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Sample records for human leucocyte antigen

  1. Uterus human leucocyte antigen expression in the perspective of transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Tristan; Filloux, Matthieu; Guillaudeau, Angelique; Essig, Marie; Bibes, Romain; Pacha, Adam Fodil; Piver, Pascal; Aubard, Yves; Marquet, Pierre; Drouet, Mireille

    2016-12-01

    To describe class I and II human leucocyte antigen (HLA) expression using different uterine tissues in the perspective of uterus transplantation. Human uterine tissues were obtained from 12 women who had undergone hysterectomy for the treatment of benign disease. HLA class I and HLA-antigen D related (DR) expression were assessed via immunochemistry. HLA class I expression in the uterus was compared with expression in other organs and tissues, including kidney and myocardium samples. HLA class I expression was strong in the endometrial glands and mild in the myometrium. Staining of endometrial glands was similar to glomerular staining in the kidney. The myometrium seems to express HLA class I similarly to hepatocytes and myocardial cells. HLA class I expression in the uterus did not differ in younger or post-menopausal women. HLA-DR was expressed in the endometrial glands, but not in the myometrium. A lack of HLA-DR expression seemed to be correlated with cell proliferation. HLA expression in the endometrium and myometrium is different. The endometrium should be the major target of alloreactive response. As for other transplanted organs, assessment of HLA unacceptable antigens and multiple immunosuppressive treatments is necessary in uterus transplantation. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  2. Evidence for a human leucocyte antigen-DM-induced structural change in human leucocyte antigen-DObeta.

    PubMed

    Deshaies, Francis; Diallo, Djibril A; Fortin, Jean-Simon; O'Rourke, Helen M; Pezeshki, Abdul Mohammad; Bellemare-Pelletier, Angélique; Raby, Nicola; Bédard, Nathalie; Brunet, Alexandre; Denzin, Lisa K; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2009-07-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DO is a non-classical major histocompatibility complex class II molecule which modulates the function of HLA-DM and the loading of antigenic peptides on molecules such as HLA-DR. The bulk of HLA-DO associates with HLA-DM and this interaction is critical for HLA-DO egress from the endoplasmic reticulum. HLA-DM assists the early steps of HLA-DO maturation presumably through the stabilization of the interactions between the N-terminal regions of the alpha and beta chains. To evaluate a possible role for HLA-DM in influencing the conformation of HLA-DO, we made use of a monoclonal antibody, Mags.DO5, that was raised against HLA-DO/DM complexes. Using transfected cells expressing mismatched heterodimers between HLA-DR and -DO chains, we found that the epitope for Mags.DO5 is located on the DObeta chain and that Mags.DO5 reactivity was increased upon cotransfection with HLA-DM. Our results suggest that HLA-DM influences the folding of HLA-DO in the endoplasmic reticulum. A mutant HLA-DO showing reduced capacity for endoplasmic reticulum egress was better recognized by Mags.DO5 in the presence of HLA-DM. On the other hand, an HLA-DO mutant capable of endoplasmic reticulum egress on its own was efficiently recognized by Mags.DO5, irrespective of the presence of HLA-DM. Taken together, our results suggest that HLA-DM acts as a private chaperone, directly assisting the folding of HLA-DO to promote egress from the endoplasmic reticulum.

  3. Natural killer cells, killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and human leucocyte antigen class I in disease

    PubMed Central

    Boyton, R J; Altmann, D M

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer cells constitute a potent, rapid part of the innate immune response to infection or transformation, and also generate a link to priming of adaptive immunity. Their function can encompass direct cytotoxicity as well as the release of cytokines and chemokines. In humans, a major component of natural killer (NK) cell target recognition depends mainly on the surveillance of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). Different KIR can transmit inhibitory or activatory signals to the cell, and effector function is considered to result from the balance of these contributing signals. The regulation of NK cell responses depends on a number of variables: KIR genotype, HLA genotype, heterozygosity versus homozygosity for these, whether there is cognate recognition between the HLA and KIR products carried by an individual, clonal variation between individual NK cells in KIR expression, and the specific modulation of HLA expression by infection, transformation or peptide binding. Different HLA/KIR genotypes can impart different thresholds of activation to the NK cell repertoire and such genotypic variation has been found to confer altered risk in a number of diseases including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) susceptibility and progression, hepatitis C virus clearance, idiopathic bronchiectasis, autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:17521317

  4. Association of chronic fatigue syndrome with human leucocyte antigen class II alleles

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J; Fritz, E L; Kerr, J R; Cleare, A J; Wessely, S; Mattey, D L

    2005-01-01

    Background: A genetic component to the development of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) has been proposed, and a possible association between human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II antigens and chronic fatigue immune dysfunction has been shown in some, but not all, studies. Aims: To investigate the role of HLA class II antigens in CFS. Methods: Forty nine patients with CFS were genotyped for the HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1, and HLA-DQB1 alleles and the frequency of these alleles was compared with a control group comprising 102 normal individuals from the UK. All patients and controls were from the same region of England and, apart from two patients, were white. Results: Analysis by 2 × 2 contingency tables revealed an increased frequency of HLA-DQA1*01 alleles in patients with CFS (51.0% v 35%; odds ratio (OR), 1.93; p  =  0.008). HLA-DQB1*06 was also increased in the patients with CFS (30.2% v 20.0%; OR, 1.73, p  =  0.052). Only the association between HLA-DQA1*01 and CFS was significant in logistic regression models containing HLA-DQA1*01 and HLA-DRQB1*06, and this was independent of HLA-DRB1 alleles. There was a decreased expression of HLA-DRB1*11 in CFS, although this association disappeared after correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusions: CFS may be associated with HLA-DQA1*01, although a role for other genes in linkage disequilibrium cannot be ruled out. PMID:16049290

  5. Distinct evolutionary strategies of human leucocyte antigen loci in pathogen-rich environments

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia; Lemaître, Jean-François; Currat, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) loci have a complex evolution where both stochastic (e.g. genetic drift) and deterministic (natural selection) forces are involved. Owing to their extraordinary level of polymorphism, HLA genes are useful markers for reconstructing human settlement history. However, HLA variation often deviates significantly from neutral expectations towards an excess of genetic diversity. Because HLA molecules play a crucial role in immunity, this observation is generally explained by pathogen-driven-balancing selection (PDBS). In this study, we investigate the PDBS model by analysing HLA allelic diversity on a large database of 535 populations in relation to pathogen richness. Our results confirm that geographical distances are excellent predictors of HLA genetic differentiation worldwide. We also find a significant positive correlation between genetic diversity and pathogen richness at two HLA class I loci (HLA-A and -B), as predicted by PDBS, and a significant negative correlation at one HLA class II locus (HLA-DQB1). Although these effects are weak, as shown by a loss of significance when populations submitted to rapid genetic drift are removed from the analysis, the inverse relationship between genetic diversity and pathogen richness at different loci indicates that HLA genes have adopted distinct evolutionary strategies to provide immune protection in pathogen-rich environments. PMID:22312050

  6. Allelic distribution of human leucocyte antigen in historical and recently diagnosed tuberculosis patients in Southern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Giuseppina; Cosentini, Elena; Zanzi, Delia; Sanna, Veronica; Terrazzano, Giuseppe; Matarese, Giuseppe; Sanduzzi, Alessandro; Perna, Francesco; Zappacosta, Serafino

    2004-01-01

    This study addresses the analysis of the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) allele distribution in 54 historical and in 68 recently diagnosed tuberculosis (TB) patients. The historical cohort was characterized by the presence of large fibrocavernous lesions effectively treated with therapeutic pneumothorax during the period 1950–55. Patients and healthy controls enrolled in the study were from the Campania region of southern Italy. No significant association between HLA alleles and TB in the population of recently diagnosed TB patients was observed. On the contrary, among the historical TB patients there was a strong association with an increased frequency of the HLA-DR4 allele alone and/or in the presence of the HLA-B14 allele (P = 0·000004; Pc = 0·0008), as well as with a decreased frequency of the HLA-A2+,-B14−,DR4− allele association (P = 0·00005; Pc = 0·01). In order to exclude any interference from age-related factors, these results were confirmed by comparing the historical cohort of TB patients with an age-matched healthy control population of the same ethnic origin (P = 0·00004; Pc = 0·008; and P = 0·0001; and Pc = 0·02, respectively). PMID:15009432

  7. A soluble recombinant form of human leucocyte antigen-G 6 (srHLA-G6).

    PubMed

    Pelá, Flávia Porto; Rustiguel, Joane Kathelen; Rodrigues, Lilian Cataldi; Mendonça, Jacqueline Nakau; Andrade, Camillo Del Cistia; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Rosa, José Cesar; Nonato, Maria Cristina; Favier, Benoit; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo

    2017-05-20

    Human Leucocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule that through RNA splicing can encode seven isoforms which are membrane bound (-G1, -G2, -G3 and -G4) and soluble (-G5, -G6 and -G7). HLA-G is described as important immune suppressor endogenous molecule to favor maternal-fetal tolerance, transplant survival and tumor immune scape. HLA-G shows low protein variability and a unique structural complexity that is related with the expression of different isoforms followed by biochemical processes, such as, proteolytic cleavage, molecular interactions, and protein ubiquitination. Studies with HLA-G have shown difficult to assess the role of the individual isoforms. Thus, the aim of this work was to obtain a HLA-G6 recombinant form. The results indicated the production of high homogeneous preparations of soluble recombinant HLA-G6 (srHLA-G6) with molecular mass 23,603.76 Da, determined by MALD-TOF/TOF. In addition, native and denatured srHLA-G6 were detected by ELISA, using commercial monoclonal antibodies. Finally, we developed a suitable methodology to express srHLA-G6 that could contribute in structural and functional studies involving specific isoforms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Soluble human leucocyte antigen-G and interleukin-10 levels in isocyanate-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Mapp, C E; Ferrazzoni, S; Rizzo, R; Miotto, D; Stignani, M; Boschetto, P; Maestrelli, P; Baricordi, O R

    2009-06-01

    We previously reported that in moderate-to-severe asthma there is a deficit of IL-10 secretion that could prevent the production of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G), a non-classical human leucocyte antigen class I molecule with tissue-protective properties in inflammatory responses. Our objective was to investigate the production of sHLA-G and the secretion of IL-10 by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in asthma induced by isocyanates and to compare the results with those obtained in non-occupational allergic asthma. sHLA-G and IL-10 were measured by ELISA in the culture supernatants of unstimulated or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated PBMCs obtained from 20 subjects with isocyanate asthma, 16 asymptomatic subjects exposed to isocyanates, 18 subjects with non-occupational allergic asthma, and 26 healthy control subjects. Occupational exposure to isocyanates was associated with high baseline levels of secretion of IL-10 by PBMCs, whether or not the exposed subjects had asthmatic symptoms. However, spontaneous production of sHLA-G by PBMC was significantly higher in subjects with isocyanate asthma compared with asymptomatic-exposed controls. In contrast, PBMCs from subjects with non-occupational allergic asthma produced sHLA-G only after LPS stimulation. sHLA-G production and IL-10 secretion are influenced by workplace exposure to isocyanates and by development of asthma. The different behaviour of both sHLA-G and IL-10 in asthma induced by isocyanates compared with non-occupational allergic asthma suggests a heterogeneous biological role for HLA-G molecules and for IL-10, a key cytokine of immune and inflammatory responses.

  9. Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II typing in Belgian multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Lysandropoulos, Andreas P; Racapé, Judith; Holovska, Vanda; Toungouz, Michel

    2017-03-01

    This is one of the first studies to compare the frequencies of different human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II alleles and haplotype HLA-DRB1*15-DQB1*06 in a cohort of 119 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and a cohort of 124 healthy controls in Belgium. An association with MS was found for the HLA-DRB1*15 (odds ratio [OR] 2.60 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.51-4.50]) and HLA-DQB1*06 (OR 1.97 [95% CI 1.18-3.29]) alleles, and for haplotype DRB1*15-DQB1*06 (OR 2.63 [95% CI 1.52-4.56]). The HLA-B*07 allele also tended to be more frequent in MS patients (OR 1.46 [95% CI 0.80-2.65]) and more frequent among MS patients with than in those without the HLA-DRB1*15 allele (26/54 [48.1%] versus 6/65 [9.2%]; p value <0.0001). Other alleles were underrepresented in MS patients, such as the HLA-DRB1*07 (OR 0.39 [95% CI 0.21-0.73]) and HLA-A*02 (OR 0.56 [95% CI 0.34-0.94]), showing a protective role against the disease. The HLA-B*44 (OR 0.58 [95% CI 0.31-1.09]) and HLA-DRB1*04 (OR 0.75 [95% CI 0.42-1.34]) alleles tended to be less frequent in MS patients. Altogether, the significant results observed in this population are in line with those from other countries and confirm that propensity to MS can be due to a complex presence of various HLA class I and class II alleles.

  10. JC Polyomavirus Infection Is Strongly Controlled by Human Leucocyte Antigen Class II Variants

    PubMed Central

    Sundqvist, Emilie; Buck, Dorothea; Warnke, Clemens; Albrecht, Eva; Gieger, Christian; Khademi, Mohsen; Lima Bomfim, Izaura; Fogdell-Hahn, Anna; Link, Jenny; Alfredsson, Lars; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Hillert, Jan; Oturai, Annette B.; Hemme, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    JC polyomavirus (JCV) carriers with a compromised immune system, such as in HIV, or subjects on immune-modulating therapies, such as anti VLA-4 therapy may develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) which is a lytic infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain. Serum antibodies to JCV mark infection occur only in 50–60% of infected individuals, and high JCV-antibody titers seem to increase the risk of developing PML. We here investigated the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA), instrumental in immune defense in JCV antibody response. Anti-JCV antibody status, as a surrogate for JCV infection, were compared to HLA class I and II alleles in 1621 Scandinavian persons with MS and 1064 population-based Swedish controls and associations were replicated in 718 German persons with MS. HLA-alleles were determined by SNP imputation, sequence specific (SSP) kits and a reverse PCR sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO) method. An initial GWAS screen displayed a strong HLA class II region signal. The HLA-DRB1*15 haplotype was strongly negatively associated to JCV sero-status in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 0.42, p = 7×10−15) and controls (OR = 0.53, p = 2×10−5). In contrast, the DQB1*06:03 haplotype was positively associated with JCV sero-status, in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 1.63, p = 0.006), and controls (OR = 2.69, p = 1×10−5). The German dataset confirmed these findings (OR = 0.54, p = 1×10−4 and OR = 1.58, p = 0.03 respectively for these haplotypes). HLA class II restricted immune responses, and hence CD4+ T cell immunity is pivotal for JCV infection control. Alleles within the HLA-DR1*15 haplotype are associated with a protective effect on JCV infection. Alleles within the DQB1*06:03 haplotype show an opposite association. These associations between JC virus antibody response and human leucocyte antigens supports the notion that CD4+ T cells are crucial in the immune defence to JCV and lays

  11. Clinical correlates of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G in systemic sclerosis1

    PubMed Central

    Favoino, E; Favia, I E; Vettori, S; Vicenti, C; Prete, M; Valentini, G; Perosa, F

    2015-01-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G has a tolerogenic function and could play a role in the pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases, including systemic sclerosis (SSc). The aim of this study was to evaluate HLA-G serum expression (sHLA-G) and the HLA-G gene 14 base pairs (bp) insertion/deletion (del−/del+) polymorphism in patients with Ssc, to search for possible associations with clinical and laboratory variables. sHLA-G was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in sera from 77 patients with SSc and 32 healthy donors (HD); the 14 bp del−/del+ polymorphism was evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) genomic DNA. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis identified the HLA-G cut-off that best discriminated dichotomized clinical and serological variables, that was subsequently employed to subdivide SSc patients into HLA-G high (HLA-G+) and low (HLA-G−) profile groups. sHLA-G were not statistically different between SSc patients and HD, nor between distinct SSc autoantibody subsets. Subdividing SSc patients by HLA-G positivity or negativity yielded significant differences for the modified Rodnan skin score (mRss) (P = 0·032), ‘general’ (P = 0·031) and ‘kidney’ (P = 0·028) Medsger severity scores (MSS) and disease activity index, and especially Δ heart/lung (P = 0·005). A worse ‘general’ MSS (P = 0·002) and Δ heart/lung (P = 0·011) were more frequent in the low sHLA-G group. These two variables and mRss were associated with sHLA-G levels at logistic regression analysis. Treatment had no influence on sHLA-G. Moreover, a higher frequency of scleredema was detected in the del+/del+ than the del-/del+ group (P = 0.04). These data suggest modulatory effects of sHLA-G on SSc. Prospective studies are needed to investigate a role in predicting the disease course. PMID:25847615

  12. An analysis of myeloma plasma cell phenotype using antibodies defined at the IIIrd International Workshop on Human Leucocyte Differentiation Antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, N; Ling, N R; Ball, J; Bromidge, E; Nathan, P D; Franklin, I M

    1988-01-01

    Fresh bone marrow from 43 cases of myeloma and three cases of plasma cell leukaemia has been phenotyped both by indirect immune-rosetting and, on fixed cytospin preparations, by indirect immunofluorescence. Both clustered and unclustered B cell associated antibodies from the IIIrd International Workshop on Human Leucocyte Differentiation Antigens were used. The results confirm the lack of many pan-B antigens on the surface of myeloma plasma cells, i.e. CD19-23, 37, 39, w40. Strong surface reactivity is seen with CD38 antibodies and with one CD24 antibody (HB8). Weak reactions are sometimes obtained with CD9, 10 and 45R. On cytospin preparations CD37, 39 and w40 are sometimes weakly positive, and anti-rough endoplasmic reticulum antibodies are always strongly positive. Specific and surface-reacting antiplasma cell antibodies are still lacking. PMID:3048803

  13. Prevalence of Alloimmunization to Human Platelet Antigen Glycoproteins and Human Leucocyte Antigen Class I in β Thalassemia Major Patients in Western India.

    PubMed

    Philip, Joseph; Kumar, Sudeep; Chatterjee, T; Mallhi, R S

    2014-12-01

    Present management of β thalassemia major by regular packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions poses risk of alloimmunization not only to red blood cell antigens, but also to human platelet antigens (HPA) and Human leucocyte antigens class I (HLA I). However data in this context is very limited in Indian population. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of alloimmunization to HPA and HLA I in β thalassemia major patients who have received multiple PRBC transfusions over the years. A cross sectional study was performed at our tertiary care blood bank. β thalassemia major patients of more than 6 years of age were included who were receiving fresh, leucoreduced and irradiated PRBC units regularly with annual requirement of more than ten PRBC transfusions. A total of 9 out of 80 (11.25 %) patients were found to be alloimmunized for HPA antigens of various specificity and 24 out of 80 (30 %) developed antibodies to HLA I. The awareness of development of alloimmunization to HPA and HLA antigens in multi PRBC transfused thalassemics, despite use of leucofilters will prompt us, to look for improvement in our current PRBC preparations to minimise platelet alloimmunisation. Further studies are required to validate the findings and build the base line data in this regard. This is of importance, especially in view of providing suitable cross-matched platelets when required in future especially when considering future haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

  14. Association of primary central nervous system vasculitis with the presence of specific human leucocyte antigen gene variant.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Markus; Becker, Jana; Horn, Peter A; Schwitalla, Jan Claudius; Keyvani, Kathy; Metz, Imke; Wegner, Christiane; Brück, Wolfgang; Schlamann, Marc; Heinemann, Falko M; Berlit, Peter

    2017-09-01

    The etiology and genetic susceptibility of primary central nervous system vasculitis (PCNSV) are still unclear. We analyzed the DNA of 25 Caucasian patients with PCNSV for human leucocyte antigen genes HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1, and HLA-DQB1, respectively. HLA-frequencies of the 25 patients with PCNSV were compared with HLA-frequencies of matched Caucasian controls. No statistically significant associations were found for HLA-B, HLA-DR1 and HLA-DQB1 variant. In the PCNSV group, only the HLA-A*69 variant was found more often than expected statistically. The results of this study indicate a potential association of HLA marker with PCNSV in Caucasian patients. Further studies are needed to elucidate the role of genes within the human major histocompatibility complex in the pathogenesis of this angiopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The significance of pretransplant donor-specific antibodies reactive with intact or denatured human leucocyte antigen in kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Otten, H G; Verhaar, M C; Borst, H P E; Eck, M; van Ginkel, W G J; Hené, R J; van Zuilen, A D

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies recognizing denatured human leucocyte antigen (HLA) can co-react with epitopes on intact HLA or recognize cryptic epitopes which are normally unaccessible to HLA antibodies. Their specificity cannot be distinguished by single antigen beads (SAB) alone, as they carry a mixture of intact and denatured HLA. In this study, we selected pretransplant sera containing donor-specific HLA class I antibodies (DSA) according to regular SAB analysis from 156 kidney transplant recipients. These sera were analysed using a SAB preparation (iBeads) which is largely devoid of denatured HLA class I, and SAB coated with denatured HLA class I antigens. A total of 241 class I DSA were found by regular SAB analysis, of which 152 (63%) were also found by iBeads, whereas 28 (11%) were caused by reactivity with denatured DNA. Patients with DSA defined either by regular SAB or iBeads showed a significantly lower graft survival rate (P = 0·007) compared to those without HLA class I DSA, whereas reactivity to exclusively denatured HLA was not associated with decreased graft survival. In addition, DSA defined by reactivity to class I SAB or class I iBeads occurred more frequently in female patients and in patients with historic HLA sensitization, whereas reactivity to denatured HLA class I was not associated with any of these parameters. Our data suggest that pretransplant donor-specific antibodies against denatured HLA are clinically irrelevant in patients already sensitized against intact HLA. PMID:23627692

  16. Development of multiple sclerosis after vaccination against hepatitis B: a study based on human leucocyte antigen haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Ozakbas, S; Idiman, E; Yulug, B; Pakoz, B; Bahar, H; Gulay, Z

    2006-09-01

    The aetiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still not fully understood. Infectious agents are believed to play a role in the development of this multifactorial disease. Cases in which this disease occurs after administration of both plasma-derived and recombinant hepatitis B vaccines have been reported. In this study, we compared a group of 11 MS patients who developed first clinical symptoms after hepatitis B vaccination (group I) with 71 MS patients who were never vaccinated against hepatitis B and were negative for hepatitis B serology (group II), and 20 healthy controls (group III). Mean age was 27.75 years (19-39) in group I, 30.16 years (18-50) in group II, and 34.4 years (18-50) in group III. Mean attack rate after 2 years was 1.5 in group I and 1.63 in group II. Mean Expanded Disability Status Scale score after 2 years was 1.31 in group I and 1.89 in group II. Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) typing and serology for hepatitis B surface antigen were performed in all groups. In groups I and II, HLA-DR2 was more frequent than in normal healthy subjects. This reflects the general role of HLA in the pathogenesis of MS but suggests that antigen presentation by different HLA is not involved in the development of MS after hepatitis B vaccination. Since there was no difference in the clinical features between vaccinated and nonvaccinated MS patients, this study supports recent reports that hepatitis B vaccination is safe in MS patients and that hepatitis B vaccination is not involved in the development of MS.

  17. Allergic women show reduced T helper type 1 alloresponses to fetal human leucocyte antigen mismatch during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, S L; Breckler, L A; Witt, C S; Smith, L; Dunstan, J A; Christiansen, F T

    2010-01-01

    Low-level alloreactivity between mother and fetus may provide stimulation for fetal T helper type 1 (Th1) cell immune maturation. This study explored the effects of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) mismatch on materno–fetal interactions detected as cytokine responses and lymphoproliferation in mixed lymphocyte reactions, and whether this was altered in allergic women (n = 62) who have a Th2 propensity compared with non-allergic women (n = 65). HLA-DRβ1 mismatch was associated with significantly increased Th1 interferon (IFN)-γ, Th2 interleukin (IL)-13 and lymphoproliferative responses by both mothers and fetuses. Allergic women showed significantly lower IFN-γ Th1 production in response to HLA-DRβ1 mismatch. The infants of these women also showed significantly lower IL-10 and lower IFN-γ production relative to IL-13. Both HLA-DRβ1 mismatch and maternal allergy had significant independent effects on maternal IFN-γ Th1 responses. Maternal allergy modifies HLA-mediated alloreactivity between the mother and the fetus, reducing Th1 activation. This may affect the cytokine milieu at the materno–fetal interface and could be implicated in the attenuated Th1 responses observed commonly in infants of atopic mothers. PMID:19860744

  18. Altered expression of intestinal human leucocyte antigen D-related and immune signalling molecules in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arvonen, M; Vähäsalo, P; Turunen, S; Salo, H M; Mäki, M; Laurila, K; Vaarala, O; Karttunen, T J

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to study intestinal immune activation status in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) by assessing intestinal human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression and the mRNA expression levels of the pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators and pattern recognition receptors. HLA-D-related (HLA-DR) expression was assessed using immunohistochemical staining of frozen sections in 11 children with JIA and 17 controls. The gene expression levels of the anti- and proinflammatory cytokines, lymphocyte recognition receptors and pattern recognition receptors were studied with reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) in 14 children with JIA and 12 controls. All subjects had various gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms indicating endoscopic examinations, but eventually were not diagnosed with GI disease. In JIA patients, the expression of HLA-DR was increased in the crypt epithelial cells and in the epithelial basement membrane of the ileum when compared with the controls. Positive HLA-DR staining in the ileal mucosa was associated with the presence of high clinical disease activity of JIA and low mRNA expression of anti-inflammatory mediators, such as forkhead box protein P3 (FoxP3), glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor-related protein (GITR) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. Low ileal expression of interleukin (IL)-10, TGF-β, FoxP3, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) and TLR-4 transcripts correlated significantly with a high clinical disease activity in the JIA patients. The increased HLA-DR expression suggests enhanced intestinal antigen presentation in JIA. A correlation between clinical disease activity and low gene expression of tolerogenic mediators in the ileum supports the hypothesis that a link exists between the gut immune system and JIA. PMID:23121667

  19. Class II human leucocyte antigen DRB1*11 in hairy cell leukaemia patients with and without haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arons, Evgeny; Adams, Sharon; Venzon, David J; Pastan, Ira; Kreitman, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Frequencies of human leucocyte antigens (HLA) were determined in 287 classic hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) patients. With respect to both population (n = 287) and allele (2n = 574) frequency respectively, the most common HLA class I and II antigens expressed were HLA-A*02 (49·1% and 28·6%), HLA-B*07 (21·3% and 11·1%), HLA-C*07 (46·7 and 28·2%), HLA-DQB1*03 (62·7% and 37·3%), HLA-DRB1*11 (30·0% and 16·0%) and HLA-DRB4*01 (45·3% and 29·6%). In comparing 6-14 databases of control Caucasians to 267 Caucasian HCL patients, only HLA-DRB1*11 was consistently over-represented in HCL, 31·1% of patients vs. 17-19·9% of controls (P = 0·0055 to <0·0001) and 16·5% of alleles vs. 6·5-12·3% of control alleles (P = 0·022 to <0·0001). HLA-DRB1*11 is a known risk factor for acquired thrombotic microangiopathy. Anti-CD22 recombinant immunotoxin BL22 in HCL was associated with a 12% incidence of completely reversible grade 3-4 haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS), mainly during the second or third retreatment cycle. Of 49 HCL patients receiving ≥2 cycles of BL22, 7 (14%) had HUS and HLA-DRB1*11 was expressed in 71% of 7 with HUS compared with only 21% of 42 without (P = 0·015). These data suggest that DBR1*11 may be a marker for increased susceptibility to HCL and, among HCL patients, could be a risk factor for BL22-induced HUS. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Class II human leucocyte antigen DRB1*11 in hairy cell leukaemia patients with and without haemolytic uraemic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Arons, Evgeny; Adams, Sharon; Venzon, Venzon, David J; Pastan, Ira; Kreitman, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Frequencies of human leucocyte antigens (HLA) were determined in 287 classic hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) patients. With respect to both population (n=287) and allele (2n=574) frequency, respectively, the most common HLA class I and II antigens expressed were HLA-A*02 (49.1% and 28.6%), HLA-B*07 (21.3% and 11.1%), HLA-C*07 (46.7 and 28.2%), HLA-DQB1*03 (62.7% and 37.3%), HLA-DRB1*11 (30.0% and 16.0%) and HLA-DRB4*01 (45.3% and 29.6%). In comparing 6–14 databases of control Caucasians to 267 Caucasian HCL patients, only HLA-DRB1*11 was consistently over-represented in HCL, 31.1% of patients vs 17–19.9% of controls (p=0.0055 to <0.0001) and 16.5% of alleles vs 6.5–12.3% of control alleles (p=0.022 to <0.0001). HLA-DRB1*11 is a known risk factor for acquired thrombotic microangiopathy. Anti-CD22 recombinant immunotoxin BL22 in HCL was associated with a 12% incidence of completely reversible grade 3–4 haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS), mainly during the second or third retreatment cycle. Of 49 HCL patients receiving ≥2 cycles of BL22, 7 (14%) had HUS and HLA-DRB1*11 was expressed in 71% of 7 with HUS compared with only 21% of 42 without (p=0.015). These data suggest that DBR1*11 may be a marker for increased susceptibility to HCL and, among HCL patients, could be a risk factor for BL22-induced HUS. PMID:24931452

  1. Generation of β cell-specific human cytotoxic T cells by lentiviral transduction and their survival in immunodeficient human leucocyte antigen-transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Babad, J; Mukherjee, G; Follenzi, A; Ali, R; Roep, B O; Shultz, L D; Santamaria, P; Yang, O O; Goldstein, H; Greiner, D L; DiLorenzo, T P

    2015-01-01

    Several β cell antigens recognized by T cells in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type 1 diabetes (T1D) are also T cell targets in the human disease. While numerous antigen-specific therapies prevent diabetes in NOD mice, successful translation of rodent findings to patients has been difficult. A human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-transgenic mouse model incorporating human β cell-specific T cells might provide a better platform for evaluating antigen-specific therapies. The ability to study such T cells is limited by their low frequency in peripheral blood and the difficulty in obtaining islet-infiltrating T cells from patients. We have worked to overcome this limitation by using lentiviral transduction to ‘reprogram’ primary human CD8 T cells to express three T cell receptors (TCRs) specific for a peptide derived from the β cell antigen islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP265–273) and recognized in the context of the human class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule HLA-A2. The TCRs bound peptide/MHC multimers with a range of avidities, but all bound with at least 10-fold lower avidity than the anti-viral TCR used for comparison. One exhibited antigenic recognition promiscuity. The β cell-specific human CD8 T cells generated by lentiviral transduction with one of the TCRs released interferon (IFN)-γ in response to antigen and exhibited cytotoxic activity against peptide-pulsed target cells. The cells engrafted in HLA-A2-transgenic NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice and could be detected in the blood, spleen and pancreas up to 5 weeks post-transfer, suggesting the utility of this approach for the evaluation of T cell-modulatory therapies for T1D and other T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:25302633

  2. Analysis of Class II human leucocyte antigens in Italian and Spanish systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Beretta, Lorenzo; Rueda, Blanca; Marchini, Maurizio; Santaniello, Alessandro; Simeón, Carmen P; Fonollosa, Vicente; Caronni, Monica; Rios-Fernandez, Raquel; Carreira, Patricia; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Moreno, Antonia; López-Nevot, Miguel A; Escalera, Ana; González-Escribano, Maria F; Martin, Javier; Scorza, Raffaella

    2012-01-01

    To determine the role of Class II HLAs in SSc patients from Italy and Spain and in SSc patients of Caucasian ancestry. Nine hundred and forty-four SSc patients (Italy 392 patients; Spain 452 patients) and 1320 ethnically matched healthy controls (Italy 398 patients; Spain 922 patients) were genotyped up to the fourth digit by PCR with sequence-specific oligonucleotides for HLA-DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 loci. Patients included 390 ACA-positive and 254 anti-topo I-positive subjects. Associations between SSc or SSc-specific antibodies and HLA alleles or HLA haplotypes were sought via the chi-square test after 10 000-fold permutation testing. A meta-analysis including this study cohort and other Caucasoids samples was also conducted. In both the cohorts, the strongest association was observed between the HLA-DRB1*1104 allele and SSc or anti-topo I antibodies. The HLA-DRB1*1104 -DQA1*0501 -DQB1*0301 haplotype was overrepresented in Italian [odds ratio (OR) = 2.069, 95% asymptotic CIs (CI(95)) 1.486, 2.881; P < 0.001] and in Spanish patients (OR = 6.707, CI(95) 3.974, 11.319; P < 0.001) as well as in anti-topo-positive patients: Italy (OR = 2.642, CI(95) 1.78, 3.924; P < 0.001) and Spain (OR = 20.625, CI(95) 11.536, 36.876; P < 0.001). In both the populations we also identified an additional risk allele (HLA-DQB1*03) and a protective allele (HLA-DQB1*0501) in anti-topo-positive patients. The meta-analysis showed different statistically significant associations, the most interesting being the differential association between HLA-DRB1*01 alleles and ACAs (OR = 1.724, CI(95) 1.482, 2.005; P < 0.001) or topo I antibodies (OR = 0.5, CI(95) 0.384, 0.651; P < 0.001). We describe multiple robust associations between SSc and HLA Class II antigens in Caucasoids that may help to understand the genetic architecture of SSc.

  3. Analysis of Class II human leucocyte antigens in Italian and Spanish systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Blanca; Marchini, Maurizio; Santaniello, Alessandro; Simeón, Carmen P.; Fonollosa, Vicente; Caronni, Monica; Rios-Fernandez, Raquel; Carreira, Patricia; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Moreno, Antonia; López-Nevot, Miguel A.; Escalera, Ana; González-Escribano, Maria F.; Martin, Javier; Scorza, Raffaella

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine the role of Class II HLAs in SSc patients from Italy and Spain and in SSc patients of Caucasian ancestry. Methods. Nine hundred and forty-four SSc patients (Italy 392 patients; Spain 452 patients) and 1320 ethnically matched healthy controls (Italy 398 patients; Spain 922 patients) were genotyped up to the fourth digit by PCR with sequence-specific oligonucleotides for HLA-DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 loci. Patients included 390 ACA-positive and 254 anti-topo I-positive subjects. Associations between SSc or SSc-specific antibodies and HLA alleles or HLA haplotypes were sought via the chi-square test after 10 000-fold permutation testing. A meta-analysis including this study cohort and other Caucasoids samples was also conducted. Results. In both the cohorts, the strongest association was observed between the HLA-DRB1*1104 allele and SSc or anti-topo I antibodies. The HLA-DRB1*1104 -DQA1*0501 -DQB1*0301 haplotype was overrepresented in Italian [odds ratio (OR) = 2.069, 95% asymptotic CIs (CI95) 1.486, 2.881; P < 0.001] and in Spanish patients (OR = 6.707, CI95 3.974, 11.319; P < 0.001) as well as in anti-topo-positive patients: Italy (OR = 2.642, CI95 1.78, 3.924; P < 0.001) and Spain (OR = 20.625, CI95 11.536, 36.876; P < 0.001). In both the populations we also identified an additional risk allele (HLA-DQB1*03) and a protective allele (HLA-DQB1*0501) in anti-topo-positive patients. The meta-analysis showed different statistically significant associations, the most interesting being the differential association between HLA-DRB1*01 alleles and ACAs (OR = 1.724, CI95 1.482, 2.005; P < 0.001) or topo I antibodies (OR = 0.5, CI95 0.384, 0.651; P < 0.001). Conclusions. We describe multiple robust associations between SSc and HLA Class II antigens in Caucasoids that may help to understand the genetic architecture of SSc. PMID:22087014

  4. Human leucocyte antigens class II allele and haplotype association with Type 1 Diabetes in Madeira Island (Portugal).

    PubMed

    Spínola, H; Lemos, A; Couto, A R; Parreira, B; Soares, M; Dutra, I; Bruges-Armas, J; Brehm, A; Abreu, S

    2017-08-20

    This study confirms for Madeira Island (Portugal) population the Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) susceptible and protective Human leucocyte antigens (HLA) markers previously reported in other populations and adds some local specificities. Among the strongest T1D HLA associations, stands out, as susceptible, the alleles DRB1*04:05 (OR = 7.3), DQB1*03:02 (OR = 6.1) and DQA1*03:03 (OR = 4.5), as well as the haplotypes DRB1*04:05-DQA1*03:03-DQB1*03:02 (OR = 100.9) and DRB1*04:04-DQA1*03:01-DQB1*03:02 (OR = 22.1), and DQB1*06:02 (OR = 0.07) and DRB1*15:01-DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 (OR = 0.04) as protective. HLA-DQA1 positive for Arginine at position 52 (Arg52) (OR = 15.2) and HLA-DQB1 negative for Aspartic acid at the position 57 (Asp57) (OR = 9.0) alleles appear to be important genetic markers for T1D susceptibility, with higher odds ratio values than any single allele and than most of the haplotypes. Genotypes generated by the association of markers Arg52 DQA1 positive and Asp57 DQB1 negative increase T1D susceptibility much more than one would expected by a simple additive effect of those markers separately (OR = 26.9). This study also confirms an increased risk for DRB1*04/DRB1*03 heterozygote genotypes (OR = 16.8) and also a DRB1*04-DQA1*03:01-DQB1*03:02 haplotype susceptibility dependent on the DRB1*04 allele (DRB1*04:01, OR = 7.9; DRB1*04:02, OR = 3.2; DRB1*04:04, OR = 22.1). © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Genotyping of coeliac-specific human leucocyte antigen in children with type 1 diabetes: does this screening method make sense?

    PubMed

    Binder, Elisabeth; Loinger, Martina; Mühlbacher, Annelies; Edlinger, Michael; Steichen, Elisabeth; Meraner, Dagmar; Loacker, Lorin; Weigel, Guenter; Müller, Thomas; Fröhlich-Reiterer, Elke; Hofer, Sabine E

    2017-07-01

    Due to a high linkage disequilibrium of diabetes and coeliac-specific human leucocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes, the prevalence of coeliac disease (CD) in children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1D) is much higher than in the general population. Recently, the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) revised new screening guidelines in which genotyping for coeliac-specific HLA alleles is recommended for high-risk patients as patients with T1D. The aim of our study was to investigate the frequency and distribution of coeliac-specific HLA genotypes in paediatric patients with T1D. HLA genotyping was performed on paediatric patients with T1D, recruited at the Medical University Hospital of Innsbruck and Graz. The test was done by PCR. Statistical analysis was performed with IBM-SPSS V.20. In 121 paediatric patients with T1D (52% male), mean age 13.3 (SD 3.9) years, mean age at diabetes diagnosis 7.4 (SD 3.8) and mean diabetes duration of 5.9 (SD 3.3) years, HLA genotyping was conducted. Ninety-two per cent showed positive HLA DQ2 and/or HLA DQ8 genotypes. Thirty-four per cent carried HLA DQ2, 33% were HLA DQ2+DQ8 positive and 25% of the patients showed positive results for HLA DQ8 alone. Only 8% had no coeliac-specific HLA markers. Four (3%) patients were diagnosed with CD. The majority of paediatric patients with T1D has positive coeliac-specific HLA genotypes DQ2 and/or DQ8. Therefore, genotyping for coeliac-specific HLA alleles as a first-line test in patients with T1D as recommended in the ESPGHAN guidelines does not seem reasonable. Screening for coeliac-specific antibodies needs to be performed on a regular basis for patients with T1D. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. The sheep analogue of leucocyte common antigen (LCA).

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, J F; Mackay, C R; Brandon, M R

    1985-01-01

    The tissue distribution and immunochemical properties of antigens recognized by two monoclonal antibodies 1.11.32 and 1.28.124 define the sheep analogue of the leucocyte common antigen found in rat, man and mouse. Histological and immunofluorescent studies show that this antigen is found on all lymphocytes, as well as other leucocytes but is absent from non-leucocytic cells. Immunochemical data show that a series of proteins of high molecular weight (190,000-225,000) are recognized, and histological studies show the presence of this antigen on a subpopulation of fetal liver cells as early as Day 27-30 of gestation, and on all fetal thymocytes from Day 40 of gestation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3159652

  7. A significant effect of the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor ligand human leucocyte antigen-C on fibrosis progression in chronic C hepatitis with or without liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Buhler, Stéphane; Giostra, Emiliano; Gbame, Corinne; de Rham, Casimir; Mullhaupt, Beat; Dufour, Jean-François; Majno, Pietro; Negro, Francesco; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; Villard, Jean

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors with their human leucocyte antigen ligands drives the activation and inhibition of natural killer cells. Natural killer cells could be implicated in the development of liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C. We analysed 206 non-transplanted and 53 liver transplanted patients, selected according to their Metavir fibrosis stage. Several variables such as the number of activator killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors or the human leucocyte antigen ligands were considered in multinomial and logistic regression models. Possible confounding variables were also investigated. The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors were not significant predictors of the fibrosis stage. Conversely, a significant reduction of the human leucocyte antigen-C1C2 genotype was observed in the most advanced fibrosis stage group (F4) in both cohorts. Furthermore, the progression rate of fibrosis was almost 10 times faster in the subgroup of patients after liver transplantation, and human leucocyte antigen-C1C2 was significantly reduced in this cohort compared with non-transplanted patients. This study suggests a possible role of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors and their ligands in the development of liver damage. The absence of C1 and C2 ligands heterozygosity could lead to less inhibition of natural killer cells and a quicker progression to a high level of fibrosis in patients infected with hepatitis C virus, especially following liver transplantation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Human leucocyte antigens B*08, DRB1*03 and DRB1*13 are significantly associated with autoimmune liver and biliary diseases in Finnish children.

    PubMed

    Ylinen, E; Salmela, L; Peräsaari, J; Jaatinen, T; Tenca, A; Vapalahti, O; Färkkilä, M; Jalanko, H; Kolho, K-L

    2017-02-01

    The human leucocyte antigen (HLA) allele and haplotype frequencies of the Finnish population are unique because of the restricted and homogenous gene population. There are no published data on HLA genotype associations in paediatric autoimmune liver diseases in Scandinavia. This study characterised the HLA genotypes of children with autoimmune liver or biliary disease in Finland. The study cohort comprised 19 paediatric patients (13 female) aged three years to 15 years treated for autoimmune liver or biliary disease at the Children's Hospital, Helsinki University Hospital, between 2000 and 2011, and followed up for four years and three months to 14.6 years. We genotyped HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 in the children, and the HLA antigen frequencies were compared with 19 807 records from the Finnish Bone Marrow Donor Registry. All paediatric patients with autoimmune liver or biliary disease had either autoimmune HLA haplotype B*08;DRB1*03 or DRB1*13. These were significantly more common among patients with autoimmune hepatitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and autoimmune hepatitis/primary sclerosing cholangitis overlap syndrome than the Finnish control population. HLA RB1*04 was not found in the study cohort. Our study found that B*08, DRB1*03 and DRB1*13 were significantly associated with autoimmune liver and biliary diseases in Finnish paediatric patients. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Panel-reactive antibody levels and renal transplantation rates in sensitized patients after desensitization and human leucocyte antigen amino acid residue matching.

    PubMed

    Shang, Wenjun; Dong, Laidong; Feng, Guiwen; Wang, Yue; Pang, Xinlu; Li, Jinfeng; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Weihong

    2013-08-01

    To determine whether a new desensitization protocol (mycophenolate mofetil [MMF], plasmapheresis and antithymocyte globulin [ATG], complemented with human leucocyte antigen [HLA] amino acid residue matching) could reduce panel-reactive antibody (PRA) levels in sensitized patients, to facilitate successful renal transplantation. Patients awaiting transplantation with PRA levels >10% received treatment with MMF; those with PRA levels >30% were also treated with plasmapheresis. Patients whose PRA level was <20% after desensitization were eligible for transplantation. When a donor became available, traditional HLA matching and HLA amino acid residue matching were performed. All patients received ATG induction therapy postoperatively. Thirty-two sensitized patients were enrolled. Desensitization produced a significant decrease in PRA levels; 27 patients (84.4%) became eligible for transplantation and 26 (81.2%) subsequently underwent successful transplantation. Residue matching improved the proportion with a mismatch number of 0-1 from 7.7% to 65.4%, compared with traditional HLA matching. Postoperatively, all patients showed immediate graft function. Acute rejection occurred in three patients (11.5%) and infections in seven patients (25.9%); all were treated successfully. The combination of a desensitization protocol (MMF, plasmapheresis and ATG) and residue matching appears to be an effective strategy for sensitized patients awaiting renal transplantation.

  10. Combined cord blood and bone marrow transplantation from the same human leucocyte antigen-identical sibling donor for children with malignant and non-malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Tucunduva, Luciana; Volt, Fernanda; Cunha, Renato; Locatelli, Franco; Zecca, Marco; Yesilipek, Akif; Caniglia, Maurizio; Güngör, Tayfun; Aksoylar, Serap; Fagioli, Franca; Bertrand, Yves; Addari, Maria Carmen; de la Fuente, Josu; Winiarski, Jacek; Biondi, Andrea; Sengeloev, Henrik; Badell, Isabel; Mellgren, Karin; de Heredia, Cristina Díaz; Sedlacek, Petr; Vora, Ajay; Rocha, Vanderson; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Gluckman, Eliane

    2015-04-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) from an human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling can be used for transplantation of patients with malignant and non-malignant diseases. However, the low cellular content of most UCB units represents a limitation to this approach. An option to increase cell dose is to harvest bone marrow (BM) cells from the same donor and infuse them along with the UCB. We studied 156 children who received such a combined graft between 1992 and 2011. Median age was 7 years and 78% of patients (n = 122) were transplanted for non-malignant diseases, mainly haemoglobinopathies. Acute leukaemia (n = 26) was the most frequent malignant diagnosis. Most patients (91%) received myeloablative conditioning. Median donor age was 1·7 years, median infused nucleated cell dose was 24·4 × 10(7) /kg and median follow-up was 41 months. Sixty-days neutrophil recovery occurred in 96% of patients at a median of 17 d. The probabilities of grade-II-IV acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were 19% and 10%, respectively. Four-year overall survival was 90% (68% malignant; 97% non-malignant diseases) with 3% probability of death. In conclusion, combined UCB and BM transplantation from an HLA-identical sibling donor is an effective treatment for children with malignant and non-malignant disorders with high overall survival and low incidence of GVHD.

  11. Leucocyte migration inhibition response to tissue antigens in asymptomatic individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, J M; Gill, K; Cordeiro Lima, M F; Coura, J R

    1981-01-01

    The direct leucocyte migration inhibition test was used to study 31 asymptomatic humans chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and 23 normal uninfected controls. The antigenic preparations used were made from mouse and guinea-pig heart, skeletal muscle, kidney, liver and brain. Positive responses were found in the parasite-infected individuals to kidney, liver and brain antigen but not to antigen prepared from heart of skeletal muscle tissue. No correlation was found between T. cruzi antibody titres and migration index values to these various antigens. On the other hand, a positive correlation was only noted between the titres of tissue-reacting immunoglobulins and the migration indices induced by brain antigens: when titres of tissue-reacting immunoglobulins were elevated, less leucocyte migration inhibition was detected. PMID:6802533

  12. Determining donor-specific antibody C1q-binding ability improves the prediction of antibody-mediated rejection in human leucocyte antigen-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Malheiro, Jorge; Tafulo, Sandra; Dias, Leonídio; Martins, La Salete; Fonseca, Isabel; Beirão, Idalina; Castro-Henriques, António; Cabrita, António

    2017-04-01

    Detrimental impact of preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) against human leucocyte antigens on outcomes after kidney transplantation are well documented, however, the value of their capacity to bind complement for predicting antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and graft survival still needs to be confirmed. We aimed to study DSA characteristics (strength and C1q binding) that might distinguish harmful DSA from clinically irrelevant ones. We retrospectively studied 60 kidney-transplanted patients with preformed DSA detected by single antigen bead (SAB) assays (IgG and C1q kits), from a cohort of 517 kidney graft recipients (124 with detectable anti-HLA antibodies). Patients were divided into DSA strength (MFI < vs. ≥ 15 000) and C1q-binding ability. AMR frequency was high (30%) and it increased with DSA strength (P = 0.002) and C1q+ DSA (P < 0.001). The performance of DSA C1q-binding ability as a predictor of AMR was better than DSA strength (diagnostic odds ratio 16.3 vs. 6.4, respectively). Furthermore, a multivariable logistic regression showed that C1q+ DSA was a risk factor for AMR (OR = 16.80, P = 0.001), while high MFI DSAs were not. Graft survival was lower in high MFI C1q+ DSA in comparison with patients with C1q- high or low MFI DSA (at 6 years, 38%, 83% and 80%, respectively; P = 0.001). Both DSA strength and C1q-binding ability assessment seem valuable for improving pretransplant risk assessment. Since DSA C1q-binding ability was a better predictor of AMR and correlated with graft survival, C1q-SAB may be a particularly useful tool.

  13. Persistence of Recipient Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA) Antibodies and Production of Donor HLA antibodies Following Reduced Intensity Allogeneic Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Ross M.; Mamcarz, Ewelina; Adams, Sharon; Jerussi, Theresa Donohue; Sugimoto, Kyoko; Tian, Xin; Flegel, Willy A.; Childs, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) on human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-alloimmunization and platelet transfusion refractoriness (PTR) following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT) are unknown. We studied HLA-alloantibodies in a cohort of 16 patients (8 HLA-alloimmunized with pre-transplant histories of PTR and 8 non-alloimmunized controls) undergoing Allo-HSCT using fludarabine/cyclophosphamide-based RIC. Pre- and post-transplant serum samples were analysed for HLA-antibodies and compared to myeloid, T-cell and bone marrow plasma cell chimaerism. Among alloimmunized patients, the duration that HLA-antibodies persisted post-transplant correlated strongly with pre-transplant HLA-antibody mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) and PRA levels (Spearman’s rank correlation = 0.954 (p=0.0048) and 0.865 (p=0.0083) respectively). Pre-transplant MFI >10,000 was associated with post-transplant HLA antibody persistence >100 days (p=0.029). HLA-antibodies persisted ≥100 days in 3/8 patients despite recipient chimaerism being undetectable in all lympho-haematopoietic lineages including plasma cells. Post-transplant de-novo HLA-antibodies developed in 3 control patients with 2 developing PTR; the donors for 2 of these patients demonstrated pre-existing HLA-antibodies of equivalent specificity to those in the patient, confirming donor origin. These data show HLA-antibodies may persist for prolonged periods following RIC. Further study is needed to determine the incidence of post-transplant PTR as a consequence of donor–derived HLA alloimmunization before recommendations on donor HLA-antibody screening can be made. PMID:24750103

  14. Towards allele-level human leucocyte antigens genotyping - assessing two next-generation sequencing platforms: Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine and Illumina MiSeq.

    PubMed

    Duke, J L; Lind, C; Mackiewicz, K; Ferriola, D; Papazoglou, A; Derbeneva, O; Wallace, D; Monos, D S

    2015-10-01

    Human leucocyte antigens (HLA) typing has been a challenge due to extreme polymorphism of the HLA genes and limitations of the current technologies and protocols used for their characterization. Recently, next-generation sequencing techniques have been shown to be a well-suited technology for the complete characterization of the HLA genes. However, a comprehensive assessment of the different platforms for HLA typing, describing the limitations and advantages of each of them, has not been presented. We have compared the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) and Illumina MiSeq, currently the two most frequently used platforms for diagnostic applications, for a number of metrics including total output, quality score per position across the reads and error rates after alignment which can all affect the accuracy of HLA genotyping. For this purpose, we have used one homozygous and three heterozygous well-characterized samples, at HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1. The total output of bases produced by the MiSeq was higher, and they have higher quality scores and a lower overall error rate than the PGM. The MiSeq also has a higher fidelity when sequencing through homopolymer regions up to 9 bp in length. The need to set phase between distant polymorphic sites was more readily achieved with MiSeq using paired-end sequencing of fragments that are longer than those obtained with PGM. Additionally, we have assessed the workflows of the different platforms for complexity of sample preparation, sequencer operation and turnaround time. The effects of data quality and quantity can impact the genotyping results; having an adequate amount of good quality data to analyse will be imperative for confident HLA genotyping. The overall turnaround time can be very comparable between the two platforms; however, the complexity of sample preparation is higher with PGM, while the actual sequencing time is longer with MiSeq.

  15. Loss of human leucocyte antigen class I and gain of class II expression are early events in carcinogenesis: clues from a study of Barrett's oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Rajendra, S; Ackroyd, R; Karim, N; Mohan, C; Ho, J J; Kutty, M K

    2006-09-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) expression is altered in oesophageal carcinomas compared with normal tissue. It is unclear, however, whether this phenotype precedes malignant transformation or results as a consequence of it. To investigate HLA class I and II expression in Barrett's oesophagus and normal squamous oesophageal tissue. Asian patients with Barrett's oesophagus (n = 64) and a control group (n = 60) with a normal oesophagus but without reflux symptoms were recruited using endoscopic and histopathological criteria. Tissue samples were stained with monoclonal antibodies specific for HLA-ABC, HLA-DR alpha chain or HLA-DP/DQ/DR, and scored semiquantitatively. The results of immunohistochemical staining were correlated with clinical and histopathological characteristics of patients. Marked expression of HLA-ABC was observed in 50% of Barrett's oesophagus sections as compared with 68.3% of controls (p = 0.038). HLA-DR staining was seen in 51.6% of Barrett's oesophagus samples versus 11.7% of controls (p<0.001). Expression of HLA-DP/DQ/DR was evident in 73.4% of oesophageal intestinal metaplasia tissue as opposed to 18.3% of controls (p<0.001). Importantly, a total loss of HLA-ABC and a concomitant gain of HLA-DP/DQ/DR expression were seen in 37.5% of patients with Barrett's oesophagus but in none of the controls (p<0.001). Interestingly, this phenotype was associated positively with dysplasia (adjusted p, p* = 0.031) but negatively with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use (p* = 0.004). HLA class I expression is down regulated and class II expression is up regulated in Barrett's oesophagus. As these changes predate malignant transformation, altered major histocompatibility complex expression may be a key event in disease progression, possibly in facilitating evasion from immune surveillance.

  16. Human leucocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) and its murine functional homolog Qa2 in the Trypanosoma cruzi Infection.

    PubMed

    Dias, Fabrício C; Mendes-Junior, Celso T; Silva, Maria C; Tristão, Fabrine S M; Dellalibera-Joviliano, Renata; Moreau, Philippe; Soares, Edson G; Menezes, Jean G; Schmidt, André; Dantas, Roberto O; Marin-Neto, José A; Silva, João S; Donadi, Eduardo A

    2015-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility factors, parasite strain, and an adequate modulation of the immune system seem to be crucial for disease progression after Trypanosoma cruzi infection. HLA-G and its murine functional homolog Qa2 have well-recognized immunomodulatory properties. We evaluated the HLA-G 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) polymorphic sites (associated with mRNA stability and target for microRNA binding) and HLA-G tissue expression (heart, colon, and esophagus) in patients presenting Chagas disease, stratified according to the major clinical variants. Further, we investigated the transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other pro- and anti-inflammatory genes in affected mouse tissues during T. cruzi experimental acute and early chronic infection induced by the CL strain. Chagas disease patients exhibited differential HLA-G 3'UTR susceptibility allele/genotype/haplotype patterns, according to the major clinical variant (digestive/cardiac/mixed/indeterminate). HLA-G constitutive expression on cardiac muscle and colonic cells was decreased in Chagasic tissues; however, no difference was observed for Chagasic and non-Chagasic esophagus tissues. The transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other anti and proinflammatory (CTLA-4, PDCD1, IL-10, INF-γ, and NOS-2) genes were induced only during the acute T. cruzi infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We present several lines of evidence indicating the role of immunomodulatory genes and molecules in human and experimental T. cruzi infection.

  17. Human Leucocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) and Its Murine Functional Homolog Qa2 in the Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Fabrício C.; Mendes-Junior, Celso T.; Silva, Maria C.; Tristão, Fabrine S. M.; Dellalibera-Joviliano, Renata; Soares, Edson G.; Menezes, Jean G.; Schmidt, André; Dantas, Roberto O.; Marin-Neto, José A.; Silva, João S.; Donadi, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility factors, parasite strain, and an adequate modulation of the immune system seem to be crucial for disease progression after Trypanosoma cruzi infection. HLA-G and its murine functional homolog Qa2 have well-recognized immunomodulatory properties. We evaluated the HLA-G 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) polymorphic sites (associated with mRNA stability and target for microRNA binding) and HLA-G tissue expression (heart, colon, and esophagus) in patients presenting Chagas disease, stratified according to the major clinical variants. Further, we investigated the transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other pro- and anti-inflammatory genes in affected mouse tissues during T. cruzi experimental acute and early chronic infection induced by the CL strain. Chagas disease patients exhibited differential HLA-G 3′UTR susceptibility allele/genotype/haplotype patterns, according to the major clinical variant (digestive/cardiac/mixed/indeterminate). HLA-G constitutive expression on cardiac muscle and colonic cells was decreased in Chagasic tissues; however, no difference was observed for Chagasic and non-Chagasic esophagus tissues. The transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other anti and proinflammatory (CTLA-4, PDCD1, IL-10, INF-γ, and NOS-2) genes were induced only during the acute T. cruzi infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We present several lines of evidence indicating the role of immunomodulatory genes and molecules in human and experimental T. cruzi infection. PMID:25688175

  18. Effects of type II collagen epitope carbamylation and citrullination in human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR4(+) monozygotic twins discordant for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    De Santis, M; Ceribelli, A; Cavaciocchi, F; Generali, E; Massarotti, M; Isailovic, N; Crotti, C; Scherer, H U; Montecucco, C; Selmi, C

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the native, citrullinated or carbamylated type II human collagen T cell- and B cell-epitopes on the adaptive immune response in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Peripheral blood T and B cells obtained from a human leucocyte D4-related (antigen DR4(-) HLA-DR4)(+) woman with early RA, her healthy monozygotic twin and an unrelated HLA-DR3(+) woman with early RA were analysed for activation (CD154/CD69), apoptosis (annexin/7-aminoactinomycin), cytokine production [interferon (IFN)γ/interleukin (IL)-17/IL-4/IL-10/IL-6] and functional phenotype (CD45Ra/CCR7) after stimulation with the collagen native T cell epitope (T261-273), the K264 carbamylated T cell epitope (carT261-273), the native B cell epitope (B359-369) or the R360 citrullinated B cell epitope (citB359-369), and the combinations of these. The T cell memory compartment was activated by T cell epitopes in both discordant DR4(+) twins, but not in the DR3(+) RA. The collagen-specific activation of CD4(+) T cells was induced with both the native and carbamylated T cell epitopes only in the RA twin. Both T cell epitopes also induced IL-17 production in the RA twin, but a greater IL-4 and IL-10 response in the healthy twin. The citrullinated B cell epitope, particularly when combined with the carbamylated T cell epitope, induced B cell activation and an increased IL-6/IL-10 ratio in the RA twin compared to a greater IL-10 production in the healthy twin. Our data suggest that circulating collagen-specific T and B cells are found in HLA-DR4(+) subjects, but only RA activated cells express co-stimulatory molecules and produce proinflammatory cytokines. Carbamylation and citrullination further modulate the activation and cytokine polarization of T and B cells. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  19. Human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DQB1*03:02 and HLA-A*02:01 have opposite patterns in their effects on susceptibility to HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Rallón, N; Restrepo, C; Vicario, J L; Del Romero, J; Rodríguez, C; García-Samaniego, J; García, M; Cabello, A; Górgolas, M; Benito, J M

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to seek correlates of immune protection in HIV infection. We sought to elucidate the association between the presence of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, as well as killer immunoglobulin receptor (KIR) genotypes, and the susceptibility to HIV infection in a Spanish cohort of HIV-exposed seronegative (HESN) individuals. A total of 152 individuals were evaluated: 29 HESN individuals in stable heterosexual relationships with an HIV-infected partner admitting high-risk sexual intercourse for at least 12 months prior to inclusion in the study, 61 HIV-infected patients and 62 healthy controls. HLA class I and II alleles and KIR genotypes were assessed in genomic DNA from all individuals in the study by polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO) using bead array technology. HESN individuals showed a higher prevalence of HLA-A3 (62%) and HLA-B44 (83%) supertypes compared with HIV-infected individuals (42% and 66%, respectively). Regarding specific HLA alleles, HESN individuals had a higher prevalence of HLA-A*33:01, DRB1*04 and DQB1*03:02 alleles (14%, 34% and 31%, respectively) and a lower prevalence of the HLA-A*02:01 allele (27%) than HIV-infected patients (3%, 15%, 11% and 52%, respectively; P < 0.05). Interestingly, in a multivariate analysis, only the presence of DQB1*03:02 and the absence of A*02:01 alleles were independently associated with HESN status [odds ratio (OR) 3.4 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-10.5) and 0.4 (95% CI: 0.1-0.9), respectively; P < 0.05]. No KIR genotype was associated with susceptibility to HIV infection. Our data showed that the presence of the HLA class II allele DQB1*03:02 was a correlate of immune protection against HIV infection, while the presence of the HLA class I allele A*02:01 was associated with being infected with HIV. © 2017 British HIV Association.

  20. Characterization of swine leucocyte antigen alleles in a crossbred pig to be used in xenotransplant studies.

    PubMed

    Reyes, L M; Blosser, R J; Smith, R F; Miner, A C; Paris, L L; Blankenship, R L; Tector, M F; Tector, A J

    2014-11-01

    We have characterized swine leucocyte antigen (SLA) classes I and II molecules of a domestic pig as a model for use in our xenotransplant program. Molecular characterization of the SLA classes I and II genes is critical to understanding the adaptive immune responses between swine and humans in the event of xenotransplantation. Seven swine leucocyte antigen genes (SLA-1, SLA-2, SLA-3, DQB1, DRB1, DQA and DRA) were analyzed and 15 alleles were identified. A novel DRA*w04re01 is reported for this limited polymorphic class II gene. The heterozygous haplotypes, Hp-32.0/35.0 and Hp-0.13/0.23 were deduced for our IU-pig model, for SLA classes I and II regions, respectively. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Pediatric adrenocortical tumors: morphological diagnostic criteria and immunohistochemical expression of matrix metalloproteinase type 2 and human leucocyte-associated antigen (HLA) class II antigens. Results from the Italian Pediatric Rare Tumor (TREP) Study project.

    PubMed

    Magro, Gaetano; Esposito, Giovanni; Cecchetto, Giovanni; Dall'Igna, Patrizia; Marcato, Raffaella; Gambini, Claudio; Boldrini, Renata; Collini, Paola; D'Onofrio, Vittoria; Salfi, Nunzio; d'Amore, Emanuele; Ferrari, Andrea; Bisogno, Gianni; Alaggio, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric adrenocortical tumors are neoplasms that only rarely occur in pediatric patients. Their clinical behavior is often unpredictable, and the histologic criteria of malignancy used in adults are not always useful in children. The aim of this study was to validate the prognostic value of the pathologic criteria of Wieneke et al and to evaluate the potential prognostic expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 and human leucocyte-associated antigen (HLA) class II antigens in a series of 20 pediatric patients affected by adrenocortical tumors, who were enrolled in the Italian Pediatric Rare Tumor (TREP) Study between 2000 and 2007. The age range was 0 to 17.5 years (mean, 7.28 years) with a male-female ratio of 1:2. The mean follow-up was 64.4 months. The histologic diagnoses were reviewed, and the cases were classified using the criteria for malignancy proposed by Wieneke et al. The immunohistochemical expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 and HLA class II antigens was scored by semiquantitative analysis and compared with the clinicopathologic parameters and outcome. Based on the scoring system of Wieneke et al, 7 tumors were classified as malignant; 12 tumors, as benign; and only 1 tumor, with "unpredictable behavior." In all cases, the clinical behavior was consistent with the pathologic criteria of Wieneke et al. Notably, areas of regressive myxoid changes, not included among the criteria of Wieneke et al, were observed in all but 1 case of malignant tumors and only in 2 cases of benign tumors. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 was focally to diffusely expressed in all malignant and in most benign tumors. HLA class II antigens immunoreactivity was absent in all benign tumors and restricted to rare isolated cells in most malignant tumors. Our findings confirm that the pathologic scoring system of Wieneke et al is a simple and reproducible diagnostic tool to predict prognosis in pediatric adrenocortical tumors. Unlike in their adult counterpart, the expression of

  2. Report of the First International Workshop on Equine Leucocyte Antigens, Cambridge, UK, July 1991.

    PubMed

    Kydd, J; Antczak, D F; Allen, W R; Barbis, D; Butcher, G; Davis, W; Duffus, W P; Edington, N; Grünig, G; Holmes, M A

    1994-07-01

    The First International Workshop on Equine Leucocyte Antigens was organized and convened for the purposes of identifying immunologically relevant cell surface molecules of equine leucocytes and establishing a system of nomenclature for those molecules. Participating members of the workshop represented the majority of laboratories world-wide engaged in the tasks of production and characterization of equine leucocyte and lymphocyte markers using monoclonal antibodies. The workshop confirmed the identification of several equine CD molecules described previously by individual laboratories, and in addition recognized antibodies identifying new CD molecules. The workshop also succeeded in fostering co-operation between laboratories around the world which study equine immunobiology. Equine CD molecules identified by the current battery of monoclonal antibodies include EqCD2, EqCD4, EqCD5, EqCD8, EqCD11a/18, EqCD13 and EqCD44. Other antibodies are markers for MHC class I and class II molecules, for B cells, granulocytes, macrophages, T cell subsets distinct from those defined by CD4 and CD8, and other sub-populations of horse leucocytes that do not have obvious counterparts in humans, rodents, or other species. Despite the progress made in the first workshop, there are still substantial gaps in the armory of reagents available to study equine leucocyte biology, and further definition of the structure, function, and genetics of the antigens identified by the workshop clusters (WC1, WC2 etc.) and other molecules of immunological importance will be a goal of future workshops. The study of equine immunobiology and resistance to disease also urgently requires the development of tools to study equine immunoglobulins and cytokines, and these needs will provide ample scope for future studies.

  3. Polymorphisms within the human leucocyte antigen-E gene and their associations with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis as well as clinical outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy.

    PubMed

    Iwaszko, M; Świerkot, J; Kolossa, K; Jeka, S; Wiland, P; Bogunia-Kubik, K

    2015-12-01

    Involvement of the non-classical human leucocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) in both innate and acquired immune response suggests its possible role in development of autoimmune pathologies. This study was undertaken to investigate relationships between the HLA-E gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as well as to evaluate a potential of these polymorphisms to modulate clinical outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) treatment in female patients. A total of 223 female patients with RA receiving anti-TNF biological therapy and 134 female healthy subjects were enrolled into the study. Genotypings for two SNPs within the HLA-E gene (rs1264457 HLA-E*01:01/01:03; rs1059510 HLA-E*01:03:01/01:03:02) were performed using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification employing LightSNiP assays. Clinical response was evaluated according to the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria at 12 and 24 weeks after initiation of the therapy. The frequency of the HLA-E*01:01/01:01 genotype was decreased significantly in RA patients in comparison to controls (P = 0.031). The presence of the HLA-E*01:01/01:01 genotype in patients correlated with better EULAR response after 12 weeks of anti-TNF treatment, while 01:03 allele carriers were generally unresponsive to the treatment (P = 0.014). The HLA-E*01:03/01:03 genotype was also over-represented among non-responding patients in comparison to HLA-E*01:01/01:01 homozygotes (P = 0.021). With respect to the HLA-E rs1059510 variation, a better response after 12 weeks was observed more frequently in patients carrying the HLA-E*01:03:01/01:03:01 genotype than other genotypes (P = 0.009). The results derived from this study imply that HLA-E polymorphisms may influence RA susceptibility and affect clinical outcome of anti-TNF therapy in female RA patients.

  4. Polymorphisms within the human leucocyte antigen-E gene and their associations with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis as well as clinical outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Iwaszko, M; Świerkot, J; Kolossa, K; Jeka, S; Wiland, P; Bogunia-Kubik, K

    2015-01-01

    Involvement of the non-classical human leucocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) in both innate and acquired immune response suggests its possible role in development of autoimmune pathologies. This study was undertaken to investigate relationships between the HLA-E gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as well as to evaluate a potential of these polymorphisms to modulate clinical outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) treatment in female patients. A total of 223 female patients with RA receiving anti-TNF biological therapy and 134 female healthy subjects were enrolled into the study. Genotypings for two SNPs within the HLA-E gene (rs1264457 HLA-E*01:01/01:03; rs1059510 HLA-E*01:03:01/01:03:02) were performed using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification employing LightSNiP assays. Clinical response was evaluated according to the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria at 12 and 24 weeks after initiation of the therapy. The frequency of the HLA-E*01:01/01:01 genotype was decreased significantly in RA patients in comparison to controls (P = 0·031). The presence of the HLA-E*01:01/01:01 genotype in patients correlated with better EULAR response after 12 weeks of anti-TNF treatment, while 01:03 allele carriers were generally unresponsive to the treatment (P = 0·014). The HLA-E*01:03/01:03 genotype was also over-represented among non-responding patients in comparison to HLA-E*01:01/01:01 homozygotes (P = 0·021). With respect to the HLA-E rs1059510 variation, a better response after 12 weeks was observed more frequently in patients carrying the HLA-E*01:03:01/01:03:01 genotype than other genotypes (P = 0·009). The results derived from this study imply that HLA-E polymorphisms may influence RA susceptibility and affect clinical outcome of anti-TNF therapy in female RA patients. PMID:26307125

  5. Human leucocyte antigen class I‐redirected anti‐tumour CD4+ T cells require a higher T cell receptor binding affinity for optimal activity than CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, M. P.; Dolton, G. M.; Gerry, A. B.; Brewer, J. E.; Bennett, A. D.; Pumphrey, N. J.; Jakobsen, B. K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary CD4+ T helper cells are a valuable component of the immune response towards cancer. Unfortunately, natural tumour‐specific CD4+ T cells occur in low frequency, express relatively low‐affinity T cell receptors (TCRs) and show poor reactivity towards cognate antigen. In addition, the lack of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression on most cancers dictates that these cells are often unable to respond to tumour cells directly. These deficiencies can be overcome by transducing primary CD4+ T cells with tumour‐specific HLA class I‐restricted TCRs prior to adoptive transfer. The lack of help from the co‐receptor CD8 glycoprotein in CD4+ cells might result in these cells requiring a different optimal TCR binding affinity. Here we compared primary CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing wild‐type and a range of affinity‐enhanced TCRs specific for the HLA A*0201‐restricted NY‐ESO‐1‐ and gp100 tumour antigens. Our major findings are: (i) redirected primary CD4+ T cells expressing TCRs of sufficiently high affinity exhibit a wide range of effector functions, including cytotoxicity, in response to cognate peptide; and (ii) optimal TCR binding affinity is higher in CD4+ T cells than CD8+ T cells. These results indicate that the CD4+ T cell component of current adoptive therapies using TCRs optimized for CD8+ T cells is below par and that there is room for substantial improvement. PMID:27324616

  6. Immunoglobulin (Ig)G purified from human sera mirrors intravenous Ig human leucocyte antigen (HLA) reactivity and recognizes one's own HLA types, but may be masked by Fab complementarity-determining region peptide in the native sera.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Maehara, C Y; Jucaud, V; Kawakita, S; Pham, T; Yamashita, W

    2015-02-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) reacted with a wide array of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, in contrast to normal sera, due possibly to the purification of IgG from the pooled plasma. The reactivity of IgG purified from normal sera was compared with that of native sera to determine whether any serum factors mask the HLA reactivity of anti-HLA IgG and whether IgG purified from sera can recognize the HLA types of the corresponding donors. The purified IgG, unlike native sera, mirrored IVIg reactivity to a wide array of HLA-I/-II alleles, indicating that anti-HLA IgG may be masked in normal sera - either by peptides derived from soluble HLA or by those from antibodies. A < 3 kDa peptide from the complementarity-determining region (CDR) of the Fab region of IgG (but not the HLA peptides) masked HLA recognition by the purified IgG. Most importantly, some of the anti-HLA IgG purified from normal sera - and serum IgG from a few donors - indeed recognized the HLA types of the corresponding donors, confirming the presence of auto-HLA antibodies. Comparison of HLA types with the profile of HLA antibodies showed auto-HLA IgG to the donors' HLA antigens in this order of frequency: DPA (80%), DQA (71%), DRB345 (67%), DQB (57%), Cw (50%), DBP (43%), DRB1 (21%), A (14%) and B (7%). The auto-HLA antibodies, when unmasked in vivo, may perform immunoregulatory functions similar to those of therapeutic preparations of IVIg.

  7. Immunoglobulin (Ig)G purified from human sera mirrors intravenous Ig human leucocyte antigen (HLA) reactivity and recognizes one's own HLA types, but may be masked by Fab complementarity-determining region peptide in the native sera

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Maehara, C Y; Jucaud, V; Kawakita, S; Pham, T; Yamashita, W

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) reacted with a wide array of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, in contrast to normal sera, due possibly to the purification of IgG from the pooled plasma. The reactivity of IgG purified from normal sera was compared with that of native sera to determine whether any serum factors mask the HLA reactivity of anti-HLA IgG and whether IgG purified from sera can recognize the HLA types of the corresponding donors. The purified IgG, unlike native sera, mirrored IVIg reactivity to a wide array of HLA-I/-II alleles, indicating that anti-HLA IgG may be masked in normal sera – either by peptides derived from soluble HLA or by those from antibodies. A < 3 kDa peptide from the complementarity-determining region (CDR) of the Fab region of IgG (but not the HLA peptides) masked HLA recognition by the purified IgG. Most importantly, some of the anti-HLA IgG purified from normal sera – and serum IgG from a few donors – indeed recognized the HLA types of the corresponding donors, confirming the presence of auto-HLA antibodies. Comparison of HLA types with the profile of HLA antibodies showed auto-HLA IgG to the donors' HLA antigens in this order of frequency: DPA (80%), DQA (71%), DRB345 (67%), DQB (57%), Cw (50%), DBP (43%), DRB1 (21%), A (14%) and B (7%). The auto-HLA antibodies, when unmasked in vivo, may perform immunoregulatory functions similar to those of therapeutic preparations of IVIg. PMID:25196542

  8. The correlation between ovomucoid-derived peptides, human leucocyte antigen class II molecules and T cell receptor-complementarity determining region 3 compositions in patients with egg-white allergy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Inoue, R; Sakaguchi, H; Aoki, M; Kato, Z; Kaneko, H; Matsushita, S; Kondo, N

    2002-08-01

    Food allergies are more prevalent in children, due to the immature gastrointestinal epithelial membrane barrier allowing more proteins through the barrier and into circulation. Ovomucoid (OM) is one of the major allergens that is found in egg white. The aim of this study was to determine T cell epitopes, antigen-presenting human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecules of the T cell lines (TCLs) and T cell clones (TCCs), and complementarity determining region (CDR) 3 loops of the T cell receptor (TCR) alpha and beta chains of the TCCs specific to OM. We established TCLs and TCCs specific to OM from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of four atopic patients with egg-white allergy using a mixture of a panel of overlapping synthetic peptides corresponding to the amino acid sequence of the entire OM. We identified the T cell epitopes by antigen-induced proliferative responses, antigen-presenting molecules using allogeneic PBMCs and CDR3 loops of the TCR alpha and beta chains by cloning and sequence analysis. The TCLs and TCCs responded to seven different peptides, and their antigen-presenting molecules were different from each other. Sequence analysis of the TCR alpha and beta gene usage of the TCCs showed marked heterogeneity, and the usage of the CDR3 loop of the TCCs involved heterogenous amino acid residues. Interestingly, TCCs 'IH3.3' and 'YT6.1' recognized the same OM peptides, and had the same TCR Vbeta-Jbeta gene usage. Considering that peptide motifs bind to HLA class II molecules, the electrically charged residue (positive or negative) on the CDR3alpha and the CDR3beta loops of TCR of TCC may form ionic bonds with a charged residue on the HLA class II molecules-peptide complex. TCCs that have the same TCR gene usage were established from patients who had shown similar hypersensitivity-type, indicating that antigen recognition by a specific TCR is closely associated with the characteristics of each patient's symptoms.

  9. Differential regulation of toll-like receptor-2, toll-like receptor-4, CD16 and human leucocyte antigen-DR on peripheral blood monocytes during mild and severe dengue fever

    PubMed Central

    Azeredo, Elzinandes L; Neves-Souza, Patrícia C; Alvarenga, Allan R; Reis, Sônia R N I; Torrentes-Carvalho, Amanda; Zagne, Sonia-Maris O; Nogueira, Rita M R; Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia M; Kubelka, Claire F

    2010-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF), a public health problem in tropical countries, may present severe clinical manifestations as result of increased vascular permeability and coagulation disorders. Dengue virus (DENV), detected in peripheral monocytes during acute disease and in in vitro infection, leads to cytokine production, indicating that virus–target cell interactions are relevant to pathogenesis. Here we investigated the in vitro and in vivo activation of human peripheral monocytes after DENV infection. The numbers of CD14+ monocytes expressing the adhesion molecule intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) were significantly increased during acute DF. A reduced number of CD14+ human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR+ monocytes was observed in patients with severe dengue when compared to those with mild dengue and controls; CD14+ monocytes expressing toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 were increased in peripheral blood from dengue patients with mild disease, but in vitro DENV-2 infection up-regulated only TLR2. Increased numbers of CD14+ CD16+ activated monocytes were found after in vitro and in vivo DENV-2 infection. The CD14high CD16+ monocyte subset was significantly expanded in mild dengue, but not in severe dengue. Increased plasma levels of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-18 in dengue patients were inversely associated with CD14high CD16+, indicating that these cells might be involved in controlling exacerbated inflammatory responses, probably by IL-10 production. We showed here, for the first time, phenotypic changes on peripheral monocytes that were characteristic of cell activation. A sequential monocyte-activation model is proposed in which DENV infection triggers TLR2/4 expression and inflammatory cytokine production, leading eventually to haemorrhagic manifestations, thrombocytopenia, coagulation disorders, plasmatic leakage and shock development, but may also produce factors that act in order to control both intense

  10. Human leucocytes in asthenozoospermic patients: endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression.

    PubMed

    Buldreghini, E; Hamada, A; Macrì, M L; Amoroso, S; Boscaro, M; Lenzi, A; Agarwal, A; Balercia, G

    2014-12-01

    In a basic study at the Andrology Unit, Department of Clinical and Molecular Sciences, Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy, we evaluated the pattern of mRNA endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression in human blood leucocytes isolated from normozoospermic fertile and asthenozoospermic infertile men to elucidate any pathogenic involvement in sperm cell motility. Forty infertile men with idiopathic asthenozoospermia and 45 normozoospermic fertile donors, age-matched, were included. Semen parameters were evaluated, and expression analysis of mRNA was performed in human leucocytes using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Sperm volume, count, motility and morphology were determined, and eNOS expression and Western blotting analyses were performed. A positive correlation was observed between the concentrations of NO and the percentage of immotile spermatozoa. The mRNA of eNOS was more expressed in peripheral blood leucocytes isolated from asthenozoospermic infertile men versus those of fertile normozoospermic men (7.46 ± 0.38 versus 7.06 ± 0.56, P = 0.0355). A significant up-regulation of eNOS gene in peripheral blood leucocytes was 1.52-fold higher than that of fertile donors. It is concluded that eNOS expression and activity are enhanced in blood leucocytes in men with idiopathic asthenozoospermia.

  11. Enhancement of mite antigen-induced histamine release by deuterium oxide from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients

    SciTech Connect

    Numata, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamura, T.

    1981-09-01

    The mite antigen-induced histamine release from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients was enhanced in the presence of deuterium oxide, which stabilizes microtubules. This enhancing effect of deuterium oxide on the histamine release from leucocytes may provide a useful means for the detection of allergens in vitro in chronic urticaria.

  12. Suppression of blastogenesis and proliferation of activated CD4+ T cells: intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) versus novel anti-human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E monoclonal antibodies mimicking HLA-I reactivity of IVIg

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Pham, T; Jucaud, V; Kawakita, S

    2014-01-01

    Activated CD4+ T cells undergo blastogenesis and proliferation and they express several surface receptors, including β2-microglobulin-free human leucocyte antigen (HLA) heavy chains (open conformers). Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) suppresses activated T cells, but the mechanism is unclear. IVIg reacts with HLA-Ia/Ib antigens but its reactivity is lost when the anti-HLA-E Ab is adsorbed out. Anti-HLA-E antibodies may bind to the peptides shared by HLA-E and the HLA-I alleles. These shared peptides are cryptic in intact HLA, but exposed in open conformers. The hypothesis that anti-HLA-E monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that mimic HLA-I reactivity of IVIg may suppress activated T cells by binding to the shared peptides of the open conformers on the T cell surface was tested by examining the relative binding affinity of those mAbs for open conformers coated on regular beads and for intact HLA coated on iBeads, and by comparing the effects on the suppression of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-activated T cells of three entities: IVIg, anti-HLA-E mAbs that mimic IVIg [Terasaki Foundation Laboratory (TFL)-006 and (TFL)-007]; and anti-HLA-E antibodies that do not mimic IVIg (TFL-033 and TFL-037). Suppression of blastogenesis and proliferation of those T cells by both IVIg and the anti-HLA-E mAbs was dose-dependent, the dose required with mAbs 50–150-fold lower than with IVIg. TFL-006 and TFL-007 significantly suppressed blastogenesis and proliferation of activated CD4+ T cells, but neither the non-IVIg-mimicking mAbs nor control antibodies did so. The suppression may be mediated by Fab-binding of TFL-006/TFL-007 to the exposed shared peptides. The mAb binding to the open conformer may signal T cell deactivation because the open conformers have an elongated cytoplasmic tail with phosphorylation sites (tryosine320/serine335). PMID:24889882

  13. Depletion of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells exacerbates sodium iodide-induced experimental autoimmune thyroiditis in human leucocyte antigen DR3 (DRB1*0301) transgenic class II-knock-out non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Flynn, J C; Meroueh, C; Snower, D P; David, C S; Kong, Y M

    2007-03-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to autoimmune disease development. Previously, we evaluated genetic factors in a humanized mouse model of Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) by immunizing human leucocyte antigen DR3 (HLA-DR3) and HLA-DQ8 transgenic class II-knock-out non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. DR3+ mice were susceptible to experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) induction by both mouse thyroglobulin (mTg) and human (h) Tg, while DQ8+ mice were weakly susceptible only to hTg. As one environmental factor associated with HT and tested in non-transgenic models is increased sodium iodide (NaI) intake, we examined the susceptibility of DR3+ and/or DQ8+ mice to NaI-induced disease. Mice were treated for 8 weeks with NaI in the drinking water. At 0 x 05% NaI, 23% of DR3+, 0% of DQ8+ and 20% of DR3+DQ8+ mice had thyroid destruction. No spleen cell proliferation to mTg was observed. Most mice had undetectable anti-mTg antibodies, but those with low antibody levels usually had thyroiditis. At 0.3% NaI, a higher percentage of DR3+ and DR3+DQ8+ mice developed destructive thyroiditis, but it was not statistically significant. However, when DR3+ mice had been depleted of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells prior to NaI treatment, destructive thyroiditis (68%) and serum anti-mTg antibodies were exacerbated further. The presence of DQ8 molecules does not alter the susceptibility of DR3+DQ8+ mice to NaI-induced thyroiditis, similar to earlier findings with mTg-induced EAT. Susceptibility of DR3+ mice to NaI-induced EAT, in both the presence and absence of regulatory T cells, demonstrates the usefulness of HLA class II transgenic mice in evaluating the roles of environmental factors and immune dysregulation in autoimmune thyroid disease.

  14. Serum antibodies to human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E, HLA-F and HLA-G in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) during disease flares: Clinical relevance of HLA-F autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Jucaud, V; Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Morales-Buenrostro, L E; Hiepe, F; Rose, T; Biesen, R

    2016-03-01

    T lymphocyte hyperactivity and progressive inflammation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients results in over-expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-Ib on the surface of lymphocytes. These are shed into the circulation upon inflammation, and may augment production of antibodies promoting pathogenicity of the disease. The objective was to evaluate the association of HLA-Ib (HLA-E, HLA-F and HLA-G) antibodies to the disease activity of SLE. The immunoglobulin (Ig)G/IgM reactivity to HLA-Ib and β2m in the sera of 69 German, 29 Mexican female SLE patients and 17 German female controls was measured by multiplex Luminex(®)-based flow cytometry. The values were expressed as mean flourescence intensity (MFI). Only the German SLE cohort was analysed in relation to the clinical disease activity. In the controls, anti-HLA-G IgG predominated over other HLA-Ib antibodies, whereas SLE patients had a preponderance of anti-HLA-F IgG over the other HLA-Ib antibodies. The disease activity index, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI)-2000, was reflected only in the levels of anti-HLA-F IgG. Anti-HLA-F IgG with MFI level of 500-1999 was associated with active SLE, whereas inactive SLE revealed higher MFI (>2000). When anti-HLA-F IgG were cross-reactive with other HLA-Ib alleles, their reactivity was reflected in the levels of anti-HLA-E and -G IgG. The prevalence of HLA-F-monospecific antibodies in SLE patients was also associated with the clinical disease activity. Anti-HLA-F IgG is possibly involved in the clearance of HLA-F shed from lymphocytes and inflamed tissues to lessen the disease's severity, and thus emerges as a beneficial immune biomarker. Therefore, anti-HLA-Ib IgG should be considered as a biomarker in standard SLE diagnostics.

  15. OBSERVATIONS ON THE PRODUCTION OF PYROGENIC SUBSTANCES BY RABBIT AND HUMAN LEUCOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Fessler, J. H.; Cooper, K. E.; Cranston, W. I.; Vollum, R. L.

    1961-01-01

    1. The mechanism of release of a pyrogen from leucocytes has been studied in cells obtained from sterile rabbit peritoneal exudates and from rabbit blood. Attempts were made to induce human leucocytes—from blood—to release a pyrogen. 2. Rabbit leucocytes, kept below 4°C., were not pyrogenic and did not release any pyrogen when disintegrated. Incubating such cells, in various media, at 37°C. led to the formation of a pyrogen which was heat-labile. The maximum yield was attained after 1½ hours' incubation. 3. The formation of rabbit leucocytic pyrogen was prevented by freezing and thawing the leucocytes, by heating them to 56°C. for half an hour before incubation, and by ageing them in the cold. 4. Nitrofurazone (5-nitro-2-furaldehyde semicarbazone) prevents the formation of leucocytic pyrogen when given by mouth to the cell-donor animals, or when added to leucocytes in intro. 5. Leucocytes from rabbit blood formed leucocytic pyrogen, on incubation in saline, and this formation was also inhibited by nitrofurazone. 6. No leucocytic pyrogen was released from human leucocytes subjected to mechanical, osmotic, or thermal damage, and it was not formed when the cells were incubated in saline. 7. The source of rabbit leucocytic pyrogen, the action of nitrofurazone on leucocytes, and the supposed role of leucocytic pyrogen in fever are discussed. PMID:13699218

  16. Disparity for the minor histocompatibility antigen HA-1 is associated with an increased risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) but it does not affect chronic GvHD incidence, disease-free survival or overall survival after allogeneic human leucocyte antigen-identical sibling donor transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, D; Aróstegui, J I; Balas, A; Torres, A; Caballero, D; Carreras, E; Brunet, S; Jiménez, A; Mataix, R; Serrano, D; Vallejo, C; Sanz, G; Solano, C; Rodríguez-Luaces, M; Marín, J; Baro, J; Sanz, C; Román, J; González, M; Martorell, J; Sierra, J; Martín, C; de la Cámara, R; Grañena, A

    2001-09-01

    Disparity for the minor histocompatibility antigen HA-1 between patient and donor has been associated with an increased risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) after allogeneic human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling donor stem cell transplantation (SCT). However, no data concerning the impact of such disparity on chronic GvHD, relapse or overall survival are available. A retrospective multicentre study was performed on 215 HLA-A2-positive patients who received an HLA-identical sibling SCT, in order to determine the differences in acute and chronic GvHD incidence on the basis of the presence or absence of the HA-1 antigen mismatch. Disease-free survival and overall survival were also analysed. We detected 34 patient-donor pairs mismatched for HA-1 antigen (15.8%). Grades II-IV acute GvHD occurred in 51.6% of the HA-1-mismatched pairs compared with 37.1% of the non-mismatched. The multivariate logistic regression model showed statistical significance (P: 0.035, OR: 2.96, 95% CI: 1.07-8.14). No differences were observed between the two groups for grades III-IV acute GvHD, chronic GvHD, disease-free survival or overall survival. These results confirmed the association between HA-1 mismatch and risk of mild acute GvHD, but HA-1 mismatch was not associated with an increased incidence of chronic GvHD and did not affect relapse or overall survival.

  17. Exposure to anthrax toxin alters human leucocyte expression of anthrax toxin receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Ingram, R J; Harris, A; Ascough, S; Metan, G; Doganay, M; Ballie, L; Williamson, E D; Dyson, H; Robinson, J H; Sriskandan, S; Altmann, D M

    2013-07-01

    Anthrax is a toxin-mediated disease, the lethal effects of which are initiated by the binding of protective antigen (PA) with one of three reported cell surface toxin receptors (ANTXR). Receptor binding has been shown to influence host susceptibility to the toxins. Despite this crucial role for ANTXR in the outcome of disease, and the reported immunomodulatory consequence of the anthrax toxins during infection, little is known about ANTXR expression on human leucocytes. We characterized the expression levels of ANTXR1 (TEM8) on human leucocytes using flow cytometry. In order to assess the effect of prior toxin exposure on ANTXR1 expression levels, leucocytes from individuals with no known exposure, those exposed to toxin through vaccination and convalescent individuals were analysed. Donors could be defined as either 'low' or 'high' expressers based on the percentage of ANTXR1-positive monocytes detected. Previous exposure to toxins appears to modulate ANTXR1 expression, exposure through active infection being associated with lower receptor expression. A significant correlation between low receptor expression and high anthrax toxin-specific interferon (IFN)-γ responses was observed in previously infected individuals. We propose that there is an attenuation of ANTXR1 expression post-infection which may be a protective mechanism that has evolved to prevent reinfection.

  18. Human peripheral blood CD4 T cell-engrafted non-obese diabetic-scid IL2rγnull H2-Ab1 tm1Gru Tg (human leucocyte antigen D-related 4) mice: a mouse model of human allogeneic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Covassin, L; Laning, J; Abdi, R; Langevin, D L; Phillips, N E; Shultz, L D; Brehm, M A

    2011-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a life-threatening complication of human allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Non-obese diabetic (NOD)-scid IL2rγnull (NSG) mice injected with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) engraft at high levels and develop a robust xenogeneic (xeno)-GVHD, which reproduces many aspects of the clinical disease. Here we show that enriched and purified human CD4 T cells engraft readily in NSG mice and mediate xeno-GVHD, although with slower kinetics compared to injection of whole PBMC. Moreover, purified human CD4 T cells engraft but do not induce a GVHD in NSG mice that lack murine MHC class II (NSG-H2-Ab1 tm1Gru, NSG-Ab°), demonstrating the importance of murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II in the CD4-mediated xeno-response. Injection of purified human CD4 T cells from a DR4-negative donor into a newly developed NSG mouse strain that expresses human leucocyte antigen D-related 4 (HLA-DR4) but not murine class II (NSG-Ab° DR4) induces an allogeneic GVHD characterized by weight loss, fur loss, infiltration of human cells in skin, lung and liver and a high level of mortality. The ability of human CD4 T cells to mediate an allo-GVHD in NSG-Ab° DR4 mice suggests that this model will be useful to investigate acute allo-GVHD pathogenesis and to evaluate human specific therapies. PMID:21985373

  19. MHC class I antigens and tumour-infiltrating leucocytes in laryngeal cancer: long-term follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, F.; Redondo, M.; Delgado, M.; Garrido, F.; Ruiz-Cabello, F.

    1996-01-01

    Alteration in MHC class I expression may be used by cancer cells to avoid immune destruction. Much experimental evidence supports this idea, although survival studies are very scarce. To investigate whether the presence or absence of HLA-A, -B and -C antigens in laryngeal carcinoma influences survival, a series of 60 primary laryngeal tumours treated surgically and normal tissues were evaluated in frozen sections for the expression of MHC class I antigens and tumour-infiltrating leucocytes (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD11b, CD1, CD20 and CD16), using monoclonal antibodies and the APAAP, technique. Long-term follow-up from the patients is available, ranging from 6 to 10 years. Thirteen tumours presented total HLA-ABC loss, five selective losses of HLA-A antigens and one absence of HLA-B antigens. Total losses were statistically associated with several clinical and pathological parameters, but there were no differences regarding tumour-infiltrating leucocytes. After conducting a prospective study, only T and N staging and scoring according to Glanz's malignancy classification were found to be independently related to patients' outcome. From our data, we conclude that neither complete loss of HLA class I antigens nor tumour-infiltrating leucocytes appear to influence survival in squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx. PMID:8956796

  20. 300 The Method of Antigen Specific Damage of Leucocytes by Food Additives in Patients with Bronchial Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Titova, Nadya

    2012-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of adverse reactions to food additives is difficult due to a variety of mechanisms involved and the lack of sufficiently reliable methods for their determination. The diagnosis of intolerance to food additives is still based only on placebo-controlled oral provocation. Methods The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of intolerance to ponceau 4R (E124), indigo carmine (E132), azorubine (E122), tartrazine (E102), sunset yellow (E110) and sodium benzoate (E211) among patients with bronchial asthma. We studied 114 patients with bronchial asthma using clinical and laboratory methods. Also we used the method of antigen specific damage of leucocytes by food additives. After the incubation of leucocytes with solutions of food additives to leucocytes was added 0.05 mL of trypan blue and counted the percentage of stained (damaged) granulocytes with the food dye and in control tests. If damaging leucocytes were more than 20% in comparison with controls - the test considered positive. Results It was found that positive to ponceau 4R were 6 of 114 patients, to indigo carmine–3 of 73, to sodium benzoate–4 of 73, to azorubine–11 of 114, to tartrazine–7 of 114 and to sunset yellow–9 of 114. There was a correlation between the results obtained and data history. Between experienced and control group (the patients without allergic diseases) were the reliable differences (P < 0.05). Conclusions 1. Under influence of the food additives leukocytes of patients with bronchial asthma are damaged and painted by trypan blue. 2. The method of antigen specific damage of leucocytes by food additives can be used for diagnostics of the allergies to food dyes, sodium benzoate and other gaptens.

  1. Molecular characterization of swine leucocyte antigen class I genes in outbred pig populations.

    PubMed

    Ho, C-S; Lunney, J K; Franzo-Romain, M H; Martens, G W; Lee, Y-J; Lee, J-H; Wysocki, M; Rowland, R R R; Smith, D M

    2009-08-01

    The highly polymorphic swine leucocyte antigen (SLA) genes are one of the most important determinants in swine immune responses to infectious diseases, vaccines, and in transplantation success. Study of SLA influence requires accurate and effective typing methods. We developed a simple and rapid method to type alleles at the three classical SLA class I loci (SLA-1, SLA-3 and SLA-2) using the PCR-sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) strategy. This typing system relies on 47 discriminatory PCR primer pairs designed to amplify the SLA class I alleles by groups that have similar sequence motifs. We applied this low-resolution group-specific typing method to characterize the SLA class I alleles present in three outbred pig populations (n = 202). Alleles from 24 class I allele groups corresponding to 56 class I genotypes were detected. We also identified 23 low-resolution SLA class I haplotypes in these pigs and found haplotypes Lr-1.0 (SLA-1*01XX-SLA-3*01XX-SLA-2*01XX) and Lr-4.0 (SLA-1*04XX-SLA-3*04XX-SLA-2*04XX) in all three pig populations with a high prevalence. Over 80% of the pigs examined (n = 162) were found to bear at least one of these haplotypes, resulting in a combined haplotype frequency of nearly 50%. This PCR-SSP-based typing system demonstrates a reliable and unambiguous detection of SLA class I alleles, and can be used to effectively investigate the SLA diversity in outbred pig populations. It will help to identify the role of SLA antigens in disease-resistant pigs and may facilitate the development of effective vaccines.

  2. Protein nitration is predominantly mediated by a peroxynitrite-dependent pathway in cultured human leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Galiñanes, Manuel; Matata, Bashir M

    2002-01-01

    Protein nitration is a common characteristic of oxidative injury caused by the invasion of leucocytes into inflammatory lesions. Two distinct pathways of nitration of protein tyrosine residues, namely the peroxynitrite (ONOO(-))-mediated pathway and another catalysed by the haem-containing peroxidases, have been reported under experimental conditions. However, the contribution of these two pathways in human leucocytes is still controversial. The present study demonstrates that the process of phenolic nitration of proteins in cultured human leucocytes is mainly ONOO(-)-mediated and that it differs between granulocytes and mononuclear cells, depending on the cell compartment and the stimuli. We have also shown that NO induces protein nitration via a ONOO(-)-dependent pathway, whereas NO(2)(-), the NO metabolite, does not increase but decreases nitration in PMA-stimulated leucocytes. The inhibition of myeloperoxidase activity did not reduce protein nitration; on the other hand, the myeloperoxidase inhibitor aminobenzoic hydrazide caused increased nitration, which was mediated by ONOO(-). These results suggest that protein nitration is predominantly mediated by a ONOO(-)-dependent pathway in cultured human leucocytes and that the myeloperoxidase-catalysed pathway does not play a significant role in protein nitration. PMID:12099887

  3. Isolation of two polypeptides comprising the neutrophil-immobilizing factor of human leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Watt, K W; Brightman, I L; Goetzl, E J

    1983-01-01

    Human leucocyte lysosomal polypeptides of mol. wt 4000-5000, which constitute the neutrophil-immobolizing factor (NIF), were isolated from the 22,000 g supernate of sonicates of human neutrophils by filtration on Sephadex G-75. The larger (NIF-1) and smaller (NIF-2) of the polypeptides were resolved by filtration on Bio-Gel P6 and purified to homogeneity by sequential reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography and paper electrophoresis. The results of analyses of amino acid composition indicated that NIF-1 and NIF-2 are distinct polypeptides composed of an apparent total of 41 and 38 amino acids, respectively. Both NIF polypeptides contain one cysteine and one methionine, lack isoleucine, tyrosine and phenylalanine, and are rich in histidine and proline. The sequence of 20 of the amino-terminal amino acids of both NIF polypeptides is identical, but NIF-2 possesses an additional alanine at the amino-terminus. Highly purified NIF-1 and NIF-2 inhibited human neutrophil random migration and chemotaxis to diverse stimuli in a concentration-dependent manner, with 50% inhibition of chemotaxis by 0.31-1 x 10(-8) M NIF-1 and 1-3 x 10(-7) M NIF-2. Neither NIF polypeptide was cytotoxic for neutrophils, altered neutrophil phagocytosis or release of lysosomal enzymes, or inhibited mononuclear leucocyte chemotaxis. The leucocyte and functional specificity of the NIF polypeptides and the quantitites released upon stimulation of the human leucocytes suggest that the transition to a mononuclear leucocyte population in chronic inflammation may be attributable in part to the NIF derived from the leucocyte infiltrates of acute responses. PMID:6848456

  4. Modulating phenotype and cytokine production of leucocytic retinal infiltrate in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis following intranasal tolerance induction with retinal antigens

    PubMed Central

    Laliotou, B.; Dick, A.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM—Nasal administration of retinal antigens induces systemic tolerance which results in suppression of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) when subsequently exposed to antigen. The aim was to establish if tolerance induction alters retinal infiltrating leucocyte phenotype and cytokine profile in tolerised animals when there is significantly reduced tissue destruction despite immunisation with retinal antigen.
METHODS—Female Lewis rats were tolerised by intranasal administration with retinal extract (RE) before immunisation with RE to induce EAU. Control animals were administered phosphate buffered saline (PBS) intranasally. Post immunisation, daily clinical responses were recorded and at the height of disease, retinas were removed and either infiltrating leucocytes isolated for flow cytometric phenotype assessment and intracellular cytokine production, or chorioretina processed for immunohistochemistry. Fellow eyes were assessed for cytokine mRNA by semiquantitative RT-PCR.
RESULTS—Flow cytometric analysis showed that before clinical onset of EAU there is no evidence of macrophage infiltration and no significant difference in circulating T cell populations within the retina. By day 14 a reduced retinal infiltrate in tolerised animals was observed and in particular a reduction in numbers of "activated" (with respect to CD4 and MHC class II expression) macrophages. Immunohistochemistry confirmed these findings and additionally minimal rod outer segment destruction was observed histologically. Cytokine analysis revealed that both IL-10 mRNA and intracellular IL-10 production was increased in tolerised eyes 7 days post immunisation. Although by day 14 post immunisation, IL-10 production was equivalent in both groups, a reduced percentage of IFN-γ+ macrophages and IFN-γ+ CD4+ T cells with increased percentage of IL-4+ CD4+ T cells were observed in tolerised animals.
CONCLUSIONS—Leucocytic infiltrate is not only reduced in number

  5. Discriminative protection against hydroxyl and superoxide anion radicals by quercetin in human leucocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wilms, Lonneke C; Kleinjans, Jos C S; Moonen, Edwin J C; Briedé, Jacob J

    2008-03-01

    Antioxidants play a vital role in the cellular protection against oxidative damage. Quercetin is a well-investigated antioxidant and known to be able to protect against cellular oxidative DNA damage. In this study, we tried to relate the protection by quercetin pre-treatment against oxidative DNA damage in human leucocytes in vitro to the interaction of quercetin in solution with hydroxyl and superoxide anion radicals as measured by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry, using DMPO as a spin trap. Further, scavenging capacity of quercetin-treated leucocytes in vitro was evaluated by ESR spectrometry. Quercetin appears capable of protecting human leucocytes against oxidative DNA damage caused by hydrogen peroxide in a dose-dependent manner. The protection of leucocytes against superoxides is ambiguous. Incubation concentrations of quercetin (1, 10, and 50 microM) reduced levels of superoxide-induced oxidative DNA damage, while at 100 microM the amount of damage was increased. These results are supported by ESR-findings on quercetin in solution, also showing a prooxidant effect at 100 microM. ESR spectroscopy showed rate constant values for the reaction kinetics of quercetin in lowering iron-dependent hydroxyl radical formation and NADH-dependent superoxide anion formation of respectively 3.2 x 10(12)M(-1)s(-1) and 1.1 x 10(4)M(-1)s(-1). This shows that quercetin is a more potent inhibitor of hydroxyl radical formation than a scavenger of superoxide anions.

  6. Interaction between leucocytes and human spermatozoa influencing reactive oxygen intermediates release.

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Monika; Sanocka, Dorota; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2004-04-01

    The relationship between the presence of white blood cells (WBCs) and the fertilizing potential of human semen is still an open question. It is well known that the presence of leucocytes in human semen can be related to the production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). Semen samples were obtained from 15 normozoospermic men and leucocytes were isolated from heparinized blood drawn from 15 volunteers. Lucigenin and luminol-mediated chemiluminescence assays were used to determine reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by non-activated or activated leucocytes through 12-myristate-13-acetate or N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenyalanine (FMLP) before the addition of spermatozoa isolated by swim-up or Percoll procedures. All spermatozoal fractions used in this study were characterized by defining their motility, morphology and viability. The levels of ROS formation by non-activated as well as stimulated leucocytes were significantly decreased after addition of swim-up separated spermatozoa (p < 0.01). The ability to inhibit the basal chemiluminescence was of lower degree for spermatozoa isolated from 90% Percoll fractions than for swim-up sperm. However, addition of sperm cells from 47% Percoll fraction was found to increase both lucigenin and luminol signals. Moreover, the determined ROI levels changed depending on the type of inducing factor used for oxidative burst. Then, spermatozoa selected by swim-up procedure although with only slightly higher viability and morphology than sperm obtained from 90% Percoll fraction clearly exhibited much higher capacity to inhibit ROI secretion by receptor-stimulated leucocytes (FMLP-activation) than Percoll fractionated sperm. Such results may indicate that within normal semen may exist sperm subpopulations with different biochemical mechanisms controlling the interaction between spermatozoa and contaminating leucocytes. When ROI levels contained in normozoospermic semen are dependent on the WBCs activation, it seems that

  7. Human liver nucleolar antigens.

    PubMed

    Busch, R K; Busch, H

    1981-10-01

    In an extension of previous studies on the antigens in rat liver nucleoli (R. K. Busch, R. C. Reddy, D. H. Henning, and H. Busch, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 160, 185 (1979); R. K. Busch and H. Busch, Tumori 63, 347 (1977); F. M. Davis, R. K. Busch, L. C. Yeoman, and H. Busch, Cancer Res. 38, 1906 (1978), rabbit antibodies were elicited to human liver nucleoli isolated by the sucrose--Mg2+ method (10). Fluorescent nucleoli were found in liver cryostat sections treated with rabbit anti-human liver nucleolar antibodies followed by fluorescein-conjugated goat anti-rabbit antibodies. In HeLa cells, fluorescence was distributed throughout the nucleus and in a nuclear network but was not localized to the nucleolus. In placental cryostat sections, an overall nuclear fluorescence was observed with some localization to nucleoli. Immunodiffusion analysis revealed two immunoprecipitin bands which appeared to be liver specific. Other immunoprecipitin bands were common to liver, placenta, and HeLa nuclear extracts. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis revealed two liver-specific antigens, one migrating to the cathode and the other to the anode Other rockets exhibited identity to antigens of other nuclear extracts. These results demonstrate the presence of human liver nucleolar-specific antigens which were not found in the HeLa and placental cells.

  8. Leucocyte migration inhibition test in coeliac disease - a reappraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, F G; Field, H P; Howdle, P D; Robertson, D A; Losowsky, M S

    1983-01-01

    Results of the direct leucocyte migration inhibition (LMI) test using gluten fraction III as antigen were unaffected by incorporation of puromycin into the culture medium at concentrations shown to prevent lymphokine mediated inhibition. Results of the LMI test performed with purified polymorphs were similar to and correlated with results of the standard LMI test using mixed leucocytes in both coeliacs and controls. The addition of purified T lymphocytes did not increase migration inhibition. Normal leucocytes incubated with serum from coeliac patients and washed showed marked migration inhibition when incubated with gluten fraction III. This sensitisation of normal leucocytes was prevented by preincubation with aggregated human IgG. These results suggest that leucocyte migration inhibition by gluten in coeliac disease is not due to lymphokine production by sensitised lymphocytes but is caused by cytophilic antibody. PMID:6832627

  9. Differential expression of lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA-1) on peripheral blood leucocytes from individuals with Down's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Barrena, M J; Echaniz, P; Garcia-Serrano, C; Zubillaga, P; Cuadrado, E

    1992-01-01

    We analysed the expression of lymphocyte function-associated antigen LFA-1 on the cell surface of peripheral blood lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes from 20 children with Down's syndrome. No differences in LFA-1 expression was found within monocytes or granulocytes from either normal or Down's syndrome children; however, a clear-cut difference was observed on lymphoid cells. Both normal and Down's syndrome lymphocytes displayed a bimodal pattern of LFA-1 staining by flow cytometry, with a predominance of cells with low expression in normal population, and an increased proportion of lymphocytes with high level of LFA-1 expression in Down's syndrome children. This difference correlates well with the abnormal proportion of T cell subsets and inversion of CD4/CD8 observed in a majority of our cases, and therefore, it could merely reflect the increase of certain T cell subsets normally expressing higher number of LFA-1 molecules. Taken together, our results do not support an abnormally increased expression of leucocytes integrins in trisomy 21 cells, and raise some doubt about the suggested role of the abnormal cellular expression of LFA-1 in the pathogensis of secondary immunodeficiency associated to Down's syndrome. PMID:1348667

  10. Chemotactic activity of Helicobacter pylori sonicate for human polymorphonuclear leucocytes and monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, H; Andersen, L P

    1992-01-01

    The immunopathology of Helicobacter pylori associated active chronic gastritis, which is characterised by predominance of polymorphonuclear leucocyte infiltration, is largely unknown. To evaluate the role of bacterial components as inflammatory mediators ultracentrifuged sonicated preparations were made of clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori. The crude sonicates were shown to exhibit chemotactic activity for human polymorphonuclear leucocytes and blood monocytes in a concentration dependent fashion. The potency was comparable with previously described bacterial derived cytotaxins. The cytotaxin(s) was non-dialysable and completely destroyed by proteinase. Heat treatment did not decrease the chemotactic activity, but in sonicate subjected to 100 degrees C for 15 minutes all activity disappeared after dialysis suggesting the breakdown of a larger protein to small fragments that are still biological active. By ammonium sulphate precipitation at increasing concentrations the cytotaxin(s) was selectively found in 10% ammonium sulphate saturation, and by further molecular gel separation the chemotactic activity was found in the molecular size range from 25 to 35 kDa. The demonstration of a polymorphonuclear leucocyte and monocyte cytotaxin from Helicobacter pylori sonicate may help in understanding the mucosal immune response in gastric inflammatory diseases. PMID:1624151

  11. In vivo microscopy of human leucocytes(Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winer, Matan; Yeheskely-Hayon, Daniella; Zeidan, Adel; Yelin, Dvir

    2017-02-01

    White blood cells (WBC) analysis is an important part of the complete blood count, providing good indication of the patient's immune system status. The most common types of WBCs are the neutrophils and lymphocytes that comprise approximately 60% and 30% of the total WBC count, respectively; differentiating between these cells at the point of care would assist in accurate diagnosis of the possible source of infection (viral or bacterial) and in effective prescription of antibiotics. In this work, we demonstrate the potential of spectrally encoded flow cytometry (SEFC) to non-invasively image WBC in human patients, allowing morphology characterization of the main types of WBCs. The optical setup includes a broadband light that was diffracted and focused onto a single transverse line within the cross section of a small blood vessel at the inner patient lip. Light backscattered from the tissue was measured by a high-speed spectrometer, forming a two-dimensional reflectance confocal image of the flowing cells. By imaging at different depths into vessels of different diameters, we determine optimal imaging conditions (i.e. imaging geometry, speed and depth) for counting the total amount of WBCs and for differentiating between their main types. The presented technology could serve for analyzing the immune system status at the point of care, and for studying the morphological and dynamical characteristics of these cells in vivo.

  12. Kinetics of the inhibition of human leucocyte elastase by eglin from the leech Hirudo medicinalis.

    PubMed Central

    Baici, A; Seemüller, U

    1984-01-01

    The rate constants for the inhibition of human leucocyte elastase by eglin from the leech Hirudo medicinalis were determined by using a pre-steady-state kinetic approach. kon and koff for complex-formation and dissociation were 1 X 10(6)M-1 X S-1 and 8 X 10(-4)S-1 respectively. Ki was calculated as the ratio koff/kon = 8 X 10(-10)M, the binding of eglin to elastase was reversible and the inhibition mechanism was of the fully competitive type. The mechanistic properties of the system and the biological significance of the rate constants are discussed. PMID:6562888

  13. Enumeration of semen leucocytes by fluorescence in situ hybridisation technique

    PubMed Central

    Conte, R A; Luke, S; Verma, R S

    1995-01-01

    Aim—To determine whether the fluorescent in situ hybridisation technique (FISH) using a total human DNA genomic probe can be used to enumerate semen leucocytes. Methods—Semen samples from five donors were subjected to a mild KC1 solution. These samples were then biotin labelled under FISH conditions using a total human DNA genomic probe and the leucocyte counts were determined. To check the accuracy of the technique a monoclonal antibody against the common leucocyte antigen CD45 [KC56(T-200)] served as a control. An isotypic control for [KC56(T-200)], the immunoglobulin [MsIgG1], served as a secondary control. Results—Semen leucocytes stained by the FISH technique were easily detected because of their distinct bright yellow colour, while the sperm cells were red. The leucocyte count ranged from 0·5 to 4·9 × 106 per ml of semen. KC56(T-200) and its isotypic control MsIgG1, which served as control for the FISH technique, accurately identified 94% and 97% of the semen leucocytes of a control donor, respectively. Conclusions—The FISH technique using a total human DNA probe can accurately and effectively enumerate the overall leucocyte population in semen. Images PMID:16696031

  14. Dog leucocyte antigen class II diversity and relationships among indigenous dogs of the island nations of Indonesia (Bali), Australia and New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Runstadler, J A; Angles, J M; Pedersen, N C

    2006-11-01

    The genetic polymorphism at the dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II loci DQA1, DQB1 and DRB1 was studied in a large genetically diverse population of feral and wild-type dogs from the large island nations of Indonesia (Bali), Australia and New Guinea (Bali street dog, dingo and New Guinea singing dog, respectively). Sequence-based typing (SBT) of the hypervariable region of DLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 alleles was used to determine genetic diversity. No new DQA1 alleles were recognized among the three dog populations, but five novel DLA-DRB1 and 2 novel DLA-DQB1 allele sequences were detected. Additional unknown alleles were postulated to exist in Bali street dogs, as indicated by the large percentage of individuals (15%-33%) that had indeterminate DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 alleles by SBT. All three groups of dogs possessed alleles that were relatively uncommon in conventional purebreds. The New Guinea singing dog and dingo shared alleles that were not present in the Bali street dogs. These findings suggested that the dingo was more closely related to indigenous dogs from New Guinea. Feral dog populations, in particular large ones such as that of Bali, show genetic diversity that existed prior to phenotypic selection for breeds originating from their respective regions. This diversity needs to be identified and maintained in the face of progressive Westernization. These populations deserve further study as potential model populations for the evolution of major histocompatibility complex alleles, for the study of canine genetic diversity, for the development of dog breeds and for studies on the comigration of ancestral human and dog populations.

  15. Melatonin counteracts alterations in oxidative metabolism and cell viability induced by intracellular calcium overload in human leucocytes: changes with age.

    PubMed

    Espino, Javier; Bejarano, Ignacio; Paredes, Sergio D; González, David; Barriga, Carmen; Reiter, Russel J; Pariente, José A; Rodríguez, Ana B

    2010-07-01

    Ageing is associated with an increased production of free radicals and alterations in the mechanisms of adaptation to oxidative stress. In fact, the free radical theory of ageing proposes that deleterious actions of free radicals are responsible for the functional deterioration associated with ageing. Moreover, a close relationship exists between calcium homeostasis and oxidative stress. The current work was aimed at proving that intracellular calcium overload induced by N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and/or thapsigargin leads to oxidative stress. We additionally examined the effect of melatonin on the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell viability in human leucocytes collected from young (20-30-year-old) and elderly (65-75-year-old) individuals under both basal and oxidative stress-induced conditions. Treatments with 10 nM FMLP and/or 1 microM thapsigargin induced a transient increase in cytosolic free-calcium concentration ([Ca(2 + )](c)) in human leucocytes due to calcium release from internal stores, and led in turn to oxidative stress, as assessed by intracellular ROS measurement. Non-treated leucocytes from aged individuals exhibited higher ROS levels and lower rates of cell survival when compared to leucocytes from young individuals. Similar results were obtained in FMLP and/or thapsigargin-treated leucocytes from elderly individuals when compared to those from the young individuals. Melatonin treatment significantly reduced both hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and superoxide anion levels, likely due to its free-radical scavenging properties, and enhanced leucocyte viability in both age groups. Therefore, melatonin may be a useful tool for the treatment of disease states and processes where an excessive production of oxidative damage occurs.

  16. [In vitro comparative study of the protective effect of different theophyllines on the leucocytes' histamine-release induced by antigen (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Biot, N; Grosclaude, M; Kofman, J; Perrin-Fayolle, M

    1980-01-01

    The recent discovery of the protective action of xanthic bases towards histamine-release consecutive to the antigen-antibody reaction led the authors to study the importance of this protection induced by various theophylline derivatives. The technique used was that described by LICHTENSTEIN and OSLER: isolation of leucocytes, measurement of histamine liberated in the presence of antigen, same measurement done in the presence of antigen and theophylline. The antigens used were: house dust, Dermatophagoides pteronyssimus (DP), graminaceae pollens. The tested theophyllines were: the theophylline base, aminophylline, bamiphylline, diprophylline, thio theo, piperazine acefilinate. All these substances studied brought a reduction of the histamine-release but according to a variable frequency and intensity: the thio theo, the diprophylline and the piperazine acefilinate gave the best results. Besides the latters are clearer when the antigen was dust or DP. This study enables the confirmation of the inhibiting action of theophyllines on histamine-release induced by antigen, but complementary studies on a larger number of cases seem necessary in order to determine precisely the most efficient derivatives.

  17. Isolation and partial characterisation of a new antiproliferative substance from human leucocytes inhibiting growth of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Naess-Andresen, C F; Ekeberg, D; Fagerhol, M K; Sandvik, K; Staahl, L

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To purify and partially characterise a fraction from human leucocytes containing a substance cytotoxic to Candida albicans. Methods: Leucocytes were isolated from the buffy coats of healthy blood donors. The cytotoxic factor (CF) was isolated from the soluble fraction of the cells. A cell lysate was passed through a filter with a cut off value of 3 kDa, and the filtrate was processed by anionic exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The purified CF was analysed for its chemical and biological properties. The cytotoxicity of CF was tested on C albicans grown on agar plates. Results: Mass spectrometry showed a molecular mass of 2.148 kDa. CF was found in polymorphonuclear neutrophilic cells only. No amino acids were detected, and a low ultraviolet absorbance at 260 nm and resistance to nuclease indicate the absence of nucleic acids. An anthrone test was positive for carbohydrate. The substance was soluble in water. CF showed a dose related cytotoxicity in the range of 0.1–1 mg/ml. The cytotoxic effect was abrogated by zinc ions. Preliminary testing indicated that CF also had cytotoxic effects against some bacteria. Conclusions: This report describes a factor from isolated human leucocytes that is cytotoxic to C albicans. The substance contains a carbohydrate moiety, whereas no amino acids were detected. The cytotoxicity can be abrogated by zinc ions in vitro. This substance is probably part of the repertoire by which leucocytes prevent infections. PMID:12890745

  18. Selective inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis in human leukaemic leucocytes by methylglyoxal.

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, S; Ray, M; Misra, S; Dutta, D P; Ray, S

    1997-01-01

    The effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption of mitochondria of both normal and leukaemic leucocytes was tested by using different respiratory substrates and complex specific artificial electron donors and inhibitors. The results indicate that methylglyoxal strongly inhibits mitochondrial respiration in leukaemic leucocytes, whereas, at a much higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit mitochondrial respiration in normal leucocytes. Methylglyoxal strongly inhibits ADP-stimulated alpha-oxoglutarate and malate plus NAD+-dependent respiration, whereas, at a higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit succinate and alpha-glycerophosphate-dependent respiration. Methylglyoxal also fails to inhibit respiration which is initiated by duroquinone and cannot inhibit oxygen consumption when the N,N,N', N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine by-pass is used. NADH oxidation by sub-mitochondrial particles of leukaemic leucocytes is also inhibited by methylglyoxal. Lactaldehyde, a catabolite of methylglyoxal, can exert a protective effect on the inhibition of leukaemic leucocyte mitochondrial respiration by methylglyoxal. Methylglyoxal also inhibits l-lactic acid formation by intact leukaemic leucocytes and critically reduces the ATP level of these cells, whereas methylglyoxal has no effect on normal leucocytes. We conclude that methylglyoxal inhibits glycolysis and the electron flow through mitochondrial complex I of leukaemic leucocytes. This is strikingly similar to our previous studies on mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis and ATP levels in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells [Ray, Dutta, Halder and Ray (1994) Biochem. J. 303, 69-72; Halder, Ray and Ray (1993) Int. J. Cancer 54, 443-449], which strongly suggests that the inhibition of electron flow through complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and inhibition of glycolysis by methylglyoxal may be common characteristics of all malignant cells. PMID:9163322

  19. Selective inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis in human leukaemic leucocytes by methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S; Ray, M; Misra, S; Dutta, D P; Ray, S

    1997-04-15

    The effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption of mitochondria of both normal and leukaemic leucocytes was tested by using different respiratory substrates and complex specific artificial electron donors and inhibitors. The results indicate that methylglyoxal strongly inhibits mitochondrial respiration in leukaemic leucocytes, whereas, at a much higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit mitochondrial respiration in normal leucocytes. Methylglyoxal strongly inhibits ADP-stimulated alpha-oxoglutarate and malate plus NAD+-dependent respiration, whereas, at a higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit succinate and alpha-glycerophosphate-dependent respiration. Methylglyoxal also fails to inhibit respiration which is initiated by duroquinone and cannot inhibit oxygen consumption when the N,N,N', N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine by-pass is used. NADH oxidation by sub-mitochondrial particles of leukaemic leucocytes is also inhibited by methylglyoxal. Lactaldehyde, a catabolite of methylglyoxal, can exert a protective effect on the inhibition of leukaemic leucocyte mitochondrial respiration by methylglyoxal. Methylglyoxal also inhibits l-lactic acid formation by intact leukaemic leucocytes and critically reduces the ATP level of these cells, whereas methylglyoxal has no effect on normal leucocytes. We conclude that methylglyoxal inhibits glycolysis and the electron flow through mitochondrial complex I of leukaemic leucocytes. This is strikingly similar to our previous studies on mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis and ATP levels in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells [Ray, Dutta, Halder and Ray (1994) Biochem. J. 303, 69-72; Halder, Ray and Ray (1993) Int. J. Cancer 54, 443-449], which strongly suggests that the inhibition of electron flow through complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and inhibition of glycolysis by methylglyoxal may be common characteristics of all malignant cells.

  20. The effects of some antirheumatic drugs on an in vitro model of human polymorphonuclear leucocyte chemokinesis.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. J.; Walker, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    1 A rapid, reproducible in vitro assay for studying the chemokinetic movement of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) is described. Two synthetic peptides, formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and formyl methionyl-phenylalanine (FMP), were used as a standard chemokinesins. 2 Maximal chemokinetic movement was observed with peptide concentrations of 2.5 nM (FMLP) and 100 muM (FMP). EC50 values of 650.0 +/- 60.0 pM and 27.0 +/- 3.5 muM respectively are similar to those reported for chemotactic activity of the peptides in micropore filter assays. 3 The PMN chemokinetic response to FMLP was enhanced by histamine (100 nM) and vitamin C (2.5 muM). 4 Human serum albumin was shown to induce chemokinesis but to antagonize the response to FMLP in a dose-related fashion. Fibrinogen similarly antagonized the cell response to peptide. 5 Levamisole (250 nM to 2.5 muM) significantly potentiated the chemokinetic responses to FMLP and FMP in a dose-related manner. The chemokinetic response to FMLP was unaffected by D-penicillamine (250 muM to 10 mM) while alclofenac (500 muM to 1 mM), salicylic acid (250 muM to 10 mM) and indomethacin (100 muM to 1 mM) caused dose-related inhibition. PMID:7397456

  1. Identification of peptides fromm foot-and-mouth disease virus structural proteins bound by class I swine leucocyte antigen (SLA) alleles, SLA-1*0401 and SLA-2*0401

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The analysis of peptide binding to porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules has not been extensively performed. Critical to understanding the adaptive immune response of swine to infection is characterization of Swine Leucocyte Antigens (SLA) class I and class II peptide bind...

  2. Albumin inhibits human polymorphonuclear leucocyte luminol-dependent chemiluminescence: evidence for oxygen radical scavenging.

    PubMed Central

    Holt, M. E.; Ryall, M. E.; Campbell, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    Luminol-dependent chemiluminescence of normal human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) which were resting, or stimulated by unopsonized latex beads, opsonized zymosan or the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-met-leu-phe was decreased more than 80% in the presence of physiological concentrations of albumin (4%, w/v). This inhibition did not result from impairment of light transmission, cellular toxicity, luminol excited-state quenching or a dialysable contaminant in the albumin preparation, but was reduced by 30% when the fall induced by albumin in extracellular free Ca2+ concentration was corrected. The inhibition was most apparent in the larger second phase of the PMN chemiluminescent response to chemotactic peptide or opsonized zymosan stimulation. The smaller first phase of these responses was in fact enhanced by low concentrations of albumin (0.05-0.5%, w/v) and only inhibited up to 50% by 4% (w/v) albumin. Albumin in the range 0.1-4% (w/v) exerted a similar effect on chemiluminescence resulting from superoxide anion (O-2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production by xanthine oxidase catalysed oxidation of xanthine in the presence of luminol. We suggest that the effect of albumin on PMN luminol-dependent chemiluminescence is mediated by modification of the oxygen radical generating pathway, or oxygen radical scavenging. This previously undocumented property of the major extracellular protein requires further examination if oxygen radicals are to be established as important mediators of inflammation. PMID:6712882

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi: sequence of phagocytosis and cytotoxicity by human polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rimoldi, M T; Cardoni, R L; Olabuenaga, S E; de Bracco, M M

    1981-01-01

    We have studied the relationship between phagocytosis and cytotoxicity of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) to sensitized Trypanosoma cruzi. Assays were done simultaneously using [3H]-uridine labelled epimastigotes as target cells. Phagocytosis was evaluated by the uptake and cytotoxicity by the release of parasite associated [3H]-uridine. Both reactions reached maximum levels at the same effector- to target-cell ratio and antibody concentration. Uptake of epimastigotes by PMN was highest at 30 min and intracellular disruption and release of parasite debris took place later. In conditions that precluded repeated uptake of sensitized radiolabelled T. cruzi, the release profile of [3H]-uridine from PMN that contained intracellular parasites was similar to that of the standard cytotoxic assay. However, as the ingestion phase was separated from the release step, no lag in the onset of the reaction was observed. Although we cannot rule out extracellular killing, the results of this study demonstrate that the bulk of damaged T. cruzi epimastigotes had been previously internalized by the PMN. PMID:7016743

  4. Paracrine effects of uterine leucocytes on gene expression of human uterine stromal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Germeyer, Ariane; Sharkey, Andrew Mark; Prasadajudio, Mirari; Sherwin, Robert; Moffett, Ashley; Bieback, Karen; Clausmeyer, Susanne; Masters, Leanne; Popovici, Roxana Maria; Hess, Alexandra Petra; Strowitzki, Thomas; von Wolff, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The endometrium contains a distinct population of immune cells that undergo cyclic changes during the menstrual cycle and implantation. The majority of these leucocytes are uterine NK (uNK) cells, however how these cells interact with uterine stromal fibroblasts remains unclear. We therefore investigated the paracrine effect of medium conditioned by uterine decidual leucocytes (which are enriched for uNK cells) on the gene expression profile of endometrial stromal fibroblasts in vitro using a cDNA microarray. Our results, verified by real-time PCR, ELISA and FACS analysis, reveal that soluble factors from uterine leucocytes substantially alter endometrial stromal fibroblast gene expression. The largest group of up-regulated genes found was chemokines and cytokines. These include IL-8, CCL8 and CXCL1, which have also been shown to be stimulated by contact of stromal fibroblasts with trophoblast, suggesting that uNK cells work synergistically to support trophoblast migration during implantation. The decidual leucocytes also up-regulated IL-15 and IL-15Ralpha in stromal fibroblasts which could produce a niche for uNK cells allowing proliferation within and recruitment into the uterus, as seen in bone marrow. Overall this study demonstrates, for the first time, the paracrine communication between uterine leucocytes and uterine stromal fibroblasts, and adds to the understanding of how the uterine immune system contributes to the changes seen within the cycling endometrium.

  5. Nitric oxide-generating system as an autocrine mechanism in human polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Riesco, A; Caramelo, C; Blum, G; Montón, M; Gallego, M J; Casado, S; López Farré, A

    1993-01-01

    Recent data [Lopéz-Farré, Riesco, Moliz, Egido, Casado, Hernando and Caramelo (1991) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 178, 884-891] revealed that endothelin 1 (ET-1) increases intracellular free [Ca2+] in polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) by a mechanism that can be inhibited by L-arginine. The aim of the present study was to clarify the mechanisms of the interaction between the effects of ET-1 and L-arginine in human PMN. The experimental findings showed that in human PMN: (a) ET-1 and the chemoattractant peptide N-formylmethionyl- leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) induce both the metabolism of L-arginine to L-citrulline and cyclic GMP (cGMP) formation; (b) the ET-1-induced cGMP production is inhibitable by the L-arginine antagonist NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, therefore suggesting the involvement of NO; (c) the ET-1- or fMLP-induced NO/cGMP stimulation is critically dependent on the availability of L-arginine; (d) human PMN possess a L-arginine transport system with both Na(+)-dependent and -independent components; (e) the L-arginine transport system in PMN appears to be feedback-regulated by NO/cGMP in ET-1-stimulated conditions, but not under baseline conditions; (f) the L-arginine transport system in PMN is independent of the gamma-glutamyl cycle and is not modified by either ET-1 or fMLP. The L-arginine/NO/cGMP-dependent mechanisms characterized in the present study may be relevant in the regulation of PMN activation in pathophysiological conditions in vivo. PMID:7686367

  6. The main catechin of green tea, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), reduces bleomycin-induced DNA damage in human leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Glei, M; Pool-Zobel, B L

    2006-04-01

    Interest in the beneficial effects of green tea has led to investigations on activities by the main catechin (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). This antioxidative compound could contribute to cancer chemoprevention by acting antigenotoxic. To further explore this hypothesis we investigated antigenotoxic potentials of low EGCG concentrations in human peripheral leucocytes. Leucocytes isolated from whole blood were (1) stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin, (2) damaged with genotoxic bleomycin, and (3) post-incubated to allow DNA repair. After each phase DNA integrity was measured with the comet assay. EGCG (2, 20, 100 microM) was added either during phases 1, 2 or 3 or during the whole process (1-3), to delineate mechanisms of antigenotoxicity reflecting induction of detoxification (phase 1), scavenging of radicals (phase 2), stimulation of repair (phase 3), respectively. Bleomycin induced breaks and endonuclease III specific damage, but EGCG did not affect damage or repair of these lesions when added during phases 1, 2 or 3. However, the application of EGCG during phases 1 and 2 significantly reduced both bleomycin-induced breaks and endonuclease III sensitive sites. EGCG added during all phases impaired persistence of damage. Our studies show that the continuous presence of EGCG can reduce radical-induced DNA damage in primary leucocytes, possibly due to a combination of different mechanisms. Together the findings support the hypotheses that EGCG acts protective in human cells.

  7. Pathological analysis, detection of antigens, FasL expression analysis and leucocytes survival analysis in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) after infection with green fluorescent protein labeled Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyuan; Wu, Jinying; Yi, Liyuan; Hou, Zengxin; Li, Wensheng

    2017-03-01

    The pathogenesis of Streptococcus agalactiae infection in tilapia has not been fully described. To understand this, we investigated the clinic-pathological features of acute experimental septicemia in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) after receiving an intra-peritoneal injection with S. agalactiae THN-1901GFP. Immunohistochemistry and sections of pathological tissues were used to estimate the level of damage in the head-kidney, liver, spleen and trunk-kidney. The expression of FasL was analyzed by western blotting in these samples based on their damage levels. Leucocytes were isolated from the head-kidney and incubated with S. agalactiae THN-1901GFP. Then, phagocytosis, programmed cell death and the expression of FasL were analyzed. The infected tissues showed varying degrees of necrosis and histolysis. The serous membrane of the intestine was dissolved by S. agalactiae THN-1901GFP. Antigens of S. agalactiae THN-1901GFP accumulated in different parts of the infected organs. In the head-kidney and spleen, the expression of FasL was up-regulated in parallel with increased tissue damage. After being incubated with S. agalactiae THN-1901GFP, the phagocytic capacity and ability were both very high and the expression of FasL remained high in leucocytes. S. agalactiae THN-1901GFP was able to survive for a long period of time after being engulfed by phagocytic cells. These findings offer insight into the pathogenesis of S. agalactiae infection in tilapia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Inheritance of mineralocorticoid effector abnormalities of human mononuclear leucocytes in families with pseudohypoaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Wehling, M; Kuhnle, U; Daumer, C; Armanini, D

    1989-11-01

    In-vitro effects of aldosterone on intracellular sodium and potassium concentrations have been described for normal human mononuclear leucocytes (HML). After incubation for 1 h at 37 degrees C, intracellular sodium and potassium in HML are significantly higher in the presence of 1.4 nM aldosterone than after incubation without aldosterone. As published earlier, these effects were absent in patients with pseudohypoaldosteronism. In the present paper, the families of seven patients with pseudohypoaldosteronism (index cases) were studied. In the first family, two siblings were affected by the disease and had a reduced number of mineralocorticoid (MC) receptors on HML. Intracellular sodium and potassium in HML from these patients did not show a response to 1.4 nM aldosterone. The parents, who were first cousins, had no history of disease and normal receptor data, but in the mother, the response of HML electrolytes to aldosterone was abnormal. In the second family, the mother of a child with pseudohypoaldosteronism, the mother's sister, and her son, had low numbers of MC receptors. Only the aunt of the index case had an uncertain history of the disease. The MC effector mechanism was abnormal in both children and both mothers studied. In a third family, the effector defect was present only in HML of the father. In three further families the abnormality of the effector mechanism was detected in HML of the patient's mother. These data suggest an autosomal dominant inheritance of pseudohypoaldosteronism with variable expression of the gene.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Inhibition of human leucocyte elastase by ursolic acid. Evidence for a binding site for pentacyclic triterpenes.

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Q L; Rinehart, A R; Simon, S R; Cheronis, J C

    1991-01-01

    Several pentacyclic triterpenoid metabolites of plant origin are inhibitors of hydrolysis of both synthetic peptide substrates and elastin by human leucocyte elastase (HLE). Ursolic acid, the most potent of these compounds, has an inhibition constant of 4-6 microM for hydrolysis of peptide substrates in phosphate-buffered saline. With tripeptide and tetrapeptide substrates, the inhibition is purely competitive, whereas with a shorter dipeptide substrate the inhibition is non-competitive, suggesting that ursolic acid interacts with subsite S3 of the extended substrate-binding domain in HLE, but not with subsites S1 and S2. The carboxy group at position 28 in the pentacyclic-ring system of the triterpenes contributes to binding to HLE, since replacement of this group with a hydroxy group, as in uvaol, the alcohol analogue of ursolic acid, reduces the potency of inhibition. The inhibitory potency of ursolic acid is also reduced by addition of 1 M-NaCl, further supporting a postulated electrostatic interaction between the negative charge on the triterpene and a positively charged residue on the enzyme, which we assign to the side chain of Arg-217, located in the vicinity of subsites S4 and S5 in HLE. These observations are consistent with a binding site for ursolic acid which extends from S3 towards S4 and S5 on the enzyme. Other triterpenes, including oleanolic acid, erythrodiol, hederagenin and 18 beta-glycyrrhetic acid, can also interact with this binding site. On the basis of these results we conclude that the extended substrate-binding domain of HLE can accommodate a variety of hydrophobic ligands, including not only such molecules as fatty acids [Ashe & Zimmerman (1977) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 75, 194-199; Cook & Ternai (1988) Biol. Chem. Hoppe-Seyler 369, 629-637], but also polycyclic molecules such as the pentacyclic triterpenoids. PMID:1859379

  10. Inherited human group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 deficiency abolishes platelet, endothelial, and leucocyte eicosanoid generation

    PubMed Central

    Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Reed, Daniel M.; Edin, Matthew L.; Rauzi, Francesca; Mataragka, Stefania; Vojnovic, Ivana; Bishop-Bailey, David; Milne, Ginger L.; Longhurst, Hilary; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Mitchell, Jane A.; Warner, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids are important vascular regulators, but the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) isoforms supporting their production within the cardiovascular system are not fully understood. To address this, we have studied platelets, endothelial cells, and leukocytes from 2 siblings with a homozygous loss-of-function mutation in group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2α). Chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to determine levels of a broad range of eicosanoids produced by isolated vascular cells, and in plasma and urine. Eicosanoid release data were paired with studies of cellular function. Absence of cPLA2α almost abolished eicosanoid synthesis in platelets (e.g., thromboxane A2, control 20.5 ± 1.4 ng/ml vs. patient 0.1 ng/ml) and leukocytes [e.g., prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), control 21.9 ± 7.4 ng/ml vs. patient 1.9 ng/ml], and this was associated with impaired platelet activation and enhanced inflammatory responses. cPLA2α-deficient endothelial cells showed reduced, but not absent, formation of prostaglandin I2 (prostacyclin; control 956 ± 422 pg/ml vs. patient 196 pg/ml) and were primed for inflammation. In the urine, prostaglandin metabolites were selectively influenced by cPLA2α deficiency. For example, prostacyclin metabolites were strongly reduced (18.4% of control) in patients lacking cPLA2α, whereas PGE2 metabolites (77.8% of control) were similar to healthy volunteer levels. These studies constitute a definitive account, demonstrating the fundamental role of cPLA2α to eicosanoid formation and cellular responses within the human circulation.—Kirkby, N. S., Reed, D. M., Edin, M. L., Rauzi, F., Mataragka, S., Vojnovic, I., Bishop-Bailey, D., Milne, G. L., Longhurst, H., Zeldin, D. C., Mitchell, J. A., Warner, T. D. Inherited human group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 deficiency abolishes platelet, endothelial, and leucocyte eicosanoid generation. PMID:26183771

  11. Expression of leucocyte function-associated antigen-1 and 7F7-antigen, an adhesion molecule related to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in non-Hodgkin lymphomas and leukaemias: possible influence on growth pattern and leukaemic behaviour.

    PubMed Central

    Stauder, R; Greil, R; Schulz, T F; Thaler, J; Gattringer, C; Radaskiewicz, T; Dierich, M P; Huber, H

    1989-01-01

    In 160 non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) of B and T cell origin the expression of leucocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) and one of its counter-structures named 7F7-antigen was studied. Functional and structural similarities and the 7F7-reactivity of pICAM-1 transfected COS-cells prove that 7F7-antigen is identical with ICAM-1. The expression of both adhesion structures occurred variably and clearly depended on the maturation stage and on the B and T cell origin of lymphomas but was not associated with the proliferative status of tumour cells. The concomitant expression of both adhesion molecules was a characteristic feature of germinal centre derived NHL, particularly of those with neoplastic follicular structures (corr. contingency coeff. = 0.506; P less than 0.02), whereas both adhesion structures were less often expressed on lymphomas with a more diffuse pattern of tumour infiltration. Most B-NHL of low-grade malignancy expressed LFA-1 while their counterparts of high-grade malignancy often tended to be LFA-1 negative. In B cell neoplasias of low-grade malignancy the lack of ICAM-1 and a leukaemic course of the disease were significantly correlated (P less than 0.0005). The results indicate that the differential expression of both adhesion molecules may account for distinct patterns of growth and spread in subtypes of lymphoid malignancies. PMID:2673591

  12. Expression of leucocyte function-associated antigen-1 and 7F7-antigen, an adhesion molecule related to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in non-Hodgkin lymphomas and leukaemias: possible influence on growth pattern and leukaemic behaviour.

    PubMed

    Stauder, R; Greil, R; Schulz, T F; Thaler, J; Gattringer, C; Radaskiewicz, T; Dierich, M P; Huber, H

    1989-08-01

    In 160 non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) of B and T cell origin the expression of leucocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) and one of its counter-structures named 7F7-antigen was studied. Functional and structural similarities and the 7F7-reactivity of pICAM-1 transfected COS-cells prove that 7F7-antigen is identical with ICAM-1. The expression of both adhesion structures occurred variably and clearly depended on the maturation stage and on the B and T cell origin of lymphomas but was not associated with the proliferative status of tumour cells. The concomitant expression of both adhesion molecules was a characteristic feature of germinal centre derived NHL, particularly of those with neoplastic follicular structures (corr. contingency coeff. = 0.506; P less than 0.02), whereas both adhesion structures were less often expressed on lymphomas with a more diffuse pattern of tumour infiltration. Most B-NHL of low-grade malignancy expressed LFA-1 while their counterparts of high-grade malignancy often tended to be LFA-1 negative. In B cell neoplasias of low-grade malignancy the lack of ICAM-1 and a leukaemic course of the disease were significantly correlated (P less than 0.0005). The results indicate that the differential expression of both adhesion molecules may account for distinct patterns of growth and spread in subtypes of lymphoid malignancies.

  13. Improved leucocyte migration inhibition response of leucocytes from lepromatous leprosy patients with hapten modified M. leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Fotedar, A; Mustafa, A S; Narang, B S; Talwar, G P

    1982-01-01

    Two acetoacetylated derivatives of Mycobacterium leprae with variable hapten groups and a conjugate with tetanus toxoid were prepared. These were tested as antigens along with unmodified M. leprae in the leucocyte migration inhibition response of leucocytes from clinically, bacteriologically and histopathologically confirmed cases of lepromatous leprosy. LMI response was poor with M. leprae, but was significantly enhanced with acetoacetylated M. leprae. PMID:6751637

  14. Effect of glucose intake on human leucocyte /sup 86/Rb influx and (/sup 3/H)-ouabain binding

    SciTech Connect

    Turaihi, K.; Baron, D.N.; Dandona, P.

    1988-02-01

    /sup 86/Rb influx and (/sup 3/H) ouabain binding by human leucocytes were measured in eight normal nonobese fasting subjects before and after a challenge with 75 g glucose orally. The mean ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb influx increased significantly from 194 to 283 mmol/kg protein/h (P less than .01), and (/sup 3/H)-ouabain binding increased from 236 to 403 fmol/mg protein. The mean plasma potassium concentration fell from 4.2 to 3.9 mmol/L (P less than .05). Following intravenous glucose infusion, the median /sup 86/Rb transport increased from 186 to 267 mmol/kg protein/h, while median plasma potassium concentration fell from 4.3 to 3.9 mmol/L. Therefore, glucose intake acutely increases Na-K ATPase units, stimulates potassium (Rb) transport, and causes a concomitant fall in plasma potassium concentrations. Nutritional intake is probably an important determinant of Na-K ATPase units and activity in the human leucocyte.

  15. Evaluation of Leucocyte Functions Six Years after Tumour Autograft in Human Mammary Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J. Maxwell; Kelly, F.; Wood, Suzanne E.; Rodger, K. D.; Freshney, R. Ian

    1973-01-01

    Mammary cancer directed and nonspecific immunoassays were made in 3 groups of female patients. One group had primary mammary cancer treated by mastectomy and postoperative radiotherapy plus an autograft of irradiated tumour (AIT) 40-66 months previously. A second age-matched group had mammary cancer comparable to the first group in clinical presentation and treatment except that no AIT was given. The third group consisted of non-cancer-bearing age-matched females. The migration of leucocytes from autografted patients was significantly inhibited in the presence of allogeneic mammary cancer cells from a standardized panel, compared with leucocytes from either non-autograft patients or non-cancer bearers. Selected data from a lymphocyte cytotoxicity test revealed a significantly greater kill of allogeneic mammary cancer target cells by autograft lymphocytes than by those of other groups. These indications of increased cancer directed cell mediated immunity in respect of sensitivity and toxicity in association with AIT require further elucidation under strictly controlled conditions. PMID:4807858

  16. Chemokines, chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules on different human endothelia: discriminating the tissue-specific functions that affect leucocyte migration

    PubMed Central

    HILLYER, P; MORDELET, E; FLYNN, G; MALE, D

    2003-01-01

    The selective accumulation of different leucocyte populations during inflammation is regulated by adhesion molecules and chemokines expressed by vascular endothelium. This study examined how chemokine production and the expression of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors vary between endothelia from different vascular beds. Human saphenous vein endothelium was compared with lung and dermal microvascular endothelia and with umbilical vein endothelium and a bone-marrow endothelial cell line. All endothelia produced CCL2 and CXCL8 constitutively, whereas CXCL10 and CCL5 were only secreted after tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α or interferon (IFN)-γ stimulation. In combination with TNF-α, IFN-γ suppressed CXCL8 but enhanced CCL5 and CXCL10, whereas transforming growth factor (TGF)-β reduced secretion of all chemokines. Basal chemokine secretion was higher from umbilical vein than other endothelial cells. Chemokine receptors, CXCR1, CXCR3 and CCR3, were present on all endothelia but highest on saphenous vein. CCR4, CCR5, CCR6, CXCR2, CXCR4 and CXCR5 were also detected at variable levels on different endothelia. The variation between endothelia in chemokine secretion was much greater than the variations in adhesion molecules, both on resting cells and following cytokine stimulation. These results indicate that it is the tissue-specific variations in endothelial chemokine secretion rather than variations in adhesion molecules that can explain the different patterns of inflammation and leucocyte traffic seen in non-lymphoid tissues. PMID:14632748

  17. The use of reference strand-mediated conformational analysis for the study of cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) feline leucocyte antigen class II DRB polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Drake, G J C; Kennedy, L J; Auty, H K; Ryvar, R; Ollier, W E R; Kitchener, A C; Freeman, A R; Radford, A D

    2004-01-01

    There is now considerable evidence to suggest the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has limited genetic diversity. However, the extent of this and its significance to the fitness of the cheetah population, both in the wild and captivity, is the subject of some debate. This reflects the difficulty associated with establishing a direct link between low variability at biologically significant loci and deleterious aspects of phenotype in this, and other, species. Attempts to study one such region, the feline leucocyte antigen (FLA), are hampered by a general reliance on cloning and sequencing which is expensive, labour-intensive, subject to PCR artefact and always likely to underestimate true variability. In this study we have applied reference strand-mediated conformational analysis (RSCA) to determine the FLA-DRB phenotypes of 25 cheetahs. This technique was rapid, repeatable and less prone to polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-induced sequence artefacts associated with cloning. Individual cheetahs were shown to have up to three FLA-DRB genes. A total of five alleles were identified (DRB*ha14-17 and DRB*gd01) distributed among four genotypes. Fifteen cheetahs were DRB*ha14/ha15/ha16/ha17, three were DRB*ha15/ha16/ha17, six were DRB*ha14/ha16/ha17 and one was DRB*ha14/ha15/ha16/ha17/gd01. Sequence analysis of DRB*gd01 suggested it was a recombinant of DRB*ha16 and DRB*ha17. Generation of new alleles is difficult to document, and the clear demonstration of such an event is unusual. This study confirms further the limited genetic variability of the cheetah at a biologically significant region. RSCA will facilitate large-scale studies that will be needed to correlate genetic diversity at such loci with population fitness in the cheetah and other species.

  18. Influence of captopril on glucose and fatty acid oxidation in human thrombocytes and mononuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Haeckel, R; Colic, D

    1991-01-01

    Captopril (CAS 62571-86-2) may be beneficial for the treatment of diabetes because of its activating effect on peripheral glucose consumption besides its well known blood pressure degradation. The glucose oxidation has been found to be activated by captopril in thrombocytes and mononuclear leucocytes, cell types which are usually considered to be independent from insulin. Because the oxidation of pyruvate labelled in position C-1 but not of 2-14C-pyruvate and of 1-14C-acetate was enhanced, captopril most probably stimulated the pyruvate decarboxylation reaction. The metabolism of glucose labelled in positions 1 and 6 was equally activated by captopril indicating another step which may be affected by captopril.

  19. The trans-stilbene oxide-active glutathione transferase in human mononuclear leucocytes is identical with the hepatic glutathione transferase mu.

    PubMed Central

    Seidegård, J; Guthenberg, C; Pero, R W; Mannervik, B

    1987-01-01

    A glutathione transferase from human mononuclear leucocytes with high activity towards trans-stilbene oxide (GT-tSBO) was purified. GT-tSBO is expressed in only about 50% of the individuals studied. As judged from activity measurements, immunological studies and the fact that only those individuals who express glutathione transferase mu have high activity towards trans-stilbene oxide, it is concluded that the hepatic transferase mu is identical with the glutathione transferase (GT-tSBO) in mononuclear leucocytes. PMID:3689332

  20. Human leukocyte Antigen-DM polymorphisms in autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Eliot; Wieczorek, Marek; Sticht, Jana; Freund, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Classical MHC class II (MHCII) proteins present peptides for CD4+ T-cell surveillance and are by far the most prominent risk factor for a number of autoimmune disorders. To date, many studies have shown that this link between particular MHCII alleles and disease depends on the MHCII's particular ability to bind and present certain peptides in specific physiological contexts. However, less attention has been paid to the non-classical MHCII molecule human leucocyte antigen-DM, which catalyses peptide exchange on classical MHCII proteins acting as a peptide editor. DM function impacts the presentation of both antigenic peptides in the periphery and key self-peptides during T-cell development in the thymus. In this way, DM activity directly influences the response to pathogens, as well as mechanisms of self-tolerance acquisition. While decreased DM editing of particular MHCII proteins has been proposed to be related to autoimmune disorders, no experimental evidence for different DM catalytic properties had been reported until recently. Biochemical and structural investigations, together with new animal models of loss of DM activity, have provided an attractive foundation for identifying different catalytic efficiencies for DM allotypes. Here, we revisit the current knowledge of DM function and discuss how DM function may impart autoimmunity at the organism level. PMID:27534821

  1. Deleterious effect of Brij 35 on alkyl 2-pyrones and other hydrophobic inhibitors of human sputum and leucocyte elastase.

    PubMed

    Cook, L; Ternai, B

    1988-10-01

    Brij 35 significantly reduced the inhibitory activity of hydrophobic alkyl 2-pyrones, oleic acid and alkyl peptides towards human sputum and leucocyte elastase, whereas 4-methoxy-6-(2'-hydroxy-2'-(carbobutyloxy)-vinyl)-2-pyrone, alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor and a sulfated chitosan were unaffected. The effect of Brij 35 on elastase appeared to be irreversible, since dialysis against Brij-free buffer was not accompanied by a return to inhibitory activity by the first group of inhibitors. However, passage through an ionic-exchange column was effective in removing the detergent from the enzyme. Brij 35 is also an activator of the elastases: kcat for Boc-Ala-4-nitrophenyl ester and methylsuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-4-nitroanilide increased by 20% and 40%, respectively in the presence of 0.015% Brij 35. Binding of the substrates to the enzyme is unaffected, since Km is unchanged.

  2. Formation and loss of O6-methyldeoxyguanosine in human leucocyte DNA following sequential DTIC and fotemustine chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, S M; Margison, G P; Thatcher, N; O'Connor, P J; Cooper, D P

    1994-05-01

    There is increasing evidence to indicate that O6-methyldeoxyguanosine (O6-MedG) formation in DNA is a critical cytotoxic event following exposure to certain anti-tumour alkylating agents and that the DNA repair protein O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (ATase) can confer resistance to these agents. We recently demonstrated a wide inter-individual variation in the depletion and subsequent regeneration of ATase in human peripheral blood lymphocytes following sequential DTIC (400 mg m-2) and fotemustine (100 mg m-2) treatment, with the nadir ATase activity occurring approximately 4 h after DTIC administration. We have now measured the formation and loss of O6-methyldeoxyguanosine (O6-MedG) in the DNA of peripheral leucocytes of eight patients receiving this treatment regimen. O6-MedG could be detected within 1 h and maximal levels occurred approximately 3-5 h after DTIC administration. Following the first treatment cycle, considerable inter-individual variation was observed in the peak O6-MedG levels, with values ranging from 0.71 to 14.3 mumol of O6-MedG per mol of dG (6.41 +/- 5.53, mean +/- s.d.). Inter- and intra-individual variation in the extent of O6-MedG formation was also seen in patients receiving additional treatment cycles. This may be a consequence of inter-patient differences in the capacity for metabolism of DTIC to release a methylating intermediate and could be one of the determinants of clinical response. Both the pretreatment ATase levels and the extent of ATase depletion were inversely correlated with the amount of O6-MedG formed in leucocyte DNA when expressed either as peak levels (r = -0.59 and -0.75 respectively) or as the area under the concentration-time curve (r = -0.72 and -0.73 respectively). One complete and one partial clinical response were seen, and these occurred in the two patients with the highest O6-MedG levels in the peripheral leucocyte DNA, although the true significance of this observation has yet to be established.

  3. Formation and loss of O6-methyldeoxyguanosine in human leucocyte DNA following sequential DTIC and fotemustine chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S. M.; Margison, G. P.; Thatcher, N.; O'Connor, P. J.; Cooper, D. P.

    1994-01-01

    There is increasing evidence to indicate that O6-methyldeoxyguanosine (O6-MedG) formation in DNA is a critical cytotoxic event following exposure to certain anti-tumour alkylating agents and that the DNA repair protein O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (ATase) can confer resistance to these agents. We recently demonstrated a wide inter-individual variation in the depletion and subsequent regeneration of ATase in human peripheral blood lymphocytes following sequential DTIC (400 mg m-2) and fotemustine (100 mg m-2) treatment, with the nadir ATase activity occurring approximately 4 h after DTIC administration. We have now measured the formation and loss of O6-methyldeoxyguanosine (O6-MedG) in the DNA of peripheral leucocytes of eight patients receiving this treatment regimen. O6-MedG could be detected within 1 h and maximal levels occurred approximately 3-5 h after DTIC administration. Following the first treatment cycle, considerable inter-individual variation was observed in the peak O6-MedG levels, with values ranging from 0.71 to 14.3 mumol of O6-MedG per mol of dG (6.41 +/- 5.53, mean +/- s.d.). Inter- and intra-individual variation in the extent of O6-MedG formation was also seen in patients receiving additional treatment cycles. This may be a consequence of inter-patient differences in the capacity for metabolism of DTIC to release a methylating intermediate and could be one of the determinants of clinical response. Both the pretreatment ATase levels and the extent of ATase depletion were inversely correlated with the amount of O6-MedG formed in leucocyte DNA when expressed either as peak levels (r = -0.59 and -0.75 respectively) or as the area under the concentration-time curve (r = -0.72 and -0.73 respectively). One complete and one partial clinical response were seen, and these occurred in the two patients with the highest O6-MedG levels in the peripheral leucocyte DNA, although the true significance of this observation has yet to be established. PMID

  4. Influence of fucoidans and their derivatives on antitumor and phagocytic activity of human blood leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Anisimova, N Yu; Ustyuzhanina, N E; Donenko, F V; Bilan, M I; Ushakova, N A; Usov, A I; Nifantiev, N E; Kiselevskiy, M V

    2015-07-01

    The immunotropic activity of structurally different fucoidans and their derivatives towards isolated immune blood cells, effectors of innate immune system, was studied. The most potent effect was observed for high molecular weight fucoidan CF from the alga Chordaria flagelliformis, whose backbone is built of (1→3)-linked units of α-L-fucopyranose, and branches included residues of α-D-glucuronic acid and α-L-fucofuranose. This compound at the concentration of 0.05 mg/ml potentiated phagocytosis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus acidophilus by neutrophils, increasing relative quantity of phagocytes as well as their effectiveness. Along with this, 14% increase in the concentration of membrane-bound integrin CD11c molecules was observed. The systemic effect of CF at the dose of 0.01 mg/mouse i.p. led to potentiation of cytotoxic activity of spleen mononuclear leucocytes towards melanoma cells of line B16 by 1.9-fold and towards chronic myelogenous leukemia cells of line K-562 by 1.7-fold. These results indicate that fucoidan CF can stimulate anti-infective and antitumor activity of effectors of the innate immune system via CD11c integrins.

  5. Harmonization of light scatter and fluorescence flow cytometry profiles obtained after staining peripheral blood leucocytes for cell surface-only versus intracellular antigens with the Fix & Perm reagent.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Elaine Sobral; Peres, Rodrigo Tosta; Almeida, Julia; Lécrevisse, Quentin; Arroyo, María Elena; Teodósio, Cristina; Pedreira, Carlos Eduardo; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Orfao, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Staining for intracellular markers with the Fix & Perm reagent is associated with variations in the scatter properties of leucocytes, limiting automated analysis of flow cytometry (FCM) data. Here, we investigated those variables significantly contributing to changes in the light scatter, autofluorescence, and bcl2 staining characteristics of peripheral blood (PB) leucocytes, after fixation with Fix & Perm. Our major aim was to evaluate a new mathematical approach for automated harmonization of FCM data from datafiles corresponding to aliquots of a sample treated with cell-surface-only versus Fix & Perm intracellular staining techniques. Overall, neither the anticoagulant used nor sample storage for <24 h showed significant impact on the light scatter and fluorescence properties of PB leucocytes; similarly, the duration of the fixation period (once >15 min were used) had a minimum impact on the FCM properties of PB leucocytes. Conversely, changes in cell/protein concentrations and the fixative/sample (vol/vol) ratio had a clear impact on the light scatter features of some populations of leucocytes. Accordingly, lower cell/protein concentrations were associated with lower scatter values, particularly for the neutrophils. Such changes could be partially corrected through the use of higher fixative to sample volume ratios. Despite the variable changes detected between aliquots of the same sample treated with cell surface-only versus intracellular staining procedures, the new mathematical approach here proposed and evaluated for automated harmonization of common parameters in both datafiles, could correct the FCM profiles of leucocytes derived from cells undergoing conventional fixation/permeabilization procedures, and made them indistinguishable from those corresponding to aliquots of the same sample treated with cell-surface-only staining techniques.

  6. The Antigenicity of Human Chorionic Gonadotrophin

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shanta S.; Shahani, Savitri K.

    1961-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) is antigenic in rabbits when injected with Freund's adjuvant. The HCG used for immunization showed the presence of five antigens in the Ouchterlony plates against the homologous antiserum. Three of these antigens were common to human serum and one of these three to normal human urine. Rabbit antiserum to HCG absorbed with human serum did not form any antigen-antibody precipitin line with either normal human serum or normal human urine. It formed two precipitin lines with HCG. One ml. of the rabbit antiserum to HCG could inhibit even 150 I.U. of HCG as tested by the Aschheim-Zondek test in mice and ovarian hyperaemia test in rats. The absorbed antiserum could inhibit hormonal activity of HCG even when the antiserum and HCG were injected simultaneously at separate sites. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8 PMID:13739538

  7. The protective effects of Achillea L. species native in Turkey against H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative damage in human erythrocytes and leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Konyalioglu, Sibel; Karamenderes, Canan

    2005-11-14

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of infusions prepared from 15 Achillea (Asteraceae) species against H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative damage in human erythrocytes and leucocytes used in traditional Turkish medicine. CAT, SOD and GPx activities, effects of LPO and GSH levels of the infusions on erythrocytes and leucocytes were assessed. The results indicated that all infusions of Achillea species were effective on antioxidant enzyme systems of erythrocytes and leucocytes when compared with H(2)O(2) group. Achillea falcata was the most effective one on CAT, GPx and SOD enzyme systems of erythrocytes. Among plant infusions, Achillea crithmifolia and Achillea nobilis subsp. neilrechii showed the highest activities on CAT, while Achillea millefolium subsp. pannonica on SOD, Achillea teretifolia on GPx and Achillea nobilis subsp. sipylea on LPO enzyme systems of leucocytes. The present results demonstrate that infusions of Achillea species are a potential source of natural antioxidants for treatment and prevention of diseases in which LPO takes place.

  8. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity evaluation of organochalcogens in human leucocytes: a comparative study between ebselen, diphenyl diselenide, and diphenyl ditelluride.

    PubMed

    Caeran Bueno, Diones; Meinerz, Daiane Francine; Allebrandt, Josiane; Waczuk, Emily Pansera; dos Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; Mariano, Douglas Oscar Ceolin; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira

    2013-01-01

    Organochalcogens, particularly ebselen, have been used in experimental and clinical trials with borderline efficacy. (PhSe)2 and (PhTe)2 are the simplest of the diaryl dichalcogenides and share with ebselen pharmacological properties. In view of the concerns with the use of mammals in studies and the great number of new organochalcogens with potential pharmacological properties that have been synthesized, it becomes important to develop screening protocols to select compounds that are worth to be tested in vivo. This study investigated the possible use of isolated human white cells as a preliminary model to test organochalcogen toxicity. Human leucocytes were exposed to 5-50  μM of ebselen, (PhSe)2, or (PhTe)2. All compounds were cytotoxic (Trypan's Blue exclusion) at the highest concentration tested, and Ebselen was the most toxic. Ebselen and (PhSe)2 were genotoxic (Comet Assay) only at 50  μM, and (PhTe)2 at 5-50  μM. Here, the acute cytotoxicity did not correspond with in vivo toxicity of the compounds. But the genotoxicity was in the same order of the in vivo toxicity to mice. These results indicate that in vitro genotoxicity in white blood cells should be considered as an early step in the investigation of potential toxicity of organochalcogens.

  9. Evaluation of C3a receptor expression on human leucocytes by the use of novel monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    ZWIRNER, J; GÖTZE, O; BEGEMANN, G; KAPP, A; KIRCHHOFF, K; WERFEL, T

    1999-01-01

    Varying results have been published in the past regarding the reactivity of different leucocyte subpopulations, including neutrophils, monocytes and B lymphocytes, to the anaphylatoxin C3a and its degradation product C3a(desArg). To better characterize the cellular distribution of C3a receptor (C3aR) expression, monoclonal antibodies against two different epitopes on the third extracellular domain of the human C3aR were generated. Quantification of C3aR as compared with C5aR densities was performed on peripheral blood leucocytes by quantitative indirect immunofluorescence. Eosinophils and basophils expressed similar numbers of C3aR and C5aR molecules/cell. On eosinophils 10 700±4500 (mean±SD) C3aR and 14 700±4100 C5aR were found, whereas basophils carried 8100±2100 C3aR and 13 500±3800 C5aR. Monocytes expressed approximately six times more C5aR than C3aR molecules on their surface (6000±2500 C3aR versus 34 100±9300 C5aR molecules) whereas on neutrophils, the expression of C5aR was more than 20 times higher than the expression of C3aR (3100±1000 C3aR versus 63 500±12 200 C5aR). No C3aR expression was detectable on peripheral blood-derived B lymphocytes and on tonsillar B cells before and after stimulation with interleukin-2/Staphylococcus aureus Cowan strain I. Our findings correspond well with the paucity of data on C3a-induced functional activities in monocytes and neutrophils and suggest that eosinophilic and basophilic granulocytes represent the primary effector cells in the peripheral blood which can be stimulated by C3a. PMID:10447728

  10. Human seroreactivity to gut microbiota antigens.

    PubMed

    Christmann, Benjamin S; Abrahamsson, Thomas R; Bernstein, Charles N; Duck, L Wayne; Mannon, Peter J; Berg, Göran; Björkstén, Bengt; Jenmalm, Maria C; Elson, Charles O

    2015-11-01

    Although immune responses directed against antigens from the intestinal microbiota are observed in certain diseases, the normal human adaptive immune response to intestinal microbiota is poorly defined. Our goal was to assess the adaptive immune response to the intestinal microbiota present in 143 healthy adults and compare this response with the response observed in 52 children and their mothers at risk of having allergic disease. Human serum was collected from adults and children followed from birth to 7 years of age, and the serum IgG response to a panel of intestinal microbiota antigens was assessed by using a novel protein microarray. Nearly every subject tested, regardless of health status, had serum IgG that recognized a common set of antigens. Seroreactivity to the panel of antigens was significantly lower in atopic adults. Healthy infants expressed the highest level of IgG seroreactivity to intestinal microbiota antigens. This adaptive response developed between 6 and 12 months of age and peaked around 2 years of age. Low IgG responses to certain clusters of microbiota antigens during infancy were associated with allergy development during childhood. There is an observed perturbation of the adaptive response to antigens from the microbiota in allergic subjects. These perturbations are observable even in childhood, suggesting that optimal stimulation of the adaptive immune system by the microbiota might be needed to prevent certain immune-mediated diseases. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Human seroreactivity to gut microbiota antigens

    PubMed Central

    Christmann, Benjamin S.; Abrahamsson, Thomas R.; Bernstein, Charles N.; Duck, L. Wayne; Mannon, Peter J.; Berg, Göran; Björkstén, Bengt; Jenmalm, Maria C.; Elson, Charles O.

    2015-01-01

    Background While immune responses directed against antigens from the intestinal microbiota are observed in certain diseases, the normal human adaptive immune response to intestinal microbiota is poorly defined. Objective Our goal was to assess the adaptive immune response to the intestinal microbiota present in 143 healthy adults and compare this response to the immune response observed in 52 children and their mothers at risk of having allergic disease. Methods Human serum was collected from adults and from children followed from birth to seven years of age, and the serum IgG response to a panel of intestinal microbiota antigens was assessed using a novel protein microarray. Results Nearly every individual tested, regardless of health status, had serum IgG that recognized a common set of antigens. Seroreactivity to the panel of antigens was significantly lower in atopic adults. Healthy infants expressed the highest level of IgG seroreactivity to intestinal microbiota antigens. This adaptive response developed between 6 and 12 months of age, and peaked around 2 years of age. Low IgG responses to certain clusters of microbiota antigens during infancy were associated with allergy development during childhood. Conclusions There is an observed perturbation of the adaptive response to antigens from the microbiota in allergic individuals. These perturbations are observable even in childhood, suggesting that optimal stimulation of the adaptive immune system by the microbiota may be needed to prevent certain immune-mediated diseases. PMID:26014812

  12. The Influence of Cytomegalovirus on Expression of HLA-G and its Ligand KIR2DL4 by Human Peripheral Blood Leucocyte Subsets.

    PubMed

    Albayati, Z; Alyami, A; Alomar, S; Middleton, D; Bonnett, L; Aleem, S; Flanagan, B F; Christmas, S E

    2017-08-17

    HLA-G is a non-classical class I HLA antigen, normally expressed in high levels only on extravillous cytotrophoblast. It has immunosuppressive properties in pregnancy and has also been found to be upregulated on leucocytes in viral infection. In this study, proportions of all leucocyte subsets expressing HLA-G were found to be low in healthy subjects positive or negative for cytomegalovirus (CMV). Significantly greater proportions of CD4+ CD69+ and CD56+ T cells expressed HLA-G compared to other T cells. However, following stimulation with CMV antigens or intact CMV, proportions of CD4+, CD8+, CD69+ and CD56+ T cells, and also B cells expressing HLA-G, were significantly increased in CMV+ subjects. Despite some subjects having alleles of HLA-G associated with high levels of expression, no relationship was found between HLA-G genotype and expression levels. Purified B cells from CMV+ subjects stimulated in mixed culture with CMV antigens showed significantly increased HLA-G mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Serum levels of soluble HLA-G were similar in CMV- and CMV+ subjects but levels in culture supernatants were significantly higher in cells from CMV+ than from CMV- subjects stimulated with CMV antigens. The HLA-G ligand KIR2DL4 was mainly expressed on NK cells and CD56+ T cells with no differences between CMV+ and CMV- subjects. Following stimulation with IL-2, an increase in the proportion of CD56+ T cells positive for KIR2DL4 was found, together with a significant decrease in CD56dimCD16+ NK cells. The results show that CMV influences HLA-G expression in healthy subjects and may contribute to viral immune evasion. © 2017 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  13. Serological analysis of human tumor antigens: molecular definition and implications.

    PubMed

    Türeci, O; Sahin, U; Pfreundschuh, M

    1997-08-01

    Specific vaccines for the immunotherapy of human neoplasms require specific human tumor antigens. While efforts to identify such antigens by the analysis of the T-cell repertoire have yielded few antigens, the application of SEREX, the serological identification of antigens by recombinant expression cloning, has brought a cornucopia of new antigens. Several specific antigens have been identified in each tumor tested, suggesting that many human tumors elicit multiple immune responses in the autologous host. The frequency of human tumor antigens, which can be readily defined at the molecular level, facilitates the identification of T-cell-dependent antigens and provides a basis for peptide and gene-therapeutic vaccine strategies.

  14. The second domain of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) maintains the structural integrity of the leucocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) ligand-binding site in the first domain.

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, P; McDowall, A; Bates, P A; Brashaw, J; Hogg, N

    2000-01-01

    The first domain of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) binds to the leucocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) I domain, which contains the principal ligand-binding site of this leucocyte integrin. Whether the function of the second domain is also to directly bind LFA-1 has been unclear. Our data show that mutation in the hydrophilic EF loop of ICAM-1 domain 2 resulted in impaired binding of the isolated I domain when compared with wild-type ICAM-1. LFA-1 on T-cells also binds with reduced affinity to this ICAM-1 mutant. A hybrid construct containing the first domain of vascular cell-adhesion molecule-1 joined to domains 2-5 of ICAM-1 was unable to bind to the I domain, showing that there is no direct interaction between the second domain of ICAM-1 and the I domain. This construct was also not bound by LFA-1 expressed in T-cells. Function-blocking monoclonal antibodies that map to domain 2 of ICAM-1, implicating this domain in ligand binding, were found to act indirectly. In summary our data suggest that the second domain of ICAM-1 has a role in maintaining the structure of the LFA-1 ligand-binding site in the first domain of ICAM-1 but does not appear to have a direct role in ligand binding. PMID:10998349

  15. Levels of expression of complement regulatory proteins CD46, CD55 and CD59 on resting and activated human peripheral blood leucocytes

    PubMed Central

    Christmas, Stephen E; de la Mata Espinosa, Claudia T; Halliday, Deborah; Buxton, Cheryl A; Cummerson, Joanne A; Johnson, Peter M

    2006-01-01

    The cell surface complement regulatory (CReg) proteins CD46, CD55 and CD59 are widely expressed on human lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells. This study aimed to compare systematically levels of CReg expression by different leucocyte subsets and to determine whether levels were increased following activation in vitro. Levels of each CReg protein were similar on freshly isolated monocytes and all major lymphocyte subsets, except that CD4+ cells expressed significantly less CD46 than CD8+ cells (P < 0·05) while the reverse was observed for CD55 (P < 0·02). CD56+ cells, predominantly natural killer cells, expressed significantly lower levels of CD59 than T cells (P < 0·02). CD45RO+ cells had higher levels of surface CD46 and CD59, but lower levels of CD55, than CD45RO– cells (P < 0·02); CD25+ cells also expressed significantly less CD55 than CD25− cells (P < 0·002). Neutrophils expressed higher levels of CD59, but lower levels of CD55, than monocytes. Following activation with phytohaemagglutinin, CD46 was up-regulated on all leucocyte subsets with the exception of CD56+ cells. Both CD55 and CD59 were also markedly up-regulated on monocytes, and CD55 expression was greater on CD8+ than CD4+ cells following activation (P < 0·02). Lipopolysaccharide treatment did not significantly alter B-cell expression of CReg proteins whereas CD55 and CD59, but not CD46, were significantly up-regulated on monocytes (P < 0·02). These observations that CReg proteins are up-regulated on certain activated leucocyte subsets indicate that levels would be increased following immune responses in vivo. This could enhance both protection against local complement activation at inflammatory sites and also the immunoregulatory properties of these leucocytes. PMID:16999828

  16. Altered leucocyte progenitor profile in human bone marrow from patients with major trauma during the recovery phase.

    PubMed

    Francis, W R; Bodger, O G; Pallister, I

    2012-11-01

    Changes in human bone marrow associated with the systemic inflammatory response to injury are little understood. It was hypothesized that major trauma results in an altered bone marrow leucocyte progenitor profile, with either uniform depletion or the balance between multipotent and committed progenitors varying, depending on whether self-renewal is favoured over differentiation. Bone marrow aspirate and peripheral blood samples were obtained at definitive surgery in adults with pelvic fractures from blunt trauma (major trauma with Injury Severity Score (ISS) at least 18, or isolated fractures) and control patients undergoing iliac crest bone grafting. ISS, interval to surgery and transfusion in the first 24 h were recorded. Bone marrow aspirate flow cytometry was used to identify haemopoietic progenitor cells (CD34(+) ), multipotent cells (CD34(+) CD45(+) CD38(-) ) and oligopotent cells (CD34(+) CD45(+) CD38(lo/+) and CD34(+) CD45(+) CD38(BRIGHT(++ +)) subsets). Peripheral blood levels of inflammatory markers were measured, and the ratio of immature to mature (CD35(-) /CD35(+) ) granulocytes was determined. The median (range) interval between injury and sampling was 7 (1-21) and 5 (1-21) days in the major trauma and isolated fracture groups respectively. The CD34(+) pool was significantly depleted in the major trauma group (P = 0·017), particularly the CD34(+) CD45(+) CD38(BRIGHT(++ +)) oligopotent pool (P = 0·003). Immature CD35(-) granulocytes increased in bone marrow with increasing injury severity (P = 0·024) and massive transfusion (P = 0·019), and in peripheral blood with increasing interval to surgery (P = 0·005). Major blunt trauma resulted in changes in the bone marrow CD34(+) progenitor pool. At the point in recovery when these samples were obtained, oligopotent progenitors were lost from the bone marrow, with continued release of immature cells. Copyright © 2012 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Arginine-specific mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase activity on the surface of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, L E; Rendell, N B; Murray, S; Allport, J R; Lo, G; Kefalas, P; Taylor, G W; MacDermot, J

    1996-01-01

    An Arg-specific mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase activity on the surface of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil leucocytes (PMNs) was confirmed by the use of diethylamino-(benzylidineamino)guanidine (DEA-BAG) as an ADP-ribose acceptor. Two separate HPLC systems were used to separate ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG from reaction mixtures, and its presence was confirmed by electrospray mass spectrometry. ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG was produced in the presence of PMNs, but not in their absence. Incubation of DEA-BAG with ADP-ribose (0.1-10 mM) did not yield ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG, which indicates that ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG formed in the presence of PMNs was not simply a product of a reaction between DEA-BAG and free ADP-ribose, due possibly to the hydrolysis of NAD+ by an NAD+ glycohydrolase. The assay of mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase with agmatine as a substrate was modified for intact PMNs, and the activity was found to be approx. 50-fold lower than that in rabbit cardiac membranes. The Km of the enzyme for NAD+ was 100.1 30.4 microM and the Vmax 1.4 0.2 pmol of ADP-ribosylagmatine/h per 10(6) cells. The enzyme is likely to be linked to the cell surface via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor, since incubation of intact PMNs with phosphoinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) led to a 98% decrease in mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase activity in the cells. Cell surface proteins were labelled after exposure of intact PMNs to [32P]NAD+. Their molecular masses were 79, 67, 46, 36 and 26 kDa. The time course for labelling was non-linear under these conditions over a period of 4 h. The labelled products were identified as mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins by hydrolysis with snake venom phosphodiesterase to yield 5'-AMP. PMID:8615841

  18. Human thymus contains amnion epithelial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Hsi, B L; Yeh, C J; Faulk, W P

    1983-01-01

    Antibodies produced in rabbits to detergent-solubilized human amnion were found to react with Hassall's corpuscles in human thymus. Following nomenclature for placental antigens, the immunogenic group responsible for these antibodies has been tentatively designated as amnion antigens 1 (AA1). The anti-AA1 antisera did not react with other thymic components, nor did they react with any other extra-embryonic tissues than amniotic epithelium. Some adult ectodermally derived tissues, such as breast ductal and corneal epithelium, reacted with anti-AA1, but others such as skin and vagina did not. These findings link an antigenic relationship between amniotic epithelium and certain ectodermal derivatives. Amnion exists long before these tissues are formed, raising the possibility that amniotic epithelium may play an inductive role in their development. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6343232

  19. Use of HLA peptidomics and whole exome sequencing to identify human immunogenic neo-antigens

    PubMed Central

    Kalaora, Shelly; Qutob, Nouar; Teer, Jamie K.; Shimony, Nilly; Schachter, Jacob; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Samuels, Yardena

    2016-01-01

    The antigenicity of cells is demarcated by the peptides bound by their Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA) molecules. Through this antigen presentation, T cell specificity response is controlled. As a fraction of the expressed mutated peptides is presented on the HLA, these neo-epitopes could be immunogenic. Such neoantigens have recently been identified through screening for predicted mutated peptides, using synthetic peptides or ones expressed from minigenes, combined with screening of patient tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). Here we present a time and cost-effective method that combines whole-exome sequencing analysis with HLA peptidome mass spectrometry, to identify neo-antigens in a melanoma patient. Of the 1,019 amino acid changes identified through exome sequencing, two were confirmed by mass spectrometry to be presented by the cells. We then synthesized peptides and evaluated the two mutated neo-antigens for reactivity with autologous bulk TILs, and found that one yielded mutant-specific T-cell response. Our results demonstrate that this method can be used for immune response prediction and promise to provide an alternative approach for identifying immunogenic neo-epitopes in cancer. PMID:26819371

  20. Assessment of the cellular immune response to HL-A antigens in human renal allograft recipients

    PubMed Central

    Falk, R. E.; Guttmann, R. D.; Falk, J. A.; Beaudoin, J. G.; Deveber, G.; Morehouse, D. D.; Wilson, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    The cellular response to HL-A antigens has been studied in thirty-one patients who had received a renal allograft from either a cadaveric or living donor, utilizing the leucocyte migration technique. The results indicate that inhibition of migration develops prior to or during the onset of a clinical rejection episode. This inhibition of migration reverts to non-inhibition in autologous serum when the rejection crisis is reversed. Inhibition of migration is still noted in allogeneic serum following this clinical reversal, but after varying time intervals the inhibition reaction also decreases in this serum. The abrogation of inhibition in autologous serum is specific to the HL-A antigens of the donor. These observations suggest that survival of human renal allografts depends on a blocking substance in the serum initially; subsequently, the loss of inhibition of migration with HL-A antigens in both autologous and allogeneic serum suggests an inactivation of specific antigen sensitive cells to the histocompatibility antigens of the donor. PMID:4577287

  1. The effects of heparin and related molecules upon the adhesion of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes to vascular endothelium in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Rebecca; Hoult, J Robin S; Page, Clive P

    2000-01-01

    The effects of an unfractionated heparin preparation (Multiparin), a low molecular weight heparin preparation (Fragmin) and a selectively O-desulphated derivative of heparin lacking anticoagulant activity, have been investigated for their effects on the adhesion of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) to cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. The effect of poly-L-glutamic acid, a large, polyanionic molecule was also studied. Unfractionated heparin (50–1000 U ml−1), the O-desulphated derivative (0.3–6 mg ml−1) and the low molecular weight heparin (50 U–1000 U ml−1) all inhibited significantly the adhesion of 51Cr labelled PMNs to HUVECs stimulated with interleukin-1β (IL-1β; 10 U ml−1), bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 2.5 μg ml−1) or tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α; 125 U ml−1) for 6 h, whereas poly-L-glutamic acid had no effect. In addition, the three heparin preparations in the same concentration range inhibited significantly the adhesion of f-met-leu-phe-stimulated PMNs to resting HUVECs. The effects of unfractionated heparin upon the expression of adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and E-selection were also investigated, as were the effects of unfractionated heparin upon adhesion of human PMNs to previously stimulated HUVECs. Heparin had little effect upon levels of expression of these adhesion molecules on stimulated HUVECs. However, a profound effect upon PMN adhesion to previously stimulated HUVECs was demonstrated using the same preparation, suggesting that inhibition of adhesion molecule expression is not a major component of the described inhibitory effects of heparin. Pre-incubation of PMNs with heparin followed by washing inhibited their adhesion to HUVECs, under different conditions of cellular activation, implying that heparin can bind to these cells and exert its anti-adhesive effects even when not directly present in the system. These

  2. [Enterobacterial antigen in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Faure-Fontenla, M A; García-Tamayo, F

    1989-11-01

    The following study has as prior history the research reports which have shown the existence of an antigenic tissue deposit in gram-negative enterobacteria. The antigens of the enterobacteria have also been found in the lymphocytic membranes and cytoplasm. Since intestinal lymphoid tissue cells can recirculate by means of the thoracic duct to the peripheral venous system, it was proposed that the circulating lymphocytes in healthy people could also contain small amounts of a common enterobacterial antigen. The study was carried out in 15 human venous blood samples, of which the lymphocytic population was separated to later be used in the preparation of 15 alcohol soluble extracts. This material was used for inhibiting the immuno-hemolysis assay in three occasions in order to show the presence of antigens shared by different enterobacterias, using as reference a fraction separated from the LPS of Escherichia coli 08. The results showed that the human lymphocytes also had antigenic determinants common to gram-negative bacteria.

  3. Lea blood group antigen on human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Dunstan, R.A.; Simpson, M.B.; Rosse, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    One- and two-stage radioligand assays were used to determine if human platelets possess the Lea antigen. Goat IgG anti-Lea antibody was purified by multiple adsorptions with Le(a-b-) human red blood cells, followed by affinity chromatography with synthetic Lea substance and labeling with /sup 125/I. Human IgG anti-Lea antibody was used either in a two stage radioassay with /sup 125/I-labeled mouse monoclonal IgG anti-human IgG as the second antibody or, alternatively, purified by Staph protein A chromatography, labeled with /sup 125/I, and used in a one-stage radioassay. Platelets from donors of appropriate red blood cell phenotypes were incubated with the antisera, centrifuged through phthalate esters, and assayed in a gamma scintillation counter. Dose response and saturation curve analysis demonstrate the presence of Lewis a antigen on platelets from Lea+ donors. Furthermore, platelets from an Le(a-b-) donor incubated in Le (a+b-) plasma adsorb Lea antigen in a similar manner to red blood cells. The clinical significance of these antigens in platelet transfusion remains undefined.

  4. Human Hybriodomas for Exotic Antigens.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    surface IgM and traces of IgG of the kappa light chain isotype. To what extent these immunoglobulin chains contribute to the total secreted antibody of...anti-human kappa (supplied by TAGO) or a 1:700 dilution of goat anti-human lambda (supplied by TAGO) in PBS-AE (phosphate buffered saline containing...plates, a variant subelone of WI-L2-729-HF 2 has been isolated which expresses undetectable amounts of heavy chain and a trace amount of kappa . However

  5. UK NEQAS for leucocyte immunophenotyping: the first 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, J; Barnett, D

    2001-01-01

    interlaboratory variations seen in cellular immunophenotyping. Furthermore, particularly in absolute counting of lymphocyte subsets, PBSCs, and the enumeration of low numbers of leucocytes, UK NEQAS for Leucocyte Immunophenotyping programmes have been instrumental in highlighting the differences that occur between single and dual platform flow cytometric technologies. As a result of these findings, UK NEQAS for Leucocyte Immunophenotyping has helped to reduce the variation seen on an interlaboratory basis and enabled greater standardisation both in the UK and internationally. These advances have been attributable to the development, by UK NEQAS for Leucocyte Immunophenotyping, of a unique whole blood stabilising process that ensures the retention of the physical characteristics (both light scatter and antigenic profile) required of cells to ensure successful cellular immunophenotyping. This major technological advancement has enabled the distribution of specimens for EQA purposes on a global scale that have minimal matrix effect and behave in a manner identical to fresh blood for several months after stabilisation. Key Words: leucocyte immunophenotyping • leukaemia • human immunodeficiency virus infection • flow cytometry • guidelines PMID:11429420

  6. The inhibitory effect of phenylpropanoid glycosides and iridoid glucosides on free radical production and beta2 integrin expression in human leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lie-Chwen; Wang, Yea-Hwey; Hou, Yu-Chang; Chang, Shiou; Liou, Kuo-Tong; Chou, Yueh-Ching; Wang, Wen-Yen; Shen, Yuh-Chiang

    2006-01-01

    Rapid production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and upregulation of beta2 integrin by leucocytes are two important inflammatory responses in human leucocytes. To evaluate whether three phenylpropanoid glycosides (acteoside, crenatoside, and rossicaside B) and two iridoid glucosides (boschnaloside and 8-epideoxyloganic acid) identified from two medicinal plants with similar indications (Orobanche caerulescens and Boschniakia rossica) exhibited anti-inflammatory activity, their effects on N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-activated peripheral human neutrophils (PMNs) and mononuclear cells were examined. Pretreatment with 1-50 microM phenylpropanoid glycoside concentration-dependently diminished PMA- and fMLP-induced ROS production with IC50 values of approximately 6.8-23.9 and 3.0-8.8 muM, respectively. Iridoid glucoside was less effective than phenylpropanoid glycoside with an IC50 value of approximately 8.9-28.4 microM in PMA-activated PMNs and 19.1-21.1 microM in fMLP-activated mononuclear cells. Phenylpropanoid glycosides also effectively inhibited NADPH oxidase (NOX) and displayed potent free radical-scavenging activity, but did not interfere with pan-protein kinase C (PKC) activity. Furthermore, all compounds, except rossicaside B, significantly inhibited PMA- and fMLP-induced Mac-1 (a beta2 integrin) upregulation at 50 microM but not that of fMLP-induced intracellular calcium mobilization. These drugs had no significant cytotoxicity as compared with the vehicle control. Our data suggested that inhibition of ROS production, possibly through modulation of NOX activity and/or the radical scavenging effect, and beta2 integrin expression in leucocytes indicated that these compounds had the potential to serve as anti-inflammatory agents during oxidative stress.

  7. Solid-phase assays for the detection of alloantibody against human leukocyte antigens: panacea or Pandora?

    PubMed

    Roberts, T; Tumer, G; Gebel, H M; Bray, R A

    2014-10-01

    Serological assessments of antibodies directed against human leucocyte antigens (HLA) formed the basis of early histocompatibility testing (Patel & Terasaki, 1969 N Engl J Med, 280, 735). However, over the past decade, significant advances in HLA antibody detection technologies have emerged. The development and implementation of solid-phase assays has led to safer and more efficient allocation of organs by effectively distinguishing HLA from non-HLA antibodies. Although solid-phase assays are not standardized, they are widely accepted as the new 'gold standard'. However, this technology is not without its challenges. This review is intended to provide a better understanding of solid-phase HLA antibody testing and will focus on important caveats associated with this evolving technology. Examples of the limitations of the technology as well as common data misinterpretations will be shown. Both of which could pose potential harm to transplant recipients (Tait et al., Transplantation, 95, 19). © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Leucocytes isolated from simply frozen whole blood can be used in human biomonitoring for DNA damage measurement with the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Akor-Dewu, Maryam B; El Yamani, Naouale; Bilyk, Olena; Holtung, Linda; Tjelle, Torunn E; Blomhoff, Rune; Collins, Andrew R

    2014-04-01

    Preservation of human blood cells for DNA damage analysis with the comet assay conventionally involves the isolation of mononuclear cells by centrifugation, suspension in freezing medium and slow freezing to -80 °C-a laborious process. A recent publication (Al-Salmani et al. Free Rad Biol Med 2011; 51: 719-725) describes a simple method in which small volumes of whole blood are frozen to -20 or -80 °C; on subsequent thawing, the comet assay is performed, with no indication of elevated DNA strand breakage resulting from the rapid freezing. However, leucocytes in whole blood (whether fresh or frozen) are abnormally resistant to damage by H2 O2 , and so a common test of antioxidant status (resistance to strand breakage by H2 O2 ) cannot be used. We have refined this method by separating the leucocytes from the thawed blood; we find that, after three washes, the cells respond normally to H2 O2 . In addition, we have measured specific endogenous base damage (oxidized purines) in the isolated leucocytes, using the enzyme formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. In a study of blood samples from 10 subjects, H2 O2 sensitivity and endogenous damage-both reflecting the antioxidant status of the cells-correlated significantly. This modified approach to sample collection and storage is particularly applicable when the available volume of blood is limited and has great potential in biomonitoring and ecogenotoxicology studies where samples are obtained in the field or at sites remote from the testing laboratory.

  9. Characterization of the human Goodpasture antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Wieslander, J; Kataja, M; Hudson, B G

    1987-01-01

    The glomerular basement membrane antigen involved in Goodpasture syndrome was purified from human kidneys. The antigen was solubilized by collagenase digestion and purified by ion exchange chromatography, gel filtration and reversed phase HPLC. The monomer proteins (M1, M2*, and M3) were immunochemically compared with the corresponding bovine monomers and appeared to be identical. The Goodpasture reactivity was localized to the same monomer (M2*) as in bovine material. It could also be shown that eight out of nine patients with Goodpasture syndrome had circulating antibodies reacting with a crude collagenase digest of human glomerular basement membrane that could be inhibited by the active monomer peptide. The ninth patient had, besides antibodies to this peptide, antibodies to the 7S domain of type IV collagen. Further immunochemical studies indicate that all patients sera recognize the same site(s) on the monomer protein. Thus the major antigenic determinant(s) of Goodpasture syndrome resides in monomer M2* which is a constituent of the globular domain of collagen IV. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:3652534

  10. Detection of a low-molecular-weight antigen on melanoma cells by a human antiserum in leukocyte-dependent antibody assays.

    PubMed

    Hersey, P; Murray, E; Werkmeister, J; McCarthy, W H

    1979-10-01

    Biochemical characterization of serologically detected human melanoma antigens was undertaken for the development of immunodiagnostic assays in melanoma. An antiserum from a human melanoma patient, which detected melanoma antigens expressed on a large proportion of different melanoma cells, was used in leucocyte-dependent cytotoxic antibody (LDA) 51Cr-release assays to monitor the purification of melanoma antigens in urea/acetate extracts of lactoperoxidase 125I-labelled melanoma cell membranes. The separation procedures included affinity chromatography on Concanavalin A, gel filtration on porous polyacrylamide beads and preparative isoelectric focusing. The fractions were also monitored by polyacrylamide electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate and by measurement of beta 2 microglobulin and carcinoembryonic antigen content. The antigens detected by this antiserum appeared to be acidic (pI 3.5) low-mol.-wt glycoproteins of approximately 15,000 daltons which were resistant to heating at 56 degrees C and digestion with neuraminidase, but susceptible to repeated freeze-thawing and trypsin digestion. They did not appear to be related to HLA antigens, beta 2 microglobulin or known foetal antigens. The nature of the antigens detected in these studies is as yet unknown, but they appear similar to those described in the sera and urine of melanoma patients in previous reports. Thes combined results and the frequent expression of these antigens on melanoma cells from different patients suggest that assays to detect this antigen may provide a valuable immunodiagnostic aid in the management of melanoma.

  11. VLA-4 blockade by natalizumab inhibits sickle reticulocyte and leucocyte adhesion during simulated blood flow.

    PubMed

    White, Jennell; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Gupta, Dipti; Lancelot, Moira; Moore, Nancy; Sarnaik, Sharada; Hobbs, William E; Light, David R; Hines, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Very Late Antigen-4 (VLA-4, α4β1-integrin, ITGA4) orchestrates cell-cell and cell-endothelium adhesion. Given the proposed role of VLA-4 in sickle cell disease (SCD) pathophysiology, we evaluated the ability of the VLA-4 blocking antibody natalizumab to inhibit SCD blood cell adhesion. Natalizumab recognized surface VLA-4 on leucocytes and reticulocytes in whole blood from SCD subjects. SCD reticulocytes were positive for VLA-4, while VLA-4 staining of non-SCD reticulocytes was undetectable. Titrations with natalizumab revealed the presence of saturable levels of VLA-4 on both SCD reticulocytes and leucocytes similar to healthy subject leucocytes. Under physiological flow conditions, the adhesion of SCD whole blood cells and isolated SCD leucocytes to immobilized vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) was blocked by natalizumab in a dose-dependent manner, which correlated with cell surface receptor binding. Natalizumab also inhibited >50% of whole blood cell binding to TNF-α activated human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers under physiological flow at clinically relevant concentrations (10 to 100 μg/ml). This indicates that VLA-4 is the dominant receptor that drives SCD reticulocyte and mononuclear cell adhesion to VCAM-1 and that the VLA-4 adhesion to VCAM-1 is a significant contributor to SCD blood cell adhesion to endothelium. Thus, VLA-4 blockade may be beneficial in sickle cell disease.

  12. Investigation of the cutaneous response to recall antigen in humans in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, A N; Reed, J R; Lacy, K E; Jackson, S E; Vukmanovic-Stejic, M; Rustin, M H A

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we provide a detailed description of an experimental method for investigating the induction and resolution of recall immune response to antigen in humans in vivo. This involves the injection of tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) into the skin, followed by inducing suction blisters at the site of injection, from which leucocytes and cytokines that are involved in the response can be isolated and characterized. Using this technique we found that although the majority of CD4+ T cells in the skin that are present early in the response express cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA), the expression of this marker is reduced significantly in later phases. This may enable these cells to leave the skin during immune resolution. Furthermore, interleukin (IL)-2 production can be detected both in CD4+ T cells and also in the blister fluid at the peak of the response at day 7, indicating that mediators found in the blister fluid are representative of the cytokine microenvironment in vivo. Finally, we found that older humans have defective ability to respond to cutaneous PPD challenge, but this does not reflect a global immune deficit as they have similar numbers of circulating functional PPD-specific CD4+ T cells as young subjects. The use of the blister technology enables further characterization of the skin specific defect in older humans and also general mechanisms that govern immune regulation in vivo. PMID:23607634

  13. Influence of human leucocyte antigen‐DRB1 on the susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis and on the production of anti‐cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in a Portuguese population

    PubMed Central

    Ligeiro, D; Fonseca, J E; Abade, O; Abreu, I; Cruz, M; Nero, P; Cavaleiro, J; Teles, J; Trindade, H; Caetano, J M; Branco, J

    2007-01-01

    Objective To clarify the influence of the HLA‐DRB1 locus on the susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis and the production of anti‐cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti‐CCP) in a Portuguese population. Methods: 141 patients with rheumatoid arthritis fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology 1987 revised criteria for rheumatoid arthritis were compared with 150 healthy controls. Human leucocyte antigen (HLA)‐DRB1 locus genotyping was assessed by polymerase chain reaction reverse probing assays and sequence‐specific primers. Anti‐CCP antibodies were quantified by ELISA in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Frequencies between groups were compared by the two‐sided Fisher's exact test and considered significant if p<0.05. Results The HLA‐DRB1*04 and HLA‐DRB1*10 groups were highly associated with rheumatoid arthritis (p<0.001 and p = 0.031, respectively). High titres of anti‐CCP antibodies were largely associated with the presence of HLA‐DRB1*04/10. Conclusion The well‐recognised susceptibility alleles to rheumatoid arthritis, HLA‐DRB1*04, were associated with rheumatoid arthritis in Portuguese patients. The relatively rare DRB1*10 was also associated with rheumatoid arthritis, as was described previously in other southern European countries. Both groups were associated with high anti‐CCP titres, reinforcing its relevance to disease onset. PMID:16793843

  14. Immune responses to chlamydial antigens in humans.

    PubMed

    Hanna, L; Kerlan, R; Senyk, G; Stites, D P; Juster, R P; Jawetz, E

    1982-01-01

    Antibody titer, lymphocyte stimulation and leukocyte migration inhibition with chlamydial antigens were determined repeatedly over many months on human subjects. The volunteers were retrospectively placed into four groups on the basis of clinical, laboratory and epidemiologic criteria. Group A consisted of persons with proven or probable chlamydial infection, including an illness confirmed by chlamydial isolation or seroconversion, or a clinically compatible illness with positive serologic results. Group B were sexual partners or close contacts of group A individuals. Group C were laboratory workers with prolonged exposure to viable chlamydiae or their antigens. Group D included persons of comparable age as those in groups A and B, but lacking a history of symptomatic chlamydial infection or of contact with chlamydiae. Individual cases illustrated the rise of antibody and some cell mediated immunity reactions (CMI) with active chlamydial infection. By contrast, laboratory exposure resulted in elevation of CMI but not of antibody. Statistical analysis of the results in 46 volunteers tested repeatedly indicated a strong association of specific antibody with lymphocyte stimulation, but not with leukocyte migration inhibition. Regression analysis suggested that the type of exposure markedly influenced the relationship between antibody and lymphocyte stimulation. Measurement of immunotype-specific antibody titer by microimmunofluorescence (or an equally sensitive method) remains the best laboratory indicator of past chlamydial infection. Neither antibody nor CMI can, as yet, be definitely related to resistance to re-infection in humans.

  15. Cationic Yersinia antigen-induced chronic allergic arthritis in rats. A model for reactive arthritis in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, A K; Batsford, S R; Curschellas, E; Kist, M J; Gondolf, K B

    1991-01-01

    Cationic antigens are known to have considerable arthritogenic potential in experimental systems. During a systematic search for suitable, naturally occurring candidates an intracellular protein was isolated from the ribosomal pellet of Yersinia enterocolitica 0:3, a bacterial strain associated with reactive arthritis in humans. The protein is highly cationic, contains two 19-kD polypeptide chains linked by a disulfide bond, and reveals a strong tendency for spontaneous aggregation. It is suggested to be a nucleic acid binding protein. We tested this antigen for its ability to induce arthritis after intra-articular challenge in preimmunized rats. An acute inflammatory phase followed by transition to chronicity was observed both by technetium-99m scintigraphy and from histology. Massive polymorphonuclear leucocyte infiltration of the synovium was seen early on and fibrosis and thickening of the joint capsule occurred in later stages. Control groups showed no evidence of inflammation. Western blot and ELISA analysis of unselected sera from Yersinia enterocolitica 0:3-infected patients revealed antibodies to the antigen in the majority of cases, whereas healthy individuals rarely reacted. This is the first report of a naturally occurring cationic antigen capable of inducing immunologic tissue injury; it justifies the speculation that cationic antigens from prokaryotic cells could trigger reactive arthritis in humans. Images PMID:1864972

  16. Antigenically Modified Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generate Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jieming; Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide a promising platform to produce dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. To streamline the production process, we investigated a unique antigen-loading strategy that suits this novel platform. Specifically, we stably modified hPSCs using tumour antigen genes in the form of a full-length tumour antigen gene or an artificial tumour antigen epitope-coding minigene. Such antigenically modified hPSCs were able to differentiate into tumour antigen-presenting DCs. Without conventional antigen-loading, DCs derived from the minigene-modified hPSCs were ready to prime a tumour antigen-specific T cell response and further expand these specific T cells in restimulation processes. These expanded tumour antigen-specific T cells were potent effectors with central memory or effector memory phenotype. Thus, we demonstrated that immunocompetent tumour antigen-loaded DCs can be directly generated from antigenically modified hPSCs. Using such strategy, we can completely eliminate the conventional antigen-loading step and significantly simplify the production of DC vaccine from hPSCs. PMID:26471005

  17. Human Ia-like antigens in non-lymphoid organs.

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, K; Fukunishi, T; Barcos, M; Tanigaki, N; Pressman, D

    1979-01-01

    Human Ia-like antigens in liver and kidney were shown by the immunofluorescence assay to be present mostly in the endothelial-mesenchymal cells of these organs. The parenchymal cells apparently contained no human Ia-like antigens. The antigens in liver and kidney were purified and shown to have the same subunit structure as human Ia-like antigens of cultured B-lymphoid cells. The human Ia-like antigens in non-lymphoid organs, not only in liver and kidney but also in testis, heart, muscle and brain, carried all the xenoantigenic characteristics of human Ia-like antigens expressed on lymphoid cells of B-cell lineage. Images Figure 1 PMID:389786

  18. Human ficolin: cDNA cloning, demonstration of peripheral blood leucocytes as the major site of synthesis and assignment of the gene to chromosome 9.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, J; Tay, P N; Kon, O L; Reid, K B

    1996-01-01

    Pig ficolins and a number of other proteins contain sequences that are homologous to the C-terminal halves of fibrinogen beta- and gamma-chains. To clone the cDNA for human ficolin, two degenerate oligonucleotide primers were synthesized, based on two stretches of protein sequence that were highly conserved among those proteins, and used for PCR with cDNA from a human uterus lambda gt11 library as a template. A PCR product with a predicted size of 300 bp was obtained and this was used to screen a uterus cDNA library. Of the positive clones isolated, two (U1 and U2), containing inserts of 1.7 and 1.1 kb respectively, were found to encode human ficolin. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequence of human ficolin has approx. 75% identity with, and a similar domain organization to, the two pig ficolin sequences, which are characterized by the presence of a leader peptide, a short N-terminal segment followed by a collagen-like region and then by a C-terminal fibrinogen-like domain. The 1.1 kb insert of clone U2 was used in Northern-blot analysis, and a very strong signal for a 1.4 kb mRNA species was detected in mRNA from human peripheral blood leucocytes. This showed that, despite the initial characterization of pig ficolin as a putative receptor on uterine cells for transforming growth factor beta 1, blood leucocytes are probably the major site of human ficolin synthesis. Much weaker signals of the same size were also detected in spleen, lung and thymus and may be due to the presence of tissue macrophages or trapped blood in these tissues. An mRNA species of approx. 1.3 kb in human liver also weakly hybridized to the U2 probe, indicating the presence of a sequence that was distinct from, but related to, ficolin. The gene for human ficolin has been mapped to chromosome 9. PMID:8573080

  19. Signalling profiles of circulating leucocytes in patients recovered from reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Alanärä, T; Aittomäki, S; Kuuliala, K; Kuuliala, A; Siitonen, S; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Repo, H

    2012-08-01

    Reactive arthritis (ReA) is a sterile joint inflammation triggered by a remote infection and associated with human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B27. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but abnormal response to microbial structures or endogenous inflammatory mediators may be involved. We studied responses in leucocyte signalling profiles in patients with previous ReA after a full recovery. The study comprised 10 HLA-B27-positive healthy subjects with a history of Yersinia enterocolitica-triggered ReA (B27+ReA+) and 20 healthy reference subjects, of whom 10 carried HLA-B27 (B27+ReA-) and 10 did not (B27-ReA-). Phosphospecific fluorescent monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry were used to determine activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) 1, 3, 5, and 6, and two mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, in monocytes, lymphocytes, lymphocyte subsets, and neutrophils. B27+ReA+ and B27-ReA- whole-blood samples were incubated with Yersinia with or without infliximab to study the role of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in lymphocyte subset activation. Samples of the three subject groups were studied using soluble bacterial or endogenous stimuli. Fluorescence levels were determined as relative fluorescence units (RFU) and the proportion of positively fluorescing cells. The intracellular activation of circulating leucocytes in response to soluble stimuli was consistently comparable in B27+ReA+, B27+ReA-, and B27-ReA- subjects. Infliximab inhibited Yersinia-induced lymphocyte NF-κB phosphorylation similarly in B27+ReA+ and B27-ReA- groups. ReA susceptibility is not reflected in leucocyte signalling profiles elicited by phlogistic stimuli. However, the possibility remains that aberrations occur in response to combinations of stimuli, such as those associated with leucocyte adhesion.

  20. Subclinical antibody-mediated rejection due to anti-human-leukocyte-antigen-DR53 antibody accompanied by plasma cell-rich acute rejection in a patient with cadaveric kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Katsuma, Ai; Yamamoto, Izumi; Komatsuzaki, Yo; Niikura, Takahito; Kawabe, Mayuko; Okabayashi, Yusuke; Yamakawa, Takafumi; Katsumata, Haruki; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Miki, Jun; Yamada, Hiroki; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    A 56-year-old man who had undergone cadaveric kidney transplantation 21 months earlier was admitted to our hospital for a protocol biopsy; he had a serum creatinine level of 1.2 mg/dL and no proteinuria. Histological features showed two distinct entities: (i) inflammatory cell infiltration, in the glomerular and peritubular capillaries and (ii) focal, aggressive tubulointerstitial inflammatory cell infiltration, predominantly plasma cells, with mild tubulitis (Banff 13 classification: i2, t1, g2, ptc2, v0, ci1, ct1, cg0, cv0). Immunohistological studies showed mildly positive C4d immunoreactivity in the peritubular capillaries. The patient had donor specific antibody to human-leucocyte-antigen-DR53. We diagnosed him with subclinical antibody-mediated rejection accompanied by plasma cell-rich acute rejection. Both antibody-mediated rejection due to anti- human-leucocyte-antigen -DR53 antibodies and plasma cell-rich acute rejection are known to be refractory and have a poor prognosis. Thus, we started plasma exchange with intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab for the former and 3 days of consecutive steroid pulse therapy for the latter. Three months after treatment, a follow-up allograft biopsy showed excellent responses to treatment for both histological features. This case report considers the importance of an early diagnosis and appropriate intervention for subclinical antibody-mediated rejection due to donor specific antibody to human-leucocyte-antigen-DR53 and plasma cell-rich acute rejection.

  1. Human γδ T Cells Augment Antigen Presentation in Listeria Monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuli; Wang, Huaishan; Xu, Yi; Hu, Yu; Chen, Hui; Cui, Lianxian; Zhang, Jianmin; He, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Circulating γδ T cells in healthy individuals rapidly respond to bacterial and viral pathogens. Many studies have demonstrated that γδ T cells are activated and expanded by Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes), a foodborne bacterial pathogen with high fatality rates. However, the roles of γδ T cells during L. monocytogenes infection are not clear. In the present study, we characterized the morphological characteristics of phagocytosis in γδ T cells after L. monocytogenes infection using transmission electron microscopy. Results show activation markers including human leucocyte antigen DR (HLA–DR) and lymph node–homing receptor CCR7 on γδ T cells were upregulated after stimulation via L. monocytogenes. Significant proliferation and differentiation of primary αβ T cells was also observed after coculture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with γδ T cells anteriorly stimulated by L. monocytogenes. L. monocytogenes infection decreased the percentage of γδ T cells in mouse intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and increased MHC-II expression on the surface of γδ T cells in vivo. Our findings shed light on antigen presentation of γδ T cells during L. monocytogenes infection. PMID:27652377

  2. THE RHYTHMIC RANGE OF THE WHITE BLOOD CELLS IN HUMAN, PATHOLOGICAL LEUCOPENIC AND LEUCOCYTIC STATES, WITH A STUDY OF THIRTY-TWO HUMAN BONE MARROWS

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Charles A.; Zerfas, Leon G.

    1927-01-01

    human biopsy and autopsy material shows the striking reciprocity found to exist between the myelocytes and the mature polymorphonuclear leucocytes. This, together with the observed focal uniformity of maturation found in bone marrow, and the periodicity of the fluctuations of the neutrophils in the peripheral blood, leads to the formulation of the hypothesis of a constant functional withdrawal of granulocytes from the peripheral blood with a periodic delivery of new cells from the marrow, which in leucopenia and in leucocytosis represents a depression or a stimulation, respectively, of the normal mechanism. The nature and degree of the response are an approximate index of the cellular factor in the complex of the "resistance" of the particular individual. PMID:19869352

  3. Intervention with polyphenol-rich fruit juices results in an elevation of glutathione S-transferase P1 (hGSTP1) protein expression in human leucocytes of healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Thomas; Liegibel, Ute; Winterhalter, Peter; Bub, Achim; Rechkemmer, Gerhard; Pool-Zobel, Beatrice Louise

    2006-12-01

    oxidative defence systems. In vivo, however, we observed a delayed enhancement of hGSTP1, which could be associated with an initial repression of oxidative DNA damage in leucocytes from human subjects, consuming juices with high levels of polyphenols.

  4. Regulation of 5-oxo-ETE synthesis by nitric oxide in human polymorphonuclear leucocytes upon their interaction with zymosan and Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Viryasova, Galina M; Galkina, Svetlana I; Gaponova, Tatjana V; Romanova, Julia M; Sud'ina, Galina F

    2014-05-23

    In the present study we have presented data on the regulation of LT (leukotriene) and 5-oxo-ETE (5-oxo-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid) syntheses in human neutrophils upon interaction with OZ (opsonized zymosan) or Salmonella typhimurium. Priming of neutrophils with PMA (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) and LPS (lipopolysaccharide) elicits 5-oxo-ETE formation in neutrophils exposed to OZ, and the addition of AA (arachidonic acid) significantly increases 5-oxo-ETE synthesis. We found that NO (nitric oxide)-releasing compounds induce 5-oxo-ETE synthesis in neutrophils treated with OZ or S. typhimurium. Exposure of neutrophils to zymosan or bacteria in the presence of the NO donor DEA NONOate (1,1-diethyl-2-hydroxy-2-nitroso-hydrazine sodium) considerably increased the conversion of endogenously formed 5-HETE (5S-hydroxy-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid) to 5-oxo-ETE. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that NO is a potent regulator of 5-oxo-ETE synthesis in human polymorphonuclear leucocytes exposed to Salmonella typhimurium and zymosan.

  5. Melanocyte antigen triggers autoimmunity in human psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Akiko; Siewert, Katherina; Stöhr, Julia; Besgen, Petra; Kim, Song-Min; Rühl, Geraldine; Nickel, Jens; Vollmer, Sigrid; Thomas, Peter; Krebs, Stefan; Pinkert, Stefan; Spannagl, Michael; Held, Kathrin; Kammerbauer, Claudia; Besch, Robert; Dornmair, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a common T cell–mediated inflammatory skin disease with a suspected autoimmune pathogenesis. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I allele, HLA-C*06:02, is the main psoriasis risk gene. Epidermal CD8+ T cells are essential for psoriasis development. Functional implications of HLA-C*06:02 and mechanisms of lesional T cell activation in psoriasis, however, remained elusive. Here we identify melanocytes as skin-specific target cells of an HLA-C*06:02–restricted psoriatic T cell response. We found that a Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 T cell receptor (TCR), which we had reconstituted from an epidermal CD8+ T cell clone of an HLA-C*06:02–positive psoriasis patient specifically recognizes HLA-C*06:02–positive melanocytes. Through peptide library screening, we identified ADAMTS-like protein 5 (ADAMTSL5) as an HLA-C*06:02–presented melanocytic autoantigen of the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 TCR. Consistent with the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1-TCR reactivity, we observed numerous CD8+ T cells in psoriasis lesions attacking melanocytes, the only epidermal cells expressing ADAMTSL5. Furthermore, ADAMTSL5 stimulation induced the psoriasis signature cytokine, IL-17A, in CD8+ T cells from psoriasis patients only, supporting a role as psoriatic autoantigen. This unbiased analysis of a TCR obtained directly from tissue-infiltrating CD8+ T cells reveals that in psoriasis HLA-C*06:02 directs an autoimmune response against melanocytes through autoantigen presentation. We propose that HLA-C*06:02 may predispose to psoriasis via this newly identified autoimmune pathway. PMID:26621454

  6. JL1, a novel differentiation antigen of human cortical thymocyte

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Expression of a novel thymocyte differentiation antigen, JL1, defined by a monoclonal antibody (mAb) developed against human thymocytes showed a specificity for stage II double positive (CD4+CD8+) human cortical thymocytes. This antigen was not expressed at detectable levels on medullary thymocytes, mature peripheral leukocytes, bone marrow cells or on other types of tissues elsewhere in the human body. Immunohistologic analysis revealed that JL1 had a clear pattern of distribution on cortical thymocytes. Immunoprecipitation of 125I- labeled cell lysates from human thymocytes and Molt-4 leukemic cell line with anti-JL1 mAb yielded a 120-130-kD single chain glycoprotein. When immunoprecipitation of cell lysate was done after endoglycosidase F treatment, JL1 antigen was still detected by antibody but the band showed a reduction in apparent molecular mass of approximately 5 kD. This suggests that, although JL1 molecule contains carbohydrate group, this does not form a critical part of the antigenic determinant for anti-JL1 antibody. JL1 antigen appears to be the first double positive, stage-specific differentiation antigen of human thymocyte reported so far. This antigen would be a useful marker for lymphoblastic malignancy of stage II thymocyte origin and it may be involved in the thymocyte education process. PMID:8376947

  7. Leucocytes are a major source of circulating nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT)/pre-B cell colony (PBEF)/visfatin linking obesity and inflammation in humans.

    PubMed

    Friebe, D; Neef, M; Kratzsch, J; Erbs, S; Dittrich, K; Garten, A; Petzold-Quinque, S; Blüher, S; Reinehr, T; Stumvoll, M; Blüher, M; Kiess, W; Körner, A

    2011-05-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is a multifunctional protein potentially involved in obesity and glucose metabolism. We systematically studied the association between circulating NAMPT, obesity, interventions and glucose metabolism and investigated potential underlying inflammatory mechanisms. Fasting morning NAMPT serum levels were measured in cohorts of lean vs obese children, cohorts of intervention by lifestyle, exercise and bariatric surgery, and during an OGTT. In addition, mRNA expression, protein production and enzymatic activity of NAMPT were assessed from isolated leucocytes and subpopulations. Circulating NAMPT was significantly elevated in obese compared with lean children and declined after obesity interventions concomitantly with the decline in BMI, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCrP) and leucocyte counts. Circulating NAMPT significantly correlated with glucose metabolism and cardiovascular variables in univariate analyses, but only the association with glucose response during an OGTT was independent from BMI. We therefore assessed the NAMPT dynamic following an oral glucose load and found a significant decline of NAMPT levels to 77.0 ± 0.1% as a function of time, and insulin-to-glucose ratio during an OGTT in obese insulin-resistant adolescents. Circulating NAMPT was, however, most strongly associated with leucocyte counts (r = 0.46, p < 0.001). The leucocyte count itself determined significantly and independently from BMI insulin resistance in multiple regression analyses. We systematically evaluated NAMPT expression among several tissues and found that NAMPT was predominantly expressed in leucocytes. In subsequent analyses of leucocyte subpopulations, we identified higher NAMPT protein concentrations in lysates of granulocytes and monocytes compared with lymphocytes, whereas granulocytes secreted highest amounts of NAMPT protein into cell culture supernatant fractions. We confirmed nicotinamide mononucleotide

  8. The possible role of the tumour necrosis factor polymorphisms and human leucocyte antigens in the development of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Stingl Jankovic, K; Hudolin, T; Kastelan, Z; Zunec, R; Grubic, Z

    2016-06-01

    The cause of prostate cancer (PC), one of the most common cancers found among ageing men, remains unclear, but genetic predisposition is believed to play a major role in its aetiology. The aim of the study was to examine HLA genes polymorphism and TNF polymorphisms in PC development. Patients diagnosed with PC (N = 113) and 150 healthy individuals were tested for HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 genes and for TNFa, TNFb and TNFd microsatellites. The comparison of patients and controls revealed a positive association of HLA-DRB1*12, TNFa2 and TNFb5, and a negative association of HLA-DRB1*13 and TNFb4 with PC. A division of patients into groups according to age, pre-operative PSA level, Gleason score (GS) and involvement of prostatic capsule, seminal vesicles or bladder neck and perineural invasion of PC demonstrated the following: a positive correlation of HLA-DRB1*12 and a negative correlation of HLA-DRB1*13 with younger patients (<65 years), GS > 7 and the positive association of prostatic capsule, seminal vesicles, bladder neck and perineural invasion of PC; TNFb4 allele's negative association with older patients displaying higher PSA levels, higher GS and positive surrounding tissue involvement; positive association of TNFb5 allele for both older and younger patients. Investigation of HLA genes and TNF microsatellites demonstrated a possible role of HLA-DRB1 and TNF regions in PC aetiology.

  9. The induction of suppressor cells in mixed leucocyte cultures and in mixed leucocyte-non-lymphoid cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Pawelec, G

    1980-01-01

    X-ray resistant porcine suppressor T cells expressing Ia-like antigens were obtained from mixed cultures of leucocytes and tissue cells (cultured kidney cells, liver cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts or X-irradiated leucocytes), and were assayed by their ability to suppress lymphocyte proliferation in a second mixed culture. All tissues tested induced suppressor cells although quantitative differences existed between them. Suppressor cell induction was under genetic control by at least two loci, one of which was within the major histocompatibility (MHC) complex. Suppressor cell function was restricted by the MHC type of the responding cell but not the stimulating cell in the second culture. PMID:6445866

  10. Human cysticercosis: antigens, antibodies and non-responders.

    PubMed Central

    Flisser, A; Woodhouse, E; Larralde, C

    1980-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis of sera from patients with brain cysticercosis against a crude antigenic extract from Cysticercus cellulosae indicates that nearly 50% of the patients do not make sufficient antibodies to ostensively precipitate. The other 50% of the patients who do make precipitating antibodies show a very heterogeneous response in the number of antigens they recognize as well as in the type of antigen--as classified by their electrophoretic mobilities. The most favoured, called antigen B, is recognized by 84% of positive sera and corresponds to one or a limited number of antigens isoelectric at pH 8.6. Indirect immunofluorescence with monospecific anti-human immunoglobulins, performed upon the immunoelectrophoretic preparations, reveal that all cysticercus antigens induced the synthesis of antibodies in the immunoglobulin classes in the order G greater than M greater than E greater than A greater than D. Finally, antigen H (an anodic component) seems to favour IgE relative to its ability to induce IgG. Thus, although in natural infection a good proportion of cysticercotic patients do not seem to mount an energetic antibody response against the parasite, giving rise to some speculations about immunosuppression, the fact that 50% do synthesize antibodies allows for some optimistic expectations from vaccination of humans--in view of the good results of vaccination in experimental animals mediated by IgG antibodies. A likely prospect for a human vaccine would be antigen B because it is the most frequently detected by humans, although its immunizing and toxic properties remain to be properly studied. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 6 PMID:7389197

  11. Antigenic Relationships among Human Pathogenic Orientia tsutsugamushi Isolates from Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Tanganuchitcharnchai, Ampai; Smith, Derek J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Paris, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Scrub typhus is a common cause of undiagnosed febrile illness in certain tropical regions, but can be easily treated with antibiotics. The causative agent, Orientia tsutsugamushi, is antigenically variable which complicates diagnosis and efforts towards vaccine development. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aimed to dissect the antigenic and genetic relatedness of O. tsutsugamushi strains and investigate sero-diagnostic reactivities by titrating individual patient sera against their O. tsutsugamushi isolates (whole-cell antigen preparation), in homologous and heterologous serum-isolate pairs from the same endemic region in NE Thailand. The indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to titrate Orientia tsutsugamushi isolates and human sera, and a mathematical technique, antigenic cartography, was applied to these data to visualise the antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between strains and sera. No functional or antigen-specific analyses were performed. The antigenic variation found in clinical isolates was much less pronounced than the genetic differences found in the 56kDa type-specific antigen genes. The Karp-like sera were more broadly reactive than the Gilliam-like sera. Conclusions/Significance Antigenic cartography worked well with scrub typhus indirect immunofluorescence titres. The data from humoral responses suggest that a Karp-like strain would provide broader antibody cross-reactivity than a Gilliam-like strain. Although previous exposure to O. tsutsugamushi could not be ruled out, scrub typhus patient serum antibody responses were characterised by strong homologous, but weak heterologous antibody titres, with little evidence for cross-reactivity by Gilliam-like sera, but a broader response from some Karp-like sera. This work highlights the importance of antigenic variation in O. tsutsugamushi diagnosis and determination of new serotypes. PMID:27248711

  12. Modulation of interferon-gamma-induced major histocompatibility (MHC) and CD14 antigen changes by lipophilic muramyltripeptide MTP-PE in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Landmann, R; Wesp, M; Dukor, P

    1988-11-01

    The lipophilic muramylpeptide derivative muramyltripeptide-phosphatidylethanolamine (MTP-PE, 0.05 to 5 micrograms/ml) and human recombinant interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma, 1 to 100 U/ml) were applied singly or in combination to fresh human mononuclear blood leucocytes in vitro. After 15 to 72 hr incubation, culture- and drug-induced changes in beta 2-microglobulin (MHC class I associated), HLA-DR (MHC class II), and Leu-M3 (CD14) antigen expression were investigated by flow cytometry; changes in monocyte morphology (forward light scatter and side scatter) were assessed by scatter analysis. It was found that (1) rIFN-gamma caused a simultaneous down-regulation of the CD14 antigen and an up-regulation of MHC class I and class II molecules on the surface of cultured monocytes; (2) MTP-PE, which by itself failed to influence the expression of these antigens, synergized with rIFN-gamma in increasing MHC antigens and reducing CD14; (3) at high concentrations rIFN-gamma reduced monocyte viability to a small but significant extent and this effect was further potentiated by MTP-PE; and (4) untreated monocytes in culture showed an apparently MTP-PE-insensitive increase in size, density, and beta 2-microglobulin, HLA-DR, and CD14 antigen expression. The influence of MTP-PE on rIFN-gamma-induced surface marker changes may contribute to its immunoadjuvant activity in vivo.

  13. Studies on the biological effects of ozone: 2. Induction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) on human leucocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Paulesu, L.; Luzzi, E.; Bocci, V. )

    1991-10-01

    The effect of ozone as a probable inducer of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) has been investigated on human blood and on Ficoll-purified blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Samples were exposed at different ozone concentrations ranging from 2.2 to 108 micrograms/ml and incubated at 37 degrees C in an 95% air-5% CO2 atmosphere. At predetermined times, all cell supernatants were tested for TNF activity and some PBMC cultures were examined for DNA synthesis. The authors have shown that ozone concentration is critical in terms of TNF production and of cell mitogenesis and that, owing to the presence of erythrocytes, higher ozone concentrations are required to be effective in blood than in PBMC. Because ozonization of blood is a procedure followed in several European countries for the treatment of viral diseases and tumors, the release of factors with antiviral and immunomodulatory activities by leukocytes may explain the mechanism of action of ozone and of autohemotherapy.

  14. Modulatory effect of interleukin-10 on the production of platelet-activating factor and superoxide anions by human leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bussolati, B; Mariano, F; Montrucchio, G; Piccoli, G; Camussi, G

    1997-01-01

    We observed that human monocytes (MO) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produce platelet-activating factor (PAF) in a pattern characterized by an early and a delayed peak of synthesis. The early peak of PAF synthesis was due to a direct stimulation of these cells through mCD14 receptor as it was inhibited by anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody. The delayed and sustained peak of PAF synthesis was dependent on protein synthesis and cytokine production as shown by the inhibitory effect of cycloheximide on both MO and PMN, and of anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha (anti-TNF-alpha) and of anti-interleukin-8 (anti-IL-8) neutralizing antibodies on MO and PMN respectively. IL-10 completely prevented this second, cytokine-dependent peak of PAF synthesis. In contrast, IL-10 markedly enhanced the first peak of PAF synthesis both in MO and PMN. Moreover, IL-10 was shown to modulate the production of superoxide anions (O2-) on both MO and PMN. As suggested by previous studies, IL-10 inhibited the delayed production of O2-. In the present study, we observed that IL-10 directly stimulated an early production of O2-. In addition, IL-10 enhanced the synthesis of O2- by MO and PMN challenged with LPS. The IL-10-induced O2- production was dependent, at least in part, from its effect on PAF synthesis, as it was inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2170. These results suggest that IL-10 may upregulate the early synthesis of PAF and O2- triggered by direct LPS stimulation, whereas it may downregulate the delayed production of these mediators. PMID:9155653

  15. A New Antigen Retrieval Technique for Human Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Byne, William; Haroutunian, Vahram; García-Villanueva, Mercedes; Rábano, Alberto; García-Amado, María; Prensa, Lucía; Giménez-Amaya, José Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining of tissues is a powerful tool used to delineate the presence or absence of an antigen. During the last 30 years, antigen visualization in human brain tissue has been significantly limited by the masking effect of fixatives. In the present study, we have used a new method for antigen retrieval in formalin-fixed human brain tissue and examined the effectiveness of this protocol to reveal masked antigens in tissues with both short and long formalin fixation times. This new method, which is based on the use of citraconic acid, has not been previously utilized in brain tissue although it has been employed in various other tissues such as tonsil, ovary, skin, lymph node, stomach, breast, colon, lung and thymus. Thus, we reported here a novel method to carry out immunohistochemical studies in free-floating human brain sections. Since fixation of brain tissue specimens in formaldehyde is a commonly method used in brain banks, this new antigen retrieval method could facilitate immunohistochemical studies of brains with prolonged formalin fixation times. PMID:18852880

  16. Mycobacterium leprae antigens involved in human immune responses. I. Identification of four antigens by monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, W.J.; Hellqvist, L.; Basten, A.; Raison, R.L.

    1985-12-01

    Four distinct antigens were identified in soluble sonicates of Mycobacterium leprae by using a panel of 11 monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivity studies with other mycobacterial species were conducted by using ELISA and immunoblot assays, and demonstrated that determinants on two of the antigens were present in many mycobacteria, whereas the other two were limited in distribution. Competitive inhibition experiments with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies showed cross-inhibition between antibodies identifying two of the four antigenicbands. These two bands, of M/sub tau/ 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD, were resistant to protease treatment after immunoblotting. In contrast the two other bands of 16 and 70 KD were protease-sensitive. Although all four bands reacted with some human lepromatous leprosy sera in immunoblots, the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands were most prominent. Lepromatous leprosy sera also inhibited the binding of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies to each of the four antigens, with the mean titer causing 50% inhibition being higher for antibodies reacting with the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands. These findings indicated that all four antigens were involved in the human B cell response to M. leprae.

  17. Detection of squamous epithelial intercellular substance antigen(s) in Hassall's corpuscles of human and animal thymus.

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, L V; Gnesditskaya, E V

    1980-01-01

    Using pemphigus sera containing high titres (1:1000) of non-species-specific antibodies to tissue-specific intercellular substance (ICS) antigen(s) of cover stratified epithelia (skin, oesophagus, vagina and so forth), we detected analogous antigen(s) by immunofluorescence in the ICS of the epithelium of Hassall's corpuscles of human and animal thymus. The results obtained, together with well-known data from histological and embryological studies, confirm the histogenetic relationship of the epithelium of thymus corpuscles and cover epithelia of ectodermal origin. ICS antigen(s) is related to the series of hetero-organic antigens, which probably take part in the natural immunological tolerance formation to the antigens of the organism's own tissues.

  18. Enterococcus faecalis antigens in human infections.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Jiang, L; Murray, B E; Weinstock, G M

    1997-10-01

    Genomic libraries of two Enterococcus faecalis strains, OG1RF and TX52 (an isolate from an endocarditis patient), were constructed in cosmid vectors pBeloBAC11 and pLAFRx, and screened with a serum from a rabbit immunized with surface proteins of an E. faecalis endocarditis isolate and sera from four patients with enterococcal endocarditis. Seventy-five cosmid clones reacted with at least two of the sera. Thirty-eight of the 75 immunopositive clones were considered to contain distinct inserts based on their DNA restriction patterns and were chosen for further subcloning into a pBluescript vector. Each sublibrary was screened with one of the five sera, and the DNA sequence of the immunopositive subclones was determined. Analysis of these sequences revealed similarities to a range of proteins, including bacterial virulence factors, transporters, two-component regulators, metabolic enzymes, and membrane or cell surface proteins. Fourteen subclones did not show significant similarity to any sequence in the databases and may contain novel genes. Thirteen of the immunopositive cosmid clones did not yield immunopositive subclones, and one such cosmid clone produced a nonprotein antigen in Escherichia coli.

  19. High-density lipoprotein 3 physicochemical modifications induced by interaction with human polymorphonuclear leucocytes affect their ability to remove cholesterol from cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cogny, A; Atger, V; Paul, J L; Soni, T; Moatti, N

    1996-01-01

    1. We have recently reported that a short incubation (60 min) in vitro of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) 3 with human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) leads to a proteolytic cleavage of apolipoprotein (apo) AII and to a change in the distribution of apo AI isoforms [Cogny, Paul, Atger, Soni and Moatti (1994) Eur. J. Biochem. 222, 965-973]. Since PMNs have been observed to be present in the earliest atherosclerotic lesions for a number of days, we investigated the HDL3 physiochemical modifications induced by in vitro interaction for a long period of time (24 h) with PMNs and the consequences of the changes on the ability of HDL3 to remove cholesterol from cells. 2. The stimulated PMN modification of HDL3 over 24 h resulted in a partial loss of protein with no variation in lipid molar ratio and a loss of 50% of HDL alpha-tocopherol content. The decrease in total protein was due first to a complete degradation of apo AII, and secondly to a partial loss of apo AI. The apo AI remaining on the particles was in part hydrolysed and the apo AI-1 isoform was completely shifted to the apo AI-2 isoform. These apo changes were accompanied by a displacement of the native HDL3 apparent size toward predominantly larger particles. 3. The ability of PMN-modified HDL3 to remove 3H-labelled free cholesterol from cells was measured in two cell lines: Fu5AH rat hepatoma cells and J774 mouse macrophages. HDL3 which had only a limited contact with PMNs (60 min) showed only a small non-significant reduction in the efficiency of cholesterol efflux. On the other hand, compared with native HDL3, HDL3 modified by PMNs for 24 h had a markedly reduced ability to remove cholesterol from cells, regardless of the type of cell. 4. The results suggest that PMN-modified HDL3, if occurring in vivo, could contribute to acceleration of the atherogenic process by decreasing the cholesterol efflux from cells. PMID:8660296

  20. Quantification of leucocytes, T-lymphocytes and macrophages in autoptical endomyocardial tissue from 56 normal human hearts during the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Grasmeyer, Sarah; Oswald, Sylvia; Madea, Burkhard

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the normal number of inflammatory cells in the heart in the first year of life using two methods to compare their ability to quantitate physiological myocardial infiltration. Eight endomyocardial samples from both ventricles were obtained at autopsy from 56 structurally normal hearts during the first year of life. In each sample the numbers of leucocytes, T-lymphocytes and macrophages were counted once in 20 randomly chosen high-power fields (400×) as well as in a 10mm(2) area of randomly chosen myocardial tissue (100×) by two independent investigators. Compared to the literature a greater representative proportion of myocardial tissue was analyzed. The results of the enumeration in mm(2) were converted into high-power-fields to compare both methods. The mean numbers and standard deviations for leucocytes, T-lymphocytes and macrophages were calculated. Both counting methods showed similar results with low inflammatory cell counts per single heart and staining. A greater understanding of the physiological myocardial infiltration by leucocytes, T-lymphocytes and macrophages is important for postmortem forensic cases, and for the interpretation of endomyocardial biopsies in infants.

  1. Sialylated Lewis × Antigen Bearing Glycoproteins in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Wonryeon; Jung, Kwanyoung; Regnier, Fred E.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that antibodies targeting Lewis × (Lex) antigen are a valuable tool in the isolation and identification of glycoproteins in plasma. A focus of this study was to determine whether sialylated Lewis × (sLex) antigen carrying glycoproteins occur in human plasma and whether an antibody targeting this antigen could be used to isolate and identify glycoproteins bearing this antigen. An additional objective was to determine the degree to which proteins conjugated to Lex and sLex antigens are similar in structure. A specific anti-sLex antibody (anti-sLexAb), CHO-131, immobilized in an immunoaffinity column was used to select a set of specific sLex bearing proteins from human plasma, after which they were identified by either of two analytical strategies. One approach was to further resolve the affinity selected proteins by reversed phase chromatography (RPC), tryptic digest the RPC fractions, and identify peptide fragments by MALDI-MS/MS. The second was to tryptic digest the affinity selected protein fraction, further resolve the tryptic fragments by RPC, and identify peptides from RPC fractions by MALDI-MS/MS. Histidine-rich glycoprotein, plasminogen, apolipoprotein A-I, vitronectin, proteoglycan-4, clusterin, Ig gamma-2 chain C region, Ig mu chain C region, and inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 were found to change three folds or more in association with breast cancer. Fifty percent of the glycoproteins carrying either sLex antigen from CHO-131 selection, Lex antigen from selection with TG-1 antibody, or both were found to be changed three folds or more in concentration in breast cancer plasma relative to controls. PMID:20858014

  2. Photoaffinity antigens for human γδ T cells1

    PubMed Central

    Sarikonda, Ghanashyam; Wang, Hong; Puan, Kia-Joo; Liu, Xiao-hui; Lee, Hoi K.; Song, Yongcheng; Distefano, Mark D.; Oldfield, Eric; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Morita, Craig T.

    2009-01-01

    Vγ2Vδ2 T cells comprise the major subset of peripheral blood γ δ T cells in humans and expand during infections by recognizing small, nonpeptide prenyl pyrophosphates. These molecules include (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl-pyrophosphate (HMBPP), a microbial isoprenoid intermediate, and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), an endogenous isoprenoid intermediate. Recognition of these nonpeptide antigens is mediated by the Vγ2Vδ2 T cell antigen receptor (TCR). Several findings suggest that prenyl pyrophosphates are presented by an antigen presenting molecule: contact between T cells and APCs is required; the antigens do not bind the Vγ2Vδ2 TCR directly; and antigen recognition is abrogated by TCR mutations in CDRs distant from the putative antigen recognition site. Identification of the putative antigen presenting molecule, however, has been hindered by the inability to achieve stable association of nonpeptide prenyl pyrophosphate antigens with the presenting molecule. In this study, we show that photoaffinity analogs of HMBPP, meta/para-benzophenone-(methylene)-prenyl pyrophosphates (m/p-BZ-(C)-C5-OPP), can cross-link to the surface of tumor cell lines and be presented as antigens to γ δ T cells. Mutant tumor cell lines lacking MHC class I, MHC class II, β2-microglobulin, and CD1, as well as tumor cell lines from a variety of tissues and individuals, will all crosslink to and present m-BZ-C5-OPP. Finally, pulsing of BZ-(C)-C5-OPP is inhibited by IPP and an inactive analog, suggesting that they bind to the same molecule. Taken together, these results suggest that nonpeptide antigens are presented by a novel antigen presenting molecule that is widely distributed, non-polymorphic, but not classical MHC class I, MHC class II, or CD1. This is an author-produced version of a manuscript accepted for publication in The Journal of Immunology (The JI). The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. (AAI), publisher of The JI, holds the copyright to this manuscript

  3. Characterization of binding specificities of Bovine Leucocyte class I molecules: Impacts for rational epitope discovery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The binding of peptides to classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class-I proteins is the single most selective step in antigen presentation. However, the peptide binding specificity of cattle MHC (bovine leucocyte antigen, BoLA) class I (BoLA-I) molecules remains poorly characterized. Her...

  4. Specificity of leucocyte migration inhibition test in coeliac disease. A reassessment using different gluten subfractions.

    PubMed Central

    Corazza, G R; Rawcliffe, P M; Frisoni, M; Sarchielli, P; Londei, M; Campieri, M; Lazzari, R; Gasbarrini, G

    1985-01-01

    Production of leucocyte migration inhibition factor by peripheral blood leucocytes in response to challenge with gluten fractions has been proposed as a reliable in vitro test for the diagnosis of coeliac disease. We have performed the leucocyte migration inhibition test with two different gluten fractions, GFIII and B2, in untreated and treated coeliac patients, patients with other intestinal diseases (abnormal controls) and healthy controls, and evaluated the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictability of the test for the diagnosis of coeliac disease. Using GFIII as antigen leucocyte migration was significantly inhibited, compared to healthy controls, not only in treated and untreated coeliacs but also in abnormal controls. Using B2 gluten subfraction as antigen only treated coeliacs and abnormal controls differed significantly from healthy controls. The elevated number of abnormal controls showing migration inhibition consistently affected the diagnostic value of the test, which did not vary using B2 subfraction instead of GFIII as antigen. Our study confirms previous observations of gluten sensitization, as detected by leucocyte migration inhibition, in coeliac patients but strongly questions the claim that coeliac disease can be diagnosed on the basis of a positive leucocyte migration inhibition test without the need for intestinal biopsy. PMID:4006297

  5. Profiling human serum antibodies with a carbohydrate antigen microarray

    PubMed Central

    Oyelaran, Oyindasola; McShane, Lisa M.; Dodd, Lori; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2009-01-01

    Carbohydrate antigen arrays (glycan arrays) have been recently developed for the high-throughput analysis of carbohydrate macromolecule interactions. When profiling serum, information about experimental variability, inter-individual biological variability, and intra-individual temporal variability is critical. In this report, we describe the characterization of a carbohydrate antigen array and assay for profiling human serum. Through optimization of assay conditions and development of a normalization strategy, we obtain highly reproducible results with a within-experiment coefficient of variation (CV) of 10.8% and an overall CV (across multiple batches of slides and days) of 28.5%. We also report antibody profiles for 48 human subjects and evaluate for the first time the effects of age, race, sex, geographic location, and blood type on antibody profiles for a large set of carbohydrate antigens. We found significant dependence on age and blood type of antibody levels for a variety of carbohydrates. Finally, we conducted a longitudinal study with a separate group of 7 serum donors to evaluate the variation in anti-carbohydrate antibody levels within an individual over a period ranging from 3 to 13 weeks and found that, for nearly all antigens on our array, antibody levels are generally stable over this period. The results presented here provide the most comprehensive evaluation of experimental and biological variation reported to date for a glycan array and have significant implications for studies involving human serum profiling. PMID:19624168

  6. Identification of human cancers deficient in antigen processing

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Intracellular antigens must be processed before presentation to CD8+ T cells by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Using a recombinant vaccinia virus (Vac) to transiently express the Kd molecule, we studied the antigen processing efficiency of 26 different human tumor lines. Three cell lines, all human small cell lung carcinoma, consistently failed to process endogenously synthesized proteins for presentation to Kd-restricted, Vac-specific T cells. Pulse- chase experiments showed that MHC class I molecules were not transported by these cell lines from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface. This finding suggested that peptides were not available for binding to nascent MHC molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum. Northern blot analysis of these cells revealed low to nondetectable levels of mRNAs for MHC-encoded proteasome components LMP-7 and LMP-2, as well as the putative peptide transporters TAP-1 and TAP-2. Treatment of cells with interferon gamma enhanced expression of these mRNAs and reversed the observed functional and biochemical deficits. Our findings suggest that downregulation of antigen processing may be one of the strategies used by tumors to escape immune surveillance. Potential therapeutic applications of these findings include enhancing antigen processing at the level of the transcription of MHC-encoded proteasome and transporter genes. PMID:8426105

  7. Photoaffinity antigens for human gammadelta T cells.

    PubMed

    Sarikonda, Ghanashyam; Wang, Hong; Puan, Kia-Joo; Liu, Xiao-hui; Lee, Hoi K; Song, Yongcheng; Distefano, Mark D; Oldfield, Eric; Prestwich, Glenn D; Morita, Craig T

    2008-12-01

    Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells comprise the major subset of peripheral blood gammadelta T cells in humans and expand during infections by recognizing small nonpeptide prenyl pyrophosphates. These molecules include (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl-pyrophosphate (HMBPP), a microbial isoprenoid intermediate, and isopentenyl pyrophosphate, an endogenous isoprenoid intermediate. Recognition of these nonpeptide Ags is mediated by the Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cell Ag receptor. Several findings suggest that prenyl pyrophosphates are presented by an Ag-presenting molecule: contact between T cells and APC is required, the Ags do not bind the Vgamma2Vdelta2 TCR directly, and Ag recognition is abrogated by TCR mutations in CDRs distant from the putative Ag recognition site. Identification of the putative Ag-presenting molecule, however, has been hindered by the inability to achieve stable association of nonpeptide prenyl pyrophosphate Ags with the presenting molecule. In this study, we show that photoaffinity analogues of HMBPP, meta/para-benzophenone-(methylene)-prenyl pyrophosphates (m/p-BZ-(C)-C(5)-OPP), can crosslink to the surface of tumor cell lines and be presented as Ags to gammadelta T cells. Mutant tumor cell lines lacking MHC class I, MHC class II, beta(2)-microglobulin, and CD1, as well as tumor cell lines from a variety of tissues and individuals, will all crosslink to and present m-BZ-C(5)-OPP. Finally, pulsing of BZ-(C)-C(5)-OPP is inhibited by isopentenyl pyrophosphate and an inactive analog, suggesting that they bind to the same molecule. Taken together, these results suggest that nonpeptide Ags are presented by a novel-Ag-presenting molecule that is widely distributed and nonpolymorphic, but not classical MHC class I, MHC class II, or CD1.

  8. Mechanism of inhibition of human leucocyte elastase by beta-lactams. 2. Stability, reactivation kinetics, and products of beta-lactam-derived E-I complexes.

    PubMed

    Green, B G; Chabin, R; Mills, S; Underwood, D J; Shah, S K; Kuo, D; Gale, P; Maycock, A L; Liesch, J; Burgey, C S

    1995-11-07

    The monocyclic beta-lactams reported by Knight et al. [Knight, W. B., et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 8160; Chabin, R., et al. (1993) Biochemistry 32, 8970] as inhibitors of human leucocyte elastase (HLE) produce stable HLE-inhibitor complexes that slowly reactivate with half-lives ranging from less than 1 to 15 h at 37 degrees C. The complexes produced between PPE and two C-3 dimethyl-substituted beta-lactams are less stable than those produced between HLE and analogous C-3 diethyl-substituted lactams. The stability of the HLE-I complexes is governed primarily by the structure of the substituted urea portion of the inhibitors and not by the identity or presence of a leaving group at C-4 of the lactam ring. In some cases substitutions on the urea portion of the inhibitors yielded complexes that displayed biphasic reactivation kinetics. This suggests the presence of at least two different complexes. The stereochemistry of the leaving group at C-4 has a small effect on the stability of the final complex (1.3-2-fold); therefore, the identity of the final complex is dependent upon the initial stereochemistry at that position. The stability of the complexes was relatively insensitive to hydroxylamine, which suggests that the acyl-enzymes are protected from nucleophilic "rescue". The rate of reactivation of the complex derived from L-680,833,[S-R*,S*)]-4-[(1-(((1-(4- methylphenyl)butyl)amino)carbonyl)-3,3-diethyl-2-oxo-4-azetidinyl)ben zeneacetic acid, was pH independent, while the L-684,481, (R)-(1-(((1-(4-methylphenyl)butyl)amino)carbonyl)-3,3-diethyl-2-azeti din one generated complex displayed a pH-dependent reactivation rate. In the latter case, the increase in reactivation rate with pH displayed a pKa of 7.2. This is consistent with the requirement for base catalysis by the active site histidine to regenerate enzymatic activity. Reactivation of the L-680,833-derived complex produced different products as a function of pH, suggesting two different pH-dependent routes

  9. Fya/Fyb antigen polymorphism in human erythrocyte Duffy antigen affects susceptibility to Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    King, Christopher L.; Adams, John H.; Xianli, Jia; Grimberg, Brian T.; McHenry, Amy M.; Greenberg, Lior J.; Siddiqui, Asim; Howes, Rosalind E.; da Silva-Nunes, Monica; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Zimmerman, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax (Pv) is a major cause of human malaria and is increasing in public health importance compared with falciparum malaria. Pv is unique among human malarias in that invasion of erythrocytes is almost solely dependent on the red cell's surface receptor, known as the Duffy blood-group antigen (Fy). Fy is an important minor blood-group antigen that has two immunologically distinct alleles, referred to as Fya or Fyb, resulting from a single-point mutation. This mutation occurs within the binding domain of the parasite's red cell invasion ligand. Whether this polymorphism affects susceptibility to clinical vivax malaria is unknown. Here we show that Fya, compared with Fyb, significantly diminishes binding of Pv Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) at the erythrocyte surface, and is associated with a reduced risk of clinical Pv in humans. Erythrocytes expressing Fya had 41–50% lower binding compared with Fyb cells and showed an increased ability of naturally occurring or artificially induced antibodies to block binding of PvDBP to their surface. Individuals with the Fya+b− phenotype demonstrated a 30–80% reduced risk of clinical vivax, but not falciparum malaria in a prospective cohort study in the Brazilian Amazon. The Fya+b− phenotype, predominant in Southeast Asian and many American populations, would confer a selective advantage against vivax malaria. Our results also suggest that efficacy of a PvDBP-based vaccine may differ among populations with different Fy phenotypes. PMID:22123959

  10. Coproduction of carcinoembryonic antigen and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen by a continuous cell line from a human pancreatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, M; Ichiki, S; Kuroki, M; Matsuoka, Y

    1982-08-01

    A simultaneous production of nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) by the same individual cells of an established human pancreatic cell line (QGP-1) was demonstrated by the immunoperoxidase method. Kinetics of cell proliferation and production of CEA and NCA were analyzed, and active synthesis of both antigens was found to be accompanied with the active proliferation of cultured cells. Both antigens in culture medium were purified by immunoadsorption and gel filtration. Immunochemical studies confirmed that CEA and NCA produced by the QGP-1 cells had properties identical to those of authentic CEA derived from metastatic colorectal carcinoma and to those of NCA from normal lungs, respectively.

  11. Identification of Goodpasture antigens in human alveolar basement membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, K; Iseki, T; Okada, M; Morimoto, Y; Eryu, N; Maki, S

    1988-01-01

    Goodpasture (GP) antigens, protein components reactive with human autoantibodies against glomerular basement membrane (GBM), were identified in human alveolar basement membrane (ABM) using an enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA), Western blotting and immunoprecipitation. All six anti-GBM antisera studied, three obtained from patients with glomerulonephritis and pulmonary haemorrhages (i.e. GP syndrome), and three from patients with glomerulonephritis alone, distinctively reacted with collagenase-digested (CD) ABM. Very cationic 22-28 kD and 40-48 kD components were detected by blot analysis combined with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. These proteins showed some similarities to GP antigens in human GBM with respect to the monomer-dimer composition and charge distribution. Inhibition ELISA revealed that the binding of anti-GBM antisera to CDGBM decreased when they were pre-incubated with CDABM, suggesting that the anti-GBM antisera recognized the same epitope(s) on the GBM and ABM. Heterogeneity of the GP antigens in human ABM was demonstrated by blotting; monomeric antigens were absent or at low levels in the CDABM of three out of 10 normal individuals. In immunoprecipitation, anti-GBM antisera from patients with and without pulmonary haemorrhage showed different reactivities with CDABM. The former antisera precipitated both monomeric and dimeric components, but the latter did not. The observations of variation in monomer-dimer composition of ABM, and the different binding of anti-GBM antisera to it may explain why only some patients with anti-GBM nephritis have lung involvement. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:2466590

  12. Antibody-induced antigenic modulation is antigen dependent: characterization of 22 proteins on a malignant human B cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Pesando, J.M.; Hoffman, P.; Abed, M.

    1986-12-01

    Expression of several of the surface antigens on normal and malignant hematopoietic cells is reduced or is modulated by incubation with specific antibodies. Although antigenic modulation provides a means by which cells can escape antibody-mediated immune destruction, the physiologic significance and frequency of this phenomenon are both poorly understood. To begin to address these issues, the authors identified and characterized surface antigens on the malignant B cell line Laz 221 established from a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Indirect immunofluorescence analysis with the use of 26 hematopoietic cell populations and immune precipitation studies with the use of iodinated ALL cells indicate the 163 monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) identify 22 different proteins on this cell line, including at least six previously described surface molecules. Seven of these antigens are expressed by all nucleated cells examined, whereas only the ..mu.. chain of immunoglobulin is B cell specific. Studies that made use of multiple MoAb specific for the same antigen suggest that the capacity for antigenic modulation is an intrinsic property of individual antigens. These studies also suggest that the murine immune response to shared human antigens varies from one immunizing cell population to another. Immunogenicity of individual human antigens in the mouse may be a function of their cell surface environment.

  13. Novel human recombinant antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85B.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Manon; Kämpfer, Susanne; Helmsing, Saskia; Spallek, Ralf; Oehlmann, Wulf; Prilop, Wiebke; Frank, Ronald; Dübel, Stefan; Singh, Mahavir; Hust, Michael

    2014-07-17

    Tuberculosis is the leading cause of death due to bacterial infections worldwide, mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The antigen 85 complex comprises a set of major secreted proteins of M. tuberculosis, which are potential biomarkers for diagnostic. In this work, the first human single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies specific for the tuberculosis biomarker 85 B were selected by phage display from naïve antibody gene libraries (HAL7/8). Produced as scFv-Fc in mammalian cells, these antibodies were further characterized and analysed for specificity and applicability in different tuberculosis antigen detection assays. Sandwich detection of recombinant 85 B was successful in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), lateral flow immunoassay and immunoblot. Whereas detection of M. tuberculosis cell extracts and culture filtrates was only possible in direct ELISA and immunoblot assays. It was found that the conformation of 85 B, depending on sample treatment, influenced antigen detection. Recombinant antibodies, selected by phage display, may be applicable for 85 B detection in various assays. These antibodies are candidates for the development of future point of care tuberculosis diagnostic kits. Using 85 B as a biomarker, the antigen conformation influenced by sample treatment is important.

  14. Novel human recombinant antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85B

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is the leading cause of death due to bacterial infections worldwide, mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The antigen 85 complex comprises a set of major secreted proteins of M. tuberculosis, which are potential biomarkers for diagnostic. Results In this work, the first human single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies specific for the tuberculosis biomarker 85 B were selected by phage display from naïve antibody gene libraries (HAL7/8). Produced as scFv-Fc in mammalian cells, these antibodies were further characterized and analysed for specificity and applicability in different tuberculosis antigen detection assays. Sandwich detection of recombinant 85 B was successful in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), lateral flow immunoassay and immunoblot. Whereas detection of M. tuberculosis cell extracts and culture filtrates was only possible in direct ELISA and immunoblot assays. It was found that the conformation of 85 B, depending on sample treatment, influenced antigen detection. Conclusions Recombinant antibodies, selected by phage display, may be applicable for 85 B detection in various assays. These antibodies are candidates for the development of future point of care tuberculosis diagnostic kits. Using 85 B as a biomarker, the antigen conformation influenced by sample treatment is important. PMID:25033887

  15. ANTIGEN-ANTIBODY REACTIONS IN ALLERGIC HUMAN TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Rappaport, Ben Z.

    1960-01-01

    Skin sensitizing human antibodies were conjugated with various fluorescent dyes without significant loss in their ability to combine with specific antigen in vitro. A biopsy of the skin site challenged with egg albumin in a patient sensitive to this antigen could be stained specifically by the fluorescent reagins. The epithelial cells of the epidermis, sweat glands, hair follicles, and sebaceous glands in such a challenged site showed specific staining. In addition to the epithelial cells, the most intense staining was in macrophages and in pericapillary cells. The endothelium of the small blood vessels stained less intensely. Fibrous tissue bundles were specifically stained. The immunologic staining with the conjugated reagins was similar to but more intense than that obtained with conjugated rabbit anti-egg albumin globulins. PMID:13739590

  16. [Isolation and physico-chemical characteristics of human cancerocerebral antigen].

    PubMed

    Prokopenko, P G; Borisenko, S A; Tatarinov, Iu S

    1984-01-01

    During gel filtration on Sephadex G-200 human cancerocerebral antigen (CCA) was eluted as two protein fractions with molecular mass of 135,000 and 270.000 daltons. Only one band of protein with molecular mass of about 15,000 daltons was noted after electrophoresis in 10% polyacrylamide gel containing SDS. As characteristic properties of CCA were recognized an electrophoretic polymorphism and a distinct trend to polymerization and isomeria. The antigen was not stained with dyes designed for staining base proteins, lipo-,glyco- and ferroproteins; CCA was thermostable (5 min at 80 degrees), it was inactivated by trypsin and protease but was resistant to pronase, hexokinase, alpha-amylase and beta-glucuronidase. A procedure was developed for isolation of CCA from brain, including fractionation with ammonium sulfate, ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50. The procedure enabled to obtain the CCA preparations suitable for radioimmunological, immunobiological assays and amino acid analyses.

  17. Human Leukocyte Antigen Diversity: A Southern African Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tshabalala, Mqondisi; Mellet, Juanita; Pepper, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasingly well-documented evidence of high genetic, ethnic, and linguistic diversity amongst African populations, there is limited data on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) diversity in these populations. HLA is part of the host defense mechanism mediated through antigen presentation to effector cells of the immune system. With the high disease burden in southern Africa, HLA diversity data is increasingly important in the design of population-specific vaccines and the improvement of transplantation therapeutic interventions. This review highlights the paucity of HLA diversity data amongst southern African populations and defines a need for information of this kind. This information will support disease association studies, provide guidance in vaccine design, and improve transplantation outcomes. PMID:26347896

  18. Antigen heterogeneity of human B and T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rabellino, E M; Grey, H M; LaForge, S; Pirofsky, B; Kashiwagi, N; Malley, A

    1976-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys were immunized with normal human lymphoid cells, cultured lymphoid cells, and chronic leukemic lymphocytes. Antisera were analyzed by cytotoxicity and immunofluorescence techniques to study the antigenic characteristics of human lymphocytes. In an attempt to obtain a reagent specifically reactive with T (thymus-derived) lymphocytes, an antispleen antiserum was absorbed with cellf from five B- (bone marrow-derived) cell lines. After absorption, the antiserum killed 60-75% of peripheral blood lymphocytes and 40-50% of tonsil cells, so that there was a relationship between the percentage of killed cells and the proportion of T lymphocytes. However, when cells after cytotoxic treatment were assayed for rosette formation with sheep erythrocytes (a T-cell marker) 5-20% of viable rosette-forming lymphocytes were found. Therefore, this antiserum was cytotoxic for only 75-90% of T cells. From studies performed with antisera prepared against spleen and B-cell lines, we conclude that lymphoblastoid cells are antigenically different and deficient in comparison to normal B lymphocytes. In addition, cultured B-cell lines appear to be antigenically heterogenous, as shown by the cytotoxic activity remaining in antispleen and anti-B-cell lines sera after absorption with various numbers and types of lymphoid cell lines. After absorption with normal lymphocytes, an antiserum produced against chronic lymphatic leukemia cells had specific activity associated with 12 chronic lymphatic leukemia cells tested. Absorption of the same antiserum with leukemic cells from two patients showed that a certain degree of antigenic heterogeneity also exists among chronic leukemic lymphocytes. PMID:815274

  19. A human-mouse hybridoma producing monoclonal antibody against human sperm coating antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Kyurkchiev, S D; Shigeta, M; Koyama, K; Isojima, S

    1986-01-01

    Since anti-sperm antibodies were first discovered in the sera of women, the relationship of these antibodies to sterility has been studied by many investigators. In order to determine the antigens of spermatozoa responsible for raising antibodies to spermatozoa in humans, many studies have been carried out by purifying human spermatozoa cell membrane and seminal plasma components. Since it was found that the purification was difficult by physiochemical procedures, the immunoaffinity chromatography bound monoclonal antibody (Mab) to spermatozoa antigens was attempted for this purpose. The establishment of hybridomas producing Mabs to human seminal plasma and human spermatozoa was reported by Shigeta et al. (1980), Isojima, Koyoma & Fujiwara (1982), Lee et al. (1982) and Isahakia & Alexander (1984). The ordinary approaches to obtain the Mabs consisted of xenogenic immunization with human semen and cell fusion of immunized spleen cells with mouse myeloma cells. However, the antigenic epitopes of human spermatozoa, which induced antibody production, are xenogenic for the mouse, and therefore there is a possibility that there is a difference in recognized antigenic epitopes in humans as isotypic and in mice as xenogenic. In order to study these antigenic epitopes, which correspond to antibodies against spermatozoa in women, the establishment of human-mouse hybridomas, which produced anti-semen antibodies as produced in sterile women, became essential. In these studies, we used recently developed cell fusion techniques to fuse immunized human peripheral lymphocytes with mouse myeloma cells. PMID:3456978

  20. Characterization of a human antigen specific helper factor

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, B.

    1986-03-01

    While antigen (Ag) specific helper factors have been characterized in mice, similar molecules have not been identified in humans. To characterize human antigen specific helper molecules, an IL-2 dependent tetanus toxoid (T.T.) reactive T cell line was fused with a 6-thioguanine resistant CEM line, and hybrids selected in medium containing hypoxanthine and azaserine. Hybrids were screened by culturing the cells with /sup 35/S-Met then reacting the supernatants with T.T. or hepatitis vaccine immobilized on nitrocellulose. One hybrid, TT6BA-O, was identified which secreted a Met-containing molecule which bound T.T. but not hepatitis vaccine. Supernatants from TT6BA-O, but not the parent CEM line, when added to autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC's) stimulated secretion of T.T. specific antibodies (Abs). Specificity controls demonstrated that TT6BA-O supernatant did not induce antibodies to diphtheria toxoid, hepatitis vaccine or pneumococcal polysaccharide, and total immunoglobulin (lg) synthesis was minimally increased. In contrast, pokeweed mitogen stimulated significant lg synthesis as well as Ab's to pneumococcal polysaccharide and T.T. TT6BA-O supernatant induced anti-T.T.Ab's in autologous PBMC's but not PBMC's from 3 unrelated donors, suggesting that the activity of the helper factor is restricted, possibly by the MHC. The molecular weight of the helper factor was estimated at 100,000-150,000 by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography. Finally, the helper factor could be demonstrated to bind and elute from sephorose-immobilized T.T. and anti-DR antisera, but not anti-lg antisera or the T40/25 monoclonal antibody, which binds a nonpolymorphic determinant on the human T cell receptor. These results demonstrate that human Ag specific helper factors exist, bind antigen and bear class II MHC determinants.

  1. Sperm-immobilizing monoclonal antibody to human seminal plasma antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Shigeta, M; Watanabe, T; Maruyama, S; Koyama, K; Isojima, S

    1980-01-01

    Rat spleen cells immunized to human azoospermic semen (a mixture of seminal plasma components) and mouse myeloma cells (P3/X63 Ag8U1; P3U1) (Marguilies et al., 1976) were successfully fused with polyethylene glycol (PEG 1500) and 19 of 89 fused cell cultures were found to produce sperm-immobilizing antibody. The cells that produced antibody indicating the highest sperm-immobilizing activity were distributed into wells for further recloning and 10 clones producing sperm-immobilizing antibody were established. The clone (1C4) producing the highest antibody titre was found to produce a large amount of IgG in culture supernatants and to contain a mixture of rat and mouse chromosomes. It was proved by immunodiffusion test that the monoclonal antibody was produced to the human seminal plasma antigen No. 7 which is common to human milk protein. Using this hybridoma which produced a large amount of monoclonal sperm-immobilizing antibody, a new method could be developed for purifying human seminal plasma antigen by immunoaffinity chromatography with bound antibody from the hybridoma. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6783353

  2. Natural micropolymorphism in human leukocyte antigens provides a basis for genetic control of antigen recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Archbold, Julia K.; Macdonald, Whitney A.; Gras, Stephanie; Ely, Lauren K.; Miles, John J.; Bell, Melissa J.; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Beddoe, Travis; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Clements, Craig S.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2009-07-10

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene polymorphism plays a critical role in protective immunity, disease susceptibility, autoimmunity, and drug hypersensitivity, yet the basis of how HLA polymorphism influences T cell receptor (TCR) recognition is unclear. We examined how a natural micropolymorphism in HLA-B44, an important and large HLA allelic family, affected antigen recognition. T cell-mediated immunity to an Epstein-Barr virus determinant (EENLLDFVRF) is enhanced when HLA-B*4405 was the presenting allotype compared with HLA-B*4402 or HLA-B*4403, each of which differ by just one amino acid. The micropolymorphism in these HLA-B44 allotypes altered the mode of binding and dynamics of the bound viral epitope. The structure of the TCR-HLA-B*4405EENLLDFVRF complex revealed that peptide flexibility was a critical parameter in enabling preferential engagement with HLA-B*4405 in comparison to HLA-B*4402/03. Accordingly, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism can alter the dynamics of the peptide-MHC landscape, resulting in fine-tuning of T cell responses between closely related allotypes.

  3. Catalase, a specific antigen in the feces of human subjects infected with Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuyuki; Wakasugi, Masahiko; Nakaya, Seigo; Kokubo, Naomi; Sato, Masami; Kajiyama, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Ryoki; Hirata, Haruhisa; Ezure, Yohji; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Shimoyama, Takashi

    2002-07-01

    Recently, we reported the production of three new monoclonal antibodies with high specificity for a Helicobacter pylori antigen suitable for diagnosis of H. pylori infection. The aim of the present study was to identify the antigen recognized by these monoclonal antibodies concerning both H. pylori and the feces of human subjects infected with H. pylori. The cellular antigen was purified from an H. pylori cell extract by immunoaffinity column chromatography with the monoclonal antibody as a ligand. The amino-terminal amino acid sequences (eight residues) of the purified antigen and H. pylori catalase were the same. The molecular weights of native and subunit, specific catalase activity, and UV and visible spectra of the purified antigen were in good agreement with those of H. pylori catalase. The human fecal antigens were purified from two fecal samples of two H. pylori-positive subjects by ammonium sulfate precipitation, CM-Sephadex C(50) chromatography, and the same immunoaffinity chromatography used for the H. pylori cellular antigen. The fecal antigens had catalase activity. The amino-terminal amino acid sequences (five residues) of the human fecal antigen and H. pylori catalase were the same. The monoclonal antibodies reacted with the native cellular antigen, but did not react with the denatured antigen, human catalase, and bovine catalase. The results show that the target antigen of the monoclonal antibodies is native H. pylori catalase and that the monoclonal antibodies are able to specifically detect the antigen, which exists in an intact form, retaining the catalase activity in human feces.

  4. Epithelial barrier and antigen uptake in lymphoepithelium of human adenoids.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Noriko; Kojima, Takashi; Go, Mitsuru; Takano, Ken-ichi; Kamekura, Ryuta; Ohkuni, Tsuyoshi; Koizumi, Jun-ichi; Masaki, Tomoyuki; Fuchimoto, Jun; Obata, Kazufumi; Kurose, Makoto; Shintani, Tomoko; Sawada, Norimasa; Himi, Tetsuo

    2011-02-01

    Invasion of antigens through the mucosal surface can be prevented by the common mucosal immune system, including Peyer's patches (PPs) and nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoreticular tissue (NALT). The adenoids (nasopharyngeal tonsils) comprise one of the NALTs and constitute the major part of Waldeyer's lymphoid ring in humans. However, the role of the lymphoepithelium, including M cells and dendritic cells (DCs), in the adenoids is unknown compared with the epithelium of PPs. NALTs also have unique functions such as the barrier of epithelial cells and uptake of antigens by M cells and DCs, and may play a crucial role in airway mucosal immune responses. The lymphoepithelium of adenoids has well-developed tight junctions that play an important role in the barrier function, the same as nasal epithelium but not palatine tonsillar epithelium. Tight junction molecules are expressed in both M cells and DCs as well as epithelial cells, and various antigens may be sampled, transported, and released to lymphocytes through the cells while they maintain the integrity of the epithelial barrier. This review summarizes the recent progress in our understanding of how M cells and DCs control the epithelial barrier in the adenoids.

  5. Human Intestinal M Cells Display the Sialyl Lewis A Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Giannasca, Paul J.; Giannasca, Karen T.; Leichtner, Alan M.; Neutra, Marian R.

    1999-01-01

    The biochemical features that distinguish human M cells from other intestinal epithelial cell types are important for understanding microbial pathogenesis and for targeting vaccines to the mucosal immune system. We applied a large panel of carbohydrate-specific monoclonal antibodies and lectins to Peyer’s patch and cecum biopsy specimens from three normal individuals and a patient with inflammatory bowel disease. The results show that human M-cell glycosylation patterns are distinct from those of other species examined and that human M cells preferentially display the sialyl Lewis A antigen. This carbohydrate epitope is also present in a small subpopulation of enterocytes in the follicle-associated epithelium and in goblet cell mucins. PMID:9916113

  6. Generation of human monoclonal antibodies reactive with cellular antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Cote, R J; Morrissey, D M; Houghton, A N; Beattie, E J; Oettgen, H F; Old, L J

    1983-01-01

    Human lymphocytes from lymph node, peripheral blood, spleen, and tumor specimens have been fused with the LICR-LON-HMy2 (LICR-2) or SKO-007 human cell lines or the NS-1 mouse myeloma line. Over 75 fusions with the three myeloma-lymphoblastoid lines have been performed. Several factors appeared to improve the fusion outcome, including maintenance of the myeloma-lymphoblastoid lines in logarithmic phase growth at greater than or equal to 95% viability, a delay of 24 hr in the introduction of aminopterin to the fused cells, and preselection of the fetal calf serum used in the medium. For a given number of lymphocytes, fusions with NS-1 produced 5-20 times more clones than fusions with LICR-2 or SKO-007, and LICR-2 produced 4 times as many clones as SKO-007. The percentage of clones secreting human immunoglobulin, the range of immunoglobulin production, and the proportion of IgM, IgA, and IgG secretors were comparable for clones derived from the three myeloma-lymphoblastoid lines. Stable Ig-secreting clones were isolated with approximately equal frequency from LICR-2 and NS-1 fusions. A number of stable clones producing human monoclonal antibodies reacting with cell-surface, cytoplasmic, or nuclear antigens have been isolated from tumor-bearing patients and normal individuals. A surface antigenic system present on normal and malignant cells has been defined with a human monoclonal antibody derived from a patient with breast cancer. Techniques for producing human monoclonal antibody now appear to be sufficiently advanced to initiate a serological dissection of the humoral immune response to cancer. Images PMID:6572959

  7. Antibodies to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Potentiate the Response of Human T Lymphocyte Clones to the Same Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis, Esteban; Chang, Tse Wen

    1984-04-01

    Human T-helper lymphocyte clones specific for hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) proliferate on stimulation with HBsAg in vitro. Antibodies specific for HBsAg, but no other antibodies, augment this proliferative response. In the presence of antibodies to HBsAg, the maximum response could be achieved at HBsAg concentrations that were 1 percent of those required in the absence of the antibodies. These findings suggest that antigen-specific antibodies exert regulatory controls on T cells that recognize the same antigens.

  8. Healthy Human T-Cell Responses to Aspergillus fumigatus Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Neelkamal; Staab, Janet F.; Marr, Kieren A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Aspergillus fumigatus is associated with both invasive and allergic pulmonary diseases, in different hosts. The organism is inhaled as a spore, which, if not cleared from the airway, germinates into hyphal morphotypes that are responsible for tissue invasion and resultant inflammation. Hyphae secrete multiple products that function as antigens, evoking both a protective (TH1–TH17) and destructive allergic (TH2) immunity. How Aspergillus allergens (Asp f proteins) participate in the development of allergic sensitization is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine whether Asp f proteins are strictly associated with TH2 responses, or represent soluble hyphal products recognized by healthy hosts, human T cell responses to crude and recombinant products were characterized by ELISPOT. While responses (number of spots producing IFN-γ, IL-4 or IL-17) to crude hyphal antigen preparations were weak, responses to recombinant Asp f proteins were higher. Recombinant allergens stimulated cells to produce IFN-γ more so than IL-4 or IL-17. Volunteers exhibited a diverse CD4+ and CD8+ T cell antigen recognition profile, with prominent CD4 TH1-responses to Asp f3 (a putative peroxismal membrane protein), Asp f9/16 (cell wall glucanase), Asp f11 (cyclophilin type peptidyl-prolyl isomerase) and Asp f22 (enolase). Strong IFN-γ responses were reproduced in most subjects tested over 6 month intervals. Conclusions Products secreted after conidial germination into hyphae are differentially recognized by protective T cells in healthy, non-atopic individuals. Defining the specificity of the human T cell repertoire, and identifying factors that govern early responses may allow for development of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for both invasive and allergic Aspergillus diseases. PMID:20174463

  9. 76 FR 51374 - Direct Discovery of HLA Associated Influenza Epitopes Isolated From Human Cells for Vaccine and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... Isolated From Human Cells for Vaccine and Therapeutic Evaluation and Development (U01) AGENCY: Food and... processed and presented on soluble HLA (human leucocyte antigen) expressed by human cells. Initial studies... produced from influenza infected human lung cell lines. There is a growing interest in developing universal...

  10. [Monoclonal antibodies of the ICO series against differentiation antigens of human lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Baryshnikov, A Iu

    1990-08-01

    The principal characteristics of monoclonal antibodies (MCA) ICO have been presented. The MCA ICO panel includes MCA against differentiating antigens of T- and B-lymphocytes, myelomonocytes, human leukemia-associated antigens. The following MCA have been described: MCA ICO-87 against common T-cell antigen CD7, ICO-33 and ICO-80 against common T-cell antigen CD5, MCA ICO-10 against Thy-1 antigen of early thymocytes, ICO-44 against CD1c antigen of cortical thymocytes, MCA ICO-90 against CD3 antigen of mature T-lymphocytes, MCA ICO-86 against CD4 antigen of T-helper/inductor cells, MCA ICO-31 against CD8 antigen of T-suppressor/cytotoxic cells, MCA ICO-1 against nonpolymorphic antigens of HLA II class, MCA ICO-12 against CD22 antigen of B-lymphocytes, MCA ICO-30 against mu-chain of human IgGM, MCA ICO-66 against CD37 antigen of B-lymphocytes, MCA ICO-88 against antigen of activated T- and B-cells, MCA ICO-35 against lymphoblasts, MCA ICO-88 against CD38 antigen of thymocytes and activated cells.

  11. Method for labelling leucocytes with indium In-111 oxine

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminsky, D.

    1992-03-03

    This patent describes an improved method for radio-labelling leucocytes with Indium In-111 oxine. It comprises separating the leucocytes from whole blood for obtaining separated leucocytes mixed with residual red blood cells; and then labelling the separated leucocytes with Indium In-111 oxine; wherein the improvement comprises the following further step: depleting residual red blood cells from the separated leucocytes by resuspending the leucocytes in an isotonic saline solution, then rocking the resuspended leucocytes for causing the leucocytes to preferentially settle out, and then removing residual red blood cells which remain suspended within the supernatant isotonic saline solution.

  12. Human leukocyte antigen-E alleles and expression in patients with serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Lu, Renquan; Xie, Suhong; Wen, Xuemei; Wang, Hongling; Gao, Xiang; Guo, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) is one of the most extensively studied non-classical MHC class I molecules that is almost non-polymorphic. Only two alleles (HLA-E*0101 and HLA-E*0103) are found in worldwide populations, and suggested to be functional differences between these variants. The HLA-E molecule can contribute to the escape of cancer cells from host immune surveillance. However, it is still unknown whether HLA-E gene polymorphisms might play a role in cancer immune escape. To explore the association between HLA-E alleles and the susceptibility to serous ovarian cancer (SOC), 85 primary SOC patients and 100 healthy women were enrolled. Here, we indicated that high frequency of HLA-E*0103 allele existed in SOC patients by the allele-specific quantitative real-time PCR method. The levels of HLA-E protein expression in SOC patients with the HLA-E*0103 allele were higher than those with the HLA-E*0101 allele using immunohistochemistry analysis. The cell surface expression and functional differences between the two alleles were verified by K562 cells transfected with HLA-E*0101 or HLA-E*0103 allelic heavy chains. The HLA-E*0103 allele made the transfer of the HLA-E molecule to the cell surface easier, and HLA-E/peptides complex more stable. These differences ultimately influenced the function of natural killer cells, showing that the cells transfected with HLA-E*0103 allele inhibited natural killer cells to lysis. This study reveals a novel mechanism regarding the susceptibility to SOC, which is correlated with the HLA-E*0103 allele. PMID:25711417

  13. Do FY antigens act as minor histocompatibility antigens in the graft-versus-host disease paradigm after human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplantation?

    PubMed

    Sellami, Mohamed Hichem; Chaabane, Manel; Kaabi, Houda; Torjemane, Lamia; Ladeb, Saloua; Ben Othmane, Tarek; Hmida, Slama

    2012-03-01

    FY antigens are candidate minor histocompatibility antigens relevant to renal allograft rejection, but no data have been reported about their role in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) incidence after human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical siblings hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of donor/recipient disparity at FY antigens on the incidence of GVHD in Tunisian patients receiving an HLA-identical HSCT. This work enrolled 105 Tunisian pairs of recipients and their HLA-identical sibling donors of HSCs. FY genotyping was performed with the polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer method and donor/recipient disparity for these antigens was analyzed at two levels: incompatibility and nonidentity. The case-control analyses showed no significant correlation between FY disparity and the incidence of either acute or chronic GVHD. Sample size calculation showed that 572 cases and 1716 controls would be necessary to be able to detect a significant association with 80% power and two-sided type I error level of 5% (α=0.05). The lack of association in the studied cohort may be explained by the low immunogenicity of FY antigens in HSCT context, compared with other antigens such as HA-1 and CD31.

  14. Use of leucocyte migration under agarose to study spontaneous and directed locomotion of leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Repo, H; Kostiala, A A; Kosunen, T U

    1978-01-01

    Three different cell attractants, together with the parallel use of the leucocyte migration agarose test (LMAT) and the leading front modification (LFM) of the Boyden chamber technique, were employed in studying whether the maximal migration of normal human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) is higher toward an attractant (chemotaxis) than in the same attractant incorporated in the culture media (chemokinesis). Using LMAT, the maximal migration distance toward zymosan activated serum (ZAS) was found to be significantly longer than that under agarose mixed with ZAS, thus indicating a chemotactic effect exerted by ZAS. When bacterial culture filtrate (BCF) and casein were used as attractants, the corresponding difference was not significant, implying that the stimulatory effect of these substances on cell migration could be explained by increased random locomotion (chemokinesis) alone. In LFM, the migration rate was significantly higher along a casein gradient than without a gradient. Using ZAS, however, only chemokinesis could be demonstrated. BCF was found to attract PMNs into membrane filters only in the presence of human serum albumin. These observations give credence to the view that both LMAT and LFM are applicable to the in vitro assessment of chemotaxis and chemokinesis but the attractant of choice for this is different in each of the two methods. Images Figure 1 PMID:359465

  15. Increased 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in plasma and decreased mRNA expression of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, anti-oxidant enzymes, mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins and glycolytic enzymes in leucocytes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lee, H-T; Lin, C-S; Lee, C-S; Tsai, C-Y; Wei, Y-H

    2014-04-01

    We measured plasma levels of the oxidative DNA damage marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and leucocyte mRNA expression levels of the genes encoding the 8-OHdG repair enzyme human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1), the anti-oxidant enzymes copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD), manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1), GPx-4, glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione synthetase (GS), the mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins mtDNA-encoded ND 1 polypeptide (ND1), ND6, ATPase 6, mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), nuclear respiratory factor 1(NRF-1), pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 component alpha subunit (PDHA1), pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoenzyme 1 (PDK-1) and hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the glycolytic enzymes hexokinase-II (HK-II), glucose 6-phosphate isomerase (GPI), phosphofructokinase (PFK), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHa). We analysed their relevance to oxidative damage in 85 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, four complicated SLE patients undergoing rituximab treatment and 45 healthy individuals. SLE patients had higher plasma 8-OHdG levels (P < 0·01) but lower leucocyte expression of the genes encoding hOGG1(P < 0·01), anti-oxidant enzymes (P < 0·05), mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (P < 0·05) and glycolytic enzymes (P < 0·05) than healthy individuals. The increase in plasma 8-OHdG was correlated positively with the elevation of leucocyte expression of the genes encoding hOGG1 (P < 0·05), anti-oxidant enzymes (P < 0·05), several mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (P < 0·05) and glycolytic enzymes (P < 0·05) in lupus patients. The patients, whose leucocyte mtDNA harboured D310 heteroplasmy, exhibited a positive correlation between the mtDNA copy number and expression of ND1, ND6 and ATPase 6 (P < 0·05) and a negative correlation between mt

  16. Impact of antigen-presenting cells on cytokine profiles of human Th clones established after stimulation with Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Conradt, P; Kaufmann, S H

    1995-01-01

    Human T cells reactive with mycobacterial antigens are generally considered to correlate with a Th1 cytokine profile. Our data show that, in addition, Th0 and Th2 clones develop in bulk culture with appropriate antigen-presenting cells before cloning. CD4+ blasts activated by mycobacterial antigens were cloned, and their mRNA patterns for the interleukins (IL) IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10 and gamma interferon were characterized by reverse-transcribed PCR. Nonadherent, nonrosetting, enriched peripheral blood mononuclear cells promoted development of Th0; after further depletion of monocytes and natural killer cells, Th2 clones were also found. Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells, with specificity for the stimulating antigen, increased the proportion of Th2 clones. PMID:7729923

  17. Cell adhesion markers are expressed by a stable human endothelial cell line transformed by the SV40 large T antigen under vimentin promoter control.

    PubMed

    Vicart, P; Testut, P; Schwartz, B; Llorens-Cortes, C; Perdomo, J J; Paulin, D

    1993-10-01

    Markers of endothelium have been studied in a new endothelial cell line derived from human umbilical cord vein cells by microinjection of a recombinant gene that includes a deletion mutant of the human vimentin gene regulatory region controlling the large T and small t antigen coding region of the SV40 virus. In culture, this immortalized venous endothelial cell line (IVEC) demonstrated morphological characteristics of endothelium; uptake of acetylated low density lipoprotein and presence of the Factor VIII-related antigen. Treatment of IVEC cells with Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) at 10 U.ml-1 activates the expression of cell adhesion molecules such as endothelial leucocyte adhesion molecule (ELAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), as observed in primary culture. Prostacyclin secretion was induced in the IVEC cells by 100 nM PMA treatment and thrombin at 0.5 U/ml. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity detected in IVEC cells was present but lower than ACE activity in primary endothelial cells and was completely blocked by enalaprilat (1 microM), a specific ACE inhibitor. The presence of ACE mRNA was also demonstrated in IVEC cells by RT-PCR amplification. Our data demonstrate that endothelial cells immortalized by use of this recombinant gene retain the morphological organization and numerous differentiated properties of endothelium.

  18. Specific binding of antigen onto human T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Durandy, A.; Fischer, A.; Charron, D.; Griscelli, C.

    1986-05-01

    Human T lymphocytes sensitized to Candida albicans (CA) were shown to proliferate in cultures induced with mannan, a ramified polysaccharide extracted from the cell well of CA. We presently describe that, when we used strongly labeled (/sup 3/H)mannan, antigen-specific T blast cells were able to bind the labeled mannan on their membrane. The observations that irrelevant blast cells did not bind (/sup 3/H)mannan, and that mannan-specific blast cells did not bind tritiated pneumococcal polysaccharide SIII, indicate the specificity of mannan binding. Mannan binding was reversible and saturable. Mannan binding on T blast cells was inhibited by preincubation with monoclonal antibodies to T3 but not to other T cell-related molecules. The characteristics of this receptor suggest its identity with the T cell receptor for antigen. The direct binding of mannan could be either due to a cross-linking of the receptor by multivalent mannan or to a recognition of mannan in association with HLA-DQ molecules, as suggested by partial blocking of mannan binding using anti-HLA-DQ monoclonal antibodies.

  19. Human cell-mediated immune responses to chlamydial antigens.

    PubMed

    Hanna, L; Schmidt, L; Sharp, M; Stites, D P; Jawetz, E

    1979-02-01

    A reproducible method was developed to determine the ability of chlamydial antigens to stimulate lymphocytes from volunteers. In tests repeated 4 to 14 times, the cells from a given volunteer gave a relatively narrow range of responses, but there were great differences in the mean response of different volunteers. In the entire group of 52 volunteers, lymphocyte stimulation was significantly associated with the presence of antibody, but in a given individual results of one test did not aid in predicting the results of the other. A majority of persons with either antichlamydial antibody or elevated lymphocyte stimulation, or both, did not have a history of signs or symptoms within a spectrum of chlamydial diseases. This may reflect the great frequency of asymptomatic infection with these organisms. The lymphocytes of some individuals were stimulated to a significantly greater degree by antigens of one chlamydial species (Chlamydia trachomatis or C. psittaci) than by the other. These and other cell-mediated reactions in human chlamydial infections, and their possible medical significance, are under continued study.

  20. Thermoinactivation of human IgE: antigenic and functional modifications.

    PubMed Central

    Demeulemester, C; Weyer, A; Peltre, G; Laurent, M; Marchand, F; David, B

    1986-01-01

    The thermoinactivation kinetics of IgE were studied in experimental models revealing the antigenic properties and the basophil-sensitizing capacity of these immunoglobulins. A pool of human sera containing anti-Dactylis glomerata (Dg) IgE was heated from 5 min up to 4 hr at 56 degrees. The IgE antigenicity was tested by two polyclonal 125I-labelled anti-IgE antibodies; one anti-IgE was specific of the whole Fc epsilon region, while the other had a specificity restricted to the D epsilon 2 domain. Radioimmunoassays showed that the D epsilon 2 epitopes were more rapidly altered than the D epsilon 1 epitopes. The capacity of IgE to bind to basophil Fc epsilon receptors was assayed by passive sensitization experiments. Basophil sensitivity towards the Dg pollen extract was tested by histamine release experiments in the presence of this allergen. A progressive decrease in cell sensitivity was observed when IgE samples used for cell sensitization were heated for longer than 5 min. Thermoinactivation kinetics of IgE revealed an unexpected increase in the apparent quantity and biological activity of IgE heated for 5 min at 56 degrees. This fact could be due to auto-anti-IgE antibodies linked to the unheated IgE and which interfere with the biological activities of IgE and their quantification. Images Figure 2 PMID:2420711

  1. Histoplasma capsulatum inhibits apoptosis and Mac-1 expression in leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, A I; Bonato, V L D; Malheiro, A; Dias, A R V; Silva, C L; Faccioli, L H

    2002-10-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum is a fungus found intracellularly in neutrophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), suggesting that it is capable of evading damage and survives inside these cells. In this study, we report that neutrophils from H. capsulatum-infected mice, and human neutrophils and mononuclear cells exposed to H. capsulatum presented less apoptosis than those from noninfected animals or cells exposed to medium only. Moreover, cells harvested from infected animals are resistant to apoptosis induced by dexamethasone - a proapoptotic stimulant. We also show that neutrophils harvested from infected mice and PBMCs from humans exposed to the fungus had a greatly decreased Mac-1 expression. We conclude that H. capsulatum induces an antiapoptotic state on leucocytes, which correlates with decreased cell-surface Mac-1 expression. These facts may represent an escape mechanism for the fungus by delaying cell death and allowing the fungus to survive inside leucocytes.

  2. A melanoma immune response signature including Human Leukocyte Antigen-E.

    PubMed

    Tremante, Elisa; Ginebri, Agnese; Lo Monaco, Elisa; Benassi, Barbara; Frascione, Pasquale; Grammatico, Paola; Cappellacci, Sandra; Catricalà, Caterina; Arcelli, Diego; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Di Filippo, Franco; Mottolese, Marcella; Visca, Paolo; Benevolo, Maria; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2014-01-01

    Paired cultures of early-passage melanoma cells and melanocytes were established from metastatic lesions and the uninvolved skin of five patients. In this stringent autologous setting, cDNA profiling was used to analyze a subset of 1477 genes selected by the Gene Ontology term 'immune response'. Human Leukocyte Antigen E (HLA-E) was ranked 19th among melanoma-overexpressed genes and was embedded in a transformation signature including its preferred peptide ligand donors HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, and HLA-G. Mostly undetectable in normal skin and 39 nevi (including rare and atypical lesions), HLA-E was detected by immunohistochemistry in 17/30 (57%) and 32/48 (67%) primary and metastatic lesions, respectively. Accordingly, surface HLA-E was higher on melanoma cells than on melanocytes and protected the former (6/6 cell lines) from lysis by natural killer (NK) cells, functionally counteracting co-expressed triggering ligands. Although lacking HLA-E, melanocytes (4/4 cultures) were nevertheless (and surprisingly) fully protected from NK cell lysis.

  3. Thyrotropin Receptor Epitope and Human Leukocyte Antigen in Graves’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hidefumi; De Groot, Leslie J.; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Graves’ disease (GD) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease, and thyrotropin (TSH) receptor (TSHR) is a major autoantigen in this condition. Since the extracellular domain of human TSHR (TSHR-ECD) is shed into the circulation, TSHR-ECD is a preferentially immunogenic portion of TSHR. Both genetic factors and environmental factors contribute to development of GD. Inheritance of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, especially HLA-DR3, is associated with GD. TSHR-ECD protein is endocytosed into antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and processed to TSHR-ECD peptides. These peptide epitopes bind to HLA-class II molecules, and subsequently the complex of HLA-class II and TSHR-ECD epitope is presented to CD4+ T cells. The activated CD4+ T cells secrete cytokines/chemokines that stimulate B-cells to produce TSAb, and in turn hyperthyroidism occurs. Numerous studies have been done to identify T- and B-cell epitopes in TSHR-ECD, including (1) in silico, (2) in vitro, (3) in vivo, and (4) clinical experiments. Murine models of GD and HLA-transgenic mice have played a pivotal role in elucidating the immunological mechanisms. To date, linear or conformational epitopes of TSHR-ECD, as well as the molecular structure of the epitope-binding groove in HLA-DR, were reported to be related to the pathogenesis in GD. Dysfunction of central tolerance in the thymus, or in peripheral tolerance, such as regulatory T cells, could allow development of GD. Novel treatments using TSHR antagonists or mutated TSHR peptides have been reported to be effective. We review and update the role of immunogenic TSHR epitopes and HLA in GD, and offer perspectives on TSHR epitope specific treatments. PMID:27602020

  4. Human Norovirus Interactions with Histo-Blood Group Antigens and Human Milk Oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Schroten, Horst; Hanisch, Franz-Georg

    2016-01-01

    Human noroviruses interact with both human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) and human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs). The former are believed to be important for a virus infection, while the latter might act as natural decoys in the host during an infection. However, certain noroviruses are known to bind poorly to HBGAs and yet still cause infections; some interact with numerous HBGA types but are nonprevalent; and yet others bind HBGAs and seem to be increasing in prevalence. HBGAs and HMOs can be found as soluble antigens in humans, can be structurally alike, and can interact with equivalent residues at identical binding pockets on the capsid. In this Gem, we discuss HBGA and HMO binding studies for human noroviruses, concentrating on the clinically important genogroup II noroviruses. In short, the roles of HBGA and HMO interactions in norovirus infections are still unclear. PMID:27122582

  5. Mapping Antigenic Epitopes on the Human Bocavirus Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Kailasan, Shweta; Garrison, Jamie; Ilyas, Maria; Chipman, Paul; McKenna, Robert; Kantola, Kalle; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Kučinskaitė-Kodzė, Indrė; Žvirblienė, Aurelija

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human bocaviruses (HBoV1 to -4) are emerging pathogens associated with pneumonia and/or diarrhea in young children. Currently, there is no treatment or vaccination, so there is a need to study these pathogens to understand their disease mechanisms on a molecular and structural level for the development of control strategies. Here, we report the structures of six HBoV monoclonal antibody (MAb) fragment complexes, HBoV1-15C6, HBoV2-15C6, HBoV4-15C6, HBoV1-4C2, HBoV1-9G12, and HBoV1-12C1, determined by cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction to 18.0- to 8.5-Å resolution. Of these, the 15C6 MAb cross-reacted with HBoV1, HBoV2, and HBoV4, while the 4C2, 12C1, and 9G12 MAbs recognized only HBoV1. Pseudoatomic modeling mapped the 15C6 footprint to the capsid surface DE and HI loops, at the 5-fold axis and the depression surrounding it, respectively, which are conserved motifs in Parvoviridae. The footprints for 4C2, 12C1, and 9G12 span the surface loops that assemble portions of the 2-/5-fold wall (a raised surface feature between the 2-fold and 5-fold axes of symmetry) and the shoulder of the 3-fold protrusions. The MAb footprints, cross reactive and strain specific, coincide with regions with high and low sequence/structural identities, respectively, on the capsid surfaces of the HBoVs and identify potential regions for the development of peptide vaccines for these viruses. IMPORTANCE Human bocaviruses (HBoVs) may cause severe respiratory and gastrointestinal infections in young children. The nonenveloped parvovirus capsid carries determinants of host and tissue tropism, pathogenicity, genome packaging, assembly, and antigenicity important for virus infection. This information is currently unavailable for the HBoVs and other bocaparvoviruses. This study identifies three strain-specific antigenic epitopes on the HBoV1 capsid and a cross-reactive epitope on the HBoV1, HBoV2, and HBoV4 capsids using structures of capsid

  6. Human erythrocyte antigens. Regulation of expression of a novel erythrocyte surface antigen by the inhibitor Lutheran In(Lu) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Telen, M J; Eisenbarth, G S; Haynes, B F

    1983-01-01

    Our study describes a novel human erythrocyte protein antigen, the expression of which is regulated by the rare Lutheran inhibitor In(Lu) gene. We have produced a monoclonal antibody (A3D8) that bound strongly to erythrocytes from subjects with Lutheran phenotypes Lu(a+b+), Lu(a+b-), and Lu(a-b+) but bound negligibly to erythrocytes from subjects with the dominant form of Lu(a-b-) phenotype, reflecting inheritance of the In(Lu) gene. Importantly, erythrocytes from an individual with the recessive form of Lu(a-b-) phenotype (i.e., absence of the In(Lu) gene and absence of genes encoding for Lutheran antigens) showed reactivity with A3D8 antibody comparable to that seen with Lu(a+) or Lu(b+) erythrocytes. A3D8 antigen activity was also found on all leukocytes and in serum and plasma; this activity also appeared to be regulated by the In(Lu) gene in serum, plasma, and on a subset of leukocytes. Thus, we have identified a human erythrocyte protein whose expression is modified by the In(Lu) gene. This knowledge that such an antigen exists on erythrocytes and in normal plasma should allow further studies into the molecular genetics of the In(Lu) gene and into the functional and structural significance of the A3D8 antigen. PMID:6863545

  7. Mucopolysaccharides in Peripheral Leucocytes of Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Riesco, Andres; Leyton, Cecilia

    1971-01-01

    The presence of mucopolysaccharides (MPS) in leucocytes of peripheral blood of 19 cancer patients, 13 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 14 normal controls, was studied histochemically. MPS was revealed in different proportions in polynuclears and mononuclears. According to the staining technics, the MPS appear to be mainly carboxylated and contain hyaluronic acid and chondroitinsulphate groups. The quantitative analysis revealed that MPS appeared only in around 3% of leucocytes of normal controls, while in the cancer patients 56% of polynuclear and 90% of mononuclears contained it. In the tuberculous patients, 90% of polynuclears and 86% of the mononuclears revealed MPS. The differences between the prevalence of leucocytes containing MPS in controls and in cancer or tuberculous patients are highly significant. The possibility that the difference in MPS content of leucocytes is related with low inmunological activity is postulated. PMID:4256006

  8. Human leukocyte antigen and idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Usui, Toru; Naisbitt, Dean J

    2017-02-01

    A clinical association between a specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele and idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions (IADRs) is a strong indication that IADRs are mediated by the adaptive immune system. For example, it is well-established that HLA-B*15:02 and HLA-B*57:01 are associated with carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS)/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and abacavir-induced hypersensitivity/flucloxacillin-induced liver injury, respectively. Drug-specific T-cells whose response is restricted by specific HLA risk alleles have been detected from IADR patients, also suggesting an adaptive immune pathogenesis. T-cells from carbamazepine SJS/TEN patients are activated by direct pharmacological interaction between carbamazepine and HLA-B*15:02 expressed on antigen presenting cells (APCs). Abacavir-specific, HLA-B*57:01-restricted T-cells are activated by APCs presenting peptides which are only displayed by the HLA molecule when abacavir is bound during peptide loading. Finally, HLA-B*57:01-restricted activation of T-cells from patients with flucloxacillin-induced liver injury is dependent on processing of drug protein adducts. Based on these observations, it is now possible to utilize blood from healthy drug-naïve volunteers to study the priming of naïve T-cells to drugs. Future development of these methodologies may lead to the development of assays that predict intrinsic immunogenicity of drugs and chemicals at the preclinical stage of drug development. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Association of human leukocyte antigen class I antigens in Iranian patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Hossein; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar; Esmaili, Nafiseh; Toofan, Hesam; Ehsani, Amir Hooshang; Hosseini, Seyed Hamed; Rezaei, Nima

    2013-04-01

    There are a limited number of reports indicating the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles in pemphigus vulgaris. This study was designed to highlight the association of HLA class I alleles with pemphigus vulgaris in Iran. Fifty patients with pemphigus vulgaris, diagnosed based on clinical, histological and direct immunofluorescence findings were enrolled into this study. The control group consisted of 50 healthy, age- and sex-matched individuals. HLA typing of class I (A, B and C alleles) was carried out using polymerase chain reaction based on the sequence-specific primer method. This study showed the higher frequency of HLA-B*44:02 (P = 0.007), -C*04:01 (P < 0.001), -C*15:02 (P < 0.001) and -C*16:01 (P = 0.027) in the patient group, compared to the controls, while the frequency of HLA-C*06:02 (P < 0.001) and -C*18:01 (P = 0.008) in the patients with pemphigus vulgaris was significantly lower than the controls. Regarding the linkage disequilibrium between HLA class I alleles, the HLA-A*03:01, -B*51:01, -C*16:02 haplotype (4% vs 0%, P = 0.04) is suggested to be a predisposing factor, whereas HLA-A*26:01, -B*38, -C*12:03 haplotype (0% vs 6%, P = 0.01) is suggested to be a protective factor. In conclusion, it is suggested that HLA-B*44:02, -C*04:01, -C*15:02 alleles and HLA-A*03:01, -B*51:01, -C*16:02 haplotype are susceptibility factors for development of pemphigus vulgaris in the Iranian population, while HLA-C*06:02, -C*18:01 alleles and HLA-A*26:01, -B*38, -C*12:03 haplotype may be considered as protective alleles.

  10. Immunological properties of the human Goodpasture target antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, M; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H; Köhler, H

    1988-01-01

    The globular domain NC1 of human basement membrane collagen IV was isolated from glomerular basement membrane after collagenase digestion by chromatographic purification. The human NC1 appears as a hexamer of 160 kD by molecular sieve chromatography which migrates as a single molecule at gel electrophoresis without sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). Reversible dissociation of the hexamer into monomers and dimers was achieved by 6 M guanidine-HC1, SDS, or at pH values less than 4.0. All the subunits of 26 kD, 28 kD, 44 kD, and 50 kD showed reactivity with anti-GBM antibodies on immunoblotting. Inhibition-ELISA demonstrated that the intact hexamer also binds to anti-GBM antibodies at higher NC1 concentrations. However, dose-response curves indicated an approximately 20-50-fold increase in reactivity after dissociation of the hexamer in 6 M guanidine-HC1. Analysis of thermostability demonstrated that heating for 24 h at 37 degrees C or 56 degrees C did not alter the reactivity to anti-GBM antibodies, while reactivity was lost after heating for more than 120 min at 95 degrees C. In contrast to bovine NC1 unfolding of the antigen occurs immediately and does not require elevated temperature. Rotary shadowing of human NC1 at neutral pH revealed homogeneous globules. Distinct but incomplete dissociation into monomers and dimers could be observed at pH 2.5. These in vitro data of the human NC1 domain give further evidence that most of the Goodpasture epitopes are sequestered within the NC1 hexamer and support the hypothesis that production of anti-GBM autoantibodies may be initiated after dissociation of the hexamer has been induced, possibly by a toxic or infective episode. Images Fig. 2 Figure 3 PMID:3224445

  11. Rabies viral antigen in human tongues and salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Feng, Z; Ye, H

    1995-10-01

    Lingual and major salivary tissue samples from three cases of rabies were stained with the immunoperoxidase (ABC) technique. All tissue blocks had been embedded in paraffin 4-10 years before. The first antibody used was monoclonal antirabies nucleocapsin (N) mouse antibody (HAM). Four out of five pieces of tongue from two cases showed a large amount of granular staining indicating rabies antigen (RVAg) inside serous glandular cells, terminal nerves, muscle cells and covering epithelial cells including taste cells. In the tissue probes from the third case only minimal granular staining was found, probably due to complete absence of the serous gland. In contrast to the tongue, only a little weakly reacting material was found in 4 out of 9 probes of salivary gland, either in acini or in nerve fibres. The amount of RVAg is evidently much greater in the human tongue than in major salivary glands, whereas major salivary glands from infected dogs, foxes and skunks reportedly contain much RVAg. As the human tongue's serous gland appears to be a preferred location for RVAg, it may be a source of oral infection.

  12. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen/cyclin in cultured human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Okada, N; Miyagawa, S; Steinberg, M L; Yoshikawa, K

    1990-09-01

    Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)/cyclin in cultured human keratinocytes was studied using an antibody from an SLE patient as the reagent. By indirect immunofluorescence staining, SV40-transformed human keratinocytes expressed PCNA/cyclin in 40-45% of the cells as a nulcear granular fluorescence. After synchronization of these cells, their nuclear distribution pattern during the S phase was sequential and showed a clear correlation with DNA synthesis. Primary cultured keratinocytes grown in high Ca+ medium expressed PCNA/cyclin in 10-15% of the cells with a similar staining pattern. These positively stained cells were confined to the basal and immediate suprabasal layers of the stratified culture sheet. The keratinocytes disaggregated by trypsin were separated according to cell size through a screen of Nitex monofilament cloth. The cells smaller than 15 microns in diameter synthesized abundant PCNA/cyclin, while the larger cells expressed very low levels. These results indicate that the expression of PCNA/cyclin correlates with DNA synthesis in cultured keratinocytes, but is not associated with their differentiation process.

  13. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  14. Two distinct antigen systems in human B lymphocytes: identification of cell surface and intracellular antigens using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Y; Takami, T; Yuasa, H; Takei, T; Kikuchi, K

    1984-01-01

    Two distinct antigen systems (L26 and L27) specifically expressed in human B lymphocytes were identified using TB2-2B3 (2B3) and T3-5B3 (5B3) monoclonal antibodies, respectively. Whereas L26 antigen defined by 2B3 were rarely expressed on the surface of B cells but abundant in the cytoplasm, 127 antigens detected by 5B3 was clearly expressed on the cell surface. These two antigens appeared to be restricted in their expression to B cells, as they were found in most B cells but not other cell types including thymocytes, T cells, monocytes and granulocytes. Functional studies demonstrated that L27 was more easily lost from B cells after activation with pokeweed mitogen than was L26. Likewise, plasma cell myeloma, as well as normal plasma cells, was devoid of both L26 and L27, whereas immunoblastic sarcoma of B cell type expressed L26 but not L27. These two antigens co-existed in the same B cell lines including Epstein-Barr virus transformed B cell lines, B cell type acute lymphatic leukaemia (B-ALL) cell line, Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines and myeloma cell lines, but pre-B and common ALL cell lines were entirely negative for both L26 and L27. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that L26 consisted of at least two polypeptide chains with molecular weights of 30K and 33K daltons, which were clearly distinct from HLA-DR antigens. The antigen L27 is presently under study. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6332692

  15. Toxoplasma gondii Recombinant Antigens as Tools for Serodiagnosis of Human Toxoplasmosis: Current Status of Studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a parasitic protozoan which is the cause of toxoplasmosis. Although human toxoplasmosis in healthy adults is usually asymptomatic, serious disease can occur in the case of congenital infections and immunocompromised individuals. Furthermore, despite the exact recognition of its etiology, it still presents a diagnostic problem. Diagnosis of toxoplasmosis is mainly based on the results of serological tests detecting anti-T. gondii-specific antibodies in the patient's serum sample. The specificities and sensitivities of serology tests depend mostly on the diagnostic antigen(s) used. Most of the commercial serological kits currently available are based on Toxoplasma lysate antigens (TLAs). In recent years, many studies showed that recombinant antigenic proteins of T. gondii may be an alternative source of antigens which are very useful for the serodiagnosis of toxoplasmosis. This article presents a review of current studies on the application and usefulness of different T. gondii recombinant antigens in serological tests for the diagnosis of human toxoplasmosis. PMID:23784855

  16. Large Scale Immune Profiling of Infected Humans and Goats Reveals Differential Recognition of Brucella melitensis Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Li; Leng, Diana; Burk, Chad; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Kayala, Matthew A.; Atluri, Vidya L.; Pablo, Jozelyn; Unal, Berkay; Ficht, Thomas A.; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Saito, Mayuko; Morrow, W. John W.; Liang, Xiaowu; Baldi, Pierre; Gilman, Robert H.; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Tsolis, Renée M.; Felgner, Philip L.

    2010-01-01

    Brucellosis is a widespread zoonotic disease that is also a potential agent of bioterrorism. Current serological assays to diagnose human brucellosis in clinical settings are based on detection of agglutinating anti-LPS antibodies. To better understand the universe of antibody responses that develop after B. melitensis infection, a protein microarray was fabricated containing 1,406 predicted B. melitensis proteins. The array was probed with sera from experimentally infected goats and naturally infected humans from an endemic region in Peru. The assay identified 18 antigens differentially recognized by infected and non-infected goats, and 13 serodiagnostic antigens that differentiate human patients proven to have acute brucellosis from syndromically similar patients. There were 31 cross-reactive antigens in healthy goats and 20 cross-reactive antigens in healthy humans. Only two of the serodiagnostic antigens and eight of the cross-reactive antigens overlap between humans and goats. Based on these results, a nitrocellulose line blot containing the human serodiagnostic antigens was fabricated and applied in a simple assay that validated the accuracy of the protein microarray results in the diagnosis of humans. These data demonstrate that an experimentally infected natural reservoir host produces a fundamentally different immune response than a naturally infected accidental human host. PMID:20454614

  17. Large scale immune profiling of infected humans and goats reveals differential recognition of Brucella melitensis antigens.

    PubMed

    Liang, Li; Leng, Diana; Burk, Chad; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Kayala, Matthew A; Atluri, Vidya L; Pablo, Jozelyn; Unal, Berkay; Ficht, Thomas A; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Saito, Mayuko; Morrow, W John W; Liang, Xiaowu; Baldi, Pierre; Gilman, Robert H; Vinetz, Joseph M; Tsolis, Renée M; Felgner, Philip L

    2010-05-04

    Brucellosis is a widespread zoonotic disease that is also a potential agent of bioterrorism. Current serological assays to diagnose human brucellosis in clinical settings are based on detection of agglutinating anti-LPS antibodies. To better understand the universe of antibody responses that develop after B. melitensis infection, a protein microarray was fabricated containing 1,406 predicted B. melitensis proteins. The array was probed with sera from experimentally infected goats and naturally infected humans from an endemic region in Peru. The assay identified 18 antigens differentially recognized by infected and non-infected goats, and 13 serodiagnostic antigens that differentiate human patients proven to have acute brucellosis from syndromically similar patients. There were 31 cross-reactive antigens in healthy goats and 20 cross-reactive antigens in healthy humans. Only two of the serodiagnostic antigens and eight of the cross-reactive antigens overlap between humans and goats. Based on these results, a nitrocellulose line blot containing the human serodiagnostic antigens was fabricated and applied in a simple assay that validated the accuracy of the protein microarray results in the diagnosis of humans. These data demonstrate that an experimentally infected natural reservoir host produces a fundamentally different immune response than a naturally infected accidental human host.

  18. Human serum antibodies to a major defined epitope of human herpesvirus 8 small viral capsid antigen.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, R; De Paoli, P; Schulz, T F; Dillner, J

    1999-04-01

    The major antibody-reactive epitope of the small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) was defined by use of overlapping peptides. Strong IgG reactivity was found among approximately 50% of 44 human immunodeficiency virus-positive or -negative patients with Kaposi's sarcoma and 13 subjects who were seropositive by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) for the latent HHV-8 nuclear antigen. Only 1 of 106 subjects seronegative for both lytic and latent HHV-8 antigens and 10 of 81 subjects IFA-seropositive only for the lytic HHV-8 antigen had strong IgG reactivity to this epitope. Among 534 healthy Swedish women, only 1.3% were strongly seropositive. Comparison of the peptide-based and purified sVCA protein-based ELISAs found 55% sensitivity and 98% specificity. However, only 1 of 452 serum samples from healthy women was positive in both tests. In conclusion, the defined sVCA epitope was a specific, but not very sensitive, serologic marker of active HHV-8 infection. Such infection appears to be rare among Swedish women, even with sexual risk-taking behavior.

  19. Association of human leukocyte antigen with postherpetic neuralgia in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hye Yoon; Song, Eun Young; Yoon, Jung Ah; Suh, Dae Hun; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Yong Chul; Park, Myoung Hee

    2016-10-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), the most frequent complication of varicella-zoster virus reactivation, is characterized by pain that persists for more than 3 months, often for years after healing of zoster rash. A few studies revealing the association of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) with PHN have been reported, but only in the Japanese. The aim of this study was to investigate the primary HLA locus associated with PHN susceptibility in Koreans. We compared HLA-A, -B, -C, and DRB1 genotypes of 66 PHN patients with those of 54 herpes zoster (HZ) patients without developing PHN and 235 healthy controls. Frequencies of HLA-B*13, B*44, B*15 (B75), DRB1*10:01, and DRB1*12:02 were increased, and those of HLA-C*01, C*12, and DRB1*01:01 were decreased in PHN patients compared to those in controls (each, p < 0.05). Among these alleles, only the frequency of HLA-B*44 was significantly increased in PHN patients compared to that in HZ patients and the change was due to HLA-B*44:03 (PHN vs controls, p = 0.043; PHN vs HZ, p = 0.012). The results suggest that HLA-B*44:03 or other closely linked gene of the major histocompatibility complex is associated with susceptibility to the development of PHN after HZ, but not with the onset of HZ.

  20. Implications for Human Leukocyte Antigen Antibodies After Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ziwei; Chen, Dong-Feng; Reinsmoen, Nancy L.; Finlen-Copeland, C. Ashley; Davis, W. Austin; Zaas, David W.; Palmer, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Long-term survival after lung transplant is limited by the development of chronic and progressive airflow obstruction, a condition known as bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). While prior studies strongly implicate cellular rejection as a strong risk factor for BOS, less is known about the clinical significance of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies and donor HLA-specific antibodies in long-term outcomes. Methods: A single-center cohort of 441 lung transplant recipients, spanning a 10-year period, was prospectively screened for HLA antibodies after transplant using flow cytometry-based methods. The prevalence of and predictors for HLA antibodies were determined. The impact of HLA antibodies on survival after transplant and the development of BOS were determined using Cox models. Results: Of the 441 recipients, 139 (32%) had detectable antibodies to HLA. Of these 139, 54 (39%) developed antibodies specific to donor HLA. The detection of posttransplant HLA antibodies was associated with BOS (HR, 1.54; P = .04) and death (HR, 1.53; P = .02) in multivariable models. The detection of donor-specific HLA antibodies was associated with death (HR, 2.42; P < .0001). The detection of posttransplant HLA antibodies was associated with pretransplant HLA-antibody detection, platelet transfusions, and the development of BOS and cytomegalovirus pneumonitis. Conclusions: Approximately one-third of lung transplant recipients have detectable HLA antibodies, which are associated with a worse prognosis regarding graft function and patient survival. PMID:23328795

  1. Human immune response to Vibrio cholerae O1 whole cells and isolated outer membrane antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, K; Kaper, J B; Levine, M M

    1989-01-01

    The serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) response of human volunteers challenged with Vibrio cholerae O1 was analyzed for reactivity to V. cholerae O1 antigens by the immunoblot technique. Components of both in vitro- and in vivo (rabbit ligated ileal loop)-grown V. cholerae O1 were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-urea-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Postchallenge serum IgG reacted uniquely with 15 antigens and with greater intensity than did prechallenge serum with at least 16 antigens. Serum IgG and SIgA reacted with antigens present in preparations from the homologous challenge strain of V. cholerae as well as antigens from strains of heterologous biotype or serotype. These heterologous antigens may represent antigens responsible for protection to rechallenge with a heterologous strain of V. cholerae. All the antigens detected by postchallenge jejunal fluid SIgA had an apparent molecular size of less than 25 kilodaltons. Serum IgG and jejunal fluid SIgA also reacted with antigens unique to in vivo-grown cells and several antigens in outer membrane preparations, suggesting that studies of protective immunity and V. cholerae O1 pathogenesis should include examination of both in vitro- and in vivo-grown V. cholerae O1 cellular antigens. Images PMID:2912896

  2. Low dose antigen promotes induction of FOXP3 in human CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Long, S. Alice; Rieck, Mary; Tatum, Megan; Bollyky, Paul L.; Wu, Rebecca P.; Muller, Isabelle; Ho, Jhon-Chun; Shilling, Heather G.; Buckner, Jane H.

    2011-01-01

    Low antigen dose promotes induction and persistence of Treg in mice, yet few studies have addressed the role of antigen dose in the induction of adaptive CD4+FOXP3+ Treg in humans. To this end, we examined the level of FOXP3 expression in human CD4+CD25− T cells upon activation with autologous antigen presenting cells and varying doses of peptide. Antigen specific T cells expressing FOXP3 were identified by flow cytometry using MHC Class II tetramer (Tmr). We found an inverse relationship between antigen dose and the frequency of FOXP3+ cells for both foreign and self antigen specific T cells. Through studies of FOXP3 locus demethylation and helios expression, we determined that variation in the frequency of Tmr+FOXP3+ T cells was not due to expansion of natural Treg, but instead, we found that induction, proliferation and persistence of FOXP3+ cells was similar in high and low dose cultures whereas proliferation of FOXP3− T cells was favored in high antigen dose cultures. The frequency of FOXP3+ cells positively correlated with suppressive function, indicative of adaptive Treg generation. The frequency of FOXP3+ cells were maintained with IL-2, but not upon re-stimulation with antigen. Together, these data suggest that low antigen dose favors the transient generation of human antigen specific adaptive Treg over the proliferation of antigen specific FOXP3- effector T cells. These adaptive Treg could function to reduce ongoing inflammatory responses and promote low dose tolerance in humans, especially when antigen exposure and tolerance is transient. PMID:21865550

  3. [Search for a new antigen associated with oncornavirus D in human breast cancer tumors].

    PubMed

    Kosiakov, P N; Korosteleva, V S; Pavliuchenkova, R P; Kosiakova, N; Nabokov, Iu S

    1979-01-01

    An antigen similar in its specificity to a nonvirion antigen emerging in stationary tissue culture cells spontaneously or experimentally infected with oncornavirus D was found in mammary gland cancer tumour tissues of 9 out of 54 examined patients. This virus-associated antigen was absent in 17 examined specimens of benign tumours of the same localization (fibroadenomas, mastopathies) or in the organs of a normal adult man or human embryo.

  4. A Human Minor Histocompatibility Antigen Resulting from Differential Expression due to a Gene Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Makoto; Warren, Edus H.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2003-01-01

    Minor histocompatibility antigens (minor H antigens) are targets of graft-versus-host disease and graft-versus-leukemia responses after allogeneic human leukocyte antigen identical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Only a few human minor H antigens have been molecularly characterized and in all cases, amino acid differences between homologous donor and recipient proteins due to nucleotide polymorphisms in the respective genes were responsible for immunogenicity. Here, we have used cDNA expression cloning to identify a novel human minor H antigen encoded by UGT2B17, an autosomal gene in the multigene UDP-glycosyltransferase 2 family that is selectively expressed in liver, intestine, and antigen-presenting cells. In contrast to previously defined human minor H antigens, UGT2B17 is immunogenic because of differential expression of the protein in donor and recipient cells as a consequence of a homozygous gene deletion in the donor. Deletion of individual members of large gene families is a common form of genetic variation in the population and our results provide the first evidence that differential protein expression as a consequence of gene deletion is a mechanism for generating minor H antigens in humans. PMID:12743171

  5. Molecular cloning of cDNA for the human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 and identification of related transmembrane antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Szala, S.; Kasai, Yasushi; Steplewski, Z.; Rodeck, U.; Koprowski, H.; Linnenbach, A.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 is a monoclonal antibody-defined cell surface glycoprotein of 27-34 kDa. By using the high-efficiency COS cell expression system, a full-length cDNA clone for CO-029 was isolated. When transiently expressed in COS cells, the cDNA clone directed the synthesis of an antigen reactive to monoclonal antibody CO-029 in mixed hemadsorption and immunoblot assays. Sequence analysis revealed that CO-029 belongs to a family of cell surface antigens that includes the melanoma-associated antigen ME491, the leukocyte cell surface antigen CD37, and the Sm23 antigen of the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni. CO-029 and ME491 antigen expression and the effect of their corresponding monoclonal antibodies on cell growth were compared in human tumor cell lines of various histologic origins.

  6. Antigen exposure shapes the ratio between antigen-specific Tregs and conventional T cells in human peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Su, Laura F.; del Alcazar, Daniel; Stelekati, Erietta; Wherry, E. John; Davis, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    The T-cell receptor (TCR) is required for maturation and function of regulatory T cells (Tregs), but the ligand specificities of Tregs outside the context of transgenic TCRs are largely unknown. Using peptide–MHC tetramers, we isolated rare specific Foxp3+ cells directly ex vivo from adult peripheral blood and defined their frequency and phenotype. We find that a proportion of circulating Tregs recognize foreign antigens and the frequency of these cells are similar to that of self-reactive Tregs in the absence of cognate infection. In contrast, the frequencies of Tregs that recognize some common microbial antigens are significantly reduced in the blood of most adults. Exposure to peripheral antigens likely has a major influence on the balance between Tregs and conventional T-cell subsets because a larger proportion of flu-specific T cells has a regulatory cell phenotype in the cord blood. Consistent with this finding, we show that lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection can directly modulate the ratio of virus-specific effectors and Tregs in mice. The resulting change in the balance within an antigen-specific T-cell population further correlates with the magnitude of effector response and the chronicity of infection. Taken together, our data highlight the importance of antigen specificity in the functional dynamics of the T-cell repertoire. Each specific population of CD4+ T cells in human peripheral blood contains a subset of Tregs at birth, but the balance between regulatory and effector subsets changes in response to peripheral antigen exposure and this could impact the robustness of antipathogen immunity. PMID:27681619

  7. Human leucocytes response to viable, extended freeze-drying or heat-killed Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin.

    PubMed

    Moreira, J; Aragão-Filho, W C; Barillas, S G; Barbosa, S M; Pedroza, L A; Condino-Neto, A

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of viable, extended freeze-drying (EFD) or heat-killed (HK) Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in respiratory burst activity, gene expression of CYBB and NCF1 encoding components of the human phagocyte nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase, TLR2 expression, and in IL-10 and TNF-α cytokine production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Viable BCG significantly inhibited TLR2 and CYBB gene expression, as well as superoxide release by human PBMC. All BCG stimuli augmented IL-10 release, but only HK BCG or viable BCG increased TNF-α release by PBMCs. Our studies show that viable BCG can impair the NADPH oxidase system activation and the TLR2 route in human PBMCs. As well, different BCG preparations can distinctly influence cytokine production by human PBMCs. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Plasmodium vivax GPI-anchored micronemal antigen (PvGAMA) binds human erythrocytes independent of Duffy antigen status

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yang; Lu, Feng; Wang, Bo; Li, Jian; Han, Jin-Hee; Ito, Daisuke; Kong, Deok-Hoon; Jiang, Lubin; Wu, Jian; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Takashima, Eizo; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Cao, Jun; Nyunt, Myat Htut; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Desai, Sanjay A.; Miller, Louis H.; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Han, Eun-Taek

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax, a major agent of malaria in both temperate and tropical climates, has been thought to be unable to infect humans lacking the Duffy (Fy) blood group antigen because this receptor is critical for erythrocyte invasion. Recent surveys in various endemic regions, however, have reported P. vivax infections in Duffy-negative individuals, suggesting that the parasite may utilize alternative receptor-ligand pairs to complete the erythrocyte invasion. Here, we identified and characterized a novel parasite ligand, Plasmodium vivax GPI-anchored micronemal antigen (PvGAMA), that bound human erythrocytes regardless of Duffy antigen status. PvGAMA was localized at the microneme in the mature schizont-stage parasites. The antibodies against PvGAMA fragments inhibited PvGAMA binding to erythrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. The erythrocyte-specific binding activities of PvGAMA were significantly reduced by chymotrypsin treatment. Thus, PvGAMA may be an adhesion molecule for the invasion of Duffy-positive and -negative human erythrocytes. PMID:27759110

  9. Antigenic analysis of immune complexes formed in normal human pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M

    1985-01-01

    Immune complexes, isolated from pregnancy sera by absorption to immobilized protein A, were dissociated and the antigen components separated from the IgG antibodies, which possessed immune reactivity directed against the plasma membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast layer of the placenta. Gel filtration studies demonstrated that five separate antigens could be identified and were of placental origin, as observed by their reactivity in an ELISA with affinity purified anti-trophoblast antibodies isolated from maternal sera. The five antigens of apparent mol. wt 2 X 10(6), 400,000, 150,000, 13,000 and less than 10,000 daltons were designated maternally recognised trophoblast antigens (MRTA), numbers V-IX; the relative proportions of these antigens in the sera were 14%, 68%, 16%, 0.5% and 1%, respectively. Immune complexes were also identified in nulliparous non-pregnant female sera and consisted of the 150,000 and the less than 10,000 daltons antigen components. The relationship between the MRTA present in the immune complexes and the MRTA (numbers I-IV) previously identified as components of the trophoblast plasma membrane is discussed. Images Fig. 3 PMID:4042429

  10. Human histocompatibility antigen associations in subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Sontheimer, R D; Stastny, P; Gilliam, J N

    1981-01-01

    We have identified a clinically distinct subset of lupus erythematosus patients marked by the presence of a histologically proven, nonscarring variety of cutaneous LE (subacute cutaneous LE) in which there is a very high frequency of the human leukocyte antigens (HLA) B8 and DR3. Differences in the configuration of their skin lesions allowed a separation of the patients into two clinical subgroups; annular and papulosquamous. HLA-B8 was increased in the annular subgroup (81%, corrected P (Pc) < 0.007) and combined group (65%, Pc < 0.004). HLA-DR3 was present in all 11 of the annular patients (10%, Pc < 0.00008). In addition, HLA-DR3 was present in increased frequencies in the papulosquamous subgroup (60%, Pc < 0.04) and combined group (77%, Pc < 0.00008). Thus, HLA-DR3 positive individuals have a relative risk of 10.8 for developing subacute cutaneous LE of either type and an even greater relative risk (67.1) for the annular variety. The HLA phenotype A1, B8, DR3 was also found more commonly in the annular (73%, P < 0.00008) and combined patient groups (46%, P < 0.004). These HLA associations, which are stronger than ever before reported for any form of LE, did not result from the concurrent presence of subclinical Sjögren's syndrome. Thus, subacute cutaneous LE can now be added to the growing list of HLA-B8, DR3-associated diseases that have autoimmune features. PMID:7451656

  11. Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of excretory secretory antigens in humans with fascioliasis.

    PubMed Central

    Espino, A M; Finlay, C M

    1994-01-01

    A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has been developed for the detection of Fasciola hepatica excretory secretory (ES) antigens in stool specimens of infected humans. The assay uses antibodies against F. hepatica ES antigens. A monoclonal antibody (ES78, mouse immunoglobulin G2a) was used to capture ES antigens, and a rabbit polyclonal antibody, peroxidase conjugate, was used to identify ES antigens. Thirteen of 14 patients with parasitological evidence of fascioliasis had a detectable concentration of ES antigens (more than 15 ng/ml). None of the stool specimens from controls and from patients with parasites other than F. hepatica showed a positive reaction, suggesting the absence of cross-reactions in this assay. When the 14 patients were retested 2 months after treatment, all of the specimens from the 11 parasitologically cured patients were negative by the antigen detection assay while the specimens from the 3 patients with persisting F. hepatica eggs in their stools remained positive. PMID:8126178

  12. Distinct antigen recognition pattern during zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis in humans and dogs.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yasuyuki; Howard, Randall F; Bhatia, Ajay; Trigo, Joelma; Nakatani, Maria; Netto, Eduardo M; Reed, Steven G

    2009-03-23

    Leishmania infantum is a causative agent of endemic zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in regions of South America and the Mediterranean. Dogs are the major reservoirs for L. infantum in these regions, and control of disease in dogs could have a significant impact on human disease. Although dogs share many symptoms of VL with humans as a result of L. infantum infection, they also show some unique clinical manifestations, which are often a combination of visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis, suggesting different mechanisms of disease development in dogs and humans. Here, we compare antibody responses of dogs and humans with VL to various defined leishmanial antigens. Parasite lysate and K39, the two most commonly used antigens for serodiagnosis of VL, detected the highest levels of antibodies in both humans and dogs with VL, whereas the recognition patterns of these antigens were distinct between the hosts. Among other defined antigens tested, LmSTI1 and CPB detected higher levels of antibodies in dogs and humans, respectively. These results indicate there is a difference between humans and dogs in antigen recognition patterns during VL. We infer that different strategies may need to be used in development of vaccines and diagnostics for humans and for dogs. In addition, we show a correlation between antibody titers to several antigens and severity of clinical symptoms during canine VL.

  13. DEMONSTRATION OF TUMOR-SPECIFIC ANTIGENS IN HUMAN COLONIC CARCINOMATA BY IMMUNOLOGICAL TOLERANCE AND ABSORPTION TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Phil; Freedman, Samuel O.

    1965-01-01

    Two methods were used to demonstrate the presence of tumor-specific antigens in adenocarcinomata of the human colon: (a) rabbits were immunized with extracts of pooled colonic carcinomata, and the antitumor antisera thus produced were absorbed with a pooled extract of normal human colon and with human blood components; (b) newborn rabbits were made immunologically tolerant to normal colonic tissue at birth, and were then immunized with pooled tumor material in adult life. Normal and tumor tissues were obtained from the same human donors in order to avoid misinterpretation of results due to individual-specific antigenic differences. The antisera prepared by both methods were tested against normal and tumor antigens by the techniques of agar gel diffusion, immunoelectrophoresis, hemagglutination, PCA, and immunofluorescence. Distinct antibody activity directed against at least two qualitatively tumor-specific antigens, or antigenic determinants, was detected in the antisera prepared by both methods and at least two additional tumor antigens were detected exclusively in antisera prepared by the tolerance technique. Whether these additional antigens were qualitatively different from normal tissue antigens, or merely present in tumor tissue in higher concentrations than in normal tissue has not as yet been determined. Furthermore, it was shown that the tumor-specific antibodies were not directed against bacterial contaminants or against the unusually high concentrations of fibrin found in many neoplastic tissues. It was concluded from these results that the pooled tumor extracts contained tumor-specific antigens not present in normal colonic tissue. Identical tumor-specific antigens were also demonstrated in a number of individual colonic carcinomata obtained from different human donors. PMID:14270243

  14. Immunohistochemical localization of human and simian immunodeficiency viral antigens in fixed tissue sections.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, J. M.; O'Leary, T. J.; Baskin, G. B.; Benveniste, R.; Harris, C. A.; Nara, P. L.; Rhodes, R. H.

    1987-01-01

    Antigens of human (HIV) or simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV) were identified with polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies and avidin-biotin complex (ABC) immunohistochemistry in fixed surgical pathology and autopsy specimens of humans or monkeys with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. With B-5 fixative, viral antigens were readily detected in lymph nodes of 8 of 13 patients with follicular hyperplasia, but in only 1 of 12 patients with follicular atrophy. Antigen was detected in follicular dendritic reticular cells and rare blastlike cells, extracellularly, and in postcapillary venules, medullary lymphocytes, sinus histiocytes, and macrophages in some lymph nodes. In the brain at autopsy, antigen could be found in gliomesenchymal-cell nodules, astrocytes, vascular endothelial cells, multinucleated cells, and astrocytes and macrophages associated with demyelination. In contrast, 4 rhesus monkeys with experimental SIV infection had abundant antigen in sinus histiocytes, macrophages, and multinucleated giant cells of lymph nodes and spleen and in thymic epithelial cells. Brain lesions of monkeys resembled those of humans, with antigen found in macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Antibodies to HIV also were immunoreactive in formalin-fixed tissue sections of monkeys containing SIV antigens. The ABC technique provided a fast and efficient method for localizing HIV and SIV antigens in fixed surgical and autopsy specimens. These findings are consistent with those found with in situ hybridization, ultrastructural studies, frozen sections of lymph nodes, and permanent sections of brain. Images Figure 1 p[201]-b p[201]-c Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:3472469

  15. Human antibody and antigen response to IncA antibody of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, P Y; Hsu, M C; Huang, C T; Li, S Y

    2007-01-01

    The high prevalence of C. trachomatis worldwide has underscored the importance of identifying specific immunogenic antigens in facilitating diagnosis as well as vaccine development. The aim of this study is to evaluate IncA antibody and antigen production in natural human infections. Our temporal expression study showed that IncA transcription and protein expression could be detected as early as 4 hours after the start of infection. Antibody responses could be detected in urine and genital swab samples from C. trachomatis-positive patients. It is especially interesting to note that the IncA antigen could be detected in urine. In conclusion, we have identified IncA as an important antigen in human. The potential applicability of the IncA antibody or antigen in the diagnosis as well as to vaccine development for C. trachomatis is also discussed.

  16. PURE CULTURES OF LARGE MONONUCLEAR LEUCOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Carrel, Alexis; Ebeling, Albert H.

    1922-01-01

    1. Pure strains of mononuclear leucocytes were isolated from the blood of adult chickens and keptin active condition for nearly 3 months. 2. The cultures were composed of large mononuclear leucocytes which migrated and proliferated in vitro at a slower rate than fibroblasts. The cells had no tendency to form a tissue, as do fibroblasts and epithelial cells. They were much less resistant than fibroblasts. 3. Differentiation of the large mononuclears into cells assuming the appearance of fibroblasts took place under certain conditions. 4. The activity of the large mononuclears was increased by embryonic tissue juice and inhibited by homologous serum. PMID:19868678

  17. Antigenic composition of human renal vascular endothelium assessed by kidney perfusion.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, W M; Claas, F H; van Rood, J J; van Es, L A

    1984-05-01

    Intravascular perfusion of healthy, viable human kidneys either with human sera or with monoclonal antibodies specific for individual HLA-A, B, DR or E-M antigens demonstrated that all of these antigens are exposed to circulating antibodies and thus can serve as stimuli or targets for immunologic mediators of renal transplant rejection. In addition, these antibodies could be recovered from the renal vessels by brief treatment with acid buffer.

  18. Purification and characterization by fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry of the polymorphonuclear-leucocyte-elastase-generated A alpha (1-21) fragment of fibrinogen from human blood after incubation with calcium ionophore A23187.

    PubMed Central

    Dewey, R S; Liesch, J M; Williams, H R; Sugg, E E; Dolan, C A; Davies, P; Mumford, R A; Albers-Schönberg, G

    1992-01-01

    The stimulation of human blood with a Ca2+ ionophore, A23187, leads to activation of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) with release of small amounts of catalyticaly active elastase, as demonstrated by the formation of a characteristic product, the N-terminal A alpha (1-21) peptide of the Aa subunit of fibrinogen. The identity of the peptide was initially established by radioimmunoassay (r.i.a.) with an antibody raised to A alpha (1-21). We now provide independent confirmation of the formation of A alpha (1-21) by fast-atom-bombardment-m.s. analysis of the fractions separated chromatographically after spiking of plasma samples with peptide labelled with [2H8]Phe at position 8. Identity of the peptides was established on the basis of their chromatographic retention time and by the distinct peaks in the mass spectra of these fractions. The relative intensities of the molecular ions of natural and labelled peptides were measured. On the basis of a comparison of the peaks of similar intensities, the concentration of the natural peptide at the time of spiking was close (79%) to the amount obtained by r.i.a. An additional peptide, des-alanyl-A alpha (2-21), was also seen. The total amount of material measured by r.i.a. could be accounted for by the sum of these two provides. The addition of label and assay by m.s. has provided an independent physical-chemical method for identifying A alpha (1-21) as a characteristic product of PMN elastase release in whole blood, but which is absent in freshly drawn blood. PMID:1736899

  19. Blastogenic response of human lymphocytes to antigens of Rothia dentocariosa.

    PubMed

    Fotos, P G; Gerencser, V F; Gerencser, M A

    1982-05-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated from 20 individuals with varying degrees of periodontal health and classified as either normal, having acute gingivitis (GV), or chronic periodontitis (PD). Crude cell wall and cytoplasmic antigens were derived from Rothia dentocariosa (RD), were applied to lymphocyte microcultures, and subjected to radioactive thymidine; the resulting lymphocyte blastogenesis (LB) was surveyed with a scintillation counter. All three groups displayed statistically similar levels of stimulation (F = 0.71), demonstrating that crude antigens of RD are not appreciably active in vitro studies of cell-mediated immunity (CMI), as measured by LB.

  20. Fetal- and uterine-specific antigens in human amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, R G; Brock, D J; Nicholson, L V; Dunn, E

    1978-09-01

    Removal of the major maternal serum proteins from second trimester amniotic fluid by antibody affinity chromatography revealed various soluble tissue antigens, of which two were fetal-specific skin proteins and another, of alpha2-mobility, was specific to the uterus, and was therefore designated alpha-uterine protein (AUP). These proteins could not be detected in maternal serum by antibody-antigen crossed electrophoresis. The concentration of AUP in amniotic fluid reached a maximum between 10 and 20 weeks of gestation, suggesting that there is an influx of uterine protein into the amniotic fluid at this stage of pregnancy.

  1. Human lymphocyte subpopulations. Human thymus-lymphoid tissue (HTL) antigen-positive lymphocytes forming rosettes with sheep erythrocytes and HTL antigen-negative lymphocytes interacting with antigen-antibody-complement complexes

    PubMed Central

    Yata, J.; Tsukimoto, I.; Tachibana, T.

    1973-01-01

    Human lymphocytes from various lymphoid tissues were studied for the relationship between the existence of HTL (human thymus-lymphoid tissue) antigen, and binding of sheep erythrocytes (E) or sheep erythrocyte–antibody-complement complexes (EA(IgM)C43). E adhered to the majority of thymus lymphocytes and formed rosettes. These lymphocytes were shown to be HTL antigen positive by immunofluorescence performed simultaneously. In the peripheral lymphoid tissues, 10–30% of lymphocytes formed E rosettes and almost all E rosette-forming lymphocytes were HTL antigen positive. Conversely HTL antigen-negative cells did not form E rosettes. In contrast, the cells binding EA(IgM)C43 were always HTL antigen negative. There were very few HTL antigen-positive or rosette-forming lymphocytes either with E or EA(IgM)C43 in bone marrow. From these data we conclude that E-rosette-forming and HTL antigen-positive lymphocytes are of thymus origin and EA(IgM)C43-rosette-forming cells are not thymus-dependent cells. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4579778

  2. Evaluation of three recombinant Leishmania infantum antigens in human and canine visceral leishmaniasis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Aliani Moura; Faria, Angélica Rosa; Rodrigues, Fernandes Tenório Gomes; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto; Magalhães, Rubens Daniel Miserani; Cunha, João Luís Reis; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; de Andrade, Hélida Monteiro

    2014-09-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a neglected disease and is fatal if untreated. Dogs serve as reservoirs for Leishmania infantum (syn. L. chagasi) due to their susceptibility to infection and high skin parasitism. Therefore, VL control in Brazil involves the elimination of seropositive dogs, among other actions. However, the most frequently used serological tests have limitations regarding sensitivity and specificity. In this study, we have selected three Leishmania antigens (C1, C8 and C9) and have produced them as recombinant proteins using pET-28a-TEV vector and Escherichia coli BL-21 as expression system. When tested in ELISA with human samples, the C9 antigen was the one showing the most promising results, with 68% sensitivity and 78% specificity. When testing canine samples, the C1, C8 and C9 antigens showed a sensitivity range from 70% to 80% and specificity range from 60% to 90%. The C1 antigen presented higher sensitivity (80%) and the C8 antigen presented higher specificity (90%). Due to it, we decided to mix and test C1 and C8 antigens together, resulting in the C18 antigen. The mix also yielded high percentages of detected symptomatic and asymptomatic dogs however it did not improve the performance of the diagnostic. Comparison of our tests with the tests recommended by the Brazilian Ministry of Health revealed that our antigens' sensitivities and the percentage of detected asymptomatic dogs were much higher. Our results suggest that the C1, C8, C18 and C9 recombinant proteins are good antigens to diagnose canine visceral leishmaniasis and could potentially be used in screening tests. To diagnose human visceral leishmaniasis, the C9 antigen presented reasonable results, but more optimization must be performed for this antigen to provide better performance.

  3. Structural, Mechanistic, and Antigenic Characterization of the Human Astrovirus Capsid

    PubMed Central

    York, Royce L.; Yousefi, Payam A.; Bogdanoff, Walter; Haile, Sara; Tripathi, Sarvind

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human astroviruses (HAstVs) are nonenveloped, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses that are a leading cause of viral gastroenteritis. HAstV particles display T=3 icosahedral symmetry formed by 180 copies of the capsid protein (CP), which undergoes proteolytic maturation to generate infectious HAstV particles. Little is known about the molecular features that govern HAstV particle assembly, maturation, infectivity, and immunogenicity. Here we report the crystal structures of the two main structural domains of the HAstV CP: the core domain at 2.60-Å resolution and the spike domain at 0.95-Å resolution. Fitting of these structures into the previously determined 25-Å-resolution electron cryomicroscopy density maps of HAstV allowed us to characterize the molecular features on the surfaces of immature and mature T=3 HAstV particles. The highly electropositive inner surface of HAstV supports a model in which interaction of the HAstV CP core with viral RNA is a driving force in T=3 HAstV particle formation. Additionally, mapping of conserved residues onto the HAstV CP core and spike domains in the context of the immature and mature HAstV particles revealed dramatic changes to the exposure of conserved residues during virus maturation. Indeed, we show that antibodies raised against mature HAstV have reactivity to both the HAstV CP core and spike domains, revealing for the first time that the CP core domain is antigenic. Together, these data provide new molecular insights into HAstV that have practical applications for the development of vaccines and antiviral therapies. IMPORTANCE Astroviruses are a leading cause of viral diarrhea in young children, immunocompromised individuals, and the elderly. Despite the prevalence of astroviruses, little is known at the molecular level about how the astrovirus particle assembles and is converted into an infectious, mature virus. In this paper, we describe the high-resolution structures of the two main astrovirus

  4. Preexisting antigen-specific immune responses are modulated by oral KLH feeding in humans.

    PubMed

    Hostmann, Arwed; Meyer, Tim; Maul, Jochen; Preiss, Jan; Boortz, Bertram; Thiel, Andreas; Duchmann, Rainer; Ullrich, Reiner

    2015-07-01

    Oral tolerance is the antigen-specific inhibition of a systemic immune response after oral antigen uptake and well established in animal models. We recently showed that keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) feeding modulates subsequently induced systemic immune responses in humans as well. In the present study, we investigated whether oral KLH can also modulate preexisting antigen-specific systemic B- and T-cell responses. We induced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions as well as systemic KLH-specific B- and T-cell responses by subcutaneous KLH injections. Subsequent oral KLH administration decreased the small proportion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells positive for the cytokine IL-17 at the end of the feeding regimen even further. After reimmunization, there was no difference in DTH reactions and the KLH-specific B-cell responses, but KLH-fed volunteers had an increased proportion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells positive for IL-10 and a reduced proportion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells positive for the skin-homing receptor cutaneous lymphocyte antigen and IL-2 and IFN-γ. Taken together, oral KLH can modulate a preexisting systemic KLH-specific immune response. These results suggest that feeding antigen may offer therapeutic strategies for the suppression of unwanted immune reactions in humans.

  5. CARbodies: Human Antibodies Against Cell Surface Tumor Antigens Selected From Repertoires Displayed on T Cell Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Sánchez-Martín, David; Compte, Marta; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Diaz, Rosa M; Vile, Richard; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library was expressed on the surface of human T cells after transduction with lentiviral vectors (LVs). The repertoire was fused to a first-generation T cell receptor ζ (TCRζ)-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We used this library to isolate antibodies termed CARbodies that recognize antigens expressed on the tumor cell surface in a proof-of-principle system. After three rounds of activation-selection there was a clear repertoire restriction, with the emergence dominant clones. The CARbodies were purified from bacterial cultures as soluble and active proteins. Furthermore, to validate its potential application for adoptive cell therapy, human T cells were transduced with a LV encoding a second-generation costimulatory CAR (CARv2) bearing the selected CARbodies. Transduced human primary T cells expressed significant levels of the CARbodies-based CARv2 fusion protein on the cell surface, and importantly could be specifically activated, after stimulation with tumor cells. This approach is a promising tool for the generation of antibodies fully adapted to the display format (CAR) and the selection context (cell synapse), which could extend the scope of current adoptive cell therapy strategies with CAR-redirected T cells. PMID:23695536

  6. THE DEFORMABILITY AND THE WETTING PROPERTIES OF LEUCOCYTES AND ERYTHROCYTES.

    PubMed

    Mudd, S; Mudd, E B

    1931-07-20

    The resistance to deformation of polymorphonuclear neutrophile leucocytes under the conditions of our observations has been shown to be on the average considerably less than the resistance to deformation of large mononuclear leucocytes. It is recognized of course that the viscosity of leucocytes, as of other cells, may be markedly influenced by osmotic conditions (17), by the reaction of the suspending medium (18, 19), by temperature, or by injury (20, 21). Although the conditions of our observations were quite different from those of the body, they were nevertheless closely similar to those of simultaneous phagocytosis experiments in which the cells functioned exceedingly well (3). Moreover E. R. and E. L. Clark (22) have noted that polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the tails of living tadpoles were more fluid than the macrophages. And Goss (23) in microdissecting human polymorphonuclear neutrophiles reports that they are more fluid than the clasmatocytes and monocytes studied by Chambers and Borquist (24). Other types of leucocytes have in our experience seemed to fall between the large mononuclear and the polymorphonuclear leucocytes in their average resistance to the interfacial tensions. The leucocyte of each type studied is surrounded by an exceedingly delicate membrane. This membrane appears under the dark-field microscope as a pale, silvery line not distinguishable by inspection alone from a simple phase boundary between two immiscible liquids. That this is a membrane, however, and not a mere interface between immiscible phases, seems certain. In the first place the cell cytoplasm and the suspending medium are not immiscible. When the cell organization is broken down by the interfacial tension the greater part of the cell contents is immediately dissolved or dispersed. Goss (23) has noted that when the membrane is torn with a microdissection needle disintegration at once spreads over the membrane and the cytoplasm undergoes profound change. Moreover it is

  7. Expression of human myeloid-associated surface antigens in human-mouse myeloid cell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Geurts van Kessel, A H; Tetteroo, P A; von dem Borne, A E; Hagemeijer, A; Bootsma, D

    1983-01-01

    Hybrid cell lines were obtained after fusion of mouse myeloid cells (WEHI-TG) with leukocytes from two patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. A third fusion was carried out with leukocytes from a patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia. All three patients carried the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph1) in the leukemia cell population. Cytochemical analysis confirmed the myelo-monocytic nature of the hybrid cell lines. The presence of Ph1 translocation products could be established in most hybrids derived from the two chronic myeloid leukemic patients, which confirms that indeed human myeloid cells were fused. Several of these hybrid lines showed reactivity with monoclonal antibodies known to be specific for human myeloid cells, whereas interlineage Chinese hamster fibroblast-human chronic myeloid leukemia hybrids failed to react with these antibodies. Five independently obtained monoclonal antibodies--MI/NI, UJ-308, VIM-D5, FMC-10, and B4.3--showed very similar reactivity patterns when tested on the hybrid clones. This result substantiates the evidence obtained from other studies, that these five antibodies are directed against the same myeloid-associated antigen. The gene(s) for expression of the latter antigen could be assigned to human chromosome 11. Images PMID:6574514

  8. Role of metalloproteases in vaccinia virus epitope processing for transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP)-independent human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B7 class I antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Elena; García, Ruth; Mir, Carmen; Barriga, Alejandro; Lemonnier, François A; Ramos, Manuel; López, Daniel

    2012-03-23

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates the viral proteolytic peptides generated by the proteasome and other proteases in the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen. There, they complex with nascent human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules, which are subsequently recognized by the CD8(+) lymphocyte cellular response. However, individuals with nonfunctional TAP complexes or tumor or infected cells with blocked TAP molecules are able to present HLA class I ligands generated by TAP-independent processing pathways. Herein, using a TAP-independent polyclonal vaccinia virus-polyspecific CD8(+) T cell line, two conserved vaccinia-derived TAP-independent HLA-B*0702 epitopes were identified. The presentation of these epitopes in normal cells occurs via complex antigen-processing pathways involving the proteasome and/or different subsets of metalloproteinases (amino-, carboxy-, and endoproteases), which were blocked in infected cells with specific chemical inhibitors. These data support the hypothesis that the abundant cellular proteolytic systems contribute to the supply of peptides recognized by the antiviral cellular immune response, thereby facilitating immunosurveillance. These data may explain why TAP-deficient individuals live normal life spans without any increased susceptibility to viral infections.

  9. Role of Metalloproteases in Vaccinia Virus Epitope Processing for Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP)-independent Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-B7 Class I Antigen Presentation*

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Elena; García, Ruth; Mir, Carmen; Barriga, Alejandro; Lemonnier, François A.; Ramos, Manuel; López, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates the viral proteolytic peptides generated by the proteasome and other proteases in the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen. There, they complex with nascent human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules, which are subsequently recognized by the CD8+ lymphocyte cellular response. However, individuals with nonfunctional TAP complexes or tumor or infected cells with blocked TAP molecules are able to present HLA class I ligands generated by TAP-independent processing pathways. Herein, using a TAP-independent polyclonal vaccinia virus-polyspecific CD8+ T cell line, two conserved vaccinia-derived TAP-independent HLA-B*0702 epitopes were identified. The presentation of these epitopes in normal cells occurs via complex antigen-processing pathways involving the proteasome and/or different subsets of metalloproteinases (amino-, carboxy-, and endoproteases), which were blocked in infected cells with specific chemical inhibitors. These data support the hypothesis that the abundant cellular proteolytic systems contribute to the supply of peptides recognized by the antiviral cellular immune response, thereby facilitating immunosurveillance. These data may explain why TAP-deficient individuals live normal life spans without any increased susceptibility to viral infections. PMID:22298786

  10. [Leucocyte alkaline phosphatase in normal and pathological pregnancy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Stark, K H; Zaki, I; Sobolewski, K

    1981-01-01

    The activities of leucocyte alkaline phosphatase were determined in 511 patients with normal and pathological pregnancy. Mean values were compared and the enzyme followed up, and the conclusion was drawn that leucocyte alkaline phosphatase was no safe indicator of foetal condition. No direct relationship were found to exist between leucocyte alkaline phosphatase, total oestrogens, HSAP, HLAP, HPL, and oxytocinase.

  11. Comparison of antigen assay and reverse transcriptase assay for detecting human immunodeficiency virus in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Feorino, P; Forrester, B; Schable, C; Warfield, D; Schochetman, G

    1987-01-01

    We compared an antigen capture assay (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Ill.) with a reverse transcriptase assay to identify and quantify human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in culture. In direct comparisons of serial dilutions of lymphadenopathy-associated virus type 1, the antigen assay was 100-fold more sensitive than the reverse transcriptase assay in detecting the virus. The antigen assay reacted strongly with 60 different HIV isolates but did not cross-react with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II, cytomegalovirus, varicella-zoster virus, herpes simplex virus type 1, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus type 5, or poliovirus type 1 or with extracts from four different control human cell lines and eight different phytohemagglutinin-stimulated normal human lymphocytes. Peripheral blood lymphocyte samples from 50 individuals were evaluated by both the antigen assay and the reverse transcriptase assay. The cells from the 34 seropositive individuals were all positive by the antigen assay (range, 3 to 9 days; average time, 5.9 days) and the reverse transcriptase assay (range, 7 to 16 days; average time, 9.6 days). Cells from the 16 seronegative individuals were negative by both assays. These results indicate that the antigen assay is an important addition to the monitoring of HIV production in the lymphocytes of infected patients. PMID:2448334

  12. Immunological fingerprinting of group B streptococci: from circulating human antibodies to protective antigens.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Andreas L; Senn, Beatrice M; Visram, Zehra; Henics, Tamás Z; Minh, Duc Bui; Schüler, Wolfgang; Neubauer, Christina; Gelbmann, Dieter; Noiges, Birgit; Sinzinger, Jan; Hanner, Markus; Dewasthaly, Shailesh; Lundberg, Urban; Hordnes, Knut; Masoud, Helga; Sevelda, Paul; von Gabain, Alexander; Nagy, Eszter

    2010-10-08

    Group B streptococcus is one of the most important pathogens in neonates, and causes invasive infections in non-pregnant adults with underlying diseases. Applying a genomic approach that relies on human antibodies we identified antigenic GBS proteins, among them most of the previously published protective antigens. In vitro analyses allowed the selection of conserved candidate antigens that were further evaluated in murine lethal sepsis models using several GBS strains. In active and passive immunization models, we identified four protective GBS antigens, FbsA and BibA, as well as two hypothetical proteins, all shown to contribute to virulence based on gene deletion mutants. These protective antigens have the potential to be components of novel vaccines or targets for passive immune prophylaxis against GBS disease.

  13. Synthesis and processing in Escherichia coli of human leucocyte interferon fused with the signal sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens a-amylase

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokin, A.V.; Avakov, A.S.; Bogush, V.G.; Kostrov, S.V.; Gaiga, G.Z.; Iomantas, Yu.V.; Abalakina, E.G.; Stepanov, A.I.; Strongin, A.Ya.; Kozlov, Yu.I.; Debabov, V.G.

    1985-11-01

    Earlier, the authors reported cloning of the alpha-amylase gene of B. amyloliquefaciens in B. subtilis and E. coli. Currently, the authors report results on the expression of the hybrid gene consisting of the DNA fragment coding for the leader part of B. amyloliquefaciens alpha-amylase and the structural part of the human interferon alpha-2 in E. coli cells. This gene contains an additional methionine codon at the 5'-terminal, which codes for the interferon structure (without its own signal peptide). The interferon gene was inserted into plasmid /sub p/TG 278 at the cleavage site of EcoRI. The structure of the plasmid thus obtained the signal peptide of amylase, five amino acids (Val-Gly-Glu-Phe-Met), and the structural part of the interferon. The E. coli C600 cells carrying plasmid pTGA6 were used to study interferon secretions. The interferon activity was determined radioimmunologically with the use of monoclonal anti-bodies NK2.

  14. Interactions of allogeneic human mononuclear cells in the two-way mixed leucocyte culture (MLC): influence of cell numbers, subpopulations and cyclosporin

    PubMed Central

    Sato, T; Deiwick, A; Raddatz, G; Koyama, K; Schlitt, H J

    1999-01-01

    With organ allografts considerable numbers of donor-type mononuclear cells are transferred to the recipient, leading to bilateral immunological interactions between donor and recipient lymphocytes. To study such bilateral immune reactions in detail, human two-way MLC were performed. In this model proliferation kinetics, patterns of activation, and survival of the two populations were analysed, and the relevance of initial cell subset composition, relative cell numbers, and the effect of immunosuppression on this co-culture were evaluated. It could be demonstrated that with an initial 50:50 ratio of two populations of allogeneic cells one population dominated after 21 days of co-culture in 78 out of 80 combinations (97%) tested; the other population decreased markedly after an initially stable phase of 6–7 days. With unequal starting conditions the larger population dominated when resting cells were used, but small populations of preactivated cells or separated CD8+ cells could also dominate. Depletion of CD16+ natural killer (NK) cells and of CD2− cells (B cell and monocytes) had no effect on domination. Addition of cyclosporin delayed or blocked the domination process while addition of IL-2 accelerated it. Disappearance of one population was associated with detection of apoptotic cells. The findings indicate that co-cultures of allogeneic mononuclear cells are generally not stable for more than 1 week, but lead to active elimination of one population. CD8+ cells and particularly preactivated cells seem to play the most important role in that process, while NK cells are of less importance. Cyclosporin can prolong survival of allogeneic cells in co-culture. These observations suggest that under the conditions of clinical organ transplantation even small amounts of immunocompetent donor cells transferred by the graft may persist for some time and may, thereby, have the chance to exert immunomodulatory functions. PMID:9933457

  15. Analysis of CD83 antigen expression in human breast fibroadenoma and adjacent tissue.

    PubMed

    Borges, Marcus Nascimento; Facina, Gil; Silva, Ismael Dale Cotrin Guerreiro; Waitzberg, Angela Flávia Logullo; Nazario, Afonso Celso Pinto

    2011-12-01

    Dendritic cell maturation is considered essential for starting an immune response. The CD83 antigen is an important marker of dendritic cell maturation. The objectives here were to analyze CD83 antigen expression in human breast fibroadenoma and breast tissue adjacent to the lesion and to identify clinical factors that might influence this expression. This was a retrospective study at a public university hospital, in which 29 histopathological samples of breast fibroadenoma and adjacent breast tissue, from 28 women of reproductive age, were analyzed. The immunohistochemistry method was used to analyze the cell expression of the antigen. The antigen expression in the cells was evaluated by means of random manual counting using an optical microscope. Positive expression of the CD83 antigen in the epithelial cells of the fibroadenoma (365.52; standard deviation ± 133.13) in relation to the adjacent breast tissue cells (189.59; standard deviation ± 140.75) was statistically larger (P < 0.001). Several clinical features were analyzed, but only parity was shown to influence CD83 antigen expression in the adjacent breast tissue, such that positive expression was more evident in nulliparous women (P = 0.042). The expression of the CD83 antigen in the fibroadenoma was positive and greater than in the adjacent breast tissue. Positive expression of the antigen in the adjacent breast tissue was influenced by parity, and was significantly more evident in nulliparous women.

  16. Antigenic Patterns and Evolution of the Human Influenza A (H1N1) Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mi; Zhao, Xiang; Hua, Sha; Du, Xiangjun; Peng, Yousong; Li, Xiyan; Lan, Yu; Wang, Dayan; Wu, Aiping; Shu, Yuelong; Jiang, Taijiao

    2015-01-01

    The influenza A (H1N1) virus causes seasonal epidemics that result in severe illnesses and deaths almost every year. A deep understanding of the antigenic patterns and evolution of human influenza A (H1N1) virus is extremely important for its effective surveillance and prevention. Through development of antigenicity inference method for human influenza A (H1N1), named PREDAC-H1, we systematically mapped the antigenic patterns and evolution of the human influenza A (H1N1) virus. Eight dominant antigenic clusters have been inferred for seasonal H1N1 viruses since 1977, which demonstrated sequential replacements over time with a similar pattern in Asia, Europe and North America. Among them, six clusters emerged first in Asia. As for China, three of the eight antigenic clusters were detected in South China earlier than in North China, indicating the leading role of South China in H1N1 transmission. The comprehensive view of the antigenic evolution of human influenza A (H1N1) virus can help formulate better strategy for its prevention and control. PMID:26412348

  17. Antigenic Patterns and Evolution of the Human Influenza A (H1N1) Virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mi; Zhao, Xiang; Hua, Sha; Du, Xiangjun; Peng, Yousong; Li, Xiyan; Lan, Yu; Wang, Dayan; Wu, Aiping; Shu, Yuelong; Jiang, Taijiao

    2015-09-28

    The influenza A (H1N1) virus causes seasonal epidemics that result in severe illnesses and deaths almost every year. A deep understanding of the antigenic patterns and evolution of human influenza A (H1N1) virus is extremely important for its effective surveillance and prevention. Through development of antigenicity inference method for human influenza A (H1N1), named PREDAC-H1, we systematically mapped the antigenic patterns and evolution of the human influenza A (H1N1) virus. Eight dominant antigenic clusters have been inferred for seasonal H1N1 viruses since 1977, which demonstrated sequential replacements over time with a similar pattern in Asia, Europe and North America. Among them, six clusters emerged first in Asia. As for China, three of the eight antigenic clusters were detected in South China earlier than in North China, indicating the leading role of South China in H1N1 transmission. The comprehensive view of the antigenic evolution of human influenza A (H1N1) virus can help formulate better strategy for its prevention and control.

  18. Fatty acid binding protein 4 in circulating leucocytes reflects atherosclerotic lesion progression in Apoe(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Agardh, Hanna E; Gertow, Karl; Salvado, Dolores M; Hermansson, Andreas; van Puijvelde, Gijs H; Hansson, Göran K; n-Berne, Gabrielle Paulsso; Gabrielsen, Anders

    2013-02-01

    Discovery of novel biomarkers for atherosclerosis is important to aid in early diagnosis of pre-symptomatic patients at high risk of cardiovascular events. The aim of the present study was therefore to identify potential biomarkers in circulating cells reflecting atherosclerotic lesion progression in the vessel wall. We performed gene arrays on circulating leucocytes from atherosclerosis prone Apoe(-/-) mice with increasing ages, using C57BL/6 mice as healthy controls. We identified fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) mRNA to be augmented in mice with established disease compared with young Apoe(-/-) or controls. Interestingly, the transcript FABP4 correlated significantly with lesion size, further supporting a disease associated increase. In addition, validation of our finding on protein level showed augmented FABP4 in circulating leucocytes whereas, importantly, no change could be observed in plasma. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated FABP4 to be present mainly in circulating neutrophils and to some extent in monocytes. Moreover, FABP4-positive neutrophils and macrophages could be identified in the subintimal space in the plaque. Using human circulating leucocytes, we confirmed the presence of FABP4 protein in neutrophils and monocytes. In conclusion, we have showed that cellular levels of FABP4 in circulating leucocytes associate with lesion development in the experimental Apoe(-/-) model. The increased expression is primarily localized to neutrophils, but also in monocytes. We have identified FABP4 in leucocytes as a potential and easy accessible biomarker of atherosclerosis which could be of future clinical relevance.

  19. Identification and characterization of major proteins carrying ABO blood group antigens in the human kidney.

    PubMed

    Tasaki, Masayuki; Yoshida, Yutaka; Miyamoto, Masahito; Nameta, Masaaki; Cuellar, Lino M; Xu, Bo; Zhang, Ying; Yaoita, Eishin; Nakagawa, Yuki; Saito, Kazuhide; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Takahashi, Kota

    2009-04-27

    It is generally admitted that ABO(H) blood group antigens are linked to lipids and proteins. Although glycolipids carrying ABO antigens have been well characterized in human kidneys, glycoproteins carrying ABO antigens are largely unknown, and their molecular properties remain to be elucidated. All the blood group A antigen-linked proteins in human kidney could be solubilized and captured on immobilized Helix pomatia lectin that recognizes A antigens. These proteins were separated on SDS-PAGE gels. The gel pieces containing protein bands immunoreactive with anti-A antibody were excised, in-gel digested with trypsin, and analyzed by nanoLC tandem mass spectrometer. Protein candidates that carry ABO antigens were confirmed by immunoprecipitation and double-labeled immunofluorescense microscopy. All the glycoproteins carrying ABO antigens were found to be Asn-linked glycoproteins, and presented as multiple bands on SDS-PAGE with molecular masses ranging from 60 to 270 kDa. The protein bands were subjected for mass spectrometric analysis, which identified 121 distinct proteins with high confidence. Of the identified proteins, 55 N-glycosylated, membrane proteins were selected as glycoprotein candidates that carry ABO antigens. Among them, most abundantly expressed proteins as estimated by the number of peptide matches in the MS spectrometric analysis, such as platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1, plasmalemmal vesicle-associated protein, and von Willebrand factor, were further characterized. Several glycoproteins were identified that represented major glycoproteins carrying ABO antigens in the human kidney, which exhibited distinct features in localization to most of vascular endothelial cells.

  20. Induction of Human Blood Group A Antigen Expression on Mouse Cells, Using Lentiviral Gene Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaohu; Lang, Haili; Zhou, Xianpei; Zhang, Li; Yin, Rong; Maciejko, Jessica; Giannitsos, Vasiliki; Motyka, Bruce; Medin, Jeffrey A.; Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The ABO histo-blood group system is the most important antigen system in transplantation medicine, yet no small animal model of the ABO system exists. To determine the feasibility of developing a murine model, we previously subcloned the human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase (H-transferase, EC 2.4.1.69) cDNA and the human α-1,3-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (A-transferase, EC 2.4.1.40) cDNA into lentiviral vectors to study their ability to induce human histo-blood group A antigen expression on mouse cells. Herein we investigated the optimal conditions for human A and H antigen expression in murine cells. We determined that transduction of a bicistronic lentiviral vector (LvEF1-AH-trs) resulted in the expression of A antigen in a mouse endothelial cell line. We also studied the in vivo utility of this vector to induce human A antigen expression in mouse liver. After intrahepatic injection of LvEF1-AH-trs, A antigen expression was observed on hepatocytes as detected by immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR. In human group A erythrocyte-sensitized mice, A antigen expression in the liver was associated with tissue damage, and deposition of antibody and complement. These results suggest that this gene transfer strategy can be used to simulate the human ABO blood group system in a murine model. This model will facilitate progress in the development of interventions for ABO-incompatible transplantation and transfusion scenarios, which are difficult to develop in clinical or large animal settings. PMID:20163247

  1. Identification of Human T Cell Antigens for the Development of Vaccines Against Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bertholet, Sylvie; Ireton, Gregory C; Kahn, Maria; Guderian, Jeffrey; Mohamath, Raodoh; Stride, Nicole; Laughlin, Elsa M.; Baldwin, Susan L.; Vedvick, Thomas S.; Coler, Rhea N.; Reed, Steven G.

    2008-01-01

    Development of a subunit vaccine for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) depends on the identification of antigens that induce appropriate T cell responses. Using bioinformatics, we selected a panel of 94 Mtb genes based on criteria which included growth in macrophages, up- or down-regulation under hypoxic conditions, secretion, membrane association, or because they were members of the PE/PPE or EsX families. Recombinant proteins encoded by these genes were evaluated for IFN-γ recall responses using PBMC from healthy subjects previously exposed to Mtb. From this screen, dominant human T-cell antigens were identified and 49 of these proteins, formulated in CpG, were evaluated as vaccine candidates in a mouse model of tuberculosis (TB). Eighteen of the individual antigens conferred partial protection against challenge with virulent Mtb. A combination of three of these antigens further increased protection against Mtb to levels comparable to those achieved with BCG vaccination. Vaccine candidates that led to reduction in lung bacterial burden following challenge induced pluripotent CD4 and CD8 T cells, including TH1 cell responses characterized by elevated levels of antigen-specific IgG2c, IFN-γ and TNF. Priority vaccine antigens elicited pluripotent CD4 and CD8 T responses in PPD+ donor PBMC. This study identified numerous novel human T cell antigens suitable to be included in subunit vaccines against TB. PMID:19017986

  2. Abnormal distribution of the histocompatibility antigens (HLA) in lousy patients.

    PubMed

    Morsy, T A; Alalfy, M S; Sabry, A H; Fikry, A A; El Sharkawy, I M

    1996-04-01

    The histocompatibility antigens have important functions in the development of the immune response, in the development of immunologic tolerance and in the resistance and susceptibility to diseases. In the present study, the frequency of the human leucocytic antigens (HLA) were studied in 31 lousy children with Pediculus h. capitis (head lice) and 14 adults with Phthirus pubis (pubic lice) to evaluate the immune response in their pathogenesis. The patients (children and adults) were parasite-free as indicated by urine, stool and blood analysis and clinical examination. A significant increase was found between HLA-A11 and, -B5 and lousy children with P. h. capitis and between HLA,-A11, -B5 and -B27 and lousy adults with P. pubis. The association between HLA antigens and parasitic infection was discussed.

  3. Molecular characterization of a fully human chimeric T-cell antigen receptor for tumor-associated antigen EpCAM.

    PubMed

    Shirasu, Naoto; Yamada, Hiromi; Shibaguchi, Hirotomo; Kuroki, Motomu; Kuroki, Masahide

    2012-01-01

    The transduction of T cells to express chimeric T-cell antigen receptor (CAR) is an attractive strategy for adaptive immunotherapy for cancer, because the CAR can redirect the recognition specificity of T cells to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) on the surface of target cells, thereby avoiding the limitations of HLA restriction. However, there are considerable problems with the clinical application of CAR, mostly due to its xenogeneic components, which could be immunogenic in humans. Moreover, while extensive studies on the CARs have been performed, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of CAR-grafted T cells remain unclear. In order to eliminate potential immunogenicity and investigate the molecular basis of the CAR-mediated T-cell activation, we constructed a novel CAR (CAR57-28ζ) specific for one of the most important TAAs, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), using only human-derived genes. We revealed that in Jurkat T cells, lentivirally expressed CAR57-28ζ can transmit the T-cell-activating signals sufficient to induce IL-2 production upon EpCAM stimulation. An immunofluorescent analysis clearly showed that the CAR57-28ζ induces the formation of signaling clusters containing endogenous CD3ζ at the CAR/EpCAM interaction interface. These results suggest that this CAR gene may be safely and effectively applied for adaptive T-cell immunotherapy.

  4. Molecular Characterization of a Fully Human Chimeric T-Cell Antigen Receptor for Tumor-Associated Antigen EpCAM

    PubMed Central

    Shirasu, Naoto; Yamada, Hiromi; Shibaguchi, Hirotomo; Kuroki, Motomu; Kuroki, Masahide

    2012-01-01

    The transduction of T cells to express chimeric T-cell antigen receptor (CAR) is an attractive strategy for adaptive immunotherapy for cancer, because the CAR can redirect the recognition specificity of T cells to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) on the surface of target cells, thereby avoiding the limitations of HLA restriction. However, there are considerable problems with the clinical application of CAR, mostly due to its xenogeneic components, which could be immunogenic in humans. Moreover, while extensive studies on the CARs have been performed, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of CAR-grafted T cells remain unclear. In order to eliminate potential immunogenicity and investigate the molecular basis of the CAR-mediated T-cell activation, we constructed a novel CAR (CAR57-28ζ) specific for one of the most important TAAs, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), using only human-derived genes. We revealed that in Jurkat T cells, lentivirally expressed CAR57-28ζ can transmit the T-cell-activating signals sufficient to induce IL-2 production upon EpCAM stimulation. An immunofluorescent analysis clearly showed that the CAR57-28ζ induces the formation of signaling clusters containing endogenous CD3ζ at the CAR/EpCAM interaction interface. These results suggest that this CAR gene may be safely and effectively applied for adaptive T-cell immunotherapy. PMID:22547929

  5. Immunohistochemical demonstration of specific antigens in the human brain fixed in zinc-ethanol-formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Korzhevskii, D E; Sukhorukova, E G; Kirik, O V; Grigorev, I P

    2015-08-05

    Tissue fixation is critical for immunohistochemistry. Recently, we developed a zinc-ethanol-formalin fixative (ZEF), and the present study was aimed to assess the applicability of the ZEF for the human brain histology and immunohistochemistry and to evaluate the detectability of different antigens in the human brain fixed with ZEF. In total, 11 antigens were tested, including NeuN, neuron-specific enolase, GFAP, Iba-1, calbindin, calretinin, choline acetyltransferase, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65), tyrosine hydroxylase, synaptophysin, and α-tubulin. The obtained data show that: i) the ZEF has potential for use in general histological practice, where detailed characterization of human brain morphology is needed; ii) the antigens tested are well-preserved in the human brain specimens fixed in the ZEF.

  6. Women's attitude towards routine human platelet antigen-screening in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Winkelhorst, Dian; Loeff, Rosanne M; van den Akker-Van Marle, M Elske; de Haas, Masja; Oepkes, Dick

    2017-08-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is a potentially life-threatening disease with excellent preventative treatment available for subsequent pregnancies. To prevent index cases, the effectiveness of a population-based screening program has been suggested repeatedly. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate women's attitude towards possible future human platelet antigen-screening in pregnancy. We performed a cross-sectional questionnaire study among healthy pregnant women receiving prenatal care in one of seven participating midwifery practices. Attitude was assessed using a questionnaire based on the validated Multidimensional Measurement of Informed Choice model, containing questions assessing knowledge, attitude and intention to participate. A total of 143 of the 220 women (65%) completed and returned the questionnaire. A positive attitude towards human platelet antigen-screening was expressed by 91% of participants, of which 94% was based on sufficient knowledge. Attitude was more likely to be negatively influenced by the opinion that screening can be frightening. Informed choices were made in 87% and occurred significantly less in women from non-European origin, 89% in European women vs. 60% in non-European women (p = 0.03). Pregnant women in the Netherlands expressed a positive attitude towards human platelet antigen-screening in pregnancy. We therefore expect a high rate of informed uptake when human platelet antigen-screening is implemented. In future counseling on human platelet antigen-screening, ethnicity and possible anxiety associated with a screening test need to be specifically addressed. © 2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. Human leukocyte antigen-G polymorphism influences the age of onset and autoantibody status in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mariaselvam, C M; Chaaben, A B; Salah, S; Charron, D; Krishnamoorthy, R; Tamouza, R; Negi, V S

    2015-03-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the frequency of three gene polymorphisms in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of human leucocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) gene in south Indian patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and analyze their influence on disease susceptibility, phenotype and treatment response. HLA-G 14 bp insertion (Ins)/deletion (del) (rs66554220), HLA-G +3142G>C (rs1063320) and +3187A>G (rs9380142) polymorphism was analyzed in 221 RA patients and 200 healthy controls. Frequency of HLA-G genotypes or alleles did not differ between patients and controls. Analysis based on rheumatoid factor (RF) status revealed that the frequency of allele 'A' (rs9380142) was significantly higher in RF-positive than in RF-negative patients [84% vs 74%, Yates-corrected P value (Pc) = 0.04, odds ratio (OR) = 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.0-3.2]. A similar difference was maintained in RF-positive female patients than their RF-negative counterparts (83% vs 71%, Pc = 0.02, OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0 to 3.4) and between RF-positive and RF-negative young onset RA (YORA) patients (84% vs 73%, Pc = 0.03, OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0-3.2), suggesting that rs9380142 polymorphism influenced RF status. The 14 bp Ins allele of rs66554220 was significantly more prevalent in RF-positive YORA than in RF-positive late onset RA (LORA) patients (51% vs 25%, P = 0.03, OR = 3.1, 95% CI = 1.1-9.8). Frequency of the four major haplotypes [InsGA (48%), DelGA (22%), DelCG (18%), DelCA (9.7%)] observed did not differ between cases and controls. HLA-G does not appear to be a risk factor for development of RA in south Indian Tamils but may act as a genetic modifier of clinical phenotype in terms of autoantibody production, gender preference and age at disease onset.

  8. Effects of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and cytokines on the expression of MHC antigens, complement receptors and other antigens on human blood monocytes and U937 cells: role in cell differentiation, activation and phagocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Spittler, A; Willheim, M; Leutmezer, F; Ohler, R; Krugluger, W; Reissner, C; Lucas, T; Brodowicz, T; Roth, E; Boltz-Nitulescu, G

    1997-01-01

    The effect of calcitriol/1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, alone and in combination with cytokines, on the expression of various antigens (Ag) on human peripheral blood monocytes and U937 cells was studied by flow cytometry. Both constitutive and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ Ag expression on monocytes was significantly down-regulated by calcitriol, IL-10 and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). The effects of calcitriol were concentration dependent and reached maximal inhibitory levels after 3-5 days. Modulation of HLA-DR by calcitriol and IFN-gamma at the protein level correlated with the amount of mRNA specific for the HLA-DR alpha-chain, as judged by Northern blot analysis. The basal as well as IL-4, IL-6, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and TGF-beta-driven levels of HLA-ABC Ag were significantly diminished by calcitriol. On U937 cells calcitriol markedly induced CD11a and CD11b expression and weakly up-regulated CD11c whereas on monocytes, constitutive CD11a, CD11b and CD11c expression was significantly down-regulated by calcitriol. The expression of CD14 Ag was strongly induced on U937 cells but only modestly on monocytes. Both the basal level of CD71 and IL-4, IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha-driven expression was diminished on calcitriol-treated U937 cells. In addition, calcitriol suppressed the expression of CD71 Ag on monocytes. The ability of monocytes to phagocytize opsonized Escherichia coli was diminished by calcitriol. Our results demonstrate that calcitriol, alone or in combination with cytokines, modulates expression of MHC, CD11b, CD11c, CD14 and CD71 Ag on both monocytes and U937 cells, and impairs the phagocytic property of monocytes. Images Figure 2 PMID:9135559

  9. Fetal leucocyte count in rhesus disease.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, N P; Buggins, A G; Snijders, R J; Noble, P N; Layton, D M; Nicolaides, K H

    1992-01-01

    The effect of fetal anaemia on the total and differential leucocyte counts was studied by examining blood samples obtained by cordocentesis from 177 previously untransfused rhesus affected fetuses at 17-36 weeks' gestation. The mean fetal total leucocyte, lymphocyte, and monocyte counts were significantly lower than the corresponding values in normal controls and there were significant associations between the decrease in these cells and the degree of fetal anaemia. Possible mechanisms for leucopenia include (i) stimulation of erythroid progenitor production at the expense of production of myeloid progenitors, (ii) non-specific haemophagocytosis, or (iii) general suppression of haemopoiesis. Further understanding of the underlying mechanism and the implications of leucopenia as well as the previously reported thrombocytopenia and anaemia may provide a basis for improved antenatal and/or postnatal treatment. PMID:1586179

  10. Human T cell activation. III. Induction of an early activation antigen, EA 1 by TPA, mitogens and antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, T.; Jung, L.K.L.; FU, S.M.

    1986-03-01

    With human T cells activated for 12 hours by 12-o-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as immunogen, an IgG/sub 2a/ monoclonal antibody, mAb Ea 1, has been generated to a 60KD phosphorylated protein with 32KD and 28KD subunits. The antigen, Ea 1, is readily detected on 60% of isolated thymocytes by indirect immunofluorescence. A low level of Ea 1 expression is detectable on 2-6% of blood lymphocytes. Isolated T cells have been induced to express Ea 1 by TPA, mitogens and anitgens. TPA activated T cells express Ea 1 as early as 1 hour after activation. By 4 hours, greater than 95% of the T cells stain with mAb Ea 1. About 50% of the PHA or Con A activated T cells express Ea 1 with a similar kinetics. Ea 1 expression proceeds that of IL-2 receptor in these activation processes. T cells activated by soluble antigens (tetanus toxoid and PPD) and alloantigens in MLR also express Ea 1 after a long incubation. About 20% of the T cells stain for Ea 1 at day 6. Ea 1 expression is not limited to activated T cells. B cells activated by TPA or anti-IgM Ab plus B cell growth factor express Ea 1. The kinetics of Ea 1 expression is slower and the staining is less intense. Repeated attempts to detect Ea 1 on resting and activated monocytes and granulocytes have not been successful. Ea 1 expression is due to de novo synthesis for its induction is blocked by cycloheximide and actinomycin D. Ea 1 is the earliest activation antigen detectable to-date.

  11. Varying expression of major histocompatibility complex antigens on human renal endothelium and epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, P. R.; Trickett, L. P.; Smith, J. L.; MacIver, A. G.; Tate, D.; Slapak, M.

    1985-01-01

    Pre-anastomosis wedge biopsies from 14 cadaveric donor kidneys were examined for the expression of class I (HLA-ABC) and class II (HLA-DR) antigens in renal tissue. Two monoclonal antibodies to class I antigens and four to class II antigens were used in an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. Consistent expression of both antigens was demonstrated on the surface of glomerular, peritubular capillary and venous endothelial cells. Renal arteries contained only class I antigens. Proximal tubules contained varying amounts of each antigen in their cytoplasm. Sixteen human lymphocytotoxic allo-antisera showed marked variation in their ability to detect HLA antigens on the kidney. The selection of donors for recipients of renal allografts involves the complement-dependent cytotoxicity test and the failure of some lymphocytotoxic antisera to bind to the kidney indicates that some suitable patients may be incorrectly excluded. The use of a binding assay using an immunoperoxidase technique should be included in cross-match techniques particularly for patients who have high levels of circulating cytotoxic antibodies. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3855644

  12. Immature human DCs efficiently translocate endocytosed antigens into the cytosol for proteasomal processing.

    PubMed

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Walden, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen is essential for induction of CD8 effector T cell responses and a hallmark of dendritic cells (DCs). The mode of antigen processing in this context is controversial and some models imply translocation of the antigen from the endosomes into the cytosol. To test this hypothesis we made use of the pro-apoptotic properties of cytochrome c when in the cytosol, and confirmed that it indeed triggered apoptosis of human immature DCs but only at high concentrations. Proteasome inhibitors reduced the required concentration of cytochrome c thousand-fold, indicating that protein translocated into the cytosol is rapidly degraded by proteasomes. Mature DCs were also susceptible to cytochrome c-triggered apoptosis at high concentrations but proteasome inhibitors did not increase their sensitivity. Other cross-presenting cells such as B cells and monocytes were not sensitive to cytochrome c at all, indicating that they do not shuttle internalized antigen into the cytosol. Thus, processing of internalized antigens seems to follow different pathways depending on cell type and, in case of DCs, maturation state. Immature DCs appear to have a unique capacity to shuttle external antigen into the cytosol for proteasomal processing, which could explain their efficiency in antigen cross-presentation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Leishmania major-Like Antigen for Specific and Sensitive Serodiagnosis of Human and Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa-de-Deus, RosÂngela; Luíz dos Mares-Guia, Marcos; Zacarias Nunes, Adriane; Morais Costa, Kátia; Gonçalves Junqueira, Roberto; Mayrink, Wilson; Genaro, Odair; Pereira Tavares, Carlos Alberto

    2002-01-01

    An antigen (LMS) prepared from Leishmania major-like promastigotes was used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the diagnosis of human and dog visceral leishmaniasis. The results were compared with those from the indirect immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT). A total of 1,822 canine sera were tested, including sera from dogs with visceral leishmaniasis, transmissible venereal tumors, ehrlichiosis, rickettsiosis, or Chagas' disease and sera from healthy dogs. The antigen was also tested with 227 samples of human sera, including sera from patients with visceral, cutaneous, or diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis and from noninfected individuals, as well as sera from patients with Chagas' disease, toxoplasmosis, rickettsiosis, hepatitis B, schistosomiasis, ascaridiasis, malaria, rheumatoid factor, leprosy and rheumatoid factor, tuberculosis, or leprosy. All dogs and all human patients had a clinical and/or serological and/or parasitological diagnosis. For detecting antibodies in sera from dogs with leishmaniasis, the antigen showed a sensitivity of 98%, specificity of 95%, and concordance of 93% and when used for detecting antibodies in human sera presented a sensitivity of 92%, specificity of 100%, and concordance of 92%. Comparison between ELISA and IFAT demonstrated that ELISA using the LMS antigen yielded more reliable results than IFAT. The LMS antigen displayed no cross-reactivity with sera from patients or dogs that had any of the other diseases tested. PMID:12414775

  14. Flow cytometry assay for intracellular detection of Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis virus (IPNV) in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Rønneseth, Anita; Pettersen, Eirin Fausa; Wergeland, Heidrun I

    2012-12-01

    Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis virus (IPNV) is traditionally detected in adherent leucocytes using immunofluorescence labelled specific antibodies, PCR or by further cultivation of infected cell material in cell lines. We present a flow cytometry (FCM) assay for detection of intracellular IPNV in salmon leucocytes, where each single cell is analysed for presence of virus. The method is established using in vitro challenge of salmon leucocytes and CHSE-214 cells. For detection of intracellular virus antigen the Cytofix/Cytoperm kit from BD is optimal compared with paraformaldehyde or acetone/methanol for cell permeabilisation. This is combined with labelling procedures allowing both internal virus antigen labelling and external antibody labelling of cell markers to identify B-cells and neutrophils. The secondary antibodies were Alexa Fluor 647 for the internal labelling and RPE for the external labelling of bound cell subtype specific antibodies. The presences of virus within cells are also demonstrated by confocal and light microscopy of infected cells. IPNV is successfully detected in blood and head kidney leucocyte samples. IPNV is found both in B-cells and neutrophils as well as in other types of leucocytes that could not be identified due to lack of cell-specific antibodies. Serial samples from cultivation of in vitro infected leucocytes and CHSE-214 cells analysed by flow cytometry showed that number of infected cells increased with increasing number of days. The flow cytometry protocol for detection of intracellular IPNV is verified using CHSE-214 cells persistently infected with IPNV. These analyses are compared with virus titre and virus infected naive CHSE-214 cells. The detection of IPNV in persistently infected cells indicates that carrier fish can be analysed, as such cells are considered to have virus titres similar to carriers.

  15. Purification of human seminal plasma no. 7 antigen by immunoaffinity chromatography on bound monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Isojima, S; Koyama, K; Fujiwara, N

    1982-01-01

    Human seminal plasma (HSP) No. 7 antigen was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography on bound 1C4 monoclonal antibody (Moab) (Shigeta et al., 1980b). The pooled HSP protein was applied to a CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B column of bound 1C4 Moab gamma globulin and the antibody bound fraction (fr) eluted was further purified by rechromatography in the same way. The purified antigen in the antibody bound fr obtained by rechromatography gave a single band on SDS-PAGE in a position corresponding to a molecular weight of 15,000 daltons. This preparation was 196.2 times more effective than the original HSP protein in neutralizing the sperm immobilizing activity of 1C4 Moab. The purified HSP No. 7 antigen contained iron, but was different from lactoferrin and transferrin. It did not show any enzymatic activities, such as those of acid phosphatase, LDH or trypsin inhibitor, and shared antigenicity with human milk protein. It was present in seminal plasma as a molecule with a higher molecular weight but seemed to be cleaved to a monomer of 15,000 daltons during purification procedures. This antigen is present on spermatozoa as sperm-coating antigen and the corresponding antibody can immobilize spermatozoa with complement. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7127911

  16. Polypeptides and functions of antigens from human coronaviruses 229E and OC43.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, O W; Kenny, G E

    1982-01-01

    Coronaviruses possess three major size classes of polypeptides as judged by molecular weight: approximately 180,000, approximately 50,000, and approximately 23,000. Human coronaviruses 229E and OC43 possess not only three similar size classes of polypeptides but also three distinct antigens, none of which cross-react with the heterologous strain. Polypeptides separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were reacted in rocket immunoelectrophoresis with antiserum monospecific to each of the three strain-specific antigens (excised precipitin lines from crossed immunoelectrophoresis profiles were used for immunogens). Monospecific antiserum with neutralizing ability reacted with a polypeptide of 186,000 daltons for 229E and a polypeptide of 190,000 daltons for OC43. The antigen which elicited neutralizing antibody response was located at the surface, associated with the corona of the virion, glycosylated, and bound by concanavalin A. Another less prominent surface antigen was represented by size classes of 23,000 daltons for 229E and 24,000 for OC43. The core antigens of the viruses had molecular weights of 49,000 and 229E and 52,000 and OC43 virus. Thus, the molecular weights and functions of the antigens of human coronaviruses are similar to those of animal coronaviruses. The polypeptides of coronaviruses 229E and OC43 are nearly identical as judged by molecular weight, but the similar polypeptides of the two viruses represent different immunological specificities. Images PMID:6173324

  17. Naturally Acquired Human Immunity to Pneumococcus Is Dependent on Antibody to Protein Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Reglinski, Mark; Jose, Ricardo J.; Marshall, Helina; de Vogel, Corné; Gordon, Stephen; Petersen, Fernanda C.; Baxendale, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Naturally acquired immunity against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is thought to be dependent on anti-capsular antibody. However nasopharyngeal colonisation by Streptococcus pneumoniae also induces antibody to protein antigens that could be protective. We have used human intravenous immunoglobulin preparation (IVIG), representing natural IgG responses to S. pneumoniae, to identify the classes of antigens that are functionally relevant for immunity to IPD. IgG in IVIG recognised capsular antigen and multiple S. pneumoniae protein antigens, with highly conserved patterns between different geographical sources of pooled human IgG. Incubation of S. pneumoniae in IVIG resulted in IgG binding to the bacteria, formation of bacterial aggregates, and enhanced phagocytosis even for unencapsulated S. pneumoniae strains, demonstrating the capsule was unlikely to be the dominant protective antigen. IgG binding to S. pneumoniae incubated in IVIG was reduced after partial chemical or genetic removal of bacterial surface proteins, and increased against a Streptococcus mitis strain expressing the S. pneumoniae protein PspC. In contrast, depletion of type-specific capsular antibody from IVIG did not affect IgG binding, opsonophagocytosis, or protection by passive vaccination against IPD in murine models. These results demonstrate that naturally acquired protection against IPD largely depends on antibody to protein antigens rather than the capsule. PMID:28135322

  18. The human mRNA encoding the Goodpasture antigen is alternatively spliced.

    PubMed

    Bernal, D; Quinones, S; Saus, J

    1993-06-05

    The noncollagenous (NC1) domain of the human collagen alpha 3(IV)-chain is the primary target of autoantibodies produced in Goodpasture syndrome and, therefore, has been designated as the Goodpasture antigen. In this report, we show that Goodpasture antigen mRNA undergoes processing to at least two alternatively spliced forms in a variety of human tissues, resulting in the exclusion of sequence encoded by either one or two exons. Interestingly, no alternatively spliced forms were observed in bovine or rat tissues. The derived amino acid sequences of the two variant mRNA forms are identical and significantly shorter than that arising from the complete Goodpasture antigen mRNA. They lack the carboxyl-terminal region contributing to the formation of the Goodpasture epitope and all but one of the cysteines found in the complete form. These sequence characteristics suggest that, if translated, the variant Goodpasture antigen is likely to be defective in triple helix formation and no longer reactive with Goodpasture autoantibodies. Although each tissue expressing Goodpasture antigen displayed a specific mRNA pattern, the complete form was always the most abundant and was present at levels apparently unrelated to whether or not the organ of origin is a potential target in Goodpasture syndrome. Furthermore, the antigen sequence was identical in the kidneys of normal and Goodpasture-affected individuals, and no major differences in the expression of the complete and spliced forms were observed.

  19. Characterization of binding specificities of bovine leucocyte class I molecules: impacts for rational epitope discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Andreas M.; Rasmussen, Michael; Svitek, Nicholas; Harndahl, Mikkel; Golde, William T.; Barlow, John; Nene, Vishvanath; Buus, Søren

    2014-01-01

    The binding of peptides to classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I proteins is the single most selective step in antigen presentation. However, the peptide-binding specificity of cattle MHC (bovine leucocyte antigen, BoLA) class I (BoLA-I) molecules remains poorly characterized. Here, we demonstrate how a combination of high-throughput assays using positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries, peptide dissociation, and peptide-binding affinity binding measurements can be combined with bioinformatics to effectively characterize the functionality of BoLA-I molecules. Using this strategy, we characterized eight BoLA-I molecules, and found the peptide specificity to resemble that of human MHC-I molecules with primary anchors most often at P2 and P9, and occasional auxiliary P1/P3/P5/P6 anchors. We analyzed nine reported CTL epitopes from Theileria parva, and in eight cases, stable and high affinity binding was confirmed. A set of peptides were tested for binding affinity to the eight BoLA proteins and used to refine the predictors of peptide–MHC binding NetMHC and NetMHCpan. The inclusion of BoLA-specific peptide-binding data led to a significant improvement in prediction accuracy for reported T. parva CTL epitopes. For reported CTL epitopes with weak or no predicted binding, these refined prediction methods suggested presence of nested minimal epitopes with high-predicted binding affinity. The enhanced affinity of the alternative peptides was in all cases confirmed experimentally. This study demonstrates how biochemical high-throughput assays combined with immunoinformatics can be used to characterize the peptide-binding motifs of BoLA-I molecules, boosting performance of MHC peptide-binding prediction methods, and empowering rational epitope discovery in cattle. PMID:25186069

  20. Identification of human trophoblast membrane antigens in maternal blood during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, M J; McIntyre, J A; Prior, M; Warriner, G; Faulk, W P

    1982-01-01

    The development of an immunoradiometric assay for the detection of human trophoblast-specific membrane antigens is described. The test revealed for the first time circulating trophoblast-specific cell membrane antigens in the peripheral blood of pregnant women, but none in non-pregnant female or male controls. Comparison of the circulating levels of these trophoblast-specific proteins between normal and pre-eclamptic blood samples showed no significant differences, thus casting doubt on the role of differential trophoblast antigen deportation in the etiology of toxaemic pregnancy. Matched retroplacental cord blood from several normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies were examined and found either negative or near the lower sensitivity limit of the assay, suggesting that deportation of trophoblast membrane antigens during gestation is limited to the maternal aspect of the placenta. PMID:6177463

  1. The role of PMN-leucocyte lysosomes in tissue injury, inflammation and hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Movat, H. Z.; Uriuhara, T.; Taichman, N. S.; Rowsell, H. C.; Mustard, J. F.

    1968-01-01

    Anaphylaxis due to intravascular interaction of hyperimmune antibody with antigen was studied in rabbits, swine and rats. Obstruction of the pulmonary vessels by the immune precipitates was found to initiate the process. This is followed by aggregation of PMN-leucocytes and platelets in pulmonary vessels and phagocytosis of the precipitates by these blood elements. During this process degranulation of the cells takes place with release of lysosomal contents. As a concomitant a rise in plasma acid protease and other hydrolases was demonstrated, presumably derived from the degranulating PMN-leucocytes and platelets. Unlike leukopaenic animals, normal ones showed a more marked hypotension, a greater tendency to protracted shock and developed focal and confluent haemorrhagic pulmonary lesions. It is suggested that anaphylaxis due to intravascular antigen—antibody interaction or aggregate anaphylaxis is a systemic or pulmonary Arthus reaction, rather than a `true' anaphylaxis. ImagesFIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 3FIG. 4 PMID:4231971

  2. Deep Sequencing Reveals Potential Antigenic Variants at Low Frequencies in Influenza A Virus-Infected Humans

    PubMed Central

    Dinis, Jorge M.; Florek, Nicholas W.; Fatola, Omolayo O.; Moncla, Louise H.; Mutschler, James P.; Charlier, Olivia K.; Meece, Jennifer K.; Belongia, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza vaccines must be frequently reformulated to account for antigenic changes in the viral envelope protein, hemagglutinin (HA). The rapid evolution of influenza virus under immune pressure is likely enhanced by the virus's genetic diversity within a host, although antigenic change has rarely been investigated on the level of individual infected humans. We used deep sequencing to characterize the between- and within-host genetic diversity of influenza viruses in a cohort of patients that included individuals who were vaccinated and then infected in the same season. We characterized influenza HA segments from the predominant circulating influenza A subtypes during the 2012-2013 (H3N2) and 2013-2014 (pandemic H1N1; H1N1pdm) flu seasons. We found that HA consensus sequences were similar in nonvaccinated and vaccinated subjects. In both groups, purifying selection was the dominant force shaping HA genetic diversity. Interestingly, viruses from multiple individuals harbored low-frequency mutations encoding amino acid substitutions in HA antigenic sites at or near the receptor-binding domain. These mutations included two substitutions in H1N1pdm viruses, G158K and N159K, which were recently found to confer escape from virus-specific antibodies. These findings raise the possibility that influenza antigenic diversity can be generated within individual human hosts but may not become fixed in the viral population even when they would be expected to have a strong fitness advantage. Understanding constraints on influenza antigenic evolution within individual hosts may elucidate potential future pathways of antigenic evolution at the population level. IMPORTANCE Influenza vaccines must be frequently reformulated due to the virus's rapid evolution rate. We know that influenza viruses exist within each infected host as a “swarm” of genetically distinct viruses, but the role of this within-host diversity in the antigenic evolution of influenza has been unclear

  3. Effect of disodium cromoglycate on antigen-evoked histamine release from human skin

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Cheryl A.; Greaves, M. W.; Plummer, Valerie M.; Yamamoto, S.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on antigen-evoked histamine release from IgE-sensitized human skin in vitro has been studied using breast skin from six donors. Concentrations of DSCG ranging from 10–200 μM did not produce any consistent effect on histamine release, the results ranging from moderate inhibition to moderate enhancement. With higher concentrations of DSCG (400–500 μM) enhancement of release occurred in nearly all experiments. Variation of antigen concentration did not modify the response to DSCG. These results do not support the possibility that DSCG may be effective in the treatment of immediate hypersensitivity reactions in human skin. PMID:4143251

  4. The Biochemical Characterization of Plasma Class I Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    Strachan T: Molecular Genetics and Polymorphism of Class I HLA Antigens. Br Med Bull 43:1-14, 1987 52. Duquesnoy FJ, Trucco M: Genetic Basis of Cell...Antibodies to Group A Erythrocytes, HLA and Other Human Cell Surface Antigens-New Tools for Genetic Analysis. Cell 14:9-30, 1978 31. Brodsky FM...Bouhallier 0, Merdrignac G, Genetet B, Turmel P, Charron DJ: New Class I in Man: Serological and Molecular Characterization. Human Immuno. 17:3-20, 1986 58

  5. Generation of Human Antigen-Specific Monoclonal IgM Antibodies Using Vaccinated “Human Immune System” Mice

    PubMed Central

    van Geelen, Caroline M. M.; Noerder, Miriam; Huntington, Nicholas D.; Lim, Annick; Yasuda, Etsuko; Diehl, Sean A.; Scheeren, Ferenc A.; Ott, Michael; Weijer, Kees; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Di Santo, James P.; Beaumont, Tim; Guzman, Carlos A.; Spits, Hergen

    2010-01-01

    Background Passive transfer of antibodies not only provides immediate short-term protection against disease, but also can be exploited as a therapeutic tool. However, the ‘humanization’ of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is a time-consuming and expensive process that has the inherent drawback of potentially altering antigenic specificity and/or affinity. The immortalization of human B cells represents an alternative for obtaining human mAbs, but relies on the availability of biological samples from vaccinated individuals or convalescent patients. In this work we describe a novel approach to generate fully human mAbs by combining a humanized mouse model with a new B cell immortalization technique. Methodology/Principal Findings After transplantation with CD34+CD38− human hematopoietic progenitor cells, BALB/c Rag2−/−IL-2Rγc−/− mice acquire a human immune system and harbor B cells with a diverse IgM repertoire. “Human Immune System” mice were then immunized with two commercial vaccine antigens, tetanus toxoid and hepatitis B surface antigen. Sorted human CD19+CD27+ B cells were retrovirally transduced with the human B cell lymphoma (BCL)-6 and BCL-XL genes, and subsequently cultured in the presence of CD40-ligand and IL-21. This procedure allows generating stable B cell receptor-positive B cells that secrete immunoglobulins. We recovered stable B cell clones that produced IgM specific for tetanus toxoid and the hepatitis B surface antigen, respectively. Conclusion/Significance This work provides the proof-of-concept for the usefulness of this novel method based on the immunization of humanized mice for the rapid generation of human mAbs against a wide range of antigens. PMID:20957227

  6. Isolation of human single chain variable fragment antibodies against specific sperm antigens for immunocontraceptive development

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, A.S.; Naz, R.K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Contraceptive vaccines can provide valuable alternatives to current methods of contraception. We describe here the development of sperm-reactive human single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies of defined sperm specificity for immunocontraception. METHODS Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from antisperm antibody-positive immunoinfertile and vasectomized men were activated with human sperm antigens in vitro, and the complementary DNA prepared and PCR-amplified using primers based on all the variable regions of heavy and light chains of immunoglobulins. The scFv repertoire was cloned into pCANTAB5E vector to create a human scFv antibody library. RESULTS Panning of the library against specific sperm antigens yielded several clones, and the four strongest reactive were selected for further analysis. These clones had novel sequences with unique complementarity-determining regions. ScFv antibodies were expressed, purified and analyzed for human sperm reactivity and effect on human sperm function. AFA-1 and FAB-7 scFv antibodies both reacted with fertilization antigen-1 antigen, but against different epitopes. YLP20 antibody reacted with the expected human sperm protein of 48 ± 5 kDa. The fourth antibody, AS16, reacted with an 18 kDa sperm protein and seems to be a human homologue of the mouse monoclonal recombinant antisperm antibody that causes sperm agglutination. All these antibodies inhibited human sperm function. CONCLUSIONS This is the first study to report the use of phage display technology to obtain antisperm scFv antibodies of defined antigen specificity. These antibodies will find clinical applications in the development of novel immunocontraceptives, and specific diagnostics for immunoinfertility. PMID:18372255

  7. Identification of Antigenic Components of Staphylococcus epidermidis Expressed during Human Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pourmand, Mohammad R.; Clarke, Simon R.; Schuman, Richard F.; Mond, James J.; Foster, Simon J.

    2006-01-01

    A spectrum of in vivo-expressed Staphylococcus epidermidis antigens was identified by probing a bacteriophage lambda library of S. epidermidis genomic DNA with human serum from infected and uninfected individuals. This analysis resulted in identification of 53 antigen-encoding loci. Six antigenic polypeptides were expressed from these loci and purified. These polypeptides were the propeptide, mature amidase, and repeat sequence domains of the major autolysin AtlE, GehD (lipase), and two members of a conserved family of surface proteins (ScaA [AaE] and ScaB). AtlE, ScaA, and ScaB all exhibit human ligand binding capacity. Screening a bank of human serum samples revealed that there were significant increases in the amounts of reactive immunoglobulin G in infected individuals compared to the amounts in healthy individuals for the repeat sequence and mature amidase domains of AtlE, ScaB, and GehD. Vaccination of mice with recombinant antigens stimulated an immune response which in vitro opsonized S. epidermidis. In this study we identified prospective candidate antigens for prophylaxis or immunotherapy to control disease. PMID:16861652

  8. Determination of an unrelated donor pool size for human leukocyte antigen-matched platelets in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bub, Carolina Bonet; Torres, Margareth Afonso; Moraes, Maria Elisa; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Kutner, José Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Background Successful transfusion of platelet refractory patients is a challenge. Many potential donors are needed to sustain human leukocyte antigen matched-platelet transfusion programs because of the different types of antigens and the constant needs of these patients. For a highly mixed population such as the Brazilian population, the pool size required to provide adequate platelet support is unknown. Methods A mathematical model was created to estimate the appropriate size of an unrelated donor pool to provide human leukocyte antigen-compatible platelet support for a Brazilian population. A group of 154 hematologic human leukocyte antigen-typed patients was used as the potential patient population and a database of 65,500 human leukocyte antigen-typed bone marrow registered donors was used as the donor population. Platelet compatibility was based on the grading system of Duquesnoy. Results Using the mathematical model, a pool containing 31,940, 1710 and 321 donors would be necessary to match more than 80% of the patients with at least five completely compatible (no cross-reactive group), partial compatible (one cross-reactive group) or less compatible (two cross-reactive group) donors, respectively. Conclusion The phenotypic diversity of the Brazilian population has probably made it more difficulty to find completely compatible donors. However, this heterogeneity seems to have facilitated finding donors when cross-reactive groups are accepted as proposed by the grading system of Duquesnoy. The results of this study may help to establish unrelated human leukocyte antigen-compatible platelet transfusions, a procedure not routinely performed in most Brazilian transfusion services. PMID:26969768

  9. Adult T-cell leukemia: antigen in an ATL cell line and detection of antibodies to the antigen in human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Hinuma, Y; Nagata, K; Hanaoka, M; Nakai, M; Matsumoto, T; Kinoshita, K I; Shirakawa, S; Miyoshi, I

    1981-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence of certain human sera demonstrated an antigen(s) in the cytoplasm of 1--5% of the cells of a T-cell line, MT-1, from a patient with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), which is endemic in southwestern Japan. The antigen was not detected in other human lymphoid cell lines, including six T-cell lines, seven B-cell lines, and four non-T non-B cell lines. The antigen did not show cross antigenicity with that of herpesviruses, including Epstein--Barr virus, herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus, varicella-zoster virus, herpesvirus saimiri, and Marek disease virus. The proportion of antigen-bearing cells was increased by a factor of approximately 5 on culture in the presence of 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine. Antibodies against the antigen in MT-1 cells were found in all 44 patients with ATL examined and in 32 of 40 patients with malignant T-cell lymphomas (most of them had diseases similar to ATL except that leukemic cells were not found in the peripheral blood). The antibodies were also detected in 26% of the healthy adults examined from ATL-endemic areas but in only a few of those examined from ATL-non-endemic areas. On electron microscopy, extracellular type C virus particles were detected in pelleted MT-1 cells cultured in the presence of 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine. Images PMID:7031654

  10. Human epidermal Langerhans cells cointernalize by receptor-mediated endocytosis "nonclassical" major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (T6 antigens) and class II molecules (HLA-DR antigens).

    PubMed Central

    Hanau, D; Fabre, M; Schmitt, D A; Garaud, J C; Pauly, G; Tongio, M M; Mayer, S; Cazenave, J P

    1987-01-01

    HLA-DR and T6 surface antigens are expressed only by Langerhans cells and indeterminate cells in normal human epidermis. We have previously demonstrated that T6 antigens are internalized in Langerhans cells and indeterminate cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. This process is induced by the binding of BL6, a monoclonal antibody directed against T6 antigens. In the present study, using a monoclonal antibody directed against HLA-DR antigens, on human epidermal cells in suspension, we show that the surface HLA-DR antigens are also internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis in Langerhans and indeterminate cells. Moreover, using immunogold double labeling, we demonstrate that T6 and HLA-DR antigens are internalized through common coated regions of the membrane of Langerhans or indeterminate cells. The receptor-mediated endocytosis that is induced involves coated pits and vesicles, receptosomes, lysosomes, and also, in Langerhans cells, the Birbeck granules. Thus, T6 antigens, which are considered to be "unusual" or "nonclassical" major histocompatibility complex class I molecules, and the major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, HLA-DR, are internalized in Langerhans and indeterminate cells through common receptor-mediated endocytosis organelles. Images PMID:3106979

  11. Flow cytometry analyses of phagocytic and respiratory burst activities and cytochemical characterization of leucocytes isolated from wrasse (Labrus bergylta A.).

    PubMed

    Haugland, Gyri T; Rønneseth, Anita; Wergeland, Heidrun I

    2014-07-01

    We have isolated leucocytes from peripheral blood (PBL), head kidney (HKL) and spleen (SL) of wrasse (Labrus bergylta A.) and studied the innate immune responses phagocytosis and respiratory burst using flow cytometry. Further, we have characterized the phenotypic properties of the leucocytes by cytochemical staining. We could differentiate between several subsets of leucocytes; lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages, neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils and small leucocytes that might be precursor or immature cells. One striking observation was the eosinophils which were present among HKL, PBL and SL. The neutrophils had rounded, bean shaped or bi-lobed nuclei and resembled neutrophils in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) and lumpsucker (Cyclopterus lumpus L.), but were different from the polymorphonucleated neutrophils in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) and humans. Basophils were observed, but they were rare. Phagocytosis and respiratory burst activities were detected among different cell types. Highest phagocytic activity was observed among monocytes/macrophages and small leucocytes. Several different subtypes had ability to perform an oxygen-dependent degradation of microbes, measured as respiratory burst activity. Knowledge of the basic properties of wrasse's leucocytes and innate immunology can benefit further studies on its adaptive immune responses.

  12. Human lymphocyte antigens (HLA) and Graves' disease in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Y; Azezli, A; Carin, M; Aral, F; Sencer, E; Molvalilar, S

    1993-09-01

    To evaluate the association of HLA types with Turkish patients with Graves' disease, HLA typing, clinical findings, and thyroid antibodies were correlated. The HLA types, clinical findings (ophthalmopathy and age at onset), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor (TRAb) and antithyroid microsomal antibodies (MAb) were analyzed. Seventy Turkish patients with Graves' disease and 306 control subjects were assessed. Serological HLA typing was performed in HLA A, B, C, DR, and DQ loci. There was a significantly increased prevalence of HLA B8, B49, DR3, DR4, and DR10 in Graves' disease. The association of Graves' disease with HLA DR3 was found to be less strong than previously described. The HLA DR4 antigen may contribute to the predisposition of Graves' disease in Turkey. The results suggest that HLA B7, B13, DR7, DQw2, and DQw3 may confer a protective effect for Graves' disease in Turkey. Patients carrying HLA B12, B18, and B44 haplotypes had a tendency to develop the disease at a later age. The difference from the other studies may be the result of the selection of the controls; in part, of the variability in serological typing reagents; and, also, of the rather weak HLA associations with the disease.

  13. Antigenic Relatedness of Norovirus GII.4 Variants Determined by Human Challenge Sera

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ying-Chun; Zhang, Xu-Fu; Xia, Ming; Tan, Ming; Quigley, Christina; Lei, Wen; Fang, Hao; Zhong, Weiming; Lee, Bonita; Pang, Xiaoli; Nie, Jun; Jiang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    The GII.4 noroviruses (NoVs) are a single genotype that is responsible for over 50% of NoV gastroenteritis epidemics worldwide. However, GII.4 NoVs have been found to undergo antigenic drifts, likely selected by host herd immunity, which raises an issue for vaccine strategies against NoVs. We previously characterized GII.4 NoV antigenic variations and found significant levels of antigenic relatedness among different GII.4 variants. Further characterization of the genetic and antigenic relatedness of recent GII.4 variants (2008b and 2010 cluster) was performed in this study. The amino acid sequences of the receptor binding interfaces were highly conserved among all GII.4 variants from the past two decades. Using serum samples from patients enrolled in a GII.4 virus challenge study, significant cross-reactivity between major GII.4 variants from 1998 to 2012 was observed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and HBGA receptor blocking assays. The overall abilities of GII.4 NoVs to bind to the A/B/H HBGAs were maintained while their binding affinities to individual ABH antigens varied. These results highlight the importance of human HBGAs in NoV evolution and how conserved antigenic types impact vaccine development against GII.4 variants. PMID:25915764

  14. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  15. A human T cell clone that mediates the monocyte procoagulant response to specific sensitizing antigen.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, B S; Reitnauer, P J; Hank, J A; Sondel, P M

    1985-09-01

    A panel of human purified protein derivative of the tubercle bacillus (PPD)-reactive T cell clones was derived by cloning out of soft agar followed by cultivation on inactivated feeder cells in the presence of interleukin-2. 1 of 4 clones tested was able to mediate an increase in monocyte procoagulant activity (PCA) in response to PPD. All four clones had identical surface marker phenotypes (T4+, T8-) and proliferated in response to antigen. The reactive T cell clone possessed no PCA of its own, but upon being presented with PPD was able to instruct monocytes to increase their expression of PCA. Antigen presentation could be performed only by autologous monocytes; allogeneic monocytes from donors unrelated to the donor of the reactive clone could not present antigen to cells of the clone in a way that would initiate the procoagulant response. Cells of the reactive clone did not mediate increased monocyte PCA in response to Candida, even though peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the donor demonstrated increased PCA to both Candida and PPD. Thus, the PCA response to specific antigen can be mediated by a single clone of cells that shows specificity in the recognition of both antigen and antigen presenting cell.

  16. Evaluation of ex vivo human immune response against candidate antigens for a visceral leishmaniasis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajiv; Goto, Yasuyuki; Gidwani, Kamlesh; Cowgill, Karen D; Sundar, Shyam; Reed, Steven G

    2010-05-01

    People cured from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) develop protection mediated by Th1-type cellular responses against new infections. We evaluated cytokine responses against 6 defined candidate vaccine antigens in 15 cured VL subjects and 5 healthy endemic controls with no evidence of previous exposure to Leishmania parasites. Of the 6 cytokines examined, only interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) differentiated cured VL patients from non-exposed individuals, with cured patients mounting a significantly higher IFN-gamma response to a crude parasite antigen preparation. Among candidate vaccine antigens tested, the largest number of cured subjects recognized cysteine proteinase B, leading to heightened IFN-gamma responses, followed by sterol 24-c-methyltransferase. These two antigens were the most immunogenic and protective antigens in a murine VL model, indicating a relationship between T cell recall responses of humans cured from VL and protective efficacy in an experimental model. Further studies may help prioritize antigens for clinical development of a subunit vaccine against VL.

  17. C-myc oncogene expression in human melanoma and its relationship with tumour antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Grover, R; Ross, D A; Richman, P I; Robinson, B; Wilson, G D

    1996-08-01

    Melanoma produces specific tumour antigens which are capable of eliciting an immune response. However, this tumour evades the immune system, in part, by downregulation of class I HLA antigens on the cell surface, which are required for T cell recognition. It has been suggested that the oncogene c-myc may have a role in effecting this change in vitro, however, the relationship between oncoprotein level and tumour antigenicity has not been established in human tumours. This study measured c-myc oncoprotein in 94 melanoma specimens (46 primary tumours and 48 regional metastases) using flow cytometry and evaluated class I HLA expression with immunohistochemistry. C-myc expression was found in 91 tumours (96%) with higher expression in metastases than primary melanomas (P<0.005). Class I HLA expression was found to show great variation although metastases showed less antigenicity than primary tumours (P<0.01). Analysis of the relationship between these two parameters revealed a highly significant correlation in both primary (P<0.01) and metastatic disease (P<0.01), with high oncoprotein being associated with down regulation of cell surface antigens. Knowledge of the control of tumour antigenicity is likely to provide an objective platform for the development of new strategies for immunotherapy.

  18. Polymorphic expression of a human superficial bladder tumor antigen defined by mouse monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Fradet, Y; Islam, N; Boucher, L; Parent-Vaugeois, C; Tardif, M

    1987-01-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which define a highly restricted antigen, were obtained by simultaneous immunizations with superficial papillary bladder tumor cells and mouse polyclonal serum against normal urothelium. The antigen was detected by the avidin/biotin/peroxidase method in 30/44 superficial bladder tumors (68%) but in only 4/27 infiltrating urothelial cancers (with much less intensity). No normal adult or fetal tissues tested expressed the antigen, including normal urothelium from 40 individuals, 13 of whom had a bladder tumor positive for the antigen. Only 1 of 45 nonbladder tumors showed some reactivity with one of the three mAbs. Serological tests on a large panel of human cancer cell lines and normal cultured cells were negative. The antigen is highly stable and well preserved on paraffin-embedded tissues. Electrophoretic transfer blot experiments with fresh tumor extracts showed that all three mAbs react with a determinant on a component of 300,000 Mr (pI 9.5) and 62,000 Mr (pI 6.5). The antigen shows polymorphic expression at the cellular level on tissue sections and also at a molecular level on immunoblots where the two bands are differentially detected on extracts of a series of tumors but are not visualized on normal urothelium extracts. The characteristics of this antigenic system suggest that it may provide some insights about the biology of bladder cancer. Specific detection of the antigen on 70% of superficial bladder tumors with normal cytology may be useful for their diagnosis and follow-up. Images PMID:3313389

  19. Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry: An Emerging Technology for Multiparametric Analysis of Tissue Antigens.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Robert W; McLachlin, Katherine M; Riquelme, Paloma; Haarer, Jan; Broichhausen, Christiane; Ritter, Uwe; Geissler, Edward K; Hutchinson, James A

    2015-09-01

    New analytical techniques for multiparametric characterisation of individual cells are likely to reveal important information about the heterogeneity of immunological responses at the single-cell level. In this proof-of-principle study, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was applied to the problem of concurrently detecting 24 lineage and activation markers expressed by human leucocytes. This approach was sufficiently sensitive and specific to identify subpopulations of isolated T, B, and natural killer cells. Leucocyte subsets were also accurately detected within unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells preparations. Accordingly, we judge LA-ICP-MS to be a suitable method for assessing expression of multiple tissue antigens in solid-phase biological specimens, such as tissue sections, cytospins, or cells grown on slides. These results augur well for future development of LA-ICP-MS-based bioimaging instruments for general users.

  20. An antigenic threshold for maintaining human immunodeficiency virus type 1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, X.; Ogg, G.; Bonhoeffer, S.; Safrit, J.; Vesanen, M.; Bauer, D.; Chen, D.; Cao, Y.; Demoitie, M. A.; Zhang, L.; Markowitz, M.; Nixon, D.; McMichael, A.; Ho, D. D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Using the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model in mice, a number of studies show that memory cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses are maintained in the presence of continuous antigenic stimulation. Yet, other groups found that memory CTL specific for LCMV could last for a lifetime in mice without viral antigens. Thus, the extent to which an antigen is required for the maintenance of virus-specific CTL remains controversial. In humans, very few studies have been conducted to investigate the relationship between the quantity of antigen and the magnitude of CTL responses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We quantified CTL precursors (CTLp) using a limiting-dilution analysis (LDA) and CTL effectors (CTLe) using a new Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I tetramer technology in six long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection, as well as in eight patients whose viral loads were well suppressed by antiretroviral therapy. The viremia levels in these patients were measured using an reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. The proviral DNA load in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) was also measured by PCR in four LTNPs. RESULTS: The LTNPs had high levels of HIV-1-specific memory CTLp and CTLe, while maintaining a low plasma viral load. Despite also having low viral loads, patients whose plasma viremia was well-suppressed by effective therapy had low levels of CTLe. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that a complex, rather than a monotonic, relationship exists between CTL levels and HIV-1 viremia, including what appears to be an antigenic threshold for the maintenance of CTL at a measurable level. Under conditions of "antigen excess,", CTLe levels correlate inversely with viral load. On the other hand, under conditions that are "antigen limited," the correlation appears to be direct. PMID:11071274

  1. Deglycosylation of Toxocara excretory-secretory antigens improves the specificity of the serodiagnosis for human toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Roldán, W H; Elefant, G R; Ferreira, A W

    2015-11-01

    Serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis is difficult in tropical areas where other helminthiasis are endemic. Many studies have shown that glycans from helminths may be the responsible for cross-reactions in the immunoassays. In this study, we have evaluated the deglycosylation of the Toxocara canis excretory-secretory (TES) antigens for the detection of IgG antibodies using a panel of 228 serum samples (58 patients with toxocariasis, 75 patients with other helminth infections and 95 healthy individuals) by ELISA and Western blot assays. Our results showed that the deglycosylation of TES antigens resulted in a single fraction of 26 kDa (dTES) and was able to detect IgG antibodies with a sensitivity and specificity of 100% in both above-mentioned assays. The rate of cross-reactions, observed in ELISA with TES (13·3%), was significantly reduced (5·3%) when the dTES antigens were used. Likewise, the cross-reactivity observed with the fractions of 32, 55 and 70 kDa of the TES antigens was totally eliminated when the dTES were used in the Western blot. All these results showed that the deglycosylation of the TES antigens really improves the specificity of the serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis in endemic areas for helminth infections.

  2. Squamous cell carcinoma antigen in human liver carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guido, M; Roskams, T; Pontisso, P; Fassan, M; Thung, S N; Giacomelli, L; Sergio, A; Farinati, F; Cillo, U; Rugge, M

    2008-04-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) is a serine protease inhibitor that can be overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at both molecular and protein level, but no data are available on its expression in pre-malignant stages. To assess SCCA expression by immunohistochemistry in HCC and its nodular precursors in cirrhotic livers. 55 nodules from 42 explanted livers were evaluated: 7 large regenerative nodules (LRNs), 7 low-grade dysplastic nodules (LG-DNs), 10 high-grade DNs (HG-DNs), and 31 HCC. SCCA expression was semiquantitatively scored on a four-tiered scale. SCCA hepatocyte immunostaining was always restricted to the cytoplasm, mainly exhibiting a granular pattern. Stain intensity varied, ranging from weak to very strong. Within the nodules, positive cells were unevenly distributed, either scattered or in irregular clusters. The prevalence of SCCA expression was 29% in LRNs, 100% in DNs and 93% in HCC. A significant difference emerged in both prevalence and score for LRNs versus LG-DNs (p<0.039), HG-DNs (p = 0.001), and HCC (p = 0.000). A barely significant difference (p = 0.49) was observed between LG-DNs and HG-DNs, while no difference in SCCA expression was detected between HG-DNs and HCC. Cirrhotic tissue adjacent to the nodules was positive in 96% of cases, with a significant difference in the score (p = 0.000) between hepatocytes adjacent to HCC and those surrounding LRNs. This study provides the first evidence that aberrant SCCA expression is an early event in liver cell carcinomatous transformation.

  3. No Evidence of Human Leukocyte Antigen Gene Association With Rheumatic Fever Among Children in Samoa.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Guliz; Seifried, Steven E

    2015-03-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) have been implicated in rheumatic fever pathogenesis. This pilot whole genome association study compares genotypes of Samoan children with rheumatic fever to unaffected siblings and unrelated healthy controls. No risk-related genotypes were associated with HLA genes. Thirteen Regions of Interest were identified as candidates for further study.

  4. Unique glycoprotein antigen defined by monoclonal antibody on human neurobiastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mujoo, K.; Spiro, R.C.; Reisfeld, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have characterized a new target antigen on the surface of human neuroblastoma cells and defined it with a monoclonal antibody (Mab) 5G3. This antibody is of IgG2a type and has an association constant of 8 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/. In ELISA assays, Mab 5G3 reacted with human neuroblastoma as well as melanoma, squamous lung, skin carcinoma, and osteogenic sarcoma. Immunocytochemical analysis of frozen tissue sections revealed strong reactivity with all neuroblastoma tissues and marginal reactivity with melanoma and glioma tissues. There was no reactivity with fetal or normal tissues with the exception of cerebellum. The antigen recognized by Mab 5G3 is a glycoprotein of 200 and 215 kDa expressed on the SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cells. The antigen appears to contain N-linked carbohydrates based on treatment of human neuroblastoma cells with tunicamycin before and after intrinsic radiolabeling followed by indirect immunoprecipitation. The pulse-chase biosynthetic studies followed by indirect immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE indicated the precursor/product relationship between 200 and 215 kDa molecules. The 200 kDa component is endoglycosidase H-sensitive, whereas 215 kDa molecule is Endo-H resistant. The 215 kDa component is also sulfated, sialylated, and phosphorylated at serine residues. Preliminary data suggests that Mab, aside from identifying a unique target antigen on human neuroblastoma cells, may be suited as a targeting device for chemotherapeutic drugs.

  5. Human tumour antigens defined by cytotoxicity and proliferative responses of cultured lymphoid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vose, Brent M.; Bonnard, Guy D.

    1982-03-01

    The long-term goal of many laboratories has been to develop cellular reagents having specific reactivity against human tumour cells. Such immune cells should prove useful for defining the antigenicity of human malignancies and may have important therapeutic potential, as has been clearly shown in some animal models1. Here we describe methods of initiating continued lymphocyte cultures (CLC) having specific anti-tumour reactivity using conditioned media containing interleukin-2 (IL-2).

  6. Novel distribution of the secretory leucocyte proteinase inhibitor in kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Ohlsson, S; Ljungkrantz, I; Ohlsson, K; Segelmark, M; Wieslander, J

    2001-01-01

    The secretory leucocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) is a low molecular weight, tissue-specific inhibitor of, for example, elastase and cathepsin G, which also have antimicrobial capacity. SLPI has been localised to the respiratory, gastrointestinal and genital tracts, but so far not to the kidney. The presence of SLPI in renal tubuli cells was demonstrated using immunohistochemistry and, by means of in situ hybridisation on human renal biopsies, we were able to demonstrate SLPI production. In various inflammatory conditions in the kidneys, the protease-antiprotease balance is disturbed. For this reason, as well as the possible role in the defence against ascending urinary tract infections, it is interesting to establish a source of SLPI in renal tubuli cells. PMID:11817677

  7. A cytokine-independent approach to identify antigen-specific human germinal center Tfh cells and rare antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in blood

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Jennifer M.; Arlehamn, Cecilia S. Lindestam; Weiskopf, Daniela; Antunes, Ricardo da Silva; Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Reiss, Samantha; Brigger, Matthew; Bothwell, Marcella; Sette, Alessandro; Crotty, Shane

    2016-01-01

    Detection of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is central to the study of many human infectious diseases, vaccines, and autoimmune diseases. However, such cells are generally rare and heterogeneous in their cytokine profiles. Identification of antigen-specific germinal center (GC) T follicular helper (Tfh) cells by cytokine production has been particularly problematic. The function of a GC Tfh cell is to selectively help adjacent GC B cells via cognate interaction; thus, GC Tfh cells may be ‘stingy’ cytokine producers, fundamentally different than Th1 or Th17 cells in the quantities of cytokines produced. Conventional identification of antigen-specific cells by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) relies on the ability of the CD4+ T cell to generate substantial amounts of cytokine. To address this problem, we have developed a cytokine-independent activation induced marker (AIM) methodology to identify antigen-specific GC Tfh cells in human lymphoid tissue. Whereas Group A Streptococcus (Strep)-specific GC Tfh cells produced minimal detectable cytokines by ICS, the AIM method identified 85-fold more antigen-specific GC Tfh cells. Intriguingly, these GC Tfh cells consistently expressed programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) upon activation. AIM also detected non-Tfh cells in lymphoid tissue. As such, we applied AIM for identification of rare antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in human peripheral blood. Dengue-, tuberculosis-, and pertussis-vaccine-specific CD4+ T cells were readily detectable by AIM. In sum, cytokine assays missed 98% of antigen-specific human GC Tfh cells, reflecting the biology of these cells, which could instead be sensitively identified by co-expression of TCR-dependent activation markers. PMID:27342848

  8. Biochemical characterization of PECAM-1 (CD31 antigen) on human platelets.

    PubMed

    Metzelaar, M J; Korteweg, J; Sixma, J J; Nieuwenhuis, H K

    1991-12-02

    The platelet plasma membrane expresses several membrane glycoproteins with a high molecular weight. In this study we have investigated the properties of the CD31 antigen on platelets and endothelial cells using the monoclonal antibody (MoAb) RUU-PL 7E8. Comparative studies revealed that the CD31 antigen, PECAM-1 and endoCAM are the same protein. The CD31 antigen was immunoprecipitated with a molecular mass of 125 kDa nonreduced and 135 kDa reduced from Nonidet-P40 lysates of surface labeled human platelets. The relative position in two-dimensional nonreduced/reduced SDS-PAGE and IEF-PAGE, compared to other glycoproteins of similar molecular weight, was elucidated. The position of the CD31 antigen was clearly distinct from the position of the platelet membrane glycoproteins Ia, Ib, IIa, IIb, IIIa and the granule membrane protein GMP-140. Native resting platelets bound 7,760 +/- 1,670 molecules/platelet, whereas thrombin-stimulated platelets bound 14,500 +/- 3,790 molecules/platelet. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed the presence of the CD31 antigen on the membrane of both resting and thrombin-activated platelets. Immunofluorescence studies showed the presence of the CD31 antigen in the membrane of endothelial cells on sites of cell-cell contact, suggesting that the CD31 antigen might be involved in cell-cell interaction. In functional studies, MoAb RUU-PL 7E8 did not inhibit platelet aggregation, platelet adherence to the extracellular matrix of endothelial cells and purified collagen fibrils under flow conditions, nor was any influence found on endothelial cell detachment and growth.

  9. Multiplexed immunophenotyping of human antigen-presenting cells in whole blood by polychromatic flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Erik; Esposito, Laura; Todd, John A.; Wicker, Linda S.

    2010-01-01

    We describe two modular protocols for immunostaining and multiparameter flow cytometric analysis of major human antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells, monocytes, B lymphocytes) in minimally manipulated whole blood. Simultaneous detection of up to eight colors is enabled by careful selection and testing of cell-subset-defining monoclonal antibodies (anchor markers) in the appropriate fluorochrome combinations, to demonstrate the quantification of surface expression levels of molecules involved in chemotaxis (e.g. CX3CR1, CCR2), adhesion (e.g. CD11b, CD62L), antigen presentation (e.g. CD83, CD86, CD209) and immune regulation (e.g. CD101) on circulating antigen-presenting cells. Each immunostaining reaction requires as little as 50–100 μl of peripheral whole blood, no density-gradient separation, and the entire procedure from preparation of reagents to flow cytometry can be completed in <5 h. PMID:20134434

  10. CTLA4 mediates antigen-specific apoptosis of human T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gribben, J G; Freeman, G J; Boussiotis, V A; Rennert, P; Jellis, C L; Greenfield, E; Barber, M; Restivo, V A; Ke, X; Gray, G S

    1995-01-01

    The regulation of T cell-mediated immune responses requires a balance between amplification and generation of effector function and subsequent selective termination by clonal deletion. Although apoptosis of previously activated T cells can be induced by signaling of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, these molecules do not appear to regulate T-cell clonal deletion in an antigen-specific fashion. We demonstrate that cross-linking of the inducible T-cell surface molecule CTLA4 can mediate apoptosis of previously activated human T lymphocytes. This function appears to be antigen-restricted, since a concomitant signal T-cell receptor signal is required. Regulation of this pathway may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to delete antigen-specific activated T cells. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7846057

  11. Design of Artificial Glycosidases: Metallopeptides that Remove H Antigen from Human Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhen; Cowan, James Allan

    2017-03-01

    Catalysts that promote carbohydrate degradation have a wide range of potential applications, but the use of either enzyme glycosidases or small-molecule catalysts in biological systems raises significant challenges. Herein, we demonstrate a novel strategy for the design of synthetic agents that mimic natural glycosidases and address current problems for biological use. This strategy is illustrated by application to the development of potential blood substitutes for the rare Bombay blood type that is characterized by a deficiency of H2 antigen. Metallopeptides with 16 to 20 amino acids were constructed as artificial fucosidases that exhibit selective carbohydrate cleavage reactivity toward l-fucose over d-glucose. Selective fucose cleavage from the H2-antigen saccharide enables efficient removal of H2 antigen from erythrocytes and thereby accomplishes the conversion of regular human type-O blood into a potential blood substitute for the rare Bombay blood type. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Atypical Antigen Recognition Mode of a Shark Immunoglobulin New Antigen Receptor (IgNAR) Variable Domain Characterized by Humanization and Structural Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Oleg V.; Olland, Andrea; Piché-Nicholas, Nicole; Godbole, Adarsh; King, Daniel; Svenson, Kristine; Calabro, Valerie; Müller, Mischa R.; Barelle, Caroline J.; Somers, William; Gill, Davinder S.; Mosyak, Lidia; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila

    2013-01-01

    The immunoglobulin new antigen receptors (IgNARs) are a class of Ig-like molecules of the shark immune system that exist as heavy chain-only homodimers and bind antigens by their single domain variable regions (V-NARs). Following shark immunization and/or in vitro selection, V-NARs can be generated as soluble, stable, and specific high affinity monomeric binding proteins of ∼12 kDa. We have previously isolated a V-NAR from an immunized spiny dogfish shark, named E06, that binds specifically and with high affinity to human, mouse, and rat serum albumins. Humanization of E06 was carried out by converting over 60% of non-complementarity-determining region residues to those of a human germ line Vκ1 sequence, DPK9. The resulting huE06 molecules have largely retained the specificity and affinity of antigen binding of the parental V-NAR. Crystal structures of the shark E06 and its humanized variant (huE06 v1.1) in complex with human serum albumin (HSA) were determined at 3- and 2.3-Å resolution, respectively. The huE06 v1.1 molecule retained all but one amino acid residues involved in the binding site for HSA. Structural analysis of these V-NARs has revealed an unusual variable domain-antigen interaction. E06 interacts with HSA in an atypical mode that utilizes extensive framework contacts in addition to complementarity-determining regions that has not been seen previously in V-NARs. On the basis of the structure, the roles of various elements of the molecule are described with respect to antigen binding and V-NAR stability. This information broadens the general understanding of antigen recognition and provides a framework for further design and humanization of shark IgNARs. PMID:23632026

  13. Atypical antigen recognition mode of a shark immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (IgNAR) variable domain characterized by humanization and structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Olland, Andrea; Piché-Nicholas, Nicole; Godbole, Adarsh; King, Daniel; Svenson, Kristine; Calabro, Valerie; Müller, Mischa R; Barelle, Caroline J; Somers, William; Gill, Davinder S; Mosyak, Lidia; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila

    2013-06-14

    The immunoglobulin new antigen receptors (IgNARs) are a class of Ig-like molecules of the shark immune system that exist as heavy chain-only homodimers and bind antigens by their single domain variable regions (V-NARs). Following shark immunization and/or in vitro selection, V-NARs can be generated as soluble, stable, and specific high affinity monomeric binding proteins of ∼12 kDa. We have previously isolated a V-NAR from an immunized spiny dogfish shark, named E06, that binds specifically and with high affinity to human, mouse, and rat serum albumins. Humanization of E06 was carried out by converting over 60% of non-complementarity-determining region residues to those of a human germ line Vκ1 sequence, DPK9. The resulting huE06 molecules have largely retained the specificity and affinity of antigen binding of the parental V-NAR. Crystal structures of the shark E06 and its humanized variant (huE06 v1.1) in complex with human serum albumin (HSA) were determined at 3- and 2.3-Å resolution, respectively. The huE06 v1.1 molecule retained all but one amino acid residues involved in the binding site for HSA. Structural analysis of these V-NARs has revealed an unusual variable domain-antigen interaction. E06 interacts with HSA in an atypical mode that utilizes extensive framework contacts in addition to complementarity-determining regions that has not been seen previously in V-NARs. On the basis of the structure, the roles of various elements of the molecule are described with respect to antigen binding and V-NAR stability. This information broadens the general understanding of antigen recognition and provides a framework for further design and humanization of shark IgNARs.

  14. Alloantigens of human lymphoid cell lines; `human Ia-like antigens'

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, K.; Nakamuro, K.; Tanigaki, N.; Pressman, D.

    1977-01-01

    Membrane glycoproteins that appear to belong to a new alloantigen system were partially purified by gel filtration and lentil-lectin affinity chromatography from a non-ionic detergent (Renex 30) solubilized membrane fraction of each of two Burkitt lymphoma cell lines, B46M and Daudi. The preparations were radioiodinated and further purified by gel filtration, lentil—lectin affinity chromatography and anti-HLA antibody affinity chromatography. The labelled preparations thus obtained did not have binding activity with any of rabbit anti-HLA, rabbit anti-human β2-microglobulin and rabbit anti-human IgG-Fab antisera, but did have a high level of binding activity with rabbit anti-B-cell membrane antiserum. Moreover, the labelled preparations showed relatively high binding activity with some conventional HLA typing sera. Out of sixty-eight human tissue typing alloantisera tested, three (Berlin 373, Betz and TO-29-01) gave especially high binding with both of the labeled preparations. The antigens involved in reaction with these alloantisera and also with the rabbit anti-B-cell membrane antiserum contained two components, one 31,000 ∼ 32,000 daltons and another 24,000 ∼ 25,000 daltons, bound non-covalently. The alloantigens were specific to B cell type cell lines (B-lymphoid cell lines and Burkitt-lymphoma cell lines) in cultured cell lines and also to B lymphocytes in peripheral blood. In organs and tissues, however, they were found to be present widely distributed in lymphoid organs (thymus as well as spleen and lymph node) and in non-lymphoid organs (including liver, kidney, testis and heart). PMID:24587

  15. Analysis of antigenic determinants in cholera enterotoxin and heat-labile enterotoxins from human and porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Y; Honda, T; Sima, H; Tsuji, T; Miwatani, T

    1983-01-01

    Antigenic determinants of cholera enterotoxin (CT) and heat-labile enterotoxin from a human strain (LTh) and a porcine strain (LTp) were analyzed by Ouchterlony double-gel diffusion test against anti-CT, anti-LTh, and anti-LTp, which were treated by immunoaffinity column chromatography. The results showed the existence of the following antigenic determinants: (i) antigenic determinants unique to CT, LTh, and LTp, respectively; (ii) an antigenic determinant common to CT, LTh, and LTp; (iii) an antigenic determinant common to CT and LTh, but not LTp; and (iv) an antigenic determinant common to LTh and LTp, but not CT. On the basis of these results, an antigenic scheme for CT, LTh, and LTp is proposed. Images PMID:6190758

  16. Detection of Hepatitis B virus antigen from human blood: SERS immunoassay in a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Kamińska, Agnieszka; Witkowska, Evelin; Winkler, Katarzyna; Dzięcielewski, Igor; Weyher, Jan L; Waluk, Jacek

    2015-04-15

    A highly sensitive immunoassay utilizing surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been developed with a new Raman reporter and a unique SERS-active substrate incorporated into a microfluidic device. An appropriately designed Raman reporter, basic fuchsin (FC), gives strong SERS enhancement and has the ability to bind both the antibody and gold nanostructures. The fuchsin-labeled immuno-Au nanoflowers can form a sandwich structure with the antigen and the antibody immobilized on the SERS-active substrate based on Au-Ag coated GaN. Our experimental results indicate that this SERS-active substrate with its strong surface-enhancement factor, high stability and reproducibility plays a crucial role in improving the efficiency of SERS immunoassay. This SERS assay was applied to the detection of Hepatitis B virus antigen (HBsAg) in human blood plasma. A calibration curve was obtained by plotting the intensity of SERS signal of FC band at 1178cm(-1) versus the concentration of antigen. The low detection limit for Hepatitis B virus antigen was estimated to be 0.01IU/mL. The average relative standard deviation (RSD) of this method is less than 10%. This SERS immunoassay gives exact results over a broad linear range, reflecting clinically relevant HBsAg concentrations. It also exhibits high biological specificity for the detection of Hepatitis B virus antigen.

  17. Expression of Ia like (HLA-DR) antigens on human alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Clerici, N; Reboiras, S; Fierro, C; Leyva-Cobian, F

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of Ia like (HLA-DR) antigens on human alveolar macrophages (HAM phi) has been investigated by indirect immunofluorescence staining of viable macrophages with a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to common determinants of these antigens. HAM phi were characterized by non-specific esterase stain, plastic adherence, phagocytosis and IgG-Fc receptor expression. Ia like antigens were expressed in approximately 45-80% of HAM phi, being localized as patchy and lineal fluorescence along the membrane. Ia like expression was higher in macrophages from non-smoker subjects (P less than 0.025). No difference in Ia like antigen expression was found between adherent and non-adherent HAM phi subsets. Ia like positive HAM phi from both smoker and non-smoker subjects consisted of a large subpopulation of phagocytic cells (60-70%) and a smaller non-phagocytic subpopulation (20-25%). These subpopulations were also present in the Ia like negative HAM phi. The percentage of Ia like positive macrophages showed variable results depending on the MoAb used, suggesting that not all anti-Ia like antibodies recognize the same antigenic determinants. Moreover, lack of staining of one macrophage subset occurred with all MoAb tested, over a large range of concentrations. PMID:6209043

  18. Differential expression of HLA class II antigens on human fetal and adult lymphocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J A; Jones, D B; Evans, P R; Smith, J L

    1985-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies to monomorphic determinants of the MHC class II subregion locus products: DP, DR and DQ, was used to investigate the expression of these antigens on early lymphocytes and macrophages from human fetal liver (13-20 weeks), placenta (16 weeks and term) and cord blood, in relation to the class II phenotype of cells from adult tonsil and peripheral blood. Fetal liver sections and cell suspensions showed differential expression of class II antigens. DP was expressed at a higher frequency (11.0% of nucleated cells) than DR on lymphoid cells and macrophages from fetal liver, and DQ was either absent or expressed on less than 0.3% of nucleated cells. Consistent with this finding, DP but not DR or DQ antigens were observed on vascular elements and macrophages in the villi of 16-week placenta. At term, all three subregion locus products were expressed. Adult tonsil and peripheral blood B lymphocytes expressed DP, DR and DQ antigens with similar frequency; however, DQ was expressed at a lower frequency than DP and DR on cord blood B lymphocytes. In contrast, 30-50% macrophages from cord blood and adult peripheral blood expressed DP and DR, but fewer (5% and 18%, respectively) expressed DQ. These data suggest that class II antigens are expressed in the sequence DP, DR, DQ on developing lymphocytes. A similar sequence is suggested for macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3894221

  19. Immunoregulatory adherent cells in human tuberculosis: radiation-sensitive antigen-specific suppression by monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinhenz, M.E.; Ellner, J.J.

    1985-07-01

    In human tuberculosis, adherent mononuclear cells (AMC) selectively depress in vitro responses to the mycobacterial antigen tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD). The phenotype of this antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell was characterized by examining the functional activity of adherent cells after selective depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or OKM1-reactive monocytes. Adherent cell suppression was studied in the (/sup 3/H)thymidine-incorporation microculture assay by using T cells rigorously depleted of T cells with surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (T gamma cells) as antigen-responsive cells. PPD-induced (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation by these non gamma T cells was uniformly reduced (mean, 42% +/- 10% (SD)) when autologous AMC were added to non gamma T cells at a ratio of 1:2. Antigen-specific suppression by AMC was not altered by depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or treatment with indomethacin. However, AMC treated with OKM1 and complement or gamma irradiation (1,500 rads) no longer suppressed tuberculin responses in vitro. These studies identify the antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell in tuberculosis as an OKM1-reactive, non-erythrocyte-rosetting monocyte. The radiosensitivity of this monocyte immunoregulatory function may facilitate its further definition.

  20. Regulation of leucocyte homeostasis in the circulation.

    PubMed

    Scheiermann, Christoph; Frenette, Paul S; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2015-08-01

    The functions of blood cells extend well beyond the immune functions of leucocytes or the respiratory and hemostatic functions of erythrocytes and platelets. Seen as a whole, the bloodstream is in charge of nurturing and protecting all organs by carrying a mixture of cell populations in transit from one organ to another. To optimize these functions, evolution has provided blood and the vascular system that carries it with various mechanisms that ensure the appropriate influx and egress of cells into and from the circulation where and when needed. How this homeostatic control of blood is achieved has been the object of study for over a century, and although the major mechanisms that govern it are now fairly well understood, several new concepts and mediators have recently emerged that emphasize the dynamism of this liquid tissue. Here we review old and new concepts that relate to the maintenance and regulation of leucocyte homeostasis in blood and briefly discuss the mechanisms for platelets and red blood cells. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Regulation of leucocyte homeostasis in the circulation

    PubMed Central

    Scheiermann, Christoph; Frenette, Paul S.; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    The functions of blood cells extend well beyond the immune functions of leucocytes or the respiratory and hemostatic functions of erythrocytes and platelets. Seen as a whole, the bloodstream is in charge of nurturing and protecting all organs by carrying a mixture of cell populations in transit from one organ to another. To optimize these functions, evolution has provided blood and the vascular system that carries it with various mechanisms that ensure the appropriate influx and egress of cells into and from the circulation where and when needed. How this homeostatic control of blood is achieved has been the object of study for over a century, and although the major mechanisms that govern it are now fairly well understood, several new concepts and mediators have recently emerged that emphasize the dynamism of this liquid tissue. Here we review old and new concepts that relate to the maintenance and regulation of leucocyte homeostasis in blood and briefly discuss the mechanisms for platelets and red blood cells. PMID:25750191

  2. Antigen shared by HeLa-like human cell line and gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bobrova, T S; Kryukova, I N; Chuev, Y V; Rottenberg, V I

    1991-01-01

    An antigen of human gastric mucosa immunologically related to the antigen of established HeLa-like cell lines (CL-GMA) is described. In gel-immunodiffusion test the antigen was revealed in 10/10 samples of normal gastric mucosa (including all parts of stomach), in 15/16 samples of cancer patients' gastric mucosa 5-10 cm distant from tumor and in 2/2 samples of ulcer patients' mucosa 5-10 cm distant from the ulcer. However, the antigen was undetectable at a distance 1-2 cm from ulcer. Homogenates of 39 embryonic organs and tissues were screened for the presence of CL-GMA. CL-GMA was detected in 7/7 samples of gastric mucosa. The antigen was revealed in trace amounts in 1/4 samples of small intestine mucosa and in 1/4 samples of spleen. Screening of 66 human tumors revealed CL-GMA in 13/16 samples of gastric cancer and in trace amounts in 2 tumors of non-stomach localization (larynx and rectum). Analysis of aceton-fixed paraffin sections by means of immunofluorescence revealed be CL-GMA in all parts of stomach. CL-GMA localized in the basal area of high columnar epithelial cells. The antigen was almost or totally undetectable in poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of stomach and in tumors of other localization. We could not detect CL-GMA in the sera of various cancer patients by means of immunodiffusion and/or dot-blotting.

  3. Detection of Goodpasture antigen in fractions prepared from collagenase digests of human glomerular basement membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Fish, A J; Lockwood, M C; Wong, M; Price, R G

    1984-01-01

    Preparations of human glomerular basement membrane (GBM) were digested with collagenase, and a Goodpasture (GP) antigen rich pool from gel filtration column runs was identified by antibody inhibition radioimmunoassay. The components of the GP antigen pool were separated on polyacrylamide gels, and transferred to nitrocellulose sheets by the 'western' blotting technique. The blots were separately reacted with thirteen GP sera as primary antibody, followed by peroxidase labelled goat anti-human IgG and revealed 45-50K (two bands) and 25-28K (one-three bands) components. No corresponding reactivity was observed using convalescent GP sera or other control sera (normal human serum, rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis with or without pulmonary haemorrhage, and lupus erythematosus) as primary antibody. Images Fig. 3 PMID:6319059

  4. Cell surface antigens of human trophoblast: definition of an apparently unique system with a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, U W; Hawes, C S; Jones, W R

    1986-01-01

    An epitope with apparent specificity for the surface of human syncytiotrophoblast was defined by a murine monoclonal antibody, FDO46B (IgG1, kappa). The epitope was predominantly expressed during the first trimester of pregnancy. Binding was detected on frozen tissue sections and on cultured trophoblast by the immunoperoxidase technique. It was also detected on the surface of a small percentage (less than 10%) of cultured choriocarcinoma cells (JEG-3). A panel of human tissues was negative, as were normal and malignant human lymphocytes. The antigen bearing the FDO46B epitope was still expressed by trophoblast after culture in the presence of tunicamycin, indicating that it is possibly protein in nature. This antigen may have potential utility as a target for a contraceptive vaccine. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2428734

  5. Tracing antigen signatures in the human IgE repertoire.

    PubMed

    Marth, Katharina; Novatchkova, Maria; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Jenisch, Stefan; Jäger, Siegfried; Kabelitz, Dieter; Valenta, Rudolf

    2010-08-01

    Allergen recognition by IgE antibodies is a key event in allergic inflammation. In this study, the IgE IGHV repertoires of individuals with allergy to the major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1, were analyzed over a four years period of allergen exposure by RT-PCR and sequencing of cDNA. Approximately half of the IgE transcripts represented non-redundant sequences, which belonged to seventeen different IGHV genes. Most variable regions contained somatic mutations but also non-mutated sequences were identified. There was no evidence for relevant increases of somatic mutations over time of allergen exposure. Highly similar IgE variable regions were found after four years of allergen exposure in the same and in genetically non-related individuals. Our results indicate that allergens select and shape a limited number of similar IgE variable regions in the human IgE repertoire.

  6. Self Antigen Prognostic for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Cynthia L.; Patel, Hirenkumar; Arnold, Roland R.

    2001-01-01

    We have recently found that an extracellular protein, α1 proteinase inhibitor (α1PI; α1 antitrypsin), is required for in vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity outcome. We show here in a study of HIV-seropositive patients that decreased viral load is significantly correlated with decreased circulating α1PI. In the asymptomatic category of HIV disease, 100% of patients manifest deficient levels of active α1PI, a condition known to lead to degenerative lung diseases and a dramatically reduced life span. Further, HIV-associated α1PI deficiency is correlated with circulating anti-α1PI immunoglobulin G. These results suggest that preventing HIV-associated α1PI deficiency may provide a strategic target for preventing HIV-associated pathophysiology. PMID:11527807

  7. Tracing antigen signatures in the human IgE repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Marth, Katharina; Novatchkova, Maria; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Jenisch, Stefan; Jäger, Siegfried; Kabelitz, Dieter; Valenta, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    Allergen recognition by IgE antibodies is a key event in allergic inflammation. In this study, the IgE IGHV repertoires of individuals with allergy to the major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1, were analyzed over a four years period of allergen exposure by RT-PCR and sequencing of cDNA. Approximately half of the IgE transcripts represented non-redundant sequences, which belonged to seventeen different IGHV genes. Most variable regions contained somatic mutations but also non-mutated sequences were identified. There was no evidence for relevant increases of somatic mutations over time of allergen exposure. Highly similar IgE variable regions were found after four years of allergen exposure in the same and in genetically non-related individuals. Our results indicate that allergens select and shape a limited number of similar IgE variable regions in the human IgE repertoire. PMID:20573403

  8. Novel in vitro booster vaccination to rapidly generate antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sanjuan Nandin, Irene; Fong, Carol; Deantonio, Cecilia; Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Pecetta, Simone; Maldonado, Paula; Gasparrini, Francesca; Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Kazer, Samuel W.; Kjaer, Svend; Borley, Daryl W.; Nair, Usha; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R.

    2017-01-01

    Vaccines remain the most effective tool to prevent infectious diseases. Here, we introduce an in vitro booster vaccination approach that relies on antigen-dependent activation of human memory B cells in culture. This stimulation induces antigen-specific B cell proliferation, differentiation of B cells into plasma cells, and robust antibody secretion after a few days of culture. We validated this strategy using cells from healthy donors to retrieve human antibodies against tetanus toxoid and influenza hemagglutinin (HA) from H1N1 and newly emergent subtypes such as H5N1 and H7N9. Anti-HA antibodies were cross-reactive against multiple subtypes, and some showed neutralizing activity. Although these antibodies may have arisen as a result of previous influenza infection, we also obtained gp120-reactive antibodies from non–HIV-infected donors, indicating that we can generate antibodies without prior antigenic exposure. Overall, our novel approach can be used to rapidly produce therapeutic antibodies and has the potential to assess the immunogenicity of candidate antigens, which could be exploited in future vaccine development. PMID:28739603

  9. Inducible expression of cancer-testis antigens in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heninger, Erika; Krueger, Timothy E.G.; Thiede, Stephanie M.; Sperger, Jamie M.; Byers, Brianna L.; Kircher, Madison R.; Kosoff, David; Yang, Bing; Jarrard, David F.; McNeel, Douglas G.; Lang, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Immune tolerance to self-antigens can limit robust anti-tumor immune responses in the use of tumor vaccines. Expression of novel tumor associated antigens can improve immune recognition and lysis of tumor cells. The cancer-testis antigen (CTA) family of proteins has been hypothesized to be an ideal class of antigens due to tumor-restricted expression, a subset of which have been found to induce antibody responses in patients with prostate disease. We demonstrate that CTA expression is highly inducible in five different Prostate Cancer (PC) cell lines using a hypomethylating agent 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5AZA) and/or a histone deacetylase inhibitor LBH589. These CTAs include NY-ESO1, multiple members of the MAGE and SSX families and NY-SAR35. A subset of CTAs is synergistically induced by the combination of 5AZA and LBH589. We developed an ex vivo organ culture using human PC biopsies for ex vivo drug treatments to evaluate these agents in clinical samples. These assays found significant induction of SSX2 in 9/9 distinct patient samples and NY-SAR35 in 7/9 samples. Further, we identify expression of SSX2 in circulating tumor cells (CTC) from patients with advanced PC. These results indicate that epigenetic modifying agents can induce expression of a broad range of neoantigens in human PC and may serve as a useful adjunctive therapy with novel tumor vaccines and checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:27769045

  10. Localization and characterization of the acrosomal antigen recognized by GB24 on human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Fénichel, P; Dohr, G; Grivaux, C; Cervoni, F; Donzeau, M; Hsi, B L

    1990-10-01

    GB24, a mouse monoclonal antibody, recognizes a trophoblast-leukocyte cross-reactive antigen (TLX), which is likely identical to the membrane cofactor protein (MCP), a complement regulatory protein. GB24 reacts also with a human acrosomal sperm antigen (Fénichel et al.: J Reprod Fertil 87:699-706, 1989). By immunofluorescence or immunoperoxidase, testicular, epididymal, and ejaculated spermatozoa were found to be positive after fixation by acetone. Motile, suspended spermatozoa became positive only through conditions known to induce acrosome reaction (A23187, follicular fluid, contact with oocytes). Ultrastructural studies with immunogold staining localized this protein on the inner acrosome membrane and in the acrosomal content. By SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, GB24 immunoprecipitated a unique protein of 48 kDa from capacitated and A23187-induced spermatozoa under reducing conditions. No cross-reactivity was found with mouse, boar, or ram spermatozoa. Localization of this human sperm antigen recognized by GB24 and its similarity with the TLX-MCP family antigens would suggest a possible role of this molecule during fertilization in sperm-egg binding or immune protection.

  11. Immunoaffinity fractionation of Schistosoma mansoni worm antigens using human antibodies and its application for serodiagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Boctor, F N; Shaheen, H I

    1986-01-01

    A crude Schistosoma mansoni soluble worm antigen preparation (SWAP) was fractionated using an immunoaffinity column consisting of specific human anti-SWAP antibodies obtained from chronic S. mansoni-infected human sera and bound to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. The chromatographic separation resulted in three fractions: the unbound material (FW), and the eluted antigens with glycine-HCl (F1) and glycine-HCl-NaCl (F2). Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that the purified antigens F1 and F2 consisted of several bands when stained with Coomassie blue and silver stain, with molecular weights between 20 X 10(3) and 200 X 10(3). The F1 and F2 fractions in addition to FW and SWAP were used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure antibody levels in sera from schistosomiasis patients. Each individual serum assessed with the purified F2 antigen gave 100% positivity and three to four times higher optical density in comparison to SWAP with only 88% positivity. No detectable cross-reactive antibodies against F2 were found when a limited number of sera from filariasis, fascioliasis and trichinellosis patients were screened. Furthermore, F2 was also used and found to be more sensitive generally in detecting anti-adult worm antibodies than SWAP in recently schistosomiasis-infected persons. Thus, F2 appears to be a highly sensitive and specific reagent for the serodiagnosis of schistosomiasis infection. Images Figure 3 Figure 7 PMID:3082749

  12. Identification of Goodpasture target antigens in basement membranes of human glomeruli, lung, and placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, M; Köhler, H; Manns, M; Baum, H P; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1987-01-01

    Collagenase-digests of human glomerular (GBM), alveolar (ABM), and placenta basement membranes (PBM) were separated by gel filtration columns and the pools rich in Goodpasture antigens (GP) were identified by an antibody inhibition-ELISA. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) followed by immunoblotting on nitrocellulose membranes was performed with each basement membrane preparation. Sera from patients with florid GP-syndrome and antibodies to glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM antibodies) were incubated with nitrocellulose strips of GBM, ABM, and PBM. Immunoperoxidase staining revealed reactivity with target antigens of 24, 26, 44, and 50 kD in the GBM and of 44 and 50 kD in the ABM and PBM, respectively. No corresponding reactivity was observed using convalescent GP-sera, sera from patients with other immunological diseases or sera from healthy blood donors. The antigens were sensitive to reduction. We conclude, that antigens of similar molecular-weights can be identified by anti-GBM positive sera in human glomerular, alveolar and placenta basement membranes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:3608225

  13. Human Leukocyte Antigen C*12:02:02 and Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor 2DL5 are Distinctly Associated with Ankylosing Spondylitis in the Taiwanese.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chin-Man; Wang, Sheng-Hung; Jan Wu, Yeong-Jian; Lin, Jing-Chi; Wu, Jianming; Chen, Ji-Yih

    2017-08-16

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands and Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) regulate the cytolytic activity of natural killer (NK) cells and certain T cells. We examined their genetic predisposition to disease susceptibility and clinical phenotypes in Taiwanese ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. KIR genotyping and Human Leucocyte Antigen C (HLA-C) sequencing were performed in 653 Taiwanese AS patients and 952 healthy controls. KIR genotype distributions and HLA-C allele frequencies were compared in patients and controls and among patients with and without HLA-B27 positivity, early age onset and spinal syndesmophytes. HLA-C alleles were functionally characterized using 3D structural modelling with peptide simulation. This study discovered that the HLA-C*12:02:02 allele (43.42% vs. 3.31%; p < 0.00001 odds ratio (OR), 16.88; 95% confidence intervals (CI): 11.27-25.28) confers a strong risk for Taiwanese AS development. The 3D modelling results identified four unique amino acid polymorphisms, Ala73, Trp156, Arg219 and Met304, that may affect the function of the HLA-C*12:02:02 allele. KIR2DL5 (p = 0.0047; pFDR = 0.0423) and the KIR Bx haplotype (p = 0.0000275) were protective against Taiwanese AS, while KIR 2DS4/1D (22 base pair truncated deletion; p = 0.0044; pFDR = 0.1998) appeared to be a risk factor for it. KIR2DL5 combined with the HLA-C1/C2 heterozygous genotype showed a protective effect (AS 5.97% vs. normal 11.66%; p = 0.002; pFDR = 0.0127, OR, 0.48 95% CI: 0.33-0.70); in contrast, KIR 2DS4/1D combined with the HLA-C1C1 homozygous genotype (AS 45.33% vs. normal 35.92%; p = 0.002; pFDR = 0.0127, OR, 1.48 95% CI: 1.21-1.81) represented a risk factor for AS development. Our data suggested that interactions between KIRs and their cognate HLA-C ligands may contribute to the pathogenesis of AS.

  14. Comparison of capillary and venous blood in the analysis of concentration and function of leucocyte sub-populations.

    PubMed

    Canetti, Elisa F D; Keane, J; McLellan, C P; Gray, A B

    2016-08-01

    Compare capillary and venous blood in the analysis of concentration and function of leucocyte sub-populations. This study hypothesised that capillary samples may be used in a site-specific manner as an alternative source of blood samples for assays of leucocyte concentration and neutrophilic phagocytic function and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, allowing acquisition of multiple samples to better monitor transient but significant post-exercise immune modulation. Resting blood samples were simultaneously obtained from vein, finger and earlobe of healthy subjects (n = 10, age: 25.1 ± 3.1 years). Leucocyte concentrations were measured using a five-part differential haematological analyser. Leucocyte sub-populations (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19, CD56, CD14) and granulocytic functional-related (CD11b, CD18, CD16b, CD66b) surface antigen markers, neutrophil phagocytosis (FITC-labelled Escherichia coli) and stimulated ROS production (DHR) were quantified utilizing flow cytometry. A MANOVA (α < 0.05 significance) analysed the effects of the different sampling sites in the concentrations of leucocyte populations, their surface antigen expression and granulocytic functions. Leucocyte concentration and neutrophilic ROS production yielded non-significant differences between sampling sites. Expression of granulocytic surface antigens was increased in both capillary sites compared to venous site (p = 0.008), particularly for adhesion markers CD11b/CD18. The percentage of neutrophils performing phagocytosis was higher in venous samples compared to finger (p = 0.025). Increased number of E. coli ingested was observed in venous sample compared to finger (p = 0.001) and to earlobe (p = 0.006). Whilst attention must be paid for varying neutrophilic surface antigen expression and further studies are needed to establish appropriate reference ranges, this study supports the use of capillary blood samples in a site-specific manner to enhance sampling capabilities field

  15. Supernatants of human leukocytes contain mediator, different from interferon gamma, which induces expression of MHC class II antigens

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    In this report, data are presented on the regulation of MHC class II antigen expression by a mediator present in supernatants of human mixed leukocyte cultures (MLC-SN), and which is different from IFN-gamma. The capacity of supernatants to induce antigen expression did not correspond to titers of IFN-gamma. Removal of IFN-gamma using either dialysis against pH 2 or neutralizing mAb against human IFN-gamma did not abrogate the MHC class II antigen expression-inducing capacity of MLC-SN when tested on adenocarcinoma cell lines, kidney epithelial cells, and fibroblasts in vitro in an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Therefore, supernatants of human leukocytes contain a mediator, different from IFN-gamma, which induces expression of MHC class II antigens. Dose-response studies revealed that the mediator is produced after allogeneic and lectin stimulation of human leukocytes, and by unstimulated leukocytes. Activation of leukocytes resulted in increased titers of the mediator. The mediator markedly enhances expression of both HLA-DR and HLA-DQ antigens, whereas IFN-gamma had a similar effect on HLA-DR antigens, and only a minor effect on HLA-DQ antigens. Interaction of the mediator and IFN-gamma resulted in a potentiating effect of these two factors on MHC class II antigen expression. Biochemical analysis revealed a mediator, distinguishable by FPLC from IL-1, IL-2, and human IFN-gamma, and which has a molecular mass of 32 kD. PMID:2941512

  16. Uncommon Structural Motifs Dominate the Antigen Binding Site in Human Autoantibodies Reactive with Basement Membrane Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Mary H.; Buckley, Elizabeth S.; Chen, Benny J.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Clark, Amy G.

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies mediate organ destruction in multiple autoimmune diseases, yet their origins in patients remain poorly understood. To probe the genetic origins and structure of disease-associated autoantibodies, we engrafted immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and immunized with the non-collagenous-1 (NC1) domain of the alpha3 chain of type IV collagen. This antigen is expressed in lungs and kidneys and is targeted by autoantibodies in anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis and Goodpasture syndrome (GPS), prototypic human organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Using Epstein Barr virus transformation and cell fusion, six human anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen monoclonal autoantibodies (mAb) were recovered, including subsets reactive with human kidney and with epitopes recognized by patients’ IgG. Sequence analysis reveals a long to exceptionally long heavy chain complementarity determining region3 (HCDR3), the major site of antigen binding, in all six mAb. Mean HCDR3 length is 25.5 amino acids (range 20–36), generated from inherently long DH and JH genes and extended regions of non-templated N-nucleotides. Long HCDR3 are suited to forming noncontiguous antigen contacts and to binding recessed, immunologically silent epitopes hidden from conventional antibodies, as seen with self-antigen crossreactive broadly neutralizing anti-HIV Ig (bnAb). The anti-alpha3(IV)NC1 collagen mAb also show preferential use of unmutated variable region genes that are enriched among human chronic lymphocytic leukemia antibodies that share features with natural polyreactive Ig. Our findings suggest unexpected relationships between pathogenic anti-collagen Ig, bnAb, and autoreactive Ig associated with malignancy, all of which arise from B cells expressing unconventional structural elements that may require transient escape from tolerance for successful expansion. PMID:27450516

  17. Clock gene expression in peripheral leucocytes of patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ando, H; Takamura, T; Matsuzawa-Nagata, N; Shima, K R; Eto, T; Misu, H; Shiramoto, M; Tsuru, T; Irie, S; Fujimura, A; Kaneko, S

    2009-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated relationships between circadian clock function and the development of metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes. We investigated whether the peripheral circadian clock is impaired in patients with type 2 diabetes. Peripheral leucocytes were obtained from eight patients with diabetes and six comparatively young non-diabetic volunteers at 09:00, 15:00, 21:00 and 03:00 hours (study 1) and from 12 male patients with diabetes and 14 age-matched men at 09:00 hours (study 2). Transcript levels of clock genes (CLOCK, BMAL1 [also known as ARNTL], PER1, PER2, PER3 and CRY1) were determined by real-time quantitative PCR. In study 1, mRNA expression patterns of BMAL1, PER1, PER2 and PER3 exhibited 24 h rhythmicity in the leucocytes of all 14 individuals. The expression levels of these mRNAs were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in patients with diabetes than in non-diabetic individuals at one or more time points. Moreover, the amplitudes of mRNA expression rhythms of PER1 and PER3 genes tended to diminish in patients with diabetes. In study 2, leucocytes obtained from patients with diabetes expressed significantly (p < 0.05) lower transcript levels of BMAL1, PER1 and PER3 compared with leucocytes from control individuals, and transcript expression was inversely correlated with HbA(1c) levels (rho = -0.47 to -0.55, p < 0.05). These results suggest that rhythmic mRNA expression of clock genes is dampened in peripheral leucocytes of patients with type 2 diabetes. The impairment of the circadian clock appears to be closely associated with the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes in humans.

  18. Experimental studies of a vaccine formulation of recombinant human VEGF antigen with aluminum phosphate.

    PubMed

    Pérez Sánchez, Lincidio; Morera Díaz, Yanelys; Bequet-Romero, Mónica; Ramses Hernández, Gerardo; Rodríguez, Yadira; Castro Velazco, Jorge; Puente Pérez, Pedro; Ayala Avila, Marta; Gavilondo, Jorge V

    2015-01-01

    CIGB-247 is a cancer vaccine that is a formulation of a recombinant protein antigen representative of the human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) with a bacterially-derived adjuvant (VSSP). The vaccine has shown an excellent safety profile in mice, rats, rabbits, not-human primates and in recent clinical trials in cancer patients. Response to the vaccine is characterized by specific antibody titers that neutralize VEGF/VEGFR2 binding and a cytotoxic tumor-specific response. To expand our present anti-VEGF active immunotherapy strategies, we have now studied in mice and non-human primates the effects of vaccination with a formulation of our recombinant VEGF antigen and aluminum phosphate adjuvant (hereafter denominated CIGB-247-A). Administered bi-weekly, CIGB-247-A produces high titers of anti-VEGF IgG blocking antibodies in 2 mice strains. Particularly in BALB/c, the treatment impaired subcutaneous F3II mammary tumor growth and reduced the number of spontaneous lung macro metastases, increasing animals' survival. Spleen cells from specifically immunized mice directly killed F3II tumor cells in vitro. CIGB-247-A also showed to be immunogenic in non-human primates, which developed anti-VEGF blocking antibodies and the ability for specific direct cell cytotoxic responses, all without impairing the healing of deep skin wounds or other side effect. Our results support consideration of aluminum phosphate as a suitable adjuvant for the development of new vaccine formulations using VEGF as antigen.

  19. Experimental studies of a vaccine formulation of recombinant human VEGF antigen with aluminum phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Pérez Sánchez, Lincidio; Morera Díaz, Yanelys; Bequet-Romero, Mónica; Ramses Hernández, Gerardo; Rodríguez, Yadira; Castro Velazco, Jorge; Puente Pérez, Pedro; Ayala Avila, Marta; Gavilondo, Jorge V

    2015-01-01

    CIGB-247 is a cancer vaccine that is a formulation of a recombinant protein antigen representative of the human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) with a bacterially-derived adjuvant (VSSP). The vaccine has shown an excellent safety profile in mice, rats, rabbits, not-human primates and in recent clinical trials in cancer patients. Response to the vaccine is characterized by specific antibody titers that neutralize VEGF/VEGFR2 binding and a cytotoxic tumor-specific response. To expand our present anti-VEGF active immunotherapy strategies, we have now studied in mice and non-human primates the effects of vaccination with a formulation of our recombinant VEGF antigen and aluminum phosphate adjuvant (hereafter denominated CIGB-247-A). Administered bi-weekly, CIGB-247-A produces high titers of anti-VEGF IgG blocking antibodies in 2 mice strains. Particularly in BALB/c, the treatment impaired subcutaneous F3II mammary tumor growth and reduced the number of spontaneous lung macro metastases, increasing animals' survival. Spleen cells from specifically immunized mice directly killed F3II tumor cells in vitro. CIGB-247-A also showed to be immunogenic in non-human primates, which developed anti-VEGF blocking antibodies and the ability for specific direct cell cytotoxic responses, all without impairing the healing of deep skin wounds or other side effect. Our results support consideration of aluminum phosphate as a suitable adjuvant for the development of new vaccine formulations using VEGF as antigen. PMID:25891359

  20. Complexity of the Rh antigen demonstrated by comparative tests using antisera of human and primate origins.

    PubMed

    Socha, W W; Rouger, P; Ruffié, J; Moor-Jankowski, J

    1987-01-01

    Comparative analysis of two antisera, one produced in chimpanzee and another of human origin, demonstrates the existence of a spectrum of antibodies directed against at least four antigenic determinants connected with Rh reactivity. Some of the determinants are shared by chimpanzee and human red cells, while others are restricted to one species only. Based on this study, it is suggested that both the human Rh(D)-positive type and its chimpanzee counterpart, the Rc-positive type, could be of common origin, while the negative types are the results of later, parallel events during evolution.

  1. Complexity of the Rh antigen demonstrated by comparative tests using antisera of human and primate origins.

    PubMed

    Socha, W W; Rouger, P; Ruffié, J; Moor-Jankowski, J

    1989-01-01

    Comparative analysis of two antisera, one produced in chimpanzee and another of human origin, demonstrates the existence of the whole spectrum of antibodies directed against at least four, and possibly five, antigenic determinants connected with the Rh reactivity. Some of the determinants are shared by chimpanzee and human red cells, while others are restricted to one species only. Based on this study, it is suggested that both the human Rh(D)-positive type and its chimpanzee counterpart, the Rc-positive type, could be of common origin, while the negative types are the results of later, parallel events during the evolution.

  2. Isolation and characterization of a human liver and kidney-specific protein: the hepato-renal (H-R) antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Nerenberg, S T; Prasad, R; Inboriboon, P; Biskup, N; Pedersen, L; Faiferman, I

    1980-01-01

    This paper reports the isolation and characterization of a soluble antigen shared by the liver and kidney of human and some other animal species. Homogenates of human liver in saline were centrifugated at 27,000 g and the supernatants were fractionated by preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The gels were divided in sections and each was injected into rabbits; after absorption with polymerized normal human serum, the antiserum obtained by injecting one of the sections reacted only with saline extracts of human liver and kidney when tested against a variety of human tissue extracts. The absorbed antiserum, polymerized and insolubilized with glutaraldehyde, was used to purify the antigen by affinity chromatography. The purified antigen proved to be a glycoprotein containing 19 percent carbohydrate, had a molecular weight of 5.8-6.0 x 10(4) Daltons and a pI of 7.2-7.4. The antigen, relatively thermostable, was precipitated by 35-55 percent ammonium sulphate; its antigenic activity was not affected by extraction with 0.6 N perchloric acid or by incubation with ribonuclease, deoxyribonuclease or neuraminidase but was destroyed by incubation with ttypsin or chymotrypsin. Immunoperoxidase studies showed that the antigen appeared concentrated in the neclei of liver and kidney glomerular epithelial and tubular epithelial cells in humans and rats. The antigen could not be detected in human hepatomas or hypernephromas or in the rat Morris hepatoma 5123. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 7 PMID:6155231

  3. Contrasting Population Structures of the Genes Encoding Ten Leading Vaccine-Candidate Antigens of the Human Malaria Parasite, Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Alyssa E.; Schultz, Lee; Buckee, Caroline O.; Reeder, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The extensive diversity of Plasmodium falciparum antigens is a major obstacle to a broadly effective malaria vaccine but population genetics has rarely been used to guide vaccine design. We have completed a meta-population genetic analysis of the genes encoding ten leading P. falciparum vaccine antigens, including the pre-erythrocytic antigens csp, trap, lsa1 and glurp; the merozoite antigens eba175, ama1, msp's 1, 3 and 4, and the gametocyte antigen pfs48/45. A total of 4553 antigen sequences were assembled from published data and we estimated the range and distribution of diversity worldwide using traditional population genetics, Bayesian clustering and network analysis. Although a large number of distinct haplotypes were identified for each antigen, they were organized into a limited number of discrete subgroups. While the non-merozoite antigens showed geographically variable levels of diversity and geographic restriction of specific subgroups, the merozoite antigens had high levels of diversity globally, and a worldwide distribution of each subgroup. This shows that the diversity of the non-merozoite antigens is organized by physical or other location-specific barriers to gene flow and that of merozoite antigens by features intrinsic to all populations, one important possibility being the immune response of the human host. We also show that current malaria vaccine formulations are based upon low prevalence haplotypes from a single subgroup and thus may represent only a small proportion of the global parasite population. This study demonstrates significant contrasts in the population structure of P. falciparum vaccine candidates that are consistent with the merozoite antigens being under stronger balancing selection than non-merozoite antigens and suggesting that unique approaches to vaccine design will be required. The results of this study also provide a realistic framework for the diversity of these antigens to be incorporated into the design of next

  4. Mouse models expressing human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a transgene: Evaluation of CEA-based cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hance, Kenneth W.; Zeytin, Hasan E.; Greiner, John W.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, investigators have carried out several studies designed to evaluate whether human tumor-associated antigens might be exploited as targets for active specific immunotherapy, specifically human cancer vaccines. Not too long ago such an approach would have been met with considerable skepticism because the immune system was believed to be a rigid discriminator between self and non-self which, in turn, protected the host from a variety of pathogens. That viewpoint has been challenged in recent years by a series of studies indicating that antigenic determinants of self have not induced absolute host immune tolerance. Moreover, under specific conditions that evoke danger signals, peptides from self-antigen can be processed by the antigen-presenting cellular machinery, loaded onto the major histocompatibility antigen groove to serve as targets for immune intervention. Those findings provide the rationale to investigate a wide range of tumor-associated antigens, including differentiation antigens, oncogenes, and tumor suppressor genes as possible immune-based targets. One of those tumor-associated antigens is the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Described almost 40 years ago, CEA is a Mr 180–200,000 oncofetal antigen that is one of the more widely studied human tumor-associated antigens. This review will provide: (i) a brief overview of the CEA gene family, (ii) a summary of early preclinical findings on overcoming immune tolerance to CEA, and (iii) the rationale to develop mouse models which spontaneously develop gastrointestinal tumors and express the CEA transgene. Those models have been used extensively in the study of overcoming host immune tolerance to CEA, a self, tumor-associated antigen, and the experimental findings have served as the rationale for the design of early clinical trials to evaluate CEA-based cancer vaccines. PMID:15888344

  5. Studies of a high molecular weight human melanoma-associated antigen.

    PubMed

    Hellström, I; Garrigues, H J; Cabasco, L; Mosely, G H; Brown, J P; Hellström, K E

    1983-03-01

    Hybridomas were generated by fusing SP2/0 mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells from mice that had been immunized with cultured human melanoma cells. One of the hybridomas secreted a monoclonal IgG1 antibody, 48.7, which binds to a cell surface antigen of cells from human melanomas and compound nevi. The presence of the target antigen in vivo was demonstrated immunohistologically by staining frozen sections of primary and metastatic melanoma by the peroxidase anti-peroxidase technique. Weak staining of some blood vessel cells was also seen, but other normal cells, including skin melanocytes, were unstained, as were cells from other tumor types. Antibody 48.7 immunoprecipitated polypeptides with apparent m.w. on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of 250,000 and greater than 400,000.

  6. Human thymic epithelial primary cells produce exosomes carrying tissue-restricted antigens

    PubMed Central

    Skogberg, Gabriel; Lundberg, Vanja; Berglund, Martin; Gudmundsdottir, Judith; Telemo, Esbjörn; Lindgren, Susanne; Ekwall, Olov

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released by cells into the extracellular space and have been shown to be present in thymic tissue both in mice and in humans. The source of thymic exosomes is however still an enigma and hence it is not known whether thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are able to produce exosomes. In this work, we have cultured human TECs and isolated exosomes. These exosomes carry tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs), for example, myelin basic protein and desmoglein 3. The presence of TRAs indicates a possible role for thymic epithelium-derived exosomes in the selection process of thymocytes. The key contribution of these exosomes could be to disseminate self-antigens from the thymic epithelia, thus making them more accessible to the pool of maturing thymocytes. This would increase the coverage of TRAs within the thymus, and facilitate the process of positive and negative selection. PMID:25776846

  7. Characterization of the lymphocyte activation gene 3-encoded protein. A new ligand for human leukocyte antigen class II antigens

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3), expressed in human activated T and natural killer (NK) cells, is closely related to CD4 at the gene and protein levels. We report here the initial characterization of the LAG-3-encoded protein. We have generated two monoclonal antibodies after immunization of mice with a 30-amino acid peptide that corresponds to an exposed extra loop region present in the LAG-3 immunoglobulin-like first domain. The reactivity of these reagents is directed against LAG-3 since they recognize both membrane-expressed and soluble recombinant LAG-3 molecules produced in a baculovirus expression system. The two antibodies are likely to react with the same or closely related epitope (termed LAG-3.1) exposed on the LAG-3 first domain extra loop, as assessed in competition experiments on LAG-3- expressing activated lymphocytes. Cellular distribution analysis indicated that the LAG-3.1 epitope is expressed on activated T (both CD4+ and CD8+ subsets) and NK cells, and not on activated B cells or monocytes. In immunoprecipitation experiments performed on activated T and NK cell lysates, a 70-kD protein was detected after SDS-PAGE analysis. 45-kD protein species were also immunoprecipitated. Both the 70- and 45-kD proteins were shown to be N-glycosylated. In Western blot analysis, only the former molecule was recognized by the anti-LAG-3 antibodies, demonstrating that it is LAG-3 encoded. These anti-LAG-3 antibodies were used to investigate whether the LAG-3 protein interacts with the CD4 ligands. By using a high-level expression cellular system based on COS-7 cell transfection with recombinant CDM8 vectors and a quantitative cellular adhesion assay, we demonstrate that rosette formation between LAG-3-transfected COS-7 cells and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-bearing B lymphocytes is specifically dependent on LAG-3/HLA class II interaction. In contrast to CD4, LAG-3 does not bind the human immunodeficiency virus gp120. This initial

  8. Epigenetic silencing of the chaperone Cosmc in human leukocytes expressing tn antigen.

    PubMed

    Mi, Rongjuan; Song, Lina; Wang, Yingchun; Ding, Xiaokun; Zeng, Junwei; Lehoux, Sylvain; Aryal, Rajindra P; Wang, Jianmei; Crew, Vanja K; van Die, Irma; Chapman, Arlene B; Cummings, Richard D; Ju, Tongzhong

    2012-11-30

    Cosmc is the specific molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum for T-synthase, a Golgi β3-galactosyltransferase that generates the core 1 O-glycan, Galβ1-3GalNAcα-Ser/Thr, in glycoproteins. Dysfunctional Cosmc results in the formation of inactive T-synthase and consequent expression of the Tn antigen (GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr), which is associated with several human diseases. However, the molecular regulation of expression of Cosmc, which is encoded by a single gene on Xq24, is poorly understood. Here we show that epigenetic silencing of Cosmc through hypermethylation of its promoter leads to loss of Cosmc transcripts in Tn4 cells, an immortalized B cell line from a male patient with a Tn-syndrome-like phenotype. These cells lack T-synthase activity and express the Tn antigen. Treatment of cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine causes restoration of Cosmc transcripts, restores T-synthase activity, and reduces Tn antigen expression. Bisulfite sequencing shows that CG dinucleotides in the Cosmc core promoter are hypermethylated. Interestingly, several other X-linked genes associated with glycosylation are not silenced in Tn4 cells, and we observed no correlation of a particular DNA methyltransferase to aberrant methylation of Cosmc in these cells. Thus, hypermethylation of the Cosmc promoter in Tn4 cells is relatively specific. Epigenetic silencing of Cosmc provides another mechanism underlying the abnormal expression of the Tn antigen, which may be important in understanding aberrant Tn antigen expression in human diseases, including IgA nephropathy and cancer.

  9. Epigenetic Silencing of the Chaperone Cosmc in Human Leukocytes Expressing Tn Antigen*

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Rongjuan; Song, Lina; Wang, Yingchun; Ding, Xiaokun; Zeng, Junwei; Lehoux, Sylvain; Aryal, Rajindra P.; Wang, Jianmei; Crew, Vanja K.; van Die, Irma; Chapman, Arlene B.; Cummings, Richard D.; Ju, Tongzhong

    2012-01-01

    Cosmc is the specific molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum for T-synthase, a Golgi β3-galactosyltransferase that generates the core 1 O-glycan, Galβ1–3GalNAcα-Ser/Thr, in glycoproteins. Dysfunctional Cosmc results in the formation of inactive T-synthase and consequent expression of the Tn antigen (GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr), which is associated with several human diseases. However, the molecular regulation of expression of Cosmc, which is encoded by a single gene on Xq24, is poorly understood. Here we show that epigenetic silencing of Cosmc through hypermethylation of its promoter leads to loss of Cosmc transcripts in Tn4 cells, an immortalized B cell line from a male patient with a Tn-syndrome-like phenotype. These cells lack T-synthase activity and express the Tn antigen. Treatment of cells with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine causes restoration of Cosmc transcripts, restores T-synthase activity, and reduces Tn antigen expression. Bisulfite sequencing shows that CG dinucleotides in the Cosmc core promoter are hypermethylated. Interestingly, several other X-linked genes associated with glycosylation are not silenced in Tn4 cells, and we observed no correlation of a particular DNA methyltransferase to aberrant methylation of Cosmc in these cells. Thus, hypermethylation of the Cosmc promoter in Tn4 cells is relatively specific. Epigenetic silencing of Cosmc provides another mechanism underlying the abnormal expression of the Tn antigen, which may be important in understanding aberrant Tn antigen expression in human diseases, including IgA nephropathy and cancer. PMID:23035125

  10. Mosaic HIV-1 Gag antigens can be Processed and Presented to human HIV-specific CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ndhlovu, Zaza M; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Vine, Seanna; McMullen, Ashley; Koofhethile, Kegakilwe C; Goulder, Phillip JR; Ndung’u, Thumbi; Barouch, Dan H; Walker, Bruce D

    2011-01-01

    Polyvalent “mosaic” HIV immunogens offer a potential solution for generating vaccines that can elicit immune responses against genetically diverse viruses. However, it is unclear whether key T cell epitopes can be processed and presented from these synthetic antigens and recognized by epitope-specific human T cells. Here we tested the ability of mosaic HIV immunogens expressed by recombinant, replication-incompetent adenovirus serotype 26 vectors to process and present major HIV clade B and clade C CD8 T cell epitopes in human cells. A bivalent mosaic vaccine expressing HIV Gag sequences was used to transduce PBMC from 12 HIV-1-infected individuals from the US and 10 HIV-1-infected individuals from South Africa, and intracellular cytokine staining together with tetramer staining was used to assess the ability of mosaic Gag antigens to stimulate pre-existing memory responses compared to natural clade B and C vectors. Mosaic Gag antigens expressed all 8 clade B epitopes tested in 12 US subjects and all 5 clade C epitopes tested in 10 South African subjects. Overall, the magnitude of cytokine production induced by stimulation with mosaic antigens was comparable to clade B and clade C antigens tested, but the mosaic antigens elicited greater cross-clade recognition. Additionally, mosaic antigens also induced HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses. Our studies demonstrate that mosaic antigens express major clade B and clade C viral T cell epitopes in human cells, and support the evaluation of mosaic HIV-1 vaccines in humans. PMID:21576505

  11. Isotypic and allotypic variation of human class II histocompatibility antigen alpha-chain genes.

    PubMed

    Auffray, C; Lillie, J W; Arnot, D; Grossberger, D; Kappes, D; Strominger, J L

    DNA sequences of four human class II histocompatibility antigen alpha chain DNA sequences (derived from cDNA and genomic clones representing DC1 alpha, DC4 alpha, DX alpha and SB alpha) are presented and compared to DR alpha and to mouse I-A alpha and I-E alpha sequences. These data suggest possible mechanisms for the generation of polymorphism and the evolution of the DR, DC and SB families.

  12. Evaluation of Antigens for Development of a Serological Test for Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Biéler, Sylvain; Waltenberger, Harald; Barrett, Michael P.; McCulloch, Richard; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Carrington, Mark; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; McKerrow, James; Phillips, Margaret A.; Michels, Paul A.; Büscher, Philippe; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Bishop, Richard; Robinson, Derrick R.; Bangs, James; Ferguson, Michael; Nerima, Barbara; Albertini, Audrey; Michel, Gerd; Radwandska, Magdalena; Ndung’u, Joseph Mathu

    2016-01-01

    Background Control and elimination of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) can be accelerated through the use of diagnostic tests that are more accurate and easier to deploy. The goal of this work was to evaluate the immuno-reactivity of antigens and identify candidates to be considered for development of a simple serological test for the detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense infections, ideally both. Methodology/Principal Findings The reactivity of 35 antigens was independently evaluated by slot blot and ELISA against sera from both T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense infected patients and controls. The antigens that were most reactive by both tests to T. b. gambiense sera were the membrane proteins VSG LiTat 1.3, VSG LiTat 1.5 and ISG64. Reactivity to T. b. rhodesiense sera was highest with VSG LiTat 1.3, VSG LiTat 1.5 and SRA, although much lower than with T. b. gambiense samples. The reactivity of all possible combinations of antigens was also calculated. When the slot blot results of 2 antigens were paired, a VSG LiTat 1.3- ISG75 combination performed best on T. b. gambiense sera, while a VSG LiTat 1.3-VSG LiTat 1.5 combination was the most reactive using ELISA. A combination of SRA and either VSG LiTat 1.3 or VSG LiTat 1.5 had the highest reactivity on T. b. rhodesiense sera according to slot blot, while in ELISA, pairing SRA with either GM6 or VSG LiTat 1.3 yielded the best results. Conclusions This study identified antigens that were highly reactive to T. b. gambiense sera, which could be considered for developing a serological test for gambiense HAT, either individually or in combination. Antigens with potential for inclusion in a test for T. b. rhodesiense HAT were also identified, but because their reactivity was comparatively lower, a search for additional antigens would be required before developing a test for this form of the disease. PMID:27936225

  13. Evaluation of Antigens for Development of a Serological Test for Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Biéler, Sylvain; Waltenberger, Harald; Barrett, Michael P; McCulloch, Richard; Mottram, Jeremy C; Carrington, Mark; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; McKerrow, James; Phillips, Margaret A; Michels, Paul A; Büscher, Philippe; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Bishop, Richard; Robinson, Derrick R; Bangs, James; Ferguson, Michael; Nerima, Barbara; Albertini, Audrey; Michel, Gerd; Radwandska, Magdalena; Ndung'u, Joseph Mathu

    2016-01-01

    Control and elimination of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) can be accelerated through the use of diagnostic tests that are more accurate and easier to deploy. The goal of this work was to evaluate the immuno-reactivity of antigens and identify candidates to be considered for development of a simple serological test for the detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense infections, ideally both. The reactivity of 35 antigens was independently evaluated by slot blot and ELISA against sera from both T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense infected patients and controls. The antigens that were most reactive by both tests to T. b. gambiense sera were the membrane proteins VSG LiTat 1.3, VSG LiTat 1.5 and ISG64. Reactivity to T. b. rhodesiense sera was highest with VSG LiTat 1.3, VSG LiTat 1.5 and SRA, although much lower than with T. b. gambiense samples. The reactivity of all possible combinations of antigens was also calculated. When the slot blot results of 2 antigens were paired, a VSG LiTat 1.3- ISG75 combination performed best on T. b. gambiense sera, while a VSG LiTat 1.3-VSG LiTat 1.5 combination was the most reactive using ELISA. A combination of SRA and either VSG LiTat 1.3 or VSG LiTat 1.5 had the highest reactivity on T. b. rhodesiense sera according to slot blot, while in ELISA, pairing SRA with either GM6 or VSG LiTat 1.3 yielded the best results. This study identified antigens that were highly reactive to T. b. gambiense sera, which could be considered for developing a serological test for gambiense HAT, either individually or in combination. Antigens with potential for inclusion in a test for T. b. rhodesiense HAT were also identified, but because their reactivity was comparatively lower, a search for additional antigens would be required before developing a test for this form of the disease.

  14. Antigen-specific acquired immunity in human brucellosis: implications for diagnosis, prognosis, and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Cannella, Anthony P; Tsolis, Renee M; Liang, Li; Felgner, Philip L; Saito, Mayuko; Sette, Alessandro; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Vinetz, Joseph M

    2012-01-01

    Brucella spp., are Gram negative bacteria that cause disease by growing within monocyte/macrophage lineage cells. Clinical manifestations of brucellosis are immune mediated, not due to bacterial virulence factors. Acquired immunity to brucellosis has been studied through observations of naturally infected hosts (cattle, goats), mouse models (mice), and human infection. Even though Brucella spp. are known for producing mechanisms that evade the immune system, cell-mediated immune responses drive the clinical manifestations of human disease after exposure to Brucella species, as high antibody responses are not associated with protective immunity. The precise mechanisms by which cell-mediated immune responses confer protection or lead to disease manifestations remain undefined. Descriptive studies of immune responses in human brucellosis show that TH(1) (interferon-γ-producing T cells) are associated with dominant immune responses, findings consistent with animal studies. Whether these T cell responses are protective, or determine the different clinical responses associated with brucellosis is unknown, especially with regard to undulant fever manifestations, relapsing disease, or are associated with responses to distinct sets of Brucella spp. antigens are unknown. Few data regarding T cell responses in terms of specific recognition of Brucella spp. protein antigens and peptidic epitopes, either by CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, have been identified in human brucellosis patients. Additionally because current attenuated Brucella vaccines used in animals cause human disease, there is a true need for a recombinant protein subunit vaccine for human brucellosis, as well as for improved diagnostics in terms of prognosis and identification of unusual forms of brucellosis. This review will focus on current understandings of antigen-specific immune responses induced Brucella peptidic epitopes that has promise for yielding new insights into vaccine and diagnostics development, and for

  15. Generation and Characterization of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Anthrax Protective Antigen following Vaccination with a Recombinant Protective Antigen Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chi, Xiangyang; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Weicen; Wang, Xiaolin; Yin, Kexin; Liu, Ju; Zai, Xiaodong; Li, Liangliang; Song, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yin, Ying; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is the central component of the three-part anthrax toxin, and it is the primary immunogenic component in the approved AVA anthrax vaccine and the "next-generation" recombinant PA (rPA) anthrax vaccines. Animal models have indicated that PA-specific antibodies (AB) are sufficient to protect against infection with Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we investigated the PA domain specificity, affinity, mechanisms of neutralization, and synergistic effects of PA-specific antibodies from a single donor following vaccination with the rPA vaccine. Antibody-secreting cells were isolated 7 days after the donor received a boost vaccination, and 34 fully human monoclonal antibodies (hMAb) were identified. Clones 8H6, 4A3, and 22F1 were able to neutralize lethal toxin (LeTx) both in vitro and in vivo. Clone 8H6 neutralized LeTx by preventing furin cleavage of PA in a dose-dependent manner. Clone 4A3 enhanced degradation of nicked PA, thereby interfering with PA oligomerization. The mechanism of 22F1 is still unclear. A fourth clone, 2A6, that was protective only in vitro was found to be neutralizing in vivo in combination with a toxin-enhancing antibody, 8A7, which binds to domain 3 of PA and PA oligomers. These results provide novel insights into the antibody response elicited by the rPA vaccine and may be useful for PA-based vaccine and immunotherapeutic cocktail design.

  16. A new TLR2 agonist promotes cross-presentation by mouse and human antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Santone, Melissa; Aprea, Susanna; Wu, Tom Y H; Cooke, Michael P; Mbow, M Lamine; Valiante, Nicholas M; Rush, James S; Dougan, Stephanie; Avalos, Ana; Ploegh, Hidde; De Gregorio, Ennio; Buonsanti, Cecilia; D'Oro, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    Cross-presentation is the process by which professional APCs load peptides from an extracellularly derived protein onto class I MHC molecules to trigger a CD8(+) T cell response. The ability to enhance this process is therefore relevant for the development of antitumor and antiviral vaccines. We investigated a new TLR2-based adjuvant, Small Molecule Immune Potentiator (SMIP) 2.1, for its ability to stimulate cross-presentation. Using OVA as model antigen, we demonstrated that a SMIP2.1-adjuvanted vaccine formulation induced a greater CD8(+) T cell response, in terms of proliferation, cytokine production and cytolytic activity, than a non-adjuvanted vaccine. Moreover, using an OVA-expressing tumor model, we showed that the CTLs induced by the SMIP2.1 formulated vaccine inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Using a BCR transgenic mouse model we found that B cells could cross-present the OVA antigen when stimulated with SMIP2.1. We also used a flow cytometry assay to detect activation of human CD8(+) T cells isolated from human PBMCs of cytomegalovirus-seropositive donors. Stimulation with SMIP2.1 increased the capacity of human APCs, pulsed in vitro with the pp65 CMV protein, to activate CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells. Therefore, vaccination with an exogenous antigen formulated with SMIP2.1 is a successful strategy for the induction of a cytotoxic T cell response along with antibody production.

  17. Distribution of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules in human gingiva.

    PubMed

    Huynh-Torlakovic, Hong; Bjerkan, Louise; Schenck, Karl; Blix, Inger J S

    2012-10-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) are glycoproteins produced in epithelial, endothelial, lymphoid, and myeloid cells. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules mediate cell-cell contact and host-pathogen interactions. The aims of this study were to map the distribution and examine the regulation of CEACAMs in human gingival sites. Quantitative real-time PCR performed on human gingival biopsies from periodontitis sites revealed mRNA coding for CEACAM1, -5, -6, and -7. Immunohistochemistry showed that CEACAMs were not found in oral gingival epithelium, except for CEACAM5 in periodontitis. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules 1, 5, and 6 were present in the oral sulcular epithelium of periodontitis but not in that of healthy gingiva. In junctional epithelium, all three molecules were present in healthy gingiva, but in periodontitis only CEACAM1 and -6 were detected. Staining for CEACAM1 and -6 was also seen in the inflammatory cell infiltrate in periodontitis. No staining for CEACAM7 was found. Proinflammatory mediators, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)/interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), increased the expression of CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 mRNAs in cultured human oral keratinocytes. CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 mRNAs were also strongly up-regulated upon stimulation with lysophosphatidic acid. In conclusion, the distribution of different CEACAMs was related to specific sites in the gingiva. This might reflect different functional roles in this tissue.

  18. A study on human leukocyte antigen class I molecules in paediatric bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Mahendra N; Dudeja, Puja; Gupta, Rakesh K

    2014-04-01

    Childhood asthma, often associated with atopy, is more common in boys and may persist throughout life in 50% of cases. This case-control study was carried out to examine if any association of paediatric bronchial asthma with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I antigens. Thirty-six children with bronchial asthma diagnosed on basis of Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) criteria and an equal number of healthy controls without history of bronchial asthma were studied. Low resolution HLA- ABC typing was performed by sequence specific primers (SSP) and the frequency of HLA-ABC antigens in the two groups was compared. Total serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) estimation was done as a marker of atopy by ELISA. The study included 24 boys and 12 girls aged 13 months to 11 yrs, of which 16 (44%) had positive family history. Serum IgE levels were elevated in 20 (55%) of the cases and 33% of controls with peak values of 4877 and 627 IU/ml, respectively. No statistically significant correlation was observed between childhood asthma and HLA class I antigens, however, a statistically significant correlation was observed between serum IgE levels and asthma, which was elevated in cases, as compared to normal population. Serum IgE levels did not show a linear trend, in that a direct correlation with the severity of disease was not observed.

  19. Excretory-secretory antigenic components of Paragonimus heterotremus recognized by infected human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Maleewong, W; Wongkham, C; Intapan, P; Pariyanonda, S; Morakote, N

    1992-01-01

    Antigenic components of Paragonimus heterotremus metabolic products were revealed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblot analysis of sera from patients with P. heterotremus infection, from patients with other illnesses, and from healthy adults. By SDS-PAGE, it was found that the metabolic products comprised more than eight major polypeptides. Immunoblot analysis revealed 11 components which were strongly recognized by paragonimiasis antisera. These antigenic components had molecular masses ranging from less than 12.3 kDa to 144 kDa. One antigenic band of 31.5 kDa was found to give a consistent reaction with paragonimiasis antisera (97% sensitivity). Of the other patient sera, only sera from patients with Fasciola sp. infection reacted with antigenic bands of 56, 38, and 18.5 kDa. The present findings suggest that the 31.5-kDa component is sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of human P. heterotremus paragonimiasis. Images PMID:1500515

  20. Optimizing Production of Antigens and Fabs in the Context of Generating Recombinant Antibodies to Human Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Nan; Loppnau, Peter; Seitova, Alma; Ravichandran, Mani; Fenner, Maria; Jain, Harshika; Bhattacharya, Anandi; Hutchinson, Ashley; Paduch, Marcin; Lu, Vincent; Olszewski, Michal; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.; Dowdell, Evan; Koide, Akiko; Koide, Shohei; Huang, Haiming; Nadeem, Vincent; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Marcon, Edyta; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Edwards, Aled M.; Gräslund, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    We developed and optimized a high-throughput project workflow to generate renewable recombinant antibodies to human proteins involved in epigenetic signalling. Three different strategies to produce phage display compatible protein antigens in bacterial systems were compared, and we found that in vivo biotinylation through the use of an Avi tag was the most productive method. Phage display selections were performed on 265 in vivo biotinylated antigen domains. High-affinity Fabs (<20nM) were obtained for 196. We constructed and optimized a new expression vector to produce in vivo biotinylated Fabs in E. coli. This increased average yields up to 10-fold, with an average yield of 4 mg/L. For 118 antigens, we identified Fabs that could immunoprecipitate their full-length endogenous targets from mammalian cell lysates. One Fab for each antigen was converted to a recombinant IgG and produced in mammalian cells, with an average yield of 15 mg/L. In summary, we have optimized each step of the pipeline to produce recombinant antibodies, significantly increasing both efficiency and yield, and also showed that these Fabs and IgGs can be generally useful for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocols. PMID:26437229

  1. Human Leukocyte Antigens Influence the Antibody Response to Hepatitis B Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Jafarzadeh, Abdollah; Bagheri-Jamebozorgi, Masoome; Nemati, Maryam; Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Shokri, Fazel

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and its sequelae such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma has remained a serious public health problem throughout the world. The WHO strategy for effective control of HBV infection and its complications is mass vaccination of neonates and children within the framework of Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). Vaccination with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) induces protective antibody response (anti-HBs ≥ 10 IU/L) in 90-99% of vaccinees. The lack of response to HBsAg has been attributed to a variety of immunological mechanisms, including defect in antigen presentation, defect in HBsAg-specific T and/or B cell repertoires, T-cell suppression, increase in the regulatory T cell count, lack of necessary help of T-cells for production of anti-HBs by B cells, defect in Th1 and/or Th2 cytokine production and selective killing of HBsAg-specific B-cells by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The HLA complex plays an important role in many of these immunological processes. A variety of HLA class I, II, and III alleles and antigens have been reported to be associated with antibody response to HBsAg vaccination in different ethnic populations. Moreover, some HLA haplotypes were also associated with responsiveness to HBsAg. In this review the association of the HLA specificities with antibody response to hepatitis B (HB) vaccine is discussed.

  2. Optimizing Production of Antigens and Fabs in the Context of Generating Recombinant Antibodies to Human Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Nan; Loppnau, Peter; Seitova, Alma; Ravichandran, Mani; Fenner, Maria; Jain, Harshika; Bhattacharya, Anandi; Hutchinson, Ashley; Paduch, Marcin; Lu, Vincent; Olszewski, Michal; Kossiakoff, Anthony A; Dowdell, Evan; Koide, Akiko; Koide, Shohei; Huang, Haiming; Nadeem, Vincent; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Greenblatt, Jack F; Marcon, Edyta; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Edwards, Aled M; Gräslund, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    We developed and optimized a high-throughput project workflow to generate renewable recombinant antibodies to human proteins involved in epigenetic signalling. Three different strategies to produce phage display compatible protein antigens in bacterial systems were compared, and we found that in vivo biotinylation through the use of an Avi tag was the most productive method. Phage display selections were performed on 265 in vivo biotinylated antigen domains. High-affinity Fabs (<20nM) were obtained for 196. We constructed and optimized a new expression vector to produce in vivo biotinylated Fabs in E. coli. This increased average yields up to 10-fold, with an average yield of 4 mg/L. For 118 antigens, we identified Fabs that could immunoprecipitate their full-length endogenous targets from mammalian cell lysates. One Fab for each antigen was converted to a recombinant IgG and produced in mammalian cells, with an average yield of 15 mg/L. In summary, we have optimized each step of the pipeline to produce recombinant antibodies, significantly increasing both efficiency and yield, and also showed that these Fabs and IgGs can be generally useful for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocols.

  3. Antigenic components of excretory-secretory products of adult Fasciola hepatica recognized in human infections.

    PubMed

    Sampaio-Silva, M L; Da Costa, J M; Da Costa, A M; Pires, M A; Lopes, S A; Castro, A M; Monjour, L

    1996-02-01

    The antigenic components of excretory-secretory products (ESP) of adult worms of Fasciola hepatica were revealed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis using sera from 20 patients infected with F. hepatica. Sera from 184 other parasitic infections and 20 healthy volunteers were also analyzed. It was found that the ESP were composed of more than 11 polypeptides; five components detected in fascioliasis sera had molecular weights of 12.4, 16.4, 19.4, 25, and 27 kilodaltons (kD). Only the 25- and 27-kD components were recognized by all 20 fascioliasis sera. Using the ESP as antigen, it was possible to perform an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 97%. Sera from other parasitic infections had antibodies to antigenic components with apparent molecular weights of 37, 38.4, 52, 63, 73, 87, 109, and 116 kD that were also found in sera from fascioliasis patients. These findings suggested that the 25- and 27-kD antigenic components may be sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of human fascioliasis.

  4. Overlapping gene coexpression patterns in human medullary thymic epithelial cells generate self-antigen diversity.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Sheena; Michel, Chloé; Schmidt-Glenewinkel, Hannah; Harder, Nathalie; Rohr, Karl; Wild, Stefan; Brors, Benedikt; Kyewski, Bruno

    2013-09-10

    Promiscuous expression of numerous tissue-restricted self-antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) is essential to safeguard self-tolerance. A distinct feature of promiscuous gene expression is its mosaic pattern (i.e., at a given time, each self-antigen is expressed only in 1-3% of mTECs). How this mosaic pattern is generated at the single-cell level is currently not understood. Here, we show that subsets of human mTECs expressing a particular TRA coexpress distinct sets of genes. We identified three coexpression groups comprising overlapping and complementary gene sets, which preferentially mapped to certain chromosomes and intrachromosomal gene clusters. Coexpressed gene loci tended to colocalize to the same nuclear subdomain. The TRA subsets aligned along progressive differentiation stages within the mature mTEC subset and, in vitro, interconverted along this sequence. Our data suggest that single mTECs shift through distinct gene pools, thus scanning a sizeable fraction of the overall repertoire of promiscuously expressed self-antigens. These findings have implications for the temporal and spatial (re)presentation of self-antigens in the medulla in the context of tolerance induction.

  5. Alphoid satellite DNA is tightly associated with centromere antigens in human chromosomes throughout the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Masumoto, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Kenji; Okazaki, Tuneko )

    1989-03-01

    In this study, the authors have examined a DNA element specific to the centromere domain of human chromosomes. Purified HeLa chromosomes were digested with the restriction enzyme Sau3AI and fractionated by sedimentation through a sucrose gradient. Fractions showing antigenicity to anticentromere (kinetochore) serum obtained from a scleroderma CREST patient were used to construct a DNA library. From this library they found one clone which has specifically hybridized to the centromere domain of metaphase chromosomes using a biotinylated probe DNA and FITC-conjugated avidin. The clone contained a stretch of alphoid DNA dimer. To determine precisely the relative location of the alphoid DNA stretch and the centromere antigen, a method was developed to carry out in situ hybridization of DNA and indirect immunofluorescent staining of antigen on the same cell preparation. Using this method, they have found perfect overlapping of the alphoid DNA sites with the centromere antigen in both metaphase chromosomes and nuclei at various stages in the cell cycle. They have also observed this exact correlation at the attachment sites of artificially extended sister chromatids. These results suggest the possibility that alphoid DNA repeats are a key component of kinetochore structure.

  6. Definition of glomerular antigens by monoclonal antibodies produced against a human glomerular membrane fraction.

    PubMed

    Neale, T J; Callus, M S; Donovan, L C; Baird, H

    1990-10-01

    Experimental animal models of glomerulonephritis (GN) produced by direct antibody binding to non-basement membrane glomerular capillary wall antigens do not to date have human parallels. To examine the potential for this form of humoral glomerular injury in man, we sought to define discrete human non-GBM glomerular antigenic targets using hybridoma technology. Mice were immunised intraperitoneally with 20-100 micrograms of a human glomerular membrane fraction (HGMF). Six fusions have yielded 12 stable reagents defined by positive glomerular indirect immunofluorescence (IF) and microELISA using HGMF as the screening antigen. Subclass analysis of ascitic McAbs indicated several IgG1, one IgG2b, and three IgM reagents. Distinctive IF patterns of reactivity with epithelial, endothelial or mesangial structures have been observed, with or without peritubular capillary, tubular basement membrane and vessel wall reactivity. Seven normal non-renal human organs and the kidneys of rat, rabbit and sheep have shown patterns characteristic of each individual McAb, restricted to human or with species cross reactivity. To partially characterise McAb-reactive antigens, detergent-solubilised renal cortex and collagenase-solubilised GBM (CS-GBM) extracts have been probed by immunoblot. A unique McAb 7-5Q, reactive with glomerular and tubular epithelial structures, binds major bands of approximately 107 KD and 93 KD in detergent solubilised cortex and a single band of similar size by immunoprecipitation (110 KD). 5-3A (a human-restricted linear-reacting McAb) binds bands of 20-200 KD (major band 58 KD) in CS-GBM. In conclusion, distinct species-restricted and more broadly disposed glomerular epitopes are definable in man by McAbs and are potential targets for humoral injury. Purification of these antigens will allow assay for circulating putative nephritogenic auto-antibody and potentially, McAbs may be useful in screening urine for evidence of occult structural renal disease.

  7. Fatty acid binding protein 4 in circulating leucocytes reflects atherosclerotic lesion progression in Apoe−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Agardh, Hanna E; Gertow, Karl; Salvado, Dolores M; Hermansson, Andreas; Puijvelde, Gijs H; Hansson, Göran K; n-Berne, Gabrielle Paulsso; Gabrielsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of novel biomarkers for atherosclerosis is important to aid in early diagnosis of pre-symptomatic patients at high risk of cardiovascular events. The aim of the present study was therefore to identify potential biomarkers in circulating cells reflecting atherosclerotic lesion progression in the vessel wall. We performed gene arrays on circulating leucocytes from atherosclerosis prone Apoe−/− mice with increasing ages, using C57BL/6 mice as healthy controls. We identified fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) mRNA to be augmented in mice with established disease compared with young Apoe−/− or controls. Interestingly, the transcript FABP4 correlated significantly with lesion size, further supporting a disease associated increase. In addition, validation of our finding on protein level showed augmented FABP4 in circulating leucocytes whereas, importantly, no change could be observed in plasma. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated FABP4 to be present mainly in circulating neutrophils and to some extent in monocytes. Moreover, FABP4-positive neutrophils and macrophages could be identified in the subintimal space in the plaque. Using human circulating leucocytes, we confirmed the presence of FABP4 protein in neutrophils and monocytes. In conclusion, we have showed that cellular levels of FABP4 in circulating leucocytes associate with lesion development in the experimental Apoe−/− model. The increased expression is primarily localized to neutrophils, but also in monocytes. We have identified FABP4 in leucocytes as a potential and easy accessible biomarker of atherosclerosis which could be of future clinical relevance. PMID:23387955

  8. Association of proinflammatory cytokines and islet resident leucocytes with islet dysfunction in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Matthew J; Hallinger, Daniel; Garcia, Eden; Machida, Yui; Chakrabarti, Swarup; Nadler, Jerry; Galkina, Elena V; Imai, Yumi

    2014-03-01

    Chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes is proposed to affect islets as well as insulin target organs. However, the nature of islet inflammation and its effects on islet function in type 2 diabetes remain unclear. Moreover, the immune cell profiles of human islets in healthy and type 2 diabetic conditions are undefined. We aimed to investigate the correlation between proinflammatory cytokine expression, islet leucocyte composition and insulin secretion in type 2 diabetic human islets. Human islets from organ donors with or without type 2 diabetes were studied. First and second phases of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were determined by perifusion. The expression of inflammatory markers was obtained by quantitative PCR. Immune cells within human islets were analysed by FACS. Type 2 diabetic islets, especially those without first-phase insulin secretion, displayed higher CCL2 and TNFa expression than healthy islets. CD45(+) leucocytes were elevated in type 2 diabetic islets, to a greater extent in moderately functional type 2 diabetic islets compared with poorly functional ones, and corresponded with elevated ALOX12 but not with CCL2 or TNFa expression. T and B lymphocytes and CD11c(+) cells were detectable within both non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic islet leucocytes. Importantly, the proportion of B cells was significantly elevated within type 2 diabetic islets. Elevated total islet leucocyte content and proinflammatory mediators correlated with islet dysfunction, suggesting that heterogeneous insulitis occurs during the development of islet dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. In addition, the altered B cell content highlights a potential role for the adaptive immune response in islet dysfunction.

  9. Association of proinflammatory cytokines and islet resident leucocytes with islet dysfunction in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Matthew J.; Hallinger, Daniel; Garcia, Eden; Machida, Yui; Chakrabarti, Swarup; Nadler, Jerry; Galkina, Elena V.; Imai, Yumi

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes is proposed to affect islets as well as insulin target organs. However, the nature of islet inflammation and its effects on islet function in type 2 diabetes remain unclear. Moreover, the immune cell profiles of human islets in healthy and type 2 diabetic conditions are undefined. We aimed to investigate the correlation between proinflammatory cytokine expression, islet leucocyte composition and insulin secretion in type 2 diabetic human islets. Methods Human islets from organ donors with or without type 2 diabetes were studied. First and second phases of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were determined by perifusion. The expression of inflammatory markers was obtained by quantitative PCR. Immune cells within human islets were analysed by FACS. Results Type 2 diabetic islets, especially those without first-phase insulin secretion, displayed higher CCL2 and TNFa expression than healthy islets. CD45+ leucocytes were elevated in type 2 diabetic islets, to a greater extent in moderately functional type 2 diabetic islets compared with poorly functional ones, and corresponded with elevated ALOX12 but not with CCL2 or TNFa expression. T and B lymphocytes and CD11c+ cells were detectable within both non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic islet leucocytes. Importantly, the proportion of B cells was significantly elevated within type 2 diabetic islets. Conclusions/interpretation Elevated total islet leucocyte content and proinflammatory mediators correlated with islet dysfunction, suggesting that heterogeneous insulitis occurs during the development of islet dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. In addition, the altered B cell content highlights a potential role for the adaptive immune response in islet dysfunction. PMID:24429578

  10. Production kinetics and immunochemical properties of carcinoembryonic antigen and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen synthesized by various human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, S; Kuroki, M; Kuroki, M; Koga, Y; Matsuoka, Y

    1986-05-01

    The production kinetics and immunochemical properties of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) in various human tumor cell lines were studied. By radioimmunoassay (RIA), five CEA-producing tumor cell lines tested--2 derived from colonic (M7609 and CCK-81), one from pancreatic (QGP-1) and 2 from lung (HLC-1 and KNS-62) carcinomas--were found to produce NCA simultaneously. The cellular contents of CEA and NCA and the amounts of both antigens released into the culture medium were highly variable among the cell lines. It was a distinct contrast that one cell line (CCK-81) released very large amounts of CEA and NCA into the medium while having the smallest amounts of both antigens in the cells, whereas the others contained much larger amounts of the antigens in the cells as compared with the amounts released into the medium. For most of the cell lines, the production of both CEA and NCA increased in the stationary phase of growth as compared with the exponential phase. The production kinetics of both CEA and NCA appeared to be parallel with each other in all the cell lines, though the amount ratio of CEA to NCA produced was variable. By means of a double immunodiffusion test with polyclonal antibodies, antigenic uniformity with no unique organ-specificity was confirmed for all the CEA preparations from spent media of the cell lines, though some differences in the sugar moiety of CEA were detected by RIA using monoclonal antibodies. No antigenic differences among NCA preparations were observed. Upon sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), molecular heterogeneity was observed among CEA or NCA preparations isolated from cell lysates.

  11. Targeted PLGA nano- but not microparticles specifically deliver antigen to human dendritic cells via DC-SIGN in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Luis J; Tacken, Paul J; Fokkink, Remco; Joosten, Ben; Stuart, Martien Cohen; Albericio, Fernando; Torensma, Ruurd; Figdor, Carl G

    2010-06-01

    Vaccine efficacy is strongly enhanced by antibody-mediated targeting of vaccine components to dendritic cells (DCs), which are professional antigen presenting cells. However, the options to link antigens or immune modulators to a single antibody are limited. Here, we engineered versatile nano- and micrometer-sized slow-release vaccine delivery vehicles that specifically target human DCs to overcome this limitation. The nano- (NPs) and microparticles (MPs), with diameters of approximately 200nm and 2microm, consist of a PLGA core coated with a polyethylene glycol-lipid layer carrying the humanized targeting antibody hD1, which does not interact with complement or Fc receptors and recognizes the human C-type lectin receptor DC-SIGN on DCs. We studied how these particles interact with human DCs and blood cells, as well as the kinetics of PLGA-encapsulated antigen degradation within DCs. Encapsulation of antigen resulted in almost 38% degradation for both NPs and MPs 6days after particle ingestion by DCs, compared to 94% when nonencapsulated, soluble antigen was used. In contrast to the MPs, which were taken up rather nonspecifically, the NPs effectively targeted human DCs. Consequently, targeted delivery only improved antigen presentation of NPs and induced antigen-dependent T cell responses at 10-100 fold lower concentrations than nontargeted NPs. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Schistosome egg antigens elicit a proinflammatory response by trophoblast cells of the human placenta.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Emily A; Kurtis, Jonathan D; Acosta, Luz; Gundogan, Fusun; Sharma, Surendra; Pond-Tor, Sunthorn; Wu, Hai-Wei; Friedman, Jennifer F

    2013-03-01

    Schistosomiasis affects nearly 40 million women of reproductive age. Many of these women are infected while pregnant and lactating. Several studies have demonstrated transplacental trafficking of schistosome antigens; however, little is known regarding how these antigens affect the developing fetus and placenta. To evaluate the impact of schistosomiasis on trophoblasts of the human placenta, we isolated primary trophoblast cells from healthy placentas delivered at term. These trophoblasts were placed in culture and treated with Schistosoma japonicum soluble egg antigens (SEA) or plasma from S. japonicum-infected pregnant women. Outcomes measured included cytokine production and activation of signal transduction pathways. Treatment of primary human trophoblast cells with SEA resulted in upregulation of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-8 and the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α). Cytokine production in response to SEA was dose dependent and reminiscent of production in response to other proinflammatory stimuli, such as Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 agonists. In addition, the signaling pathways extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK), p38, and NF-κB were all activated by SEA in primary trophoblasts. These effects appeared to be mediated through both carbohydrate and protein epitopes of SEA. Finally, primary trophoblasts cocultured with plasma from S. japonicum-infected pregnant women produced increased levels of IL-8 compared to trophoblasts cocultured with plasma from uninfected pregnant women. We report here a direct impact of SEA on primary human trophoblast cells, which are critical for many aspects of a healthy pregnancy. Our data indicate that schistosome antigens can activate proinflammatory responses in trophoblasts, which might compromise maternal-fetal health in pregnancies complicated by schistosomiasis.

  13. Prediction and conformation by synthesis of two antigenic sites in human haemoglobin by extrapolation from the known antigenic structure of sperm-whale myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Kazim, A L; Atassi, M Z

    1977-10-01

    The complete antigenic structure of sperm-whale myoglobin was previously determined in our laboratory. By structural analogy with myoglobin, two regions in human haemoglobin were predicted to comprise antigenic sites. One region was on the alpha-chain [alpha-(15-23)] and the other on the beta-chain [beta-(16-23)]. These two regions were synthesized, purified and characterized, and their immunochemistry was studied. Each peptide was able specifically to bind considerable amounts of haemoglobin antibodies. In a set of homologous proteins, barring any drastic conformational or electrostatic inductive effects exerted by the substitutions, and allowing for obstruction due to subunit interaction, the determination of the antigenic structure of one protein may serve as a useful starting model for the others.

  14. The polyphosphoinositide content of the leucocyte, erythrocyte and macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Wieneke, Antonnette A.; Woodin, A. M.

    1967-01-01

    1. The polyphosphoinositide content of macrophages and the cell membranes of leucocytes and erythrocytes was determined by an extension of the `acid-hydrolysis' procedure of Dawson & Eichberg (1965). The estimation was controlled by adding a little highly radioactive polyphosphoinositide to the tissue extracts before fractionation. Several standard methods for determining polyphosphoinositides gave low recoveries when applied to leucocytes, and it is suggested that these cells contain materials that form complexes with the polyphosphoinositides and interfere with the assay. 2. The method for the preparation of leucocyte cell surface membranes has been modified. PMID:16742528

  15. Circulating leucocytes perpetuate stroke-induced aortic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Asano, Shinichi; O'Connell, Grant C; Lemaster, Kent C; DeVallance, Evan R; Branyan, Kayla W; Simpkins, James W; Frisbee, Jefferson C; Barr, Taura L; Chantler, Paul D

    2017-07-24

    What is the central question of this study? Does a stroke event influence aortic endothelial function; and what is the role of peripheral circulating leucocytes in stroke on the vascular reactivity of the aorta? What is the main finding and its importance? In vitro co-culture experiments demonstrated that aortic endothelium-dependent relaxation was impaired when rat aortic rings were co-cultured with leucocytes stimulated with serum from stroke patients. Impaired vascular reactivity was not observed in aortic rings without leucocytes stimulated with serum from stroke patients or age-matched control patients with or without leucocytes. These data suggest that leucocyte-dependent altered aortic endothelium-dependent relaxation with stroke and the systemic consequences of stroke on vascular inflammation may occur in the aorta. Post-stroke inflammation has been linked to poor stroke outcomes. The vascular endothelium senses and responds to circulating factors, in particular inflammatory cytokines. Although stroke-associated local cerebrovascular dysfunction is well reported, the effects of a stroke on conduit artery function are not fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that serum from stroke patients triggers leucocyte-dependent aortic endothelial dysfunction that is associated with elevated concentrations of cytokines. Total leucocytes were isolated from healthy individuals, and the cells were incubated in serum from control subjects or stroke patients for 6 h. The quantity of cytokines in media was determined using an immunoassay. Vascular reactivity was determined by the rat aortic rings that were co-cultured with or without leucocytes and stimulated with serum samples from control subjects or stroke patients. Endothelium-dependent dilatation was significantly impaired in aortic rings co-cultured with leucocytes plus serum from stroke patients (50 ± 30 versus 85 ± 13%, P < 0.05) versus serum from control subjects. In contrast, no difference was

  16. Detection of a human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle antigenically related to HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garry, R. F.; Fermin, C. D.; Hart, D. J.; Alexander, S. S.; Donehower, L. A.; Luo-Zhang, H.

    1990-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes. The loss of salivary and lacrimal gland function is accompanied by lymphocytic infiltration. Because similar symptoms and glandular pathology are observed in certain persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a search was initiated for a possible retroviral etiology in this syndrome. A human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle that is antigenically related to HIV was detected in lymphoblastoid cells exposed to homogenates of salivary tissue from patients with Sjogren's syndrome. Comparison of this retroviral particle to HIV indicates that they are distinguishable by several ultrastructural, physical, and enzymatic criteria.

  17. Detection of a human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle antigenically related to HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garry, R. F.; Fermin, C. D.; Hart, D. J.; Alexander, S. S.; Donehower, L. A.; Luo-Zhang, H.

    1990-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes. The loss of salivary and lacrimal gland function is accompanied by lymphocytic infiltration. Because similar symptoms and glandular pathology are observed in certain persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a search was initiated for a possible retroviral etiology in this syndrome. A human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle that is antigenically related to HIV was detected in lymphoblastoid cells exposed to homogenates of salivary tissue from patients with Sjogren's syndrome. Comparison of this retroviral particle to HIV indicates that they are distinguishable by several ultrastructural, physical, and enzymatic criteria.

  18. Antigenic relationship between the animal and human pathogen Pythium insidiosum and nonpathogenic Pythium species.

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, L; Kaufman, L; Standard, P

    1987-01-01

    Identification of the newly named pathogenic oomycete Pythium insidiosum and its differentiation from other Pythium species by morphologic criteria alone can be difficult and time-consuming. Antigenic analysis by fluorescent-antibody and immunodiffusion precipitin techniques demonstrated that the P. insidiosum isolates that cause pythiosis in dogs, horses, and humans are identical and that they were distinguishable from other Pythium species by these means. The immunologic data agreed with the morphologic data. This indicated that the animal and human isolates belonged to a single species, P. insidiosum. Fluorescent-antibody and immunodiffusion reagents were developed for the specific identification of P. insidiosum. PMID:3121666

  19. Generation of Large Numbers of Antigen-Expressing Human Dendritic Cells Using CD14-ML Technology

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Yuya; Haruta, Miwa; Tomita, Yusuke; Matsumura, Keiko; Ikeda, Tokunori; Yuno, Akira; Hirayama, Masatoshi; Nakayama, Hideki; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported a method to expand human monocytes through lentivirus-mediated introduction of cMYC and BMI1, and we named the monocyte-derived proliferating cells, CD14-ML. CD14-ML differentiated into functional DC (CD14-ML-DC) upon addition of IL-4, resulting in the generation of a large number of DC. One drawback of this method was the extensive donor-dependent variation in proliferation efficiency. In the current study, we found that introduction of BCL2 or LYL1 along with cMYC and BMI1 was beneficial. Using the improved method, we obtained CD14-ML from all samples, regardless of whether the donors were healthy individuals or cancer patients. In vitro stimulation of peripheral blood T cells with CD14-ML-DC that were loaded with cancer antigen-derived peptides led to the establishment of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lines that recognized the peptides. Since CD14-ML was propagated for more than 1 month, we could readily conduct genetic modification experiments. To generate CD14-ML-DC that expressed antigenic proteins, we introduced lentiviral antigen-expression vectors and subjected the cells to 2 weeks of culture for drug-selection and expansion. The resulting antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC successfully induced CD8+ T cell lines that were reactive to CMVpp65 or MART1/MelanA, suggesting an application in vaccination therapy. Thus, this improved method enables the generation of a sufficient number of DC for vaccination therapy from a small amount of peripheral blood from cancer patients. Information on T cell epitopes is not necessary in vaccination with cancer antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC; therefore, all patients, irrespective of HLA type, will benefit from anti-cancer therapy based on this technology. PMID:27050553

  20. Glomerular Autoimmune Multicomponents of Human Lupus Nephritis In Vivo (2): Planted Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Galetti, Maricla; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Bonanni, Alice; Radice, Antonella; Tincani, Angela; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Murtas, Corrado; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Brunini, Francesca; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Barbano, Giancarlo; Piaggio, Giorgio; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Scolari, Francesco; Candiano, Giovanni; Martini, Alberto; Allegri, Landino

    2015-01-01

    Glomerular planted antigens (histones, DNA, and C1q) are potential targets of autoimmunity in lupus nephritis (LN). However, the characterization of these antigens in human glomeruli in vivo remains inconsistent. We eluted glomerular autoantibodies recognizing planted antigens from laser-microdissected renal biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN. Prevalent antibody isotypes were defined, levels were determined, and glomerular colocalization was investigated. Renal and circulating antibodies were matched, and serum levels were compared in 104 patients with LN, 84 patients with SLE without LN, and 50 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Autoantibodies against podocyte antigens (anti–α-enolase/antiannexin AI) were also investigated. IgG2 autoantibodies against DNA, histones (H2A, H3, and H4), and C1q were detected in 50%, 55%, and 70% of biopsy samples, respectively. Anti-DNA IgG3 was the unique non-IgG2 anti-DNA deposit, and anti-C1q IgG4 was mainly detected in subepithelial membranous deposits. Anti-H3, anti-DNA, and anti-C1q IgG2 autoantibodies were also prevalent in LN serum, which also contained IgG3 against the antigen panel and anti-C1q IgG4. Serum and glomerular levels of autoantibodies were not strictly associated. High serum levels of all autoantibodies detected, including anti–α-enolase and antiannexin AI, identified LN versus SLE and RA. Anti-H3 and anti–α-enolase IgG2 levels had the most remarkable increase in LN serum and represented a discriminating feature of LN in principal component analysis. The highest levels of these two autoantibodies were also associated with proteinuria>3.5 g/24 hours and creatinine>1.2 mg/dl. Our findings suggest that timely autoantibody characterization might allow outcome prediction and targeted therapies for patients with nephritis. PMID:25398787

  1. Glomerular Autoimmune Multicomponents of Human Lupus Nephritis In Vivo (2): Planted Antigens.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Galetti, Maricla; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Bonanni, Alice; Radice, Antonella; Tincani, Angela; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Murtas, Corrado; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Brunini, Francesca; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Barbano, Giancarlo; Piaggio, Giorgio; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Scolari, Francesco; Candiano, Giovanni; Martini, Alberto; Allegri, Landino; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2015-08-01

    Glomerular planted antigens (histones, DNA, and C1q) are potential targets of autoimmunity in lupus nephritis (LN). However, the characterization of these antigens in human glomeruli in vivo remains inconsistent. We eluted glomerular autoantibodies recognizing planted antigens from laser-microdissected renal biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN. Prevalent antibody isotypes were defined, levels were determined, and glomerular colocalization was investigated. Renal and circulating antibodies were matched, and serum levels were compared in 104 patients with LN, 84 patients with SLE without LN, and 50 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Autoantibodies against podocyte antigens (anti-α-enolase/antiannexin AI) were also investigated. IgG2 autoantibodies against DNA, histones (H2A, H3, and H4), and C1q were detected in 50%, 55%, and 70% of biopsy samples, respectively. Anti-DNA IgG3 was the unique non-IgG2 anti-DNA deposit, and anti-C1q IgG4 was mainly detected in subepithelial membranous deposits. Anti-H3, anti-DNA, and anti-C1q IgG2 autoantibodies were also prevalent in LN serum, which also contained IgG3 against the antigen panel and anti-C1q IgG4. Serum and glomerular levels of autoantibodies were not strictly associated. High serum levels of all autoantibodies detected, including anti-α-enolase and antiannexin AI, identified LN versus SLE and RA. Anti-H3 and anti-α-enolase IgG2 levels had the most remarkable increase in LN serum and represented a discriminating feature of LN in principal component analysis. The highest levels of these two autoantibodies were also associated with proteinuria>3.5 g/24 hours and creatinine>1.2 mg/dl. Our findings suggest that timely autoantibody characterization might allow outcome prediction and targeted therapies for patients with nephritis.

  2. Generation of Large Numbers of Antigen-Expressing Human Dendritic Cells Using CD14-ML Technology.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Yuya; Haruta, Miwa; Tomita, Yusuke; Matsumura, Keiko; Ikeda, Tokunori; Yuno, Akira; Hirayama, Masatoshi; Nakayama, Hideki; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported a method to expand human monocytes through lentivirus-mediated introduction of cMYC and BMI1, and we named the monocyte-derived proliferating cells, CD14-ML. CD14-ML differentiated into functional DC (CD14-ML-DC) upon addition of IL-4, resulting in the generation of a large number of DC. One drawback of this method was the extensive donor-dependent variation in proliferation efficiency. In the current study, we found that introduction of BCL2 or LYL1 along with cMYC and BMI1 was beneficial. Using the improved method, we obtained CD14-ML from all samples, regardless of whether the donors were healthy individuals or cancer patients. In vitro stimulation of peripheral blood T cells with CD14-ML-DC that were loaded with cancer antigen-derived peptides led to the establishment of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lines that recognized the peptides. Since CD14-ML was propagated for more than 1 month, we could readily conduct genetic modification experiments. To generate CD14-ML-DC that expressed antigenic proteins, we introduced lentiviral antigen-expression vectors and subjected the cells to 2 weeks of culture for drug-selection and expansion. The resulting antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC successfully induced CD8+ T cell lines that were reactive to CMVpp65 or MART1/MelanA, suggesting an application in vaccination therapy. Thus, this improved method enables the generation of a sufficient number of DC for vaccination therapy from a small amount of peripheral blood from cancer patients. Information on T cell epitopes is not necessary in vaccination with cancer antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC; therefore, all patients, irrespective of HLA type, will benefit from anti-cancer therapy based on this technology.

  3. Establishment of a cell line from leucocytes of a cow with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Adomaitiene, D; Tamosiunas, V; Mauricas, M; Surovas, V; Markevicius, A

    1983-07-01

    A cell line was established from blood leucocytes of a cow with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The leucocytes were cultured with conditioned medium (culture fluid of mouse cell line L). In vitro cell transformation was demonstrated by adaptation to permanent growth, modification of cell morphology, the alteration of cell surface phenotype, kinetic behaviour and the loss of the euploid stability of the cell karyotype. Ultrastructural studies showed rather a uniform cell pattern in a culture population heterogeneous for degree of cell vacuolization. A wide variation in the expression of surface markers in cells was demonstrated by E-, EA- and EAC-rosetting. In suspension culture the cell population was found to be sIg negative. Expression of leukemia-associated antigens by a fraction of the cultured cells was evidenced by a cytotoxic technique using complement and heterologous antisera against bovine leukemic lymphocytes, absorbed with normal lymphoid cells. Virus-like particles and BLV antigens were not identified. Culture cells failed to show spontaneous or antibody-dependent killer cytotoxicity. Comparison with blood lymphocytes of healthy and leukemic cattle was done. The established culture should be useful as a model for experimental immunology and oncology.

  4. A Killer Immunoglobulin - Like Receptor Gene - Content Haplotype and A Cognate Human Leukocyte Antigen Ligand are Associated with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Anthony; Westover, Jonna; Benson, Michael; Johnson, Randall; Dykes, Annelise

    2016-01-01

    The killing activity of natural killer cells is largely regulated by the binding of class I human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands to killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor proteins. The killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - complex contains genes that activate and others that inhibit the killing state of natural killer cells depending on the binding of specific human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands. It has been suggested in previous publications that activating human leukocyte antigen/killer - cell immunoglobulin - like receptor complexes are increased in people with autism. We present data, which suggests that an activating cB01/tA01 killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - content haplotype and the cognate ligand human leukocyte antigen - C1k that activates this haplotype is significantly increased in autism. This is an important observation suggesting that the interaction between two proteins encoded on different chromosomes increases natural killer cell killing in autism. PMID:27853655

  5. A Killer Immunoglobulin - Like Receptor Gene - Content Haplotype and A Cognate Human Leukocyte Antigen Ligand are Associated with Autism.

    PubMed

    Torres, Anthony; Westover, Jonna; Benson, Michael; Johnson, Randall; Dykes, Annelise

    2016-04-01

    The killing activity of natural killer cells is largely regulated by the binding of class I human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands to killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor proteins. The killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - complex contains genes that activate and others that inhibit the killing state of natural killer cells depending on the binding of specific human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands. It has been suggested in previous publications that activating human leukocyte antigen/killer - cell immunoglobulin - like receptor complexes are increased in people with autism. We present data, which suggests that an activating cB01/tA01 killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - content haplotype and the cognate ligand human leukocyte antigen - C1k that activates this haplotype is significantly increased in autism. This is an important observation suggesting that the interaction between two proteins encoded on different chromosomes increases natural killer cell killing in autism.

  6. An antigen chimera of poliovirus induces antibodies against human papillomavirus type 16.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, O; Cason, J; Burke, K L; Lunney, D; Gillen, A; Patel, D; McCance, D J; Almond, J W

    1990-01-01

    It has been established that the surface of poliovirus type 1 can be extensively modified to incorporate antigenic domains from other poliovirus serotypes and from unrelated viruses. The fact that the modified (chimeric) viruses exhibit dual antigenicity and immunogenicity led us to explore the possibility of using the Sabin vaccine strain of poliovirus type 1 as a vector for the presentation of antigenic domains from human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16), a virus associated with the development of cervical carcinoma. We report here the construction and characterization of a chimeric poliovirus containing a 16-residue sequence derived from the major capsid protein (L1) of HPV-16. This virus chimera stimulated the production in rabbits of antibodies which recognized the HPV-16-derived peptide and an L1 fusion protein synthesized in Escherichia coli and detected HPV-16 in human biopsy material by immunoperoxidase staining. The possibility that poliovirus-HPV chimeras could be used as vaccines against HPV-16 is discussed. Images PMID:2154604

  7. A Gene Encoding Antigenic Peptides of Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Recognized by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shichijo, Shigeki; Nakao, Masanobu; Imai, Yasuhisa; Takasu, Hideo; Kawamoto, Mayumi; Niiya, Fumihiko; Yang, Damu; Toh, Yuji; Yamana, Hideaki; Itoh, Kyogo

    1998-01-01

    Except for melanomas, tumor antigens recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are yet unidentified. We have identified a gene encoding antigenic peptides of human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) recognized by human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens (HLA)- A2601–restricted CTLs. This gene showed no similarity to known sequences, and encoded two (125- and 43-kilodalton [kD]) proteins. The 125-kD protein with the leucine zipper motif was expressed in the nucleus of the majority of proliferating cells tested, including normal and malignant cells. The 43-kD protein was expressed in the cytosol of most SCCs from various organs and half of lung adenocarcinomas, but was not expressed in other cancers nor in a panel of normal tissues. The three nonapeptides shared by the two proteins were recognized by the KE4 CTLs, and one of the peptides induced in vitro from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) the CTLs restricted to the autologous tumor cells. The 43-kD protein and this nonapeptide (KGSGKMKTE) may be useful for the specific immunotherapy of HLA-A2601+ epithelial cancer patients. PMID:9449708

  8. Rabbit cardiomyopathy associated with a virus antigenically related to human coronavirus strain 229E.

    PubMed Central

    Small, J. D.; Aurelian, L.; Squire, R. A.; Strandberg, J. D.; Melby, E. C.; Turner, T. B.; Newman, B.

    1979-01-01

    A new disease of rabbits is described. Following an acute febrile course, animals die or recover by the 11th day postinoculation. The characteristic pathologic finding is multifocal myocardial degeneration and necrosis. The disease can be transmitted by various routes with tissue filtrates or with infectious sera diluted to 10(-6) and passed through 0.1 micron filters. Virus particles with morphologic features characteristic of a coronavirus are present in infectious but not in normal rabbit serums. The antigen(s) in the infectious serums cross-reacts with the 229E and the OC43 strains of human coronavirus. Antigen cross-reacting with the 229E virus is detectable by immunofluorescent staining in frozen sections of heart tissue from sick but not from healthy animals. Animals surviving infection seroconvert to coronavirus specificity, as demonstrated by the presence in convalescent serums of antibody capable of reacting with the 339E virus. Susceptibility to infection has not been demonstrated in mice, hamsters, or guinea pigs, and the virus was not adapted for growth in tissue culture. It is uncertain whether the agent is a natural pathogen of rabbits or a coronavirus contaminant from another species, possibly human. The name rabbit infectious cardiomyopathy is suggested for this disease. Images Figure 8 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 7 PMID:222151

  9. Allopurinol reduces antigen-specific and polyclonal activation of human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Mazliah, Damián; Albareda, María C.; Alvarez, María G.; Lococo, Bruno; Bertocchi, Graciela L.; Petti, Marcos; Viotti, Rodolfo J.; Laucella, Susana A.

    2012-01-01

    Allopurinol is the most popular commercially available xanthine oxidase inhibitor and it is widely used for treatment of symptomatic hyperuricaemia, or gout. Although, several anti-inflammatory actions of allopurinol have been demonstrated in vivo and in vitro, there have been few studies on the action of allopurinol on T cells. In the current study, we have assessed the effect of allopurinol on antigen-specific and mitogen-driven activation and cytokine production in human T cells. Allopurinol markedly decreased the frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2-producing T cells, either after polyclonal or antigen-specific stimulation with Herpes Simplex virus 1, Influenza (Flu) virus, tetanus toxoid and Trypanosoma cruzi-derived antigens. Allopurinol attenuated CD69 upregulation after CD3 and CD28 engagement and significantly reduced the levels of spontaneous and mitogen-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species in T cells. The diminished T cell activation and cytokine production in the presence of allopurinol support a direct action of allopurinol on human T cells, offering a potential pharmacological tool for the management of cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23049532

  10. Monoclonal antibodies directed against human Rh antigens in tests with the red cells of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Socha, W W; Ruffie, J

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against Rh related antigens on human red cells often crossreact with the red cells of the highest subhuman primate species. Depending on specificity of antibody, the species tested, and technique used, these reactions can be either species-specific or type specific. In tests with chimpanzee red cells, some of the latter type reactions have specificities related to the R antigen of the R-C-E-F blood group system of chimpanzee; specificities of some others seem to be unrelated to any known chimpanzee blood groups. Monoclonal anti-D reagents that give uniformly positive reactions with human D-positive (common and rare types) red cells, display wide individual differences in tests with chimpanzee blood. This indicates that there are minute structural variations of antibody molecules from one monoclonal anti-D antibodies apparently have no bearing on recognition of the D combining site on the human red cells, but come into play when in contact with chimpanzee rbcs. Some of the monoclonal antibodies directed against Rh and LW molecules are distinguished by unusually strong reactions with the red cells of the Old World monkeys (macaques and baboons), which is in contrast with negative or weak reactions of the same antibodies with the red cells of anthropoid apes and human bloods. One may recall, that polyclonal anti-Rh sera do not react with the blood of rhesus monkeys, the phenomenon that was the source of controversy surrounding the discovery of the rhesus factor of the human blood.

  11. A Micrograting Sensor for DNA Hybridization and Antibody Human Serum Albumin-Antigen Human Serum Albumin Interaction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chathirat, Naphat; Atthi, Nithi; Hruanun, Charndet; Poyai, Amporn; Leasen, Suthisa; Osotchan, Tanakorn; Hodak, Jose H.

    2011-01-01

    A biosensor structure comprising silicon nitride (Si3N4) micrograting arrays coated with a spin-on-glass (SOG) material was investigated. This grating structure was located on a silicon groove, which was etched by a deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process. The biosensor was used as a specific detector of DNA molecules and antibody-antigen interactions. In our DNA sensing experiments, the first step was the activation of the grating surface with amine functional groups, followed by attachment of a 23-base oligonucleotide probe layer for hybridization with a complementary target DNA. The sensing device was tested for detecting specific antigen/antibody interactions for human serum albumin (HSA) and antigen bovine serum albumin (BSA). The readout system consisted of a white light lamp that illuminated a small spot on the grating surface at normal incidence through a fiber optic probe with a spectrometer used to collect the reflected light through a second fiber. We show that these sensing devices have the capability to detect DNA as well as antigen-antibody binding for HSA. The detection sensitivity for HSA was better than that for DNA mainly owing to the larger size and concomitant refractive index changes upon binding to the sensor. We show that it is possible to quantify the amount of biomolecules bound to the grating surface by measuring the wavelength shift of the reflectance spectra upon exposure to the samples.

  12. Australia Antigen: Large-Scale Purification from Human Serum and Biochemical Studies of Its Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gerin, J. L.; Holland, P. V.; Purcell, R. H.

    1971-01-01

    Biophysical techniques are described for the large-scale isolation of Australia antigen (Au) from unit quantities of human serum by using the batch-type zonal centrifuge rotors. A three-step procedure involving isopycnic banding of the particle in CsCl density gradients and rate-zonal centrifugation on sucrose gradients resulted in a highly purified Au preparation which was used for biochemical studies of Au proteins and as immunizing antigen for the production of reagent antiserum in animals. The spherical form of Au, which was devoid of detectable nucleic acid, was composed of two major proteins (AuP1 and AuP2) and a minor protein (AuP3) of 26,000, 32,000, and 40,000 molecular weight, respectively, as determined by acrylamide gel electrophoresis. The significance of these findings to the possibility of Au subtypes is discussed. PMID:5105002

  13. Development of Lateral Flow Immunoassay for Antigen Detection in Human Angiostrongylus cantonensis Infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mu-Xin; Chen, Jia-Xu; Chen, Shao-Hong; Huang, Da-Na; Ai, Lin; Zhang, Ren-Li

    2016-06-01

    Angiostrongyliasis is difficult to be diagnosed for the reason that no ideal method can be used. Serologic tests require specific equipment and are not always available in poverty-stricken zone and are time-consuming. A lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) may be useful for angiostrongyliasis control. We established a LFIA for the diagnosis of angiostrongyliasis based on 2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against antigens of Angiostrongylus cantonensis adults. The sensitivity and specificity were 91.1% and 100% in LFIA, while those of commercial ELISA kit was 97.8% and 86.3%, respectively. Youden index was 0.91 in LFIA and 0.84 in commercial ELISA kit. LFIA showed detection limit of 1 ng/ml of A. cantonensis ES antigens. This LFIA was simple, rapid, highly sensitive and specific, which opened an alternative approach for the diagnosis of human angiostrongyliasis.

  14. Alloantibody Generation and Effector Function Following Sensitization to Human Leukocyte Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Michelle J.; Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2016-01-01

    Allorecognition is the activation of the adaptive immune system to foreign human leukocyte antigen (HLA) resulting in the generation of alloantibodies. Due to a high polymorphism, foreign HLA is recognized by the immune system following transplant, transfusion, or pregnancy resulting in the formation of the germinal center and the generation of long-lived alloantibody-producing memory B cells. Alloantibodies recognize antigenic epitopes displayed by the HLA molecule on the transplanted allograft and contribute to graft damage through multiple mechanisms, including (1) activation of the complement cascade resulting in the formation of the MAC complex and inflammatory anaphylatoxins, (2) transduction of intracellular signals leading to cytoskeletal rearrangement, growth, and proliferation of graft vasculature, and (3) immune cell infiltration into the allograft via FcγR interactions with the FC portion of the antibody. This review focuses on the generation of HLA alloantibody, routes of sensitization, alloantibody specificity, and mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft damage. PMID:26870045

  15. Human dendritic cell activation induced by a permannosylated dendron containing an antigenic GM3-lactone mimetic

    PubMed Central

    Rojo, Javier; Ballerini, Clara; Comito, Giuseppina; Nativi, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Summary Vaccination strategies based on dendritic cells (DCs) armed with specific tumor antigens have been widely exploited due the properties of these immune cells in coordinating an innate and adaptive response. Here, we describe the convergent synthesis of the bifunctional multivalent glycodendron 5, which contains nine residues of mannose for DC targeting and one residue of an immunogenic mimetic of a carbohydrate melanoma associated antigen. The immunological assays demonstrated that the glycodendron 5 is able to induce human immature DC activation in terms of a phenotype expression of co-stimulatory molecules expression and MHCII. Furthermore, DCs activated by the glycodendron 5 stimulate T lymphocytes to proliferate in a mixed lymphocytes reaction (MLR). PMID:24991284

  16. Development of Lateral Flow Immunoassay for Antigen Detection in Human Angiostrongylus cantonensis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mu-Xin; Chen, Jia-Xu; Chen, Shao-Hong; Huang, Da-Na; Ai, Lin; Zhang, Ren-Li

    2016-01-01

    Angiostrongyliasis is difficult to be diagnosed for the reason that no ideal method can be used. Serologic tests require specific equipment and are not always available in poverty-stricken zone and are time-consuming. A lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) may be useful for angiostrongyliasis control. We established a LFIA for the diagnosis of angiostrongyliasis based on 2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against antigens of Angiostrongylus cantonensis adults. The sensitivity and specificity were 91.1% and 100% in LFIA, while those of commercial ELISA kit was 97.8% and 86.3%, respectively. Youden index was 0.91 in LFIA and 0.84 in commercial ELISA kit. LFIA showed detection limit of 1 ng/ml of A. cantonensis ES antigens. This LFIA was simple, rapid, highly sensitive and specific, which opened an alternative approach for the diagnosis of human angiostrongyliasis. PMID:27417097

  17. Methodological aspects of anti-human leukocyte antigen antibody analysis in solid organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lobashevsky, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    Donor human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-specific antibodies (DSA) play an important role in solid organ transplantation. Preexisting IgG isotype DSA are considered a risk factor for antibody mediated rejection, graft failure or graft loss. The post-transplant development of DSA depends on multiple factors including immunogenicity of mismatched antigens, HLA class II typing of the recipient, cytokine gene polymorphisms, and cellular immunoregulatory mechanisms. De novo developed antibodies require special attention because not all DSA have equal clinical significance. Therefore, it is important for transplant clinicians and transplant immunologists to accurately characterize DSA. In this review, the contemporary immunological techniques for detection and characterization of anti-HLA antibodies and their pitfalls are described. PMID:25346888

  18. Antigenicity and Diagnostic Potential of Vaccine Candidates in Human Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shivali; Wan, Xianxiu; Zago, Maria P.; Martinez Sellers, Valena C.; Silva, Trevor S.; Assiah, Dadjah; Dhiman, Monisha; Nuñez, Sonia; Petersen, John R.; Vázquez-Chagoyán, Juan C.; Estrada-Franco, Jose G.; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2013-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in Latin America and an emerging infectious disease in the US and Europe. We have shown TcG1, TcG2, and TcG4 antigens elicit protective immunity to T. cruzi in mice and dogs. Herein, we investigated antigenicity of the recombinant proteins in humans to determine their potential utility for the development of next generation diagnostics for screening of T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease. Methods and Results Sera samples from inhabitants of the endemic areas of Argentina-Bolivia and Mexico-Guatemala were analyzed in 1st-phase for anti-T. cruzi antibody response by traditional serology tests; and in 2nd-phase for antibody response to the recombinant antigens (individually or mixed) by an ELISA. We noted similar antibody response to candidate antigens in sera samples from inhabitants of Argentina and Mexico (n = 175). The IgG antibodies to TcG1, TcG2, and TcG4 (individually) and TcGmix were present in 62–71%, 65–78% and 72–82%, and 89–93% of the subjects, respectively, identified to be seropositive by traditional serology. Recombinant TcG1- (93.6%), TcG2- (96%), TcG4- (94.6%) and TcGmix- (98%) based ELISA exhibited significantly higher specificity compared to that noted for T. cruzi trypomastigote-based ELISA (77.8%) in diagnosing T. cruzi-infection and avoiding cross-reactivity to Leishmania spp. No significant correlation was noted in the sera levels of antibody response and clinical severity of Chagas disease in seropositive subjects. Conclusions Three candidate antigens were recognized by antibody response in chagasic patients from two distinct study sites and expressed in diverse strains of the circulating parasites. A multiplex ELISA detecting antibody response to three antigens was highly sensitive and specific in diagnosing T. cruzi infection in humans, suggesting that a diagnostic kit based on TcG1, TcG2 and TcG4 recombinant proteins will be useful in diverse situations. PMID

  19. Proteins of Human Immunodeficiency Virus that Cross-React with Human ’Self’ Antigens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-20

    evaluated a number of experimental conditions in order to have high M22 antigen expression. We found that scrapie agent caused, by several fold, the...highest expression of M22 antigen ( scrapie > Theiler’s = EAE). Lastly, we evaluated different regions in the CNS of SWR/J and C57BI/6 mice for M22...analysis of the quality and GFAP expression in total RNA isolated from control (-) and scrapie -infected (+) brain regions in C57B1/6 mice. A large

  20. In vitro interactions between Neoparamoeba spp. and salmonid leucocytes; The effect of parasite sonicate on anterior kidney leucocyte function

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gross, K.; Alcorn, S.; Murray, A.; Morrison, R.; Nowak, B.

    2006-01-01

    Sonicated Neoparamoeba spp. (Nspp) did not affect the in vitro respiratory burst response of leucocytes isolated from Atlantic salmon Salmo salar, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha anterior kidneys (P > 0.05). Atlantic salmon and chinook salmon leucocytes pre-incubated with the parasites, however, responded to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation with a greater response compared to cells incubated with PMA on its own (P < 0.05). Sonicated Nspp was not chemo-attractive for anterior kidney leucocytes isolated from all three fish species. ?? 2006 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  1. Large-scale sequence and structural comparisons of human naive and antigen-experienced antibody repertoires

    PubMed Central

    DeKosky, Brandon J.; Lungu, Oana I.; Park, Daechan; Johnson, Erik L.; Charab, Wissam; Chrysostomou, Constantine; Kuroda, Daisuke; Ellington, Andrew D.; Ippolito, Gregory C.; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Georgiou, George

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating how antigen exposure and selection shape the human antibody repertoire is fundamental to our understanding of B-cell immunity. We sequenced the paired heavy- and light-chain variable regions (VH and VL, respectively) from large populations of single B cells combined with computational modeling of antibody structures to evaluate sequence and structural features of human antibody repertoires at unprecedented depth. Analysis of a dataset comprising 55,000 antibody clusters from CD19+CD20+CD27− IgM-naive B cells, >120,000 antibody clusters from CD19+CD20+CD27+ antigen–experienced B cells, and >2,000 RosettaAntibody-predicted structural models across three healthy donors led to a number of key findings: (i) VH and VL gene sequences pair in a combinatorial fashion without detectable pairing restrictions at the population level; (ii) certain VH:VL gene pairs were significantly enriched or depleted in the antigen-experienced repertoire relative to the naive repertoire; (iii) antigen selection increased antibody paratope net charge and solvent-accessible surface area; and (iv) public heavy-chain third complementarity-determining region (CDR-H3) antibodies in the antigen-experienced repertoire showed signs of convergent paired light-chain genetic signatures, including shared light-chain third complementarity-determining region (CDR-L3) amino acid sequences and/or Vκ,λ–Jκ,λ genes. The data reported here address several longstanding questions regarding antibody repertoire selection and development and provide a benchmark for future repertoire-scale analyses of antibody responses to vaccination and disease. PMID:27114511

  2. Human T helper cells specific for antigens of typhus group rickettsiae enhance natural killer cell activity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Carl, M; Martin, E E; Dasch, G A

    1986-01-01

    The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 5 individuals immune to typhus group rickettsiae and from 13 nonimmune individuals were stimulated in vitro for 7 days with typhus group rickettsial antigen (TGRA). At the end of day 7, lysis of the natural killer (NK)-susceptible target K562 by these PBMC was determined. As controls, PBMC from both groups of donors were cultured in vitro for 7 days without antigen or were freshly isolated, and lysis of the K562 target was determined. There was no significant difference between the level of NK activity in freshly isolated PBMC from immune and nonimmune donors. PBMC from immune donors which were stimulated with antigen for 7 days exhibited significantly greater NK activity than did the control population, which was cultured for 7 days without antigen. PBMC from immune donors which were stimulated with TGRA demonstrated significantly higher NK activity than the same PBMC stimulated with antigen derived from an antigenically unrelated rickettsia, Coxiella burnetii. There was no significant difference, however, in the level of NK activity of nonimmune antigen-stimulated PBMC compared with that of the same PBMC population cultured without antigen. Most of the antigen-stimulated NK activity was mediated by Leu-11-positive cells as determined by electronic cell sorting. The ability of TGRA to sustain the NK activity of PBMC from immune donors was abolished when the T4/Leu-3-positive population of lymphocytes was eliminated by positive or negative selection prior to antigen stimulation. The ability of TGRA to sustain the NK activity of PBMC from immune donors was also significantly decreased in the presence of antibodies against human interleukin-2. The results suggest that the activity of human NK cells can be sustained in vitro by antigen-specific T helper cells and that the effect of the T helper cell is mediated, at least in part, by interleukin-2. PMID:2945787

  3. Human dendritic cells adenovirally-engineered to express three defined tumor antigens promote broad adaptive and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Blalock, Leeann T; Landsberg, Jennifer; Messmer, Michelle; Shi, Jian; Pardee, Angela D; Haskell, Ronald; Vujanovic, Lazar; Kirkwood, John M; Butterfield, Lisa H

    2012-05-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy has shown a promising ability to promote anti-tumor immunity in vitro and in vivo. Many trials have tested single epitopes and single antigens to activate single T cell specificities, and often CD8(+) T cells only. We previously found that determinant spreading and breadth of antitumor immunity correlates with improved clinical response. Therefore, to promote activation and expansion of polyclonal, multiple antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells, as well as provide cognate help from antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells, we have created an adenovirus encoding three full length melanoma tumor antigens (tyrosinase, MART-1 and MAGE-A6, "AdVTMM"). We previously showed that adenovirus (AdV)-mediated antigen engineering of human DC is superior to peptide pulsing for T cell activation, and has positive biological effects on the DC, allowing for efficient activation of not only antigen-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells, but also NK cells. Here we describe the cloning and testing of "AdVTMM2," an E1/E3-deleted AdV encoding the three melanoma antigens. This novel three-antigen virus expresses mRNA and protein for all antigens, and AdVTMM-transduced DC activate both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells which recognize melanoma tumor cells more efficiently than single antigen AdV. Addition of physiological levels of interferon-α (IFNα) further amplifies melanoma antigen-specific T cell activation. NK cells are also activated, and show cytotoxic activity. Vaccination with multi-antigen engineered DC may provide for superior adaptive and innate immunity and ultimately, improved antitumor responses.

  4. Human dendritic cells adenovirally-engineered to express three defined tumor antigens promote broad adaptive and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, LeeAnn T.; Landsberg, Jennifer; Messmer, Michelle; Shi, Jian; Pardee, Angela D.; Haskell, Ronald; Vujanovic, Lazar; Kirkwood, John M.; Butterfield, Lisa H.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy has shown a promising ability to promote anti-tumor immunity in vitro and in vivo. Many trials have tested single epitopes and single antigens to activate single T cell specificities, and often CD8+ T cells only. We previously found that determinant spreading and breadth of antitumor immunity correlates with improved clinical response. Therefore, to promote activation and expansion of polyclonal, multiple antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, as well as provide cognate help from antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, we have created an adenovirus encoding three full length melanoma tumor antigens (tyrosinase, MART-1 and MAGE-A6, “AdVTMM”). We previously showed that adenovirus (AdV)-mediated antigen engineering of human DC is superior to peptide pulsing for T cell activation, and has positive biological effects on the DC, allowing for efficient activation of not only antigen-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, but also NK cells. Here we describe the cloning and testing of “AdVTMM2,” an E1/E3-deleted AdV encoding the three melanoma antigens. This novel three-antigen virus expresses mRNA and protein for all antigens, and AdVTMM-transduced DC activate both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells which recognize melanoma tumor cells more efficiently than single antigen AdV. Addition of physiological levels of interferon-α (IFNα) further amplifies melanoma antigen-specific T cell activation. NK cells are also activated, and show cytotoxic activity. Vaccination with multi-antigen engineered DC may provide for superior adaptive and innate immunity and ultimately, improved antitumor responses. PMID:22737604

  5. Characteristics of the transport of ascorbic acid into leucocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Raghoebar, M.; Huisman, J.A.M.; van den Berg, W.B.; van Ginneken, C.A.M.

    1987-02-02

    The degree and the mode of association of (/sup 14/C)-ascorbic acid with leucocytes are examined. The degree of association of ascorbic acid with polymorphonuclear leucocytes (1-3 %) is dependent on cell type, extracellular concentration of ascorbic acid, incubation temperature, intactness of the cells and the extracellular pH. All experiments are performed according to strict protocols as these compounds are labile in aqueous solutions. Further it is noticed that in all experiments an outward gradient of leucocyte endogenic ascorbic acid exists. The results suggest that the association process comprises at least one saturable pathway. The activation of polymorphonuclear leucocytes by phorbol myristate acetate increases the accumulation of ascorbic acid threefold. 30 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  6. Characterization of a simian hepatitis A virus (HAV): antigenic and genetic comparison with human HAV.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, E A; Jansen, R W; Lemon, S M

    1989-01-01

    PA21, a strain of hepatitis A virus (HAV) recovered from a naturally infected captive owl monkey, is indistinguishable from human HAV in polyclonal radioimmunoassays and cross-neutralization studies. However, cDNA-RNA hybridization has suggested a significant difference at the genomic level between PA21 and a reference human virus, HM175. Further characterization of this unique HAV was undertaken in an effort to determine the extent of genetic divergence from human HAV and its relation to the conserved antigenic structure of the virus. The close similarity between PA21 and HM175 antigens was confirmed with an extended panel of 18 neutralizing murine monoclonal antibodies: a reproducible difference in binding to the two viruses was detected with only one antibody (B5-B3). The nucleotide sequence of the P1 region of the PA21 genome had only 83.2% identity with HM175 virus, a difference approximately twice as great as that found between any two human strains. Most nucleotide changes were in third base positions, and the amino acid sequences of the capsid proteins were largely conserved. Amino acid replacements were clustered in the carboxy terminus of VP1 and the amino-terminal regions of VP2 and VP1. These data indicate that PA21 virus represents a unique genotype of HAV and suggest the existence of an ecologically isolated niche for HAV among feral owl monkeys. Images PMID:2552172

  7. Approach for Identifying Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-DR Bound Peptides from Scarce Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Heyder, Tina; Kohler, Maxie; Tarasova, Nataliya K; Haag, Sabrina; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Rivera, Natalia V; Sandin, Charlotta; Mia, Sohel; Malmström, Vivianne; Wheelock, Åsa M; Wahlström, Jan; Holmdahl, Rikard; Eklund, Anders; Zubarev, Roman A; Grunewald, Johan; Ytterberg, A Jimmy

    2016-09-01

    Immune-mediated diseases strongly associating with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles are likely linked to specific antigens. These antigens are presented to T cells in the form of peptides bound to HLA molecules on antigen presenting cells, e.g. dendritic cells, macrophages or B cells. The identification of HLA-DR-bound peptides presents a valuable tool to investigate the human immunopeptidome. The lung is likely a key player in the activation of potentially auto-aggressive T cells prior to entering target tissues and inducing autoimmune disease. This makes the lung of exceptional interest and presents an ideal paradigm to study the human immunopeptidome and to identify antigenic peptides.Our previous investigation of HLA-DR peptide presentation in the lung required high numbers of cells (800 × 10(6) bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells). Because BAL from healthy nonsmokers typically contains 10-15 × 10(6) cells, there is a need for a highly sensitive approach to study immunopeptides in the lungs of individual patients and controls.In this work, we analyzed the HLA-DR immunopeptidome in the lung by an optimized methodology to identify HLA-DR-bound peptides from low cell numbers. We used an Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) immortalized B cell line and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells obtained from patients with sarcoidosis, an inflammatory T cell driven disease mainly occurring in the lung. Specifically, membrane complexes were isolated prior to immunoprecipitation, eluted peptides were identified by nanoLC-MS/MS and processed using the in-house developed ClusterMHCII software. With the optimized procedure we were able to identify peptides from 10 × 10(6) cells, which on average correspond to 10.9 peptides/million cells in EBV-B cells and 9.4 peptides/million cells in BAL cells. This work presents an optimized approach designed to identify HLA-DR-bound peptides from low numbers of cells, enabling the investigation of the BAL immunopeptidome from individual patients

  8. Approach for Identifying Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-DR Bound Peptides from Scarce Clinical Samples *

    PubMed Central

    Heyder, Tina; Kohler, Maxie; Tarasova, Nataliya K.; Haag, Sabrina; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Rivera, Natalia V.; Sandin, Charlotta; Mia, Sohel; Malmström, Vivianne; Wheelock, Åsa M.; Wahlström, Jan; Holmdahl, Rikard; Eklund, Anders; Zubarev, Roman A.; Grunewald, Johan; Ytterberg, A. Jimmy

    2016-01-01

    Immune-mediated diseases strongly associating with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles are likely linked to specific antigens. These antigens are presented to T cells in the form of peptides bound to HLA molecules on antigen presenting cells, e.g. dendritic cells, macrophages or B cells. The identification of HLA-DR-bound peptides presents a valuable tool to investigate the human immunopeptidome. The lung is likely a key player in the activation of potentially auto-aggressive T cells prior to entering target tissues and inducing autoimmune disease. This makes the lung of exceptional interest and presents an ideal paradigm to study the human immunopeptidome and to identify antigenic peptides. Our previous investigation of HLA-DR peptide presentation in the lung required high numbers of cells (800 × 106 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells). Because BAL from healthy nonsmokers typically contains 10–15 × 106 cells, there is a need for a highly sensitive approach to study immunopeptides in the lungs of individual patients and controls. In this work, we analyzed the HLA-DR immunopeptidome in the lung by an optimized methodology to identify HLA-DR-bound peptides from low cell numbers. We used an Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) immortalized B cell line and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells obtained from patients with sarcoidosis, an inflammatory T cell driven disease mainly occurring in the lung. Specifically, membrane complexes were isolated prior to immunoprecipitation, eluted peptides were identified by nanoLC-MS/MS and processed using the in-house developed ClusterMHCII software. With the optimized procedure we were able to identify peptides from 10 × 106 cells, which on average correspond to 10.9 peptides/million cells in EBV-B cells and 9.4 peptides/million cells in BAL cells. This work presents an optimized approach designed to identify HLA-DR-bound peptides from low numbers of cells, enabling the investigation of the BAL immunopeptidome from individual patients and

  9. Changes in beta-adrenoceptors and leucocyte subpopulations after physical exercise in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Landmann, R; Portenier, M; Staehelin, M; Wesp, M; Box, R

    1988-03-01

    Seven healthy volunteers were subjected to standardized bicycle ergometry. Before and at the end of exercise, leucocyte and lymphocyte subset distribution was assessed by immunofluorescence labelling with monoclonal antibodies and the cytofluorograf. Competition binding studies were performed on mononuclear leucocytes with a fixed amount of the radioligand 125I-(-)-cyanopindolol (125I-CYP) and increasing concentrations of the hydrophilic ligand (-)4-(3-tertiary-butylamino-2-hydroxypropoxy)-benzimidazol-2-one hydrochloride (CGP-12177). Total numbers of beta-adrenoceptors per cell and the receptor-ligand affinities were then derived by computer analysis. In separate experiments with blood obtained from resting subjects, beta-adrenoceptor numbers of lymphocyte subsets, which had been sorted by the fluorescence activated cell sorter, were determined by saturation binding of 125I-CYP. During exercise there was a twofold increase in total leucocyte numbers. The ratio between monocytes (4%) and lymphocytes (55%) remained constant, but the composition of lymphocyte subsets had changed. A twofold increase was observed for the lymphocyte population carrying the Leu-7 and the CD8 antigens or only the Leu-7 antigen, whereas the number of B cells and CD4 positive T cells increased only slightly. The lymphocyte phenotype changes appeared after 3 min, reached a maximum at the end of ergometry and had disappeared 30 min after exercise. Exercise led to a doubling of the number of beta-adrenoceptors in unseparated mononuclear leucocytes from 240 +/- 46 to 535 +/- 190 sites per cell (SD, n = 6). beta-Adrenoceptor numbers were higher on sorted Leu-7 positive cells (KD 14 +/- 6 pmol/l, Bmax 1174 +/- 233 sites/cell) and on CD8 positive cells (KD 145 +/- 79 pmol/l, Bmax 1577 +/- 670 sites/cell) than on monocytes (KD 39 +/- 31 pmol/l, 647 +/- 91 sites/cell). Very low specific 125I-CYP binding was found on Leu-7 and CD8 negative cells (less than 0.2 pmol/l). Before exercise the

  10. Avian leucocyte counting using the hemocytometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dein, F.J.; Wilson, A.; Fischer, D.; Langenberg, P.

    1994-01-01

    Automated methods for counting leucocytes in avian blood are not available because of the presence of nucleated erythrocytes and thrombocytes. Therefore, total white blood cell counts are performed by hand using a hemocytometer. The Natt and Herrick and the Unopette methods are the most common stain and diluent preparations for this procedure. Replicate hemocytometer counts using these two methods were performed on blood from four birds of different species. Cells present in each square of the hemocytometer were counted. Counting cells in the corner, side, or center hemocytometer squares produced statistically equivalent results; counting four squares per chamber provided a result similar to that obtained by counting nine squares; and the Unopette method was more precise for hemocytometer counting than was the Natt and Herrick method. The Unopette method is easier to learn and perform but is an indirect process, utilizing the differential count from a stained smear. The Natt and Herrick method is a direct total count, but cell identification is more difficult.

  11. Isolation and characterization of a human sperm antigen gene h-Sp-1.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Ri-Ichiro; Komori, Shinji; Sakata, Kazuko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Sawai, Hideaki; Tsuji, Yoshiyuki; Koyama, Koji

    2003-08-01

    We isolated and characterized a human sperm antigen gene (h-Sp-1) from human testis complementary DNA using antiserum against the human sperm membrane. Northern blot analysis detected two transcripts (2.3 and 1.1 kb) of the h-Sp-1 gene. The 2.3-kb transcript is ubiquitous, whereas the 1.1-kb transcript is specific to the human testis with a high level of expression. Determination of the base sequence of h-Sp-1 showed a size of 2170 bp and 43.4% homology with human synaptophysin. The base sequence indicates a molecule consisting of 259 amino acids, with four hydrophilic and four hydrophobic regions. In order to further characterize the h-Sp-1 molecule, we synthesized the probable region of amino acids with high antigenicity based on the amino acid sequence (amino acid nos. 174-198) and immunized rabbits to prepare an antiserum. In our experimental model of fertilization between human sperm and zona pellucida-free hamster ova, partial inhibition of fertilization was observed. We were able to synthesize a large quantity of recombinant protein by inserting the h-Sp-1 gene into a baculovirus vector and infecting spodoptera frugiperda culture cells (sf9 insect cells). The synthesized protein had a molecular weight of 30 kDa. We then immunized Balb/c mice with this protein to prepare a monoclonal antibody (G3G9), which was used to localize the h-Sp-1 molecule in sperm and tissues (e.g. testis). The h-Sp-1 molecule was present in the cell membrane from the head to tail of human sperm. Staining of the testis and epididymis also showed h-Sp-1 to be present in spermatogonia, spermatocyte, sperm and epididymal duct epithelium. These findings suggest that the h-Sp-1 molecule is expressed in sperm and testes and plays a role in fertilization.

  12. Antigenic assessment of a recombinant human CD90 protein expressed in prokaryotic expression system.

    PubMed

    Yousefi-Rad, Narges; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Behdani, Mahdi; Moradi-Kalbolandi, Shima; Motamedi-Rad, Mahdieh; Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi

    2015-12-01

    Cluster of Differentiation 90 (CD90, Thy-1) has been proposed as one of the most important biomarkers in several cancer cells including cancer stem cells (CSCs). CD90 is considered as a potential normal stem cell and CSCs biomarker and also has been identified in lung cancer stem cells, hepatocellular carcinoma cells and high-grade gliomas. Using eukaryotic host systems involves complex procedures and frequently results in low protein yields. The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli is comparatively easier than eukaryotic host cells. The potential of large scale production of recombinant protein has made this system an economic production platform. In this study we expressed the extra-membrane domain of human CD90 (exCD90) antigen (Gln15-Cys130) in E. coli expression host cells. The epitope integrity of purified recombinant antigen was confirmed by antibody-antigen interaction using 5E10 anti-CD90 monoclonal antibody and binding study through ELISA and florescent staining of CD90(+) cells in a flow cytometry experiment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. An Integrated Peptide-Antigen Microarray on Plasmonic Gold Films for Sensitive Human Antibody Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Price, Jordan V.; Tabakman, Scott M.; Li, Yanguang; Gong, Ming; Hong, Guosong; Feng, Ju; Utz, Paul J.; Dai, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput screening for interactions of peptides with a variety of antibody targets could greatly facilitate proteomic analysis for epitope mapping, enzyme profiling, drug discovery and biomarker identification. Peptide microarrays are suited for such undertaking because of their high-throughput capability. However, existing peptide microarrays lack the sensitivity needed for detecting low abundance proteins or low affinity peptide-protein interactions. This work presents a new peptide microarray platform constructed on nanostructured plasmonic gold substrates capable of metal enhanced NIR fluorescence enhancement (NIR-FE) by hundreds of folds for screening peptide-antibody interactions with ultrahigh sensitivity. Further, an integrated histone peptide and whole antigen array is developed on the same plasmonic gold chip for profiling human antibodies in the sera of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, revealing that collectively a panel of biomarkers against unmodified and post-translationally modified histone peptides and several whole antigens allow more accurate differentiation of SLE patients from healthy individuals than profiling biomarkers against peptides or whole antigens alone. PMID:23923050

  14. Human leukocyte antigens in indigenous (mapuche) people in a regional renal transplantation program in chile.

    PubMed

    Droguett, M A; Oyarzún, M J; Alruiz, P; Jerez, V; Mezzano, S; Ardiles, L

    2005-10-01

    An active regional transplantation program established in the southern region of Chile has allowed the incorporation of ethnic minorities particularly Mapuche living in this geographic area in the development of a histocompatibility database. To identify possible differences in the human leukocyte (HLA) antigen distribution in Chilean Mapuche compared with non-Mapuche, we reviewed 442 HLA tissue-typing studies. Seventy-eight of 309 recipients (25%) and 18 of 133 donors (13%) were Mapuche. Among recipients, Mapuche people showed a significantly higher frequency of the HLA antigens, A28, B16, DR4, and DR8, and a lower one for A19, B15, and DR1 (P < .05) compared with non-Mapuche individuals. A particularly higher frequency of the haplotype A28, -B16, -DR4 was also evidenced in Mapuche. Besides, these recipients showed a higher frequency of the allele -DR4 when compared with Mapuche donors. A greater frequency of some histocompatibility antigens in patients with chronic renal disease might be attributed to allelic concentration due to a high index of endogamy, but a possible association with the development of progressive renal disease cannot be ignored, especially when a higher prevalence of DR4 was observed among Mapuche recipients.

  15. Comparative efficacy of antigen and antibody detection tests for human trichinellosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanoska, D.; Cuperlovic, K.; Gamble, H.R.; Murrell, K.D.

    1989-02-01

    Sera collected from patients with suspected or confirmed exposure to Trichinella spiralis were tested for circulating parasite antigens and antiparasite antibodies. Using an immunoradiometric assay, excretory--secretory antigens from muscle-stage larvae of T. spiralis were detected in the sera of 47% of 62 patients with clinical trichinellosis and 13% of 39 patients without clinical signs but suspected of exposure to infected meat. In comparison, antibodies were detected using an indirect immunofluorescent test in the circulation of 100% of the 62 patients with clinical trichinellosis and 46% of the 39 patients with suspected exposure. The presence of antibodies specific to excretory-secretory products of T. spiralis muscle larvae was confirmed in the majority of the samples tested by a monoclonal antibody-based competitive inhibition assay. These results indicate that antibody detection is a more sensitive diagnostic method for human trichinellosis, but that antigen detection might be a useful confirmatory test because it is a direct demonstration of parasite products in the circulation.

  16. Increased plasma soluble human leukocyte antigen-G in persistent wheezy infants.

    PubMed

    Tahan, Fulya; Eke Gungor, Hatice; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Saraymen, Berkay

    2017-05-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is a non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I antigen characterized by limited polymorphism in its coding region, unique tissue expression pattern in physiologic conditions and immunomodulatory properties. Recently, the level of soluble (s)HLA-G was found to be higher in atopic asthma and allergic rhinitis, but this remains to be clarified in wheezy infants. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate sHLA-G in wheezy infants. The subjects consisted of infants with persistent wheezing and positive modified asthma predictive index (mAPI; n = 30; persistent group) and those with transient wheezing and negative mAPI (n = 17; transient group). sHLA-G was measured in plasma using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Total immunoglobulin E (IgE) and eosinophil count were measured, and skin testing was performed with a battery of 13 antigens with appropriate positive and negative controls. sHLA-G was significantly higher in the persistent wheezing (positive mAPI) group compared with the transient wheezing (negative mAPI) group (P = 0.008). There was no significant difference in peripheral blood eosinophil count and total IgE between the groups. The increased sHLA-G in infants with persistent wheeze suggests that sHLA-G may be able to be used to distinguish persistent from transient wheeze. Further comprehensive studies are needed on this topic. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  17. Antigenic changes in human albumin caused by reactivity with the occupational allergen diphenylmethane diisocyanate

    PubMed Central

    Wisnewski, Adam V.; Liu, Jian; Redlich, Carrie A.

    2010-01-01

    Diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI), the chemical commonly used as a cross-linking agent in commercial polyurethane production, is a well-recognized cause of asthma. Reaction products between MDI and “self” proteins are hypothesized to act as antigens capable of inducing airway inflammation and asthma; however, such MDI antigens remain incompletely understood. We used a variety of analytical methods to characterize the range of MDI–albumin reaction products that form under physiological conditions. Sites of MDI conjugation on antigenic MDI–albumin products, as defined by serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) from MDI-exposed workers, were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The data identified 14 MDI conjugation sites (12 lysines and 2 asparagines) on human albumin and highlight reaction specificity for the second lysine in dilysine (KK) motifs, and this may be a common characteristic of “immune-sensitizing” chemicals. Several of the MDI conjugation sites are not conserved in albumin from other species, and this may suggest species differences in epitope specificity for self protein (albumin)–isocyanate conjugates. The study also describes new applications of contemporary proteomic methodology for characterizing and standardizing MDI–albumin conjugates destined for use in clinical research. PMID:20123080

  18. Gene frequencies of human neutrophil antigens in the Tunisian blood donors and Berbers.

    PubMed

    Abid, S; Zili, M; Bouzid, L; Kibech, R; Foudhaili, N; Joudi, K; Ren Regaya, Z; Abdennaji, B; Mrad, R; Boukef, K

    2001-08-01

    Human neutrophil antigens play an important role in provoking immune neutropenia and transfusion-reactions. The aim of this study was to determine granulocyte-specific antigens on the neutrophil Fc gamma receptor IIIb (Fc gamma RIIIb, CD16b), namely, the HNA-1a(NA1) and HNA-1b(NA2) antigens and their gene frequencies in Tunisian blood donors and Berbers. One hundred and ninety-nine unrelated healthy Tunisian blood donors and Berbers were typed for HNA-1a and HNA-1b(NA1 and NA2), using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP). In 24 granulocyte samples, the HNA-1a and HNA-1b phenotypes was additionally determined by the granulocyte immunofluorescence test (GIFT) and correlated with the genotyping results. A subsequent analysis of the genotyping study showed that, the HNA-1a and HNA-1b gene frequencies observed, were 0.342 and 0.658 for Berbers, and 0.311 and 0.668 for blood donors, respectively. In the genotyping study conducted, it was determined that the HNA-1a and HNA-1b gene frequencies observed in Tunisian blood donors and Berbers are similar to those previously reported in other white populations.

  19. Signal transduction-associated and cell activation-linked antigens expressed in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Valent, Peter; Ghannadan, Minoo; Hauswirth, Alexander W; Schernthaner, Gerit-Holger; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Arock, Michel

    2002-05-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are multifunctional hematopoietic effector cells that produce and release an array of biologically active mediator substances. Growth and functions of MCs are regulated by cytokines, other extracellular factors, surface and cytoplasmic receptors, oncogene products, and a complex network of signal transduction cascades. Key regulators of differentiation of MCs appear to be stem cell factor (SCF) and its tyrosine kinase receptor KIT (c-kit proto-oncogene product=CD117), downstream-acting elements, and the mi transcription factor (MITF). Signaling through KIT is negatively regulated by the signal regulatory protein (SIRP)-alpha (CD172a)-SHP-1-pathway that is disrupted in neoplastic MCs in MC proliferative disorders. Both KIT and FcepsilonRI are involved in MC activation and mediator release. Activation of MCs through FcepsilonRI is associated with increased expression of activation-linked membrane antigens as well as with signaling events involving Lyn and Syk kinases, the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-pathway, Ras pathway, and the phospholipase C-protein kinase C pathway. A similar network of signaling is found in SCF-activated MCs. The current article gives an overview on signal transduction-associated and activation-linked antigens expressed in human MCs. Wherever possible the functional implication of signaling pathways and antigen expression are discussed.

  20. Variable expression of activation-linked surface antigens on human mast cells in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Valent, P; Schernthaner, G H; Sperr, W R; Fritsch, G; Agis, H; Willheim, M; Bühring, H J; Orfao, A; Escribano, L

    2001-02-01

    Mast cells (MC) are multipotent effector cells of the immune system. They contain an array of biologically active mediator substances in their granules. MC also express a number of functionally important cell surface antigens, including stem cell factor receptor (SCFR=kit=CD117), high affinity IgER (FcepsilonRI), or CSaR (CD88). Respective ligands can induce or promote degranulation, migration, or cytokine production. Other integral surface molecules can mediate adhesion or cell aggregation. Recent data suggest that a number of critical molecules are variably expressed on the surface of human MC. In fact, depending on the environment (organ), stage of cell maturation, type of disease, and other factors, MC express variable amounts of activation-linked antigens (CD25, CD63, CD69, CD88), cell recognition molecules (CD2, CD11, CD18, CD50, CD54), or cytokine receptors. At present, however, little is known about the mechanisms and regulation of expression of such antigens. The present article gives an overview of MC phenotypes in health and disease, and attempts to provide explanations for the phenotypic variability of MC.

  1. Modulation of ABH histo-blood group antigen expression in normal and myasthenic human thymus.

    PubMed

    Sarafian, Victoria S; Marinova, Tsvetana T

    2006-10-01

    The role of ABH histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) in intercellular communication during normal and pathological processes is still uncertain. The present work investigates the expression of ABH HBGA in epithelial cells and lymphocytes in normal thymus, and characterizes the modulation of their immunoreactivity during myasthenic transformation. Immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy were applied on normal young thymus and on myasthenia gravis-associated thymomas and thymic hyperplasias. The Hassall's corpuscules in the thymus of young individuals were homogeneously stained for HBGA, while in hyperplastic glands only their central part was positive. Stromal epithelial cells permanently expressed HBGA in all tissue samples. In thymomas, mainly the lymphocytes in close proximity to antigen expressing epithelial cells were positive, while in the hyperplastic gland the most intensely stained lymphocytes were those within Hassall's corpuscules. Novel evidence for modulation of ABH antigen reactivity in normal and myasthenic human thymus is presented. It suggests that HBGA might participate in the regulation of the cross-talk in the thymocyte microenvironment throughout the ontogeny, as well as during the myasthenic transformation.

  2. A novel human B-lymphocyte antigen shared with lymphoid dendritic cells: characterization by monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Y; Takami, T; Kokai, Y; Yuasa, H; Fujimoto, J; Takei, T; Kikuchi, K

    1985-01-01

    A novel cell-surface antigen (L25) expressed on human B cells was identified using a B cell-reactive monoclonal antibody (TB1-4D5). This L25 antigen was expressed on most B-lineage cells but not other cell types including thymocytes, T cells, granulocytes and monocytes. Thus, L25 existed on the majority of normal B cells present in the blood and lymphoid tissues, on cultured cell lines derived from normal and malignant B cells, and on neoplastic cells isolated from patients with B cell-derived malignancies. Though L25 was persistently expressed on B cells until 7 days after their activation with pokeweed mitogen (PWM), neither normal nor neoplastic plasma cells expressed L25. Moreover, L25 was present on cultured as well as freshly isolated leukaemic cells with common acute lymphatic leukaemia (CALL) antigen, which have been thought to correspond to the early B-cell ontogeny. Besides pan-B cell reactivity of TB1-4D5 antibody, it apparently cross-reacted with so-called dendritic or interdigitating cells located in the thymic-dependent areas of peripheral lymphoid organs, which have been presumably ascribed to those associated with accessory-cell function. Functional studies showed that anti-L25 (TB1-4D5) antibody had inhibitory effect on induction of immunoglobulin synthesis by PWM-stimulated B cells. Images Fig. 2 PMID:3907905

  3. The effects of cyclic AMP on leucocyte inhibitory factor (LIF) production and on the inhibition of leucocyte migration.

    PubMed Central

    Lomnitzer, R; Rabson, A R; Koornhof, H J

    1976-01-01

    The effect of drugs known to increase intracellular levels of cyllic AMP were studied in the leucocyte migration ihibition system. It was found that cyclic AMP, dibutyryl cyclic AMP, theophyline, and prostaglandins E1 and E2 inhibited the production of leucocyte inhibiting factor by HA pulsed lymphocytes Inhibition only occured when the drugs were present during or after the PHA pulse. In addition it was found that these drugs enhanced the migration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN), in this system. Electrophoretic mobility of PMN cells was not altered by these drug indicating that the effect is not due to changes in membrane charge. However, granulocyte adhesion was reduced in the presence of these drug suggesting that adhesion is of primary importance in the migration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes out of capillary tubes. The findings show that cyclic AMP is important in modulating both cell-mediated and inflammatory responses. PMID:181189

  4. Oxidative bioactivation of abacavir in subcellular fractions of human antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Bell, Catherine C; Santoyo Castelazo, Anahi; Yang, Emma L; Maggs, James L; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Tugwood, Jonathan; O'Neill, Paul M; Naisbitt, Dean J; Park, B Kevin

    2013-07-15

    Human exposure to abacavir, a primary alcohol antiretroviral, is associated with the development of immunological drug reactions in individuals carrying the HLA risk allele B*57:01. Interaction of abacavir with antigen presenting cells results in cell activation through an Hsp70-mediated Toll-like receptor pathway and the provision of T-cell antigenic determinants. Abacavir's electrophilic aldehyde metabolites are potential precursors of neoantigens. Herein, we have used mass spectrometry to study the oxidative metabolism of abacavir in EBV-transformed human B-cells. RNA and protein were isolated from the cells and subjected to transcriptomic and mass spectrometric analyses to identify the redox enzymes expressed. Low levels of isomeric abacavir carboxylic acids were detected in subcellular fractions of EBV-transformed human B-cells incubated with abacavir. Metabolite formation was time-dependent but was not reduced by an inhibitor of Class I alcohol dehydrogenases. Relatively high levels of mRNA were detected for several redox enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase 5 (Class III), aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH3A2, ALDH6A1, and ALDH9A1), CYP1B1, CYP2R1, CYP7B1, and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 10. Over 2600 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. More than 1000 of these proteins exhibited catalytic activity, and 80 were oxido-reductases. This is the first proteomic inventory of enzymes in antigen presenting cells. However, neither of the hepatic alcohol dehydrogenases of Class I which metabolize abacavir in vitro was expressed at the protein level. Nevertheless the metabolic production of abacavir carboxylic acids by B-cell fractions implies abacavir-treated immune cells might be exposed to the drug's protein-reactive aldehyde metabolites in vivo.

  5. Antigenic characterization of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein precursor incorporated into nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Kristen C.; Castillo-Menendez, Luis; Ding, Haitao; Espy, Nicole; Zhang, Shijian; Kappes, John C.; Sodroski, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    The entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) into host cells is mediated by the viral envelope glycoproteins (Envs), which are derived by the proteolytic cleavage of a trimeric gp160 Env precursor. The mature Env trimer is a major target for entry inhibitors and vaccine-induced neutralizing antibodies. Env interstrain variability, conformational flexibility and heavy glycosylation contribute to evasion of the host immune response, and create challenges for structural characterization and vaccine development. Here we investigate variables associated with reconstitution of the HIV-1 Env precursor into nanodiscs, nanoscale lipid bilayer discs enclosed by membrane scaffolding proteins. We identified detergents, as well as lipids similar in composition to the viral lipidome, that allowed efficient formation of Env-nanodiscs (Env-NDs). Env-NDs were created with the full-length Env precursor and with an Env precursor with the majority of the cytoplasmic tail intact. The self-association of Env-NDs was decreased by glutaraldehyde crosslinking. The Env-NDs exhibited an antigenic profile expected for the HIV-1 Env precursor. Env-NDs were recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Of note, neutralizing antibody epitopes in the gp41 membrane-proximal external region and in the gp120:gp41 interface were well exposed on Env-NDs compared with Env expressed on cell surfaces. Most Env epitopes recognized by non-neutralizing antibodies were masked on the Env-NDs. This antigenic profile was stable for several days, exhibiting a considerably longer half-life than that of Env solubilized in detergents. Negative selection with weak neutralizing antibodies could be used to improve the antigenic profile of the Env-NDs. Finally, we show that lipid adjuvants can be incorporated into Env-NDs. These results indicate that Env-NDs represent a potentially useful platform for investigating the structural, functional and antigenic properties of the HIV-1 Env trimer in a membrane context

  6. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II alleles in Turkish patients with rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gündogdu, Fuat; Islamoglu, Yahya; Pirim, Ibrahim; Gurlertop, Yekta; Dogan, Hasan; Arslan, Sakir; Sevimli, Serdar; Aksakal, Enbiya; Senocak, Huseyin

    2007-05-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is often preceded by rheumatic fever (RF). The disease is a multisystem inflammatory condition that develops as a sequel to untreated throat infection by group A beta-hemolytic streptococci. Several studies have suggested that genetic susceptibility to RHD may be linked to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II alleles. The study aim was to investigate the association between RHD and the antigens HLA-A, -B, -C, -DR and -DQ profile in RHD patients in eastern Turkey. A case-control study was conducted which included 85 unrelated patients with RHD, and 85 control subjects. The diagnosis was supported by echocardiography and histories of RHD of those patients who underwent valve replacement. The association of class I and class II HLA antigens was examined in RHD and control subjects using a sequence-specific primer (SSP) method. The phenotypes HLA-B51, -Cw*4 and -DRB1*01 were encountered in significantly lower frequencies in patients with RHD compared to the control population (p <0.05, p <0.05, p <0.05, respectively). There was also a significant increase in antigen frequency of HLA-DQB1*08 in RHD patients compared to controls (p <0.005). Among the studied population, the results suggested that susceptibility to RHD was HLA-related, with HLA-DQB1*08 most likely influencing the occurrence of the condition. HLA-B51, -Cw*4 and -DRB1*01 appeared to be more common in control subjects.

  7. Differential Glioma-Associated Tumor Antigen Expression Profiles of Human Glioma Cells Grown in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lisheng; Cornforth, Andrew N.; Hoa, Neil T.; Delgado, Christina; Chiou, Shiun Kwei; Zhou, Yi Hong; Jadus, Martin R.

    2012-01-01

    Human U251 and D54 glioma cells were tested for expression of 25 glioma-associated tumor antigen precursor proteins (TAPP) under hypoxic (1% O2) or normoxic (21% O2) conditions. Hypoxic glioma cell lines increased their mRNA expression for nine TAPP (Aim2, Art-4, EphA2, EZH2, Fosl1, PTH-rP, Sox 11, Whsc2 and YKL-40), as assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time/polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Increased differences with three hypoxic-induced TAPP: EZH2, Whsc2 and YKL-40 were shown at the protein levels by fluorescent antibody staining and quantitative electrophoretic analysis. Two TAPP (MRP3 and Trp1) were down-regulated by hypoxia in glioma cell lines. Growing the glioma cells under hypoxia for 13 days, followed by returning them back to normoxic conditions for 7 days, and restored the original normoxic TAPP profile. Thus, hypoxia was an environmental factor that stimulated the transient expression of these antigens. Intracranial xenografts grown in nude mice derived from U251 cells that had been cultured under neurosphere stem cell conditions showed increased expression of Whsc2 or YKL-40, demonstrating that these in vitro properties of glioma also occur in vivo. Whsc2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes killed the hypoxic U251 glioma cells better than normoxic glioma cells. The antigens expressed by hypoxic tumor cells may be a better source of starting tumor material for loading dendritic cells for novel immunotherapy of glioma using tumor-associated antigens. PMID:22957023

  8. Differential glioma-associated tumor antigen expression profiles of human glioma cells grown in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ge, Lisheng; Cornforth, Andrew N; Hoa, Neil T; Delgado, Christina; Chiou, Shiun Kwei; Zhou, Yi Hong; Jadus, Martin R

    2012-01-01

    Human U251 and D54 glioma cells were tested for expression of 25 glioma-associated tumor antigen precursor proteins (TAPP) under hypoxic (1% O(2)) or normoxic (21% O(2)) conditions. Hypoxic glioma cell lines increased their mRNA expression for nine TAPP (Aim2, Art-4, EphA2, EZH2, Fosl1, PTH-rP, Sox 11, Whsc2 and YKL-40), as assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time/polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Increased differences with three hypoxic-induced TAPP: EZH2, Whsc2 and YKL-40 were shown at the protein levels by fluorescent antibody staining and quantitative electrophoretic analysis. Two TAPP (MRP3 and Trp1) were down-regulated by hypoxia in glioma cell lines. Growing the glioma cells under hypoxia for 13 days, followed by returning them back to normoxic conditions for 7 days, and restored the original normoxic TAPP profile. Thus, hypoxia was an environmental factor that stimulated the transient expression of these antigens. Intracranial xenografts grown in nude mice derived from U251 cells that had been cultured under neurosphere stem cell conditions showed increased expression of Whsc2 or YKL-40, demonstrating that these in vitro properties of glioma also occur in vivo. Whsc2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes killed the hypoxic U251 glioma cells better than normoxic glioma cells. The antigens expressed by hypoxic tumor cells may be a better source of starting tumor material for loading dendritic cells for novel immunotherapy of glioma using tumor-associated antigens.

  9. Immunization by blood-type antigen in human immunoglobulin products before ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Tokihiko; Ando, Tetsuo; Sato, Sumihiko; Kubota, Keiichi; Fuchinoue, Shohei; Teraoka, Satoshi

    2004-04-01

    A 29-year-old man wanted to receive an ABO-incompatible kidney transplant. His blood type was O, and the donor, his father, was A1. After endoscopic splenectomy performed before kidney transplantation, the recipient developed a high fever and leukocytosis, and he was treated with antibiotics and 5 g of human immunoglobulin products by intravenous infusion for 3 d. Soon after the infusions, his anti-blood type A antibody titer (anti-A titer) rose, and several sessions of plasma-exchange (PEX) and double-filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) failed to lower it. Three courses of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody were administered to suppress the antibody production more specifically, and the rituximab infusions and repeated PEX and DFPP session lowered the anti-A titer and enabled kidney transplantation. Mild humoral rejection was observed 16 d after transplantation, but the recipient's serum creatinine was 1.5 mg/dL when discharged from the hospital. The increased anti-A titer may have been due to immunization by blood-type A antigen, with the human immunoglobulin products given to the patient being the source of the antigen. Administration of human immunoglobulin products to recipients of ABO-incompatible kidney transplants should be avoided, because it may cause an unexpected increase in anti-blood-type antibody titer.

  10. Allele-Independent Turnover of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class Ia Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Prevosto, Claudia; Usmani, M. Farooq; McDonald, Sarah; Gumienny, Aleksandra M.; Key, Tim; Goodman, Reyna S.; Gaston, J. S. Hill; Deery, Michael J.; Busch, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) glycoproteins present cytosolic peptides to CD8+ T cells and regulate NK cell activity. Their heavy chains (HC) are expressed from up to three MHC gene loci (human leukocyte antigen [HLA]-A, -B, and -C in humans), whose extensive polymorphism maps predominantly to the antigen-binding groove, diversifying the bound peptide repertoire. Codominant expression of MHCI alleles is thus functionally critical, but how it is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the effect of polymorphism on the turnover rates of MHCI molecules in cell lines with functional MHCI peptide loading pathways and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs). Proteins were labeled biosynthetically with heavy water (2H2O), folded MHCI molecules immunoprecipitated, and tryptic digests analysed by mass spectrometry. MHCI-derived peptides were assigned to specific alleles and isotypes, and turnover rates quantified by 2H incorporation, after correcting for cell growth. MHCI turnover half-lives ranged from undetectable to a few hours, depending on cell type, activation state, donor, and MHCI isotype. However, in all settings, the turnover half-lives of alleles of the same isotype were similar. Thus, MHCI protein turnover rates appear to be allele-independent in normal human cells. We propose that this is an important feature enabling the normal function and codominant expression of MHCI alleles. PMID:27529174

  11. Establishment of a carcinoembryonic antigen-producing cell line from human pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kaku, M; Nishiyama, T; Yagawa, K; Abe, M

    1980-10-01

    A human pancreatic carcinoma cell line of islet cell origin (QGP-1) has been established and maintained for over two years. The parent tumor and the cultured cell line produce carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and there is no evidence of hormone secretion from the tumor cells. The epithelioid cells, which had migrated from rounded, irregular cell aggregates, grow as a confluent monolayer with piling up of cells in some areas, and have a population doubling time of 3.5 days. The modal chromosome number was 50. Exponentially growing cultures produce 76.3 ng of CEA/10(6) cells after 7 days. CEA production was confirmed by immuno-peroxidase staining.

  12. Appropriate clinical use of human leukocyte antigen typing for coeliac disease: an Australasian perspective.

    PubMed

    Tye-Din, J A; Cameron, D J S; Daveson, A J; Day, A S; Dellsperger, P; Hogan, C; Newnham, E D; Shepherd, S J; Steele, R H; Wienholt, L; Varney, M D

    2015-04-01

    The past decade has seen human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing emerge as a remarkably popular test for the diagnostic work-up of coeliac disease with high patient acceptance. Although limited in its positive predictive value for coeliac disease, the strong disease association with specific HLA genes imparts exceptional negative predictive value to HLA typing, enabling a negative result to exclude coeliac disease confidently. In response to mounting evidence that the clinical use and interpretation of HLA typing often deviates from best practice, this article outlines an evidence-based approach to guide clinically appropriate use of HLA typing, and establishes a reporting template for pathology providers to improve communication of results.

  13. Immunization of humans with polyribophosphate, the capsular antigen of Hemophilus influenzae, type b.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P; Peter, G; Johnston, R B; Wetterlow, L H; Smith, D H

    1972-01-01

    In human volunteers, single injections of purified polyribophosphate elicited antibodies detectable by passive hemagglutination and by serum bactericidal and opsonizing activities against viable Hemophilus influenzae, type b. All three activities rose by 2 wk to maximal levels, at which they remained for at least 6 months. Doses of 1 mug elicited antibody responses in nearly all recipients; higher doses of the antigen, however, produced larger increases in titer. Booster doses of 1 mug given at 6 months did not further increase the antibody titers. A tuberculin-like response was often observed at the site of injections given intradermally.

  14. Reverse vaccinology 2.0: Human immunology instructs vaccine antigen design

    PubMed Central

    Bottomley, Matthew J.; D’Oro, Ugo; Finco, Oretta; De Gregorio, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, vaccines have been developed by cultivating infectious agents and isolating the inactivated whole pathogen or some of its purified components. 20 years ago, reverse vaccinology enabled vaccine discovery and design based on information deriving from the sequence of microbial genomes rather than via the growth of pathogens. Today, the high throughput discovery of protective human antibodies, sequencing of the B cell repertoire, and the increasing structural characterization of protective antigens and epitopes provide the molecular and mechanistic understanding to drive the discovery of novel vaccines that were previously impossible. We are entering a “reverse vaccinology 2.0” era. PMID:27022144

  15. Killer Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells (KaAPC) for Efficient In Vitro Depletion of Human Antigen-specific T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Christian; Fleck, Martin; Schneck, Jonathan P.; Oelke, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Current treatment of T cell mediated autoimmune diseases relies mostly on strategies of global immunosuppression, which, in the long term, is accompanied by adverse side effects such as a reduced ability to control infections or malignancies. Therefore, new approaches need to be developed that target only the disease mediating cells and leave the remaining immune system intact. Over the past decade a variety of cell based immunotherapy strategies to modulate T cell mediated immune responses have been developed. Most of these approaches rely on tolerance-inducing antigen presenting cells (APC). However, in addition to being technically difficult and cumbersome, such cell-based approaches are highly sensitive to cytotoxic T cell responses, which limits their therapeutic capacity. Here we present a protocol for the generation of non-cellular killer artificial antigen presenting cells (KaAPC), which allows for the depletion of pathologic T cells while leaving the remaining immune system untouched and functional. KaAPC is an alternative solution to cellular immunotherapy which has potential for treating autoimmune diseases and allograft rejections by regulating undesirable T cell responses in an antigen specific fashion. PMID:25145915

  16. Inference of Genotype–Phenotype Relationships in the Antigenic Evolution of Human Influenza A (H3N2) Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Steinbrück, Lars; McHardy, Alice Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Distinguishing mutations that determine an organism's phenotype from (near-) neutral ‘hitchhikers’ is a fundamental challenge in genome research, and is relevant for numerous medical and biotechnological applications. For human influenza viruses, recognizing changes in the antigenic phenotype and a strains' capability to evade pre-existing host immunity is important for the production of efficient vaccines. We have developed a method for inferring ‘antigenic trees’ for the major viral surface protein hemagglutinin. In the antigenic tree, antigenic weights are assigned to all tree branches, which allows us to resolve the antigenic impact of the associated amino acid changes. Our technique predicted antigenic distances with comparable accuracy to antigenic cartography. Additionally, it identified both known and novel sites, and amino acid changes with antigenic impact in the evolution of influenza A (H3N2) viruses from 1968 to 2003. The technique can also be applied for inference of ‘phenotype trees’ and genotype–phenotype relationships from other types of pairwise phenotype distances. PMID:22532796

  17. Discrepancy Between Tumor Antigen Distribution and Radiolabeled Antibody Binding in a Nude Mouse Xenograft Model of Human Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Il; Paeng, Jin Chul; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kang, Keon Wook; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key

    2017-04-01

    Biodistribution of antibodies is vital to successful immunoscintigraphy/immunotherapy, and it is assumed to be similar to antigen distribution. We measured and compared the binding pattern of radiolabeled antibody to tissue antigen distribution in a nude mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. We transplanted 10(7) FEM-XII human melanoma cells into the right flank of five nude mice. For the control, we transplanted 5 × 10(6) LS174T human colon cancer cells into the left flank. Two weeks later, 10 μCi of (131)I-labeled melanoma-associated 96.5 monoclonal antibody (targeting p97 antigen) was intravenously injected. Three days later, we sacrificed the mice and evaluated 96.5 antibody binding and concentration in the tumors by ex vivo quantitative autoradiography (QAR). Two months later, we incubated adjacent tumor tissue slices in various concentrations of (125)I-labeled 96.5 MoAb and evaluated the distribution/concentration of p97 antigen by in vitro QAR. p97 antigen distribution was homogeneous in the tumors (total antigen concentration [Bmax] = 17.36-38.36 pmol/g). In contrast, radiolabeled 96.5 antibody binding was heterogenous between location within the tumor (estimated bound antigen concentration = 0.7-6.6 pmol/g). No quantifiable parameters were found to be related with radiolabeled antibody binding and tumor antigen distribution. Antibody-bound tumor antigen to total antigen ratios ranged between 2% and 38%. Heterogeneous features of target antibody binding were observed in contrast to relatively homogenous feature of tumor antigen. We did not identify any correlations between p97 antigen distribution and 96.5 antibody binding in melanoma tissue. Radiolabeled 96.5 antibody binding patterns within melanoma cannot be predicted based on p97 antigen distribution in the tumor, which needs to be further studied with several other methods and more subjects in the future.

  18. Identification of antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies using high-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju; Li, Ruihua; Liu, Kun; Li, Liangliang; Zai, Xiaodong; Chi, Xiangyang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-22

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire provides a large number of antibody variable region sequences that can be used to generate human monoclonal antibodies. However, current screening methods for identifying antigen-specific antibodies are inefficient. In the present study, we developed an antibody clone screening strategy based on clone dynamics and relative frequency, and used it to identify antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that at least 52% of putative positive immunoglobulin heavy chains composed antigen-specific antibodies. Combining information on dynamics and relative frequency improved identification of positive clones and elimination of negative clones. and increase the credibility of putative positive clones. Therefore the screening strategy could simplify the subsequent experimental screening and may facilitate the generation of antigen-specific antibodies.

  19. Human Immune Response Varies by the Degree of Relative Cryptococcal Antigen Shedding.

    PubMed

    Boulware, David R; von Hohenberg, Maximilian; Rolfes, Melissa A; Bahr, Nathan C; Rhein, Joshua; Akampurira, Andrew; Williams, Darlisha A; Taseera, Kabanda; Schutz, Charlotte; McDonald, Tami; Muzoora, Conrad; Meintjes, Graeme; Meya, David B; Nielsen, Kirsten; Huppler Hullsiek, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cryptococcal glucuronoxylomannan antigen (CrAg) titers generally correlate with quantitative fungal culture burden; however, correlation is not precise. Some patients have higher CrAg titers with lower fungal burdens and vice versa. We hypothesized that the relative discordancy between CrAg titer and quantitative culture burden reflects the relative degree of CrAg shedding by Cryptococcus neoformans and is associated with human immune responses. Methods.  One hundred ninety human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals with cryptococcal meningitis were enrolled in Uganda and South Africa. We compared initial CSF CrAg titers relative to their CSF quantitative cultures to determine low (n = 58), intermediate (n = 68), or high (n = 64) CrAg shedders. We compared cytokines measured by Luminex multiplex assay on cryopreserved CSF and 10-week mortality across shedding groups using linear and logistic regression and distribution of genotypes by multilocus sequence typing. Results.  The relative degree of CrAg shedding was positively associated with increasing CSF levels of the following: interleukin (IL)-6, IL-7, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α (each P < 0.01), which are all secreted by antigen-presenting cells and negatively associated with vascular endothelial growth factor (P = .01). In addition, IL-5, IL-13, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and macrophage chemotactic protein were decreased in low-CrAg shedders compared with intermediate shedders (each P ≤ .01). Type 1 T-helper cells (Th1) cytokine responses and 10-week mortality did not differ between the shedding groups. Cryptococcal genotypes were equally distributed across shedding groups. Conclusions.  Discordancy between CrAg shedding and expected shedding based on quantitative fungal burden is associated with detectable immunologic differences in CSF, primarily among secreted cytokines and chemokines produced by antigen-presenting cells and Th2.

  20. Antigen nature and complexity influence human antibody light chain usage and specificity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth; Shah, Hemangi; Muther, Jennifer J; Duke, Angie L; Haley, Kathleen; James, Judith A

    2016-05-27

    Human antibodies consist of a heavy chain and one of two possible light chains, kappa (κ) or lambda (λ). Here we tested how these two possible light chains influence the overall antibody response to polysaccharide and protein antigens by measuring light chain usage in human monoclonal antibodies from antibody secreting cells obtained following vaccination with Pneumovax23. Remarkably, we found that individuals displayed restricted light chain usage to certain serotypes and that lambda antibodies have different specificities and modes of cross-reactivity than kappa antibodies. Thus, at both the monoclonal (7 kappa, no lambda) and serum level