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Sample records for human leucocyte antigen

  1. Evidence for a human leucocyte antigen-DM-induced structural change in human leucocyte antigen-DObeta.

    PubMed

    Deshaies, Francis; Diallo, Djibril A; Fortin, Jean-Simon; O'Rourke, Helen M; Pezeshki, Abdul Mohammad; Bellemare-Pelletier, Angélique; Raby, Nicola; Bédard, Nathalie; Brunet, Alexandre; Denzin, Lisa K; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2009-07-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DO is a non-classical major histocompatibility complex class II molecule which modulates the function of HLA-DM and the loading of antigenic peptides on molecules such as HLA-DR. The bulk of HLA-DO associates with HLA-DM and this interaction is critical for HLA-DO egress from the endoplasmic reticulum. HLA-DM assists the early steps of HLA-DO maturation presumably through the stabilization of the interactions between the N-terminal regions of the alpha and beta chains. To evaluate a possible role for HLA-DM in influencing the conformation of HLA-DO, we made use of a monoclonal antibody, Mags.DO5, that was raised against HLA-DO/DM complexes. Using transfected cells expressing mismatched heterodimers between HLA-DR and -DO chains, we found that the epitope for Mags.DO5 is located on the DObeta chain and that Mags.DO5 reactivity was increased upon cotransfection with HLA-DM. Our results suggest that HLA-DM influences the folding of HLA-DO in the endoplasmic reticulum. A mutant HLA-DO showing reduced capacity for endoplasmic reticulum egress was better recognized by Mags.DO5 in the presence of HLA-DM. On the other hand, an HLA-DO mutant capable of endoplasmic reticulum egress on its own was efficiently recognized by Mags.DO5, irrespective of the presence of HLA-DM. Taken together, our results suggest that HLA-DM acts as a private chaperone, directly assisting the folding of HLA-DO to promote egress from the endoplasmic reticulum.

  2. Natural killer cells, killer immunoglobulin-like receptors and human leucocyte antigen class I in disease

    PubMed Central

    Boyton, R J; Altmann, D M

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer cells constitute a potent, rapid part of the innate immune response to infection or transformation, and also generate a link to priming of adaptive immunity. Their function can encompass direct cytotoxicity as well as the release of cytokines and chemokines. In humans, a major component of natural killer (NK) cell target recognition depends mainly on the surveillance of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). Different KIR can transmit inhibitory or activatory signals to the cell, and effector function is considered to result from the balance of these contributing signals. The regulation of NK cell responses depends on a number of variables: KIR genotype, HLA genotype, heterozygosity versus homozygosity for these, whether there is cognate recognition between the HLA and KIR products carried by an individual, clonal variation between individual NK cells in KIR expression, and the specific modulation of HLA expression by infection, transformation or peptide binding. Different HLA/KIR genotypes can impart different thresholds of activation to the NK cell repertoire and such genotypic variation has been found to confer altered risk in a number of diseases including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) susceptibility and progression, hepatitis C virus clearance, idiopathic bronchiectasis, autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:17521317

  3. Association of chronic fatigue syndrome with human leucocyte antigen class II alleles

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J; Fritz, E L; Kerr, J R; Cleare, A J; Wessely, S; Mattey, D L

    2005-01-01

    Background: A genetic component to the development of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) has been proposed, and a possible association between human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II antigens and chronic fatigue immune dysfunction has been shown in some, but not all, studies. Aims: To investigate the role of HLA class II antigens in CFS. Methods: Forty nine patients with CFS were genotyped for the HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1, and HLA-DQB1 alleles and the frequency of these alleles was compared with a control group comprising 102 normal individuals from the UK. All patients and controls were from the same region of England and, apart from two patients, were white. Results: Analysis by 2 × 2 contingency tables revealed an increased frequency of HLA-DQA1*01 alleles in patients with CFS (51.0% v 35%; odds ratio (OR), 1.93; p  =  0.008). HLA-DQB1*06 was also increased in the patients with CFS (30.2% v 20.0%; OR, 1.73, p  =  0.052). Only the association between HLA-DQA1*01 and CFS was significant in logistic regression models containing HLA-DQA1*01 and HLA-DRQB1*06, and this was independent of HLA-DRB1 alleles. There was a decreased expression of HLA-DRB1*11 in CFS, although this association disappeared after correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusions: CFS may be associated with HLA-DQA1*01, although a role for other genes in linkage disequilibrium cannot be ruled out. PMID:16049290

  4. Human leucocyte antigens: their association with end-stage renal disease in Saudi patients awaiting transplantation.

    PubMed

    Almogren, A; Shakoor, Z; Hamam, K D

    2012-01-01

    Most patients with chronic renal failure develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that requires renal transplantation. This study investigates the possible associations between human leucocyte antigen (HLA) Class I and Class II molecules with ESRD. Genotyping data (HLA) obtained between 2005 and 2009 on 235 unrelated Saudi patients (147 males, 88 females; mean age: 58 +/- 7 years) with ESRD awaiting renal transplantation were assessed retrospectively at the King Khalid University Hospital. Data were compared with the results on 60 normal, healthy, unrelated Saudi individuals (37 males and 23 females; mean age: 51 +/- 5 years). HLA Class I and Class II antigens were detected by lymphocytotoxicity and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method using DNA sequence-specific primers. Although present in small numbers, HLA Cw2 was found in significantly fewer patients (n = 11; 4.68%) compared to normal subjects (n = 9; 15%) and was found to confer protection against ESRD (P = 0.005; relative risk [RR]: 3.594, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.415-9.126). Among the HLA Class II antigens, HLA DQB1*03(8) was detected more frequently in the patient group (n = 65; 27.6%) than in the normal controls (n = 9; 15%) and was positively associated with risk of ESRD (P = 0.04; RR: 0.462, 95% CI: 0.215-0.991). No significant differences were observed between the two groups in respect of HLA-A2, HLA-B50(21), HLA-B51(5) and HLA-Cw7 (HLA Class I), and HLA-DRB1*04, HLA-DRB1*07 and HLA-DQB1*02 (HLA Class II). Occurrence of the most frequent HLA alleles was no different between the ESRD group and the controls. The protective role of HLA-Cw2 and the marginal susceptibility associated with HLA-DQBI*03(8) for ESRD requires further investigation.

  5. A soluble recombinant form of human leucocyte antigen-G 6 (srHLA-G6).

    PubMed

    Pelá, Flávia Porto; Rustiguel, Joane Kathelen; Rodrigues, Lilian Cataldi; Mendonça Galiote Silva, Jacqueline Nakau; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Rosa, José Cesar; Nonato, Maria Cristina; Favier, Benoit; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; Baruffi, Marcelo Dias

    2017-03-29

    Human Leucocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule that through RNA splicing can encode seven isoforms which are membrane bound (-G1, -G2, -G3 and -G4) and soluble (-G5, -G6 and -G7). HLA-G is described as important immune suppressor endogenous molecule to favor maternal-fetal tolerance, transplant survival and tumor immune scape. HLA-G shows low protein variability and a unique structural complexity that is related with the expression of different isoforms followed by biochemical processes, such as, photolytic cleavage, molecular interactions, and protein ubiquitination. Studies with HLA-G have shown difficult to assess the role of the individual isoforms. Thus, the aim of this work was to obtain a HLA-G6 recombinant form. The results indicated the production of high homogeneous preparations of soluble recombinant HLA-G6 (srHLA-G6) with molecular mass 23,603.76 Da, determined by MALD-TOF/TOF. In addition, native and denatured srHLA-G6 were detected by ELISA, using commercial monoclonal antibodies. Finally, we developed a suitable methodology to express srHLA-G6 that could contribute in structural and functional studies involving specific isoforms.

  6. JC Polyomavirus Infection Is Strongly Controlled by Human Leucocyte Antigen Class II Variants

    PubMed Central

    Sundqvist, Emilie; Buck, Dorothea; Warnke, Clemens; Albrecht, Eva; Gieger, Christian; Khademi, Mohsen; Lima Bomfim, Izaura; Fogdell-Hahn, Anna; Link, Jenny; Alfredsson, Lars; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Hillert, Jan; Oturai, Annette B.; Hemme, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    JC polyomavirus (JCV) carriers with a compromised immune system, such as in HIV, or subjects on immune-modulating therapies, such as anti VLA-4 therapy may develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) which is a lytic infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain. Serum antibodies to JCV mark infection occur only in 50–60% of infected individuals, and high JCV-antibody titers seem to increase the risk of developing PML. We here investigated the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA), instrumental in immune defense in JCV antibody response. Anti-JCV antibody status, as a surrogate for JCV infection, were compared to HLA class I and II alleles in 1621 Scandinavian persons with MS and 1064 population-based Swedish controls and associations were replicated in 718 German persons with MS. HLA-alleles were determined by SNP imputation, sequence specific (SSP) kits and a reverse PCR sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO) method. An initial GWAS screen displayed a strong HLA class II region signal. The HLA-DRB1*15 haplotype was strongly negatively associated to JCV sero-status in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 0.42, p = 7×10−15) and controls (OR = 0.53, p = 2×10−5). In contrast, the DQB1*06:03 haplotype was positively associated with JCV sero-status, in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 1.63, p = 0.006), and controls (OR = 2.69, p = 1×10−5). The German dataset confirmed these findings (OR = 0.54, p = 1×10−4 and OR = 1.58, p = 0.03 respectively for these haplotypes). HLA class II restricted immune responses, and hence CD4+ T cell immunity is pivotal for JCV infection control. Alleles within the HLA-DR1*15 haplotype are associated with a protective effect on JCV infection. Alleles within the DQB1*06:03 haplotype show an opposite association. These associations between JC virus antibody response and human leucocyte antigens supports the notion that CD4+ T cells are crucial in the immune defence to JCV and lays

  7. An analysis of myeloma plasma cell phenotype using antibodies defined at the IIIrd International Workshop on Human Leucocyte Differentiation Antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, N; Ling, N R; Ball, J; Bromidge, E; Nathan, P D; Franklin, I M

    1988-01-01

    Fresh bone marrow from 43 cases of myeloma and three cases of plasma cell leukaemia has been phenotyped both by indirect immune-rosetting and, on fixed cytospin preparations, by indirect immunofluorescence. Both clustered and unclustered B cell associated antibodies from the IIIrd International Workshop on Human Leucocyte Differentiation Antigens were used. The results confirm the lack of many pan-B antigens on the surface of myeloma plasma cells, i.e. CD19-23, 37, 39, w40. Strong surface reactivity is seen with CD38 antibodies and with one CD24 antibody (HB8). Weak reactions are sometimes obtained with CD9, 10 and 45R. On cytospin preparations CD37, 39 and w40 are sometimes weakly positive, and anti-rough endoplasmic reticulum antibodies are always strongly positive. Specific and surface-reacting antiplasma cell antibodies are still lacking. PMID:3048803

  8. Altered expression of intestinal human leucocyte antigen D-related and immune signalling molecules in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arvonen, M; Vähäsalo, P; Turunen, S; Salo, H M; Mäki, M; Laurila, K; Vaarala, O; Karttunen, T J

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to study intestinal immune activation status in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) by assessing intestinal human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression and the mRNA expression levels of the pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators and pattern recognition receptors. HLA-D-related (HLA-DR) expression was assessed using immunohistochemical staining of frozen sections in 11 children with JIA and 17 controls. The gene expression levels of the anti- and proinflammatory cytokines, lymphocyte recognition receptors and pattern recognition receptors were studied with reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) in 14 children with JIA and 12 controls. All subjects had various gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms indicating endoscopic examinations, but eventually were not diagnosed with GI disease. In JIA patients, the expression of HLA-DR was increased in the crypt epithelial cells and in the epithelial basement membrane of the ileum when compared with the controls. Positive HLA-DR staining in the ileal mucosa was associated with the presence of high clinical disease activity of JIA and low mRNA expression of anti-inflammatory mediators, such as forkhead box protein P3 (FoxP3), glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor-related protein (GITR) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. Low ileal expression of interleukin (IL)-10, TGF-β, FoxP3, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) and TLR-4 transcripts correlated significantly with a high clinical disease activity in the JIA patients. The increased HLA-DR expression suggests enhanced intestinal antigen presentation in JIA. A correlation between clinical disease activity and low gene expression of tolerogenic mediators in the ileum supports the hypothesis that a link exists between the gut immune system and JIA. PMID:23121667

  9. Combined cord blood and bone marrow transplantation from the same human leucocyte antigen-identical sibling donor for children with malignant and non-malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Tucunduva, Luciana; Volt, Fernanda; Cunha, Renato; Locatelli, Franco; Zecca, Marco; Yesilipek, Akif; Caniglia, Maurizio; Güngör, Tayfun; Aksoylar, Serap; Fagioli, Franca; Bertrand, Yves; Addari, Maria Carmen; de la Fuente, Josu; Winiarski, Jacek; Biondi, Andrea; Sengeloev, Henrik; Badell, Isabel; Mellgren, Karin; de Heredia, Cristina Díaz; Sedlacek, Petr; Vora, Ajay; Rocha, Vanderson; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Gluckman, Eliane

    2015-04-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) from an human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling can be used for transplantation of patients with malignant and non-malignant diseases. However, the low cellular content of most UCB units represents a limitation to this approach. An option to increase cell dose is to harvest bone marrow (BM) cells from the same donor and infuse them along with the UCB. We studied 156 children who received such a combined graft between 1992 and 2011. Median age was 7 years and 78% of patients (n = 122) were transplanted for non-malignant diseases, mainly haemoglobinopathies. Acute leukaemia (n = 26) was the most frequent malignant diagnosis. Most patients (91%) received myeloablative conditioning. Median donor age was 1·7 years, median infused nucleated cell dose was 24·4 × 10(7) /kg and median follow-up was 41 months. Sixty-days neutrophil recovery occurred in 96% of patients at a median of 17 d. The probabilities of grade-II-IV acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were 19% and 10%, respectively. Four-year overall survival was 90% (68% malignant; 97% non-malignant diseases) with 3% probability of death. In conclusion, combined UCB and BM transplantation from an HLA-identical sibling donor is an effective treatment for children with malignant and non-malignant disorders with high overall survival and low incidence of GVHD.

  10. Determining donor-specific antibody C1q-binding ability improves the prediction of antibody-mediated rejection in human leucocyte antigen-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Malheiro, Jorge; Tafulo, Sandra; Dias, Leonídio; Martins, La Salete; Fonseca, Isabel; Beirão, Idalina; Castro-Henriques, António; Cabrita, António

    2017-04-01

    Detrimental impact of preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) against human leucocyte antigens on outcomes after kidney transplantation are well documented, however, the value of their capacity to bind complement for predicting antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and graft survival still needs to be confirmed. We aimed to study DSA characteristics (strength and C1q binding) that might distinguish harmful DSA from clinically irrelevant ones. We retrospectively studied 60 kidney-transplanted patients with preformed DSA detected by single antigen bead (SAB) assays (IgG and C1q kits), from a cohort of 517 kidney graft recipients (124 with detectable anti-HLA antibodies). Patients were divided into DSA strength (MFI < vs. ≥ 15 000) and C1q-binding ability. AMR frequency was high (30%) and it increased with DSA strength (P = 0.002) and C1q+ DSA (P < 0.001). The performance of DSA C1q-binding ability as a predictor of AMR was better than DSA strength (diagnostic odds ratio 16.3 vs. 6.4, respectively). Furthermore, a multivariable logistic regression showed that C1q+ DSA was a risk factor for AMR (OR = 16.80, P = 0.001), while high MFI DSAs were not. Graft survival was lower in high MFI C1q+ DSA in comparison with patients with C1q- high or low MFI DSA (at 6 years, 38%, 83% and 80%, respectively; P = 0.001). Both DSA strength and C1q-binding ability assessment seem valuable for improving pretransplant risk assessment. Since DSA C1q-binding ability was a better predictor of AMR and correlated with graft survival, C1q-SAB may be a particularly useful tool.

  11. Towards allele-level human leucocyte antigens genotyping - assessing two next-generation sequencing platforms: Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine and Illumina MiSeq.

    PubMed

    Duke, J L; Lind, C; Mackiewicz, K; Ferriola, D; Papazoglou, A; Derbeneva, O; Wallace, D; Monos, D S

    2015-10-01

    Human leucocyte antigens (HLA) typing has been a challenge due to extreme polymorphism of the HLA genes and limitations of the current technologies and protocols used for their characterization. Recently, next-generation sequencing techniques have been shown to be a well-suited technology for the complete characterization of the HLA genes. However, a comprehensive assessment of the different platforms for HLA typing, describing the limitations and advantages of each of them, has not been presented. We have compared the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) and Illumina MiSeq, currently the two most frequently used platforms for diagnostic applications, for a number of metrics including total output, quality score per position across the reads and error rates after alignment which can all affect the accuracy of HLA genotyping. For this purpose, we have used one homozygous and three heterozygous well-characterized samples, at HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1. The total output of bases produced by the MiSeq was higher, and they have higher quality scores and a lower overall error rate than the PGM. The MiSeq also has a higher fidelity when sequencing through homopolymer regions up to 9 bp in length. The need to set phase between distant polymorphic sites was more readily achieved with MiSeq using paired-end sequencing of fragments that are longer than those obtained with PGM. Additionally, we have assessed the workflows of the different platforms for complexity of sample preparation, sequencer operation and turnaround time. The effects of data quality and quantity can impact the genotyping results; having an adequate amount of good quality data to analyse will be imperative for confident HLA genotyping. The overall turnaround time can be very comparable between the two platforms; however, the complexity of sample preparation is higher with PGM, while the actual sequencing time is longer with MiSeq.

  12. Persistence of Recipient Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA) Antibodies and Production of Donor HLA antibodies Following Reduced Intensity Allogeneic Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Ross M.; Mamcarz, Ewelina; Adams, Sharon; Jerussi, Theresa Donohue; Sugimoto, Kyoko; Tian, Xin; Flegel, Willy A.; Childs, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) on human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-alloimmunization and platelet transfusion refractoriness (PTR) following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT) are unknown. We studied HLA-alloantibodies in a cohort of 16 patients (8 HLA-alloimmunized with pre-transplant histories of PTR and 8 non-alloimmunized controls) undergoing Allo-HSCT using fludarabine/cyclophosphamide-based RIC. Pre- and post-transplant serum samples were analysed for HLA-antibodies and compared to myeloid, T-cell and bone marrow plasma cell chimaerism. Among alloimmunized patients, the duration that HLA-antibodies persisted post-transplant correlated strongly with pre-transplant HLA-antibody mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) and PRA levels (Spearman’s rank correlation = 0.954 (p=0.0048) and 0.865 (p=0.0083) respectively). Pre-transplant MFI >10,000 was associated with post-transplant HLA antibody persistence >100 days (p=0.029). HLA-antibodies persisted ≥100 days in 3/8 patients despite recipient chimaerism being undetectable in all lympho-haematopoietic lineages including plasma cells. Post-transplant de-novo HLA-antibodies developed in 3 control patients with 2 developing PTR; the donors for 2 of these patients demonstrated pre-existing HLA-antibodies of equivalent specificity to those in the patient, confirming donor origin. These data show HLA-antibodies may persist for prolonged periods following RIC. Further study is needed to determine the incidence of post-transplant PTR as a consequence of donor–derived HLA alloimmunization before recommendations on donor HLA-antibody screening can be made. PMID:24750103

  13. Human leucocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) and its murine functional homolog Qa2 in the Trypanosoma cruzi Infection.

    PubMed

    Dias, Fabrício C; Mendes-Junior, Celso T; Silva, Maria C; Tristão, Fabrine S M; Dellalibera-Joviliano, Renata; Moreau, Philippe; Soares, Edson G; Menezes, Jean G; Schmidt, André; Dantas, Roberto O; Marin-Neto, José A; Silva, João S; Donadi, Eduardo A

    2015-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility factors, parasite strain, and an adequate modulation of the immune system seem to be crucial for disease progression after Trypanosoma cruzi infection. HLA-G and its murine functional homolog Qa2 have well-recognized immunomodulatory properties. We evaluated the HLA-G 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) polymorphic sites (associated with mRNA stability and target for microRNA binding) and HLA-G tissue expression (heart, colon, and esophagus) in patients presenting Chagas disease, stratified according to the major clinical variants. Further, we investigated the transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other pro- and anti-inflammatory genes in affected mouse tissues during T. cruzi experimental acute and early chronic infection induced by the CL strain. Chagas disease patients exhibited differential HLA-G 3'UTR susceptibility allele/genotype/haplotype patterns, according to the major clinical variant (digestive/cardiac/mixed/indeterminate). HLA-G constitutive expression on cardiac muscle and colonic cells was decreased in Chagasic tissues; however, no difference was observed for Chagasic and non-Chagasic esophagus tissues. The transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other anti and proinflammatory (CTLA-4, PDCD1, IL-10, INF-γ, and NOS-2) genes were induced only during the acute T. cruzi infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We present several lines of evidence indicating the role of immunomodulatory genes and molecules in human and experimental T. cruzi infection.

  14. Human Leucocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) and Its Murine Functional Homolog Qa2 in the Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Fabrício C.; Mendes-Junior, Celso T.; Silva, Maria C.; Tristão, Fabrine S. M.; Dellalibera-Joviliano, Renata; Soares, Edson G.; Menezes, Jean G.; Schmidt, André; Dantas, Roberto O.; Marin-Neto, José A.; Silva, João S.; Donadi, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility factors, parasite strain, and an adequate modulation of the immune system seem to be crucial for disease progression after Trypanosoma cruzi infection. HLA-G and its murine functional homolog Qa2 have well-recognized immunomodulatory properties. We evaluated the HLA-G 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) polymorphic sites (associated with mRNA stability and target for microRNA binding) and HLA-G tissue expression (heart, colon, and esophagus) in patients presenting Chagas disease, stratified according to the major clinical variants. Further, we investigated the transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other pro- and anti-inflammatory genes in affected mouse tissues during T. cruzi experimental acute and early chronic infection induced by the CL strain. Chagas disease patients exhibited differential HLA-G 3′UTR susceptibility allele/genotype/haplotype patterns, according to the major clinical variant (digestive/cardiac/mixed/indeterminate). HLA-G constitutive expression on cardiac muscle and colonic cells was decreased in Chagasic tissues; however, no difference was observed for Chagasic and non-Chagasic esophagus tissues. The transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other anti and proinflammatory (CTLA-4, PDCD1, IL-10, INF-γ, and NOS-2) genes were induced only during the acute T. cruzi infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We present several lines of evidence indicating the role of immunomodulatory genes and molecules in human and experimental T. cruzi infection. PMID:25688175

  15. Polymorphisms within the human leucocyte antigen-E gene and their associations with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis as well as clinical outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy.

    PubMed

    Iwaszko, M; Świerkot, J; Kolossa, K; Jeka, S; Wiland, P; Bogunia-Kubik, K

    2015-12-01

    Involvement of the non-classical human leucocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) in both innate and acquired immune response suggests its possible role in development of autoimmune pathologies. This study was undertaken to investigate relationships between the HLA-E gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as well as to evaluate a potential of these polymorphisms to modulate clinical outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) treatment in female patients. A total of 223 female patients with RA receiving anti-TNF biological therapy and 134 female healthy subjects were enrolled into the study. Genotypings for two SNPs within the HLA-E gene (rs1264457 HLA-E*01:01/01:03; rs1059510 HLA-E*01:03:01/01:03:02) were performed using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification employing LightSNiP assays. Clinical response was evaluated according to the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria at 12 and 24 weeks after initiation of the therapy. The frequency of the HLA-E*01:01/01:01 genotype was decreased significantly in RA patients in comparison to controls (P = 0.031). The presence of the HLA-E*01:01/01:01 genotype in patients correlated with better EULAR response after 12 weeks of anti-TNF treatment, while 01:03 allele carriers were generally unresponsive to the treatment (P = 0.014). The HLA-E*01:03/01:03 genotype was also over-represented among non-responding patients in comparison to HLA-E*01:01/01:01 homozygotes (P = 0.021). With respect to the HLA-E rs1059510 variation, a better response after 12 weeks was observed more frequently in patients carrying the HLA-E*01:03:01/01:03:01 genotype than other genotypes (P = 0.009). The results derived from this study imply that HLA-E polymorphisms may influence RA susceptibility and affect clinical outcome of anti-TNF therapy in female RA patients.

  16. Human leucocyte antigen class I‐redirected anti‐tumour CD4+ T cells require a higher T cell receptor binding affinity for optimal activity than CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, M. P.; Dolton, G. M.; Gerry, A. B.; Brewer, J. E.; Bennett, A. D.; Pumphrey, N. J.; Jakobsen, B. K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary CD4+ T helper cells are a valuable component of the immune response towards cancer. Unfortunately, natural tumour‐specific CD4+ T cells occur in low frequency, express relatively low‐affinity T cell receptors (TCRs) and show poor reactivity towards cognate antigen. In addition, the lack of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression on most cancers dictates that these cells are often unable to respond to tumour cells directly. These deficiencies can be overcome by transducing primary CD4+ T cells with tumour‐specific HLA class I‐restricted TCRs prior to adoptive transfer. The lack of help from the co‐receptor CD8 glycoprotein in CD4+ cells might result in these cells requiring a different optimal TCR binding affinity. Here we compared primary CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing wild‐type and a range of affinity‐enhanced TCRs specific for the HLA A*0201‐restricted NY‐ESO‐1‐ and gp100 tumour antigens. Our major findings are: (i) redirected primary CD4+ T cells expressing TCRs of sufficiently high affinity exhibit a wide range of effector functions, including cytotoxicity, in response to cognate peptide; and (ii) optimal TCR binding affinity is higher in CD4+ T cells than CD8+ T cells. These results indicate that the CD4+ T cell component of current adoptive therapies using TCRs optimized for CD8+ T cells is below par and that there is room for substantial improvement. PMID:27324616

  17. Immunoglobulin (Ig)G purified from human sera mirrors intravenous Ig human leucocyte antigen (HLA) reactivity and recognizes one's own HLA types, but may be masked by Fab complementarity-determining region peptide in the native sera.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Maehara, C Y; Jucaud, V; Kawakita, S; Pham, T; Yamashita, W

    2015-02-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) reacted with a wide array of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles, in contrast to normal sera, due possibly to the purification of IgG from the pooled plasma. The reactivity of IgG purified from normal sera was compared with that of native sera to determine whether any serum factors mask the HLA reactivity of anti-HLA IgG and whether IgG purified from sera can recognize the HLA types of the corresponding donors. The purified IgG, unlike native sera, mirrored IVIg reactivity to a wide array of HLA-I/-II alleles, indicating that anti-HLA IgG may be masked in normal sera - either by peptides derived from soluble HLA or by those from antibodies. A < 3 kDa peptide from the complementarity-determining region (CDR) of the Fab region of IgG (but not the HLA peptides) masked HLA recognition by the purified IgG. Most importantly, some of the anti-HLA IgG purified from normal sera - and serum IgG from a few donors - indeed recognized the HLA types of the corresponding donors, confirming the presence of auto-HLA antibodies. Comparison of HLA types with the profile of HLA antibodies showed auto-HLA IgG to the donors' HLA antigens in this order of frequency: DPA (80%), DQA (71%), DRB345 (67%), DQB (57%), Cw (50%), DBP (43%), DRB1 (21%), A (14%) and B (7%). The auto-HLA antibodies, when unmasked in vivo, may perform immunoregulatory functions similar to those of therapeutic preparations of IVIg.

  18. Differential regulation of toll-like receptor-2, toll-like receptor-4, CD16 and human leucocyte antigen-DR on peripheral blood monocytes during mild and severe dengue fever

    PubMed Central

    Azeredo, Elzinandes L; Neves-Souza, Patrícia C; Alvarenga, Allan R; Reis, Sônia R N I; Torrentes-Carvalho, Amanda; Zagne, Sonia-Maris O; Nogueira, Rita M R; Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia M; Kubelka, Claire F

    2010-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF), a public health problem in tropical countries, may present severe clinical manifestations as result of increased vascular permeability and coagulation disorders. Dengue virus (DENV), detected in peripheral monocytes during acute disease and in in vitro infection, leads to cytokine production, indicating that virus–target cell interactions are relevant to pathogenesis. Here we investigated the in vitro and in vivo activation of human peripheral monocytes after DENV infection. The numbers of CD14+ monocytes expressing the adhesion molecule intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) were significantly increased during acute DF. A reduced number of CD14+ human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR+ monocytes was observed in patients with severe dengue when compared to those with mild dengue and controls; CD14+ monocytes expressing toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 were increased in peripheral blood from dengue patients with mild disease, but in vitro DENV-2 infection up-regulated only TLR2. Increased numbers of CD14+ CD16+ activated monocytes were found after in vitro and in vivo DENV-2 infection. The CD14high CD16+ monocyte subset was significantly expanded in mild dengue, but not in severe dengue. Increased plasma levels of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-18 in dengue patients were inversely associated with CD14high CD16+, indicating that these cells might be involved in controlling exacerbated inflammatory responses, probably by IL-10 production. We showed here, for the first time, phenotypic changes on peripheral monocytes that were characteristic of cell activation. A sequential monocyte-activation model is proposed in which DENV infection triggers TLR2/4 expression and inflammatory cytokine production, leading eventually to haemorrhagic manifestations, thrombocytopenia, coagulation disorders, plasmatic leakage and shock development, but may also produce factors that act in order to control both intense

  19. Human leucocytes in asthenozoospermic patients: endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression.

    PubMed

    Buldreghini, E; Hamada, A; Macrì, M L; Amoroso, S; Boscaro, M; Lenzi, A; Agarwal, A; Balercia, G

    2014-12-01

    In a basic study at the Andrology Unit, Department of Clinical and Molecular Sciences, Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy, we evaluated the pattern of mRNA endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression in human blood leucocytes isolated from normozoospermic fertile and asthenozoospermic infertile men to elucidate any pathogenic involvement in sperm cell motility. Forty infertile men with idiopathic asthenozoospermia and 45 normozoospermic fertile donors, age-matched, were included. Semen parameters were evaluated, and expression analysis of mRNA was performed in human leucocytes using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Sperm volume, count, motility and morphology were determined, and eNOS expression and Western blotting analyses were performed. A positive correlation was observed between the concentrations of NO and the percentage of immotile spermatozoa. The mRNA of eNOS was more expressed in peripheral blood leucocytes isolated from asthenozoospermic infertile men versus those of fertile normozoospermic men (7.46 ± 0.38 versus 7.06 ± 0.56, P = 0.0355). A significant up-regulation of eNOS gene in peripheral blood leucocytes was 1.52-fold higher than that of fertile donors. It is concluded that eNOS expression and activity are enhanced in blood leucocytes in men with idiopathic asthenozoospermia.

  20. Enhancement of mite antigen-induced histamine release by deuterium oxide from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients

    SciTech Connect

    Numata, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamura, T.

    1981-09-01

    The mite antigen-induced histamine release from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients was enhanced in the presence of deuterium oxide, which stabilizes microtubules. This enhancing effect of deuterium oxide on the histamine release from leucocytes may provide a useful means for the detection of allergens in vitro in chronic urticaria.

  1. Serum antibodies to human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E, HLA-F and HLA-G in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) during disease flares: Clinical relevance of HLA-F autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Jucaud, V; Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Morales-Buenrostro, L E; Hiepe, F; Rose, T; Biesen, R

    2016-03-01

    T lymphocyte hyperactivity and progressive inflammation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients results in over-expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-Ib on the surface of lymphocytes. These are shed into the circulation upon inflammation, and may augment production of antibodies promoting pathogenicity of the disease. The objective was to evaluate the association of HLA-Ib (HLA-E, HLA-F and HLA-G) antibodies to the disease activity of SLE. The immunoglobulin (Ig)G/IgM reactivity to HLA-Ib and β2m in the sera of 69 German, 29 Mexican female SLE patients and 17 German female controls was measured by multiplex Luminex(®)-based flow cytometry. The values were expressed as mean flourescence intensity (MFI). Only the German SLE cohort was analysed in relation to the clinical disease activity. In the controls, anti-HLA-G IgG predominated over other HLA-Ib antibodies, whereas SLE patients had a preponderance of anti-HLA-F IgG over the other HLA-Ib antibodies. The disease activity index, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI)-2000, was reflected only in the levels of anti-HLA-F IgG. Anti-HLA-F IgG with MFI level of 500-1999 was associated with active SLE, whereas inactive SLE revealed higher MFI (>2000). When anti-HLA-F IgG were cross-reactive with other HLA-Ib alleles, their reactivity was reflected in the levels of anti-HLA-E and -G IgG. The prevalence of HLA-F-monospecific antibodies in SLE patients was also associated with the clinical disease activity. Anti-HLA-F IgG is possibly involved in the clearance of HLA-F shed from lymphocytes and inflamed tissues to lessen the disease's severity, and thus emerges as a beneficial immune biomarker. Therefore, anti-HLA-Ib IgG should be considered as a biomarker in standard SLE diagnostics.

  2. OBSERVATIONS ON THE PRODUCTION OF PYROGENIC SUBSTANCES BY RABBIT AND HUMAN LEUCOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Fessler, J. H.; Cooper, K. E.; Cranston, W. I.; Vollum, R. L.

    1961-01-01

    1. The mechanism of release of a pyrogen from leucocytes has been studied in cells obtained from sterile rabbit peritoneal exudates and from rabbit blood. Attempts were made to induce human leucocytes—from blood—to release a pyrogen. 2. Rabbit leucocytes, kept below 4°C., were not pyrogenic and did not release any pyrogen when disintegrated. Incubating such cells, in various media, at 37°C. led to the formation of a pyrogen which was heat-labile. The maximum yield was attained after 1½ hours' incubation. 3. The formation of rabbit leucocytic pyrogen was prevented by freezing and thawing the leucocytes, by heating them to 56°C. for half an hour before incubation, and by ageing them in the cold. 4. Nitrofurazone (5-nitro-2-furaldehyde semicarbazone) prevents the formation of leucocytic pyrogen when given by mouth to the cell-donor animals, or when added to leucocytes in intro. 5. Leucocytes from rabbit blood formed leucocytic pyrogen, on incubation in saline, and this formation was also inhibited by nitrofurazone. 6. No leucocytic pyrogen was released from human leucocytes subjected to mechanical, osmotic, or thermal damage, and it was not formed when the cells were incubated in saline. 7. The source of rabbit leucocytic pyrogen, the action of nitrofurazone on leucocytes, and the supposed role of leucocytic pyrogen in fever are discussed. PMID:13699218

  3. Exposure to anthrax toxin alters human leucocyte expression of anthrax toxin receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Ingram, R J; Harris, A; Ascough, S; Metan, G; Doganay, M; Ballie, L; Williamson, E D; Dyson, H; Robinson, J H; Sriskandan, S; Altmann, D M

    2013-07-01

    Anthrax is a toxin-mediated disease, the lethal effects of which are initiated by the binding of protective antigen (PA) with one of three reported cell surface toxin receptors (ANTXR). Receptor binding has been shown to influence host susceptibility to the toxins. Despite this crucial role for ANTXR in the outcome of disease, and the reported immunomodulatory consequence of the anthrax toxins during infection, little is known about ANTXR expression on human leucocytes. We characterized the expression levels of ANTXR1 (TEM8) on human leucocytes using flow cytometry. In order to assess the effect of prior toxin exposure on ANTXR1 expression levels, leucocytes from individuals with no known exposure, those exposed to toxin through vaccination and convalescent individuals were analysed. Donors could be defined as either 'low' or 'high' expressers based on the percentage of ANTXR1-positive monocytes detected. Previous exposure to toxins appears to modulate ANTXR1 expression, exposure through active infection being associated with lower receptor expression. A significant correlation between low receptor expression and high anthrax toxin-specific interferon (IFN)-γ responses was observed in previously infected individuals. We propose that there is an attenuation of ANTXR1 expression post-infection which may be a protective mechanism that has evolved to prevent reinfection.

  4. MHC class I antigens and tumour-infiltrating leucocytes in laryngeal cancer: long-term follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, F.; Redondo, M.; Delgado, M.; Garrido, F.; Ruiz-Cabello, F.

    1996-01-01

    Alteration in MHC class I expression may be used by cancer cells to avoid immune destruction. Much experimental evidence supports this idea, although survival studies are very scarce. To investigate whether the presence or absence of HLA-A, -B and -C antigens in laryngeal carcinoma influences survival, a series of 60 primary laryngeal tumours treated surgically and normal tissues were evaluated in frozen sections for the expression of MHC class I antigens and tumour-infiltrating leucocytes (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD11b, CD1, CD20 and CD16), using monoclonal antibodies and the APAAP, technique. Long-term follow-up from the patients is available, ranging from 6 to 10 years. Thirteen tumours presented total HLA-ABC loss, five selective losses of HLA-A antigens and one absence of HLA-B antigens. Total losses were statistically associated with several clinical and pathological parameters, but there were no differences regarding tumour-infiltrating leucocytes. After conducting a prospective study, only T and N staging and scoring according to Glanz's malignancy classification were found to be independently related to patients' outcome. From our data, we conclude that neither complete loss of HLA class I antigens nor tumour-infiltrating leucocytes appear to influence survival in squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx. PMID:8956796

  5. Protein nitration is predominantly mediated by a peroxynitrite-dependent pathway in cultured human leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Galiñanes, Manuel; Matata, Bashir M

    2002-01-01

    Protein nitration is a common characteristic of oxidative injury caused by the invasion of leucocytes into inflammatory lesions. Two distinct pathways of nitration of protein tyrosine residues, namely the peroxynitrite (ONOO(-))-mediated pathway and another catalysed by the haem-containing peroxidases, have been reported under experimental conditions. However, the contribution of these two pathways in human leucocytes is still controversial. The present study demonstrates that the process of phenolic nitration of proteins in cultured human leucocytes is mainly ONOO(-)-mediated and that it differs between granulocytes and mononuclear cells, depending on the cell compartment and the stimuli. We have also shown that NO induces protein nitration via a ONOO(-)-dependent pathway, whereas NO(2)(-), the NO metabolite, does not increase but decreases nitration in PMA-stimulated leucocytes. The inhibition of myeloperoxidase activity did not reduce protein nitration; on the other hand, the myeloperoxidase inhibitor aminobenzoic hydrazide caused increased nitration, which was mediated by ONOO(-). These results suggest that protein nitration is predominantly mediated by a ONOO(-)-dependent pathway in cultured human leucocytes and that the myeloperoxidase-catalysed pathway does not play a significant role in protein nitration. PMID:12099887

  6. Isolation of two polypeptides comprising the neutrophil-immobilizing factor of human leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Watt, K W; Brightman, I L; Goetzl, E J

    1983-01-01

    Human leucocyte lysosomal polypeptides of mol. wt 4000-5000, which constitute the neutrophil-immobolizing factor (NIF), were isolated from the 22,000 g supernate of sonicates of human neutrophils by filtration on Sephadex G-75. The larger (NIF-1) and smaller (NIF-2) of the polypeptides were resolved by filtration on Bio-Gel P6 and purified to homogeneity by sequential reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography and paper electrophoresis. The results of analyses of amino acid composition indicated that NIF-1 and NIF-2 are distinct polypeptides composed of an apparent total of 41 and 38 amino acids, respectively. Both NIF polypeptides contain one cysteine and one methionine, lack isoleucine, tyrosine and phenylalanine, and are rich in histidine and proline. The sequence of 20 of the amino-terminal amino acids of both NIF polypeptides is identical, but NIF-2 possesses an additional alanine at the amino-terminus. Highly purified NIF-1 and NIF-2 inhibited human neutrophil random migration and chemotaxis to diverse stimuli in a concentration-dependent manner, with 50% inhibition of chemotaxis by 0.31-1 x 10(-8) M NIF-1 and 1-3 x 10(-7) M NIF-2. Neither NIF polypeptide was cytotoxic for neutrophils, altered neutrophil phagocytosis or release of lysosomal enzymes, or inhibited mononuclear leucocyte chemotaxis. The leucocyte and functional specificity of the NIF polypeptides and the quantitites released upon stimulation of the human leucocytes suggest that the transition to a mononuclear leucocyte population in chronic inflammation may be attributable in part to the NIF derived from the leucocyte infiltrates of acute responses. PMID:6848456

  7. Modulating phenotype and cytokine production of leucocytic retinal infiltrate in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis following intranasal tolerance induction with retinal antigens

    PubMed Central

    Laliotou, B.; Dick, A.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM—Nasal administration of retinal antigens induces systemic tolerance which results in suppression of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) when subsequently exposed to antigen. The aim was to establish if tolerance induction alters retinal infiltrating leucocyte phenotype and cytokine profile in tolerised animals when there is significantly reduced tissue destruction despite immunisation with retinal antigen.
METHODS—Female Lewis rats were tolerised by intranasal administration with retinal extract (RE) before immunisation with RE to induce EAU. Control animals were administered phosphate buffered saline (PBS) intranasally. Post immunisation, daily clinical responses were recorded and at the height of disease, retinas were removed and either infiltrating leucocytes isolated for flow cytometric phenotype assessment and intracellular cytokine production, or chorioretina processed for immunohistochemistry. Fellow eyes were assessed for cytokine mRNA by semiquantitative RT-PCR.
RESULTS—Flow cytometric analysis showed that before clinical onset of EAU there is no evidence of macrophage infiltration and no significant difference in circulating T cell populations within the retina. By day 14 a reduced retinal infiltrate in tolerised animals was observed and in particular a reduction in numbers of "activated" (with respect to CD4 and MHC class II expression) macrophages. Immunohistochemistry confirmed these findings and additionally minimal rod outer segment destruction was observed histologically. Cytokine analysis revealed that both IL-10 mRNA and intracellular IL-10 production was increased in tolerised eyes 7 days post immunisation. Although by day 14 post immunisation, IL-10 production was equivalent in both groups, a reduced percentage of IFN-γ+ macrophages and IFN-γ+ CD4+ T cells with increased percentage of IL-4+ CD4+ T cells were observed in tolerised animals.
CONCLUSIONS—Leucocytic infiltrate is not only reduced in number

  8. Discriminative protection against hydroxyl and superoxide anion radicals by quercetin in human leucocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wilms, Lonneke C; Kleinjans, Jos C S; Moonen, Edwin J C; Briedé, Jacob J

    2008-03-01

    Antioxidants play a vital role in the cellular protection against oxidative damage. Quercetin is a well-investigated antioxidant and known to be able to protect against cellular oxidative DNA damage. In this study, we tried to relate the protection by quercetin pre-treatment against oxidative DNA damage in human leucocytes in vitro to the interaction of quercetin in solution with hydroxyl and superoxide anion radicals as measured by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry, using DMPO as a spin trap. Further, scavenging capacity of quercetin-treated leucocytes in vitro was evaluated by ESR spectrometry. Quercetin appears capable of protecting human leucocytes against oxidative DNA damage caused by hydrogen peroxide in a dose-dependent manner. The protection of leucocytes against superoxides is ambiguous. Incubation concentrations of quercetin (1, 10, and 50 microM) reduced levels of superoxide-induced oxidative DNA damage, while at 100 microM the amount of damage was increased. These results are supported by ESR-findings on quercetin in solution, also showing a prooxidant effect at 100 microM. ESR spectroscopy showed rate constant values for the reaction kinetics of quercetin in lowering iron-dependent hydroxyl radical formation and NADH-dependent superoxide anion formation of respectively 3.2 x 10(12)M(-1)s(-1) and 1.1 x 10(4)M(-1)s(-1). This shows that quercetin is a more potent inhibitor of hydroxyl radical formation than a scavenger of superoxide anions.

  9. Interaction between leucocytes and human spermatozoa influencing reactive oxygen intermediates release.

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Monika; Sanocka, Dorota; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2004-04-01

    The relationship between the presence of white blood cells (WBCs) and the fertilizing potential of human semen is still an open question. It is well known that the presence of leucocytes in human semen can be related to the production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). Semen samples were obtained from 15 normozoospermic men and leucocytes were isolated from heparinized blood drawn from 15 volunteers. Lucigenin and luminol-mediated chemiluminescence assays were used to determine reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by non-activated or activated leucocytes through 12-myristate-13-acetate or N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenyalanine (FMLP) before the addition of spermatozoa isolated by swim-up or Percoll procedures. All spermatozoal fractions used in this study were characterized by defining their motility, morphology and viability. The levels of ROS formation by non-activated as well as stimulated leucocytes were significantly decreased after addition of swim-up separated spermatozoa (p < 0.01). The ability to inhibit the basal chemiluminescence was of lower degree for spermatozoa isolated from 90% Percoll fractions than for swim-up sperm. However, addition of sperm cells from 47% Percoll fraction was found to increase both lucigenin and luminol signals. Moreover, the determined ROI levels changed depending on the type of inducing factor used for oxidative burst. Then, spermatozoa selected by swim-up procedure although with only slightly higher viability and morphology than sperm obtained from 90% Percoll fraction clearly exhibited much higher capacity to inhibit ROI secretion by receptor-stimulated leucocytes (FMLP-activation) than Percoll fractionated sperm. Such results may indicate that within normal semen may exist sperm subpopulations with different biochemical mechanisms controlling the interaction between spermatozoa and contaminating leucocytes. When ROI levels contained in normozoospermic semen are dependent on the WBCs activation, it seems that

  10. Human liver nucleolar antigens.

    PubMed

    Busch, R K; Busch, H

    1981-10-01

    In an extension of previous studies on the antigens in rat liver nucleoli (R. K. Busch, R. C. Reddy, D. H. Henning, and H. Busch, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 160, 185 (1979); R. K. Busch and H. Busch, Tumori 63, 347 (1977); F. M. Davis, R. K. Busch, L. C. Yeoman, and H. Busch, Cancer Res. 38, 1906 (1978), rabbit antibodies were elicited to human liver nucleoli isolated by the sucrose--Mg2+ method (10). Fluorescent nucleoli were found in liver cryostat sections treated with rabbit anti-human liver nucleolar antibodies followed by fluorescein-conjugated goat anti-rabbit antibodies. In HeLa cells, fluorescence was distributed throughout the nucleus and in a nuclear network but was not localized to the nucleolus. In placental cryostat sections, an overall nuclear fluorescence was observed with some localization to nucleoli. Immunodiffusion analysis revealed two immunoprecipitin bands which appeared to be liver specific. Other immunoprecipitin bands were common to liver, placenta, and HeLa nuclear extracts. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis revealed two liver-specific antigens, one migrating to the cathode and the other to the anode Other rockets exhibited identity to antigens of other nuclear extracts. These results demonstrate the presence of human liver nucleolar-specific antigens which were not found in the HeLa and placental cells.

  11. Leucocyte migration inhibition test in coeliac disease - a reappraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, F G; Field, H P; Howdle, P D; Robertson, D A; Losowsky, M S

    1983-01-01

    Results of the direct leucocyte migration inhibition (LMI) test using gluten fraction III as antigen were unaffected by incorporation of puromycin into the culture medium at concentrations shown to prevent lymphokine mediated inhibition. Results of the LMI test performed with purified polymorphs were similar to and correlated with results of the standard LMI test using mixed leucocytes in both coeliacs and controls. The addition of purified T lymphocytes did not increase migration inhibition. Normal leucocytes incubated with serum from coeliac patients and washed showed marked migration inhibition when incubated with gluten fraction III. This sensitisation of normal leucocytes was prevented by preincubation with aggregated human IgG. These results suggest that leucocyte migration inhibition by gluten in coeliac disease is not due to lymphokine production by sensitised lymphocytes but is caused by cytophilic antibody. PMID:6832627

  12. Chemotactic activity of Helicobacter pylori sonicate for human polymorphonuclear leucocytes and monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, H; Andersen, L P

    1992-01-01

    The immunopathology of Helicobacter pylori associated active chronic gastritis, which is characterised by predominance of polymorphonuclear leucocyte infiltration, is largely unknown. To evaluate the role of bacterial components as inflammatory mediators ultracentrifuged sonicated preparations were made of clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori. The crude sonicates were shown to exhibit chemotactic activity for human polymorphonuclear leucocytes and blood monocytes in a concentration dependent fashion. The potency was comparable with previously described bacterial derived cytotaxins. The cytotaxin(s) was non-dialysable and completely destroyed by proteinase. Heat treatment did not decrease the chemotactic activity, but in sonicate subjected to 100 degrees C for 15 minutes all activity disappeared after dialysis suggesting the breakdown of a larger protein to small fragments that are still biological active. By ammonium sulphate precipitation at increasing concentrations the cytotaxin(s) was selectively found in 10% ammonium sulphate saturation, and by further molecular gel separation the chemotactic activity was found in the molecular size range from 25 to 35 kDa. The demonstration of a polymorphonuclear leucocyte and monocyte cytotaxin from Helicobacter pylori sonicate may help in understanding the mucosal immune response in gastric inflammatory diseases. PMID:1624151

  13. Enumeration of semen leucocytes by fluorescence in situ hybridisation technique

    PubMed Central

    Conte, R A; Luke, S; Verma, R S

    1995-01-01

    Aim—To determine whether the fluorescent in situ hybridisation technique (FISH) using a total human DNA genomic probe can be used to enumerate semen leucocytes. Methods—Semen samples from five donors were subjected to a mild KC1 solution. These samples were then biotin labelled under FISH conditions using a total human DNA genomic probe and the leucocyte counts were determined. To check the accuracy of the technique a monoclonal antibody against the common leucocyte antigen CD45 [KC56(T-200)] served as a control. An isotypic control for [KC56(T-200)], the immunoglobulin [MsIgG1], served as a secondary control. Results—Semen leucocytes stained by the FISH technique were easily detected because of their distinct bright yellow colour, while the sperm cells were red. The leucocyte count ranged from 0·5 to 4·9 × 106 per ml of semen. KC56(T-200) and its isotypic control MsIgG1, which served as control for the FISH technique, accurately identified 94% and 97% of the semen leucocytes of a control donor, respectively. Conclusions—The FISH technique using a total human DNA probe can accurately and effectively enumerate the overall leucocyte population in semen. Images PMID:16696031

  14. Melatonin counteracts alterations in oxidative metabolism and cell viability induced by intracellular calcium overload in human leucocytes: changes with age.

    PubMed

    Espino, Javier; Bejarano, Ignacio; Paredes, Sergio D; González, David; Barriga, Carmen; Reiter, Russel J; Pariente, José A; Rodríguez, Ana B

    2010-07-01

    Ageing is associated with an increased production of free radicals and alterations in the mechanisms of adaptation to oxidative stress. In fact, the free radical theory of ageing proposes that deleterious actions of free radicals are responsible for the functional deterioration associated with ageing. Moreover, a close relationship exists between calcium homeostasis and oxidative stress. The current work was aimed at proving that intracellular calcium overload induced by N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and/or thapsigargin leads to oxidative stress. We additionally examined the effect of melatonin on the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell viability in human leucocytes collected from young (20-30-year-old) and elderly (65-75-year-old) individuals under both basal and oxidative stress-induced conditions. Treatments with 10 nM FMLP and/or 1 microM thapsigargin induced a transient increase in cytosolic free-calcium concentration ([Ca(2 + )](c)) in human leucocytes due to calcium release from internal stores, and led in turn to oxidative stress, as assessed by intracellular ROS measurement. Non-treated leucocytes from aged individuals exhibited higher ROS levels and lower rates of cell survival when compared to leucocytes from young individuals. Similar results were obtained in FMLP and/or thapsigargin-treated leucocytes from elderly individuals when compared to those from the young individuals. Melatonin treatment significantly reduced both hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and superoxide anion levels, likely due to its free-radical scavenging properties, and enhanced leucocyte viability in both age groups. Therefore, melatonin may be a useful tool for the treatment of disease states and processes where an excessive production of oxidative damage occurs.

  15. Dog leucocyte antigen class II diversity and relationships among indigenous dogs of the island nations of Indonesia (Bali), Australia and New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Runstadler, J A; Angles, J M; Pedersen, N C

    2006-11-01

    The genetic polymorphism at the dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II loci DQA1, DQB1 and DRB1 was studied in a large genetically diverse population of feral and wild-type dogs from the large island nations of Indonesia (Bali), Australia and New Guinea (Bali street dog, dingo and New Guinea singing dog, respectively). Sequence-based typing (SBT) of the hypervariable region of DLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 alleles was used to determine genetic diversity. No new DQA1 alleles were recognized among the three dog populations, but five novel DLA-DRB1 and 2 novel DLA-DQB1 allele sequences were detected. Additional unknown alleles were postulated to exist in Bali street dogs, as indicated by the large percentage of individuals (15%-33%) that had indeterminate DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 alleles by SBT. All three groups of dogs possessed alleles that were relatively uncommon in conventional purebreds. The New Guinea singing dog and dingo shared alleles that were not present in the Bali street dogs. These findings suggested that the dingo was more closely related to indigenous dogs from New Guinea. Feral dog populations, in particular large ones such as that of Bali, show genetic diversity that existed prior to phenotypic selection for breeds originating from their respective regions. This diversity needs to be identified and maintained in the face of progressive Westernization. These populations deserve further study as potential model populations for the evolution of major histocompatibility complex alleles, for the study of canine genetic diversity, for the development of dog breeds and for studies on the comigration of ancestral human and dog populations.

  16. [In vitro comparative study of the protective effect of different theophyllines on the leucocytes' histamine-release induced by antigen (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Biot, N; Grosclaude, M; Kofman, J; Perrin-Fayolle, M

    1980-01-01

    The recent discovery of the protective action of xanthic bases towards histamine-release consecutive to the antigen-antibody reaction led the authors to study the importance of this protection induced by various theophylline derivatives. The technique used was that described by LICHTENSTEIN and OSLER: isolation of leucocytes, measurement of histamine liberated in the presence of antigen, same measurement done in the presence of antigen and theophylline. The antigens used were: house dust, Dermatophagoides pteronyssimus (DP), graminaceae pollens. The tested theophyllines were: the theophylline base, aminophylline, bamiphylline, diprophylline, thio theo, piperazine acefilinate. All these substances studied brought a reduction of the histamine-release but according to a variable frequency and intensity: the thio theo, the diprophylline and the piperazine acefilinate gave the best results. Besides the latters are clearer when the antigen was dust or DP. This study enables the confirmation of the inhibiting action of theophyllines on histamine-release induced by antigen, but complementary studies on a larger number of cases seem necessary in order to determine precisely the most efficient derivatives.

  17. Isolation and partial characterisation of a new antiproliferative substance from human leucocytes inhibiting growth of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Naess-Andresen, C F; Ekeberg, D; Fagerhol, M K; Sandvik, K; Staahl, L

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To purify and partially characterise a fraction from human leucocytes containing a substance cytotoxic to Candida albicans. Methods: Leucocytes were isolated from the buffy coats of healthy blood donors. The cytotoxic factor (CF) was isolated from the soluble fraction of the cells. A cell lysate was passed through a filter with a cut off value of 3 kDa, and the filtrate was processed by anionic exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The purified CF was analysed for its chemical and biological properties. The cytotoxicity of CF was tested on C albicans grown on agar plates. Results: Mass spectrometry showed a molecular mass of 2.148 kDa. CF was found in polymorphonuclear neutrophilic cells only. No amino acids were detected, and a low ultraviolet absorbance at 260 nm and resistance to nuclease indicate the absence of nucleic acids. An anthrone test was positive for carbohydrate. The substance was soluble in water. CF showed a dose related cytotoxicity in the range of 0.1–1 mg/ml. The cytotoxic effect was abrogated by zinc ions. Preliminary testing indicated that CF also had cytotoxic effects against some bacteria. Conclusions: This report describes a factor from isolated human leucocytes that is cytotoxic to C albicans. The substance contains a carbohydrate moiety, whereas no amino acids were detected. The cytotoxicity can be abrogated by zinc ions in vitro. This substance is probably part of the repertoire by which leucocytes prevent infections. PMID:12890745

  18. Selective inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis in human leukaemic leucocytes by methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S; Ray, M; Misra, S; Dutta, D P; Ray, S

    1997-04-15

    The effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption of mitochondria of both normal and leukaemic leucocytes was tested by using different respiratory substrates and complex specific artificial electron donors and inhibitors. The results indicate that methylglyoxal strongly inhibits mitochondrial respiration in leukaemic leucocytes, whereas, at a much higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit mitochondrial respiration in normal leucocytes. Methylglyoxal strongly inhibits ADP-stimulated alpha-oxoglutarate and malate plus NAD+-dependent respiration, whereas, at a higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit succinate and alpha-glycerophosphate-dependent respiration. Methylglyoxal also fails to inhibit respiration which is initiated by duroquinone and cannot inhibit oxygen consumption when the N,N,N', N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine by-pass is used. NADH oxidation by sub-mitochondrial particles of leukaemic leucocytes is also inhibited by methylglyoxal. Lactaldehyde, a catabolite of methylglyoxal, can exert a protective effect on the inhibition of leukaemic leucocyte mitochondrial respiration by methylglyoxal. Methylglyoxal also inhibits l-lactic acid formation by intact leukaemic leucocytes and critically reduces the ATP level of these cells, whereas methylglyoxal has no effect on normal leucocytes. We conclude that methylglyoxal inhibits glycolysis and the electron flow through mitochondrial complex I of leukaemic leucocytes. This is strikingly similar to our previous studies on mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis and ATP levels in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells [Ray, Dutta, Halder and Ray (1994) Biochem. J. 303, 69-72; Halder, Ray and Ray (1993) Int. J. Cancer 54, 443-449], which strongly suggests that the inhibition of electron flow through complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and inhibition of glycolysis by methylglyoxal may be common characteristics of all malignant cells.

  19. Selective inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis in human leukaemic leucocytes by methylglyoxal.

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, S; Ray, M; Misra, S; Dutta, D P; Ray, S

    1997-01-01

    The effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption of mitochondria of both normal and leukaemic leucocytes was tested by using different respiratory substrates and complex specific artificial electron donors and inhibitors. The results indicate that methylglyoxal strongly inhibits mitochondrial respiration in leukaemic leucocytes, whereas, at a much higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit mitochondrial respiration in normal leucocytes. Methylglyoxal strongly inhibits ADP-stimulated alpha-oxoglutarate and malate plus NAD+-dependent respiration, whereas, at a higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit succinate and alpha-glycerophosphate-dependent respiration. Methylglyoxal also fails to inhibit respiration which is initiated by duroquinone and cannot inhibit oxygen consumption when the N,N,N', N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine by-pass is used. NADH oxidation by sub-mitochondrial particles of leukaemic leucocytes is also inhibited by methylglyoxal. Lactaldehyde, a catabolite of methylglyoxal, can exert a protective effect on the inhibition of leukaemic leucocyte mitochondrial respiration by methylglyoxal. Methylglyoxal also inhibits l-lactic acid formation by intact leukaemic leucocytes and critically reduces the ATP level of these cells, whereas methylglyoxal has no effect on normal leucocytes. We conclude that methylglyoxal inhibits glycolysis and the electron flow through mitochondrial complex I of leukaemic leucocytes. This is strikingly similar to our previous studies on mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis and ATP levels in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells [Ray, Dutta, Halder and Ray (1994) Biochem. J. 303, 69-72; Halder, Ray and Ray (1993) Int. J. Cancer 54, 443-449], which strongly suggests that the inhibition of electron flow through complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and inhibition of glycolysis by methylglyoxal may be common characteristics of all malignant cells. PMID:9163322

  20. The effects of some antirheumatic drugs on an in vitro model of human polymorphonuclear leucocyte chemokinesis.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. J.; Walker, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    1 A rapid, reproducible in vitro assay for studying the chemokinetic movement of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) is described. Two synthetic peptides, formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) and formyl methionyl-phenylalanine (FMP), were used as a standard chemokinesins. 2 Maximal chemokinetic movement was observed with peptide concentrations of 2.5 nM (FMLP) and 100 muM (FMP). EC50 values of 650.0 +/- 60.0 pM and 27.0 +/- 3.5 muM respectively are similar to those reported for chemotactic activity of the peptides in micropore filter assays. 3 The PMN chemokinetic response to FMLP was enhanced by histamine (100 nM) and vitamin C (2.5 muM). 4 Human serum albumin was shown to induce chemokinesis but to antagonize the response to FMLP in a dose-related fashion. Fibrinogen similarly antagonized the cell response to peptide. 5 Levamisole (250 nM to 2.5 muM) significantly potentiated the chemokinetic responses to FMLP and FMP in a dose-related manner. The chemokinetic response to FMLP was unaffected by D-penicillamine (250 muM to 10 mM) while alclofenac (500 muM to 1 mM), salicylic acid (250 muM to 10 mM) and indomethacin (100 muM to 1 mM) caused dose-related inhibition. PMID:7397456

  1. Paracrine effects of uterine leucocytes on gene expression of human uterine stromal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Germeyer, Ariane; Sharkey, Andrew Mark; Prasadajudio, Mirari; Sherwin, Robert; Moffett, Ashley; Bieback, Karen; Clausmeyer, Susanne; Masters, Leanne; Popovici, Roxana Maria; Hess, Alexandra Petra; Strowitzki, Thomas; von Wolff, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The endometrium contains a distinct population of immune cells that undergo cyclic changes during the menstrual cycle and implantation. The majority of these leucocytes are uterine NK (uNK) cells, however how these cells interact with uterine stromal fibroblasts remains unclear. We therefore investigated the paracrine effect of medium conditioned by uterine decidual leucocytes (which are enriched for uNK cells) on the gene expression profile of endometrial stromal fibroblasts in vitro using a cDNA microarray. Our results, verified by real-time PCR, ELISA and FACS analysis, reveal that soluble factors from uterine leucocytes substantially alter endometrial stromal fibroblast gene expression. The largest group of up-regulated genes found was chemokines and cytokines. These include IL-8, CCL8 and CXCL1, which have also been shown to be stimulated by contact of stromal fibroblasts with trophoblast, suggesting that uNK cells work synergistically to support trophoblast migration during implantation. The decidual leucocytes also up-regulated IL-15 and IL-15Ralpha in stromal fibroblasts which could produce a niche for uNK cells allowing proliferation within and recruitment into the uterus, as seen in bone marrow. Overall this study demonstrates, for the first time, the paracrine communication between uterine leucocytes and uterine stromal fibroblasts, and adds to the understanding of how the uterine immune system contributes to the changes seen within the cycling endometrium.

  2. Nitric oxide-generating system as an autocrine mechanism in human polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Riesco, A; Caramelo, C; Blum, G; Montón, M; Gallego, M J; Casado, S; López Farré, A

    1993-01-01

    Recent data [Lopéz-Farré, Riesco, Moliz, Egido, Casado, Hernando and Caramelo (1991) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 178, 884-891] revealed that endothelin 1 (ET-1) increases intracellular free [Ca2+] in polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) by a mechanism that can be inhibited by L-arginine. The aim of the present study was to clarify the mechanisms of the interaction between the effects of ET-1 and L-arginine in human PMN. The experimental findings showed that in human PMN: (a) ET-1 and the chemoattractant peptide N-formylmethionyl- leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) induce both the metabolism of L-arginine to L-citrulline and cyclic GMP (cGMP) formation; (b) the ET-1-induced cGMP production is inhibitable by the L-arginine antagonist NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, therefore suggesting the involvement of NO; (c) the ET-1- or fMLP-induced NO/cGMP stimulation is critically dependent on the availability of L-arginine; (d) human PMN possess a L-arginine transport system with both Na(+)-dependent and -independent components; (e) the L-arginine transport system in PMN appears to be feedback-regulated by NO/cGMP in ET-1-stimulated conditions, but not under baseline conditions; (f) the L-arginine transport system in PMN is independent of the gamma-glutamyl cycle and is not modified by either ET-1 or fMLP. The L-arginine/NO/cGMP-dependent mechanisms characterized in the present study may be relevant in the regulation of PMN activation in pathophysiological conditions in vivo. PMID:7686367

  3. Inherited human group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 deficiency abolishes platelet, endothelial, and leucocyte eicosanoid generation

    PubMed Central

    Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Reed, Daniel M.; Edin, Matthew L.; Rauzi, Francesca; Mataragka, Stefania; Vojnovic, Ivana; Bishop-Bailey, David; Milne, Ginger L.; Longhurst, Hilary; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Mitchell, Jane A.; Warner, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids are important vascular regulators, but the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) isoforms supporting their production within the cardiovascular system are not fully understood. To address this, we have studied platelets, endothelial cells, and leukocytes from 2 siblings with a homozygous loss-of-function mutation in group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2α). Chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to determine levels of a broad range of eicosanoids produced by isolated vascular cells, and in plasma and urine. Eicosanoid release data were paired with studies of cellular function. Absence of cPLA2α almost abolished eicosanoid synthesis in platelets (e.g., thromboxane A2, control 20.5 ± 1.4 ng/ml vs. patient 0.1 ng/ml) and leukocytes [e.g., prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), control 21.9 ± 7.4 ng/ml vs. patient 1.9 ng/ml], and this was associated with impaired platelet activation and enhanced inflammatory responses. cPLA2α-deficient endothelial cells showed reduced, but not absent, formation of prostaglandin I2 (prostacyclin; control 956 ± 422 pg/ml vs. patient 196 pg/ml) and were primed for inflammation. In the urine, prostaglandin metabolites were selectively influenced by cPLA2α deficiency. For example, prostacyclin metabolites were strongly reduced (18.4% of control) in patients lacking cPLA2α, whereas PGE2 metabolites (77.8% of control) were similar to healthy volunteer levels. These studies constitute a definitive account, demonstrating the fundamental role of cPLA2α to eicosanoid formation and cellular responses within the human circulation.—Kirkby, N. S., Reed, D. M., Edin, M. L., Rauzi, F., Mataragka, S., Vojnovic, I., Bishop-Bailey, D., Milne, G. L., Longhurst, H., Zeldin, D. C., Mitchell, J. A., Warner, T. D. Inherited human group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 deficiency abolishes platelet, endothelial, and leucocyte eicosanoid generation. PMID:26183771

  4. Improved leucocyte migration inhibition response of leucocytes from lepromatous leprosy patients with hapten modified M. leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Fotedar, A; Mustafa, A S; Narang, B S; Talwar, G P

    1982-01-01

    Two acetoacetylated derivatives of Mycobacterium leprae with variable hapten groups and a conjugate with tetanus toxoid were prepared. These were tested as antigens along with unmodified M. leprae in the leucocyte migration inhibition response of leucocytes from clinically, bacteriologically and histopathologically confirmed cases of lepromatous leprosy. LMI response was poor with M. leprae, but was significantly enhanced with acetoacetylated M. leprae. PMID:6751637

  5. Effect of glucose intake on human leucocyte /sup 86/Rb influx and (/sup 3/H)-ouabain binding

    SciTech Connect

    Turaihi, K.; Baron, D.N.; Dandona, P.

    1988-02-01

    /sup 86/Rb influx and (/sup 3/H) ouabain binding by human leucocytes were measured in eight normal nonobese fasting subjects before and after a challenge with 75 g glucose orally. The mean ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb influx increased significantly from 194 to 283 mmol/kg protein/h (P less than .01), and (/sup 3/H)-ouabain binding increased from 236 to 403 fmol/mg protein. The mean plasma potassium concentration fell from 4.2 to 3.9 mmol/L (P less than .05). Following intravenous glucose infusion, the median /sup 86/Rb transport increased from 186 to 267 mmol/kg protein/h, while median plasma potassium concentration fell from 4.3 to 3.9 mmol/L. Therefore, glucose intake acutely increases Na-K ATPase units, stimulates potassium (Rb) transport, and causes a concomitant fall in plasma potassium concentrations. Nutritional intake is probably an important determinant of Na-K ATPase units and activity in the human leucocyte.

  6. Evaluation of Leucocyte Functions Six Years after Tumour Autograft in Human Mammary Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J. Maxwell; Kelly, F.; Wood, Suzanne E.; Rodger, K. D.; Freshney, R. Ian

    1973-01-01

    Mammary cancer directed and nonspecific immunoassays were made in 3 groups of female patients. One group had primary mammary cancer treated by mastectomy and postoperative radiotherapy plus an autograft of irradiated tumour (AIT) 40-66 months previously. A second age-matched group had mammary cancer comparable to the first group in clinical presentation and treatment except that no AIT was given. The third group consisted of non-cancer-bearing age-matched females. The migration of leucocytes from autografted patients was significantly inhibited in the presence of allogeneic mammary cancer cells from a standardized panel, compared with leucocytes from either non-autograft patients or non-cancer bearers. Selected data from a lymphocyte cytotoxicity test revealed a significantly greater kill of allogeneic mammary cancer target cells by autograft lymphocytes than by those of other groups. These indications of increased cancer directed cell mediated immunity in respect of sensitivity and toxicity in association with AIT require further elucidation under strictly controlled conditions. PMID:4807858

  7. Chemokines, chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules on different human endothelia: discriminating the tissue-specific functions that affect leucocyte migration

    PubMed Central

    HILLYER, P; MORDELET, E; FLYNN, G; MALE, D

    2003-01-01

    The selective accumulation of different leucocyte populations during inflammation is regulated by adhesion molecules and chemokines expressed by vascular endothelium. This study examined how chemokine production and the expression of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors vary between endothelia from different vascular beds. Human saphenous vein endothelium was compared with lung and dermal microvascular endothelia and with umbilical vein endothelium and a bone-marrow endothelial cell line. All endothelia produced CCL2 and CXCL8 constitutively, whereas CXCL10 and CCL5 were only secreted after tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α or interferon (IFN)-γ stimulation. In combination with TNF-α, IFN-γ suppressed CXCL8 but enhanced CCL5 and CXCL10, whereas transforming growth factor (TGF)-β reduced secretion of all chemokines. Basal chemokine secretion was higher from umbilical vein than other endothelial cells. Chemokine receptors, CXCR1, CXCR3 and CCR3, were present on all endothelia but highest on saphenous vein. CCR4, CCR5, CCR6, CXCR2, CXCR4 and CXCR5 were also detected at variable levels on different endothelia. The variation between endothelia in chemokine secretion was much greater than the variations in adhesion molecules, both on resting cells and following cytokine stimulation. These results indicate that it is the tissue-specific variations in endothelial chemokine secretion rather than variations in adhesion molecules that can explain the different patterns of inflammation and leucocyte traffic seen in non-lymphoid tissues. PMID:14632748

  8. The use of reference strand-mediated conformational analysis for the study of cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) feline leucocyte antigen class II DRB polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Drake, G J C; Kennedy, L J; Auty, H K; Ryvar, R; Ollier, W E R; Kitchener, A C; Freeman, A R; Radford, A D

    2004-01-01

    There is now considerable evidence to suggest the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has limited genetic diversity. However, the extent of this and its significance to the fitness of the cheetah population, both in the wild and captivity, is the subject of some debate. This reflects the difficulty associated with establishing a direct link between low variability at biologically significant loci and deleterious aspects of phenotype in this, and other, species. Attempts to study one such region, the feline leucocyte antigen (FLA), are hampered by a general reliance on cloning and sequencing which is expensive, labour-intensive, subject to PCR artefact and always likely to underestimate true variability. In this study we have applied reference strand-mediated conformational analysis (RSCA) to determine the FLA-DRB phenotypes of 25 cheetahs. This technique was rapid, repeatable and less prone to polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-induced sequence artefacts associated with cloning. Individual cheetahs were shown to have up to three FLA-DRB genes. A total of five alleles were identified (DRB*ha14-17 and DRB*gd01) distributed among four genotypes. Fifteen cheetahs were DRB*ha14/ha15/ha16/ha17, three were DRB*ha15/ha16/ha17, six were DRB*ha14/ha16/ha17 and one was DRB*ha14/ha15/ha16/ha17/gd01. Sequence analysis of DRB*gd01 suggested it was a recombinant of DRB*ha16 and DRB*ha17. Generation of new alleles is difficult to document, and the clear demonstration of such an event is unusual. This study confirms further the limited genetic variability of the cheetah at a biologically significant region. RSCA will facilitate large-scale studies that will be needed to correlate genetic diversity at such loci with population fitness in the cheetah and other species.

  9. Influence of captopril on glucose and fatty acid oxidation in human thrombocytes and mononuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Haeckel, R; Colic, D

    1991-01-01

    Captopril (CAS 62571-86-2) may be beneficial for the treatment of diabetes because of its activating effect on peripheral glucose consumption besides its well known blood pressure degradation. The glucose oxidation has been found to be activated by captopril in thrombocytes and mononuclear leucocytes, cell types which are usually considered to be independent from insulin. Because the oxidation of pyruvate labelled in position C-1 but not of 2-14C-pyruvate and of 1-14C-acetate was enhanced, captopril most probably stimulated the pyruvate decarboxylation reaction. The metabolism of glucose labelled in positions 1 and 6 was equally activated by captopril indicating another step which may be affected by captopril.

  10. Deleterious effect of Brij 35 on alkyl 2-pyrones and other hydrophobic inhibitors of human sputum and leucocyte elastase.

    PubMed

    Cook, L; Ternai, B

    1988-10-01

    Brij 35 significantly reduced the inhibitory activity of hydrophobic alkyl 2-pyrones, oleic acid and alkyl peptides towards human sputum and leucocyte elastase, whereas 4-methoxy-6-(2'-hydroxy-2'-(carbobutyloxy)-vinyl)-2-pyrone, alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor and a sulfated chitosan were unaffected. The effect of Brij 35 on elastase appeared to be irreversible, since dialysis against Brij-free buffer was not accompanied by a return to inhibitory activity by the first group of inhibitors. However, passage through an ionic-exchange column was effective in removing the detergent from the enzyme. Brij 35 is also an activator of the elastases: kcat for Boc-Ala-4-nitrophenyl ester and methylsuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-4-nitroanilide increased by 20% and 40%, respectively in the presence of 0.015% Brij 35. Binding of the substrates to the enzyme is unaffected, since Km is unchanged.

  11. Human leukocyte Antigen-DM polymorphisms in autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Eliot; Wieczorek, Marek; Sticht, Jana; Freund, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Classical MHC class II (MHCII) proteins present peptides for CD4+ T-cell surveillance and are by far the most prominent risk factor for a number of autoimmune disorders. To date, many studies have shown that this link between particular MHCII alleles and disease depends on the MHCII's particular ability to bind and present certain peptides in specific physiological contexts. However, less attention has been paid to the non-classical MHCII molecule human leucocyte antigen-DM, which catalyses peptide exchange on classical MHCII proteins acting as a peptide editor. DM function impacts the presentation of both antigenic peptides in the periphery and key self-peptides during T-cell development in the thymus. In this way, DM activity directly influences the response to pathogens, as well as mechanisms of self-tolerance acquisition. While decreased DM editing of particular MHCII proteins has been proposed to be related to autoimmune disorders, no experimental evidence for different DM catalytic properties had been reported until recently. Biochemical and structural investigations, together with new animal models of loss of DM activity, have provided an attractive foundation for identifying different catalytic efficiencies for DM allotypes. Here, we revisit the current knowledge of DM function and discuss how DM function may impart autoimmunity at the organism level. PMID:27534821

  12. Influence of fucoidans and their derivatives on antitumor and phagocytic activity of human blood leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Anisimova, N Yu; Ustyuzhanina, N E; Donenko, F V; Bilan, M I; Ushakova, N A; Usov, A I; Nifantiev, N E; Kiselevskiy, M V

    2015-07-01

    The immunotropic activity of structurally different fucoidans and their derivatives towards isolated immune blood cells, effectors of innate immune system, was studied. The most potent effect was observed for high molecular weight fucoidan CF from the alga Chordaria flagelliformis, whose backbone is built of (1→3)-linked units of α-L-fucopyranose, and branches included residues of α-D-glucuronic acid and α-L-fucofuranose. This compound at the concentration of 0.05 mg/ml potentiated phagocytosis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus acidophilus by neutrophils, increasing relative quantity of phagocytes as well as their effectiveness. Along with this, 14% increase in the concentration of membrane-bound integrin CD11c molecules was observed. The systemic effect of CF at the dose of 0.01 mg/mouse i.p. led to potentiation of cytotoxic activity of spleen mononuclear leucocytes towards melanoma cells of line B16 by 1.9-fold and towards chronic myelogenous leukemia cells of line K-562 by 1.7-fold. These results indicate that fucoidan CF can stimulate anti-infective and antitumor activity of effectors of the innate immune system via CD11c integrins.

  13. Harmonization of light scatter and fluorescence flow cytometry profiles obtained after staining peripheral blood leucocytes for cell surface-only versus intracellular antigens with the Fix & Perm reagent.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Elaine Sobral; Peres, Rodrigo Tosta; Almeida, Julia; Lécrevisse, Quentin; Arroyo, María Elena; Teodósio, Cristina; Pedreira, Carlos Eduardo; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Orfao, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Staining for intracellular markers with the Fix & Perm reagent is associated with variations in the scatter properties of leucocytes, limiting automated analysis of flow cytometry (FCM) data. Here, we investigated those variables significantly contributing to changes in the light scatter, autofluorescence, and bcl2 staining characteristics of peripheral blood (PB) leucocytes, after fixation with Fix & Perm. Our major aim was to evaluate a new mathematical approach for automated harmonization of FCM data from datafiles corresponding to aliquots of a sample treated with cell-surface-only versus Fix & Perm intracellular staining techniques. Overall, neither the anticoagulant used nor sample storage for <24 h showed significant impact on the light scatter and fluorescence properties of PB leucocytes; similarly, the duration of the fixation period (once >15 min were used) had a minimum impact on the FCM properties of PB leucocytes. Conversely, changes in cell/protein concentrations and the fixative/sample (vol/vol) ratio had a clear impact on the light scatter features of some populations of leucocytes. Accordingly, lower cell/protein concentrations were associated with lower scatter values, particularly for the neutrophils. Such changes could be partially corrected through the use of higher fixative to sample volume ratios. Despite the variable changes detected between aliquots of the same sample treated with cell surface-only versus intracellular staining procedures, the new mathematical approach here proposed and evaluated for automated harmonization of common parameters in both datafiles, could correct the FCM profiles of leucocytes derived from cells undergoing conventional fixation/permeabilization procedures, and made them indistinguishable from those corresponding to aliquots of the same sample treated with cell-surface-only staining techniques.

  14. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity evaluation of organochalcogens in human leucocytes: a comparative study between ebselen, diphenyl diselenide, and diphenyl ditelluride.

    PubMed

    Caeran Bueno, Diones; Meinerz, Daiane Francine; Allebrandt, Josiane; Waczuk, Emily Pansera; dos Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; Mariano, Douglas Oscar Ceolin; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira

    2013-01-01

    Organochalcogens, particularly ebselen, have been used in experimental and clinical trials with borderline efficacy. (PhSe)2 and (PhTe)2 are the simplest of the diaryl dichalcogenides and share with ebselen pharmacological properties. In view of the concerns with the use of mammals in studies and the great number of new organochalcogens with potential pharmacological properties that have been synthesized, it becomes important to develop screening protocols to select compounds that are worth to be tested in vivo. This study investigated the possible use of isolated human white cells as a preliminary model to test organochalcogen toxicity. Human leucocytes were exposed to 5-50  μM of ebselen, (PhSe)2, or (PhTe)2. All compounds were cytotoxic (Trypan's Blue exclusion) at the highest concentration tested, and Ebselen was the most toxic. Ebselen and (PhSe)2 were genotoxic (Comet Assay) only at 50  μM, and (PhTe)2 at 5-50  μM. Here, the acute cytotoxicity did not correspond with in vivo toxicity of the compounds. But the genotoxicity was in the same order of the in vivo toxicity to mice. These results indicate that in vitro genotoxicity in white blood cells should be considered as an early step in the investigation of potential toxicity of organochalcogens.

  15. Human seroreactivity to gut microbiota antigens

    PubMed Central

    Christmann, Benjamin S.; Abrahamsson, Thomas R.; Bernstein, Charles N.; Duck, L. Wayne; Mannon, Peter J.; Berg, Göran; Björkstén, Bengt; Jenmalm, Maria C.; Elson, Charles O.

    2015-01-01

    Background While immune responses directed against antigens from the intestinal microbiota are observed in certain diseases, the normal human adaptive immune response to intestinal microbiota is poorly defined. Objective Our goal was to assess the adaptive immune response to the intestinal microbiota present in 143 healthy adults and compare this response to the immune response observed in 52 children and their mothers at risk of having allergic disease. Methods Human serum was collected from adults and from children followed from birth to seven years of age, and the serum IgG response to a panel of intestinal microbiota antigens was assessed using a novel protein microarray. Results Nearly every individual tested, regardless of health status, had serum IgG that recognized a common set of antigens. Seroreactivity to the panel of antigens was significantly lower in atopic adults. Healthy infants expressed the highest level of IgG seroreactivity to intestinal microbiota antigens. This adaptive response developed between 6 and 12 months of age, and peaked around 2 years of age. Low IgG responses to certain clusters of microbiota antigens during infancy were associated with allergy development during childhood. Conclusions There is an observed perturbation of the adaptive response to antigens from the microbiota in allergic individuals. These perturbations are observable even in childhood, suggesting that optimal stimulation of the adaptive immune system by the microbiota may be needed to prevent certain immune-mediated diseases. PMID:26014812

  16. Arginine-specific mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase activity on the surface of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, L E; Rendell, N B; Murray, S; Allport, J R; Lo, G; Kefalas, P; Taylor, G W; MacDermot, J

    1996-01-01

    An Arg-specific mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase activity on the surface of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil leucocytes (PMNs) was confirmed by the use of diethylamino-(benzylidineamino)guanidine (DEA-BAG) as an ADP-ribose acceptor. Two separate HPLC systems were used to separate ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG from reaction mixtures, and its presence was confirmed by electrospray mass spectrometry. ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG was produced in the presence of PMNs, but not in their absence. Incubation of DEA-BAG with ADP-ribose (0.1-10 mM) did not yield ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG, which indicates that ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG formed in the presence of PMNs was not simply a product of a reaction between DEA-BAG and free ADP-ribose, due possibly to the hydrolysis of NAD+ by an NAD+ glycohydrolase. The assay of mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase with agmatine as a substrate was modified for intact PMNs, and the activity was found to be approx. 50-fold lower than that in rabbit cardiac membranes. The Km of the enzyme for NAD+ was 100.1 30.4 microM and the Vmax 1.4 0.2 pmol of ADP-ribosylagmatine/h per 10(6) cells. The enzyme is likely to be linked to the cell surface via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor, since incubation of intact PMNs with phosphoinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) led to a 98% decrease in mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase activity in the cells. Cell surface proteins were labelled after exposure of intact PMNs to [32P]NAD+. Their molecular masses were 79, 67, 46, 36 and 26 kDa. The time course for labelling was non-linear under these conditions over a period of 4 h. The labelled products were identified as mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins by hydrolysis with snake venom phosphodiesterase to yield 5'-AMP. PMID:8615841

  17. Use of HLA peptidomics and whole exome sequencing to identify human immunogenic neo-antigens

    PubMed Central

    Kalaora, Shelly; Qutob, Nouar; Teer, Jamie K.; Shimony, Nilly; Schachter, Jacob; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Samuels, Yardena

    2016-01-01

    The antigenicity of cells is demarcated by the peptides bound by their Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA) molecules. Through this antigen presentation, T cell specificity response is controlled. As a fraction of the expressed mutated peptides is presented on the HLA, these neo-epitopes could be immunogenic. Such neoantigens have recently been identified through screening for predicted mutated peptides, using synthetic peptides or ones expressed from minigenes, combined with screening of patient tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). Here we present a time and cost-effective method that combines whole-exome sequencing analysis with HLA peptidome mass spectrometry, to identify neo-antigens in a melanoma patient. Of the 1,019 amino acid changes identified through exome sequencing, two were confirmed by mass spectrometry to be presented by the cells. We then synthesized peptides and evaluated the two mutated neo-antigens for reactivity with autologous bulk TILs, and found that one yielded mutant-specific T-cell response. Our results demonstrate that this method can be used for immune response prediction and promise to provide an alternative approach for identifying immunogenic neo-epitopes in cancer. PMID:26819371

  18. Assessment of the cellular immune response to HL-A antigens in human renal allograft recipients

    PubMed Central

    Falk, R. E.; Guttmann, R. D.; Falk, J. A.; Beaudoin, J. G.; Deveber, G.; Morehouse, D. D.; Wilson, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    The cellular response to HL-A antigens has been studied in thirty-one patients who had received a renal allograft from either a cadaveric or living donor, utilizing the leucocyte migration technique. The results indicate that inhibition of migration develops prior to or during the onset of a clinical rejection episode. This inhibition of migration reverts to non-inhibition in autologous serum when the rejection crisis is reversed. Inhibition of migration is still noted in allogeneic serum following this clinical reversal, but after varying time intervals the inhibition reaction also decreases in this serum. The abrogation of inhibition in autologous serum is specific to the HL-A antigens of the donor. These observations suggest that survival of human renal allografts depends on a blocking substance in the serum initially; subsequently, the loss of inhibition of migration with HL-A antigens in both autologous and allogeneic serum suggests an inactivation of specific antigen sensitive cells to the histocompatibility antigens of the donor. PMID:4577287

  19. UK NEQAS for leucocyte immunophenotyping: the first 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, J; Barnett, D

    2001-01-01

    interlaboratory variations seen in cellular immunophenotyping. Furthermore, particularly in absolute counting of lymphocyte subsets, PBSCs, and the enumeration of low numbers of leucocytes, UK NEQAS for Leucocyte Immunophenotyping programmes have been instrumental in highlighting the differences that occur between single and dual platform flow cytometric technologies. As a result of these findings, UK NEQAS for Leucocyte Immunophenotyping has helped to reduce the variation seen on an interlaboratory basis and enabled greater standardisation both in the UK and internationally. These advances have been attributable to the development, by UK NEQAS for Leucocyte Immunophenotyping, of a unique whole blood stabilising process that ensures the retention of the physical characteristics (both light scatter and antigenic profile) required of cells to ensure successful cellular immunophenotyping. This major technological advancement has enabled the distribution of specimens for EQA purposes on a global scale that have minimal matrix effect and behave in a manner identical to fresh blood for several months after stabilisation. Key Words: leucocyte immunophenotyping • leukaemia • human immunodeficiency virus infection • flow cytometry • guidelines PMID:11429420

  20. Human thymus contains amnion epithelial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Hsi, B L; Yeh, C J; Faulk, W P

    1983-01-01

    Antibodies produced in rabbits to detergent-solubilized human amnion were found to react with Hassall's corpuscles in human thymus. Following nomenclature for placental antigens, the immunogenic group responsible for these antibodies has been tentatively designated as amnion antigens 1 (AA1). The anti-AA1 antisera did not react with other thymic components, nor did they react with any other extra-embryonic tissues than amniotic epithelium. Some adult ectodermally derived tissues, such as breast ductal and corneal epithelium, reacted with anti-AA1, but others such as skin and vagina did not. These findings link an antigenic relationship between amniotic epithelium and certain ectodermal derivatives. Amnion exists long before these tissues are formed, raising the possibility that amniotic epithelium may play an inductive role in their development. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6343232

  1. [Enterobacterial antigen in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Faure-Fontenla, M A; García-Tamayo, F

    1989-11-01

    The following study has as prior history the research reports which have shown the existence of an antigenic tissue deposit in gram-negative enterobacteria. The antigens of the enterobacteria have also been found in the lymphocytic membranes and cytoplasm. Since intestinal lymphoid tissue cells can recirculate by means of the thoracic duct to the peripheral venous system, it was proposed that the circulating lymphocytes in healthy people could also contain small amounts of a common enterobacterial antigen. The study was carried out in 15 human venous blood samples, of which the lymphocytic population was separated to later be used in the preparation of 15 alcohol soluble extracts. This material was used for inhibiting the immuno-hemolysis assay in three occasions in order to show the presence of antigens shared by different enterobacterias, using as reference a fraction separated from the LPS of Escherichia coli 08. The results showed that the human lymphocytes also had antigenic determinants common to gram-negative bacteria.

  2. Lea blood group antigen on human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Dunstan, R.A.; Simpson, M.B.; Rosse, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    One- and two-stage radioligand assays were used to determine if human platelets possess the Lea antigen. Goat IgG anti-Lea antibody was purified by multiple adsorptions with Le(a-b-) human red blood cells, followed by affinity chromatography with synthetic Lea substance and labeling with /sup 125/I. Human IgG anti-Lea antibody was used either in a two stage radioassay with /sup 125/I-labeled mouse monoclonal IgG anti-human IgG as the second antibody or, alternatively, purified by Staph protein A chromatography, labeled with /sup 125/I, and used in a one-stage radioassay. Platelets from donors of appropriate red blood cell phenotypes were incubated with the antisera, centrifuged through phthalate esters, and assayed in a gamma scintillation counter. Dose response and saturation curve analysis demonstrate the presence of Lewis a antigen on platelets from Lea+ donors. Furthermore, platelets from an Le(a-b-) donor incubated in Le (a+b-) plasma adsorb Lea antigen in a similar manner to red blood cells. The clinical significance of these antigens in platelet transfusion remains undefined.

  3. Human Hybriodomas for Exotic Antigens.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    surface IgM and traces of IgG of the kappa light chain isotype. To what extent these immunoglobulin chains contribute to the total secreted antibody of...anti-human kappa (supplied by TAGO) or a 1:700 dilution of goat anti-human lambda (supplied by TAGO) in PBS-AE (phosphate buffered saline containing...plates, a variant subelone of WI-L2-729-HF 2 has been isolated which expresses undetectable amounts of heavy chain and a trace amount of kappa . However

  4. Leucocytes isolated from simply frozen whole blood can be used in human biomonitoring for DNA damage measurement with the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Akor-Dewu, Maryam B; El Yamani, Naouale; Bilyk, Olena; Holtung, Linda; Tjelle, Torunn E; Blomhoff, Rune; Collins, Andrew R

    2014-04-01

    Preservation of human blood cells for DNA damage analysis with the comet assay conventionally involves the isolation of mononuclear cells by centrifugation, suspension in freezing medium and slow freezing to -80 °C-a laborious process. A recent publication (Al-Salmani et al. Free Rad Biol Med 2011; 51: 719-725) describes a simple method in which small volumes of whole blood are frozen to -20 or -80 °C; on subsequent thawing, the comet assay is performed, with no indication of elevated DNA strand breakage resulting from the rapid freezing. However, leucocytes in whole blood (whether fresh or frozen) are abnormally resistant to damage by H2 O2 , and so a common test of antioxidant status (resistance to strand breakage by H2 O2 ) cannot be used. We have refined this method by separating the leucocytes from the thawed blood; we find that, after three washes, the cells respond normally to H2 O2 . In addition, we have measured specific endogenous base damage (oxidized purines) in the isolated leucocytes, using the enzyme formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. In a study of blood samples from 10 subjects, H2 O2 sensitivity and endogenous damage-both reflecting the antioxidant status of the cells-correlated significantly. This modified approach to sample collection and storage is particularly applicable when the available volume of blood is limited and has great potential in biomonitoring and ecogenotoxicology studies where samples are obtained in the field or at sites remote from the testing laboratory.

  5. VLA-4 blockade by natalizumab inhibits sickle reticulocyte and leucocyte adhesion during simulated blood flow.

    PubMed

    White, Jennell; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Gupta, Dipti; Lancelot, Moira; Moore, Nancy; Sarnaik, Sharada; Hobbs, William E; Light, David R; Hines, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Very Late Antigen-4 (VLA-4, α4β1-integrin, ITGA4) orchestrates cell-cell and cell-endothelium adhesion. Given the proposed role of VLA-4 in sickle cell disease (SCD) pathophysiology, we evaluated the ability of the VLA-4 blocking antibody natalizumab to inhibit SCD blood cell adhesion. Natalizumab recognized surface VLA-4 on leucocytes and reticulocytes in whole blood from SCD subjects. SCD reticulocytes were positive for VLA-4, while VLA-4 staining of non-SCD reticulocytes was undetectable. Titrations with natalizumab revealed the presence of saturable levels of VLA-4 on both SCD reticulocytes and leucocytes similar to healthy subject leucocytes. Under physiological flow conditions, the adhesion of SCD whole blood cells and isolated SCD leucocytes to immobilized vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) was blocked by natalizumab in a dose-dependent manner, which correlated with cell surface receptor binding. Natalizumab also inhibited >50% of whole blood cell binding to TNF-α activated human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers under physiological flow at clinically relevant concentrations (10 to 100 μg/ml). This indicates that VLA-4 is the dominant receptor that drives SCD reticulocyte and mononuclear cell adhesion to VCAM-1 and that the VLA-4 adhesion to VCAM-1 is a significant contributor to SCD blood cell adhesion to endothelium. Thus, VLA-4 blockade may be beneficial in sickle cell disease.

  6. Detection of a low-molecular-weight antigen on melanoma cells by a human antiserum in leukocyte-dependent antibody assays.

    PubMed

    Hersey, P; Murray, E; Werkmeister, J; McCarthy, W H

    1979-10-01

    Biochemical characterization of serologically detected human melanoma antigens was undertaken for the development of immunodiagnostic assays in melanoma. An antiserum from a human melanoma patient, which detected melanoma antigens expressed on a large proportion of different melanoma cells, was used in leucocyte-dependent cytotoxic antibody (LDA) 51Cr-release assays to monitor the purification of melanoma antigens in urea/acetate extracts of lactoperoxidase 125I-labelled melanoma cell membranes. The separation procedures included affinity chromatography on Concanavalin A, gel filtration on porous polyacrylamide beads and preparative isoelectric focusing. The fractions were also monitored by polyacrylamide electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate and by measurement of beta 2 microglobulin and carcinoembryonic antigen content. The antigens detected by this antiserum appeared to be acidic (pI 3.5) low-mol.-wt glycoproteins of approximately 15,000 daltons which were resistant to heating at 56 degrees C and digestion with neuraminidase, but susceptible to repeated freeze-thawing and trypsin digestion. They did not appear to be related to HLA antigens, beta 2 microglobulin or known foetal antigens. The nature of the antigens detected in these studies is as yet unknown, but they appear similar to those described in the sera and urine of melanoma patients in previous reports. Thes combined results and the frequent expression of these antigens on melanoma cells from different patients suggest that assays to detect this antigen may provide a valuable immunodiagnostic aid in the management of melanoma.

  7. Influence of human leucocyte antigen‐DRB1 on the susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis and on the production of anti‐cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in a Portuguese population

    PubMed Central

    Ligeiro, D; Fonseca, J E; Abade, O; Abreu, I; Cruz, M; Nero, P; Cavaleiro, J; Teles, J; Trindade, H; Caetano, J M; Branco, J

    2007-01-01

    Objective To clarify the influence of the HLA‐DRB1 locus on the susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis and the production of anti‐cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti‐CCP) in a Portuguese population. Methods: 141 patients with rheumatoid arthritis fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology 1987 revised criteria for rheumatoid arthritis were compared with 150 healthy controls. Human leucocyte antigen (HLA)‐DRB1 locus genotyping was assessed by polymerase chain reaction reverse probing assays and sequence‐specific primers. Anti‐CCP antibodies were quantified by ELISA in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Frequencies between groups were compared by the two‐sided Fisher's exact test and considered significant if p<0.05. Results The HLA‐DRB1*04 and HLA‐DRB1*10 groups were highly associated with rheumatoid arthritis (p<0.001 and p = 0.031, respectively). High titres of anti‐CCP antibodies were largely associated with the presence of HLA‐DRB1*04/10. Conclusion The well‐recognised susceptibility alleles to rheumatoid arthritis, HLA‐DRB1*04, were associated with rheumatoid arthritis in Portuguese patients. The relatively rare DRB1*10 was also associated with rheumatoid arthritis, as was described previously in other southern European countries. Both groups were associated with high anti‐CCP titres, reinforcing its relevance to disease onset. PMID:16793843

  8. Cationic Yersinia antigen-induced chronic allergic arthritis in rats. A model for reactive arthritis in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, A K; Batsford, S R; Curschellas, E; Kist, M J; Gondolf, K B

    1991-01-01

    Cationic antigens are known to have considerable arthritogenic potential in experimental systems. During a systematic search for suitable, naturally occurring candidates an intracellular protein was isolated from the ribosomal pellet of Yersinia enterocolitica 0:3, a bacterial strain associated with reactive arthritis in humans. The protein is highly cationic, contains two 19-kD polypeptide chains linked by a disulfide bond, and reveals a strong tendency for spontaneous aggregation. It is suggested to be a nucleic acid binding protein. We tested this antigen for its ability to induce arthritis after intra-articular challenge in preimmunized rats. An acute inflammatory phase followed by transition to chronicity was observed both by technetium-99m scintigraphy and from histology. Massive polymorphonuclear leucocyte infiltration of the synovium was seen early on and fibrosis and thickening of the joint capsule occurred in later stages. Control groups showed no evidence of inflammation. Western blot and ELISA analysis of unselected sera from Yersinia enterocolitica 0:3-infected patients revealed antibodies to the antigen in the majority of cases, whereas healthy individuals rarely reacted. This is the first report of a naturally occurring cationic antigen capable of inducing immunologic tissue injury; it justifies the speculation that cationic antigens from prokaryotic cells could trigger reactive arthritis in humans. Images PMID:1864972

  9. Antigenically Modified Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generate Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jieming; Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide a promising platform to produce dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. To streamline the production process, we investigated a unique antigen-loading strategy that suits this novel platform. Specifically, we stably modified hPSCs using tumour antigen genes in the form of a full-length tumour antigen gene or an artificial tumour antigen epitope-coding minigene. Such antigenically modified hPSCs were able to differentiate into tumour antigen-presenting DCs. Without conventional antigen-loading, DCs derived from the minigene-modified hPSCs were ready to prime a tumour antigen-specific T cell response and further expand these specific T cells in restimulation processes. These expanded tumour antigen-specific T cells were potent effectors with central memory or effector memory phenotype. Thus, we demonstrated that immunocompetent tumour antigen-loaded DCs can be directly generated from antigenically modified hPSCs. Using such strategy, we can completely eliminate the conventional antigen-loading step and significantly simplify the production of DC vaccine from hPSCs. PMID:26471005

  10. Human ficolin: cDNA cloning, demonstration of peripheral blood leucocytes as the major site of synthesis and assignment of the gene to chromosome 9.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, J; Tay, P N; Kon, O L; Reid, K B

    1996-01-01

    Pig ficolins and a number of other proteins contain sequences that are homologous to the C-terminal halves of fibrinogen beta- and gamma-chains. To clone the cDNA for human ficolin, two degenerate oligonucleotide primers were synthesized, based on two stretches of protein sequence that were highly conserved among those proteins, and used for PCR with cDNA from a human uterus lambda gt11 library as a template. A PCR product with a predicted size of 300 bp was obtained and this was used to screen a uterus cDNA library. Of the positive clones isolated, two (U1 and U2), containing inserts of 1.7 and 1.1 kb respectively, were found to encode human ficolin. The cDNA-derived amino acid sequence of human ficolin has approx. 75% identity with, and a similar domain organization to, the two pig ficolin sequences, which are characterized by the presence of a leader peptide, a short N-terminal segment followed by a collagen-like region and then by a C-terminal fibrinogen-like domain. The 1.1 kb insert of clone U2 was used in Northern-blot analysis, and a very strong signal for a 1.4 kb mRNA species was detected in mRNA from human peripheral blood leucocytes. This showed that, despite the initial characterization of pig ficolin as a putative receptor on uterine cells for transforming growth factor beta 1, blood leucocytes are probably the major site of human ficolin synthesis. Much weaker signals of the same size were also detected in spleen, lung and thymus and may be due to the presence of tissue macrophages or trapped blood in these tissues. An mRNA species of approx. 1.3 kb in human liver also weakly hybridized to the U2 probe, indicating the presence of a sequence that was distinct from, but related to, ficolin. The gene for human ficolin has been mapped to chromosome 9. PMID:8573080

  11. Human Ia-like antigens in non-lymphoid organs.

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, K; Fukunishi, T; Barcos, M; Tanigaki, N; Pressman, D

    1979-01-01

    Human Ia-like antigens in liver and kidney were shown by the immunofluorescence assay to be present mostly in the endothelial-mesenchymal cells of these organs. The parenchymal cells apparently contained no human Ia-like antigens. The antigens in liver and kidney were purified and shown to have the same subunit structure as human Ia-like antigens of cultured B-lymphoid cells. The human Ia-like antigens in non-lymphoid organs, not only in liver and kidney but also in testis, heart, muscle and brain, carried all the xenoantigenic characteristics of human Ia-like antigens expressed on lymphoid cells of B-cell lineage. Images Figure 1 PMID:389786

  12. Subclinical antibody-mediated rejection due to anti-human-leukocyte-antigen-DR53 antibody accompanied by plasma cell-rich acute rejection in a patient with cadaveric kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Katsuma, Ai; Yamamoto, Izumi; Komatsuzaki, Yo; Niikura, Takahito; Kawabe, Mayuko; Okabayashi, Yusuke; Yamakawa, Takafumi; Katsumata, Haruki; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Miki, Jun; Yamada, Hiroki; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    A 56-year-old man who had undergone cadaveric kidney transplantation 21 months earlier was admitted to our hospital for a protocol biopsy; he had a serum creatinine level of 1.2 mg/dL and no proteinuria. Histological features showed two distinct entities: (i) inflammatory cell infiltration, in the glomerular and peritubular capillaries and (ii) focal, aggressive tubulointerstitial inflammatory cell infiltration, predominantly plasma cells, with mild tubulitis (Banff 13 classification: i2, t1, g2, ptc2, v0, ci1, ct1, cg0, cv0). Immunohistological studies showed mildly positive C4d immunoreactivity in the peritubular capillaries. The patient had donor specific antibody to human-leucocyte-antigen-DR53. We diagnosed him with subclinical antibody-mediated rejection accompanied by plasma cell-rich acute rejection. Both antibody-mediated rejection due to anti- human-leucocyte-antigen -DR53 antibodies and plasma cell-rich acute rejection are known to be refractory and have a poor prognosis. Thus, we started plasma exchange with intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab for the former and 3 days of consecutive steroid pulse therapy for the latter. Three months after treatment, a follow-up allograft biopsy showed excellent responses to treatment for both histological features. This case report considers the importance of an early diagnosis and appropriate intervention for subclinical antibody-mediated rejection due to donor specific antibody to human-leucocyte-antigen-DR53 and plasma cell-rich acute rejection.

  13. Human γδ T Cells Augment Antigen Presentation in Listeria Monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuli; Wang, Huaishan; Xu, Yi; Hu, Yu; Chen, Hui; Cui, Lianxian; Zhang, Jianmin; He, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Circulating γδ T cells in healthy individuals rapidly respond to bacterial and viral pathogens. Many studies have demonstrated that γδ T cells are activated and expanded by Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes), a foodborne bacterial pathogen with high fatality rates. However, the roles of γδ T cells during L. monocytogenes infection are not clear. In the present study, we characterized the morphological characteristics of phagocytosis in γδ T cells after L. monocytogenes infection using transmission electron microscopy. Results show activation markers including human leucocyte antigen DR (HLA–DR) and lymph node–homing receptor CCR7 on γδ T cells were upregulated after stimulation via L. monocytogenes. Significant proliferation and differentiation of primary αβ T cells was also observed after coculture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with γδ T cells anteriorly stimulated by L. monocytogenes. L. monocytogenes infection decreased the percentage of γδ T cells in mouse intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and increased MHC-II expression on the surface of γδ T cells in vivo. Our findings shed light on antigen presentation of γδ T cells during L. monocytogenes infection. PMID:27652377

  14. THE RHYTHMIC RANGE OF THE WHITE BLOOD CELLS IN HUMAN, PATHOLOGICAL LEUCOPENIC AND LEUCOCYTIC STATES, WITH A STUDY OF THIRTY-TWO HUMAN BONE MARROWS

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Charles A.; Zerfas, Leon G.

    1927-01-01

    human biopsy and autopsy material shows the striking reciprocity found to exist between the myelocytes and the mature polymorphonuclear leucocytes. This, together with the observed focal uniformity of maturation found in bone marrow, and the periodicity of the fluctuations of the neutrophils in the peripheral blood, leads to the formulation of the hypothesis of a constant functional withdrawal of granulocytes from the peripheral blood with a periodic delivery of new cells from the marrow, which in leucopenia and in leucocytosis represents a depression or a stimulation, respectively, of the normal mechanism. The nature and degree of the response are an approximate index of the cellular factor in the complex of the "resistance" of the particular individual. PMID:19869352

  15. Intervention with polyphenol-rich fruit juices results in an elevation of glutathione S-transferase P1 (hGSTP1) protein expression in human leucocytes of healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Thomas; Liegibel, Ute; Winterhalter, Peter; Bub, Achim; Rechkemmer, Gerhard; Pool-Zobel, Beatrice Louise

    2006-12-01

    oxidative defence systems. In vivo, however, we observed a delayed enhancement of hGSTP1, which could be associated with an initial repression of oxidative DNA damage in leucocytes from human subjects, consuming juices with high levels of polyphenols.

  16. The possible role of the tumour necrosis factor polymorphisms and human leucocyte antigens in the development of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Stingl Jankovic, K; Hudolin, T; Kastelan, Z; Zunec, R; Grubic, Z

    2016-06-01

    The cause of prostate cancer (PC), one of the most common cancers found among ageing men, remains unclear, but genetic predisposition is believed to play a major role in its aetiology. The aim of the study was to examine HLA genes polymorphism and TNF polymorphisms in PC development. Patients diagnosed with PC (N = 113) and 150 healthy individuals were tested for HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 genes and for TNFa, TNFb and TNFd microsatellites. The comparison of patients and controls revealed a positive association of HLA-DRB1*12, TNFa2 and TNFb5, and a negative association of HLA-DRB1*13 and TNFb4 with PC. A division of patients into groups according to age, pre-operative PSA level, Gleason score (GS) and involvement of prostatic capsule, seminal vesicles or bladder neck and perineural invasion of PC demonstrated the following: a positive correlation of HLA-DRB1*12 and a negative correlation of HLA-DRB1*13 with younger patients (<65 years), GS > 7 and the positive association of prostatic capsule, seminal vesicles, bladder neck and perineural invasion of PC; TNFb4 allele's negative association with older patients displaying higher PSA levels, higher GS and positive surrounding tissue involvement; positive association of TNFb5 allele for both older and younger patients. Investigation of HLA genes and TNF microsatellites demonstrated a possible role of HLA-DRB1 and TNF regions in PC aetiology.

  17. JL1, a novel differentiation antigen of human cortical thymocyte

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Expression of a novel thymocyte differentiation antigen, JL1, defined by a monoclonal antibody (mAb) developed against human thymocytes showed a specificity for stage II double positive (CD4+CD8+) human cortical thymocytes. This antigen was not expressed at detectable levels on medullary thymocytes, mature peripheral leukocytes, bone marrow cells or on other types of tissues elsewhere in the human body. Immunohistologic analysis revealed that JL1 had a clear pattern of distribution on cortical thymocytes. Immunoprecipitation of 125I- labeled cell lysates from human thymocytes and Molt-4 leukemic cell line with anti-JL1 mAb yielded a 120-130-kD single chain glycoprotein. When immunoprecipitation of cell lysate was done after endoglycosidase F treatment, JL1 antigen was still detected by antibody but the band showed a reduction in apparent molecular mass of approximately 5 kD. This suggests that, although JL1 molecule contains carbohydrate group, this does not form a critical part of the antigenic determinant for anti-JL1 antibody. JL1 antigen appears to be the first double positive, stage-specific differentiation antigen of human thymocyte reported so far. This antigen would be a useful marker for lymphoblastic malignancy of stage II thymocyte origin and it may be involved in the thymocyte education process. PMID:8376947

  18. The induction of suppressor cells in mixed leucocyte cultures and in mixed leucocyte-non-lymphoid cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Pawelec, G

    1980-01-01

    X-ray resistant porcine suppressor T cells expressing Ia-like antigens were obtained from mixed cultures of leucocytes and tissue cells (cultured kidney cells, liver cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts or X-irradiated leucocytes), and were assayed by their ability to suppress lymphocyte proliferation in a second mixed culture. All tissues tested induced suppressor cells although quantitative differences existed between them. Suppressor cell induction was under genetic control by at least two loci, one of which was within the major histocompatibility (MHC) complex. Suppressor cell function was restricted by the MHC type of the responding cell but not the stimulating cell in the second culture. PMID:6445866

  19. Studies on the biological effects of ozone: 2. Induction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) on human leucocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Paulesu, L.; Luzzi, E.; Bocci, V. )

    1991-10-01

    The effect of ozone as a probable inducer of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) has been investigated on human blood and on Ficoll-purified blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Samples were exposed at different ozone concentrations ranging from 2.2 to 108 micrograms/ml and incubated at 37 degrees C in an 95% air-5% CO2 atmosphere. At predetermined times, all cell supernatants were tested for TNF activity and some PBMC cultures were examined for DNA synthesis. The authors have shown that ozone concentration is critical in terms of TNF production and of cell mitogenesis and that, owing to the presence of erythrocytes, higher ozone concentrations are required to be effective in blood than in PBMC. Because ozonization of blood is a procedure followed in several European countries for the treatment of viral diseases and tumors, the release of factors with antiviral and immunomodulatory activities by leukocytes may explain the mechanism of action of ozone and of autohemotherapy.

  20. Human cysticercosis: antigens, antibodies and non-responders.

    PubMed Central

    Flisser, A; Woodhouse, E; Larralde, C

    1980-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis of sera from patients with brain cysticercosis against a crude antigenic extract from Cysticercus cellulosae indicates that nearly 50% of the patients do not make sufficient antibodies to ostensively precipitate. The other 50% of the patients who do make precipitating antibodies show a very heterogeneous response in the number of antigens they recognize as well as in the type of antigen--as classified by their electrophoretic mobilities. The most favoured, called antigen B, is recognized by 84% of positive sera and corresponds to one or a limited number of antigens isoelectric at pH 8.6. Indirect immunofluorescence with monospecific anti-human immunoglobulins, performed upon the immunoelectrophoretic preparations, reveal that all cysticercus antigens induced the synthesis of antibodies in the immunoglobulin classes in the order G greater than M greater than E greater than A greater than D. Finally, antigen H (an anodic component) seems to favour IgE relative to its ability to induce IgG. Thus, although in natural infection a good proportion of cysticercotic patients do not seem to mount an energetic antibody response against the parasite, giving rise to some speculations about immunosuppression, the fact that 50% do synthesize antibodies allows for some optimistic expectations from vaccination of humans--in view of the good results of vaccination in experimental animals mediated by IgG antibodies. A likely prospect for a human vaccine would be antigen B because it is the most frequently detected by humans, although its immunizing and toxic properties remain to be properly studied. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 6 PMID:7389197

  1. Antigenic Relationships among Human Pathogenic Orientia tsutsugamushi Isolates from Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Tanganuchitcharnchai, Ampai; Smith, Derek J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Paris, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Scrub typhus is a common cause of undiagnosed febrile illness in certain tropical regions, but can be easily treated with antibiotics. The causative agent, Orientia tsutsugamushi, is antigenically variable which complicates diagnosis and efforts towards vaccine development. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aimed to dissect the antigenic and genetic relatedness of O. tsutsugamushi strains and investigate sero-diagnostic reactivities by titrating individual patient sera against their O. tsutsugamushi isolates (whole-cell antigen preparation), in homologous and heterologous serum-isolate pairs from the same endemic region in NE Thailand. The indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to titrate Orientia tsutsugamushi isolates and human sera, and a mathematical technique, antigenic cartography, was applied to these data to visualise the antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between strains and sera. No functional or antigen-specific analyses were performed. The antigenic variation found in clinical isolates was much less pronounced than the genetic differences found in the 56kDa type-specific antigen genes. The Karp-like sera were more broadly reactive than the Gilliam-like sera. Conclusions/Significance Antigenic cartography worked well with scrub typhus indirect immunofluorescence titres. The data from humoral responses suggest that a Karp-like strain would provide broader antibody cross-reactivity than a Gilliam-like strain. Although previous exposure to O. tsutsugamushi could not be ruled out, scrub typhus patient serum antibody responses were characterised by strong homologous, but weak heterologous antibody titres, with little evidence for cross-reactivity by Gilliam-like sera, but a broader response from some Karp-like sera. This work highlights the importance of antigenic variation in O. tsutsugamushi diagnosis and determination of new serotypes. PMID:27248711

  2. High-density lipoprotein 3 physicochemical modifications induced by interaction with human polymorphonuclear leucocytes affect their ability to remove cholesterol from cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cogny, A; Atger, V; Paul, J L; Soni, T; Moatti, N

    1996-01-01

    1. We have recently reported that a short incubation (60 min) in vitro of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) 3 with human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) leads to a proteolytic cleavage of apolipoprotein (apo) AII and to a change in the distribution of apo AI isoforms [Cogny, Paul, Atger, Soni and Moatti (1994) Eur. J. Biochem. 222, 965-973]. Since PMNs have been observed to be present in the earliest atherosclerotic lesions for a number of days, we investigated the HDL3 physiochemical modifications induced by in vitro interaction for a long period of time (24 h) with PMNs and the consequences of the changes on the ability of HDL3 to remove cholesterol from cells. 2. The stimulated PMN modification of HDL3 over 24 h resulted in a partial loss of protein with no variation in lipid molar ratio and a loss of 50% of HDL alpha-tocopherol content. The decrease in total protein was due first to a complete degradation of apo AII, and secondly to a partial loss of apo AI. The apo AI remaining on the particles was in part hydrolysed and the apo AI-1 isoform was completely shifted to the apo AI-2 isoform. These apo changes were accompanied by a displacement of the native HDL3 apparent size toward predominantly larger particles. 3. The ability of PMN-modified HDL3 to remove 3H-labelled free cholesterol from cells was measured in two cell lines: Fu5AH rat hepatoma cells and J774 mouse macrophages. HDL3 which had only a limited contact with PMNs (60 min) showed only a small non-significant reduction in the efficiency of cholesterol efflux. On the other hand, compared with native HDL3, HDL3 modified by PMNs for 24 h had a markedly reduced ability to remove cholesterol from cells, regardless of the type of cell. 4. The results suggest that PMN-modified HDL3, if occurring in vivo, could contribute to acceleration of the atherogenic process by decreasing the cholesterol efflux from cells. PMID:8660296

  3. Quantification of leucocytes, T-lymphocytes and macrophages in autoptical endomyocardial tissue from 56 normal human hearts during the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Grasmeyer, Sarah; Oswald, Sylvia; Madea, Burkhard

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the normal number of inflammatory cells in the heart in the first year of life using two methods to compare their ability to quantitate physiological myocardial infiltration. Eight endomyocardial samples from both ventricles were obtained at autopsy from 56 structurally normal hearts during the first year of life. In each sample the numbers of leucocytes, T-lymphocytes and macrophages were counted once in 20 randomly chosen high-power fields (400×) as well as in a 10mm(2) area of randomly chosen myocardial tissue (100×) by two independent investigators. Compared to the literature a greater representative proportion of myocardial tissue was analyzed. The results of the enumeration in mm(2) were converted into high-power-fields to compare both methods. The mean numbers and standard deviations for leucocytes, T-lymphocytes and macrophages were calculated. Both counting methods showed similar results with low inflammatory cell counts per single heart and staining. A greater understanding of the physiological myocardial infiltration by leucocytes, T-lymphocytes and macrophages is important for postmortem forensic cases, and for the interpretation of endomyocardial biopsies in infants.

  4. A New Antigen Retrieval Technique for Human Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Byne, William; Haroutunian, Vahram; García-Villanueva, Mercedes; Rábano, Alberto; García-Amado, María; Prensa, Lucía; Giménez-Amaya, José Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining of tissues is a powerful tool used to delineate the presence or absence of an antigen. During the last 30 years, antigen visualization in human brain tissue has been significantly limited by the masking effect of fixatives. In the present study, we have used a new method for antigen retrieval in formalin-fixed human brain tissue and examined the effectiveness of this protocol to reveal masked antigens in tissues with both short and long formalin fixation times. This new method, which is based on the use of citraconic acid, has not been previously utilized in brain tissue although it has been employed in various other tissues such as tonsil, ovary, skin, lymph node, stomach, breast, colon, lung and thymus. Thus, we reported here a novel method to carry out immunohistochemical studies in free-floating human brain sections. Since fixation of brain tissue specimens in formaldehyde is a commonly method used in brain banks, this new antigen retrieval method could facilitate immunohistochemical studies of brains with prolonged formalin fixation times. PMID:18852880

  5. Characterization of binding specificities of Bovine Leucocyte class I molecules: Impacts for rational epitope discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The binding of peptides to classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class-I proteins is the single most selective step in antigen presentation. However, the peptide binding specificity of cattle MHC (bovine leucocyte antigen, BoLA) class I (BoLA-I) molecules remains poorly characterized. Her...

  6. Mycobacterium leprae antigens involved in human immune responses. I. Identification of four antigens by monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, W.J.; Hellqvist, L.; Basten, A.; Raison, R.L.

    1985-12-01

    Four distinct antigens were identified in soluble sonicates of Mycobacterium leprae by using a panel of 11 monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivity studies with other mycobacterial species were conducted by using ELISA and immunoblot assays, and demonstrated that determinants on two of the antigens were present in many mycobacteria, whereas the other two were limited in distribution. Competitive inhibition experiments with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies showed cross-inhibition between antibodies identifying two of the four antigenicbands. These two bands, of M/sub tau/ 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD, were resistant to protease treatment after immunoblotting. In contrast the two other bands of 16 and 70 KD were protease-sensitive. Although all four bands reacted with some human lepromatous leprosy sera in immunoblots, the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands were most prominent. Lepromatous leprosy sera also inhibited the binding of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies to each of the four antigens, with the mean titer causing 50% inhibition being higher for antibodies reacting with the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands. These findings indicated that all four antigens were involved in the human B cell response to M. leprae.

  7. Detection of squamous epithelial intercellular substance antigen(s) in Hassall's corpuscles of human and animal thymus.

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, L V; Gnesditskaya, E V

    1980-01-01

    Using pemphigus sera containing high titres (1:1000) of non-species-specific antibodies to tissue-specific intercellular substance (ICS) antigen(s) of cover stratified epithelia (skin, oesophagus, vagina and so forth), we detected analogous antigen(s) by immunofluorescence in the ICS of the epithelium of Hassall's corpuscles of human and animal thymus. The results obtained, together with well-known data from histological and embryological studies, confirm the histogenetic relationship of the epithelium of thymus corpuscles and cover epithelia of ectodermal origin. ICS antigen(s) is related to the series of hetero-organic antigens, which probably take part in the natural immunological tolerance formation to the antigens of the organism's own tissues.

  8. Specificity of leucocyte migration inhibition test in coeliac disease. A reassessment using different gluten subfractions.

    PubMed Central

    Corazza, G R; Rawcliffe, P M; Frisoni, M; Sarchielli, P; Londei, M; Campieri, M; Lazzari, R; Gasbarrini, G

    1985-01-01

    Production of leucocyte migration inhibition factor by peripheral blood leucocytes in response to challenge with gluten fractions has been proposed as a reliable in vitro test for the diagnosis of coeliac disease. We have performed the leucocyte migration inhibition test with two different gluten fractions, GFIII and B2, in untreated and treated coeliac patients, patients with other intestinal diseases (abnormal controls) and healthy controls, and evaluated the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictability of the test for the diagnosis of coeliac disease. Using GFIII as antigen leucocyte migration was significantly inhibited, compared to healthy controls, not only in treated and untreated coeliacs but also in abnormal controls. Using B2 gluten subfraction as antigen only treated coeliacs and abnormal controls differed significantly from healthy controls. The elevated number of abnormal controls showing migration inhibition consistently affected the diagnostic value of the test, which did not vary using B2 subfraction instead of GFIII as antigen. Our study confirms previous observations of gluten sensitization, as detected by leucocyte migration inhibition, in coeliac patients but strongly questions the claim that coeliac disease can be diagnosed on the basis of a positive leucocyte migration inhibition test without the need for intestinal biopsy. PMID:4006297

  9. Photoaffinity antigens for human γδ T cells1

    PubMed Central

    Sarikonda, Ghanashyam; Wang, Hong; Puan, Kia-Joo; Liu, Xiao-hui; Lee, Hoi K.; Song, Yongcheng; Distefano, Mark D.; Oldfield, Eric; Prestwich, Glenn D.; Morita, Craig T.

    2009-01-01

    Vγ2Vδ2 T cells comprise the major subset of peripheral blood γ δ T cells in humans and expand during infections by recognizing small, nonpeptide prenyl pyrophosphates. These molecules include (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl-pyrophosphate (HMBPP), a microbial isoprenoid intermediate, and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), an endogenous isoprenoid intermediate. Recognition of these nonpeptide antigens is mediated by the Vγ2Vδ2 T cell antigen receptor (TCR). Several findings suggest that prenyl pyrophosphates are presented by an antigen presenting molecule: contact between T cells and APCs is required; the antigens do not bind the Vγ2Vδ2 TCR directly; and antigen recognition is abrogated by TCR mutations in CDRs distant from the putative antigen recognition site. Identification of the putative antigen presenting molecule, however, has been hindered by the inability to achieve stable association of nonpeptide prenyl pyrophosphate antigens with the presenting molecule. In this study, we show that photoaffinity analogs of HMBPP, meta/para-benzophenone-(methylene)-prenyl pyrophosphates (m/p-BZ-(C)-C5-OPP), can cross-link to the surface of tumor cell lines and be presented as antigens to γ δ T cells. Mutant tumor cell lines lacking MHC class I, MHC class II, β2-microglobulin, and CD1, as well as tumor cell lines from a variety of tissues and individuals, will all crosslink to and present m-BZ-C5-OPP. Finally, pulsing of BZ-(C)-C5-OPP is inhibited by IPP and an inactive analog, suggesting that they bind to the same molecule. Taken together, these results suggest that nonpeptide antigens are presented by a novel antigen presenting molecule that is widely distributed, non-polymorphic, but not classical MHC class I, MHC class II, or CD1. This is an author-produced version of a manuscript accepted for publication in The Journal of Immunology (The JI). The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. (AAI), publisher of The JI, holds the copyright to this manuscript

  10. Profiling human serum antibodies with a carbohydrate antigen microarray

    PubMed Central

    Oyelaran, Oyindasola; McShane, Lisa M.; Dodd, Lori; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2009-01-01

    Carbohydrate antigen arrays (glycan arrays) have been recently developed for the high-throughput analysis of carbohydrate macromolecule interactions. When profiling serum, information about experimental variability, inter-individual biological variability, and intra-individual temporal variability is critical. In this report, we describe the characterization of a carbohydrate antigen array and assay for profiling human serum. Through optimization of assay conditions and development of a normalization strategy, we obtain highly reproducible results with a within-experiment coefficient of variation (CV) of 10.8% and an overall CV (across multiple batches of slides and days) of 28.5%. We also report antibody profiles for 48 human subjects and evaluate for the first time the effects of age, race, sex, geographic location, and blood type on antibody profiles for a large set of carbohydrate antigens. We found significant dependence on age and blood type of antibody levels for a variety of carbohydrates. Finally, we conducted a longitudinal study with a separate group of 7 serum donors to evaluate the variation in anti-carbohydrate antibody levels within an individual over a period ranging from 3 to 13 weeks and found that, for nearly all antigens on our array, antibody levels are generally stable over this period. The results presented here provide the most comprehensive evaluation of experimental and biological variation reported to date for a glycan array and have significant implications for studies involving human serum profiling. PMID:19624168

  11. Mechanism of inhibition of human leucocyte elastase by beta-lactams. 2. Stability, reactivation kinetics, and products of beta-lactam-derived E-I complexes.

    PubMed

    Green, B G; Chabin, R; Mills, S; Underwood, D J; Shah, S K; Kuo, D; Gale, P; Maycock, A L; Liesch, J; Burgey, C S

    1995-11-07

    The monocyclic beta-lactams reported by Knight et al. [Knight, W. B., et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 8160; Chabin, R., et al. (1993) Biochemistry 32, 8970] as inhibitors of human leucocyte elastase (HLE) produce stable HLE-inhibitor complexes that slowly reactivate with half-lives ranging from less than 1 to 15 h at 37 degrees C. The complexes produced between PPE and two C-3 dimethyl-substituted beta-lactams are less stable than those produced between HLE and analogous C-3 diethyl-substituted lactams. The stability of the HLE-I complexes is governed primarily by the structure of the substituted urea portion of the inhibitors and not by the identity or presence of a leaving group at C-4 of the lactam ring. In some cases substitutions on the urea portion of the inhibitors yielded complexes that displayed biphasic reactivation kinetics. This suggests the presence of at least two different complexes. The stereochemistry of the leaving group at C-4 has a small effect on the stability of the final complex (1.3-2-fold); therefore, the identity of the final complex is dependent upon the initial stereochemistry at that position. The stability of the complexes was relatively insensitive to hydroxylamine, which suggests that the acyl-enzymes are protected from nucleophilic "rescue". The rate of reactivation of the complex derived from L-680,833,[S-R*,S*)]-4-[(1-(((1-(4- methylphenyl)butyl)amino)carbonyl)-3,3-diethyl-2-oxo-4-azetidinyl)ben zeneacetic acid, was pH independent, while the L-684,481, (R)-(1-(((1-(4-methylphenyl)butyl)amino)carbonyl)-3,3-diethyl-2-azeti din one generated complex displayed a pH-dependent reactivation rate. In the latter case, the increase in reactivation rate with pH displayed a pKa of 7.2. This is consistent with the requirement for base catalysis by the active site histidine to regenerate enzymatic activity. Reactivation of the L-680,833-derived complex produced different products as a function of pH, suggesting two different pH-dependent routes

  12. Identification of human cancers deficient in antigen processing

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Intracellular antigens must be processed before presentation to CD8+ T cells by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Using a recombinant vaccinia virus (Vac) to transiently express the Kd molecule, we studied the antigen processing efficiency of 26 different human tumor lines. Three cell lines, all human small cell lung carcinoma, consistently failed to process endogenously synthesized proteins for presentation to Kd-restricted, Vac-specific T cells. Pulse- chase experiments showed that MHC class I molecules were not transported by these cell lines from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface. This finding suggested that peptides were not available for binding to nascent MHC molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum. Northern blot analysis of these cells revealed low to nondetectable levels of mRNAs for MHC-encoded proteasome components LMP-7 and LMP-2, as well as the putative peptide transporters TAP-1 and TAP-2. Treatment of cells with interferon gamma enhanced expression of these mRNAs and reversed the observed functional and biochemical deficits. Our findings suggest that downregulation of antigen processing may be one of the strategies used by tumors to escape immune surveillance. Potential therapeutic applications of these findings include enhancing antigen processing at the level of the transcription of MHC-encoded proteasome and transporter genes. PMID:8426105

  13. Coproduction of carcinoembryonic antigen and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen by a continuous cell line from a human pancreatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, M; Ichiki, S; Kuroki, M; Matsuoka, Y

    1982-08-01

    A simultaneous production of nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) by the same individual cells of an established human pancreatic cell line (QGP-1) was demonstrated by the immunoperoxidase method. Kinetics of cell proliferation and production of CEA and NCA were analyzed, and active synthesis of both antigens was found to be accompanied with the active proliferation of cultured cells. Both antigens in culture medium were purified by immunoadsorption and gel filtration. Immunochemical studies confirmed that CEA and NCA produced by the QGP-1 cells had properties identical to those of authentic CEA derived from metastatic colorectal carcinoma and to those of NCA from normal lungs, respectively.

  14. Antibody-induced antigenic modulation is antigen dependent: characterization of 22 proteins on a malignant human B cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Pesando, J.M.; Hoffman, P.; Abed, M.

    1986-12-01

    Expression of several of the surface antigens on normal and malignant hematopoietic cells is reduced or is modulated by incubation with specific antibodies. Although antigenic modulation provides a means by which cells can escape antibody-mediated immune destruction, the physiologic significance and frequency of this phenomenon are both poorly understood. To begin to address these issues, the authors identified and characterized surface antigens on the malignant B cell line Laz 221 established from a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Indirect immunofluorescence analysis with the use of 26 hematopoietic cell populations and immune precipitation studies with the use of iodinated ALL cells indicate the 163 monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) identify 22 different proteins on this cell line, including at least six previously described surface molecules. Seven of these antigens are expressed by all nucleated cells examined, whereas only the ..mu.. chain of immunoglobulin is B cell specific. Studies that made use of multiple MoAb specific for the same antigen suggest that the capacity for antigenic modulation is an intrinsic property of individual antigens. These studies also suggest that the murine immune response to shared human antigens varies from one immunizing cell population to another. Immunogenicity of individual human antigens in the mouse may be a function of their cell surface environment.

  15. Human Leukocyte Antigen Diversity: A Southern African Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tshabalala, Mqondisi; Mellet, Juanita; Pepper, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasingly well-documented evidence of high genetic, ethnic, and linguistic diversity amongst African populations, there is limited data on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) diversity in these populations. HLA is part of the host defense mechanism mediated through antigen presentation to effector cells of the immune system. With the high disease burden in southern Africa, HLA diversity data is increasingly important in the design of population-specific vaccines and the improvement of transplantation therapeutic interventions. This review highlights the paucity of HLA diversity data amongst southern African populations and defines a need for information of this kind. This information will support disease association studies, provide guidance in vaccine design, and improve transplantation outcomes. PMID:26347896

  16. [Isolation and physico-chemical characteristics of human cancerocerebral antigen].

    PubMed

    Prokopenko, P G; Borisenko, S A; Tatarinov, Iu S

    1984-01-01

    During gel filtration on Sephadex G-200 human cancerocerebral antigen (CCA) was eluted as two protein fractions with molecular mass of 135,000 and 270.000 daltons. Only one band of protein with molecular mass of about 15,000 daltons was noted after electrophoresis in 10% polyacrylamide gel containing SDS. As characteristic properties of CCA were recognized an electrophoretic polymorphism and a distinct trend to polymerization and isomeria. The antigen was not stained with dyes designed for staining base proteins, lipo-,glyco- and ferroproteins; CCA was thermostable (5 min at 80 degrees), it was inactivated by trypsin and protease but was resistant to pronase, hexokinase, alpha-amylase and beta-glucuronidase. A procedure was developed for isolation of CCA from brain, including fractionation with ammonium sulfate, ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50. The procedure enabled to obtain the CCA preparations suitable for radioimmunological, immunobiological assays and amino acid analyses.

  17. A human-mouse hybridoma producing monoclonal antibody against human sperm coating antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Kyurkchiev, S D; Shigeta, M; Koyama, K; Isojima, S

    1986-01-01

    Since anti-sperm antibodies were first discovered in the sera of women, the relationship of these antibodies to sterility has been studied by many investigators. In order to determine the antigens of spermatozoa responsible for raising antibodies to spermatozoa in humans, many studies have been carried out by purifying human spermatozoa cell membrane and seminal plasma components. Since it was found that the purification was difficult by physiochemical procedures, the immunoaffinity chromatography bound monoclonal antibody (Mab) to spermatozoa antigens was attempted for this purpose. The establishment of hybridomas producing Mabs to human seminal plasma and human spermatozoa was reported by Shigeta et al. (1980), Isojima, Koyoma & Fujiwara (1982), Lee et al. (1982) and Isahakia & Alexander (1984). The ordinary approaches to obtain the Mabs consisted of xenogenic immunization with human semen and cell fusion of immunized spleen cells with mouse myeloma cells. However, the antigenic epitopes of human spermatozoa, which induced antibody production, are xenogenic for the mouse, and therefore there is a possibility that there is a difference in recognized antigenic epitopes in humans as isotypic and in mice as xenogenic. In order to study these antigenic epitopes, which correspond to antibodies against spermatozoa in women, the establishment of human-mouse hybridomas, which produced anti-semen antibodies as produced in sterile women, became essential. In these studies, we used recently developed cell fusion techniques to fuse immunized human peripheral lymphocytes with mouse myeloma cells. PMID:3456978

  18. Antigen heterogeneity of human B and T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rabellino, E M; Grey, H M; LaForge, S; Pirofsky, B; Kashiwagi, N; Malley, A

    1976-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys were immunized with normal human lymphoid cells, cultured lymphoid cells, and chronic leukemic lymphocytes. Antisera were analyzed by cytotoxicity and immunofluorescence techniques to study the antigenic characteristics of human lymphocytes. In an attempt to obtain a reagent specifically reactive with T (thymus-derived) lymphocytes, an antispleen antiserum was absorbed with cellf from five B- (bone marrow-derived) cell lines. After absorption, the antiserum killed 60-75% of peripheral blood lymphocytes and 40-50% of tonsil cells, so that there was a relationship between the percentage of killed cells and the proportion of T lymphocytes. However, when cells after cytotoxic treatment were assayed for rosette formation with sheep erythrocytes (a T-cell marker) 5-20% of viable rosette-forming lymphocytes were found. Therefore, this antiserum was cytotoxic for only 75-90% of T cells. From studies performed with antisera prepared against spleen and B-cell lines, we conclude that lymphoblastoid cells are antigenically different and deficient in comparison to normal B lymphocytes. In addition, cultured B-cell lines appear to be antigenically heterogenous, as shown by the cytotoxic activity remaining in antispleen and anti-B-cell lines sera after absorption with various numbers and types of lymphoid cell lines. After absorption with normal lymphocytes, an antiserum produced against chronic lymphatic leukemia cells had specific activity associated with 12 chronic lymphatic leukemia cells tested. Absorption of the same antiserum with leukemic cells from two patients showed that a certain degree of antigenic heterogeneity also exists among chronic leukemic lymphocytes. PMID:815274

  19. Characterization of a human antigen specific helper factor

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, B.

    1986-03-01

    While antigen (Ag) specific helper factors have been characterized in mice, similar molecules have not been identified in humans. To characterize human antigen specific helper molecules, an IL-2 dependent tetanus toxoid (T.T.) reactive T cell line was fused with a 6-thioguanine resistant CEM line, and hybrids selected in medium containing hypoxanthine and azaserine. Hybrids were screened by culturing the cells with /sup 35/S-Met then reacting the supernatants with T.T. or hepatitis vaccine immobilized on nitrocellulose. One hybrid, TT6BA-O, was identified which secreted a Met-containing molecule which bound T.T. but not hepatitis vaccine. Supernatants from TT6BA-O, but not the parent CEM line, when added to autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC's) stimulated secretion of T.T. specific antibodies (Abs). Specificity controls demonstrated that TT6BA-O supernatant did not induce antibodies to diphtheria toxoid, hepatitis vaccine or pneumococcal polysaccharide, and total immunoglobulin (lg) synthesis was minimally increased. In contrast, pokeweed mitogen stimulated significant lg synthesis as well as Ab's to pneumococcal polysaccharide and T.T. TT6BA-O supernatant induced anti-T.T.Ab's in autologous PBMC's but not PBMC's from 3 unrelated donors, suggesting that the activity of the helper factor is restricted, possibly by the MHC. The molecular weight of the helper factor was estimated at 100,000-150,000 by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography. Finally, the helper factor could be demonstrated to bind and elute from sephorose-immobilized T.T. and anti-DR antisera, but not anti-lg antisera or the T40/25 monoclonal antibody, which binds a nonpolymorphic determinant on the human T cell receptor. These results demonstrate that human Ag specific helper factors exist, bind antigen and bear class II MHC determinants.

  20. Sperm-immobilizing monoclonal antibody to human seminal plasma antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Shigeta, M; Watanabe, T; Maruyama, S; Koyama, K; Isojima, S

    1980-01-01

    Rat spleen cells immunized to human azoospermic semen (a mixture of seminal plasma components) and mouse myeloma cells (P3/X63 Ag8U1; P3U1) (Marguilies et al., 1976) were successfully fused with polyethylene glycol (PEG 1500) and 19 of 89 fused cell cultures were found to produce sperm-immobilizing antibody. The cells that produced antibody indicating the highest sperm-immobilizing activity were distributed into wells for further recloning and 10 clones producing sperm-immobilizing antibody were established. The clone (1C4) producing the highest antibody titre was found to produce a large amount of IgG in culture supernatants and to contain a mixture of rat and mouse chromosomes. It was proved by immunodiffusion test that the monoclonal antibody was produced to the human seminal plasma antigen No. 7 which is common to human milk protein. Using this hybridoma which produced a large amount of monoclonal sperm-immobilizing antibody, a new method could be developed for purifying human seminal plasma antigen by immunoaffinity chromatography with bound antibody from the hybridoma. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6783353

  1. Natural micropolymorphism in human leukocyte antigens provides a basis for genetic control of antigen recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Archbold, Julia K.; Macdonald, Whitney A.; Gras, Stephanie; Ely, Lauren K.; Miles, John J.; Bell, Melissa J.; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Beddoe, Travis; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Clements, Craig S.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2009-07-10

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene polymorphism plays a critical role in protective immunity, disease susceptibility, autoimmunity, and drug hypersensitivity, yet the basis of how HLA polymorphism influences T cell receptor (TCR) recognition is unclear. We examined how a natural micropolymorphism in HLA-B44, an important and large HLA allelic family, affected antigen recognition. T cell-mediated immunity to an Epstein-Barr virus determinant (EENLLDFVRF) is enhanced when HLA-B*4405 was the presenting allotype compared with HLA-B*4402 or HLA-B*4403, each of which differ by just one amino acid. The micropolymorphism in these HLA-B44 allotypes altered the mode of binding and dynamics of the bound viral epitope. The structure of the TCR-HLA-B*4405EENLLDFVRF complex revealed that peptide flexibility was a critical parameter in enabling preferential engagement with HLA-B*4405 in comparison to HLA-B*4402/03. Accordingly, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism can alter the dynamics of the peptide-MHC landscape, resulting in fine-tuning of T cell responses between closely related allotypes.

  2. Method for labelling leucocytes with indium In-111 oxine

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminsky, D.

    1992-03-03

    This patent describes an improved method for radio-labelling leucocytes with Indium In-111 oxine. It comprises separating the leucocytes from whole blood for obtaining separated leucocytes mixed with residual red blood cells; and then labelling the separated leucocytes with Indium In-111 oxine; wherein the improvement comprises the following further step: depleting residual red blood cells from the separated leucocytes by resuspending the leucocytes in an isotonic saline solution, then rocking the resuspended leucocytes for causing the leucocytes to preferentially settle out, and then removing residual red blood cells which remain suspended within the supernatant isotonic saline solution.

  3. Use of leucocyte migration under agarose to study spontaneous and directed locomotion of leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Repo, H; Kostiala, A A; Kosunen, T U

    1978-01-01

    Three different cell attractants, together with the parallel use of the leucocyte migration agarose test (LMAT) and the leading front modification (LFM) of the Boyden chamber technique, were employed in studying whether the maximal migration of normal human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) is higher toward an attractant (chemotaxis) than in the same attractant incorporated in the culture media (chemokinesis). Using LMAT, the maximal migration distance toward zymosan activated serum (ZAS) was found to be significantly longer than that under agarose mixed with ZAS, thus indicating a chemotactic effect exerted by ZAS. When bacterial culture filtrate (BCF) and casein were used as attractants, the corresponding difference was not significant, implying that the stimulatory effect of these substances on cell migration could be explained by increased random locomotion (chemokinesis) alone. In LFM, the migration rate was significantly higher along a casein gradient than without a gradient. Using ZAS, however, only chemokinesis could be demonstrated. BCF was found to attract PMNs into membrane filters only in the presence of human serum albumin. These observations give credence to the view that both LMAT and LFM are applicable to the in vitro assessment of chemotaxis and chemokinesis but the attractant of choice for this is different in each of the two methods. Images Figure 1 PMID:359465

  4. Generation of human monoclonal antibodies reactive with cellular antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Cote, R J; Morrissey, D M; Houghton, A N; Beattie, E J; Oettgen, H F; Old, L J

    1983-01-01

    Human lymphocytes from lymph node, peripheral blood, spleen, and tumor specimens have been fused with the LICR-LON-HMy2 (LICR-2) or SKO-007 human cell lines or the NS-1 mouse myeloma line. Over 75 fusions with the three myeloma-lymphoblastoid lines have been performed. Several factors appeared to improve the fusion outcome, including maintenance of the myeloma-lymphoblastoid lines in logarithmic phase growth at greater than or equal to 95% viability, a delay of 24 hr in the introduction of aminopterin to the fused cells, and preselection of the fetal calf serum used in the medium. For a given number of lymphocytes, fusions with NS-1 produced 5-20 times more clones than fusions with LICR-2 or SKO-007, and LICR-2 produced 4 times as many clones as SKO-007. The percentage of clones secreting human immunoglobulin, the range of immunoglobulin production, and the proportion of IgM, IgA, and IgG secretors were comparable for clones derived from the three myeloma-lymphoblastoid lines. Stable Ig-secreting clones were isolated with approximately equal frequency from LICR-2 and NS-1 fusions. A number of stable clones producing human monoclonal antibodies reacting with cell-surface, cytoplasmic, or nuclear antigens have been isolated from tumor-bearing patients and normal individuals. A surface antigenic system present on normal and malignant cells has been defined with a human monoclonal antibody derived from a patient with breast cancer. Techniques for producing human monoclonal antibody now appear to be sufficiently advanced to initiate a serological dissection of the humoral immune response to cancer. Images PMID:6572959

  5. Antibodies to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Potentiate the Response of Human T Lymphocyte Clones to the Same Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis, Esteban; Chang, Tse Wen

    1984-04-01

    Human T-helper lymphocyte clones specific for hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) proliferate on stimulation with HBsAg in vitro. Antibodies specific for HBsAg, but no other antibodies, augment this proliferative response. In the presence of antibodies to HBsAg, the maximum response could be achieved at HBsAg concentrations that were 1 percent of those required in the absence of the antibodies. These findings suggest that antigen-specific antibodies exert regulatory controls on T cells that recognize the same antigens.

  6. Increased 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in plasma and decreased mRNA expression of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, anti-oxidant enzymes, mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins and glycolytic enzymes in leucocytes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lee, H-T; Lin, C-S; Lee, C-S; Tsai, C-Y; Wei, Y-H

    2014-04-01

    We measured plasma levels of the oxidative DNA damage marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and leucocyte mRNA expression levels of the genes encoding the 8-OHdG repair enzyme human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1), the anti-oxidant enzymes copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD), manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1), GPx-4, glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione synthetase (GS), the mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins mtDNA-encoded ND 1 polypeptide (ND1), ND6, ATPase 6, mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), nuclear respiratory factor 1(NRF-1), pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 component alpha subunit (PDHA1), pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoenzyme 1 (PDK-1) and hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the glycolytic enzymes hexokinase-II (HK-II), glucose 6-phosphate isomerase (GPI), phosphofructokinase (PFK), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHa). We analysed their relevance to oxidative damage in 85 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, four complicated SLE patients undergoing rituximab treatment and 45 healthy individuals. SLE patients had higher plasma 8-OHdG levels (P < 0·01) but lower leucocyte expression of the genes encoding hOGG1(P < 0·01), anti-oxidant enzymes (P < 0·05), mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (P < 0·05) and glycolytic enzymes (P < 0·05) than healthy individuals. The increase in plasma 8-OHdG was correlated positively with the elevation of leucocyte expression of the genes encoding hOGG1 (P < 0·05), anti-oxidant enzymes (P < 0·05), several mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (P < 0·05) and glycolytic enzymes (P < 0·05) in lupus patients. The patients, whose leucocyte mtDNA harboured D310 heteroplasmy, exhibited a positive correlation between the mtDNA copy number and expression of ND1, ND6 and ATPase 6 (P < 0·05) and a negative correlation between mt

  7. Do FY antigens act as minor histocompatibility antigens in the graft-versus-host disease paradigm after human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplantation?

    PubMed

    Sellami, Mohamed Hichem; Chaabane, Manel; Kaabi, Houda; Torjemane, Lamia; Ladeb, Saloua; Ben Othmane, Tarek; Hmida, Slama

    2012-03-01

    FY antigens are candidate minor histocompatibility antigens relevant to renal allograft rejection, but no data have been reported about their role in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) incidence after human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical siblings hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of donor/recipient disparity at FY antigens on the incidence of GVHD in Tunisian patients receiving an HLA-identical HSCT. This work enrolled 105 Tunisian pairs of recipients and their HLA-identical sibling donors of HSCs. FY genotyping was performed with the polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer method and donor/recipient disparity for these antigens was analyzed at two levels: incompatibility and nonidentity. The case-control analyses showed no significant correlation between FY disparity and the incidence of either acute or chronic GVHD. Sample size calculation showed that 572 cases and 1716 controls would be necessary to be able to detect a significant association with 80% power and two-sided type I error level of 5% (α=0.05). The lack of association in the studied cohort may be explained by the low immunogenicity of FY antigens in HSCT context, compared with other antigens such as HA-1 and CD31.

  8. Cell adhesion markers are expressed by a stable human endothelial cell line transformed by the SV40 large T antigen under vimentin promoter control.

    PubMed

    Vicart, P; Testut, P; Schwartz, B; Llorens-Cortes, C; Perdomo, J J; Paulin, D

    1993-10-01

    Markers of endothelium have been studied in a new endothelial cell line derived from human umbilical cord vein cells by microinjection of a recombinant gene that includes a deletion mutant of the human vimentin gene regulatory region controlling the large T and small t antigen coding region of the SV40 virus. In culture, this immortalized venous endothelial cell line (IVEC) demonstrated morphological characteristics of endothelium; uptake of acetylated low density lipoprotein and presence of the Factor VIII-related antigen. Treatment of IVEC cells with Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) at 10 U.ml-1 activates the expression of cell adhesion molecules such as endothelial leucocyte adhesion molecule (ELAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), as observed in primary culture. Prostacyclin secretion was induced in the IVEC cells by 100 nM PMA treatment and thrombin at 0.5 U/ml. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity detected in IVEC cells was present but lower than ACE activity in primary endothelial cells and was completely blocked by enalaprilat (1 microM), a specific ACE inhibitor. The presence of ACE mRNA was also demonstrated in IVEC cells by RT-PCR amplification. Our data demonstrate that endothelial cells immortalized by use of this recombinant gene retain the morphological organization and numerous differentiated properties of endothelium.

  9. Specific binding of antigen onto human T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Durandy, A.; Fischer, A.; Charron, D.; Griscelli, C.

    1986-05-01

    Human T lymphocytes sensitized to Candida albicans (CA) were shown to proliferate in cultures induced with mannan, a ramified polysaccharide extracted from the cell well of CA. We presently describe that, when we used strongly labeled (/sup 3/H)mannan, antigen-specific T blast cells were able to bind the labeled mannan on their membrane. The observations that irrelevant blast cells did not bind (/sup 3/H)mannan, and that mannan-specific blast cells did not bind tritiated pneumococcal polysaccharide SIII, indicate the specificity of mannan binding. Mannan binding was reversible and saturable. Mannan binding on T blast cells was inhibited by preincubation with monoclonal antibodies to T3 but not to other T cell-related molecules. The characteristics of this receptor suggest its identity with the T cell receptor for antigen. The direct binding of mannan could be either due to a cross-linking of the receptor by multivalent mannan or to a recognition of mannan in association with HLA-DQ molecules, as suggested by partial blocking of mannan binding using anti-HLA-DQ monoclonal antibodies.

  10. Thermoinactivation of human IgE: antigenic and functional modifications.

    PubMed Central

    Demeulemester, C; Weyer, A; Peltre, G; Laurent, M; Marchand, F; David, B

    1986-01-01

    The thermoinactivation kinetics of IgE were studied in experimental models revealing the antigenic properties and the basophil-sensitizing capacity of these immunoglobulins. A pool of human sera containing anti-Dactylis glomerata (Dg) IgE was heated from 5 min up to 4 hr at 56 degrees. The IgE antigenicity was tested by two polyclonal 125I-labelled anti-IgE antibodies; one anti-IgE was specific of the whole Fc epsilon region, while the other had a specificity restricted to the D epsilon 2 domain. Radioimmunoassays showed that the D epsilon 2 epitopes were more rapidly altered than the D epsilon 1 epitopes. The capacity of IgE to bind to basophil Fc epsilon receptors was assayed by passive sensitization experiments. Basophil sensitivity towards the Dg pollen extract was tested by histamine release experiments in the presence of this allergen. A progressive decrease in cell sensitivity was observed when IgE samples used for cell sensitization were heated for longer than 5 min. Thermoinactivation kinetics of IgE revealed an unexpected increase in the apparent quantity and biological activity of IgE heated for 5 min at 56 degrees. This fact could be due to auto-anti-IgE antibodies linked to the unheated IgE and which interfere with the biological activities of IgE and their quantification. Images Figure 2 PMID:2420711

  11. A melanoma immune response signature including Human Leukocyte Antigen-E.

    PubMed

    Tremante, Elisa; Ginebri, Agnese; Lo Monaco, Elisa; Benassi, Barbara; Frascione, Pasquale; Grammatico, Paola; Cappellacci, Sandra; Catricalà, Caterina; Arcelli, Diego; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Di Filippo, Franco; Mottolese, Marcella; Visca, Paolo; Benevolo, Maria; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2014-01-01

    Paired cultures of early-passage melanoma cells and melanocytes were established from metastatic lesions and the uninvolved skin of five patients. In this stringent autologous setting, cDNA profiling was used to analyze a subset of 1477 genes selected by the Gene Ontology term 'immune response'. Human Leukocyte Antigen E (HLA-E) was ranked 19th among melanoma-overexpressed genes and was embedded in a transformation signature including its preferred peptide ligand donors HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, and HLA-G. Mostly undetectable in normal skin and 39 nevi (including rare and atypical lesions), HLA-E was detected by immunohistochemistry in 17/30 (57%) and 32/48 (67%) primary and metastatic lesions, respectively. Accordingly, surface HLA-E was higher on melanoma cells than on melanocytes and protected the former (6/6 cell lines) from lysis by natural killer (NK) cells, functionally counteracting co-expressed triggering ligands. Although lacking HLA-E, melanocytes (4/4 cultures) were nevertheless (and surprisingly) fully protected from NK cell lysis.

  12. Mucopolysaccharides in Peripheral Leucocytes of Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Riesco, Andres; Leyton, Cecilia

    1971-01-01

    The presence of mucopolysaccharides (MPS) in leucocytes of peripheral blood of 19 cancer patients, 13 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 14 normal controls, was studied histochemically. MPS was revealed in different proportions in polynuclears and mononuclears. According to the staining technics, the MPS appear to be mainly carboxylated and contain hyaluronic acid and chondroitinsulphate groups. The quantitative analysis revealed that MPS appeared only in around 3% of leucocytes of normal controls, while in the cancer patients 56% of polynuclear and 90% of mononuclears contained it. In the tuberculous patients, 90% of polynuclears and 86% of the mononuclears revealed MPS. The differences between the prevalence of leucocytes containing MPS in controls and in cancer or tuberculous patients are highly significant. The possibility that the difference in MPS content of leucocytes is related with low inmunological activity is postulated. PMID:4256006

  13. Thyrotropin Receptor Epitope and Human Leukocyte Antigen in Graves’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hidefumi; De Groot, Leslie J.; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Graves’ disease (GD) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease, and thyrotropin (TSH) receptor (TSHR) is a major autoantigen in this condition. Since the extracellular domain of human TSHR (TSHR-ECD) is shed into the circulation, TSHR-ECD is a preferentially immunogenic portion of TSHR. Both genetic factors and environmental factors contribute to development of GD. Inheritance of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, especially HLA-DR3, is associated with GD. TSHR-ECD protein is endocytosed into antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and processed to TSHR-ECD peptides. These peptide epitopes bind to HLA-class II molecules, and subsequently the complex of HLA-class II and TSHR-ECD epitope is presented to CD4+ T cells. The activated CD4+ T cells secrete cytokines/chemokines that stimulate B-cells to produce TSAb, and in turn hyperthyroidism occurs. Numerous studies have been done to identify T- and B-cell epitopes in TSHR-ECD, including (1) in silico, (2) in vitro, (3) in vivo, and (4) clinical experiments. Murine models of GD and HLA-transgenic mice have played a pivotal role in elucidating the immunological mechanisms. To date, linear or conformational epitopes of TSHR-ECD, as well as the molecular structure of the epitope-binding groove in HLA-DR, were reported to be related to the pathogenesis in GD. Dysfunction of central tolerance in the thymus, or in peripheral tolerance, such as regulatory T cells, could allow development of GD. Novel treatments using TSHR antagonists or mutated TSHR peptides have been reported to be effective. We review and update the role of immunogenic TSHR epitopes and HLA in GD, and offer perspectives on TSHR epitope specific treatments. PMID:27602020

  14. Human Norovirus Interactions with Histo-Blood Group Antigens and Human Milk Oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Schroten, Horst; Hanisch, Franz-Georg

    2016-01-01

    Human noroviruses interact with both human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) and human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs). The former are believed to be important for a virus infection, while the latter might act as natural decoys in the host during an infection. However, certain noroviruses are known to bind poorly to HBGAs and yet still cause infections; some interact with numerous HBGA types but are nonprevalent; and yet others bind HBGAs and seem to be increasing in prevalence. HBGAs and HMOs can be found as soluble antigens in humans, can be structurally alike, and can interact with equivalent residues at identical binding pockets on the capsid. In this Gem, we discuss HBGA and HMO binding studies for human noroviruses, concentrating on the clinically important genogroup II noroviruses. In short, the roles of HBGA and HMO interactions in norovirus infections are still unclear. PMID:27122582

  15. Mapping Antigenic Epitopes on the Human Bocavirus Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Kailasan, Shweta; Garrison, Jamie; Ilyas, Maria; Chipman, Paul; McKenna, Robert; Kantola, Kalle; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Kučinskaitė-Kodzė, Indrė; Žvirblienė, Aurelija

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human bocaviruses (HBoV1 to -4) are emerging pathogens associated with pneumonia and/or diarrhea in young children. Currently, there is no treatment or vaccination, so there is a need to study these pathogens to understand their disease mechanisms on a molecular and structural level for the development of control strategies. Here, we report the structures of six HBoV monoclonal antibody (MAb) fragment complexes, HBoV1-15C6, HBoV2-15C6, HBoV4-15C6, HBoV1-4C2, HBoV1-9G12, and HBoV1-12C1, determined by cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction to 18.0- to 8.5-Å resolution. Of these, the 15C6 MAb cross-reacted with HBoV1, HBoV2, and HBoV4, while the 4C2, 12C1, and 9G12 MAbs recognized only HBoV1. Pseudoatomic modeling mapped the 15C6 footprint to the capsid surface DE and HI loops, at the 5-fold axis and the depression surrounding it, respectively, which are conserved motifs in Parvoviridae. The footprints for 4C2, 12C1, and 9G12 span the surface loops that assemble portions of the 2-/5-fold wall (a raised surface feature between the 2-fold and 5-fold axes of symmetry) and the shoulder of the 3-fold protrusions. The MAb footprints, cross reactive and strain specific, coincide with regions with high and low sequence/structural identities, respectively, on the capsid surfaces of the HBoVs and identify potential regions for the development of peptide vaccines for these viruses. IMPORTANCE Human bocaviruses (HBoVs) may cause severe respiratory and gastrointestinal infections in young children. The nonenveloped parvovirus capsid carries determinants of host and tissue tropism, pathogenicity, genome packaging, assembly, and antigenicity important for virus infection. This information is currently unavailable for the HBoVs and other bocaparvoviruses. This study identifies three strain-specific antigenic epitopes on the HBoV1 capsid and a cross-reactive epitope on the HBoV1, HBoV2, and HBoV4 capsids using structures of capsid

  16. Association of human leukocyte antigen class I antigens in Iranian patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Hossein; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar; Esmaili, Nafiseh; Toofan, Hesam; Ehsani, Amir Hooshang; Hosseini, Seyed Hamed; Rezaei, Nima

    2013-04-01

    There are a limited number of reports indicating the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles in pemphigus vulgaris. This study was designed to highlight the association of HLA class I alleles with pemphigus vulgaris in Iran. Fifty patients with pemphigus vulgaris, diagnosed based on clinical, histological and direct immunofluorescence findings were enrolled into this study. The control group consisted of 50 healthy, age- and sex-matched individuals. HLA typing of class I (A, B and C alleles) was carried out using polymerase chain reaction based on the sequence-specific primer method. This study showed the higher frequency of HLA-B*44:02 (P = 0.007), -C*04:01 (P < 0.001), -C*15:02 (P < 0.001) and -C*16:01 (P = 0.027) in the patient group, compared to the controls, while the frequency of HLA-C*06:02 (P < 0.001) and -C*18:01 (P = 0.008) in the patients with pemphigus vulgaris was significantly lower than the controls. Regarding the linkage disequilibrium between HLA class I alleles, the HLA-A*03:01, -B*51:01, -C*16:02 haplotype (4% vs 0%, P = 0.04) is suggested to be a predisposing factor, whereas HLA-A*26:01, -B*38, -C*12:03 haplotype (0% vs 6%, P = 0.01) is suggested to be a protective factor. In conclusion, it is suggested that HLA-B*44:02, -C*04:01, -C*15:02 alleles and HLA-A*03:01, -B*51:01, -C*16:02 haplotype are susceptibility factors for development of pemphigus vulgaris in the Iranian population, while HLA-C*06:02, -C*18:01 alleles and HLA-A*26:01, -B*38, -C*12:03 haplotype may be considered as protective alleles.

  17. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  18. Rabies viral antigen in human tongues and salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Feng, Z; Ye, H

    1995-10-01

    Lingual and major salivary tissue samples from three cases of rabies were stained with the immunoperoxidase (ABC) technique. All tissue blocks had been embedded in paraffin 4-10 years before. The first antibody used was monoclonal antirabies nucleocapsin (N) mouse antibody (HAM). Four out of five pieces of tongue from two cases showed a large amount of granular staining indicating rabies antigen (RVAg) inside serous glandular cells, terminal nerves, muscle cells and covering epithelial cells including taste cells. In the tissue probes from the third case only minimal granular staining was found, probably due to complete absence of the serous gland. In contrast to the tongue, only a little weakly reacting material was found in 4 out of 9 probes of salivary gland, either in acini or in nerve fibres. The amount of RVAg is evidently much greater in the human tongue than in major salivary glands, whereas major salivary glands from infected dogs, foxes and skunks reportedly contain much RVAg. As the human tongue's serous gland appears to be a preferred location for RVAg, it may be a source of oral infection.

  19. Two distinct antigen systems in human B lymphocytes: identification of cell surface and intracellular antigens using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Y; Takami, T; Yuasa, H; Takei, T; Kikuchi, K

    1984-01-01

    Two distinct antigen systems (L26 and L27) specifically expressed in human B lymphocytes were identified using TB2-2B3 (2B3) and T3-5B3 (5B3) monoclonal antibodies, respectively. Whereas L26 antigen defined by 2B3 were rarely expressed on the surface of B cells but abundant in the cytoplasm, 127 antigens detected by 5B3 was clearly expressed on the cell surface. These two antigens appeared to be restricted in their expression to B cells, as they were found in most B cells but not other cell types including thymocytes, T cells, monocytes and granulocytes. Functional studies demonstrated that L27 was more easily lost from B cells after activation with pokeweed mitogen than was L26. Likewise, plasma cell myeloma, as well as normal plasma cells, was devoid of both L26 and L27, whereas immunoblastic sarcoma of B cell type expressed L26 but not L27. These two antigens co-existed in the same B cell lines including Epstein-Barr virus transformed B cell lines, B cell type acute lymphatic leukaemia (B-ALL) cell line, Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines and myeloma cell lines, but pre-B and common ALL cell lines were entirely negative for both L26 and L27. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that L26 consisted of at least two polypeptide chains with molecular weights of 30K and 33K daltons, which were clearly distinct from HLA-DR antigens. The antigen L27 is presently under study. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6332692

  20. Large Scale Immune Profiling of Infected Humans and Goats Reveals Differential Recognition of Brucella melitensis Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Li; Leng, Diana; Burk, Chad; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Kayala, Matthew A.; Atluri, Vidya L.; Pablo, Jozelyn; Unal, Berkay; Ficht, Thomas A.; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Saito, Mayuko; Morrow, W. John W.; Liang, Xiaowu; Baldi, Pierre; Gilman, Robert H.; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Tsolis, Renée M.; Felgner, Philip L.

    2010-01-01

    Brucellosis is a widespread zoonotic disease that is also a potential agent of bioterrorism. Current serological assays to diagnose human brucellosis in clinical settings are based on detection of agglutinating anti-LPS antibodies. To better understand the universe of antibody responses that develop after B. melitensis infection, a protein microarray was fabricated containing 1,406 predicted B. melitensis proteins. The array was probed with sera from experimentally infected goats and naturally infected humans from an endemic region in Peru. The assay identified 18 antigens differentially recognized by infected and non-infected goats, and 13 serodiagnostic antigens that differentiate human patients proven to have acute brucellosis from syndromically similar patients. There were 31 cross-reactive antigens in healthy goats and 20 cross-reactive antigens in healthy humans. Only two of the serodiagnostic antigens and eight of the cross-reactive antigens overlap between humans and goats. Based on these results, a nitrocellulose line blot containing the human serodiagnostic antigens was fabricated and applied in a simple assay that validated the accuracy of the protein microarray results in the diagnosis of humans. These data demonstrate that an experimentally infected natural reservoir host produces a fundamentally different immune response than a naturally infected accidental human host. PMID:20454614

  1. Large scale immune profiling of infected humans and goats reveals differential recognition of Brucella melitensis antigens.

    PubMed

    Liang, Li; Leng, Diana; Burk, Chad; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Kayala, Matthew A; Atluri, Vidya L; Pablo, Jozelyn; Unal, Berkay; Ficht, Thomas A; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Saito, Mayuko; Morrow, W John W; Liang, Xiaowu; Baldi, Pierre; Gilman, Robert H; Vinetz, Joseph M; Tsolis, Renée M; Felgner, Philip L

    2010-05-04

    Brucellosis is a widespread zoonotic disease that is also a potential agent of bioterrorism. Current serological assays to diagnose human brucellosis in clinical settings are based on detection of agglutinating anti-LPS antibodies. To better understand the universe of antibody responses that develop after B. melitensis infection, a protein microarray was fabricated containing 1,406 predicted B. melitensis proteins. The array was probed with sera from experimentally infected goats and naturally infected humans from an endemic region in Peru. The assay identified 18 antigens differentially recognized by infected and non-infected goats, and 13 serodiagnostic antigens that differentiate human patients proven to have acute brucellosis from syndromically similar patients. There were 31 cross-reactive antigens in healthy goats and 20 cross-reactive antigens in healthy humans. Only two of the serodiagnostic antigens and eight of the cross-reactive antigens overlap between humans and goats. Based on these results, a nitrocellulose line blot containing the human serodiagnostic antigens was fabricated and applied in a simple assay that validated the accuracy of the protein microarray results in the diagnosis of humans. These data demonstrate that an experimentally infected natural reservoir host produces a fundamentally different immune response than a naturally infected accidental human host.

  2. Human serum antibodies to a major defined epitope of human herpesvirus 8 small viral capsid antigen.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, R; De Paoli, P; Schulz, T F; Dillner, J

    1999-04-01

    The major antibody-reactive epitope of the small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) was defined by use of overlapping peptides. Strong IgG reactivity was found among approximately 50% of 44 human immunodeficiency virus-positive or -negative patients with Kaposi's sarcoma and 13 subjects who were seropositive by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) for the latent HHV-8 nuclear antigen. Only 1 of 106 subjects seronegative for both lytic and latent HHV-8 antigens and 10 of 81 subjects IFA-seropositive only for the lytic HHV-8 antigen had strong IgG reactivity to this epitope. Among 534 healthy Swedish women, only 1.3% were strongly seropositive. Comparison of the peptide-based and purified sVCA protein-based ELISAs found 55% sensitivity and 98% specificity. However, only 1 of 452 serum samples from healthy women was positive in both tests. In conclusion, the defined sVCA epitope was a specific, but not very sensitive, serologic marker of active HHV-8 infection. Such infection appears to be rare among Swedish women, even with sexual risk-taking behavior.

  3. Low dose antigen promotes induction of FOXP3 in human CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Long, S. Alice; Rieck, Mary; Tatum, Megan; Bollyky, Paul L.; Wu, Rebecca P.; Muller, Isabelle; Ho, Jhon-Chun; Shilling, Heather G.; Buckner, Jane H.

    2011-01-01

    Low antigen dose promotes induction and persistence of Treg in mice, yet few studies have addressed the role of antigen dose in the induction of adaptive CD4+FOXP3+ Treg in humans. To this end, we examined the level of FOXP3 expression in human CD4+CD25− T cells upon activation with autologous antigen presenting cells and varying doses of peptide. Antigen specific T cells expressing FOXP3 were identified by flow cytometry using MHC Class II tetramer (Tmr). We found an inverse relationship between antigen dose and the frequency of FOXP3+ cells for both foreign and self antigen specific T cells. Through studies of FOXP3 locus demethylation and helios expression, we determined that variation in the frequency of Tmr+FOXP3+ T cells was not due to expansion of natural Treg, but instead, we found that induction, proliferation and persistence of FOXP3+ cells was similar in high and low dose cultures whereas proliferation of FOXP3− T cells was favored in high antigen dose cultures. The frequency of FOXP3+ cells positively correlated with suppressive function, indicative of adaptive Treg generation. The frequency of FOXP3+ cells were maintained with IL-2, but not upon re-stimulation with antigen. Together, these data suggest that low antigen dose favors the transient generation of human antigen specific adaptive Treg over the proliferation of antigen specific FOXP3- effector T cells. These adaptive Treg could function to reduce ongoing inflammatory responses and promote low dose tolerance in humans, especially when antigen exposure and tolerance is transient. PMID:21865550

  4. A Human Minor Histocompatibility Antigen Resulting from Differential Expression due to a Gene Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Makoto; Warren, Edus H.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2003-01-01

    Minor histocompatibility antigens (minor H antigens) are targets of graft-versus-host disease and graft-versus-leukemia responses after allogeneic human leukocyte antigen identical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Only a few human minor H antigens have been molecularly characterized and in all cases, amino acid differences between homologous donor and recipient proteins due to nucleotide polymorphisms in the respective genes were responsible for immunogenicity. Here, we have used cDNA expression cloning to identify a novel human minor H antigen encoded by UGT2B17, an autosomal gene in the multigene UDP-glycosyltransferase 2 family that is selectively expressed in liver, intestine, and antigen-presenting cells. In contrast to previously defined human minor H antigens, UGT2B17 is immunogenic because of differential expression of the protein in donor and recipient cells as a consequence of a homozygous gene deletion in the donor. Deletion of individual members of large gene families is a common form of genetic variation in the population and our results provide the first evidence that differential protein expression as a consequence of gene deletion is a mechanism for generating minor H antigens in humans. PMID:12743171

  5. Molecular cloning of cDNA for the human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 and identification of related transmembrane antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Szala, S.; Kasai, Yasushi; Steplewski, Z.; Rodeck, U.; Koprowski, H.; Linnenbach, A.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The human tumor-associated antigen CO-029 is a monoclonal antibody-defined cell surface glycoprotein of 27-34 kDa. By using the high-efficiency COS cell expression system, a full-length cDNA clone for CO-029 was isolated. When transiently expressed in COS cells, the cDNA clone directed the synthesis of an antigen reactive to monoclonal antibody CO-029 in mixed hemadsorption and immunoblot assays. Sequence analysis revealed that CO-029 belongs to a family of cell surface antigens that includes the melanoma-associated antigen ME491, the leukocyte cell surface antigen CD37, and the Sm23 antigen of the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni. CO-029 and ME491 antigen expression and the effect of their corresponding monoclonal antibodies on cell growth were compared in human tumor cell lines of various histologic origins.

  6. Antigen exposure shapes the ratio between antigen-specific Tregs and conventional T cells in human peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Su, Laura F.; del Alcazar, Daniel; Stelekati, Erietta; Wherry, E. John; Davis, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    The T-cell receptor (TCR) is required for maturation and function of regulatory T cells (Tregs), but the ligand specificities of Tregs outside the context of transgenic TCRs are largely unknown. Using peptide–MHC tetramers, we isolated rare specific Foxp3+ cells directly ex vivo from adult peripheral blood and defined their frequency and phenotype. We find that a proportion of circulating Tregs recognize foreign antigens and the frequency of these cells are similar to that of self-reactive Tregs in the absence of cognate infection. In contrast, the frequencies of Tregs that recognize some common microbial antigens are significantly reduced in the blood of most adults. Exposure to peripheral antigens likely has a major influence on the balance between Tregs and conventional T-cell subsets because a larger proportion of flu-specific T cells has a regulatory cell phenotype in the cord blood. Consistent with this finding, we show that lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection can directly modulate the ratio of virus-specific effectors and Tregs in mice. The resulting change in the balance within an antigen-specific T-cell population further correlates with the magnitude of effector response and the chronicity of infection. Taken together, our data highlight the importance of antigen specificity in the functional dynamics of the T-cell repertoire. Each specific population of CD4+ T cells in human peripheral blood contains a subset of Tregs at birth, but the balance between regulatory and effector subsets changes in response to peripheral antigen exposure and this could impact the robustness of antipathogen immunity. PMID:27681619

  7. Plasmodium vivax GPI-anchored micronemal antigen (PvGAMA) binds human erythrocytes independent of Duffy antigen status

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yang; Lu, Feng; Wang, Bo; Li, Jian; Han, Jin-Hee; Ito, Daisuke; Kong, Deok-Hoon; Jiang, Lubin; Wu, Jian; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Takashima, Eizo; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Cao, Jun; Nyunt, Myat Htut; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Desai, Sanjay A.; Miller, Louis H.; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Han, Eun-Taek

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax, a major agent of malaria in both temperate and tropical climates, has been thought to be unable to infect humans lacking the Duffy (Fy) blood group antigen because this receptor is critical for erythrocyte invasion. Recent surveys in various endemic regions, however, have reported P. vivax infections in Duffy-negative individuals, suggesting that the parasite may utilize alternative receptor-ligand pairs to complete the erythrocyte invasion. Here, we identified and characterized a novel parasite ligand, Plasmodium vivax GPI-anchored micronemal antigen (PvGAMA), that bound human erythrocytes regardless of Duffy antigen status. PvGAMA was localized at the microneme in the mature schizont-stage parasites. The antibodies against PvGAMA fragments inhibited PvGAMA binding to erythrocytes in a dose-dependent manner. The erythrocyte-specific binding activities of PvGAMA were significantly reduced by chymotrypsin treatment. Thus, PvGAMA may be an adhesion molecule for the invasion of Duffy-positive and -negative human erythrocytes. PMID:27759110

  8. Antigenic analysis of immune complexes formed in normal human pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M

    1985-01-01

    Immune complexes, isolated from pregnancy sera by absorption to immobilized protein A, were dissociated and the antigen components separated from the IgG antibodies, which possessed immune reactivity directed against the plasma membrane of the syncytiotrophoblast layer of the placenta. Gel filtration studies demonstrated that five separate antigens could be identified and were of placental origin, as observed by their reactivity in an ELISA with affinity purified anti-trophoblast antibodies isolated from maternal sera. The five antigens of apparent mol. wt 2 X 10(6), 400,000, 150,000, 13,000 and less than 10,000 daltons were designated maternally recognised trophoblast antigens (MRTA), numbers V-IX; the relative proportions of these antigens in the sera were 14%, 68%, 16%, 0.5% and 1%, respectively. Immune complexes were also identified in nulliparous non-pregnant female sera and consisted of the 150,000 and the less than 10,000 daltons antigen components. The relationship between the MRTA present in the immune complexes and the MRTA (numbers I-IV) previously identified as components of the trophoblast plasma membrane is discussed. Images Fig. 3 PMID:4042429

  9. Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of excretory secretory antigens in humans with fascioliasis.

    PubMed Central

    Espino, A M; Finlay, C M

    1994-01-01

    A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has been developed for the detection of Fasciola hepatica excretory secretory (ES) antigens in stool specimens of infected humans. The assay uses antibodies against F. hepatica ES antigens. A monoclonal antibody (ES78, mouse immunoglobulin G2a) was used to capture ES antigens, and a rabbit polyclonal antibody, peroxidase conjugate, was used to identify ES antigens. Thirteen of 14 patients with parasitological evidence of fascioliasis had a detectable concentration of ES antigens (more than 15 ng/ml). None of the stool specimens from controls and from patients with parasites other than F. hepatica showed a positive reaction, suggesting the absence of cross-reactions in this assay. When the 14 patients were retested 2 months after treatment, all of the specimens from the 11 parasitologically cured patients were negative by the antigen detection assay while the specimens from the 3 patients with persisting F. hepatica eggs in their stools remained positive. PMID:8126178

  10. Purification and characterization by fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry of the polymorphonuclear-leucocyte-elastase-generated A alpha (1-21) fragment of fibrinogen from human blood after incubation with calcium ionophore A23187.

    PubMed Central

    Dewey, R S; Liesch, J M; Williams, H R; Sugg, E E; Dolan, C A; Davies, P; Mumford, R A; Albers-Schönberg, G

    1992-01-01

    The stimulation of human blood with a Ca2+ ionophore, A23187, leads to activation of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) with release of small amounts of catalyticaly active elastase, as demonstrated by the formation of a characteristic product, the N-terminal A alpha (1-21) peptide of the Aa subunit of fibrinogen. The identity of the peptide was initially established by radioimmunoassay (r.i.a.) with an antibody raised to A alpha (1-21). We now provide independent confirmation of the formation of A alpha (1-21) by fast-atom-bombardment-m.s. analysis of the fractions separated chromatographically after spiking of plasma samples with peptide labelled with [2H8]Phe at position 8. Identity of the peptides was established on the basis of their chromatographic retention time and by the distinct peaks in the mass spectra of these fractions. The relative intensities of the molecular ions of natural and labelled peptides were measured. On the basis of a comparison of the peaks of similar intensities, the concentration of the natural peptide at the time of spiking was close (79%) to the amount obtained by r.i.a. An additional peptide, des-alanyl-A alpha (2-21), was also seen. The total amount of material measured by r.i.a. could be accounted for by the sum of these two provides. The addition of label and assay by m.s. has provided an independent physical-chemical method for identifying A alpha (1-21) as a characteristic product of PMN elastase release in whole blood, but which is absent in freshly drawn blood. PMID:1736899

  11. Distinct antigen recognition pattern during zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis in humans and dogs.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yasuyuki; Howard, Randall F; Bhatia, Ajay; Trigo, Joelma; Nakatani, Maria; Netto, Eduardo M; Reed, Steven G

    2009-03-23

    Leishmania infantum is a causative agent of endemic zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in regions of South America and the Mediterranean. Dogs are the major reservoirs for L. infantum in these regions, and control of disease in dogs could have a significant impact on human disease. Although dogs share many symptoms of VL with humans as a result of L. infantum infection, they also show some unique clinical manifestations, which are often a combination of visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis, suggesting different mechanisms of disease development in dogs and humans. Here, we compare antibody responses of dogs and humans with VL to various defined leishmanial antigens. Parasite lysate and K39, the two most commonly used antigens for serodiagnosis of VL, detected the highest levels of antibodies in both humans and dogs with VL, whereas the recognition patterns of these antigens were distinct between the hosts. Among other defined antigens tested, LmSTI1 and CPB detected higher levels of antibodies in dogs and humans, respectively. These results indicate there is a difference between humans and dogs in antigen recognition patterns during VL. We infer that different strategies may need to be used in development of vaccines and diagnostics for humans and for dogs. In addition, we show a correlation between antibody titers to several antigens and severity of clinical symptoms during canine VL.

  12. DEMONSTRATION OF TUMOR-SPECIFIC ANTIGENS IN HUMAN COLONIC CARCINOMATA BY IMMUNOLOGICAL TOLERANCE AND ABSORPTION TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Phil; Freedman, Samuel O.

    1965-01-01

    Two methods were used to demonstrate the presence of tumor-specific antigens in adenocarcinomata of the human colon: (a) rabbits were immunized with extracts of pooled colonic carcinomata, and the antitumor antisera thus produced were absorbed with a pooled extract of normal human colon and with human blood components; (b) newborn rabbits were made immunologically tolerant to normal colonic tissue at birth, and were then immunized with pooled tumor material in adult life. Normal and tumor tissues were obtained from the same human donors in order to avoid misinterpretation of results due to individual-specific antigenic differences. The antisera prepared by both methods were tested against normal and tumor antigens by the techniques of agar gel diffusion, immunoelectrophoresis, hemagglutination, PCA, and immunofluorescence. Distinct antibody activity directed against at least two qualitatively tumor-specific antigens, or antigenic determinants, was detected in the antisera prepared by both methods and at least two additional tumor antigens were detected exclusively in antisera prepared by the tolerance technique. Whether these additional antigens were qualitatively different from normal tissue antigens, or merely present in tumor tissue in higher concentrations than in normal tissue has not as yet been determined. Furthermore, it was shown that the tumor-specific antibodies were not directed against bacterial contaminants or against the unusually high concentrations of fibrin found in many neoplastic tissues. It was concluded from these results that the pooled tumor extracts contained tumor-specific antigens not present in normal colonic tissue. Identical tumor-specific antigens were also demonstrated in a number of individual colonic carcinomata obtained from different human donors. PMID:14270243

  13. Immunohistochemical localization of human and simian immunodeficiency viral antigens in fixed tissue sections.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, J. M.; O'Leary, T. J.; Baskin, G. B.; Benveniste, R.; Harris, C. A.; Nara, P. L.; Rhodes, R. H.

    1987-01-01

    Antigens of human (HIV) or simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV) were identified with polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies and avidin-biotin complex (ABC) immunohistochemistry in fixed surgical pathology and autopsy specimens of humans or monkeys with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. With B-5 fixative, viral antigens were readily detected in lymph nodes of 8 of 13 patients with follicular hyperplasia, but in only 1 of 12 patients with follicular atrophy. Antigen was detected in follicular dendritic reticular cells and rare blastlike cells, extracellularly, and in postcapillary venules, medullary lymphocytes, sinus histiocytes, and macrophages in some lymph nodes. In the brain at autopsy, antigen could be found in gliomesenchymal-cell nodules, astrocytes, vascular endothelial cells, multinucleated cells, and astrocytes and macrophages associated with demyelination. In contrast, 4 rhesus monkeys with experimental SIV infection had abundant antigen in sinus histiocytes, macrophages, and multinucleated giant cells of lymph nodes and spleen and in thymic epithelial cells. Brain lesions of monkeys resembled those of humans, with antigen found in macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Antibodies to HIV also were immunoreactive in formalin-fixed tissue sections of monkeys containing SIV antigens. The ABC technique provided a fast and efficient method for localizing HIV and SIV antigens in fixed surgical and autopsy specimens. These findings are consistent with those found with in situ hybridization, ultrastructural studies, frozen sections of lymph nodes, and permanent sections of brain. Images Figure 1 p[201]-b p[201]-c Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:3472469

  14. THE DEFORMABILITY AND THE WETTING PROPERTIES OF LEUCOCYTES AND ERYTHROCYTES.

    PubMed

    Mudd, S; Mudd, E B

    1931-07-20

    The resistance to deformation of polymorphonuclear neutrophile leucocytes under the conditions of our observations has been shown to be on the average considerably less than the resistance to deformation of large mononuclear leucocytes. It is recognized of course that the viscosity of leucocytes, as of other cells, may be markedly influenced by osmotic conditions (17), by the reaction of the suspending medium (18, 19), by temperature, or by injury (20, 21). Although the conditions of our observations were quite different from those of the body, they were nevertheless closely similar to those of simultaneous phagocytosis experiments in which the cells functioned exceedingly well (3). Moreover E. R. and E. L. Clark (22) have noted that polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the tails of living tadpoles were more fluid than the macrophages. And Goss (23) in microdissecting human polymorphonuclear neutrophiles reports that they are more fluid than the clasmatocytes and monocytes studied by Chambers and Borquist (24). Other types of leucocytes have in our experience seemed to fall between the large mononuclear and the polymorphonuclear leucocytes in their average resistance to the interfacial tensions. The leucocyte of each type studied is surrounded by an exceedingly delicate membrane. This membrane appears under the dark-field microscope as a pale, silvery line not distinguishable by inspection alone from a simple phase boundary between two immiscible liquids. That this is a membrane, however, and not a mere interface between immiscible phases, seems certain. In the first place the cell cytoplasm and the suspending medium are not immiscible. When the cell organization is broken down by the interfacial tension the greater part of the cell contents is immediately dissolved or dispersed. Goss (23) has noted that when the membrane is torn with a microdissection needle disintegration at once spreads over the membrane and the cytoplasm undergoes profound change. Moreover it is

  15. Human antibody and antigen response to IncA antibody of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, P Y; Hsu, M C; Huang, C T; Li, S Y

    2007-01-01

    The high prevalence of C. trachomatis worldwide has underscored the importance of identifying specific immunogenic antigens in facilitating diagnosis as well as vaccine development. The aim of this study is to evaluate IncA antibody and antigen production in natural human infections. Our temporal expression study showed that IncA transcription and protein expression could be detected as early as 4 hours after the start of infection. Antibody responses could be detected in urine and genital swab samples from C. trachomatis-positive patients. It is especially interesting to note that the IncA antigen could be detected in urine. In conclusion, we have identified IncA as an important antigen in human. The potential applicability of the IncA antibody or antigen in the diagnosis as well as to vaccine development for C. trachomatis is also discussed.

  16. [Leucocyte alkaline phosphatase in normal and pathological pregnancy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Stark, K H; Zaki, I; Sobolewski, K

    1981-01-01

    The activities of leucocyte alkaline phosphatase were determined in 511 patients with normal and pathological pregnancy. Mean values were compared and the enzyme followed up, and the conclusion was drawn that leucocyte alkaline phosphatase was no safe indicator of foetal condition. No direct relationship were found to exist between leucocyte alkaline phosphatase, total oestrogens, HSAP, HLAP, HPL, and oxytocinase.

  17. Synthesis and processing in Escherichia coli of human leucocyte interferon fused with the signal sequence of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens a-amylase

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokin, A.V.; Avakov, A.S.; Bogush, V.G.; Kostrov, S.V.; Gaiga, G.Z.; Iomantas, Yu.V.; Abalakina, E.G.; Stepanov, A.I.; Strongin, A.Ya.; Kozlov, Yu.I.; Debabov, V.G.

    1985-11-01

    Earlier, the authors reported cloning of the alpha-amylase gene of B. amyloliquefaciens in B. subtilis and E. coli. Currently, the authors report results on the expression of the hybrid gene consisting of the DNA fragment coding for the leader part of B. amyloliquefaciens alpha-amylase and the structural part of the human interferon alpha-2 in E. coli cells. This gene contains an additional methionine codon at the 5'-terminal, which codes for the interferon structure (without its own signal peptide). The interferon gene was inserted into plasmid /sub p/TG 278 at the cleavage site of EcoRI. The structure of the plasmid thus obtained the signal peptide of amylase, five amino acids (Val-Gly-Glu-Phe-Met), and the structural part of the interferon. The E. coli C600 cells carrying plasmid pTGA6 were used to study interferon secretions. The interferon activity was determined radioimmunologically with the use of monoclonal anti-bodies NK2.

  18. Evaluation of three recombinant Leishmania infantum antigens in human and canine visceral leishmaniasis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Aliani Moura; Faria, Angélica Rosa; Rodrigues, Fernandes Tenório Gomes; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto; Magalhães, Rubens Daniel Miserani; Cunha, João Luís Reis; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; de Andrade, Hélida Monteiro

    2014-09-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a neglected disease and is fatal if untreated. Dogs serve as reservoirs for Leishmania infantum (syn. L. chagasi) due to their susceptibility to infection and high skin parasitism. Therefore, VL control in Brazil involves the elimination of seropositive dogs, among other actions. However, the most frequently used serological tests have limitations regarding sensitivity and specificity. In this study, we have selected three Leishmania antigens (C1, C8 and C9) and have produced them as recombinant proteins using pET-28a-TEV vector and Escherichia coli BL-21 as expression system. When tested in ELISA with human samples, the C9 antigen was the one showing the most promising results, with 68% sensitivity and 78% specificity. When testing canine samples, the C1, C8 and C9 antigens showed a sensitivity range from 70% to 80% and specificity range from 60% to 90%. The C1 antigen presented higher sensitivity (80%) and the C8 antigen presented higher specificity (90%). Due to it, we decided to mix and test C1 and C8 antigens together, resulting in the C18 antigen. The mix also yielded high percentages of detected symptomatic and asymptomatic dogs however it did not improve the performance of the diagnostic. Comparison of our tests with the tests recommended by the Brazilian Ministry of Health revealed that our antigens' sensitivities and the percentage of detected asymptomatic dogs were much higher. Our results suggest that the C1, C8, C18 and C9 recombinant proteins are good antigens to diagnose canine visceral leishmaniasis and could potentially be used in screening tests. To diagnose human visceral leishmaniasis, the C9 antigen presented reasonable results, but more optimization must be performed for this antigen to provide better performance.

  19. Preexisting antigen-specific immune responses are modulated by oral KLH feeding in humans.

    PubMed

    Hostmann, Arwed; Meyer, Tim; Maul, Jochen; Preiss, Jan; Boortz, Bertram; Thiel, Andreas; Duchmann, Rainer; Ullrich, Reiner

    2015-07-01

    Oral tolerance is the antigen-specific inhibition of a systemic immune response after oral antigen uptake and well established in animal models. We recently showed that keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) feeding modulates subsequently induced systemic immune responses in humans as well. In the present study, we investigated whether oral KLH can also modulate preexisting antigen-specific systemic B- and T-cell responses. We induced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions as well as systemic KLH-specific B- and T-cell responses by subcutaneous KLH injections. Subsequent oral KLH administration decreased the small proportion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells positive for the cytokine IL-17 at the end of the feeding regimen even further. After reimmunization, there was no difference in DTH reactions and the KLH-specific B-cell responses, but KLH-fed volunteers had an increased proportion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells positive for IL-10 and a reduced proportion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells positive for the skin-homing receptor cutaneous lymphocyte antigen and IL-2 and IFN-γ. Taken together, oral KLH can modulate a preexisting systemic KLH-specific immune response. These results suggest that feeding antigen may offer therapeutic strategies for the suppression of unwanted immune reactions in humans.

  20. Interactions of allogeneic human mononuclear cells in the two-way mixed leucocyte culture (MLC): influence of cell numbers, subpopulations and cyclosporin

    PubMed Central

    Sato, T; Deiwick, A; Raddatz, G; Koyama, K; Schlitt, H J

    1999-01-01

    With organ allografts considerable numbers of donor-type mononuclear cells are transferred to the recipient, leading to bilateral immunological interactions between donor and recipient lymphocytes. To study such bilateral immune reactions in detail, human two-way MLC were performed. In this model proliferation kinetics, patterns of activation, and survival of the two populations were analysed, and the relevance of initial cell subset composition, relative cell numbers, and the effect of immunosuppression on this co-culture were evaluated. It could be demonstrated that with an initial 50:50 ratio of two populations of allogeneic cells one population dominated after 21 days of co-culture in 78 out of 80 combinations (97%) tested; the other population decreased markedly after an initially stable phase of 6–7 days. With unequal starting conditions the larger population dominated when resting cells were used, but small populations of preactivated cells or separated CD8+ cells could also dominate. Depletion of CD16+ natural killer (NK) cells and of CD2− cells (B cell and monocytes) had no effect on domination. Addition of cyclosporin delayed or blocked the domination process while addition of IL-2 accelerated it. Disappearance of one population was associated with detection of apoptotic cells. The findings indicate that co-cultures of allogeneic mononuclear cells are generally not stable for more than 1 week, but lead to active elimination of one population. CD8+ cells and particularly preactivated cells seem to play the most important role in that process, while NK cells are of less importance. Cyclosporin can prolong survival of allogeneic cells in co-culture. These observations suggest that under the conditions of clinical organ transplantation even small amounts of immunocompetent donor cells transferred by the graft may persist for some time and may, thereby, have the chance to exert immunomodulatory functions. PMID:9933457

  1. CARbodies: Human Antibodies Against Cell Surface Tumor Antigens Selected From Repertoires Displayed on T Cell Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Sánchez-Martín, David; Compte, Marta; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Diaz, Rosa M; Vile, Richard; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library was expressed on the surface of human T cells after transduction with lentiviral vectors (LVs). The repertoire was fused to a first-generation T cell receptor ζ (TCRζ)-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We used this library to isolate antibodies termed CARbodies that recognize antigens expressed on the tumor cell surface in a proof-of-principle system. After three rounds of activation-selection there was a clear repertoire restriction, with the emergence dominant clones. The CARbodies were purified from bacterial cultures as soluble and active proteins. Furthermore, to validate its potential application for adoptive cell therapy, human T cells were transduced with a LV encoding a second-generation costimulatory CAR (CARv2) bearing the selected CARbodies. Transduced human primary T cells expressed significant levels of the CARbodies-based CARv2 fusion protein on the cell surface, and importantly could be specifically activated, after stimulation with tumor cells. This approach is a promising tool for the generation of antibodies fully adapted to the display format (CAR) and the selection context (cell synapse), which could extend the scope of current adoptive cell therapy strategies with CAR-redirected T cells. PMID:23695536

  2. Role of Metalloproteases in Vaccinia Virus Epitope Processing for Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP)-independent Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-B7 Class I Antigen Presentation*

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Elena; García, Ruth; Mir, Carmen; Barriga, Alejandro; Lemonnier, François A.; Ramos, Manuel; López, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates the viral proteolytic peptides generated by the proteasome and other proteases in the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen. There, they complex with nascent human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules, which are subsequently recognized by the CD8+ lymphocyte cellular response. However, individuals with nonfunctional TAP complexes or tumor or infected cells with blocked TAP molecules are able to present HLA class I ligands generated by TAP-independent processing pathways. Herein, using a TAP-independent polyclonal vaccinia virus-polyspecific CD8+ T cell line, two conserved vaccinia-derived TAP-independent HLA-B*0702 epitopes were identified. The presentation of these epitopes in normal cells occurs via complex antigen-processing pathways involving the proteasome and/or different subsets of metalloproteinases (amino-, carboxy-, and endoproteases), which were blocked in infected cells with specific chemical inhibitors. These data support the hypothesis that the abundant cellular proteolytic systems contribute to the supply of peptides recognized by the antiviral cellular immune response, thereby facilitating immunosurveillance. These data may explain why TAP-deficient individuals live normal life spans without any increased susceptibility to viral infections. PMID:22298786

  3. Fatty acid binding protein 4 in circulating leucocytes reflects atherosclerotic lesion progression in Apoe(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Agardh, Hanna E; Gertow, Karl; Salvado, Dolores M; Hermansson, Andreas; van Puijvelde, Gijs H; Hansson, Göran K; n-Berne, Gabrielle Paulsso; Gabrielsen, Anders

    2013-02-01

    Discovery of novel biomarkers for atherosclerosis is important to aid in early diagnosis of pre-symptomatic patients at high risk of cardiovascular events. The aim of the present study was therefore to identify potential biomarkers in circulating cells reflecting atherosclerotic lesion progression in the vessel wall. We performed gene arrays on circulating leucocytes from atherosclerosis prone Apoe(-/-) mice with increasing ages, using C57BL/6 mice as healthy controls. We identified fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) mRNA to be augmented in mice with established disease compared with young Apoe(-/-) or controls. Interestingly, the transcript FABP4 correlated significantly with lesion size, further supporting a disease associated increase. In addition, validation of our finding on protein level showed augmented FABP4 in circulating leucocytes whereas, importantly, no change could be observed in plasma. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated FABP4 to be present mainly in circulating neutrophils and to some extent in monocytes. Moreover, FABP4-positive neutrophils and macrophages could be identified in the subintimal space in the plaque. Using human circulating leucocytes, we confirmed the presence of FABP4 protein in neutrophils and monocytes. In conclusion, we have showed that cellular levels of FABP4 in circulating leucocytes associate with lesion development in the experimental Apoe(-/-) model. The increased expression is primarily localized to neutrophils, but also in monocytes. We have identified FABP4 in leucocytes as a potential and easy accessible biomarker of atherosclerosis which could be of future clinical relevance.

  4. Immunological fingerprinting of group B streptococci: from circulating human antibodies to protective antigens.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Andreas L; Senn, Beatrice M; Visram, Zehra; Henics, Tamás Z; Minh, Duc Bui; Schüler, Wolfgang; Neubauer, Christina; Gelbmann, Dieter; Noiges, Birgit; Sinzinger, Jan; Hanner, Markus; Dewasthaly, Shailesh; Lundberg, Urban; Hordnes, Knut; Masoud, Helga; Sevelda, Paul; von Gabain, Alexander; Nagy, Eszter

    2010-10-08

    Group B streptococcus is one of the most important pathogens in neonates, and causes invasive infections in non-pregnant adults with underlying diseases. Applying a genomic approach that relies on human antibodies we identified antigenic GBS proteins, among them most of the previously published protective antigens. In vitro analyses allowed the selection of conserved candidate antigens that were further evaluated in murine lethal sepsis models using several GBS strains. In active and passive immunization models, we identified four protective GBS antigens, FbsA and BibA, as well as two hypothetical proteins, all shown to contribute to virulence based on gene deletion mutants. These protective antigens have the potential to be components of novel vaccines or targets for passive immune prophylaxis against GBS disease.

  5. Antigenic Patterns and Evolution of the Human Influenza A (H1N1) Virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mi; Zhao, Xiang; Hua, Sha; Du, Xiangjun; Peng, Yousong; Li, Xiyan; Lan, Yu; Wang, Dayan; Wu, Aiping; Shu, Yuelong; Jiang, Taijiao

    2015-09-28

    The influenza A (H1N1) virus causes seasonal epidemics that result in severe illnesses and deaths almost every year. A deep understanding of the antigenic patterns and evolution of human influenza A (H1N1) virus is extremely important for its effective surveillance and prevention. Through development of antigenicity inference method for human influenza A (H1N1), named PREDAC-H1, we systematically mapped the antigenic patterns and evolution of the human influenza A (H1N1) virus. Eight dominant antigenic clusters have been inferred for seasonal H1N1 viruses since 1977, which demonstrated sequential replacements over time with a similar pattern in Asia, Europe and North America. Among them, six clusters emerged first in Asia. As for China, three of the eight antigenic clusters were detected in South China earlier than in North China, indicating the leading role of South China in H1N1 transmission. The comprehensive view of the antigenic evolution of human influenza A (H1N1) virus can help formulate better strategy for its prevention and control.

  6. Induction of Human Blood Group A Antigen Expression on Mouse Cells, Using Lentiviral Gene Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaohu; Lang, Haili; Zhou, Xianpei; Zhang, Li; Yin, Rong; Maciejko, Jessica; Giannitsos, Vasiliki; Motyka, Bruce; Medin, Jeffrey A.; Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The ABO histo-blood group system is the most important antigen system in transplantation medicine, yet no small animal model of the ABO system exists. To determine the feasibility of developing a murine model, we previously subcloned the human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase (H-transferase, EC 2.4.1.69) cDNA and the human α-1,3-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (A-transferase, EC 2.4.1.40) cDNA into lentiviral vectors to study their ability to induce human histo-blood group A antigen expression on mouse cells. Herein we investigated the optimal conditions for human A and H antigen expression in murine cells. We determined that transduction of a bicistronic lentiviral vector (LvEF1-AH-trs) resulted in the expression of A antigen in a mouse endothelial cell line. We also studied the in vivo utility of this vector to induce human A antigen expression in mouse liver. After intrahepatic injection of LvEF1-AH-trs, A antigen expression was observed on hepatocytes as detected by immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR. In human group A erythrocyte-sensitized mice, A antigen expression in the liver was associated with tissue damage, and deposition of antibody and complement. These results suggest that this gene transfer strategy can be used to simulate the human ABO blood group system in a murine model. This model will facilitate progress in the development of interventions for ABO-incompatible transplantation and transfusion scenarios, which are difficult to develop in clinical or large animal settings. PMID:20163247

  7. Abnormal distribution of the histocompatibility antigens (HLA) in lousy patients.

    PubMed

    Morsy, T A; Alalfy, M S; Sabry, A H; Fikry, A A; El Sharkawy, I M

    1996-04-01

    The histocompatibility antigens have important functions in the development of the immune response, in the development of immunologic tolerance and in the resistance and susceptibility to diseases. In the present study, the frequency of the human leucocytic antigens (HLA) were studied in 31 lousy children with Pediculus h. capitis (head lice) and 14 adults with Phthirus pubis (pubic lice) to evaluate the immune response in their pathogenesis. The patients (children and adults) were parasite-free as indicated by urine, stool and blood analysis and clinical examination. A significant increase was found between HLA-A11 and, -B5 and lousy children with P. h. capitis and between HLA,-A11, -B5 and -B27 and lousy adults with P. pubis. The association between HLA antigens and parasitic infection was discussed.

  8. Fetal leucocyte count in rhesus disease.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, N P; Buggins, A G; Snijders, R J; Noble, P N; Layton, D M; Nicolaides, K H

    1992-01-01

    The effect of fetal anaemia on the total and differential leucocyte counts was studied by examining blood samples obtained by cordocentesis from 177 previously untransfused rhesus affected fetuses at 17-36 weeks' gestation. The mean fetal total leucocyte, lymphocyte, and monocyte counts were significantly lower than the corresponding values in normal controls and there were significant associations between the decrease in these cells and the degree of fetal anaemia. Possible mechanisms for leucopenia include (i) stimulation of erythroid progenitor production at the expense of production of myeloid progenitors, (ii) non-specific haemophagocytosis, or (iii) general suppression of haemopoiesis. Further understanding of the underlying mechanism and the implications of leucopenia as well as the previously reported thrombocytopenia and anaemia may provide a basis for improved antenatal and/or postnatal treatment. PMID:1586179

  9. Molecular Characterization of a Fully Human Chimeric T-Cell Antigen Receptor for Tumor-Associated Antigen EpCAM

    PubMed Central

    Shirasu, Naoto; Yamada, Hiromi; Shibaguchi, Hirotomo; Kuroki, Motomu; Kuroki, Masahide

    2012-01-01

    The transduction of T cells to express chimeric T-cell antigen receptor (CAR) is an attractive strategy for adaptive immunotherapy for cancer, because the CAR can redirect the recognition specificity of T cells to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) on the surface of target cells, thereby avoiding the limitations of HLA restriction. However, there are considerable problems with the clinical application of CAR, mostly due to its xenogeneic components, which could be immunogenic in humans. Moreover, while extensive studies on the CARs have been performed, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of CAR-grafted T cells remain unclear. In order to eliminate potential immunogenicity and investigate the molecular basis of the CAR-mediated T-cell activation, we constructed a novel CAR (CAR57-28ζ) specific for one of the most important TAAs, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), using only human-derived genes. We revealed that in Jurkat T cells, lentivirally expressed CAR57-28ζ can transmit the T-cell-activating signals sufficient to induce IL-2 production upon EpCAM stimulation. An immunofluorescent analysis clearly showed that the CAR57-28ζ induces the formation of signaling clusters containing endogenous CD3ζ at the CAR/EpCAM interaction interface. These results suggest that this CAR gene may be safely and effectively applied for adaptive T-cell immunotherapy. PMID:22547929

  10. Immunohistochemical demonstration of specific antigens in the human brain fixed in zinc-ethanol-formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Korzhevskii, D E; Sukhorukova, E G; Kirik, O V; Grigorev, I P

    2015-08-05

    Tissue fixation is critical for immunohistochemistry. Recently, we developed a zinc-ethanol-formalin fixative (ZEF), and the present study was aimed to assess the applicability of the ZEF for the human brain histology and immunohistochemistry and to evaluate the detectability of different antigens in the human brain fixed with ZEF. In total, 11 antigens were tested, including NeuN, neuron-specific enolase, GFAP, Iba-1, calbindin, calretinin, choline acetyltransferase, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65), tyrosine hydroxylase, synaptophysin, and α-tubulin. The obtained data show that: i) the ZEF has potential for use in general histological practice, where detailed characterization of human brain morphology is needed; ii) the antigens tested are well-preserved in the human brain specimens fixed in the ZEF.

  11. Flow cytometry assay for intracellular detection of Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis virus (IPNV) in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Rønneseth, Anita; Pettersen, Eirin Fausa; Wergeland, Heidrun I

    2012-12-01

    Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis virus (IPNV) is traditionally detected in adherent leucocytes using immunofluorescence labelled specific antibodies, PCR or by further cultivation of infected cell material in cell lines. We present a flow cytometry (FCM) assay for detection of intracellular IPNV in salmon leucocytes, where each single cell is analysed for presence of virus. The method is established using in vitro challenge of salmon leucocytes and CHSE-214 cells. For detection of intracellular virus antigen the Cytofix/Cytoperm kit from BD is optimal compared with paraformaldehyde or acetone/methanol for cell permeabilisation. This is combined with labelling procedures allowing both internal virus antigen labelling and external antibody labelling of cell markers to identify B-cells and neutrophils. The secondary antibodies were Alexa Fluor 647 for the internal labelling and RPE for the external labelling of bound cell subtype specific antibodies. The presences of virus within cells are also demonstrated by confocal and light microscopy of infected cells. IPNV is successfully detected in blood and head kidney leucocyte samples. IPNV is found both in B-cells and neutrophils as well as in other types of leucocytes that could not be identified due to lack of cell-specific antibodies. Serial samples from cultivation of in vitro infected leucocytes and CHSE-214 cells analysed by flow cytometry showed that number of infected cells increased with increasing number of days. The flow cytometry protocol for detection of intracellular IPNV is verified using CHSE-214 cells persistently infected with IPNV. These analyses are compared with virus titre and virus infected naive CHSE-214 cells. The detection of IPNV in persistently infected cells indicates that carrier fish can be analysed, as such cells are considered to have virus titres similar to carriers.

  12. Human leukocyte antigen-G polymorphism influences the age of onset and autoantibody status in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mariaselvam, C M; Chaaben, A B; Salah, S; Charron, D; Krishnamoorthy, R; Tamouza, R; Negi, V S

    2015-03-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the frequency of three gene polymorphisms in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of human leucocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) gene in south Indian patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and analyze their influence on disease susceptibility, phenotype and treatment response. HLA-G 14 bp insertion (Ins)/deletion (del) (rs66554220), HLA-G +3142G>C (rs1063320) and +3187A>G (rs9380142) polymorphism was analyzed in 221 RA patients and 200 healthy controls. Frequency of HLA-G genotypes or alleles did not differ between patients and controls. Analysis based on rheumatoid factor (RF) status revealed that the frequency of allele 'A' (rs9380142) was significantly higher in RF-positive than in RF-negative patients [84% vs 74%, Yates-corrected P value (Pc) = 0.04, odds ratio (OR) = 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.0-3.2]. A similar difference was maintained in RF-positive female patients than their RF-negative counterparts (83% vs 71%, Pc = 0.02, OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0 to 3.4) and between RF-positive and RF-negative young onset RA (YORA) patients (84% vs 73%, Pc = 0.03, OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0-3.2), suggesting that rs9380142 polymorphism influenced RF status. The 14 bp Ins allele of rs66554220 was significantly more prevalent in RF-positive YORA than in RF-positive late onset RA (LORA) patients (51% vs 25%, P = 0.03, OR = 3.1, 95% CI = 1.1-9.8). Frequency of the four major haplotypes [InsGA (48%), DelGA (22%), DelCG (18%), DelCA (9.7%)] observed did not differ between cases and controls. HLA-G does not appear to be a risk factor for development of RA in south Indian Tamils but may act as a genetic modifier of clinical phenotype in terms of autoantibody production, gender preference and age at disease onset.

  13. Effects of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and cytokines on the expression of MHC antigens, complement receptors and other antigens on human blood monocytes and U937 cells: role in cell differentiation, activation and phagocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Spittler, A; Willheim, M; Leutmezer, F; Ohler, R; Krugluger, W; Reissner, C; Lucas, T; Brodowicz, T; Roth, E; Boltz-Nitulescu, G

    1997-01-01

    The effect of calcitriol/1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, alone and in combination with cytokines, on the expression of various antigens (Ag) on human peripheral blood monocytes and U937 cells was studied by flow cytometry. Both constitutive and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ Ag expression on monocytes was significantly down-regulated by calcitriol, IL-10 and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). The effects of calcitriol were concentration dependent and reached maximal inhibitory levels after 3-5 days. Modulation of HLA-DR by calcitriol and IFN-gamma at the protein level correlated with the amount of mRNA specific for the HLA-DR alpha-chain, as judged by Northern blot analysis. The basal as well as IL-4, IL-6, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and TGF-beta-driven levels of HLA-ABC Ag were significantly diminished by calcitriol. On U937 cells calcitriol markedly induced CD11a and CD11b expression and weakly up-regulated CD11c whereas on monocytes, constitutive CD11a, CD11b and CD11c expression was significantly down-regulated by calcitriol. The expression of CD14 Ag was strongly induced on U937 cells but only modestly on monocytes. Both the basal level of CD71 and IL-4, IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha-driven expression was diminished on calcitriol-treated U937 cells. In addition, calcitriol suppressed the expression of CD71 Ag on monocytes. The ability of monocytes to phagocytize opsonized Escherichia coli was diminished by calcitriol. Our results demonstrate that calcitriol, alone or in combination with cytokines, modulates expression of MHC, CD11b, CD11c, CD14 and CD71 Ag on both monocytes and U937 cells, and impairs the phagocytic property of monocytes. Images Figure 2 PMID:9135559

  14. Varying expression of major histocompatibility complex antigens on human renal endothelium and epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, P. R.; Trickett, L. P.; Smith, J. L.; MacIver, A. G.; Tate, D.; Slapak, M.

    1985-01-01

    Pre-anastomosis wedge biopsies from 14 cadaveric donor kidneys were examined for the expression of class I (HLA-ABC) and class II (HLA-DR) antigens in renal tissue. Two monoclonal antibodies to class I antigens and four to class II antigens were used in an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. Consistent expression of both antigens was demonstrated on the surface of glomerular, peritubular capillary and venous endothelial cells. Renal arteries contained only class I antigens. Proximal tubules contained varying amounts of each antigen in their cytoplasm. Sixteen human lymphocytotoxic allo-antisera showed marked variation in their ability to detect HLA antigens on the kidney. The selection of donors for recipients of renal allografts involves the complement-dependent cytotoxicity test and the failure of some lymphocytotoxic antisera to bind to the kidney indicates that some suitable patients may be incorrectly excluded. The use of a binding assay using an immunoperoxidase technique should be included in cross-match techniques particularly for patients who have high levels of circulating cytotoxic antibodies. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3855644

  15. Human T cell activation. III. Induction of an early activation antigen, EA 1 by TPA, mitogens and antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, T.; Jung, L.K.L.; FU, S.M.

    1986-03-01

    With human T cells activated for 12 hours by 12-o-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as immunogen, an IgG/sub 2a/ monoclonal antibody, mAb Ea 1, has been generated to a 60KD phosphorylated protein with 32KD and 28KD subunits. The antigen, Ea 1, is readily detected on 60% of isolated thymocytes by indirect immunofluorescence. A low level of Ea 1 expression is detectable on 2-6% of blood lymphocytes. Isolated T cells have been induced to express Ea 1 by TPA, mitogens and anitgens. TPA activated T cells express Ea 1 as early as 1 hour after activation. By 4 hours, greater than 95% of the T cells stain with mAb Ea 1. About 50% of the PHA or Con A activated T cells express Ea 1 with a similar kinetics. Ea 1 expression proceeds that of IL-2 receptor in these activation processes. T cells activated by soluble antigens (tetanus toxoid and PPD) and alloantigens in MLR also express Ea 1 after a long incubation. About 20% of the T cells stain for Ea 1 at day 6. Ea 1 expression is not limited to activated T cells. B cells activated by TPA or anti-IgM Ab plus B cell growth factor express Ea 1. The kinetics of Ea 1 expression is slower and the staining is less intense. Repeated attempts to detect Ea 1 on resting and activated monocytes and granulocytes have not been successful. Ea 1 expression is due to de novo synthesis for its induction is blocked by cycloheximide and actinomycin D. Ea 1 is the earliest activation antigen detectable to-date.

  16. Naturally Acquired Human Immunity to Pneumococcus Is Dependent on Antibody to Protein Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Reglinski, Mark; Jose, Ricardo J.; Marshall, Helina; de Vogel, Corné; Gordon, Stephen; Petersen, Fernanda C.; Baxendale, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Naturally acquired immunity against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is thought to be dependent on anti-capsular antibody. However nasopharyngeal colonisation by Streptococcus pneumoniae also induces antibody to protein antigens that could be protective. We have used human intravenous immunoglobulin preparation (IVIG), representing natural IgG responses to S. pneumoniae, to identify the classes of antigens that are functionally relevant for immunity to IPD. IgG in IVIG recognised capsular antigen and multiple S. pneumoniae protein antigens, with highly conserved patterns between different geographical sources of pooled human IgG. Incubation of S. pneumoniae in IVIG resulted in IgG binding to the bacteria, formation of bacterial aggregates, and enhanced phagocytosis even for unencapsulated S. pneumoniae strains, demonstrating the capsule was unlikely to be the dominant protective antigen. IgG binding to S. pneumoniae incubated in IVIG was reduced after partial chemical or genetic removal of bacterial surface proteins, and increased against a Streptococcus mitis strain expressing the S. pneumoniae protein PspC. In contrast, depletion of type-specific capsular antibody from IVIG did not affect IgG binding, opsonophagocytosis, or protection by passive vaccination against IPD in murine models. These results demonstrate that naturally acquired protection against IPD largely depends on antibody to protein antigens rather than the capsule. PMID:28135322

  17. Polypeptides and functions of antigens from human coronaviruses 229E and OC43.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, O W; Kenny, G E

    1982-01-01

    Coronaviruses possess three major size classes of polypeptides as judged by molecular weight: approximately 180,000, approximately 50,000, and approximately 23,000. Human coronaviruses 229E and OC43 possess not only three similar size classes of polypeptides but also three distinct antigens, none of which cross-react with the heterologous strain. Polypeptides separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were reacted in rocket immunoelectrophoresis with antiserum monospecific to each of the three strain-specific antigens (excised precipitin lines from crossed immunoelectrophoresis profiles were used for immunogens). Monospecific antiserum with neutralizing ability reacted with a polypeptide of 186,000 daltons for 229E and a polypeptide of 190,000 daltons for OC43. The antigen which elicited neutralizing antibody response was located at the surface, associated with the corona of the virion, glycosylated, and bound by concanavalin A. Another less prominent surface antigen was represented by size classes of 23,000 daltons for 229E and 24,000 for OC43. The core antigens of the viruses had molecular weights of 49,000 and 229E and 52,000 and OC43 virus. Thus, the molecular weights and functions of the antigens of human coronaviruses are similar to those of animal coronaviruses. The polypeptides of coronaviruses 229E and OC43 are nearly identical as judged by molecular weight, but the similar polypeptides of the two viruses represent different immunological specificities. Images PMID:6173324

  18. Purification of human seminal plasma no. 7 antigen by immunoaffinity chromatography on bound monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Isojima, S; Koyama, K; Fujiwara, N

    1982-01-01

    Human seminal plasma (HSP) No. 7 antigen was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography on bound 1C4 monoclonal antibody (Moab) (Shigeta et al., 1980b). The pooled HSP protein was applied to a CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B column of bound 1C4 Moab gamma globulin and the antibody bound fraction (fr) eluted was further purified by rechromatography in the same way. The purified antigen in the antibody bound fr obtained by rechromatography gave a single band on SDS-PAGE in a position corresponding to a molecular weight of 15,000 daltons. This preparation was 196.2 times more effective than the original HSP protein in neutralizing the sperm immobilizing activity of 1C4 Moab. The purified HSP No. 7 antigen contained iron, but was different from lactoferrin and transferrin. It did not show any enzymatic activities, such as those of acid phosphatase, LDH or trypsin inhibitor, and shared antigenicity with human milk protein. It was present in seminal plasma as a molecule with a higher molecular weight but seemed to be cleaved to a monomer of 15,000 daltons during purification procedures. This antigen is present on spermatozoa as sperm-coating antigen and the corresponding antibody can immobilize spermatozoa with complement. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7127911

  19. Identification of human trophoblast membrane antigens in maternal blood during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, M J; McIntyre, J A; Prior, M; Warriner, G; Faulk, W P

    1982-01-01

    The development of an immunoradiometric assay for the detection of human trophoblast-specific membrane antigens is described. The test revealed for the first time circulating trophoblast-specific cell membrane antigens in the peripheral blood of pregnant women, but none in non-pregnant female or male controls. Comparison of the circulating levels of these trophoblast-specific proteins between normal and pre-eclamptic blood samples showed no significant differences, thus casting doubt on the role of differential trophoblast antigen deportation in the etiology of toxaemic pregnancy. Matched retroplacental cord blood from several normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies were examined and found either negative or near the lower sensitivity limit of the assay, suggesting that deportation of trophoblast membrane antigens during gestation is limited to the maternal aspect of the placenta. PMID:6177463

  20. Flow cytometry analyses of phagocytic and respiratory burst activities and cytochemical characterization of leucocytes isolated from wrasse (Labrus bergylta A.).

    PubMed

    Haugland, Gyri T; Rønneseth, Anita; Wergeland, Heidrun I

    2014-07-01

    We have isolated leucocytes from peripheral blood (PBL), head kidney (HKL) and spleen (SL) of wrasse (Labrus bergylta A.) and studied the innate immune responses phagocytosis and respiratory burst using flow cytometry. Further, we have characterized the phenotypic properties of the leucocytes by cytochemical staining. We could differentiate between several subsets of leucocytes; lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages, neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils and small leucocytes that might be precursor or immature cells. One striking observation was the eosinophils which were present among HKL, PBL and SL. The neutrophils had rounded, bean shaped or bi-lobed nuclei and resembled neutrophils in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) and lumpsucker (Cyclopterus lumpus L.), but were different from the polymorphonucleated neutrophils in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) and humans. Basophils were observed, but they were rare. Phagocytosis and respiratory burst activities were detected among different cell types. Highest phagocytic activity was observed among monocytes/macrophages and small leucocytes. Several different subtypes had ability to perform an oxygen-dependent degradation of microbes, measured as respiratory burst activity. Knowledge of the basic properties of wrasse's leucocytes and innate immunology can benefit further studies on its adaptive immune responses.

  1. Deep Sequencing Reveals Potential Antigenic Variants at Low Frequencies in Influenza A Virus-Infected Humans

    PubMed Central

    Dinis, Jorge M.; Florek, Nicholas W.; Fatola, Omolayo O.; Moncla, Louise H.; Mutschler, James P.; Charlier, Olivia K.; Meece, Jennifer K.; Belongia, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza vaccines must be frequently reformulated to account for antigenic changes in the viral envelope protein, hemagglutinin (HA). The rapid evolution of influenza virus under immune pressure is likely enhanced by the virus's genetic diversity within a host, although antigenic change has rarely been investigated on the level of individual infected humans. We used deep sequencing to characterize the between- and within-host genetic diversity of influenza viruses in a cohort of patients that included individuals who were vaccinated and then infected in the same season. We characterized influenza HA segments from the predominant circulating influenza A subtypes during the 2012-2013 (H3N2) and 2013-2014 (pandemic H1N1; H1N1pdm) flu seasons. We found that HA consensus sequences were similar in nonvaccinated and vaccinated subjects. In both groups, purifying selection was the dominant force shaping HA genetic diversity. Interestingly, viruses from multiple individuals harbored low-frequency mutations encoding amino acid substitutions in HA antigenic sites at or near the receptor-binding domain. These mutations included two substitutions in H1N1pdm viruses, G158K and N159K, which were recently found to confer escape from virus-specific antibodies. These findings raise the possibility that influenza antigenic diversity can be generated within individual human hosts but may not become fixed in the viral population even when they would be expected to have a strong fitness advantage. Understanding constraints on influenza antigenic evolution within individual hosts may elucidate potential future pathways of antigenic evolution at the population level. IMPORTANCE Influenza vaccines must be frequently reformulated due to the virus's rapid evolution rate. We know that influenza viruses exist within each infected host as a “swarm” of genetically distinct viruses, but the role of this within-host diversity in the antigenic evolution of influenza has been unclear

  2. Generation of Human Antigen-Specific Monoclonal IgM Antibodies Using Vaccinated “Human Immune System” Mice

    PubMed Central

    van Geelen, Caroline M. M.; Noerder, Miriam; Huntington, Nicholas D.; Lim, Annick; Yasuda, Etsuko; Diehl, Sean A.; Scheeren, Ferenc A.; Ott, Michael; Weijer, Kees; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Di Santo, James P.; Beaumont, Tim; Guzman, Carlos A.; Spits, Hergen

    2010-01-01

    Background Passive transfer of antibodies not only provides immediate short-term protection against disease, but also can be exploited as a therapeutic tool. However, the ‘humanization’ of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is a time-consuming and expensive process that has the inherent drawback of potentially altering antigenic specificity and/or affinity. The immortalization of human B cells represents an alternative for obtaining human mAbs, but relies on the availability of biological samples from vaccinated individuals or convalescent patients. In this work we describe a novel approach to generate fully human mAbs by combining a humanized mouse model with a new B cell immortalization technique. Methodology/Principal Findings After transplantation with CD34+CD38− human hematopoietic progenitor cells, BALB/c Rag2−/−IL-2Rγc−/− mice acquire a human immune system and harbor B cells with a diverse IgM repertoire. “Human Immune System” mice were then immunized with two commercial vaccine antigens, tetanus toxoid and hepatitis B surface antigen. Sorted human CD19+CD27+ B cells were retrovirally transduced with the human B cell lymphoma (BCL)-6 and BCL-XL genes, and subsequently cultured in the presence of CD40-ligand and IL-21. This procedure allows generating stable B cell receptor-positive B cells that secrete immunoglobulins. We recovered stable B cell clones that produced IgM specific for tetanus toxoid and the hepatitis B surface antigen, respectively. Conclusion/Significance This work provides the proof-of-concept for the usefulness of this novel method based on the immunization of humanized mice for the rapid generation of human mAbs against a wide range of antigens. PMID:20957227

  3. Isolation of human single chain variable fragment antibodies against specific sperm antigens for immunocontraceptive development

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, A.S.; Naz, R.K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Contraceptive vaccines can provide valuable alternatives to current methods of contraception. We describe here the development of sperm-reactive human single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies of defined sperm specificity for immunocontraception. METHODS Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from antisperm antibody-positive immunoinfertile and vasectomized men were activated with human sperm antigens in vitro, and the complementary DNA prepared and PCR-amplified using primers based on all the variable regions of heavy and light chains of immunoglobulins. The scFv repertoire was cloned into pCANTAB5E vector to create a human scFv antibody library. RESULTS Panning of the library against specific sperm antigens yielded several clones, and the four strongest reactive were selected for further analysis. These clones had novel sequences with unique complementarity-determining regions. ScFv antibodies were expressed, purified and analyzed for human sperm reactivity and effect on human sperm function. AFA-1 and FAB-7 scFv antibodies both reacted with fertilization antigen-1 antigen, but against different epitopes. YLP20 antibody reacted with the expected human sperm protein of 48 ± 5 kDa. The fourth antibody, AS16, reacted with an 18 kDa sperm protein and seems to be a human homologue of the mouse monoclonal recombinant antisperm antibody that causes sperm agglutination. All these antibodies inhibited human sperm function. CONCLUSIONS This is the first study to report the use of phage display technology to obtain antisperm scFv antibodies of defined antigen specificity. These antibodies will find clinical applications in the development of novel immunocontraceptives, and specific diagnostics for immunoinfertility. PMID:18372255

  4. Determination of an unrelated donor pool size for human leukocyte antigen-matched platelets in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bub, Carolina Bonet; Torres, Margareth Afonso; Moraes, Maria Elisa; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Kutner, José Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Background Successful transfusion of platelet refractory patients is a challenge. Many potential donors are needed to sustain human leukocyte antigen matched-platelet transfusion programs because of the different types of antigens and the constant needs of these patients. For a highly mixed population such as the Brazilian population, the pool size required to provide adequate platelet support is unknown. Methods A mathematical model was created to estimate the appropriate size of an unrelated donor pool to provide human leukocyte antigen-compatible platelet support for a Brazilian population. A group of 154 hematologic human leukocyte antigen-typed patients was used as the potential patient population and a database of 65,500 human leukocyte antigen-typed bone marrow registered donors was used as the donor population. Platelet compatibility was based on the grading system of Duquesnoy. Results Using the mathematical model, a pool containing 31,940, 1710 and 321 donors would be necessary to match more than 80% of the patients with at least five completely compatible (no cross-reactive group), partial compatible (one cross-reactive group) or less compatible (two cross-reactive group) donors, respectively. Conclusion The phenotypic diversity of the Brazilian population has probably made it more difficulty to find completely compatible donors. However, this heterogeneity seems to have facilitated finding donors when cross-reactive groups are accepted as proposed by the grading system of Duquesnoy. The results of this study may help to establish unrelated human leukocyte antigen-compatible platelet transfusions, a procedure not routinely performed in most Brazilian transfusion services. PMID:26969768

  5. Human epidermal Langerhans cells cointernalize by receptor-mediated endocytosis "nonclassical" major histocompatibility complex class I molecules (T6 antigens) and class II molecules (HLA-DR antigens).

    PubMed Central

    Hanau, D; Fabre, M; Schmitt, D A; Garaud, J C; Pauly, G; Tongio, M M; Mayer, S; Cazenave, J P

    1987-01-01

    HLA-DR and T6 surface antigens are expressed only by Langerhans cells and indeterminate cells in normal human epidermis. We have previously demonstrated that T6 antigens are internalized in Langerhans cells and indeterminate cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. This process is induced by the binding of BL6, a monoclonal antibody directed against T6 antigens. In the present study, using a monoclonal antibody directed against HLA-DR antigens, on human epidermal cells in suspension, we show that the surface HLA-DR antigens are also internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis in Langerhans and indeterminate cells. Moreover, using immunogold double labeling, we demonstrate that T6 and HLA-DR antigens are internalized through common coated regions of the membrane of Langerhans or indeterminate cells. The receptor-mediated endocytosis that is induced involves coated pits and vesicles, receptosomes, lysosomes, and also, in Langerhans cells, the Birbeck granules. Thus, T6 antigens, which are considered to be "unusual" or "nonclassical" major histocompatibility complex class I molecules, and the major histocompatibility complex class II molecules, HLA-DR, are internalized in Langerhans and indeterminate cells through common receptor-mediated endocytosis organelles. Images PMID:3106979

  6. A human T cell clone that mediates the monocyte procoagulant response to specific sensitizing antigen.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, B S; Reitnauer, P J; Hank, J A; Sondel, P M

    1985-09-01

    A panel of human purified protein derivative of the tubercle bacillus (PPD)-reactive T cell clones was derived by cloning out of soft agar followed by cultivation on inactivated feeder cells in the presence of interleukin-2. 1 of 4 clones tested was able to mediate an increase in monocyte procoagulant activity (PCA) in response to PPD. All four clones had identical surface marker phenotypes (T4+, T8-) and proliferated in response to antigen. The reactive T cell clone possessed no PCA of its own, but upon being presented with PPD was able to instruct monocytes to increase their expression of PCA. Antigen presentation could be performed only by autologous monocytes; allogeneic monocytes from donors unrelated to the donor of the reactive clone could not present antigen to cells of the clone in a way that would initiate the procoagulant response. Cells of the reactive clone did not mediate increased monocyte PCA in response to Candida, even though peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the donor demonstrated increased PCA to both Candida and PPD. Thus, the PCA response to specific antigen can be mediated by a single clone of cells that shows specificity in the recognition of both antigen and antigen presenting cell.

  7. Evaluation of ex vivo human immune response against candidate antigens for a visceral leishmaniasis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajiv; Goto, Yasuyuki; Gidwani, Kamlesh; Cowgill, Karen D; Sundar, Shyam; Reed, Steven G

    2010-05-01

    People cured from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) develop protection mediated by Th1-type cellular responses against new infections. We evaluated cytokine responses against 6 defined candidate vaccine antigens in 15 cured VL subjects and 5 healthy endemic controls with no evidence of previous exposure to Leishmania parasites. Of the 6 cytokines examined, only interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) differentiated cured VL patients from non-exposed individuals, with cured patients mounting a significantly higher IFN-gamma response to a crude parasite antigen preparation. Among candidate vaccine antigens tested, the largest number of cured subjects recognized cysteine proteinase B, leading to heightened IFN-gamma responses, followed by sterol 24-c-methyltransferase. These two antigens were the most immunogenic and protective antigens in a murine VL model, indicating a relationship between T cell recall responses of humans cured from VL and protective efficacy in an experimental model. Further studies may help prioritize antigens for clinical development of a subunit vaccine against VL.

  8. C-myc oncogene expression in human melanoma and its relationship with tumour antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Grover, R; Ross, D A; Richman, P I; Robinson, B; Wilson, G D

    1996-08-01

    Melanoma produces specific tumour antigens which are capable of eliciting an immune response. However, this tumour evades the immune system, in part, by downregulation of class I HLA antigens on the cell surface, which are required for T cell recognition. It has been suggested that the oncogene c-myc may have a role in effecting this change in vitro, however, the relationship between oncoprotein level and tumour antigenicity has not been established in human tumours. This study measured c-myc oncoprotein in 94 melanoma specimens (46 primary tumours and 48 regional metastases) using flow cytometry and evaluated class I HLA expression with immunohistochemistry. C-myc expression was found in 91 tumours (96%) with higher expression in metastases than primary melanomas (P<0.005). Class I HLA expression was found to show great variation although metastases showed less antigenicity than primary tumours (P<0.01). Analysis of the relationship between these two parameters revealed a highly significant correlation in both primary (P<0.01) and metastatic disease (P<0.01), with high oncoprotein being associated with down regulation of cell surface antigens. Knowledge of the control of tumour antigenicity is likely to provide an objective platform for the development of new strategies for immunotherapy.

  9. Antigenic Relatedness of Norovirus GII.4 Variants Determined by Human Challenge Sera

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ying-Chun; Zhang, Xu-Fu; Xia, Ming; Tan, Ming; Quigley, Christina; Lei, Wen; Fang, Hao; Zhong, Weiming; Lee, Bonita; Pang, Xiaoli; Nie, Jun; Jiang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    The GII.4 noroviruses (NoVs) are a single genotype that is responsible for over 50% of NoV gastroenteritis epidemics worldwide. However, GII.4 NoVs have been found to undergo antigenic drifts, likely selected by host herd immunity, which raises an issue for vaccine strategies against NoVs. We previously characterized GII.4 NoV antigenic variations and found significant levels of antigenic relatedness among different GII.4 variants. Further characterization of the genetic and antigenic relatedness of recent GII.4 variants (2008b and 2010 cluster) was performed in this study. The amino acid sequences of the receptor binding interfaces were highly conserved among all GII.4 variants from the past two decades. Using serum samples from patients enrolled in a GII.4 virus challenge study, significant cross-reactivity between major GII.4 variants from 1998 to 2012 was observed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and HBGA receptor blocking assays. The overall abilities of GII.4 NoVs to bind to the A/B/H HBGAs were maintained while their binding affinities to individual ABH antigens varied. These results highlight the importance of human HBGAs in NoV evolution and how conserved antigenic types impact vaccine development against GII.4 variants. PMID:25915764

  10. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  11. Human lymphocyte antigens (HLA) and Graves' disease in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Y; Azezli, A; Carin, M; Aral, F; Sencer, E; Molvalilar, S

    1993-09-01

    To evaluate the association of HLA types with Turkish patients with Graves' disease, HLA typing, clinical findings, and thyroid antibodies were correlated. The HLA types, clinical findings (ophthalmopathy and age at onset), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor (TRAb) and antithyroid microsomal antibodies (MAb) were analyzed. Seventy Turkish patients with Graves' disease and 306 control subjects were assessed. Serological HLA typing was performed in HLA A, B, C, DR, and DQ loci. There was a significantly increased prevalence of HLA B8, B49, DR3, DR4, and DR10 in Graves' disease. The association of Graves' disease with HLA DR3 was found to be less strong than previously described. The HLA DR4 antigen may contribute to the predisposition of Graves' disease in Turkey. The results suggest that HLA B7, B13, DR7, DQw2, and DQw3 may confer a protective effect for Graves' disease in Turkey. Patients carrying HLA B12, B18, and B44 haplotypes had a tendency to develop the disease at a later age. The difference from the other studies may be the result of the selection of the controls; in part, of the variability in serological typing reagents; and, also, of the rather weak HLA associations with the disease.

  12. Polymorphic expression of a human superficial bladder tumor antigen defined by mouse monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Fradet, Y; Islam, N; Boucher, L; Parent-Vaugeois, C; Tardif, M

    1987-01-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which define a highly restricted antigen, were obtained by simultaneous immunizations with superficial papillary bladder tumor cells and mouse polyclonal serum against normal urothelium. The antigen was detected by the avidin/biotin/peroxidase method in 30/44 superficial bladder tumors (68%) but in only 4/27 infiltrating urothelial cancers (with much less intensity). No normal adult or fetal tissues tested expressed the antigen, including normal urothelium from 40 individuals, 13 of whom had a bladder tumor positive for the antigen. Only 1 of 45 nonbladder tumors showed some reactivity with one of the three mAbs. Serological tests on a large panel of human cancer cell lines and normal cultured cells were negative. The antigen is highly stable and well preserved on paraffin-embedded tissues. Electrophoretic transfer blot experiments with fresh tumor extracts showed that all three mAbs react with a determinant on a component of 300,000 Mr (pI 9.5) and 62,000 Mr (pI 6.5). The antigen shows polymorphic expression at the cellular level on tissue sections and also at a molecular level on immunoblots where the two bands are differentially detected on extracts of a series of tumors but are not visualized on normal urothelium extracts. The characteristics of this antigenic system suggest that it may provide some insights about the biology of bladder cancer. Specific detection of the antigen on 70% of superficial bladder tumors with normal cytology may be useful for their diagnosis and follow-up. Images PMID:3313389

  13. Novel distribution of the secretory leucocyte proteinase inhibitor in kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Ohlsson, S; Ljungkrantz, I; Ohlsson, K; Segelmark, M; Wieslander, J

    2001-01-01

    The secretory leucocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) is a low molecular weight, tissue-specific inhibitor of, for example, elastase and cathepsin G, which also have antimicrobial capacity. SLPI has been localised to the respiratory, gastrointestinal and genital tracts, but so far not to the kidney. The presence of SLPI in renal tubuli cells was demonstrated using immunohistochemistry and, by means of in situ hybridisation on human renal biopsies, we were able to demonstrate SLPI production. In various inflammatory conditions in the kidneys, the protease-antiprotease balance is disturbed. For this reason, as well as the possible role in the defence against ascending urinary tract infections, it is interesting to establish a source of SLPI in renal tubuli cells. PMID:11817677

  14. An antigenic threshold for maintaining human immunodeficiency virus type 1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, X.; Ogg, G.; Bonhoeffer, S.; Safrit, J.; Vesanen, M.; Bauer, D.; Chen, D.; Cao, Y.; Demoitie, M. A.; Zhang, L.; Markowitz, M.; Nixon, D.; McMichael, A.; Ho, D. D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Using the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model in mice, a number of studies show that memory cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses are maintained in the presence of continuous antigenic stimulation. Yet, other groups found that memory CTL specific for LCMV could last for a lifetime in mice without viral antigens. Thus, the extent to which an antigen is required for the maintenance of virus-specific CTL remains controversial. In humans, very few studies have been conducted to investigate the relationship between the quantity of antigen and the magnitude of CTL responses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We quantified CTL precursors (CTLp) using a limiting-dilution analysis (LDA) and CTL effectors (CTLe) using a new Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I tetramer technology in six long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection, as well as in eight patients whose viral loads were well suppressed by antiretroviral therapy. The viremia levels in these patients were measured using an reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. The proviral DNA load in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) was also measured by PCR in four LTNPs. RESULTS: The LTNPs had high levels of HIV-1-specific memory CTLp and CTLe, while maintaining a low plasma viral load. Despite also having low viral loads, patients whose plasma viremia was well-suppressed by effective therapy had low levels of CTLe. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that a complex, rather than a monotonic, relationship exists between CTL levels and HIV-1 viremia, including what appears to be an antigenic threshold for the maintenance of CTL at a measurable level. Under conditions of "antigen excess,", CTLe levels correlate inversely with viral load. On the other hand, under conditions that are "antigen limited," the correlation appears to be direct. PMID:11071274

  15. Deglycosylation of Toxocara excretory-secretory antigens improves the specificity of the serodiagnosis for human toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Roldán, W H; Elefant, G R; Ferreira, A W

    2015-11-01

    Serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis is difficult in tropical areas where other helminthiasis are endemic. Many studies have shown that glycans from helminths may be the responsible for cross-reactions in the immunoassays. In this study, we have evaluated the deglycosylation of the Toxocara canis excretory-secretory (TES) antigens for the detection of IgG antibodies using a panel of 228 serum samples (58 patients with toxocariasis, 75 patients with other helminth infections and 95 healthy individuals) by ELISA and Western blot assays. Our results showed that the deglycosylation of TES antigens resulted in a single fraction of 26 kDa (dTES) and was able to detect IgG antibodies with a sensitivity and specificity of 100% in both above-mentioned assays. The rate of cross-reactions, observed in ELISA with TES (13·3%), was significantly reduced (5·3%) when the dTES antigens were used. Likewise, the cross-reactivity observed with the fractions of 32, 55 and 70 kDa of the TES antigens was totally eliminated when the dTES were used in the Western blot. All these results showed that the deglycosylation of the TES antigens really improves the specificity of the serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis in endemic areas for helminth infections.

  16. Unique glycoprotein antigen defined by monoclonal antibody on human neurobiastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mujoo, K.; Spiro, R.C.; Reisfeld, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have characterized a new target antigen on the surface of human neuroblastoma cells and defined it with a monoclonal antibody (Mab) 5G3. This antibody is of IgG2a type and has an association constant of 8 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/. In ELISA assays, Mab 5G3 reacted with human neuroblastoma as well as melanoma, squamous lung, skin carcinoma, and osteogenic sarcoma. Immunocytochemical analysis of frozen tissue sections revealed strong reactivity with all neuroblastoma tissues and marginal reactivity with melanoma and glioma tissues. There was no reactivity with fetal or normal tissues with the exception of cerebellum. The antigen recognized by Mab 5G3 is a glycoprotein of 200 and 215 kDa expressed on the SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cells. The antigen appears to contain N-linked carbohydrates based on treatment of human neuroblastoma cells with tunicamycin before and after intrinsic radiolabeling followed by indirect immunoprecipitation. The pulse-chase biosynthetic studies followed by indirect immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE indicated the precursor/product relationship between 200 and 215 kDa molecules. The 200 kDa component is endoglycosidase H-sensitive, whereas 215 kDa molecule is Endo-H resistant. The 215 kDa component is also sulfated, sialylated, and phosphorylated at serine residues. Preliminary data suggests that Mab, aside from identifying a unique target antigen on human neuroblastoma cells, may be suited as a targeting device for chemotherapeutic drugs.

  17. No Evidence of Human Leukocyte Antigen Gene Association With Rheumatic Fever Among Children in Samoa.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Guliz; Seifried, Steven E

    2015-03-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) have been implicated in rheumatic fever pathogenesis. This pilot whole genome association study compares genotypes of Samoan children with rheumatic fever to unaffected siblings and unrelated healthy controls. No risk-related genotypes were associated with HLA genes. Thirteen Regions of Interest were identified as candidates for further study.

  18. Platelets in leucocyte recruitment and function.

    PubMed

    Rossaint, Jan; Zarbock, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    Platelets have a longstanding recognition as an essential cellular component of the coagulation system. However, substantial research over the last decade has added another important aspect to platelet function in that they are also an integral part of the innate immune system. Complex organisms are facing a constant threat of infections by invading pathogens, and they have developed a sophisticated and elegant measure to combat this threat, namely the immune system. Leucocyte recruitment to sites of infections is an essential step at the forefront of the immune response. Platelets have been shown to be involved in several steps of this process and they are an integrated connecting element among haemostasis, host defence, and additional immunological functions (e.g. neutrophil extracellular traps formation). However, the immune system also requires a tight regulation, as an overshooting immune response carries the risk of harming the host itself. This review aims at highlighting the unique features and molecular mechanisms that allow for the interactions of platelets and leucocytes and the regulation of this process. Furthermore, this article identifies the functional relevance of these events for the immune response.

  19. Human tumour antigens defined by cytotoxicity and proliferative responses of cultured lymphoid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vose, Brent M.; Bonnard, Guy D.

    1982-03-01

    The long-term goal of many laboratories has been to develop cellular reagents having specific reactivity against human tumour cells. Such immune cells should prove useful for defining the antigenicity of human malignancies and may have important therapeutic potential, as has been clearly shown in some animal models1. Here we describe methods of initiating continued lymphocyte cultures (CLC) having specific anti-tumour reactivity using conditioned media containing interleukin-2 (IL-2).

  20. Biochemical characterization of PECAM-1 (CD31 antigen) on human platelets.

    PubMed

    Metzelaar, M J; Korteweg, J; Sixma, J J; Nieuwenhuis, H K

    1991-12-02

    The platelet plasma membrane expresses several membrane glycoproteins with a high molecular weight. In this study we have investigated the properties of the CD31 antigen on platelets and endothelial cells using the monoclonal antibody (MoAb) RUU-PL 7E8. Comparative studies revealed that the CD31 antigen, PECAM-1 and endoCAM are the same protein. The CD31 antigen was immunoprecipitated with a molecular mass of 125 kDa nonreduced and 135 kDa reduced from Nonidet-P40 lysates of surface labeled human platelets. The relative position in two-dimensional nonreduced/reduced SDS-PAGE and IEF-PAGE, compared to other glycoproteins of similar molecular weight, was elucidated. The position of the CD31 antigen was clearly distinct from the position of the platelet membrane glycoproteins Ia, Ib, IIa, IIb, IIIa and the granule membrane protein GMP-140. Native resting platelets bound 7,760 +/- 1,670 molecules/platelet, whereas thrombin-stimulated platelets bound 14,500 +/- 3,790 molecules/platelet. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed the presence of the CD31 antigen on the membrane of both resting and thrombin-activated platelets. Immunofluorescence studies showed the presence of the CD31 antigen in the membrane of endothelial cells on sites of cell-cell contact, suggesting that the CD31 antigen might be involved in cell-cell interaction. In functional studies, MoAb RUU-PL 7E8 did not inhibit platelet aggregation, platelet adherence to the extracellular matrix of endothelial cells and purified collagen fibrils under flow conditions, nor was any influence found on endothelial cell detachment and growth.

  1. CTLA4 mediates antigen-specific apoptosis of human T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gribben, J G; Freeman, G J; Boussiotis, V A; Rennert, P; Jellis, C L; Greenfield, E; Barber, M; Restivo, V A; Ke, X; Gray, G S

    1995-01-01

    The regulation of T cell-mediated immune responses requires a balance between amplification and generation of effector function and subsequent selective termination by clonal deletion. Although apoptosis of previously activated T cells can be induced by signaling of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, these molecules do not appear to regulate T-cell clonal deletion in an antigen-specific fashion. We demonstrate that cross-linking of the inducible T-cell surface molecule CTLA4 can mediate apoptosis of previously activated human T lymphocytes. This function appears to be antigen-restricted, since a concomitant signal T-cell receptor signal is required. Regulation of this pathway may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to delete antigen-specific activated T cells. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7846057

  2. Atypical Antigen Recognition Mode of a Shark Immunoglobulin New Antigen Receptor (IgNAR) Variable Domain Characterized by Humanization and Structural Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Oleg V.; Olland, Andrea; Piché-Nicholas, Nicole; Godbole, Adarsh; King, Daniel; Svenson, Kristine; Calabro, Valerie; Müller, Mischa R.; Barelle, Caroline J.; Somers, William; Gill, Davinder S.; Mosyak, Lidia; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila

    2013-01-01

    The immunoglobulin new antigen receptors (IgNARs) are a class of Ig-like molecules of the shark immune system that exist as heavy chain-only homodimers and bind antigens by their single domain variable regions (V-NARs). Following shark immunization and/or in vitro selection, V-NARs can be generated as soluble, stable, and specific high affinity monomeric binding proteins of ∼12 kDa. We have previously isolated a V-NAR from an immunized spiny dogfish shark, named E06, that binds specifically and with high affinity to human, mouse, and rat serum albumins. Humanization of E06 was carried out by converting over 60% of non-complementarity-determining region residues to those of a human germ line Vκ1 sequence, DPK9. The resulting huE06 molecules have largely retained the specificity and affinity of antigen binding of the parental V-NAR. Crystal structures of the shark E06 and its humanized variant (huE06 v1.1) in complex with human serum albumin (HSA) were determined at 3- and 2.3-Å resolution, respectively. The huE06 v1.1 molecule retained all but one amino acid residues involved in the binding site for HSA. Structural analysis of these V-NARs has revealed an unusual variable domain-antigen interaction. E06 interacts with HSA in an atypical mode that utilizes extensive framework contacts in addition to complementarity-determining regions that has not been seen previously in V-NARs. On the basis of the structure, the roles of various elements of the molecule are described with respect to antigen binding and V-NAR stability. This information broadens the general understanding of antigen recognition and provides a framework for further design and humanization of shark IgNARs. PMID:23632026

  3. Atypical antigen recognition mode of a shark immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (IgNAR) variable domain characterized by humanization and structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Olland, Andrea; Piché-Nicholas, Nicole; Godbole, Adarsh; King, Daniel; Svenson, Kristine; Calabro, Valerie; Müller, Mischa R; Barelle, Caroline J; Somers, William; Gill, Davinder S; Mosyak, Lidia; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila

    2013-06-14

    The immunoglobulin new antigen receptors (IgNARs) are a class of Ig-like molecules of the shark immune system that exist as heavy chain-only homodimers and bind antigens by their single domain variable regions (V-NARs). Following shark immunization and/or in vitro selection, V-NARs can be generated as soluble, stable, and specific high affinity monomeric binding proteins of ∼12 kDa. We have previously isolated a V-NAR from an immunized spiny dogfish shark, named E06, that binds specifically and with high affinity to human, mouse, and rat serum albumins. Humanization of E06 was carried out by converting over 60% of non-complementarity-determining region residues to those of a human germ line Vκ1 sequence, DPK9. The resulting huE06 molecules have largely retained the specificity and affinity of antigen binding of the parental V-NAR. Crystal structures of the shark E06 and its humanized variant (huE06 v1.1) in complex with human serum albumin (HSA) were determined at 3- and 2.3-Å resolution, respectively. The huE06 v1.1 molecule retained all but one amino acid residues involved in the binding site for HSA. Structural analysis of these V-NARs has revealed an unusual variable domain-antigen interaction. E06 interacts with HSA in an atypical mode that utilizes extensive framework contacts in addition to complementarity-determining regions that has not been seen previously in V-NARs. On the basis of the structure, the roles of various elements of the molecule are described with respect to antigen binding and V-NAR stability. This information broadens the general understanding of antigen recognition and provides a framework for further design and humanization of shark IgNARs.

  4. Alloantigens of human lymphoid cell lines; `human Ia-like antigens'

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, K.; Nakamuro, K.; Tanigaki, N.; Pressman, D.

    1977-01-01

    Membrane glycoproteins that appear to belong to a new alloantigen system were partially purified by gel filtration and lentil-lectin affinity chromatography from a non-ionic detergent (Renex 30) solubilized membrane fraction of each of two Burkitt lymphoma cell lines, B46M and Daudi. The preparations were radioiodinated and further purified by gel filtration, lentil—lectin affinity chromatography and anti-HLA antibody affinity chromatography. The labelled preparations thus obtained did not have binding activity with any of rabbit anti-HLA, rabbit anti-human β2-microglobulin and rabbit anti-human IgG-Fab antisera, but did have a high level of binding activity with rabbit anti-B-cell membrane antiserum. Moreover, the labelled preparations showed relatively high binding activity with some conventional HLA typing sera. Out of sixty-eight human tissue typing alloantisera tested, three (Berlin 373, Betz and TO-29-01) gave especially high binding with both of the labeled preparations. The antigens involved in reaction with these alloantisera and also with the rabbit anti-B-cell membrane antiserum contained two components, one 31,000 ∼ 32,000 daltons and another 24,000 ∼ 25,000 daltons, bound non-covalently. The alloantigens were specific to B cell type cell lines (B-lymphoid cell lines and Burkitt-lymphoma cell lines) in cultured cell lines and also to B lymphocytes in peripheral blood. In organs and tissues, however, they were found to be present widely distributed in lymphoid organs (thymus as well as spleen and lymph node) and in non-lymphoid organs (including liver, kidney, testis and heart). PMID:24587

  5. Detection of Hepatitis B virus antigen from human blood: SERS immunoassay in a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Kamińska, Agnieszka; Witkowska, Evelin; Winkler, Katarzyna; Dzięcielewski, Igor; Weyher, Jan L; Waluk, Jacek

    2015-04-15

    A highly sensitive immunoassay utilizing surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been developed with a new Raman reporter and a unique SERS-active substrate incorporated into a microfluidic device. An appropriately designed Raman reporter, basic fuchsin (FC), gives strong SERS enhancement and has the ability to bind both the antibody and gold nanostructures. The fuchsin-labeled immuno-Au nanoflowers can form a sandwich structure with the antigen and the antibody immobilized on the SERS-active substrate based on Au-Ag coated GaN. Our experimental results indicate that this SERS-active substrate with its strong surface-enhancement factor, high stability and reproducibility plays a crucial role in improving the efficiency of SERS immunoassay. This SERS assay was applied to the detection of Hepatitis B virus antigen (HBsAg) in human blood plasma. A calibration curve was obtained by plotting the intensity of SERS signal of FC band at 1178cm(-1) versus the concentration of antigen. The low detection limit for Hepatitis B virus antigen was estimated to be 0.01IU/mL. The average relative standard deviation (RSD) of this method is less than 10%. This SERS immunoassay gives exact results over a broad linear range, reflecting clinically relevant HBsAg concentrations. It also exhibits high biological specificity for the detection of Hepatitis B virus antigen.

  6. Differential expression of HLA class II antigens on human fetal and adult lymphocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J A; Jones, D B; Evans, P R; Smith, J L

    1985-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies to monomorphic determinants of the MHC class II subregion locus products: DP, DR and DQ, was used to investigate the expression of these antigens on early lymphocytes and macrophages from human fetal liver (13-20 weeks), placenta (16 weeks and term) and cord blood, in relation to the class II phenotype of cells from adult tonsil and peripheral blood. Fetal liver sections and cell suspensions showed differential expression of class II antigens. DP was expressed at a higher frequency (11.0% of nucleated cells) than DR on lymphoid cells and macrophages from fetal liver, and DQ was either absent or expressed on less than 0.3% of nucleated cells. Consistent with this finding, DP but not DR or DQ antigens were observed on vascular elements and macrophages in the villi of 16-week placenta. At term, all three subregion locus products were expressed. Adult tonsil and peripheral blood B lymphocytes expressed DP, DR and DQ antigens with similar frequency; however, DQ was expressed at a lower frequency than DP and DR on cord blood B lymphocytes. In contrast, 30-50% macrophages from cord blood and adult peripheral blood expressed DP and DR, but fewer (5% and 18%, respectively) expressed DQ. These data suggest that class II antigens are expressed in the sequence DP, DR, DQ on developing lymphocytes. A similar sequence is suggested for macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3894221

  7. Immunoregulatory adherent cells in human tuberculosis: radiation-sensitive antigen-specific suppression by monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinhenz, M.E.; Ellner, J.J.

    1985-07-01

    In human tuberculosis, adherent mononuclear cells (AMC) selectively depress in vitro responses to the mycobacterial antigen tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD). The phenotype of this antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell was characterized by examining the functional activity of adherent cells after selective depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or OKM1-reactive monocytes. Adherent cell suppression was studied in the (/sup 3/H)thymidine-incorporation microculture assay by using T cells rigorously depleted of T cells with surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (T gamma cells) as antigen-responsive cells. PPD-induced (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation by these non gamma T cells was uniformly reduced (mean, 42% +/- 10% (SD)) when autologous AMC were added to non gamma T cells at a ratio of 1:2. Antigen-specific suppression by AMC was not altered by depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or treatment with indomethacin. However, AMC treated with OKM1 and complement or gamma irradiation (1,500 rads) no longer suppressed tuberculin responses in vitro. These studies identify the antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell in tuberculosis as an OKM1-reactive, non-erythrocyte-rosetting monocyte. The radiosensitivity of this monocyte immunoregulatory function may facilitate its further definition.

  8. Antigen shared by HeLa-like human cell line and gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bobrova, T S; Kryukova, I N; Chuev, Y V; Rottenberg, V I

    1991-01-01

    An antigen of human gastric mucosa immunologically related to the antigen of established HeLa-like cell lines (CL-GMA) is described. In gel-immunodiffusion test the antigen was revealed in 10/10 samples of normal gastric mucosa (including all parts of stomach), in 15/16 samples of cancer patients' gastric mucosa 5-10 cm distant from tumor and in 2/2 samples of ulcer patients' mucosa 5-10 cm distant from the ulcer. However, the antigen was undetectable at a distance 1-2 cm from ulcer. Homogenates of 39 embryonic organs and tissues were screened for the presence of CL-GMA. CL-GMA was detected in 7/7 samples of gastric mucosa. The antigen was revealed in trace amounts in 1/4 samples of small intestine mucosa and in 1/4 samples of spleen. Screening of 66 human tumors revealed CL-GMA in 13/16 samples of gastric cancer and in trace amounts in 2 tumors of non-stomach localization (larynx and rectum). Analysis of aceton-fixed paraffin sections by means of immunofluorescence revealed be CL-GMA in all parts of stomach. CL-GMA localized in the basal area of high columnar epithelial cells. The antigen was almost or totally undetectable in poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of stomach and in tumors of other localization. We could not detect CL-GMA in the sera of various cancer patients by means of immunodiffusion and/or dot-blotting.

  9. Detection of Goodpasture antigen in fractions prepared from collagenase digests of human glomerular basement membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Fish, A J; Lockwood, M C; Wong, M; Price, R G

    1984-01-01

    Preparations of human glomerular basement membrane (GBM) were digested with collagenase, and a Goodpasture (GP) antigen rich pool from gel filtration column runs was identified by antibody inhibition radioimmunoassay. The components of the GP antigen pool were separated on polyacrylamide gels, and transferred to nitrocellulose sheets by the 'western' blotting technique. The blots were separately reacted with thirteen GP sera as primary antibody, followed by peroxidase labelled goat anti-human IgG and revealed 45-50K (two bands) and 25-28K (one-three bands) components. No corresponding reactivity was observed using convalescent GP sera or other control sera (normal human serum, rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis with or without pulmonary haemorrhage, and lupus erythematosus) as primary antibody. Images Fig. 3 PMID:6319059

  10. Cell surface antigens of human trophoblast: definition of an apparently unique system with a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, U W; Hawes, C S; Jones, W R

    1986-01-01

    An epitope with apparent specificity for the surface of human syncytiotrophoblast was defined by a murine monoclonal antibody, FDO46B (IgG1, kappa). The epitope was predominantly expressed during the first trimester of pregnancy. Binding was detected on frozen tissue sections and on cultured trophoblast by the immunoperoxidase technique. It was also detected on the surface of a small percentage (less than 10%) of cultured choriocarcinoma cells (JEG-3). A panel of human tissues was negative, as were normal and malignant human lymphocytes. The antigen bearing the FDO46B epitope was still expressed by trophoblast after culture in the presence of tunicamycin, indicating that it is possibly protein in nature. This antigen may have potential utility as a target for a contraceptive vaccine. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2428734

  11. Tracing antigen signatures in the human IgE repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Marth, Katharina; Novatchkova, Maria; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Jenisch, Stefan; Jäger, Siegfried; Kabelitz, Dieter; Valenta, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    Allergen recognition by IgE antibodies is a key event in allergic inflammation. In this study, the IgE IGHV repertoires of individuals with allergy to the major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1, were analyzed over a four years period of allergen exposure by RT-PCR and sequencing of cDNA. Approximately half of the IgE transcripts represented non-redundant sequences, which belonged to seventeen different IGHV genes. Most variable regions contained somatic mutations but also non-mutated sequences were identified. There was no evidence for relevant increases of somatic mutations over time of allergen exposure. Highly similar IgE variable regions were found after four years of allergen exposure in the same and in genetically non-related individuals. Our results indicate that allergens select and shape a limited number of similar IgE variable regions in the human IgE repertoire. PMID:20573403

  12. Self Antigen Prognostic for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Cynthia L.; Patel, Hirenkumar; Arnold, Roland R.

    2001-01-01

    We have recently found that an extracellular protein, α1 proteinase inhibitor (α1PI; α1 antitrypsin), is required for in vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity outcome. We show here in a study of HIV-seropositive patients that decreased viral load is significantly correlated with decreased circulating α1PI. In the asymptomatic category of HIV disease, 100% of patients manifest deficient levels of active α1PI, a condition known to lead to degenerative lung diseases and a dramatically reduced life span. Further, HIV-associated α1PI deficiency is correlated with circulating anti-α1PI immunoglobulin G. These results suggest that preventing HIV-associated α1PI deficiency may provide a strategic target for preventing HIV-associated pathophysiology. PMID:11527807

  13. Tracing antigen signatures in the human IgE repertoire.

    PubMed

    Marth, Katharina; Novatchkova, Maria; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Jenisch, Stefan; Jäger, Siegfried; Kabelitz, Dieter; Valenta, Rudolf

    2010-08-01

    Allergen recognition by IgE antibodies is a key event in allergic inflammation. In this study, the IgE IGHV repertoires of individuals with allergy to the major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1, were analyzed over a four years period of allergen exposure by RT-PCR and sequencing of cDNA. Approximately half of the IgE transcripts represented non-redundant sequences, which belonged to seventeen different IGHV genes. Most variable regions contained somatic mutations but also non-mutated sequences were identified. There was no evidence for relevant increases of somatic mutations over time of allergen exposure. Highly similar IgE variable regions were found after four years of allergen exposure in the same and in genetically non-related individuals. Our results indicate that allergens select and shape a limited number of similar IgE variable regions in the human IgE repertoire.

  14. Immunoaffinity fractionation of Schistosoma mansoni worm antigens using human antibodies and its application for serodiagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Boctor, F N; Shaheen, H I

    1986-01-01

    A crude Schistosoma mansoni soluble worm antigen preparation (SWAP) was fractionated using an immunoaffinity column consisting of specific human anti-SWAP antibodies obtained from chronic S. mansoni-infected human sera and bound to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. The chromatographic separation resulted in three fractions: the unbound material (FW), and the eluted antigens with glycine-HCl (F1) and glycine-HCl-NaCl (F2). Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that the purified antigens F1 and F2 consisted of several bands when stained with Coomassie blue and silver stain, with molecular weights between 20 X 10(3) and 200 X 10(3). The F1 and F2 fractions in addition to FW and SWAP were used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure antibody levels in sera from schistosomiasis patients. Each individual serum assessed with the purified F2 antigen gave 100% positivity and three to four times higher optical density in comparison to SWAP with only 88% positivity. No detectable cross-reactive antibodies against F2 were found when a limited number of sera from filariasis, fascioliasis and trichinellosis patients were screened. Furthermore, F2 was also used and found to be more sensitive generally in detecting anti-adult worm antibodies than SWAP in recently schistosomiasis-infected persons. Thus, F2 appears to be a highly sensitive and specific reagent for the serodiagnosis of schistosomiasis infection. Images Figure 3 Figure 7 PMID:3082749

  15. Localization and characterization of the acrosomal antigen recognized by GB24 on human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Fénichel, P; Dohr, G; Grivaux, C; Cervoni, F; Donzeau, M; Hsi, B L

    1990-10-01

    GB24, a mouse monoclonal antibody, recognizes a trophoblast-leukocyte cross-reactive antigen (TLX), which is likely identical to the membrane cofactor protein (MCP), a complement regulatory protein. GB24 reacts also with a human acrosomal sperm antigen (Fénichel et al.: J Reprod Fertil 87:699-706, 1989). By immunofluorescence or immunoperoxidase, testicular, epididymal, and ejaculated spermatozoa were found to be positive after fixation by acetone. Motile, suspended spermatozoa became positive only through conditions known to induce acrosome reaction (A23187, follicular fluid, contact with oocytes). Ultrastructural studies with immunogold staining localized this protein on the inner acrosome membrane and in the acrosomal content. By SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, GB24 immunoprecipitated a unique protein of 48 kDa from capacitated and A23187-induced spermatozoa under reducing conditions. No cross-reactivity was found with mouse, boar, or ram spermatozoa. Localization of this human sperm antigen recognized by GB24 and its similarity with the TLX-MCP family antigens would suggest a possible role of this molecule during fertilization in sperm-egg binding or immune protection.

  16. Inducible expression of cancer-testis antigens in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heninger, Erika; Krueger, Timothy E.G.; Thiede, Stephanie M.; Sperger, Jamie M.; Byers, Brianna L.; Kircher, Madison R.; Kosoff, David; Yang, Bing; Jarrard, David F.; McNeel, Douglas G.; Lang, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Immune tolerance to self-antigens can limit robust anti-tumor immune responses in the use of tumor vaccines. Expression of novel tumor associated antigens can improve immune recognition and lysis of tumor cells. The cancer-testis antigen (CTA) family of proteins has been hypothesized to be an ideal class of antigens due to tumor-restricted expression, a subset of which have been found to induce antibody responses in patients with prostate disease. We demonstrate that CTA expression is highly inducible in five different Prostate Cancer (PC) cell lines using a hypomethylating agent 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5AZA) and/or a histone deacetylase inhibitor LBH589. These CTAs include NY-ESO1, multiple members of the MAGE and SSX families and NY-SAR35. A subset of CTAs is synergistically induced by the combination of 5AZA and LBH589. We developed an ex vivo organ culture using human PC biopsies for ex vivo drug treatments to evaluate these agents in clinical samples. These assays found significant induction of SSX2 in 9/9 distinct patient samples and NY-SAR35 in 7/9 samples. Further, we identify expression of SSX2 in circulating tumor cells (CTC) from patients with advanced PC. These results indicate that epigenetic modifying agents can induce expression of a broad range of neoantigens in human PC and may serve as a useful adjunctive therapy with novel tumor vaccines and checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:27769045

  17. Identification of Antigens of Pathogenic Free-Living Amoebae by Protein Immunoblotting with Rabbit Immune and Human Sera

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    or more broad bands of less than 1.85 kDa were prominent features in three different Acanthamoeba species. Few cross-reactive antibodies could be...detected between representative species of the three subgroups of Acanthamoeba . Naegleria antigen was likewise serologically distinct, as were...antigens. A prominent band of less than 18.5 kDa was identified in the Acanthamoeba culbertsoni antigen lane in 2 of the 10 human serum specimen pools. When

  18. Experimental studies of a vaccine formulation of recombinant human VEGF antigen with aluminum phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Pérez Sánchez, Lincidio; Morera Díaz, Yanelys; Bequet-Romero, Mónica; Ramses Hernández, Gerardo; Rodríguez, Yadira; Castro Velazco, Jorge; Puente Pérez, Pedro; Ayala Avila, Marta; Gavilondo, Jorge V

    2015-01-01

    CIGB-247 is a cancer vaccine that is a formulation of a recombinant protein antigen representative of the human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) with a bacterially-derived adjuvant (VSSP). The vaccine has shown an excellent safety profile in mice, rats, rabbits, not-human primates and in recent clinical trials in cancer patients. Response to the vaccine is characterized by specific antibody titers that neutralize VEGF/VEGFR2 binding and a cytotoxic tumor-specific response. To expand our present anti-VEGF active immunotherapy strategies, we have now studied in mice and non-human primates the effects of vaccination with a formulation of our recombinant VEGF antigen and aluminum phosphate adjuvant (hereafter denominated CIGB-247-A). Administered bi-weekly, CIGB-247-A produces high titers of anti-VEGF IgG blocking antibodies in 2 mice strains. Particularly in BALB/c, the treatment impaired subcutaneous F3II mammary tumor growth and reduced the number of spontaneous lung macro metastases, increasing animals' survival. Spleen cells from specifically immunized mice directly killed F3II tumor cells in vitro. CIGB-247-A also showed to be immunogenic in non-human primates, which developed anti-VEGF blocking antibodies and the ability for specific direct cell cytotoxic responses, all without impairing the healing of deep skin wounds or other side effect. Our results support consideration of aluminum phosphate as a suitable adjuvant for the development of new vaccine formulations using VEGF as antigen. PMID:25891359

  19. Isolation and characterization of a human liver and kidney-specific protein: the hepato-renal (H-R) antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Nerenberg, S T; Prasad, R; Inboriboon, P; Biskup, N; Pedersen, L; Faiferman, I

    1980-01-01

    This paper reports the isolation and characterization of a soluble antigen shared by the liver and kidney of human and some other animal species. Homogenates of human liver in saline were centrifugated at 27,000 g and the supernatants were fractionated by preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The gels were divided in sections and each was injected into rabbits; after absorption with polymerized normal human serum, the antiserum obtained by injecting one of the sections reacted only with saline extracts of human liver and kidney when tested against a variety of human tissue extracts. The absorbed antiserum, polymerized and insolubilized with glutaraldehyde, was used to purify the antigen by affinity chromatography. The purified antigen proved to be a glycoprotein containing 19 percent carbohydrate, had a molecular weight of 5.8-6.0 x 10(4) Daltons and a pI of 7.2-7.4. The antigen, relatively thermostable, was precipitated by 35-55 percent ammonium sulphate; its antigenic activity was not affected by extraction with 0.6 N perchloric acid or by incubation with ribonuclease, deoxyribonuclease or neuraminidase but was destroyed by incubation with ttypsin or chymotrypsin. Immunoperoxidase studies showed that the antigen appeared concentrated in the neclei of liver and kidney glomerular epithelial and tubular epithelial cells in humans and rats. The antigen could not be detected in human hepatomas or hypernephromas or in the rat Morris hepatoma 5123. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 7 PMID:6155231

  20. Fatty acid binding protein 4 in circulating leucocytes reflects atherosclerotic lesion progression in Apoe−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Agardh, Hanna E; Gertow, Karl; Salvado, Dolores M; Hermansson, Andreas; Puijvelde, Gijs H; Hansson, Göran K; n-Berne, Gabrielle Paulsso; Gabrielsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of novel biomarkers for atherosclerosis is important to aid in early diagnosis of pre-symptomatic patients at high risk of cardiovascular events. The aim of the present study was therefore to identify potential biomarkers in circulating cells reflecting atherosclerotic lesion progression in the vessel wall. We performed gene arrays on circulating leucocytes from atherosclerosis prone Apoe−/− mice with increasing ages, using C57BL/6 mice as healthy controls. We identified fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) mRNA to be augmented in mice with established disease compared with young Apoe−/− or controls. Interestingly, the transcript FABP4 correlated significantly with lesion size, further supporting a disease associated increase. In addition, validation of our finding on protein level showed augmented FABP4 in circulating leucocytes whereas, importantly, no change could be observed in plasma. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated FABP4 to be present mainly in circulating neutrophils and to some extent in monocytes. Moreover, FABP4-positive neutrophils and macrophages could be identified in the subintimal space in the plaque. Using human circulating leucocytes, we confirmed the presence of FABP4 protein in neutrophils and monocytes. In conclusion, we have showed that cellular levels of FABP4 in circulating leucocytes associate with lesion development in the experimental Apoe−/− model. The increased expression is primarily localized to neutrophils, but also in monocytes. We have identified FABP4 in leucocytes as a potential and easy accessible biomarker of atherosclerosis which could be of future clinical relevance. PMID:23387955

  1. Contrasting Population Structures of the Genes Encoding Ten Leading Vaccine-Candidate Antigens of the Human Malaria Parasite, Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Alyssa E.; Schultz, Lee; Buckee, Caroline O.; Reeder, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The extensive diversity of Plasmodium falciparum antigens is a major obstacle to a broadly effective malaria vaccine but population genetics has rarely been used to guide vaccine design. We have completed a meta-population genetic analysis of the genes encoding ten leading P. falciparum vaccine antigens, including the pre-erythrocytic antigens csp, trap, lsa1 and glurp; the merozoite antigens eba175, ama1, msp's 1, 3 and 4, and the gametocyte antigen pfs48/45. A total of 4553 antigen sequences were assembled from published data and we estimated the range and distribution of diversity worldwide using traditional population genetics, Bayesian clustering and network analysis. Although a large number of distinct haplotypes were identified for each antigen, they were organized into a limited number of discrete subgroups. While the non-merozoite antigens showed geographically variable levels of diversity and geographic restriction of specific subgroups, the merozoite antigens had high levels of diversity globally, and a worldwide distribution of each subgroup. This shows that the diversity of the non-merozoite antigens is organized by physical or other location-specific barriers to gene flow and that of merozoite antigens by features intrinsic to all populations, one important possibility being the immune response of the human host. We also show that current malaria vaccine formulations are based upon low prevalence haplotypes from a single subgroup and thus may represent only a small proportion of the global parasite population. This study demonstrates significant contrasts in the population structure of P. falciparum vaccine candidates that are consistent with the merozoite antigens being under stronger balancing selection than non-merozoite antigens and suggesting that unique approaches to vaccine design will be required. The results of this study also provide a realistic framework for the diversity of these antigens to be incorporated into the design of next

  2. Human thymic epithelial primary cells produce exosomes carrying tissue-restricted antigens

    PubMed Central

    Skogberg, Gabriel; Lundberg, Vanja; Berglund, Martin; Gudmundsdottir, Judith; Telemo, Esbjörn; Lindgren, Susanne; Ekwall, Olov

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released by cells into the extracellular space and have been shown to be present in thymic tissue both in mice and in humans. The source of thymic exosomes is however still an enigma and hence it is not known whether thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are able to produce exosomes. In this work, we have cultured human TECs and isolated exosomes. These exosomes carry tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs), for example, myelin basic protein and desmoglein 3. The presence of TRAs indicates a possible role for thymic epithelium-derived exosomes in the selection process of thymocytes. The key contribution of these exosomes could be to disseminate self-antigens from the thymic epithelia, thus making them more accessible to the pool of maturing thymocytes. This would increase the coverage of TRAs within the thymus, and facilitate the process of positive and negative selection. PMID:25776846

  3. Epigenetic silencing of the chaperone Cosmc in human leukocytes expressing tn antigen.

    PubMed

    Mi, Rongjuan; Song, Lina; Wang, Yingchun; Ding, Xiaokun; Zeng, Junwei; Lehoux, Sylvain; Aryal, Rajindra P; Wang, Jianmei; Crew, Vanja K; van Die, Irma; Chapman, Arlene B; Cummings, Richard D; Ju, Tongzhong

    2012-11-30

    Cosmc is the specific molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum for T-synthase, a Golgi β3-galactosyltransferase that generates the core 1 O-glycan, Galβ1-3GalNAcα-Ser/Thr, in glycoproteins. Dysfunctional Cosmc results in the formation of inactive T-synthase and consequent expression of the Tn antigen (GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr), which is associated with several human diseases. However, the molecular regulation of expression of Cosmc, which is encoded by a single gene on Xq24, is poorly understood. Here we show that epigenetic silencing of Cosmc through hypermethylation of its promoter leads to loss of Cosmc transcripts in Tn4 cells, an immortalized B cell line from a male patient with a Tn-syndrome-like phenotype. These cells lack T-synthase activity and express the Tn antigen. Treatment of cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine causes restoration of Cosmc transcripts, restores T-synthase activity, and reduces Tn antigen expression. Bisulfite sequencing shows that CG dinucleotides in the Cosmc core promoter are hypermethylated. Interestingly, several other X-linked genes associated with glycosylation are not silenced in Tn4 cells, and we observed no correlation of a particular DNA methyltransferase to aberrant methylation of Cosmc in these cells. Thus, hypermethylation of the Cosmc promoter in Tn4 cells is relatively specific. Epigenetic silencing of Cosmc provides another mechanism underlying the abnormal expression of the Tn antigen, which may be important in understanding aberrant Tn antigen expression in human diseases, including IgA nephropathy and cancer.

  4. Epigenetic Silencing of the Chaperone Cosmc in Human Leukocytes Expressing Tn Antigen*

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Rongjuan; Song, Lina; Wang, Yingchun; Ding, Xiaokun; Zeng, Junwei; Lehoux, Sylvain; Aryal, Rajindra P.; Wang, Jianmei; Crew, Vanja K.; van Die, Irma; Chapman, Arlene B.; Cummings, Richard D.; Ju, Tongzhong

    2012-01-01

    Cosmc is the specific molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum for T-synthase, a Golgi β3-galactosyltransferase that generates the core 1 O-glycan, Galβ1–3GalNAcα-Ser/Thr, in glycoproteins. Dysfunctional Cosmc results in the formation of inactive T-synthase and consequent expression of the Tn antigen (GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr), which is associated with several human diseases. However, the molecular regulation of expression of Cosmc, which is encoded by a single gene on Xq24, is poorly understood. Here we show that epigenetic silencing of Cosmc through hypermethylation of its promoter leads to loss of Cosmc transcripts in Tn4 cells, an immortalized B cell line from a male patient with a Tn-syndrome-like phenotype. These cells lack T-synthase activity and express the Tn antigen. Treatment of cells with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine causes restoration of Cosmc transcripts, restores T-synthase activity, and reduces Tn antigen expression. Bisulfite sequencing shows that CG dinucleotides in the Cosmc core promoter are hypermethylated. Interestingly, several other X-linked genes associated with glycosylation are not silenced in Tn4 cells, and we observed no correlation of a particular DNA methyltransferase to aberrant methylation of Cosmc in these cells. Thus, hypermethylation of the Cosmc promoter in Tn4 cells is relatively specific. Epigenetic silencing of Cosmc provides another mechanism underlying the abnormal expression of the Tn antigen, which may be important in understanding aberrant Tn antigen expression in human diseases, including IgA nephropathy and cancer. PMID:23035125

  5. Characterization of the lymphocyte activation gene 3-encoded protein. A new ligand for human leukocyte antigen class II antigens

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3), expressed in human activated T and natural killer (NK) cells, is closely related to CD4 at the gene and protein levels. We report here the initial characterization of the LAG-3-encoded protein. We have generated two monoclonal antibodies after immunization of mice with a 30-amino acid peptide that corresponds to an exposed extra loop region present in the LAG-3 immunoglobulin-like first domain. The reactivity of these reagents is directed against LAG-3 since they recognize both membrane-expressed and soluble recombinant LAG-3 molecules produced in a baculovirus expression system. The two antibodies are likely to react with the same or closely related epitope (termed LAG-3.1) exposed on the LAG-3 first domain extra loop, as assessed in competition experiments on LAG-3- expressing activated lymphocytes. Cellular distribution analysis indicated that the LAG-3.1 epitope is expressed on activated T (both CD4+ and CD8+ subsets) and NK cells, and not on activated B cells or monocytes. In immunoprecipitation experiments performed on activated T and NK cell lysates, a 70-kD protein was detected after SDS-PAGE analysis. 45-kD protein species were also immunoprecipitated. Both the 70- and 45-kD proteins were shown to be N-glycosylated. In Western blot analysis, only the former molecule was recognized by the anti-LAG-3 antibodies, demonstrating that it is LAG-3 encoded. These anti-LAG-3 antibodies were used to investigate whether the LAG-3 protein interacts with the CD4 ligands. By using a high-level expression cellular system based on COS-7 cell transfection with recombinant CDM8 vectors and a quantitative cellular adhesion assay, we demonstrate that rosette formation between LAG-3-transfected COS-7 cells and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-bearing B lymphocytes is specifically dependent on LAG-3/HLA class II interaction. In contrast to CD4, LAG-3 does not bind the human immunodeficiency virus gp120. This initial

  6. Isotypic and allotypic variation of human class II histocompatibility antigen alpha-chain genes.

    PubMed

    Auffray, C; Lillie, J W; Arnot, D; Grossberger, D; Kappes, D; Strominger, J L

    DNA sequences of four human class II histocompatibility antigen alpha chain DNA sequences (derived from cDNA and genomic clones representing DC1 alpha, DC4 alpha, DX alpha and SB alpha) are presented and compared to DR alpha and to mouse I-A alpha and I-E alpha sequences. These data suggest possible mechanisms for the generation of polymorphism and the evolution of the DR, DC and SB families.

  7. Evaluation of Antigens for Development of a Serological Test for Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Biéler, Sylvain; Waltenberger, Harald; Barrett, Michael P.; McCulloch, Richard; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Carrington, Mark; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; McKerrow, James; Phillips, Margaret A.; Michels, Paul A.; Büscher, Philippe; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Bishop, Richard; Robinson, Derrick R.; Bangs, James; Ferguson, Michael; Nerima, Barbara; Albertini, Audrey; Michel, Gerd; Radwandska, Magdalena; Ndung’u, Joseph Mathu

    2016-01-01

    Background Control and elimination of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) can be accelerated through the use of diagnostic tests that are more accurate and easier to deploy. The goal of this work was to evaluate the immuno-reactivity of antigens and identify candidates to be considered for development of a simple serological test for the detection of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense infections, ideally both. Methodology/Principal Findings The reactivity of 35 antigens was independently evaluated by slot blot and ELISA against sera from both T. b. gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense infected patients and controls. The antigens that were most reactive by both tests to T. b. gambiense sera were the membrane proteins VSG LiTat 1.3, VSG LiTat 1.5 and ISG64. Reactivity to T. b. rhodesiense sera was highest with VSG LiTat 1.3, VSG LiTat 1.5 and SRA, although much lower than with T. b. gambiense samples. The reactivity of all possible combinations of antigens was also calculated. When the slot blot results of 2 antigens were paired, a VSG LiTat 1.3- ISG75 combination performed best on T. b. gambiense sera, while a VSG LiTat 1.3-VSG LiTat 1.5 combination was the most reactive using ELISA. A combination of SRA and either VSG LiTat 1.3 or VSG LiTat 1.5 had the highest reactivity on T. b. rhodesiense sera according to slot blot, while in ELISA, pairing SRA with either GM6 or VSG LiTat 1.3 yielded the best results. Conclusions This study identified antigens that were highly reactive to T. b. gambiense sera, which could be considered for developing a serological test for gambiense HAT, either individually or in combination. Antigens with potential for inclusion in a test for T. b. rhodesiense HAT were also identified, but because their reactivity was comparatively lower, a search for additional antigens would be required before developing a test for this form of the disease. PMID:27936225

  8. Establishment of a cell line from leucocytes of a cow with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Adomaitiene, D; Tamosiunas, V; Mauricas, M; Surovas, V; Markevicius, A

    1983-07-01

    A cell line was established from blood leucocytes of a cow with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The leucocytes were cultured with conditioned medium (culture fluid of mouse cell line L). In vitro cell transformation was demonstrated by adaptation to permanent growth, modification of cell morphology, the alteration of cell surface phenotype, kinetic behaviour and the loss of the euploid stability of the cell karyotype. Ultrastructural studies showed rather a uniform cell pattern in a culture population heterogeneous for degree of cell vacuolization. A wide variation in the expression of surface markers in cells was demonstrated by E-, EA- and EAC-rosetting. In suspension culture the cell population was found to be sIg negative. Expression of leukemia-associated antigens by a fraction of the cultured cells was evidenced by a cytotoxic technique using complement and heterologous antisera against bovine leukemic lymphocytes, absorbed with normal lymphoid cells. Virus-like particles and BLV antigens were not identified. Culture cells failed to show spontaneous or antibody-dependent killer cytotoxicity. Comparison with blood lymphocytes of healthy and leukemic cattle was done. The established culture should be useful as a model for experimental immunology and oncology.

  9. Antigen-specific acquired immunity in human brucellosis: implications for diagnosis, prognosis, and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Cannella, Anthony P; Tsolis, Renee M; Liang, Li; Felgner, Philip L; Saito, Mayuko; Sette, Alessandro; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Vinetz, Joseph M

    2012-01-01

    Brucella spp., are Gram negative bacteria that cause disease by growing within monocyte/macrophage lineage cells. Clinical manifestations of brucellosis are immune mediated, not due to bacterial virulence factors. Acquired immunity to brucellosis has been studied through observations of naturally infected hosts (cattle, goats), mouse models (mice), and human infection. Even though Brucella spp. are known for producing mechanisms that evade the immune system, cell-mediated immune responses drive the clinical manifestations of human disease after exposure to Brucella species, as high antibody responses are not associated with protective immunity. The precise mechanisms by which cell-mediated immune responses confer protection or lead to disease manifestations remain undefined. Descriptive studies of immune responses in human brucellosis show that TH(1) (interferon-γ-producing T cells) are associated with dominant immune responses, findings consistent with animal studies. Whether these T cell responses are protective, or determine the different clinical responses associated with brucellosis is unknown, especially with regard to undulant fever manifestations, relapsing disease, or are associated with responses to distinct sets of Brucella spp. antigens are unknown. Few data regarding T cell responses in terms of specific recognition of Brucella spp. protein antigens and peptidic epitopes, either by CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, have been identified in human brucellosis patients. Additionally because current attenuated Brucella vaccines used in animals cause human disease, there is a true need for a recombinant protein subunit vaccine for human brucellosis, as well as for improved diagnostics in terms of prognosis and identification of unusual forms of brucellosis. This review will focus on current understandings of antigen-specific immune responses induced Brucella peptidic epitopes that has promise for yielding new insights into vaccine and diagnostics development, and for

  10. A new TLR2 agonist promotes cross-presentation by mouse and human antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Santone, Melissa; Aprea, Susanna; Wu, Tom Y H; Cooke, Michael P; Mbow, M Lamine; Valiante, Nicholas M; Rush, James S; Dougan, Stephanie; Avalos, Ana; Ploegh, Hidde; De Gregorio, Ennio; Buonsanti, Cecilia; D'Oro, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    Cross-presentation is the process by which professional APCs load peptides from an extracellularly derived protein onto class I MHC molecules to trigger a CD8(+) T cell response. The ability to enhance this process is therefore relevant for the development of antitumor and antiviral vaccines. We investigated a new TLR2-based adjuvant, Small Molecule Immune Potentiator (SMIP) 2.1, for its ability to stimulate cross-presentation. Using OVA as model antigen, we demonstrated that a SMIP2.1-adjuvanted vaccine formulation induced a greater CD8(+) T cell response, in terms of proliferation, cytokine production and cytolytic activity, than a non-adjuvanted vaccine. Moreover, using an OVA-expressing tumor model, we showed that the CTLs induced by the SMIP2.1 formulated vaccine inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Using a BCR transgenic mouse model we found that B cells could cross-present the OVA antigen when stimulated with SMIP2.1. We also used a flow cytometry assay to detect activation of human CD8(+) T cells isolated from human PBMCs of cytomegalovirus-seropositive donors. Stimulation with SMIP2.1 increased the capacity of human APCs, pulsed in vitro with the pp65 CMV protein, to activate CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells. Therefore, vaccination with an exogenous antigen formulated with SMIP2.1 is a successful strategy for the induction of a cytotoxic T cell response along with antibody production.

  11. Distribution of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules in human gingiva.

    PubMed

    Huynh-Torlakovic, Hong; Bjerkan, Louise; Schenck, Karl; Blix, Inger J S

    2012-10-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) are glycoproteins produced in epithelial, endothelial, lymphoid, and myeloid cells. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules mediate cell-cell contact and host-pathogen interactions. The aims of this study were to map the distribution and examine the regulation of CEACAMs in human gingival sites. Quantitative real-time PCR performed on human gingival biopsies from periodontitis sites revealed mRNA coding for CEACAM1, -5, -6, and -7. Immunohistochemistry showed that CEACAMs were not found in oral gingival epithelium, except for CEACAM5 in periodontitis. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecules 1, 5, and 6 were present in the oral sulcular epithelium of periodontitis but not in that of healthy gingiva. In junctional epithelium, all three molecules were present in healthy gingiva, but in periodontitis only CEACAM1 and -6 were detected. Staining for CEACAM1 and -6 was also seen in the inflammatory cell infiltrate in periodontitis. No staining for CEACAM7 was found. Proinflammatory mediators, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)/interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), increased the expression of CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 mRNAs in cultured human oral keratinocytes. CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 mRNAs were also strongly up-regulated upon stimulation with lysophosphatidic acid. In conclusion, the distribution of different CEACAMs was related to specific sites in the gingiva. This might reflect different functional roles in this tissue.

  12. Generation and Characterization of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Anthrax Protective Antigen following Vaccination with a Recombinant Protective Antigen Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chi, Xiangyang; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Weicen; Wang, Xiaolin; Yin, Kexin; Liu, Ju; Zai, Xiaodong; Li, Liangliang; Song, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yin, Ying; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is the central component of the three-part anthrax toxin, and it is the primary immunogenic component in the approved AVA anthrax vaccine and the "next-generation" recombinant PA (rPA) anthrax vaccines. Animal models have indicated that PA-specific antibodies (AB) are sufficient to protect against infection with Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we investigated the PA domain specificity, affinity, mechanisms of neutralization, and synergistic effects of PA-specific antibodies from a single donor following vaccination with the rPA vaccine. Antibody-secreting cells were isolated 7 days after the donor received a boost vaccination, and 34 fully human monoclonal antibodies (hMAb) were identified. Clones 8H6, 4A3, and 22F1 were able to neutralize lethal toxin (LeTx) both in vitro and in vivo. Clone 8H6 neutralized LeTx by preventing furin cleavage of PA in a dose-dependent manner. Clone 4A3 enhanced degradation of nicked PA, thereby interfering with PA oligomerization. The mechanism of 22F1 is still unclear. A fourth clone, 2A6, that was protective only in vitro was found to be neutralizing in vivo in combination with a toxin-enhancing antibody, 8A7, which binds to domain 3 of PA and PA oligomers. These results provide novel insights into the antibody response elicited by the rPA vaccine and may be useful for PA-based vaccine and immunotherapeutic cocktail design.

  13. Antigenic components of excretory-secretory products of adult Fasciola hepatica recognized in human infections.

    PubMed

    Sampaio-Silva, M L; Da Costa, J M; Da Costa, A M; Pires, M A; Lopes, S A; Castro, A M; Monjour, L

    1996-02-01

    The antigenic components of excretory-secretory products (ESP) of adult worms of Fasciola hepatica were revealed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis using sera from 20 patients infected with F. hepatica. Sera from 184 other parasitic infections and 20 healthy volunteers were also analyzed. It was found that the ESP were composed of more than 11 polypeptides; five components detected in fascioliasis sera had molecular weights of 12.4, 16.4, 19.4, 25, and 27 kilodaltons (kD). Only the 25- and 27-kD components were recognized by all 20 fascioliasis sera. Using the ESP as antigen, it was possible to perform an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 97%. Sera from other parasitic infections had antibodies to antigenic components with apparent molecular weights of 37, 38.4, 52, 63, 73, 87, 109, and 116 kD that were also found in sera from fascioliasis patients. These findings suggested that the 25- and 27-kD antigenic components may be sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of human fascioliasis.

  14. Optimizing Production of Antigens and Fabs in the Context of Generating Recombinant Antibodies to Human Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Nan; Loppnau, Peter; Seitova, Alma; Ravichandran, Mani; Fenner, Maria; Jain, Harshika; Bhattacharya, Anandi; Hutchinson, Ashley; Paduch, Marcin; Lu, Vincent; Olszewski, Michal; Kossiakoff, Anthony A; Dowdell, Evan; Koide, Akiko; Koide, Shohei; Huang, Haiming; Nadeem, Vincent; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Greenblatt, Jack F; Marcon, Edyta; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Edwards, Aled M; Gräslund, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    We developed and optimized a high-throughput project workflow to generate renewable recombinant antibodies to human proteins involved in epigenetic signalling. Three different strategies to produce phage display compatible protein antigens in bacterial systems were compared, and we found that in vivo biotinylation through the use of an Avi tag was the most productive method. Phage display selections were performed on 265 in vivo biotinylated antigen domains. High-affinity Fabs (<20nM) were obtained for 196. We constructed and optimized a new expression vector to produce in vivo biotinylated Fabs in E. coli. This increased average yields up to 10-fold, with an average yield of 4 mg/L. For 118 antigens, we identified Fabs that could immunoprecipitate their full-length endogenous targets from mammalian cell lysates. One Fab for each antigen was converted to a recombinant IgG and produced in mammalian cells, with an average yield of 15 mg/L. In summary, we have optimized each step of the pipeline to produce recombinant antibodies, significantly increasing both efficiency and yield, and also showed that these Fabs and IgGs can be generally useful for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocols.

  15. Human Leukocyte Antigens Influence the Antibody Response to Hepatitis B Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Jafarzadeh, Abdollah; Bagheri-Jamebozorgi, Masoome; Nemati, Maryam; Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Shokri, Fazel

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and its sequelae such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma has remained a serious public health problem throughout the world. The WHO strategy for effective control of HBV infection and its complications is mass vaccination of neonates and children within the framework of Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). Vaccination with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) induces protective antibody response (anti-HBs ≥ 10 IU/L) in 90-99% of vaccinees. The lack of response to HBsAg has been attributed to a variety of immunological mechanisms, including defect in antigen presentation, defect in HBsAg-specific T and/or B cell repertoires, T-cell suppression, increase in the regulatory T cell count, lack of necessary help of T-cells for production of anti-HBs by B cells, defect in Th1 and/or Th2 cytokine production and selective killing of HBsAg-specific B-cells by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The HLA complex plays an important role in many of these immunological processes. A variety of HLA class I, II, and III alleles and antigens have been reported to be associated with antibody response to HBsAg vaccination in different ethnic populations. Moreover, some HLA haplotypes were also associated with responsiveness to HBsAg. In this review the association of the HLA specificities with antibody response to hepatitis B (HB) vaccine is discussed.

  16. Optimizing Production of Antigens and Fabs in the Context of Generating Recombinant Antibodies to Human Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Nan; Loppnau, Peter; Seitova, Alma; Ravichandran, Mani; Fenner, Maria; Jain, Harshika; Bhattacharya, Anandi; Hutchinson, Ashley; Paduch, Marcin; Lu, Vincent; Olszewski, Michal; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.; Dowdell, Evan; Koide, Akiko; Koide, Shohei; Huang, Haiming; Nadeem, Vincent; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Marcon, Edyta; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Edwards, Aled M.; Gräslund, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    We developed and optimized a high-throughput project workflow to generate renewable recombinant antibodies to human proteins involved in epigenetic signalling. Three different strategies to produce phage display compatible protein antigens in bacterial systems were compared, and we found that in vivo biotinylation through the use of an Avi tag was the most productive method. Phage display selections were performed on 265 in vivo biotinylated antigen domains. High-affinity Fabs (<20nM) were obtained for 196. We constructed and optimized a new expression vector to produce in vivo biotinylated Fabs in E. coli. This increased average yields up to 10-fold, with an average yield of 4 mg/L. For 118 antigens, we identified Fabs that could immunoprecipitate their full-length endogenous targets from mammalian cell lysates. One Fab for each antigen was converted to a recombinant IgG and produced in mammalian cells, with an average yield of 15 mg/L. In summary, we have optimized each step of the pipeline to produce recombinant antibodies, significantly increasing both efficiency and yield, and also showed that these Fabs and IgGs can be generally useful for chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocols. PMID:26437229

  17. A study on human leukocyte antigen class I molecules in paediatric bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Mahendra N; Dudeja, Puja; Gupta, Rakesh K

    2014-04-01

    Childhood asthma, often associated with atopy, is more common in boys and may persist throughout life in 50% of cases. This case-control study was carried out to examine if any association of paediatric bronchial asthma with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I antigens. Thirty-six children with bronchial asthma diagnosed on basis of Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) criteria and an equal number of healthy controls without history of bronchial asthma were studied. Low resolution HLA- ABC typing was performed by sequence specific primers (SSP) and the frequency of HLA-ABC antigens in the two groups was compared. Total serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) estimation was done as a marker of atopy by ELISA. The study included 24 boys and 12 girls aged 13 months to 11 yrs, of which 16 (44%) had positive family history. Serum IgE levels were elevated in 20 (55%) of the cases and 33% of controls with peak values of 4877 and 627 IU/ml, respectively. No statistically significant correlation was observed between childhood asthma and HLA class I antigens, however, a statistically significant correlation was observed between serum IgE levels and asthma, which was elevated in cases, as compared to normal population. Serum IgE levels did not show a linear trend, in that a direct correlation with the severity of disease was not observed.

  18. Definition of glomerular antigens by monoclonal antibodies produced against a human glomerular membrane fraction.

    PubMed

    Neale, T J; Callus, M S; Donovan, L C; Baird, H

    1990-10-01

    Experimental animal models of glomerulonephritis (GN) produced by direct antibody binding to non-basement membrane glomerular capillary wall antigens do not to date have human parallels. To examine the potential for this form of humoral glomerular injury in man, we sought to define discrete human non-GBM glomerular antigenic targets using hybridoma technology. Mice were immunised intraperitoneally with 20-100 micrograms of a human glomerular membrane fraction (HGMF). Six fusions have yielded 12 stable reagents defined by positive glomerular indirect immunofluorescence (IF) and microELISA using HGMF as the screening antigen. Subclass analysis of ascitic McAbs indicated several IgG1, one IgG2b, and three IgM reagents. Distinctive IF patterns of reactivity with epithelial, endothelial or mesangial structures have been observed, with or without peritubular capillary, tubular basement membrane and vessel wall reactivity. Seven normal non-renal human organs and the kidneys of rat, rabbit and sheep have shown patterns characteristic of each individual McAb, restricted to human or with species cross reactivity. To partially characterise McAb-reactive antigens, detergent-solubilised renal cortex and collagenase-solubilised GBM (CS-GBM) extracts have been probed by immunoblot. A unique McAb 7-5Q, reactive with glomerular and tubular epithelial structures, binds major bands of approximately 107 KD and 93 KD in detergent solubilised cortex and a single band of similar size by immunoprecipitation (110 KD). 5-3A (a human-restricted linear-reacting McAb) binds bands of 20-200 KD (major band 58 KD) in CS-GBM. In conclusion, distinct species-restricted and more broadly disposed glomerular epitopes are definable in man by McAbs and are potential targets for humoral injury. Purification of these antigens will allow assay for circulating putative nephritogenic auto-antibody and potentially, McAbs may be useful in screening urine for evidence of occult structural renal disease.

  19. In vitro interactions between Neoparamoeba spp. and salmonid leucocytes; The effect of parasite sonicate on anterior kidney leucocyte function

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gross, K.; Alcorn, S.; Murray, A.; Morrison, R.; Nowak, B.

    2006-01-01

    Sonicated Neoparamoeba spp. (Nspp) did not affect the in vitro respiratory burst response of leucocytes isolated from Atlantic salmon Salmo salar, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha anterior kidneys (P > 0.05). Atlantic salmon and chinook salmon leucocytes pre-incubated with the parasites, however, responded to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation with a greater response compared to cells incubated with PMA on its own (P < 0.05). Sonicated Nspp was not chemo-attractive for anterior kidney leucocytes isolated from all three fish species. ?? 2006 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  20. Production kinetics and immunochemical properties of carcinoembryonic antigen and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen synthesized by various human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, S; Kuroki, M; Kuroki, M; Koga, Y; Matsuoka, Y

    1986-05-01

    The production kinetics and immunochemical properties of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) in various human tumor cell lines were studied. By radioimmunoassay (RIA), five CEA-producing tumor cell lines tested--2 derived from colonic (M7609 and CCK-81), one from pancreatic (QGP-1) and 2 from lung (HLC-1 and KNS-62) carcinomas--were found to produce NCA simultaneously. The cellular contents of CEA and NCA and the amounts of both antigens released into the culture medium were highly variable among the cell lines. It was a distinct contrast that one cell line (CCK-81) released very large amounts of CEA and NCA into the medium while having the smallest amounts of both antigens in the cells, whereas the others contained much larger amounts of the antigens in the cells as compared with the amounts released into the medium. For most of the cell lines, the production of both CEA and NCA increased in the stationary phase of growth as compared with the exponential phase. The production kinetics of both CEA and NCA appeared to be parallel with each other in all the cell lines, though the amount ratio of CEA to NCA produced was variable. By means of a double immunodiffusion test with polyclonal antibodies, antigenic uniformity with no unique organ-specificity was confirmed for all the CEA preparations from spent media of the cell lines, though some differences in the sugar moiety of CEA were detected by RIA using monoclonal antibodies. No antigenic differences among NCA preparations were observed. Upon sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), molecular heterogeneity was observed among CEA or NCA preparations isolated from cell lysates.

  1. Schistosome egg antigens elicit a proinflammatory response by trophoblast cells of the human placenta.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Emily A; Kurtis, Jonathan D; Acosta, Luz; Gundogan, Fusun; Sharma, Surendra; Pond-Tor, Sunthorn; Wu, Hai-Wei; Friedman, Jennifer F

    2013-03-01

    Schistosomiasis affects nearly 40 million women of reproductive age. Many of these women are infected while pregnant and lactating. Several studies have demonstrated transplacental trafficking of schistosome antigens; however, little is known regarding how these antigens affect the developing fetus and placenta. To evaluate the impact of schistosomiasis on trophoblasts of the human placenta, we isolated primary trophoblast cells from healthy placentas delivered at term. These trophoblasts were placed in culture and treated with Schistosoma japonicum soluble egg antigens (SEA) or plasma from S. japonicum-infected pregnant women. Outcomes measured included cytokine production and activation of signal transduction pathways. Treatment of primary human trophoblast cells with SEA resulted in upregulation of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-8 and the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α). Cytokine production in response to SEA was dose dependent and reminiscent of production in response to other proinflammatory stimuli, such as Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 agonists. In addition, the signaling pathways extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK), p38, and NF-κB were all activated by SEA in primary trophoblasts. These effects appeared to be mediated through both carbohydrate and protein epitopes of SEA. Finally, primary trophoblasts cocultured with plasma from S. japonicum-infected pregnant women produced increased levels of IL-8 compared to trophoblasts cocultured with plasma from uninfected pregnant women. We report here a direct impact of SEA on primary human trophoblast cells, which are critical for many aspects of a healthy pregnancy. Our data indicate that schistosome antigens can activate proinflammatory responses in trophoblasts, which might compromise maternal-fetal health in pregnancies complicated by schistosomiasis.

  2. Prediction and conformation by synthesis of two antigenic sites in human haemoglobin by extrapolation from the known antigenic structure of sperm-whale myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Kazim, A L; Atassi, M Z

    1977-10-01

    The complete antigenic structure of sperm-whale myoglobin was previously determined in our laboratory. By structural analogy with myoglobin, two regions in human haemoglobin were predicted to comprise antigenic sites. One region was on the alpha-chain [alpha-(15-23)] and the other on the beta-chain [beta-(16-23)]. These two regions were synthesized, purified and characterized, and their immunochemistry was studied. Each peptide was able specifically to bind considerable amounts of haemoglobin antibodies. In a set of homologous proteins, barring any drastic conformational or electrostatic inductive effects exerted by the substitutions, and allowing for obstruction due to subunit interaction, the determination of the antigenic structure of one protein may serve as a useful starting model for the others.

  3. Characteristics of the transport of ascorbic acid into leucocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Raghoebar, M.; Huisman, J.A.M.; van den Berg, W.B.; van Ginneken, C.A.M.

    1987-02-02

    The degree and the mode of association of (/sup 14/C)-ascorbic acid with leucocytes are examined. The degree of association of ascorbic acid with polymorphonuclear leucocytes (1-3 %) is dependent on cell type, extracellular concentration of ascorbic acid, incubation temperature, intactness of the cells and the extracellular pH. All experiments are performed according to strict protocols as these compounds are labile in aqueous solutions. Further it is noticed that in all experiments an outward gradient of leucocyte endogenic ascorbic acid exists. The results suggest that the association process comprises at least one saturable pathway. The activation of polymorphonuclear leucocytes by phorbol myristate acetate increases the accumulation of ascorbic acid threefold. 30 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Antigenic relationship between the animal and human pathogen Pythium insidiosum and nonpathogenic Pythium species.

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, L; Kaufman, L; Standard, P

    1987-01-01

    Identification of the newly named pathogenic oomycete Pythium insidiosum and its differentiation from other Pythium species by morphologic criteria alone can be difficult and time-consuming. Antigenic analysis by fluorescent-antibody and immunodiffusion precipitin techniques demonstrated that the P. insidiosum isolates that cause pythiosis in dogs, horses, and humans are identical and that they were distinguishable from other Pythium species by these means. The immunologic data agreed with the morphologic data. This indicated that the animal and human isolates belonged to a single species, P. insidiosum. Fluorescent-antibody and immunodiffusion reagents were developed for the specific identification of P. insidiosum. PMID:3121666

  5. Detection of a human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle antigenically related to HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garry, R. F.; Fermin, C. D.; Hart, D. J.; Alexander, S. S.; Donehower, L. A.; Luo-Zhang, H.

    1990-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes. The loss of salivary and lacrimal gland function is accompanied by lymphocytic infiltration. Because similar symptoms and glandular pathology are observed in certain persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a search was initiated for a possible retroviral etiology in this syndrome. A human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle that is antigenically related to HIV was detected in lymphoblastoid cells exposed to homogenates of salivary tissue from patients with Sjogren's syndrome. Comparison of this retroviral particle to HIV indicates that they are distinguishable by several ultrastructural, physical, and enzymatic criteria.

  6. Generation of Large Numbers of Antigen-Expressing Human Dendritic Cells Using CD14-ML Technology.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Yuya; Haruta, Miwa; Tomita, Yusuke; Matsumura, Keiko; Ikeda, Tokunori; Yuno, Akira; Hirayama, Masatoshi; Nakayama, Hideki; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported a method to expand human monocytes through lentivirus-mediated introduction of cMYC and BMI1, and we named the monocyte-derived proliferating cells, CD14-ML. CD14-ML differentiated into functional DC (CD14-ML-DC) upon addition of IL-4, resulting in the generation of a large number of DC. One drawback of this method was the extensive donor-dependent variation in proliferation efficiency. In the current study, we found that introduction of BCL2 or LYL1 along with cMYC and BMI1 was beneficial. Using the improved method, we obtained CD14-ML from all samples, regardless of whether the donors were healthy individuals or cancer patients. In vitro stimulation of peripheral blood T cells with CD14-ML-DC that were loaded with cancer antigen-derived peptides led to the establishment of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lines that recognized the peptides. Since CD14-ML was propagated for more than 1 month, we could readily conduct genetic modification experiments. To generate CD14-ML-DC that expressed antigenic proteins, we introduced lentiviral antigen-expression vectors and subjected the cells to 2 weeks of culture for drug-selection and expansion. The resulting antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC successfully induced CD8+ T cell lines that were reactive to CMVpp65 or MART1/MelanA, suggesting an application in vaccination therapy. Thus, this improved method enables the generation of a sufficient number of DC for vaccination therapy from a small amount of peripheral blood from cancer patients. Information on T cell epitopes is not necessary in vaccination with cancer antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC; therefore, all patients, irrespective of HLA type, will benefit from anti-cancer therapy based on this technology.

  7. Glomerular Autoimmune Multicomponents of Human Lupus Nephritis In Vivo (2): Planted Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Galetti, Maricla; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Bonanni, Alice; Radice, Antonella; Tincani, Angela; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Murtas, Corrado; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Brunini, Francesca; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Barbano, Giancarlo; Piaggio, Giorgio; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Scolari, Francesco; Candiano, Giovanni; Martini, Alberto; Allegri, Landino

    2015-01-01

    Glomerular planted antigens (histones, DNA, and C1q) are potential targets of autoimmunity in lupus nephritis (LN). However, the characterization of these antigens in human glomeruli in vivo remains inconsistent. We eluted glomerular autoantibodies recognizing planted antigens from laser-microdissected renal biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN. Prevalent antibody isotypes were defined, levels were determined, and glomerular colocalization was investigated. Renal and circulating antibodies were matched, and serum levels were compared in 104 patients with LN, 84 patients with SLE without LN, and 50 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Autoantibodies against podocyte antigens (anti–α-enolase/antiannexin AI) were also investigated. IgG2 autoantibodies against DNA, histones (H2A, H3, and H4), and C1q were detected in 50%, 55%, and 70% of biopsy samples, respectively. Anti-DNA IgG3 was the unique non-IgG2 anti-DNA deposit, and anti-C1q IgG4 was mainly detected in subepithelial membranous deposits. Anti-H3, anti-DNA, and anti-C1q IgG2 autoantibodies were also prevalent in LN serum, which also contained IgG3 against the antigen panel and anti-C1q IgG4. Serum and glomerular levels of autoantibodies were not strictly associated. High serum levels of all autoantibodies detected, including anti–α-enolase and antiannexin AI, identified LN versus SLE and RA. Anti-H3 and anti–α-enolase IgG2 levels had the most remarkable increase in LN serum and represented a discriminating feature of LN in principal component analysis. The highest levels of these two autoantibodies were also associated with proteinuria>3.5 g/24 hours and creatinine>1.2 mg/dl. Our findings suggest that timely autoantibody characterization might allow outcome prediction and targeted therapies for patients with nephritis. PMID:25398787

  8. Glomerular Autoimmune Multicomponents of Human Lupus Nephritis In Vivo (2): Planted Antigens.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Galetti, Maricla; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Bonanni, Alice; Radice, Antonella; Tincani, Angela; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Murtas, Corrado; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Brunini, Francesca; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Barbano, Giancarlo; Piaggio, Giorgio; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Scolari, Francesco; Candiano, Giovanni; Martini, Alberto; Allegri, Landino; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2015-08-01

    Glomerular planted antigens (histones, DNA, and C1q) are potential targets of autoimmunity in lupus nephritis (LN). However, the characterization of these antigens in human glomeruli in vivo remains inconsistent. We eluted glomerular autoantibodies recognizing planted antigens from laser-microdissected renal biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN. Prevalent antibody isotypes were defined, levels were determined, and glomerular colocalization was investigated. Renal and circulating antibodies were matched, and serum levels were compared in 104 patients with LN, 84 patients with SLE without LN, and 50 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Autoantibodies against podocyte antigens (anti-α-enolase/antiannexin AI) were also investigated. IgG2 autoantibodies against DNA, histones (H2A, H3, and H4), and C1q were detected in 50%, 55%, and 70% of biopsy samples, respectively. Anti-DNA IgG3 was the unique non-IgG2 anti-DNA deposit, and anti-C1q IgG4 was mainly detected in subepithelial membranous deposits. Anti-H3, anti-DNA, and anti-C1q IgG2 autoantibodies were also prevalent in LN serum, which also contained IgG3 against the antigen panel and anti-C1q IgG4. Serum and glomerular levels of autoantibodies were not strictly associated. High serum levels of all autoantibodies detected, including anti-α-enolase and antiannexin AI, identified LN versus SLE and RA. Anti-H3 and anti-α-enolase IgG2 levels had the most remarkable increase in LN serum and represented a discriminating feature of LN in principal component analysis. The highest levels of these two autoantibodies were also associated with proteinuria>3.5 g/24 hours and creatinine>1.2 mg/dl. Our findings suggest that timely autoantibody characterization might allow outcome prediction and targeted therapies for patients with nephritis.

  9. Generation of Large Numbers of Antigen-Expressing Human Dendritic Cells Using CD14-ML Technology

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Yuya; Haruta, Miwa; Tomita, Yusuke; Matsumura, Keiko; Ikeda, Tokunori; Yuno, Akira; Hirayama, Masatoshi; Nakayama, Hideki; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported a method to expand human monocytes through lentivirus-mediated introduction of cMYC and BMI1, and we named the monocyte-derived proliferating cells, CD14-ML. CD14-ML differentiated into functional DC (CD14-ML-DC) upon addition of IL-4, resulting in the generation of a large number of DC. One drawback of this method was the extensive donor-dependent variation in proliferation efficiency. In the current study, we found that introduction of BCL2 or LYL1 along with cMYC and BMI1 was beneficial. Using the improved method, we obtained CD14-ML from all samples, regardless of whether the donors were healthy individuals or cancer patients. In vitro stimulation of peripheral blood T cells with CD14-ML-DC that were loaded with cancer antigen-derived peptides led to the establishment of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lines that recognized the peptides. Since CD14-ML was propagated for more than 1 month, we could readily conduct genetic modification experiments. To generate CD14-ML-DC that expressed antigenic proteins, we introduced lentiviral antigen-expression vectors and subjected the cells to 2 weeks of culture for drug-selection and expansion. The resulting antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC successfully induced CD8+ T cell lines that were reactive to CMVpp65 or MART1/MelanA, suggesting an application in vaccination therapy. Thus, this improved method enables the generation of a sufficient number of DC for vaccination therapy from a small amount of peripheral blood from cancer patients. Information on T cell epitopes is not necessary in vaccination with cancer antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC; therefore, all patients, irrespective of HLA type, will benefit from anti-cancer therapy based on this technology. PMID:27050553

  10. A Killer Immunoglobulin - Like Receptor Gene - Content Haplotype and A Cognate Human Leukocyte Antigen Ligand are Associated with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Anthony; Westover, Jonna; Benson, Michael; Johnson, Randall; Dykes, Annelise

    2016-01-01

    The killing activity of natural killer cells is largely regulated by the binding of class I human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands to killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor proteins. The killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - complex contains genes that activate and others that inhibit the killing state of natural killer cells depending on the binding of specific human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands. It has been suggested in previous publications that activating human leukocyte antigen/killer - cell immunoglobulin - like receptor complexes are increased in people with autism. We present data, which suggests that an activating cB01/tA01 killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - content haplotype and the cognate ligand human leukocyte antigen - C1k that activates this haplotype is significantly increased in autism. This is an important observation suggesting that the interaction between two proteins encoded on different chromosomes increases natural killer cell killing in autism. PMID:27853655

  11. A Killer Immunoglobulin - Like Receptor Gene - Content Haplotype and A Cognate Human Leukocyte Antigen Ligand are Associated with Autism.

    PubMed

    Torres, Anthony; Westover, Jonna; Benson, Michael; Johnson, Randall; Dykes, Annelise

    2016-04-01

    The killing activity of natural killer cells is largely regulated by the binding of class I human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands to killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor proteins. The killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - complex contains genes that activate and others that inhibit the killing state of natural killer cells depending on the binding of specific human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands. It has been suggested in previous publications that activating human leukocyte antigen/killer - cell immunoglobulin - like receptor complexes are increased in people with autism. We present data, which suggests that an activating cB01/tA01 killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - content haplotype and the cognate ligand human leukocyte antigen - C1k that activates this haplotype is significantly increased in autism. This is an important observation suggesting that the interaction between two proteins encoded on different chromosomes increases natural killer cell killing in autism.

  12. A Gene Encoding Antigenic Peptides of Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Recognized by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shichijo, Shigeki; Nakao, Masanobu; Imai, Yasuhisa; Takasu, Hideo; Kawamoto, Mayumi; Niiya, Fumihiko; Yang, Damu; Toh, Yuji; Yamana, Hideaki; Itoh, Kyogo

    1998-01-01

    Except for melanomas, tumor antigens recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are yet unidentified. We have identified a gene encoding antigenic peptides of human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) recognized by human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens (HLA)- A2601–restricted CTLs. This gene showed no similarity to known sequences, and encoded two (125- and 43-kilodalton [kD]) proteins. The 125-kD protein with the leucine zipper motif was expressed in the nucleus of the majority of proliferating cells tested, including normal and malignant cells. The 43-kD protein was expressed in the cytosol of most SCCs from various organs and half of lung adenocarcinomas, but was not expressed in other cancers nor in a panel of normal tissues. The three nonapeptides shared by the two proteins were recognized by the KE4 CTLs, and one of the peptides induced in vitro from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) the CTLs restricted to the autologous tumor cells. The 43-kD protein and this nonapeptide (KGSGKMKTE) may be useful for the specific immunotherapy of HLA-A2601+ epithelial cancer patients. PMID:9449708

  13. BK Polyomavirus Genomic Integration and Large T Antigen Expression: Evolving Paradigms in Human Oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kenan, D J; Mieczkowski, P A; Latulippe, E; Côté, I; Singh, H K; Nickeleit, V

    2016-12-31

    Human polyomaviruses are ubiquitous, with primary infections that typically occur during childhood and subsequent latency that may last a lifetime. Polyomavirus-mediated disease has been described in immunocompromised patients; its relationship to oncogenesis is poorly understood. We present deep sequencing data from a high-grade BK virus-associated tumor expressing large T antigen. The carcinoma arose in a kidney allograft 6 years after transplantation. We identified a novel genotype 1a BK polyomavirus, called Chapel Hill BK polyomavirus 2 (CH-2), that was integrated into the BRE gene in chromosome 2 of tumor cells. At the chromosomal integration site, viral break points were found, disrupting late BK gene sequences encoding capsid proteins VP1 and VP2/3. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization studies demonstrated that the integrated BK virus was replication incompetent. We propose that the BK virus CH-2 was integrated into the human genome as a concatemer, resulting in alterations of feedback loops and overexpression of large T antigen. Collectively, these findings support the emerging understanding that viral integration is a nearly ubiquitous feature in polyomavirus-associated malignancy and that unregulated large T antigen expression drives a proliferative state that is conducive to oncogenesis. Based on the current observations, we present an updated model of polyomavirus-mediated oncogenesis.

  14. Rabbit cardiomyopathy associated with a virus antigenically related to human coronavirus strain 229E.

    PubMed Central

    Small, J. D.; Aurelian, L.; Squire, R. A.; Strandberg, J. D.; Melby, E. C.; Turner, T. B.; Newman, B.

    1979-01-01

    A new disease of rabbits is described. Following an acute febrile course, animals die or recover by the 11th day postinoculation. The characteristic pathologic finding is multifocal myocardial degeneration and necrosis. The disease can be transmitted by various routes with tissue filtrates or with infectious sera diluted to 10(-6) and passed through 0.1 micron filters. Virus particles with morphologic features characteristic of a coronavirus are present in infectious but not in normal rabbit serums. The antigen(s) in the infectious serums cross-reacts with the 229E and the OC43 strains of human coronavirus. Antigen cross-reacting with the 229E virus is detectable by immunofluorescent staining in frozen sections of heart tissue from sick but not from healthy animals. Animals surviving infection seroconvert to coronavirus specificity, as demonstrated by the presence in convalescent serums of antibody capable of reacting with the 339E virus. Susceptibility to infection has not been demonstrated in mice, hamsters, or guinea pigs, and the virus was not adapted for growth in tissue culture. It is uncertain whether the agent is a natural pathogen of rabbits or a coronavirus contaminant from another species, possibly human. The name rabbit infectious cardiomyopathy is suggested for this disease. Images Figure 8 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 7 PMID:222151

  15. Quantitation of venom antigens from European vipers in human serum or urine by ELISA.

    PubMed

    Audebert, F; Grosselet, O; Sabouraud, A; Bon, C

    1993-01-01

    We describe an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to quantitate venom antigens in human serum and urine, and thus to help evaluate the severity of envenomation due to viper bites. This assay, which is performed with commercially available polyclonal Fab'2s in a double-sandwich method, is rapid, simple, and specific for antigens of European vipers (Vipera aspis, Vipera berus, and Vipera ammodytes). No cross-reactivity was observed with other snake venoms or human serum proteins. It showed a good linear response over a wide range of concentrations of venom antigens (from 1 to 100 ng/mL). It was very sensitive, with detection limits of 7 and 2 ng/mL for Vipera aspis venom in serum and urine, respectively. This ELISA is also easily reproducible; the coefficients of variation determined at different concentrations of venom (50, 25, and 5 ng/mL) did not exceed 10% in serum and 14% in urine samples collected from different donors. This test was applied to determine the concentrations of venom in the serum of patients bitten by a viper in France and to follow its elimination as a function of time. The method is adaptable to other venoms by using other specific immunoglobulins.

  16. Allopurinol reduces antigen-specific and polyclonal activation of human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Mazliah, Damián; Albareda, María C.; Alvarez, María G.; Lococo, Bruno; Bertocchi, Graciela L.; Petti, Marcos; Viotti, Rodolfo J.; Laucella, Susana A.

    2012-01-01

    Allopurinol is the most popular commercially available xanthine oxidase inhibitor and it is widely used for treatment of symptomatic hyperuricaemia, or gout. Although, several anti-inflammatory actions of allopurinol have been demonstrated in vivo and in vitro, there have been few studies on the action of allopurinol on T cells. In the current study, we have assessed the effect of allopurinol on antigen-specific and mitogen-driven activation and cytokine production in human T cells. Allopurinol markedly decreased the frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2-producing T cells, either after polyclonal or antigen-specific stimulation with Herpes Simplex virus 1, Influenza (Flu) virus, tetanus toxoid and Trypanosoma cruzi-derived antigens. Allopurinol attenuated CD69 upregulation after CD3 and CD28 engagement and significantly reduced the levels of spontaneous and mitogen-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species in T cells. The diminished T cell activation and cytokine production in the presence of allopurinol support a direct action of allopurinol on human T cells, offering a potential pharmacological tool for the management of cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:23049532

  17. Avian leucocyte counting using the hemocytometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dein, F.J.; Wilson, A.; Fischer, D.; Langenberg, P.

    1994-01-01

    Automated methods for counting leucocytes in avian blood are not available because of the presence of nucleated erythrocytes and thrombocytes. Therefore, total white blood cell counts are performed by hand using a hemocytometer. The Natt and Herrick and the Unopette methods are the most common stain and diluent preparations for this procedure. Replicate hemocytometer counts using these two methods were performed on blood from four birds of different species. Cells present in each square of the hemocytometer were counted. Counting cells in the corner, side, or center hemocytometer squares produced statistically equivalent results; counting four squares per chamber provided a result similar to that obtained by counting nine squares; and the Unopette method was more precise for hemocytometer counting than was the Natt and Herrick method. The Unopette method is easier to learn and perform but is an indirect process, utilizing the differential count from a stained smear. The Natt and Herrick method is a direct total count, but cell identification is more difficult.

  18. A Micrograting Sensor for DNA Hybridization and Antibody Human Serum Albumin-Antigen Human Serum Albumin Interaction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chathirat, Naphat; Atthi, Nithi; Hruanun, Charndet; Poyai, Amporn; Leasen, Suthisa; Osotchan, Tanakorn; Hodak, Jose H.

    2011-01-01

    A biosensor structure comprising silicon nitride (Si3N4) micrograting arrays coated with a spin-on-glass (SOG) material was investigated. This grating structure was located on a silicon groove, which was etched by a deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process. The biosensor was used as a specific detector of DNA molecules and antibody-antigen interactions. In our DNA sensing experiments, the first step was the activation of the grating surface with amine functional groups, followed by attachment of a 23-base oligonucleotide probe layer for hybridization with a complementary target DNA. The sensing device was tested for detecting specific antigen/antibody interactions for human serum albumin (HSA) and antigen bovine serum albumin (BSA). The readout system consisted of a white light lamp that illuminated a small spot on the grating surface at normal incidence through a fiber optic probe with a spectrometer used to collect the reflected light through a second fiber. We show that these sensing devices have the capability to detect DNA as well as antigen-antibody binding for HSA. The detection sensitivity for HSA was better than that for DNA mainly owing to the larger size and concomitant refractive index changes upon binding to the sensor. We show that it is possible to quantify the amount of biomolecules bound to the grating surface by measuring the wavelength shift of the reflectance spectra upon exposure to the samples.

  19. Alloantibody Generation and Effector Function Following Sensitization to Human Leukocyte Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Michelle J.; Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2016-01-01

    Allorecognition is the activation of the adaptive immune system to foreign human leukocyte antigen (HLA) resulting in the generation of alloantibodies. Due to a high polymorphism, foreign HLA is recognized by the immune system following transplant, transfusion, or pregnancy resulting in the formation of the germinal center and the generation of long-lived alloantibody-producing memory B cells. Alloantibodies recognize antigenic epitopes displayed by the HLA molecule on the transplanted allograft and contribute to graft damage through multiple mechanisms, including (1) activation of the complement cascade resulting in the formation of the MAC complex and inflammatory anaphylatoxins, (2) transduction of intracellular signals leading to cytoskeletal rearrangement, growth, and proliferation of graft vasculature, and (3) immune cell infiltration into the allograft via FcγR interactions with the FC portion of the antibody. This review focuses on the generation of HLA alloantibody, routes of sensitization, alloantibody specificity, and mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft damage. PMID:26870045

  20. Development of Lateral Flow Immunoassay for Antigen Detection in Human Angiostrongylus cantonensis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mu-Xin; Chen, Jia-Xu; Chen, Shao-Hong; Huang, Da-Na; Ai, Lin; Zhang, Ren-Li

    2016-01-01

    Angiostrongyliasis is difficult to be diagnosed for the reason that no ideal method can be used. Serologic tests require specific equipment and are not always available in poverty-stricken zone and are time-consuming. A lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) may be useful for angiostrongyliasis control. We established a LFIA for the diagnosis of angiostrongyliasis based on 2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against antigens of Angiostrongylus cantonensis adults. The sensitivity and specificity were 91.1% and 100% in LFIA, while those of commercial ELISA kit was 97.8% and 86.3%, respectively. Youden index was 0.91 in LFIA and 0.84 in commercial ELISA kit. LFIA showed detection limit of 1 ng/ml of A. cantonensis ES antigens. This LFIA was simple, rapid, highly sensitive and specific, which opened an alternative approach for the diagnosis of human angiostrongyliasis. PMID:27417097

  1. Human dendritic cell activation induced by a permannosylated dendron containing an antigenic GM3-lactone mimetic

    PubMed Central

    Rojo, Javier; Ballerini, Clara; Comito, Giuseppina; Nativi, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Summary Vaccination strategies based on dendritic cells (DCs) armed with specific tumor antigens have been widely exploited due the properties of these immune cells in coordinating an innate and adaptive response. Here, we describe the convergent synthesis of the bifunctional multivalent glycodendron 5, which contains nine residues of mannose for DC targeting and one residue of an immunogenic mimetic of a carbohydrate melanoma associated antigen. The immunological assays demonstrated that the glycodendron 5 is able to induce human immature DC activation in terms of a phenotype expression of co-stimulatory molecules expression and MHCII. Furthermore, DCs activated by the glycodendron 5 stimulate T lymphocytes to proliferate in a mixed lymphocytes reaction (MLR). PMID:24991284

  2. Development of Lateral Flow Immunoassay for Antigen Detection in Human Angiostrongylus cantonensis Infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mu-Xin; Chen, Jia-Xu; Chen, Shao-Hong; Huang, Da-Na; Ai, Lin; Zhang, Ren-Li

    2016-06-01

    Angiostrongyliasis is difficult to be diagnosed for the reason that no ideal method can be used. Serologic tests require specific equipment and are not always available in poverty-stricken zone and are time-consuming. A lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) may be useful for angiostrongyliasis control. We established a LFIA for the diagnosis of angiostrongyliasis based on 2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against antigens of Angiostrongylus cantonensis adults. The sensitivity and specificity were 91.1% and 100% in LFIA, while those of commercial ELISA kit was 97.8% and 86.3%, respectively. Youden index was 0.91 in LFIA and 0.84 in commercial ELISA kit. LFIA showed detection limit of 1 ng/ml of A. cantonensis ES antigens. This LFIA was simple, rapid, highly sensitive and specific, which opened an alternative approach for the diagnosis of human angiostrongyliasis.

  3. Proteins of Human Immunodeficiency Virus that Cross-React with Human ’Self’ Antigens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-20

    evaluated a number of experimental conditions in order to have high M22 antigen expression. We found that scrapie agent caused, by several fold, the...highest expression of M22 antigen ( scrapie > Theiler’s = EAE). Lastly, we evaluated different regions in the CNS of SWR/J and C57BI/6 mice for M22...analysis of the quality and GFAP expression in total RNA isolated from control (-) and scrapie -infected (+) brain regions in C57B1/6 mice. A large

  4. Large-scale sequence and structural comparisons of human naive and antigen-experienced antibody repertoires

    PubMed Central

    DeKosky, Brandon J.; Lungu, Oana I.; Park, Daechan; Johnson, Erik L.; Charab, Wissam; Chrysostomou, Constantine; Kuroda, Daisuke; Ellington, Andrew D.; Ippolito, Gregory C.; Gray, Jeffrey J.; Georgiou, George

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating how antigen exposure and selection shape the human antibody repertoire is fundamental to our understanding of B-cell immunity. We sequenced the paired heavy- and light-chain variable regions (VH and VL, respectively) from large populations of single B cells combined with computational modeling of antibody structures to evaluate sequence and structural features of human antibody repertoires at unprecedented depth. Analysis of a dataset comprising 55,000 antibody clusters from CD19+CD20+CD27− IgM-naive B cells, >120,000 antibody clusters from CD19+CD20+CD27+ antigen–experienced B cells, and >2,000 RosettaAntibody-predicted structural models across three healthy donors led to a number of key findings: (i) VH and VL gene sequences pair in a combinatorial fashion without detectable pairing restrictions at the population level; (ii) certain VH:VL gene pairs were significantly enriched or depleted in the antigen-experienced repertoire relative to the naive repertoire; (iii) antigen selection increased antibody paratope net charge and solvent-accessible surface area; and (iv) public heavy-chain third complementarity-determining region (CDR-H3) antibodies in the antigen-experienced repertoire showed signs of convergent paired light-chain genetic signatures, including shared light-chain third complementarity-determining region (CDR-L3) amino acid sequences and/or Vκ,λ–Jκ,λ genes. The data reported here address several longstanding questions regarding antibody repertoire selection and development and provide a benchmark for future repertoire-scale analyses of antibody responses to vaccination and disease. PMID:27114511

  5. Human dendritic cells adenovirally-engineered to express three defined tumor antigens promote broad adaptive and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Blalock, Leeann T; Landsberg, Jennifer; Messmer, Michelle; Shi, Jian; Pardee, Angela D; Haskell, Ronald; Vujanovic, Lazar; Kirkwood, John M; Butterfield, Lisa H

    2012-05-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy has shown a promising ability to promote anti-tumor immunity in vitro and in vivo. Many trials have tested single epitopes and single antigens to activate single T cell specificities, and often CD8(+) T cells only. We previously found that determinant spreading and breadth of antitumor immunity correlates with improved clinical response. Therefore, to promote activation and expansion of polyclonal, multiple antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells, as well as provide cognate help from antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells, we have created an adenovirus encoding three full length melanoma tumor antigens (tyrosinase, MART-1 and MAGE-A6, "AdVTMM"). We previously showed that adenovirus (AdV)-mediated antigen engineering of human DC is superior to peptide pulsing for T cell activation, and has positive biological effects on the DC, allowing for efficient activation of not only antigen-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells, but also NK cells. Here we describe the cloning and testing of "AdVTMM2," an E1/E3-deleted AdV encoding the three melanoma antigens. This novel three-antigen virus expresses mRNA and protein for all antigens, and AdVTMM-transduced DC activate both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells which recognize melanoma tumor cells more efficiently than single antigen AdV. Addition of physiological levels of interferon-α (IFNα) further amplifies melanoma antigen-specific T cell activation. NK cells are also activated, and show cytotoxic activity. Vaccination with multi-antigen engineered DC may provide for superior adaptive and innate immunity and ultimately, improved antitumor responses.

  6. Human dendritic cells adenovirally-engineered to express three defined tumor antigens promote broad adaptive and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, LeeAnn T.; Landsberg, Jennifer; Messmer, Michelle; Shi, Jian; Pardee, Angela D.; Haskell, Ronald; Vujanovic, Lazar; Kirkwood, John M.; Butterfield, Lisa H.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy has shown a promising ability to promote anti-tumor immunity in vitro and in vivo. Many trials have tested single epitopes and single antigens to activate single T cell specificities, and often CD8+ T cells only. We previously found that determinant spreading and breadth of antitumor immunity correlates with improved clinical response. Therefore, to promote activation and expansion of polyclonal, multiple antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, as well as provide cognate help from antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, we have created an adenovirus encoding three full length melanoma tumor antigens (tyrosinase, MART-1 and MAGE-A6, “AdVTMM”). We previously showed that adenovirus (AdV)-mediated antigen engineering of human DC is superior to peptide pulsing for T cell activation, and has positive biological effects on the DC, allowing for efficient activation of not only antigen-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, but also NK cells. Here we describe the cloning and testing of “AdVTMM2,” an E1/E3-deleted AdV encoding the three melanoma antigens. This novel three-antigen virus expresses mRNA and protein for all antigens, and AdVTMM-transduced DC activate both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells which recognize melanoma tumor cells more efficiently than single antigen AdV. Addition of physiological levels of interferon-α (IFNα) further amplifies melanoma antigen-specific T cell activation. NK cells are also activated, and show cytotoxic activity. Vaccination with multi-antigen engineered DC may provide for superior adaptive and innate immunity and ultimately, improved antitumor responses. PMID:22737604

  7. Characterization of a simian hepatitis A virus (HAV): antigenic and genetic comparison with human HAV.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, E A; Jansen, R W; Lemon, S M

    1989-01-01

    PA21, a strain of hepatitis A virus (HAV) recovered from a naturally infected captive owl monkey, is indistinguishable from human HAV in polyclonal radioimmunoassays and cross-neutralization studies. However, cDNA-RNA hybridization has suggested a significant difference at the genomic level between PA21 and a reference human virus, HM175. Further characterization of this unique HAV was undertaken in an effort to determine the extent of genetic divergence from human HAV and its relation to the conserved antigenic structure of the virus. The close similarity between PA21 and HM175 antigens was confirmed with an extended panel of 18 neutralizing murine monoclonal antibodies: a reproducible difference in binding to the two viruses was detected with only one antibody (B5-B3). The nucleotide sequence of the P1 region of the PA21 genome had only 83.2% identity with HM175 virus, a difference approximately twice as great as that found between any two human strains. Most nucleotide changes were in third base positions, and the amino acid sequences of the capsid proteins were largely conserved. Amino acid replacements were clustered in the carboxy terminus of VP1 and the amino-terminal regions of VP2 and VP1. These data indicate that PA21 virus represents a unique genotype of HAV and suggest the existence of an ecologically isolated niche for HAV among feral owl monkeys. Images PMID:2552172

  8. Isolation and characterization of a human sperm antigen gene h-Sp-1.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Ri-Ichiro; Komori, Shinji; Sakata, Kazuko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Sawai, Hideaki; Tsuji, Yoshiyuki; Koyama, Koji

    2003-08-01

    We isolated and characterized a human sperm antigen gene (h-Sp-1) from human testis complementary DNA using antiserum against the human sperm membrane. Northern blot analysis detected two transcripts (2.3 and 1.1 kb) of the h-Sp-1 gene. The 2.3-kb transcript is ubiquitous, whereas the 1.1-kb transcript is specific to the human testis with a high level of expression. Determination of the base sequence of h-Sp-1 showed a size of 2170 bp and 43.4% homology with human synaptophysin. The base sequence indicates a molecule consisting of 259 amino acids, with four hydrophilic and four hydrophobic regions. In order to further characterize the h-Sp-1 molecule, we synthesized the probable region of amino acids with high antigenicity based on the amino acid sequence (amino acid nos. 174-198) and immunized rabbits to prepare an antiserum. In our experimental model of fertilization between human sperm and zona pellucida-free hamster ova, partial inhibition of fertilization was observed. We were able to synthesize a large quantity of recombinant protein by inserting the h-Sp-1 gene into a baculovirus vector and infecting spodoptera frugiperda culture cells (sf9 insect cells). The synthesized protein had a molecular weight of 30 kDa. We then immunized Balb/c mice with this protein to prepare a monoclonal antibody (G3G9), which was used to localize the h-Sp-1 molecule in sperm and tissues (e.g. testis). The h-Sp-1 molecule was present in the cell membrane from the head to tail of human sperm. Staining of the testis and epididymis also showed h-Sp-1 to be present in spermatogonia, spermatocyte, sperm and epididymal duct epithelium. These findings suggest that the h-Sp-1 molecule is expressed in sperm and testes and plays a role in fertilization.

  9. Modulation of ABH histo-blood group antigen expression in normal and myasthenic human thymus.

    PubMed

    Sarafian, Victoria S; Marinova, Tsvetana T

    2006-10-01

    The role of ABH histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) in intercellular communication during normal and pathological processes is still uncertain. The present work investigates the expression of ABH HBGA in epithelial cells and lymphocytes in normal thymus, and characterizes the modulation of their immunoreactivity during myasthenic transformation. Immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy were applied on normal young thymus and on myasthenia gravis-associated thymomas and thymic hyperplasias. The Hassall's corpuscules in the thymus of young individuals were homogeneously stained for HBGA, while in hyperplastic glands only their central part was positive. Stromal epithelial cells permanently expressed HBGA in all tissue samples. In thymomas, mainly the lymphocytes in close proximity to antigen expressing epithelial cells were positive, while in the hyperplastic gland the most intensely stained lymphocytes were those within Hassall's corpuscules. Novel evidence for modulation of ABH antigen reactivity in normal and myasthenic human thymus is presented. It suggests that HBGA might participate in the regulation of the cross-talk in the thymocyte microenvironment throughout the ontogeny, as well as during the myasthenic transformation.

  10. Gene frequencies of human neutrophil antigens in the Tunisian blood donors and Berbers.

    PubMed

    Abid, S; Zili, M; Bouzid, L; Kibech, R; Foudhaili, N; Joudi, K; Ren Regaya, Z; Abdennaji, B; Mrad, R; Boukef, K

    2001-08-01

    Human neutrophil antigens play an important role in provoking immune neutropenia and transfusion-reactions. The aim of this study was to determine granulocyte-specific antigens on the neutrophil Fc gamma receptor IIIb (Fc gamma RIIIb, CD16b), namely, the HNA-1a(NA1) and HNA-1b(NA2) antigens and their gene frequencies in Tunisian blood donors and Berbers. One hundred and ninety-nine unrelated healthy Tunisian blood donors and Berbers were typed for HNA-1a and HNA-1b(NA1 and NA2), using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP). In 24 granulocyte samples, the HNA-1a and HNA-1b phenotypes was additionally determined by the granulocyte immunofluorescence test (GIFT) and correlated with the genotyping results. A subsequent analysis of the genotyping study showed that, the HNA-1a and HNA-1b gene frequencies observed, were 0.342 and 0.658 for Berbers, and 0.311 and 0.668 for blood donors, respectively. In the genotyping study conducted, it was determined that the HNA-1a and HNA-1b gene frequencies observed in Tunisian blood donors and Berbers are similar to those previously reported in other white populations.

  11. Signal transduction-associated and cell activation-linked antigens expressed in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Valent, Peter; Ghannadan, Minoo; Hauswirth, Alexander W; Schernthaner, Gerit-Holger; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Arock, Michel

    2002-05-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are multifunctional hematopoietic effector cells that produce and release an array of biologically active mediator substances. Growth and functions of MCs are regulated by cytokines, other extracellular factors, surface and cytoplasmic receptors, oncogene products, and a complex network of signal transduction cascades. Key regulators of differentiation of MCs appear to be stem cell factor (SCF) and its tyrosine kinase receptor KIT (c-kit proto-oncogene product=CD117), downstream-acting elements, and the mi transcription factor (MITF). Signaling through KIT is negatively regulated by the signal regulatory protein (SIRP)-alpha (CD172a)-SHP-1-pathway that is disrupted in neoplastic MCs in MC proliferative disorders. Both KIT and FcepsilonRI are involved in MC activation and mediator release. Activation of MCs through FcepsilonRI is associated with increased expression of activation-linked membrane antigens as well as with signaling events involving Lyn and Syk kinases, the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-pathway, Ras pathway, and the phospholipase C-protein kinase C pathway. A similar network of signaling is found in SCF-activated MCs. The current article gives an overview on signal transduction-associated and activation-linked antigens expressed in human MCs. Wherever possible the functional implication of signaling pathways and antigen expression are discussed.

  12. Variable expression of activation-linked surface antigens on human mast cells in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Valent, P; Schernthaner, G H; Sperr, W R; Fritsch, G; Agis, H; Willheim, M; Bühring, H J; Orfao, A; Escribano, L

    2001-02-01

    Mast cells (MC) are multipotent effector cells of the immune system. They contain an array of biologically active mediator substances in their granules. MC also express a number of functionally important cell surface antigens, including stem cell factor receptor (SCFR=kit=CD117), high affinity IgER (FcepsilonRI), or CSaR (CD88). Respective ligands can induce or promote degranulation, migration, or cytokine production. Other integral surface molecules can mediate adhesion or cell aggregation. Recent data suggest that a number of critical molecules are variably expressed on the surface of human MC. In fact, depending on the environment (organ), stage of cell maturation, type of disease, and other factors, MC express variable amounts of activation-linked antigens (CD25, CD63, CD69, CD88), cell recognition molecules (CD2, CD11, CD18, CD50, CD54), or cytokine receptors. At present, however, little is known about the mechanisms and regulation of expression of such antigens. The present article gives an overview of MC phenotypes in health and disease, and attempts to provide explanations for the phenotypic variability of MC.

  13. A novel human B-lymphocyte antigen shared with lymphoid dendritic cells: characterization by monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Y; Takami, T; Kokai, Y; Yuasa, H; Fujimoto, J; Takei, T; Kikuchi, K

    1985-01-01

    A novel cell-surface antigen (L25) expressed on human B cells was identified using a B cell-reactive monoclonal antibody (TB1-4D5). This L25 antigen was expressed on most B-lineage cells but not other cell types including thymocytes, T cells, granulocytes and monocytes. Thus, L25 existed on the majority of normal B cells present in the blood and lymphoid tissues, on cultured cell lines derived from normal and malignant B cells, and on neoplastic cells isolated from patients with B cell-derived malignancies. Though L25 was persistently expressed on B cells until 7 days after their activation with pokeweed mitogen (PWM), neither normal nor neoplastic plasma cells expressed L25. Moreover, L25 was present on cultured as well as freshly isolated leukaemic cells with common acute lymphatic leukaemia (CALL) antigen, which have been thought to correspond to the early B-cell ontogeny. Besides pan-B cell reactivity of TB1-4D5 antibody, it apparently cross-reacted with so-called dendritic or interdigitating cells located in the thymic-dependent areas of peripheral lymphoid organs, which have been presumably ascribed to those associated with accessory-cell function. Functional studies showed that anti-L25 (TB1-4D5) antibody had inhibitory effect on induction of immunoglobulin synthesis by PWM-stimulated B cells. Images Fig. 2 PMID:3907905

  14. Antigenic assessment of a recombinant human CD90 protein expressed in prokaryotic expression system.

    PubMed

    Yousefi-Rad, Narges; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Behdani, Mahdi; Moradi-Kalbolandi, Shima; Motamedi-Rad, Mahdieh; Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi

    2015-12-01

    Cluster of Differentiation 90 (CD90, Thy-1) has been proposed as one of the most important biomarkers in several cancer cells including cancer stem cells (CSCs). CD90 is considered as a potential normal stem cell and CSCs biomarker and also has been identified in lung cancer stem cells, hepatocellular carcinoma cells and high-grade gliomas. Using eukaryotic host systems involves complex procedures and frequently results in low protein yields. The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli is comparatively easier than eukaryotic host cells. The potential of large scale production of recombinant protein has made this system an economic production platform. In this study we expressed the extra-membrane domain of human CD90 (exCD90) antigen (Gln15-Cys130) in E. coli expression host cells. The epitope integrity of purified recombinant antigen was confirmed by antibody-antigen interaction using 5E10 anti-CD90 monoclonal antibody and binding study through ELISA and florescent staining of CD90(+) cells in a flow cytometry experiment.

  15. Comparative efficacy of antigen and antibody detection tests for human trichinellosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanoska, D.; Cuperlovic, K.; Gamble, H.R.; Murrell, K.D.

    1989-02-01

    Sera collected from patients with suspected or confirmed exposure to Trichinella spiralis were tested for circulating parasite antigens and antiparasite antibodies. Using an immunoradiometric assay, excretory--secretory antigens from muscle-stage larvae of T. spiralis were detected in the sera of 47% of 62 patients with clinical trichinellosis and 13% of 39 patients without clinical signs but suspected of exposure to infected meat. In comparison, antibodies were detected using an indirect immunofluorescent test in the circulation of 100% of the 62 patients with clinical trichinellosis and 46% of the 39 patients with suspected exposure. The presence of antibodies specific to excretory-secretory products of T. spiralis muscle larvae was confirmed in the majority of the samples tested by a monoclonal antibody-based competitive inhibition assay. These results indicate that antibody detection is a more sensitive diagnostic method for human trichinellosis, but that antigen detection might be a useful confirmatory test because it is a direct demonstration of parasite products in the circulation.

  16. An Integrated Peptide-Antigen Microarray on Plasmonic Gold Films for Sensitive Human Antibody Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Price, Jordan V.; Tabakman, Scott M.; Li, Yanguang; Gong, Ming; Hong, Guosong; Feng, Ju; Utz, Paul J.; Dai, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput screening for interactions of peptides with a variety of antibody targets could greatly facilitate proteomic analysis for epitope mapping, enzyme profiling, drug discovery and biomarker identification. Peptide microarrays are suited for such undertaking because of their high-throughput capability. However, existing peptide microarrays lack the sensitivity needed for detecting low abundance proteins or low affinity peptide-protein interactions. This work presents a new peptide microarray platform constructed on nanostructured plasmonic gold substrates capable of metal enhanced NIR fluorescence enhancement (NIR-FE) by hundreds of folds for screening peptide-antibody interactions with ultrahigh sensitivity. Further, an integrated histone peptide and whole antigen array is developed on the same plasmonic gold chip for profiling human antibodies in the sera of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, revealing that collectively a panel of biomarkers against unmodified and post-translationally modified histone peptides and several whole antigens allow more accurate differentiation of SLE patients from healthy individuals than profiling biomarkers against peptides or whole antigens alone. PMID:23923050

  17. Antigenic changes in human albumin caused by reactivity with the occupational allergen diphenylmethane diisocyanate

    PubMed Central

    Wisnewski, Adam V.; Liu, Jian; Redlich, Carrie A.

    2010-01-01

    Diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI), the chemical commonly used as a cross-linking agent in commercial polyurethane production, is a well-recognized cause of asthma. Reaction products between MDI and “self” proteins are hypothesized to act as antigens capable of inducing airway inflammation and asthma; however, such MDI antigens remain incompletely understood. We used a variety of analytical methods to characterize the range of MDI–albumin reaction products that form under physiological conditions. Sites of MDI conjugation on antigenic MDI–albumin products, as defined by serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) from MDI-exposed workers, were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The data identified 14 MDI conjugation sites (12 lysines and 2 asparagines) on human albumin and highlight reaction specificity for the second lysine in dilysine (KK) motifs, and this may be a common characteristic of “immune-sensitizing” chemicals. Several of the MDI conjugation sites are not conserved in albumin from other species, and this may suggest species differences in epitope specificity for self protein (albumin)–isocyanate conjugates. The study also describes new applications of contemporary proteomic methodology for characterizing and standardizing MDI–albumin conjugates destined for use in clinical research. PMID:20123080

  18. Oxidative bioactivation of abacavir in subcellular fractions of human antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Bell, Catherine C; Santoyo Castelazo, Anahi; Yang, Emma L; Maggs, James L; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Tugwood, Jonathan; O'Neill, Paul M; Naisbitt, Dean J; Park, B Kevin

    2013-07-15

    Human exposure to abacavir, a primary alcohol antiretroviral, is associated with the development of immunological drug reactions in individuals carrying the HLA risk allele B*57:01. Interaction of abacavir with antigen presenting cells results in cell activation through an Hsp70-mediated Toll-like receptor pathway and the provision of T-cell antigenic determinants. Abacavir's electrophilic aldehyde metabolites are potential precursors of neoantigens. Herein, we have used mass spectrometry to study the oxidative metabolism of abacavir in EBV-transformed human B-cells. RNA and protein were isolated from the cells and subjected to transcriptomic and mass spectrometric analyses to identify the redox enzymes expressed. Low levels of isomeric abacavir carboxylic acids were detected in subcellular fractions of EBV-transformed human B-cells incubated with abacavir. Metabolite formation was time-dependent but was not reduced by an inhibitor of Class I alcohol dehydrogenases. Relatively high levels of mRNA were detected for several redox enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase 5 (Class III), aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH3A2, ALDH6A1, and ALDH9A1), CYP1B1, CYP2R1, CYP7B1, and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 10. Over 2600 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. More than 1000 of these proteins exhibited catalytic activity, and 80 were oxido-reductases. This is the first proteomic inventory of enzymes in antigen presenting cells. However, neither of the hepatic alcohol dehydrogenases of Class I which metabolize abacavir in vitro was expressed at the protein level. Nevertheless the metabolic production of abacavir carboxylic acids by B-cell fractions implies abacavir-treated immune cells might be exposed to the drug's protein-reactive aldehyde metabolites in vivo.

  19. Differential Glioma-Associated Tumor Antigen Expression Profiles of Human Glioma Cells Grown in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lisheng; Cornforth, Andrew N.; Hoa, Neil T.; Delgado, Christina; Chiou, Shiun Kwei; Zhou, Yi Hong; Jadus, Martin R.

    2012-01-01

    Human U251 and D54 glioma cells were tested for expression of 25 glioma-associated tumor antigen precursor proteins (TAPP) under hypoxic (1% O2) or normoxic (21% O2) conditions. Hypoxic glioma cell lines increased their mRNA expression for nine TAPP (Aim2, Art-4, EphA2, EZH2, Fosl1, PTH-rP, Sox 11, Whsc2 and YKL-40), as assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time/polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Increased differences with three hypoxic-induced TAPP: EZH2, Whsc2 and YKL-40 were shown at the protein levels by fluorescent antibody staining and quantitative electrophoretic analysis. Two TAPP (MRP3 and Trp1) were down-regulated by hypoxia in glioma cell lines. Growing the glioma cells under hypoxia for 13 days, followed by returning them back to normoxic conditions for 7 days, and restored the original normoxic TAPP profile. Thus, hypoxia was an environmental factor that stimulated the transient expression of these antigens. Intracranial xenografts grown in nude mice derived from U251 cells that had been cultured under neurosphere stem cell conditions showed increased expression of Whsc2 or YKL-40, demonstrating that these in vitro properties of glioma also occur in vivo. Whsc2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes killed the hypoxic U251 glioma cells better than normoxic glioma cells. The antigens expressed by hypoxic tumor cells may be a better source of starting tumor material for loading dendritic cells for novel immunotherapy of glioma using tumor-associated antigens. PMID:22957023

  20. Antigenic characterization of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein precursor incorporated into nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Kristen C.; Castillo-Menendez, Luis; Ding, Haitao; Espy, Nicole; Zhang, Shijian; Kappes, John C.; Sodroski, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    The entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) into host cells is mediated by the viral envelope glycoproteins (Envs), which are derived by the proteolytic cleavage of a trimeric gp160 Env precursor. The mature Env trimer is a major target for entry inhibitors and vaccine-induced neutralizing antibodies. Env interstrain variability, conformational flexibility and heavy glycosylation contribute to evasion of the host immune response, and create challenges for structural characterization and vaccine development. Here we investigate variables associated with reconstitution of the HIV-1 Env precursor into nanodiscs, nanoscale lipid bilayer discs enclosed by membrane scaffolding proteins. We identified detergents, as well as lipids similar in composition to the viral lipidome, that allowed efficient formation of Env-nanodiscs (Env-NDs). Env-NDs were created with the full-length Env precursor and with an Env precursor with the majority of the cytoplasmic tail intact. The self-association of Env-NDs was decreased by glutaraldehyde crosslinking. The Env-NDs exhibited an antigenic profile expected for the HIV-1 Env precursor. Env-NDs were recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Of note, neutralizing antibody epitopes in the gp41 membrane-proximal external region and in the gp120:gp41 interface were well exposed on Env-NDs compared with Env expressed on cell surfaces. Most Env epitopes recognized by non-neutralizing antibodies were masked on the Env-NDs. This antigenic profile was stable for several days, exhibiting a considerably longer half-life than that of Env solubilized in detergents. Negative selection with weak neutralizing antibodies could be used to improve the antigenic profile of the Env-NDs. Finally, we show that lipid adjuvants can be incorporated into Env-NDs. These results indicate that Env-NDs represent a potentially useful platform for investigating the structural, functional and antigenic properties of the HIV-1 Env trimer in a membrane context

  1. Differential glioma-associated tumor antigen expression profiles of human glioma cells grown in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ge, Lisheng; Cornforth, Andrew N; Hoa, Neil T; Delgado, Christina; Chiou, Shiun Kwei; Zhou, Yi Hong; Jadus, Martin R

    2012-01-01

    Human U251 and D54 glioma cells were tested for expression of 25 glioma-associated tumor antigen precursor proteins (TAPP) under hypoxic (1% O(2)) or normoxic (21% O(2)) conditions. Hypoxic glioma cell lines increased their mRNA expression for nine TAPP (Aim2, Art-4, EphA2, EZH2, Fosl1, PTH-rP, Sox 11, Whsc2 and YKL-40), as assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time/polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Increased differences with three hypoxic-induced TAPP: EZH2, Whsc2 and YKL-40 were shown at the protein levels by fluorescent antibody staining and quantitative electrophoretic analysis. Two TAPP (MRP3 and Trp1) were down-regulated by hypoxia in glioma cell lines. Growing the glioma cells under hypoxia for 13 days, followed by returning them back to normoxic conditions for 7 days, and restored the original normoxic TAPP profile. Thus, hypoxia was an environmental factor that stimulated the transient expression of these antigens. Intracranial xenografts grown in nude mice derived from U251 cells that had been cultured under neurosphere stem cell conditions showed increased expression of Whsc2 or YKL-40, demonstrating that these in vitro properties of glioma also occur in vivo. Whsc2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes killed the hypoxic U251 glioma cells better than normoxic glioma cells. The antigens expressed by hypoxic tumor cells may be a better source of starting tumor material for loading dendritic cells for novel immunotherapy of glioma using tumor-associated antigens.

  2. Immunization by blood-type antigen in human immunoglobulin products before ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Tokihiko; Ando, Tetsuo; Sato, Sumihiko; Kubota, Keiichi; Fuchinoue, Shohei; Teraoka, Satoshi

    2004-04-01

    A 29-year-old man wanted to receive an ABO-incompatible kidney transplant. His blood type was O, and the donor, his father, was A1. After endoscopic splenectomy performed before kidney transplantation, the recipient developed a high fever and leukocytosis, and he was treated with antibiotics and 5 g of human immunoglobulin products by intravenous infusion for 3 d. Soon after the infusions, his anti-blood type A antibody titer (anti-A titer) rose, and several sessions of plasma-exchange (PEX) and double-filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) failed to lower it. Three courses of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody were administered to suppress the antibody production more specifically, and the rituximab infusions and repeated PEX and DFPP session lowered the anti-A titer and enabled kidney transplantation. Mild humoral rejection was observed 16 d after transplantation, but the recipient's serum creatinine was 1.5 mg/dL when discharged from the hospital. The increased anti-A titer may have been due to immunization by blood-type A antigen, with the human immunoglobulin products given to the patient being the source of the antigen. Administration of human immunoglobulin products to recipients of ABO-incompatible kidney transplants should be avoided, because it may cause an unexpected increase in anti-blood-type antibody titer.

  3. Immunization of humans with polyribophosphate, the capsular antigen of Hemophilus influenzae, type b.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P; Peter, G; Johnston, R B; Wetterlow, L H; Smith, D H

    1972-01-01

    In human volunteers, single injections of purified polyribophosphate elicited antibodies detectable by passive hemagglutination and by serum bactericidal and opsonizing activities against viable Hemophilus influenzae, type b. All three activities rose by 2 wk to maximal levels, at which they remained for at least 6 months. Doses of 1 mug elicited antibody responses in nearly all recipients; higher doses of the antigen, however, produced larger increases in titer. Booster doses of 1 mug given at 6 months did not further increase the antibody titers. A tuberculin-like response was often observed at the site of injections given intradermally.

  4. Establishment of a carcinoembryonic antigen-producing cell line from human pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kaku, M; Nishiyama, T; Yagawa, K; Abe, M

    1980-10-01

    A human pancreatic carcinoma cell line of islet cell origin (QGP-1) has been established and maintained for over two years. The parent tumor and the cultured cell line produce carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and there is no evidence of hormone secretion from the tumor cells. The epithelioid cells, which had migrated from rounded, irregular cell aggregates, grow as a confluent monolayer with piling up of cells in some areas, and have a population doubling time of 3.5 days. The modal chromosome number was 50. Exponentially growing cultures produce 76.3 ng of CEA/10(6) cells after 7 days. CEA production was confirmed by immuno-peroxidase staining.

  5. Appropriate clinical use of human leukocyte antigen typing for coeliac disease: an Australasian perspective.

    PubMed

    Tye-Din, J A; Cameron, D J S; Daveson, A J; Day, A S; Dellsperger, P; Hogan, C; Newnham, E D; Shepherd, S J; Steele, R H; Wienholt, L; Varney, M D

    2015-04-01

    The past decade has seen human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing emerge as a remarkably popular test for the diagnostic work-up of coeliac disease with high patient acceptance. Although limited in its positive predictive value for coeliac disease, the strong disease association with specific HLA genes imparts exceptional negative predictive value to HLA typing, enabling a negative result to exclude coeliac disease confidently. In response to mounting evidence that the clinical use and interpretation of HLA typing often deviates from best practice, this article outlines an evidence-based approach to guide clinically appropriate use of HLA typing, and establishes a reporting template for pathology providers to improve communication of results.

  6. Reverse vaccinology 2.0: Human immunology instructs vaccine antigen design

    PubMed Central

    Bottomley, Matthew J.; D’Oro, Ugo; Finco, Oretta; De Gregorio, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, vaccines have been developed by cultivating infectious agents and isolating the inactivated whole pathogen or some of its purified components. 20 years ago, reverse vaccinology enabled vaccine discovery and design based on information deriving from the sequence of microbial genomes rather than via the growth of pathogens. Today, the high throughput discovery of protective human antibodies, sequencing of the B cell repertoire, and the increasing structural characterization of protective antigens and epitopes provide the molecular and mechanistic understanding to drive the discovery of novel vaccines that were previously impossible. We are entering a “reverse vaccinology 2.0” era. PMID:27022144

  7. Killer Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells (KaAPC) for Efficient In Vitro Depletion of Human Antigen-specific T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Christian; Fleck, Martin; Schneck, Jonathan P.; Oelke, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Current treatment of T cell mediated autoimmune diseases relies mostly on strategies of global immunosuppression, which, in the long term, is accompanied by adverse side effects such as a reduced ability to control infections or malignancies. Therefore, new approaches need to be developed that target only the disease mediating cells and leave the remaining immune system intact. Over the past decade a variety of cell based immunotherapy strategies to modulate T cell mediated immune responses have been developed. Most of these approaches rely on tolerance-inducing antigen presenting cells (APC). However, in addition to being technically difficult and cumbersome, such cell-based approaches are highly sensitive to cytotoxic T cell responses, which limits their therapeutic capacity. Here we present a protocol for the generation of non-cellular killer artificial antigen presenting cells (KaAPC), which allows for the depletion of pathologic T cells while leaving the remaining immune system untouched and functional. KaAPC is an alternative solution to cellular immunotherapy which has potential for treating autoimmune diseases and allograft rejections by regulating undesirable T cell responses in an antigen specific fashion. PMID:25145915

  8. Identification of antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies using high-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju; Li, Ruihua; Liu, Kun; Li, Liangliang; Zai, Xiaodong; Chi, Xiangyang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-22

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire provides a large number of antibody variable region sequences that can be used to generate human monoclonal antibodies. However, current screening methods for identifying antigen-specific antibodies are inefficient. In the present study, we developed an antibody clone screening strategy based on clone dynamics and relative frequency, and used it to identify antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that at least 52% of putative positive immunoglobulin heavy chains composed antigen-specific antibodies. Combining information on dynamics and relative frequency improved identification of positive clones and elimination of negative clones. and increase the credibility of putative positive clones. Therefore the screening strategy could simplify the subsequent experimental screening and may facilitate the generation of antigen-specific antibodies.

  9. Antigen nature and complexity influence human antibody light chain usage and specificity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth; Shah, Hemangi; Muther, Jennifer J; Duke, Angie L; Haley, Kathleen; James, Judith A

    2016-05-27

    Human antibodies consist of a heavy chain and one of two possible light chains, kappa (κ) or lambda (λ). Here we tested how these two possible light chains influence the overall antibody response to polysaccharide and protein antigens by measuring light chain usage in human monoclonal antibodies from antibody secreting cells obtained following vaccination with Pneumovax23. Remarkably, we found that individuals displayed restricted light chain usage to certain serotypes and that lambda antibodies have different specificities and modes of cross-reactivity than kappa antibodies. Thus, at both the monoclonal (7 kappa, no lambda) and serum levels (145μg/mL kappa, 2.82μg/mL lambda), antibodies to cell wall polysaccharide were nearly always kappa. The pneumococcal reference serum 007sp was analyzed for light chain usage to 12 pneumococcal serotypes for which it is well characterized. Similar to results at the monoclonal level, certain serotypes tended to favor one of the light chains (14 and 19A, lambda; 6A and 23F, kappa). We also explored differences in light chain usage at the serum level to a variety of antigens. We examined serum antibodies to diphtheria toxin mutant CRM197 and Epstein-Barr virus protein EBNA-1. These responses tended to be kappa dominant (average kappa-to-lambda ratios of 4.52 and 9.72 respectively). Responses to the influenza vaccine were more balanced with kappa-to-lambda ratio averages having slight strain variations: seasonal H1N1, 1.1; H3N2, 0.96; B, 0.91. We conclude that antigens with limited epitopes tend to produce antibodies with restricted light chain usage and that in most individuals, antibodies with lambda light chains have specificities different and complementary to kappa-containing antibodies.

  10. Human Immune Response Varies by the Degree of Relative Cryptococcal Antigen Shedding.

    PubMed

    Boulware, David R; von Hohenberg, Maximilian; Rolfes, Melissa A; Bahr, Nathan C; Rhein, Joshua; Akampurira, Andrew; Williams, Darlisha A; Taseera, Kabanda; Schutz, Charlotte; McDonald, Tami; Muzoora, Conrad; Meintjes, Graeme; Meya, David B; Nielsen, Kirsten; Huppler Hullsiek, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cryptococcal glucuronoxylomannan antigen (CrAg) titers generally correlate with quantitative fungal culture burden; however, correlation is not precise. Some patients have higher CrAg titers with lower fungal burdens and vice versa. We hypothesized that the relative discordancy between CrAg titer and quantitative culture burden reflects the relative degree of CrAg shedding by Cryptococcus neoformans and is associated with human immune responses. Methods.  One hundred ninety human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals with cryptococcal meningitis were enrolled in Uganda and South Africa. We compared initial CSF CrAg titers relative to their CSF quantitative cultures to determine low (n = 58), intermediate (n = 68), or high (n = 64) CrAg shedders. We compared cytokines measured by Luminex multiplex assay on cryopreserved CSF and 10-week mortality across shedding groups using linear and logistic regression and distribution of genotypes by multilocus sequence typing. Results.  The relative degree of CrAg shedding was positively associated with increasing CSF levels of the following: interleukin (IL)-6, IL-7, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α (each P < 0.01), which are all secreted by antigen-presenting cells and negatively associated with vascular endothelial growth factor (P = .01). In addition, IL-5, IL-13, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and macrophage chemotactic protein were decreased in low-CrAg shedders compared with intermediate shedders (each P ≤ .01). Type 1 T-helper cells (Th1) cytokine responses and 10-week mortality did not differ between the shedding groups. Cryptococcal genotypes were equally distributed across shedding groups. Conclusions.  Discordancy between CrAg shedding and expected shedding based on quantitative fungal burden is associated with detectable immunologic differences in CSF, primarily among secreted cytokines and chemokines produced by antigen-presenting cells and Th2.

  11. Is Stage-Specific Embryonic Antigen 4 a Marker for Human Ductal Stem/Progenitor Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Kayali, Ayse; Lopez, Ana; Hayek, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The presence of pancreatic stem cells (PnSCs) has not been firmly demonstrated in the human or animal pancreas. Previous reports have suggested that ductal and acinar structures in the exocrine pancreas can be a potential source of progenitor cells. More recently, immature insulin precursors in the periphery of human islets have been found to self-replicate and differentiate to endocrine cells in vitro. Transplantation of these cells under the kidney capsule improves the diabetic state in mice. The controversy surrounding where PnSCs reside could be resolved if a specific marker were to be found that allowed their identification, purification, and directed differentiation to endocrine cells. We have identified in human pancreas cells positive for the stage-specific embryonic antigen 4 (SSEA4), a stem cell marker. These cells also express ductal, pancreatic progenitor, and stem cell protein markers. Interestingly, some of the SSEA4+ cells scattered in the ducts do not show a ductal cell phenotype. SSEA4+-sorted cells formed aggregate-like spheres in culture and robustly differentiated to pancreatic hormone-expressing cells in conditions of high glucose concentration and B27 supplementation. We hypothesize that SSEA4+ cells or a subpopulation of those cells residing in the pancreatic ducts may be the elusive PnSCs, and in this case, SSEA4 may represent a potential surface antigen marker for human PnSCs. The discovery of specific markers for the identification and purification of human PnSCs would greatly facilitate studies aimed at the expansion of these cells and the development of targeting tools for their potential induction to insulin-producing cells. PMID:23515456

  12. Cloning of the murine counterpart of the tumor-associated antigen H-L6: Epitope mapping of the human and murine L6 antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, C.P.; Farr, A.G.; Marken, J.S. |

    1995-10-03

    The murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) L6 was raised against human lung carcinoma cells and found to recognize an antigen which is highly expressed on lung, breast, colon, and ovarian carcinomas. Promising results in phase 1 clinical studies with this antibody or its chimerized counterpart suggest the antigen recognized by mAb L6 (H-L6) is an attractive target for monoclonal antibody-based cancer therapy. Further development of L6 as an anti-tumor-targeting agent would benefit from the development of a murine model. However, initial attempts to develop such a model were hampered by our inability to generate antibodies against the murine homologue of the L6 antigen, M-L6. Here we describe the preparation of the mAb 12A8, which was raised against murine thymic epithelial cells, the tissue distribution of the murine antigen recognized by 12A8, the cloning of a cDNA encoding the 12A8 target antigen, and the demonstration that this antigen is M-L6. Using H-L6/M-L6 chimeric proteins, we show that the region of the M-L6 protein recognized by mAb 12A8 corresponds to the region of H-L6 recognized by mAb L6. There are five amino acid differences in the regions of the H-L6 and M-L6 proteins recognized by L6 and 12A8, respectively. We further mapped the protein epitope recognized by L6 by individually exchanging each of these residues in H-L6 with the corresponding residue found in M-L6. Substitution of the single H-L6 residue Leu122 with Ser resulted in the H-L6 mutant HL6-L122S which failed to bind L6. The HL6-L122S mutant also failed to bind 12A8. Substituting residue Ser122 in M-L6 with Leu did not prevent 12A8 binding and did not result in L6 binding. The availability of mAb 12A8 and the finding that it recognizes the same region of M-L6 that is recognized by L6 on H-L6 might allow the development of a murine tumor model in which the L6 antigen can be further evaluated as a therapeutic target. 31 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Epitopes recognized by human T lymphocytes in the ROP2 protein antigen of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, R; Becerril, M A; Dubeaux, C; Lippens, R; De Vos, M J; Hérion, P; Bollen, A

    1996-01-01

    The ROP2 protein of Toxoplasma gondii possesses immunological and biological properties which have led to its proposal as a vaccine candidate. To identify epitopes recognized by human T cells in the ROP2 antigen, we submitted the sequence of this protein to three reported T-cell epitope prediction algorithms. Three sequences that were predicted by all three methods were selected (sequences 197 to 216, 393 to 410, and 501 to 524), and the corresponding peptides were synthesized. The peptides were first tested in a proliferation assay with a DPw4-restricted, ROP2-specific human T-cell clone, and the peptide corresponding to residues 197 to 216 was shown to stimulate the T-cell clone. The three peptides were further tested in proliferation assays with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a panel of T. gondii-seropositive and -seronegative individuals. We found that cells from a high proportion of the seropositive donors (64%) recognized at least one of the three peptides. The most frequently recognized ones were peptides 197 to 216 (45%) and 501 to 524 (36%). None of the seronegative donors responded to any peptide. These results show that the ROP2 antigen of T. gondii contains T-cell epitopes recognized by a high percentage of the immune population and further strengthen its potential as a vaccine candidate. PMID:8751939

  14. B7 expression and antigen presentation by human brain endothelial cells: requirement for proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Prat, A; Biernacki, K; Becher, B; Antel, J P

    2000-02-01

    Interaction between systemic immune cells with cells of the blood-brain barrier is a central step in development of CNS-directed immune responses. Endothelial cells are the first cells of the blood-brain barrier encountered by migrating lymphocytes. To investigate the antigen-presenting capacity of human adult brain endothelial cells (HBECs), we used HBECs derived from surgically resected temporal lobe tissue, cocultured with allogeneic peripheral blood derived CD4+ T lymphocytes. HBECs in response to IFN-gamma, but not under basal culture conditions, expressed HLA-DR, B7.1 and B7.2 antigens. Despite such up-regulation, these IFN-gamma-treated HBECs, in contrast to human microglia and PB monocytes, did not sustain allogeneic CD4+ cell proliferation, supported only low levels of IL-2 and IFN-gamma production, and did not stimulate IL-2 receptor expression. CD4+ T cell proliferation and increased IL-2 receptor expression could be obtained by addition of IL-2. Our data suggests that, although HBECs cannot alone support T cell proliferation and cytokine production, HBECs acting in concert with cytokines derived from a proinflammatory environment could support such a response.

  15. Quantitation of fixative-induced morphologic and antigenic variation in mouse and human breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Cardiff, Robert D; Hubbard, Neil E; Engelberg, Jesse A; Munn, Robert J; Miller, Claramae H; Walls, Judith E; Chen, Jane Q; Velásquez-García, Héctor A; Galvez, Jose J; Bell, Katie J; Beckett, Laurel A; Li, Yue-Ju; Borowsky, Alexander D

    2013-04-01

    Quantitative Image Analysis (QIA) of digitized whole slide images for morphometric parameters and immunohistochemistry of breast cancer antigens was used to evaluate the technical reproducibility, biological variability, and intratumoral heterogeneity in three transplantable mouse mammary tumor models of human breast cancer. The relative preservation of structure and immunogenicity of the three mouse models and three human breast cancers was also compared when fixed with representatives of four distinct classes of fixatives. The three mouse mammary tumor cell models were an ER+/PR+ model (SSM2), a Her2+ model (NDL), and a triple negative model (MET1). The four breast cancer antigens were ER, PR, Her2, and Ki67. The fixatives included examples of (1) strong cross-linkers, (2) weak cross-linkers, (3) coagulants, and (4) combination fixatives. Each parameter was quantitatively analyzed using modified Aperio Technologies ImageScope algorithms. Careful pre-analytical adjustments to the algorithms were required to provide accurate results. The QIA permitted rigorous statistical analysis of results and grading by rank order. The analyses suggested excellent technical reproducibility and confirmed biological heterogeneity within each tumor. The strong cross-linker fixatives, such as formalin, consistently ranked higher than weak cross-linker, coagulant and combination fixatives in both the morphometric and immunohistochemical parameters.

  16. Two highly antigenic sites in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Björling, E; Boucher, C A; Samuelsson, A; Wolfs, T F; Utter, G; Norrby, E; Chiodi, F

    1993-01-01

    Antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) are found in the serum of the majority of infected individuals, and inhibition of RT polymerase activity by HIV-1-positive sera can be demonstrated in vitro. The binding sites of human antibodies on the protein have not yet been identified. We synthesized overlapping peptides covering the entire RT protein of HIV-1 and used them in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system to map the reactivities of HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibody-positive sera. Two highly antigenic regions were identified by both HIV serotypes. One region was found in the central part of the RT protein (amino acids 261 to 280) and another was found at the carboxy terminus in the RNase H portion of RT (amino acids 517 to 536). Comparison of the serological results with the crystal structure of the RT revealed that the antigenic region in the RNase H portion is located at the surface of the protein. The other antibody-binding site (amino acids 261 to 280) was located in the "thumb" region of the polymerase domain of RT. Polyclonal antibodies to either of the antibody-binding sites do not affect the polymerase activity of the RT protein. PMID:7681439

  17. Clinical significance of a new autoantibody against a human eye muscle soluble antigen, detected by immunofluorescence.

    PubMed Central

    Mengistu, M; Laryea, E; Miller, A; Wall, J R

    1986-01-01

    The clinical significance of a circulating autoantibody against a recently identified soluble human eye muscle-derived antigen was studied in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy and autoimmune thyroid disorders. Tests were positive in 73% of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy, including six of seven with no associated thyroid disease (euthyroid Graves' disease). Tests were also positive in 27% of patients with hyperthyroidism but no clinically apparent eye disease, in 13% of patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis without eye disease, in two of 12 patients with subacute thyroiditis, in one of 20 patients with nonimmunological thyroid disorders but in none of 39 normal subjects. There were significant positive correlations between serum levels of the antibody (expressed as a titre) and the severity of the eye muscle component quantified as an index as well as the duration of the eye disease. Antibodies were detected in three of five patients with only lid lag and state who subsequently developed active ophthalmopathy, in six of nine patients who developed eye disease after treatment of their hyperthyroidism and in one of eight first degree relatives of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. In addition three of the 12 patients with autoimmune thyroid disease without apparent eye involvement, but positive antibody tests, have developed ophthalmopathy since the time of testing. These findings suggest that tests for antibodies against a soluble human eye muscle antigen may be useful clinically as a diagnostic test and to predict the onset of eye disease in predisposed patients and subjects. PMID:3539423

  18. CD Nomenclature 2015: Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigen Workshops as a Driving Force in Immunology.

    PubMed

    Engel, Pablo; Boumsell, Laurence; Balderas, Robert; Bensussan, Armand; Gattei, Valter; Horejsi, Vaclav; Jin, Bo-Quan; Malavasi, Fabio; Mortari, Frank; Schwartz-Albiez, Reinhard; Stockinger, Hannes; van Zelm, Menno C; Zola, Heddy; Clark, Georgina

    2015-11-15

    CD (cluster of differentiation) Ags are cell surface molecules expressed on leukocytes and other cells relevant for the immune system. CD nomenclature has been universally adopted by the scientific community and is officially approved by the International Union of Immunological Societies and sanctioned by the World Health Organization. It provides a unified designation system for mAbs, as well as for the cell surface molecules that they recognize. This nomenclature was established by the Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens Workshops. In addition to defining the CD nomenclature, these workshops have been instrumental in identifying and determining the expression and function of cell surface molecules. Over the past 30 y, the data generated by the 10 Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens Workshops have led to the characterization and formal designation of more than 400 molecules. CD molecules are commonly used as cell markers, allowing the identification and isolation of leukocyte populations, subsets, and differentiation stages. mAbs against these molecules have proven to be essential for biomedical research and diagnosis, as well as in biotechnology. More recently, they have been recognized as invaluable tools for the treatment of several malignancies and autoimmune diseases. In this article, we describe how the CD nomenclature was established, present the official updated list of CD molecules, and provide a rationale for their usefulness in the 21st century.

  19. IMMUNODIAGNOSIS OF HUMAN STRONGYLOIDIASIS: USE OF SIX DIFFERENT ANTIGENIC FRACTIONS FROM Strongyloides venezuelensis PARASITIC FEMALES

    PubMed Central

    CORRAL, Marcelo Andreetta; de PAULA, Fabiana Martins; GOTTARDI, Maiara; MEISEL, Dirce Mary Correia Lima; CASTILHO, Vera Lucia Pagliusi; GONÇALVES, Elenice Messias do Nascimento; CHIEFFI, Pedro Paulo; GRYSCHEK, Ronaldo Cesar Borges

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of this study was to evaluate six different antigenic fractions from Strongyloides venezuelensis parasitic females for the immunodiagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. Soluble and membrane fractions from S. venezuelensis parasitic females were prepared in phosphate-buffered saline (SSF and SMF, respectively), Tris-HCl (TSF and TMF, respectively), and an alkaline buffer (ASF and AMF, respectively). Serum samples obtained from patients with strongyloidiasis or, other parasitic diseases, and healthy individuals were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Soluble fractions SSF, TSF, and ASF showed 85.0%, 75.0%, and 80.0% sensitivity and 93.1%, 93.1%, and 87.5% specificity, respectively. Membrane fractions SMF, TMF, and AMF showed 80.0%, 75.0%, and 85.0% sensitivity, and 95.8%, 90.3%, and 91.7% specificity, respectively. In conclusion, the present results suggest that the fractions obtained from parasitic females, especially the SSF and SMF, could be used as alternative antigen sources in the serodiagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. PMID:26603231

  20. Different human vaccine adjuvants promote distinct antigen-independent immunological signatures tailored to different pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Niels Peter H.; Olsen, Anja; Buonsanti, Cecilia; Follmann, Frank; Zhang, Yuan; Coler, Rhea N.; Fox, Christopher B.; Meinke, Andreas; D´Oro, Ugo; Casini, Daniele; Bonci, Alessandra; Billeskov, Rolf; De Gregorio, Ennio; Rappuoli, Rino; Harandi, Ali M.; Andersen, Peter; Agger, Else Marie

    2016-01-01

    The majority of vaccine candidates in clinical development are highly purified proteins and peptides relying on adjuvants to enhance and/or direct immune responses. Despite the acknowledged need for novel adjuvants, there are still very few adjuvants in licensed human vaccines. A vast number of adjuvants have been tested pre-clinically using different experimental conditions, rendering it impossible to directly compare their activity. We performed a head-to-head comparison of five different adjuvants Alum, MF59®, GLA-SE, IC31® and CAF01 in mice and combined these with antigens from M. tuberculosis, influenza, and chlamydia to test immune-profiles and efficacy in infection models using standardized protocols. Regardless of antigen, each adjuvant had a unique immunological signature suggesting that the adjuvants have potential for different disease targets. Alum increased antibody titers; MF59® induced strong antibody and IL-5 responses; GLA-SE induced antibodies and Th1; CAF01 showed a mixed Th1/Th17 profile and IC31® induced strong Th1 responses. MF59® and GLA-SE were strong inducers of influenza HI titers while CAF01, GLA-SE and IC31® enhanced protection to TB and chlamydia. Importantly, this is the first extensive attempt to categorize clinical-grade adjuvants based on their immune profiles and protective efficacy to inform a rational development of next generation vaccines for human use. PMID:26791076

  1. Antigen binding of human IgG Fabs mediate ERK-associated proliferation of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yue-Jin; Mancino, Anne; Pashov, Anastas; Whitehead, Tracy; Stanley, Joseph; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2005-02-01

    Serum-circulating antibody can be linked to poor outcomes in some cancer patients. To investigate the role of human antibodies in regulating tumor cell growth, we constructed a recombinant cDNA expression library of human IgG Fab from a patient with breast cancer. Clones were screened from the library with breast tumor cell lysate. Sequence analysis of the clones showed somatic hypermutations when compared to their closest VH/VL germ-line genes. Initial characterizations focused on five clones. All tested clones displayed stronger binding to antigen derived from primary breast cancers and established breast cancer cell lines than to normal breast tissues. In vitro functional studies showed that four out of five tested clones could stimulate the growth of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines, and one out of five was able to promote MCF-7 cell growth as well. Involvement of ERK2 pathway was observed. By 1H-NMR spectra and Western blot analysis, it was evident that two tested antibody Fabs are capable of interacting with sialic acid. Our study suggests a possible role for human antibody in promoting tumor cell growth by direct binding of IgG Fab to breast tumor antigen. Such studies prompt speculation regarding the role of serum antibodies in mediating tumor growth as well as their contribution to disease progression.

  2. Generation and characterization of neutralizing human recombinant antibodies against antigenic site II of rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lina; Chen, Zhe; Yu, Li; Wei, Jingshuang; Li, Chuan; Jin, Jing; Shen, Xinxin; Lv, Xinjun; Tang, Qing; Li, Dexin; Liang, Mifang

    2012-10-01

    The currently recommended treatment for individuals exposed to rabies virus (RV) is post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) through the combined administration of rabies vaccine and rabies immune globulin (RIG). Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralize RV offer an opportunity to replace RIG for rabies PEP. Here, a combinatorial human Fab library was constructed using antibody genes derived from the blood of RV-vaccinated donors. Selections of this library against purified RV virions resulted in the identification of 11 unique Fab antibodies specific for RV glycoprotein. Of the Fab antibodies, five were converted to full human IgG1 format. The human IgG antibodies revealed high binding affinity and neutralizing activities against RV fixed strains through a rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test in vitro as well as the early stage protective function after exposure to RV infection in vivo. Furthermore, epitope mapping and binding competition analysis showed that all of obtained human neutralizing and protective antibodies were directed to the antigenic site II of RV glycoprotein. Our results provide not only important insight into the protective immune response to RV in humans, but also more candidates eligible for use in a mAb cocktail aimed at replacing RIG for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis.

  3. Detection and identification of individual antigen molecules in human serum with pulsed semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, M.; Zander, C.; Müller, R.; Ullrich, B.; Drexhage, K. H.; Kaul, S.; Wolfrum, J.

    1997-09-01

    The fluorescence bursts of individual antibody molecules BM-7 (IgG1) labeled with single dye molecules were detected and identified by the characteristic fluorescence lifetimes of the dyes Cy5 (1.5 ns) and JA169 (2.7 ns) directly in neat human serum. Fluorescence excitation was performed by a short-pulse (FWHM<400 ps, 50 MHz) semiconductor diode laser. The tumor marker mucine (MUC1) was detected in neat human serum by single-molecule events containing both fluorescence lifetimes indicating specific binding of both antibody molecules (Cy5-BM-7 and JA169-BM-7). The sensitivity achieved allows the detection of antigens at concentrations below 10-11 M without separation steps.

  4. Effect of age on generation of progeny from antigen-stimulated human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sohnle, P G; Collins-Lech, C; Huhta, K E

    1982-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown the proliferative response to various mitogenic stimuli of peripheral blood lymphocytes from elderly humans to be impaired. The present investigation examined the termination phase of antigen-stimulated proliferative responses of lymphocytes from elderly and young subjects. In both groups, the responding lymphocytes appeared to stop proliferating and enter the resting stage of the cell cycle when a certain total number of progeny had been generated, suggesting the phenomenon of density-dependent regulation of growth. Lymphocytes from elderly subjects stopped proliferating when significantly fewer progeny had been generated than did those from young subjects. The data suggest, therefore, that lymphocytes from elderly humans may have increased sensitivity to one or more of the factors which cause density-dependent inhibition of growth.

  5. [Study of the antigenic structure of human immunoglobulin lambda-chain using monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Arsen'eva, E L; Bogacheva, G T; Solomon, A; Weiss, D; Ibragimov, A R; Rokhlin, O V

    1990-01-01

    Nine monoclonals against human Ig lambda chains were produced, 4 antibodies react with C-domain, 5--with V-domain of the lambda chain. Anti-C lambda domain antibodies recognize not less than 3 epitopes and one of them is expressed only on the isolated chain. Anti-V lambda antibodies bind both isolated lambda chain and intact IgG, IgM, IgA. Four epitopes are expressed by few lambda Bence Jones proteins of the III subgroup, the immunogen possessing the same isotype. The 4 mentioned epitopes represent private idiotypic determinants. The epitope 3E10 is characteristic of 50% Bence Jones proteins of the II and III V lambda-subgroups thus representing a common idiotypic determinant. Using anti-V lambda antibodies germ line variability of V lambda III proteins was analysed and the similarity of antigenic structure of normal and myeloma human Ig lambda chains was demonstrated.

  6. Arteriovenous fistula stent infection diagnosed with radiolabelled leucocyte scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jeong Rae; Heo, Sang Taek; Kim, Miyeon; Kim, Hyun Woo; Chang, Jee Won; Song, Heesung

    2015-07-01

    Infectious complications of haemodialysis in patients with arteriovenous fistula stent are rare. In addition, patients with low-grade infection are more difficult to diagnose. Here, we report the first case of low-grade infection of an arteriovenous fistula stent diagnosed using (99m)Tc-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO)-labelled leucocyte scintigraphy. A 62-year-old man with end-stage renal disease was referred for prolonged fever. We performed (99m)Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocyte scintigraphy following a work-up according to fever of unknown origin. A focal uptake on the left forearm compatible with the arteriovenous fistula stent insertion site was shown, and the stent was removed. (99m)Tc-HMPAO-labelled leucocyte scintigraphy could be a suitable method for assessing vascular stent infection in low-grade fever.

  7. MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

  8. Fcγ receptor antigen targeting potentiates cross-presentation by human blood and lymphoid tissue BDCA-3+ dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Flinsenberg, Thijs W H; Compeer, Ewoud B; Koning, Dan; Klein, Mark; Amelung, Femke J; van Baarle, Debbie; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Boes, Marianne

    2012-12-20

    The reactivation of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) poses a serious health threat to immune compromised individuals. As a treatment strategy, dendritic cell (DC) vaccination trials are ongoing. Recent work suggests that BDCA-3(+) (CD141(+)) subset DCs may be particularly effective in DC vaccination trials. BDCA-3(+) DCs had however been mostly characterized for their ability to cross-present antigen from necrotic cells. We here describe our study of human BDCA-3(+) DCs in elicitation of HCMV-specific CD8(+) T-cell clones. We show that Fcgamma-receptor (FcγR) antigen targeting facilitates antigen cross-presentation in several DC subsets, including BDCA-3(+) DCs. FcγR antigen targeting stimulates antigen uptake by BDCA-1(+) rather than BDCA-3(+) DCs. Conversely, BDCA-3(+) DCs and not BDCA-1(+) DCs show improved cross-presentation by FcγR targeting, as measured by induced release of IFNγ and TNF by antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. FcγR-facilitated cross-presentation requires antigen processing in both an acidic endosomal compartment and by the proteasome, and did not induce substantial DC maturation. FcγRII is the most abundantly expressed FcγR on both BDCA-1(+) and BDCA-3(+) DCs. Furthermore we show that BDCA-3(+) DCs express relatively more stimulatory FcγRIIa than inhibitory FcγRIIb in comparison with BDCA-1(+) DCs. These studies support the exploration of FcγR antigen targeting to BDCA-3(+) DCs for human vaccination purposes.

  9. Factors influencing in vitro respiratory burst assays with head kidney leucocytes from rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum).

    PubMed

    Chettri, J K; Holten-Andersen, L; Buchmann, K

    2010-07-01

    Abstract Head kidney leucocytes are central elements in a number of in vivo and in vitro assays elucidating innate and adaptive immune mechanisms in teleosts following stimulation with various antigens. These systems are sensitive to several factors affecting the outcome of the assays. The present work describes the importance of temperature, cell concentration, exposure time and immune-modulatory molecules on the respiratory burst activity (RBA) of rainbow trout head kidney leucocytes in vitro. Some variation in RBA was observed among individual fish. However, use of cells pooled from four individuals produced satisfactory results following exposure to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, zymosan and beta-glucan. Temperature was shown to have a significant effect on production of reactive radicals as illustrated by a high activity in cells maintained at 15-20 degrees C and a reduced activity at temperature extremes (1, 4 and 30 degrees C). Highest activity was found at a cell concentration of 1 x 10(7) cells mL(-1). Reactivity showed a clear decline when cells were exposed for more than 4 h. Moreover, incubation of cells with inhibitory substances viz., DiMePE2, cortisol and superoxide dismutase decreased the RBA. It is concluded that several biotic and abiotic factors should be taken into account when conducting RBA assays with head kidney leucocytes for elucidation of rainbow trout immune responses.

  10. Histo-Blood Group Antigen-Like Substances of Human Enteric Bacteria as Specific Adsorbents for Human Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Takayuki; Suenaga, Atsushi; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Fuzawa, Miyu; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Okabe, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) have been suggested to be receptors or coreceptors for human noroviruses (HuNoVs) expressed on the intestinal epithelium. We isolated an enteric bacterium strain (SENG-6), closely related to Enterobacter cloacae, bearing HBGA-like substances from a fecal sample of a healthy individual by using a biopanning technique with anti-HBGA antibodies. The binding capacities of four genotypes of norovirus-like particles (NoVLPs) to Enterobacter sp. SENG-6 cells were confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that NoVLPs bound mainly to extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, where the HBGA-like substances were localized. EPS that contained HBGA-like substances extracted from Enterobacter sp. SENG-6 was shown by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to be capable of binding to NoVLPs of a GI.1 wild-type strain (8fIIa) and a GII.6 strain that can recognize A antigen but not to an NoVLP GI.1 mutant strain (W375A) that loses the ability to bind to A antigen. Enzymatic cleavage of terminal N-acetyl-galactosamine residues in the bacterial EPS weakened bacterial EPS binding to the GI.1 wild-type strain (8fIIa). These results indicate that A-like substances in the bacterial EPS play a key role in binding to NoVLPs. Since the specific binding of HuNoVs to HBGA-positive enteric bacteria is likely to affect the transmission and infection processes of HuNoVs in their hosts and in the environment, further studies of human enteric bacteria and their binding capacity to HuNoVs will provide a new scientific platform for understanding interactions between two types of microbes that were previously regarded as biologically unrelated. PMID:23804639

  11. Evaluation of the humoral immune response to human leukocyte antigens in Brazilian renal transplant candidates.

    PubMed

    Saito, Patricia Keiko; Yamakawa, Roger Haruki; Aparecida, Erica Pereira; da Silva Júnior, Waldir Verissimo; Borelli, Sueli Donizete

    2014-01-01

    Pre-transplant sensitization to human leukocyte antigens (HLA) is a risk factor for graft failure. Studies of the immunological profile related to anti-HLA antibodies in Brazilian renal transplant candidates are few. In this study, we evaluated the humoral immune response to HLA antigens in 269 renal transplant candidates, in Paraná State, Brazil. The HLA typing was performed by the polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific oligonucleotide method (PCR-SSO) combined with Luminex technology, using an SSO-LABType commercial kit (One Lambda, Inc., Canoga Park, CA, USA). The percentages of panel-reactive antibodies (PRA) and the specificity of anti-HLA antibodies were determined using the LS1PRA and LS2PRA commercial kits (One Lambda, Inc.). The PRA-positive group consisted of 182 (67.7%) patients, and the PRA-negative group of 87 (32.3%) patients. The two groups differed significantly only with respect to gender. Females were the most sensitized. Among the 182 patients with PRA- positive, 62 (34.1%) were positive for class I and negative for class II, 39 (21.4%) were negative for class I and positive for class II, and 81 (44.5%) were positive for both classes I and II. The HLA-A*02, A*24, A*01, B*44, B*35, B*15, DRB1*11, DRB1*04 and DRB1*03 allele groups were the most frequent. The specificities of anti-HLA antibodies were more frequent: A34, B57, Cw15, Cw16, DR51, DQ8 and DP14. This study documented the profile of anti-HLA antibodies in patients with chronic renal failure who were on waiting lists for an organ in Paraná, and found high sensitization to HLA antigens in the samples.

  12. An Integrated Multiomics Approach to Identify Candidate Antigens for Serodiagnosis of Human Onchocerciasis.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Samantha N; Rosa, Bruce A; Fischer, Peter U; Rumsey, Jeanne M; Erdmann-Gilmore, Petra; Curtis, Kurt C; Specht, Sabine; Townsend, R Reid; Weil, Gary J; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-12-01

    Improved diagnostic methods are needed to support ongoing efforts to eliminate onchocerciasis (river blindness). This study used an integrated approach to identify adult female Onchocerca volvulus antigens that can be explored for developing serodiagnostic tests. The first step was to develop a detailed multi-omics database of all O. volvulus proteins deduced from the genome, gene transcription data for different stages of the parasite including eight individual female worms (providing gene expression information for 94.8% of all protein coding genes), and the adult female worm proteome (detecting 2126 proteins). Next, female worm proteins were purified with IgG antibodies from onchocerciasis patients and identified using LC-MS with a high-resolution hybrid quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometer. A total of 241 immunoreactive proteins were identified among those bound by IgG from infected individuals but not IgG from uninfected controls. These included most of the major diagnostic antigens described over the past 25 years plus many new candidates. Proteins of interest were prioritized for further study based on a lack of conservation with orthologs in the human host and other helminthes, their expression pattern across the life cycle, and their consistent expression among individual female worms. Based on these criteria, we selected 33 proteins that should be carried forward for testing as serodiagnostic antigens to supplement existing diagnostic tools. These candidates, together with the extensive pan-omics dataset generated in this study are available to the community (http://nematode.net) to facilitate basic and translational research on onchocerciasis.

  13. Antibodies against a Plasmodium falciparum antigen PfMSPDBL1 inhibit merozoite invasion into human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Hirokazu; Takeo, Satoru; Maier, Alexander G; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Cowman, Alan F; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2012-03-02

    One approach to develop a malaria blood-stage vaccine is to target proteins that play critical roles in the erythrocyte invasion of merozoites. The merozoite surface proteins (MSPs) and the erythrocyte-binding antigens (EBAs) are considered promising vaccine candidates, for they are known to play important roles in erythrocyte invasion and are exposed to host immune system. Here we focused on a Plasmodium falciparum antigen, PfMSPDBL1 (encoded by PF10_0348 gene) that is a member of the MSP3 family and has both Duffy binding-like (DBL) domain and secreted polymorphic antigen associated with merozoites (SPAM) domain. Therefore, we aimed to characterize PfMSPDBL1 as a vaccine candidate. Recombinant full-length protein (rFL) of PfMSPDBL1 was synthesized by a wheat germ cell-free system, and rabbit antiserum was raised against rFL. We show that rabbit anti-PfMSPDBL1 antibodies inhibited erythrocyte invasion of wild type parasites in vitro in a dose dependent manner, and the specificity of inhibitory activity was confirmed using PfMSPDBL1 knockout parasites. Pre-incubation of the anti-PfMSPDBL1 antibodies with the recombinant SPAM domain had no effect on the inhibitory activity suggesting that antibodies to this region were not involved. In addition, antibodies to rFL were elicited by P. falciparum infection in malaria endemic area, suggesting the PfMSLDBL1 is immunogenic to humans. Our results suggest that PfMSPDBL1 is a novel blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate.

  14. A Study of Human Leukocyte D Locus Related Antigens in Graves' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Farid, Nadir R.; Sampson, Laura; Noel, Elke P.; Barnard, John M.; Mandeville, Robert; Larsen, Bodil; Marshall, William H.; Carter, Nicholas D.

    1979-01-01

    An association between Graves' disease and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system has previously been reported. The disease was more strongly associated with the HLA D locus antigen Dw3 than with HLA B8. Products of the HLA D locus are determined by the interaction of test cells with standard typing lymphocytes, a technically difficult procedure. Recently, it has been possible to type serologically for D locus related (DRw) specificities on peripheral bone marrow-derived (B) lymphocytes. Blood B lymphocytes from 50 unrelated controls and 41 patients with Graves' disease were typed for seven HLA DRw specificities. 28 patients with Graves' disease (68%) were positive for DRw3, in contrast to 14 controls (28%); whereas only 21 patients (50%) were HLA B8 positive, compared with 13 (26%) controls. Thus, positivity for DRw3 afforded a relative risk for Graves' disease of 5.5, whereas that for HLA B8 amounted to 3.0. Additionally, a family with multiple cases of Graves' disease in which the disease was previously shown to be inherited with the haplotype, was linked to DRw2, which suggests that the susceptibility to the disease was inherited in association with that antigen. Two HLA B/glyoxalase recombination events were observed in this family; in both instances HLA DRw followed HLA B. This study thus demonstrates that the disease susceptibility gene for Graves' disease is in strong linkage disequilibrium with DRw3; however, it may be associated with other DRw specificities and inherited within family units in association with them. PMID:105012

  15. Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Efficiently Capture HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins via CD4 for Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sandgren, Kerrie J; Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Forsell, Mattias N; Soldemo, Martina; Adams, William C; Liang, Frank; Perbeck, Leif; Koup, Richard A; Wyatt, Richard T; Hedestam, Gunilla B Karlsson; Loré, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Advances in HIV-1 vaccine clinical trials and preclinical research indicate that the virus envelope glycoproteins (Env) are likely to be an essential component of a prophylactic vaccine. Efficient antigen uptake and presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) is important for strong CD4+ T helper cell responses and the development of effective humoral immune responses. Here, we examined the capacity of distinct primary human DC subsets to internalise and present recombinant Env to CD4+ T cells. Consistent with their specific receptor expression, skin DCs bound and internalised Env via C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) while blood DC subsets, including CD1c+ myeloid DCs (MDCs), CD123+ plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs) and CD141+ DCs exhibited a restricted repertoire of CLRs and relied on CD4 for uptake of Env. Despite a generally poor capacity for antigen uptake compared to MDCs, the high expression of CD4 on PDCs allowed them to bind and internalise Env very efficiently. CD4-mediated uptake delivered Env to EEA1+ endosomes that progressed to Lamp1+ and MHC class II+ lysosomes where internalised Env was degraded rapidly. Finally, all three blood DC subsets were able to internalise an Env-CMV pp65 fusion protein via CD4 and stimulate pp65-specific CD4+ T cells. Thus, in the in vitro systems described here, CD4-mediated uptake of Env is a functional pathway leading to antigen presentation and this may therefore be a mechanism utilised by blood DCs, including PDCs, for generating immune responses to Env-based vaccines. PMID:23729440

  16. Gene for the major antigenic structural protein (p100) of human herpesvirus 6.

    PubMed Central

    Neipel, F; Ellinger, K; Fleckenstein, B

    1992-01-01

    A human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) structural protein of 100 kDa (p100) is the polypeptide most frequently and intensively reactive in immunoblotting analyses with human sera on HHV-6-infected cells or partially purified virions. The gene for p100 was identified by screening a bacteriophage lambda library with monospecific rabbit antisera. The gene codes for a polypeptide of 870 amino acids with a calculated molecular size of 97 kDa. Its amino-terminal third is weakly homologous to the immunogenic basic matrix phosphoprotein pp150 of human cytomegalovirus. Five fragments representing more than 93% of HHV-6 p100 were prokaryotically expressed. The antigenic epitopes of p100 were preliminary mapped by immunoblotting with human sera. They are located within the carboxy-terminal part which is neither homologous nor cross-reactive to pp150 of human cytomegalovirus. Availability of the gene for the immunodominant structural protein should provide tools for studies of pathogenesis by HHV-6. Images PMID:1374813

  17. Epidermal surface antigen (MS17S1) is highly conserved between mouse and human

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.J.; Chema, D.; Cho, M.

    1995-05-20

    A mouse monoclonal antibody ECS-1 raised to human keratinocytes detects a 35-kDa epidermal surface antigen (ESA) and causes keratinocyte dissociation in vitro. ECS-1 stains skin of 16-day mouse embryo and 8- to 9-week human fetus. Mouse Esa cDNA encodes a 379-amino-acid protein that is 99.2% identical to the human, differing at only 3 amino acids. The gene (M17S1) was mapped to mouse chromosome 11, highlighting the conserved linkage synteny existing between human chromosome 17 and mouse chromosome 11. Although the nude locus has been mapped to the same region of chromosome 11, no abnormalities in protein, mRNA, or cDNA or genomic sequences were detected in nude mice. However, both nude and control mice were found to have a second Esa mRNA transcript that conserves amino acid sequence and molecular weight. The mouse and human 5{prime} and 3{prime} untranslated sequences are conserved. Similar RNA folding patterns of the 5{prime} untranslated region are predicted despite a 91-bp insertion in the mouse. These data suggest that both the function and the regulation of ESA protein are of importance and that Esa (M17S1) is not the nude locus gene. 42 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Determination of antigenicity-altering patches on the major surface protein of human influenza A/H3N2 viruses.

    PubMed

    Kratsch, Christina; Klingen, Thorsten R; Mümken, Linda; Steinbrück, Lars; McHardy, Alice C

    2016-01-01

    Human influenza viruses are rapidly evolving RNA viruses that cause short-term respiratory infections with substantial morbidity and mortality in annual epidemics. Uncovering the general principles of viral coevolution with human hosts is important for pathogen surveillance and vaccine design. Protein regions are an appropriate model for the interactions between two macromolecules, but the currently used epitope definition for the major antigen of influenza viruses, namely hemagglutinin, is very broad. Here, we combined genetic, evolutionary, antigenic, and structural information to determine the most relevant regions of the hemagglutinin of human influenza A/H3N2 viruses for interaction with human immunoglobulins. We estimated the antigenic weights of amino acid changes at individual sites from hemagglutination inhibition data using antigenic tree inference followed by spatial clustering of antigenicity-altering protein sites on the protein structure. This approach determined six relevant areas (patches) for antigenic variation that had a key role in the past antigenic evolution of the viruses. Previous transitions between successive predominating antigenic types of H3N2 viruses always included amino acid changes in either the first or second antigenic patch. Interestingly, there was only partial overlap between the antigenic patches and the patches under strong positive selection. Therefore, besides alterations of antigenicity, other interactions with the host may shape the evolution of human influenza A/H3N2 viruses.

  19. GnRH-II receptor-like antigenicity in human placenta and in cancers of the human reproductive organs.

    PubMed

    Eicke, Nicola; Günthert, Andreas R; Viereck, Volker; Siebold, Doreen; Béhé, Martin; Becker, Tamara; Emons, Günter; Gründker, Carsten

    2005-10-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the antiproliferative activity of GnRH-II on human endometrial and ovarian cancer cell lines is not mediated through the GnRH-I receptor. A functional receptor for human GnRH-II has not yet been identified. In this study, we have generated a polyclonal antiserum to the putative human GnRH-II receptor using a peptide (YSPTMLTEVPPC) corresponding to the third extracellular domain coupled to keyhole limpet haemocyanin via the Cys residue. A database search showed no identical peptide sequences in any other human gene. To avoid cross-reactions against two similar amino acid sequences the antiserum was pre-absorbed using these peptides. Immune histological sections of human placenta and human endometrial, ovarian and prostate cancers using rabbit anti-human GnRH-II receptor antiserum showed GnRH-II receptor-like staining. Western blot analysis of cell membrane preparations of human endometrial and ovarian cancer cell lines yielded a band at approximately 43 kDa whereas Western blot analysis of cell membrane preparations of ovaries obtained from the marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) yielded a band at approximately 54 kDa. To identify the GnRH-II receptor-like antigen we used the photo-affinity labelling technique. Photochemical reaction of (125)I-labelled (4-azidobenzoyl)-N-hydroxysuccinimide-[d-Lys(6)]-GnRH-II (10(-9) M) with cell membrane preparations of human endometrial and ovarian cancer cells yielded a band at approximately 43 kDa. In competition experiments, the GnRH-I agonist Triptorelin (10(-7) M) showed a weak decrease of (125)I-labelled (4-azidobenzoyl)-N-hydroxysuccinimide-[d-Lys(6)]-GnRH-II binding to its binding site. The GnRH-I antagonist Cetrorelix (10(-7) M) showed a clearly stronger decrease, whereas GnRH-II agonist [d-Lys(6)]-GnRH-II (10(-7) M) was the most potent competitor. Western blot analysis of the same gel using rabbit anti-human GnRH-II receptor antiserum identified this band as GnRH-II receptor

  20. Heterosubtypic Protection against Pathogenic Human and Avian Influenza Viruses via In Vivo Electroporation of Synthetic Consensus DNA Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Laddy, Dominick J.; Yan, Jian; Kutzler, Michele; Kobasa, Darwyn; Kobinger, Gary P.; Khan, Amir S.; Greenhouse, Jack; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra; Weiner, David B.

    2008-01-01

    Background The persistent evolution of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) highlights the need for novel vaccination techniques that can quickly and effectively respond to emerging viral threats. We evaluated the use of optimized consensus influenza antigens to provide broad protection against divergent strains of H5N1 influenza in three animal models of mice, ferrets, and non-human primates. We also evaluated the use of in vivo electroporation to deliver these vaccines to overcome the immunogenicity barrier encountered in larger animal models of vaccination. Methods and Findings Mice, ferrets and non-human primates were immunized with consensus plasmids expressing H5 hemagglutinin (pH5HA), N1 neuraminidase (pN1NA), and nucleoprotein antigen (pNP). Dramatic IFN-γ-based cellular immune responses to both H5 and NP, largely dependent upon CD8+ T cells were seen in mice. Hemaggutination inhibition titers classically associated with protection (>1:40) were seen in all species. Responses in both ferrets and macaques demonstrate the ability of synthetic consensus antigens to induce antibodies capable of inhibiting divergent strains of the H5N1 subtype, and studies in the mouse and ferret demonstrate the ability of synthetic consensus vaccines to induce protection even in the absence of such neutralizing antibodies. After challenge, protection from morbidity and mortality was seen in mice and ferrets, with significant reductions in viral shedding and disease progression seen in vaccinated animals. Conclusions By combining several consensus influenza antigens with in vivo electroporation, we demonstrate that these antigens induce both protective cellular and humoral immune responses in mice, ferrets and non-human primates. We also demonstrate the ability of these antigens to protect from both morbidity and mortality in a ferret model of HPAI, in both the presence and absence of neutralizing antibody, which will be critical in responding to the antigenic drift that

  1. The human E48 antigen, highly homologous to the murine Ly-6 antigen ThB, is a GPI-anchored molecule apparently involved in keratinocyte cell-cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The E48 antigen, a putative human homologue of the 20-kD protein present in desmosomal preparations of bovine muzzle, and formerly called desmoglein III (dg4), is a promising target antigen for antibody- based therapy of squamous cell carcinoma in man. To anticipate the effect of high antibody dose treatment, and to evaluate the possible biological involvement of the antigen in carcinogenesis, we set out to molecularly characterize the antigen. A cDNA clone encoding the E48 antigen was isolated by expression cloning in COS cells. Sequence analysis revealed that the clone contained an open reading frame of 128 amino acids, encoding a core protein of 13,286 kD. Database searching showed that the E48 antigen has a high level of sequence similarity with the mouse ThB antigen, a member of the Ly-6 antigen family. Phosphatidylinositol-specific (PI-specific) phospholipase-C treatment indicated that the E48 antigen is glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored (GPI-anchored) to the plasma membrane. The gene encoding the E48 antigen is a single copy gene, located on human chromosome 8 in the 8q24-qter region. The expression of the gene is confined to keratinocytes and squamous tumor cells. The putative mouse homologue, the ThB antigen, originally identified as an antigen on cells of the lymphocyte lineage, was shown to be highly expressed in squamous mouse epithelia. Moreover, the ThB expression level is in keratinocytes, in contrast to that in lymphocytes, not mouse strain related. Transfection of mouse SV40-polyoma transformed mouse NIH/3T3 cells with the E48 cDNA confirmed that the antigen is likely to be involved in cell-cell adhesion. PMID:7790363

  2. Fully human CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptors for T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Sommermeyer, D; Hill, T; Shamah, S M; Salter, A I; Chen, Y; Mohler, K M; Riddell, S R

    2017-02-16

    Impressive results have been achieved by adoptively transferring T-cells expressing CD19-specific CARs with binding domains from murine mAbs to treat B-cell malignancies. T-cell mediated immune responses specific for peptides from the murine scFv antigen-binding domain of the CAR can develop in patients and result in premature elimination of CAR-T-cells increasing the risk of tumor relapse. As fully human scFv might reduce immunogenicity, we generated CD19-specific human scFvs with similar binding characteristics as the murine FMC63-derived scFv using human Ab/DNA-libraries. CARs were constructed in various formats from several scFvs and used to transduce primary human T-cells. The resulting CD19-CAR-T-cells were specifically activated by and lysed CD19-positive tumor cell lines and primary CLL cells, and eliminated human lymphoma xenografts in immunodeficient mice. Certain fully human CAR constructs were superior to the FMC63-CAR, which is widely used in clinical trials. Imaging of cell surface distribution of the human CARs revealed no evidence of clustering without target cell engagement, and tonic signaling was not observed. To further reduce potential immunogenicity of the CARs, we also modified the fusion sites between different CAR components. The described fully human CARs for a validated clinical target may reduce immune rejection compared with murine based CARs.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 16 February 2017. doi:10.1038/leu.2017.57.

  3. Combined flow cytometric analysis of surface and intracellular antigens reveals surface molecule markers of human neuropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Turaç, Gizem; Hindley, Christopher J; Thomas, Ria; Davis, Jason A; Deleidi, Michela; Gasser, Thomas; Karaöz, Erdal; Pruszak, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Surface molecule profiles undergo dynamic changes in physiology and pathology, serve as markers of cellular state and phenotype and can be exploited for cell selection strategies and diagnostics. The isolation of well-defined cell subsets is needed for in vivo and in vitro applications in stem cell biology. In this technical report, we present an approach for defining a subset of interest in a mixed cell population by flow cytometric detection of intracellular antigens. We have developed a fully validated protocol that enables the co-detection of cluster of differentiation (CD) surface antigens on fixed, permeabilized neural cell populations defined by intracellular staining. Determining the degree of co-expression of surface marker candidates with intracellular target population markers (nestin, MAP2, doublecortin, TUJ1) on neuroblastoma cell lines (SH-SY5Y, BE(2)-M17) yielded a combinatorial CD49f(-)/CD200(high) surface marker panel. Its application in fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) generated enriched neuronal cultures from differentiated cell suspensions derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Our data underlines the feasibility of using the described co-labeling protocol and co-expression analysis for quantitative assays in mammalian neurobiology and for screening approaches to identify much needed surface markers in stem cell biology.

  4. Experimental radioimmunotherapy of a xenografted human colonic tumor (GW-39) producing carcinoembryonic antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Goldenberg, D.M.; Gaffar, S.A.; Bennett, S.J.; Beach, J.L.

    1981-11-01

    Experiments were undertaken to evaluate the antitumor effects of 131I-labeled goat antibody immunoglobulin G prepared against carcinoembryonic antigen in hamsters bearing the carcinoembryonic antigen-producing GW-39 human colonic carcinoma. At a single injection of 1 mCi 131I and higher, a marked growth inhibition of GW-39 tumors, as well as a considerable increase in the survival time of the tumor-bearing hamsters, could be achieved. At a dose of 1 mCi, the radioactive affinity-purified antibody appeared to be superior to radioactive normal goat immunoglobulin G in influencing tumor growth and survival time, but no significant difference could be seen at the higher dose of 2 mCi given. Radiobiological calculations indicated that the tumors received, at up to 20 days after therapy, 1325 rads for the specific antibody and only 411 rads for the normal immunoglobulin G preparation. These findings encourage the further evaluation of antibodies to tumor markers for isotopic cancer therapy.

  5. Neisserial Heparin Binding Antigen (NHBA) Contributes to the Adhesion of Neisseria meningitidis to Human Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vacca, Irene; Del Tordello, Elena; Gasperini, Gianmarco; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Di Fede, Martina; Rossi Paccani, Silvia; Marchi, Sara; Mubaiwa, Tsisti D.; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E.; Jennings, Michael P.; Seib, Kate L.; Masignani, Vega; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Serruto, Davide; Aricò, Beatrice; Delany, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Neisserial Heparin Binding Antigen (NHBA) is a surface-exposed lipoprotein ubiquitously expressed by Neisseria meningitidis strains and an antigen of the Bexsero® vaccine. NHBA binds heparin through a conserved Arg-rich region that is the target of two proteases, the meningococcal NalP and human lactoferrin (hLf). In this work, in vitro studies showed that recombinant NHBA protein was able to bind epithelial cells and mutations of the Arg-rich tract abrogated this binding. All N-terminal and C-terminal fragments generated by NalP or hLf cleavage, regardless of the presence or absence of the Arg-rich region, did not bind to cells, indicating that a correct positioning of the Arg-rich region within the full length protein is crucial. Moreover, binding was abolished when cells were treated with heparinase III, suggesting that this interaction is mediated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). N. meningitidis nhba knockout strains showed a significant reduction in adhesion to epithelial cells with respect to isogenic wild-type strains and adhesion of the wild-type strain was inhibited by anti-NHBA antibodies in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, the results demonstrate that NHBA contributes to meningococcal adhesion to epithelial cells through binding to HSPGs and suggest a possible role of anti-Bexsero® antibodies in the prevention of colonization. PMID:27780200

  6. Characterization of cell surface antigens reactive with autologous antibodies from human ovarian neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Kutteh, W.H.

    1986-03-01

    Autologous antibodies eluted from membrane fragments of ovarian epithelial neoplasms have been prepared from cyst and ascites fluids. The predominant membrane-bound immunoglobulin, IgG, was present in a range of 18 to 4275 ng of membrane-bound IgG/ml fluid. The autologous antibodies were strongly reactive with human ovarian neoplastic cell lines and fresh ovarian tumor tissue but not with normal human ovaries, other non-ovarian normal or neoplastic tissue or non-ovarian human cell lines. Human ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma cell lined number2774 was surface labeled with /sup 125/Iodine using lactoperoxidose. Cells were washed and solubilized with Triton X-100. Membrane antigens were prepared and precipitated with autologous antibodies. Precipitates were washed, electrophoresed on 7.5% polyacrylamide gels and analyzed for radioactivity. Three major bands of activity (molecular weights: 180,000; 160,000 and 120,000) were precipitated with autologous antibodies from two patients with serous cystadenocarcinoma and two patients with papillary adenocarcinoma, but not with normal serum or autologous antibodies from a plural effusion of a patient with colon disease.

  7. The effects of chemical modification on the antigenicity of human and rabbit immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed Central

    Hunneyball, I M; Stanworth, D R

    1976-01-01

    In order to characterize the precise structure within human and rabbit IgG molecules against which 'general' rheumatoid factors are directed, an immunochemical comparison has been made of the effects of the selective substitution of specific amino acid side-chains on various types of antigenicity exhibited by human and rabbit IgG. The epsilon-amino groups of lysine residues have been substituted by citraconylation and carbamylation; whilst tyrosine residues have been substituted by nitration with tetranitromethane. In this manner, evidence has been obtained which indicates that the autoantigenic determinants of human IgG are structurally distinct from species-specific ones and from certain Fc-located allotypic markers (Gm(a) and Gm(x)). It is also concluded that lysine residues are probably not involved in the site of IgG reactivity with 'general' rheumatoid factors, in contrast to tyrosine residues which appear to be implicated in the activity of human but not rabbit IgG. Images Figure 4 PMID:68918

  8. Comparison of Effects of Running and Playing Exercises on Differential Leucocyte Count in Young Elite Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cenikli, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present research are to test the effects of running and playing exercises on leucocyte and differential leucocyte accounts, and to test the possible differences between running and playing exercises in terms of leucocyte accounts. They were thirty two male young soccer players. Participants arrived at the laboratory after a 12-hour…

  9. Buffered Plate Antigen Test as a Screening Test for Diagnosis of Human Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Nidia E.; Bolpe, Jorge E.

    1998-01-01

    Brucellosis in Argentina is currently investigated in bank donor blood by the standard plate agglutination test (PAT). This study evaluated the buffered plate antigen test (BPA), now used to screen for bovine brucellosis, as a screen for human disease. Of 57 sera from patients with culture-confirmed brucellosis, 100% were detected with the BPA. Of 142 sera positive by rose bengal (RB) and complement fixation (CF), from patients with clinical evidence of brucellosis, the BPA detected 100%. Of 307 sera from a nonsymptomatic population that were RB and CF negative, the BPA detected 99.67% of the negative sera. The data indicate that the BPA is satisfactory compared to the other agglutination tests employed. It is an inexpensive and practical screening test and reduces the nonspecific reactions detected by the PAT. PMID:9574720

  10. Impaired antigen presentation and potent phagocytic activity identifying tumor-tolerant human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Soares-Schanoski, Alessandra; Jurado, Teresa; Córdoba, Raúl; Siliceo, María; Fresno, Carlos Del; Gómez-Piña, Vanesa; Toledano, Victor; Vallejo-Cremades, Maria T; Alfonso-Iñiguez, Sergio; Carballo-Palos, Arkaitz; Fernández-Ruiz, Irene; Cubillas-Zapata, Carolina; Biswas, Subhra K; Arnalich, Francisco; García-Río, Francisco; López-Collazo, Eduardo

    2012-06-29

    Monocyte exposure to tumor cells induces a transient state in which these cells are refractory to further exposure to cancer. This phenomenon, termed "tumor tolerance", is characterized by a decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines in response to tumors. In the past, we found that this effect comprises IRAK-M up regulation and TLR4 and CD44 activation. Herein we have established a human model of tumor tolerance and have observed a marked down-regulation of MHCII molecules as well as the MHCII master regulator, CIITA, in monocytes/macrophages. These cells combine an impaired capability for antigen presentation with potent phagocytic activity and exhibit an M2-like phenotype. In addition circulating monocytes isolated from Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia patients exhibited the same profile as tumor tolerant cells after tumor ex vivo exposition.

  11. Jon Van Rood: pioneer at the crossroad of human leukocyte antigens and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jan

    2007-04-01

    Jon Van Rood (born in 1926) has made major contributions to the fields of transfusion medicine as well as organ and stem cell transplantation. His group was the first to start unraveling the complexity of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system through collaborative studies that used panels of sera and leukocyte samples. Furthermore, using HLA typing, he introduced the first HLA-matched platelet transfusions and developed routine leukocyte depletion as a means to prevent HLA alloimmunization. Van Rood has also been active in the fields of kidney transplantation (Eurotransplant) and stem cell transplantation (Europdonor). He combined scientific laboratory research with application to clinical medicine. He retired from his university position in 1991 but remains active in the field.

  12. Surface expression of Mo3e antigen by activated human monocytes and U-937 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Todd R.F. III; Bury, M.J.; Liu, D.Y.

    1986-03-05

    The surface expression of a protease-sensitive antigen, Mo3e, by activated human monocytes and U-937 cells is a plasma membrane feature of the activated state. Mo3e, which is an 80 kD protein on Western blot analysis, may represent the surface receptor for migration inhibitory factor (MIF), as evidenced by inhibition of MIF responsiveness produced by anti-Mo3e monoclonal antibody. Mo3e is barely detectable (by surface immunofluorescence) on freshly isolated monocytes but becomes expressed in high antigen density during 18-24 hrs culture in medium containing E. coli lipopolysaccharide (> 1 ng/ml), 4..beta..-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) (5-10 nM), or muramyl dipeptide (0.1-1 ..mu..M). In U-937 cells, Mo3e surface expression is detectable after 24 hrs exposure to PMA and other pharmacological activators of protein kinase C: 4..beta..-phorbol 12, 13 dibutyrate, 4..beta..-phorbol 12, 13 didecanoate, mezerein, or Sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol. The biologically-inactivate phorbol compounds, 4..cap alpha..-phorbol 12, 13 didecanoate and 4/sub ..beta../-phorbol do not stimulate Mo3e expression. The calcium ionophore, ionomycin, has a synergistic effect on Mo3e expression stimulated by PMA; conversely, calcium antagonists block PMA-induced Mo3e expression. These results suggest the involvement of protein kinase C activation and intracellular calcium mobilization in the stimulated expression of Mo3e by activated human mononuclear phagocytes.

  13. Physiological level production of antigen-specific human immunoglobulin in cloned transchromosomic cattle.

    PubMed

    Sano, Akiko; Matsushita, Hiroaki; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs) derived from pooled plasma from human donors are Food and Drug Administration approved biologics used in the treatment of a variety of human diseases. Powered by the natural diversity of immune response, hpAbs are effective in treating diseases caused by complex or quickly-evolving antigens such as viruses. We previously showed that transchromosomic (Tc) cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin heavy-chain (hIGH) and kappa-chain (hIGK) germline loci (named as κHAC) are capable of producing functional hpAbs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, are homozygously inactivated (double knockouts or DKO). However, B lymphocyte development in these Tc cattle is compromised, and the overall production of hpAbs is low. Here, we report the construction of an improved HAC, designated as cKSL-HACΔ, by incorporating all of the human immunoglobulin germline loci into the HAC. Furthermore, for avoiding the possible human-bovine interspecies incompatibility between the human immunoglobulin mu chain protein (hIgM) and bovine transmembrane α and β immunoglobulins (bIgα and bIgβ) in the pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR) complex, we partially replaced (bovinized) the hIgM constant domain with the counterpart of bovine IgM (bIgM) that is involved in the interaction between bIgM and bIgα/Igβ; human IgM bovinization would also improve the functionality of hIgM in supporting B cell activation and proliferation. We also report the successful production of DKO Tc cattle carrying the cKSL-HACΔ (cKSL-HACΔ/DKO), the dramatic improvement of B cell development in these cattle and the high level production of hpAbs (as measured for the human IgG isotype) in the plasma. We further demonstrate that, upon immunization by tumor immunogens, high titer tumor immunogen-specific human IgG (hIgG) can be produced from such Tc cattle.

  14. Usage of Murine T-cell Hybridoma Cells as Responder Cells Reveals Interference of Helicobacter Pylori with Human Dendritic Cell-mediated Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Fehlings, Michael; Drobbe, Lea; Beigier-Bompadre, Macarena; Viveros, Pablo Renner; Moos, Verena; Schneider, Thomas; Meyer, Thomas F.; Aebischer, Toni; Ignatius, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Direct effects of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) on human CD4+ T-cells hamper disentangling a possible bacterial-mediated interference with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-dependent antigen presentation to these cells. To overcome this limitation, we employed a previously described assay, which enables assessing human antigen-processing cell function by using murine T-cell hybridoma cells restricted by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. HLA-DR1+ monocyte-derived dendritic cells were exposed to H. pylori and pulsed with the antigen 85B from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis). Interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion by AG85Baa97-112-specific hybridoma cells was then evaluated as an integral reporter of cognate antigen presentation. This methodology enabled revealing of interference of H. pylori with the antigen-presenting capacity of human dendritic cells. PMID:27980859

  15. Antigenic variation of the human influenza A (H3N2) virus during the 2014-2015 winter season.

    PubMed

    Hua, Sha; Li, XiYan; Liu, Mi; Cheng, YanHui; Peng, YouSong; Huang, WeiJuan; Tan, MinJu; Wei, HeJiang; Guo, JunFeng; Wang, DaYan; Wu, AiPing; Shu, YueLong; Jiang, TaiJiao

    2015-09-01

    The human influenza A (H3N2) virus dominated the 2014-2015 winter season in many countries and caused massive morbidity and mortality because of its antigenic variation. So far, very little is known about the antigenic patterns of the recent H3N2 virus. By systematically mapping the antigenic relationships of H3N2 strains isolated since 2010, we discovered that two groups with obvious antigenic divergence, named SW13 (A/Switzerland/9715293/2013-like strains) and HK14 (A/Hong Kong/5738/2014-like strains), co-circulated during the 2014-2015 winter season. HK14 group co-circulated with SW13 in Europe and the United States during this season, while there were few strains of HK14 in mainland China, where SW13 has dominated since 2012. Furthermore, we found that substitutions near the receptor-binding site on hemagglutinin played an important role in the antigenic variation of both the groups. These findings provide a comprehensive understanding of the recent antigenic evolution of H3N2 virus and will aid in the selection of vaccine strains.

  16. Induction of antigen-specific regulatory T lymphocytes by human dendritic cells expressing the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Haifa; Godot, Véronique; Maillot, Marie-Christine; Prejean, Maria Victoria; Cohen, Nicolas; Krzysiek, Roman; Lemoine, François M; Zou, Weiping; Emilie, Dominique

    2007-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) determine whether antigen presentation leads to immune activation or to tolerance. Tolerance-inducing DCs (also called regulatory DCs) act partly by generating regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs). The mechanism used by DCs to switch toward regulatory DCs during their differentiation is unclear. We show here that human DCs treated in vitro with glucocorticoids produce the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ). Antigen presentation by GILZ-expressing DCs generates CD25(high)FOXP3(+)CTLA-4/CD152(+) and interleukin-10-producing Tregs inhibiting the response of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. This inhibition is specific to the antigen presented, and only proliferating CD4(+) T lymphocytes express the Treg markers. Interleukin-10 is required for Treg induction by GILZ-expressing DCs. It is also needed for the suppressive function of Tregs. Antigen-presenting cells from patients treated with glucocorticoids generate interleukin-10-secreting Tregs ex vivo. These antigen-presenting cells produce GILZ, which is needed for Treg induction. Therefore, GILZ is critical for commitment of DCs to differentiate into regulatory DCs and to the generation of antigen-specific Tregs. This mechanism may contribute to the therapeutic effects of glucocorticoids.

  17. Identification of Candida albicans antigens reactive with immunoglobulin E antibody of human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, A; Homma, M; Torii, S; Tanaka, K

    1992-01-01

    Candida albicans antigens which reacted with immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies of 57 allergic patients were detected by immunoblotting. Of the various antigens, the 175-, 125-, 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigenic components reacted most frequently with the patient sera. To purify the major antigens, C. albicans cells were fractionated. The 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigens were recovered in cytoplasmic fractions, but the 175- and 125-kDa antigens were not recovered in any fraction. The 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigens were purified from cytoplasmic fractions by DEAE and P11 ion-exchange chromatography. Antigens were isolated by cutting bands out of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The purified components confirmed by immunoblotting were next processed for amino acid sequencing. Parts of the sequences of the 46-, 43-, and 37-kDa antigens had significant levels of homology with Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycolytic enzyme enolase, phosphoglycerate kinase, and aldolase, respectively. Rabbit IgG antibodies prepared against the 46- and 43-kDa antigens strongly cross-reacted with the homologous proteins of S. cerevisiae. However, S. cerevisiae enolase and phosphoglycerate kinase did not cross-react with IgE of patient sera. This result suggests that IgE antibodies against only small parts of their epitopes are elevated in the allergic patients. Since enolase is reported to be a major antigen for systemic candidiasis, this enzyme may be the immunodominant protein in both allergies and fungal infections. Images PMID:1548078

  18. Erythrocytes in human transplantation: effects of pretreatment with ABO group-specific antigens

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, F. T.; Dausset, J.; Legrand, L.; Barge, A.; Lawrence, H. S.; Converse, J. M.

    1968-01-01

    Erythrocyte group antigens A and B can act as potent and group-specific transplantation antigens in man. ABO group-incompatible recipients pretreated with such antigens have rejected skin allografts obtained from donors incompatible for the same antigens in an accelerated (4-5 days) or white graft manner. Skin grafts applied to the same recipients from ABO-compatible donors were accorded first-set survival times. Intact erythrocyte suspensions and antigens isolated from hog (A substance) and horse (B substance) stomachs, were equally capable of inducing this type of allograft sensitivity. The latter observation broadens the spectrum of heterologous antigens capable of inducing allograft sensitivity in the mammalian host and provides a readily available, heat-stable, and water-soluble source of antigens for further studies of allograft rejection mechanisms in man. PMID:4877681

  19. Human recombinant domain antibodies against multiple sclerosis antigenic peptide CSF114(Glc).

    PubMed

    Niccheri, Francesca; Real-Fernàndez, Feliciana; Ramazzotti, Matteo; Lolli, Francesco; Rossi, Giada; Rovero, Paolo; Degl'Innocenti, Donatella

    2014-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic auto-immune disease characterized by a damage to the myelin component of the central nervous system. Self-antigens created by aberrant glycosylation have been described to be a key component in the formation of auto-antibodies. CSF114(Glc) is a synthetic glucopeptide detecting in vitro MS-specific auto-antibodies, and it is actively used in diagnostics and research to monitor and quantify MS-associated Ig levels. We reasoned that antibodies raised against this probe could have been relevant for MS. We therefore screened a human Domain Antibody library against CSF114(Glc) using magnetic separation as a panning method. We obtained and described several clones, and the one with the highest signals was produced as a 6×His-tagged protein to properly study the binding properties as a soluble antibody. By surface plasmon resonance measurements, we evidenced that our clone recognized CSF114(Glc) with high affinity and specific for the glucosylated peptide. Kinetic parameters of peptide-clone interaction were calculated obtaining a value of KD in the nanomolar range. Harboring a human framework, this antibody should be very well tolerated by human immune system and may represent a valuable tool for MS diagnosis and therapy, paving the way to new research strategies.

  20. Human leukocyte antigen-G in the male reproductive system and in seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Margit Hørup; Bzorek, Michael; Pass, Malene B; Larsen, Lise Grupe; Nielsen, Mette Weidinger; Svendsen, Signe Goul; Lindhard, Anette; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2011-12-01

    One of the non-classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib proteins, HLA-G, is believed to exert important immunoregulatory functions, especially during pregnancy. The presence of HLA protein in paternal seminal fluid has been suggested to have an influence on the risk of developing pre-eclampsia. We have investigated whether HLA-G protein is present in human seminal plasma and in different tissue samples of the male reproductive system. Western blot technique and a soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) assay were used to detect sHLA-G in human seminal plasma samples. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue samples. We detected sHLA-G protein in seminal plasma, and HLA-G expression in normal testis and in epididymal tissue of the male reproductive system but not in the seminal vesicle. Furthermore, the results indicated a weak expression of HLA-G in hyperplastic prostatic tissue. In summary, several of the findings reported in this study suggest an immunoregulatory role of HLA-G in the male reproductive system and in seminal plasma.

  1. Complex regulation of transcription from the hepatitis B virus major surface antigen promoter in human hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Raney, A K; Milich, D R; McLachlan, A

    1991-01-01

    A detailed mutational analysis of the regulatory DNA sequence elements that control expression of the hepatitis B virus major surface antigen gene was performed in the human hepatoma cell lines HepG2.1 and Huh7, using transient transfection assays. Seven regions (A to G) of the major surface antigen promoter located within 200 nucleotides of the RNA initiation site have been identified which influence the level of transcription from this promoter. The three distal regions (A to C), located between -188 and -68, appear to possess a level of redundancy in their ability to influence the transcriptional activity from the major surface antigen promoter. The simultaneous deletion of regions A, B, and C resulted in an approximately fourfold reduction in transcription from the major surface antigen promoter. Region D, located between -67 and -49, is an essential element of the major surface antigen promoter. The three proximal regions (E to G) are located within 45 nucleotides of the major transcription initiation site. Region E prevents the negative influence of region F and can compensate for the effect of mutation of region G on transcription from the major surface antigen promoter. Region G can compensate for the effect of the loss of a functional region E sequence on the transcriptional activity of the major surface antigen promoter only in the absence of a functional region F sequence. These results imply that the level of expression of the major surface antigen gene is controlled by the complex interplay between a minimum of six transcription factors which activate and one transcription factor which represses transcription from this gene. PMID:1651407

  2. Rapid T cell–based identification of human tumor tissue antigens by automated two-dimensional protein fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Beckhove, Philipp; Warta, Rolf; Lemke, Britt; Stoycheva, Diana; Momburg, Frank; Schnölzer, Martina; Warnken, Uwe; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Hubertus; Ahmadi, Rezvan; Dyckhoff, Gerhard; Bucur, Mariana; Jünger, Simone; Schueler, Thomas; Lennerz, Volker; Woelfel, Thomas; Unterberg, Andreas; Herold-Mende, Christel

    2010-01-01

    Identifying the antigens that have the potential to trigger endogenous antitumor responses in an individual cancer patient is likely to enhance the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy, but current methodologies do not efficiently identify such antigens. This study describes what we believe to be a new method of comprehensively identifying candidate tissue antigens that spontaneously cause T cell responses in disease situations. We used the newly developed automated, two-dimensional chromatography system PF2D to fractionate the proteome of human tumor tissues and tested protein fractions for recognition by preexisting tumor-specific CD4+ Th cells and CTLs. Applying this method using mice transgenic for a TCR that recognizes an OVA peptide presented by MHC class I, we demonstrated efficient separation, processing, and cross-presentation to CD8+ T cells by DCs of OVA expressed by the OVA-transfected mouse lymphoma RMA-OVA. Applying this method to human tumor tissues, we identified MUC1 and EGFR as tumor-associated antigens selectively recognized by T cells in patients with head and neck cancer. Finally, in an exemplary patient with a malignant brain tumor, we detected CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses against two novel antigens, transthyretin and calgranulin B/S100A9, which were expressed in tumor and endothelial cells. The immunogenicity of these antigens was confirmed in 4 of 10 other brain tumor patients. This fast and inexpensive method therefore appears suitable for identifying candidate T cell antigens in various disease situations, such as autoimmune and malignant diseases, without being restricted to expression by a certain cell type or HLA allele. PMID:20458140

  3. HCA519/TPX2: a potential T-cell tumor-associated antigen for human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Aref, Ahmed M; Hoa, Neil T; Ge, Lisheng; Agrawal, Anshu; Dacosta-Iyer, Maria; Lambrecht, Nils; Ouyang, Yi; Cornforth, Andrew N; Jadus, Martin R

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunotherapy for human hepatocellular cancer (HCC) is slowly making progress towards treating these fatal cancers. The identification of new antigens can improve this approach. We describe a possible new antigen, hepatocellular carcinoma‐associated antigen‐519/targeting protein for Xklp‐2 (HCA519/TPX2), for HCC that might be beneficial for T‐cell specific HCC immunotherapy. Methods HCC was studied for the expression for 15 tumor‐associated antigens considered useful for immunotherapy within three HCC cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B, and PLC/PRF/5), lymphocytes, non‐cancerous livers, and clinical HCC. The expression of tumor antigenic precursor proteins (TAPPs) messenger RNA was first screened by reverse transcriptase quantitative real‐time polymerase chain reaction. Results Four antigens (alpha fetoprotein, aspartyl/asparaginyl β­hydroxylase, glypican­3 and HCA519/TPX2) proved to be the best expressed TAPPs within the HCC specimens by molecular analyses. HCA519/TPX2 was detected by intracellular cell flow cytometry within HCC cell lines by using a specific antibody towards this TAPP. This antibody also detected the protein within primary HCCs. We synthesized two HCA519/TPX2 peptides (HCA519464–472 and HCA519351–359) which can bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA)‐A*0201. Dendritic cells pulsed with these peptides stimulated cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs). These killer T‐cells lysed HLA‐A*0201+ T2 cells exogenously loaded with the correct specific peptide. The CTLs killed HepG2 (HLA‐A2+ and HCA519+), but not the Hep3B and PLC/PRF/5 cell lines, which are HCA519+ but HLA‐A2‐negative. In silico analysis reveals that HCA519/TPX2 has the inherent ability to bind to a very wide variety of HLA antigens. Conclusion HCA519/TPX2 is a viable immunotarget that should be further investigated within HCC patients. PMID:24966688

  4. Guanine polynucleotides are self-antigens for human natural autoantibodies and are significantly reduced in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Fattal, Ittai; Shental, Noam; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Molad, Yair; Gabrielli, Armando; Pokroy-Shapira, Elisheva; Oren, Shirly; Livneh, Avi; Langevitz, Pnina; Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Sarig, Ofer; Margalit, Raanan; Gafter, Uzi; Domany, Eytan; Cohen, Irun R

    2015-01-01

    In the course of investigating anti-DNA autoantibodies, we examined IgM and IgG antibodies to poly-G and other oligonucleotides in the sera of healthy persons and those diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma (SSc), or pemphigus vulgaris (PV); we used an antigen microarray and informatic analysis. We now report that all of the 135 humans studied, irrespective of health or autoimmune disease, manifested relatively high amounts of IgG antibodies binding to the 20-mer G oligonucleotide (G20); no participants entirely lacked this reactivity. IgG antibodies to homo-nucleotides A20, C20 or T20 were present only in the sera of SLE patients who were positive for antibodies to dsDNA. The prevalence of anti-G20 antibodies led us to survey human, mouse and Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) genomes for runs of T20 and G20 or more: runs of T20 appear > 170 000 times compared with only 93 runs of G20 or more in the human genome; of these runs, 40 were close to brain-associated genes. Mouse and fruit fly genomes showed significantly lower T20/G20 ratios than did human genomes. Moreover, sera from both healthy and SLE mice contained relatively little or no anti-G20 antibodies; so natural anti-G20 antibodies appear to be characteristic of humans. These unexpected observations invite investigation of the immune functions of anti-G20 antibodies in human health and disease and of runs of G20 in the human genome. PMID:26227667

  5. Guanine polynucleotides are self-antigens for human natural autoantibodies and are significantly reduced in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Fattal, Ittai; Shental, Noam; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Molad, Yair; Gabrielli, Armando; Pokroy-Shapira, Elisheva; Oren, Shirly; Livneh, Avi; Langevitz, Pnina; Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Sarig, Ofer; Margalit, Raanan; Gafter, Uzi; Domany, Eytan; Cohen, Irun R

    2015-11-01

    In the course of investigating anti-DNA autoantibodies, we examined IgM and IgG antibodies to poly-G and other oligonucleotides in the sera of healthy persons and those diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma (SSc), or pemphigus vulgaris (PV); we used an antigen microarray and informatic analysis. We now report that all of the 135 humans studied, irrespective of health or autoimmune disease, manifested relatively high amounts of IgG antibodies binding to the 20-mer G oligonucleotide (G20); no participants entirely lacked this reactivity. IgG antibodies to homo-nucleotides A20, C20 or T20 were present only in the sera of SLE patients who were positive for antibodies to dsDNA. The prevalence of anti-G20 antibodies led us to survey human, mouse and Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) genomes for runs of T20 and G20 or more: runs of T20 appear > 170,000 times compared with only 93 runs of G20 or more in the human genome; of these runs, 40 were close to brain-associated genes. Mouse and fruit fly genomes showed significantly lower T20/G20 ratios than did human genomes. Moreover, sera from both healthy and SLE mice contained relatively little or no anti-G20 antibodies; so natural anti-G20 antibodies appear to be characteristic of humans. These unexpected observations invite investigation of the immune functions of anti-G20 antibodies in human health and disease and of runs of G20 in the human genome.

  6. [Antigens of the human immunodeficiency virus in serum of high risk people in the city of Monterrey].

    PubMed

    Salinas Carmona, M C; Flores de Castañeda, M S; Garza Elizondo, M A; Pérez Rivera, L I

    1989-01-01

    One hundred forty human sera distributed in 2 groups were analyzed. In group I, 50 serum samples from healthy individuals that did not belong to the high-risk acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) population were included. In group II, there were 90 individuals, most of whom were apparently healthy but were at high risk of getting AIDS through their life styles or by transfusion. Of the 90 persons, 5 had a clinical picture of AIDS. All sera were analyzed by the enzyme - linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the anti VIH antibodies. The positive cases were confirmed by the Western blot assay. In all samples the presence of the human immune deficiency virus antigens was sought. The results showed that the 50 healthy individuals (control group) were negative for both HIV antigens and antibodies. Of the 90 sera for the high-risk group, 50 were negative for antibodies, and 2 of them (4%) were positive for HIV antigens. Forty sera were positive for anti HIV antibody and among them, 5 patients were diagnosed as AIDS, and showed positive for antigen and antibody. The other 35 patients were all positive for HIV antibody and in 8 of them HIV antigen was also present.

  7. Involvement of rainbow trout leucocytes in the pathogenesis of infectious hematopoietic necrosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chilmonczyk, S.; Winton, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus myluss leucocytes were tested for their ability to support replication of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Viral replication occurred in vitro uslng leucocytes cultured from peripheral blood, kidney, and thymus where viral titers peaked at 2 to 4 d post-inoculation. Leucocytes collected from trout following waterborne challenge with IHNV were cocultured on EPC cell monolayers. These assays detected IHNV in leucocytes infected in vivo as early as 6 h post-exposure before the challenge virus had undergone replication. These data showed that leucocyte populations could serve as target cells in the initial phase of IHNV infection.

  8. Intracerebral delivery of a third generation EGFRvIII-specific chimeric antigen receptor is efficacious against human glioma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bryan D; Suryadevara, Carter M; Gedeon, Patrick C; Herndon, James E; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Bigner, Darell D; Sampson, John H

    2014-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CAR)-transduced T cells hold great promise in the treatment of malignant disease. Here, we demonstrate that intracerebral injection with a human, epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII)-specific, third generation CAR successfully treats glioma in mice. Importantly, these results endorse clinical translation of this CAR in patients with EGFRvIII-expressing brain tumors.

  9. Expanded Human Blood-Derived γδT Cells Display Potent Antigen-Presentation Functions

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohd Wajid A.; Curbishley, Stuart M.; Chen, Hung-Chang; Thomas, Andrew D.; Pircher, Hanspeter; Mavilio, Domenico; Steven, Neil M.; Eberl, Matthias; Moser, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Cell-based immunotherapy strategies target tumors directly (via cytolytic effector cells) or aim at mobilizing endogenous anti-tumor immunity. The latter approach includes dendritic cells (DC) most frequently in the form of in vitro cultured peripheral blood monocytes-derived DC. Human blood γδT cells are selective for a single class of non-peptide agonists (“phosphoantigens”) and develop into potent antigen-presenting cells (APC), termed γδT-APC within 1–3 days of in vitro culture. Availability of large numbers of γδT-APC would be advantageous for use as a novel cellular vaccine. We here report optimal γδT cell expansion (>107 cells/ml blood) when peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy individuals and melanoma patients were stimulated with zoledronate and then cultured for 14 days in the presence of IL-2 and IL-15, yielding γδT cell cultures of variable purity (77 ± 21 and 56 ± 26%, respectively). They resembled effector memory αβT (TEM) cells and retained full functionality as assessed by in vitro tumor cell killing as well as secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFNγ, TNFα) and cell proliferation in response to stimulation with phosphoantigens. Importantly, day 14 γδT cells expressed numerous APC-related cell surface markers and, in agreement, displayed potent in vitro APC functions. Day 14 γδT cells from PBMC of patients with cancer were equally effective as their counterparts derived from blood of healthy individuals and triggered potent CD8+ αβT cell responses following processing and cross-presentation of simple (influenza M1) and complex (tuberculin purified protein derivative) protein antigens. Of note, and in clear contrast to peripheral blood γδT cells, the ability of day 14 γδT cells to trigger antigen-specific αβT cell responses did not depend on re-stimulation. We conclude that day 14 γδT cell cultures provide a convenient source of autologous APC for use in immunotherapy of patients

  10. Expanded Human Blood-Derived γδT Cells Display Potent Antigen-Presentation Functions.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohd Wajid A; Curbishley, Stuart M; Chen, Hung-Chang; Thomas, Andrew D; Pircher, Hanspeter; Mavilio, Domenico; Steven, Neil M; Eberl, Matthias; Moser, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Cell-based immunotherapy strategies target tumors directly (via cytolytic effector cells) or aim at mobilizing endogenous anti-tumor immunity. The latter approach includes dendritic cells (DC) most frequently in the form of in vitro cultured peripheral blood monocytes-derived DC. Human blood γδT cells are selective for a single class of non-peptide agonists ("phosphoantigens") and develop into potent antigen-presenting cells (APC), termed γδT-APC within 1-3 days of in vitro culture. Availability of large numbers of γδT-APC would be advantageous for use as a novel cellular vaccine. We here report optimal γδT cell expansion (>10(7) cells/ml blood) when peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy individuals and melanoma patients were stimulated with zoledronate and then cultured for 14 days in the presence of IL-2 and IL-15, yielding γδT cell cultures of variable purity (77 ± 21 and 56 ± 26%, respectively). They resembled effector memory αβT (TEM) cells and retained full functionality as assessed by in vitro tumor cell killing as well as secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFNγ, TNFα) and cell proliferation in response to stimulation with phosphoantigens. Importantly, day 14 γδT cells expressed numerous APC-related cell surface markers and, in agreement, displayed potent in vitro APC functions. Day 14 γδT cells from PBMC of patients with cancer were equally effective as their counterparts derived from blood of healthy individuals and triggered potent CD8(+) αβT cell responses following processing and cross-presentation of simple (influenza M1) and complex (tuberculin purified protein derivative) protein antigens. Of note, and in clear contrast to peripheral blood γδT cells, the ability of day 14 γδT cells to trigger antigen-specific αβT cell responses did not depend on re-stimulation. We conclude that day 14 γδT cell cultures provide a convenient source of autologous APC for use in immunotherapy of patients

  11. Human leukocyte antigens and cellular immune responses to anthrax vaccine adsorbed.

    PubMed

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Pankratz, V Shane; Vierkant, Robert A; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Quinn, Conrad P; Kaslow, Richard A; Jacobson, Robert M; Poland, Gregory A

    2013-07-01

    Interindividual variations in vaccine-induced immune responses are in part due to host genetic polymorphisms in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and other gene families. This study examined associations between HLA genotypes, haplotypes, and homozygosity and protective antigen (PA)-specific cellular immune responses in healthy subjects following immunization with Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA). While limited associations were observed between individual HLA alleles or haplotypes and variable lymphocyte proliferative (LP) responses to AVA, analyses of homozygosity supported the hypothesis of a "heterozygote advantage." Individuals who were homozygous for any HLA locus demonstrated significantly lower PA-specific LP than subjects who were heterozygous at all eight loci (median stimulation indices [SI], 1.84 versus 2.95, P = 0.009). Similarly, we found that class I (HLA-A) and class II (HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1) homozygosity was significantly associated with an overall decrease in LP compared with heterozygosity at those three loci. Specifically, individuals who were homozygous at these loci had significantly lower PA-specific LP than subjects heterozygous for HLA-A (median SI, 1.48 versus 2.13, P = 0.005), HLA-DQA1 (median SI, 1.75 versus 2.11, P = 0.007), and HLA-DQB1 (median SI, 1.48 versus 2.13, P = 0.002) loci, respectively. Finally, homozygosity at an increasing number (≥ 4) of HLA loci was significantly correlated with a reduction in LP response (P < 0.001) in a dose-dependent manner. Additional studies are needed to reproduce these findings and determine whether HLA-heterozygous individuals generate stronger cellular immune response to other virulence factors (Bacillus anthracis LF and EF) than HLA-homozygous subjects.

  12. Expression and antigenicity of recombinant human respiratory syncytial virus glycoproteins having different affinity tags.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Saem; Kim, A-Reum; Kim, Kisoon; Lee, Wan-Ji; Kim, Sung Soon; Kim, You-Jin

    2016-12-29

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a main cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and the elderly. Glycoprotein (G) is major antigen on the viral surface, and plays a key role for virus entry. Therefore, purification of the glycoprotein of HRSV is critical for the development of HRSV vaccine and serological diagnosis. In this study, we report the design and characterization of glycoprotein engineered rationally to enhance the protein solubility and to facilitate efficient purification. We permuted HRSV glycoproteins with two tags: (i) an immunoglobulin (Ig) M signal peptide and a protein A B domain tag to render HRSV glycoprotein secret into the culture media and (ii) a foldon and 6 × histidine tag with or without transmembrane domain. Three recombinant baculoviruses were constructed: (i) transmembrane-truncated HRSV glycoprotein (amino acid positions 66-298) inserted with the N-terminal IgM signal peptide and protein A B domain (MG-GΔTM), (ii) truncated HRSV glycoprotein (amino acid positions 66-298) fused with a C-terminal foldon and 6 × histidine tag (GΔTM-FH), and (iii) full-length HRSV glycoprotein (amino acid positions 1-298) fused with a C-terminal foldon and 6 × histidine tag (G-FH). Highly soluble recombinant MG-GΔTM protein was clearly purified using one-step affinity chromatography with IgG-sepharose resin, whereas the recombinant G-FH protein and truncated GΔTM-FH were purified partially using nickel-resin. Although, the antigenicity of GΔTM-FH was stronger than highly mannose-rich MG-GΔTM protein, MG-GΔTM induced neutralizing antibodies efficiently in the mice to protect from infectious HRSV.

  13. Superior Immunologic and Therapeutic Efficacy of a Xenogeneic Genetic Cancer Vaccine Targeting Carcinoembryonic Human Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Roscilli, Giuseppe; Marra, Emanuele; Luberto, Laura; Mancini, Rita; La Monica, Nicola; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We have generated a xenogeneic vaccine against human carcinoembryonic antigen (hCEACAM-5 or commonly hCEA) using as immunogen rhesus CEA (rhCEA). RhCEA cDNA was codon-usage optimized (rhCEAopt) and delivered by sequential DNA electro-gene-transfer (DNA-EGT) and adenoviral (Ad) vector. RhCEAopt was capable to break tolerance to CEA in hCEA transgenic mice and immune responses were detected against epitopes distributed over the entire length of the protein. Xenovaccination with rhCEA resulted in the activation of CD4+ T-cell responses in addition to self-reactive CD8+ T-cells, the development of high-titer antibodies against hCEA, and significant antitumor effects upon challenge with hCEA+ tumor cells. The superior activity of rhCEAopt compared with hCEAopt was confirmed in hCEA/HHD double-transgenic mice, where potent CD8+ T-cell responses against specific human HLA A*0201 hCEA epitopes were detected. Our data show that xenogeneic gene-based vaccination with rhCEA is a viable approach to break tolerance against CEA, thus suggesting further development in the clinical setting. PMID:25869226

  14. Superior Immunologic and Therapeutic Efficacy of a Xenogeneic Genetic Cancer Vaccine Targeting Carcinoembryonic Human Antigen.

    PubMed

    Aurisicchio, Luigi; Roscilli, Giuseppe; Marra, Emanuele; Luberto, Laura; Mancini, Rita; La Monica, Nicola; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2015-06-01

    We have generated a xenogeneic vaccine against human carcinoembryonic antigen (hCEACAM-5 or commonly hCEA) using as immunogen rhesus CEA (rhCEA). RhCEA cDNA was codon-usage optimized (rhCEAopt) and delivered by sequential DNA electro-gene-transfer (DNA-EGT) and adenoviral (Ad) vector. RhCEAopt was capable to break tolerance to CEA in hCEA transgenic mice and immune responses were detected against epitopes distributed over the entire length of the protein. Xenovaccination with rhCEA resulted in the activation of CD4+ T-cell responses in addition to self-reactive CD8+ T-cells, the development of high-titer antibodies against hCEA, and significant antitumor effects upon challenge with hCEA+ tumor cells. The superior activity of rhCEAopt compared with hCEAopt was confirmed in hCEA/HHD double-transgenic mice, where potent CD8+ T-cell responses against specific human HLA A*0201 hCEA epitopes were detected. Our data show that xenogeneic gene-based vaccination with rhCEA is a viable approach to break tolerance against CEA, thus suggesting further development in the clinical setting.

  15. Characterization of a novel inhibitory human monoclonal antibody directed against Plasmodium falciparum Apical Membrane Antigen 1

    PubMed Central

    Maskus, Dominika J.; Królik, Michał; Bethke, Susanne; Spiegel, Holger; Kapelski, Stephanie; Seidel, Melanie; Addai-Mensah, Otchere; Reimann, Andreas; Klockenbring, Torsten; Barth, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer; Fendel, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Malaria remains a major challenge to global health causing extensive morbidity and mortality. Yet, there is no efficient vaccine and the immune response remains incompletely understood. Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1), a leading vaccine candidate, plays a key role during merozoite invasion into erythrocytes by interacting with Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 (RON2). We generated a human anti-AMA1-antibody (humAbAMA1) by EBV-transformation of sorted B-lymphocytes from a Ghanaian donor and subsequent rescue of antibody variable regions. The antibody was expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana and in HEK239-6E, characterized for binding specificity and epitope, and analyzed for its inhibitory effect on Plasmodium falciparum. The generated humAbAMA1 shows an affinity of 106–135 pM. It inhibits the parasite strain 3D7A growth in vitro with an expression system-independent IC50-value of 35 μg/ml (95% confidence interval: 33 μg/ml–37 μg/ml), which is three to eight times lower than the IC50-values of inhibitory antibodies 4G2 and 1F9. The epitope was mapped to the close proximity of the RON2-peptide binding groove. Competition for binding between the RON2-peptide and humAbAMA1 was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy measurements. The particularly advantageous inhibitory activity of this fully human antibody might provide a basis for future therapeutic applications. PMID:28000709

  16. Soluble antigens from group B streptococci induce cytokine production in human blood cultures.

    PubMed Central

    von Hunolstein, C; Totolian, A; Alfarone, G; Mancuso, G; Cusumano, V; Teti, G; Orefici, G

    1997-01-01

    Group B streptococcal antigens stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 production in human blood cultures in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. The minimal concentrations of type-specific polysaccharides, lipoteichoic acid, and group-specific polysaccharide required to produce these effects were, respectively, 0.01, 1, and 10 microg/ml. Cell separation experiments indicated that monocytes were the cell type mainly responsible for cytokine production. Time course studies indicated that TNF-alpha was released before the other cytokines. TNF-alpha, however, did not appear to directly induce IL-1beta, as shown by blockade experiments with anti-TNF-alpha antibodies. IL-6 levels were moderately but significantly decreased by anti-TNF-alpha. These data indicate that several products from group B streptococci are able to directly stimulate human monocytes to release TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6. These findings may be clinically relevant, since proinflammatory cytokines can mediate pathophysiologic changes during sepsis. PMID:9317001

  17. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G Within the Male Reproductive System: Implications for Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2015-01-01

    In sexual reproduction in humans, a man has a clear interest in ensuring that the immune system of his female partner accepts the semi-allogenic fetus. Increasing attention has been given to soluble immunomodulatory molecules in the seminal fluid as one mechanism of ensuring this, possibly by "priming" the woman's immune system before conception and at conception. Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of the immunoregulatory and tolerance-inducible human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G in the male reproductive organs. The expression of HLA-G in the blastocyst and by extravillous trophoblast cells in the placenta during pregnancy has been well described. Highly variable amounts of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) in seminal plasma from different men have been reported, and the concentration of sHLA-G is associated with HLA-G genotype. A first pilot study indicates that the level of sHLA-G in seminal plasma may even be associated with the chance of pregnancy in couples, where the male partner has reduced semen quality. More studies are needed to verify these preliminary findings.

  18. Human leukocyte antigen haplotype phasing by allele-specific enrichment with peptide nucleic acid probes

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Nicholas M; Pouton, Colin W; Irving, Helen R

    2014-01-01

    Targeted capture of large fragments of genomic DNA that enrich for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system haplotypes has utility in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Current methods of HLA matching are based on inference or familial studies of inheritance; and each approach has its own inherent limitations. We have designed and tested a probe–target-extraction method for capturing specific HLA haplotypes by hybridization of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes to alleles of the HLA-DRB1 gene. Short target fragments contained in plasmids were initially used to optimize the method followed by testing samples of genomic DNA from human subjects with preselected HLA haplotypes and obtained approximately 10% enrichment for the specific haplotype. When performed with high-molecular-weight genomic DNA, 99.0% versus 84.0% alignment match was obtained for the specific haplotype probed. The allele-specific target enrichment that we obtained can facilitate the elucidation of haplotypes between the 65 kb separating the HLA-DRB1 and the HLA-DQA1 genes, potentially spanning a total distance of at least 130 kb. Allele-specific target enrichment with PNA probes is a straightforward technique that has the capability to improve the resolution of DNA and whole genome sequencing technologies by allowing haplotyping of enriched DNA and crucially, retaining the DNA methylation profile. PMID:24936514

  19. Monocyte human leukocyte antigen-DR transcriptional downregulation by cortisol during septic shock.

    PubMed

    Le Tulzo, Yves; Pangault, Celine; Amiot, Laurence; Guilloux, Valérie; Tribut, Olivier; Arvieux, Cédric; Camus, Christophe; Fauchet, Renée; Thomas, Rémi; Drénou, Bernard

    2004-05-15

    Monocyte deactivation has been identified as a major factor of immunosuppression in sepsis and is associated with a loss of surface human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) expression on circulating monocytes. Using flow cytometry, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, we investigated this phenomenon in septic patients. We confirmed the early loss of monocyte HLA-DR expression in all infected patients and demonstrated that this persistent lowered expression at Day 6 correlated with severity scores, secondary infection, and death. This phenomenon occurred at a transcriptional level via a decrease in the class II transactivator A (CIITA) transcription. Furthermore, these abnormalities correlated with the high cortisol levels observed in sepsis and not with those of other putative factors such as catecholamines or interleukin-10. Finally, in vitro studies evidenced that glucocorticoids decrease HLA-DR expression at a transcriptional level via a decrease in CIITA mRNA levels, mainly by down modulating its isoforms I and III. We conclude that in human sepsis, the loss of HLA-DR expression on circulating monocytes is associated with a poor outcome. We suggest that the high endogenous cortisol level observed in septic shock may be a possible new factor involved in the loss of HLA-DR expression on monocytes via its effect on HLA-DR and CIITA transcription.

  20. Characterization of a novel inhibitory human monoclonal antibody directed against Plasmodium falciparum Apical Membrane Antigen 1.

    PubMed

    Maskus, Dominika J; Królik, Michał; Bethke, Susanne; Spiegel, Holger; Kapelski, Stephanie; Seidel, Melanie; Addai-Mensah, Otchere; Reimann, Andreas; Klockenbring, Torsten; Barth, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer; Fendel, Rolf

    2016-12-21

    Malaria remains a major challenge to global health causing extensive morbidity and mortality. Yet, there is no efficient vaccine and the immune response remains incompletely understood. Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1), a leading vaccine candidate, plays a key role during merozoite invasion into erythrocytes by interacting with Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 (RON2). We generated a human anti-AMA1-antibody (humAbAMA1) by EBV-transformation of sorted B-lymphocytes from a Ghanaian donor and subsequent rescue of antibody variable regions. The antibody was expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana and in HEK239-6E, characterized for binding specificity and epitope, and analyzed for its inhibitory effect on Plasmodium falciparum. The generated humAbAMA1 shows an affinity of 106-135 pM. It inhibits the parasite strain 3D7A growth in vitro with an expression system-independent IC50-value of 35 μg/ml (95% confidence interval: 33 μg/ml-37 μg/ml), which is three to eight times lower than the IC50-values of inhibitory antibodies 4G2 and 1F9. The epitope was mapped to the close proximity of the RON2-peptide binding groove. Competition for binding between the RON2-peptide and humAbAMA1 was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy measurements. The particularly advantageous inhibitory activity of this fully human antibody might provide a basis for future therapeutic applications.

  1. Small-angle neutron scattering study of recombinant yeast-derived human hepatitis B virus surface antigen vaccine particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.; Ito, Y.; Kameyama, K.; Imai, M.; Ishikawa, N.; Takagi, T.

    1995-02-01

    The overall and internal structure of recombinant yeast-derived human hepatitis B virus surface antigen vaccine particles was investigated by small-angle neutron scattering using the contrast variation method. The vaccine is a nearly spherical particle, and its contrast-matching point was determined to be at about 24% D 2O content, indicating that a large part of the vaccine particle is occupied by lipids and carbohydrates from the yeast. The Stuhrmann plot suggests that the surface antigens exist predominantly in the peripheral region of the particle, which is favorable to the induction of anti-virus antibodies.

  2. Use of antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigen and human milk fat globule to distinguish carcinoma, mesothelioma, and reactive mesothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, R J; Herbert, A; Braye, S G; Jones, D B

    1984-01-01

    Antibodies raised against human milk fat globule (HMFG 1 and 2) and carcinoembryonic antigen were used in an immunoperoxidase technique to differentiate mesothelioma, carcinoma, and benign, reactive mesothelium. Sixteen mesotheliomas, 27 lung carcinomas, and 13 specimens of reactive mesothelium were examined. Staining for carcinoembryonic antigen was not seen in reactive mesothelium or mesothelioma but was present in 22 of 27 carcinomas. Mesothelioma and carcinoma usually stained with HMFG 1 and 2; reactive mesothelium did not. These three antibodies may help to distinguish carcinoma, mesothelioma, and reactive mesothelium. Images PMID:6094617

  3. [DNA extraction from coagulated human blood for application in genotyping techniques for human leukocyte antigen and immunoglobulin-like receptors].

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Daniela Maira; Guelsin, Gláucia Andréia; Clementino, Samaia Laface; Melo, Fabiano Cavalcante de; Braga, Marco Antônio; Souza, Cleonice de; Moliterno, Ricardo Alberto; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to standardize a method for extracting high-quality DNA from samples of coagulated blood. Forty-eight samples of human coagulated blood were used for DNA extraction by means of the EZ-DNA commercial kit (Biological Industries, Beit Haemek, Israel), the Neoscience column kit (One Lambda Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) and a modified salting-out method. Only the salting-out method was able to extract high concentrations of DNA (mean, 180 ng/(1/4)microl), which were measured using the Qubit fluorescence detector (Invitrogen, USA). This method enabled amplification of HLA (human leukocyte antigen) genes using the Luminex PCR-SSO (polymerase chain reaction - sequence-specific oligonucleotide) technology, which demands good quality DNA, and amplification of KIR (killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor) genes using an in-house PCR-SSP (polymerase chain reaction - sequence-specific primer) technique, which demands a specific concentration of DNA (10 ng/(1/4)microl). We concluded that the modified salting-out technique was very efficient, simple and fast for DNA extraction from human coagulated blood samples, with the aim of genotyping the HLA and KIR genes.

  4. Selection of Human Antibody Fragments Which Bind Novel Breast Tumor Antigens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    cell type specific scFv for tumor targeting and as tools for identifying novel tumor antigens ... tumor specific antigens ). Subsequently, the cells were washed extensively with PBS to remove unbound phage and then incubated at 37°C for 15 minutes... detection and isolation of a tumor cell surface antigen using antibody phage display. J. Immunol. Meth. 203: 11-24. 46. Watters, J.M., Telleman, P.,

  5. IMMORTALIZATION OF HUMAN AND RHESUS MACAQUE PRIMARY ANTIGEN-SPECIFIC T CELLS BY RETROVIRALLY TRANSDUCED TELOMERASE REVERSE TRANSCRIPTASE

    PubMed Central

    Barsov, Eugene V.

    2011-01-01

    Human and rhesus macaque primary antigen-specific T cells derived from infected or immunized individuals or animals are a valuable material with which to study cellular immune responses against pathogens and tumors. Antigen-specific T cells can be expanded in vitro but have a finite proliferative life span. After a limited period in culture, primary T cells undergo replicative senescence and stop dividing. This restricts their applicability to short term experiments and complicates their use in adoptive immunotherapy. The proliferative life span of primary human and rhesus macaque T cells can be considerably extended by ectopically expressed human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). Antigen-specific T cells transduced with TERT-expressing retroviral vectors can proliferate and expand in culture for long periods of time while maintaining their primary T cell characteristics including antigen-specific responses. Thus, TERT-immortalized T cells are an important and valuable resource for studying T cell immune responses and, potentially, for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:22048804

  6. Evaluation of a di-O-methylated glycan as a potential antigenic target for the serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis.

    PubMed

    Elefant, G R; Roldán, W H; Seeböck, A; Kosma, P

    2016-04-01

    Serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis is based on the detection of specific IgG antibodies by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using Toxocara larvae excretory-secretory (TES) antigens, but its production is a laborious and time-consuming process being also limited by the availability of adult females of T. canis as source for ova to obtain larvae. Chemical synthesis of the di-O-methylated (DiM) glycan structure found in the TES antigens has provided material for studying the antibody reactivity in a range of mammalian hosts, showing reactivity with human IgM and IgG. In this study, we have evaluated the performance of the DiM glycan against a panel of sera including patients with toxocariasis (n = 60), patients with other helminth infections (n = 75) and healthy individuals (n = 94), showing that DiM is able to detect IgG antibodies with a sensitivity and specificity of 91·7% and 94·7%, respectively, with a very good agreement with the TES antigens (kappa = 0·825). However, cross-reactivity was observed in some sera from patients with ascariasis, hymenolepiasis and fascioliasis. These results show that the DiM glycan could be a promising antigenic tool for the serodiagnosis of human toxocariasis.

  7. Human invariant chain isoform p35 restores thymic selection and antigen presentation in CD74-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Genève, Laetitia; Chemali, Magali; Desjardins, Michel; Labrecque, Nathalie; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2012-10-01

    The invariant chain (Ii) has pleiotropic functions and is a key factor in antigen presentation. Ii associates with major histocompatibility complex class II molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and targets the complex in the endocytic pathway to allow antigenic peptide loading. The human Iip35 isoform includes a cytoplasmic extension containing a di-arginine motif causing ER retention. This minor isoform does not exist in mice and its function in humans has not been thoroughly investigated. We have recently generated transgenic mice expressing Iip35 and these were crossed with Ii-deficient mice to generate animals (Tgp35/mIiKO) expressing exclusively the human isoform. In these mice, we show that Iip35 is expressed in antigen presenting cells and is inducible by interferon gamma (IFN-γ). Despite the low constitutive expression of the protein and some minor differences in the Vβ repertoire of Tgp35/mIiKO mice, Iip35 restored thymic selection of CD4(+) T cells and of invariant natural killer T cells. In vitro functional assays using purified primary macrophages treated with IFN-γ showed that Iip35 allows presentation of an Ii-dependent ovalbumin T-cell epitope. Altogether, our results suggest that Iip35 is functional and does not require co-expression of other isoforms for antigen presentation.

  8. Analysis of the role of human leukocyte antigen class-I genes to understand the etiopathology of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bisu; Banerjee, Sikta; Bera, Nirmal K.; Nayak, Chitta R.; Chaudhuri, Tapas K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia is the paradigmatic illness of psychiatry. The involvement of immunological and immunopathological mechanisms in the etiopathogenesis of schizophrenia has been a matter of research, with recently increasing effort. Aims: In this study, we investigated the incidence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) Class I antigens to understand the role of HLA genes in schizophrenia. Materials and Methods: India born schizophrenic patients in and around Siliguri who attended outpatient department (OPD) of Department of Psychiatry, North Bengal Medical College and Hospital were considered for the present study. After the longitudinal follow up, 50 patients were enrolled for the study. The same number of age, sex and ethnically matched healthy subjects were considered as control. Low resolution polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primer method was applied for typing the HLA antigens. Statistics: The phenotype frequencies were calculated by direct count. χ2 test was done to compare the frequency of each antigen among the patients and control group and it was followed by Fisher's exact test. Relative risk was estimated by using Haldane's method. Results: The result showed that some of the HLA antigens are associated with the schizophrenia and significant increase were observed for HLA A*03 antigen along with the significant decrease for HLA A*25, A*31 and HLA B*51. Conclusions: The study provides the evidence for the possible existence of susceptibility locus for schizophrenia within the HLA region. This preliminary observation may help to understand the etiological basis of this disorder and the study may further strengthen the HLA antigens as the marker for schizophrenia. PMID:19742184

  9. Human peripheral blood leucocyte non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene mouse model of xenogeneic graft-versus-host-like disease and the role of host major histocompatibility complex

    PubMed Central

    King, M A; Covassin, L; Brehm, M A; Racki, W; Pearson, T; Leif, J; Laning, J; Fodor, W; Foreman, O; Burzenski, L; Chase, T H; Gott, B; Rossini, A A; Bortell, R; Shultz, L D; Greiner, D L

    2009-01-01

    Immunodeficient non-obese diabetic (NOD)-severe combined immune-deficient (scid) mice bearing a targeted mutation in the gene encoding the interleukin (IL)-2 receptor gamma chain gene (IL2rγnull) engraft readily with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Here, we report a robust model of xenogeneic graft-versus-host-like disease (GVHD) based on intravenous injection of human PBMC into 2 Gy conditioned NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice. These mice develop xenogeneic GVHD consistently (100%) following injection of as few as 5 × 106 PBMC, regardless of the PBMC donor used. As in human disease, the development of xenogeneic GVHD is highly dependent on expression of host major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules and is associated with severely depressed haematopoiesis. Interrupting the tumour necrosis factor-α signalling cascade with etanercept, a therapeutic drug in clinical trials for the treatment of human GVHD, delays the onset and progression of disease. This model now provides the opportunity to investigate in vivo mechanisms of xenogeneic GVHD as well as to assess the efficacy of therapeutic agents rapidly. PMID:19659776

  10. Production of the second component of complement by human monocytes: stimulation by antigen-activated lymphocytes or lymphokines

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultured in the presence of antigen produced hemolytically active second complement component earlier and in larger amounts than did control cultures of the same cells without antigen. The increased amount of C2 in culture supernates came primarily from the adherent cell population and was due to increased synthesis as demonstrated by inhibition with 10(-4) M cycloheximide. Purified adherent monocytes produced more C2 when exposed to lymphokine-rich supernates from antigen-stimulated lymphocytes than when exposed to control supernates from unstimulated lymphocyte cultures. The increased synthesis of C2, which appeared to be mediated by a lymphokine, was partially inhibited specifically by 0.025 M alpha-L(-) fucose, a sugar which has previously been shown in inhibit the response of macrophages to migration inhibitory factor. PMID:858999

  11. Recombinant measles viruses expressing single or multiple antigens of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) induce cellular and humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Liniger, Matthias; Zuniga, Armando; Morin, Teldja Neige Azzouz; Combardiere, Behazine; Marty, Rene; Wiegand, Marian; Ilter, Orhan; Knuchel, Marlyse; Naim, Hussein Y

    2009-05-26

    Recombinant measles viruses (rMV) based on the live attenuated measles vaccine strain (MVb) expressing antigens of HIV-1 clade B were generated by reverse genetics. Recombinants expressing single or double antigens of HIV-1 (rMV-HIV) were genetically highly stable on human diploid cells. The production process of these viruses was essentially similar to the parental MV strain, yielding comparative end titers. Immunization of tg-mice by different regimens and formulations showed potent humoral and cellular immune responses against MV and HIV antigens. Recombinant MV-HIV expressing Gag protein conferred protective immunity in tg-mice after a high-dose pseudochallenge with recombinant vaccinia virus. In addition, rMV-HIV boosted anti-HIV antibodies, in the presence of pre-existing anti-vector antibodies.

  12. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Targeting by Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells: Bridging the Gap from Preclinical Modeling to Human Studies.

    PubMed

    Rotiroti, Maria Caterina; Arcangeli, Silvia; Casucci, Monica; Perriello, Vincenzo; Bondanza, Attilio; Biondi, Andrea; Tettamanti, Sarah; Biagi, Ettore

    2017-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) still represents an unmet clinical need for adult and pediatric high-risk patients, thus demanding advanced and personalized therapies. In this regard, different targeted immunotherapeutic approaches are available, ranging from naked monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to conjugated and multifunctional mAbs (i.e., BiTEs and DARTs). Recently, researchers have focused their attention on novel techniques of genetic manipulation specifically to redirect cytotoxic T cells endowed with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) toward selected tumor associated antigens. So far, CAR T cells targeting the CD19 antigen expressed by B-cell origin hematological cancers have gained impressive clinical results, leading to the possibility of translating the CAR platform to treat other hematological malignancies such as AML. However, one of the main concerns in the field of AML CAR immunotherapy is the identification of an ideal target cell surface antigen, being highly expressed on tumor cells but minimally present on healthy tissues, together with the design of an anti-AML CAR appropriately balancing efficacy and safety profiles. The current review focuses mainly on AML target antigens and the related immunotherapeutic approaches developed so far, deeply dissecting methods of CAR T cell safety improvements, when designing novel CARs approaching human studies.

  13. Excretory-secretory and somatic antigens in the diagnosis of human filariasis.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, N A; Hussain, R; Ottesen, E A

    1984-06-01

    In order to compare the immunodiagnostic value of excretory-secretory (E-S) antigens derived from adult Brugia malayi worms with somatic antigens derived from adults, microfilariae (Mf) and infective larvae (L3) of these parasites, well defined serum pools from patients with filarial (brugia, bancrofti, loa and perstans) and non-filarial (ascaris, stronglyoides, toxocara, echinococcus, cysticercus and schistosoma) helminth infections were tested against antigens derived from these different life cycle stages of B. malayi in a Staphylococcus aureus radioimmunoprecipitation assay (S. aureus RIA). The adult brugia antigens proved significantly more discriminatory than those of the other parasite stages, with the homologous brugia serum pool also showing greater reactivity to adult than to L3 and Mf antigens. Similar results were obtained when individual sera from patients (rather than serum pools) were tested in the same assay. The most surprising finding was the minimal reactivity seen between the adult filarial antigens and the non-filarial serum pools despite the presence in these pools of strong antibody reactivity with their homologous antigens. The reasons underlying the unexpected specificity of this S. aureus RIA for discriminating among sera from filarial and non-filarial infections were analysed qualitatively by immunoprecipitation techniques. It was found that use of the chloramine-T method for radioiodination resulted in preferential labelling of the low molecular weight (mol. wt) proteins (10-70,000 daltons) in the B. malayi adult somatic antigen and that these antigens were bound primarily by the filarial and not the non-filarial serum pools. These findings suggest that lower mol. wt helminth antigens may show greater species specificity than those with higher mol. wt, and those with higher mol. wt, greater cross-reactivity. If substantiated by further analysis, such results would have important implications for the subsequent isolation of diagnostically

  14. Antigenic Properties and Processing Requirements of 65-Kilodalton Mannoprotein, a Major Antigen Target of Anti-Candida Human T-Cell Response, as Disclosed by Specific Human T-Cell Clones

    PubMed Central

    Nisini, Roberto; Romagnoli, Giulia; Gomez, Maria Jesus; La Valle, Roberto; Torosantucci, Antonella; Mariotti, Sabrina; Teloni, Raffaela; Cassone, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    T-cell-mediated immunity is known to play a central role in the host response to Candida albicans. T-cell clones are useful tools for the exact identification of fungal T-cell epitopes and the processing requirements of C. albicans antigens. We isolated human T-cell clones from an HLA-DRB1*1101 healthy donor by using an antigenic extract (MP-F2) of the fungus. Specific clones were T-cell receptor α/β and CD4+/CD8− and showed a T-helper type 1 cytokine profile (production of gamma interferon and not interleukin-4). The large majority of these clones recognized both the natural (highly glycosylated) and the recombinant (nonglycosylated) 65-kDa mannoprotein (MP65), an MP-F2 minor constituent that was confirmed to be an immunodominant antigen of the human T-cell response. Surprisingly, most of the clones recognized two synthetic peptides of different MP65 regions. However, the peptides shared the amino acid motif IXSXIXXL, which may be envisaged as a motif sequence representing the minimal epitope recognized by these clones. Three clones recognized natural and pronase-treated MP65 but did not detect nonglycosylated, recombinant MP65 or the peptides, suggesting a possible role for polysaccharides in T-cell recognition of C. albicans. Finally, lymphoblastoid B-cell lines were efficient antigen-presenting cells (APC) for recombinant MP65 and peptides but failed to present natural, glycosylated antigens, suggesting that nonprofessional APC might be defective in processing highly glycosylated yeast proteins. In conclusion, this study provides the first characterization of C. albicans-specific human T-cell clones and provides new clues for the definition of the cellular immune response against C. albicans. PMID:11349037

  15. Cell surface phenotype and ultramicroscopic analysis of purified human enterocytes: a possible antigen-presenting cell in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Martín-Villa, J M; Ferre-López, S; López-Suárez, J C; Corell, A; Pérez-Blas, M; Arnaiz-Villena, A

    1997-12-01

    Epithelial cells of the intestine seem to act as antigen-presenting cells to surrounding lymphoid tissue and may be crucial to maintain the pool of peripheral T lymphocytes. The scope of this study was to carry out an immunophenotypic and ultramicroscopic analysis of purified human enterocytes to elucidate their role as antigen-presenting cells, in the immune responses in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. A method has been developed to obtain purified and viable human enterocyte populations, later labeled with relevant monoclonal antibodies directed to leukocyte antigens and subjected to cytofluorometric analysis. Phenotypic analysis revealed the presence of markers common to "classical" antigen-presenting cells (CD14, CD35, CD39, CD43, CD63 and CD64), reinforcing the idea that enterocytes may act as such. Moreover, several integrins (CD11b, CD11c, CD18, CD41a, CD61 and CD29) were also found. CD25 (IL-2 receptor alpha chain) and CD28, characteristic of T cells, were detected on the surface of these cells; this latter finding rises the possibility that enterocytes could be activated by IL-2 and/or via CD28 through binding to its ligands CD80 or CD86. Finally, the presence of CD21, CD32, CD35 and CD64 that may bind immune complexes via Fc or C3, suggests their participation in the metabolism of immune complexes. Furthermore, the finding of a Birbeck's-like granule in the cytoplasm of the cells, shows that enterocytes contain an ultramicroscopic feature previously thought to be characteristic of Langerhans' cells, an antigen-presenting cell. The phenotype detected on the surface of enterocytes, along with their ultramicroscopic characteristics, suggests that they may play an important role in the immune responses elicited in the gut, presenting antigens to surrounding lymphoid cells, and establishing cognate interactions with them.

  16. LEWIS X ANTIGEN MEDIATES ADHESION OF HUMAN BREAST CARCINOMA CELLS TO ACTIVATED ENDOTHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Elola, María Teresa; Capurro, Mariana Isabel; Barrio, María Marcela; Coombs, Peter J.; Taylor, Maureen E.; Drickamer, Kurt; Mordoh, José

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Lewis x (Lex, CD15), also known as SSEA-1 (stage specific embryonic antigen-1), is a trisaccharide with the structure Galβ(1-4)Fucα(1-3)GlcNAc, which is expressed on glycoconjugates in human polymorphonuclear granulocytes and various tumors such as colon and breast carcinoma. We have investigated the role of Lex in the adhesion of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and PMN to human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC) and the effects of two different anti-Lex mAbs (FC-2.15 and MCS-1) on this adhesion. We also analyzed the cytolysis of Lex+-cells induced by anti-Lex mAbs and complement when cells were adhered to the endothelium, and the effect of these antibodies on HUVEC. The results indicate that MCF-7 cells can bind to HUVEC, and that MCS-1 but not FC-2.15 mAb inhibit this interaction. Both mAbs can efficiently lyse MCF-7 cells bound to HUVEC in the presence of complement without damaging endothelial cells. We also found a Lex-dependent PMN interaction with HUVEC. Although both anti-Lex mAbs lysed PMN in suspension and adhered to HUVEC, PMN aggregation was only induced by mAb FC-2.15. Blotting studies revealed that the endothelial scavenger receptor C-type lectin (SRCL), which binds Lex-trisaccharide, interacts with specific glycoproteins of Mr ∼ 28 kD and 10 kD from MCF-7 cells. The interaction between Lex+-cancer cells and vascular endothelium is a potential target for cancer treatment. PMID:16850248

  17. Efficacy of immunotherapy using antigens of Pythium insidiosum in the treatment of vascular pythiosis in humans.

    PubMed

    Wanachiwanawin, Wanchai; Mendoza, Leonel; Visuthisakchai, Sanan; Mutsikapan, Piroon; Sathapatayavongs, Boonmee; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Suwanagool, Parvinee; Manuskiatti, Worapong; Ruangsetakit, Chanian; Ajello, Libero

    2004-09-09

    Human pythiosis is an emerging disease in the tropical, subtropical and temperate regions of the world. It is caused by the straminipilan, fungus-like, aquatic organism Pythium insidiosum. Pythiosis occurs in localized as well as systemic or vascular forms. Most patients with arterial pythiosis usually have underlying hematologic disorders such as thalassemia and aplastic anemia/paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) syndrome. Vascular pythiosis is characterized by ascending blood vessel infections and thrombosis of the major arteries especially those of the lower extremities. When the infection reaches a main artery, the patient usually dies within weeks. Since this pathogen is resistant to most antifungal drugs, immunotherapy was recently used to cure humans and animals with the disease. A modified P. insidiosum-antigen (PIA) formulation had already saved a young boy with life-threatening arterial pythiosis. Here, we report the therapeutic benefits of the PIA in eight patients with vascular pythiosis. Six of them had thalassemia and the other two had PNH. All of the patients had arterial occlusion of the lower limbs. P. insidiosum was isolated and identified by culture and by histopathology. All patients had evidence of active infection when immunotherapy began. After two injections of 100-200 microl of PIA (2.0mg/ml), at a 14-day interval, four patients (50%) had dramatic and complete remission. Two patients showed partial responses to PIA while the other two did not. Clinical responses correlated with the immunological reactions at the site of injection, clearance of the arteries and cytokine production. The latter included the shifting in serum levels of IL4 and IL5 to IL2 suggesting a switching from a T helper 2 (Th2) to a T helper 1 (Th1) subset. Our findings provide further evidence that immunotherapy using PIA is a safe and effective method to treat pythiosis in humans.

  18. Identification of a Nonstructural DNA-Binding Protein (DBP) as an Antigen with Diagnostic Potential for Human Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongli; Wu, Chao; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Vernet, Guy; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei; Hung, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Background Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) have been implicated as important agents in a wide range of human illnesses. To date, 58 distinct HAdV serotypes have been identified and can be grouped into six species. For the immunological diagnosis of adenoviruses, the hexon protein, a structural protein, has been used. The potential of other HAdV proteins has not been fully addressed. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, a nonstructural antigenic protein, the DNA binding protein (DBP) of human adenovirus 5 and 35 (Ad5, Ad35) - was identified using immunoproteomic technology. The expression of Ad5 and Ad35 DBP in insect cells could be detected by rhesus monkey serum antibodies and healthy adult human serum positive for Ad5 and Ad35. Recombinant DBPs elicited high titer antibodies in mice. Their conserved domain displayed immunological cross-reactions with heterologous DBP antibodies in Western blot assays. DBP-IgM ELISA showed higher sensitivity adenovirus IgM detection than the commercial Adenovirus IgM Human ELISA Kit. A Western blot method developed based on Ad5 DBP was highly consistent with (χ2 =  44.9, P<0.01) the Western blot assay for the hexon protein in the detection of IgG, but proved even more sensitive. Conclusions/Significance The HAdV nonstructural protein DBP is an antigenic protein that could serve as an alternative common antigen for adenovirus diagnosis. PMID:23516396

  19. Breadth of humoral response and antigenic targets of sporozoite-inhibitory antibodies associated with sterile protection induced by controlled human malaria infection

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Kaitian; Goh, Yun Shan; Siau, Anthony; Franetich, Jean-François; Chia, Wan Ni; Ong, Alice Soh Meoy; Malleret, Benoit; Wu, Ying Ying; Snounou, Georges; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; Adams, John H.; Mazier, Dominique; Preiser, Peter R.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Grüner, Anne-Charlotte; Rénia, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    The development of an effective malaria vaccine has remained elusive even until today. This is due to our incomplete understanding of the immune mechanisms that confer and/or correlate with protection. Human volunteers have been protected experimentally from a subsequent challenge by immunization with Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites under drug cover. Here, we demonstrate that sera from the protected individuals contain neutralizing antibodies against the pre erythrocytic stage. To identify the antigen(s) recognized by these antibodies, a newly developed library of P. falciparum antigens was screened with the neutralizing sera. Antibodies from protected individuals recognized a broad antigenic repertoire of which three antigens, PfMAEBL, PfTRAP and PfSEA1 were recognized by most protected individuals. As a proof of principle, we demonstrated that anti-PfMAEBL antibodies block liver stage development in human hepatocytes. Thus, these antigens identified are promising targets for vaccine development against malaria. PMID:27130708

  20. Leucocyte adhesion deficiency presenting as a chronic ileocolitis.

    PubMed Central

    D'Agata, I D; Paradis, K; Chad, Z; Bonny, Y; Seidman, E

    1996-01-01

    CD11/CD18 leucocyte glycoprotein deficiency is a rare, congenital adhesion molecule disorder which, in its severe form, is usually fatal. Leucocytes in affected subjects have abnormal migration and adherence, rendering patients susceptible to life threatening infections. The CD11/CD18 integrins, and other adhesion molecules, are considered essential to the normal inflammatory response. It has been postulated that adhesion molecules may be responsible for mediating in part, the inflammatory changes observed in inflammatory bowel diseases and related disorders. This report describes the first case of CD11/CD18 deficiency characterised by a chronic ileocolitis. Bone marrow transplantation completely resolved the gastrointestinal symptoms, supporting a role for neutrophil dysfunction in the pathogenesis of the gut lesions. This case suggests that specific blockade of CD11/CD18 integrins alone may not halt the chronic inflammatory response observed in immune mediated bowel disorders, and that abnormalities of leucocyte function must be included in the differential diagnosis of paediatric Crohn's disease. Images p606-a PMID:8944573

  1. Linear antigenic regions of the structural proteins of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays using synthetic peptides as antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Washitani, Y; Kuroda, N; Shiraki, H; Itoyama, Y; Sato, H; Ohshima, K; Kiyokawa, H; Maeda, Y

    1992-01-01

    We synthesized 46 sequential peptides 21 to 39 amino acids long over the structural protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I; the p19 and p24 gag protein and the gp46 and p20E env proteins) and tested their reactivities against antibodies in sera from HTLV-I healthy carriers and patients diagnosed as having human T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATLL) and myelopathy (HAM) by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Of the 46 synthetic peptides, 18 peptides (2 corresponding to the p19 gag protein, 2 corresponding to the p24 gag protein, 8 corresponding to the gp46 env protein, and 6 corresponding to the p20E env protein) reacted with antibodies in the sera from HTLV-I healthy carriers. In particular, the peptides comprising amino acids 100 to 119 and 119 to 130 of the gag and 175 to 199, 213 to 236, 253 to 282, and 288 to 317 of the env proteins reacted with antibodies in sera from more than 30% of HTLV-I healthy carriers. These peptides also showed high reactivities to the antibodies in the sera from patients with ATLL and HAM. The results indicate that the predominant antigenic regions of the structural protein of HTLV-I were located at the C-terminal end of the p19 gag protein and the C-terminal half of the gp46 env protein, and the corresponding peptides proved to be useful antigens in detecting antibodies in the sera from individuals infected with HTLV-I. PMID:1537894

  2. Role of interleukin 8 on leucocyte-endothelial cell adhesion in intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, H; Bolanowski, M A; Granger, D N

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An important action of interleukin 8 (IL8) is stimulation of granulocytes. The object of this study was to assess the contribution of IL8 to the leucocyte-endothelial cell interactions associated with intestinal inflammation in the rat. METHODS: Two indomethacin injections (48 and 24 hours prior to the experiments) induced a longlasting ileitis in rats. The number of adherent and emigrated leucocytes, leucocyte rolling velocity, and shear rate were monitored in normal and inflamed mesenteric postcapillary venules. Some animals received a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against IL8 or CD11b/CD18 at 24 and 12 hours prior to the experiment. RESULTS: Indomethacin elicited a seven-fold increase in leucocyte adherence and a 5.4-fold increase in leucocyte emigration, while leucocyte rolling velocity was reduced by nearly 80%. The indomethacin induced increases in leucocyte adherence and emigration were significantly reduced (by 57% and 67%, respectively) while leucocyte rolling velocity was increased (to 63% of control) by the IL8-specific MAb. The level of inhibition seen with the IL8 MAb was similar to that associated with administration of a MAb directed against the leucocyte adhesion molecule CD11b/CD18. CONCLUSIONS: IL8 contributes to the leucocyte-endothelial cell interactions elicited in mesenteric venules by indomethacin. PMID:8984032

  3. Engineered Human Ferritin Nanoparticles for Direct Delivery of Tumor Antigens to Lymph Node and Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bo-Ram; Ko, Ho Kyung; Ryu, Ju Hee; Ahn, Keum Young; Lee, Young-Ho; Oh, Se Jin; Na, Jin Hee; Kim, Tae Woo; Byun, Youngro; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Jeewon

    2016-01-01

    Efficient delivery of tumor-specific antigens (TSAs) to lymph nodes (LNs) is essential to eliciting robust immune response for cancer immunotherapy but still remains unsolved. Herein, we evaluated the direct LN-targeting performance of four different protein nanoparticles with different size, shape, and origin [Escherichia coli DNA binding protein (DPS), Thermoplasma acidophilum proteasome (PTS), hepatitis B virus capsid (HBVC), and human ferritin heavy chain (hFTN)] in live mice, using an optical fluorescence imaging system. Based on the imaging results, hFTN that shows rapid LN targeting and prolonged retention in LNs was chosen as a carrier of the model TSA [red fluorescence protein (RFP)], and the flexible surface architecture of hFTN was engineered to densely present RFPs on the hFTN surface through genetic modification of subunit protein of hFTN. The RFP-modified hFTN rapidly targeted LNs, sufficiently exposed RFPs to LN immune cells during prolonged period of retention in LNs, induced strong RFP-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cell response, and notably inhibited RFP-expressing melanoma tumor growth in live mice. This suggests that the strategy using protein nanoparticles as both TSA-carrying scaffold and anti-cancer vaccine holds promise for clinically effective immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:27725782

  4. Characterization of X-ray-induced immunostaining of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in human diploid fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Masahiko; Sasaki, Takehito; Takasaki, Yoshinari

    1996-01-01

    The repair of X-ray-induced DNA damage related to the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was characterized in human diploid fibroblasts by an indirect immunofluorescence method. PCNA staining induced by X rays was lost after DNase I treatment but not after RNase treatment. The staining was not induced when ATP was depleted or the temperature was lowered to 0{degrees}C during the X irradiation. When cells were incubated at 37{degrees}C after X irradiation, PCNA staining diminished gradually and was almost entirely absent 12-15 h later. On the other hand, PCNA staining persisted during aphidicolin treatment even 20 h after X irradiation. Induction of PCNA staining was not affected by the aphidicolin treatment. Cycloheximide treatment did not affect induction of the staining either, but did inhibit the disappearance of the staining. There was no difference in the staining pattern and time course of PCNA staining after X irradiation between normal and xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XP-A) cells. These results imply that PCNA-dependent, aphidicolin-sensitive DNA polymerases may be involved in repair of X-ray-induced DNA damage in vivo, but the repair initiation step could be different from that of nucleotide excision repair initiated by XP proteins. 39 refs., 6 figs.

  5. sup 131 I-anticarcinoembryonic antigen therapy of LS174T human colon adenocarcinoma spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Langmuir, V.K.; McGann, J.K.; Buchegger, F.; Sutherland, R.M. )

    1989-06-15

    LS174T human colon adenocarcinoma multicell spheroids were used to study the radiobiological aspects of radioimmunotherapy. The spheroids were incubated in 131I-anticarcinoembryonic antigen (B7) at an antibody concentration of 0.5 microgram/ml and at 131I concentrations of 2.5 and 7.5 microCi/ml. After incubation times of 90 h, clonogenic cells per spheroid were reduced by 1400-fold and 23-fold at the high and low 131I concentrations, respectively. 131I Nonspecific antibody (PX63) resulted in 2- and 1.2-fold reductions. Spheroid diameter was not significantly affected by therapy but histological examination revealed that there had been a significant reduction in the cell density, particularly near the spheroid surface. Using a theoretical model to estimate radiation dose, a radiation survival curve was constructed. The resulting curve was somewhat concave suggesting the presence of a resistant population of cells. It is likely that this observation is primarily due to the fact that the inner cells received a lower dose than the outer cells. A population of radiobiologically hypoxic cells in the inner portion of the spheroids may also have contributed to the decreasing slope of the curve as well as ongoing cell division leading to new cells which receive a lower radiation dose per cell cycle. Because of the ability to estimate radiation dose for a given biological effect, these types of experiments may allow predictions of the efficacy of radiolabeled antibody therapy for micrometastatic disease.

  6. The enterobacterial common antigen-like gene cluster of Haemophilus ducreyi contributes to virulence in humans.

    PubMed

    Banks, Keith E; Fortney, Kate R; Baker, Beth; Billings, Steven D; Katz, Barry P; Munson, Robert S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2008-06-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi 35000HP contains a cluster of homologues of genes required for the synthesis of enterobacterial common antigen (ECA), suggesting that H. ducreyi may express a putative ECA-like glycoconjugate. WecA initiates the synthesis of ECA by transferring N-acetylglucosamine to undecaprenyl-P, to form lipid I. A wecA mutant (35000HPwecA) was constructed, and 5 volunteers were inoculated at 3 sites with fixed doses of 35000HP on one arm and at 3 sites with varying doses of 35000HPwecA on the other arm. 35000HPwecA caused pustules to form at 3 sites inoculated with a dose 2.5-fold higher than that of 35000HP. However, at sites inoculated with similar doses of 35000HP and 35000HPwecA, pustules developed at 46.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 23.3%-70.0%) of 15 parent-strain sites and at 8.3% (95% CI, 0.01%-23.6%) of 12 mutant-strain sites (P = .013). Thus, the expression of wecA contributes to the ability of H. ducreyi to cause pustules in humans.

  7. Meta-Analysis of the Association between Vitiligo and Human Leukocyte Antigen-A

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jianwen; Niu, Xinwu; Xu, Qingqiang; Wang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Yale

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to systematically evaluate the association between vitiligo and human leukocyte antigen- (HLA-) A. Methods. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and reference lists were searched for relevant original articles. Results. Nineteen case-control studies comprising 3042 patients and 5614 controls were included, in which 33 HLA-A alleles were reported. Overall, three alleles (HLA-A⁎02, A⁎33, and Aw⁎31) were significantly associated with increased risk of vitiligo, two (HLA-A⁎09 and Aw⁎19) were associated with decreased risk, and the remaining 28 were unassociated. Twelve alleles, seven alleles, and 19 alleles were common to three ethnicities, both types of vitiligo, and both typing methods, respectively. In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity and typing methods, the association of six alleles and five alleles was inconsistent in three populations and both typing methods, respectively. In the subgroup analysis by clinical type, the association of all seven alleles was consistent in both types of vitiligo. Conclusion. The meta-analysis suggests that HLA-A⁎02, A⁎33, and Aw⁎31 are associated with increased risk of vitiligo, while HLA-A⁎09 and Aw⁎19 are associated with decreased risk of vitiligo. The association of some alleles varies in terms of ethnicity and typing methods. PMID:27689083

  8. Genetic screening for human leukocyte antigen alleles prior to carbamazepine treatment.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jeremy C K; Murrell, Dedee F; Hersch, Mark I

    2015-12-01

    We describe a 28-year-old Malaysian Australian man of Han Chinese descent with toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), occurring 2 weeks after commencing carbamazepine. He was subsequently found to be positive for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*1502. Carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome/TEN is strongly associated with the HLA-B*1502 allele, which is highly prevalent in Han Chinese, Malay, Thai and Indian populations. Prospective screening for the allele may prevent this cutaneous adverse drug reaction from occurring, but many neurologists and other medical practitioners are still unaware of the medico-legal risks of prescribing carbamazepine in susceptible populations and the availability of HLA-B*1502 testing. Performing HLA-B*1502 genotyping and avoiding carbamazepine in at-risk individuals has been proven to decrease incidences of drug-induced TEN. This test is widely available at most large pathology services in Australia, with results available within 2 weeks. The recommendation by regulatory bodies should be strengthened to ensure that the broad medical community is made more aware of this pertinent issue.

  9. Reduced Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Protection in Gulf War Illness (GWI)

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulos, Apostolos P.; James, Lisa M.; Mahan, Margaret Y.; Joseph, Jasmine; Georgopoulos, Angeliki; Engdahl, Brian E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gulf War Illness (GWI) is a disease of unknown etiology with symptoms suggesting the involvement of an immune process. Here we tested the hypothesis that Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) composition might differ between veterans with and without GWI. Methods We identified 144 unique alleles of Class I and II HLA genes in 82 veterans (66 with and 16 without GWI). We tested the hypothesis that a subset of HLA alleles may classify veterans in their respective group using a stepwise linear discriminant analysis. In addition, each participant rated symptom severity in 6 domains according to established GWI criteria, and an overall symptom severity was calculated. Findings We found 6 Class II alleles that classified participants 84.1% correctly (13/16 control and 56/66 GWI). The number of copies of the 6 alleles was significantly higher in the control group, suggesting a protective role. This was supported by a significant negative dependence of overall symptom severity on the number of allele copies, such that symptom severity was lower in participants with larger numbers of allele copies. Interpretation These results indicate a reduced HLA protection (i.e. genetic susceptibility) in veterans with GWI. Funding University of Minnesota and U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. PMID:26870819

  10. Human platelet antigen genotyping using a fluorescent SSCP technique with an automatic sequencer.

    PubMed

    Quintanar, A; Jallu, V; Legros, Y; Kaplan, C

    1998-11-01

    The typing of human platelet antigens (HPA) can be useful in many clinical situations such as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, post-transfusion purpura, and platelet transfusion refractoriness. The fluorescent-based single-strand conformation polymorphism (F-SSCP) technique is a fast and convenient way to perform HPA genotyping. Universal sequences from phage M13 were introduced at both ends of specific PCR-products by using 5'-tailed primers. A short second round of PCR with universal primers coupled to Cy-5 enabled the PCR-products to be fluorescently labelled. F-SSCP was performed by gel electrophoresis on an automated fluorescent DNA analyser. Genotyping of the three major HPA systems carried by the GP IIb-IIIa complex showed the F-SSCP technique to be accurate and reliable. A single gel procedure has been sufficient to detect HPA genetic polymorphisms tested to date. Neither restriction enzyme, radioactive material, nor any other hazardous chemicals such as ethidium bromide were required. This technique enabled us to genotype HPA-1, -3 and -4 alleles easily and to diagnose materno-fetal incompatibility in a rare alloantigenic system. F-SSCP is a promising technique for the detection of new mutations and/or DNA polymorphisms on a large scale.

  11. Genomic organization of the human T-cell antigen-receptor alpha/delta locus.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, K; Hata, S; Devlin, P; Roncarolo, M G; De Vries, J E; Spits, H; Strominger, J L; Krangel, M S

    1988-11-01

    Two clusters of overlapping cosmid clones comprising about 100 kilobases (kb) at the human T-cell antigen-receptor alpha/delta locus were isolated from a genomic library. The structure of the germ-line V delta 1 variable gene segment was determined. V delta 1 is located 8.5 kb downstream of the V alpha 13.1 gene segment, and both V segments are arranged in the same transcriptional orientation. The V alpha 17.1 segment is located between V delta 1 and the D delta, J delta, C delta region (containing the diversity, joining, and constant gene segments). Thus, V delta and V alpha segments are interspersed along the chromosome. The germ-line organization of the D delta 2, J delta 1, and J delta 2 segments was determined. Linkage of C delta to the J alpha region was established by identification of J alpha segments within 20 kb downstream of C delta. The organization of the locus was also analyzed by field-inversion gel electrophoresis. The unrearranged V delta 1 and D delta, J delta, C delta regions are quite distant from each other, apparently separated by a minimum of 175-180 kb.

  12. Maturation of human B lymphocytes--studies with a panel of monoclonal antibodies against membrane antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Zola, H; McNamara, P J; Moore, H A; Smart, I J; Brooks, D A; Beckman, I G; Bradley, J

    1983-01-01

    The expression of six different membrane markers by cells of the human B lymphocyte lineage has been studied, using monoclonal antibodies. B cells representing various stages of differentiation/maturation have been examined, using normal cells, leukaemia cells, and continuous cell lines. The expression of the six markers has been compared with maturation stages defined by immunoglobulin expression. The HLA/beta 2-microglobulin complex is present throughout the B cell lineage, whilst the Ia (p28,33) marker is present from the earliest stage that can be attributed to the B lineage, but is lost during plasma cell differentiation. A marker detected by monoclonal antibody FMC 1 is present only on mature B lymphocytes, being absent from pre-B cells or plasma cells. FMC 7 detects an antigen found on a relatively mature subpopulation, whereas FMC 8 detects early as well as mature B cells. FMC 3 expression is found on a proportion of cells at any maturation stage, suggesting that expression of this marker is controlled by factors unrelated to maturation. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6191892

  13. Characterization of two distinct antigens expressed on either resting or activated human B cells as defined by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Kokai, Y; Ishii, Y; Kikuchi, K

    1986-01-01

    Two antigen systems (L29 & L30) expressed on two distinct human B cell subpopulations were identified by using BL1-4D6 and TB3-7D5 monoclonal antibodies, respectively. L29 was expressed on approximately one-third of B cells in human lymphoid tissues. These B cells associated with L29 were large activated B cells located in the germinal centres of lymphoid follicles. L30, on the other hand, existed on approximately two-thirds of B cells mainly located in the mantle zone of lymphoid follicles, most of which also expressed IgM and IgD on their cell membrane. In addition, L30 was shared on mature granulocytes. With the use of polyclonal activators such as pokeweek mitogen (PWM) and protein A-bearing staphylococci (SAC), L29 antigen was inducible on PWM- or SAC-stimulated B cells in correspondence with the emergence of Tac and T10 antigens of these B cells. In contrast, L30 antigen on the B cells stimulated by the polyclonal activators was decreased in its expression and was finally lost from these B cells. Although none of L29 and L30 was expressed on normal, non-activated human thymus and peripheral T cells, L29 but not L30 was expressed on concanavalin A-activated T cells. Immunochemical studies showed that L30 consist of a single polypeptide with mol. wt of 40,000. L29 antigen is presently under study. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:3527505

  14. Isolation of various canine leucocytes and their characterization by surface marker analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, C K; Babiuk, L A

    1978-01-01

    Various techniques were used to separate canine peripheral blood leucocytes into populations enriched in lymphocytes, polymorphonuclear leucocytes, phagocytic mononuclear cells (monocytes) and macrophages. Surface markers on each cell population were determined by rosette formation. Fc receptors for IgG and complement receptors (C3b and C3d) were present on PMN, monocytes, macrophages as well as on a sub-population of lymphocytes. Purification of the lymphocytes into T-and B-cell-enriched populations revealed that these receptors were present only on the B lymphocytes and not on the T lymphocytes. In addition, a third lymphocyte population, which did not possess surface immunoglobulin, and Fc receptor but not the complement receptor. None of the cell populations exhibited C4 complement receptors or Fc receptors for IgM. When different cell populations were tested for their ability to form rosettes directly with human type 'O' red blood cells it was found that most populations could rosette, suggesting that this technique could not be used as a specific marker for canine T lymphocytes. PMID:309854

  15. Association of human leukocyte A, B, and DR antigens in Colombian patients with diagnosis of spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ana M; Peña, Paola; Avila, Mabel; Briceño, Ignacio; Jaramillo, Carlos; Vargas-Alarcon, Gilberto; Rueda, Juan C; Saldarriaga, Eugenia-Lucia; Angarita, Jose-Ignacio; Martinez-Rodriguez, Nancy; Londono, John

    2017-04-01

    There is substantial evidence that non-B27 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are associated with spondyloarthritis (SpA). Studies in Mexican and Tunisian populations demonstrated the association of SpA and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B15. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of HLA-A, B, and DR antigens in a group of Colombian patients with a diagnosis of SpA. A total of 189 patients and 100 healthy subjects were included in the present study. All subjects underwent a complete characterization of HLA alleles A, B, and DR. Of the 189 studied patients, 35 were reactive arthritis (ReA), 87 were ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and 67 undifferentiated SpA (uSpA). According to the Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society (ASAS) criteria, 167 were axial SpA (axSpA) and 171 were peripheral SpA (pSpA). 63.8% were men, with a mean age of 35.9 ± 12.7 years. 40.7% (77/189) of patients were HLA-B27 positive of which 52.9% had AS and 42.5% axSpA. 23.2% (44/189) of patients were HLA-B15 positive: 23.8% were uSpA, 12.57% were axSpA, and 11.7% were pSpA. In addition, HLA-DRB1*01 was associated with AS (58.6%) and axSpA (42.5%). Also, HLA-DRB1*04 was present in 62 patients with AS (71.2%) and in 26 with axSpA (15.5%). In this population, we found a strong association between the presence of HLA-B27 and the diagnosis of axSpA and AS, but the HLA-B15 is also significantly associated with all subtypes of the disease, predominantly with pSpA. Additionally, HLA-DR1 and DR4 were associated in a cohort of patients with SpA from Colombia.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to human growth hormone induce an allosteric conformational change in the antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, M M; Retegui, L A

    1989-01-01

    We re-investigated the properties of a monoclonal antibody (mAb), 4D11, to human growth hormone (hGH) that showed a very weak affinity, recognizing hGH only when the hormone was solubilized on a solid surface. MAb4D11 did not significantly bind 125I-hGH. It was found that three mAb directed to different hGH epitopes (mAb 3C11, 10C1 and NA71) were able to induce the binding of the soluble antigen to mAb 4D11. The co-operative effect could be demonstrated by the formation of binary complexes (Ag:Ab, 1:2) detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and by the increase of radioactivity found when the synergistic mAb were added to 125I-hGH incubated with mAb 4D11 immobilized on polyvinyl microplates. Other possible explanations, such as the formation of cyclic complexes or the generation of a new epitope in the Fc fragment of the first antibody (Ab), were dismissed because the Fab fragment of one of the enhancing mAb (3C11) gave the same effect as the intact Ab. The data suggest that the hGH molecule undergoes a localized conformational change after binding to mAb 3C11, NA71 or 10C1 and that mAb 4D11 binds with high affinity to the modified region of the hormone. The formation or not of ternary complexes (Ag:Ab, 1:3) was used to localize the 4D11 epitope on the surface of the Ag. It is suggested that mAb 4D11 recognizes a conformational change produced in the region defined by the AE5/AC8 epitopes, which is close to the hGH antigenic domain only expressed when the protein is immobilized on plastic surfaces. PMID:2473953

  17. Porcine rotaviruses antigenically related to human rotavirus serotypes 1 and 2.

    PubMed Central

    Bellinzoni, R B; Mattion, N M; Matson, D O; Blackhall, J; La Torre, J L; Scodeller, E A; Urasawa, S; Taniguchi, K; Estes, M K

    1990-01-01

    Fecal samples from rotavirus-infected piglets were characterized by a serotyping enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) by using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to human serotypes 1, 2, 3, and 4 (D. O. Matson, M. K. Estes, J. W. Burns, H. B. Greenberg, K. Taniguchi, and S. Urasawa, submitted for publication). Rotavirus in 19 of 25 specimens tested from two herds of pigs from Buenos Aires province, Argentina, were classified antigenically as follows: one serotype 1, four serotype 2, two serotype 3, and no serotype 4. Six specimens reacted with both serotype 1 and 2 MAbs, and viruses in six specimens probably belonged to other serotypes because they reacted only with a VP7 common epitope MAb. Two porcine rotavirus fecal samples found to contain both serotype 1 and 2 viruses by the MAb-based test and one found to contain a serotype 2 virus were grown in tissue culture. When plaque-purified preparations of these tissue culture-adapted viruses were analyzed in the serotyping ELISA, the C60 and C86 preparations reacted only as serotype 1 viruses, indicating that the original fecal samples, which showed multiple VP7 reactivities, were heterogeneous and apparently contained two types of viruses. Testing of plaque-purified C134 virus confirmed its serotype 2 reactivity. The MAb-based serotype designations of these viruses also were confirmed by using a neutralization immunoperoxidase focus reduction assay. This is the first report of the occurrence of serotype 1 and 2 rotaviruses in animals. The MAbs originally developed to serotype human rotaviruses can be utilized to type animal rotaviruses. PMID:2157739

  18. Animal and human antibodies to distinct Staphylococcus aureus antigens mutually neutralize opsonic killing and protection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Skurnik, David; Merighi, Massimo; Grout, Martha; Gadjeva, Mihaela; Maira-Litran, Tomas; Ericsson, Maria; Goldmann, Donald A.; Huang, Susan S.; Datta, Rupak; Lee, Jean C.; Pier, Gerald B.

    2010-01-01

    New prophylactic approaches are needed to control infection with the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, which is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections. To develop these, greater understanding of protective immunity against S. aureus infection is needed. Human immunity to extracellular Gram-positive bacterial pathogens is primarily mediated by opsonic killing (OPK) via antibodies specific for surface polysaccharides. S. aureus expresses two such antigens, capsular polysaccharide (CP) and poly-N-acetyl glucosamine (PNAG). Here, we have shown that immunization-induced polyclonal animal antisera and monoclonal antibodies specific for either CP or PNAG antigens have excellent in vitro OPK activity in human blood but that when mixed together they show potent interference in OPK activity. In addition, reductions in antibody binding to the bacterial surface, complement deposition, and passive protection were seen in two mouse models of S. aureus infection. Electron microscopy, isothermal calorimetry, and surface plasmon resonance indicated that antibodies to CP and PNAG bound together via an apparent idiotype–anti-idiotype interaction. This interaction was also found in sera from humans with S. aureus bacteremia. These findings suggest that the lack of effective immunity to S. aureus infections in humans could be due, in part, to interference in OPK when antibodies to CP and PNAG antigens are both present. This information could be used to better design S. aureus vaccine components. PMID:20739753

  19. Spike Protein VP8* of Human Rotavirus Recognizes Histo-Blood Group Antigens in a Type-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pengwei; Xia, Ming; Zhong, Weiming; Wei, Chao; Wang, Leyi; Morrow, Ardythe

    2012-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs), an important cause of severe diarrhea in children, have been found to recognize sialic acid as receptors for host cell attachment. While a few animal RVs (of P[1], P[2], P[3], and P[7]) are sialidase sensitive, human RVs and the majority of animal RVs are sialidase insensitive. In this study, we demonstrated that the surface spike protein VP8* of the major P genotypes of human RVs interacts with the secretor histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). Strains of the P[4] and P[8] genotypes shared reactivity with the common antigens of Lewis b (Leb) and H type 1, while strains of the P[6] genotype bound the H type 1 antigen only. The bindings between recombinant VP8* and human saliva, milk, or synthetic HBGA oligosaccharides were demonstrated, which was confirmed by blockade of the bindings by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to Leb and/or H type 1. In addition, specific binding activities were observed when triple-layered particles of a P[8] (Wa) RV were tested. Our results suggest that the spike protein VP8* of RVs is involved in the recognition of human HBGAs that may function as ligands or receptors for RV attachment to host cells. PMID:22345472

  20. Effects of reduced temperature on the components of human lymphocyte transformation responses to antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Lettau, L A; Sohnle, P G

    1982-01-01

    The present studies were designed to determine the site at which reduced temperature, such as that found at the skin surface, affects the lymphocyte transformation response to an antigenic stimulus. Extracts of Candida albicans and Pityrosporum orbiculare were used as antigens since most normal subjects demonstrate positive lymphocyte responses to both. Total lymphocyte transformation responses to both antigens were reduced and delayed at 34.5 as compared with 37 degrees C. The former temperature did not significantly affect the numbers of antigen-responsive cells, as estimated by limiting dilution analysis. However, the response of first-generation lymphocytes to both antigens was significantly reduced at the lower temperature. There did not seem to be any significant differences between the two antigens with respect to the effects of the reduced temperature on the resulting lymphocyte transformation response or its components. Therefore, the present data suggest that reduced temperature suppresses antigen-stimulated lymphocyte transformation by affecting the later stages of this response. PMID:7049948

  1. Isolation and characterization of recombinant antigens from Leishmania aethiopica that react with human antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Osland, A; Beyene, D; Ashenafi, S; Beetsma, A

    1992-01-01

    A genomic expression library of Leishmania aethiopica was constructed in lambda gt11 and screened with patient sera and sera from healthy people living in an area of endemicity. Forty-five recombinant clones were isolated and partly characterized. Clone-specific antibodies were prepared and used with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western immunoblot analysis to estimate the molecular masses of the parasite-derived antigens containing the reactive epitope(s). Antigens with apparent molecular masses of 90, 85, 63, 50, 41, 25 and 24 kDa as well as several antigens with lower molecular masses were detected. The clone-specific antibodies from patients with diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis reacted with high-molecular-weight antigens (30,000 less than Mr less than 90,000), whereas antibodies from patients with localized cutaneous leishmaniasis recognized low-molecular-weight antigens (Mr less than 25,000). Nine different purified recombinant antigens were obtained from lysogens in Escherichia coli Y1089 by immunoaffinity chromatography on anti-beta-galactosidase columns and were subsequently tested with patient sera. It is suggested that some of these recombinant antigens might be used for immunodiagnostic purposes. Images PMID:1372294

  2. The Challenge of Producing Skin Test Antigens with Minimal Resources Suitable for Human Application against a Neglected Tropical Disease; Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Rivoire, Becky L.; TerLouw, Stephen; Groathouse, Nathan A.; Brennan, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    True incidence of leprosy and its impact on transmission will not be understood until a tool is available to measure pre-symptomatic infection. Diagnosis of leprosy disease is currently based on clinical symptoms, which on average take 3–10 years to manifest. The fact that incidence, as defined by new case detection, equates with prevalence, i.e., registered cases, suggests that the cycle of transmission has not been fully intercepted by implementation of multiple drug therapy. This is supported by a high incidence of childhood leprosy. Epidemiological screening for pre-symptomatic leprosy in large endemic populations is required to facilitate targeted chemoprophylactic interventions. Such a test must be sensitive, specific, simple to administer, cost-effective, and easy to interpret. The intradermal skin test method that measures cell-mediated immunity was explored as the best option. Prior knowledge on skin testing of healthy subjects and leprosy patients with whole or partially fractionated Mycobacterium leprae bacilli, such as Lepromin or the Rees' or Convit' antigens, has established an acceptable safety and potency profile of these antigens. These data, along with immunoreactivity data, laid the foundation for two new leprosy skin test antigens, MLSA-LAM (M. leprae soluble antigen devoid of mycobacterial lipoglycans, primarily lipoarabinomannan) and MLCwA (M. leprae cell wall antigens). In the absence of commercial interest, the challenge was to develop these antigens under current good manufacturing practices in an acceptable local pilot facility and submit an Investigational New Drug to the Food and Drug Administration to allow a first-in-human phase I clinical trial. PMID:24874086

  3. In vitro effects of prostaglandin E2 on leucocytes from sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) infected and not infected with the cestode Schistocephalus solidus.

    PubMed

    Kutyrev, Ivan A; Franke, Frederik; Büscher, Janine; Kurtz, Joachim; Scharsack, Jörn P

    2014-12-01

    Many helminth parasites have evolved strategies to evade the immune response of their hosts, which includes immunomodulation. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is one of the best-described immunomodulators in mammalian helminth parasite infections. We hypothesized that also in teleost fish anti-helminthic immune responses are regulated via PGE2. We used a model system consisting of the tapeworm Schistocephalus solidus and its host, the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), to investigate in vitro effects of PGE2 on head kidney leucocytes (HKL) derived from sticklebacks that were experimentally infected with S. solidus. PGE2 was tested alone or in combination with either S. solidus antigens or bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS). After in vitro culture, cell viability and changes in leucocyte subpopulations (granulocytes to lymphocytes ratios) were monitored by flow cytometry and HKL were tested for their capacity to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) with a chemiluminescence assay. In short term (2 h) HKL cultures PGE2 did not change the total numbers of live HKL, but the production of ROS decreased significantly with high (0.1 μmol L(-1)) PGE2 concentrations. In long-term (96 h) cultures high PGE2 concentrations induced a sharp decrease of leucocytes viability, while low (0.1 pmol L(-1)) and intermediate (0.1 nmol L(-1)) concentrations of PGE2 caused elevated leucocyte viability compared to controls. This coincided with reduced ROS production in cultures with high PGE2 and elevated ROS production in cultures with low PGE2. Granulocyte to lymphocyte ratios increased with high PGE2 concentrations alone and in combination with S. solidus antigens and LPS, most prominently with HKL from S. solidus infected sticklebacks. The present study supports the hypothesis that PGE2 might be an immunomodulator in tapeworm-fish parasite-host interactions.

  4. Identification of an antigenic domain in the N-terminal region of avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) capsid protein that is not common to swine and human HEVs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lizhen; Sun, Yani; Du, Taofeng; Wang, Chengbao; Xiao, Shuqi; Mu, Yang; Zhang, Gaiping; Liu, Lihong; Widén, Frederik; Hsu, Walter H; Zhao, Qin; Zhou, En-Min

    2014-12-01

    The antigenic domains located in the C-terminal 268 amino acid residues of avian hepatitis E virus (HEV) capsid protein have been characterized. This region shares common epitopes with swine and human HEVs. However, epitopes in the N-terminal 338 amino acid residues have never been reported. In this study, an antigenic domain located between amino acids 23 and 85 was identified by indirect ELISA using the truncated recombinant capsid proteins as coating antigens and anti-avian HEV chicken sera as primary antibodies. In addition, this domain did not react with anti-swine and human HEV sera. These results indicated that the N-terminal 338 amino acid residues of avian HEV capsid protein do not share common epitopes with swine and human HEVs. This finding is important for our understanding of the antigenicity of the avian HEV capsid protein. Furthermore, it has important implications in the selection of viral antigens for serological diagnosis.

  5. Expression of Ia-like antigens by human vascular endothelial cells is inducible in vitro: demonstration by monoclonal antibody binding and immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed Central

    Pober, J S; Gimbrone, M A

    1982-01-01

    The expression of Ia-like antigens by cultured human endothelial cells has been investigated by means of monoclonal antibody binding to intact cells and by immunoprecipitation of radioiodinated membrane proteins. Primary growing and confluent cultures of human umbilical vein endothelium express little, if any, detectable Ia-like antigens under standard culture conditions. However, treatment of primary cultures with the lectin phytohemagglutinin induces the expression of Ia-like antigens. This action of the lectin uniformly affects all the endothelial cells in a culture, does not depend on cell division, and is associated with a cell shape change. The data presented in this report provide unequivocal serological and biochemical demonstration of Ia-like antigens on human vascular endothelial cells. The fact that the expression of Ia-like antigens by endothelium can be induced may have important implications for organ transplantation and for regulation of the immunological response. Images PMID:6815654

  6. Response of in vivo protein synthesis in T lymphocytes and leucocytes to an endotoxin challenge in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Januszkiewicz, A; Loré, K; EsséN, P; Andersson, B; Mcnurlan, M A; Garlick, P J; RingdéN, O; Andersson, J; Wernerman, J

    2002-01-01

    In vivo determination of protein synthesis in immune cells reflects metabolic activity and immunological activation. An intravenous injection of endotoxin to healthy volunteers was used as a human sepsis model, and in vivo protein synthesis of T lymphocytes and leucocytes was measured. The results were related to plasma concentrations of selected cytokines, peripheral cell counts and subpopulations of immune cells. The subjects (n = 8 + 8) were randomized to an endotoxin (4 ng/kg) or a saline group. In vivo protein synthesis was determined twice: before and 1–2·5 h after the endotoxin/saline injection. Protein synthesis decreased in isolated T lymphocytes, but increased in leucocytes. Plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1 ra and IL-10 were elevated, whereas IL-2 and IFN-γ, produced predominantly by T lymphocytes, did not change in response to endotoxin. Neutrophils increased, whereas lymphocytes and monocytes decreased 2·5 h after the endotoxin injection. Flow cytometry revealed a drop in total CD3+ T lymphocytes and CD56+ natural killer cells, accompanied by an increase in CD15+ granulocytes. In summary, in vivo protein synthesis decreased in T lymphocytes, while the total leucocyte population showed a concomitant increase immediately after the endotoxin challenge. The changes in protein synthesis were accompanied by alterations in immune cell subpopulations and in plasma cytokine levels. PMID:12390314

  7. Response of in vivo protein synthesis in T lymphocytes and leucocytes to an endotoxin challenge in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, A; Loré, K; Essén, P; Andersson, B; McNurlan, M A; Garlick, P J; Ringdén, O; Andersson, J; Wernerman, J

    2002-11-01

    In vivo determination of protein synthesis in immune cells reflects metabolic activity and immunological activation. An intravenous injection of endotoxin to healthy volunteers was used as a human sepsis model, and in vivo protein synthesis of T lymphocytes and leucocytes was measured. The results were related to plasma concentrations of selected cytokines, peripheral cell counts and subpopulations of immune cells. The subjects (n = 8 + 8) were randomized to an endotoxin (4 ng/kg) or a saline group. In vivo protein synthesis was determined twice: before and 1-2.5 h after the endotoxin/saline injection. Protein synthesis decreased in isolated T lymphocytes, but increased in leucocytes. Plasma levels of TNF-alpha, IL-8, IL-6, IL-1 ra and IL-10 were elevated, whereas IL-2 and IFN-gamma, produced predominantly by T lymphocytes, did not change in response to endotoxin. Neutrophils increased, whereas lymphocytes and monocytes decreased 2.5 h after the endotoxin injection. Flow cytometry revealed a drop in total CD3+ T lymphocytes and CD56+ natural killer cells, accompanied by an increase in CD15+ granulocytes. In summary, in vivo protein synthesis decreased in T lymphocytes, while the total leucocyte population showed a concomitant increase immediately after the endotoxin challenge. The changes in protein synthesis were accompanied by alterations in immune cell subpopulations and in plasma cytokine levels.

  8. Molecular cloning of MER-2, a human chromosome-11-encoded red blood cell antigen, using linkage of cotransfected markers.

    PubMed

    Bill, J; Palmer, E; Jones, C

    1987-09-01

    We report the molecular cloning of a human gene MER-2 located on chromosome 11 that encodes a cell surface antigen which is polymorphic on red blood cells. An essential element of the cloning strategy was cotransfection-induced linkage of pSV2-neo, which encodes resistance to the antibiotic G418, to the human MER-2 gene. An important feature of the pSV2-neo construct is that the same gene (the transposon, Tn5) that encodes G418 resistance in eukaryotic cells confers neomycin resistance in bacteria. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were cotransfected with pSV2-neo and genomic DNA from a CHO X human cell hybrid containing a single human chromosome (chromosome 11). Transfectants expressing both the human MER-2 gene and G418 resistance were isolated by selection in the antibiotic G418, followed by indirect immunofluorescence using the monoclonal antibody 1D12, which recognizes the MER-2 antigen, manual enrichment, and single-cell cloning. Genomic DNA from a primary transfectant positive for MER-2 expression and G418 resistance was used to construct a cosmid library and cosmid clones able to grow in neomycin were isolated. Of 150,000 cosmid clones screened, 90 were resistant to neomycin and of these, 11 contained human repetitive sequences. Five neomycin-resistant cosmid clones containing human repetitive DNA were able to transfect CHO cells for G418 resistance and MER-2 expression.

  9. Generation of functional, antigen-specific CD8+ human T cells from cord blood stem cells using exogenous Notch and tetramer-TCR signaling.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Irina; Ooi, Tracy P; Roy, Krishnendu

    2014-01-01

    In vitro differentiation of mouse and human stem cells into early T cells has been successfully demonstrated using artificial Notch signaling systems. However, generation of mature, antigen-specific, functional T cells, directly from human stem cells has remained elusive, except when using stromal coculture of stem cells retrovirally transfected with antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs). Here we show that human umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived CD34+CD38-/low hematopoietic stem cells can be successfully differentiated into functional, antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells without direct stromal coculture or retroviral TCR transfection. Surface-immobilized Notch ligands (DLL1) and stromal cell conditioned medium successfully induced the development of CD1a+CD7+ and CD4+CD8+ early T cells. These cells, upon continued culture with cytomegalovirus (CMV) or influenza-A virus M1 (GIL) epitope-loaded human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201 tetramers, resulted in the generation of a polyclonal population of CMV-specific or GIL-specific CD8+ T cells, respectively. Upon further activation with antigen-loaded target cells, these antigen-specific, stem cell-derived T cells exhibited cytolytic functionality, specifically CD107a surface mobilization, interferon gamma (IFNg) production, and Granzyme B secretion. Such scalable, in vitro generation of functional, antigen-specific T cells from human stem cells could eventually provide a readily available cell source for adoptive transfer immunotherapies and also allow better understanding of human T cell development.

  10. Selection of Human Antibody Fragments which Bind Novel Breast Tumor Antigens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    diagnosis of node-negative breast cancer patients, for immunotherapy prior to growth of large tumor mass , and as adjuvant therapy for minimal residual...biosensor based on surface plasmon resonance (35). For this technique, antigen is coupled to a derivatized sensor chip capable of detecting changes in mass ...When antibody is passed over the sensor chip, antibody binds to the antigen resulting in an increase in mass which can be quantitated. Measurement of

  11. Immunodominant Antigens of Leishmania chagasi Associated with Protection against Human Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Abánades, Daniel R.; Arruda, Leonardo V.; Arruda, Elaine S.; Pinto, José Roberto A. S.; Palma, Mario S.; Aquino, Dorlene; Caldas, Arlene J.; Soto, Manuel; Barral, Aldina; Barral-Netto, Manoel

    2012-01-01

    Background Protection and recovery from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) have been associated with cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, whereas no protective role has been attributed to humoral responses against specific parasitic antigens. In this report, we compared carefully selected groups of individuals with distinct responses to Leishmania chagasi to explore antigen-recognizing IgG present in resistant individuals. Methodology and Principal Findings VL patients with negative delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) were classified into the susceptible group. Individuals who had recovered from VL and converted to a DTH+ response, as well as asymptomatic infected individuals (DTH+), were categorized into the resistant group. Sera from these groups were used to detect antigens from L. chagasi by conventional and 2D Western blot assays. Despite an overall reduction in the reactivity of several proteins after DTH conversion, a specific group of proteins (approximately 110–130 kDa) consistently reacted with sera from DTH converters. Other antigens that specifically reacted with sera from DTH+ individuals were isolated and tandem mass spectrometry followed by database query with the protein search engine MASCO were used to identify antigens. The serological properties of recombinant version of the selected antigens were tested by ELISA. Sera from asymptomatic infected people (DTH+) reacted more strongly with a mixture of selected recombinant antigens than with total soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA), with less cross-reactivity against Chagas disease patients' sera. Significance Our results are the first evidence of leishmania proteins that are specifically recognized by sera from individuals who are putatively resistant to VL. In addition, these data highlight the possibility of using specific proteins in serological tests for the identification of asymptomatic infected individuals. PMID:22724032

  12. A Rapid and Sensitive Method for the Quantitation of Legionella Pneumophila Antigen from Human Urine.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-12

    reverse% passive hemagglutination test was developed to assay concentrations of solubl4 antigen of Legionnaires ’ Disease ( Legionella pneumophila) in...reversed passive hemagglutination test was developed to assay concentrations of soluble antigen of Legionnaires disease ( Legionella pneumophila) in...G. W. Gorman, R. E. Weaver, D. C. Mackel, and H. W. Smith. 1978. Primary isolation media for Legionnaires ’ disease bacterium. J. Clin. Hicrobiol. 8

  13. Immunodiagnosis of human cysticercosis (Taenia solium) with antigens purified by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, E; Tavares, C A; Lopes, J D

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were generated from mice immunized with scolex protein antigen of Cysticercus cellulosae. Three monoclonal antibodies specific for cysticercal antigens, which did not show any cross-reactivity with Taenia solium or Taenia saginata antigens, were selected. Each monoclonal antibody coupled to Sepharose could purify one antigen, which appeared as a single band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. When antigens purified by monoclonal antibodies were used to detect antibody in serum samples taken from patients with cysticercosis, taeniasis, and other parasitic infections in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, cross-reactivity was observed until a serum dilution of 1:128 was reached. Since serum samples from unexposed subjects showed positive reactions until a dilution of 1:64 was reached, we chose a discriminative dilution (1:128) above which no cross-reaction was observed. The percent positive serum samples from cysticercosis patients was 100% by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with any of the antigens purified by monoclonal antibodies. Images PMID:3611310

  14. Defining antigen-specific plasmablast and memory B cell subsets in blood following viral infection and vaccination of humans

    PubMed Central

    Ellebedy, Ali H.; Jackson, Katherine J.L.; Kissick, Haydn T.; Nakaya, Helder I.; Davis, Carl W.; Roskin, Krishna M.; McElroy, Anita K.; Oshansky, Christine M.; Elbein, Rivka; Thomas, Shine; Lyon, George M.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.; Mehta, Aneesh K.; Thomas, Paul G.; Boyd, Scott D.; Ahmed, Rafi

    2016-01-01

    Antigen-specific B cells bifurcate into antibody secreting cells (ASC) and memory B cells after infection or vaccination. ASCs or plasmablasts have been extensively studied in humans but less is known about B cells that get activated but do not differentiate into early plasmablasts. Here, we define the phenotype and transcriptional program of an antigen-specific B cell subset, referred to as activated B cells (ABC), that is distinct from ASCs and is committed to the memory B cell lineage. ABCs were detected in humans after infection with Ebola virus or influenza virus and also after vaccination. By simultaneously analyzing antigen-specific ASCs and ABCs in human blood after influenza vaccination we interrogated the clonal overlap and extent of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in the ASC (effector) and ABC (memory) lineages. Longitudinal tracking of vaccination-induced HA-specific clones revealed minimal increase in SHM over time suggesting that repeated annual immunization may have limitations in enhancing the quality of influenza-specific antibody. PMID:27525369

  15. Targeting TARP, a novel breast and prostate tumor-associated antigen, with T cell receptor-like human recombinant antibodies.

    PubMed

    Epel, Malka; Carmi, Irit; Soueid-Baumgarten, Sharon; Oh, Sang Kon; Bera, Tapan; Pastan, Ira; Berzofsky, Jay; Reiter, Yoram

    2008-06-01

    MHC class I molecules are important components of immune surveillance. There are no available methods to directly visualize and determine the quantity and distribution of MHC/peptide complexes on individual cells or to detect such complexes on antigen-presenting cells in tissues. MHC-restricted recombinant antibodies with the same specificity of T cell receptors (TCR) may become a valuable tool to address these questions. They may also serve as valuable targeting molecules that mimic the specificity of cytotoxic T cells. We isolated by phage display a panel of human recombinant Fab antibodies with peptide-specific, MHC-restricted TCR-like reactivity directed toward HLA-A2-restricted T cell epitopes derived from a novel antigen termed TCRgamma alternative reading frame protein (TARP) which is expressed on prostate and breast cancer cells. We have characterized one of these recombinant antibodies and demonstrated its capacity to directly detect specific HLA-A2/TARP T cell epitopes on antigen-presenting cells that have complexes formed by naturally occurring active intracellular processing of the antigen, as well as on the surface of tumor cells. Moreover, by genetic fusion we armed the TCR-like antibody with a potent toxin and demonstrated that it can serve as a targeting moiety killing tumor cells in a peptide-specific, MHC-restricted manner similar to cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

  16. Antigenic Protein In Microgravity-Grown Human Mixed Mullerian Tumor (LN1) Cells Preserved In RNA Stabilizing Agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Dianne K.; Becker, Jeanne; Holubec, K.; Baker, T. L.; Love, J. E.

    2004-01-01

    Cells treated with RNAlater(TradeMark) have previously been shown to contain antigenic proteins that can be visualized using Western blot analysis. These proteins seem to be stable for several months when stored in RNA stabilizer at 4 C. Antigenic protein can be recovered from cells that have been processed using an Ambion RNAqueous(Registered TradeMark) kit to remove RNA. In this set of experiments, human mixed Mullerian tumor (LN1) cells grown on the International Space Station during Expedition 3 were examined for antigenic stability after removal of RNA. The cells were stored for three months in RNAlater(TradeMark) and RNA was extracted. The RNA filtrate Containing the protein was precipitated, washed, and suspended in buffer containing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Samples containing equal concentrations of protein were loaded onto SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Proteins were separated by electrophoresis and transferred by Western blot to polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane. The Western blots were stained with an enhanced chemiluminescent ECL(Registered TradeMark)Plus detection kit (Amersham) and scanned using a Storm 840 gel image analyzer (Amersham, Molecular Dynamics). ImageQuant(Registered TradeMark)a software was used to quantify the densities of the protein bands. The ground control and flight LN1 cell samples showed a similar staining pattern over time with antibodies to vimentin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and epithelial membrane antigens.

  17. Antigenic Protein In Microgravity-Grown Human Mixed Mullerian Tumor (LN1) Cells Preserved In RNA Stabilizing Agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Dianne K.; Becker, Jeanne; Elliott, T. F.; Holubec, K.; Baker, T. L.; Love, J. E.

    2004-01-01

    Cells treated with RNAlater(TradeMark) have previously been shown to contain antigenic proteins that can be visualized using Western blot analysis. These proteins seem to be stable for several months when stored in RNA stabilizer at 4 C. Antigenic protein can be recovered from cells that have been processed using an Ambion RNAqueous(Registered TradeMark) kit to remove RNA. In this set of experiments, human mixed Mullerian tumor (LNI) cells grown on the International Space Station during Expedition 3 were examined for antigenic stability after removal of RNA. The cells were stored for three months in RNAlater(TradeMark) and RNA was extracted. The RNA filtrate containing the protein was precipitated, washed, and suspended in buffer containing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Samples containing equal concentrations of protein were loaded onto SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Proteins were separated by electrophoresis and transferred by Western blot to polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane. The Western blots were stained with an enhanced chemiluminescent ECL(Registered Trademark) Plus detection kit (Amersham) and scanned using a Storm 840 gel image analyzer (Amersham, Molecular Dynamics). ImageQuant(Registered TradeMark) software was used to quantify the densities of the protein bands. The ground control and flight LN1 cell samples showed a similar staining pattern over time with antibodies to vimentin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and epithelial membrane antigens.

  18. Enhanced expression and secretion of an epithelial membrane antigen (MA5) in a human mucinous breast tumor line (BT549).

    PubMed

    Williams, C J; Major, P P; Dion, A S

    1990-01-01

    The mouse monoclonal antibody MA5, generated versus a membrane-enriched extract of breast cancer metastatic to liver, detects one or two high molecular weight species (greater than 200 kD) in breast tumor membranes, human milk fat globule membranes, and various breast tumor cell lines. From comparative studies of five breast carcinoma lines (BT20, BT549, MCF-7, T47D, and ZR75-1), as well as an epithelial line established from milk (HBL-100), we report the stimulation of expression of MA5-reactive antigen in a mucinous breast tumor cell line (BT549) through the use of a culture medium supplemented with charcoal-absorbed fetal calf serum, insulin, and hydrocortisone. Large amounts of aggregated MA5-reactive antigen are secreted into the culture medium and can be recovered from the media for further purification by centrifugation. These findings suggest that BT549 cells, grown in the special nutritive medium, may be useful in providing an ample source of epithelial membrane antigen (also termed polymorphic epithelial mucin) for standardization of clinical assay protocols, as well as provide a model system for studies of the regulation of expression for this class of antigens in breast carcinoma.

  19. Presence of antibodies against self human leukocyte antigen class II molecules in autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Yamagiwa, Satoshi; Kamimura, Hiroteru; Takamura, Masaaki; Genda, Takuya; Ichida, Takafumi; Nomoto, Minoru; Aoyagi, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) can arise de novo after liver transplantation (LT) for non-autoimmune liver diseases. Considering the identical features of de novo AIH after LT and classical AIH, as well as the importance of anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies in graft rejection, we investigated the presence of circulating anti-HLA class II antibodies in the sera of 35 patients with AIH, 30 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and 30 healthy donors using fluorescent dye-impregnated beads bound to HLA molecules. We then investigated the allele specificity of the antibodies and identified the HLA alleles in each patient using DNA-based HLA typing. We also examined HLA class II expression in liver samples using immunohistochemistry. Anti-HLA class II antibodies were detected significantly more frequently in the patients with AIH (88.1%) than in the patients with PBC (33.3%) or in the healthy donors (13.3%) (both P <0.01). We confirmed that the anti-HLA class II antibodies in the AIH patients showed specificity for several HLA class II alleles, including self HLA class II alleles. Moreover, positive reactivity with anti-self HLA class II antibodies was associated with higher serum transaminase levels. In conclusion, we demonstrated, for the first time, that antibodies against self HLA class II alleles were detectable in patients with AIH. Our results suggest that an antibody-mediated immune response against HLA class II molecules on hepatocytes may be involved in the pathogenesis or acceleration of liver injury in AIH.

  20. The Human Minor Histocompatibility Antigen1 Is a RhoGAP

    PubMed Central

    de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Schaefer, Antje; Anthony, Eloise C.; Tol, Simon; Fernandez-Borja, Mar; Geerts, Dirk; Pool, Jos; Hambach, Lothar; Goulmy, Els; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    The human minor Histocompatibility Antigen HMHA-1 is a major target of immune responses after allogeneic stem cell transplantation applied for the treatment of leukemia and solid tumors. The restriction of its expression to hematopoietic cells and many solid tumors raised questions regarding its cellular functions. Sequence analysis of the HMHA-1 encoding HMHA1 protein revealed the presence of a possible C-terminal RhoGTPase Activating Protein (GAP) domain and an N-terminal BAR domain. Rho-family GTPases, including Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA are key regulators of the actin cytoskeleton and control cell spreading and migration. RhoGTPase activity is under tight control as aberrant signaling can lead to pathology, including inflammation and cancer. Whereas Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factors (GEFs) mediate the exchange of GDP for GTP resulting in RhoGTPase activation, GAPs catalyze the low intrinsic GTPase activity of active RhoGTPases, resulting in inactivation. Here we identify the HMHA1 protein as a novel RhoGAP. We show that HMHA1 constructs, lacking the N-terminal region, negatively regulate the actin cytoskeleton as well as cell spreading. Furthermore, we show that HMHA1 regulates RhoGTPase activity in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that the HMHA1 N-terminal BAR domain is auto-inhibitory as HMHA1 mutants lacking this region, but not full-length HMHA1, showed GAP activity towards RhoGTPases. In conclusion, this study shows that HMHA1 acts as a RhoGAP to regulate GTPase activity, cytoskeletal remodeling and cell spreading, which are crucial functions in normal hematopoietic and cancer cells. PMID:24086303

  1. Preparation, characterization, and determination of immunological activities of transfer factor specific to human sperm antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianwei; Kong, Cui; Yuan, Zhaohong; Luo, Junmin; Ma, Rui; Yu, Jiang; Cao, Jinghe

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The objective of this study was to prepare, characterize, and determine immunological activities of specific transfer factor (STF) specific to human sperm antigen (HSA) for the preparation of antisperm contraceptive vaccine that can be used as an immunocontraceptive. METHODS. HSA-STF was prepared using the spleens of rabbits vaccinated with HSA. The specific immunological activities were examined by lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT), leukocyte adhesion inhibition test (LAIT), and by determining the concentrations of IL-4, γ -IFN, and IL-21. HSA-STF was a helveolous substance, having a pH value of 7.0 ± 0.4 and UV absorption maxima at 258 ± 6 nm. It contained seventeen amino acids; glycine and glutamic acids were the highest in terms of concentrations (38.8 μ g/mL and 36.3 μ g/mL, resp.). RESULTS. The concentration of polypeptide was 2.34 ± 0.31 mg/mL, and ribose was 0.717 ± 0.043 mg/mL. The stimulation index for lymphocyte proliferation test was 1.84, and the leukocyte adhesion inhibition rate was 37.7%. There was a statistically significant difference between the cultural lymphocytes with HSA-STF and non-HSA-STF for γ -IFN and IL-21 (P < 0.05), but there was no statistical significance for IL-4 (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION. HSA-STF was prepared and characterized successfully. It had immunological activity which could transfer the immune response specific to HSA and prove to be a potential candidate for the development of male immunocontraceptive agents.

  2. Prospective evaluation of rapid antigen tests for diagnosis of respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus infections.

    PubMed

    Aslanzadeh, Jaber; Zheng, Xiaotian; Li, Haijing; Tetreault, Janice; Ratkiewicz, Irene; Meng, Shufang; Hamilton, Pamela; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2008-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are two important viral pathogens that cause respiratory tract infections in the pediatric population. The rapid detection of these agents allows the prompt isolation and treatment of infected patients. In the present prospective study, we evaluated the performances of four rapid antigen detection assays, including a rapid chromatographic immunoassay (CIA) for RSV (Directigen EZ RSV; Becton Dickinson, Sparks, MD), a direct fluorescent-antibody assay (DFA) for RSV (Bartels; Trinity Biotech, Carlsbad, CA), and two DFAs for hMPV manufactured by Diagnostic Hybrids Inc. (DHI; Athens, OH) and Imagen (Oxoid Ltd., Basingstoke, Hampshire, United Kingdom). The clinical specimens tested comprised 515 nasopharyngeal aspirates submitted to the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory at Hartford Hospital from 1 November 2006 to 21 April 2007. Compared to the results of real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), the CIA had a sensitivity of 79.8% and a specificity of 89.5%. The RSV DFA with Bartels reagents showed a sensitivity of 94.1% and a specificity of 96.8%. For hMPV, the sensitivity and specificity were 62.5% and 99.8%, respectively, for the DHI DFA and 63.2% and 100%, respectively, for the Imagen DFA. The hands-on and test turnaround times for CIA were 10 and 30 to 60 min, respectively, and the hands-on and test turnaround times for the RSV and hMPV DFAs were 30 and 105 min, respectively. We conclude that while the RSV CIA is user-friendly, it lacks sensitivity and specificity, especially during off-peak months. In contrast, the RSV DFA is more sensitive and specific, but interpretation of its results is subjective and it demands technical time and expertise. Similarly, both hMPV DFAs are highly specific in comparison to the results of RT-PCR, but their sensitivities await further improvements.

  3. Prospective Evaluation of Rapid Antigen Tests for Diagnosis of Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus Infections▿

    PubMed Central

    Aslanzadeh, Jaber; Zheng, Xiaotian; Li, Haijing; Tetreault, Janice; Ratkiewicz, Irene; Meng, Shufang; Hamilton, Pamela; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are two important viral pathogens that cause respiratory tract infections in the pediatric population. The rapid detection of these agents allows the prompt isolation and treatment of infected patients. In the present prospective study, we evaluated the performances of four rapid antigen detection assays, including a rapid chromatographic immunoassay (CIA) for RSV (Directigen EZ RSV; Becton Dickinson, Sparks, MD), a direct fluorescent-antibody assay (DFA) for RSV (Bartels; Trinity Biotech, Carlsbad, CA), and two DFAs for hMPV manufactured by Diagnostic Hybrids Inc. (DHI; Athens, OH) and Imagen (Oxoid Ltd., Basingstoke, Hampshire, United Kingdom). The clinical specimens tested comprised 515 nasopharyngeal aspirates submitted to the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory at Hartford Hospital from 1 November 2006 to 21 April 2007. Compared to the results of real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), the CIA had a sensitivity of 79.8% and a specificity of 89.5%. The RSV DFA with Bartels reagents showed a sensitivity of 94.1% and a specificity of 96.8%. For hMPV, the sensitivity and specificity were 62.5% and 99.8%, respectively, for the DHI DFA and 63.2% and 100%, respectively, for the Imagen DFA. The hands-on and test turnaround times for CIA were 10 and 30 to 60 min, respectively, and the hands-on and test turnaround times for the RSV and hMPV DFAs were 30 and 105 min, respectively. We conclude that while the RSV CIA is user-friendly, it lacks sensitivity and specificity, especially during off-peak months. In contrast, the RSV DFA is more sensitive and specific, but interpretation of its results is subjective and it demands technical time and expertise. Similarly, both hMPV DFAs are highly specific in comparison to the results of RT-PCR, but their sensitivities await further improvements. PMID:18337386

  4. Evidence for carboxyl-terminal processing and glycolipid-anchoring of human carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Takami, N; Misumi, Y; Kuroki, M; Matsuoka, Y; Ikehara, Y

    1988-09-05

    We have investigated the post-translational modification of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) for membrane-anchoring in QGP-1 cells derived from a human pancreatic carcinoma. Pulse-chase experiments with [3H]leucine demonstrated that CEA was initially synthesized as a precursor form with Mr 150,000 having N-linked high-mannose-type oligosaccharides, which was then converted to a mature form with Mr 200,000 containing the complex type sugar chains. The mature protein thus labeled was found to be released from the cell surface by treatment with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, suggesting that CEA is a phosphatidylinositol-linked membrane protein. This was confirmed by metabolic incorporation into CEA of 3H-labeled compounds such as ethanolamine, myo-inositol, palmitic acid, and stearic acid. The 3H-labeled fatty acids incorporated were specifically removed from the protein by nitrous acid deamination as well as by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C treatment. Since the available cDNA sequence predicts that CEA contains a single methionine residue only in its carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic domain, processing of the carboxyl terminus was examined by pulse-chase experiments with [35S]methionine. It was found that CEA with Mr 150,000 was initially labeled with [35S]methionine but its radioactivity was immediately lost with chase. Taken together, these results suggest that CEA is anchored to the membrane by simultaneously occurring proteolysis of the carboxyl terminus and replacement by the glycophospholipid immediately after the synthesis.

  5. Human neutrophil antigen profiles in Banjar, Bugis, Champa, Jawa and Kelantan Malays in Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Manaf, Siti M.; NurWaliyuddin, Hanis Z.A.; Panneerchelvam, Sundararajulu; Zafarina, Zainuddin; Norazmi, Mohd N.; Chambers, Geoffrey K.; Edinur, Hisham A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human neutrophil antigens (HNA) are polymorphic and immunogenic proteins involved in the pathogenesis of neonatal alloimmune neutropenia, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-related alloimmune neutropenia. The characterisation of HNA at a population level is important for predicting the risk of alloimmunisation associated with blood transfusion and gestation and for anthropological studies. Materials and methods Blood samples from 192 healthy, unrelated Malays were collected and genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primers (HNA-1, -3, -4) and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (HNA-5). The group comprised 30 Banjar, 37 Bugis, 51 Champa, 39 Jawa and 35 Kelantan Malays. Results The most common HNA alleles in the Malays studied were HNA-1a (0.641–0.765), -3a (0.676–0.867), -4a (0.943–1.000) and -5a (0.529–0.910). According to principal coordinate plots constructed using HNA allele frequencies, the Malay sub-ethnic groups are closely related and grouped together with other Asian populations. The risks of TRALI or neonatal neutropenia were not increased for subjects with HNA-1, -3 and -4 loci even for donor and recipient or pairs from different Malay sub-ethnic groups. Nonetheless, our estimates showed significantly higher risks of HNA alloimmunisation during pregnancy and transfusion between Malays and other genetically differentiated populations such as Africans and Europeans. Discussion This study reports HNA allele and genotype frequencies for the five Malay sub-ethnic groups living in Peninsular Malaysia for the first time. These Malay sub-ethnic groups show closer genetic relationships with other Asian populations than with Europeans and Africans. The distributions of HNA alleles in other lineages of people living in Malaysia (e.g. Chinese, Indian and Orang Asli) would be an interesting subject for future study. PMID:26057487

  6. The effect of haemagglutinating factor from boar seminal vesicle fluid on leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Veselský, L; Sedláková, E; Dostál, J; Hruban, V; Pazdera, J

    1981-01-01

    Complete agglutination of porcine, bovine, ovine, and rabbit leucocytes and of porcine and bovine thrombocytes was observed after their exposure to a 1% solution of the haemagglutinating protein isolated from boar seminal fluid. Bull seminal vesicle fluid had the same agglutinating effect on leucocytes, but did not agglutinate thrombocytes. Ram seminal plasma and other fluids from the reproductive tract of boar and bull did not agglutinate either leucocytes or thrombocytes. A viability test showed that the agglutinin of boar seminal vesicle fluid, bull seminal vesicle fluid, and boar prostate fluid were all lethal for leucocytes.

  7. The monoclonal antibody GZS-1 detects a maturation-associated antigen of human spermatozoa that is also present on the surface of human mononuclear blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hutter, H; Hammer, A; Blaschitz, A; Hartmann, M; Mahnert, W; Sedlmayr, P; Primus, G; Rosenkranz, C; Gebru, G; Henkel, R; Dohr, G

    1996-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody (GZS-1) has been generated by fusion of mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunised with human sperm cells. The antibody was determined to be an IgG1. The corresponding antigen is present on the whole surface of ejaculated human spermatozoa. It is not detectable on spermatozoa of other mammalian species (rabbit, cat, dog, sheep, boar, bull, horse). In human male genital organs, immunostaining with GZS-1 is observed on sperm cells in the epididymis and the ductus deferens together with the lining epithelium of those organs. No reactivity of sperm cells or germ cell precursors in the testis has been detected. Functional tests using the antibody show a strong inhibitory effect of human sperm in the hamster egg penetration assay. Furthermore, the GZS-1 antigen is detectable on the surface of human lymphocytes and monocytes by immunogold electron microscopy and FACS analysis. By Western blotting of human sperm and seminal plasma performed under reducing conditions immunostaining was detected at 21-25, 31, 51-54, and 62 kDa. The reaction with human lymphocytes shows one major band at 62 kDa and additional bands at 31 and 54 kDa. The results suggest that the monoclonal antibody GZS-1 may recognise an antigen which is secreted from the epithelial cells of the epididymis and binds to ejaculated spermatozoa as a sperm coating antigen. This component may be involved in the capacitation of the sperm and the acrosome reaction. Molecules that are expressed both on sperm and on immunocompetent cells may be relevant for the regulation of immunological processes or for the development of the related immunological tolerance of sperm in the female reproductive tract.

  8. Antigenic drift in H5N1 avian influenza virus in poultry is driven by mutations in major antigenic sites of the hemagglutinin molecule analogous to those for human influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Cattoli, Giovanni; Milani, Adelaide; Temperton, Nigel; Zecchin, Bianca; Buratin, Alessandra; Molesti, Eleonora; Aly, Mona Meherez; Arafa, Abdel; Capua, Ilaria

    2011-09-01

    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus has been endemic in poultry in Egypt since 2008, notwithstanding the implementation of mass vaccination and culling of infected birds. Extensive circulation of the virus has resulted in a progressive genetic evolution and an antigenic drift. In poultry, the occurrence of antigenic drift in avian influenza viruses is less well documented and the mechanisms remain to be clarified. To test the hypothesis that H5N1 antigenic drift is driven by mechanisms similar to type A influenza viruses in humans, we generated reassortant viruses, by reverse genetics, that harbored molecular changes identified in genetically divergent viruses circulating in the vaccinated population. Parental and reassortant phenotype viruses were antigenically analyzed by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test and microneutralization (MN) assay. The results of the study indicate that the antigenic drift of H5N1 in poultry is driven by multiple mutations primarily occurring in major antigenic sites at the receptor binding subdomain, similarly to what has been described for human influenza H1 and H3 subtype viruses.

  9. Effects of humanization and gene shuffling on immunogenicity and antigen binding of anti-TAG-72 single-chain Fvs.

    PubMed

    Pavlinkova, G; Colcher, D; Booth, B J; Goel, A; Wittel, U A; Batra, S K

    2001-12-01

    One major constraint in the clinical application of murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is the development of a human antimurine antibody response. The immunogenicity of MAbs can be minimized by replacing nonhuman regions with corresponding human sequences. The studies reported in our article were undertaken to analyze the immunoreactivity and the immunogenicity of the CC49 single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs): (i) an scFv construct comprised of mouse CC49 VL and VH (m/m scFv), (ii) a light chain shuffled scFv with human VL (Hum4 VL) and mouse CC49 VH (h/m scFv), and (iii) a humanized scFv assembled from Hum4 VL and CC49 VH complementary determining regions (CDRs) grafted onto a VH framework of MAb 21/28' CL (h/CDR scFv). The CC49 scFvs competed for an antigen binding site with CC49 IgG in a similar fashion in a competition radioimmunoassay and were able to inhibit the binding of CC49 IgG to the antigen completely. The immunogenicity of CC49 scFvs was tested using sera with antiidiotypic antibodies to MAb CC49 obtained from patients treated by CC49 IgG in clinical trials. All tested sera exhibited the highest reactivity to the m/m scFv. However, the sera demonstrated differential reactivities to h/CDR scFv and h/m scFv. Replacement of the mouse chain in h/m scFv and h/CDR scFv decreased or completely averted serum reactivity. Our studies compared for the first time the antigen binding and immunogenicity of different scFv constructs containing the mouse, CDR grafted or human variable chains. These results indicate that the humanized CC49 scFv is potentially an important agent for imaging and therapeutic applications with TAG-72-positive tumors.

  10. Aberrant Cosmc genes result in Tn antigen expression in human colorectal carcinoma cell line HT-29

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaofeng; Du, Zhenzhen; Sun, Xuhong; Shi, Chuanqin; Zhang, Huaixiang; Hu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The Tn antigen, which arises from mutation in the Cosmc gene is one of the most common tumor associated carbohydrate antigens. Cosmc resides in X24 encoded by a single gene and functions as a specific molecular chaperone for T-synthase. While the Tn antigen cannot be detected in normal cells, Cosmc mutations inactivate T-synthase and consequently result in Tn antigen expression within certain cancers. In addition to this Cosmc mutation-induced expression, the Tn antigen is also expressed in such cell lines as Jurkat T, LSC and LS174T. Whether the Cosmc mutation is present in the colon cancer cell line HT-29 is still unclear. Here, we isolate HT-29-Tn+ cells from HT-29 cells derived from a female colon cancer patient. These HT-29-Tn+ cells show a loss of the Cosmc gene coding sequence (CDS) leading to an absence of T-synthase activity and Tn antigen expression. Additionally, almost no methylation of Cosmc CpG islands was detected in HT-29-Tn+ as well as in HT-29-Tn- and Tn- tumor cells from male patients. In contrast, the methylation frequency of CpG island of Cosmc in normal female cells was ~50%. Only one active allele of Cosmc existed in HT-29-Tn+ and HT-29-Tn- cells as based upon detection of SNP sites. These results indicate that Tn antigens expression and T-synthase inactivity in HT-29-Tn+ cells can be related to the absence of CDS in Cosmc active alleles, while an inactive allele deletion of Cosmc in HT-29 cells has no influence on Cosmc function. PMID:26045765

  11. Development and comparative evaluation of a plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on recombinant outer membrane antigens Omp28 and Omp31 for diagnosis of human brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Sapana; Kumar, Ashu; Thavaselvam, Duraipandian; Mangalgi, Smita; Rathod, Vedika; Prakash, Archana; Barua, Anita; Arora, Sonia; Sathyaseelan, Kannusamy

    2013-08-01

    Brucellosis is an important zoonotic infectious disease of humans and livestock with worldwide distribution and is caused by bacteria of the genus Brucella. The diagnosis of brucellosis always requires laboratory confirmation by either isolation of pathogens or detection of specific antibodies. The conventional serological tests available for the diagnosis of brucellosis are less specific and show cross-reactivity with other closely related organisms. These tests also necessitate the handling of Brucella species for antigen preparation. Therefore, there is a need to develop reliable, rapid, and user-friendly systems for disease diagnosis and alternatives to vaccine approaches. Keeping in mind the importance of brucellosis as an emerging infection and the prevalence in India, we carried out the present study to compare the recombinant antigens with the native antigens (cell envelope and sonicated antigen) of Brucella for diagnosis of human brucellosis by an indirect plate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Recombinant outer membrane protein 28 (rOmp28) and rOmp31 antigens were cloned, expressed, and purified in the bacterial expression system, and the purified proteins were used as antigens. Indirect plate ELISAs were then performed and standardized for comparison of the reactivities of recombinant and native antigens against the 433 clinical samples submitted for brucellosis testing, 15 culture-positive samples, and 20 healthy donor samples. The samples were separated into four groups based on their positivity to rose bengal plate agglutination tests (RBPTs), standard tube agglutination tests (STATs), and 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) tests. The sensitivities and specificities of all the antigens were calculated, and the rOmp28 antigen was found to be more suitable for the clinical diagnosis of brucellosis than the rOmp31 antigen and native antigens. The rOmp28-based ELISA showed a very high degree of agreement with the conventional agglutination tests and

  12. Human leukocyte antigen class I supertypes and HIV-1 control in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Lazaryan, Aleksandr; Song, Wei; Lobashevsky, Elena; Tang, Jianming; Shrestha, Sadeep; Zhang, Kui; Gardner, Lytt I; McNicholl, Janet M; Wilson, Craig M; Klein, Robert S; Rompalo, Anne; Mayer, Kenneth; Sobel, Jack; Kaslow, Richard A

    2010-03-01

    The role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I supertypes in controlling human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in African Americans has not been established. We examined the effects of the HLA-A and HLA-B alleles and supertypes on the outcomes of HIV-1 clade B infection among 338 African American women and adolescents. HLA-B58 and -B62 supertypes (B58s and B62s) were associated with favorable HIV-1 disease control (proportional odds ratio [POR] of 0.33 and 95% confidence interval [95% CI] of 0.21 to 0.52 for the former and POR of 0.26 and 95% CI of 0.09 to 0.73 for the latter); B7s and B44s were associated with unfavorable disease control (POR of 2.39 and 95% CI of 1.54 to 3.73 for the former and POR of 1.63 and 95% CI of 1.08 to 2.47 for the latter). In general, individual alleles within specific B supertypes exerted relatively homogeneous effects. A notable exception was B27s, whose protective influence (POR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.35 to 0.94) was masked by the opposing effect of its member allele B*1510. The associations of most B supertypes (e.g., B58s and B7s) were largely explained either by well-known effects of constituent B alleles or by effects of previously unimplicated B alleles aggregated into a particular supertype (e.g., B44s and B62s). A higher frequency of HLA-B genotypic supertypes correlated with a higher mean viral load (VL) and lower mean CD4 count (Pearson's r = 0.63 and 0.62, respectively; P = 0.03). Among the genotypic supertypes, B58s and its member allele B*57 contributed disproportionately to the explainable VL variation. The study demonstrated the dominant role of HLA-B supertypes in HIV-1 clade B-infected African Americans and further dissected the contributions of individual class I alleles and their population frequencies to the supertype effects.

  13. In Vitro Generation of Human NK cells Expressing Chimeric Antigen Receptor through Differentiation of Gene-Modified Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Emily; Truscott, Laurel C.; De Oliveira, Satiro N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary NK cells represent a very promising source for adoptive cellular approaches for cancer immunotherapy, and extensive research has been conducted, including clinical trials. Gene modification of NK cells can direct their specificity and enhance their function, but the efficiency of gene transfer techniques is very limited. Here we describe two protocols designed to generate mature human NK cells from gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells. These protocols use chimeric antigen receptor as the transgene, but could potentially be modified for the expression any particular transgene in human NK cells. PMID:27177671

  14. Profiling leucocyte subsets in tuberculosis-diabetes co-morbidity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Moideen, Kadar; Dhakshinraj, Sharmila D; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Nair, Dina; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Babu, Subash

    2015-10-01

    The immune system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary tuberculosis-type 2 diabetes mellitus (PTB-DM) co-morbidity. However, the phenotypic profile of leucocyte subsets at homeostasis in individuals with active or latent tuberculosis (LTB) with coincident diabetes is not known. To characterize the influence of diabetes on leucocyte phenotypes in PTB or LTB, we examined the frequency (Fo ) of leucocyte subsets in individuals with TB with (PTB-DM) or without (PTB) diabetes; individuals with latent TB with (LTB-DM) or without (LTB) diabetes and non-TB-infected individuals with (NTB-DM) or without (NTB) diabetes. Coincident DM is characterized by significantly lower Fo of effector memory CD4(+) T cells in LTB individuals. In contrast, DM is characterized by significantly lower Fo of effector memory CD8(+) T cells and significantly higher Fo of central memory CD8(+) T cells in PTB individuals. Coincident DM resulted in significantly higher Fo of classical memory B cells in PTB and significantly higher Fo of activated memory and atypical B cells in LTB individuals. Coincident DM resulted in significantly lower Fo of classical and intermediate monocytes in PTB, LTB and NTB individuals. Finally, DM resulted in significantly lower Fo of myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in PTB, LTB and NTB individuals. Our data reveal that coincident diabetes alters the cellular subset distribution of T cells, B cells, dendritic cells and monocytes in both individuals with active TB and those with latent TB, thus potentially impacting the pathogenesis of this co-morbid condition.

  15. Memory-Like Antigen-Specific Human NK Cells from TB Pleural Fluids Produced IL-22 in Response to IL-15 or Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoying; Yu, Sifei; Yang, Binyan; Lao, Suihua; Li, Baiqing; Wu, Changyou

    2016-01-01

    Our previous result indicated that memory-like human natural killer (NK) cells from TB pleural fluid cells (PFCs) produced large amounts of IFN-γ in response to Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG). Furthermore, recent studies have shown that human lymphoid tissues harbored a unique NK cell subset that specialized in production of interleukin (IL)-22, a proinflammatory cytokine that mediates host defense against pathogens. Yet little information was available with regard to the properties of IL-22 production by memory-like human NK cells. In the present study, we found that cytokines IL-15 induced and IL-12 enhanced the levels of IL-22 by NK cells from TB PFCs. In addition, IL-22 but not IL-17 was produced by NK cells from PFCs in response to BCG and M.tb-related Ags. More importantly, the subset of specific IL-22-producing NK cells were distinct from IFN-γ-producing NK cells in PFCs. CD45RO+ or CD45RO- NK cells were sorted, co-cultured with autologous monocytes and stimulated with BCG for the production of IL-22. The result demonstrated that CD45RO+ but not CD45RO- NK cells produced significantly higher level of IL-22. Anti-IL-12Rβ1 mAbs (2B10) partially inhibit the expression of IL-22 by NK cells under the culture with BCG. Consistently, BCG specific IL-22-producing NK cells from PFCs expressed CD45ROhighNKG2Dhighgranzyme Bhigh. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that memory-like antigen-specific CD45RO+ NK cells might participate in the recall immune response for M. tb infection via producing IL-22, which display a critical role to fight against M. tb.

  16. Antigen capsid-display on human adenovirus 35 via pIX fusion is a potent vaccine platform

    PubMed Central

    van der Helm, Esmeralda; Spek, Dirk; Vorthoren, Lars; Serroyen, Jan; Kuipers, Harmjan; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Zahn, Roland; Custers, Jerome; Vellinga, Jort

    2017-01-01

    Durable protection against complex pathogens is likely to require immunity that comprises both humoral and cellular responses. While heterologous prime-boost regimens based on recombinant, replication-incompetent Adenoviral vectors (AdV) and adjuvanted protein have been able to induce high levels of concomitant humoral and cellular responses, complex manufacturing and handling in the field may limit their success. To combine the benefits of genetic and protein-based vaccination within one vaccine construct and to facilitate their use, we generated Human Adenovirus 35 (HAdV35) vectors genetically encoding a model antigen based on the Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) circumsporozoite (CS) protein and displaying a truncated version of the same antigen (CSshort) via protein IX on the capsid, with or without a flexible glycine-linker and/or a 45Å-spacer. The four tested pIX-antigen display variants were efficiently incorporated and presented on the HAdV35 capsid irrespective of whether a transgene was encoded or not. Transgene-expression and producibility of the display-/expression vectors were not impeded by the pIX-display. In mice, the pIX-modified vectors induced strong humoral antigen-specific immunity that increased with the inclusion of the linker-/spacer molecules, exceeded the responses induced by the genetic, transgene-expressing HAdV35 vector, and surpassed recombinant protein in potency. In addition, the pIX- display/expression vectors elicited high antigen-specific cellular immune responses that matched those of the genetic HAdV35 vector expressing CS. pIX-modified display-/expression HAdV vectors may therefore be a valuable technology for the development of vaccines against complex pathogens, especially in resource-limited settings. PMID:28362809

  17. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons—Induced ROS Accumulation Enhances Mutagenic Potential of T-Antigen From Human Polyomavirus JC

    PubMed Central

    WILK, ANNA; RSKI, PIOTR WALIGÓ; LASSAK, ADAM; VASHISTHA, HIMANSHU; LIRETTE, DAVID; TATE, DAVID; ZEA, ARNOLD H.; KOOCHEKPOUR, SHAHRIAR; RODRIGUEZ, PAULO; MEGGS, LEONARD G.; ESTRADA, JOHN J.; OCHOA, AUGUSTO; REISS, KRZYSZTOF

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the products of incomplete combustion of organic materials, which are present in cigarette smoke, deep-fried food, and in natural crude oil. Since PAH-metabolites form DNA adducts and cause oxidative DNA damage, we asked if these environmental carcinogens could affect transforming potential of the human Polyomavirus JC oncoprotein, T-antigen (JCV T-antigen). We extracted DMSO soluble PAHs from Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico (oil-PAHs), and detected several carcinogenic PAHs. The oil-PAHs were tested in exponentially growing cultures of normal mouse fibroblasts (R508), and in R508 stably expressing JCV T-antigen (R508/T). The oil-PAHs were cytotoxic only at relatively high doses (1:50–1:100 dilution), and at 1:500 dilution the growth and cell survival rates were practically unaffected. This non-toxic dose triggered however, a significant accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), caused oxidative DNA damage and the formation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). Although oil-PAHs induced similar levels of DNA damage in R508 and R508/T cells, only T-antigen expressing cells demonstrated inhibition of high fidelity DNA repair by homologous recombination (HRR). In contrast, low-fidelity repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) was unaffected. This potential mutagenic shift between DNA repair mechanisms was accompanied by a significant increase in clonal growth of R508/T cells chronically exposed to low doses of the oil-PAHs. Our results indicate for the first time carcinogenic synergy in which oil-PAHs trigger oxidative DNA damage and JCV T-antigen compromises DNA repair fidelity. PMID:23558788

  18. Antigenic structure of human hepatitis A virus defined by analysis of escape mutants selected against murine monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Ping, L H; Lemon, S M

    1992-01-01

    We examined the antigenic structure of human hepatitis A virus (HAV) by characterizing a series of 21 murine monoclonal-antibody-resistant neutralization escape mutants derived from the HM175 virus strain. The escape phenotype of each mutant was associated with reduced antibody binding in radioimmunofocus assays. Neutralization escape mutations were identified at the Asp-70 and Gln-74 residues of the capsid protein VP3, as well as at Ser-102, Val-171, Ala-176, and Lys-221 of VP1. With the exception of the Lys-221 mutants, substantial cross-resistance was evident among escape mutants tested against a panel of 22 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, suggesting that the involved residues contribute to epitopes composing a single antigenic site. As mutations at one or more of these residues conferred resistance to 20 of 22 murine antibodies, this site appears to be immunodominant in the mouse. However, multiple mutants selected independently against any one monoclonal antibody had mutations at only one or, at the most, two amino acid residues within the capsid proteins, confirming that there are multiple epitopes within this antigenic site and suggesting that single-amino-acid residues contributing to these epitopes may play key roles in the binding of individual antibodies. A second, potentially independent antigenic site was identified by three escape mutants with different substitutions at Lys-221 of VP1. These mutants were resistant only to antibody H7C27, while H7C27 effectively neutralized all other escape mutants. These data support the existence of an immunodominant neutralization site in the antigenic structure of hepatitis A virus which involves residues of VP3 and VP1 and a second, potentially independent site involving residue 221 of VP1. PMID:1312628

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-induced ROS accumulation enhances mutagenic potential of T-antigen from human polyomavirus JC.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Anna; Waligórski, Piotr; Lassak, Adam; Vashistha, Himanshu; Lirette, David; Tate, David; Zea, Arnold H; Koochekpour, Shahriar; Rodriguez, Paulo; Meggs, Leonard G; Estrada, John J; Ochoa, Augusto; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2013-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the products of incomplete combustion of organic materials, which are present in cigarette smoke, deep-fried food, and in natural crude oil. Since PAH-metabolites form DNA adducts and cause oxidative DNA damage, we asked if these environmental carcinogens could affect transforming potential of the human Polyomavirus JC oncoprotein, T-antigen (JCV T-antigen). We extracted DMSO soluble PAHs from Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico (oil-PAHs), and detected several carcinogenic PAHs. The oil-PAHs were tested in exponentially growing cultures of normal mouse fibroblasts (R508), and in R508 stably expressing JCV T-antigen (R508/T). The oil-PAHs were cytotoxic only at relatively high doses (1:50-1:100 dilution), and at 1:500 dilution the growth and cell survival rates were practically unaffected. This non-toxic dose triggered however, a significant accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), caused oxidative DNA damage and the formation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). Although oil-PAHs induced similar levels of DNA damage in R508 and R508/T cells, only T-antigen expressing cells demonstrated inhibition of high fidelity DNA repair by homologous recombination (HRR). In contrast, low-fidelity repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) was unaffected. This potential mutagenic shift between DNA repair mechanisms was accompanied by a significant increase in clonal growth of R508/T cells chronically exposed to low doses of the oil-PAHs. Our results indicate for the first time carcinogenic synergy in which oil-PAHs trigger oxidative DNA damage and JCV T-antigen compromises DNA repair fidelity.

  20. Polymorphonuclear leucocyte motility in men with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed Central

    Pease, C T; Fennell, M; Brewerton, D A

    1989-01-01

    The polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) response to a chemotactic or chemokinetic stimulus is enhanced in men with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This effect does not parallel the severity of disease activity or the size of the acute phase response, and it is independent of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment. Polymorph function is normal in HLA-B27 positive brothers of probands with AS and in other HLA-B27 positive individuals in the absence of disease. Polymorph motility is also normal in patients with psoriasis vulgaris or Crohn's disease, indicating that enhanced PMN motility is not a non-specific consequence of all inflammatory disorders. PMID:2784306

  1. Response of sensitized and unsensitized human lymphocyte subpopulations to Plasmodium falciparum antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Wyler, D J; Herrod, H G; Weinbaum, F I

    1979-01-01

    Antigen preparations derived from Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (but not from uninfected erythrocytes) can stimulate the in vitro proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes from malaria-sensitized as well as nonsensitized donors. The possibility that the nonspecific responses might be due to a parasite-derived B-cell mitogen has been previously suggested since polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia is a frequent accompaniment of malaria infection. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the in vitro proliferative responses of purified T- and B-cell populations to malaria antigens. T but not B cells responded to the antigens. The addition of small numbers of T cells restored the ability of purified B cells to respond to lectin mitogens but not to malaria antigens. Falciparum malaria infection was associated with an increase in T-cell but not in B-cell proliferation in vivo, as assessed by the spontaneous tritiated thymidine incorporation of lymphocytes during a brief incubation in vitro. Our observations suggest that extracts of malaria parasites do not contain a B-cell mitogen but are antigenic as well as mitogenic for T cells. PMID:378840

  2. Use of fractionated urinary filarial antigen in the diagnosis of human filariasis.

    PubMed

    Ramaprasad, P; Harinath, B C

    1995-02-01

    Fractionated urinary filarial antigen UFA C2 has shown high antigenic activity after absorption of urinary albumin present in the fraction. As little as 500 ag (10(-18) g) of albumin absorbed UFA C2, labelled as UFA C2-A, was found to be sufficient to detect filarial antibody. Stick enzyme immunoassay to assess the immunodiagnostic potential of UFA C2-A indicated filarial IgG antibody in 89% of microfilaraemic (mf) cases, 84% of clinical filariasis and 7% of endemic normals. UFA C2-A was found to be present in circulation in active as well as clinical infections as observed by inhibition assay using UFA C2-A penicillinase conjugate. Eighty-six per cent of mf, 50% of clinical cases and 6% of endemic normal subjects revealed parasite antigen to UFA C2-A on further serological analysis. None of the non-endemic normal sera showed the presence of filarial antibody/antigen to UFA C2-A. Furthermore, the test to determine phosphorylcholine (PC) bearing epitopes in UFA C2-A indicated no immunological reaction with anti-PC monoclonal antibody by avidin-biotin enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The highly sensitive and more easily obtainable non-PC urinary filarial antigen, UFA C2-A, is of great immunodiagnostic interest for lymphatic filariasis.

  3. Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses to Sublingual or Intramuscular Human Papilloma Virus Antigens in Healthy Female Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Giemza, Raphaela; Beddows, Simon; Oeser, Clarissa; Lewis, David J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The sublingual route has been proposed as a needle-free option to induce systemic and mucosal immune protection against viral infections. In a translational study of systemic and mucosal humoral immune responses to sublingual or systemically administered viral antigens, eighteen healthy female volunteers aged 19–31 years received three immunizations with a quadravalent Human Papilloma Virus vaccine at 0, 4 and 16 weeks as sublingual drops (SL, n = 12) or intramuscular injection (IM, n = 6). IM antigen delivery induced or boosted HPV-specific serum IgG and pseudovirus-neutralizing antibodies, HPV-specific cervical and vaginal IgG, and elicited circulating IgG and IgA antibody secreting cells. SL antigens induced ∼38-fold lower serum and ∼2-fold lower cervical/vaginal IgG than IM delivery, and induced or boosted serum virus neutralizing antibody in only 3/12 subjects. Neither route reproducibly induced HPV-specific mucosal IgA. Alternative delivery systems and adjuvants will be required to enhance and evaluate immune responses following sublingual immunization in humans. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00949572 PMID:22438987

  4. Human Monoclonal Islet Cell Antibodies From a Patient with Insulin- Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Reveal Glutamate Decarboxylase as the Target Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Wiltrud; Endl, Josef; Eiermann, Thomas H.; Brandt, Michael; Kientsch-Engel, Rosemarie; Thivolet, Charles; Jungfer, Herbert; Scherbaum, Werner A.

    1992-09-01

    The autoimmune phenomena associated with destruction of the β cell in pancreatic islets and development of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) include circulating islet cell antibodies. We have immortalized peripheral blood lymphocytes from prediabetic individuals and patients with newly diagnosed IDDM by Epstein-Barr virus transformation. IgG-positive cells were selected by anti-human IgG-coupled magnetic beads and expanded in cell culture. Supernatants were screened for cytoplasmic islet cell antibodies using the conventional indirect immunofluorescence test on cryostat sections of human pancreas. Six islet cell-specific B-cell lines, originating from a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM, could be stabilized on a monoclonal level. All six monoclonal islet cell antibodies (MICA 1-6) were of the IgG class. None of the MICA reacted with human thyroid, adrenal gland, anterior pituitary, liver, lung, stomach, and intestine tissues but all six reacted with pancreatic islets of different mammalian species and, in addition, with neurons of rat cerebellar cortex. MICA 1-6 were shown to recognize four distinct antigenic epitopes in islets. Islet cell antibody-positive diabetic sera but not normal human sera blocked the binding of the monoclonal antibodies to their target epitopes. Immunoprecipitation of 35S-labeled human islet cell extracts revealed that a protein of identical size to the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15) was a target of all MICA. Furthermore, antigen immunotrapped by the MICA from brain homogenates showed glutamate decarboxylase enzyme activity. MICA 1-6 therefore reveal glutamate decarboxylase as the predominant target antigen of cytoplasmic islet cell autoantibodies in a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM.

  5. Use of human antigen presenting cell gene array profiling to examine the effect of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax on primary human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Jaya; Kampani, Karan; Datta, Suman; Wigdahl, Brian; Flaig, Katherine E; Jain, Pooja

    2006-02-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is etiologically linked to adult T-cell leukemia and a progressive demyelinating disorder termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). One of the most striking features of the immune response in HAM/TSP centers on the expansion of HTLV-1-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) compartment in the peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid. More than 90% of the HTLV-1-specific CTLs are directed against the viral Tax (11-19) peptide implying that Tax is available for immune recognition by antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). DCs obtained from HAM/TSP patients have been shown to be infected with HTLV-1 and exhibit rapid maturation. Therefore, we hypothesized that presentation of Tax peptides by activated DCs to naIve CD8(+) T cells may play an important role in the induction of a Tax-specific CTL response and neurologic dysfunction. In this study, a pathway-specific antigen presenting cell gene array was used to study transcriptional changes induced by exposure of monocyte-derived DCs to extracellular HTLV-1 Tax protein. Approximately 100 genes were differentially expressed including genes encoding toll-like receptors, cell surface receptors, proteins involved in antigen uptake and presentation and adhesion molecules. The differential regulation of chemokines and cytokines characteristic of functional DC activation was also observed by the gene array analyses. Furthermore, the expression pattern of signal transduction genes was also significantly altered. These results have suggested that Tax-mediated DC gene regulation might play a critical role in cellular activation and the mechanisms resulting in HTLV-1-induced disease.

  6. T-cell receptor gene therapy targeting melanoma-associated antigen-A4 inhibits human tumor growth in non-obese diabetic/SCID/γcnull mice.

    PubMed

    Shirakura, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Yukari; Wang, Linan; Imai, Naoko; Amaike, Chisaki; Sato, Eiichi; Ito, Mamoru; Nukaya, Ikuei; Mineno, Junichi; Takesako, Kazutoh; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with lymphocytes that have been genetically engineered to express tumor-reactive T-cell receptors (TCR) is a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy. We have been exploring the development of TCR gene therapy targeting cancer/testis antigens, including melanoma-associated antigen (MAGE) family antigens, that are ideal targets for adoptive T-cell therapy. The efficacy of TCR gene therapy targeting MAGE family antigens, however, has not yet been evaluated in vivo. Here, we demonstrate the in vivo antitumor activity in immunodeficient non-obese diabetic/SCID/γc(null) (NOG) mice of human lymphocytes genetically engineered to express TCR specific for the MAGE-A4 antigen. Polyclonal T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were transduced with the αβ TCR genes specific for MAGE-A4, then adoptively transferred into NOG mice inoculated with MAGE-A4 expressing human tumor cell lines. The transferred T cells maintained their effector function in vivo, infiltrated into tumors, and inhibited tumor growth in an antigen-specific manner. The combination of adoptive cell therapy with antigen peptide vaccination enhanced antitumor activity, with improved multifunctionality of the transferred cells. These data suggest that TCR gene therapy with MAGE-A4-specific TCR is a promising strategy to treat patients with MAGE-A4-expressing tumors; in addition, the acquisition of multifunctionality in vivo is an important factor to predict the quality of the T-cell response during adoptive therapy with human lymphocytes.

  7. The Genetic Origin of Leucocytic Mucopolysaccharides in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Riesco, A.; Coke, R. Cruz

    1973-01-01

    The presence or absence of lymphocytic mucopolysaccharides (MPS) is studied in 223 subjects: 100 normals (controls); 8 cancer patients cured for more than 6 years; 30 cancer patients at the start of their treatment; and 85 relatives of first degree consanguinity of these last patients. The data are studied by statistical and genetic analysis. The results confirm the findings reported earlier and show that the difference in the probability of a high frequency of leucocytic MPS between the relatives of cancer patients and the controls is highly significant. Furthermore, this probability in a relative of first degree of consanguinity of a cancer patient is more than three times greater than in an individual of the general population. Genetic segregation analysis shows that the high leucocytic MPS trait segregates in the families of cancer patients after a classic pattern of dominant autosomal inheritance. Applying Falconer's nomogram it is concluded that the whole of this phenotypic variation is of genetic origin. Its interrelationships with cancer are discussed and it is postulated that this disturbance of the lymphocytic MPS represents a subclinical variant, not known until now, of the clinical mucopolysaccaridoses. PMID:4270340

  8. In vivo leucocyte migration in Behçet's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Efthimiou, J; Addison, I E; Johnson, B V

    1989-01-01

    Serial studies of leucocyte migration in vivo were carried out in 15 patients with Behçet's syndrome using a skin window technique. Where possible, patients with and without active disease were studied during and in the absence of treatment. In patients with active disease neutrophil migration was frequently greater than normal, particularly with respect to numbers of cells migrating. There was also an increased frequency of emigrating neutrophils with less or more nuclear lobes than normal. In three patients in whom function of skin window neutrophils was studied nitroblue tetrazolium reduction and phagocytosis and killing of Candida guilliermondiae were normal. The monocyte component of the skin window was more often reduced in patients than in normal controls. Corticosteroid treatment did not exert a major effect on leucocyte migration, though the doses involved were relatively small. Neutrophil abnormalities were common in patients and particularly those with active disease. These results suggest that neutrophil hyperactivity may have an important role in the pathogenesis of Behçet's syndrome. PMID:2649027

  9. Rational development and characterization of humanized anti-EGFR variant III chimeric antigen receptor T cells for glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Laura A; Scholler, John; Ohkuri, Takayuki; Kosaka, Akemi; Patel, Prachi R; McGettigan, Shannon E; Nace, Arben K; Dentchev, Tzvete; Thekkat, Pramod; Loew, Andreas; Boesteanu, Alina C; Cogdill, Alexandria P; Chen, Taylor; Fraietta, Joseph A; Kloss, Christopher C; Posey, Avery D; Engels, Boris; Singh, Reshma; Ezell, Tucker; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Ramones, Melissa H; Li, Na; Zhou, Li; Plesa, Gabriela; Seykora, John T; Okada, Hideho; June, Carl H; Brogdon, Jennifer L; Maus, Marcela V

    2015-02-18

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are synthetic molecules designed to redirect T cells to specific antigens. CAR-modified T cells can mediate long-term durable remissions in B cell malignancies, but expanding this platform to solid tumors requires the discovery of surface targets with limited expression in normal tissues. The variant III mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) results from an in-frame deletion of a portion of the extracellular domain, creating a neoepitope. We chose a vector backbone encoding a second-generation CAR based on efficacy of a murine scFv-based CAR in a xenograft model of glioblastoma. Next, we generated a panel of humanized scFvs and tested their specificity and function as soluble proteins and in the form of CAR-transduced T cells; a low-affinity scFv was selected on the basis of its specificity for EGFRvIII over wild-type EGFR. The lead candidate scFv was tested in vitro for its ability to direct CAR-transduced T cells to specifically lyse, proliferate, and secrete cytokines in response to antigen-bearing targets. We further evaluated the specificity of the lead CAR candidate in vitro against EGFR-expressing keratinocytes and in vivo in a model of mice grafted with normal human skin. EGFRvIII-directed CAR T cells were also able to control tumor growth in xenogeneic subcutaneous and orthotopic models of human EGFRvIII(+) glioblastoma. On the basis of these results, we have designed a phase 1 clinical study of CAR T cells transduced with humanized scFv directed to EGFRvIII in patients with either residual or recurrent glioblastoma (NCT02209376).

  10. Gene therapy with human and mouse T-cell receptors mediates cancer regression and targets normal tissues expressing cognate antigen

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Laura A.; Morgan, Richard A.; Dudley, Mark E.; Cassard, Lydie; Yang, James C.; Hughes, Marybeth S.; Kammula, Udai S.; Royal, Richard E.; Sherry, Richard M.; Wunderlich, John R.; Lee, Chyi-Chia R.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Schwarz, Susan L.; Cogdill, Alexandria P.; Bishop, Rachel J.; Kim, Hung; Brewer, Carmen C.; Rudy, Susan F.; VanWaes, Carter; Davis, Jeremy L.; Mathur, Aarti; Ripley, Robert T.; Nathan, Debbie A.; Laurencot, Carolyn M.

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy of human cancer using genetically engineered lymphocytes is dependent on the identification of highly reactive T-cell receptors (TCRs) with antitumor activity. We immunized transgenic mice and also conducted high-throughput screening of human lymphocytes to generate TCRs highly reactive to melanoma/melanocyte antigens. Genes encoding these TCRs were engineered into retroviral vectors and used to transduce autologous peripheral lymphocytes administered to 36 patients with metastatic melanoma. Transduced patient lymphocytes were CD45RA− and CD45RO+ after ex vivo expansion. After infusion, the persisting cells displayed a CD45RA+ and CD45RO− phenotype. Gene-engineered cells persisted at high levels in the blood of all patients 1 month after treatment, responding patients with higher ex vivo antitumor reactivity than nonresponders. Objective cancer regressions were seen in 30% and 19% of patients who received the human or mouse TCR, respectively. However, patients exhibited destruction of normal melanocytes in the skin, eye, and ear, and sometimes required local steroid administration to treat uveitis and hearing loss. Thus, T cells expressing highly reactive TCRs mediate cancer regression in humans and target rare cognate–antigen-containing cells throughout the body, a finding with important implications for the gene therapy of cancer. This trial was registered at www.ClinicalTrials.gov as NCI-07-C-0174 and NCI-07-C-0175. PMID:19451549

  11. Stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 identifies human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kawanabe, Noriaki; Murata, Satoko; Fukushima, Hiroaki; Ishihara, Yoshihito; Yanagita, Takeshi; Yanagita, Emmy; Ono, Mitsuaki; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Kamioka, Hiroshi; Itoh, Tomoo; Kuboki, Takuo; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2012-03-10

    Embryonic stem cell-associated antigens are expressed in a variety of adult stem cells as well as embryonic stem cells. In the present study, we investigated whether stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4 can be used to isolate dental pulp (DP) stem cells. DP cells showed plastic adherence, specific surface antigen expression, and multipotent differentiation potential, similar to mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). SSEA-4+ cells were found in cultured DP cells in vitro as well as in DP tissue in vivo. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that 45.5% of the DP cells were SSEA-4+. When the DP cells were cultured in the presence of all-trans-retinoic acid, marked downregulation of SSEA-3 and SSEA-4 and the upregulation of SSEA-1 were observed. SSEA-4+ DP cells showed a greater telomere length and a higher growth rate compared to ungated and SSEA-4- cells. A clonal assay demonstrated that 65.5% of the SSEA-4+ DP cells had osteogenic potential, and the SSEA-4+ clonal DP cells showed multilineage differentiation potential toward osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and neurons in vitro. In addition, the SSEA-4+ DP cells had the capacity to form ectopic bone in vivo. Thus, our results suggest that SSEA-4 is a specific cell surface antigen that can be used to identify DP stem cells.

  12. Use of heteropolymeric monoclonal antibodies to attach antigens to the C3b receptor of human erythrocytes: A potential therapeutic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.P.; Sutherland, W.M.; Reist, C.J.; Webb, D.J.; Wright, E.L.; Labuguen, R.H. )

    1991-04-15

    The authors prepared bispecific, cross-linked monoclonal antibodies (heteropolymers) with specificity for both targeted antigens and the human erythrocyte (RBC) complement receptor. These heteropolymers facilitate binding of target antigens (human IgG and dinitrophenylated bovine {gamma} globulin) to human RBCs under conditions that either allow or preclude complement activation. Radioimmuno-assay analyses of this binding agree well with the number of complement receptors per RBC. In vitro whole-blood model experiments indicate heteropolymer-facilitated binding of antigens to RBCs is rapid and stable at 37C. It may be possible to extend these prototype experiments to the in vivo situation and use heteropolymer-attached RBCs for the safe and rapid binding, neutralization, and removal from the circulation of pathogenic antigens associated with infectious disease.

  13. Use of Heteropolymeric Monoclonal Antibodies to Attach Antigens to the C3b Receptor of Human Erythrocytes: A Potential Therapeutic Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Ronald P.; Sutherland, William M.; Reist, Craig J.; Webb, Donna J.; Wright, Eleanor L.; Labuguen, Ronald H.

    1991-04-01

    We have prepared bispecific, cross-linked monoclonal antibodies (heteropolymers) with specificity for both targeted antigens and the human erythrocyte (RBC) complement receptor. These heteropolymers facilitate binding of target antigens (human IgG and dinitrophenylated bovine γ globulin) to human RBCs under conditions that either allow or preclude complement activation. Quantitative analyses of this binding agree well with the number of complement receptors per RBC. In vitro "whole-blood" model experiments indicate heteropolymer-facilitated binding of antigens to RBCs is rapid and stable at 37^circC. It may be possible to extend these prototype experiments to the in vivo situation and use heteropolymer-attached RBCs for the safe and rapid binding, neutralization, and removal from the circulation of pathogenic antigens associated with infectious disease.

  14. Human lymphocyte markers defined by antibodies derived from somatic cell hybrids. II. A hybridoma secreting antibody against an antigen expressed by human B and null lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Beckman, I G; Bradley, J; Brooks, D A; Kupa, A; McNamara, P J; Thomas, M E; Zola, H

    1980-06-01

    A hybridoma (FMC4) has been derived which secretes antibody showing selective reaction with human B lymphocytes, monocytes and some null lymphocytes. Few, if any, T lymphocytes in normal blood are stained, although stimulation of lymphocytes with PHA leads to an increase in the proportion of cells reacting with the hybridoma antibody. The antibody reacts with B and null lymphoblastoid cell lines but not with T cell lines. B chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells but not T-CLLs are stained and null-type acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) cells but not T-type ALL also react. Normal blood myeloid cells do not react with FMC4 supernatant whilst some myeloid leukaemias do. The expression of the antigen reacting with FMC4 supernatant suggests that FMC4 may secrete an antibody against the human equivalent of the Ia antigen.

  15. Human lymphocyte markers defined by antibodies derived from somatic cell hybrids. II. A hybridoma secreting antibody against an antigen expressed by human B and null lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Beckman, I G; Bradley, J; Brooks, D A; Kupa, A; McNamara, P J; Thomas, M E; Zola, H

    1980-01-01

    A hybridoma (FMC4) has been derived which secretes antibody showing selective reaction with human B lymphocytes, monocytes and some null lymphocytes. Few, if any, T lymphocytes in normal blood are stained, although stimulation of lymphocytes with PHA leads to an increase in the proportion of cells reacting with the hybridoma antibody. The antibody reacts with B and null lymphoblastoid cell lines but not with T cell lines. B chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells but not T-CLLs are stained and null-type acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) cells but not T-type ALL also react. Normal blood myeloid cells do not react with FMC4 supernatant whilst some myeloid leukaemias do. The expression of the antigen reacting with FMC4 supernatant suggests that FMC4 may secrete an antibody against the human equivalent of the Ia antigen. PMID:6968260

  16. Diagnosing tumours on routine surgical sections by immunohistochemistry: use of cytokeratin, common leucocyte, and other markers.

    PubMed Central

    Poston, R N; Sidhu, Y S

    1986-01-01

    Tumours of uncertain tissue of origin were investigated by immunohistochemistry on formalin fixed paraffin embedded sections. Two antibodies--PD7/26, an anti common leucocyte antigen, and CAM5.2, an anticytokeratin--recognised most lymphomas and carcinomas, respectively: 88% of these tumours were identified by the two antibodies alone. These antibodies permitted the separation of the cases into groups: positive with CAM5.2, positive with PD7/26, and a third comprising those negative with both. The negative group contained other tumours and a small number of carcinomas and lymphomas; many of the lymphomas were, apparently, of histiocytic origin. Comparison of CAM5.2 with other epithelial markers showed that it was the most effective. Some further classification of the tumours was carried out with a panel of organ and cell specific antibodies: mesotheliomas were recognised by their pattern of reactivity with epithelial markers. Overall, the tumour type was determined in 90% of cases. Immunohistochemistry performed as described can be a potent aid to the diagnostic histopathology of tumours. Images PMID:2424934

  17. Endotoxin activation of endothelium for polymorphonuclear leucocyte transendothelial migration and modulation by interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Issekutz, A C; Lopes, N

    1993-01-01

    Endotoxin [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] is a potent inflammatory stimulus and can activate human umbilical vein endothelium (HUVE) for leucocyte adhesiveness and transendothelial migration. Here we investigated the role of HUVE-secreted cytokines in this process. When HUVE monolayers were grown on filters and preincubated for 3 hr with LPS, 51Cr-labelled polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) migrated across the HUVE in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Maximal PMNL transmigration with LPS (1 ng/ml) was 26 +/- 3% of added PMNL in 75 min. Neutralizing antibodies to interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) and IL-1 beta, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-8 or recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist had no effect on the activation by LPS of the HUVE for supporting migration of PMNL. The HUVE 'activated state' declined with prolonged (22 hr) exposure to LPS, as reflected by a decrease in PMNL transendothelial migration to 5.5 +/- 1% and in the expression of the endothelial cell adhesion molecule, E-selectin, as compared to stimulation with LPS for 3 hr. However, simultaneous exposure to interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) (200 IU/ml) and LPS maintained maximal PMNL transendothelial migration (28 +/- 4%) for at least 24 hr, prolonged E-selectin expression by HUVE and superinduced intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression. The PMNL transendothelial migration was blocked by > 90% by monoclonal antibody (mAb) to CD18 with either 3 hr of LPS or 22 hr LPS + IFN-gamma stimulation. Migration was partially inhibited by mAb to E-selectin (30-40%) or to ICAM-1 (35-45%) and by a combination of both reagents (50-60%) under both stimulation conditions. Thus, LPS activation of HUVE for PMNL transendothelial migration: (a) does not require secretion of IL-1, TNF-alpha or IL-8 by the endothelium, (b) IFN-gamma enhances and prolongs endothelial activation by LPS and may increase leucocyte infiltration in LPS or bacterial inflammatory reactions, and (c) CD18-dependent mechanisms are

  18. Antigen-presenting cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania major.

    PubMed Central

    ElHassan, A M; Gaafar, A; Theander, T G

    1995-01-01

    In this study biopsies from skin lesions and draining lymph nodes of patients suffering from cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major were examined by immunohistochemistry, and by light and electron microscopy to identify the types of antigen-presenting cells (APC) and their location. APC, identified morphologically and by their expression of specific cell markers, included Langerhans cells, macrophages, follicular dendritic cells, and interdigitating reticulum cells of the paracortex of lymph nodes. These cells expressed MHC class II antigens and contained Leishmania antigen. Since some keratinocytes and endothelial cells also showed these characteristics, they may also act as APC. By examining tissue samples from skin lesions and draining lymph nodes it was possible to follow the probable route of trafficking of various inflammatory cells between the skin lesion and lymph nodes. Leishmania antigen containing Langerhans cells were found in the epidermis, dermis and the regional lymph nodes. We believe these cells translocate from the epidermis to the dermis, where they take up antigen and migrate to the paracortex of the regional lymph nodes. There they are intimately associated with cells of the paracortex, and could be involved in the generation of Leishmania-specific T memory cells. LFA-1-positive T cells of the CD45RO phenotype were found in the skin lesion. Venular endothelium in the skin lesions expressed intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which is the ligand for LFA-1. The migration of lymphocytes from the vascular lumen to the site of inflammation is possibly a result of the interaction of these two adhesion molecules. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7882568

  19. Simian virus 40 DNA replication correlates with expression of a particular subclass of T antigen in a human glial cell line.

    PubMed

    Deminie, C A; Norkin, L C

    1990-08-01

    Immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization were used to identify simian virus 40 (SV40) large T-antigen expression and viral DNA replication in individual cells of infected semipermissive human cell lines. SV40 infection aborts before T-antigen expression in many cells of each of the human cell lines examined. In all but one of the human cell lines, most of the T-antigen-producing cells replicated viral DNA. However, in the A172 line of human glial cells only a small percentage of the T-antigen-expressing cells replicated viral DNA. Since different structural and functional classes of T antigen can be recognized with anti-T monoclonal antibodies, we examined infected A172 cells with a panel of 10 anti-T monoclonal antibodies to determine whether viral DNA replication might correlate with the expression of a particular epitope of T antigen. One anti-T monoclonal antibody, PAb 100, did specifically recognize that subset of A172 cells which replicated SV40 DNA. The percentage of PAb 100-reactive A172 cells was dramatically increased by the DNA synthesis inhibitors hydroxyurea and aphidicolin. Removal of the hydroxyurea was followed by an increase in the percentage of cells replicating viral DNA corresponding to the increased percentage reactive with PAb 100. The pattern of SV40 infection in A172 cells was not altered by infection with viable viral mutants containing lesions in the small t protein, the agnoprotein, or the enhancer region. Finally, in situ hybridization was used to show that the percentage of human cells expressing T antigen was similar to the percentage transcribing early SV40 mRNA. Thus, the block to T-antigen expression in human cells is at a stage prior to transcription of early SV40 mRNA.

  20. Functional Recombinant Extra Membrane Loop of Human CD20, an Alternative of the Full Length CD20 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Anbouhi, Mahdi Habibi; Baraz, Aida Feiz; Bouzari, Saeid; Abolhassani, Mohsen; Khanahmad, Hossein; Golkar, Majid; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Behdani, Mahdi; Najafabadi, Ali Jahanian; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2012-01-01

    Background: Targeting of CD20 antigen with monoclonal antibodies has become the mainstay in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and immunotherapeutic depletion of malignant B cells. Accessibility of antigen is one of the crucial factors in development of monoclonal antibodies against this antigen. One major problem in expression of full length CD20 is aggregation and misfolding. Therefore, production of an alternative polypeptide is easer and favorable comparing to that of a full length transmembrane protein CD20. Methods: In this study, we expressed the extra membrane loop of hCD20 (exCD20) consisting of a non-glycosylated 47-amino acids region. The exCD20 coding sequence was amplified by PCR and cloned in pET32a(+) expression vector. The desired protein was expressed in fusion with thioredoxin and 6× His tag in E. coli Origami strain. ELISA and Western-blotting data were performed to indicate the functionality of this protein. Results: We have obtained the exCD20 recombinant protein which can be detected in ELISA and Western-blot experiments. This recombinant fusion protein was soluble and stable without aggregation and misfolding problems. Conclusion: The recombinant extra membrane loop of human CD20 protein in fusion with thioredoxin (exCD20) can be used in function assays and some applications such as ELISA, immuneblotting, affinity purification, immunization, screening, and development of anti-CD20 antibodies. PMID:23023212

  1. Expression of senescent antigen on erythrocytes infected with a knobby variant of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Winograd, E.; Greenan, J.R.T.; Sherman, I.W.

    1987-04-01

    Erythrocytes infected with a knobby variant of Plasmodium falciparum selectively bind IgG autoantibodies in normal human serum. Quantification of membrane-bound IgG, by use of /sup 125/I-labeled protein A, revealed that erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant bound 30 times more protein A than did noninfected erythrocytes; infection with a knobless variant resulted in less than a 2-fold difference compared with noninfected erythrocytes. IgG binding to knobby erythrocytes appeared to be related to parasite development, since binding of /sup 125/I-labeled protein A to cells bearing young trophozoites (less than 20 hr after parasite invasion) was similar to binding to uninfected erythrocytes. By immunoelectron microscopy, the membrane-bound IgG on erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant was found to be preferentially associated with the protuberances (knobs) of the plasma membrane. The removal of aged or senescent erythrocytes from the peripheral circulation is reported to involve the binding of specific antibodies to an antigen (senescent antigen) related to the major erythrocyte membrane protein band 3. Since affinity-purified autoantibodies against band 3 specifically bound to the plasma membrane of erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant of P. falciparum, it is clear that the malaria parasite induces expression of senescent antigen.

  2. Modulation of human natural killer T cell ligands on TLR-mediated antigen-presenting cell activation.

    PubMed

    Salio, Mariolina; Speak, Anneliese O; Shepherd, Dawn; Polzella, Paolo; Illarionov, Petr A; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S; Platt, Frances M; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2007-12-18

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a subset of nonconventional T cells recognizing endogenous and/or exogenous glycolipid antigens in the context of CD1d molecules. It remains unclear whether innate stimuli can modify the profile of endogenous lipids recognized by iNKT cells on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). We report that activation of human APCs by Toll-like receptor ligands (TLR-L) modulates the lipid biosynthetic pathway, resulting in enhanced recognition of CD1d-associated lipids by iNKT cells, as defined by IFN-gamma secretion. APC-derived soluble factors further increase CD1d-restricted iNKT cell activation. Finally, using soluble tetrameric iNKT T cell receptors (TCR) as a staining reagent, we demonstrate specific up-regulation of CD1d-bound ligand(s) on TLR-mediated APC maturation. The ability of innate stimuli to modulate the lipid profile of APCs resulting in iNKT cell activation and APC maturation underscores the role of iNKT cells in assisting priming of antigen-specific immune responses.

  3. Modulation of human natural killer T cell ligands on TLR-mediated antigen-presenting cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Salio, Mariolina; Speak, Anneliese O.; Shepherd, Dawn; Polzella, Paolo; Illarionov, Petr A.; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Platt, Frances M.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2007-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a subset of nonconventional T cells recognizing endogenous and/or exogenous glycolipid antigens in the context of CD1d molecules. It remains unclear whether innate stimuli can modify the profile of endogenous lipids recognized by iNKT cells on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). We report that activation of human APCs by Toll-like receptor ligands (TLR-L) modulates the lipid biosynthetic pathway, resulting in enhanced recognition of CD1d-associated lipids by iNKT cells, as defined by IFN-γ secretion. APC-derived soluble factors further increase CD1d-restricted iNKT cell activation. Finally, using soluble tetrameric iNKT T cell receptors (TCR) as a staining reagent, we demonstrate specific up-regulation of CD1d-bound ligand(s) on TLR-mediated APC maturation. The ability of innate stimuli to modulate the lipid profile of APCs resulting in iNKT cell activation and APC maturation underscores the role of iNKT cells in assisting priming of antigen-specific immune responses. PMID:18077358

  4. Genetic analysis and antigenic characterization of human respiratory syncytial virus group A viruses isolated in Germany 1996-2008.

    PubMed

    Adams, Ortwin; Werzmirzowsky, Judith; Hengel, Hartmut

    2013-10-01

    The genetic and antigenic variability of 18 human respiratory syncytial virus group A viruses isolated in Germany from 1996 to 2008 was evaluated by nucleotide sequencing of the complete G and F genes and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis with anti-G and anti-F monoclonal antibodies. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the G-proteins clustered into the two genotypes GA2 and GA5. The antigenic analysis of G-gene was carried out with a panel of anti-G and anti-F monoclonal antibodies that recognized strain-specific or variable epitopes which were originally derived against long strain (subtype GA1) and MON-3-88 strain (GA2). An amino acid substitution was found in a potential O-glycosylation site leading to a loss of reactivity with a strain-specific MAb. A score was calculated for quantifying the overall reactivity of the antibodies. If reactivity of all MAbs was totalized, a net sum loss of reactivity was seen over the time suggesting that antigenic drift due to immune selection may be occurring.

  5. Human dendritic cells differentiated in hypoxia down-modulate antigen uptake and change their chemokine expression profile.

    PubMed

    Elia, Angela Rita; Cappello, Paola; Puppo, Maura; Fraone, Tiziana; Vanni, Cristina; Eva, Alessandra; Musso, Tiziana; Novelli, Francesco; Varesio, Luigi; Giovarelli, Mirella

    2008-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells and fine-tune the immune response. We have investigated hypoxia's effects on the differentiation and maturation of DCs from human monocytes in vitro, and have shown that it affects DC functions. Hypoxic immature DCs (H-iDCs) significantly fail to capture antigens through down-modulation of the RhoA/Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin pathway and the expression of CD206. Moreover, H-iDCs released higher levels of CXCL1, VEGF, CCL20, CXCL8, and CXCL10 but decreased levels of CCL2 and CCL18, which predict a different ability to recruit neutro