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Sample records for human lung tissue

  1. Inhaled cellulosic and plastic fibers found in human lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Pauly, J L; Stegmeier, S J; Allaart, H A; Cheney, R T; Zhang, P J; Mayer, A G; Streck, R J

    1998-05-01

    We report the results of studies undertaken to determine whether inhaled plant (i.e., cellulosic; e.g., cotton) and plastic (e.g., polyester) fibers are present in human lungs and, if so, whether inhaled fibers are also present in human lung cancers. Specimens of lung cancer of different histological types and adjacent nonneoplastic lung tissue were obtained from patients undergoing a lung resection for removal of a tumor. With the protection of a laminar flow hood and safeguards to prevent contamination by extraneous fibers, fresh, nonfixed, and nonstained samples of lung tissue were compressed between two glass microscope slides. Specimens in these dual slide chambers were examined with a microscope configured to permit viewing with white light, fluorescent light, polarizing light, and phase-contrast illumination. Near-term fetal bovine lungs and nonlung human tumors were used as controls. In contrast to the observations of these control tissues, morphologically heterogeneous fibers were seen repetitively in freshly excised human lung tissue using polarized light. Inhaled fibers were present in 83% of nonneoplastic lung specimens (n = 67/81) and in 97% of malignant lung specimens (n = 32/33). Thus, of the 114 human lung specimens examined, fibers were observed in 99 (87%). Examination of histopathology slides of lung tissue with polarized light confirmed the presence of inhaled cellulosic and plastic fibers. Of 160 surgical histopathology lung tissue slides, 17 were selected for critical examination; of these, fibers were identified in 13 slides. The inhalation of mineral (e.g., asbestos) fibers has been described by many investigators; we believe, however, that this is the first report of inhaled nonmineral (e.g., plant and plastic) fibers. These bioresistant and biopersistent cellulosic and plastic fibers are candidate agents contributing to the risk of lung cancer.

  2. A novel SCID mouse model for studying spontaneous metastasis of human lung cancer to human tissue.

    PubMed

    Teraoka, S; Kyoizumi, S; Seyama, T; Yamakido, M; Akiyama, M

    1995-05-01

    We established a novel severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model for the study of human lung cancer metastasis to human lung. Implantation of both human fetal and adult lung tissue into mammary fat pads of SCID mice showed a 100% rate of engraftment, but only fetal lung implants revealed normal morphology of human lung tissue. Using these chimeric mice, we analyzed human lung cancer metastasis to both mouse and human lungs by subcutaneous inoculation of human squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma cell lines into the mice. In 60 to 70% of SCID mice injected with human-lung squamous-cell carcinoma, RERF-LC-AI, cancer cells were found to have metastasized to both mouse lungs and human fetal lung implants but not to human adult lung implants 80 days after cancer inoculation. Furthermore, human-lung adenocarcinoma cells, RERF-LC-KJ, metastasized to the human lung implants within 90 days in about 40% of SCID mice, whereas there were no metastases to the lungs of the mice. These results demonstrate the potential of this model for the in vivo study of human lung cancer metastasis.

  3. Impact of Statins on Gene Expression in Human Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jérôme; van Eeden, Stephan F.; Obeidat, Ma’en; Sin, Don D.; Tebbutt, Scott J.; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje S.; Laviolette, Michel; Paré, Peter D.; Bossé, Yohan

    2015-01-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that alter the synthesis of cholesterol. Some studies have shown a significant association of statins with improved respiratory health outcomes of patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Here we hypothesize that statins impact gene expression in human lungs and may reveal the pleiotropic effects of statins that are taking place directly in lung tissues. Human lung tissues were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection or transplantation. Gene expression was measured on a custom Affymetrix array in a discovery cohort (n = 408) and two replication sets (n = 341 and 282). Gene expression was evaluated by linear regression between statin users and non-users, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and other covariables. The results of each cohort were combined in a meta-analysis and biological pathways were studied using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The discovery set included 141 statin users. The lung mRNA expression levels of eighteen and three genes were up-regulated and down-regulated in statin users (FDR < 0.05), respectively. Twelve of the up-regulated genes were replicated in the first replication set, but none in the second (p-value < 0.05). Combining the discovery and replication sets into a meta-analysis improved the significance of the 12 up-regulated genes, which includes genes encoding enzymes and membrane proteins involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Canonical biological pathways altered by statins in the lung include cholesterol, steroid, and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. No genes encoding inflammatory, proteases, pro-fibrotic or growth factors were altered by statins, suggesting that the direct effect of statin in the lung do not go beyond its antilipidemic action. Although more studies are needed with specific lung cell types and different classes and doses of statins, the improved health outcomes and survival observed in statin

  4. Proteogenomic Analysis of Human Chromosome 9-Encoded Genes from Human Samples and Lung Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jung-Mo; Kim, Min-Sik; Kim, Yong-In; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Lee, Sun Hee; Paik, Young-Ki; Pandey, Akhilesh; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2014-01-01

    The Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) was recently initiated as an international collaborative effort. Our team adopted chromosome 9 (Chr 9) and performed a bioinformatics and proteogenomic analysis to catalog Chr 9-encoded proteins from normal tissues, lung cancer cell lines and lung cancer tissues. Approximately 74.7% of the Chr 9 genes of the human genome were identified, which included approximately 28% of missing proteins (46 of 162) on Chr 9 compared with the list of missing proteins from the neXtProt master table (2013-09). In addition, we performed a comparative proteomics analysis between normal lung and lung cancer tissues. Based on the data analysis, 15 proteins from Chr 9 were detected only in lung cancer tissues. Finally, we conducted a proteogenomic analysis to discover Chr 9-residing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and mutations described in the COSMIC cancer mutation database. We identified 21 SNPs and 4 mutations containing peptides on Chr 9 from normal human cells/tissues and lung cancer cell lines, respectively. In summary, this study provides valuable information of the human proteome for the scientific community as part of C-HPP. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD. PMID:24274035

  5. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H.; Deatly, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesenchymal tissue-like assemblies (3D hLEM TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infection with the virus. Therefore, we assert TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host s immune system.

  6. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Myeloid Cells in Human Blood, Bronchoalveolar Lavage, and Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yen-Rei A.; Hotten, Danielle F.; Malakhau, Yuryi; Volker, Ellen; Ghio, Andrew J.; Noble, Paul W.; Kraft, Monica; Hollingsworth, John W.; Gunn, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Clear identification of specific cell populations by flow cytometry is important to understand functional roles. A well-defined flow cytometry panel for myeloid cells in human bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue is currently lacking. The objective of this study was to develop a flow cytometry–based panel for human BAL and lung tissue. We obtained and performed flow cytometry/sorting on human BAL cells and lung tissue. Confocal images were obtained from lung tissue using antibodies for cluster of differentiation (CD)206, CD169, and E cadherin. We defined a multicolor flow panel for human BAL and lung tissue that identifies major leukocyte populations. These include macrophage (CD206+) subsets and other CD206− leukocytes. The CD206− cells include: (1) three monocyte (CD14+) subsets, (2) CD11c+ dendritic cells (CD14−, CD11c+, HLA-DR+), (3) plasmacytoid dendritic cells (CD14−, CD11c−, HLA-DR+, CD123+), and (4) other granulocytes (neutrophils, mast cells, eosinophils, and basophils). Using this panel on human lung tissue, we defined two populations of pulmonary macrophages: CD169+ and CD169− macrophages. In lung tissue, CD169− macrophages were a prominent cell type. Using confocal microscopy, CD169+ macrophages were located in the alveolar space/airway, defining them as alveolar macrophages. In contrast, CD169− macrophages were associated with airway/alveolar epithelium, consistent with interstitial-associated macrophages. We defined a flow cytometry panel in human BAL and lung tissue that allows identification of multiple immune cell types and delineates alveolar from interstitial-associated macrophages. This study has important implications for defining myeloid cells in human lung samples. PMID:26267148

  7. hPSC-derived lung and intestinal organoids as models of human fetal tissue.

    PubMed

    Aurora, Megan; Spence, Jason R

    2016-12-15

    In vitro human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) derived tissues are excellent models to study certain aspects of normal human development. Current research in the field of hPSC derived tissues reveals these models to be inherently fetal-like on both a morphological and gene expression level. In this review we briefly discuss current methods for differentiating lung and intestinal tissue from hPSCs into individual 3-dimensional units called organoids. We discuss how these methods mirror what is known about in vivo signaling pathways of the developing embryo. Additionally, we will review how the inherent immaturity of these models lends them to be particularly valuable in the study of immature human tissues in the clinical setting of premature birth. Human lung organoids (HLOs) and human intestinal organoids (HIOs) not only model normal development, but can also be utilized to study several important diseases of prematurity such as respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC).

  8. Preferential elevation of Prx I and Trx expression in lung cancer cells following hypoxia and in human lung cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Chae, H Z; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y H; Hwangs, T S; Park, E M; Park, Y M

    2003-10-01

    Transient/chronic microenvironmental hypoxia that exists within a majority of solid tumors has been suggested to have a profound influence on tumor growth and therapeutic outcome. Since the functions of novel antioxidant proteins, peroxiredoxin I (Prx I) and II, have been implicated in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, it was of our special interest to probe a possible role of Prx I and II in the context of hypoxic tumor microenvironment. Since both Prx I and II use thioredoxin (Trx) as an electron donor and Trx is a substrate for thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), we investigated the regulation of Trx and TrxR as well as Prx expression following hypoxia. Here we show a dynamic change of glutathione homeostasis in lung cancer A549 cells and an up-regulation of Prx I and Trx following hypoxia. Western blot analysis of 10 human lung cancer and paired normal lung tissues also revealed an elevated expression of Prx I and Trx proteins in lung cancer tissues. Immunohistochemical analysis of the lung cancer tissues confirmed an augmented Prx I and Trx expression in cancer cells with respect to the parenchymal cells in adjacent normal lung tissue. Based on these results, we suggest that the redox changes in lung tumor microenvironment could have acted as a trigger for the up-regulation of Prx I and Trx in lung cancer cells. Although the clinical significance of our finding awaits more rigorous future study, preferential augmentation of the Prx I and Trx in lung cancer cells may well represent an attempt of cancer cells to manipulate a dynamic redox change in tumor microenvironment in a manner that is beneficial for their proliferation and malignant progression.

  9. Modeling Mycobacterium tuberculosis early granuloma formation in experimental human lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Parasa, Venkata Ramanarao; Rahman, Muhammad Jubayer; Ngyuen Hoang, Anh Thu; Svensson, Mattias; Brighenti, Susanna; Lerm, Maria

    2014-02-01

    The widely used animal models for tuberculosis (TB) display fundamental differences from human TB. Therefore, a validated model that recapitulates human lung TB is attractive for TB research. Here, we describe a unique method for establishment of TB infection in an experimental human lung tissue model. The model is based on cell lines derived from human lungs and primary macrophages from peripheral blood, and displays characteristics of human lung tissue, including evenly integrated macrophages throughout the epithelium, production of extracellular matrix, stratified epithelia and mucus secretion. Establishment of experimental infection in the model tissue with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes TB, resulted in clustering of macrophages at the site of infection, reminiscent of early TB granuloma formation. We quantitated the extent of granuloma formation induced by different strains of mycobacteria and validated our model against findings in other TB models. We found that early granuloma formation is dependent on ESAT-6, which is secreted via the type VII secretion machinery of virulent mycobacteria. Our model, which can facilitate the discovery of the interactions between mycobacteria and host cells in a physiological environment, is the first lung tissue model described for TB.

  10. Electron microscopy analysis of mineral fibers in human lung tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrichs, K.H.; Brockmann, M.; Fischer, M.; Wick, G. )

    1992-01-01

    In the present study, lung samples from 126 autopsied cases were examined to determine the content of mineral fibers using analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM). The cases were divided into four groups (22 lungs of persons exposed to ambient environmental pollution, 32 cases of mesothelioma, 38 cases of primary lung cancer, and 34 asbestosis cases, 13 of these with additional pleural plaques). Fibers were counted, measured, and mineralogically identified using a combination of X-ray microanalysis and electron diffraction of the non-oriented fiber. Concentration of fibrous particles (defined as particles above 1 micron in length with roughly parallel long sides and an aspect ratio of 5:1 and greater) was calculated as fibers 10(6)/g dry lung weight. The concentration of chrysotile was found to be similar throughout the groups except for two cases in the asbestosis group with comparably high numbers of chrysotile. However, a remarkable difference for amphiboles could be observed between the groups. Asbestos bodies were mostly found in the asbestosis group. There was a rather good correlation between numbers of amphibole fibers and asbestos bodies, with an average ratio of 10:1. For comparison purposes between occupationally exposed/non-exposed individuals, a transition was found in the concentration range of 3-10(7) asbestos fibers/g dried lung weight.

  11. RBFOX3 regulates Claudin-1 expression in human lung tissue via attenuation of proteasomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Eun; Choi, Sunkyung

    2017-01-01

    RBFOX3, a nuclear RNA-binding protein, is well known as a regulator of alternative pre-mRNA splicing during neuronal development. However, other functions of RBFOX3 are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the function of RBFOX3 in the cytoplasm with respect to regulation of Claudin-1 expression. In human lung tissue, Claudin-1 is higher in RBFOX3-positive cells than in RBFOX3-negative cells. Immunostaining and mRNA quantification revealed that protein levels, but not mRNA levels, of Claudin-1 are increased by RBFOX3. In addition, cycloheximide treatment of human lung cancer cells revealed that RBFOX3 increases the stability of Claudin-1 through attenuation of its ubiquitination. Our study provides insights into the molecular mechanisms by which RBFOX3 regulates Claudin-1 expression in human lung tissue. PMID:28126724

  12. In vivo electrical bioimpedance characterization of human lung tissue during the bronchoscopy procedure. A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Benjamin; Vandersteen, Gerd; Martin, Irene; Castillo, Diego; Torrego, Alfons; Riu, Pere J; Schoukens, Johan; Bragos, Ramon

    2013-07-01

    Lung biopsies form the basis for the diagnosis of lung cancer. However, in a significant number of cases bronchoscopic lung biopsies fail to provide useful information, especially in diffuse lung disease, so more aggressive procedures are required. Success could be improved using a guided electronic biopsy based on multisine electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), a technique which is evaluated in this paper. The theoretical basis of the measurement method and the instrument developed are described, characterized and calibrated while the performance of the instrument is assessed by experiments to evaluate the noise and nonlinear source of errors from measurements on phantoms. Additional preliminary results are included to demonstrate that it is both feasible and safe to monitor in vivo human lung tissue electrical bioimpedance (EBI) during the bronchoscopy procedure. The time required for performing bronchoscopy is not extended because the bioimpedance measurements, present no complications, tolerance problems or side effects among any of the patients measured.

  13. Human receptor kinetics and lung tissue retention of the enhanced-affinity glucocorticoid fluticasone furoate

    PubMed Central

    Valotis, Anagnostis; Högger, Petra

    2007-01-01

    Fluticasone furoate (FF) – USAN approved name, a new topically active glucocorticoid has been recently identified. The aim of this study was to characterise the binding affinity of this compound to the human lung glucocorticoid receptor in relation to other glucocorticoids. Additionally, we sought to determine the binding behaviour of fluticasone furoate to human lung tissue. The glucocorticoid receptor binding kinetics of fluticasone furoate revealed a remarkably fast association and a slow dissociation resulting in a relative receptor affinity (RRA) of 2989 ± 135 with reference to dexamethasone (RRA: 100 ± 5). Thus, the RRA of FF exceeds the RRAs of all currently clinically used corticosteroids such as mometasone furoate (MF; RRA 2244), fluticasone propionate (FP; RRA 1775), ciclesonide's active metabolite (RRA 1212 – rat receptor data) or budesonide (RRA 855). FP and FF displayed pronounced retention in human lung tissue in vitro. Lowest tissue binding was found for MF. There was no indication of instability or chemical modification of FF in human lung tissue. These advantageous binding attributes may contribute to a highly efficacious profile for FF as a topical treatment for inflammatory disorders of the respiratory tract. PMID:17650349

  14. TISSUE REMODELING IN THE HUMAN LUNG IN RELATION TO PARTICLE CONCENTRATION AND METAL CONTENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    TISSUE REMODELING IN THE HUMAN LUNG IN RELATION TO PARTICLE CONCENTRATION AND METAL CONTENT. J Gallagher1, J Inmon1, S Schlaegle2, A Levine2, T Rogers3, J Scott1, F Green4, M Schenker5, K Pinkerton5 1NHEERL, US-EPA, RTP, NC, USA; 2RJ Lee Group Inc, Monroeville, Pa, USA; ...

  15. Beryllium detection in human lung tissue using electron probe X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Butnor, Kelly J; Sporn, Thomas A; Ingram, Peter; Gunasegaram, Sue; Pinto, John F; Roggli, Victor L

    2003-11-01

    Chronic berylliosis is an uncommon disease that is caused by the inhalation of beryllium particles, dust, or fumes. The distinction between chronic berylliosis and sarcoidosis can be difficult both clinically and histologically, as both entities can have similar presentations and exhibit nonnecrotizing granulomatous inflammation of the lungs. The diagnosis of chronic berylliosis relies on a history of exposure to beryllium, roentgenographic evidence of diffuse nodular disease, and demonstration of beryllium hypersensitivity by ancillary studies, such as lymphocyte proliferation testing. Additional support may be gained by the demonstration of beryllium in lung tissue. Unlike other exogenous particulates, such as asbestos, detection of beryllium in human lung tissue is problematic. The low atomic number of beryllium usually makes it unsuitable for conventional microprobe analysis. We describe a case of chronic berylliosis in which beryllium was detected in lung tissue using atmospheric thin-window energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (ATW EDXA). A woman with a history of occupational exposure to beryllium at a nuclear weapons testing facility presented with progressive cough and dyspnea and a nodular pattern on chest roentgenograph. Open lung biopsy showed nonnecrotizing granulomatous inflammation that was histologically indistinguishable from sarcoidosis. Scanning electron microscopy and ATW EDXA demonstrated particulates containing beryllium within the granulomas. This application of EDXA offers significant advantages over existing methods of beryllium detection in that it is nondestructive, more widely available, and can be performed using routine paraffin sections.

  16. [Study of remanent magnetization of the human body: lung and liver tissues].

    PubMed

    Sakai, H; Wang, H; Murai, Y; Soukejima, S; Kagamimori, S

    2001-07-01

    In this study, we used lung and liver tissue specimens distracted from tissue to investigate remanant magnetization, and found that specimens with a volume of 6 mm3 had an intensity of 10(-10) Am2, which was significantly stronger than the noise level of the superconducting magnetometer. This finding indicates that both lung and liver tissues contain magnetic materials. We speculated that biological magnetite is the magnetic material in these tissues. In addition, we found that lung tissue specimens with strong magnetization had correspondingly strong magnetized findings in the liver tissue specimens. In a comparison of magnetization in lung cancer tissue specimens and normal lung tissue, no significant relationship was noted, but two of the lung cancer tissue specimens showed strong magnetization. The number of lung cancer specimens studies was insufficient to investigate the relation between the magnetization (accumulation of magnetic materials) and lung cancer, and further studies are necessary. The magnetic properties of two lung cancer tissue specimens showing strong magnetization were further investigated, and an alternating field demagnetization experiment showed that their magnetization was composed of a unit stable vector, which indicates that the lung tissue may have been magnetized after the accumulation of magnetic materials. The Wohlfarth ratio (Moskowitz et al., 1989) of them was less than 0.5, which suggests that magnetic materials are distributed in clusters in lung tissue.

  17. hPSC-derived lung and intestinal organoids as models of human fetal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Aurora, Megan; Spence, Jason R.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) derived tissues are excellent models to study certain aspects of normal human development. Current research in the field of hPSC derived tissues reveals these models to be inherently fetal-like on both a morphological and gene expression level. In this review we briefly discuss current methods for differentiating lung and intestinal tissue from hPSCs into individual 3-dimensional units called organoids. We discuss how these methods mirror what is known about in vivo signaling pathways of the developing embryo. Additionally, we will review how the inherent immaturity of these models lends them to be particularly valuable in the study of immature human tissues in the clinical setting of premature birth. Human lung organoids (HLOs) and human intestinal organoids (HIOs) not only model normal development, but can also be utilized to study several important diseases of prematurity such as respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). PMID:27287882

  18. Human Lung Tissue Explants Reveal Novel Interactions during Legionella pneumophila Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Jens; Marwitz, Sebastian; Tiefenau, Jana; Rasch, Janine; Shevchuk, Olga; Kugler, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Histological and clinical investigations describe late stages of Legionnaires' disease but cannot characterize early events of human infection. Cellular or rodent infection models lack the complexity of tissue or have nonhuman backgrounds. Therefore, we developed and applied a novel model for Legionella pneumophila infection comprising living human lung tissue. We stimulated lung explants with L. pneumophila strains and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) to analyze tissue damage, bacterial replication, and localization as well as the transcriptional response of infected tissue. Interestingly, we found that extracellular adhesion of L. pneumophila to the entire alveolar lining precedes bacterial invasion and replication in recruited macrophages. In contrast, OMVs predominantly bound to alveolar macrophages. Specific damage to septa and epithelia increased over 48 h and was stronger in wild-type-infected and OMV-treated samples than in samples infected with the replication-deficient, type IVB secretion-deficient DotA− strain. Transcriptome analysis of lung tissue explants revealed a differential regulation of 2,499 genes after infection. The transcriptional response included the upregulation of uteroglobin and the downregulation of the macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO). Immunohistochemistry confirmed the downregulation of MARCO at sites of pathogen-induced tissue destruction. Neither host factor has ever been described in the context of L. pneumophila infections. This work demonstrates that the tissue explant model reproduces realistic features of Legionnaires' disease and reveals new functions for bacterial OMVs during infection. Our model allows us to characterize early steps of human infection which otherwise are not feasible for investigations. PMID:24166955

  19. Tissue spray ionization mass spectrometry for rapid recognition of human lung squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yiping; Chen, Liru; Zhou, Wei; Chingin, Konstantin; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Zhu, Tenggao; Wen, Hua; Ding, Jianhua; Xu, Jianjun; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-05-01

    Tissue spray ionization mass spectrometry (TSI-MS) directly on small tissue samples has been shown to provide highly specific molecular information. In this study, we apply this method to the analysis of 38 pairs of human lung squamous cell carcinoma tissue (cancer) and adjacent normal lung tissue (normal). The main components of pulmonary surfactants, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC, m/z 757.47), phosphatidylcholine (POPC, m/z 782.52), oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC, m/z 808.49), and arachidonic acid stearoyl phosphatidylcholine (SAPC, m/z 832.43), were identified using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Monte Carlo sampling partial least squares linear discriminant analysis (PLS-LDA) was used to distinguish full-mass-range mass spectra of cancer samples from the mass spectra of normal tissues. With 5 principal components and 30 - 40 Monte Carlo samplings, the accuracy of cancer identification in matched tissue samples reached 94.42%. Classification of a tissue sample required less than 1 min, which is much faster than the analysis of frozen sections. The rapid, in situ diagnosis with minimal sample consumption provided by TSI-MS is advantageous for surgeons. TSI-MS allows them to make more informed decisions during surgery.

  20. Development of a nonlinear fiber-optic spectrometer for human lung tissue exploration.

    PubMed

    Peyrot, Donald A; Lefort, Claire; Steffenhagen, Marie; Mansuryan, Tigran; Ducourthial, Guillaume; Abi-Haidar, Darine; Sandeau, Nicolas; Vever-Bizet, Christine; Kruglik, Sergei G; Thiberville, Luc; Louradour, Frédéric; Bourg-Heckly, Geneviève

    2012-05-01

    Several major lung pathologies are characterized by early modifications of the extracellular matrix (ECM) fibrillar collagen and elastin network. We report here the development of a nonlinear fiber-optic spectrometer, compatible with an endoscopic use, primarily intended for the recording of second-harmonic generation (SHG) signal of collagen and two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) of both collagen and elastin. Fiber dispersion is accurately compensated by the use of a specific grism-pair stretcher, allowing laser pulse temporal width around 70 fs and excitation wavelength tunability from 790 to 900 nm. This spectrometer was used to investigate the excitation wavelength dependence (from 800 to 870 nm) of SHG and 2PEF spectra originating from ex vivo human lung tissue samples. The results were compared with spectral responses of collagen gel and elastin powder reference samples and also with data obtained using standard nonlinear microspectroscopy. The excitation-wavelength-tunable nonlinear fiber-optic spectrometer presented in this study allows performing nonlinear spectroscopy of human lung tissue ECM through the elastin 2PEF and the collagen SHG signals. This work opens the way to tunable excitation nonlinear endomicroscopy based on both distal scanning of a single optical fiber and proximal scanning of a fiber-optic bundle.

  1. Development of an Ex Vivo Tissue Platform To Study the Human Lung Response to Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Joseph G.; Winchell, Caylin G.; Kurten, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes human Q fever, an acute debilitating flu-like illness that can also present as chronic endocarditis. Disease typically occurs following inhalation of contaminated aerosols, resulting in an initial pulmonary infection. In human cells, C. burnetii generates a replication niche termed the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) by directing fusion with autophagosomes and lysosomes. C. burnetii requires this lysosomal environment for replication and uses a Dot/Icm type IV secretion system to generate the large PV. However, we do not understand how C. burnetii evades the intracellular immune surveillance that triggers an inflammatory response. We recently characterized human alveolar macrophage (hAM) infection in vitro and found that avirulent C. burnetii triggers sustained interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production. Here, we evaluated infection of ex vivo human lung tissue, defining a valuable approach for characterizing C. burnetii interactions with a human host. Within whole lung tissue, C. burnetii preferentially replicated in hAMs. Additionally, IL-1β production correlated with formation of an apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain (ASC)-dependent inflammasome in response to infection. We also assessed potential activation of a human-specific noncanonical inflammasome and found that caspase-4 and caspase-5 are processed during infection. Interestingly, although inflammasome activation is closely linked to pyroptosis, lytic cell death did not occur following C. burnetii-triggered inflammasome activation, indicating an atypical response after intracellular detection. Together, these studies provide a novel platform for studying the human innate immune response to C. burnetii. PMID:26902725

  2. Global DNA methylation and PTEN hypermethylation alterations in lung tissues from human silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianan; Jia, Xiaowei; Mei, Liangying; Zheng, Min; Yu, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background Silicosis is a respiratory disease caused by long-term silica dust exposure. Our previous study has demonstrated that silica mediates the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN)/serine or threonine kinase (AKT)/mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK)/AP-1 pathway in human embryo lung fibroblasts (HELFs). The purpose of this study is to identify genome-wide aberrant DNA methylation profiling in lung tissues from silicosis patients. Methods We performed Illumina Human Methylation 450K Beadchip arrays to investigate the methylation alteration in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) lung specimens, immunohistochemistry to detect the level of c-Jun and PTEN proteins; methylation specific PCR (MS-PCR) to identify PTEN and c-Jun promoter methylation in HELFs. Results We found 86,770 CpG sites and 79,660 CpG sites significantly differed in methylation status in early-stage and advanced-stage compared with GEO normal lung methylation data. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis revealed the methylated status of MAPK signaling pathway was considered changed. The number of PTEN and c-Jun CpG promoter methylated-sites were increased in advanced-stage. Early-stage showed the positive expression of c-Jun and PTEN protein and negative or mild expression in advanced-stage. PTEN promoter was no differentially methylated and c-Jun promoter differed at 12 and 24 h in HELFs. Conclusions Abnormal DNA methylation on genome-scale was implicated in silicosis, and PTEN promoter hypermethylation might be associated with decrease of PTEN protein. PMID:27621875

  3. Automated decellularization of intact, human-sized lungs for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Price, Andrew P; Godin, Lindsay M; Domek, Alex; Cotter, Trevor; D'Cunha, Jonathan; Taylor, Doris A; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2015-01-01

    We developed an automated system that can be used to decellularize whole human-sized organs and have shown lung as an example. Lungs from 20 to 30 kg pigs were excised en bloc with the trachea and decellularized with our established protocol of deionized water, detergents, sodium chloride, and porcine pancreatic DNase. A software program was written to control a valve manifold assembly that we built for selection and timing of decellularization fluid perfusion through the airway and the vasculature. This system was interfaced with a prototypic bioreactor chamber that was connected to another program, from a commercial source, which controlled the volume and flow pressure of fluids. Lung matrix that was decellularized by the automated method was compared to a manual method previously used by us and others. Automation resulted in more consistent acellular matrix preparations as demonstrated by measuring levels of DNA, hydroxyproline (collagen), elastin, laminin, and glycosaminoglycans. It also proved highly beneficial in saving time as the decellularization procedure was reduced from days down to just 24 h. Developing a rapid, controllable, automated system for production of reproducible matrices in a closed system is a major step forward in whole-organ tissue engineering.

  4. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells are Readily Recoverable from Lung Tissue, but not the Alveolar Space, in Healthy Humans.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, K A; Yerkovich, S T; Chen, T; McQualter, J L; Hopkins, P M-A; Wells, C A; Chambers, D C

    2016-10-01

    Stromal support is critical for lung homeostasis and the maintenance of an effective epithelial barrier. Despite this, previous studies have found a positive association between the number of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from the alveolar compartment and human lung diseases associated with epithelial dysfunction. We hypothesised that bronchoalveolar lavage derived MSCs (BAL-MSCs) are dysfunctional and distinct from resident lung tissue MSCs (LT-MSCs). In this study, we comprehensively interrogated the phenotype and transcriptome of human BAL-MSCs and LT-MSCs. We found that MSCs were rarely recoverable from the alveolar space in healthy humans, but could be readily isolated from lung transplant recipients by bronchoalveolar lavage. BAL-MSCs exhibited a CD90(Hi) , CD73(Hi) , CD45(Neg) , CD105(Lo) immunophenotype and were bipotent, lacking adipogenic potential. In contrast, MSCs were readily recoverable from healthy human lung tissue and were CD90(Hi or Lo) , CD73(Hi) , CD45(Neg) , CD105(Int) and had full tri-lineage potential. Transcriptional profiling of the two populations confirmed their status as bona fide MSCs and revealed a high degree of similarity between each other and the archetypal bone-marrow MSC. 105 genes were differentially expressed; 76 of which were increased in BAL-MSCs including genes involved in fibroblast activation, extracellular matrix deposition and tissue remodelling. Finally, we found the fibroblast markers collagen 1A1 and α-smooth muscle actin were increased in BAL-MSCs. Our data suggests that in healthy humans, lung MSCs reside within the tissue, but in disease can differentiate to acquire a profibrotic phenotype and migrate from their in-tissue niche into the alveolar space. Stem Cells 2016;34:2548-2558.

  5. Preclinical validation and imaging of Wnt-induced repair in human 3D lung tissue cultures.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Franziska E; Vierkotten, Sarah; Wagner, Darcy E; Burgstaller, Gerald; Costa, Rita; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Meiners, Silke; Eickelberg, Oliver; Königshoff, Melanie

    2015-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by a progressive loss of lung tissue. Inducing repair processes within the adult diseased lung is of major interest and Wnt/β-catenin signalling represents a promising target for lung repair. However, the translation of novel therapeutic targets from model systems into clinical use remains a major challenge.We generated murine and patient-derived three-dimensional (3D) ex vivo lung tissue cultures (LTCs), which closely mimic the 3D lung microenvironment in vivo. Using two well-known glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitors, lithium chloride (LiCl) and CHIR 99021 (CT), we determined Wnt/β-catenin-driven lung repair processes in high spatiotemporal resolution using quantitative PCR, Western blotting, ELISA, (immuno)histological assessment, and four-dimensional confocal live tissue imaging.Viable 3D-LTCs exhibited preserved lung structure and function for up to 5 days. We demonstrate successful Wnt/β-catenin signal activation in murine and patient-derived 3D-LTCs from COPD patients. Wnt/β-catenin signalling led to increased alveolar epithelial cell marker expression, decreased matrix metalloproteinase-12 expression, as well as altered macrophage activity and elastin remodelling. Importantly, induction of surfactant protein C significantly correlated with disease stage (per cent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s) in patient-derived 3D-LTCs.Patient-derived 3D-LTCs represent a valuable tool to analyse potential targets and drugs for lung repair. Enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signalling attenuated pathological features of patient-derived COPD 3D-LTCs.

  6. Tissue optical clearing, three-dimensional imaging, and computer morphometry in whole mouse lungs and human airways.

    PubMed

    Scott, Gregory D; Blum, Emily D; Fryer, Allison D; Jacoby, David B

    2014-07-01

    In whole adult mouse lung, full identification of airway nerves (or other cellular/subcellular objects) has not been possible due to patchy distribution and micron-scale size. Here we describe a method using tissue clearing to acquire the first complete image of three-dimensional (3D) innervation in the lung. We then created a method to pair analysis of nerve (or any other colabeled epitope) images with identification of 3D tissue compartments and airway morphometry by using fluorescent casting and morphometry software (which we designed and are making available as open-source). We then tested our method to quantify a sparse heterogeneous nerve population by examining visceral pleural nerves. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of our method in human tissue to image full thickness innervation in irregular 3D tissue compartments and to quantify sparse objects (intrinsic airway ganglia). Overall, this method can uniquely pair the advantages of whole tissue imaging and cellular/subcellular fluorescence microscopy.

  7. Two-color widefield fluorescence microendoscopy enables multiplexed molecular imaging in the alveolar space of human lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstajić, Nikola; Akram, Ahsan R.; Choudhary, Tushar R.; McDonald, Neil; Tanner, Michael G.; Pedretti, Ettore; Dalgarno, Paul A.; Scholefield, Emma; Girkin, John M.; Moore, Anne; Bradley, Mark; Dhaliwal, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a fast two-color widefield fluorescence microendoscopy system capable of simultaneously detecting several disease targets in intact human ex vivo lung tissue. We characterize the system for light throughput from the excitation light emitting diodes, fluorescence collection efficiency, and chromatic focal shifts. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the instrument by imaging bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) in ex vivo human lung tissue. We describe a mechanism of bacterial detection through the fiber bundle that uses blinking effects of bacteria as they move in front of the fiber core providing detection of objects smaller than the fiber core and cladding (˜3 μm). This effectively increases the measured spatial resolution of 4 μm. We show simultaneous imaging of neutrophils, monocytes, and fungus (Aspergillus fumigatus) in ex vivo human lung tissue. The instrument has 10 nM and 50 nM sensitivity for fluorescein and Cy5 solutions, respectively. Lung tissue autofluorescence remains visible at up to 200 fps camera acquisition rate. The optical system lends itself to clinical translation due to high-fluorescence sensitivity, simplicity, and the ability to multiplex several pathological molecular imaging targets simultaneously.

  8. Regional Mapping of Gas Uptake by Blood and Tissue in the Human Lung using Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Kun; Ruppert, Kai; Jiang, Yun; Mata, Jaime F.; Miller, G. Wilson; Shim, Y. Michael; Wang, Chengbo; Ruset, Iulian C.; Hersman, F. William; Altes, Talissa A.; Mugler, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop a breath-hold acquisition for regional mapping of ventilation and the fractions of hyperpolarized xenon-129 (Xe129) dissolved in tissue (lung parenchyma and plasma) and red blood cells (RBCs), and to perform an exploratory study to characterize data obtained in human subjects. Materials and Methods A three-dimensional, multi-echo, radial-trajectory pulse sequence was developed to obtain ventilation (gaseous Xe129), tissue and RBC images in healthy subjects, smokers and asthmatics. Signal ratios (total dissolved Xe129 to gas, tissue-to-gas, RBC-to-gas and RBC-to-tissue) were calculated from the images for quantitative comparison. Results Healthy subjects demonstrated generally uniform values within coronal slices, and a gradient in values along the anterior-to-posterior direction. In contrast, images and associated ratio maps in smokers and asthmatics were generally heterogeneous and exhibited values mostly lower than those in healthy subjects. Whole-lung values of total dissolved Xe129 to gas, tissue-to-gas, and RBC-to-gas ratios in healthy subjects were significantly larger than those in diseased subjects. Conclusion Regional maps of tissue and RBC fractions of dissolved Xe129 were obtained from a short breath-hold acquisition, well tolerated by healthy volunteers and subjects with obstructive lung disease. Marked differences were observed in spatial distributions and overall amounts of Xe129 dissolved in tissue and RBCs among healthy subjects, smokers and asthmatics. PMID:23681559

  9. Use of human lung tissue for studies of structural changes associated with chronic ozone exposure: opportunities and critical issues.

    PubMed Central

    Lippmann, M

    1993-01-01

    Definitive information on the chronic effects of exposure to ozone (O3) in humans is not available. There is a strong concern that ozone could produce chronic lung damage in humans on the basis that exposures are ubiquitous at levels that produce transient symptoms, function deficits, and lung inflammation in humans and chronic lung damage in laboratory animals. Both prospective and national population surveys suggest an association between chronic O3 exposure and reduced lung function, and a pilot investigation of autopsied lungs of accident victims in Los Angeles reported an unexpectedly high incidence of disease in the centriacinar region, the lung region known to receive the highest dose of inhaled O3. This paper discusses the advantages and limitations of further studies of structural changes in human lung tissue in relation to chronic O3 exposure. The major advantages of such studies are that a) measurable effects may be related to realistic chronic exposures, b) the effects may be described quantitatively and compared directly to those obtained in chronic animal inhalation exposures, and c) evidence for chronic effects may be obtained much more rapidly than in prospective studies. The major limitations are the difficulties in obtaining sufficient reliable information on residential history, physical activity out-of-doors, and smoking and other confounding exposures to lung irritants from next of kin, and limited availability of adequate air quality data for determining ambient concentrations at places of residence and/or outdoor exercise. The paper also discusses approaches to minimizing these limitations in the design of specific studies. PMID:8206033

  10. Ubiquitination of tissue transglutaminase is modulated by interferon alpha in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Carla; Marra, Monica; Giuberti, Gaia; D'Alessandro, Anna Maria; Porta, Raffaele; Cozzolino, Anna; Caraglia, Michele; Abbruzzese, Alberto

    2003-01-01

    The addition of 2500 i.u./ml interferon alpha (IFNalpha) for 48 h induced apoptosis, and caused an approx. 4-fold increase in the activity and expression of tissue transglutaminase (tTG), in human lung cancer H1355 cells. However, the increase in mRNA levels for tTG was just 1.6-fold. On the basis of these data, we investigated whether tTG levels may be regulated through regulation of its degradation via ubiquitination. It was found that 2500 i.u./ml IFNalpha induced a time-dependent decrease in tTG ubiquitination. On the other hand, addition of the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin led to accumulation of the ubiquitinated form of the enzyme and to a consequent increase in its expression. Treatment of the cells with the two agents combined antagonized the accumulation of the ubiquitinated isoforms of tTG induced by lactacystin and caused a potentiation of tTG expression. Moreover, the tTG inducer retinoic acid was also able to cause increased expression and ubiquitination of tTG in H1355 cells. The addition of monodansylcadaverine (a tTG inhibitor) to IFNalpha-treated H1355 cells completely antagonized growth inhibition and apoptosis induced by the cytokine. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that tTG is ubiquitinated and degraded by a proteasome-dependent pathway. Moreover, IFNalpha can, at least in part, induce apoptosis through the modulation of this pathway. PMID:12401132

  11. Routes of conjugation in normal and cancerous tissue from human lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Gerald M.; Gibby, Elizabeth M.; Mehta, Rekha

    1981-06-01

    The selective toxicity of drugs leading to major advances in antibacterial chemotherapy has often resulted from the identification and exploitation of major biochemical differences between bacterial and mammalian species1. Similar progress has not been made in cancer chemotherapy, partly due to a lack of suitable biochemical differences between normal and cancerous tissue other than in DNA synthesis, but also because of many other problems such as those of metastases and resistance, and the presence in tumours of cells at different states of the cell cycle. Here we report a major biochemical difference in the routes of conjugation between normal lung and tumour tissue from patients with lung cancer. Conjugation with glucuronic acid and sulphate constitute two of the most important pathways of metabolism of drugs, other foreign compounds and hormonal steroids2,3. Using 1-naphthol as a model phenolic substrate, normal peripheral lung tissue formed almost exclusively the sulphate ester conjugate, 1-naphthyl sulphate, whereas tumour tissue from squamous carcinomas from the same patients formed predominantly the glucuronic acid conjugate, 1-naphthyl glucuronide. Such major biochemical differences may be exploitable in the design of selectively toxic cancer chemotherapeutic agents.

  12. Buffer optimization for high resolution of human lung cancer tissue proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kibeom; Pi, Kyungbae; Lee, Keeman

    2009-01-01

    A problem in proteomic analysis of lung cancer tissue is the presence of complex components of different histological backgrounds (squamous cell carcinoma, small cell lung carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma). The efficient solubilization of protein components before two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) is a very critical. Poor solubilization has been associated with a failure to detect proteins and diffuse, streaked and/or trailing protein spots. Here, we have optimized the solubilization of human lung cancer tissue to increase protein resolution. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) rehydration buffer containing a thiourea-urea mixture provided superior resolution, whereas a buffer without thiourea yielded consistently poor results. In addition, IEF rehydration buffers containing CHAPS and DTT gave superior resolution, whereas buffers containing Nonidet P-40 (NP-40) and/or Triton X-100 did not. A tributylphosphine-containing buffer gave consistently poor results. Using optimized conditions, we used 2-D gel analysis of human lung cancer tissue to identify 11 differentially-expressed protein spots by MALDI-mass spectrometry. This study provides a methodological tool to study the complex mammalian proteomes.

  13. Cardiac troponin I is abnormally expressed in non-small cell lung cancer tissues and human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Liu, Jia-Bao; Bian, Zhi-Ping; Xu, Jin-Dan; Wu, Heng-Fang; Gu, Chun-Rong; Shi, Yi; Zhang, Ji-Nan; Chen, Xiang-Jian; Yang, Di

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is the only sarcomeric protein identified to date that is expressed exclusively in cardiac muscle. Its expression in cancer tissues has not been reported. Herein, we examined cTnI expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues, human adenocarcinoma cells SPCA-1 (lung) and BGC 823 (gastric) by immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and real-time PCR. Immunopositivity for cTnI was demonstrated in 69.4% (34/49) NSCLC tissues evaluated, and was strong intensity in 35.3% (6/17) lung squamous cell carcinoma cases. The non-cancer-bearing lung tissues except tuberculosis (9/9, 100%) showed negative staining for cTnI. Seven monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human cTnI were applied in immunofluorescence. The result showed that the staining pattern within SPCA-1 and BGC 823 was dependent on the epitope of the cTnI mAbs. The membrane and nucleus of cancer cells were stained by mAbs against N-terminal peptides of cTnI, and cytoplasm was stained by mAbs against the middle and C-terminal peptides of cTnI. A ~25 kD band was identified by anti-cTnI mAb in SPCA-1 and BGC 823 extracts by western blot, as well as in cardiomyocyte extracts. The cTnI mRNA expressions in SPCA-1 and BGC 823 cells were about ten thousand times less than that in cardiomyocytes. Our study shows for the first time that cTnI protein and mRNA were abnormally expressed in NSCLC tissues, SPCA-1 and BGC 823 cells. These findings challenge the conventional view of cTnI as a cardiac-specific protein, enabling the potential use of cTnI as a diagnostic marker or targeted therapy for cancer.

  14. Gender-dependent expression of alpha and beta estrogen receptors in human nontumor and tumor lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Fasco, Michael J; Hurteau, Gregory J; Spivack, Simon D

    2002-02-25

    Estrogen receptor (ER) expression in human lung has been understudied, particularly in light of its potential biological importance in the female lung cancer epidemic. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to probe mRNA expression of wild-type ERalpha and ERbeta and their splice variants in human bronchogenic tumor and adjacent nontumor specimens. In tumor tissue from 13 women and 13 men, ERalpha was expressed in 85% of women versus 15% in men [P=0.001]. ERbeta was expressed equally in tumors from women versus men [92% vs. 69%, P=ns]. Both ERalpha and beta forms were expressed simultaneously in the lung tumors of 77% of women versus 15% of men [P=0.005]. Among adjacent nontumor lung specimens, 31% of the women expressed ERalpha mRNA versus 0% of men [P=0.101], and 39% of women expressed ERbeta mRNA versus 31% of men [P=ns]; only one woman and no men expressed both ERalpha and beta in nontumor tissue. Females expressed ERalpha [P=0.017], ERbeta [P=0.013], and ERalpha+beta [P=0.002] more frequently in tumor versus nontumor tissue, whereas in males expression of ERalpha, beta and both alpha+beta was not clearly different for tumor versus nontumor tissue. In specimens expressing ERalpha mRNA, the transcript lacking exon 7 (delta7) was the major splice variant with varying contributions from the transcripts delta4, delta3+4, delta5 and others unidentified. Alternative splicing of ERbeta mRNA was observed, but not to as great an extent as for ERalpha mRNA. ERalpha promoter usage in tumors varied among individuals. When the ER receptors were co-expressed in tumors, ERalpha was quantitatively more abundant in the majority of cases than ERbeta. Within this small group of 26 patients, no correlation was found between age, smoking history, plasma nicotine, cotinine, estradiol concentrations or histopathologic type with tumor or nontumor estrogen receptor status of any type. However, several positive correlations imply that: (1) ERalpha expression occurs

  15. Inhibition of connective tissue growth factor attenuates paraquat-induced lung fibrosis in a human MRC-5 cell line.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Yang, Huifang; Zhu, Lingqin; Li, Honghui; Zhou, Jian; Zhou, Zhijun

    2016-11-01

    Chronic exposure to Paraquat (PQ) may result in progressive pulmonary fibrosis and subsequent chronic obstructive pulmonary malfunction. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been proposed as a key determinant in the development of lung fibrosis. We investigated thus whether knock down of CTGF can prevent human lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) activation and proliferation with the subsequent inhibition of PQ-induced fibrosis. MRC-5 was transfected with CTGF-siRNAs and exposed to different concentrations of PQ. The siRNA-silencing efficacy was evaluated using western blotting analyses, qRT-PCR and flow cytometry. Next, the viability and migration of MRC-5 was determined. MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 accumulation were quantified to evaluate the lung fibrosis exposure to PQ. Over expression of CTGF mRNA was observed in human MRC-5 cell as early as 6 h following PQ stimulation. CTGF gene expression in MRC-5 cells was substantially reduced by RNAi, which significantly suppressed the expression of the lung fibrosis markers such as tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) that were stimulated by PQ. Inhibition of CTGF expression suppressed impeded the proliferation and migration ability of MRC-5 cells and resulted in cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) protein accumulation in cells. Our results suggest that CTGF promoted the development of PQ-induced lung fibrosis in collaboration with transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1). Furthermore, the observed arresting effects of CTGF knock down during this process suggested that CTGF is the potential target site for preventing PQ-induced pulmonary fibrosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1620-1626, 2016.

  16. Assessment of regional non-linear tissue deformation and air volume change of human lungs via image registration.

    PubMed

    Jahani, Nariman; Yin, Youbing; Hoffman, Eric A; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-05-07

    We evaluate the non-linear characteristics of the human lung via image registration-derived local variables based on volumetric multi-detector-row computed tomographic (MDCT) lung image data of six normal human subjects acquired at three inflation levels: 20% of vital capacity (VC), 60% VC and 80% VC. Local variables include Jacobian (ratio of volume change) and maximum shear strain for assessment of lung deformation, and air volume change for assessment of air distribution. First, the variables linearly interpolated between 20% and 80% VC images to reflect deformation from 20% to 60% VC are compared with those of direct registration of 20% and 60% VC images. The result shows that the linearly-interpolated variables agree only qualitatively with those of registration (P<0.05). Then, a quadratic (or linear) interpolation is introduced to link local variables to global air volumes of three images (or 20% and 80% VC images). A sinusoidal breathing waveform is assumed for assessing the time rate of change of these variables. The results show significant differences between two-image and three-image results (P<0.05). The three-image results for the whole lung indicate that the peak of the maximum shear rate occurs at about 37% of the maximum volume difference between 20% and 80% VC, while the peaks for the Jacobian and flow rate occur at 50%. This is in agreement with accepted physiology whereby lung tissues deform more at lower lung volumes due to lower elasticity and greater compliance. Furthermore, the three-image results show that the upper and middle lobes, even in the recumbent, supine posture, reach full expansion earlier than the lower lobes.

  17. Assessment of the effects of ultrasound-mediated glucose on permeability of normal, benign, and cancerous human lung tissues with the Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Huajiang; Wu, Guoyong; Guo, Zhouyi; Yang, Hongqin; He, Yonghong; Xie, Shusen; Guo, Xiao

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of ultrasound-mediated analyte diffusion on permeability of normal, benign, and cancerous human lung tissue in vitro and to find more effective sonophoretic (SP) delivery in combination with the optical clearing agents (OCAs) method to distinguish normal and diseased lung tissues. The permeability coefficients of SP in combination with OCAs diffusion in lung tissue were measured with Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). 30% glucose and SP with a frequency of 1 MHz and an intensity of 0.80 W/cm2 over a 3 cm probe was simultaneously applied for 15 min. Experimental results show that the mean permeability coefficients of 30% glucose/SP were found to be (2.01±0.21)×10-5 cm/s from normal lung (NL) tissue, (2.75±0.28)×10-5 cm/s from lung benign granulomatosis (LBG) tissue, (4.53±0.49)×10-5 cm/s from lung adenocarcinoma tumor (LAT) tissue, and (5.81±0.62)×10-5 cm/s from lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) tissue, respectively. The permeability coefficients of 30% glucose/SP increase approximately 36.8%, 125.4%, and 189.1% for the LBG, LAT, and LSCC tissue compared with that for the NL tissue, respectively. There were statistically significant differences in permeability coefficients of 30% glucose/SP between LBG and NL tissue (p<0.05), between LAT and NL tissue (p<0.05), and between LSCC and NL tissue (p<0.05). The results suggest that the OCT functional imaging technique to combine an ultrasound-OCAs combination method could become a powerful tool in early diagnosis and monitoring of changed microstructure of pathologic human lung tissue.

  18. Strategies for Whole Lung Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Calle, Elizabeth A.; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Sundaram, Sumati; Sivarapatna, Amogh; Tseng, Michelle K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated the feasibility of using decellularized lung extracellular matrix scaffolds to support the engineering of functional lung tissue in vitro. Rendered acellular through the use of detergents and other reagents, the scaffolds are mounted in organ-specific bioreactors where cells in the scaffold are provided with nutrients and appropriate mechanical stimuli such as ventilation and perfusion. Though initial studies are encouraging, a great deal remains to be done to advance the field and transition from rodent lungs to whole human tissue engineered lungs. To do so, a variety of hurdles must be overcome. In particular, a reliable source of human-sized scaffolds, as well as a method of terminal sterilization of scaffolds, must be identified. Continued research in lung cell and developmental biology will hopefully help identify the number and types of cells that will be required to regenerate functional lung tissue. Finally, bioreactor designs must be improved in order to provide more precise ventilation stimuli and vascular perfusion in order to avoid injury to or death of the cells cultivated within the scaffold. Ultimately, the success of efforts to engineer a functional lung in vitro will critically depend on the ability to create a fully endothelialized vascular network that provides sufficient barrier function and alveolar-capillary surface area to exchange gas at rates compatible with healthy lung function. PMID:24691527

  19. Bioreactor Development for Lung Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Much recent interest in lung bioengineering by pulmonary investigators, industry and the organ transplant field has seen a rapid growth of bioreactor development ranging from the microfluidic scale to the human-sized whole lung systems. A comprehension of the findings from these models is needed to provide the basis for further bioreactor development. Objective The goal was to comprehensively review the current state of bioreactor development for the lung. Methods A search using PubMed was done for published, peer-reviewed papers using the keywords “lung” AND “bioreactor” or “bioengineering” or “tissue engineering” or “ex vivo perfusion”. Main Results Many new bioreactors ranging from the microfluidic scale to the human-sized whole lung systems have been developed by both academic and commercial entities. Microfluidic, lung-mimic and lung slice cultures have the advantages of cost-efficiency and high throughput analyses ideal for pharmaceutical and toxicity studies. Perfused/ventilated rodent whole lung systems can be adapted for mid-throughput studies of lung stem/progenitor cell development, cell behavior, understanding and treating lung injury and for preliminary work that can be translated to human lung bioengineering. Human-sized ex vivo whole lung bioreactors incorporating perfusion and ventilation are amenable to automation and have been used for whole lung decellularization and recellularization. Clinical scale ex vivo lung perfusion systems have been developed for lung preservation and reconditioning and are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Conclusions Significant advances in bioreactors for lung engineering have been made at both the microfluidic and the macro scale. The most advanced are closed systems that incorporate pressure-controlled perfusion and ventilation and are amenable to automation. Ex vivo lung perfusion systems have advanced to clinical trials for lung preservation and reconditioning. The biggest

  20. Carcinogen metabolism in human lung tissues and the effect of tobacco smoking: results from a case--control multicenter study on lung cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, H; Petruzzelli, S; De Flora, S; Hietanen, E; Camus, A M; Castegnaro, M; Alexandrov, K; Rojas, M; Saracci, R; Giuntini, C

    1992-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the strongest risk factor for lung cancer, but genetically determined variations in the activities of pulmonary enzyme that metabolize tobacco-derived carcinogens may affect individual risk. To investigate whether these enzymes (e.g., CYP1A-related) can serve as markers for carcinogen-DNA damage, lung tissue specimens were taken during surgery from middle-aged men with either lung cancer or non-neoplastic lung disease. Phase I [aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH), ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD)] and phase II (epoxide hydrolase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, glutathione S-transferase) enzyme activities, glutathione and malondialdehyde contents were determined in lung parenchyma and/or bronchial tissues; some samples were also analyzed for DNA adducts, using 32P-postlabeling. The data were then analyzed for the following: a) differences in metabolic profiles between bronchial and parenchymal lung tissue; b) the effect of recent exposure to tobacco smoke on enzyme inducibility and benzo[a]pyrene metabolism; c) differences in enzyme inducibility between lung cancer and non-lung cancer patients; d) the effect of smoking on metabolism of mutagens in vitro; e) pulmonary DNA adduct levels and AHH activity in lung parenchyma of smokers and ex-smokers; f) lipid peroxidation products in lung tissue from lung cancer and non-lung cancer patients, as related to smoking habits and degree of airway obstruction; and g) prognostic value of AHH pulmonary activity in lung cancer patients. The results demonstrate a pronounced effect of tobacco smoke on pulmonary metabolism of xenobiotics and prooxidant state and suggest the existence of a metabolic phenotype at higher risk for tobacco-associated lung cancer. PMID:1336722

  1. Inhibition of Human Metapneumovirus Binding to Heparan Sulfate Blocks Infection in Human Lung Cells and Airway Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Klimyte, Edita M.; Smith, Stacy E.; Oreste, Pasqua; Lembo, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human metapneumovirus (HMPV), a recently discovered paramyxovirus, infects nearly 100% of the world population and causes severe respiratory disease in infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised patients. We previously showed that HMPV binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and that HMPV binding requires only the viral fusion (F) protein. To characterize the features of this interaction critical for HMPV binding and the role of this interaction in infection in relevant models, we utilized sulfated polysaccharides, heparan sulfate mimetics, and occluding compounds. Iota-carrageenan demonstrated potent anti-HMPV activity by inhibiting binding to lung cells mediated by the F protein. Furthermore, analysis of a minilibrary of variably sulfated derivatives of Escherichia coli K5 polysaccharide mimicking the HS structure revealed that the highly O-sulfated K5 polysaccharides inhibited HMPV infection, identifying a potential feature of HS critical for HMPV binding. The peptide dendrimer SB105-A10, which binds HS, reduced binding and infection in an F-dependent manner, suggesting that occlusion of HS at the target cell surface is sufficient to prevent infection. HMPV infection was also inhibited by these compounds during apical infection of polarized airway tissues, suggesting that these interactions take place during HMPV infection in a physiologically relevant model. These results reveal key features of the interaction between HMPV and HS, supporting the hypothesis that apical HS in the airway serves as a binding factor during infection, and HS modulating compounds may serve as a platform for potential antiviral development. IMPORTANCE Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a paramyxovirus that causes respiratory disease worldwide. It has been previously shown that HMPV requires binding to heparan sulfate on the surfaces of target cells for attachment and infection. In this study, we characterize the key features of this binding interaction using heparan sulfate

  2. Dynamic OCT monitoring and quantification of light penetration enhancement for normal, benign and cancerous human lung tissues at different concentrations of glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Shu-wen Tan; Ying Jin; Hui Yu; Guo-yong Wu

    2013-10-31

    We have evaluated the dynamic effects of the analyte diffusion on the 1/e light penetration depths of normal, benign and cancerous human lung tissue in vitro, as well as have monitored and quantified the dynamic change in the light penetration depths of the mentioned human lung tissue after application of 25 % and 50 % glycerol solution, respectively. The light penetration depths of the analyte diffusion in the lung tissue are measured using the Fourierdomain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). Experimental results show that the application of glycerol as a chemical agent can significantly enhance light penetration depths into the human normal lung (NL), lung benign granulomatosis (LBG) and lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) tissue. In-depth transport of the glycerol molecules in the NL, LBG and LSCC tissue at a lower glycerol concentration (25 %) are faster than those at a higher glycerol concentration (50 %), and the 1/e light penetration depths at a lower glycerol concentration (25 %) are smaller than those at a higher glycerol concentration (50 %), respectively. Their differences in the maximal 1/e light penetration depths of the NL, LBG and LSCC tissue at a higher and a lower glycerol concentrations were only 8.8 %, 6.8 % and 4.7 %, respectively. (biophotonics)

  3. Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) expression is negatively regulated by certain microRNAs in human lung tissues.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Takeshi; Date, Yuko; Nishibatake, Yu; Takane, Hiroshi; Fukuoka, Yasushi; Taniguchi, Yuuji; Burioka, Naoto; Shimizu, Eiji; Nakamura, Hiroshige; Otsubo, Kenji; Ieiri, Ichiro

    2012-07-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is important to the antitumor effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). DPD gene (DPYD) expression in tumors is correlated with sensitivity to 5-FU. Because the 5-FU accumulated in cancer cells is also rapidly converted into inactivated metabolites through catabolic pathways mediated by DPD, high DPD activity in cancer cells is an important determinant of the response to 5-FU. DPD activity is highly variable and reduced activity causes a high risk of 5-FU toxicity. Genetic variation in DPYD has been proposed as the main factor responsible for the variation in DPD activity. However, only a small proportion of the activity of DPD can be explained by DPYD mutations. In this study, we found that DPYD is a target of the following microRNAs (miRNA): miR-27a, miR-27b, miR-134, and miR-582-5p. In luciferase assays with HepG2 cells, the overexpression of these miRNAs was associated with significantly decreased reporter activity in a plasmid containing the 3'-UTR of DYPD mRNA. The level of DPD protein in MIAPaca-2 cells was also significantly decreased by the overexpression of these four miRNAs. The results suggest that miR-27a, miR-27b, miR-134, and miR-582-5p post-transcriptionally regulate DPD protein expression. The levels of miRNAs in normal lung tissue and lung tumors were compared; miR-27b and miR-134 levels were significantly lower in the tumors than normal tissue (3.64 ± 4.02 versus 9.75 ± 6.58 and 0.64 ± 0.75 versus 1.48 ± 1.39). DPD protein levels were significantly higher in the tumors. Thus, the decreased expression of miR-27b would be responsible for the high levels of DPD protein. This study is the first to show that miRNAs regulate the DPD protein, and provides new insight into 5-FU-based chemotherapy.

  4. MICRO DOSE ASESSMENT OF INHALED PARTICLES IN HUMAN LUNGS: A STEP CLOSER TOWARDS THE TARGET TISSUE DOSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Inhaled particles deposit inhomogeneously in the lung and this may result in excessive deposition dose at local regions of the lung, particularly at the anatomic sites of bifurcations and junctions of the airways, which in turn leads to injuries to the tissues and adve...

  5. Induction of carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1) expression in human lung tissues and lung cancer cells by the cigarette smoke constituent benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Kalabus, James L; Cheng, Qiuying; Jamil, Raqeeb G; Schuetz, Erin G; Blanco, Javier G

    2012-06-20

    Carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1) reduces various xenobiotic carbonyl substrates to corresponding alcohol metabolites. Here we demonstrated that benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), a potent pro-carcinogen and predominant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compound in cigarette smoke and air pollutants, upregulates CBR1 gene expression in vitro and in vivo, and that a proximal xenobiotic response element (XRE) motif (₋₁₂₂XRE) mediates the induction effect of B[a]P. First, we observed 46% and 50% increases in CBR1 mRNA and CBR1 protein levels, respectively, in human lung tissue samples from smokers compared to never-smokers. Second, we detected 3.0-fold (p<0.0001) induction of CBR1 mRNA and 1.5-fold (p<0.01) induction of CBR1 protein levels in cells of the human lung cancer cell line A549 incubated with 2.5 μM B[a]P for 24h. Third, results from experiments with CBR1 promoter constructs indicated that a proximal XRE motif ₋₁₂₂XRE) mediates induction of reporter activity in response to B[a]P. Furthermore, we detected enhanced nuclear translocation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) following B[a]P exposure in A549 cells. Finally, we demonstrated increased binding of specific protein complexes to ₋₁₂₂XRE in nuclear extracts from B[a]P-treated cells and the presence of the AhR/Arnt complex in the specific nuclear protein ₋₁₂₂XRE complexes.

  6. Evidence for Human Lung Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kajstura, Jan; Rota, Marcello; Hall, Sean R.; Hosoda, Toru; D’Amario, Domenico; Sanada, Fumihiro; Zheng, Hanqiao; Ogórek, Barbara; Rondon-Clavo, Carlos; Ferreira-Martins, João; Matsuda, Alex; Arranto, Christian; Goichberg, Polina; Giordano, Giovanna; Haley, Kathleen J.; Bardelli, Silvana; Rayatzadeh, Hussein; Liu, Xiaoli; Quaini, Federico; Liao, Ronglih; Leri, Annarosa; Perrella, Mark A.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Anversa, Piero

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although progenitor cells have been described in distinct anatomical regions of the lung, description of resident stem cells has remained elusive. METHODS Surgical lung-tissue specimens were studied in situ to identify and characterize human lung stem cells. We defined their phenotype and functional properties in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS Human lungs contain undifferentiated human lung stem cells nested in niches in the distal airways. These cells are self-renewing, clonogenic, and multipotent in vitro. After injection into damaged mouse lung in vivo, human lung stem cells form human bronchioles, alveoli, and pulmonary vessels integrated structurally and functionally with the damaged organ. The formation of a chimeric lung was confirmed by detection of human transcripts for epithelial and vascular genes. In addition, the self-renewal and long-term proliferation of human lung stem cells was shown in serial-transplantation assays. CONCLUSIONS Human lungs contain identifiable stem cells. In animal models, these cells participate in tissue homeostasis and regeneration. They have the undemonstrated potential to promote tissue restoration in patients with lung disease. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.) PMID:21561345

  7. Three-Dimensional Engineered High Fidelity Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies (TLA) as Targets for Human Respiratory Virus Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; Deatly, A. M.; Suderman, M. T.; Lin, Y.-H.; Chen, W.; Gupta, C. K.; Randolph, V. B.; Udem, S. A.

    2003-01-01

    Unlike traditional two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures, three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like assemblies (TLA) (Goodwin et aI, 1992, 1993, 2000 and Nickerson et aI. , 2001,2002) offer high organ fidelity with the potential to emulate the infective dynamics of viruses and bacteria in vivo. Thus, utilizing NASA micro gravity Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology, in vitro human broncho-epithelial (HBE) TLAs were engineered to mimic in vivo tissue for study of human respiratory viruses. These 3D HBE TLAs were propagated from a human broncho-tracheal cell line with a mesenchymal component (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and either an adult human broncho-epithelial cell (BEAS-2B) or human neonatal epithelial cell (16HBE140-) as the overlying element. Resulting TLAs share several characteristic features with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including tight junctions, desmosomes and cilia (SEM, TEM). The presence of epithelium and specific lung epithelium markers furthers the contention that these HBE cells differentiate into TLAs paralleling in vivo tissues. A time course of infection of these 3D HBE TLAs with human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) wild type A2 strain, indicates that virus replication and virus budding are supported and manifested by increasing virus titer and detection of membrane-bound F and G glycoproteins. Infected 3D HBE TLAs remain intact for up to 12 days compared to infected 2D cultures that are destroyed in 2-3 days. Infected cells show an increased vacuolation and cellular destruction (by transmission electron microscopy) by day 9; whereas, uninfected cells remain robust and morphologically intact. Therefore, the 3D HBE TLAs mimic aspects of human respiratory epithelium providing a unique opportunity to analyze, for the first time, simulated in vivo viral infection independent of host immune response.

  8. Differentiation of normal and cancerous lung tissues by multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Li, Feng-Chieh; Wu, Ruei-Jhih; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Lin, Wei-Chou; Lin, Sung-Jan; So, Peter T. C.; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2009-07-01

    We utilize multiphoton microscopy for the label-free diagnosis of noncancerous, lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tissues from humans. Our results show that the combination of second-harmonic generation (SHG) and multiphoton excited autofluorescence (MAF) signals may be used to acquire morphological and quantitative information in discriminating cancerous from noncancerous lung tissues. Specifically, noncancerous lung tissues are largely fibrotic in structure, while cancerous specimens are composed primarily of tumor masses. Quantitative ratiometric analysis using MAF to SHG index (MAFSI) shows that the average MAFSI for noncancerous and LAC lung tissue pairs are 0.55+/-0.23 and 0.87+/-0.15, respectively. In comparison, the MAFSIs for the noncancerous and SCC tissue pairs are 0.50+/-0.12 and 0.72+/-0.13, respectively. Our study shows that nonlinear optical microscopy can assist in differentiating and diagnosing pulmonary cancer from noncancerous tissues.

  9. Computational model of OCT in lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, David C.; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2010-02-01

    Lung research may have significant impact on human health. As two examples, recovery from collapse of the alveoli and the severe post surgery declines in forced vital capacity in patients under the effects of anesthesia are both poorly understood. Optical imaging is important to lung research for its inherently high resolution. Microscopy and color imaging are fundamentals of medicine, but interior lung tissue is usually viewed either endoscopically or ex vivo, stained slices. Techniques such as confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) have become increasingly popular in medical imaging because of their sectioning and depth penetration. Since OCT has the ability to achieve higher depth penetration than confocal it is more widely used in lung imaging, despite the difficulty of interpreting the images due to the poor numerical aperture (NA). To understand light propagation through the highly reflective and refractive surfaces of the lung, we developed a Finite-Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulation. FDTD solves a discrete approximation to Maxwell's equations. Initial simulations have shown that structure up to 30 - 40μm below the surface is clearly visible. Deeper structures are hard to interpret, because of light scattering, compounded by speckle associated with coherent detection. Further simulations and experimental imaging may lead to improved collection and processing of images at deeper levels.

  10. Cytokines in human lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Martinet, Y; Menard, O; Vaillant, P; Vignaud, J M; Martinet, N

    1996-01-01

    Fibrosis is a pathological process characterized by the replacement of normal tissue by mesenchymal cells and the extracellular matrix produced by these cells. The sequence of events leading to fibrosis of an organ involves the subsequent processes of injury with inflammation and disruption of the normal tissue architecture, followed by tissue repair with accumulation of mesenchymal cells in the area of derangement. The same sequence of events occurs in wound healing with normal granulation tissue and scar formation, but, while normal scar formation is very localized and transient, in contrast, in fibrosis, the repair process is exaggerated and usually widespread and can be chronic. Inflammatory cells (mainly mononuclear phagocytes), platelets, endothelial cells, and type II pneumocytes play a direct and indirect role in tissue injury and repair. The evaluation of three human fibrotic lung diseases, two diffuse [idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)], and one focal (tumor stroma in lung cancer), has shown that several cytokines participate to the local injury and inflammatory reaction [interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)], while other cytokines are involved in tissue repair and fibrosis [platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), and basic-fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF)]. A better understanding of the cytokines and cytokine networks involved in lung fibrosis leads to the possibility of new therapeutic approaches.

  11. Human lung lysozyme: sources and properties.

    PubMed

    Konstan, M W; Chen, P W; Sherman, J M; Thomassen, M J; Wood, R E; Boat, T F

    1981-01-01

    Lysozyme in human airway secretions is thought to defend the lung against airborne bacteria. Although lysozyme has been purified and characterized from human tears, milk, saliva, and other sources (1-5), human lung lysozyme has received little attention except for measurements of concentrations in sputum (6, 7), immunocytochemical and histochemical localization (8-12),and studies of secretion by alveolar macrophages (13). This study was designed to identify the sources of secreted lung lysozyme, to quantitate the secretory activities of the various sources,and to compare the properties of lysozyme from lung cells with those from other tissues.

  12. Quantitative expression of human drug transporter proteins in lung tissues: analysis of regional, gender, and interindividual differences by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Matsumaru, Takehisa; Yamamura, Norio; Uchida, Yasuo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to clarify the expression levels of transporter proteins in human lung tissue and to analyze regional and interindividual differences in primary cultured epithelial cells. Organic cation/carnitine tranporter 1 (OCTN1) protein expression was highest (2.08 ± 1.19 fmol/μg protein) in human lung tissue, followed by multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) and breast cancer resistance protein expression (1.41 ± 0.41, 1.30 ± 1.29 fmol/μg protein, respectively). Interestingly, the same expression levels of OATP2B1 protein were demonstrated among the epithelial cells derived from all pulmonary regions for the first time. These results suggest that OCTN1 may be the best target transporter protein for pulmonary disease drug design, and OATP2B1 may be an alternative target. MRP1 protein expression was also high and mainly localized in bronchial and alveolar regions. Regarding interindividual differences, the MRP1 protein showed a significant 18-fold maximal difference in the bronchial region among five donors. Sixteen of the 18 transporters showed higher expression in female lungs than in male lungs, especially MRP8 showed a 7.32-fold maximal difference. In conclusion, the protein expression profiles of pulmonary drug transporters and regional, gender, and interindividual differences were clarified. These findings may provide significant insights for pulmonary disease drug design and indicate that administration by inhalation may be viable.

  13. Human lung ex vivo infection models.

    PubMed

    Hocke, Andreas C; Suttorp, Norbert; Hippenstiel, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Pneumonia is counted among the leading causes of death worldwide. Viruses, bacteria and pathogen-related molecules interact with cells present in the human alveolus by numerous, yet poorly understood ways. Traditional cell culture models little reflect the cellular composition, matrix complexity and three-dimensional architecture of the human lung. Integrative animal models suffer from species differences, which are of particular importance for the investigation of zoonotic lung diseases. The use of cultured ex vivo infected human lung tissue may overcome some of these limitations and complement traditional models. The present review gives an overview of common bacterial lung infections, such as pneumococcal infection and of widely neglected pathogens modeled in ex vivo infected lung tissue. The role of ex vivo infected lung tissue for the investigation of emerging viral zoonosis including influenza A virus and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus is discussed. Finally, further directions for the elaboration of such models are revealed. Overall, the introduced models represent meaningful and robust methods to investigate principles of pathogen-host interaction in original human lung tissue.

  14. Lung tissue mechanics as an emergent phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Suki, Béla; Bates, Jason H T

    2011-04-01

    The mechanical properties of lung parenchymal tissue are both elastic and dissipative, as well as being highly nonlinear. These properties cannot be fully understood, however, in terms of the individual constituents of the tissue. Rather, the mechanical behavior of lung tissue emerges as a macroscopic phenomenon from the interactions of its microscopic components in a way that is neither intuitive nor easily understood. In this review, we first consider the quasi-static mechanical behavior of lung tissue and discuss computational models that show how smooth nonlinear stress-strain behavior can arise through a percolation-like process in which the sequential recruitment of collagen fibers with increasing strain causes them to progressively take over the load-bearing role from elastin. We also show how the concept of percolation can be used to link the pathologic progression of parenchymal disease at the micro scale to physiological symptoms at the macro scale. We then examine the dynamic mechanical behavior of lung tissue, which invokes the notion of tissue resistance. Although usually modeled phenomenologically in terms of collections of springs and dashpots, lung tissue viscoelasticity again can be seen to reflect various types of complex dynamic interactions at the molecular level. Finally, we discuss the inevitability of why lung tissue mechanics need to be complex.

  15. Trace element load in cancer and normal lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubala-Kukuś , A.; Braziewicz, J.; Banaś , D.; Majewska, U.; Góź Dź , S.; Urbaniak, A.

    1999-04-01

    Samples of malignant and benign human lung tissues were analysed by two complementary methods, i.e., particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TRXRF). The concentration of trace elements of P, S, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Sr, Hg and Pb was determined in squamous cancer of lung tissue from 65 people and in the benign lung tumour tissue from 5 people. Several elements shows enhancement in cancerous lung tissue of women in comparison to men, i.e., titanium show maximum enhancement by 48% followed by Cr (20%) and Mn (36%). At the same time trace element concentration of Sr and Pb are declaimed by 30% and 20% in women population. Physical basis of used analytical methods, experimental set-up and the procedure of sample preparation are described.

  16. Differentiation of normal and cancerous lung tissues by multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Li, Feng-Chieh; Wu, Ruei-Jr; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Lin, Wei-Chou; Lin, Sung-Jan; So, Peter T. C.; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-02-01

    In this work, we utilized multiphoton microscopy for the label-free diagnosis of non-cancerous, lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tissues from human. Our results show that the combination of second harmonic generation (SHG) and multiphoton excited autofluorescence (MAF) signals may be used to acquire morphological and quantitative information in discriminating cancerous from non-cancerous lung tissues. Specifically, non-cancerous lung tissues are largely fibrotic in structure while cancerous specimens are composed primarily of tumor masses. Quantitative ratiometric analysis using MAF to SHG index (MAFSI or SAAID) shows that the average MAFSI for noncancerous and LAC lung tissue pairs are 0.55 +/-0.23 and 0.87+/-0.15 respectively. In comparison, the MAFSIs for the noncancerous and SCC tissue pairs are 0.50+/-0.12 and 0.72+/-0.13 respectively. Intrinsic fluorescence ratio (FAD/NADH) of SCC and non-cancerous tissues are 0.40+/-0.05 and 0.53+/-0.05 respectively, the redox ratio of SCC diminishes significantly, indicating that increased cellular metabolic activity. Our study shows that nonlinear optical microscopy can assist in differentiating and diagnosing pulmonary cancer from non-cancerous tissues. With additional development, multiphoton microscopy may be used for the clinical diagnosis of lung cancers.

  17. Lung tissue classification using wavelet frames.

    PubMed

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Sage, Daniel; Hidki, Asmâa; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Unser, Michael; Müller, Henning

    2007-01-01

    We describe a texture classification system that identifies lung tissue patterns from high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images of patients affected with interstitial lung diseases (ILD). This pattern recognition task is part of an image-based diagnostic aid system for ILDs. Five lung tissue patterns (healthy, emphysema, ground glass, fibrosis and microdules) selected from a multimedia database are classified using the overcomplete discrete wavelet frame decompostion combined with grey-level histogram features. The overall multiclass accuracy reaches 92.5% of correct matches while combining the two types of features, which are found to be complementary.

  18. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Ginsenoside Rg3 via NF-κB Pathway in A549 Cells and Human Asthmatic Lung Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In-Seung; Uh, InJoon; Kim, Ki-Suk; Kim, Kang-Hoon; Park, Jiyoung; Kim, Yumi; Jung, Ji-Hoon; Jung, Hee-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Objective. There is limited information of the anti-inflammatory effects of Rg3 on inflamed lung cells and tissues. Therefore, we confirmed the anti-inflammatory mechanism of ginsenoside Rg3 in inflamed human airway epithelial cells (A549) and tissues whether Rg3 regulates nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity. Methods. To induce the inflammation, IL-1β (10 ng/ml) was treated to A549 cells for 4 h. The effects of Rg3 on NF-κB activity and COX-2 expression were evaluated by western blotting analysis in both IL-1β-induced inflamed A549 cell and human asthmatic airway epithelial tissues. Using multiplex cytokines assay, the secretion levels of NF-κB-mediated cytokines/chemokines were measured. Result. Rg3 showed the significant inhibition of NF-κB activity thereby reduced COX-2 expression was determined in both IL-1β-induced inflamed A549 cell and human asthmatic airway epithelial tissues. In addition, among NF-κB-mediated cytokines, the secretion levels of IL-4, TNF-α, and eotaxin were significantly decreased by Rg3 in asthma tissues. Even though there was no significant difference, IL-6, IL-9, and IL-13 secretion showed a lower tendency compared to saline-treated human asthmatic airway epithelial tissues. Conclusion. The results from this study demonstrate the potential of Rg3 as an anti-inflammatory agent through regulating NF-κB activity and reducing the secretion of NF-κB-mediated cytokines/chemokines. PMID:28116321

  19. Tiny Device Mimics Human Lung Function

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Rebecca; Harris, Jennifer; Nath, Pulak

    2016-04-25

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing a miniature, tissue-engineered artificial lung that mimics the response of the human lung to drugs, toxins and other agents. “We breathe in and out thousands of times every day. And while we have control over what we eat or drink, we don’t always have control over what we breathe in,” said Jennifer Harris of Biosecurity and Public Health at Los Alamos, "and so we’re making this miniature lung to be able to test on actual human cells whether something in the environment, or a drug, is toxic or harmful to us." Nicknamed “PuLMo” for Pulmonary Lung Model (Pulmo is also the Latin word for "lung")the device consists of two major parts, the bronchiolar unit and the alveolar unit—just like the human lung. The units are primarily made from various polymers and are connected by a microfluidic “circuit board” that manages fluid and air flow. “When we build our lung, we not only take into account the aspects of different cell types, the tissues that are involved, we also take into account that a lung is supposed to breathe, so PuLMo actually breathes,” said Pulak Nath of Applied Modern Physics, who leads engineering efforts for the project. The most exciting application of PuLMo is a potentially revolutionary improvement in the reliability of drug-toxicity assessments and the prediction of new pharmaceutical success in humans, according to Harris. The PuLMo may also be designed to mimic lung disease conditions, such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and asthma, and may be used to study lung air-flow dynamics to better understand the mechanisms of toxins and drug delivery and the effects of smoking, particularly the less-understood effects of e-cigarettes.

  20. Influence of different sized nanoparticles combined with ultrasound on the optical properties of in vitro normal and cancerous human lung tissue studied with OCT and diffuse reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L. P.; Wu, G. Y.; Wei, H. J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Yang, H. Q.; He, Y. H.; Xie, S. S.; Liu, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The present study is concerned with the in vitro study of different sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles’ (NPs) penetration and accumulation in human normal lung (NL) tissue and lung adenocarcinoma tumor (LAT) tissue by the methods of continuous optical coherence tomography (OCT) monitoring and diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra measurement, and their evaluating the effects of TiO2 NPs in two sizes (60 nm and 100 nm) and their combination with ultrasound (US) on the optical properties of human NL and LAT tissue. Spectral measurements indicate that TiO2 NPs penetrate and accumulate into the tissues and thus induce enhancement of DR. The averaged and normalized OCT signal intensity suggests that light penetration depth is significantly enlarged by ultrasound. The average attenuation coefficient of NL tissue changes from 5.10  ±  0.26 mm-1 to 3.12  ±  0.43 mm-1 and 2.15  ±  0.54 mm-1 at 120 min for 60 nm TiO2 NPs and 60 nm TiO2NPs/US treatment, respectively, and from 5.54  ±  0.46 mm-1 to 3.24  ±  0.73 mm-1 and 2.69  ±  0.34 mm-1 at 150 min for 100 nm TiO2 NPs and 100 nm TiO2NPs/US, respectively. The average attenuation coefficient of LAT tissue changes from 9.12  ±  0.54 mm-1 to 4.54  ±  0.39 mm-1 and 3.61  ±  0.38 mm-1 at 120 min for 60 nm TiO2 NPs and 60 nm TiO2NPs/US treatment, respectively, and from 9.79  ±  0.32 mm-1 to 5.12  ±  0.47 mm-1 and 4.89  ±  0.59 mm-1 at 150 min for 100 nm TiO2 NPs and 100 nm TiO2NPs/US, respectively. The results suggest that the optical properties of NL and LAT tissues are greatly influenced by TiO2 NPs and their combination with ultrasound.

  1. PilY1 Promotes Legionella pneumophila Infection of Human Lung Tissue Explants and Contributes to Bacterial Adhesion, Host Cell Invasion, and Twitching Motility

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Julia; Ünal, Can M.; Thiem, Stefanie; Grimpe, Louisa; Goldmann, Torsten; Gaßler, Nikolaus; Richter, Matthias; Shevchuk, Olga; Steinert, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is an acute fibrinopurulent pneumonia. During infection Legionella pneumophila adheres to the alveolar lining and replicates intracellularly within recruited macrophages. Here we provide a sequence and domain composition analysis of the L. pneumophila PilY1 protein, which has a high homology to PilY1 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PilY1 proteins of both pathogens contain a von Willebrand factor A (vWFa) and a C-terminal PilY domain. Using cellular fractionation, we assigned the L. pneumophila PilY1 as an outer membrane protein that is only expressed during the transmissive stationary growth phase. PilY1 contributes to infection of human lung tissue explants (HLTEs). A detailed analysis using THP-1 macrophages and A549 lung epithelial cells revealed that this contribution is due to multiple effects depending on host cell type. Deletion of PilY1 resulted in a lower replication rate in THP-1 macrophages but not in A549 cells. Further on, adhesion to THP-1 macrophages and A549 epithelial cells was decreased. Additionally, the invasion into non-phagocytic A549 epithelial cells was drastically reduced when PilY1 was absent. Complementation variants of a PilY1-negative mutant revealed that the C-terminal PilY domain is essential for restoring the wild type phenotype in adhesion, while the putatively mechanosensitive vWFa domain facilitates invasion into non-phagocytic cells. Since PilY1 also promotes twitching motility of L. pneumophila, we discuss the putative contribution of this newly described virulence factor for bacterial dissemination within infected lung tissue. PMID:28326293

  2. Lung retention of cerium in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Pairon, J C; Roos, F; Iwatsubo, Y; Janson, X; Billon-Galland, M A; Bignon, J; Brochard, P

    1994-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate lung retention of particles containing cerium in subjects with and without previous occupational exposure to mineral dusts. Analytical transmission electron microscopy was performed on 459 samples of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and 75 samples of lung tissue. Study of the distribution of mineralogical species in human samples showed that particles containing cerium were encountered in less than 10% of subjects. The proportion of subjects with particles containing cerium in their biological samples was not different between controls and subjects with previous occupational exposure to fibrous or nonfibrous mineral dusts. This was considered as the background level of lung retention of cerium in the general population. By contrast, determination of the absolute concentration of particles containing cerium in BAL fluid and lung tissue samples showed that 1.2% (from BAL fluid) and 1.5% (from lung tissue) of subjects with previous exposure to mineral particles had high lung retention of particles containing cerium. This study is believed to be the first one in which lung retention of cerium was estimated in the general population. PMID:8130849

  3. Stereology and morphometry of lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Mühlfeld, Christian; Knudsen, Lars; Ochs, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    This chapter deals with the stereological quantification of structural characteristics of the lung. The aim of design-based stereological methods is the unbiased and efficient estimation of structural features without making any assumptions on the underlying nature of the biological sample. The methods are based on rigorous sampling of location and orientation, the application of appropriate test systems, and the controlling of the precision of the estimates. Here, we describe the workflow from the fixation of the lung over the processing of the tissue samples to gaining estimates on the structural properties of the lung. Specifically, this chapter deals with methods for estimating the reference volume, sampling location, and sampling orientation, estimating volumes and surface areas of alveolar compartments, estimating total alveolar number, performing stereology at light and electron microscopic level, and dealing with technical problems such as tissue shrinkage. The procedures are illustrated using a worked example from the authors' own laboratory.

  4. Functional EpoR Pathway Utilization Is Not Detected in Primary Tumor Cells Isolated from Human Breast, Non-Small Cell Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Tumor Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Scott D.; Rossi, John M.; Paweletz, Katherine L.; Fitzpatrick, V. Dan; Begley, C. Glenn; Busse, Leigh; Elliott, Steve; McCaffery, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Several clinical trials in oncology have reported increased mortality or disease progression associated with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. One hypothesis proposes that erythropoiesis-stimulating agents directly stimulate tumor proliferation and/or survival through cell-surface receptors. To test this hypothesis and examine if human tumors utilize the erythropoietin receptor pathway, the response of tumor cells to human recombinant erythropoietin was investigated in disaggregated tumor cells obtained from 186 patients with colorectal, breast, lung, ovarian, head and neck, and other tumors. A cocktail of well characterized tumor growth factors (EGF, HGF, and IGF-1) were analyzed in parallel as a positive control to determine whether freshly-isolated tumor cells were able to respond to growth factor activation ex vivo. Exposing tumor cells to the growth factor cocktail resulted in stimulation of survival and proliferation pathways as measured by an increase in phosphorylation of the downstream signaling proteins AKT and ERK. In contrast, no activation by human recombinant erythropoietin was observed in isolated tumor cells. Though tumor samples exhibited a broad range of cell-surface expression of EGFR, c-Met, and IGF-1R, no cell-surface erythropoietin receptor was detected in tumor cells from the 186 tumors examined (by flow cytometry or Western blot). Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents did not act directly upon isolated tumor cells to stimulate pathways known to promote proliferation or survival of human tumor cells isolated from primary and metastatic tumor tissues. PMID:25807104

  5. CXCL12 induces connective tissue growth factor expression in human lung fibroblasts through the Rac1/ERK, JNK, and AP-1 pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Huang; Shih, Chung-Huang; Tseng, Chih-Chieh; Yu, Chung-Chi; Tsai, Yuan-Jhih; Bien, Mauo-Ying; Chen, Bing-Chang

    2014-01-01

    CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor-1, SDF-1) is a potent chemokine for homing of CXCR4+ fibrocytes to injury sites of lung tissue, which contributes to pulmonary fibrosis. Overexpression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) plays a critical role in pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the roles of Rac1, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and activator protein-1 (AP-1) in CXCL12-induced CTGF expression in human lung fibroblasts. CXCL12 caused concentration- and time-dependent increases in CTGF expression and CTGF-luciferase activity. CXCL12-induced CTGF expression was inhibited by a CXCR4 antagonist (AMD3100), small interfering RNA of CXCR4 (CXCR4 siRNA), a dominant negative mutant of Rac1 (RacN17), a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK) inhibitor (PD98059), a JNK inhibitor (SP600125), a p21-activated kinase inhibitor (PAK18), c-Jun siRNA, and an AP-1 inhibitor (curcumin). Treatment of cells with CXCL12 caused activations of Rac1, Rho, ERK, and c-Jun. The CXCL12-induced increase in ERK phosphorylation was inhibited by RacN17. Treatment of cells with PD98059 and SP600125 both inhibited CXCL12-induced c-Jun phosphorylation. CXCL12 caused the recruitment of c-Jun and c-Fos binding to the CTGF promoter. Furthermore, CXCL12 induced an increase in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, a myofibroblastic phenotype, and actin stress fiber formation. CXCL12-induced actin stress fiber formation and α-SMA expression were respectively inhibited by AMD3100 and CTGF siRNA. Taken together, our results suggest that CXCL12, acting through CXCR4, activates the Rac/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, which in turn initiates c-Jun phosphorylation, and recruits c-Jun and c-Fos to the CTGF promoter and ultimately induces CTGF expression in human lung fibroblasts. Moreover, overexpression of CTGF mediates CXCL12-induced α-SMA expression.

  6. CXCL12 Induces Connective Tissue Growth Factor Expression in Human Lung Fibroblasts through the Rac1/ERK, JNK, and AP-1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chih-Chieh; Yu, Chung-Chi; Tsai, Yuan-Jhih; Bien, Mauo-Ying; Chen, Bing-Chang

    2014-01-01

    CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor-1, SDF-1) is a potent chemokine for homing of CXCR4+ fibrocytes to injury sites of lung tissue, which contributes to pulmonary fibrosis. Overexpression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) plays a critical role in pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the roles of Rac1, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and activator protein-1 (AP-1) in CXCL12-induced CTGF expression in human lung fibroblasts. CXCL12 caused concentration- and time-dependent increases in CTGF expression and CTGF-luciferase activity. CXCL12-induced CTGF expression was inhibited by a CXCR4 antagonist (AMD3100), small interfering RNA of CXCR4 (CXCR4 siRNA), a dominant negative mutant of Rac1 (RacN17), a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK) inhibitor (PD98059), a JNK inhibitor (SP600125), a p21-activated kinase inhibitor (PAK18), c-Jun siRNA, and an AP-1 inhibitor (curcumin). Treatment of cells with CXCL12 caused activations of Rac1, Rho, ERK, and c-Jun. The CXCL12-induced increase in ERK phosphorylation was inhibited by RacN17. Treatment of cells with PD98059 and SP600125 both inhibited CXCL12-induced c-Jun phosphorylation. CXCL12 caused the recruitment of c-Jun and c-Fos binding to the CTGF promoter. Furthermore, CXCL12 induced an increase in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, a myofibroblastic phenotype, and actin stress fiber formation. CXCL12-induced actin stress fiber formation and α-SMA expression were respectively inhibited by AMD3100 and CTGF siRNA. Taken together, our results suggest that CXCL12, acting through CXCR4, activates the Rac/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, which in turn initiates c-Jun phosphorylation, and recruits c-Jun and c-Fos to the CTGF promoter and ultimately induces CTGF expression in human lung fibroblasts. Moreover, overexpression of CTGF mediates CXCL12-induced α-SMA expression. PMID:25121739

  7. Preconditioning allows engraftment of mouse and human embryonic lung cells, enabling lung repair in mice.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Chava; Shezen, Elias; Aronovich, Anna; Klionsky, Yael Zlotnikov; Yaakov, Yasmin; Assayag, Miri; Biton, Inbal Eti; Tal, Orna; Shakhar, Guy; Ben-Hur, Herzel; Shneider, David; Vaknin, Zvi; Sadan, Oscar; Evron, Shmuel; Freud, Enrique; Shoseyov, David; Wilschanski, Michael; Berkman, Neville; Fibbe, Willem E; Hagin, David; Hillel-Karniel, Carmit; Krentsis, Irit Milman; Bachar-Lustig, Esther; Reisner, Yair

    2015-08-01

    Repair of injured lungs represents a longstanding therapeutic challenge. We show that human and mouse embryonic lung tissue from the canalicular stage of development (20-22 weeks of gestation for humans, and embryonic day 15-16 (E15-E16) for mouse) are enriched with progenitors residing in distinct niches. On the basis of the marked analogy to progenitor niches in bone marrow (BM), we attempted strategies similar to BM transplantation, employing sublethal radiation to vacate lung progenitor niches and to reduce stem cell competition. Intravenous infusion of a single cell suspension of canalicular lung tissue from GFP-marked mice or human fetal donors into naphthalene-injured and irradiated syngeneic or SCID mice, respectively, induced marked long-term lung chimerism. Donor type structures or 'patches' contained epithelial, mesenchymal and endothelial cells. Transplantation of differentially labeled E16 mouse lung cells indicated that these patches were probably of clonal origin from the donor. Recipients of the single cell suspension transplant exhibited marked improvement in lung compliance and tissue damping reflecting the energy dissipation in the lung tissues. Our study provides proof of concept for lung reconstitution by canalicular-stage human lung cells after preconditioning of the pulmonary niche.

  8. DETECTION AND QUANTITATION OF FALLOUT PARTICLES IN A HUMAN LUNG.

    PubMed

    WEGST, A V; PELLETIER, C A; WHIPPLE, G H

    1964-02-28

    Portions of an adult human lung were studied by autoradiography in order to detect the presence of fallout particles. The radioactivity in the remainder of the tissue was determined with a gamma-ray spectrometer. Four particles were found and their activities were determined. From the measurement for total-fission-product activity in the lung tissue it was calculated that there were approximately 264 particles in the right lung at the time of death.

  9. Tissue Specificity of Decellularized Rhesus Monkey Kidney and Lung Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Karina H.; Lee, C. Chang I.; Batchelder, Cynthia A.; Tarantal, Alice F.

    2013-01-01

    Initial steps in establishing an optimal strategy for functional bioengineered tissues is generation of three-dimensional constructs containing cells with the appropriate organization and phenotype. To effectively utilize rhesus monkey decellularized kidney scaffolds, these studies evaluated two key parameters: (1) residual scaffold components after decellularization including proteomics analysis, and (2) the use of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) for recellularization in order to explore cellular differentiation in a tissue-specific manner. Sections of kidney and lung were selected for a comparative evaluation because of their similar pattern of organogenesis. Proteomics analysis revealed the presence of growth factors and antimicrobial proteins as well as stress proteins and complement components. Immunohistochemistry of recellularized kidney scaffolds showed the generation of Cytokeratin+ epithelial tubule phenotypes throughout the scaffold that demonstrated a statistically significant increase in expression of kidney-associated genes compared to baseline hESC gene expression. Recellularization of lung scaffolds showed that cells lined the alveolar spaces and demonstrated statistically significant upregulation of key lung-associated genes. However, overall expression of kidney and lung-associated markers was not statistically different when the kidney and lung recellularized scaffolds were compared. These results suggest that decellularized scaffolds have an intrinsic spatial ability to influence hESC differentiation by physically shaping cells into tissue-appropriate structures and phenotypes, and that additional approaches may be needed to ensure consistent recellularization throughout the matrix. PMID:23717553

  10. Analysis of Lung Tissue Using Ion Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, J. L.; Barrera, R.; Miranda, J.

    2002-08-01

    In this work a comparative study is presented of the contents of metals in lung tissue from healthy patients and with lung cancer, by means of two analytical techniques: Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The samples of cancerous tissue were taken from 26 autopsies made to individuals died in the National Institute of Respiratory Disease (INER), 22 of cancer and 4 of other non-cancer biopsies. When analyzing the entirety of the samples, in the cancerous tissues, there were increments in the concentrations of S (4%), K (635%), Co (85%) and Cu (13%). Likewise, there were deficiencies in the concentrations of Cl (59%), Ca (6%), Fe (26%) and Zn (7%). Only in the cancerous tissues there were appearances of P, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Br and Sr. The tissue samples were classified according to cancer types (adenocarcinomas, epidermoides and of small cell carcinoma), personal habits (smokers and alcoholic), genetic predisposition and residence place. There was a remarkable decrease in the concentration of Ca and a marked increment in the Cu in the epidermoide tissue samples with regard to those of adenocarcinoma or of small cells cancer. Also, decrements were detected in K and increments of Fe, Co and Cu in the sample belonging to people that resided in Mexico City with regard to those that resided in the State of Mexico.

  11. Some connective tissue disorders of the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Turner-Warwick, M.

    1988-01-01

    Many connective tissue disorders involve the lungs. The same clinical syndrome may be associated with several distinctive types of pathology in different patients. Fibrosing alveolitis is a common feature of a number of different syndromes. An hypothesis is set out in schematic form which may help to account for some of these differences and emphasizes the potential importance of the pulmonary vasculature in pathogenesis. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:3074281

  12. A classification framework for lung tissue categorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Iavindrasana, Jimison; Hidki, Asmâa; Cohen, Gilles; Geissbuhler, Antoine; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Müller, Henning

    2008-03-01

    We compare five common classifier families in their ability to categorize six lung tissue patterns in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images of patients affected with interstitial lung diseases (ILD) but also normal tissue. The evaluated classifiers are Naive Bayes, k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN), J48 decision trees, Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) and Support Vector Machines (SVM). The dataset used contains 843 regions of interest (ROI) of healthy and five pathologic lung tissue patterns identified by two radiologists at the University Hospitals of Geneva. Correlation of the feature space composed of 39 texture attributes is studied. A grid search for optimal parameters is carried out for each classifier family. Two complementary metrics are used to characterize the performances of classification. Those are based on McNemar's statistical tests and global accuracy. SVM reached best values for each metric and allowed a mean correct prediction rate of 87.9% with high class-specific precision on testing sets of 423 ROIs.

  13. Tiny Device Mimics Human Lung Function

    ScienceCinema

    McDonald, Rebecca; Harris, Jennifer; Nath, Pulak

    2016-07-12

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing a miniature, tissue-engineered artificial lung that mimics the response of the human lung to drugs, toxins and other agents. “We breathe in and out thousands of times every day. And while we have control over what we eat or drink, we don’t always have control over what we breathe in,” said Jennifer Harris of Biosecurity and Public Health at Los Alamos, "and so we’re making this miniature lung to be able to test on actual human cells whether something in the environment, or a drug, is toxic or harmful to us." Nicknamed “PuLMo” for Pulmonary Lung Model (Pulmo is also the Latin word for "lung")the device consists of two major parts, the bronchiolar unit and the alveolar unit—just like the human lung. The units are primarily made from various polymers and are connected by a microfluidic “circuit board” that manages fluid and air flow. “When we build our lung, we not only take into account the aspects of different cell types, the tissues that are involved, we also take into account that a lung is supposed to breathe, so PuLMo actually breathes,” said Pulak Nath of Applied Modern Physics, who leads engineering efforts for the project. The most exciting application of PuLMo is a potentially revolutionary improvement in the reliability of drug-toxicity assessments and the prediction of new pharmaceutical success in humans, according to Harris. The PuLMo may also be designed to mimic lung disease conditions, such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and asthma, and may be used to study lung air-flow dynamics to better understand the mechanisms of toxins and drug delivery and the effects of smoking, particularly the less-understood effects of e-cigarettes.

  14. Accumulation of perfluoroalkyl substances in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Francisca; Nadal, Martí; Navarro-Ortega, Alícia; Fàbrega, Francesc; Domingo, José L; Barceló, Damià; Farré, Marinella

    2013-09-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are environmental pollutants with an important bioaccumulation potential. However, their metabolism and distribution in humans are not well studied. In this study, the concentrations of 21 PFASs were analyzed in 99 samples of autopsy tissues (brain, liver, lung, bone, and kidney) from subjects who had been living in Tarragona (Catalonia, Spain). The samples were analyzed by solvent extraction and online purification by turbulent flow and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The occurrence of PFASs was confirmed in all human tissues. Although PFASs accumulation followed particular trends depending on the specific tissue, some similarities were found. In kidney and lung, perfluorobutanoic acid was the most frequent compound, and at highest concentrations (median values: 263 and 807ng/g in kidney and lung, respectively). In liver and brain, perfluorohexanoic acid showed the maximum levels (median: 68.3 and 141ng/g, respectively), while perfluorooctanoic acid was the most contributively in bone (median: 20.9ng/g). Lung tissues accumulated the highest concentration of PFASs. However, perfluorooctane sulfonic acid and perfluorooctanoic acid were more prevalent in liver and bone, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the accumulation of different PFASs in samples of various human tissues from the same subjects is here reported for the very first time. The current results may be of high importance for the validation of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models, which are being developed for humans. However, further studies on the distribution of the same compounds in the human body are still required.

  15. [Determination of thirty three elements in lung cancer tissues of patients with lung cancer by microwave digestion-ICP-MS].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin-Lin; Ma, Qian-Li; Huang, Yun-Chao; Wu, Guo-Ping; Wei, Fu-Sheng

    2009-12-01

    A method for determining 33 elements in lung tissues of patients with lung cancer was developed by using vacuum freeze-drying microwave digestion-ICP-MS. The lung tissue samples were treated by vacuum freeze-drying equipment. After microwave digestion in HNO3-H2O2 solution system, the samples were diluted with the method of constant volume. Under the optimized conditions the samples were analyzed by ICP-MS. The double internal standard elements Rh and Re were used to compensate for matrix suppression effect and sensitivity drift. The analytical results showed that the detection limits of the 33 elements were 0.01-0.45 ng x mL(-1). The national standard reference material GBW(E)080193 bovine liver was analyzed by the described method and the measured element values accorded with the standard values or the reference values. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the method was 2.1%-14.3%. The recovery rates of the studied elements were 90.1%-117.5%. The contents of 33 elements in lung cancer tissues, paracancerous lung tissues and benign lung tissues of 6 patients with lung cancer were determined by the method. It was indicated that the method is rapid, simple and accurate for determining multi-elements in human lung tissue and other biological samples.

  16. Andes Hantavirus-Infection of a 3D Human Lung Tissue Model Reveals a Late Peak in Progeny Virus Production Followed by Increased Levels of Proinflammatory Cytokines and VEGF-A.

    PubMed

    Sundström, Karin B; Nguyen Hoang, Anh Thu; Gupta, Shawon; Ahlm, Clas; Svensson, Mattias; Klingström, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), a severe acute disease with a 40% case fatality rate. Humans are infected via inhalation, and the lungs are severely affected during HPS, but little is known regarding the effects of ANDV-infection of the lung. Using a 3-dimensional air-exposed organotypic human lung tissue model, we analyzed progeny virus production and cytokine-responses after ANDV-infection. After a 7-10 day period of low progeny virus production, a sudden peak in progeny virus levels was observed during approximately one week. This peak in ANDV-production coincided in time with activation of innate immune responses, as shown by induction of type I and III interferons and ISG56. After the peak in ANDV production a low, but stable, level of ANDV progeny was observed until 39 days after infection. Compared to uninfected models, ANDV caused long-term elevated levels of eotaxin-1, IL-6, IL-8, IP-10, and VEGF-A that peaked 20-25 days after infection, i.e., after the observed peak in progeny virus production. Notably, eotaxin-1 was only detected in supernatants from infected models. In conclusion, these findings suggest that ANDV replication in lung tissue elicits a late proinflammatory immune response with possible long-term effects on the local lung cytokine milieu. The change from an innate to a proinflammatory response might be important for the transition from initial asymptomatic infection to severe clinical disease, HPS.

  17. Synchrotron soft X-ray imaging and fluorescence microscopy reveal novel features of asbestos body morphology and composition in human lung tissues

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Occupational or environmental exposure to asbestos fibres is associated with pleural and parenchymal lung diseases. A histopathologic hallmark of exposure to asbestos is the presence in lung parenchyma of the so-called asbestos bodies. They are the final product of biomineralization processes resulting in deposition of endogenous iron and organic matter (mainly proteins) around the inhaled asbestos fibres. For shedding light on the formation mechanisms of asbestos bodies it is of fundamental importance to characterize at the same length scales not only their structural morphology and chemical composition but also to correlate them to the possible alterations in the local composition of the surrounding tissues. Here we report the first correlative morphological and chemical characterization of untreated paraffinated histological lung tissue samples with asbestos bodies by means of soft X-ray imaging and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) microscopy, which reveals new features in the elemental lateral distribution. Results The X-ray absorption and phase contrast images and the simultaneously monitored XRF maps of tissue samples have revealed the location, distribution and elemental composition of asbestos bodies and associated nanometric structures. The observed specific morphology and differences in the local Si, Fe, O and Mg content provide distinct fingerprints characteristic for the core asbestos fibre and the ferruginous body. The highest Si content is found in the asbestos fibre, while the shell and ferruginous bodies are characterized by strongly increased content of Mg, Fe and O compared to the adjacent tissue. The XRF and SEM-EDX analyses of the extracted asbestos bodies confirmed an enhanced Mg deposition in the organic asbestos coating. Conclusions The present report demonstrates the potential of the advanced synchrotron-based X-ray imaging and microspectroscopy techniques for studying the response of the lung tissue to the presence of asbestos fibres

  18. Lung flooding enables efficient lung sonography and tumour imaging in human ex vivo and porcine in vivo lung cancer model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sonography has become the imaging technique of choice for guiding intraoperative interventions in abdominal surgery. Due to artefacts from residual air content, however, videothoracoscopic and open intraoperative ultrasound-guided thermoablation of lung malignancies are impossible. Lung flooding is a new method that allows complete ultrasound imaging of lungs and their tumours. Methods Fourteen resected tumourous human lung lobes were examined transpleurally with B-mode ultrasound before (in atelectasis) and after lung flooding with isotonic saline solution. In two swine, the left lung was filled with 15 ml/kg isotonic saline solution through the left side of a double-lumen tube. Lung tumours were simulated by transthoracic ultrasound-guided injection of 5 ml of purified bovine serum albumin in glutaraldehyde, centrally into the left lower lung lobe. The rate of tumour detection, the severity of disability caused by residual gas, and sonomorphology of the lungs and tumours were assessed. Results The ex vivo tumour detection rate was 100% in flooded human lung lobes and 43% (6/14) in atelectatic lungs. In all cases of atelectasis, sonographic tumour imaging was impaired by residual gas. Tumours and atelectatic tissue were isoechoic. In 28% of flooded lungs, a little residual gas was observed that did not impair sonographic tumour imaging. In contrast to tumours, flooded lung tissue was hyperechoic, homogeneous, and of fine-grained structure. Because of the bronchial wall three-laminar structure, sonographic differentiation of vessels and bronchi was possible. In all cases, malignant tumours in the flooded lung appeared well-demarcated from the lung parenchyma. Adenocarcinoma, squamous, and large cell carcinomas were hypoechoic. Bronchioloalveolar cell carcinoma was slightly hyperechoic. Transpleural sonography identifies endobronchial tumour growth and bronchial wall destruction. With transthoracic sonography, the flooded animal lung can be completely

  19. Lung regeneration by fetal lung tissue implantation in a mouse pulmonary emphysema model.

    PubMed

    Uyama, Koh; Sakiyama, Shoji; Yoshida, Mitsuteru; Kenzaki, Koichiro; Toba, Hiroaki; Kawakami, Yukikiyo; Okumura, Kazumasa; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Kondo, Kazuya; Tangoku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are high. However, no radical therapy has been developed to date. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether fetal mouse lung tissue can grow and differentiate in the emphysematous lung. Fetal lung tissue from green fluorescent protein C57BL/6 mice at 16 days' gestation was used as donor material. Twelve-month-old pallid mice were used as recipients. Donor lungs were cut into small pieces and implanted into the recipient left lung by performing thoracotomy under anesthesia. The recipient mice were sacrificed at day 7, 14, and 28 after implantation and used for histological examination. Well-developed spontaneous pulmonary emphysema was seen in 12-month-old pallid mice. Smooth and continuous connection between implanted fetal lung tissue and recipient lung was recognized. Air space expansion and donor tissue differentiation were observed over time. We could clearly distinguish the border zones between injected tissue and native tissue by the green fluorescence of grafts. Fetal mouse lung fragments survived and differentiated in the emphysematous lung of pallid mice. Implantation of fetal lung tissue in pallid mice might lead to further lung regeneration research from the perspective of respiratory and exercise function. J. Med. Invest. 63: 182-186, August, 2016.

  20. Mtb-Specific CD27low CD4 T Cells as Markers of Lung Tissue Destruction during Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Nikitina, Irina Yu; Kondratuk, Natalya A.; Kosmiadi, George A.; Amansahedov, Rasul B.

    2012-01-01

    differentiation during TB; evaluation of CD27lowIFN-γ+ cells provides a valuable means to assess TB activity, lung destruction, and tissue repair following TB therapy. PMID:22937086

  1. Production and Assessment of Decellularized Pig and Human Lung Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Niles, Jean; Riddle, Michael; Vargas, Gracie; Schilagard, Tuya; Ma, Liang; Edward, Kert; La Francesca, Saverio; Sakamoto, Jason; Vega, Stephanie; Ogadegbe, Marie; Mlcak, Ronald; Deyo, Donald; Woodson, Lee; McQuitty, Christopher; Lick, Scott; Beckles, Daniel; Melo, Esther; Cortiella, Joaquin

    2013-01-01

    The authors have previously shown that acellular (AC) trachea-lung scaffolds can (1) be produced from natural rat lungs, (2) retain critical components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) such as collagen-1 and elastin, and (3) be used to produce lung tissue after recellularization with murine embryonic stem cells. The aim of this study was to produce large (porcine or human) AC lung scaffolds to determine the feasibility of producing scaffolds with potential clinical applicability. We report here the first attempt to produce AC pig or human trachea-lung scaffold. Using a combination of freezing and sodium dodecyl sulfate washes, pig trachea-lungs and human trachea-lungs were decellularized. Once decellularization was complete we evaluated the structural integrity of the AC lung scaffolds using bronchoscopy, multiphoton microscopy (MPM), assessment of the ECM utilizing immunocytochemistry and evaluation of mechanics through the use of pulmonary function tests (PFTs). Immunocytochemistry indicated that there was loss of collagen type IV and laminin in the AC lung scaffold, but retention of collagen-1, elastin, and fibronectin in some regions. MPM scoring was also used to examine the AC lung scaffold ECM structure and to evaluate the amount of collagen I in normal and AC lung. MPM was used to examine the physical arrangement of collagen-1 and elastin in the pleura, distal lung, lung borders, and trachea or bronchi. MPM and bronchoscopy of trachea and lung tissues showed that no cells or cell debris remained in the AC scaffolds. PFT measurements of the trachea-lungs showed no relevant differences in peak pressure, dynamic or static compliance, and a nonrestricted flow pattern in AC compared to normal lungs. Although there were changes in content of collagen I and elastin this did not affect the mechanics of lung function as evidenced by normal PFT values. When repopulated with a variety of stem or adult cells including human adult primary alveolar epithelial type II

  2. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Mononuclear Phagocytes in Nondiseased Human Lung and Lung-Draining Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Desch, A. Nicole; Gibbings, Sophie L.; Goyal, Rajni; Kolde, Raivo; Bednarek, Joe; Bruno, Tullia; Slansky, Jill E.; Jacobelli, Jordan; Mason, Robert; Ito, Yoko; Messier, Elise; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Prabagar, Miglena; Atif, Shaikh M.; Segura, Elodie; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Bratton, Donna L.; Janssen, William J.; Henson, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: The pulmonary mononuclear phagocyte system is a critical host defense mechanism composed of macrophages, monocytes, monocyte-derived cells, and dendritic cells. However, our current characterization of these cells is limited because it is derived largely from animal studies and analysis of human mononuclear phagocytes from blood and small tissue resections around tumors. Objectives: Phenotypic and morphologic characterization of mononuclear phagocytes that potentially access inhaled antigens in human lungs. Methods: We acquired and analyzed pulmonary mononuclear phagocytes from fully intact nondiseased human lungs (including the major blood vessels and draining lymph nodes) obtained en bloc from 72 individual donors. Differential labeling of hematopoietic cells via intrabronchial and intravenous administration of antibodies within the same lobe was used to identify extravascular tissue-resident mononuclear phagocytes and exclude cells within the vascular lumen. Multiparameter flow cytometry was used to identify mononuclear phagocyte populations among cells labeled by each route of antibody delivery. Measurements and Main Results: We performed a phenotypic analysis of pulmonary mononuclear phagocytes isolated from whole nondiseased human lungs and lung-draining lymph nodes. Five pulmonary mononuclear phagocytes were observed, including macrophages, monocyte-derived cells, and dendritic cells that were phenotypically distinct from cell populations found in blood. Conclusions: Different mononuclear phagocytes, particularly dendritic cells, were labeled by intravascular and intrabronchial antibody delivery, countering the notion that tissue and blood mononuclear phagocytes are equivalent systems. Phenotypic descriptions of the mononuclear phagocytes in nondiseased lungs provide a precedent for comparative studies in diseased lungs and potential targets for therapeutics. PMID:26551758

  3. [Human brown adipose tissue].

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Kirsi A; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2015-01-01

    Adult humans have heat-producing and energy-consuming brown adipose tissue in the clavicular region of the neck. There are two types of brown adipose cells, the so-called classic and beige adipose cells. Brown adipose cells produce heat by means of uncoupler protein 1 (UCP1) from fatty acids and sugar. By applying positron emission tomography (PET) measuring the utilization of sugar, the metabolism of brown fat has been shown to multiply in the cold, presumably influencing energy consumption. Active brown fat is most likely present in young adults, persons of normal weight and women, least likely in obese persons.

  4. Regional differences in alveolar density in the human lung are related to lung height.

    PubMed

    McDonough, John E; Knudsen, Lars; Wright, Alexander C; Elliott, W Mark; Ochs, Matthias; Hogg, James C

    2015-06-01

    The gravity-dependent pleural pressure gradient within the thorax produces regional differences in lung inflation that have a profound effect on the distribution of ventilation within the lung. This study examines the hypothesis that gravitationally induced differences in stress within the thorax also influence alveolar density in terms of the number of alveoli contained per unit volume of lung. To test this hypothesis, we measured the number of alveoli within known volumes of lung located at regular intervals between the apex and base of four normal adult human lungs that were rapidly frozen at a constant transpulmonary pressure, and used microcomputed tomographic imaging to measure alveolar density (number alveoli/mm3) at regular intervals between the lung apex and base. These results show that at total lung capacity, alveolar density in the lung apex is 31.6 ± 3.4 alveoli/mm3, with 15 ± 6% of parenchymal tissue consisting of alveolar duct. The base of the lung had an alveolar density of 21.2 ± 1.6 alveoli/mm3 and alveolar duct volume fraction of 29 ± 6%. The difference in alveolar density can be negated by factoring in the effects of alveolar compression due to the pleural pressure gradient at the base of the lung in vivo and at functional residual capacity.

  5. Trace element concentration distributions in breast, lung and colon tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewska, Urszula; Banas, Dariusz; Braziewicz, Janusz; Gózdz, Stanislaw; Kubala-Kukus, Aldona; Kucharzewski, Marek

    2007-07-01

    The concentrations of Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in cancerous and benign tissues of breast, lung and intestine (colon) have been determined. In the cases when the element concentration has not been determined in all samples the Kaplan-Meier method has been used for the reconstruction of the original concentration distributions and estimation of the true mean concentrations and medians. Finally, the log-rank test has been applied to compare the elemental concentration distributions between cancerous and benign tissues of the same organ, between cancerous tissues and between benign tissues taken from different organs. Comparing benign and malignant neoplastic tissues, statistically significant differences have been found between Fe and Se concentration distributions of breast as well as for Cu and Zn in the case of lung tissues and in the case of colon tissues for Zn. The concentrations of all elements have been found to be statistically different in cancer tissues as well as in benign ones when comparing the different organs, i.e. groups 'breast-colon' and 'breast-lung'. Concentrations of Fe and Cu have been found to be statistically different in lung and colon cancerous tissues. For benign tissues of lung and colon a statistically significant difference has been found only for Zn.

  6. Innate lymphoid cells promote lung tissue homeostasis following acute influenza virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Monticelli, Laurel A.; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.; Abt, Michael C.; Alenghat, Theresa; Ziegler, Carly G.K.; Doering, Travis A.; Angelosanto, Jill M.; Laidlaw, Brian J.; Yang, Cliff Y.; Sathaliyawala, Taheri; Kubota, Masaru; Turner, Damian; Diamond, Joshua M.; Goldrath, Ananda W.; Farber, Donna L.; Collman, Ronald G.; Wherry, E. John; Artis, David

    2012-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), a recently identified heterogeneous cell population, are critical in orchestrating immunity and inflammation in the intestine but whether ILCs can influence immune responses or tissue homeostasis at other mucosal sites remains poorly characterized. Here we identify a population of lung-resident ILCs in mice and humans that expressed CD90, CD25, CD127 and T1-ST2. Strikingly, mouse ILCs accumulated in the lung following influenza virus infection and depletion of ILCs resulted in loss of airway epithelial integrity, decreased lung function and impaired airway remodeling. These defects could be restored by administration of the lung ILC product amphiregulin. Collectively, these results demonstrate a critical role for lung ILCs in restoring airway epithelial integrity and tissue homeostasis following influenza virus infection. PMID:21946417

  7. Development of a Three-Dimensional Bioengineering Technology to Generate Lung Tissue for Personalized Disease Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Dan C; Alva-Ornelas, Jackelyn A; Sucre, Jennifer M S; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Durra, Abdo; Richardson, Wade; Jonas, Steven J; Paul, Manash K; Karumbayaram, Saravanan; Dunn, Bruce; Gomperts, Brigitte N

    2017-02-01

    Stem cell technologies, especially patient-specific, induced stem cell pluripotency and directed differentiation, hold great promise for changing the landscape of medical therapies. Proper exploitation of these methods may lead to personalized organ transplants, but to regenerate organs, it is necessary to develop methods for assembling differentiated cells into functional, organ-level tissues. The generation of three-dimensional human tissue models also holds potential for medical advances in disease modeling, as full organ functionality may not be necessary to recapitulate disease pathophysiology. This is specifically true of lung diseases where animal models often do not recapitulate human disease. Here, we present a method for the generation of self-assembled human lung tissue and its potential for disease modeling and drug discovery for lung diseases characterized by progressive and irreversible scarring such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Tissue formation occurs because of the overlapping processes of cellular adhesion to multiple alveolar sac templates, bioreactor rotation, and cellular contraction. Addition of transforming growth factor-β1 to single cell-type mesenchymal organoids resulted in morphologic scarring typical of that seen in IPF but not in two-dimensional IPF fibroblast cultures. Furthermore, this lung organoid may be modified to contain multiple lung cell types assembled into the correct anatomical location, thereby allowing cell-cell contact and recapitulating the lung microenvironment. Our bottom-up approach for synthesizing patient-specific lung tissue in a scalable system allows for the development of relevant human lung disease models with the potential for high throughput drug screening to identify targeted therapies. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:622-633.

  8. Development of a Three-Dimensional Bioengineering Technology to Generate Lung Tissue for Personalized Disease Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Dan C; Alva-Ornelas, Jackelyn A; Sucre, Jennifer M S; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Durra, Abdo; Richardson, Wade; Jonas, Steven J; Paul, Manash K; Karumbayaram, Saravanan; Dunn, Bruce; Gomperts, Brigitte N

    2016-09-15

    : Stem cell technologies, especially patient-specific, induced stem cell pluripotency and directed differentiation, hold great promise for changing the landscape of medical therapies. Proper exploitation of these methods may lead to personalized organ transplants, but to regenerate organs, it is necessary to develop methods for assembling differentiated cells into functional, organ-level tissues. The generation of three-dimensional human tissue models also holds potential for medical advances in disease modeling, as full organ functionality may not be necessary to recapitulate disease pathophysiology. This is specifically true of lung diseases where animal models often do not recapitulate human disease. Here, we present a method for the generation of self-assembled human lung tissue and its potential for disease modeling and drug discovery for lung diseases characterized by progressive and irreversible scarring such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Tissue formation occurs because of the overlapping processes of cellular adhesion to multiple alveolar sac templates, bioreactor rotation, and cellular contraction. Addition of transforming growth factor-β1 to single cell-type mesenchymal organoids resulted in morphologic scarring typical of that seen in IPF but not in two-dimensional IPF fibroblast cultures. Furthermore, this lung organoid may be modified to contain multiple lung cell types assembled into the correct anatomical location, thereby allowing cell-cell contact and recapitulating the lung microenvironment. Our bottom-up approach for synthesizing patient-specific lung tissue in a scalable system allows for the development of relevant human lung disease models with the potential for high throughput drug screening to identify targeted therapies.

  9. UWB pulse propagation into human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnaro, Marta; Pittella, Erika; Pisa, Stefano

    2013-12-01

    In this paper the propagation of a UWB pulse into a layered model of the human body is studied to characterize absorption and reflection of the UWB signal due to the different body tissues. Several time behaviours for the incident UWB pulse are considered and compared with reference to the feasibility of breath and heartbeat activity monitoring. Results show that if the UWB source is placed far from the human body, the reflection coming from the interface between air and skin can be used to detect the respiratory activity. On the contrary, if the UWB source is placed close to the human body, a small reflection due to the interface between the posterior lung wall and the bone, which is well distanced in time from the reflections due to the first layers of the body model, can be used to detect lung and heart changes associated with the cardio-respiratory activity.

  10. Human Tissue Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Neurodyne Corporation Human Tissue Stimulator (HTS) is a totally implantable system used for treatment of chronic pain and involuntary motion disorders by electrical stimulation. It was developed by Pacesetter Systems, Inc. in cooperation with the Applied Physics Laboratory. HTS incorporates a nickel cadmium battery, telemetry and command systems technologies of the same type as those used in NASA's Small Astronomy Satellite-3 in microminiature proportions so that the implantable element is the size of a deck of cards. The stimulator includes a rechargeable battery, an antenna and electronics to receive and process commands and to report on its own condition via telemetry, a wireless process wherein instrument data is converted to electrical signals and sent to a receiver where signals are presented as usable information. The HTS is targeted to nerve centers or to particular areas of the brain to provide relief from intractable pain or arrest involuntary motion. The nickel cadmium battery can be recharged through the skin. The first two HTS units were implanted last year and have been successful. Extensive testing is required before HTS can be made available for general use.

  11. Human lung expresses unique gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Wetmore, L A; Gerard, C; Drazen, J M

    1993-01-01

    gamma-Glutamyl transpeptidase (EC 2.3.2.2, gamma GT) is a membrane-bound ectoenzyme that plays an important role in the metabolism of glutathione. It is composed of two subunits, both of which are encoded by a common mRNA. We examined the expression of gamma GT in human lung tissue by Northern blot analysis and screening a cDNA library made from human lung poly(A)+ RNA. Our results show that there are two gamma GT mRNA populations in human lung tissue. We define these as group I (2.4 kb) and group II (approximately 1.2 kb) transcripts. In the present communication, we characterize the unique lung transcript. Sequence analysis of representative clones shows that group I transcripts are virtually identical to those previously isolated from liver and placenta but possess a unique 5' untranslated region. In marked contrast, group II transcripts appear to be human-lung-specific. Group II transcripts appear on Northern blots probed with full-length or 3'-biased gamma GT cDNA. Sequence analysis of group II clones shows them to be homologous with group I clones in the region that encodes the reading frame for the light chain; however, they possess a series of unique 5' untranslated regions, which suggests that they arise from lung-specific message processing. Additionally, approximately 50% of the isolated group II clones contain 34 nt substitutions compared with the "wild-type" gamma GT transcripts. These data indicate that human lung expresses unique gamma GT transcripts of unknown function as well as the classical form. The abundant group II transcripts may encode part of a heterodimer related to gamma GT or represent processed lung-specific pseudogenes. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7689219

  12. Lung cancer tissue diagnosis in poor lung function: addressing the ongoing percutaneous lung biopsy FEV1 paradox using Heimlich valve.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, R; Tavare, A N; Creamer, A; Creer, D; Vancheeswaran, R; Hare, S S

    2016-08-01

    Many centres continue to decline percutaneous lung biopsy (PLB) in patients with poor lung function (particularly FEV1 <1 L) due to the theoretically increased risk of pneumothorax. This practice limits access to novel lung cancer therapies and minimally invasive surgical techniques. Our retrospective single-centre analysis of 212 patients undergoing PLB, all performed prospectively and blinded to lung function, demonstrates that using ambulatory Heimlich valve chest drain (HVCD) to treat significant postbiopsy pneumothorax facilitates safe, diagnostic, early discharge lung biopsy irrespective of lung function with neither FEV1 <1 L nor transfer coefficient for carbon monoxide (TLCO) <40% predicted shown to be independent predictors of HVCD insertion or pneumothorax outcomes. Incorporating ambulatory HVCD into standard PLB practice thereby elegantly bridges the gap that currently exists between tissue diagnosis in patients with poor lung function and the advanced therapeutic options available for this cohort.

  13. Proteomic analysis of lung tissue by DIGE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lungs perform an essential physiological function, mediated by a complex series of events that involve the coordination of multiple cell types to support not only gaseous exchange, but homeostasis and protection from infection. Guinea pigs are an important animal disease model for a number of infect...

  14. On the behaviour of lung tissue under tension and compression

    PubMed Central

    Andrikakou, Pinelopi; Vickraman, Karthik; Arora, Hari

    2016-01-01

    Lung injuries are common among those who suffer an impact or trauma. The relative severity of injuries up to physical tearing of tissue have been documented in clinical studies. However, the specific details of energy required to cause visible damage to the lung parenchyma are lacking. Furthermore, the limitations of lung tissue under simple mechanical loading are also not well documented. This study aimed to collect mechanical test data from freshly excised lung, obtained from both Sprague-Dawley rats and New Zealand White rabbits. Compression and tension tests were conducted at three different strain rates: 0.25, 2.5 and 25 min−1. This study aimed to characterise the quasi-static behaviour of the bulk tissue prior to extending to higher rates. A nonlinear viscoelastic analytical model was applied to the data to describe their behaviour. Results exhibited asymmetry in terms of differences between tension and compression. The rabbit tissue also appeared to exhibit stronger viscous behaviour than the rat tissue. As a narrow strain rate band is explored here, no conclusions are being drawn currently regarding the rate sensitivity of rat tissue. However, this study does highlight both the clear differences between the two tissue types and the important role that composition and microstructure can play in mechanical response. PMID:27819358

  15. On the behaviour of lung tissue under tension and compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrikakou, Pinelopi; Vickraman, Karthik; Arora, Hari

    2016-11-01

    Lung injuries are common among those who suffer an impact or trauma. The relative severity of injuries up to physical tearing of tissue have been documented in clinical studies. However, the specific details of energy required to cause visible damage to the lung parenchyma are lacking. Furthermore, the limitations of lung tissue under simple mechanical loading are also not well documented. This study aimed to collect mechanical test data from freshly excised lung, obtained from both Sprague-Dawley rats and New Zealand White rabbits. Compression and tension tests were conducted at three different strain rates: 0.25, 2.5 and 25 min‑1. This study aimed to characterise the quasi-static behaviour of the bulk tissue prior to extending to higher rates. A nonlinear viscoelastic analytical model was applied to the data to describe their behaviour. Results exhibited asymmetry in terms of differences between tension and compression. The rabbit tissue also appeared to exhibit stronger viscous behaviour than the rat tissue. As a narrow strain rate band is explored here, no conclusions are being drawn currently regarding the rate sensitivity of rat tissue. However, this study does highlight both the clear differences between the two tissue types and the important role that composition and microstructure can play in mechanical response.

  16. Induction of Connective Tissue Growth Factor Expression by Hypoxia in Human Lung Fibroblasts via the MEKK1/MEK1/ERK1/GLI-1/GLI-2 and AP-1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi; Lin, Chien-huang; Chen, Jing-Yun; Li, Chien-Hua; Liu, Yu-Tin; Chen, Bing-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Several reports have indicated that hypoxia, GLI, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) contribute to pulmonary fibrosis in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We investigated the participation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) kinase 1 (MEKK1)/MEK1/ERK1/GLI-1/2 and activator protein-1 (AP-1) signaling in hypoxia-induced CTGF expression in human lung fibroblasts. Hypoxia time-dependently increased CTGF expression, which was attenuated by the small interfering RNA (siRNA) of GLI-1 (GLI-1 siRNA) and GLI-2 (GLI-2 siRNA) in both human lung fibroblast cell line (WI-38) and primary human lung fibroblasts (NHLFs). Moreover, GLI-1 siRNA and GLI-2 siRNA attenuated hypoxia-induced CTGF-luciferase activity, and the treatment of cells with hypoxia induced GLI-1 and GLI-2 translocation. Furthermore, hypoxia-induced CTGF expression was reduced by an MEK inhibitor (PD98059), MEK1 siRNA, ERK inhibitor (U0126), ERK1 siRNA, and MEKK1 siRNA. Both PD98059 and U0126 significantly attenuated hypoxia-induced CTGF-luciferase activity. Hypoxia time-dependently increased MEKK1, ERK, and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Moreover, SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) also apparently inhibited hypoxia-induced CTGF expression. The treatment of cells with hypoxia induced ERK, GLI-1, or GLI-2 complex formation. Hypoxia-induced GLI-1 and GLI-2 translocation into the nucleus was significantly attenuated by U0126. In addition, hypoxia-induced ERK Tyr204 phosphorylation was impeded by MEKK1 siRNA. Moreover, hypoxia-induced CTGF-luciferase activity was attenuated by cells transfected with AP-1 site mutation in a CTGF construct. Exposure to hypoxia caused a time-dependent phosphorylation of c-Jun, but not of c-Fos. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) revealed that hypoxia induced the recruitment of c-Jun, GLI-1, and GLI-2 to the AP-1 promoter region of CTGF. Hypoxia-treated cells exhibited an increase in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen production, which was blocked by GLI-1 siRNA and

  17. The Field of Tissue Injury in the Lung and Airway

    PubMed Central

    Steiling, Katrina; Ryan, John; Brody, Jerome S.; Spira, Avrum

    2009-01-01

    The concept of field cancerization was first introduced over six decades ago in the setting of oral cancer. Later, field cancerization involving histologic and molecular changes of neoplasms and adjacent tissue began to be characterized in smokers with or without lung cancer. Investigators also described a diffuse, non-neoplastic field of molecular injury throughout the respiratory tract that is attributable to cigarette smoking and susceptibility to smoking-induced lung disease. The potential molecular origins of field cancerization and the field of injury following cigarette smoke exposure in lung and airway epithelia are critical to understanding the impact of the field of injury on clinical diagnostics and therapeutics for smoking-induced lung disease. PMID:19138985

  18. Perivascular fluid cuffs decrease lung compliance by increasing tissue resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Kevin; Alvarez, Diego F.; King, Judy A.; Stevens, Troy

    2010-01-01

    Objective Lung inflammation causes perivascular fluid cuffs to form around extra-alveolar blood vessels; however, the physiologic consequences of such cuffs remain poorly understood. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that perivascular fluid cuffs, without concomitant alveolar edema, are sufficient to decrease lung compliance. Design Prospective, randomized, controlled study. Setting Research laboratory. Subjects One hundred twenty male CD40 rats. Interventions To test this hypothesis, the plant alkaloid thapsigargin was used to activate store-operated calcium entry and increase cytosolic calcium in endothelium. Thapsigargin was infused into a central venous catheter of intact, sedated, and mechanically ventilated rats. Measurements Static and dynamic lung mechanics and hemodynamics were measured continuously. Main Results Thapsigargin produced perivascular fluid cuffs along extra-alveolar vessels but did not cause alveolar flooding or blood gas abnormalities. Lung compliance dose-dependently decreased after thapsigargin infusion, attributable to an increase in tissue resistance that was attributed to increased tissue damping and tissue elastance. Airway resistance was not changed. Neither central venous pressure nor left ventricular end diastolic pressure was altered by thapsigargin. Heart rate did not change, although thapsigargin decreased pressure over time sufficient to reduce cardiac output by 50%. Infusion of the type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor, rolipram, prevented thapsigargin from inducing perivascular cuffs and decreasing lung compliance. Rolipram also normalized pressure over time and corrected the deficit in cardiac output. Conclusions Our findings resolve for the first time that perivascular cuff formation negatively impacts mechanical coupling between the bronchovascular bundle and the lung parenchyma, decreasing lung compliance without impacting central venous pressure. PMID:20400904

  19. Relationship Between Diseased Lung Tissues on Computed Tomography and Motion of Fiducial Marker Near Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, Yuya; Nishioka, Noriko; Yasuda, Koichi; Fujima, Noriyuki; Torres, Mylin; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Ooyama, Noriko; Onimaru, Rikiya; Terae, Satoshi; Ooizumi, Satoshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Shirato, Hiroki

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: For lung cancer patients with poor pulmonary function because of emphysema or fibrosis, it is important to predict the amplitude of internal tumor motion to minimize the irradiation of the functioning lung tissue before undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Two board-certified diagnostic radiologists independently assessed the degree of pulmonary emphysema and fibrosis on computed tomography scans in 71 patients with peripheral lung tumors before real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy. The relationships between the computed tomography findings of the lung parenchyma and the motion of the fiducial marker near the lung tumor were investigated. Of the 71 patients, 30 had normal pulmonary function, and 29 had obstructive pulmonary dysfunction (forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity ratio of <70%), 6 patients had constrictive dysfunction (percentage of vital capacity <80%), and 16 had mixed dysfunction. Results: The upper region was associated with smaller tumor motion, as expected (p = .0004), and the presence of fibrosis (p = .088) and pleural tumor contact (p = .086) were weakly associated with tumor motion. The presence of fibrotic changes in the lung tissue was associated with smaller tumor motion in the upper region (p <.05) but not in the lower region. The findings of emphysema and pulmonary function tests were not associated with tumor motion. Conclusion: Tumors in the upper lung region with fibrotic changes have smaller motion than those in the upper region of the lungs without fibrotic changes. The tumor motion in the lower lung region was not significantly different between patients with and without lung fibrosis. Emphysema was not associated with the amplitude of tumor motion.

  20. Asbestos content of lung tissue in asbestos associated diseases: a study of 110 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Roggli, V L; Pratt, P C; Brody, A R

    1986-01-01

    Diseases associated with asbestos exposure include asbestosis, malignant mesothelioma, carcinoma of the lung, and parietal pleural plaques. In this study the asbestos content of lung tissue was examined in groups of cases representing each of these diseases and in several cases with non-occupational idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Asbestos bodies (AB), which are the hallmark of asbestos exposure, were present in the lungs of virtually everyone in the general population and present at increased levels in individuals with asbestos associated diseases. The highest numbers of AB occurred in individuals with asbestosis, all of whom had levels greater than or equal to 2000 ABs/g wet lung tissue. Every case with a content of 100,000 ABs/g or higher had asbestosis. Intermediate levels occurred in individuals with malignant mesothelioma and the lowest levels in patients with parietal pleural plaques. There was no overlap between the asbestos content of lung tissue from patients with asbestosis and those with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Lung cancer was present in half the patients with asbestosis, and the distribution of histological patterns did not differ from that in patients with lung cancer without asbestosis. The asbestos body content in patients with lung cancer was highly variable. Control cases had values within our previously established normal range (0-20 ABs/g). There was a significant correlation (p less than 0.001) between AB counted by light microscope and AB and uncoated fibres counted by scanning electron microscopy. The previous observation that the vast majority of asbestos bodies isolated from human tissues have an amphibole core was confirmed. Images PMID:3947558

  1. SU-E-T-671: Range-Modulation Effects of Carbon Ion Beams in Lung Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, M; Weber, U; Simeonov, Y; Zink, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: When particles traversing inhomogeneous materials like lung they show a characteristic range modulation which cannot be observed in homogeneous materials. It is possible to describe the range modulation by a convolution of an unperturbed Bragg-Curve and a normal distribution. The sigma of the normal distribution is a parameter for the strength of the modulation effect. A new material parameter (modulation power, P-mod) is introduced which is independent of the material thickness. It is defined as the square of sigma divided by the mean water equivalent thickness of the target (µ). Methods: The modulation power of lung tissue was determined by actual Bragg-peak measurements after traversing an ex-vivo porcine lung and by Monte-Carlo simulations with micro-CT data of human lung tissue. The determined modulation powers were used to show the effect of range modulation effects in a simplified treatment situation. A four centimeter spread-out Bragg-peak after traversing eight centimeter of lung tissue was simulated in FLUKA. The SOBP with and without consideration of range modulation effects were compared. Results: As well in the measurements as in the MC simulations range modulation effects of lung tissue were observed. The determined modulation powers showed a great range from 0.05 mm, in the micro-CT data, to 0.7 mm in the lung measurements. The SOBP comparison showed that range modulation effects Result in over- and underdosages at the distal and proximal edge of the SOBP. In the investigated case, the last 0.5 cm of the SOBP showed an underdosage of up to 50% at the distal edge, while 0.5 cm distal to the SOBP an overdosage of up to 50% was observed. Conclusion: Range modulation effects occur in inhomogeneous materials like lung. These modulation effects may Result in clinically relevant over- and underdosages but are currently not considered in commercially available treatment planning systems.

  2. Human lung small-cell carcinoma contains bombesin.

    PubMed Central

    Erisman, M D; Linnoila, R I; Hernandez, O; DiAugustine, R P; Lazarus, L H

    1982-01-01

    The presence of immunoreactive bombesin in a human lung small-cell carcinoma grown in nude mice was established by several criteria: (i) Radioimmunoassay of tissue extracts for bombesin revealed approximately 6.5 pmol/g of tissue; (ii) bombesin was found in 12-14% of the tumor cells by immunohistochemical localization; (iii) gel filtration of small-cell carcinoma extract on Sephadex G-75 and Bio-Gel P-4 gave only a single peak of immunoreactivity, which occurred at the elution volume of bombesin; and (iv) reverse-phase HPLC of acid-solubilized extracts separated the immunoreactive material into three discrete peaks, one of which eluted with a retention time identical to that of synthetic bombesin. The presence of bombesin may represent the ectopic expression of this peptide in small-cell carcinoma, because immunoreactive bombesin was found in human fetal and neonatal lung but apparently not in adult lung tissue [Wharton, J., Polak, J. M., Bloom, S. R., Ghatei, M. A., Solcia, E., Brown, M. R. & Pearse, A. G. E. (1978) Nature (London) 273, 769-770]. The immunoreactive bombesin previously found in mammalian tissues is considerably larger than amphibian bombesin; these data substantiate the presence of a mammalian form of bombesin in a human tumor that may have a structure similar to that of the amphibian peptide. Images PMID:6285381

  3. Human embryonic stem cells and lung regeneration.

    PubMed

    Varanou, A; Page, C P; Minger, S L

    2008-10-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells derived from the inner cell mass of preimplantation stage embryos. Their unique potential to give rise to all differentiated cell types has generated great interest in stem cell research and the potential that it may have in developmental biology, medicine and pharmacology. The main focus of stem cell research has been on cell therapy for pathological conditions with no current methods of treatment, such as neurodegenerative diseases, cardiac pathology, retinal dysfunction and lung and liver disease. The overall aim is to develop methods of application either of pure cell populations or of whole tissue parts to the diseased organ under investigation. In the field of pulmonary research, studies using human embryonic stem cells have succeeded in generating enriched cultures of type II pneumocytes in vitro. On account of their potential of indefinite proliferation in vitro, embryonic stem cells could be a source of an unlimited supply of cells available for transplantation and for use in gene therapy. Uncovering the ability to generate such cell types will expand our understanding of biological processes to such a degree that disease understanding and management could change dramatically.

  4. Mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma of lung: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Subir; Deb, Asit Ranjan; Aich, Ranen Karti; Chakraborty, Sudipto; Das, Diptimoy; Dee, Abhijit

    2010-07-01

    Mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma is a rare disease particularly when occurring in the lungs. In 1983, Issacson and Wright first described it as a distinct clinicopathological entity. A 39-year-old woman was suffering from mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma of the lung and was treated with moderate dose radiotherapy only. Six months after treatment the woman is symptom free and without any evidence of relapse. The disease undergoes a very indolent course and local form of treatment like surgery or radiotherapy is effective though radiotherapy is probably associated with higher local control rate and event free survival particularly in early stages. But for diagnostic purpose thoracotomy is generally required in pulmonary variety. Due to rarity of cases it is almost impossible to compare surgery with radiotherapy in mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma disorder in a prospective manner. Radiotherapy is the preferred mode of treatment either alone or in combination with surgery.

  5. Establishment of a human lung cancer cell line with high metastatic potential to multiple organs: gene expression associated with metastatic potential in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Tetsuhiro; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Kawashima, Osamu; Kamiyoshihara, Mitsuhiro; Kakegawa, Seiichi; Sugano, Masayuki; Ibe, Takashi; Nagashima, Toshiteru; Kaira, Kyoichi; Sunaga, Noriaki; Ohtaki, Youichi; Atsumi, Jun; Takeyoshi, Izumi

    2012-11-01

    Convenient and reliable multiple organ metastasis model systems might contribute to understanding the mechanism(s) of metastasis of lung cancer, which may lead to overcoming metastasis and improvement in the treatment outcome of lung cancer. We isolated a highly metastatic subline, PC14HM, from the human pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell line, PC14, using an in vivo selection method. The expression of 34,580 genes was compared between PC14HM and parental PC14 by cDNA microarray analysis. Among the differentially expressed genes, expression of four genes in human lung cancer tissues and adjacent normal lung tissues were compared using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Although BALB/c nude mice inoculated with parental PC14 cells had few metastases, almost all mice inoculated with PC14HM cells developed metastases in multiple organs, including the lung, bone and adrenal gland, the same progression seen in human lung cancer. cDNA microarray analysis revealed that 981 genes were differentially (more than 3-fold) expressed between the two cell lines. Functional classification revealed that many of those genes were associated with cell growth, cell communication, development and transcription. Expression of three upregulated genes (HRB-2, HS3ST3A1 and RAB7) was higher in human cancer tissue compared to normal lung tissue, while expression of EDG1, which was downregulated, was lower in the cancer tissue compared to the normal lung. These results suggest that the newly established PC14HM cell line may provide a mouse model of widespread metastasis of lung cancer. This model system may provide insights into the key genetic determinants of widespread metastasis of lung cancer.

  6. Characterization of human tissue carnosinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lenney, J F; Peppers, S C; Kucera-Orallo, C M; George, R P

    1985-01-01

    Human tissue carnosinase (EC 3.4.13.3) had optimum activity at pH9.5 and was a cysteine peptidase, being activated by dithiothreitol and inhibited by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. By optimizing assay conditions, the activity per g of tissue was increased 10-fold compared with values in the literature. The enzyme was present in every human tissue assayed and was entirely different from serum carnosinase. Highly purified tissue carnosinase had a broader specificity than hog kidney carnosinase. Although tissue carnosinase was very strongly inhibited by bestatin, it did not hydrolyse tripeptides, and thus appears to be a dipeptidase rather than an aminopeptidase. It had a relative molecular mass of 90 000, an isoelectric point of 5.6, and a Km value of 10 mM-carnosine. Two forms of kidney and brain carnosinase were separated by high-resolution anion-exchange chromatography, although only one form was detected by various electrophoretic methods. Homocarnosinase and Mn2+-independent carnosinase were not detected in human tissues, although these enzymes are present in rat and hog kidney. PMID:4026801

  7. Immune surveillance of the lung by migrating tissue monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rodero, Mathieu P; Poupel, Lucie; Loyher, Pierre-Louis; Hamon, Pauline; Licata, Fabrice; Pessel, Charlotte; Hume, David A; Combadière, Christophe; Boissonnas, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes are phagocytic effector cells in the blood and precursors of resident and inflammatory tissue macrophages. The aim of the current study was to analyse and compare their contribution to innate immune surveillance of the lung in the steady state with macrophage and dendritic cells (DC). ECFP and EGFP transgenic reporters based upon Csf1r and Cx3cr1 distinguish monocytes from resident mononuclear phagocytes. We used these transgenes to study the migratory properties of monocytes and macrophages by functional imaging on explanted lungs. Migratory monocytes were found to be either patrolling within large vessels of the lung or locating at the interface between lung capillaries and alveoli. This spatial organisation gives to monocytes the property to capture fluorescent particles derived from both vascular and airway routes. We conclude that monocytes participate in steady-state surveillance of the lung, in a way that is complementary to resident macrophages and DC, without differentiating into macrophages. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07847.001 PMID:26167653

  8. [Immunohistochemical Analysis of Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6) Expression in Lung Tissue in Primary Lung Cancer Patients with High Serum KL-6 Levels].

    PubMed

    Yatsuyanagi, Eiji; Sato, Kazuhiro; Sato, Keisuke

    2015-09-01

    We investigated sialylated carbohydrate antigen( Krebs von den Lungen-6:KL-6) expression in lung tissue and correlation between the expression and serum KL-6 level in the patients with primary lung cancer. Thirty-four primary lung cancer patients with high serum KL-6 levels( >500 U/ml) were evaluated. A coexistence of interstitial pneumonia (IP) was histopathologically evaluated and an immunohistochemical staining using a mouse anti-human KL-6 antibody (mKL-6) was performed. A multiple regression analysis was also caluculated using a serum KL-6 level as a target variable and the histopathological and immunohistochemical factors (KL-6 expression in cancer tissue and IP tissue, coexistence of IP, tumor size, pathological staging) as descriptive variables. Twenty-two patients (64.7%) were histopathologically concomitant with IP. Cancer tissues were positively stained by mKL-6 in 32 patients (94.1%). Among them, 20 patients were concomitant with IP and all of their cancer tissues were more strongly stained by mKL-6 than IP tissues. Although considerable high rate of lung cancer patients might express the KL-6 in the cancer tissue, we could not reveal the relationship between the expression and serum KL-6 level by a multiple regression analysis. For revealing the mechanism of elevating serum KL-6 level in the patients with lung cancer, more detailed and powerful study is thought to be needed.

  9. The role of cytokines in human lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Vaillant, P; Menard, O; Vignaud, J M; Martinet, N; Martinet, Y

    1996-04-01

    Fibrosis is a disorder characterized by a qualitative and quantitative alteration of the deposition of extracellular matrix with accumulation of mesenchymal cells in replacement of normal tissue. The sequence of events leading to fibrosis of an organ involves the subsequent processes of injury with inflammation and disruption of the normal tissue architecture, followed by tissue repair with accumulation of mesenchymal cells in this area. A similar sequence of events occurs in wound healing with formation of normal, limited and transient granulation tissue, while in fibrosis, a maladaptive repair leads to an extensive, exaggerated process with functional impairment. Inflammatory cells (mainly mononuclear phagocytes), platelets, endothelial cells, and type II pneumocytes play a direct and indirect role in tissue injury and repair. The evaluation of several human fibrotic lung diseases, five diffuse (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF); adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP); Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS); systemic sclerosis (SS)) and two focal (tumour stroma in lung cancer; and obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) after lung transplantation), has shown that several cytokines participate in the local injury and inflammatory reaction (interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)), while other cytokines are involved in tissue repair and fibrosis (platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), and basic-fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF)). A better understanding of the cytokines and cytokine networks involved in lung fibrosis leads to the possibility of new therapeutic approaches.

  10. MALDI Profiling of Human Lung Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Nistal, Manuel; Calvo, Enrique; Madero, Rosario; Díaz, Esther; Camafeita, Emilio; de Castro, Javier; López, Juan Antonio; González-Barón, Manuel; Espinosa, Enrique; Fresno Vara, Juan Ángel

    2009-01-01

    Background Proteomics is expected to play a key role in cancer biomarker discovery. Although it has become feasible to rapidly analyze proteins from crude cell extracts using mass spectrometry, complex sample composition hampers this type of measurement. Therefore, for effective proteome analysis, it becomes critical to enrich samples for the analytes of interest. Despite that one-third of the proteins in eukaryotic cells are thought to be phosphorylated at some point in their life cycle, only a low percentage of intracellular proteins is phosphorylated at a given time. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, we have applied chromatographic phosphopeptide enrichment techniques to reduce the complexity of human clinical samples. A novel method for high-throughput peptide profiling of human tumor samples, using Parallel IMAC and MALDI-TOF MS, is described. We have applied this methodology to analyze human normal and cancer lung samples in the search for new biomarkers. Using a highly reproducible spectral processing algorithm to produce peptide mass profiles with minimal variability across the samples, lineal discriminant-based and decision tree–based classification models were generated. These models can distinguish normal from tumor samples, as well as differentiate the various non–small cell lung cancer histological subtypes. Conclusions/Significance A novel, optimized sample preparation method and a careful data acquisition strategy is described for high-throughput peptide profiling of small amounts of human normal lung and lung cancer samples. We show that the appropriate combination of peptide expression values is able to discriminate normal lung from non-small cell lung cancer samples and among different histological subtypes. Our study does emphasize the great potential of proteomics in the molecular characterization of cancer. PMID:19890392

  11. Engineered human broncho-epithelial tissue-like assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional human broncho-epithelial tissue-like assemblies (TLAs) are produced in a rotating wall vessel (RWV) with microcarriers by coculturing mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (BTC) and bronchial epithelium cells (BEC). These TLAs display structural characteristics and express markers of in vivo respiratory epithelia. TLAs are useful for screening compounds active in lung tissues such as antiviral compounds, cystic fibrosis treatments, allergens, and cytotoxic compounds.

  12. Tissue engineering a human phalanx.

    PubMed

    Landis, W J; Chubinskaya, S; Tokui, T; Wada, Y; Isogai, N; Jacquet, R

    2016-03-21

    A principal purpose of tissue engineering is the augmentation, repair or replacement of diseased or injured human tissue. This study was undertaken to determine whether human biopsies as a cell source could be utilized for successful engineering of human phalanges consisting of both bone and cartilage. This paper reports the use of cadaveric human chondrocytes and periosteum as a model for the development of phalanx constructs. Two factors, osteogenic protein-1 [OP-1/bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7)], alone or combined with insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), were examined for their potential enhancement of chondrocytes and their secreted extracellular matrices. Design of the study included culture of chondrocytes and periosteum on biodegradable polyglycolic acid (PGA) and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)-poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds and subsequent implantation in athymic nu/nu (nude) mice for 5, 20, 40 and 60 weeks. Engineered constructs retrieved from mice were characterized with regard to genotype and phenotype as a function of developmental (implantation) time. Assessments included gross observation, X-ray radiography or microcomputed tomography, histology and gene expression. The resulting data showed that human cell-scaffold constructs could be successfully developed over 60 weeks, despite variability in donor age. Cartilage formation of the distal phalanx models enhanced with both OP-1 and IGF-1 yielded more cells and extracellular matrix (collagen and proteoglycans) than control chondrocytes without added factors. Summary data demonstrated that human distal phalanx models utilizing cadaveric chondrocytes and periosteum were successfully fabricated and OP-1 and OP-1/IGF-1 accelerated construct development and mineralization. The results suggest that similar engineering and transplantation of human autologous tissues in patients are clinically feasible. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Distribution of miRNA expression across human tissues.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Nicole; Leidinger, Petra; Becker, Kurt; Backes, Christina; Fehlmann, Tobias; Pallasch, Christian; Rheinheimer, Steffi; Meder, Benjamin; Stähler, Cord; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-05-05

    We present a human miRNA tissue atlas by determining the abundance of 1997 miRNAs in 61 tissue biopsies of different organs from two individuals collected post-mortem. One thousand three hundred sixty-four miRNAs were discovered in at least one tissue, 143 were present in each tissue. To define the distribution of miRNAs, we utilized a tissue specificity index (TSI). The majority of miRNAs (82.9%) fell in a middle TSI range i.e. were neither specific for single tissues (TSI > 0.85) nor housekeeping miRNAs (TSI < 0.5). Nonetheless, we observed many different miRNAs and miRNA families that were predominantly expressed in certain tissues. Clustering of miRNA abundances revealed that tissues like several areas of the brain clustered together. Considering -3p and -5p mature forms we observed miR-150 with different tissue specificity. Analysis of additional lung and prostate biopsies indicated that inter-organism variability was significantly lower than inter-organ variability. Tissue-specific differences between the miRNA patterns appeared not to be significantly altered by storage as shown for heart and lung tissue. MiRNAs TSI values of human tissues were significantly (P = 10(-8)) correlated with those of rats; miRNAs that were highly abundant in certain human tissues were likewise abundant in according rat tissues. We implemented a web-based repository enabling scientists to access and browse the data (https://ccb-web.cs.uni-saarland.de/tissueatlas).

  14. Interpretation of autoantibody positivity in interstitial lung disease and lung-dominant connective tissue disease*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Kawassaki, Alexandre de Melo; Baldi, Bruno Guedes

    2013-01-01

    The initial evaluation of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) primarily involves a comprehensive, active search for the cause. Autoantibody assays, which can suggest the presence of a rheumatic disease, are routinely performed at various referral centers. When interstitial lung involvement is the condition that allows the definitive diagnosis of connective tissue disease and the classical criteria are met, there is little debate. However, there is still debate regarding the significance, relevance, specificity, and pathophysiological role of autoimmunity in patients with predominant pulmonary involvement and only mild symptoms or formes frustes of connective tissue disease. The purpose of this article was to review the current knowledge of autoantibody positivity and to discuss its possible interpretations in patients with ILD and without clear etiologic associations, as well as to enhance the understanding of the natural history of an allegedly new disease and to describe the possible prognostic implications. We also discuss the proposition of a new term to be used in the classification of ILDs: lung-dominant connective tissue disease. PMID:24473767

  15. Interpretation of autoantibody positivity in interstitial lung disease and lung-dominant connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Kawassaki, Alexandre de Melo; Baldi, Bruno Guedes

    2013-01-01

    The initial evaluation of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) primarily involves a comprehensive, active search for the cause. Autoantibody assays, which can suggest the presence of a rheumatic disease, are routinely performed at various referral centers. When interstitial lung involvement is the condition that allows the definitive diagnosis of connective tissue disease and the classical criteria are met, there is little debate. However, there is still debate regarding the significance, relevance, specificity, and pathophysiological role of autoimmunity in patients with predominant pulmonary involvement and only mild symptoms or formes frustes of connective tissue disease. The purpose of this article was to review the current knowledge of autoantibody positivity and to discuss its possible interpretations in patients with ILD and without clear etiologic associations, as well as to enhance the understanding of the natural history of an allegedly new disease and to describe the possible prognostic implications. We also discuss the proposition of a new term to be used in the classification of ILDs: lung-dominant connective tissue disease.

  16. Regenerative potential of human airway stem cells in lung epithelial engineering.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Sarah E; Charest, Jonathan M; Ren, Xi; Tapias, Luis F; Wu, Tong; Evangelista-Leite, Daniele; Mathisen, Douglas J; Ott, Harald C

    2016-11-01

    Bio-engineered organs for transplantation may ultimately provide a personalized solution for end-stage organ failure, without the risk of rejection. Building upon the process of whole organ perfusion decellularization, we aimed to develop novel, translational methods for the recellularization and regeneration of transplantable lung constructs. We first isolated a proliferative KRT5(+)TP63(+) basal epithelial stem cell population from human lung tissue and demonstrated expansion capacity in conventional 2D culture. We then repopulated acellular rat scaffolds in ex vivo whole organ culture and observed continued cell proliferation, in combination with primary pulmonary endothelial cells. To show clinical scalability, and to test the regenerative capacity of the basal cell population in a human context, we then recellularized and cultured isolated human lung scaffolds under biomimetic conditions. Analysis of the regenerated tissue constructs confirmed cell viability and sustained metabolic activity over 7 days of culture. Tissue analysis revealed extensive recellularization with organized tissue architecture and morphology, and preserved basal epithelial cell phenotype. The recellularized lung constructs displayed dynamic compliance and rudimentary gas exchange capacity. Our results underline the regenerative potential of patient-derived human airway stem cells in lung tissue engineering. We anticipate these advances to have clinically relevant implications for whole lung bioengineering and ex vivo organ repair.

  17. Multidimensional immunolabeling and 4D time-lapse imaging of vital ex vivo lung tissue

    PubMed Central

    Vierkotten, Sarah; Lindner, Michael; Königshoff, Melanie; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades, the study of cell behavior was largely accomplished in uncoated or extracellular matrix (ECM)-coated plastic dishes. To date, considerable cell biological efforts have tried to model in vitro the natural microenvironment found in vivo. For the lung, explants cultured ex vivo as lung tissue cultures (LTCs) provide a three-dimensional (3D) tissue model containing all cells in their natural microenvironment. Techniques for assessing the dynamic live interaction between ECM and cellular tissue components, however, are still missing. Here, we describe specific multidimensional immunolabeling of living 3D-LTCs, derived from healthy and fibrotic mouse lungs, as well as patient-derived 3D-LTCs, and concomitant real-time four-dimensional multichannel imaging thereof. This approach allowed the evaluation of dynamic interactions between mesenchymal cells and macrophages with their ECM. Furthermore, fibroblasts transiently expressing focal adhesions markers incorporated into the 3D-LTCs, paving new ways for studying the dynamic interaction between cellular adhesions and their natural-derived ECM. A novel protein transfer technology (FuseIt/Ibidi) shuttled fluorescently labeled α-smooth muscle actin antibodies into the native cells of living 3D-LTCs, enabling live monitoring of α-smooth muscle actin-positive stress fibers in native tissue myofibroblasts residing in fibrotic lesions of 3D-LTCs. Finally, this technique can be applied to healthy and diseased human lung tissue, as well as to adherent cells in conventional two-dimensional cell culture. This novel method will provide valuable new insights into the dynamics of ECM (patho)biology, studying in detail the interaction between ECM and cellular tissue components in their natural microenvironment. PMID:26092995

  18. Modeling of the Nitric Oxide Transport in the Human Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Karamaoun, Cyril; Van Muylem, Alain; Haut, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    In the human lungs, nitric oxide (NO) acts as a bronchodilatator, by relaxing the bronchial smooth muscles and is closely linked to the inflammatory status of the lungs, owing to its antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, the molar fraction of NO in the exhaled air has been shown to be higher for asthmatic patients than for healthy patients. Multiple models have been developed in order to characterize the NO dynamics in the lungs, owing to their complex structure. Indeed, direct measurements in the lungs are difficult and, therefore, these models are valuable tools to interpret experimental data. In this work, a new model of the NO transport in the human lungs is proposed. It belongs to the family of the morphological models and is based on the morphometric model of Weibel (1963). When compared to models published previously, its main new features are the layered representation of the wall of the airways and the possibility to simulate the influence of bronchoconstriction (BC) and of the presence of mucus on the NO transport in lungs. The model is based on a geometrical description of the lungs, at rest and during a respiratory cycle, coupled with transport equations, written in the layers composing an airway wall and in the lumen of the airways. First, it is checked that the model is able to reproduce experimental information available in the literature. Second, the model is used to discuss some features of the NO transport in healthy and unhealthy lungs. The simulation results are analyzed, especially when BC has occurred in the lungs. For instance, it is shown that BC can have a significant influence on the NO transport in the tissues composing an airway wall. It is also shown that the relation between BC and the molar fraction of NO in the exhaled air is complex. Indeed, BC might lead to an increase or to a decrease of this molar fraction, depending on the extent of the BC and on the possible presence of mucus. This should be confirmed experimentally and might

  19. Processing of CT images for analysis of diffuse lung disease in the lung tissue research consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karwoski, Ronald A.; Bartholmai, Brian; Zavaletta, Vanessa A.; Holmes, David; Robb, Richard A.

    2008-03-01

    The goal of Lung Tissue Resource Consortium (LTRC) is to improve the management of diffuse lung diseases through a better understanding of the biology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and fibrotic interstitial lung disease (ILD) including Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF). Participants are subjected to a battery of tests including tissue biopsies, physiologic testing, clinical history reporting, and CT scanning of the chest. The LTRC is a repository from which investigators can request tissue specimens and test results as well as semi-quantitative radiology reports, pathology reports, and automated quantitative image analysis results from the CT scan data performed by the LTRC core laboratories. The LTRC Radiology Core Laboratory (RCL), in conjunction with the Biomedical Imaging Resource (BIR), has developed novel processing methods for comprehensive characterization of pulmonary processes on volumetric high-resolution CT scans to quantify how these diseases manifest in radiographic images. Specifically, the RCL has implemented a semi-automated method for segmenting the anatomical regions of the lungs and airways. In these anatomic regions, automated quantification of pathologic features of disease including emphysema volumes and tissue classification are performed using both threshold techniques and advanced texture measures to determine the extent and location of emphysema, ground glass opacities, "honeycombing" (HC) and "irregular linear" or "reticular" pulmonary infiltrates and normal lung. Wall thickness measurements of the trachea, and its branches to the 3 rd and limited 4 th order are also computed. The methods for processing, segmentation and quantification are described. The results are reviewed and verified by an expert radiologist following processing and stored in the public LTRC database for use by pulmonary researchers. To date, over 1200 CT scans have been processed by the RCL and the LTRC project is on target for recruitment of the

  20. Cryopreservation and in vitro culture of primary cell types from lung tissue of a stranded pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps).

    PubMed

    Annalaura Mancia; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; McFee, Wayne E; Newton, Danforth A; Baatz, John E

    2012-01-01

    Current models for in vitro studies of tissue function and physiology, including responses to hypoxia or environmental toxins, are limited and rely heavily on standard 2-dimensional (2-D) cultures with immortalized murine or human cell lines. To develop a new more powerful model system, we have pursued methods to establish and expand cultures of primary lung cell types and reconstituted tissues from marine mammals. What little is known about the physiology of the deep-sea diving pygmy sperm whale (PSW), Kogia breviceps, comes primarily from stranding events that occur along the coast of the southeastern United States. Thus, development of a method for preserving live tissues and retrieving live cells from deceased stranded individuals was initiated. This report documents successful cryopreservation of PSW lung tissue. We established in vitro cultures of primary lung cell types from tissue fragments that had been cryopreserved several months earlier at the stranding event. Dissociation of cryopreserved lung tissues readily provides a variety of primary cell types that, to varying degrees, can be expanded and further studied/manipulated in cell culture. In addition, PSW-specific molecular markers have been developed that permitted the monitoring of fibroblast, alveolar type II, and vascular endothelial cell types. Reconstitution of 3-D cultures of lung tissues with these cell types is now underway. This novel system may facilitate the development of rare or disease-specific lung tissue models (e.g., to test causes of PSW stranding events and lead to improved treatments for pulmonary hypertension or reperfusion injury in humans). Also, the establishment of a "living" tissue bank biorepository for rare/endangered species could serve multiple purposes as surrogates for freshly isolated samples.

  1. Hyaluronic Acid is Overexpressed in Fibrotic Lung Tissue and Promotes Collagen Expression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    will be performed using mice in which lung fibrosis is induced by intraoral delivery of bleomycin and will focus on mice in which periostin...tissue of mice in which lung injury/ fibrosis had been induced using bleomycin (Fig. 1). In normal lung tissue, periostin is uniformly expressed in...further understand the role of periostin in the progression of lung fibrosis , we treated control mice and periostin knockout mice with bleomycin

  2. Growth suppressive efficacy of human lak cells against human lung-cancer implanted into scid mice.

    PubMed

    Teraoka, S; Kyoizumi, S; Suzuki, T; Yamakido, M; Akiyama, M

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the efficacy of immunotherapy using human lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells against a human-lung squamous-cell carcinoma cell line (RERF-LC-AI) implanted into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. A statistically significant growth suppressive effect on RERF-LC-AI implanted into SCID mice was observed when human LAK cells were administered into the caudal vein of the mice treated with a continuous supply (initiated prior to LAK cells injection) of rIL-2. The human LAK cells stained with PKH 2, a fluorescent dye, for later detection using flow cytometry were administered into the caudal vein of RERF-LC-AI bearing SCID mice; the cells persisted for 7 days in the implanted lung cancer tissue and in the mouse peripheral blood, but for 5 days in the mouse spleen. The number of infiltrated human LAK cells in each tissue increased dose-dependently with the number of injected cells. The results indicate that the antitumor effect most likely occurred during the early implantation period of the human LAK cells. These results demonstrate the applicability of this model to the in vivo study of human lung cancer therapy.

  3. Connective Tissue Disease-Associated Interstitial Lung Diseases: Unresolved Issues.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Irene Jarana; Lee, Joyce S

    2016-06-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) complicating connective tissue disorders, such as scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Progress has been made in our understanding of these collective diseases; however, there are still many unanswered questions. In this review, we describe the current views on epidemiology, clinical presentation, treatment, and prognosis in patients with connective tissue disease (CTD)-associated ILD. We also highlight several areas that remain unresolved and in need of further investigation, including interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features, histopathologic phenotype, and pharmacologic management. A multidisciplinary and multidimensional approach to diagnosis, management, and investigation of CTD-associated ILD patients is essential to advance our understanding of the epidemiology and pathobiology of this challenging group of diseases.

  4. Connective Tissue Disease-associated Interstitial Lung Disease: A review

    PubMed Central

    Gutsche, Markus; Rosen, Glenn D.; Swigris, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is commonly encountered in patients with connective tissue diseases (CTD). Besides the lung parenchyma, the airways, pulmonary vasculature and structures of the chest wall may all be involved, depending on the type of CTD. As a result of this so-called multi-compartment involvement, airflow limitation, pulmonary hypertension, vasculitis and extrapulmonary restriction can occur alongside fibro-inflammatory parenchymal abnormalities in CTD. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic sclerosis (SSc), poly-/dermatomyositis (PM/DM), Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and undifferentiated (UCTD) as well as mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) can all be associated with the development of ILD. Non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) is the most commonly observed histopathological pattern in CTD-ILD, but other patterns including usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), organizing pneumonia (OP), diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP) may occur. Although the majority of patients with CTD-ILD experience stable or slowly advancing ILD, a small yet significant group exhibits a more severe and progressive course. Randomized placebo-controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of immunomodulatory treatments have been conducted only in SSc-associated ILD. However, clinical experience suggests that a handful of immunosuppressive medications are potentially effective in a sizeable portion of patients with ILD caused by other CTDs. In this manuscript, we review the clinical characteristics and management of the most common CTD-ILDs. PMID:23125954

  5. Radiation Effect on Human Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Cruz, Angela; Bors, Karen; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Predicting the occurrence of human cancer following exposure of an epidemiologic population to any agent causing genetic damage is a difficult task. To an approximation, this is because the uncertainty of uniform exposure to the damaging agent, and the uncertainty of uniform processing of that damage within a complex set of biological variables, degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event within clinically normal individuals. This situation begs the need for alternate controlled experimental models that are predictive for the development of human cancer following exposures to agents causing genetic damage. Such models historically have not been of substantial proven value. It is more recently encouraging, however, that developments in molecular and cell biology have led to an expanded knowledge of human carcinogenesis, and of molecular markers associated with that process. It is therefore appropriate to consider new laboratory models developed to accomodate that expanded knowledge in order to assess the cancer risks associated with exposures to genotoxic agents. When ionizing radiation of space is the genotoxic agent, then a series of additional considerations for human cancer risk assessment must also be applied. These include the dose of radiation absorbed by tissue at different locations in the body, the quality of the absorbed radiation, the rate at which absorbed dose accumulates in tissue, the way in which absorbed dose is measured and calculated, and the alterations in incident radiation caused by shielding materials. It is clear that human cancer risk assessment for damage caused by ionizing radiation is a multidisciplinary responsibility, and that within this responsibility no single discipline can hold disproportionate sway if a risk assessment model of radiation-induced human cancer is to be developed that has proven value. Biomolecular and cellular markers from the work reported here are considered

  6. Microbiota of Human Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Urbaniak, Camilla; Cummins, Joanne; Brackstone, Muriel; Macklaim, Jean M.; Gloor, Gregory B.; Baban, Chwanrow K.; Scott, Leslie; O'Hanlon, Deidre M.; Burton, Jeremy P.; Francis, Kevin P.; Tangney, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a greater appreciation for the microbes inhabiting human body sites has emerged. In the female mammary gland, milk has been shown to contain bacterial species, ostensibly reaching the ducts from the skin. We decided to investigate whether there is a microbiome within the mammary tissue. Using 16S rRNA sequencing and culture, we analyzed breast tissue from 81 women with and without cancer in Canada and Ireland. A diverse population of bacteria was detected within tissue collected from sites all around the breast in women aged 18 to 90, not all of whom had a history of lactation. The principal phylum was Proteobacteria. The most abundant taxa in the Canadian samples were Bacillus (11.4%), Acinetobacter (10.0%), Enterobacteriaceae (8.3%), Pseudomonas (6.5%), Staphylococcus (6.5%), Propionibacterium (5.8%), Comamonadaceae (5.7%), Gammaproteobacteria (5.0%), and Prevotella (5.0%). In the Irish samples the most abundant taxa were Enterobacteriaceae (30.8%), Staphylococcus (12.7%), Listeria welshimeri (12.1%), Propionibacterium (10.1%), and Pseudomonas (5.3%). None of the subjects had signs or symptoms of infection, but the presence of viable bacteria was confirmed in some samples by culture. The extent to which these organisms play a role in health or disease remains to be determined. PMID:24610844

  7. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  8. Metabolic heterogeneity in human lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Christopher T.; Faubert, Brandon; Yuan, Qing; Lev-Cohain, Naama; Jin, Eunsook; Kim, Jiyeon; Jiang, Lei; Ko, Bookyung; Skelton, Rachael; Loudat, Laurin; Wodzak, Michelle; Klimko, Claire; McMillan, Elizabeth; Butt, Yasmeen; Ni, Min; Oliver, Dwight; Torrealba, Jose; Malloy, Craig R.; Kernstine, Kemp; Lenkinski, Robert E.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is heterogeneous in the genetic and environmental parameters that influence cell metabolism in culture. Here, we assessed the impact of these factors on human NSCLC metabolism in vivo using intra-operative 13C-glucose infusions in nine NSCLC patients to compare metabolism between tumors and benign lung. While enhanced glycolysis and glucose oxidation were common among these tumors, we observed evidence for oxidation of multiple nutrients in each of them, including lactate as a potential carbon source. Moreover, metabolically heterogeneous regions were identified within and between tumors, and surprisingly, our data suggested potential contributions of non-glucose nutrients in well-perfused tumor areas. Our findings not only demonstrate the heterogeneity in tumor metabolism in vivo but also highlight the strong influence of the microenvironment on this feature. PMID:26853473

  9. Zinc transporters are differentially expressed in human non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingxuan; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common human malignancies worldwide, but its oncogenesis process remains unclear. Recent studies demonstrated that zinc (Zn) and Zn transporters were associated with the development and progression of human cancers. The role of Zn transporters including ZIPs and ZnTs in lung cancer, however, has never been evaluated. Thus, we aimed to investigate the expression levels of all human Zn transporters, including 14 ZIPs and 10 ZnTs, in eight different lung cancer cell lines and paired human tumor tissues. We observed great variations in ZIPs and ZnTs mRNA levels across cell lines and human lung cancer specimens. ZIPs showed a tendency to be upregulated, while ZnTs exhibited a downward expression trend. ZIP4 was overexpressed in six lung cancer cell lines and 59% (26/44) of tumor tissues, which was consistent with results from lung cancer datasets including TCGA database. Our results indicated that the dysregulation of Zn transporters may contribute to lung tumorigenesis. PMID:27611948

  10. Quantification of Regional Interstitial Lung Disease from CT-derived Fractional Tissue Volume: A Lung Tissue Research Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Watharkar, Snehal S.; de Leon, Alberto Diaz; Garcia, Christine K.; Patel, Nova C.; Jordan, Kirk G.; Hsia, Connie C.W.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Evaluation of chest CT is usually qualitative or semi-quantitative, resulting in subjective descriptions often by different observers over time and imprecise determinations of disease severity within distorted lobes. There is a need for standardized imaging biomarkers to quantify regional disease, maximize diagnostic yield, and facilitate multi-center comparisons. We applied lobe-based voxelwise image analysis to derive regional air (Vair) and tissue (Vtissue) volumes and fractional tissue volume (FTV=tissue/[tissue+air] volume) as internally standardized parameter for assessing interstitial lung disease (ILD). Materials and Methods High-resolution CT was obtained at supine and prone end-inspiration and supine end-expiration in 29 patients with ILD and 20 normal subjects. Lobar Vair, Vtissue, and FTV were expressed along standard coordinate axes. Results In normal subjects from end-inspiration to end-expiration, total Vair declined 43%, FTV increased ~80% while Vtissue remained unchanged. With increasing ILD, Vair declined and Vtissue rose in all lobes; FTV increased with a peripheral-to-central progression inversely correlated to spirometry and lung diffusing capacity (R2=0.57–0.75, prone end-inspiration). Inter- and intra-lobar coefficients of variation (CVs) of FTV increased 84–148% in mild-to-moderate ILD, indicating greater spatial heterogeneity, then normalized in severe ILD. Analysis of discontinuous images incurs <3% error compared to consecutive images. Conclusions These regional attenuation-based biomarkers could quantify heterogeneous parenchymal disease in distorted lobes, detect mild ILD involvement in all lobes and describe the pattern of disease progression. The next step would be to study a larger series, examine reproducibility and follow longitudinal changes in correlation with clinical and functional indices. PMID:21596593

  11. Morphometric examination of native lungs in human lung allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, B M; Burton, C M; Milman, N; Iversen, M; Andersen, C B

    2006-11-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the degree of lung damage in patients with alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha1AT) deficiency, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF) at the time of lung transplantation. Using unbiased stereological methods, lung-, bronchial- and vessel-volume, capillary length, and alveolar surface area and densities were estimated in recipient lungs from 21 consecutive patients with pre-transplant diagnoses including COPD (n=7), alpha1AT deficiency (n=6) and CF (n=8). Six unused adult donor lungs served as controls. Information relating to patient demography and pre-transplant lung function was obtained by retrospective chart review. Disease groups differed significantly with respect to demographics and pre-transplant lung function. Total lung volume was similar in all groups. Bronchial volume was significantly larger in CF patients compared to the control group (p<0.0001) and to the other two diagnostic groups: alpha1AT deficiency (p=0.0001) and COPD (p<0.0001). Alveolar surface density and capillary length density were significantly lower in patients with alpha1AT deficiency and COPD compared to controls (p<0.0001, respectively) and to patients with CF (p<0.0002, respectively). There were no correlations between clinical lung function and morphometric measurements. We conclude that unbiased microscopic stereological morphometry is an evolving science with the potential to elucidate pulmonary disease pathogenesis.

  12. Ultra-trace analysis of platinum in human tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Elisabeth; Hann, Stephan; Stingeder, Gerhard; Reiter, Christian

    2005-08-01

    Background levels of platinum were determined in human autopsy tissues taken from five individuals. The investigated specimens were lung, liver and kidney. Sample preparation involved microwave digestion followed by an open vessel treatment. Inductively-coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS) was applied in combination with an ultrasonic nebulization/membrane desolvation system for sample introduction. Isotope dilution analysis was employed for accurate quantification of platinum. Excellent procedural detection limits (3 s validation) of 20, 20 and 34 pg g(-1) dry weight were obtained for lung, liver and kidney tissue, respectively. Due to the lack of appropriate biological reference material, road dust (BCR-723) was used for method validation. Platinum levels ranging between 0.03 and 1.42 ng g(-1) were determined in the investigated samples. The platinum concentrations observed in human lung tissue may reflect the increasing atmospheric background levels of platinum originating from car catalysts. The presence of platinum in kidney and liver tissue samples clearly indicates the bioavailability of the element.

  13. Lung tissues in systemic sclerosis have gene expression patterns unique to pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Eileen; Shi, Haiwen; Jordan, Rick M.; Lyons-Weiler, James; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Pulmonary complications in systemic sclerosis (SSc), including pulmonary fibrosis (PF) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), are the leading cause of mortality. We compared the molecular fingerprint of SSc lung tissues and matching primary lung fibroblasts to those of normal donors, and patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). Methods Lung tissues were obtained from 33 patients with SSc who underwent lung transplantation. Tissues and cells from a subgroup of SSc patients with predominantly PF or PAH were compared to those from normal donors, patients with IPF, or IPAH. Microarray data was analyzed using Efficiency Analysis for determination of optimal data processing methods. Real time PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to confirm differential levels of mRNA and protein, respectively. Results We identified a consensus of 242 and 335 genes that were differentially expressed in lungs and primary fibroblasts, respectively. Enriched function groups in SSc-PF and IPF lungs included fibrosis, insulin-like growth factor signaling and caveolin-mediated endocytosis. Functional groups shared by SSc-PAH and IPAH lungs included antigen presentation, chemokine activity, and IL-17 signaling. Conclusion Using microarray analysis on carefully phenotyped SSc and comparator lung tissues, we demonstrated distinct molecular profiles in tissues and fibroblasts of patients with SSc-associated lung disease compared to idiopathic forms of lung disease. Unique molecular signatures were generated that are disease- (SSc) and phenotype- (PF vs PAH) specific. These signatures provide new insights into pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets for SSc lung disease. PMID:21360508

  14. Frizzled-8 as a putative therapeutic target in human lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hua-qing; Xu, Mei-lin; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Yi; Xie, Cong-hua

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fzd-8 is over-expressed in human lung cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down of Fzd-8 inhibits proliferation and Wnt pathway in lung cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down of Fzd-8 suppresses tumor growth in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down Fzd-8 sensitizes lung cancer cells to chemotherapy Taxotere. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. It is necessary to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung cancer in order to develop more effective therapeutics for the treatment of this disease. Recent reports have shown that Wnt signaling pathway is important in a number of cancer types including lung cancer. However, the role of Frizzled-8 (Fzd-8), one of the Frizzled family of receptors for the Wnt ligands, in lung cancer still remains to be elucidated. Here in this study we showed that Fzd-8 was over-expressed in human lung cancer tissue samples and cell lines. To investigate the functional importance of the Fzd-8 over-expression in lung cancer, we used shRNA to knock down Fzd-8 mRNA in lung cancer cells expressing the gene. We observed that Fzd-8 shRNA inhibited cell proliferation along with decreased activity of Wnt pathway in vitro, and also significantly suppressed A549 xenograft model in vivo (p < 0.05). Furthermore, we found that knocking down Fzd-8 by shRNA sensitized the lung cancer cells to chemotherapy Taxotere. These data suggest that Fzd-8 is a putative therapeutic target for human lung cancer and over-expression of Fzd-8 may be important for aberrant Wnt activation in lung cancer.

  15. Rewiring of human lung cell lineage and mitotic networks in lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il-Jin; Quigley, David; To, Minh D.; Pham, Patrick; Lin, Kevin; Jo, Brian; Jen, Kuang-Yu; Raz, Dan; Kim, Jae; Mao, Jian-Hua; Jablons, David; Balmain, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of gene expression patterns in normal tissues and their perturbations in tumors can help to identify the functional roles of oncogenes or tumor suppressors and identify potential new therapeutic targets. Here, gene expression correlation networks were derived from 92 normal human lung samples and patient-matched adenocarcinomas. The networks from normal lung show that NKX2-1 is linked to the alveolar type 2 lineage, and identify PEBP4 as a novel marker expressed in alveolar type 2 cells. Differential correlation analysis shows that the NKX2-1 network in tumors includes pathways associated with glutamate metabolism, and identifies Vaccinia-related kinase (VRK1) as a potential drug target in a tumor-specific mitotic network. We show that VRK1 inhibition cooperates with inhibition of PARP signaling to inhibit growth of lung tumor cells. Targeting of genes that are recruited into tumor mitotic networks may provide a wider therapeutic window than that seen by inhibition of known mitotic genes. PMID:23591868

  16. Asbestos fibers in human lung: forensic significance

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrenreich, T.; Selikoff, I.J.

    1981-03-01

    Asbestos is a fibrous mineral which, because of its unique properties, has innumerable applications in many industries and is used in a large variety of consumer products. It has become ubiquitous and is woven, literally and figuratively, into the fabric of our present-day civilization. However, its presence is sometimes unknown and unsuspected by those who are exposed to asbestos by virtue of occupation or environment and inhale its fibers. Exposed workers and even urban dwellers may have a variable lung burden of asbestos fibers. There is indisputable clinical, pathological, experimental and epidemiological proof that, after varying periods of latency, asbestos may cause benign and malignant disease often leading to disability or death. Forensic investigation of suspected asbestos-related deaths includes a life-time occupational history, a complete autopsy, and identification of the asbestos fiber tissue burden. The latter usually requires special procedures.

  17. HOPE-fixation of lung tissue allows retrospective proteome and phosphoproteome studies.

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, Olga; Abidi, Nada; Klawonn, Frank; Wissing, Josef; Nimtz, Manfred; Kugler, Christian; Steinert, Michael; Goldmann, Torsten; Jänsch, Lothar

    2014-11-07

    Hepes-glutamic acid buffer-mediated organic solvent protection effect (HOPE)-fixation has been introduced as an alternative to formalin fixation of clinical samples. Beyond preservation of morphological structures for histology, HOPE-fixation was demonstrated to be compatible with recent methods for RNA and DNA sequencing. However, the suitability of HOPE-fixed materials for the inspection of proteomes by mass spectrometry so far remained undefined. This is of particular interest, since proteins constitute a prime resource for drug research and can give valuable insights into the activity status of signaling pathways. In this study, we extracted proteins from human lung tissue and tested HOPE-treated and snap-frozen tissues comparatively by proteome and phosphoproteome analyses. High confident data from accurate mass spectrometry allowed the identification of 2603 proteins and 3036 phosphorylation sites. HOPE-fixation did not hinder the representative extraction of proteins, and investigating their biochemical properties, covered subcellular localizations, and cellular processes revealed no bias caused by the type of fixation. In conclusion, proteome as well as phosphoproteome data of HOPE lung samples were qualitatively equivalent to results obtained from snap-frozen tissues. Thus, HOPE-treated tissues match clinical demands in both histology and retrospective proteome analyses of patient samples by proteomics.

  18. Gene expression profile of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in lung tissue of patients exposed to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Tahmasbpour, Eisa; Ghanei, Mostafa; Qazvini, Ali; Vahedi, Ensieh; Panahi, Yunes

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a potent alkylating agent that targets several organs, especially lung tissue. Although pathological effects of SM on mustard lung have been widely considered, molecular and cellular mechanisms for these pathologies are poorly understood. We investigated changes in expression of genes related to oxidative stress (OS) and antioxidant defense caused by SM in lung tissue of patients. We performed gene expression profiling of OS and antioxidant defense in lung tissue samples from healthy controls (n=5) and SM-exposed patients (n=6). Changes in gene expression were measured using a 96-well RT(2) Profiler ™PCR Array: Human Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defense, which arrayed 84 genes functionally involved in cellular OS response. 47 (55.95%) genes were found to be significantly upregulated in patients with mustard lung compared with controls (p<0.05), whereas 7 (8.33%) genes were significantly downregulated (p<0.05). Among the most upregulated genes were OS responsive-1 (OXSR1), forkhead box M1 (FOXM1), and glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPX2), while metallothionein-3 (MT3) and glutathione reductase (GSR) were the most downregulated genes. Expression of hypoxia-induced genes (CYGB and MB), antioxidants and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing genes were significantly altered, suggesting an increased oxidative damage in mustard lungs. Mustard lungs were characterized by hypoxia, massive production of ROS, OS, disruption of epithelial cells, surfactant dysfunction, as well as increased risk of lung cancer and pulmonary fibrosis. Oxidative stress induced by ROS is the major mechanism for direct effect of SM exposure on respiratory system. Antioxidant treatment may improve the main features of mustard lungs.

  19. Gene Expression Profiling of Lung Tissue of Rats Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Feiveson, Alan H.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Kidane, Yared H.; Ploutz-Snyder Robert; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zalesak, Selina M.; Scully, Robert R.; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in the lung tissue of rats exposed to lunar dust particles. Multiple pathways and transcription factors were identified using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool, showing the potential networks of these signaling regulations involved in lunar dust-induced prolonged proflammatory response and toxicity. The data presented in this study, for the first time, explores the molecular mechanisms of lunar dust induced toxicity. This work contributes not only to the risk assessment for future space exploration, but also to the understanding of the dust-induced toxicity to humans on earth.

  20. Histamine release by Western red cedar (Thuja plicata) from lung tissue in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Elizabeth; Nicholls, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Evans, Elizabeth and Nicholls, P. J. (1974).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,31, 28-30. Histamine release by Western red cedar(Thuja plicata)from lung tissue in vitro. Various respiratory symptoms have previously been observed in workers exposed to dust from Western red cedar (Thuja plicata). Although an allergic basis for these effects has been proposed, the possibility that the dust may contain a pharmacologically active agent was investigated. Aqueous extracts of two samples of red cedar released significant amounts of histamine from pig and human lung in vitro. For one of these samples, using pig lung, a dose-response relation was found over a narrow range of concentrations. These dusts possessed the same order of histamine-releasing activity as a sample of cotton dust. Potassium cyanide reduced the release of histamine caused by low concentrations of Western red cedar. Similar effects of cyanide on the histamine-releasing activity of cotton dust and compound 48/80 were observed. It is possible that release of histamine in the lungs and upper respiratory tract occurs on inhalation of dust from Western red cedar and this may be a contributory factor to the development of respiratory symptoms in workers exposed to the dust of this wood. PMID:4132384

  1. Flow cytometric determination of stem/progenitor content in epithelial tissues: an example from nonsmall lung cancer and normal lung.

    PubMed

    Donnenberg, Vera S; Landreneau, Rodney J; Pfeifer, Melanie E; Donnenberg, Albert D

    2013-01-01

    Single cell analysis and cell sorting has enabled the study of development, growth, differentiation, repair and maintenance of "liquid" tissues and their cancers. The application of these methods to solid tissues is equally promising, but several unique technical challenges must be addressed. This report illustrates the application of multidimensional flow cytometry to the identification of candidate stem/progenitor populations in non-small cell lung cancer and paired normal lung tissue. Seventeen paired tumor/normal lung samples were collected at the time of surgical excision and processed immediately. Tissues were mechanically and enzymatically dissociated into single cell suspension and stained with a panel of antibodies used for negative gating (CD45, CD14, CD33, glycophorin A), identification of epithelial cells (intracellular cytokeratin), and detection of stem/progenitor markers (CD44, CD90, CD117, CD133). DAPI was added to measure DNA content. Formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue samples were stained with key markers (cytokeratin, CD117, DAPI) for immunofluorescent tissue localization of populations detected by flow cytometry. Disaggregated tumor and lung preparations contained a high proportion of events that would interfere with analysis, were they not eliminated by logical gating. We demonstrate how inclusion of doublets, events with hypodiploid DNA, and cytokeratin+ events also staining for hematopoietic markers reduces the ability to quantify epithelial cells and their precursors. Using the lung cancer/normal lung data set, we present an approach to multidimensional data analysis that consists of artifact removal, identification of classes of cells to be studied further (classifiers) and the measurement of outcome variables on these cell classes. The results of bivariate analysis show a striking similarity between the expression of stem/progenitor markers on lung tumor and adjacent tumor-free lung.

  2. The HSP90 Inhibitor Ganetespib Radiosensitizes Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Casal, Roberto; Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Epperly, Michael W.; Basse, Per H.; Wang, Hong; Wang, Xinhui; Proia, David A.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Socinski, Mark A.; Levina, Vera

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone HSP90 is involved in stabilization and function of multiple client proteins, many of which represent important oncogenic drivers in NSCLC. Utilization of HSP90 inhibitors as radiosensitizing agents is a promising approach. The antitumor activity of ganetespib, HSP90 inhibitor, was evaluated in human lung adenocarcinoma (AC) cells for its ability to potentiate the effects of IR treatment in both in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxic effects of ganetespib included; G2/M cell cycle arrest, inhibition of DNA repair, apoptosis induction, and promotion of senescence. All of these antitumor effects were both concentration- and time-dependent. Both pretreatment and post-radiation treatment with ganetespib at low nanomolar concentrations induced radiosensitization in lung AC cells in vitro. Ganetespib may impart radiosensitization through multiple mechanisms: such as down regulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway; diminished DNA repair capacity and promotion of cellular senescence. In vivo, ganetespib reduced growth of T2821 tumor xenografts in mice and sensitized tumors to IR. Tumor irradiation led to dramatic upregulation of β-catenin expression in tumor tissues, an effect that was mitigated in T2821 xenografts when ganetespib was combined with IR treatments. These data highlight the promise of combining ganetespib with IR therapies in the treatment of AC lung tumors. PMID:26010604

  3. Relevance of particle-induced rat lung tumors for assessing lung carcinogenic hazard and human lung cancer risk.

    PubMed Central

    Mauderly, J L

    1997-01-01

    Rats and other rodents are exposed by inhalation to identify agents that might present hazards for lung cancer in humans exposed by inhalation. In some cases, the results are used in attempts to develop quantitative estimates of human lung cancer risk. This report reviews evidence for the usefulness of the rat for evaluation of lung cancer hazards from inhaled particles. With the exception of nickel sulfate, particulate agents thought to be human lung carcinogens cause lung tumors in rats exposed by inhalation. The rat is more sensitive to carcinogenesis from nonfibrous particles than mice or Syrian hamsters, which have both produced false negatives. However, rats differ from mice and nonhuman primates in both the pattern of particle retention in the lung and alveolar epithelial hyperplastic responses to chronic particle exposure. Present evidence warrants caution in extrapolation from the lung tumor response of rats to inhaled particles to human lung cancer hazard, and there is considerable uncertainty in estimating unit risks for humans from rat data. It seems appropriate to continue using rats in inhalation carcinogenesis assays of inhaled particles, but the upper limit of exposure concentrations must be set carefully to avoid false-positive results. A positive finding in both rats and mice would give greater confidence that an agent presents a carcinogenic hazard to man, and both rats and mice should be used if the agent is a gas or vapor. There is little justification for including Syrian hamsters in assays of the intrapulmonary carcinogenicity of inhaled agents. PMID:9400748

  4. Procoagulant, Tissue Factor-Bearing Microparticles in Bronchoalveolar Lavage of Interstitial Lung Disease Patients: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Tavanti, Laura; Armani, Chiara; Noce, Concettina; Falaschi, Fabio; Bartoli, Maria Laura; Martino, Federica; Palla, Antonio; Celi, Alessandro; Paggiaro, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Coagulation factor Xa appears involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Through its interaction with protease activated receptor-1, this protease signals myofibroblast differentiation in lung fibroblasts. Although fibrogenic stimuli induce factor X synthesis by alveolar cells, the mechanisms of local posttranslational factor X activation are not fully understood. Cell-derived microparticles are submicron vesicles involved in different physiological processes, including blood coagulation; they potentially activate factor X due to the exposure on their outer membrane of both phosphatidylserine and tissue factor. We postulated a role for procoagulant microparticles in the pathogenesis of interstitial lung diseases. Nineteen patients with interstitial lung diseases and 11 controls were studied. All subjects underwent bronchoalveolar lavage; interstitial lung disease patients also underwent pulmonary function tests and high resolution CT scan. Microparticles were enumerated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid with a solid-phase assay based on thrombin generation. Microparticles were also tested for tissue factor activity. In vitro shedding of microparticles upon incubation with H2O2 was assessed in the human alveolar cell line, A549 and in normal bronchial epithelial cells. Tissue factor synthesis was quantitated by real-time PCR. Total microparticle number and microparticle-associated tissue factor activity were increased in interstitial lung disease patients compared to controls (84±8 vs. 39±3 nM phosphatidylserine; 293±37 vs. 105±21 arbitrary units of tissue factor activity; mean±SEM; p<.05 for both comparisons). Microparticle-bound tissue factor activity was inversely correlated with lung function as assessed by both diffusion capacity and forced vital capacity (r2 = .27 and .31, respectively; p<.05 for both correlations). Exposure of lung epithelial cells to H2O2 caused an increase in microparticle-bound tissue factor without affecting tissue

  5. Expression of Rab1A is upregulated in human lung cancer and associated with tumor size and T stage

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiaoyu; Huang, Tinglei; Huang, Bo; Zhang, Yanjie; Jiang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Rab1A expression is associated with malignant phenotypes in several human tumors; however, the role of Rab1A in lung cancer is still unclear. In this study, we attempted to establish the role of Rab1A in major human lung cancer subtypes. Rab1A expression in different histological types of human lung cancer was analyzed in lung cancer tissues with paired adjacent noncancerous tissues and a large panel of lung cancer cell lines. The effect of Rab1A expression on multiple cancer-associated signaling pathways was also examined. The results demonstrated that Rab1A was significantly overexpressed in the different histological types of lung cancer as compared to non-cancerous tissues, and Rab1A expression was correlated with tumor volume and stage. In a large panel of lung cancer cell lines, high Rab1A expression was observed as compared to a normal lung/bronchus epithelial cell line. However, Rab1A protein levels were not correlated with mTORC1 (P-S6K1), mTORC2 (P-AKT), MEK (P-ERK), JNK (P-c-Jun) or p38MAPK (P-MK2) signaling. Rab1A knockdown had no effect on mTOR signaling or cell growth. These data suggested that Rab1A may be involved in the pathogenesis of human lung cancer in an mTOR- and MAPK-independent manner. PMID:27902464

  6. Quantitative Anatomy of the Growing Lungs in the Human Fetus.

    PubMed

    Szpinda, Michał; Siedlaczek, Waldemar; Szpinda, Anna; Woźniak, Alina; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Badura, Mateusz

    2015-01-01

    Using anatomical, digital, and statistical methods we examined the three-dimensional growth of the lungs in 67 human fetuses aged 16-25 weeks. The lung dimensions revealed no sex differences. The transverse and sagittal diameters and the base circumference were greater in the right lungs while the lengths of anterior and posterior margins and the lung height were greater in the left lungs. The best-fit curves for all the lung parameters were natural logarithmic models. The transverse-to-sagittal diameter ratio remained stable and averaged 0.56 ± 0.08 and 0.52 ± 0.08 for the right and left lungs, respectively. For the right and left lungs, the transverse diameter-to-height ratio significantly increased from 0.74 ± 0.09 to 0.92 ± 0.08 and from 0.56 ± 0.07 to 0.79 ± 0.09, respectively. The sagittal diameter-to-height ratio significantly increased from 1.41 ± 0.23 to 1.66 ± 0.18 in the right lung, and from 1.27 ± 0.17 to 1.48 ± 0.22 in the left lung. In the fetal lungs, their proportionate increase in transverse and sagittal diameters considerably accelerates with relation to the lung height. The lung dimensions in the fetus are relevant in the evaluation of the normative pulmonary growth and the diagnosis of pulmonary hypoplasia.

  7. A New Antigen Retrieval Technique for Human Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Byne, William; Haroutunian, Vahram; García-Villanueva, Mercedes; Rábano, Alberto; García-Amado, María; Prensa, Lucía; Giménez-Amaya, José Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining of tissues is a powerful tool used to delineate the presence or absence of an antigen. During the last 30 years, antigen visualization in human brain tissue has been significantly limited by the masking effect of fixatives. In the present study, we have used a new method for antigen retrieval in formalin-fixed human brain tissue and examined the effectiveness of this protocol to reveal masked antigens in tissues with both short and long formalin fixation times. This new method, which is based on the use of citraconic acid, has not been previously utilized in brain tissue although it has been employed in various other tissues such as tonsil, ovary, skin, lymph node, stomach, breast, colon, lung and thymus. Thus, we reported here a novel method to carry out immunohistochemical studies in free-floating human brain sections. Since fixation of brain tissue specimens in formaldehyde is a commonly method used in brain banks, this new antigen retrieval method could facilitate immunohistochemical studies of brains with prolonged formalin fixation times. PMID:18852880

  8. Fluorescence spectroscopy and cryoimaging of rat lung tissue mitochondrial redox state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, R.; Audi, S.; Staniszewski, K.; Maleki, S.; Ranji, M.

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the utility of optical cryoimaging and fluorometry to evaluate tissue redox state of the mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide) and FAD (Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide) in intact rat lungs. The ratio (NADH/FAD), referred to as mitochondrial redox ratio (RR), is a measure of the lung tissue mitochondrial redox state. Isolated rat lungs were connected to a ventilation-perfused system. Surface NADH and FAD fluorescence signals were acquired before and after lung perfusion in the absence (control perfusate) or presence of potassium cyanide (KCN, complex IV inhibitor) to reduce the mitochondrial respiratory chain (state 5 respiration). Another group of lungs were perfused with control perfusate or KCN-containing perfusate as above, after which the lungs were deflated and frozen rapidly for subsequent 3D cryoimaging. Results demonstrate that lung treatment with KCN increased lung surface NADH signal by 22%, decreased FAD signal by 8%, and as result increased RR by 31% as compared to control perfusate (baseline) values. Cryoimaging results also show that KCN increased mean lung tissue NADH signal by 37%, decreased mean FAD signal by 4%, and increased mean RR by 47%. These results demonstrate the utility of these optical techniques to evaluate the effect of pulmonary oxidative stress on tissue mitochondrial redox state in intact lungs.

  9. Elastin Cables Define the Axial Connective Tissue System in the Murine Lung.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Willi; Bennett, Robert D; Ackermann, Maximilian; Ysasi, Alexandra B; Belle, Janeil; Valenzuela, Cristian D; Pabst, Andreas; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A; Mentzer, Steven J

    2015-11-01

    The axial connective tissue system is a fiber continuum of the lung that maintains alveolar surface area during changes in lung volume. Although the molecular anatomy of the axial system remains undefined, the fiber continuum of the lung is central to contemporary models of lung micromechanics and alveolar regeneration. To provide a detailed molecular structure of the axial connective tissue system, we examined the extracellular matrix of murine lungs. The lungs were decellularized using a 24 hr detergent treatment protocol. Systematic evaluation of the decellularized lungs demonstrated no residual cellular debris; morphometry demonstrated a mean 39 ± 7% reduction in lung dimensions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated an intact structural hierarchy within the decellularized lung. Light, fluorescence, and SEM of precision-cut lung slices demonstrated that alveolar duct structure was defined by a cable line element encased in basement membrane. The cable line element arose in the distal airways, passed through septal tips and inserted into neighboring blood vessels and visceral pleura. The ropelike appearance, collagenase resistance and anti-elastin immunostaining indicated that the cable was an elastin macromolecule. Our results indicate that the helical line element of the axial connective tissue system is composed of an elastin cable that not only defines the structure of the alveolar duct, but also integrates the axial connective tissue system into visceral pleura and peripheral blood vessels.

  10. Bag-of-features approach for improvement of lung tissue classification in diffuse lung disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Noriji; Fukui, Motofumi; Isozaki, Takashi

    2009-02-01

    Many automated techniques have been proposed to classify diffuse lung disease patterns. Most of the techniques utilize texture analysis approaches with second and higher order statistics, and show successful classification result among various lung tissue patterns. However, the approaches do not work well for the patterns with inhomogeneous texture distribution within a region of interest (ROI), such as reticular and honeycombing patterns, because the statistics can only capture averaged feature over the ROI. In this work, we have introduced the bag-of-features approach to overcome this difficulty. In the approach, texture images are represented as histograms or distributions of a few basic primitives, which are obtained by clustering local image features. The intensity descriptor and the Scale Invariant Feature Transformation (SIFT) descriptor are utilized to extract the local features, which have significant discriminatory power due to their specificity to a particular image class. In contrast, the drawback of the local features is lack of invariance under translation and rotation. We improved the invariance by sampling many local regions so that the distribution of the local features is unchanged. We evaluated the performance of our system in the classification task with 5 image classes (ground glass, reticular, honeycombing, emphysema, and normal) using 1109 ROIs from 211 patients. Our system achieved high classification accuracy of 92.8%, which is superior to that of the conventional system with the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) feature especially for inhomogeneous texture patterns.

  11. Natural killer cell distribution and trafficking in human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Carrega, Paolo; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Few data are available regarding the recirculation of natural killer (NK) cells among human organs. Earlier studies have been often impaired by the use of markers then proved to be either not sufficiently specific for NK cells (e.g., CD57, CD56) or expressed only by subsets of NK cells (e.g., CD16). At the present, available data confirmed that human NK cells populate blood, lymphoid organs, lung, liver, uterus (during pregnancy), and gut. Several studies showed that NK cell homing appears to be subset-specific, as secondary lymphoid organs and probably several solid tissues are preferentially inhabited by CD56brightCD16neg/dull non-cytotoxic NK cells. Similar studies performed in the mouse model showed that lymph node and bone marrow are preferentially populated by CD11bdull NK cells while blood, spleen, and lung by CD27dull NK cells. Therefore, an important topic to be addressed in the human system is the contribution of factors that regulate NK cell tissue homing and egress, such as chemotactic receptors or homeostatic mechanisms. Here, we review the current knowledge on NK cell distribution in peripheral tissues and, based on recent acquisitions, we propose our view regarding the recirculation of NK cells in the human body. PMID:23230434

  12. Tissue distribution of human acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase messenger RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Jbilo, O.; Barteles, C.F.; Chatonnet, A.; Toutant, J.P.; Lockridge, O.

    1994-12-31

    Tissue distribution of human acetyicholinesterase and butyryicholinesterase messenger RNA. 1 Cholinesterase inhibitors occur naturally in the calabar bean (eserine), green potatoes (solanine), insect-resistant crab apples, the coca plant (cocaine) and snake venom (fasciculin). There are also synthetic cholinesterase inhibitors, for example man-made insecticides. These inhibitors inactivate acetyicholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase as well as other targets. From a study of the tissue distribution of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase mRNA by Northern blot analysis, we have found the highest levels of butyrylcholinesterase mRNA in the liver and lungs, tissues known as the principal detoxication sites of the human body. These results indicate that butyrylcholinesterase may be a first line of defense against poisons that are eaten or inhaled.

  13. Human dignity and human tissue: a meaningful ethical relationship?

    PubMed

    Kirchhoffer, David G; Dierickx, Kris

    2011-09-01

    Human dignity has long been used as a foundational principle in policy documents and ethical guidelines intended to govern various forms of biomedical research. Despite the vast amount of literature concerning human dignity and embryonic tissues, the majority of biomedical research uses non-embryonic human tissue. Therefore, this contribution addresses a notable lacuna in the literature: the relationship, if any, between human dignity and human tissue. This paper first elaborates a multidimensional understanding of human dignity that overcomes many of the shortcomings associated with the use of human dignity in other ethical debates. Second, it discusses the relationship between such an understanding of human dignity and 'non-embryonic' human tissue. Finally, it considers the implications of this relationship for biomedical research and practice involving human tissue. The contribution demonstrates that while human tissue cannot be said to have human dignity, human dignity is nevertheless implicated by human tissue, making what is done with human tissue and how it is done worthy of moral consideration.

  14. Human cancers overexpress genes that are specific to a variety of normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, Joseph; Netanely, Dvir; Domany, Eytan; Sachs, Leo

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed gene expression data from three different kinds of samples: normal human tissues, human cancer cell lines, and leukemic cells from lymphoid and myeloid leukemia pediatric patients. We have searched for genes that are overexpressed in human cancer and also show specific patterns of tissue-dependent expression in normal tissues. Using the expression data of the normal tissues, we identified 4,346 genes with a high variability of expression and clustered these genes according to their relative expression level. Of 91 stable clusters obtained, 24 clusters included genes preferentially expressed either only in hematopoietic tissues or in hematopoietic and one to two other tissues; 28 clusters included genes preferentially expressed in various nonhematopoietic tissues such as neuronal, testis, liver, kidney, muscle, lung, pancreas, and placenta. Analysis of the expression levels of these two groups of genes in the human cancer cell lines and leukemias identified genes that were highly expressed in cancer cells but not in their normal counterparts and, thus, were overexpressed in the cancers. The different cancer cell lines and leukemias varied in the number and identity of these overexpressed genes. The results indicate that many genes that are overexpressed in human cancer cells are specific to a variety of normal tissues, including normal tissues other than those from which the cancer originated. It is suggested that this general property of cancer cells plays a major role in determining the behavior of the cancers, including their metastatic potential. PMID:16339305

  15. Lung Motion Model Validation Experiments, Free-Breathing Tissue Densitometry, and Ventilation Mapping using Fast Helical CT Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hsiang-Tai

    The uncertainties due to respiratory motion present significant challenges to accurate characterization of cancerous tissues both in terms of imaging and treatment. Currently available clinical lung imaging techniques are subject to inferior image quality and incorrect motion estimation, with consequences that can systematically impact the downstream treatment delivery and outcome. The main objective of this thesis is the development of the techniques of fast helical computed tomography (CT) imaging and deformable image registration for the radiotherapy applications in accurate breathing motion modeling, lung tissue density modeling and ventilation imaging. Fast helical CT scanning was performed on 64-slice CT scanner using the shortest available gantry rotation time and largest pitch value such that scanning of the thorax region amounts to just two seconds, which is less than typical breathing cycle in humans. The scanning was conducted under free breathing condition. Any portion of the lung anatomy undergoing such scanning protocol would be irradiated for only a quarter second, effectively removing any motion induced image artifacts. The resulting CT data were pristine volumetric images that record the lung tissue position and density in a fraction of the breathing cycle. Following our developed protocol, multiple fast helical CT scans were acquired to sample the tissue positions in different breathing states. To measure the tissue displacement, deformable image registration was performed that registers the non-reference images to the reference one. In modeling breathing motion, external breathing surrogate signal was recorded synchronously with the CT image slices. This allowed for the tissue-specific displacement to be modeled as parametrization of the recorded breathing signal using the 5D lung motion model. To assess the accuracy of the motion model in describing tissue position change, the model was used to simulate the original high-pitch helical CT scan

  16. Clinic application of tissue engineered bronchus for lung cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruijun; Chen, Xiaoke; Wu, Jingxiang; Pan, Yinggen; Lu, Shun; Weder, Walter; Luo, Qingquan

    2017-01-01

    Background Delayed revascularization process and substitute infection remain to be key challenges in tissue engineered (TE) airway reconstruction. We propose an “in-vivo bioreactor” design, defined as an implanted TE substitutes perfused with an intra-scaffold medium flow created by an extracorporeal portable pump system for in situ organ regeneration. The perfusate keeps pre-seeded cells alive before revascularization. Meanwhile the antibiotic inside the perfusate controls topical infection. Methods A stage IIIA squamous lung cancer patient received a 5-cm TE airway substitute, bridging left basal segment bronchus to carina, with the in-vivo bioreactor design to avoid left pneumonectomy. Continuous intra-scaffold Ringer’s-gentamicin perfusion lasted for 1 month, together with orthotopic peripheral total nucleated cells (TNCs) injection twice a week. Results The patient recovered uneventfully. Bronchoscopy follow-up confirmed complete revascularization and reepithelialization four months postoperatively. Perfusate waste test demonstrated various revascularization growth factors secreted by TNCs. The patient received two cycles of chemotherapy and 30 Gy radiotherapy thereafter without complications related to the TE substitute. Conclusions In-vivo bioreactor design combines the traditionally separated in vitro 3D cell-scaffold culture system and the in vivo regenerative processes associated with TE substitutes, while treating the recipients as bioreactors for their own TE prostheses. This design can be applied clinically. We also proved for the first time that TE airway substitute is able to tolerate chemo-radiotherapy and suitable to be used in cancer treatment. PMID:28203403

  17. Spectroscopic quantitation of cytochrome P-450 in human lung microsomes.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, C W; Guenthner, T M

    1990-01-01

    The cytochrome P-450 content of human lung microsomes was measured by difference spectroscopy of the carbon monoxide-complexed hemoprotein. These measurements were only possible after the microsome preparation had been subjected to centrifugation over a discontinuous sucrose gradient, to remove an opaque black contaminant. The specific concentration of total cytochrome P-450 in human lung microsomes is essentially identical to that of microsomes prepared under identical conditions from untreated baboon lungs, but is only 0.7% of the specific content found in lung microsomes from untreated rabbits. These measurements correspond well to the observed metabolic capacities of the various microsome samples.

  18. Read-through transcripts in normal human lung parenchyma are down-regulated in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cotroneo, Chiara E.; Galvan, Antonella; Noci, Sara; Piazza, Rocco; Pirola, Alessandra; Spinelli, Roberta; Incarbone, Matteo; Palleschi, Alessandro; Rosso, Lorenzo; Santambrogio, Luigi; Dragani, Tommaso A.; Colombo, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Read-through transcripts result from the continuous transcription of adjacent, similarly oriented genes, with the splicing out of the intergenic region. They have been found in several neoplastic and normal tissues, but their pathophysiological significance is unclear. We used high-throughput sequencing of cDNA fragments (RNA-Seq) to identify read-through transcripts in the non-involved lung tissue of 64 surgically treated lung adenocarcinoma patients. A total of 52 distinct read-through species was identified, with 24 patients having at least one read-through event, up to a maximum of 17 such transcripts in one patient. Sanger sequencing validated 28 of these transcripts and identified an additional 15, for a total of 43 distinct read-through events involving 35 gene pairs. Expression levels of 10 validated read-through transcripts were measured by quantitative PCR in pairs of matched non-involved lung tissue and lung adenocarcinoma tissue from 45 patients. Higher expression levels were observed in normal lung tissue than in the tumor counterpart, with median relative quantification ratios between normal and tumor varying from 1.90 to 7.78; the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001, Wilcoxon's signed-rank test for paired samples) for eight transcripts: ELAVL1–TIMM44, FAM162B–ZUFSP, IFNAR2–IL10RB, INMT–FAM188B, KIAA1841–C2orf74, NFATC3–PLA2G15, SIRPB1–SIRPD, and SHANK3–ACR. This report documents the presence of read-through transcripts in apparently normal lung tissue, with inter-individual differences in patterns and abundance. It also shows their down-regulation in tumors, suggesting that these chimeric transcripts may function as tumor suppressors in lung tissue. PMID:27058892

  19. Autoradiographic visualization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and guinea pig lung

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, J.C.; Barnes, P.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Muscarinic receptor subtypes have been localized in human and guinea pig lung sections by an autoradiographic technique, using (3H)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate (( 3H)QNB) and selective muscarinic antagonists. (3H)QNB was incubated with tissue sections for 90 min at 25 degrees C, and nonspecific binding was determined by incubating adjacent serial sections in the presence of 1 microM atropine. Binding to lung sections had the characterization expected for muscarinic receptors. Autoradiography revealed that muscarinic receptors were widely distributed in human lung, with dense labeling over submucosal glands and airway ganglia, and moderate labeling over nerves in intrapulmonary bronchi and of airway smooth muscle of large and small airways. In addition, alveolar walls were uniformly labeled. In guinea pig lung, labeling of airway smooth muscle was similar, but in contrast to human airways, epithelium was labeled but alveolar walls were not. The muscarinic receptors of human airway smooth muscle from large to small airways were entirely of the M3-subtype, whereas in guinea pig airway smooth muscle, the majority were the M3-subtype with a very small population of the M2-subtype present. In human bronchial submucosal glands, M1- and M3-subtypes appeared to coexist in the proportions of 36 and 64%, respectively. In human alveolar walls the muscarinic receptors were entirely of the M1-subtype, which is absent from the guinea pig lung. No M2-receptors were demonstrated in human lung. The localization of M1-receptors was confirmed by direct labeling with (3H)pirenzepine. With the exception of the alveolar walls in human lung, the localization of muscarinic receptor subtypes on structures in the lung is consistent with known functional studies.

  20. Comparison of lung alveolar and tissue cells in silica-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sjöstrand, M; Absher, P M; Hemenway, D R; Trombley, L; Baldor, L C

    1991-01-01

    The silicon dioxide mineral, cristobalite (CRS) induces inflammation involving both alveolar cells and connective tissue compartments. In this study, we compared lung cells recovered by whole lung lavage and by digestion of lung tissue from rats at varying times after 8 days of exposure to aerosolized CRS. Control and exposed rats were examined between 2 and 36 wk after exposure. Lavaged cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage with phosphate-buffered saline. Lung wall cells were prepared via collagenase digestion of lung tissue slices. Cells from lavage and lung wall were separated by Percoll density centrifugation. The three upper fractions, containing mostly macrophages, were cultured, and the conditioned medium was assayed for effect on lung fibroblast growth and for activity of the lysosomal enzyme, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. Results demonstrated that the cells separated from the lung walls exhibited different reaction patterns compared with those cells recovered by lavage. The lung wall cells exhibited a progressive increase in the number of macrophages and lymphocytes compared with a steady state in cells of the lung lavage. This increase in macrophages apparently was due to low density cells, which showed features of silica exposure. Secretion of a fibroblast-stimulating factor was consistently high by lung wall macrophages, whereas lung lavage macrophages showed inconsistent variations. The secretion of NAG was increased in lung lavage macrophages, but decreased at most observation times in lung wall macrophages. No differences were found among cells in the different density fractions regarding fibroblast stimulation and enzyme secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. CYLD Promotes TNF-α-Induced Cell Necrosis Mediated by RIP-1 in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xing; Chen, Qianshun; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Cylindromatosis (CYLD) is a deubiquitination enzyme and contributes to the degradation of ubiquitin chains on RIP1. The aim of the present study is to investigate the levels of CYLD in lung cancer patients and explore the molecular mechanism of CYLD in the lung cancer pathogenesis. The levels of CYLD were detected in human lung cancer tissues and the paired paracarcinoma tissues by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. The proliferation of human lung cancer cells was determined by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis and necrosis were determined by FACS assay. The results demonstrated that low levels of CYLD were detected in clinical lung carcinoma specimens. Three pairs of siRNA were used to knock down the endogenous CYLD in lung cancer cells. Knockdown of CYLD promoted cell proliferation of lung cancer cells. Otherwise overexpression of CYLD induced TNF-α-induced cell death in A549 cells and H460 cells. Moreover, CYLD-overexpressed lung cancer cells were treated with 10 μM of z-VAD-fmk for 12 hours and the result revealed that TNF-α-induced cell necrosis was significantly enhanced. Additionally, TNF-α-induced cell necrosis in CYLD-overexpressed H460 cells was mediated by receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP-1) kinase. Our findings suggested that CYLD was a potential target for the therapy of human lung cancers. PMID:27738385

  2. Human sweat metabolomics for lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Santiago, Mónica; Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Turck, Natacha; Robin, Xavier; Jurado-Gámez, Bernabé; Sanchez, Jean C; Luque de Castro, María D

    2015-07-01

    Sweat is one of the less employed biofluids for discovery of markers in spite of its increased application in medicine for detection of drugs or for diagnostic of cystic fibrosis. In this research, human sweat was used as clinical sample to develop a screening tool for lung cancer, which is the carcinogenic disease with the highest mortality rate owing to the advanced stage at which it is usually detected. In this context, a method based on the metabolite analysis of sweat to discriminate between patients with lung cancer versus smokers as control individuals is proposed. The capability of the metabolites identified in sweat to discriminate between both groups of individuals was studied and, among them, a trisaccharide phosphate presented the best independent performance in terms of the specificity/sensitivity pair (80 and 72.7%, respectively). Additionally, two panels of metabolites were configured using the PanelomiX tool as an attempt to reduce false negatives (at least 80% specificity) and false positives (at least 80% sensitivity). The first panel (80% specificity and 69% sensitivity) was composed by suberic acid, a tetrahexose, and a trihexose, while the second panel (69% specificity and 80% sensitivity) included nonanedioic acid, a trihexose, and the monoglyceride MG(22:2). Thus, the combination of the five metabolites led to a single panel providing 80% specificity and 79% sensitivity, reducing the false positive and negative rates to almost 20%. The method was validated by estimation of within-day and between-days variability of the quantitative analysis of the five metabolites.

  3. Thorium isotopes in human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Stehney, A.F.; Lucas, H.F.

    1991-12-31

    Concentrations of {sup 232}Th and activity ratios of {sup 228}Th to {sup 232}Th and {sup 230}Th to {sup 232}Th were determined in autopsy samples from five former employees of a thorium refinery. The ranges of {sup 232}Th activity concentrations (mBq g{sup {minus}1}) were 0.17--94 in lungs, 3.9--1210 in pulmonary lymph nodes, 0.14--1.19 in bones, 0.015--0.68 in liver, 0.97--5.8 in spleen, and 0.009--0.068 in kidneys. These concentrations are 10 to 1000 times greater than have been reported for persons not occupationally exposed to Th. In most of the samples, the ratios of {sup 230}Th to {sup 232}Th and {sup 228}Th to {sup 232}Th activity at death of the subject were 0.1--0.2 and 0.2--0.4, respectively. Thorium-228 to {sup 228}Ra activity ratios ({plus_minus} standard errors) of 0.86 {plus_minus} 0.11 in lungs and 1.18 {plus_minus} 0.13 in lymph nodes of one subject were obtained by calculation from ratios of {sup 228}Th to {sup 232}Th.

  4. Species-Specific Metastasis of Human Tumor Cells in the Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Mouse Engrafted with Human Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtivelman, Emma; Namikawa, Reiko

    1995-05-01

    We have attempted to model human metastatic disease by implanting human target organs into the immunodeficient C.B-17 scid/scid (severe combined immunodeficiency; SCID) mouse, creating SCID-hu mice. Preferential metastasis to implants of human fetal lung and human fetal bone marrow occurred after i.v. injection of human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells into SCID-hu mice; the homologous mouse organs were spared. Clinically more aggressive variant SCLC cells metastasized more efficiently to human fetal lung implants than did cells from classic SCLC. Metastasis of variant SCLC to human fetal bone marrow was enhanced in SCID-hu mice exposed to γ-irradiation or to interleukin 1α. These data indicate that the SCID-hu mice may provide a model in which to study species- and tissue-specific steps of the human metastatic process.

  5. Production of decellularized porcine lung scaffolds for use in tissue engineering†

    PubMed Central

    Balestrini, Jenna L.; Gard, Ashley L.; Liu, Angela; Leiby, Katherine L.; Schwan, Jonas; Kunkemoeller, Britta; Calle, Elizabeth A.; Sivarapatna, Amogh; Lin, Tylee; Dimitrievska, Sashka; Cambpella, Stuart G.; Niklason, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing body of work dedicated to producing acellular lung scaffolds for use in regenerative medicine by decellularizing donor lungs of various species. These scaffolds typically undergo substantial matrix damage due to the harsh conditions required to remove cellular material (e.g., high pH, strong detergents), lengthy processing times, or pre-existing tissue contamination from microbial colonization. In this work, a new decellularization technique is described that maintains the global tissue architecture, key matrix components, mechanical composition and cell-seeding potential of lung tissue while effectively removing resident cellular material. Acellular lung scaffolds were produced from native porcine lungs using a combination of Triton X-100 and sodium deoxycholate (SDC) at low concentrations in 24 hours. We assessed the effect of matrix decellularization by measuring residual PMID:26426090

  6. Imaging lung tissue oscillations using high-speed X-ray velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Thurgood, Jordan; Dubsky, Stephen; Uesugi, Kentaro; Curtis, Michael; Samarage, Chaminda R; Thompson, Bruce; Zosky, Graeme; Fouras, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    This work utilized synchrotron imaging to achieve a regional assessment of the lung's response to imparted oscillations. The forced oscillation technique is increasingly being used in clinical and research settings for the measurement of lung function. During the forced oscillation technique, pressure oscillations are imparted to the lungs via the subjects' airway opening and the response is measured. This provides information about the mechanical properties of the airways and lung tissue. The quality of measurements is dependent upon the input signal penetrating uniformly throughout the lung. However, the penetration of these signals is not well understood. The development and use of a novel image-processing technique in conjunction with synchrotron-based imaging was able to regionally assess the lungs' response to input pressure oscillation signals in anaesthetized mice. The imaging-based technique was able to quantify both the power and distribution of lung tissue oscillations during forced oscillations of the lungs. It was observed that under forced oscillations the apices had limited lung tissue expansion relative to the base. This technique could be used to optimize input signals used for the forced oscillation technique or potentially as a diagnostic tool itself.

  7. Expression and clinicopathological implication of DcR3 in lung cancer tissues: a tissue microarray study with 365 cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Luo, Jie; He, Rongquan; Huang, Wenting; Li, Zuyun; Li, Ping; Dang, Yiwu; Chen, Gang; Li, Shikang

    2016-01-01

    Background Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) has been reported to be involved in different cancers. However, few related researches have been accomplished on the role of DcR3 in lung cancer. Objective To explore the expression level and clinicopathological implication of DcR3 protein in lung cancer tissues. Materials and methods Immunohistochemistry was used to examine DcR3 protein expression in lung cancer (n=365) and normal lung tissues (n=26). The relationships between DcR3 expression and clinical parameters were further investigated. Furthermore, the diagnostic and clinicopathological value of DcR3 mRNA was analyzed based on The Cancer Genome Atlas database in lung cancer patients. Results Compared to normal lung tissues, DcR3 expression was significantly higher in lung cancer (P=0.007) tissues, including small-cell lung cancer (P=0.001) and non-small-cell lung cancer (P=0.008). In addition, DcR3 expression was related to tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage (P<0.001), tumor diameter (P=0.007), distant metastasis (P<0.001), and lymph node metastasis (P<0.001) in lung cancers. When concerning non-small-cell lung cancer, consistent correlations between DcR3 expression and TNM stage (P<0.001), tumor diameter (P=0.019), distant metastasis (P<0.001), and lymph node metastasis (P<0.001) were found. Simultaneously, in small-cell lung cancer, TNM stage (P=0.004) and lymph node metastasis (P=0.005) were also associated with DcR3 expression. Additionally, receiver operator characteristic curve revealed that the area under curve (AUC) of DcR3 was 0.637 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.531–0.742) for lung cancer. Furthermore, DcR3 was overexpressed in both adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma tissues than in noncancerous lung tissues (all P<0.0001) based on the data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. AUC of DcR3 was 0.726 (95% CI 0.644–0.788) for lung adenocarcinoma patients and 0.647 (95% CI 0.566–0.728) for squamous cell carcinoma patients. DcR3 expression was also related to

  8. Humanized mice and tissue transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Laurie L; Shultz, Leonard D.; Greiner, Dale L; Brehm, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of the molecular pathways that control immune responses, particularly immunomodulatory molecules that control the extent and duration of an immune response, have led to new approaches in the field of transplantation immunology to induce allograft survival. These molecular pathways are being defined precisely in murine models, and are now being translated into clinical practice. However, many of the newly available drugs are human-specific reagents and furthermore, there exist many species-specific differences between mouse and human immune systems. Recent advances in the development of humanized mice, i.e., immunodeficient mice engrafted with functional human immune systems, have led to the availability of a small animal model for the study of human immune responses. Humanized mice represent an important pre-clinical model system for evaluation of new drugs as well as identification of the mechanisms underlying human allograft rejection without putting patients at risk. This review highlights recent advances in the development of humanized mice and their use as pre-clinical models for the study of human allograft responses. PMID:26588186

  9. Tissue Specificity of Human Disease Module

    PubMed Central

    Kitsak, Maksim; Sharma, Amitabh; Menche, Jörg; Guney, Emre; Ghiassian, Susan Dina; Loscalzo, Joseph; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-01-01

    Genes carrying mutations associated with genetic diseases are present in all human cells; yet, clinical manifestations of genetic diseases are usually highly tissue-specific. Although some disease genes are expressed only in selected tissues, the expression patterns of disease genes alone cannot explain the observed tissue specificity of human diseases. Here we hypothesize that for a disease to manifest itself in a particular tissue, a whole functional subnetwork of genes (disease module) needs to be expressed in that tissue. Driven by this hypothesis, we conducted a systematic study of the expression patterns of disease genes within the human interactome. We find that genes expressed in a specific tissue tend to be localized in the same neighborhood of the interactome. By contrast, genes expressed in different tissues are segregated in distinct network neighborhoods. Most important, we show that it is the integrity and the completeness of the expression of the disease module that determines disease manifestation in selected tissues. This approach allows us to construct a disease-tissue network that confirms known and predicts unexpected disease-tissue associations. PMID:27748412

  10. A bioengineered niche promotes in vivo engraftment and maturation of pluripotent stem cell derived human lung organoids

    PubMed Central

    Dye, Briana R; Dedhia, Priya H; Miller, Alyssa J; Nagy, Melinda S; White, Eric S; Shea, Lonnie D; Spence, Jason R

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) derived tissues often remain developmentally immature in vitro, and become more adult-like in their structure, cellular diversity and function following transplantation into immunocompromised mice. Previously we have demonstrated that hPSC-derived human lung organoids (HLOs) resembled human fetal lung tissue in vitro (Dye et al., 2015). Here we show that HLOs required a bioartificial microporous poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) scaffold niche for successful engraftment, long-term survival, and maturation of lung epithelium in vivo. Analysis of scaffold-grown transplanted tissue showed airway-like tissue with enhanced epithelial structure and organization compared to HLOs grown in vitro. By further comparing in vitro and in vivo grown HLOs with fetal and adult human lung tissue, we found that in vivo transplanted HLOs had improved cellular differentiation of secretory lineages that is reflective of differences between fetal and adult tissue, resulting in airway-like structures that were remarkably similar to the native adult human lung. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19732.001 PMID:27677847

  11. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, Samir A.; Omar, Hany A.; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A.; AlSaeed, Mohammed S.; EL-Tarras, Adel E.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron

  12. Morphogenetic implications of peristaltic fluid-tissue dynamics in the embryonic lung.

    PubMed

    Bokka, Kishore K; Jesudason, Edwin C; Warburton, David; Lubkin, Sharon R

    2015-10-07

    Peristalsis begins in the lung as soon as the smooth muscle forms, and persists until birth. Since the prenatal lung is liquid-filled, smooth muscle action can deform tissues and transport fluid far from the immediately adjacent tissues. Stretching of embryonic tissues and sensation of internal fluid flows have been shown to have potent morphogenetic effects. We hypothesize that these effects are at work in lung morphogenesis. To place that hypothesis in a quantitative framework, we analyze a model of the fluid-structure interactions between embryonic tissues and lumen fluid resulting from peristaltic waves that partially occlude the airway. We find that if the airway is closed, deformations are synchronized; by contrast, if the trachea is open, maximal occlusion precedes maximal pressure. We perform a parametric analysis of how occlusion, stretch, and flow depend on tissue stiffnesses, smooth muscle force, tissue shape and size, and fluid viscosity. We find that most of these relationships are governed by simple ratios.

  13. Grating-based tomography of human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Mehlin, Andrea; Herzen, Julia; Lang, Sabrina; Holme, Margaret; Zanette, Irene; Hieber, Simone; Deyhle, Hans; Beckmann, Felix; Pfeiffer, Franz; Weitkamp, Timm

    2012-07-01

    The development of therapies to improve our health requires a detailed knowledge on the anatomy of soft tissues from the human body down to the cellular level. Grating-based phase contrast micro computed tomography using synchrotron radiation provides a sensitivity, which allows visualizing micrometer size anatomical features in soft tissue without applying any contrast agent. We show phase contrast tomography data of human brain, tumor vessels and constricted arteries from the beamline ID 19 (ESRF) and urethral tissue from the beamline W2 (HASYLAB/DESY) with micrometer resolution. Here, we demonstrate that anatomical features can be identified within brain tissue as well known from histology. Using human urethral tissue, the application of two photon energies is compared. Tumor vessels thicker than 20 μm can be perfectly segmented. The morphology of coronary arteries can be better extracted in formalin than after paraffin embedding.

  14. GSTCD and INTS12 regulation and expression in the human lung.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, Ma'en; Miller, Suzanne; Probert, Kelly; Billington, Charlotte K; Henry, Amanda P; Hodge, Emily; Nelson, Carl P; Stewart, Ceri E; Swan, Caroline; Wain, Louise V; Soler Artigas, María; Melén, Erik; Ushey, Kevin; Hao, Ke; Lamontagne, Maxime; Bossé, Yohan; Postma, Dirkje S; Tobin, Martin D; Sayers, Ian; Hall, Ian P

    2013-01-01

    Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) meta-analyses have identified a strong association signal for lung function, which maps to a region on 4q24 containing two oppositely transcribed genes: glutathione S-transferase, C-terminal domain containing (GSTCD) and integrator complex subunit 12 (INTS12). Both genes were found to be expressed in a range of human airway cell types. The promoter regions and transcription start sites were determined in mRNA from human lung and a novel splice variant was identified for each gene. We obtained the following evidence for GSTCD and INTS12 co-regulation and expression: (i) correlated mRNA expression was observed both via Q-PCR and in a lung expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) study, (ii) induction of both GSTCD and INTS12 mRNA expression in human airway smooth muscle cells was seen in response to TGFβ1, (iii) a lung eQTL study revealed that both GSTCD and INTS12 mRNA levels positively correlate with percent predicted FEV1, and (iv) FEV1 GWAS associated SNPs in 4q24 were found to act as an eQTL for INTS12 in a number of tissues. In fixed sections of human lung tissue, GSTCD protein expression was ubiquitous, whereas INTS12 expression was predominantly in epithelial cells and pneumocytes. During human fetal lung development, GSTCD protein expression was observed to be highest at the earlier pseudoglandular stage (10-12 weeks) compared with the later canalicular stage (17-19 weeks), whereas INTS12 expression levels did not alter throughout these stages. Knowledge of the transcriptional and translational regulation and expression of GSTCD and INTS12 provides important insights into the potential role of these genes in determining lung function. Future work is warranted to fully define the functions of INTS12 and GSTCD.

  15. Nickel accumulation in lung tissues is associated with increased risk of p53 mutation in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Yu-Hu; Wong, Ruey-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Chen, Chih-Yi; Liou, Saou-Hsing; Lee, Huei

    2014-10-01

    Occupational exposure to nickel compounds has been associated with lung cancer. The correlation between high nickel levels and increased risk of lung cancer has been previously reported in a case-control study. This study assessed whether nickel exposure increased the occurrence of p53 mutations due to DNA repair inhibition by nickel. A total of 189 lung cancer patients were enrolled to determine nickel levels in tumor-adjacent normal lung tissues and p53 mutation status in lung tumors through atomic absorption spectrometry and direct sequencing, respectively. Nickel levels in p53 mutant patients were significantly higher than those in p53 wild-type patients. When patients were divided into high- and low-nickel subgroups by median nickel level, the high-nickel subgroup of patients had an odds ratio (OR) of 3.25 for p53 mutation risk relative to the low-nickel subgroup patients. The OR for p53 mutation risk of lifetime non-smokers, particularly females, in the high-nickel subgroup was greater than that in the low-nickel subgroup. To determine whether nickel affected DNA repair capacity, we conducted the host cell reactivation assay in A549 and H1975 lung cancer cells and showed that the DNA repair activity was reduced by nickel chloride in a dose-dependent manner. This was associated with elevated production of hydrogen peroxide-induced 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine. Therefore, increased risk of p53 mutation due to defective DNA repair caused by high nickel levels in lung tissues may be one mechanism by which nickel exposure contributes to lung cancer development, especially in lifetime female non-smokers.

  16. NCI’s Cooperative Human Tissue Network

    Cancer.gov

    Quality biospecimens are a foundational resource for cancer research. One of NCI’s longest running biospecimen programs is the Cooperative Human Tissue Network, a resource mainly for basic discovery and early translational research.

  17. Progressive changes in composition of lymphocytes in lung tissues from patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    del Mar Valenzuela-Membrives, María; Perea-García, Francisco; Sanchez-Palencia, Abel; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco; Gómez-Morales, Mercedes; Miranda-León, María Teresa; Galindo-Angel, Inmaculada; Fárez-Vidal, María Esther

    2016-01-01

    Immune cell infiltration is a common feature of many human solid tumors. Innate and adaptative immune systems contribute to tumor immunosurveillance. We investigated whether tumors evade immune surveillance by inducing states of tolerance and/or through the inability of some immune subpopulations to effectively penetrate tumor nests. Immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry analysis were used to study the composition and distribution of immune subpopulations in samples of peripheral blood, tumor tissue (TT), adjacent tumor tissue (ATT), distant non-tumor tissue (DNTT), cancer nests, cancer stroma, and invasive margin in 61 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. A significantly higher percentage of T and B cells and significantly lower percentage of NK cells were detected in TT than in DNTT. Memory T cells (CD4+CD45RO+, CD8+CD45RO+) and activated T cells (CD8+DR+) were more prevalent in TT. Alongside this immune activation, the percentage of T cells with immunosuppressive activity was higher in TT than in DNTT. B- cells were practically non-existent in tumor nests and were preferentially located in the invasive margin. The dominant NK cell phenotype in peripheral blood and DNTT was the cytotoxic phenotype (CD56+ CD16+), while the presence of these cells was significantly decreased in ATT and further decreased in TT. Finally, the immunologic response differed between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma and according to the tumor differentiation grade. These findings on the infiltration of innate and adaptative immune cells into tumors contribute to a more complete picture of the immune reaction in NSCLC. PMID:27689405

  18. Evidence that human class Theta glutathione S-transferase T1-1 can catalyse the activation of dichloromethane, a liver and lung carcinogen in the mouse. Comparison of the tissue distribution of GST T1-1 with that of classes Alpha, Mu and Pi GST in human.

    PubMed Central

    Sherratt, P J; Pulford, D J; Harrison, D J; Green, T; Hayes, J D

    1997-01-01

    The cDNA encoding human glutathione S-transferase (GST) T1 has been expressed as two recombinant forms in Escherichia coli that could be purified by affinity chromatography on either IgG-Sepharose or nickel-agarose; one form of the transferase was synthesized from the pALP 1 expression vector as a Staphylococcus aureus protein A fusion, whereas the other form was synthesized from the pET-20b expression vector as a C-terminal polyhistidine-tagged recombinant. The yields of the two purified recombinant proteins from E. coli cultures were approx. 15 mg/l for the protein A fusion and 25 mg/l for the C-terminal polyhistidine-tagged GST T1-1. The purified recombinant proteins were catalytically active, although the protein A fusion was typically only 5-30% as active as the histidine-tagged GST. Both recombinant forms could catalyse the conjugation of glutathione with the model substrates 1,2-epoxy-3-(4'-nitrophenoxy)propane,4-nitrobenzyl chloride and 4-nitrophenethyl bromide but were inactive towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, ethacrynic acid and 1-menaphthyl sulphate. Recombinant human GST T1-1 was found to exhibit glutathione peroxidase activity and could catalyse the reduction of cumene hydroperoxide. In addition, recombinant human GST T1-1 was found to conjugate glutathione with dichloromethane, a pulmonary and hepatic carcinogen in the mouse. Immunoblotting with antibodies raised against different transferase isoenzymes showed that GST T1-1 is expressed in a large number of human organs in a tissue-specific fashion that differs from the pattern of expression of classes Alpha, Mu and Pi GST. Most significantly, GST T1-1 was found in only low levels in human pulmonary soluble extract of cells, suggesting that in man the lung has little capacity to activate the volatile dichloromethane. PMID:9307035

  19. Coming to terms with tissue engineering and regenerative medicine in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Lung diseases such as emphysema, interstitial fibrosis, and pulmonary vascular diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality, but despite substantial mechanistic understanding, clinical management options for them are limited, with lung transplantation being implemented at end stages. However, limited donor lung availability, graft rejection, and long-term problems after transplantation are major hurdles to lung transplantation being a panacea. Bioengineering the lung is an exciting and emerging solution that has the ultimate aim of generating lung tissues and organs for transplantation. In this article we capture and review the current state of the art in lung bioengineering, from the multimodal approaches, to creating anatomically appropriate lung scaffolds that can be recellularized to eventually yield functioning, transplant-ready lungs. Strategies for decellularizing mammalian lungs to create scaffolds with native extracellular matrix components vs. de novo generation of scaffolds using biocompatible materials are discussed. Strengths vs. limitations of recellularization using different cell types of various pluripotency such as embryonic, mesenchymal, and induced pluripotent stem cells are highlighted. Current hurdles to guide future research toward achieving the clinical goal of transplantation of a bioengineered lung are discussed. PMID:26254424

  20. Inhaled histamine increases human lung mucociliary transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mussatto, D.J.; Garrard, C.S.; Trumbull, J.J.; Bowers, M.W.; Sanders, C.J.; Yeates, D.B.; Lourenco, R.V.

    1986-03-01

    Histamine, a mediator of airways constriction, alters ciliary beat frequency, bronchial mucus production, and epithelial ion transport; and in dogs, increases mucociliary transport. To evaluate the effect of inhaled histamine on human tracheobronchial mucociliary clearance, the authors measured lung mucociliary clearance (LMC) and tracheal mucociliary transport rate (TMTR) in 5 healthy, nonsmoking subjects in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study. The concentration of inhaled histamine which produced a 20% fall in FEV/sub 1/ was established for each subject. On a separate day the subjects inhaled a 9 ..mu..m MMAD /sup 99m/Tc-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosol. LMC and TMTR were then measured for 2.5h using a gamma camera and a tracheal multidetector probe. Simultaneously, the subjects were challenged every 26 +/- 4 min with either PBS or histamine in PBS. The Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ retained after 24h for histamine (14.4 +/- 7.6%) and PBS studies (13.1 +/- 8.6%) indicated no difference in deposition of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (ANOVA). Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ clearance at 30 min was increased in the histamine studies (61 +/- 21% compared to the PBS studies (44 +/- 29%; p < 0.02, ANOVA)). TMTR was also increased with histamine (7.6 +/- 3.4 mm/min) compared to PBS (4.6 +/- 1.7 mm/min; p < 0.001, ANOVA). Results indicate an acute stimulatory effect of inhaled histamine on mucous transport in humans.

  1. Comparative Microscopic Study of Human and Rat Lungs After Overexposure to Welding Fume

    PubMed Central

    ANTONINI, JAMES M.; ROBERTS, JENNY R.; SCHWEGLER-BERRY, DIANE; MERCER, ROBERT R.

    2015-01-01

    Welding is a common industrial process used to join metals and generates complex aerosols of potentially hazardous metal fumes and gases. Most long-time welders experience some type of respiratory disorder during their time of employment. The use of animal models and the ability to control the welding fume exposure in toxicology studies have been helpful in developing a better understanding of how welding fumes affect health. There are no studies that have performed a side-by-side comparison of the pulmonary responses from an animal toxicology welding fume study with the lung responses associated with chronic exposure to welding fume by a career welder. In this study, post-mortem lung tissue was donated from a long-time welder with a well-characterized work background and a history of extensive welding fume exposure. To simulate a long-term welding exposure in an animal model, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated once a week for 28 weeks by intratracheal instillation with 2 mg of a stainless steel, hard-surfacing welding fume. Lung tissues from the welder and the welding fume-treated rats were examined by light and electron microscopy. Pathological analysis of lung tissue collected from the welder demonstrated inflammatory cell influx and significant pulmonary injury. The poor and deteriorating lung condition observed in the welder examined in this study was likely due to exposure to very high levels of potentially toxic metal fumes and gases for a significant number of years due to work in confined spaces. The lung toxicity profile for the rats treated with welding fume was similar. For tissue samples from both the welder and treated rats, welding particle accumulations deposited and persisted in lung structures and were easily visualized using light microscopic techniques. Agglomerates of deposited welding particles mostly were observed within lung cells, particularly alveolar macrophages. Analysis of individual particles within the agglomerates showed that these

  2. Comparative microscopic study of human and rat lungs after overexposure to welding fume.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Roberts, Jenny R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Mercer, Robert R

    2013-11-01

    Welding is a common industrial process used to join metals and generates complex aerosols of potentially hazardous metal fumes and gases. Most long-time welders experience some type of respiratory disorder during their time of employment. The use of animal models and the ability to control the welding fume exposure in toxicology studies have been helpful in developing a better understanding of how welding fumes affect health. There are no studies that have performed a side-by-side comparison of the pulmonary responses from an animal toxicology welding fume study with the lung responses associated with chronic exposure to welding fume by a career welder. In this study, post-mortem lung tissue was donated from a long-time welder with a well-characterized work background and a history of extensive welding fume exposure. To simulate a long-term welding exposure in an animal model, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated once a week for 28 weeks by intratracheal instillation with 2mg of a stainless steel, hard-surfacing welding fume. Lung tissues from the welder and the welding fume-treated rats were examined by light and electron microscopy. Pathological analysis of lung tissue collected from the welder demonstrated inflammatory cell influx and significant pulmonary injury. The poor and deteriorating lung condition observed in the welder examined in this study was likely due to exposure to very high levels of potentially toxic metal fumes and gases for a significant number of years due to work in confined spaces. The lung toxicity profile for the rats treated with welding fume was similar. For tissue samples from both the welder and treated rats, welding particle accumulations deposited and persisted in lung structures and were easily visualized using light microscopic techniques. Agglomerates of deposited welding particles mostly were observed within lung cells, particularly alveolar macrophages. Analysis of individual particles within the agglomerates showed that these

  3. Biochemical and connective tissue changes in cyclophosphamide-induced lung fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, N; Punithavathi, D; Chandrakasan, G

    1998-10-01

    The present investigation was designed to characterize the biochemical and connective tissue components and to correlate the significance of morphological and biochemical perturbations in cyclophosphamide (CP)-induced lung fibrosis in rats. Lung fibrosis was induced in male Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of 20 mg/100 g body weight of CP, and their pneumotoxic derangements were characterized during an early destructive phase followed by a proliferative and synthetic phase. Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity was higher in CP-treated rats at days 2, 3, 5, 7, and 11, but there was a significant decrease in lung ACE activity during the same time period. Elevated levels of beta-glucuronidase activity were observed in the lung lavage fluid of CP-administered rats days 2, 3, 5, and 7. Lung myeloperoxidase activity was higher in CP rats. Of significance was the presence of collagenase and collagenolytic cathepsin in the lavage fluid of CP rats, when compared with the barely detectable levels in controls. A similar increase in these enzyme activities was also noticed in the lung tissue of CP rats during the same experimental period. Lavage fluid hydroxyproline content was higher in CP rats when compared with controls. Similarly, lung protein and DNA levels were elevated significantly after treatment with CP. The pulmonary histamine and serotonin contents were significantly higher in CP rats. The incorporation of [3H]thymidine into lung total DNA, [3H]proline into lung hydroxyproline, and [35S]sulphate into lung glycosaminoglycan, measured as indicators of lung DNA, collagen, and glycosaminoglycan synthesis, respectively, was also higher in CP groups. Increased levels of hydroxyproline, elastin, hexosamine, total hexose, fucose, sialic acid, and uronic acid in the lungs of rats 14, 28, and 42 days after CP insult were characterized as biomarkers of CP-induced interstitial changes. These findings indicate that CP-induced lung fibrosis results in

  4. Cortisol in human tissues at different stages of life.

    PubMed

    Costa, A; Benedetto, C; Fabris, C; Giraudi, G F; Testori, O; Bertino, E; Marozio, L; Varvello, G; Arisio, R; Ariano, M; Emanuel, A

    1996-01-01

    Aim of the work was to measure the cortisol level in human tissues at different stages of life, by means of radioimmunoassay and by chromatography. Viable samples of 13 different tissues were obtained during surgical intervention from 30 to 70 years old patients of either sex. Mean tissue cortisol concentration was 78 +/- 35 ng/g, ranging from 20 +/- 10 ng/g in the thyroid to 124 +/- 76 ng/g in the kidney. Similar values were measured in the corresponding tissues from not decayed corpses, so that paired values could be mediated. However the pancreas, and corrupted autopsy tissues, gave nil or exceedingly high cortisol concentration values; in some cases, opposite extreme values were measured in different organs of the same body. Cortisol concentration was also measured in 11 sound different tissues of spontaneously aborted or stillbirth fetuses, between 16 and 36 weeks of gestation. Mean value was 63 +/- 27 ng/g, ranging from 30 +/- 25 ng/g in the liver to 104 +/- 52 ng/g in the lungs. Also in fetuses nil or exceedingly high cortisol values occurred in altered tissues. One hundred and fourteen samples of limbs and carcasses of 7 to 12 gestational weeks embryos, obtained from voluntary abortions, were also examined: 20% gave nil result, in the remaining mean cortisol concentration was 32 ng/g. In 33 samples of embryos' mixed viscera, RIA and chromatography gave unreliable exceedingly high values. The nil and the exceedingly high values measured in the altered autoptic tissue specimens were inconsistent with the cortisol blood level measured in the patients, as were those measured in embryonic tissues with the acknowledged blood and adrenals cortisol levels at that stage of life. Thus cortisol may be measured by RIA and by chromatography in sound tissues, while the values obtained in the pancreas, in corrupted tissues, and in embryonal viscera do not represent the hormonal milieu, but are likely artifacts due to impeachment of the diagnostic system.

  5. Melanin content of hamster tissues, human tissues, and various melanomas

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, K.P.; Fairchild, R.G.; Slatkin, D.N.; Greenberg, D.; Packer, S.; Atkins, H.L.; Hannon, S.J.

    1981-02-01

    Melanin content (percentage by weight) was determined in both pigmented and nonpigmented tissues of Syrian golden hamsters bearing Greene melanoma. Melanin content was also measured in various other melanoma models (B-16 in C57 mice, Harding-Passey in BALB/c mice, and KHDD in C3H mice) and in nine human melanomas, as well as in selected normal tissues. The purpose was to evaluate the possible efficacy of chlorpromazine, which is known to bind to melanin, as a vehicle for boron transport in neutron capture therapy. Successful therapy would depend upon selective uptake and absolute concentration of borated compounds in tumors; these parameters will in turn depend upon melanin concentration in melanomas and nonpigmented ''background'' tissues. Hamster whole eyes, hamster melanomas, and other well-pigmented animal melanomas were found to contain 0.3 to 0.8% melanin by weight, whereas human melanomas varied from 0.1 to 0.9% (average, 0.35%). Other tissues, with the exception of skin, were lower in content by a factor of greater than or equal to30. Melanin pigment was extracted from tissues, and the melanin content was determined spectrophotometrically. Measurements were found to be sensitive to the presence of other proteins. Previous procedures for isolating and quantifying melanin often neglected the importance of removing proteins and other interfering nonmelanic substances.

  6. Variation in alternative splicing across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Gene; Holste, Dirk; Kreiman, Gabriel; Burge, Christopher B

    2004-01-01

    Background Alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) is widely used by higher eukaryotes to generate different protein isoforms in specific cell or tissue types. To compare AS events across human tissues, we analyzed the splicing patterns of genomically aligned expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from libraries of cDNAs from different tissues. Results Controlling for differences in EST coverage among tissues, we found that the brain and testis had the highest levels of exon skipping. The most pronounced differences between tissues were seen for the frequencies of alternative 3' splice site and alternative 5' splice site usage, which were about 50 to 100% higher in the liver than in any other human tissue studied. Quantifying differences in splice junction usage, the brain, pancreas, liver and the peripheral nervous system had the most distinctive patterns of AS. Analysis of available microarray expression data showed that the liver had the most divergent pattern of expression of serine-arginine protein and heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein genes compared to the other human tissues studied, possibly contributing to the unusually high frequency of alternative splice site usage seen in liver. Sequence motifs enriched in alternative exons in genes expressed in the brain, testis and liver suggest specific splicing factors that may be important in AS regulation in these tissues. Conclusions This study distinguishes the human brain, testis and liver as having unusually high levels of AS, highlights differences in the types of AS occurring commonly in different tissues, and identifies candidate cis-regulatory elements and trans-acting factors likely to have important roles in tissue-specific AS in human cells. PMID:15461793

  7. MicroRNA Profile of Lung Tumor Tissues Is Associated with a High Risk Plasma miRNA Signature

    PubMed Central

    Fortunato, Orazio; Verri, Carla; Pastorino, Ugo; Sozzi, Gabriella; Boeri, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. Many studies have reported that alterations in miRNA expression are involved in several human tumors. We have previously identified a circulating miRNA signature classifier (MSC) able to discriminate lung cancer with more aggressive features. In the present work, microarray miRNA profiling of tumor tissues collected from 19 lung cancer patients with an available MSC result were perform in order to find a possible association between miRNA expression and the MSC risk level. Eleven tissue mature miRNAs and six miRNA precursors were observed to be associated with the plasma MSC risk level of patients. Not one of these miRNAs was included in the MSC algorithm. A pathway enrichment analysis revealed a role of these miRNA in the main pathways determining lung cancer aggressiveness. Overall, these findings add to the knowledge that tissue and plasma miRNAs behave as excellent diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, which may find rapid application in clinical settings. PMID:27600084

  8. Lung cancer development in patients with connective tissue disease–related interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Yasunori; Inui, Naoki; Yoshimura, Katsuhiro; Nishimoto, Koji; Mori, Kazutaka; Kono, Masato; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Iwashita, Toshihide; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have reported that patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis occasionally develop lung cancer (LC). However, in connective tissue disease (CTD)-related interstitial lung disease (ILD), there are few data regarding the LC development. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical significance of LC development in patients with CTD-ILD. A retrospective review of our database of 562 patients with ILD between 2000 and 2014 identified 127 patients diagnosed with CTD-ILD. The overall and cumulative incidences of LC were calculated. In addition, the risk factors and prognostic impact of LC development were evaluated. The median age at the ILD diagnosis was 63 years (range 37–84 years), and 73 patients (57.5%) were female. The median follow-up period from the ILD diagnosis was 67.4 months (range 10.4–322.1 months). During the period, 7 out of the 127 patients developed LC (overall incidence 5.5%). The cumulative incidences at 1, 3, and 5 years were 0.0%, 1.8%, and 2.9%, respectively. The risk of LC development was significantly higher in patients with higher smoking pack-year (odds ratio [OR] 1.028; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.008–1.049; P = 0.007) and emphysema on chest high-resolution computed tomography (OR 14.667; 95% CI 2.871–74.926; P = 0.001). The median overall survival time after developing LC was 7.0 months (95% CI 4.9–9.1 months), and the most common cause of death was LC, not ILD. According to the Cox proportional hazard model analysis with time-dependent covariates, patients who developed LC showed significantly poorer prognosis than those who did not (hazard ratio 87.86; 95% CI 19.56–394.67; P < 0.001). In CTD-ILD, clinicians should be careful with the risk of LC development in patients with a heavy smoking history and subsequent emphysema. Although not so frequent, the complication could be a poor prognostic determinant. PMID:27977621

  9. Microstructural Analysis of Peripheral Lung Tissue through CPMG Inter-Echo Time R2 Dispersion.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Felix T; Kampf, Thomas; Buschle, Lukas R; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Ziener, Christian H

    2015-01-01

    Since changes in lung microstructure are important indicators for (early stage) lung pathology, there is a need for quantifiable information of diagnostically challenging cases in a clinical setting, e.g. to evaluate early emphysematous changes in peripheral lung tissue. Considering alveoli as spherical air-spaces surrounded by a thin film of lung tissue allows deriving an expression for Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill transverse relaxation rates R2 with a dependence on inter-echo time, local air-tissue volume fraction, diffusion coefficient and alveolar diameter, within a weak field approximation. The model relaxation rate exhibits the same hyperbolic tangent dependency as seen in the Luz-Meiboom model and limiting cases agree with Brooks et al. and Jensen et al. In addition, the model is tested against experimental data for passively deflated rat lungs: the resulting mean alveolar radius of RA = 31.46 ± 13.15 μm is very close to the literature value (∼34 μm). Also, modeled radii obtained from relaxometer measurements of ageing hydrogel foam (that mimics peripheral lung tissue) are in good agreement with those obtained from μCT images of the same foam (mean relative error: 0.06 ± 0.01). The model's ability to determine the alveolar radius and/or air volume fraction will be useful in quantifying peripheral lung microstructure.

  10. Microstructural Analysis of Peripheral Lung Tissue through CPMG Inter-Echo Time R2 Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Felix T.; Kampf, Thomas; Buschle, Lukas R.; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Ziener, Christian H.

    2015-01-01

    Since changes in lung microstructure are important indicators for (early stage) lung pathology, there is a need for quantifiable information of diagnostically challenging cases in a clinical setting, e.g. to evaluate early emphysematous changes in peripheral lung tissue. Considering alveoli as spherical air-spaces surrounded by a thin film of lung tissue allows deriving an expression for Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill transverse relaxation rates R2 with a dependence on inter-echo time, local air-tissue volume fraction, diffusion coefficient and alveolar diameter, within a weak field approximation. The model relaxation rate exhibits the same hyperbolic tangent dependency as seen in the Luz-Meiboom model and limiting cases agree with Brooks et al. and Jensen et al. In addition, the model is tested against experimental data for passively deflated rat lungs: the resulting mean alveolar radius of RA = 31.46 ± 13.15 μm is very close to the literature value (∼34 μm). Also, modeled radii obtained from relaxometer measurements of ageing hydrogel foam (that mimics peripheral lung tissue) are in good agreement with those obtained from μCT images of the same foam (mean relative error: 0.06 ± 0.01). The model’s ability to determine the alveolar radius and/or air volume fraction will be useful in quantifying peripheral lung microstructure. PMID:26544068

  11. Human airway organoid engineering as a step toward lung regeneration and disease modeling.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qi; Choi, Kyoung Moo; Sicard, Delphine; Tschumperlin, Daniel J

    2017-01-01

    Organoids represent both a potentially powerful tool for the study cell-cell interactions within tissue-like environments, and a platform for tissue regenerative approaches. The development of lung tissue-like organoids from human adult-derived cells has not previously been reported. Here we combined human adult primary bronchial epithelial cells, lung fibroblasts, and lung microvascular endothelial cells in supportive 3D culture conditions to generate airway organoids. We demonstrate that randomly-seeded mixed cell populations undergo rapid condensation and self-organization into discrete epithelial and endothelial structures that are mechanically robust and stable during long term culture. After condensation airway organoids generate invasive multicellular tubular structures that recapitulate limited aspects of branching morphogenesis, and require actomyosin-mediated force generation and YAP/TAZ activation. Despite the proximal source of primary epithelium used in the airway organoids, discrete areas of both proximal and distal epithelial markers were observed over time in culture, demonstrating remarkable epithelial plasticity within the context of organoid cultures. Airway organoids also exhibited complex multicellular responses to a prototypical fibrogenic stimulus (TGF-β1) in culture, and limited capacity to undergo continued maturation and engraftment after ectopic implantation under the murine kidney capsule. These results demonstrate that the airway organoid system developed here represents a novel tool for the study of disease-relevant cell-cell interactions, and establishes this platform as a first step toward cell-based therapy for chronic lung diseases based on de novo engineering of implantable airway tissues.

  12. The potential for resident lung mesenchymal stem cells to promote functional tissue regeneration: understanding microenvironmental cues.

    PubMed

    Foronjy, Robert F; Majka, Susan M

    2012-12-01

    Tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are important regulators of tissue repair or regeneration, fibrosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and tumor formation. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are currently being considered and tested in clinical trials as a potential therapy in patients with such inflammatory lung diseases including, but not limited to, chronic lung disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), pulmonary fibrosis (PF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/emphysema and asthma. However, our current understanding of tissue resident lung MSCs remains limited. This review addresses how environmental cues impact on the phenotype and function of this endogenous stem cell pool. In addition, it examines how these local factors influence the efficacy of cell-based treatments for lung diseases.

  13. The accumulation of nickel in human lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Edelman, D.A.; Roggli, V.L. )

    1989-05-01

    Using data from published studies, lung concentrations of nickel were compare for persons with and without occupational exposure to nickel. As expected, the concentrations were much higher for persons with occupational exposure. To estimate the effects of nickel-containing tobacco smoke and nickel in the ambient air on the amount of nickel accumulated in lungs over time, a model was derived that took into account various variables related to the deposition of nickel in lungs. The model predicted nickel concentrations that were in the range of those of persons without known nickel exposure. Nickel is a suspected carcinogen and has been associated with an increased risk of respiratory tract cancer among nickel workers. However, before the nickel content of cigarettes can be implicated in the etiology of lung cancer, further studies are needed to evaluate the independent effects of smoking and exposure to nickel.

  14. The accumulation of nickel in human lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, D A; Roggli, V L

    1989-01-01

    Using data from published studies, lung concentrations of nickel were compare for persons with and without occupational exposure to nickel. As expected, the concentrations were much higher for persons with occupational exposure. To estimate the effects of nickel-containing tobacco smoke and nickel in the ambient air on the amount of nickel accumulated in lungs over time, a model was derived that took into account various variables related to the deposition of nickel in lungs. The model predicted nickel concentrations that were in the range of those of persons without known nickel exposure. Nickel is a suspected carcinogen and has been associated with an increased risk of respiratory tract cancer among nickel workers. However, before the nickel content of cigarettes can be implicated in the etiology of lung cancer, further studies are needed to evaluate the independent effects of smoking and exposure to nickel. PMID:2759060

  15. Optical imaging of tissue mitochondrial redox state in intact rat lungs in two models of pulmonary oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Staniszewski, Kevin; Maleki, Sepideh; Jacobs, Elizabeth R.; Audi, Said; Ranji, Mahsa

    2012-04-01

    Ventilation with enhanced fractions of O2 (hyperoxia) is a common and necessary treatment for hypoxemia in patients with lung failure, but prolonged exposure to hyperoxia causes lung injury. Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury of lung tissue is common in lung transplant or crush injury to the chest. These conditions are associated with apoptosis and decreased survival of lung tissue. The objective of this work is to use cryoimaging to evaluate the effect of exposure to hyperoxia and IR injury on lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in rats. The autofluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are electron carriers in ATP generation. These intrinsic fluorophores were imaged for rat lungs using low-temperature fluorescence imaging (cryoimaging). Perfused lungs from four groups of rats were studied: normoxia (control), control perfused with an mitochondrial complex IV inhibitor (potassium cyanide, KCN), rats exposed to hyperoxia (85% O2) for seven days, and from rats subjected to lung IR in vivo 24 hours prior to study. Each lung was sectioned sequentially in the transverse direction, and the images were used to reconstruct a three-dimensional (3-D) rendering. In KCN perfused lungs the respiratory chain was more reduced, whereas hyperoxic and IR lung tissue have a more oxidized respiratory chain than control lung tissue, consistent with previously measured mitochondrial dysfunction in both hyperoxic and IR lungs.

  16. Linear dimensions and volumes of human lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, David P.

    2012-03-30

    TOTAL LUNG Capacity is defined as “the inspiratory capacity plus the functional residual capacity; the volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration; also equals vital capacity plus residual volume” (from MediLexicon.com). Within the Results and Discussion section of their April 2012 Health Physics paper, Kramer et al. briefly noted that the lungs of their experimental subjects were “not fully inflated.” By definition and failure to obtain maximal inspiration, Kramer et. al. did not measure Total Lung Capacity (TLC). The TLC equation generated from this work will tend to underestimate TLC and does not improve or update total lung capacity data provided by ICRP and others. Likewise, the five linear measurements performed by Kramer et. al. are only representative of the conditions of the measurement (i.e., not at-rest volume, but not fully inflated either). While there was significant work performed and the data are interesting, the data does not represent a maximal situation, a minimal situation, or an at-rest situation. Moreover, while interesting, the linear data generated by this study is limited by the conditions of the experiment and may not be fully comparative with other lung or inspiratory parameters, measures, or physical dimensions.

  17. Linear dimensions and volumes of human lungs

    DOE PAGES

    Hickman, David P.

    2012-03-30

    TOTAL LUNG Capacity is defined as “the inspiratory capacity plus the functional residual capacity; the volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration; also equals vital capacity plus residual volume” (from MediLexicon.com). Within the Results and Discussion section of their April 2012 Health Physics paper, Kramer et al. briefly noted that the lungs of their experimental subjects were “not fully inflated.” By definition and failure to obtain maximal inspiration, Kramer et. al. did not measure Total Lung Capacity (TLC). The TLC equation generated from this work will tend to underestimate TLC and does notmore » improve or update total lung capacity data provided by ICRP and others. Likewise, the five linear measurements performed by Kramer et. al. are only representative of the conditions of the measurement (i.e., not at-rest volume, but not fully inflated either). While there was significant work performed and the data are interesting, the data does not represent a maximal situation, a minimal situation, or an at-rest situation. Moreover, while interesting, the linear data generated by this study is limited by the conditions of the experiment and may not be fully comparative with other lung or inspiratory parameters, measures, or physical dimensions.« less

  18. Human histocultures (tissue explants) in retrovirology

    PubMed Central

    Arakelyan, Anush; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    Summary Viral pathogenesis is studied predominantly in cultures of primary isolated cells or cell lines. Many retroviruses efficiently replicate only in activated cells. Therefore, in order to become efficient viral producers cells should be artificially activated, a procedure which significantly changes cell physiology. However, for many viral diseases, like HIV-1 and other retroviruses’ diseases, critical pathogenic events occur in tissues and cell isolation from their native microenvironment prevents single cell cultures from faithfully reflecting important aspects of cell-cell and cell-pathogen interactions that occur in the context of complex tissue cytoarchitecture. Tissue explants (histocultures) that retain tissue cytoarchitecture and many aspects of cell-cell interactions more faithfully represent in vivo tissue features. Human histocultures constitute an adequate model for studying viral pathogenesis under controlled laboratory conditions. Protocols for various human histocultures as applied to study retroviral pathogenesis, in particular of HIV-1, have been refined by our laboratory and are described in the present publication. Human histocultures of human tonsils and lymph nodes, as well as of recto-sigmoid and cervico-vaginal tissues can be used to study viral transmission, pathogenesis and as a pre-clinical platform for antivirals evaluation. PMID:24158827

  19. Toward in vivo lung's tissue incompressibility characterization for tumor motion modeling in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shirzadi, Zahra; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Samani, Abbas

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: A novel technique is proposed to characterize lung tissue incompressibility variation during respiration. Estimating lung tissue incompressibility parameter variations resulting from air content variation throughout respiration is critical for computer assisted tumor motion tracking. Continuous tumor motion is a major challenge in lung cancer radiotherapy, especially with external beam radiotherapy. If not accounted for, this motion may lead to areas of radiation overdosage for normal tissue. Given the unavailability of imaging modality that can be used effectively for real-time lung tumor tracking, computer assisted approach based on tissue deformation estimation can be a good alternative. This approach involves lung biomechanical model where its fidelity depends on input tissue properties. This investigation shows that considering variable tissue incompressibility parameter is very important for predicting tumor motion accurately, hence improving the lung radiotherapy outcome. Methods: First, an in silico lung phantom study was conducted to demonstrate the importance of employing variable Poisson's ratio for tumor motion predication. After it was established that modeling this variability is critical for accurate tumor motion prediction, an optimization based technique was developed to estimate lung tissue Poisson's ratio as a function of respiration cycle time. In this technique, the Poisson's ratio and lung pressure value were varied systematically until optimal values were obtained, leading to maximum similarity between acquired and simulated 4D CT lung images. This technique was applied in an ex vivo porcine lung study where simulated images were constructed using the end exhale CT image and deformation fields obtained from the lung's FE modeling of each respiration time increment. To model the tissue, linear elastic and Marlow hyperelastic material models in conjunction with variable Poisson's ratio were used. Results: The phantom study showed that

  20. STUDIES ON A LUNG TISSUE COMPONENT WHICH COMBINES WITH PNEUMONIA VIRUS OF MICE (PVM)

    PubMed Central

    Volkert, Mogens; Horsfall, Frank L.

    1947-01-01

    Evidence has been obtained which indicates that the lung tissues of mammalian species susceptible to infection with PVM contain a specific component which combines with the virus. The concentration of this tissue component appears to be directly proportional to the suceptibility of the species; in its absence infection with PVM cannot be established. The available evidence suggests that the presence of the virus-combining component in lung tissue may play a decisive ro1e in the initiation of infection with this pneumotropic virus. PMID:19871686

  1. Differences in Redox Regulatory Systems in Human Lung and Liver Tumors Suggest Different Avenues for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tobe, Ryuta; Carlson, Bradley A.; Tsuji, Petra A.; Lee, Byeong Jae; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Hatfield, Dolph L.

    2015-01-01

    A common characteristic of many cancer cells is that they suffer from oxidative stress. They, therefore, require effective redox regulatory systems to combat the higher levels of reactive oxygen species that accompany accelerated growth compared to the normal cells of origin. An elevated dependence on these systems in cancers suggests that targeting these systems may provide an avenue for retarding the malignancy process. Herein, we examined the redox regulatory systems in human liver and lung cancers by comparing human lung adenocarcinoma and liver carcinoma to their respective surrounding normal tissues. Significant differences were found in the two major redox systems, the thioredoxin and glutathione systems. Thioredoxin reductase 1 levels were elevated in both malignancies, but thioredoxin was highly upregulated in lung tumor and only slightly upregulated in liver tumor, while peroxiredoxin 1 was highly elevated in lung tumor, but downregulated in liver tumor. There were also major differences within the glutathione system between the malignancies and their normal tissues. The data suggest a greater dependence of liver on either the thioredoxin or glutathione system to drive the malignancy, while lung cancer appeared to depend primarily on the thioredoxin system. PMID:26569310

  2. Effect of alloxan-diabetes on multiple forms of hexokinase in adipose tissue and lung

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Patricia; Brown, J.; Walters, Eileen; Greenslade, K.

    1967-01-01

    Comparison has been made of the effect of alloxan-diabetes on the multiple forms of hexokinase (EC 2.7.1.1) in adipose tissue and lung. Types I and II hexokinase were distinguished in adipose tissue by their different stabilities to heat treatment, which made it possible to determine the activity of each form spectrophotometrically; additional confirmatory evidence was obtained from starch-gel electrophoresis. Type II hexokinase was markedly depressed in adipose tissue from alloxan-diabetic rats. Lung contained types I, II and III hexokinase, type I predominating. There was no significant change in the pattern of these multiple forms of hexokinase in lung from alloxan-diabetic rats. These results are discussed in relation to current ideas that the insulin-sensitivity of a tissue may be correlated with the content of type II hexokinase. PMID:16742560

  3. NRF2/miR-140 signaling confers radioprotection to human lung fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Duru, Nadire; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Zhang, Yongshu; Yao, Yuan; Lo, Pang-Kuo; Wolfson, Benjamin; Zhou, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Breast and lung cancer patients who are treated with radiotherapy often have severe side effects, including radiation-induced lung damage and secondary cancers. Activation of the NRF2 pathway is a well-known mechanism that protects cells against radiation induced oxidative stress, but its role in radiation-induced lung damage is not well understood. Using human lung fibroblasts (HLFs) we found that ionizing radiation (IR) leads to BRCA1-dependent activation of NRF2 through the inhibition of KEAP1 function, promoting the nuclear accumulation of NRF2, and activating critical radioprotective mechanisms. We discovered that NRF2 directly binds to the miR-140 promoter and increases its expression in response to IR treatment. Gain and loss of function studies further showed the ability of miR-140 to regulate lung fibroblast self-renewal upon irradiation, a potential mechanism to contribute to the regulation of DNA repair. We verified our in vitro findings using primary lung fibroblast cultures from wild type and Nrf2 (KO) mice. Using these models we showed that IR induces overexpression of Brca1, Nrf2 and miR-140 in lung tissue after irradiation. These data reveal a novel radioprotective mechanism in which IR promotes NRF2 nuclear translocation and subsequent activation of miR-140 transcription in HLFs. PMID:26300493

  4. Multimodal imaging of lung tissue using optical coherence tomography and two photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Maria; Cimalla, Peter; Geissler, Stefan; Meissner, Sven; Schnabel, Christian; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Koch, Edmund

    2012-02-01

    In the context of protective artificial ventilation strategies for patients with severe lung diseases, the contribution of ventilator settings to tissue changes on the alveolar level of the lung is still a question under debate. To understand the impact of respiratory settings as well as the dynamic process of respiration, high-resolution monitoring and visualization of the dynamics of lung alveoli are essential. An instrument allowing 3D imaging of lung tissue as well as imaging of functional constituents, such as elastin fibers, in in situ experimental conditions is presented in this study using a combination of Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) and fiber-guided two photon microscopy. In a comparative study, fixed lung tissue, stained with sulforhodamine B for elastin fibers, was used to illustrate the ability of fiber-guided two photon excitation and single photon excitation for the visualization of elastin fibers within the tissue. Together with the fast 3D imaging capability of OCT, a new tool is given for the monitoring of alveolar lung dynamics in future in vivo experiments.

  5. Human lung hydrolases delineate Mycobacterium tuberculosis-macrophage interactions and the capacity to control infection.

    PubMed

    Arcos, Jesús; Sasindran, Smitha J; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Turner, Joanne; Schlesinger, Larry S; Torrelles, Jordi B

    2011-07-01

    Pulmonary surfactant contains homeostatic and antimicrobial hydrolases. When Mycobacterium tuberculosis is initially deposited in the terminal bronchioles and alveoli, as well as following release from lysed macrophages, bacilli are in intimate contact with these lung surfactant hydrolases. We identified and measured several hydrolases in human alveolar lining fluid and lung tissue that, at their physiological concentrations, dramatically modified the M. tuberculosis cell envelope. Independent of their action time (15 min to 12 h), the effects of the hydrolases on the M. tuberculosis cell envelope resulted in a significant decrease (60-80%) in M. tuberculosis association with, and intracellular growth of the bacteria within, human macrophages. The cell envelope-modifying effects of the hydrolases also led to altered M. tuberculosis intracellular trafficking and induced a protective proinflammatory response to infection. These findings add a new concept to our understanding of M. tuberculosis-macrophage interactions (i.e., the impact of lung surfactant hydrolases on M. tuberculosis infection).

  6. Paraquat increases connective tissue growth factor expression and impairs lung fibroblast proliferation and viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, N; Xie, Y-P; Pang, L; Zang, X-X; Wang, J; Shi, D; Wu, Y; Liu, X-L; Wang, G-H

    2014-12-01

    This in vitro study was designed to investigate the molecular mechanisms of paraquat-induced damage using cultured human fetal lung fibroblasts (MRC-5 cells), in order to promote the development of improved therapies for paraquat poisoning. Paraquat's effects on proliferation were examined by flow cytometry, on viscoelasticity by the micropipette aspiration technique, and on connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Paraquat was found to significantly reduce the proliferation index of MRC-5 cells in a concentration-dependent manner (p < 0.05) and to significantly impair the viscoelastic properties in a time-independent manner (p < 0.05). Exposure to paraquat led to a significant and time-dependent increase in CTGF expression (p < 0.05) and induced changes in the morphology and biomechanical characteristics of the MRC-5 cells. These findings not only provide novel insights into the mechanisms of paraquat-induced lung fibrosis but may represent useful targets of improved molecular-based therapies for paraquat poisoning.

  7. Humanized mice with ectopic artificial liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alice A; Thomas, David K; Ong, Luvena L; Schwartz, Robert E; Golub, Todd R; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2011-07-19

    "Humanized" mice offer a window into aspects of human physiology that are otherwise inaccessible. The best available methods for liver humanization rely on cell transplantation into immunodeficient mice with liver injury but these methods have not gained widespread use due to the duration and variability of hepatocyte repopulation. In light of the significant progress that has been achieved in clinical cell transplantation through tissue engineering, we sought to develop a humanized mouse model based on the facile and ectopic implantation of a tissue-engineered human liver. These human ectopic artificial livers (HEALs) stabilize the function of cryopreserved primary human hepatocytes through juxtacrine and paracrine signals in polymeric scaffolds. In contrast to current methods, HEALs can be efficiently established in immunocompetent mice with normal liver function. Mice transplanted with HEALs exhibit humanized liver functions persistent for weeks, including synthesis of human proteins, human drug metabolism, drug-drug interaction, and drug-induced liver injury. Here, mice with HEALs are used to predict the disproportionate metabolism and toxicity of "major" human metabolites using multiple routes of administration and monitoring. These advances may enable manufacturing of reproducible in vivo models for diverse drug development and research applications.

  8. Comparison of EGFR mutation rates in lung adenocarcinoma tissue and pleural effusion samples.

    PubMed

    Guan, Y; Wang, Z J; Wang, L Q; Hua, D F; Liu, J

    2016-04-04

    The goal of the current study was to investigate the differences in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation rates in tumor tissue and pleural effusion specimens from patients with lung adenocarcinoma. PCR amplification and gene sequencing were used to detect EGFR mutations in exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 in tumor tissue and pleural effusion samples from 50 patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma. The EGFR mutation rate was 34.0% in tissue samples from patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma. There were 11 cases with exon 19 mutations and 6 cases with exon 21 mutations. The EGFR mutation rate was 30.0% in pleural effusion specimens, including 10 cases with exon 19 mutation and 5 cases with exon 21 mutations. Although the tissue samples had a slightly higher mutation rate compared to the pleural effusion samples, the difference was not statistically significant. These results indicate that the EGFR mutation rate detected in pleural effusion specimens from patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma is similar to that detected in tumor tissue samples. Therefore, pleural effusion specimens can potentially be used for EGFR mutation detection in advanced lung adenocarcinoma.

  9. Determination of U in Japanese human tissues by the fission track method

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Y.; Yamakawa, A.; Seki, R.; Ikeda, N.

    1985-11-01

    Uranium in several human tissues (lung, liver, kidney, muscle, spleen, heart, cerebrum and bones) from Japanese in the Tokyo area was determined by the fission track method. The average U content was the highest in lung with 1.70 ppb wet, and decreased in the order of lung greater than bones greater than heart and muscle greater than kidney greater than liver and spleen, showing markedly different tendencies from the description in the 1982 UNSCEAR Report (UNSCEAR82). Correlations were observed between U content in lung and in other tissues. These data suggest that the contribution of inhalation of U to its total intake is not negligible. The total body burden of U for the ICRP Reference Man (ICRP74) was estimated to be about 40 micrograms, which is rather small compared with the average normal burden of 90 micrograms currently accepted by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP79).

  10. Micro FT-IR Characterization Of Human Lung Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Enzo; Teodori, L.; Vergamini, Piergiorgio; Trinca, M. L.; Mauro, F.; Salvati, F.; Spremolla, Giuliano

    1989-12-01

    FT-IR spectroscopy has opened up a new approach to the analytical study of cell transformation. Investigations carried out in normal and leukemic lymphocytes have evidenced an increase in DNA with respect to proteic components in neoplastic cells.(1) The evaluation of the ratio of the integrated areas(A) of the bands at 1080 cm-1 (mainly DNA) and at 1540 cm-1 (proteic components) has allowed us to establish a parameter which indicates, for values above 1.5, the neoplastic nature of cells. Recently, this approach has been applied to the study of human lung tumor cells. Several monocellular suspension procedures of the tissue fragment (mechanical and/or chemical) were tested to obtain reproducible and reliable spectra able to differentiate clearly between normal and patological cells. Chemical treatment (EDTA, Pepsin, Collagenase, etc.) produced additional bands in the spectra of the cells causing distortion of the profiles of some absorptions, and as a result, mechanical treatment was preferred. The normal and neoplastic cells homogeneously distributed by cytospin preparation on BaF2 windows were examined by means of FT-IR microscopy. An examination of several microareas of each sample yielded reproducible spectra, with values of the A 1080 cm-1 / A 1540 cm-1 parameter within a very narrow range for each sample, even if certain differences still remained among the different cases, in good agreement with the results obtained for leukemic cells.(1) The value of this parameter was found to be lower for cells isolated from the normal area of lung, than in the case of those corresponding to the tumoral area, meaning that an increase occurs in DNA with respect to the proteic components. These insights, which provide a basis to obtain indications at the molecular level, can open up new possibilities in clinical practice, in order to obtain diagnosis confirmation, to detect early stages of disease and to offer additional indications in cases of dubious interpretation.

  11. [Biopsy of lung tissue in the diagnosis of disseminated transformations].

    PubMed

    Lewaschow, J N; Orsheschkowskij, O W

    1988-01-01

    The results of complex studies in 440 patients with disseminated processes are presented. In 135 of them the diagnosis was confirmed by clinical, roentgenologic and laboratory data and by biopsies of skin, muscles and subcutaneous lymph nodes. Transbronchial lung biopsy was performed in 218 patients. It gave positive results in 65% of the cases. Open biopsy of lung was performed in 134 cases. Hemodynamic and gas exchange studies during the operation indicated its insignificant traumatism. Complications (limited hemothorax, partial pneumothorax, subcutaneous emphysema, wound suppuration) were noted in 10 (7.5%) cases in the postoperative period. Pulmonary tests performed three weeks after the operation did not reveal significant changes in the subjects, even those with considerable initial disorders. Open biopsy permitted to verify the diagnosis in 131 (98%) patients. In 52% of these cases the diagnosis did not correspond to the presumed one and considerably influenced the subsequent treatment.

  12. Glucocorticoid Clearance and Metabolite Profiling in an In Vitro Human Airway Epithelium Lung Model

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Sarkar, Ujjal; Lever, Amanda R.; Avram, Michael J.; Coppeta, Jonathan R.; Wishnok, John S.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of microphysiologic epithelial lung models using human cells in a physiologically relevant microenvironment has the potential to be a powerful tool for preclinical drug development and to improve predictive power regarding in vivo drug clearance. In this study, an in vitro model of the airway comprising human primary lung epithelial cells cultured in a microfluidic platform was used to establish a physiologic state and to observe metabolic changes as a function of glucocorticoid exposure. Evaluation of mucus production rate and barrier function, along with lung-specific markers, demonstrated that the lungs maintained a differentiated phenotype. Initial concentrations of 100 nM hydrocortisone (HC) and 30 nM cortisone (C) were used to evaluate drug clearance and metabolite production. Measurements made using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography and high-mass-accuracy mass spectrometry indicated that HC metabolism resulted in the production of C and dihydrocortisone (diHC). When the airway model was exposed to C, diHC was identified; however, no conversion to HC was observed. Multicompartmental modeling was used to characterize the lung bioreactor data, and pharmacokinetic parameters, including elimination clearance and elimination half-life, were estimated. Polymerse chain reaction data confirmed overexpression of 11-β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11βHSD2) over 11βHSD1, which is biologically relevant to human lung. Faster metabolism was observed relative to a static model on elevated rates of C and diHC formation. Overall, our results demonstrate that this lung airway model has been successfully developed and could interact with other human tissues in vitro to better predict in vivo drug behavior. PMID:26586376

  13. Glucocorticoid Clearance and Metabolite Profiling in an In Vitro Human Airway Epithelium Lung Model.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Sarkar, Ujjal; Lever, Amanda R; Avram, Michael J; Coppeta, Jonathan R; Wishnok, John S; Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2016-02-01

    The emergence of microphysiologic epithelial lung models using human cells in a physiologically relevant microenvironment has the potential to be a powerful tool for preclinical drug development and to improve predictive power regarding in vivo drug clearance. In this study, an in vitro model of the airway comprising human primary lung epithelial cells cultured in a microfluidic platform was used to establish a physiologic state and to observe metabolic changes as a function of glucocorticoid exposure. Evaluation of mucus production rate and barrier function, along with lung-specific markers, demonstrated that the lungs maintained a differentiated phenotype. Initial concentrations of 100 nM hydrocortisone (HC) and 30 nM cortisone (C) were used to evaluate drug clearance and metabolite production. Measurements made using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography and high-mass-accuracy mass spectrometry indicated that HC metabolism resulted in the production of C and dihydrocortisone (diHC). When the airway model was exposed to C, diHC was identified; however, no conversion to HC was observed. Multicompartmental modeling was used to characterize the lung bioreactor data, and pharmacokinetic parameters, including elimination clearance and elimination half-life, were estimated. Polymerse chain reaction data confirmed overexpression of 11-β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11βHSD2) over 11βHSD1, which is biologically relevant to human lung. Faster metabolism was observed relative to a static model on elevated rates of C and diHC formation. Overall, our results demonstrate that this lung airway model has been successfully developed and could interact with other human tissues in vitro to better predict in vivo drug behavior.

  14. Interactive lung segmentation in abnormal human and animal chest CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Kockelkorn, Thessa T. J. P. Viergever, Max A.; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M.; Bozovic, Gracijela; Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate; Rikxoort, Eva M. van; Brown, Matthew S.; Jong, Pim A. de; Ginneken, Bram van

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Many medical image analysis systems require segmentation of the structures of interest as a first step. For scans with gross pathology, automatic segmentation methods may fail. The authors’ aim is to develop a versatile, fast, and reliable interactive system to segment anatomical structures. In this study, this system was used for segmenting lungs in challenging thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods: In volumetric thoracic CT scans, the chest is segmented and divided into 3D volumes of interest (VOIs), containing voxels with similar densities. These VOIs are automatically labeled as either lung tissue or nonlung tissue. The automatic labeling results can be corrected using an interactive or a supervised interactive approach. When using the supervised interactive system, the user is shown the classification results per slice, whereupon he/she can adjust incorrect labels. The system is retrained continuously, taking the corrections and approvals of the user into account. In this way, the system learns to make a better distinction between lung tissue and nonlung tissue. When using the interactive framework without supervised learning, the user corrects all incorrectly labeled VOIs manually. Both interactive segmentation tools were tested on 32 volumetric CT scans of pigs, mice and humans, containing pulmonary abnormalities. Results: On average, supervised interactive lung segmentation took under 9 min of user interaction. Algorithm computing time was 2 min on average, but can easily be reduced. On average, 2.0% of all VOIs in a scan had to be relabeled. Lung segmentation using the interactive segmentation method took on average 13 min and involved relabeling 3.0% of all VOIs on average. The resulting segmentations correspond well to manual delineations of eight axial slices per scan, with an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.933. Conclusions: The authors have developed two fast and reliable methods for interactive lung segmentation in

  15. Time- and Dose-Dependency of Radiographic Normal Tissue Changes of the Lung After Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hof, Holger; Zgoda, Jacqueline; Nill, Simeon; Hoess, Angelika; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Herfarth, Klaus; Debus, Juergen; Plathow, Christian

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Normal tissue changes (NTC) of the normal lung parenchyma are commonly seen after stereotactic single-dose radiotherapy (radiosurgery) of lung tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent and dynamics of NTCs after radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Fifty lung tumors in 49 patients were treated with radiosurgery. Follow-up CTs were anatomically matched to the treatment planning CTs, incorporating the treatment plan and enabling spatial correlation of initial radiation dose distribution and subsequent NTCs of the lung. Lung parenchyma was divided into nine areas of different radiation dose exposures (range, 6-35 Gy). Areas were investigated and compared at different time points according to the development of NTCs. Results: Twenty-six patients developed NTCs during follow-up. The evaluation of the dependency of the extent of NTCs on the amount of radiation dose lead to a linear model for the fixed effects: Fraction of reacting volume =Intercept{sub T} +0.0208 * Dose ('Dose' should be given in Gy). Dose had a slope of 0.0208 (fraction of normal tissue reaction/Gy) (SE 0.000804, p < 0.0001), implying a significant correlation between dose level and the extent of NTC. Conclusion: For radiosurgery of lung tumors, a significant correlation of radiation dose and the extent of NTCs could be demonstrated. Using the introduced formula, a preview on the extent of NTCs to develop in normal lung parenchyma according to the dose level can be performed.

  16. Histopathology effects of nickel nanoparticles on lungs, liver, and spleen tissues in male mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajdari, Marziyeh; Ziaee Ghahnavieh, Marziyeh

    2014-09-01

    Because of the classification of the nickel compounds as carcinogenic substances, there is a need for in vivo tests to nickel nanoparticles (NiNPs) for observing their effects on health experimentally. Spherical NiNPs with 10 nm in diameter and 75 ppm concentration were applied for investigating their toxicities within male albino mice as an in vivo model. We randomly made sham group, control group, and 75 ppm group (with five animals in each group). Then, the nanoparticles were injected into mice intraperitonealy for 7 days and after that their lungs, liver, and spleen were removed for histopathological observations. At the end of the test, section microscopic observations of liver, spleen, and lung in sham and control groups showed normal tissues but these tissues underwent significant abnormal effects in 75 ppm group. NiNPs can cause undesirable effects in lungs, liver, and spleen tissues with same condition of this study.

  17. Effect of lung flooding and high-intensity focused ultrasound on lung tumours: an experimental study in an ex vivo human cancer model and simulated in vivo tumours in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High-intensity focused ultrasound is a valuable tool for minimally invasive tumour ablation. However, due to the air content in ventilated lungs, lung tumours have never been treated with high-intensity focused ultrasound. Lung flooding enables efficient lung sonography and tumour imaging in ex vivo human and in vivo porcine lung cancer models. The current study evaluates the effectiveness of lung flooding and sonography-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound for lung tumour ablation in ex vivo human and in vivo animal models. Methods Lung flooding was performed in four human lung lobes which were resected from non-small cell lung cancers. B-mode imaging and temperature measurements were simultaneously obtained during high-intensity focused ultrasonography of centrally located lung cancers. The tumour was removed immediately following insonation and processed for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase and H&E staining. In addition, the left lungs of three pigs were flooded. Purified BSA in glutaraldehyde was injected centrally into the left lower lung lobe to simulate a lung tumour. The ultrasound was focused transthoracically through the flooded lung into the simulated tumour with the guidance of sonography. The temperature of the tumour was simultaneously measured. The vital signs of the animal were monitored during the procedure. Results A well-demarcated lesion of coagulation necrosis was produced in four of four human lung tumours. There did not appear to be any damage to the surrounding lung parenchyma. After high-intensity focused ultrasound insonation, the mean temperature increase was 7.5-fold higher in the ex vivo human tumour than in the flooded lung tissue (52.1 K ± 8.77 K versus 7.1 K ± 2.5 K). The transthoracic high-intensity focused ultrasound of simulated tumours in the in vivo model resulted in a mean peak temperature increase up to 53.7°C (±4.5). All of the animals survived the procedure without

  18. The histone demethylase PHF8 is an oncogenic protein in human non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yuzhou; Pan, Xufeng; Zhao, Heng

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • PHF8 overexpresses in human NSCLC and predicts poor survival. • PHF8 regulates lung cancer cell growth and transformation. • PHF8 regulates apoptosis in human lung cancer cells. • PHF8 promotes miR-21 expression in human lung cancer. • MiR-21 is critically essential for PHF8 function in human lung cancer cells. - Abstract: PHF8 is a JmjC domain-containing protein and erases repressive histone marks including H4K20me1 and H3K9me1/2. It binds to H3K4me3, an active histone mark usually located at transcription start sites (TSSs), through its plant homeo-domain, and is thus recruited and enriched in gene promoters. PHF8 is involved in the development of several types of cancer, including leukemia, prostate cancer, and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Herein we report that PHF8 is an oncogenic protein in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). PHF8 is up-regulated in human NSCLC tissues, and high PHF8 expression predicts poor survival. Our in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrate that PHF8 regulates lung cancer cell proliferation and cellular transformation. We found that PHF8 knockdown induces DNA damage and apoptosis in lung cancer cells. PHF8 promotes miR-21 expression in human lung cancer, and miR-21 knockdown blocks the effects of PHF8 on proliferation and apoptosis of lung cancer cells. In summary, PHF8 promotes lung cancer cell growth and survival by regulating miR-21.

  19. Depletion of tissue plasminogen activator attenuates lung ischemia-reperfusion injury via inhibition of neutrophil extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunge; Sharma, Ashish K.; LaPar, Damien J.; Kron, Irving L.; Ailawadi, Gorav; Liu, Yuan; Jones, David R.; Laubach, Victor E.

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury following lung transplantation remains a major source of early morbidity and mortality. Histologically, this inflammatory process is characterized by neutrophil infiltration and activation. We previously reported that lung IR injury was significantly attenuated in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-deficient mice. In this study, we explored the potential role of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in a mouse lung IR injury model. As a result, tPA knockout (KO) mice were significantly protected from lung IR injury through several mechanisms. At the cellular level, tPA KO specifically blocked neutrophil extravasation into the interstitium, and abundant homotypic neutrophil aggregation (HNA) was detected in the lung microvasculature of tPA KO mice after IR. At the molecular level, inhibition of neutrophil extravasation was associated with reduced expression of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 mediated through the tPA/ LDL receptor-related protein/NF-κB signaling pathway, whereas increased P-selectin triggered HNA. At the functional level, tPA KO mice incurred significantly decreased vascular permeability and improved lung function following IR. Protection from lung IR injury in tPA KO mice occurs through a fibrinolysis-independent mechanism. These results suggest that tPA could serve as an important therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of acute IR injury after lung transplantation. PMID:21378024

  20. Energy absorption buildup factors of human organs and tissues at energies and penetration depths relevant for radiotherapy and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Manohara, S R; Hanagodimath, S M; Gerward, L

    2011-11-15

    Energy absorption geometric progression (GP) fitting parameters and the corresponding buildup factors have been computed for human organs and tissues, such as adipose tissue, blood (whole), cortical bone, brain (grey/white matter), breast tissue, eye lens, lung tissue, skeletal muscle, ovary, testis, soft tissue, and soft tissue (4-component), for the photon energy range 0.015-15 MeV and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp (mean free path). The chemical composition of human organs and tissues is seen to influence the energy absorption buildup factors. It is also found that the buildup factor of human organs and tissues changes significantly with the change of incident photon energy and effective atomic number, Z(eff). These changes are due to the dominance of different photon interaction processes in different energy regions and different chemical compositions of human organs and tissues. With the proper knowledge of buildup factors of human organs and tissues, energy absorption in the human body can be carefully controlled. The present results will help in estimating safe dose levels for radiotherapy patients and also useful in diagnostics and dosimetry. The tissue-equivalent materials for skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, cortical bone, and lung tissue are also discussed. It is observed that water and MS20 are good tissue equivalent materials for skeletal muscle in the extended energy range.

  1. The isolation and culture of endothelial colony-forming cells from human and rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Rajesh S; Vadivel, Arul; Zhong, Shumei; Zong, Shumei; McConaghy, Suzanne; Ohls, Robin; Yoder, Mervin C; Thébaud, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Blood vessels are crucial for the normal development, lifelong repair and homeostasis of tissues. Recently, vascular progenitor cell-driven 'postnatal vasculogenesis' has been suggested as an important mechanism that contributes to new blood vessel formation and organ repair. Among several described progenitor cell types that contribute to blood vessel formation, endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) have received widespread attention as lineage-specific 'true' vascular progenitors. Here we describe a protocol for the isolation of pulmonary microvascular ECFCs from human and rat lung tissue. Our technique takes advantage of an earlier protocol for the isolation of circulating ECFCs from the mononuclear cellular fraction of peripheral blood. We adapted the earlier protocol to isolate resident ECFCs from the distal lung tissue. After enzymatic dispersion of rat or human lung samples into a cellular suspension, CD31-expressing cells are positively selected using magnetic-activated cell sorting and plated in endothelial-specific growth conditions. The colonies arising after 1-2 weeks in culture are carefully separated and expanded to yield pure ECFC cultures after a further 2-3 weeks. The resulting cells demonstrate the defining characteristics of ECFCs such as (i) 'cobblestone' morphology of cultured cell monolayers; (ii) acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake and Ulex europaeus lectin binding; (iii) tube-like network formation in Matrigel; (iv) expression of endothelial cell-specific surface markers and the absence of hematopoietic or myeloid surface antigens; (v) self-renewal potential displayed by the most proliferative cells; and (vi) contribution to de novo vessel formation in an in vivo mouse implant model. Assuming typical initial cell adhesion and proliferation rates, the entire procedure can be completed within 4 weeks. Isolation and culture of lung vascular ECFCs will allow assessment of the functional state of these cells in experimental and human

  2. Nuclear distribution of claudin-2 increases cell proliferation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ikari, Akira; Watanabe, Ryo; Sato, Tomonari; Taga, Saeko; Shimobaba, Shun; Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Sugatani, Junko

    2014-09-01

    Claudin-2 is expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma tissue and cell lines, although it is absent in normal lung tissue. However, the role of claudin-2 in cell proliferation and the regulatory mechanism of intracellular distribution remain undefined. Proliferation of human adenocarcinoma A549 cells was decreased by claudin-2 knockdown together with a decrease in the percentage of S phase cells. This knockdown decreased the expression levels of ZONAB and cell cycle regulators. Claudin-2 was distributed in the nucleus in human adenocarcinoma tissues and proliferating A549 cells. The nuclear distribution of ZONAB and percentage of S phase cells were higher in cells exogenously expressing claudin-2 with a nuclear localization signal than in cells expressing claudin-2 with a nuclear export signal. Nuclear claudin-2 formed a complex with ZO-1, ZONAB, and cyclin D1. Nuclear distribution of S208A mutant, a dephosphorylated form of claudin-2, was higher than that of wild type. We suggest that nuclear distribution of claudin-2 is up-regulated by dephosphorylation and claudin-2 serves to retain ZONAB and cyclin D1 in the nucleus, resulting in the enhancement of cell proliferation in lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  3. Immunohistological study of human lungs by immunoperoxidase technique.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, B; Shousha, S; James, K R; Miller, G C

    1982-01-01

    An unlabelled antibody peroxidase-antiperoxidase method for the detection of IgG, IgM, complement (C3 and Clq), fibrinogen and albumin was applied to routinely processed paraffin sections of lung from 27 cases. The results in 11 cases were compared with those obtained by immunofluorescence using frozen sections. Tissue was obtained from surgical specimens of cases with interstitial pneumonia comprising 10 of the usual type (UIP) and three of the desquamative type (DIP). Tissue was also obtained from the specimens of cases with sarcoidosis (two cases) and granulomatous inflammation of unknown cause (one case). There were 11 control cases, nine with primary carcinoma of the lung and two with metastatic tumours of the lung. Immunoglobulins of various types and complement were seen in diseased lung tissue. Although most of these deposits were probably due to a non-immunological mechanism there was evidence of the possible implication of immune complexes in three cases of UIP and in the interstitial pneumonia present in the two cases of sarcoidosis. The immunoperoxidase technique is a more sensitive method than immunofluorescence and has the additional advantage of the easy identification of the precise sites of the various deposits. Images PMID:7040481

  4. Near-affine-invariant texture learning for lung tissue analysis using isotropic wavelet frames.

    PubMed

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Van de Ville, Dimitri; Platon, Alexandra; Geissbuhler, Antoine; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Müller, Henning

    2012-07-01

    We propose near-affine-invariant texture descriptors derived from isotropic wavelet frames for the characterization of lung tissue patterns in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) imaging. Affine invariance is desirable to enable learning of nondeterministic textures without a priori localizations, orientations, or sizes. When combined with complementary gray-level histograms, the proposed method allows a global classification accuracy of 76.9% with balanced precision among five classes of lung tissue using a leave-one-patient-out cross validation, in accordance with clinical practice.

  5. Hair Growth Promoting Potential of Phospholipids Purified from Porcine Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seong-Hyun; Moon, Jeong-Su; Jeon, Byung-Suk; Jeon, Yeon-Jeong; Yoon, Byung-Il; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    BP201, porcine lung tissue-derived phospholipids, consists of phosphatidylcholine as a major phospholipid species. BP201 promoted hair growth after application onto the shaved backs of BALB/c and C3H mice. Its effect was enhanced when applied together with minoxidil (MNX) in C3H mice. When the tissue specimens prepared from the shaved skins of BP201-treated and control mice were microscopically examined, the total numbers of hair follicles in both anagen and telogen phases of BP201-treated mice were significantly higher than those of control mice. The numbers of hair follicles in the anagen phase of BP201-treated mice were also higher than those of control mice. In combination with MNX, BP201 further increased the total number of hair follicles, but did not alter the percentage of hair follicles in the anagenic phase. BP201 also increased the proliferation of human hair follicle dermal papilla cells. Collectively, BP201 possesses hair growth promoting potential, which would suggest its use singly or in combination for hair growth products. PMID:25767686

  6. Viral infection of human lung macrophages increases PDL1 expression via IFNβ.

    PubMed

    Staples, Karl J; Nicholas, Ben; McKendry, Richard T; Spalluto, C Mirella; Wallington, Joshua C; Bragg, Craig W; Robinson, Emily C; Martin, Kirstin; Djukanović, Ratko; Wilkinson, Tom M A

    2015-01-01

    Lung macrophages are an important defence against respiratory viral infection and recent work has demonstrated that influenza-induced macrophage PDL1 expression in the murine lung leads to rapid modulation of CD8+ T cell responses via the PD1 receptor. This PD1/PDL1 pathway may downregulate acute inflammatory responses to prevent tissue damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of PDL1 regulation by human macrophages in response to viral infection. Ex-vivo viral infection models using influenza and RSV were established in human lung explants, isolated lung macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and analysed by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Incubation of lung explants, lung macrophages and MDM with X31 resulted in mean cellular infection rates of 18%, 18% and 29% respectively. Viral infection significantly increased cell surface expression of PDL1 on explant macrophages, lung macrophages and MDM but not explant epithelial cells. Infected MDM induced IFNγ release from autologous CD8+ T cells, an effect enhanced by PDL1 blockade. We observed increases in PDL1 mRNA and IFNβ mRNA and protein release by MDM in response to influenza infection. Knockdown of IFNβ by siRNA, resulted in a 37.5% reduction in IFNβ gene expression in response to infection, and a significant decrease in PDL1 mRNA. Furthermore, when MDM were incubated with IFNβ, this cytokine caused increased expression of PDL1 mRNA. These data indicate that human macrophage PDL1 expression modulates CD8+ cell IFNγ release in response to virus and that this expression is regulated by autologous IFNβ production.

  7. Oxidative damage induced by cigarette smoke exposure in mice: impact on lung tissue and diaphragm muscle*,**

    PubMed Central

    de Carlos, Samanta Portão; Dias, Alexandre Simões; Forgiarini, Luiz Alberto; Patricio, Patrícia Damiani; Graciano, Thaise; Nesi, Renata Tiscoski; Valença, Samuel; Chiappa, Adriana Meira Guntzel; Cipriano, Gerson; de Souza, Claudio Teodoro; Chiappa, Gaspar Rogério da Silva

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate oxidative damage (lipid oxidation, protein oxidation, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances [TBARS], and carbonylation) and inflammation (expression of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin [p-AMPK and p-mTOR, respectively]) in the lung parenchyma and diaphragm muscles of male C57BL-6 mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 7, 15, 30, 45, or 60 days. METHODS: Thirty-six male C57BL-6 mice were divided into six groups (n = 6/group): a control group; and five groups exposed to CS for 7, 15, 30, 45, and 60 days, respectively. RESULTS: Compared with control mice, CS-exposed mice presented lower body weights at 30 days. In CS-exposed mice (compared with control mice), the greatest differences (increases) in TBARS levels were observed on day 7 in diaphragm-muscle, compared with day 45 in lung tissue; the greatest differences (increases) in carbonyl levels were observed on day 7 in both tissue types; and sulfhydryl levels were lower, in both tissue types, at all time points. In lung tissue and diaphragm muscle, p-AMPK expression exhibited behavior similar to that of TBARS. Expression of p-mTOR was higher than the control value on days 7 and 15 in lung tissue, as it was on day 45 in diaphragm muscle. CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that CS exposure produces oxidative damage, not only in lung tissue but also (primarily) in muscle tissue, having an additional effect on respiratory muscle, as is frequently observed in smokers with COPD. PMID:25210964

  8. Alterations of mouse lung tissue dimensions during processing for morphometry: a comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jan Philipp; Ochs, Matthias

    2014-02-15

    Preservation of original tissue dimensions is an essential prerequisite for morphometric studies. Shrinkage occurring during tissue processing for histology may severely influence the appearance of structures seen under the microscope and stereological calculations. Therefore, shrinkage has to be avoided so that estimates obtained by application of unbiased stereology are indeed unbiased. The present study investigates the alterations of tissue dimensions of mouse lung samples during processing for histology. Different fixatives as well as embedding protocols are considered. Mouse lungs were fixed by instillation of either 4% formalin or a mixture of 1.5% glutaraldehyde/1.5% formaldehyde. Tissue blocks were sampled according to principles of stereology for embedding in paraffin, glycol methacrylate without treatment with osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate, and glycol methacrylate including treatment with osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate before dehydration. Shrinkage was investigated by stereological measurements of dimensional changes of tissue cut faces. Results show a shrinkage of the cut face areas of roughly 40% per lung during paraffin embedding, 30% during "simple" glycol methacrylate embedding, and <3% during osmium tetroxide/uranyl acetate/glycol methacrylate embedding. Furthermore, the superiority of the glutaraldehyde-containing fixative regarding shrinkage is demonstrated. In conclusion, the use of a glutaraldehyde-containing fixative and embedding in glycol methacrylate with previous treatment of the samples with osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate before dehydration is recommended for stereological studies of the mouse lung.

  9. Frequency domain optical tomography in human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuqi; Wang, Yao; Pei, Yaling; Zhu, Wenwu; Hu, Jenhun; Barbour, Randall L.

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, a reconstruction algorithm for frequency-domain optical tomography in human tissue is presented. A fast and efficient multigrid finite difference (MGFD) method is adopted as a forward solver to obtain the simulated detector responses and the required imaging operator. The solutions obtained form MGFD method for 3D problems with weakly discontinuous cocoefficients are compared with analyzed solutions to determine the accuracy of the numerical method. Simultaneous reconstruction of both absorption and scattering coefficients for tissue-like media is accomplished by solving a perturbation equation using the Born approximation. This solution is obtained by a conjugate gradient descent method with Tikhonov regularization. Two examples are given to show the quality of the reconstruction results. Both involve the examination of anatomically accurate optical models of tissue derived from segmented 3D magnetic resonance images to which have been assigned optical coefficients to the designated tissue types. One is a map of a female breast containing two small 'added pathologies', such as tumors. The other is a map of the brain containing a 'local bleeding' area, representing a hemorrhage. The reconstruction results show that the algorithm is computationally practical and can yield qualitatively correct geometry of the objects embedded in the simulated human tissue. Acceptable results are obtaiend even when 10% noise is present in the data.

  10. High concentrations of chromium in lung tissue from lung cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Anttila, S.; Kokkonen, P.; Paeaekkoe PRai; Rainio, P.; Kalliomaeki, P.L.P.; Pallon, J.; Malmqvist, K.; Pakarinen, P.; Naentoe, V.Su.; Sutinen, S.

    1989-02-01

    The pulmonary chromium content was determined by plasma atomic emission spectrometer (DCP-AES) from 53 lung cancer and 43 control patients, and compared with smoking habits, severity of emphysema and occupational history. The chromium content from the lung cancer patients was higher than that from the smoking (P less than 0.025) or nonsmoking control patients (6.4 +/- 4.3, 4.0 +/- 4.0, and 2.2 +/- 0.6 microgram/g dry weight, respectively). A positive correlation between the pulmonary chromium and smoking time (P less than 0.025) and the severity of emphysema (P less than 0.001) was found in the control but not in the cancer patients. The difference in the pulmonary chromium content was greatest between those lung cancer and control patients who were light smokers or had mild emphysema. This group of lung cancer patients included subjects with occupational exposure to chromium. The possibility of occupational cancer should be considered especially with light smokers. The grade of emphysema and metals such as chromium accumulating from tobacco could serve as objective indicators of smoking.

  11. Oral recombinant human or mouse lactoferrin reduces Mycobacterium tuberculosis TDM induced granulomatous lung pathology.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shen-An; Kruzel, Marian L; Actor, Jeffrey K

    2017-02-01

    Trehalose 6'6-dimycolate (TDM) is the most abundant glycolipid on the cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). TDM is capable of inducing granulomatous pathology in mouse models that resembles those induced by MTB infection. Using the acute TDM model, this work investigates the effect of recombinant human and mouse lactoferrin to reduce granulomatous pathology. C57BL/6 mice were injected intravenously with TDM at a dose of 25 μg·mouse(-1). At day 4 and 6, recombinant human or mouse lactoferrin (1 mg·(100 μL)(-1)·mouse(-1)) were delivered by gavage. At day 7 after TDM injection, mice were evaluated for lung pathology, cytokine production, and leukocyte populations. Mice given human or mouse lactoferrin had reduced production of IL-12p40 in their lungs. Mouse lactoferrin increased IL-6 and KC (CXCL1) in lung tissue. Increased numbers of macrophages were observed in TDM-injected mice given human or mouse lactoferrin. Granulomatous pathology, composed of mainly migrated leukocytes, was visually reduced in mice that received human or mouse lactoferrin. Quantitation of granulomatous pathology demonstrated a significant decrease in mice given human or mouse lactoferrin compared with TDM control mice. This report is the first to directly compare the immune modulatory effects of both heterologous recombinant human and homologous mouse lactoferrin on the development of TDM-induced granulomas.

  12. Consecutive CT-guided core needle tissue biopsy of lung lesions in the same dog at different phases of radiation-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhongyuan; Deng, Sisi; Liang, Zhiwen; Wang, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    This project aimed to set up a Beagle dog model of radiation-induced lung injury in order to supply fresh lung tissue samples in the different injury phases for gene and protein research. Three dogs received 18 Gy X-ray irradiation in one fraction, another three dogs received 8 Gy in each of three fractions at weekly intervals, and one control dog was not irradiated. Acute pneumonitis was observed during the first 3 months after radiation, and chronic lung fibrosis was found during the next 4–12 months in all the dogs exposed to radiation. CT-guided core needle lung lesion biopsies were extracted from each dog five times over the course of 1 year. The dogs remained healthy after each biopsy, and 50–100 mg fresh lung lesion tissues were collected in each operation. The incidence of pneumothorax and hemoptysis was 20% and 2.8%, respectively, in the 35 tissue biopsies. A successful and stable radiation-induced lung injury dog model was established. Lung lesion tissue samples from dogs in acute stage, recovery stage and fibrosis stage were found to be sufficient to support cytology, genomics and proteomics research. This model safely supplied fresh tissue samples that would allow future researchers to more easily explore and develop treatments for radiation-induced lung injury. PMID:27422930

  13. Biopersistence of man-made vitreous silicate fibers in the human lung.

    PubMed Central

    Sébastien, P

    1994-01-01

    There is now a substantial body of experimental data on the pulmonary biopersistence of man-made vitreous silicate fibers (MMVSF), but human data are seriously lacking. Our knowledge in this field is essentially limited to a few reports of measurements of fibers retained in lung tissue samples taken at autopsy from workers manufacturing these products. Three types of exposure were studied: fibrous glass, mineral wool, and refractory ceramic fibers. Overall, the available data do not provide evidence for substantial long-term retention of fibers in the human lung after occupational exposure to MMVSF dusts. A word of caution, however; the amount of data supporting the previous statement is much greater for fibrous glass than for either mineral wool or refractory ceramic fibers. There is no human data on the key question of the kinetics of pulmonary clearance of inhaled MMVSF. PMID:7882938

  14. Improved OCT imaging of lung tissue using a prototype for total liquid ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, Christian; Meissner, Sven; Koch, Edmund

    2011-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is used for imaging subpleural alveoli in animal models to gain information about dynamic and morphological changes of lung tissue during mechanical ventilation. The quality of OCT images can be increased if the refraction index inside the alveoli is matched to the one of tissue via liquid-filling. Thereby, scattering loss can be decreased and higher penetration depth and tissue contrast can be achieved. Until now, images of liquid-filled lungs were acquired in isolated and fixated lungs only, so that an in vivo measurement situation is not present. To use the advantages of liquid-filling for in vivo imaging of small rodent lungs, it was necessary to develop a liquid ventilator. Perfluorodecalin, a perfluorocarbon, was selected as breathing fluid because of its refraction index being similar to the one of water and the high transport capacity for carbon dioxide and oxygen. The setup is characterized by two independent syringe pumps to insert and withdraw the fluid into and from the lung and a custom-made control program for volume- or pressure-controlled ventilation modes. The presented results demonstrate the liquid-filling verified by optical coherence tomography and intravital microscopy (IVM) and the advantages of liquid-filling to OCT imaging of subpleural alveoli.

  15. Local tissue-weight-based nonrigid registration of lung images with application to regional ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Youbing; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, a new nonrigid image registration method is presented to align two volumetric lung CT datasets with an application to estimate regional ventilation. Instead of the sum of squared intensity difference (SSD), we introduce the sum of squared tissue volume difference (SSTVD) as the similarity criterion to take into account the variation of intensity due to respiration. This new criterion aims to minimize the local difference of tissue volume inside the lungs between two images scanned in the same session or over short periods of time, thus preserving the tissue weight of the lungs. Our approach is tested using a pair of volumetric lung datasets acquired at 15% and 85% of vital capacity (VC) in a single scanning session. The results show that the new SSTVD predicts a smaller registration error and also yields a better alignment of structures within the lungs than the normal SSD similarity measure. In addition, the regional ventilation derived from the new method exhibits a much more improved physiological pattern than that of SSD.

  16. Biopersistence of the mineral matter of coal mine dusts in silicotic human lungs: is there a preferential release of iron?

    PubMed Central

    Tourmann, J L; Kaufmann, R

    1994-01-01

    Toxic potency of quartz-containing dusts, including coal mine dusts, is usually inhibited by protective clay mineral layers on the surface of quartz particles. This investigation of 11 dusts recovered from lungs of coal miners with different silicosis grade shows that such layers persist during long-term contact with human lung tissues. On the other hand, the results suggest that an apparently preferential release of iron occurred in lungs with massive fibrosis. These preliminary results support the hypothesis of an iron-related harmfulness of coal mine dusts. PMID:7882948

  17. Tissue factor as an initiator of coagulation and inflammation in the lung.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Patients with severe infections almost invariably exhibit evidence of activation of the coagulation system. The lungs are amongst the most frequently affected organs during severe infection and sepsis. The abundant presence of intravascular and extravascular fibrin appears to be a specific hallmark of acute lung injury after sepsis. Tissue factor (TF) is regarded to be the primary initiator of coagulation in severe infection. Effective blockade of the TF pathway, either by recombinant TF pathway inhibitor or by anti-TF antibodies in experimental sepsis, attenuates lung injury and partially prevents pulmonary dysfunction. In addition, inhibition of the activity of TF prevents local activation of coagulation in models of pneumonia. The TF pathway can influence inflammatory signaling by activation of protease activated receptor-1 and -2. This review presents the most recent data on the crosstalk between TF-mediated coagulation and inflammation, with a specific emphasis on these processes in the lung.

  18. Next Generation Respiratory Viral Vaccine System: Advanced and Emerging Bioengineered Human Lung Epithelia Model (HLEM) Organoid Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; Schneider, Sandra L.; MacIntosh, Victor; Gibbons, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections, including pneumonia and influenza, are the S t" leading cause of United States and worldwide deaths. Newly emerging pathogens signaled the need for an advanced generation of vaccine technology.. Human bronchial-tracheal epithelial tissue was bioengineered to detect, identify, host and study the pathogenesis of acute respiratory viral disease. The 3-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesechymal tissue-like assemblies (HLEM TLAs) share characteristics with human respiratory epithelium: tight junctions, desmosomes, microvilli, functional markers villin, keratins and production of tissue mucin. Respiratory Syntial Virus (RSV) studies demonstrate viral growth kinetics and membrane bound glycoproteins up to day 20 post infection in the human lung-orgainoid infected cell system. Peak replication of RSV occurred on day 10 at 7 log10 particles forming units per ml/day. HLEM is an advanced virus vaccine model and biosentinel system for emergent viral infectious diseases to support DoD global surveillance and military readiness.

  19. Heme-related gene expression signatures of meat intakes in lung cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Lam, Tram Kim; Rotunno, Melissa; Ryan, Brid M; Pesatori, Angela C; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Spitz, Margaret; Caporaso, Neil E; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Lung cancer causes more deaths worldwide than any other cancer. In addition to cigarette smoking, dietary factors may contribute to lung carcinogenesis. Epidemiologic studies, including the environment and genetics in lung cancer etiology (EAGLE), have reported increased consumption of red/processed meats to be associated with higher risk of lung cancer. Heme-iron toxicity may link meat intake with cancer. We investigated this hypothesis in meat-related lung carcinogenesis using whole genome expression. We measured genome-wide expression (HG-U133A) in 49 tumor and 42 non-involved fresh frozen lung tissues of 64 adenocarcinoma EAGLE patients. We studied gene expression profiles by high-versus-low meat consumption, with and without adjustment by sex, age, and smoking. Threshold for significance was a false discovery rate (FDR) ≤ 0.15. We studied whether the identified genes played a role in heme-iron related processes by means of manually curated literature search and gene ontology-based pathway analysis. We found that gene expression of 232 annotated genes in tumor tissue significantly distinguished lung adenocarcinoma cases who consumed above/below the median intake of fresh red meats (FDR = 0.12). Sixty-three (∼ 28%) of the 232 identified genes (12 expected by chance, P-value < 0.001) were involved in heme binding, absorption, transport, and Wnt signaling pathway (e.g., CYPs, TPO, HPX, HFE, SLCs, and WNTs). We also identified several genes involved in lipid metabolism (e.g., NCR1, TNF, and UCP3) and oxidative stress (e.g., TPO, SGK2, and MTHFR) that may be indirectly related to heme-toxicity. The study's results provide preliminary evidence that heme-iron toxicity might be one underlying mechanism linking fresh red meat intake and lung cancer.

  20. Association between human papillomavirus and EGFR mutations in advanced lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Deng, Fang; Qian, Li-Ting; Meng, Shui-Ping; Zhang, Yang; Shan, Wu-Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Bao-Long

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene in lung cancer patients; however, few studies have investigated this association in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients undergoing gefitinib treatment. The present study investigated the association between HPV and EGFR mutations in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients. A total of 95 advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients were enrolled in the study. The HPV infection status and presence of EGFR mutations in tumor tissue was evaluated. Patient clinical characteristics were also determined and compared with HPV infection and EGFR mutation status to analyze their impact on progression-free survival. HPV DNA was identified in 27/95 (28.4%) lung adenocarcinoma tumors and was most common in patients with lymph node metastasis (P=0.016). A total of 44/95 (46.3%) cases exhibited EGFR mutations, which were predominantly observed in female patients and non-smokers. The presence of HPV DNA was significantly associated with EGFR mutations (P=0.012) and multivariate analysis also revealed that HPV DNA was significantly associated with EGFR mutations (odds ratio=3.971) in advanced lung adenocarcinoma. Patients with both HPV infections and EGFR mutations exhibit a marked decrease in the risk of lung cancer progression when compared with those without HPV infection or EGFR mutations (adjusted HR=0.640; 95% confidence interval: 0.488–0.840; P=0.001). HPV infection was significantly associated with EGFR mutations in advanced lung adenocarcinoma patients. Furthermore, patients with HPV infections exhibited the longest progression-free survival times, which may be due to good response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor- or platinum-based-adjuvant therapy in these patients. Patients with EGFR mutations exhibited a better prognosis when compared with those exhibiting wild-type EGFR, regardless of HPV status. PMID:27602120

  1. Proteinase-3 as the major autoantigen of c-ANCA is strongly expressed in lung tissue of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Brockmann, Holger; Schwarting, Andreas; Kriegsmann, Jörg; Petrow, Peter; Gaumann, Andreas; Müller, Klaus-Michael; Galle, Peter Robert; Mayet, Werner

    2002-01-01

    Proteinase-3 (PR-3) is a neutral serine proteinase present in azurophil granules of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and serves as the major target antigen of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies with a cytoplasmic staining pattern (c-ANCA) in Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). The WG disease appears as severe vasculitis in different organs (e.g. kidney, nose and lung). Little is known about the expression and distribution of PR-3 in the lung. We found that PR-3 is expressed in normal lung tissue and is upregulated in lung tissue of patients with WG. Interestingly, the parenchymal cells (pneumocytes type I and II) and macrophages, and not the neutrophils, express PR-3 most strongly and may contribute to lung damage in patients with WG via direct interaction with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antobodies (ANCA). These findings suggest that the PR-3 expression in parenchymal cells of lung tissue could be at least one missing link in the etiopathogenesis of pulmonary pathology in ANCA-associated disease. PMID:12010574

  2. Mechanism of Tissue Remodeling in Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    acute lung injury have been identified (e.g., infection, trauma ), little is known about the factors that control the tissue remodeling response. This...in fibroblasts. This suggests that the main player in this process is acetaldehyde . To test this, we exposed cells to acetaldehyde and found that this

  3. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A.; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, but whether these possess the attributes required to directly promote the development of Foxp3+ iTreg cells is unclear. Here, we show that lung-resident tissue MØs coexpress TGF-β and retinal dehydrogenases (RALDH1 and RALDH 2) under steady-state conditions and that their sampling of harmless airborne antigen and presentation to antigen-specific CD4 T cells resulted in the generation of Foxp3+ Treg cells. Treg cell induction in this model depended on both TGF-β and retinoic acid. Transfer of the antigen-pulsed tissue MØs into the airways correspondingly prevented the development of asthmatic lung inflammation upon subsequent challenge with antigen. Moreover, exposure of lung tissue MØs to allergens suppressed their ability to generate iTreg cells coincident with blocking airway tolerance. Suppression of Treg cell generation required proteases and TLR-mediated signals. Therefore, lung-resident tissue MØs have regulatory functions, and strategies to target these cells might hold promise for prevention or treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:23547101

  4. Isolation, cultivation and identification of human lung adenocarcinoma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, DE-GENG; JIANG, AI-GUI; LU, HUI-YU; ZHANG, LI-XIN; GAO, XIAO-YAN

    2015-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of studies have demonstrated that lung cancer is a stem cell disease. However, ideal cell surface markers for isolating stem cells in lung cancer are yet to be identified. In the present study, a cell population with a cluster of differentiation (CD)133+ phenotype was successfully isolated from a single cell suspension of lung adenocarcinoma tissue using magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) and enriched in a serum-free culture. In comparison to CD133− cells, the CD133+ cells exhibited an enhanced capacity for self-renewal and differentiation, and a greater potential for in vivo tumor formation, in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. Tumors could be induced in NOD/SCID mice by the transplantation of 102 stem-like cells per mouse. The results of the present study demonstrated that CD133 may serve as a specific cell surface marker for lung adenocarcinoma stem cells, and that MACS combined with serum-free culture is an effective method for isolating and enriching lung cancer stem cells. PMID:25435932

  5. RECONSTRUCTION OF HUMAN LUNG MORPHOLOGY MODELS FROM MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Reconstruction of Human Lung Morphology Models from Magnetic Resonance Images
    T. B. Martonen (Experimental Toxicology Division, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709) and K. K. Isaacs (School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27514)

  6. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF PARTICLE TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION IN HUMAN LUNGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF PARTICLE TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION IN HUMAN LUNGS. Jung-il Choi*, Center for Environmental Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599; C. S. Kim, USEPA National Health and Environmental Effects Research Lab. RTP, NC 27711

    Partic...

  7. Antimicrobial proteins and peptides in human lung diseases: A friend and foe partnership with host proteases.

    PubMed

    Lecaille, Fabien; Lalmanach, Gilles; Andrault, Pierre-Marie

    2016-03-01

    Lung antimicrobial proteins and peptides (AMPs) are major sentinels of innate immunity by preventing microbial colonization and infection. Nevertheless bactericidal activity of AMPs against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is compromised in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis (CF) and asthma. Evidence is accumulating that expression of harmful human serine proteases, matrix metalloproteases and cysteine cathepsins is markedely increased in these chronic lung diseases. The local imbalance between proteases and protease inhibitors compromises lung tissue integrity and function, by not only degrading extracellular matrix components, but also non-matrix proteins. Despite the fact that AMPs are somewhat resistant to proteolytic degradation, some human proteases cleave them efficiently and impair their antimicrobial potency. By contrast, certain AMPs may be effective as antiproteases. Host proteases participate in concert with bacterial proteases in the degradation of key innate immunity peptides/proteins and thus may play immunomodulatory activities during chronic lung diseases. In this context, the present review highlights the current knowledge and recent discoveries on the ability of host enzymes to interact with AMPs, providing a better understanding of the role of human proteases in innate host defense.

  8. Global Gene Expression Profiling in Lung Tissues of Rat Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeshitla, Samrawit A.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Kidane, Yared H.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.; Meyers, Valerie E.; Zhang, Ye

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, potential reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% respirable very fine dust (less than 3 micrometers). The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in lung tissues of rats exposed to lunar dust particles. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 mg/m3 of lunar dust. Animals were euthanized at 1 day and 13 weeks after the last inhalation exposure. After being lavaged, lung tissue from each animal was collected and total RNA was isolated. Four samples of each dose group were analyzed using Agilent Rat GE v3 microarray to profile global gene expression of 44K transcripts. After background subtraction, normalization, and log transformation, t tests were used to compare the mean expression levels of each exposed group to the control group. Correction for multiple testing was made using the method of Benjamini, Krieger, and Yekuteli (1) to control the false discovery rate. Genes with significant changes of at least 1.75 fold were identified as genes of interest. Both low and high doses of lunar dust caused dramatic, dose-dependent global gene expression changes in the lung tissues. However, the responses of lung tissue to low dose lunar dust are distinguished from those of high doses, especially those associated with 61mg/m3 dust exposure. The data were further integrated into the Ingenuity system to analyze the gene ontology (GO), pathway distribution and putative upstream regulators and gene targets. Multiple pathways, functions, and upstream regulators have been identified in response to lunar dust induced damage in the lung tissue.

  9. [Distribution of compact bone mesenchymal stem cells in lung tissue and bone marrow of mouse].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Ping; Wu, Ren-Na; Guo, Yu-Qing; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Hu

    2014-02-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of compact bone mesenchymal stem cells(MSC) marked with lentiviral plasmid pGC FU-RFP-LV in lung tissue and bone marrow of mouse. The MSC were infected by lentivirus with infection efficiency 78%, the infected MSC were injected into BALB/c mice via tail veins in concentration of 1×10(6) /mouse. The mice were randomly divided into 4 group according to 4 time points as 1, 2, 5 and 7 days. The lung tissue and bone marrow were taken and made of frozen sections and smears respectively in order to observed the distributions of MSC. The results indicated that the lentiviral infected MSC displayed phenotypes and biological characteristics which conformed to MSC by immunophenotyping analysis and induction differentiation detection. After the MSC were infected with optimal viral titer MOI = 50, the cell growth no significantly changed; the fluorescent microscopy revealed that the distributions of MSC in bone marrow on day 1, 2, 5 and 7 were 0.50 ± 0.20, 0.67 ± 0.23, 0.53 ± 0.14, 0.33 ± 0.16; those in lung tissue were 0.55 ± 0.15, 0.47 ± 0.13, 0.29 ± 0.13, 0.26 ± 0.08. It is concluded that the distribution of MSC in lung tissue reaches a peak on day 1, while distribution of MSC in bone marrow reaches a peak on day 2. The distribution of mouse MSC relates with RFP gene expression and implantation of MSC in lung tissue and bone marrow.

  10. Tracking lung tissue motion and expansion/compression with inverse consistent image registration and spirometry

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Gary E.; Song, Joo Hyun; Lu, Wei; Naqa, Issam El; Low, Daniel A.

    2007-06-15

    Breathing motion is one of the major limiting factors for reducing dose and irradiation of normal tissue for conventional conformal radiotherapy. This paper describes a relationship between tracking lung motion using spirometry data and image registration of consecutive CT image volumes collected from a multislice CT scanner over multiple breathing periods. Temporal CT sequences from 5 individuals were analyzed in this study. The couch was moved from 11 to 14 different positions to image the entire lung. At each couch position, 15 image volumes were collected over approximately 3 breathing periods. It is assumed that the expansion and contraction of lung tissue can be modeled as an elastic material. Furthermore, it is assumed that the deformation of the lung is small over one-fifth of a breathing period and therefore the motion of the lung can be adequately modeled using a small deformation linear elastic model. The small deformation inverse consistent linear elastic image registration algorithm is therefore well suited for this problem and was used to register consecutive image scans. The pointwise expansion and compression of lung tissue was measured by computing the Jacobian of the transformations used to register the images. The logarithm of the Jacobian was computed so that expansion and compression of the lung were scaled equally. The log-Jacobian was computed at each voxel in the volume to produce a map of the local expansion and compression of the lung during the breathing period. These log-Jacobian images demonstrate that the lung does not expand uniformly during the breathing period, but rather expands and contracts locally at different rates during inhalation and exhalation. The log-Jacobian numbers were averaged over a cross section of the lung to produce an estimate of the average expansion or compression from one time point to the next and compared to the air flow rate measured by spirometry. In four out of five individuals, the average log

  11. Tracking lung tissue motion and expansion/compression with inverse consistent image registration and spirometry.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Gary E; Song, Joo Hyun; Lu, Wei; El Naqa, Issam; Low, Daniel A

    2007-06-01

    Breathing motion is one of the major limiting factors for reducing dose and irradiation of normal tissue for conventional conformal radiotherapy. This paper describes a relationship between tracking lung motion using spirometry data and image registration of consecutive CT image volumes collected from a multislice CT scanner over multiple breathing periods. Temporal CT sequences from 5 individuals were analyzed in this study. The couch was moved from 11 to 14 different positions to image the entire lung. At each couch position, 15 image volumes were collected over approximately 3 breathing periods. It is assumed that the expansion and contraction of lung tissue can be modeled as an elastic material. Furthermore, it is assumed that the deformation of the lung is small over one-fifth of a breathing period and therefore the motion of the lung can be adequately modeled using a small deformation linear elastic model. The small deformation inverse consistent linear elastic image registration algorithm is therefore well suited for this problem and was used to register consecutive image scans. The pointwise expansion and compression of lung tissue was measured by computing the Jacobian of the transformations used to register the images. The logarithm of the Jacobian was computed so that expansion and compression of the lung were scaled equally. The log-Jacobian was computed at each voxel in the volume to produce a map of the local expansion and compression of the lung during the breathing period. These log-Jacobian images demonstrate that the lung does not expand uniformly during the breathing period, but rather expands and contracts locally at different rates during inhalation and exhalation. The log-Jacobian numbers were averaged over a cross section of the lung to produce an estimate of the average expansion or compression from one time point to the next and compared to the air flow rate measured by spirometry. In four out of five individuals, the average log

  12. Optical studies of tissue mitochondrial redox in isolated perfused rat lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, R.; Staniszewski, K.; Jacobs, E. R.; Audi, S.; Ranji, M.

    2012-02-01

    Through the monitoring of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes, NADH (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide) and FAD (Flavoprotein Adenine Dinucleotide), the redox state of metabolism can be probed in real time in many intact organs, but its use has not been fully developed in lungs. The ratio of these fluorophores, (NADH/FAD), referred to as the mitochondrial redox ratio (RR), can be used as a quantitative metabolic marker of tissue. We have designed a fluorometer that can be used to monitor lung surface NADH and FAD fluorescence in isolated perfused lungs. Surface fluorescence NADH and FAD signals were acquired in the absence (control) and presence of pentachlorophenol (PCP), rotenone, and potassium cyanide (KCN). Rotenone, an inhibitor of complex I, increased RR by 18%, predominantly due to an increase in NADH signal. KCN, an inhibitor of complex IV reduced the chain and resulted in an increase of 33% in RR, as a result of 23% increase in NADH and 8% in FAD . PCP, an uncoupler which oxidizes the respiratory chain, decreased RR by 18% as a result of 14% decrease in NADH signal and 4% increase in FAD signal. These results demonstrate the ability of surface fluorometry to detect changes in lung tissue mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused lungs.

  13. Alterations in Tissue Metabolism (The Lung) with Injury and Shock.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-15

    of Insulin Resistance by In Vivo infusion of AT? in Experinental Shock. Surg~ica1 Foruri , itt Press. b. Chaudry , Lii., Sayeed , N.M., and Bauc, A.E...Surgery, 109:349—350, 1974. p. Chaudry, I.H., Sayeed , N .M . , and 8aue,~ A.E.: Insulin Resistance in Experimental Shock. Archives of Surgery, 109:412...determine the effect of In vivo infusion of AT?—~’gCl2 on tissue insulin resistance in shock. The results indicate that insulin resistance can be overcome

  14. New techniques for imaging and analyzing lung tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Roggli, V L; Ingram, P; Linton, R W; Gutknecht, W F; Mastin, P; Shelburne, J D

    1984-01-01

    The recent technological revolution in the field of imaging techniques has provided pathologists and toxicologists with an expanding repertoire of analytical techniques for studying the interaction between the lung and the various exogenous materials to which it is exposed. Analytical problems requiring elemental sensitivity or specificity beyond the range of that offered by conventional scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis are particularly appropriate for the application of these newer techniques. Electron energy loss spectrometry, Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and laser microprobe mass analysis each offer unique advantages in this regard, but also possess their own limitations and disadvantages. Diffraction techniques provide crystalline structural information available through no other means. Bulk chemical techniques provide useful cross-checks on the data obtained by microanalytical approaches. It is the purpose of this review to summarize the methodology of these techniques, acknowledge situations in which they have been used in addressing problems in pulmonary toxicology, and comment on the relative advantages and disadvantages of each approach. It is necessary for an investigator to weigh each of these factors when deciding which technique is best suited for any given analytical problem; often it is useful to employ a combination of two or more of the techniques discussed. It is anticipated that there will be increasing utilization of these technologies for problems in pulmonary toxicology in the decades to come. Images FIGURE 3. A FIGURE 3. B FIGURE 3. C FIGURE 3. D FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 7. A FIGURE 7. B FIGURE 8. A FIGURE 8. B FIGURE 8. C FIGURE 9. A FIGURE 9. B FIGURE 10. PMID:6090115

  15. Distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Dinjens, W N; ten Kate, J; van der Linden, E P; Wijnen, J T; Khan, P M; Bosman, F T

    1989-12-01

    The normal distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in the human body was investigated quantitatively by ADCP-specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) and qualitatively by immunohistochemistry. In these studies we used a specific rabbit anti-human ADCP antiserum. In all 19 investigated tissues, except erythrocytes, ADCP was found by RIA in the soluble and membrane fractions. From all tissues the membrane fractions contained more ADCP (expressed per mg protein) than the soluble fractions. High membrane ADCP concentrations were found in skin, renal cortex, gastrointestinal tract, and prostate. Immunoperoxidase staining confirmed the predominant membrane-associated localization of the protein. In serous sweat glands, convoluted tubules of renal cortex, bile canaliculi, gastrointestinal tract, lung, pancreas, prostate gland, salivary gland, gallbladder, mammary gland, and uterus, ADCP immunoreactivity was found confined to the luminal membranes of the epithelial cells. These data demonstrate that ADCP is present predominantly in exocrine glands and absorptive epithelia. The localization of ADCP at the secretory or absorptive apex of the cells suggests that the function of ADCP is related to the secretory and/or absorptive process.

  16. 3D imaging of lung tissue by confocal microscopy and micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriete, Andres; Breithecker, Andreas; Rau, Wigbert D.

    2001-07-01

    Two complementary techniques for the imaging of tissue subunits are discussed. A computer guided light microscopic imaging technique is described first, which confocally resolves thick serial sections axially. The lateral area of interest is increased by scanning a mosaic of images in each plane. Subsequently, all images are fused digitally to form a highly resolved volume exhibiting the fine structure of complete respiratory units of lung. A different technique described is based on microtomography. This method allows to image volumes up to 3x3x3 cm at a resolution of up to 7 microns. Due to the lack of strong density differences, a contrast enhancement procedure is introduced which makes this technique applicable for the imaging of lung tissue. Imaging, visualization and analysis described here are parts of an ongoing project to model structure and to simulate function of tissue subunits and complete organs.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance in cancer, XII: Application of NMR malignancy index to human lung tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, M.; Koutcher, J. A.; Damadian, R.

    1977-01-01

    Sixty specimens of human lung tissue from 52 individuals were inspected at 22.5 MHz by proton magnetic resonance techniques. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic capabilities of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique for the diagnosis of malignancy. The combination of two NMR parameters (spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times) into a malignancy index yielded 3 cases of overlap between the two populations of tissue. The mean and standard deviations obtained were 1.966 +/- 0.262 for normal tissue, and 2.925 +/- 0.864 for malignant specimens. In addition, analysis of the electrolyte and water content of the tissues confirm that factors other than specimen water content influence the relaxation time. PMID:911662

  18. Mineral fibres, fibrosis, and asbestos bodies in lung tissue from deceased asbestos cement workers.

    PubMed Central

    Albin, M; Johansson, L; Pooley, F D; Jakobsson, K; Attewell, R; Mitha, R

    1990-01-01

    Lung tissue from 76 deceased asbestos cement workers (seven with mesothelioma) exposed to chrysotile asbestos and small amounts of amphiboles, has been studied by transmission electron microscopy, together with lung tissue from 96 controls. The exposed workers with mesothelioma had a significantly higher total content of asbestos fibre in the lungs than those without mesothelioma, who in turn, had higher concentrations than the controls (medians 189, 50, and 29 x 10(6) fibres/g (f/g]. Chrysotile was the major type of fibre. The differences were most pronounced for the amphibole fibres (62, 4.7, and 0.15 f/g), especially crocidolite (54, 1.8 and less than 0.001 f/g), but were evident also for tremolite (2.9, less than 0.001, and less than 0.001 f/g) and anthophyllite (1.7, less than 0.001, and less than 0.001 f/g). For amosite, there was no statistically significant difference between lungs from workers with and without mesothelioma; the lungs of workers had, however, higher concentrations than the controls. Strong correlations were found between duration of exposure and content of amphibole fibres in the lungs. Asbestos bodies, counted by light microscopy, were significantly correlated with the amphibole but not with the chrysotile contents. Fibrosis was correlated with the tremolite but not the chrysotile content in lungs from both exposed workers and controls. Overall, similar results were obtained using fibre counts and estimates of mass. PMID:2173948

  19. Sorption studies of human keratinized tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, G. K.; Martinsen, Ø. G.; Grimnes, Sverre

    2010-04-01

    Water content is known to be the most important single parameter for keratinized tissue to remain its vital functions. In that sense, a general knowledge of the water binding properties is of great interest, and a reliable measurement setup must be found. Also, revealing the sorption properties of human keratinized tissues is vital towards a calibration of susceptance based skin hydration measurements that already is an important diagnostic tool in clinical dermatology, and we will see that any hysteresis will complicate such a calibration further. In this study we investigated the sorption properties of keratinized tissues such as human epidermal stratum corneum (SC), hair and nail. The study was performed under controlled environmental conditions with a dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) instrument, and the water uptake of the keratinized test samples was measured as the relative humidity in the ambient air was altered step-wisely. In this study, vital and characteristic water sorption properties such as the isotherm, relative water uptake, and hysteresis were investigated and will be discussed.

  20. Rapamycin regulates connective tissue growth factor expression of lung epithelial cells via phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuefeng; Wan, Xuan; Geng, Jing; Li, Fei; Yang, Ting; Dai, Huaping

    2013-09-01

    The pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) remains largely unknown. It is believed that IPF is mainly driven by activated alveolar epithelial cells that have a compromised migration capacity, and that also produce substances (such as connective tissue growth factor, CTGF) that contribute to fibroblast activation and matrix protein accumulation. Because the mechanisms regulating these processes are unclear, the aim of this study was to determine the role of rapamycin in regulating epithelial cell migration and CTGF expression. Transformed epithelial cell line A549 and normal human pulmonary alveolar or bronchial epithelial cells were cultured in regular medium or medium containing rapamycin. Real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was employed to determine CTGF mRNA expression. Western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for detecting CTGF protein. Wound healing and migration assays were used to determine the cell migration potential. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β type I receptor (TβRI) inhibitor, SB431542 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, LY294002 were used to determine rapamycin's mechanism of action. It was found that treatment of A549 and normal human alveolar or bronchial epithelial cells with rapamycin significantly promoted basal or TGF-β1 induced CTGF expression. LY294002, not SB431542 attenuated the promotional effect of rapamycin on CTGF expression. Cell mobility was not affected by rapamycin in wound healing and migration assays. These data suggest rapamycin has a profibrotic effect in vitro and underscore the potential of combined therapeutic approach with PI3K and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors for the treatment of animal or human lung fibrosis.

  1. Periostin facilitates eosinophil tissue infiltration in allergic lung and esophageal responses.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C; Mingler, M K; McBride, M; Putnam, P E; Collins, M H; Chang, G; Stringer, K; Abonia, J P; Molkentin, J D; Rothenberg, M E

    2008-07-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein that has been primarily studied in the context of the heart, where it has been shown to promote cardiac repair and remodeling. In this study, we focused on the role of periostin in an allergic eosinophilic inflammatory disease (eosinophilic esophagitis (EE)) known to involve extensive tissue remodeling. Periostin was indeed markedly overexpressed (35-fold) in the esophagus of EE patients, particularly in the papillae, compared with control individuals. Periostin expression was downstream from transforming growth factor-beta and interleukin-13, as these cytokines were elevated in EE esophageal samples and markedly induced periostin production by primary esophageal fibroblasts (107- and 295-fold, respectively, at 10 ng ml(-1)). A functional role for periostin in eliciting esophageal eosinophilia was demonstrated, as periostin-null mice had a specific defect in allergen-induced eosinophil recruitment to the lungs and esophagus (66 and 72% decrease, respectively). Mechanistic analyses revealed that periostin increased (5.8-fold) eosinophil adhesion to fibronectin. As such, these findings extend the involvement of periostin to esophagitis and uncover a novel role for periostin in directly regulating leukocyte (eosinophil) accumulation in T helper type 2-associated mucosal inflammation in both mice and humans.

  2. Mechanical interactions between collagen and proteoglycans: implications for the stability of lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Francisco S A; Ito, Satoru; Brewer, Kelly; Sakai, Hiroaki; Alencar, Adriano M; Almeida, Murilo P; Andrade, José S; Majumdar, Arnab; Ingenito, Edward P; Suki, Béla

    2005-02-01

    Collagen and elastin are thought to dominate the elasticity of the connective tissue including lung parenchyma. The glycosaminoglycans on the proteoglycans may also play a role because osmolarity of interstitial fluid can alter the repulsive forces on the negatively charged glycosaminoglycans, allowing them to collapse or inflate, which can affect the stretching and folding pattern of the fibers. Hence, we hypothesized that the elasticity of lung tissue arises primarily from 1) the topology of the collagen-elastin network and 2) the mechanical interaction between proteoglycans and fibers. We measured the quasi-static, uniaxial stress-strain curves of lung tissue sheets in hypotonic, normal, and hypertonic solutions. We found that the stress-strain curve was sensitive to osmolarity, but this sensitivity decreased after proteoglycan digestion. Images of immunofluorescently labeled collagen networks showed that the fibers follow the alveolar walls that form a hexagonal-like structure. Despite the large heterogeneity, the aspect ratio of the hexagons at 30% uniaxial strain increased linearly with osmolarity. We developed a two-dimensional hexagonal network model of the alveolar structure incorporating the mechanical properties of the collagen-elastin fibers and their interaction with proteoglycans. The model accounted for the stress-strain curves observed under all experimental conditions. The model also predicted how aspect ratio changed with osmolarity and strain, which allowed us to estimate the Young's modulus of a single alveolar wall and a collagen fiber. We therefore identify a novel and important role for the proteoglycans: they stabilize the collagen-elastin network of connective tissues and contribute to lung elasticity and alveolar stability at low to medium lung volumes.

  3. Activated protooncogenes in human lung tumors from smokers.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, S H; Anna, C K; Brown, K C; Wiest, J S; Beattie, E J; Pero, R W; Iglehart, J D; Anderson, M W

    1991-02-15

    Fourteen primary human lung tumor DNAs from smokers were analyzed for transforming activity by two DNA transfection assays. Activated protooncogenes were detected in 3 of 11 tumor DNAs by the NIH 3T3 focus assay, whereas activated protooncogenes were detected in 11 of 13 tumor DNAs by the NIH 3T3 cotransfection-nude mouse tumorigenicity assay. K- or NRAS genes activated by point mutation at codons 12 or 61 were detected in a large cell carcinoma, a squamous cell carcinoma, and 5 adenocarcinomas. An HRAS oncogene activated by a different mechanism was detected in an epidermoid carcinoma. One adenocarcinoma was found to contain an activated RAF gene. Two unidentified transforming genes were detected in a squamous cell carcinoma DNA and two adenocarcinoma DNAs. Eight of 10 lung adenocarcinomas that had formed metastases at the time of surgery were found to contain RAS oncogenes. No significant increase in metastasis was observed in the lung adenocarcinomas that contained one or more 6-kilobase EcoRI alleles of the LMYC gene. Overall, 12 of 14 (86%) of the lung tumor DNAs from smokers were found to contain activated protooncogenes. RAS oncogenes appear to play a role in the development of metastases in lung adenocarcinomas.

  4. Human lung morphology models for particle deposition studies.

    PubMed

    Martonen, T B; Schroeter, J D; Hwang, D; Fleming, J S; Conway, J H

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge of human lung morphology is of paramount importance in calculating deposition patterns of inhaled particulate matter (PM) to be used in the definition of ambient air quality standards. Due to the inherently complex nature of the branching structure of the airway network, practical assumptions must be made for modeling purposes. The most commonly used mathematical models reported in the literature that describe PM deposition use Weibel's model A morphology. This assumes the airways of the lung to be a symmetric, dichotomously branching system. However, computer simulations of this model, when compared to scintigraphy images, have shown it to lack physiological realism (Martonen et al., 1994a). Therefore, a more physiologically realistic model of the lung is needed to improve the current PM dosimetry models. Herein, a morphological model is presented that is based on laboratory data from planar gamma camera and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Key elements of this model include: The parenchymal wall of the lung is defined in mathematical terms, the whole lung is divided into distinct left and right components, a set of branching angles is derived from experimental measurements, and the branching network is confined within the discrete left and right components (i.e., there is no overlapping of airways). In future work, this new, more physiologically realistic morphological model can be used to calculate PM deposition patterns for risk assessment protocols.

  5. Best immunohistochemical panel in distinguishing adenocarcinoma from squamous cell carcinoma of lung: tissue microarray assay in resected lung cancer specimens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jin; Shin, Hyeong Chan; Shin, Kyeong Cheol; Ro, Jae Y

    2013-02-01

    The emergence of the targeted therapies for non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) has generated a need for accurate histologic subtyping of NSCLC. In this study, we assessed the utility of immunohistochemical markers that could be helpful in distinction between adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We performed a battery of immunohistochemistry using tissue microarray for napsin-A, Thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), p63, cytokeratin (CK) 5/6, thrombomodulin (CD141), Epithelial-related antigen (MOC-31), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), high-molecular-weight CK (HMWCK), p27kip1 (p27), and Rb protein in 129 resected primary NSCLC with 81 ADCs and 48 SCCs and 10 metastatic ADC to the lung (primary in colon, 7 cases; stomach, 2 cases; vagina, 1 case). Cases of ADC and SCC were morphologically unequivocal and solid tumors with no definite squamous or glandular differentiation were excluded for this analysis. Napsin-A and TTF-1 were positive in 81% and 70% of ADC and in 0% and 2% of SCC, respectively, whereas P63 and CK5/6 were positive in 91% and 90% of SCC and in 9% and 4% of ADC, respectively (P < .001). CD141 stained significantly higher in SCC over ADC (positive in 2% of ADC and 46% of SCC. MOC-31, CEA, COX-2, HMWCK, p27, and Rb appeared to be not useful markers in distinction between ADC and SCC because of their low specificity. None of metastatic ADC to the lung showed positive for napsin-A and TTF-1. It was evident that combination of napsin-A, TTF-1, CK5/6, and p63 was the best immunohistochemical panel in differentiating ADC from SCC of the lung in this study. CD141 appeared to be a potential new marker for SCC with high specificity. Cyclooxygenase 2, MOC-31, CEA, HMWCK, p27, and Rb showed less specificity for differentiation ADC from SCC.

  6. YBX1 regulates tumor growth via CDC25a pathway in human lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wendan; Li, Jinxiu; Tang, Zhipeng; Yu, Zhenlong; Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Yixiang; Wang, Ziyi; Wang, Peng; Li, Yechi; Li, Fengzhou; Sun, Zhe; Xuan, Yang; Tang, Ranran; Deng, Wu-guo; Guo, Wei; Gu, Chundong

    2016-01-01

    Y-box binding protein 1 (YBX1) is involved in the multi-tumor occurrence and development. However, the regulation of YBX1 in lung tumorigenesis and the underlying mechanisms, especially its relationship with CDC25a, was remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the expression and clinical significance of YBX1 and CDC25a in lung adenocarcinoma and identified their roles in the regulation of lung cancer growth. The retrospective analysis of 116 patients with lung adenocarcinoma indicated that YBX1 was positively correlated with CDC25a expression. The Cox-regression analysis showed only high-ranking TNM stage and low CDC25a expression were an independent risk factor of prognosis in enrolled patients. High expression of YBX1 or CDC25a protein was also observed in lung adenocarcinoma cells compared with HLF cells. ChIP assay demonstrated the binding of endogenous YBX1 to the CDC25a promoter region. Overexpression of exogenous YBX1 up-regulated the expression of the CDC25a promoter-driven luciferase. By contrast, inhibition of YBX1 by siRNA markedly decreased the capability of YBX1 binding to CDC25a promoter in A549 and H322 cells. Inhibition of YBX1 expression also blocked cell cycle progression, suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis via the CDC25a pathway in vitro. Moreover, inhibition of YBX1 by siRNA suppressed tumorigenesis in a xenograft mouse model and down-regulated the expression of YBX1, CDC25a, Ki67 and cleaved caspase 3 in the tumor tissues of mice. Collectively, these results demonstrate inhibition of YBX1 suppressed lung cancer growth partly via the CDC25a pathway and high expression of YBX1/CDC25a predicts poor prognosis in human lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27384875

  7. Optical pathology of human brain metastasis of lung cancer using combined resonance Raman and spatial frequency spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Pu, Yang; Cheng, Gangge; Zhou, Lixin; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Ke; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy has become widely used for diagnostic purpose of breast, lung and brain cancers. This report introduced a new approach based on spatial frequency spectra analysis of the underlying tissue structure at different stages of brain tumor. Combined spatial frequency spectroscopy (SFS), Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopic method is used to discriminate human brain metastasis of lung cancer from normal tissues for the first time. A total number of thirty-one label-free micrographic images of normal and metastatic brain cancer tissues obtained from a confocal micro- Raman spectroscopic system synchronously with examined RR spectra of the corresponding samples were collected from the identical site of tissue. The difference of the randomness of tissue structures between the micrograph images of metastatic brain tumor tissues and normal tissues can be recognized by analyzing spatial frequency. By fitting the distribution of the spatial frequency spectra of human brain tissues as a Gaussian function, the standard deviation, σ, can be obtained, which was used to generate a criterion to differentiate human brain cancerous tissues from the normal ones using Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. This SFS-SVM analysis on micrograph images presents good results with sensitivity (85%), specificity (75%) in comparison with gold standard reports of pathology and immunology. The dual-modal advantages of SFS combined with RR spectroscopy method may open a new way in the neuropathology applications.

  8. Repeated intratracheal instillation of PM10 induces lipid reshaping in lung parenchyma and in extra-pulmonary tissues.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Angela Maria; Corsetto, Paola Antonia; Farina, Francesca; Montorfano, Gigliola; Pani, Giuseppe; Battaglia, Cristina; Sancini, Giulio; Palestini, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Adverse health effects of air pollution attributed mainly to airborne particulate matter have been well documented in the last couple of decades. Short term exposure, referring to a few hours exposure, to high ambient PM10 concentration is linked to increased hospitalization rates for cardiovascular events, typically 24 h after air pollution peaks. Particulate matter exposure is related to pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases, with increased oxidative stress and inflammatory status. Previously, we have demonstrated that repeated intratracheal instillation of PM10sum in BALB/c mice leads to respiratory tract inflammation, creating in lung a condition which could potentially evolve in a systemic toxic reaction. Additionally, plasma membrane and tissue lipids are easily affected by oxidative stress and directly correlated with inflammatory products. With this aim, in the present investigation using the same model, we analyzed the toxic potential of PM10sum exposure on lipid plasma membrane composition, lipid peroxidation and the mechanisms of cells protection in multiple organs such as lung, heart, liver and brain. Obtained results indicated that PM10 exposure led to lung lipid reshaping, in particular phospholipid and cholesterol content increases; concomitantly, the generation of oxidative stress caused lipid peroxidation. In liver we found significant changes in lipid content, mainly due to an increase of phosphatidylcholine, and in total fatty acid composition with a more pronounced level of docosahexaenoic acid; these changes were statistically correlated to lung molecular markers. Heart and brain were similarly affected; heart was significantly enriched in triglycerides in half of the PM10sum treated mice. These results demonstrated a direct involvement of PM10sum in affecting lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in peripheral tissues that might be related to the serious systemic air-pollution effects on human health.

  9. Measurement of the depth-dependent resonance of water-loaded human lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. S.; Rogers, P. H.; Cudahy, E. A.

    2005-04-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the response of the human lung to water-borne sound in the range of 20 to 500 Hz. A small pool inside a hyperbaric chamber was used to simulate four ambient pressure conditions spanning the range of recreational diving depths. Ten subjects were tested on two occasions each using three separate measures to evaluate the response of the subjects' lungs. With some notable exceptions, results were consistent between subjects and between measures. These indicate that human lungs can be reasonably modeled as a lumped single-degree-of-freedom system over the lower portion of the band of interest. Here, the surrounding fluid provides the dominant mass and the dominant stiffness is provided by the entrapped air with a small additional contribution from tissue elasticity. Measured resonances increase with the square root of ambient pressure from an average of 40 Hz with a quality factor of 1.8 at near-surface pressure to 73 Hz with a quality factor of 2.6 at an equivalent depth of 36.4 m. There is evidence of other resonances within or near the band of interest that may be attributable to nonvolumetric chest/lung modes, Helmholtz resonance, and/or resonance of gastrointestinal bubbles. .

  10. Osseous differentiation of human fat tissue grafts: From tissue engineering to tissue differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bondarava, Maryna; Cattaneo, Chiara; Ren, Bin; Thasler, Wolfgang E.; Jansson, Volkmar; Müller, Peter E.; Betz, Oliver B.

    2017-01-01

    Conventional bone tissue engineering approaches require isolation and in vitro propagation of autologous cells, followed by seeding on a variety of scaffolds. Those protracted procedures impede the clinical applications. Here we report the transdifferentiation of human fat tissue fragments retrieved from subcutaneous fat into tissue with bone characteristics in vitro without prior cell isolation and propagation. 3D collagen-I cultures of human fat tissue were cultivated either in growth medium or in osteogenic medium (OM) with or without addition of Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) BMP-2, BMP-7 or BMP-9. Ca2+ depositions were observed after two weeks of osteogenic induction which visibly increased when either type of BMP was added. mRNA levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OCN) increased when cultured in OM alone but addition of BMP-2, BMP-7 or BMP-9 caused significantly higher expression levels of ALP and OCN. Immunofluorescent staining for OCN, osteopontin and sclerostin supported the observed real-time-PCR data. BMP-9 was the most effective osteogenic inducer in this system. Our findings reveal that tissue regeneration can be remarkably simplified by omitting prior cell isolation and propagation, therefore removing significant obstacles on the way to clinical applications of much needed regeneration treatments. PMID:28054585

  11. Discrimination and quantification of autofluorescence spectra of human lung cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Mahya; Khani, Mohammad Mehdi; Khazaei Koohpar, Zeinab; Molik, Paria

    2016-10-01

    To study laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy of the human lung cell line, we evaluated the native fluorescence properties of cancer QU-DB and normal MRC-5 human lung cells during continuous exposure to 405 nm laser light. Two emission bands centered at ~470 nm and ~560 nm were observed. These peaks are most likely attributable to mitochondrial fluorescent reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and riboflavin fluorophores, respectively. This article highlights lung cell autofluorescence characterization and signal discrimination by collective investigation of different spectral features. The absolute intensity, the spectral shape factor or redox ratio, the full width of half-maximum and the full width of quarter maximum was evaluated. Moreover, the intensity ratio, the area under the peak and the area ratio as a contrast factor for normal and cancerous cells were also calculated. Among all these features it seems that the contrast factor precisely and significantly discriminates the spectral differences of normal and cancerous lung cells. On the other hand, the relative quantum yield for both cell types were found by comparing the quantum yield of an unknown compound with known fluorescein sodium as a reference solution.

  12. Noninvasive determination of ozone distribution in the human lung airways

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Shuchieh.

    1991-01-01

    The response of lung epithelium to ozone exposure depends on cell sensitivity as well as on delivered dose. Because lung damage by ozone is site-specific, it was the main objective of this study to develop and utilize a bolus-response method for the noninvasive determination of longitudinal ozone distribution in the human lung. Ozone transport in a rigid single-pathway anatomic model of the lung was simulated numerically by the method of orthogonal collocation on finite elements to predict the data that would be obtained in human subjects. The simulation results provided evidence supporting the safety of the bolus-response technique. A bolus-response inhalation system including a fast-responding chemiluminescent O[sub 3] analyzer and a small-scale O[sub 3] bolus generator was specifically developed for this project. Measurements of ozone absorption were carried out on nine healthy male subjects at a constant inspiratory and expiratory flow of 250 m[ell]/sec as well as elevated respiratory flows ranging from 150 to 1,000 m[ell]/sec. By evaluating the mathematical moments of the inspired bolus and expired response data, the fraction of inhaled ozone that was absorbed was computed in the first 200 m[ell] of the human lung. The resulting data indicated that under quiet breathing conditions, the fraction of inhaled O[sub 3] absorbed by the upper airways is roughly 50%. By increasing the respired flow from 150 to 1,000 m[ell]/sec, the fraction of ozone absorbed into upper airways decreased from 65 to 15%. Virtually all of the remaining O[sub 3] was absorbed in the lower airways.

  13. Aerosol Deposition in the Human Lung in Reduced Gravity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The deposition of aerosol in the human lung occurs mainly through a combination of inertial impaction, gravitational sedimentation, and diffusion. For 0.5- to 5-μm-diameter particles and resting breathing conditions, the primary mechanism of deposition in the intrathoracic airways is sedimentation, and therefore the fate of these particles is markedly affected by gravity. Studies of aerosol deposition in altered gravity have mostly been performed in humans during parabolic flights in both microgravity (μG) and hypergravity (∼1.6G), where both total deposition during continuous aerosol mouth breathing and regional deposition using aerosol bolus inhalations were performed with 0.5- to 3-μm particles. Although total deposition increased with increasing gravity level, only peripheral deposition as measured by aerosol bolus inhalations was strongly dependent on gravity, with central deposition (lung depth<200 mL) being similar between gravity levels. More recently, the spatial distribution of coarse particles (mass median aerodynamic diameter≈5 μm) deposited in the human lung was assessed using planar gamma scintigraphy. The absence of gravity caused a smaller portion of 5-μm particles to deposit in the lung periphery than in the central region, where deposition occurred mainly in the airways. Indeed, 5-μm-diameter particles deposit either by inertial impaction, a mechanism most efficient in the large and medium-sized airways, or by gravitational sedimentation, which is most efficient in the distal lung. On the contrary, for fine particles (∼1 μm), both aerosol bolus inhalations and studies in small animals suggest that particles deposit more peripherally in μG than in 1G, beyond the reach of the mucociliary clearance system. PMID:24870702

  14. The use of an electrothermal bipolar tissue sealing system in the management of lung hydatid disease.

    PubMed

    Santini, Mario; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Milione, Roberta; Vicidomini, Giovanni; Accardo, Marina

    2014-10-01

    Surgery is the treatment of choice for management of pulmonary hydatid cysts. Total pericystectomy provided the best results concerning the recurrence of the disease, but haemorrhagia and air leak during dissection of the pericystic space are the main disadvantages of such a method. To avoid these complications, we proposed the use of an electrothermal bipolar tissue sealing system. After the extraction of the hydatid cyst, a small space is created between the pericyst and normal lung, and the separation between the two zones is joined using the electrothermal bipolar tissue sealing system. This procedure reduces the risk of bleeding and of air leaks because the bronchi and the vessels encountered during dissection are sealed by the electrothermal bipolar tissue sealing system. When the pericystic membrane (inflammatory host reaction) is intimately adherent to the lung, total pericystectomy demands greater technical training because the bronchovascular axes of the healthy segments are situated in the pericyst. In such cases, the electrothermal bipolar tissue sealing system allowed creation of an appropriate plane through the parenchyma close to the pericyst, minimizing the normal lung exposed to resection as much as possible and reducing the resulting bleeding and air leak. This procedure was successfully applied in 4 consecutive patients each with a giant hydatid cyst.

  15. Immunohistochemical detection of IgM and IgG in lung tissue of dogs with leptospiral pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome (LPHS).

    PubMed

    Schuller, Simone; Callanan, John J; Worrall, Sheila; Francey, Thierry; Schweighauser, Ariane; Kohn, Barbara; Klopfleisch, Robert; Posthaus, Horst; Nally, Jarlath E

    2015-06-01

    Leptospiral pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome (LPHS) is a severe form of leptospirosis. Pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. Lung tissues from 26 dogs with LPHS, 5 dogs with pulmonary haemorrhage due to other causes and 6 healthy lungs were labelled for IgG (n=26), IgM (n=25) and leptospiral antigens (n=26). Three general staining patterns for IgG/IgM were observed in lungs of dogs with LPHS with most tissues showing more than one staining pattern: (1) alveolar septal wall staining, (2) staining favouring alveolar surfaces and (3) staining of intra-alveolar fluid. Healthy control lung showed no staining, whereas haemorrhagic lung from dogs not infected with Leptospira showed staining of intra-alveolar fluid and occasionally alveolar septa. Leptospiral antigens were not detected. We conclude that deposition of IgG/IgM is demonstrable in the majority of canine lungs with naturally occurring LPHS, similar to what has been described in other species. Our findings suggest involvement of the host humoral immunity in the pathogenesis of LPHS and provide further evidence to support the dog as a natural disease model for human LPHS.

  16. Comparative Pathobiology of Environmentally Induced Lung Cancers in Humans and Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Pandiri, Arun

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer-related deaths in humans worldwide. Environmental factors play an important role in the epidemiology of these cancers. Rodents are the most common experimental model to study human lung cancers and are frequently used in bioassays to identify environmental exposure hazards associated with lung cancer. Lung tumors in rodents are common, particularly in certain strains of mice. Rodent lung tumors are predominantly bronchioloalveolar carcinomas and usually follow a progressive continuum of hyperplasia to adenoma to carcinoma. Human lung cancers are phenotypically more diverse and broadly constitute 2 types: small cell lung cancers or non-small cell lung cancers. Rodent lung tumors resulting from exposure to environmental agents are comparable to certain adenocarcinomas that are a subset of human non-small cell lung cancers. Human pulmonary carcinomas differ from rodent lung tumors by exhibiting greater morphologic heterogeneity (encompassing squamous cell, neuroendocrine, mucinous, sarcomatoid, and multiple cell combinations), higher metastatic rate, higher stromal response, aggressive clinical behavior, and lack of a clear continuum of proliferative lesions. In spite of these differences, rodent lung tumors recapitulate several fundamental aspects of human lung tumor biology at the morphologic and molecular level especially in lung cancers resulting from exposure to environmental carcinogens. PMID:25351923

  17. The Audible Human Project: Modeling Sound Transmission in the Lungs and Torso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zoujun

    Auscultation has been used qualitatively by physicians for hundreds of years to aid in the monitoring and diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Alterations in the structure and function of the pulmonary system that occur in disease or injury often give rise to measurable changes in lung sound production and transmission. Numerous acoustic measurements have revealed the differences of breath sounds and transmitted sounds in the lung under normal and pathological conditions. Compared to the extensive cataloging of lung sound measurements, the mechanism of sound transmission in the pulmonary system and how it changes with alterations of lung structural and material properties has received less attention. A better understanding of sound transmission and how it is altered by injury and disease might improve interpretation of lung sound measurements, including new lung imaging modalities that are based on an array measurement of the acoustic field on the torso surface via contact sensors or are based on a 3-dimensional measurement of the acoustic field throughout the lungs and torso using magnetic resonance elastography. A long-term goal of the Audible Human Project (AHP ) is to develop a computational acoustic model that would accurately simulate generation, transmission and noninvasive measurement of sound and vibration within the pulmonary system and torso caused by both internal (e.g. respiratory function) and external (e.g. palpation) sources. The goals of this dissertation research, fitting within the scope of the AHP, are to develop specific improved theoretical understandings, computational algorithms and experimental methods aimed at transmission and measurement. The research objectives undertaken in this dissertation are as follows. (1) Improve theoretical modeling and experimental identification of viscoelasticity in soft biological tissues. (2) Develop a poroviscoelastic model for lung tissue vibroacoustics. (3) Improve lung airway acoustics modeling and its

  18. Digital 3D reconstructions using histological serial sections of lung tissue including the alveolar capillary network.

    PubMed

    Grothausmann, Roman; Knudsen, Lars; Ochs, Matthias; Mühlfeld, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Grothausmann R, Knudsen L, Ochs M, Mühlfeld C. Digital 3D reconstructions using histological serial sections of lung tissue including the alveolar capillary network. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 312: L243-L257, 2017. First published December 2, 2016; doi:10.1152/ajplung.00326.2016-The alveolar capillary network (ACN) provides an enormously large surface area that is necessary for pulmonary gas exchange. Changes of the ACN during normal or pathological development or in pulmonary diseases are of great functional impact and warrant further analysis. Due to the complexity of the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the ACN, 2D approaches are limited in providing a comprehensive impression of the characteristics of the normal ACN or the nature of its alterations. Stereological methods offer a quantitative way to assess the ACN in 3D in terms of capillary volume, surface area, or number but lack a 3D visualization to interpret the data. Hence, the necessity to visualize the ACN in 3D and to correlate this with data from the same set of data arises. Such an approach requires a large sample volume combined with a high resolution. Here, we present a technically simple and cost-efficient approach to create 3D representations of lung tissue ranging from bronchioles over alveolar ducts and alveoli up to the ACN from more than 1 mm sample extent to a resolution of less than 1 μm. The method is based on automated image acquisition of serially sectioned epoxy resin-embedded lung tissue fixed by vascular perfusion and subsequent automated digital reconstruction and analysis of the 3D data. This efficient method may help to better understand mechanisms of vascular development and pathology of the lung.

  19. Molecular and histological changes in cerebral cortex and lung tissues under the effect of tramadol treatment.

    PubMed

    Awadalla, Eatemad A; Salah-Eldin, Alaa-Eldin

    2016-08-01

    Tramadol abuse is one of the most frequent health problems in Egypt and worldwide. In most cases, tramadol abused by men face a problem with premature ejaculation. Tramadol like other opioids induces a decrease in plasma antioxidant levels, which may reflect a failure of the antioxidant defense mechanism against oxidative damage. The present work aimed to study the possible deleterious effects of oral administration of tramadol on brain and lung tissues in rats. Twenty adult male albino rats were divided into two groups; a control administered with normal saline and tramadol-treated (40mg/kg b.w.) group for 20 successive days. At the end of experimental period, blood was collected and specimens from brains and lungs were taken for histopathological and molecular studies. Malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities were measured in serum of control and tramadol-treated groups. Brain and lung specimens were histopathological evaluated using light microscopy. The expression levels of apoptotic related genes; Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3 were study in brain and lung tissues using RT-PCR analysis. We recorded a significant increase MDA level, while antioxidant enzymes; GSH, SOD and CAT were significantly decreased after tramadol-treatment. The obtained results revealed that tramadol induced a remarkable histomorphological changes in rats' brains (cerebral cortex and hippocampus) and severe histopathological changes in rats' lung when compared to that of control. On molecular level, the expression of the pro-apoptotic Bax and Caspase-3 showed a significant increase whereas the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 decreased markedly indicating that tramadol is harmful at cellular level and can induce apoptotic changes in brain tissues. Our data confirmed the risk of increased oxidative stress, neuronal and pulmonary damage due to tramadol abuse. Although tramadol is reported to be effective in pain management, its toxicity should

  20. Involvement of alveolar macrophages in the formation of 8-oxodeoxyguanosine associated with exogenous particles in human lungs.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Hiroshi; Sera, Nobuyuki; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2005-10-01

    Lung specimens were collected from 161 non-smoking male patients with carcinoma to determine the deposition of carbon particles and oxidative damage in lung tissues. Morphologically, carbon particles deposited in human lungs with carcinoma were similar to those of diesel exhaust like particles, and mass of particles showed a significant increase with the increasing age of the patients. An increasing age of patient with carcinomas was also associated with 8-oxodeoxy-guanosine (8-oxo-dG) formation, which was analyzed using the HPLC-electrochemical detector method. In addition, it was found that 8-oxo-dG increased in cancerous tissues rather than in non-cancerous ones. To determine whether particles in lung tissues were associated with 8-oxo-dG formation, carbon particles deposited in lung tissues were partially purified by cycling of alkali fusion with 1 M KOH; mutagenic chemicals in particles were extracted and excluded by removal with an equal volume of benzene/methanol and dichloromethane. It was also found that 8-oxo-dG was formed by non-mutagenic particles, and enhanced in the in vivo test using mouse rather than in the in vitro using RAW 254.7 tissue cultured cells. The 8-oxo-dG formation in vivo was due to the fact that hydroxyl radicals might be involved with phagocytosis of non-mutagenic particles in inflammatory cells, and the mutation was induced by hydroxylation of guanine residue on DNA. These results were also demonstrated by the occurrence of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils after intratracheal instillation of particles. These observations suggest that small particles from lung cancer patients further promote oxidative damage when used to treat the mouse lung. Especially, particles from which organic chemicals were removed were highly reactive to oxidative damage and formed 8-oxo-dG.

  1. Conditional overexpression of connective tissue growth factor disrupts postnatal lung development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu; Platteau, Astrid; Chen, Shaoyi; McNamara, George; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Bancalari, Eduardo

    2010-05-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a member of an emerging family of immediate-early gene products that coordinates complex biological processes during development, differentiation, and tissue repair. Overexpression of CTGF is associated with mechanical ventilation with high tidal volume and oxygen exposure in newborn lungs. However, the role of CTGF in postnatal lung development and remodeling is not well understood. In the present study, a double-transgenic mouse model was generated with doxycycline-inducible overexpression of CTGF in respiratory epithelial cells. Overexpression of CTGF from Postnatal Days 1-14 resulted in thicker alveolar septa and decreased secondary septal formation. This is correlated with increased myofibroblast differentiation and disorganized elastic fiber deposition in alveolar septa. Overexpression of CTGF also decreased alveolar capillary network formation. There were increased alpha-smooth muscle actin expression and collagen deposition, and dramatic thickening in the peribronchial/peribronchiolar and perivascular regions in the double-transgenic lungs. Furthermore, overexpression of CTGF increased integrin-linked kinase expression, activated its downstream signaling target, Akt, as well as increased mRNA expression of fibronectin. These data demonstrate that overexpression of CTGF disrupts alveologenesis and capillary formation, and induces fibrosis during the critical period of alveolar development. These histologic changes are similar to those observed in lungs of infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

  2. Interstitial lung disease in connective tissue disease--mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Wells, Athol U; Denton, Christopher P

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary complications are an important extra-articular feature of autoimmune rheumatic diseases and a major cause of mortality. The underlying pathogenesis probably involves multiple cellular compartments, including the epithelium, lung fibroblasts, and the innate and adaptive immune system. Heterogeneity in the extent and progression of lung fibrosis probably reflects differences in underlying pathogenic mechanisms. Growing understanding of the key pathogenic drivers of lung fibrosis might lead to the development of more effective targeted therapies to replicate the treatment advances in other aspects of these diseases. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) in connective tissue disease (CTD) is characterized using the classification of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. Systemic sclerosis is most frequently associated with ILD and, in most of these patients, ILD manifests as a histological pattern of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Conversely, in rheumatoid arthritis, the pattern of ILD is most often usual interstitial pneumonia. The key goals of clinical assessment of patients with both ILD and CTD are the detection of ILD and prognostic evaluation to determine which patients should be treated. Data from treatment trials in systemic sclerosis support the use of immunosuppressive therapy, with the treatment benefit largely relating to the prevention of progression of lung disease.

  3. Interstitial lung disease in connective tissue diseases: evolving concepts of pathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a challenging clinical entity associated with multiple connective tissue diseases, and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Effective therapies for connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease (CTD-ILD) are still lacking. Multidisciplinary clinics dedicated to the early diagnosis and improved management of patients with CTD-ILD are now being established. There is rapid progress in understanding and identifying the effector cells, the proinflammatory and profibrotic mediators, and the pathways involved in the pathogenesis of CTD-ILD. Serum biomarkers may provide new insights as risk factors for pulmonary fibrosis and as measures of disease progression. Despite these recent advances, the management of patients with CTD-ILD remains suboptimal. Further studies are therefore urgently needed to better understand these conditions, and to develop effective therapeutic interventions. PMID:20735863

  4. Hippocampus and epilepsy: findings from human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Huberfeld, Gilles; Blauwblomme, Thomas; Miles, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Surgical removal of the epileptogenic zone provides an effective therapy for several epileptic syndromes. This surgery offers the opportunity to study pathological activity in living human tissue for pharmacoresistant partial epilepsy syndromes including (1) temporal lobe epilepsies with hippocampal sclerosis, (2) cortical dysplasias, (3) epilepsies associated with tumors and (4) developmental malformations. Slices of tissue from patient with these syndromes retain functional neuronal networks and may generate epileptic activities. The properties of cells in this tissue may not be greatly changed, but excitatory synaptic transmission is often enhanced and GABAergic inhibition is preserved. Typically epileptic activity is not generated spontaneously by the neocortex, whether dysplastic or not, but can be induced by convulsants. The initiation of ictal discharges in neocortex depends on both GABAergic signaling and increased extracellular potassium. In contrast, a spontaneous interictal-like activity is generated by tissues from patients with temporal lobe epilepsies associated with hippocampal sclerosis. This activity is initiated, not in the hippocampus but in the subiculum an output region which projects to the entorhinal cortex. Interictal events seem to be triggered by GABAergic cells which paradoxically excite about 20% of subicular pyramidal cells while simultaneously inhibiting the majority. Interictal discharges thus depend on both GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling. The depolarizing effects of GABA depend on a pathological elevation in levels of chloride in some subicular cells, similar to those of developmentally immature cells. Such defect is caused by a perturbed expression of the cotransporters regulating intracellular chloride concentration, the importer NKCC1 and the extruder KCC2. Blockade of NKCC1 actions by the diuretic bumetanide, restores intracellular chloride and thus hyperpolarizing GABAergic actions so suppressing interictal activity. PMID

  5. Mechanism of Tissue Remodeling in Sepsis-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    identified (e.g., infection, trauma ), little is known about the factors that control the tissue remodeling response. This project addresses this very...induced fibronectin expression in fibroblasts. This suggests that the main player in this process is acetaldehyde . To test this, we exposed cells...to acetaldehyde and found that this molecule indeed stimulated fibronectin expression. The latter observation suggests that lung fibroblasts contain

  6. Development of an inhalable, stimuli-responsive particulate system for delivery to deep lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Yasmine; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Tammam, Salma; Lamprecht, Alf; Ali, Mohamed Ehab; Schmidt, Annette; Sollazzo, Silvio; Mathur, Sanjay

    2016-10-01

    Lung cancer, the deadliest solid tumor among all types of cancer, remains difficult to treat. This is a result of unavoidable exposure to carcinogens, poor diagnosis, the lack of targeted drug delivery platforms and limitations associated with delivery of drug to deep lung tissues. Development of a non-invasive, patient-convenient formula for the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutics to cancer in deep lung tissue is the aim of this study. The formulation consisted of inhalable polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/maltodextrin (MD)-based microparticles (MPs) encapsulating chitosan (CS) nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with either drug only or drug and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Drug release from CS NPs was enhanced with the aid of MNPs by a factor of 1.7 in response to external magnetic field. Preferential toxicity by CS NPs was shown towards tumor cells (A549) in comparison to cultured fibroblasts (L929). The prepared spray freeze dried (SFD) powders for CS NPs and CS MNPs were of the same size at ∼6μm. They had a fine particle fraction (FPF≤5.2μm) of 40-42% w/w and mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 5-6μm as determined by the Next Generation Impactor (NGI). SFD-MPs of CS MNPs possess higher MMAD due to the high density associated with encapsulated MNPs. The developed formulation demonstrates several capabilities including tissue targeting, controlled drug release, and the possible imaging and diagnostic values (due to its MNPs content) and therefore represents an improved therapeutic platform for drug delivery to cancer in deep lung tissue.

  7. Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis organisms for 8 days in fresh lung tissue from an exhumed body.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Kurt B

    2005-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated from the lung tissue of an 86-year-old unembalmed woman who was exhumed for an autopsy 8 days after her death. Autopsy prosectors should consider performing microbiological culture in all cases with a history or gross pathological findings suggestive of an infection even if the postmortem interval is extended. In addition, prosectors should still adhere to biosafety precautions for airborne pathogens, because a long postmortem interval does not necessarily provide assurance that these organisms are not viable.

  8. C-reactive protein modulates human lung fibroblast migration.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kazuhiko; Kohyama, Tadashi; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Kato, Jun; Takami, Kazutaka; Okazaki, Hitoshi; Desaki, Masashi; Nagase, Takahide; Rennard, Stephen I; Takizawa, Hajime

    2009-02-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has been classically used as a marker of inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CRP on migration of human fetal lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) to human plasma fibronectin (HFn). Using the blindwell chamber technique, CRP inhibited HFL-1 migration in a dose-dependent fashion (at 1 microg/mL, inhibition: 32.5% +/- 7.1%; P < .05). Western blot analysis showed that CRP inhibited the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity in the presence of HFn. Moreover, the MAPK inhibitors SB202190 (25 microM) and SB203580 (25 microM) inhibited HFn-induced cell migration, suggesting an important role of p38 MAPK in HFn-induced migration. Taken together, these results suggest that the inhibitory effect of CRP is mediated by blocking MAPK. In summary, this study demonstrates that CRP directly modulates human lung fibroblasts migration. Thus, CRP may contribute to regulation of wound healing and may be endogenous antifibrotic factor acting on lung fibrosis.

  9. Microarray expression profiles of genes in lung tissues of rats subjected to focal cerebral ischemia-induced lung injury following bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yue; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Zhang, Piao; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Ischemia-induced stroke is the most common disease of the nervous system and is associated with a high mortality rate worldwide. Cerebral ischemia may lead to remote organ dysfunction, particular in the lungs, resulting in lung injury. Nowadays, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are widely studied in clinical trials as they may provide an effective solution to the treatment of neurological and cardiac diseases; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, a model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia-induced lung injury was successfully established and confirmed by neurological evaluation and lung injury scores. We demonstrated that the transplantation of BMSCs (passage 3) via the tail vein into the lung tissues attenuated lung injury. In order to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms, we analyzed the gene expression profiles in lung tissues from the rats with focal cerebral ischemia and transplanted with BMSCs using a Gene microarray. Moreover, the Gene Ontology database was employed to determine gene function. We found that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT signaling pathway, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) were downregulated in the BMSC transplantation groups, compared with the control group. These results suggested that BMSC transplantation may attenuate lung injury following focal cerebral ischemia and that this effect is associated with the downregulation of TGF-β, PDGF and the PI3K-AKT pathway. PMID:27922691

  10. Microarray expression profiles of genes in lung tissues of rats subjected to focal cerebral ischemia-induced lung injury following bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Zhang, Piao; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Ischemia-induced stroke is the most common disease of the nervous system and is associated with a high mortality rate worldwide. Cerebral ischemia may lead to remote organ dysfunction, particular in the lungs, resulting in lung injury. Nowadays, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are widely studied in clinical trials as they may provide an effective solution to the treatment of neurological and cardiac diseases; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, a model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia-induced lung injury was successfully established and confirmed by neurological evaluation and lung injury scores. We demonstrated that the transplantation of BMSCs (passage 3) via the tail vein into the lung tissues attenuated lung injury. In order to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms, we analyzed the gene expression profiles in lung tissues from the rats with focal cerebral ischemia and transplanted with BMSCs using a Gene microarray. Moreover, the Gene Ontology database was employed to determine gene function. We found that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT signaling pathway, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) were downregulated in the BMSC transplantation groups, compared with the control group. These results suggested that BMSC transplantation may attenuate lung injury following focal cerebral ischemia and that this effect is associated with the downregulation of TGF-β, PDGF and the PI3K-AKT pathway.

  11. Activation of proto-oncogenes in human and mouse lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.H.; Anderson, M.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in several nations. Epidemiological studies have indicated that 85% of all lung cancer deaths and 30% of all cancer deaths in the US are associated with tobacco smoking. Various chemicals in tobacco smoke are thought to react with DNA and to ultimately yield heritable mutations. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung tumorigenesis, the authors have analyzed proto-oncogene activation in a series of human lung tumors from smokers and spontaneously occurring and chemically induced lung tumors in mice. Approximately 86% of the human lung tumors and > 90% of the mouse lung tumors were found to contain activated oncogenes. ras Oncogenes activated by point mutations were detected in many of the human lung adenocarcinomas and virtually all of the mouse lung adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The mutation profiles of the activated K-ras genes detected in the chemically induced mouse lung tumors suggest that the observed mutations result from genotoxic effects of the chemicals. Comparison of the K-ras mutations observed in the human lung adenocarcinomas with mutation profiles observed in the mouse lung tumors suggest that bulky hydrophobic DNA adducts may be responsible for the majority of the mutations observed in the activated human K-ras genes. Other data indicate that approximately 20% of human lung tumors contain potentially novel transforming genes that may also be targets for mutagens in cigarette smoke.

  12. Genes overexpressed in different human solid cancers exhibit different tissue-specific expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Bock Axelsen, Jacob; Lotem, Joseph; Sachs, Leo; Domany, Eytan

    2007-01-01

    We have analyzed gene expression in different normal human tissues and different types of solid cancers derived from these tissues. The cancers analyzed include brain (astrocytoma and glioblastoma), breast, colon, endometrium, kidney, liver, lung, ovary, prostate, skin, and thyroid cancers. Comparing gene expression in each normal tissue to 12 other normal tissues, we identified 4,917 tissue-selective genes that were selectively expressed in different normal tissues. We also identified 2,929 genes that are overexpressed at least 4-fold in the cancers compared with the normal tissue from which these cancers were derived. The overlap between these two gene groups identified 1,340 tissue-selective genes that are overexpressed in cancers. Different types of cancers, including different brain cancers arising from the same lineage, showed differences in the tissue-selective genes they overexpressed. Melanomas overexpressed the highest number of brain-selective genes and this may contribute to melanoma metastasis to the brain. Of all of the genes with tissue-selective expression, those selectively expressed in testis showed the highest frequency of genes that are overexpressed in at least two types of cancer. However, colon and prostate cancers did not overexpress any testis-selective gene. Nearly all of the genes with tissue-selective expression that are overexpressed in cancers showed selective expression in tissues different from the cancers' tissue of origin. Cancers aberrantly expressing such genes may acquire phenotypic alterations that contribute to cancer cell viability, growth, and metastasis. PMID:17664417

  13. Sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury in mice: Implications for acute and chronic lung disease in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Lingappan, Krithika; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Barrios, Roberto; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2013-10-15

    Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO{sub 2} > 0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F{sub 2} alpha (8-iso-PGF 2α) (LC–MS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2α levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F > M) and VEGF (M > F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. - Highlights: • Male mice were more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than females. • Sex differences in inflammatory markers were observed. • CYP1A expression was higher in females after hyperoxia exposure.

  14. Tissue engineering and organ structure: a vascularized approach to liver and lung.

    PubMed

    Hoganson, David M; Pryor, Howard I; Vacanti, Joseph P

    2008-05-01

    Over the past two decades, great strides have been made in the field of tissue engineering. Many of the initial attempts to develop an engineered tissue construct were based on the concept of seeding cells onto an avascular scaffold. Using advanced manufacturing technologies, the creation of a preformed vascular scaffold has become a reality. This article discusses some of the issues surrounding the development of such a vascular scaffold. We then examine of the challenges associated with applying this scaffold technology to two vital organ constructs: liver and lung.

  15. Diagnosis and prevalence of ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma in lung tissues of naturally infected farm sheep

    PubMed Central

    Sonawane, Ganesh G.; Tripathi, Bhupendra Nath; Kumar, Rajiv; Kumar, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was aimed to detect ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA) in sheep flocks affected with pulmonary disorders at organized farm. Materials and Methods: A total of 75 sheep died naturally were thoroughly examined for the lesions of OPA during necropsy. Tissue sections from affected portion of the lungs from each animal were collected aseptically and divided into two parts; one each for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and another for histopathology. Results: On PCR examination of lung tissues, six sheep (8%) were found to be positive for JSRV. Two of them were 3-6 months of age and did not show clinical signs/gross lesions of OPA. Four adult sheep positive on PCR revealed characteristic lesions of OPA on gross and histopathological examination. Conclusion: In the absence of known specific antibody response to the infection with JSRV, there is no diagnostic serological test available. The PCR assay employed in this study on lung tissues, using primers based on the U3 region of the viral long terminal repeat for JSRV would be helpful in the screening of preclinical and clinical cases of OPA in sheep. PMID:27182131

  16. Differential effects of chronic cyanide intoxication on heart, lung and pancreatic tissues.

    PubMed

    Okolie, N P; Osagie, A U

    2000-06-01

    The histotoxic effects of chronic cyanide insult on heart, lung and pancreatic tissues, and some corroborative enzyme and metabolite changes were studied in New Zealand White rabbits using colorimetric, enzymatic and histochemical methods. Two groups of rabbits were fed for 10 months on either pure growers mash or grower mash +702 ppm inorganic cyanide. There were no significant differences in time-course profiles of serum amylase and fasting blood glucose between the cyanide-fed group and control. Pancreatic islet and heart histologies showed no pathological changes, and there were no significant differences in both serum and heart aspartate transaminase activities between the two groups. However, there were significant decreases (P<0.01) in alkaline phosphatase activity in the lungs of the cyanide-fed group, with corresponding significant (P<0.05) increases in the serum activity of the enzyme. Histological examination of lung tissue of the cyanide-treated rabbits revealed focal areas of pulmonary oedema and necrosis. These results suggest the existence of variabilities in tissue susceptibilities to the toxic effect of chronic cyanide exposure. It would appear that chronic cyanide exposure may not predispose to diabetes in the presence of adequate protein intake.

  17. Comparative performance analysis of state-of-the-art classification algorithms applied to lung tissue categorization.

    PubMed

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Iavindrasana, Jimison; Hidki, Asmâa; Cohen, Gilles; Geissbuhler, Antoine; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Müller, Henning

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we compare five common classifier families in their ability to categorize six lung tissue patterns in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images of patients affected with interstitial lung diseases (ILD) and with healthy tissue. The evaluated classifiers are naive Bayes, k-nearest neighbor, J48 decision trees, multilayer perceptron, and support vector machines (SVM). The dataset used contains 843 regions of interest (ROI) of healthy and five pathologic lung tissue patterns identified by two radiologists at the University Hospitals of Geneva. Correlation of the feature space composed of 39 texture attributes is studied. A grid search for optimal parameters is carried out for each classifier family. Two complementary metrics are used to characterize the performances of classification. These are based on McNemar's statistical tests and global accuracy. SVM reached best values for each metric and allowed a mean correct prediction rate of 88.3% with high class-specific precision on testing sets of 423 ROIs.

  18. Three-dimensional simultaneous optical coherence tomography and confocal fluorescence microscopy for investigation of lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Maria; Cimalla, Peter; Meissner, Sven; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Koch, Edmund

    2012-07-01

    Although several strategies exist for a minimal-invasive treatment of patients with lung failure, the mortality rate of acute respiratory distress syndrome still reaches 30% at minimum. This striking number indicates the necessity of understanding lung dynamics on an alveolar level. To investigate the dynamical behavior on a microscale, we used three-dimensional geometrical and functional imaging to observe tissue parameters including alveolar size and length of embedded elastic fibers during ventilation. We established a combined optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal fluorescence microscopy system that is able to monitor the distension of alveolar tissue and elastin fibers simultaneously within three dimensions. The OCT system can laterally resolve a 4.9 μm line pair feature and has an approximately 11 μm full-width-half-maximum axial resolution in air. confocal fluorescence microscopy visualizes molecular properties of the tissue with a resolution of 0.75 μm (laterally), and 5.9 μm (axially) via fluorescence detection of the dye sulforhodamine B specifically binding to elastin. For system evaluation, we used a mouse model in situ to perform lung distension by application of different constant pressure values within the physiological regime. Our method enables the investigation of alveolar dynamics by helping to reveal basic processes emerging during artificial ventilation and breathing.

  19. Automated characterization of normal and pathologic lung tissue by topological texture analysis of multidetector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Fink, C.; Becker, C.; Reiser, M.

    2007-03-01

    Reliable and accurate methods for objective quantitative assessment of parenchymal alterations in the lung are necessary for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of pulmonary diseases. Two major types of alterations are pulmonary emphysema and fibrosis, emphysema being characterized by abnormal enlargement of the air spaces distal to the terminal, nonrespiratory bronchiole, accompanied by destructive changes of the alveolar walls. The main characteristic of fibrosis is coursening of the interstitial fibers and compaction of the pulmonary tissue. With the ability to display anatomy free from superimposing structures and greater visual clarity, Multi-Detector-CT has shown to be more sensitive than the chest radiograph in identifying alterations of lung parenchyma. In automated evaluation of pulmonary CT-scans, quantitative image processing techniques are applied for objective evaluation of the data. A number of methods have been proposed in the past, most of which utilize simple densitometric tissue features based on the mean X-ray attenuation coefficients expressed in terms of Hounsfield Units [HU]. Due to partial volume effects, most of the density-based methodologies tend to fail, namely in cases, where emphysema and fibrosis occur within narrow spatial limits. In this study, we propose a methodology based upon the topological assessment of graylevel distribution in the 3D image data of lung tissue which provides a way of improving quantitative CT evaluation. Results are compared to the more established density-based methods.

  20. Effect of methacholine on low-frequency mechanics of canine airways and lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Sato, J; Suki, B; Davey, B L; Bates, J H

    1993-07-01

    We measured tracheal flow, tracheal pressure, and alveolar capsule pressure in four anesthetized paralyzed tracheostomized open-chest dogs. Lung impedance between 0.12 and 4.88 Hz was measured with a forced volume oscillation technique before and after the intravenous administration of methacholine (MCh). Before MCh administration, lung impedance was well described by a model featuring a single airway leading to an alveolar region surrounded by tissue with a continuous distribution of viscoelastic time constants as used by Hantos et al. (J. Appl. Physiol. 68: 849-860, 1990). After MCh, however, this model gave a poor fit to the impedances. The impedances were well accounted for, however, when the model was enhanced to include an extra time constant term, which we suspect is required to account for the uneven ventilation distribution produced by MCh. Airway impedance before MCh administration was well described by a simple resistance-inertance model, but a model incorporating serial inhomogeneity of ventilation was again required after MCh. Our results support those of previous studies indicating that the impedance of the normal dog lung is well described by a homogeneously ventilated viscoelastic tissue model. In contrast, our results after MCh administration show strong evidence of marked regional ventilation inhomogeneity in addition to the rheological properties of the tissues.

  1. The reconstruction and analysis of tissue specific human metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tong; Ma, Hong-Wu; Zhao, Xue-Ming; Goryanin, Igor

    2012-02-01

    Human tissues have distinct biological functions. Many proteins/enzymes are known to be expressed only in specific tissues and therefore the metabolic networks in various tissues are different. Though high quality global human metabolic networks and metabolic networks for certain tissues such as liver have already been studied, a systematic study of tissue specific metabolic networks for all main tissues is still missing. In this work, we reconstruct the tissue specific metabolic networks for 15 main tissues in human based on the previously reconstructed Edinburgh Human Metabolic Network (EHMN). The tissue information is firstly obtained for enzymes from Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) and UniprotKB databases and transfers to reactions through the enzyme-reaction relationships in EHMN. As our knowledge of tissue distribution of proteins is still very limited, we replenish the tissue information of the metabolic network based on network connectivity analysis and thorough examination of the literature. Finally, about 80% of proteins and reactions in EHMN are determined to be in at least one of the 15 tissues. To validate the quality of the tissue specific network, the brain specific metabolic network is taken as an example for functional module analysis and the results reveal that the function of the brain metabolic network is closely related with its function as the centre of the human nervous system. The tissue specific human metabolic networks are available at .

  2. A Human Antibody That Binds to the Sixth Ig-Like Domain of VCAM-1 Blocks Lung Cancer Cell Migration In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Ra; Jang, Ji Hye; Park, Chang Sik; Kim, Taek-Keun; Kim, Youn-Jae; Chung, Junho; Shim, Hyunbo; Nam, In Hyun; Han, Jung Min; Lee, Sukmook

    2017-01-01

    Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) is closely associated with tumor progression and metastasis. However, the relevance and role of VCAM-1 in lung cancer have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, we found that VCAM-1 was highly overexpressed in lung cancer tissue compared with that of normal lung tissue, and high VCAM-1 expression correlated with poor survival in lung cancer patients. VCAM-1 knockdown reduced migration of A549 human lung cancer cells into Matrigel, and competitive blocking experiments targeting the Ig-like domain 6 of VCAM-1 (VCAM-1-D6) demonstrated that the VCAM-1-D6 domain was critical for VCAM-1 mediated A549 cell migration into Matrigel. Next, we developed a human monoclonal antibody specific to human and mouse VCAM-1-D6 (VCAM-1-D6 huMab), which was isolated from a human synthetic antibody library using phage display technology. Finally, we showed that VCAM-1-D6 huMab had a nanomolar affinity for VCAM-1-D6 and that it potently suppressed the migration of A549 and NCI-H1299 lung cancer cell lines into Matrigel. Taken together, these results suggest that VCAM-1-D6 is a key domain for regulating VCAM-1-mediated lung cancer invasion and that our newly developed VCAM-1-D6 huMab will be a useful tool for inhibiting VCAM-1-expressing lung cancer cell invasion. PMID:28272300

  3. Multiphoton microscopy based cryo-imaging of inflated frozen human lung sections at -60°C in healthy and COPD lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Thomas; Kayra, Damian; Zhang, Angela; Suzuki, Masaru; McDonough, John; Elliott, W. M.; Cooper, Joel D.; Hogg, James C.

    2013-02-01

    Lung is a complex gas exchanger with interfacial area (where the gas exchange takes place) is about the size of a tennis court. Respiratory function is linked to the biomechanical stability of the gas exchange or alveolar regions which directly depends on the spatial distributions of the extracellular matrix fibers such fibrillar collagens and elastin fibers. It is very important to visualize and quantify these fibers at their native and inflated conditions to have correct morphometric information on differences between control and diseased states. This can be only achieved in the ex vivo states by imaging directly frozen lung specimens inflated to total lung capacity. Multiphoton microscopy, which uses ultra-short infrared laser pulses as the excitation source, produces multiphoton excitation fluorescence (MPEF) signals from endogenously fluorescent proteins (e.g. elastin) and induces specific second harmonic generation (SHG) signals from non-centrosymmetric proteins such as fibrillar collagens in fresh human lung tissues [J. Struct. Biol. (2010)171,189-196]. Here we report for the first time 3D image data obtained directly from thick frozen inflated lung specimens (~0.7- 1.0 millimeter thick) visualized at -60°C without prior fixation or staining in healthy and diseased states. Lung specimens donated for transplantation and released for research when no appropriate recipient was identified served as controls, and diseased lung specimens donated for research by patients receiving lung transplantation for very severe COPD (n=4) were prepared as previously described [N. Engl. J. Med. (2011) 201, 1567]. Lung slices evenly spaced between apex and base were examined using multiphoton microscopy while maintained at -60°C using a temperature controlled cold stage with a temperature resolution of 0.1°C. Infrared femto-second laser pulses tuned to 880nm, dry microscopic objectives, and non-de-scanned detectors/spectrophotometer located in the reflection geometry were

  4. Lung Mucosa Lining Fluid Modification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to Reprogram Human Neutrophil Killing Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Arcos, Jesús; Diangelo, Lauren E; Scordo, Julia M; Sasindran, Smitha J; Moliva, Juan I; Turner, Joanne; Torrelles, Jordi B

    2015-09-15

    We have shown that human alveolar lining fluid (ALF) contains homeostatic hydrolases capable of altering the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall and subsequently its interaction with human macrophages. Neutrophils are also an integral part of the host immune response to M. tuberculosis infection. Here we show that the human lung mucosa influences M. tuberculosis interaction with neutrophils, enhancing the intracellular killing of ALF-exposed M. tuberculosis and up-regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 8. In contrast, ALF-exposed M. tuberculosis does not induce neutrophil apoptosis or necrosis, degranulation, or release of extracellular traps, and it decreases the oxidative response. These results suggest an important role for the human alveolar mucosa: increasing the innate capacity of the neutrophil to recognize and kill M. tuberculosis by favoring the use of intracellular mechanisms, while at the same time limiting neutrophil extracellular inflammatory responses to minimize their associated tissue damage.

  5. Lung Mucosa Lining Fluid Modification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to Reprogram Human Neutrophil Killing Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Arcos, Jesús; Diangelo, Lauren E.; Scordo, Julia M.; Sasindran, Smitha J.; Moliva, Juan I.; Turner, Joanne; Torrelles, Jordi B.

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that human alveolar lining fluid (ALF) contains homeostatic hydrolases capable of altering the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall and subsequently its interaction with human macrophages. Neutrophils are also an integral part of the host immune response to M. tuberculosis infection. Here we show that the human lung mucosa influences M. tuberculosis interaction with neutrophils, enhancing the intracellular killing of ALF-exposed M. tuberculosis and up-regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 8. In contrast, ALF-exposed M. tuberculosis does not induce neutrophil apoptosis or necrosis, degranulation, or release of extracellular traps, and it decreases the oxidative response. These results suggest an important role for the human alveolar mucosa: increasing the innate capacity of the neutrophil to recognize and kill M. tuberculosis by favoring the use of intracellular mechanisms, while at the same time limiting neutrophil extracellular inflammatory responses to minimize their associated tissue damage. PMID:25748325

  6. Post-mortem detection of gasoline residues in lung tissue and heart blood of fire victims.

    PubMed

    Pahor, Kevin; Olson, Greg; Forbes, Shari L

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether gasoline residues could be detected post-mortem in lung tissue and heart blood of fire victims. The lungs and heart blood were investigated to determine whether they were suitable samples for collection and could be collected without contamination during an autopsy. Three sets of test subjects (pig carcasses) were investigated under two different fire scenarios. Test subjects 1 were anaesthetized following animal ethics approval, inhaled gasoline vapours for a short period and then euthanized. The carcasses were clothed and placed in a house where additional gasoline was poured onto the carcass post-mortem in one fire, but not in the other. Test subjects 2 did not inhale gasoline, were clothed and placed in the house and had gasoline poured onto them in both fires. Test subjects 3 were clothed but had no exposure to gasoline either ante- or post-mortem. Following controlled burns and suppression with water, the carcasses were collected, and their lungs and heart blood were excised at a necropsy. The headspace from the samples was analysed using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Gasoline was identified in the lungs and heart blood from the subjects that were exposed to gasoline vapours prior to death (test subjects 1). All other samples were negative for gasoline residues. These results suggest that it is useful to analyse for volatile ignitable liquids in lung tissue and blood as it may help to determine whether a victim was alive and inhaling gases at the time of a fire.

  7. Real-time soft tissue motion estimation for lung tumors during radiotherapy delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rottmann, Joerg; Keall, Paul; Berbeco, Ross

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To provide real-time lung tumor motion estimation during radiotherapy treatment delivery without the need for implanted fiducial markers or additional imaging dose to the patient. Methods: 2D radiographs from the therapy beam's-eye-view (BEV) perspective are captured at a frame rate of 12.8 Hz with a frame grabber allowing direct RAM access to the image buffer. An in-house developed real-time soft tissue localization algorithm is utilized to calculate soft tissue displacement from these images in real-time. The system is tested with a Varian TX linear accelerator and an AS-1000 amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device operating at a resolution of 512 × 384 pixels. The accuracy of the motion estimation is verified with a dynamic motion phantom. Clinical accuracy was tested on lung SBRT images acquired at 2 fps. Results: Real-time lung tumor motion estimation from BEV images without fiducial markers is successfully demonstrated. For the phantom study, a mean tracking error <1.0 mm [root mean square (rms) error of 0.3 mm] was observed. The tracking rms accuracy on BEV images from a lung SBRT patient (≈20 mm tumor motion range) is 1.0 mm. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate for the first time real-time markerless lung tumor motion estimation from BEV images alone. The described system can operate at a frame rate of 12.8 Hz and does not require prior knowledge to establish traceable landmarks for tracking on the fly. The authors show that the geometric accuracy is similar to (or better than) previously published markerless algorithms not operating in real-time. PMID:24007146

  8. Tumor-associated neutrophils stimulate T cell responses in early-stage human lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy B.; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik S.; Quatromoni, Jon G.; Stephen, Tom Li; Ranganathan, Anjana; Deshpande, Charuhas; Akimova, Tatiana; Vachani, Anil; Litzky, Leslie; Hancock, Wayne W.; Conejo-Garcia, José R.; Feldman, Michael; Albelda, Steven M.; Singhal, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Infiltrating inflammatory cells are highly prevalent within the tumor microenvironment and mediate many processes associated with tumor progression; however, the contribution of specific populations remains unclear. For example, the nature and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in the cancer microenvironment is largely unknown. The goal of this study was to provide a phenotypic and functional characterization of TANs in surgically resected lung cancer patients. We found that TANs constituted 5%–25% of cells isolated from the digested human lung tumors. Compared with blood neutrophils, TANs displayed an activated phenotype (CD62LloCD54hi) with a distinct repertoire of chemokine receptors that included CCR5, CCR7, CXCR3, and CXCR4. TANs produced substantial quantities of the proinflammatory factors MCP-1, IL-8, MIP-1α, and IL-6, as well as the antiinflammatory IL-1R antagonist. Functionally, both TANs and neutrophils isolated from distant nonmalignant lung tissue were able to stimulate T cell proliferation and IFN-γ release. Cross-talk between TANs and activated T cells led to substantial upregulation of CD54, CD86, OX40L, and 4-1BBL costimulatory molecules on the neutrophil surface, which bolstered T cell proliferation in a positive-feedback loop. Together our results demonstrate that in the earliest stages of lung cancer, TANs are not immunosuppressive, but rather stimulate T cell responses. PMID:25384214

  9. Characterization of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human peripheral lung

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, J.W.; Halonen, M.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1988-02-01

    The authors have characterized the muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human peripheral lung membranes using the selective muscarinic antagonist (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine ((/sup 3/H)PZ) and the classical muscarinic antagonist (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinuclidinyl benzilate. High-affinity binding with pharmacologic specificity was demonstrated for both radioligands. The high affinity Kd for (/sup 3/H)PZ binding determined from saturation isotherms was 5.6 nM, and the Kd for (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding was 14.3 pM. Approximately 62% of the total muscarinic binding sites in human peripheral lung bind (/sup 3/H)PZ with high affinity. There was no significant effect of the guanine nucleotide, guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate, on the inhibition of (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinyclidinyl benzilate binding by the muscarinic agonist carbachol in peripheral lung membranes. If the muscarinic receptor with high affinity for PZ has an important role in bronchoconstriction, its characterization could result in the development of more selective bronchodilators.

  10. A numerical study of gas transport in human lung models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Long; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2005-04-01

    Stable Xenon (Xe) gas has been used as an imaging agent for decades in its radioactive form, is chemically inert, and has been used as a ventilation tracer in its non radioactive form during computerized tomography (CT) imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using hyperpolarized Helium (He) gas and Xe has also emerged as a powerful tool to study regional lung structure and function. However, the present state of knowledge regarding intra-bronchial Xe and He transport properties is incomplete. As the use of these gases rapidly advances, it has become critically important to understand the nature of their transport properties and to, in the process, better understand the role of gas density in general in determining regional distribution of respiratory gases. In this paper, we applied the custom developed characteristic-Galerkin finite element method, which solves the three-dimensional (3D) incompressible variable-density Navier-Stokes equations, to study the transport of Xe and He in the CT-based human lung geometries, especially emulating the washin and washout processes. The realistic lung geometries are segmented and reconstructed from CT images as part of an effort to build a normative atlas (NIH HL-064368) documenting airway geometry over 4 decades of age in healthy and disease-state adult humans. The simulation results show that the gas transport process depends on the gas density and the body posture. The implications of these results on the difference between washin and washout time constants are discussed.

  11. Tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 2 and matrix metalloproteinase activity in the serum and lungs of mice with lewis lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kisarova, Ya A; Korolenko, T A

    2012-10-01

    We studied the content of tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 2 (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2) and activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) in the serum and lungs of mice with Lewis lung carcinoma metastasizing into the lung. Metastasizing was associated with increased serum content of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 (only on day 20 at the terminal stage of the tumor process). These data confirm the hypothesis on pro-tumorigenic role of TIMP-1 in the serum. Locally, the development of metastases was associated with a decrease in TIPM-1 concentration (day 7), an increase in TIMP-2 concentration (days 7 and 20), and elevated activity of MMP at all terms of the study (days 7, 15, and 20). Increased concentration of TIMP-2 in the lungs (but not in the serum) can be regarded as an indicator of Lewis lung carcinoma metastasizing.

  12. Natural innate cytokine response to immunomodulators and adjuvants in human precision-cut lung slices

    SciTech Connect

    Switalla, S.; Lauenstein, L.; Prenzler, F.; Knothe, S.; Foerster, C.; Fieguth, H.-G.; Pfennig, O.; Schaumann, F.; Martin, C.; Guzman, C.A.; Ebensen, T.; Mueller, M.; Hohlfeld, J.M.; Krug, N.; Braun, A.; Sewald, K.

    2010-08-01

    Prediction of lung innate immune responses is critical for developing new drugs. Well-established immune modulators like lipopolysaccharides (LPS) can elicit a wide range of immunological effects. They are involved in acute lung diseases such as infections or chronic airway diseases such as COPD. LPS has a strong adjuvant activity, but its pyrogenicity has precluded therapeutic use. The bacterial lipopeptide MALP-2 and its synthetic derivative BPPcysMPEG are better tolerated. We have compared the effects of LPS and BPPcysMPEG on the innate immune response in human precision-cut lung slices. Cytokine responses were quantified by ELISA, Luminex, and Meso Scale Discovery technology. The initial response to LPS and BPPcysMPEG was marked by coordinated and significant release of the mediators IL-1{beta}, MIP-1{beta}, and IL-10 in viable PCLS. Stimulation of lung tissue with BPPcysMPEG, however, induced a differential response. While LPS upregulated IFN-{gamma}, BPPcysMPEG did not. This traces back to their signaling pathways via TLR4 and TLR2/6. The calculated exposure doses selected for LPS covered ranges occurring in clinical studies with human beings. Correlation of obtained data with data from human BAL fluid after segmental provocation with endotoxin showed highly comparable effects, resulting in a coefficient of correlation > 0.9. Furthermore, we were interested in modulating the response to LPS. Using dexamethasone as an immunosuppressive drug for anti-inflammatory therapy, we found a significant reduction of GM-CSF, IL-1{beta}, and IFN-{gamma}. The PCLS-model offers the unique opportunity to test the efficacy and toxicity of biological agents intended for use by inhalation in a complex setting in humans.

  13. Microenvironmental modulation of asymmetric cell division in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pine, Sharon R; Ryan, Bríd M; Varticovski, Lyuba; Robles, Ana I; Harris, Curtis C

    2010-02-02

    Normal tissue homeostasis is maintained through asymmetric cell divisions that produce daughter cells with differing self-renewal and differentiation potentials. Certain tumor cell subfractions can self-renew and repopulate the heterogeneous tumor bulk, suggestive of asymmetric cell division, but an equally plausible explanation is that daughter cells of a symmetric division subsequently adopt differing cell fates. Cosegregation of template DNA during mitosis is one mechanism by which cellular components are segregated asymmetrically during cell division in fibroblast, muscle, mammary, intestinal, and neural cells. Asymmetric cell division of template DNA in tumor cells has remained elusive, however. Through pulse-chase experiments with halogenated thymidine analogs, we determined that a small population of cells within human lung cancer cell lines and primary tumor cell cultures asymmetrically divided their template DNA, which could be visualized in single cells and in real time. Template DNA cosegregation was enhanced by cell-cell contact. Its frequency was density-dependent and modulated by environmental changes, including serum deprivation and hypoxia. In addition, we found that isolated CD133(+) lung cancer cells were capable of tumor cell repopulation. Strikingly, during cell division, CD133 cosegregated with the template DNA, whereas the differentiation markers prosurfactant protein-C and pan-cytokeratins were passed to the opposing daughter cell, demonstrating that segregation of template DNA correlates with lung cancer cell fate. Our results demonstrate that human lung tumor cell fate decisions may be regulated during the cell division process. The characterization and modulation of asymmetric cell division in lung cancer can provide insight into tumor initiation, growth, and maintenance.

  14. Effects of intravenous pentafraction on lung and soft tissue liquid exchange in hypoproteinemic sheep.

    PubMed

    Conhaim, R L; Rosenfeld, D J; Schreiber, M A; Baaske, D M; Harms, B A

    1993-11-01

    Effects of infusing pentafraction (Pen), a synthetic hydroxyethyl starch plasma volume expander, on lung and soft tissue lymph flux were compared in nonanesthetized sheep that were protein depleted by batch plasmapheresis. Pen (5%) was infused to raise pulmonary arterial wedge pressure by 5 mmHg for 2 h (1.8 +/- 0.3 l). Pen raised plasma osmotic pressure from plasmapheresis baseline (10.7 +/- 2.2 mmHg; preplasmapheresis baseline, 19.6 +/- 0.6 mmHg) to 16.6 +/- 2.4 mmHg. After Pen, lung lymph flows peaked at 3.9 +/- 2.0 times a preplasmapheresis baseline value of 1.0 (plasmapheresis baseline, 2.7 +/- 0.7), but soft tissue lymph flows rose insignificantly. Plasma Pen concentrations were 2.3 +/- 1.0% postinfusion and 1.6 +/- 0.3% at 12 h. Pen mean molecular masses at these times, measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, were 160 +/- 44 and 129 +/- 23 kDa, respectively. In lung lymph, Pen concentrations were 0.8 +/- 0.6% postinfusion and 0.7 +/- 0.2% at 12 h, with mean molecular masses of 125 +/- 44 and 112 +/- 18 kDa, respectively. In soft tissue lymph Pen was nearly undetectable postinfusion, but at 12 h concentrations averaged 0.3 +/- 0.2% with a mean molecular mass of 80 +/- 10 kDa. The osmotic effectiveness of Pen may be related to its molecular mass, which was large enough to restrict filtration so that the plasma-to-lung lymph osmotic pressure gradient widened. Pen remained effective in the circulation for at least 24 h.

  15. Three-dimensional scaffolds of acellular human and porcine lungs for high throughput studies of lung disease and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Darcy E.; Bonenfant, Nicholas R.; Sokocevic, Dino; DeSarno, Michael; Borg, Zachary; Parsons, Charles; Brooks, Elice M.; Platz, Joseph; Khalpey, Zain; Hoganson, David M.; Deng, Bin; Lam, Ying Wai; Oldinski, Rachael A.; Ashikaga, Takamaru; Weiss, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Acellular scaffolds from complex whole organs such as lung are being increasingly studied for ex vivo organ generation and for in vitro studies of cell-extracellular matrix interactions. We have established effective methods for efficient de- and recellularization of large animal and human lungs including techniques which allow multiple small segments (∼1–3cm3) to be excised that retain 3-dimensional lung structure. Coupled with the use of a synthetic pleural coating, cells can be selectively physiologically inoculated via preserved vascular and airway conduits. Inoculated segments can be further sliced for high throughput studies. Further, we demonstrate thermography as a powerful noninvasive technique for monitoring perfusion decellularization and for evaluating preservation of vascular and airway networks following human and porcine lung decellularization. Collectively, these techniques are a significant step forward as they allow high throughput in vitro studies from a single lung or lobe in a more biologically relevant, three-dimensional acellular scaffold. PMID:24411675

  16. CDK-associated Cullin 1 promotes cell proliferation with activation of ERK1/2 in human lung cancer A549 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tian Jun; Gao, Fei; Yang, Tian; Thakur, Asmitanand; Ren, Hui; Li, Yang; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Ting; Chen, Ming Wei

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •CDK-associated Cullin 1 (CAC1) expression increases in human lung carcinoma. •CAC1 promotes the proliferation of lung cancer A549 cells. •CAC1 promotes human lung cancer A549 cell proliferation with activation of ERK1/2. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death in the world, but the mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the expression of CDK-associated Cullin 1 (CAC1) in lung cancer, the effect of CAC1 on the proliferation of human lung cancer A549 cells, and the activation of signaling pathways of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Results showed that CAC1 expression was higher levels in human lung carcinoma than normal lung tissue, and CAC1 siRNA reduced the proliferation of lung cancer A549 cells by decreasing cell activity and cell division in vitro. The proportion of cells treated with CAC1 siRNA increased in the G1 phase and decreased in the S and G2/M phase, indicative of G1 cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, the proportions of early/late apoptosis in lung cancer A549 cells were enhanced with CAC1 siRNA treatment. It was also found that activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 signaling pathways were involved in the proliferation of A549 cells. After CAC1 siRNA treatment, p-ERK1/2 levels decreased, and meanwhile p-p38 level increased, A549 cell proliferation increased when ERK1/2 signaling is activated by PMA. Our findings demonstrated that CAC1 promoted the proliferation of human lung cancer A549 cells with activation of ERK1/2 signaling pathways, suggesting a potential cure target for treatment of human lung cancer.

  17. Overexpression of polo-like kinase 1 and its clinical significance in human non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Xia; Xue, Dong; Liu, Zhi-Li; Lu, Bin-Bin; Bian, Hai-Bo; Pan, Xuan; Yin, Yong-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 is a serine/threonine kinase which plays an essential role in mitosis and malignant transformation. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of polo-like kinase 1 expression and determine its possibility as a therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay was performed to detect polo-like kinase 1 mRNA expression in non-small cell lung cancer cells or tissues. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect polo-like kinase 1 protein expression in 100 non-small cell lung cancer tissue samples, and the associations of polo-like kinase 1 expression with clinicopathological factors or prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer patients were evaluated. RNA interference was employed to inhibit endogenous polo-like kinase 1 expression and analyzed the effects of polo-like kinase 1 inhibition on the malignant phenotypes of non-small cell lung cancer cells including growth, apoptosis, radio- or chemoresistance. Also, the possible molecular mechanisms were also investigated. The levels of polo-like kinase 1 mRNA expression in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines or tissues were significantly higher than those in normal human bronchial epithelial cell line or corresponding non-tumor tissues. High polo-like kinase 1 expression was significantly correlated with advanced clinical stage, higher tumor classification and lymph node metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer patients (P=0.001, 0.004 and 0.001, respectively). Meanwhile, high polo-like kinase 1 protein expression was also an independent prognostic molecular marker for non-small cell lung cancer patients (hazard ratio: 2.113; 95% confidence interval: 1.326-3.557; P=0.017). Polo-like kinase 1 inhibition could significantly inhibit in vitro and in vivo proliferation, induce cell arrest of G(2)/M phase and apoptosis enhancement in non-small cell lung cancer cells, which might be activation of the p53 pathway and the Cdc25C/cdc2/cyclin B1 feedback

  18. Vessel co-option is common in human lung metastases and mediates resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy in preclinical lung metastasis models.

    PubMed

    Bridgeman, Victoria L; Vermeulen, Peter B; Foo, Shane; Bilecz, Agnes; Daley, Frances; Kostaras, Eleftherios; Nathan, Mark R; Wan, Elaine; Frentzas, Sophia; Schweiger, Thomas; Hegedus, Balazs; Hoetzenecker, Konrad; Renyi-Vamos, Ferenc; Kuczynski, Elizabeth A; Vasudev, Naveen S; Larkin, James; Gore, Martin; Dvorak, Harold F; Paku, Sandor; Kerbel, Robert S; Dome, Balazs; Reynolds, Andrew R

    2017-02-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapies have shown limited efficacy in the clinical management of metastatic disease, including lung metastases. Moreover, the mechanisms via which tumours resist anti-angiogenic therapies are poorly understood. Importantly, rather than utilizing angiogenesis, some metastases may instead incorporate pre-existing vessels from surrounding tissue (vessel co-option). As anti-angiogenic therapies were designed to target only new blood vessel growth, vessel co-option has been proposed as a mechanism that could drive resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy. However, vessel co-option has not been extensively studied in lung metastases, and its potential to mediate resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy in lung metastases is not established. Here, we examined the mechanism of tumour vascularization in 164 human lung metastasis specimens (composed of breast, colorectal and renal cancer lung metastasis cases). We identified four distinct histopathological growth patterns (HGPs) of lung metastasis (alveolar, interstitial, perivascular cuffing, and pushing), each of which vascularized via a different mechanism. In the alveolar HGP, cancer cells invaded the alveolar air spaces, facilitating the co-option of alveolar capillaries. In the interstitial HGP, cancer cells invaded the alveolar walls to co-opt alveolar capillaries. In the perivascular cuffing HGP, cancer cells grew by co-opting larger vessels of the lung. Only in the pushing HGP did the tumours vascularize by angiogenesis. Importantly, vessel co-option occurred with high frequency, being present in >80% of the cases examined. Moreover, we provide evidence that vessel co-option mediates resistance to the anti-angiogenic drug sunitinib in preclinical lung metastasis models. Assuming that our interpretation of the data is correct, we conclude that vessel co-option in lung metastases occurs through at least three distinct mechanisms, that vessel co-option occurs frequently in lung metastases, and that vessel

  19. 2010 Great Lakes Human Health Fish Tissue Study Fish Tissue Data Dictionary

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Office of Science and Technology (OST) is providing the fish tissue results from the 2010 Great Lakes Human Health Fish Tissue Study (GLHHFTS). This document includes the “data dictionary” for Mercury, PFC, PBDE and PCBs.

  20. A quantitative comparison analysis of diatoms in the lung tissues and the drowning medium as an indicator of drowning.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Ma, Yanbin; Liu, Chao; Wen, Jinfeng; Hu, Sunlin; Shi, He; Zhu, Lingyun

    2016-08-01

    The presence of diatoms in the lung tissues, internal organs and bone marrow is considered as the supportive evidence in the diagnosis of death by drowning. Generally, the diatoms detected in the lung tissues are regarded as insignificant since these diatoms can be detected in the lung tissues of the postmortem immersion bodies. In this study, we analyzed the relationships between the numbers of the diatoms in the lung tissues and the drowning medium. We made a comparison analysis between the diatoms in the lung tissues and the drowning medium using the ratio of diatom numbers in both samples (L/D ratio), utilizing Microwave Digestion - Vacuum Filtration - Automated Scanning Electron Microscopy method. Our data indicate that the L/D ratios in victims of the drowning group were higher than the postmortem immersion group. A higher L/D ratio provides valuable information about the cause of death in drowning victims. Quantitative diatom analysis in the lung tissues, especially combined with the diatom analysis of the drowning medium, provides supportive evidence in determining if a body recovered in water was due to drowning or not.

  1. Benefit of adjunctive tacrolimus in connective tissue disease-interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Leah J.; Demchuk, Carley; Curran, James J.; Strek, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the safety and effectiveness of adjunctive tacrolimus therapy with conventional immunosuppression in patients with severe connective tissue disease-related interstitial lung disease (CTD-ILD). We included patients from our interstitial lung disease (ILD) registry with CTD-ILD, in whom tacrolimus was added to corticosteroids and an additional immunosuppressive agent. Demographic data, clinical features, lung function, radiographic images, and pathologic findings were reviewed. Effectiveness was assessed by comparing pulmonary function tests (PFTs) closest to tacrolimus initiation to PFTs approximately 6–12 months later. Corticosteroid dose at these time points was also evaluated. We report adverse events attributed to tacrolimus. Seventeen patients with CTD-ILD were included in adverse event analysis; twelve were included in efficacy analysis. Length of tacrolimus therapy ranged from 6 to 110 months (mean 38.8 months ± 31.4). The mean improvement in percent predicted total lung capacity was 7.5% ± 11.7 (p=0.02). Forced vital capacity mean improvement was 7.4% ± 12.5 (p=0.06). The average decrease in corticosteroid dose at follow-up was 20.3mg ± 25.2 (p=0.02) with complete discontinuation in six patients. No patients experienced a life-threatening adverse event attributed to tacrolimus. Tacrolimus can be effective and is well tolerated as an adjunctive therapy and allows tapering of corticosteroids. PMID:26762710

  2. Evaluation of brachytherapy lung implant dose distributions from photon-emitting sources due to tissue heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yun; Rivard, Mark J.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Photon-emitting brachytherapy sources are used for permanent implantation to treat lung cancer. However, the current brachytherapy dose calculation formalism assumes a homogeneous water medium without considering the influence of radiation scatter or tissue heterogeneities. The purpose of this study was to determine the dosimetric effects of tissue heterogeneities for permanent lung brachytherapy. Methods: The MCNP5 v1.40 radiation transport code was used for Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Point sources with energies of 0.02, 0.03, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 MeV were simulated to cover the range of pertinent brachytherapy energies and to glean dosimetric trends independent of specific radionuclide emissions. Source positions from postimplant CT scans of five patient implants were used for source coordinates, with dose normalized to 200 Gy at the center of each implant. With the presence of fibrosis (around the implant), cortical bone, lung, and healthy tissues, dose distributions and {sub PTV}DVH were calculated using the MCNP *FMESH4 tally and the NIST mass-energy absorption coefficients. This process was repeated upon replacing all tissues with water. For all photon energies, 10{sup 9} histories were simulated to achieve statistical errors (k = 1) typically of 1%. Results: The mean PTV doses calculated using tissue heterogeneities for all five patients changed (compared to dose to water) by only a few percent over the examined photon energy range, as did PTV dose at the implant center. The {sub PTV}V{sub 100} values were 81.2%, 90.0% (as normalized), 94.3%, 93.9%, 92.7%, and 92.2% for 0.02, 0.03, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 MeV source photons, respectively. Relative to water, the maximum bone doses were higher by factors of 3.7, 5.1, 5.2, 2.4, 1.2, and 1.0 The maximum lung doses were about 0.98, 0.94, 0.91, 0.94, 0.97, and 0.99. Relative to water, the maximum healthy tissue doses at the mediastinal position were higher by factors of 9.8, 2.2, 1.3, 1.1, 1.1, and

  3. Silencing of AP-4 inhibits proliferation, induces cell cycle arrest and promotes apoptosis in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuanyu; Guo, Wei; Chen, Shanshan; Xu, Yizhuo; Li, Ping; Wang, Huaqi; Chu, Heying; Li, Juan; DU, Yuwen; Chen, Xiaonan; Zhang, Guojun; Zhao, Guoqiang

    2016-06-01

    Activating enhancer-binding protein (AP)-4 is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, and is involved in tumor biology. However, the role of AP-4 in human lung cancer remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, the expression of AP-4 in human lung cancer tissues and cells was investigated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and it was observed that the level of AP-4 was increased in tumor tissues and cells compared with their normal counterparts. AP-4 expression was knocked down by transfection with a specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) in lung cancer cells, and this indicated that siRNA-mediated silencing of AP-4 inhibited cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase and induced apoptosis by modulating the expression of p21 and cyclin D1. The results of the present study suggest that AP-4 may be an oncoprotein that has a significant role in lung cancer, and that siRNA-mediated silencing of AP-4 may have therapeutic potential as a strategy for the treatment of lung cancer.

  4. High-Resolution Phase-Contrast Imaging of Submicron Particles in Unstained Lung Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Schittny, J. C.; Barre, S. F.; Haberthuer, D.; Mokso, R.; Tsuda, A.; Stampanoni, M.

    2011-09-09

    To access the risks and chances of deposition of submicron particles in the gas-exchange area of the lung, a precise three-dimensional (3D)-localization of the sites of deposition is essential--especially because local peaks of deposition are expected in the acinar tree and in individual alveoli. In this study we developed the workflow for such an investigation. We administered 200-nm gold particles to young adult rats by intratracheal instillation. After fixation and paraffin embedding, their lungs were imaged unstained using synchrotron radiation x-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) at the beamline TOMCAT (Swiss Light Source, Villigen, Switzerland) at sample detector distances of 2.5 mm (absorption contrast) and of 52.5 mm (phase contrast). A segmentation based on a global threshold of grey levels was successfully done on absorption-contrast images for the gold and on the phase-contrast images for the tissue. The smallest spots containing gold possessed a size of 1-2 voxels of 370-nm side length. We conclude that a combination of phase and absorption contrast SRXTM imaging is necessary to obtain the correct segmentation of both tissue and gold particles. This method will be used for the 3D localization of deposited particles in the gas-exchange area of the lung.

  5. Characterization of TLR-induced inflammatory responses in COPD and control lung tissue explants

    PubMed Central

    Pomerenke, Anna; Lea, Simon R; Herrick, Sarah; Lindsay, Mark A; Singh, Dave

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Viruses are a common cause of exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). They activate toll-like receptors (TLRs) 3, 7, and 8, leading to a pro-inflammatory response. We have characterized the responses of TLR3 and TLR7/8 in lung tissue explants from COPD patients and control smokers. Methods We prepared lung whole tissue explants (WTEs) from patients undergoing surgery for confirmed or suspected lung cancer. In order to mimic the conditions of viral infection, we used poly(I:C) for TLR3 stimulation and R848 for TLR7/8 stimulation. These TLR ligands were used alone and in combination. The effects of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) neutralization and dexamethasone on TLR responses were examined. Inflammatory cytokine release was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and gene expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results WTEs from COPD patients released higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared with WTEs from smokers. Activation of multiple TLRs led to a greater than additive release of TNFα and CCL5. TNFα neutralization and dexamethasone treatment decreased cytokine release. Conclusion This WTE model shows an enhanced response of COPD compared with controls, suggesting an increased response to viral infection. There was amplification of innate immune responses with multiple TLR stimulation. PMID:27729782

  6. Increased chromium and nickel content in lung tissue and bronchial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kollmeier, H.; Seemann, J.W.; Mueller, K.M.R.; Rothe, G.; Wittig, P.; Schejbal, V.B.

    1987-01-01

    In 25 random autopsies, chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) in lung tissue and regional lymph nodes were analysed by means of flameless atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The subjects originate from Bochum in the Ruhr District, which is defined as a particular pollution area with locally high Cr and Ni emissions. The subjects examined from Bochum (BO) and vicinity have Cr and Ni concentrations about 5 and 6 times higher than those in a previous series form Muenster (MS) and vicinity (outside the particular pollution area), which is used for comparison purposes. BO and MS data showed an age-dependent increase of chromium and nickel in the lung, and in both data sets as well as in the combined, the Cr and Ni values showed extremely high correlations. The Cr and Ni concentrations (BO) in lung (3.47 +/- 2.53 micrograms Cr/g, 1.09 +/- 1.43 micrograms Ni/g dry weight) and lymph node tissue (6.30 +/- 3.72 micrograms Cr/g, 1.00 +/- 0.58 micrograms Ni/g dry weight) do not show any correlation. The BO data contained four cases of bronchial carcinoma (all male), three of which showed pulmonary Cr and Ni concentrations that lie clearly above the predicted level. One case of bronchial carcinoma had extremely high Cr and Ni values; an occupational exposure as dental laboratory technician is taken into consideration.

  7. Inhibition of Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel ANO1/TMEM16A Suppresses Tumor Growth and Invasion in Human Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Linghan; Liu, Wen; Guan, Lizhao; Lu, Min; Wang, KeWei

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer or pulmonary carcinoma is primarily derived from epithelial cells that are thin and line on the alveolar surfaces of the lung for gas exchange. ANO1/TMEM16A, initially identified from airway epithelial cells, is a member of Ca2+-activated Cl- channels (CaCCs) that function to regulate epithelial secretion and cell volume for maintenance of ion and tissue homeostasis. ANO1/TMEM16A has recently been shown to be highly expressed in several epithelium originated carcinomas. However, the role of ANO1 in lung cancer remains unknown. In this study, we show that inhibition of calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1/TMEM16A suppresses tumor growth and invasion in human lung cancer. ANO1 is upregulated in different human lung cancer cell lines. Knocking-down ANO1 by small hairpin RNAs inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of GLC82 and NCI-H520 cancel cells evaluated by CCK-8, would-healing, transwell and 3D soft agar assays. ANO1 protein is overexpressed in 77.3% cases of human lung adenocarcinoma tissues detected by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the tumor growth in nude mice implanted with GLC82 cells was significantly suppressed by ANO1 silencing. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that ANO1 overexpression contributes to tumor growth and invasion of lung cancer; and suppressing ANO1 overexpression may have therapeutic potential in lung cancer therapy. PMID:26305547

  8. Inhibition of Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel ANO1/TMEM16A Suppresses Tumor Growth and Invasion in Human Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jia, Linghan; Liu, Wen; Guan, Lizhao; Lu, Min; Wang, KeWei

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer or pulmonary carcinoma is primarily derived from epithelial cells that are thin and line on the alveolar surfaces of the lung for gas exchange. ANO1/TMEM16A, initially identified from airway epithelial cells, is a member of Ca2+-activated Cl- channels (CaCCs) that function to regulate epithelial secretion and cell volume for maintenance of ion and tissue homeostasis. ANO1/TMEM16A has recently been shown to be highly expressed in several epithelium originated carcinomas. However, the role of ANO1 in lung cancer remains unknown. In this study, we show that inhibition of calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1/TMEM16A suppresses tumor growth and invasion in human lung cancer. ANO1 is upregulated in different human lung cancer cell lines. Knocking-down ANO1 by small hairpin RNAs inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of GLC82 and NCI-H520 cancel cells evaluated by CCK-8, would-healing, transwell and 3D soft agar assays. ANO1 protein is overexpressed in 77.3% cases of human lung adenocarcinoma tissues detected by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the tumor growth in nude mice implanted with GLC82 cells was significantly suppressed by ANO1 silencing. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that ANO1 overexpression contributes to tumor growth and invasion of lung cancer; and suppressing ANO1 overexpression may have therapeutic potential in lung cancer therapy.

  9. Characterization of human lung cancer-associated fibroblasts in three-dimensional in vitro co-culture model

    SciTech Connect

    Horie, Masafumi; Saito, Akira; Mikami, Yu; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Nakajima, Jun; Kohyama, Tadashi; Nagase, Takahide

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established three patient-paired sets of CAFs and NFs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs and NFs were analyzed using three-dimensional co-culture experiments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs clearly enhanced collagen gel contraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs showed higher {alpha}-SMA expression than NFs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAFs were implicated in invasion and differentiation of lung cancer cells. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play crucial roles in carcinogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of non-small cell lung carcinoma, and targeting of CAFs could be a novel strategy for cancer treatment. However, the characteristics of human CAFs still remain to be better defined. In this study, we established patient-matched CAFs and normal fibroblasts (NFs), from tumoral and non-tumoral portions of resected lung tissue from lung cancer patients. CAFs showed higher {alpha}-smooth muscle actin ({alpha}-SMA) expression than NFs, and CAFs clearly enhanced collagen gel contraction. Furthermore, we employed three-dimensional co-culture assay with A549 lung cancer cells, where CAFs were more potent in inducing collagen gel contraction. Hematoxylin and eosin staining of co-cultured collagen gel revealed that CAFs had the potential to increase invasion of A549 cells compared to NFs. These observations provide evidence that lung CAFs have the tumor-promoting capacity distinct from NFs.

  10. Arsenic Species in Scute (Shell Plate) and Lung Tissues of Desert Tortoises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, A. L.; Berry, K.; Jacobson, E. R.; Rytuba, J. J.

    2009-12-01

    The desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is federally listed as a threatened species, and its numbers have been in decline for at least two decades. Portions of protected desert tortoise habitats coincide with anthropogenic features such as historic mines and military bases that are potential sources of ingested or inhaled arsenic. Previous studies of necropsied desert tortoise specimens collected from the Mojave Desert have shown a statistically significant link between elevated tissue levels of arsenic (As) and the occurrence of clinical disease states. Synchrotron-based, microbeam X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) and X-ray fluorescence mapping (XRF) were the primary techniques used to identify As species in these tissues. Specimens have been analyzed from a mining-impacted area (Kelly-Rand Mining district, Kern County), and from sites on or adjacent to military bases (National Training Center, Ft Irwin, and Edwards AFB). XRF maps showed that scute sections sliced perpendicular to the exposed surface contain one or more diffuse bands of As(III) coordinated by oxygen instead of sulfur. This As(III) species is identical in all individuals, suggesting that it represents metabolized As. In contrast, the exterior surface and edges of scute sections contained As-rich particles of varying oxidation state and species, suggesting an exogenous origin. Particles contained reduced As in sulfides (Cu sulfide or arsenide) and As(V) in ferric sulfates and/or ferric arsenates. XAFS spectra of many As(V)-rich particles were close visual matches to spectra of known arsenic-bearing minerals or phases such as scorodite, jarosite, and arsenic adsorbed to iron (hydr)oxides. At least one, and more commonly 3-5 exogeneous As-rich particles were found in the formalin-preserved lung tissue sections examined, suggesting that such particles were relatively common. Pentavalent As was observed in forms similar to those encountered on scute sections. As(III) was observed in

  11. Persistent Expression Changes of Fibrosis Related Genes in the Lung Tissues of Rats Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Scully, Robert R.; Theriot, Corey; Zalesak, Selina; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Williams, Kyle; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of reactive dust, containing 1-2% of respirable fine dust (< 3 microns). The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the toxicity of Apollo moon dust in rodents through inhalation to assess the health risk of dust exposures to humans and to identify the mechanisms and potential pathways involved in lunar dust-induced toxicity. Ccl3, Ccl12, Cxcl2, Cxcl5, Itgb8, Tnf, Ldhc, Clec4e, Bmp7, and Smad6, showed persistently significant expression changes in the lung tissue. The expression of several of these genes were dose- and time- dependent, and were significantly correlated with other pathological. Our previous data showed that no pathological changes were detected in low dose groups. However, several genes, primarily produced by lung epithelial, were significantly altered persistently in response to low-dose dust exposure. The data presented in this study, for the first time, explores the molecular mechanisms of lunar dust induced toxicity, contributing not only the risk assessment for future space exploration, but also understandings of the dust-induced toxicity to humans on earth.

  12. Extracellular histones are essential effectors of C5aR- and C5L2-mediated tissue damage and inflammation in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Bosmann, Markus; Grailer, Jamison J; Ruemmler, Robert; Russkamp, Norman F; Zetoune, Firas S; Sarma, J Vidya; Standiford, Theodore J; Ward, Peter A

    2013-12-01

    We investigated how complement activation promotes tissue injury and organ dysfunction during acute inflammation. Three models of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by LPS, IgG immune complexes, or C5a were used in C57BL/6 mice, all models requiring availability of both C5a receptors (C5aR and C5L2) for full development of ALI. Ligation of C5aR and C5L2 with C5a triggered the appearance of histones (H3 and H4) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). BALF from humans with ALI contained H4 histone. Histones were absent in control BALF from healthy volunteers. In mice with ALI, in vivo neutralization of H4 with IgG antibody reduced the intensity of ALI. Neutrophil depletion in mice with ALI markedly reduced H4 presence in BALF and was highly protective. The direct lung damaging effects of extracellular histones were demonstrated by airway administration of histones into mice and rats (Sprague-Dawley), which resulted in ALI that was C5a receptor-independent, and associated with intense inflammation, PMN accumulation, damage/destruction of alveolar epithelial cells, together with release into lung of cytokines/chemokines. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated lung damage, edema and consolidation in histone-injured lungs. These studies confirm the destructive C5a-dependent effects in lung linked to appearance of extracellular histones.

  13. Effect of zinc on the content of chemical elements in the lung tissue during obesity in the experiment.

    PubMed

    Churin, B V; Trunova, V A; Sidorina, A V; Zvereva, V V; Astashov, V V

    2015-02-01

    We found no deviations from normalcy in the content of chemical elements (K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Br, Rb, and Sr) in the lungs of rats with mild alimentary obesity, but revealed redistribution of correlations between the elements indicating impaired metabolism in this organ. Zinc supplementation had no effect on the body weight and content of chemical elements (including zinc) in the lung tissue in rats fed high fat diet, but led to significant changes in the correlations between the elements. Bromine, rubidium, and strontium are actively involved in interelement interactions in the lung tissue. These elements should be given more attention in considering biological processes including alimentary obesity.

  14. Dielectric spectroscopy of normal and malignant human lung cells at ultra-high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Egot-Lemaire, S; Pijanka, J; Sulé-Suso, J; Semenov, S

    2009-04-21

    Microwave techniques for biomedical applications aimed at cancer treatment or diagnosis, either by imaging or spectroscopy, are promising. Their use relies on knowledge of the dielectric properties of tissues, especially on a detectable difference between malignant and normal tissues. As most studies investigated the dielectric properties of ex vivo tissues, there is a need for better biophysical understanding of human tissues in their living state. As an essential component of tissues, cells represent valuable objects of analysis. The approach developed in this study is an investigation at cell level. Its aim was to compare human lung normal and malignant cells by dielectric spectroscopy in the beginning of the microwave range, where such information is of substantial biomedical importance. These cells were embedded in small and low-conductivity agarose hydrogels and laid on an open-ended coaxial probe connected to a vector network analyser operated from 200 MHz to 2 GHz. The comparison between normal and malignant cells was drawn using the variation of measured dielectric properties and fitting the measurements using the Maxwell-Wagner equation. Both methods revealed slight differences between the two cell lines, which were statistically significant regarding conductivities of composite gels and cells.

  15. Comparison between concentrations of amphotericin B in infected lung lesion and in uninfected lung tissue in a patient treated with liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome).

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akira; Matsumoto, Kana; Igari, Hidetoshi; Uesato, Masaya; Yoshida, Shigetoshi; Nakamura, Yasutaka; Morita, Kunihiko; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Yoshino, Ichiro; Kamei, Katsuhiko

    2010-09-01

    Generally, the primary lesion of a mold infection is in the airway, an extravascular site. Therefore, the antifungal drug concentration at the actual tissue lesion of a mold infection is as important as in the blood compartment. Although our antifungal armamentarium has expanded recently, polyenes are still often needed in clinical practice because of their potent fungicidal activity and the rarity of resistance. Nevertheless, the distribution of amphotericin B (AmB) in infected lung tissue has not yet been evaluated. Using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, we determined the concentrations of AmB in plasma and infected and uninfected tissues of resected lung simultaneously, in a patient with pulmonary aspergillosis treated with liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB). The AmB concentration in the infected lesion of the lung was approximately 5.2 times higher than that in plasma and 3.7 times higher than in uninfected lung tissue. L-AmB accumulated in the infected lesion of the lung at a higher concentration. Although our data are from only one patient, they may be useful in helping to develop better strategies for the use of L-AmB against pulmonary fungal infections.

  16. Human Lung Hydrolases Delineate Mycobacterium tuberculosis–Macrophage Interactions and the Capacity To Control Infection

    PubMed Central

    Arcos, Jesus; Sasindran, Smitha J.; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Turner, Joanne; Schlesinger, Larry S.; Torrelles, Jordi B.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant contains homeostatic and antimicrobial hydrolases. When Mycobacterium tuberculosis is initially deposited in the terminal bronchioles and alveoli, as well as following release from lysed macrophages, bacilli are in intimate contact with these lung surfactant hydrolases. We identified and measured several hydrolases in human alveolar lining fluid and lung tissue that, at their physiological concentrations, dramatically modified the M. tuberculosis cell envelope. Independent of their action time (15 min to 12 h), the effects of the hydrolases on the M. tuberculosis cell envelope resulted in a significant decrease (60–80%) in M. tuberculosis association with, and intracellular growth of the bacteria within, human macrophages. The cell envelope-modifying effects of the hydrolases also led to altered M. tuberculosis intracellular trafficking and induced a protective proin-flammatory response to infection. These findings add a new concept to our understanding of M. tuberculosis–macrophage inter-actions (i.e., the impact of lung surfactant hydrolases on M. tuberculosis infection). PMID:21602490

  17. Cyclic mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast proliferation and autocrine growth factor activity.

    PubMed

    Bishop, J E; Mitchell, J J; Absher, P M; Baldor, L; Geller, H A; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Hamblin, M J; Vacek, P; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    Cellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia and increased extracellular matrix deposition are features of tissue hypertrophy resulting from increased work load. It is known, for example, that mechanical forces play a critical role in lung development, cardiovascular remodeling following pressure overload, and skeletal muscle growth. The mechanisms involved in these processes, however, remain unclear. Here we examined the effect of mechanical deformation on fibroblast function in vitro. IMR-90 human fetal lung fibroblasts grown on collagen-coated silastic membranes were subjected to cyclical mechanical deformation (10% increase in culture surface area; 1 Hz) for up to 5 days. Cell number was increased by 39% after 2 days of deformation (1.43 +/- .01 x 10(5) cells/membrane compared with control, 1.03 +/- 0.02 x 10(5) cells; mean +/- SEM; P < 0.02) increasing to 163% above control by 4 days (2.16 +/- 0.16 x 10(5) cells compared with 0.82 +/- 0.03 x 10(5) cells; P < 0.001). The medium from mechanically deformed cells was mitogenic for IMR-90 cells, with maximal activity in the medium from cells mechanically deformed for 2 days (stimulating cell replication by 35% compared with media control; P < 0.002). These data suggest that mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast replication and that this effect is mediated by the release of autocrine growth factors.

  18. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  19. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  20. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  1. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  2. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  3. Common SIRT1 variants modify the effect of abdominal adipose tissue on aging-related lung function decline.

    PubMed

    Curjuric, Ivan; Imboden, Medea; Bridevaux, Pierre-Olivier; Gerbase, Margaret W; Haun, Margot; Keidel, Dirk; Kumar, Ashish; Pons, Marco; Rochat, Thierry; Schikowski, Tamara; Schindler, Christian; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Kronenberg, Florian; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M

    2016-06-01

    Lung function is an independent predictor of mortality and serves as an aging marker in never smokers. The protein sirtuin-1 of gene SIRT1 has profound anti-inflammatory effects and regulates metabolic pathways. Its suggested longevity effects on lower organisms remain poorly studied in humans. In 1132 never smokers of the population-based SAPALDIA cohort, we investigated associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs730821, rs10997868, rs10823116) of SIRT1 and aging-related lung function decline over 11 years in terms of change in forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC ratio, and forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75 % of FVC (FEF25-75) using multiple linear regression models. Interactions between the SIRT1 SNPs and adiposity parameters (body mass index (BMI), its change and weight gain) were tested by including multiplicative interaction terms into the models. SIRT1 polymorphisms exhibited no main effects, but modified the association between obesity measures and FEV1/FVC and FEF25-75 decline (p = 0.009-0.046). Per risk allele, FEV1/FVC decline was accelerated up to -0.5 % (95 % CI -1.0 to 0 %) and -0.7 % (-1.3 to -0.2 %) over interquartile range increases in BMI (2.4 kg/m(2)) or weight (6.5 kg), respectively. For FEF25-75 decline, corresponding estimates were -57 mL/s (-117 to 4 mL/s) and -76 mL/s (-1429 to -9 mL/s). Interactions were not present in participants with genetically lowered C-reactive protein concentrations. Genetic variation in SIRT1 might therefore affect lung function and human longevity by modifying subclinical inflammation arising from abdominal adipose tissue.

  4. [The lungs in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection].

    PubMed

    Barić, D; Vrkić, L

    1997-01-01

    This report describes a case of two patients who were admitted to the Zadar hospital and according to clinical symptoms directed to the Department of Lung Diseases. Both patients were temporarily employed abroad. It has been established that they were infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). One of the patients has been moved to the Department of Infectious Diseases and later to Zagreb, while the other has returned abroad. On admission to the hospital of the Zadar Medical Center none of them answered the question about being engaged in risky behavior. In 1990 there were 699 registered patients hospitalized and 745 registered in the protocol of the Outpatient Clinic of the Department of Lung Diseases. 0.069% of patients were HIV-1-infected. In 1991, there were 520 hospitalized and 453 outpatients, whereas 0.102% were HIV-1-infected and registered subjects. It must be pointed out that these are only numbers of registration and not subjects, because there were patients who were examined or hospitalized twice or more times during the corresponding calendar year. The aim of this study was to point to a new differentially-diagnostic problem present especially at the Department of Lung Diseases after AIDS has become part of our reality. There still remains a problem in regard to detection of HIV-1 seropositivity in patients at departments with opportunistic infections such as tuberculosis.

  5. GENETIC ASSOCIATION BETWEEN HUMAN CHITINASES AND LUNG FUNCTION IN COPD

    PubMed Central

    Aminuddin, F.; Akhabir, L.; Stefanowicz, D.; Paré, P.D.; Connett, J.E.; Anthonisen, N.R.; Fahy, J.V.; Seibold, M.A.; Burchard, E.G.; Eng, C.; Gulsvik, A.; Bakke, P.; Cho, M. H.; Litonjua, A.; Lomas, D.A.; Anderson, W. H.; Beaty, T.H.; Crapo, J.D.; Silverman, E.K.; Sandford, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Two primary chitinases have been identified in humans – acid mammalian chitinase (AMCase) and chitotriosidase (CHIT1). Mammalian chitinases have been observed to affect the host’s immune response. The aim of this study was to test for association between genetic variation in the chitinases and phenotypes related to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Polymorphisms in the chitinase genes were selected based on previous associations with respiratory diseases. Polymorphisms that were associated with lung function level or rate of decline in the Lung Health Study (LHS) cohort were analyzed for association with COPD affection status in four other COPD case-control populations. Chitinase activity and protein levels were also related to genotypes. In the Caucasian LHS population, the baseline forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was significantly different between the AA and GG genotypic groups of the AMCase rs3818822 polymorphism. Subjects with the GG genotype had higher AMCase protein and chitinase activity compared with AA homozygotes. For CHIT1 rs2494303, a significant association was observed between rate of decline in FEV1 and the different genotypes. In the African American LHS population, CHIT1 rs2494303 and AMCase G339T genotypes were associated with rate of decline in FEV1. Although a significant effect of chitinase gene alleles was found on lung function level and decline in the LHS, we were unable to replicate the associations with COPD affection status in the other COPD study groups. PMID:22200767

  6. [Correlation of tissue respiration and some mitochondria stereometric characteristics of the lung tissue in different modifications of hypoxic hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Rozova, K V; Nazarenko, A I; Tavolzhanova, T I; Trepats'ka, T V; Cherkesova, M O

    2005-01-01

    In experiments on the adult white laboratory rats the correlation of tissue respiration and some morpho- and stereometric characteristics of mitochondria in lung tissue under breathing by air and gas mixture with 7% O2 in N2 was investigated. The following agents were used as modulators: indomethacin, a blockator of cyclooxygenase way of arachidonic acid metabolism; quercetin and linoleil of hydroxamic acid, blockators of lipooxygenase way ofarachidonic acid metabolism; taurine, an antihypoxant and energy source under hypoxic conditions; lipin-antihypoxant with significant membrane protective effect. It was shown, that the respiration intensity of tissue homogenate, not only of its mitochondrial fraction, closely connected with structural organization of mitochondria. It was demonstrated that changes of O2 concentration in gas mixture lead to the alteration of interrelation between O2 consumption and stereometric characteristics of mitochondria: in normoxia the intimate correlation was established with number of mitochondria and its total surface; in hypoxia such correlation was established with mitochondria diameter and number of structurally damage organelles. Pharmacological modulation factors play in this process not so significant role.

  7. Cellular morphometry of the bronchi of human and dog lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, E.S.

    1991-09-01

    One hundred and forty-seven bronchial samples (generations 3--6) from 66 patients (62 usable; 36 female, 26 male; median age 61) have been dissected by generation from fixed surgical lung specimens obtained after the removal of pathological lesions. In addition, one hundred and fifty-six mongol dog bronchi (generations 2--6) dissected from different lobes of 26 dog lungs have also been similarly prepared. One hundred and twenty-seven human samples have been completely processed for electron microscopy and have yielded 994 electron micrographs of which 655 have been entered into the Computerized Stereological Analysis System (COSAS) and been used for the measurement of the distances of basal and mucous cell nuclei to the epithelial free surface. Similarly 328 micrographs of dog epithelium from 33 bronchial samples have been used to measure the distances of basal and mucous cell nuclei to the epithelial free surface and have been entered into COSAS. Using the COSAS planimetry program, we continue to expand our established data bases which describe the volume density and nuclear numbers per electron micrograph for 5 cell types of the human bronchial epithelial lining of men and women, as well as smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers and similar parameters for the same 5 epithelial cell types of dog bronchi. Our micrographs of human bronchial epithelium have allowed us to analyze the recent suggestion that the DNA of lymphocytes may be subject to significant damage from Rn progeny while within the lung. Since the last progress report three papers have been submitted for publication. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

  8. Expression of cytochrome P450 2A13 in human non-small cell lung cancer and its clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Fan, Xiaoli

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most important causes of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Human cytochrome P450 2A13 enzyme (CYP2A13) is predominantly expressed in the respiratory tract and could catalyze various carcinogens. In this study, we quantified CYP2A13 expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues and examined the relation between CYP2A13 and clinicopathologic factors. Thirty-five paired lung cancer and normal tissues were studied for the expression of the CYP2A13 gene by using real-time PCR and Western blotting assays. We also investigated the relationship between CYP2A13 expression and clinicopathologic factors such as age, gender, histology and lymph node status in tumor tissues. SPSS (17.0) statistical software was applied for data analysis. The real-time PCR results showed that there was no significant difference in the CYP2A13 mRNA transcript levels between tumor and paired normal tissues in the 35 samples and in 12 paired squamous cell carcinomas. In adenocarcinoma, the expression of CYP2A13 mRNA in tumor tissues was 12.5% of that in adjacent tissues (P < 0.05) and it was not associated with age, gender, histology and lymph node status of the patients. The amounts of CYP2A13 proteins detected by Western blotting assays correlated well with those of the corresponding mRNAs. In conclusion, the expression of CYP2A13 was downregulated in lung adenocarcinoma. CYP2A13 may be involved in the development and progression of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:23720675

  9. TBI lung dose comparisons using bilateral and anteroposterior delivery techniques and tissue density corrections.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Daniel W; Wang, Iris Z; Lakeman, Tara; Hales, Lee D; Singh, Anurag K; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2015-03-08

    This study compares lung dose distributions for two common techniques of total body photon irradiation (TBI) at extended source-to-surface distance calculated with, and without, tissue density correction (TDC). Lung dose correction factors as a function of lateral thorax separation are approximated for bilateral opposed TBI (supine), similar to those published for anteroposterior-posteroanterior (AP-PA) techniques in AAPM Report 17 (i.e., Task Group 29). 3D treatment plans were created retrospectively for 24 patients treated with bilateral TBI, and for whom CT data had been acquired from the head to the lower leg. These plans included bilateral opposed and AP-PA techniques- each with and without - TDC, using source-to-axis distance of 377 cm and largest possible field size. On average, bilateral TBI requires 40% more monitor units than AP-PA TBI due to increased separation (26% more for 23 MV). Calculation of midline thorax dose without TDC leads to dose underestimation of 17% on average (standard deviation, 4%) for bilateral 6 MV TBI, and 11% on average (standard deviation, 3%) for 23 MV. Lung dose correction factors (CF) are calculated as the ratio of midlung dose (with TDC) to midline thorax dose (without TDC). Bilateral CF generally increases with patient separation, though with high variability due to individual uniqueness of anatomy. Bilateral CF are 5% (standard deviation, 4%) higher than the same corrections calculated for AP-PA TBI in the 6 MV case, and 4% higher (standard deviation, 2%) for 23 MV. The maximum lung dose is much higher with bilateral TBI (up to 40% higher than prescribed, depending on patient anatomy) due to the absence of arm tissue blocking the anterior chest. Dose calculations for bilateral TBI without TDC are incorrect by up to 24% in the thorax for 6 MV and up to 16% for 23 MV. Bilateral lung CF may be calculated as 1.05 times the values published in Table 6 of AAPM Report 17, though a larger patient pool is necessary to better

  10. An optimized disaggregation method for human lung tumors that preserves the phenotype and function of the immune cells.

    PubMed

    Quatromoni, Jon G; Singhal, Sunil; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik; Hancock, Wayne W; Albelda, Steven M; Eruslanov, Evgeniy

    2015-01-01

    Careful preparation of human tissues is the cornerstone of obtaining accurate data in immunologic studies. Despite the essential importance of tissue processing in tumor immunology and clinical medicine, current methods of tissue disaggregation have not been rigorously tested for data fidelity. Thus, we critically evaluated the current techniques available in the literature that are used to prepare human lung tumors for immunologic studies. We discovered that these approaches are successful at digesting cellular attachments and ECMs; however, these methods frequently alter the immune cell composition and/or expression of surface molecules. We thus developed a novel approach to prepare human lung tumors for immunologic studies by combining gentle mechanical manipulation with an optimized cocktail of enzymes used at low doses. This enzymatic digestion cocktail optimized cell yield and cell viability, retrieved all major tumor-associated cell populations, and maintained the expression of cell-surface markers for lineage definition and in vivo effector functions. To our knowledge, we present the first rigorously tested disaggregation method designed for human lung tumors.

  11. Radiographic Comparison of Human Lung Shape During Normal Gravity and Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michels, D. B.; Friedman, P. J.; West, J. B.

    1979-01-01

    Chest radiographs in five seated normal volunteers at 1 G and 0 G were made with a view toward comparing human lung shape during normal gravity and weightlessness. Lung shape was assessed by measuring lung heights and widths in upper, middle and lower lung regions. No significant differences were found between any of the 1-G and 0-G measurements, although there was a slight tendency for the lung to become shorter and wider at 0 G. The evidence that gravity causes regional differences in ventilation by direct action on the lung is consistent with the theoretical analysis of West and Matthews (1972).

  12. Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Downregulates Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-D Expression in Human Lung Fibroblasts via the Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ye; Osorio, Juan C; Risquez, Cristobal; Wang, Hao; Shi, Ying; Gochuico, Bernadette R; Morse, Danielle; Rosas, Ivan O; El-Chemaly, Souheil

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-D, a member of the VEGF family, induces both angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis by activating VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and VEGFR-3 on the surface of endothelial cells. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 has been shown to stimulate VEGF-A expression in human lung fibroblast via the Smad3 signaling pathway and to induce VEGF-C in human proximal tubular epithelial cells. However, the effects of TGF-β1 on VEGF-D regulation are unknown. To investigate the regulation of VEGF-D, human lung fibroblasts were studied under pro-fibrotic conditions in vitro and in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) lung tissue. We demonstrate that TGF-β1 downregulates VEGF-D expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human lung fibroblasts. This TGF-β1 effect can be abolished by inhibitors of TGF-β type I receptor kinase and Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), but not by Smad3 knockdown. In addition, VEGF-D knockdown in human lung fibroblasts induces G1/S transition and promotes cell proliferation. Importantly, VEGF-D protein expression is decreased in lung homogenates from IPF patients compared with control lung. In IPF lung sections, fibroblastic foci show very weak VEGF-D immunoreactivity, whereas VEGF-D is abundantly expressed within alveolar interstitial cells in control lung. Taken together, our data identify a novel mechanism for downstream signal transduction induced by TGF-β1 in lung fibroblasts, through which they may mediate tissue remodeling in IPF. PMID:24515257

  13. Effect of atelectasis changes on tissue mass and dose during lung radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Christopher L.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Jan, Nuzhat; Reshko, Leonid B.; Christensen, Gary E.; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize mass and density changes of lung parenchyma in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients following midtreatment resolution of atelectasis and to quantify the impact this large geometric change has on normal tissue dose. Methods: Baseline and midtreatment CT images and contours were obtained for 18 NSCLC patients with atelectasis. Patients were classified based on atelectasis volume reduction between the two scans as having either full, partial, or no resolution. Relative mass and density changes from baseline to midtreatment were calculated based on voxel intensity and volume for each lung lobe. Patients also had clinical treatment plans available which were used to assess changes in normal tissue dose constraints from baseline to midtreatment. The midtreatment image was rigidly aligned with the baseline scan in two ways: (1) bony anatomy and (2) carina. Treatment parameters (beam apertures, weights, angles, monitor units, etc.) were transferred to each image. Then, dose was recalculated. Typical IMRT dose constraints were evaluated on all images, and the changes from baseline to each midtreatment image were investigated. Results: Atelectatic lobes experienced mean (stdev) mass changes of −2.8% (36.6%), −24.4% (33.0%), and −9.2% (17.5%) and density changes of −66.0% (6.4%), −25.6% (13.6%), and −17.0% (21.1%) for full, partial, and no resolution, respectively. Means (stdev) of dose changes to spinal cord Dmax, esophagus Dmean, and lungs Dmean were 0.67 (2.99), 0.99 (2.69), and 0.50 Gy (2.05 Gy), respectively, for bone alignment and 0.14 (1.80), 0.77 (2.95), and 0.06 Gy (1.71 Gy) for carina alignment. Dose increases with bone alignment up to 10.93, 7.92, and 5.69 Gy were found for maximum spinal cord, mean esophagus, and mean lung doses, respectively, with carina alignment yielding similar values. 44% and 22% of patients had at least one metric change by at least 5 Gy (dose metrics) or 5% (volume metrics) for bone and carina

  14. Normal Human Lung Epithelial Cells Inhibit Transforming Growth Factor-β Induced Myofibroblast Differentiation via Prostaglandin E2

    PubMed Central

    Epa, Amali P.; Thatcher, Thomas H.; Pollock, Stephen J.; Wahl, Lindsay A.; Lyda, Elizabeth; Kottmann, R. M.; Phipps, Richard P.; Sime, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic progressive disease with very few effective treatments. The key effector cells in fibrosis are believed to be fibroblasts, which differentiate to a contractile myofibroblast phenotype with enhanced capacity to proliferate and produce extracellular matrix. The role of the lung epithelium in fibrosis is unclear. While there is evidence that the epithelium is disrupted in IPF, it is not known whether this is a cause or a result of the fibroblast pathology. We hypothesized that healthy epithelial cells are required to maintain normal lung homeostasis and can inhibit the activation and differentiation of lung fibroblasts to the myofibroblast phenotype. To investigate this hypothesis, we employed a novel co-culture model with primary human lung epithelial cells and fibroblasts to investigate whether epithelial cells inhibit myofibroblast differentiation. Measurements and Main Results In the presence of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, fibroblasts co-cultured with epithelial cells expressed significantly less α-smooth muscle actin and collagen and showed marked reduction in cell migration, collagen gel contraction, and cell proliferation compared to fibroblasts grown without epithelial cells. Epithelial cells from non-matching tissue origins were capable of inhibiting TGF-β induced myofibroblast differentiation in lung, keloid and Graves’ orbital fibroblasts. TGF-β promoted production of prostaglandin (PG) E2 in lung epithelial cells, and a PGE2 neutralizing antibody blocked the protective effect of epithelial cell co-culture. Conclusions We provide the first direct experimental evidence that lung epithelial cells inhibit TGF-β induced myofibroblast differentiation and pro-fibrotic phenotypes in fibroblasts. This effect is not restricted by tissue origin, and is mediated, at least in part, by PGE2. Our data support the hypothesis that the epithelium plays a crucial role in maintaining lung homeostasis

  15. Hormone Receptor Expression in Human Fascial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fede, C.; Albertin, G.; Petrelli, L.; Sfriso, M.M.; Biz, C.; De Caro, R.

    2016-01-01

    Many epidemiologic, clinical, and experimental findings point to sex differences in myofascial pain in view of the fact that adult women tend to have more myofascial problems with respect to men. It is possible that one of the stimuli to sensitization of fascial nociceptors could come from hormonal factors such as estrogen and relaxin, that are involved in extracellular matrix and collagen remodeling and thus contribute to functions of myofascial tissue. Immunohistochemical and molecular investigations (real-time PCR analysis) of relaxin receptor 1 (RXFP1) and estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) localization were carried out on samples of human fascia collected from 8 volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery (all females, between 42 and 70 yrs, divided into pre- and post-menopausal groups), and in fibroblasts isolated from deep fascia, to examine both protein and RNA expression levels. We can assume that the two sex hormone receptors analyzed are expressed in all the human fascial districts examined and in fascial fibroblasts culture cells, to a lesser degree in the post-menopausal with respect to the pre-menopausal women. Hormone receptor expression was concentrated in the fibroblasts, and RXFP1 was also evident in blood vessels and nerves. Our results are the first demonstrating that the fibroblasts located within different districts of the muscular fasciae express sex hormone receptors and can help to explain the link between hormonal factors and myofascial pain. It is known, in fact, that estrogen and relaxin play a key role in extracellular matrix remodeling by inhibiting fibrosis and inflammatory activities, both important factors affecting fascial stiffness and sensitization of fascial nociceptors. PMID:28076930

  16. Prostaglandin E₂ inhibits human lung fibroblast chemotaxis through disparate actions on different E-prostanoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Ji; Wang, Xing-Qi; Sato, Tadashi; Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Nakanishi, Masanori; Kim, Miok; Michalski, Joel; Nelson, Amy J; Sun, Jian-Hong; Farid, Maha; Basma, Hesham; Patil, Amol; Toews, Myron L; Liu, Xiangde; Rennard, Stephen I

    2011-01-01

    The migration of fibroblasts is believed to play a key role in both normal wound repair and abnormal tissue remodeling. Prostaglandin E (PGE)(2), a mediator that can inhibit many fibroblast functions including chemotaxis, was reported to be mediated by the E-prostanoid (EP) receptor EP2. PGE(2), however, can act on four receptors. This study was designed to determine if EP receptors, in addition to EP2, can modulate fibroblast chemotaxis. Using human fetal lung fibroblasts, the expression of all four EP receptors was demonstrated by Western blotting. EP2-selective and EP4-selective agonists inhibited both chemotaxis toward fibronectin in the blindwell assay and migration in a wound-closure assay. In contrast, EP1-selective and EP3-selective agonists stimulated cell migration in both assay systems. These results were confirmed using EP-selective antagonists. The role of both EP2 and EP4 receptors in mediating the PGE(2) inhibition of chemotaxis was also confirmed by small interfering RNA suppression. Furthermore, the role of EP receptors was confirmed by blocking the expected signaling pathways. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PGE(2) can act on multiple EP receptors in human lung fibroblasts, to exert disparate effects. Alterations in EP receptor expression may have the potential to alter PGE(2) action. Targeting specific EP receptors may offer therapeutic opportunities in conditions characterized by abnormal tissue repair and remodeling.

  17. Smoking-Related Gene Expression in Laser Capture Microdissected Human Lung

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Wang, Tao; Xiong, Shengli; Kumar, Shalini V.; Han, Weiguo; Spivack, Simon D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Inter-individual differences in quantitative expression could underlie a propensity for lung cancer. To determine precise individual gene expression signatures on a lung compartment-specific basis, we investigated the expression of carcinogen metabolism genes encoding cytochromes P450 (CYP) 1B1, 2A13, glutathione S-transferase (GST) P1, and a tumor suppressor gene p16 in laser capture microdissected samples of human alveolar compartment (AC) and bronchial epithelial compartment (BEC) lung tissue from 62 smokers and non-smokers. Experimental Design Tobacco exposure was determined by plasma nicotine, cotinine, and smoking history. Precise mRNA expression was determined using our RNA-specific qRT-PCR strategy, and correlated with detailed demographic and clinical characteristics. Results Several correlations of mRNA expression included: (a) CYP1B1 in AC (positively with plasma nicotine level, P = 0.008; plasma cotinine level, P = 0.001); (b) GSTP1 in AC (positively with plasma cotinine level, P = 0.003); (c) GSTP1 in BEC (negatively with smoke dose, P = 0.043; occupational risk, P = 0.019). CYP2A13 was rarely expressed in AC, and not expressed in BEC. p16 expression was not correlated with any measured factor. For each gene, subjects showed expression that was individually concordant between these compartments. No clear association of mRNA expression with lung cancer risk was observed in this pilot analysis. Conclusions The association between lung mRNA expression and tobacco exposure implies that gene-tobacco interaction is a measurable quantitative trait, albeit with wide inter-individual variation. Gene expression tends to be concordant for alveolar and bronchial compartments for these genes in an individual, controlling for proximate tobacco exposure. PMID:19996203

  18. Smoking-Related Gene Expression in Laser Capture-Microdissected Human Lung.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Wang, Tao; Xiong, Shengli; Kumar, Shalini V; Han, Weiguo; Spivack, Simon D

    2009-12-15

    PURPOSE: Interindividual differences in quantitative expression could underlie a propensity for lung cancer. To determine precise individual gene expression signatures on a lung compartment-specific basis, we investigated the expression of carcinogen metabolism genes encoding cytochromes P450 (CYP) 1B1, 2A13, GSTP1, and a tumor suppressor gene p16 in laser capture-microdissected samples of human alveolar compartment (AC) and bronchial epithelial compartment (BEC) lung tissue from 62 smokers and nonsmokers. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Tobacco exposure was determined by plasma nicotine, cotinine, and smoking history. Precise mRNA expression was determined using our RNA-specific qRT-PCR strategy, and correlated with detailed demographic and clinical characteristics. RESULTS: Several correlations of mRNA expression included (a) CYP1B1 in AC (positively with plasma nicotine level, P = 0.008; plasma cotinine level, P = 0.001), (b) GSTP1 in AC (positively with plasma cotinine level, P = 0.003), and (c) GSTP1 in BEC (negatively with smoke dose, P = 0.043; occupational risk, P = 0.019). CYP2A13 was rarely expressed in AC and not expressed in BEC. p16 expression was not correlated with any measured factor. For each gene, subjects showed expression that was individually concordant between these compartments. No clear association of mRNA expression with lung cancer risk was observed in this pilot analysis. CONCLUSIONS: The association between lung mRNA expression and tobacco exposure implies that gene-tobacco interaction is a measurable quantitative trait, albeit with wide interindividual variation. Gene expression tends to be concordant for alveolar and bronchial compartments for these genes in an individual, controlling for proximate tobacco exposure. (Clin Cancer Res 2009;15(24):7562-70).

  19. Distribution of EV71 receptors SCARB2 and PSGL-1 in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiao-Yang; Guo, Li; Huang, Dong-Yang; Chang, Xiao-Lan; Qiu, Qian-Cheng

    2014-09-22

    The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of Enterovirus 71 (EV71) receptors SCARB2 and PSGL-1 in human tissues. The samples were chosen from archived specimens, and the profiles of two receptors were detected in the gastrointestinal tract, lung, and brain in situ by immunohistochemistry. SCARB2 was detected in all the tissues studied, and strong staining was observed in the gastric fundus gland, mucosal and glandular epithelia of the intestine. Similar expression was found in bronchial epithelia and pneumocytes. In addition, SCARB2 was observed in the esophagus/gastric mucosal epithelia, neuron, glial cells, and blood vessels and the perivascular tissues of the brain. By comparison, PSGL-1 was expressed weakly in the mucosal and glandular epithelia of the small intestine and colon. PSGL-1 was expressed in a few bronchial epithelia, and weak staining was observed in the pneumocytes. However, PSGL-1 was found easily in the lamina propria of all the tissues studied, and strong staining of PSGL-1 was also observed in the neurons and glial cells. The distribution of the SCARB2 and PSGL-1 in human gastrointestinal tract, lung, and brain tissues correlated with the distribution of pathological changes seen in EV71 infection. The widespread prevalence of these receptors may help explain the multiple organ involvement in infection with EV71.

  20. Optimization of CT image reconstruction algorithms for the lung tissue research consortium (LTRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollough, Cynthia; Zhang, Jie; Bruesewitz, Michael; Bartholmai, Brian

    2006-03-01

    To create a repository of clinical data, CT images and tissue samples and to more clearly understand the pathogenetic features of pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) launched a cooperative effort known as the Lung Tissue Resource Consortium (LTRC). The CT images for the LTRC effort must contain accurate CT numbers in order to characterize tissues, and must have high-spatial resolution to show fine anatomic structures. This study was performed to optimize the CT image reconstruction algorithms to achieve these criteria. Quantitative analyses of phantom and clinical images were conducted. The ACR CT accreditation phantom containing five regions of distinct CT attenuations (CT numbers of approximately -1000 HU, -80 HU, 0 HU, 130 HU and 900 HU), and a high-contrast spatial resolution test pattern, was scanned using CT systems from two manufacturers (General Electric (GE) Healthcare and Siemens Medical Solutions). Phantom images were reconstructed using all relevant reconstruction algorithms. Mean CT numbers and image noise (standard deviation) were measured and compared for the five materials. Clinical high-resolution chest CT images acquired on a GE CT system for a patient with diffuse lung disease were reconstructed using BONE and STANDARD algorithms and evaluated by a thoracic radiologist in terms of image quality and disease extent. The clinical BONE images were processed with a 3 x 3 x 3 median filter to simulate a thicker slice reconstructed in smoother algorithms, which have traditionally been proven to provide an accurate estimation of emphysema extent in the lungs. Using a threshold technique, the volume of emphysema (defined as the percentage of lung voxels having a CT number lower than -950 HU) was computed for the STANDARD, BONE, and BONE filtered. The CT numbers measured in the ACR CT Phantom images were accurate for all reconstruction kernels for both manufacturers. As expected, visual evaluation of the

  1. The patterns and expression of KDR in normal tissues of human internal organs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianfei; Zhu, Huijun; Wang, Xudong; Tang, Qi; Huang, Hua; Wu, Kerong; Zhu, Jin; Feng, Zhenqing; Shi, Gongshen

    2011-12-01

    KDR has been implicated for playing an important role in the formation of new blood vessels and in solid tumor growth. It was considered as one of the most important regulators of angiogenesis and a key target in anticancer treatment. In the present study, we characterized KDR mRNA and protein expression in normal tissues of perinatal and adult tissues using One-step Real-Time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry with a self-made anti-KDR antibody. The expression of KDR mRNA and protein in perinatal internal organs were all higher than in adult organs including brain, kidney, liver, lung and heart, respectively. KDR protein was presented in the cell plasma membrane of human internal tissues. The expression of KDR protein was raised in macrophage of spleen, and decreased in neurons of brain, myocardium, bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar epithelial cell, proximal and distal tubules cells, and hepatic cells with the maturity process of human organs. Notably, the order of KDR protein expression from highest to lowest is as follows: brain, liver, heart, kidney, and lung in adult tissues with statistically significant. It follows that how to balance the potential therapeutic side effect with human internal organs in targeted therapy of over-expressing KDR tumor.

  2. Respiratory epithelial cell expression of human transforming growth factor-alpha induces lung fibrosis in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Korfhagen, T R; Swantz, R J; Wert, S E; McCarty, J M; Kerlakian, C B; Glasser, S W; Whitsett, J A

    1994-01-01

    Increased production of EGF or TGF-alpha by the respiratory epithelial cells has been associated with the pathogenesis of various forms of lung injury. Growth factors and cytokines are thought to act locally, via paracrine and autocrine mechanisms, to stimulate cell proliferation and matrix deposition by interstitial lung cells resulting in pulmonary fibrosis. To test whether TGF-alpha mediates pulmonary fibrotic responses, we have generated transgenic mice expressing human TGF-alpha under control of regulatory regions of the human surfactant protein C (SP-C) gene. Human TGF-alpha mRNA was expressed in pulmonary epithelial cells in the lungs of the transgenic mice. Adult mice bearing the SP-C-TGF-alpha transgene developed severe pulmonary fibrosis. Fibrotic lesions were observed in peribronchial, peribronchiolar, and perivascular regions, as well as subjacent to pleural surfaces. Lesions consisted of fibrous tissue that included groups of epithelial cells expressing endogenous SP-C mRNA, consistent with their identification as distal respiratory epithelial cells. Peripheral fibrotic regions consisted of thickened pleura associated with extensive collagen deposition. Alveolar architecture was disrupted in the transgenic mice with loss of alveoli in the lung parenchyma. Pulmonary epithelial cell expression of TGF-alpha in transgenic mice disrupts alveolar morphogenesis and produces fibrotic lesions mediated by paracrine signaling between respiratory epithelial and interstitial cells of the lung. Images PMID:8163670

  3. Recognition of Pneumocystis carinii by gram stain in impression smears of lung tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Felegie, T P; Pasculle, A W; Dekker, A

    1984-01-01

    In 12 of 20 (60%) biopsy-proven cases of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, the diagnosis was first suggested by examination of routine Gram stains of impression smears made from infected lung tissue and later confirmed by methenamine-silver staining. The cysts appeared as 5- to 7-microns unstained spheres, each containing six to eight intracystic gram-negative bodies (sporozoites). Although the Gram stain does not appear to be as sensitive as more traditional staining techniques for the detection of P. carinii, clinical microbiologists should be aware of the morphology of this organism in gram-stained specimens because this relatively simple procedure gives quick results. Images PMID:6084017

  4. Characterization of RNA isolated from eighteen different human tissues: results from a rapid human autopsy program.

    PubMed

    Walker, Douglas G; Whetzel, Alexis M; Serrano, Geidy; Sue, Lucia I; Lue, Lih-Fen; Beach, Thomas G

    2016-09-01

    Many factors affect the integrity of messenger RNA from human autopsy tissues including postmortem interval (PMI) between death and tissue preservation and the pre-mortem agonal and disease states. In this communication, we describe RNA isolation and characterization of 389 samples from 18 different tissues from elderly donors who were participants in a rapid whole-body autopsy program located in Sun City, Arizona ( www.brainandbodydonationprogram.org ). Most tissues were collected within a PMI of 2-6 h (median 3.15 h; N = 455), but for this study, tissue from cases with longer PMIs (1.25-29.25 h) were included. RNA quality was assessed by RNA integrity number (RIN) and total yield (ng RNA/mg tissue). RIN correlated with PMI for heart (r = -0.531, p = 0.009) and liver (r = -558, p = 0.0017), while RNA yield correlated with PMI for colon (r = -485, p = 0.016) and skin (r = -0.460, p = 0.031). RNAs with the lowest integrity were from skin and cervix where 22.7 and 31.4 % of samples respectively failed to produce intact RNA; by contrast all samples from esophagus, lymph node, jejunum, lung, stomach, submandibular gland and kidney produced RNA with measurable RINs. Expression levels in heart RNA of 4 common housekeeping normalization genes showed significant correlations of Ct values with RIN, but only one gene, glyceraldehyde-3 phosphate dehydrogenase, showed a correlation of Ct with PMI. There were no correlations between RIN values obtained for liver, adrenal, cervix, esophagus and lymph node and those obtained from corresponding brain samples. We show that high quality RNA can be produced from most human autopsy tissues, though with significant differences between tissues and donors. The RNA stability and yield did not depend solely on PMI; other undetermined factors are involved, but these do not include the age of the donor.

  5. A mast cell secretagogue, compound 48/80, prevents the accumulation of hyaluronan in lung tissue injured by ionizing irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, K.; Bjermer, L.; Hellstroem, S.H.; Henriksson, R.; Haellgren, R. )

    1990-02-01

    Irradiation with a single dose of 30 Grey on the basal regions of the lungs of Sprague-Dawley rats induced a peribronchial and alveolar inflammation. Infiltration of mast cells in the edematous alveolar interstitial tissue and also in the peribronchial tissue were characteristic features of the lesion. The appearance of mast cells was already seen 4 wk after irradiation and by weeks 6 to 8 there was a heavy infiltration. The staining properties suggested that they were connective tissue-type mast cells. The infiltration of mast cells was paralleled by an accumulation of hyaluronan (hyaluronic acid) in the alveolar interstitial tissue 6 and 8 wk after irradiation. The recovery of hyaluronan (HA) during bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of the lungs also increased at this time. Treatment with a mast cell secretagogue, compound 48/80, induced a distinct reduction of granulated mast cells in the alveolar tissue. Regular treatment with compound 48/80 from the time of irradiation considerably reduced the HA recovery during BAL and the HA accumulation in the interstitial tissue but did not affect the interstitial infiltration of mononuclear cells and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. By contrast, an accumulation of HA in the alveolar interstitial space was induced when compound 48/80 was given not until mast cell infiltration of the lung had started. The effects of compound 48/80 indicate that the connective tissue response after lung irradiation is dependent on whether or not mast cell degranulation is induced before or after the mast cell infiltration of the alveolar tissue.

  6. Decreased Laminin Expression by Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Cultured in Acellular Lung Scaffolds from Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Godin, Lindsay M.; Sandri, Brian J.; Wagner, Darcy E.; Meyer, Carolyn M.; Price, Andrew P.; Akinnola, Ifeolu; Weiss, Daniel J.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The lung changes functionally and structurally with aging. However, age-related effects on the extracellular matrix (ECM) and corresponding effects on lung cell behavior are not well understood. We hypothesized that ECM from aged animals would induce aging-related phenotypic changes in healthy inoculated cells. Decellularized whole organ scaffolds provide a powerful model for examining how ECM cues affect cell phenotype. The effects of age on ECM composition in both native and decellularized mouse lungs were assessed as was the effect of young vs old acellular ECM on human bronchial epithelial cells (hBECs) and lung fibroblasts (hLFs). Native aged (1 year) lungs demonstrated decreased expression of laminins α3 and α4, elastin and fibronectin, and elevated collagen, compared to young (3 week) lungs. Proteomic analyses of decellularized ECM demonstrated similar findings, and decellularized aged lung ECM contained less diversity in structural proteins compared to young ECM. When seeded in old ECM, hBECs and hLFs demonstrated lower gene expression of laminins α3 and α4, respectively, as compared to young ECM, paralleling the laminin deficiency of aged ECM. ECM changes appear to be important factors in potentiating aging-related phenotypes and may provide clues to mechanisms that allow for aging-related lung diseases. PMID:26954258

  7. Decreased Laminin Expression by Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Cultured in Acellular Lung Scaffolds from Aged Mice.

    PubMed

    Godin, Lindsay M; Sandri, Brian J; Wagner, Darcy E; Meyer, Carolyn M; Price, Andrew P; Akinnola, Ifeolu; Weiss, Daniel J; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The lung changes functionally and structurally with aging. However, age-related effects on the extracellular matrix (ECM) and corresponding effects on lung cell behavior are not well understood. We hypothesized that ECM from aged animals would induce aging-related phenotypic changes in healthy inoculated cells. Decellularized whole organ scaffolds provide a powerful model for examining how ECM cues affect cell phenotype. The effects of age on ECM composition in both native and decellularized mouse lungs were assessed as was the effect of young vs old acellular ECM on human bronchial epithelial cells (hBECs) and lung fibroblasts (hLFs). Native aged (1 year) lungs demonstrated decreased expression of laminins α3 and α4, elastin and fibronectin, and elevated collagen, compared to young (3 week) lungs. Proteomic analyses of decellularized ECM demonstrated similar findings, and decellularized aged lung ECM contained less diversity in structural proteins compared to young ECM. When seeded in old ECM, hBECs and hLFs demonstrated lower gene expression of laminins α3 and α4, respectively, as compared to young ECM, paralleling the laminin deficiency of aged ECM. ECM changes appear to be important factors in potentiating aging-related phenotypes and may provide clues to mechanisms that allow for aging-related lung diseases.

  8. Dendritic Cells Display Subset and Tissue-Specific Maturation Dynamics over Human Life.

    PubMed

    Granot, Tomer; Senda, Takashi; Carpenter, Dustin J; Matsuoka, Nobuhide; Weiner, Joshua; Gordon, Claire L; Miron, Michelle; Kumar, Brahma V; Griesemer, Adam; Ho, Siu-Hong; Lerner, Harvey; Thome, Joseph J C; Connors, Thomas; Reizis, Boris; Farber, Donna L

    2017-03-21

    Maturation and migration to lymph nodes (LNs) constitutes a central paradigm in conventional dendritic cell (cDC) biology but remains poorly defined in humans. Using our organ donor tissue resource, we analyzed cDC subset distribution, maturation, and migration in mucosal tissues (lungs, intestines), associated lymph nodes (LNs), and other lymphoid sites from 78 individuals ranging from less than 1 year to 93 years of age. The distribution of cDC1 (CD141(hi)CD13(hi)) and cDC2 (Sirp-α(+)CD1c(+)) subsets was a function of tissue site and was conserved between donors. We identified cDC2 as the major mature (HLA-DR(hi)) subset in LNs with the highest frequency in lung-draining LNs. Mature cDC2 in mucosal-draining LNs expressed tissue-specific markers derived from the paired mucosal site, reflecting their tissue-migratory origin. These distribution and maturation patterns were largely maintained throughout life, with site-specific variations. Our findings provide evidence for localized DC tissue surveillance and reveal a lifelong division of labor between DC subsets, with cDC2 functioning as guardians of the mucosa.

  9. Impact of acute and subchronic asbestos exposure on some parameters of antioxidant defense system and lung tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Kaiglová, A; Kováciková, Z; Hurbánková, M

    1999-07-01

    Asbestos fibers have been used in industry for decades. Deleterious effect of asbestos on the lungs has been documented. However, the mechanism of asbestos related diseases has not been fully explained yet. Numerous papers suggest there is a role of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) in asbestos-induced lung disease development. The excess ROI produced can be removed from the lungs by enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants. The aim of our study was to compare the levels of antioxidants (ascorbic acid, retinol, alpha-tocopherol, glutathionperoxidase) as well as some markers of lung injury (lipid peroxides, total amount of protein, alkaline phosphatase) in asbestos treated Wistar-rats both 24 hr and 3 months after exposure to those in the controls, and to find out if the changes in antioxidant levels could affect impairment of the lungs. Decreased levels of antioxidants and increased values of lung tissue injury parameters in exposed groups suggest involvement of ROI in the mechanism of asbestos lung disease development, resulting in lung tissue injury, both 24 hr and 3 months after exposure.

  10. SOX2 gene regulates the transcriptional network of oncogenes and affects tumorigenesis of human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Xu, Yingxi; Chen, Yanan; Li, Xuefei; Mou, Wenjun; Wang, Lina; Liu, Yanhua; Reisfeld, Ralph A; Xiang, Rong; Lv, Dan; Li, Na

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that cancer stem cells (CSCs) have higher tumorigenesis properties than those of differentiated cancer cells and that transcriptional factor-SOX2 plays a vital role in maintaining the unique properties of CSCs; however, the function and underlying mechanism of SOX2 in carcinogenesis of lung cancer are still elusive. This study applied immunohistochemistry to analyze the expression of SOX2 in human lung tissues of normal individuals as well as patients with adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and large cell and small cell carcinoma and demonstrated specific overexpression of SOX2 in all types of lung cancer tissues. This finding supports the notion that SOX2 contributes to the tumorigenesis of lung cancer cells and can be used as a diagnostic probe. In addition, obviously higher expression of oncogenes c-MYC, WNT1, WNT2, and NOTCH1 was detected in side population (SP) cells than in non-side population (NSP) cells of human lung adenocarcinoma cell line-A549, revealing a possible mechanism for the tenacious tumorigenic potential of CSCs. To further elucidate the function of SOX2 in tumorigenesis of cancer cells, A549 cells were established with expression of luciferase and doxycycline-inducible shRNA targeting SOX2. We found silencing of SOX2 gene reduces the tumorigenic property of A549 cells with attenuated expression of c-MYC, WNT1, WNT2, and NOTCH1 in xenografted NOD/SCID mice. By using the RNA-Seq method, an additional 246 target cancer genes of SOX2 were revealed. These results present evidence that SOX2 may regulate the expression of oncogenes in CSCs to promote the development of human lung cancer.

  11. Lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... they can't breathe deeply. Pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis are examples of lung tissue disease. Lung circulation ... tuberculosis Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Simple pulmonary eosinophilia Patient Instructions Chronic obstructive pulmonary ...

  12. Measurement of optical penetration depth and refractive index of human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shusen; Li, Hui; Li, Buhong

    2003-01-01

    Experimental techniques for measurement of optical penetration depth and refractive index of human tissue are presented, respectively. Optical penetration depth can be obtained from the measurement of the relative fluence-depth distribution inside the target tissue. The depth of normal and carcinomatous human lung tissues irradiated with the wavelengths of 406.7, 632.8 and 674.4 nm in vitro are respectively determined. In addition, a novel simple method based on total internal reflection for measuring the refractive index of biotissue in vivo is developed, and the refractive indices of skin from people of different age, sex and skin color are measured. Their refractive indices are almost same and the average is 1.533.

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: Human soft tissue analysis using x-ray or gamma-ray techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakou, C.; Farquharson, M. J.

    2008-06-01

    This topical review is intended to describe the x-ray techniques used for human soft tissue analysis. X-ray techniques have been applied to human soft tissue characterization and interesting results have been presented over the last few decades. The motivation behind such studies is to provide improved patient outcome by using the data obtained to better understand a disease process and improve diagnosis. An overview of theoretical background as well as a complete set of references is presented. For each study, a brief summary of the methodology and results is given. The x-ray techniques include x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, Compton scattering, Compton to coherent scattering ratio and attenuation measurements. The soft tissues that have been classified using x-rays or gamma rays include brain, breast, colon, fat, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, prostate, skin, thyroid and uterus.

  14. The Role of Serotonin Transporter in Human Lung Development and in Neonatal Lung Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sen, P.; Parks, W. T.; Langston, C.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Failure of the vascular pulmonary remodeling at birth often manifests as pulmonary hypertension (PHT) and is associated with a variety of neonatal lung disorders including a uniformly fatal developmental disorder known as alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV). Serum serotonin regulation has been linked to pulmonary vascular function and disease, and serotonin transporter (SERT) is thought to be one of the key regulators in these processes. We sought to find evidence of a role that SERT plays in the neonatal respiratory adaptation process and in the pathomechanism of ACD/MPV. Methods. We used histology and immunohistochemistry to determine the timetable of SERT protein expression in normal human fetal and postnatal lungs and in cases of newborn and childhood PHT of varied etiology. In addition, we tested for a SERT gene promoter defect in ACD/MPV patients. Results. We found that SERT protein expression begins at 30 weeks of gestation, increases to term, and stays high postnatally. ACD/MPV patients had diminished SERT expression without SERT promoter alteration. Conclusion. We concluded that SERT/serotonin pathway is crucial in the process of pulmonary vascular remodeling/adaptation at birth and plays a key role in the pathobiology of ACD/MPV. PMID:28316463

  15. Cellular morphometry of the bronchi of human and dog lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, E.S.

    1992-09-01

    Quantitative data of the human bronchial epithelial cells at possible risk for malignant transformation in lung cancer is crucial for accurate radon dosimetry and risk analysis. The locations and other parameters of the nuclei which may be damaged by [alpha] particles must be determined and compared in different airway generations, among smokers, non-smokers and ex-smokers, between men and women and in people of different ages. This proposal includes extended morphometric studies on electron micrographs of human epithelium of defined airway generations and in parallel on electron micrographs of the dog bronchial lining. The second part of this proposal describes studies to quantitate the cycling bronchial epithelial population(s) using proliferation markers and immunocytochemistry on frozen and paraffin sections and similar labeling of isolated bronchial epithelial cells sorted flow cytometry.

  16. Overexpression and activation of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor in human non-small-cell lung carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Olivero, M.; Rizzo, M.; Madeddu, R.; Casadio, C.; Pennacchietti, S.; Nicotra, M. R.; Prat, M.; Maggi, G.; Arena, N.; Natali, P. G.; Comoglio, P. M.; Di Renzo, M. F.

    1996-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) stimulates the invasive growth of epithelial cells via the c-MET oncogene-encoded receptor. In normal lung, both the receptor and the ligand are detected, and the latter is known to be a mitogenic and a motogenic factor for both cultured bronchial epithelial cells and non-small-cell carcinoma lines. Here, ligand and receptor expression was examined in 42 samples of primary human non-small-cell lung carcinoma of different histotype. Each carcinoma sample was compared with adjacent normal lung tissue. The Met/HGF receptor was found to be 2 to 10-fold increased in 25% of carcinoma samples (P = 0.0113). The ligand, HGF/SF, was found to be 10 to 100-fold overexpressed in carcinoma samples (P < 0.0001). Notably, while HGF/SF was occasionally detectable and found exclusively as a single-chain inactive precursor in normal tissues, it was constantly in the biologically-active heterodimeric form in carcinomas. Immunohistochemical staining showed homogeneous expression of both the receptor and the ligand in carcinoma samples, whereas staining was barely detectable in their normal counterparts. These data show that HGF/SF is overexpressed and consistently activated in non-small-cell lung carcinomas and may contribute to the invasive growth of lung cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8980383

  17. Classification of 27 Tumor-Associated Antigens by Histochemical Analysis of 36 Freshly Resected Lung Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Gene; Sugiura, Mototaka; Hattori, Yoshinobu; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    In previous studies, we identified 29 tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and isolated 488 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that specifically bind to one of the 29 TAAs. In the present study, we performed histochemical analysis of 36 freshly resected lung cancer tissues by using 60 mAbs against 27 TAAs. Comparison of the staining patterns of tumor cells, bronchial epithelial cells, and normal pulmonary alveolus cells and interalveolar septum allowed us to determine the type and location of cells that express target molecules, as well as the degree of expression. The patterns were classified into 7 categories. While multiple Abs were used against certain TAAs, the differences observed among them should be derived from differences in the binding activity and/or the epitope. Thus, such data indicate the versatility of respective clones as anti-cancer drugs. Although the information obtained was limited to the lung and bronchial tube, bronchial epithelial cells represent normal growing cells, and therefore, the data are informative. The results indicate that 9 of the 27 TAAs are suitable targets for therapeutic Abs. These 9 Ags include EGFR, HER2, TfR, and integrin α6β4. Based on our findings, a pharmaceutical company has started to develop anti-cancer drugs by using Abs to TfR and integrin α6β4. HGFR, PTP-LAR, CD147, CDCP1, and integrin αvβ3 are also appropriate targets for therapeutic purposes. PMID:27834817

  18. The use of animal tissues alongside human tissue: Cultural and ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Kaw, Anu; Jones, D Gareth; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Teaching and research facilities often use cadaveric material alongside animal tissues, although there appear to be differences in the way we handle, treat, and dispose of human cadaveric material compared to animal tissue. This study sought to analyze cultural and ethical considerations and provides policy recommendations on the use of animal tissues alongside human tissue. The status of human and animal remains and the respect because of human and animal tissues were compared and analyzed from ethical, legal, and cultural perspectives. The use of animal organs and tissues is carried out within the context of understanding human anatomy and function. Consequently, the interests of human donors are to be pre-eminent in any policies that are enunciated, so that if any donors find the presence of animal remains unacceptable, the latter should not be employed. The major differences appear to lie in differences in our perceptions of their respective intrinsic and instrumental values. Animals are considered to have lesser intrinsic value and greater instrumental value than humans. These differences stem from the role played by culture and ethical considerations, and are manifested in the resulting legal frameworks. In light of this discussion, six policy recommendations are proposed, encompassing the nature of consent, respect for animal tissues as well as human remains, and appropriate separation of both sets of tissues in preparation and display.

  19. Epigenetic clustering of lung adenocarcinomas based on DNA methylation profiles in adjacent lung tissue: Its correlation with smoking history and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takashi; Arai, Eri; Kohno, Takashi; Takahashi, Yoriko; Miyata, Sayaka; Tsuta, Koji; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Soejima, Kenzo; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Kanai, Yae

    2014-07-15

    The aim of this study was to clarify the significance of DNA methylation alterations during lung carcinogenesis. Infinium assay was performed using 139 paired samples of non-cancerous lung tissue (N) and tumorous tissue (T) from a learning cohort of patients with lung adenocarcinomas (LADCs). Fifty paired N and T samples from a validation cohort were also analyzed. DNA methylation alterations on 1,928 probes occurred in N samples relative to normal lung tissue from patients without primary lung tumors, and were inherited by, or strengthened in, T samples. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering using DNA methylation levels in N samples on all 26,447 probes subclustered patients into Cluster I (n = 32), Cluster II (n = 35) and Cluster III (n = 72). LADCs in Cluster I developed from the inflammatory background in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in heavy smokers and were locally invasive. Most patients in Cluster II were non-smokers and had a favorable outcome. LADCs in Cluster III developed in light smokers were most aggressive (frequently showing lymphatic and blood vessel invasion, lymph node metastasis and an advanced pathological stage), and had a poor outcome. DNA methylation levels of hallmark genes for each cluster, such as IRX2, HOXD8, SPARCL1, RGS5 and EI24, were again correlated with clinicopathological characteristics in the validation cohort. DNA methylation profiles reflecting carcinogenetic factors such as smoking and COPD appear to be established in non-cancerous lung tissue from patients with LADCs and may determine the aggressiveness of tumors developing in individual patients, and thus patient outcome.

  20. Uptake, accumulation, and egress of erythromycin by tissue culture cells of human origin.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J R; Johnson, P; Miller, M F

    1985-01-01

    The ability of erythromycin A base to penetrate and accumulate in tissue culture cells of human origin was investigated. The antibiotic was highly concentrated by early passage cells of normal bronchus, kidney, liver, lung, and skin and by cancer cells derived from breast, liver, and lung. Intracellular levels 4 to 12 times that of the extracellular milieu were obtained in both early-passage and transformed cells. The total quantity of erythromycin accumulated depended on the extracellular concentration of antibiotic, but the cellular/extracellular ratios were, for the most part, independent of the initial extracellular drug concentration. In all cell types tested, the accumulated antibiotic rapidly egressed when cells were incubated in antibiotic-free medium. Bioactivity assays demonstrated that the expelled drug was unmetabolized, fully active antibiotic. The concentration of erythromycin by a variety of human cell types probably accounts, in part, for the effectiveness of the antibiotic against intracellular parasites such as Legionella and Chlamydia spp. PMID:3994346

  1. Expression of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) in human lung cancer and the impact of YangZheng XiaoJi on SHH-mediated biological function of lung cancer cells and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen G; Ye, Lin; Ruge, Fiona; Sun, Ping-Hui; Sanders, Andrew J; Ji, Ki; Lane, Jane; Zhang, Lijian; Satherley, Lucy; Weeks, Hoi P; Zhi, Xiuyi; Gao, Yong; Wei, Cong; Wu, Yiling; Mason, Malcolm D

    2015-03-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) is a protein that is aberrantly expressed in various human tumors. SHH and its signaling molecules have been indicated as potential therapeutic targets. In the present study, we evaluated the expression of SHH transcript in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues and investigated the impact of inhibiting SHH together with a traditional Chinese medicine formula, YangZheng XiaoJi (YZXJ), on the function and growth of lung cancer cells. Human NSCLC tissues had significantly higher levels of the SHH transcript compared matched normal lung tissues (n=83). TNM2 tumors and tumors with pleural invasion had higher levels than TNM1 and non-invasive tumors. High SHH levels were associated with a shorter overall survival (OS) of the patients. A SHH inhibitor, cyclopamine, and YZXJ alone or in combination had a marked inhibitory effect on cellular invasion and cellular migration of human lung cancer cells, A549 and SKMES1. YangZheng XiaoJi and its combination with cyclopamine also significantly reduced the growth of lung tumors in vivo together with a reduction of SHH and smoothened (Smo) proteins in the lung tumors. The present study provides evidence that blocking SHH by way of small inhibitor and by YangZheng XiaoJi has a profound influence on lung cancer cells as seen by in vitro invasion and cell migration and in vivo tumor growth. Together with the aberrant expression of SHH in NSCLC tumors in the patients, it is suggested that SHH is a potential target for therapies for NSCLC.

  2. CD8+ T lymphocytes in lung tissue from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Daniil, Zoe; Kitsanta, Panagiota; Kapotsis, George; Mathioudaki, Maria; Kollintza, Androniki; Karatza, Marilena; Milic-Emili, Joseph; Roussos, Charis; Papiris, Spyros A

    2005-01-01

    Background Several studies have implicated a role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of lung damage in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Parenchymal lung damage leads to defects in mechanics and gas exchange and clinically manifests with exertional dyspnea. Investigations of inflammatory cells in IPF have shown that eosinophils, neutrophils and CD8+ TLs may be associated with worse prognosis. We wished to investigate by quantitative immunohistochemistry infiltrating macrophages, neutrophils and T lymphocytes (TLs) subpopulations (CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+) in lung tissue of patients with IPF and their correlation with lung function indices and grade of dyspnoea. Methods Surgical biopsies of 12 patients with IPF were immunohistochemically stained with mouse monoclonal antibodies (anti-CD68 for macrophages, anti-elastase for neutrophils, and anti-CD3, anti-CD4, anti-CD8 for CD3+TLs, CD4+TLs, and CD8+TLs respectively). The number of positively stained cells was determined by observer-interactive computerized image analysis (SAMBA microscopic image processor). Cell numbers were expressed in percentage of immunopositive nuclear surface in relation to the total nuclear surface of infiltrative cells within the tissue (labeling Index). Correlations were performed between cell numbers and physiological indices [FEV1, FVC, TLC, DLCO, PaO2, PaCO2 and P(A-a)O2)] as well as dyspnoea scores assessed by the Medical Research Council (MRC) scale. Results Elastase positive cells accounted for the 7.04% ± 1.1 of total cells, CD68+ cells for the 16.6% ± 2, CD3+ TLs for the 28.8% ± 7, CD4+ TLs for the 14.5 ± 4 and CD8+ TLs for the 13.8 ± 4. CD8+TLs correlated inversely with FVC % predicted (rs = -0.67, p = 0.01), TLC % predicted (rs = -0.68, p = 0.01), DLCO % predicted (rs = -0.61, p = 0.04), and PaO2 (rs = -0.60, p = 0.04). Positive correlations were found between CD8+TLs and P(A-a)O2 (rs = 0.65, p = 0.02) and CD8+TLs and MRC score (rs = 0.63, p = 0.02). Additionally, CD68+ cells

  3. Successful cryopreservation of human ovarian cortex tissues using supercooling.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Hisashi; Zhang, Yue; Mihara, Makoto; Sato, Chifumi

    2012-01-01

    The development of new method to cryopreserve human ovarian cortex tissues without damage is needed for the improvement of quality of life (QOL) of female cancer patients. Here we show novel cryopreservation method of human ovarian cortex tissues by using supercooling (S.C.) procedure. Our method will be helpful in order to preserve fertility of female cancer patients.

  4. Circulating and tissue biomarkers in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fumagalli, Caterina; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Raviele, Paola Rafaniello; Vacirca, Davide; Bertalot, Giovanni; Rampinelli, Cristiano; Lazzeroni, Matteo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Veronesi, Giulia; Fusco, Nicola; Barberis, Massimo; Guerini-Rocco, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Objective We sought to characterise circulating and tissue tumour biomarkers of patients who developed early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during long-term follow-up of a chemoprevention trial (NCT00321893). Materials and Methods Blood and sputum samples were collected from 202 high-risk asymptomatic individuals with CT-detected stable lung nodules. Real-time PCR was performed on plasma to quantify free circulating DNA. Baseline serum was investigated with a previously validated test based on 13 circulating miRNAs (miR-Test). Promoter methylation status of p16, RASSF1a and RARβ2 and telomerase activity were assessed in sputum samples. DNA was extracted from each tumour developed during follow-up and subjected to a mutation survey using the LungCarta panel on the Sequenom MassARRAY platform. Results During follow-up (9 years) six individuals underwent surgery for stage I NSCLC with a median time of disease onset of 20.5 months. MiR-Test scores were positive (range: 0.14–7.24) in four out of six baseline pre-disease onset sera. No association was identified between free circulating DNA or sputum biomarkers and disease onset. All tumours harboured at least one somatic mutation in well-known cancer genes, including KRAS (n = 4), BRAF (n = 1), and TP53 (n = 3). Conclusion Circulating miRNA tests may represent valuable tools to detect clinically-silent tumours. Early-stage lung adenocarcinomas harbour recurrent genetic events similar to those described in advanced-stage NSCLCs. PMID:28194229

  5. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate cobalt in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong; Smith, Leah J; Holmes, Amie L; Zheng, Tongzhang; Pierce Wise, John

    2016-05-01

    Cobalt is a toxic metal used in various industrial applications leading to adverse lung effects by inhalation. Cobalt is considered a possible human carcinogen with the lung being a primary target. However, few studies have considered cobalt-induced toxicity in human lung cells, especially normal lung epithelial cells. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble cobalt in normal primary human lung epithelial cells. Cobalt oxide and cobalt chloride were used as representative particulate and soluble cobalt compounds, respectively. Exposure to both particulate and soluble cobalt induced a concentration-dependent increase in cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and intracellular cobalt ion levels. Based on intracellular cobalt ion levels, we found that soluble and particulate cobalt induced similar cytotoxicity while soluble cobalt was more genotoxic than particulate cobalt. These data indicate that cobalt compounds are cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung epithelial cells.

  6. Parametric and nonparametric nonlinear system identification of lung tissue strip mechanics.

    PubMed

    Yuan, H; Westwick, D T; Ingenito, E P; Lutchen, K R; Suki, B

    1999-01-01

    Lung parenchyma is a soft biological material composed of many interacting elements such as the interstitial cells, extracellular collagen-elastin fiber network, and proteoglycan ground substance. The mechanical behavior of this delicate structure is complex showing several mild but distinct types of nonlinearities and a fractal-like long memory stress relaxation characterized by a power-law function. To characterize tissue nonlinearity in the presence of such long memory, we investigated the robustness and predictive ability of several nonlinear system identification techniques on stress-strain data obtained from lung tissue strips with various input wave forms. We found that in general, for a mildly nonlinear system with long memory, a nonparametric nonlinear system identification in the frequency domain is preferred over time-domain techniques. More importantly, if a suitable parametric nonlinear model is available that captures the long memory of the system with only a few parameters, high predictive ability with substantially increased robustness can be achieved. The results provide evidence that the first-order kernel of the stress-strain relationship is consistent with a fractal-type long memory stress relaxation and the nonlinearity can be described as a Wiener-type nonlinear structure for displacements mimicking tidal breathing.

  7. Lung cancer in uranium miners: A tissue resource and pilot study. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.; Gilliland, F.D.

    1998-08-13

    This project incorporates two related research projects directed toward understanding respiratory carcinogenesis in radon-exposed former uranium miners. The first project involved a continuation of the tissue resource of lung cancer cases from former underground uranium miners and comparison cases from non-miners. The second project was a pilot study for a proposed longitudinal study of respiratory carcinogenesis in former uranium miners. The objectives including facilitating the investigation of molecular changes in radon exposed lung cancer cases, developing methods for prospectively studying clinical, cytologic, cytogenetic, and molecular changes in the multi-event process of respiratory carcinogenesis, and assessing the feasibility of recruiting former uranium miners into a longitudinal study that collected multiple biological specimens. A pilot study was conducted to determine whether blood collection, induced sputum, bronchial brushing, washings, and mucosal biopsies from participants at two of the hospitals could be included efficiently. A questionnaire was developed for the extended study and all protocols for specimen collection and tissue handling were completed. Resource utilization is in progress at ITRI and the methods have been developed to study molecular and cellular changes in exfoliated cells contained in sputum as well as susceptibility factors.

  8. Gene Expression Profiling in Lung Tissues from Rat Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Zalesak, Selina M.; Kidane, Yared H.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Scully, Robert R.; Williams, Kyle; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% of very fine dust (< 3 micron), that is respirable. The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in lung tissues from rats exposed to lunar dust particles. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 mg/m(exp 3) of lunar dust. Five rats per group were euthanized 1 day, and 3 months after the last inhalation exposure. The total RNAs were isolated from lung tissues after being lavaged. The Agilent Rat GE v3 microarray was used to profile global gene expression (44K). The genes with significant expression changes are identified and the gene expression data were further analyzed using various statistical tools.

  9. Fundamentals of gas phase plasmas for treatment of human tissue.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Mark J; Babaeva, Natalia Yu

    2011-01-01

    The use of gas phase plasmas for treating human tissue is at the intersection of two disciplines - plasma physics and engineering, and medicine. In this paper, a primer will be provided for the medical practitioner on the fundamentals of generating gas phase plasmas at atmospheric pressure in air for the treatment of human tissue. The mechanisms for gas phase plasmas interacting with tissue and biological fluids will also be discussed using results from computer modeling.

  10. TUMORAL TISSUE SPECIFIC PROMOTER HYPERMETHYLATION OF DISTINCT TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENES IN A CASE WITH NONSMALL CELL LUNG CARCINOMA: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Sulhattin; Dogan, Tamer; Koksal, Binnur; Yildirim, Malik Ejder; Gumus, Cesur; Elagoz, Sahenda; Akkurt, Ibrahim; Ozdemir, Oztürk

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective: Non-small cell lung carcinoma is an aggressive phenomenon and the epigenetical alterations of some tumor supressor genes have been reported for the different tumor types. Case Presentation: It is presented a case report concerning a 43 years old male with NSCLC on the lower segment of the right lung. The patient underwent a diag-nostic excisional thin-needle biopsy and after the histological confirmation. We examined the promoter methylation status of some distinct tumor supressor genes in tumoral and blood tissues of the case after sodium bisulfite conversion and DNA amplification with methylation specific multiplex PCR technique. Both tissues were also searched for G to A transitions in codons 12 and 13 of the K-ras proto-oncogene. Results: Tumor specimen showed fully methyl pattern profiles for the SFRP2, p16, DAPK1 and partially hyper-methylated profile for the p53 and MGMT genes in this case with non-small lung carci-noma. Blood speicemen showed normal hypomethylated profiles for all studied TS genes. The K-ras proto-oncogene was in normal structure both in blood and tumoral spiecemens that examined. Conclusion: Results indicate that genes exhibit tumor suppressor activi-ties in blood, but exhibit epigenetic inactivation in carcinoma cell. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that epigenetic mechanisms may play an important role in the non-small cell lung carcinogenesis in human. PMID:21264081

  11. Expression of metalloprotease insulin-degrading enzyme (insulysin) in normal and malignant human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yfanti, Christina; Mengele, Karin; Gkazepis, Apostolos; Weirich, Gregor; Giersig, Cecylia; Kuo, Wen-Liang; Tang, Wei-Jen; Rosner, Marsha; Schmitt, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Background Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE, insulysin, insulinase; EC 3.4.22.11), a thiol metalloendopeptidase, is involved in intracellular degradation of insulin, thereby inhibiting its translocation and accumulation to the nucleus. Recently, protein expression of IDE has been demonstrated in the epithelial ducts of normal breast and in breast cancer tissue (Radulescu et al., Int J Oncol 30:73; 2007). Materials and Methods Utilizing four different antibodies generated against different epitopes of the IDE molecule, we performed western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining on several normal human tissues, on a plethora of tumor cell lines of different tissue origin, and on malignant breast and ovarian tissue. Results Applying the four IDE-directed antibodies, we demonstrate IDE expression at the protein level, both by means of immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry, in all of the tumor cell lines analyzed. Besides, IDE protein expression was found in normal tissues of the kidney, liver, lung, brain, breast and skeletal muscle, as well as in breast and ovarian cancer tissues. Immunohistochemical visualization of IDE indicated cytoplasmic localization of IDE in all of the cell lines and tissues assessed. Conclusions We performed for the first time a wide-ranging survey on IDE protein expression in normal and malignant tissues and cells and thus extend knowledge about cellular and tissue distribution of IDE, an enzyme which so far has mainly been studied in connection with Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes but not in cancer. PMID:18813847

  12. Marked longevity of human lung parenchymal elastic fibers deduced from prevalence of D-aspartate and nuclear weapons-related radiocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, S.D.; Endicott, S.K.; Province, M.A.; Pierce, J.A.; Campbell, E.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Normal structure and function of the lung parenchyma depend upon elastic fibers. Amorphous elastin is biochemically stable in vitro, and may provide a metabolically stable structural framework for the lung parenchyma. To test the metabolic stability of elastin in the normal human lung parenchyma, we have (a) estimated the time elapsed since the synthesis of the protein through measurement of aspartic acid racemization and (b) modeled the elastin turnover through measurement of the prevalence of nuclear weapons-related {sup 14}C. Elastin purified by a new technique from normal lung parenchyma was hydrolyzed; then the prevalences of D-aspartate and {sup 14}C were measured by gas chromatography and accelerator-mass spectrometry, respectively. D-aspartate increased linearly with age; Kasp (1.76 x 10{sup {minus} 3} yr{sup {minus} 1}) was similar to that previously found for extraordinarily stable human tissues, indicating that the age of lung parenchymal elastin corresponded with the age of the subject. Radiocarbon prevalence data also were consistent with extraordinary metabolic stability of elastin; the calculated mean carbon residence time in elastin was 74 yr (95% confidence limits, 40-174 yr). These results indicate that airspace enlargement characteristic of 'aging lung' is not associated with appreciable new synthesis of lung parenchymal elastin. The present study provides the first tissue-specific evaluation of turnover of an extracellular matrix component in humans and underscores the potential importance of elastin for maintenance of normal lung structure. Most importantly, the present work provides a foundation for strategies to directly evaluate extracellular matrix injury and repair in diseases of lung (especially pulmonary emphysema), vascular tissue, and skin.

  13. OX40 blockade inhibits house dust mite driven allergic lung inflammation in mice and in vitro allergic responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Katie E; Dumont, Celine; Thompson, Clare L; Catley, Matthew C; Dixon, Kate L; Marshall, Diane

    2015-04-01

    The costimulatory receptor OX40 is expressed on activated T cells and regulates T-cell responses. Here, we show the efficacy and mechanism of action of an OX40 blocking antibody using the chronic house dust mite (HDM) mouse model of lung inflammation and in vitro HDM stimulation of cells from HDM allergic human donors. We have demonstrated that OX40 blockade leads to a reduction in the number of eosinophils and neutrophils in the lavage fluid and lung tissue of HDM sensitized mice. This was accompanied by a decrease in activated and memory CD4(+) T cells in the lungs and further analysis revealed that both the Th2 and Th17 populations were inhibited. Improved lung function and decreased HDM-specific antibody responses were also noted. Significantly, efficacy was observed even when anti-OX40 treatment was delayed until after inflammation was established. OX40 blockade also inhibited the release of the Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 from cells isolated from HDM allergic human donors. Altogether, our data provide evidence of a role of the OX40/OX40L pathway in ongoing allergic lung inflammation and support clinical studies of a blocking OX40 antibody in Th2 high severe asthma patients.

  14. Role of the CKIP1 gene in proliferation and apoptosis of the human lung cancer cell line H1299.

    PubMed

    Chen, G M; Ding, R F; Tan, Y D; Pan, X B; Jiang, G M; He, J F; Lin, S H; Liu, C; Jia, Y

    2015-04-27

    Casein kinase 2 interacting protein 1 (CKIP1) is a specific interacting protein of the casein kinase 2 (CK2) α subunit, and, by binding CK2 and other proteins, functions as an adaptor to regulate a series of cellular functions. Previous studies suggested that CKIP1 might play an important role in regulating oncogenic activities. However, few studies examining the function of CKIP1 in cancer cells have been performed. The present study aimed to investigate the role of CKIP1 in lung cancer. CKIP1 mRNA expression was detected in 5 human lung cancer cell lines (H-125, H1299, LTEP-A-2, SPC-A-1, and NCL-H446) by semi-quantitative RT-PCR, and in 10 noncancerous lung tissues and 30 non-small lung cancer tissues by real-time quantitative PCR. A lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to knock down CKIP1 expression in the H1299 cell line. To elucidate the impact of CKIP1 downregulation on H1299 cells, cell proliferation, DNA synthesis, and cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were measured by high content screening assay, BrdU incorporation, and flow cytometric analyses, respectively. CKIP1 mRNA was highly expressed both in H1299 cells and lung cancer tissues. We found that downregulation of CKIP1 resulted in suppression of proliferation and colony-forming ability of H1299 cells, and led to S phase cell cycle arrest and G2 phase promotion, as well as a significant enhancement of H1299 cell apoptosis. Our study indicated that high expression levels of CKIP1 were associated with the development of lung cancer, and that CKIP1 knockdown may block tumor cell growth mainly by promoting cell apoptosis.

  15. Mechanical Forces Accelerate Collagen Digestion by Bacterial Collagenase in Lung Tissue Strips

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Eunice; Sato, Susumu; Takahashi, Ayuko; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Blute, Todd A.; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Suki, Béla

    2016-01-01

    Most tissues in the body are under mechanical tension, and while enzymes mediate many cellular and extracellular processes, the effects of mechanical forces on enzyme reactions in the native extracellular matrix (ECM) are not fully understood. We hypothesized that physiological levels of mechanical forces are capable of modifying the activity of collagenase, a key remodeling enzyme of the ECM. To test this, lung tissue Young's modulus and a nonlinearity index characterizing the shape of the stress-strain curve were measured in the presence of bacterial collagenase under static uniaxial strain of 0, 20, 40, and 80%, as well as during cyclic mechanical loading with strain amplitudes of ±10 or ±20% superimposed on 40% static strain, and frequencies of 0.1 or 1 Hz. Confocal and electron microscopy was used to determine and quantify changes in ECM structure. Generally, mechanical loading increased the effects of enzyme activity characterized by an irreversible decline in stiffness and tissue deterioration seen on both confocal and electron microscopic images. However, a static strain of 20% provided protection against digestion compared to both higher and lower strains. The decline in stiffness during digestion positively correlated with the increase in equivalent alveolar diameters and negatively correlated with the nonlinearity index. These results suggest that the decline in stiffness results from rupture of collagen followed by load transfer and subsequent rupture of alveolar walls. This study may provide new understanding of the role of collagen degradation in general tissue remodeling and disease progression. PMID:27462275

  16. Mechanical Forces Accelerate Collagen Digestion by Bacterial Collagenase in Lung Tissue Strips.

    PubMed

    Yi, Eunice; Sato, Susumu; Takahashi, Ayuko; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Blute, Todd A; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Suki, Béla

    2016-01-01

    Most tissues in the body are under mechanical tension, and while enzymes mediate many cellular and extracellular processes, the effects of mechanical forces on enzyme reactions in the native extracellular matrix (ECM) are not fully understood. We hypothesized that physiological levels of mechanical forces are capable of modifying the activity of collagenase, a key remodeling enzyme of the ECM. To test this, lung tissue Young's modulus and a nonlinearity index characterizing the shape of the stress-strain curve were measured in the presence of bacterial collagenase under static uniaxial strain of 0, 20, 40, and 80%, as well as during cyclic mechanical loading with strain amplitudes of ±10 or ±20% superimposed on 40% static strain, and frequencies of 0.1 or 1 Hz. Confocal and electron microscopy was used to determine and quantify changes in ECM structure. Generally, mechanical loading increased the effects of enzyme activity characterized by an irreversible decline in stiffness and tissue deterioration seen on both confocal and electron microscopic images. However, a static strain of 20% provided protection against digestion compared to both higher and lower strains. The decline in stiffness during digestion positively correlated with the increase in equivalent alveolar diameters and negatively correlated with the nonlinearity index. These results suggest that the decline in stiffness results from rupture of collagen followed by load transfer and subsequent rupture of alveolar walls. This study may provide new understanding of the role of collagen degradation in general tissue remodeling and disease progression.

  17. Brown adipose tissue as an anti-obesity tissue in humans.

    PubMed

    Chechi, K; Nedergaard, J; Richard, D

    2014-02-01

    During the 11th Stock Conference held in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, world-leading experts came together to present and discuss recent developments made in the field of brown adipose tissue biology. Owing to the vast capacity of brown adipose tissue for burning food energy in the process of thermogenesis, and due to demonstrations of its presence in adult humans, there is tremendous interest in targeting brown adipose tissue as an anti-obesity tissue in humans. However, the future of such therapeutic approaches relies on our understanding of the origin, development, recruitment, activation and regulation of brown adipose tissue in humans. As reviewed here, the 11th Stock Conference was organized around these themes to discuss the recent progress made in each aspect, to identify gaps in our current understanding and to further provide a common groundwork that could support collaborative efforts aimed at a future therapy for obesity, based on brown adipose tissue thermogenesis.

  18. Decellularized extracellular matrix derived from human adipose tissue as a potential scaffold for allograft tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Suk; Kim, Beob Soo; Kim, Jun Young; Kim, Jae Dong; Choi, Young Chan; Yang, Hyun-Jin; Park, Kinam; Lee, Hee Young; Cho, Yong Woo

    2011-06-01

    Decellularized tissues composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) have been clinically used to support the regeneration of various human tissues and organs. Most decellularized tissues so far have been derived from animals or cadavers. Therefore, despite the many advantages of decellularized tissue, there are concerns about the potential for immunogenicity and the possible presence of infectious agents. Herein, we present a biomaterial composed of ECM derived from human adipose tissue, the most prevalent, expendable, and safely harvested tissue in the human body. The ECM was extracted by successive physical, chemical, and enzymatic treatments of human adipose tissue isolated by liposuction. Cellular components including nucleic acids were effectively removed without significant disruption of the morphology or structure of the ECM. Major ECM components were quantified, including acid/pepsin-soluble collagen, sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), and soluble elastin. In an in vivo experiment using mice, the decellularized ECM graft exhibited good compatibility to surrounding tissues. Overall results suggest that the decellularized ECM containing biological and chemical cues of native human ECM could be an ideal scaffold material not only for autologous but also for allograft tissue engineering.

  19. Macrophages modulate engineered human tissues for enhanced vascularization and healing

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, Kara L.; Freytes, Donald O.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering is increasingly based on recapitulating human physiology, through integration of biological principles into engineering designs. In spite of all progress in engineering functional human tissues, we are just beginning to develop effective methods for establishing blood perfusion and controlling the inflammatory factors following implantation into the host. Functional vasculature largely determines tissue survival and function in vivo. The inflammatory response is a major regulator of vascularization and overall functionality of engineered tissues, through the activity of different types of macrophages and the cytokines they secrete. We discuss cell-scaffold-bioreactor systems for harnessing the inflammatory response for enhanced tissue vascularization and healing. To this end, inert scaffolds that have been considered for many decades a “gold standard” in regenerative medicine are beginning to be replaced by a new generation of “smart” tissue engineering systems designed to actively mediate tissue survival and function. PMID:25331098

  20. Diagnose human colonic tissues by terahertz near-field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua; Ma, Shihua; Wu, Xiumei; Yang, Wenxing; Zhao, Tian

    2015-03-01

    Based on a terahertz (THz) pipe-based near-field imaging system, we demonstrate the capability of THz imaging to diagnose freshly surgically excised human colonic tissues. Through THz near-field scanning the absorbance of the colonic tissues, the acquired images can clearly distinguish cancerous tissues from healthy tissues fast and automatically without pathological hematoxylin and eosin stain diagnosis. A statistical study on 58 specimens (20 healthy tissues and 38 tissues with tumor) from 31 patients (mean age: 59 years; range: 46 to 79 years) shows that the corresponding diagnostic sensitivity and specificity on colonic tissues are both 100%. Due to its capability to perform quantitative analysis, our study indicates the potential of the THz pipe-based near-field imaging for future automation on human tumor pathological examinations.

  1. Inducible expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase attenuates acute rejection of tissue-engineered lung allografts in rats.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Ammar; Kardar, Gholam Ali; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Toolabi, LadanTeimoori; Ghanbari, Hossein; Sadroddiny, Esmaeil

    2016-01-15

    Lung disease remains one of the principal causes of death worldwide and the incidence of pulmonary diseases is increasing. Complexity in treatments and shortage of donors leads us to develop new ways for lung disease treatment. One promising strategy is preparing engineered lung for transplantation. In this context, employing new immunosuppression strategies which suppresses immune system locally rather than systemic improves transplant survival. This tends to reduce the difficulties in transplant rejection and the systemic impact of the use of immunosuppressive drugs which causes side effects such as serious infections and malignancies. In our study examining the immunosuppressive effects of IDO expression, we produced rat lung tissues with the help of decellularized tissue, differentiating medium and rat mesenchymal stem cells. Transduction of these cells by IDO expressing lentiviruses provided inducible and local expression of this gene. To examine immunosuppressive properties of IDO expression by these tissues, we transplanted these allografts into rats and, subsequently, evaluated cytokine expression and histopathological properties. Expression of inflammatory cytokines IFNγ and TNFα were significantly downregulated in IDO expressing allograft. Moreover, acute rejection score of this experimental group was also lower comparing other two groups and mRNA levels of FOXP3, a regulatory T cell marker, upregulated in IDO expressing group. However, infiltrating lymphocyte counting did not show significant difference between groups. This study demonstrates that IDO gene transfer into engineered lung allograft tissues significantly attenuates acute allograft damage suggesting local therapy with IDO as a strategy to reduce the need for systemic immunosuppression and, thereby, its side effects.

  2. [Neuronal differentiation of human small cell lung cancer cell line PC-6 by Solcoseryl].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T

    1997-11-01

    Solcoseryl is composed of extracts from calf blood, and is a drug known to activate tissue respiration. In the present study, I demonstrated the cell biological effects of Solcoseryl on a human small cell lung cancer cell line, PC-6, by analyzing cell morphology, cell growth, expression of neuronal differentiation markers, and the ras proto-oncogene product(ras p21). Exposure of PC-6 cells to Solcoseryl at the concentration of 200 microliters/ml induced (1) cell morphological changes, including neurodendrite-like projections from the cell surface, and (2) complete inhibition of cell growth, that was shown by the loss of Ki-67 expression. Solcoseryl also induced the expression of neurofilament protein and acetylcholinesterase, both of which are markers of neuronal differentiation. Moreover, it upregulated the expression of the ras proto-oncogene product, ras p21. Taken together, these data suggest that Solcoseryl is composed of component(s) which can induce neuronal differentiation of the human small cell lung cancer cell line, PC-6.

  3. Depth-resolved fluorescence of human ectocervical tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Xi, Peng; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yim, So Fan; Yu, Mei-Yung; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2005-04-01

    The depth-resolved autofluorescence of normal and dysplastic human ectocervical tissue within 120um depth were investigated utilizing a portable confocal fluorescence spectroscopy with the excitations at 355nm and 457nm. From the topmost keratinizing layer of all ectocervical tissue samples, strong keratin fluorescence with the spectral characteristics similar to collagen was observed, which created serious interference in seeking the correlation between tissue fluorescence and tissue pathology. While from the underlying non-keratinizing epithelial layer, the measured NADH fluorescence induced by 355nm excitation and FAD fluorescence induced by 457nm excitation were strongly correlated to the tissue pathology. The ratios between NADH over FAD fluorescence increased statistically in the CIN epithelial relative to the normal and HPV epithelia, which indicated increased metabolic activity in precancerous tissue. This study demonstrates that the depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy can reveal fine structural information on epithelial tissue and potentially provide more accurate diagnostic information for determining tissue pathology.

  4. Effect Of α2-Adrenergic Agonists And Antagonists On Cytokine Release From Human Lung Macrophages Cultured In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, O.; Staiano, R.I.; De Robertis, E.; Conti, G.; Di Crescenzo, V.; Loffredo, S.; Marone, G.; Marinosci, G. Zito; Cataldi, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    The most trusted hypothesis to explain how α2-adrenergic agonists may preserve pulmonary functions in critically ill patients is that they directly act on macrophages by interfering with an autocrine/paracrine adrenergic system that controls cytokine release through locally synthetized noradrenaline and α1- and α2-adrenoreceptors. We tested this hypothesis in primary cultures of resident macrophages from human lung (HLMs). HLMs were isolated by centrifugation on percoll gradients from macroscopically healthy human lung tissue obtained from four different patients at the time of lung resection for cancer. HLMs from these patients showed a significant expression of α2A, α2B and α2C adrenoreceptors both at the mRNA and at the protein level. To evaluate whether α2 adrenoreceptors controlled cytokine release from HMLs, we measured IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α concentrations in the culture medium in basal conditions and after preincubation with several α2-adrenergic agonists or antagonists. Neither the pretreatment with the α2-adrenergic agonists clonidine, medetomidine or dexdemetomidine or with the α2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine caused significant changes in the response of any of these cytokines to LPS. These results show that, different from what reported in rodents, clonidine and dexdemetomidine do not directly suppress cytokine release from human pulmonary macrophages. This suggests that alternative mechanisms such as effects on immune cells activation or the modulation of autonomic neurotransmission could be responsible for the beneficial effects of these drugs on lung function in critical patients. PMID:27896229

  5. Tissue Platinum Concentration and Tumor Response in Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eric S.; Lee, J. Jack; He, Guangan; Chow, Chi-Wan; Fujimoto, Junya; Kalhor, Neda; Swisher, Stephen G.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Stewart, David J.; Siddik, Zahid H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Platinum resistance is a major limitation in the treatment of advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Reduced intracellular drug accumulation is one of the most consistently identified features of platinum-resistant cell lines, but clinical data are limited. We assessed the effects of tissue platinum concentrations on response and survival in NSCLC. Patients and Methods We measured total platinum concentrations by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry in 44 archived fresh-frozen NSCLC specimens from patients who underwent surgical resection after neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy. Tissue platinum concentration was correlated with percent reduction in tumor size on post- versus prechemotherapy computed tomography scans. The relationship between tissue platinum concentration and survival was assessed by univariate and multicovariate Cox proportional hazards regression model analysis and Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results Tissue platinum concentration correlated significantly with percent reduction in tumor size (P < .001). The same correlations were seen with cisplatin, carboplatin, and all histology subgroups. Furthermore, there was no significant impact of potential variables such as number of cycles and time lapse from last chemotherapy on platinum concentration. Patients with higher platinum concentration had longer time to recurrence (P = .034), progression-free survival (P = .018), and overall survival (P = .005) in the multicovariate Cox model analysis after adjusting for number of cycles. Conclusion This clinical study established a relationship between tissue platinum concentration and response in NSCLC. It suggests that reduced platinum accumulation might be an important mechanism of platinum resistance in the clinical setting. Further studies investigating factors that modulate intracellular platinum concentration are warranted. PMID:22891266

  6. Transcriptomics resources of human tissues and organs.

    PubMed

    Uhlén, Mathias; Hallström, Björn M; Lindskog, Cecilia; Mardinoglu, Adil; Pontén, Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-04-04

    Quantifying the differential expression of genes in various human organs, tissues, and cell types is vital to understand human physiology and disease. Recently, several large-scale transcriptomics studies have analyzed the expression of protein-coding genes across tissues. These datasets provide a framework for defining the molecular constituents of the human body as well as for generating comprehensive lists of proteins expressed across tissues or in a tissue-restricted manner. Here, we review publicly available human transcriptome resources and discuss body-wide data from independent genome-wide transcriptome analyses of different tissues. Gene expression measurements from these independent datasets, generated using samples from fresh frozen surgical specimens and postmortem tissues, are consistent. Overall, the different genome-wide analyses support a distribution in which many proteins are found in all tissues and relatively few in a tissue-restricted manner. Moreover, we discuss the applications of publicly available omics data for building genome-scale metabolic models, used for analyzing cell and tissue functions both in physiological and in disease contexts.

  7. Targeted Therapy Against VEGFR and EGFR With ZD6474 Enhances the Therapeutic Efficacy of Irradiation in an Orthotopic Model of Human Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shibuya, Keiko; Komaki, Ritsuko; Shintani, Tomoaki; Itasaka, Satoshi; Ryan, Anderson; Juergensmeier, Juliane M.; Milas, Luka; Ang, Kian; Herbst, Roy S.; O'Reilly, Michael S.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Conventional therapies for patients with lung cancer have reached a therapeutic plateau. We therefore evaluated the feasibility of combined vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) targeting with radiation therapy in an orthotopic model that closely recapitulates the clinical presentation of human lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Effects of irradiation and/or ZD6474, a small-molecule inhibitor of VEGFR2 and EGFR tyrosine kinases, were studied in vitro for human lung adenocarcinoma cells by using proliferation and clonogenic assays. The feasibility of combining ZD6474 with radiation therapy was then evaluated in an orthotopic model of human lung adenocarcinoma. Lung tumor burden and spread within the thorax were assessed, and tumor and adjacent tissues were analyzed by means of immunohistochemical staining for multiple parameters, including CD31, VEGF, VEGFR2, EGF, EGFR, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9, and basic fibroblast growth factor. Results: ZD6474 enhanced the radioresponse of NCI-H441 human lung adenocarcinoma cells by a factor of 1.37 and markedly inhibited sublethal damage repair. In vivo, the combined blockade of VEGFR2 and EGFR by ZD6474 blocked pleural effusion formation and angiogenesis and enhanced the antivascular and antitumor effects of radiation therapy in the orthotopic human lung cancer model and was superior to chemoradiotherapy. Conclusions: When radiation therapy is combined with VEGFR2 and EGFR blockade, significant enhancement of antiangiogenic, antivascular, and antitumor effects are seen in an orthotopic model of lung cancer. These data provide support for clinical trials of biologically targeted and conventional therapies for human lung cancer.

  8. Metallic artifact mitigation and organ-constrained tissue assignment for Monte Carlo calculations of permanent implant lung brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Miksys, N.; Thomson, R. M.; Furutani, K. M.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate methods of generating accurate patient-specific computational phantoms for the Monte Carlo calculation of lung brachytherapy patient dose distributions. Methods: Four metallic artifact mitigation methods are applied to six lung brachytherapy patient computed tomography (CT) images: simple threshold replacement (STR) identifies high CT values in the vicinity of the seeds and replaces them with estimated true values; fan beam virtual sinogram replaces artifact-affected values in a virtual sinogram and performs a filtered back-projection to generate a corrected image; 3D median filter replaces voxel values that differ from the median value in a region of interest surrounding the voxel and then applies a second filter to reduce noise; and a combination of fan beam virtual sinogram and STR. Computational phantoms are generated from artifact-corrected and uncorrected images using several tissue assignment schemes: both lung-contour constrained and unconstrained global schemes are considered. Voxel mass densities are assigned based on voxel CT number or using the nominal tissue mass densities. Dose distributions are calculated using the EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose for{sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs seeds and are compared directly as well as through dose volume histograms and dose metrics for target volumes surrounding surgical sutures. Results: Metallic artifact mitigation techniques vary in ability to reduce artifacts while preserving tissue detail. Notably, images corrected with the fan beam virtual sinogram have reduced artifacts but residual artifacts near sources remain requiring additional use of STR; the 3D median filter removes artifacts but simultaneously removes detail in lung and bone. Doses vary considerably between computational phantoms with the largest differences arising from artifact-affected voxels assigned to bone in the vicinity of the seeds. Consequently, when metallic artifact reduction and constrained tissue

  9. Differential protein folding and chemical changes in lung tissues exposed to asbestos or particulates.

    PubMed

    Pascolo, Lorella; Borelli, Violetta; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Birarda, Giovanni; Bedolla, Diana E; Salomé, Murielle; Vaccari, Lisa; Calligaro, Carla; Cotte, Marine; Hesse, Bernhard; Luisi, Fernando; Zabucchi, Giuliano; Melato, Mauro; Rizzardi, Clara

    2015-07-10

    Environmental and occupational inhalants may induce a large number of pulmonary diseases, with asbestos exposure being the most risky. The mechanisms are clearly related to chemical composition and physical and surface properties of materials. A combination of X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) and Fourier Transform InfraRed (μFTIR) microscopy was used to chemically characterize and compare asbestos bodies versus environmental particulates (anthracosis) in lung tissues from asbestos exposed and control patients. μXRF analyses revealed heterogeneously aggregated particles in the anthracotic structures, containing mainly Si, K, Al and Fe. Both asbestos and particulates alter lung iron homeostasis, with a more marked effect in asbestos exposure. μFTIR analyses revealed abundant proteins on asbestos bodies but not on anthracotic particles. Most importantly, the analyses demonstrated that the asbestos coating proteins contain high levels of β-sheet structures. The occurrence of conformational changes in the proteic component of the asbestos coating provides new insights into long-term asbestos effects.

  10. Differential protein folding and chemical changes in lung tissues exposed to asbestos or particulates

    PubMed Central

    Pascolo, Lorella; Borelli, Violetta; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Birarda, Giovanni; Bedolla, Diana E.; Salomé, Murielle; Vaccari, Lisa; Calligaro, Carla; Cotte, Marine; Hesse, Bernhard; Luisi, Fernando; Zabucchi, Giuliano; Melato, Mauro; Rizzardi, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Environmental and occupational inhalants may induce a large number of pulmonary diseases, with asbestos exposure being the most risky. The mechanisms are clearly related to chemical composition and physical and surface properties of materials. A combination of X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) and Fourier Transform InfraRed (μFTIR) microscopy was used to chemically characterize and compare asbestos bodies versus environmental particulates (anthracosis) in lung tissues from asbestos exposed and control patients. μXRF analyses revealed heterogeneously aggregated particles in the anthracotic structures, containing mainly Si, K, Al and Fe. Both asbestos and particulates alter lung iron homeostasis, with a more marked effect in asbestos exposure. μFTIR analyses revealed abundant proteins on asbestos bodies but not on anthracotic particles. Most importantly, the analyses demonstrated that the asbestos coating proteins contain high levels of β-sheet structures. The occurrence of conformational changes in the proteic component of the asbestos coating provides new insights into long-term asbestos effects. PMID:26159651

  11. Are there characteristic alterations in lung tissue associated with Crohn's disease?

    PubMed

    Kayser, K; Probst, F; Gabius, H J; Müller, K M

    1990-08-01

    Two male patients aged 12 and 31 years suffered from Crohn's disease for more than six years and were treated with Cortison for more than four years. Surgical excision of parts of the terminal ileum was performed in both patients. They suffered from pulmonary symptoms as dyspnoea, shortness of breath and ventilation disturbances two years after operation. Wedge biopsies of the lungs revealed the following histomorphological findings: 1. Granulomatous interstitial lymphocyte infiltrates 2. Acute alveolitis with severe dysplasia of pneumocytes 3. Moderate interstitial fibrosis. Immunohistology performed in one case showed predominantly lambda chains expressed by lymphocytes associated with IgA and IgM. IgG was missing, furthermore kappa chains could not be detected. Macrophages contained endogenous lectins (sugar receptors) for fucose, maltose, and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (glcNAc). No receptors specific for mannose, lactose, and heparin could be found. Pneumocytes did not bind the neoglycoproteins but were found to express HLA-DR receptors detectable by the monoclonal antibody LN 3 in dysplastic pneumocytes only. The histomorphological and immunohistochemical findings suggest that the analyzed alterations of lung tissue are related to the underlying disease of enteritis regionalis.

  12. Predictions of ozone absorption in human lungs from newborn to adult

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, J.H.; Graham, R.C. )

    1989-01-01

    Although children are an important human population, dosimetry models for gases have been used to predict absorption mainly in laboratory animals and adult humans. To correct this omission, we have used several sources of data on age-dependent lower respiratory tract (LRT) volumes, age-dependent airway dimensions, a model of the adult tracheobronchial region, and a model of the adult acinus to construct theoretical LRT lung models for humans from birth to adulthood. An ozone (O3) dosimetry model was then used to estimate the regional and local uptake of O3 in the (theoretical) LRT of children and adults. For sedentary or quiet breathing, the LRT distribution of absorbed O3, the percent uptake (84 to 88%) and the centriacinar O3 tissue dose are not very sensitive to age. For maximal work during exercise, predicted LRT uptakes range from 87 to 93%, and the regional percent uptakes are more dependent on age than during quiet breathing. In general, the total quantity of O3 absorbed per minute increases with age. Regardless of age and state of breathing, the largest tissue dose of O3 is predicted to occur in the centriacinar region, where many animal studies show the maximal morphological damage from O3.

  13. Inducible Bronchus-Associated Lymphoid Tissue: Taming Inflammation in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ji Young; Randall, Troy D.; Silva-Sanchez, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Following pulmonary inflammation, leukocytes that infiltrate the lung often assemble into structures known as inducible Bronchus-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (iBALT). Like conventional lymphoid organs, areas of iBALT have segregated B and T cell areas, specialized stromal cells, high endothelial venules, and lymphatic vessels. After inflammation is resolved, iBALT is maintained for months, independently of inflammation. Once iBALT is formed, it participates in immune responses to pulmonary antigens, including those that are unrelated to the iBALT-initiating antigen, and often alters the clinical course of disease. However, the mechanisms that govern immune responses in iBALT and determine how iBALT impacts local and systemic immunity are poorly understood. Here, we review our current understanding of iBALT formation and discuss how iBALT participates in pulmonary immunity. PMID:27446088

  14. Proteomic Study of Differential Protein Expression in Mouse Lung Tissues after Aerosolized Ricin Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhendong; Han, Chao; Du, Jiajun; Zhao, Siyan; Fu, Yingying; Zheng, Guanyu; Sun, Yucheng; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Wensen; Wan, Jiayu; Qian, Jun; Liu, Linna

    2014-01-01

    Ricin is one of the most poisonous natural toxins from plants and is classified as a Class B biological threat pathogen by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of U.S.A. Ricin exposure can occur through oral or aerosol routes. Ricin poisoning has a rapid onset and a short incubation period. There is no effective treatment for ricin poisoning. In this study, an aerosolized ricin-exposed mouse model was developed and the pathology was investigated. The protein expression profile in the ricin-poisoned mouse lung tissue was analyzed using proteomic techniques to determine the proteins that were closely related to the toxicity of ricin. 2D gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and subsequent biological functional analysis revealed that six proteins including Apoa1 apolipoprotein, Ywhaz 14-3-3 protein, Prdx6 Uncharacterized Protein, Selenium-binding protein 1, HMGB1, and DPYL-2, were highly related to ricin poisoning. PMID:24786090

  15. Proteomic study of differential protein expression in mouse lung tissues after aerosolized ricin poisoning.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhendong; Han, Chao; Du, Jiajun; Zhao, Siyan; Fu, Yingying; Zheng, Guanyu; Sun, Yucheng; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Wensen; Wan, Jiayu; Qian, Jun; Liu, Linna

    2014-04-28

    Ricin is one of the most poisonous natural toxins from plants and is classified as a Class B biological threat pathogen by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of U.S.A. Ricin exposure can occur through oral or aerosol routes. Ricin poisoning has a rapid onset and a short incubation period. There is no effective treatment for ricin poisoning. In this study, an aerosolized ricin-exposed mouse model was developed and the pathology was investigated. The protein expression profile in the ricin-poisoned mouse lung tissue was analyzed using proteomic techniques to determine the proteins that were closely related to the toxicity of ricin. 2D gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and subsequent biological functional analysis revealed that six proteins including Apoa1 apolipoprotein, Ywhaz 14-3-3 protein, Prdx6 Uncharacterized Protein, Selenium-binding protein 1, HMGB1, and DPYL-2, were highly related to ricin poisoning.

  16. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia overlaps organizing pneumonia in lung-dominant connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Ren; Peng, Shou-Chun; Wei, Lu-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Here, we reported two cases of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia overlap organizing pneumonia (NSIP/OP) with lung-dominant connective tissue disease (LD-ILD). The first case is a patient with hands of chapped skin, right-sided pleuritic chest discomfort, weakness, positive ANA and antibodies to Ro/SS-A (+++) and Ro-52 (++). In the second case, there were Reynaud's disease, and nucleolus-ANA increased (1:800). Chest high resolution CT scan in both cases showed ground-glass opacifications, predominantly in basal and subpleural region and the pathologic manifestation were correlated with NSIP/OP, which were previously discovered in Sjogren syndrome, PM/DM and other rheumatic diseases. The two cases of NSIP/OP with LD-CTD we reported expand disease spectrum of NSIP/OP pathological types in ILD. However, it is necessary to process large-scale studies.

  17. HIV-1 cellular and tissue replication patterns in infected humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Araínga, Mariluz; Su, Hang; Poluektova, Larisa Y.; Gorantla, Santhi; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2016-01-01

    Humanized mice have emerged as a testing platform for HIV-1 pathobiology by reflecting natural human disease processes. Their use to study HIV-1 biology, virology, immunology, pathogenesis and therapeutic development has served as a robust alternative to more-well developed animal models for HIV/AIDS. A critical component in reflecting such human pathobiology rests in defining the tissue and cellular sites for HIV-1 infection. To this end, we examined the tissue sites for viral infection in bone marrow, blood, spleens, liver, gut, brain, kidney and lungs of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell engrafted virus-infected NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice. Cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and sorted from species mixtures defined as CD34+ lineage negative progenitor cells, CD14+CD16+ monocyte-macrophages and central, stem cell and effector memory T cells. The cell distribution and viral life cycle were found dependent on the tissue compartment and time of infection. Cell subsets contained HIV-1 total and integrated DNA as well as multi-spliced and unspliced RNA in divergent proportions. The data support the idea that humanized mice can provide a means to examine the multifaceted sites of HIV-1 replication including, but not limited to progenitor cells and monocyte-macrophages previously possible only in macaques and human. PMID:26996968

  18. Smooth muscle myosin regulation by serum and cell density in cultured rat lung connective tissue cells.

    PubMed

    Babij, P; Zhao, J; White, S; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Periasamy, M; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    RNA and protein analyses were used to detect expression of SM1 and SM2 smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) in cultured adult rat lung connective tissue cells (RL-90). Smooth muscle MHC mRNA expression in confluent cells grown in 10% serum was approximately 50% of the level in adult stomach. Similar results were obtained in cells cultured at low density (25% confluency) in 1% serum. However, in low-density cultures transferred to 10% serum for 24 h, the level of MHC mRNA decreased to approximately 20% of that in adult stomach. Smooth muscle alpha-actin showed a pattern of expression similar to that for smooth muscle MHC. Expression of nonmuscle MHC-A mRNA was higher in all culture conditions compared to stomach. MHC-A mRNA expression was less in low-density cultures in low serum and increased when low-density cultures were transferred to 10% serum for 24 h. MHC-B mRNA expression was less in low- vs. high-density cultures. In contrast to MHC-A, however, MHC-B mRNA expression in low-density cultures was higher in low serum. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting with SM1-specific antibody demonstrated the presence of the SM1 protein isoform as well as reactivity to a protein band migrating slightly faster than SM2. These results demonstrate that cultured rat lung connective tissue cells express smooth muscle MHC and that expression is modulated by culture conditions.

  19. Effects of acupuncture on the gene expression profile of lung tissue from normal rats.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lei-Miao; Wang, Yu; Wang, Yan; Xu, Yu-Dong; Liu, Yan-Yan; Jin, Wei-Rong; Zhang, Qing-Hua; Yang, Yong-Qing

    2012-08-01

    Acupuncture has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for various diseases. However, little attention has been paid to its physiological influences, especially on the changes in protein and mRNA levels following acupuncture treatment under normal conditions. In this study, we investigated the gene expression profile of lung tissue from acupuncture-treated normal rats and attempted to characterize the underlying mechanisms of the changes in expression. Three common acupoints, Dazhui (GV14), fengmen (BL12) and feishu (BL13) were selected for analysis, and 2 serial analyses of gene expression (SAGE) tag libraries of the lung tissues that were derived from the normal and acupuncture-treated rats were established. Bioinformatic analyses were carried out using the functional annotation tools of the database for annotation, visualization and integrated discovery (DAVID), the gene ontology (GO) Tree Machine and the Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis. In total, 144 tags were differentially expressed (P<0.05), and the DAVID functional classification of genes demonstrated that the genes were divided into 6 types. Furthermore, GO Tree Machine analysis of the gene categories indicated that 10 enriched GO categories had become enriched after acupuncture, and that 15 KEGG pathways matched the differentially expressed tags of the 2 SAGE libraries. Our results show that the essential effects of acupuncture on normal rats include the regulation of macromolecular biosynthesis, transportation and metabolism. Cellular biosynthesis and cellular lipid metabolism are the common biological processes that occur in response to acupuncture under normal and morbid conditions, which may be the general physiological effects of acupuncture.

  20. Detection of Chlamydia pneumoniae on cytospin preparations from bronchoalveolar lavage in COPD patients and in lung tissue from advanced emphysema.

    PubMed

    Brandén, Eva; Gnarpe, Judy; Hillerdal, Gunnar; Orre, Lotta; Sköld, C Magnus; Löfdahl, Magnus; Koyi, Hirsh; Tornling, Göran

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with smoking but other etiological factors contribute. Chlamydia pneumoniae is an obligate intracellular bacterium causing both acute and chronic respiratory tract infections. Studies have revealed an association between chronic C. pneumoniae infection and COPD, asthma and lung cancer but there have been difficulties detecting C. pneumoniae in the bronchial tree. Cytospin slides prepared from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from 14 patients with COPD, 10 healthy smokers (S) and 7 non smokers (NS) were analyzed with a fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled monoclonal antibody to C. pneumoniae. Lung tissue from 24 patients with advanced emphysema who had undergone lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) was examined with immunohistochemistry for C. pneumoniae. Archived serum samples for detection of specific C. pneumoniae antibodies by microimmunofluorescence were available for 30 of the BAL subjects and 11 of LVRS patients. C. pneumoniae elementary body like structures were found in 29% of cytospin specimens from COPD patients, 14% of NS and 10% of HS. C. pneumoniae was detected in lung tissue in 8%. COPD patients had higher titres of IgG and IgA than NS and S. There was no association between occurrence of C. pneumoniae in BAL fluid and antibody titres. In conclusion, the assays used for detection of C. pneumoniae in lung tissue are feasible, and could be adapted in adequately powered studies to further confirm an association between C. pneumoniae infection and COPD.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of tildipirosin in bovine plasma, lung tissue, and bronchial fluid (from live, nonanesthetized cattle).

    PubMed

    Menge, M; Rose, M; Bohland, C; Zschiesche, E; Kilp, S; Metz, W; Allan, M; Röpke, R; Nürnberger, M

    2012-12-01

    The pharmacokinetics of tildipirosin (Zuprevo(®) 180 mg/mL solution for injection for cattle), a novel 16-membered macrolide for treatment, control, and prevention of bovine respiratory disease, were investigated in studies collecting blood plasma, lung tissue, and in vivo samples of bronchial fluid (BF) from cattle. After single subcutaneous (s.c.) injection at 4 mg/kg body weight, maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) was 0.7 μg/mL. T(max) was 23 min. Mean residence time from the time of dosing to the time of last measurable concentration (MRT(last)) and terminal half-life (T(1/2) ) was 6 and 9 days, respectively. A strong dose-response relationship with no significant sex effect was shown for both C(max) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to the last sampling time with a quantifiable drug concentration (AUC(last) ) over the range of doses up to 6 mg/kg. Absolute bioavailability was 78.9%. The volume of distribution based on the terminal phase (V(z)) was 49.4 L/kg, and the plasma clearance was 144 mL/h/kg. The time-concentration profile of tildipirosin in BF and lung far exceeded those in blood plasma. In lung, tildipirosin concentrations reached 9.2 μg/g at 4 h, peaked at 14.8 μg/g at day 1, and slowly declined to 2.0 μg/g at day 28. In BF, the concentration of tildipirosin reached 1.5 and 3.0 μg/g at 4 and 10 h, maintained a plateau of about 3.5 μg/g between day 1 and 3, and slowly declined to 1.0 at day 21. T(1/2) in lung and BF was approximately 10 and 11 days. Tildipirosin is rapidly and extensively distributed to the respiratory tract followed by slow elimination.

  2. Altered autophagy in human adipose tissues in obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Context: Autophagy is a housekeeping mechanism, involved in metabolic regulation and stress response, shown recently to regulate lipid droplets biogenesis/breakdown and adipose tissue phenotype. Objective: We hypothesized that in human obesity autophagy may be altered in adipose tissue in a fat d...

  3. Nanoparticle diffusion in respiratory mucus from humans without lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Benjamin S.; Suk, Jung Soo; Woodworth, Graeme F.; Hanes, Justin

    2013-01-01

    A major role of respiratory mucus is to trap inhaled particles, including pathogens and environmental particulates, to limit body exposure. Despite the tremendous health implications, how particle size and surface chemistry affect mobility in respiratory mucus from humans without lung disease is not known. We prepared polymeric nanoparticles densely coated with low molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) to minimize muco-adhesion, and compared their transport to that of uncoated particles in human respiratory mucus, which we collected from the endotracheal tubes of surgical patients with no respiratory comorbidities. We found that 100 and 200 nm diameter PEG-coated particles rapidly penetrated respiratory mucus, at rates exceeding their uncoated counterparts by approximately 15- and 35-fold, respectively. In contrast, PEG-coated particles ≥ 500 nm in diameter were sterically immobilized by the mucus mesh. Thus, even though respiratory mucus is a viscoelastic solid at the macroscopic level (as measured using a bulk rheometer), nanoparticles that are sufficiently small and muco-inert can penetrate the mucus as if it were primarily a viscous liquid. These findings help elucidate the barrier properties of respiratory mucus and provide design criteria for therapeutic nanoparticles capable of penetrating mucus to approach the underlying airway epithelium. PMID:23384790

  4. Tissue-Based Imaging Model of Human Trabecular Meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Edward R.; Gonzalez, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We have developed a tissue-based model of the human trabecular meshwork (TM) using viable postmortem corneoscleral donor tissue. Two-photon microscopy is used to optically section and image deep in the tissue to analyze cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) within the original three-dimensional (3D) environment of the TM. Multimodal techniques, including autofluorescence (AF), second harmonic generation (SHG), intravital dye fluorescence, and epifluorescence, are combined to provide unique views of the tissue at the cellular and subcellular level. SHG and AF imaging are non-invasive tissue imaging techniques with potential for clinical application, which can be modeled in the system. We describe the following in the tissue-based model: analysis of live cellularity to determine tissue viability; characteristics of live cells based on intravital labeling; features and composition of the TM's structural ECM; localization of specific ECM proteins to regions such as basement membrane; in situ induction and expression of tissue markers characteristic of cultured TM cells relevant to glaucoma; analysis of TM actin and pharmacological effects; in situ visualization of TM, inner wall endothelium, and Schlemm's canal; and application of 3D reconstruction, modeling, and quantitative analysis to the TM. The human model represents a cost-effective use of valuable and scarce yet available human tissue that allows unique cell biology, pharmacology, and translational studies of the TM. PMID:24517246

  5. Sites of particle retention and lung tissue responses to chronically inhaled diesel exhaust and coal dust in rats and cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Nikula, K J; Avila, K J; Griffith, W C; Mauderly, J L

    1997-01-01

    The usefulness of pulmonary carcinogenicity data from rats exposed to high concentrations of particles for quantitatively predicting lung cancer risk in humans exposed to much lower environmental or occupational concentrations has been questioned. The results of several chronic inhalation bioassays of poorly soluble, nonfibrous particles have suggested that rats may be more prone than other rodent species to develop persistent pulmonary epithelial hyperplasia, metaplasia, and tumors in response to the accumulation of inhaled particles. In addition, rats and primates differ in their pulmonary anatomy and rate of particle clearance from the lung. This paper reviews results of recent Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (Albuquerque, NM) investigations that directly compared the anatomical patterns of particle retention and the lung tissue responses of rats and monkeys exposed chronically to high occupational concentrations of poorly soluble particles. Lung sections from male cynomolgus monkeys and F344 rats exposed 7 hr/day, 5 days/week for 24 months to filtered ambient air, diesel exhaust (2 mg soot/m3), coal dust (2 mg respirable particulate material/m3), or diesel exhaust and coal dust combined (1 mg soot and 1 mg respirable coal dust/m3) were obtained from a study conducted at the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and examined histopathologically and morphometrically. Within each species, the sites of particle retention and lung tissue responses were the same for diesel soot, coal dust, and combined material. Rats retained a significantly greater portion of the particulate material in the lumens of alveolar ducts and alveoli than monkeys. Conversely, monkeys retained a significantly greater portion of the particulate material in the interstitium than rats. Rats, but not monkeys, had significant alveolar epithelial hyperplastic, inflammatory, and septal fibrotic responses to the retained particles. These results suggest that anatomic

  6. Application of a Neutral Community Model To Assess Structuring of the Human Lung Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Venkataraman, Arvind; Bassis, Christine M.; Beck, James M.; Young, Vincent B.; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Huffnagle, Gary B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT  DNA from phylogenetically diverse microbes is routinely recovered from healthy human lungs and used to define the lung microbiome. The proportion of this DNA originating from microbes adapted to the lungs, as opposed to microbes dispersing to the lungs from other body sites and the atmosphere, is not known. We use a neutral model of community ecology to distinguish members of the lung microbiome whose presence is consistent with dispersal from other body sites and those that deviate from the model, suggesting a competitive advantage to these microbes in the lungs. We find that the composition of the healthy lung microbiome is consistent with predictions of the neutral model, reflecting the overriding role of dispersal of microbes from the oral cavity in shaping the microbial community in healthy lungs. In contrast, the microbiome of diseased lungs was readily distinguished as being under active selection. We also assessed the viability of microbes from lung samples by cultivation with a variety of media and incubation conditions. Bacteria recovered by cultivation from healthy lungs represented species that comprised 61% of the 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequences derived from bronchoalveolar lavage samples. Importance  Neutral distribution of microbes is a distinguishing feature of the microbiome in healthy lungs, wherein constant dispersal of bacteria from the oral cavity overrides differential growth of bacteria. No bacterial species consistently deviated from the model predictions in healthy lungs, although representatives of many of the dispersed species were readily cultivated. In contrast, bacterial populations in diseased lungs were identified as being under active selection. Quantification of the relative importance of selection and neutral processes such as dispersal in shaping the healthy lung microbiome is a first step toward understanding its impacts on host health. PMID:25604788

  7. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  8. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues.

    PubMed

    Kletsov, Andrey; Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated.

  9. In vitro immunological degranulation of human basophils is modulated by lung histamine and Apis mellifica.

    PubMed Central

    Poitevin, B; Davenas, E; Benveniste, J

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of high dilutions of two homeopathic drugs Lung histamine (Lung his) and Apis mellifica (Apis mel) used for the treatment of allergic diseases has been assessed on in vitro human basophil degranulation. Experiments were conducted blind. 2. Basophil degranulation induced by 1.66 X 10(-9) M anti-IgE antibody was significantly inhibited in the presence of 5 Lung his (5th centesimal dilution of Lung his) and 15 Lung his (15th centesimal dilution of Lung his) by 28.8% and 28.6% respectively and by 65.8% in the presence of 9 Apis mel (9th centesimal dilution of Apis mel). Basophil degranulation induced by 1.66 X 10(-16) to 1.66 X 10(-18) M anti-IgE antibody was also inhibited by high dilutions of Lung his and Apis mel with an inhibition of nearly 100% with 18 Lung his (18th centesimal dilution of Lung his) and 10 Apis mel (10th centesimal dilution of Apis mel). An alternance of inhibition, inactivity and stimulation was observed when basophils were incubated in the presence of serial dilutions of Lung his and Apis mel. 3. The investigation of the clinical efficacy of high dilutions of Lung his and Apis mel should be envisaged in allergic diseases in parallel with in vitro and ex vivo biological assays. PMID:3382588

  10. Differential response of the epithelium and interstitium in developing human fetal lung explants to hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Bustani, Porus; Hodge, Rachel; Tellabati, Ananth; Li, Juan; Pandya, Hitesh; Kotecha, Sailesh

    2006-03-01

    Hyperoxia is closely linked with the development of chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLD), but the exact mechanisms whereby hyperoxia alters the lung architecture in the developing lung remain largely unknown. We developed a fetal human lung organ culture model to investigate (a) the morphologic changes induced by hyperoxia and (b) whether hyperoxia resulted in differential cellular responses in the epithelium and interstitium. The effects of hyperoxia on lung morphometry were analyzed using computer-assisted image analysis. The lung architecture remained largely unchanged in normoxia lasting as long as 4 d. In contrast, hyperoxic culture of pseudoglandular fetal lungs resulted in significant dilatation of airways, thinning of the epithelium, and regression of the interstitium including the pulmonary vasculature. Although there were no significant differences in Ki67 between normoxic and hyperoxic lungs, activated caspase-3 was significantly increased in interstitial cells, but not epithelial cells, under hyperoxic conditions. These changes show that exposure of pseudoglandular lungs to hyperoxia modulates the lung architecture to resemble saccular lungs.

  11. Lung Beractant Increases Free Cytosolic Levels of Ca2+ in Human Lung Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Silva, Alejandro; Vázquez de Lara, Luis G.; Torres-Jácome, Julián; Vargaz-Guadarrama, Ajelet; Flores-Flores, Marycruz; Pezzat Said, Elias; Lagunas-Martínez, Alfredo; Mendoza-Milla, Criselda; Tanzi, Franco; Moccia, Francesco; Berra-Romani, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Beractant, a natural surfactant, induces an antifibrogenic phenotype and apoptosis in normal human lung fibroblasts (NHLF). As intracellular Ca2+ signalling has been related to programmed cell death, we aimed to assess the effect of beractant on intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in NHLF in vitro. Cultured NHLF were loaded with Fura-2 AM (3 μM) and Ca2+ signals were recorded by microfluorimetric techniques. Beractant causes a concentration-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i with a EC50 of 0.82 μg/ml. The application of beractant, at a concentration of 500 μg/ml, which has been shown to exert an apoptotic effect in human fibroblasts, elicited different patterns of Ca2+ signals in NHLF: a) a single Ca2+ spike which could be followed by b) Ca2+ oscillations, c) a sustained Ca2+ plateau or d) a sustained plateau overlapped by Ca2+ oscillations. The amplitude and pattern of Ca2+ transients evoked by beractant were dependent on the resting [Ca2+]i. Pharmacological manipulation revealed that beractant activates a Ca2+ signal through Ca2+ release from intracellular stores mediated by phospholipase Cβ (PLCβ), Ca2+ release from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and Ca2+ influx via a store-operated pathway. Moreover, beractant-induced Ca2+ release was abolished by preventing membrane depolarization upon removal of extracellular Na+ and Ca2+. Finally, the inhibition of store-operated channels prevented beractant-induced NHLF apoptosis and downregulation of α1(I) procollagen expression. Therefore, beractant utilizes SOCE to exert its pro-apoptotic and antifibrinogenic effect on NHLF. PMID:26230503

  12. ON BENZO[A]PYRENE DERIVED DNA ADDUCTS FORMED IN LUNG TISSUE OF MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    On Benzo [a] pyrene Derived DNA Adducts Formed in Lung Tissue of Mice
    The previously identified major DNA adducts of benzo[a]pyrene (BP) in vitro and in vivo are the stable and unstable adducts formed by reaction of the bay-region diol epoxide of BP (BPDE) and BP radical catio...

  13. Lung squamous cell carcinoma with brachial soft tissue metastasis responsive to gefitinib: Report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Kana; Osaka, Eiji; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Okamura, Yuki; Yoshida, Yukihiro; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki

    2016-11-01

    Metastasis of lung cancer to soft tissue is rare and patient outcomes are generally poor. There are no reports describing soft tissue metastasis in lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), in which gefitinib treatment was effective not only for the primary tumor but also the metastatic lesion. A 61-year-old Asian woman presented to our facility with pain and a mass in the brachium. An additional tumor was identified in the lung. As we suspected soft tissue metastasis of lung cancer, an incisional biopsy was performed, yielding a diagnosis of SCC. The brachial tumor continued to grow and became exposed at the biopsy site when the incisional wound dehisced. Because the biopsied specimen was positive for an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutation, we commenced gefitinib administration. This treatment resulted in the rapid shrinkage of both the brachial metastasis and the primary tumor, followed by healing of the wound. Therefore, tyrosine kinase inhibitors should be used for cases that present EGFR activating mutations independently from the presence of skin and soft tissue metastases.

  14. Persistent Expression Changes of Fibrosis-Related Genes in the Lung Tissues of Rats Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Scully, Robert R.; Yeshitla, Samrawit A.; Wu, Honglu; Meyers, Valerie; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, potential reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% of very fine respirable dust (less than 3 micrometers). The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the toxicity of Apollo moon dust in rodents to assess the health risk of dust exposures to humans. One of the particular interests in the study is to evaluate dust-induced changes of the expression of fibrosis-related genes, and to identify specific signaling pathways involved in lunar dustinduced toxicity. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 milligrams per cubic meters of lunar dust. Five rats per group were euthanized at 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after the last inhalation exposure. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected by lavaging with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). A zymosan-induced luminolbased chemiluminescence assay was used to assess the activity of BAL cells. The lavaged lung tissue was snap frozen in LN2 and total RNA was isolated using the Qigen RNeasy kit. The expression of 84 fibrosisrelated genes were analyzed using the RT2 Profiler PCR Array technique. The expression of 18 genes of interest were further measured using real-time PCR technique in all the samples. 10 out of 18 genes of interest showed persistently significant expression changes in the local lung tissue exposed to lunar dust, indicating a prolonged proinflammatory response. The expressions of several of these genes were dose- and time-dependent and were significantly correlated with other pathological parameters. The potential signaling pathways and upstream regulators were further analyzed using IPA pathway analysis tool based on the gene expression data. The data presented in this study, for the first time, explore the

  15. Methanolic extract of adlay seed suppresses COX-2 expression of human lung cancer cells via inhibition of gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Hung, Wen-Chun; Chang, Hui-Chiu

    2003-12-03

    Previous results demonstrated that the methanolic extract of adlay seed exerted an antiproliferative effect on human lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and might prevent tobacco carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. In this study, the methanolic extract of adlay seed was tested for its regulation of COX-2 expression of human lung cancer cells. Western blot analysis showed that the methanolic extract of adlay seed inhibited basal and TPA-induced COX-2 expression in a dose-dependent fashion, whereas COX-1 expression was not affected. By using a promoter activity assay, it was found that the methanolic extract inhibited basal and TPA-stimulated COX-2 expression at the transcription level. The effect of the methanolic extract on COX-2 expression in vivo was then investigated. The data demonstrated that treatment of the methanolic extract reduced the PGE(2) level in serum and inhibited COX-2 expression of tumor tissues in nude mice. Taken together, these results suggest that inhibition of COX-2 is one of the mechanisms by which the methanolic extract of adlay seed inhibits cancer growth and prevents lung tumorigenesis.

  16. Total DDT and dieldrin content of human adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, N.; Harsas, W.; Marolt, R.S.; Morton, M.; Pollack, J.K.

    1988-12-01

    As far as the authors could ascertain only 4 well-documented analytical studies have been carried out in Australia determining the total DDT and dieldrin content of human adipose tissue. The latest of these studies was published over 16 years ago. Therefore it is timely and important to re-examine the total DDT and dieldrin concentration within the adipose tissue of the Australian population. The present investigation has analyzed 290 samples of human adipose tissue obtained from Westmead Hospital situated in an outer suburb of Sydney, New South Wales for their content of total DDT and dieldrin.

  17. Improved correction for the tissue fraction effect in lung PET/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Beverley F.; Cuplov, Vesna; Millner, Lynn; Hutton, Brian F.; Maher, Toby M.; Groves, Ashley M.; Thielemans, Kris

    2015-09-01

    Recently, there has been an increased interest in imaging different pulmonary disorders using PET techniques. Previous work has shown, for static PET/CT, that air content in the lung influences reconstructed image values and that it is vital to correct for this ‘tissue fraction effect’ (TFE). In this paper, we extend this work to include the blood component and also investigate the TFE in dynamic imaging. CT imaging and PET kinetic modelling are used to determine fractional air and blood voxel volumes in six patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. These values are used to illustrate best and worst case scenarios when interpreting images without correcting for the TFE. In addition, the fractional volumes were used to determine correction factors for the SUV and the kinetic parameters. These were then applied to the patient images. The kinetic parameters K1 and Ki along with the static parameter SUV were all found to be affected by the TFE with both air and blood providing a significant contribution to the errors. Without corrections, errors range from 34-80% in the best case and 29-96% in the worst case. In the patient data, without correcting for the TFE, regions of high density (fibrosis) appeared to have a higher uptake than lower density (normal appearing tissue), however this was reversed after air and blood correction. The proposed correction methods are vital for quantitative and relative accuracy. Without these corrections, images may be misinterpreted.

  18. Novel peptides functionally targeting in vivo human lung cancer discovered by in vivo peptide displayed phage screening.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Jin; Lee, Jae Hee; Chung, Hye Kyung; Choi, Jinhyang; Park, Jaesook; Park, Seok Soon; Ju, Eun Jin; Park, Jin; Shin, Seol Hwa; Park, Hye Ji; Ko, Eun Jung; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, InKi; Hwang, Jung Jin; Song, Si Yeol; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2015-02-01

    Discovery of the cancer-specific peptidic ligands have been emphasized for active targeting drug delivery system and non-invasive imaging. For the discovery of useful and applicable peptidic ligands, in vivo peptide-displayed phage screening has been performed in this study using a xenograft mouse model as a mimic microenvironment to tumor. To seek human lung cancer-specific peptides, M13 phage library displaying 2.9 × 10(9) random peptides was intravenously injected into mouse model bearing A549-derived xenograft tumor through the tail vein. Then the phages emerged from a course of four rounds of biopanning in the xenograft tumor tissue. Novel peptides were categorized into four groups according to a sequence-homology phylogenicity, and in vivo tumor-targeting capacity of these peptides was validated by whole body imaging with Cy5.5-labeled phages in various cancer types. The result revealed that novel peptides accumulated only in adenocarcinoma lung cancer cell-derived xenograft tissue. For further confirmation of the specific targeting ability, in vitro cell-binding assay and immunohistochemistry in vivo tumor tissue were performed with a selected peptide. The peptide was found to bind intensely to lung cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, which was efficiently compromised with unlabeled phages in an in vitro competition assay. In conclusion, the peptides specifically targeting human lung cancer were discovered in this study, which is warranted to provide substantive feasibilities for drug delivery and imaging in terms of a novel targeted therapeutics and diagnostics.

  19. Characterization of a simplified method of cryopreserving human parathyroid tissue.

    PubMed

    Saxe, A W; Gibson, G W; Kay, S

    1990-12-01

    Cryopreservation of human parathyroid tissue plays an important role in managing difficult parathyroid disease. It also can permit investigators to conduct experiments without dependence on the operating room schedule. Availability of cryopreservation has been limited by the perceived need for expensive, complex equipment. We adapted a simple method of freezing cell suspensions to freezing human parathyroid tissue. Vials containing human parathyroid in culture media, dimethylsulfoxide, and patient serum were placed in a plastic rack in a metal pan containing prechilled (4 degrees C) ethanol and placed in a -70 degrees C freezer. We compared viability (trypan blue dye exclusion by collagenase dispersed cells) of tissue frozen in this manner to that of tissue frozen in a programmable liquid nitrogen freezer at 1 degrees C per minute, a cooling rate recommended for human parathyroid tissue. The viability of 30 patients' samples cooled in liquid nitrogen (average length of storage 5 months) was 74% +/- 15% and that of 64 patients' samples cooled in ethanol (average length of storage 26 months) was 71% +/- 15%. Viability of 19 samples of fresh tissue was 79% +/- 10%. Neither method had a statistically significant correlation between length of storage and viability. Successful cryopreservation with simplified technology may expand the availability of parathyroid tissue to meet both clinical and investigative requirements.

  20. Efficient In Vitro Electropermeabilization of Reconstructed Human Dermal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Madi, Moinecha; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Gibot, Laure

    2015-10-01

    DNA electrotransfer is a successful technic for gene delivery. However, its use in clinical applications is limited since little is known about the mechanisms governing DNA electrotransfer in the complex environment occurring in a tissue. The objectives of this work were to investigate the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in that process. Tumor ECM composition was shown to modulate in vivo gene electrotransfer efficiency. In order to assess the effects of ECM composition and organization, as well as intercellular junctions and communication, in normal tissue response to electric pulses, we developed an innovative three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed human connective tissue model. 3D human dermal tissue was reconstructed in vitro by a tissue engineering approach and was representative of in vivo cell organization since cell-cell contacts were present as well as complex ECM. This human cell model presented multiple layers of primary dermal fibroblasts embedded in a native, collagen-rich ECM. This dermal tissue could become a useful tool to study skin DNA electrotransfer mechanisms. As proof of the concept, we show here that the cells within this standardized 3D tissue can be efficiently electropermeabilized by milliseconds electric pulses. We believe that a better comprehension of gene electrotransfer in such a model tissue would help improve electrogene therapy approaches such as the systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins and DNA vaccination.

  1. [Analysis of human tissue samples for volatile fire accelerants].

    PubMed

    Treibs, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    In police investigations of fires, the cause of a fire and the fire debris analysis regarding traces of fire accelerants are important aspects for forensic scientists. Established analytical procedures were recently applied to the remains of fire victims. When examining lung tissue samples, vapors inhaled from volatile ignitable liquids could be identified and differentiated from products of pyrolysi