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Sample records for human lupus autoimmunity

  1. Glomerular Autoimmune Multicomponents of Human Lupus Nephritis In Vivo: α-Enolase and Annexin AI

    PubMed Central

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Galetti, Maricla; Murtas, Corrado; Tincani, Angela; Madaio, Michael; Radice, Antonella; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Bianchi, Laura; Giallongo, Agata; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Scaloni, Andrea; D’Ambrosio, Chiara; Carnevali, Maria Luisa; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Barbano, Giancarlo; Bianco, Beatrice; Bonanni, Alice; Scolari, Francesco; Martini, Alberto; Candiano, Giovanni; Allegri, Landino

    2014-01-01

    Renal targets of autoimmunity in human lupus nephritis (LN) are unknown. We sought to identify autoantibodies and glomerular target antigens in renal biopsy samples from patients with LN and determine whether the same autoantibodies can be detected in circulation. Glomeruli were microdissected from biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN and characterized by proteomic techniques. Serum samples from large cohorts of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with and without LN and other glomerulonephritides were tested. Glomerular IgGs recognized 11 podocyte antigens, with reactivity varying by LN pathology. Notably, IgG2 autoantibodies against α-enolase and annexin AI were detected in 11 and 10 of the biopsy samples, respectively, and predominated over other autoantibodies. Immunohistochemistry revealed colocalization of α-enolase or annexin AI with IgG2 in glomeruli. High levels of serum anti–α-enolase (>15 mg/L) IgG2 and/or anti-annexin AI (>2.7 mg/L) IgG2 were detected in most patients with LN but not patients with other glomerulonephritides, and they identified two cohorts: patients with high anti–α-enolase/low anti-annexin AI IgG2 and patients with low anti–α-enolase/high anti-annexin AI IgG2. Serum levels of both autoantibodies decreased significantly after 12 months of therapy for LN. Anti–α-enolase IgG2 recognized specific epitopes of α-enolase and did not cross-react with dsDNA. Furthermore, nephritogenic monoclonal IgG2 (clone H147) derived from lupus-prone MRL-lpr/lpr mice recognized human α-enolase, suggesting homology between animal models and human LN. These data show a multiantibody composition in LN, where IgG2 autoantibodies against α-enolase and annexin AI predominate in the glomerulus and can be detected in serum. PMID:24790181

  2. Glomerular autoimmune multicomponents of human lupus nephritis in vivo: α-enolase and annexin AI.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Galetti, Maricla; Murtas, Corrado; Tincani, Angela; Madaio, Michael; Radice, Antonella; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Bianchi, Laura; Giallongo, Agata; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Scaloni, Andrea; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Carnevali, Maria Luisa; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Barbano, Giancarlo; Bianco, Beatrice; Bonanni, Alice; Scolari, Francesco; Martini, Alberto; Candiano, Giovanni; Allegri, Landino; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2014-11-01

    Renal targets of autoimmunity in human lupus nephritis (LN) are unknown. We sought to identify autoantibodies and glomerular target antigens in renal biopsy samples from patients with LN and determine whether the same autoantibodies can be detected in circulation. Glomeruli were microdissected from biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN and characterized by proteomic techniques. Serum samples from large cohorts of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with and without LN and other glomerulonephritides were tested. Glomerular IgGs recognized 11 podocyte antigens, with reactivity varying by LN pathology. Notably, IgG2 autoantibodies against α-enolase and annexin AI were detected in 11 and 10 of the biopsy samples, respectively, and predominated over other autoantibodies. Immunohistochemistry revealed colocalization of α-enolase or annexin AI with IgG2 in glomeruli. High levels of serum anti-α-enolase (>15 mg/L) IgG2 and/or anti-annexin AI (>2.7 mg/L) IgG2 were detected in most patients with LN but not patients with other glomerulonephritides, and they identified two cohorts: patients with high anti-α-enolase/low anti-annexin AI IgG2 and patients with low anti-α-enolase/high anti-annexin AI IgG2. Serum levels of both autoantibodies decreased significantly after 12 months of therapy for LN. Anti-α-enolase IgG2 recognized specific epitopes of α-enolase and did not cross-react with dsDNA. Furthermore, nephritogenic monoclonal IgG2 (clone H147) derived from lupus-prone MRL-lpr/lpr mice recognized human α-enolase, suggesting homology between animal models and human LN. These data show a multiantibody composition in LN, where IgG2 autoantibodies against α-enolase and annexin AI predominate in the glomerulus and can be detected in serum.

  3. Glomerular Autoimmune Multicomponents of Human Lupus Nephritis In Vivo (2): Planted Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Galetti, Maricla; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Bonanni, Alice; Radice, Antonella; Tincani, Angela; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Murtas, Corrado; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Brunini, Francesca; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Barbano, Giancarlo; Piaggio, Giorgio; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Scolari, Francesco; Candiano, Giovanni; Martini, Alberto; Allegri, Landino

    2015-01-01

    Glomerular planted antigens (histones, DNA, and C1q) are potential targets of autoimmunity in lupus nephritis (LN). However, the characterization of these antigens in human glomeruli in vivo remains inconsistent. We eluted glomerular autoantibodies recognizing planted antigens from laser-microdissected renal biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN. Prevalent antibody isotypes were defined, levels were determined, and glomerular colocalization was investigated. Renal and circulating antibodies were matched, and serum levels were compared in 104 patients with LN, 84 patients with SLE without LN, and 50 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Autoantibodies against podocyte antigens (anti–α-enolase/antiannexin AI) were also investigated. IgG2 autoantibodies against DNA, histones (H2A, H3, and H4), and C1q were detected in 50%, 55%, and 70% of biopsy samples, respectively. Anti-DNA IgG3 was the unique non-IgG2 anti-DNA deposit, and anti-C1q IgG4 was mainly detected in subepithelial membranous deposits. Anti-H3, anti-DNA, and anti-C1q IgG2 autoantibodies were also prevalent in LN serum, which also contained IgG3 against the antigen panel and anti-C1q IgG4. Serum and glomerular levels of autoantibodies were not strictly associated. High serum levels of all autoantibodies detected, including anti–α-enolase and antiannexin AI, identified LN versus SLE and RA. Anti-H3 and anti–α-enolase IgG2 levels had the most remarkable increase in LN serum and represented a discriminating feature of LN in principal component analysis. The highest levels of these two autoantibodies were also associated with proteinuria>3.5 g/24 hours and creatinine>1.2 mg/dl. Our findings suggest that timely autoantibody characterization might allow outcome prediction and targeted therapies for patients with nephritis. PMID:25398787

  4. Glomerular Autoimmune Multicomponents of Human Lupus Nephritis In Vivo (2): Planted Antigens.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Maurizio; Galetti, Maricla; Sinico, Renato Alberto; Moroni, Gabriella; Bonanni, Alice; Radice, Antonella; Tincani, Angela; Pratesi, Federico; Migliorini, Paola; Murtas, Corrado; Franceschini, Franco; Trezzi, Barbara; Brunini, Francesca; Gatti, Rita; Tardanico, Regina; Barbano, Giancarlo; Piaggio, Giorgio; Messa, Piergiorgio; Ravani, Pietro; Scolari, Francesco; Candiano, Giovanni; Martini, Alberto; Allegri, Landino; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2015-08-01

    Glomerular planted antigens (histones, DNA, and C1q) are potential targets of autoimmunity in lupus nephritis (LN). However, the characterization of these antigens in human glomeruli in vivo remains inconsistent. We eluted glomerular autoantibodies recognizing planted antigens from laser-microdissected renal biopsy samples of 20 patients with LN. Prevalent antibody isotypes were defined, levels were determined, and glomerular colocalization was investigated. Renal and circulating antibodies were matched, and serum levels were compared in 104 patients with LN, 84 patients with SLE without LN, and 50 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Autoantibodies against podocyte antigens (anti-α-enolase/antiannexin AI) were also investigated. IgG2 autoantibodies against DNA, histones (H2A, H3, and H4), and C1q were detected in 50%, 55%, and 70% of biopsy samples, respectively. Anti-DNA IgG3 was the unique non-IgG2 anti-DNA deposit, and anti-C1q IgG4 was mainly detected in subepithelial membranous deposits. Anti-H3, anti-DNA, and anti-C1q IgG2 autoantibodies were also prevalent in LN serum, which also contained IgG3 against the antigen panel and anti-C1q IgG4. Serum and glomerular levels of autoantibodies were not strictly associated. High serum levels of all autoantibodies detected, including anti-α-enolase and antiannexin AI, identified LN versus SLE and RA. Anti-H3 and anti-α-enolase IgG2 levels had the most remarkable increase in LN serum and represented a discriminating feature of LN in principal component analysis. The highest levels of these two autoantibodies were also associated with proteinuria>3.5 g/24 hours and creatinine>1.2 mg/dl. Our findings suggest that timely autoantibody characterization might allow outcome prediction and targeted therapies for patients with nephritis.

  5. Molecular organization of the non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements that induce an autoimmune disease resembling human lupus in mice.

    PubMed

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Reséndiz, Albany; Tescucano, Alonso; Bustos, Israel; Ibáñez, Miguel; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel

    2012-03-01

    Non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements are three-dimensional structures that can form when anionic phospholipids with an intermediate form of the tubular hexagonal phase II (H(II)), such as phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylserine or cardiolipin, are present in a bilayer of lipids. The drugs chlorpromazine and procainamide, which trigger a lupus-like disease in humans, can induce the formation of non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements, and we have previously shown that liposomes with non-bilayer arrangements induced by these drugs cause an autoimmune disease resembling human lupus in mice. Here we show that liposomes with non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements induced by Mn²⁺ cause a similar disease in mice. We extensively characterize the physical properties and immunological reactivity of liposomes made of the zwitterionic lipid phosphatidylcholine and a H(II)-preferring lipid, in the absence or presence of Mn²⁺, chlorpromazine or procainamide. We use an hapten inhibition assay to define the epitope recognized by sera of mice with the disease, and by a monoclonal antibody that binds specifically to non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements, and we report that phosphorylcholine and glycerolphosphorylcholine, which form part of the polar region of phosphatidylcholine, are the only haptens that block the binding of the tested antibodies to non-bilayer arrangements. We propose a model in which the negatively charged H(II)-preferring lipids form an inverted micelle by electrostatic interactions with the positive charge of Mn²⁺, chlorpromazine or procainamide; the inverted micelle is inserted into the bilayer of phosphatidylcholine, whose polar regions are exposed and become targets for antibody production. This model may be relevant in the pathogenesis of human lupus.

  6. Fli-1, a Functional Factor Performed in Autoimmune Lupus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wang-Dong; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Yi; Liu, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease. The friend leukemia insertion site 1 (Fli-1) belongs to the Ets family of transcription factors. Recent findings suggested that expression of Fli-1 was abnormal in SLE patients and lupus mice. In addition, functional analysis indicated that Fli-1 plays a key role in the development of this complex autoimmune disorder. Here, we review the updated evidence indicating the roles of Fli-1 in autoimmune lupus. Hopefully, the information obtained may result in a better understanding of the pathogenesis of the systemic autoimmune disease.

  7. Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    What is lupus? Lupus is an autoimmune disease. This means that your immune system attacks healthy cells and tissues by mistake. This can ... vessels, and brain. There are several kinds of lupus Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the most common ...

  8. Prolactin and autoimmune diseases in humans.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ellie; Molitch, Mark E

    2007-01-01

    Prolactin has been shown to have immunomodulatory as well as lactogenic effects. Generally less well known is that prolactin may also play a role in the activity of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. Studies have shown decreasing prolactin production to be beneficial in animal models of autoimmune disease. Thus far, double-blinded, placebo-controlled studies of dopamine agonist treatment in humans with autoimmune disease have been done only in lupus patients, and support the potential efficacy of such agents. Small, open-label trials have also suggested potential benefit in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, Reiter's syndrome, and psoriasis. More studies are required to further delineate the mechanisms by which prolactin affects autoimmune disease activity, to determine in which specific diseases prolactin plays a significant role, and to test the efficacy of prolactin-lowering agents as therapy for such diseases.

  9. Immunodeficiency and autoimmunity: lessons from systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Grammatikos, Alexandros P.; Tsokos, George C.

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that systemic autoimmunity and immunodeficiency are not separate entities, but rather interconnected processes. Immunodeficiency results from distinct defects of the immune response and primarily presents as infections, but also frequently with autoimmune features. Systemic autoimmunity is the combined effect of multiple genetic variations, infectious and immunoregulatory factors that result in dominant autoimmune manifestations in addition to frequent and opportunistic infections. The overlap in disease manifestations and symptoms suggests that immunodeficiency should be considered in the presence of autoimmunity, and vice versa. In this review, we present the shared or similar aspects of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity using systemic lupus erythematosus as a paradigm and discuss the implications for clinical care. PMID:22177735

  10. Alterations in nuclear structure promote lupus autoimmunity in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Namrata; Johnstone, Duncan B.; Martin, Kayla A.; Tempera, Italo; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the development of autoantibodies that recognize components of the cell nucleus. The vast majority of lupus research has focused on either the contributions of immune cell dysfunction or the genetics of the disease. Because granulocytes isolated from human SLE patients had alterations in neutrophil nuclear morphology that resembled the Pelger–Huet anomaly, and had prominent mis-splicing of mRNA encoding the nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor (LBR), consistent with their Pelger–Huet-like nuclear morphology, we used a novel mouse model system to test the hypothesis that a disruption in the structure of the nucleus itself also contributes to the development of lupus autoimmunity. The lupus-prone mouse strain New Zealand White (NZW) was crossed with c57Bl/6 mice harboring a heterozygous autosomal dominant mutation in Lbr (B6.Lbric/+), and the (NZW×B6.Lbric)F1 offspring were evaluated for induction of lupus autoimmunity. Only female (NZW×B6.Lbric)F1 mice developed lupus autoimmunity, which included splenomegaly, kidney damage and autoantibodies. Kidney damage was accompanied by immune complex deposition, and perivascular and tubule infiltration of mononuclear cells. The titers of anti-chromatin antibodies exceeded those of aged female MRL-Faslpr mice, and were predominantly of the IgG2 subclasses. The anti-nuclear antibody staining profile of female (NZW×B6.Lbric)F1 sera was complex, and consisted of an anti-nuclear membrane reactivity that colocalized with the A-type lamina, in combination with a homogeneous pattern that was related to the recognition of histones with covalent modifications that are associated with gene activation. An anti-neutrophil IgM recognizing calreticulin, but not myeloperoxidase (MPO) or proteinase 3 (PR3), was also identified. Thus, alterations in nuclear structure contribute to lupus autoimmunity when expressed in the context of a lupus

  11. BCMA deficiency exacerbates lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity in murine lupus1

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chao; Loo, William M.; Greenley, Erin J.; Tung, Kenneth S.; Erickson, Loren D.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its preclinical lupus-prone mouse models are autoimmune disorders involving the production of pathogenic autoantibodies. Genetic predisposition to SLE results in B cell hyperactivity, survival of self-reactive B cells, and differentiation to autoantibody-secreting plasma cells (PC). These corrupt B cell responses are, in part, controlled by excess levels of the cytokine B cell activation factor from the TNF family (BAFF) that normally maintains B cell homeostasis and self-tolerance through limited production. B cell maturation antigen (BCMA) is a receptor for BAFF that, under nonautoimmune conditions, is important for sustaining enduring antibody protection by mediating survival of long-lived PCs, but is not required for B cell maturation and homeostasis. Through analysis of two different lupus-prone mouse models deficient in BCMA, we identify BCMA as an important factor in regulating peripheral B cell expansion, differentiation, and survival. We demonstrate that a BCMA deficiency combined with the lpr mutation or the murine lupus susceptibility locus Nba2 cause dramatic B cell and PC lymphoproliferation, accelerated autoantibody production, and early lethality. This study unexpectedly reveals that BCMA works to control B cell homeostasis and self-tolerance in systemic autoimmunity. PMID:21536804

  12. The critical role of epigenetics in systemic lupus erythematosus and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Long, Hai; Yin, Heng; Wang, Ling; Gershwin, M Eric; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-11-01

    One of the major disappointments in human autoimmunity has been the relative failure on genome-wide association studies to provide "smoking genetic guns" that would explain the critical role of genetic susceptibility to loss of tolerance. It is well known that autoimmunity refers to the abnormal state that the dysregulated immune system attacks the healthy cells and tissues due to the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. Its clinical outcomes are generally characterized by the presence of autoreactive immune cells and (or) the development of autoantibodies, leading to various types of autoimmune disorders. The etiology and pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases are highly complex. Both genetic predisposition and environmental factors such as nutrition, infection, and chemicals are implicated in the pathogenic process of autoimmunity, however, how much and by what mechanisms each of these factors contribute to the development of autoimmunity remain unclear. Epigenetics, which refers to potentially heritable changes in gene expression and function that do not involve alterations of the DNA sequence, has provided us with a brand new key to answer these questions. In the recent decades, increasing evidence have demonstrated the roles of epigenetic dysregulation, including DNA methylation, histone modification, and noncoding RNA, in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, especially systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), which have shed light on a new era for autoimmunity research. Notably, DNA hypomethylation and reactivation of the inactive X chromosome are two epigenetic hallmarks of SLE. We will herein discuss briefly how genetic studies fail to completely elucidate the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and present a comprehensive review on landmark epigenetic findings in autoimmune diseases, taking SLE as an extensively studied example. The epigenetics of other autoimmune diseases such as rheumatic arthritis, systemic sclerosis and primary biliary

  13. Pristane-Accelerated Autoimmune Disease in (SWR X NZB) F1 Mice Leads to Prominent Tubulointerstitial Inflammation and Human Lupus Nephritis-Like Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Gardet, Agnes; Chou, Wei C.; Reynolds, Taylor L.; Velez, Diana B.; Fu, Kai; Czerkowicz, Julia M.; Bajko, Jeffrey; Ranger, Ann M.; Allaire, Normand; Kerns, Hannah M.; Ryan, Sarah; Legault, Holly M.; Dunstan, Robert W.; Lafyatis, Robert; Lukashev, Matvey; Viney, Joanne L.; Browning, Jeffrey L.; Rabah, Dania

    2016-01-01

    Mouse models lupus nephritis (LN) have provided important insights into disease pathogenesis, although none have been able to recapitulate all features of the human disease. Using comprehensive longitudinal analyses, we characterized a novel accelerated mouse model of lupus using pristane treatment in SNF1 (SWR X NZB F1) lupus prone mice (pristane-SNF1 mice). Pristane treatment in SNF1 mice accelerated the onset and progression of proteinuria, autoantibody production, immune complex deposition and development of renal lesions. At week 14, the pristane-SNF1 model recapitulated kidney disease parameters and molecular signatures seen in spontaneous disease in 36 week-old SNF1 mice and in a traditional IFNα-accelerated NZB X NZW F1 (BWF1) model. Blood transcriptome analysis revealed interferon, plasma cell, neutrophil, T-cell and protein synthesis signatures in the pristane-SNF1 model, all known to be present in the human disease. The pristane-SNF1 model appears to be particularly useful for preclinical research, robustly exhibiting many characteristics reminiscent of human disease. These include i) a stronger upregulation of the cytosolic nucleic acid sensing pathway, which is thought to be key component of the pathogenesis of the human disease, and ii) more prominent kidney interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, which have been both associated with poor prognosis in human LN. To our knowledge, this is the only accelerated model of LN that exhibits a robust tubulointerstitial inflammatory and fibrosis response. Taken together our data show that the pristane-SNF1 model is a novel accelerated model of LN with key features similar to human disease. PMID:27760209

  14. Natural killer cells in human autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that play a critical role in early host defense against viruses. Through their cytolytic capacity and generation of cytokines and chemokines, NK cells modulate the activity of other components of the innate and adaptive immune systems and have been implicated in the initiation or maintenance of autoimmune responses. This review focuses on recent research elucidating a potential immunoregulatory role for NK cells in T-cell and B-cell-mediated autoimmune disorders in humans, with a particular focus on multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematous. A better understanding of the contributions of NK cells to the development of autoimmunity may lead to novel therapeutic targets in these diseases. PMID:23856014

  15. Promiscuous Presentation and Recognition of Nucleosomal Autoepitopes in Lupus: Role of Autoimmune T Cell Receptor α Chain

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yan; Kaliyaperumal, Arunan; Lu, Liangjun; Southwood, Scott; Sette, Alessandro; Michaels, Marissa A.; Datta, Syamal K.

    1998-01-01

    T cells specific for nucleosomal autoepitopes are selectively expanded in lupus mice and these Th cells drive autoimmune B cells to produce pathogenic antinuclear antibodies. We transfected the TCR-α and -β chain genes of a representative, pathogenic autoantibody-inducing Th clone specific for the nucleosomal core histone peptide H471–94 into TCR-negative recipient cells. Although the autoimmune TCRs were originally derived from SNF1 (I-Ad/q) mice, the transfectants could recognize the nucleosomal autoepitope presented by APC-bearing I-A molecules of all haplotypes tested, as well as human DR molecules. Competition assays indicated that the autoepitopes bound to the MHC class II groove. Most remarkably, MHC-unrestricted recognition of the nucleosomal peptide epitope was conferred by the lupus TCR-α chain even when it paired with a TCR-β chain of irrelevant specificity. Several other disease-relevant Th clones and splenic T cells of lupus mice had similar properties. The TCR-α chains of these murine lupus Th clones shared related motifs and charged residues in their CDRs, and similar motifs were apparent even in TCR-α chains of human lupus Th clones. The lupus TCR-α chains probably contact the nucleosomal peptide complexed with MHC with relatively high affinity/avidity to sustain TCR signaling, because CD4 coreceptor was not required for promiscuous recognition. Indeed, pathogenic autoantibody-inducing, CD4-negative, TCR-αβ+ Th cells are expanded in systemic lupus erythematosus. These results have implications regarding thymic selection and peripheral expansion of nucleosome-specific T cells in lupus. They also suggest that universally tolerogenic epitopes could be designed for therapy of lupus patients with diverse HLA alleles. We propose to designate nucleosomes and other antigens bearing universal epitopes “Pantigens” (for promiscuous antigens). PMID:9449717

  16. Silica-Triggered Autoimmunity in Lupus-Prone Mice Blocked by Docosahexaenoic Acid Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Melissa A.; Brandenberger, Christina; Langohr, Ingeborg I.; Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Lock, Adam L.; Harkema, Jack R.; Holian, Andrij; Pestka, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica (cSiO2, quartz) is etiologically linked to systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus) and other human autoimmune diseases (ADs). In the female NZBWF1 mouse, a widely used animal model that is genetically prone to lupus, short-term repeated intranasal exposure to cSiO2 triggers premature initiation of autoimmune responses in the lungs and kidneys. In contrast to cSiO2’s triggering action, consumption of the ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) prevents spontaneous onset of autoimmunity in this mouse strain. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that consumption of DHA will prevent cSiO2-triggered autoimmunity in the female NZBWF1 mouse. Mice (6 wk old) were fed isocaloric AIN-93G diets containing 0.0, 0.4, 1.2 or 2.4% DHA. Two wk after initiating feeding, mice were intranasally instilled with 1 mg cSiO2 once per wk for 4 wk and maintained on experimental diets for an additional 12 wk. Mice were then sacrificed and the lung, blood and kidney assessed for markers of inflammation and autoimmunity. DHA was incorporated into lung, red blood cells and kidney from diet in a concentration-dependent fashion. Dietary DHA dose-dependently suppressed cSiO2-triggered perivascular leukocyte infiltration and ectopic lymphoid tissue neogenesis in the lung. DHA consumption concurrently inhibited cSiO2–driven elevation of proinflammatory cytokines, B-cell proliferation factors, IgG and anti-dsDNA Ig in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma. DHA’s prophylactic effects were further mirrored in reduced proteinuria and glomerulonephritis in cSiO2-treated mice. Taken together, these results reveal that DHA consumption suppresses cSiO2 triggering of autoimmunity in female NZBWF1 mice as manifested in the lung, blood and kidney. Our findings provide novel insight into how dietary modulation of the lipidome might be used to prevent or delay triggering of AD by cSiO2. Such knowledge opens the

  17. Human neutrophils in auto-immunity.

    PubMed

    Thieblemont, Nathalie; Wright, Helen L; Edwards, Steven W; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    Human neutrophils have great capacity to cause tissue damage in inflammatory diseases via their inappropriate activation to release reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteases and other tissue-damaging molecules. Furthermore, activated neutrophils can release a wide variety of cytokines and chemokines that can regulate almost every element of the immune system. In addition to these important immuno-regulatory processes, activated neutrophils can also release, expose or generate neoepitopes that have the potential to break immune tolerance and result in the generation of autoantibodies, that characterise a number of human auto-immune diseases. For example, in vasculitis, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) that are directed against proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are neutrophil-derived autoantigens and activated neutrophils are the main effector cells of vascular damage. In other auto-immune diseases, these neutrophil-derived neoepitopes may arise from a number of processes that include release of granule enzymes and ROS, changes in the properties of components of their plasma membrane as a result of activation or apoptosis, and via the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs are extracellular structures that contain chromatin that is decorated with granule enzymes (including citrullinated proteins) that can act as neo-epitopes to generate auto-immunity. This review therefore describes the processes that can result in neutrophil-mediated auto-immunity, and the role of neutrophils in the molecular pathologies of auto-immune diseases such as vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We discuss the potential role of NETs in these processes and some of the debate in the literature regarding the role of this phenomenon in microbial killing, cell death and auto-immunity.

  18. Therapeutic interventions of tissue specific autoimmune onset in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Subhajit; Dasgupta, Shaoni

    2016-06-10

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus) is a female predominant autoimmune disease. The auto reactive B cells and T helper cells together are known to develop self-reactive immune responses in different tissues like kidney, bone, cardiovascular and central nervous system. Progression of disease is associated with deposition of immune complex which initiates tissue damage. The therapy for lupus still includes corticosteroids to reduce allergic manifestations and inflammatory immune responses. Recent observations suggested that, mycophenolate mofetil and cyclophosphamide treatment in combination with corticosteroids have benefit in lupus therapy. The prospect of B cell depletion by CD20 targeted monoclonal antibody Rituximab has been demonstrated in lupus patients. The CD52 specific monoclonal antibody Alemtuzumab is another proposition for lupus therapy. The drug Belimumab inhibits B cell activation by altering BAFF/APRIL signal cascade. Recent discovery of the CD22 targeted Epratuzumab also shows therapeutic prospect. The researches on new generation drugs for autoimmune lupus include search for inhibitors of CD40-CD40Ligand interactions, CD86 activation, selective modulation of complement cascades. The choice of inhibitors of transcription factor NF-κBp65 and selective modulators for estrogen receptor alpha are proposed areas of lupus drug discovery research. Keeping a close eye on the mechanisms of disease onset, a comprehensive view is provided on recent therapy of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  19. An unusual association of three autoimmune disorders: celiac disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Boccuti, Viera; Perrone, Antonio; D'Introno, Alessia; Campobasso, Anna; Sangineto, Moris; Sabbà, Carlo

    2016-12-01

    Autoimmune disorders are known to be more frequent in women and often associated each others, but it is rare to see multiple autoimmune diseases in a single patient. Recently, the concept of multiple autoimmune syndrome has been introduced to describe patients with at least three autoimmune diseases. We describe a case of a young man with a clinical history of psychiatric symptoms and celiac disease (CD) who was diagnosed to have other two autoimmune disorders: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This case is unusual upon different patterns: the rare combination of the three autoimmune diseases, their appearance in a man and the atypical onset of the diseases with psychiatric symptoms likely to be related either to CD or to SLE.

  20. [A severe course of autoimmune thrombocytopenia and the procedure for its treatment in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Mendeleev, I M; Miasnikov, A A; Polezhaev, Iu N; Berliner, G B

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe three comparatively rare cases of extremely severe symptomatic autoimmune thrombocytopenia associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. The use of glucocorticoids in large doses and in two cases of splenectomy turned out ineffective. The next therapeutic measures are suggested in the following succession: glucocorticoids----cytostatic drugs (vincristine)----splenectomy to be performed only in special cases.

  1. Cytokines and Cytokine Profiles in Human Autoimmune Diseases and Animal Models of Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Manfred; Ibrahim, Saleh M.

    2009-01-01

    The precise pathomechanisms of human autoimmune diseases are still poorly understood. However, a deepened understanding of these is urgently needed to improve disease prevention and early detection and guide more specific treatment approaches. In recent years, many new genes and signalling pathways involved in autoimmunity with often overlapping patterns between different disease entities have been detected. Major contributions were made by experiments using DNA microarray technology, which has been used for the analysis of gene expression patterns in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, among which were rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriasis, systemic sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and type-1 diabetes. In systemic lupus erythematosus, a so-called interferon signature has been identified. In psoriasis, researchers found a particular immune signalling cluster. Moreover the identification of a new subset of inflammatory T cells, so-called Th17 T cells, secreting interleukin (IL)-17 as one of their major cytokines and the identification of the IL-23/IL-17 axis of inflammation regulation, have significantly improved our understanding of autoimmune diseases. Since a plethora of new treatment approaches using antibodies or small molecule inhibitors specifically targeting cytokines, cellular receptors, or signalling mechanisms has emerged in recent years, more individualized treatment for affected patients may be within reach in the future. PMID:19884985

  2. Oxidative stress as a potential causal factor for autoimmune hemolytic anemia and systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Junichi; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Konno, Tasuku; Homma, Takujiro; Iuchi, Yoshihito

    2015-01-01

    The kidneys and the blood system mutually exert influence in maintaining homeostasis in the body. Because the kidneys control erythropoiesis by producing erythropoietin and by supporting hematopoiesis, anemia is associated with kidney diseases. Anemia is the most prevalent genetic disorder, and it is caused by a deficiency of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), for which sulfhydryl oxidation due to an insufficient supply of NADPH is a likely direct cause. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) result in the sulfhydryl oxidation and hence are another potential cause for anemia. ROS are elevated in red blood cells (RBCs) under superoxide dismutase (SOD1) deficiency in C57BL/6 mice. SOD1 deficient mice exhibit characteristics similar to autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) at the gerontic stage. An examination of AIHA-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) mice, which have normal SOD1 and G6PD genes, indicated that ROS levels in RBCs are originally high and further elevated during aging. Transgenic overexpression of human SOD1 in erythroid cells effectively suppresses ROS elevation and ameliorates AIHA symptoms such as elevated anti-RBC antibodies and premature death in NZB mice. These results support the hypothesis that names oxidative stress as a risk factor for AIHA and other autoimmune diseases such as SLE. Herein we discuss the association between oxidative stress and SLE pathogenesis based mainly on the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of NZB and New Zealand white mice and provide insight into the mechanism of SLE pathogenesis. PMID:25949934

  3. Oxidative stress as a potential causal factor for autoimmune hemolytic anemia and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Junichi; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Konno, Tasuku; Homma, Takujiro; Iuchi, Yoshihito

    2015-05-06

    The kidneys and the blood system mutually exert influence in maintaining homeostasis in the body. Because the kidneys control erythropoiesis by producing erythropoietin and by supporting hematopoiesis, anemia is associated with kidney diseases. Anemia is the most prevalent genetic disorder, and it is caused by a deficiency of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), for which sulfhydryl oxidation due to an insufficient supply of NADPH is a likely direct cause. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) result in the sulfhydryl oxidation and hence are another potential cause for anemia. ROS are elevated in red blood cells (RBCs) under superoxide dismutase (SOD1) deficiency in C57BL/6 mice. SOD1 deficient mice exhibit characteristics similar to autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) at the gerontic stage. An examination of AIHA-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) mice, which have normal SOD1 and G6PD genes, indicated that ROS levels in RBCs are originally high and further elevated during aging. Transgenic overexpression of human SOD1 in erythroid cells effectively suppresses ROS elevation and ameliorates AIHA symptoms such as elevated anti-RBC antibodies and premature death in NZB mice. These results support the hypothesis that names oxidative stress as a risk factor for AIHA and other autoimmune diseases such as SLE. Herein we discuss the association between oxidative stress and SLE pathogenesis based mainly on the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of NZB and New Zealand white mice and provide insight into the mechanism of SLE pathogenesis.

  4. B cell maturation antigen deficiency exacerbates lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity in murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chao; Loo, William M; Greenley, Erin J; Tung, Kenneth S; Erickson, Loren D

    2011-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus and its preclinical lupus-prone mouse models are autoimmune disorders involving the production of pathogenic autoantibodies. Genetic predisposition to systemic lupus erythematosus results in B cell hyperactivity, survival of self-reactive B cells, and differentiation to autoantibody-secreting plasma cells (PCs). These corrupt B cell responses are, in part, controlled by excess levels of the cytokine BAFF that normally maintains B cell homeostasis and self-tolerance through limited production. B cell maturation Ag (BCMA) is a receptor for BAFF that, under nonautoimmune conditions, is important for sustaining enduring Ab protection by mediating survival of long-lived PCs but is not required for B cell maturation and homeostasis. Through analysis of two different lupus-prone mouse models deficient in BCMA, we identify BCMA as an important factor in regulating peripheral B cell expansion, differentiation, and survival. We demonstrate that a BCMA deficiency combined with the lpr mutation or the murine lupus susceptibility locus Nba2 causes dramatic B cell and PC lymphoproliferation, accelerated autoantibody production, and early lethality. This study unexpectedly reveals that BCMA works to control B cell homeostasis and self-tolerance in systemic autoimmunity.

  5. CD74 Deficiency Mitigates Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-like Autoimmunity and Pathological Findings in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Chen, Huimei; Liu, Li; Yu, Xueqing; Sukhova, Galina K; Yang, Min; Zhang, Lijun; Kyttaris, Vasileios C; Tsokos, George C; Stillman, Isaac E; Ichimura, Takaharu; Bonventre, Joseph V; Libby, Peter; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2017-04-01

    CD74 mediates MHC class-II antigenic peptide loading and presentation and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus. C57BL/6 Fas(lpr) mice that develop spontaneous lupus-like autoimmunity and pathology showed elevated CD74 expression in the inflammatory cell infiltrates and the adjacent tubular epithelial cells (TECs) in kidneys affected by lupus nephritis but negligible levels in kidneys from age-matched wild-type mice. The inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ or IL-6 induced CD74 expression in kidney TECs in vitro. The presence of kidney TECs from Fas(lpr) mice, rather than from wild-type mice, produced significantly stronger histones, dsDNA, and ribonucleoprotein-Smith Ag complex-induced CD4(+) T cell activation. Splenocytes from CD74-deficient Fas(lpr)Cd74(-/-) mice had muted responses in a MLR and to the autoantigen histones. Compared with Fas(lpr)Cd74(+/+) mice, Fas(lpr)Cd74(-/-) mice had reduced kidney and spleen sizes, splenic activated T cells and B cells, serum IgG and autoantibodies, urine albumin/creatinine ratio, kidney Periodic acid-Schiff score, IgG and C3 deposition, and serum IL-6 and IL-17A levels, but serum IL-2 and TGF-β levels were increased. Study of chronic graft-versus-host C57BL/6 mice that received donor splenocytes from B6.C-H2(bm12) /KhEg mice and those that received syngeneic donor splenocytes yielded similar observations. CD74 deficiency reduced lupus-like autoimmunity and kidney pathology in chronic graft-versus-host mice. This investigation establishes the direct participation of CD74 in autoimmunity and highlights a potential role for CD74 in kidney TECs, together with professional APCs in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  6. B cells expressing the transcription factor T-bet drive lupus-like autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rubtsov, Anatoly V.; Thurman, Joshua M.; Mennona, Johanna M.; Kappler, John W.; Marrack, Philippa

    2017-01-01

    B cells contribute to multiple aspects of autoimmune disorders and may play a role in triggering disease. Thus, targeting B cells may be a promising strategy for treating autoimmune disorders. Better understanding of the B cell subsets that are responsible for the development of autoimmunity will be critical for developing efficient therapies. Here we have reported that B cells expressing the transcription factor T-bet promote the rapid appearance of autoantibodies and germinal centers in spontaneous murine models of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Conditional deletion of T-bet from B cells impaired the formation of germinal centers and mitigated the development of kidney damage and rapid mortality in SLE mice. B cell–specific deletion of T-bet was also associated with lower activation of both B cells and T cells. Taken together, our results suggest that targeting T-bet–expressing B cells may be a potential target for therapy for autoimmune diseases. PMID:28240602

  7. Peptide-based approaches to treat lupus and other autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Schall, Nicolas; Page, Nicolas; Macri, Christophe; Chaloin, Olivier; Briand, Jean-Paul; Muller, Sylviane

    2012-09-01

    After a long period where the potential of therapeutic peptides was let into oblivion and even dismissed, there is a revival of interest in peptides as potential drug candidates. Novel strategies for limiting metabolism and improve their bioavailability, and alternative routes of administration have emerged. This resulted in a large number of peptide-based drugs that are now being marketed in different indications. Regarding autoimmunity, successful data have been reported in numerous mouse models of autoimmune inflammation, yet relatively few clinical trials based on synthetic peptides are currently underway. This review reports on peptides that show much promises in appropriate mouse models of autoimmunity and describes in more detail clinical trials based on peptides for treating autoimmune patients. A particular emphasis is given to the 21-mer peptide P140/Lupuzor that has completed successfully phase I, phase IIa and phase IIb clinical trials for systemic lupus erythematosus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A rare cause of cytopenia in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus: Autoimmune myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cansu, Döndü Üsküdar; Teke, Hava Üsküdar; Korkmaz, Cengiz

    2017-01-01

    Hematological abnormalities are very common in the course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Myelofibrosis is a bone marrow disorder in which there is excessive fibrous tissue formation in the bone marrow. Various benign and malignant disorders can cause or be associated with a diffuse increase in the bone marrow reticular tissue. Some diseases such as infections, neoplasms, and autoimmune diseases may also induce bone marrow fibrosis (secondary myelofibrosis). Cytopenia from autoimmune myelofibrosis (AIMF) in SLE is a rare condition. Here we present a case of AIMF associated with SLE and aim to emphasize on the other cause of cytopenia in SLE. PMID:28293461

  9. Autoimmune myelofibrosis with pancytopenia as a presenting manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus responsive to mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Ungprasert, P; Chowdhary, V R; Davis, M D; Makol, A

    2016-04-01

    Hematological abnormalities, such as anemia, leucopenia, and thrombocytopenia, secondary to peripheral destruction, are common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, cytopenias from autoimmune myelofibrosis (AIMF) are extremely uncommon in SLE, with less than 40 reported cases in the literature. We report the case of a 33-year-old female who presented with bullous skin lesions and pancytopenia as the presenting manifestation of what was ultimately diagnosed as SLE with AIMF. She responded well to glucocorticoids and mycophenolate mofetil.

  10. Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Lupus KidsHealth > For Teens > Lupus Print A A A ... dad that she might have lupus. What Is Lupus? Lupus (pronounced: LOO-pus) is a disease that ...

  11. Death receptor 6 contributes to autoimmunity in lupus-prone mice

    PubMed Central

    Fujikura, Daisuke; Ikesue, Masahiro; Endo, Tsutomu; Chiba, Satoko; Higashi, Hideaki; Uede, Toshimitsu

    2017-01-01

    Expansion of autoreactive follicular helper T (Tfh) cells is tightly restricted to prevent induction of autoantibody-dependent immunological diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we show expression of an orphan immune regulator, death receptor 6 (DR6/TNFRSF21), on a population of Tfh cells that are highly expanded in lupus-like disease progression in mice. Genome-wide screening reveals an interaction between syndecan-1 and DR6 resulting in immunosuppressive functions. Importantly, syndecan-1 is expressed specifically on autoreactive germinal centre (GC) B cells that are critical for maintenance of Tfh cells. Syndecan-1 expression level on GC B cells is associated with Tfh cell expansion and disease progression in lupus-prone mouse strains. In addition, Tfh cell suppression by DR6-specific monoclonal antibody delays disease progression in lupus-prone mice. These findings suggest that the DR6/syndecan-1 axis regulates aberrant GC reactions and could be a therapeutic target for autoimmune diseases such as SLE. PMID:28045014

  12. Oxidative stress promotes hypertension and albuminuria during the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Keisa W; Venegas-Pont, Marcia; Masterson, C Warren; Stewart, Nicholas J; Wasson, Katie L; Ryan, Michael J

    2012-03-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that essential hypertension originates from an autoimmune-mediated mechanism. One consequence of chronic immune activation is the generation of oxygen-derived free radicals, resulting in oxidative stress. Renal oxidative stress has direct prohypertensive actions on renal microvascular and tubular function. Whether oxidative stress contributes to the prevalent hypertension associated with autoimmune disease is not clear. We showed previously that female NZBWF1 mice, an established model of the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), develop hypertension associated with renal oxidative stress. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that oxidative stress contributes to autoimmune-mediated hypertension by treating SLE and control (NZW/LacJ) mice with tempol (2.0 mmol/L) and apocynin (1.5 mmol/L) in the drinking water for 4 weeks. Although the treatment did not alter SLE disease activity (assessed by plasma double-stranded DNA autoantibodies), blood pressure and renal injury (urinary albumin) were reduced in the treated SLE mice. Tempol plus apocynin-treated SLE mice had reduced expression of nitrosylated proteins in the renal cortex, as well as reduced urinary and renal cortical hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that treatment reduced renal markers of oxidative stress. These data suggest that renal oxidative stress plays an important mechanistic role in the development of autoimmune-mediated hypertension.

  13. Acquired haemophilia A in a woman with autoimmune hepatitis and systemic lupus erythematosus; review of literature.

    PubMed

    Rezaieyazdi, Zahra; Sharifi-Doloui, Davood; Hashemzadeh, Kamila; Shirdel, Abbas; Mansouritorghabeh, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Acquired haemophilia A, secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a rare bleeding diathesis. Here we report a 37-year-old woman with autoimmune hepatitis who developed SLE and acquired haemophilia caused by factor VIII inhibitors. She presented with spontaneous ecchymosis and haematuria. There were a prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time, reduced factor VIII activity and a high titer of FVIII inhibitors. Therapeutic regimen was started with intravenous methylprednisolone pulse, continued with prednisolone, intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide and fresh frozen plasma. After 8 weeks, factor VIII inhibitor assay was negative.

  14. Acquired haemophilia A in a woman with autoimmune hepatitis and systemic lupus erythematosus: review of literature.

    PubMed

    Rezaieyazdi, Zahra; Sharifi-Doloui, Davood; Hashemzadeh, Kamila; Shirdel, Abbas; Mansouritorghabeh, Hassan

    2011-12-01

    Acquired haemophilia A, secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), is a rare bleeding diathesis. Here we report a 37-year-old woman with autoimmune hepatitis who developed SLE and acquired haemophilia caused by factor VIII (fVIII) inhibitors. She presented with spontaneous ecchymosis and haematuria. There were a prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time, reduced fVIII activity and a high titre of fVIII inhibitors. Therapeutic regimen was started with intravenous methylprednisolone pulse, continued with prednisolone, intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide and fresh frozen plasma. After 8 weeks, fVIII inhibitor assay was negative.

  15. Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-07-1-0121 TITLE: Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gerald T Nepom, M.D., Ph.D...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes Sb. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1-0121 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT...therapies. This research study entails using humanized mice manifesting type 1 diabetes (T1 D)-associated human HLA molecules to address the fate and

  16. Perspectives on autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, I.R.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: HLA and Autoimmunity; Self-Recognition and Symmetry in the Immune System; Immunology of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus; Multiple Sclerosis; Autoimmunity and Immune Pathological Aspects of Virus Disease; Analyses of the Idiotypes and Ligand Binding Characteristics of Human Monoclonal Autoantibodies to DNA: Do We Understand Better Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Autoimmunity and Rheumatic Fever; Autoimmune Arthritis Induced by Immunization to Mycobacterial Antigens; and The Interaction Between Genetic Factors and Micro-Organisms in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Facts and Fiction.

  17. Association of autoimmune hepatitis and systemic lupus erythematodes: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Beisel, Claudia; Weiler-Normann, Christina; Teufel, Andreas; Lohse, Ansgar W

    2014-09-21

    Liver test abnormalities have been described in up to 60% of patients with systemic lupus erythematodes (SLE) at some point during the course of their disease. Prior treatment with potentially hepatotoxic drugs or viral hepatitis is commonly considered to be the main cause of liver disease in SLE patients. However, in rare cases elevated liver enzymes may be due to concurrent autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). To distinguish whether the patient has primary liver disease with associated autoimmune clinical and laboratory features resembling SLE - such as AIH - or the elevation of liver enzymes is a manifestation of SLE remains a difficult challenge for the treating physician. Here, we present six female patients with complex autoimmune disorders and hepatitis. Patient charts were reviewed in order to investigate the complex relationship between SLE and AIH. All patients had coexisting autoimmune disease in their medical history. At the time of diagnosis of AIH, patients presented with arthralgia, abdominal complaints, cutaneous involvement and fatigue as common symptoms. All patients fulfilled the current diagnostic criteria of both, AIH and SLE. Remission of acute hepatitis was achieved in all cases after the initiation of immunosuppressive therapy. In addition to this case study a literature review was conducted.

  18. beta2-microglobulin dependence of the lupus-like autoimmune syndrome of MRL-lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Christianson, G J; Blankenburg, R L; Duffy, T M; Panka, D; Roths, J B; Marshak-Rothstein, A; Roopenian, D C

    1996-06-15

    MRL-lpr/lpr mice develop a distinctive immunologic disease characterized by accumulation of unusually large numbers of T cells in the peripheral lymphoid organs. Most of the accumulating T cells express an alpha beta-TCR but are peculiar in that they express neither CD4 nor CD8 co-ligands. Concurrent with lymphoaccumulation of such double negative (DN) T cells, MRL-lpr/lpr mice develop a lethal systemic lupus erythematosus-like autoimmune syndrome. This study focuses on the role of MHC class I molecules in this latter pathologic process. Highly backcrossed class I molecule-deficient MRL and MRL-lpr mice carrying a functionally defective allele of the gene beta 2-microglobulin (B2m) were produced. Class I deficient MRL-lpr/lpr mice demonstrated a substantial reduction in DN T cells, confirming other reports indicating that most DN T cells arise from progenitors positively selected on MHC class I molecules. Significantly, class I-deficient MRL-lpr/lpr mice also demonstrated a diminution of every autoimmune disease indicator analyzed including hypergammaglobulinemia; autoantibodies including anti-DNA, anti-Smith antigen, and rheumatoid factor; and glomerulonephritis. The results indicate that class I-dependent T cells are crucial not only for the development of DN T cells, but for multiple features of the MRL-lpr/lpr systemic lupus erythematosus syndrome. Moreover, the pattern of hypergammaglobulinemia suggests that the requirement for MHC class I proteins is restricted temporally to later stages of the disease.

  19. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression is upregulated in autoimmune murine lupus nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Wuthrich, R. P.; Jevnikar, A. M.; Takei, F.; Glimcher, L. H.; Kelley, V. E.

    1990-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a cell-surface protein regulating interactions among immune cells. To determine whether altered expression of ICAM-1 occurs in autoimmune lupus nephritis, we studied ICAM-1 expression in kidneys of normal and autoimmune MRL-lpr and (NZBX NZW)F1 (NZB/W) mice. By immunoperoxidase staining, ICAM-1 is constitutively expressed at low levels in proximal tubules (PT), endothelium and interstitial cells in normal C3H/FeJ mice. In nephritic MRL-lpr and NZB/W kidneys, staining for ICAM-1 is increased in the PT, particularly in the brush border, and is prominent in the glomerular mesangium and the endothelium of large vessels. By Western blot analysis, ICAM-1 is not detected in the urine of normal BALB/c and C3H/FeJ or autoimmune MRL-lpr. By Northern blot analysis, nephritic MRL-lpr and NZB/W have a two- to fivefold increase in steady state levels of ICAM-1 transcripts in the kidney as compared with normal or prenephritic mice. This is paralleled by an increase in MHC class II transcripts. In cultured PT cells, ICAM-1 is expressed at basal levels in PT and is increased by the cytokines interferon-gamma, IL-1 alpha, and TNF-alpha. Thus cytokine-mediated upregulation of ICAM-1 in lupus nephritis may promote interaction of immune cells with renal tissue. The predominant apical expression of ICAM-1 opposite to the basolateral Ia expression suggests a novel role for this adhesion molecule in PT. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1968316

  20. Ascending paresis as presentation of an unusual association between necrotizing autoimmune myopathy and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    García-Reynoso, Marco Julio; Veramendi-Espinoza, Liz Eliana; Ruiz-Garcia, Henry Jeison

    2014-01-01

    A 45 year-old man went to the emergency room due to disease duration of 15 days of insidious onset and progressive course. It began with symmetrical weakness and pain in feet and ankles that extends upward to the knees. Later, this progressed to paraparesis with Creatine phosphokinase levels of 44,270 U/L and respiratory failure that required mechanical ventilation. Electromyography and muscle biopsy of quadriceps were made. The patient responded to corticotherapy in pulses and supporting management. The presentation of ascending paresis suggested the diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome. However, the degree of muscle involvement with rhabdomyolysis explains the neurological damage by itself. The biopsy revealed pathological criteria for necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM), as well as other clinical and laboratory evidence. Patient disease continued and reached criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To our best knowledge, this is the first report of the NAM and SLE association.

  1. Human autoimmune diseases: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-10-01

    There have been significant advances in our understanding of human autoimmunity that have led to improvements in classification and diagnosis and, most importantly, research advances in new therapies. The importance of autoimmunity and the mechanisms that lead to clinical disease were first recognized about 50 years ago following the pioneering studies of Macfarlane Burnett and his Nobel Prize-winning hypothesis of the 'forbidden clone'. Such pioneering efforts led to a better understanding not only of autoimmunity, but also of lymphoid cell development, thymic education, apoptosis and deletion of autoreactive cells. Contemporary theories suggest that the development of an autoimmune disease requires a genetic predisposition and environmental factors that trigger the immune pathways that lead, ultimately, to tissue destruction. Despite extensive research, there are no genetic tools that can be used clinically to predict the risk of autoimmune disease. Indeed, the concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins is 12-67%, highlighting not only a role for environmental factors, but also the potential importance of stochastic or epigenetic phenomena. On the other hand, the identification of cytokines and chemokines, and their cognate receptors, has led to novel therapies that block pathological inflammatory responses within the target organ and have greatly improved the therapeutic effect in patients with autoimmune disease, particularly rheumatoid arthritis. Further advances involving the use of multiplex platforms for diagnosis and identification of new therapeutic agents should lead to major breakthroughs within the next decade.

  2. Silica Triggers Inflammation and Ectopic Lymphoid Neogenesis in the Lungs in Parallel with Accelerated Onset of Systemic Autoimmunity and Glomerulonephritis in the Lupus-Prone NZBWF1 Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Melissa A.; Brandenberger, Christina; Langohr, Ingeborg; Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Harkema, Jack R.; Holian, Andrij; Pestka, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic predisposition and environmental factors influence the development of human autoimmune disease. Occupational exposure to crystalline silica (cSiO2) has been etiologically linked to increased incidence of autoimmunity, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that early repeated short-term cSiO2 exposure will modulate both latency and severity of autoimmunity in the lupus-prone female NZBWF1 mouse. Weekly intranasal exposure to cSiO2 (0.25 and 1.0 mg) for 4 wk beginning at 9 wk of age both reduced latency and increased intensity of glomerulonephritis. cSiO2 elicited robust inflammatory responses in the lungs as evidenced by extensive perivascular and peribronchial lymphoplasmacytic infiltration consisting of IgG-producing plasma cells, and CD45R+ and CD3+ lymphocytes that were highly suggestive of ectopic lymphoid tissue (ELT). In addition, there were elevated concentrations of immunoglobulins and the cytokines MCP-1, TNF-α and IL-6 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. cSiO2-associated kidney and lung effects paralleled dose-dependent elevations of autoantibodies and proinflammatory cytokines in plasma. Taken together, cSiO2-induced pulmonary inflammation and ectopic lymphoid neogenesis in the NZBWF1 mouse corresponded closely to systemic inflammatory and autoimmune responses as well as the early initiation of pathological outcomes in the kidney. These findings suggest that following airway exposure to crystalline silica, in mice genetically prone to SLE, the lung serves as a platform for triggering systemic autoimmunity and glomerulonephritis. PMID:25978333

  3. Role of MHC-Linked Susceptibility Genes in the Pathogenesis of Human and Murine Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Relle, Manfred; Schwarting, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies against nuclear antigens and a systemic inflammation that can damage a broad spectrum of organs. SLE patients suffer from a wide variety of symptoms, which can affect virtually almost any tissue. As lupus is difficult to diagnose, the worldwide prevalence of SLE can only be roughly estimated to range from 10 and 200 cases per 100,000 individuals with dramatic differences depending on gender, ethnicity, and location. Although the treatment of this disease has been significantly ameliorated by new therapies, improved conventional drug therapy options, and a trained expert eye, the underlying pathogenesis of lupus still remain widely unknown. The complex etiology reflects the complex genetic background of the disease, which is also not well understood yet. However, in the past few years advances in lupus genetics have been made, notably with the publication of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in humans and the identification of susceptibility genes and loci in mice. This paper reviews the role of MHC-linked susceptibility genes in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:22761632

  4. MicroRNA-21 deficiency protects from lupus-like autoimmunity in the chronic graft-versus-host disease model of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Garchow, Barry; Kiriakidou, Marianthi

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression primarily at the post-transcriptional level. Emerging evidence supports a regulatory role for miRNAs in the immune response and autoimmunity. In this work, we investigated the implication of miR-21 in the experimentally inducible bm12→B6 cGVHD model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). cGVHD host mice deficient in miR-21 show a 2-fold reduction in splenomegaly, significantly reduced autoantibody titers and down-regulated components of the CD40:CD40L and CD28:CD80/86 co-stimulation pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrate that miR-21-deficient hosts have reduced CD4(+) IL-17(+) cell populations and an expanded CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) cell compartment. We propose that miR-21 has a pluripotent role, serving to link distinct lymphocyte signaling pathways and acting as a "rheostat" for signals that promote B and T cell activation in lupus. Collectively, our experiments demonstrate that miR-21 deficiency in cGVHD host mice is sufficient to protect from lupus-like autoimmunity.

  5. Amelioration of lupus-like autoimmune disease in NZB/WF1 mice after treatment with a blocking monoclonal antibody specific for complement component C5.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Hu, Q; Madri, J A; Rollins, S A; Chodera, A; Matis, L A

    1996-01-01

    New Zealand black x New Zealand white (NZB/W) F1 mice spontaneously develop an autoimmune syndrome with notable similarities to human systemic lupus erythematosus. Female NZB/WF1 mice produce high titers of antinuclear antibodies and invariably succumb to severe glomerulonephritis by 12 months of age. Although the development of the immune-complex nephritis is accompanied by abundant local and systemic complement activation, the role of proinflammatory complement components in disease progression has not been established. In this study we have examined the contribution of activated terminal complement proteins to the pathogenesis of the lupus-like autoimmune disease. Female NZB/W F1 mice were treated with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for the C5 component of complement that blocks the cleavage of C5 and thus prevents the generation of the potent proinflammatory factors C5a and C5b-9. Continuous therapy with anti-C5 mAb for 6 months resulted in significant amelioration of the course of glomerulonephritis and in markedly increased survival. These findings demonstrate an important role for the terminal complement cascade in the progression of renal disease in NZB/W F1 mice, and suggest that mAb-mediated C5 inhibition may be a useful approach to the therapy of immune-complex glomerulonephritis in humans. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:8710910

  6. Autoimmune-mediated glucose intolerance in a mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Curtis L.; Smith, Patricia B.; Mendez-Fernandez, Yanice V.; Wilhelm, Ashley J.; Ye, Audrey Musi

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies against self-antigens such as double-stranded DNA and phospholipids. Classical comorbidities of SLE include glomerulonephritis, infection, cardiovascular disease, arthritis, skin disorders, and neurological disease. In addition to these classical comorbidities, there is emerging evidence that SLE patients are at higher risk of developing insulin resistance and other components of the metabolic syndrome. Visceral adipose tissue inflammation is a central mediator of insulin resistance in the obese setting, but the mechanism behind the pathogenesis of metabolic disease in the SLE patient population is unclear. We hypothesize that lupus-associated changes in the adaptive immune system are associated with disruption in glucose homeostasis in the context of SLE. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the metabolic and immunological phenotype of SLE-prone B6.SLE mice. B6.SLE mice fed a low-fat diet had significantly worsened glucose tolerance, increased adipose tissue insulin resistance, increased β-cell insulin secretion, and increased adipocyte size compared with their respective B6 controls. Independently of diet, B cells isolated from the white adipose tissue of B6.SLE mice were skewed toward IgG production, and the level of IgG1 was elevated in the serum of SLE-prone mice. These data show that B6.SLE mice develop defects in glucose homeostasis even when fed a low-fat diet and suggest that B cells may play a role in this metabolic dysfunction. PMID:23032686

  7. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  8. Murine lupus strains differentially model unique facets of human lupus serology.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Nukala, S; Du, Y; Han, J; Liu, K; Hutcheson, J; Pathak, S; Li, Q; Mohan, C

    2012-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a polygenic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of anti-nuclear autoantibodies that lead to subsequent end organ damage. Previous array-based studies in patients with SLE have shown that high immunoglobulin (Ig)G anti-nuclear autoantibody reactivity was associated with severe renal lupus, whereas IgM polyreactivity was associated with less severe disease. To ascertain how different murine lupus strains recapitulate these different autoantibody profiles seen in patients, serum from New Zealand black (NZB)/NZ white (W) F(1), Murphy Roths large (MRL)/lpr, NZ mixed (M)2410 and BXSB strains were compared using a comprehensive array-based screen. The array results were verified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Serum from MRL/lpr mice exhibited high levels of IgG anti-nuclear antibodies as well as anti-glomerular antibodies and variable levels of antibodies to myosin, Matrigel and thyroglobulin. Elevated anti-nuclear IgG antibodies were associated with severe nephritis in this strain. In contrast, NZM2410 mice exhibited lower IgG autoantibody levels with less severe nephritis but a significantly higher polyreactive IgM autoantibody profile. ELISA analysis confirmed these results. The NZB/NZW F(1) and BXSB strains exhibited an intermediate serological profile. Hence, just as in patients with SLE, whereas strong IgG reactivity to nuclear antigens is associated with severe renal disease, a polyreactive IgM seroprofile is also less ominous in murine lupus.

  9. Renal outcomes in children with lupus and a family history of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Apenteng, T; Kaplan, B; Meyers, K

    2006-01-01

    Genetic factors play an important role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility and development of lupus nephritis (LN). The significance, however, of a positive family history of autoimmune disease on renal outcome in SLE patients is unknown. This retrospective study of 64 children with LN investigates whether children with LN and a family history of AID (autoimmune disease; 34 patients) had worse renal outcomes when compared with children who did not have a family history (26 patients) of AID. In four patients the family history was unknown. The primary endpoint was doubling of serum creatinine (sCr) and the secondary endpoint was requiring dialysis or transplant (ESRD). Demographic variables for family history + versus mean age in years (range) at onset of LN were 13.5 (7.4-15.9) versus 13.2 (6.4-19.7); female 26: 34 (76%) versus 24: 26 (92%), P = 0.097; race Black 23 (68%), Caucasian 7 (21%), Asian 1 (2%), Hispanic 3(9%) versus Black 14 (54%), Caucasian 6 (23%), Asian 2 (8%), Hispanic 4 (15%). Three patients died (1.6%); sCr doubled in 6/34 (17.6%) versus 2/26 (7.7%), P = 0.45, followed for 2.8 years (0.8-5.8) and 1.8 years (1.8-1.9), respectively, P = 0.24; sCr doubled plus ESRD in 10/34 (29%) versus 6/26 (23%), P = 0.77, followed for 2.7 years (0.8-5.8) and 2.0 years (0.7-4.1) respectively, P = 0.29. In the family history + group, more Black versus non-Black patients doubled their sCr or reached ESRD, 8/23 (35%) versus 2/11 (18%), P = 0.44. More males and Black patients with LN had a positive family history for AID and were more likely to double their sCr or reach ESRD. These results suggest that a family history of AID impacts on renal outcome in children with SLE.

  10. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in systemic lupus erythematosus at diagnosis: differences between pediatric and adult patients.

    PubMed

    Gormezano, N W S; Kern, D; Pereira, O L; Esteves, G C X; Sallum, A M E; Aikawa, N E; Pereira, R M R; Silva, C A; Bonfá, E

    2017-04-01

    Objective To determine the overall prevalence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), and to compare clinical and laboratory features in a large population of children and adult lupus patients at diagnosis. Methods This retrospective study evaluated the medical charts of 336 childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) and 1830 adult SLE (aSLE) patients followed in the same tertiary hospital. Demographic data, clinical features and disease activity were recorded. AIHA was defined according to the presence of anemia (hemoglobin <10 g/dL) and evidence of hemolysis (reticulocytosis and positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT)/Coombs test) at SLE diagnosis. Evans syndrome (ES) was defined by the combination of immune thrombocytopenia (platelet count <100,000/mm(3)) and AIHA. Results The frequency of AIHA at diagnosis was significantly higher in cSLE patients compared to aSLE (49/336 (14%) vs 49/1830 (3%), p = 0.0001), with similar frequency of ES (3/336 (0.9%) vs 10/1830 (0.5%), p = 0.438). The median of hemoglobin levels was reduced in cSLE vs aSLE patients (8.3 (2.2-10) vs 9.5 (6.6-10) g/dL, p = 0.002) with a higher frequency of multiple hemorrhagic manifestations (41% vs 7%, p = 0.041) and erythrocyte transfusion due to bleeding (24% vs 5%, p = 0.025). cSLE patients also had more often constitutional involvement (84% vs 31%, p < 0.001), fever (65% vs 26%, p < 0.001), weight loss > 2 kg (39% vs 6%, p < 0.001), reticuloendothelial manifestations (48% vs 8%, p < 0.001), hepatomegaly (25% vs 2%, p < 0.001) and splenomegaly (21% vs 2%, p = 0.004). Other major organ involvements were common but with similar frequencies in cSLE and aSLE ( p > 0.05). Median systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index 2000 (SLEDAI-2 K) was comparable in cSLE and aSLE (p = 0.161). Conclusions We identified that AIHA was not a common condition in cSLE and aSLE, with distinct features characterized by a higher prevalence

  11. [MMPI-2 profiles in groups of systemic autoimmune disease - rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus - patients].

    PubMed

    Csókási, Krisztina; Hargitai, Rita; Járai, Róbert; Nagy, László; Czirják, László; Kiss, Enikö Csilla

    2015-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are characterized by the alteration of immunological response, which can damage many organs and systems and result in a wide variety of clinical presentations. In addition to physical symptoms, psychiatric disorders are also common to many autoimmune diseases. Anxiety, depression, psychosis and cognitive deficits have the highest prevalence. The aim of this study was to display the degree of psychopathological symptoms in patients with RA and SLE. Female inpatients with RA (N=68) and SLE (N=78) were recruited from the Rheumatology and Immunology Clinic of the University of Pecs and were asked to complete the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) and a short demografical form. The clinical personality profiles of the patient groups were explored and compared with each other. High scores (above 64T) were detected on the Hypochondriasis (Hs), Depression (D) and Hysteria (Hy) scales in both groups. Besides, the participants performed elevated scores on the Masculinity-Feminity (Mf), Psychasthenia (Pt) and Social Introversion (Si) clinical scales. They scored in the elevated range on the Physical Malfunctioning, Subjective Depression, Lassitude-Malaise and Somatic Complaints subscales of the neurotic triad. No significant difference was found on the ten clinical scales between the SLE and RA patients. Characteristics of MMPI-2 profiles in SLE and RA patients seem to be the consequence of the disease and a common feature of chronic conditions. High scores on the neurotic triad scales may reflect the comorbid psychiatric disorders and the somatic symptoms alike, so further investigations with the revised Hungarian MMPI-2 are needed.

  12. The innate immune system in human systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Weidenbusch, Marc; Kulkarni, Onkar P; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-04-25

    Although the role of adaptive immune mechanisms, e.g. autoantibody formation and abnormal T-cell activation, has been long noted in the pathogenesis of human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the role of innate immunity has been less well characterized. An intricate interplay between both innate and adaptive immune elements exists in protective anti-infective immunity as well as in detrimental autoimmunity. More recently, it has become clear that the innate immune system in this regard not only starts inflammation cascades in SLE leading to disease flares, but also continues to fuel adaptive immune responses throughout the course of the disease. This is why targeting the innate immune system offers an additional means of treating SLE. First trials assessing the efficacy of anti-type I interferon (IFN) therapy or modulators of pattern recognition receptor (PRR) signalling have been attempted. In this review, we summarize the available evidence on the role of several distinct innate immune elements, especially neutrophils and dendritic cells as well as the IFN system, as well as specific innate PRRs along with their signalling pathways. Finally, we highlight recent clinical trials in SLE addressing one or more of the aforementioned components of the innate immune system.

  13. The autoimmune diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, N.R.; Mackay, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 25 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Genetic Predisposition to Autoimmune Diseases; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Autoimmune Aspects of Rheumatoid Arthritis; Immunology of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes; and Adrenal Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndromes.

  14. Murine lupus strains differentially model unique facets of human lupus serology

    PubMed Central

    Li, L; Nukala, S; Du, Y; Han, J; Liu, K; Hutcheson, J; Pathak, S; Li, Q; Mohan, C

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a polygenic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of anti-nuclear autoantibodies that lead to subsequent end organ damage. Previous array-based studies in patients with SLE have shown that high immunoglobulin (Ig)G anti-nuclear autoantibody reactivity was associated with severe renal lupus, whereas IgM polyreactivity was associated with less severe disease. To ascertain how different murine lupus strains recapitulate these different autoantibody profiles seen in patients, serum from New Zealand black (NZB)/NZ white (W) F1, Murphy Roths large (MRL)/lpr, NZ mixed (M)2410 and BXSB strains were compared using a comprehensive array-based screen. The array results were verified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Serum from MRL/lpr mice exhibited high levels of IgG anti-nuclear antibodies as well as anti-glomerular antibodies and variable levels of antibodies to myosin, Matrigel and thyroglobulin. Elevated anti-nuclear IgG antibodies were associated with severe nephritis in this strain. In contrast, NZM2410 mice exhibited lower IgG autoantibody levels with less severe nephritis but a significantly higher polyreactive IgM autoantibody profile. ELISA analysis confirmed these results. The NZB/NZW F1 and BXSB strains exhibited an intermediate serological profile. Hence, just as in patients with SLE, whereas strong IgG reactivity to nuclear antigens is associated with severe renal disease, a polyreactive IgM seroprofile is also less ominous in murine lupus. PMID:22471278

  15. Purinergic signalling in autoimmunity: A role for the P2X7R in systemic lupus erythematosus?

    PubMed

    Di Virgilio, Francesco; Giuliani, Anna Lisa

    2016-10-01

    Purinergic signalling plays a crucial role in immunity and autoimmunity. Among purinergic receptors, the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) has an undisputed role as it is expressed to high level by immune cells, triggers cytokine release and modulates immune cell differentiation. In this review, we focus on evidence supporting a possible role of the P2X7R in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Copyright © 2016 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Bindarit retards renal disease and prolongs survival in murine lupus autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Zoja, C; Corna, D; Benedetti, G; Morigi, M; Donadelli, R; Guglielmotti, A; Pinza, M; Bertani, T; Remuzzi, G

    1998-03-01

    proteinuria and survival of lupus mice, in an additional group of animals (N = 16). Thus, at 14.5 months when all mice given bindarit alone died, 50% of mice on combined therapy were still alive (P < 0.023). Studies are needed to establish whether bindarit may function as a steroid sparing drug in human lupus.

  17. Human innate B cells: a link between host defense and autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Milner, Eric C B; Anolik, Jennifer; Cappione, Amedeo; Sanz, Iñaki

    2005-03-01

    B cells play a variety of immunoregulatory roles through their antigen-presentation ability and through cytokine and chemokine production. Innate immune activation of B cells may play a beneficial role through the generation of natural cross-reactive antibodies, by maintaining B cell memory and by exercising immunomodulatory functions that may provide protection against autoimmunity. In this article, we review human B cell populations and their functional properties, with a particular focus on a population of inherently autoreactive B cells, which seem to play an important physiological role in innate immunity, but which, if selected into adaptive immune responses, appear to become pathogenic agents in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  18. Definition of human autoimmunity--autoantibodies versus autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Lleo, Ana; Invernizzi, Pietro; Gao, Bin; Podda, Mauro; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-03-01

    The critical function of the immune system is to discriminate self from non-self. Tolerance against self-antigens is a highly regulated process and, in order to maintain it, the immune system must be able to distinguish self-reactive lymphocytes as they develop. The presence of autoantibodies is the consequence of breakdown of tolerance and, although they are an important serological feature of autoimmune diseases, their presence is not exclusive of these conditions. Antibodies against self-antigens are also found in cancer, during massive tissue damage and even in healthy subjects. Natural autoantibodies provide immediate protection against infection and also prevent inflammation by facilitating the clearance of oxidized lipids, oxidized proteins, and apoptotic cells; their role in development of autoimmunity is still unclear. Detection of serum autoantibodies in clinical practice has become more available to clinicians worldwide while providing a powerful diagnostic tool. This review discusses the clinical significance of autoantibodies, their pathogenic mechanisms in autoimmune diseases and, finally, illustrates the technology available for appropriate autoantibody detection.

  19. Pathogenesis of human systemic lupus erythematosus: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Crispín, José C.; Liossis, Stamatis-Nick C.; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Lieberman, Linda A.; Kyttaris, Vasileios C.; Juang, Yuang-Taung; Tsokos, George C.

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that predominantly affects women and presents with manifestations derived from the involvement of multiple organs including the kidneys, joints, nervous system, and hematopoietic organs. Immune system aberrations, as well as heritable, hormonal, and environmental factors interplay in the expression of organ damage. Recent contributions from different fields have developed our understanding of SLE and reshaped current pathogenic models. Here, we review novel information that deals with 1) genes associated with disease expression, 2) immune cell molecular abnormalities that lead to autoimmune pathology, 3) the role of hormones and sex chromosomes in the development of disease, 4) environmental and epigenetic factors thought to contribute to the expression of SLE. Finally, we emphasize molecular defects intimately associated with the disease process of SLE that represent ideal therapeutic targets and disease biomarkers. PMID:20138006

  20. Human histocompatibility antigen associations in subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Sontheimer, R D; Stastny, P; Gilliam, J N

    1981-01-01

    We have identified a clinically distinct subset of lupus erythematosus patients marked by the presence of a histologically proven, nonscarring variety of cutaneous LE (subacute cutaneous LE) in which there is a very high frequency of the human leukocyte antigens (HLA) B8 and DR3. Differences in the configuration of their skin lesions allowed a separation of the patients into two clinical subgroups; annular and papulosquamous. HLA-B8 was increased in the annular subgroup (81%, corrected P (Pc) < 0.007) and combined group (65%, Pc < 0.004). HLA-DR3 was present in all 11 of the annular patients (10%, Pc < 0.00008). In addition, HLA-DR3 was present in increased frequencies in the papulosquamous subgroup (60%, Pc < 0.04) and combined group (77%, Pc < 0.00008). Thus, HLA-DR3 positive individuals have a relative risk of 10.8 for developing subacute cutaneous LE of either type and an even greater relative risk (67.1) for the annular variety. The HLA phenotype A1, B8, DR3 was also found more commonly in the annular (73%, P < 0.00008) and combined patient groups (46%, P < 0.004). These HLA associations, which are stronger than ever before reported for any form of LE, did not result from the concurrent presence of subclinical Sjögren's syndrome. Thus, subacute cutaneous LE can now be added to the growing list of HLA-B8, DR3-associated diseases that have autoimmune features. PMID:7451656

  1. Development of Murine Lupus Involves the Combined Genetic Contribution of the SLAM and FcγR Intervals within the Nba2 Autoimmune Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Trine N.; Alfaro, Jennifer; Enriquez, Hilda L.; Jiang, Chao; Loo, William M.; Atencio, Stephanie; Bupp, Melanie R. Gubbels; Mailloux, Christina M.; Metzger, Troy; Flannery, Shannon; Rozzo, Stephen J.; Kotzin, Brian L.; Rosemblatt, Mario; Bono, María Rosa; Erickson, Loren D.

    2010-01-01

    Autoantibodies are of central importance in the pathogenesis of Ab-mediated autoimmune disorders. The murine lupus susceptibility locus Nba2 on chromosome 1 and the syntenic human locus are associated with a loss of immune tolerance that leads to antinuclear Ab production. To identify gene intervals within Nba2 that control the development of autoantibody-producing B cells and to determine the cellular components through which Nba2 genes accomplish this, we generated congenic mice expressing various Nba2 intervals where genes for the FcγR, SLAM, and IFN-inducible families are encoded. Analysis of congenic strains demonstrated that the FcγR and SLAM intervals independently controlled the severity of autoantibody production and renal disease, yet are both required for lupus susceptibility. Deregulated homeostasis of terminally differentiated B cells was found to be controlled by the FcγR interval where FcγRIIb-mediated apoptosis of germinal center B cells and plasma cells was impaired. Increased numbers of activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells that were distinctly CD19+ and promoted plasma cell differentiation via the proinflammatory cytokines IL-10 and IFNα were linked to the SLAM interval. These findings suggest that SLAM and FcγR intervals act cooperatively to influence the clinical course of disease through supporting the differentiation and survival of autoantibody-producing cells. PMID:20018631

  2. Autoantibodies against the replication protein A complex in systemic lupus erythematosus and other autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Yoshioki; Narain, Sonali; Hernandez, Liza; Barker, Tolga; Ikeda, Keigo; Segal, Mark S; Richards, Hanno B; Chan, Edward KL; Reeves, Westley H; Satoh, Minoru

    2006-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), a heterotrimer with subunits of molecular masses 70, 32, and 14 kDa, is a single-stranded-DNA-binding factor involved in DNA replication, repair, and recombination. There have been only three reported cases of anti-RPA in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren syndrome (SjS). This study sought to clarify the clinical significance of autoantibodies against RPA. Sera from 1,119 patients enrolled during the period 2000 to 2005 were screened by immunoprecipitation (IP) of 35S-labeled K562 cell extract. Antigen-capture ELISA with anti-RPA32 mAb, immunofluorescent antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and western blot analysis with purified RPA were also performed. Our results show that nine sera immunoprecipitated the RPA70–RPA32–RPA14 complex and all were strongly positive by ELISA (titers 1:62,500 to 1:312,500). No additional sera were positive by ELISA and subsequently confirmed by IP or western blotting. All sera showed fine speckled/homogeneous nuclear staining. Anti-RPA was found in 1.4% (4/276) of SLE and 2.5% (1/40) of SjS sera, but not in rheumatoid arthritis (0/35), systemic sclerosis (0/47), or polymyositis/dermatomyositis (0/43). Eight of nine patients were female and there was no racial predilection. Other positive patients had interstitial lung disease, autoimmune thyroiditis/hepatitis C virus/pernicious anemia, or an unknown diagnosis. Autoantibody specificities found in up to 40% of SLE and other diseases, such as anti-nRNP, anti-Sm, anti-Ro, and anti-La, were unusual in anti-RPA-positive sera. Only one of nine had anti-Ro, and zero of nine had anti-nRNP, anti-Sm, anti-La, or anti-ribosomal P antibodies. In summary, high titers of anti-RPA antibodies were found in nine patients (1.4% of SLE and other diseases). Other autoantibodies found in SLE were rare in this subset, suggesting that patients with anti-RPA may form a unique clinical and immunological subset. PMID:16846524

  3. Description of 214 cases of autoimmune congenital heart block: Results of the French neonatal lupus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Kateri; Morel, Nathalie; Maltret, Alice; Baron, Gabriel; Masseau, Agathe; Orquevaux, Pauline; Piette, Jean-Charles; Barriere, Francois; Le Bidois, Jérome; Fermont, Laurent; Fain, Olivier; Theulin, Arnaud; Sassolas, Francois; Pezard, Philippe; Amoura, Zahir; Guettrot-Imbert, Gaëlle; Le Mercier, Delphine; Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie; Deligny, Christophe; Hachulla, Eric; Mouthon, Luc; Ravaud, Philippe; Villain, Elisabeth; Bonnet, Damien; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac neonatal lupus syndrome is due to anti-SSA or SSB antibodies and mainly includes congenital heart block (CHB) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Its optimal management is still debated. We report a large series of autoimmune high degree CHB. Inclusion criteria in this retrospective study were fetuses or neonates with high-degree CHB associated with maternal anti-SSA/SSB antibodies. 214 CHB were included: 202 detected in utero at a median term of 23 weeks' gestation (WG) [range 16 to 39 WG] and 12 neonatal cases diagnosed at a median age of 0 days [range birth to 8 days]. The 214 cases of CHB included 202 (94.4%) third-degree CHB, 8 (3.7%) second-degree CHB, and 4 (1.9%) intermittent CHB. In multivariate analysis, the factors associated with feto-neonatal deaths (15.7%) were hydrops (p<0.001; hazard ratio [HR] 12.4 [95% confidence interval (95%CI) 4.7-32.7]) and prematurity (p=0.002; HR 17.1 [95%CI 2.8-103.1]). During a median follow-up of 7 years [birth to 36 years], 148 of 187 children born alive (79.1%) had a pacemaker, 35 (18.8%, one missing data) had DCM, and 22 (11.8%) died. In multivariate analysis, factors associated with child death were in utero DCM (p=0.0157; HR 6.37 [95%CI: 1.25-32.44]), postnatal DCM (p<0.0001; HR 227.58[95%CI: 24.33-2128.46]) and pacemaker implantation (p=0.0035; HR 0.11[95%CI: 0.02-0.51]). The use of fluorinated steroids was neither associated with survival nor with regression of 2nd degree CHB. In this second largest series of CHB, we confirm some of the previous results. We were unable to find data supporting the routine use of in utero fluorinated steroids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. microRNAs in lupus

    PubMed Central

    ZAN, HONG; TAT, CONNIE; CASALI, PAOLO

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of an array of pathogenic autoantibodies, including high-affinity anti-dsDNA IgG antibodies, which plays an important role in disease development and progression. Lupus preferentially affects women during their reproductive years. The pathogenesis of lupus is contributed by both genetic factors and epigenetic modifications that arise from exposure to the environment. Epigenetic marks, including DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications and microRNAs (miRNAs), interact with genetic programs to regulate immune responses. Epigenetic modifications influence gene expression and modulate B cell functions, such as class switch DNA recombination (CSR), somatic hypermutation (SHM) and plasma cell differentiation, thereby informing the antibody response. Epigenetic dysregulation can result in aberrant antibody responses to exogenous antigens or self-antigens, such as chromatin, histones and dsDNA in lupus. miRNAs play key roles in the post-transcriptional regulation of most gene-regulatory pathways and regulate both the innate and the adaptive immune responses. In mice, dysregulation of miRNAs leads to aberrant immune responses and development of systemic autoimmunity. Altered miRNA expression has been reported in human autoimmune diseases, including lupus. The dysregulation of miRNAs in lupus could be the result of multiple environmental factors, such as sex hormones and viral or bacterial infection. Modulation of miRNA is a potential therapeutic strategy for lupus. PMID:24826805

  5. Melanocyte antigen triggers autoimmunity in human psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Akiko; Siewert, Katherina; Stöhr, Julia; Besgen, Petra; Kim, Song-Min; Rühl, Geraldine; Nickel, Jens; Vollmer, Sigrid; Thomas, Peter; Krebs, Stefan; Pinkert, Stefan; Spannagl, Michael; Held, Kathrin; Kammerbauer, Claudia; Besch, Robert; Dornmair, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a common T cell–mediated inflammatory skin disease with a suspected autoimmune pathogenesis. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I allele, HLA-C*06:02, is the main psoriasis risk gene. Epidermal CD8+ T cells are essential for psoriasis development. Functional implications of HLA-C*06:02 and mechanisms of lesional T cell activation in psoriasis, however, remained elusive. Here we identify melanocytes as skin-specific target cells of an HLA-C*06:02–restricted psoriatic T cell response. We found that a Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 T cell receptor (TCR), which we had reconstituted from an epidermal CD8+ T cell clone of an HLA-C*06:02–positive psoriasis patient specifically recognizes HLA-C*06:02–positive melanocytes. Through peptide library screening, we identified ADAMTS-like protein 5 (ADAMTSL5) as an HLA-C*06:02–presented melanocytic autoantigen of the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1 TCR. Consistent with the Vα3S1/Vβ13S1-TCR reactivity, we observed numerous CD8+ T cells in psoriasis lesions attacking melanocytes, the only epidermal cells expressing ADAMTSL5. Furthermore, ADAMTSL5 stimulation induced the psoriasis signature cytokine, IL-17A, in CD8+ T cells from psoriasis patients only, supporting a role as psoriatic autoantigen. This unbiased analysis of a TCR obtained directly from tissue-infiltrating CD8+ T cells reveals that in psoriasis HLA-C*06:02 directs an autoimmune response against melanocytes through autoantigen presentation. We propose that HLA-C*06:02 may predispose to psoriasis via this newly identified autoimmune pathway. PMID:26621454

  6. Drug-induced lupus erythematosus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes Drug-induced lupus erythematosus is similar to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It is an autoimmune disorder. This means ... 2015:chap 132. Wright B, Bharadwaj S, Abelson A. Systemic lupus erythematosus. In: Carey WD, ed. Cleveland Clinic: Current Clinical ...

  7. Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... bite or scratch of a wolf ("lupus" is Latin for wolf and "erythematosus" is Latin for red). SLE is the most serious form ... occurs more often in African-American, Asian-American, Latin-American, and Native-American women than in non- ...

  8. Regulation of autoimmune germinal center reactions in lupus-prone BXD2 mice by follicular helper T cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Uk; Lim, Hoyong; Jung, Ha Eun; Wetsel, Rick A; Chung, Yeonseok

    2015-01-01

    BXD2 mice spontaneously develop autoantibodies and subsequent glomerulonephritis, offering a useful animal model to study autoimmune lupus. Although initial studies showed a critical contribution of IL-17 and Th17 cells in mediating autoimmune B cell responses in BXD2 mice, the role of follicular helper T (Tfh) cells remains incompletely understood. We found that both the frequency of Th17 cells and the levels of IL-17 in circulation in BXD2 mice were comparable to those of wild-type. By contrast, the frequency of PD-1+ CXCR5+ Tfh cells was significantly increased in BXD2 mice compared with wild-type mice, while the frequency of PD-1+ CXCR5+ Foxp3+ follicular regulatory T (Tfr) cells was reduced in the former group. The frequency of Tfh cells rather than that of Th17 cells was positively correlated with the frequency of germinal center B cells as well as the levels of autoantibodies to dsDNA. More importantly, CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells isolated from BXD2 mice induced the production of IgG from naïve B cells in an IL-21-dependent manner, while CCR6+ CD4+ T cells failed to do so. These results together demonstrate that Tfh cells rather than Th17 cells contribute to the autoimmune germinal center reactions in BXD2 mice.

  9. Association between rs2294020 in X-linked CCDC22 and susceptibility to autoimmune diseases with focus on systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Fabio; Skarmoutsou, Evangelia; Lo, Lauren J; Granata, Mariagrazia; Trovato, Chiara; Rossi, Giulio A; Bellocchi, Chiara; Marchini, Maurizio; Scorza, Raffaella; Mazzarino, Maria Clorinda; Keinan, Alon

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases often share common susceptibility genes. Most genetic variants associated with susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus are also associated with other autoimmune diseases. The X-linked variant rs2294020 is positioned in exon 7 of the CCDC22 gene. The encoded protein functions in the regulation of NF-κB, a master regulator in immune response. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the rs2294020 polymorphism may be a general susceptibility factor for autoimmunity. We evaluated case-control association between the occurrence of rs2294020 and different autoimmune diseases, including new data for systemic lupus erythematosus and previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (though most did not analyse the X chromosome) of psoriasis, celiac disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, multiple sclerosis, vitiligo, type-1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Cases from patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and type-2 diabetes were also included in the study. We detected nominal significant associations of rs2294020 with systemic lupus erythematosus (additive model test: p=0.01), vitiligo (p=0.016), psoriasis (p=0.038), and in only one of two studies of multiple sclerosis (p=0.03). Our results suggest that rs2294020 is associated with the risk of several autoimmune diseases in European populations, specifically with diseases that present themselves, among else, in the skin.

  10. HLA-DR3 restricted T cell epitope mimicry in induction of autoimmune response to lupus-associated antigen SmD

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Umesh S; Sim, Davis L; Dai, Chao; Kannapell, Carol J; Gaskin, Felicia; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan; David, Chella S; Fu, Shu Man

    2012-01-01

    Although systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multigenic autoimmune disorder, HLA-D is the most dominant genetic susceptibility locus. This study was undertaken to investigate the hypothesis that microbial peptides bind HLA-DR3 and activate T cells reactive with lupus autoantigens. Using HLA-DR3 transgenic mice and lupus-associated autoantigen SmD protein, SmD79–93 was identified to contain a dominant HLA-DR3 restricted T cell epitope. This T cell epitope was characterized by using a T-T hybridoma, C1P2, generated from SmD immunized HLA-DR3 transgenic mouse. By pattern search analysis, 20 putative mimicry peptides (P2–P21) of SmD79–93, from microbial and human origin were identified. C1P2 cells responded to SmD, SmD79–93 and a peptide (P20) from Vibro cholerae. Immunization of HLA-DR3 mice with P20 induced T cell responses and IgG antibodies to SmD that were not cross-reactive with the immunogen. A T-T hybridoma, P20P1, generated from P20 immunized mice, not only responded to P20 and SmD79–93, but also to peptides from Streptococccus agalactiae (P17) and human-La related protein (P11). These three T cell mimics (P20, P11 and P17) induced diverse and different autoantibody response profiles. Our data demonstrates for the first time molecular mimicry at T cell epitope level between lupus-associated autoantigen SmD and microbial peptides. Considering distinct autoreactive T cell clones, activated by different microbial peptides, molecular mimicry at T cell epitope level can be an important pathway for the activation of autoreactive T cells resulting in the production of autoantibodies. In addition, the novel findings reported herein may have significant implications in the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:21868195

  11. HLA-DR3 restricted T cell epitope mimicry in induction of autoimmune response to lupus-associated antigen SmD.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Umesh S; Sim, Davis L; Dai, Chao; Kannapell, Carol J; Gaskin, Felicia; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan; David, Chella S; Fu, Shu Man

    2011-11-01

    Although systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multigenic autoimmune disorder, HLA-D is the most dominant genetic susceptibility locus. This study was undertaken to investigate the hypothesis that microbial peptides bind HLA-DR3 and activate T cells reactive with lupus autoantigens. Using HLA-DR3 transgenic mice and lupus-associated autoantigen SmD protein, SmD(79-93) was identified to contain a dominant HLA-DR3 restricted T cell epitope. This T cell epitope was characterized by using a T-T hybridoma, C1P2, generated from SmD immunized HLA-DR3 transgenic mouse. By pattern search analysis, 20 putative mimicry peptides (P2-P21) of SmD(79-93,) from microbial and human origin were identified. C1P2 cells responded to SmD, SmD(79-93) and a peptide (P20) from Vibro cholerae. Immunization of HLA-DR3 mice with P20 induced T cell responses and IgG antibodies to SmD that were not cross-reactive with the immunogen. A T-T hybridoma, P20P1, generated from P20 immunized mice, not only responded to P20 and SmD(79-93), but also to peptides from Streptococcus agalactiae (P17) and human-La related protein (P11). These three T cell mimics (P20, P11 and P17) induced diverse and different autoantibody response profiles. Our data demonstrates for the first time molecular mimicry at T cell epitope level between lupus-associated autoantigen SmD and microbial peptides. Considering that distinct autoreactive T cell clones were activated by different microbial peptides, molecular mimicry at T cell epitope level can be an important pathway for the activation of autoreactive T cells resulting in the production of autoantibodies. In addition, the novel findings reported herein may have significant implications in the pathogenesis of SLE. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Design of effective immunotherapy for human autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Feldmann, Marc; Steinman, Lawrence

    2005-06-02

    A better understanding of the molecules involved in immune responses has identified many potential targets for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. But although successful therapies have been found for immune disorders in animal studies, few have passed the much harder test of treating human diseases. So far, non-antigen-specific approaches, such as the blocking of tumour-necrosis factor, are achieving some success but the same is not true for antigen-specific approaches. Future therapies will probably include both non-antigen-specific strategies that target cytokines (cell-cell signalling molecules) or block the molecules that stimulate immune responses, and antigen-specific therapies that induce tolerance to self antigens.

  13. A Comprehensive Analysis of Shared Loci between Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and Sixteen Autoimmune Diseases Reveals Limited Genetic Overlap

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Paula S.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Moser, Kathy L.; Comeau, Mary E.; Williams, Adrienne H.; Pajewski, Nicholas M.; Chung, Sharon A.; Graham, Robert R.; Zidovetzki, Raphael; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Tsao, Betty P.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Harley, John B.; Langefeld, Carl D.

    2011-01-01

    In spite of the well-known clustering of multiple autoimmune disorders in families, analyses of specific shared genes and polymorphisms between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune diseases (ADs) have been limited. Therefore, we comprehensively tested autoimmune variants for association with SLE, aiming to identify pleiotropic genetic associations between these diseases. We compiled a list of 446 non–Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) variants identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of populations of European ancestry across 17 ADs. We then tested these variants in our combined Caucasian SLE cohorts of 1,500 cases and 5,706 controls. We tested a subset of these polymorphisms in an independent Caucasian replication cohort of 2,085 SLE cases and 2,854 controls, allowing the computation of a meta-analysis between all cohorts. We have uncovered novel shared SLE loci that passed multiple comparisons adjustment, including the VTCN1 (rs12046117, P = 2.02×10−06) region. We observed that the loci shared among the most ADs include IL23R, OLIG3/TNFAIP3, and IL2RA. Given the lack of a universal autoimmune risk locus outside of the MHC and variable specificities for different diseases, our data suggests partial pleiotropy among ADs. Hierarchical clustering of ADs suggested that the most genetically related ADs appear to be type 1 diabetes with rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease with ulcerative colitis. These findings support a relatively distinct genetic susceptibility for SLE. For many of the shared GWAS autoimmune loci, we found no evidence for association with SLE, including IL23R. Also, several established SLE loci are apparently not associated with other ADs, including the ITGAM-ITGAX and TNFSF4 regions. This study represents the most comprehensive evaluation of shared autoimmune loci to date, supports a relatively distinct non–MHC genetic susceptibility for SLE, provides further evidence for previously and newly

  14. A comprehensive analysis of shared loci between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and sixteen autoimmune diseases reveals limited genetic overlap.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Paula S; Criswell, Lindsey A; Moser, Kathy L; Comeau, Mary E; Williams, Adrienne H; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Chung, Sharon A; Graham, Robert R; Zidovetzki, Raphael; Kelly, Jennifer A; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Jacob, Chaim O; Vyse, Timothy J; Tsao, Betty P; Kimberly, Robert P; Gaffney, Patrick M; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Harley, John B; Langefeld, Carl D

    2011-12-01

    In spite of the well-known clustering of multiple autoimmune disorders in families, analyses of specific shared genes and polymorphisms between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune diseases (ADs) have been limited. Therefore, we comprehensively tested autoimmune variants for association with SLE, aiming to identify pleiotropic genetic associations between these diseases. We compiled a list of 446 non-Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) variants identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of populations of European ancestry across 17 ADs. We then tested these variants in our combined Caucasian SLE cohorts of 1,500 cases and 5,706 controls. We tested a subset of these polymorphisms in an independent Caucasian replication cohort of 2,085 SLE cases and 2,854 controls, allowing the computation of a meta-analysis between all cohorts. We have uncovered novel shared SLE loci that passed multiple comparisons adjustment, including the VTCN1 (rs12046117, P = 2.02×10(-06)) region. We observed that the loci shared among the most ADs include IL23R, OLIG3/TNFAIP3, and IL2RA. Given the lack of a universal autoimmune risk locus outside of the MHC and variable specificities for different diseases, our data suggests partial pleiotropy among ADs. Hierarchical clustering of ADs suggested that the most genetically related ADs appear to be type 1 diabetes with rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease with ulcerative colitis. These findings support a relatively distinct genetic susceptibility for SLE. For many of the shared GWAS autoimmune loci, we found no evidence for association with SLE, including IL23R. Also, several established SLE loci are apparently not associated with other ADs, including the ITGAM-ITGAX and TNFSF4 regions. This study represents the most comprehensive evaluation of shared autoimmune loci to date, supports a relatively distinct non-MHC genetic susceptibility for SLE, provides further evidence for previously and newly identified

  15. Autoimmunity caused by disruption of central T cell tolerance. A murine model of drug-induced lupus.

    PubMed Central

    Kretz-Rommel, A; Duncan, S R; Rubin, R L

    1997-01-01

    A side effect of therapy with procainamide and numerous other medications is a lupus-like syndrome characterized by autoantibodies directed against denatured DNA and the (H2A-H2B)-DNA subunit of chromatin. We tested the possibility that an effect of lupus-inducing drugs on central T cell tolerance underlies these phenomena. Two intrathymic injections of procainamide-hydroxylamine (PAHA), a reactive metabolite of procainamide, resulted in prompt production of IgM antidenatured DNA antibodies in C57BL/6xDBA/2 F1 mice. Subsequently, IgG antichromatin antibodies began to appear in the serum 3 wk after the second injection and were sustained for several months. Specificity, inhibition and blocking studies demonstrated that the PAHA-induced antibodies showed remarkable specificity to the (H2A-H2B)-DNA complex. No evidence for polyclonal B cell activation could be detected based on enumeration of Ig-secreting B cells and serum Ig levels, suggesting that a clonally restricted autoimmune response was induced by intrathymic PAHA. The IgG isotype of the antichromatin antibodies indicated involvement of T cell help, and proliferative responses of splenocytes to oligonucleosomes increased up to 100-fold. As little as 5 microM PAHA led to a 10-fold T cell proliferative response to chromatin in short term organ culture of neonatal thymi. We suggest that PAHA interferes with self-tolerance mechanisms accompanying T cell maturation in the thymus, resulting in the emergence of chromatin-reactive T cells followed by humoral autoimmunity. PMID:9109433

  16. Anti-Lipid IgG Antibodies Are Produced via Germinal Centers in a Murine Model Resembling Human Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Reséndiz-Mora, Albany; Donis-Maturano, Luis; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Zárate-Neira, Luz; Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Calderón-Amador, Juana; Medina, Yolanda; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Anti-lipid IgG antibodies are produced in some mycobacterial infections and in certain autoimmune diseases [such as anti-phospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)]. However, few studies have addressed the B cell responses underlying the production of these immunoglobulins. Anti-lipid IgG antibodies are consistently found in a murine model resembling human lupus induced by chlorpromazine-stabilized non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements (NPA). NPA are transitory lipid associations found in the membranes of most cells; when NPA are stabilized they can become immunogenic and induce specific IgG antibodies, which appear to be involved in the development of the mouse model of lupus. Of note, anti-NPA antibodies are also detected in patients with SLE and leprosy. We used this model of lupus to investigate in vivo the cellular mechanisms that lead to the production of anti-lipid, class-switched IgG antibodies. In this murine lupus model, we found plasma cells (Gr1−, CD19−, CD138+) producing NPA-specific IgGs in the draining lymph nodes, the spleen, and the bone marrow. We also found a significant number of germinal center B cells (IgD−, CD19+, PNA+) specific for NPA in the draining lymph nodes and the spleen, and we identified in situ the presence of NPA in these germinal centers. By contrast, very few NPA-specific, extrafollicular reaction B cells (B220+, Blimp1+) were found. Moreover, when assessing the anti-NPA IgG antibodies produced during the experimental protocol, we found that the affinity of these antibodies progressively increased over time. Altogether, our data indicate that, in this murine model resembling human lupus, B cells produce anti-NPA IgG antibodies mainly via germinal centers. PMID:27746783

  17. An Overlap Syndrome involving systemic lupus erythematosus and autoimmune hepatitis in an adolescent girl.

    PubMed

    Battagliotti, Cristina; Rispolo Klubek, Daniela; Karakachoff, Mario; Costaguta, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    La superposición del lupus eritematoso sistémico y la hepatitis autoinmune se describe ocasionalmente. Aunque ambas enfermedades pueden compartir ciertos hallazgos, como poliartralgias, hipergammaglobulinemia y anticuerpo antinúcleo positivo, son consideradas dos diferentes. Se presenta a una paciente de 14 años con lupus eritematoso sistémico, que, luego de dos años, consultó por ictericia. Sin antecedentes de ingesta de drogas, alcohol o exposición a virus hepatotropos. Tenia un aumento de las enzimas hepáticas con anticuerpos antinúcleo, anti-ADN de doble cadena y LKM 1 positivos. La biopsia hepática mostró una hepatitis de interfase con infiltrado linfoplasmocitario. De esta manera, cumplia con los criterios diagnósticos tanto para lupus eritematoso sistémico como para hepatitis autoinmune. Tratada con corticoides y micofenolato mofetil, mejoró su clinica y laboratorio. Conclusión. La hepatitis autoinmune puede ocurrir en el curso del lupus eritematoso sistémico. Un diagnóstico temprano es importante para prevenir el avance de la enfermedad; es obligatoria la realización de la biopsia hepática.

  18. Promoting Autoimmune Diabetes in Non-Human Primates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    0417 TITLE: Promoting Autoimmune Diabetes in Non -Human Primates PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Massimo Trucco, M.D...11 January 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Promoting Autoimmune Diabetes in Non -Human Primates 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11...the genetically diabetes -prone non -obese diabetic mouse strain, whose etio-pathogenesis is widely-held to parallel the one that occurs in humans

  19. Early Components of the Complement Classical Activation Pathway in Human Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lintner, Katherine E.; Wu, Yee Ling; Yang, Yan; Spencer, Charles H.; Hauptmann, Georges; Hebert, Lee A.; Atkinson, John P.; Yu, C. Yung

    2016-01-01

    The complement system consists of effector proteins, regulators, and receptors that participate in host defense against pathogens. Activation of the complement system, via the classical pathway (CP), has long been recognized in immune complex-mediated tissue injury, most notably systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Paradoxically, a complete deficiency of an early component of the CP, as evidenced by homozygous genetic deficiencies reported in human, are strongly associated with the risk of developing SLE or a lupus-like disease. Similarly, isotype deficiency attributable to a gene copy-number (GCN) variation and/or the presence of autoantibodies directed against a CP component or a regulatory protein that result in an acquired deficiency are relatively common in SLE patients. Applying accurate assay methodologies with rigorous data validations, low GCNs of total C4, and heterozygous and homozygous deficiencies of C4A have been shown as medium to large effect size risk factors, while high copy numbers of total C4 or C4A as prevalent protective factors, of European and East-Asian SLE. Here, we summarize the current knowledge related to genetic deficiency and insufficiency, and acquired protein deficiencies for C1q, C1r, C1s, C4A/C4B, and C2 in disease pathogenesis and prognosis of SLE, and, briefly, for other systemic autoimmune diseases. As the complement system is increasingly found to be associated with autoimmune diseases and immune-mediated diseases, it has become an attractive therapeutic target. We highlight the recent developments and offer a balanced perspective concerning future investigations and therapeutic applications with a focus on early components of the CP in human systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:26913032

  20. Drug-induced lupus.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Robert L

    2015-03-01

    Drug-induced lupus (DIL) refers to an idiosyncratic side effect of numerous, apparently unrelated, medications, in which symptoms overlap with those of systemic lupus erythematosus. DIL is reversible by discontinuation of the medication. The etiological mechanism underlying DIL is linked to the inherent susceptibility of the adaptive immune system to lapse into auto-reactivity. Clinical and laboratory features of DIL will be compared with those of idiopathic systemic lupus and with other types of drug reactions with overlapping features. Formerly commonly-used drugs conferred very high risk of developing DIL, although the probability of developing DIL has not been established with most lupus-inducing drugs. Pharmacological or physiochemical properties of the parent compounds are uninformative, but the importance of reactive drug metabolites in initiating autoimmunity will be discussed. As with most systemic autoimmune diseases, the pathogenesis of DIL is complex and obscure. The role of complement and human leukocyte allotypes as well as drug acetylator phenotype inform the underlying mechanism, and several of these non-mutually exclusive concepts will be described. The pros and cons of proposed mechanisms for DIL will be discussed in the context of current understanding of autoimmunity and immune tolerance to self.

  1. The role of molecular mimicry and other factors in the association of Human Endogenous Retroviruses and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Trela, Malgorzata; Nelson, Paul N; Rylance, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Human Endogenous Retroviruses (HERVs) have been implicated in autoimmune and other diseases. Molecular mimicry has been postulated as a potential mechanism of autoimmunity. Exogenous viruses have also been reported to be associated with the same diseases, as have genetic and environmental factors. If molecular mimicry were to be shown to be an initiating mechanism of some autoimmune diseases, then therapeutic options of blocking antibodies and peptides might be of benefit in halting diseases at the outset. Bioinformatic and molecular modelling techniques have been employed to investigate molecular mimicry and the evidence for the association of HERVs and autoimmunity is reviewed. The most convincing evidence for molecular mimicry is in rheumatoid arthritis, where HERV K-10 shares amino acid sequences with IgG1Fc, a target for rheumatoid factor. Systemic lupus erythematosus is an example of a condition associated with several autoantibodies, and several endogenous and exogenous viruses have been reported to be associated with the disease. The lack of a clear link between one virus and this condition, and the spectrum of clinical manifestations, suggests that genetic, environmental and the inflammatory response to a virus or viruses might also be major factors in the pathogenesis of lupus and other autoimmune conditions. Where there are strong associations between a virus and an autoimmune condition, such as in hepatitis C and cryoglobulinaemia, the use of bioinformatics and molecular modelling can also be utilized to help to understand the role of molecular mimicry in how HERVs might trigger disease. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Sequential autoantigenic determinants of the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein Sm D shared by human lupus autoantibodies and MRL lpr/lpr antibodies.

    PubMed

    James, J A; Mamula, M J; Harley, J B

    1994-12-01

    Autoantibodies directed against the Sm proteins of the spliceosome complex are found in approximately 25% of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients sera. To determine which regions of the Sm D polypeptide are involved in the lupus autoimmune response, binding to overlapping octapeptides of Sm D has been evaluated with sera from nine Sm D-positive patients, six patients with other autoimmune serology, and five normal human sera. Lupus patient sera which are Sm precipitin-positive bind various combinations of five regions of the peptide. The major antigenic region, Epitope 5 (REAVA(GR)10GGPRR), is bound by eight of nine Sm precipitin-positive sera tested. This region of Sm D shows significant sequence homology with Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1. To determine the fine specificity of the murine Sm response, four unique Sm D MoAbs derived from MRL lpr/lpr mice and three adult anti-Sm-positive MRL lpr/lpr mouse sera have been analysed. Two of these monoclonals, KSm 4 and Y12, as well as the MRL lpr/lpr sera tested, show binding with Epitope 5. Another of these monoclonals, KSm 2, binds octapeptides 84-91, DVEPKVKSKKREAVAG, which corresponds to Epitope 4 of this study. Antibodies from SLE patients with autoimmune serology other than anti-Sm bind the carboxyl glycine-arginine repeat (GR)10 peptides of Sm D. However, none of the antibodies tested from patients who do not have lupus and who have different autoimmune serology binds any of the Sm D octapeptides. Normal controls did not significantly bind any of the Sm D octapeptides. These results describe two major regions of shared antigenicity of Sm D between sera from SLE patients and MRL lpr/lpr mice, thereby establishing a basis for the cross-species similarity of autoimmunity to the Sm autoantigen in SLE.

  3. P-Selectin preserves immune tolerance in mice and is reduced in human cutaneous lupus.

    PubMed

    González-Tajuelo, Rafael; Silván, Javier; Pérez-Frías, Alicia; de la Fuente-Fernández, María; Tejedor, Reyes; Espartero-Santos, Marina; Vicente-Rabaneda, Esther; Juarranz, Ángeles; Muñoz-Calleja, Cecilia; Castañeda, Santos; Gamallo, Carlos; Urzainqui, Ana

    2017-02-02

    Mice deficient in P-Selectin presented altered immunity/tolerance balance. We have observed that the absence of P-Selectin promotes splenomegaly with reduced naïve T cell population, elevated activated/effector T cell subset, increased germinal center B and Tfh populations and high production of autoreactive antibodies. Moreover, 1.5-3-month-old P-selectin KO mice showed reduced IL-10-producing leukocytes in blood and a slightly reduced Treg population in the skin. With aging and, coinciding with disease severity, there is an increase in the IL17(+) circulating and dermal T cell subpopulations and reduction of dermal Treg. As a consequence, P-Selectin deficient mice developed a progressive autoimmune syndrome showing skin alterations characteristic of lupus prone mice and elevated circulating autoantibodies, including anti-dsDNA. Similar to human SLE, disease pathogenesis was characterized by deposition of immune complexes in the dermoepidermal junction and renal glomeruli, and a complex pattern of autoantibodies. More important, skin biopsies of cutaneous lupus erythematosus patients did not show increased expression of P-Selectin, as described for other inflammatory diseases, and the number of vessels expressing P-Selectin was reduced.

  4. P-Selectin preserves immune tolerance in mice and is reduced in human cutaneous lupus

    PubMed Central

    González-Tajuelo, Rafael; Silván, Javier; Pérez-Frías, Alicia; de la Fuente-Fernández, María; Tejedor, Reyes; Espartero-Santos, Marina; Vicente-Rabaneda, Esther; Juarranz, Ángeles; Muñoz-Calleja, Cecilia; Castañeda, Santos; Gamallo, Carlos; Urzainqui, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Mice deficient in P-Selectin presented altered immunity/tolerance balance. We have observed that the absence of P-Selectin promotes splenomegaly with reduced naïve T cell population, elevated activated/effector T cell subset, increased germinal center B and Tfh populations and high production of autoreactive antibodies. Moreover, 1.5-3-month-old P-selectin KO mice showed reduced IL-10-producing leukocytes in blood and a slightly reduced Treg population in the skin. With aging and, coinciding with disease severity, there is an increase in the IL17+ circulating and dermal T cell subpopulations and reduction of dermal Treg. As a consequence, P-Selectin deficient mice developed a progressive autoimmune syndrome showing skin alterations characteristic of lupus prone mice and elevated circulating autoantibodies, including anti-dsDNA. Similar to human SLE, disease pathogenesis was characterized by deposition of immune complexes in the dermoepidermal junction and renal glomeruli, and a complex pattern of autoantibodies. More important, skin biopsies of cutaneous lupus erythematosus patients did not show increased expression of P-Selectin, as described for other inflammatory diseases, and the number of vessels expressing P-Selectin was reduced. PMID:28150814

  5. The IRF5-TNPO3 association with systemic lupus erythematosus has two components that other autoimmune disorders variably share.

    PubMed

    Kottyan, Leah C; Zoller, Erin E; Bene, Jessica; Lu, Xiaoming; Kelly, Jennifer A; Rupert, Andrew M; Lessard, Christopher J; Vaughn, Samuel E; Marion, Miranda; Weirauch, Matthew T; Namjou, Bahram; Adler, Adam; Rasmussen, Astrid; Glenn, Stuart; Montgomery, Courtney G; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Xie, Gang; Coltescu, Catalina; Amos, Chris; Li, He; Ice, John A; Nath, Swapan K; Mariette, Xavier; Bowman, Simon; Rischmueller, Maureen; Lester, Sue; Brun, Johan G; Gøransson, Lasse G; Harboe, Erna; Omdal, Roald; Cunninghame-Graham, Deborah S; Vyse, Tim; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Brennan, Michael T; Lessard, James A; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Kvarnström, Marika; Illei, Gabor G; Witte, Torsten; Jonsson, Roland; Eriksson, Per; Nordmark, Gunnel; Ng, Wan-Fai; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Rhodus, Nelson L; Segal, Barbara M; Merrill, Joan T; James, Judith A; Guthridge, Joel M; Scofield, R Hal; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A; Criswell, Lindsey A; Gilkeson, Gary; Kamen, Diane L; Jacob, Chaim O; Kimberly, Robert; Brown, Elizabeth; Edberg, Jeffrey; Alarcón, Graciela S; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Petri, Michelle; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Freedman, Barry I; Niewold, Timothy; Stevens, Anne M; Tsao, Betty P; Ying, Jun; Mayes, Maureen D; Gorlova, Olga Y; Wakeland, Ward; Radstake, Timothy; Martin, Ezequiel; Martin, Javier; Siminovitch, Katherine; Moser Sivils, Kathy L; Gaffney, Patrick M; Langefeld, Carl D; Harley, John B; Kaufman, Kenneth M

    2015-01-15

    Exploiting genotyping, DNA sequencing, imputation and trans-ancestral mapping, we used Bayesian and frequentist approaches to model the IRF5-TNPO3 locus association, now implicated in two immunotherapies and seven autoimmune diseases. Specifically, in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we resolved separate associations in the IRF5 promoter (all ancestries) and with an extended European haplotype. We captured 3230 IRF5-TNPO3 high-quality, common variants across 5 ethnicities in 8395 SLE cases and 7367 controls. The genetic effect from the IRF5 promoter can be explained by any one of four variants in 5.7 kb (P-valuemeta = 6 × 10(-49); OR = 1.38-1.97). The second genetic effect spanned an 85.5-kb, 24-variant haplotype that included the genes IRF5 and TNPO3 (P-valuesEU = 10(-27)-10(-32), OR = 1.7-1.81). Many variants at the IRF5 locus with previously assigned biological function are not members of either final credible set of potential causal variants identified herein. In addition to the known biologically functional variants, we demonstrated that the risk allele of rs4728142, a variant in the promoter among the lowest frequentist probability and highest Bayesian posterior probability, was correlated with IRF5 expression and differentially binds the transcription factor ZBTB3. Our analytical strategy provides a novel framework for future studies aimed at dissecting etiological genetic effects. Finally, both SLE elements of the statistical model appear to operate in Sjögren's syndrome and systemic sclerosis whereas only the IRF5-TNPO3 gene-spanning haplotype is associated with primary biliary cirrhosis, demonstrating the nuance of similarity and difference in autoimmune disease risk mechanisms at IRF5-TNPO3.

  6. How compelling are the data for Epstein-Barr virus being a trigger for systemic lupus and other autoimmune diseases?

    PubMed

    Draborg, Anette; Izarzugaza, Jose M G; Houen, Gunnar

    2016-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is caused by a combination of genetic and acquired immunodeficiencies and environmental factors including infections. An association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been established by numerous studies over the past decades. Here, we review recent experimental studies on EBV, and present our integrated theory of SLE development. SLE patients have dysfunctional control of EBV infection resulting in frequent reactivations and disease progression. These comprise impaired functions of EBV-specific T-cells with an inverse correlation to disease activity and elevated serum levels of antibodies against lytic cycle EBV antigens. The presence of EBV proteins in renal tissue from SLE patients with nephritis suggests direct involvement of EBV in SLE development. As expected for patients with immunodeficiencies, studies reveal that SLE patients show dysfunctional responses to other viruses as well. An association with EBV infection has also been demonstrated for other autoimmune diseases, including Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. Collectively, the interplay between an impaired immune system and the cumulative effects of EBV and other viruses results in frequent reactivation of EBV and enhanced cell death, causing development of SLE and concomitant autoreactivities.

  7. An atypical case of late-onset systemic lupus erythematosus with systemic lymphadenopathy and severe autoimmune thrombocytopenia/neutropenia mimicking malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Keita; Morishima, Satoko; Nakachi, Sawako; Kitamura, Sakiko; Uchibori, Sachie; Tomori, Shouhei; Hanashiro, Taeko; Shimabukuro, Natsuki; Tedokon, Iori; Morichika, Kazuho; Nishi, Yukiko; Tomoyose, Takeaki; Karube, Kennosuke; Fukushima, Takuya; Masuzaki, Hiroaki

    2017-04-01

    Here, we report a rare case of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with conspicuous manifestation of hematological abnormalities. At onset, the 52-year-old male patient showed systemic lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly, severe autoimmune thrombocytopenia, and autoimmune neutropenia. Bone marrow examination and lymph node biopsy excluded the possibility of malignant lymphoma. Based on laboratory findings, he was finally diagnosed with combined autoimmune cytopenia coupled with SLE. Atypical clinical manifestations of SLE prompted us to explore the possibility of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS). However, we did not detect an increased number of CD4(-)/CD8(-), CD3(+), TCRαβ(+) double-negative T cells in the circulating blood or dysfunctional T cell apoptosis in the Fas/Fas ligand pathway due to mutations in the FAS, FASLG or CASP10 genes. Combined autoimmune cytopenia is a rare clinical entity that in some cases co-occurs with other autoimmune diseases. Given that most SLE patients presenting atypical hematological manifestations at an early stage subsequently exhibit typical systemic manifestations, the present case raises the possibility that initial hematological abnormalities may be signs of unexpected SLE manifestations.

  8. Autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) after quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination in Colombians: a call for personalised medicine.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Reyes, Benjamin; Perdomo-Arciniegas, Ana M; Camacho-Rodríguez, Bernardo; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    This was a case study in which 3 patients with autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) after quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination (HPV) were evaluated and described. All the patients were women. Diagnosis consisted of HLA-B27 enthesitis related arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematous, respectively. Our results highlight the risk of developing ASIA after HPV vaccination and may serve to increase the awareness of such a complication. Factors that are predictive of developing autoimmune diseases should be examined at the population level in order to establish preventive measures in at-risk individuals for whom healthcare should be personalized and participatory.

  9. The human microbiome in rheumatic autoimmune diseases: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Coit, Patrick; Sawalha, Amr H

    2016-09-01

    The human microbiome consists of the total diversity of microbiota and their genes. High-throughput sequencing has allowed for inexpensive and rapid evaluation of taxonomic representation and functional capability of the microbiomes of human body sites. Autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases are characterized by dysbiosis of the microbiome. Microbiome dysbiosis can be influenced by host genetics and environmental factors. Dysbiosis is also associated with shifts in certain functional pathways. The goal of this article is to provide a current and comprehensive review of the unique characteristics of the microbiome of patients with autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases, measured using high-throughput sequencing. We also highlight the need for broader studies utilizing a longitudinal approach to better understand how the human microbiome contributes to disease susceptibility, and to characterize the role of the interaction between host genetics and microbial diversity in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, disease manifestations, and progression.

  10. Distinguishing the cerebrospinal fluid cytokine profile in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus from other autoimmune neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Kunihiro; Arima, Kazuhiko; Ushigusa, Takeshi; Nishino, Ayako; Nakashima, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Takahisa; Horai, Yoshiro; Nakajima, Hideki; Kawashiri, Shin-Ya; Iwamoto, Naoki; Tamai, Mami; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Motomura, Masakatsu; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is a serious complication in SLE. Although the mechanism of NPSLE remains unclear, cytokines and chemokines are considered to be involved in their pathogenesis. Here we used Bio-Plex Pro assays to examine 27 types of cytokines and chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 32 NPSLE patients. We used the CSF of 20 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 22 patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) as a disease control group. Fourteen of 27 cytokines/chemokines were significantly higher in the NPSLE patients compared to the MS/NMO patients. We could identify six "minimum predictive markers" by using a weighted-voting algorithm that could distinguish NPSLE from MS and NMO: interleukin (IL)-17, IL-2, interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-5, basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-basic and IL-15. The determination of various types of CSF cytokine profiles may contribute to the diagnosis of NPSLE and may help elucidate the mechanisms underlying this disease.

  11. The indirect costs of systemic autoimmune diseases, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis and sarcoidosis: a summary of 2012 real-life data from the Social Insurance Institution in Poland.

    PubMed

    Kawalec, Paweł P; Malinowski, Krzysztof P

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis and sarcoidosis are three different autoimmune systemic diseases that generate a significant burden to society due to treatment costs and also those caused by a work disability or absenteeism among patients. Relevant 2012 data referring to the three components of absenteeism produced by autoimmune systemic diseases, sick leave, short-term and long-term work disability, were obtained from the Social Insurance Institution in Poland (PSII). By applying the Human Capital Approach using gross domestic product per capita, gross value added per worker and gross income per worker in 2012, total indirect costs for the diseases were calculated. All costs were presented in euros and were valid for 2012. The PSII recorded 1600 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, 500 patients with systemic sclerosis and 2700 patients with sarcoidosis in the 2012 - total indirect costs were as high as 7,260,595, 2,268,571 and 4,027,575 EUR, respectively. Costs were estimated using gross domestic product per capita; 17,485,412, 5,463,312 and 9,699,455 EUR, accordingly, calculated using gross value added per worker and 5,346,933, 1,670,648 and 2,966,034 EUR estimated using gross income per worker, respectively. Considering only data on absenteeism gathered by the PSII we can conclude that the three autoimmune systemic diseases bore great indirect costs. Their social burden for Poland could be even greater when considering presenteeism as well as other components of absenteeism such as loss of unpaid work, a gray economy or loss of leisure time.

  12. Systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-06-22

    Essential facts Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a rare, chronic autoimmune disease that causes inflammation in various parts of the body. Its annual incidence is estimated at one in 20,000. Although there is no cure, early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can help to control the symptoms, preventing damage to vital organs. In addition, there are other types of lupus that affect the skin, including discoid lupus erythematosus and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

  13. Towards patient stratification and treatment in the autoimmune disease lupus erythematosus using a systems pharmacology approach.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Cerdá, M Leire; Irurzun-Arana, Itziar; González-Garcia, Ignacio; Hu, Chuanpu; Zhou, Honghui; Vermeulen, An; Trocóniz, Iñaki F; Gómez-Mantilla, José David

    2016-10-30

    Drug development in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) has been hindered by poor translation from successful preclinical experiments to clinical efficacy. This lack of success has been attributed to the high heterogeneity of SLE patients and to the lack of understanding of disease physiopathology. Modelling approaches could be useful for supporting the identification of targets, biomarkers and patient subpopulations with differential response to drugs. However, the use of traditional quantitative models based on differential equations is not justifiable in a sparse data situation. Boolean networks models are less demanding on the required data to be implemented and can provide insights into the dynamics of biological networks. This methodology allows the integration of all the available knowledge into a single framework to evaluate the behavior of the system under different conditions and test hypotheses about unknown aspects of the disease. In this proof-of-concept study, we explored the potential of a systems pharmacology model based on Boolean networks to support drug development in SLE. We focused the analysis on the antigen presentation by the antigen presenting cells (APC) to the T-cells to evaluate the scope of this methodology in a medium size network before full implementation of the whole SLE pathway. The heterogeneity of SLE patients was replicated using this methodology simulating subjects with distinct pathway alterations. A perturbation analysis of the network coupled with clustering analysis showed potential to identify drug targets, optimal combinatorial regimens and subpopulations of responders and non-responders to drug treatment. We propose this approach as a first step towards the development of more quantitative platforms to address the current challenges in drug development for complex diseases.

  14. Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-07

    complexes in the thymus. As T cell CD4 avidity interaction with the 2 domain of the MHC class II has been shown to contribute positively to thymic T...mice (DR4) were generated as previously de- scribed [ 2 ]. These C57BL/6 I-Abo/o mice express a human- mouse chimeric class II molecule in which the TcR...transgenic for the type 1 diabetes- associated human MHC class II allele, DRB1*0401. J Clin Invest 1996;98:2597e603. [9] Kim J, Richter W, Aanstoot HJ

  15. Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Noorchashm H , Noorchashm N, Kern J, Rostami SY, Barker CF, Naji A. B-cells are required for the initiation of insulitis and sialitis in nonobese...HUnrath KA H , HYue BBH, HMiyake T H , HFalk BAH, HNepom GTH. 2007. Autoreactive human T-cell receptor initiates insulitis and impaired glucose...AAALAC-accredited animal facility. For intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT) mice were fasted (given water only) for 6 h . At the end of 6 h mice

  16. Human parvovirus B19 and autoimmune diseases. Review of the literature and pathophysiological hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Page, Cyril; François, Catherine; Goëb, Vincent; Duverlie, Gilles

    2015-11-01

    A number of arguments support the role played by PVB19 in autoimmunity, in the broad sense of the term essentially derived from numerous clinical case reports and/or small series over the past 20-30 years in the medical literature. PVB19 can induce a very broad spectrum of autoantibody production, especially including: anti-soluble nuclear antigen antibodies, antiphospholipid antibodies anti-native DNA antibodies, antilymphocyte antibody, anticardiolipin antibodies, antinuclear antibodies and rheumatoid factor. Notably acute PVB19 infection can mimic or stimulate autoimmune systemic diseases as rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus. However, at the present time, there is no formal scientific evidence demonstrating a direct role of PVB19 in autoimmunity, bearing in mind that there are also no formal arguments against it. Further large studies are needed to understand the eventual role of PVB19 in autoimmune diseases.

  17. Immunogenicity and safety of the human papillomavirus vaccine in patients with autoimmune diseases: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Paolo; Radice, Sonia; Clementi, Emilio

    2015-07-09

    Whereas safety and efficacy of HPV vaccines in healthy women have been shown in several randomised controlled clinical trials and in post marketing analyses, only few data exist in patients affected by autoimmune diseases. These issues are significant as autoimmune conditions are recognised as a risk factor for the persistence of HPV infection. Herein we review and systematise the existing literature to assess immunogenicity and safety of HPV vaccination in patients with autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The results of our literature revision suggest that the HPV vaccines are efficacious and safe in most of the patients affected by autoimmune diseases. Yet, some points of concern remain to be tackled, including the effects of concomitant therapies, the risk of disease exacerbation and the cost-effectiveness of such immunisation programmes in these populations.

  18. Pristane-induced lupus as a model of human lupus arthritis: evolvement of autoantibodies, internal organ and joint inflammation.

    PubMed

    Leiss, H; Niederreiter, B; Bandur, T; Schwarzecker, B; Blüml, S; Steiner, G; Ulrich, W; Smolen, J S; Stummvoll, G H

    2013-07-01

    Arthritis is frequently seen in human lupus, but rarely in lupus models. Pristane-induced lupus (PIL) can be induced in various mouse strains such as BALB/c and C57BL/6. We herein characterize clinical and histological features of arthritis in the context of systemic lupus and provide a prudent comparison with models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A total of 57 BALB/c mice received pristane (PIL group) and were analyzed for serum autoantibodies (anti-chromatin-, -histone, -Sm, -dsDNA), as well as for clinical features and histopathology of joints, lungs and kidneys. Joint pathology was quantified by image analysis and tissue cytometry. Ten C57BL/6 mice (Bl/6-PIL) and historical groups of two different RA models were analyzed accordingly. In BALB/c PIL, clinical arthritis started at three months, occurred finally in 79% of PIL (but not in controls, p<0.001) and correlated with areas of inflammation, erosion, cartilage damage, osteoclast numbers and total severity score (for all: r>0.7, p<0.001). After eight months, 58% of PIL (but no controls, p<0.001) had mild-erosive arthritis. In contrast to RA, the most frequent inflammatory cell type of the pannus was granulocytes (17.7%), PIL had lower numbers of osteoclasts, erosions rarely affected both layers of the cortical bone and there was no progression to complete joint destruction (even after one year of observation). Serum autoantibodies (auto-abs) preceded arthritis and became significantly elevated in all PIL; affected joints showed increased deposits of IgG (and IgM) within the inflammatory tissue, indicative of an ab-mediated process. PIL mice with arthritis also showed signs of pulmonary (100%) and renal (46%) lupus. In contrast to BALB/c, Bl/6-PIL mice did not develop any signs of arthritis. PIL in BALB/c mice is characterized by severe organ involvement, typical autoabs and by a mild-erosive arthritis with similarities to, but also with distinct differences from, RA. PIL may help to study arthritis along with

  19. Chondrodysplasia punctata associated with maternal autoimmune diseases: expanding the spectrum from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) to mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) and scleroderma report of eight cases.

    PubMed

    Chitayat, David; Keating, Sarah; Zand, Dina J; Costa, Teresa; Zackai, Elaine H; Silverman, Earl; Tiller, George; Unger, Sheila; Miller, Stephen; Kingdom, John; Toi, Ants; Curry, Cynthia J R

    2008-12-01

    Chondrodysplasia punctata (CDP) is etiologically a heterogeneous condition and has been associated with single gene disorders, chromosome abnormalities and teratogenic exposures. The first publication of the association between CDP and maternal autoimmune connective tissue disorder was by Curry et al. 1993]. Chondrodysplasia punctata associated with maternal collagen vascular disease. A new etiology? Presented at the David W. Smith Workshop on Morphogenesis and Malformations, Mont Tremblant, Quebec, August 1993] and subsequently, other cases have been reported. We report on eight cases of maternal collagen vascular disease associated with fetal CDP and included the cases reported by Curry et al. 1993. Chondrodysplasia punctata associated with maternal collagen vascular disease. A new etiology? Presented at the David W. Smith Workshop on Morphogenesis and Malformations, Mont Tremblant, Quebec, August 1993] and Costa et al. [1993]. Maternal systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE) and chondrodysplasia punctata in two infants. Coincidence or association? 1st Meeting of Bone Dysplasia Society, Chicago, June 1993] which were reported in an abstract form. We suggest that maternal autoimmune diseases should be part of the differential diagnosis and investigation in newborns/fetuses with CDP. Thus, in addition to cardiac evaluation, fetuses/newborn to mothers with autoimmune diseases should have fetal ultrasound/newborn examination and if indicated, X-rays, looking for absent/hypoplastic nasal bone, brachydactyly, shortened long bones and epiphyseal stippling. Copyright (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Damage-associated molecular patterns and their role as initiators of inflammatory and auto-immune signals in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Karen; Vasquez, Gloria

    2017-09-29

    Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are endogenous molecules that are released into the extracellular space under conditions of activation, cellular stress, or tissue damage. These molecules are recognized by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) and can induce inflammation and immune responses in the absence of infection. An increasing number of DAMPs have been linked to the pathogenesis of many auto-immune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), psoriatic arthritis, and systemic sclerosis (SSc); as they promote the maturation/activation of different immune cells and pro-inflammatory cytokines production associated with these diseases. Several studies suggest that the loss of tolerance to self-antigens in these diseases could be due to continuous exposure to DAMPs. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of sterile inflammation triggered by DAMPs is important to elucidate novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of various auto-immune diseases through inhibition or modulation the expression of these molecules. To this end, this review describes different DAMPs, their molecular characteristics, their modifications, and the receptors through which they activate an immune response while considering their role in the pathogenesis of various auto-immune diseases.

  1. Dephosphorylation of autoantigenic ribosomal P proteins during Fas-L induced apoptosis: a possible trigger for the development of the autoimmune response in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, S; Degen, W; Ghiradello, A; Doria, A; van Venrooij, W J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Autoimmune diseases are characterised by the production of autoantibodies against various autoantigens. In the past few years data have been published on a possible role of apoptosis in the development of autoimmunity. These include the finding that several autoantigens become modified (for example, by cleavage) during apoptosis, and the observation that these modified antigens are translocated to the cell surface. When the normal clearance of apoptotic cells somehow is disturbed, such modified antigens might become exposed to the immune system. Because acidic ribosomal P (phospho-) proteins targeted by autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are also concentrated at the surface of apoptotic cells, this study aimed at investigating what modifications occur on these antigens during apoptosis.
METHODS—Apoptosis in Jurkat cells was induced by Fas ligand (Fas-L), and the fate of autoantigenic P proteins was analysed in both normal and apoptotic total cell extracts.
RESULTS—The autoantigenic P proteins were not cleaved but dephosphorylated during Fas-L induced apoptosis. This dephosphorylation was prevented when caspase activity was inhibited.
CONCLUSIONS—As has been shown for other autoantigens targeted by autoantibodies in SLE, P proteins also are modified during apoptosis. P1 and P2 are completely dephosphorylated while P0 is partly dephosphorylated. Because the epitope targeted by autoantibodies normally is phosphorylated, it is possible that the apoptotic dephosphorylation of the antigen might be the trigger for the development of the autoimmune response against P proteins.

 PMID:11114288

  2. ABIN1 dysfunction as a genetic basis for lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Caster, Dawn J; Korte, Erik A; Nanda, Sambit K; McLeish, Kenneth R; Oliver, Rebecca K; G'sell, Rachel T; Sheehan, Ryan M; Freeman, Darrell W; Coventry, Susan C; Kelly, Jennifer A; Guthridge, Joel M; James, Judith A; Sivils, Kathy L; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E; Scofield, R Hal; Adrianto, Indra; Gaffney, Patrick M; Stevens, Anne M; Freedman, Barry I; Langefeld, Carl D; Tsao, Betty P; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Jacob, Chaim O; Kamen, Diane L; Gilkeson, Gary S; Brown, Elizabeth E; Alarcon, Graciela S; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Kimberly, Robert P; Martin, Javier; Merrill, Joan T; Harley, John B; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Reveille, John D; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Criswell, Lindsey A; Vila, Luis M; Petri, Michelle; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A; Vyse, Timothy J; Niewold, Timothy B; Cohen, Philip; Powell, David W

    2013-11-01

    The genetic factors underlying the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus are largely unknown, although animal studies indicate that nuclear factor (NF)-κB is involved. We reported previously that a knockin mouse expressing an inactive form of ABIN1 (ABIN1[D485N]) develops lupus-like autoimmune disease and demonstrates enhanced activation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases in immune cells after toll-like receptor stimulation. In the current study, we show that ABIN1[D485N] mice develop progressive GN similar to class III and IV lupus nephritis in humans. To investigate the clinical relevance of ABIN1 dysfunction, we genotyped five single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene encoding ABIN1, TNIP1, in samples from European-American, African American, Asian, Gullah, and Hispanic participants in the Large Lupus Association Study 2. Comparing cases of systemic lupus erythematosus with nephritis and cases of systemic lupus erythematosus without nephritis revealed strong associations with lupus nephritis at rs7708392 in European Americans and rs4958881 in African Americans. Comparing cases of systemic lupus erythematosus with nephritis and healthy controls revealed a stronger association at rs7708392 in European Americans but not at rs4958881 in African Americans. Our data suggest that variants in the TNIP1 gene are associated with the risk for lupus nephritis and could be mechanistically involved in disease development via aberrant regulation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase activity.

  3. ABIN1 Dysfunction as a Genetic Basis for Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Caster, Dawn J.; Korte, Erik A.; Nanda, Sambit K.; McLeish, Kenneth R.; Oliver, Rebecca K.; G'Sell, Rachel T.; Sheehan, Ryan M.; Freeman, Darrell W.; Coventry, Susan C.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Guthridge, Joel M.; James, Judith A.; Sivils, Kathy L.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.; Scofield, R. Hal; Adrianto, Indra; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Stevens, Anne M.; Freedman, Barry I.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Tsao, Betty P.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Kamen, Diane L.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Alarcon, Graciela S.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Martin, Javier; Merrill, Joan T.; Harley, John B.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Reveille, John D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Vila, Luis M.; Petri, Michelle; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Cohen, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The genetic factors underlying the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus are largely unknown, although animal studies indicate that nuclear factor (NF)-κB is involved. We reported previously that a knockin mouse expressing an inactive form of ABIN1 (ABIN1[D485N]) develops lupus-like autoimmune disease and demonstrates enhanced activation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases in immune cells after toll-like receptor stimulation. In the current study, we show that ABIN1[D485N] mice develop progressive GN similar to class III and IV lupus nephritis in humans. To investigate the clinical relevance of ABIN1 dysfunction, we genotyped five single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene encoding ABIN1, TNIP1, in samples from European-American, African American, Asian, Gullah, and Hispanic participants in the Large Lupus Association Study 2. Comparing cases of systemic lupus erythematosus with nephritis and cases of systemic lupus erythematosus without nephritis revealed strong associations with lupus nephritis at rs7708392 in European Americans and rs4958881 in African Americans. Comparing cases of systemic lupus erythematosus with nephritis and healthy controls revealed a stronger association at rs7708392 in European Americans but not at rs4958881 in African Americans. Our data suggest that variants in the TNIP1 gene are associated with the risk for lupus nephritis and could be mechanistically involved in disease development via aberrant regulation of NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase activity. PMID:23970121

  4. Autoantibodies with Enzymatic Properties in Human Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wootla, Bharath; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Warrington, Arthur E.; Bieber, Allan J.; Kaveri, Srini V.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. In addition to this plethora of functions, some antibodies express enzymatic activity. Antibodies endowed with enzymatic properties have been described in human autoimmune manifestations for more than a decade in a variety of disorders such as autoimmune thyroiditis, systemic erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), multiple sclerosis (MS) and acquired hemophilia (AH). Antibodies isolated from these conditions were able to specifically hydrolyze thyroglobulin, DNA, RNA, myelin basic protein (MBP), and factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX), respectively. The therapeutic relevance of these findings is discussed. PMID:21624820

  5. Autoimmune hepatitis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)

    PubMed Central

    Kia, Leila; Beattie, Adam; Green, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Chronic liver disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV. However, autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) in patients with HIV has rarely been reported. Our aim was to evaluate a cohort of patients with HIV and AIH and identify clinical presentations and outcomes. Patient Concerns: Management of autoimmune hepatitis in context of human immunodeficiency virus, long-term outcomes, and safety in setting of underlying immunocompromised state. Diagnoses: Autoimmune Hepatitis, Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatotoxicity, Liver Injury, Liver Transplantation. Interventions: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of patients with HIV and AIH based on histological, serologic, biochemical demographic, and clinical data. Outcomes: Five patients were identified with autoimmune hepatitis; 4 of 5 were women, and all were African or African-American. The age at the time of AIH diagnosis was 46.6 ± 13.4 years. All patients acquired HIV sexually and all had CD4 counts >250 cells/uL (456–1011 cells/uL) and undetectable HIV viral loads at the time of AIH diagnosis. One patient presented with acute liver failure necessitating liver transplantation and developed AIH posttransplantation. At the time of diagnosis, the AST were 350 ± 448 U/L, ALT 247 ± 190 U/L, bilirubin 7 ± 12 mg/dL, and alkaline phosphatase 126 ± 53 U/L. All patients had histologic evidence of AIH on liver biopsies. Patients were successfully treated with prednisone and azathioprine, without a decrease in CD4 <250 cells/uL, infectious complications or significant side effects. Lessons: AIH occurs in patients with well-controlled HIV. In our patient cohort, immunosuppressive therapy with prednisone and azathioprine was safe and effective in inducing remission, without significant complications or development of opportunistic infections. PMID:28207511

  6. Diet, microbiota and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Vieira, S M; Pagovich, O E; Kriegel, M A

    2014-05-01

    There is growing evidence that the commensal bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (the gut microbiota) influence the development of autoimmunity in rodent models. Since humans have co-evolved with commensals for millennia, it is likely that people, who are genetically predisposed to autoimmunity, harbor gut microbial communities that similarly influence the onset and/or severity of disease. Beyond the current efforts to identify such disease-promoting or -preventing commensals ("pathobionts" or "symbionts"), it will be important to determine what factors modulate them. Dietary changes are known to affect both the composition and function of the gut microbial communities, which in turn can alter the innate and adaptive immune system. In this review, we focus on the relationships between diet, microbiota, and autoimmune diseases. We hypothesize that the beneficial and life-prolonging effects of caloric restriction on a variety of autoimmune models including lupus might partly be mediated by its effects on the gut microbiome and associated virome, the collection of all viruses in the gut. We give recent examples of the immunomodulatory potential of select gut commensals and their products or diet-derived metabolites in murine models of arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes. Lastly, we summarize the published phenotypes of germ-free mouse models of lupus and speculate on any role of the diet-sensitive microbiome and virome in systemic lupus and the related antiphospholipid syndrome.

  7. Autoimmunity and dysmetabolism of human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Mei; Hong, Xue-Zhi; Xu, Jia-Hua; Luo, Jiang-Xi; Mo, Han-You; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-06-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) remains ill-defined by lists of symptoms, infections, tumors, and disorders in metabolism and immunity. Low CD4 cell count, severe loss of body weight, pneumocystis pneumonia, and Kaposi's sarcoma are the major disease indicators. Lines of evidence indicate that patients living with AIDS have both immunodeficiency and autoimmunity. Immunodeficiency is attributed to deficits in the skin- and mucosa-defined innate immunity, CD4 T cells and regulatory T cells, presumably relating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The autoimmunity in AIDS is evident by: (1) overproduction of autoantibodies, (2) impaired response of CD4 cells and CD8 cells, (3) failure of clinical trials of HIV vaccines, and (4) therapeutic benefits of immunosuppression following solid organ transplantation and bone marrow transplantation in patients at risk of AIDS. Autoantibodies are generated in response to antigens such as debris and molecules de novo released from dead cells, infectious agents, and catabolic events. Disturbances in metabolic homeostasis occur at the interface of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity in the development of AIDS. Optimal treatments favor therapeutics targeting on the regulation of metabolism to restore immune homeostasis.

  8. Human leukocyte Antigen-DM polymorphisms in autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Eliot; Wieczorek, Marek; Sticht, Jana; Freund, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Classical MHC class II (MHCII) proteins present peptides for CD4+ T-cell surveillance and are by far the most prominent risk factor for a number of autoimmune disorders. To date, many studies have shown that this link between particular MHCII alleles and disease depends on the MHCII's particular ability to bind and present certain peptides in specific physiological contexts. However, less attention has been paid to the non-classical MHCII molecule human leucocyte antigen-DM, which catalyses peptide exchange on classical MHCII proteins acting as a peptide editor. DM function impacts the presentation of both antigenic peptides in the periphery and key self-peptides during T-cell development in the thymus. In this way, DM activity directly influences the response to pathogens, as well as mechanisms of self-tolerance acquisition. While decreased DM editing of particular MHCII proteins has been proposed to be related to autoimmune disorders, no experimental evidence for different DM catalytic properties had been reported until recently. Biochemical and structural investigations, together with new animal models of loss of DM activity, have provided an attractive foundation for identifying different catalytic efficiencies for DM allotypes. Here, we revisit the current knowledge of DM function and discuss how DM function may impart autoimmunity at the organism level. PMID:27534821

  9. Th17 cells in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Han, Lei; Yang, Jing; Wang, Xiuwen; Li, Dan; Lv, Ling; Li, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Th17 cells are a new subset of CD4(+) T cells involved in the clearance of extracellular pathogens and fungi. Accumulating evidence suggests that Th17 cells and their signature cytokines have a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Here, we summarize recent research progress on Th17 function in the development and pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We also propose to identify new small molecule compounds to manipulate Th17 function for potential therapeutic application to treat human autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, and multiple sclerosis.

  10. Animal models of endocrine/organ-specific autoimmune diseases: do they really help us to understand human autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Lam-Tse, W K; Lernmark, A; Drexhage, H A

    2002-12-01

    Organ-specific or endocrine autoimmune diseases are complex, polygenic afflictions the penetrance of which is heavily dependent on various environmental influences. Important target tissues are the thyroid, the islets of Langerhans, gastric parietal cells and steroid-producing cells in the adrenal and ovary. The etiology of these diseases remains to be clarified. The pathogenesis is strongly associated with autoimmune phenomena. None of the current treatment approaches provides a cure; rather they represent replacement therapy. An important objective in the treatment of endocrine/organ-specific autoimmune diseases is the detection of individuals at risk for the development of such diseases and the development of interventions to prevent an outbreak of the diseases. This requires an exquisite knowledge of the early etio-pathogenic stages of these diseases. This review concentrates on the usefulness of animal models for a precise understanding of these very early stages. It must be emphasized that studying animal models cannot answer all the problems presented by endocrine/organ-specific autoimmune diseases as seen in the clinic. It must be expected - considering the different etiologies in the different animal models (see below) - that the causes of the diseases in the human and the involvement of various genes and environmental factors may also vary. Yet, particularly in the study of the pre-autoimmune phases of the diseases, there is hardly any alternative to the study of animal models. Only limited series of experiments can be carried out in human subjects at risk to develop such diseases. Moreover, a general semblance (blueprint) of the etio-pathogenesis found in the animal models can lead the way for human studies. Efforts to understand the patho-physiology of the early stages of endocrine/organ-specific autoimmune diseases have mainly involved animal models that "spontaneously" develop such diseases. Of these the bio-breeding diabetes-prone (BB-DP) rat and the

  11. Diet Influences Expression of Autoimmune Associated Genes and Disease Severity By Epigenetic Mechanisms in a Transgenic Lupus Model

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Faith M.; Hewagama, Anura; Wu, Ailing; Sawalha, Amr H.; Delaney, Colin; Hoeltzel, Mark F.; Yung, Raymond; Johnson, Kent; Mickelson, Barbara; Richardson, Bruce C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Lupus flares when genetically predisposed people encounter appropriate environmental agents. Current evidence indicates that the environment contributes by inhibiting T cell DNA methylation, causing overexpression of normally silenced genes. DNA methylation depends on both dietary transmethylation micronutrients and Erk-regulated DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) levels. We used transgenic mice to study interactions between diet, Dnmt1 levels and genetic predisposition on the development and severity of lupus. Methods A doxycycline-inducible Erk defect was bred into lupus-resistant (C57BL/6) or lupus-susceptible (C57BL/6xSJL) mouse strains. Doxycycline treated mice were fed a standard commercial diet for eighteen weeks then switched to diets supplemented(MS) or restricted(MR) intransmethylation micronutrients. Disease severity was assessed by anti-dsDNA antibodies, proteinuria, hematuria and histopathology of kidney tissues. Pyrosequencing was used to determine micronutrient effects on DNA methylation. Results Doxycycline induced modest levels of anti-dsDNA antibodies in C57BL/6 mice and higher levels in C57BL/6xSJL mice. Doxycycline-treated C57BL/6xSJL mice developed hematuria and glomerulonephritis on the MR and standard but not the MS diet. In contrast C57BL/6 mice developed kidney disease only on the MR diet. Decreasing Erk signaling and methyl donors also caused demethylation and overexpression of the CD40lg gene in female mice, consistent with demethylation of the second X chromosome. Both the dietary methyl donor content and duration of treatment influenced methylation and expression of the CD40lg gene. Conclusions Dietary micronutrients that affect DNA methylation can exacerbate or ameliorate SLE disease in this transgenic murine lupus model, and contribute to lupus susceptibility and severity through genetic/epigenetic interactions. PMID:23576011

  12. Human lupus autoantibody-DNA complexes activate DCs through cooperation of CD32 and TLR9.

    PubMed

    Means, Terry K; Latz, Eicke; Hayashi, Fumitaka; Murali, Mandakolathur R; Golenbock, Douglas T; Luster, Andrew D

    2005-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by pathogenic autoantibodies against nucleoproteins and DNA. Here we show that DNA-containing immune complexes (ICs) within lupus serum (SLE-ICs), but not protein-containing ICs from other autoimmune rheumatic diseases, stimulates plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs) to produce cytokines and chemokines via a cooperative interaction between Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) and FcgammaRIIa (CD32). SLE-ICs transiently colocalized to a subcellular compartment containing CD32 and TLR9, and CD32+, but not CD32-, PDCs internalized and responded to SLE-ICs. Our findings demonstrate a novel functional interaction between Fc receptors and TLRs, defining a pathway in which CD32 delivers SLE-ICs to intracellular lysosomes containing TLR9, inducing a signaling cascade leading to PDC activation. These data demonstrate that endogenous DNA-containing autoantibody complexes found in the serum of patients with SLE activate the innate immune system and suggest a novel mechanism whereby these ICs contribute to the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease.

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study in African-Americans with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Americans with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Harley, M.D., Ph.D...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus ( lupus ) is a potentially deadly systemic autoimmune disease that disproportionately... Systemic lupus erythematosus ( lupus ) is a potentially deadly systemic autoimmune disease that disproportionately afflicts women and African

  14. Technetium-99m thyroid scan; does it have a diagnostic aid in sub-clinical auto-immune thyroid disease in systemic lupus erythematosus patients?

    PubMed

    Amin, A; Alkemary, A; Abdo, M; Salama, M

    2016-02-01

    Technetium-99m (Tc-99m) thyroid scintigraphy is a well known diagnostic tool that shows the entire gland in a single image. We aimed to evaluate its additive diagnostic value in subclinical autoimmune thyroid disease (S-AITD) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. We investigated 100 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients without overt thyroid involvement (eight men and 92 women; mean age 40±6.5 years) and 50 age and sex matched controls. All were subjected to thyroid evaluation using anti-thyroglobulin (anti-TG) and anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) antibodies; hormones (FT3; FT4 and TSH) and Tc-99m thyroid scintigraphy. 14/100 (14%) and none (0%) were positive for S-AITD in SLE and control groups, respectively (P = 0.0001). They were classified by thyroid scintigraphy and hormonal profile into 2/14 Hashimoto; 10/14 atrophic thyroiditis and 2/14 Graves' disease. Anti-TPO was elevated in 12 SLE cases, while anti-TG was elevated in only 2/14 (P = 0.0001). Thyroid scintigraphy showed statistically significant associations with FT4, TSH and anti-TPO. Tc-99m thyroid scintigraphy may have an additional diagnostic role in S-AITD among SLE patients, with an impact on patient management. This potential needs to be further evaluated in a larger series on a multicenter basis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Cutting Edge: Nanogel-Based Delivery of an Inhibitor of CaMK4 to CD4+ T Cells Suppresses Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Lupus-like Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Otomo, Kotaro; Koga, Tomohiro; Mizui, Masayuki; Yoshida, Nobuya; Kriegel, Christina; Bickerton, Sean; Fahmy, Tarek M; Tsokos, George C

    2015-12-15

    Treatment of autoimmune diseases is still largely based on the use of systemically acting immunosuppressive drugs, which invariably cause severe side effects. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV is involved in the suppression of IL-2 and the production of IL-17. Its pharmacologic or genetic inhibition limits autoimmune disease in mice. In this study, we demonstrate that KN93, a small-molecule inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV, targeted to CD4(+) T cells via a nanolipogel delivery system, markedly reduced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and was 10-fold more potent than the free systemically delivered drug in the lupus mouse models. The targeted delivery of KN93 did not deplete T cells but effectively blocked Th17 cell differentiation and expansion as measured in the spinal cords and kidneys of mice developing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis or lupus, respectively. These results highlight the promise of cell-targeted inhibition of molecules involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity as a means of advancing the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  16. T-regs in autoimmune hepatitis-systemic lupus erythematosus/mixed connective tissue disease overlap syndrome are functionally defective and display a Th1 cytokine profile.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Maria Serena; Ma, Yun; Grant, Charlotte R; Samyn, Marianne; Gordon, Patrick; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2013-03-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), a severe hepatopathy characterized by hypergammaglobulinaemia, autoantibodies and interface hepatitis, is occasionally associated with systemic autoimmune manifestations [systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD)]. In both AIH and SLE/MCTD numerical and/or functional impairment of regulatory T-cells (T-regs) is believed to favour autoimmunity. To investigate whether immune-tolerance breakdown profiles differ in patients with AIH and SLE/MCTD, isolated AIH or systemic autoimmunity, we studied phenotypic and functional features of T-regs in 10 patients with AIH-SLE/MCTD, 22 with AIH, 12 with SLE and 20 healthy subjects. Compared to health, CD4(pos)CD25(pos) cells were decreased in number and expressed high levels of the CD127 activation marker in all three disease groups; in AIH-SLE/MCTD and in SLE they displayed low levels of FOXP3. In AIH-SLE/MCTD, they also contained a high proportion of IFNγ positive cells, indicating a Th1 profile. Similarly, in AIH-SLE/MCTD, CD4(pos)CD25(pos)CD25(high) T-regs were reduced in number and contained an increased proportion of activated CD127(pos) and IFNγ(pos) cells. Such skewing towards a Th1 profile was also present at effector level, as a high frequency of IFNγ-producing cells was observed within AIH-SLE/MCTD CD4(pos)CD25(neg) responder cells. Impairment in suppressor function both of CD4(pos)CD25(pos) cells and CD4(pos)CD25(pos)CD127(neg) T-regs was observed in all three autoimmune conditions, but while addition of CD4(pos)CD25(pos)CD127(neg) T-regs decreased CD4(pos)CD25(neg) responder cell proliferation in healthy subjects and partially in AIH patients, it had no effect in AIH-SLE/MCTD and SLE patients. In conclusion, in AIH-SLE/MCTD T-regs display a distinctive phenotypic and functional signature, characterized by marked activation, elevated IFNγ production and by a profound impairment of suppressive function, suggesting that multiple autoimmune manifestations

  17. Curcumin and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Bright, John J

    2007-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to protect the host from microbial infection; nevertheless, a breakdown in the immune system often results in infection, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. Multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, myocarditis, thyroiditis, uveitis, systemic lupus erythromatosis, and myasthenia gravis are organ-specific autoimmune diseases that afflict more than 5% of the population worldwide. Although the etiology is not known and a cure is still wanting, the use of herbal and dietary supplements is on the rise in patients with autoimmune diseases, mainly because they are effective, inexpensive, and relatively safe. Curcumin is a polyphenolic compound isolated from the rhizome of the plant Curcuma longa that has traditionally been used for pain and wound-healing. Recent studies have shown that curcumin ameliorates multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and inflammatory bowel disease in human or animal models. Curcumin inhibits these autoimmune diseases by regulating inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-12, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma and associated JAK-STAT, AP-1, and NF-kappaB signaling pathways in immune cells. Although the beneficial effects of nutraceuticals are traditionally achieved through dietary consumption at low levels for long periods of time, the use of purified active compounds such as curcumin at higher doses for therapeutic purposes needs extreme caution. A precise understanding of effective dose, safe regiment, and mechanism of action is required for the use of curcumin in the treatment of human autoimmune diseases.

  18. Silica, Silicosis, and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Kenneth Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response, which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements, suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, and autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However, numerous questions remain unanswered.

  19. Silica, Silicosis, and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Kenneth Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response, which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements, suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, and autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However, numerous questions remain unanswered. PMID:27014276

  20. Sex differences in the expression of lupus-associated miRNAs in splenocytes from lupus-prone NZB/WF1 mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A majority of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), occur predominantly in females. Recent studies have identified specific dysregulated microRNAs (miRNAs) in both human and murine lupus, implying an important contribution of these miRNAs to lupus pathogenesis. However, to date, there is no study that examined sex differences in miRNA expression in immune cells as a plausible basis for sex differences in autoimmune disease. This study addresses this aspect in NZB/WF1 mice, a classical murine lupus model with marked female bias, and further investigates estrogen regulation of lupus-associated miRNAs. Methods The Taqman miRNA assay system was used to quantify the miRNA expression in splenocytes from male and female NZB/WF1 mice at 17–18, 23, and 30 weeks (wks) of age. To evaluate potential estrogen's effect on lupus-associated miRNAs, 6-wk-old NZB/WF1 male mice were orchidectomized and surgically implanted with empty (placebo) or estrogen implants for 4 and 26 wks, respectively. To assess the lupus status in the NZB/WF1 mice, serum anti-dsDNA autoantibody levels, proteinuria, and renal histological changes were determined. Results The sex differences in the expression of lupus-associated miRNAs, including the miR-182-96-183 cluster, miR-155, miR-31, miR-148a, miR-127, and miR-379, were markedly evident after the onset of lupus, especially at 30 wks of age when female NZB/WF1 mice manifested moderate to severe lupus when compared to their male counterparts. Our limited data also suggested that estrogen treatment increased the expression of aforementioned lupus-associated miRNAs, with the exception of miR-155, in orchidectomized male NZB/WF1 mice to a similar level in age-matched intact female NZB/WF1 mice. It is noteworthy that orchiectomy, itself, did not affect the expression of lupus-associated miRNAs. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrated sex differences in the expression of lupus

  1. Polyspecificity of monoclonal lupus autoantibodies produced by human-human hybridomas.

    PubMed

    Shoenfeld, Y; Rauch, J; Massicotte, H; Datta, S K; André-Schwartz, J; Stollar, B D; Schwartz, R S

    1983-02-24

    We studied the serologic properties of monoclonal autoantibodies that were produced by hybridomas derived from lymphocytes of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The hybridomas were made by fusion of a human lymphoblastoid cell line, GM 4672 (derived from a patient with multiple myeloma), with peripheral-blood or splenic lymphocytes from six patients with lupus. Thirty monoclonal autoantibodies, selected for their ability to react with denatured DNA, were analyzed. Eighteen of them reacted with three or more additional polynucleotides, including native DNA, left-handed double-helical DNA (Z-DNA), poly(l), and poly(dT). Ten reacted both with nucleic acids and the phospholipid cardiolipin. The multiple binding reactions of the monoclonal autoantibodies may be explained by the presence of appropriately spaced phosphodiester groups in both the polynucleotides and the phospholipid. The sharing of antigenic groups by polymers of different natures may contribute to the apparent diversity of serologic reactions in systemic lupus erythematosus. These findings suggest that DNA itself need not be the immunogenic stimulus for autoantibody formation in this disease.

  2. Induction of lupus autoantibodies by adjuvants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Satoh, M.; Kuroda, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Behney, K.M.; Mizutani, A.; Akaogi, J.; Nacionales, D.C.; Lorenson, T.D.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Reeves, W.H.

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to the hydrocarbon oil pristane induces lupus specific autoantibodies in non-autoimmune mice. We investigated whether the capacity to induce lupus-like autoimmunity is a unique property of pristane or is shared by other adjuvant oils. Seven groups of 3-month-old female BALB/cJ mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of pristane, squalene (used in the adjuvant MF59), incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA), three different medicinal mineral oils, or saline, respectively. Serum autoantibodies and peritoneal cytokine production were measured. In addition to pristane, the mineral oil Bayol F (IFA) and the endogenous hydrocarbon squalene both induced anti-nRNP/Sm and -Su autoantibodies (20% and 25% of mice, respectively). All of these hydrocarbons had prolonged effects on cytokine production by peritoneal APCs. However, high levels of IL-6, IL-12, and TNF?? production 2-3 months after intraperitoneal injection appeared to be associated with the ability to induce lupus autoantibodies. The ability to induce lupus autoantibodies is shared by several hydrocarbons and is not unique to pristane. It correlates with stimulation of the production of IL-12 and other cytokines, suggesting a relationship with a hydrocarbon's adjuvanticity. The potential to induce autoimmunity may complicate the use of oil adjuvants in human and veterinary vaccines. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. C5a alters blood-brain barrier integrity in a human in vitro model of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Supriya D; Parikh, Neil U; Woodruff, Trent M; Jarvis, James N; Lopez, Molly; Hennon, Teresa; Cunningham, Patrick; Quigg, Richard J; Schwartz, Stanley A; Alexander, Jessy J

    2015-09-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a crucial role in brain homeostasis, thereby maintaining the brain environment precise for optimal neuronal function. Its dysfunction is an intriguing complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is a systemic autoimmune disorder where neurological complications occur in 5-50% of cases and is associated with impaired BBB integrity. Complement activation occurs in SLE and is an important part of the clinical profile. Our earlier studies demonstrated that C5a generated by complement activation caused the loss of brain endothelial layer integrity in rodents. The goal of the current study was to determine the translational potential of these studies to a human system. To assess this, we used a two dimensional in vitro BBB model constructed using primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells and astroglial cells, which closely emulates the in vivo BBB allowing the assessment of BBB integrity. Increased permeability monitored by changes in transendothelial electrical resistance and cytoskeletal remodelling caused by actin fiber rearrangement were observed when the cells were exposed to lupus serum and C5a, similar to the observations in mice. In addition, our data show that C5a/C5aR1 signalling alters nuclear factor-κB translocation into nucleus and regulates the expression of the tight junction proteins, claudin-5 and zonula occludens 1 in this setting. Our results demonstrate for the first time that C5a regulates BBB integrity in a neuroinflammatory setting where it affects both endothelial and astroglial cells. In addition, we also demonstrate that our previous findings in a mouse model, were emulated in human cells in vitro, bringing the studies one step closer to understanding the translational potential of C5a/C5aR1 blockade as a promising therapeutic strategy in SLE and other neurodegenerative diseases. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) deficiency delays lupus nephritis in MRL-Faslpr mice: the IL-6 pathway as a new therapeutic target in treatment of autoimmune kidney disease in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Cash, Hannes; Relle, Manfred; Menke, Julia; Brochhausen, Christoph; Jones, Simon A; Topley, Nicholas; Galle, Peter R; Schwarting, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the pathophysiological effect of interleukin 6 (IL-6) on lupus nephritis in MRL-Fas(lpr) mice. We generated IL-6-deficient MRL-Fas(lpr) mice using a backcross/intercross breeding scheme. Renal pathology was evaluated using immunohistochemistry detection for macrophages, lymphocytes, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling) for apoptotic cells, and renal IgG and C3 deposition by immunofluorescence staining. Expression of inflammatory markers in the spleen was analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Serum cytokine concentrations were detected by FACS analysis. IL-6 deficiency was highly effective in prolonging survival and ameliorating the clinical, immunological, and histological indicators of murine systemic lupus erythematosus. During the study period of 6 months, MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-6 -/- mice showed delayed onset of proteinuria and hematuria compared to IL-6-intact control mice. Survival rate was 100% in IL-6-deficient MRL-Fas(lpr) mice and 25% in the control group at 6 months of age. The absence of IL-6 resulted in significant reduction of infiltrating macrophages in the kidney (p < 0.05), a decrease in renal IgG and C3 deposition, and a reduction of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. The parenchymal adhesion molecule VCAM-1 was found to be downregulated in kidneys of MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-6 -/- compared to IL-6-intact mice. We found elevated serum levels of IL-10 and interferon-gamma in IL-6-deficient mice, while splenic mRNA showed an overall downregulation of immunoregulatory genes. IL-6 is a strong promoter of lupus nephritis and may be a promising new therapeutic target in the treatment of human lupus nephritis.

  5. Overview of Pathophysiology and Treatment of Human Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Trotter, Kimberly; Clark, Marcus R.; Liarski, Vladimir M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite recent developments and treatment successes, the outcome and prognosis of patients with lupus nephritis have not greatly changed since the 1980s. This review covers the application of new concepts to the understanding of renal inflammation and the study of new pharmacologic agents to improve patient outcomes. Recent findings Studies have shown that the presence of anti-vimentin antibodies and T follicular helper cells in patient biopsies are associated with more severe interstitial inflammation, which has been tied to faster disease progression and onset of end stage renal disease. Additionally, data regarding the role of serum IgE anti-dsDNA antibodies in lupus nephritis by means of mediating type I inferferon production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells is highlighted. Finally, a thorough review of completed and currently open clinical trials of therapeutic agents is provided. Summary Current management of lupus nephritis is guided almost exclusively by glomerular involvement. Based on the data provided in this review, we argue that renal tubulointerstitial inflammation is no less important and represents an overlooked feature in the current clinical approach to patients. Tubulointerstitial inflammation is driven by both adaptive and innate immune mechanisms that are still poorly understood. Studying these pathogenic processes promises to reveal new therapeutic opportunities for those lupus nephritis patients with the worse prognosis. PMID:27341623

  6. Targeting cancer with a lupus autoantibody#

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, James E.; Chan, Grace; Liu, Yanfeng; Hegan, Denise C.; Dalal, Shibani; Dray, Eloise; Kwon, Youngho; Xu, Yuanyuan; Xu, Xiaohua; Peterson-Roth, Elizabeth; Geiger, Erik; Liu, Yilun; Gera, Joseph; Sweasy, Joann B.; Sung, Patrick; Rockwell, Sara; Nishimura, Robert N.; Weisbart, Richard H.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is distinct among autoimmune diseases due to its association with circulating autoantibodies reactive against host DNA. The precise role that anti-DNA antibodies play in SLE pathophysiology remains to be elucidated, and potential applications of lupus autoantibodies in cancer therapy have not previously been explored. Here we report the unexpected finding that a cell-penetrating lupus autoantibody, 3E10, has potential as a targeted therapy for DNA-repair deficient malignancies. We find that 3E10 preferentially binds DNA single-strand tails, inhibits key steps in DNA single-strand and double-strand break repair, and sensitizes cultured tumor cells and human tumor xenografts to DNA-damaging therapy, including doxorubicin and radiation. Moreover, we demonstrate that 3E10 alone is synthetically lethal to BRCA2-deficient human cancer cells and selectively sensitizes such cells to low dose doxorubicin. Our results establish an approach to cancer therapy that we expect will be particularly applicable to BRCA2-related malignancies such as breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers. In addition, our findings raise the possibility that lupus autoantibodies may be partly responsible for the intrinsic deficiencies in DNA repair and the unexpectedly low rates of breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers observed in SLE patients. In summary, this study provides the basis for the potential use of a lupus anti-DNA antibody in cancer therapy and identifies lupus autoantibodies as a potentially rich source of therapeutic agents. PMID:23100628

  7. Targeting cancer with a lupus autoantibody.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James E; Chan, Grace; Liu, Yanfeng; Hegan, Denise C; Dalal, Shibani; Dray, Eloise; Kwon, Youngho; Xu, Yuanyuan; Xu, Xiaohua; Peterson-Roth, Elizabeth; Geiger, Erik; Liu, Yilun; Gera, Joseph; Sweasy, Joann B; Sung, Patrick; Rockwell, Sara; Nishimura, Robert N; Weisbart, Richard H; Glazer, Peter M

    2012-10-24

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is distinct among autoimmune diseases because of its association with circulating autoantibodies reactive against host DNA. The precise role that anti-DNA antibodies play in SLE pathophysiology remains to be elucidated, and potential applications of lupus autoantibodies in cancer therapy have not previously been explored. We report the unexpected finding that a cell-penetrating lupus autoantibody, 3E10, has potential as a targeted therapy for DNA repair-deficient malignancies. We find that 3E10 preferentially binds DNA single-strand tails, inhibits key steps in DNA single-strand and double-strand break repair, and sensitizes cultured tumor cells and human tumor xenografts to DNA-damaging therapy, including doxorubicin and radiation. Moreover, we demonstrate that 3E10 alone is synthetically lethal to BRCA2-deficient human cancer cells and selectively sensitizes such cells to low-dose doxorubicin. Our results establish an approach to cancer therapy that we expect will be particularly applicable to BRCA2-related malignancies such as breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers. In addition, our findings raise the possibility that lupus autoantibodies may be partly responsible for the intrinsic deficiencies in DNA repair and the unexpectedly low rates of breast, ovarian, and prostate cancers observed in SLE patients. In summary, this study provides the basis for the potential use of a lupus anti-DNA antibody in cancer therapy and identifies lupus autoantibodies as a potentially rich source of therapeutic agents.

  8. Human hybridoma lupus anticoagulants distinguish between lamellar and hexagonal phase lipid systems.

    PubMed

    Rauch, J; Tannenbaum, M; Tannenbaum, H; Ramelson, H; Cullis, P R; Tilcock, C P; Hope, M J; Janoff, A S

    1986-07-25

    Antibodies to phospholipids may have important physiological and biological functions. Lupus anticoagulants represent a subclass of anti-phospholipid antibodies which are characterized by their ability to prolong the clotting time in in vitro coagulation assays measuring partial thromboplastin time (PTT) (Thiagarajan, P., Shapiro, S. S., and DeMarco, L. (1980) J. Clin. Invest. 66, 397-405). In the present study, we produced hybridomas by fusing lymphocytes from 13 systemic lupus erythematosus patients with the GM 4672 lymphoblastoid line. Of the resulting 67 hybridoma autoantibodies, 14 (21%) were found to prolong a modified PTT assay, and 11 of these antibodies were analyzed further. Competition experiments, using a modified PTT assay, demonstrated that hexagonal phase phospholipids, including natural and synthetic forms of phosphatidylethanolamine, were able to neutralize the lupus anticoagulant activity of all 11 hybridoma antibodies. In contrast, lamellar phospholipids, such as phosphatidylcholine and synthetic lamellar forms of phosphatidylethanolamine, had no effect on the anticoagulant activity. Thus, these antibodies are capable of recognizing phospholipids on purely structural criteria. The demonstration that anti-phospholipid antibodies are able to distinguish between different structural arrangements of phospholipid may have important implications regarding the immunoregulation of autoimmunity.

  9. Renal biopsy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: Not just lupus glomerulonephritis!

    PubMed

    Howell, David N

    2017-01-01

    Kidney biopsy is a mainstay in the diagnosis and management of renal disease in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Though biopsies from patients with lupus typically show various forms of immune complex glomerulonephritis, other pathologies are occasionally encountered, including unusual lupus-related nephropathies, other forms of autoimmune disease, and occasional renal disorders without any direct connection with lupus or autoimmunity. Electron microscopy is a powerful tool for detecting and classifying these unusual conditions, which frequently have important therapeutic and prognostic implications.

  10. [Autoimmune thrombophilia].

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Niels H H; Locht, Henning

    2005-08-08

    Antibodies against phospholipids and phospholipid-binding proteins, especially anti-cardiolipin and anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies, are important diagnostic markers of autoimmune thrombophilia. These autoantibodies are quite common among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus but can also be found in individuals without concurrent rheumatic conditions. Apart from thromboembolic disease, these antibodies are linked to recurring fetal loss and intrauterine fetal death. In patients with recurring thrombotic events in whom anti-phospholipid antibodies or prolonged aPTT (as a sign of lupus anticoagulant activity) is found, long-term or even lifelong anticoagulation therapy should be considered. Habitual spontaneous abortions and other obstetric complications are often preventable with LMW heparin in combination with low-dose acetylsalicylic acid. In this review, we outline a diagnostic strategy for uncovering autoimmune thrombophilia supplemented with functional and genetic tests for hypercoagulability.

  11. Prophylactic effect of Withania somnifera on inflammation in a non-autoimmune prone murine model of lupus.

    PubMed

    Minhas, U; Minz, R; Bhatnagar, A

    2011-08-01

    The immunosuppressive properties of an aqueous suspension of Withania somnifera (WS) root powder were investigated in a pristine induced female Balb/c model of a systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) like disease. The course of disease is initiated by peritoneal inflammation caused by pristane which results in development of SLE like symptoms, i.e. autoantibody production, proteinuria, and nephritis within a period of five to six months. The model of SLE was established by injecting 0.5 mL of pristane intraperitoneally into female Balb/c mice (12-18 weeks old). WS root powder (500 mg and 1,000 mg per kg body weight) was administered orally from one month prior to disease induction and for the following 6 months. Parameters of inflammation like nitric oxide (NO), Interleukin 6 and tumour necrosis factor-α and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in serum and/or ascitic fluid were measured. Prophylactic administration of WS root powder (500 mg and 1,000 mg per kg body weight) potently inhibits the proinflammatory cytokines, NO, and ROS in the ascetic fluid as well as in serum. Therefore, our results indicate a preventive effect of WS root powder on the mouse model of lupus.

  12. The IRF5–TNPO3 association with systemic lupus erythematosus has two components that other autoimmune disorders variably share

    PubMed Central

    Kottyan, Leah C.; Zoller, Erin E.; Bene, Jessica; Lu, Xiaoming; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Rupert, Andrew M.; Lessard, Christopher J.; Vaughn, Samuel E.; Marion, Miranda; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Namjou, Bahram; Adler, Adam; Rasmussen, Astrid; Glenn, Stuart; Montgomery, Courtney G.; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Xie, Gang; Coltescu, Catalina; Amos, Chris; Li, He; Ice, John A.; Nath, Swapan K.; Mariette, Xavier; Bowman, Simon; Rischmueller, Maureen; Lester, Sue; Brun, Johan G.; Gøransson, Lasse G.; Harboe, Erna; Omdal, Roald; Cunninghame-Graham, Deborah S.; Vyse, Tim; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Brennan, Michael T.; Lessard, James A.; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Kvarnström, Marika; Illei, Gabor G.; Witte, Torsten; Jonsson, Roland; Eriksson, Per; Nordmark, Gunnel; Ng, Wan-Fai; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Rhodus, Nelson L.; Segal, Barbara M.; Merrill, Joan T.; James, Judith A.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Hal Scofield, R.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Gilkeson, Gary; Kamen, Diane L.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Kimberly, Robert; Brown, Elizabeth; Edberg, Jeffrey; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Reveille, John D.; Vilá, Luis M.; Petri, Michelle; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Freedman, Barry I.; Niewold, Timothy; Stevens, Anne M.; Tsao, Betty P.; Ying, Jun; Mayes, Maureen D.; Gorlova, Olga Y.; Wakeland, Ward; Radstake, Timothy; Martin, Ezequiel; Martin, Javier; Siminovitch, Katherine; Moser Sivils, Kathy L.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Harley, John B.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Exploiting genotyping, DNA sequencing, imputation and trans-ancestral mapping, we used Bayesian and frequentist approaches to model the IRF5–TNPO3 locus association, now implicated in two immunotherapies and seven autoimmune diseases. Specifically, in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we resolved separate associations in the IRF5 promoter (all ancestries) and with an extended European haplotype. We captured 3230 IRF5–TNPO3 high-quality, common variants across 5 ethnicities in 8395 SLE cases and 7367 controls. The genetic effect from the IRF5 promoter can be explained by any one of four variants in 5.7 kb (P-valuemeta = 6 × 10−49; OR = 1.38–1.97). The second genetic effect spanned an 85.5-kb, 24-variant haplotype that included the genes IRF5 and TNPO3 (P-valuesEU = 10−27–10−32, OR = 1.7–1.81). Many variants at the IRF5 locus with previously assigned biological function are not members of either final credible set of potential causal variants identified herein. In addition to the known biologically functional variants, we demonstrated that the risk allele of rs4728142, a variant in the promoter among the lowest frequentist probability and highest Bayesian posterior probability, was correlated with IRF5 expression and differentially binds the transcription factor ZBTB3. Our analytical strategy provides a novel framework for future studies aimed at dissecting etiological genetic effects. Finally, both SLE elements of the statistical model appear to operate in Sjögren's syndrome and systemic sclerosis whereas only the IRF5–TNPO3 gene-spanning haplotype is associated with primary biliary cirrhosis, demonstrating the nuance of similarity and difference in autoimmune disease risk mechanisms at IRF5–TNPO3. PMID:25205108

  13. X Chromosome Dose and Sex Bias in Autoimmune Diseases: Increased Prevalence of 47,XXX in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Sjögren's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Kurien, Biji T; Zimmerman, Sarah L; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Taft, Diana H; Kottyan, Leah C; Lazaro, Sara; Weaver, Carrie A; Ice, John A; Adler, Adam J; Chodosh, James; Radfar, Lida; Rasmussen, Astrid; Stone, Donald U; Lewis, David M; Li, Shibo; Koelsch, Kristi A; Igoe, Ann; Talsania, Mitali; Kumar, Jay; Maier-Moore, Jacen S; Harris, Valerie M; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Jonsson, Roland; Lessard, James A; Lu, Xianglan; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Cunninghame-Graham, Deborah S; Huang, Andrew J W; Brennan, Michael T; Hughes, Pamela; Illei, Gabor G; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Keystone, Edward C; Bykerk, Vivian P; Hirschfield, Gideon; Xie, Gang; Ng, Wan-Fai; Nordmark, Gunnel; Eriksson, Per; Omdal, Roald; Rhodus, Nelson L; Rischmueller, Maureen; Rohrer, Michael; Segal, Barbara M; Vyse, Timothy J; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Witte, Torsten; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E; Guthridge, Joel M; James, Judith A; Lessard, Christopher J; Kelly, Jennifer A; Thompson, Susan D; Gaffney, Patrick M; Montgomery, Courtney G; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Kimberly, Robert P; Alarcón, Graciela S; Langefeld, Carl L; Gilkeson, Gary S; Kamen, Diane L; Tsao, Betty P; McCune, W Joseph; Salmon, Jane E; Merrill, Joan T; Weisman, Michael H; Wallace, Daniel J; Utset, Tammy O; Bottinger, Erwin P; Amos, Christopher I; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Mariette, Xavier; Sivils, Kathy L; Harley, John B; Scofield, R Hal

    2016-05-01

    More than 80% of autoimmune disease predominantly affects females, but the mechanism for this female bias is poorly understood. We suspected that an X chromosome dose effect accounts for this, and we undertook this study to test our hypothesis that trisomy X (47,XXX; occurring in ∼1 in 1,000 live female births) would be increased in patients with female-predominant diseases (systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE], primary Sjögren's syndrome [SS], primary biliary cirrhosis, and rheumatoid arthritis [RA]) compared to patients with diseases without female predominance (sarcoidosis) and compared to controls. All subjects in this study were female. We identified subjects with 47,XXX using aggregate data from single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays, and, when possible, we confirmed the presence of 47,XXX using fluorescence in situ hybridization or quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We found 47,XXX in 7 of 2,826 SLE patients and in 3 of 1,033 SS patients, but in only 2 of 7,074 controls (odds ratio in the SLE and primary SS groups 8.78 [95% confidence interval 1.67-86.79], P = 0.003 and odds ratio 10.29 [95% confidence interval 1.18-123.47], P = 0.02, respectively). One in 404 women with SLE and 1 in 344 women with SS had 47,XXX. There was an excess of 47,XXX among SLE and SS patients. The estimated prevalence of SLE and SS in women with 47,XXX was ∼2.5 and ∼2.9 times higher, respectively, than that in women with 46,XX and ∼25 and ∼41 times higher, respectively, than that in men with 46,XY. No statistically significant increase of 47,XXX was observed in other female-biased diseases (primary biliary cirrhosis or RA), supporting the idea of multiple pathways to sex bias in autoimmunity. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  14. X Chromosome Dose and Sex Bias in Autoimmune Diseases: Increased 47,XXX in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Sjögren’s Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Kurien, Biji T.; Zimmerman, Sarah L.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Taft, Diana H.; Kottyan, Leah C.; Lazaro, Sara; Weaver, Carrie A.; Ice, John A.; Adler, Adam J.; Chodosh, James; Radfar, Lida; Rasmussen, Astrid; Stone, Donald U.; Lewis, David M.; Li, Shibo; Koelsch, Kristi A.; Igoe, Ann; Talsania, Mitali; Kumar, Jay; Maier-Moore, Jacen S.; Harris, Valerie M.; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Jonsson, Roland; Lessard, James A.; Lu, Xianglan; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Cunninghame-Graham, Deborah S.; Huang, Andrew J. W.; Brennan, Michael T.; Hughes, Pamela; Illei, Gabor G.; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Keystone, Edward C.; Bykerk, Vivian P.; Hirschfield, Gideon; Xie, Gang; Ng, Wan-Fai; Nordmark, Gunnel; Eriksson, Per; Omdal, Roald; Rhodus, Nelson L.; Rischmueller, Maureen; Rohrer, Michael; Segal, Barbara M.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Witte, Torsten; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.; Guthridge, Joel M.; James, Judith A.; Lessard, Christopher J.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Susan D.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Montgomery, Courtney G.; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Kimberly, Robert P; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Langefeld, Carl L.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Kamen, Diane L.; Tsao, Betty P.; McCune, W. Joseph; Salmon, Jane E.; Merrill, Joan T.; Weisman, Michael H; Wallace, Daniel J; Utset, Tammy O; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Amos, Christopher I.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Mariette, Xavier; Sivils, Kathy L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective More than 80% of autoimmune disease is female dominant, but the mechanism for this female bias is poorly understood. We suspected an X chromosome dose effect and hypothesized that trisomy X (47,XXX , 1 in ~1,000 live female births) would be increased in female predominant diseases (e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE], primary Sjögren’s syndrome [SS], primary biliary cirrhosis [PBC] and rheumatoid arthritis [RA]) compared to diseases without female predominance (sarcoidosis) and controls. Methods We identified 47,XXX subjects using aggregate data from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and confirmed, when possible, by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) or quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR). Results We found 47,XXX in seven of 2,826 SLE and three of 1,033 SS female patients, but only in two of the 7,074 female controls (p=0.003, OR=8.78, 95% CI: 1.67-86.79 and p=0.02, OR=10.29, 95% CI: 1.18-123.47; respectively). One 47,XXX subject was present for ~404 SLE women and ~344 SS women. 47,XXX was present in excess among SLE and SS subjects. Conclusion The estimated prevalence of SLE and SS in women with 47,XXX was respectively ~2.5 and ~2.9 times higher than in 46,XX women and ~25 and ~41 times higher than in 46,XY men. No statistically significant increase of 47,XXX was observed in other female-biased diseases (PBC or RA), supporting the idea of multiple pathways to sex bias in autoimmunity. PMID:26713507

  15. Incidence of cervical human papillomavirus infection in systemic lupus erythematosus women.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Pinto, C; García-Carrasco, M; Vallejo-Ruiz, V; Méndez-Martínez, S; Taboada-Cole, A; Etchegaray-Morales, I; Muñóz-Guarneros, M; Reyes-Leyva, J; López-Colombo, A

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to study the incidence, persistence and clearance of human papillomavirus infection in systemic lupus erythematosus women and assess risk factors for persistence of human papillomavirus infection. Methods We carried out a prospective, observational cohort study of 127 systemic lupus erythematosus women. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at three years. Traditional and systemic lupus erythematosus women-related disease risk factors were collected. Gynaecological evaluations and cervical cytology screening were made. Human papillomavirus detection and genotyping were made by polymerase chain reaction and linear array. Results The cumulative prevalence of human papillomavirus infection increased from 22.8% at baseline to 33.8% at three years; p = < 0.001: 20.1% of patients experienced 43 incident infections. The risk of any human papillomavirus infection was 10.1 per 1000 patient-months. At three years, 47 (88.6%) prevalent infections were cleared. Independent risk factors associated with incident human papillomavirus infection included more lifetime sexual partners (odds ratio = 1.8, 95% confidence interval = 1.11-3.0) and cumulative cyclophosphamide dose (odds ratio = 3.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.2-12.8). Conclusions In systemic lupus erythematosus women, the cumulative prevalence of human papillomavirus infection, including high risk-human papillomavirus and multiple human papillomavirus infections, may increase over time. Most persistent infections were low risk-human papillomavirus. The number of lifetime sexual partners and the cumulative cyclophosphamide dose were independently associated with incident human papillomavirus infection.

  16. Cholesterol Independent Suppression of Lymphocyte Activation, Autoimmunity and Glomerulonephritis by Apolipoprotein A-I in Normocholesterolemic Lupus-Prone Mice

    PubMed Central

    Black, Leland L.; Srivastava, Roshni; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Moore, Ray D.; Barnes, Stephen; Kabarowski, Janusz H.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I), the major lipid-binding protein of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), can prevent autoimmunity and suppress inflammation in hypercholesterolemic mice by attenuating lymphocyte cholesterol accumulation and removing tissue oxidized lipids. However, whether ApoA-I mediates immune suppressive or anti-inflammatory effects in normocholesterolemic conditions and the mechanisms involved remain unresolved. We transferred bone marrow from SLE-prone Sle123 mice into normal, ApoA-I knockout (ApoA-I−/−) and ApoA-I transgenic (ApoA-Itg) mice. Increased ApoA-I in ApoA-Itg mice suppressed CD4+ T and B cell activation without changing lymphocyte cholesterol levels or reducing major ApoA-I-binding oxidized fatty acids. Unexpectedly, oxidized fatty acid peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) ligands 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE) and 9-HODE were increased in lymphocytes of autoimmune ApoA-Itg mice. ApoA-I reduced Th1 cells independently of changes in CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells or CD11c+ dendritic cell activation and migration. Follicular helper T cells, germinal center B cells and autoantibodies were also lower in ApoA-Itg mice. Transgenic ApoA-I also improved SLE-mediated glomerulonephritis. However, ApoA-I deficiency did not have opposite effects on autoimmunity or glomerulonephritis, possibly due to compensatory increases of ApoE on HDL. We conclude that although compensatory mechanisms prevent pro-inflammatory effects of ApoA-I deficiency in normocholesterolemic mice, increasing ApoA-I can attenuate lymphocyte activation and autoimmunity in SLE independently of cholesterol transport, possibly through oxidized fatty acid PPARγ ligands, and can reduce renal inflammation in glomerulonephritis. PMID:26466956

  17. Liver injury correlates with biomarkers of autoimmunity and disease activity and represents an organ system involvement in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuxin; Yu, Jianghong; Oaks, Zachary; Marchena-Mendez, Ivan; Francis, Lisa; Bonilla, Eduardo; Aleksiejuk, Phillip; Patel, Jessica; Banki, Katalin; Landas, Steve K.; Perl, Andras

    2015-01-01

    Liver disease (LD), defined as ≥2-fold elevation of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) or alanine aminotransferase (ALT), was examined in a longitudinal study of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Among 435 patients, 90 (20.7%) had LD with a greater prevalence in males (15/39; 38.5%) than females (75/396; 18.9%; p = 0.01). SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) was greater in LD patients (7.8 ± 0.7) relative to those without (5.8 ± 0.3; p = 0.0025). Anti-smooth muscle antibodies, anti-DNA antibodies, hypocomplementemia, proteinuria, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia, and anti-phospholipid syndrome were increased in LD. An absence of LD was noted in patients receiving rapamycin relative to azathioprine, cyclosporine A, or cyclophosphamide. An absence of LD was also noted in patients treated with N-acetylcysteine. LFTs were normalized and SLEDAI was diminished with increased prednisone use in 76/90 LD patients over 12.1 ± 2.6 months. Thus, LD is attributed to autoimmunity and disease activity, it responds to prednisone, and it is potentially preventable by rapamycin or N-acetylcysteine treatment. PMID:26160213

  18. Development of additional autoimmune diseases in a multiethnic cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus with reference to damage and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, S A; Charman, S C; Rahman, A; Isenberg, D A

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of other autoimmune diseases (AID) in black, Caucasian and South Asian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) compared with the prevalence of these AID in the UK population, and to assess the impact of these additional AID on damage scores and mortality. Methods The prevalence and chronology of development of additional AID in SLE patients was determined by case note review. Comparisons were made with prevalence data for AID in the general UK population. The impact of additional AID on mortality and damage scores at up to 10 years was determined in the index cases (patients who developed another AID either in the same year or within 5 years of onset of SLE) compared with controls matched for sex, age, ethnicity and year of onset of SLE. Results There was no significant difference in the total number of AID that developed in patients from each ethnic group but differences in the frequency of some AID were noted. Mortality and damage scores were worse at 5 years in the study cases than the controls, particularly in the peripheral vascular category. Conclusion Patients with SLE might develop other AID that could complicate management of SLE by having an adverse impact on damage scores and mortality. PMID:17213253

  19. Promoter variant of PIK3C3 is associated with autoimmunity against Ro and Sm epitopes in African-American lupus patients.

    PubMed

    Kariuki, Silvia N; Franek, Beverly S; Mikolaitis, Rachel A; Utset, Tammy O; Jolly, Meenakshi; Skol, Andrew D; Niewold, Timothy B

    2010-01-01

    The PIK3C3 locus was implicated in case-case genome-wide association study of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) which we had performed to detect genes associated with autoantibodies and serum interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha). Herein, we examine a PIK3C3 promoter variant (rs3813065/-442 C/T) in an independent multiancestral cohort of 478 SLE cases and 522 controls. rs3813065 C was strongly associated with the simultaneous presence of both anti-Ro and anti-Sm antibodies in African-American patients [OR = 2.24 (1.34-3.73), P = 2.0 x 10(-3)]. This autoantibody profile was associated with higher serum IFN-alpha (P = 7.6 x 10(-6)). In the HapMap Yoruba population, rs3813065 was associated with differential expression of ERAP2 (P = 2.0 x 10(-5)), which encodes an enzyme involved in MHC class I peptide processing. Thus, rs3813065 C is associated with a particular autoantibody profile and altered expression of an MHC peptide processing enzyme, suggesting that this variant modulates serologic autoimmunity in African-American SLE patients.

  20. Purine receptor antagonist modulates serology and affective behaviors in lupus-prone mice: evidence of autoimmune-induced pain?

    PubMed Central

    Ballok, David A.; Sakic, Boris

    2008-01-01

    Neurologic and psychiatric (NP) manifestations are severe complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). As commonly seen in patients, spontaneous disease onset in the MRL/MpJ-Faslpr/ J (MRL-lpr) mouse model of NP-SLE is accompanied by increased autoantibodies, proinflammatorycytokines and behavioral dysfunction which precede neuroinflammation and structural brain lesions. The role of purinergic receptors in the regulation of immunity and behavior remains largely unexplored in the field of neuropsychiatry. To examine the possibility that purinoception is involved in the development of affective behaviors, the P2X purinoceptor antagonist, suramin, was administered to lupus-prone mice from 5 to 14 weeks of age. In addition to food and water measures, novel object and sucrose preference tests were performed to assess neophobic anxiety- and anhedonic-like behaviors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays for anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and pro-inflammatory cytokines were employed in immunopathological analyses. Changes in dendritic morphology in the hippocampal CA1 region were examined by a Golgi impregnation method. Suramin significantly lowered serum ANA and prevented behavioral deficits, but did not prevent neuronal atrophy in MRL-lpr animals. In a new batch of asymptomatic mice, systemic administration of corticosterone was found to induce aberrations in CA1 dendrites, comparable to the “stress” of chronic disease. The precise mechanism(s) through which purine receptor inhibition exerted beneficial effects is not known. The present data supports the hypothesis that activation of the peripheral immune system induces nociceptive-related behavioral symptomatology which is attenuated by the analgesic effects of suramin. Hypercortisolemia may also initiate neuronal damage, and metabolic perturbations may underlie neuro-immuno-endocrine imbalances in MRL-lpr mice. PMID:18601998

  1. Belimumab in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Ankita

    2016-01-01

    Belimumab is the only approved biological agent for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It is a fully humanized IgG1γ monoclonal antibody directed against soluble B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS). It is indicated as an add-on therapy for the treatment of adult patients with active, autoantibody-positive SLE, who are receiving standard therapy. Belimumab is generally well-tolerated, common adverse effects include infections, infusion reactions, hypersensitivity, headache, nausea, and fatigue. Psychiatric events including suicidal tendency, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy and malignancies too have been reported. Apart from SLE, the drug is also being tried for other autoimmune disorders. PMID:27688447

  2. Cross-species transcriptional network analysis defines shared inflammatory responses in murine and human lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Celine C; Bethunaickan, Ramalingam; Gonzalez-Rivera, Tania; Nair, Viji; Ramanujam, Meera; Zhang, Weijia; Bottinger, Erwin P; Segerer, Stephan; Lindenmeyer, Maja; Cohen, Clemens D; Davidson, Anne; Kretzler, Matthias

    2012-07-15

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a serious manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. Therapeutic studies in mouse LN models do not always predict outcomes of human therapeutic trials, raising concerns about the human relevance of these preclinical models. In this study, we used an unbiased transcriptional network approach to define, in molecular terms, similarities and differences among three lupus models and human LN. Genome-wide gene-expression networks were generated using natural language processing and automated promoter analysis and compared across species via suboptimal graph matching. The three murine models and human LN share both common and unique features. The 20 commonly shared network nodes reflect the key pathologic processes of immune cell infiltration/activation, endothelial cell activation/injury, and tissue remodeling/fibrosis, with macrophage/dendritic cell activation as a dominant cross-species shared transcriptional pathway. The unique nodes reflect differences in numbers and types of infiltrating cells and degree of remodeling among the three mouse strains. To define mononuclear phagocyte-derived pathways in human LN, gene sets activated in isolated NZB/W renal mononuclear cells were compared with human LN kidney profiles. A tissue compartment-specific macrophage-activation pattern was seen, with NF-κB1 and PPARγ as major regulatory nodes in the tubulointerstitial and glomerular networks, respectively. Our study defines which pathologic processes in murine models of LN recapitulate the key transcriptional processes active in human LN and suggests that there are functional differences between mononuclear phagocytes infiltrating different renal microenvironments.

  3. Diet and Nutrition With Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Should a person with lupus be on a gluten-free diet? If you also have celiac disease, a gluten-free diet is critical. Otherwise, there is no evidence that gluten worsens or improves inflammation in any other autoimmune ...

  4. Diet and Nutrition With Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Should a person with lupus be on a gluten-free diet? If you also have celiac disease, a gluten-free diet is critical. Otherwise, there is no evidence that gluten worsens or improves inflammation in any other autoimmune ...

  5. The role of AIRE in human autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Akirav, Eitan M; Ruddle, Nancy H; Herold, Kevan C

    2011-01-01

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene encodes a transcription factor involved in the presentation of tissue-restricted antigens during T-cell development in the thymus. Mutations of this gene lead to type 1 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS-1), also termed autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) syndrome, which is characterized by the clinical presentation of at least two of a triad of underlying disorders: Addison disease, hypoparathyroidism and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. This Review describes the process of positive and negative selection of developing T cells in the thymus and the role of AIRE as a regulator of peripheral antigen presentation. Furthermore, it addresses how mutations of this gene lead to the failure to eliminate autoreactive T cells, which can lead to clinical autoimmune syndromes.

  6. Recombinant human erythropoietin modulates erythrocyte complement receptor 1 functional activity in patients with lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Kiss, E; Kávai, M; Csipõ, I; Szegedi, G

    1998-06-01

    Deposition of immune complexes (IC) is an important step in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. Impairment of IC-clearance contributes to the accumulation of IC. It may be partly attributed to decreased complement containing immune complex (ICC) binding by erythrocytic complement receptor 1 (ECR1). Stimulating erythropoiesis with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) may enhance the IC-clearance as increasing ECR1 expression and/or functional activity. Ten anemic patients with lupus nephritis were treated with 50 IU rHuEPO (Eprex) per kg body weight three times a week during a five week period. ICC-binding capacity of ECR1 was determined with 125I-labelled, C3ib containing BSA-anti-BSA complexes. In addition to effective correction of anemia, indicated by increased red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin concentration and reticulocyte ratio, rHuEPO significantly improved decreased ECR1 functional (ICC-binding) activity in patients with lupus nephritis. This improvement correlated with the increase in reticulocyte ratio. Although patients were kept on their previous therapy during Eprex administration, their clinical condition also improved. That was shown by a decrease in Westergreen ratio, serum creatinine concentration and anti-dsDNA level and also by an increase in creatinine clearance. Results suggest a beneficial immune modulatory effect of rHuEPO in lupus nephritis.

  7. Amyloid-DNA composites of bacterial biofilms stimulate autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Paul M.; Rapsinski, Glenn J.; Wilson, R. Paul; Oppong, Gertrude O.; Sriram, Uma; Goulian, Mark; Buttaro, Bettina; Caricchio, Roberto; Gallucci, Stefania; Tükel, Çagla

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Research on the human microbiome has established that commensal and pathogenic bacteria can influence obesity, cancer, and autoimmunity through mechanisms mostly unknown. We found that a component of bacterial biofilms, the amyloid protein curli, irreversibly formed fibers with bacterial DNA during biofilm formation. This interaction accelerated amyloid polymerization and created potent immunogenic complexes that activated immune cells, including dendritic cells, to produce cytokines such as Type I interferons, which are pathogenic in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). When given systemically, curli-DNA composites triggered immune activation and production of autoantibodies in lupus-prone and wild-type mice. We also found that the infection of lupus-prone mice with curli-producing bacteria triggered higher autoantibody titers compared to curli-deficient bacteria. These data provide a mechanism by which the microbiome and biofilm-producing enteric infections may contribute to the progression of SLE and point to a potential molecular target for treatment of autoimmunity. PMID:26084027

  8. Induction of a systemic lupus erythematosus-like disease in mice by a common human anti-DNA idiotype

    SciTech Connect

    Mendlovic, S.; Brocke, S.; Meshorer, A.; Mozes, E. ); Shoenfeld, Y.; Bakimer, R. ); Ben-Bassat, M. )

    1988-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is considered to be the quintessential autoimmune disease. It has not been possible to induce SLE in animal models by DNA immunization or by challenge with anti-DNA antibodies. The authors report a murine model of SLE-like disease induced by immunization of C3H.SW female mice with a common human monoclonal anti-DNA idiotype (16/6 idiotype). Following a booster injection with the 16/6 idiotype, high levels of murine anti-16/6 and anti-anti-16/6 antibodies (associated with anti-DNA activity) were detected in the sera of the immunized mice. Elevated titers of autoantibodies reacting with DNA, poly(I), poly(dT), ribonucleoprotein, autoantigens (Sm, SS-A (Ro), and SS-B (La)), and cardiolipin were noted. The serological findings were associated with increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate, leukopenia, proteinuria, immune complex deposition in the glomerular mesangium, and sclerosis of the glomeruli. The immune complexes in the kidneys were shown to contain the 16/6 idiotype. This experimental SLE-like model may be used to elucidate the mechanisms underlying SLE.

  9. Assessment of attachment behaviour to human caregivers in wolf pups (Canis lupus lupus).

    PubMed

    Hall, Nathaniel J; Lord, Kathryn; Arnold, Anne-Marie K; Wynne, Clive D L; Udell, Monique A R

    2015-01-01

    Previous research suggested that 16-week old dog pups, but not wolf pups, show attachment behaviour to a human caregiver. Attachment to a caregiver in dog pups has been demonstrated by differential responding to a caregiver compared to a stranger in the Ainsworth Strange Situation Test. We show here that 3-7 week old wolf pups also show attachment-like behaviour to a human caregiver as measured by preferential proximity seeking, preferential contact, and preferential greeting to a human caregiver over a human stranger in a modified and counterbalanced version of the Ainsworth Strange Situation Test. In addition, our results show that preferential responding to a caregiver over a stranger is only apparent following brief isolation. In initial episodes, wolf pups show no differentiation between the caregiver and the stranger; however, following a 2-min separation, the pups show proximity seeking, more contact, and more greeting to the caregiver than the stranger. These results suggest intensive human socialization of a wolf can lead to attachment--like responding to a human caregiver during the first two months of a wolf pup's life. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Kaleidoscope of autoimmune diseases in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Roszkiewicz, Justyna; Smolewska, Elzbieta

    2016-11-01

    Within the last 30 years, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has changed its status from inevitably fatal to chronic disorder with limited impact on life span. However, this breakthrough was mainly the effect of introduction of the aggressive antiviral treatment, which has led to the clinically significant increase in CD4+ cell count, resulting in fewer cases of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and improved management of opportunistic infections occurring in the course of the disease. The occurrence of a particular autoimmune disease depends on degree of immunosuppression of the HIV-positive patient. In 2002, four stages of autoimmunity were proposed in patients infected by HIV, based on the absolute CD4+ cell count, feature of AIDS as well as on the presence of autoimmune diseases. Spectrum of autoimmune diseases associated with HIV infection seems to be unexpectedly wide, involving several organs, such as lungs (sarcoidosis), thyroid gland (Graves' disease), liver (autoimmune hepatitis), connective tissue (systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, polyarteritis nodosa and other types of vasculitis, antiphospholipid syndrome) or hematopoietic system (autoimmune cytopenias). This paper contains the state of art on possible coincidences between HIV infection and a differential types of autoimmune diseases, including the potential mechanisms of this phenomenon. As the clinical manifestations of autoimmunization often mimic those inscribed in the course of HIV infection, health care providers should be aware of this rare but potentially deadly association and actively seek for its symptoms in their patients.

  11. Breakdown of Immune Tolerance in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reihl, Alec M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play an important role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease with multiple tissue manifestations. In this review, we summarize recent studies on the roles of conventional DC and plasmacytoid DC in the development of both murine lupus and human SLE. In the past decade, studies using selective DC depletions have demonstrated critical roles of DC in lupus progression. Comprehensive in vitro and in vivo studies suggest activation of DC by self-antigens in lupus pathogenesis, followed by breakdown of immune tolerance to self. Potential treatment strategies targeting DC have been developed. However, many questions remain regarding the mechanisms by which DC modulate lupus pathogenesis that require further investigations. PMID:27034965

  12. Lupus Nephritis: Animal Modeling of a Complex Disease Syndrome Pathology

    PubMed Central

    McGaha, Tracy L; Madaio, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Nephritis as a result of autoimmunity is a common morbidity associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). There is substantial clinical and industry interest in medicinal intervention in the SLE nephritic process; however, clinical trials to specifically treat lupus nephritis have not resulted in complete and sustained remission in all patients. Multiple mouse models have been used to investigate the pathologic interactions between autoimmune reactivity and SLE pathology. While several models bear a remarkable similarity to SLE-driven nephritis, there are limitations for each that can make the task of choosing the appropriate model for a particular aspect of SLE pathology challenging. This is not surprising given the variable and diverse nature of human disease. In many respects, features among murine strains mimic some (but never all) of the autoimmune and pathologic features of lupus patients. Although the diversity often limits universal conclusions relevant to pathogenesis, they provide insights into the complex process that result in phenotypic manifestations of nephritis. Thus nephritis represents a microcosm of systemic disease, with variable lesions and clinical features. In this review, we discuss some of the most commonly used models of lupus nephritis (LN) and immune-mediated glomerular damage examining their relative strengths and weaknesses, which may provide insight in the human condition. PMID:25722732

  13. [Morphological alterations in nailfold capillaroscopy and the clinical picture of vascular involvement in autoimmune diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus and type 1 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Kuryliszyn-Moskal, Anna; Ciołkiewicz, Mariusz; Dubicki, Artur

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) belong to the group of autoimmune diseases presenting with a wide range of organ manifestations. Microvascular abnormalities seem to play a crucial role in the development of persistent multi-organ complications in both diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between microvascular changes examined with nailfold capillaroscopy and organ involvement. We eurolled 76 SLE patients, 106 patients with type 1 diabetes, and 40 healthy controls. Morphological changes were observed with nailfold capillaroscopy in 86 (81%) diabetics and in 70 (92.1%) SLE patients. Severe capillaroscopic changes were disclosed in 32 out of 54 (59%) diabetic patients with microangiopathy and in only 7 out of 52 (13%) patients without microangiopathy. In the SLE group, severe capillaroscopic abnormalities were found in 18 out of 34 (52.9%) patients with organ involvement and in 9 out of 42 (21.4%) patients without organ involvement. The capillaroscopic score was significantly higher in diabetic patients with microangiopathic complications in comparison to patients without microangiopathy (p < 0.001). Moreover, diabetic patients with advanced microvascular changes had longer disease durations than patients with mild abnormalities. A similar comparison between SLE patients with and without systemic manifestations showed significantly higher capillaroscopic scores in the group with organ involvement (p < 0.001). Furthermore, a positive correlation between capillaroscopic score and disease activity was observed in SLE patients (p < 0.01). Our findings suggest that abnormalities in nailfold capillaroscopy reflect the extent of microvascular involvement and are associated with organ involvement in SLE and diabetes.

  14. Human genome-microbiome interaction: metagenomics frontiers for the aetiopathology of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Gundogdu, Aycan; Nalbantoglu, Ufuk

    2017-04-01

    A short while ago, the human genome and microbiome were analysed simultaneously for the first time as a multi-omic approach. The analyses of heterogeneous population cohorts showed that microbiome components were associated with human genome variations. In-depth analysis of these results reveals that the majority of those relationships are between immune pathways and autoimmune disease-associated microbiome components. Thus, it can be hypothesized that autoimmunity may be associated with homeostatic disequilibrium of the human-microbiome interactome. Further analysis of human genome-human microbiome relationships in disease contexts with tailored systems biology approaches may yield insights into disease pathogenesis and prognosis.

  15. Variation in Microbiome LPS Immunogenicity Contributes to Autoimmunity in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Vatanen, Tommi; Kostic, Aleksandar D.; d’Hennezel, Eva; Siljander, Heli; Franzosa, Eric A.; Yassour, Moran; Kolde, Raivo; Vlamakis, Hera; Arthur, Timothy D.; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Uibo, Raivo; Mokurov, Sergei; Dorshakova, Natalya; Ilonen, Jorma; Virtanen, Suvi M.; Szabo, Susanne J.; Porter, Jeffrey A.; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Huttenhower, Curtis; Gevers, Dirk; Cullen, Thomas W.; Knip, Mikael; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary According to the hygiene hypothesis, the increasing incidence of autoimmune diseases in western countries may be explained by changes in early microbial exposure, leading to altered immune maturation. We followed gut microbiome development from birth until age three in 222 infants in Northern Europe, where early-onset autoimmune diseases are common in Finland and Estonia but less prevalent in Russia. We found that Bacteroides species are lowly abundant in Russians but dominate in Finnish and Estonian infants. Therefore their Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposures arose primarily from Bacteroides rather than from Escherichia coli which is a potent innate immune activator. We show that Bacteroides LPS is structurally distinct from E. coli LPS and inhibits innate immune signaling and endotoxin tolerance; furthermore, unlike LPS from E. coli, B. dorei LPS does not decrease incidence of autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice. Early colonization by immunologically silencing microbiota may thus preclude aspects of immune education. PMID:27133167

  16. Lupus - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - lupus ... The following organizations are good resources for information on systemic lupus erythematosus : The Lupus Foundation of America -- www.lupus.org The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal ...

  17. Successful treatment of severe refractory lupus hepatitis with mycophenolate mofetil.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Y; Saito, T; Takada, K; Kawahata, K; Kohsaka, H

    2016-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus-related hepatitis, known as lupus hepatitis, is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus, and is usually subclinical with mild abnormalities of serum liver enzymes. While cases with clinically significant and refractory lupus hepatitis are uncommon, treatment options for lupus hepatitis are to be established. Here, we report the case of a 45-year-old man with progressive lupus hepatitis accompanied by autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. Lupus hepatitis of this patient was refractory to tacrolimus, azathioprine and cyclophosphamide, but was successfully treated by mycophenolate mofetil. Mycophenolate mofetil might be an effective therapeutic option for refractory lupus hepatitis.

  18. Annotation: PANDAS--A Model for Human Autoimmune Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swedo, Susan E.; Grant, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcus infections (PANDAS) is a recently recognized syndrome in which pre-adolescent children have abrupt onsets of tics and/or obsessive-compulsive symptoms, a recurring and remitting course of illness temporally related to streptococcal infections, and associated…

  19. Annotation: PANDAS--A Model for Human Autoimmune Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swedo, Susan E.; Grant, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcus infections (PANDAS) is a recently recognized syndrome in which pre-adolescent children have abrupt onsets of tics and/or obsessive-compulsive symptoms, a recurring and remitting course of illness temporally related to streptococcal infections, and associated…

  20. Helicobacter pylori and autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hasni, S; Ippolito, A; Illei, GG

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a widely prevalent microbe, with between 50 and 80% of the population infected worldwide. Clinically, infection with H. pylori is commonly associated with peptic ulcer disease, but many of those infected remain asymptomatic. H. pylori has evolved a number of means to affect the host immune response and has been implicated in many diseases mitigated by immune dysregulation, such as immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), atrophic gastritis, and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and Sjogren’s syndrome, are the result of a dysregulated host immune system which targets otherwise healthy tissues. The exact etiology of autoimmune diseases is unclear, but it has long been suggested that exposure to certain environmental agents, such as viral and bacterial infection or chemical exposures, in genetically susceptible individuals may be the catalyst for the initiation of autoimmune processes. Because of its prevalence and ability to affect human immune function, many researchers have hypothesized that H. pylori might contribute to the development of autoimmune diseases. In this article, we review the available literature regarding the role of chronic H. pylori infection in various autoimmune disease states. PMID:21902767

  1. Renal Dnase1 Enzyme Activity and Protein Expression Is Selectively Shut Down in Murine and Human Membranoproliferative Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Rekvig, Ole Petter

    2010-01-01

    Background Deposition of chromatin-IgG complexes within glomerular membranes is a key event in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. We recently reported an acquired loss of renal Dnase1 expression linked to transformation from mild to severe membranoproliferative lupus nephritis in (NZBxNZW)F1 mice. As this may represent a basic mechanism in the progression of lupus nephritis, several aspects of Dnase1 expression in lupus nephritis were analyzed. Methodology/Principal Findings Total nuclease activity and Dnase1 expression and activity was evaluated using in situ and in vitro analyses of kidneys and sera from (NZBxNZW)F1 mice of different ages, and from age-matched healthy controls. Immunofluorescence staining for Dnase1 was performed on kidney biopsies from (NZBxNZW)F1 mice as well as from human SLE patients and controls. Reduced serum Dnase1 activity was observed in both mesangial and end-stage lupus nephritis. A selective reduction in renal Dnase1 activity was seen in mice with massive deposition of chromatin-containing immune complexes in glomerular capillary walls. Mice with mild mesangial nephritis showed normal renal Dnase1 activity. Similar differences were seen when comparing human kidneys with severe and mild lupus nephritis. Dnase1 was diffusely expressed within the kidney in normal and mildly affected kidneys, whereas upon progression towards end-stage renal disease, Dnase1 was down-regulated in all renal compartments. This demonstrates that the changes associated with development of severe nephritis in the murine model are also relevant to human lupus nephritis. Conclusions/Significance Reduction in renal Dnase1 expression and activity is limited to mice and SLE patients with signs of membranoproliferative nephritis, and may be a critical event in the development of severe forms of lupus nephritis. Reduced Dnase1 activity reflects loss in the expression of the protein and not inhibition of enzyme activity. PMID:20856893

  2. Chaperonin-containing T-complex Protein 1 Subunit ζ Serves as an Autoantigen Recognized by Human Vδ2 γδ T Cells in Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; You, Hongqin; Wang, Lifang; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Jianmin; He, Wei

    2016-09-16

    Human γδ T cells recognize conserved endogenous and stress-induced antigens typically associated with autoimmune diseases. However, the role of γδ T cells in autoimmune diseases is not clear. Few autoimmune disease-related antigens recognized by T cell receptor (TCR) γδ have been defined. In this study, we compared Vδ2 TCR complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and healthy donors. Results show that CDR3 length distribution differed significantly and displayed oligoclonal characteristics in SLE patients when compared with healthy donors. We found no difference in the frequency of Jδ gene fragment usage between these two groups. According to the dominant CDR3δ sequences in SLE patients, synthesized SL2 peptides specifically bound to human renal proximal tubular epithelial cell line HK-2; SL2-Vm, a mutant V sequence of SL2, did not bind. We identified the putative protein ligand chaperonin-containing T-complex protein 1 subunit ζ (CCT6A) using SL2 as a probe in HK-2 cell protein extracts by affinity chromatography and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. We found CCT6A expression on the surface of HK-2 cells. Cytotoxicity of only Vδ2 γδ T cells to HK-2 cells was blocked by anti-CCT6A antibody. Finally, we note that CCT6A concentration was significantly increased in plasma of SLE and rheumatoid arthritis patients. These data suggest that CCT6A is a novel autoantigen recognized by Vδ2 γδ T cells, which deepens our understanding of mechanisms in autoimmune diseases. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. [Autophagy, autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Muller, Sylviane

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus, are the consequence of immunity directed against the organism itself. The immune system abnormally recognizes self-components as foreign and produces antibodies targeting normal cells and tissues. We and others have discovered a number of failures affecting autophagy pathways in the lymphocytes of model mice and patients with lupus. While the current treatments are mainly based on immunosuppressive drugs that can lead to important side effects, the synthetic phosphopeptide P140/Lupuzor, which targets chaperone-mediated autophagy and displays no side effects, holds a lot of promise as a drug candidate. P140, which is currently evaluated in a phase III clinical trial, targets chaperone-mediated autophagy that is hyperactivated in lupus mice, and reduces antigenic peptides presentation to autoreactive helper T cells. Remarkably, we showed in lupus mice that upon treatment with P140, a number of immunological abnormalities affecting the pool of T and B cells as well as many biological and clinical features no longer occur. © 2017 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  4. [Interferons and autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Niino, Masaaki; Miyazaki, Yusei

    2013-11-01

    Interferons are widely expressed cytokines that have potent antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory effects. Type I interferons show complex biology; in some cases, they promote autoimmunity and inflammation, and in other cases, exhibit homeostatic functions by controlling inflammation and tissue destruction. This complexity is exemplified in the 2 major autoimmune diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus, in which type I interferons play an important role in the pathogenesis, and multiple sclerosis, in which interferon beta, a type I interferon, exhibits protective and therapeutic roles. This article reviews the basic clinical data on type I interferons in autoimmune diseases and type I interferons as potential targets for therapies in autoimmune diseases.

  5. Genome-wide differential expression reveals candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis of lupus and lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    AlFadhli, Suad; Ghanem, Aqeel A M; Nizam, Rasheeba

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus) is an autoimmune disease characterized by multiorgan pathology, accelerated apoptosis and hyper-autoantibody production against self-components. The root cause of lupus remains unknown, although multiple susceptibility factors have been reported in different ethnic group. We aimed to explore the genome-wide differential expression spectrum of lupus and its severe form lupus nephritis (LN) in Arab females. A total of 98 subjects: 40 lupus, 18 LN and 40 age/gender/ethnically matched healthy controls (HC) were recruited. Carefully chosen subjects (n = 11) were employed for whole human-genome expression profiling using high-density Human Exon 1.0.ST arrays (Affymetrix) and statistical analysis was carried out using appropriate software. Validation cohorts (n = 98) were investigated to quantify the expression of the nine selected candidate genes relative to GAPDH as endogenous control. Genome-wide differential analysis revealed seven candidate genes in lupus and 36 in LN, when individually compared to HC (anova Welch t-test, P ≤ 0.005, Tukey's honestly post hoc analysis). Analysis of differentially expressed genes with a fold change of 2, revealed 16 Gene Ontology terms satisfying a P ≤ 0.05. We further detected five distinct inflammatory and metabolic pathways such as TWEAK, osteopontin, endochondral ossification, fluropyrimidine activity and urea cycle and metabolism of amino groups that significantly contribute to the pathogenesis of lupus (P < 0.05). Validation of selected candidate genes (IRF9, ABCA1, APOBEC3, CEACAM3, OSCAR, TNFA1P6, MMP9, SLC4A1) revealed significant differences in expression, indicating their promissory role in the pathogenesis of lupus. Our study provides central gene regulators of therapeutic potential, indicating the future prospects of the study. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Preventing autoimmunity protects against the development of hypertension and renal injury.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Keisa W; Wallace, Kedra; Flynn, Elizabeth R; Maric-Bilkan, Christine; LaMarca, Babbette; Ryan, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    Several studies suggest a link between autoimmunity and essential hypertension in humans. However, whether autoimmunity can drive the development of hypertension remains unclear. The autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by autoantibody production, and the prevalence of hypertension is increased markedly in this patient population compared with normal healthy women. We hypothesized that preventing the development of autoimmunity would prevent the development of hypertension in a mouse model of lupus. Female lupus (NZBWF1) and control mice (NZW) were treated weekly with anti-CD20 or immunoglobulin G antibodies (both 10 mg/kg, IV) starting at 20 weeks of age for 14 weeks. Anti-CD20 therapy markedly attenuated lupus disease progression as evidenced by reduced CD45R+ B cells and lower double-stranded DNA autoantibody activity. In addition, renal injury in the form of urinary albumin, glomerulosclerosis, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, as well as tubular injury (indicated by renal cortical expression of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin) was prevented by anti-CD20 therapy in lupus mice. Finally, lupus mice treated with anti-CD20 antibody did not develop hypertension. The protection against the development of hypertension was associated with lower renal cortical tumor necrosis factor-α expression, a cytokine that has been previously reported by us to contribute to the hypertension in this model, as well as renal cortical monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression and circulating T cells. These data suggest that the development of autoimmunity and the resultant increase in renal inflammation are an important underlying factor in the prevalent hypertension that occurs during systemic lupus erythematosus. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Central nervous system manifestations of neonatal lupus: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Lin, K-L; Chen, C-L; Wong, A May-Kuen; Huang, J-L

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal lupus is a rare and acquired autoimmune disease. Central nervous system abnormalities are potential manifestations in neonatal lupus. Through a systematic literature review, we analyzed the clinical features of previously reported neonatal lupus cases where central nervous system abnormalities had been identified. Most reported neonatal lupus patients with central nervous system involvement were neuroimaging-determined and asymptomatic. Only seven neonatal lupus cases were identified as having a symptomatic central nervous system abnormality which caused physical disability or required neurosurgery. A high percentage of these neurosymptomatic neonatal lupus patients had experienced a transient cutaneous skin rash and had no maternal history of autoimmune disease before pregnancy.

  8. Drug-induced lupus.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Robert L

    2005-04-15

    Autoantibodies and, less commonly, systemic rheumatic symptoms are associated with treatment with numerous medications and other types of ingested compounds. Distinct syndromes can be distinguished, based on clinical and laboratory features, as well as exposure history. Drug-induced lupus has been reported as a side-effect of long-term therapy with over 40 medications. Its clinical and laboratory features are similar to systemic lupus erythematosus, except that patients fully recover after the offending medication is discontinued. This syndrome differs from typical drug hypersensitivity reactions in that drug-specific T-cells or antibodies are not involved in induction of autoimmunity, it usually requires many months to years of drug exposure, is drug dose-dependent and generally does not result in immune sensitization to the drug. Circumstantial evidence strongly suggests that oxidative metabolites of the parent compound trigger autoimmunity. Several mechanisms for induction of autoimmunity will be discussed, including bystander activation of autoreactive lymphocytes due to drug-specific immunity or to non-specific activation of lymphocytes, direct cytotoxicity with release of autoantigens and disruption of central T-cell tolerance. The latter hypothesis will be supported by a mouse model in which a reactive metabolite of procainamide introduced into the thymus results in lupus-like autoantibody induction. These findings, as well as evidence for thymic function in drug-induced lupus patients, support the concept that abnormalities during T-cell selection in the thymus initiate autoimmunity.

  9. Exhausted Cytotoxic Control of Epstein-Barr Virus in Human Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Martin; Sauce, Delphine; Deback, Claire; Arnaud, Laurent; Mathian, Alexis; Miyara, Makoto; Boutolleau, David; Parizot, Christophe; Dorgham, Karim; Papagno, Laura; Appay, Victor; Amoura, Zahir; Gorochov, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) pathology has long been associated with an increased Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) seropositivity, viremia and cross-reactive serum antibodies specific for both virus and self. It has therefore been postulated that EBV triggers SLE immunopathology, although the mechanism remains elusive. Here, we investigate whether frequent peaks of EBV viral load in SLE patients are a consequence of dysfunctional anti-EBV CD8+ T cell responses. Both inactive and active SLE patients (n = 76 and 42, respectively), have significantly elevated EBV viral loads (P = 0.003 and 0.002, respectively) compared to age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n = 29). Interestingly, less EBV-specific CD8+ T cells are able to secrete multiple cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and MIP-1β) in inactive and active SLE patients compared to controls (P = 0.0003 and 0.0084, respectively). Moreover, EBV-specific CD8+ T cells are also less cytotoxic in SLE patients than in controls (CD107a expression: P = 0.0009, Granzyme B release: P = 0.0001). Importantly, cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific responses were not found significantly altered in SLE patients. Furthermore, we demonstrate that EBV-specific CD8+ T cell impairment is a consequence of their Programmed Death 1 (PD-1) receptor up-regulation, as blocking this pathway reverses the dysfunctional phenotype. Finally, prospective monitoring of lupus patients revealed that disease flares precede EBV reactivation. In conclusion, EBV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in SLE patients are functionally impaired, but EBV reactivation appears to be an aggravating consequence rather than a cause of SLE immunopathology. We therefore propose that autoimmune B cell activation during flares drives frequent EBV reactivation, which contributes in a vicious circle to the perpetuation of immune activation in SLE patients. PMID:22028659

  10. [Thymoma and autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Jamilloux, Y; Frih, H; Bernard, C; Broussolle, C; Petiot, P; Girard, N; Sève, P

    2017-03-29

    The association between thymoma and autoimmunity is well known. Besides myasthenia gravis, which is found in 15 to 20% of patients with thymoma, other autoimmune diseases have been reported: erythroblastopenia, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory myopathies, thyroid disorders, Isaac's syndrome or Good's syndrome. More anecdotally, Morvan's syndrome, limbic encephalitis, other autoimmune cytopenias, autoimmune hepatitis, and bullous skin diseases (pemphigus, lichen) have been reported. Autoimmune diseases occur most often before thymectomy, but they can be discovered at the time of surgery or later. Two situations require the systematic investigation of a thymoma: the occurrence of myasthenia gravis or autoimmune erythroblastopenia. Nevertheless, the late onset of systemic lupus erythematosus or the association of several autoimmune manifestations should lead to look for a thymoma. Neither the characteristics of the patients nor the pathological data can predict the occurrence of an autoimmune disease after thymectomy. Thus, thymectomy usefulness in the course of the autoimmune disease, except myasthenia gravis, has not been demonstrated. This seems to indicate the preponderant role of self-reactive T lymphocytes distributed in the peripheral immune system prior to surgery. Given the high infectious morbidity in patients with thymoma, immunoglobulin replacement therapy should be considered in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia who receive immunosuppressive therapy, even in the absence of prior infection. Copyright © 2017 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. HTLV-1, Immune Response and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Quaresma, Juarez A S; Yoshikawa, Gilberto T; Koyama, Roberta V L; Dias, George A S; Fujihara, Satomi; Fuzii, Hellen T

    2015-12-24

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (PET/HAM) is involved in the development of autoimmune diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and Sjögren's Syndrome (SS). The development of HTLV-1-driven autoimmunity is hypothesized to rely on molecular mimicry, because virus-like particles can trigger an inflammatory response. However, HTLV-1 modifies the behavior of CD4⁺ T cells on infection and alters their cytokine production. A previous study showed that in patients infected with HTLV-1, the activity of regulatory CD4⁺ T cells and their consequent expression of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are altered. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying changes in cytokine release leading to the loss of tolerance and development of autoimmunity.

  12. HTLV-1, Immune Response and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Quaresma, Juarez A S; Yoshikawa, Gilberto T; Koyama, Roberta V L; Dias, George A S; Fujihara, Satomi; Fuzii, Hellen T

    2015-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (PET/HAM) is involved in the development of autoimmune diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and Sjögren’s Syndrome (SS). The development of HTLV-1-driven autoimmunity is hypothesized to rely on molecular mimicry, because virus-like particles can trigger an inflammatory response. However, HTLV-1 modifies the behavior of CD4+ T cells on infection and alters their cytokine production. A previous study showed that in patients infected with HTLV-1, the activity of regulatory CD4+ T cells and their consequent expression of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are altered. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying changes in cytokine release leading to the loss of tolerance and development of autoimmunity. PMID:26712781

  13. Altered B cell signalling in autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, David J.; Metzler, Genita; Wray-Dutra, Michelle; Jackson, Shaun W.

    2017-01-01

    Recent work has provided new insights into how altered B cell-intrinsic signals — through the B cell receptor (BCR) and key co-receptors — function together to promote the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. These combined signals affect B cells at two distinct stages: first, in the selection of the naive repertoire; and second, during extrafollicular or germinal centre activation responses. Thus, dysregulated signalling can lead to both an altered naive BCR repertoire and the generation of autoantibody-producing B cells. Strikingly, high-affinity autoantibodies predate and predict disease in several autoimmune disorders, including type 1 diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus. This Review summarizes how, rather than being a downstream consequence of autoreactive T cell activation, dysregulated B cell signalling can function as a primary driver of many human autoimmune diseases. PMID:28393923

  14. Incidence of new-onset autoimmune disease in girls and women with pre-existing autoimmune disease after quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Grönlund, O; Herweijer, E; Sundström, K; Arnheim-Dahlström, L

    2016-12-01

    To assess whether quadrivalent human papillomavirus (qHPV) vaccination is associated with increased incidence of new-onset autoimmune disease in girls and women with pre-existing autoimmune disease. This register-based open cohort study included all girls and women between 10 and 30 years of age in Sweden in 2006-2012 diagnosed with at least one of 49 prespecified autoimmune diseases (n = 70 265). Incidence rate ratios were estimated for new-onset autoimmune disease within 180 days of qHPV vaccination using Poisson regression adjusting for, country of birth, parental country of birth, parental income and parental education. A total of 70 265 girls and women had at least one of the 49 predefined autoimmune diseases; 16% of these individuals received at least one dose of qHPV vaccine. In unvaccinated girls and women, 5428 new-onset autoimmune diseases were observed during 245 807 person-years at a rate of 22.1 (95% CI 21.5-22.7) new events per 1000 person-years. In vaccinated girls and women, there were 124 new events during 7848 person-years at a rate of 15.8 (95% CI 13.2-18.8) per 1000 person-years. There was no increase in the incidence of new-onset autoimmune disease associated with qHPV vaccination during the risk period; on the contrary, we found a slightly reduced risk (incidence rate ratio 0.77, 95% CI 0.65-0.93). In this nationwide study, qHPV vaccination was not associated with increased incidence of new-onset autoimmune disease in girls and women with pre-existing autoimmune disease. © 2016 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  15. The human GIMAP5 gene has a common polyadenylation polymorphism increasing risk to systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Hellquist, Anna; Zucchelli, Marco; Kivinen, Katja; Saarialho‐Kere, Ulpu; Koskenmies, Sari; Widen, Elisabeth; Julkunen, Heikki; Wong, Andrew; Karjalainen‐Lindsberg, Marja‐Liisa; Skoog, Tiina; Vendelin, Johanna; Cunninghame‐Graham, Deborah S; Vyse, Timothy J; Kere, Juha; Lindgren, Cecilia M

    2007-01-01

    Background Several members of the GIMAP gene family have been suggested as being involved in different aspects of the immune system in different species. Recently, a mutation in the GIMAP5 gene was shown to cause lymphopenia in a rat model of autoimmune insulin‐dependent diabetes. Thus it was hypothesised that genetic variation in GIMAP5 may be involved in susceptibility to other autoimmune disorders where lymphopenia is a key feature, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Material and methods To investigate this, seven single nucleotide polymorphisms in GIMAP5 were analysed in five independent sets of family‐based SLE collections, containing more than 2000 samples. Result A significant increase in SLE risk associated with the most common GIMAP5 haplotype was found (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.54, p = 0.0033). In families with probands diagnosed with trombocytopenia, the risk was increased (OR 2.11, 95% CI 1.09 to 4.09, p = 0.0153). The risk haplotype bears a polymorphic polyadenylation signal which alters the 3′ part of GIMAP5 mRNA by producing an inefficient polyadenylation signal. This results in higher proportion of non‐terminated mRNA for homozygous individuals (p<0.005), a mechanism shown to be causal in thalassaemias. To further assess the functional effect of the polymorphic polyadenylation signal in the risk haplotype, monocytes were treated with several cytokines affecting apoptosis. All the apoptotic cytokines induced GIMAP5 expression in two monocyte cell lines (1.5–6 times, p<0.0001 for all tests). Conclusion Taken together, the data suggest the role of GIMAP5 in the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:17220214

  16. Immunometabolism of human autoimmune diseases: from metabolites to extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    de Candia, Paola; De Rosa, Veronica; Gigantino, Vincenzo; Botti, Gerardo; Ceriello, Antonio; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2017-06-26

    Immunometabolism focuses on the mechanisms regulating the impact of metabolism on lymphocyte activity and autoimmunity outbreak. The adipose tissue is long known to release adipokines, either pro- or anti-inflammatory factors bridging nutrition and immune function. More recently, adipocytes were discovered to also release extracellular vesicles (EVs) containing a plethora of biological molecules, including metabolites and microRNAs, which can regulate cell function/metabolism in distant tissues, suggesting that immune regulatory function by the adipose tissue may be far more complex than originally thought. Moreover, EVs were also identified as important mediators of immune cell-to-cell communication, adding a further microenvironmental mechanism of plasticity to fine-tune specific lymphocyte responses. This Review will first focus on the known mechanisms by which metabolism impacts immune function, presenting a systemic (nutrition and long-ranged adipokines) and a cellular point of view (metabolic pathway derangement in autoimmunity). It will then discuss the new discoveries concerning how EVs may act as nanometric vehicles integrating immune/metabolic responses at the level of the extracellular environment and affecting pathological processes. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. C5a alters blood–brain barrier integrity in a human in vitro model of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Supriya D; Parikh, Neil U; Woodruff, Trent M; Jarvis, James N; Lopez, Molly; Hennon, Teresa; Cunningham, Patrick; Quigg, Richard J; Schwartz, Stanley A; Alexander, Jessy J

    2015-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) plays a crucial role in brain homeostasis, thereby maintaining the brain environment precise for optimal neuronal function. Its dysfunction is an intriguing complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is a systemic autoimmune disorder where neurological complications occur in 5–50% of cases and is associated with impaired BBB integrity. Complement activation occurs in SLE and is an important part of the clinical profile. Our earlier studies demonstrated that C5a generated by complement activation caused the loss of brain endothelial layer integrity in rodents. The goal of the current study was to determine the translational potential of these studies to a human system. To assess this, we used a two dimensional in vitro BBB model constructed using primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells and astroglial cells, which closely emulates the in vivo BBB allowing the assessment of BBB integrity. Increased permeability monitored by changes in transendothelial electrical resistance and cytoskeletal remodelling caused by actin fiber rearrangement were observed when the cells were exposed to lupus serum and C5a, similar to the observations in mice. In addition, our data show that C5a/C5aR1 signalling alters nuclear factor-κB translocation into nucleus and regulates the expression of the tight junction proteins, claudin-5 and zonula occludens 1 in this setting. Our results demonstrate for the first time that C5a regulates BBB integrity in a neuroinflammatory setting where it affects both endothelial and astroglial cells. In addition, we also demonstrate that our previous findings in a mouse model, were emulated in human cells in vitro, bringing the studies one step closer to understanding the translational potential of C5a/C5aR1 blockade as a promising therapeutic strategy in SLE and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26059553

  18. Are humans prone to autoimmunity? Implications from evolutionary changes in hominin sialic acid biology.

    PubMed

    Varki, Ajit

    2017-09-01

    Given varied intrinsic and extrinsic challenges to the immune system, it is unsurprising that each evolutionary lineage evolves distinctive features of immunoreactivity, and that tolerance mechanisms fail, allowing autoimmunity. Humans appear prone to many autoimmune diseases, with mechanisms both genetic and environmental. Another rapidly evolving biological system involves sialic acids, a family of monosaccharides that are terminal caps on cell surface and secreted molecules of vertebrates, and play multifarious roles in immunity. We have explored multiple genomic changes in sialic acid biology that occurred in human ancestors (hominins), some with implications for enhanced immunoreactivity, and hence for autoimmunity. Human ancestors lost the enzyme synthesizing the common mammalian sialic acid Neu5Gc, with an accumulation of the precursor sialic acid Neu5Ac. Resulting changes include an enhanced reactivity by some immune cells and increased ability of macrophages to kill bacteria, at the cost of increased endotoxin sensitivity. There are also multiple human-specific evolutionary changes in inhibitory and activating Siglecs, immune cell receptors that recognize sialic acids as "self-associated molecular patterns" (SAMPs) to modulate immunity, but can also be hijacked by pathogen molecular mimicry of SAMPs. Altered expression patterns and fixed or polymorphic SIGLEC pseudogenization in humans has modulated both innate and adaptive immunity, sometimes favoring over-reactivity. Meanwhile, dietary intake of Neu5Gc (derived primarily from red meats) allows metabolic incorporation of this non-human molecule into human cells--apparently the first example of "xeno-autoimmunity" involving "xeno-autoantigen" interactions with circulating "xeno-autoantibodies". Taken together, some of these factors may contribute to the apparent human propensity for autoimmunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Parasites alter the pathological phenotype of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Katsuhisa; Adachi, Keishi; Watanabe, Maho; Sasatomi, Yoshie; Ogahara, Satoru; Abe, Yasuhiro; Ito, Kenji; Dan Justin, Yombo K; Saito, Takao; Nakashima, Hitoshi; Hamano, Shinjiro

    2014-12-01

    Lupus nephritis is one of the most serious complications of systemic lupus erythematosus and manifests with considerable phenotypic and histological heterogeneity. In particular, diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis (DPLN) and membranous lupus nephritis (MLN) represent morphologic forms that are polar opposites. DPLN is associated with autoimmune responses dominated by Th1 immune response associated with high levels of interferon (IFN)-γ. In contrast, a Th2 cytokine response is associated with the pathogenesis of MLN. MRL/lpr mice develop human LN-like immune complex-associated nephritis and provide a suitable histological model for human DPLN. Infection with Schistosoma mansoni skewed a Th2-type immune response induction and IL-10 in MRL/lpr mice, drastically changing the pathophysiology of glomerulonephritis from DPLN to MLN accompanied by increased IgG1 and IgE in the sera. T cells in 32-week-old MRL/lpr mice infected with S. mansoni expressed significantly more IL-4 and IL-10 than T cells of uninfected mice; T cells with IFN-γ were comparable between infected and uninfected MR/lpr mice. Thus, the helminthic infection modified the cytokine microenvironment and altered the pathological phenotype of autoimmune nephritis.

  20. Parasites alter the pathological phenotype of lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Katsuhisa; Adachi, Keishi; Watanabe, Maho; Sasatomi, Yoshie; Ogahara, Satoru; Abe, Yasuhiro; Ito, Kenji; Dan Justin, Yombo K.; Saito, Takao

    2014-01-01

    lpr Lupus nephritis is one of the most serious complications of systemic lupus erythematosus and manifests with considerable phenotypic and histological heterogeneity. In particular, diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis (DPLN) and membranous lupus nephritis (MLN) represent morphologic forms that are polar opposites. DPLN is associated with autoimmune responses dominated by Th1 immune response associated with high levels of interferon (IFN)-γ. In contrast, a Th2 cytokine response is associated with the pathogenesis of MLN. MRL/lpr mice develop human LN-like immune complex-associated nephritis and provide a suitable histological model for human DPLN. Infection with Schistosoma mansoni skewed a Th2-type immune response induction and IL-10 in MRL/lpr mice, drastically changing the pathophysiology of glomerulonephritis from DPLN to MLN accompanied by increased IgG1 and IgE in the sera. T cells in 32-week-old MRL/lpr mice infected with S. mansoni expressed significantly more IL-4 and IL-10 than T cells of uninfected mice; T cells with IFN-γ were comparable between infected and uninfected MR/lpr mice. Thus, the helminthic infection modified the cytokine microenvironment and altered the pathological phenotype of autoimmune nephritis. PMID:24957876

  1. Prolactin and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Vera-Lastra, Olga; Jara, Luis J; Espinoza, Luis R

    2002-12-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a versatile hormone that is produced by the anterior pituitary gland and various extrapituitary sites including immune cells. Furthermore, PRL has widespread influences on proliferation and differentiation of a variety of cells in the immune system and is, in effect, a cytokine. PRL-receptors (PRL-R) are distributed throughout the immune system and are included as members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. PRL-R signal transduction is mediated by a complex array of signaling molecules of which JAK2, Stat1 and Stat5 pathway have been well studied. In PRL-stimulated T cells, the transcription factor gene, interferon regulatory factor-1 provides a mechanism whereby PRL can regulate the immune response. The human PRL gene is situated on the short arm of chromosome 6 close to the major histocompatibility complex. Polymorphisms of the human PRL gene have implications for production of lymphocyte PRL in SLE. Mild and moderate hyperprolactinemia (HPRL) has been demonstrated in 20-30% of SLE patients and is associated with active disease. HPRL may have a role in lupus nephritis and central nervous system involvement of SLE patients. HPRL stimulated the production of autoantibodies. These evidences support the important role of PRL in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases, mainly SLE.

  2. B cell IFN-γ receptor signaling promotes autoimmune germinal centers via cell-intrinsic induction of BCL-6

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Shaun W.; Jacobs, Holly M.; Arkatkar, Tanvi; Dam, Elizabeth M.; Scharping, Nicole E.; Kolhatkar, Nikita S.; Hou, Baidong; Buckner, Jane H.

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulated germinal center (GC) responses are implicated in the pathogenesis of human autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although both type 1 and type 2 interferons (IFNs) are involved in lupus pathogenesis, their respective impacts on the establishment of autoimmune GCs has not been addressed. In this study, using a chimeric model of B cell-driven autoimmunity, we demonstrate that B cell type 1 IFN receptor signals accelerate, but are not required for, lupus development. In contrast, B cells functioning as antigen-presenting cells initiate CD4+ T cell activation and IFN-γ production, and strikingly, B cell–intrinsic deletion of the IFN-γ receptor (IFN-γR) abrogates autoimmune GCs, class-switched autoantibodies (auto-Abs), and systemic autoimmunity. Mechanistically, although IFN-γR signals increase B cell T-bet expression, B cell–intrinsic deletion of T-bet exerts an isolated impact on class-switch recombination to pathogenic auto-Ab subclasses without impacting GC development. Rather, in both mouse and human B cells, IFN-γ synergized with B cell receptor, toll-like receptor, and/or CD40 activation signals to promote cell-intrinsic expression of the GC master transcription factor, B cell lymphoma 6 protein. Our combined findings identify a novel B cell–intrinsic mechanism whereby IFN signals promote lupus pathogenesis, implicating this pathway as a potential therapeutic target in SLE. PMID:27069113

  3. Gastrointestinal system involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Xu, D; Wang, Z; Wang, Y; Zhang, S; Li, M; Zeng, X

    2017-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem disorder which can affect the gastrointestinal (GI) system. Although GI symptoms can manifest in 50% of patients with SLE, these have barely been reviewed due to difficulty in identifying different causes. This study aims to clarify clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of the four major SLE-related GI system complications: protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), intestinal pseudo-obstruction (IPO), hepatic involvement and pancreatitis. It is a systematic review using MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the major search terms were SLE, PLE, IPO, hepatitis and pancreatitis. A total of 125 articles were chosen for our study. SLE-related PLE was characterized by edema and hypoalbuminemia, with Technetium 99m labeled human albumin scintigraphy ((99m)Tc HAS) and alpha-1-antitrypsin fecal clearance test commonly used as diagnostic test. The most common site of protein leakage was the small intestine and the least common site was the stomach. More than half of SLE-related IPO patients had ureterohydronephrosis, and sometimes they manifested as interstitial cystitis and hepatobiliary dilatation. Lupus hepatitis and SLE accompanied by autoimmune hepatitis (SLE-AIH overlap) shared similar clinical manifestations but had different autoantibodies and histopathological features, and positive anti-ribosome P antibody highly indicated the diagnosis of lupus hepatitis. Lupus pancreatitis was usually accompanied by high SLE activity with a relatively high mortality rate. Early diagnosis and timely intervention were crucial, and administration of corticosteroids and immunosuppressants was effective for most of the patients.

  4. Evidence for linkage of a candidate chromosome 1 region to human systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, B P; Cantor, R M; Kalunian, K C; Chen, C J; Badsha, H; Singh, R; Wallace, D J; Kitridou, R C; Chen, S L; Shen, N; Song, Y W; Isenberg, D A; Yu, C L; Hahn, B H; Rotter, J I

    1997-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility confers significant risk for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The MHC region and other polymorphic loci have been associated with SLE. Because more compelling evidence for an involvement of a genetic locus includes linkage, we tested a candidate region homologous to a murine SLE susceptibility region in 52 SLE-affected sibpairs from three ethnic groups. We analyzed seven microsatellite markers from the human chromosome 1q31-q42 region corresponding to the telomeric end of mouse chromosome 1, the region where specific manifestations of murine lupus, including glomerulonephritis and IgG antichromatin, have been mapped. Comparing the mean allele sharing in affected sibpairs of each of these seven markers to their expected values of 0.50, only the five markers located at 1q41-q42 showed evidence for linkage (P = 0.0005-0.08). Serum levels of IgG antichromatin also showed evidence for linkage to two of these five markers (P = 0.04), suggesting that this phenotype is conserved between mice and humans. Compared to the expected random distribution, the trend of increased sharing of haplotypes was observed in affected sibpairs from three ethnic groups (P < 0.01). We concluded that this candidate 1q41-q42 region probably contains a susceptibility gene(s) that confers risk for SLE in multiple ethnic groups. PMID:9045876

  5. NKG2D initiates caspase-mediated CD3ζ degradation and lymphocyte receptor impairments associated with human cancer and autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Hanaoka, Nobuyoshi; Jabri, Bana; Dai, Zhenpeng; Ciszewski, Cezary; Stevens, Anne M.; Yee, Cassian; Nakakuma, Hideki; Spies, Thomas; Groh, Veronika

    2011-01-01

    Deficiencies of the T cell and NK cell CD3ζ signaling adapter protein in cancer and autoimmune disease patients are well documented but mechanistic explanations are fragmentary. The stimulatory NKG2D receptor on T cells and NK cells mediates tumor immunity but can also promote local and systemic immune suppression in conditions of persistent NKG2D ligand induction that include cancer and certain autoimmune diseases. Here we provide evidence that establishes a causative link between CD3ζ impairment and chronic NKG2D stimulation due to pathological ligand expression. We describe a mechanism whereby NKG2D signaling in human T cells and NK cells initiates Fas ligand/Fas-mediated caspase-3/7 activation and resultant CD3ζ degradation. As a consequence, the functional capacities of the TCR, the low-affinity Fc receptor for IgG, and the NKp30 and NKp46 natural cytotoxicity receptors, which all signal through CD3ζ, are impaired. These findings are extended to ex vivo phenotypes of T cells and NK cells among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and in peripheral blood from juvenile-onset lupus patients. Collectively, these results indicate that pathological NKG2D ligand expression leads to simultaneous impairment of multiple CD3ζ-dependent receptor functions, thus offering an explanation that may be applicable to CD3ζ deficiencies associated with diverse disease conditions. PMID:20926796

  6. Functional characterization of the MECP2/IRAK1 lupus risk haplotype in human T cells and a human MECP2 transgenic mouse

    PubMed Central

    Koelsch, Kristi A.; Webb, Ryan; Jeffries, Matlock; Dozmorov, Mikhail G.; Frank, Mark Barton; Guthridge, Joel M.; James, Judith A.; Wren, Jonathan D.; Sawalha, Amr H.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic polymorphism in MECP2/IRAK1 on chromosome Xq28 is a confirmed and replicated susceptibility locus for lupus. High linkage disequilibrium in this locus suggests that both MECP2 and IRAK1 are candidate genes for the disease. DNA methylation changes in lupus T cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of lupus, and MeCp-2 (encoded by MECP2) is a master regulator of gene expression and is also known to recruit DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) during DNA synthesis. Using human T cells from normal individuals with either the lupus risk or the lupus protective haplotype in MECP2/IRAK1, we demonstrate that polymorphism in this locus increases MECP2 isoform 2 mRNA expression in stimulated but not unstimulated T cells. By assessing DNA methylation levels across over 485,000 methylation sites across the entire genome, we further demonstrate that the lupus risk variant in this locus is associated with significant DNA methylation changes, including in the HLA-DR and HLA-DQ loci, as well as interferon-related genes such as IFI6, IRF6, and BST2. Further, using a human MECP2 transgenic mouse, we show that overexpression of MECP2 alters gene expression in stimulated T cells. This includes overexpression of Eif2c2 that regulates the expression of multiple microRNAs (such as miR-21), and the histone demethylase Jhdm1d. In addition, we show that MECP2 transgenic mice develop antinuclear antibodies. Our data suggest that the lupus associated variant in the MECP2/IRAK1 locus has the potential to affect all 3 epigenetic mechanisms: DNA methylation, microRNA expression, and histone modification. Importantly, these data support the notion that variants within the MECP2 gene can alter DNA methylation in other genetic loci including the HLA and interferon-regulated genes, thereby providing evidence for genetic-epigenetic interaction in lupus. PMID:23428850

  7. Mercury and autoimmunity: implications for occupational and environmental health

    SciTech Connect

    Silbergeld, Ellen K. . E-mail: esilberg@jhsph.edu; Silva, Ines A.; Nyland, Jennifer F.

    2005-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) has long been recognized as a neurotoxicant; however, recent work in animal models has implicated Hg as an immunotoxicant. In particular, Hg has been shown to induce autoimmune disease in susceptible animals with effects including overproduction of specific autoantibodies and pathophysiologic signs of lupus-like disease. However, these effects are only observed at high doses of Hg that are above the levels to which humans would be exposed through contaminated fish consumption. While there is presently no evidence to suggest that Hg induces frank autoimmune disease in humans, a recent epidemiological study has demonstrated a link between occupational Hg exposure and lupus. In our studies, we have tested the hypothesis that Hg does not cause autoimmune disease directly, but rather that it may interact with triggering events, such as genetic predisposition, exposure to antigens, or infection, to exacerbate disease. Treatment of mice that are not susceptible to Hg-induced autoimmune disease with very low doses and short term exposures of inorganic Hg (20-200 {mu}g/kg) exacerbates disease and accelerates mortality in the graft versus host disease model of chronic lupus in C57Bl/6 x DBA/2 mice. Furthermore, low dose Hg exposure increases the severity and prevalence of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (induced by immunization with cardiac myosin peptide in adjuvant) in A/J mice. To test our hypothesis further, we examined sera from Amazonian populations exposed to Hg through small-scale gold mining, with and without current or past malaria infection. We found significantly increased prevalence of antinuclear and antinucleolar antibodies and a positive interaction between Hg and malaria. These results suggest a new model for Hg immunotoxicity, as a co-factor in autoimmune disease, increasing the risks and severity of clinical disease in the presence of other triggering events, either genetic or acquired.

  8. Aberrant splicing of the milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8) gene in human systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Takashi; Nakamura, Shinobu; Ohmura, Koichiro; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2010-06-01

    Milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8) promotes the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by serving as a bridging molecule between apoptotic cells and phagocytes. Many apoptotic cells are left unengulfed in the germinal centers of the spleen of MFG-E8(-/-) mice, which develop a human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like autoimmune disease. Here, we analyzed the MFG-E8 gene in human SLE patients, and found in two out of 322 female patients a heterozygous intronic mutation, which caused a cryptic exon from intron 6 to be included in the transcript. The cryptic exon contained a premature termination codon, generating a C-terminally truncated MFG-E8 protein. The mutant MFG-E8 was aberrantly glycosylated and sialylated, but bound to phosphatidylserine and enhanced the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. When intravenously injected into mice, the mutant MFG-E8 was sustained longer in the blood circulation than wild-type MFG-E8. Repeated administrations of the mutant MFG-E8 protein induced the production of autoantibodies, such as anti-cardiolipin and anti-nuclear antibodies, at a lower dose than that required for the wild-type protein. These results suggested that the intronic mutation in the human MFG-E8 gene can lead to the development of SLE.

  9. Familial cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) in the German shorthaired pointer maps to CFA18, a canine orthologue to human CLE

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Zangerl, Barbara; Werner, Petra; Mauldin, Elizabeth A.; Casal, Margret L.

    2011-01-01

    A familial form of lupus, termed exfoliative cutaneous lupus erythematosus (ECLE) has been recognized for decades in German shorthaired pointer dogs (GSP). Previous studies were suggestive of autosomal recessive inheritance. The disease presents as a severe dermatitis with age of onset between 16 and 40 weeks, and mirrors cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) in humans. Lameness and, in advanced cases, renal disease may be present. Most affected dogs are euthanized before reaching the age of 4 years. The diagnosis is made by clinical observations and microscopic examination of skin biopsies. In humans, many different forms of CLE exist and various genes and chromosomal locations have been implicated. The large number of potential candidate loci combined with often weak association prevented in depth screening of the dog population thus far. During the course of our studies, we developed a colony of dogs with ECLE as a model for human CLE and the genetic analysis of these dogs confirmed the autosomal recessive mode of inheritance of CLE in GSPs. Using canine patient material, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify the genomic region harboring the gene involved in the development of the disease in GSPs. We identified a SNP allele on canine chromosome 18 that segregated with the disease in the 267 dogs tested. The data generated should allow identification of the mutant gene responsible for this form of cutaneous lupus erythematosus in dogs and assist in the understanding of the development of similar disease in humans. PMID:21132284

  10. Prolactin and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Shelly, Shahar; Boaz, Mona; Orbach, Hedi

    2012-05-01

    Sex hormones, especially estrogen and prolactin (PRL), have an important role in modulating the immune response. PRL is secreted from the pituitary gland as well as other organs and cells particularly lymphocytes. PRL has an immune stimulatory effect and promotes autoimmunity. PRL interferes specifically with B cell tolerance induction, enhances proliferative response to antigens and mitogens and increases the production of immune globulins, cytokines and autoantibodies. Hyperprolactinemia (HPRL) in women present with clinical manifestations of galactorrhea, primary or secondary amenorrhea, delayed menarche or a change in the menses either in the amount or in the regularity. Furthermore in the last 2 decades multi-organ and organ specific autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Sjogren's syndrome (SS), Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), multiple sclerosis (MS), psoriasis, hepatitis C patients, Behçet's disease, peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) and active celiac disease were discussed to be associated with HPRL. There is data showing correlation between PRL level and diseases activity in few diseases. Genetic factors may have a role in humans as in animal models. The PRL isoforms based on the differences in the amino acid sequence and size of the cytoplasmic domain have an important effect on the bioactivity on prolactin receptors (PRL-Rs).

  11. Onset of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) in humans as a consequence of genetic defect accumulation.

    PubMed

    Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Neven, Bénédicte; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Daussy, Cécile; Arkwright, Peter D; Lanzarotti, Nina; Schaffner, Catherine; Cluet-Dennetiere, Sophie; Haerynck, Filomeen; Michel, Gérard; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Zarhrate, Mohammed; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Romana, Serge P; Picard, Capucine; Fischer, Alain; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases develop in approximately 5% of humans. They can arise when self-tolerance checkpoints of the immune system are bypassed as a consequence of inherited mutations of key genes involved in lymphocyte activation, survival, or death. For example, autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) results from defects in self-tolerance checkpoints as a consequence of mutations in the death receptor-encoding gene TNF receptor superfamily, member 6 (TNFRSF6; also known as FAS). However, some mutation carriers remain asymptomatic throughout life. We have now demonstrated in 7 ALPS patients that the disease develops as a consequence of an inherited TNFRSF6 heterozygous mutation combined with a somatic genetic event in the second TNFRSF6 allele. Analysis of the patients' CD4(-)CD8(-) (double negative) T cells--accumulation of which is a hallmark of ALPS--revealed that in these cells, 3 patients had somatic mutations in their second TNFRSF6 allele, while 4 patients had loss of heterozygosity by telomeric uniparental disomy of chromosome 10. This observation provides the molecular bases of a nonmalignant autoimmune disease development in humans and may shed light on the mechanism underlying the occurrence of other autoimmune diseases.

  12. Pediatric lupus nephritis: Management update

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rajiv; Raut, Sumantra

    2014-01-01

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is a severe multisystem autoimmune disease. Renal involvement occurs in the majority of cSLE patients and is often fatal. Renal biopsy is an important investigation in the management of lupus nephritis. Treatment of renal lupus consists of an induction phase and maintenance phase. Treatment of childhood lupus nephritis using steroids is associated with poor outcome and excess side-effects. The addition of cyclophosphamide to the treatment schedule has improved disease control. In view of treatment failure using these drugs and a tendency for non-adherence, many newer agents such as immune-modulators and monoclonal antibodies are being tried in patients with cSLE. Trials of these novel agents in the pediatric population are still lacking making a consensus in the management protocol of pediatric lupus nephritis difficult. PMID:24868499

  13. Pediatric lupus nephritis: Management update.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajiv; Raut, Sumantra

    2014-05-06

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is a severe multisystem autoimmune disease. Renal involvement occurs in the majority of cSLE patients and is often fatal. Renal biopsy is an important investigation in the management of lupus nephritis. Treatment of renal lupus consists of an induction phase and maintenance phase. Treatment of childhood lupus nephritis using steroids is associated with poor outcome and excess side-effects. The addition of cyclophosphamide to the treatment schedule has improved disease control. In view of treatment failure using these drugs and a tendency for non-adherence, many newer agents such as immune-modulators and monoclonal antibodies are being tried in patients with cSLE. Trials of these novel agents in the pediatric population are still lacking making a consensus in the management protocol of pediatric lupus nephritis difficult.

  14. Regulatory and pathogenic mechanisms in human autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Le Panse, Rozen; Cizeron-Clairac, Géraldine; Cuvelier, Mélinée; Truffault, Frédérique; Bismuth, Jacky; Nancy, Patrice; De Rosbo, Nicole Kerlero; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2008-01-01

    The thymus is frequently hyperplastic in young female myasthenia gravis (MG) patients presenting with anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies. This thymic pathology is characterized by the presence of ectopic germinal centers (GCs) containing B cells involved at least partially in the production of pathogenic anti-AChR antibodies. Our recent studies have furthered our understanding of the mechanisms leading to GC formation in the hyperplastic thymus. First, we showed that CXCL13 and CCL21, chemokines involved in GC formation, are overexpressed in MG thymus. Second, we demonstrated an increase in pro-inflammatory activity in the thymus from MG patients and its partial normalization by glucocorticoids, as evidenced by gene expression profile. Third, we found that pro-inflammatory cytokines are able to upregulate the expression of AChR subunits in thymic epithelial and myoid cells. Fourth, we showed that the function of T regulatory (Treg) cells, whose role is to downregulate the immune response, is severely impaired in the thymus of MG patients; such a defect could explain the chronic immune activation observed consistently in MG thymic hyperplasia. Altogether, these new data suggest that CXCL13 and CCL21, which are produced in excess in MG thymus, attract peripheral B cells and activated T cells, which are maintained chronically activated in the inflammatory thymic environment because of the defect in suppressive activity of Treg cells. Presence of AChR in the thymus and upregulation of its expression by the pro-inflammatory environment contribute to the triggering and maintenance of the anti-AChR autoimmune response.

  15. The genetics and epigenetics of autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hewagama, Anura; Richardson, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Self tolerance loss is fundamental to autoimmunity. While understanding of immune regulation is expanding rapidly, the mechanisms causing loss of tolerance in most autoimmune diseases remain elusive. Autoimmunity is believed to develop when genetically predisposed individuals encounter environmental agents that trigger the disease. Recent advances in the genetic and environmental contributions to autoimmunity suggest that interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic changes caused by environmental agents may be responsible for inducing autoimmune disease. Genetic loci predisposing to autoimmunity are being identified through multi-center consortiums, and the number of validated genes is growing rapidly. Recent reports also indicate that the environment can contribute to autoimmunity by modifying gene expression through epigenetic mechanisms. This article will review current understanding of the genetics and epigenetics of lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes, using systemic lupus erythematosus as the primary example. Other autoimmune diseases may have a similar foundation. PMID:19349147

  16. The genetics and epigenetics of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Hewagama, Anura; Richardson, Bruce

    2009-08-01

    Self tolerance loss is fundamental to autoimmunity. While understanding of immune regulation is expanding rapidly, the mechanisms causing loss of tolerance in most autoimmune diseases remain elusive. Autoimmunity is believed to develop when genetically predisposed individuals encounter environmental agents that trigger the disease. Recent advances in the genetic and environmental contributions to autoimmunity suggest that interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic changes caused by environmental agents may be responsible for inducing autoimmune disease. Genetic loci predisposing to autoimmunity are being identified through multi-center consortiums, and the number of validated genes is growing rapidly. Recent reports also indicate that the environment can contribute to autoimmunity by modifying gene expression through epigenetic mechanisms. This article will review current understanding of the genetics and epigenetics of lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes, using systemic lupus erythematosus as the primary example. Other autoimmune diseases may have a similar foundation.

  17. Kallikrein genes are associated with lupus and glomerular basement membrane–specific antibody–induced nephritis in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kui; Li, Quan-Zhen; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M.; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Li, Li; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jinchun; Yan, Mei; Ye, Qiu; Liu, Shenxi; Xie, Chun; Zhou, Xin J.; Chung, Sharon A.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Witte, Torsten; de Ramón, Enrique; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Barizzone, Nadia; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Merrill, Joan T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Gilkeson, Gary G.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Kim, Il; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Martin, Javier; Harley, John B.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Wakeland, Edward K.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Mohan, Chandra

    2009-01-01

    Immune-mediated nephritis contributes to disease in systemic lupus erythematosus, Goodpasture syndrome (caused by antibodies specific for glomerular basement membrane [anti-GBM antibodies]), and spontaneous lupus nephritis. Inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody–induced and spontaneous lupus nephritis. This study sought to clarify the genetic and molecular factors that may be responsible for enhanced immune-mediated renal disease in these models. When the kidneys of 3 mouse strains sensitive to anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis were compared with those of 2 control strains using microarray analysis, one-fifth of the underexpressed genes belonged to the kallikrein gene family, which encodes serine esterases. Mouse strains that upregulated renal and urinary kallikreins exhibited less evidence of disease. Antagonizing the kallikrein pathway augmented disease, while agonists dampened the severity of anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis. In addition, nephritis-sensitive mouse strains had kallikrein haplotypes that were distinct from those of control strains, including several regulatory polymorphisms, some of which were associated with functional consequences. Indeed, increased susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis and spontaneous lupus nephritis was achieved by breeding mice with a genetic interval harboring the kallikrein genes onto a disease-resistant background. Finally, both human SLE and spontaneous lupus nephritis were found to be associated with kallikrein genes, particularly KLK1 and the KLK3 promoter, when DNA SNPs from independent cohorts of SLE patients and controls were compared. Collectively, these studies suggest that kallikreins are protective disease-associated genes in anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis and lupus. PMID:19307730

  18. Kallikrein genes are associated with lupus and glomerular basement membrane-specific antibody-induced nephritis in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kui; Li, Quan-Zhen; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Kelly, Jennifer A; Li, Li; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jinchun; Yan, Mei; Ye, Qiu; Liu, Shenxi; Xie, Chun; Zhou, Xin J; Chung, Sharon A; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Witte, Torsten; de Ramón, Enrique; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Barizzone, Nadia; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Merrill, Joan T; Gregersen, Peter K; Gilkeson, Gary G; Kimberly, Robert P; Vyse, Timothy J; Kim, Il; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Martin, Javier; Harley, John B; Criswell, Lindsey A; Wakeland, Edward K; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Mohan, Chandra

    2009-04-01

    Immune-mediated nephritis contributes to disease in systemic lupus erythematosus, Goodpasture syndrome (caused by antibodies specific for glomerular basement membrane [anti-GBM antibodies]), and spontaneous lupus nephritis. Inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody-induced and spontaneous lupus nephritis. This study sought to clarify the genetic and molecular factors that maybe responsible for enhanced immune-mediated renal disease in these models. When the kidneys of 3 mouse strains sensitive to anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis were compared with those of 2 control strains using microarray analysis, one-fifth of the underexpressed genes belonged to the kallikrein gene family,which encodes serine esterases. Mouse strains that upregulated renal and urinary kallikreins exhibited less evidence of disease. Antagonizing the kallikrein pathway augmented disease, while agonists dampened the severity of anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis. In addition, nephritis-sensitive mouse strains had kallikrein haplotypes that were distinct from those of control strains, including several regulatory polymorphisms,some of which were associated with functional consequences. Indeed, increased susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis and spontaneous lupus nephritis was achieved by breeding mice with a genetic interval harboring the kallikrein genes onto a disease-resistant background. Finally, both human SLE and spontaneous lupus nephritis were found to be associated with kallikrein genes, particularly KLK1 and the KLK3 promoter, when DNA SNPs from independent cohorts of SLE patients and controls were compared. Collectively, these studies suggest that kallikreins are protective disease-associated genes in anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis and lupus.

  19. What Causes Lupus Flares?

    PubMed

    Fernandez, David; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease, follows a chronic disease course, punctuated by flares. Disease flares often occur without apparent cause, perhaps from progressive inherent buildup of autoimmunity. However, there is evidence that certain environmental factors may trigger the disease. These include exposure to UV light, infections, certain hormones, and drugs which may activate the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in inflammation, cytotoxic effects, and clinical symptoms. Uncontrolled disease flares, as well as their treatment, especially with glucocorticoids, can cause significant organ damage. Tight surveillance and timely control of lupus flares with judicial use of effective treatments to adequately suppress the excessive immune system activation are required to bring about long term remission of the disease. We hope that new clinical trials will soon offer additional effective and target-specific biologic treatments for SLE.

  20. Genetic remodeling of protein glycosylation in vivo induces autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Chui, Daniel; Sellakumar, Gayathri; Green, Ryan S.; Sutton-Smith, Mark; McQuistan, Tammie; Marek, Kurt W.; Morris, Howard R.; Dell, Anne; Marth, Jamey D.

    2001-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are among the most prevalent of afflictions, yet the genetic factors responsible are largely undefined. Protein glycosylation in the Golgi apparatus produces structural variation at the cell surface and contributes to immune self-recognition. Altered protein glycosylation and antibodies that recognize endogenous glycans have been associated with various autoimmune syndromes, with the possibility that such abnormalities may reflect genetic defects in glycan formation. We show that mutation of a single gene, encoding α-mannosidase II, which regulates the hybrid to complex branching pattern of extracellular asparagine (N)-linked oligosaccharide chains (N-glycans), results in a systemic autoimmune disease similar to human systemic lupus erythematosus. α-Mannosidase II-deficient autoimmune disease is due to an incomplete overlap of two conjoined pathways in complex-type N-glycan production. Lymphocyte development, abundance, and activation parameters are normal; however, serum immunoglobulins are increased and kidney function progressively falters as a disorder consistent with lupus nephritis develops. Autoantibody reactivity and circulating immune complexes are induced, and anti-nuclear antibodies exhibit reactivity toward histone, Sm antigen, and DNA. These findings reveal a genetic cause of autoimmune disease provoked by a defect in the pathway of protein N-glycosylation. PMID:11158608

  1. Mucormycosis in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Royer, Mathieu; Puéchal, Xavier

    2014-07-01

    Mucormycosis is an emerging infection in systemic autoimmune diseases. All published cases of systemic autoimmune diseases complicated by mucormycosis were reviewed. The clinical features, diagnostic procedures and the main principles of treatment were analyzed. Twenty-four cases of mucormycosis have been reported in systemic auto-immune diseases, of which 83% in systemic lupus erythematosus, all occurring during immunosuppressants. In most cases, the infection was disseminated or rhinocerebral and it had mimicked a flare of the underlying connective tissue disease. A fatal outcome was reported in 58.3% of these patients. In conclusion, mucormycosis often mimics a flare of the underlying systemic disease and is associated with a high mortality rate. Systemic lupus erythematosus is by far the most common associated systemic autoimmune disease. A high degree of awareness is warranted to rapidly rule out infection, of which mucormycosis, in immunocompromised patients with systemic autoimmune disease before a disease flare is conclusively diagnosed.

  2. Pauci-immune lupus nephritis: possibility or co-incidence?

    PubMed Central

    Cansu, Döndü Üsküdar; Temiz, Gökhan; Açıkalın, Mustafa F.; Korkmaz, Cengiz

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized with immune complex formation and renal involvement of lupus and may include several kinds of pathological conditions, but mostly, it is associated with immune complex-induced glomerular disease. Pauci-immune lupus nephritis is a very rare condition. We describe a 45-year-old female patient with pauci-immune crescentic necrotizing lupus nephritis and briefly discuss the possible mechanism and pathogenesis. PMID:28293460

  3. Urinary soluble CD163 level reflects glomerular inflammation in human lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Endo, Nobuhide; Tsuboi, Naotake; Furuhashi, Kazuhiro; Shi, Yiqin; Du, Qiuna; Abe, Tomoko; Hori, Mayuko; Imaizumi, Takahiro; Kim, Hangsoo; Katsuno, Takayuki; Ozaki, Takenori; Kosugi, Tomoki; Matsuo, Seiichi; Maruyama, Shoichi

    2016-12-01

    In addition to classically activated macrophages that have effector roles in tissue injury, alternatively activated M2 macrophages are involved in the resolution of inflammation in animal models of kidney disease. To clarify the clinical relevance of macrophage phenotypes in human glomerular diseases, we evaluated the renal accumulation of macrophages and plasma and urine levels of CD163, an M2 marker, in lupus nephritis (LN) patients. Kidney biopsies and plasma and urine samples were obtained from LN patients who underwent renal biopsy between 2008 and 2012. CD163(+), CD68(+) and CD204(+) cells were counted in paraffin-embedded and frozen sections. LN histological activity was evaluated semiquantitatively using the biopsy activity index. Plasma and urinary soluble CD163 (sCD163) concentrations were also measured and evaluated for their significance as potential LN biomarkers. Immunohistological analysis of glomeruli from LN patients revealed that >60% of CD68(+) macrophages had merged with CD163(+) cells. The increased number of glomerular CD163(+) macrophages was correlated with LN severity, as determined by the biopsy active index (r = 0.635). Urinary (u-) sCD163 level was strongly correlated with glomerular CD163(+) cell counts and histological disease score as well as urinary monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 levels (r = 0.638 and 0.592, respectively). Furthermore, the u-sCD163 level was higher in patients with active LN than in those with other diseases. Glomerular CD163(+) macrophages are the predominant phenotype in the kidneys of lupus patients. These findings indicate that the u-sCD163 level can serve as a biomarker for macrophage-dependent glomerular inflammation in human LN. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  4. Metabolic Factors that Contribute to Lupus Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Sivakumar, Ramya; Titov, Anton A.; Choi, Seung-Chul; Morel, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease in which organ damage is mediated by pathogenic autoantibodies directed against nucleic acids and protein complexes. Studies in SLE patients and in mouse models of lupus have implicated virtually every cell type in the immune system in the induction or amplification of the autoimmune response as well as the promotion of an inflammatory environment that aggravates tissue injury. Here, we review the contribution of CD4+ T cells, B cells, and myeloid cells to lupus pathogenesis and then discuss alterations in the metabolism of these cells that may contribute to disease, given the recent advances in the field of immunometabolism. PMID:27480903

  5. Accumulation of VH Replacement Products in IgH Genes Derived from Autoimmune Diseases and Anti-Viral Responses in Human

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Miles D.; Huang, Lin; Yu, Yangsheng; Li, Song; Liao, Hongyan; Zemlin, Michael; Su, Kaihong; Zhang, Zhixin

    2014-01-01

    VH replacement refers to RAG-mediated secondary recombination of the IgH genes, which renews almost the entire VH gene coding region but retains a short stretch of nucleotides as a VH replacement footprint at the newly generated VH–DH junction. To explore the biological significance of VH replacement to the antibody repertoire, we developed a Java-based VH replacement footprint analyzer program and analyzed the distribution of VH replacement products in 61,851 human IgH gene sequences downloaded from the NCBI database. The initial assignment of the VH, DH, and JH gene segments provided a comprehensive view of the human IgH repertoire. To our interest, the overall frequency of VH replacement products is 12.1%; the frequencies of VH replacement products in IgH genes using different VH germline genes vary significantly. Importantly, the frequencies of VH replacement products are significantly elevated in IgH genes derived from different autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and allergic rhinitis, and in IgH genes encoding various autoantibodies or anti-viral antibodies. The identified VH replacement footprints preferentially encoded charged amino acids to elongate IgH CDR3 regions, which may contribute to their autoreactivities or anti-viral functions. Analyses of the mutation status of the identified VH replacement products suggested that they had been actively involved in immune responses. These results provide a global view of the distribution of VH replacement products in human IgH genes, especially in IgH genes derived from autoimmune diseases and anti-viral immune responses. PMID:25101087

  6. Accumulation of VH Replacement Products in IgH Genes Derived from Autoimmune Diseases and Anti-Viral Responses in Human.

    PubMed

    Lange, Miles D; Huang, Lin; Yu, Yangsheng; Li, Song; Liao, Hongyan; Zemlin, Michael; Su, Kaihong; Zhang, Zhixin

    2014-01-01

    VH replacement refers to RAG-mediated secondary recombination of the IgH genes, which renews almost the entire VH gene coding region but retains a short stretch of nucleotides as a VH replacement footprint at the newly generated VH-DH junction. To explore the biological significance of VH replacement to the antibody repertoire, we developed a Java-based VH replacement footprint analyzer program and analyzed the distribution of VH replacement products in 61,851 human IgH gene sequences downloaded from the NCBI database. The initial assignment of the VH, DH, and JH gene segments provided a comprehensive view of the human IgH repertoire. To our interest, the overall frequency of VH replacement products is 12.1%; the frequencies of VH replacement products in IgH genes using different VH germline genes vary significantly. Importantly, the frequencies of VH replacement products are significantly elevated in IgH genes derived from different autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and allergic rhinitis, and in IgH genes encoding various autoantibodies or anti-viral antibodies. The identified VH replacement footprints preferentially encoded charged amino acids to elongate IgH CDR3 regions, which may contribute to their autoreactivities or anti-viral functions. Analyses of the mutation status of the identified VH replacement products suggested that they had been actively involved in immune responses. These results provide a global view of the distribution of VH replacement products in human IgH genes, especially in IgH genes derived from autoimmune diseases and anti-viral immune responses.

  7. Prevention of murine experimental autoimmune orchitis by recombinant human interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Itoh, Masahiro; Ablake, Maila; Macrì, Battesimo; Bendtzen, Klaus; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2002-02-01

    We studied the effect of exogenously administered recombinant human interleukin (IL)-6 on the development of experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) in C3H/Hej mice. IL-6 significantly reduced histological signs of EAO and appearance of delayed type hypersensitivity against the immunizing testicular germinal cells. The effect was seen even though the cytokine was administered for only 6 consecutive days and 2 weeks after immunization.

  8. Interferon triggers experimental synovitis and may potentiate auto-immune disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Rosenbach, T O; Moshonov, S; Zor, U; Yaron, M

    1984-09-01

    From these data it appears that IFN is capable of stimulating prostaglandin E and hyaluronic acid production by human synovial fibroblasts in vitro and of initiating an inflammatory reaction in animal joints. In chronic arthritis its production may result from persisting viral or other antigenic stimulation. IFN may enhance the immune response and mediate the inflammatory process in the joint. Its role in the pathogenesis of rheumatic and various other autoimmune diseases is undergoing further study.

  9. Autoimmune rheumatic disease and sleep: a review.

    PubMed

    Sangle, Shirish R; Tench, Colin M; D'Cruz, David P

    2015-11-01

    Sleep has an important role to play in the human immune system and it is critical in the restoration and maintenance of homeostasis. Sleep deprivation and disorders may have a profound impact on health, well being and the ability to resist infection. Autoimmune rheumatic diseases are multisystem disorders that involve complicated hormonal and immunological pathophysiology. Previous studies have suggested that sleep deprivation may lead to immunological disturbance in experimental mouse models. Sleep disorders may trigger immune system abnormalities inducing autoantibody production, possibly leading to the development of autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma or rheumatoid arthritis. Indeed, in experimental models, it has been suggested that sleep deprivation may induce the onset of autoimmune disease. Chronic deprivation of sleep is common in modern society and has been seen in various autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases. We have reviewed various aspects of sleep deprivation and sleep apnoea syndrome, and their effects on the immune system and their relevance to autoimmune diseases. We hope that these data will encourage greater awareness of the role that improved sleep hygiene may play in the management of these rheumatic diseases.

  10. Antibodies as predictors of complex autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Vojdani, A

    2008-01-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested environmental factors such as infections and xenobiotics and some dietary proteins and peptides in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Considering the fact that autoantibodies can often be detected prior to the onset of a disease, in this study an enzyme immunoassay was used for measurement of antibodies against different highly purified antigens or synthetic peptides originating not only from human tissue, but also from cross-reactive epitopes of infectious agents, dietary proteins and xenobiotics. The measurement of antibodies against a panel of antigens allows for identification of patterns or antibody signatures, rather than just one or two markers of autoimmunity, thus establishing the premise for increased sensitivity and specificity of prediction, as well as positive predictive values. This panel of different autoantibodies was applied to 420 patients with different autoimmune diseases, including pernicious anemia, celiac disease, thyroiditis, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, Addison's disease, type 1 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and autoimmunity, which are presented in this article. In all cases, the levels of these antibodies were significantly elevated in patients versus controls. Antibody patterns related to neuroautoimmune disorders, cancer, and patients with somatic hypermutation will be shown in a subsequent article. We believe that this novel 96 antigen-specific autoantibody or predictive antibody screen should be studied for its incorporation into routine medical examinations. Clinicians should be aware that the detection of antibodies should not automatically mean that a patient will definitely become ill, but would rather give a percentage of risk for autoimmune disease over subsequent months or years.

  11. Regulatory T cells in experimental autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Suri-Payer, Elisabeth; Fritzsching, Benedikt

    2006-08-01

    During the past 10 years, CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) have been extensively studied for their function in autoimmune disease. This review summarizes the evidence for a role of Treg in suppression of innate and adaptive immune responses in experimental models of autoimmunity including arthritis, colitis, diabetes, autoimmune encephalomyelitis, lupus, gastritis, oophoritis, prostatitis, and thyroiditis. Antigen-specific activation of Treg, but antigen-independent suppressive function, emerges as a common paradigm derived from several disease models. Treg suppress conventional T cells (Tcon) by direct cell contact in vitro. However, downmodulation of dendritic cell function and secretion of inhibitory cytokines such as IL-10 and TGF-beta might underlie Treg function in vivo. The final outcome of autoimmunity vs tolerance depends on the balance between stimulatory signals (Toll-like receptor engagement, costimulation, and antigen dose) and inhibitory signals from Treg. Whereas most experimental settings analyze the capacity of Treg to prevent onset of autoimmune disease, more recent efforts indicate successful treatment of ongoing disease. Thus, Treg are on the verge of moving from experimental animal models into clinical applications in humans.

  12. 77 FR 38305 - Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus-Developing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... availability of a guidance entitled ``Lupus Nephritis Caused By Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Lupus Nephritis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus--Developing Medical Products for Treatment; Withdrawal of Guidance AGENCY: Food...

  13. Comparative Effects of n-3, n-6 and n-9 Unsaturated Fatty Acid-Rich Diet Consumption on Lupus Nephritis, Autoantibody Production and CD4+ T Cell-Related Gene Responses in the Autoimmune NZBWF1 Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Pestka, James J.; Vines, Laura L.; Bates, Melissa A.; He, Kaiyu; Langohr, Ingeborg

    2014-01-01

    Mortality from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a prototypical autoimmune disease, correlates with the onset and severity of kidney glomerulonephritis. There are both preclinical and clinical evidence that SLE patients may benefit from consumption of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) found in fish oil, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here we employed the NZBWF1 SLE mouse model to compare the effects of dietary lipids on the onset and severity of autoimmune glomerulonephritis after consuming: 1) n-3 PUFA-rich diet containing docosahexaenoic acid-enriched fish oil (DFO), 2) n-6 PUFA-rich Western-type diet containing corn oil (CRN) or 3) n-9 monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA)-rich Mediterranean-type diet containing high oleic safflower oil (HOS). Elevated plasma autoantibodies, proteinuria and glomerulonephritis were evident in mice fed either the n-6 PUFA or n-9 MUFA diets, however, all three endpoints were markedly attenuated in mice that consumed the n-3 PUFA diet until 34 wk of age. A focused PCR array was used to relate these findings to the expression of 84 genes associated with CD4+ T cell function in the spleen and kidney both prior to and after the onset of the autoimmune nephritis. n-3 PUFA suppression of autoimmunity in NZBWF1 mice was found to co-occur with a generalized downregulation of CD4+ T cell-related genes in kidney and/or spleen at wk 34. These genes were associated with the inflammatory response, antigen presentation, T cell activation, B cell activation/differentiation and leukocyte recruitment. Quantitative RT-PCR of representative affected genes confirmed that n-3 PUFA consumption was associated with reduced expression of CD80, CTLA-4, IL-10, IL-18, CCL-5, CXCR3, IL-6, TNF-α and osteopontin mRNAs in kidney and/or spleens as compared to mice fed n-6 PUFA or n-9 MUFA diets. Remarkably, many of the genes identified in this study are currently under consideration as biomarkers and/or biotherapeutic targets for SLE and other autoimmune

  14. Interleukin-17 and systemic lupus erythematosus: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Nalbandian, A; Crispín, J C; Tsokos, G C

    2009-08-01

    The emerging role of interleukin (IL)-17 as a hallmark proinflammatory cytokine of the adaptive immune system, produced primarily by a new T helper cell subset termed 'Th17', has received considerable attention. Differentiation of Th17 cells is driven by the simultaneous presence of transforming growth factor-beta and certain inflammatory cytokines (e.g. IL-6, IL-21), and recent studies have shown that inflammation instigated by IL-17-producing cells is central to the development and pathogenesis of several human autoimmune diseases and animal models of autoimmunity. In this review, we focus on the information regarding IL-17 and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a chronic autoimmune disease. The work that has explored the development and behaviour of IL-17-producing cells in SLE is discussed, and different mechanisms by which IL-17 could potentially augment inflammation and autoantibody production in the context of SLE are proposed.

  15. Epigenetics and autoimmune diseases: the X chromosome-nucleolus nexus

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Wesley H.; Renaudineau, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur more often in females, suggesting a key role for the X chromosome. X chromosome inactivation, a major epigenetic feature in female cells that provides dosage compensation of X-linked genes to avoid overexpression, presents special vulnerabilities that can contribute to the disease process. Disruption of X inactivation can result in loss of dosage compensation with expression from previously sequestered genes, imbalance of gene products, and altered endogenous material out of normal epigenetic context. In addition, the human X has significant differences compared to other species and these differences can contribute to the frequency and intensity of the autoimmune disease in humans as well as the types of autoantigens encountered. Here a link is demonstrated between autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, and the X chromosome by discussing cases in which typically non-autoimmune disorders complicated with X chromosome abnormalities also present lupus-like symptoms. The discussion is then extended to the reported spatial and temporal associations of the inactive X chromosome with the nucleolus. When frequent episodes of cellular stress occur, the inactive X chromosome may be disrupted and inadvertently become involved in the nucleolar stress response. Development of autoantigens, many of which are at least transiently components of the nucleolus, is then described. Polyamines, which aid in nucleoprotein complex assembly in the nucleolus, increase further during cell stress, and appear to have an important role in the autoimmune disease process. Autoantigenic endogenous material can potentially be stabilized by polyamines. This presents a new paradigm for autoimmune diseases: that many are antigen-driven and the autoantigens originate from altered endogenous material due to episodes of cellular stress that disrupt epigenetic control. This suggests that epigenetics and the X chromosome are important aspects of autoimmune

  16. Epigenetics and autoimmune diseases: the X chromosome-nucleolus nexus.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Wesley H; Renaudineau, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur more often in females, suggesting a key role for the X chromosome. X chromosome inactivation, a major epigenetic feature in female cells that provides dosage compensation of X-linked genes to avoid overexpression, presents special vulnerabilities that can contribute to the disease process. Disruption of X inactivation can result in loss of dosage compensation with expression from previously sequestered genes, imbalance of gene products, and altered endogenous material out of normal epigenetic context. In addition, the human X has significant differences compared to other species and these differences can contribute to the frequency and intensity of the autoimmune disease in humans as well as the types of autoantigens encountered. Here a link is demonstrated between autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, and the X chromosome by discussing cases in which typically non-autoimmune disorders complicated with X chromosome abnormalities also present lupus-like symptoms. The discussion is then extended to the reported spatial and temporal associations of the inactive X chromosome with the nucleolus. When frequent episodes of cellular stress occur, the inactive X chromosome may be disrupted and inadvertently become involved in the nucleolar stress response. Development of autoantigens, many of which are at least transiently components of the nucleolus, is then described. Polyamines, which aid in nucleoprotein complex assembly in the nucleolus, increase further during cell stress, and appear to have an important role in the autoimmune disease process. Autoantigenic endogenous material can potentially be stabilized by polyamines. This presents a new paradigm for autoimmune diseases: that many are antigen-driven and the autoantigens originate from altered endogenous material due to episodes of cellular stress that disrupt epigenetic control. This suggests that epigenetics and the X chromosome are important aspects of autoimmune

  17. Autoimmune diseases and HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Virot, Emilie; Duclos, Antoine; Adelaide, Leopold; Miailhes, Patrick; Hot, Arnaud; Ferry, Tristan; Seve, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To describe the clinical manifestations, treatments, prognosis, and prevalence of autoimmune diseases (ADs) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. All HIV-infected patients managed in the Infectious Diseases Department of the Lyon University Hospitals, France, between January 2003 and December 2013 and presenting an AD were retrospectively included. Thirty-six ADs were found among 5186 HIV-infected patients which represents a prevalence of 0.69% including immune thrombocytopenic purpura (n = 15), inflammatory myositis (IM) (n = 4), sarcoidosis (n = 4), Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) (n = 4), myasthenia gravis (n = 2), Graves’ disease (n = 2), and 1 case of each following conditions: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hepatitis, Hashimoto thyroiditis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. One patient presented 2 ADs. Thirty patients were known to be HIV-infected when they developed an AD. The AD preceded HIV infection in 2 patients. GBS and HIV infection were diagnosed simultaneously in 3 cases. At AD diagnosis, CD4 T lymphocytes count were higher than 350/mm3 in 63% of patients, between 200 and 350/mm3 in 19% and less than 200/mm3 in 19%. Twenty patients benefited from immunosuppressant treatments, with a good tolerance. ADs during HIV infection are uncommon in this large French cohort. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura, sarcoidosis, IM, and GBS appear to be more frequent than in the general population. Immunosuppressant treatments seem to be effective and well tolerated. PMID:28121924

  18. Autoimmune anti-androgen-receptor antibodies in human serum.

    PubMed Central

    Liao, S; Witte, D

    1985-01-01

    Circulating autoantibodies to human and rat androgen receptors are present at high titers in the blood sera of some patients with prostate diseases. The antibodies from some serum samples were associated with a purified IgG fraction and interacted with the 3.8S cytosolic androgen-receptor complexes of rat ventral prostate to form 9- to 12S units. Other serum samples, however, formed 14- to 19S units, suggesting that other immunoglobulins might be involved. In the presence of an anti-human immunoglobulin as a second antibody, the androgen-receptor-antibody complexes could be immunoprecipitated. The antibodies interacted with the nuclear and the cytosolic androgen-receptor complexes, either the DNA-binding or the nonbinding form, but not with receptors for estradiol, progestin, or dexamethasone from a variety of sources. Human testosterone/estradiol-binding globulin, rat epididymal androgen-binding protein, or rat prostate alpha-protein (a nonreceptor steroid-binding protein) also did not interact with the antibodies to form immunoprecipitates. About 37% of male and 3% of female serum samples screened had significant antibody titer. The chance of finding serum with a high titer is much better in males older than 66 years than in the younger males or females at all ages. The presence of the high-titer antibodies may make it possible to prepare monoclonal antibodies to androgen receptors without purification of the receptors for immunization. PMID:3866227

  19. Therapeutic manipulation of natural killer (NK) T cells in autoimmunity: are we close to reality?

    PubMed Central

    Simoni, Y; Diana, J; Ghazarian, L; Beaudoin, L; Lehuen, A

    2013-01-01

    T cells reactive to lipids and restricted by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-like molecules represent more than 15% of all lymphocytes in human blood. This heterogeneous population of innate cells includes the invariant natural killer T cells (iNK T), type II NK T cells, CD1a,b,c-restricted T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. These populations are implicated in cancer, infection and autoimmunity. In this review, we focus on the role of these cells in autoimmunity. We summarize data obtained in humans and preclinical models of autoimmune diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and atherosclerosis. We also discuss the promise of NK T cell manipulations: restoration of function, specific activation, depletion and the relevance of these treatments to human autoimmune diseases. PMID:23199318

  20. Introduction to immunology and autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D A; Germolec, D R

    1999-01-01

    Autoimmune disease occurs when the immune system attacks self-molecules as a result of a breakdown of immunologic tolerance to autoreactive immune cells. Many autoimmune disorders have been strongly associated with genetic, infectious, and/or environmental predisposing factors. Comprising multiple disorders and symptoms ranging from organ-specific to systemic, autoimmune diseases include insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, thyroiditis, and multiple sclerosis. There are also implications of autoimmune pathology in such common health problems as arteriosclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, schizophrenia, and certain types of infertility. Largely of unknown etiology, autoimmune disorders affect approximately 3% of the North American and European populations, > 75% of those affected being women. This discussion provides a brief introduction to the immune system and tolerance maintenance, an overview of selected autoimmune diseases and possible mechanisms of immune autoreactivity, and a review of experimental autoimmune models. PMID:10502528

  1. Genome scan of human systemic lupus erythematosus: Evidence for linkage on chromosome 1q in African-American pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Kathy L.; Neas, Barbara R.; Salmon, Jane E.; Yu, Hua; Gray-McGuire, Courtney; Asundi, Neeraj; Bruner, Gail R.; Fox, Jerome; Kelly, Jennifer; Henshall, Stephanie; Bacino, Debra; Dietz, Myron; Hogue, Robert; Koelsch, Gerald; Nightingale, Lydia; Shaver, Tim; Abdou, Nabih I.; Albert, Daniel A.; Carson, Craig; Petri, Michelle; Treadwell, Edward L.; James, Judith A.; Harley, John B.

    1998-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by production of autoantibodies against intracellular antigens including DNA, ribosomal P, Ro (SS-A), La (SS-B), and the spliceosome. Etiology is suspected to involve genetic and environmental factors. Evidence of genetic involvement includes: associations with HLA-DR3, HLA-DR2, Fcγ receptors (FcγR) IIA and IIIA, and hereditary complement component deficiencies, as well as familial aggregation, monozygotic twin concordance >20%, λs > 10, purported linkage at 1q41–42, and inbred mouse strains that consistently develop lupus. We have completed a genome scan in 94 extended multiplex pedigrees by using model-based linkage analysis. Potential [log10 of the odds for linkage (lod) > 2.0] SLE loci have been identified at chromosomes 1q41, 1q23, and 11q14–23 in African-Americans; 14q11, 4p15, 11q25, 2q32, 19q13, 6q26–27, and 12p12–11 in European-Americans; and 1q23, 13q32, 20q13, and 1q31 in all pedigrees combined. An effect for the FcγRIIA candidate polymorphism) at 1q23 (lod = 3.37 in African-Americans) is syntenic with linkage in a murine model of lupus. Sib-pair and multipoint nonparametric analyses also support linkage (P < 0.05) at nine loci detected by using two-point lod score analysis (lod > 2.0). Our results are consistent with the presumed complexity of genetic susceptibility to SLE and illustrate racial origin is likely to influence the specific nature of these genetic effects. PMID:9843982

  2. Autoimmune disease: A role for new anti-viral therapies?

    PubMed

    Dreyfus, David H

    2011-12-01

    Many chronic human diseases may have an underlying autoimmune mechanism. In this review, the author presents a case of autoimmune CIU (chronic idiopathic urticaria) in stable remission after therapy with a retroviral integrase inhibitor, raltegravir (Isentress). Previous reports located using the search terms "autoimmunity" and "anti-viral" and related topics in the pubmed data-base are reviewed suggesting that novel anti-viral agents such as retroviral integrase inhibitors, gene silencing therapies and eventually vaccines may provide new options for anti-viral therapy of autoimmune diseases. Cited epidemiologic and experimental evidence suggests that increased replication of epigenomic viral pathogens such as Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) in chronic human autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and multiple sclerosis (MS) may activate endogenous human retroviruses (HERV) as a pathologic mechanism. Memory B cells are the reservoir of infection of EBV and also express endogenous retroviruses, thus depletion of memory b-lymphocytes by monoclonal antibodies (Rituximab) may have therapeutic anti-viral effects in addition to effects on B-lymphocyte presentation of both EBV and HERV superantigens. Other novel anti-viral therapies of chronic autoimmune diseases, such as retroviral integrase inhibitors, could be effective, although not without risk.

  3. Autologous haemopoietic stem cell transplantation for autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Zeher, Margit; Papp, Gabor; Szodoray, Peter

    2011-09-01

    Autoimmune diseases are signified by complex errors of immune-regulation, and the development of autoreactive T and B cells targeting self-antigens, which eventually can lead to permanent organ damage. Despite novel therapeutic protocols, the disease course is chronic, debilitating and in some instances the outcome is lethal. Previously, stem cell transplantation has been reported to be beneficial in autoimmune animal models, as well as in autoimmune diseases related to hematological abnormalities, which opened potential new avenues in the treatment of human autoimmune diseases. In this review, the authors describe the compound cellular regulatory effects of autologous hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and also clinical observations, related to the therapy in a variety of organ-specific and systemic autoimmune diseases. ASCT has a broad effect on the re-populated immune system, complex regulatory potentials and long term beneficial effect via down-regulating immune-reactivity, yet its widespread use in autoimmune diseases is limited, mostly due to the serious side-effects of the conditioning treatments. However, in certain autoimmune diseases with severe debilitating, or even life-threatening course, including systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis or multiple sclerosis, ASCT can be a reasonable choice when conventional therapy has failed.

  4. Spiegelmer inhibition of CCL2/MCP-1 ameliorates lupus nephritis in MRL-(Fas)lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Onkar; Pawar, Rahul D; Purschke, Werner; Eulberg, Dirk; Selve, Norma; Buchner, Klaus; Ninichuk, Volha; Segerer, Stephan; Vielhauer, Volker; Klussmann, Sven; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2007-08-01

    The monocyte chemoattractant protein CCL2 is crucial for monocyte and T cell recruitment from the vascular to the extravascular compartment at sites of inflammation. CCL2 is expressed in human lupus nephritis and was shown to mediate experimental lupus; therefore, CCL2 antagonists may be beneficial for therapy. This study describes the l-enantiomeric RNA oligonucleotide mNOX-E36, a so-called Spiegelmer that binds murine CCL2 with high affinity and neutralizes its action in vitro and in vivo. The mirror image configuration of the Spiegelmer confers nuclease resistance and thus excellent biostability. mNOX-E36 does not induce type I IFN via Toll-like receptor-7 or cytosolic RNA receptors, as recently shown for certain synthetic D-RNA. Autoimmune-prone MRL(lpr/lpr) mice that were treated with a polyethylene glycol form of mNOX-E36 from weeks 14 to 24 of age showed prolonged survival associated with a robust improvement of lupus nephritis, peribronchial inflammation, and lupus-like inflammatory skin lesions. Thus, mNOX-E36-based inhibition of CCL2 represents a novel strategy for the treatment of autoimmune tissue injury, such as lupus nephritis.

  5. A novel human autoimmune syndrome caused by combined hypomorphic and activating mutations in ZAP-70.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alice Y; Punwani, Divya; Kadlecek, Theresa A; Cowan, Morton J; Olson, Jean L; Mathes, Erin F; Sunderam, Uma; Fu, Shu Man; Srinivasan, Rajgopal; Kuriyan, John; Brenner, Steven E; Weiss, Arthur; Puck, Jennifer M

    2016-02-08

    A brother and sister developed a previously undescribed constellation of autoimmune manifestations within their first year of life, with uncontrollable bullous pemphigoid, colitis, and proteinuria. The boy had hemophilia due to a factor VIII autoantibody and nephrotic syndrome. Both children required allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), which resolved their autoimmunity. The early onset, severity, and distinctive findings suggested a single gene disorder underlying the phenotype. Whole-exome sequencing performed on five family members revealed the affected siblings to be compound heterozygous for two unique missense mutations in the 70-kD T cell receptor ζ-chain associated protein (ZAP-70). Healthy relatives were heterozygous mutation carriers. Although pre-HCT patient T cells were not available, mutation effects were determined using transfected cell lines and peripheral blood from carriers and controls. Mutation R192W in the C-SH2 domain exhibited reduced binding to phosphorylated ζ-chain, whereas mutation R360P in the N lobe of the catalytic domain disrupted an autoinhibitory mechanism, producing a weakly hyperactive ZAP-70 protein. Although human ZAP-70 deficiency can have dysregulated T cells, and autoreactive mouse thymocytes with weak Zap-70 signaling can escape tolerance, our patients' combination of hypomorphic and activating mutations suggested a new disease mechanism and produced previously undescribed human ZAP-70-associated autoimmune disease. © 2016 Chan et al.

  6. A novel human autoimmune syndrome caused by combined hypomorphic and activating mutations in ZAP-70

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Alice Y.; Punwani, Divya; Kadlecek, Theresa A.; Cowan, Morton J.; Olson, Jean L.; Mathes, Erin F.; Sunderam, Uma; Man Fu, Shu; Srinivasan, Rajgopal; Kuriyan, John; Brenner, Steven E.; Weiss, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    A brother and sister developed a previously undescribed constellation of autoimmune manifestations within their first year of life, with uncontrollable bullous pemphigoid, colitis, and proteinuria. The boy had hemophilia due to a factor VIII autoantibody and nephrotic syndrome. Both children required allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), which resolved their autoimmunity. The early onset, severity, and distinctive findings suggested a single gene disorder underlying the phenotype. Whole-exome sequencing performed on five family members revealed the affected siblings to be compound heterozygous for two unique missense mutations in the 70-kD T cell receptor ζ-chain associated protein (ZAP-70). Healthy relatives were heterozygous mutation carriers. Although pre-HCT patient T cells were not available, mutation effects were determined using transfected cell lines and peripheral blood from carriers and controls. Mutation R192W in the C-SH2 domain exhibited reduced binding to phosphorylated ζ-chain, whereas mutation R360P in the N lobe of the catalytic domain disrupted an autoinhibitory mechanism, producing a weakly hyperactive ZAP-70 protein. Although human ZAP-70 deficiency can have dysregulated T cells, and autoreactive mouse thymocytes with weak Zap-70 signaling can escape tolerance, our patients’ combination of hypomorphic and activating mutations suggested a new disease mechanism and produced previously undescribed human ZAP-70–associated autoimmune disease. PMID:26783323

  7. Exonuclease TREX1 degrades double-stranded DNA to prevent spontaneous lupus-like inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Grieves, Jessica L; Fye, Jason M; Harvey, Scott; Grayson, Jason M; Hollis, Thomas; Perrino, Fred W

    2015-04-21

    The TREX1 gene encodes a potent DNA exonuclease, and mutations in TREX1 cause a spectrum of lupus-like autoimmune diseases. Most lupus patients develop autoantibodies to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), but the source of DNA antigen is unknown. The TREX1 D18N mutation causes a monogenic, cutaneous form of lupus called familial chilblain lupus, and the TREX1 D18N enzyme exhibits dysfunctional dsDNA-degrading activity, providing a link between dsDNA degradation and nucleic acid-mediated autoimmune disease. We determined the structure of the TREX1 D18N protein in complex with dsDNA, revealing how this exonuclease uses a novel DNA-unwinding mechanism to separate the polynucleotide strands for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) loading into the active site. The TREX1 D18N dsDNA interactions coupled with catalytic deficiency explain how this mutant nuclease prevents dsDNA degradation. We tested the effects of TREX1 D18N in vivo by replacing the TREX1 WT gene in mice with the TREX1 D18N allele. The TREX1 D18N mice exhibit systemic inflammation, lymphoid hyperplasia, vasculitis, and kidney disease. The observed lupus-like inflammatory disease is associated with immune activation, production of autoantibodies to dsDNA, and deposition of immune complexes in the kidney. Thus, dysfunctional dsDNA degradation by TREX1 D18N induces disease in mice that recapitulates many characteristics of human lupus. Failure to clear DNA has long been linked to lupus in humans, and these data point to dsDNA as a key substrate for TREX1 and a major antigen source in mice with dysfunctional TREX1 enzyme.

  8. Total lymphoid irradiation in alloimmunity and autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Strober, S.

    1987-12-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation has been used as an immunosuppressive regimen in autoimmune disease and organ transplantation. The rationale for its use originated from studies of patients with Hodgkin disease, in whom this radiotherapy regimen was noted to induce profound and long-lasting immune suppression and yet was well tolerated, with few long-term side effects. Total lymphoid irradiation is a unique immunosuppressive regimen that produces a selective (and long-lasting) reduction in the number and function of helper T cells and certain subsets of B cells. Conventional immunosuppressive drugs show little selectivity, and their effects are short-lived. The most important aspect of total lymphoid irradiation is the potential for achieving transplantation tolerance and permanent remissions in autoimmune disease in laboratory animals. Attempts are being made to achieve similar goals in humans given total lymphoid irradiation, so that immunosuppressive drugs can be ultimately withdrawn from transplant recipients and patients with lupus nephritis. 28 references.

  9. HPV and systemic lupus erythematosus: a mosaic of potential crossreactions.

    PubMed

    Segal, Yahel; Dahan, Shani; Calabrò, Michele; Kanduc, Darja; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2017-04-01

    Etiology, pathogenesis, and immunology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) form a complex, still undeciphered picture that recently has been further made complicated by a new factor of morbidity: human papillomaviruses (HPVs). Indeed, a prevalence of HPV infections has been reported among SLE patients. Searching for molecular mechanisms that might underlie and explain the relationship between HPV infection and SLE, we explored the hypothesis that immune responses following HPV infection may crossreact with proteins that, when altered, associate with SLE. Analyzing HPV L1 proteins and using Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human retrovirus (HERV) as controls, we found a vast peptide overlap with human proteins comprehending lupus Ku autoantigen proteins p86 and p70, lupus brain antigen 1 homolog, lupus antigen expressed in neurons and muscles, natural killer cell IgG-like receptors, complement proteins C4-A and C4-B, complement receptor CD19, and others. The multitude and heterogeneity of peptide overlaps not only further support the hypothesis that crossreactivity can represent a primum movens in SLE onset, but also provide a molecular framework to the concept of SLE as "an autoimmune mosaic syndrome." Finally, once more, it emerges the need of using the principle of peptide uniqueness as a new paradigm for safe and efficacious vaccinology.

  10. Oxidized mitochondrial nucleoids released by neutrophils drive type I interferon production in human lupus

    PubMed Central

    Caielli, Simone; Athale, Shruti; Domic, Bojana; Murat, Elise; Chandra, Manjari; Banchereau, Romain; Baisch, Jeanine; Phelps, Kate; Clayton, Sandra; Gong, Mei; Wright, Tracey; Punaro, Marilynn; Palucka, Karolina; Guiducci, Cristiana; Banchereau, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies against nucleic acids and excessive type I interferon (IFN) are hallmarks of human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We previously reported that SLE neutrophils exposed to TLR7 agonist autoantibodies release interferogenic DNA, which we now demonstrate to be of mitochondrial origin. We further show that healthy human neutrophils do not complete mitophagy upon induction of mitochondrial damage. Rather, they extrude mitochondrial components, including DNA (mtDNA), devoid of oxidized (Ox) residues. When mtDNA undergoes oxidation, it is directly routed to lysosomes for degradation. This rerouting requires dissociation from the transcription factor A mitochondria (TFAM), a dual high-mobility group (HMG) protein involved in maintenance and compaction of the mitochondrial genome into nucleoids. Exposure of SLE neutrophils, or healthy IFN-primed neutrophils, to antiribonucleotide protein autoantibodies blocks TFAM phosphorylation, a necessary step for nucleoid dissociation. Consequently, Ox nucleoids accumulate within mitochondria and are eventually extruded as potent interferogenic complexes. In support of the in vivo relevance of this phenomenon, mitochondrial retention of Ox nucleoids is a feature of SLE blood neutrophils, and autoantibodies against Ox mtDNA are present in a fraction of patients. This pathway represents a novel therapeutic target in human SLE. PMID:27091841

  11. Toll-Like Receptor and Accessory Molecule mRNA Expression in Humans and Mice as Well as in Murine Autoimmunity, Transient Inflammation, and Progressive Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramaiah, Santhosh Kumar Vankayala; Günthner, Roman; Lech, Maciej; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2013-01-01

    The cell type-, organ-, and species-specific expression of the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are well described, but little is known about the respective expression profiles of their accessory molecules. We therefore determined the mRNA expression levels of LBP, MD2, CD36, CD14, granulin, HMGB1, LL37, GRP94, UNC93b1, TRIL, PRAT4A, AP3B1, AEP and the respective TLRs in human and mouse solid organs. Humans and mice displayed significant differences between their respective mRNA expression patterns of these factors. In addition, the expression profiles in transient tissue inflammation upon renal ischemia-reperfusion injury, in spleens and kidneys from mice with lupus-like systemic autoimmunity, and in progressive tissue fibrosis upon unilateral ureteral obstruction were studied. Several TLR co-factors were specifically regulated during the different phases of these disease entities, suggesting a functional involvement in the disease process. Thus, the organ- and species-specific expression patterns need to be considered in the design and interpretation of studies related to TLR-mediated innate immunity, which seems to be involved in the tissue injury phase, in the phase of tissue regeneration, and in progressive tissue remodelling. PMID:23803655

  12. Cancer and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Giat, Eitan; Ehrenfeld, Michael; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2017-10-01

    The association between autoimmunity and cancer is well established. Cancer has been implicated in some autoimmune disorders (AID), such as scleroderma and myositis. On the other hand, many autoimmune disorders and immunosuppressive therapy, have been linked to an increased risk for cancer. We reviewed the accumulating data on the association between autoimmunity and cancer during the past three years, with an emphasis on large cohorts, as well as concept changing discoveries in the association of cancer and auto-immunity. Recent published data from large registries and databases have changed our perspective on the association of AID and cancer, as well as the presumed association between anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti -TNF) therapy and certain malignancies, suggesting a small to no increase in almost all types of cancers. Similarly, the increased risk of malignancies in some AID, such as Sjogren's syndrome (SS) and lupus, may be different from previous estimations. New associations with malignancies were discovered, such as IgG4 related disease, Behcet's and sarcoidosis, which were not clearly associated with cancer in the past. These newly described associations may have clinical implications and contribute to our understanding of both autoimmunity and cancer. Similarly, we reviewed studies of autoimmunity secondary to malignancy, and the concomitant appearance of cancer with autoimmune disease, such as the discovery of a specific mutation in scleroderma (SS) patients that developed cancer, which establishes the association between these disorders and sheds light on the pathology behind this association. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Autoimmunity and Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Dosanjh, Amrita

    2015-11-01

    The references provided include data from evidence A and B studies based on the relevant populations. Because many primary immunodeficiencies associated with autoimmune diseases are rare, illustrative cases (evidence D) also are referenced. On the basis of level A evidence, immunoglobulin A deficiency is the most common primary immunodeficiency and is associated with defective mucosal immunity and autoimmune disease. On the basis of strong evidence (level A), Wiskott Aldrich syndrome presents early in life and is associated with autoimmune arthritis and anemia. On the basis of strong evidence in the literature, a number of primary immunodeficiencies are associated with defects in T regulatory cell number and development, cytokine aberrancies, and, as a consequence, production of autoantibodies. On the basis of strong evidence (level A) and case reports (level D), complement deficiency can be associated with autoimmune disease, most notably systemic lupus erythematosus.

  14. Targeting BLyS in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaoyang; La Cava, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic disabling autoimmune disease that significantly impacts the quality of life of patients, and can associate with several complications including end-stage renal disease and shortened lifespan. A central component in the pathogenesis of SLE is the B-cell production of autoantibodies to multiple self-antigens. Since, B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) plays a key role in the selection, differentiation and survival of most B cells, it has been studied as a therapeutic target in SLE. After a gap of more than fifty years without new drugs being approved for this disease, the human neutralizing anti-BLyS monoclonal antibody belimumab has recently been approved by the FDA for SLE therapy. This review provides an overview on the targeting of BLyS in lupus animal models, the use of belimumab in human SLE, and relevant patents.

  15. A loss-of-function variant of PTPN22 is associated with reduced risk of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Orrú, Valeria; Tsai, Sophia J.; Rueda, Blanca; Fiorillo, Edoardo; Stanford, Stephanie M.; Dasgupta, Jhimli; Hartiala, Jaana; Zhao, Lei; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Arnett, Frank C.; Wu, Hui; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Tsao, Betty P.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta E.; He, Yantao; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Allayee, Hooman; Chen, Xiaojiang S.; Martin, Javier; Bottini, Nunzio

    2009-01-01

    A gain-of-function R620W polymorphism in the PTPN22 gene, encoding the lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase LYP, has recently emerged as an important risk factor for human autoimmunity. Here we report that another missense substitution (R263Q) within the catalytic domain of LYP leads to reduced phosphatase activity. High-resolution structural analysis revealed the molecular basis for this loss of function. Furthermore, the Q263 variant conferred protection against human systemic lupus erythematosus, reinforcing the proposal that inhibition of LYP activity could be beneficial in human autoimmunity. PMID:18981062

  16. Th1/Th17 Plasticity Is a Marker of Advanced β Cell Autoimmunity and Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Reinert-Hartwall, Linnea; Honkanen, Jarno; Salo, Harri M.; Nieminen, Janne K.; Luopajärvi, Kristiina; Härkönen, Taina; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Olli; Ilonen, Jorma; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Knip, Mikael; Knip, Mikael; Koski, Katriina; Koski, Matti; Härkönen, Taina; Ryhänen, Samppa; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Ormisson, Anne; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Ulich, Valentina; Kuzmicheva, Elena; Mokurov, Sergei; Markova, Svetlana; Pylova, Svetlana; Isakova, Marina; Shakurova, Elena; Petrov, Vladimir; Dorshakova, Natalya V.; Karapetyan, Tatyana; Varlamova, Tatyana; Ilonen, Jorma; Kiviniemi, Minna; Alnek, Kristi; Janson, Helis; Uibo, Raivo; Salum, Tiit; von Mutius, Erika; Weber, Juliane; Ahlfors, Helena; Kallionpää, Henna; Laajala, Essi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Moulder, Robert; Nieminen, Janne; Ruohtula, Terhi; Vaarala, Outi; Honkanen, Hanna; Hyöty, Heikki; Kondrashova, Anita; Oikarinen, Sami; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; De Goffau, Marcus C.; Welling, Gjalt; Alahuhta, Kirsi; Virtanen, Suvi M.

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of IL-17 immunity and detrimental effects of IL-17 on human islets have been implicated in human type 1 diabetes. In animal models, the plasticity of Th1/Th17 cells contributes to the development of autoimmune diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that the upregulation of the IL-17 pathway and Th1/Th17 plasticity in peripheral blood are markers of advanced β cell autoimmunity and impaired β cell function in human type 1 diabetes. Activated Th17 immunity was observed in the late stage of preclinical diabetes in children with β cell autoimmunity and impaired glucose tolerance, but not in children with early β cell autoimmunity. We found an increased ratio of IFN-γ/IL-17 expression in Th17 cells in children with advanced β cell autoimmunity, which correlated with HbA1c and plasma glucose concentrations in an oral glucose tolerance test, and thus impaired β cell function. Low expression of Helios was seen in Th17 cells, suggesting that Th1/Th17 cells are not converted thymus-derived regulatory T cells. Our results suggest that the development of Th1/Th17 plasticity may serve as a biomarker of disease progression from β cell autoantibody positivity to type 1 diabetes. These data in human type 1 diabetes emphasize the role of Th1/Th17 plasticity as a potential contributor to tissue destruction in autoimmune conditions. PMID:25480564

  17. Non-human primate models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: Variations on a theme.

    PubMed

    't Hart, Bert A; Bauer, Jan; Brok, Herbert P M; Amor, Sandra

    2005-11-01

    Despite years of intensive research into multiple sclerosis (MS) scientists have not yet succeeded in developing an absolute therapy for the treatment of this disabling disease of the human central nervous system. The wide immunological gap between inbred rodent strains and the heterogeneous human population is probably the single most important factor that hampers the translation of scientific principles developed in rodents into effective therapies for MS. Because of the closer immunological proximity to humans, non-human primates provide useful experimental models that may help to bridge this gap. Here we review the models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in rhesus macaques and common marmosets. We will discuss the salient points of the models and suggest how these may represent the spectrum of inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system in humans.

  18. Human T-Cell Clones from Autoimmune Thyroid Glands: Specific Recognition of Autologous Thyroid Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londei, Marco; Bottazzo, G. Franco; Feldmann, Marc

    1985-04-01

    The thyroid glands of patients with autoimmune diseases such as Graves' disease and certain forms of goiter contain infiltrating activated T lymphocytes and, unlike cells of normal glands, the epithelial follicular cells strongly express histocompatability antigens of the HLA-DR type. In a study of such autoimmune disorders, the infiltrating T cells from the thyroid glands of two patients with Graves' disease were cloned in mitogen-free interleukin-2 (T-cell growth factor). The clones were expanded and their specificity was tested. Three types of clones were found. One group, of T4 phenotype, specifically recognized autologous thyroid cells. Another, also of T4 phenotype, recognized autologous thyroid or blood cells and thus responded positively in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction. Other clones derived from cells that were activated in vivo were of no known specificity. These clones provide a model of a human autoimmune disease and their analysis should clarify mechanisms of pathogenesis and provide clues to abrogating these undesirable immune responses.

  19. Induction of Regulatory t Cells by Low Dose il2 in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-12

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Ankylosing Spondylitis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Psoriasis; Behcet's Disease; Wegener's Granulomatosis; Takayasu's Disease; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Colitis; Autoimmune Hepatitis; Sclerosing Cholangitis; Gougerot-sjögren

  20. Functional characterization of the MECP2/IRAK1 lupus risk haplotype in human T cells and a human MECP2 transgenic mouse.

    PubMed

    Koelsch, Kristi A; Webb, Ryan; Jeffries, Matlock; Dozmorov, Mikhail G; Frank, Mark Barton; Guthridge, Joel M; James, Judith A; Wren, Jonathan D; Sawalha, Amr H

    2013-03-01

    Genetic polymorphism in MECP2/IRAK1 on chromosome Xq28 is a confirmed and replicated susceptibility locus for lupus. High linkage disequilibrium in this locus suggests that both MECP2 and IRAK1 are candidate genes for the disease. DNA methylation changes in lupus T cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of lupus, and MeCp-2 (encoded by MECP2) is a master regulator of gene expression and is also known to recruit DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) during DNA synthesis. Using human T cells from normal individuals with either the lupus risk or the lupus protective haplotype in MECP2/IRAK1, we demonstrate that polymorphism in this locus increases MECP2 isoform 2 mRNA expression in stimulated but not unstimulated T cells. By assessing DNA methylation levels across over 485,000 methylation sites across the entire genome, we further demonstrate that the lupus risk variant in this locus is associated with significant DNA methylation changes, including in the HLA-DR and HLA-DQ loci, as well as interferon-related genes such as IFI6, IRF6, and BST2. Further, using a human MECP2 transgenic mouse, we show that overexpression of MECP2 alters gene expression in stimulated T cells. This includes overexpression of Eif2c2 that regulates the expression of multiple microRNAs (such as miR-21), and the histone demethylase Jhdm1d. In addition, we show that MECP2 transgenic mice develop antinuclear antibodies. Our data suggest that the lupus-associated variant in the MECP2/IRAK1 locus has the potential to affect all 3 epigenetic mechanisms: DNA methylation, microRNA expression, and histone modification. Importantly, these data support the notion that variants within the MECP2 gene can alter DNA methylation in other genetic loci including the HLA and interferon-regulated genes, thereby providing evidence for genetic-epigenetic interaction in lupus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Exposure of Mice to Topical Bovine Thrombin Induces Systemic Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Schoenecker, Jonathan G.; Johnson, Rachel K.; Lesher, Aaron P.; Day, Jarrod D.; Love, Stephanie D.; Hoffman, Maureane R.; Ortel, Thomas L.; Parker, William; Lawson, Jeffrey H.

    2001-01-01

    Bovine thrombin is used as an aid to hemostasis in medical and surgical procedures. At least 500,000 Americans are exposed to this therapeutic annually and reports suggest that exposure is associated with the development of autoreactive antibodies. To determine whether bovine thrombin can induce pathological autoimmunity we exposed nonautoimmune-prone galactose-α1-3-galactose-deficient mice to the two bovine thrombin preparations currently approved for use in the United States. We found that, like humans exposed to bovine thrombin, mice developed an immune response against the therapeutic and the xenogeneic carbohydrate galactose-α1-3-galactose, and some mice developed autoantibodies against clotting factors. Further, unexpectedly, a single exposure to this therapeutic also induced autoimmunity with features characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus including antibodies against nuclear antigens, native DNA, double-stranded DNA, and cardiolipin. High levels of these autoantibodies correlated with glomerulonephritis in all mice evaluated. This autoimmune syndrome was detected in mice 15 weeks after a secondary exposure to bovine thrombin and female mice were found to develop the syndrome at a significantly greater frequency than males. Thus, these studies indicate that exposure to bovine thrombin preparations can induce a pathological systemic autoimmune syndrome with lupus-like serology. PMID:11696457

  2. Lupus risk variants in the PXK locus alter B-cell receptor internalization

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Samuel E.; Foley, Corinne; Lu, Xiaoming; Patel, Zubin H.; Zoller, Erin E.; Magnusen, Albert F.; Williams, Adrienne H.; Ziegler, Julie T.; Comeau, Mary E.; Marion, Miranda C.; Glenn, Stuart B.; Adler, Adam; Shen, Nan; Nath, Swapan; Stevens, Anne M.; Freedman, Barry I.; Tsao, Betty P.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Kamen, Diane L.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Reveille, John D.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; James, Judith A.; Moser, Kathy L.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Vilá, Luis M.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Petri, Michelle; Scofield, R. Hal; Kimberly, Robert P.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Binjoo, Young; Choi, Jeongim; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Namjou, Bahram; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Harley, Isaac T. W.; Harley, John B.; Kottyan, Leah C.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies have identified variants in PXK that confer risk for humoral autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus), rheumatoid arthritis and more recently systemic sclerosis. While PXK is involved in trafficking of epidermal growth factor Receptor (EGFR) in COS-7 cells, mechanisms linking PXK to lupus pathophysiology have remained undefined. In an effort to uncover the mechanism at this locus that increases lupus-risk, we undertook a fine-mapping analysis in a large multi-ancestral study of lupus patients and controls. We define a large (257kb) common haplotype marking a single causal variant that confers lupus risk detected only in European ancestral populations and spans the promoter through the 3′ UTR of PXK. The strongest association was found at rs6445972 with P < 4.62 × 10−10, OR 0.81 (0.75–0.86). Using stepwise logistic regression analysis, we demonstrate that one signal drives the genetic association in the region. Bayesian analysis confirms our results, identifying a 95% credible set consisting of 172 variants spanning 202 kb. Functionally, we found that PXK operates on the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR); we confirmed that PXK influenced the rate of BCR internalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that individuals carrying the risk haplotype exhibited a decreased rate of BCR internalization, a process known to impact B cell survival and cell fate. Taken together, these data define a new candidate mechanism for the genetic association of variants around PXK with lupus risk and highlight the regulation of intracellular trafficking as a genetically regulated pathway mediating human autoimmunity. PMID:25620976

  3. Lupus risk variants in the PXK locus alter B-cell receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Samuel E; Foley, Corinne; Lu, Xiaoming; Patel, Zubin H; Zoller, Erin E; Magnusen, Albert F; Williams, Adrienne H; Ziegler, Julie T; Comeau, Mary E; Marion, Miranda C; Glenn, Stuart B; Adler, Adam; Shen, Nan; Nath, Swapan; Stevens, Anne M; Freedman, Barry I; Tsao, Betty P; Jacob, Chaim O; Kamen, Diane L; Brown, Elizabeth E; Gilkeson, Gary S; Alarcón, Graciela S; Reveille, John D; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; James, Judith A; Moser, Kathy L; Criswell, Lindsey A; Vilá, Luis M; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Petri, Michelle; Scofield, R Hal; Kimberly, Robert P; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Binjoo, Young; Choi, Jeongim; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A; Vyse, Timothy J; Guthridge, Joel M; Namjou, Bahram; Gaffney, Patrick M; Langefeld, Carl D; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kelly, Jennifer A; Harley, Isaac T W; Harley, John B; Kottyan, Leah C

    2014-01-01

    Genome wide association studies have identified variants in PXK that confer risk for humoral autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or lupus), rheumatoid arthritis and more recently systemic sclerosis. While PXK is involved in trafficking of epidermal growth factor Receptor (EGFR) in COS-7 cells, mechanisms linking PXK to lupus pathophysiology have remained undefined. In an effort to uncover the mechanism at this locus that increases lupus-risk, we undertook a fine-mapping analysis in a large multi-ancestral study of lupus patients and controls. We define a large (257kb) common haplotype marking a single causal variant that confers lupus risk detected only in European ancestral populations and spans the promoter through the 3' UTR of PXK. The strongest association was found at rs6445972 with P < 4.62 × 10(-10), OR 0.81 (0.75-0.86). Using stepwise logistic regression analysis, we demonstrate that one signal drives the genetic association in the region. Bayesian analysis confirms our results, identifying a 95% credible set consisting of 172 variants spanning 202 kb. Functionally, we found that PXK operates on the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR); we confirmed that PXK influenced the rate of BCR internalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that individuals carrying the risk haplotype exhibited a decreased rate of BCR internalization, a process known to impact B cell survival and cell fate. Taken together, these data define a new candidate mechanism for the genetic association of variants around PXK with lupus risk and highlight the regulation of intracellular trafficking as a genetically regulated pathway mediating human autoimmunity.

  4. Genetic and epitopic analysis of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) autoantibodies: markers of the human thyroid autoimmune response.

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, S M; Rapoport, B

    1995-01-01

    TPO autoantibodies, the hallmark of human autoimmune thyroid disease, are of IgG class and are associated with thyroid destruction and hypothyroidism. Using the immunoglobulin gene combinatorial library approach, a panel of human monoclonal TPO autoantibodies (expressed as Fab) has been generated from thyroid tissue-infiltrating B cells. TPO-specific Fab closely resemble patients' serum autoantibodies in terms of L chain type, IgG subclass, affinities for TPO as well as epitopes recognized by > 80% of TPO autoantibodies in an individual's serum. TPO autoantibody V region genes are not unique; H chain V genes are usually mutated, while L chain V genes are sometimes in germ-line conformation. The autoantibodies recognize an immunodominant region involving conformational, overlapping epitopes in domains A and B. Finally, TPO autoantibody epitopic fingerprints are distinctive for individual sera, are not associated with hypothyroidism, but are conserved over time (indicating a lack of B cell epitope spreading). Evidence for conservation as well as inheritance of the fingerprints in some families, together with VH gene polymorphisms, may provide insight into the genetic basis of human autoimmune thyroid disease. Furthermore, monoclonal human TPO autoantibodies will be invaluable for B cell presentation of TPO to determine the T cell epitopes involved in TPO autoantibody production. PMID:7544244

  5. Immunologic studies of autoimmune disease in NZB-NZW F1 mice. I. Binding of fluorescein-labeled antinucleoside antibodies in lesions of lupus-like nephritis.

    PubMed

    Seegal, B C; Accinni, L; Andres, G A; Beiser, S M; Christian, C L; Erlanger, B F; Hsu, K

    1969-08-01

    For the past 3 years NZB and NZW mice have been maintained by sister-brother matings from English breeder stock. NZB/NZW F(1) hybrids developed lupus-like nephritis during the 6th to 7th month and few survived beyond the 8th month. Renal tissues of these animals were examined with fluorescein-labeled antinucleoside sera, specific for thymine and cytosine, for the presence of denatured DNA in GCW, and with labeled antibody to mouse IgG for the presence of excess host globulin in the same areas. The following results have been obtained: (a) All 51 hybrids, over 5 months of age, had an excess of mouse globulin in GCW. 40 animals between the ages of 5 and 12 months showed, in the same areas, antigens which bound one or both of the antinucleoside antibodies. (b) Renal tissues of 19 NZB mice, 5-19 months old, and 27 NZW mice, 2-18 months old, were examined. Excess host globulin was seen in GCW of 13 NZB and 20 NZW animals. The tissues of only two old NZB mice, 14 months of age, bound antinucleoside antibody but none of the other animals did. The association of rapidly fatal lupus-like nephritis in NZB/NZW F(1) mice with denatured DNA and mouse globulin in GCW supports the hypothesis involving this antigen-antibody complex in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  6. The Pathogenesis of Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Lech, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Lupus nephritis is an immune complex GN that develops as a frequent complication of SLE. The pathogenesis of lupus nephritis involves a variety of pathogenic mechanisms. The extrarenal etiology of systemic lupus is based on multiple combinations of genetic variants that compromise those mechanisms normally assuring immune tolerance to nuclear autoantigens. This loss of tolerance becomes clinically detectable by the presence of antinuclear antibodies. In addition, nucleic acids released from netting or apoptotic neutrophils activate innate and adaptive immunity via viral nucleic acid-specific Toll-like receptors. Therefore, many clinical manifestations of systemic lupus resemble those of viral infection. In lupus, endogenous nuclear particles trigger IFN-α signaling just like viral particles during viral infection. As such, dendritic cells, T helper cells, B cells, and plasma cells all contribute to the aberrant polyclonal autoimmunity. The intrarenal etiology of lupus nephritis involves antibody binding to multiple intrarenal autoantigens rather than the deposition of circulating immune complexes. Tertiary lymphoid tissue formation and local antibody production add to intrarenal complement activation as renal immunopathology progresses. Here we provide an update on the pathogenic mechanisms that lead to lupus nephritis and provide the rationale for the latest and novel treatment strategies. PMID:23929771

  7. Functional Domains of Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Modulate INS-VNTR Transcription in Human Thymic Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Avis E; Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S

    2016-05-20

    INS-VNTR (insulin-variable number of tandem repeats) and AIRE (autoimmune regulator) have been associated with the modulation of insulin gene expression in thymus, which is essential to induce either insulin tolerance or the development of insulin autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. We sought to analyze whether each functional domain of AIRE is critical for the activation of INS-VNTR in human thymic epithelial cells. Twelve missense or nonsense mutations in AIRE and two chimeric AIRE constructs were generated. A luciferase reporter assay and a pulldown assay using biotinylated INS-class I VNTR probe were performed to examine the transactivation and binding activities of WT, mutant, and chimeric AIREs on the INS-VNTR promoter. Confocal microscopy analysis was performed for WT or mutant AIRE cellular localization. We found that all of the AIRE mutations resulted in loss of transcriptional activation of INS-VNTR except mutant P252L. Using WT/mutant AIRE heterozygous forms to modulate the INS-VNTR target revealed five mutations (R257X, G228W, C311fsX376, L397fsX478, and R433fsX502) that functioned in a dominant negative fashion. The LXXLL-3 motif is identified for the first time to be essential for DNA binding to INS-VNTR, whereas the intact PHD1, PHD2, LXXLL-3, and LXXLL-4 motifs were important for successful transcriptional activation. AIRE nuclear localization in the human thymic epithelial cell line was disrupted by mutations in the homogenously staining region domain and the R257X mutation in the PHD1 domain. This study supports the notion that AIRE mutation could specifically affect human insulin gene expression in thymic epithelial cells through INS-VNTR and subsequently induce either insulin tolerance or autoimmunity. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Functional Domains of Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Modulate INS-VNTR Transcription in Human Thymic Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Avis E.; Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B.; Lan, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    INS-VNTR (insulin-variable number of tandem repeats) and AIRE (autoimmune regulator) have been associated with the modulation of insulin gene expression in thymus, which is essential to induce either insulin tolerance or the development of insulin autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. We sought to analyze whether each functional domain of AIRE is critical for the activation of INS-VNTR in human thymic epithelial cells. Twelve missense or nonsense mutations in AIRE and two chimeric AIRE constructs were generated. A luciferase reporter assay and a pulldown assay using biotinylated INS-class I VNTR probe were performed to examine the transactivation and binding activities of WT, mutant, and chimeric AIREs on the INS-VNTR promoter. Confocal microscopy analysis was performed for WT or mutant AIRE cellular localization. We found that all of the AIRE mutations resulted in loss of transcriptional activation of INS-VNTR except mutant P252L. Using WT/mutant AIRE heterozygous forms to modulate the INS-VNTR target revealed five mutations (R257X, G228W, C311fsX376, L397fsX478, and R433fsX502) that functioned in a dominant negative fashion. The LXXLL-3 motif is identified for the first time to be essential for DNA binding to INS-VNTR, whereas the intact PHD1, PHD2, LXXLL-3, and LXXLL-4 motifs were important for successful transcriptional activation. AIRE nuclear localization in the human thymic epithelial cell line was disrupted by mutations in the homogenously staining region domain and the R257X mutation in the PHD1 domain. This study supports the notion that AIRE mutation could specifically affect human insulin gene expression in thymic epithelial cells through INS-VNTR and subsequently induce either insulin tolerance or autoimmunity. PMID:27048654

  9. The role of genetic factors in autoimmune disease: implications for environmental research.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, G S; Miller, F W; Pandey, J P

    1999-01-01

    Studies in both humans and in animal models of specific disorders suggest that polymorphisms of multiple genes are involved in conferring either a predisposition to or protection from autoimmune diseases. Genes encoding polymorphic proteins that regulate immune responses or the rates and extent of metabolism of certain chemical structures have been the focus of much of the research regarding genetic susceptibility. We examine the type and strength of evidence concerning genetic factors and disease etiology, drawing examples from a number of autoimmune diseases. Twin studies of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), type I diabetes, and multiple sclerosis (MS) indicate that disease concordance in monozygotic twins is 4 or more times higher than in dizygotic twins. Strong familial associations (odds ratio ranging from 5-10) are seen in studies of MS, type I diabetes, Graves disease, discoid lupus, and SLE. Familial association studies have also reported an increased risk of several systemic autoimmune diseases among relatives of patients with a systemic autoimmune disease. This association may reflect a common etiologic pathway with shared genetic or environmental influences among these diseases. Recent genomewide searches in RA, SLE, and MS provide evidence for multiple susceptibility genes involving major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and non-MHC loci; there is also evidence that many autoimmune diseases share a common set of susceptibility genes. The multifactorial nature of the genetic risk factors and the low penetrance of disease underscore the potential influence of environmental factors and gene-environment interactions on the etiology of autoimmune diseases. PMID:10502533

  10. Expression of glomerular heparan sulphate domains in murine and human lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Rops, Angelique L; van den Hoven, Mabel J; Bakker, Marinka A; Lensen, Joost F; Wijnhoven, Tessa J; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; van der Vlag, Johan; Berden, Jo H

    2007-07-01

    Recently, we identified specific N- and 6-O-sulphated heparan sulphate (HS) domains on activated glomerular endothelial cells. In this study, we evaluated in lupus nephritis the expression of different HS domains on glomerular endothelium and in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). The expression of specific glomerular HS domains and the presence of immunoglobulins (Ig) were determined by immunofluorescence staining of kidney sections of patients with nephritis due to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and MRL/lpr lupus mice. The expression/presence of glomerular HS domains and Ig was also evaluated after eluting Ig from renal sections of lupus mice using two elution methods, and in renal sections of lupus mice treated with heparinoids. Both MRL/lpr mice and patients with lupus nephritis showed a decreased expression of HS in the GBM. The expression of N- and 6-O-sulphated HS domains on glomerular endothelium was decreased in MRL/lpr mice, but increased in SLE patients. MRL/lpr mice had more extensive glomerular Ig deposits than SLE patients. After elution of Ig, the glomerular endothelial expression of N- and 6-O-sulphated HS domains in MRL/lpr mice was recovered and even increased above normal levels, while the expression of HS in the GBM was restored to normal levels. Treatment with heparinoids prevented Ig deposition and preserved the expression of glomerular HS domains at normal levels in lupus mice. The expression of specific HS domains on glomerular endothelium and in the GBM is changed during lupus nephritis due to masking by Ig deposits and induction of inflammatory N- and 6-O-sulphated HS domains.

  11. [Autoimmune thyroid disease and other non-endocrine autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Dilas, Ljiljana Todorović; Icin, Tijana; Paro, Jovanka Novaković; Bajkin, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are chronic conditions initiated by the loss of immunological tolerance to self-antigens. They constitute heterogeneous group of disorders, in which multiple alterations in the immune system result in a spectrum of syndromes that either target specific organs or affect the body systematically. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a possible shift of one autoimmune disease to another or the fact that more than one autoimmune disease may coexist in a single patient or in the same family. Numerous autoimmune diseases have been shown to coexist frequently with thyroid autoimmune diseases. AUTOIMMNUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: This part of the study reviews the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease coexisting with: pernicious anaemia, vitiligo, celiac disease, autoimmune liver disease, miastenia gravis, alopecia areata and sclerosis multiplex, and several recommendations for screening have been given. AUTOIMMUNE THYROID DISEASE AND OTHER ORGAN NON-SPECIFIC NON-ENDOCRINE AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES: Special attention is given to the correlation between autoimmune thyroid disease and rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, syndrome Sjögren, systemic sclerosis and mixed connective tissue disease. Screening for autoimmune thyroid diseases should be recommended in everyday clinical practice, in patients with primary organ-specific or organ non-specific autoimmune disease. Otherwise, in patients with primary thyroid autoimmune disease, there is no good reason of seeking for all other autoimmune diseases, although these patients have a greater risk of developing other autoimmune disease. Economic aspects of medicine require further analyzing of these data, from cost/benefit point of view to justified either mandatory screening or medical practitioner judgment.

  12. Pericarditis and pleuritis associated with human parvovirus B19 infection in a systemic lupus erythematosus patient.

    PubMed

    Seishima, Mariko; Shibuya, Yoshinao; Watanabe, Kana; Kato, Genichi

    2010-12-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (PVB19) infection sometimes shows systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like symptoms. We present an SLE patient showing pericarditis and pleuritis with a fever and an acute swelling of extremities 2 months after the fist consultation. Initially, a diagnosis of SLE exacerbation was made. Additional laboratory examination showed positive results for immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody to PVB19 and PVB19 DNA in serum and pleural effusion at that time. After 1 month, PVB19 DNA in serum and IgM antibody to PVB19 was negative. Based on these findings, a final diagnosis of PVB19 infection in an SLE patient was made. PVB19 infection should be taken into consideration for SLE with acute swelling of the extremities and fever, as these symptoms are often observed in adult cases of PVB19 infection. Steroid pulse therapy rapidly improved these symptoms, and later the dose of steroid was reduced to 5 mg/day of prednisolone. Thus, steroids may be one of the choices for severe and/or rapidly progressive symptoms of pericarditis and pleuritis due to PVB19 infection.

  13. Cervical human papillomavirus infection in Mexican women with systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rojo-Contreras, W; Olivas-Flores, E M; Gamez-Nava, J I; Montoya-Fuentes, H; Trujillo-Hernandez, B; Trujillo, X; Suarez-Rincon, A E; Baltazar-Rodriguez, L M; Sanchez-Hernandez, J; Ramirez-Flores, M; Vazquez-Salcedo, J; Rojo-Contreras, J; Morales-Romero, J; Gonzalez-Lopez, L

    2012-04-01

    Cervical human papillomavirus (HPV+) infection is associated with an increased risk of cervical dysplasia. Although the frequency of HPV+ in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has been investigated in some races its prevalence in Hispanic women is still unknown. This cross-sectional study evaluated the prevalence of cervical HPV+ in Mexican women with SLE (n = 34) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n = 43) and in healthy controls (n = 146). These women were interviewed about risk factors for sexually transmitted infections and cervical cytology analysis was performed. HPV+ viral types were identified using PCR: HPV+ was observed in 14.7% of SLE, 27.9% of RA and 30.8% of controls. High-risk HPV types were observed in 11.7% of women with SLE, 27.9% of women with RA, and in 26% of the controls. High-risk viral types 58, 35 and 18 were the most frequently identified in SLE. Two women with SLE had a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion and one had cervical cancer. An association was observed between methotrexate utilization, longer duration of therapy with prednisone, and HPV+ in RA or SLE. Thus, there is a high prevalence of cervical HPV infection in Mexican women with SLE or RA, and physicians must be vigilant in preventing the development of cervical dysplasia.

  14. Drugs in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, D B; Bicker, U

    1990-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases arise when autoimmunity or the loss of self tolerance results in tissue damages. Many mechanisms have been proposed for the origin of autoimmunity, including immunologic, viral, hormonal and genetic factors. All known parts of the immunological network are involved in causing immunopathologic symptoms. Therefore, more or less specific immunosuppressants are widely used in the treatment of autoimmune disorders which range from organ-specific, i.e. Hashimoto's thyroiditis, to non-organ-specific or systemic diseases, i.e. systemic lupus erythematosus. Unspecifically acting cytostatics do not only suppress autoimmune reactions but also create severe side-effects due to the impairment of immune responses against foreign antigens, leading, for example, to an increased risk of infections. Moreover, the genotoxic activity of cytostatics might induce malignancies. Corticosteroids are clinically well known and very active agents for the management of acute symptoms but different side-effects limit their use in the treatment of chronic diseases. Cyclosporin A has been an important step forward to a more specific prevention of organ transplant rejections and to the therapy of some autoimmune disorders. Modern approaches to immunosuppression include monoclonal antibodies directed against a variety of different determinants on immunocompetent cells. Ciamexone and Leflunomide which are in early clinical and preclinical development, respectively, might be interesting new drugs. Future immunopharmacologic drug research and development should lead to more specific, low molecular weight, orally active and chemically defined immunosuppressive compounds with good tolerability under long-term treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  15. Different Types of Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Facebook Pinterest Email Print Different types of lupus Lupus Foundation of America February 24, 2017 Resource ... lupus. Learn more about each type below. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Systemic lupus is the most common form ...

  16. Different Types of Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Facebook Pinterest Email Print Different types of lupus Lupus Foundation of America September 18, 2017 Resource ... lupus. Learn more about each type below. Systemic lupus erythematosus Systemic lupus is the most common form ...

  17. GWAS implicates a role for quantitative immune traits and threshold effects in risk for human autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Peter K; Diamond, Betty; Plenge, Robert M

    2012-10-01

    Genome wide association studies in human autoimmune disorders have provided a long list of alleles with rather modest degrees of risk. A large fraction of these associations are probably owing to either quantitative differences in gene expression or amino acid changes that regulate quantitative aspects of the immune response. While functional studies are still lacking for most of these associations, we present examples of autoimmune disease risk alleles that influence quantitative changes in lymphocyte activation, cytokine signaling and dendritic cell function. The analysis of immune quantitative traits associated with autoimmune loci is clearly going to be an important component of understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. This will require both new and more efficient ways of characterizing the normal immune system, as well as large population resources in which genotype-phenotype correlations can be convincingly demonstrated. Future development of new therapies will depend on understanding the mechanistic underpinnings of immune regulation by these new risk loci.

  18. MicroRNAs in Human Diseases: From Autoimmune Diseases to Skin, Psychiatric and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules that negatively regulate gene expression via degradation or translational repression of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Recent studies have clearly demonstrated that miRNAs play critical roles in several biologic processes, including cell cycle, differentiation, cell development, cell growth, and apoptosis and that miRNAs are highly expressed in regulatory T (Treg) cells and a wide range of miRNAs are involved in the regulation of immunity and in the prevention of autoimmunity. It has been increasingly reported that miRNAs are associated with various human diseases like autoimmune disease, skin disease, neurological disease and psychiatric disease. Recently, the identification of mi- RNAs in skin has added a new dimension in the regulatory network and attracted significant interest in this novel layer of gene regulation. Although miRNA research in the field of dermatology is still relatively new, miRNAs have been the subject of much dermatological interest in skin morphogenesis and in regulating angiogenesis. In addition, miRNAs are moving rapidly onto center stage as key regulators of neuronal development and function in addition to important contributions to neurodegenerative disorder. Moreover, there is now compelling evidence that dysregulation of miRNA networks is implicated in the development and onset of human neruodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Down syndrome, depression and schizophrenia. In this review, I briefly summarize the current studies about the roles of miRNAs in various autoimmune diseases, skin diseases, psychoneurological disorders and mental stress. PMID:22194706

  19. MicroRNAs in Human Diseases: From Autoimmune Diseases to Skin, Psychiatric and Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tai-You

    2011-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA molecules that negatively regulate gene expression via degradation or translational repression of their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Recent studies have clearly demonstrated that miRNAs play critical roles in several biologic processes, including cell cycle, differentiation, cell development, cell growth, and apoptosis and that miRNAs are highly expressed in regulatory T (Treg) cells and a wide range of miRNAs are involved in the regulation of immunity and in the prevention of autoimmunity. It has been increasingly reported that miRNAs are associated with various human diseases like autoimmune disease, skin disease, neurological disease and psychiatric disease. Recently, the identification of mi- RNAs in skin has added a new dimension in the regulatory network and attracted significant interest in this novel layer of gene regulation. Although miRNA research in the field of dermatology is still relatively new, miRNAs have been the subject of much dermatological interest in skin morphogenesis and in regulating angiogenesis. In addition, miRNAs are moving rapidly onto center stage as key regulators of neuronal development and function in addition to important contributions to neurodegenerative disorder. Moreover, there is now compelling evidence that dysregulation of miRNA networks is implicated in the development and onset of human neruodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Down syndrome, depression and schizophrenia. In this review, I briefly summarize the current studies about the roles of miRNAs in various autoimmune diseases, skin diseases, psychoneurological disorders and mental stress.

  20. [Neonatal lupus. Case report].

    PubMed

    Alcántara-Salinas, Adriana; Solano-Fiesco, Liborio; Romero-Ramírez, Jorge Armando; Olivera-Solórzano, Florisela; Alonso-Pérez, Nancy Carmencita; Marcos-Cabrera, Liliana; González-Martínez, Rosa Ana

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal lupus has a rare incidence, distinct from systemic lupus erythematosus. This is an acquired autoimmune disease associated with maternal antibodies to proteins Ro / La (SSA /SSB), transferred by the placenta; it represents the prototype of passive transfer of antibodies from mother to child. The disease can affect the skin, heart, and rarely, the hepatobiliary or hematologic systems. Congenital complete heart block is the most severe form of neonatal lupus. In clinical practice it is important to distinguish in utero a complete from an incomplete atrioventricular block (AV) in order to render prompt care. We present the case of a new born female, who was diagnosed with an atrio-ventricular block at 26 weeksí gestation. When the baby was delivered at 38 weeksí gestation, she presented bradycardia (54 xí). On the suspicion of neonatal lupus, we required antinuclear antibodies, anti-Sm, anti-RNP, anti-SS-A and anti-SS-B, which were positive. A bicameral pacemaker was placed uneventfully.

  1. Severe chronic blepharitis and scarring ectropion associated with discoid lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kopsachilis, Nikolaos; Tsaousis, Konstantinos T; Tourtas, Theofilos; Tsinopoulos, Ioannis T

    2013-01-01

    Discoid lupus erythematosus is a common form of chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus, an autoimmune inflammatory disease that affects most of the human organs, including the skin, kidneys, joints, heart and lungs. We describe a 45-year-old Caucasian woman with a 21-year history of eyelid redness and irritation. She had been treated with antibiotics, steroids and eyelid hygiene, a therapy that resulted to brief periods of relief of symptoms. In the last 12 months, her symptoms seemed to have exacerbated, despite the administration of a local therapy. Following biopsy, a diagnosis of discoid lupus erythematosus was confirmed and the patient was placed on a systemic therapy with hydroxychloroquine. The eyelid inflammation decreased but severe scarring of the marginal eyelids persisted, resulting in cicatricial ectropion. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2012 Optometrists Association Australia.

  2. The National Institutes of Health Center for Human Immunology, Autoimmunity, and Inflammation: history and progress.

    PubMed

    Dickler, Howard B; McCoy, J Philip; Nussenblatt, Robert; Perl, Shira; Schwartzberg, Pamela A; Tsang, John S; Wang, Ena; Young, Neil S

    2013-05-01

    The Center for Human Immunology, Autoimmunity, and Inflammation (CHI) is an exciting initiative of the NIH intramural program begun in 2009. It is uniquely trans-NIH in support (multiple institutes) and leadership (senior scientists from several institutes who donate their time). Its goal is an in-depth assessment of the human immune system using high-throughput multiplex technologies for examination of immune cells and their products, the genome, gene expression, and epigenetic modulation obtained from individuals both before and after interventions, adding information from in-depth clinical phenotyping, and then applying advanced biostatistical and computer modeling methods for mining these diverse data. The aim is to develop a comprehensive picture of the human "immunome" in health and disease, elucidate common pathogenic pathways in various diseases, identify and validate biomarkers that predict disease progression and responses to new interventions, and identify potential targets for new therapeutic modalities. Challenges, opportunities, and progress are detailed.

  3. Delineating liver events in trichloroethylene-induced autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; Przybyla, Beata; Pumford, Neil R; Han, Tao; Fuscoe, James; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Holland, Ricky D; Doss, Jason C; Macmillan-Crow, Lee Ann; Blossom, Sarah J

    2009-04-01

    Exposure to the environmental pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) has been linked to autoimmune disease development in humans. Chronic (32-week) low-level exposure to TCE has been shown to promote autoimmune hepatitis in association with CD4(+) T cell activation in autoimmune-prone MRL+/+ mice. MRL+/+ mice are usually thought of as a model of systemic lupus rather than an organ-specific disease such as autoimmune hepatitis. Consequently, the present study examined gene expression and metabolites to delineate the liver events that skewed the autoimmune response toward that organ in TCE-treated mice. Female MRL+/+ mice were treated with 0.5 mg/mL TCE in their drinking water. The results showed that TCE-induced autoimmune hepatitis could be detected in as little as 26 weeks. TCE exposure also generated a time-dependent increase in the number of antibodies specific for liver proteins. The gene expression correlated with the metabolite analysis to show that TCE upregulated the methionine/homocysteine pathway in the liver after 26 weeks of exposure. The results also showed that TCE exposure altered the expression of selective hepatic genes associated with immunity and inflammation. On the basis of these results, future mechanistic studies will focus on how alterations in genes associated with immunity and inflammation, in conjunction with protein alterations in the liver, promote liver immunogenicity in TCE-treated MRL+/+ mice.

  4. Toxicology of Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hultman, Per; Kono, Dwight H.

    2010-01-01

    Susceptibility to most autoimmune diseases is dependent on polygenic inheritance, environmental factors, and poorly defined stochastic events. One of the significant challenges facing autoimmune disease research is in identifying the specific events that trigger loss of tolerance and autoimmunity. Although many intrinsic factors, including age, sex, and genetics, contribute to autoimmunity, extrinsic factors such as drugs, chemicals, microbes, or other environmental factors can also act as important initiators. This review explores how certain extrinsic factors, namely drugs and chemicals, can promote the development of autoimmunity, focusing on a few better characterized agents that, in most instances, have been shown to produce autoimmune manifestations in human populations. Mechanisms of autoimmune disease induction are discussed in terms of research obtained using specific animal models. Although a number of different pathways have been delineated for drug/chemical-induced autoimmunity some similarities do exist and a working model is proposed. PMID:20078109

  5. Epidemiologic studies of environmental agents and systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, M D

    1999-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic scleroderma are autoimmune diseases thought to have an exogenous trigger. This review summarizes relevant case-control and cohort studies that investigated exogenous sex hormones, silica, silicone, solvents, pesticides, mercuric chloride, and hair dyes as putative risk factors for the development of these diseases. These studies indicate that estrogen replacement therapy in postmenopausal women increases the risk of developing lupus, scleroderma, and Raynaud disease, although the increase in risk is relatively modest. Oral contraceptives may also play a role in disease susceptibility in lupus but not apparently in scleroderma. Environmental endocrine modulators, in the form of pesticides, may represent another opportunity for estrogenlike effects to occur, but there is scant evidence that these agents play a role in human systemic autoimmune disease. Although exposure to silica dust increases the risk of scleroderma in men occupied in the industry, this does not explain most male scleroderma cases. When this exposure was investigated among women, no significant risk was found. Additionally, silicone in implanted devices as well as occupational exposure to silicone-containing compounds did not pose an increased risk among women for scleroderma. The role of solvent exposure has been investigated as a risk factor for scleroderma with mixed findings. One study suggested a potential role in male patients or in those individuals with Scl-70 antibody positivity either male or female. Two other studies were unable to corroborate this finding. Mercuric chloride causes antifibrillarin antibodies and immune complex glomerulonephritis in susceptible mouse strains. Antifibrillarin antibodies, but not glomerulonephritis, occur in a subset of scleroderma patients and preliminary evidence suggests that mercury levels may be higher in this group of individuals. Hair products have been studied as possibly raising the risk of developing lupus

  6. A conserved anti-DNA antibody idiotype associated with nephritis in murine and human systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Weisbart, R H; Noritake, D T; Wong, A L; Chan, G; Kacena, A; Colburn, K K

    1990-04-01

    In order to identify unique structural features of pathogenic autoantibodies to DNA in SLE, a murine anti-anti-DNA (anti-Id) mAb (mAb 1C7) was produced in response to immunization of lupus mice with a syngeneic anti-DNA mAb (mAb 3E10). Immunization of lupus mice with mAb 3E10 inhibited production of native anti-DNA antibodies, suppressed development of lupus kidney disease (nephritis), and induced production of anti-anti-DNA (anti-Id) antibodies. mAb 1C7 bound F(ab')2 fragments of mAb 3E10, and it bound other murine anti-DNA mAb, but not murine mAb or polyclonal serum antibodies unreactive with DNA. Moreover, binding of mAb 1C7 anti-Id to mAb 3E10 was inhibited by DNA, suggesting anti-Id binding within or near the binding site for DNA. Furthermore, mAb 1C7 bound serum IgG immunoglobulins from 9/12 patients with lupus nephritis and serum anti-DNA antibodies compared to only 3/12 SLE patients with comparable serum levels of anti-DNA antibodies, but without nephritis (p = 0.04), and only 1/53 SLE patients without serum anti-DNA antibodies, 0/49 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and 1/47 healthy subjects (p less than 0.001). These results provide evidence that mAb 1C7 identifies a conserved Id associated with anti-DNA antibodies in murine and human SLE and may be useful as a structural probe to characterize pathogenic anti-DNA antibodies in SLE.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases in experimental animal models

    PubMed Central

    Klinker, Matthew W; Wei, Cheng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells [also known as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)] are currently being studied as a cell-based treatment for inflammatory disorders. Experimental animal models of human immune-mediated diseases have been instrumental in establishing their immunosuppressive properties. In this review, we summarize recent studies examining the effectiveness of MSCs as immunotherapy in several widely-studied animal models, including type 1 diabetes, experimental autoimmune arthritis, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, inflammatory bowel disease, graft-vs-host disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus. In addition, we discuss mechanisms identified by which MSCs mediate immune suppression in specific disease models, and potential sources of functional variability of MSCs between studies. PMID:25914763

  8. Treatment of Cutaneous Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Aileen Y.; Werth, Victoria P.

    2011-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) is an autoimmune, inflammatory skin disease seen in patients with or without systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The management of CLE includes treatment and prevention of lesions, as well as routine assessment for systemic disease. Treatment options include both topical and systemic therapies. Topical therapies include corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors. Systemic therapies generally fall under one of three categories: antimalarials, immunomodulators, such as dapsone and thalidomide, and immunosuppressives, such as methotrexate and mycophenolate. Evidence for the treatment of CLE is limited by few prospective studies, as well as lack of a validated outcome measure up until recently. There is good evidence to support the use of topical steroids and calcineurin inhibitors, though most of these trials have not used placebo or vehicle controls. There have been no randomized placebo-controlled trials evaluating systemic therapies for the treatment of CLE. PMID:21503694

  9. Genome Screening in Human Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Results from a Second Minnesota Cohort and Combined Analyses of 187 Sib-Pair Families

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, Patrick M.; Ortmann, Ward A.; Selby, Scott A.; Shark, Katherine B.; Ockenden, Theresa C.; Rohlf, Kristine E.; Walgrave, Nichole L.; Boyum, Wade P.; Malmgren, Michelle L.; Miller, Michael E.; Kearns, Grainne M.; Messner, Ronald P.; King, Richard A.; Rich, Stephen S.; Behrens, Timothy W.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by a loss of immunologic tolerance to a multitude of self-antigens. Epidemiological data suggest an important role for genes in the etiology of lupus, and previous genetic studies have implicated the HLA locus, complement genes, and low-affinity IgG (Fcγ) receptors in SLE pathogenesis. In an effort to identify new susceptibility loci for SLE, we recently reported the results of a genomewide microsatellite marker screen in 105 SLE sib-pair families. By using nonparametric methods, evidence for linkage was found in four intervals: 6p11-21 (near the HLA), 16q13, 14q21-23, and 20p12.3 (LOD scores ⩾2.0), and weaker evidence in another nine regions. We now report the results of a second complete genome screen in a new cohort of 82 SLE sib-pair families. In the cohort 2 screen, the four best intervals were 7p22 (LOD score 2.87), 7q21 (LOD score 2.40), 10p13 (LOD score 2.24), and 7q36 (LOD score 2.15). Eight additional intervals were identified with LOD scores in the range 1.00–1.67. A combined analysis of MN cohorts 1 and 2 (187 sib-pair families) showed that markers in 6p11-p21 (D6S426, LOD score 4.19) and 16q13 (D16S415, LOD score 3.85) met the criteria for significant linkage. Three intervals (2p15, 7q36, and 1q42) had LOD scores in the range 1.92–2.06, and another 13 intervals had LOD scores in the range of 1.00–1.78 in the combined sample. These data, together with other available gene mapping results in SLE, are beginning to allow a prioritization of genomic intervals for gene discovery efforts in human SLE. PMID:10677315

  10. Abnormal thymic maturation and lymphoproliferation in MRL-Faslpr/lpr mice can be partially reversed by synthetic oligonucleotides: implications for systemic lupus erythematosus and autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ashman, R F; Singh, N; Lenert, P S

    2016-11-10

    MRL-Fas (lpr/lpr) mice represent an excellent animal model for studying non-malignant lymphoproliferation, regeneration and systemic autoimmunity. Retro-transposon insertion into the second intron of the pro-apoptotic Fas gene appears to be responsible for both lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity, while other genes are more likely to contribute to the regenerative healing characteristic of this mouse strain. Previous studies have shown that neonatal thymectomy can halt the development of abnormal lymphoproliferation. Whereas at four weeks of age primary and secondary lymphoid organs appear to be grossly intact, vigorous lymphoproliferation and autoantibody production subsequently ensues. This is first noticeable at six weeks of age, at which time lymph nodes, spleens and thymuses, but not the bone marrow, become infiltrated with abnormal B220(+)CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells. Around the same time, thymuses show a significant drop in CD4(+)CD8(+)double-positive T cells generating an abnormal ratio between double-positive and single-positive thymocytes. The objective of current study was to evaluate the effect of synthetic oligonucleotides-toll-like receptor antagonists on early lymphoid development in this strain of mice. Herein, we demonstrate the ability of synthetic oligonucleotides made with the nuclease-resistant phosphorothioate backbone to partially reverse abnormal lymphoproliferation and thymic involution in pre-diseased MRL-Fas (lpr/lpr) mice when administered intraperitoneally starting from week four of age. This curative effect of oligonucleotides was primary sequence/secondary oligonucleotide structure-independent, suggesting an effect through the toll-like receptor 7. A similar approach may potentially benefit patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome who, like MRL-Fas (lpr/lpr) mice, carry a mutation in the Fas gene.

  11. Photosensitivity in cutaneous lupus erythematosus: lessons from mice and men.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Fukumi

    2003-11-01

    Mouse models are similar but not identical to human diseases. However, they are important for research into the pathogenesis underlying autoimmune diseases because they allow us to evaluate similarities and differences between human diseases and mouse models. In fact, experimental models and inbred lupus-prone mice are tools that enable a better understanding of the 'photosensitivity' or 'photocytotoxicity' phenomena in relation to autoimmunity. Genetic studies of MRL/lpr mice revealed that the appearance of macroscopic lupus erythematosus (LE)-like skin lesions needs the lpr mutation plus an additional factor in an autosomal dominant fashion. The candidate is ultraviolet (UV) B light, the susceptibility to which is regulated by the genetic background. Such a genetic background is also speculated to be important in human cutaneous LE patients. The translocation of anti-SS-A/Ro on cultured keratinocytes irradiated with UVB light is quantitatively different from photocytotoxicity, and the quantitative levels are significantly higher in systemic LE and subacute cutaneous LE than in discoid LE and normal controls. This review focuses on the lessons gleaned from mouse and human models, and discusses photosensitivity in human cutaneous LE.

  12. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lateef, Aisha; Petri, Michelle

    2017-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with a strong female predilection. Pregnancy remains a commonly encountered but high-risk situation in this setting. Both maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity are still significantly increased despite improvements in outcomes. Maternal morbidity includes higher risk of disease flares, preeclampsia and other pregnancy-related complications. Fetal issues include higher rates of preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, and neonatal lupus syndromes. Treatment options during pregnancy are also limited and maternal benefit has to be weighed against fetal risk. A coordinated approach, with close monitoring by a multidisciplinary team, is essential for optimal outcomes.

  13. Abnormal costimulatory phenotype and function of dendritic cells before and after the onset of severe murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Colonna, Lucrezia; Dinnall, Joudy-Ann; Shivers, Debra K; Frisoni, Lorenza; Caricchio, Roberto; Gallucci, Stefania

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed the activation and function of dendritic cells (DCs) in the spleens of diseased, lupus-prone NZM2410 and NZB-W/F1 mice and age-matched BALB/c and C57BL/6 control mice. Lupus DCs showed an altered ex vivo costimulatory profile, with a significant increase in the expression of CD40, decreased expression of CD80 and CD54, and normal expression of CD86. DCs from young lupus-prone NZM2410 mice, before the development of the disease, expressed normal levels of CD80 and CD86 but already overexpressed CD40. The increase in CD40-positive cells was specific for DCs and involved the subset of myeloid and CD8alpha+ DCs before disease onset, with a small involvement of plasmacytoid DCs in diseased mice. In vitro data from bone marrow-derived DCs and splenic myeloid DCs suggest that the overexpression of CD40 is not due to a primary alteration of CD40 regulation in DCs but rather to an extrinsic stimulus. Our analyses suggest that the defect of CD80 in NZM2410 and NZB-W/F1 mice, which closely resembles the costimulatory defect found in DCs from humans with systemic lupus erythematosus, is linked to the autoimmune disease. The increase in CD40 may instead participate in disease pathogenesis, being present months before any sign of autoimmunity, and its downregulation should be explored as an alternative to treatment with anti-CD40 ligand in lupus.

  14. Headache in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    John, Seby; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous inflammatory disorders characterized by systemic or localized inflammation, leading to ischemia and tissue destruction. These include disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus and related diseases, systemic vasculitides, and central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis (primary or secondary). Headache is a very common manifestation of CNS involvement of these diseases. Although headache characteristics can be unspecific and often non-diagnostic, it is important to recognize because headache can be the first manifestation of CNS involvement. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary not only to treat the headache, but also to help prevent serious neurological sequelae that frequently accompany autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss headache associated with autoimmune diseases along with important mimics.

  15. Cellular Targeting in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jennifer L.; Serafin, Donald S.; Timoshchenko, Roman G.; Tarrant, Teresa K.

    2012-01-01

    Many biologic agents that were first approved for the treatment of malignancies are now being actively investigated and used in a variety of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and Sjogren’s syndrome. The relatively recent advance of selective immune targeting has significantly changed the management of autoimmune disorders, and in part, can be attributed to the progress made in understanding effector cell function and their signaling pathways. In this review, we will discuss the recent FDA approved biologic therapies that directly target immune cells as well as the most promising investigational drugs affecting immune cell function and signaling for the treatment of autoimmune disease. PMID:23054625

  16. Lupus nephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... American College of Rheumatology Guidelines for Screening, Case Definition, Treatment and Management of Lupus Nephritis. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) . ... kidney disease Immune response Incidence ...

  17. [Cutaneous lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Sandreva, Tatjana; Voss, Anne; Bygum, Anette

    2015-07-27

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE) is an autoimmune disease. The most common clinical forms are acute cutaneous LE (ACLE), subacute cutaneous LE (SCLE) and discoid LE (DLE). Cutaneous LE, mainly ACLE, can be the first sign of systemic LE (SLE). DLE and SCLE are less associated with development of SLE, however, up to 85% of patients with SLE have cutaneous manifestations. The aetiology is multifactorial. Drugs such as proton pump inhibitors can induce SCLE, while UV-light and smoking can worsen the lesions. Treatment includes preventive strategies in addition to topical steroids and systemic hydroxychloroquine.

  18. Epigenetics and lupus.

    PubMed

    Miceli-Richard, Corinne

    2015-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is among the systemic autoimmune diseases whose complex pathogenesis involves both genetic and environmental factors. Epigenetic dysregulation resulting in overexpression of certain genes in some of the key immune cells, such as T cells, has been incriminated in the pathophysiology of SLE. Epigenetics is defined as transmissible and reversible modifications in gene expression without alterations in the nucleotide sequences. Epigenetic information is carried chiefly by DNA itself, histones, and noncoding RNAs. Several epigenetic mechanisms may play a role in SLE pathogenesis. This review discusses the various epigenetic mechanisms that regulate gene expression and provides examples relevant to SLE.

  19. Patterns of Exposure of Iberian Wolves (Canis lupus) to Canine Viruses in Human-Dominated Landscapes.

    PubMed

    Millán, Javier; López-Bao, José Vicente; García, Emilio J; Oleaga, Álvaro; Llaneza, Luis; Palacios, Vicente; de la Torre, Ana; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Dubovi, Edward J; Esperón, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    Wildlife inhabiting human-dominated landscapes is at risk of pathogen spill-over from domestic species. With the aim of gaining knowledge in the dynamics of viral infections in Iberian wolves (Canis lupus) living in anthropized landscapes of northern Spain, we analysed between 2010 and 2013 the samples of 54 wolves by serology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for exposure to four pathogenic canine viruses: canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus-2 (CPV), canine adenovirus 1 and 2 (CAV-1 and CAV-2) and canine herpesvirus. Overall, 76% of the studied wolves presented evidence of exposure to CPV (96% by HI, 66% by PCR) and 75% to CAV (75% by virus neutralization (VN), 76% by PCR, of which 70% CAV-1 and 6% CAV-2). This represents the first detection of CAV-2 infection in a wild carnivore. CPV/CAV-1 co-infection occurred in 51% of the wolves. The probability of wolf exposure to CPV was positively and significantly correlated with farm density in a buffer zone around the place where the wolf was found, indicating that rural dogs might be the origin of CPV infecting wolves. CPV and CAV-1 appear to be enzootic in the Iberian wolf population, which is supported by the absence of seasonal and inter-annual variations in the proportion of positive samples detected. However, while CPV may depend on periodical introductions by dogs, CAV-1 may be maintained within the wolf population. All wolves were negative for exposure to CDV (by VN and PCR) and CHV (by PCR). The absence of acquired immunity against CDV in this population may predispose it to an elevated rate of mortality in the event of a distemper spill-over via dogs.

  20. A possible link between the Epstein-Barr virus infection and autoimmune thyroid disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gwizdek, Katarzyna; Michalski, Marek; Wojnicz, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), also known as human herpesvirus 4, is a member of the Herpesviridae virus family. EBV infection can cause infectious mononucleosis (IM) in the lytic phase of EBV’s life cycle. Past EBV infection is associated with lymphomas, and may also result in certain allergic and autoimmune diseases. Although potential mechanisms of autoimmune diseases have not been clearly elucidated, both genetic and environmental factors, such as infectious agents, are considered to be responsible for their development. In addition, EBV modifies the host immune response. The worldwide prevalence of autoimmune diseases shows how common this pathogen is. Normally, the virus stays in the body and remains dormant throughout life. However, this is not always the case, and a serious EBV-related illness may develop later in life. This explains the chronic course of autoimmune diseases that is often accompanied by exacerbations of symptoms. Based on the present studies, EBV infection can cause autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Sjögren’s syndrome, and autoimmune hepatitis. The EBV has also been reported in patients with autoimmune thyroid disorders. Although EBV is not the only agent responsible for the development of autoimmune thyroid diseases, it can be considered a contributory factor. PMID:27833448

  1. A possible link between the Epstein-Barr virus infection and autoimmune thyroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Dittfeld, Anna; Gwizdek, Katarzyna; Michalski, Marek; Wojnicz, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), also known as human herpesvirus 4, is a member of the Herpesviridae virus family. EBV infection can cause infectious mononucleosis (IM) in the lytic phase of EBV's life cycle. Past EBV infection is associated with lymphomas, and may also result in certain allergic and autoimmune diseases. Although potential mechanisms of autoimmune diseases have not been clearly elucidated, both genetic and environmental factors, such as infectious agents, are considered to be responsible for their development. In addition, EBV modifies the host immune response. The worldwide prevalence of autoimmune diseases shows how common this pathogen is. Normally, the virus stays in the body and remains dormant throughout life. However, this is not always the case, and a serious EBV-related illness may develop later in life. This explains the chronic course of autoimmune diseases that is often accompanied by exacerbations of symptoms. Based on the present studies, EBV infection can cause autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Sjögren's syndrome, and autoimmune hepatitis. The EBV has also been reported in patients with autoimmune thyroid disorders. Although EBV is not the only agent responsible for the development of autoimmune thyroid diseases, it can be considered a contributory factor.

  2. Autoimmunity in 2013.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo

    2014-08-01

    The peer-reviewed publications in the field of autoimmunity published in 2013 represented a significant proportion of immunology articles and grew since the previous year to indicate that more immune-mediated phenomena may recognize an autoimmune mechanism and illustrated by osteoarthritis and atherosclerosis. As a result, our understanding of the mechanisms of autoimmunity is becoming the paradigm for translational research in which the progress in disease pathogenesis for both tolerance breakdown and inflammation perpetuation is rapidly followed by new treatment approaches and clinical management changes. The similarities across the autoimmune disease spectrum outnumber differences, particularly when treatments are compared. Indeed, the therapeutics of autoimmune diseases are based on a growing armamentarium that currently includes monoclonal antibodies and small molecules which act by targeting molecular markers or intracellular mediators with high specificity. Among the over 100 conditions considered as autoimmune, the common grounds are well illustrated by the data reported for systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis or by the plethora of studies on Th17 cells and biomarkers, particularly serum autoantibodies. Further, we are particularly intrigued by studies on the genomics, epigenetics, and microRNA at different stages of disease development or on the safe and effective use of abatacept acting on the costimulation of T and B cells in rheumatoid arthritis. We are convinced that the data published in 2013 represent a promising background for future developments that will exponentially impact the work of laboratory and clinical scientists over the next years.

  3. Serum PEDF levels are decreased in a spontaneous animal model for human autoimmune uveitis.

    PubMed

    Zipplies, Johanna K; Hauck, Stefanie M; Schoeffmann, Stephanie; Amann, Barbara; Stangassinger, Manfred; Ueffing, Marius; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2009-02-01

    Identification of biomarkers is of critical relevance toward improving diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune disorders. Serum markers are a desirable choice as sera are easily accessible and the development of assays for routine clinical detection prompts feasible. Autoimmune uveitis, a recurrent disease affecting the eye, is characterized by returning inflammatory attacks of the inner eye followed by variable periods of quiescent stages. Spontaneous equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) is the equine equivalent and serves as a model for the human disease. To identify potential biomarker candidates, we first systematically compared the proteomes of individual ERU cases with healthy controls by proteomic profiling using 2-D difference-gel-electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) followed by tandem mass spectrometry. A total of seven differentially expressed proteins were identified. Besides the upregulation of IgG and the significant lower expression of albumin, Antithrombin III, and Vitamin D binding protein, we found complement components C1q and C4, to be downregulated in uveitic state. Interestingly, Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a marker already detected by 2DE differential proteome analysis in ERU target tissues, vitreous and retina, was found to be also significantly downregulated in sera. The lower expression of PEDF in sera of horses with uveitis could be verified in a cohort of 116 ERU cases and 115 healthy controls. Our findings of a significant lower PEDF expression in ERU cases also in the periphery of the eye proves PEDF as a promising uveitis biomarker.

  4. Advances in Pemphigus and its Endemic Pemphigus Foliaceus (Fogo Selvagem) Phenotype: A Paradigm of Human Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Culton, Donna A.; Qian, Ye; Li, Ning; Rubenstein, David; Aoki, Valeria; Filhio, Gunter Hans; Rivitti, Evandro A.; Diaz, Luis A.

    2009-01-01

    Pemphigus encompasses a group of organ specific, antibody mediated autoimmune diseases of the skin characterized by keratinocyte detachment that leads to the development of blisters and erosions, which can become life-threatening. The pathogenic autoantibodies recognize desmogleins, which are members of the desmosomal cadherin family of cell adhesion molecules. Desmoglein 3 is targeted in pemphigus vulgaris while desmoglein 1 is targeted in pemphigus foliaceus and its endemic form, fogo selvagem. This review will briefly define the salient features of pemphigus and the proposed steps in pathogenesis. We will then summarize the most recent advances in three important areas of investigation: (i) epidemiologic, genetic, and immunologic features of fogo selvagem, (ii) molecular mechanisms of injury to the epidermis, and (iii) novel therapeutic strategies targeting specific steps in disease pathogenesis. The advances in each of these three seemingly separate areas contribute to the overall understanding of the pemphigus disease model. These recent advancements also underscore the dynamic interplay between the treatment of patients in a clinical setting and basic science research, which has led to an integrative understanding disease pathogenesis and treatment and allow pemphigus to serve as a paradigm of human autoimmunity. PMID:18838249

  5. Different Types of Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... lupus. Learn more about each type below. Systemic lupus erythematosus Systemic lupus is the most common form of lupus—it’s ... it is likely that these people already had systemic lupus, with the skin rash as their ... lupus erythematosus Drug-induced lupus is a lupus-like disease ...

  6. Evaluation of the reactivity of sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus against the human MCP1.

    PubMed

    Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Nóvoa, Ana; Teixeira, Natércia; Vasconcelos, Carlos Silva; Cerveira, Conceição; Castro e Melo, João; Carvalho, Manuel Cirne

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluates metaphase chromosome protein 1 (MCP1), a nuclear antigen, as a diagnostic marker for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Reactivity of sera from 114 Portuguese patients with autoimmune rheumatic disease or from healthy blood donors (HBD), against MCP1, produced in bacteria (bact-MCP1) or in its native form (native-MCP1), was determined by immunoblotting. Predictive and discriminative power of MCP1 reactivity for SLE diagnosis in disease-control groups was evaluated by logistic regression, its diagnostic value determined by receiver-operating characteristic analysis and compared with similar analysis of antinuclear antibody and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). We demonstrated that native-MCP1, in contrast to bact-MCP1, reacts with SLE sera with significant predictive and discriminative power versus other autoimmune diseases (odds ratio [OR] ≤3.537 and ≥3.265; area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve [AUC] ≤0.643 and ≥0.636) or versus HBD (OR = 5.006; AUC = 0.671), showing a good diagnostic power with high specificity (82.1% versus HBD) and low sensitivity for SLE, similar to those of dsDNA. The reactivity of SLE sera with native-MCP1 was shown to be dependent on the presence of phosphorylated residues. Native-MCP1 was shown to have diagnostic value as a specific marker for SLE diagnosis and, therefore, is a suitable substrate for a new antibody test. The widely reported importance of phosphorylated epitopes as targets for autoantibodies in SLE could also be confirmed for native-MCP1.

  7. Multiple autoimmune syndrome with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Harpreet, Singh; Kiran, B.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) is a condition characterised by three or more autoimmune disorders in a same individual. Familial, immunologic and infectious factors are implicated in the development of MAS. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old woman with co-existence of four auto-immune diseases, namely autoimmune hypothyroidism, Sjögren’s syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and celiac disease which leads to the final diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 with celiac disease. Patients with single autoimmune disorder are at 25% risk of developing other autoimmune disorders. The present case emphasises to clinicians that there is a need for continued surveillance for the development of new autoimmune disease in predisposed patients. PMID:28115785

  8. Multiple autoimmune syndrome with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Harpreet, Singh; Deepak, Jain; Kiran, B

    2016-01-01

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) is a condition characterised by three or more autoimmune disorders in a same individual. Familial, immunologic and infectious factors are implicated in the development of MAS. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old woman with co-existence of four auto-immune diseases, namely autoimmune hypothyroidism, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and celiac disease which leads to the final diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 with celiac disease. Patients with single autoimmune disorder are at 25% risk of developing other autoimmune disorders. The present case emphasises to clinicians that there is a need for continued surveillance for the development of new autoimmune disease in predisposed patients.

  9. A case of pure red cell aplasia and systemic lupus erythematosus caused by human parvovirus B19 infection.

    PubMed

    Ideguchi, Haruko; Ohno, Shigeru; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    2007-02-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19) rarely induces pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) in healthy hosts. Meanwhile B19 infection is often clinically similar to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and several cases have been reported wherein B19 actually stimulated SLE exacerbation in an immunocompetent subject. An 82-year-old healthy woman was diagnosed to have complicated with B19 infection and PRCA. Four weeks later, she had high fever, polyarthritis, and oral ulcers, additionally diagnosed with SLE, and subsequently, 15 mg of prednisone was started. This is the first case wherein B19 infection caused both PRCA and SLE in a healthy patient as far as our investigations are concerned.

  10. Reducing FLI1 Levels in the MRL/lpr Lupus Mouse Model Impacts T Cell Function by Modulating Glycosphingolipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Erin Morris; Thiyagarajan, Thirumagal; Bunni, Marlene A.; Basher, Fahmin; Roddy, Patrick O.; Siskind, Leah J.; Nietert, Paul J.; Nowling, Tamara K.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic Lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease caused, in part, by abnormalities in cells of the immune system including B and T cells. Genetically reducing globally the expression of the ETS transcription factor FLI1 by 50% in two lupus mouse models significantly improves disease measures and survival through an unknown mechanism. In this study we analyze the effects of reducing FLI1 in the MRL/lpr lupus prone model on T cell function. We demonstrate that adoptive transfer of MRL/lpr Fli1+/+ or Fli1+/- T cells and B cells into Rag1-deficient mice results in significantly decreased serum immunoglobulin levels in animals receiving Fli1+/- lupus T cells compared to animals receiving Fli1+/+ lupus T cells regardless of the genotype of co-transferred lupus B cells. Ex vivo analyses of MRL/lpr T cells demonstrated that Fli1+/- T cells produce significantly less IL-4 during early and late disease and exhibited significantly decreased TCR-specific activation during early disease compared to Fli1+/+ T cells. Moreover, the Fli1+/- T cells expressed significantly less neuraminidase 1 (Neu1) message and decreased NEU activity during early disease and significantly decreased levels of glycosphingolipids during late disease compared to Fli1+/+ T cells. FLI1 dose-dependently activated the Neu1 promoter in mouse and human T cell lines. Together, our results suggest reducing FLI1 in lupus decreases the pathogenicity of T cells by decreasing TCR-specific activation and IL-4 production in part through the modulation of glycosphingolipid metabolism. Reducing the expression of FLI1 or targeting the glycosphingolipid metabolic pathway in lupus may serve as a therapeutic approach to treating lupus. PMID:24040398

  11. B Cells in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, Christiane S.

    2012-01-01

    The role of B cells in autoimmune diseases involves different cellular functions, including the well-established secretion of autoantibodies, autoantigen presentation and ensuing reciprocal interactions with T cells, secretion of inflammatory cytokines, and the generation of ectopic germinal centers. Through these mechanisms B cells are involved both in autoimmune diseases that are traditionally viewed as antibody mediated and also in autoimmune diseases that are commonly classified as T cell mediated. This new understanding of the role of B cells opened up novel therapeutic options for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. This paper includes an overview of the different functions of B cells in autoimmunity; the involvement of B cells in systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and type 1 diabetes; and current B-cell-based therapeutic treatments. We conclude with a discussion of novel therapies aimed at the selective targeting of pathogenic B cells. PMID:23807906

  12. Autoimmunity in Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shradha; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common clinically significant primary immune defect. Although the hallmark of CVID is hypogammaglobulinemia, the intrinsic dysregulation of the immune system leads to defective T-cell activation and proliferation, as well as dendritic cell and cytokine defects. Although 70% to 80% of patients have had recurrent sinopulmonary infections, auto-immunity and inflammatory complications are also common. The most common autoimmune conditions are immune thrombocytopenic purpura and hemolytic anemia, but other autoimmune complications arise, including rheumatoid arthritis, pernicious anemia, primary biliary cirrhosis, thyroiditis, sicca syndrome, systemic lupus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Treatment of autoimmunity includes high-dose immunoglobulins, corticosteroids, selected immunosuppressants, and other immune modulators. This review focuses on autoimmune conditions associated with CVID, potential mechanisms of immune dysregulation, and therapeutic strategies. PMID:19671377

  13. The autoimmune disease risk allele of UBE2L3 in African American patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a recessive effect upon subphenotypes.

    PubMed

    Agik, Sandra; Franek, Beverly S; Kumar, Akaash A; Kumabe, Marissa; Utset, Tammy O; Mikolaitis, Rachel A; Jolly, Meenakshi; Niewold, Timothy B

    2012-01-01

    UBE2L3 is associated with susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis in European ancestry populations, and this locus has not been investigated fully in non-European populations. We studied the UBE2L3 risk allele for association with SLE, interferon-α (IFN-α), and autoantibodies in a predominantly African American SLE cohort. We studied 395 patients with SLE and 344 controls. The UBE2L3 rs5754217 polymorphism was genotyped using Taqman primer-probe sets, and IFN-α was measured using a reporter cell assay. The UBE2L3 rs5754217 T allele was strongly enriched in African American patients with anti-La antibodies as compared to controls, and a recessive model was the best fit for this association (OR 2.55, p = 0.0061). Serum IFN-α also demonstrated a recessive association with the rs5754217 genotype in African American patients, and the TT/anti-La-positive patients formed a significantly high IFN-α subgroup (p = 0.0040). Similar nonstatistically significant patterns of association were observed in the European American patients with SLE. Case-control analysis did not show large allele frequency differences, supporting the idea that this allele is most strongly associated with anti-La-positive patients. This pattern of recessive influence within a subgroup of patients may explain why this allele does not produce a strong signal in standard case-control studies, and subphenotypes should be included in future studies of UBE2L3. The interaction we observed between UBE2L3 genotype and autoantibodies upon serum IFN-α suggests a biological role for this locus in patients with SLE in vivo.

  14. The Autoimmune Disease Risk Allele of UBE2L3 in African American Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Recessive Effect Upon Subphenotypes

    PubMed Central

    AGIK, SANDRA; FRANEK, BEVERLY S.; KUMAR, AKAASH A.; KUMABE, MARISSA; UTSET, TAMMY O.; MIKOLAITIS, RACHEL A.; JOLLY, MEENAKSHI; NIEWOLD, TIMOTHY B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective UBE2L3 is associated with susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis in European ancestry populations, and this locus has not been investigated fully in non-European populations. We studied the UBE2L3 risk allele for association with SLE, interferon-α (IFN-α), and autoantibodies in a predominantly African American SLE cohort. Methods We studied 395 patients with SLE and 344 controls. The UBE2L3 rs5754217 polymorphism was genotyped using Taqman primer-probe sets, and IFN-α was measured using a reporter cell assay. Results The UBE2L3 rs5754217 T allele was strongly enriched in African American patients with anti-La antibodies as compared to controls, and a recessive model was the best fit for this association (OR 2.55, p = 0.0061). Serum IFN-α also demonstrated a recessive association with the rs5754217 genotype in African American patients, and the TT/anti-La-positive patients formed a significantly high IFN-α subgroup (p = 0.0040). Similar nonstatistically significant patterns of association were observed in the European American patients with SLE. Case-control analysis did not show large allele frequency differences, supporting the idea that this allele is most strongly associated with anti-La-positive patients. Conclusion This pattern of recessive influence within a subgroup of patients may explain why this allele does not produce a strong signal in standard case-control studies, and subphenotypes should be included in future studies of UBE2L3. The interaction we observed between UBE2L3 genotype and autoantibodies upon serum IFN-α suggests a biological role for this locus in patients with SLE in vivo. PMID:22045845

  15. Lupus mastitis.

    PubMed

    Cerveira, Isabel; Costa Matos, L; Garrido, António; Oliveira, Elda; Solheiro, Helena; Bastos, Marina; Cortez Vaz, F; Nogueira Martins, F

    2006-10-01

    We report a case of a 28-year-old female with the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) referred to our breast pathology consultancy in 2002 due to a left breast nodule. Further investigation revealed bilateral coarse calcifications. Biopsy was consistent with a diagnosis of lupus mastitis.

  16. Aluminum in the central nervous system (CNS): toxicity in humans and animals, vaccine adjuvants, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C A; Tomljenovic, L

    2013-07-01

    We have examined the neurotoxicity of aluminum in humans and animals under various conditions, following different routes of administration, and provide an overview of the various associated disease states. The literature demonstrates clearly negative impacts of aluminum on the nervous system across the age span. In adults, aluminum exposure can lead to apparently age-related neurological deficits resembling Alzheimer's and has been linked to this disease and to the Guamanian variant, ALS-PDC. Similar outcomes have been found in animal models. In addition, injection of aluminum adjuvants in an attempt to model Gulf War syndrome and associated neurological deficits leads to an ALS phenotype in young male mice. In young children, a highly significant correlation exists between the number of pediatric aluminum-adjuvanted vaccines administered and the rate of autism spectrum disorders. Many of the features of aluminum-induced neurotoxicity may arise, in part, from autoimmune reactions, as part of the ASIA syndrome.

  17. Assessment of autoimmunity-inducing potential using the brown Norway rat challenge model.

    PubMed

    White, K L; David, D W; Butterworth, L F; Klykken, P C

    2000-03-15

    The development of autoimmune disease in humans is thought to occur as a result of the interactions of a genetic predisposition of the host and environmental factors. There is evidence that treatment with certain drugs and exposure to environmental toxicants increase the risk associated with the development and severity of autoimmune disease. When exposed to certain chemicals, Brown Norway (BN) rats develop autoimmune disease similar to human systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) characterized by elevation of antibody levels to self and non-self antigens which can result in the formation of immune complexes and lead to a fatal glomerulonephritis. A unique characteristic of the BN rat model is that the increase in IgE is self-limiting with levels eventually returning to normal. The objective of these studies was to determine if the BN rat and the self-limiting nature of the IgE response could be used in identifying compounds capable of initiating autoimmune responses. Two compounds known to produce autoimmunity, mercuric chloride and D-penicillamine, were studied as were, trichloroethylene and silicone gel, two agents suspected of inducing autoimmune disease. The results indicated that the BN rat model may prove useful for detecting compounds with the potential to produce autoimmunity, particularly if a HgCl(2) challenge is incorporated into the evaluation.

  18. Vitamin D in systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Theodor, Emanuel; Segal, Ramit Maoz; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-10-01

    Lately, vitamin D has been linked with metabolic and immunological processes, which established its role as an essential component of human health preservation. Vitamin D has been defined as natural immune modulators, and upon activation of its receptors (VDRs), it regulates calcium metabolism, cellular growth, proliferation and apoptosis, and other immunological functions. Epidemiological data underline a strong correlation between poor vitamin D status and higher risk for chronic inflammatory illnesses of various etiologies, including autoimmune diseases. Epidemiological, genetic, and basic studies indicated a potential role of vitamin D in the pathogenesis of certain systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. These studies demonstrate correlation between low vitamin D and prevalence of diseases. In addition, VDRs' polymorphisms observed in some of these autoimmune diseases may further support a plausible pathogenic link. Notably, for some autoimmune disease, no correlation with vitamin D levels could be confirmed. Thus, in the current review we present the body of evidence regarding the plausible roles of vitamin D and VDR's polymorphism in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We summarize the data regarding systemic (i.e., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, etc.) and organ-specific (i.e., multiple sclerosis, diabetes mellitus, primary biliary cirrhosis, etc.) autoimmune diseases, in which low level of vitamin D was found comparing to healthy subjects. In addition, we discuss the correlations between vitamin D levels and clinical manifestations and/or activity of diseases. In this context, we address the rational for vitamin D supplementation in patients suffering from autoimmune diseases. Further studies addressing the mechanisms by which vitamin D affects autoimmunity and the proper supplementation required are needed.

  19. Analysis of genetic regulation of chicken spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis, an animal model of human Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Vasícek, D; Vasícková, K; Kaiser, P; Drozenová, R; Cítek, J; Hala, K

    2001-12-01

    We analyzed the genetic regulation of spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis (SAT) by means of crosses between Obese strain (OS) chickens with the disease, and healthy inbred chicken of line CB. Mononuclear cell infiltration of the thyroid was used as a criterion for the disease. We confirmed the existence of one recessive gene, regulating the susceptibility of the thyroid gland to autoimmune attack. From the frequency of progeny with the thyroid infiltration in backcross and F2 generations, we presume the existence of one or two additional dominant genes coding for abnormal reactivity of the immune system. The total number of genes regulating SAT is therefore a maximum of three. We attempted to identify disease-specific transcripts responsible for the initiation of the disease using suppression subtractive hybridization of RNA prepared from OS and CB thyroid lobes, obtained from 3-day-old chicks. From forward and reverse subtractions, we recovered a fragment mixture in the range of 300 bp to 1.5 kb. In total, 768 clones were screened and 9 were sequenced. Four of them represent unknown sequences. Two, specific for OS thyroid, correspond to envelope genes of avian endogenous viruses (ev)-1, -3 and -6. The expressed product of an env gene could be iodinated in the thyroid gland and become involved in thyroglobulin metabolism. This may be another possible mechanism driving SAT, as iodine modulates SAT in the chicken. Further experiments will be required to prove this hypothesis. Two thyroid-specific clones had significant alignment to human thyroglobulin, and one clone to human coatomer protein. We analyzed, by RFLP and RNA dot blots, cosegregation between clones for the env gene of endogenous viruses as the most promising candidate for involvement in driving SAT; we did not find differences at the DNA and RNA levels. We can possibly therefore rule out a simple involvement of env genes with the initiation of disease.

  20. Lupus pathobiology based on genomics.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder with complex genetic underpinnings. This review attempts to assemble the myriad of genomic findings to build a clearer picture of the pathobiology of SLE to serve as a guide for therapeutics. Over 100 genes are now known for SLE, and several more penetrant ones have led to the emergence of more defined lupus phenotypes. Also discussed here are the targeted therapies that have come up on the horizon and the specific biologic mechanisms of more traditional therapies which have only recently been explored. The diagnostic toolbox has been enhanced by the addition of new antibodies, gene expression signatures, and mutation panels. This provides an opportunity to piece together the lupus puzzle and even revisit the clinical classification of SLE.

  1. Omega-3 fatty acids in inflammation and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Simopoulos, Artemis P

    2002-12-01

    Among the fatty acids, it is the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) which possess the most potent immunomodulatory activities, and among the omega-3 PUFA, those from fish oil-eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)--are more biologically potent than alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). Some of the effects of omega-3 PUFA are brought about by modulation of the amount and types of eicosanoids made, and other effects are elicited by eicosanoid-independent mechanisms, including actions upon intracellular signaling pathways, transcription factor activity and gene expression. Animal experiments and clinical intervention studies indicate that omega-3 fatty acids have anti-inflammatory properties and, therefore, might be useful in the management of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Coronary heart disease, major depression, aging and cancer are characterized by an increased level of interleukin 1 (IL-1), a proinflammatory cytokine. Similarly, arthritis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and lupus erythematosis are autoimmune diseases characterized by a high level of IL-1 and the proinflammatory leukotriene LTB(4) produced by omega-6 fatty acids. There have been a number of clinical trials assessing the benefits of dietary supplementation with fish oils in several inflammatory and autoimmune diseases in humans, including rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, psoriasis, lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis and migraine headaches. Many of the placebo-controlled trials of fish oil in chronic inflammatory diseases reveal significant benefit, including decreased disease activity and a lowered use of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  2. [Involvement of Syk in pathology of systemic autoimmune disease].

    PubMed

    Iwata, Shigeru; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Niiro, Hiroaki; Nakano, Kazuhisa; Wang, Sheau-Pey; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Akashi, Koichi; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2012-01-01

    Biological products have proven its high efficacy on autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Meanwhile, small molecular drugs have attracted attention over the years because of its availability of oral administration and cost effectiveness. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is a 72 kDa protein tyrosine kinase widely expressed on cells that are involved in the immune system and inflammation such as B cells, T cells, macrophages and synovial fibroblast. Syk is involved in intracellular signaling of the multi-chain immune receptors, including B cell receptor (BCR), ζchain of T-cell receptor (TCR), FcR and integrins, which contains the immune-receptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). Recently, Syk inhibitor fostamatinib has exerted potent therapeutic efficacy against autoimmune and allergic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), bronchial asthma and thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Moreover, Syk blockade prevented the development of skin and kidney lesions in lupus-prone mice, however the mechanism of action is unclear. We have revealed that Syk-mediated BCR-signaling is prerequisite for optimal induction of toll-like receptor (TLR)-9, thereby allowing efficient propagation of CD40- and TLR9- signaling in human B cells. These results indicate that inhibition of Syk have a potential to regulate B-cell mediated inflammatory diseases such as SLE. We here document the in vitro and in vivo effects of a Syk inhibitor for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, mainly in RA and SLE.

  3. IL-10 regulates murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhinan; Bahtiyar, Gul; Zhang, Na; Liu, Lanzhen; Zhu, Ping; Robert, Marie E; McNiff, Jennifer; Madaio, Michael P; Craft, Joe

    2002-08-15

    MRL/MpJ-Tnfrsf6(lpr) (MRL/MpJ-Fas(lpr); MRL-Fas(lpr)) mice develop a spontaneous lupus syndrome closely resembling human systemic lupus erythematosus. To define the role of IL-10 in the regulation of murine lupus, IL-10 gene-deficient (IL-10(-/-)) MRL-Fas(lpr) (MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-)) mice were generated and their disease phenotype was compared with littermates with one or two copies of an intact IL-10 locus (MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(+/-) and MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(+/+) mice, respectively). MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-) mice developed severe lupus, with earlier appearance of skin lesions, increased lymphadenopathy, more severe glomerulonephritis, and higher mortality than their IL-10-intact littermate controls. The increased severity of lupus in MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-) mice was closely associated with enhanced IFN-gamma production by both CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells and increased serum concentration of IgG2a anti-dsDNA autoantibodies. The protective effect of IL-10 in this lupus model was further supported by the observation that administration of rIL-10 reduced IgG2a anti-dsDNA autoantibody production in wild-type MRL-Fas(lpr) animals. In summary, our results provide evidence that IL-10 can down-modulate murine lupus through inhibition of pathogenic Th1 cytokine responses. Modulation of the level of IL-10 may be of potential therapeutic benefit for human lupus.

  4. Identification of the long noncoding RNA NEAT1 as a novel inflammatory regulator acting through MAPK pathway in human lupus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feifei; Wu, Lingling; Qian, Jie; Qu, Bo; Xia, Shiwei; La, Ting; Wu, Yanfang; Ma, Jianyang; Zeng, Jing; Guo, Qiang; Cui, Yong; Yang, Wanling; Huang, Jiaqi; Zhu, Wei; Yao, Yihong; Shen, Nan; Tang, Yuanjia

    2016-12-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently been identified to be tightly linked to diverse human diseases. However, our knowledge of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)-related lncRNAs remains limited. In the present study we investigated the contribution of the lncRNA NEAT1 to the pathogenesis of SLE. Here, we found NEAT1 expression was abnormally increased in SLE patients and predominantly expressed in human monocytes. Additionally, NEAT1 expression was induced by LPS via p38 activation. Silencing NEAT1 significantly reduced the expression of a group of chemokines and cytokines, including IL-6, CXCL10, etc., which were induced by LPS continuously and in late stages. Furthermore, it was identified the involvement of NEAT1 in TLR4-mediated inflammatory process was through affecting the activation of the late MAPK signaling pathway. Importantly, there was a positive correlation between NEAT1 and clinical disease activity in SLE patients. In conclusion, the increased NEAT1 expression may be a potential contributor to the elevated production of a number of cytokines and chemokines in SLE patients. Our findings suggest lncRNA contributes to the pathogenesis of lupus and provides potentially novel target for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. PD-1/PD-L and autoimmunity: A growing relationship.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Mohammad Reza; Aslani, Saeed; Salmaninejad, Arash; Javan, Mohammad Reza; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-12-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1) and its ligands, namely PD-L1 and PD-L2, are one of the key factors responsible for inhibitory T cell signaling, mediating the mechanisms of tolerance and providing immune homeostasis. Mounting evidence demonstrates that impaired PD-1:PD-L function plays an important role in a variety of autoimmune diseases such as Type 1 diabetes (T1D), encephalomyelitis, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), Behcet's disease (BD), myasthenia gravis (MG), autoimmune uveitis (AU), Sjögren's syndrome (SjS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), myocarditis, and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). By investigating the candidate genes, genome-wide association studies, and identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in PD-1 gene in humans, it has been shown that there is a higher risk in relevant genetic associations with developing autoimmune diseases in certain ethnic groups. In this review we have tried to present a comprehensive role of PD-1:PD-L in all recently studied autoimmune diseases.

  6. Novel structural features of autoantibodies in murine lupus: a possible superantigen binding site?

    PubMed

    Zack, D J; Wong, A L; Weisbart, R H

    1994-12-01

    The stimulus for the production of anti-DNA autoantibodies in lupus remains unknown. Since double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is a weak immunogen, other stimuli such as B cell superantigens or anti-idiotypic antibodies may provide an alternative mechanism for their production. The presence of regulatory determinants on autoantibodies might be revealed through their structural characterization, but they have eluded detection, perhaps because they may be three-dimensional and require closer analysis. In this report we cloned and sequenced the heavy chain variable region (VH) of a monoclonal anti-dsDNA antibody, mAb 3E10, derived from MRL/lpr mice with lupus nephritis previously shown to express an idiotype associated with nephritis in murine and human lupus. We now show that mAb 3E10 VH contains novel structural features unrelated to DNA binding which are shared only by a subset of autoantibodies expressed in murine lupus. These lupus autoantibodies can be distinguished from antibodies of non-autoimmune strains by the presence of a specific sequence at the junction of the diversity and joining genes combined with the use of variable region genes with conserved sequences in framework 1 (FR1) and FR3. The location of the novel sequences indicates the possibility of a three-dimensional solvent-exposed determinant located distant from the classical antigen binding site that could regulate their production, possibly through binding B cell superantigens or other infectious agents.

  7. Regulation of human autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene translation by miR-220b.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Tomohito; Noguchi, Yukiko; Shindo, Mieko; Morita, Yoshifumi; Oda, Yoshie; Yoshida, Eiko; Hamada, Hiroko; Harada, Mine; Shiokawa, Yuichi; Nishida, Takahiro; Tominaga, Ryuji; Kikushige, Yoshikane; Akashi, Koichi; Kudoh, Jun; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Tanaka, Yuka; Umemura, Tsukuru; Taniguchi, Taketoshi; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Kobayashi, Takashi; Mitsuyama, Masao; Kurisaki, Hironori; Katsuta, Hitoshi; Nagafuchi, Seiho

    2013-11-01

    Although mutations of autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene are responsible for autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), presenting a wide spectrum of many characteristic and non-characteristic clinical features, some patients lack AIRE gene mutations. Therefore, something other than a mutation, such as dysregulation of AIRE gene, may be a causal factor for APECED or its related diseases. However, regulatory mechanisms for AIRE gene expression and/or translation have still remained elusive. We found that IL-2-stimulated CD4(+) T (IL-2T) cells showed a high expression of AIRE gene, but very low AIRE protein production, while Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B (EBV-B) cells express both AIRE gene and AIRE protein. By using microarray analysis, we could identify miR-220b as a possible regulatory mechanism for AIRE gene translation in IL-2T cells. Here we report that miR-220b significantly reduced the expression of AIRE protein in AIRE gene with 3'UTR region transfected 293T cells, whereas no alteration of AIRE protein production was observed in the open reading frame of AIRE gene alone transfected cells. In addition, anti-miR-220b reversed the inhibitory function of miR-220b for the expression of AIRE protein in AIRE gene with 3'UTR region transfected cells. Moreover, when AIRE gene transfected cells with mutated 3'UTR were transfected with miR-220b, no reduction of AIRE protein production was observed. Taken together, it was concluded that miR-220b inhibited the AIRE gene translation through the 3'UTR region of AIRE gene, indicating that miR-220b could serve as a regulator for human AIRE gene translation. © 2013.

  8. Presence of antibodies against self human leukocyte antigen class II molecules in autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Yamagiwa, Satoshi; Kamimura, Hiroteru; Takamura, Masaaki; Genda, Takuya; Ichida, Takafumi; Nomoto, Minoru; Aoyagi, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) can arise de novo after liver transplantation (LT) for non-autoimmune liver diseases. Considering the identical features of de novo AIH after LT and classical AIH, as well as the importance of anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies in graft rejection, we investigated the presence of circulating anti-HLA class II antibodies in the sera of 35 patients with AIH, 30 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and 30 healthy donors using fluorescent dye-impregnated beads bound to HLA molecules. We then investigated the allele specificity of the antibodies and identified the HLA alleles in each patient using DNA-based HLA typing. We also examined HLA class II expression in liver samples using immunohistochemistry. Anti-HLA class II antibodies were detected significantly more frequently in the patients with AIH (88.1%) than in the patients with PBC (33.3%) or in the healthy donors (13.3%) (both P <0.01). We confirmed that the anti-HLA class II antibodies in the AIH patients showed specificity for several HLA class II alleles, including self HLA class II alleles. Moreover, positive reactivity with anti-self HLA class II antibodies was associated with higher serum transaminase levels. In conclusion, we demonstrated, for the first time, that antibodies against self HLA class II alleles were detectable in patients with AIH. Our results suggest that an antibody-mediated immune response against HLA class II molecules on hepatocytes may be involved in the pathogenesis or acceleration of liver injury in AIH.

  9. Autoimmunity and Asbestos Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pfau, Jean C.; Serve, Kinta M.; Noonan, Curtis W.

    2014-01-01

    Despite a body of evidence supporting an association between asbestos exposure and autoantibodies indicative of systemic autoimmunity, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), a strong epidemiological link has never been made to specific autoimmune diseases. This is in contrast with another silicate dust, crystalline silica, for which there is considerable evidence linking exposure to diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Instead, the asbestos literature is heavily focused on cancer, including mesothelioma and pulmonary carcinoma. Possible contributing factors to the absence of a stronger epidemiological association between asbestos and autoimmune disease include (a) a lack of statistical power due to relatively small or diffuse exposure cohorts, (b) exposure misclassification, (c) latency of clinical disease, (d) mild or subclinical entities that remain undetected or masked by other pathologies, or (e) effects that are specific to certain fiber types, so that analyses on mixed exposures do not reach statistical significance. This review summarizes epidemiological, animal model, and in vitro data related to asbestos exposures and autoimmunity. These combined data help build toward a better understanding of the fiber-associated factors contributing to immune dysfunction that may raise the risk of autoimmunity and the possible contribution to asbestos-related pulmonary disease. PMID:24876951

  10. Living with Lupus (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lupus The three main types of lupus are: Systemic lupus erythematosus, or SLE , which can affect multiple organs in ... which can cause scarring; and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) , ... systemic lupus. Drug-induced lupus , which accounts for about ...

  11. Systemic lupus erythematosus following HPV immunization or infection?

    PubMed

    Soldevilla, H F; Briones, S F R; Navarra, S V

    2012-02-01

    The link between autoimmunity and infectious agents has been strongly suggested by reports of lupus or lupus-like syndromes following immunization. This report describes three patients with either newly diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or SLE flare, following vaccination for human papilloma virus (HPV). CASE 1: A 17-year-old female completed two doses of HPV vaccine uneventfully. Two months later, she developed arthralgias with pruritic rashes on both lower extremities, later accompanied by livedo reticularis, bipedal edema with proteinuria, anemia, leucopenia, hypocomplementemia and high titers of anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA). Kidney biopsy showed International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society Class III lupus nephritis. She was started on high dose steroids followed by pulse cyclophosphamide therapy protocol for lupus nephritis, and subsequently went into remission. CASE 2: A 45-year-old housewife, previously managed for 11 years as having rheumatoid arthritis, had been in clinical remission for a year when she received two doses of HPV immunization. Four months later, she developed fever accompanied by arthritis, malar rash, oral ulcers, recurrent ascites with intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and behavioral changes. Cranial MRI showed vasculitic lesions on the frontal and parietal lobes. Laboratory tests showed anemia with leucopenia, hypocomplementemia, proteinuria, ANA positive at 1:320, and antibodies against dsDNA, Ro/SSA, La/SSB and histone. She improved following pulse methylprednisolone with subsequent oral prednisone combined with hydroxychloroquine. CASE 3: A 58-year-old housewife diagnosed with SLE had been in clinical remission for 8 years when she received two doses of HPV immunization. Three months later, she was admitted to emergency because of a 1-week history of fever, malar rash, easy fatigability, cervical lymph nodes, gross hematuria and pallor. Laboratory exams showed severe

  12. Photosensitivity in Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Andrew; Chong, Benjamin F.

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) encompasses several different forms including acute, subacute, and chronic manifestations that may or may not occur in the setting of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a well-known exacerbating factor for CLE, with photosensitivity comprising one of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) diagnostic criteria for SLE. However, discerning true photosensitivity in this population is difficult due to the broad language utilized by the ACR and the delayed-onset nature of photosensitive lupus lesions. Photoprovocation testing provides a more objective method to measure photosensitivity, but photoprovocation trials demonstrate significantly varying results due to protocol variations. Despite UVR’s deleterious effect on lupus patients, UVA-1 may have therapeutic benefits as shown by some observations on murine and human lupus subjects. Accurately discerning photosensitivity has diagnostic implications for SLE and provides motivation for greater patient adherence to photoprotective measures. PMID:23281691

  13. [The role of BAFF in autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Takashi; Sato, Shinichi

    2005-10-01

    B cell activating factor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF) is a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily member best known for its role in the survival and maturation of B cells. BAFF is a ligand for three TNF receptor superfamily members: B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA), transmembrane activator and calcium-modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI), and BAFF receptor (BAFF-R). Among them, BAFF-R plays the central role in the BAFF system, whereas TACI plays the inhibitory role. BAFF/BAFF receptors appear to span nearly all stages of B-lineage differentiation, ranging from the development, selection, and homeostasis of naive primary B cells to the maintenance of long-lived bone marrow plasma cells. Furthermore, excessive BAFF rescues self-reactive B cells from anergy, which may play a crucial role in the induction and development of autoimmunity. Mice overexpressing BAFF exhibit increased B cell numbers in spleen and lymph node and autoimmune phenotype similar to patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren's syndrome. Furthermore, inhibition of BAFF by TACI-Ig and BAFFR-Ig has been successful in treating murine models of SLE and rheumatoid arthritis. In humans, previous reports have shown elevated serum BAFF levels in SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, and systemic sclerosis patients. Thus, the dysregulation of BAFF/BAFF receptor system may contribute to induction and development of autoimmune diseases and become one of important therapeutic targets.

  14. Two functional lupus-associated BLK promoter variants control cell-type- and developmental-stage-specific transcription.

    PubMed

    Guthridge, Joel M; Lu, Rufei; Sun, Harry; Sun, Celi; Wiley, Graham B; Dominguez, Nicolas; Macwana, Susan R; Lessard, Christopher J; Kim-Howard, Xana; Cobb, Beth L; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kelly, Jennifer A; Langefeld, Carl D; Adler, Adam J; Harley, Isaac T W; Merrill, Joan T; Gilkeson, Gary S; Kamen, Diane L; Niewold, Timothy B; Brown, Elizabeth E; Edberg, Jeffery C; Petri, Michelle A; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Kimberly, Robert P; Freedman, Barry I; Stevens, Anne M; Boackle, Susan A; Criswell, Lindsey A; Vyse, Tim J; Behrens, Timothy W; Jacob, Chaim O; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Sivils, Kathy L; Choi, Jiyoung; Joo, Young Bin; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Shen, Nan; Qian, Xiaoxia; Tsao, Betty P; Scofield, R Hal; Harley, John B; Webb, Carol F; Wakeland, Edward K; James, Judith A; Nath, Swapan K; Graham, Robert R; Gaffney, Patrick M

    2014-04-03

    Efforts to identify lupus-associated causal variants in the FAM167A/BLK locus on 8p21 are hampered by highly associated noncausal variants. In this report, we used a trans-population mapping and sequencing strategy to identify a common variant (rs922483) in the proximal BLK promoter and a tri-allelic variant (rs1382568) in the upstream alternative BLK promoter as putative causal variants for association with systemic lupus erythematosus. The risk allele (T) at rs922483 reduced proximal promoter activity and modulated alternative promoter usage. Allelic differences at rs1382568 resulted in altered promoter activity in B progenitor cell lines. Thus, our results demonstrated that both lupus-associated functional variants contribute to the autoimmune disease association by modulating transcription of BLK in B cells and thus potentially altering immune responses. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Sensitivity to foot shock in autoimmune NZB x NZW F1 hybrid mice.

    PubMed

    Schrott, L M; Crnic, L S

    1994-11-01

    Prior studies have demonstrated deficits in active avoidance learning in young (12-week-old) mice that develop lupus-like autoimmunity. Because foot shock is the motivating stimulus in this task, sensitivity to foot shock was assessed in autoimmune NZB x NZW F1 hybrid (B/W) and nonautoimmune NZW female mice. Responses to shock at levels ranging from 0.05 to 1.6 mA were recorded twice during the development of autoimmunity. At 12 weeks of age, B/W mice did not differ from NZW mice in sensitivity to shock. However, at 24 weeks of age, when antibody levels were elevated, sensitivity to foot shock decreased in B/W mice at low shock levels and increased at high shock levels. A neurological battery revealed no deficits that could account for these effects. However, IgM anti-DNA antibody levels were positively correlated with responsiveness to high levels of shock. The change in the pattern of sensitivity at 24 weeks may be due to a combination of disease-related sensory impairment at low shock levels and hyperalgesia at high shock levels. The response to high levels of shock may also be an indication of enhanced emotionality, an interpretation consistent with reports in other lupus-prone strains and affective disorders in humans with lupus.

  16. Oxidative Stress and Treg and Th17 Dysfunction in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that involves multiple organ systems. The pathogenic mechanisms that cause SLE remain unclear; however, it is well recognized that the immune balance is disturbed and that this imbalance contributes to the autoimmune symptoms of SLE. Oxidative stress represents an imbalance between the production and manifestation of reactive oxygen species and the ability of the biological system to readily detoxify the reactive intermediates or to repair the resulting damage. In humans, oxidative stress is involved in many diseases, including atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, and autoimmune diseases. Numerous studies have confirmed that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of SLE. This review mainly focuses on the recent research advances with respect to oxidative stress and regulatory T (Treg)/helper T 17 (Th17) cell dysfunction in the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:27597882

  17. Pre-B cell leukemia homeobox 1 is associated with lupus susceptibility in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Cuda, Carla M; Li, Shiwu; Liang, Shujuan; Yin, Yiming; Potula, Hari Hara S K; Xu, Zhiwei; Sengupta, Mayami; Chen, Yifang; Butfiloski, Edward; Baker, Henry; Chang, Lung-Ji; Dozmorov, Igor; Sobel, Eric S; Morel, Laurence

    2012-01-15

    Sle1a.1 is part of the Sle1 susceptibility locus, which has the strongest association with lupus nephritis in the NZM2410 mouse model. In this study, we show that Sle1a.1 results in the production of activated and autoreactive CD4(+) T cells. Additionally, Sle1a.1 expression reduces the peripheral regulatory T cell pool, as well as induces a defective response of CD4(+) T cells to the retinoic acid expansion of TGF-β-induced regulatory T cells. At the molecular level, Sle1a.1 corresponds to an increased expression of a novel splice isoform of Pbx1, Pbx1-d. Pbx1-d overexpression is sufficient to induce an activated/inflammatory phenotype in Jurkat T cells and to decrease their apoptotic response to retinoic acid. PBX1-d is expressed more frequently in the CD4(+) T cells from lupus patients than from healthy controls, and its presence correlates with an increased central memory T cell population. These findings indicate that Pbx1 is a novel lupus susceptibility gene that regulates T cell activation and tolerance.

  18. Interferon-alpha regulates the dynamic balance between human activated regulatory and effector T cells: implications for antiviral and autoimmune responses.

    PubMed

    Golding, Amit; Rosen, Antony; Petri, Michelle; Akhter, Ehtisham; Andrade, Felipe

    2010-09-01

    An adequate effector response against pathogens and its subsequent inactivation after pathogen clearance are critical for the maintenance of immune homeostasis. This process involves an initial phase of T-cell effector (Teff) activation followed by the expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs), a unique cell population that limits Teff functions. However, significant questions remain unanswered about the mechanisms that regulate the balance between these cell populations. Using an in vitro system to mimic T-cell activation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we analysed the patterns of Treg and Teff activation, with special attention to the role of type I interferon (IFN-I). Interestingly, we found that IFN-alpha, either exogenously added or endogenously induced, suppressed the generation of CD4(+) FoxP3(HI )IFN-gamma(Neg) activated Tregs (aTregs) while simultaneously promoting propagation of CD4(+) FoxP3(Low/Neg )IFN-gamma(Pos) activated Teffs (aTeffs). We also showed that IFN-alpha-mediated inhibition of interleukin (IL)-2 production may play an essential role in IFN-alpha-induced suppression of aTregs. In order to test our findings in a disease state with chronically elevated IFN-alpha, we investigated systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Plasma from patients with SLE was found to contain IFN-I activity that suppressed aTreg generation. Furthermore, anti-CD3 activated SLE PBMCs exhibited preferential expansion of aTeffs with a very limited increase in aTreg numbers. Together, these observations support a model whereby a transient production of IFN-alpha (such as is seen in an early antiviral response) may promote CD4 effector functions by delaying aTreg generation, but a chronic elevation of IFN-alpha may tip the aTeff:aTreg balance towards aTeffs and autoimmunity.

  19. Immune complex-mediated autoimmunity in a patient With Smith-Magenis syndrome (del 17p11.2).

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianying; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C; Vilboux, Thierry; Smith, Ann C M; Peterson, Erik J

    2014-08-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a sporadic congenital disorder involving multiple organ systems caused by chromosome 17p11.2 deletions. Smith-Magenis syndrome features craniofacial and skeletal anomalies, cognitive impairment, and neurobehavioral abnormalities. In addition, some SMS patients may exhibit hypogammaglobulinemia. We report the first case of SMS-associated autoimmunity in a woman who presented with adult onset of multiple autoimmune disorders, including systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, and autoimmune hepatitis. Molecular analysis using single-nucleotide polymorphism array confirmed a de novo 3.8-Mb deletion (breakpoints, chr17: 16,660,721-20,417,975), resulting in haploinsufficiency for TACI (transmembrane activator and CAML interactor). Our data are consistent with potential loss of function for the BAFF (B cell-activating factor) receptor TACI as a contributing factor to human autoimmune phenomena.

  20. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review.

    PubMed

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis.

  1. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis. PMID:25915571

  2. Proinsulin multi-peptide immunotherapy induces antigen-specific regulatory T cells and limits autoimmunity in a humanized model

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, V B; Nikolic, T; Pearce, V Q; Demengeot, J; Roep, B O; Peakman, M

    2015-01-01

    Peptide immunotherapy (PIT) is a targeted therapeutic approach, involving administration of disease-associated peptides, with the aim of restoring antigen-specific immunological tolerance without generalized immunosuppression. In type 1 diabetes, proinsulin is a primary antigen targeted by the autoimmune response, and is therefore a strong candidate for exploitation via PIT in this setting. To elucidate the optimal conditions for proinsulin-based PIT and explore mechanisms of action, we developed a preclinical model of proinsulin autoimmunity in a humanized HLA-DRB1*0401 transgenic HLA-DR4 Tg mouse. Once proinsulin-specific tolerance is broken, HLA-DR4 Tg mice develop autoinflammatory responses, including proinsulin-specific T cell proliferation, interferon (IFN)-γ and autoantibody production. These are preventable and quenchable by pre- and post-induction treatment, respectively, using intradermal proinsulin-PIT injections. Intradermal proinsulin-PIT enhances proliferation of regulatory [forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3+)CD25high] CD4 T cells, including those capable of proinsulin-specific regulation, suggesting this as its main mode of action. In contrast, peptide delivered intradermally on the surface of vitamin D3-modulated (tolerogenic) dendritic cells, controls autoimmunity in association with proinsulin-specific IL-10 production, but no change in regulatory CD4 T cells. These studies define a humanized, translational model for in vivo optimization of PIT to control autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes and indicate that dominant mechanisms of action differ according to mode of peptide delivery. PMID:26206289

  3. CD24: from a Hematopoietic Differentiation Antigen to a Genetic Risk Factor for Multiple Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yixin; Zhao, Ming; Xiang, Bo; Chang, Christopher; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-02-01

    The autoantibody is an essential characteristic of inflammatory disorders, including autoimmune diseases. Although the exact pathogenic mechanisms of these diseases remain elusive, accumulated evidence has implicated that genetic factors play important roles in autoimmune inflammation. Among these factors, CD24 was first identified as a heat-stable antigen in 1978 and first successfully cloned in 1990. Thereafter, its functional roles have been intensively investigated in various human diseases, especially autoimmune diseases and cancers. It is currently known that CD24 serves as a costimulatory factor of T cells that regulate their homeostasis and proliferation, while in B cells, CD24 is functionally involved in cell activation and differentiation. CD24 can enhance autoimmune diseases in terms of its protective role in the clonal deletion of autoreactive thymocytes. Furthermore, CD24 deficiency has been linked to mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Finally, CD24 genetic variants, including single-nucleotide polymorphisms and deletions, are etiologically relevant to autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Therefore, CD24 is a promising biomarker and novel therapeutic target for autoimmune diseases.

  4. The Effect of Type 1 IFN on Human Aortic Endothelial Cell Function In Vitro: Relevance to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Ray, David W.; Zeef, Leo A.H.; O'Neill, Terence; Bruce, Ian N.; Alexander, M. Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The etiopathogenesis of premature CVD is not fully understood, but recently interferon-alpha (IFNα) has been implicated as a contributing factor. Since IFNα has been associated with both disease activity and endothelial dysfunction in lupus patients, we aimed to determine whether IFNα has direct effects on human aortic endothelial cell (HAoEC) function in vitro. We studied the function of IFNα2b-treated HAoECs in terms of cell proliferation, capillary-like network formation, and nitric oxide (NO) generation. Changes in gene expression were also analyzed using an exon gene array. IFNα2b regulated the expression of 198 genes, including recognized interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Gene ontology analysis showed over-representation of genes involved in antigen presentation and host response to virus but no significant changes in clusters of genes recognized as important in endothelial cell activation or dysfunction. HAoEC proliferation, tubule formation, and NO bioavailability were unchanged, suggesting that IFNα in isolation does not have a direct impact on aortic endothelial cell function. PMID:24444308

  5. The effect of type 1 IFN on human aortic endothelial cell function in vitro: relevance to systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, John A; Ray, David W; Zeef, Leo A H; O'Neill, Terence; Bruce, Ian N; Alexander, M Yvonne

    2014-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The etiopathogenesis of premature CVD is not fully understood, but recently interferon-alpha (IFNα) has been implicated as a contributing factor. Since IFNα has been associated with both disease activity and endothelial dysfunction in lupus patients, we aimed to determine whether IFNα has direct effects on human aortic endothelial cell (HAoEC) function in vitro. We studied the function of IFNα2b-treated HAoECs in terms of cell proliferation, capillary-like network formation, and nitric oxide (NO) generation. Changes in gene expression were also analyzed using an exon gene array. IFNα2b regulated the expression of 198 genes, including recognized interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Gene ontology analysis showed over-representation of genes involved in antigen presentation and host response to virus but no significant changes in clusters of genes recognized as important in endothelial cell activation or dysfunction. HAoEC proliferation, tubule formation, and NO bioavailability were unchanged, suggesting that IFNα in isolation does not have a direct impact on aortic endothelial cell function.

  6. Autoimmune blistering dermatoses as systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, Snejina; Drenovska, Kossara; Manuelyan, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune blistering dermatoses are examples of skin-specific autoimmune disorders that can sometimes represent the cutaneous manifestation of a multiorgan disease due to potential common pathogenic mechanisms. As soon as a distinct autoimmune blistering dermatosis is diagnosed, it is imperative to consider its potential systemic involvement, as well as the autoimmune and inflammatory conditions that are frequently associated with it. In paraneoplastic pemphigus/paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome, the internal organs (particularly the lungs) are affected by the autoimmune injury. Pemphigus erythematosus may manifest with overlapping serologic and immunohistologic features of lupus erythematosus. In patients with bullous pemphigoid, there is a greater prevalence of neurologic disease, possibly caused by cross-reactivity of the autoantibodies with isoforms of bullous pemphigoid antigens expressed in the skin and brain. Anti-laminin 332 pemphigoid shows an increased risk for adenocarcinomas. Patients with anti-p200 pemphigoid often suffer from psoriasis. A rare form of pemphigoid with antibodies against the α5 chain of type IV collagen is characterized by underlying nephropathia. Particularly interesting is the association of linear IgA disease or epidermolysis bullosa acquisita with inflammatory bowel disease. Dermatitis herpetiformis is currently regarded as the skin manifestation of gluten sensitivity. Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus is part of the clinical spectrum of systemic lupus erythematosus, a prototypic autoimmune disease with multisystem involvement.

  7. Neuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Alexandra; Kao, Amy H

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is the least understood, yet perhaps the most prevalent manifestation of lupus. The pathogenesis of NPSLE is multifactorial and involves various inflammatory cytokines, autoantibodies, and immune complexes resulting in vasculopathic, cytotoxic and autoantibody-mediated neuronal injury. The management of NPSLE is multimodal and has not been subjected to rigorous study. Different treatment regimens include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, anticoagulation, and immunosuppressives such as cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and methotrexate. For refractory NPSLE, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), plasmapheresis, and rituximab have been used. Adjunctive symptomatic treatment complements these therapies by targeting mood disorders, psychosis, cognitive impairment, seizures or headaches. Several new biological agents are being tested including Belimumab, a human monoclonal antibody that targets B lymphocyte stimulator. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, treatment, and new potential therapies for neuropsychiatric manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:22379459

  8. Use of Humanized Mice to Study the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Koboziev, Iurii; Jones-Hall, Yava; Valentine, John F.; Webb, Cynthia Reinoso; Furr, Kathryn L.; Grisham, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of disease have been used extensively by the research community for the past several decades to better understand the pathogenesis of different diseases as well as assess the efficacy and toxicity of different therapeutic agents. Retrospective analyses of numerous preclinical intervention studies using mouse models of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases reveal a generalized failure to translate promising interventions or therapeutics into clinically-effective treatments in patients. Although several possible reasons have been suggested to account for this generalized failure to translate therapeutic efficacy from the laboratory bench to the patient’s bedside, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the mouse immune system may not adequately recapitulate the immuno-pathological mechanisms observed in human diseases. Indeed, it is well-known that >80 major differences exist between mouse and human immunology; all of which contribute to significant differences in immune system development, activation and responses to challenges in innate and adaptive immunity. This inconvenient reality has prompted investigators to attempt to humanize the mouse immune system in order to address important, human-specific questions that are impossible to study in patients. The successful long-term engraftment of human hemato-lymphoid cells in mice would provide investigators with a relatively inexpensive, small animal model to study clinically-relevant mechanisms as well as facilitate the evaluation of human-specific therapies in vivo. The discovery that targeted mutation of the IL-2 receptor common gamma chain in lymphopenic mice allows for the long-term engraftment of functional human immune cells has advanced greatly our ability to humanize the mouse immune system. The objective of this review is to present a brief overview of the recent advances that have been made in the development and use of humanized mice with special emphasis on autoimmune and chronic

  9. Epigenetics in autoimmune diseases: Pathogenesis and prospects for therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zimu; Zhang, Rongxin

    2015-10-01

    Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in genome function without underlying modifications in their nucleotide sequence. Disorders of epigenetic processes, which involve DNA methylation, histone modification, non-coding RNA and nucleosome remodeling, may influence chromosomal stability and gene expression, resulting in complicated syndromes. In the past few years, it has been disclosed that identified epigenetic alterations give rise to several typical human autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and multiple sclerosis (MS). These emerging epigenetic studies provide new insights into autoimmune diseases. The identification of specific epigenetic dysregulation may inspire more discoveries of other uncharacterized mechanisms. Further elucidation of the biological functions and clinical significance of these epigenetic alterations may be exploited for diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic benefits.

  10. Diagnosing Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter Facebook Pinterest Email Print Sort and Filter I want to sort by: Sort all topics ... tailored to your symptoms. article What does it mean when lupus is "active"? Disease activity is caused ...

  11. Increased expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7 and 9 and other cytokines in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients: ethnic differences and potential new targets for therapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Lyn-Cook, Beverly D; Xie, Chenghui; Oates, Jarren; Treadwell, Edward; Word, Beverly; Hammons, George; Wiley, Kenneth

    2014-09-01

    Increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon, tumor necrosis factors (TNFs) and specific interleukins (ILs) has been found in a number of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematous (SLE). These cytokines are induced by toll-like receptors (TLRs). Toll-like receptors are activated in response to accumulation of apoptotic bodies. These receptors play critical roles in innate immune systems. Increased levels of interferon-alpha (INF-α) have also been found in many SLE patients and often correlate with disease severity. The objectives of this study were to examine the expression of selected TLRs and cytokines that have been identified in animal models and some limited human studies in a group of African Americans (AA) and European Americans (EA) women with lupus in comparison to age-matched non-lupus women. Blood samples were consecutively obtained by informed consent from 286 patients, 153 lupus and 136 non-lupus, seen in the rheumatology clinics at East Carolina University. Cytokines were analyzed from blood serum using enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) for IL-6 and INF-α. Total RNA was isolated, using a Paxgene kit, from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of African American and European American women blood samples. Quantitative real-time PCR using the CFX real-time system was conducted on all samples to determine TLRs 7 and 9, as well as INF-α expression. Toll-like receptor 7 (p<0.01) and 9 (p=0.001) expression levels were significantly increased in lupus patients compared to age-matched controls. African American women with lupus had a 2-fold increase in TLR-9 expression level when compared to their healthy controls or European American lupus patients. However, there was no ethnic difference in expression of TLR-7 in lupus patients. INF-α expression was significantly higher in lupus patients (p<0.0001) and also showed ethnic difference in expression. Serum levels revealed significant increases in expression of IL-6

  12. Novel treatments for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Gayed, Mary; Gordon, Caroline

    2010-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that is associated with the production of autoantibodies, and with considerable morbidity and mortality. There has been much interest in developing more specific therapies for this disease, which is currently managed with immunosuppressive drugs, predominantly corticosteroids, azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide, in combination with hydroxychloroquine. Mycophenolate mofetil has been demonstrated to be as efficacious as cyclophosphamide in patients with lupus nephritis, and is being used increasingly in the clinic despite not being licensed for this indication. Novel methods of reducing autoantibody formation in SLE include the use of mAbs that modulate and/or deplete B-cells (anti-CD22 and anti-CD20 antibodies, respectively), or that interfere with the stimulatory effects of the soluble factor B-lymphocyte stimulator (anti-BLys antibodies). Alternative approaches include the use of atacicept (Merck Serono), a transmembrane activator and calcium modulator ligand interactor (TACI)-Ig fusion protein, which inhibits B-cell stimulation by binding to BLys and a profileration-inducing ligand (APRIL), or toleragens such as abetimus. Blocking costimulatory molecule interactions, such as the CD40-CD40 ligand interaction with mAbs and the CD28-B7 interaction with a soluble cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4)-IgG1 construct (abatacept), has also been attempted as a therapeutic strategy for SLE. The most promising strategy for a new drug for SLE is belimumab (Human Genome Sciences/GlaxoSmithKline), an anti-BLys antibody, as two phase III clinical trials with this drug recently met their primary endpoints. In this review, these novel approaches to the treatment of SLE, including the potential of targeting cytokine pathways involved in autoimmunity, are discussed.

  13. Intestinal dysbiosis and probiotic applications in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gislane Lelis Vilela; Leite, Aline Zazeri; Higuchi, Bruna Stevanato; Gonzaga, Marina Ignácio; Mariano, Vânia Sammartino

    2017-09-01

    In humans, a complex interaction between the host immune system and commensal microbiota is required to maintain gut homeostasis. In this symbiotic relationship, the microbiota provides carbohydrate fermentation and digestion, vitamin synthesis and gut-associated lymphoid tissue development, as well as preventing colonization by pathobionts, whereas the host offers a niche and nutrients for the survival of the microbiota. However, when this mutualistic relationship is compromised and an altered interaction between immune cells and microorganisms occurs, the gut microbiota may cause or contribute to the establishment of infectious diseases and trigger autoimmune diseases. Researchers have made efforts to clarify the role of the microbiota in autoimmune disease development and find new therapeutic approaches to treat immune-mediated diseases. However, the exact mechanisms involved in the dysbiosis and breakdown of the gut epithelial barrier are currently unknown. Here, we provide a general overview of studies describing gut microbiota perturbations in animal models of autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Moreover, we include the main studies concerning dysbiosis in humans and a critical discussion of the existing data on the use of probiotics in these autoimmune diseases. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Btk-specific inhibition blocks pathogenic plasma cell signatures and myeloid cell–associated damage in IFNα-driven lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Katewa, Arna; Wang, Yugang; Hackney, Jason A.; Huang, Tao; Suto, Eric; Ramamoorthi, Nandhini; Bremer, Meire; Chen, Jacob Zhi; Crawford, James J.; Currie, Kevin S.; Blomgren, Peter; DeVoss, Jason; DiPaolo, Julie A.; Hau, Jonathan; Lesch, Justin; DeForge, Laura E.; Lin, Zhonghua; Liimatta, Marya; Lubach, Joseph W.; McVay, Sami; Modrusan, Zora; Nguyen, Allen; Poon, Chungkee; Wang, Jianyong; Liu, Lichuan; Lee, Wyne P.; Wong, Harvey; Young, Wendy B.; Townsend, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is often associated with exaggerated B cell activation promoting plasma cell generation, immune-complex deposition in the kidney, renal infiltration of myeloid cells, and glomerular nephritis. Type-I IFNs amplify these autoimmune processes and promote severe disease. Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) inhibitors are considered novel therapies for SLE. We describe the characterization of a highly selective reversible Btk inhibitor, G-744. G-744 is efficacious, and superior to blocking BAFF and Syk, in ameliorating severe lupus nephritis in both spontaneous and IFNα-accelerated lupus in NZB/W_F1 mice in therapeutic regimens. Selective Btk inhibition ablated plasmablast generation, reduced autoantibodies, and — similar to cyclophosphamide — improved renal pathology in IFNα-accelerated lupus. Employing global transcriptional profiling of spleen and kidney coupled with cross-species human modular repertoire analyses, we identify similarities in the inflammatory process between mice and humans, and we demonstrate that G-744 reduced gene expression signatures essential for splenic B cell terminal differentiation, particularly the secretory pathway, as well as renal transcriptional profiles coupled with myeloid cell–mediated pathology and glomerular plus tubulointerstitial disease in human glomerulonephritis patients. These findings reveal the mechanism through which a selective Btk inhibitor blocks murine autoimmune kidney disease, highlighting pathway activity that may translate to human SLE. PMID:28405610

  15. Regulated necrosis-related molecule mRNA expression in humans and mice and in murine acute tissue injury and systemic autoimmunity leading to progressive organ damage, and progressive fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Honarpisheh, Mohsen; Desai, Jyaysi; Marschner, Julian A.; Weidenbusch, Marc; Lech, Maciej; Vielhauer, Volker; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Mulay, Shrikant R.

    2016-01-01

    The species-specific, as well as organ-specific expression of regulated necrosis (RN)-related molecules, is not known. We determined the expression levels of tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1), receptor activated protein kinase (RIPK)1, RIPK3, mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL), CASP8, Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD), cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein (CIAP)1, CIAP2, glutathione peroxidase-4 (GPX4), cyclophilin D (CYPD), CASP1, NLRP3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1) in human and mouse solid organs. We observed significant differences in expression of these molecules between human and mice. In addition, we characterized their expression profiles in acute as well as persistent tissue injury and chronic tissue remodelling using acute and chronic kidney injury models. We observed that the degree and pattern of induction of RN-related molecules were highly dependent on the trigger and disease pathogenesis. Furthermore, we studied their expression patterns in mice with lupus-like systemic autoimmunity, which revealed that the expression of MLKL, GPX4 and PARP1 significantly increased in the spleen along disease progression and CASP1, RIPK1, RIPK3 and CYPD were higher at the earlier stages but were significantly decreased in the later stages. In contrast, in the kidney, the expression of genes involved in pyroptosis, e.g. NLRP3 and CASP1 were significantly increased and TNFR1, RIPK1, RIPK3, CIAP1/2 and GPX4 were significantly decreased along the progression of lupus nephritis (LN). Thus, the organ- and species-specific expression of RN-related molecules should be considered during designing experiments, interpreting the results as well as extrapolating the conclusions from one species or organ to another species or organ respectively. PMID:27811014

  16. Occupational exposures and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Glinda S; Miller, Frederick W; Germolec, Dori R

    2002-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are pathologic conditions defined by abnormal autoimmune responses and characterized by immune system reactivity in the form of autoantibodies and T cell responses to self-structures. Here we review the limited but growing epidemiologic and experimental literature pertaining to the association between autoimmune diseases and occupational exposure to silica, solvents, pesticides, and ultraviolet radiation. The strongest associations (i.e., relative risks of 3.0 and higher) have been documented in investigations of silica dust and rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, scleroderma and glomerulonephritis. Weaker associations are seen, however, for solvent exposures (in scleroderma, undifferentiated connective tissue disease, and multiple sclerosis) and for farming or pesticide exposures (in rheumatoid arthritis). Experimental studies suggest two different effects of these exposures: an enhanced proinflammatory (TH1) response (e.g., TNF-alpha and IL-1 cytokine production with T cell activation), and increased apoptosis of lymphocytes leading to exposure to or modification of endogenous proteins and subsequent autoantibody formation. The former is a general mechanism that may be relevant across a spectrum of autoimmune diseases, whereas the latter may be a mechanism more specific to particular diseases (e.g., ultraviolet radiation, Ro autoantibodies, and lupus). Occupational exposures are important risk factors for some autoimmune diseases, but improved exposure assessment methods and better coordination between experimental/animal models and epidemiologic studies are needed to define these risks more precisely.

  17. Autoimmunity in 2016.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo

    2017-08-01

    The number of peer-reviewed articles published during the 2016 solar year and retrieved using the "autoimmunity" key word remained stable while gaining a minimal edge among the immunology articles. Nonetheless, the quality of the publications has been rising significantly and, importantly, acquisitions have become available through scientific journals dedicated to immunology or autoimmunity. Major discoveries have been made in the fields of systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmunity of the central nervous system, vasculitis, and seronegative spondyloarthrithritides. Selected examples include the role of IL17-related genes and long noncoding RNAs in systemic lupus erythematosus or the effects of anti-pentraxin 3 (PTX3) in the treatment of this paradigmatic autoimmune condition. In the case of rheumatoid arthritis, there have been reports of the role of induced regulatory T cells (iTregs) or fibrocytes and T cell interactions with exciting implications. The large number of studies dealing with neuroimmunology pointed to Th17 cells, CD56(bright) NK cells, and low-level TLR2 ligands as involved in multiple sclerosis, along with a high salt intake or the micriobiome-derived Lipid 654. Lastly, we focused on the rare vasculitides to which numerous studies were devoted and suggested that unsuspected cell populations, including monocytes, mucosal-associated invariant T cells, and innate lymphoid cells, may be crucial to ANCA-associated manifestations. This brief and arbitrary discussion of the findings published in 2016 is representative of a promising background for developments that will enormously impact the work of laboratory scientists and physicians at an exponential rate.

  18. The interferon-inducible HIN-200 gene family in apoptosis and inflammation: implication for autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Mondini, Michele; Costa, Silvia; Sponza, Simone; Gugliesi, Francesca; Gariglio, Marisa; Landolfo, Santo

    2010-04-01

    The Ifi-200/HIN-200 gene family encodes highly homologous human (IFI16, myeloid cell nuclear differentiation antigen, absent in melanoma 2, and IFIX) and murine proteins (Ifi202a, Ifi202b, Ifi203, Ifi204, Ifi205, and Ifi206), which are induced by type I and II interferons (IFN). These proteins have been described as regulators of cell proliferation and differentiation and, more recently, several reports have suggested their involvement in both apoptotic and inflammatory processes. The relevance of HIN-200 proteins in human disease is beginning to be clarified, and emerging experimental data indicate their role in autoimmunity. Autoimmune disorders are sustained by perpetual activation of inflammatory process and a link between autoimmunity and apoptosis has been clearly established. Moreover, the interferon system is now considered as a key player in autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythemathosus, systemic sclerosis, and Sjögren's syndrome, and it is therefore conceivable to hypothesize that HIN-200 may be among the pivotal mediators of IFN activity in autoimmune disease. In particular, the participation of HIN-200 proteins in apoptosis and inflammation could support their potential role in autoimmunity.

  19. Linking susceptibility genes and pathogenesis mechanisms using mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Crampton, Steve P.; Morawski, Peter A.; Bolland, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) represents a challenging autoimmune disease from a clinical perspective because of its varied forms of presentation. Although broad-spectrum steroids remain the standard treatment for SLE, they have many side effects and only provide temporary relief from the symptoms of the disease. Thus, gaining a deeper understanding of the genetic traits and biological pathways that confer susceptibility to SLE will help in the design of more targeted and effective therapeutics. Both human genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and investigations using a variety of mouse models of SLE have been valuable for the identification of the genes and pathways involved in pathogenesis. In this Review, we link human susceptibility genes for SLE with biological pathways characterized in mouse models of lupus, and discuss how the mechanistic insights gained could advance drug discovery for the disease. PMID:25147296

  20. Initial clinical trial of epratuzumab (humanized anti-CD22 antibody) for immunotherapy of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Dörner, Thomas; Kaufmann, Joerg; Wegener, William A; Teoh, Nick; Goldenberg, David M; Burmester, Gerd R

    2006-01-01

    B cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), so the safety and activity of anti-B cell immunotherapy with the humanized anti-CD22 antibody epratuzumab was evaluated in SLE patients. An open-label, single-center study of 14 patients with moderately active SLE (total British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) score 6 to 12) was conducted. Patients received 360 mg/m2 epratuzumab intravenously every 2 weeks for 4 doses with analgesic/antihistamine premedication (but no steroids) prior to each dose. Evaluations at 6, 10, 18 and 32 weeks (6 months post-treatment) follow-up included safety, SLE activity (BILAG score), blood levels of epratuzumab, B and T cells, immunoglobulins, and human anti-epratuzumab antibody (HAHA) titers. Total BILAG scores decreased by > or = 50% in all 14 patients at some point during the study (including 77% with a > or = 50% decrease at 6 weeks), with 92% having decreases of various amounts continuing to at least 18 weeks (where 38% showed a >/= 50% decrease). Almost all patients (93%) experienced improvements in at least one BILAG B- or C-level disease activity at 6, 10 and 18 weeks. Additionally, 3 patients with multiple BILAG B involvement at baseline had completely resolved all B-level disease activities by 18 weeks. Epratuzumab was well tolerated, with a median infusion time of 32 minutes. Drug serum levels were measurable for at least 4 weeks post-treatment and detectable in most samples at 18 weeks. B cell levels decreased by an average of 35% at 18 weeks and remained depressed at 6 months post-treatment. Changes in routine safety laboratory tests were infrequent and without any consistent pattern, and there was no evidence of immunogenicity or significant changes in T cells, immunoglobulins, or autoantibody levels. In patients with mild to moderate active lupus, 360 mg/m2 epratuzumab was well tolerated, with evidence of clinical improvement after the first infusion and durable clinical

  1. Initial clinical trial of epratuzumab (humanized anti-CD22 antibody) for immunotherapy of systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Dörner, Thomas; Kaufmann, Joerg; Wegener, William A; Teoh, Nick; Goldenberg, David M; Burmester, Gerd R

    2006-01-01

    B cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), so the safety and activity of anti-B cell immunotherapy with the humanized anti-CD22 antibody epratuzumab was evaluated in SLE patients. An open-label, single-center study of 14 patients with moderately active SLE (total British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) score 6 to 12) was conducted. Patients received 360 mg/m2 epratuzumab intravenously every 2 weeks for 4 doses with analgesic/antihistamine premedication (but no steroids) prior to each dose. Evaluations at 6, 10, 18 and 32 weeks (6 months post-treatment) follow-up included safety, SLE activity (BILAG score), blood levels of epratuzumab, B and T cells, immunoglobulins, and human anti-epratuzumab antibody (HAHA) titers. Total BILAG scores decreased by ≥ 50% in all 14 patients at some point during the study (including 77% with a ≥ 50% decrease at 6 weeks), with 92% having decreases of various amounts continuing to at least 18 weeks (where 38% showed a ≥ 50% decrease). Almost all patients (93%) experienced improvements in at least one BILAG B- or C-level disease activity at 6, 10 and 18 weeks. Additionally, 3 patients with multiple BILAG B involvement at baseline had completely resolved all B-level disease activities by 18 weeks. Epratuzumab was well tolerated, with a median infusion time of 32 minutes. Drug serum levels were measurable for at least 4 weeks post-treatment and detectable in most samples at 18 weeks. B cell levels decreased by an average of 35% at 18 weeks and remained depressed at 6 months post-treatment. Changes in routine safety laboratory tests were infrequent and without any consistent pattern, and there was no evidence of immunogenicity or significant changes in T cells, immunoglobulins, or autoantibody levels. In patients with mild to moderate active lupus, 360 mg/m2 epratuzumab was well tolerated, with evidence of clinical improvement after the first infusion and durable clinical benefit

  2. Nonbilayer Phospholipid Arrangements Are Toll-Like Receptor-2/6 and TLR-4 Agonists and Trigger Inflammation in a Mouse Model Resembling Human Lupus.

    PubMed

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Tescucano, Alonso; Astudillo, Horacio; Reséndiz, Albany; Landa, Carla; España, Luis; Serafín-López, Jeanet; Estrada-García, Iris; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by dysregulated activation of T and B cells and autoantibodies to nuclear antigens and, in some cases, lipid antigens. Liposomes with nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements induce a disease resembling human lupus in mice, including IgM and IgG antibodies against nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements. As the effect of these liposomes on the innate immune response is unknown and innate immune system activation is necessary for efficient antibody formation, we evaluated the effect of these liposomes on Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, cytokine production, proinflammatory gene expression, and T, NKT, dendritic, and B cells. Liposomes induce TLR-4- and, to a lesser extent, TLR-2/TLR-6-dependent signaling in TLR-expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. Mice with the lupus-like disease had increased serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, C3a and C5a; they also had more TLR-4-expressing splenocytes, a higher expression of genes associated with TRIF-dependent TLR-4-signaling and complement activation, and a lower expression of apoptosis-related genes, compared to healthy mice. The percentage of NKT and the percentage and activation of dendritic and B2 cells were also increased. Thus, TLR-4 and TLR-2/TLR-6 activation by nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements triggers an inflammatory response that could contribute to autoantibody production and the generation of a lupus-like disease in mice.

  3. Nonbilayer Phospholipid Arrangements Are Toll-Like Receptor-2/6 and TLR-4 Agonists and Trigger Inflammation in a Mouse Model Resembling Human Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Tescucano, Alonso; Astudillo, Horacio; Reséndiz, Albany; Landa, Carla; España, Luis; Serafín-López, Jeanet; Estrada-García, Iris; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by dysregulated activation of T and B cells and autoantibodies to nuclear antigens and, in some cases, lipid antigens. Liposomes with nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements induce a disease resembling human lupus in mice, including IgM and IgG antibodies against nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements. As the effect of these liposomes on the innate immune response is unknown and innate immune system activation is necessary for efficient antibody formation, we evaluated the effect of these liposomes on Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, cytokine production, proinflammatory gene expression, and T, NKT, dendritic, and B cells. Liposomes induce TLR-4- and, to a lesser extent, TLR-2/TLR-6-dependent signaling in TLR-expressing human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. Mice with the lupus-like disease had increased serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, C3a and C5a; they also had more TLR-4-expressing splenocytes, a higher expression of genes associated with TRIF-dependent TLR-4-signaling and complement activation, and a lower expression of apoptosis-related genes, compared to healthy mice. The percentage of NKT and the percentage and activation of dendritic and B2 cells were also increased. Thus, TLR-4 and TLR-2/TLR-6 activation by nonbilayer phospholipid arrangements triggers an inflammatory response that could contribute to autoantibody production and the generation of a lupus-like disease in mice. PMID:26568960

  4. Human thyroglobulin peptide p2340 induces autoimmune thyroiditis in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Karras, Evangelos; Yang, Huan; Lymberi, Peggy; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2005-06-01

    In a previous study we demonstrated that the human thyroglobulin (hTg) peptide p2340 (aa 2340-2359) can stimulate a T cell response and elicit experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) in AKR/J (H-2(k)) mice. In the present study we examined whether p2340 can induce EAT in single HLA class II DR3 transgenic mice. This peptide was found to be immunogenic at the T cell level in DR3 mice, since it induced specific proliferative responses, as well as IL-2 and IFN-gamma secretion in secondary cultures of peptide-primed lymph node cells (LNC). Immunization of HLA-DR3 mice with p2340 in CFA elicited EAT (infiltration index of 1 to 2) in eight of nine mice. Peptide-primed LNC responded to intact hTg, whereas, hTg-primed LNC did not respond to p2340 in culture, suggesting that p2340 contains subdominant T cell epitope(s). P2340 was also found to be immunogenic at the B cell level, since strong p2340-specific IgG response was detected in all transgenic mice tested. Thus, we provide evidence for a pathogenic role of an hTg peptide in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice. Therefore, p2340 could be presented by DR3 molecule in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and participate in the development of the disease.

  5. Neo-epitopes on methylglyoxal modified human serum albumin lead to aggressive autoimmune response in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jyoti; Mir, Abdul Rouf; Habib, Safia; Siddiqui, Sheelu Shafiq; Ali, Asif; Moinuddin

    2016-05-01

    Glyco-oxidation of proteins has implications in the progression of diabetes type 2. Human serum albumin is prone to glyco-oxidative attack by sugars and methylglyoxal being a strong glycating agent may have severe impact on its structure and consequent role in diabetes. This study has probed the methylglyoxal mediated modifications of HSA, the alterations in its immunological characteristics and possible role in autoantibody induction. We observed an exposure of chromophoric groups, loss in the fluorescence intensity, generation of AGEs, formation of cross-linked products, decrease in α-helical content, increase in hydrophobic clusters, FTIR band shift, attachment of methylglyoxal to HSA and the formation of N(ε)-(carboxyethyl) lysine in the modified HSA, when compared to the native albumin. MG-HSA was found to be highly immunogenic with additional immunogenicity invoking a highly specific immune response than its native counterpart. The binding characteristics of circulating autoantibodies in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients showed the generation of anti-MG-HSA auto-antibodies in the these patients, that are preferentially recognized by the modified albumin. We propose that MG induced structural perturbations in HSA, result in the generation of neo-epitopes leading to an aggressive auto-immune response and may contribute to the immunopathogenesis of diabetes type 2 associated complications.

  6. Immunomodulation by Transplanted Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Oligodendroglial Progenitors in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heechul; Walczak, Piotr; Kerr, Candace; Galpoththawela, Chulani; Gilad, Assaf A.; Muja, Naser; Bulte, Jeff W.M.

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation of embryonic stem cells and their neural derivatives can lead to amelioration of the disease symptoms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS). Oligodendroglial progenitors (OPs), derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC, HES-1), were labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide and transduced with luciferase. At 7 days following induction of EAE in C57/BL6 mice, 1 × 106 cells were transplanted in the ventricles of C57/BL6 mice and noninvasively monitored by magnetic resonance and bioluminescence imaging. Cells were found to remain within the cerebroventricular system and did not survive for more than 10 days. However, EAE mice that received hESC-OPs showed a significant improvement in neurological disability scores (0.9 ± 0.2; n = 12) compared to that of control animals (3.3 ± 0.4; n = 12) at day 15 post-transplantation. Histopathologically, transplanted hESC-OPs generated TREM2-positive CD45 cells, increased TIMP-1 expression, confined inflammatory cells within the subarachnoid space, and gave rise to higher numbers of Foxp3-positive regulatory T cells in the spinal cord and spleen. Our results suggest that transplantation of hESC-OPs can alter the pathogenesis of EAE through immunomodulation, potentially providing new avenues for stem cell-based treatment of MS. PMID:22949039

  7. Ranking the impact of human health disorders on gut metabolism: systemic lupus erythematosus and obesity as study cases.

    PubMed

    Rojo, David; Hevia, Arancha; Bargiela, Rafael; López, Patricia; Cuervo, Adriana; González, Sonia; Suárez, Ana; Sánchez, Borja; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Milani, Christian; Ventura, Marco; Barbas, Coral; Moya, Andrés; Suárez, Antonio; Margolles, Abelardo; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-02-06

    Multiple factors have been shown to alter intestinal microbial diversity. It remains to be seen, however, how multiple collective pressures impact the activity in the gut environment and which, if any, is positioned as a dominant driving factor determining the final metabolic outcomes. Here, we describe the results of a metabolome-wide scan of gut microbiota in 18 subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 17 healthy control subjects and demonstrate a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) between the two groups. Healthy controls could be categorized (p < 0.05) based on their body mass index (BMI), whereas individuals with SLE could not. We discuss the prevalence of SLE compared with BMI as the dominant factor that regulates gastrointestinal microbial metabolism and provide plausible explanatory causes. Our results uncover novel perspectives with clinical relevance for human biology. In particular, we rank the importance of various pathophysiologies for gut homeostasis.

  8. Continuous administration of anti-interleukin 10 antibodies delays onset of autoimmunity in NZB/W F1 mice

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have previously shown that continuous administration of anti- interleukin 10 (anti-IL-10) antibodies (Abs) to BALB/c mice modifies endogenous levels of autoantibodies, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF- alpha), and interferon gamma, three immune mediators known to affect the development of autoimmunity in "lupus-prone" New Zealand black/white (NZB/W)F1 mice. To explore the consequences of IL-10 neutralization in NZB/W F1 mice, animals were injected two to three times per week from birth until 8-10 mo of age with anti-IL-10 Abs or with isotype control Abs. Anti-IL-10 treatment substantially delayed onset of autoimmunity in NZB/W F1 mice as monitored either by overall survival, or by development of proteinuria, glomerulonephritis, or autoantibodies. Survival at 9 mo was increased from 10 to 80% in anti- IL-10-treated mice relative to Ig isotype-treated controls. This protection against autoimmunity appeared to be due to an anti-IL-10- induced upregulation of endogenous TNF-alpha, since anti-IL-10- protected NZB/W F1 mice rapidly developed autoimmunity when neutralizing anti-TNF-alpha Abs were introduced at 30 wk along with the anti-IL-10 treatment. Consistent with the protective role of anti-IL-10 treatment in these experiments, continuous administration of IL-10 from 4 until 38 wk of age accelerated the onset of autoimmunity in NZB/W F1 mice. The same period of continuous IL-10 administration did not appear to be toxic to, or cause development of lupus-like autoimmunity in normal BALB/c mice. These data suggest that IL-10 antagonists may be beneficial in the treatment of human systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:8270873

  9. Cloning of a gene encoding a lupus-associated human autoantibody VK region using the polymerase chain reaction and degenerate primers.

    PubMed

    Chastagner, P; Thèze, J; Zouali, M

    1991-05-30

    The variable light-chain-encoding gene of a human autoantibody secreted by a B-cell hybridoma derived from a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus was amplified using the polymerase chain reaction and degenerate primers. After cloning, the nucleotide sequence of the EcoRI-HindIII region was determined. It is highly homologous to a previously described gene expressed by a human lymphoid cell line.

  10. Transient Expression of Transgenic IL-12 in Mouse Liver Triggers Unremitting Inflammation Mimicking Human Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Gil-Farina, Irene; Di Scala, Marianna; Salido, Eduardo; López-Franco, Esperanza; Rodríguez-García, Estefania; Blasi, Mercedes; Merino, Juana; Aldabe, Rafael; Prieto, Jesús; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2016-09-15

    The etiopathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) remains poorly understood. In this study, we sought to develop an animal model of human AIH to gain insight into the immunological mechanisms driving this condition. C57BL/6 mice were i.v. injected with adeno-associated viral vectors encoding murine IL-12 or luciferase under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Organ histology, response to immunosuppressive therapy, and biochemical and immunological parameters, including Ag-specific humoral and cellular response, were analyzed. Mechanistic studies were carried out using genetically modified mice and depletion of lymphocyte subpopulations. Adeno-associated virus IL-12-treated mice developed histological, biochemical, and immunological changes resembling type 1 AIH, including marked and persistent liver mononuclear cell infiltration, hepatic fibrosis, hypergammaglobulinemia, anti-nuclear and anti-smooth muscle actin Abs, and disease remission with immunosuppressive drugs. Interestingly, transgenic IL-12 was short-lived, but endogenous IL-12 expression was induced, and both IL-12 and IFN-γ remained elevated during the entire study period. IFN-γ was identified as an essential mediator of liver damage, and CD4 and CD8 T cells but not NK, NKT, or B cells were essential executors of hepatic injury. Furthermore, both MHC class I and MHC class II expression was upregulated at the hepatocellular membrane, and induction of autoreactive liver-specific T cells was detected. Remarkably, although immunoregulatory mechanisms were activated, they only partially mitigated liver damage. Thus, low and transient expression of transgenic IL-12 in hepatocytes causes loss of tolerance to hepatocellular Ags, leading to chronic hepatitis resembling human AIH type 1. This model provides a practical tool to explore AIH pathogenesis and novel therapies.

  11. The human anti-thyroid peroxidase autoantibody repertoire in Graves' and Hashimoto's autoimmune thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Chardès, Thierry; Chapal, Nicolas; Bresson, Damien; Bès, Cédric; Giudicelli, Véronique; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Péraldi-Roux, Sylvie

    2002-06-01

    Human anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) autoantibodies (aAb) are generated during autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). Within recent years, increasing knowledge of the TPO-specific aAb repertoire, gained mainly by the use of combinatorial library methodology, has led to the cloning and sequencing of around 180 human anti-TPO aAb. Analysis of the immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) genes encoding the TPO aAb in the ImMunoGeneTics database (IMGT) (http://imgt.cines.fr) reveals major features of the TPO-directed aAb repertoire during AITD. Heavy chain VH domains of TPO-specific aAb from Graves' disease patients preferentially use D proximal IGHV1 genes, whereas those from Hashimoto's thyroiditis are characterized more frequently by IGHV3 genes, mainly located in the middle of the IGH locus. A large proportion of the anti-TPO heavy chain VH domains is obtained following a VDJ recombination process that uses inverted D genes. J distal IGKV1 and IGLV1 genes are predominantly used in TPO aAb. In contrast to the numerous somatic hypermutations in the TPO-specific heavy chains, there is only limited amino acid replacement in most of the TPO-specific light chains, particularly in those encoded by J proximal IGLV or IGKV genes, suggesting that a defect in receptor editing can occur during aAb generation in AITD. Among the predominant IGHV1 or IGKV1 TPO aAb, conserved somatic mutations are the hallmark of the TPO aAb repertoire. The aim of this review is to provide new insights into aAb generation against TPO, a major autoantigen involved in AITD.

  12. Sex-based differences in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Ortona, Elena; Pierdominici, Marina; Maselli, Angela; Veroni, Caterina; Aloisi, Francesca; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by an exaggerated immune response leading to damage and dysfunction of specific or multiple organs and tissues. Most autoimmune diseases are more prevalent in women than in men. Symptom severity, disease course, response to therapy and overall survival may also differ between males and females with autoimmune diseases. Sex hormones have a crucial role in this sex bias, with estrogens being potent stimulators of autoimmunity and androgens playing a protective role. Accumulating evidence indicates that genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors may also contribute to sex-related differences in risk and clinical course of autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss possible mechanisms for sex specific differences in autoimmunity with a special focus on three paradigmatic diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis.

  13. [Hydroxychloroquine for autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Danza, Álvaro; Graña, Diego; Goñi, Mabel; Vargas, Andrea; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo

    2016-02-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is by far the most frequently used antimalarial for the management of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases. It has immunomodulatory, hypolipidemic, hypoglycemic and antithrombotic properties and it diminishes the risk of malignancies. The most important mechanisms to explain the immunomodulatory actions are its ability to reduce inflammatory pathways and Toll-like receptors activation. The safety profile is favorable. In spite of its low frequency, retinal toxicity is potentially severe. In systemic lupus erythematous HCQ therapy reduces activity, the accrual of organ damage, risk of infections and thrombosis and improves the cardiometabolic profile. It contributes to induce lupus nephritis remission, spares steroid use and increases survival rates. In rheumatoid arthritis, it improves cardiometabolic risk and has a favorable effect in joint inflammation. In Sjögren's syndrome, an increased lacrimal quality as well as an improvement in objective and subjective inflammatory markers has been demonstrated with HCQ. In Antiphospholipid Syndrome, HCQ is effective in primary and secondary thrombosis prevention. The effectiveness of the drug in other systemic autoimmune diseases is less established. HCQ therapy may improve dermatological manifestations in Dermatomyositis and may have a positive effects in the treatment of Sarcoidosis and Still disease.

  14. Metals and kidney autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Bigazzi, P E

    1999-01-01

    The causes of autoimmune responses leading to human kidney pathology remain unknown. However, environmental agents such as microorganisms and/or xenobiotics are good candidates for that role. Metals, either present in the environment or administered for therapeutic reasons, are prototypical xenobiotics that cause decreases or enhancements of immune responses. In particular, exposure to gold and mercury may result in autoimmune responses to various self-antigens as well as autoimmune disease of the kidney and other tissues. Gold compounds, currently used in the treatment of patients with progressive polyarticular rheumatoid arthritis, can cause a nephrotic syndrome. Similarly, an immune-mediated membranous nephropathy frequently occurred when drugs containing mercury were commonly used. Recent epidemiologic studies have shown that occupational exposure to mercury does not usually result in autoimmunity. However, mercury induces antinuclear antibodies, sclerodermalike disease, lichen planus, or membranous nephropathy in some individuals. Laboratory investigations have confirmed that the administration of gold or mercury to experimental animals leads to autoimmune disease quite similar to that observed in human subjects exposed to these metals. In addition, studies of inbred mice and rats have revealed that a few strains are susceptible to the autoimmune effects of gold and mercury, whereas the majority of inbred strains are resistant. These findings have emphasized the importance of genetic (immunogenetic and pharmacogenetic) factors in the induction of metal-associated autoimmunity. (italic)In vitro(/italic) and (italic)in vivo(/italic) research of autoimmune disease caused by mercury and gold has already yielded valuable information and answered a number of important questions. At the same time it has raised new issues about possible immunostimulatory or immunosuppressive mechanisms of xenobiotic activity. Thus it is evident that investigations of metal

  15. Do Asian patients have worse lupus?

    PubMed

    Mok, M Y; Li, W L

    2010-10-01

    The predisposition to and clinical phenotype of systemic lupus erythematosus, an autoimmune disease that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, are affected by genetic and environmental factors. This article aims to examine whether Asians have worse lupus by reviewing the literature on genetic predisposition and clinical outcomes, including major organ involvement, damage score and mortality in Asian populations compared with other ethnicities. A number of lupus nephritis susceptibility genes have been identified in Asians and White patients, with further variations among different Asian populations. Meta-analysis studies on various Fcγ receptor subtypes revealed that FcγRIIIA-F158 allele, which is associated with low binding affinity to IgG1 and IgG3, predisposed to lupus nephritis in Asian patients. Asian patients were reported to have higher rates of lupus nephritis-associated autoantibodies, lupus nephritis and more active glomerulonephritis compared with White patients. Renal outcome and the level of immunosuppressant use in Asians were comparable to Afro-American Blacks in some studies. Asians were also found to have higher overall damage scores compared with Whites. The difference in mortality between Asian patients and other ethnicities in different geographical regions was found to vary depending on socioeconomic factors such as access to health care. Poverty, education level, cultural and behavioural factors are confounders to ethnicity in determining clinical outcome of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  16. Selfie: Autoimmunity, boon or bane.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Haseeb

    2017-01-01

    The immune system provides protection to tissues damaged by infectious microrganisms or physical damage. In autoimmune diseases, the immune system recognizes and attacks its own tissues, i.e., self-destruction. Various agents such as genetic factors and environmental triggers are thought to play a major role in the development of autoimmune diseases. A common feature of all autoimmune diseases is the presence of autoantibodies and inflammation, including mononuclear phagocytes, autoreactive T lymphocytes, and autoantibody producing B cells (plasma cells). It has long been known that B cells produce autoantibodies and, thereby, contribute to the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune diseases can be classified as organ-specific or non-organ specific depending on whether the autoimmune response is directed against a particular tissue or against widespread antigens as in chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both SLE and RA are characterized by the presence of autoantibodies which play a major role in their etiopathogenesis. SLE is characterized by circulating antibodies and immune complex deposition that can trigger an inflammatory damage in organs. RA is a progressive inflammatory disease in which T cells, B cells, and pro-inflammatory cytokines play a key role in its pathophysiology.

  17. Human leucocyte antigens B*08, DRB1*03 and DRB1*13 are significantly associated with autoimmune liver and biliary diseases in Finnish children.

    PubMed

    Ylinen, E; Salmela, L; Peräsaari, J; Jaatinen, T; Tenca, A; Vapalahti, O; Färkkilä, M; Jalanko, H; Kolho, K-L

    2017-02-01

    The human leucocyte antigen (HLA) allele and haplotype frequencies of the Finnish population are unique because of the restricted and homogenous gene population. There are no published data on HLA genotype associations in paediatric autoimmune liver diseases in Scandinavia. This study characterised the HLA genotypes of children with autoimmune liver or biliary disease in Finland. The study cohort comprised 19 paediatric patients (13 female) aged three years to 15 years treated for autoimmune liver or biliary disease at the Children's Hospital, Helsinki University Hospital, between 2000 and 2011, and followed up for four years and three months to 14.6 years. We genotyped HLA-B and HLA-DRB1 in the children, and the HLA antigen frequencies were compared with 19 807 records from the Finnish Bone Marrow Donor Registry. All paediatric patients with autoimmune liver or biliary disease had either autoimmune HLA haplotype B*08;DRB1*03 or DRB1*13. These were significantly more common among patients with autoimmune hepatitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and autoimmune hepatitis/primary sclerosing cholangitis overlap syndrome than the Finnish control population. HLA RB1*04 was not found in the study cohort. Our study found that B*08, DRB1*03 and DRB1*13 were significantly associated with autoimmune liver and biliary diseases in Finnish paediatric patients. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. CXCL13 antibody for the treatment of autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Klimatcheva, Ekaterina; Pandina, Tracy; Reilly, Christine; Torno, Sebold; Bussler, Holm; Scrivens, Maria; Jonason, Alan; Mallow, Crystal; Doherty, Michael; Paris, Mark; Smith, Ernest S; Zauderer, Maurice

    2015-02-12

    Homeostatic B Cell-Attracting chemokine 1 (BCA-1) otherwise known as CXCL13 is constitutively expressed in secondary lymphoid organs by follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and macrophages. It is the only known ligand for the CXCR5 receptor, which is expressed on mature B cells, follicular helper T cells (Tfh), Th17 cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells. Aberrant expression of CXCL13 within ectopic germinal centers has been linked to the development of autoimmune disorders (e.g. Rheumatoid Arthritis, Multiple Sclerosis, Systemic Lupus Erythematosis). We, therefore, hypothesized that antibody-mediated disruption of the CXCL13 signaling pathway would interfere with the formation of ectopic lymphoid follicles in the target organs and inhibit autoimmune disease progression. This work describes pre-clinical development of human anti-CXCL13 antibody MAb 5261 and includes therapeutic efficacy data of its mouse counterpart in murine models of autoimmunity. We developed a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody, MAb 5261 that specifically binds to human, rodent and primate CXCL13 with an affinity of approximately 5 nM and is capable of neutralizing the activity of CXCL13 from these various species in in vitro functional assays. For in vivo studies we have engineered a chimeric antibody to contain the same human heavy and light chain variable genes along with mouse constant regions. Treatment with this antibody led to a reduction in the number of germinal centers in mice immunized with 4-Hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl hapten conjugated to Keyhole Limpet Hemocyanin (NP-KLH) and, in adoptive transfer studies, interfered with the trafficking of B cells to the B cell areas of mouse spleen. Furthermore, this mouse anti-CXCL13 antibody demonstrated efficacy in a mouse model of Rheumatoid arthritis (Collagen-Induced Arthritis (CIA)) and Th17-mediated murine model of Multiple Sclerosis (passively-induced Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE)). We developed a novel therapeutic antibody

  19. Squamous cell carcinoma in an African American with discoid lupus erythematosus: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Harper, James Garrett; Pilcher, Mary Frances; Szlam, Sarah; Lind, David Scott

    2010-03-01

    Discoid lupus is an autoimmune disorder with primarily cutaneous manifestations. Carcinomatous changes in discoid lupus can lead to the development of squamous cell carcinoma. While this most often occurs in Caucasians, the presented patient is an African American. She developed numerous squamous cell carcinomas in areas of scarring from discoid lupus. This case illustrates the need for careful observation of discoid lupus for the development of squamous cell carcinoma in the African American patient.

  20. Lupus Foundation of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread Awareness Lupus Awareness Month Put On Purple World Lupus Day Lupus Voices Across America Become a Media Spokesperson KNOW LUPUS Special Thanks People and Stories Celebrity Supporters Raise Funds Walk to End Lupus Now Direct Giving Join Team Make Your ...

  1. Adeno-associated virus-mediated human IL-10 gene transfer suppresses the development of experimental autoimmune orchitis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Kashiwakura, Y; Kusumi, N; Tamayose, K; Nasu, Y; Nagai, A; Shimada, T; Daida, H; Kumon, H

    2005-07-01

    Testicular germ cell-induced autoimmune orchitis is characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration followed by disturbance of spermatogenesis. Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) is an animal model for human immunological male infertility; delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response plays a key role in its induction. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a regulatory cytokine that is critical in preventing organ-specific autoimmune inflammation. To determine the effects on EAO of human IL-10 (hIL-10) gene transfer, C3H/He mice immunized by unilateral testicular injury were administered intramuscular (i.m.) injections of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-encoding hIL-10 on the day of immunization. Serum hIL-10 was detected beginning at 1 week postinjection, and peaked at 3 weeks. Histological examinations showed a significantly low incidence of orchitis and disturbance of spermatogenesis in AAV hIL-10-treated mice, and the DTH response to autologous testicular cells was significantly suppressed. Immunohistochemical analysis of IFN- and IL-2, T-cell-associated cytokines, in the spleen and testes revealed significantly fewer cytokine-expressing cells after treatment. We conclude that a single i.m. administration of AAV hIL-10 significantly suppresses EAO and hypospermatogenesis by regulating cell-mediated immunity in the testes.

  2. Autoimmune disease-associated variants of extracellular endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 induce altered innate immune responses by human immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Aldhamen, Yasser A.; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Rastall, David P.W.; Seregin, Sergey S.; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Koumantou, Despoina; Aylsworth, Charles F.; Quiroga, Dionisia; Godbehere, Sarah; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    ERAP1 gene polymorphisms have been linked to several autoimmune diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations are not well understood. Recently, we have demonstrated that ERAP1 regulates key aspects of the innate immune response. Moreover, previous studies show ERAP1 to be ER-localized and secreted during inflammation. Herein, we investigate the possible roles that ERAP1 polymorphic variants may have in modulating innate immune responses of human PBMCs using two experimental methods: extracellular exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variants and adenovirus-based ERAP1 expression. We found that exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variant proteins as well as ERAP1 overexpression by Ad vectors increased inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and enhanced immune cell activation. Investigating the molecular mechanisms behind these responses revealed that ERAP1 is able to activate innate immunity via multiple pathways, including the NLRP3 inflammasome. Importantly, these responses varied if autoimmune-disease-associated variants of ERAP1 were examined in the assay systems. Unexpectedly, blocking ERAP1 cellular internalization augmented IL-1β production. To our knowledge, this is the first report identifying ERAP1 as being involved in modulating innate responses of human immune cells, a finding that may explain why ERAP1 has been genetically associated with several autoimmune diseases. PMID:25591727

  3. Immunogenicity and safety of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Mok, Chi Chiu; Ho, Ling Yin; Fong, Lai Shan; To, Chi Hung

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of GARDASIL, a quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Women with SLE aged 18-35 years who had stable disease were recruited to receive GARDASIL vaccination and an equal number of age-matched healthy women were also vaccinated. Seroconversion rates of antibodies to HPV serotypes 6, 11, 16 and 18 at months 7 and 12 and adverse events (AEs) were compared between patients and controls. The rate of disease flares in SLE participants was compared with matched SLE controls. 50 patients with SLE and 50 healthy controls were studied. The mean age and disease duration of the patients was 25.8±3.9 years and 6.6±4.5 years, respectively. At month 12 the seroconversion rates of anti-HPV serotypes 6, 11, 16 and 18 in patients and controls were 82%, 89%, 95%, 76% and 98%, 98%, 98%, 80%, respectively. In patients with SLE there were no significant changes in the titres of anti-dsDNA, complements, anti-C1q and SLE Disease Activity Index scores from baseline to months 2, 7 and 12. There was one mild/moderate SLE flare at months 0-2, two mild/moderate flares at months 3-6 and six mild/moderate and two severe flares at months 7-12. Disease flares in patients with SLE occurred at a similar frequency to that of 50 matched SLE controls (0.22/patient/year vs 0.20/patient/year, p=0.81). Injection site reaction was the commonest AE (5%), and the incidence of AEs was comparable between patients with SLE and controls. The quadrivalent HPV vaccine is well tolerated and reasonably effective in patients with stable SLE and does not induce an increase in lupus activity or flares.

  4. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... them. Causes This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference ... inflammation, or hepatitis, may occur along with other autoimmune diseases. These include: Graves disease Inflammatory bowel disease Rheumatoid ...

  5. Systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Maliha F; Jordan, Natasha; D'Cruz, David P

    2017-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease that is highly heterogeneous in its presentation. This can pose significant challenges for physicians responsible for the diagnosis and treatment of such patients. SLE arises from a combination of genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. Pathologically, the disease is primarily driven by loss of immune tolerance and abnormal B- and T-cell function. Major organ involvement may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Classification criteria for SLE have been developed largely for research purposes; however, these are also widely used in clinical practice. Antinuclear antibodies are the hallmark serological feature, occurring in over 95% of patients with SLE at some point during their disease. The mainstay of treatment is antimalarial drugs such as hydroxychloroquine, combined with corticosteroids and conventional immunosuppressive drugs. An increasing understanding of pathogenesis has facilitated a move towards the development of targeted biologic therapies, with the introduction of rituximab and belimumab into clinical practice.

  6. [Neonatal lupus syndrome].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masahiro

    2005-02-01

    Neonatal lupus syndrome is a passively acquired autoimmune syndrome in which pathogenic autoantibodies (anti-SSA/Ro, anti-SSB/La, and both, or rarely anti-U(1)RNP antibodies) are transmitted from a mother to her fetus through the placenta. The major clinical manifestations in the infants are cardiac (congenital heart block), dermatologic (skin lesion), hepatic (elevated hepatic enzymes), and hematologic (cytopenia). Congenital complete heart block (CCHB) is irreversible, while noncardiac manifestations are transient, resolving by one-year-old of age without specific treatments. Two prospective studies show that the prevalence of CCHB in children from a woman previously known to have anti-SSA/Ro antibodies is approximately 2%. However, when the previous pregnancy is complicated by CCHB and skin lesion, the recurrence rates of these symptoms go much higher to 10.5% and 26%, respectively, in the subsequent pregnancy.

  7. Transcriptional effects of a lupus-associated polymorphism in the 5´ untranslated region (UTR) of human complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21)

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshank, Mark N.; Karimi, Mahdad; Mason, Rhonda L.; Fenwick, Emily; Mercer, Tim; Tsao, Betty P.; Boackle, Susan A.; Ulgiati, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component that determines risk. A common three single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotype of the complement receptor 2 (CR2) gene has been associated with increased risk of SLE (Wu et al., 2007) (Douglas et al., 2009), and a less common haplotype consisting of the major allele at SNP1 and minor alleles at SNP2 and 3 confers protection (Douglas et al., 2009). SNP1 (rs3813946), which is located in the 5´ untranslated region (UTR) of the CR2 gene, altered transcriptional activity of a CR2 promoter-luciferase reporter gene construct transiently transfected into a B cell line (Wu et al., 2007) and had an independent effect in the protective haplotype (Douglas et al., 2009). In this study, we show that this SNP alters transcriptional activity in a transiently transfected non B-cell line as well as in stably transfected cell lines, supporting its relevance in vivo. Furthermore, the allele at this SNP affects chromatin accessibility of the surrounding sequence and transcription factor binding. These data confirm the effects of rs3813946 on CR2 transcription, identifying the 5´UTR to be a novel regulatory element for the CR2 gene in which variation may alter gene function and modify the development of lupus. PMID:22673213

  8. The peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor-γ agonist pioglitazone modulates aberrant T cell responses in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wenpu; Berthier, Celine C.; Lewis, Emily E.; McCune, W. Joseph; Kretzler, Matthias; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2013-01-01

    PPAR-γ agonists can suppress autoimmune responses and renal inflammation in murine lupus but the mechanisms implicated in this process remain unclear. We tested the effect of the PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone in human lupus and control PBMCs with regards to gene regulation and various functional assays. By Affymetrix microarray analysis, several T cell-related pathways were significantly highlighted in pathway analysis in lupus PBMCs. Transcriptional network analysis showed IFN-γ as an important regulatory node, with pioglitazone treatment inducing transcriptional repression of various genes implicated in T cell responses. Confirmation of these suppressive effects was observed specifically in purified CD4+ T cells. Pioglitazone downregulated lupus CD4+ T cell effector proliferation and activation, while it significantly increased proliferation and function of lupus T regulatory cells. We conclude that PPAR-γ agonists selectively modulate CD4+ T cell function in SLE. supporting the concept that pioglitazone and related-agents should be explored as potential therapies in this disease. PMID:23962407

  9. Extracellular MicroRNA Signature of Human Helper T Cell Subsets in Health and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Torri, Anna; Carpi, Donatella; Bulgheroni, Elisabetta; Crosti, Maria-Cristina; Moro, Monica; Gruarin, Paola; Rossi, Riccardo L; Rossetti, Grazisa; Di Vizio, Dolores; Hoxha, Mirjam; Bollati, Valentina; Gagliani, Cristina; Tacchetti, Carlo; Paroni, Moira; Geginat, Jens; Corti, Laura; Venegoni, Luigia; Berti, Emilio; Pagani, Massimiliano; Matarese, Giuseppe; Abrignani, Sergio; de Candia, Paola

    2017-02-17

    Upon T cell receptor stimulation, CD4(+) T helper (Th) lymphocytes release extracellular vesicles (EVs) containing microRNAs. However, no data are available on whether human CD4(+) T cell subsets release EVs containing different pattern of microRNAs. The present work aimed at filling this gap by assessing the microRNA content in EVs released upon in vitro T cell receptor stimulation of Th1, Th17, and T regulatory (Treg) cells. Our results indicate that EVs released by Treg cells are significantly different compared with those released by the other subsets. In particular, miR-146a-5p, miR-150-5p, and miR-21-5p are enriched, whereas miR-106a-5p, miR-155-5p, and miR-19a-3p are depleted in Treg-derived EVs. The in vitro identified EV-associated microRNA signature was increased in serum of autoimmune patients with psoriasis and returned to healthy levels upon effective treatment with etanercept, a biological drug targeting the TNF pathway and suppressing inflammation. Moreover, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis showed an over-representation of genes relevant for T cell activation, such as CD40L, IRAK1, IRAK2, STAT1, and c-Myb in the list of validated targets of Treg-derived EV miRNAs. At functional level, Treg-derived (but not Th1/Th17-derived) EVs inhibited CD4(+) T cell proliferation and suppressed two relevant targets of miR-146a-5p: STAT1 and IRAK2. In conclusion, our work identified the miRNAs specifically released by different human CD4(+) T cell subsets and started to unveil the potential use of their quantity in human serum to mark the pathological elicitation of these cells in vivo and their biological effect in cell to cell communication during the adaptive immune response. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. PTPN22: Its role in SLE and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sharon A; Criswell, Lindsey A

    2010-01-01

    A functional variant of protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor 22 (PTPN22) has recently been shown to be associated with multiple autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, and autoimmune thyroid disease. In this review, we discuss the structure and function of this gene and its disease-associated polymorphisms. In addition, we review the studies investigating the association between this gene and SLE, along with other autoimmune diseases. PMID:18075792

  11. [Systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Diniz-da-Costa, Teresa; Centeno, Mónica; Pinto, Luísa; Marques, Aurora; Mendes-Graça, Luís

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic inflammatory disease, resulting from an auto-immune dysfunction. The etiology of this disease is unknown. It frequently occurs in women of childbearing age. Pregnancy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus may be associated with several complications (maternal, obstetrical and fetal). The prognosis for both mother and child is better when systemic lupus erythematosus has been quiescent for at least six months before pregnancy. Thus, preconceptional assessment and management is crucial for helping women to achieve a period of disease remission before pregnancy as well as for allowing an adjustment of therapy. Maternal health and fetal development should be closely monitored during pregnancy. These patients should be surveilled by a multidisciplinary team (obstetrician, rheumatologist or internist, nephrologist if necessary and a pediatrician), in a tertiary care hospital. Antiphospholipid syndrome, positivity for anti-SSA/Ro or anti-SSB/LA antibodies, hypertension or renal involvement are associated with an increase of adverse pregnancy outcomes. In this article the authors review the main aspects of Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and pregnancy.

  12. Immunogenetics of cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Aimee O; Arkin, Lisa M; Prahalad, Sampath

    2016-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the prototypic autoimmune condition, often affecting multiple organ systems, including the skin. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) is distinct from SLE and may be skin limited or associated with systemic disease. Histopathologically, the hallmark of lupus-specific manifestations of SLE and CLE is an interface dermatitis. The cause of SLE and CLE is likely multifactorial and may include shared genetic factors. In this review, we will discuss the genetic findings related to the cutaneous manifestations of SLE and isolated CLE, with a particular focus on the lupus-specific CLE subtypes. Several major histocompatibility complex and nonmajor histocompatibility complex genetic polymorphisms have been identified which may contribute to the cutaneous manifestations of SLE and to CLE. Most of these genetic variants are associated with mechanisms attributed to the pathogenesis of SLE, including pathways involved in interferon and vitamin D regulation and ultraviolet light exposure. Although there is overlap between the genetic factors associated with SLE and CLE, there appear to be unique genetic factors specific for CLE. Improved understanding of the genetics of CLE may lead to the creation of targeted therapies, improving outcomes for patients with this challenging dermatologic condition.

  13. Histopathology of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Giannakakis, Konstantinos; Faraggiana, Tullio

    2011-06-01

    The spectrum of morphologic changes in lupus nephritis, either microscopic, ultrastructural, or immunohistological, closely reflects the great variety of immune complexes that are produced in the course of the disease. Every tissue component of the kidney can be affected, but glomeruli are the target structure in most patients. Several attempts have been made to correlate the clinical severity and the outcome of the nephritis with the pathologic features; the current classification and the six classes that resulted from an international study group are entirely based on glomerular changes. Major criteria of classification include the focal or diffuse involvement of the glomerulus, the site of hypercellularity, the site of immune complex deposition and the presence of active and/or sclerotic lesions. Even if less thoroughly investigated than the glomerulus, the interstitial compartment has revealed many interesting features as are vascular lesions, a common and often underestimated feature. Typing of subpopulation of lymphoid infiltrates supports the emerging evidence indicating that B cells are promoting autoimmunity in mechanisms other than autoAb secretion. Many aspects are still debated and/or poorly understood, such as the interpretation of the so-called "full house nephropathy" that closely mimic lupus nephritis in seronegative patients.

  14. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Levy, Yair; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2005-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease with diverse manifestations. We suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy may be beneficial and safe for various manifestations in SLE. A structured literature search of articles published on the efficacy of IVIg in the treatment of SLE between 1983 and 2005 was conducted. We searched the terms "IVIg," "intravenous immunoglobulin," "lupus," "SLE," and "systemic lupus erythematosus." The various clinical manifestations of SLE that were reported to be successfully treated by IVIg in case reports include autoimmune hemolytic anemia, acquired factor VIII inhibitors, acquired von Willebrand disease, pure red cell aplasia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, myelofibrosis, pneumonitis, pleural effusion, pericarditis, myocarditis, cardiogenic shock, nephritis, end-stage renal disease, encephalitis, neuropsychiatric lupus, psychosis, peripheral neuropathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, and vasculitis. The most extensive experience is with lupus nephritis. There are only a few case series of IVIg use in patients with SLE with various manifestations, in which the response rate to IVIg therapy ranged from 33 to 100%. We suggest that IVIg devoid of sucrose, at a dose of 2 g/kg over a 5-d period given uniformly and at a slow infusion rate in patients without an increased risk for thromboembolic events or renal failure, is a safe and beneficial adjunct therapy for cases of SLE that are resistant to or refuse conventional treatment. The duration of therapy is yet to be established. Controlled trials are warranted.

  15. Lupus Foundation of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Testing New Treatments Learn More About the Lupus Foundation of America We are devoted to solving ... Spam Control Text: Please leave this field empty Lupus FAQ What is lupus? What are the common ...

  16. [Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Flavio; López Meiller, María José; Naswetter, Gustavo; Longoni, Héctor

    2008-01-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells, which are capable of self renewal and reconstitution of all types of blood cells, can be a treatment for numerous potential lethal diseases, including leukemias and lymphomas. It may now be applicable for the treatment of severe autoimmune diseases, such as therapy-resistant multiple sclerosis, lupus and systemic sclerosis. Studies in animal models show that the transfer of hematopoietic stem cells can reverse autoimmunity. The outcome of ongoing clinical trials, as well as of studies in patients and animal models, will help to determine the role that stem-cell transplantation can play in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  17. Manifestations of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    COJOCARU, Manole; COJOCARU, Inimioara Mihaela; SILOSI, Isabela; VRABIE, Camelia Doina

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multifaceted autoimmune inflammatory disease that can affect any part of the body. SLE is a disease of unknown aetiology with a variety of presenting features and manifestations. Interest in the disease has been stimulated in recent years, and improved methods of diagnosis have resulted in a significant increase in the number of cases recognized. It is apparent that it can no longer be regarded as a rare disease. The majority of the pathology in SLE is related to deposits of immune complexes in various organs, which triggers complement and other mediators of inflammation. Symptoms vary from person to person, and may come and go, depend on what part of the body is affected, can be mild, moderate, or severe. Diagnosis can be difficult because lupus mimics many other diseases; it requires clinical and serologic criteria. PMID:22879850

  18. Update in endocrine autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark S

    2008-10-01

    The endocrine system is a common target in pathogenic autoimmune responses, and there has been recent progress in our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of autoimmune endocrine diseases. Rapid progress has recently been made in our understanding of the genetic factors involved in endocrine autoimmune diseases. Studies on monogenic autoimmune diseases that include endocrine phenotypes like autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 and immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked have helped reveal the role of key regulators in the maintenance of immune tolerance. Highly powered genetic studies have found and confirmed many new genes outside of the established role of the human leukocyte antigen locus with these diseases, and indicate an essential role of immune response pathways in these diseases. Progress has also been made in identifying new autoantigens and the development of new animal models for the study of endocrine autoimmunity. Finally, although hormone replacement therapy is still likely to be a mainstay of treatment in these disorders, there are new agents being tested for potentially treating and reversing the underlying autoimmune process. Although autoimmune endocrine disorders are complex in etiology, these recent advances should help contribute to improved outcomes for patients with, or at risk for, these disorders.

  19. Genetics of systemic lupus erythematosus: immune responses and end organ resistance to damage

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chao; Deng, Yun; Quinlan, Aaron; Gaskin, Felicia; Tsao, Betty P; Fu, Shu Man

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic systemic autoimmune disorder. Considerable progress has been made to delineate the genetic control of this complex disorder. In this review, selected aspects of human and mouse genetics related to SLE are reviewed with emphasis on genes that contribute to both innate and adaptive immunity and to genes that contribute directly to susceptibility to end organ damage. It is concluded that the interactions among these two major pathways will provide further insight into the pathogenesis of SLE. An interactive model of the two major pathways is proposed without emphasis on the importance of breaking tolerance to autoantigens. PMID:25458999

  20. The impact of glucocorticoids and anti-cd20 therapy on cervical human papillomavirus infection risk in women with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; Garcia-Carrasco, Mario; Vallejo-Ruiz, Veronica; Taboada-Cole, Alejandro; Muñoz-Guarneros, Margarita; Solis-Poblano, Juan Carlos; Pezzat-Said, Elias; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Jave-Suarez, Luis Felipe; de Lara, Luis Vazquez; Ramos-Alvarez, Gloria; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Lopez-Colombo, Aurelio

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence and factors associated with cervical human papillomavirus infection in women with systemic lupus erythematosus METHODS: This cross-sectional study collected traditional and systemic lupus erythematosus-related disease risk factors, including conventional and biologic therapies. A gynecological evaluation and cervical cytology screen were performed. Human papillomavirus detection and genotyping were undertaken by PCR and linear array assay. RESULTS: A total of 148 patients were included, with a mean age and disease duration of 42.5±11.8 years and 9.7±5.3 years, respectively. The prevalence of squamous intraepithelial lesions was 6.8%. The prevalence of human papillomavirus infection was 29%, with human papillomavirus subtype 59 being the most frequent. Patients with human papillomavirus were younger than those without the infection (38.2±11.2 vs. 44.2±11.5 years, respectively; p = 0.05), and patients with the virus had higher daily prednisone doses (12.8±6.8 vs. 9.7±6.7 mg, respectively; p = 0.01) and cumulative glucocorticoid doses (14.2±9.8 vs. 9.7±7.3 g, respectively; p = 0.005) compared with patients without. Patients with human papillomavirus infection more frequently received rituximab than those without (20.9% vs. 8.5%, respectively; p = 0.03). In the multivariate analysis, only the cumulative glucocorticoid dose was associated with human papillomavirus infection. CONCLUSIONS: The cumulative glucocorticoid dose may increase the risk of human papillomavirus infection. Although rituximab administration was more frequent in patients with human papillomavirus infection, no association was found. Screening for human papillomavirus infection is recommended in women with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:24473503

  1. Annexin A1 as a target for managing murine pristane-induced systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Mihaylova, Nikolina; Bradyanova, Silviya; Chipinski, Petroslav; Herbáth, Melinda; Chausheva, Stela; Kyurkchiev, Dobroslav; Prechl, József; Tchorbanov, Andrey I

    2017-03-16

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a polygenic pathological disorder which involves multiple organs. Self-specific B cells play a main role in the lupus pathogenesis by generating autoantibodies as well as by serving as important autoantigen-presenting cells. Autoreactive T lymphocytes, on the other hand, are responsible for B cell activation and proliferation, and cytokine production. Therefore, both factors promote the idea that a down-modulation of activated self-reactive T and B cells involved in the pathogenic immune response is a reasonable approach for SLE therapy. Annexin A1 (ANX A1) is expressed by many cell types and binds to phospholipids in a Ca(2+) dependent manner. Abnormal expression of ANX A1 was found on activated B and T cells in both murine and human autoimmunity, suggesting its potential role as a therapeutic target. While its role on T lymphocytes is through formyl peptide receptor-like molecules (FPRL), and the formed ANX A1/FPRL pathway modulates T cell receptor signalling, there is still no fool-proof data available for the role of ANX A1 in B cells. We employed a lupus model of Balb/c mice with pristane-induced SLE which very closely resembles human lupus. In the present study, we investigated the possibility to modulate the autoimmune response in a pristane-induced mouse model of SLE using an anti- ANX A1 antibody. Administration of this monoclonal antibody resulted in the inhibition of T-cell activation and proliferation, suppression of IgG anti-dsDNA antibody-secreting plasma cells and of proteinuria, decreased disease activity and prolonged survival compared to control group.

  2. Living with Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Fatigue Family Life and Relationships Exercise and Nutrition Lupus and the Workplace Mental Health and Wellbeing Overlapping Diseases Personal Stories Lupus in Men Finding the Right Doctor ...

  3. [Pregnancy and systemic lupus erythematosus: compatible?].

    PubMed

    Jason, M; von Frenckell, C; Emonts, P

    2012-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease that predominantly occurs in women of childbearing age. The risk of obstetric complications in lupus parturients is significant. In addition, pregnancy may be associated with flares of the disease requiring immunosuppressive therapy. For these reasons, SLE pregnancies are considered high risk and involve careful collaboration of the obstetrician and rheumatologist. Through the latter and medical advances including a better and better understanding of the binomial mother-child, most pregnancies end in a success.

  4. [B lymphocyte stimulator in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Mercado, Ulises

    2012-01-01

    The B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) is an essential protein for the growth and survival of B cells. BLyS is expressed on monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. BLyS binds to three receptors on B cells: BAFF-R, BCMA, and TACI. BLyS overexpression in mice leads to lupus-like syndrome, but not in all, whereas BLyS deficient mice results in a block of B cell development. High serum levels of BLyS can be detected in patients with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. BLyS antagonists are an attractive target for treating autoimmune diseases.

  5. Reconstitution of the human biome as the most reasonable solution for epidemics of allergic and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Bilbo, Staci D; Wray, Gregory A; Perkins, Sarah E; Parker, William

    2011-10-01

    A wide range of hyperimmune-associated diseases plague post-industrial society, with a prevalence and impact that is staggering. Strong evidence points towards a loss of helminths from the ecosystem of the human body (the human biome) as the most important factor in this epidemic. Helminths, intestinal worms which are largely eradicated by elements of post-industrial culture including toilets and water treatment facilities, have an otherwise ubiquitous presence in vertebrates, and have co-evolved with the immune system. Not only do helminths discourage allergic and autoimmune reactions by diverting the immune system away from these pathologic processes and stimulating host regulatory networks, helminths release a variety of factors which down-modulate the immune system. A comprehensive view of hyperimmune-related disease based on studies in immunology, parasitology, evolutionary biology, epidemiology, and neurobiology indicates that the effects of biome depletion may not yet be fully realized, and may have an unexpectedly broad impact on many areas of human biology, including cognition. Fortunately, colonization with helminths results in a cure of numerous autoimmune and allergic diseases in laboratory rodents, and clinical studies in humans have indicated their utility for treatment of both multiple sclerosis and inflammatory bowel disease. Based on these considerations, commitment of considerable resources toward understanding the effects of "biome depletion" and systematically evaluating the most effective approach toward biome reconstitution is strongly encouraged.

  6. Progress Made in Lupus Diagnosis and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents Mariana Kaplan, M.D., is Chief of the Systemic Autoimmunity ... Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS). Dr. Kaplan answers questions related to ongoing research into lupus. ...

  7. Meta-analysis of relationships between human offtake, total mortality and population dynamics of gray wolves (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Creel, Scott; Rotella, Jay J

    2010-09-29

    Following the growth and geographic expansion of wolf (Canis lupus) populations reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park and central Idaho in 1995-1996, Rocky Mountain wolves were removed from the endangered species list in May 2009. Idaho and Montana immediately established hunting seasons with quotas equaling 20% of the regional wolf population. Combining hunting with predator control, 37.1% of Montana and Idaho wolves were killed in the year of delisting. Hunting and predator control are well-established methods to broaden societal acceptance of large carnivores, but it is unprecedented for a species to move so rapidly from protection under the Endangered Species Act to heavy direct harvest, and it is important to use all available data to assess the likely consequences of these changes in policy. For wolves, it is widely argued that human offtake has little effect on total mortality rates, so that a harvest of 28-50% per year can be sustained. Using previously published data from 21 North American wolf populations, we related total annual mortality and population growth to annual human offtake. Contrary to current conventional wisdom, there was a strong association between human offtake and total mortality rates across North American wolf populations. Human offtake was associated with a strongly additive or super-additive increase in total mortality. Population growth declined as human offtake increased, even at low rates of offtake. Finally, wolf populations declined with harvests substantially lower than the thresholds identified in current state and federal policies. These results should help to inform management of Rocky Mountain wolves.

  8. Meta-Analysis of Relationships between Human Offtake, Total Mortality and Population Dynamics of Gray Wolves (Canis lupus)

    PubMed Central

    Creel, Scott; Rotella, Jay J.

    2010-01-01

    Following the growth and geographic expansion of wolf (Canis lupus) populations reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park and central Idaho in 1995–1996, Rocky Mountain wolves were removed from the endangered species list in May 2009. Idaho and Montana immediately established hunting seasons with quotas equaling 20% of the regional wolf population. Combining hunting with predator control, 37.1% of Montana and Idaho wolves were killed in the year of delisting. Hunting and predator control are well-established methods to broaden societal acceptance of large carnivores, but it is unprecedented for a species to move so rapidly from protection under the Endangered Species Act to heavy direct harvest, and it is important to use all available data to assess the likely consequences of these changes in policy. For wolves, it is widely argued that human offtake has little effect on total mortality rates, so that a harvest of 28–50% per year can be sustained. Using previously published data from 21 North American wolf populations, we related total annual mortality and population growth to annual human offtake. Contrary to current conventional wisdom, there was a strong association between human offtake and total mortality rates across North American wolf populations. Human offtake was associated with a strongly additive or super-additive increase in total mortality. Population growth declined as human offtake increased, even at low rates of offtake. Finally, wolf populations declined with harvests substantially lower than the thresholds identified in current state and federal policies. These results should help to inform management of Rocky Mountain wolves. PMID:20927363

  9. Contribution of Defective PS Recognition and Efferocytosis to Chronic Inflammation and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Kimani, Stanley Gititu; Geng, Ke; Kasikara, Canan; Kumar, Sushil; Sriram, Ganapathy; Wu, Yi; Birge, Raymond B.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid and efficient clearance of apoptotic cells results in the elimination of auto-antigens and provides a strong anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive signal to prevent autoimmunity. While professional and non-professional phagocytes utilize a wide array of surface receptors to recognize apoptotic cells, the recognition of phosphatidylserine (PS) on apoptotic cells by PS receptors on phagocytes is the emblematic signal for efferocytosis in metazoans. PS-dependent efferocytosis is associated with the production of anti-inflammatory factors such as IL-10 and TGF-β that function, in part, to maintain tolerance to auto-antigens. In contrast, when apoptotic cells fail to be recognized and processed for degradation, auto-antigens persist, such as self-nucleic acids, which can trigger immune activation leading to autoantibody production and autoimmunity. Despite the fact that genetic mouse models clearly demonstrate that loss of PS receptors can lead to age-dependent auto-immune diseases reminiscent of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the link between PS and defective clearance in chronic inflammation and human autoimmunity is not well delineated. In this perspective, we review emerging questions developing in the field that may be of relevance to SLE and human autoimmunity. PMID:25426118

  10. Photosensitivity in lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Annegret; Beissert, Stefan

    2005-11-01

    Lupus erythematosus (LE) is an autoimmune disease which can be triggered by environmental factors such as solar irradiation. It has long been observed that especially ultraviolet (UV) exposure can induce and exacerbate skin lesions in patients with this disease. However, despite the frequency of photosensitivity in LE, the mechanisms by which UV irradiation activates autoimmune responses is only now becoming increasingly unfolded by advanced molecular and cellular biological investigations. Phototesting, according to a standardized protocol with UVA and UVB irradiation has proven to be a valid model to study photosensitivity in various subtypes of LE and to evaluate the underlying pathomechanisms of this disease. Detailed analysis of the molecular events that govern lesion formation in experimentally photoprovoced LE showed increased accumulation of apoptotic keratinocytes and impaired expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In the near future, gene expression profiling and proteomics will further increase our knowledge on the complexity of the "UV response" in LE. This review summarizes the current understanding of the clinical and molecular mechanisms that initiate photosensitivity in this disease.

  11. Effective combination of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and minocycline in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS). Minocycline ameliorates the clinical severity of MS and exhibits antiinflammatory, neuroprotective activities, and good tolerance for long-term use, whereas it is toxic to the CNS. Recently, the immunomodulation and neuroprotection capabilities of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) were shown in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In this study, we evaluated whether the combination of hBM-MSCs and a low-dose minocycline could produce beneficial effects in EAE mice. Methods The sensitivity of hBM-MSCs to minocycline was determined by an established cell-viability assay. Minocycline-treated hBM-MSCs were also characterized with flow cytometry by using MSC surface markers and analyzed for their multiple differentiation capacities. EAE was induced in C57BL/6 mice by using immunization with MOG35-55. Immunopathology assays were used to detect the inflammatory cells, demyelination, and neuroprotection. Interferon gamma (IFN-γ)/tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-4 (IL-4)/interleukin-10 (IL-10), the hallmark cytokines that direct Th1 and Th2 development, were detected with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). terminal dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining was performed to elucidate the cell apoptosis in the spinal cords of EAE mice. Results Minocycline did not affect the viability, surface phenotypes, or differentiation capacity of hBM-MSCs, while minocycline affected the viability of astrocytes at a high dose. In vivo efficacy experiments showed that combined treatment, compared to the use of minocycline or hBM-MSCs alone, resulted in a significant reduction in clinical scores, along with attenuation of inflammation, demyelination, and neurodegeneration. Moreover, the combined treatment with hBM-MSCs and minocycline enhanced the immunomodulatory effects, which suppressed proinflammatory

  12. Photosensitivity in cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Andrew; Chong, Benjamin F

    2013-02-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a well-known exacerbating factor for cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE), with photosensitivity comprising one of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) diagnostic criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, discerning true photosensitivity in this population is difficult due to the broad language utilized by the ACR and the delayed-onset nature of photosensitive lupus lesions. The objective of this report is to provide a review of photosensitivity, photoprovocation, and phototherapy in the context of CLE patients. A literature review in PubMed was conducted using the terms 'ultraviolet light,' 'lupus erythematosus,' 'photoprovocation,' or 'photosensitivity.' Self-patient reporting of photosensitivity and the broad definition of photosensitivity have led to the wide range of photosensitivity rates in CLE patients. Photoprovocation testing provides a more objective method to measure photosensitivity, but even these trials demonstrate significant differences due to protocol variations. Despite UVR's deleterious effect on lupus patients, ultraviolet A (UVA)-1 may have therapeutic benefits as shown by observations on murine models and human lupus subjects. Accurately discerning photosensitivity has diagnostic implications for SLE and provides motivation for greater patient adherence to photoprotective methods. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. [Systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Karen; Lykke, Jacob Alexander; Nielsen, Henriette Svarre; Jacobsen, Søren

    2016-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease which most often affects women of childbearing age. Pregnancy is therefore an important issue for the patient and the responsible physician. Pregnancy outcomes in women with SLE has improved significantly over the latest decades, and current research initiatives aim towards further improvement. Pregnant women with SLE are still considered being at various levels of risk. In order to achieve the best possible outcomes for mother and child, joint care in specialised multidisciplinary teams including rheumatologists and obstetricians is recommended.

  14. Genetics of Lupus Nephritis: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Melissa E.; James, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease marked by the presence of pathogenic autoantibodies, immune dysregulation, and chronic inflammation that may lead to increased morbidity and early mortality from end-organ damage. Over half of all SLE patients will develop lupus nephritis. Genetic association studies have identified more than fifty polymorphisms that contribute to lupus nephritis pathogenesis, including genetic variants associated with altered programmed cell death (PCD) and defective immune clearance of PCD debris. These variants may support the generation of autoantibody-containing immune complexes that contribute to lupus nephritis. Genetic variants associated with lupus nephritis also affect the initial phase of innate immunity and the amplifying, adaptive phase of the immune response. Finally, genetic variants associated with the kidney-specific effector response may influence end-organ damage and the progression to end-stage renal disease and death. This review discusses genetic insights of key pathogenic processes and pathways that may lead to lupus nephritis, as well as the clinical implications of these findings as they apply to recent advances in biologic therapies. PMID:26573543

  15. Complement Depletion Protects Lupus-prone Mice from Ischemia-reperfusion-initiated Organ Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-25

    ischemia-reperfusion injury; intestine; complement; systemic lupus erythematosus MESENTERIC ISCHEMIA-REPERFUSION (IR) injury is encountered after...also affect the disease process in patients with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (1, 36, 47). SLE is characterized by...Bove A, Delgado G, Cervera R, Ingelmo M, Font J. Vasculitis in systemic lupus erythematosus : prevalence and clinical characteristics in 670 patients

  16. Genome-Wide Association Study in African-Americans With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Americans with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Harley, M.D., Ph.D... Systemic Lupus Erythematosus 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER John Harley, M.D., Ph.D. 5e. TASK...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus is a potentially deadly systemic autoimmune disease that disproportionately afflicts women

  17. Hematological complications of neonatal lupus: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chao, Mwe Mwe; Luchtman-Jones, Lori; Silverman, Robert A

    2013-11-01

    Neonatal thrombocytopenia is a common clinical problem and may be a result of maternal and/or fetal conditions. We present a young patient with thrombocytopenia as a result of neonatal lupus, a passively acquired autoimmune disease. The diagnosis was suspected on the basis of the presence of a facial rash. This case highlights the characteristic eruption of neonatal lupus and an underappreciated cause of neonatal thrombocytopenia for the pediatric hematologist. We also review the hematological complications of neonatal lupus.

  18. T-bet(+)CD11c(+) B cells are critical for antichromatin immunoglobulin G production in the development of lupus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya; Zhou, Shiyu; Qian, Jie; Wang, Yan; Yu, Xiang; Dai, Dai; Dai, Min; Wu, Lingling; Liao, Zhuojun; Xue, Zhixin; Wang, Jiehua; Hou, Goujun; Ma, Jianyang; Harley, John B; Tang, Yuanjia; Shen, Nan

    2017-10-05

    A hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus is high titers of circulating autoantibodies. Recently, a novel CD11c(+) B-cell subset has been identified that is critical for the development of autoimmunity. However, the role of CD11c(+) B cells in the development of lupus is unclear. Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a lupus-like syndrome with high autoantibody production. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of CD11c(+) B cells in the pathogenesis of lupus in cGVHD mice. cGVHD was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of 5 × 10(7) Bm12 splenocytes into B6 mice. Flow cytometry was used to analyze mice splenocytes and human samples. Magnetic beads were used to isolate mice B cells. Gene expression was determined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect antibodies in serum and supernatants. The percentage and absolute number of CD11c(+) B cells was increased in cGVHD-induced lupus, with elevated levels of antichromatin immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgG2a in sera. CD11c(+) plasma cells from cGVHD mice produced large amounts of antichromatin IgG2a upon stimulation. Depletion of CD11c(+) B cells reduced antichromatin IgG and IgG2a production. T-bet was upregulated in CD11c(+) B cells. Knockout of T-bet in B cells alleviated cGVHD-induced lupus. Importantly, the percentage of T-bet(+)CD11c(+) B cells increased in lupus patients and positively correlated with serum antichromatin levels. T-bet(+)CD11c(+) B cells promoted high antichromatin IgG production in the lupus-like disease model cGVHD. In lupus patients, the percentage of T-bet(+)CD11c(+) B cells was elevated and positively correlated with antichromatin antibodies. The findings provide potential therapeutic insight into lupus disease treatment.

  19. Persistent scarring, atrophy, and dyspigmentation in a preteen girl with neonatal lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    High, Whitney A; Costner, Melissa I

    2003-04-01

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus is an uncommon autoimmune disease with distinctive cutaneous findings. Descriptions of chronic cutaneous sequelae are rare. We describe a 12-year-old girl with persistent dyspigmentation, scarring, and atrophy as a result of neonatal lupus occurring during infancy.

  20. Neonatal lupus.

    PubMed

    Robles, David T; Jaramillo, Lorena; Hornung, Robin L

    2006-12-10

    An otherwise healthy 5-week-old infant with erythematous plaques predominantly on the face and scalp presented to our dermatology clinic. The mother had been diagnosed with lupus erythematosus 2 years earlier but her disease was quiescent. Neonatal lupus is a rare condition associated with transplacental transfer of IgG anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies from the mother to the fetus. Active connective tissue disease in the mother does not have to be present and in fact is often absent. Although the cutaneous, hematologic and hepatic manifestations are transient, the potential for permanent heart block makes it necessary for this to be carefully ruled out. As in this case, the dermatologist may be the one to make the diagnosis and should be aware of the clinical presentation, work-up, and management of this important disease.

  1. Homology of the NH2-terminal amino acid sequences of the heavy and light chains of human monoclonal lupus autoantibodies containing the dominant 16/6 idiotype.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, P M; Lampman, G W; Furie, B C; Naparstek, Y; Schwartz, R S; Stollar, B D; Furie, B

    1985-01-01

    The NH2-terminal amino acid sequences have been determined by automated Edman degradation for the heavy and light chains of five monoclonal IgM anti-DNA autoantibodies that were produced by human-human hybridomas derived from lymphocytes of two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Four of the antibodies were closely related to the idiotype system 16/6, whereas the fifth antibody was unrelated idiotypically. The light chains of the 16/6 idiotype-positive autoantibodies (HF2-1/13b, HF2-1/17, HF2-18/2, and HF3-16/6) had identical amino acid sequences from residues 1 to 40. Their framework structures were characteristic of VKI light chains. The light chain of the 16/6 idiotype-negative autoantibody HF6-21/28 was characteristic of the VKII subgroup. The heavy chains of the 16/6 idiotype-positive autoantibodies had nearly identical amino acid sequences from residues 1 to 40. The framework structures were characteristic of the VHIII subgroup. In contrast, the GM4672 fusion partner of the hybridoma produced small quantities of an IgG with a VHI heavy chain and a VKI light chain. The heavy chains of the lupus autoantibodies and the light chains of those autoantibodies that were idiotypically related to the 16/6 system had marked sequence homology with WEA, a Waldenstrom IgM that binds to Klebsiella polysaccharides and expresses the 16/6 idiotype. These results indicate a striking homology in the amino termini of the heavy and light chains of the lupus autoantibodies studied and suggest that the V regions of the heavy and light chains of the 16/6 idiotype-positive DNA-binding lupus auto-antibodies are each encoded by a single germ line gene. PMID:3921567

  2. Influence of fusion cell ratio and cell plating density on production of human-human hybridomas secreting anti-DNA autoantibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Massicotte, H; Rauch, J; Shoenfeld, Y; Tannenbaum, H

    1984-01-01

    The utilization of one human lymphoblastoid cell line in fusion experiments with peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has made it possible to define efficient and reproducible conditions for the production of anti-DNA-secreting human-human hybridomas. This investigation, using the human lymphoblastoid cell line GM 4672 fused in the presence of 44% polyethylene glycol with lymphocytes from SLE patients, demonstrated a maximal yield of 22.8% hybridomas, 17% of which produced anti-DNA antibodies. We were able to define, in two independent laboratories, that the maximal yield of hybridomas occurred when the lymphocyte to GM 4672 cell ratio was 1:1 and cells were seeded in 2.0 ml wells at a concentration of 4 X 10(5) cells/well. This report demonstrates the reproducibility of human-human hybridoma production with the GM 4672 cell line and the establishment of efficient conditions for the production of anti-DNA autoantibodies from SLE patients.

  3. Autoimmune epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Greco, Antonio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; De Virgilio, Armando; Conte, Michela; Gallo, Andrea; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Ruoppolo, Giovanni; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Despite the fact that epilepsy is the third most common chronic brain disorder, relatively little is known about the processes leading to the generation of seizures. Accumulating data support an autoimmune basis in patients with antiepileptic drug-resistant seizures. Besides, recent studies show that epilepsy and autoimmune disease frequently co-occur. Autoimmune epilepsy is increasingly recognized in the spectrum of neurological disorders characterized by detection of neural autoantibodies in serum or spinal fluid and responsiveness to immunotherapy. An autoimmune cause is suspected based on frequent or medically intractable seizures and the presence of at least one neural antibody, inflammatory changes indicated in serum or spinal fluid or on MRI, or a personal or family history of autoimmunity. It is essential that an autoimmune etiology be considered in the initial differential diagnosis of new onset epilepsy, because early immunotherapy assures an optimal outcome for the patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Tuffanelli, D.L.

    1981-02-01

    Lupus erythematosus (LE) is a multisystem disease. Genetic predisposition, altered immunity, hormones, drugs, viruses, and ultraviolet light all may play a role in etiology. A wide range of cutaneous lesions occur, and variants such as subacute cutaneous LE, complement-deficient LE, and neonatal LE have recently been emphasized. Management of the LE patient, including appropriate diagnostic studies and therapy relevant to the dermatologist, is discussed in the review.

  5. Abnormal costimulatory phenotype and function of dendritic cells before and after the onset of severe murine lupus

    PubMed Central

    Colonna, Lucrezia; Dinnall, Joudy-Ann; Shivers, Debra K; Frisoni, Lorenza; Caricchio, Roberto; Gallucci, Stefania

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed the activation and function of dendritic cells (DCs) in the spleens of diseased, lupus-prone NZM2410 and NZB-W/F1 mice and age-matched BALB/c and C57BL/6 control mice. Lupus DCs showed an altered ex vivo costimulatory profile, with a significant increase in the expression of CD40, decreased expression of CD80 and CD54, and normal expression of CD86. DCs from young lupus-prone NZM2410 mice, before the development of the disease, expressed normal levels of CD80 and CD86 but already overexpressed CD40. The increase in CD40-positive cells was specific for DCs and involved the subset of myeloid and CD8α+ DCs before disease onset, with a small involvement of plasmacytoid DCs in diseased mice. In vitro data from bone marrow-derived DCs and splenic myeloid DCs suggest that the overexpression of CD40 is not due to a primary alteration of CD40 regulation in DCs but rather to an extrinsic stimulus. Our analyses suggest that the defect of CD80 in NZM2410 and NZB-W/F1 mice, which closely resembles the costimulatory defect found in DCs from humans with systemic lupus erythematosus, is linked to the autoimmune disease. The increase in CD40 may instead participate in disease pathogenesis, being present months before any sign of autoimmunity, and its downregulation should be explored as an alternative to treatment with anti-CD40 ligand in lupus. PMID:16507174

  6. Influenza vaccination responses in human systemic lupus erythematosus: impact of clinical and demographic features.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Sherry R; Merrill, Joan T; Vista, Evan S; Dedeke, Amy B; Thompson, David M; Stewart, Scott; Guthridge, Joel M; Niewold, Timothy B; Franek, Beverly S; Air, Gillian M; Thompson, Linda F; James, Judith A

    2011-08-01

    Vaccination against common pathogens, such as influenza, is recommended for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) to decrease infections and improve health. However, most reports describing the vaccination response are limited to evaluations of SLE patients with quiescent disease. This study focuses on understanding the clinical, serologic, therapeutic, and demographic factors that influence the response to influenza vaccination in SLE patients with a broad range of disease activity. Blood specimens and information on disease activity were collected from 72 patients with SLE, at baseline and at 2, 6, and 12 weeks after influenza vaccination. Influenza-specific antibody responses were assessed by determining the total serum antibody concentration (B(max)), relative affinity (K(a)), and level of hemagglutination inhibition in the plasma. Using a cumulative score, the patients were evenly divided into groups of high or low vaccine responders. Autoantibody levels were evaluated at each time point using immunofluorescence tests and standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Compared to high responders, low responders to the vaccine were more likely to have hematologic criteria (P = 0.009), to have more American College of Rheumatology classification criteria for SLE (P = 0.05), and to be receiving concurrent prednisone treatment (P = 0.04). Interestingly, European American patients were more likely to be low responders than were African American patients (P = 0.03). Following vaccination, low responders were more likely to experience disease flares (P = 0.01) and to have increased titers of antinuclear antibodies (P = 0.04). Serum interferon-α activity at baseline was significantly higher in patients in whom a flare occurred after vaccination compared to a matched group of patients who did not experience a disease flare (P = 0.04). Ancestral background, prednisone treatment, hematologic criteria, and evidence of increased likelihood of disease flares were

  7. Three functional variants of IFN regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) define risk and protective haplotypes for human lupus

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Robert R.; Kyogoku, Chieko; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Vlasova, Irina A.; Davies, Leela R. L.; Baechler, Emily C.; Plenge, Robert M.; Koeuth, Thearith; Ortmann, Ward A.; Hom, Geoffrey; Bauer, Jason W.; Gillett, Clarence; Burtt, Noel; Cunninghame Graham, Deborah S.; Onofrio, Robert; Petri, Michelle; Gunnarsson, Iva; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Rönnblom, Lars; Nordmark, Gunnel; Gregersen, Peter K.; Moser, Kathy; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Daly, Mark J.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Altshuler, David

    2007-01-01

    Systematic genome-wide studies to map genomic regions associated with human diseases are becoming more practical. Increasingly, efforts will be focused on the identification of the specific functional variants responsible for the disease. The challenges of identifying causal variants include the need for complete ascertainment of genetic variants and the need to consider the possibility of multiple causal alleles. We recently reported that risk of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is strongly associated with a common SNP in IFN regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), and that this variant altered spicing in a way that might provide a functional explanation for the reproducible association to SLE risk. Here, by resequencing and genotyping in patients with SLE, we find evidence for three functional alleles of IRF5: the previously described exon 1B splice site variant, a 30-bp in-frame insertion/deletion variant of exon 6 that alters a proline-, glutamic acid-, serine- and threonine-rich domain region, and a variant in a conserved polyA+ signal sequence that alters the length of the 3′ UTR and stability of IRF5 mRNAs. Haplotypes of these three variants define at least three distinct levels of risk to SLE. Understanding how combinations of variants influence IRF5 function may offer etiological and therapeutic insights in SLE; more generally, IRF5 and SLE illustrates how multiple common variants of the same gene can together influence risk of common disease. PMID:17412832

  8. Lupus: An Overview of the Disease And Management Options

    PubMed Central

    Maidhof, William; Hilas, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Lupus is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease with a wide range of clinical presentations resulting from its effect on multiple organ systems. There are four main types of lupus: neonatal, discoid, drug-induced, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the type that affects the majority of patients. Patients with lupus experience a loss of self-tolerance as a result of abnormal immunological function and the production of autoantibodies, which lead to the formation of immune complexes that may adversely affect healthy tissue. Although the precise etiologic mechanism is unknown, genetic, hormonal, and environmental factors, as well as immune abnormalities, have been identified. Associations between lupus onset and age, sex, geography, and race have also been established. Management of this disease should be individualized and should include both pharmacological and nonpharmacological modalities for symptom relief and resolution as well as improved quality of life. PMID:22593636

  9. Lupus erythematosus. Are residential insecticides exposure the missing link?

    PubMed

    Fortes, Cristina

    2010-12-01

    Although the etiology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remains to be fully elucidated, it is now apparent that multiple genetic and environmental factors are at play. Because lupus has a strong female preponderance, several studies have examined the role of female hormones in disease etiology. Yet this knowledge has not helped to explain lupus etiology or to prevent it. Estrogens exist not only as natural or drug compounds, but also as environmental chemical contaminant and women are highly exposed to all of them. Estrogenic activity has been found in a number of pesticides including pyrethroids that are largely used in the household. Although there is only a small amount of published data examining a possible causal relationship between lupus and pesticides it can be hypothesized that pesticides, in particular insecticides, through their estrogenic activity and capacity to induce oxidative stress provoke autoimmune reaction influencing lupus development.

  10. Exacerbation of lupus panniculitis following anti-hepatitis-B vaccination.

    PubMed

    Choffray, A; Pinquier, L; Bachelez, H

    2007-01-01

    Even though benefits of vaccination policies have been widely demonstrated, vaccine injections might be associated with rare side effects. In this setting, the potential role of vaccines, mostly against hepatitis B virus, in the induction of autoimmunity has been a matter of controversy. We report the case of a woman followed for a lupus panniculitis which had been in remission for 3 years, who developed a lupus flare following an anti-hepatitis-B vaccine injection. The topography of recurring lupus lesions, the chronology of the flare and the increase in the antinuclear autoantibody serum level all supported a causal role for vaccination in the relapse of the lupus lesions. We believe that the present case might provide a first observation of lupus panniculitis possibly induced by hepatitis B vaccination, and this should be added to the range of dysimmune manifestations caused by vaccinations.

  11. Coincident systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis vulgaris: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Da, G; Yu, Y; Han, J; Li, H

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease, but its association with other typical autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus has only occasionally been reported. We presented a 25-year-old female who developed systemic lupus erythematosus associated with psoriasis vulgaris. Her conditions were in good control after she got administration of prednisolone (5 mg/day) and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook (20 mg/day). It is necessary to integrate past history and physical examination to diagnose coincident SLE and psoriasis, and combined treatment with prednisolone and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook proves effective.

  12. Systemic lupus erythematosus flare triggered by a spider bite.

    PubMed

    Martín Nares, Eduardo; López Iñiguez, Alvaro; Ontiveros Mercado, Heriberto

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune disease with a relapsing and remitting course characterized by disease flares. Flares are a major cause of hospitalization, morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Some triggers for these exacerbations have been identified, including infections, vaccines, pregnancy, environmental factors such as weather, stress and drugs. We report a patient who presented with a lupus flare with predominantly mucocutaneous, serosal and cardiac involvement after being bitten by a spider and we present the possible mechanisms by which the venom elicited such a reaction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such case reported in the literature.

  13. The Genetics of Human Autoimmune Disease: A Perspective on Progress in the Field and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Seldin, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Progress in defining the genetics of autoimmune disease has been dramatically enhanced by large scale genetic studies. Genome-wide approaches examining hundreds or for some diseases thousands of cases and controls have been implemented using high throughput genotyping and appropriate algorithms to provide a wealth of data over the last decade. These studies have identified hundreds of non-HLA loci as well as further defining HLA region variations that predispose to different autoimmune diseases. These studies to identify genetic risk loci are also complemented by progress in gene expression studies including definition of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), various alterations in chromatin structure including histone marks, DNase I sensitivity, repressed chromatin regions as well as transcript factor binding sites. Integration of this information can partially explain why particular variations can alter proclivity to autoimmune phenotypes. Despite our incomplete knowledge base with only partial definition of hereditary factors and possible functional connections, this progress has and will continue to facilitate a better understanding of critical pathways and critical changes in immunoregulation. Advances in defining and understanding functional variants potentially can lead to both novel therapeutics and personalized medicine in which therapeutic approaches are chosen based on particular molecular phenotypes and genomic alterations. PMID:26343334

  14. The genetics of human autoimmune disease: A perspective on progress in the field and future directions.

    PubMed

    Seldin, Michael F

    2015-11-01

    Progress in defining the genetics of autoimmune disease has been dramatically enhanced by large scale genetic studies. Genome-wide approaches, examining hundreds or for some diseases thousands of cases and controls, have been implemented using high throughput genotyping and appropriate algorithms to provide a wealth of data over the last decade. These studies have identified hundreds of non-HLA loci as well as further defining HLA variations that predispose to different autoimmune diseases. These studies to identify genetic risk loci are also complemented by progress in gene expression studies including definition of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), various alterations in chromatin structure including histone marks, DNase I sensitivity, repressed chromatin regions as well as transcript factor binding sites. Integration of this information can partially explain why particular variations can alter proclivity to autoimmune phenotypes. Despite our incomplete knowledge base with only partial definition of hereditary factors and possible functional connections, this progress has and will continue to facilitate a better understanding of critical pathways and critical changes in immunoregulation. Advances in defining and understanding functional variants potentially can lead to both novel therapeutics and personalized medicine in which therapeutic approaches are chosen based on particular molecular phenotypes and genomic alterations.

  15. Psoriasis and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Sticherling, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic inflammatory human skin diseases. Though clinically well characterized, the exact etiological and pathogenic mechanisms are still not known in detail. Current knowledge indicates distinct overlap to other inflammatory as well as autoimmune disorders. However, the one or more relevant autoantigens could not be characterized so-far. On the other side, several autoimmune diseases were shown to be associated with psoriasis. In addition, serological autoimmune phenomena, namely diverse circulating specific autoantibodies could be demonstrated in the past. A matter of current debate is if psoriasis is a primary autoimmune disease or secondarily evolving into autoimmunity as seen in other chronic inflammatory diseases. Related to this aspect is the concept of autoinflammation versus autoimmunity where psoriasis shares mechanisms of both entities. Though T-cells remain among the most important cellular players in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and current therapeutic strategies successfully target these cells or their products irrespective of these concepts, autoimmunity if relevant will add to the treatment armamentarium by using protective and prophylactic antigen-specific modalities.

  16. RS rearrangement frequency as a marker of receptor editing in lupus and type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Anil K; Goodman, Noah G; Eisenberg, Robert A; Rickels, Michael R; Naji, Ali; Luning Prak, Eline T

    2008-12-22

    Continued antibody gene rearrangement, termed receptor editing, is an important mechanism of central B cell tolerance that may be defective in some autoimmune individuals. We describe a quantitative assay for recombining sequence (RS) rearrangement that we use to estimate levels of antibody light chain receptor editing in various B cell populations. RS rearrangement is a recombination of a noncoding gene segment in the kappa antibody light chain locus. RS rearrangement levels are highest in the most highly edited B cells, and are inappropriately low in autoimmune mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and type 1 diabetes (T1D), including those without overt disease. Low RS rearrangement levels are also observed in human subjects with SLE or T1D.

  17. RS rearrangement frequency as a marker of receptor editing in lupus and type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Anil K.; Goodman, Noah G.; Eisenberg, Robert A.; Rickels, Michael R.; Naji, Ali; Luning Prak, Eline T.

    2008-01-01

    Continued antibody gene rearrangement, termed receptor editing, is an important mechanism of central B cell tolerance that may be defective in some autoimmune individuals. We describe a quantitative assay for recombining sequence (RS) rearrangement that we use to estimate levels of antibody light chain receptor editing in various B cell populations. RS rearrangement is a recombination of a noncoding gene segment in the κ antibody light chain locus. RS rearrangement levels are highest in the most highly edited B cells, and are inappropriately low in autoimmune mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and type 1 diabetes (T1D), including those without overt disease. Low RS rearrangement levels are also observed in human subjects with SLE or T1D. PMID:19075293

  18. Current concepts in the etiopathogenesis and treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    PubMed

    Manolios, N; Schrieber, L

    1986-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disorder that occurs spontaneously in humans and mice. Genetic factors play an important role in the predisposition to and expression of disease. Environmental factors augment the expression of illness and in the absence of normal control mechanisms may provide the stimulus to autoimmunity. Sex hormones modulate the immune response and tend to modify disease expression. Disordered immune regulation may be due to a primary or secondary abnormality in cellular, cytokine, and/or humoral function. Therapy for SLE is directed towards suppression of exaggerated immunological and inflammatory activity. This review will re-evaluate current therapy and describe newer approaches including the use of pharmacological, hormonal, immunological, dietary, and physical modalities.

  19. Prevention of autoimmune demyelination in non-human primates by a cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Genain, C P; Roberts, T; Davis, R L; Nguyen, M H; Uccelli, A; Faulds, D; Li, Y; Hedgpeth, J; Hauser, S L

    1995-01-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that serves as a model for the human disease multiple sclerosis. We evaluated rolipram, a type IV phosphodiesterase inhibitor, for its efficacy in preventing EAE in the common marmoset Callithrix jacchus. In a blinded experimental design, clinical signs of EAE developed within 17 days of immunization with human white matter in two placebo-treated animals but in none of three monkeys that received rolipram (10 mg/kg s.c. every other day) beginning 1 week after immunization. In controls, signs of EAE were associated with development of cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis and cerebral MRI abnormalities. In the treatment group, there was sustained protection from clinical EAE, transient cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis in only one of three animals, no MRI abnormality, and marked reduction in histopathologic findings. Rolipram-treated and control animals equally developed circulating antibodies to myelin basic protein. Thus, inhibition of type IV phosphodiesterase, initiated after sensitization to central nervous system antigens, protected against autoimmune demyelinating disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7536938

  20. Understanding mechanisms of hypertension in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Erin B.; Ryan, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disorder that predominately affects women of reproductive age. Hypertension is an important cardiovascular risk factor that is prevalent in this patient population. Despite the high incidence of hypertension in women with SLE, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of hypertension remain poorly understood. This review will focus on disease-related factors, including inflammation, autoantibodies, and sex hormones that may contribute to hypertension in patients with SLE. In addition, we will highlight studies performed by our laboratory using the female NZBWF1 (F1 hybrid of New Zealand Black and New Zealand White strains) mouse model, a spontaneous model of SLE that mimics human disease and develops hypertension and renal injury. Specifically, using female NZBWF1 mice, we have demonstrated that multiple factors contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension, including the inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, oxidative stress, as well as B-cell hyperactivity and autoantibody production. PMID:26985016

  1. Successful treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus with subcutaneous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Brasileiro, A; Fonseca Oliveira, J; Pinheiro, S; Paiva-Lopes, M J

    2016-05-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients is well established. However, side effects might limit its use and lead to the consideration of therapeutic alternatives, such as the subcutaneous formulation of immunoglobulin, which has been used in some patients with other autoimmune diseases. We report a case of SLE refractory to classical therapies. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin was effective, but gave rise to significant side effects. The patient was successfully treated with subcutaneous human immunoglobulin, achieving and maintaining clinical and laboratory remission. A lower immunoglobulin dose was needed and no side effects were observed, compared to the intravenous administration. Subcutaneous immunoglobulin could be a better-tolerated and cost-saving therapeutic option for select SLE patients.

  2. [Autoimmune hepatitis and autoimmune cholangitis].

    PubMed

    Dienes, H P

    2005-01-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases encompass autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) as lesions of the biliary tract. The term autoimmune cholangitis has not been generally accepted, so it remains an entitiy waiting for precise definition. AIH is a chronic progressive necroinflammatory liver disease mostly occuring in female individuals and leading to ultimate autodestruction of the liver if not treated. Histopathology of the liver reflects the gerneral understanding of the underlying immune especially self reactive CD4 + T-helper cells mediated mechanisms in destruction of liver cells displaying a typical but by no means pathognomonic histopathological pattern. Since there are no specific and generally valid tests the diagnosis should be confirmed by a scoring system including histopathology. Variants of autoimmune hepatitis cover seronegative cases, acute onset autoimmune hepatitis and autoimmune hepatitis with centrilobular necrosis. Differential diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis includes drug induced chronic hepatitis that may mimick autoimmune hepatitis by clinical course and serology. Histopathology may give helpful hints for the correct diagnosis. Autoimmune lesions of the biliary tract are PBC in the first line. The target antigen of the autoimmune response has been identified, natural history of the diseases is well known and histopathology is pathognomonic in about a third of the cases. In clinical practice liver biopsy is taken to exclude other etiologies when AMA is present in the serum, staging the disease at first diagnosis and to establish diagnosis in cases of AMA negativity. The autoimmune nature of PSC has been discussed in the literature ever since the first description and the answer in not settled yet. Histopathology is relevant for the diagnosis in excluding other etiologies and confirming the diagnosis of small duct PSC. The term autoimmune cholangitis has been used to designate AMA-negative PBC

  3. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Watad, Abdulla; David, Paula; Brown, Stav; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2017-01-01

    The autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA), presented by Shoenfeld and Agmon-Levin in 2011, is an entity that incorporates diverse autoimmune conditions induced by the exposure to various adjuvants. Adjuvants are agents that entail the capability to induce immune reactions. Adjuvants are found in many vaccines and used mainly to increase the response to vaccination in the general population. Silicone has also been reported to be able to induce diverse immune reactions. Clinical cases and series of heterogeneous autoimmune conditions including systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis have been reported to be induced by several adjuvants. However, only a small number of cases of autoimmune thyroid disorder have been included under the umbrella of ASIA syndrome. Indeed, clinical cases of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and/or subacute thyroiditis were observed after the exposure to vaccines as well as silicone implantation. In our review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge on ASIA syndrome presented as endocrinopathies, focusing on autoimmune thyroid disorders associated with the various adjuvants. PMID:28167927

  4. Soluble helminth products suppress clinical signs in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and differentially modulate human dendritic cell activation.

    PubMed

    Kuijk, Loes M; Klaver, Elsenoor J; Kooij, Gijs; van der Pol, Susanne M A; Heijnen, Priscilla; Bruijns, Sven C M; Kringel, Helene; Pinelli, Elena; Kraal, Georg; de Vries, Helga E; Dijkstra, Christine D; Bouma, Gerd; van Die, Irma

    2012-06-01

    The increased incidence of auto-inflammatory and autoimmune diseases in the developed countries seems to be caused by an imbalance of the immune system due to the lack of proper regulation. Helminth parasites are well known modulators of the immune system and as such are of great interest for the treatment of these disorders. Clinical studies showed that administration of eggs of the pig nematode Trichuris suis to patients with inflammatory bowel disease reduces the disease severity. Here we demonstrate that treatment with soluble products from the nematodes T. suis and Trichinella spiralis induces significant suppression of symptoms in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a validated animal model for multiple sclerosis. These data show that infection with live nematodes is not a prerequisite for suppression of inflammation. To translate these results to the human system, the effects of soluble products of T. suis, T. spiralis and Schistosoma mansoni on the phenotype and function of human dendritic cells (DCs) were compared. Our data show that soluble products of T. suis, S. mansoni and T. spiralis suppress TNF-α and IL-12 secretion by TLR-activated human DCs, and that T. suis and S. mansoni, but not T. spiralis, strongly enhance expression of OX40L. Furthermore, helminth-primed human DCs differentially suppress the development of Th1 and/or Th17 cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that soluble helminth products have strong immunomodulatory capacities, but might exert their effects through different mechanisms. The suppressed secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines together with an upregulation of OX40L expression on human DCs might contribute to achieve this modulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Autoimmunity against laminins.

    PubMed

    Florea, Florina; Koch, Manuel; Hashimoto, Takashi; Sitaru, Cassian

    2016-09-01

    Laminins are ubiquitous constituents of the basement membranes with major architectural and functional role as supported by the fact that absence or mutations of laminins lead to either lethal or severely impairing phenotypes. Besides genetic defects, laminins are involved in a wide range of human diseases including cancer, infections, and inflammatory diseases, as well as autoimmune disorders. A growing body of evidence implicates several laminin chains as autoantigens in blistering skin diseases, collagenoses, vasculitis, or post-infectious autoimmunity. The current paper reviews the existing knowledge on autoimmunity against laminins referring to both experimental and clinical data, and on therapeutic implications of anti-laminin antibodies. Further investigation of relevant laminin epitopes in pathogenic autoimmunity would facilitate the development of appropriate diagnostic tools for thorough characterization of patients' antibody specificities and should decisively contribute to designing more specific therapeutic interventions.

  6. Protective Autoimmunity in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Objective Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. It is accompanied by an autoimmune response against ApoB100, the core protein of LDL, which manifests as CD4 T cell and antibody responses. Approach and Results To assess the role of the autoimmune response in atherosclerosis, the nature of the CD4 T cell response against ApoB100 was studied with and without vaccination with MHC-II restricted ApoB100 peptides. The immunological basis of autoimmunity in atherosclerosis is discussed in the framework of theories of adaptive immunity. Older vaccination approaches are also discussed. Vaccinating Apoe−/− mice with MHC-II restricted ApoB100 peptides reduces atheroma burden in the aorta by ~40%. The protective mechanism likely includes secretion of IL-10. Conclusion Protective autoimmunity limits atherosclerosis in mice and suggests potential for developing preventative and therapeutic vaccines for humans. PMID:26821946

  7. Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women - particularly African-American, Hispanic-American, and Native-American women - have a higher risk for some autoimmune diseases. There are more than 80 types of autoimmune diseases, and some have similar symptoms. This makes it hard for your health care provider to know if ...

  8. Flares of systemic lupus erythematosus during pregnancy and the puerperium: prevention, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Stojan, George; Baer, Alan N

    2012-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a systemic autoimmune disease that primarily affects women in their reproductive age years. Pregnancy in systemic lupus erythematosus now has favorable outcomes for the majority of women. However, flares of disease activity, preeclampsia, fetal loss, intrauterine growth retardation and preterm birth are established risks of such pregnancies. Active lupus nephritis at the time of conception poses the greatest risk for disease flares and poor obstetric outcomes. Patients should delay conception until their lupus has been in remission for at least 6 months. In addition, certain lupus medications are potentially teratogenic and need to be stopped before conception. The signs and symptoms of a lupus flare may mimic those of normal pregnancy, impeding its recognition during pregnancy. Hydroxychloroquine, low-dose prednisone, pulse intravenous methylprednisolone and azathioprine are commonly used to treat lupus flares during pregnancy.

  9. PKK deficiency in B cells prevents lupus development in Sle lupus mice.

    PubMed

    Oleksyn, D; Zhao, J; Vosoughi, A; Zhao, J C; Misra, R; Pentland, A P; Ryan, D; Anolik, J; Ritchlin, C; Looney, J; Anandarajah, A P; Schwartz, G; Calvi, L M; Georger, M; Mohan, C; Sanz, I; Chen, L

    2017-03-06

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies that can result in damage to multiple organs. It is well documented that B cells play a critical role in the development of the disease. We previously showed that protein kinase C associated kinase (PKK) is required for B1 cell development as well as for the survival of recirculating mature B cells and B-lymphoma cells. Here, we investigated the role of PKK in lupus development in a lupus mouse model. We demonstrate that the conditional deletion of PKK in B cells prevents lupus development in Sle1Sle3 mice. The loss of PKK in Sle mice resulted in the amelioration of multiple classical lupus-associated phenotypes and histologic features of lupus nephritis, including marked reduction in the levels of serum autoantibodies, proteinuria, spleen size, peritoneal B-1 cell population and the number of activated CD4 T cells. In addition, the abundance of autoreactive plasma cells normally seen in Sle lupus mice was also significantly decreased in the PKK-deficient Sle mice. Sle B cells deficient in PKK display defective proliferation responses to BCR and LPS stimulation. Consistently, B cell receptor-mediated NF-κB activation, which is required for the survival of activated B cells, was impaired in the PKK-deficient B cells. Taken together, our work uncovers a critical role of PKK in lupus development and suggests that targeting the PKK-mediated pathway may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for lupus treatment.

  10. cDNA Immunization of Mice with Human Thyroglobulin Generates Both Humoral and T Cell Responses: A Novel Model of Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Eric M.; Concepcion, Erlinda; Ho, Kenneth; Kopp, Peter; Vono Toniolo, Jussara; Tomer, Yaron

    2011-01-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) represents one of the largest known self-antigens involved in autoimmunity. Numerous studies have implicated it in triggering and perpetuating the autoimmune response in autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). Indeed, traditional models of autoimmune thyroid disease, experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), are generated by immunizing mice with thyroglobulin protein in conjunction with an adjuvant, or by high repeated doses of Tg alone, without adjuvant. These extant models are limited in their experimental flexibility, i.e. the ability to make modifications to the Tg used in immunizations. In this study, we have immunized mice with a plasmid cDNA encoding the full-length human Tg (hTG) protein, in order to generate a model of Hashimoto's thyroiditis which is closer to the human disease and does not require adjuvants to breakdown tolerance. Human thyroglobulin cDNA was injected and subsequently electroporated into skeletal muscle using a square wave generator. Following hTg cDNA immunizations, the mice developed both B and T cell responses to Tg, albeit with no evidence of lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid. This novel model will afford investigators the means to test various hypotheses which were unavailable with the previous EAT models, specifically the effects of hTg sequence variations on the induction of thyroiditis. PMID:21559421

  11. cDNA immunization of mice with human thyroglobulin generates both humoral and T cell responses: a novel model of thyroid autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Eric M; Concepcion, Erlinda; Ho, Kenneth; Kopp, Peter; Vono Toniolo, Jussara; Tomer, Yaron

    2011-04-29

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) represents one of the largest known self-antigens involved in autoimmunity. Numerous studies have implicated it in triggering and perpetuating the autoimmune response in autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). Indeed, traditional models of autoimmune thyroid disease, experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), are generated by immunizing mice with thyroglobulin protein in conjunction with an adjuvant, or by high repeated doses of Tg alone, without adjuvant. These extant models are limited in their experimental flexibility, i.e. the ability to make modifications to the Tg used in immunizations. In this study, we have immunized mice with a plasmid cDNA encoding the full-length human Tg (hTG) protein, in order to generate a model of Hashimoto's thyroiditis which is closer to the human disease and does not require adjuvants to breakdown tolerance. Human thyroglobulin cDNA was injected and subsequently electroporated into skeletal muscle using a square wave generator. Following hTg cDNA immunizations, the mice developed both B and T cell responses to Tg, albeit with no evidence of lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid. This novel model will afford investigators the means to test various hypotheses which were unavailable with the previous EAT models, specifically the effects of hTg sequence variations on the induction of thyroiditis.

  12. Analysis of a cDNA clone expressing a human autoimmune antigen: full-length sequence of the U2 small nuclear RNA-associated B antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Habets, W.J.; Sillekens, P.T.G.; Hoet, M.H.; Schalken, J.A.; Roebroek, A.J.M.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Van de Ven, W.J.M.; Van Venrooij, W.J.

    1987-04-01

    A U2 small nuclear RNA-associated protein, designated B'', was recently identified as the target antigen for autoimmune sera from certain patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other rheumatic diseases. Such antibodies enabled them to isolate cDNA clone lambdaHB''-1 from a phage lambdagt11 expression library. This clone appeared to code for the B'' protein as established by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected mRNA. The identity of clone lambdaHB''-1 was further confirmed by partial peptide mapping and analysis of the reactivity of the recombinant antigen with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the 1015-base-pair cDNA insert of clone lambdaHB''-1 revealed a large open reading frame of 800 nucleotides containing the coding sequence for a polypeptide of 25,457 daltons. In vitro transcription of the lambdaHB''-1 cDNA insert and subsequent translation resulted in a protein product with the molecular size of the B'' protein. These data demonstrate that clone lambdaHB''-1 contains the complete coding sequence of this antigen. The deduced polypeptide sequence contains three very hydrophilic regions that might constitute RNA binding sites and/or antigenic determinants. These findings might have implications both for the understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases as well as for the elucidation of the biological function of autoimmune antigens.

  13. Sex hormones and the genesis of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Lindsay S

    2006-03-01

    The sexually dimorphic prevalence of autoimmune disease remains one of the most intriguing clinical observations among this group of disorders. While sex hormones have long been recognized for their roles in reproductive functions, within the past 2 decades scientists have found that sex hormones are integral signaling modulators of the mammalian immune system. Sex hormones have definitive roles in lymphocyte maturation, activation, and synthesis of antibodies and cytokines. Sex hormone expression is altered among patients with autoimmune disease, and this variation of expression contributes to immune dysregulation. English-language literature from the last 10 years was reviewed to examine the relationship between sex hormones and the function of the mammalian immune system. Approximately 50 publications were included in this review, and the majority were controlled trials with investigator blinding that compared both male and female diseased and normal subjects. The review provided basic knowledge regarding the broad impact of sex hormones on the immune system and how abnormal sex hormone expression contributes to the development and maintenance of autoimmune phenomena, with a focus on systemic lupus erythematosus, as models of "lupus-prone" mice are readily available. Sex hormones affect the function of the mammalian immune system, and sex hormone expression is different in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus than in healthy subjects. Sex hormones play a role in the genesis of autoimmunity. Future research may provide a therapeutic approach that is capable of altering disease pathogenesis, rather than targeting disease sequelae.

  14. Kawasaki disease and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Diniz, J C; Almeida, R T; Aikawa, N E; Sallum, A M E; Sakane, P T; Silva, C A

    2012-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a common vasculitis in childhood. To the authors' knowledge, only one case of juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE)-like onset mimicking KD and another case of KD and JSLE association have previously been described. However, the prevalence of this association of the two diseases was not reported. Therefore, over 27 consecutive years, 5419 patients were followed at the Pediatric Rheumatology Unit and 271 (5%) of them met the ACR classification criteria for JSLE. Two (0.7%) of them were female. These also had KD according to European League against Rheumatism / Paediatric Rheumatology European Society (EULAR/PReS) consensus criteria and are described in this report. One case was a 13-year-old who presented all six KD criteria. Echocardiogram showed pericardial effusion, dilatation and tortuosity of right and left coronary, and her symptoms promptly improved after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). Lupus diagnosis was established a few days later. Another case was a 4-year-old who had also met all six KD criteria, with improvement after IVIG, and lupus diagnosis was made 1 year later. In conclusion, the frequency of the association between these two autoimmune diseases was rare. The occurrence of a second autoimmune systemic disease in a patient with a history of KD should also be considered. Furthermore, the initial presentation of lupus may mimic KD.

  15. Linkage proof for PTPN22, a rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility gene and a human autoimmunity gene.

    PubMed

    Michou, Laëtitia; Lasbleiz, Sandra; Rat, Anne-Christine; Migliorini, Paola; Balsa, Alejandro; Westhovens, René; Barrera, Pilar; Alves, Helena; Pierlot, Céline; Glikmans, Elodie; Garnier, Sophie; Dausset, Jean; Vaz, Carlos; Fernandes, Manuela; Petit-Teixeira, Elisabeth; Lemaire, Isabelle; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora; Bombardieri, Stefano; Dequeker, Jan; Radstake, Timothy R; Van Riel, Piet; van de Putte, Leo; Lopes-Vaz, Antonio; Prum, Bernard; Bardin, Thomas; Dieudé, Philippe; Cornélis, François

    2007-01-30

    The tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22 allele 1858T has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune diseases. RA is the most frequent of those multifactorial diseases. The RA association was usually restricted to serum rheumatoid factor positive disease (RF+). No interaction was shown with HLA-DRB1, the first RA gene. Many case-control studies replicated the RA association, showing an allele frequency increase of approximately 5% on average and large variations of population allele frequencies (2.1-15.5%). In multifactorial diseases, the final proof for a new susceptibility allele is provided by departure from Mendel's law (50% transmission from heterozygous parents). For PTPN22-1858T allele, convincing linkage proof was available only for type 1 diabetes. We aimed at providing this proof for RA. We analyzed 1,395 West European Caucasian individuals from 465 "trio" families. We replicated evidence for linkage, demonstrating departure from Mendel's law in this subset of early RA onset patients. We estimated the overtransmission of the 1858T allele in RF+ families: T = 63%, P < 0.0007. The 1858T allele frequency increased from 11.0% in controls to 17.4% in RF+ RA for the French Caucasian population and the susceptibility genotype (1858T/T or T/C) from 20.2% to 31.6% [odds ratio (OR) = 1.8 (1.2-2.8)]. In conclusion, we provided the linkage proof for the PTPN22-1858T allele and RF+ RA. With diabetes and RA, PTPN22 is therefore a "linkage-proven" autoimmunity gene. PTPN22 accounting for approximately 1% of the RA familial aggregation, many new genes could be expected that are as many leads to definitive therapy for autoimmune diseases.

  16. Linkage proof for PTPN22, a rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility gene and a human autoimmunity gene

    PubMed Central

    Michou, Laëtitia; Lasbleiz, Sandra; Rat, Anne-Christine; Migliorini, Paola; Balsa, Alejandro; Westhovens, René; Barrera, Pilar; Alves, Helena; Pierlot, Céline; Glikmans, Elodie; Garnier, Sophie; Dausset, Jean; Vaz, Carlos; Fernandes, Manuela; Petit-Teixeira, Elisabeth; Lemaire, Isabelle; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora; Bombardieri, Stefano; Dequeker, Jan; Radstake, Timothy R.; Van Riel, Piet; van de Putte, Leo; Lopes-Vaz, Antonio; Prum, Bernard; Bardin, Thomas; Dieudé, Philippe; Cornélis, François

    2007-01-01

    The tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22 allele 1858T has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune diseases. RA is the most frequent of those multifactorial diseases. The RA association was usually restricted to serum rheumatoid factor positive disease (RF+). No interaction was shown with HLA-DRB1, the first RA gene. Many case-control studies replicated the RA association, showing an allele frequency increase of ≈5% on average and large variations of population allele frequencies (2.1–15.5%). In multifactorial diseases, the final proof for a new susceptibility allele is provided by departure from Mendel's law (50% transmission from heterozygous parents). For PTPN22–1858T allele, convincing linkage proof was available only for type 1 diabetes. We aimed at providing this proof for RA. We analyzed 1,395 West European Caucasian individuals from 465 “trio” families. We replicated evidence for linkage, demonstrating departure from Mendel's law in this subset of early RA onset patients. We estimated the overtransmission of the 1858T allele in RF+ families: T = 63%, P < 0.0007. The 1858T allele frequency increased from 11.0% in controls to 17.4% in RF+ RA for the French Caucasian population and the susceptibility genotype (1858T/T or T/C) from 20.2% to 31.6% [odds ratio (OR) = 1.8 (1.2–2.8)]. In conclusion, we provided the linkage proof for the PTPN22–1858T allele and RF+ RA. With diabetes and RA, PTPN22 is therefore a “linkage-proven” autoimmunity gene. PTPN22 accounting for ≈1% of the RA familial aggregation, many new genes could be expected that are as many leads to definitive therapy for autoimmune diseases. PMID:17237219

  17. Autoimmune diseases and HIV infection: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Virot, Emilie; Duclos, Antoine; Adelaide, Leopold; Miailhes, Patrick; Hot, Arnaud; Ferry, Tristan; Seve, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    To describe the clinical manifestations, treatments, prognosis, and prevalence of autoimmune diseases (ADs) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients.All HIV-infected patients managed in the Infectious Diseases Department of the Lyon University Hospitals, France, between January 2003 and December 2013 and presenting an AD were retrospectively included.Thirty-six ADs were found among 5186 HIV-infected patients which represents a prevalence of 0.69% including immune thrombocytopenic purpura (n = 15), inflammatory myositis (IM) (n = 4), sarcoidosis (n = 4), Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) (n = 4), myasthenia gravis (n = 2), Graves' disease (n = 2), and 1 case of each following conditions: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hepatitis, Hashimoto thyroiditis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. One patient presented 2 ADs. Thirty patients were known to be HIV-infected when they developed an AD. The AD preceded HIV infection in 2 patients. GBS and HIV infection were diagnosed simultaneously in 3 cases. At AD diagnosis, CD4 T lymphocytes count were higher than 350/mm in 63% of patients, between 200 and 350/mm in 19% and less than 200/mm in 19%. Twenty patients benefited from immunosuppressant treatments, with a good tolerance.ADs during HIV infection are uncommon in this large French cohort. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura, sarcoidosis, IM, and GBS appear to be more frequent than in the general population. Immunosuppressant treatments seem to be effective and well tolerated.

  18. GITR+ regulatory T cells in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Petrillo, Maria Grazia; Ronchetti, Simona; Ricci, Erika; Alunno, Alessia; Gerli, Roberto; Nocentini, Giuseppe; Riccardi, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases decrease life expectancy and quality of life for millions of women and men. Although treatments can slow disease progression and improve quality of life, all currently available drugs have adverse effects and none of them are curative; therefore, requiring patients to take immunosuppressive drugs for the remainder of their lives. A curative therapy that is safe and effective is urgently needed. We believe that therapies promoting the in vivo expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) or injection of in vitro expanded autologous/heterologous Tregs (cellular therapy) can alter the natural history of autoimmune diseases. In this review, we present data from murine and human studies suggesting that 1) glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-related protein (GITR) plays a crucial role in thymic Treg (tTreg) differentiation and expansion; 2) GITR plays a crucial role in peripheral Treg (pTreg) expansion; 3) in patients with Sjögren syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus, CD4(+)GITR(+) pTregs are expanded in patients with milder forms of the disease; and 4) GITR is superior to other cell surface markers to differentiate Tregs from other CD4(+) T cells. In this context, we consider two potential new approaches for treating autoimmune diseases consisting of the in vivo expansion of GITR(+) Tregs by GITR-triggering drugs and in vitro expansion of autologous or heterologous GITR(+) Tregs to be infused in patients. Advantages of such an approach, technical problems, and safety issues are discussed.

  19. Pathophysiology of cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Julie H; Dutz, Jan P; Sontheimer, Richard D; Werth, Victoria P

    2007-10-01

    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE; syn LE-specific skin disease) is an autoimmune disease with well-defined skin manifestations often accentuated in a photodistribution and frequently associated with specific autoantibodies. These clinical observations have led to numerous laboratory studies related to the role of ultraviolet light, as well as studies of the cascade of immunologic events involved in the pathogenesis of cutaneous LE. We discuss the epidemiologic, clinical, and laboratory findings of cutaneous LE, including the classification of disease subsets. We review the evidence for abnormal photoreactivity in LE with an overview of the cellular, molecular, and genetic factors that may underlie this abnormality. As there is yet no convincing animal model of cutaneous LE, many studies remain descriptive in nature. To arrive at an understanding of the potential mechanisms underlying the development of cutaneous lupus, we discuss the role of ultraviolet light-mediated induction of apoptosis, antigen presentation, genetic factors, and mediators of inflammation. In addition, we consider the role and importance of humoral and cellular factors, synthesizing the current understanding of the pathophysiology of cutaneous lupus.

  20. The paracrine effect of mesenchymal human stem cells restored hearing in β-tubulin induced autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Yoo, T J; Du, Xiaoping; Zhou, Bin

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the activities of hASCs (Human Adipose tissue Derived Stem Cells) on experimental autoimmune hearing loss (EAHL) and how human stem cells regenerated mouse cochlea cells. We have restored hearing in 19 years old white female with autoimmune hearing loss with autologous adipose tissue derived stem cells and we wish to understand the mechanism of restoration of hearing in animal model. BALB/c mice underwent to develop EAHL; mice with EAHL were given hASCs intraperitoneally once a week for 6 consecutive weeks. ABR were examined over time. The helper type 1 autoreactive responses and T-reg cells were examined. H&E staining or immunostaining with APC conjugated anti-HLA-ABC antibody were conducted. The organ of Corti, stria vascularis, spira ligament and spiral ganglion in stem cell group are normal. In control group, without receiving stem cells, the organ of Corti is replaced by a single layer of cells, atrophy of stria vascularis. Systemic infusion of hASCs significantly improved hearing function and protected hair cells in established EAHL. The hASCs decreased the proliferation of antigen specific Th1/Th17 cells and induced the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin10 in splenocytes. They also induced the generation of antigen specific CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)T-reg cells. The experiment showed the restoration is due to the paracrine activities of human stem cells, since there are newly regenerated mice spiral ganglion cells, not human mesenchymal stem cells derived tissue given by intraperitoneally. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Diet and Nutrition With Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter Facebook Pinterest Email Print Diet and nutrition with lupus Lupus Foundation of America September 26, ... Living with Lupus I Have Lupus Exercise and Nutrition Site Footer Need to talk to someone? Our ...

  2. The role of T helper 17 (Th17) and regulatory T cells (Treg) in human organ transplantation and autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Afzali, B; Lombardi, G; Lechler, R I; Lord, G M

    2007-01-01

    Uncommitted (naive) murine CD4+ T helper cells (Thp) can be induced to differentiate towards T helper 1 (Th1), Th2, Th17 and regulatory (Treg) phenotypes according to the local cytokine milieu. This can be demonstrated most readily both in vitro and in vivo in murine CD4+ T cells. The presence of interleukin (IL)-12 [signalling through signal transduction and activator of transcription (STAT)-4] skews towards Th1, IL-4 (signalling through STAT-6) towards Th2, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β towards Treg and IL-6 and TGF-β towards Th17. The committed cells are characterized by expression of specific transcription factors, T-bet for Th1, GATA-3 for Th2, forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) for Tregs and RORγt for Th17 cells. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the skewing of murine Thp towards Th17 and Treg is mutually exclusive. Although human Thp can also be skewed towards Th1 and Th2 phenotypes there is as yet no direct evidence for the existence of discrete Th17 cells in humans nor of mutually antagonistic development of Th17 cells and Tregs. There is considerable evidence, however, both in humans and in mice for the importance of interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-17 in the development and progression of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases (AD). Unexpectedly, some models of autoimmunity thought traditionally to be solely Th1-dependent have been demonstrated subsequently to have a non-redundant requirement for Th17 cells, notably experimental allergic encephalomyelitis and collagen-induced arthritis. In contrast, Tregs have anti-inflammatory properties and can cause quiescence of autoimmune diseases and prolongation of transplant function. As a result, it can be proposed that skewing of responses towards Th17 or Th1 and away from Treg may be responsible for the development and/or progression of AD or acute transplant rejection in humans. Blocking critical cytokines in vivo, notably IL-6, may result in a shift from a Th17 towards a regulatory phenotype and induce quiescence

  3. Haematological manifestations of lupus

    PubMed Central

    Fayyaz, Anum; Igoe, Ann; Kurien, Biji T; Danda, Debashish; James, Judith A; Stafford, Haraldine A; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to compile information on the haematological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), namely leucopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and myelofibrosis. During our search of the English-language MEDLINE sources, we did not place a date-of-publication constraint. Hence, we have reviewed previous as well as most recent studies with the subject heading SLE in combination with each manifestation. Neutropenia can lead to morbidity and mortality from increased susceptibility to infection. Severe neutropenia can be successfully treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. While related to disease activity, there is no specific therapy for lymphopenia. Severe lymphopenia may require the use of prophylactic therapy to prevent select opportunistic infections. Isolated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura maybe the first manifestation of SLE by months or even years. Some manifestations of lupus occur more frequently in association with low platelet count in these patients, for example, neuropsychiatric manifestation, haemolytic anaemia, the antiphospholipid syndrome and renal disease. Thrombocytopenia can be regarded as an important prognostic indicator of survival in patients with SLE. Medical, surgical and biological treatment modalities are reviewed for this manifestation. First-line therapy remains glucocorticoids. Through our review, we conclude glucocorticoids do produce a response in majority of patients initially, but sustained response to therapy is unlikely. Glucocorticoids are used as first-line therapy in patients with SLE with AIHA, but there is no conclusive evidence to guide second-line therapy. Rituximab is promising in refractory and non-responding AIHA. TTP is not recognised as a criteria for classification of SLE, but there is a considerable overlap between the presenting features of TTP and SLE, and a few patients with SLE have concurrent

  4. Interleukin 35-Producing B Cells (i35-Breg): A New Mediator of Regulatory B-Cell Functions in CNS Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Egwuagu, Charles E; Yu, Cheng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation contributes to neuronal deficits in neurodegenerative CNS (central nervous system) autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and uveitis. The major goal of most treatment modalities for CNS autoimmune diseases is to limit inflammatory responses in the CNS; immune-suppressive drugs are the therapy of choice. However, lifelong immunosuppression increases the occurrence of infections, nephrotoxicity, malignancies, cataractogenesis, and glaucoma, which can greatly impair quality of life for the patient. Biologics that target pathogenic T cells is an alternative approach that is gaining wide acceptance as indicated by the popularity of a variety of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved anti-inflammatory compounds and humanized antibodies such as Zenapax, Etanercept, Remicade, anti-ICAM, rapamycin, or tacrolimus. B cells are also potential therapeutic targets because they provide costimulatory signals that activate pathogenic T cells and secrete cytokines that promote autoimmune pathology. B cells also produce autoreactive antibodies implicated in several organ-specific and systemic autoimmune diseases including lupus erythematosus, Graves' disease, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. On the other hand, recent studies have led to the discovery of several regulatory B-cell (Breg) populations that suppress immune responses and autoimmune diseases. In this review, we present a brief overview of Breg phenotypes and in particular, the newly discovered IL35-producing regulatory B cell (i35-Breg). We discuss the critical roles played by i35-Bregs in regulating autoimmune diseases and the potential use of adoptive Breg therapy in CNS autoimmune diseases.

  5. Inhibition of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Human C-Reactive Protein Transgenic Mice Is FcγRIIB Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xian-Zhen; Wright, Tyler T.; Jones, Nicholas R.; Ramos, Theresa N.; Skibinski, Gregory A.; McCrory, Mark A.; Barnum, Scott R.; Szalai, Alexander J.

    2011-01-01

    We showed earlier that experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in human C-reactive protein (CRP) transgenic mice (CRPtg) has delayed onset and reduced severity compared to wild-type mice. Since human CRP is known to engage Fc receptors and Fc receptors are known to play a role in EAE in the mouse, we sought to determine if FcγRI, FcγRIIb, or FcγRIII was needed to manifest human CRP-mediated protection of CRPtg. We report here that in CRPtg lacking either of the two activating receptors, FcγRI and FcγRIII, the beneficial effects of human CRP are still observed. In contrast, if CRPtg lack expression of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIB, then the beneficial effect of human CRP is abrogated. Also, subcutaneous administration of purified human CRP stalled progression of ongoing EAE in wild-type mice, but similar treatment failed to impede EAE progression in mice lacking FcγRIIB. The results reveal that a CRP → FcγRIIB axis is responsible for protection against EAE in the CRPtg model. PMID:21151582

  6. Inhibition of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Human C-Reactive Protein Transgenic Mice Is FcγRIIB Dependent.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xian-Zhen; Wright, Tyler T; Jones, Nicholas R; Ramos, Theresa N; Skibinski, Gregory A; McCrory, Mark A; Barnum, Scott R; Szalai, Alexander J

    2010-10-12

    We showed earlier that experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in human C-reactive protein (CRP) transgenic mice (CRPtg) has delayed onset and reduced severity compared to wild-type mice. Since human CRP is known to engage Fc receptors and Fc receptors are known to play a role in EAE in the mouse, we sought to determine if FcγRI, FcγRIIb, or FcγRIII was needed to manifest human CRP-mediated protection of CRPtg. We report here that in CRPtg lacking either of the two activating receptors, FcγRI and FcγRIII, the beneficial effects of human CRP are still observed. In contrast, if CRPtg lack expression of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIB, then the beneficial effect of human CRP is abrogated. Also, subcutaneous administration of purified human CRP stalled progression of ongoing EAE in wild-type mice, but similar treatment failed to impede EAE progression in mice lacking FcγRIIB. The results reveal that a CRP → FcγRIIB axis is responsible for protection against EAE in the CRPtg model.

  7. Anti-SSA/Ro52 autoantibodies blocking the cardiac 5-HT4 serotoninergic receptor could explain neonatal lupus congenital heart block.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, P; Sallé, L; Lezoualc'h, F; Mialet, J; Gastineau, M; Briand, J P; Isenberg, D A; Fournié, G J; Argibay, J; Fischmeister, R; Muller, S; Hoebeke, J

    2000-10-01

    The 52-kDa SSA/Ro (Ro52) ribonucleoprotein is an antigenic target strongly associated with the autoimmune response in mothers whose children develop neonatal lupus and congenital heart block. When sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were used as autoimmune controls in an enzyme immunoassay to screen for antibodies against the human serotoninergic 5-HT4-receptor, a high correlation was found between the presence of anti-Ro52 protein antibodies in such sera and antibodies reacting with a synthetic peptide, corresponding to the second extracellular loop of the human 5-HT4 receptor (amino acid residues 165-185). Homology scanning between the 5-HT4 peptide and the sequence of the Ro52 protein indicated two potential common epitopes located between residues 365 and 396 of the Ro52 protein. Cross-reactivity was found between the peptide derived from the 5-HT4 receptor, and a peptide corresponding to residues 365-382 of the Ro52 protein. Autoantibodies, affinity-purified on the 5-HT4 receptor peptide, specifically recognized both the Ro52 protein and the 5-HT4 receptor protein in immunoblots. The affinity-purified antibodies antagonized the serotonin-induced L-type Ca channel activation on human atrial cells. This effect could explain the electrophysiological abnormalities in neonatal lupus.

  8. Congenic autoimmune murine models of central nervous system disease in connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed

    Alexander, E L; Murphy, E D; Roths, J B; Alexander, G E

    1983-08-01

    Congenic mice of the MRL/Mp strain spontaneously develop an autoimmune connective tissue disease that shares immunological and histopathological features with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and Sjögren's syndrome. The autoimmune disorder in these mice is accelerated markedly by the recessive gene lpr. By 6 months of age, MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice developed prominent mononuclear cell infiltrates restricted to the choroid plexus and meninges, whereas congeneric MRL/Mp- +/+ mice (which lack the lpr gene) showed delayed but widespread inflammatory infiltrates involving cerebral vessels and meninges, with sparing of the choroid plexus. These distinctive patterns of cerebral inflammation, which are comparable in many respects to those seen in human connective tissue disease, provide some of the first animal models of relevant central nervous system histopathological processes associated with underlying connective tissue disease.

  9. Fcγ receptor IIIa single-nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes affect human IgG binding and are associated with lupus nephritis in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chaoling; Ptacek, Travis S; Redden, David T; Zhang, Kui; Brown, Elizabeth E; Edberg, Jeffrey C; McGwin, Gerald; Alarcón, Graciela S; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Petri, Michelle; Qin, Aijian; Wu, Jianming; Kimberly, Robert P

    2014-05-01

    To investigate whether the Fcγ receptor IIIa-66L/R/H (FcγRIIIa-66L/R/H) polymorphism influences net effective receptor function and to assess if the FCGR3A combined genotypes formed by FcγRIIIa-66L/R/H and FcγRIIIa-176F/V, as well as copy number variation (CNV), confer risk of developing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis. FcγRIIIa variants, expressed on A20 IIA1.6 cells, were used in flow cytometry-based human IgG-binding assays. Using Pyrosequencing methodology, FCGR3A single-nucleotide polymorphism and CNV genotypes were determined in a cohort of 1,728 SLE patients and 2,404 healthy controls. The FcγRIIIa-66L/R/H (rs10127939) polymorphism influenced ligand binding capacity in the presence of the FcγRIIIa-176V (rs396991) allele. There was a trend toward an association of the low-binding FcγRIIIa-176F allele with lupus nephritis among African Americans (P = 0.0609) but not among European Americans (P > 0.10). Nephritis among African American patients with SLE was associated with FcγRIIIa low-binding haplotypes containing the 66L/R/H and 176F variants (P = 0.03) and with low-binding genotype combinations (P = 0.002). No association was observed among European American patients with SLE. The distribution of FCGR3A CNV was not significantly different among controls and SLE patients with or without nephritis. FcγRIIIa-66L/R/H influences ligand binding. The low-binding haplotypes formed by 66L/R/H and 176F confer enhanced risk of lupus nephritis in African Americans. FCGR3A CNVs are not associated with SLE or lupus nephritis in either African Americans or European Americans. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  10. Autoimmune Inflammatory Myopathy in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Seema; Suri, Vanita; Bagga, Rashmi; Thami, Meenakshi R.; Sharma, Aman; Bambery, Pardeep

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases such as systemic sclerosis, Wegner's granulomatosis, and polyarteritis nodosa are rarely seen in pregnancy, unlike systemic lupus erythematosus, whose association with pregnancy is well studied. Dermatomyositis is a protean disease that affects women in reproductive age. There are only a few case reports documenting the outcome of pregnancy in patients with dermatomyositis/polymyositis. The disease is usually considered to have an adverse effect on pregnancy. Fetal prognosis is guided by the severity of maternal disease and is usually good when the disease remains inactive during pregnancy. PMID:18324327

  11. Autoimmune gastritis.

    PubMed

    Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2016-10-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with destruction of parietal cells of the corpus and fundus of the stomach. The known consequence is vitamin B12 deficiency and, consequently, pernicious anemia. However, loss of parietal cells reduces secretion of gastric acid which is also required for absorption of inorganic iron; thus, iron deficiency is commonly found in patients with autoimmune gastritis. This usually precedes vitamin B12 deficiency and is found mainly in young women. Patients with chronic iron deficiency, especially those refractory to oral iron therapy, should therefore be evaluated for the presence of autoimmune gastritis.

  12. Vaccines and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    De Martino, M; Chiappini, E; Galli, L

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines have eradicated or controlled many infectious diseases, saving each year millions of lives and quality of life of many other millions of people. In spite of the success of vaccines over the last two centuries, parents (and also some health care workers) gloss over the devastating consequences of diseases, which are now avoided thanks to vaccines, and direct their attention to possible negative effects of immunization. Three immunological objections are raised: vaccines cause antigenic overload, natural immunity is safer and better than vaccine-induced immunity, and vaccines induce autoimmunity. The last point is examined in this review. Theoretically, vaccines could trigger autoimmunity by means of cytokine production, anti-idiotypic network, expression of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens, modification of surface antigens and induction of novel antigens, molecular mimicry, bystander activation, epitope spreading, and polyclonal activation of B cells. There is strong evidence that none of these mechanisms is really effective in causing autoimmune diseases. Vaccines are not a source of autoimmune diseases. By contrast, absolute evidence exists that infectious agents can trigger autoimmune mechanisms and that they do cause autoimmune diseases.

  13. Local synthesis of interferon-alpha in lupus nephritis is associated with type I interferons signature and LMP7 induction in renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Giuseppe; Cafiero, Cesira; Divella, Chiara; Sallustio, Fabio; Gigante, Margherita; Pontrelli, Paola; De Palma, Giuseppe; Rossini, Michele; Grandaliano, Giuseppe; Gesualdo, Loreto

    2015-03-22

    Type I interferons are pivotal in the activation of autoimmune response in systemic lupus erythematous. However, the pathogenic role of interferon-alpha in patients affected by lupus nephritis remains uncertain. The aim of our study was to investigate the presence of a specific interferon signature in lupus nephritis and the effects of interferon-alpha at renal level. We performed immunohistochemical analysis for MXA-protein and in situ hybridization to detect interferon-alpha signature and production in human lupus nephritis. Through microarray studies, we analyzed the gene expression profile of renal tubular epithelial cells, stimulated with interferon-alpha. We validated microarray results through real-time polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry on renal tubular epithelial cells, and through immunohistochemical analysis and confocal microscopy on renal biopsies. Type I interferons signature was characterized by MXA-specific staining in renal tubular epithelial cells; in addition, in situ hybridization showed that renal tubular epithelial cells were the major producers of interferon-alpha, indicating a potential autocrine effect. Whole-genome expression profile showed interferon-alpha induced up-regulation of genes involved in innate immunity, protein ubiquitination and switching to immunoproteasome. In accordance with the in vitro data, class IV lupus nephritis showed up-regulation of the immunoproteasome subunit LMP7 in tubular epithelial cells associated with type I interferon signature. Our data indicate that type I interferons might have a pathogenic role in lupus nephritis characterized by an autocrine effect of interferon-alpha on renal tubular epithelial cells. Therefore we hypothesize that inhibition of type I interferons might represent a therapeutic target to prevent tubulo-interstitial damage in patients with lupus nephritis.

  14. Suppression of IRAK1 or IRAK4 Catalytic Activity, but Not Type 1 IFN Signaling, Prevents Lupus Nephritis in Mice Expressing a Ubiquitin Binding–Defective Mutant of ABIN1

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Pelaez, Marta; Arthur, J. Simon C.; Marchesi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the TNIP1 gene encoding A20-binding inhibitor of NF-κB1 (ABIN1) predispose to lupus and other autoimmune diseases in at least eight human populations. We found previously that knock-in mice expressing a ubiquitin-binding–defective mutant of ABIN1 (ABIN1[D485N]) develop autoimmunity as they age and succumb to a disease resembling lupus nephritis in humans. In this article, we report that Flt3-derived dendritic cells from these mice overproduced type 1 IFNs upon stimulation with ligands that activate TLR7 or TLR9. However, crossing ABIN1[D485N] mice to IFNAR1-knockout mice that do not express the α-subunit of the type 1 IFNR did not prevent splenomegaly, the appearance of high serum levels of autoantibodies and other Igs, or liver inflammation and only reduced kidney inflammation modestly. In contrast, crossing ABIN1[D485N] mice to knock-in mice expressing catalytically inactive mutants of IRAK1 or IRAK4 prevented splenomegaly, autoimmunity, and liver and kidney inflammation. Our results support the notion that IRAK1 and/or IRAK4 are attractive targets for the development of drugs to prevent, and perhaps treat, lupus nephritis and other autoinflammatory diseases caused by the decreased ability of ABIN1 or other proteins to restrict the strength of MyD88 signaling. PMID:27807192

  15. Suppression of IRAK1 or IRAK4 Catalytic Activity, but Not Type 1 IFN Signaling, Prevents Lupus Nephritis in Mice Expressing a Ubiquitin Binding-Defective Mutant of ABIN1.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Sambit K; Lopez-Pelaez, Marta; Arthur, J Simon C; Marchesi, Francesco; Cohen, Philip

    2016-12-01

    Polymorphisms in the TNIP1 gene encoding A20-binding inhibitor of NF-κB1 (ABIN1) predispose to lupus and other autoimmune diseases in at least eight human populations. We found previously that knock-in mice expressing a ubiquitin-binding-defective mutant of ABIN1 (ABIN1[D485N]) develop autoimmunity as they age and succumb to a disease resembling lupus nephritis in humans. In this article, we report that Flt3-derived dendritic cells from these mice overproduced type 1 IFNs upon stimulation with ligands that activate TLR7 or TLR9. However, crossing ABIN1[D485N] mice to IFNAR1-knockout mice that do not express the α-subunit of the type 1 IFNR did not prevent splenomegaly, the appearance of high serum levels of autoantibodies and other Igs, or liver inflammation and only reduced kidney inflammation modestly. In contrast, crossing ABIN1[D485N] mice to knock-in mice expressing catalytically inactive mutants of IRAK1 or IRAK4 prevented splenomegaly, autoimmunity, and liver and kidney inflammation. Our results support the notion that IRAK1 and/or IRAK4 are attractive targets for the development of drugs to prevent, and perhaps treat, lupus nephritis and other autoinflammatory diseases caused by the decreased ability of ABIN1 or other proteins to restrict the strength of MyD88 signaling.

  16. [Of worms and men--Administration of helminth products as an innovative approach to treatment of autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Sega, Yahel; Versini, Mathilde; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-07-01

    In areas where helminth infections are common, there is a low prevalence of autoimmune diseases. This observation gave rise to the hygiene hypothesis, claiming that certain organisms which were abundant in the human microenvironment hold an immunoregulatory and immunosuppressive effect, therefore, their eradication led to an increase in immune mediated diseases. This hypothesis laid the foundation for several directions of research which demonstrated an immunosuppressive and immunoregulatory effect of helminths on both the acquired and the innate immune systems. These studies led to the examination of the therapeutic potential of helminths and their components in treating different autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. The administration of helminth products in murine models of these diseases exhibited a positive effect on disease expression, morbidity and mortality, as well as the ability to prevent the onset of disease to some extent (when given in a preventive protocol). Recently, a synthetic molecule composed of phosphorylcholine (a product of the nematode a. vitae) combined with the protein tuftsin, which is produced by human splenocytes, was shown to exert the aforementioned positive effects on a murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). These discoveries point to a new direction in research for developing helminth-based therapies for autoimmune diseases.

  17. Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Luísa Eça; Baker, Britain; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. Vaccine efficacy is based on whether host immune response against an antigen can elicit a memory T-cell response over time. Although the described side effects thus far have been mostly transient and acute, vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. The diagnosis of a definite autoimmune disease and the occurrence of fatal outcome post-vaccination have been less frequently reported. Since vaccines are given to previously healthy hosts, who may have never developed the disease had they not been immunized, adverse events should be carefully accessed and evaluated even if they represent a limited number of occurrences. In this review of the literature, there is evidence of vaccine-induced autoimmunity and adjuvant-induced autoimmunity in both experimental models as well as human patients. Adjuvants and infectious agents may exert their immune-enhancing effects through various functional activities, encompassed by the adjuvant effect. These mechanisms are shared by different conditions triggered by adjuvants leading to the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome). In conclusion, there are several case reports of autoimmune diseases following vaccines, however, due to the limited number of cases, the different classifications of symptoms and the long latency period of the diseases, every attempt for an epidemiological study has so far failed to deliver a connection. Despite this, efforts to unveil the connection between the triggering of the immune system by adjuvants and the development of autoimmune conditions should be undertaken. Vaccinomics is a field that may bring to light novel customized, personalized treatment approaches in the future.

  18. Autophagy in autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Goronzy, Jörg J; Weyand, Cornelia M

    2015-07-01

    Autophagy is a protective and life-sustaining process in which cytoplasmic components are packaged into double-membrane vesicles and targeted to lysosomes for degradation. This process of cellular self-digestion is an essential stress response and is cytoprotective by removing damaged organelles and proteins that threaten the cell's survival. Key outcomes include energy generation and recycling of metabolic precursors. In the immune system, autophagy regulates processes such as antigen uptake and presentation, removal of pathogens, survival of short- and long-lived immune cells, and cytokine-dependent inflammation. In all cases, a window of optimal autophagic activity appears critical to balance catabolic, reparative, and inflammation-inducing processes. Dysregulation of autophagosome formation and autophagic flux can have deleterious consequences, ranging from a failure to "clean house" to the induction of autophagy-induced cell death. Abnormalities in the autophagic pathway have been implicated in numerous autoimmune diseases. Genome-wide association studies have linked polymorphisms in autophagy-related genes with predisposition for tissue-destructive inflammatory disease, specifically in inflammatory bowel disease and systemic lupus erythematosus. Although the precise mechanisms by which dysfunctional autophagy renders the host susceptible to continuous inflammation remain unclear, autophagy's role in regulating the long-term survival of adaptive immune cells has recently surfaced as a defect in multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Efforts are underway to identify autophagy-inducing and autophagy-suppressing pharmacologic interventions that can be added to immunosuppressive therapy to improve outcomes of patients with autoimmune disease.

  19. cDNA cloning and sequencing of human fibrillarin, a conserved nucleolar protein recognized by autoimmune antisera

    SciTech Connect

    Aris, J.P.; Blobel, G. )

    1991-02-01

    The authors have isolated a 1.1-kilobase cDNA clone that encodes human fibrillarin by screening a hepatoma library in parallel with DNA probes derived from the fibrillarin genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (NOP1) and Xenopus laevis. RNA blot analysis indicates that the corresponding mRNA is {approximately}1,300 nucleotides in length. Human fibrillarin expressed in vitro migrates on SDS gels as a 36-kDa protein that is specifically immunoprecipitated by antisera from humans with scleroderma autoimmune disease. Human fibrillarin contains an amino-terminal repetitive domain {approximately}75-80 amino acids in length that is rich in glycine and arginine residues and is similar to amino-terminal domains in the yeast and Xenopus fibrillarins. The occurrence of a putative RNA-binding domain and an RNP consensus sequence within the protein is consistent with the association of fibrillarin with small nucleolar RNAs. Protein sequence alignments show that 67% of amino acids from human fibrillarin are identical to those in yeast fibrillarin and that 81% are identical to those in Xenopus fibrillarin. This identity suggests the evolutionary conservation of an important function early in the pathway for ribosome biosynthesis.

  20. D-penicillamine-induced autoimmunity: relationship to macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinze; Uetrecht, Jack P

    2009-09-01

    Idiosyncratic drug reactions represent a serious health problem, and they remain unpredictable largely due to our limited understanding of the mechanisms involved. Penicillamine-induced autoimmunity in Brown Norway (BN) rats represents one model of an idiosyncratic reaction, and this drug can also cause autoimmune reactions in humans. We previously demonstrated that penicillamine binds to aldehydes on the surface of macrophages. There is evidence that an imine bond formed by aldehyde groups on macrophages and amine groups on T cells is one type of interaction between these two cells that is involved in the induction of an immune response. We proposed that the binding of penicillamine with aldehyde groups on macrophages could lead to their activation and in some patients could lead to autoimmunity. In this study, the transcriptome profile of spleen macrophages 6 h after penicillamine treatment was used to detect effects of penicillamine on macrophages with a focus on 20 genes known to be macrophage activation biomarkers. One biological consequence of macrophage activation was investigated by determining mRNA levels for IL-15 and IL-1 beta which are crucial for NK cell activation, as well as levels of mRNA for selected cytokines in spleen NK cells. Up-regulation of the macrophage activating cytokines, IFN-gamma and GM-CSF, and down-regulation of IL-13 indicated activation of NK cells, which suggests a positive feedback loop between macrophages and NK cells. Furthermore, treatment of a murine macrophage cell line, RAW264.7, with penicillamine increased the production of TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-23, providing additional evidence that penicillamine activates macrophages. Hydralazine and isoniazid cause a lupus-like syndrome in humans and also bind to aldehyde groups. These drugs were also found to activate RAW264.7 macrophages. Together, these data support the hypothesis that drugs that bind irreversibly with aldehydes lead to macrophage activation, which in some

  1. T-helper cell intrinsic defects in lupus that break peripheral tolerance to nuclear autoantigens.

    PubMed

    Datta, Syamal K; Zhang, Li; Xu, Luting

    2005-04-01

    Special populations of T helper cells drive B cells to produce IgG class switched, pathogenic autoantibodies in lupus. The major source of antigenic determinants (epitopes) that trigger interactions between lupus T and B cells is nucleosomes of apoptotic cells. These epitopes can be used for antigen-specific therapy of lupus. Secondly, the autoimmune T cells of lupus are sustained because they resist anergy and activation-induced programmed cell death by markedly upregulating cyclooxygenase (COX) 2 along with the antiapoptotic molecule c-FLIP. Only certain COX-2 inhibitors block pathogenic anti-DNA autoantibody production in lupus by causing death of autoimmune T helper cells. Hence COX-2 inhibitors may work independently of their ability to block the enzymatic function of COX-2, and structural peculiarities of these select inhibitors may lead to better drug discovery and design.

  2. Autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Robazzi, Teresa Cristina Martins Vicente; Adan, Luis Fernando Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid function abnormalities and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with rheumatologic autoimmune diseases, such as Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma. Limited data are available regarding the prevalence and clinical characteristics of autoimmune thyroiditis in other rheumatologic disorders, such as rheumatic fever and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus. The authors review the association of endocrine autoimmune and rheumatic autoimmune diseases, assessing various age groups and clinical conditions. The bibliographic survey was conducted through the search for scientific articles indexed in the general health sciences databases, such as Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), Medline/PubMed, and Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO). The following descriptors were used: "rheumatic autoimmune diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases"; "thyroid disorders and rheumatic diseases"; "thyroiditis and rheumatic diseases"; "autoimmune diseases and thyroid"; and "pediatric rheumatic diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases". This study showed that, despite contradictory results in the literature, there is a greater prevalence of the association between autoimmune thyroid diseases and rheumatic diseases, highlighting the possibility of common pathogenic mechanisms among them.

  3. Autoimmunity in Primary Antibody Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Gholamreza; Ahmadi, Moslem; Abolhassani, Hassan; Yazdani, Reza; Mohammadi, Hamed; Mirshafiey, Abbas; Rezaei, Nima; Aghamohammadi, Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Primary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common inherited primary immunodeficiencies in humans, characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, an inability to produce specific antibodies, and recurrent infections mainly caused by encapsulated bacteria. However, it has been shown that inflammatory disorders, granulomatous lesions, lymphoproliferative diseases, cancer, and autoimmunity are associated with the various types of PAD. Both systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases could be attributed to B-cell defects in PAD patients. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia are the most common autoimmune disorders in this group of patients. The aim of this review is to describe the proposed mechanisms for autoimmunity and to review the literature with respect to the reported autoimmune disorders in each type of PAD. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Triggered by Infection with Human Parvovirus B19 after Total Abdominal Colectomy for Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Iida, Tomoya; Satoh, Shuji; Nakagaki, Suguru; Shimizu, Haruo; Kaneto, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for an adhesive ileus 14 years after total abdominal colectomy for ulcerative colitis (UC). The ileus decreased with conservative treatment, however, autoimmune hemolytic an