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Sample records for human lymphocyte subsets

  1. Circadian changes of T lymphocyte subsets in human peripheral blood.

    PubMed Central

    Miyawaki, T; Taga, K; Nagaoki, T; Seki, H; Suzuki, Y; Taniguchi, N

    1984-01-01

    The circadian variations in circulating T cell subsets defined by monoclonal antibodies in eight healthy male volunteers were evaluated in whole blood using a flow cytometry. In all subjects, the number of lymphocytes showed a clear rhythmicity with high values at night and low values during the day. This circadian variation in circulating lymphocytes appeared to reflect largely a change in the number of T cells rather than B cells. The percentage of OKT3+ and OKT11+ cells showed a similar fluctuation with a peak at night and a depression during the day. It was found that the percentage of OKT4+ cells varied in parallel with that of T cells, particularly of OKT3+ cells, but the OKT8+ subset was not appreciably altered over a 24 h period. Thus, a circadian variation of T cells could be largely accounted for by a circadian change of OKT4+ cells. Plasma cortisol levels showed an expected circadian variation. It was also shown that there might be an intimate relationship between these circadian changes of T cell subsets and plasma cortisol levels. PMID:6608426

  2. Flow cytometry of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocytes: alterations of blood/CSF ratios of lymphocyte subsets in inflammation disorders of human central nervous system (CNS).

    PubMed

    Kleine, T O; Albrecht, J; Zöfel, P

    1999-03-01

    Flow cytometry was adapted to measure lymphocytes in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The method was sufficiently precise, reproducible and accurate despite low cell counts. In lumbar CSF of controls with 500 to 3500 (10(3)/l) leukocytes, lymphocyte counts correlated with those in corresponding venous blood: blood/CSF ratios of approximately 2000 : 1 were found for total T cells (CD3+) and CD3+ HLA-DR-, CD3+4+, CD3+8+ subsets, ratios were increased for the lymphocyte subsets CD3+ HLA-DR+ < or = CD3+16+56+ < CD16+56+3- < CD8+3- < CD19+; CD8+4+ ratio was half of CD3+ ratio. Data indicate selective barriers (blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers) to blood lymphocyte subsets which favor the transfer of T subsets. Correlation of the subset ratios to the CD3+ ratio indicates distinct barrier properties which changed differently with acute and subacute inflammations and neuroimmunological diseases of central nervous system (CNS) in lumbar or ventricular CSF, but not with simple protein barrier disturbance. HLA DR+ T ratios were higher than HLA DR- T ratios only with controls and some neuroimmunological diseases. Lymphocyte barrier characteristics were related to protein leakage situated at the same barriers, indicating for the lymphocyte subsets selective transfer routes in control subjects and non-selective routes in patients with CNS inflammation where altered ratios revealed a mixture of both routes.

  3. Cell surface Glut1 levels distinguish human CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte subsets with distinct effector functions

    PubMed Central

    Cretenet, Gaspard; Clerc, Isabelle; Matias, Maria; Loisel, Severine; Craveiro, Marco; Oburoglu, Leal; Kinet, Sandrina; Mongellaz, Cédric; Dardalhon, Valérie; Taylor, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte activation requires the generation of sufficient energy to support new biosynthetic demands. Following T cell receptor (TCR) engagement, these requirements are met by an increased glycolysis, due, at least in part, to induction of the Glut1 glucose transporter. As Glut1 is upregulated on tumor cells in response to hypoxia, we assessed whether surface Glut1 levels regulate the antigen responsiveness of human T lymphocytes in both hypoxic and atmospheric oxygen conditions. Notably, Glut1 upregulation in response to TCR stimulation was significantly higher in T lymphocytes activated under hypoxic as compared to atmospheric oxygen conditions. Furthermore, TCR-stimulated human T lymphocytes sorted on the basis of Glut1-Lo and Glut1-Hi profiles maintained distinct characteristics, irrespective of the oxygen tension. While T cells activated in hypoxia divided less than those activated in atmospheric oxygen, Glut1-Hi lymphocytes exhibited increased effector phenotype acquisition, augmented proliferation, and an inverted CD4/CD8 ratio in both oxygen conditions. Moreover, Glut1-Hi T lymphocytes exhibited a significantly enhanced ability to produce IFN-γ and this secretion potential was completely dependent on continued glycolysis. Thus, Glut1 surface levels identify human T lymphocytes with distinct effector functions in both hypoxic and atmospheric oxygen tensions. PMID:27067254

  4. Subsets of blood, spleen and recirculating lymphocytes in man.

    PubMed Central

    Reinecke, G; Pabst, R

    1983-01-01

    Lymphocyte subpopulations were characterized in human blood and spleens. In addition the spleens were perfused by a closed extracorporeal perfusion system under almost physiological conditions. Lymphocytes released from the spleen during perfusion were taken to be representative of recirculating lymphocytes. B lymphocytes were classified by their surface immunoglobulin, T lymphocytes and T lymphocyte subsets by cytochemistry, sheep red blood cell rosette formation and in some experiments by monoclonal antibodies. In the blood 71 +/- 4.3% of the lymphocytes were rosette forming cells and 23.3 +/- 3.8% B lymphocytes. In the spleen 49.8 +/- 3.6% were T and 53.3 +/- 2.1% were B lymphocytes. In three spleens the mean number of OKT3+ lymphocytes were 27.6 +/- 7.0% OKT4+ 8.6 +/- 1.4% and OKT8+ 13.7 +/- 2.2%. The ratio of T helper to T suppressor lymphocytes was 0.67 for the spleen and 1.7 for the blood. The lymphocytes released from the perfused spleen showed a similar distribution pattern of surface markers to that of the splenic subpopulations. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6225579

  5. Investigating chromosome damage and gammaH2AX response in human lymphocytes and lymphocyte subsets as potential biomarkers of radiation sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaton, Lindsay A.

    This thesis examines in vitro irradiated blood samples from prostate cancer patients exhibiting late normal tissue damage after receiving radiotherapy, for lymphocyte response. Chromosomal aberrations, translocations and proliferation rate are measured, as well as gammaH2AX response in lymphocytes and lymphocyte subsets. The goal of this thesis is to determine whether the lymphocyte response to in vitro radiation could be used as a marker for radiosensitivity. Patients were selected from a randomized clinical trial evaluating the optimal timing of Dose Escalated Radiation and short course Androgen Deprivation Therapy. Of 438 patients, 3% developed Grade 3 late radiation proctitis and were considered to be radiosensitive. Blood was drawn from 10 of these patients along with 20 matched samples from patients with grade 0 proctitis. The samples were irradiated and were analyzed for dicentric chromosomes, excess fragments and proliferation rates (at 6 Gy), translocations, stable and unstable damage (at 4 Gy), and dose response (up to 10 Gy), along with time response after 2 Gy (0 -- 24 h). Chromosome aberrations, excess fragments per cell, translocations per cell and proliferation rates were analyzed by brightfield and fluorescent microscopy, while the gammaH2AX response in lymphocytes and lymphocyte subsets was analyzed by flow cytometry. Both groups were statistically similar for all endpoints at 0 Gy. At 6 Gy, there were statistically significant differences between the radiosensitive and control cohorts for three endpoints; the mean number of dicentric chromosomes per cell, the mean number of excess fragments per cell and the proportion of cells in second metaphase. At 4 Gy, there were statistically significant differences between the two cohorts for three endpoints; the mean number of translocations per cell, the mean number of dicentric chromosomes per cell and the mean number of deletions per cell. There were no significant differences between the gammaH2AX

  6. Effects of multiple-dose ponesimod, a selective S1P1 receptor modulator, on lymphocyte subsets in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Jurcevic, Stipo; Juif, Pierre-Eric; Hamid, Colleen; Greenlaw, Roseanna; D’Ambrosio, Daniele; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of ponesimod, a selective S1P1 receptor modulator, on T lymphocyte subsets in 16 healthy subjects. Lymphocyte subset proportions and absolute numbers were determined at baseline and on Day 10, after once-daily administration of ponesimod (10 mg, 20 mg, and 40 mg each consecutively for 3 days) or placebo (ratio 3:1). The overall change from baseline in lymphocyte count was −1,292±340×106 cells/L and 275±486×106 cells/L in ponesimod- and placebo-treated subjects, respectively. This included a decrease in both T and B lymphocytes following ponesimod treatment. A decrease in naïve CD4+ T cells (CD45RA+CCR7+) from baseline was observed only after ponesimod treatment (−113±98×106 cells/L, placebo: 0±18×106 cells/L). The number of T-cytotoxic (CD3+CD8+) and T-helper (CD3+CD4+) cells was significantly altered following ponesimod treatment compared with placebo. Furthermore, ponesimod treatment resulted in marked decreases in CD4+ T-central memory (CD45RA−CCR7+) cells (−437±164×106 cells/L) and CD4+ T-effector memory (CD45RA−CCR7−) cells (−131±57×106 cells/L). In addition, ponesimod treatment led to a decrease of −228±90×106 cells/L of gut-homing T cells (CLA−integrin β7+). In contrast, when compared with placebo, CD8+ T-effector memory and natural killer (NK) cells were not significantly reduced following multiple-dose administration of ponesimod. In summary, ponesimod treatment led to a marked reduction in overall T and B cells. Further investigations revealed that the number of CD4+ cells was dramatically reduced, whereas CD8+ and NK cells were less affected, allowing the body to preserve critical viral-clearing functions. PMID:28096659

  7. Lymphocyte subsets alteration in patients with argentine hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, D A; Ambrosio, A M; Feuillade, M R; Maiztegui, J I

    1989-02-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations were studied in 15 patients with Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever (AHF), during the acute period of the disease and in early convalescence. Anti-human Ig antibodies were used to identify B cells and monoclonal antibodies to assess T4 and T8 subsets. During the acute period of the disease, significant alterations were found in B, T4, and T8 lymphocytes (P less than .001), as well as in T4/T8 ratios (P less than .001). These abnormalities disappeared in early convalescence, around 30 days after the clinical onset. Diminished numbers of T4 lymphocytes are interpreted as relevant to the immunodepression that characterizes the acute phase of AHF.

  8. Distribution of B lymphocyte subsets in normal lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, L J; Swerdlow, S H; Habeshaw, J A

    1984-01-01

    Using the ABC avidin-biotin peroxidase techniques and a series of monoclonal antibodies against B cell associated antigens, the anatomical distribution of B lymphocyte subsets was studied in reactive lymph node, tonsil and spleen. Evidence is presented for at least five major phenotypically distinct B cell subsets, each localized to specific compartments of peripheral lymphoid tissue. The possible relationship of these subsets of B lymphocytes to activation, maturation and function in the B cell lineage is discussed. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6375918

  9. Occupational exposure to formaldehyde and alterations in lymphocyte subsets

    PubMed Central

    Hosgood, H. Dean; Zhang, Luoping; Tang, Xiaojiang; Vermeulen, Roel; Hao, Zhenyue; Shen, Min; Qiu, Chuangyi; Ge, Yichen; Hua, Ming; Ji, Zhiying; Li, Senhua; Xiong, Jun; Reiss, Boris; Liu, Songwang; Xin, Kerry X.; Azuma, Mariko; Xie, Yuxuan; Freeman, Laura Beane; Ruan, Xiaolin; Guo, Weihong; Galvan, Noe; Blair, Aaron; Li, Laiyu; Huang, Hanlin; Smith, Martyn T.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Background Formaldehyde is used in many occupational settings, most notably in manufacturing, health care, and embalming. Formaldehyde has been classified as a human carcinogen, but its mechanism of action remains uncertain. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional study of 43 formaldehyde exposed-workers and 51 unexposed age and sex-matched controls in Guangdong, China to study formaldehyde’s early biologic effects. To follow-up our previous report that the total lymphocyte count was decreased in formaldehyde-exposed workers compared to controls, we evaluated each major lymphocyte subset (i.e., CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and B cells) and T cell lymphocyte subset (CD4+ naïve and memory T cells, CD8+ naïve and memory T cells, and regulatory T cells). Linear regression of each subset was used to test for differences between exposed workers and controls, adjusting for potential confounders. Results Total NK cell and T cell counts were about 24% (p=0.037) and 16% (p=0.0042) lower, respectively, among exposed workers. Among certain T cell subsets, decreased counts among exposed workers were observed for CD8+ T cells (p=0.026), CD8+ effector memory T cells (p=0.018), and regulatory T cells (CD4+FoxP3+: p=0.04; CD25+FoxP3+: p=0.008). Conclusions Formaldehyde exposed-workers experienced decreased counts of NK cells, regulatory T cells, and CD8+ effector memory T cells; however, due to the small sample size these findings need to be confirmed in larger studies. PMID:22767408

  10. CD4CD8αα lymphocytes, a novel human regulatory T cell subset induced by colonic bacteria and deficient in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Sarrabayrouse, Guillaume; Bossard, Céline; Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Jarry, Anne; Meurette, Guillaume; Quévrain, Elodie; Bridonneau, Chantal; Preisser, Laurence; Asehnoune, Karim; Labarrière, Nathalie; Altare, Frédéric; Sokol, Harry; Jotereau, Francine

    2014-04-01

    How the microbiota affects health and disease is a crucial question. In mice, gut Clostridium bacteria are potent inducers of colonic interleukin (IL)-10-producing Foxp3 regulatory T cells (Treg), which play key roles in the prevention of colitis and in systemic immunity. In humans, although gut microbiota dysbiosis is associated with immune disorders, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In contrast with mice, the contribution of Foxp3 Treg in colitis prevention has been questioned, suggesting that other compensatory regulatory cells or mechanisms may exist. Here we addressed the regulatory role of the CD4CD8 T cells whose presence had been reported in the intestinal mucosa and blood. Using colonic lamina propria lymphocytes (LPL) and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from healthy individuals, and those with colon cancer and irritable bowel disease (IBD), we demonstrated that CD4CD8αα (DP8α) T lymphocytes expressed most of the regulatory markers and functions of Foxp3 Treg and secreted IL-10. Strikingly, DP8α LPL and PBL exhibited a highly skewed repertoire toward the recognition of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a major Clostridium species of the human gut microbiota, which is decreased in patients with IBD. Furthermore, the frequencies of DP8α PBL and colonic LPL were lower in patients with IBD than in healthy donors and in the healthy mucosa of patients with colon cancer, respectively. Moreover, PBL and LPL from most patients with active IBD failed to respond to F. prausnitzii in contrast to PBL and LPL from patients in remission and/or healthy donors. These data (i) uncover a Clostridium-specific IL-10-secreting Treg subset present in the human colonic LP and blood, (ii) identify F. prausnitzii as a major inducer of these Treg, (iii) argue that these cells contribute to the control or prevention of colitis, opening new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for IBD, and (iv) provide new tools to address the systemic impact of both these Treg and the

  11. Binding of CLL Subset 4 B Cell Receptor Immunoglobulins to Viable Human Memory B Lymphocytes Requires a Distinctive IGKV Somatic Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Catera, Rosa; Liu, Yun; Gao, Chao; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Magli, Amanda; Allen, Steven L; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Rai, Kanti R; Chu, Charles C; Feizi, Ten; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Amino acid replacement mutations in certain chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) stereotyped B cell receptor (BCR) immunoglobulins (IGs) at defined positions within antigen-binding sites strongly imply antigen selection. Prime examples of this are CLL subset 4 BCR IGs using IGHV4-34/IGHD5-18/IGHJ6 and IGKV2-30/IGKJ2 rearrangements. Conspicuously, and unlike most CLL IGs, subset 4 IGs do not bind apoptotic cells. By testing the (auto)antigenic reactivities of subset 4 IGs toward viable lymphoid-lineage cells and specific autoantigens typically bound by IGHV4-34+ IGs, we found that IGs from both subset 4 and non–subset 4 IGHV4-34–expressing CLL cases bound naïve B cells. However, only subset 4 IGs reacted with memory B cells. Furthermore, subset 4 IGs did not bind DNA nor i or I carbohydrate antigens that are common targets of IGHV4-34-utilizing antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus and cold agglutinin disease, respectively. Notably, we found that subset 4 IG binding to memory B lymphocytes depends on an aspartic acid at position 66 of FR3 in the rearranged IGKV2-30 gene; this amino acid residue is acquired by somatic mutation. Our findings illustrate the importance of positive and negative selection criteria for structural elements in CLL IGs and suggest that autoantigens driving normal B cells to become subset 4 CLL cells differ from those driving IGHV4-34+ B cells in other diseases. PMID:28097289

  12. Naïve subset develops the most important alloreactive response among human CD4+ T lymphocytes in human leukocyte antigen-identical related setting.

    PubMed

    Chérel, Mathilde; Choufi, Bachra; Trauet, Jacques; Cracco, Pascale; Dessaint, Jean-Paul; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Labalette, Myriam

    2014-06-01

    In longitudinal clinical studies, receiving a high percentage of allogeneic donor-derived CD4(+) CCR7(+) T cells, which include naïve and central memory subsets have been correlated with increased incidence and severity of acute GVHD. Whether naïve and central memory CD4(+) T-cell subsets contribute more or equally to alloimmune responses are still unclear in human. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the alloreactive response of purified naïve, central memory, and effector memory CD4(+) T-cell subsets in HLA identical setting. By coculturing monocyte-derived dendritic cells and purified CD4(+) T-cell subsets, from healthy HLA-identical male and female sibling pairs, we found that naïve CD4(+) CCR7(+) CD45RA(+) T cells developed the highest proliferative response upon stimulation by minor histocompatibility antigens and were progressively driven to produce high levels of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin-6. Comparatively, the central memory CD4(+) CCR7(+) CD45RA(neg) subset proliferated to a lower extent and produced very low amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines while the CCR7(neg) effector memory CD4(+) subset was unresponsive. This study demonstrates the superior capacity of naïve CD4(+) T cells to mount a primary alloreactive response as compared to central memory T cells. Their proliferative response associated with a pro-inflammatory differentiation makes them potentially acute GVHD inducers. These in vitro results in line with what we have observed in clinical studies and may also lend support to approaches of partial selective T-cell depletion for GVHD prevention.

  13. Lack of effect of cimetidine on lymphocyte subsets in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Cohen, C J; Hellinger, J A; Day, J; Salitsky, N; Shevitz, A; Zackin, R; DeGruttola, V

    1996-11-01

    Cimetidine, widely used for peptic ulcer disease, blocks type 2 histamine receptors present on immune cells, including T cells, B cells, and monocytes. As an earlier published study showed evidence of increases in CD4 cell counts due to this drug, we conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, 8-week trial of oral cimetidine (400 mg p.o. t.i.d.) in a study involving 182 patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Overall, cimetidine-treated patients had a decline in CD4+ cell counts that was no different from the decline for placebo-treated persons, neither during the first 8 weeks of the trial (mean drop, 7.1% [standard error, 12.1-1.8] vs. 6.7% [standard error, 11.6-1.5]) nor during the subsequent 8 weeks of open-label administration of cimetidine. No differences were evident between the treatment groups in terms of the percentage reactive to p24 antigen at baseline, and p24 antigen concentrations did not change from baseline to the end of week 8. In summary, cimetidine is well tolerated by HIV-infected individuals but alters neither CD4+ cell counts nor at least one quantitative measure of viral load, HIV p24 antigen levels.

  14. Effects of a Simulated Tennis Match on Lymphocyte Subset Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Mark; Kell, Holly; Navalta, James; Tibana, Ramires; Lyons, Scott; Arnett, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Tennis is an activity requiring both endurance and anaerobic components, which could have immunosuppressive effects postexercise. Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of a simulated tennis match on apoptotic and migratory markers on lymphocyte subsets. Method: Male high school (n = 5) and college (n = 3) tennis…

  15. Control Lymphocyte Subsets: Can one country's values serve for another's?

    PubMed Central

    Mandala, Wilson L.; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Apornpong, Tanakorn; Kerr, Stephen J; MacLennan, Jenny M.; Hanson, Celine; Jaimulwong, Tanyathip; Gondwe, Esther N.; Rosenblatt, Howard M.; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Spector, Stephen A.; Pancharoen, Chitsanu; Gelman, Rebecca S; MacLennan, Calman A.; Shearer, William T

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocyte subsets can be affected by host and environmental factors, yet direct comparisons of their patterns across continents are lacking. This work compares proportions and counts of lymphocyte subsets between healthy children from Thailand, Malawi and the USA. We analyzed subsets of 1,399 healthy children aged between 0 and 15 years: 281 Thai, 397 Malawian and 721American children. Existing data for five subsets were available for all three cohorts (Total T, CD4+ T, CD8+ T, natural killer (NK) and B cells), with data for another six subsets from the Thai and American cohorts (naïve, memory and activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells). Cellular patterns between cohorts differed mainly in children under two years. Compared to American children, Thai children had higher median numbers of total T cells, CD8+ T cells and NK cells while Malawian children under 18 months, on average, had more CD8+ T cells and B cells. Both Thai and Malawian children had lower median CD4+ T cell percentages and CD4/CD8 ratios than American children. Thai children had more memory and activated CD8+ T cells than American children. Approximately one-fifth of Thai and Malawian HIV-uninfected healthy children aged 0-3 years met WHO-defined CD4+ count criteria for immune-deficiency in HIV-infected children. Healthy children from Thailand, Malawi and the USA have differences in lymphocyte subsets that are likely to be due to differences in ethnicity, exposure to infectious diseases and environmental factors. These results indicate the need for country-specific reference ranges for diagnosis and management of immunologic disorders. PMID:25171870

  16. Preparation of Internal Quality Control Material for Lymphocyte Subset Analysis.

    PubMed

    Roh, Eun Youn; Shin, Sue; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Oh, Sohee; Park, Kyoung Un; Lee, Nuri; Song, Eun Young

    2016-07-01

    Lymphocyte subset analysis is widely used in clinical laboratories, and more than two levels of daily QC materials are required for reliable results. Commercially available, expensive QC materials have short shelf lives and may not be suitable in resource-poor settings. We compared different methods for preparing homemade QC material, including fixation with 1%, 2%, or 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA); freezing with 10% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), 0.1% bovine serum albumin-phosphate buffered saline, or after ethanolic dehydration; and using cryopreservation temperatures of -20°C, -80°C, or -196°C. We found an optimal experimental condition, which is 'fixation with 4% PFA, freezing with 10% DMSO, and storage at 80°C'. To evaluate long-term stability of QC materials prepared in this optimal condition, two levels of QC materials (QM1 and QM2) were thawed after 30, 33, 35, 37, 60, 62, 64, and 67 days of cryopreservation. Lymphocyte subset was analyzed with BD Multitest IMK kit (BD Biosciences, USA). QM1 and QM2 were stable after 1-2 months of cryopreservation (CV <3% for CD3, CD4, and CD8 and 5-7% for CD16/56 and CD19). We propose this method as an alternative cost-effective protocol for preparing homemade internal QC materials for lymphocyte subset analysis in resource-poor settings.

  17. Cytokine profile and lymphocyte subsets in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Francisco, C O; Catai, A M; Moura-Tonello, S C G; Arruda, L C M; Lopes, S L B; Benze, B G; Del Vale, A M; Malmegrim, K C R; Leal, A M O

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a metabolic disease with inflammation as an important pathogenic background. However, the pattern of immune cell subsets and the cytokine profile associated with development of T2D are unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate different components of the immune system in T2D patients' peripheral blood by quantifying the frequency of lymphocyte subsets and intracellular pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by T cells. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 22 men (51.6±6.3 years old) with T2D and 20 nonsmoking men (49.4±7.6 years old) who were matched for age and sex as control subjects. Glycated hemoglobin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and the lipid profile were measured by a commercially available automated system. Frequencies of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood and intracellular production of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ cytokines by CD3+ T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. No differences were observed in the frequency of CD19+ B cells, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells, CD16+56+ NK cells, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells in patients with T2D compared with controls. The numbers of IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells were significantly higher in patients with T2D than in controls (P<0.05). The frequency of interferon-γ-producing CD3+ T cells was positively correlated with body mass index (r=0.59; P=0.01). In conclusion, this study shows increased numbers of circulating IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells in patients with T2D, suggesting that these cytokines are involved in the immune pathology of this disease.

  18. Cytokine profile and lymphocyte subsets in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, C.O.; Catai, A.M.; Moura-Tonello, S.C.G.; Arruda, L.C.M.; Lopes, S.L.B.; Benze, B.G.; Del Vale, A.M.; Malmegrim, K.C.R.; Leal, A.M.O.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a metabolic disease with inflammation as an important pathogenic background. However, the pattern of immune cell subsets and the cytokine profile associated with development of T2D are unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate different components of the immune system in T2D patients' peripheral blood by quantifying the frequency of lymphocyte subsets and intracellular pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by T cells. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 22 men (51.6±6.3 years old) with T2D and 20 nonsmoking men (49.4±7.6 years old) who were matched for age and sex as control subjects. Glycated hemoglobin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and the lipid profile were measured by a commercially available automated system. Frequencies of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood and intracellular production of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ cytokines by CD3+ T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. No differences were observed in the frequency of CD19+ B cells, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells, CD16+56+ NK cells, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells in patients with T2D compared with controls. The numbers of IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells were significantly higher in patients with T2D than in controls (P<0.05). The frequency of interferon-γ-producing CD3+ T cells was positively correlated with body mass index (r=0.59; P=0.01). In conclusion, this study shows increased numbers of circulating IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells in patients with T2D, suggesting that these cytokines are involved in the immune pathology of this disease. PMID:27007651

  19. Interactions of human alpha/beta and gamma/delta T lymphocyte subsets in shear flow with E-selectin and P-selectin

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have compared the ability of human alpha/beta and gamma/delta T lymphocytes to adhere to selectin-bearing substrates, an interaction thought to be essential for homing and localization at sites of inflammation. Both T cell populations form rolling adhesions on E- and P-selectin substrates under physiologic flow conditions. Although equivalent to alpha/beta T cells in binding to E-selectin, gamma/delta T cells demonstrated greater ability to adhere to P-selectin that was purified or expressed on the surface of activated, adherent platelets. Under static conditions, 80% of gamma/delta T cells and 53% of alpha/beta T cells formed shear-resistant adhesions to P-selectin, whereas only 30% of gamma/delta and alpha/beta T cells adhered to E- selectin. The enhance ability of gamma/delta T cells to adhere to P- selectin cannot be attributed to differences in expression of the P- selectin glycoprotein ligand (PSGL-1), as all alpha/beta T cells versus approximately 75% of gamma/delta T cells expressed PSGL-1. Both cell populations expressed a similar percentage of the carbohydrate antigens sialyl LewisX and cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen. Depletion of lymphocyte populations or T cell clones bearing these oligosaccharides with the monoclonal antibody CSLEX-1 and HECA-452, respectively, resulted in a substantial reduction in adhesion to E-selectin and slight reduction in adhesion to P-selectin under flow conditions. Treatment of cells with an endopeptidase that selectively degrades O- sialomucins such as PSGL-1, abolished P-selectin but not E-selectin adhesion. Removal of terminal sialic acids with neuraminidase or protease treatment of cells abrogated cell adhesion to both selectin substrates. These results provide direct evidence for the presence of distinct E- and P-selectin ligands on T lymphocytes and suggest that gamma/delta T cells may be preferentially recruited to inflammatory sites during the early stages of an immune response when P-selectin is

  20. Harnessing Human Dendritic Cell Subsets for Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Hideki; Schmitt, Nathalie; Klechevsky, Eynav; Pedroza-Gonzales, Alexander; Matsui, Toshimichi; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon; Fay, Joseph; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina

    2010-01-01

    Summary Immunity results from a complex interplay between the antigen-nonspecific innate immune system and the antigen-specific adaptive immune system. The cells and molecules of the innate system employ non-clonal recognition receptors including lectins, Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors and helicases. B and T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system employ clonal receptors recognizing antigens or their derived peptides in a highly specific manner. An essential link between innate and adaptive immunity is provided by dendritic cells (DCs). DCs can induce such contrasting states as immunity and tolerance. The recent years have brought a wealth of information on the biology of DCs revealing the complexity of this cell system. Indeed, DC plasticity and subsets are prominent determinants of the type and quality of elicited immune responses. Here we summarize our recent studies aimed at a better understanding of the DC system to unravel the pathophysiology of human diseases and design novel human vaccines. PMID:20193020

  1. Homeostasis of IL-15 dependent lymphocyte subsets in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Cepero-Donates, Yuneivy; Rakotoarivelo, Volatiana; Mayhue, Marian; Ma, Averil; Chen, Yi-Guang; Ramanathan, Sheela

    2017-01-01

    IL-15 is a member of the gamma chain family of cytokines (γc – CD132). The IL-15 receptor (IL-15R) complex consists of 3 subunits: the ligand-binding IL-15Rα chain (CD215), the β chain (CD122; also used by IL-2), and the common γ chain. The biological activities of IL-15 are mostly mediated by the IL-15:IL-15Rα complex, produced by the same cell and ‘trans-presented’ to responder cells expressing the IL-15Rβγc. The peculiar and almost unique requirement for IL-15 to be trans-presented by IL-15Rα suggests that the biological effects of IL-15 signaling are tightly regulated even at the level of availability of IL-15. Tissue-specific deletion of IL-15Rα has shown macrophage-and dendritic cell-derived IL-15Rα mediate the homeostasis of different CD8+ T cell subsets. Here we show that hepatocyte and macrophage- specific expression of IL-15Rα is required to maintain the homeostasis of NK and NKT cells in the liver. Thus, homeostasis of IL-15-dependent lymphocyte subsets is also regulated by trans-presentation of IL-15 by non-hematopoietic cells in the tissue environment. PMID:26778709

  2. Transformation of T-lymphocyte subsets by Marek's disease herpesvirus.

    PubMed Central

    Schat, K A; Chen, C L; Calnek, B W; Char, D

    1991-01-01

    Marek's disease herpesvirus (MDV)-transformed lymphoblastoid tumor cell lines were characterized for the presence of the surface markers. Monoclonal antibodies were used for CD3 (T-cell receptor [TCR] complex), TCR1, TCR2, and TCR3, CD4, CD8, and Ia antigen by indirect fluorescence staining followed by microscopic examination or flow cytometry. The lymphoblastoid cell lines were obtained from tumors from chickens infected with MDV (n = 44) or from local lesions induced by inoculation of allogeneic, MDV-infected chick kidney cells (n = 56). Lymphocytes were harvested from these lesions between 4 and 16 days postinoculation and cultured in vitro to establish cell lines. All cell lines expressed Ia antigen and CD3 and/or TCR and thus are activated T cells. Most of the cell lines developed from tumors were CD4+ CD8-; only one cell line was negative for both markers. Sixteen percent of the cell lines were TCR3+, while the remainder were TCR2+. The cell lines developed from local lesions were much more heterogeneous: 45% were CD4- CD8+, 34% were CD4- CD8-, and only 21% were CD4+ CD8-. The number of TCR3+ cell lines was larger than expected for the CD4- CD8+ and CD4- CD8- cell lines, as judged from the presence of these cells in the blood. These results indicate that several subsets of T lymphocytes can be transformed by MDV, depending on the pathogenesis of infection. Activation of T cells as a consequence of the normal pathogenesis or by allogeneic stimulation seem to be a first important step in the process of transformation. PMID:1847460

  3. Changes in lymphocyte function and subsets in dogs with naturally occurring chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Kralova, Simona; Leva, Lenka; Toman, Miroslav

    2010-04-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) causes immunosuppresion in humans and is thought to be one of the causes of noninfectious secondary immunosuppression in dogs. Hematological, biochemical, and immunological examinations were performed on blood samples obtained from dogs in various stages of CRF. The number of dogs with lymphopenia increased with the progression of clinical signs. All main subsets of lymphocytes were decreased, but more considerable reduction was detected in B-cells, Tc-cells, and NK cells. Depressed lymphocyte response to concanavalin A and pokeweed mitogen was found in dogs with severe clinical signs and lymphopenia. Our results, showing impaired immunological functions, are similar to results obtained from uremic humans, suggesting that infection may be an important complication in dogs with CRF.

  4. Distinct transcriptional control in major immunogenetic subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia exhibiting subset-biased global DNA methylation profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kanduri, Meena; Marincevic, Millaray; Halldórsdóttir, Anna M.; Mansouri, Larry; Junevik, Katarina; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Kultima, Hanna Göransson; Isaksson, Anders; Juliusson, Gunnar; Andersson, Per-Ola; Ehrencrona, Hans; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) can be divided into prognostic subgroups based on the IGHV gene mutational status, and is further characterized by multiple subsets of cases with quasi-identical or stereotyped B cell receptors that also share clinical and biological features. We recently reported differential DNA methylation profiles in IGHV-mutated and IGHV-unmutated CLL subgroups. For the first time, we here explore the global methylation profiles of stereotyped subsets with different prognosis, by applying high-resolution methylation arrays on CLL samples from three major stereotyped subsets: the poor-prognostic subsets #1 (n = 15) and #2 (n = 9) and the favorable-prognostic subset #4 (n = 15). Overall, the three subsets exhibited significantly different methylation profiles, which only partially overlapped with those observed in our previous study according to IGHV gene mutational status. Specifically, gene ontology analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed a clear enrichment of genes involved in immune response, such as B cell activation (e.g., CD80, CD86 and IL10), with higher methylation levels in subset #1 than subsets #2 and #4. Accordingly, higher expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 was demonstrated in subset #4 vs. subset #1, pointing to a key role for these molecules in the crosstalk of CLL subset #4 cells with the microenvironment. In summary, investigation of three prototypic, stereotyped CLL subsets revealed distinct DNA methylation profiles for each subset, which suggests subset-biased patterns of transcriptional control and highlights a key role for epigenetics during leukemogenesis. PMID:23154584

  5. Distinct transcriptional control in major immunogenetic subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia exhibiting subset-biased global DNA methylation profiles.

    PubMed

    Kanduri, Meena; Marincevic, Millaray; Halldórsdóttir, Anna M; Mansouri, Larry; Junevik, Katarina; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Kultima, Hanna Göransson; Isaksson, Anders; Juliusson, Gunnar; Andersson, Per-Ola; Ehrencrona, Hans; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2012-12-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) can be divided into prognostic subgroups based on the IGHV gene mutational status, and is further characterized by multiple subsets of cases with quasi-identical or stereotyped B cell receptors that also share clinical and biological features. We recently reported differential DNA methylation profiles in IGHV-mutated and IGHV-unmutated CLL subgroups. For the first time, we here explore the global methylation profiles of stereotyped subsets with different prognosis, by applying high-resolution methylation arrays on CLL samples from three major stereotyped subsets: the poor-prognostic subsets #1 (n = 15) and #2 (n = 9) and the favorable-prognostic subset #4 (n = 15). Overall, the three subsets exhibited significantly different methylation profiles, which only partially overlapped with those observed in our previous study according to IGHV gene mutational status. Specifically, gene ontology analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed a clear enrichment of genes involved in immune response, such as B cell activation (e.g., CD80, CD86 and IL10), with higher methylation levels in subset #1 than subsets #2 and #4. Accordingly, higher expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 was demonstrated in subset #4 vs. subset #1, pointing to a key role for these molecules in the crosstalk of CLL subset #4 cells with the microenvironment. In summary, investigation of three prototypic, stereotyped CLL subsets revealed distinct DNA methylation profiles for each subset, which suggests subset-biased patterns of transcriptional control and highlights a key role for epigenetics during leukemogenesis.

  6. Flow cytometry study of lymphocyte subsets in malnourished and well-nourished children with bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Nájera, Oralia; González, Cristina; Toledo, Guadalupe; López, Laura; Ortiz, Rocío

    2004-05-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition is the primary cause of immune deficiency in children across the world. It has been related to changes in peripheral T-lymphocyte subsets. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of infection and malnutrition on the proportion of peripheral-lymphocyte subsets in well-nourished non-bacterium-infected (WN), well-nourished bacterium-infected (WNI), and malnourished bacterium-infected (MNI) children by flow cytometry. A prospectively monitored cohort of 15 MNI, 12 WNI, and 17 WN children was studied. All the children were 3 years old or younger and had only bacterial infections. Results showed a significant decrease in the proportion of T CD3(+) (P < 0.05 for relative and P < 0.03 for absolute values), CD4(+) (P < 0.01 for relative and absolute values), and CD8(+) (P < 0.05 for relative values) lymphocyte subsets in WNI children compared to the results seen with WN children. Additionally, B lymphocytes in MNI children showed significant lower values (CD20(+) P < 0.02 for relative and P < 0.05 for absolute values) in relation to the results seen with WNI children. These results suggest that the decreased proportions of T-lymphocyte subsets observed in WNI children were associated with infection diseases and that the incapacity to increase the proportion of B lymphocyte was associated with malnutrition. This low proportion of B lymphocytes may be associated with the mechanisms involved in the immunodeficiency of malnourished children.

  7. T Helper Lymphocyte Subsets and Plasticity in Autoimmunity and Cancer: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2015-01-01

    In response to cytokine signalling and other factors, CD4-positive T lymphocytes differentiate into distinct populations that are characterized by the production of certain cytokines and are controlled by different master transcription factors. The spectrum of such populations, which was initially limited to Th1 and Th2 subsets, is currently broadened to include Th17 and Treg subsets, as well as a number of less studied subtypes, such as Tfh, Th9, and Th22. Although these subsets appear to be relatively stable, certain plasticity exists that allows for transition between the subsets and formation of hybrid transition forms. This provides the immune system flexibility needed for adequate response to pathogens but, at the same time, can play a role in the pathogenic processes in cases of deregulation. In this review, we will discuss the properties of T lymphocyte subsets and their plasticity, as well as its implications for cancer and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26583100

  8. A subset of memory CD4+ helper T lymphocytes identified by expression of Pgp-1

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The Pgp-1 glycoprotein (Ly-24 antigen) is acquired by mature murine T lymphocytes at the time of primary antigen stimulation Pgp-1 was previously shown to be a useful cell surface marker for distinguishing antigen-specific memory CD8+ T lymphocytes after immunization. Here we demonstrate that this observation extends to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in mice immunized with sperm whale myoglobin or keyhole limpet hemocyanin were contained nearly exclusively in the minor Pgp-1+ subset. PMID:2564418

  9. Expression of CD8alpha identifies a distinct subset of effector memory CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Macchia, Iole; Gauduin, Marie-Claire; Kaur, Amitinder; Johnson, R Paul

    2006-10-01

    Circulating CD4+ CD8+ T lymphocytes have been described in the peripheral blood of humans and several animal species. However, the origin and functional properties of these cells remain poorly understood. In the present study, we evaluated the frequency, phenotype and function of peripheral CD4+ CD8+ T cells in rhesus macaques. Two distinct populations of CD4+ CD8+ T cells were identified: the dominant one was CD4hi CD8lo and expressed the CD8alphaalpha homodimer, while the minor population was CD4lo CD8hi and expressed the CD8alphabeta heterodimer. The majority of CD4hi CD8alphalo T cells exhibited an activated effector/memory phenotype (CCR5lo CD7- CD28- HLA-DR+) and expressed relatively high levels of granzyme B. Intracellular cytokine staining assays demonstrated that the frequency of cytomegalovirus-specific T cells was enriched five-fold in CD4hi CD8alphalo T cells compared to single-positive CD4+ T cells, whereas no consistent enrichment was observed for simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-specific T cells. Cross-sectional studies of SIV-infected animals demonstrated that the frequency of CD4hi CD8alphalo T cells was lower in wild-type SIV-infected animals compared to uninfected controls, although prospective studies of SIV-infected animals demonstrated depletion of CD4hi CD8alphalo lymphocytes only in a subset of animals. Taken together, these data suggest that CD4+ T cells expressing CD8alpha represent an effector/memory subset of CD4+ T cells and that this cell population can be depleted during the course of SIV infection.

  10. Identification of a novel CD160+ CD4+ T-lymphocyte subset in the skin: a possible role for CD160 in skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Abecassis, Sofia; Giustiniani, Jérôme; Meyer, Nicolas; Schiavon, Valérie; Ortonne, Nicolas; Campillo, José A; Bagot, Martine; Bensussan, Armand

    2007-05-01

    CD160 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored cell surface molecule expressed by human circulating cytotoxic lymphocytes that correspond to the majority of natural killer cell (NK) expressing CD56(dim), TCRgammadelta lymphocytes, and to a minor CD8 T-cell subset. CD160 engagement by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules triggers by itself both cytotoxic function and cytokine production in NK lymphocytes, whereas it provides co-activating signals to TCR-induced proliferation in T CD8+ lymphocytes. In this study, we analyzed by immunohistochemistry the phenotype of lymphocytes infiltrating normal skin and inflammatory skin lesions of atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, and psoriasis. We identified a minor original subset of CD4+ CD160+ T cells infiltrating inflammatory lesions. We found that this lymphocyte subset localization is not restricted to the skin, as we demonstrated that CD160 transcripts could be induced in IL-2 or IL-15-activated CD4+ peripheral blood lymphocytes. Finally, we report that CD160 acts as a co-activator receptor for CD3-induced proliferation of CD4+ CD160+ T cells isolated from inflammatory skin lesions. Thus, we hypothesize that the unique CD4+ CD160+ lymphocyte subset plays a role in the pathogenesis of skin inflammation.

  11. Reference ranges of hematology and lymphocyte subsets in healthy Korean native cattle (Hanwoo) and Holstein dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Mi; Lee, Jin-A; Jung, Bock-Gie; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Bong-Joo; Suh, Guk-Hyun

    2016-06-01

    There are no accurate reference ranges for hematology parameters and lymphocyte subsets in Korean native beef cattle (Hanwoo). This study was performed to establish reliable reference ranges of hematology and lymphocyte subsets using a large number of Hanwoo cattle (n = 350) and to compare differences between Hanwoo and Holstein dairy cattle (n = 334). Additionally, age-related changes in lymphocyte subsets were studied. Bovine leukocyte subpopulation analysis was performed using mono or dual color flow cytometry. The leukocyte subpopulations investigated in healthy cattle included: CD2(+) cells, sIgM(+) cells, MHC class II(+) cells, CD3(+) CD4(+) cells, CD3(+) CD8(+) cells, and WC1(+) cells. Although Hanwoo and Holstein cattle are the same species, results showed several differences in hematology and lymphocyte subsets between Hanwoo and Holstein cattle. This study is the first report to establish reference ranges of hematology and lymphocyte subsets in adult Hanwoo cattle.

  12. The selective expression of distinct fucosylated glycoproteins on murine T and B lymphocyte subsets.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Salam, Fatma; Mansour, Mohamed H; Al-Shemary, Tahany

    2005-01-01

    The putative expression of distinct terminally fucosylated glycoconjugates among murine lymphocyte subpopulations was sought using Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) and Anguilla anguilla agglutinin (AAA), each with a distinctive primary binding preference to type II and type I blood group H oligosaccharide determinants, respectively. In newly born and adult mice, direct labeling of isolated lymphocyte subsets in suspension, as well as immunohistochemical assays were indicative of the age-regulated co-expression of the UEA-I-reactive ligand among thymic epithelial cells and a subset of the mature (PNA-), medullary thymocytes. In the spleen, UEA-I-ligand expression was selectively confined to a subset of the CD4+ T lymphocytes scattered around red pulp sinuses in newly born mice, but distinctively localized within the T cell-dependent periarteriolar lymphoid sheath compartment in adult mice. Among thymocytes of adult mice, two-dimensional Western blots demonstrated the expression of the UEA-I-reactive ligand among multiple isoforms of three major 50, 114 and 180kDa acidic glycoproteins, of which, heterogeneous weight and charge variants of the 114kDa component were also evident among splenocytes. The expression of the AAA-reactive ligand was, on the other hand, restricted to a single major 120 kDa acidic glycoprotein, in addition to a minor molecular weight variant of 115kDa, associated with a subset of immature IgM+ B lymphocytes localized within the red pulp, in both newly born and adult mice. The significance of these findings is discussed in relation to mechanisms that govern lymphocyte maturation, selection and migration.

  13. Establishing a pure lymphocyte gate for subset analysis by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Horvatinovich, J M; Sparks, S D; Mann, K P

    1996-06-15

    Development of a more cost-effective and efficient method of performing lymphocyte subset analysis is of continuing importance in clinical flow cytometry laboratories. Current two-color methods utilize forward and right angle light scatter and multiple tubes per sample and are thereby liable to gate contamination. Methods using three-color analysis with CD45 vs. right angle light scatter (RALS) gating cannot always exclude a contaminating nonlymphoid population. We have established a two tube approach to directly measure total T cells, T suppressor, and T helper subsets, total B cells and total natural killer cells. The technique involves staining of whole blood with a mixture of five monoclonal antibodies conjugated to three fluorochromes: CD4+CD19 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), CD3+CD33 phycoerythrin (PE), CD45 peridin chlorophyll alpha protein (PerCP), CD8+CD16 FITC, CD3+CD33 PE, and CD45 PerCP. Analysis is performed using a single laser flow cytometer. This method has equivalent recovery to and improved purity of the lymphocyte gate when compared to well-established methods. These antibody combinations additionally allow clear separation of lymphocytes from other leukocytes and debris as well as separation of the T cell helper and suppressor subsets, natural killer cells and B lymphocytes. We additionally provide preliminary data that an accurate lymphocyte subset analysis can be performed on a single tube containing five antibodies (CD4+CD19 FITC, CD3+CD33 PE, and CD45 PerCP), although some measurements are performed deductively.

  14. Subsets of T lymphocytes in relation to T lymphocyte function in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, J C; Hawkins, S A; Swallow, M W; Lyttle, J A; Patterson, V H; Merrett, J D; Haire, M

    1985-01-01

    T lymphocyte control of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of autologous B lymphocytes was examined in parallel to the enumeration of subpopulations of mononuclear cells in 22 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and in 22 healthy individuals. All were seropositive for EBV. The incidence of lack of T cell control was significantly higher in patients than in controls, confirming previous published work. In the present study, we have shown in addition a significantly reduced proportion of OKT8+ cells and a significantly increased ratio of OKT4/OKT8 cells in the group of patients with lack of control. The findings point to abnormal immunoregulation in MS. PMID:3000660

  15. Lymphocyte proliferative response and subset profiles during extended periods of chloroquine or primaquine prophylaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Fryauff, D J; Richards, A L; Baird, J K; Richie, T L; Mouzin, E; Tjitra, E; Sutamihardja, M A; Ratiwayanto, S; Hadiputranto, H; Larasati, R P; Pudjoprawoto, N; Subianto, B; Hoffman, S L

    1996-01-01

    Immune suppression and disturbances of normal leukocyte populations are side effects attributed to many antimalarial drugs and were concerns during a recent year-long placebo-controlled trial that compared daily primaquine (0.5 mg of base per kg of body weight per day) with weekly chloroquine (300 mg of base one time per week) for malaria prophylaxis. The study took place in Irian Jaya, Indonesia, from July 1994 to August 1995 and enrolled 129 Javanese men with normal glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase function. Tests for lymphocyte function and subset composition were conducted blindly on a cross-section of subjects during weeks 10 (n = 42) and 48 (n = 72) of supervised prophylaxis. Lymphocyte function, measured as the proliferative response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to a panel of mitogens (pokeweed mitogen, phytohemagglutinin, and concanavalin A) and antigens (purified protein derivative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Clostridium tetani toxoid) and expressed as a stimulation index, allowed for statistical comparison between groups and sampling times. The lymphocyte subset composition for each group and time point was based on flow cytometry profiling, and the results were expressed as the mean percentages of CD3 (total T cells), CD19 (total B cells), CD4+ (T-helper and inducer cells), and CD8+ (T suppressor and cytotoxic cells), CD3/CD16+ CD56 (natural killer cells), CD3/anti-HLA-DR (activated T cells) cells and the CD4+/CD8+ ratios. Lymphocyte stimulation indices were statistically comparable among the placebo, primaquine, and chloroquine groups at both time points, although the primaquine group was distinguished by having repeatedly greater proportions of subjects with high ( > 3.0) stimulation indices. The lymphocyte subset profiles of these groups at both time points were also similar and undistorted relative to those of healthy reference populations matched for age, sex, and ethnicity. The results provide quantitative support for the safety of

  16. Lymphocyte subset differences in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, multiple sclerosis and major depression

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, M J; Schacterle, R S; Mackin, G A; Wilson, S N; Bloomingdale, K L; Ritz, J; Komaroff, A L

    2005-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a heterogeneous disorder of unknown aetiology characterized by debilitating fatigue, along with other symptoms, for at least 6 months. Many studies demonstrate probable involvement of the central and autonomic nervous system, as well as a state of generalized immune activation and selective immune dysfunction in patients with CFS. The aim of this study was to compare the lymphocyte subsets of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome to those of patients with major depression and multiple sclerosis as well as those of healthy control subjects. No differences were found in total numbers of T cells, B cells or natural killer (NK) cells. However, differences were found in T, B and NK cell subsets. Patients with major depression had significantly fewer resting T (CD3+/CD25–) cells than the other groups. Patients with major depression also had significantly more CD20+/CD5+ B cells, a subset associated with the production of autoantibodies. Compared to patients with multiple sclerosis, patients with CFS had greater numbers of CD16+/CD3– NK cells. Further study will be required to determine whether these alterations in lymphocyte subsets are directly involved in the pathophysiology of these disorders, or are secondary effects of the causal agent(s). PMID:15996197

  17. Influence of bestatin, an inhibitor of aminopeptidases, on T and B lymphocyte subsets in mice.

    PubMed

    Lis, M; Szczypka, M; Suszko, A; Obmińska-Mrukowicz, B

    2011-01-01

    Bestatin, a low-molecular weight dipeptide, is a potent inhibitor of aminopeptidase N which has been demonstrated to have antitumor and immunomodulatory effects. The effects of bestatin (10, 1 and 0.1 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally once, five or ten times to mice on the total number of lymphocytes in the thymus, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes and the percentage and the absolute number of T cell subsets (CD4+CD8+, CD4-CD8-, CD4+, CD8+) in the thymus and T (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+) and B (CD19+) lymphocytes in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes were studied. It has been found that bestatin administered ten times at doses of 10, 1 and 0.1 mg/kg increased the total number of thymocytes, splenocytes and lymphocytes of mesenteric lymph nodes. Bestatin also changed the percentage and the absolute number of T cell subsets in the thymus and T and B lymphocytes in the peripheral lymphatic organs. Five and ten exposures to bestatin (10, 1 and 0.1 mg/kg) increased the absolute count of both immature CD4+CD8+ and CD4-CD8- thymic cells. Moreover, both a single and multiple administration of bestatin (1 and 0.1 mg/kg) decreased the percentage and absolute count of CD3+ splenocytes and mesenteric lymph node cells with corresponding decreases in the percentage and absolute count of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. Both a single and multiple administration of bestatin at all the doses under investigation augmented the percentage and the absolute count of CD19+ (B lymphocytes) in the peripheral lymphatic organs. The results of the study show that there is a relationship between the effect induced by bestatin and the dose of the drug as well as the number of doses applied. The strongest effect on the T and B lymphocyte subsets was noted after five injections of bestatin at doses of 1 and 0.1 mg/kg.

  18. Flow cytometric lymphocyte subset analysis using material from frozen whole blood.

    PubMed

    Alam, Iftikhar; Goldeck, David; Larbi, Anis; Pawelec, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Multicenter immune monitoring programs commonly rely on storing and shipping cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), isolated from whole blood before freezing. However, under many conditions in the field, facilities to separate PBMC are absent. Here, we investigate the feasibility of using whole blood (WB) frozen at -80°C as a source of viable lymphocytes for use in immunological studies. We compare the percentage of CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes and their subsets from frozen WB with results from cryopreserved PBMC in five random healthy blood donors (three female, two male). We report that CD4 and CD8 values in lymphocytes from WB frozen up to 120 days were very similar to those of PBMC frozen up to 10 days. These data suggest that within the limits of parameters investigated in this study, contrary to our original assumptions, whole blood frozen at -80°C may in fact be an appropriate source of viable lymphocytes for T cell enumeration assays in immunological and epidemiological studies.

  19. A rapid technique for lymphocyte preparation prior to two-color immunofluorescence analysis of lymphocyte subsets using flow cytometry. Comparison with density gradient separation.

    PubMed

    Mansour, I; Bourin, P; Rouger, P; Doinel, C

    1990-02-20

    A technique is described for lymphocyte preparation which permits analyses by two-color immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. It consists, briefly, of the lysis of red blood cells and washing of white blood cells prior to labeling. We tested this technique with a large panel of monoclonal antibodies in mono- and dual immunofluorescence. By comparing these results to those obtained after density gradient separation, we found the following statistically significant differences: the count of the phenotype B1+ was higher after whole blood lysis preparation than after density gradient separation; whereas, the corresponding counts of OKT4+ and Leu-4-Leu-7+ phenotypes were lower. No difference was detected with OKT8+, Leu-4+, OKT8+Leu-4+, OKT8+Leu-4-, OKT8-Leu-4+, OKT8+Leu-7+, Leu-4+Leu-7+, Leu-4-Leu-11c+, OKT8+Leu-11c+ and OKT8+Leu-15+ phenotypes. We have studied the reproducibility of both methods and the correlation between them. The disparity of the lymphocyte subset count between these two methods, though statistically significant, was relatively weak and seems to be due to the density gradient separation. Since the preparation of lymphocytes using the density gradient method is time consuming, we propose whole blood lysis as an alternative lymphocyte separation method when assessing immune status in human disease by flow cytometry. It offers the following advantages: (i) it does not require additional steps, (ii) it permits two-color immunofluorescence through the labeling of white blood cells after washing, (iii) it is reliable, (iv) it is reproducible, and (v) it is helpful in studies of lymphopenia since it offers the possibility of lymphocyte enrichment.

  20. Circulating lymphocyte and T memory subsets in glucocorticosteroid versus IVIG treated patients with CIDP.

    PubMed

    Klehmet, Juliane; Staudt, Max; Ulm, Lena; Unterwalder, Nadine; Meisel, Andreas; Meisel, Christian

    2015-06-15

    The present study compared lymphocyte and T memory subsets in currently untreated patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) to glucocorticosteroid (GS) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treated patients. Peripheral blood from 48 CIDP patients (21 untreated who were either treatment naïve or without treatment during the last 3 months, 17 IVIG and 10 GS treatment) and from 12 age-matched controls was evaluated using flow cytometric analysis. Our data demonstrate that long-term GS treatment is associated with reduced frequencies of total CD4+ T cells, CD4+ memory subsets and NK cells while long-term IVIG treatment is associated with alterations of the CD8+ memory compartment. Reduction of CD4+ naïve T cell counts may explain the observation that GS treatment induces prolonged clinical remission compared to IVIG treatment.

  1. Changes in hematological indices and lymphocyte subsets in response to whole blood donation in healthy male donors.

    PubMed

    Borai, Anwar; Livingstone, Callum; Alsobhi, Enaam; Al Sofyani, Abeer; Balgoon, Dalal; Farzal, Anwar; Almohammadi, Mohammed; Al-Amri, Abdulafattah; Bahijri, Suhad; Alrowaili, Daad; Bassiuni, Wafaa; Saleh, Ayman; Alrowaili, Norah; Abdelaal, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    Whole blood donation has immunomodulatory effects, and most of these have been observed at short intervals following blood donation. This study aimed to investigate the impact of whole blood donation on lymphocyte subsets over a typical inter-donation interval. Healthy male subjects were recruited to study changes in complete blood count (CBC) (n = 42) and lymphocyte subsets (n = 16) before and at four intervals up to 106 days following blood donation. Repeated measures ANOVA were used to compare quantitative variables between different visits. Following blood donation, changes in CBC and erythropoietin were as expected. The neutrophil count increased by 11.3% at 8 days (p < .001). Novel changes were observed in lymphocyte subsets as the CD4/CD8 ratio increased by 9.2% (p < .05) at 8 days and 13.7% (p < .05) at 22 days. CD16-56 cells decreased by 16.2% (p < .05) at 8 days. All the subsets had returned to baseline by 106 days. Regression analysis showed that the changes in CD16-56 cells and CD4/CD8 ratio were not significant (Wilk's lambda = 0.15 and 0.94, respectively) when adjusted for BMI. In conclusion, following whole blood donation, there are transient changes in lymphocyte subsets. The effect of BMI on lymphocyte subsets and the effect of this immunomodulation on the immune response merit further investigation.

  2. Exercise Training, Lymphocyte Subsets and Their Cytokines Production: Experience of an Italian Professional Football Team and Their Impact on Allergy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. In recent years, numerous articles have attempted to shed light on our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of exercise-induced immunologic changes and their impact on allergy and asthma. It is known that lymphocyte subclasses, cytokines, and chemokines show modifications after exercise, but outcomes can be affected by the type of exercise as well as by its intensity and duration. Interesting data have been presented in many recent studies on mouse models, but few studies on humans have been performed to check the long-term effects of exercise over a whole championship season. Methods. This study evaluated lymphocyte subsets and their intracellular IL-2, IL-4, TNF-α, and IFN-γ production in professional football (soccer) players, at three stages of the season, to evaluate if alterations occur, particularly in relation to their allergic status. Results and Conclusion. Despite significant mid-season alterations, no significant lymphocyte subclasses count modifications, except for NKs that were significantly higher, were observed at the end. IL-2 and IL-4 producing cells showed a significant decrease (P = 0.018 and P = 0.001, but in a steady fashion for IL-4), confirming the murine data about the potential beneficial effects of aerobic exercise for allergic asthma. PMID:25050349

  3. Peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in Fasciola hepatica infected and immunised goats.

    PubMed

    Zafra, R; Pérez, J; Buffoni, L; Martínez-Moreno, F J; Acosta, I; Mozos, E; Martínez-Moreno, A

    2013-09-01

    The proportions of CD4(+), CD8(+) and WC1+ T lymphocytes from peripheral blood using flow cytometry were investigated in goats infected with Fasciola hepatica and previously immunised with recombinant Cathepsin-L1 (rCL1) and Glutathione-S-transferase sigma class (GST). The immunisation trial did not induce protective responses, and no significant differences were recorded between immunised and non-immunised groups. However, there was a significant decrease in the proportion of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in the infected groups both at 5 weeks post-infection (wpi), coinciding with the migratory stage of the infection, and at 12 wpi in the biliary stage of the infection. The proportional decrease in this circulating population may be related to the recruitment of CD4(+) T cells in liver and hepatic lymph nodes and also to the immunomodulatory effect of the parasite through the interaction of F. hepatica excretory-secretory products (FhESP) with this cell population. To date, this is the first report about the effect of F. hepatica infection in peripheral lymphocyte subsets in goats.

  4. Reduction of the peripheral blood CD56(bright) NK lymphocyte subset in FTY720-treated multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Trina A; Evans, Barbara L; Durafourt, Bryce A; Blain, Manon; Lapierre, Yves; Bar-Or, Amit; Antel, Jack P

    2011-07-01

    FTY720 (fingolimod) treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) results in lymphopenia due to increased recruitment into and decreased egress from secondary lymphoid organs of CCR7(+) lymphocytes. Although absolute numbers of NK lymphocytes were reported as being unaltered in FTY720-treated MS patients (MS-FTY), such analyses did not detect a change in a minor subset. Because expression of CCR7 has been described on CD56(bright) NK cells, a minority population of NK cells, we investigated the effect of FTY720 treatment on the phenotype and function of human NK cells in the peripheral circulation of MS patients. MS-FTY patients displayed a decreased proportion of peripheral CD56(bright)CD62L(+)CCR7(+) NK cells compared with untreated MS and healthy donors. In vitro treatment with FTY720-P increased migration of untreated donor NK cells to CXCL12 while reducing the response to CX3CL1 with similar migration responses seen in NK cells from MS-FTY patients. FTY720-P inhibited sphingosine 1-phosphate-directed migration of CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells subsets from untreated healthy donors. IL-12- and IL-15-stimulated NK cells from MS-FTY patients displayed similar capacity to produce IFN-γ, TNF, IL-10, and MIP-1α cytokines/chemokines compared with NK cells from untreated healthy donors and displayed comparable levels of degranulation in response to K562 tumor cells compared with untreated donors. Subset alterations and function of NK cell populations will need to be considered as part of assessing overall immunosurveillance capacity of patients with MS who will receive sustained FTY720 therapy.

  5. Leishmania infantum antigens modulate memory cell subsets of liver resident T lymphocyte.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A; Claro, M; Alexandre-Pires, G; Santos-Mateus, D; Martins, C; Valério-Bolas, A; Rafael-Fernandes, M; Pereira, M A; Pereira da Fonseca, I; Tomás, A M; Santos-Gomes, G

    2017-02-01

    In the recent years, the liver has been recognized as an important immune organ with major regulatory functions and immune memory, adding to the well-described vital metabolic functions. There are evidences from experimental infections performed with visceral Leishmania species that immune responses to parasite infection can be organ-specific. The liver is the compartment of acute resolving infection, with minimal tissue damage and resistance to reinfection, whereas the spleen is the compartment of parasite persistence. Control of hepatic infection in mice requires a coordinated immune response that involves the development of inflammatory granulomas. It is also described that the liver harbors populations of resident lymphocytes, which may exhibit memory characteristics. Therefore, the present study aims to address the role of the liver as an immune memory organ in the context of Leishmania infantum infection, by characterizing phenotypically resident liver T lymphocytes. The dynamics of memory T cells in L. infantum infected BALB/c mice and the effect of anti-leishmanial treatment in the differentiation of memory cell subsets were analyzed. The potential of recognition, differentiation and selection of memory lymphocytes by three L. infantum recombinant proteins were also explored. L. infantum infection generates effector and central memory T cells, but the cells did not expand when recalled, demonstrating a possible parasite silencing effect. The treatment with a leishmanicidal drug (antimoniate meglumine) increases the levels of memory and effector T cells, eliciting a more robust hepatic immune response. L. infantum parasites with a decreased sensitivity to the leishmanicidal drug favor the expansion of memory CD8(+) T cell subset, but inhibit the proliferation of CD8(+) T effector cells, possibly assuring their own survival. The recombinant proteins LirCyp1 and LirSOD are strongly recognized by memory cells of treated mice, indicating that these proteins

  6. [Reference intervals for peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in healthy adults in Lima, Peru].

    PubMed

    Cóndor, José M; Álvarez, Marco; Cano, Luis; Matos, Edgar; Leiva, Christian; Paredes, José A

    2013-04-01

    In order to establish the reference intervals (RIs) of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets (PBL) in healthy adults in Lima (Peru), a cross-sectional study was conducted among blood donors taken in between 2011 and 2012. Based on the criteria obtained from the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI C28-A3), 318 samples were processed, 61.9% (197/318) coming from male donors. For PBL count, a flow cytometer with a simple platform was used. The RIs are established for each PBL in adults based on sex with their respective reference limits and 90% confidence intervals. Differences were found in CD3+ percentage counts (p=0.001) and in CD3-CD56+ absolute (p=0.003) and percentage counts (p?0.001). The RIs found are different to those described in studies conducted in other countries due to the characteristics of the population and the study model.

  7. Expression of T-cell-activating protein in peripheral lymphocyte subsets.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, E T; Reiser, H; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1986-01-01

    T-cell-activating protein (TAP) is an allelic 12-kDa membrane protein that participates in T-cell activation. Soluble anti-TAP monoclonal antibodies can trigger antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex-restricted T-cell hybridomas to produce interleukin 2 and are mitogenic for normal T cells and thymocytes. TAP is expressed on 10% of thymocytes, which are mainly cortisone-resistant and mature. In the periphery, TAP is expressed on 70% of resting T cells but not on resting B cells. In this report, we analyze in detail the nature of TAP expression on peripheral lymphocyte subsets by immunofluorescence techniques. We show that all inducer (L3T4+) T cells are TAP+. In contrast, only 50% of Lyt-2+ T cells express detectable TAP. Functional studies demonstrated that at least part of the heterogeneity of TAP expression is present in the Lyt-2+ cytolytic T-cell (CTL) subset. Unstimulated CTL precursors are TAP- but are induced to express TAP in the effector state. Furthermore, this reflects actual synthesis of TAP, as TAP is detectable on activated Lyt-2+ CTLs passaged in vitro under conditions where passive acquisition can be ruled out. To extend this observation, we have studied the expression of TAP on activated T and B cells. Upon activation, all T and B cells became TAP+. Furthermore, the TAP molecules on B and T cells are indistinguishable by NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This suggests that TAP expression defines further heterogeneity of lymphocytes, with activation being one parameter influencing its expression. Images PMID:3020545

  8. CD160 expression defines a uniquely exhausted subset of T lymphocytes in HTLV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Chibueze, Chioma Ezinne; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Arima, Naomichi

    2014-10-24

    HTLV-1 infection is a life-long retroviral infection. Chronic viral antigenic stimulation induces persistent infection which results in a clinically asymptomatic carrier state. Only a minor proportion of infected individuals develop adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) or HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic myelopathy (HAM/TSP). This is dependent on a balance of host and genetic factors. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte function is important in the immune response against viral infection; however, the contribution of CD160 receptor associated with CD8+ T lymphocytes is unclear. Thus, we sought to decipher its role on CTL function in HTLV-1 infection. Here, we report high frequencies of CD160 on CD8+ T cells, with significantly higher levels on HTLV-1 specific CD8+ T cells. Intercepting the CD160 pathway via blockade of the receptor or its ligand, herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) resulted in improved perforin production and CD107a degranulation of HTLV-1 specific CD8+ T cells. Analysis of the CD160-expressing CD8+ cells demonstrated a unique subset associated with a highly differentiated effector memory based on CD45RA and CCR7 co-expression, increased expression of inhibitory molecules, 2B4 and PD1. Altogether, these results suggest a role for CD160/HVEM pathway in regulating immune response against HTLV-1 infection which may prove promising in the development of immune therapies for the treatment of HTLV-1 infection and other associated disorders.

  9. Identification of novel dendritic cell subset markers in human blood.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Fabian; Hackstein, Holger

    2014-01-10

    Human dendritic cells (DC) are key regulators of innate and adaptive immunity that can be divided in at least three major subpopulations: plasmacytoid DC (pDC), myeloid type 1 DC (mDC1) and myeloid type 2 DC (mDC2) exhibiting different functions. However, research, diagnostic and cell therapeutic studies on human DC subsets are limited because only few DC subset markers have been identified so far. Especially mDC2 representing the rarest blood DC subset are difficult to be separated from mDC1 and pDC due to a paucity of mDC2 markers. We have combined multiparameter flow cytometry analysis of human blood DC subsets with systematic expression analysis of 332 surface antigens in magnetic bead-enriched blood DC samples. The initial analysis revealed eight novel putative DC subset markers CD26, CD85a, CD109, CD172a, CD200, CD200R, CD275 and CD301 that were subsequently tested in bulk peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples from healthy blood donors. Secondary analysis of PBMC samples confirmed three novel DC subset markers CD26 (dipeptidyl peptidase IV), CD85a (Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor B3) and CD275 (inducible costimulator ligand). CD85a is specifically expressed in mDC1 and CD26 and CD275 represent novel mDC2 markers. These markers will facilitate human DC subset discrimination and additionally provide insight into potentially novel DC subset-specific functions.

  10. Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Young, Emma; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Moysiadis, Theodoros; Plevova, Karla; Rossi, Davide; Kminkova, Jana; Stalika, Evangelia; Pedersen, Lone Bredo; Malcikova, Jitka; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Davis, Zadie; Mansouri, Larry; Scarfò, Lydia; Boudjoghra, Myriam; Navarro, Alba; Muggen, Alice F.; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Larrayoz, Marta; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Niemann, Carsten Utoft; Belessi, Chrysoula; Campo, Elias; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Langerak, Anton W.; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pospisilova, Sarka; Davi, Frederic; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We report on markedly different frequencies of genetic lesions within subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying mutated or unmutated stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in the largest cohort (n=565) studied for this purpose. By combining data on recurrent gene mutations (BIRC3, MYD88, NOTCH1, SF3B1 and TP53) and cytogenetic aberrations, we reveal a subset-biased acquisition of gene mutations. More specifically, the frequency of NOTCH1 mutations was found to be enriched in subsets expressing unmutated immunoglobulin genes, i.e. #1, #6, #8 and #59 (22–34%), often in association with trisomy 12, and was significantly different (P<0.001) to the frequency observed in subset #2 (4%, aggressive disease, variable somatic hypermutation status) and subset #4 (1%, indolent disease, mutated immunoglobulin genes). Interestingly, subsets harboring a high frequency of NOTCH1 mutations were found to carry few (if any) SF3B1 mutations. This starkly contrasts with subsets #2 and #3 where, despite their immunogenetic differences, SF3B1 mutations occurred in 45% and 46% of cases, respectively. In addition, mutations within TP53, whilst enriched in subset #1 (16%), were rare in subsets #2 and #8 (both 2%), despite all being clinically aggressive. All subsets were negative for MYD88 mutations, whereas BIRC3 mutations were infrequent. Collectively, this striking bias and skewed distribution of mutations and cytogenetic aberrations within specific chronic lymphocytic leukemia subsets implies that the mechanisms underlying clinical aggressiveness are not uniform, but rather support the existence of distinct genetic pathways of clonal evolution governed by a particular stereotyped B-cell receptor selecting a certain molecular lesion(s). PMID:27198719

  11. Membrane expression of NK receptors CD160 and CD158k contributes to delineate a unique CD4+ T-lymphocyte subset in normal and mycosis fungoides skin.

    PubMed

    Sako, Nouhoum; Schiavon, Valérie; Bounfour, Touda; Dessirier, Valérie; Ortonne, Nicolas; Olive, Daniel; Ram-Wolff, Caroline; Michel, Laurence; Sicard, Hélène; Marie-Cardine, Anne; Bagot, Martine; Bensussan, Armand; Schmitt, Christian

    2014-10-01

    CD160 is a GPI-anchored Ig-like receptor identified by the BY55 mAb on human circulating CD56dim+ NK cells and TCRγδ lymphocytes. In addition, while most intestinal T lymphocytes express it, only a minor circulating CD4+ or CD8+ T lymphocyte subset is CD160+. Here we describe a population of CD4+ CD160+ human blood T lymphocytes of circulating cutaneous T cells. These rare T lymphocytes represent 2.1 ± 1.9% of the circulating CD3+ CD4+ T cells, coexpress CD8αα, CD244, and perforin but lack CD28 expression, a phenotype corresponding to effector memory cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Functional studies further confirmed their cytotoxic potential. These cells lack αEβ7 integrin and CCR7 expression but do express skin-addressing molecules CLA, and CCR4. In normal human skin, CD4+ CD160+ cells represent 34.6 ± 14.7% of the CD4+ T lymphocytes extracted by collagenase treatment. These T cells coexpress CLA (81 ± 13.6%), CCR4 (62.3 ± 15.9%), and some CD8αα (19.6 ± 13%) or CCR7 (24.4 ± 11.7%) expression. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cells express the natural killer receptor KIR3DL2 (CD158k) used as a tumor marker. Not only we confirmed the expression of this marker in the blood and/or skin of mycosis fungoides patients but we also show for the first time CD158k expression (often associated with CD160) on cutaneous CD4+ T cells from healthy individuals (25.3 ± 15%). Therefore, CD4+ CD160+ T cells expressing CD158k might represent specialized cutaneous lymphocytes devoted to immune surveillance, from which could originate cutaneous T-cell lymphomas such as mycosis fungoides.

  12. Peripheral blood lymphocyte subset levels differ in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hai-Zhou; Deng, Wei; Li, Ji-Lin; Tang, Ya-Mei; Zhang, Li-Tu; Cui, Ying; Liang, Xin-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the levels of target lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood lymphocyte samples from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 715 high-risk patients with primary HCC were recruited in Guangxi, China as the case group. The control group included 100 patients who received health examinations at the same hospital during the same period. Fasting elbow venous blood (10 mL) was collected from each participant, and flow cytometry was used to detect the levels of NK cells and CD3+, CD4+ and CD19+ T cells in peripheral blood samples. All included patients with prmary HCC were treated by surgical resection, and followed up for one year. The levels of CD19+ and NK cells were lower in cases than in controls (both P < 0.05). In addition, the level of CD8+ cells was greater in the case group than in the control group (P < 0.05). In the high-HCC-risk population, CD8+, CD19+ and NK cell levels all differed between male and female patients, patients in TNM stages I–II and stages III–IV, patients with and without extrahepatic metastasis, and patients with and without HBV infection (all P < 0.05). After follow-up, detected recurrence and survival rate was 33.71% and 83.64%, respectively. CD8+ levels was reduced following surgical resection, whereas the levels of CD19+ and NK cells were increased (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, altered levels of CD8+, CD19+ and NK cell levels may be used as reference values for monitoring immune function in certain populations with high HCC risk, and as potential evidence for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of HCC. PMID:27813499

  13. Regulation of Human Helper T Cell Subset Differentiation by Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Nathalie; Ueno, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of Th1 and Th2 cells in the late 80’s, the family of effector CD4+ helper T (Th) cell subsets has expanded. The differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells is largely determined when they interact with dendritic cells in lymphoid organs, and cytokines play a major role in the regulation of Th differentiation in the early stages. Recent studies show that the developmental mechanism of certain Th subsets is not fully shared between mice and humans. Here we will review recent discoveries on the roles of cytokines in the regulation of Th differentiation in humans, and discuss the differences between mice and humans in the developmental mechanisms of several Th subsets, including Th17 cells and T follicular helper (Tfh) cells. We propose that the differentiation of human Th subsets is largely regulated by the three cytokines, IL-12, IL-23, and TGF-β. PMID:25879814

  14. Adenovirus-receptor interaction with human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Mentel, R; Döpping, G; Wegner, U; Seidel, W; Liebermann, H; Döhner, L

    1997-03-01

    Lymphocytes play a key role in cell-mediated immunity and are host cells for several viral and bacterial pathogens. Their importance in adenovirus (Ad) infections is not yet fully understood. The initial event, the attachment of Ad to lymphocytes and their subsets, was examined using flow cytometry. The study included analysis of stimulated T cells in binding assays with FITC-labeled Ad fiber. The results confirm that native peripheral lymphocytes express very small amounts of Ad receptors. Stimulation with PHA and interleukin 2 induced the expression. The presence of Ad DNA as a sign of internalization in stimulated cells was demonstrated using the polymerase chain reaction. The findings suggest that lymphocytes after stimulation can turn into target cells for Ad. This is particularly important if there are indications for persistence of Ad, and in the case of immunocompromised patients severe, life-threatening diseases can develop.

  15. Pathogenesis of Renal Disease in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus—The Role of Autoantibodies and Lymphocytes Subset Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Desmond Y. H.; Lai, Kar N.

    2015-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a common and severe organ manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and is associated with significant patient morbidity and mortality. Autoantibodies and aberrations in lymphocyte subsets have putative roles in the pathogenesis of SLE and LN, and might reflect disease activity and are amenable to immunosuppressive treatments. Anti-DNA is one of the well-studied autoantibodies, which correlates with disease activity and has direct nephritogenic effects on resident renal cells and various glomerular components. Other important autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of LN include anti-C1q, anti-α-actinin and anti-nucleosome antibodies. Changes in naive and memory B cells and plasma cells have been observed in SLE and LN patients. These B cell subsets exert diverse effects during pathogenesis of LN such as production of autoantibodies, secretion of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines and presentation of auto-antigens to effector cells. Aberration of T lymphocytes, especially the T-helper subsets, is also highly pertinent in the development of LN. In this context, important T helper subsets include Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, TReg and follicular T-helper cells. The growing knowledge on these autoantibodies and lymphocyte subset abnormalities will enhance our understanding of SLE and LN, and hence help devise better strategies for disease monitoring and treatment. PMID:25860947

  16. Metabolic Profile as a Potential Modifier of Long-Term Radiation Effects on Peripheral Lymphocyte Subsets in Atomic Bomb Survivors.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kengo; Nakashima, Eiji; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Hakoda, Masayuki; Hayashi, Tomonori; Hida, Ayumi; Ohishi, Waka; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2016-09-01

    Immune system impairments reflected by the composition and function of circulating lymphocytes are still observed in atomic bomb survivors, and metabolic abnormalities including altered blood triglyceride and cholesterol levels have also been detected in such survivors. Based on closely related features of immune and metabolic profiles of individuals, we investigated the hypothesis that long-term effects of radiation exposure on lymphocyte subsets might be modified by metabolic profiles in 3,113 atomic bomb survivors who participated in health examinations at the Radiation Effect Research Foundation, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in 2000-2002. The lymphocyte subsets analyzed involved T-, B- and NK-cell subsets, and their percentages in the lymphocyte fraction were assessed using flow cytometry. Health examinations included metabolic indicators, body mass index, serum levels of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, C-reactive protein and hemoglobin A1c, as well as diabetes and fatty liver diagnoses. Standard regression analyses indicated that several metabolic indicators of obesity/related disease, particularly high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, were positively associated with type-1 helper T- and B-cell percentages but were inversely associated with naïve CD4 T and NK cells. A regression analysis adjusted for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol revealed a radiation dose relationship with increasing NK-cell percentage. Additionally, an interaction effect was suggested between radiation dose and C-reactive protein on B-cell percentage with a negative coefficient of the interaction term. Collectively, these findings suggest that radiation exposure and subsequent metabolic profile changes, potentially in relationship to obesity-related inflammation, lead to such long-term alterations in lymphocyte subset composition. Because this study is based on cross-sectional and exploratory analyses, the implications regarding radiation exposure, metabolic

  17. Suppression of mixed lymphocyte reactivity by human chorionic gonadotrophin

    PubMed Central

    Beling, C. G.; Weksler, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    Highly purified human chorionic gonadotrophin inhibits the response of lymphocytes from both male and female subjects to allogeneic cells in mixed lymphocyte culture. Human chorionic gonadotrophin is not cytotoxic for human lymphocytes. PMID:4283122

  18. Lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood of patients with psoriasis before and after treatment with leishmania antigens.

    PubMed

    O'Daly, Jose Antonio; Rodriguez, Beatriz; Ovalles, Tania; Pelaez, Civel

    2010-03-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) collected from subjects prior to treatment and post-treatment with a vaccine composed of leishmania antigens were analyzed by flow cytometry. Upon analysis, it was noticed that lymphocyte subsets (LS) varied with psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) range (1-10, 11-20 and 21-72). Pre-treatment absolute values of gated LS were as follows. CD4+CD8-, CD3+CD8-, CD8+CD3+, CD8+CD4- and CD8+HLA- decreased in PBMC as PASI increased, suggesting migration from the blood to the skin. Contrary to the previous finding, the following LS, CD8+HLA+ and HLA+CD8-, and membrane surface immunoglobulin IgA+, IgD+ and IgM+ increased in PBMC as PASI increased, suggesting activation and proliferation by unknown antigens. After treatment with seven doses of AS100, the following LS, CD3+CD8-, CD8+CD3-, HLA+CD8-, CD8+HLA+ and CD4+CD8-, increased, while CD8+CD3+, CD8+HLA-, CD19 and CD8+CD4+ decreased in PBMC.

  19. Novel monoclonal antibodies recognizing different subsets of lymphocytes from the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Ito, Ryoji; Maekawa, Shin-ichiro; Kawai, Kenji; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Shuzo; Ishii, Hajime; Tanioka, Yoshikuni; Satake, Masanobu; Yagita, Hideo; Habu, Sonoko; Ito, Mamoru

    2008-12-22

    Callithrix jacchus, the common marmoset, is a small new world primate that is considered effective as an experimental animal model for various human diseases. In this study, we generated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against common marmoset lymphocytes for immunological studies on the common marmoset. We established five hybridoma clones, 6C9, 10D7, 6F10, 7A4 and 5A1, producing anti-marmoset mAbs against cell surface antigens on marmoset T and/or B lymphocytes. We confirmed that 6C9 and 10D7 antibodies recognized CD45 antigen, and 6F10 antibody recognized CD8 antigen by flow cytometry using marmoset cDNA transfectants. We also tested them for application of immunoprecipitation, Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. We found that immunohistochemistry using marmoset spleen sections could be applied with all established mAbs but immunoprecipitation and the Western blot analysis could be applied with 6F10 and 10D7 antibodies but not with the other three mAbs. These results show that these monoclonal antibodies are useful for advancing immunological research on the common marmoset.

  20. Phenotypic Characterization of Five Dendritic Cell Subsets in Human Tonsils

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Kelly L.; Hock, Barry D.; McKenzie, Judith L.; Hart, Derek N. J.

    2001-01-01

    Heterogeneous expression of several antigens on the three currently defined tonsil dendritic cell (DC) subsets encouraged us to re-examine tonsil DCs using a new method that minimized DC differentiation and activation during their preparation. Three-color flow cytometry and dual-color immunohistology was used in conjunction with an extensive panel of antibodies to relevant DC-related antigens to analyze lin− HLA-DR+ tonsil DCs. Here we identify, quantify, and locate five tonsil DC subsets based on their relative expression of the HLA-DR, CD11c, CD13, and CD123 antigens. In situ localization identified four of these DC subsets as distinct interdigitating DC populations. These included three new interdigitating DC subsets defined as HLA-DRhi CD11c+ DCs, HLA-DRmod CD11c+ CD13+ DCs, and HLA-DRmod CD11c− CD123− DCs, as well as the plasmacytoid DCs (HLA-DRmod CD11c− CD123+). These subsets differed in their expression of DC-associated differentiation/activation antigens and co-stimulator molecules including CD83, CMRF-44, CMRF-56, 2-7, CD86, and 4-1BB ligand. The fifth HLA-DRmod CD11c+ DC subset was identified as germinal center DCs, but contrary to previous reports they are redefined as lacking the CD13 antigen. The definition and extensive phenotypic analysis of these five DC subsets in human tonsil extends our understanding of the complexity of DC biology. PMID:11438475

  1. Lymphocyte adhesion-dependent calcium signaling in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) can undergo dramatic phenotypic and functional alterations in response to humoral and cellular stimuli. These changes promote endothelial participation in the inflammatory response through active recruitment of immune effector cells, increased vascular permeability, and alteration in vascular tone. In an attempt to define early events in lymphocyte-mediated EC signaling, we investigated cytosolic-free calcium (Ca2+) changes in single, Fluo-3- labeled human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs), using an ACAS interactive laser cytometer. Of all lymphocyte subsets tested, allogeneic CD3-, CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells uniquely elicited oscillatory EC Ca2+ signals in cytokine (interleukin [IL]-1- or tumor necrosis factor [TNF])-treated ECs. The induction of these signals required avid intercellular adhesion, consisted of both Ca2+ mobilization and extracellular influx, and was associated with EC inositol phosphate (IP) generation. Simultaneous recording of NK and EC Ca2+ signals using two-color fluorescence detection revealed that, upon adhesion, NK cells flux prior to EC. Lymphocyte Ca2+ buffering with 1,2-bis-5-methyl-amino- phenoxylethane-N,N,N'-tetra-acetoxymethyl acetate (MAPTAM) demonstrated that lymphocyte fluxes are, in fact, prerequisites for the adhesion- dependent EC signals. mAb studies indicate that the beta 2 integrin- intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 adhesion pathway is critically involved. However, ICAM-1 antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of IL-1- mediated ICAM-1 hyperinduction had no effect on EC Ca2+ signaling in lymphocyte-EC conjugates, indicating that additional cytokine-induced EC alteration is required. These experiments combine features of lymphocyte-endothelial interactions, intercellular adhesion, EC cytokine activation and transmembrane signaling. The results implicate the IP/Ca2+ second messenger pathway in EC outside-in signaling induced by cytotoxic lymphocytes, and suggest that these signals may play a

  2. An entity evolving into a community: defining the common ancestor and evolutionary trajectory of chronic lymphocytic leukemia stereotyped subset #4.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Papadopoulos, Giorgos; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, Stavros; Kostareli, Efterpi; Rosenquist, Richard; Tzovaras, Dimitrios; Stamatopoulos, Kostas

    2015-04-02

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) assigned to stereotyped subset #4 express highly homologous B-cell receptor immunoglobulin (BcR IG) sequences with intense intraclonal diversification (ID) in the context of ongoing somatic hypermutation (SHM). Their remarkable biological and clinical similarities strongly support derivation from a common ancestor. We here revisited ID in subset #4 CLL to reconstruct their evolutionary history as a community of related clones. To this end, using specialized bioinformatics tools we assessed both IGHV-IGHD-IGHJ rearrangements (n = 511) and IGKV-IGKJ rearrangements (n = 397) derived from eight subset #4 cases. Due to high sequence relatedness, a number of subclonal clusters from different cases lay very close to one another, forming a core from which clusters exhibiting greater variation stemmed. Minor subclones from individual cases were mutated to such an extent that they now resembled the sequences of another patient. Viewing the entire subset #4 data set as a single entity branching through diversification enabled inference of a common sequence representing the putative ancestral BcR IG expressed by their still elusive common progenitor. These results have implications for improved understanding of the ontogeny of CLL subset #4, as well as the design of studies concerning the antigenic specificity of the clonotypic BcR IGs.

  3. Multicolor flow cytometry analysis of the proliferations of T-lymphocyte subsets in vitro by EdU incorporation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanli; Sun, Yu; Lin, Guigao; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Kuo; Xie, Jiehong; Wang, Lunan; Li, Jinming

    2012-10-01

    EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) incorporation has proved advantageous in the studies of cell kinetics, DNA synthesis, and cellular proliferation in vitro and in vivo compared to [(3) H]thymidine incorporation and BrdU (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine) incorporation. Here, we describe a method that combines EdU incorporation and immunostaining with flow cytometric analysis to detect the proliferations of T lymphocyte subsets in vitro and optimized the assay's conditions. We found that the number of EdU(+) cells were associated with EdU concentration, incubation time, and the volume of Click reaction solution, the best EdU concentration 10-50 μM, the optimal incubation time 8-12 h and the proper volume of Click volume 100 μl for labeling 1 × 10(6) lymphocytes. Fixation was better to be performed before permeabilization, not together with. Furthermore, the permeabilization detergent reagent, PBS with 0.05% saponin was better than Tris buffer saline (TBS) with 0.1% Triton X-100. In addition, sufficient wash with PBS with 0.05% saponin has no influence on the staining of EdU(+) cells. Also, the lymphocytes incorporating EdU could be stored at 4°C, -80°C, and in liquid nitrogen up to 21 days. The present study will aid in optimization of flow cytometry assay to detect the proliferations of T cell subsets by EdU incorporation and the labeling of cell surface antigens.

  4. Immunoregulatory effects of morphine on human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nair, M P; Schwartz, S A; Polasani, R; Hou, J; Sweet, A; Chadha, K C

    1997-01-01

    It is now well established that parenteral drug abuse is a significant risk factor for contracting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and subsequently developing AIDS. Earlier studies have shown that morphine can modulate various immune responses and therefore support the premise that morphine is a cofactor in susceptibility to and progression of HIV infection. Dysregulation of interferon (IFN) production, nonspecific apoptosis of T cells, and the immune response to soluble HIV gene products have been associated with potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in HIV disease. The present study was undertaken to examine the immunomodulatory role of morphine on HIV protein-induced lymphocyte proliferative responses, Sendai and Newcastle disease virus-induced alpha IFN (IFN-alpha) and IFN-beta production by lymphocytes and fibroblast cells, respectively, and induction of apoptosis of normal lymphocytes in vitro. Our results demonstrate that HIV protein-induced human lymphocyte proliferative responses were significantly inhibited by morphine in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, morphine significantly inhibited both IFN-alpha and IFN-beta production by normal lymphocytes and fibroblasts but induced apoptosis of normal lymphocytes. Inhibition of IFN-alpha production by morphine could be reversed by the opiate receptor antagonist naloxone. This suggests that the immunomodulatory effects of morphine are mediated through the opioid receptor. These studies support a role of morphine as a cofactor in the pathogenesis of HIV infection and describe some of the possible pathologic mechanisms which underlie the immunoregulatory effects of morphine. PMID:9067644

  5. A Reassessment of IgM Memory Subsets in Humans.

    PubMed

    Bagnara, Davide; Squillario, Margherita; Kipling, David; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Da Silva, Lucie; Weller, Sandra; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-10-15

    From paired blood and spleen samples from three adult donors, we performed high-throughput VH sequencing of human B cell subsets defined by IgD and CD27 expression: IgD(+)CD27(+) ("marginal zone [MZ]"), IgD(-)CD27(+) ("memory," including IgM ["IgM-only"], IgG and IgA) and IgD(-)CD27(-) cells ("double-negative," including IgM, IgG, and IgA). A total of 91,294 unique sequences clustered in 42,670 clones, revealing major clonal expansions in each of these subsets. Among these clones, we further analyzed those shared sequences from different subsets or tissues for VH gene mutation, H-CDR3-length, and VH/JH usage, comparing these different characteristics with all sequences from their subset of origin for which these parameters constitute a distinct signature. The IgM-only repertoire profile differed notably from that of MZ B cells by a higher mutation frequency and lower VH4 and higher JH6 gene usage. Strikingly, IgM sequences from clones shared between the MZ and the memory IgG/IgA compartments showed a mutation and repertoire profile of IgM-only and not of MZ B cells. Similarly, all IgM clonal relationships (among MZ, IgM-only, and double-negative compartments) involved sequences with the characteristics of IgM-only B cells. Finally, clonal relationships between tissues suggested distinct recirculation characteristics between MZ and switched B cells. The "IgM-only" subset (including cells with its repertoire signature but higher IgD or lower CD27 expression levels) thus appear as the only subset showing precursor-product relationships with CD27(+) switched memory B cells, indicating that they represent germinal center-derived IgM memory B cells and that IgM memory and MZ B cells constitute two distinct entities.

  6. The presence of non-segmental vitiligo modifies intracellular cytokine subsets in patients with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Santaguida, M G; Del Duca, S C; Virili, C; Gargano, L; Centanni, M

    2010-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis and vitiligo often occur in association and seem to be characterized by a prevalent Th1-driven autoimmune process. The aim of this study is to analyze selected intracellular Τh1 and Th2 cytokines in patients with Hashimoto?s thyroiditis when associated with non-segmental vitiligo. We analyzed intracellular interleukin-2, interferon-gamma (Τh1) and interleukin-4 (Th2), in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 23 patients with isolated Hashimoto?s thyroiditis (group A) and of 11 patients with Hashimoto?s thyroiditis associated with non-segmental vitiligo (group B). Peripheral blood lymphocytes were stimulated and incubated with specific monoclonal antibodies. Intracellular cytokines were assayed by flow cytometric analysis. Interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma positive cells were increased in almost all patients but the median values were similar in patients with isolated Hashimoto?s thyroiditis and in those with concurrent vitiligo. In contrast, the number of patients with increased interleukin-4 positive cells was higher in patients with thyroiditis and vitiligo (9/11) than in those with isolated thyroiditis (2/23; p<0.0001). The median values of IL-4 positive cells in the two groups confirmed this difference (A: 5.8 percent, vs B: 20.6 percent; p=0.0011). Increased interleukin-4 positive lymphocytes characterize Hashimoto?s thyroiditis when associated with non-segmental vitiligo, suggesting a modified balance from highly prevalent Th1 to mixed Th1/Th2 subset.

  7. Changes in lymphocyte and macrophage subsets due to morphine and ethanol treatment during a retrovirus infection causing murine AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.R.; Prabhala, R.H.; Darban, H.R.; Yahya, M.D.; Smith, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    The number of lymphocytes of various subsets were not significantly changed by the ethanol exposure except those showing activation markers which were reduced. The percentage of peripheral blood cells showing markers for macrophage functions and their activation were significantly reduced after binge use of ethanol. Ethanol retarded suppression of cells by retroviral infection. However by 25 weeks of infection there was a 8.6% survival in the ethanol fed mice infected with retrovirus which was much less than virally infected controls. Morphine treatment also increased the percentage of cells with markers for macrophages and activated macrophages in virally infected mice, while suppressing them in uninfected mice. The second and third morphine injection series suppressed lymphocyte T-helper and T-suppressor cells, but not total T cells. However, suppression by morphine was significantly less during retroviral disease than suppression caused by the virus only. At 25 weeks of infection 44.8% of morphine treated, infected mice survived.

  8. Analysis of the relationship between peripheral blood T lymphocyte subsets and HCV RNA levels in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Zheng, M J; Xu, Y H

    2015-08-21

    We investigated the relationship between peripheral blood T lymphocyte subsets and hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels in patients with hepatitis C. Samples from 69 chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients and 20 healthy controls were analyzed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect HCV RNA and flow cytometry to determine the expression levels of CD3, CD4, and CD8 in lymphocytes. The percentage of CD4+ T cells (42.87 ± 6.11%) and the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ (1.34 ± 0.25) in these patients were significantly lower than those in the healthy control group (49.55 ± 6.68%, 1.82 ± 0.11, respectively) (P < 0.01, P < 0.01), while the percentage of CD8+ T cells (32.78 ± 5.48%) was higher than that in the control group (27.35 ± 4.32%) (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in the percentage of CD3+ T cells between the two groups (P > 0.05). With the increase in HCV RNA replication, the percentage of CD8+ T cells increased gradually, while the CD4+ T cell percentage and CD4/CD8 ratio decreased. The change in the percentage of T lymphocyte subsets may be one of the reasons for persistent HCV infection, and the high expression levels of HCV RNA might be the reason for the low frequency of CD4+ T lymphocytes in patients with chronic HCV.

  9. Human mixed lymphocyte culture using separated lymphocyte populations.

    PubMed Central

    Potter, M R; Moore, M

    1977-01-01

    The ability of human blood lymphocyte populations enriched with T or B cells to act as responder and stimulator populations in the one-way mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) was investigated. T- and B-cell-enriched populations were obtained by separation of rosette-forming and non rosette-forming cells and T-cell-enriched populations were also obtained by nylon-fibre column filtration. Using cells prepared by rosette sedimentation, control unseparated and T-cell-enriched populations responded well when stimulated by mitomycin C-treated unseparated cells from a second individual; and stimulation by T- and B-enriched populations generally produced some response, although the magnitude was variable. B-cell-enriched populations gave virtually no response regardless of the composition of the stimulating populations. Nylon-column-enriched T-cell populations responded to stimulation by control unseparated cells but not to T cells purified by the same procedure. T-cell enriched populations prepared by the two methods thus had different activities in the MLR despite containing similar numbers of T cells suggesting that other factors, such as the presence of small numbers of accessory cells, are important in determining the magnitude of the MLR. PMID:139361

  10. Lymphocyte Subsets in the Adrenal Glands of Dogs With Primary Hypoadrenocorticism.

    PubMed

    Friedenberg, S G; Brown, D L; Meurs, K M; Law, J McHugh

    2016-01-01

    Primary hypoadrenocorticism, or Addison's disease, is an autoimmune condition common in certain dog breeds that leads to the destruction of the adrenal cortex and a clinical syndrome involving anorexia, gastrointestinal upset, and electrolyte imbalances. Previous studies have demonstrated that this destruction is strongly associated with lymphocytic-plasmacytic inflammation and that the lymphocytes are primarily T cells. In this study, we used both immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization to characterize the T-cell subtypes involved. We collected postmortem specimens of 5 dogs with primary hypoadrenocorticism and 2 control dogs and, using the aforementioned techniques, showed that the lymphocytes are primarily CD4+ rather than CD8+. These findings have important implications for improving our understanding of the pathogenesis and in searching for the underlying causative genetic polymorphisms.

  11. Lymphocyte subsets as biomarkers of therapeutic response in Fingolimod treated Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Paolicelli, D; Manni, A; D'Onghia, M; Direnzo, V; Iaffaldano, P; Zoccolella, S; Di Lecce, V; Tortorella, C; Specchia, G; Trojano, M

    2017-02-15

    We investigated, lymphocyte count (LC) and lymphocyte subpopulations (LS) in a real life setting of Fingolimod (FTY) treated Relapsing MS (RMS) patients. Peripheral blood counts with LS, relapses and MRI scans were recorded in a cohort of 119 FTY patients, during one year of treatment. Simple and multivariate logistic regression models, were performed. ROC analysis identified cut-off values of LS predicting a higher risk of relapses and of Gd+ lesions. We demonstrated a FTY-induced re-modulation of the immune system, suggesting that LS in RMS FTY treated patients can predict the clinical response to the drug.

  12. Plasticity of Human CD4 T Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Geginat, Jens; Paroni, Moira; Maglie, Stefano; Alfen, Johanna Sophie; Kastirr, Ilko; Gruarin, Paola; De Simone, Marco; Pagani, Massimiliano; Abrignani, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Human beings are exposed to a variety of different pathogens, which induce tailored immune responses and consequently generate highly diverse populations of pathogen-specific T cells. CD4+ T cells have a central role in adaptive immunity, since they provide essential help for both cytotoxic T cell- and antibody-mediated responses. In addition, CD4+ regulatory T cells are required to maintain self-tolerance and to inhibit immune responses that could damage the host. Initially, two subsets of CD4+ helper T cells were identified that secrete characteristic effector cytokines and mediate responses against different types of pathogens, i.e., IFN-γ secreting Th1 cells that fight intracellular pathogens, and IL-4 producing Th2 cells that target extracellular parasites. It is now well established that this dichotomy is insufficient to describe the complexity of CD4+ T cell differentiation, and in particular the human CD4 compartment contains a myriad of T cell subsets with characteristic capacities to produce cytokines and to home to involved tissues. Moreover, it has become increasingly clear that these T cell subsets are not all terminally differentiated cells, but that the majority is plastic and that in particular central memory T cells can acquire different properties and functions in secondary immune responses. In addition, there is compelling evidence that helper T cells can acquire regulatory functions upon chronic stimulation in inflamed tissues. The plasticity of antigen-experienced human T cell subsets is highly relevant for translational medicine, since it opens new perspectives for immune-modulatory therapies for chronic infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. PMID:25566245

  13. Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes contain a CD3- CD7+ subset expressing natural killer markers and a singular pattern of adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Eiras, P; Leon, F; Camarero, C; Lombardia, M; Roldan, E; Bootello, A; Roy, G

    2000-07-01

    Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (i-IEL) represent one of the largest, non-organized lymphoid population in the body. They are located outside the epithelial basement membrane among the mucosal epithelial cells. We, and previously other groups, have reported the presence of a CD7+CD3-IEL subset in the epithelium of human small intestine. This subset is drastically reduced in coeliac disease (CD) patients. In the present work we accomplish a better phenotypic characterization of this CD3-IEL subset and demonstrate the expression of typical natural killer (NK) cell markers. Most, if not all, CD3-CD7+ cells express NKPR1 (CD161)[98% +/- 2] and CD122[92% +/- 6]. In addition, a variable percentage express CD2[55% +/- 16], CD94[24% +/- 18], CD56[44% +/- 21] and CD16[12% +/- 4], however, no CD57 expression was observed. Moreover, these cells contain perforin granules[75% +/- 5], supporting a potential cytolytic ability. Regarding adhesion molecules, CD18 and CD44 expression is absent, which is consistent with a limited capacity of migration. Altogether, these data suggest the presence of intraepithelial NK cells in human intestinal epithelium, a compartment where cytotoxic effectors have not been clearly defined.

  14. Specific lymphocyte subsets predict response to adoptive cell therapy using expanded autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in metastatic melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Radvanyi, Laszlo G.; Bernatchez, Chantale; Zhang, Minying; Fox, Patricia S.; Miller, Priscilla; Chacon, Jessica; Wu, Richard; Lizee, Gregory; Mahoney, Sandy; Alvarado, Gladys; Glass, Michelle; Johnson, Valen E.; McMannis, John D.; Shpall, Elizabeth; Prieto, Victor; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Kim, Kevin; Homsi, Jade; Bedikian, Agop; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Patel, Sapna; Ross, Merrick I.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Lucci, Anthony; Royal, Richard; Cormier, Janice N.; Davies, Michael A.; Mansaray, Rahmatu; Fulbright, Orenthial J.; Toth, Christopher; Ramachandran, Renjith; Wardell, Seth; Gonzalez, Audrey; Hwu, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) is a promising treatment for metastatic melanoma unresponsive to conventional therapies. We report here on the results of an ongoing Phase II clinical trial testing the efficacy of ACT using TIL in metastatic melanoma patients and the association of specific patient clinical characteristics and the phenotypic attributes of the infused TIL with clinical response. Experimental Design Altogether, 31 transiently lymphodepleted patients were treated with their expanded TIL followed by two cycles of high-dose (HD) IL-2 therapy. The effects of patient clinical features and the phenotypes of the T-cells infused on clinical response were determined. Results Overall, 15/31 (48.4%) patients had an objective clinical response using immune-related response criteria (irRC), with two patients (6.5%) having a complete response. Progression-free survival of >12 months was observed for 9/15 (60%) of the responding patients. Factors significantly associated with objective tumor regression included a higher number of TIL infused, a higher proportion of CD8+ T-cells in the infusion product, a more differentiated effector phenotype of the CD8+ population and a higher frequency of CD8+ T-cells co-expressing the negative costimulation molecule “B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator” (BTLA). No significant difference in telomere lengths of TIL between responders and non-responders was identified. Conclusion These results indicate that immunotherapy with expanded autologous TIL is capable of achieving durable clinical responses in metastatic melanoma patients and that CD8+ T-cells in the infused TIL, particularly differentiated effectors cells and cells expressing BTLA, are associated with tumor regression. PMID:23032743

  15. Fixation and long-term storage of human lymphocytes for surface marker analysis by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Lal, R B; Edison, L J; Chused, T M

    1988-05-01

    A method to preserve stained human lymphocytes for subsequent cell surface analysis by flow cytometry (FCM) is described. Cells stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and phycoerythrin (PE)-conjugated monoclonal antibodies and then fixed in 1% paraformaldehyde, followed by extensive washing and resuspension in 1% BSA medium, could be stored at 4 degrees C for at least 2 weeks prior to FCM analysis without significant alteration in the light scatter or fluorescence properties of the cells. Furthermore, the method was also suitable for analyzing lymphocytes that express T-cell activation markers in certain disease conditions. In addition, we have identified monoclonal antibody combinations that discriminate different lymphocyte subsets that are satisfactory for multiparameter analysis after 2 weeks of storage. This method should prove useful for enumerating lymphocyte subsets in field study sites remote from flow cytometry laboratories.

  16. Circulating T lymphocyte subsets, cytokines, and immune checkpoint inhibitors in patients with bipolar II or major depression: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Zheng, Ya-li; Tian, Li-ping; Lai, Jian-bo; Hu, Chan-chan; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Jing-kai; Hu, Jian-bo; Huang, Man-li; Wei, Ning; Xu, Wei-juan; Zhou, Wei-hua; Lu, Shao-jia; Lu, Jing; Qi, Hong-li; Wang, Dan-dan; Zhou, Xiao-yi; Duan, Jin-feng; Xu, Yi; Hu, Shao-hua

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the less known activation pattern of T lymphocyte populations and immune checkpoint inhibitors on immunocytes in patients with bipolar II disorder depression (BD) or major depression (MD). A total of 23 patients with BD, 22 patients with MD, and 20 healthy controls (HCs) were recruited. The blood cell count of T lymphocyte subsets and the plasma level of cytokines (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, and IFN-γ) were selectively investigated. The expression of T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain containing-3 (TIM-3), programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, on T lymphocytes and monocytes, was detected. In results, blood proportion of cytotoxic T cells significantly decreased in BD patients than in either MD patients or HCs. The plasma level of IL-6 increased in patients with BD and MD. The expression of TIM-3 on cytotoxic T cells significantly increased, whereas the expression of PD-L2 on monocytes significantly decreased in patients with BD than in HCs. These findings extended our knowledge of the immune dysfunction in patients with affective disorders. PMID:28074937

  17. [Enterobacterial antigen in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Faure-Fontenla, M A; García-Tamayo, F

    1989-11-01

    The following study has as prior history the research reports which have shown the existence of an antigenic tissue deposit in gram-negative enterobacteria. The antigens of the enterobacteria have also been found in the lymphocytic membranes and cytoplasm. Since intestinal lymphoid tissue cells can recirculate by means of the thoracic duct to the peripheral venous system, it was proposed that the circulating lymphocytes in healthy people could also contain small amounts of a common enterobacterial antigen. The study was carried out in 15 human venous blood samples, of which the lymphocytic population was separated to later be used in the preparation of 15 alcohol soluble extracts. This material was used for inhibiting the immuno-hemolysis assay in three occasions in order to show the presence of antigens shared by different enterobacterias, using as reference a fraction separated from the LPS of Escherichia coli 08. The results showed that the human lymphocytes also had antigenic determinants common to gram-negative bacteria.

  18. Aging of immune system: Immune signature from peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in 1068 healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ling; Jing, Xie; Qiu, Zhifeng; Cao, Wei; Jiao, Yang; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Li, Taisheng

    2016-01-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for several conditions including neurodegenerative, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Functional impairments in cellular pathways controlling genomic stability, and immune control have been identified. Biomarker of immune senescence is needed to improve vaccine response and to develop therapy to improve immune control. To identify phenotypic signature of circulating immune cells with aging, we enrolled 1068 Chinese healthy volunteers ranging from 18 to 80 years old. The decreased naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, increased memory CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, loss of CD28 expression on T cells and reverse trend of CD38 and HLA-DR, were significant for aging of immune system. Conversely, the absolute counts and percentage of NK cells and CD19+B cells maintained stable in aging individuals. The Chinese reference ranges of absolute counts and percentage of peripheral lymphocyte in this study might be useful for future clinical evaluation. PMID:26886066

  19. Aging of immune system: Immune signature from peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in 1068 healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ling; Jing, Xie; Qiu, Zhifeng; Cao, Wei; Jiao, Yang; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Li, Taisheng

    2016-05-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for several conditions including neurodegenerative, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Functional impairments in cellular pathways controlling genomic stability, and immune control have been identified. Biomarker of immune senescence is needed to improve vaccine response and to develop therapy to improve immune control. To identify phenotypic signature of circulating immune cells with aging, we enrolled 1068 Chinese healthy volunteers ranging from 18 to 80 years old. The decreased naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, increased memory CD4+ or CD8+ T cells, loss of CD28 expression on T cells and reverse trend of CD38 and HLA-DR, were significant for aging of immune system. Conversely, the absolute counts and percentage of NK cells and CD19+B cells maintained stable in aging individuals. The Chinese reference ranges of absolute counts and percentage of peripheral lymphocyte in this study might be useful for future clinical evaluation.

  20. Distribution of HIV-1 Infection in Different T Lymphocyte Subsets: Antiretroviral Therapy-Naïve vs. Experienced Patients

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Raul; Gibson, Sonia; Lopez, Pablo; Koenig, Ellen; De Castro, Marisol

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Memory CD4 T cells are the primary targets of HIV-1 infection, which then subsequently spreads to other T lymphocyte subsets. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) alters the pattern of HIV-1 distribution. Blood samples were collected from ART-naïve or -experienced HIV-1 patients, and the memory and naïve subsets of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, respectively, were isolated by cell sorting. DNA was extracted and the HIV-1 env C2/V3 region PCR amplified. Amplicons were cloned and sequenced, and genetic relatedness among different HIV-1 compartments was determined by the phylogenetic analysis of clonal sequences. The viral V3 sequence of HIV-1 in each compartment was analyzed by using webPSSM to determine CCR5 or CXCR4 coreceptor binding property of the virus. The direction of viral migration among involved compartments was determined by using the MacClade program. In ART-naïve patients, HIV-1 was generally confined to the memory CD4 T (mT4) cell compartment, even though in a few cases, naïve CD4 T (nT4) cells were also infected. When this occurred, the HIV-1 gene migrated from nT4 to mT4. In contrast, HIV-1 was detected in nT4 and mT4 as well as in the memory CD8 T (mT8) compartments of ART-experienced patients. However, no clear pattern of directional HIV-1 gene flow among the compartments could be determined because of the small sample size. All HIV-1–infected T cell compartments housed the virus that used either CCR5 or CXCR4 as the coreceptor. PMID:21054214

  1. BTLA marks a less-differentiated tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte subset in melanoma with enhanced survival properties

    PubMed Central

    Haymaker, Cara L; Wu, Richard C; Ritthipichai, Krit; Bernatchez, Chantale; Forget, Marie-Andrée; Chen, Jie Qing; Liu, Hui; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco; Hwu, Patrick; Radvanyi, Laszlo G

    2015-01-01

    In a recent adoptive cell therapy (ACT) clinical trial using autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in patients with metastatic melanoma, we found an association between CD8+ T cells expressing the inhibitory receptor B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) and clinical response. Here, we further characterized this CD8+BTLA+ TIL subset and their CD8+BTLA− counterparts. We found that the CD8+ BTLA+ TILs had an increased response to IL-2, were less-differentiated effector-memory (TEM) cells, and persisted longer in vivo after infusion. In contrast, CD8+BTLA− TILs failed to proliferate and expressed genes associated with T-cell deletion/tolerance. Paradoxically, activation of BTLA signaling by its ligand, herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM), inhibited T-cell division and cytokine production, but also activated the Akt/PKB pathway thus protecting CD8+BTLA+ TILs from apoptosis. Our results point to a new role of BTLA as a useful T-cell differentiation marker in ACT and a dual signaling molecule that curtails T-cell activation while also conferring a survival advantage for CD8+ T cells. These attributes may explain our previous observation that BTLA expression on CD8+ TILs correlates with clinical response to adoptive T-cell therapy in metastatic melanoma. PMID:26405566

  2. Changes in lymphocyte subsets and macrophage functions from high, short-term dietary ethanol in C57/BL6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.R.; Prabhala, R.H.; Abril, E.; Smith, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic administration of a diet containing 7% ethanol (36% of total calories) for 8 days to male C57/BL6 mice resulted in significant changes in functioning of macrophages. Peritoneal exudate macrophages from the ethanol-fed mice released more tumor cell cytotoxic materials upon culturing in vitro than cells from controls. However, peritoneal exudate cells continued to respond to exogenous beta carotene in vitro to produce additional cytotoxic materials. Phagocytosis of sheep red blood cells in vitro was suppressed in cells from ethanol treated mice. The number of splenic lymphocytes of various subsets was significantly changed by the ethanol exposure. Total T cells and T suppressor cells were lower, with a significant decrease in B cells containing IgM on their surface. The percentage of spleen cells showing markers for macrophage functions and their activation were significantly reduced. It is concluded that short-term chronic consumption of dietary ethanol, which was sufficient to produce physical dependence, results in significant alterations in lymphocyte subtypes and suppression of some macrophage functions.

  3. Effects of moderate and severe malnutrition in rats on splenic T lymphocyte subsets and activation assessed by flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Barberena, E; González-Márquez, H; Gómez-Olivares, J L; Ortiz-Muñiz, R

    2008-01-01

    Malnutrition is distributed widely throughout the world and is a particular problem in developing countries. Laboratory animals have been very useful in studying the effects of varying levels of malnutrition because non-nutritional factors that affect humans may be controlled. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of moderate and severe malnutrition on lymphocyte proportions and activation markers of T cells in experimentally malnourished rats during lactation by flow cytometry. Lower absolute (total) and relative (%) numbers of CD3+ and CD4+ lymphocyte subpopulations were observed in moderately (second degree) and severely (third degree) malnourished rats compared with well-nourished rats (P < 0·05). Both groups of malnourished rats showed a significant decrease in the percentage of CD71+ cells at 24 h post-activation with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). After 24 h activation of spleen cells with PHA, a lower percentage of CD25+ cells was observed in malnourished than well-nourished rats (P < 0·05). In conclusion, the results of this study indicated an altered expression of CD71 and CD25 during activation of T lymphocytes in malnourished rats and may partially explain increased susceptibility to infection associated with malnutrition. Moreover, these results demonstrated that moderate malnutrition affects the response of T lymphocytes as much as severe malnutrition. PMID:18373698

  4. Association between Chemotherapy-Response Assays and Subsets of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Gastric Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Youn; Son, Taeil; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon; Kim, Choong-Bai; Park, Chung-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the association between adenosine triphosphate-based chemotherapy response assays (ATP-CRAs) and subsets of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in gastric cancer. Materials and Methods In total, 15 gastric cancer tissue samples were obtained from gastrectomies performed between February 2007 and January 2011. Chemotherapy response assays were performed on tumor cells from these samples using 11 chemotherapeutic agents, including etoposide, doxorubicin, epirubicin, mitomycin, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin, irinotecan, docetaxel, paclitaxel, methotrexate, and cisplatin. TILs in the tissue samples were evaluated using antibodies specific for CD3, CD4, CD8, Foxp3, and Granzyme B. Results The highest cancer cell death rates were induced by etoposide (44.8%), 5-FU (43.1%), and mitomycin (39.9%). Samples from 10 patients who were treated with 5-FU were divided into 5-FU-sensitive and -insensitive groups according to median cell death rate. No difference was observed in survival between the two groups (P=0.216). Only two patients were treated with a chemotherapeutic agent determined by an ATP-CRA and there was no significant difference in overall survival compared with that of patients treated with their physician's choice of chemotherapeutic agent (P=0.105). However, a high number of CD3 TILs was a favorable prognostic factor (P=0.008). Pearson's correlation analyses showed no association between cancer cell death rates in response to chemotherapeutic agents and subsets of TILs. Conclusions Cancer cell death rates in response to specific chemotherapeutic agents were not significantly associated with the distribution of TIL subsets. PMID:26819801

  5. Lymphocyte subset characterization associated with persistent hepatitis C virus infection and subsequent progression of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kengo; Ohishi, Waka; Nakashima, Eiji; Fujiwara, Saeko; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Chayama, Kazuaki; Hakoda, Masayuki; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Nakachi, Kei; Hayashi, Tomonori; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2011-10-01

    This study aims to deepen the understanding of lymphocyte phenotypes related to the course of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and progression of liver fibrosis in a cohort of atomic bomb survivors. The study subjects comprise 3 groups: 162 HCV persistently infected, 145 spontaneously cleared, and 3,511 uninfected individuals. We observed increased percentages of peripheral blood T(H)1 and total CD8 T cells and decreased percentages of natural killer (NK) cells in the HCV persistence group compared with the other 2 groups after adjustment for age, gender, and radiation exposure dose. Subsequently, we determined that increased T(H)1 cell percentages in the HCV persistence group were significantly associated with an accelerated time-course reduction in platelet counts-accelerated progression of liver fibrosis-whereas T(C)1 and NK cell percentages were inversely associated with progression. This study suggests that T(H)1 immunity is enhanced by persistent HCV infection and that percentages of peripheral T(H)1, T(C)1, and NK cells may help predict progression of liver fibrosis.

  6. Extracellular MicroRNA Signature of Human Helper T Cell Subsets in Health and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Torri, Anna; Carpi, Donatella; Bulgheroni, Elisabetta; Crosti, Maria-Cristina; Moro, Monica; Gruarin, Paola; Rossi, Riccardo L; Rossetti, Grazisa; Di Vizio, Dolores; Hoxha, Mirjam; Bollati, Valentina; Gagliani, Cristina; Tacchetti, Carlo; Paroni, Moira; Geginat, Jens; Corti, Laura; Venegoni, Luigia; Berti, Emilio; Pagani, Massimiliano; Matarese, Giuseppe; Abrignani, Sergio; de Candia, Paola

    2017-02-17

    Upon T cell receptor stimulation, CD4(+) T helper (Th) lymphocytes release extracellular vesicles (EVs) containing microRNAs. However, no data are available on whether human CD4(+) T cell subsets release EVs containing different pattern of microRNAs. The present work aimed at filling this gap by assessing the microRNA content in EVs released upon in vitro T cell receptor stimulation of Th1, Th17, and T regulatory (Treg) cells. Our results indicate that EVs released by Treg cells are significantly different compared with those released by the other subsets. In particular, miR-146a-5p, miR-150-5p, and miR-21-5p are enriched, whereas miR-106a-5p, miR-155-5p, and miR-19a-3p are depleted in Treg-derived EVs. The in vitro identified EV-associated microRNA signature was increased in serum of autoimmune patients with psoriasis and returned to healthy levels upon effective treatment with etanercept, a biological drug targeting the TNF pathway and suppressing inflammation. Moreover, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis showed an over-representation of genes relevant for T cell activation, such as CD40L, IRAK1, IRAK2, STAT1, and c-Myb in the list of validated targets of Treg-derived EV miRNAs. At functional level, Treg-derived (but not Th1/Th17-derived) EVs inhibited CD4(+) T cell proliferation and suppressed two relevant targets of miR-146a-5p: STAT1 and IRAK2. In conclusion, our work identified the miRNAs specifically released by different human CD4(+) T cell subsets and started to unveil the potential use of their quantity in human serum to mark the pathological elicitation of these cells in vivo and their biological effect in cell to cell communication during the adaptive immune response.

  7. Antigenic properties of subsets of splenic T lymphocytes responding to lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, M; Israel, E; Gery, I

    1976-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the antigenic properties of spleen cells responding in vitro to various mitogenic stimuli. Mouse spleen cells were treated with alloantibodies and C and then cultured with various concentrations of lectins. The exposure of spleen cells to various dilutions of either anti-theta serum and C or anti-Ly serum and C inhibited the response to optimal concentrations of PHA to a greater extent than the response to optimal concentrations of Con A. With the exception of the optimal lectin concentration, theta-antiserum and C had a stronger inhibitory effect on the response to Con A than to PHA. The exposure of spleen cells to H-2 antiserum and C inhibited their response to Con A to a greater extent than to PHA. The inhibitory activity of H-2 antiserum and C was inversely correlated with the dose of PHA used for stimulation. The lower the concentration of PHA used for stimulation the more effective was the inhibitory effect of the antiserum. The inhibitory effect of H-2 antiserum and C on the response to Con A was highest at optimal concentrations of the mitogen, and somewhat less pronounced above or below this concentration. The present study suggests that subsets of splenic T-cells that react to various concentrations of mitogens, differ in their theta- and H-2 alloantigenicity. PMID:1088415

  8. Radiosensitivity of human natural killer cells: Binding and cytotoxic activities of natural killer cell subsets

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, R.; Vitale, M.; Mazzotti, G.; Manzoli, L.; Papa, S. )

    1990-10-01

    The sensitivity of human natural killer (NK) cell activities (both binding and killing) after exposure of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to different doses of gamma radiation was studied. A panel of monoclonal antibodies was used to identify the NK and T-lymphocyte subsets and to evaluate their radiosensitivity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were irradiated with low (2-6 Gy) and high (10-30 Gy) doses and NK cell binding and cytotoxic activity against K562 target cells were studied after 3 h and 48 h in culture. The primary damage to NK cell activity was identified at the postbinding level and affected mainly the lytic machinery. After 48 h culture postirradiation, an overall depression of cytotoxic activity was observed, but ionizing radiation produced either a selection of the more cytotoxic NK cell subsets, which therefore might be considered more resistant to radiation damage than the less cytotoxic NK cells, or a long-term stimulation of cytotoxic activity in surviving cells.

  9. CCR7 is mainly expressed in teleost gills, where it defines an IgD+IgM- B lymphocyte subset.

    PubMed

    Castro, Rosario; Bromage, Erin; Abós, Beatriz; Pignatelli, Jaime; González Granja, Aitor; Luque, Alfonso; Tafalla, Carolina

    2014-02-01

    Chemokine receptor CCR7, the receptor for both CCL19 and CCL21 chemokines, regulates the recruitment and clustering of circulating leukocytes to secondary lymphoid tissues, such as lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. Even though teleost fish do not have either of these secondary lymphoid structures, we have recently reported a homolog to CCR7 in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the present work, we have studied the distribution of leukocytes bearing extracellular CCR7 in naive adult tissues by flow cytometry, observing that among the different leukocyte populations, the highest numbers of cells with membrane (mem)CCR7 were recorded in the gill (7.5 ± 2% CCR7(+) cells). In comparison, head kidney, spleen, thymus, intestine, and peripheral blood possessed <5% CCR7(+) cells. When CCR7 was studied at early developmental stages, we detected a progressive increase in gene expression and protein CCR7 levels in the gills throughout development. Surprisingly, the majority of the CCR7(+) cells in the gills were not myeloid cells and did not express membrane CD8, IgM, nor IgT, but expressed IgD on the cell surface. In fact, most IgD(+) cells in the gills expressed CCR7. Intriguingly, the IgD(+)CCR7(+) population did not coexpress memIgM. Finally, when trout were bath challenged with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, the number of CCR7(+) cells significantly decreased in the gills while significantly increased in head kidney. These results provide evidence of the presence of a novel memIgD(+)memIgM(-) B lymphocyte subset in trout that expresses memCCR7 and responds to viral infections. Similarities with IgD(+)IgM(-) subsets in mammals are discussed.

  10. The association between CD2+ peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets and the relapse of bladder cancer in prophylactically BCG-treated patients

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, E; Carballido, J; Manzano, L; Moltó, L; Olivier, C; Alvarez-Mon, M

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the potential existence of differences in the distribution of T-lymphocyte subsets and in the proliferative response of these CD2+ cells to polyclonal mitogens in patients with transitional cell bladder carcinoma (SBTCC) treated with prophylactic intracavitary instillations of bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) according to their clinical response to this treatment. Before BCG treatment, different subset distribution (CD8+ and CD3+ CD56+), activation antigen expression (CD3+ HLA– DR+) and proliferative response to mitogenic signals were found in CD2+ cells from SBTCC patients prophylactically treated with BCG who remained free of disease or those who had recurrence of tumour. Otherwise, the prophylactic intracavitary BCG instillations in SBTCC patients are associated with a transitory variation of T-lymphocyte subset distribution (CD4 and CD8) and activation antigens expression (CD25). © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10098752

  11. Differential changes in CD4+ and CD8+ effector and regulatory T lymphocyte subsets in the testis of rats undergoing autoimmune orchitis.

    PubMed

    Jacobo, P; Guazzone, V A; Jarazo-Dietrich, S; Theas, M S; Lustig, L

    2009-07-01

    Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) is a useful model to study organ-specific autoimmunity and chronic testicular inflammation. EAO is characterized by an interstitial lymphomononuclear cell infiltration and damage of the seminiferous tubules showing germ cell sloughing and apoptosis. Using flow cytometry, we analysed the phenotype and number of T lymphocytes present in the testicular interstitium of rats during EAO development. A large increase in the number of testicular CD3+ T lymphocytes was detected. The number of CD4+ and CD8+ effector T lymphocytes (T(effector) cells) dramatically increased in the testis at EAO onset, with the CD4+ cell subset predominating. As the severity of the disease progressed, CD4+ T(effector) cells declined in number while the CD8+ T(effector) cell subset remained unchanged, suggesting their involvement in maintenance of the chronic phase of EAO. As a novel finding, we detected by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry Foxp3 expressing CD4+ and CD8+ regulatory T lymphocytes (T(regs)) in chronically inflamed testis of EAO rats. The numbers of both T(reg) cell subsets increased in the testis of rats with orchitis, mainly at the onset of EAO; CD4+Foxp3+ T(reg) cells were more abundant than CD8+Foxp3+ T(reg) cells. Unexpectedly, CD25- T lymphocytes were more abundant than CD25+ cells within CD4+Foxp3+ and CD8+Foxp3+ T(reg) cell populations. Although T(reg) subsets are actively accumulated into the testis in EAO rats, these cells are outnumbered by an even more vigorously expanding T(effector) subset. Further, it is possible that factors present in the inflamed testis might limit the ability of T(regs) to abrogate tissue damage.

  12. Effect of diet and age on jejunal and circulating lymphocyte subsets in children with coeliac disease: persistence of CD4-8-intraepithelial T cells through treatment.

    PubMed

    Verkasalo, M A; Arató, A; Savilahti, E; Tainio, V M

    1990-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were used to determine the relative numbers of T lymphocyte subsets in 61 jejunal biopsies and in peripheral blood of 35 children with coeliac disease, and of 13 healthy controls. The T cell numbers in the lamina propria were unaffected by a change from gluten-free to gluten containing diet in the patients. The number of intraepithelial lymphocytes (where the CD8 cells predominated) were significantly raised in patients taking gluten. Ten to 20% of the patients' intraepithelial CD3 (mature T) cells expressed neither CD8 nor CD4 surface antigens. This CD4 8 T cell population persisted through gluten elimination and challenge. The circulating lymphocyte subsets showed little variation with the diet although there was a marked increase in the proportion (14.9%) of CD4 8 T cells in patients during gluten elimination. In the histologically normal jejunal mucosa from control subjects, the age of the subject showed a positive correlation with villus intraepithelial CD3+ and CD8+ cells, and crypt intraepithelial CD4+ cells. No clear cut effect of age was observed on lamina propria lymphocyte counts of the controls, or on the lymphocyte counts in jejunal mucosa of the coeliac patients. The observed CD3+4-8- lymphocytes may represent activated cells unable to present their surface antigens, or they may be gamma delta-receptor bearing T cells, which could have a significant role in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease.

  13. Establishment of reference values of CD4 and CD8 lymphocyte subsets in healthy Nigerian adults.

    PubMed

    Oladepo, D K; Idigbe, E O; Audu, R A; Inyang, U S; Imade, G E; Philip, A O; Okafor, G O; Olaleye, D; Mohammed, S B; Odunukwe, N N; Harry, T O; Edyong-Ekpa, M; Idoko, J; Musa, A Z; Adedeji, A; Nasidi, A; Ya'aba, Y; Ibrahim, K

    2009-09-01

    A total of 2,570 apparently healthy human immunodeficiency virus-negative adults from the six geopolitical zones in the country were enrolled in our study in 2006. The samples were assayed using the Cyflow technique. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Scientists (SPSS). The majority (64%) of the participants had CD4 counts within the range of 501 to 1,000 cells/microl. The reference range for CD4 was 365 to 1,571 cells/microl, while the reference range for CD8 was 145 to 884 cells/microl.

  14. Effects of castration, Depo-testosterone and cyproterone acetate on lymphocyte T subsets in mouse thymus and spleen.

    PubMed

    Aboudkhil, S; Bureau, J P; Garrelly, L; Vago, P

    1991-11-01

    The effects of testosterone on the relative proportion of Thy 1.2, CD4 (L3T4) and CD8 (Lyt-2) cells in thymus and spleen were studied after castration and administration of Depo-testosterone (DT) separately or together with cyproterone acetate (CA) (an antiandrogen) in BDF1 mice. Injection of 0.5 mg/100 g body weight of DT during 2 weeks decreased significantly the number and proportion of double positive (DP) (CD4+ CD8+) and increased the percentage of single positive (SP) CD4+ (CD4+ CD8-), whereas there was a slight decrease in the Thy 1.2+ cells in the thymus. In parallel, we observed an increase in CD8+ (CD4- CD8+) cells in the spleen. The androgen deprivation after 3 weeks of castration induced a decrease in the percentage of CD4+ cells in thymus and both CD4+ and CD8+ cells in spleen. Injection of CA (0.5 mg/100 g body weight) had the same qualitative effects as DT on the proportion of lymphocyte T subsets in castrated mice. However, the combined activities of DT and CA were greater than either alone. These data indicate the main role of testosterone in the distribution of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in male mice. The similar effects of CA and DT in the lymphoid organs may suggest a difference between androgen receptors of sexual and lymphoid organs.

  15. Mutations in TLR/MYD88 pathway identify a subset of young chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with favorable outcome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Pinyol, Magda; Navarro, Alba; Aymerich, Marta; Jares, Pedro; Juan, Manel; Rozman, María; Colomer, Dolors; Delgado, Julio; Giné, Eva; González-Díaz, Marcos; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Colado, Enrique; Rayón, Consolación; Payer, Angel R; Terol, Maria José; Navarro, Blanca; Quesada, Victor; Puente, Xosé S; Rozman, Ciril; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías; López-Guillermo, Armando; Villamor, Neus

    2014-06-12

    Mutations in Toll-like receptor (TLR) and myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MYD88) genes have been found in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at low frequency. We analyzed the incidence, clinicobiological characteristics, and outcome of patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations in 587 CLL patients. Twenty-three patients (3.9%) had mutations, 19 in MYD88 (one with concurrent IRAK1 mutation), 2 TLR2 (one with concomitant TLR6 mutation), 1 IRAK1, and 1 TLR5. No mutations were found in IRAK2 and IRAK4. TLR/MYD88-mutated CLL overexpressed genes of the nuclear factor κB pathway. Patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations were significantly younger (83% age ≤50 years) than those with no mutations. TLR/MYD88 mutations were the most frequent in young patients. Patients with mutated TLR/MYD88 CLL had a higher frequency of mutated IGHV and low expression of CD38 and ZAP-70. Overall survival (OS) was better in TLR/MYD88-mutated than unmutated patients in the whole series (10-year OS, 100% vs 62%; P = .002), and in the subset of patients age ≤50 years (100% vs 70%; P = .02). In addition, relative OS of TLR/MYD88-mutated patients was similar to that in the age- and gender-matched population. In summary, TLR/MYD88 mutations identify a population of young CLL patients with favorable outcome.

  16. Effects of coronary artery bypass grafting on cellular immunity with or without cardiopulmonary bypass: changes in lymphocytes subsets.

    PubMed

    Akbas, Haluk; Erdal, A Cenk; Demiralp, Emel; Alp, Mete

    2002-12-01

    Cell-mediated immunity responses decrease after all kinds of surgical procedures. Either anesthesia or surgical trauma plays an important role in this effect. Identification of functional lymphocyte subsets, by using appropriate monoclonal antibodies and analysis of flow cytometry data, appears to provide an accurate measurement of cellular immune competence. We found a significant decrease in the total number of T helper/inducer cells (p<0.035), B cells (p<0.043) and natural killer cells (NK) (p<0.018) but in contrast, increase in NK cell activity (p<0.012) in the peripheral arterial blood of ten patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass (group 1) immediately after surgery and postoperative day 1 (POD1). On the other hand, there was no significant change of these parameters occurred in the peripheral arterial blood of ten patients (group 2) who were undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting without cardiopulmonary bypass. Therefore, we conclude that coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with cardiopulmonary bypass induce a greater decrease in immunologic response than CABG without cardiopulmonary bypass (off pump) operations. Nevertheless, off pump CABG operations do not induce a greater decrease in immunologic response than other surgical operations.

  17. Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase activity in human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, G.D.; Schuresko, D.D.

    1981-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase (AHM), an enzyme of key importance in metabolism of xenobiotic chemicals such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA), is present in human lymphocytes. Studies investing the relation of activity of AHM in human lymphocytes to parameters such as disease state, PNA exposure, in vitro mitogen stimulation, etc. have been summarized in this report. Some studies have demonstrated increased AHM activity in lymphocytes from cigarette smokers (compared to nonsmokers), and in lung cancer patients when compared to appropriate control groups. These observations are confused by extreme variability in human lymphocyte AHM activities, such variability arising from factors such as genetic variation in AHM activity, variation in in vitro culture conditions which affect AHM activity, and the problematical relationship of common AHM assays to actual PNA metabolism taking place in lymphocytes. If some of the foregoing problems can be adequately addressed, lymphocyte AHM activity could hold the promise of being a useful biomarker system for human PNA exposure.

  18. Characterization of a chromosome-specific chimpanzee alpha satellite subset: Evolutionary relationship to subsets on human chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Warburton, P.E.; Gosden, J.; Lawson, D.

    1996-04-15

    Alpha satellite DNA is a tandemly repeated DNA family found at the centromeres of all primate chromosomes examined. The fundamental repeat units of alpha satellite DNA are diverged 169- to 172-bp monomers, often found to be organized in chromosome-specific higher-order repeat units. The chromosomes of human (Homo sapiens (HSA)), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes (PTR) and Pan paniscus), and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) share a remarkable similarity and synteny. It is of interest to ask if alpha satellite arrays at centromeres of homologous chromosomes between these species are closely related (evolving in an orthologous manner) or if the evolutionary processes that homogenize and spread these arrays within and between chromosomes result in nonorthologous evolution of arrays. By using PCR primers specific for human chromosome 17-specific alpha satellite DNA, we have amplified, cloned, and characterized a chromosome-specific subset from the PTR chimpanzee genome. Hybridization both on Southern blots and in situ as well as sequence analysis show that this subset is most closely related, as expected, to sequences on HSA 17. However, in situ hybridization reveals that this subset is not found on the homologous chromosome in chimpanzee (PTR 19), but instead on PTR 12, which is homologous to HSA 2p. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of human newborns' B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Durandy, A; Thuillier, L; Forveille, M; Fischer, A

    1990-01-01

    It has been demonstrated two major facts concerning human newborns' B lymphocytes: 1) they differentiate poorly into Ig-producing cells and 2) they express CD5 and CD1c membrane proteins. We have further analyzed human newborns' B cell characteristics and found that approximately half of them express activation Ag, i.e., 4F2 and IL-2R, both associated in significant proportions with CD23 and Bac-1. These membrane Ag were found both on CD5(+) and CD5(-) B cells. Newborns' B cells do not exhibit other activation markers because they express surface IgD, and because their size, RNA, and DNA contents do not differ from those of adults' B cells, indicating that they are in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase. Newborns' B cell proliferation can be induced by rIL-2, rIL-4, low m.w. B cell growth factor, and by Staphylococcus aureus protein A. It is presently difficult to build a hypothesis accounting for all the specific findings made on newborns' B cells. It is not known for instance whether CD5(+) and (-) B cells belong to distinct subsets as suggested by the fluorescence intensity curve obtained with an anti-CD5 antibody or to distinct stages in a unique pattern of B cell maturation during fetal and newborn life. This may indicate that partially activated B cells actually produce natural polyspecific autoantibodies of the IgM isotype found in newborns' human serum.

  20. Cystic lung lesions in Sjogren syndrome: analysis of lymphocyte subsets in tissue with clinico-radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Jagirdar, Jaishree; Chikkamuniyappa, Shylashree; Sirohi, Deepika; McCarthy, Michael J; Peters, Jay I

    2013-02-01

    Pulmonary complications associated with Sjögren syndrome (SS) have attracted attention in recent years. Sjögren syndrome has been associated with small cyst formation in salivary glands, thymus, and lungs and has been recently brought to the forefront by radiologists due to high-resolution techniques. However, pathologists are less aware of this finding unless clinico-radiologic-pathologic correlation is sought. Formation of large bullae in SS is a rare complication with potential for confusion with other diseases. Here, we present the clinical, radiologic, and pathologic findings in 3 patients with SS associated with multiple pulmonary cystic lesions. All 3 patients had a variable mixed restrictive and obstructive component of the disease. There was good correlation with the pulmonary function tests (PFTs), high-resolution computed tomographic scan, and morphology with regard to the restrictive component. The small cysts appear to correlate with the extent of obstructive changes on the PFTs. However, the large bullae do not, implying noncommunication with the conducting airways. This noncorrelation between the PFTs and extent of bullous disease with predominant involvement of lower lobes in SS enables distinction from bullous emphysema. The mechanism of bulla formation in SS appears to be different from bullous emphysema. A check valve mechanism has been proposed previously in SS, which does not explain cyst formation in the thymus. Alternately, inflammation may play a role with the key suspects being CD4 T-helper cells and perhaps NK cells. This is the first report of a clinico-radiologic-pathologic correlation with analysis of lymphocyte subsets.

  1. Progranulin Inhibits Human T Lymphocyte Proliferation by Inducing the Formation of Regulatory T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kwack, Kyu Hwan

    2017-01-01

    We have examined the effect of progranulin (PGRN) on human T cell proliferation and its underlying mechanism. We show that PGRN inhibits the PHA-induced multiplication of T lymphocytes. It increases the number of iTregs when T lymphocytes are activated by PHA but does not do so in the absence of PHA. PGRN-mediated inhibition of T lymphocyte proliferation, as well as the induction of iTregs, was completely reversed by a TGF-β inhibitor or a Treg inhibitor. PGRN induced TGF-β secretion in the presence of PHA whereas it did not in the absence of PHA. Our findings indicate that PGRN suppresses T lymphocyte proliferation by enhancing the formation of iTregs from activated T lymphocytes in response to TGF-β. PMID:28194047

  2. Parameters of disease progression in long-term experimental feline retrovirus (feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus) infections: hematology, clinical chemistry, and lymphocyte subsets.

    PubMed

    Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Holznagel, E; Ossent, P; Lutz, H

    1997-01-01

    After several years of latency, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) cause fatal disease in the cat. The aim of this study was to determine laboratory parameters characteristic of disease progression which would allow a better description of the asymptomatic phase and a better understanding of the pathogenesis of the two infections. Therefore, experimentally infected cats (FIV and/or FeLV positive) and control animals were observed over a period of 6.5 years under identical conditions. Blood samples were analyzed for the following: complete hematology, clinical chemistry, serum protein electrophoresis, and determination of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte subsets. The following hematological and clinical chemistry parameters were markedly changed in the FIV-infected animals from month 9 onwards: glucose, serum protein, gamma globulins, sodium, urea, phosphorus, lipase, cholesterol, and triglyceride. In FeLV infection, the markedly changed parameters were mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, aspartate aminotransferase, and urea. In contrast to reports of field studies, neither FIV-positive nor FeLV-positive animals developed persistent leukopenia, lymphopenia, or neutropenia. A significant decrease was found in the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in FIV-positive and FIV-FeLV-positive animals mainly due to loss of CD4+ lymphocytes. In FeLV-positive cats, both CD4+ and, to a lesser degree, CD8+ lymphocytes were decreased in long-term infection. The changes in FIV infection may reflect subclinical kidney dysfunction, changes in energy and lipid metabolism, and transient activation of the humoral immune response as described for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. The changes in FeLV infection may also reflect subclinical kidney dysfunction and, in addition, changes in erythrocyte and immune function of the animals. No severe clinical signs were observed in the FIV-positive cats, while FeLV had a severe influence on the life

  3. Parameters of disease progression in long-term experimental feline retrovirus (feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus) infections: hematology, clinical chemistry, and lymphocyte subsets.

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Holznagel, E; Ossent, P; Lutz, H

    1997-01-01

    After several years of latency, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) cause fatal disease in the cat. The aim of this study was to determine laboratory parameters characteristic of disease progression which would allow a better description of the asymptomatic phase and a better understanding of the pathogenesis of the two infections. Therefore, experimentally infected cats (FIV and/or FeLV positive) and control animals were observed over a period of 6.5 years under identical conditions. Blood samples were analyzed for the following: complete hematology, clinical chemistry, serum protein electrophoresis, and determination of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte subsets. The following hematological and clinical chemistry parameters were markedly changed in the FIV-infected animals from month 9 onwards: glucose, serum protein, gamma globulins, sodium, urea, phosphorus, lipase, cholesterol, and triglyceride. In FeLV infection, the markedly changed parameters were mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, aspartate aminotransferase, and urea. In contrast to reports of field studies, neither FIV-positive nor FeLV-positive animals developed persistent leukopenia, lymphopenia, or neutropenia. A significant decrease was found in the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in FIV-positive and FIV-FeLV-positive animals mainly due to loss of CD4+ lymphocytes. In FeLV-positive cats, both CD4+ and, to a lesser degree, CD8+ lymphocytes were decreased in long-term infection. The changes in FIV infection may reflect subclinical kidney dysfunction, changes in energy and lipid metabolism, and transient activation of the humoral immune response as described for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. The changes in FeLV infection may also reflect subclinical kidney dysfunction and, in addition, changes in erythrocyte and immune function of the animals. No severe clinical signs were observed in the FIV-positive cats, while FeLV had a severe influence on the life

  4. Indium 111 toxicity in the human lymphocyte

    SciTech Connect

    Silberstein, E.B.; Watson, S.; Mayfield, G.; Kereiakes, J.G.; Bullock, W.

    1985-05-01

    Indium-labeled lymphocytes were examined for response to a variety of mitogens, ability to synthesize immunoglobulins, mitotic index, and presence of chromosome aberrations at a range of exposures from 0.2 to 500 muCi/10(8) cells. Results of all four tests were found to be abnormal when the lymphocytes were labeled with /sup 111/In activities well within those employed for diagnostic testing.

  5. Altered cytokine production by specific human peripheral blood cell subsets immediately following space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, B. E.; Cubbage, M. L.; Sams, C. F.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, flow cytometry was used to positively identify the specific lymphocyte subsets exhibiting space flight-induced alterations in cytokine production. Whole blood samples were collected from 27 astronauts at three points (one preflight, two postflight) surrounding four space shuttle missions. Assays performed included serum/urine stress hormones, white blood cell (WBC) phenotyping, and intracellular cytokine production following mitogenic stimulation. Absolute levels of peripheral granulocytes were significantly elevated following space flight, but the levels of circulating lymphocytes and monocytes were unchanged. Lymphocyte subset analysis demonstrated a decreased percentage of T cells, whereas percentages of B cells and natural killer (NK) cells remained unchanged after flight. Nearly all the astronauts exhibited an increased CD4/CD8 T cell ratio. Assessment of naive (CD45RA+) vs. memory (CD45RO+) CD4+ T cell subsets was ambiguous, and subjects tended to group within specific missions. Although no significant trend was seen in absolute monocyte levels, a significant decrease in the percentage of the CD14+ CD16+ monocytes was seen following space flight in all subjects tested. T cell (CD3+) production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) was significantly decreased after space flight, as was IL-2 production by both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets. Production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was not altered by space flight for the CD8+ cell subset, but there was a significant decrease in IFN-gamma production for the CD4+ T cell subset. Serum and urine stress hormone analysis indicated significant physiologic stresses in astronauts following space flight. Altered peripheral leukocyte subsets, altered serum and urine stress hormone levels, and altered T cell cytokine secretion profiles were all observed postflight. In addition, there appeared to be differential susceptibility to space flight regarding cytokine secretion by T cell subsets. These alterations may be the

  6. Tempol protects human lymphocytes from genotoxicity induced by cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Khabour, Omar F; Alzoubi, Karem H; Mfady, Doa’a S; Alasseiri, Mohammed; Hasheesh, Taghrid F

    2014-01-01

    The use of cisplatin in treatments of human malignancies is limited by its side effects that include DNA damage and the subsequent risk of developing secondary cancer. In this study, we examined the possible protective effect of Tempol against DNA damage induced by cisplatin in human lymphocytes using chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) assays. Cisplatin induced significant elevation in the frequencies of CAs and SCEs in cultured human lymphocytes (P < 0.01). Treatment of lymphocytes with Tempol significantly lowered CAs and SCEs induced by cisplatin. Tempol alone did not affect spontaneous levels of SCEs and CAs observed in the control group (P > 0.05). In conclusion, Tempol protects human lymphocytes against genotoxicity induced by the anticancer drug cisplatin. PMID:24955171

  7. Curcumin, myrecen and cineol modulate the percentage of lymphocyte subsets altered by 2,3,7, 8-tetracholorodibenzo-p-dioxins (TCDD) in rats.

    PubMed

    Ciftci, Osman; Tanyildizi, Sadettin; Godekmerdan, Ahmet

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the toxic effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a persistent environmental pollutant, on the percentage of T-cell subsets and B-lymphocyte and effectiveness of curcumin, β-myrcene (myrcene) and 1,8-cineole (cineol) on this toxicity in rats. Rats (n = 112) were divided randomly into 8 equal groups. One group was kept as control and given corn oil as carrier. TCDD was orally administered at the dose of 2 µg/kg/week. Curcumin, myrcene and cineol were orally administered by gavages at the doses of 100, 200 and 100 mg/kg/day, respectively, dissolved in corn oil with and without TCDD. The blood samples were taken from half of the rats on day 30 and from the rest on day 60 for the determination of lymphocyte subsets (CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+), CD161(+), CD45RA, CD4(+)CD25(+) and total lymphocyte). The results indicated that although TCDD significantly (p < 0.05) decreased the percentage of CD3(+), CD4(+), CD161(+), CD45RA, CD4(+)CD25(+) and total lymphocyte, it caused a significant increase in the percentage of CD8(+) cells. In contrast, curcumin, myrcene and cineol significantly decreased CD8(+) cells levels but increased CD3(+), CD4(+), CD161(+), CD45RA, CD4(+)CD25(+) and total lymphocyte cells populations. The beneficial effects of curcumin, myrcene and cineol and the toxic effects of TCDD were increased at day 60 compared to day 30. In conclusion, curcumin, myrcene and cineol showed immunomodulatory effects and eliminated TCDD-induced immune suppressive effects in rats.

  8. Monoclonal antibody HBME-1 reacts with a minor subset of B cells with villous surface and can be useful in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia and other indolent lymphoproliferations of villous B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Krenács, László; Tóth-Lipták, Judit; Demeter, Judit; Piukovics, Klára; Borbényi, Zita; Gogolák, Péter; Sári, Eszter; Bagdi, Enikő

    2013-12-01

    The Hector Battifora mesothelial epitope-1 (HBME-1) monoclonal antibody has been generated against human mesothelioma cells and recognizes a biochemically unknown membrane epitope. We have accidentally found that the HBME-1 reacts with scattered lymphocytes showing villous surface in hyperplastic lymphoid tissue. To evaluate its reactivity pattern, we have performed a consecutive immunohistochemical study in nonneoplastic bone marrow and lymphoid samples (n = 40), as well as in malignant lymphoproliferations (n = 427), including hairy cell leukemia (HCL) (n = 72), HCL variant (HCL-v) (n = 13), splenic diffuse red pulp small B cell lymphoma (SDRPL) (n = 8), splenic B cell marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) (n = 59), and splenic B cell lymphoma/leukemia, not further classifiable on bone marrow morphology (SBCL) (n = 37) cases. The staining pattern of HBME-1 was compared to DBA.44. HBME-1(+) villous lymphocytes were constantly detected in low number in nonneoplastic lymphoid tissues. With multicolor immunofluorescence staining, HBME-1(+) lymphocytes showed a CD20(+)/CD79a(+)/IgM(+) B cell phenotype. In B cell lymphoproliferations of villous lymphocytes, HBME-1 reactivity was demonstrated in 96 % of HCL, 39 % of HCL-v, 50 % of SDRPL, 12 % of SMZL, and 19 % of SBCL cases. Nodal and extranodal marginal zone lymphoma cases were positive in 12 % of the cases. A small minority (4 %) of the other B cell lymphomas and no T cell lymphoma revealed tumor cell reactivity with HBME-1. In conclusion, our study has established that HBME-1 reacts with a minor subset of B lymphocytes and a small proportion of B cell lymphomas, which has not been described previously. We suggest that HBME-1 can be a useful marker in the diagnosis of HCL and other indolent lymphoproliferations of villous B lymphocytes.

  9. Designing vaccines based on biology of human dendritic cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Mellman, Ira

    2010-01-01

    The effective vaccines developed against a variety of infectious agents, including polio, measles and Hepatitis B, represent major achievements in medicine. These vaccines, usually composed of microbial antigens, are often associated with an adjuvant that activates dendritic cells (DCs). Many infectious diseases are still in need of an effective vaccine including HIV, malaria, hepatitis C and tuberculosis. In some cases, the induction of cellular rather than humoral responses may be more important as the goal is to control and eliminate the existing infection rather than to prevent it. Our increased understanding of the mechanisms of antigen presentation, particularly with the description of DC subsets with distinct functions, as well as their plasticity in responding to extrinsic signals, represent opportunities to develop novel vaccines. In addition, we foresee that this increased knowledge will permit us to design vaccines that will reprogram the immune system to intervene therapeutically in cancer, allergy and autoimmunity. PMID:21029958

  10. Monocyte subset dynamics in human atherosclerosis can be profiled with magnetic nano-sensors.

    PubMed

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Lee, Hakho; Chudnovskiy, Aleksey; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Etzrodt, Martin; Pittet, Mikael J; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Croce, Kevin; Libby, Peter; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K

    2009-05-22

    Monocytes are circulating macrophage and dendritic cell precursors that populate healthy and diseased tissue. In humans, monocytes consist of at least two subsets whose proportions in the blood fluctuate in response to coronary artery disease, sepsis, and viral infection. Animal studies have shown that specific shifts in the monocyte subset repertoire either exacerbate or attenuate disease, suggesting a role for monocyte subsets as biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Assays are therefore needed that can selectively and rapidly enumerate monocytes and their subsets. This study shows that two major human monocyte subsets express similar levels of the receptor for macrophage colony stimulating factor (MCSFR) but differ in their phagocytic capacity. We exploit these properties and custom-engineer magnetic nanoparticles for ex vivo sensing of monocytes and their subsets. We present a two-dimensional enumerative mathematical model that simultaneously reports number and proportion of monocyte subsets in a small volume of human blood. Using a recently described diagnostic magnetic resonance (DMR) chip with 1 microl sample size and high throughput capabilities, we then show that application of the model accurately quantifies subset fluctuations that occur in patients with atherosclerosis.

  11. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) with normal lymphocyte counts is associated with decreased numbers of normal circulating B-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Hauswirth, Alexander W; Almeida, Julia; Nieto, Wendy G; Teodosio, Cristina; Rodriguez-Caballero, Arancha; Romero, Alfonso; López, Antonio; Fernandez-Navarro, Paulino; Vega, Tomas; Perez-Andres, Martin; Valent, Peter; Jäger, Ulrich; Orfao, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) with normal lymphocyte counts is associated with decreased numbers of normal circulating B-cell subsets.Little is known about the distribution of normal lymphoid cells and their subsets in the peripheral blood (PB) of subjects with monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL). In our study, we compared the absolute number of PB lymphoid cells and their subpopulations in 95 MBL cases with normal lymphocyte counts vs. 617 age-/sex-matched non-MBL healthy subjects (controls), using highly sensitive flow cytometry. MBL cases showed significantly reduced numbers of normal circulating B-cells, at the expense of immature and naive B-cells; in addition, CD4+CD8+ double-positive T-cells and CD8+ T-cells were significantly lower and higher vs. controls, respectively. Moreover, most normal B-cell subsets were significantly decreased in PB at >1% MBL-counts, vs. "low-count" MBL cases, and lower amounts of immature/naive B-cells were detected in biclonal (particularly in cases with coexisting CLL-like- and non-CLL-like B-cell clones) vs. monoclonal MBL subjects. In summary, our results show imbalanced (reduced) absolute numbers of recently produced normal circulating B-cells (e.g., immature and naıve B-cells) in MBL, which becomes more pronounced as the MBL cell count increases.

  12. Mutant Huntingtin Does Not Affect the Intrinsic Phenotype of Human Huntington's Disease T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Miller, James R C; Träger, Ulrike; Andre, Ralph; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative condition caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The peripheral innate immune system is dysregulated in Huntington's disease and may contribute to its pathogenesis. However, it is not clear whether or to what extent the adaptive immune system is also involved. Here, we carry out the first comprehensive investigation of human ex vivo T lymphocytes in Huntington's disease, focusing on the frequency of a range of T lymphocyte subsets, as well as analysis of proliferation, cytokine production and gene transcription. In contrast to the innate immune system, the intrinsic phenotype of T lymphocytes does not appear to be affected by the presence of mutant huntingtin, with Huntington's disease T lymphocytes exhibiting no significant functional differences compared to control cells. The transcriptional profile of T lymphocytes also does not appear to be significantly affected, suggesting that peripheral immune dysfunction in Huntington's disease is likely to be mediated primarily by the innate rather than the adaptive immune system. This study increases our understanding of the effects of Huntington's disease on peripheral tissues, while further demonstrating the differential effects of the mutant protein on different but related cell types. Finally, this study suggests that the potential use of novel therapeutics aimed at modulating the Huntington's disease innate immune system should not be extended to include the adaptive immune system.

  13. Activation of human lymphocytes by supernatants from human thymic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Vesole, D H; Fudenberg, H H

    1979-11-01

    Supernatants from human thymic epithelial cells (TS) were found to have a mitogenic effect on cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to potentiate their responses to lectins. This was not observed with culture supernatants from the human cell lines AV-3 and HeLa or from the murine cell line L-929. The maximum potentiating effects were observed with pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), whereas the response to concanavalin A (Con A) was only slightly enhanced. TS also potentiated the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) response of normal T cells and thymocytes cultured with mitomycin C-treated B lymphoid cell lines. The mitogenic effect of TS was time-dependent and paralleled the appearance of lymphoid colonies in semi-solid agar. Chromatographical separation of concentrated serum-free TS on Sephadex G-100 yielded an active fraction of molecular weight 15,000--25,000 which had all the activities of unseparated TS.

  14. Activation of human lymphocytes by supernatants from human thymic epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Goust, J M; Vesole, D H; Fudenberg, H H

    1979-01-01

    Supernatants from human thymic epithelial cells (TS) were found to have a mitogenic effect on cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to potentiate their responses to lectins. This was not observed with culture supernatants from the human cell lines AV-3 and HeLa or from the murine cell line L-929. The maximum potentiating effects were observed with pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), whereas the response to concanavalin A (Con A) was only slightly enhanced. TS also potentiated the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) response of normal T cells and thymocytes cultured with mitomycin C-treated B lymphoid cell lines. The mitogenic effect of TS was time-dependent and paralleled the appearance of lymphoid colonies in semi-solid agar. Chromatographical separation of concentrated serum-free TS on Sephadex G-100 yielded an active fraction of molecular weight 15,000--25,000 which had all the activities of unseparated TS. PMID:160851

  15. Studying the Role for CD4+ T Cell Subsets in Human Lupus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    subsets in human lupus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Insoo Kang, M.D. CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Studying the role for CD4+ T cell subsets in human lupus 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0150 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We have investigated whether and how autoimmune complex (AIC) in SLE ( lupus ) can

  16. Interaction of Choriocarcinoma Cells and Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    August, Charles S.; Cox, Sheila T.; Naughton, Michael A.

    1979-01-01

    Cultured choriocarcinoma (Be Wo) cells exist that share many of the morphologic and bio-synthetic properties of normal human trophoblasts. In an attempt to develop a model for the immunologic relationship between a sensitized mother and fetus, we mixed Be Wo cells with mitogen-activated cytotoxic lymphocytes in vitro. Be Wo cells were resistant to the cytolytic effects of the activated lymphocytes despite 24-h exposure and intimate cell-to-cell contact as determined by microscopy. Control target cells, a line of human hepatoma cells, were readily destroyed. Cytotoxicity was measured by determining residual radioactivity of [3H]thymidine-labeled target cells after exposure to activated lymphocytes. Employing the quantitative assay, we confirmed the morphologic results and showed that Be Wo and a number of other choriocarcinoma cell lines were resistant to the cytotoxic effects of lymphocytes activated by phytohemagglutinin, pokeweed mitogen, and allogeneic cells in mixed lymphocyte cultures. Moreover, Be Wo cells were resistant to injury over a wide range of killer to target cell ratios. Significant killing of the Be Wo cells occurred only after prolonged exposure (48 and 72 h) to the activated lymphocytes. We suggest that one mechanism that may assist the fetus (or a choriocarcinoma) in its immunologic survival is the intrinsic resistance of trophoblast cells to lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity. Images PMID:570981

  17. Shen-Qi-Jie-Yu-Fang has antidepressant effects in a rodent model of postpartum depression by regulating the immune organs and subsets of T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Miao; Tang, Qisheng; Li, Xiaoli; Zhao, Ruizhen; Li, Jingya; Xu, Hong; Gao, Yushan; Mao, Yingqiu

    2015-01-01

    Background Shen-Qi-Jie-Yu-Fang (SJ Fang) is a herbal preparation used in traditional Chinese medicine, and is a potentially important new therapeutic agent in postpartum depression (PPD). Previously, we have elucidated the effects of SJ Fang on hormone receptors and monoamine neurotransmitters involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axes in PPD rats. However, the immune-modulating effects of SJ Fang in PPD are still unknown. In this study, we explored the effects of SJ Fang on the immune organs and subsets of T lymphocytes in PPD rats. Methods PPD was created in Sprague-Dawley rats by inducing hormone-simulated pregnancy followed by hormone withdrawal. After hormone withdrawal, the PPD rats were then treated with fluoxetine at 1, 2, and 4 weeks, and the SJ Fang rats were also treated at 1, 2, and 4 weeks. Depressive behavior in the rats was evaluated by the forced swim test, sucrose consumption test, and open field test. The thymus index and spleen index were calculated. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was used to identify pathological features in the thymus and spleen. CD3, CD4, and CD8 lymphocyte subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Both fluoxetine and SJ Fang decreased immobility time, increased sucrose consumption, an horizontal and vertical movement. After 4 weeks of treatment with fluoxetine or SJ Fang, the thymus index and spleen index were significantly higher than at baseline, and the morphology of the thymus and spleen were returning to normal. Two weeks after hormone withdrawal, subsets of T lymphocytes indicated a shift from immune activation to immune suppression, which was reversed by 4 weeks of treatment with fluoxetine or SJ Fang. Conclusion It is suggested that T-cell mediate immune responses which may play a role in the etiopathology of postpartum depression. SJ Fang had an antidepressant effect on the immune system in rats with PPD. PMID:26203247

  18. Circulating and in situ lymphocyte subsets and Langerhans cells in patients with compositae oleoresin dermatitis and increased ultraviolet A sensitivity during treatment with azathioprine

    SciTech Connect

    Baadsgaard, O.

    1986-04-01

    Circulating and in situ lymphocyte subsets and Langerhans cells in four patients with compositae oleoresin dermatitis and increased ultraviolet A sensitivity before and during treatment with azathioprine were estimated. It was found that the number of Leu 6+ Langerhans cells decreased during therapy. This decrease was accompanied by a reduction in the number of Leu 2a+, Leu 3a+, Leu 4+, DR+, and Leu M2+ cells in the blood and a reduction in the number of Leu 2a+, Leu 3a+, Leu 4+, and DR+ cells in the skin. Concomitantly with the changes in the number of immunocompetent cells, the eczema cleared.

  19. Th22 cells represent a distinct human T cell subset involved in epidermal immunity and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Eyerich, Stefanie; Eyerich, Kilian; Pennino, Davide; Carbone, Teresa; Nasorri, Francesca; Pallotta, Sabatino; Cianfarani, Francesca; Odorisio, Teresa; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Behrendt, Heidrun; Durham, Stephen R; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B; Cavani, Andrea

    2009-12-01

    Th subsets are defined according to their production of lineage-indicating cytokines and functions. In this study, we have identified a subset of human Th cells that infiltrates the epidermis in individuals with inflammatory skin disorders and is characterized by the secretion of IL-22 and TNF-alpha, but not IFN-gamma, IL-4, or IL-17. In analogy to the Th17 subset, cells with this cytokine profile have been named the Th22 subset. Th22 clones derived from patients with psoriasis were stable in culture and exhibited a transcriptome profile clearly separate from those of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells; it included genes encoding proteins involved in tissue remodeling, such as FGFs, and chemokines involved in angiogenesis and fibrosis. Primary human keratinocytes exposed to Th22 supernatants expressed a transcriptome response profile that included genes involved in innate immune pathways and the induction and modulation of adaptive immunity. These proinflammatory Th22 responses were synergistically dependent on IL-22 and TNF-alpha. Furthermore, Th22 supernatants enhanced wound healing in an in vitro injury model, which was exclusively dependent on IL-22. In conclusion, the human Th22 subset may represent a separate T cell subset with a distinct identity with respect to gene expression and function, present within the epidermal layer in inflammatory skin diseases. Future strategies directed against the Th22 subset may be of value in chronic inflammatory skin disorders.

  20. Antigen heterogeneity of human B and T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rabellino, E M; Grey, H M; LaForge, S; Pirofsky, B; Kashiwagi, N; Malley, A

    1976-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys were immunized with normal human lymphoid cells, cultured lymphoid cells, and chronic leukemic lymphocytes. Antisera were analyzed by cytotoxicity and immunofluorescence techniques to study the antigenic characteristics of human lymphocytes. In an attempt to obtain a reagent specifically reactive with T (thymus-derived) lymphocytes, an antispleen antiserum was absorbed with cellf from five B- (bone marrow-derived) cell lines. After absorption, the antiserum killed 60-75% of peripheral blood lymphocytes and 40-50% of tonsil cells, so that there was a relationship between the percentage of killed cells and the proportion of T lymphocytes. However, when cells after cytotoxic treatment were assayed for rosette formation with sheep erythrocytes (a T-cell marker) 5-20% of viable rosette-forming lymphocytes were found. Therefore, this antiserum was cytotoxic for only 75-90% of T cells. From studies performed with antisera prepared against spleen and B-cell lines, we conclude that lymphoblastoid cells are antigenically different and deficient in comparison to normal B lymphocytes. In addition, cultured B-cell lines appear to be antigenically heterogenous, as shown by the cytotoxic activity remaining in antispleen and anti-B-cell lines sera after absorption with various numbers and types of lymphoid cell lines. After absorption with normal lymphocytes, an antiserum produced against chronic lymphatic leukemia cells had specific activity associated with 12 chronic lymphatic leukemia cells tested. Absorption of the same antiserum with leukemic cells from two patients showed that a certain degree of antigenic heterogeneity also exists among chronic leukemic lymphocytes. PMID:815274

  1. Bioluminescent assay for human lymphocyte blast transformation.

    PubMed

    Bulanova, E G; Budagyan, V M; Romanova, N A; Brovko LYu; Ugarova, N N

    1995-05-01

    One of the basic tests of in vitro evaluation of immune cell functional activity is a proliferative response of lymphocytes on the action of external stimuli such as mitogenic lectines, antigens, etc. We compared two methods used to assess the lymphocyte functional status. (1) [3H]thymidine incorporation and (2) bioluminescence for determination of intracellular ATP in blast cells. Comparison has been done for healthy donors and patients with proven low immunological status. The proposed bioluminescent method for evaluation of the proliferative response was shown to be sensitive enough for diagnostic purposes. This method allows one to process a large number of samples at the same time and correlates highly with the radionuclide test use hazardous radioactive materials.

  2. CD161 Expression Defines a Th1/Th17 Polyfunctional Subset of Resident Memory T Lymphocytes in Bronchoalveolar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Yolanda; Herrera, María Teresa; Juárez, Esmeralda; Salazar-Lezama, Miguel Angel; Bobadilla, Karen; Torres, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar resident memory T cells (TRM) comprise a currently uncharacterized mixture of cell subpopulations. The CD3+CD161+ T cell subpopulation resides in the liver, intestine and skin, but it has the capacity for tissue migration; however, the presence of resident CD3+CD161+ T cells in the bronchoalveolar space under normal conditions has not been reported. Bronchoalveolar cells (BACs) from healthy volunteers were evaluated and found that 8.6% (range 2.5%-21%) of these cells were CD3+ T lymphocytes. Within the CD3+ population, 4.6% of the cells (2.1–11.3) expressed CD161 on the cell surface, and 74.2% of the CD161+CD3+ T cells expressed CD45RO. The number of CD3+CD161+ T cells was significantly lower in the bronchoalveolar space than in the blood (4.6% of BACs vs 8.4% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs); P<0.05). We also found that 2.17% of CD4+ T lymphocytes and 1.52% of CD8+ T lymphocytes expressed CD161. Twenty-two percent of the alveolar CD3+CD161+ T lymphocytes produced cytokines upon stimulation by PMA plus ionomycin, and significantly more interferon gamma (IFN-γ) was produced compared with other cytokines (P = 0.05). Most alveolar CD3+CD161+ T cells produced interleukin-17 (IL-17) and IFN-γ simultaneously, and the percentage of these cells was significantly higher than the percentage of CD3+CD161− T cells. Moreover, the percentage of alveolar CD3+CD161+ T lymphocytes that produced IFN-γ/IL-17 was significantly higher than those in the peripheral blood (p<0.05). In conclusion, Th1/Th17-CD3+CD161+ TRM could contribute to compartment-specific immune responses in the lung. PMID:25906076

  3. Carbon nanotubes enhance cytotoxicity mediated by human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhao; Liu, Zhe; Meng, Jie; Meng, Jie; Duan, Jinhong; Xie, Sishen; Lu, Xin; Zhu, Zhaohui; Wang, Chen; Chen, Shuchang; Xu, Haiyan; Yang, Xian-Da

    2011-01-01

    With the expansion of the potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biomedical fields, the toxicity and biocompatibility of CNT have become issues of growing concern. Since the immune system often mediates tissue damage during pathogenesis, it is important to explore whether CNT can trigger cytotoxicity through affecting the immune functions. In the current study, we evaluated the influence of CNT on the cytotoxicity mediated by human lymphocytes in vitro. The results showed that while CNT at low concentrations (0.001 to 0.1 µg/ml) did not cause obvious cell death or apoptosis directly, it enhanced lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity against multiple human cell lines. In addition, CNT increased the secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α by the lymphocytes. CNT also upregulated the NF-κB expression in lymphocytes, and the blockage of the NF-κB pathway reduced the lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity triggered by CNT. These results suggest that CNT at lower concentrations may prospectively initiate an indirect cytotoxicity through affecting the function of lymphocytes.

  4. Interaction of nanosilver particles with human lymphocyte cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhornik, Alena; Baranova, Ludmila; Volotovski, Igor; Chizhik, Sergey; Drozd, Elizaveta; Sudas, Margarita; Buu Ngo, Quoc; Chau Nguyen, Hoai; Huynh, Thi Ha; Hien Dao, Trong

    2015-01-01

    The damaging effects of nanoparticles were hypothesized to be the oxidative stress caused by the formation of reactive oxygen species and initiation of inflammatory reactions. In this context a study on the effects of nanosilver particles on the formation of reactive oxygen species in human lymphocyte culture was carried out. The obtained results showed that fluorescence intensity considerably increased after cells had interacted with nanosilver particles of varying concentrations, indicating the formation of reactive oxygen species and their accumulation in lymphocyte cells. Morphological study of the lymphocyte cells under the effects of nanosilver particles showed that the change in morphology depends on the concentration and size of nanosilver particles: for a size ≤20 nm the lymphocyte cell significantly shrank with pronounced differences in the morphological structure of the cell membrane, but for a size ≥200 nm no change was observed.

  5. Diverse effects of three furocoumarins on human lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Arslan, P.; Cantini, M.; Cossarizza, A.; Franceschi, C.; Dall'acqua, F.

    1989-01-01

    The biological effects of three furocoumarins on the proliferation of human normal peripheral blood lymphocytes have been investigated. Mitogen-stimulated human lymphocytes were assayed in vitro by measuring /sup 3/H-thymidine (/sup 3/H-TdR) incorporation in the presence and in the absence of 15-30 /mu/M 3-carbethoxypsoralen (3-CPs), trimethylangelicin (TMA) and psoralen (PSR) with and without UV-A irradiation. The three furocoumarins differ in their ability to form mono- and bi-functional adducts with DNA pyrimidine furocoumarin doses and short times of UV-A irradiation used in the present study, 3-CPs did not affect /sup 3/H-TdR incorporation in PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes. TMA strongly inhibited /sup 3/H-TdR incorporation, while, unexpectedly, PSR increased /sup 3/H-TdR incorporation in the absence of irradiation, likely acting, under these experimental conditions, as a co-mitogen.

  6. Effect of controlled ozone exposure on human lymphocyte function

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.L.; Smialowicz, R.; Harder, S.; Ketcham, B.; House, D.

    1981-04-01

    The effects of ozone (O/sub 3/) on cell-mediated immunity were studied in 16 human subjects exposed to 1176 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ O/sub 3/ (0.6 ppM) for 2 h in an environmentally controlled exposure chamber. Venous blood samples were taken before and immediately after controlled air and O/sub 3/ exposures, as well as at 72 h, 2 and 4 weeks, and at one random time at least 1 month after treatment. The relative frequency of T lymphocytes in blood and the in vitro blastogenic response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), pokeweed mitogen (PWM), and Candida albicans were determined. During the course of the experiment, no statistically significant changes were observed in the number of T lymphocytes that form spontaneous rosettes with sheep erythrocytes. The response of T lymphocytes to PHA was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in samples taken at 2 and 4 weeks, following O/sub 3/ exposure. Normal response to PHA was observed at 2 months post-O/sub 3/ exposure. No statistically significant changes in lymphocyte responses to Con A, PWM, or Candida were seen. These results show that one 2 h exposure of humans to 0.6 ppM O/sub 3/ may lead to a transient suppression of the PHA-stimulated blastogenic transformation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. The data indicate that the blastogenic response to PHA of human lymphocytes is exquisitely sensitive to O/sub 3/ exposure and could serve as a bioassay for evaluating subtle changes in cellular immunity induced by O/sub 3/ and possibly other pollutants.

  7. Transcriptional Classification and Functional Characterization of Human Airway Macrophage and Dendritic Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vineet I; Booth, J Leland; Duggan, Elizabeth S; Cate, Steven; White, Vicky L; Hutchings, David; Kovats, Susan; Burian, Dennis M; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Metcalf, Jordan P

    2017-02-01

    The respiratory system is a complex network of many cell types, including subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells that work together to maintain steady-state respiration. Owing to limitations in acquiring cells from healthy human lung, these subsets remain poorly characterized transcriptionally and phenotypically. We set out to systematically identify these subsets in human airways by developing a schema of isolating large numbers of cells by whole-lung bronchoalveolar lavage. Six subsets of phagocytic APC (HLA-DR(+)) were consistently observed. Aside from alveolar macrophages, subsets of Langerin(+), BDCA1(-)CD14(+), BDCA1(+)CD14(+), BDCA1(+)CD14(-), and BDCA1(-)CD14(-) cells were identified. These subsets varied in their ability to internalize Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus anthracis particles. All subsets were more efficient at internalizing S. aureus and B. anthracis compared with E. coli Alveolar macrophages and CD14(+) cells were overall more efficient at particle internalization compared with the four other populations. Subsets were further separated into two groups based on their inherent capacities to upregulate surface CD83, CD86, and CCR7 expression levels. Whole-genome transcriptional profiling revealed a clade of "true dendritic cells" consisting of Langerin(+), BDCA1(+)CD14(+), and BDCA1(+)CD14(-) cells. The dendritic cell clade was distinct from a macrophage/monocyte clade, as supported by higher mRNA expression levels of several dendritic cell-associated genes, including CD1, FLT3, CX3CR1, and CCR6 Each clade, and each member of both clades, was discerned by specific upregulated genes, which can serve as markers for future studies in healthy and diseased states.

  8. Early deficit of lymphocytes in Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome: possible role of WASP in human lymphocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    PARK, J Y; KOB, M; PRODEUS, A P; ROSEN, F S; SHCHERBINA, A; REMOLD-O'DONNELL, E

    2004-01-01

    Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked platelet/immunodeficiency disease. The affected gene encodes WASP, a multidomain protein that regulates cytoskeletal assembly in blood cells. Patients have recurring infections, and their lymphocytes exhibit deficient proliferative responses in vitro. We report an evaluation of peripheral blood lymphocytes of 27 WAS patients, aged one month to 55 years. Whereas NK cells were normal, a significant deficit of T and B lymphocytes was observed. The number of lymphocytes was already decreased in infant patients, suggesting deficient output. Both CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes were affected; the decrease was most pronounced for naïve T cells. Naïve CD4 lymphocytes of patients showed normal expression of Bcl-2, and Ki-67, and normal survival in vitro, suggesting that their in vivo survival and proliferation are normal. The collective data suggest that the patients’ lymphocyte deficit results from deficient output, likely due to abnormal lymphocyte maturation in the thymus and bone marrow. We propose that WASP plays an important role not only in the function of mature T lymphocytes, but also in the maturation of human T and B lymphocytes and that impaired lymphocyte maturation is central to the aetiology of WAS immunodeficiency. PMID:15030520

  9. Altered Cytokine Production By Specific Human Peripheral Blood Cell Subsets Immediately Following Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Cubbage, Michael L.; Sams, Clarence F.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we have attempted to combine standard immunological assays with the cellular resolving power of the flow cytometer to positively identify the specific cell types involved in spaceflight-induced immune alterations. We have obtained whole blood samples from 27 astronauts collected at three timepoints (L-10, R+0 and R+3) surrounding four recent space shuttle missions. The duration of these missions ranged from 10 to 18 days. Assays performed included serum/urine cortisol, comprehensive subset phenotyping, assessment of cellular activation markers and intracellular cytokine production following mitogenic stimulation. Absolute levels of peripheral granulocytes were significantly elevated following spaceflight, but the levels of circulating lymphocytes and monocytes were unchanged. Lymphocyte subset analysis demonstrated trends towards a decreased percentage of T cells and an increased percentage of B cells. Nearly all of the astronauts exhibited an increased CD4:CD8 ratio, which was dramatic in some individuals. Assessment of memory (CD45RA+) vs. naive (CD45RO+) CD4+ T cell subsets was more ambiguous, with subjects tending to group more as a flight crew. All subjects from one mission demonstrated an increased CD45RA:CD45RO ratio, while all subjects from another Mission demonstrated a decreased ratio. While no significant trend was seen in the monocyte population as defined by scatter, a decreased percentage of the CD14+ CD16+ monocyte subset was seen following spaceflight in all subjects tested. In general, most of the cellular changes described above which were assessed at R+O and compared to L-10 trended to pre-flight levels by R+3. Although no significant differences were seen in the expression of the cellular activation markers CD69 and CD25 following exposure to microgravity, significant alterations were seen in cytokine production in response to mitogenic activation for specific subsets. T cell (CD3+) production of IL-2 was significantly decreased

  10. Distribution and compartmentalization of human circulating and tissue-resident memory T cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Sathaliyawala, Taheri; Kubota, Masaru; Yudanin, Naomi; Turner, Damian; Camp, Philip; Thome, Joseph J. C.; Bickham, Kara L.; Lerner, Harvey; Goldstein, Michael; Sykes, Megan; Kato, Tomoaki; Farber, Donna L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Knowledge of human T cells derives chiefly from studies of peripheral blood, whereas their distribution and function in tissues remains largely unknown. Here, we present a unique analysis of human T cells in lymphoid and mucosal tissues obtained from individual organ donors, revealing tissue-intrinsic compartmentalization of naive, effector and memory subsets conserved between diverse individuals. Effector-memory CD4+ T cells producing IL-2 predominated in mucosal tissues and accumulated as central-memory subsets in lymphoid tissue, whereas CD8+ T cells were maintained as naïve subsets in lymphoid tissues and IFN-γ-producing effector-memory CD8+ T cells in mucosal sites. The T cell activation marker, CD69, was constitutively expressed by memory T cells in all tissues, distinguishing them from circulating subsets, with mucosal memory T cells exhibiting additional distinct phenotypic and functional properties. Our results provide an assessment of human T cell compartmentalization as a new baseline for understanding human adaptive immunity. PMID:23260195

  11. Specific anti-influenza virus antibody production in vitro by lymphocytes from a subset of patients with hypogammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed Central

    Yarchoan, R; Schneider, H S; Wray, B B; Nelson, D L

    1983-01-01

    Specific anti-influenza virus antibody production in vitro was studied in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 17 patients with hypogammaglobulinemia. Cells obtained from 6 of 12 patients with common variable hypogammaglobulinemia produced anti-influenza virus antibody, predominantly of the IgM isotype, when cultured in vitro with type A influenza virus. No antibody was produced in vitro, however, by cells from either of two patients with Bruton's type X-linked hypogammaglobulinemia or by cells from any of three patients with X-linked hypogammaglobulinemia and isolated growth hormone deficiency. These studies demonstrate that peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a subset of patients with common variable hypogammaglobulinemia retain the potential to produce specific antibody in response to antigenic stimulation. PMID:6863541

  12. Expression of IL-4 receptor on human T and B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zola, H; Flego, L; Weedon, H

    1993-08-01

    The expression of the interleukin-4 receptor on human blood and tonsil lymphocytes has been studied using a monoclonal antibody and high-sensitivity immunofluorescence flow cytometry. While no receptor expression could be detected on circulating or tonsil T cells, a subset of B cells was shown to express the receptor. The IL-4R-positive B cells in tonsil had a phenotype suggesting that they included both germinal centre B cells and B cells outside the germinal centre. The subset of B cells in the blood that expressed the receptor included CD23-positive B cells. Activation of tonsil B cells using anti-IgM, IL-4, IL-2, or combinations of these reagents led to increases in IL-4R expression, but these changes were small compared to changes in the expression of IL-2R p55 (CD25), a known marker of activation. Similarly, activation of T cells led to low-level expression of IL-4R, with IL-4 itself up-regulating IL-4R, especially in CD4 cells. The majority of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia samples were positive for IL-4R expression, whilst most other leukemic samples were negative.

  13. Age-dependent effects of in vitro radiofrequency exposure (mobile phone) on CD95+ T helper human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Capri, Miriam; Salvioli, Stefano; Altilia, Serena; Sevini, Federica; Remondini, Daniel; Mesirca, Pietro; Bersani, Ferdinando; Monti, Daniela; Franceschi, Claudio

    2006-05-01

    Recent studies on "nonthermal" effects of mobile phone radiofrequency (RF) suggest that RF can interact with cellular functions and molecular pathways. To study the possible RF effects on human lymphocyte activation, we analyzed CD25, CD95, CD28 molecules in unstimulated and stimulated CD4+ e CD8+ T cells in vitro. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from young and elderly donors were exposed or sham-exposed to RF (1,800 MHz, Specific Absorption Rate 2 W/kg) with or without mitogenic stimulation. No significant changes in the percentage of these cell subsets were found between exposed and sham-exposed lymphocytes in both young and elderly donors. Nevertheless, after RF exposure we observed a slight, but significant, downregulation of CD95 expression in stimulated CD4+ T lymphocytes from elderly, but not from young donors. This age-related result is noteworthy given the importance of a such molecule in regulation of the immune response.

  14. Type I IFN-mediated synergistic activation of mouse and human DC subsets by TLR agonists.

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Martin; Bakdash, Ghaith; Dolen, Yusuf; Sköld, Annette E; van Hout-Kuijer, Maaike A; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Figdor, Carl G

    2015-10-01

    Novel approaches of dendritic cell (DC) based cancer immunotherapy aim at harnessing the unique attributes of different DC subsets. Classical monocyte-derived DC vaccines are currently being replaced by either applying primary DCs or specifically targeting antigens and adjuvants to these subsets in vivo. Appropriate DC activation in both strategies is essential for optimal effect. For this purpose TLR agonists are favorable adjuvant choices, with TLR7 triggering being essential for inducing strong Th1 responses. However, mouse CD8α(+) DCs, considered to be the major cross-presenting subset, lack TLR7 expression. Interestingly, this DC subset can respond to TLR7 ligand upon concurrent TLR3 triggering. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying this synergy remains obscure. We now show that TLR3 ligation results in the production of IFN-α, which rapidly induces the expression of TLR7, resulting in synergistic activation. Moreover, we demonstrate that this mechanism conversely holds for plasmacytoid DCs that respond to TLR3 ligation when TLR7 pathway is mobilized. We further demonstrate that this mechanism of sharpening DC senses is also conserved in human BDCA1(+) DCs and plasmacytoid DCs. These findings have important implications for future clinical trials as it suggests that combinations of TLR ligands should be applied irrespective of initial TLR expression profiles on natural DC subsets for optimal stimulation.

  15. Human lymphocyte culture and chromosome analysis.

    PubMed

    Benn, Peter; Delach, Judith

    2008-09-01

    INTRODUCTIONPhytohaemagglutinin (PHA), a lectin derived from the red kidney bean, is a powerful mitogen for human T-cells. When PHA is added in vitro to whole blood, mitotic cells can be found after 48 h, with a peak mitotic index at ~64-72 h. The convenience of peripheral blood as a source of human cells, the abundance of mitotic cells, and the simplicity of the cell culture technique make this the most convenient approach to study human chromosomes for both clinical and research purposes. This method of chromosome preparation provides metaphase cells that can be stained by a variety of methods or used for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The most common chromosome staining techniques involve exposing fixed preparations to a protease (e.g., trypsin), followed by an appropriate semipermanent stain. The characteristic banding patterns obtained reflect both structural and functional differences in different parts of the chromosomes. The staining procedure described here provides a Giemsa banding pattern using trypsin with Wright stain (i.e., GTW banding). This procedure is reliable and, with only minor modifications, suitable for preparing chromosomes from a variety of human tissues.

  16. Genetic Causes of Human NK Cell Deficiency and Their Effect on NK Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Mace, Emily M; Orange, Jordan S

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cells play critical roles in human host defense, particularly the control of viral infection and malignancy, and patients with congenital immunodeficiency affecting NK cell function or number can suffer from severe illness. The importance of NK cell function is particularly underscored in patients with primary immunodeficiency in which NK cells are the primary or sole affected population (NK cell deficiency, NKD). While NKD may lead to the absence of NK cells, we are also gaining an increasing appreciation of the effect that NKD may have on the generation of specific NK cell subsets. In turn, this leads to improved insights into the requirements for human NK cell subset generation, as well as their importance in immune homeostasis. The presence of inherently abnormally developed or functionally impaired NK cells, in particular, appears to be problematic in the way of interfering with normal human host defense and may be more impactful than low numbers of NK cells alone. Here, we review the known genetic causes of NKD and the insight that is derived by these into the requirements for human subset generation and, by extension, for NK cell-mediated immunity.

  17. Genetic Causes of Human NK Cell Deficiency and Their Effect on NK Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Emily M.; Orange, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cells play critical roles in human host defense, particularly the control of viral infection and malignancy, and patients with congenital immunodeficiency affecting NK cell function or number can suffer from severe illness. The importance of NK cell function is particularly underscored in patients with primary immunodeficiency in which NK cells are the primary or sole affected population (NK cell deficiency, NKD). While NKD may lead to the absence of NK cells, we are also gaining an increasing appreciation of the effect that NKD may have on the generation of specific NK cell subsets. In turn, this leads to improved insights into the requirements for human NK cell subset generation, as well as their importance in immune homeostasis. The presence of inherently abnormally developed or functionally impaired NK cells, in particular, appears to be problematic in the way of interfering with normal human host defense and may be more impactful than low numbers of NK cells alone. Here, we review the known genetic causes of NKD and the insight that is derived by these into the requirements for human subset generation and, by extension, for NK cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27994588

  18. Human NK Cell Subsets in Pregnancy and Disease: Toward a New Biological Complexity.

    PubMed

    Cristiani, Costanza Maria; Palella, Eleonora; Sottile, Rosa; Tallerico, Rossana; Garofalo, Cinzia; Carbone, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    In humans, NK cells are mainly identified by the surface expression levels of CD56 and CD16, which differentiate between five functionally different NK cell subsets. However, nowadays NK cells are considered as a more heterogeneous population formed by various subsets differing in function, surface phenotype, and anatomic localization. In human CMV- and hantaviruses-infected subjects, an increased frequency of a NKG2A(-)CD57(+)NKG2C(+) NK cell subset has been observed, while the phenotype of the NK cell subpopulation associated with cancer may vary according to the specific kind of tumor and its anatomical location. The healthy human lymph nodes contain mainly the CD56(bright) NK cell subset while in melanoma metastatic lymph nodes the CD56(dim)CD57(+)KIR(+)CCR7(+) NK cell subpopulation prevails. The five NK cell subpopulations are found in breast cancer patients, where they differ for expression pattern of chemokine receptors, maturation stage, functional capabilities. In pregnancy, uterine NK cells show a prevalence of the CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cell compartment, whose activity is influenced by KIRs repertoire. This NK cell subset's super specialization could be explained by (i) the expansion of single mature CD56(dim) clones, (ii) the recruitment and maturation of CD56(bright) NK cells through specific stimuli, and (iii) the in situ development of tumor-resident NK cells from tissue-resident CD56(bright) NK cells independently of the circulating NK cell compartment. This new and unexpected biological feature of the NK cell compartment could be an important source of new biomarkers to improve patients' diagnosis.

  19. Diverging biological roles among human monocyte subsets in the context of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Balboa, Luciana; Barrios-Payan, Jorge; González-Domínguez, Erika; Lastrucci, Claire; Lugo-Villarino, Geanncarlo; Mata-Espinoza, Dulce; Schierloh, Pablo; Kviatcovsky, Denise; Neyrolles, Olivier; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Sánchez-Torres, Carmen; Sasiain, María del Carmen; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio

    2015-08-01

    Circulating monocytes (Mo) play an essential role in the host immune response to chronic infections. We previously demonstrated that CD16(pos) Mo were expanded in TB (tuberculosis) patients, correlated with disease severity and were refractory to dendritic cell differentiation. In the present study, we investigated whether human Mo subsets (CD16(neg) and CD16(pos)) differed in their ability to influence the early inflammatory response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We first evaluated the capacity of the Mo subsets to migrate and engage a microbicidal response in vitro. Accordingly, CD16(neg) Mo were more prone to migrate in response to different mycobacteria-derived gradients, were more resistant to M. tuberculosis intracellular growth and produced higher reactive oxygen species than their CD16(pos) counterpart. To assess further the functional dichotomy among the human Mo subsets, we carried out an in vivo analysis by adapting a hybrid mouse model (SCID/Beige, where SCID is severe combined immunodeficient) to transfer each Mo subset, track their migratory fate during M. tuberculosis infection, and determine their impact on the host immune response. In M. tuberculosis-infected mice, the adoptively transferred CD16(neg) Mo displayed a higher lung migration index, induced a stronger pulmonary infiltration of murine leucocytes expressing pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and significantly decreased the bacterial burden, in comparison with CD16(pos) Mo. Collectively, our results indicate that human Mo subsets display divergent biological roles in the context of M. tuberculosis infection, a scenario in which CD16(neg) Mo may contribute to the anti-mycobacterial immune response, whereas CD16(pos) Mo might promote microbial resilience, shedding light on a key aspect of the physiopathology of TB disease.

  20. IgD positive L&H cells identify a unique subset of nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Sonam; Fountaine, Thomas; Raffeld, Mark; Jaffe, Elaine S; Pittaluga, Stefania

    2006-05-01

    Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) is a rare B-cell lymphoma considered to be of germinal center (GC) derivation. Studies on immunoglobulin expression have been few, and post-switch immunoglobulin (IgG) has been identified in the majority of cases examined thus far. We reviewed 180 cases of NLPHL and observed the unexpected expression of IgD in 27% of cases. IgD is usually coexpressed with IgM in naive B cells but can also be seen as IgD-only in centroblasts (CD38-positive) or memory B cells (CD27-positive). We asked whether IgD-positive NLPHL differed from cases of NLPHL negative for IgD. Clinically, the IgD-positive cases presented at a younger median age (21 vs. 44 years) and had a striking male predominance (male-to-female ratio, 23:1 vs. 1.5:1). Cervical lymph nodes were more frequently involved (56% vs. 18.2%). L&H cells were localized in a predominantly extrafollicular distribution in the majority of IgD-positive cases (69%). The IgD-positive cases did not coexpress IgM or CD27 (a marker associated with memory B cells), and nearly all (93%) were weakly positive for CD38, supporting a GC derivation. The expression of Bcl-6, BOB.1, Oct2, and SWAP-70 was similar in the two groups. However, PU.1 expression was seen in 60% of the IgD-positive cases in contrast to 86% of the IgD-negative cases. The absence of PU.1 staining correlated with more L&H cells in an extrafollicular distribution, weakening the use of this marker in the differential diagnosis with T-cell rich/histiocyte rich B-cell lymphomas. To study IgD expression in "de-novo" T-cell rich/histiocyte rich B-cell lymphomas, we analyzed 20 cases and all but one were negative. In conclusion, cases of IgD-positive NLPHL do not differ from IgD-negative cases regarding cellular derivation and most other immunophenotypic characteristics. However, IgD-positive NLPHL exhibits distinctive clinical features, and more often involves the interfollicular region in a background relatively rich in T

  1. Cellular and humoral immune reactions in chronic active liver disease. II. Lymphocyte subsets and viral antigens in liver biopsies of patients with acute and chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, H F; Houthoff, H J; Huitema, S; Wolters, G; Poppema, S; Gips, C H

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics and distribution of the inflammatory infiltrate in liver biopsies of 25 patients with hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection were studied in relation to the distribution and expression of HBV antigens. Mononuclear subsets were characterized with monoclonal (OKT, OKM, Leu) antibodies to surface antigens. For the demonstration of viral antigens directly conjugated antibodies to surface (HBsAg), core (HBcAg) and 'e' (HBeAg) antigen were used. For the study of mutual relations all methods were performed on serial cut tissue sections. In chronic active hepatitis B (CAH-B, n = 12) OKT8+ lymphocytes of T cell origin were the only cell type present in areas with liver cell degeneration and T cell cytotoxicity appears to be the only immune mechanism. In chronic persistent hepatitis B (CPH-B, n = 7) the only conspicuous feature was the presence of many Leu 3+ lymphocytes of the helper/inducer population in the portal tracts. In acute hepatitis B (AHB, n = 6) OKT8+ cells of non-T origin (OKT1-,3-) and Leu 7+ cells of presumed natural killer (NK) potential predominated in the areas with liver cell necrosis, and non-T cell cytotoxicity appears to be the predominant immune mechanism. In none of these disease entities a positive spatial relation could be established between the cytotoxic cells and the demonstrable expression of HBV antigens in hepatocytes. It is concluded that differences in immunological reaction pattern may explain the different course in the three forms of HBV infection studied. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6713726

  2. High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity Identifies a Subset of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells with Vascular Regenerative Potential.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Stephen E; Kuljanin, Miljan; Cooper, Tyler T; Putman, David M; Lajoie, Gilles A; Hess, David A

    2017-03-15

    During culture expansion, multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) differentially express aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), an intracellular detoxification enzyme that protects long-lived cells against oxidative stress. Thus, MSC selection based on ALDH-activity may be used to reduce heterogeneity and distinguish MSC subsets with improved regenerative potency. After expansion of human bone marrow-derived MSCs, cell progeny was purified based on low versus high ALDH-activity (ALDH(hi) ) by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and each subset was compared for multipotent stromal and provascular regenerative functions. Both ALDH(l) ° and ALDH(hi) MSC subsets demonstrated similar expression of stromal cell (>95% CD73(+) , CD90(+) , CD105(+) ) and pericyte (>95% CD146(+) ) surface markers and showed multipotent differentiation into bone, cartilage, and adipose cells in vitro. Conditioned media (CDM) generated by ALDH(hi) MSCs demonstrated a potent proliferative and prosurvival effect on human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) under serum-free conditions and augmented HMVEC tube-forming capacity in growth factor-reduced matrices. After subcutaneous transplantation within directed in vivo angiogenesis assay implants into immunodeficient mice, ALDH(hi) MSC or CDM produced by ALDH(hi) MSC significantly augmented murine vascular cell recruitment and perfused vessel infiltration compared with ALDH(l) ° MSC. Although both subsets demonstrated strikingly similar mRNA expression patterns, quantitative proteomic analyses performed on subset-specific CDM revealed the ALDH(hi) MSC subset uniquely secreted multiple proangiogenic cytokines (vascular endothelial growth factor beta, platelet derived growth factor alpha, and angiogenin) and actively produced multiple factors with chemoattractant (transforming growth factor-β, C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 1, 2, and 3 (GRO), C-C motif chemokine ligand 5 (RANTES), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), interleukin [IL]-6, IL-8

  3. Dendritic Cells Display Subset and Tissue-Specific Maturation Dynamics over Human Life.

    PubMed

    Granot, Tomer; Senda, Takashi; Carpenter, Dustin J; Matsuoka, Nobuhide; Weiner, Joshua; Gordon, Claire L; Miron, Michelle; Kumar, Brahma V; Griesemer, Adam; Ho, Siu-Hong; Lerner, Harvey; Thome, Joseph J C; Connors, Thomas; Reizis, Boris; Farber, Donna L

    2017-03-21

    Maturation and migration to lymph nodes (LNs) constitutes a central paradigm in conventional dendritic cell (cDC) biology but remains poorly defined in humans. Using our organ donor tissue resource, we analyzed cDC subset distribution, maturation, and migration in mucosal tissues (lungs, intestines), associated lymph nodes (LNs), and other lymphoid sites from 78 individuals ranging from less than 1 year to 93 years of age. The distribution of cDC1 (CD141(hi)CD13(hi)) and cDC2 (Sirp-α(+)CD1c(+)) subsets was a function of tissue site and was conserved between donors. We identified cDC2 as the major mature (HLA-DR(hi)) subset in LNs with the highest frequency in lung-draining LNs. Mature cDC2 in mucosal-draining LNs expressed tissue-specific markers derived from the paired mucosal site, reflecting their tissue-migratory origin. These distribution and maturation patterns were largely maintained throughout life, with site-specific variations. Our findings provide evidence for localized DC tissue surveillance and reveal a lifelong division of labor between DC subsets, with cDC2 functioning as guardians of the mucosa.

  4. Mass Cytometry of the Human Mucosal Immune System Identifies Tissue- and Disease-Associated Immune Subsets.

    PubMed

    van Unen, Vincent; Li, Na; Molendijk, Ilse; Temurhan, Mine; Höllt, Thomas; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Verspaget, Hein W; Mearin, M Luisa; Mulder, Chris J; van Bergen, Jeroen; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; Koning, Frits

    2016-05-17

    Inflammatory intestinal diseases are characterized by abnormal immune responses and affect distinct locations of the gastrointestinal tract. Although the role of several immune subsets in driving intestinal pathology has been studied, a system-wide approach that simultaneously interrogates all major lineages on a single-cell basis is lacking. We used high-dimensional mass cytometry to generate a system-wide view of the human mucosal immune system in health and disease. We distinguished 142 immune subsets and through computational applications found distinct immune subsets in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and intestinal biopsies that distinguished patients from controls. In addition, mucosal lymphoid malignancies were readily detected as well as precursors from which these likely derived. These findings indicate that an integrated high-dimensional analysis of the entire immune system can identify immune subsets associated with the pathogenesis of complex intestinal disorders. This might have implications for diagnostic procedures, immune-monitoring, and treatment of intestinal diseases and mucosal malignancies.

  5. Flow cytometric analysis of age-related changes in intestine intraepithelial lymphocyte subsets and their functional preservation after feeding mice on spirulina.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Osamu; Katayanagi, Yuki; Ishii, Kyoko; Kato, Toshimitsu

    2009-10-01

    We investigated age-related changes in intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) subsets in mice by flow cytometric analysis and their functional preservation as affected by feeding Spirulina, a cyanobacterium that is known to possess various therapeutic effects, including immune modulation activity. The number of cells possessing the leukocyte-common antigen CD45(+) cells in mice (43 weeks old) of the aged group, used as a representative marker for IELs, was significantly lower than that of adult mice (5 weeks old). Either the proportion or the number of CD45(+)CD8(+) cells of the aged mice was significantly lower than that of adult mice, corresponding to previous reports. Proportions and numbers of CD4(+)CD8(+) cells in aged mice, on the other hand, were higher than those in adult mice. Increased or decreased levels of the cell surface antigens observed in the aged mice tended to be restored in aged mice fed Spirulina (aged-SP group), which ingested a hot water extract of Spirulina (SpHW). In fact, the proportions of CD45(+)CD8(+) cells and CD45(+)TCRgammadelta(+) cells in the aged-SP group significantly increased in comparison to the control aged group, which ingested ordinary chow and water ad libitum. These results suggest that ingestion of SpHW in the aged-SP group may contribute to the functional preservation of the intestinal epithelium as a first line of mucosal barrier against infectious agents through retaining the number of certain IELs. Changes in the number of other IEL subsets and blood cells are also discussed.

  6. In vitro effect of fenthion on human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, M.V.U. ); Rao, M.S. )

    1991-08-01

    Fenthion is an organophosphorus insecticide which is extensively used in control of leaf hoppers, cutworms, mites on vegetable crops. It has been reported that organophosphorus pesticides cause a significant increase in sister chromatid exchanges in mammalian cell lines. A significant increase of chromosomal aberrations has been reported in rural population exposed to pesticides. Organosphosphorus pesticides malathion, diazinon, dimethoate, phosdrin and dursban induced sister chromatid exchanges in human lymphoid cells. Exchange type of aberration has been reported in fluoriculturist who were exposed to organophosphorus, organochlorine pesticides. In the present investigation an attempt has been made to evaluate the cytogenetic effect of fenthion in human lymphocyte cultures in vitro.

  7. A Progenitor Cell Expressing Transcription Factor RORγt Generates All Human Innate Lymphoid Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Scoville, Steven D; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Zhang, Michael H; Chen, Li; Zhang, Xiaoli; Keller, Karen A; Hughes, Tiffany; Chen, Luxi; Cheng, Stephanie; Bergin, Stephen M; Mao, Hsiaoyin C; McClory, Susan; Yu, Jianhua; Carson, William E; Caligiuri, Michael A; Freud, Aharon G

    2016-05-17

    The current model of murine innate lymphoid cell (ILC) development holds that mouse ILCs are derived downstream of the common lymphoid progenitor through lineage-restricted progenitors. However, corresponding lineage-restricted progenitors in humans have yet to be discovered. Here we identified a progenitor population in human secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs) that expressed the transcription factor RORγt and was unique in its ability to generate all known ILC subsets, including natural killer (NK) cells, but not other leukocyte populations. In contrast to murine fate-mapping data, which indicate that only ILC3s express Rorγt, these human progenitor cells as well as human peripheral blood NK cells and all mature ILC populations expressed RORγt. Thus, all human ILCs can be generated through an RORγt(+) developmental pathway from a common progenitor in SLTs. These findings help establish the developmental signals and pathways involved in human ILC development.

  8. Human NK Cell Subsets in Pregnancy and Disease: Toward a New Biological Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Cristiani, Costanza Maria; Palella, Eleonora; Sottile, Rosa; Tallerico, Rossana; Garofalo, Cinzia; Carbone, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    In humans, NK cells are mainly identified by the surface expression levels of CD56 and CD16, which differentiate between five functionally different NK cell subsets. However, nowadays NK cells are considered as a more heterogeneous population formed by various subsets differing in function, surface phenotype, and anatomic localization. In human CMV- and hantaviruses-infected subjects, an increased frequency of a NKG2A−CD57+NKG2C+ NK cell subset has been observed, while the phenotype of the NK cell subpopulation associated with cancer may vary according to the specific kind of tumor and its anatomical location. The healthy human lymph nodes contain mainly the CD56bright NK cell subset while in melanoma metastatic lymph nodes the CD56dimCD57+KIR+CCR7+ NK cell subpopulation prevails. The five NK cell subpopulations are found in breast cancer patients, where they differ for expression pattern of chemokine receptors, maturation stage, functional capabilities. In pregnancy, uterine NK cells show a prevalence of the CD56brightCD16− NK cell compartment, whose activity is influenced by KIRs repertoire. This NK cell subset’s super specialization could be explained by (i) the expansion of single mature CD56dim clones, (ii) the recruitment and maturation of CD56bright NK cells through specific stimuli, and (iii) the in situ development of tumor-resident NK cells from tissue-resident CD56bright NK cells independently of the circulating NK cell compartment. This new and unexpected biological feature of the NK cell compartment could be an important source of new biomarkers to improve patients’ diagnosis. PMID:28082990

  9. Regulation of cannabinoid receptor gene expression and endocannabinoid levels in lymphocyte subsets by interferon-β: a longitudinal study in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Sánchez López, A J; Román-Vega, L; Ramil Tojeiro, E; Giuffrida, A; García-Merino, A

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests the involvement of the cannabinoid system in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied cannabinoid receptor (CB)1 and CB2 receptor gene expression in B, natural killer (NK) and T cells from MS patients before and after 1 year of interferon beta therapy, and compared these levels to those of healthy controls. We also measured the production of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and the gene expression of the endocannabinoid-degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in these cells. Prior to interferon therapy, MS patients showed significantly elevated CB2 expression in B cells, but not in T or NK cells. These levels decreased gradually within 6 months to 1 year of interferon treatment. CB1 expression was elevated in all cell subsets, but only reached statistical significance in T cells; all levels decreased progressively over time. Before treatment, AEA but not 2-AG levels were significantly elevated in the three cell populations; after 1 year of treatment, all values decreased to control levels. The expression of FAAH was unchanged. The different expression of cannabinoid receptor genes and the increased level of AEA in lymphocytes point to a possible role of the cannabinoid system in MS immune response and its modulation by interferon.

  10. Regulation of cannabinoid receptor gene expression and endocannabinoid levels in lymphocyte subsets by interferon-β: a longitudinal study in multiple sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez López, A J; Román-Vega, L; Ramil Tojeiro, E; Giuffrida, A; García-Merino, A

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests the involvement of the cannabinoid system in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied cannabinoid receptor (CB)1 and CB2 receptor gene expression in B, natural killer (NK) and T cells from MS patients before and after 1 year of interferon beta therapy, and compared these levels to those of healthy controls. We also measured the production of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and the gene expression of the endocannabinoid-degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in these cells. Prior to interferon therapy, MS patients showed significantly elevated CB2 expression in B cells, but not in T or NK cells. These levels decreased gradually within 6 months to 1 year of interferon treatment. CB1 expression was elevated in all cell subsets, but only reached statistical significance in T cells; all levels decreased progressively over time. Before treatment, AEA but not 2-AG levels were significantly elevated in the three cell populations; after 1 year of treatment, all values decreased to control levels. The expression of FAAH was unchanged. The different expression of cannabinoid receptor genes and the increased level of AEA in lymphocytes point to a possible role of the cannabinoid system in MS immune response and its modulation by interferon. PMID:25169051

  11. Characterization of resident lymphocytes in human pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, M; Uvebrant, K; Skog, O; Sarmiento, L; Avartsson, J; Storm, P; Vickman, P; Bertilsson, P-A; Fex, M; Korgsgren, O; Cilio, C M

    2017-03-01

    The current view of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is that it is an immune-mediated disease where lymphocytes infiltrate the pancreatic islets, promote killing of beta cells and cause overt diabetes. Although tissue resident immune cells have been demonstrated in several organs, the composition of lymphocytes in human healthy pancreatic islets have been scarcely studied. Here we aimed to investigate the phenotype of immune cells associated with human islets of non-diabetic organ donors. A flow cytometry analysis of isolated islets from perfused pancreases (n = 38) was employed to identify alpha, beta, T, natural killer (NK) and B cells. Moreover, the expression of insulin and glucagon transcripts was evaluated by RNA sequencing. Up to 80% of the lymphocytes were CD3(+) T cells with a remarkable bias towards CD8(+) cells. Central memory and effector memory phenotypes dominated within the CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells and most CD8(+) T cells were positive for CD69 and up to 50-70% for CD103, both markers of resident memory cells. The frequency of B and NK cells was low in most islet preparations (12 and 3% of CD45(+) cells, respectively), and the frequency of alpha and beta cells varied between donors and correlated clearly with insulin and glucagon mRNA expression. In conclusion, we demonstrated the predominance of canonical tissue resident memory CD8(+) T cells associated with human islets. We believe that these results are important to understand more clearly the immunobiology of human islets and the disease-related phenotypes observed in diabetes.

  12. Distribution of beta-adrenergic receptors on human lymphocyte subpopulations.

    PubMed Central

    Pochet, R; Delespesse, G; Gausset, P W; Collet, H

    1979-01-01

    A technique is described allowing the quantification and the characterization of specific beta-adrenergic receptors in intact living human lymphocytes. 125I-Iodohydroxybenzylpindolol, a potent beta-adrenergic antagonist was used to label specific binding sites on unfractionated lymphoid cells and on purified subpopulations of T (F1 and F2) and B cells. F1 and F2 were obtained by filtration through nylon wool column as previously described (Delespesse et al., 1976), they differ in their response to mitogens, and in their interactions with adherent cells and B cells. 125I-HYP binding to unfractionated lymphocytes was a saturable, stereospecific and rapid process with a dissociation constant of 2.5 10(-10) M and a binding capacity of 400--600 sites/cell. Bindings on unfractionated lymphocytes, purified B cells and T cells of the F2 fraction were similar. No detectable binding was noted on T cells from the F1 fraction. Enriched T cells obtained by a rosetting technique displayed 200 receptors/cell. PMID:43789

  13. Genotoxic evaluation of terbinafine in human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tolomeotti, Danielle; de Castro-Prado, Marialba Avezum Alves; de Sant'Anna, Juliane Rocha; Martins, Ana Beatriz Tozzo; Della-Rosa, Valter Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Terbinafine is an antimycotic drug usually used against several superficial fungal infections and with a potential application in the treatment of human cancers. Since to date there are few data on the genotoxic effects of terbinafine in mammalian cells, current study evaluated the potential genotoxic of such antifungal agent in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Terbinafine was used at the peak plasma concentration (1.0 μg/ml) and in four additional concentrations higher than the human plasmatic peak (5.0 μg/ml, 25.0 μg/ml, 50.0 μg/ml and 100.0 μg/ml). Chromosomal aberrations (CA), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridges (NP) and nuclear buds (NB) were scored as genetic endpoints. In all analysis no significant differences (α = 0.05, Kruskal-Wallis test) were observed. Complementary criterion adopted to obtain the final response in cytogenetic agreed with statistical results. Therefore, results of this study showed that terbinafine neither induced CA, SCE, MN, NP and NB nor affected significantly mitotic, replication and cytokinesis-block proliferation indices in any of the tested concentrations. It may be assumed that terbinafine was not genotoxic or cytotoxic to cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes in our experimental conditions.

  14. Immunohistochemical identification of cytotoxic lymphocytes using human perforin monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, A.; Olsen, K. J.; Cheng, L.; Fox, W. M.; Hruban, R. H.; Podack, E. R.

    1992-01-01

    Perforin is a potent cytolytic pore-forming protein expressed in cytoplasmic granules of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. A new monoclonal antibody raised against human perforin was used to detect both in vitro and in vivo perforin expression in cytotoxic cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultured in recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) showed strong granular cytoplasmic staining of the IL-2 activated cytotoxic cells. Fresh-frozen tissue sections from patients with heart allograft rejection were also stained. Strong granular cytoplasmic staining of the mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate characteristic for perforin in cardiac allograft rejection was observed. The detection and quantitative analysis of perforin-associated cytotoxic cells by the human anti-perforin monoclonal antibody will help to evaluate the significance of these functionally distinct cytotoxic cells in human tissue. Images Figure 1 PMID:1374586

  15. Human dendritic cell subsets from spleen and blood are similar in phenotype and function but modified by donor health status.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Diana; Proietto, Anna I; Loudovaris, Thomas; Mannering, Stuart I; Vremec, David; Shortman, Ken; Wu, Li; Harrison, Leonard C

    2011-06-01

    Mouse dendritic cells (DC) have been extensively studied in various tissues, especially spleen, and they comprise subsets with distinct developmental origins, surface phenotypes, and functions. Considerably less is known about human DC due to their rarity in blood and inaccessibility of other human tissues. The study of DC in human blood has revealed four subsets distinct in phenotype and function. In this study, we describe four equivalent DC subsets in human spleen obtained from deceased organ donors. We identify three conventional DC subsets characterized by surface expression of CD1b/c, CD141, and CD16, and one plasmacytoid DC subset characterized by CD304 expression. Human DC subsets in spleen were very similar to those in human blood with respect to surface phenotype, TLR and transcription factor expression, capacity to stimulate T cells, cytokine secretion, and cross-presentation of exogenous Ag. However, organ donor health status, in particular treatment with corticosteroid methylprednisolone and brain death, may affect DC phenotype and function. DC T cell stimulatory capacity was reduced but DC were qualitatively unchanged in methylprednisolone-treated deceased organ donor spleen compared with healthy donor blood. Overall, our findings indicate that human blood DC closely resemble human spleen DC. Furthermore, we confirm parallels between human and mouse DC subsets in phenotype and function, but also identify differences in transcription factor and TLR expression as well as functional properties. In particular, the hallmark functions of mouse CD8α(+) DC subsets, that is, IL-12p70 secretion and cross-presentation, are not confined to the equivalent human CD141(+) DC but are shared by CD1b/c(+) and CD16(+) DC subsets.

  16. Influence of a constant magnetic field on human lymphocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Ardito, G; Lamberti, L; Bigatti, P; Prono, G

    1984-07-31

    The growing exposure to magnetic fields of a certain intensity could represent a serious hazard for our health. In the present note we analyze the effect of a 740 Gauss magnetic field on human lymphocyte cell cultures. From the analysis of our data it is possible to point out that this field produces an inhibition of the cell growth, while does not affect at all the sister chromatid exchange frequency of the chromosomes. Conversely we found a significant increase of chromosome aberrations in the exposed cells. The chromosome aberrations found were mostly gaps and breaks.

  17. Specific phenotype and function of CD56-expressing innate immune cell subsets in human thymus.

    PubMed

    Gerstner, Stephanie; Köhler, Wolfgang; Heidkamp, Gordon; Purbojo, Ariawan; Uchida, Shizuka; Ekici, Arif B; Heger, Lukas; Luetke-Eversloh, Merlin; Schubert, Ralf; Bader, Peter; Klingebiel, Thomas; Koehl, Ulrike; Mackensen, Andreas; Romagnani, Chiara; Cesnjevar, Robert; Dudziak, Diana; Ullrich, Evelyn

    2016-12-01

    Whereas innate immune cells, such as NK and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), have been characterized in different human tissues, knowledge on the thymic CD56-expressing cell subsets is limited. In this study, the rare subpopulations of thymic CD56(+)CD3(-) cells from samples of >100 patients have been successfully analyzed. The results revealed fundamental differences between thymic and peripheral blood (PB) CD56(+)CD3(-) cells. Thymic tissues lacked immunoregulatory CD56(high)CD16(dim) NK cells but showed two Eomes(+)CD56(dim) subsets on which common NK cell markers were significantly altered. CD56(dim)CD16(high) cells expressed high amounts of NKG2A, NKG2D, and CD27 with low CD57. Conversely, CD56(dim)CD16(dim) cells displayed high CD127 but low expression of KIR, NKG2D, and natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs). Thymic CD56(+)CD3(-) cells were able to gain cytotoxicity but were especially immunoregulatory cells, producing a broad range of cytokines. Finally, one population of thymic CD56(+) cells resembled conventional NK cells, whereas the other represented a novel, noncanonical NK subset.

  18. FcgammaRIIb expression on human germinal center B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Macardle, Peter J; Mardell, Carolyn; Bailey, Sheree; Wheatland, Loretta; Ho, Alice; Jessup, Claire; Roberton, Donal M; Zola, Heddy

    2002-12-01

    IgG antibody can specifically suppress the antibody response to antigen. This has been explained by the hypothesis that signaling through the B cell antigen receptor is negatively modulated by the co-ligation of immunoglobulin with the receptor for IgG, FcgammaRIIb. We hypothesized that inhibitory signaling through FcgammaRIIb would be counter-productive in germinal center cells undergoing selection by affinity maturation, since these cells are thought to receive a survival/proliferative signal by interacting with antigen displayed on follicular dendritic cells. We have identified and characterized a population of B lymphocytes with low/negative FcgammaRIIb expression that are present in human tonsil. Phenotypically these cells correspond to germinal center B cells and comprise both centroblast and centrocyte populations. In examining expression at the molecular level we determined that these B cells do not express detectable mRNA for FcgammaRIIb. We examined several culture conditions to induce expression of FcgammaRIIb on germinal center cells but could not determine conditions that altered expression. We then examined the functional consequence of cross-linking membrane immunoglobulin and the receptor for IgG on human B lymphocytes. Our results cast some doubt on the value of anti-IgG as a model for antigen-antibody complexes in studying human B cell regulation.

  19. Boosting antitumor responses of T lymphocytes infiltrating human prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Kasic, Tihana; Gri, Giorgia; Gallana, Keti; Borsellino, Giovanna; Marigo, Ilaria; Battistini, Luca; Iafrate, Massimo; Prayer-Galetti, Tommaso; Pagano, Francesco; Viola, Antonella

    2005-04-18

    Immunotherapy may provide valid alternative therapy for patients with hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer. However, if the tumor environment exerts a suppressive action on antigen-specific tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), immunotherapy will achieve little, if any, success. In this study, we analyzed the modulation of TIL responses by the tumor environment using collagen gel matrix-supported organ cultures of human prostate carcinomas. Our results indicate that human prostatic adenocarcinomas are infiltrated by terminally differentiated cytotoxic T lymphocytes that are, however, in an unresponsive status. We demonstrate the presence of high levels of nitrotyrosines in prostatic TIL, suggesting a local production of peroxynitrites. By inhibiting the activity of arginase and nitric oxide synthase, key enzymes of L-arginine metabolism that are highly expressed in malignant but not in normal prostates, reduced tyrosine nitration and restoration of TIL responsiveness to tumor were achieved. The metabolic control exerted by the tumor on TIL function was confirmed in a transgenic mouse prostate model, which exhibits similarities with human prostate cancer. These results identify a novel and dominant mechanism by which cancers induce immunosuppression in situ and suggest novel strategies for tumor immunotherapy.

  20. The interaction of human macrophage subsets with silicone as a biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Vijaya Bhaskar, Thanga Bhuvanesh; Ma, Nan; Lendlein, Andreas; Roch, Toralf

    2015-01-01

    Silicones are widely used as biomaterials for medical devices such as extracorporeal equipments. However, there is often conflicting evidence about their supposed cell- and histocompatibility. Macrophages could mediate silicone-induced adverse responses such as foreign body reaction and fibrous encapsulation. The polarization behaviour of macrophages could determine the clinical outcome after implantation of biomaterials. Induction of classically activated macrophages (CAM) may induce and support uncontrolled inflammatory responses and undesired material degradation. In contrast, polarization into alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) is assumed to support healing processes and implant integration.This study compared the interaction of non-polarized macrophages (M0), CAM, and AAM with commercially available tissue culture polystyrene (TCP) and a medical grade silicone-based biomaterial, regarding the secretion of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and chemokines. Firstly, by using the Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) test the silicone films were shown to be free of soluble endotoxins, which is the prerequisite to investigate their interaction with primary immune cells. Primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (M0) were polarized into CAM and AAM by addition of suitable differentiation factors. These macrophage subsets were incubated on the materials for 24 hours and their viability and cytokine secretion was assessed. In comparison to TCP, cell adhesion was lower on silicone after 24 hours for all three macrophage subsets. However, compared to TCP, silicone induced higher levels of certain inflammatory and chemotactic cytokines in M0, CAM, and AAM macrophage subsets.Conclusively, it was shown that silicone has the ability to induce a pro-inflammatory state to different magnitudes dependent on the macrophage subsets. This priming of the macrophage phenotype by silicone could explain the incidence of severe foreign body complications observed in vivo.

  1. Immunofluorescence identifies distinct subsets of endothelial cells in the human liver

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Otto; Phillips, Anthony; Ruggiero, Katya; Bartlett, Adam; Dunbar, P. Rod

    2017-01-01

    As well as systemic vascular endothelial cells, the liver has specialised sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC). LSEC dysfunction has been documented in many diseased states yet their phenotype in normal human liver has not been comprehensively assessed. Our aim was to improve characterisation of subsets of endothelial cells and associated pericytes in the human liver. Immunofluorescence microscopy was performed on normal human liver tissue samples to assess endothelial and structural proteins in a minimum of three donors. LSEC are distributed in an acinar pattern and universally express CD36, but two distinctive subsets of LSEC can be identified in different acinar zones. Type 1 LSEC are CD36hiCD32−CD14−LYVE-1− and are located in acinar zone 1 of the lobule, while Type 2 LSEC are LYVE-1+CD32hiCD14+CD54+CD36mid-lo and are located in acinar zones 2 and 3 of the lobule. Portal tracts and central veins can be identified using markers for systemic vascular endothelia and pericytes, none of which are expressed by LSEC. In areas of low hydrostatic pressure LSEC are lined by stellate cells that express the pericyte marker CD146. Our findings identify distinctive populations of LSEC and distinguish these cells from adjacent stellate cells, systemic vasculature and pericytes in different zones of the liver acinus. PMID:28287163

  2. Identification of a human intestinal myeloid cell subset that regulates gut homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Barman, Soumik; Kayama, Hisako; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Ogino, Takayuki; Osawa, Hideki; Matsuno, Hiroshi; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Mori, Masaki; Nishimura, Junichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2016-11-01

    Inappropriate activation of T helper (Th) cells, such as Th1 and Th17 cells, is implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory disorders including ulcerative colitis (UC). CX3CR1(high) macrophages contribute to intestinal homeostasis through various mechanisms in mice. However, whether mononuclear phagocytes with regulatory functions are present in the human colon is not clearly defined. We investigated whether innate myeloid cells that suppress activation of effector T cells exist in the human intestinal mucosa. Among intestinal lamina propria cells, Lin(-) HLA-DR(high) CD14(+) CD163(high) cells were subdivided into CD160(low) and CD160(high) cells. Both subsets produced high levels of IL-10. CD163(high) CD160(high) cells suppressed effector T cell proliferation, whereas CD163(high) CD160(low) cells induced Th17 differentiation. Patients with UC exhibited increased numbers of CD163(high) CD160(low) cells, while showing profoundly decreased numbers of CD163(high) CD160(high) cells. In this context, CD163(high) CD160(high) cells had higher CD80/CD86 expression and lower IL10RB expression, and these cells did not suppress effector T cell proliferation. The CD163(high) CD160(high) subset in normal intestinal mucosa inhibits inappropriate Th1/Th17 responses through suppression of their proliferation, and its number and suppressive activity are impaired in patients with UC. These findings indicate how human innate immune cells might prevent UC development.

  3. Transcriptional Landscape of Human Tissue Lymphocytes Unveils Uniqueness of Tumor-Infiltrating T Regulatory Cells.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Marco; Arrigoni, Alberto; Rossetti, Grazisa; Gruarin, Paola; Ranzani, Valeria; Politano, Claudia; Bonnal, Raoul J P; Provasi, Elena; Sarnicola, Maria Lucia; Panzeri, Ilaria; Moro, Monica; Crosti, Mariacristina; Mazzara, Saveria; Vaira, Valentina; Bosari, Silvano; Palleschi, Alessandro; Santambrogio, Luigi; Bovo, Giorgio; Zucchini, Nicola; Totis, Mauro; Gianotti, Luca; Cesana, Giancarlo; Perego, Roberto A; Maroni, Nirvana; Pisani Ceretti, Andrea; Opocher, Enrico; De Francesco, Raffaele; Geginat, Jens; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Abrignani, Sergio; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2016-11-15

    Tumor-infiltrating regulatory T lymphocytes (Treg) can suppress effector T cells specific for tumor antigens. Deeper molecular definitions of tumor-infiltrating-lymphocytes could thus offer therapeutic opportunities. Transcriptomes of T helper 1 (Th1), Th17, and Treg cells infiltrating colorectal or non-small-cell lung cancers were compared to transcriptomes of the same subsets from normal tissues and validated at the single-cell level. We found that tumor-infiltrating Treg cells were highly suppressive, upregulated several immune-checkpoints, and expressed on the cell surfaces specific signature molecules such as interleukin-1 receptor 2 (IL1R2), programmed death (PD)-1 Ligand1, PD-1 Ligand2, and CCR8 chemokine, which were not previously described on Treg cells. Remarkably, high expression in whole-tumor samples of Treg cell signature genes, such as LAYN, MAGEH1, or CCR8, correlated with poor prognosis. Our findings provide insights into the molecular identity and functions of human tumor-infiltrating Treg cells and define potential targets for tumor immunotherapy.

  4. Transcriptional specialization of human dendritic cell subsets in response to microbial vaccines.

    PubMed

    Banchereau, Romain; Baldwin, Nicole; Cepika, Alma-Martina; Athale, Shruti; Xue, Yaming; Yu, Chun I; Metang, Patrick; Cheruku, Abhilasha; Berthier, Isabelle; Gayet, Ingrid; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ohouo, Marina; Snipes, LuAnn; Xu, Hui; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Blankenship, Derek; Oh, Sangkon; Ramilo, Octavio; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina; Pascual, Virginia

    2014-10-22

    The mechanisms by which microbial vaccines interact with human APCs remain elusive. Herein, we describe the transcriptional programs induced in human DCs by pathogens, innate receptor ligands and vaccines. Exposure of DCs to influenza, Salmonella enterica and Staphylococcus aureus allows us to build a modular framework containing 204 transcript clusters. We use this framework to characterize the responses of human monocytes, monocyte-derived DCs and blood DC subsets to 13 vaccines. Different vaccines induce distinct transcriptional programs based on pathogen type, adjuvant formulation and APC targeted. Fluzone, Pneumovax and Gardasil, respectively, activate monocyte-derived DCs, monocytes and CD1c+ blood DCs, highlighting APC specialization in response to vaccines. Finally, the blood signatures from individuals vaccinated with Fluzone or infected with influenza reveal a signature of adaptive immunity activation following vaccination and symptomatic infections, but not asymptomatic infections. These data, offered with a web interface, may guide the development of improved vaccines.

  5. Association of BoLA-DRB3.2 Alleles with BLV Infection Profiles (Persistent Lymphocytosis/Lymphosarcoma) and Lymphocyte Subsets in Iranian Holstein Cattle.

    PubMed

    Nikbakht Brujeni, Gholamreza; Ghorbanpour, Reyhaneh; Esmailnejad, Atefeh

    2016-04-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is the best-characterized genetic region associated with resistance and susceptibility to a wide range of diseases. In cattle, the most important example of the relationship between the MHC and infectious diseases has been established by the resistance to Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection. The association of the bovine MHC class II BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles with BLV infection profiles was examined. BoLA-DRB3.2 allelic diversity was determined in 190 Iranian Holstein cattle using direct sequencing method. Association of the DRB3.2 alleles with BLV infection profiles was found as the odds ratio. Effects of the alleles on lymphocyte subsets were also evaluated by multivariate regression analysis and GLM procedures. The studied cattle were categorized into three groups: BLV seronegative, BLV seropositive with persistent lymphocytosis (PL), and BLV seropositive with lymphosarcoma (LS). The PL profile was significantly associated with the BoLA-DRB3.2*0101, *1101 and *4201 alleles, although the *3202 allele mediating resistance to PL was observed. Significant association was found between the BoLA-DRB3.2*1802, *3202, and *0901 alleles and susceptibility to LS, while the *0101 and *1101 alleles were associated with resistance to LS. BoLA-DRB3.2 alleles also showed a significant correlation with CD4, CD8, CD21 cells and CD4/CD8 ratio. Allelic differences influence the immune response to BLV infection and developing the disease profile. These differences also have important consequences for tumor resistance.

  6. The effect of dietary walnuts compared to fatty fish on eicosanoids, cytokines, soluble endothelial adhesion molecules and lymphocyte subsets: a randomized, controlled crossover trial.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yu-Lan; Haddad, Ella; Rajaram, Sujatha; Shavlik, David; Sabaté, Joan

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that walnut consumption can exert effects on markers of inflammation and endothelial activation similar to those produced by fish consumption. In a crossover dietary intervention trial, 25 normal to mildly hyperlipidemic men and women were randomly assigned to one of three isoenergetic diets: a walnut diet incorporating 42.5 g of walnuts per 10.1 mJ 6 times per week (1.8% of energy n-3 fat); a fish diet providing 113 g of fatty fish per 10.1 mJ 2 times per week (0.8% of energy n-3 fat), or a control diet (no nuts or fish, 0.4% of energy n-3 fat) for 4 weeks on each diet. Both the walnut and fish diets inhibited circulating concentrations of prostaglandin E metabolite (PGEM) and 11-dehydro thromboxane B2, but demonstrated no effect on blood interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α¯ (TNF-α¯), and C-reactive protein (CRP) or the number of circulating lymphocyte subsets. On the walnut diet the proportion of plasma phospholipid α¯-linolenic acid (ALA) increased 140% and arachidonic acid (AA) decreased 7% compared to both the control and fish diets. The proportion of plasma phospholipid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) increased about 200% and 900% respectively on the fish diet relative to either the control or walnut diet. The walnut diet inhibited E-selectin by 12.7% relative to the fish diet, and the fish diet inhibited secretory intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (s-ICAM-1) by 4.5% relative to the control diet. Both walnuts and fish in commonly consumed amounts may have modest albeit distinct effects on circulating adhesion molecules.

  7. Human lymphocyte polymorphisms detected by quantitative two-dimensional electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, D.; Merril, C.R.

    1983-09-01

    A survey of 186 soluble lymphocyte proteins for genetic polymorphism was carried out utilizing two-dimensional electrophoresis of /sup 14/C-labeled phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human lymphocyte proteins. Nineteen of these proteins exhibited positional variation consistent with independent genetic polymorphism in a primary sample of 28 individuals. Each of these polymorphisms was characterized by quantitative gene-dosage dependence insofar as the heterozygous phenotype expressed approximately 50% of each allelic gene product as was seen in homozygotes. Patterns observed were also identical in monozygotic twins, replicate samples, and replicate gels. The three expected phenotypes (two homozygotes and a heterozygote) were observed in each of 10 of these polymorphisms while the remaining nine had one of the homozygous classes absent. The presence of the three phenotypes, the demonstration of gene-dosage dependence, and our own and previous pedigree analysis of certain of these polymorphisms supports the genetic basis of these variants. Based on this data, the frequency of polymorphic loci for man is: P . 19/186 . .102, and the average heterozygosity is .024. This estimate is approximately 1/3 to 1/2 the rate of polymorphism previously estimated for man in other studies using one-dimensional electrophoresis of isozyme loci. The newly described polymorphisms and others which should be detectable in larger protein surveys with two-dimensional electrophoresis hold promise as genetic markers of the human genome for use in gene mapping and pedigree analyses.

  8. slan/M-DC8+ cells constitute a distinct subset of dendritic cells in human tonsils

    PubMed Central

    Micheletti, Alessandra; Finotti, Giulia; Calzetti, Federica; Lonardi, Silvia; Zoratti, Elisa; Bugatti, Mattia; Stefini, Stefania; Vermi, William; Cassatella, Marco A.

    2016-01-01

    Human blood dendritic cells (DCs) include three main distinct subsets, namely the CD1c+ and CD141+ myeloid DCs (mDCs) and the CD303+ plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). More recently, a population of slan/M-DC8+ cells, also known as “slanDCs”, has been described in blood and detected even in inflamed secondary lymphoid organs and non-lymphoid tissues. Nevertheless, hallmarks of slan/M-DC8+ cells in tissues are poorly defined. Herein, we report a detailed characterization of the phenotype and function of slan/M-DC8+ cells present in human tonsils. We found that tonsil slan/M-DC8+ cells represent a unique DC cell population, distinct from their circulating counterpart and also from all other tonsil DC and monocyte/macrophage subsets. Phenotypically, slan/M-DC8+ cells in tonsils display a CD11c+HLA-DR+CD14+CD11bdim/negCD16dim/negCX3CR1dim/neg marker repertoire, while functionally they exhibit an efficient antigen presentation capacity and a constitutive secretion of TNFα. Notably, such DC phenotype and functions are substantially reproduced by culturing blood slan/M-DC8+ cells in tonsil-derived conditioned medium (TDCM), further supporting the hypothesis of a full DC-like differentiation program occurring within the tonsil microenvironment. Taken together, our data suggest that blood slan/M-DC8+ cells are immediate precursors of a previously unrecognizedcompetent DC subset in tonsils, and pave the way for further characterization of slan/M-DC8+ cells in other tissues. PMID:26695549

  9. slan/M-DC8+ cells constitute a distinct subset of dendritic cells in human tonsils.

    PubMed

    Micheletti, Alessandra; Finotti, Giulia; Calzetti, Federica; Lonardi, Silvia; Zoratti, Elisa; Bugatti, Mattia; Stefini, Stefania; Vermi, William; Cassatella, Marco A

    2016-01-05

    Human blood dendritic cells (DCs) include three main distinct subsets, namely the CD1c+ and CD141+ myeloid DCs (mDCs) and the CD303+ plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). More recently, a population of slan/M-DC8+ cells, also known as "slanDCs", has been described in blood and detected even in inflamed secondary lymphoid organs and non-lymphoid tissues. Nevertheless, hallmarks of slan/M-DC8+ cells in tissues are poorly defined. Herein, we report a detailed characterization of the phenotype and function of slan/M-DC8+ cells present in human tonsils. We found that tonsil slan/M-DC8+ cells represent a unique DC cell population, distinct from their circulating counterpart and also from all other tonsil DC and monocyte/macrophage subsets. Phenotypically, slan/M-DC8+ cells in tonsils display a CD11c+HLA-DR+CD14+CD11bdim/negCD16dim/negCX3CR1dim/neg marker repertoire, while functionally they exhibit an efficient antigen presentation capacity and a constitutive secretion of TNFα. Notably, such DC phenotype and functions are substantially reproduced by culturing blood slan/M-DC8+ cells in tonsil-derived conditioned medium (TDCM), further supporting the hypothesis of a full DC-like differentiation program occurring within the tonsil microenvironment. Taken together, our data suggest that blood slan/M-DC8+ cells are immediate precursors of a previously unrecognizedcompetent DC subset in tonsils, and pave the way for further characterization of slan/M-DC8+ cells in other tissues.

  10. Features of Memory-Like and PD-1(+) Human NK Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Della Chiesa, Mariella; Pesce, Silvia; Muccio, Letizia; Carlomagno, Simona; Sivori, Simona; Moretta, Alessandro; Marcenaro, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cells are distinguished into CD56(bright)CD16(-) cells and CD56(dim)CD16(+) cells. These two subsets are conventionally associated with differential functional outcomes and are heterogeneous with respect to the expression of KIR and CD94/NKG2 heterodimers that represent the two major types of HLA-class I-specific receptors. Recent studies indicated that immature CD56(bright) NK cells, homogeneously expressing the inhibitory CD94/NKG2A receptor, are precursors of CD56(dim) NK cells that, in turn, during their process of differentiation, lose expression of CD94/NKG2A and subsequentially acquire inhibitory KIRs and LIR-1. The terminally differentiated phenotype of CD56(dim) cells is marked by the expression of the CD57 molecule that is associated with poor responsiveness to cytokine stimulation, but retained cytolytic capacity. Remarkably, this NKG2A(-)KIR(+)LIR-1(+)CD57(+)CD56(dim) NK cell subset when derived from individuals previously exposed to pathogens, such as human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), may contain "memory-like" NK cells. These cells are generally characterized by an upregulation of the activating receptor CD94/NKG2C and a downregulation of the inhibitory receptor Siglec-7. The "memory-like" NK cells are persistent over time and display some hallmarks of adaptive immunity, i.e., clonal expansion, more effective antitumor and antiviral immune responses, longevity, as well as given epigenetic modifications. Interestingly, unknown cofactors associated with HCMV infection may induce the onset of a recently identified fully mature NK cell subset, characterized by marked downregulation of the activating receptors NKp30 and NKp46 and by the unexpected expression of the inhibitory PD-1 receptor. This phenotype correlates with an impaired antitumor NK cell activity that can be partially restored by antibody-mediated disruption of PD-1/PD-L interaction.

  11. Selective toxicity of persian gulf sea cucumber holothuria parva on human chronic lymphocytic leukemia b lymphocytes by direct mitochondrial targeting.

    PubMed

    Salimi, Ahmad; Motallebi, Abbasali; Ayatollahi, Maryam; Seydi, Enayatollah; Mohseni, Ali Reza; Nazemi, Melika; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2017-04-01

    Natural products isolated from marine environment are well known for their pharmacodynamic potential in diversity of disease treatments such as cancer or inflammatory conditions. Sea cucumbers are one of the marine animals of the phylum Echinoderm. Many studies have shown that the sea cucumber contains antioxidants and anti-cancer compounds. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a disease characterized by the relentless accumulation of CD5(+) B lymphocytes. CLL is the most common leukemia in adults, about 25-30% of all leukemias. In this study B lymphocytes and their mitochondria (cancerous and non-cancerous) were obtained from peripheral blood of human subjects and B lymphocyte cytotoxicity assay, and caspase 3 activation along with mitochondrial upstream events of apoptosis signaling including reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and mitochondrial swelling were determined following the addition of Holothuria parva extract to both cancerous and non-cancerous B lymphocytes and their mitochondria. Our in vitro finding showed that mitochondrial ROS formation, MMP collapse, and mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release were significantly (P < 0.05) increased after addition of different concentrations of H. parva only in cancerous BUT NOT normal non-cancerous mitochondria. Consistently, different concentrations of H. parva significantly (P < 0.05) increased cytotoxicity and caspase 3 activation only in cancerous BUT NOT normal non-cancerous B lymphocytes. These results showed that H. parva methanolic extract has a selective mitochondria mediated apoptotic effect on chronic lymphocytic leukemia B lymphocytes hence may be promising in the future anticancer drug development for treatment of CLL. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1158-1169, 2017.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies to human lymphocyte homing receptors define a novel class of adhesion molecules on diverse cell types

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    A 90-kD lymphocyte surface glycoprotein, defined by monoclonal antibodies of the Hermes series, is involved in lymphocyte recognition of high endothelial venules (HEV). Lymphocyte gp90Hermes binds in a saturable, reversible fashion to the mucosal vascular addressin (MAd), a tissue-specific endothelial cell adhesion molecule for lymphocytes. We and others have recently shown that the Hermes antigen is identical to or includes CD44 (In[Lu]-related p80), human Pgp-1, and extracellular matrix receptor III-molecules reportedly expressed on diverse cell types. Here, we examine the relationship between lymphoid and nonlymphoid Hermes antigens using serologic, biochemical, and, most importantly, functional assays. Consistent with studies using mAbs to CD44 or Pgp-1, mAbs against five different epitopes on lymphocyte gp90Hermes reacted with a wide variety of nonhematolymphoid cells in diverse normal human tissues, including many types of epithelium, mesenchymal elements such as fibroblasts and smooth muscle, and a subset of glia in the central nervous system. To ask whether these non- lymphoid molecules might also be functionally homologous to lymphocyte homing receptors, we assessed their ability to interact with purified MAd using fluorescence energy transfer techniques. The Hermes antigen isolated from both glial cells and fibroblasts--which express a predominant 90-kD form similar in relative molecular mass, isoelectric point, and protease sensitivity to lymphocyte gp90Hermes--was able to bind purified MAd. In contrast, a 140-160-kD form of the Hermes antigen isolated from squamous epithelial cells lacked this capability. Like lymphocyte binding to mucosal HEV, the interaction between glial gp90Hermes and MAd is inhibited by mAb Hermes-3, but not Hermes-1, suggesting that similar molecular domains are involved in the two binding events. The observation that the Hermes/CD44 molecules derived from several nonlymphoid cell types display binding domains homologous to those

  13. Human CD4−8− T cells are a distinctive immunoregulatory subset

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mei-Chuan; Patel, Kalpesh; Taub, Dennis D.; Longo, Dan L.; Goetzl, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    Human CD4−8− T cells are a minor subset quantitatively but potentially important in immunity because they are predominantly distributed at body surfaces, and their number and activities increase in autoimmune diseases and decrease with aging. Distinguishing characteristics of CD4−8− T cells are found to include a unique profile of cytokines, including Serpin E1, which is not generated by other T cells, MIF, and TGF-β. At 2–5% of the total in mixtures with CD4 + CD8 T cells, CD4−8− T cells enhance the generation of IFN-γ and IL-17 by up to 12- and 5-fold, respectively, without contributing either cytokine or affecting cytokine production by NK/NKT cells. CD4−8− T cell-derived MIF is their major enhancer and TGFβ their principal inhibitor of CD4 and CD8 T cell cytokine production. Decreases in CD4−8− T cell effects may diminish protective immunity in aging, whereas increases may augment the severity of autoimmune diseases.—Huang, M.-C., Patel, K., Taub, D. D., Longo, D. L., Goetzl, E. J. Human CD4−8− T cells are a distinctive immunoregulatory subset. PMID:20154266

  14. Adenoviruses in Lymphocytes of the Human Gastro-Intestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Soumitra; Calcedo, Roberto; Medina-Jaszek, Angelica; Keough, Martin; Peng, Hui; Wilson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Persistent adenoviral shedding in stools is known to occur past convalescence following acute adenoviral infections. We wished to establish the frequency with which adenoviruses may colonize the gut in normal human subjects. Methods The presence of adenoviral DNA in intestinal specimens obtained at surgery or autopsy was tested using a nested PCR method. The amplified adenoviral DNA sequences were compared to each other and to known adenoviral species. Lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs) were isolated from the specimens and the adenoviral copy numbers in the CD4+ and CD8+ fractions were determined by quantitative PCR. Adenoviral gene expression was tested by amplification of adenoviral mRNA. Results Intestinal tissue from 21 of 58 donors and LPLs from 21 of 24 donors were positive for the presence of adenoviral DNA. The majority of the sequences could be assigned to adenoviral species E, although species B and C sequences were also common. Multiple sequences were often present in the same sample. Forty-one non-identical sequences were identified from 39 different tissue donors. Quantitative PCR for adenoviral DNA in CD4+ and CD8+ fractions of LPLs showed adenoviral DNA to be present in both cell types and ranged from a few hundred to several million copies per million cells on average. Active adenoviral gene expression as evidenced by the presence of adenoviral messenger RNA in intestinal lymphocytes was demonstrated in 9 of the 11 donors tested. Conclusion Adenoviral DNA is highly prevalent in lymphocytes from the gastro-intestinal tract indicating that adenoviruses may be part of the normal gut flora. PMID:21980361

  15. Human lymphocyte markers defined by antibodies derived from somatic cell hybrids. II. A hybridoma secreting antibody against an antigen expressed by human B and null lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Beckman, I G; Bradley, J; Brooks, D A; Kupa, A; McNamara, P J; Thomas, M E; Zola, H

    1980-06-01

    A hybridoma (FMC4) has been derived which secretes antibody showing selective reaction with human B lymphocytes, monocytes and some null lymphocytes. Few, if any, T lymphocytes in normal blood are stained, although stimulation of lymphocytes with PHA leads to an increase in the proportion of cells reacting with the hybridoma antibody. The antibody reacts with B and null lymphoblastoid cell lines but not with T cell lines. B chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells but not T-CLLs are stained and null-type acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) cells but not T-type ALL also react. Normal blood myeloid cells do not react with FMC4 supernatant whilst some myeloid leukaemias do. The expression of the antigen reacting with FMC4 supernatant suggests that FMC4 may secrete an antibody against the human equivalent of the Ia antigen.

  16. Human lymphocyte markers defined by antibodies derived from somatic cell hybrids. II. A hybridoma secreting antibody against an antigen expressed by human B and null lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Beckman, I G; Bradley, J; Brooks, D A; Kupa, A; McNamara, P J; Thomas, M E; Zola, H

    1980-01-01

    A hybridoma (FMC4) has been derived which secretes antibody showing selective reaction with human B lymphocytes, monocytes and some null lymphocytes. Few, if any, T lymphocytes in normal blood are stained, although stimulation of lymphocytes with PHA leads to an increase in the proportion of cells reacting with the hybridoma antibody. The antibody reacts with B and null lymphoblastoid cell lines but not with T cell lines. B chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells but not T-CLLs are stained and null-type acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) cells but not T-type ALL also react. Normal blood myeloid cells do not react with FMC4 supernatant whilst some myeloid leukaemias do. The expression of the antigen reacting with FMC4 supernatant suggests that FMC4 may secrete an antibody against the human equivalent of the Ia antigen. PMID:6968260

  17. Comprehensive gene expression analysis of human NK cells and CD8(+) T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Obata-Onai, Aya; Hashimoto, Shin-ichi; Onai, Nobuyuki; Kurachi, Makoto; Nagai, Shigenori; Shizuno, Ken-ichi; Nagahata, Tomoyuki; Matsushima, Kouji; Mathushima, Kouji

    2002-10-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes, NK cells and CD8(+) T cells play a pivotal role in the host defense. To reveal the biological function of these cells through establishing a comprehensive gene expression profile, serial analysis of gene expression was performed in human peripheral blood NK cells and CD8(+) T cells. In total, 85,848 tags corresponding to >20,000 different transcripts were sequenced. The genes expressed abundantly in these libraries mostly consisted of genes encoding MHC class I and molecules related to protein synthesis. Among gene transcripts which related to cytotoxicity, granulysin, perforin, granzyme B and alpha-defensin 1 were highly expressed in NK cells. Resting CD8(+) T cells did not express the genes related to cytotoxicity, but expressed abundantly the genes encoding chemokines, tumor necrosis factor family. When CD8(+) T cells were sorted into naive, memory and effector subsets based on the expression of CD45RA and CD27, perforin and granzyme B were expressed in the CD45RA(+)CD27(-) effector subset. Alpha-defensin 1, one of the selectively expressed genes in NK cells, induced migration of naive CD8(+)CD45RA(+)CD27(+) T cells, but not memory CD8(+)CD45RA(-)CD27(+) or effector CD8(+)CD45RA(+)CD27(-) T cells. Furthermore, treatment with IL-15, a stimulator of NK cell development, differentiation, survival and cytotoxicity, rapidly enhanced the expression of alpha-defensin 1 in NK cells. The identification of the genes preferentially expressed in NK and CD8(+) T cell subsets may give important insights into the functions of these cells against virus infection and in tumor immunity.

  18. Effects of budlein A on human neutrophils and lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    KNOB, Carollinie Dias; SILVA, Milena; GASPAROTO, Thaís Helena; OLIVEIRA, Carine Ervolino; AMÔR, Nádia Ghinelli; ARAKAWA, Nilton Syogo; COSTA, Fernando Batista; CAMPANELLI, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) are the active constituents of a variety of medicinal plants used in traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and other ailments. Objective In this study, we evaluated whether budlein A modulates the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells such as neutrophils and lymphocytes. Material and Methods Our research group has investigated several plant species and several compounds have been isolated, identified, and their medical potential evaluated. Budlein A is a SL isolated from the species Aldama buddlejiformis and A. robusta (Asteraceae) and shows anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities. Advances in understanding how plant-derived substances modulate the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells have led to the development of new therapies for human diseases. Results Budlein A inhibited MPO activity, IL-6, CXCL8, IL-10, and IL-12 production and induces neutrophil apoptosis. In contrast, budlein A inhibited lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2, IL-10, TGF-β, and IFN-γ production, but it did not lead to cell death. Conclusions Collectively, our results indicate that budlein A shows distinct immunomodulatory effects on immune cells. PMID:27383709

  19. Radiation-induced chromosome damage in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, D. C.; Dolphin, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    ABSTRACT Analysis for chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes has been developed as an indicator of dose from ionising radiation. This paper outlines the mechanism of production of aberrations, the technique for their analysis and the dose-effect relationships for various types of radiation. During the past ten years the National Radiological Protection Board has developed a service for the UK in which estimates of dose from chromosome aberration analysis are made on people known or suspected of being accidentally over-exposed. This service can provide estimates where no physical dosemeter was worn and is frequently able to resolve anomalous or disputed data from routine film badges. Several problems in the interpretation of chromosome aberration yields are reviewed. These include the effects of partial body irradiation and the response to variations in dose rate and the intermittent nature of some exposures. The dosimetry service is supported by a research programme which includes surveys of groups of patients irradiated for medical purposes. Two surveys are described. In the first, lymphocyte aberrations were examined in rheumatiod arthritis patients receiving intra-articular injections of colloidal radiogold or radioyttrium. A proportion of the nuclide leaked from the joint into the regional lymphatic system. In the second survey a comparison was made between the cytogenetic and physical estimates of whole body dose in patients receiving iodine 131 for thyroid carcinoma. Images PMID:338021

  20. Spaceflight alters microtubules and increases apoptosis in human lymphocytes (Jurkat)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. L.; Reynolds, J. L.; Cubano, L. A.; Hatton, J. P.; Lawless, B. D.; Piepmeier, E. H.

    1998-01-01

    Alteration in cytoskeletal organization appears to underlie mechanisms of gravity sensitivity in space-flown cells. Human T lymphoblastoid cells (Jurkat) were flown on the Space Shuttle to test the hypothesis that growth responsiveness is associated with microtubule anomalies and mediated by apoptosis. Cell growth was stimulated in microgravity by increasing serum concentration. After 4 and 48 h, cells filtered from medium were fixed with formalin. Post-flight, confocal microscopy revealed diffuse, shortened microtubules extending from poorly defined microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs). In comparable ground controls, discrete microtubule filaments radiated from organized MTOCs and branched toward the cell membrane. At 4 h, 30% of flown, compared to 17% of ground, cells showed DNA condensation characteristic of apoptosis. Time-dependent increase of the apoptosis-associated Fas/ APO-1 protein in static flown, but not the in-flight 1 g centrifuged or ground controls, confirmed microgravity-associated apoptosis. By 48 h, ground cultures had increased by 40%. Flown populations did not increase, though some cells were cycling and actively metabolizing glucose. We conclude that cytoskeletal alteration, growth retardation, and metabolic changes in space-flown lymphocytes are concomitant with increased apoptosis and time-dependent elevation of Fas/APO-1 protein. We suggest that reduced growth response in lymphocytes during spaceflight is linked to apoptosis.

  1. Violacein cytotoxicity on human blood lymphocytes and effect on phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, N; Justo, G Z; Haun, M; Durán, N; Ferreira, C V

    2005-10-01

    Given the importance of protein phosphorylation in the context of cellular functions, abnormal protein phosphatase activity has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer. These critical roles of protein phosphatases qualify them as potential targets for the development of medicinal compounds that possess distinct modes of action such as violacein. In this work, studies with this natural indolic pigment at a concentration of 10.0 micromol L(-1) demonstrated a 20% activation of total protein phosphatase extracted from human lymphocytes. Although no alteration was observed on protein tyrosine phosphatase (CD45), 30% of inhibition was achieved in cytoplasmatic protein phosphatase activity after incubation with 10.0 micromol L(-1) violacein. Additionally, 5.0 micromol L(-1) of violacein inhibited by 50% the serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity. Violacein presented toxic effect on lymphocytes with IC50 values of 3 and 10 micromol L(-1) for protein content and protein phosphatase activity, respectively. These findings suggest an important role for protein phosphatases in the mechanisms controlling proliferation and cell death.

  2. Neoplastic cells obtained from Hodgkin's disease are potent stimulators of human primary mixed lymphocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R I; Bostick-Bruton, F; Sauder, D N; Scala, G; Diehl, V

    1983-06-01

    Neoplastic cells obtained from the pleural effusion of a patient with Hodgkin's disease have been maintained in culture since 1978. These tumor cells have been shown to have the cytologic features, cytochemical staining, and cell surface markers of Reed-Sternberg cells. In this study we demonstrate that the cell line termed L428 is a potent stimulator of the primary human mixed lymphocyte reaction. Significant proliferation occurred when mononuclear leukocytes obtained from normal donors were stimulated with radiated L428 cells at responder:stimulator ratios varying from 200:1 to 20:1. Proliferative responses occurred between days 3 and 6 of the cultures with maximal proliferation on day 5. Under optimal culture conditions, mean net proliferative response of 14 normal donors was 51,000 +/- 10,600 dpm. The mixed lymphocyte response was totally blocked by concentrations of monoclonal anti-Ia antibody that had no effect on concanavalin A-induced proliferation. However, the mixed lymphocyte response was not blocked by an anti-K562 cell monoclonal antibody of the same immunoglobulin subclass that binds to the L428 cells. Antigen processing by responder monocytes or Ia-positive cells was not required for the MLC. When responder T cells from two normals were depleted of Ia-bearing cells and monocytes, the mixed lymphocyte reaction between the two normals was eliminated, yet the stimulation of each normal by the L428 cells was not reduced. The cells that proliferated in response to stimulation by the L428 cells were T cells, primarily of the helper subset. No IL 1 activity could be detected in concentrated supernatants of L428 cultures after stimulation of L428 cells by mitogens, phorbol esters, or muramyl dipeptide, or in the MLC. All of these cultures contain fetal calf serum. However, the L428 cells are capable of producing IL 1, because IL 1 was detected when the L428 cells were stimulated with LPS in the absence of fetal calf serum. These neoplastic cells, obtained

  3. Effect of steady magnetic field on human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mileva, M.; Ivanov, B.; Bulanova, M.; Pantev, T.

    1983-01-01

    Exposure to steady magnetic field (SMF) for different periods of time did not elicit statistically reliable increase in chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Metaphase analysis of Crepis capilaris cells revealed that SMF (9 k0e, 200 0e/cm) for 2 days did not induce chromosome aberrations. Nor were any changes demonstrated in roots of beans, onions and L-fibroblasts of subcutaneous tissue of mice and Chinese hamsters. The obtained data are indicative of absence of cytogenetic effect of SMF. The level and spectrum of chromosome aberrations did not exceed the values for spontaneous chromatic fragments in cultures. Cytogenetic analysis of DEDE cells of the Chinese hamster revealed a mild mutagenic effect of SMF. Chromosomal aberrations were also demonstrated after exposure (5 min) of garlic roots.

  4. [Isolation of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus from human individuals].

    PubMed

    Saavedra, M C; Ambrosio, A M; Riera, L; Levis, S; Sottosanti, J; Sabattini, M

    2001-01-01

    The activity of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMv) in Argentina has been previously reported on the basis of serological evidence in rodents and humans and the isolation of only one strain of LCMv from a Mus domesticus captured in the province of Córdoba. The aim of this paper was to register patients with serological diagnosis of LCM, to isolate and to identify human strains of LCMv in Argentina. During the last 19 years, 15 cases were diagnosed as LCM by immunoflourescent indirect assay (IFI) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) but when neutralizing assay (NT) was incorporated, eight cases were classified as confirmed, three as probable and four as negative. The geographic distribution of the cases included three provinces: Córdoba, Buenos Aires and Santa Fe. Viral isolation was attempted in five patients classified as confirmed and only two resulted positive (P5226 and P8573). They were identified as LCMv by IFI and NT. The coexistence of LCMv with other arenaviruses, such as Junin and Oliveros viruses, in the same area, raises the probability of interactions between them, which could modify the virulence and/or pathogenicity for humans associated to genomic changes. Future studies of antigenic, genomic and virulence variability of different Argentine strains of LCMv, as well as the systematic search for human infection, will contribute to define the importance of this viral agent in our country and to implement control measures.

  5. Continuous versus discontinuous drinking of an ethanol liquid diet in peripubertal rats: effect on 24-h variation of lymph node and splenic mitogenic responses and lymphocyte subset populations.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ortega, Vanesa; Fernández-Mateos, María P; Barquilla, Pilar Cano; Cardinali, Daniel P; Esquifino, Ana I

    2011-03-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption continues to be a major public health problem, particularly in the adolescent and young adult populations. Generally, such a behavior tends to be confined to the weekends, to attain frequently binge drinking. This study in peripubertal male rats compares the effect of the discontinuous feeding of a liquid diet containing a moderate amount of ethanol (6.2% wt/vol) to that of continuous ethanol administration or a control diet, taking as end points the 24-h variations of plasma prolactin levels and mitogenic responses and lymphocyte subset populations in submaxillary lymph nodes and spleen. Animals received the ethanol liquid diet starting on day 35 of life, the diet being similar to that given to controls except for that maltose was isocalorically replaced by ethanol. Ethanol provided 36% of the total caloric content. Every week, the discontinuous ethanol group received the ethanol diet for 3 days and the control liquid diet for the remaining 4 days. After 4 weeks, rats were killed at six time intervals, beginning at 0900 h. A significant decrease of splenic cells' response to concanavalin A, and of lymph node and splenic cells' response to lipopolysaccharide was found in rats under the discontinuous ethanol regime, when compared with control- or ethanol-chronic rats. Under discontinuous ethanol feeding, mean values of lymph node and splenic CD8(+) and CD4(+)-CD8(+) cells decreased, whereas those of lymph node and splenic T cells, and splenic B cells, augmented. In rats chronically fed with ethanol, splenic mean levels of CD8(+) and CD4(+)-CD8(+) cells augmented. Both modalities of ethanol administration disrupted the 24 h variation in immune function seen in controls. Mean plasma prolactin levels increased by 3.6-fold and 8.5-fold in rats chronically or discontinuously fed with alcohol, respectively. The immune parameters examined in an additional group of rats fed regular chow and water ad libitum did not differ significantly from

  6. Effects of Clostridium difficile toxin A and B on human T lymphocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Joyee, Antony George; Nandagopal, Saravanan; Lopez, Marianela; Ma, Xiuli; Berry, Jody; Lin, Francis

    2013-05-03

    Bacterial products such as toxins can interfere with a variety of cellular processes, leading to severe human diseases. Clostridium difficile toxins, TcdA and TcdB are the primary contributing factors to the pathogenesis of C. difficile-associated diseases (CDAD). While the mechanisms for TcdA and TcdB mediated cellular responses are complex, it has been shown that these toxins can alter chemotactic responses of neutrophils and intestinal epithelial cells leading to innate immune responses and tissue damages. The effects of C. difficile toxins on the migration and trafficking of other leukocyte subsets, such as T lymphocytes, are not clear and may have potential implications for adaptive immunity. We investigated here the direct and indirect effects of TcdA and TcdB on the migration of human blood T cells using conventional cell migration assays and microfluidic devices. It has been found that, although both toxins decrease T cell motility, only TcdA but not TcdB decreases T cell chemotaxis. Similar effects are observed in T cell migration toward the TcdA- or TcdB-treated human epithelial cells. Our study demonstrated the primary role of TcdA (compared to TcdB) in altering T cell migration and chemotaxis, suggesting possible implications for C. difficile toxin mediated adaptive immune responses in CDAD.

  7. Effects of Clostridium difficile Toxin A and B on Human T Lymphocyte Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Joyee, Antony George; Nandagopal, Saravanan; Lopez, Marianela; Ma, Xiuli; Berry, Jody; Lin, Francis

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial products such as toxins can interfere with a variety of cellular processes, leading to severe human diseases. Clostridium difficile toxins, TcdA and TcdB are the primary contributing factors to the pathogenesis of C. difficile-associated diseases (CDAD). While the mechanisms for TcdA and TcdB mediated cellular responses are complex, it has been shown that these toxins can alter chemotactic responses of neutrophils and intestinal epithelial cells leading to innate immune responses and tissue damages. The effects of C. difficile toxins on the migration and trafficking of other leukocyte subsets, such as T lymphocytes, are not clear and may have potential implications for adaptive immunity. We investigated here the direct and indirect effects of TcdA and TcdB on the migration of human blood T cells using conventional cell migration assays and microfluidic devices. It has been found that, although both toxins decrease T cell motility, only TcdA but not TcdB decreases T cell chemotaxis. Similar effects are observed in T cell migration toward the TcdA- or TcdB-treated human epithelial cells. Our study demonstrated the primary role of TcdA (compared to TcdB) in altering T cell migration and chemotaxis, suggesting possible implications for C. difficile toxin mediated adaptive immune responses in CDAD. PMID:23645153

  8. Holistic systems biology approaches to molecular mechanisms of human helper T cell differentiation to functionally distinct subsets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Lönnberg, T; Lahesmaa, R

    2013-08-01

    Current knowledge of helper T cell differentiation largely relies on data generated from mouse studies. To develop therapeutical strategies combating human diseases, understanding the molecular mechanisms how human naïve T cells differentiate to functionally distinct T helper (Th) subsets as well as studies on human differentiated Th cell subsets is particularly valuable. Systems biology approaches provide a holistic view of the processes of T helper differentiation, enable discovery of new factors and pathways involved and generation of new hypotheses to be tested to improve our understanding of human Th cell differentiation and immune-mediated diseases. Here, we summarize studies where high-throughput systems biology approaches have been exploited to human primary T cells. These studies reveal new factors and signalling pathways influencing T cell differentiation towards distinct subsets, important for immune regulation. Such information provides new insights into T cell biology and into targeting immune system for therapeutic interventions.

  9. Viruses disrupt functions of human lymphocytes. Effects of measles virus and influenza virus on lymphocyte-mediated killing and antibody production

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    We present experimental data that offer, in part, a better understanding of the immunosuppression that accompanies measles virus infection. We note that measles virus "silently" infects human lymphocytes and that the infection does not alter lymphocyte survival in vitro. Yet such infected lymphocytes fail to generate natural killer (NK) cell activity or synthesize immunoglobulins (Ig). Thus, the presence of virus within lymphocytes impairs their specific immune functions in the absence of cytolysis. Influenza virus also infects human lymphocytes. In contrast to measles virus infection of resting lymphocytes in which viral antigen is rarely expressed, influenza virus infection of these cells yields viral antigens expressed in the cytoplasm and on the cell surface. Influenza virus-infected lymphocytes have normal NK cell activity but fail to synthesize IgG or IgM. PMID:6716049

  10. Lymphocyte subset analyses in blood, spleen and lymph nodes of female Sprague-Dawley rats after short or prolonged exposure to a 50 Hz 100-microT magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Thun-Battersby, S; Westermann, J; Löscher, W

    1999-10-01

    Based primarily on the results of in vitro studies, it has been suggested that power-line (50 or 60 Hz) magnetic fields (MFs) may reduce immune function, which could lower resistance to infection or cancer. This study was conducted to evaluate the influence of acute and chronic in vivo exposure to a linearly polarized 50 Hz MF on immune function in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Groups of rats were exposed continuously to the MF at a flux density of 100 microT for periods of 3 days, 14 days or 13 weeks. For each exposure period, one control group of rats was sham-exposed together with each MF-exposed group. Experimental end points included analyses of T-lymphocyte subsets as well as other immune cells involved in cell-mediated immune responses, i.e. natural killer (NK) cells, B lymphocytes, macrophages, and granulocytes in blood, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. In addition, immunohistochemical methods were used to detect proliferating and apoptotic cells in the various compartments of spleen tissue. The results obtained failed to demonstrate a significant effect of short or prolonged MF exposure on different types of leukocytes, including lymphocyte subsets. Furthermore, the experiments on the in vivo proliferation activity of lymphocytes and the extent of apoptosis in spleen samples did not indicate a difference between the MF-exposed and sham-exposed groups, indicating that MF exposure does not affect the mechanisms involved in the control of lymphocyte homeostasis. The lack of MF effects in the immune tests used in the present in vivo study makes it highly unlikely that MF exposure induces immunotoxicity, at least under the experimental conditions used. However, the data do not exclude the possibility that functional alterations in T-cell responses to mitogens and in NK cell activity as recently described for MF-exposed rodents may be one mechanism involved in the carcinogenic effects of MF exposure observed in some models of co-carcinogenesis.

  11. Chromosome Aberration in Human Blood Lymphocytes Exposed to Energetic Protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2008-01-01

    During space flight, astronauts are exposed to a space radiation consisting of high-energy protons, high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei, as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary particles have a higher LET value than primary protons and therefore expected to have a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). To investigate this theory, we exposed human peripheral blood lymphocytes to protons with energies of 250 MeV, 800MeV, 2 GeV, or 2.5 GeV. LET values for these protons ranged from 0.4 to 0.2 keV/micrometer. and doses ranged from 0.2 to 3 Gy. Over this energy the probability of nuclear reaction leading to secondary radiation, and the multiplicity of reaction produces such as neutrons and mesons increases substantially. The effect of aluminum and polyethylene shielding was also assessed using the 2 GeV and 2.5GeV proton beams. After exposure lymphocytes were stimulated to divide and chromosomes were collected from cells in the first G2 and metaphase cell cycle after exposure using a chemical induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Dose response data for chromosome damage was analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting technique. Selected samples were also analyzed with multicolor FISH (mFISH) and multicolor banding FISH (mBAND) techniques. Data indicates that the dose response for simple-type exchanges is similar for proton and gamma exposure, whereas protons induce higher yields of complex exchanges that are LET dependent. RBE values will be presented for each proton energy, and the effects of shielding and possible cytogenetic signatures of proton exposure will be discussed.

  12. Chromosome aberrations in human blood lymphocytes exposed to energetic protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, Ms Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    During space flight, astronauts are exposed to space radiation consisting of high-energy protons, high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei, as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary particles have a higher LET value than primary protons and are therefore expected to have a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). To investigate this theory, we exposed human peripheral blood lymphocytes to protons with energies of 250 MeV, 800MeV, 2 GeV, or 2.5 GeV. LET values for these protons ranged from 0.4 to 0.2 keV/µm. and doses ranged from 0.2 to 3 Gy. Over this energy range the probability of nuclear reaction leading to secondary radiation, and the multiplicity of reaction products such as neutrons and mesons increases substantially. The effect of aluminum and polyethylene shielding was also assessed using the 2 GeV and 2.5GeV proton beams. After exposure lymphocytes were stimulated to divide and chromosomes were collected from cells in the first G2 and metaphase cell cycle after exposure using a chemical induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Dose response data for chromosome damage was analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting technique. Selected samples were also analyzed with multicolor FISH (mFISH) and multicolor banding FISH (mBAND) techniques. Data indicates that the dose response for simple-type exchanges is similar for proton and gamma exposure, whereas protons induce higher yields of complex exchanges that are energy dependent. RBE values will be presented for each proton energy, and the effects of shielding and possible cytogenetic signatures of proton exposure will be discussed.

  13. Functional characteristics of histamine receptor-bearing mononuclear cells. II. Identification and characterization of two histamine-induced human lymphokines that inhibit lymphocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Berman, J S; McFadden, R G; Cruikshank, W W; Center, D M; Beer, D J

    1984-09-01

    Although functional histamine receptors have generally been restricted to those human T lymphocytes expressing suppressor cell functions, more recent evidence suggests that histamine receptor-bearing human T lymphocytes are functionally heterogeneous and capable of other immunomodulatory activities. Lymphocyte chemoattractant factor (LCF) is a cationic sialoprotein with an apparent m.w. of 56,000, whose production is limited to histamine-type 2 receptor-bearing human T cells. LCF is selectively chemokinetic for T lymphocytes, and presumably contributes to the recruitment of unsensitized effector lymphocytes at inflammatory sites. In addition to LCF, Sephadex G-100 gel filtration of histamine-induced lymphocyte supernatants revealed two regions of migration inhibitory activity for human blood T and rat splenic lymphocytes. These regions corresponded to m.w. of 70,000 to 80,000 (LyMIF75K) and 30,000 to 40,000 (LyMIF35K). LyMIF75K had a single pI of 7.5 to 8.0, and its biologic activity was sensitive to trypsin but not to neuraminidase or heat (56 degrees C). LyMIF35K had a single pI of 8.5 to 8.8, and its biologic activity was sensitive to neuraminidase and heat but not to trypsin. These LyMIFs therefore appeared to be distinct from one another and physicochemically different from other migration inhibitory lymphokines. All three lymphokine activities appeared within 4 hr of incubation. The minimum concentration of histamine required to stimulate production of the LyMIF was 10(-6) M. Lymphocytes that did not adhere to a histamine affinity matrix were unable to produce either LyMIF upon subsequent stimulation with histamine or concanavalin A (Con A). Lymphocytes incubated with histamine and diphenhydramine produced LCF but neither LyMIF, whereas cells incubated with histamine in the presence of cimetidine produced both LyMIF but not LCF. These data suggest that a subset of lymphocytes defined by the presence of histamine-type 1 receptors are capable of producing two

  14. Human dendritic cells and macrophages. In situ immunophenotypic definition of subsets that exhibit specific morphologic and microenvironmental characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, G. S.; Turner, R. R.; Shiurba, R. A.; Eng, L.; Warnke, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Using a panel of monoclonal antibodies and antisera in situ, the authors have defined subsets of human dendritic cells and macrophages that exhibit specific morphologic and microenvironmental characteristics. All subsets contained cells that reacted with antibodies directed against HLA-A,B,C, HLA-Dr, leukocyte common, Leu-M3, and Leu-3(T4) antigens. R4/23 and anti-S100 defined three major subsets. R4/23+, S100- cells constituted the B-cell-related follicular dendritic cells, which were identified only within the germinal center/mantle microenvironment of lymphoid follicles. R4/23-, S100+ cells constituted the T-cell-related dendritic cell subset. Anti-Leu-6(T6) further subdivided this group into Leu-6(T6)- interdigitating cells within the T-cell microenvironments of lymphoid organs and Leu-6(T6)+ Langerhans cells found predominantly in epithelial microenvironments, especially the skin. R4/23-, S100- cells constituted the nondendritic tissue macrophage subset which was widely distributed, primarily outside of dendritic-cell microenvironments. These data indicate that although dendritic cells and macrophages share several common antigenic features, morphologically and microenvironmentally distinct subsets express distinct immunologic phenotypes. Such data may provide insight into the ontogeny and function of these subsets and constitute a basis for the comparison of normal dendritic cells and macrophages to various histiocytic proliferative disorders. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 p78-c Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3985124

  15. Analysis of somatic mutation in five B cell subsets of human tonsil.

    PubMed

    Pascual, V; Liu, Y J; Magalski, A; de Bouteiller, O; Banchereau, J; Capra, J D

    1994-07-01

    Using a series of phenotypic markers that include immunoglobulin (Ig)D, IgM, IgG, CD23, CD44, Bcl-2, CD38, CD10, CD77, and Ki67, human tonsillar B cells were separated into five fractions representing different stages of B cell differentiation that included sIgD+ (Bm1 and Bm2), germinal center (Bm3 and Bm4), and memory (Bm5) B cells. To establish whether the initiation of somatic mutation correlated with this phenotypic characterization, we performed polymerase chain reaction and subsequent sequence analysis of the Ig heavy chain variable region genes from each of the B cell subsets. We studied the genes from the smallest VH families (VH4, VH5, and VH6) in order to facilitate the mutational analysis. In agreement with previous reports, we found that the somatic mutation machinery is activated only after B cells reach the germinal center and become centroblasts (Bm3). Whereas 47 independently rearranged IgM transcripts from the Bm1 and Bm2 subsets were nearly germline encoded, 57 Bm3-, and Bm4-, and Bm5-derived IgM transcripts had accumulated an average of 5.7 point mutations within the VH gene segment. gamma transcripts corresponding to the same VH gene families were isolated from subsets Bm3, Bm4, and Bm5, and had accumulated an average of 9.5 somatic mutations. We conclude that the molecular events underlying the process of somatic mutation takes place during the transition from IgD+, CD23+ B cells (Bm2) to the IgD-, CD23-, germinal center centroblast (Bm3). Furthermore, the analysis of Ig variable region transcripts from the different subpopulations confirms that the pathway of B cell differentiation from virgin B cell throughout the germinal center up to the memory compartment can be traced with phenotypic markers. The availability of these subpopulations should permit the identification of the functional molecules relevant to each stage of B cell differentiation.

  16. TMEM119 marks a subset of microglia in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Jun-ichi; Kino, Yoshihiro; Asahina, Naohiro; Takitani, Mika; Miyoshi, Junko; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Saito, Yuko

    2016-02-01

    Microglia are resident myeloid cells of the central nervous system (CNS), activated in the brains of various neurological diseases. Microglia are ontogenetically and functionally distinct from monocyte-derived macrophages that infiltrate the CNS under pathological conditions. However, a lack of specific markers that distinguish resident microglia from circulating blood-derived macrophages in human brain tissues hampers accurate evaluation of microglial contributions to the human brain pathology. By comparative analysis of five comprehensive microglial transcriptome datasets, we identified an evolutionarily conserved protein TMEM119 as the most promising candidate for human microglial markers. TMEM119 was expressed on immortalized human microglia, in which the expression levels were not elevated by exposure to lipopolysaccharide, IFNγ, IL-4, IL-13 or TGFβ1. Notably, TMEM119 immunoreactivity was expressed exclusively on a subset of Iba1(+) CD68(+) microglia with ramified and amoeboid morphologies in the brains of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), whereas Iba1(+) CD68(+) infiltrating macrophages do not express TMEM119 in demyelinating lesions of multiple sclerosis and necrotic lesions of cerebral infarction. TMEM119 mRNA levels were elevated in AD brains, although the protein levels were not significantly different between AD and non-AD cases by western blot and morphometric analyses. TMEM119-positive microglia did not consistently express polarized markers for M1 (CD80) or M2 (CD163, CD209) in AD brains. These results suggest that TMEM119 serves as a reliable microglial marker that discriminates resident microglia from blood-derived macrophages in the human brain.

  17. Differential uptake and cross-presentation of soluble and necrotic cell antigen by human DC subsets.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Meng-Chieh; Tullett, Kirsteen M; Lee, Yoke Seng; Idris, Adi; Ding, Yitian; McDonald, Kylie J; Kassianos, Andrew; Leal Rojas, Ingrid M; Jeet, Varinder; Lahoud, Mireille H; Radford, Kristen J

    2016-02-01

    Cross-presentation is the mechanism by which exogenous Ag is processed for recognition by CD8(+) T cells. Murine CD8α(+) DCs are specialized at cross-presenting soluble and cellular Ag, but in humans this process is poorly characterized. In this study, we examined uptake and cross-presentation of soluble and cellular Ag by human blood CD141(+) DCs, the human equivalent of mouse CD8α(+) DCs, and compared them with human monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) and blood CD1c(+) DC subsets. MoDCs were superior in their capacity to internalize and cross-present soluble protein whereas CD141(+) DCs were more efficient at ingesting and cross-presenting cellular Ag. Whilst cross-presentation by CD1c(+) DCs and CD141(+) DCs was dependent on the proteasome, and hence cytosolic translocation, cross-presentation by MoDCs was not. Inhibition of endosomal acidification enhanced cross-presentation by CD1c(+) DCs and MoDCs but not by CD141(+) DCs. These data demonstrate that CD1c(+) DCs, CD141(+) DCs, and MoDCs are capable of cross-presentation; however, they do so via different mechanisms. Moreover, they demonstrate that human CD141(+) DCs, like their murine CD8α(+) DC counterparts, are specialized at cross-presenting cellular Ag, most likely mediated by an enhanced capacity to ingest cellular Ag combined with subtle changes in lysosomal pH during Ag processing and use of the cytosolic pathway.

  18. Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Infection of the Three Monocyte Subsets Contributes to Viral Burden in Humans

    PubMed Central

    de Castro-Amarante, Maria Fernanda; McKinnon, Katherine; Washington Parks, Robyn; Galli, Veronica; Omsland, Maria; Andresen, Vibeke; Massoud, Raya; Brunetto, Giovanna; Caruso, Breanna; Venzon, David; Jacobson, Steven

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because the viral DNA burden correlates with disease development, we investigated the contribution of monocyte subsets (classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocytes) to the total viral burden in 22 human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected individuals by assessing their infectivity status, frequency, as well as chemotactic and phagocytic functions. All three monocyte subsets sorted from HTLV-1-infected individuals were positive for viral DNA, and the frequency of classical monocytes was lower in the blood of HTLV-1-infected individuals than in that of uninfected individuals, while the expression levels of the chemokine receptors CCR5, CXCR3, and CX3CR1 in classical monocytes were higher in HTLV-1-infected individuals than uninfected individuals; the percentage of intermediate monocytes and their levels of chemokine receptor expression did not differ between HTLV-1-infected and uninfected individuals. However, the capacity of intermediate monocytes to migrate to CCL5, the ligand for CCR5, was higher, and a higher proportion of nonclassical monocytes expressed CCR1, CXCR3, and CX3CR1. The level of viral DNA in the monocyte subsets correlated with the capacity to migrate to CCL2, CCL5, and CX3CL1 for classical monocytes, with lower levels of phagocytosis for intermediate monocytes, and with the level of viral DNA in CD8+ and CD4+ T cells for nonclassical monocytes. These data suggest a model whereby HTLV-1 infection augments the number of classical monocytes that migrate to tissues and become infected and the number of infected nonclassical monocytes that transmit virus to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These results, together with prior findings in a macaque model of HTLV-1 infection, support the notion that infection of monocytes by HTLV-1 is likely a requisite for viral persistence in humans. IMPORTANCE Monocytes have been implicated in immune regulation and disease progression in patients with HTLV-1-associated inflammatory diseases. We detected

  19. Aging-induced changes in 24-h rhythms of mitogenic responses, lymphocyte subset populations and neurotransmitter and amino acid content in rat submaxillary lymph nodes during Freund's adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bonacho, M G; Cardinali, D P; Castrillón, P; Cutrera, R A; Esquifino, A I

    2001-02-01

    In young (two months) and aged (18 months) male rats injected s.c. with Freund's adjuvant or adjuvant's vehicle 18 days earlier, 24-h variations in mitogenic responses, lymphocyte subsets and monoamine and amino acid content were examined in submaxillary lymph nodes. Mitogenic responses to concanavalin A (Con A) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were higher during the light phase of daily photoperiod. Old rats exhibited a suppressed or impaired mitogenic response to Con A but not to LPS. Acrophases of 24-h rhythm in lymphocyte subset populations in submaxillary lymph nodes were: 18:37-19:44h (B cells), 09:00-10:08h (T and CD4(+) cells) and 12:19-15:58h (CD8(+) cells). Aging augmented B cells and decreased T, CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells. Significant correlations were found between Con A activity and T cells, between lymph node 5HT content and B, T and CD8(+) lymphocytes, and between lymph node 5HT and taurine and GABA content. Aging increased lymph node 5HT content but did not modify NE content. Lymph node concentration of aspartate, glutamate and taurine was higher at night while that of GABA attained peak values at late afternoon. Old rats injected with Freund's adjuvant showed a higher mean value (glutamate) and smaller amplitude (glutamate, taurine) than their respective young controls. The results further document the effects of aging on the chronobiology of the immune system.

  20. Association of Selected Phenotypic Markers of Lymphocyte Activation and Differentiation with Perinatal Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission and Infant Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, John S.; Moye, Jack; Plaeger, Susan F.; Stiehm, E. Richard; Bethel, James; Mofenson, Lynne M.; Mathieson, Bonnie; Kagan, Jonathan; Rosenblatt, Howard; Paxton, Helene; Suter, Hildie; Landay, Alan

    2005-01-01

    This study of a subset of women and infants participating in National Institutes of Health Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol 185 evaluated lymphocyte phenotypic markers of immune activation and differentiation to determine their association with the likelihood of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission from the women to their infants and the potential for early identification and/or prognosis of infection in the infants. Lymphocytes from 215 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV)-infected women and 192 of their infants were analyzed by flow cytometry with an extended three-color panel of monoclonal antibodies. Women who did not transmit to their infants tended to have higher CD4+ T cells. Most notably, levels of total CD8+ T cells and CD8+ CD38+ cells made significant independent contributions to predicting the risk of mother-to-child transmission. Adjusting for HIV-1 RNA level at entry, a one percentage-point increase in these marker combinations was associated with a nine percent increase in the likelihood of maternal transmission. Total as well as naïve CD4+ T cells were significantly higher in uninfected than infected infants. Total CD8+ cells, as well as CD8+cells positive for HLA-DR+, CD45 RA+ HLA-DR+, and CD28+ HLA-DR+ were elevated in infected infants. Detailed immunophenotyping may be helpful in predicting which pregnant HIV-infected women are at increased risk of transmitting HIV to their infants. Increasing differences in lymphocyte subsets between infected and uninfected infants became apparent as early as six weeks of age. Detailed immunophenotyping may be useful in supporting the diagnosis of HIV infection in infants with perinatal HIV exposure. PMID:15879023

  1. Human spleen contains phenotypic subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells that occupy discrete microanatomic locations.

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, P. J.; Smith, M. R.; Braverman, M. F.; Dickson, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    Macrophages (M phi s) are an important component of the immune response and mediate numerous other functions. Phenotypic and functional subsets of circulating monocytes have been described, but few similar studies have analyzed M phi s in human tissues. By use of immunohistochemical techniques and a large number of monoclonal antibodies, the presence and distribution of phenotypic subpopulations of M phi s and dendritic cells in human spleen were assessed. The results of this study show that different subsets of M phi s and dendritic cells are present in the spleen and that some of these occupy discrete microanatomic locations. In the red pulp (RP) certain groups of antigens are expressed by different proportions of uniformly distributed M phi s in the cords. On the other hand, some antigens are present on M phi s that form clusters of variable size within the red pulp. M phi s in the splenic marginal zone (MZ) share some antigens with red pulp M phi s, but in addition express CR3, Mo-2, 61D3, and 63D3. These antigens are found on only a few RP M phi s. MZ cells expressing one antigen shared with RP M phi s (Leu-3a,b) and one present largely on the MZ cells (63D3) form clusters around small vessels; these structures resemble the so-called splenic ellipsoids that may play a role in the trapping of circulating antigens. Phagocytic M phi s (tingible body M phi s) of the white pulp follicular germinal centers were also shown to differ from RP and MZ cels with respect to the expression of the antigens detected by anti-FcR, Leu-M3, Mo-2, 25F9, and anti-CR3. The unique topographical and surface antigenic features of dendritic cells were confirmed by this study. Furthermore, these cells were found to share a number of antigens with RP, MZ, and white pulp M phi s, which suggests that they may be derived from a common progenitor. The presence of phenotypic subpopulations and variation in distribution among human splenic phagocytic cells and dendritic cells may be indicative

  2. Effects of flavonoids on human lymphocyte proliferative responses

    SciTech Connect

    Mookerjee, B.K.; Lee, T.P.; Logue, G.P.; Lippes, H.A.; Middleton, E.

    1986-01-01

    Flavonoids reversibly inhibit lymphocyte proliferative responses to phytomitogens, soluble antigens and phorbol esters by blocking an early event or events that follow stimulation. Quercetin and tangeretin inhibit thymidine transport in stimulated lymphocytes. These flavonoids reversibly inhibit antigen processing by monocytes and inhibit the expression of class II histocompatibility (DR) antigens in PBM cells.

  3. Vincristine-induced bystander effect in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Testi, Serena; Azzarà, Alessia; Giovannini, Caterina; Lombardi, Sara; Piaggi, Simona; Facioni, Maria Sole; Scarpato, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Bystander effect is a known radiobiological effect, widely described using ionizing radiations and which, more recently, has also been related to chemical mutagens. In this study, we aimed to assess whether or not a bystander response can be induced in cultured human peripheral lymphocytes by vincristine, a chemotherapeutic mutagen acting as spindle poison, and by mitomycin-C, an alkylating agent already known to induce this response in human lymphoblastoid cells. Designing a modified ad hoc protocol for the cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (MN) assay, we detected the presence of a dose-dependent bystander response in untreated cultures receiving the conditioned medium (CM) from mitomycin-C (MMC) or vincristine (VCR) treated cultures. In the case of MMC, MN frequencies, expressed as micronucleated binucleates, were: 13.5±1.41 at 6μM, 22±2.12 at 12μM or 28.25±5.13 at 15μM vs. a control value of 4.75±1.59. MN levels for VCR, expressed as micronucleated mononucleates were: 2.75±0.88 at 0.0μM, 27.25±2.30 at 0.4μM, 46.25±1.94 at 0.8μM, 98.25±7.25 at 1.6μM. To verify that no mutagen residual was transferred to recipient cultures together with the CM, we evaluated MN levels in cultures receiving the medium immediately after three washings following the chemical treatment (unconditioned medium). We further confirmed these results using a cell-mixing approach where untreated lymphocytes were co-cultured with donor cells treated with an effect-inducing dose of MMC or VCR. A distinct production pattern of both reactive oxygen species and soluble mediator proteins by treated cells may account for the differences observed in the manifestation of the bystander effect induced by VCR. In fact, we observed an increased level of ROS, IL-32 and TGF-β in the CM from VCR treated cultures, not present in MMC treated cultures.

  4. Human gamma interferon increases the binding of T lymphocytes to endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, C L; Haskard, D O; Cavender, D; Johnson, A R; Ziff, M

    1985-01-01

    Binding of lymphocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) was quantitated by measuring adhesion of 51Cr labelled lymphocytes to endothelial cell monolayers and rosette formation between lymphocytes and EC in suspension. Mitogen stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture supernatants and mixed lymphocyte reaction supernatants enhanced the binding of T lymphocytes to EC monolayers or suspensions preincubated with such supernatants. The active component of these supernatants appeared to be gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) since culture supernatants lost activity after heating at 56 degrees C for 60 min, exposure to pH 2.0 or treatment with anti-IFN-gamma. In addition, purified IFN-gamma increased the binding of T lymphocytes to EC (T-EC). This occurred in a concentration dependent manner when IFN-gamma was preincubated with EC but not with lymphocytes. While the optimum concentration of IFN-gamma was 250 u/ml, a significant enhancement was seen with as little as 10 u/ml. These findings suggest that IFN-gamma may play a part in the emigration of lymphocytes to perivascular chronic inflammatory sites by augmenting the adhesion of lymphocytes to the endothelium of small blood vessels. PMID:2935340

  5. T-lymphocyte induction of human monocyte angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is not dependent upon T-lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Vuk-Pavlovic, Z.; Rohrbach, M.S.

    1986-03-05

    Human peripheral blood monocytes cultured in serum free media for seven days show a basal activity of the ectoenzyme ACE which is augmented 2-3 times by the presence of autologous peripheral blood T-lymphocytes. Since these two cell types are also involved in autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction if serum is present, the authors compared the ability of T-cells to stimulate ACE activity in the presence or absence of proliferation (measured by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation). By the seventh day, cultures with 5% AB/sup +/ serum showed significant increase in proliferation but no increase in ACE activity compared to the serum free cultures. Even higher proliferation rate achieved by co-culturing T-lymphocytes with allogeneic monocytes did not increase ACE production; on the contrary, ACE activity remained at the basal level. Monocyte-T-cell co-cultures stimulated with increasing concentrations of ConA or PHA showed dose dependent increases in proliferation but parallel decreases in ACE activity. Addition of soluble antigen (Candida albicans) also enhanced proliferation but not ACE synthesis. They conclude that T-lymphocyte induction of monocyte ACE is a result of cooperation between autologous cells which is not dependent upon T-cell proliferation.

  6. Novel insights into the relationships between dendritic cell subsets in human and mouse revealed by genome-wide expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Scott H; Walzer, Thierry; Dembélé, Doulaye; Thibault, Christelle; Defays, Axel; Bessou, Gilles; Xu, Huichun; Vivier, Eric; Sellars, MacLean; Pierre, Philippe; Sharp, Franck R; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe; Dalod, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) are a complex group of cells that play a critical role in vertebrate immunity. Lymph-node resident DCs (LN-DCs) are subdivided into conventional DC (cDC) subsets (CD11b and CD8α in mouse; BDCA1 and BDCA3 in human) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). It is currently unclear if these various DC populations belong to a unique hematopoietic lineage and if the subsets identified in the mouse and human systems are evolutionary homologs. To gain novel insights into these questions, we sought conserved genetic signatures for LN-DCs and in vitro derived granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) DCs through the analysis of a compendium of genome-wide expression profiles of mouse or human leukocytes. Results We show through clustering analysis that all LN-DC subsets form a distinct branch within the leukocyte family tree, and reveal a transcriptomal signature evolutionarily conserved in all LN-DC subsets. Moreover, we identify a large gene expression program shared between mouse and human pDCs, and smaller conserved profiles shared between mouse and human LN-cDC subsets. Importantly, most of these genes have not been previously associated with DC function and many have unknown functions. Finally, we use compendium analysis to re-evaluate the classification of interferon-producing killer DCs, lin-CD16+HLA-DR+ cells and in vitro derived GM-CSF DCs, and show that these cells are more closely linked to natural killer and myeloid cells, respectively. Conclusion Our study provides a unique database resource for future investigation of the evolutionarily conserved molecular pathways governing the ontogeny and functions of leukocyte subsets, especially DCs. PMID:18218067

  7. Membrane-associated immunoglobulins of human lymphocytes in immunologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nicod, Isabelle; Girard, J. P.; Cruchaud, A.

    1973-01-01

    Membrane-associated immunoglobulins of peripheral blood lymphocytes were studied by indirect immunofluorescence for γ, α, μ, κ and λ chains in healthy subjects and patients with immunologic disease. In healthy subjects, heavy chains were found on 30·7% of lymphocytes (γ 15·3%, α 7·2% and μ 8·2%) and light chains on 32·8% of cells (κ 20·4% and λ 12·4%). Patients with humoral immune deficiencies had fewer immunoglobulin-bearing cells; sarcoidosis or thymectomy patients had normal or decreased immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes; cells with light chains were fewer than those with heavy chains on their lymphocytes. In some cases, normal levels of serum immunoglobulins were found in the absence of the corresponding immunoglobulin-bearing cells, and in others normal immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes were present in the absence of the corresponding serum immunoglobulins. These data suggest that (1) immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes in blood do not reflect the condition of immunoglobulin-synthesizing cells in peripheral lymphoid tissues, and (2) in certain immunologic disorders, either some B-lymphocytes do not synthesize immunoglobulins, or immunoglobulins are in such a situation that the whole molecule or part of the molecule is not visualized by current methods. PMID:4587505

  8. Specific binding of antigen onto human T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Durandy, A.; Fischer, A.; Charron, D.; Griscelli, C.

    1986-05-01

    Human T lymphocytes sensitized to Candida albicans (CA) were shown to proliferate in cultures induced with mannan, a ramified polysaccharide extracted from the cell well of CA. We presently describe that, when we used strongly labeled (/sup 3/H)mannan, antigen-specific T blast cells were able to bind the labeled mannan on their membrane. The observations that irrelevant blast cells did not bind (/sup 3/H)mannan, and that mannan-specific blast cells did not bind tritiated pneumococcal polysaccharide SIII, indicate the specificity of mannan binding. Mannan binding was reversible and saturable. Mannan binding on T blast cells was inhibited by preincubation with monoclonal antibodies to T3 but not to other T cell-related molecules. The characteristics of this receptor suggest its identity with the T cell receptor for antigen. The direct binding of mannan could be either due to a cross-linking of the receptor by multivalent mannan or to a recognition of mannan in association with HLA-DQ molecules, as suggested by partial blocking of mannan binding using anti-HLA-DQ monoclonal antibodies.

  9. Divalent ion trapping inside potassium channels of human T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Using the patch-clamp whole-cell recording technique, we investigated the influence of external Ca2+, Ba2+, K+, Rb+, and internal Ca2+ on the rate of K+ channel inactivation in the human T lymphocyte-derived cell line, Jurkat E6-1. Raising external Ca2+ or Ba2+, or reducing external K+, accelerated the rate of the K+ current decay during a depolarizing voltage pulse. External Ba2+ also produced a use-dependent block of the K+ channels by entering the open channel and becoming trapped inside. Raising internal Ca2+ accelerated inactivation at lower concentrations than external Ca2+, but increasing the Ca2+ buffering with BAPTA did not affect inactivation. Raising [K+]o or adding Rb+ slowed inactivation by competing with divalent ions. External Rb+ also produced a use-dependent removal of block of K+ channels loaded with Ba2+ or Ca2+. From the removal of this block we found that under normal conditions approximately 25% of the channels were loaded with Ca2+, whereas under conditions with 10 microM internal Ca2+ the proportion of channels loaded with Ca2+ increased to approximately 50%. Removing all the divalent cations from the external and internal solution resulted in the induction of a non-selective, voltage-independent conductance. We conclude that Ca2+ ions from the outside or the inside can bind to a site at the K+ channel and thereby block the channel or accelerate inactivation. PMID:2786551

  10. The “Intermediate” CD14++CD16+ monocyte subset increases in severe peripheral artery disease in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Aschenbrenner, Teresa; Wendorff, Heiko; Czubba, Maria; Glinzer, Almut; Haller, Bernhard; Schiemann, Matthias; Zimmermann, Alexander; Berger, Hermann; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Meier, Reinhard; Wohlgemuth, Walter A.; Libby, Peter; Zernecke, Alma

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes are key players in atherosclerotic. Human monocytes display a considerable heterogeneity and at least three subsets can be distinguished. While the role of monocyte subset heterogeneity has already been well investigated in coronary artery disease (CAD), the knowledge about monocytes and their heterogeneity in peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) still is limited. Therefore, we aimed to investigate monocyte subset heterogeneity in patients with PAOD. Peripheral blood was obtained from 143 patients suffering from PAOD (Rutherford stage I to VI) and three monocyte subsets were identified by flow cytometry: CD14++CD16− classical monocytes, CD14+CD16++ non-classical monocytes and CD14++CD16+ intermediate monocytes. Additionally the expression of distinct surface markers (CD106, CD162 and myeloperoxidase MPO) was analyzed. Proportions of CD14++CD16+ intermediate monocyte levels were significantly increased in advanced stages of PAOD, while classical and non-classical monocytes displayed no such trend. Moreover, CD162 and MPO expression increased significantly in intermediate monocyte subsets in advanced disease stages. Likewise, increased CD162 and MPO expression was noted in CD14++CD16− classical monocytes. These data suggest substantial dynamics in monocyte subset distributions and phenotypes in different stages of PAOD, which can either serve as biomarkers or as potential therapeutic targets to decrease the inflammatory burden in advanced stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:27991581

  11. Identification and characterization of human dendritic cell subsets in the steady state: a review of our current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Metcalf, Jordan Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are generally categorized as a group of rare antigen presenting cells that are to the crucial development of immune responses to pathogens and also of tolerance to self-antigens. Therefore, having the ability to identify DC in specific tissues and to test their functional abilities in the steady state are scientific gaps needing attention. Research on primary human DC is lacking due to their rarity and the difficulty of obtaining tissue samples. However, recent findings have shown that several different DC subsets exist, and that these subsets vary both by markers expressed and functions depending on their specific microenvironment. After discriminating from other cell types, DC can be split into myeloid and plasmacytoid fractions. While plasmacytoid DC express definite markers, CD123 and BDCA-2, myeloid DC encompass several different subsets with overlapping markers expressed. Such markers include the blood DC antigens BDCA-1 and BDCA-3, along with Langerin, CD1a and CD14. Marker specificity is further reduced when accounting for microenvironmental differences, as observed in the blood, primary lymphoid tissues, skin and lungs. The mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR) has been used to measure the strength of antigen presentation by specific DC subsets. Surface markers and MLR require standardization to enable consistent identification of and comparisons between DC subsets. To alleviate these issues, researchers have begun comparing DC subsets at the transcriptional level. This has allowed degrees of relatedness to be determined between DC in different microenvironments, and should be a continued area of focus in years to come.

  12. Serum BAFF and APRIL Levels, T-Lymphocyte Subsets, and Immunoglobulins after B-Cell Depletion Using the Monoclonal Anti-CD20 Antibody Rituximab in Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lunde, Sigrid; Kristoffersen, Einar K.; Sapkota, Dipak; Risa, Kristin; Dahl, Olav; Bruland, Ove; Mella, Olav; Fluge, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a disease of unknown etiology. We have previously suggested clinical benefit from B-cell depletion using the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in a randomized and placebo-controlled study. Prolonged responses were then demonstrated in an open-label phase-II study with maintenance rituximab treatment. Using blood samples from patients in the previous two clinical trials, we investigated quantitative changes in T-lymphocyte subsets, in immunoglobulins, and in serum levels of two B-cell regulating cytokines during follow-up. B-lymphocyte activating factor of the tumor necrosis family (BAFF) in baseline serum samples was elevated in 70 ME/CFS patients as compared to 56 healthy controls (p = 0.011). There were no significant differences in baseline serum BAFF levels between patients with mild, moderate, or severe ME/CFS, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) serum levels were not significantly different in ME/CFS patients compared to healthy controls at baseline, and no changes in serum levels were seen during follow-up. Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets and T-cell activation markers at multiple time points during follow-up showed no significant differences over time, between rituximab and placebo groups, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. Baseline serum IgG levels were significantly lower in patients with subsequent response after rituximab therapy compared to non-responders (p = 0.03). In the maintenance study, slight but significant reductions in mean serum immunoglobulin levels were observed at 24 months compared to baseline; IgG 10.6–9.5 g/L, IgA 1.8–1.5 g/L, and IgM 0.97–0.70 g/L. Although no functional assays were performed, the lack of significant associations of T- and NK-cell subset numbers with B-cell depletion, as well as the lack of associations to clinical responses, suggest that B

  13. CCR5 susceptibility to ligand-mediated down-modulation differs between human T lymphocytes and myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Fox, James M; Kasprowicz, Richard; Hartley, Oliver; Signoret, Nathalie

    2015-07-01

    CCR5 is a chemokine receptor expressed on leukocytes and a coreceptor used by HIV-1 to enter CD4(+) T lymphocytes and macrophages. Stimulation of CCR5 by chemokines triggers internalization of chemokine-bound CCR5 molecules in a process called down-modulation, which contributes to the anti-HIV activity of chemokines. Recent studies have shown that CCR5 conformational heterogeneity influences chemokine-CCR5 interactions and HIV-1 entry in transfected cells or activated CD4(+) T lymphocytes. However, the effect of CCR5 conformations on other cell types and on the process of down-modulation remains unclear. We used mAbs, some already shown to detect distinct CCR5 conformations, to compare the behavior of CCR5 on in vitro generated human T cell blasts, monocytes and MDMs and CHO-CCR5 transfectants. All human cells express distinct antigenic forms of CCR5 not detected on CHO-CCR5 cells. The recognizable populations of CCR5 receptors exhibit different patterns of down-modulation on T lymphocytes compared with myeloid cells. On T cell blasts, CCR5 is recognized by all antibodies and undergoes rapid chemokine-mediated internalization, whereas on monocytes and MDMs, a pool of CCR5 molecules is recognized by a subset of antibodies and is not removed from the cell surface. We demonstrate that this cell surface-retained form of CCR5 responds to prolonged treatment with more-potent chemokine analogs and acts as an HIV-1 coreceptor. Our findings indicate that the regulation of CCR5 is highly specific to cell type and provide a potential explanation for the observation that native chemokines are less-effective HIV-entry inhibitors on macrophages compared with T lymphocytes.

  14. Molecular signatures distinguish human central memory from effector memory CD8 T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Willinger, Tim; Freeman, Tom; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; McMichael, Andrew J; Callan, Margaret F C

    2005-11-01

    Memory T cells are heterogeneous in terms of their phenotype and functional properties. We investigated the molecular profiles of human CD8 naive central memory (T(CM)), effector memory (T(EM)), and effector memory RA (T(EMRA)) T cells using gene expression microarrays and phospho-protein-specific intracellular flow cytometry. We demonstrate that T(CM) have a gene expression and cytokine signaling signature that lies between that of naive and T(EM) or T(EMRA) cells, whereas T(EM) and T(EMRA) are closely related. Our data define the molecular basis for the different functional properties of central and effector memory subsets. We show that T(EM) and T(EMRA) cells strongly express genes with known importance in CD8 T cell effector function. In contrast, T(CM) are characterized by high basal and cytokine-induced STAT5 phosphorylation, reflecting their capacity for self-renewal. Altogether, our results distinguish T(CM) and T(EM)/T(EMRA) at the molecular level and are consistent with the concept that T(CM) represent memory stem cells.

  15. Human endotoxin tolerance is associated with enrichment of the CD14+ CD16+ monocyte subset.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Nieto, Aimée; Zentella, Alejandro; Moreno, José; Ventura, José L; Pedraza, Sigifredo; Velázquez, Juan R

    2015-01-01

    Prior exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induces a state of cell resistance to subsequent LPS restimulation, known as endotoxin tolerance, mainly by repressing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We established an endotoxin tolerance model in human monocytes Endotoxin-tolerant cells showed a decrease in IκBα degradation and diminished expression of Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) (both messenger RNA [mRNA] and protein content). The myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/MyD88 splice variant (MyD88s) ratio, an indirect way to test the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) MyD88-dependent signaling cascade, did not change in endotoxin-tolerant cells when compared to LPS-stimulated or -unstimulated ones. Remarkably, cell population analysis indicated a significant increase of the CD14+ CD16+ subset only under the endotoxin-tolerant condition. Furthermore, endotoxin-tolerant cells produced higher amounts of C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10), a typical MyD88-independent cytokine.

  16. Human CD4- 8- T cells are a distinctive immunoregulatory subset.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mei-Chuan; Patel, Kalpesh; Taub, Dennis D; Longo, Dan L; Goetzl, Edward J

    2010-07-01

    Human CD4(-)8(-) T cells are a minor subset quantitatively but potentially important in immunity because they are predominantly distributed at body surfaces, and their number and activities increase in autoimmune diseases and decrease with aging. Distinguishing characteristics of CD4(-)8(-) T cells are found to include a unique profile of cytokines, including Serpin E1, which is not generated by other T cells, MIF, and TGF-beta. At 2-5% of the total in mixtures with CD4 + CD8 T cells, CD4(-)8(-) T cells enhance the generation of IFN-gamma and IL-17 by up to 12- and 5-fold, respectively, without contributing either cytokine or affecting cytokine production by NK/NKT cells. CD4(-)8(-) T cell-derived MIF is their major enhancer and TGFbeta their principal inhibitor of CD4 and CD8 T cell cytokine production. Decreases in CD4(-)8(-) T cell effects may diminish protective immunity in aging, whereas increases may augment the severity of autoimmune diseases.

  17. Effect of age on generation of progeny from antigen-stimulated human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sohnle, P G; Collins-Lech, C; Huhta, K E

    1982-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown the proliferative response to various mitogenic stimuli of peripheral blood lymphocytes from elderly humans to be impaired. The present investigation examined the termination phase of antigen-stimulated proliferative responses of lymphocytes from elderly and young subjects. In both groups, the responding lymphocytes appeared to stop proliferating and enter the resting stage of the cell cycle when a certain total number of progeny had been generated, suggesting the phenomenon of density-dependent regulation of growth. Lymphocytes from elderly subjects stopped proliferating when significantly fewer progeny had been generated than did those from young subjects. The data suggest, therefore, that lymphocytes from elderly humans may have increased sensitivity to one or more of the factors which cause density-dependent inhibition of growth.

  18. Global transcriptome analysis and enhancer landscape of human primary T follicular helper and T effector lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Jason S.; Lezon-Geyda, Kimberly; Maksimova, Yelena; Craft, Samuel; Zhang, Yaoping; Su, Mack; Schulz, Vincent P.

    2014-01-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are a subset of CD4+ T helper cells that migrate into germinal centers and promote B-cell maturation into memory B and plasma cells. Tfh cells are necessary for promotion of protective humoral immunity following pathogen challenge, but when aberrantly regulated, drive pathogenic antibody formation in autoimmunity and undergo neoplastic transformation in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma and other primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Limited information is available on the expression and regulation of genes in human Tfh cells. Using a fluorescence-activated cell sorting–based strategy, we obtained primary Tfh and non-Tfh T effector cells from tonsils and prepared genome-wide maps of active, intermediate, and poised enhancers determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation–sequencing, with parallel transcriptome analyses determined by RNA sequencing. Tfh cell enhancers were enriched near genes highly expressed in lymphoid cells or involved in lymphoid cell function, with many mapping to sites previously associated with autoimmune disease in genome-wide association studies. A group of active enhancers unique to Tfh cells associated with differentially expressed genes was identified. Fragments from these regions directed expression in reporter gene assays. These data provide a significant resource for studies of T lymphocyte development and differentiation and normal and perturbed Tfh cell function. PMID:25331115

  19. Expression Profiles of miRNA Subsets Distinguish Human Colorectal Carcinoma and Normal Colonic Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Pellatt, Daniel F; Stevens, John R; Wolff, Roger K; Mullany, Lila E; Herrick, Jennifer S; Samowitz, Wade; Slattery, Martha L

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-protein-coding RNA molecules that are commonly dysregulated in colorectal tumors. The objective of this study was to identify smaller subsets of highly predictive miRNAs. METHODS: Data come from population-based studies of colorectal cancer conducted in Utah and the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. Tissue samples were available for 1,953 individuals, of which 1,894 had carcinoma tissue and 1,599 had normal mucosa available for statistical analysis. Agilent Human miRNA Microarray V.19.0 was used to generate miRNA expression profiles; validation of expression levels was carried out using quantitative PCR. We used random forest analysis and verified findings with logistic modeling in separate data sets. Important microRNAs are identified and bioinformatics tools are used to identify target genes and related biological pathways. RESULTS: We identified 16 miRNAs for colon and 17 miRNAs for rectal carcinoma that appear to differentiate between carcinoma and normal mucosa; of these, 12 were important for both colon and rectal cancer, hsa-miR-663b, hsa-miR-4539, hsa-miR-17-5p, hsa-miR-20a-5p, hsa-miR-21-5p, hsa-miR-4506, hsa-miR-92a-3p, hsa-miR-93-5p, hsa-miR-145-5p, hsa-miR-3651, hsa-miR-378a-3p, and hsa-miR-378i. Estimated misclassification rates were low at 4.83% and 2.5% among colon and rectal observations, respectively. Among independent observations, logistic modeling reinforced the importance of these miRNAs, finding the primary principal components of their variation statistically significant (P<0.001 among both colon and rectal observations) and again producing low misclassification rates. Repeating our analysis without those miRNAs initially identified as important identified other important miRNAs; however, misclassification rates increased and distinctions between remaining miRNAs in terms of classification importance were reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the hypothesis that while many miRNAs are

  20. A Single-Cell Gene-Expression Profile Reveals Inter-Cellular Heterogeneity within Human Monocyte Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Gren, Susanne T.; Rasmussen, Thomas B.; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Håkansson, Katarina; Gerwien, Jens G.; Grip, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Human monocytes are a heterogeneous cell population classified into three different subsets: Classical CD14++CD16-, intermediate CD14++CD16+, and non-classical CD14+CD16++ monocytes. These subsets are distinguished by their differential expression of CD14 and CD16, and unique gene expression profile. So far, the variation in inter-cellular gene expression within the monocyte subsets is largely unknown. In this study, the cellular variation within each human monocyte subset from a single healthy donor was described by using a novel single-cell PCR gene-expression analysis tool. We investigated 86 different genes mainly encoding cell surface markers, and proteins involved in immune regulation. Within the three human monocyte subsets, our descriptive findings show multimodal expression of key immune response genes, such as CD40, NFⱪB1, RELA, TLR4, TLR8 and TLR9. Furthermore, we discovered one subgroup of cells within the classical monocytes, which showed alterations of 22 genes e.g. IRF8, CD40, CSF1R, NFⱪB1, RELA and TNF. Additionally one subgroup within the intermediate and non-classical monocytes also displayed distinct gene signatures by altered expression of 8 and 6 genes, respectively. Hence the three monocyte subsets can be further subdivided according to activation status and differentiation, independently of the traditional classification based on cell surface markers. Demonstrating the use and the ability to discover cell heterogeneity within defined populations of human monocytes is of great importance, and can be useful in unravelling inter-cellular variation in leukocyte populations, identifying subpopulations involved in disease pathogenesis and help tailor new therapies. PMID:26650546

  1. Human Lymphocytes Response to Low Gamma-ray Doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Carrillo, Héctor René; Manzanares-Acuña, Eduardo; Bañuelos-Valenzuela, Rómulo

    2002-08-01

    Radiation and non-radiation workers lymphocytes were exposed to a low strength gamma-ray field to determine heat shock protein expression in function of radiation dose. Protein identification was carried out using mAb raised against Hsp25, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90; from these, only Hsp70 protein was detected before and after lymphocyte irradiation. In all cases, an increasing trend of relative amounts of Hsp70 in function to irradiation time was observed. After 70.5 uGy gamma-ray dose, radiation worker's lymphocytes expressed more Hsp70 protein, than non radiation workers' lymphocytes, indicating a larger tolerance to gamma rays (gammatolerance), due to an adaptation process developed by his labor condition.

  2. Comparative Analysis of the In Vitro Sensitivity of Human Lymphocytes Exposed to Radiation of Different LET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaytseva, Ekaterina M.; Deperas-Kaminska, Marta; Govorun, Raisa D.; Deperas-Standylo, Joanna; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify if the sensitivity of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) to high LET radiation is individually variable and whether it correlates with the sensitivity to low LET radiation.

  3. Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast™ chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultur...

  4. Inhibitory and stimulatory effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanine on human T and B lymphocytes and human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ulmer, A J; Pryjma, J; Tarnok, Z; Ernst, M; Flad, H D

    1990-01-01

    Pyocyanine, a pigment produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has dual dose-dependent stimulatory as well as inhibitory effects on immune responses in vitro as measured by DNA synthesis of human T and B lymphocytes, interleukin-2 (IL-2) production by human T lymphocytes, immunoglobulin production by human B lymphocytes, and monokine production by human monocytes. In general, stimulatory activity was found at low concentrations of pyocyanine, whereas high concentrations of the pigment resulted in an inhibition of responses. At a pyocyanine concentration of 0.1 micrograms/ml or less the proliferation of T and B lymphocytes was enhanced, but at 0.5 micrograms/ml it was suppressed. IL-2 production by T lymphocytes was enhanced at concentrations up to 0.5 micrograms/ml but totally inhibited at 1.0 micrograms/ml. The differentiation of B lymphocytes to become immunoglobulin-producing cells was also enhanced in the presence of low doses of pyocyanine, whereas secretion of immunoglobulin by B lymphocytes was suppressed at all concentrations of pyocyanine. In contrast to the dual effects of pyocyanine on lymphocyte response, lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor release by monocytes was markedly enhanced by low as well as high concentrations of pyocyanine. From these results we conclude that this property of pyocyanine may lead to suppression of specific defense mechanisms and enhance harmful inflammatory reactions of the host during infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:2106495

  5. Contribution of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte subsets to the cytokine secretion patterns induced in mice during sensitization to contact and respiratory chemical allergens.

    PubMed Central

    Dearman, R J; Moussavi, A; Kemeny, D M; Kimber, I

    1996-01-01

    Chemical allergens of different types, those that cause in humans allergic contact dermatitis or occupational asthma induce in mice divergent immune responses characteristic, respectively, of T-helper 1 (Th1)- and Th2-type cell activation. Such responses are associated with the development of different cytokine secretion patterns by draining lymph node cells (LNC), such that contact allergens stimulate vigorous interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production, but little secretion of the Th2 cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-10 (IL-4 and IL-10), whereas the converse pattern is provoked by respiratory allergens. Using selective depletion with antibody and complement we have here examined the relative contribution of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes to the cytokine secretion patterns of draining LNC isolated from mice sensitized to chemical allergens. Mice received repeated topical applications of respiratory allergens, trimellitic anhydride (TMA) or diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI), or of contact allergens 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) or formaldehyde. Thirteen days following the initiation of exposure the production by draining LNC of IL-10, IFN-gamma and mitogen (concanavalin A)-inducible IL-4 was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) after various periods of culture. It was found that the high levels of IL-4 and IL-10 secretion stimulated by TMA or MDI, and the lower levels of these cytokines induced by DNCB or formaldehyde, were in all cases dependent upon the presence of CD4- cells. In contrast, the comparatively high concentrations of IFN-gamma observed following exposure to contact allergens were found to be derived from CD4+ cells, and in the case of DNCB from CD8+ cells also. The low levels of IFN-gamma induced by treatment with TMA or MDI were associated largely or wholly with CD8+ cells. These data indicate that the type 2 cytokine responses induced to different extents by both contact and respiratory chemical allergens are almost exclusively

  6. Volume regulation by human lymphocytes. Role of calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Grinstein, S.; Dupre, A.; Rothstein, A.

    1982-05-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes regulate their volumes in hypotonic solutions. In hypotonic media in which Na+ is the predominant cation, an initial swelling phase is followed by a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) associated with a net loss of cellular K+. In media in which K+ is the predominant cation, the rapid initial swelling is followed by a slower second swelling phase. /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes increased during RVD and returned to normal when the original volume was approximately regained. Effects similar to those induced by hypotonic stress could also be produced by raising the intracellular Ca++ level. In isotonic, Ca++-containing media cells were found to shrink upon addition of the Ca++ ionophore A23187 in K+-free media, but to swell in K+-rich media. Exposure to Ca++ plus A23187 also increased /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes. Quinine (75 microM), an inhibitor of the Ca++-activated K+ pathway in other systems blocked RVD, the associated K+ loss, and the increase in /sup 86/Rb+ efflux. Quinine also inhibited the volume changes and the increased /sup 86/Rb fluxes induced by Ca++ plus ionophore. The calmodulin inhibitors trifluoperazine, pimozide and chlorpromazine blocked RVD as well as Ca++ plus A23187-induced volume changes. Trifluoperazine also prevented the increase in /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes and K+ loss induced by hypotonicity. Chlorpromazine sulfoxide, a relatively ineffective calmodulin antagonist, was considerably less potent as an inhibitor of RVD than chlorpromazine. It is suggested than an elevation in cytoplasmic (Ca++), triggered by cell swelling, increases the plasma membrane permeability to K+, the ensuing increased efflux of K+, associated anions, and osmotically obliged water, leading to cell shrinking (RVD).

  7. HIV-1 Interacts with Human Endogenous Retrovirus K (HML-2) Envelopes Derived from Human Primary Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Brinzevich, Daria; Young, George R.; Sebra, Robert; Ayllon, Juan; Maio, Susan M.; Deikus, Gintaras; Chen, Benjamin K.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Simon, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are viruses that have colonized the germ line and spread through vertical passage. Only the more recently acquired HERVs, such as the HERV-K (HML-2) group, maintain coding open reading frames. Expression of HERV-Ks has been linked to different pathological conditions, including HIV infection, but our knowledge on which specific HERV-Ks are expressed in primary lymphocytes currently is very limited. To identify the most expressed HERV-Ks in an unbiased manner, we analyzed their expression patterns in peripheral blood lymphocytes using Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing. We observe that three HERV-Ks (KII, K102, and K18) constitute over 90% of the total HERV-K expression in primary human lymphocytes of five different donors. We also show experimentally that two of these HERV-K env sequences (K18 and K102) retain their ability to produce full-length and posttranslationally processed envelope proteins in cell culture. We show that HERV-K18 Env can be incorporated into HIV-1 but not simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) particles. Moreover, HERV-K18 Env incorporation into HIV-1 virions is dependent on HIV-1 matrix. Taken together, we generated high-resolution HERV-K expression profiles specific for activated human lymphocytes. We found that one of the most abundantly expressed HERV-K envelopes not only makes a full-length protein but also specifically interacts with HIV-1. Our findings raise the possibility that these endogenous retroviral Env proteins could directly influence HIV-1 replication. IMPORTANCE Here, we report the HERV-K expression profile of primary lymphocytes from 5 different healthy donors. We used a novel deep-sequencing technology (PacBio SMRT) that produces the long reads necessary to discriminate the complexity of HERV-K expression. We find that primary lymphocytes express up to 32 different HERV-K envelopes, and that at least two of the most expressed Env proteins

  8. Identification of the Gene for Scleroderma in the Tsk/2 Mouse Strain: Implicationsfor Human Scleroderma Pathogenesis and Subset Distinctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    11-1-0524 TITLE: Identification of the Gene for Scleroderma in the Tsk/2 Mouse Strain: Implications for Human Scleroderma Pathogenesis and...Z39.18 Identification of the Gene for Scleroderma in the Tsk/2 Mouse Strain: Implications for Human Scleroderma Pathogenesis and Subset...clinical model. In this report, we show a clear time dependence on the gene expression in the skin of the Tsk2/+ mice. We have proven that Col3a1 is

  9. Signaling in Human and Murine Lymphocytes in Microgravity: Parallels and Contrasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Pellis; Alamelu, Sundaresan; Kulkarni, A. D.; Yamauchi, K.

    2006-01-01

    Immune function in space undergoes dramatic changes, some of which are detrimental to lymphocyte function. These changes may lead to significant immune suppression. Studies with human lymphocytes both in space flight and with ground-based models (NASA in vitro ground-based microgravity analog) indicate that T cell activation is inhibited in microgravity. Other lymphocyte functions, such as locomotion, are also inhibited. There is about an 80 percent homology in the immune response of mice to that of humans. A murine model was investigated because of its ability to parallel some microgravity using hind limb suspension. In in vivo antiorthostatically (AOS)-suspended mice, T cell activation is greatly suppressed, with the majority of activation related cytokines being inhibited. PHA activation in lymphocytes derived from AOS mice (in vivo ground-based microgravity analog) is also suppressed. Calcium ionophore studies in human lymphocytes exposed to modeled microgravity indicate that the calcium pathways are probably unaffected in microgravity. IP3 (inositol triphosphate) receptor expression in both human and mouse lymphocytes cultured in modeled microgravity indicate no suppression of calcium signaling. In the human system, microgravity seems to inhibit signaling cascades either at the level of, or up-stream of, Protein Kinase C (PKC). In particular, a membrane event, such as phospholipase C gamma 1 activity in human lymphocytes is affected, with its direct upstream effector, LAT, being deficiently expressed. In the mouse pathway, LAT is undiminished while another critical intermediate, SLP-76, is diminished significantly. This study identifies critical stages in the human and mouse immune systems and in lymphocytes as a function of microgravity.

  10. Diverse Gene Expression in Human Regulatory T Cell Subsets Uncovers Connection between Regulatory T Cell Genes and Suppressive Function.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jing; Davis, Scott P; Hill, Jonathan A; Yamagata, Tetsuya

    2015-10-15

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells have a critical role in the control of immunity, and their diverse subpopulations may allow adaptation to different types of immune responses. In this study, we analyzed human Treg cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood by performing genome-wide expression profiling of 40 Treg cell subsets from healthy donors. We found that the human peripheral blood Treg cell population is comprised of five major genomic subgroups, represented by 16 tractable subsets with a particular cell surface phenotype. These subsets possess a range of suppressive function and cytokine secretion and can exert a genomic footprint on target effector T (Teff) cells. Correlation analysis of variability in gene expression in the subsets identified several cell surface molecules associated with Treg suppressive function, and pharmacological interrogation revealed a set of genes having causative effect. The five genomic subgroups of Treg cells imposed a preserved pattern of gene expression on Teff cells, with a varying degree of genes being suppressed or induced. Notably, there was a cluster of genes induced by Treg cells that bolstered an autoinhibitory effect in Teff cells, and this induction appears to be governed by a different set of genes than ones involved in counteracting Teff activation. Our work shows an example of exploiting the diversity within human Treg cell subpopulations to dissect Treg cell biology.

  11. Clinically used selective oestrogen receptor modulators increase LDL receptor activity in primary human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cerrato, F; Fernández-Suárez, M E; Alonso, R; Alonso, M; Vázquez, C; Pastor, O; Mata, P; Lasunción, M A; Gómez-Coronado, D

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Treatment with selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. We assessed the effect of tamoxifen, raloxifene and toremifene and their combinations with lovastatin on LDL receptor activity in lymphocytes from normolipidaemic and familial hypercholesterolaemic (FH) subjects, and human HepG2 hepatocytes and MOLT-4 lymphoblasts. Experimental Approach Lymphocytes were isolated from peripheral blood, treated with different compounds, and 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labelled LDL uptake was analysed by flow cytometry. Key Results Tamoxifen, toremifene and raloxifene, in this order, stimulated DiI-LDL uptake by lymphocytes by inhibiting LDL-derived cholesterol trafficking and subsequent down-regulation of LDL receptor expression. Differently to what occurred in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells, only tamoxifen consistently displayed a potentiating effect with lovastatin in primary lymphocytes. The SERM-mediated increase in LDL receptor activity was not altered by the anti-oestrogen ICI 182 780 nor was it reproduced by 17β-oestradiol. However, the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen was equally effective as tamoxifen. The SERMs produced similar effects on LDL receptor activity in heterozygous FH lymphocytes as in normal lymphocytes, although none of them had a potentiating effect with lovastatin in heterozygous FH lymphocytes. The SERMs had no effect in homozygous FH lymphocytes. Conclusions and Implications Clinically used SERMs up-regulate LDL receptors in primary human lymphocytes. There is a mild enhancement between SERMs and lovastatin of lymphocyte LDLR activity, the potentiation being greater in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells. The effect of SERMs is independent of oestrogen receptors but is preserved in the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen. This mechanism may contribute to the cholesterol-lowering action of SERMs. PMID:25395200

  12. [Human chronic chagasic myocarditis: quantitative study of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes in inflammatory exudates].

    PubMed

    Tostes Júnior, S; Lopes, E R; Pereira, F E; Chapadeiro, E

    1994-01-01

    Myocardial exsudate CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes were counted in transmural left ventricular free wall frozen sections taken from 10 necropsied chronic cardiac chagasic patients. The cells were labeled with monoclonal antibodies using a streptavidin-biotin technique. We counted: 1) lymphocytes in the total exsudate (LTE) and, separately, 2) the lymphocytes touching or very near to myocells (LTVNM). Lymphocytes were considered very near whenever their own nuclear shortest nuclear diameter was larger than their distance from myocells. CD8+ lymphocytes were more numerous than CD4+ lymphocytes, especially among the LTVNM. The LTE CD4/CD8 ratio was 0.37 +/- 0.20, but the LTVNM CD4/CD8 ratio was smaller (0.23 +/- 0.11). Among the LTE, 34 +/- 11% of CD8+ (against 24 +/- 12% of CD4+) were LTVNM. All these differences were statistically significant. Both subtypes of T-lymphocytes were found to have an intimate relationship with both ruptured and unruptured myocells, and parasites were not seen. These findings are in accordance with the idea that the myocardial cell lesions in the cardiac form of human Chagas' disease are mediated mainly by T-cytotoxic lymphocytes.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S induces proliferation of human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Mody, C H; Buser, D E; Syme, R M; Woods, D E

    1995-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacterium that is responsible for devastating acute and chronic infections, which include bronchiectasis in cystic fibrosis, nosocomial pneumonia, and infection of burn wounds. Previous studies have demonstrated that these patients have impaired host responses, including cell-mediated immune responses, which are important in anti-Pseudomonas host defense. The P. aeruginosa exoproduct, exoenzyme S, has a number of characteristics which suggest that it might be important in cell-mediated immunity. To determine whether exoenzyme S activates lymphocytes to proliferate, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from normal volunteers were stimulated with purified exoenzyme S, and the lymphocyte response was assessed by measuring [3H]thymidine uptake and by counting the number of cells after various times in culture. Ninety-five percent of healthy adult donors had a lymphocyte response to exoenzyme S. The optimal lymphocyte response occurred on day 7, with 4 x 10(5) PBMC per microtiter well when cells were stimulated with 10 micrograms exoenzyme S per ml. [3H]thymidine uptake correlated with an increase in the number of mononuclear cells, indicating that proliferation occurred. In unseparated PBMC, T cells, and to a lesser extent B cells, proliferated. Purified T cells proliferated, while purified B cells proliferated only after the addition of irradiated T cells. Thus, T lymphocytes are necessary and sufficient for the proliferative response to exoenzyme S. We speculate that exoenzyme S from P. aeruginosa is important in T-lymphocyte-mediated host defense to P. aeruginosa. In strategies to enhance impaired cell-mediated immunity, exoenzyme S should be considered as a potential stimulant. PMID:7537248

  14. B Cell Subsets in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Heather M.; Bender, Timothy P.; McNamara, Coleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of heart attacks and strokes, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the artery wall. Immune cells, including lymphocytes modulate atherosclerotic lesion development through interconnected mechanisms. Elegant studies over the past decades have begun to unravel a role for B cells in atherosclerosis. Recent findings provide evidence that B cell effects on atherosclerosis may be subset-dependent. B-1a B cells have been reported to protect from atherosclerosis by secretion of natural IgM antibodies. Conventional B-2 B cells can promote atherosclerosis through less clearly defined mechanism that may involve CD4 T cells. Yet, there may be other populations of B cells within these subsets with different phenotypes altering their impact on atherosclerosis. Additionally, the role of B cell subsets in atherosclerosis may depend on their environmental niche and/or the stage of atherogenesis. This review will highlight key findings in the evolving field of B cells and atherosclerosis and touch on the potential and importance of translating these findings to human disease. PMID:23248624

  15. The in vitro and in vivo effects of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) on murine lymphocyte subsets and Ia antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Frazier, D E; Tarr, M J; Olsen, R G

    1991-01-01

    1,1-Dimethylhydrazine or unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) is a highly volatile and reactive compound used primarily as a liquid rocket propellant. Previous studies found UDMH to possess immunomodulatory activity similar to other hydrazine derivatives. Modulation of T lymphocyte subpopulations and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II or Ia antigen were evaluated as possible mechanisms for this UDMH-induced immunomodulation. Murine lymphoid cell populations were examined by flow cytometry for changes in their cell surface marker percentages or relative number upon exposure to UDMH either in vitro or in vivo. The results show UDMH caused significant suppression of the T helper cell population derived from the thymus at the 75 mg/kg dose in vivo, but did not affect other lymphocyte subpopulations isolated from mesenteric lymph node, spleen or thymus at this or any other dose. In vivo exposure of mice at all doses of UDMH did not significantly alter expression of Ia antigens on adherent cell populations and expression of the Ia antigen following in vitro UDMH exposure was not affected as well. Results indicate that the immunomodulatory effects of UDMH are not mediated by phenotypic alteration of T lymphocyte subpopulations or Ia antigen.

  16. Radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphocytes: Potential as a biological dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Boreham, D.R.; Gale, K.L.; Maves, S.R.; Walker, J.A.; Morrison, D.P.

    1996-11-01

    We have tested the possibility of using apoptosis (programmed cell death) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes as a short-term biological dosimeter. Lymphocytes isolated from whole blood were irradiated in culture with 250 kVp x-rays or {sup 60}Co gamma rays. Two assays were used to measure apoptosis in lymphocytes after irradiation: in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase assay and fluorescence analysis of DNA unwinding assay. Similar qualitative and quantitative results were produced by the assays, supporting the notion that the fluorescence analysis of DNA unwinding assay measured DNA fragmentation associated with apoptosis. Induction of apoptosis in lymphocytes irradiated in vitro was proportional to dose and could be detected following exposures as low as 0.05 Gy. Lymphocytes irradiated in vitro was proportional to dose and could be detected following exposures as low as 0.05 Gy. Lymphocytes from individual donors had reproducible dose responses. There was, however, variation between donors. X-ray and gamma-ray exposures induced similar levels of apoptosis at similar doses. The induction kinetics of apoptosis in vitro indicate a maximum is reached about 72 h after irradiation. In conclusion, the in vitro experimental evidence indicates that radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphocytes has the kinetics, sensitivity, and reproductibility to be a potential biological dosimeter. 29 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Viscoelastic Properties Measurement of Human Lymphocytes by Atomic Force Microscopy Based on Magnetic Beads Cell Isolation.

    PubMed

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lianqing; Xiao, Xiubin; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao

    2016-03-28

    Cell mechanics has been proved to be an effective biomarker for indicating cellular states. The advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides an exciting instrument for measuring the mechanical properties of single cells. However, current AFM single-cell mechanical measurements are commonly performed on cell lines cultured in vitro which are quite different from the primary cells in the human body. Investigating the mechanical properties of primary cells from clinical environments can help us to better understand cell behaviors. Here, by combining AFM with magnetic beads cell isolation, the viscoelastic properties of human primary B lymphocytes were quantitatively measured. B lymphocytes were isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers by density gradient centrifugation and CD19 magnetic beads cell isolation. The activity and specificity of the isolated cells were confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. AFM imaging revealed the surface topography and geometric parameters of B lymphocytes. The instantaneous modulus and relaxation time of living B lymphocytes were measured by AFM indenting technique, showing that the instantaneous modulus of human normal B lymphocytes was 2~3 kPa and the relaxation times were 0.03~0.06 s and 0.35~0.55 s. The differences in cellular visocoelastic properties between primary B lymphocytes and cell lines cultured in vitro were analyzed. The study proves the capability of AFM in quantifying the viscoelastic properties of individual specific primary cells from the blood sample of clinical patients, which will improve our understanding of the behaviors of cells in the human body.

  18. Celecoxib mitigates genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human blood lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Fathi, Mahdieh; Ghasemi, Arash; Shiadeh, Seyedeh Nesa Rezaeian; Pourfallah, Tayyeb Allahverdi

    2017-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes DNA damage and chromosome abbreviations on normal cells. The radioprotective effect of celecoxib (CLX) was investigated against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in cultured human blood lymphocytes. Peripheral blood samples were collected from human volunteers and were incubated at different concentrations at 1, 5, 10 and 50 μM of CLX for two hours. At each dose point, the whole blood was exposed in vitro to 150 cGy of X-ray, and then the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronucleus frequency in cytokinesis blocked binucleated lymphocytes. Incubation of the whole blood with CLX exhibited a significant decrease in the incidence of micronuclei in lymphocytes induced by ionizing radiation, as compared with similarly irradiated lymphocytes without CLX treatment. The maximum reduction on the frequency of micronuclei was observed at 50 μM of CLX (65% decrease). This data may have an important possible application for the protection of human lymphocytes from the genetic damage induced by ionizing irradiation in human exposed to radiation. PMID:28255318

  19. Interaction between human lung fibroblasts and T-lymphocytes prevents activation of CD4+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Vancheri, Carlo; Mastruzzo, Claudio; Trovato-Salinaro, Elisa; Gili, Elisa; Lo Furno, Debora; Pistorio, Maria P; Caruso, Massimo; La Rosa, Cristina; Crimi, Claudia; Failla, Marco; Crimi, Nunzio

    2005-01-01

    Background T lymphocytes are demonstrated to play an important role in several chronic pulmonary inflammatory diseases. In this study we provide evidence that human lung fibroblasts are capable of mutually interacting with T-lymphocytes leading to functionally significant responses by T-cells and fibroblasts. Methods Human lung fibroblast were co-cultured with PMA-ionomycin activated T-CD4 lymphocytes for 36 hours. Surface as well as intracellular proteins expression, relevant to fibroblasts and lymphocytes activation, were evaluated by means of flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Proliferative responses of T lymphocytes to concanavalin A were evaluated by the MTT assay. Results In lung fibroblasts, activated lymphocytes promote an increase of expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and ICAM-1, expressed as mean fluorescence intensity (MFI), from 5.4 ± 0.9 and 0.7 ± 0.15 to 9.1 ± 1.5 and 38.6 ± 7.8, respectively. Fibroblasts, in turn, induce a significant reduction of transcription and protein expression of CD69, LFA-1 and CD28 in activated lymphocytes and CD3 in resting lymphocytes. In activated T lymphocytes, LFA-1, CD28 and CD69 expression was 16.6 ± 0.7, 18.9 ± 1.9 and 6.6 ± 1.3, respectively, and was significantly reduced by fibroblasts to 9.4 ± 0.7, 9.4 ± 1.4 and 3.5 ± 1.0. CD3 expression in resting lymphocytes was 11.9 ± 1.4 and was significantly reduced by fibroblasts to 6.4 ± 1.1. Intracellular cytokines, TNF-alpha and IL-10, were evaluated in T lymphocytes. Co-incubation with fibroblasts reduced the number of TNF-alpha positive lymphocytes from 54,4% ± 6.12 to 30.8 ± 2.8, while IL-10 positive cells were unaffected. Finally, co-culture with fibroblasts significantly reduced Con A proliferative response of T lymphocytes, measured as MTT absorbance, from 0.24 ± 0.02 nm to 0.16 ± 0.02 nm. Interestingly, while the activation of fibroblasts is mediated by a soluble factor, a cognate interaction ICAM-1 mediated was demonstrated to be responsible for the modulation

  20. Identification of the Gene for Scleroderma in the Tsk/2 Mouse Strain: Implications for Human Scleroderma Pathogenesis and Subset Distinctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Col3a1Tsk2)gene)alone)can)induce))15.&SUBJECT&TERMS&A imal&model,&systemic&sclerosis,&scleroderma,&Tsk2/+,&fibrosis,&gene,& genetics ,&TGFβ&) )) 16...differently)in)females)than)males,)a)phenomenon)also)observed)in)human) SSc.)These)SSc)phenotypes)in)B6.Tsk2)mice)are)all)likely)due)to)a)single) genetic ...and) systemic) sclerosis) (SSc);) animal) models;) mice;) Tsk2/+) mice;) genetic ) mapping;) fibroproliferative) subset;) TGFβ;) TWEAK/FN14) signaling

  1. Human intestinal Vdelta1+ lymphocytes recognize tumor cells of epithelial origin

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    gammadelta T cells can be grouped into discrete subsets based upon their expression of T cell receptor (TCR) variable (V) region families, their tissue distribution, and their specificity. Vdelta2+ T cells constitute the majority of gammadelta T cells in peripheral blood whereas Vdelta1+T cells reside preferentially in skin epithelium and in the intestine. gammadelta T cells are envisioned as first line host defense mechanisms capable of providing a source of immune effector T cells and immunomodulating cytokines such as interleukin (IL) 4 or interferon (IFN) gamma. We describe here the fine specificity of three distinct gammadelta+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) obtained from patients with primary or metastatic colorectal cancer, that could be readily expanded in vitro in the presence of IL-1beta and IL-7. Irrespective of donor, these individual gammadelta T cells exhibited a similar pattern of reactivity defined by recognition of autologous and allogeneic colorectal cancer cells, renal cell cancer, pancreatic cancer, and a freshly isolated explant from human intestine as measured by cytolytic T cell responses and by IFN-gamma release. In contrast, tumors of alternate histologies were not lysed, including lung cancer, squamous cell cancer, as well as the natural/lymphocyte-activated killer cell-sensitive hematopoietic cell lines T2, C1R, or Daudi. The cell line K562 was only poorly lysed when compared with colorectal cancer targets. Target cell reactivity mediated by Vdelta1+ T cells was partially blocked with Abs directed against the TCR, the beta2 or beta7 integrin chains, or fibronectin receptor. Marker analysis using flow cytometry revealed that all three gammadelta T cell lines exhibit a similar phenotype. Analysis of the gammadelta TCR junctional suggested exclusive usage of the Vdelta1/Ddelta3/Jdelta1 TCR segments with extensive (< or = 29 bp) N/P region diversity. T cell recognition of target cells did not appear to be a major histocompatibility

  2. Effects of doxycycline on haematology, blood chemistry and peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets of healthy dogs and dogs naturally infected with Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed

    Villaescusa, A; García-Sancho, M; Rodríguez-Franco, F; Tesouro, M Á; Sainz, Á

    2015-06-01

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME), caused by Ehrlichia canis, is a vector-borne disease with a worldwide distribution. It has been proposed that the pathogenesis, clinical severity and outcome of disease caused by Ehrlichia spp. can be attributed to the immune response rather than to any direct rickettsial effect. Moreover, doxycycline, the antimicrobial of choice for the treatment of CME, has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties associated with blood leukocyte proliferation function, cytokine synthesis, and matrix metalloproteinase activity. In order to assess the potential effects of doxycycline, dependent and independent of its antimicrobial activity, the present study compared changes in haematology, blood chemistry and circulating lymphocyte subpopulations in 12 healthy dogs and 20 dogs with CME after doxycycline therapy. Some changes were recorded only in the CME affected dogs, probably due to the antimicrobial effect of doxycycline. However, increases in mean corpuscular haemoglobin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, platelet count and α2-globulins, and decreased plasma creatinine were observed in both healthy and CME affected dogs. The absolute count of B lymphocytes (CD21(+)) increased initially, but then decreased until the end of the study period in both groups. A potential effect of doxycycline unrelated to its antimicrobial activity against E. canis is suggested, taking into account the results observed both in healthy dogs and in dogs with CME.

  3. [239Pu and chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Okladnikova, N D; Osovets, S V; Kudriavtseva, T I

    2009-01-01

    The genome status in somatic cells was assessed using the chromosomal aberration (CA) test in peripheral blood lymphocytes from 194 plutonium workers exposed to occupational radiation mainly from low-transportable compounds of airborne 230Pu. Pu body burden at the time of cytogenetic study varied from values close to the method sensitivity to values multiply exceeding the permissible level. Standard (routine) methods of peripheral blood lymphocytes cultivation were applied. Chromatid- and chromosomal-type structural changes were estimated. Aberrations were estimated per 100 examined metaphase cells. The quantitative relationship between the CA frequency and Pu body burden and the absorbed dose to the lung was found. Mathematical processing of results was carried out based on the phenomenological model. The results were shown as theoretical and experimental curves. The threshold of the CA yield was 0.43 +/- 0.03 kBq (Pu body burden) and 6.12 +/- 1.20 cGy (absorbed dose to the lung).

  4. CXCR6 marks a novel subset of T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) natural killer cells residing in human liver.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, Kerstin A; Robertson, Francis; Hansi, Navjyot; Gill, Upkar; Pallant, Celeste; Christophides, Theodoros; Pallett, Laura J; Peppa, Dimitra; Dunn, Claire; Fusai, Giuseppe; Male, Victoria; Davidson, Brian R; Kennedy, Patrick; Maini, Mala K

    2016-05-23

    Natural killer cells (NK) are highly enriched in the human liver, where they can regulate immunity and immunopathology. We probed them for a liver-resident subset, distinct from conventional bone-marrow-derived NK. CXCR6+ NK were strikingly enriched in healthy and diseased liver compared to blood (p < 0.0001). Human hepatic CXCR6+ NK had an immature phenotype (predominantly CD56(bright)CD16-CD57-), and expressed the tissue-residency marker CD69. CXCR6+ NK produced fewer cytotoxic mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines than the non-liver-specific CXCR6- fraction. Instead CXCR6+ NK could upregulate TRAIL, a key death ligand in hepatitis pathogenesis. CXCR6 demarcated liver NK into two transcriptionally distinct populations: T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo)(CXCR6-) and T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi)(CXCR6+); the latter was virtually absent in the periphery. The small circulating CXCR6+ subset was predominantly T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo), suggesting its lineage was closer to CXCR6- peripheral than CXCR6+ liver NK. These data reveal a large subset of human liver-resident T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) NK, distinguished by their surface expression of CXCR6, adapted for hepatic tolerance and inducible anti-viral immunity.

  5. Multicolor flow cytometry analysis of blood cell subsets in patients given total body irradiation before bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Clave, E.; Socie, G.; Carosella, E.

    1995-11-01

    Bone marrow transplantation has often been closely linked with accidental or intentional therapeutical irradiation. In both situations, study of the radiosensitivity of human blood cell subsets is of interest. Using one-color flow cytometry analysis of B lymphocytes, T cell subsets, and natural killer cells, we previously reported that lymphocyte subsets exhibit equal radiosensitivity. Taking advantage of recent developments in the knowledge of leukocyte differentiation antigens and flow cytometry technology we undertook a study of blood cell subsets to search for rare populations exhibiting different radiosensitivity. Thirty patients, who were delivered a 12 Gy fractionated total body irradiation as part of their conditioning regimen before transplantation for malignant disorders, were studied using multicolor flow cytometry. T and B lymphocytes showed a sharp, radiation-induced decrease, with the B lymphocytes (cluster of differentiation (CD) 19+) being the most sensitive. When analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry all major lymphocyte subsets appeared equally sensitive to the in vivo irradiation. Therefore, all major lymphocyte subsets sharing the helper phenotype (naive or memory) and the cytotoxic phenotype appeared equally sensitive to in vivo whole body irradiation. In parallel, the CD34+ cell subset remained basically unchanged after whole body irradiation. Finally, the CD3{minus}, 56+, 16+ natural killer cell subset was relatively radioresistant (91 and 74% of its initial value, after 2 and 4 Gy, respectively) as compared to other lymphocyte subsets. Our study provides evidence that T and B cell subsets seem to be highly radiosensitive in vivo. The CD34+ progenitor/stem cells and NK cells seem to be more radioresistant. This latter result might provide clues to the understanding of the pathophysiogeny of radiation-induced aplasia and of the engrafment/rejection process following bone marrow transplantation. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Age-related differences in human palatine tonsillar B cell subsets and immunoglobulin isotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jino; Chang, Dong-Yeop; Kim, Sang-Wook; Choi, Yoon Seok; Jeon, Sea-Yuong; Racanelli, Vito; Kim, Dae Woo; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2016-02-01

    The tonsils provide defense of the upper aerodigestive tract against pathogens. Although long known to undergo functional changes with age, the precise changes occurring within tonsillar B cell populations remain undefined. In the present study, we investigated age-related changes in palatine tonsillar B cell subsets and immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes. Palatine tonsils were obtained from forty-two tonsillectomy patients without tonsillitis who were divided into three groups: young children (4-9 years), adolescents (10-19 years), and adults (20-60 years). Tonsillar B cells were then analyzed by flow cytometry. Using expression of CD38 and IgD to define B cell subsets, we found that the frequency of germinal center (GC) B cells in the tonsils was significantly higher, and the frequency of memory B cells lower, in young children as compared to adolescents and adults. Within the GC B cell subsets, adults had a higher frequency of IgA(+) cells and a lower frequency of IgM(+) cells as compared to individuals in the younger age groups. Moreover, young children had a higher frequency of IgG(+) cells in the GC B cell subsets than did individuals in the older age groups. We also observed an abundance of IgM(+) cells among memory B cells and plasmablasts in young children and IgA(+) cells in adults. In summary, the proportion of GC B cells in palatine tonsillar B cells decreases with age, while the proportion of memory B cells increases with age. In addition, Ig isotypes in tonsils preferentially switch from IgM to IgA as individuals age.

  7. LincRNA landscape in human lymphocytes highlights regulation of T cell differentiation by linc-MAF-4

    PubMed Central

    Curti, Serena; Gruarin, Paola; Provasi, Elena; Sugliano, Elisa; Marconi, Maurizio; De Francesco, Raffaele; Geginat, Jens; Bodega, Beatrice; Abrignani, Sergio; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding-RNAs are emerging as important regulators of cellular functions but little is known on their role in human immune system. Here we investigated long intergenic non-coding-RNAs (lincRNAs) in thirteen T and B lymphocyte subsets by RNA-seq analysis and de novo transcriptome reconstruction. Over five hundred new lincRNAs were identified and lincRNAs signatures were described. Expression of linc-MAF-4, a chromatin-associated TH1-specific lincRNA, was inversely correlated with MAF, a TH2-associated transcription factor. Linc-MAF-4 down-regulation skewed T cell differentiation toward TH2. We identified a long-distance interaction between linc-MAF-4 and MAF genomic regions, where linc-MAF-4 associates with LSD1 and EZH2, suggesting linc-MAF-4 regulated MAF transcription by recruitment of chromatin modifiers. Our results demonstrate a key role of lincRNAs in T lymphocyte differentiation. PMID:25621826

  8. Protective effect of quercetin against oxidative stress caused by dimethoate in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of quercetin in alleviating the cytotoxic effects of Dimethoate in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Methods Lymphocytes were divided into too groups. The first group, lymphocytes were incubated for 4 h at 37°C with different concentrations (0, 40, 60 and 100 mM) of Dimethoate. The second group was preincubated with quercetin for 30 min and followed by Dim incubation for 4 h at 37°C. Results Following in vitro incubation, Dimethoate caused a significant increase in malondialdehyde levels, a significant decrease in thiol levels, as well as a significant increase in superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities in lymphocytes at different concentrations. Quercetin pretreated lymphocytes showed a significant protection against the cytotoxic effects inducted by Dimethoate on the studied parameters. Conclusion In conclusion, antioxidant quercetin could protect against Dimethoate-induced oxidative stress by decreasing lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and increasing superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in human lymphocytes. PMID:21861917

  9. Apoptosis preferentially eliminates irradiated g0 human lymphocytes bearing dicentric chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Belloni, P; Meschini, R; Lewinska, D; Palitti, F

    2008-02-01

    G(0) human peripheral blood lymphocytes were X-irradiated to determine whether there is a direct relationship between radiation-induced dicentric chromosomes and the triggering of apoptosis. Immediately after X-ray exposure, control and irradiated lymphocytes were analyzed for viability, apoptosis and chromosome damage using the premature chromosome condensation technique. A batch of lymphocytes was kept in liquid holding for 48 h and then loaded on Ficoll-Paque medium to separate apoptotic (high-density) and normal (normal-density) cells. Then the same end points were analyzed in high-density and normal-density fractions of control and irradiated lymphocytes. After 48 h of liquid holding, the majority of apoptotic cells contained dicentric chromosomes. These results demonstrate that in human lymphocytes, the type of chromosome damage influences the induction of programmed cell death and provide direct evidence that cells bearing dicentrics are eliminated by apoptosis. G0 lymphocytes are the most common tissue used in biodosimetry studies, and the amount of chromosomal damage detected depends on the time between exposure and sampling. Since the radiation-induced apoptotic cells show the presence of dicentrics, radiation-induced damage can be underestimated. These results may have relevance in evaluations of the efficacy of radiotherapy based on the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations.

  10. In vivo traffic of indium-111-oxine labeled human lymphocytes collected by automated apheresis

    SciTech Connect

    Read, E.J.; Keenan, A.M.; Carter, C.S.; Yolles, P.S.; Davey, R.J. )

    1990-06-01

    The in vivo traffic patterns of autologous lymphocytes were studied in five normal human volunteers using lymphocytes obtained by automated apheresis, separated on Ficoll-Hypaque gradients, and labeled ex vivo with {sup 111}In-oxine. Final lymphocyte infusions contained 1.8-3.1 X 10(9) cells and 270-390 microCi (9.99-14.43 MBq) {sup 111}In, or 11-17 microCi (0.41-0.63 MBq) per 10(8) lymphocytes. Gamma imaging showed transient lung uptake and significant retention of radioactivity in the liver and spleen. Progressive uptake of activity in normal, nonpalpable axillary and inguinal lymph nodes was seen from 24 to 96 hr. Accumulation of radioactivity also was demonstrated at the forearm skin test site, as well as in its associated epitrochlear and axillary lymph nodes, in a subject who had been tested for delayed hypersensitivity with tetanus toxoid. Indium-111-oxine labeled human lymphocytes may provide a useful tool for future studies of normal and abnormal lymphocyte traffic.

  11. Specific high-affinity binding sites for a synthetic gliadin heptapeptide of human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Payan, D.G.; Horvath, K.; Graf, L.

    1987-03-23

    The synthetic peptide containing residues 43-49 of ..cap alpha..-gliadin, the major protein component of gluten, has previously been shown to inhibit the production of lymphokine activities by mononuclear leukocytes. The authors demonstrate using radiolabeled ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) that human peripheral blood lymphocytes express approximately 20,000-25,000 surface receptors for this peptide, with a dissociation constant (K/sub D/) of 20 nM. In addition, binding is inhibited by naloxone and an enkephalin analog, thus confirming the functional correlate which demonstrates inhibition by these agents of ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) functional effects. Furthermore, B-lymphocytes bind specifically a greater amount of (/sup 125/I)..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) than T-lymphocytes. The lymphocyte ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) receptor may play an important role in mediating the immunological response to ..cap alpha..-gliadin. 16 references, 4 figures.

  12. IL-10 conditioning of human skin affects the distribution of migratory dendritic cell subsets and functional T cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lindenberg, Jelle J; Oosterhoff, Dinja; Sombroek, Claudia C; Lougheed, Sinéad M; Hooijberg, Erik; Stam, Anita G M; Santegoets, Saskia J A M; Tijssen, Henk J; Buter, Jan; Pinedo, Herbert M; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J M; Scheper, Rik J; Koenen, Hans J P M; van de Ven, Rieneke; de Gruijl, Tanja D

    2013-01-01

    In cancer patients pervasive systemic suppression of Dendritic Cell (DC) differentiation and maturation can hinder vaccination efficacy. In this study we have extensively characterized migratory DC subsets from human skin and studied how their migration and T cell-stimulatory abilities were affected by conditioning of the dermal microenvironment through cancer-related suppressive cytokines. To assess effects in the context of a complex tissue structure, we made use of a near-physiological skin explant model. By 4-color flow cytometry, we identified migrated Langerhans Cells (LC) and five dermis-derived DC populations in differential states of maturation. From a panel of known tumor-associated suppressive cytokines, IL-10 showed a unique ability to induce predominant migration of an immature CD14(+)CD141(+)DC-SIGN(+) DC subset with low levels of co-stimulatory molecules, up-regulated expression of the co-inhibitory molecule PD-L1 and the M2-associated macrophage marker CD163. A similarly immature subset composition was observed for DC migrating from explants taken from skin overlying breast tumors. Whereas predominant migration of mature CD1a(+) subsets was associated with release of IL-12p70, efficient Th cell expansion with a Th1 profile, and expansion of functional MART-1-specific CD8(+) T cells, migration of immature CD14(+) DDC was accompanied by increased release of IL-10, poor expansion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and skewing of Th responses to favor coordinated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression and regulatory T cell differentiation and outgrowth. Thus, high levels of IL-10 impact the composition of skin-emigrated DC subsets and appear to favor migration of M2-like immature DC with functional qualities conducive to T cell tolerance.

  13. COMPARATIVE GENOTOXIC RESPONSES TO ARSENITE IN GUINEA PIG, MOUSE, RAT AND HUMAN LYMPHOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative genotoxic responses to arsenite in guinea pig, mouse, rat and human
    lymphocytes.

    Inorganic arsenic is a known human carcinogen causing skin, lung, and bladder cancer following chronic exposures. Yet, long-term laboratory animal carcinogenicity studies have ...

  14. Infrequent normal B lymphocytes express features of B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    An infrequent (2-3%) B lymphocyte subpopulation was found in the normal human tonsil and lymph nodes that shows the phenotypic characteristics of B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) (rosette formation with mouse erythrocytes, weak expression of membrane Ig, staining for HLA-DR, and OKT1 or Leu-1 detecting a T cell-associated p65 antigen). Preliminary evidence suggests that at least a subpopulation of these cells is found, in small proportions, within the germinal centers. These cells were not observed in the human bone marrow. B-CLL may involve this peripheral B lymphocyte subset. PMID:6977012

  15. Diurnal redistribution of human lymphocytes and their temporal associations with salivary cortisol.

    PubMed

    Trifonova, Slavena T; Zimmer, Jacques; Turner, Jonathan D; Muller, Claude P

    2013-06-01

    Immune cell trafficking is crucial for surveillance and effector functions of the immune system. Circadian rhythms of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and of cortisol have been implicated in circadian redistribution of circulating lymphocytes and granulocytes. However, information regarding the diurnal redistribution of immune cells and their temporal correlations with cortisol is scarce. In this study, we investigated the diurnal redistribution of T, B, and natural killer (NK) cell subsets in relation to the endogenous cortisol rhythm. Saliva and blood samples were collected every 15 min over an 8-h period. Salivary-free cortisol was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Surface markers (CD3, CD19, CD8, CD56, CD16, KIR) were measured in whole blood samples by 6-color flow cytometry and cell subsets quantified as a percentage of the total lymphocyte population. To study associations between the diurnal cortisol rhythm and the redistribution of T, B, and NK cells, we calculated cross-correlations with lag periods of 15 min. The salivary cortisol levels showed the typical diurnal variations with a significant morning cortisol awakening response (CAR) peaking around 07:30 h followed by an afternoon nadir. Whereas B cells remained stable throughout the 8 h, T cells (CD3 + CD8+ and CD3 + CD8-) showed a significant positive cross-correlation with cortisol levels when a delay of 30-105 min was taken into account. This was followed by a negative correlation covering a period of 165-285 min after the cortisol peak. Conversely, NK cells showed an initial negative correlation at 45-105 min, followed by a positive correlation at 120-285 min. The major CD56 + CD16+ subset and the CD56 - CD16+ population showed similar temporal correlation profiles. The minor CD56 + CD16- NK cell subset showed no temporal changes. The major NK subset (CD56 + CD16+) contains cells with higher cytolytic activity (KIR+) cells, whereas the single

  16. Inhibition of malaria parasite invasion of human erythrocytes by a lymphocyte membrane polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Benzaquen-Geffin, R; Milner, Y; Ginsburg, H

    1987-02-01

    Extraction by boiling of the buffy coat of human blood yields a protein solution which inhibits the propagation of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in culture with a 50% inhibitory dose of 105 micrograms of protein per ml. The inhibitory activity is associated exclusively with the lymphocytes and affects solely the invasion of erythrocytes by free merozoites. Boiled extracts of isolated lymphocytes had a 50% inhibitory dose of 22 micrograms/ml. Fractionation of surface-labeled or pronase-treated lymphocytes revealed that the antimalarial lymphocyte factor is associated with the intracellular aspect of the membrane fraction and is probably not involved in the host defense system against malaria. Further purification by salt extraction, ion-exchange chromatography, molecular gel filtration, and electroelution from lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels resulted in 300- to 550-fold purification, i.e., a 50% inhibitory dose of 40 to 70 ng/ml. All inhibitory fractions contained a 48-kilodalton polypeptide which eluted from a gel filtration column as a 400-kilodalton species, implying multimeric association. Some 6,000 molecules of the 48-kilodalton polypeptide bind with high affinity to one merozoite, the free form of the parasite. The Kd of 0.1 to 0.5 nM for the binding of the 48-kilodalton polypeptide correlated well with the 50% inhibitory dose of 0.3 to 0.4 nM obtained with purified active antimalarial lymphocyte factor. We therefore suggest that the 48-kilodalton polypeptide partially purified from lymphocyte membranes is the antimalarial lymphocyte factor and that it exerts its inhibitory activity by binding to merozoites, thereby preventing their invasion into erythrocytes. The antimalarial lymphocyte factor or a polypeptide sequence thereof could serve for further probing of invasion at the molecular level.

  17. Inhibition of malaria parasite invasion of human erythrocytes by a lymphocyte membrane polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Benzaquen-Geffin, R; Milner, Y; Ginsburg, H

    1987-01-01

    Extraction by boiling of the buffy coat of human blood yields a protein solution which inhibits the propagation of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in culture with a 50% inhibitory dose of 105 micrograms of protein per ml. The inhibitory activity is associated exclusively with the lymphocytes and affects solely the invasion of erythrocytes by free merozoites. Boiled extracts of isolated lymphocytes had a 50% inhibitory dose of 22 micrograms/ml. Fractionation of surface-labeled or pronase-treated lymphocytes revealed that the antimalarial lymphocyte factor is associated with the intracellular aspect of the membrane fraction and is probably not involved in the host defense system against malaria. Further purification by salt extraction, ion-exchange chromatography, molecular gel filtration, and electroelution from lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels resulted in 300- to 550-fold purification, i.e., a 50% inhibitory dose of 40 to 70 ng/ml. All inhibitory fractions contained a 48-kilodalton polypeptide which eluted from a gel filtration column as a 400-kilodalton species, implying multimeric association. Some 6,000 molecules of the 48-kilodalton polypeptide bind with high affinity to one merozoite, the free form of the parasite. The Kd of 0.1 to 0.5 nM for the binding of the 48-kilodalton polypeptide correlated well with the 50% inhibitory dose of 0.3 to 0.4 nM obtained with purified active antimalarial lymphocyte factor. We therefore suggest that the 48-kilodalton polypeptide partially purified from lymphocyte membranes is the antimalarial lymphocyte factor and that it exerts its inhibitory activity by binding to merozoites, thereby preventing their invasion into erythrocytes. The antimalarial lymphocyte factor or a polypeptide sequence thereof could serve for further probing of invasion at the molecular level. Images PMID:3542831

  18. Enhanced cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of gadolinium following ELF-EMF irradiation in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seunghyun; Lee, Younghyun; Lee, Sunyeong; Choi, Young Joo; Chung, Hai Won

    2014-10-01

    There are many studies of Gd nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity, whereas research on cyto- and genotoxicity in normal human lymphocytes is scarce. It is important to investigate the effect of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on Gd toxicity, as patients are co-exposed to Gd and ELF-EMF generated by MRI scanners. We investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoixcity of Gd and the possible enhancing effect of ELF-EMF on Gd toxicity in cultured human lymphocytes by performing a micronuclei (MN) assay, trypan blue dye exclusion, single cell gel electrophoresis, and apoptosis analyses using flow cytometry. Isolated lymphocytes were exposed to 0.2-1.2 mM of Gd only or in combination with a 60-Hz ELF-EMF of 0.8-mT field strength. Exposing human lymphocytes to Gd resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent decrease in cell viability and an increase in MN frequency, single strand DNA breakage, apoptotic cell death, and ROS production. ELF-EMF (0.8 mT) exposure also increased cell death, MN frequency, olive tail moment, and apoptosis induced by Gd treatment alone. These results suggest that Gd induces DNA damage and apoptotic cell death in human lymphocytes and that ELF-EMF enhances the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Gd.

  19. Cytostatic and genotoxic effect of temephos in human lymphocytes and HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Benitez-Trinidad, A B; Herrera-Moreno, J F; Vázquez-Estrada, G; Verdín-Betancourt, F A; Sordo, M; Ostrosky-Wegman, P; Bernal-Hernández, Y Y; Medina-Díaz, I M; Barrón-Vivanco, B S; Robledo-Marenco, M L; Salazar, A M; Rojas-García, A E

    2015-06-01

    Temephos is an organophosphorus pesticide that is used in control campaigns against Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which transmit dengue. In spite of the widespread use of temephos, few studies have examined its genotoxic potential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic, cytostatic and genotoxic effects of temephos in human lymphocytes and hepatoma cells (HepG2). The cytotoxicity was evaluated with simultaneous staining (FDA/EtBr). The cytostatic and genotoxic effects were evaluated using comet assays and the micronucleus technique. We found that temephos was not cytotoxic in either lymphocytes or HepG2 cells. Regarding the cytostatic effect in human lymphocytes, temephos (10 μM) caused a significant decrease in the percentage of binucleated cells and in the nuclear division index as well as an increase in the apoptotic cell frequency, which was not the case for HepG2 cells. The comet assay showed that temephos increased the DNA damage levels in human lymphocytes, but it did not increase the MN frequency. In contrast, in HepG2 cells, temephos increased the tail length, tail moment and MN frequency in HepG2 cells compared to control cells. In conclusion, temephos causes stable DNA damage in HepG2 cells but not in human lymphocytes. These findings suggest the importance of temephos biotransformation in its genotoxic effect.

  20. Characterization of the lymphocyte activation gene 3-encoded protein. A new ligand for human leukocyte antigen class II antigens

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3), expressed in human activated T and natural killer (NK) cells, is closely related to CD4 at the gene and protein levels. We report here the initial characterization of the LAG-3-encoded protein. We have generated two monoclonal antibodies after immunization of mice with a 30-amino acid peptide that corresponds to an exposed extra loop region present in the LAG-3 immunoglobulin-like first domain. The reactivity of these reagents is directed against LAG-3 since they recognize both membrane-expressed and soluble recombinant LAG-3 molecules produced in a baculovirus expression system. The two antibodies are likely to react with the same or closely related epitope (termed LAG-3.1) exposed on the LAG-3 first domain extra loop, as assessed in competition experiments on LAG-3- expressing activated lymphocytes. Cellular distribution analysis indicated that the LAG-3.1 epitope is expressed on activated T (both CD4+ and CD8+ subsets) and NK cells, and not on activated B cells or monocytes. In immunoprecipitation experiments performed on activated T and NK cell lysates, a 70-kD protein was detected after SDS-PAGE analysis. 45-kD protein species were also immunoprecipitated. Both the 70- and 45-kD proteins were shown to be N-glycosylated. In Western blot analysis, only the former molecule was recognized by the anti-LAG-3 antibodies, demonstrating that it is LAG-3 encoded. These anti-LAG-3 antibodies were used to investigate whether the LAG-3 protein interacts with the CD4 ligands. By using a high-level expression cellular system based on COS-7 cell transfection with recombinant CDM8 vectors and a quantitative cellular adhesion assay, we demonstrate that rosette formation between LAG-3-transfected COS-7 cells and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-bearing B lymphocytes is specifically dependent on LAG-3/HLA class II interaction. In contrast to CD4, LAG-3 does not bind the human immunodeficiency virus gp120. This initial

  1. Human small intestinal mucosa harbours a small population of cytolytically active CD8+ αβ T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Melgar, Silvia; Bas, Anna; Hammarström, Sten; Hammarström, Marie-Louise

    2002-01-01

    Intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) in normal human small intestine exhibit cytotoxicity. This study was undertaken to characterize the effector cells and their mode of action. Freshly isolated jejunal IEL and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPL), as well as IEL and LPL depleted of CD4+, CD8+ and T-cell receptor (TCR)-γδ+ cells were used as effector cells in anti-CD3-mediated redirected cytotoxicity against a murine FcγR-expressing cell line. Effector cell frequencies were estimated by effector to target cell titration and limiting dilution. The capacity of IEL and LPL to kill a Fas-expressing human T-cell line was also analysed. T-cell subsets were analysed for perforin, granzyme B, Fas-ligand (FasL), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) mRNA expression by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Frequencies of IEL expressing the perforin and FasL proteins were determined by immunomorphometry. Both IEL and LPL exhibited significant Ca2+-dependent, anti-CD3-mediated cytotoxicity, ≈ 30% specific lysis at the effector to target cell ratio 100. The cytotoxic cells constituted, however, only a small fraction of IEL and LPL (≈ 0·01%). CD8+ TCR-αβ+ cells accounted for virtually all the cytotoxicity and expressed mRNA for all five cytotoxic proteins. The frequency of granzyme B-expressing samples was higher in CD8+ cells than in CD4+ cells (P<0·05 and <0·01 for IEL and LPL, respectively). In addition, both IEL and LPL exhibited significant spontaneous anti-CD3-independent cytotoxicity against Fas-expressing human T cells. This killing was mediated by Fas–FasL interaction. On average, 2–3% of the IEL expressed perforin and FasL. We speculate that CD8+ memory cells accumulate in the jejunal mucosa and that the CD8+ TCR-αβ+ lymphocytes executing TCR/CD3-mediated, Ca2+-dependent cytotoxicity are classical cytotoxic T lymphocytes ‘caught in the act’ of eliminating infected epithelial cells

  2. Genotoxicity test of self-renovated ceramics in primary human peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hua, Nan; Zhu, Huifang; Zhuang, Jing; Chen, Liping

    2014-12-01

    Zirconia-based ceramics is widely used in dentistry. Different compositions of ceramics have different features. Our self-renovated ceramics become more machinable without scarifying its dental restoration properties after adjusting ratio of lanthanum phosphate (LaPO4)/yttrium oxide (Y2O3). In order to evaluate its safety, here, we tested its genotoxicity in primary human peripheral lymphocytes. The human lymphocytes cultured on three groups of different ratios of LaPO4/Y2O3 diphase ceramics for 6 days showed little effect of growth inhibition and similar effect of growth trend to the negative control. Furthermore, single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) indicated that there was no significant difference of the value of tail moment between the tested ceramics and negative control, the IPS Empress II (P > 0.05). Our findings implicate that our self-renovated ceramics do not induce DNA damages in human peripheral lymphocytes and support their future clinic application.

  3. Interleukin‑33‑induced immune tolerance is associated with the imbalance of memory and naïve T‑lymphocyte subsets.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xu; Tang, Ying; Sun, Xiguang; Liu, Yufei; Sun, Ying; Sun, Munan; Jiang, Yanfang; Li, Yulin

    2016-11-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the distribution of memory and naïve T cell (TN) subsets in hepatitis B virus (HBV)‑infected patients at different immune stages and investigate the effect of interleukin 33 (IL‑33) on the regulation of the T‑cell subsets. The distributions of memory and naïve T cells were detected by flow cytometry. ELISA was conducted to assess the levels of IL‑4, IL‑5, IL‑10, IL‑12, interferon γ and tumor necrosis factor α. The expression levels of IL‑33 and HBV x protein (HBx) were measured by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. By detecting TNs, central memory T cells (TCM) and effector memory T cells (TEM), it was identified that the proportions of TCM and TEM in CD4+ T cells were increased in patients with HBV. The trend observed for levels of CD8+ TCM and TEM was similar to that of CD4+ T cells in the immune tolerance and immune activation groups, however CD8+ TCM and TEM were significantly reduced in patients who underwent treatment. The CD8+ TEM cells appeared to be more sensitive to HBV activation and drug therapy. In addition, IL‑33 stimulation was observed to induce imbalances of CD8+ TN and CD8+ TEM, and while the imbalances were directly regulated by HBx, IL‑33 was not a key factor for the expression of HBx. CD8+ TEM cells may be a sensitive marker to assess the immune state of patients with HBV and the effect of clinical therapy. Treatment targeting IL‑33 may be a potential method to reverse HBV‑induced immune tolerance.

  4. A Rapid, Quantitative Method to Characterize The Human Lymphocyte Concentration for Automated High-Throughput Radiation Biodosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanping; Turner, Helen C.; Garty, Guy; Brenner, David

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a Quantitative Light Absorption Analysis (QLAA) method to rapidly estimate human lymphocyte concentrations isolated from small volumes of whole blood. Measurements of the light absorption analysis were calibrated for lymphocyte concentration levels using a hemocytometer. To validate the QLAA system, blood samples were collected from 17 healthy donors and lymphocyte absorption measurements were directly compared with the manual microscope counting. The results showed that lymphocyte measurements obtained using the QLAA system were comparable with the manually scored lymphocyte counts but with measurements taken in seconds. PMID:23781493

  5. Thiocyclam does not induce structural chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Celikler, Serap; Saleh, Kamel; Sarhan, Mohammed A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Thiocyclam (trade name Evisect) is a broad-spectrum nereistoxin analogue insecticide used widely for agricultural applications. The aim of this investigation was to determine its genotoxic effects in the chromosome aberration (CA) test and determining of mitotic index (MI), using lymphocytes from peripheral blood samples of healthy human donors. A negative and a positive control (MMC) were also included. Chromosomal analyses of the metaphase plates of the samples treated with 14 different concentrations (from 0.1 to 120 μg/ml) of thiocyclam, indicating the lack effect on chromosomes. Thus thiocyclam is not genotoxic but highly toxic on cell proliferation in human lymphocytes. PMID:23961080

  6. Effect of malathion on nucleic acid synthesis in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Czajkowska, A; Walter, Z

    1980-01-01

    The effect of malathion, an organophosphorus insecticide, on DNA and RNA synthesis was investigated by measuring the rate of incorporation of 3H thymidine and 3H uridine, respectively, into human lymphocytes stimulated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Increasing concentrations of malathion, from 10 to 70 micrograms/ml, were added to human lymphocyte cultures at different times in relation to PHA introduction. The lowest applied dose of malathion (10 micrograms/ml) in most cases led to increased incorporation of both 3H thymidine and 3H uridine. Higher concentrations of malathion (30, 50, 70 micrograms/ml) caused a time- and dose-dependent decrease of radioisotope incorporation.

  7. A new prenylated flavanonol from Seseli annuum roots showing protective effect on human lymphocytes DNA.

    PubMed

    Vucković, Ivan; Vajs, Vlatka; Stanković, Miroslava; Tesević, Vele; Milosavljević, Slobodan

    2010-03-01

    A new prenylated flavanonol named seselinonol (1) was isolated from the roots of Seseli annuum, together with the well-known biologically active polyacetylenes falcarinol (2) and falcarindiol (3), and the prenylated furanocoumarin phellopterin (4). Its structure was elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis, including HR-ESI-MS, 1D- and 2D-NMR. Seselinonol and phellopterin were tested for in vitro protective effect on chromosome aberrations in peripheral human lymphocytes using cytochalasin-B blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay. The new compound exerted a beneficial effect by decreasing DNA damage of human lymphocytes.

  8. Terahertz radiation increases genomic instability in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Korenstein-Ilan, Avital; Barbul, Alexander; Hasin, Pini; Eliran, Alon; Gover, Avraham; Korenstein, Rafi

    2008-08-01

    Terahertz radiation is increasingly being applied in new and evolving technologies applied in areas such as homeland security and medical imaging. Thus a timely assessment of the potential hazards and health effects of occupational and general population exposure to THz radiation is required. We applied continuous-wave (CW) 0.1 THz radiation (0.031 mW/ cm(2)) to dividing lymphocytes for 1, 2 and 24 h and examined the changes in chromosome number of chromosomes 1, 10, 11 and 17 and changes in the replication timing of their centromeres using interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Chromosomes 11 and 17 were most vulnerable (about 30% increase in aneuploidy after 2 and 24 h of exposure), while chromosomes 1 and 10 were not affected. We observed changes in the asynchronous mode of replication of centromeres 11, 17 and 1 (by 40%) after 2 h of exposure and of all four centromeres after 24 h of exposure (by 50%). It is speculated that these effects are caused by radiation-induced low-frequency collective vibrational modes of proteins and DNA. Our results demonstrate that exposure of lymphocytes in vitro to a low power density of 0.1 THz radiation induces genomic instability. These findings, if verified, may suggest that such exposure may result in an increased risk of cancer.

  9. Protective effect of hawthorn extract against genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Azadbakht, Mohammad; Tanha, Mohammad; Mahmodzadeh, Aziz; Mohammadifar, Sohila

    2011-05-01

    The preventive effect of hawthorn (Crataegus microphylla) fruit extract against genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) has been investigated in human cultured blood lymphocytes. Peripheral blood samples were collected from human volunteers at 0 (10 minutes before), and at 1 and 2 hours after a single oral ingestion of 1 g hawthorn powder extract. At each time point, the whole blood was treated in vitro with MMS (200 µmol) at 24 hours after cell culture, and then the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cells. The lymphocytes treated with hawthorn and MMS to exhibit a significant decreasing in the incidence of micronucleated binucleated cells, as compared with similarly MMS-treated lymphocytes from blood samples collected at 0 hour. The maximum protection and decreasing in frequency of micronuclei (36%) was observed at 1 hour after ingestion of hawthorn extract. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that hawthorn contained chlorogenic acid, epicatechin and hyperoside. It is obvious that hawthorn, particularly flavonoids constituents with antioxidative activity, reduced the oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by toxic compounds. This set of data may have an important application for the protection of human lymphocyte from the genetic damage and side effects induced by chemicals hazardous in people.

  10. Protective effects of curcumin against genotoxicity induced by 131-iodine in human cultured lymphocyte cells

    PubMed Central

    Shafaghati, Nayereh; Hedayati, Monireh; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2014-01-01

    Background: 131-radioiodine has been widely used as an effective radionuclide for treatment of patients with thyroid diseases. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the radioprotective effects of curcumin as a natural product that protects against the genotoxic effects of 131I in human cultured lymphocytes. Materials and Methods: Whole blood samples from human volunteers were incubated with curcumin at doses of 5, 10, and 50 μg/mL. After 1-hour incubation, the lymphocytes were incubated with 131I (100 μCi/1.5 ml) for 2 hours. The lymphocyte cultures were then mitogenically stimulated to allow for evaluation of the number of micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cells. Results: Incubation of lymphocytes with 131I at dose 100 μCi/1.5 mL induced genotoxicity shown by increase in micronuclei frequency in human lymphocytes. Curcumin at 5, 10, and 50 μg/mL doses significantly reduced the micronuclei frequency. Maximal protective effects and greatest decrease in micronuclei frequency were observed when whole blood was incubated with 50 μg/mL dose of curcumin with 52%. Conclusion: This study has important implications for patients undergoing 131I therapy. Our results indicate a protective role for curcumin against the genetic damage and side effects induced by 131I administration. PMID:24914274

  11. Radioprotective Effect of Achillea millefolium L Against Genotoxicity Induced by Ionizing Radiation in Human Normal Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shahani, Somayeh; Rostamnezhad, Mostafa; Ghaffari-rad, Vahid; Ghasemi, Arash; Allahverdi Pourfallah, Tayyeb

    2015-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of Achillea millefolium L (ACM) extract was investigated against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in human lymphocytes. Peripheral blood samples were collected from human volunteers and incubated with the methanolic extract of ACM at different concentrations (10, 50, 100, and 200 μg/mL) for 2 hours. At each dose point, the whole blood was exposed in vitro to 2.5 Gy of X-ray and then the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated cell. Antioxidant capacity of the extract was determined using free radical-scavenging method. The treatment of lymphocytes with the extract showed a significant decrease in the incidence of micronuclei binucleated cells, as compared with similarly irradiated lymphocytes without any extract treatment. The maximum protection and decrease in frequency of micronuclei were observed at 200 μg/mL of ACM extract which completely protected genotoxicity induced by IR in human lymphocytes. Achillea millefolium extract exhibited concentration-dependent radical-scavenging activity on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl free radicals. These data suggest that the methanolic extract of ACM may play an important role in the protection of normal tissues against genetic damage induced by IR. PMID:26675116

  12. Radioprotective effect of chicory seeds against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human normal lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hosseinimehr, S J; Ghaffari-Rad, V; Rostamnezhad, M; Ghasemi, A; Allahverdi Pourfallah, T; Shahani, S

    2015-08-17

    The search for less-toxic radioprotective agents has led to a growing trend towards natural products. Protective effect of the methanolic extract of chicory seeds (MCS) was investigated against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes. Human peripheral blood samples were collected and incubated with MCS at different concentrations (10, 50, 100, and 200 μg/mL) for two hours. The whole blood samples were exposed in vitro to X-ray at dose 2.5 Gy. Then, the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronucleus in cytokinesis blocked binucleated cell. The methanolic extract at all doses significantly reduced the frequency of micronuclei in binucleated lymphocytes, as compared with similarly irradiated lymphocytes without any extract treatment. The maximum protection was observed at 200 μg/mL of MCS, it completely protected genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes. The extract exhibited a concentration-dependent radical scavenging activity on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl free radicals. HPLC analysis of MCS showed this extract is containing chlorogenic acid as a phenolic compound. These data suggest that the radioprotective effect of methanolic extract of chicory seeds can be attributed to the presence of phenolic compounds such as chlorogenic acid which act as antioxidant agents.

  13. Mutations in human lymphocytes: effect of X- and UV-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, B J; Dempsey, J L; Morley, A A

    1984-08-01

    The mutagenic effects of X- and UV-irradiation on human lymphocytes were studied using a highly efficient cloning technique. The hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase enzyme locus was used to study mutation induction, with mutant cells being selected by their ability to form a clone in the presence of the purine analogue 6-thioguanine. Mutation dose-response curves for X- and UV-irradiation were established by studying lymphocytes from 11 individuals on day 10 after irradiation. The mean mutation frequency of unirradiated lymphocytes was 2.9 X 10(-6) and there were dose-dependent increase to 9.5 X 10(-5) after 400 rad of X-irradiation, and to 5.6 X 10(-5) after 125 erg/mm2 of the UV. The expression time of X-ray-induced mutations was 3-7 days. Dose-responses were obtained for mutation frequency and survival following X-irradiation of proliferating and non-proliferating lymphocytes from 8 individuals. Compared with non-proliferating lymphocytes, the proliferating lymphocytes developed fewer mutations but had a greater mortality after irradiation

  14. Genetic modification of human T lymphocytes for the treatment of hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hoyos, Valentina; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro

    2012-01-01

    Modern chemotherapy regimens and supportive care have produced remarkable improvements in the overall survival of patients with hematologic malignancies. However, the development of targeted small molecules, monoclonal antibodies, and biological therapies that demonstrate greater efficacy and lower toxicity remains highly desirable in hematology, and oncology in general. In the context of biological therapies, T-lymphocyte based treatments have enormous potential. Donor lymphocyte infusion in patients relapsed after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant pioneered the concept that T lymphocytes can effectively control tumor growth, and this was then followed by the development of cell culture strategies to generate T lymphocytes with selective activity against tumor cells. Over the past decade, it has become clear that the adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes promotes sustained antitumor effects in patients with virus-associated lymphomas, such as Epstein-Barr virus related post-transplant lymphomas and Hodgkin's lymphomas. Because of this compelling clinical evidence and the concomitant development of methodologies for robust gene transfer to human T lymphocytes, the field has rapidly evolved, offering new opportunities to extend T-cell based therapies. This review summarizes the most recent biological and clinical developments using genetically manipulated T cells for the treatment of hematologic malignancies. PMID:22929977

  15. Quercetin and Bornyl Acetate Regulate T-Lymphocyte Subsets and INF-γ/IL-4 Ratio In Utero in Pregnant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaodan; Ma, Aituan; Shi, Wanyu; Geng, Meiying; Zhong, Xiuhui; Zhao, Yantao

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the antiabortive effects of Quercetin and Bornvl Acetate and their immunological modulation at maternal-fetal interface. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was injected via tail vein to induce abortion in mice which received Quercetin and Bornvl Acetate at days 4–7 of gestation. Uterine CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocytes and IFN-γ/IL-4 of each group (n = 10) were detected by immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The ratio of CD4+/CD8+ increased significantly (P < .01) in the uterus of LPS-induced abortion mice. In the Quercetin and Bornvl Acetate pretreated mice followed by LPS administration, the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ dropped to 0.562 ± 0.021, lower than that of LPS-abortion group (P < .01). The mean value of IFN-γ/IL-4 in LPS-treated mice was 0.310 ± 0.066, higher than that of Quercetin and Bornyl Acetate group. The results indicate that Quercetin and Bornyl Acetate have an antiabortive effect through modulation of immunological balance at maternal-fetal interface. PMID:20981318

  16. Specific subsets of immune cells in human decidua differ between normal pregnancy and preeclampsia - a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Changes in the balance of decidual leucocyte populations may lead to an unfavourable uterine microenvironment which may be associated with the development of preeclampsia (PE). In this study, we therefore investigated the leucocyte subpopulations in decidual tissues of 33 women with preeclampsia and 66 control patients. Methods Decidua was either obtained via curettage during cesarean section or dissected from the surface of the basal plate of the placenta after spontaneous delivery. We used FACS analysis to quantify decidual leukocytes (CD45), NK cells (CD56+/CD16+ and CD56++/CD16-), antigen presenting cells (HLA-DR, DC-Sign, CD14) and T/B cells (CD8, CD4, alpha-beta-T-cell receptor, gamma-delta-T-cell receptor, CD25, CD19). Results The number of decidual cytotoxic CD8+T-lymphocytes (P < 0.02), alpha-beta -T-cell receptor positive T cells (P < 0.03) and of CD56+/CD16+ NK cells (P < 0.03) was lower in decidua from women with PE than in decidua from control patients. Conclusion The observed reduction of specific leucocyte subsets could create a microenvironment which is unfavourable for an appropriate placentation and could thereby be involved in the development of preeclamptic symptoms. PMID:19930648

  17. Differential expression of a subset of ribosomal protein genes in cell lines derived from human nasopharyngeal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sim, Edmund Ui Hang; Ang, Chow Hiang; Ng, Ching Ching; Lee, Choon Weng; Narayanan, Kumaran

    2010-02-01

    Extraribosomal functions of human ribosomal proteins (RPs) include the regulation of cellular growth and differentiation, and are inferred from studies that linked congenital disorders and cancer to the deregulated expression of RP genes. We have previously shown the upregulation and downregulation of RP genes in tumors of colorectal and nasopharyngeal carcinomas (NPCs), respectively. Herein, we show that a subset of RP genes for the large ribosomal subunit is differentially expressed among cell lines derived from the human nasopharyngeal epithelium. Three such genes (RPL27, RPL37a and RPL41) were found to be significantly downregulated in all cell lines derived from NPC tissues compared with a nonmalignant nasopharyngeal epithelial cell line. The expression of RPL37a and RPL41 genes in human nasopharyngeal tissues has not been reported previously. Our findings support earlier suspicions on the existence of NPC-associated RP genes, and indicate their importance in human nasopharyngeal organogenesis.

  18. Antibacterial activity of neem nanoemulsion and its toxicity assessment on human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jerobin, Jayakumar; Makwana, Pooja; Suresh Kumar, R S; Sundaramoorthy, Rajiv; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica) is recognized as a medicinal plant well known for its antibacterial, antimalarial, antiviral, and antifungal properties. Neem nanoemulsion (NE) (O/W) is formulated using neem oil, Tween 20, and water by high-energy ultrasonication. The formulated neem NE showed antibacterial activity against the bacterial pathogen Vibrio vulnificus by disrupting the integrity of the bacterial cell membrane. Despite the use of neem NE in various biomedical applications, the toxicity studies on human cells are still lacking. The neem NE showed a decrease in cellular viability in human lymphocytes after 24 hours of exposure. The neem NE at lower concentration (0.7-1 mg/mL) is found to be nontoxic while it is toxic at higher concentrations (1.2-2 mg/mL). The oxidative stress induced by the neem NE is evidenced by the depletion of catalase, SOD, and GSH levels in human lymphocytes. Neem NE showed a significant increase in DNA damage when compared to control in human lymphocytes (P<0.05). The NE is an effective antibacterial agent against the bacterial pathogen V. vulnificus, and it was found to be nontoxic at lower concentrations to human lymphocytes.

  19. Long-term study of the impact of methotrexate on serum cytokines and lymphocyte subsets in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis: correlation with pharmacokinetic measures

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Joel M; Lawrence, David A; Hamilton, Robert; McInnes, Iain B

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe changes in immune parameters observed during long-term methotrexate (MTX) therapy in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and explore correlations with simultaneously measured MTX pharmacokinetic (PKC) parameters. Design Prospective, open-label, long-term mechanism of action study. Setting University clinic. Methods MTX was initiated at a single weekly oral dose of 7.5 mg and dose adjusted for efficacy and toxicity for the duration of the study. Standard measures of disease activity were performed at baseline and every 6–36 months. Serum cytokine measurements in blood together with lymphocyte surface immunophenotypes and stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cytokine production were assessed at each clinical evaluation. Results Cytokine concentrations exhibited multiple significant correlations with disease activity measures over time. The strongest correlations observed were for interleukin (IL)-6 (r=0.45, p<0.0001 for swollen joints and r=0.32, p=0.002 for tender joints) and IL-8 (r=0.25, p=0.01 for swollen joints). Significant decreases from baseline were observed in serum IL-1B, IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations. The most significant changes were observed for IL-6 (p<0.001). Significant increases from baseline were observed in IL-2 release from PBMCs ex vivo (p<0.01). In parallel, multiple statistically significant correlations were observed between MTX PKC measures and immune parameters. The change in swollen joint count correlated inversely with the change in area under the curve (AUC) for MTX (r=−0.63, p=0.007). Conclusions MTX therapy of patients with RA is accompanied by a variety of changes in serum cytokine expression, which in turn correlate strongly with clinical disease activity and MTX pharmacokinetics (PKCs). These data strongly support the notion that MTX mediates profound and functionally relevant effects on the immunological hierarchy in the RA lesion. PMID:27335660

  20. The effects of Eleutherococcus senticosus and Panax ginseng on steroidal hormone indices of stress and lymphocyte subset numbers in endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, B T; Hügel, H M; Rich, P A

    2001-12-14

    A clinical trial was undertaken to investigate the effects of Eleutherococcus senticosus (ES) and Panax ginseng (PG) on competitive club-level endurance athletes engaged in their normal in-season training. Participants were matched for training stress and received a 33% ethanolic extract (8 mL/day) containing either ES, PG (equivalent to 4 g and 2 g/day of dried root, respectively), or a placebo. A pre-test and post-test were used to evaluate the effects of six weeks of supplementation on cortisol, testosterone, and testosterone to cortisol ratio (TCR) as well as circulating numbers of total T-cells, T-helper cells (CD4), T-suppressor cells (CD8), CD4 to CD8 ratio, natural killer cells, and B lymphocytes. None of the immune system variables changed significantly nor showed any clear trend from pre to post test in any of the treatment groups. No significant change in testosterone, cortisol or TCR was observed in the PG group. In the ES group, however, TCR decreased by 28.7% from 0.0464 to 0.0331 (P=0.03). The main contribution to this decrease appeared to be a non-significant (P= 0.07) 31% trend towards increased cortisol rather than a very small non-significant (P = 0.36) 7% decrease in the calculated mean for testosterone. This result suggested that contrary to initial expectation, ES increased rather than decreased hormonal indices of stress, which may be consistent with animal research suggesting a threshold of stress below which ES increases the stress response and above which ES decreases the stress response.

  1. Modulation of Mitogen-Induced Proliferation of Autologous Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes by Human Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, Henry; Sweeney, Jan A.; Herscowitz, Herbert B.; Barsoum, Ibrahim S.; Kagan, Elliott

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to determine the effect of cocultivation of T-cell-enriched human peripheral blood lymphocytes with autologous alveolar macrophages on mitogen-induced proliferation as determined by [3H]thymidine uptake. Cells obtained by fiberoptic bronchoscopy and saline bronchial lavage from 14 normal volunteers were enriched for macrophages by adherence in plastic dishes for 1 h in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum. Nonadherent mononuclear cells were prepared from heparinized venous blood after Ficoll-Hypaque sedimentation by passage over nylon wool columns. T-cell-enriched populations were incubated with and without alveolar macrophages, either in the presence or absence of phytohemagglutinin. In these experiments, the number of lymphocytes was held constant (105 per well), while the number of alveolar macrophages was varied (0.1 × 105 to 4.0 × 105 per well). Alveolar macrophages generally tended to stimulate phytohemagglutinin-induced lymphoproliferation at lymphocyte/macrophage ratios of 10:1 but consistently and significantly suppressed proliferation at ratios which approach those usually observed in recovered human bronchial lavage fluid, namely, 1:4. The suppressive effect of alveolar macrophages was observed as early as 48 h after culture initiation, while the magnitude of suppression increased with time. Suppression did not appear to be due to alteration in lymphocyte viability, nor was it sensitive to indomethacin. These results indicate that human alveolar macrophages can modulate the in vitro proliferative response of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes. This observation may have relevance to interactions between alveolar macrophages and bronchial lymphocytes in the human lung in vivo. PMID:6982862

  2. Heterogeneity of human lymphocyte Fc receptors. I. Differential susceptibility to proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gormus, B. J.; Woodson, Mildred; Kaplan, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    To study the possible heterogeneity of human lymphocyte Fc receptors, isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were enzymatically altered (`stripped') by exposure to pronase or papain. Pronase treatment markedly increased the percentages of PBL binding IgG-sensitized erythrocytes (EA), while simultaneously removing or inactivating their receptors for heat-aggregated IgG (aggG). Papain treatment markedly diminished the ability of PBL to bind both EA and aggG. Essentially identical results were obtained utilizing EA composed of either human Rh-positive type O erythrocytes sensitized with the human anti-Rh serum Ripley (HRBC-A Ripley) or with chicken erythrocytes sensitized with rabbit anti-CRBC IgG (CRBC-A). CRBC sensitized with Fab'2 fragments of rabbit anti-CRBC IgG were incapable of forming rosettes with normal or with pronase- or papain-stripped PBL. Pre-treatment of normal lymphocytes with aggG totally ablated their ability to rosette with EA. Incubation of pronase-stripped PBL for 18–20 hr in 5% CO2-air at 37°C resulted in diminution (to levels originally present) in the percentages of lymphocytes binding EA, but no regeneration of aggG receptors. Similar incubation of papain-stripped PBL resulted in significant reappearance of receptors binding EA, but no regeneration of aggG receptors. These results strongly suggest that: (1) lymphocyte receptors that bind EA complexes differ from those that bind aggG; (2) some lymphocytes possess cryptic receptors for EA that are expressed after proteolysis with pronase; (3) PBL having receptors for EA also have aggG receptors; and (4) there is no evidence that proteolytic stripping of PBL results in the generation of functionally different receptors for complexed IgG, since the Fc specificity of this receptor remains unchanged. PMID:737911

  3. Diphtheria toxin resistance in human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts in the in vivo somatic cell mutation test

    SciTech Connect

    Tomkins, D.J.; Wei, L.; Laurie, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    It has been shown that circulating peripheral blood lymphocytes can be used for the enumeration of 6-thioguanine-resistant cells that presumably arise by mutation in vivo. This somatic cell mutation test has been studied in lymphocytes from human populations exposed to known mutagens and/or carcinogens. The sensitivity of the test could be further enhanced by including other gene markers, since there is evidence for locus-specific differences in response to mutagens. Resistance to diphtheria toxin (Dip/sup r/) seemed like a potential marker to incorporate into the test because the mutation acts codominantly, can readily be selected in human diploid fibroblasts and Chinese hamster cells with no evidence for cell density or cross-feeding effects, and can be assayed for in nondividing cells by measuring protein synthesis inhibition. Blood samples were collected from seven individuals, and fresh, cryopreserved, or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphocytes were tested for continued DNA synthesis (TH-thymidine, autoradiography) or protein synthesis (TVS-methionine, scintillation counting). Both fresh and cryopreserved lymphocytes, stimulated to divide with phytohemagglutinin (PHA), continued to synthesize DNA in the presence of high doses of diphtheria toxin (DT). Similarly, both dividing (PHA-stimulated) and nondividing fresh lymphocytes carried on significant levels of protein synthesis even 68 hr after exposure to 100 flocculating units (LF)/ml DT. The results suggest that human T and B lymphocytes may not be as sensitive to DT protein synthesis inhibition as human fibroblast and Chinese hamster cells. For this reason, Dip/sup r/ may not be a suitable marker for the somatic cell mutation test.

  4. Beta-carotene prevents x-ray induction of micronuclei in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Umegaki, K; Ikegami, S; Inoue, K; Ichikawa, T; Kobayashi, S; Soeno, N; Tomabechi, K

    1994-02-01

    The effects of beta-carotene and ascorbic acid on spontaneous and x-ray-induced appearance of micronuclei (MNs) in human lymphocytes were studied. For 12 d, three groups of healthy volunteers were given beta-carotene-deficient meals containing 100 mg ascorbic acid. There was no supplementation in the first 6 d but, in the last 6 d, the respective groups were given beta-carotene (30 mg), ascorbic acid (300 mg), or placebo. Blood samples were drawn on days 7 and 13 before breakfast, exposed either to x-ray irradiation or left unexposed and were cultured. Lymphocytes containing MNs were then counted. On day 7 the three groups showed comparable MN frequencies. On day 13 lymphocytes containing x-ray-induced MNs became less frequent in the beta-carotene but not the ascorbic acid group. Both before and after the supplementation, the MN frequency of irradiated lymphocytes showed a significant inverse correlation with plasma beta-carotene. These results strongly suggest that beta-carotene protects human lymphocytes from x-ray-induced genetic damage.

  5. Evidence that calcineurin is rate-limiting for primary human lymphocyte activation.

    PubMed Central

    Batiuk, T D; Kung, L; Halloran, P F

    1997-01-01

    Cyclosporine (CsA) is both a clinical immunosuppressive drug and a probe to dissect intracellular signaling pathways. In vitro, CsA inhibits lymphocyte gene activation by inhibiting the phosphatase activity of calcineurin (CN). In clinical use, CsA treatment inhibits 50-75% of CN activity in circulating leukocytes. We modeled this degree of CN inhibition in primary human leukocytes in vitro in order to study the effect of partial CN inhibition on the downstream signaling events that lead to gene activation. In CsA-treated leukocytes stimulated by calcium ionophore, the degree of reduction in CN activity was accompanied by a similar degree of inhibition of each event tested: dephosphorylation of nuclear factor of activated T cell proteins, nuclear DNA binding, activation of a transfected reporter gene construct, IFN-gamma and IL-2 mRNA accumulation, and IFN-gamma production. Furthermore, the degree of CN inhibition was reflected by a similar degree of reduction in lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-gamma production in the allogeneic mixed lymphocyte cultures. These data support the conclusion that CN activity is rate-limiting for the activation of primary human T lymphocytes. Thus, the reduction of CN activity observed in CsA-treated patients is accompanied by a similar degree of reduction in lymphocyte gene activation, and accounts for the immunosuppression observed. PMID:9312192

  6. T3 glycoprotein is functional although structurally distinct on human T-cell receptor. gamma. T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Krangel, M.S.; Bierer, B.E.; Devlin, P.; Clabby, M.; Strominger, J.L.; McLean, J.; Brenner, M.B.

    1987-06-01

    The T-cell receptor (TCR) ..gamma.. gene product occurs in association with T3 (CD3) polypeptides on the surface of human T lymphocytes. TCR ..gamma.. lymphocytes express arrays of T3 polypeptides distinct from those typically observed on TCR ..cap alpha beta.. lymphocytes. This report demonstrates that identical T3 ..gamma.., delta, and element of polypeptides are synthesized by TCR ..gamma.. lymphocytes and TCR ..cap alpha beta.. lymphocytes. However, the processing of T3 delta oligosaccharides is distinct in the two cell types. This observation may suggest distinct quaternary structures of these receptor complexes. Despite these structural differences, the T3 molecule on TCR ..gamma.. lymphocytes is functional. It is associated with and comodulates with TCR ..gamma.. and it serves as a substrate from protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation. Anti-T3 monoclonal antibodies induce a rapid increase in cytoplasmic free calcium, indicating that the receptor complex is involved in signal transduction and triggering of TCR ..gamma.. lymphocytes.

  7. Inorganic arsenic represses interleukin-17A expression in human activated Th17 lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Morzadec, Claudie; Macoch, Mélinda; Robineau, Marc; Sparfel, Lydie; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2012-08-01

    Trivalent inorganic arsenic [As(III)] is an efficient anticancer agent used to treat patients suffering from acute promyelocytic leukemia. Recently, experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that this metalloid can also cure lymphoproliferative and/or pro-inflammatory syndromes in different murine models of chronic immune-mediated diseases. T helper (Th) 1 and Th17 lymphocytes play a central role in development of these diseases, in mice and humans, especially by secreting the potent pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ and IL-17A, respectively. As(III) impairs basic functions of human T cells but its ability to modulate secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by differentiated Th lymphocytes is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that As(III), used at concentrations clinically achievable in plasma of patients, has no effect on the secretion of interferon-γ from Th1 cells but almost totally blocks the expression and the release of IL-17A from human Th17 lymphocytes co-stimulated for five days with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies, in the presence of differentiating cytokines. In addition, As(III) specifically reduces mRNA levels of the retinoic-related orphan receptor (ROR)C gene which encodes RORγt, a key transcription factor controlling optimal IL-17 expression in fully differentiated Th17 cells. The metalloid also blocks initial expression of IL-17 gene induced by the co-stimulation, probably in part by impairing activation of the JNK/c-Jun pathway. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that As(III) represses expression of the major pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17A produced by human Th17 lymphocytes, thus strengthening the idea that As(III) may be useful to treat inflammatory immune-mediated diseases in humans. -- Highlights: ► Arsenic inhibits secretion of IL-17A from human naïve and memory Th17 lymphocytes. ► Arsenic represses early expression of IL-17A gene in human activated T lymphocytes. ► Arsenic interferes with activation of

  8. The Effect of a Grape Seed Extract on Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicu, Tiberius; Postescu, Ion D.; Foriş, Vasile; Brie, Ioana; Fischer-Fodor, Eva; Cernea, Valentin; Moldovan, Mircea; Cosma, Constantin

    2009-05-01

    Plant-derived antioxidants due to their phenolic compounds content are reported as potential candidates for reducing the levels of oxidative stress in living organisms. Grape seed extracts are very potent antioxidants and exhibit numerous interesting pharmacologic activities. Hydroethanolic (50/50, v/v) standardized extract was obtained from red grape seed (Vitis vinifera, variety Burgund Mare—BM). The total polyphenols content was evaluated by Folin-Ciocalteu procedure and expressed as μEq Gallic Acid/ml. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential antioxidant effects of different concentrations of BM extract against 60Co γ-rays induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Samples of human lymphocytes were incubated with BM extract (12.5, 25.0 and 37.5 μEq GA/ml, respectively) administered at 30 minutes before in vitro irradiation with γ-rays (2 Gy). The DNA damage and repair in lymphocytes were evaluated using alkaline comet assay. Using the lesion score, the radiation-induced DNA damage was found to be significantly different (p<0.05) from control, both in the absence and presence of BM extract (except the lymphocytes treated with 37.5 μEq GA/ml BM extract). DNA repair analyzed by incubating the irradiated cells at 37° C and 5% CO2 atmosphere for 2 h, indicated a significant difference (p<0.05) in the lymphocytes group treated with 25.0 μEq GA/ml BM extract, immediately and two hours after irradiation. These results suggest radioprotective effects after treatment with BM extract in human lymphocytes.

  9. Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinstreuer, N.C.; Smith, A.M.; West, P.R.; Conard, K.R.; Fontaine, B.R.; Weir-Hauptman, A.M.; Palmer, J.A.; Knudsen, T.B.; Dix, D.J.; Donley, E.L.R.; Cezar, G.G.

    2011-11-15

    Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast Trade-Mark-Sign chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultures were evaluated for known and novel signatures that may be indicative of developmental toxicity. Significant fold changes in endogenous metabolites were detected for 83 putatively annotated mass features in response to the subset of ToxCast chemicals. The annotations were mapped to specific human metabolic pathways. This revealed strong effects on pathways for nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism pathways. Predictivity for adverse outcomes in mammalian prenatal developmental toxicity studies used ToxRefDB and other sources of information, including Stemina Biomarker Discovery's predictive DevTox Registered-Sign model trained on 23 pharmaceutical agents of known developmental toxicity and differing potency. The model initially predicted developmental toxicity from the blinded ToxCast compounds in concordance with animal data with 73% accuracy. Retraining the model with data from the unblinded test compounds at one concentration level increased the predictive accuracy for the remaining concentrations to 83%. These preliminary results on a 11-chemical subset of the ToxCast chemical library indicate that metabolomics analysis of the hES secretome provides information valuable for predictive modeling and mechanistic understanding of mammalian developmental toxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested 11 environmental compounds in a hESC metabolomics platform. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant changes in secreted small molecule metabolites were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perturbed mass features map to pathways critical for normal development and

  10. Loss of telomeric DNA during aging of normal and trisomy 21 human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Vaziri, H.; Uchida, I.; Lan Wei; Harley, C.B. ); Schaechter, F.; Cohen, D. ); Xiaoming Zhu; Effros, R. )

    1993-04-01

    The telomere hypothesis of cellular aging proposes that loss of telomeric DNA (TTAGGG) from human chromosomes may ultimately cause cell-cycle exit during replicative senescence. Since lymphocytes have a limited replicative capacity and since blood cells were previously shown to lose telomeric DNA during aging in vivo, the authors wished to determine (a) whether accelerated telomere loss is associated with the premature immunosenescence of lymphocytes in individuals with Down syndrome (DS) and (b) whether telomeric DNA is also lost during aging of lymphocytes in vitro. To investigate the effects of aging and trisomy 21 on telomere loss in vivo, genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood lymphocytes of 140 individuals (age 0--107 years), including 21 DS patients (age 0--45 years). Digestion with restriction enzymes HinfI and RsaI generated terminal restriction fragments (TRFs), which were detected by Southern analysis using a telomere-specific probe ([sup 32]P-(C[sub 3]TA[sub 2])[sub 3]). The rate of telomere loss was calculated from the decrease in mean TRF length, as a function of donor age. DS patients showed a significantly higher rate of telomere loss with donor age (133 [+-] 15 bp/year) compared with age-matched controls (41 [+-] 7.7 bp/year) (P < .0005), suggesting that accelerated telomere loss is a biomarker of premature immunosenescence of DS patients and that it may play a role in this process. Telomere loss during aging in vitro was calculated for lymphocytes from four normal individuals, grown in culture for 10--30 population doublings. The rate of telomere loss was [approximately]120 bp/cell doubling, comparable to that seen in other somatic cells. Moreover, telomere lengths of lymphocytes from centenarians and from older DS patients were similar to those of senescent lymphocytes in culture, which suggests that replicative senescence could partially account for aging of the immune system in DS patients and in elderly individuals. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells promote intracellular crawling of lymphocytes during recruitment: A new step in migration.

    PubMed

    Patten, Daniel A; Wilson, Garrick K; Bailey, Dalan; Shaw, Robert K; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Salmi, Marko; Rot, Antal; Weston, Chris J; Adams, David H; Shetty, Shishir

    2017-01-01

    The recruitment of lymphocytes via the hepatic sinusoidal channels and positioning within liver tissue is a critical event in the development and persistence of chronic inflammatory liver diseases. The hepatic sinusoid is a unique vascular bed lined by hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (HSECs), a functionally and phenotypically distinct subpopulation of endothelial cells. Using flow-based adhesion assays to study the migration of lymphocytes across primary human HSECs, we found that lymphocytes enter into HSECs, confirmed by electron microscopy demonstrating clear intracellular localization of lymphocytes in vitro and by studies in human liver tissues. Stimulation by interferon-γ increased intracellular localization of lymphocytes within HSECs. Furthermore, using confocal imaging and time-lapse recordings, we demonstrated "intracellular crawling" of lymphocytes entering into one endothelial cell from another. This required the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and stabilin-1 and was facilitated by the junctional complexes between HSECs.

  12. Evaluation of genetic damage in human peripheral lymphocytes exposed to mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements.

    PubMed

    Braz, M G; Camargo, E A; Salvadori, D M F; Marques, M E A; Ribeiro, D A

    2006-03-01

    summary Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement are being used in dentistry as root-end-filling material for periapical surgery and for the sealing of communications between the root canal system and the surrounding tissues. However, genotoxicity tests for complete risk assessment of these compounds have not been conducted up to now. In the present study, the genotoxic effects of MTA and Portland cements were evaluated in peripheral lymphocytes from 10 volunteers by the alkaline single cell gel (comet) assay. The results pointed out that the single cell gel (comet) assay failed to detect the presence of DNA damage after a treatment of peripheral lymphocytes by MTA and Portland cements for concentrations up to 1000 mug mL(-1). In summary, our results indicate that exposure to MTA or Portland cements may not be a factor that increases the level of DNA lesions in human peripheral lymphocytes as detected by single cell gel (comet) assay.

  13. Differential transforming activity of the retroviral Tax oncoproteins in human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tong; Cheng, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 and type 2 (HTLV-1 and -2) are two closely related retroviruses. HTLV-1 causes adult T cell leukemia and lymphoma, whereas HTLV-2 infection is not etiologically linked to human disease. The viral genomes of HTLV-1 and -2 encode highly homologous transforming proteins, Tax-1 and Tax-2, respectively. Tax-1 is thought to play a central role in transforming CD4+ T lymphocytes. Expression of Tax-1 is crucial for promoting survival and proliferation of virally infected human T lymphocytes and is necessary for initiating HTLV-1-mediated oncogenesis. In transgenic mice and humanized mouse model, Tax-1 has proven to be leukemogenic. Although Tax-1 is able to efficiently transform rodent fibroblasts and to induce lymphoma in mouse model, it rarely transforms primary human CD4+ T lymphocytes. In contrast, Tax-2 efficiently immortalizes human CD4+ T cells though it exhibits a lower transforming activity in rodent cells as compared to Tax-1. We here discuss our recent observation and views on the differential transforming activity of Tax-1 and Tax-2 in human T cells.

  14. Early effects of low dose 12C6+ ion or X-ray irradiation on human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingtai; Li, Yumin; Zhang, Hong; Xie, Yi; Chen, Xuezhong; Ren, Jinyu; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Zijiang; Liu, Hongliang; Zhang, Yawei

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the acute effects of low dose 12C6+ ions or X-ray radiation on human immune function. The human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) of seven healthy donors were exposed to 0.05 Gy 12C6+ ions or X-ray radiation and cell responses were measured at 24 h after exposure. The cytotoxic activities of HPBL were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT); the percentages of T and NK cells subsets were detected by flow cytometry; mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ were examined by real time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR); and these cytokines protein levels in supernatant of cultured cells were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The results showed that the cytotoxic activity of HPBL, mRNA expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α in HPBL and their protein levels in supernatant were significantly increased at 24 h after exposure to 0.05 Gy 12C6+ ions radiation and the effects were stronger than observed for X-ray exposure. However, there was no significant change in the percentage of T and NK cells subsets of HPBL. These results suggested that 0.05 Gy high linear energy transfer (LET) 12C6+ radiation was a more effective approach to host immune enhancement than that of low LET X-ray. We conclude that cytokines production might be used as sensitive indicators of acute response to LDI.

  15. Toxicological Implications and Inflammatory Response in Human Lymphocytes Challenged with Oxytetracycline

    PubMed Central

    Di Cerbo, A.; Palatucci, A. T.; Rubino, V.; Centenaro, S.; Giovazzino, A.; Fraccaroli, E.; Cortese, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Guidetti, G.; Canello, S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibiotics are widely used in zoo technical and veterinary practices as feed supplementation to ensure wellness of farmed animals and livestock. Several evidences have been suggesting both the toxic role for tetracyclines, particularly for oxytetracycline (OTC). This potential toxicity appears of great relevance for human nutrition and for domestic animals. This study aimed to extend the evaluation of such toxicity. The biologic impact of the drug was assessed by evaluating the proinflammatory effect of OTC and their bone residues on cytokine secretion by in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Our results showed that both OTC and OTC‐bone residues significantly induced the T lymphocyte and non‐T cell secretion of interferon (IFN)‐γ, as cytokine involved in inflammatory responses in humans as well as in animals. These results may suggest a possible implication for new potential human and animal health risks depending on the entry of tetracyclines in the food‐processing chain. PMID:26537863

  16. Generation of tumor-targeted human T lymphocytes from induced pluripotent stem cells for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Themeli, Maria; Kloss, Christopher C; Ciriello, Giovanni; Fedorov, Victor D; Perna, Fabiana; Gonen, Mithat; Sadelain, Michel

    2013-10-01

    Progress in adoptive T-cell therapy for cancer and infectious diseases is hampered by the lack of readily available, antigen-specific, human T lymphocytes. Pluripotent stem cells could provide an unlimited source of T lymphocytes, but the therapeutic potential of human pluripotent stem cell-derived lymphoid cells generated to date remains uncertain. Here we combine induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) technologies to generate human T cells targeted to CD19, an antigen expressed by malignant B cells, in tissue culture. These iPSC-derived, CAR-expressing T cells display a phenotype resembling that of innate γδ T cells. Similar to CAR-transduced, peripheral blood γδ T cells, the iPSC-derived T cells potently inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model. This approach of generating therapeutic human T cells 'in the dish' may be useful for cancer immunotherapy and other medical applications.

  17. Mechanism of deoxyadenosine and 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine toxicity to nondividing human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Seto, S; Carrera, C J; Kubota, M; Wasson, D B; Carson, D A

    1985-01-01

    Deoxyadenosine has been implicated as the toxic metabolite causing profound lymphopenia in immunodeficient children with a genetic deficiency of adenosine deaminase (ADA), and in adults treated with the potent ADA inhibitor deoxycoformycin. However, the biochemical basis for deoxyadenosine toxicity toward lymphocytes remains controversial. The present experiments have examined in detail the sequential metabolic changes induced in nondividing human peripheral blood lymphocytes by incubation with deoxyadenosine plus deoxycoformycin, or with 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine (CdA), an ADA resistant deoxyadenosine congener with anti-leukemic and immunosuppressive properties. The lymphotoxic effect of deoxyadenosine and CdA required their phosphorylation, and was inhibited by deoxycytidine. As early as 4 h after exposure to the deoxynucleosides, strand breaks in lymphocyte DNA began to accumulate, and RNA synthesis decreased. These changes were followed by a significant fall in intracellular NAD levels at 8 h, a drop in ATP pools at 24 h, and cell death by 48 h. Incubation of the lymphocytes with 5 mM nicotinamide, a NAD precursor and an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase, prevented NAD depletion. The nicotinamide treatment also rendered the lymphocytes highly resistant to deoxyadenosine and CdA toxicity, without altering dATP formation or the accumulation of DNA strand breaks. The poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide exerted a similar although less potent effect. These results suggest that NAD depletion, probably triggered by poly(ADP-ribose) formation, is the principle cause of death in normal resting human lymphocytes exposed to deoxyadenosine plus deoxycoformycin, or to CdA. PMID:2579098

  18. Phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils and their subsets in early-stage human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy B

    2017-03-10

    Neutrophils accumulate in many types of human and murine tumors and represent a significant portion of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells. Our current understanding of the role of neutrophils in tumor development has depended primarily on murine models of cancer. However, there are crucial species differences in the evolution of tumors, genetic diversity, immune and inflammatory responses, and intrinsic biology of neutrophils that might have a profound impact on the tumor development and function of neutrophils in mouse versus human tumors. To date, the majority of experimental approaches to study neutrophils in cancer patients have been limited to the examination of circulating blood neutrophils. The phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in humans, particularly in the early stages of tumor development, have not been extensively investigated. Thus, the long-term goal of our work has been to characterize human TANs and determine their specific role in tumor development. Here, we summarize our findings on human TANs obtained from human early stage lung cancer patients. We will describe the phenotypes of different TAN subsets identified in early stage lung tumors, as well as their functional dialog with T cells.

  19. Differential expression of the granzymes A, K and M and perforin in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bade, Britta; Boettcher, Heidrun Elise; Lohrmann, Jens; Hink-Schauer, Clara; Bratke, Kai; Jenne, Dieter E; Virchow, J Christian; Luttmann, Werner

    2005-11-01

    Granzymes (Gzm) are a group of serine proteases which are stored in the granules of cytotoxic lymphocytes. In humans, five granzymes have been characterized to date at the molecular level. While GzmA and GzmB have been extensively studied, little is known about GzmH, GzmK and GzmM. In this study, we describe the generation of mAbs against human GzmK and GzmM by genetic immunization. The obtained anti-GzmK and anti-GzmM mAbs are not cross-reactive with GzmA, GzmB, GzmM and GzmA, GzmB, GzmK, respectively, and show a granular staining pattern in human lymphocytes. Flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed that GzmA, GzmM and perforin show a similar distribution. They are expressed in almost all CD16+CD56+ NK cells, CD3+CD56+ NKT cells and gammadelta T cells as well as in 20-30% of all CD3+CD8+ TC cells. Surprisingly, GzmK was not detected in the highly cytotoxic CD16+CD56+ NK cells but was preferentially expressed in lymphocytes of the T cell lineage, staining 20% of CD3+CD8+ TC cells, 50% of CD3+CD56+ NKT cells and 40% of gammadelta T cells, as well as 60% of the small sub-population of CD56bright+ NK cells. Our data suggest that human granzymes are differentially expressed in distinct sub-populations of peripheral blood lymphocytes.

  20. Xmrk, Kras and Myc Transgenic Zebrafish Liver Cancer Models Share Molecular Signatures with Subsets of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Weiling; Li, Zhen; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Li, Caixia; Emelyanov, Alexander; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Previously three oncogene transgenic zebrafish lines with inducible expression of xmrk, kras or Myc in the liver have been generated and these transgenic lines develop oncogene-addicted liver tumors upon chemical induction. In the current study, comparative transcriptomic approaches were used to examine the correlation of the three induced transgenic liver cancers with human liver cancers. RNA profiles from the three zebrafish tumors indicated relatively small overlaps of significantly deregulated genes and biological pathways. Nevertheless, the three transgenic tumor signatures all showed significant correlation with advanced or very advanced human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Interestingly, molecular signature from each oncogene-induced zebrafish liver tumor correlated with only a small subset of human HCC samples (24–29%) and there were conserved up-regulated pathways between the zebrafish and correlated human HCC subgroup. The three zebrafish liver cancer models together represented nearly half (47.2%) of human HCCs while some human HCCs showed significant correlation with more than one signature defined from the three oncogene-addicted zebrafish tumors. In contrast, commonly deregulated genes (21 up and 16 down) in the three zebrafish tumor models generally showed accordant deregulation in the majority of human HCCs, suggesting that these genes might be more consistently deregulated in a broad range of human HCCs with different molecular mechanisms and thus serve as common diagnosis markers and therapeutic targets. Thus, these transgenic zebrafish models with well-defined oncogene-induced tumors are valuable tools for molecular classification of human HCCs and for understanding of molecular drivers in hepatocarcinogenesis in each human HCC subgroup. PMID:24633177

  1. Only a subset of C. canimorsus strains is dangerous for humans

    PubMed Central

    Renzi, Francesco; Dol, Melanie; Raymackers, Alice; Manfredi, Pablo; Cornelis, Guy Richard

    2015-01-01

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus are gram-negative bacteria living as commensals in the mouth of dogs and cats. C. canimorsus cause rare but life-threatening generalized infections in humans that have been in contact with a dog or a cat. Over the last years we collected 105 C. canimorsus strains from different geographical origins and from severe human infections or healthy dogs. All these strains were analyzed by 16S rDNA sequencing and a phylogenetic tree revealed two main groups of bacteria instead of one with no relation to the geographical origin. This branching was confirmed by the whole-genome sequencing of 10 strains, supporting the evidence of a new Capnocytophaga species in dogs. Interestingly, 19 out of 19 C. canimorsus strains isolated from human infections belonged to the same species. Furthermore, most strains from this species could grow in heat-inactivated human serum (HIHS) (40/46 tested), deglycosylate IgM (48/66) and were cytochrome-oxidase positive (60/66) while most strains from the other species could not grow in HIHS (22/23 tested), could not deglycosylate IgM (33/34) and were cytochrome-oxidase negative (33/34). Here, we propose to call Capnocytophaga canis (Latin: dog) the novel, presumably less virulent dog-hosted Capnocytophaga species and to keep the name C. canimorsus for the species including human pathogens. PMID:26421271

  2. Distinct Regulation of IL-17 in Human Helper T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi; Tato, Cristina M.; Muul, Linda; Laurence, Arian; O’Shea, John J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective IL-17 producing helper T cells have been proposed to represent a separate lineage of CD4+ cells, designated Th17 cells, which are regulated by the transcription factor RORγt. However, despite advances in understanding murine Th17 differentiation, a systematic assessment of factors that promote the differentiation of naïve human T cells to Th17 cells has not been reported. This present study was undertaken to assess the effects of cytokines known to promote murine Th17 cells on naïve human CD4+ T cells. Methods Human naïve and memory CD4+ T cells isolated from peripheral blood were activated and cultured with various cytokines. Cytokine production was measured by ELISA and flow cytometry. mRNA was measured by quantitative PCR. Results In response to CD3/CD28 stimulation alone, human memory T cells rapidly produced IL-17, whereas naïve T cells expressed low levels. TGF-β1 and IL-6 upregulated RORγt expression but did not induce Th17 differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells. However, IL-23 upregulated its own receptor and was an important inducer of IL-17 and IL-22. Conclusion The present data demonstrate the differential regulation of IL-17 and RORγt expression in human CD4+ T cells compared to murine cells. Optimal conditions for the development of IL-17-producing T cells from murine naïve precursors are ineffective in human T cells. Conversely, IL-23 promoted generation of human Th17 cells but was also a very potent inducer of other proinflammatory cytokines. These findings may have important implications in the pathogenesis of human autoimmunity compared to mouse models. PMID:17763419

  3. Protective Effect of Onion Extract on Bleomycin-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon Hee; Lee, Joong Won; Woo, Hae Dong; Lee, Sunyeong; Kim, Yang Jee; Lee, Younghyun; Shin, Sangah; Joung, Hyojee; Chung, Hai Won

    2016-01-01

    Following one of the world’s largest nuclear accidents, occured at Fukushima, Japan in 2011, a significant scientific effort has focused on minimizing the potential adverse health effects due to radiation exposure. The use of natural dietary antioxidants to reduce the risk of radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage is a simple strategy for minimizing radiation-related cancer rates and improving overall health. The onion is among the richest sources of dietary flavonoids and is an important food for increasing their overall intake. Therefore, we examined the effect of an onion extract on cyto- and geno-toxicity in human lymphocytes treated with bleomycin (BLM), a radiomimetic agent. In addition, we measured the frequency of micronuclei (MN) and DNA damage following treatment with BLM using a cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay and a single cell gel electrophoresis assay. We observed a significant increase in cell viability in lymphocytes treated with onion extract then exposed to BLM compared to cells treated with BLM alone. The frequency of BLM induced MN and DNA damage increased in a dose-dependent manner; however, when lymphocytes were pretreated with onion extract (10 and 20 μL/mL), the frequency of BLM-induced MN was decreased at all doses of BLM and DNA damage was decreased at 3 μg/mL of BLM. These results suggest that onion extract may have protective effects against BLM-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in human lymphocytes. PMID:26907305

  4. Inhibitory effects of extracellular products from oral bacteria on human fibroblasts and stimulated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Higerd, T B; Vesole, D H; Goust, J M

    1978-08-01

    Extracellular products of 12 strains of Streptococcus mutans and 5 additional species of oral bacteria were analyzed for their ability to inhibit proliferation of fibroblastoid cells (HeLa and AV3) and blast transformation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from normal individuals. Products from S. mutans strains AHT and BHT, Streptococcus intermedius, and Actinomyces viscosus inhibited [3H]thymidine uptake by fibroblastoid cells and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes. Products from S. mutans E49, Streptococcus salivarius, and Actinomyces naeslundii inhibited blast transformation of human lymphocytes but did not significantly inhibit the growth of fibroblastoid cells. Preparations from S. intermedius gave the greatest inhibitory activity against both target cell types; initial characterization of this preparation suggested a single factor active in both assays, in that the heat lability and Sephadex G-200 elution profile were similar for the inhibitory activity seen with the two cell types. The molecular weight of the inhibitor, estimated by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200 and Ultragel AcA34, was approximately 160,000. The results strongly suggest that oral bacteria produce heat-labile substances that interfere with fibroblast proliferation and alter the lymphocytic immunological response.

  5. Protective Effect of Onion Extract on Bleomycin-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoon Hee; Lee, Joong Won; Woo, Hae Dong; Lee, Sunyeong; Kim, Yang Jee; Lee, Younghyun; Shin, Sangah; Joung, Hyojee; Chung, Hai Won

    2016-02-19

    Following one of the world's largest nuclear accidents, occured at Fukushima, Japan in 2011, a significant scientific effort has focused on minimizing the potential adverse health effects due to radiation exposure. The use of natural dietary antioxidants to reduce the risk of radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage is a simple strategy for minimizing radiation-related cancer rates and improving overall health. The onion is among the richest sources of dietary flavonoids and is an important food for increasing their overall intake. Therefore, we examined the effect of an onion extract on cyto- and geno-toxicity in human lymphocytes treated with bleomycin (BLM), a radiomimetic agent. In addition, we measured the frequency of micronuclei (MN) and DNA damage following treatment with BLM using a cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay and a single cell gel electrophoresis assay. We observed a significant increase in cell viability in lymphocytes treated with onion extract then exposed to BLM compared to cells treated with BLM alone. The frequency of BLM induced MN and DNA damage increased in a dose-dependent manner; however, when lymphocytes were pretreated with onion extract (10 and 20 μL/mL), the frequency of BLM-induced MN was decreased at all doses of BLM and DNA damage was decreased at 3 μg/mL of BLM. These results suggest that onion extract may have protective effects against BLM-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in human lymphocytes.

  6. Insight into the immunobiology of human skin and functional specialization of skin dendritic cell subsets to innovate intradermal vaccination design.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, M B M; Haniffa, M; Collin, M P

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the key initiators and regulators of any immune response which determine the outcome of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses. Multiple distinct DC subsets can be distinguished by location, phenotype, and function in the homeostatic and inflamed human skin. The function of steady-state cutaneous DCs or recruited inflammatory DCs is influenced by the surrounding cellular and extracellular skin microenvironment. The skin is an attractive site for vaccination given the extended local network of DCs and the easy access to the skin-draining lymph nodes to generate effector T cells and immunoglobulin-producing B cells for long-term protective immunity. In the context of intradermal vaccination we describe in this review the skin-associated immune system, the characteristics of the different skin DC subsets, the mechanism of antigen uptake and presentation, and how the properties of DCs can be manipulated. This knowledge is critical for the development of intradermal vaccine strategies and supports the concept of intradermal vaccination as a superior route to the conventional intramuscular or subcutaneous methods.

  7. The tax gene of human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 is essential for transformation of human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ross, T M; Pettiford, S M; Green, P L

    1996-08-01

    The mechanism of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)-mediated transformation and induction of malignancy is unknown; however, several studies have implicated the viral gene product, Tax. Conclusive evidence for the role of Tax in the HTLV malignant process has been impeded by the inability to mutate tax in the context of an infectious virus and dissociate viral replication from cellular transformation. To circumvent this problem we constructed a mutant of HTLV type 2 (HTLV-2) that replicates by a Tax-independent mechanism. For these studies, the Tax response element in the viral long terminal repeat was replaced with the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter enhancer (C-enh). Transcription of the chimeric HTLV-2 (HTLVC-enh) was efficiently directed by this heterologous promoter. Also, the chimeric virus transformed primary human T lymphocytes with an efficiency similar to that of wild-type HTLV-2. A tax-knockout virus, termed HTLVC-enhDeltaTax, was constructed to directly assess the importance of Tax in cellular transformation. Transfection and infection studies indicated that HTLVC-enhDeltaTax was replication competent; however, HTLVC-enhDeltaTax failed to transform primary human T lymphocytes. We conclude that Tax is essential for HTLV-mediated transformation of human T lymphocytes. Furthermore, this chimeric HTLV, that replicates in the absence of Tax, should facilitate studies to determine the precise mechanism of T-lymphocyte transformation by HTLV.

  8. Proliferation and cytogenetic studies in human blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to 2450 MHz radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Vijayalaxmi; Mohan, N; Meltz, M L; Wittler, M A

    1997-12-01

    Aliquots of human peripheral blood collected from two healthy human volunteers were exposed in vitro to continuous wave 2450 MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR), either continuously for a period of 90 min or intermittently for a total exposure period of 90 min (30 min on and 30 min off, repeated three times). Blood aliquots which were sham-exposed or exposed in vitro to 150 cGy gamma radiation served as controls. The continuous wave 2450 MHz RFR was generated with a net forward power of 34.5 W and transmitted from a standard gain rectangular antenna horn in a vertically downward direction. The mean power density at the position of the cells was 5.0 mW/cm2. The mean specific absorption rate calculated by Finite Difference Time Domain analysis was 12.46 W/kg. Immediately after exposure, lymphocytes were cultured for 48 and 72 h to determine the incidence of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei, respectively. Proliferation indices were also recorded. There were no significant differences between RFR-exposed and sham-exposed lymphocytes with respect to; (a) mitotic indices; (b) incidence of cells showing chromosome damage; (c) exchange aberrations; (d) acentric fragments; (e) binucleate lymphocytes, and (f) micronuclei, for either the continuous or intermittent RFR exposures. In contrast, the response of positive control cells exposed to 150 cGy gamma radiation was significantly different from RFR-exposed and sham-exposed lymphocytes. Thus, there is no evidence for an effect on mitogen-stimulated proliferation kinetics or for excess genotoxicity within 72 h in human blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to 2450 MHz RFR.

  9. Radiation-induced bystander effect in healthy G(o) human lymphocytes: biological and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Belloni, Paola; Latini, Paolo; Palitti, Fabrizio

    2011-08-01

    To study the bystander effects, G(0) human peripheral blood lymphocytes were X-irradiated with 0.1, 0.5 and 3 Gy. After 24h, cell-free conditioned media from irradiated cultures were transferred to unexposed lymphocytes. Following 48 h of medium transfer, viability, induction of apoptosis, telomere shortening, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and micronuclei (after stimulation) were analyzed. A statistically significant decrement in cell viability, concomitant with the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, telomere shortening, increases in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) with depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) level, and higher frequencies of micronuclei, were observed in bystander lymphocytes incubated with medium from 0.5 and 3 Gy irradiated samples, compared to lymphocytes unexposed. Furthermore, no statistically significant difference between the response to 0.5 and 3 Gy of irradiation in bystander lymphocytes, was found. However, when lymphocytes were irradiated with 0.1 Gy, no bystander effect with regard to viability, apoptosis, telomere length, and micronuclei was observed, although a high production of ROS level persisted. Radiation in the presence of the radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) suppressed oxidative stress induced by 3 Gy of X-rays with the effective elimination of bystander effects, suggesting a correlation between ROS and bystander signal formation in irradiated cells. The data propose that bystander effect might be mostly due to the reactions of radiation induced free radicals on DNA, with the existence of a threshold at which the bystander signal is not operative (0.1 Gy dose of X-rays). Our results may have clinical implications for health risk associated with radiation exposure.

  10. Molybdate modulates mitogen and cyclosporin responses of human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Michelis, Fotios V; Delitheos, Andreas; Tiligada, Ekaterini

    2011-07-01

    The trace element molybdenum (Mo) is an essential component of key physiological systems in animals, plants and microorganisms. The molybdate oxoanion MoO(4)(2-) has been demonstrated to cause diverse yet poorly understood biochemical and pharmacological effects, such as non-specific inhibition of phosphatases and stabilization of steroid receptors. This study aimed to investigate the effects of molybdate on the activation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (hPBLs) ex vivo and its potential interaction with the widely used immunosuppressant drug cyclosporin A (CsA). Lymphocyte activation was evaluated by performing multiple experiments determining blastogenesis in cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from 5 healthy volunteers, following stimulation induced by phytohemagglutinin (PHA), in the absence or presence of 0.05-10 mM sodium molybdate or/and 2.5-30 μg/mL CsA. Blastogenesis was assessed by a morphometric assay based on the relative proportions of unactivated lymphocytes, activated lymphoblasts and cells with aberrant morphology after PHA-induced activation. Molybdate concentrations up to 1 mM showed no effect on lymphocyte blastogenesis, while higher concentrations exerted immunosuppressive actions on cultured hPBLs. Co-administration of 0.1 mM sodium molybdate with CsA, at doses up to 20 μg/mL, induced no alteration in the response of cultured hPBLs to CsA. However, molybdate potentiated the immunosuppressive action of higher CsA concentrations, implying a likely dose-related synergistic interaction of the two agents in PHA-stimulated blood lymphocytes. These observations are indicative of the possible biological importance of molybdate oxoanions in the modulation of hPBL activation that may have pharmacological consequences during the therapeutic application of immunomodulatory drugs.

  11. Purification and separation of subsets of human Ia molecules by papain digestion.

    PubMed Central

    Tanigaki, N; Tosi, R; Koyama, K; Pressman, D

    1980-01-01

    Papain digestion of human Ia(-like) molecules was performed under various conditions using 125I-labelled preparation of non-ionic-detergent-solubilized Ia antigens of Daudi cells. The products were examined for their allospecificities by a direct binding reaction with human Ia alloantisera. The Daudi Ia preparation is known to contain Ia molecules of DRw6 specificity, an HLA-DR specificity and also Ia molecules of DC1 specificity, a putative non-HLA-DR specificity. Limited papain digestion cleaved off the hydrophobic portion of human Ia molecules and gave smaller sized Ia products. The cleavage did not affect the Ia alloantigenic determinants and occurred much more readily with molecules of DC1 specificity than with molecules of DRw6 specificity. As a consequence, limited papain digestion of the Daudi Ia pool yielded an Ia preparation with DRw6 specificity but lacking DC1 specificity and another Ia preparation which was enriched in DC1 specificity. The limited papain digestion of the Daudi Ia pool followed by gel filtration and LcH affinity chromatography also produced Ia REPARATIONS OF HIGH PURITY. Extensive papain digestion damaged the Ia alloantigenic determinants but the DC1 determinant was much more resistant than the DRw6 determinant. Thus extensive papain digestion yielded an Ia preparation which was relatively rich in DC1 specificity and essentially devoid of DRw6 specificity. PMID:6155328

  12. Son maintains accurate splicing for a subset of human pre-mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok; Markey, Michael; Torres-Muñoz, Keshia; Varia, Sapna; Kadakia, Madhavi; Bubulya, Athanasios; Bubulya, Paula A

    2011-12-15

    Serine-arginine-rich (SR) proteins play a key role in alternative pre-mRNA splicing in eukaryotes. We recently showed that a large SR protein called Son has unique repeat motifs that are essential for maintaining the subnuclear organization of pre-mRNA processing factors in nuclear speckles. Motif analysis of Son highlights putative RNA interaction domains that suggest a direct role for Son in pre-mRNA splicing. Here, we used in situ approaches to show that Son localizes to a reporter minigene transcription site, and that RNAi-mediated Son depletion causes exon skipping on reporter transcripts at this transcription site. A genome-wide exon microarray analysis was performed to identify human transcription and splicing targets of Son. Our data show that Son-regulated splicing encompasses all known types of alternative splicing, the most common being alternative splicing of cassette exons. We confirmed that knockdown of Son leads to exon skipping in pre-mRNAs for chromatin-modifying enzymes, including ADA, HDAC6 and SetD8. This study reports a comprehensive view of human transcription and splicing targets for Son in fundamental cellular pathways such as integrin-mediated cell adhesion, cell cycle regulation, cholesterol biosynthesis, apoptosis and epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

  13. Modulation of potassium channels in human T lymphocytes: effects of temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Pahapill, P A; Schlichter, L C

    1990-01-01

    1. The predominant channels found in lymphocytes with patch-clamp whole-cell recordings are voltage-gated K+ channels. Several lines of evidence suggest that these channels are involved in lymphocyte function. Most lymphocyte functions are temperature sensitive and have not been correlated with electrophysiology at different temperatures. We have examined the effect of temperature on the voltage-dependent K+ channel in normal human T lymphocytes. Both macroscopic current and single-channel events were studied with whole-cell recordings at temperatures from 5 to 42 degrees C. 2. Peak conductance, activation rate, inactivation rate and rate of recovery from inactivation all increased progressively as the temperature increased. The effect of temperature on channel opening processes was greater at low temperatures. In contrast, the inactivation process was most sensitive to temperature changes above room temperature. Arrhenius plots of conductance and kinetic parameters were curvilinear with no obvious break-points. 3. The increase in whole-cell conductance at 37 degrees C was due to both an increase in the single-channel conductance and in the probability that each channel is open at any time. 4. K+ currents were fitted by Hodgkin-Huxley equations with n4j kinetics providing the best description of the currents at all temperatures tested. 5. Steady-state activation- and inactivation-voltage curves shifted in opposite directions with warming, resulting in a greater area of overlap of the curves ('window' current). The increase in resting K+ channel activity predicted by a greater window current was confirmed with single-channel measurements. 6. The present study has shown that the behaviour of K+ channels in human T lymphocytes is temperature dependent. PMID:2352174

  14. In human alloreactive CD4⁺ T-cells, dichloroacetate inhibits aerobic glycolysis, induces apoptosis and favors differentiation towards the regulatory T-cell subset instead of effector T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Sounidaki, Maria; Pissas, Georgios; Antoniadi, Georgia; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    Although kidney transplantation is the best therapy for end-stage renal disease, rejection remains a concern, and currently available immunosuppressive agents contribute to morbidity and mortality. Thus, novel immunosuppressive drugs are required. Dichloroacetate (DCA) is already used in the treatment of congenital lactic acidosis and characterized by limited toxicity. As DCA inhibits aerobic glycolysis, which is a prerequisite for CD4+ T-cell proliferation and differentiation into effector T-cells, its possible immunosuppressive role in mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR), a model of alloreactivity, was investigated. Glucose and lactate concentrations were measured in the supernatants, and cell proliferation was assessed immunoenzymatically. CD4+ T‑cells were then isolated from the MLRs and the expression of cleaved caspase‑3, various enzymes involved in glycolysis, and the signature transcription factors of CD4+ T‑cell subsets were evaluated by western blotting. In MLRs, DCA decreased glucose consumption and aerobic glycolysis, while it exerted a negligible effect on cell proliferation. In CD4+ T‑cells, DCA induced apoptosis, and decreased the expression of glucose trasporter‑1, hexokinase II, lactate dehydrogenase‑A and phosphorylated pyruvate dehydrogenase, while it increased total pyruvate dehydrogenase. In addition, DCA increased the expression of transcription factor forkhead box P3, whereas it decreased the expression of T‑box transcription factor TBX21, trans‑acting T-cell-specific transcription factor GATA‑3 and retinoic acid receptor related orphan receptor‑γt. In conclusion, in alloreactive CD4+ T‑cells, DCA inhibits aerobic glycolysis, induces apoptosis and favors differentiation towards the regulatory T‑cell subset. These characteristics render it a promising immunosuppressive agent in the field of transplantation.

  15. CTLA4 blockade induces frequent tumor infiltration by activated lymphocytes regardless of clinical responses in humans

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rong Rong; Jalil, Jason; Economou, James S.; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Koya, Richard C.; Mok, Stephen; Sazegar, Hooman; Seja, Elizabeth; Villanueva, Arturo; Gomez-Navarro, Jesus; Glaspy, John A.; Cochran, Alistair J.; Ribas, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Background CTLA4 blocking monoclonal antibodies provide durable clinical benefit in a subset of patients with advanced melanoma mediated by intratumoral lymphocytic infiltrates. A key question is defining if the intratumoral infiltration is a differentiating factor between patients with and without tumor responses. Methods Paired baseline and post-dosing tumor biopsies from 19 subjects, including three patients with an objective tumor response, were prospectively collected from patients with metastatic melanoma receiving the anti-CTLA4 antibody tremelimumab within a clinical trial with primary endpoint of quantitating CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) infiltration in tumors. Samples were analyzed for cell density using automated imaging capture, and further characterized for functional lymphocyte properties by assessing the cell activation markers HLA-DR and CD45RO, the cell proliferation marker Ki67 and the T regulatory cell marker FOXP3. Results There was a highly significant increase in intratumoral infiltration by CD8+ cells in biopsies taken after tremelimumab treatment. This included increases between 1-fold and 100-fold changes in 14 out of 18 evaluable cases regardless of clinical tumor response or progression. There was no difference between the absolute number, location or cell density of infiltrating cells between clinical responders and patients with non-responding lesions that showed acquired intratumoral infiltrates. There were similar levels of expression of T cell activation markers (CD45RO, HLA-DR) in both groups, and no difference in markers for cell replication (Ki67) or the suppressor cell marker FOXP3. Conclusion CTLA4 blockade induces frequent increases in intratumoral T cell infiltration despite which only a minority of patients have objective tumor responses. PMID:21558401

  16. Engineered Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Lymphocytes to Study In Vivo Trafficking and Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Knorr, David A.; Bock, Allison; Brentjens, Renier J.

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived natural killer (NK) cells are a promising source of antitumor lymphocytes for immunotherapeutics. They also provide a genetically tractable platform well suited for the study of antitumor immunotherapies in preclinical models. We have previously demonstrated the potency of hESC-derived NK cells in vivo. Here we use both bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging to demonstrate trafficking of hESC-derived NK cells to tumors in vivo. Our dual-imaging approach allowed us to more specifically define the kinetics of NK cell trafficking to tumor sites. NK cell persistence and trafficking were further evaluated by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. This integrated approach provides a unique system to apply the use of human pluripotent stem cells to study the kinetics and biodistribution of adoptively transferred lymphocytes, advances broadly applicable to the field of immunotherapy. PMID:23421330

  17. [Rapid dicentric assay of human blood lymphocytes after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Repin, M V; Repina, L A

    2011-01-01

    The probability of losses of different chromosome aberrations during the dicentric chromosome assay of metaphase cells with incomplete sets of chromosome centromeres was estimated using a mathematical model for low doses of ionizing radiation. A dicentric assay of human blood lymphocytes without determination of the total amount of chromosome centromeres in cells without chromosome aberrations (rapid dicentric assay) has been proposed. The rapid dicentric analysis allows to register chromosome aberrations in full compliance with the conventional classification. The experimental data have shown no statistically significant difference between the frequencies of dicentric chromosomes detected by rapid and classical dicentric chromosome assays of human lymphocytes exposed to 0.5 Gy of 60Co gamma-rays. The rate of the rapid dicentric assay was almost twice as high as that of the classical dicentric assay.

  18. Engineered human embryonic stem cell-derived lymphocytes to study in vivo trafficking and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Knorr, David A; Bock, Allison; Brentjens, Renier J; Kaufman, Dan S

    2013-07-01

    Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived natural killer (NK) cells are a promising source of antitumor lymphocytes for immunotherapeutics. They also provide a genetically tractable platform well suited for the study of antitumor immunotherapies in preclinical models. We have previously demonstrated the potency of hESC-derived NK cells in vivo. Here we use both bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging to demonstrate trafficking of hESC-derived NK cells to tumors in vivo. Our dual-imaging approach allowed us to more specifically define the kinetics of NK cell trafficking to tumor sites. NK cell persistence and trafficking were further evaluated by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. This integrated approach provides a unique system to apply the use of human pluripotent stem cells to study the kinetics and biodistribution of adoptively transferred lymphocytes, advances broadly applicable to the field of immunotherapy.

  19. Human IFN-gamma up-regulates IL-2 receptors in mitogen-activated T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, M A; De Sanctis, J B; Blasini, A M; Leon-Ponte, M; Abadi, I

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the role of human recombinant interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma) in the expression of interleukin-2 receptors (IL-2R) by human T lymphocytes. rIFN-gamma enhanced total numbers of IL-2R in mitogen-activated but not resting T cells. Scatchard plot analysis indicated that rIFN-gamma increased both high- and low-affinity receptors, with a predominant effect on the latter. Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-activated T cells treated with IFN-gamma showed higher IL-2 binding and greater IL-2 internalization and degradation than cells treated with PHA alone. There was a corresponding increase of mitogen-driven proliferative responses, indicating an increase of functional receptors in IFN-treated cultures. IFN-gamma may influence T-cell activation and proliferation by enhancing expression of IL-2R and promoting IL-2 uptake by mitogen-activated lymphocytes. PMID:2110548

  20. Marked reduction of radiation-induced micronuclei in human blood lymphocytes pretreated with melatonin

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayalaxmi; Reiter, R.J.; Leal, B.Z.

    1995-07-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes which were pretreated in vitro with melatonin, and endogenously synthesized pineal hormone, for 20 min at 37 {plus_minus} 1{degrees}C exhibited a significant and concentration-dependent reduction in the frequency of {gamma}radiation-induced micronuclei compared with irradiated cells which did not receive the pretreatment. The extent of the reduction observed with 2.0 mM melatonin was similar to that found in lymphocytes pretreated for 20 min with 1.0 M dimethylsulfoxide, a known free radical scavenger. These observations indicate that melatonin may have an active role in protection of humans against genetic damage due to endogenously produced free radicals, and also may be of use in reducing damage due to exposure to physical and chemical mutagens and carcinogens which generate free radicals. 25 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. [Ways of realizing apoptosis of human lymphocytes induced by UV-light and reactive oxygen species].

    PubMed

    Artiukhov, V G; Trubitsyna, M S; Nakvasina, M A; Solov'eva, E V; Lidokhova, O V

    2011-01-01

    Changes of DNA structural condition, the level of membrane Fas-receptor expression, caspase-3 functional activity, concentrations of Ca2+, p53 and cytochrome c proteins of human lymphocytes in dynamics of apoptosis development induced by UV-light (240-390 nm) at doses 151, 1510, 3020 J/m2 and reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion-radical, hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen peroxide, singlet oxygen) have been studied. UV-light and reactive oxygen species have been established to induce fragmentation of lymphocyte DNA after 20 h incubation of the modified cells. It has been shown, that the increase in the expression level of membrane death Fas-receptors is observed during 1-5 h after exposure oflymphocytes to UV-light and ROS compared with intact cells. Also revealed is augmentation of lymphocyte caspase-3 functional activity 4 h after generation of singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide addition, as well as 8 and 24 and 6 and 8 h after UV-irradiation of the cells at doses 151 and 1510 J/m2, correspondingly. Using DNA-comet method made it possible to tape that DNA damages (single-strand breaks) appear 15-20 min after lymphocyte UV-irradiation at doses 1510 and 3020 J/m and addition of hydrogen peroxide in concentration 10(-6) mol/l (C1 type comet) and reach their maximum 6 h after modification of the cells (C2 and C3 type comets). It has been observed, that 6 h after exposure oflymphocytes to hydrogen peroxide and UV-light at doses 1510 and 3020 J/m2, the p53 level of investigated cells raises. It has also been shown that the higher level of calcium in lymphocyte cytosol in conditions of UV-light exposure (1510 J/m2) and exogenous generation of reactive oxygen species is caused by Ca2+ exit from intracellular depots as a result of activating the components of the phosphoinositide mechanism for transferring information into a cell. Ideas about correlation between alterations of the calcium level and initiation of programmed cellular destruction of human

  2. The anticancer homeopathic composite "Canova Method" is not genotoxic for human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Seligmann, Igor C; Lima, Patrícia D L; Cardoso, Plínio C S; Khayat, André S; Bahia, Marcelo O; Buchi, Dorli de Freitas; Cabral, Isabel R; Burbano, Rommel R

    2003-06-30

    The Canova Method (CM) is a homeopathic medicine indicated for the treatment of patients with cancer and for pathologies that involve a depressed immune system, such as AIDS. This product is composed of homeopathic dilutions of Aconitum napellus, Arsenicum album (arsenic trioxide), Bryonia alba, Lachesis muta venom and Thuya occidentalis. It stimulates the immune system by activating macrophages. Activated macrophages stimulate the lymphocytes so that they increase their cytotoxic action in response to tumoral growth or infection. Given that the CM stimulates and accelerates the activity of macrophages and lymphocytes, we evaluated genotoxic effects induced in human lymphocytes treated with this homeopathic medication in vitro. Structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations were scored for the assessment of induced genotoxic effects, while the variation in mitotic index was considered as a monitor for induced cellular toxicity. The lymphocytes were cultivated for 24, 48 or 72 h in the following final concentrations of the medicinal composite CM: 4, 8 and 12%. Treatments with the CM did not affect mitotic indexes, nor did they provoke chromosomal aberrations, when compared with untreated controls. There was no cytotoxicity or genotoxicity at the chromosomal level.

  3. In vitro protection of human lymphocytes from toxic effects of chlorpyrifos by selenium-enriched medicines

    PubMed Central

    Navaei-Nigjeh, Mona; Asadi, Hamidreza; Baeeri, Maryam; Pedram, Sahar; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Chlorpyrifos (CP) is a broad-spectrum organophosphorus pesticide used extensively in agricultural and domestic pest control, accounting for 50% of the global insecticidal use. In the present study, protective effects of two selenium-enriched strong antioxidative medicines IMOD and Angipars were examined in human lymphocytes treated with CP in vitro. Materials and Methods: Isolated lymphocytes were exposed to 12 µg/ml CP either alone or in combination with effective doses (ED50) of IMOD (0.2 µg/ml) and Angipars (1 µg/ml). After 3 days incubation, the viability and oxidative stress markers including cellular lipid peroxidation (LPO), myeloperoxidase (MPO), total thiol molecules (TTM), and total antioxidant power (TAP) were evaluated. Also, the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as inflammatory index along with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and cell apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry. Results: Results indicated that effective doses of IMOD and Angipars reduced CP-exposed lymphocyte mortality rate along with oxidative stress. Both agents restored CP-induced elevation of TNF-α and protected the lymphocytes from CP-induced apoptosis and necrosis. Conclusion: Overall, results confirm that IMOD and Angipars reduce the toxic effects associated with CP through free radical scavenging and protection from apoptosis and necrosis. PMID:25945242

  4. Differential expression of HLA class II antigens on human fetal and adult lymphocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J A; Jones, D B; Evans, P R; Smith, J L

    1985-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies to monomorphic determinants of the MHC class II subregion locus products: DP, DR and DQ, was used to investigate the expression of these antigens on early lymphocytes and macrophages from human fetal liver (13-20 weeks), placenta (16 weeks and term) and cord blood, in relation to the class II phenotype of cells from adult tonsil and peripheral blood. Fetal liver sections and cell suspensions showed differential expression of class II antigens. DP was expressed at a higher frequency (11.0% of nucleated cells) than DR on lymphoid cells and macrophages from fetal liver, and DQ was either absent or expressed on less than 0.3% of nucleated cells. Consistent with this finding, DP but not DR or DQ antigens were observed on vascular elements and macrophages in the villi of 16-week placenta. At term, all three subregion locus products were expressed. Adult tonsil and peripheral blood B lymphocytes expressed DP, DR and DQ antigens with similar frequency; however, DQ was expressed at a lower frequency than DP and DR on cord blood B lymphocytes. In contrast, 30-50% macrophages from cord blood and adult peripheral blood expressed DP and DR, but fewer (5% and 18%, respectively) expressed DQ. These data suggest that class II antigens are expressed in the sequence DP, DR, DQ on developing lymphocytes. A similar sequence is suggested for macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3894221

  5. Altered distribution of natural killer cell subsets identified by CD56, CD27 and CD70 in primary and chronic human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Titanji, Kehmia; Sammicheli, Stefano; De Milito, Angelo; Mantegani, Paola; Fortis, Claudio; Berg, Louise; Kärre, Klas; Travi, Giovanna; Tassandin, Chiara; Lopalco, Lucia; Rethi, Bence; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Chiodi, Francesca

    2008-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) (CD3− CD56+) cells can be divided into two functionally distinct subsets, CD3− CD56dim and CD3− CD56bright. We analysed the distribution of NK cell subsets in primary and chronic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection, to determine if HIV infection stage may influence the subset distribution. In primary infection, contrary to chronic infection, the CD3− CD56dim subset was expanded compared to healthy controls. We also studied the effect of antiretroviral therapy administered early in infection and found that NK cell subset distribution was partially restored after 6 months of antiretroviral therapy in primary infection, but not normalized. Recently, NK cells have been divided into CD27− and CD27+ subsets with different migratory and functional capacity and CD27-mediated NK cell activation has been described in mice. We therefore investigated whether CD27 and/or CD70 (CD27 ligand) expression on NK cells, and thus the distribution of these novel NK subsets, was altered in HIV-1-infected patients. We found up-regulated expression of both CD27 and CD70 on NK cells of patients, resulting in higher proportions of CD27high and CD70high NK cells, and this phenomenon was more pronounced in chronic infection. Experiments conducted in vitro suggest that the high interleukin-7 levels found during HIV-1 infection may participate in up-regulation of CD70 on NK cell subsets. Imbalance of NK cell subsets and up-regulated expression of CD27 and CD70 initiated early in HIV-1 infection may indicate NK cell activation and intrinsic defects initiated by HIV-1 to disarm the innate immune response to the virus. PMID:17627773

  6. Resveratrol affects DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Basso, Emiliano; Regazzo, Giulia; Fiore, Mario; Palma, Valentina; Traversi, Gianandrea; Testa, Antonella; Degrassi, Francesca; Cozzi, Renata

    2016-08-01

    Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene; RSV) acts on cancer cells in several ways, inducing cell cycle delay and apoptotic death, and enhancing ionizing radiation (IR)-mediated responses. However, fewer studies have examined RSV effects on normal cells. We have treated human lymphocytes in vitro with RSV, either alone or combined with IR, to evaluate its potential use as a radioprotector. We measured the effects of RSV on induction of DNA damage, repair kinetics, and modulation of histone deacetylase activity.

  7. Microgravity simulations with human lymphocytes in the free fall machine and in the random positioning machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarzenberg, M.; Pippia, P.; Meloni, M. A.; Cossu, G.; Cogoli-Greuter, M.; Cogoli, A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the results obtained in our laboratory with both instruments, the FFM [free fall machine] and the RPM [random positioning machine], to compare them with the data from earlier experiments with human lymphocytes conducted in the FRC [fast rotating clinostat] and in space. Furthermore, the suitability of the FFM and RPM for research in gravitational cell biology is discussed.

  8. Glucocorticoid receptor activation and inactivation in cultured human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, R H; Leach, K L; La Forest, A C; O'Toole, T E; Wagner, R; Pratt, W B

    1981-01-10

    Although glucocorticoids are not cytolytic for and do not inhibit the growth of the IM-9 line of cultured human lymphoblasts, these cells have a high steroid-binding capacity. We have used IM-9 cells in order to examine whether unoccupied glucocorticoid receptors are inactivated and activated in intact cells. when IM-9 cells are incubated in glucose-free medium in a nitrogen atmosphere, both their ability to bind triamcinolone acetonide and their ATP levels decline and, when glucose and oxygen are reintroduced, ATP levels and receptor activity return. The specific glucocorticoid-binding activity of cytosol prepared from cells exposed to various degrees of energy limitation is directly correlated with the ATP content. Receptor activation in intact cells is rapid and independent of protein synthesis. Cytosol prepared from inactivated cells cannot be activated by addition of ATP. The inactivation of glucocorticoid receptors that occurs when cytosol from normal IM-9 cells is incubated at 25 degrees C is inhibited by molybdate, vanadate, fluoride, ATP, and several other nucleotides. The experiments with intact human lymphoblasts suggest that assays of specific glucocorticoid-binding capacity do not necessarily reflect the cellular content of receptor protein.

  9. Defining antigen-specific plasmablast and memory B cell subsets in blood following viral infection and vaccination of humans

    PubMed Central

    Ellebedy, Ali H.; Jackson, Katherine J.L.; Kissick, Haydn T.; Nakaya, Helder I.; Davis, Carl W.; Roskin, Krishna M.; McElroy, Anita K.; Oshansky, Christine M.; Elbein, Rivka; Thomas, Shine; Lyon, George M.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.; Mehta, Aneesh K.; Thomas, Paul G.; Boyd, Scott D.; Ahmed, Rafi

    2016-01-01

    Antigen-specific B cells bifurcate into antibody secreting cells (ASC) and memory B cells after infection or vaccination. ASCs or plasmablasts have been extensively studied in humans but less is known about B cells that get activated but do not differentiate into early plasmablasts. Here, we define the phenotype and transcriptional program of an antigen-specific B cell subset, referred to as activated B cells (ABC), that is distinct from ASCs and is committed to the memory B cell lineage. ABCs were detected in humans after infection with Ebola virus or influenza virus and also after vaccination. By simultaneously analyzing antigen-specific ASCs and ABCs in human blood after influenza vaccination we interrogated the clonal overlap and extent of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in the ASC (effector) and ABC (memory) lineages. Longitudinal tracking of vaccination-induced HA-specific clones revealed minimal increase in SHM over time suggesting that repeated annual immunization may have limitations in enhancing the quality of influenza-specific antibody. PMID:27525369

  10. Ectopic lymphokine gene expression in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, C.A.; Kang, Joonsoo; Hozumi, Nobumichi Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario )

    1992-02-01

    An animal model to study the effects of ectopic expression of cytokines involved in cell growth and differentiation has been established. Retrovirus vectors containing the human interleukin 6 cDNA were used to produce high titer virus-producing lines. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (hPBLs) were successfully infected with the retrovirus and engrafted into severe combined immunodeficient mice. The majority of the animals were engrafted with hPBLs, as determined by the presence of human glucose phosphate isomerase. Furthermore, six of seven mice engrafted with hPBLs infected with high titer virus and detectable hPBLs present in the spleen expressed the retroviral human interleukin 6 gene. Importantly, human interleukin 6 protein was expressed at physiologically significant levels in these mice. These results demonstrate that models for human disease and immunotherapy involving retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into human cells can be developed in mice.

  11. Deoxynivalenol induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Yu, Miao; Fu, Juan; Bao, Wei; Wang, Di; Hao, Liping; Yao, Ping; Nüssler, Andreas K; Yan, Hong; Liu, Liegang

    2014-02-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is one of the most common mycotoxins. The aim of this study consists in using diverse cellular and molecular assays to evaluate cytotoxicity, genotoxicity as well as oxidative damage and to investigate their mechanisms in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The human lymphocytes were cultured in eight different doses of DON (0, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 250 and 500 ng/mL) during 6, 12 and 24 h. DON was able to decrease cell viability and cause damage to the membrane, the chromosomes or the DNA at all times of culture. It was also able to induce lipid peroxidation and raise the levels of 8-OHdG and ROS in 6, 12 and 24 h. The results of the RT-PCR and the Western Blot indicated that DON is able to enhance mRNA or protein expressions of DNA repair genes and HO-1 in 6 h and to inhibit these expressions in 24 h. DON potentially triggers genotoxicity in human lymphocytes. This mechanism is probably related to depletion of antioxidase and oxidative damage to the DNA that reduced expression of HO-1, thereby inhibiting the ability of DNA repair.

  12. Genotoxic effect of Physalis angulata L. (Solanaceae) extract on human lymphocytes treated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Alves dos Santos, Raquel; Cabral, Teresinha Rosa; Cabral, Isabel Rosa; Antunes, Lusânia Maria; Pontes Andrade, Cristiane; Cerqueira dos Santos Cardoso, Plínio; de Oliveira Bahia, Marcelo; Pessoa, Claudia; Martins do Nascimento, José Luis; Rodríguez Burbano, Rommel; Takahashi, Catarina Satie

    2008-08-01

    Physalis angulata L (Solanaceae) is a medicinal plant from North of Brazil, whose different extracts and infusions are commonly used in the popular medicine for the treatment of malaria, asthma, hepatitis, dermatitis and rheumatism. However, the genotoxic effects of P. angulata on human cells is not well known. The main purpose of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro genotoxic effects of aqueous extract of P. angulata using the comet assay and the micronucleus assay in human lymphocytes provided from 6 healthy donors. Treatments with P. angulata extracts were performed in vitro in order to access the extent of DNA damage. The comet assay has shown that treatments with P. angulata at 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 6.0 microg/mL in culture medium were genotoxic. Lymphocytes treated with P. angulata at the concentrations of 3.0 and 6.0 microg/mL in culture medium showed a statistically significant increase in the frequency of micronucleus (p<0.05), however, the cytokinesis blocked proliferation index (CBPI) was not decreased after P. angulata treatment. In conclusion, the present work demonstrated the genotoxic effects of P. angulata extract on human lymphocytes in vitro.

  13. Physical association and functional interaction between beta1 integrin and CD98 on human T lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyamoto, Yuko J.; Mitchell, Jason S.; McIntyre, Bradley W.

    2003-01-01

    CD98 is a cell surface protein previously characterized as a cell activation marker, an amino acid transporter, and has recently been implicated in integrin-related functions. Integrins are cell surface proteins, important for homotypic cell aggregation, cell adhesion, and coactivation of T lymphocytes. We have previously shown that the anti-CD98 mAb 80A10, when coimmobilized with anti-CD3 mAb OKT3, is able to mediate human T cell coactivation that is inhibited by anti-beta1 integrin specific mAb 18D3. These results indicated a functional association of CD98 and beta1 integrin signaling but left open the question of a physical association. We now show the induction of homotypic aggregation through CD98 among human T cells and this aggregation was inhibited by anti-beta1 integrin mAb. Therefore, CD98-dependent lymphocyte proliferation and adhesion may involve integrins. Competitive binding assays and fluorescence colocalization analysis suggested that CD98 and beta1 integrin were physically associated. Differential extraction techniques and immunoprecipitations provided the first evidence that the alpha4beta1 integrin and CD98 are specifically associated on human T lymphocytes.

  14. Human lymph node lymphocytes fail to effect lysis of antibody-coated target cells.

    PubMed Central

    O'Toole, C; Saxon, A; Bohrer, R

    1977-01-01

    Human lymphocytes prepared from peripheral blood, lymph nodes, spleen and thymus were titrated for ability to mediate lysis of human target cells coated with rabbit anti target antibody. Lymphocytes from blood and spleen produced efficient lysis of targets in the presence of antibody. Lymph node cells and thymocytes were essentially non-reactive in this system. Lymph node preparations from non-cancer patients contained approximately 25% of non-T cells with receptors for Fc,C3 and/or Ig. Regional lymph nodes from patients with primary tumours contained 37-50% non-T cells by the same criteria. Failure of lymph node lymphocytes to effect lysis of antibody-coated targets did not therefore correlate with content of Fc or C3 bearing cells per se. The effector cell in antibody-dependent cytotoxicity in other systems has been shown to carry Fc and C3 receptors, but not surface Ig. This cell type appears to be absent or non-functional in human lymph nodes. PMID:300304

  15. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of dioxacarb by human peripheral blood lymphocytes CAs and Allium test.

    PubMed

    Eren, Yasin; Erdoğmuş, Sevim Feyza; Akyıl, Dilek; Özkara, Arzu; Konuk, Muhsin; Sağlam, Esra

    2015-12-01

    Dioxacarb (Elecron, Famid) is a phenyl methylcarbamate insecticide and in vitro cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of this pesticide on human peripheral blood lymphocytes and Allium root meristematic cells were investigated by chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and Allium test. Human lymphocytes were treated with 62.5, 125, 250 and 500 ppm doses of dioxacarb for CAs. CA/cell, abnormal cell % and mitotic index % (MI %) data were obtained from these concentrations in 24 and 48 h treatment periods. Dioxacarb did not increase the CA/cell frequency significantly, so this insecticide was not identified as genotoxic. But it was found cytotoxic especially at 250 and 500 ppm concentrations because of the reduced the MI % and increased the abnormal cell %. In Allium test, 25 ppm (EC50/2), 50 ppm (EC50) and 100 ppm (EC50 × 2) concentrations were used for root growth inhibition (EC50 determination) and Allium mitotic index (MI) determination tests. The used concentrations of dioxacarb induced dose-dependent inhibition of MI and root growth on root meristems. Mitotic inhibition of dioxacarb was found significantly higher than for the positive control. These Allium results indicated the high cytotoxicity of dioxacarb. The present study is the first research on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of dioxacarb by human lymphocyte CAs and Allium test.

  16. Analysis of the mechanisms of human cytotoxic T lymphocyte response inhibition by NO.

    PubMed

    Blesson, Séverine; Thiery, Jérôme; Gaudin, Catherine; Stancou, Rodica; Kolb, Jean-Pierre; Moreau, Jean-Louis; Theze, Jacques; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia; Chouaib, Salem

    2002-10-01

    NO is a potent cellular mediator which has been shown to modulate several immune mechanisms. Using human T lymphocytes as responder cells in a primary mixed lymphocyte reaction, we demonstrated that, at the initiation of the culture, exogenously provided NO via sodium nitroprusside, in non-toxic concentrations, inhibited both allogeneic proliferative and primary cytotoxic responses in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, it had no effect on the cytotoxic activity of established human TCR (alpha)beta and TCR (gamma)delta cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones. The NO inhibitory effect on primary cytotoxic T cell response correlates with inhibition of T cell blastogenesis. Furthermore, under our stimulation conditions, NO induced an inhibition of IL-2 production, an alteration of IL-2R(alpha) expression, and a down-regulation of NF-AT translocation in CD4(+) and CD8(+)allostimulated T cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the inhibition of allospecific CTL activity by the NO donor was at least in part related to an inhibition of granzyme B and Fas ligand transcription as revealed respectively by RNase protection and RT-PCR analysis. These results suggest that NO may function to fine tune human CD3(+) T cell activation and subsequent CTL generation.

  17. Effects of Valproic Acid on Radiation-Induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Di Tomaso, María Vittoria; Gregoire, Eric; Martínez-López, Wilner

    2017-01-01

    One of the most widely employed histone deacetylases inhibitors in the clinic is the valproic acid (VA), proving to have a good tolerance and low side effects on human health. VA induces changes in chromatin structure making DNA more susceptible to damage induction and influence DNA repair efficiency. VA is also proposed as a radiosensitizing agent. To know if VA is suitable to sensitize human lymphocytes γ-irradiation in vitro, different types of chromosomal aberrations in the lymphocytes, either in the absence or presence of VA, were analyzed. For this purpose, blood samples from four healthy donors were exposed to γ-rays at a dose of 1.5 Gy and then treated with two different doses of VA (0.35 or 0.70 mM). Unstable and stable chromosomal aberrations were analyzed by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization. Human lymphocytes treated with VA alone did not show any increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations. However, a moderate degree of sensitization was observed, through the increase of chromosomal aberrations, when 0.35 mM VA was employed after γ-irradiation, whereas 0.70 mM VA did not modify chromosomal aberration frequencies. The lower number of chromosomal aberrations obtained when VA was employed at higher dose after γ-irradiation, could be related to the induction of a cell cycle arrest, a fact that should be taken into consideration when VA is employed in combination with physical or chemical agents. PMID:28250911

  18. Synthesis and toxicity assessment of 3-oxobutanamides against human lymphocytes and isolated mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi-Asl, Nima; Seydi, Enaytollah; Alikhani, Radin; Rezvani, Saba; Miri, Ramin; Salimi, Ahmad

    2017-03-07

    To reduce costly late-phase compound scrubbing, there has been an increased focus on assessing compounds within in vitro assays that predict properties of human safety liabilities, before preclinical in vivo studies. The aim of our study was to answer the questions that whether the toxicity risk of a series of 3-oxobutanamide derivatives could be predicted by using of human lymphocytes and their isolated mitochondria. Using biochemical and flow cytometry assessments, we demonstrated that exposure of lymphocytes and isolated mitochondria to five 3-oxobutanamide derivatives (1-5) did not exhibit remarkable toxicity at low concentrations (50-500μM) but toxicity could be observed at high concentrations (1000 and 2000μM), particularly for N-(5-(4-bromophenyl)-3-isoxazolyl)-3-oxobutanamide (4) and N-(2-benzothiazolyl)-3-oxo butanamide (5). Compounds 4, 5 and partly N-(5-methyl-3-isoxazol yl)-3-oxo butanamide (1) also showed a marked cellular and mitochondrial toxicity while compound 5 displayed superior toxicity. Compound 5 induced cytotoxicity on human blood lymphocytes which was associated with the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) collapse, lysosomal membrane injury, lipid peroxidation and depletion of glutathione. Our results suggested that among assessed compounds, increased toxicity of compound 5 compared to other compounds could be likely attributed to the presence of bromine substituent in 5. Finally our findings proposed that using of antioxidants and mitochondrial/lysosomal protective agents could be beneficial in decreasing the toxicity of 5.

  19. Human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells promote intracellular crawling of lymphocytes during recruitment- a new step in migration

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Daniel A.; Wilson, Garrick K.; Bailey, Dalan; Shaw, Robert K.; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Salmi, Marko; Rot, Antal; Weston, Christopher J.; Adams, David H.; Shetty, Shishir

    2017-01-01

    The recruitment of lymphocytes via the hepatic sinusoidal channels and positioning within liver tissue is a critical event in the development and persistence of chronic inflammatory liver diseases. The hepatic sinusoid is a unique vascular bed lined by hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (HSEC), a functionally and phenotypically distinct sub-population of endothelial cells. Using flow based adhesion assays to study the migration of lymphocytes across primary human HSEC, we found that lymphocytes enter into HSEC, confirmed by electron microscopy demonstrating clear intracellular localization of lymphocytes in vitro and by studies in human liver tissues. Stimulation by interferon gamma increased intracellular localization of lymphocytes within HSECs. Furthermore using confocal imaging and time-lapse recordings we demonstrated ‘intracellular crawling’ of lymphocytes entering into one endothelial cell from another. This required the expression of ICAM-1 and stabilin-1 and was facilitated by the junctional complexes between HSEC. Conclusion: We demonstrate a new step in lymphocyte migration which is facilitated by the unique structure of HSEC. We believe ‘intracellular crawling’ contributes to optimal lymphocyte positioning in liver tissue during chronic hepatitis. PMID:27770554

  20. Modeled Microgravity-Induced Protein Kinase C Isoform Expression in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    2003-01-01

    In long-term space travel, the crew is exposed to microgravity and radiation that invoke potential hazards to the immune system. T cell activation is a critical step in the immune response. Receptor-mediated signaling is inhibited both in microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) as reflected in diminished DNA synthess in peripheral blood lymphocytes and their locomotion through gelled type 1 collagen. Direct activation of Protein Kinase C (PKC) bypassing cell surface events using the phorbol ester PMA rescues MMG-inhibited lymphocyte activation and locomotion, whereas calcium ionophore ionomycin had no rescue effect. Thus calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be affected in MMG-induced locomotion inhibition and rescue. Both calcium-dependent isoforms and calcium-independent PKC isoforms were investigated to assess their expression in lymphocytes in 19 and MMG-culture. Human lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours and serial samples assessed for locomotion using type I collagen and expression of PKC isoforms. Expression of PKC-alpha, -delta and -epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunoblotting. Results indicated that PKC isoforms delta and epsilon were down-regulated by more than 50% at the transcriptional and translational levels in MMG-cultured lymphocytes compared with 19 controls. Events upstream of PKC such as phosphorylation of Phospholipase C(gamma) (PLC-gamma) in MMG, revealed accumulation of inactive enzyme. Depressed Ca++ -independent PKC isoforms may be a consequence of an upstream lesion in the signal transduction pathway. The differential response among calcium-dependent and calcium-independent isoforms may actually result from MMG intrusion events earlier than, but after ligand-receptor interaction. Keywords: Signal transduction, locomotion, immunity

  1. The Cell Wall and Membrane of Cryptococcus neoformans Possess a Mitogen for Human T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Christopher H.; Wood, Cynthia J.; Syme, Rachel M.; Spurrell, Jason C. L.

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism of human T-lymphocyte activation by the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans has not been established. Previous investigations have suggested that C. neoformans contains a mitogen for T lymphocytes, while other investigators have attributed lymphocyte proliferation in vitro to a recall antigen. Because of the potential importance of the mechanism of T-cell activation for our understanding of the immune response to C. neoformans, the present studies were performed to determine whether C. neoformans contains a mitogen for T lymphocytes. C. neoformans stimulates fetal blood lymphocytes to proliferate and stimulates proliferation of CD45RA+ cells from adults, indicating that it stimulates naive T cells. The T-cell response to C. neoformans was dependent upon the presence of accessory cells. However, allogeneic cells were sufficient for accessory cell function, indicating that the response was not major histocompatibility complex restricted. The percentage of T cells in the cell cycle was higher than that with the recall antigen tetanus toxoid but lower than that with the mitogenic lectin phytohemagglutinin A or the superantigen Staphylococcus enterotoxin B. Precursor frequency analysis established that 1 in 7,750 ± 2,270 T cells proliferated in response to the cryptococcal cell wall and membrane. Compared to the case for most mitogens or superantigens, the proliferative response is late and the number of T cells that enter the cell cycle and the precursor frequency are low, indicating that the mitogenic effect is modest. However, the mitogenic effect of C. neoformans should be considered when interpreting the immune response to C. neoformans, since even weak mitogens can have profound effects on host defense. PMID:9916111

  2. Modeled microgravity-induced protein kinase C isoform expression in human lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    2004-01-01

    In long-term space travel, the crew is exposed to microgravity and radiation that invoke potential hazards to the immune system. T cell activation is a critical step in the immune response. Receptor-mediated signaling is inhibited in both microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) as reflected by diminished DNA synthesis in peripheral blood lymphocytes and their locomotion through gelled type I collagen. Direct activation of protein kinase C (PKC) bypassing cell surface events using the phorbol ester PMA rescues MMG-inhibited lymphocyte activation and locomotion, whereas the calcium ionophore ionomycin had no rescue effect. Thus calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be affected in MMG-induced locomotion inhibition and rescue. Both calcium-dependent isoforms and calcium-independent PKC isoforms were investigated to assess their expression in lymphocytes in 1 g and MMG culture. Human lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h, and serial samples were assessed for locomotion by using type I collagen and expression of PKC isoforms. Expression of PKC-alpha, -delta, and -epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and immunoblotting. Results indicated that PKC isoforms delta and epsilon were downregulated by >50% at the transcriptional and translational levels in MMG-cultured lymphocytes compared with 1-g controls. Events upstream of PKC, such as phosphorylation of phospholipase Cgamma in MMG, revealed accumulation of inactive enzyme. Depressed calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be a consequence of an upstream lesion in the signal transduction pathway. The differential response among calcium-dependent and calcium-independent isoforms may actually result from MMG intrusion events earlier than PKC, but after ligand-receptor interaction.

  3. Chemotaxis of human B lymphocytes to anti-IgD.

    PubMed Central

    Komai-Koma, M; Wilkinson, P C

    1996-01-01

    The resting population of small surface IgM+ and surface IgD+ B cells from the human tonsil can be preactivated by overnight culture in interleukin-4 (IL-4) to show locomotor responses to anti-IgM and anti-IgD at between 10 ng and 1 microgram/ml. Because this locomotion is activated through the antigen receptor and may simulate a response to antigen, we set out to establish whether this was a chemotactic response using a checkerboard filter assay with a range of concentrations and concentration gradients of anti-IgD. At high concentrations (100 ng/ml to 1 microgram/ml), a chemokinetic response, but no chemotaxis, to anti-IgD was seen. However, in concentration gradients set up at lower concentrations (0-50 ng/ml) a chemotactic response was demonstrable. During the period of culture in anti-IgD at 1 microgram/ml, a progressive loss of surface IgD from the cells was seen, but there was no loss at 10 ng/ml. This receptor loss from the cell surface may account for the lack of chemotactic effect of the anti-IgD at higher concentrations. PMID:8881763

  4. DNA methylation profiling reveals differences in the 3 human monocyte subsets and identifies uremia to induce DNA methylation changes during differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zawada, Adam M.; Schneider, Jenny S.; Michel, Anne I.; Rogacev, Kyrill S.; Hummel, Björn; Krezdorn, Nicolas; Müller, Soeren; Rotter, Björn; Winter, Peter; Obeid, Rima; Geisel, Jürgen; Fliser, Danilo; Heine, Gunnar H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human monocytes are a heterogeneous cell population consisting of 3 subsets: classical CD14++CD16-, intermediate CD14++CD16+ and nonclassical CD14+CD16++ monocytes. Via poorly characterized mechanisms, intermediate monocyte counts rise in chronic inflammatory diseases, among which chronic kidney disease is of particular epidemiologic importance. DNA methylation is a central epigenetic feature that controls hematopoiesis. By applying next-generation Methyl-Sequencing we now tested how far the 3 monocyte subsets differ in their DNA methylome and whether uremia induces DNA methylation changes in differentiating monocytes. We found that each monocyte subset displays a unique phenotype with regards to DNA methylation. Genes with differentially methylated promoter regions in intermediate monocytes were linked to distinct immunological processes, which is in line with results from recent gene expression analyses. In vitro, uremia induced dysregulation of DNA methylation in differentiating monocytes, which affected several transcription regulators important for monocyte differentiation (e.g., FLT3, HDAC1, MNT) and led to enhanced generation of intermediate monocytes. As potential mediator, the uremic toxin and methylation inhibitor S-adenosylhomocysteine induced shifts in monocyte subsets in vitro, and associated with monocyte subset counts in vivo. Our data support the concept of monocyte trichotomy and the distinct role of intermediate monocytes in human immunity. The shift in monocyte subsets that occurs in chronic kidney disease, a proinflammatory condition of substantial epidemiological impact, may be induced by accumulation of uremic toxins that mediate epigenetic dysregulation. PMID:27018948

  5. DNA methylation profiling reveals differences in the 3 human monocyte subsets and identifies uremia to induce DNA methylation changes during differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Adam M; Schneider, Jenny S; Michel, Anne I; Rogacev, Kyrill S; Hummel, Björn; Krezdorn, Nicolas; Müller, Soeren; Rotter, Björn; Winter, Peter; Obeid, Rima; Geisel, Jürgen; Fliser, Danilo; Heine, Gunnar H

    2016-04-02

    Human monocytes are a heterogeneous cell population consisting of 3 subsets: classical CD14++CD16-, intermediate CD14++CD16+ and nonclassical CD14+CD16++ monocytes. Via poorly characterized mechanisms, intermediate monocyte counts rise in chronic inflammatory diseases, among which chronic kidney disease is of particular epidemiologic importance. DNA methylation is a central epigenetic feature that controls hematopoiesis. By applying next-generation Methyl-Sequencing we now tested how far the 3 monocyte subsets differ in their DNA methylome and whether uremia induces DNA methylation changes in differentiating monocytes. We found that each monocyte subset displays a unique phenotype with regards to DNA methylation. Genes with differentially methylated promoter regions in intermediate monocytes were linked to distinct immunological processes, which is in line with results from recent gene expression analyses. In vitro, uremia induced dysregulation of DNA methylation in differentiating monocytes, which affected several transcription regulators important for monocyte differentiation (e.g., FLT3, HDAC1, MNT) and led to enhanced generation of intermediate monocytes. As potential mediator, the uremic toxin and methylation inhibitor S-adenosylhomocysteine induced shifts in monocyte subsets in vitro, and associated with monocyte subset counts in vivo. Our data support the concept of monocyte trichotomy and the distinct role of intermediate monocytes in human immunity. The shift in monocyte subsets that occurs in chronic kidney disease, a proinflammatory condition of substantial epidemiological impact, may be induced by accumulation of uremic toxins that mediate epigenetic dysregulation.

  6. A human CD34(+) subset resides in lymph nodes and differentiates into CD56bright natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Freud, Aharon G; Becknell, Brian; Roychowdhury, Sameek; Mao, Hsiaoyin C; Ferketich, Amy K; Nuovo, Gerard J; Hughes, Tiffany L; Marburger, Trent B; Sung, John; Baiocchi, Robert A; Guimond, Martin; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2005-03-01

    In humans, T cells differentiate in thymus and B cells develop in bone marrow (BM), but the natural killer (NK) precursor cell(s) and site(s) of NK development are unclear. The CD56bright NK subset predominates in lymph nodes (LN) and produces abundant cytokines compared to the cytolytic CD56dim NK cell that predominates in blood. Here, we identify a novel CD34dimCD45RA(+) hematopoietic precursor cell (HPC) that is integrin alpha4beta7bright. CD34dimCD45RA(+)beta7bright HPCs constitute <1% of BM CD34(+) HPCs and approximately 6% of blood CD34(+) HPCs, but >95% of LN CD34(+) HPCs. They reside in the parafollicular T cell regions of LN with CD56bright NK cells, and when stimulated by IL-15, IL-2, or activated LN T cells, they become CD56bright NK cells. The data identify a new NK precursor and support a model of human NK development in which BM-derived CD34dimCD45RA(+)beta7bright HPCs reside in LN where endogenous cytokines drive their differentiation to CD56bright NK cells in vivo.

  7. Low doses of ochratoxin A induce micronucleus formation and delay DNA repair in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    González-Arias, Cyndia A; Benitez-Trinidad, Alma B; Sordo, Monserrat; Robledo-Marenco, Lourdes; Medina-Díaz, Irma M; Barrón-Vivanco, Briscia S; Marín, Sonia; Sanchis, Vicente; Ramos, Antonio J; Rojas-García, Aurora E

    2014-12-01

    The contamination of food commodities by fungal toxins has attracted great interest because many of these mycotoxins are responsible for different diseases, including cancer and other chronic illnesses. Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin naturally present in food, and long-term exposure to food contaminated with low levels of OTA has been associated with renal cancer. In the present study, the cytotoxicity, cytostaticity, and genotoxicity of OTA (0.075-15 µM) in human lymphocytes were evaluated. A comet assay, a modified comet assay (DNA repair assay), which uses N-hydroxyurea (NHU) to detect non-repaired lesions produced by OTA, and a cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay were used. Treatments with OTA were not cytotoxic, but OTA caused a cytostatic effect in human lymphocytes at a concentration of 15 µM. OTA (0.075-5 µM) produced a slight increase in the percentage of DNA in the comets and a delay in the DNA repair capacity of the lymphocytes. Micronucleus (MN) induction was observed at OTA concentrations of 1.5 and 5 µM. Our results indicate that OTA induces DNA stable damage at low doses that are neither cytotoxic nor cytostatic, and OTA delays the DNA repair kinetics. These findings indicate that OTA affects two pivotal events in the carcinogenesis pathway.

  8. Biological effects of asbestos fibers on human cells in vitro--especially on lymphocytes and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ueki, A

    2001-04-01

    Biological effects of asbestos fibers were reviewed in relation to the polyclonal activation of human lymphocytes and to the release of free radicals from human neutrophils in vitro. Chrysotile, crocidolite, and amosite asbestos activate CD4+ T lymphocytes polyclonally, followed by activation-induced cell death (a type of apoptosis). The activation is HLA class II dependent, and certain Vbeta repertoire, e.g. Vbeta 5.3, are detected among the fractionated T cells with a high Ca++ level that had been stimulated by asbestos fibers. These observations support the possibility that asbestos acts as a superantigen, and that asbestos stimulate lymphocytes repeatedly in vivo. It has been reported that asbestos-induced cytotoxicity can be suppressed by the scavengers of superoxide or hydroxyl radical. Some of these scavengers such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) or retinoic acid are known as inducers of cell differentiation. The biological functions of DMSO for cell differentiation of HL-60 cells to neutrophils are suppressed by co-culturing of crocidolite asbestos, because DMSO reacts with the hydroxyl radical released after the stimulation with crocidolite and spent itself. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibited the effects of crocidolite, reacting rapidly with *O2- before the secondary release of *OH. It seems to be probable that asbestos fibers, especially crocidolite, suppress the tissue cell differentiation by releasing free radicals and by wasting inducers of cell differentiation as radical scavengers.

  9. A secreted form of the human lymphocyte cell surface molecule CD8 arises from alternative splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Giblin, P.; Kavathas, P. ); Ledbetter, J.A. )

    1989-02-01

    The human lymphocyte differentiation antigen CD8 is encoded by a single gene that gives rise to a 33- to 34-kDa glycoprotein expressed on the cell surface as a dimer and in higher molecular mass forms. The authors demonstrate that the mRNA is alternatively spliced so that an exon encoding a transmembrane domain is deleted. This gives rise to a 30-kDa molecule that is secreted and exists primarily as a monomer. mRNA corresponding to both forms is present in peripheral blood lymphocytes, Con A-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes, and three CD8{sup +} T-cell lines, with the membrane form being the major species. However, differences in the ratio of mRNA for membrane CD8 and secreted CD8 exist. In addition, the splicing pattern observed differs from the pattern found for the mouse CD8 gene. This mRNA is also alternatively spliced, but an exon encoding a cytoplasmic region is deleted, giving rise to a cell surface molecule that differs in its cytoplasmic tail from the protein encoded by the longer mRNA. Neither protein is secreted. This is one of the first examples of a different splicing pattern between two homologous mouse and human genes giving rise to very different proteins. This represents one mechanism of generating diversity during speciation.

  10. Levoprotiline ((-)-oxaprotiline) effects on inositol phosphate generation in human peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Schubert, T; Müller, W E

    1991-01-01

    The effects of the atypical antidepressant levoprotiline (LPT) on inositol phosphate metabolism were investigated in N-formyl-methionyl-leucylphenylalanine (fMLP) activated human lymphocytes. In the presence of LPT, stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis by fMLP lead to an increased accumulation of inositol bisphosphates, an effect which could be detected within the range of therapuetic plasma concentrations and which is exerted by lithium in a similar way. Furthermore, incubation of lymphocytes with LPT and subsequent stimulation with fMLP lead to a pronounced decrease in the level of free intracellular [3H]inositol. Both LPT effects, the increased accumulation of inositol bisphosphates and the reduction of free intracellular [3H]inositol, were found to be more pronounced for LPT than for its enantiomer (+)-oxaprotiline. The results are discussed in view of a possible biochemical mechanism which may contribute to the antidepressive activity of LPT.

  11. Metabolic and cytoskeletal modulation of transferrin receptor mobility in mitogen-activated human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, G M; Galbraith, R M

    1980-01-01

    The transferrin receptors which appear on mitogen-activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes were found by the use of immunofluorescence techniques to display temperature-dependent patching and capping reactions upon binding of transferrin. Lateral mobility of ligand-occupied membrane sites was accompanied by both shedding and endocytosis of receptor-transferrin complexes. In the presence of sodium azide or the microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin B, cap formation and shedding were markedly inhibited. In contrast, endocytosis of patched receptor-ligand complexes was inhibited by azide and microtubule inhibitors, including colchicine, vinblastine and vincristine. Co-capping experiments performed to elucidate further the alterations in membrane configuration involved in these reactions failed to reveal any topographical relationship between transferrin receptors and lectin-binding sites in these cells. These studied indicate that temperature-dependent mobility of transferrin receptors upon mitogen-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes is dependent upon the integrity of the cytoskeletal system and metabolic function of the cell. PMID:6258830

  12. Immunomodulatory effects of inosine pranobex on cytokine production by human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lasek, Witold; Janyst, Michał; Wolny, Rafał; Zapała, Łukasz; Bocian, Katarzyna; Drela, Nadzieja

    2015-06-01

    Inosine pranobex (inosine dimepranol acedoben, isoprinosine) (Inos) is an immunomodulatory and antiviral drug used in some viral infections, especially in patients with weakened immunity. In the present study, effects of Inos on the production of cytokines attributable to Th1 (IL-2, IFN-g, and TNF-a) or Th2 cells (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10) were tested in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Inos enhanced TNF-a secretion significantly (in short-term--24-hour, and prolonged term--72-hour cultures) and IFN-g (in 72-hour cultures). Surprisingly, production of IL-10 by PHA-stimulated lymphocytes was suppressed by Inos in a dose-dependent manner in both 24-hour and 72-hour cultures. These results shed some light on immunomodulatory properties of Inos and suggest applicability of this agent in patients with a depressed function of the immune system.

  13. Relationship between alpha 7 nAChR and apoptosis in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, María José; Esandi, María Del Carmen; Garelli, Andrés; Rayes, Diego; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2005-03-01

    The presence of nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) in blood cells has been demonstrated. However, little is known about their functional roles. We have detected mRNA of alpha7 nAChR in peripheral human lymphocytes and determined that its expression is highly variable among individuals and within the same individual at different times. Upregulation of alpha7 is systematically observed after incubation of lymphocytes with nicotine or alpha-bungarotoxin. In addition, the incubation with these drugs decreases the percentage of apoptotic cells induced by the exposure to cortisol. Our results suggest that alpha7 nAChRs are involved in the modulation of cortisol-induced apoptosis.

  14. Lymphocyte trafficking and HIV infection of human lymphoid tissue in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, L. B.; Fitzgerald, W.; Glushakova, S.; Hatfill, S.; Amichay, N.; Baibakov, B.; Zimmerberg, J.

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenesis of HIV infection involves a complex interplay between both the infected and noninfected cells of human lymphoid tissue, the release of free viral particles, the de novo infection of cells, and the recirculatory trafficking of peripheral blood lymphocytes. To develop an in vitro model for studying these various aspects of HIV pathogenesis we have utilized blocks of surgically excised human tonsils and a rotating wall vessel (RWV) cell culture system. Here we show that (1) fragments of the surgically excised human lymphoid tissue remain viable and retain their gross cytoarchitecture for at least 3 weeks when cultured in the RWV system; (2) such lymphoid tissue gradually shows a loss of both T and B cells to the surrounding growth medium; however, this cellular migration is reversible as demonstrated by repopulation of the tissue by labeled cells from the growth medium; (3) this cellular migration may be partially or completely inhibited by embedding the blocks of lymphoid tissue in either a collagen or agarose gel matrix; these embedded tissue blocks retain most of the basic elements of a normal lymphoid cytoarchitecture; and (4) both embedded and nonembedded RWV-cultured blocks of human lymphoid tissue are capable of productive infection by HIV-1 of at least three various strains of different tropism and phenotype, as shown by an increase in both p24 antigen levels and free virus in the culture medium, and by the demonstration of HIV-1 RNA-positive cells inside the tissue identified by in situ hybridization. It is therefore reasonable to suggest that gel-embedded and nonembedded blocks of human lymphoid tissue, cocultured with a suspension of tonsillar lymphocytes in an RWV culture system, constitute a useful model for simulating normal lymphocyte recirculatory traffic and provide a new tool for testing the various aspects of HIV pathogenesis.

  15. Nanoparticle-mediated combinatorial targeting of multiple human dendritic cell (DC) subsets leads to enhanced T cell activation via IL-15-dependent DC crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Kartik; Ragheb, Ragy; Fahmy, Tarek M; Dhodapkar, Madhav V; Dhodapkar, Kavita M

    2014-09-01

    Most vaccines depend on coadministration of Ags and adjuvants that activate APCs. Nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as an attractive vehicle for synchronized delivery of Ags and adjuvants to APCs and can be targeted to specific cell types, such as dendritic cells (DCs), which are potent APCs. Which subset of human DCs should be targeted for optimal activation of T cell immunity, however, remains unknown. In this article, we describe a poly-lactic-coglycolic acid-based NP platform, wherein avidin-decorated NPs can be targeted to multiple human DC subsets via biotinylated Abs. Both BDCA3(+) and monocyte-derived DC-SIGN(+) NP-loaded DCs were equally effective at generating Ag-specific human T cells in culture, including against complex peptide mixtures from viral and tumor Ags across multiple MHC molecules. Ab-mediated targeting of NPs to distinct DC subsets led to enhanced T cell immunity. However, combination targeting to both DC-SIGN and BDCA3(+) DCs led to significantly greater activation of T cells compared with targeting either DC subset alone. Enhanced T cell activation following combination targeting depended on DC-mediated cytokine release and was IL-15 dependent. These data demonstrate that simultaneous targeting of multiple DC subsets may improve NP vaccines by engaging DC crosstalk and provides a novel approach to improving vaccines against pathogens and tumors.

  16. Toxoplasma gondii-Infected Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells Induce T-Lymphocyte Dysfunction and Contact-Dependent Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shuang; Marches, Florentina; Borvak, Jozef; Zou, Weiping; Channon, Jacqueline; White, Michael; Radke, Jay; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Curiel, Tyler J.

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells ignite adaptive immunity by priming naïve T lymphocytes. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) infected with Toxoplasma gondii induce T-lymphocyte gamma interferon production and may thus activate T. gondii-specific immunity. However, we now demonstrate that T. gondii-infected MDDCs are poor at activating T lymphocytes and are unable to induce specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. On the other hand, MDDCs acquiring nonviable T. gondii antigens directly, or indirectly through captured apoptotic or necrotic cell bodies, induce potent T-lymphocyte activation. T lymphocytes exposed to infected MDDCs are significantly impaired in upregulation of CD69 and CD28, are refractory to activation, and die through contact-dependent apoptosis mediated by an as-yet-unidentified mechanism not requiring Fas, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, leukocyte function antigen 1, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 10, alpha interferon, gamma interferon, prostaglandins, or reactive nitrogen intermediates. Bystander T lymphocytes that were neither infected nor apoptotic were refractory to activation, suggesting global dysfunction. Immunosuppression and T-lymphocyte unresponsiveness and apoptosis are typical of acute T. gondii infection. Our data suggest that infected dendritic cells contribute to these processes. On the other hand, host cells infected with T. gondii are resistant to multiple inducers of apoptosis. Thus, regulation of host cell and bystander cell apoptosis by viable T. gondii may be significant components of a strategy to evade immunity and enhance intracellular parasite survival. PMID:11895936

  17. Heterogeneity of human lymphocyte Fc receptors. II. Relationship to antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gormus, B. J.; Woodson, Mildred; Kaplan, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were incubated (stripped) with pronase or papain and compared with unstripped lymphocytes for their ability to mediate antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Despite marked removal or inactivation of receptors for heat-aggregated IgG (aggG) by proteolytic digestion, and pronounced changes in the percentages of cells rosetting with IgG-sensitized erythrocytes (EA) (decreased by papain, increased by pronase), stripped PBL functioned normally in ADCC. Stripped and unstripped lymphocytes were pre-treated with aggG to determine the role of aggG receptors in ADCC. AggG almost totally abolished ADCC by unstripped PBL, but inhibited ADCC by enzyme-stripped lymphocytes relatively poorly. Neither untreated nor stripped PBL were able to induce cytotoxicity of chicken erythrocyte (CRBC) target cells sensitized with the Fab'2 fragment of anti-CRBC IgG antibody (CRBC-A). Exposure of PBL to EA monolayers composed of CRBC-A or of sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) sensitized with rabbit anti-SRBC IgG antibody (SRBC-A) depleted PBL of cells that rosetted with CRBC-A and with human Rh-positive, type O erythrocytes sensitized with the human anti-Rh serum Ripley (HRBC-A Ripley). Non-adherent cells were incapable of binding aggG and had markedly diminished cytotoxicity in ADCC. Similarly, exposure of PBL to HRBC-A Ripley monolayers resulted in non-adherent cells that were incapable of rosette formation with HRBC-A or CRBC-A, failed to bind aggG, and exhibited significantly diminished ADCC activity. These studies indicated that: (1) cytotoxic effector PBL active in ADCC (K cells) have receptors for aggG and for EA; (2) PBL deficient in functional aggG receptors (enzymatically inactivated or removed) are capable of inducing normal levels of ADCC; (3) aggG and EA receptors appear to be closely associated on native K-cell membranes; (4) there is no clear-cut relationship in a given lymphocyte population between the presence of either aggG or

  18. Expression of T-Lymphocyte Markers in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Changro; Kim, Joo Heung; Lim, Sung Mook; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Seung Il; Park, Byeong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The present study aimed to examine the clinical implications of CD4, CD8, and FOXP3 expression on the prognosis of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer using a web-based database, and to compare the immunohistochemical expression of T-lymphocyte markers using primary and metastatic HER2-positive tumor tissues before and after HER2-targeted therapy. Methods Using the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics and Kaplan-Meier plotter, the mRNA expression, association between T-lymphocyte markers, and survival in HER2-positive cancers were investigated according to various cutoff levels. Immunohistochemistry analysis was performed using paired primary and metastatic tissues of 29 HER2-positive tumors treated with systemic chemotherapy and HER2-directed therapy. Results HER2 mRNA was mutually exclusive of T-lymphocyte markers, and a significant correlation between T-cell markers was observed in the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics. According to analysis of the Kaplan-Meier plotter, the impact of T-lymphocyte marker expression on survival was statistically insignificant in clinical HER2-positive tumors, irrespective of the cutoff levels. However, in the intrinsic HER2-positive subtype, the individual analyses of T-cell markers except for FOXP3 and combined analysis showed significantly favorable survival irrespective of cutoff points. Although the small clinical sample size made it difficult to show the statistical relevance of immunohistochemistry findings, good responses to neoadjuvant treatments might be associated with positive expression of combined T-lymphocyte markers, and approximately half of the samples showed discordance of combined markers between baseline and resistant tumors. Conclusion T-lymphocyte markers could be favorable prognostic factors in HER2-positive breast cancers; however, a consensus on patient section criteria, detection methods, and cutoff value could not be reached. The resistance to HER2-directed therapy might

  19. Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. The objective of the research was to define a way to differentiate between effects due to microgravity and those due to possible stress from non-optimal spaceflight conditions.

  20. Expression of a gp33/27,000 MW activation inducer molecule (AIM) on human lymphoid tissues. Induction of cell proliferation on thymocytes and B lymphocytes by anti-AIM antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Mateos, P; Cebrián, M; Acevedo, A; López-Botet, M; De Landázuri, M O; Sánchez-Madrid, F

    1989-01-01

    We have recently described several monoclonal antibodies (mAb) that recognize a heterodimeric structure (gp33/27,000 MW) expressed on the surface of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes upon activation with different mitogenic stimuli. Such mAb, when used in combination with submitogenic doses of phorbol ester, were capable of triggering T-cell proliferation. The antigen has been designated as activation inducer molecule (AIM). In the present study we have investigated the expression of the AIM in different lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues. In addition, we have analysed the ability of lymphocyte subsets derived from thymus and tonsil to proliferate in response to anti-AIM mAb. The presence of AIM on subpopulations of lymphoid cells from thymus, tonsil, lymph node and spleen has been demonstrated by immunoprecipitation, flow cytometry and immunoperoxidase staining of tissue sections. By contrast, non-lymphoid cells from tissue such as brain, kidney, liver, lung or skin did not react with anti-AIM mAb. In thymus, the AIM expression was restricted to a subset of CD3+ medullary thymocytes, whereas CD1+ CD3- cortical thymocytes did not express this antigen. Nevertheless, the majority of both purified CD1- and CD3- thymocytes expressed AIM antigen after treatment with PMA. In tonsil and lymph node, a strong staining of a subset of CD3+ T lymphocytes located in the germinal centre was observed by immunohistochemical labelling with anti-AIM mAb. Certain T cells from the paracortical zone and CD19+ B lymphocytes from mantle region were also reactive. Both purified tonsillar T and B lymphocytes strongly expressed AIM after activation with PMA. The anti-AIM mAb was able to induce a strong proliferative response on purified CD1- thymocytes as well as on both purified tonsillar T and B lymphocytes in the presence of submitogenic doses of PMA. By contrast, no proliferative response was induced through the AIM in the CD3- immature thymocyte subset. Images Figure 1 Figure 3

  1. Expression of membrane receptor for tumour necrosis factor on human blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zola, H; Flego, L; Weedon, H

    1993-08-01

    Using a monoclonal antibody against the human p75 tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR-I) combined with a high-sensitivity immunofluorescence flow cytometric procedure, a proportion of peripheral blood lymphocytes can be shown to express TNFR-I constitutively. Approximately 50% of peripheral blood lymphocytes consisting mostly of CD4 cells and including most CD45R0-positive cells, express TNFR-I. Receptor expression is increased by a variety of activation signals. Only a minority (up to 30%) of tonsil B cells express measurable levels of TNFR-I. The tonsil B cells which express TNFR-I include both cells with a germinal centre cell phenotype and cells with the phenotype of the follicular mantle zone. Activation of B cells with anti-immunoglobulin, alone or in combination with interleukin-4 or interleukin-2, increases receptor expression, particularly in cells with the phenotype of mantle zone cells. The functional significance of constitutive expression of TNFR by blood and tissue lymphocytes is discussed.

  2. [Early anomalies of CD4 and CD20 lymphocyte cycles in human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Martini, E; Muller, J Y; Gastal, C; Doinel, C; Meyohas, M C; Roquin, H; Frottier, J; Salmon, C

    1988-11-19

    Circadian variations in the number of circulating lymphocytes and their subpopulations have been observed in healthy subjects. These cyclic changes are characterized by a trough at 8:00 a.m. and a peak at midnight. Using multiple peripheral blood samplings, we were able to confirm that this cycle applied to CD4 T-cells (helpers) and to B-cells (CD20). No cycle of CD8 lymphocytes was observed. In a second stage, for greater comfort of the patient the number of samplings was reduced to two: one at 8:00 a.m. (trough) and one at midnight (peak). This method enabled us to calculate the amplitude of lymphocytes cycles in 18 controls and 74 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive patients. In asymptomatic HIV carriers the amplitude of CD4 cycles was normal in 6/26 cases and that of B-cell cycles in 2/17 cases. In the group of asymptomatic HIV carriers the mean amplitude of the cycles was much less reduced than in the other two groups. These results incite us to believe that the loss of the CD4 T-cell cycles is an early sign of HIV infection antedating the decrease observed in the number of these cells.

  3. Dynamin2 controls Rap1 activation and integrin clustering in human T lymphocyte adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Eppler, Felix J.

    2017-01-01

    Leukocyte trafficking is crucial to facilitate efficient immune responses. Here, we report that the large GTPase dynamin2, which is generally considered to have a key role in endocytosis and membrane remodeling, is an essential regulator of integrin-dependent human T lymphocyte adhesion and migration. Chemical inhibition or knockdown of dynamin2 expression significantly reduced integrin-dependent T cell adhesion in vitro. This phenotype was not observed when T cells were treated with various chemical inhibitors which abrogate endocytosis or actin polymerization. We furthermore detected dynamin2 in signaling complexes and propose that it controls T cell adhesion via FAK/Pyk2- and RapGEF1-mediated Rap1 activation. In addition, the dynamin2 inhibitor-induced reduction of lymphocyte adhesion can be rescued by Rap1a overexpression. We demonstrate that the dynamin2 effect on T cell adhesion does not involve integrin affinity regulation but instead relies on its ability to modulate integrin valency. Taken together, we suggest a previously unidentified role of dynamin2 in the regulation of integrin-mediated lymphocyte adhesion via a Rap1 signaling pathway. PMID:28273099

  4. Assessment of genotoxicity of Lannate-90® and its plant and animal metabolites in human lymphocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Quintana, Rafael; Gómez-Arroyo, Sandra; Sánchez-Alarcón, Juana; Milić, Mirta; Olivares, José Luis Gómez; Waliszewski, Stefan M; Cortés-Eslava, Josefina; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Calderón-Segura, María Elena

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated direct and metabolic genotoxic effects caused by Lannate-90®, a methomyl-based formulation (90 % active ingredient), in human lymphocyte cultures using sister chromatid exchange assay (SCE). Two processes were used for the plant promutagens evaluation: in vivo activation, applying the insecticide systemically in plants for 4 h and subsequently adding plant metabolites containing extracts to lymphocyte cultures; and in vitro activation, where the insecticide was incubated with Vicia faba S10 mix plus human lymphocyte culture. Direct treatment with the insecticide significantly increased SCE frequency in human lymphocytes (250-750 mgL-1), with cellular death observed at 1000 mgL-1 concentration. Using the extracts of Vicia faba treated with Lannate-90® to treat human lymphocytes, a dose-response relationship was observed. In lymphocyte cultures treated directly with the insecticide for 2 h, a negative response was obtained. When S10 mix was added, SCE frequency did not change significantly. Meanwhile, a mixture of S9 mammalian metabolic mix and Lannate-90® increased the SCE frequency, with an observed concentration-dependent response. Although Lannate-90® induced cellular death at the highest concentrations, it did not cause a delay in cell proliferation in any of the treatments, confirming its genotoxic action. This study is one of the first to evaluate and compare the direct effect of Lannate-90® in two bioassays, animal and vegetal, and the effect of plant and animal metabolism on its genotoxic potential.

  5. NCR1 Expression Identifies Canine Natural Killer Cell Subsets with Phenotypic Similarity to Human Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Jennifer A.; Somanchi, Srinivas S.; Yang, Yanwen; Aquino-Lopez, Arianexys; Bishop, Erin E.; Lee, Dean A.

    2016-01-01

    Canines spontaneously develop many cancers similar to humans – including osteosarcoma, leukemia, and lymphoma – offering the opportunity to study immune therapies in a genetically heterogeneous and immunocompetent environment. However, a lack of antibodies recognizing canine NK cell markers has resulted in suboptimal characterization and unknown purity of NK cell products, hindering the development of canine models of NK cell adoptive immunotherapy. To this end, we generated a novel antibody to canine NCR1 (NKp46), the putative species-wide marker of NK cells, enabling purification of NK cells for further characterization. We demonstrate that CD3−/NKp46+ cells in healthy and osteosarcoma-bearing canines have phenotypic similarity to human CD3−/NKp46+ NK cells, expressing mRNA for CD16 and the natural cytotoxicity receptors NKp30, NKp44, and NKp80. Functionally, we demonstrate with the calcein release assay that canine CD3−/NKp46+ cells kill canine tumor cell lines without prior sensitization and secrete IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-10, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor as measured by Luminex. Similar to human NK cells, CD3−/NKp46+ cells expand rapidly on feeder cells expressing 4-1BBL and membrane-bound IL-21 (median = 20,283-fold in 21 days). Furthermore, we identify a minor Null population (CD3−/CD21−/CD14−/NKp46−) with reduced cytotoxicity against osteosarcoma cells, but similar cytokine secretion as CD3−/NKp46+ cells. Null cells in canines and humans have reduced expression of NKG2D, NKp44, and CD16 compared to NKp46+ NK cells and can be induced to express NKp46 with further expansion on feeder cells. In conclusion, we have identified and characterized canine NK cells, including an NKp46− subset of canine and human NK cells, using a novel anti-canine NKp46 antibody, and report robust ex vivo expansion of canine NK cells sufficient for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27933061

  6. Early and Late Damages in Chromosome 3 of Human Lymphocytes After Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Mangala, Lingegowda; Zhang, Ye; Kahdim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    Tumor formation in humans or animals is a multi-step process. An early stage of cancer development is believed to be genomic instability (GI) which accelerates the mutation rate in the descendants of the cells surviving radiation exposure. GI is defined as elevated or persistent genetic damages occurring many generations after the cells are exposed. While early studies have demonstrated radiation-induced GI in several cell types as detected in endpoints such as mutation, apoptosis and damages in chromosomes, the dependence of GI on the quality of radiation remains uncertain. To investigate GI in human lymphocytes induced by both low- and high-LET radiation, we initially exposed white blood cells collected from healthy subjects to gamma rays in vitro, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis post irradiation and at several intervals during the culture period. Among a number of biological endpoints planned for the project, the multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) allows identification of inversions that were expected to be stable. We present here early and late chromosome aberrations detected with mBAND in chromosome 3 after gamma exposure. Comparison of chromosome damages in between human lymphocytes and human epithelial cells is also discussed

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exoenzyme S Is a Mitogen but Not a Superantigen for Human T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Tony F.; Buser, Deborah E.; Syme, Rachel M.; Woods, Donald E.; Mody, Christopher H.

    1998-01-01

    Virtually all cystic fibrosis (CF) patients become infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and once the infection is established, the organism is rarely cleared. One of the P. aeruginosa virulence factors, exoenzyme S, has been shown to correlate with increased morbidity and mortality both in rat models of chronic pulmonary inflammation and in human CF patients. It has previously been shown that exoenzyme S is a potent stimulus for the proliferation of T cells in greater than 95% of adults, which could contribute to the pathogenesis of CF. The goal of this study was to determine the mechanism of T-cell stimulation by exoenzyme S in an effort to shed light on the immune response and contribute to understanding its role in P. aeruginosa pathogenesis. The current studies demonstrate that exoenzyme S stimulates naive T cells, since fetal blood lymphocytes proliferated and adult lymphocytes that expressed CD45RA proliferated. The percentage of T cells activated by exoenzyme S after a 4-h culture (as measured by CD69 surface expression) was intermediate in magnitude compared to levels induced by a panel of superantigens and mitogens. To determine the mechanism of activation, the requirement for accessory cells was investigated. The proliferative response to exoenzyme S was dependent on the presence of accessory cells but was not blocked by an anti-DR antibody. Exoenzyme S activated both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, but CD4+ T cells were preferentially activated. The Vβ repertoire of donor T cells showed no preferential activation or preferential expansion after stimulation by exoenzyme S, suggesting that it is not a superantigen. Taken together, our data suggest that exoenzyme S is a T-cell mitogen but not a superantigen. Activation of a large percentage of T lymphocytes by exoenzyme S may produce a lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory response that should be considered in the pathogenesis of CF. PMID:9632568

  8. Impact of the New Generation Reconstituted Surfactant CHF5633 on Human CD4+ Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fehrholz, Markus; Glaser, Kirsten; Seidenspinner, Silvia; Ottensmeier, Barbara; Curstedt, Tore; Speer, Christian P.; Kunzmann, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Background Natural surfactant preparations, commonly isolated from porcine or bovine lungs, are used to treat respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants. Besides biophysical effectiveness, several studies have documented additional immunomodulatory properties. Within the near future, synthetic surfactant preparations may be a promising alternative. CHF5633 is a new generation reconstituted synthetic surfactant preparation with defined composition, containing dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine, palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol and synthetic analogs of surfactant protein (SP-) B and SP-C. While its biophysical effectiveness has been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, possible immunomodulatory abilities are currently unknown. Aim The aim of the current study was to define a potential impact of CHF5633 and its single components on pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine responses in human CD4+ lymphocytes. Methods Purified human CD4+ T cells were activated using anti CD3/CD28 antibodies and exposed to CHF5633, its components, or to the well-known animal-derived surfactant Poractant alfa (Curosurf®). Proliferative response and cell viability were assessed using flow cytometry and a methylthiazolyldiphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay. The mRNA expression of IFNγ, IL-2, IL-17A, IL-22, IL-4, and IL-10 was measured by quantitative PCR, while intracellular protein expression was assessed by means of flow cytometry. Results Neither CHF5633 nor any of its phospholipid components with or without SP-B or SP-C analogs had any influence on proliferative ability and viability of CD4+ lymphocytes under the given conditions. IFNγ, IL-2, IL-17A, IL-22, IL-4, and IL-10 mRNA as well as IFNγ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10 protein levels were unaffected in both non-activated and activated CD4+ lymphocytes after exposure to CHF5633 or its constituents compared to non-exposed controls. However, in comparison to Curosurf®, expression levels of anti-inflammatory IL-4 and IL-10 m

  9. Automatic analysis of the micronucleus test in primary human lymphocytes using image analysis.

    PubMed

    Frieauff, W; Martus, H J; Suter, W; Elhajouji, A

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro micronucleus test (MNT) is a well-established test for early screening of new chemical entities in industrial toxicology. For assessing the clastogenic or aneugenic potential of a test compound, micronucleus induction in cells has been shown repeatedly to be a sensitive and a specific parameter. Various automated systems to replace the tedious and time-consuming visual slide analysis procedure as well as flow cytometric approaches have been discussed. The ROBIAS (Robotic Image Analysis System) for both automatic cytotoxicity assessment and micronucleus detection in human lymphocytes was developed at Novartis where the assay has been used to validate positive results obtained in the MNT in TK6 cells, which serves as the primary screening system for genotoxicity profiling in early drug development. In addition, the in vitro MNT has become an accepted alternative to support clinical studies and will be used for regulatory purposes as well. The comparison of visual with automatic analysis results showed a high degree of concordance for 25 independent experiments conducted for the profiling of 12 compounds. For concentration series of cyclophosphamide and carbendazim, a very good correlation between automatic and visual analysis by two examiners could be established, both for the relative division index used as cytotoxicity parameter, as well as for micronuclei scoring in mono- and binucleated cells. Generally, false-positive micronucleus decisions could be controlled by fast and simple relocation of the automatically detected patterns. The possibility to analyse 24 slides within 65h by automatic analysis over the weekend and the high reproducibility of the results make automatic image processing a powerful tool for the micronucleus analysis in primary human lymphocytes. The automated slide analysis for the MNT in human lymphocytes complements the portfolio of image analysis applications on ROBIAS which is supporting various assays at Novartis.

  10. Specific Western Blot Bands Are Associated with Initial CD4+ Lymphocyte Counts in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Seroconverters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-30

    SPECIFIC WESTERN BLOT BANDS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH INITIAL CD4+ LYMPHOCYTE COUNTS IN HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS SEROCONVERTERS DTI C ELEkCTE AUG...NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT COMMAND BETHESDA, MARYLAND Specific Western Blot Bands Are Associated With Initial CD4+ Lymphocyte Counts in...and Ms. Susan Yu also provided - quality assurance review of Western blot results. Mr. Jerry Talicurian, Mr. Juan Jurado, Mr. David Morgan, and

  11. Brucella fractions behave as nonspecific mitogens and polyclonal B-cell activators for human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Vendrell, J P; Rabesandratana, H; Huguet, M F; Cannat, A; Serre, A

    1985-01-01

    Two lipid-A-free fractions which were extracted from Brucella melitensis and were designated PI and SF stimulated human unsensitized mononuclear cells to proliferate and to secrete immunoglobulins. Both of these effects were observed in cultures of peripheral blood, tonsils, and cord blood lymphocytes. Neither B cells nor T cells alone proliferated in the presence of these fractions, whereas the proliferative response of T cells plus B cells was largely independent of accessory cells. Polyclonal activation was estimated by counting the cells which secreted immunoglobulins of different isotypes into culture supernatants. This phenomenon was strongly T dependent. PMID:3876286

  12. Chromatid damage in human lymphocytes is not affected by 50 Hz electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Hone, P; Lloyd, D; Szłuińska, M; Edwards, A

    2006-01-01

    Cultured human blood lymphocytes were exposed during the S/G(2) phases of the cell cycle to continuous extremely low frequency (50 Hz) electromagnetic fields of 0.23, 0.47 or 0.7 mT either alone or immediately after an acute exposure to 1.0 Gy of gamma rays. The ionising radiation, as expected, induced chromosomal aberrations of the chromatid-type observed at the next metaphase. The field applied alone did not induce chromosomal damage nor did it modify the frequency of aberrations caused by the gamma rays.

  13. The effects of lipid A on gamma-irradiated human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubničková, M.; Kuzmina, E. A.; Chausov, V. N.; Ravnachka, I.; Boreyko, A. V.; Krasavin, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The modulatory effects of lipid A (diphosphoryl lipid A (DLA) and monophosphoryl lipid A (MLA)) on apoptosis induction and DNA structure damage (single and double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs, respectively)) in peripheral human blood lymphocytes are studied for 60Co gamma-irradiation. It is shown that in the presence of these agents the amount of apoptotic cells increases compared with the irradiated control samples. The effect is most strongly pronounced for DLA. In its presence, a significant increase is observed in the number of radiation-induced DNA SSBs and DSBs. Possible mechanisms are discussed of the modifying influence of the used agents on radiation-induced cell reactions

  14. Relative biological effectiveness of 280 keV neutrons for apoptosis in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ryan, L A; Wilkins, R C; McFarlane, N M; Sung, M M; McNamee, J P; Boreham, D R

    2006-07-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons varies from unity to greater than ten depending upon neutron energy and the biological endpoint measured. In our study, we examined apoptosis in human lymphocytes to assess the RBE of low energy 280 keV neutrons compared to Cs gamma radiation and found the RBE to be approximately one. Similar results have been observed for high energy neutrons using the same endpoint. As apoptosis is a major process that influences the consequences of radiation exposure, our results indicate that biological effect and the corresponding weighting factors for 280 keV neutrons may be lower in some cell types and tissues.

  15. Genotoxicity evaluation of drinking water sources in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yulin; Chen, Haigang; Li, Zhaoli; Sun, Liwei; Qu, Mengmeng; Li, Mei; Kong, Zhiming

    2008-01-01

    The potential harm of organic pollutants in drinking water to human health is widely focused on in the world; more and more pollutants with genotoxic substances are released into the aquatic environment. Water source samples were collected from 7 different localities of Nanjing City. The potential genotoxicity of organic extracts from drinking water sources were investigated by means of the comet assay in human peripheral lymphocytes. The results showed that all the organic extracts from all the water source samples could induce DNA damages of human peripheral blood lymphocytes at different levels. A significant difference (P < 0.01) was observed when compared with the solvent control. The DNA damage increased with the increase of the dosage of the original water source. Significant differences of DNA damage were observed in different drinking water sources, as shown by the multiple comparisons analysis at the dosage of 100x; the degree of DNA damage treated by Hushu waterworks (at town level) was the most serious, the arbitrary units (AU) was 141.62 +/- 6.96, however, that of Shangyuanmen waterworks (at city level) was only 109.64 +/- 2.97. The analysis also revealed that the genotoxicity of town's water sources was higher than that of the city. The results demonstrated that the comet assay can be successfully applied to the genotoxicity monitoring programs of drinking water sources.

  16. Geno- and cytotoxicity of salinomycin in human nasal mucosa and peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Scherzad, Agmal; Hackenberg, Stephan; Schramm, Carolin; Froelich, Katrin; Ginzkey, Christian; Hagen, Rudolf; Kleinsasser, Norbert

    2015-06-01

    Salinomycin is usually applied in stock breading but has also been described as a promising agent against cancer stem cells (CSC). However, knowledge about the toxicity of this ionophor substance is incomplete. The aim of this study was to investigate cyto- and genotoxic effects of salinomycin in human non-malignant cells. Primary human nasal mucosa cells (monolayer and mini organ cultures) and peripheral blood lymphocytes from 10 individuals were used to study the cytotoxic effects of salinomycin (0.1-175 μM) by annexin-propidiumiodide- and MTT-test. The comet assay was performed to evaluate DNA damage. Additionally, the secretion of interleukin-8 was analyzed by ELISA. Flow cytometry and MTT assay revealed significant cytotoxic effects in nasal mucosa cells and lymphocytes at low salinomycin concentrations of 10-20 μM. No genotoxic effects could be observed. IL-8 secretion was elevated at 5 μM. Salinomycin-induced cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory effects were seen at concentrations relevant for anti-cancer treatment. Concurrent to the evaluation of salinomycin application in experimental oncology, adverse effects in non-malignant cells need to be monitored and reduced as much as possible. Further studies are also warranted to evaluate the toxic effects in a variety of human cell systems, e.g., liver, kidney and muscle cells.

  17. Proteomic and protein interaction network analysis of human T lymphocytes during cell-cycle entry

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Stephen J; Boutz, Daniel R; Wang, Rong; Chronis, Constantinos; Lea, Nicholas C; Thayaparan, Thivyan; Hamilton, Emma; Milewicz, Hanna; Blanc, Eric; Mufti, Ghulam J; Marcotte, Edward M; Thomas, N Shaun B

    2012-01-01

    Regulating the transition of cells such as T lymphocytes from quiescence (G0) into an activated, proliferating state involves initiation of cellular programs resulting in entry into the cell cycle (proliferation), the growth cycle (blastogenesis, cell size) and effector (functional) activation. We show the first proteomic analysis of protein interaction networks activated during entry into the first cell cycle from G0. We also provide proof of principle that blastogenesis and proliferation programs are separable in primary human T cells. We employed a proteomic profiling method to identify large-scale changes in chromatin/nuclear matrix-bound and unbound proteins in human T lymphocytes during the transition from G0 into the first cell cycle and mapped them to form functionally annotated, dynamic protein interaction networks. Inhibiting the induction of two proteins involved in two of the most significantly upregulated cellular processes, ribosome biogenesis (eIF6) and hnRNA splicing (SF3B2/SF3B4), showed, respectively, that human T cells can enter the cell cycle without growing in size, or increase in size without entering the cell cycle. PMID:22415777

  18. Characterization of effector and memory T cell subsets in the immune response to bovine tuberculosis in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccine-elicited long-term cultured IFN-gamma ELISPOT responses correlate with protection against bovine tuberculosis in cattle. With humans, cultured IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays are primarily a measure of central memory T cell (Tcm) responses; however, this important subset of lymphocytes is poorly ch...

  19. Generation and characterization of human B lymphocyte stimulator blocking monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Weiliang; Zhang, Jianjun; Pei, Lili; Fang, Shuping; Liu, Honghao; Wang, Ruixue; Su, Yunpeng

    2016-09-01

    The cytokine, B lymphocyte stimulator (Blys) is essential for activation and proliferation of B cells and is involved in the pathogenesis of B-cell mediated autoimmune diseases. Based on its essential activity, Blys may be a potential therapeutic target for human autoimmune diseases. In this article, we have described the development of a novel humanized anti-Blys antibody, NMB04, that binds with high affinity and specificity to both soluble and membrane bound Blys. This monoclonal antibody has the potential to block Blys binding to all its three receptors, TACI, BCMA and BR-3. Further in vivo studies revealed that NMB04 possessed more potent inhibitory activity against human Blys as compared to an existing antibody, Belimumab. Therefore, NMB04 may have potential as a therapeutic candidate targeting autoimmune diseases.

  20. Interaction of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with human B-lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, George; Klein, Eva; Kashuba, Elena

    2010-05-21

    Epstein-Barr virus, EBV, and humans have a common history that reaches back to our primate ancestors. The virus co-evolved with man and has established a largely harmless and highly complex co-existence. It is carried as silent infection by almost all human adults. A serendipitous discovery established that it is the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis. Still, EBV became known first in 1964, in a rare, geographically prevalent malignant lymphoma of B-cell origin, Burkitt lymphoma BL. Its association with a malignancy prompted intensive studies and its capacity to immortalize B-lymphocytes in vitro was soon demonstrated. Consequently EBV was classified therefore as a potentially tumorigenic virus. Despite of this property however, the virus carrier state itself does not lead to malignancies because the transformed cells are recognized by the immune response. Consequently the EBV induced proliferation of EBV carrying B-lymphocytes is manifested only under immunosuppressive conditions. The expression of EBV encoded genes is regulated by the cell phenotype. The virus genome can be found in malignancies originating from cell types other than the B-lymphocyte. Even in the EBV infected B-cell, the direct transforming capacity is restricted to a defined window of differentiation. A complex interaction between virally encoded proteins and B-cell specific cellular proteins constitute the proliferation inducing program. In this short review we touch upon aspects which are the subject of our present work. We describe the mechanisms of some of the functional interactions between EBV encoded and cellular proteins that determine the phenotype of latently infected B-cells. The growth promoting EBV encoded genes are not expressed in the virus carrying BL cells. Still, EBV seems to contribute to the etiology of this tumor by modifying events that influence cell survival and proliferation. We describe a possible growth promoting mechanism in the genesis of Burkitt lymphoma

  1. Protective effect of apigenin on radiation-induced chromosomal damage in human lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy; Tungjai, Montree; Whorton, Elbert B.

    2005-01-01

    The potential use of flavonoids as a radioprotector is of increasing interest because of their high antioxidant activity and abundance in the diet. The aim of this study is to examine genotoxic and radioprotective effects of one of the most common flavonoids, apigenin, on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was used to evaluate such effects of apigenin. Blood samples were collected from two non-smoking healthy male volunteers who had no history of previous exposure to other clastogenic agents. Isolated lymphocytes were cultured. There were two tubes per concentration for all treatments. To evaluate the genotoxicity of apigenin, cells were first treated with different concentrations of apigenin (0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 25 microg/mL) at 24 h after culture initiation, followed by cytochalasin-B (Cyt-B) treatment (3 microg/mL) and cell harvest at 44 and 72 h, respectively. Secondly, to investigate the radioprotective effect, cell cultures were exposed to different concentrations of apigenin as described above for 30 min before being irradiated to 2 Gy of 137Cs gamma rays (at a dose rate of 0.75 Gy/min). In all instances, the frequency of MN was scored in binucleated (BN) cells. The nuclear proliferation index also was calculated. We did not detect an increase in the frequency of MN in non-irradiated human lymphocyte cultures treated with 2.5, 5.0 or 10 microg/mL apigenin; although, we did observe an increase in cultures treated with 25 microg/mL apigenin (the highest concentration of apigenin used in our study). We also observed a significant increase in the frequency of MN in irradiated cells overall; however, the frequency was decreased as the concentration of apigenin increased, suggesting a radioprotective effect. These findings provide a basis for additional studies to help clarify the potential use and benefit of apigenin as a radioprotector.

  2. Human blood CXCR5(+)CD4(+) T cells are counterparts of T follicular cells and contain specific subsets that differentially support antibody secretion.

    PubMed

    Morita, Rimpei; Schmitt, Nathalie; Bentebibel, Salah-Eddine; Ranganathan, Rajaram; Bourdery, Laure; Zurawski, Gerard; Foucat, Emile; Dullaers, Melissa; Oh, SangKon; Sabzghabaei, Natalie; Lavecchio, Elizabeth M; Punaro, Marilynn; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Ueno, Hideki

    2011-01-28

    Although a fraction of human blood memory CD4(+) T cells expresses chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 5 (CXCR5), their relationship to T follicular helper (Tfh) cells is not well established. Here we show that human blood CXCR5(+)CD4(+) T cells share functional properties with Tfh cells and appear to represent their circulating memory compartment. Blood CXCR5(+)CD4(+) T cells comprised three subsets: T helper 1 (Th1), Th2, and Th17 cells. Th2 and Th17 cells within CXCR5(+), but not within CXCR5(-), compartment efficiently induced naive B cells to produce immunoglobulins via interleukin-21 (IL-21). In contrast, Th1 cells from both CXCR5(+) and CXCR5(-) compartments lacked the capacity to help B cells. Patients with juvenile dermatomyositis, a systemic autoimmune disease, displayed a profound skewing of blood CXCR5(+) Th cell subsets toward Th2 and Th17 cells. Importantly, the skewing of subsets correlated with disease activity and frequency of blood plasmablasts. Collectively, our study suggests that an altered balance of Tfh cell subsets contributes to human autoimmunity.

  3. Increased tubulointerstitial recruitment of human CD141(hi) CLEC9A(+) and CD1c(+) myeloid dendritic cell subsets in renal fibrosis and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kassianos, Andrew J; Wang, Xiangju; Sampangi, Sandeep; Muczynski, Kimberly; Healy, Helen; Wilkinson, Ray

    2013-11-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play critical roles in immune-mediated kidney diseases. Little is known, however, about DC subsets in human chronic kidney disease, with previous studies restricted to a limited set of pathologies and to using immunohistochemical methods. In this study, we developed novel protocols for extracting renal DC subsets from diseased human kidneys and identified, enumerated, and phenotyped them by multicolor flow cytometry. We detected significantly greater numbers of total DCs as well as CD141(hi) and CD1c(+) myeloid DC (mDCs) subsets in diseased biopsies with interstitial fibrosis than diseased biopsies without fibrosis or healthy kidney tissue. In contrast, plasmacytoid DC numbers were significantly higher in the fibrotic group compared with healthy tissue only. Numbers of all DC subsets correlated with loss of kidney function, recorded as estimated glomerular filtration rate. CD141(hi) DCs expressed C-type lectin domain family 9 member A (CLEC9A), whereas the majority of CD1c(+) DCs lacked the expression of CD1a and DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), suggesting these mDC subsets may be circulating CD141(hi) and CD1c(+) blood DCs infiltrating kidney tissue. Our analysis revealed CLEC9A(+) and CD1c(+) cells were restricted to the tubulointerstitium. Notably, DC expression of the costimulatory and maturation molecule CD86 was significantly increased in both diseased cohorts compared with healthy tissue. Transforming growth factor-β levels in dissociated tissue supernatants were significantly elevated in diseased biopsies with fibrosis compared with nonfibrotic biopsies, with mDCs identified as a major source of this profibrotic cytokine. Collectively, our data indicate that activated mDC subsets, likely recruited into the tubulointerstitium, are positioned to play a role in the development of fibrosis and, thus, progression to chronic kidney disease.

  4. 50 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields do not affect human lymphocyte activation and proliferation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capri, Miriam; Mesirca, Pietro; Remondini, Daniel; Carosella, Simona; Pasi, Sara; Castellani, Gastone; Franceschi, Claudio; Bersani, Ferdinando

    2004-12-01

    In the last 30 years, an increasing public concern about the possible harmful effects of electromagnetic fields generated by power lines and domestic appliances has pushed the scientific community to search for a correct and comprehensive answer to this problem. In this work the effects of exposure to 50 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields, with a magnetic flux density of 0.05 mT and 2.5 mT (peak values), were studied on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected from healthy young and elderly donors. Cell activation and proliferation were investigated by using flow cytometry techniques and 3H-TdR incorporation assays, respectively. The results obtained indicated that exposure to the fields altered neither DNA synthesis nor the capacity of lymphocytes to enter the activation phase and progress into the cell cycle. Thus, the conclusions are that two important functional phases of human lymphocytes, such as activation and proliferation, are not affected by exposures to 50 Hz magnetic fields similar to those found under power lines.

  5. Evaluation of cytogenetic and DNA damage in human lymphocytes treated with adrenaline in vitro.

    PubMed

    Djelić, Ninoslav; Radaković, Milena; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana; Zivković, Lada; Bajić, Vladan; Stevanović, Jevrosima; Stanimirović, Zoran

    2015-02-01

    Catechol groups can be involved in redox cycling accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which may lead to oxidative damage of cellular macromolecules including DNA. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate possible genotoxic effects of a natural catecholamine adrenaline in cultured human lymphocytes using cytogenetic (sister chromatid exchange and micronuclei) and the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay. In cytogenetic tests, six experimental concentrations of adrenaline were used in a range from 0.01-500 μM. There were no indications of genotoxic effects of adrenaline in sister chromatid exchange and micronucleus tests. However, at four highest concentrations of adrenaline (5 μM, 50 μM, 150 μM and 300 μM) we observed a decreased mitotic index and cell-cycle delay. In addition, in the Comet assay we used adrenaline in a range from 0.0005-500 μM, at two treatment times: 15 min or 60 min. In contrast to cytogenetic analysis, there was a dose-dependent increase of DNA damage detected in the Comet assay. These effects were significantly reduced by concomitant treatment with quercetin or catalase. Therefore, the obtained results indicate that adrenaline may exhibit genotoxic effects in cultured human lymphocytes, most likely due to production of reactive oxygen species.

  6. Cytogenotoxicity of sewage sludge leachate before and after calcium oxide-based solidification in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Gajski, Goran; Oreščanin, Višnja; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2011-07-01

    Present study aimed to establish the chemical composition of sewage sludge leachate before/after calcium oxide-based solidification using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The other aim was to determine leachate effects on human lymphocyte and DNA integrity in vitro using a battery of bioassays (DNA diffusion assay, micronucleus test and comet assay) to determine effects of those complex mixtures of elements on cell and DNA integrity. EDXRF showed that nickel concentration in the leachate of untreated sludge was 18.5 times higher than the upper permissible limit for inert waste landfills. Other elements were kept below the permissible values. After sludge solidification, leachate concentrations of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb dropped 1.6, 2.7, 37, 5.9, 3.2, 7.8, and 2.6 times, respectively. Untreated sludge leachate was cytogenotoxic to lymphocytes, and may lead to adverse effects on the exposed human populations, but calcium oxide-based solidification reduced these effects in significant manner.

  7. DNA damage in human lymphocytes exposed to four food additives in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Serkan; Unal, Fatma; Yüzbaşıoğlu, Deniz; Celik, Mustafa

    2014-11-01

    In vitro genotoxic effects of antioxidant additives, such as citric acid (CA) and phosphoric acid (PA) and their combination, as well as antimicrobial additives, such as benzoic acid (BA) and calcium propionate (CP), on human lymphocytes were determined using alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis. There was a significant increase in the DNA damage in human lymphocytes after 1 h of in vitro exposure to CA, PA, BA and CP (200, 25-200, 50-500, 50-1000 μg/mL, respectively). The combination of CA and PA significantly increased the mean tail intensity at all the concentrations used (25-200 μg/mL) and significantly increased the mean tail length mainly after higher concentrations (100 and 200 μg/mL). Data in this study showed that the concentrations of food additives used induce DNA damage and PA was the most genotoxic and CA was less genotoxic additives among them.

  8. Grapevine fruit extract protects against radiation-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in human lymphocyte.

    PubMed

    Singha, Indrani; Das, Subir Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) causes oxidative stress through overwhelming generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the living cells leading the oxidative damage further to biomolecules. Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) posses several bioactive phytochemicals and is the richest source of antioxidants. In this study, we investigated V. vinifera for its phytochemical content, enzymes profile and, ROS- and oxidant-scavenging activities. We have also studied the fruit extract of four different grapevine viz., Thompson seedless, Flame seedless, Kishmish chorni and Red globe for their radioprotective actions in human lymphocytes. The activities of ascorbic acid oxidase and catalase significantly (P < 0.01) differed among extracts within the same cultivar, while that of peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase did not differ significantly. The superoxide radical-scavenging activity was higher in the seed as compared to the skin or pulp of the same cultivar. Pretreatment with grape extracts attenuated the oxidative stress induced by 4 Gy γ-radiation in human lymphocytes in vitro. Further, γ-radiation-induced increase in caspase 3/7 activity was significantly attenuated by grape extracts. These results suggest that grape extract serve as a potential source of natural antioxidants against the IR-induced oxidative stress and also inhibit apoptosis. Furthermore, the protective action of grape depends on the source of extract (seed, skin or pulp) and type of the cultivars.

  9. Evaluation of Possible Genotoxic Activity of Dirithromycin in Cultured Human Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kayraldız, Ahmet; Dönbak, Lale; Yavuz Kocaman, Ayşe; Köker, Esra; Gökçe, Şule

    2015-01-01

    Dirithromycin antibiotic is a 14-membered lactone ring macrolide and is widely used in medicine to treat many different types of bacterial infections. In the present study, the possible genotoxicity of dirithromycin was evaluated in cultured human lymphocytes by using sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), chromosome aberration (CA), and micronucleus (MN) tests and also cell proliferation kinetics such as mitotic index (MI), replication index (RI), and nuclear division index (NDI) were analyzed for cytotoxicity. Cell cultures were treated with four different concentrations of dirithromycin (37.75, 67.50, 125, and 250 µg/mL) for 24 and 48 h periods. Dirithromycin significantly induced SCE and MN frequency at all concentrations in both 24 and 48 h treated cells. In addition, CA level has been markedly increased in the cells treated with almost all concentrations of dirithromycin for 24 (except 37.75 µg/mL) and 48 h treatment periods as compared to control. However, MI, RI, and NDI values were not affected by the dirithromycin treatment (p > 0.05). The results of this study indicated that dirithromycin treatment caused genetic damage by increasing the level of cytogenetic endpoints, suggesting its genotoxic and mutagenic action on human lymphocytes in vitro. PMID:26576152

  10. Genotoxic evaluation of Halfenprox using the human peripheral lymphocyte micronucleus assay and the Ames test.

    PubMed

    Akyıl, Dilek; Eren, Yasin; Konuk, Muhsin; Dere, Hatice; Serteser, Ahmet

    2017-04-01

    The genotoxicity and mutagenicity of Halfenprox, a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide and acaricide, was assessed using two standard genotoxicity assays of the Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity assay (Ames test) and in vitro micronucleus (MN) assay in human peripheral lymphocytes. In the Ames test, Salmonella strains TA98 and TA100 were treated with or without S9 fraction. The doses of Halfenprox were 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 μg/plate and test materials were dissolved in DMSO. The concentrations of Halfenprox did not show mutagenic activity on both strains with and without S9 fraction. The MN assay was used to investigate the genotoxic effects of Halfenprox in human peripheral lymphocytes treated with 250, 500, 750, and 1000 μg/ml concentrations of Halfenprox for 24 and 48 h, and at 1000 μg/ml the concentration was significantly increased and the MN formation was compared with the negative control for both treatment periods. In addition, a significant decrease of the nuclear devision index (NDI) values at the higher concentrations of Halfenprox and at both treatment periods was observed.

  11. Lead and cadmium at very low doses affect in vitro immune response of human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Borella, P.; Giardino, A. )

    1991-08-01

    The effect of lead chloride and cadmium chloride on in vitro immunoglobulin (Ig) production by human lymphocytes was investigated. After 7 days in culture, lead added in the range of human exposure (207-1035 {mu}g/liter) significantly enhanced Ig production either when cells were activated by pokeweed mitogen (PWM) or not. The effect was dose-dependent and was related to the Pb were measured in the extracellular medium and in the cells. Independently of the mitogen addition, about 2% of the Pb added was accumulated in the cells, most being associated with the nuclear fraction. Those findings suggest that the Pb effects could depend on its uptake and distribution in the cells. Cadmium added in the 50-500 nM range exhibited a dose-independent mitogenic activity in unstimulated cells, whereas the Ig secretion was not significantly affected by Cd when cells were PWM-activated. A considerable intraindividual variability, however, was observed when blood donors were separately examined, with both an increase, a decrease, or no variation on Ig production. Furthermore, higher percentages of Cd were accumulated in the nuclear fraction, and lower in the cytosol and precipitate, in PWM-activated compared to resting lymphocytes. Genetic factors could be of importance for the observed variability of the immune response to cadmium, and the authors support the hypothesis that differences in the metallothionein (MT) inducibility could play a role.

  12. Assessment of genotoxicity of vincristine, vinblastine and vinorelbine in human cultured lymphocytes: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Alzoubi, KH; Khabour, OF; Alawneh, KZ; Raffee, LA; Alsatari, ES; Hussein, EI; Bani-Hani, KE

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vincristine (VCR), vinblastine (VBL) and vinorelbine (VRL) are anticancer agents from the Vinca alkaloid family that have the potential to induce genotoxic effect. The aim of the present study was to compare the genotoxic effect of VCR, VBL and VRL. Levels of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy guanosine (8-OHdG) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) were measured in cultured human blood lymphocytes treated with VCR, VBL and VRL at concentrations of 0.01 and 0.1 μg/mL. Results showed that VCR, VBL and VRL significantly increased the 8-OHdG levels (p <0.05), whereas it did not cause a significant increase in the frequencies of SCEs in human blood lymphocytes as compared to controls. On the other hand, all three agents significantly increased cells mitotic index (p <0.05). At both tested concentrations, the magnitude of the increase in 8-OHdG was VBL>VCR>VRL. In conclusion, VCR, VBL and VRL induce DNA damage as indicated by the increase in the 8-OHdG biomarker but with different magnitude. PMID:27785403

  13. Magnetic flow sorting using a model system of human lymphocytes and a colloidal magnetic label.

    PubMed

    Zborowski, M; Moore, L R; Reddy, S; Chen, G H; Sun, L; Chalmers, J J

    1996-01-01

    Cells of identical physical properties that differ in the expression of surface proteins can be sorted conveniently using immunospecific stains conjugated to fluorescent, or magnetic, labels. Immunomagnetic cell sorting using commercial batch sorters offers advantages of high sorting capacity, high viability of sorted fractions, and high depletion rates; its disadvantages are low enrichment rate and batch processing. The authors developed and tested a continuous, flow-through magnetic cell sorter for small volume, experimental cell enrichment. Freshly isolated human peripheral lymphocytes were labeled using an immunofluoromagnetic sandwich consisting of mouse anti human CD8 monoclonal antibody-fluorescein conjugate and rat anti mouse polyclonal antibody-colloidal iron-dextran conjugate. A total of 2-3 min lymphocytes were sorted per hour using a saturation magnetic field of 1.334 T and a five channel sorter. The fluorescent cells were distributed among the channels in relation to their fluorescence intensity and magnetic susceptibility. The purity (68-85%) and enrichment rates (16-34x) were comparable to those of commercial batch magnetic separators; sorting capacity and recovery of the enriched fractions (up to 32%) were limited by the small scale of the sorter. Future direction is focused on increasing the resolution, recovery, and sorting capacity of the enriched fractions, and testing the sorter on other cell systems.

  14. Gibbon ape leukemia virus poorly replicates in primary human T lymphocytes: implications for safety testing of primary human T lymphocytes transduced with GALV-pseudotyped vectors.

    PubMed

    Lamers, Cor H J; Willemsen, Ralph A; van Elzakker, Pascal M M L; Gratama, Jan Willem; Debets, Reno

    2009-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration/Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research has defined that for retroviral gene therapy, the vector-producing cell, the vector preparation, and the ex vivo gene-transduced cells have to be tested for absence of replication-competent retrovirus (RCR) if the transduced cells are cultured for >4 days. We assessed the sensitivity of the "extended PG4(S+L-) assay" to detect gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) RCR, and applied this assay to measure GALV RCR spread in retrovirally transduced T cells. To this end, T cells were expanded for 12 days after transduction with a GALV-envelope pseudotyped retroviral vector expressing single chain variable fragment (anticarbonic anhydrase IX) in presence or absence of GALV RCR. Results showed that: (1) the "extended PG4(S+L-) assay" detects 1 focus-forming unit (ffu) GALV RCR and thus is applicable and sufficiently sensitive to screen human T-cell cultures for absence of infectious GALV RCR; (2) although GALV RCR infect human T cells, it very poorly replicate in T cells; (3) GALV RCR, when present at low levels immediately upon gene transduction (ie, 100 ffu/20x10 T cells in 100 mL), did not spread during a 12-day T-cell culture at clinical scale. Our observation that GALV RCR poorly spreads in primary human T-cell cultures questions the relevance of testing T-cell transductants for RCR on top of testing the vector-producing cells and the clinical vector batch for RCR and warrants evaluation of the current policy for safety testing of ex vivo retrovirally transduced T lymphocytes for GALV RCR.

  15. Diversified expression of NG2/CSPG4 isoforms in glioblastoma and human foetal brain identifies pericyte subsets.

    PubMed

    Girolamo, Francesco; Dallatomasina, Alice; Rizzi, Marco; Errede, Mariella; Wälchli, Thomas; Mucignat, Maria Teresa; Frei, Karl; Roncali, Luisa; Perris, Roberto; Virgintino, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    NG2/CSPG4 is a complex surface-associated proteoglycan (PG) recognized to be a widely expressed membrane component of glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) cells and angiogenic pericytes. To determine the precise expression pattern of NG2/CSPG4 on glioblastoma cells and pericytes, we generated a panel of >60 mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against the ectodomain of human NG2/CSPG4, partially characterized the mAbs, and performed a high-resolution distributional mapping of the PG in human foetal, adult and glioblastoma-affected brains. The reactivity pattern initially observed on reference tumour cell lines indicated that the mAbs recognized 48 immunologically distinct NG2/CSPG4 isoforms, and a total of 14 mAbs was found to identify NG2/CSPG4 isoforms in foetal and neoplastic cerebral sections. These were consistently absent in the adult brain, but exhibited a complementary expression pattern in angiogenic vessels of both tumour and foetal tissues. Considering the extreme pleomorphism of tumour areas, and with the aim of subsequently analysing the distributional pattern of the NG2/CSPG4 isoforms on similar histological vessel typologies, a preliminary study was carried out with endothelial cell and pericyte markers, and with selected vascular basement membrane (VBM) components. On both tumour areas characterized by 'glomeruloid' and 'garland vessels', which showed a remarkably similar cellular and molecular organization, and on developing brain vessels, spatially separated, phenotypically diversified pericyte subsets with a polarized expression of key surface components, including NG2/CSPG4, were disclosed. Interestingly, the majority of the immunolocalized NG2/CSPG4 isoforms present in glioblastoma tissue were present in foetal brain, except for one isoform that seemed to be exclusive of tumour cells, being absent in foetal brain. The results highlight an unprecedented, complex pattern of NG2/CSPG4 isoform expression in foetal and neoplastic CNS, discriminating

  16. Loss of Telomeres in the Progeny of Human Lymphocytes Exposed to Energetic Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F.A.; George, K.; Durante, M.

    2006-01-01

    We have used cross-species multi-color banding (RxFISH) combined with telomere FISH probes, to measure chromosomal aberrations in the progeny of human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to ionizing radiation. Accelerated iron particles (energy 1 GeV/nucleon) induced many more terminal deletions than the same dose of gamma-rays. We found that truncated chromosomes without telomeres could be transmitted for at least three cell cycles following exposure, and represented about 10% of all aberrations observed in the progeny of cells exposed to iron ions. High energy heavy ions generate the most significant health risk for human space exploration and the results suggest that telomere loss may be the leading mechanism for their high efficiency in the induction of late effects.

  17. Evaluation of toxicity of essential oils palmarosa, citronella, lemongrass and vetiver in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sonali; Jothiramajayam, Manivannan; Ghosh, Manosij; Mukherjee, Anita

    2014-06-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to study the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of the essential oils (palmarosa, citronella, lemongrass and vetiver) and monoterpenoids (citral and geraniol) in human lymphocytes. Trypan blue dye exclusion and MTT test was used to evaluate cytotoxicity. The genotoxicity studies were carried out by comet and DNA diffusion assays. Apoptosis was confirmed by Annexin/PI double staining. In addition, generation of reactive oxygen species was evaluated by DCFH-DA staining using flow cytometry. The results demonstrated that the four essential oils and citral induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity at higher concentrations. The essential oils were found to induce oxidative stress evidenced by the generation of reactive oxygen species. With the exception of geraniol, induction of apoptosis was confirmed at higher concentrations of the test substances. Based on the results, the four essential oils are considered safe for human consumption at low concentrations.

  18. Stability of Radiation Induced Chromosome Damage in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; George, K.; Willingham, V.

    2006-01-01

    Chromosome damage in an individual's peripheral blood lymphocytes can be an indicator of radiation exposure and this data can be used to evaluate dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Evidence suggests that the yield of chromosome damage in lymphocytes is also a relevant biomarker of cancer risk in humans that reflects individual cancer susceptibility. It follows that biomonitoring studies can be used to uncover subjects who are particularly susceptible to radiation damage and therefore at higher risk of cancer. Translocations and other stable aberrations are commonly believed to persist in peripheral blood cells for many years after exposure, and it has been suggested that translocations can be used for assessing retrospective radiation doses or chronic exposures. However, recent investigations suggest that translocations might not always persist indefinitely. We measured chromosome aberrations in the blood lymphocytes of six astronauts before their respective missions of approximately 3 to 6 months onboard the international space station, and again at various intervals up to 5 years after flight. In samples collected a few days after return to earth, the yield of chromosome translocations had significantly increased compared with preflight values, and results indicate that biodosimetry estimates lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. However, for five of the astronauts, follow up analysis revealed a temporal decline in translocations with half-lives ranging from 10 to 58 months. The yield of exchanges remained unchanged for the sixth astronaut during an observation period of 5 months post-flight. These results may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction and could affect cancer risk predictions that are estimated from yields of chromosome damage obtained shortly after exposure.

  19. p53 mutations in human lymphoid malignancies: Association with Burkitt lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidano, G.; Ballerini, P.; Gong, J.Z.; Inghirami, G.; Knowles, D.M.; Dalla-Favera, R. ); Neri, A, Centro Malattie del Sangue G. Marcora, Milan ); Newcomb, E.W. ); Magrath, I.T. )

    1991-06-15

    The authors have investigated the frequency of p53 mutations in B- and T-cell human lymphoid malignancies, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the major subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. p53 exons 5-9 were studied by using genomic DNA from 197 primary tumors and 27 cell lines by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and by direst sequencing of PCR-amplified fragments. Mutations were found associated with (i) Burkitt lymphoma (9/27 biopsoes; 17/27 cell lines) and its leukemic counterpart L{sub 3}-type B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (5/9), both of which also carry activated c-myc oncogenes, and (ii) B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (6/40) and, in particular, its stage of progression known as Richter's transformation (3/7). Mutations were not found at any significant frequency in other types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma or acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In many cases, only the mutated allele was detectable, implying loss of the normal allele. These results suggest that (1) significant differences in the frequency of p53 mutations are present among subtypes of neoplasms derived from the same tissue; (2) p53 may play a role in tumor progression in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia; (3) the presence of both p53 loss/inactivation and c-myc oncogene activation may be important in the pathogenesis of Burkitt lymphoma and its leukemia form L{sub 3}-type B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  20. Regulation of interferon receptor expression in human blood lymphocytes in vitro and during interferon therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, A.S.; Hannigan, G.E.; Freedman, M.H.; Williams, B.R.

    1986-05-01

    Interferons (IFN) elicit antiviral and antineoplastic activities by binding to specific receptors on the cell surface. The binding characteristics of IFN to human lymphocytes were studied using IFN alpha 2 labeled with /sup 125/I to high specific activity. The specific binding curves generated were analyzed by the LIGAND program of Munson and Rodbard to determine receptor numbers. The number of receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and tonsillar B-lymphocytes (TBL) from normal individuals were 505 +/- 293 (n = 10) and 393 +/- 147 (n = 3) respectively. When these cells were preincubated in vitro with unlabeled IFN alpha 2, the receptor number decreased to 82 +/- 45 and 61 +/- 16 respectively. Receptor binding activities recovered gradually over a period of 72 h when the cells were incubated in IFN-free medium. This recovery of receptors could be blocked by the addition of actinomycin D to the incubation medium. A similar decrease in receptor expression was observed in vivo in PBL from patients being treated daily with 5 X 10(6) units/m2 per d of IFN alpha 2 by subcutaneous injection, for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or papilloma virus infections. Receptor numbers in PBL in vivo were further reduced concurrent with the progression of IFN therapy. Thus, the reduction in IFN receptor expression observed in vitro can be demonstrated in vivo. These studies indicate that monitoring IFN receptor expression in vivo can provide information regarding the availability of IFN receptors at the cell surface for the mediation of IFN actions during the course of IFN therapy.

  1. Rapid alterations of cell cycle control proteins in human T lymphocytes in microgravity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In our study we aimed to identify rapidly reacting gravity-responsive mechanisms in mammalian cells in order to understand if and how altered gravity is translated into a cellular response. In a combination of experiments using "functional weightlessness" provided by 2D-clinostats and real microgravity provided by several parabolic flight campaigns and compared to in-flight-1g-controls, we identified rapid gravity-responsive reactions inside the cell cycle regulatory machinery of human T lymphocytes. In response to 2D clinorotation, we detected an enhanced expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1 protein within minutes, less cdc25C protein expression and enhanced Ser147-phosphorylation of cyclinB1 after CD3/CD28 stimulation. Additionally, during 2D clinorotation, Tyr-15-phosphorylation occurred later and was shorter than in the 1 g controls. In CD3/CD28-stimulated primary human T cells, mRNA expression of the cell cycle arrest protein p21 increased 4.1-fold after 20s real microgravity in primary CD4+ T cells and 2.9-fold in Jurkat T cells, compared to 1 g in-flight controls after CD3/CD28 stimulation. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitor curcumin was able to abrogate microgravity-induced p21 mRNA expression, whereas expression was enhanced by a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Therefore, we suppose that cell cycle progression in human T lymphocytes requires Earth gravity and that the disturbed expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins could contribute to the breakdown of the human immune system in space. PMID:22273506

  2. CLEC12A-Mediated Antigen Uptake and Cross-Presentation by Human Dendritic Cell Subsets Efficiently Boost Tumor-Reactive T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Hutten, Tim J A; Thordardottir, Soley; Fredrix, Hanny; Janssen, Lisanne; Woestenenk, Rob; Tel, Jurjen; Joosten, Ben; Cambi, Alessandra; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Franssen, Gerben M; Boerman, Otto C; Bakker, Lex B H; Jansen, Joop H; Schaap, Nicolaas; Dolstra, Harry; Hobo, Willemijn

    2016-10-01

    Potent immunotherapies are urgently needed to boost antitumor immunity and control disease in cancer patients. As dendritic cells (DCs) are the most powerful APCs, they are an attractive means to reinvigorate T cell responses. An appealing strategy to use the effective Ag processing and presentation machinery, T cell stimulation and cross-talk capacity of natural DC subsets is in vivo tumor Ag delivery. In this context, endocytic C-type lectin receptors are attractive targeting molecules. In this study, we investigated whether CLEC12A efficiently delivers tumor Ags into human DC subsets, facilitating effective induction of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses. We confirmed that CLEC12A is selectively expressed by myeloid cells, including the myeloid DC subset (mDCs) and the plasmacytoid DC subset (pDCs). Moreover, we demonstrated that these DC subsets efficiently internalize CLEC12A, whereupon it quickly translocates to the early endosomes and subsequently routes to the lysosomes. Notably, CLEC12A Ab targeting did not negatively affect DC maturation or function. Furthermore, CLEC12A-mediated delivery of keyhole limpet hemocyanin resulted in enhanced proliferation and cytokine secretion by keyhole limpet hemocyanin-experienced CD4(+) T cells. Most importantly, CLEC12A-targeted delivery of HA-1 long peptide resulted in efficient Ag cross-presentation by mDCs and pDCs, leading to strong ex vivo activation of HA-1-specific CD8(+) T cells of patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Collectively, these data indicate that CLEC12A is an effective new candidate with great potential for in vivo Ag delivery into mDCs and pDCs, thereby using the specialized functions and cross-talk capacity of these DC subsets to boost tumor-reactive T cell immunity in cancer patients.

  3. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-mediated killing of human pancreatic islet cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Peter D; Estella, Eugene; Dudek, Nadine L; Jhala, Gaurang; Thomas, Helen E; Kay, Thomas W H; Mannering, Stuart I

    2008-09-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are believed to play an essential role in beta-cell destruction leading to development of type 1 diabetes and allogeneic islet graft failure. We aimed to identify the mechanisms used by CTL to kill human beta cells. CTL clones that recognize epitopes from influenza virus and Epstein-Barr virus restricted by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A0201 and -B0801, respectively, were used to investigate the susceptibility of human beta cells to CTL. In a short-term (5-hour) assay, CTL killed human islet cells of the appropriate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I type that had been pulsed with viral peptides. Killing was increased by pretreating islets with interferon gamma that increases MHC class I on target cells. Killing was abolished by incubation of CTL with the perforin inhibitor concanamycin A. The Fas pathway did not contribute to killing because blocking with neutralizing anti-Fas ligand antibody did not significantly reduce beta-cell killing. In conclusion, we report a novel way of investigating the interaction between CTL and human islets. Human islets were rapidly killed in vitro by MHC class I-restricted CTL predominantly by the granule exocytosis pathway.

  4. CD8low CD100− T Cells Identify a Novel CD8 T Cell Subset Associated with Viral Control during Human Hantaan Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bei; Ma, Ying; Zhang, Yusi; Zhang, Chunmei; Yi, Jing; Zhuang, Ran; Yu, Haitao; Yang, Angang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hantaan virus (HTNV) infection can cause a severe lethal hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in humans. CD8+ T cells play a critical role in combating HTNV infections. However, the contributions of different CD8+ T cell subsets to the immune response against viral infection are poorly understood. Here, we identified a novel subset of CD8+ T cells characterized by the CD8low CD100− phenotype in HFRS patients. The CD8low CD100− subset accounted for a median of 14.3% of the total CD8+ T cells in early phase of HFRS, and this percentage subsequently declined in the late phase of infection, whereas this subset was absent in healthy controls. Furthermore, the CD8low CD100− cells were associated with high activation and expressed high levels of cytolytic effector molecules and exhibited a distinct expression profile of effector CD8+ T cells (CCR7+/− CD45RA− CD127high CD27int CD28low CD62L−). When stimulated with specific HTNV nucleocapsid protein-derived peptide pools, most responding CD8+ cells (gamma interferon [IFN-γ] positive and/or tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α] positive) were CD8low CD100− cells. The frequency of CD8low CD100− cells among HTNV-specific CD8+ T cells was higher in milder cases than in more severe cases. Importantly, the proportion of the CD8low CD100− subset among CD8+ T cells in early phase of HFRS was negatively correlated with the HTNV viral load, suggesting that CD8low CD100− cells may be associated with viral clearance. The contraction of the CD8low CD100− subset in late phase of infection may be related to the consistently high expression levels of PD-1. These results may provide new insights into our understanding of CD8+ T cell-mediated protective immunity as well as immune homeostasis after HTNV infection in humans. IMPORTANCE CD8+ T cells play important roles in the antiviral immune response. We found that the proportion of CD8low CD100− cells among CD8+ T cells from HFRS patients was

  5. Long-lived Plasma Cells Are Contained Within the CD19−CD38hiCD138+ Subset in Human Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Halliley, Jessica L.; Tipton, Christopher; Liesveld, Jane; Rosenberg, Alexander F.; Darce, Jaime; Gregoretti, Ivan V.; Popova, Lana; Kaminiski, Denise; Fucile, Christopher F.; Albizua-Santin, Igor; Kyu, Shuya; Chiang, Kuang-Yueh; Bradley, Kyle T.; Burack, Richard; Slifka, Mark; Hammarlund, Erika; Wu, Hao; Zhao, Liping; Walsh, Edward E.; Falsey, Ann R.; Randall, Troy D.; Cheung, Wan Cheung; Sanz, Iñaki; Lee, F. Eun-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Antibody responses to viral infections are sustained for decades by long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs). However, LLPCs have yet to be characterized in humans. Here we used CD19, CD38, and CD138 to identify four PC subsets in human bone marrow (BM). We found that the CD19−CD38hiCD138+ subset was morphologically distinct, differentially expressed PC-associated genes and exclusively contained PCs specific for viral antigens to which the subjects had not been exposed for over 40 years. Protein sequences of measles- and mumps-specific circulating antibodies were encoded for by CD19−CD38hiCD138+ PCs in the BM. Finally, we found that CD19−CD38hiCD138+ PCs had a distinct RNA transcriptome signature and human immunoglobulin heavy chain (VH) repertoire that was relatively uncoupled from other BM PC subsets and likely represents the B cell response’s “historical record” of antigenic exposure. Thus, our studies define human LLPCs and provide a mechanism for the life-long maintenance of anti-viral antibodies in the serum. PMID:26187412

  6. Radioprotective effect of sesamol on gamma-radiation induced DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and antioxidants levels in cultured human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, N Rajendra; Menon, Venugopal P; Vasudev, V; Pugalendi, K V

    2005-05-05

    Sesamol pretreated (1, 5 and 10 microg/ml) lymphocytes were exposed to different doses of gamma-radiation, i.e., 1, 2 and 4 Gray (Gy) and the cellular changes were estimated by using cytokinesis blocked micronucleus assay (MN), dicentric aberration (DC), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH) and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Radiation significantly increased MN, DC frequencies, TBARS levels and decreased GSH and antioxidant enzyme levels in a dose dependent manner. The highest damage to lymphocytes was observed at 4 Gy irradiation. On the other hand, sesamol pretreatment significantly decreased MN, DC frequencies, TBARS levels and increased GSH levels and SOD, CAT and GPx activities in a concentration dependent manner. At 1 Gy irradiation all concentrations of sesamol (1, 5 and 10 microg/ml) significantly protects the lymphocytes from radiation damage. At 2 Gy irradiation 5 and 10 microg/ml of sesamol shows significant radioprotection. Since the highest damage was observed at 4 Gy irradiation both 1 and 5 microg/ml of sesamol pretreatment were not sufficient to protect the lymphocytes from radiation damage but 10 microg/ml of sesamol significantly (p<0.05) protects the lymphocytes from radiation effect. Thus, sesamol pretreatment gives significant protection to cultured human lymphocytes against gamma-radiation induced cellular damage. The possible mechanism involved in the radioprotective influence of sesamol is discussed.

  7. Mutations in human lymphocytes commonly involve gene duplication and resemble those seen in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.R.; Grist, S.A.; Janatipour, M.; Morley, A.A.

    1988-05-01

    Mutations in human lymphocytes are commonly due to gene deletion. To investigate the mechanism of deletion for autosomal genes, the authors immunoselected lymphocytes mutated at the HLA-A locus and clones them for molecular analysis. Of 36 mutant clones that showed deletion of the selected HLA-A allele, 8 had resulted from a simple gene deletion, whereas 28 had resulted from a more complex mutational event involving reduplication of the nonselected HLA-A allele as indicated by hybridization intensity on Southern blots. In 3 of the 28 clones, retention of heterozygosity at the HLA-B locus indicated that the reduplication was due to recombination between the two chromosomes 6; but in the remaining 25 clones, distinction could not be made between recombination and chromosome reduplication. The results indicate that mutations in normal somatic cells frequently result in hemizygosity or homozygosity at gene loci and, thereby, resemble the mutations thought to be important in the etiology of various forms of cancer.

  8. Resveratrol may reduce oxidative stress induced by platinum compounds in human plasma, blood platelets and lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara; Majsterek, Ireneusz; Blasiak, Janusz

    2005-07-01

    Resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenolic compound found in grapes and wine, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-tumor and anti-platelet activities. Using different methods, we show that resveratrol reduces oxidative stress induced by cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II) and selenium-cisplatin conjugate ([NH(3)](2)Pt(SeO(3)), Se-Pt) in human blood platelets, lymphocytes and plasma. Resveratrol decreased the production of 8-epi-prostaglandin F(2) (a biomarker of lipid peroxidation) in control blood platelets and platelets treated with platinum compounds (10 microg/ml), and markedly reduced activities of different anti-oxidative enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase) in these cells. A combined action of resveratrol and Se-Pt evoked a significant decrease of DNA damage (measured by comet assay) in lymphocytes compared with cells treated with Se-Pt only. Resveratrol also caused a distinct reduction of total anti-oxidant level in plasma after incubation with platinum compounds. Therefore, anti-oxidative activity of resveratrol may diminish oxidative stress and damage to cellular biomolecules (lipids, proteins and DNA) induced by platinum compounds.

  9. Karyotypes of Human Lymphocytes Exposed to High-Energy Iron Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2002-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to gamma rays or accelerated (56)Fe ions (1 GeV/nucleon, 145 keV/microm) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY). Doses of 0.3 and 3 Gy were used for both radiation types. Chromosomes were prematurely condensed by a phosphatase inhibitor (calyculin A) to avoid the population selection bias observed at metaphase as a result of the severe cell cycle delays induced by heavy ions. A total of 1053 karyotypes (G(2) and M phases) were analyzed in irradiated lymphocytes. Results revealed different distribution patterns for chromosomal aberrations after low- and high-LET radiation exposures: Heavy ions induced a much higher fraction of cells with multiple aberrations, while the majority of the aberrant cells induced by low doses of gamma rays contained a single aberration. The high fraction of complex-type exchanges after heavy ions leads to an overestimation of simple-type asymmetrical interchanges (dicentrics) from analysis of Giemsa-stained samples. However, even after a dose of 3 Gy iron ions, about 30% of the cells presented no complex-type exchanges. The involvement of individual chromosomes in exchanges was similar for densely and sparsely ionizing radiation, and no statistically significant evidence of a nonrandom involvement of specific chromosomes was detected.

  10. Biodosimetry of ionizing radiation by selective painting of prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Painting of interphase chromosomes can be useful for biodosimetric purposes in particular cases such as radiation therapy, accidental exposure to very high radiation doses and exposure to densely ionizing radiation, for example during space missions. Biodosimetry of charged-particle radiation is analyzed in the present paper. Target cells were human peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with gamma rays, protons and iron ions. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated for different times to allow repair of radiation-induced damage and then fused to mitotic hamster cells to promote premature condensation in the interphase chromosomes. Chromosome spreads were then hybridized with whole-chromosome DNA probes labeled with fluorescent stains. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromatin fragments shortly after exposure, as well as the kinetics of rejoining and misrejoining, were not markedly dependent on linear energy transfer. However, after exposure to heavy ions, more aberrations were scored in the interphase cells after incubation for repair than in metaphase samples harvested at the first postirradiation mitosis. On the other hand, no significant differences were observed in the two samples after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation. These results suggest that interphase chromosome painting can be a useful tool for biodosimetry of particle radiation.

  11. Gentiana asclepiadea and Armoracia rusticana can modulate the adaptive response induced by zeocin in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hudecova, A; Hasplova, K; Kellovska, L; Ikreniova, M; Miadokova, E; Galova, E; Horvathova, E; Vaculcikova, D; Gregan, F; Dusinska, M

    2012-01-01

    Zeocin is a member of bleomycin/phleomycin family of antibiotics isolated from Streptomyces verticullus. This unique radiomimetic antibiotic is known to bind to DNA and induce oxidative stress in different organisms producing predominantly single- and double- strand breaks, as well as a DNA base loss resulting in apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites. The aim of this study was to induce an adaptive response (AR) by zeocin in freshly isolated human lymphocytes from blood and to observe whether plant extracts could modulate this response. The AR was evaluated by the comet assay. The optimal conditions for the AR induction and modulation were determined as: 2 h-intertreatment time (in PBS, at 4°C) given after a priming dose (50 µg/ml) of zeocin treatment. Genotoxic impact of zeocin to lymphocytes was modulated by plant extracts isolated from Gentiana asclepiadea (methanolic and aqueous haulm extracts, 0.25 mg/ml) and Armoracia rusticana (methanolic root extract, 0.025 mg/ml). These extracts enhanced the AR and also decreased DNA damage caused by zeocin (after 0, 1 and 4 h-recovery time after the test dose of zeocin application) to more than 50%. These results support important position of plants containing many biologically active compounds in the field of pharmacology and medicine.

  12. Micronuclei Assessment of The Radioprotective Effects of Melatonin and Vitamin C in Human Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Aram; Moosavi, Seyed Akbar; Dianat Moghadam, Hassan; Bolookat, Eftekhar Rajab

    2016-01-01

    Objective Critical macromolecules such as DNA maybe damaged by free radicals that are generated from the interaction of ionizing radiation with biological systems. Melatonin and vitamin C have been shown to be direct free radical scavengers. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vivo/in vitro radioprotective effects of melatonin and vitamin C separately and combined against genotoxicity induced by 6 MV x-ray irradiation in human cultured blood lymphocytes. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, fifteen volunteers were divided into three groups of melatonin, vitamin C and melatonin plus vitamin C treatment. Peripheral blood samples were collected from each group before, and 1, 2 and 3 hours after melatonin and vitamin C administration (separately and combined). The blood samples were then irradiated with 200 cGy of 6 MV x-ray. In order to characterize chromosomal aberrations, the lymphocyte samples were cultured with mitogenic stimulus on cytokinesisblocked binucleated cells. Results The samples collected 1hour after melatonin and vitamin C (separately and combined) ingestion exhibited a significant decrease in the incidence of micronuclei compared with their control group (P<0.05). The maximum synergic protection and reduction in frequency of micronuclei (57%) was observed 1 hour after vitamin C and melatonin administration combined. Conclusion We conclude that simultaneous administration of melatonin and vitamin C as radioprotector substances before irradiation may reduce genotoxicity caused by x-ray irradiation. PMID:27054118

  13. [Double-strand DNA breaks induction and repair in human blood lymphocytes irradiated with adapting dose].

    PubMed

    Osipov, A N; Lizunova, E Iu; Vorob'eva, N Iu; Pelevina, I I

    2009-01-01

    Using a DNA-comet assay was shown that irradiation of human blood lymphocytes at G1 cell cycle with a low conditioning dose (5 cGy) induces an adaptive response (AR) manifested in reduction of the double-strand DNA (DSB) amount induced by challenging dose at 10 Gy. 24 h after conditioning irradiation (48 h after PHA addition) in cells irradiated at both conditioning and challenging doses a relative DBS amount was approximately 24% less in comparison to versus a control irradiated at challenging dose only. 48 h after adapting irradiation this index increased to approximately 35%, while 72 h after was decreased to approximately 29%. AR observed by us during 72 h after its induction did not accompanied by statistically significant changes in DBS repair enhancing. It is possible to assume that basic role in AR forming in lymphocytes under experimental conditions used by us playing the processes preventing radiation-induced DBS formation (antioxidant defense system activation, chromatin conformation changes ets).

  14. Effects of halothane on the human beta-adrenergic receptor of lymphocyte membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Marty, J.; Nivoche, Y.; Nimier, M.; Rocchiccioli, C.; Luscombe, F.; Henzel, D.; Loiseau, A.; Desmonts, J.M.

    1987-12-01

    The effects of halothane on beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist interaction were studied using the membranes of human lymphocytes as a model. Membrane preparations of lymphocytes were obtained from blood samples withdrawn from seven healthy young volunteers. Beta-receptor studies were performed using (-)/sup 125/I iodocyanopindolol (/sup 125/ICP) binding. Non-specific binding was determined in the presence of (-)isoproterenol. Beta-receptor density (Bmax) and the dissociation constant (KD) for /sup 125/ICP were determined from saturation curves. Beta-receptor affinity for agonists evaluated by the IC50 (the concentration of isoproterenol required to inhibit 50% of specific /sup 125/ICP binding) and the dissociation constant (KL) for isoproterenol was established from competition curves. The effect of halothane 1%, in an air oxygen mixture (oxygen fraction: 0.3) administered by tonometry during ligand membrane incubation, on beta-adrenergic receptor, was compared to that of control experiments not exposed to halothane. Halothane produced a moderate but significant decrease of Bmax (-10%) and a significant increase in non-specific binding (+30%), while KD, IC50, and KL were unchanged. The authors conclude that halothane, in vitro, decreases beta-adrenergic receptor density. This effect could be mediated by an alteration of the receptor in the membrane due to action of halothane on the lipid phase of the membrane.

  15. Induction of sister chromatid exchanges by coal dust and tobacco snuff extracts in human peripheral lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, J.D.; Ong, T.

    1985-01-01

    The organic solvent extracts of sub-bituminous coal dust and tobacco snuff, both together and separately, were tested for the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in human peripheral lymphocytes. The results indicate that these extracts induced SCEs, and that when tested together synergistically induced SCEs in two of three donors. Studies with the organic solvent extracts of all five ranks of coal indicate that the extracts of bituminous, lignite, and peat, but not anthracite, induced SCEs. Similar experiments conducted with water extracts, induced SCEs, and that anthracite was equivocal. To determine whether individuals differed in their SCE responses to coal dust extracts, lymphocytes from five donors were tested with organic solvent extracts of bituminous and sub-bituminous coal. An analysis of variance indicates that the SCE response was significantly influenced by the donor and each of the two coal extracts. The findings presented here suggest that coal dust, with or without tobacco snuff, may play a role in the elevated incidence of gastric cancer in coal miners. Because water extracts of some ranks of coal induced SCEs, there exists the possibility of adverse environmental effects due to coal leachates.

  16. Maturation of human B lymphocytes--studies with a panel of monoclonal antibodies against membrane antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Zola, H; McNamara, P J; Moore, H A; Smart, I J; Brooks, D A; Beckman, I G; Bradley, J

    1983-01-01

    The expression of six different membrane markers by cells of the human B lymphocyte lineage has been studied, using monoclonal antibodies. B cells representing various stages of differentiation/maturation have been examined, using normal cells, leukaemia cells, and continuous cell lines. The expression of the six markers has been compared with maturation stages defined by immunoglobulin expression. The HLA/beta 2-microglobulin complex is present throughout the B cell lineage, whilst the Ia (p28,33) marker is present from the earliest stage that can be attributed to the B lineage, but is lost during plasma cell differentiation. A marker detected by monoclonal antibody FMC 1 is present only on mature B lymphocytes, being absent from pre-B cells or plasma cells. FMC 7 detects an antigen found on a relatively mature subpopulation, whereas FMC 8 detects early as well as mature B cells. FMC 3 expression is found on a proportion of cells at any maturation stage, suggesting that expression of this marker is controlled by factors unrelated to maturation. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6191892

  17. Pertussis toxin activates adult and neonatal naive human CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Tonon, Sandrine; Badran, Bassam; Benghiat, Fleur Samantha; Goriely, Stanislas; Flamand, Véronique; Willard-Gallo, Karen; Willems, Fabienne; Goldman, Michel; De Wit, Dominique

    2006-07-01

    Pertussis toxin (PTX) is known to be mitogenic for T lymphocytes, but its direct action on naive human T cells has not been specified. Herein, we show that PTX induces the proliferation of purified adult CD45RA(+)CD4(+) T cells independently of its ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. PTX directly induces TNF-alpha and IL-2 mRNA expression, modulates the level of several cell surface receptors and induces Forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) protein accumulation in naive CD4(+) T cells. Addition of autologous dendritic cells was found to be required for the production of high levels of IFN-gamma by PTX-stimulated naive T cells. These effects of PTX occurred in conjunction with activation of NF-kappaB and NFAT transcription factors. Overall, responses of neonatal CD4(+) T cells to PTX were similar to those of adult CD45RA(+)CD4(+) naive T cells except for their blunted CD40 ligand up-regulation. We suggest that the adjuvant properties of PTX during primary cell-mediated immune responses involve a direct action on naive T lymphocytes in addition to activation of antigen-presenting cells.

  18. Identification of a novel dendritic cell-like subset of CD64(+) / CD16(+) blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Grage-Griebenow, E; Zawatzky, R; Kahlert, H; Brade, L; Flad, H; Ernst, M

    2001-01-01

    Human monocytes (Mo) consist of a major subset of Fcgamma-receptor I (CD64)-positive typical low accessory phagocytes, and a minor CD64(-) DC-like subset with high T cell-accessory and IFN-alpha-releasing activity. Both populations also differentially express CD16 (Fcgamma-receptor III). Double labeling with anti-CD64 and anti-CD16 mAb, as performed here, identified four different subsets. The CD64(-) subset consists of CD64(-) / 16(+) cells with high antigen-presenting cell (APC) function and macrophage-like phenotype, and a CD64(-) / 16(-) subset of less active APC but which exhibits a higher mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) stimulating and IFN-alpha-producing capacity, possibly resembling plasmacytoid dendritic cell type II (DC2) blood precursors. As well as the majority of CD64(+) cells that appeared CD64(+) / 16(-) and represent typical low-accessory, CD14(high) Mo, we could identify and describe a novel minor subset of CD64(+) / 16(+) cells which is unique in combining typical DC and Mo characteristics in the same cell. These are high IL-12 production, high accessory capacity for antigen- or allogen-activated lymphocytes, and high expression of HLA-DR, CD86, and CD11c.

  19. In vitro mitigation of arsenic toxicity by tea polyphenols in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Dona; Dey, Subhabrata; Bhattacharya, Rathindra Kumar; Roy, Madhumita

    2007-01-01

    The groundwater arsenicals have brought dreadful misery for the people residing in the endemic regions of West Bengal, India. Arsenic-related anomalies include arsenicosis, hyperkera-tosis, gastric complications, liver fibrosis, peripheral neuropathy, and cancer. Some of these diseases have been frequently associated with overproduction of reactive oxygen species that cause DNA damage and improper functioning of body's antioxidant defense mechanism. Natural polyphenols present in tea serve as excellent antioxidants. In the present study, an attempt has been made to elucidate the role of representative polyphenols and extracts of green and black tea in modulating sodium arsenite (As III)-induced DNA damage in normal human lymphocytes. Comet assay was used to detect the DNA damage. Arsenic-induced oxidative stress was measured with generation of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and activity of some antioxidant enzymes. Expression of some repair enzymes such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and DNA polymerase beta was measured to assess the effect of tea on DNA repair. Tea afforded efficient reduction of As III-induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Tea also quenched the excessive production of reactive oxygen species by arsenic, reduced the elevated levels of lipid peroxidation, and increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase. Furthermore, tea enhanced recovery of DNA damage, which was indicative of repair as confirmed by unscheduled DNA synthesis and pronounced expression of DNA repair enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. It is speculated that the antioxidant potential and repair-inducing capacity of tea might help in combating the severe genotoxic effects induced by arsenic in the human population.

  20. Cytogenetic Low-Dose Hyperradiosensitivity Is Observed in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, Isheeta; Joiner, Michael C.; Tucker, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The shape of the ionizing radiation response curve at very low doses has been the subject of considerable debate. Linear-no-threshold (LNT) models are widely used to estimate risks associated with low-dose exposures. However, the low-dose hyperradiosensitivity (HRS) phenomenon, in which cells are especially sensitive at low doses but then show increased radioresistance at higher doses, provides evidence of nonlinearity in the low-dose region. HRS is more prominent in the G2 phase of the cell cycle than in the G0/G1 or S phases. Here we provide the first cytogenetic mechanistic evidence of low-dose HRS in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using structural chromosomal aberrations. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood lymphocytes from 2 normal healthy female donors were acutely exposed to cobalt 60 γ rays in either G0 or G2 using closely spaced doses ranging from 0 to 1.5 Gy. Structural chromosomal aberrations were enumerated, and the slopes of the regression lines at low doses (0-0.4 Gy) were compared with doses of 0.5 Gy and above. Results: HRS was clearly evident in both donors for cells irradiated in G2. No HRS was observed in cells irradiated in G0. The radiation effect per unit dose was 2.5- to 3.5-fold higher for doses ≤0.4 Gy than for doses >0.5 Gy. Conclusions: These data provide the first cytogenetic evidence for the existence of HRS in human cells irradiated in G2 and suggest that LNT models may not always be optimal for making radiation risk assessments at low doses.

  1. Charybdotoxin blocks voltage-gated K+ channels in human and murine T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    A variety of scorpion venoms and purified toxins were tested for effects on ion channels in human T lymphocytes, a human T leukemia cell line (Jurkat), and murine thymocytes, using the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Nanomolar concentrations of charbdotoxin (CTX), a purified peptide component of Leiurus quinquestriatus venom known to block Ca2+- activated K+ channels from muscle, blocked "type n" voltage-gated K+ channels in human T lymphoid cells. The Na+ channels occasionally expressed in these cells were unaffected by the toxin. From the time course of development and removal of K+ channel block we determined the rates of CTX binding and unbinding. CTX blocks K+ channels in Jurkat cells with a Kd value between 0.5 and 1.5 nM. Of the three types of voltage-gated K+ channels present in murine thymocytes, types n and n' are blocked by CTX at nanomolar concentrations. The third variety of K+ channels, "type l," is unaffected by CTX. Noxiustoxin (NTX), a purified toxin from Centruroides noxius known to block Ca2+-activated K+ channels, also blocked type n K+ channels with a high degree of potency (Kd = 0.2 nM). In addition, several types of crude scorpion venoms from the genera Androctonus, Buthus, Centruroides, and Pandinus blocked type n channels. We conclude that CTX and NTX are not specific for Ca2+ activated K+ channels and that purified scorpion toxins will provide useful probes of voltage-gated K+ channels in T lymphocytes. The existence of high-affinity sites for scorpion toxin binding may help to classify structurally related K+ channels and provide a useful tool for their biochemical purification. PMID:2475579

  2. Rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced chromatin breaks. I. experiments with human lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Yang, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a composite probe for human chromosome 4 and a probe that stained all centromeres was used to study gamma-ray induced breakage, rejoining and misrejoining in prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes. Dose-response curves for the induction of all types of aberrations in prematurely condensed human chromosomes 4 were determined immediately after irradiation and after 8 h postirradiation incubation. In addition, aberrations were measured after various incubation times from 0 to 18 h after a dose of 7 Gy. Unrejoined chromosome breaks were the most frequent type of aberration observed immediately after irradiation. Approximately 15% of total aberrations observed were chromosome exchanges. After 8 h postirradiation incubation, the frequency of breaks in prematurely condensed chromosomes declined to about 20% of the initial value, and chromosomal exchanges became the most frequent aberration. Results of metaphase analysis were similar to those for prematurely condensed chromosomes after 8 h incubation with the exception that a significantly lower frequency of fragments was observed. Symmetrical and asymmetrical interchanges were found at similar frequencies at all doses. No complex exchanges were observed in lymphocyte chromosomes immediately after exposure. They accounted for about 1% of total exchanges in metaphase chromosomes at doses <3 Gy and about 14% at 7 Gy. Incomplete exchanges amounted to approximately 15% of total exchanges at all doses. The kinetics of break rejoining was exponential, and the frequency of exchanges increased with kinetics similar to that observed for the rejoining of the breaks. This increase in the total exchanges as a function of the time between irradiation and fusion was due to a rapid increase in reciprocal interchanges, and a slower increase in complex exchanges; the frequency of incomplete exchanges increased initially, then decreased with prolonged incubation to the level observed

  3. Effect of sulfur mustard exposure on protease activity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, F.M.; Broomfield, C.A.; Smith, W.J.

    1991-12-31

    Sulfur mustard is a chemical warfare blistering agent for which neither the mechanism of action nor an antidote is known. Papirmeister et al. (1985) have postulated a biochemical hypothesis for mustard-induced cutaneous injury involving a sequelae of DNA alkylation, metabolic disruption and activation of protease. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes in cell cultures were employed as an in vitro model for alkylating agent toxicity. A chromogenic peptide substrate assay was used for detection of protease in lymphocytes treated with sulfur mustard or chloroethyl sulfide. Exposure of human peripheral blood lymphocytes from normal donors to these alkylating agents resulted in an increase in cell associated protease activity. This increase in protease activity may contribute to the pathology or act as an indicator to predict methods of therapeutic intervention for sulfur mustard toxicity.

  4. Remainder Subset Awareness for Feature Subset Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat-Masramon, Gabriel; Belanche-Muñoz, Lluís A.

    Feature subset selection has become more and more a common topic of research. This popularity is partly due to the growth in the number of features and application domains. It is of the greatest importance to take themost of every evaluation of the inducer, which is normally the more costly part. In this paper, a technique is proposed that takes into account the inducer evaluation both in the current subset and in the remainder subset (its complementary set) and is applicable to any sequential subset selection algorithm at a reasonable overhead in cost. Its feasibility is demonstrated on a series of benchmark data sets.

  5. Revisiting human natural killer cell subset function revealed cytolytic CD56dimCD16+ NK cells as rapid producers of abundant IFN-γ on activation

    PubMed Central

    De Maria, Andrea; Bozzano, Federica; Cantoni, Claudia; Moretta, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    The two major functions of human natural killer (NK) cells are conventionally associated with distinct cell subsets. Thus, cytolytic activity is mostly confined to the CD56dimCD16+ subset, whereas cytokine production is generally assigned to CD56brightCD16+/− cells. In this study, we reevaluated the functional capabilities of these NK subsets with regard to the production of IFN-γ at different time points after cell triggering via NKp46 and NKp30 activating receptors. Different from previous studies, cytokine production was also assessed at early intervals. We show that CD56dim NK cells produce IFN-γ already at 2 to 4 h, whereas no cytokine production is detected beyond 16 h. In contrast, CD56bright cells release IFN-γ only at late time intervals (>16 h after stimulation). The rapid IFN-γ production by CD56dim NK cells is in line with the presence of IFN-γ mRNA in freshly isolated cells. Rapid IFN-γ production was also induced by combinations of IL-2, IL-12, and IL-15. Our data indicate that not only cytolytic activity but also early IFN-γ production is a functional property of CD56dim NK cells. Thus, this subset can assure a rapid and comprehensive NK cell intervention during the early phases of innate responses. PMID:21187373

  6. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell heterogeneity and subset definition.

    PubMed

    Peranzoni, Elisa; Zilio, Serena; Marigo, Ilaria; Dolcetti, Luigi; Zanovello, Paola; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-04-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are defined in mice on the basis of CD11b and Gr-1 marker expression and the functional ability to inhibit T lymphocyte activation. Nevertheless the term 'heterogeneous' remains the first, informal feature commonly attributed to this population. It is clear that CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells are part of a myeloid macropopulation, which comprises at least two subsets of polymorphonuclear and monocytic cells with different immunosuppressive properties. While recent literature shows substantial agreement on the immunoregulatory property of the monocytic MDSC subset, there is still contrasting evidence on the role of the granulocytic fraction. Moreover, this dichotomy holds true for human MDSCs. We attempt here to summarize conflicting findings in the field and provide some possible, unifying explanations.

  7. Adenylate pool and energy charge in human lymphocytes and granulocytes irradiated at 632 nm (HeNe laser)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolognani, Lorenzo; Venturelli, T.; Volpi, N.; Zirilli, O.

    1995-05-01

    Aim of this report was to investigate the adenylate pool and the energy charge in human white blood cells exposed to increasing time (15, 30 and 60 min) of HeNe laser treatment. EDTA treated human blood diluted 1:1 with 0.88% KCl was added (1:5) with NaCl-dextran solution to allow sedimentation of red blood cells. 6 ml of the white cells floating in the supernatant were layered on 3 ml of Lymphoprep in plastic tubes and each tube was centrifuged (from 50 to 5000 X g for 5 min). Granulocytes were concentrated in the lower phase, whilst lymphocytes were in the intermediated phase. After further purification cytological homogeneity was tested by a cell counter. Granulocytes and lymphocytes were irradiated at +22°C with HeNe (Space, Valfivre equipment). On these population ATP was tested by luminometric procedure, the adenylate pool was separated by HPLC (Jasco) on neutralyzed perchloric extracts. ATP concentration increased in lymphocytes (+63.9%, p < 0.01) and in granulocytes (+25.0%, p < 0.05) after 60 min irradiation. The adenylate pool (tested by HPLC) does not change significatively in lymphocytes or granulocytes after 30 min irradiation, whilst in 60 min irradiated lymphocytes and granulocytes a significative increment was observed in nucleotide concentration. No changes were observed in energy charge according to Atkinson.

  8. Portable device for magnetic stimulation: Assessment survival and proliferation in human lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, H.; Cordova-Fraga, T.; López-Briones, S.; Martínez-Espinosa, J. C.; Rosas, E. F.; Espinoza, A.; Villagómez-Castro, J. C.; Sosa, M.; Topsu, S.; Bernal-Alvarado, J. J.

    2013-09-01

    A device's instrumentation for magnetic stimulation on human lymphocytes is presented. This is a new procedure to stimulate growing cells with ferrofluid in vortices of magnetic field. The stimulation of magnetic vortices was provided at five different frequencies, from 100 to 2500 Hz and intensities from 1.13 to 4.13 mT. To improve the stimulation effects, a paramagnetic ferrofluid was added on the cell culture medium. The results suggest that the frequency changes and the magnetic field variation produce an important increase in the number of proliferating cells as well as in the cellular viability. This new magnetic stimulation modality could trigger an intracellular mechanism to induce cell proliferation and cellular survival only on mitogen stimulated cells.

  9. Genotoxicity studies on the antimicrobial drug sulfamethoxazole in cultured human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Abou-Eisha, Ahmed; Marcos, Ricard; Creus, Amadeu

    2004-11-14

    The genotoxicity of the antimicrobial drug sulfamethoxazole was evaluated in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The frequencies of sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) and micronuclei (MN) were scored as genetic endpoints. Both tests cover a wide range of induced genetic damage such as primary DNA damage, clastogenicity and aneugenicity. Cultures were set up with blood samples from two healthy donors and the treatment was done with different sulfamethoxazole concentrations ranging from 10 to 500 microg/ml. From the results obtained it appears that this drug is able to induce weak genotoxic effects, as revealed by the slight increase in the SCE and MN frequencies, at least at one of the two highest concentrations tested. However, the results of the SCE assay should be interpreted with caution because the increase is just significant. In addition, cyotoxic/cytostatic effects of sulfamethoxazole were revealed by a decrease in the proliferative rate index (PRI) and in the cytokinesis block proliferation index (CBPI).

  10. Comparison of two different strategies for human monocyte subsets gating within the large-scale prospective CARE FOR HOMe Study.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Adam M; Fell, Lisa H; Untersteller, Kathrin; Seiler, Sarah; Rogacev, Kyrill S; Fliser, Danilo; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems; Heine, Gunnar H

    2015-08-01

    Monocytes are heterogeneous cells consisting of (at least) three subsets: classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocytes. Correct enumeration of cell counts necessitates well-defined gating strategies, which are essentially based upon CD14 and CD16 expression. For the delineation of intermediate from nonclassical monocytes, a "rectangular gating (RG) strategy" and a "trapezoid gating (TG) strategy" have been proposed. We compared the two gating strategies in a well-defined clinical cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Within the ongoing CARE FOR HOMe study, monocyte subsets were reanalyzed in 416 CKD patients, who were followed 3.6 ± 1.6 years for the occurrence of a cardiovascular event. Gating was performed by either RG or TG. We analyzed the expression of surface markers, and compared the predictive role of cell counts of monocyte subsets, as defined by RG and TG, respectively. With both gating strategies, higher intermediate monocyte counts predicted the cardiovascular endpoint in Kaplan-Meier analyses (P < 0.001 with RG; P < 0.001 with TG). After correction for confounders, intermediate monocyte counts remained independent predictors in Cox-Regression analyses (HR = 1.013 [95% CI: 1.006-1.020; P < 0.001] with RG; HR = 1.015 [95% CI: 1.006-1.024; P = 0.001] with TG). NRI was 3.9% when reclassifying patients from quartiles of intermediate monocyte counts with RG strategy toward quartiles of intermediate monocytes counts with TG strategy. In expression analysis, those monocytes which are defined as intermediate monocytes by the RG strategy and as nonclassical monocytes by the TG strategy share characteristics of both subsets. In conclusion, intermediate monocytes were independent predictors of cardiovascular outcome irrespective of the applied gating strategy. Future studies should aim to identify markers that allow for an unequivocal definition of intermediate monocytes, which may further improve their power to

  11. Microcystin-LR induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zegura, B; Gajski, G; Straser, A; Garaj-Vrhovac, V; Filipič, M

    2011-12-24

    Human exposure to microcystins, which are produced by freshwater cyanobacterial species, is of growing concern due to increasing appearance of cyanobacterial blooms as a consequence of global warming and increasing water eutrophication. Although microcystins are considered to be liver-specific, there is evidence that they may also affect other tissues. These substances have been shown to induce DNA damage in vitro and in vivo, but the mechanisms of their genotoxic activity remain unclear. In human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs) exposure to non-cytotoxic concentrations (0, 0.1, 1 and 10μg/ml) of microcystin-LR (MCLR) induced a dose- and time-dependent increase in DNA damage, as measured with the comet assay. Digestion of DNA from MCLR-treated HPBLs with purified formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg) displayed a greater number of DNA strand-breaks than non-digested DNA, confirming the evidence that MCLR induces oxidative DNA damage. With the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay no statistically significant induction of micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds was observed after a 24-h exposure to MCLR. At the molecular level, no changes in the expression of selected genes involved in the cellular response to DNA damage and oxidative stress were observed after a 4-h exposure to MCLR (1μg/ml). After 24h, DNA damage-responsive genes (p53, mdm2, gadd45a, cdkn1a), a gene involved in apoptosis (bax) and oxidative stress-responsive genes (cat, gpx1, sod1, gsr, gclc) were up-regulated. These results provide strong support that MCLR is an indirectly genotoxic agent, acting via induction of oxidative stress, and that lymphocytes are also the target of microcystin-induced toxicity.

  12. An antigenic threshold for maintaining human immunodeficiency virus type 1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, X.; Ogg, G.; Bonhoeffer, S.; Safrit, J.; Vesanen, M.; Bauer, D.; Chen, D.; Cao, Y.; Demoitie, M. A.; Zhang, L.; Markowitz, M.; Nixon, D.; McMichael, A.; Ho, D. D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Using the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model in mice, a number of studies show that memory cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses are maintained in the presence of continuous antigenic stimulation. Yet, other groups found that memory CTL specific for LCMV could last for a lifetime in mice without viral antigens. Thus, the extent to which an antigen is required for the maintenance of virus-specific CTL remains controversial. In humans, very few studies have been conducted to investigate the relationship between the quantity of antigen and the magnitude of CTL responses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We quantified CTL precursors (CTLp) using a limiting-dilution analysis (LDA) and CTL effectors (CTLe) using a new Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I tetramer technology in six long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection, as well as in eight patients whose viral loads were well suppressed by antiretroviral therapy. The viremia levels in these patients were measured using an reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. The proviral DNA load in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) was also measured by PCR in four LTNPs. RESULTS: The LTNPs had high levels of HIV-1-specific memory CTLp and CTLe, while maintaining a low plasma viral load. Despite also having low viral loads, patients whose plasma viremia was well-suppressed by effective therapy had low levels of CTLe. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that a complex, rather than a monotonic, relationship exists between CTL levels and HIV-1 viremia, including what appears to be an antigenic threshold for the maintenance of CTL at a measurable level. Under conditions of "antigen excess,", CTLe levels correlate inversely with viral load. On the other hand, under conditions that are "antigen limited," the correlation appears to be direct. PMID:11071274

  13. IL-10 is excluded from the functional cytokine memory of human CD4+ memory T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jun; Ivascu, Claudia; Chang, Hyun-Dong; Wu, Peihua; Angeli, Roberta; Maggi, Laura; Eckhardt, Florian; Tykocinski, Lars; Haefliger, Carolina; Möwes, Beate; Sieper, Jochen; Radbruch, Andreas; Annunziato, Francesco; Thiel, Andreas

    2007-08-15

    Epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, profoundly influence gene expression of CD4(+) Th-specific cells thereby shaping memory Th cell function. We demonstrate here a correlation between a lacking fixed potential of human memory Th cells to re-express the immunoregulatory cytokine gene IL10 and its DNA methylation status. Memory Th cells secreting IL-10 or IFN-gamma were directly isolated ex vivo from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers, and the DNA methylation status of IL10 and IFNG was assessed. Limited difference in methylation was found for the IL10 gene locus in IL-10-secreting Th cells, as compared with Th cells not secreting IL-10 isolated directly ex vivo or from in vitro-established human Th1 and Th2 clones. In contrast, in IFN-gamma(+) memory Th cells the promoter of the IFNG gene was hypomethylated, as compared with IFN-gamma-nonsecreting memory Th cells. In accordance with the lack of epigenetic memory, almost 90% of ex vivo-isolated IL-10-secreting Th cells lacked a functional memory for IL-10 re-expression after restimulation. Our data indicate that IL10 does not become epigenetically marked in human memory Th cells unlike effector cytokine genes such as IFNG. The exclusion of IL-10, but not effector cytokines, from the functional memory of human CD4(+) T lymphocytes ex vivo may reflect the need for appropriate regulation of IL-10 secretion, due to its potent immunoregulatory potential.

  14. Lymphocyte maintenance during healthy aging requires no substantial alterations in cellular turnover.

    PubMed

    Westera, Liset; van Hoeven, Vera; Drylewicz, Julia; Spierenburg, Gerrit; van Velzen, Jeroen F; de Boer, Rob J; Tesselaar, Kiki; Borghans, José A M

    2015-04-01

    In healthy humans, lymphocyte populations are maintained at a relatively constant size throughout life, reflecting a balance between lymphocyte production and loss. Given the profound immunological changes that occur during healthy aging, including a significant decline in T-cell production by the thymus, lymphocyte maintenance in the elderly is generally thought to require homeostatic alterations in lymphocyte dynamics. Surprisingly, using in vivo (2) H2 O labeling, we find similar dynamics of most lymphocyte subsets between young adult and elderly healthy individuals. As the contribution of thymic output to T-cell production is only minor from young adulthood onward, compensatory increases in peripheral T-cell division rates are not required to maintain the T-cell pool, despite a tenfold decline in thymic output. These fundamental insights will aid the interpretation of further research into aging and clinical conditions related to disturbed lymphocyte dynamics.

  15. Effect of environmental exposures to lead and cadmium on human lymphocytic detoxifying enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, S.J.; Narurkar, L.M.; Narurkar, M.V. )

    1994-09-01

    Lead (Pb) is among the most toxic heavy elements in the atmosphere. Aerosol lead enters the human blood stream by way of the respiratory tract and indirectly, by surface disposition in the alimentary tract followed by adsorption. Lead pollution is also known to occur through its presence in petrol, pain, glazed vessels and solder. Atmospheric lead pollution may be predominantly high around factories manufacturing Pb alloys. Lead toxicity is associated with inhibition of [alpha]-aminolevulinic acid dehydrase (ALAD) activity, rise in the blood porphyrin, inhibition of ATPase in erthrocytes, decreased blood haemoglobin and anemia. Elevated lead concentrations in pregnant women have been shown to cause hypertension and birth defects. Lead is also known to interact with other elements such as Fe, Zn, Ca and Cu in biological systems. Cadmium (Cd) is not essential for human body. It enters the human environment as a contaminant. Human intake of Cd is chiefly through the food chain (about 400-500 [mu]g/wk). Analysis of neuropsy material shows that smokers accumulate much more Cd than nonsmokers. Chronic Cd poisoning produces proteinuere and affects the proximal tubules of kidney, causing the formation of kidney stones. The reported hypertensive effect of Cd in man has been associated with high Cd/Zn ratio in kidney. Studies on air pollution have shown that Cd concentration in air could be positively correlated with heart disease, hypertension and arteriosclerosis. The present investigation was aimed at assessing the usefulness of human lymphocytic detoxicating enzyme activities and their ratios in an assessment of human health-risks during environmental exposures to Pb and Cd. The human subjects investigated comprised those exposed to highly contaminated lead and cadmium areas in the state of Maharashtra, India. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Chemokines fail to up-regulate beta 1 integrin-dependent adhesion in human Th2 T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Clissi, B; D'Ambrosio, D; Geginat, J; Colantonio, L; Morrot, A; Freshney, N W; Downward, J; Sinigaglia, F; Pardi, R

    2000-03-15

    Th1 and Th2 cells are functionally distinct subsets of CD4+ T lymphocytes whose tissue-specific homing to sites of inflammation is regulated in part by the differential expression of P- and E-selectin ligands and selected chemokine receptors. Here we investigated the expression and function of beta 1 integrins in Th1 and Th2 cells polarized in vitro. Th1 lymphocytes adhere transiently to the extracellular matrix ligands laminin 1 and fibronectin in response to chemokines such as RANTES and stromal cell-derived factor-1, and this process is paralleled by the activation of the Rac1 GTPase and by a rapid burst of actin polymerization. Selective inhibitors of phosphoinositide-3 kinase prevent efficiently all of the above processes, whereas the protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide prevents chemokine-induced adhesion without affecting Rac1 activation and actin polymerization. Notably, chemokine-induced adhesion to beta 1 integrin ligands is markedly reduced in Th2 cells. Such a defect cannot be explained by a reduced sensitivity to chemokine stimulation in this T cell subset, nor by a defective activation of the signaling cascade involving phosphoinositide-3 kinase, Rac1, and actin turnover, as all these processes are activated at comparable levels by chemokines in the two subsets. We propose that reduced beta 1 integrin-mediated adhesion in Th2 cells may restrain their ability to invade and/or reside in sites of chronic inflammation, which are characterized by thickening of basement membranes and extensive fibrosis, requiring efficient interaction with organized extracellular matrices.

  17. No significant increase in chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in cultured human lymphocytes treated with spiramycin.

    PubMed

    Rencüzoğullari, Eyyüp; Ila, Hasan Basri; Topaktaş, Mehmet; Kayraldiz, Ahmet; Budak, Songül; Arslan, Mehmet

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) were investigated in human lymphocytes treated with spiramycin antibiotic (trade name, rovamycin). Spiramycin did not induce the CAs and SCEs, and also did not decrease the mitotic index (MI). However, spiramycin decreased the replication index (RI) only at 48 h treatment times.

  18. Recombinant human erythropoietin treatment of chronic renal failure patients normalizes altered phenotype and proliferation of CD4-positive T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lisowska, Katarzyna A; Debska-Slizien, Alicja; Radzka, Monika; Witkowski, Jacek M; Rutkowski, Boleslaw; Bryl, Ewa

    2010-03-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) receive recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) for the correction of anemia. However, rhEPO also has an immunomodulatory effect. Detailed changes of phenotype and function of CD4(+) T lymphocytes in CRF patients receiving rhEPO have not been reported yet; their study may bring insight into understanding of this immunomodulatory action of rhEPO. Two groups of CRF patients were included into the study: those treated; and those not receiving rhEPO. The expression of activation markers on CD4(+) lymphocytes was measured with flow cytometry, both ex vivo and in vitro. The kinetics of CD4(+) T lymphocytes proliferation was calculated using a dividing cells tracing method and numerical approach. Significantly higher percentages of CD4(+)CD95(+), CD4(+)HLA-DR(+) cells, and lower percentages of CD4(+)CD69(+) and CD4(+)CD28(+) cells were observed in both rhEPO-treated and untreated patients when compared with healthy controls. Changes in the proportions of CD4(+)CD28(+) and CD4(+)HLA-DR(+) subpopulations were dependent on the type of rhEPO, being more pronounced for rhEPObeta. CD4(+) lymphocytes from untreated patients exhibited decreased expression of CD28 and CD69 after stimulation in vitro, whereas the expression of these antigens on lymphocytes of rhEPO-treated patients was similar to that observed in healthy controls. Fewer CD4(+)CD28(+) T lymphocytes of untreated patients proliferated in vitro; these cells had longer G0-->G1 time, which negatively correlated with surface expression of CD28. Our study confirms that rhEPO treatment normalizes activation parameters of CD4(+) T lymphocytes and their proliferative capacity, which could explain earlier described immunomodulatory effects of rhEPO in patients suffering from CRF.

  19. A permethrin/allethrin mixture induces genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Chavez, Lucio A; Sordo, Monserrat; Calderon-Aranda, Emma; Castañeda-Saucedo, Eduardo; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Moreno-Godinez, Ma Elena

    2015-01-01

    Two pyrethroids, permethrin and allethrin, are often combined for large-scale use in public health programs to control vector-borne diseases. In this study, the genotoxic potential of a commercial formulation of permethrin and allethrin was examined using cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). Genotoxicity was evaluated using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome (CBMN cyt) assay by measuring the frequency of micronuclei (MN), nuclear division index (NDI), formation of nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) and nuclear buds (NBUD), as well as apoptotic and necrotic cells. Human PBL were treated with different concentrations of a permethrin/allethrin mixture (1/0.01, 5/0.07, and 10/0.14 μg/ml) for 24 or 36 h. The highest concentration (10/0.14 μg/ml) of permethrin/allethrin mixture significantly increased MN frequency and percent apoptotic cells after incubations for 24 or 36 h. The NDI was markedly decreased in response to treatment with 5/0.07 or 10/0.14 μg/ml permethrin/allethrin for both 24 and 36 h. Exposure to the permethrin/allethrin mixture did not significantly alter formation of NBUD, NPB, or percent necrotic cells. The MN frequency was significantly correlated with the number of apoptotic and necrotic cells but inversely correlated with NDI. Data demonstrated that a mixture of permethrin and allethrin induced concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxic and genotoxic damage to human PBL in vitro.

  20. Protective effect of docosahexaenoic acid against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bechoua, S; Dubois, M; Dominguez, Z; Goncalves, A; Némoz, G; Lagarde, M; Prigent, A F

    1999-05-01

    Oxidatively stressed lymphocytes exhibit decreased proliferative response to mitogenic stimulation. Although several sensitive targets involved in lymphocyte suppression have already been identified, little is known about the influence of oxidative stress on cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE) (EC 3.1.4.17), thought to play a major role in the control of cyclic AMP (cAMP) level, a well-recognized negative effector of lymphoproliferation. Although the polyunsaturated fatty acid content of membrane phospholipids is thought to be directly related to the extent of oxidant-induced lipid peroxidation, some n-3 fatty acids also seem to have antioxidant effects, depending on the concentration used and the overall redox status of the cells in question. Results of the present study showed that human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as well as rat thymocytes were relatively resistant to a short-term exposure (10 min) to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Indeed, H2O2-induced lipid peroxidation, estimated by malondialdehyde (MDA) production, was only 2-fold increased by H2O2 concentrations lower than 2 mM, whereas a larger increase (10-fold) could be observed in PBMC at the highest dose (5 mM). Previous enrichment of PBMC with 5 microM docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3), brought to the cells as a fatty acid-albumin complex (ratio 1), significantly reduced MDA production induced by low doses of H2O2, the protective effect no longer being observed at the highest doses. In contrast, eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) did not have any protective effect. Cytosolic PDE activities of both human PBMC and rat thymocytes were significantly inhibited (40-50%) after H2O2 treatment of the cells, whereas particulate PDE activities were not modified. Different responses of PDE activities to H2O2 treatment were observed when PBMC were first enriched with 22:6n-3 prior to H2O2 addition. In 22:6n-3-treated cells, the H2O2-induced inhibition of both cAMP- and cGMP-PDE cytosolic activities was

  1. Relation between clinical mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood and their spatial label free scattering patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Zhenxi; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Li

    2016-07-01

    A single living cell's light scattering pattern (LSP) in the horizontal plane, which has been denoted as the cell's "2D fingerprint," may provide a powerful label-free detection tool in clinical applications. We have recently studied the LSP in spatial scattering planes, denoted as the cell's "3D fingerprint," for mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood. The effects of membrane size, morphology, and the existence of the nucleus on the spatial LSP are discussed. In order to distinguish clinical label-free mature and immature lymphocytes, the special features of the spatial LSP are studied by statistical method in both the spatial and frequency domains. Spatial LSP provides rich information on the cell's morphology and contents, which can distinguish matur