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Sample records for human lymphocyte subsets

  1. Restricted expression of LW antigen on subsets of human B and T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, O L; Thomas, D B; Lomas, C G; Tippett, P

    1984-01-01

    NIM-M8 is a monoclonal IgM antibody, specific for the LWab antigen as shown by its reaction with red cells of all donors except those lacking LWa, LWb and LWab. Indirect immunofluorescent staining and cell sorter analyses have shown that LWab is present on a subpopulation of human lymphocytes. Cell fractionation studies indicate that subsets of both B and T cells express LWab and it may, therefore, provide a further marker for heterogeneity in these lymphocyte populations. PMID:6443217

  2. In situ identification of T lymphocyte subsets and HLA-DR expressing cells in the human skin tuberculin reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Scheynius, A; Klareskog, L; Forsum, U

    1982-01-01

    T lymphocyte subsets and HLA-DR expressing cells were studied with an immunohistochemical double staining technique in frozen sections of human skin 6, 48 and 96 hr after intradermal PPD injections. The number of lymphocytes reacting with monoclonal Leu 1 antibodies (all mature peripheral T cells) increased with time. The majority of the T lymphocytes at 48 and 96 hr reacted with Leu 3a ('helper/inducer' phenotype) antibodies and a few with Leu 2a ('suppressor/cytotoxic' phenotype) antibodies. Apposition of T lymphocytes of both subsets to HLA-DR expressing cells occurred in the dermis as well as in the epidermis. The study gives a morphological picture of the cell-mediated immune reactions in delayed type of hypersensitivity consistent with in vitro experiments on proliferative responses to soluble antigens. Images p328-a PMID:6751638

  3. GB virus C quasispecies detected in plasma and lymphocyte subsets in a natural human infection.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Vanesa; Giordano, Mirta; Rivero, Cintia W; Minassian, María L; Cuestas, María L; Trinks, Julieta; Mathet, Verónica L; Oubiña, José Raúl

    2010-07-01

    Genomic heterogeneity and quasispecies composition of GB virus C (GBV-C) within plasma and lymphocyte subsets in a naturally infected blood donor were investigated. For this purpose, fragments from the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) and the E2 gene recovered from plasma, B and T lymphocytes, were cloned and sequenced. A total of 63 clones was analysed: 95.2 % of them (n=60) - obtained from plasma and cells - were assigned to genotype 2b, while only three derived from plasma corresponded to genotyope 3. The G215A transition within this region was present in 90.9 % of the clones from B lymphocytes, but absent in the remaining cell compartments (P<0.01). Apparently, most of the circulating GBV-C quasispecies in this blood donor were related to the viral population infecting CD8(+) T cells, and B cells to a lesser extent. This is the first report showing the quasispecies nature of GBV-C in lymphocyte subsets within peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:20335494

  4. Leukocyte and lymphocyte subsets after a short pharmacological stress by intravenous epinephrine and hydrocortisone in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Brohee, D; Vanhaeverbeek, M; Kennes, B; Neve, P

    1990-08-01

    Nine healthy volunteers received epinephrine and hydrocortisone intravenously in order to assess the typical acute response to a brief stress, of leukocyte and lymphocyte subsets, acute phase reactants and lymphocyte reactivity to T and B mitogens. At 10 min., all leukocyte subsets were increased, especially mononuclear cells. At 1 hour, moderate lymphopenia and monocytopenia occurred. At 6 hours, neutrophilia and eosinopenia were observed. During the lymphocytic early wave, all the lymphocyte subset counts increased, particularly T-suppressive/cytotoxic and natural killer cells. As a consequence, the percentage of T cells decreased and the CD4/CD8 ratio fell. No changes in acute phase reactants occurred over the 24 hours of the study. All leukocyte and lymphocyte subsets were normalized and mitogen reactivity was unchanged 24 hours after the stress. These typical shifts in leukocyte subsets could probe the adrenocortical and medullary response to an environmental stressor.

  5. Binding of C-reactive protein to human lymphocytes. II. Interaction with a subset of cells bearing the Fc receptor.

    PubMed

    James, K; Hansen, B; Gewurz, H

    1981-12-01

    In the preceding paper we reported that C-reactive protein (CRP) in the presence of a multimeric binding specificity such as C-polysaccharide (CPS) binds to a small percentage of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). In the present paper additional methods for demonstrating this binding were developed and utilized to help characterize the CRP-binding cell. Heat-modified CRP and E-CPS-CRP each were found to bind to a similar percentage of PBL by microscopic visualization, and an identical degree of binding was observed by cytofluorimetric analysis. Multiple marker studies indicated that CRP-binding cells are found in the T cell, B cell, and null cell categories in a ratio of 2:1:1, respectively. Preferential overlap was seen with IgG FcR-bearing cells, which accounted for 70% of the CRP-binding cells; however, only 12% of the FcR cells bound CRP. These studies indicate that CRP-binding cells predominantly represent a subset of cells bearing FcR, and these cells have the morphologic characteristics of large granular lymphocytes. CRP in the presence of CPS bound to cells of multiple human and murine cultured lines shown to have IgG FcR reactivity, but showed lesser or no binding to cell lines negative for FcR. The precise morphologic and functional characterization of the CRP-binding cells and the nature of the binding site are yet to be established.

  6. Cell surface Glut1 levels distinguish human CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte subsets with distinct effector functions

    PubMed Central

    Cretenet, Gaspard; Clerc, Isabelle; Matias, Maria; Loisel, Severine; Craveiro, Marco; Oburoglu, Leal; Kinet, Sandrina; Mongellaz, Cédric; Dardalhon, Valérie; Taylor, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte activation requires the generation of sufficient energy to support new biosynthetic demands. Following T cell receptor (TCR) engagement, these requirements are met by an increased glycolysis, due, at least in part, to induction of the Glut1 glucose transporter. As Glut1 is upregulated on tumor cells in response to hypoxia, we assessed whether surface Glut1 levels regulate the antigen responsiveness of human T lymphocytes in both hypoxic and atmospheric oxygen conditions. Notably, Glut1 upregulation in response to TCR stimulation was significantly higher in T lymphocytes activated under hypoxic as compared to atmospheric oxygen conditions. Furthermore, TCR-stimulated human T lymphocytes sorted on the basis of Glut1-Lo and Glut1-Hi profiles maintained distinct characteristics, irrespective of the oxygen tension. While T cells activated in hypoxia divided less than those activated in atmospheric oxygen, Glut1-Hi lymphocytes exhibited increased effector phenotype acquisition, augmented proliferation, and an inverted CD4/CD8 ratio in both oxygen conditions. Moreover, Glut1-Hi T lymphocytes exhibited a significantly enhanced ability to produce IFN-γ and this secretion potential was completely dependent on continued glycolysis. Thus, Glut1 surface levels identify human T lymphocytes with distinct effector functions in both hypoxic and atmospheric oxygen tensions. PMID:27067254

  7. Lymphocytes subsets reference values in childhood.

    PubMed

    Tosato, F; Bucciol, G; Pantano, G; Putti, M C; Sanzari, M C; Basso, G; Plebani, M

    2015-01-01

    Immunophenotyping of blood lymphocyte subsets and activation markers is a basic tool in the diagnostic process of primary immunodeficiency diseases, its use becoming more and more widespread as the knowledge about these illnesses increases. However, the availability of reliable reference values, which need to be age-matched for the pediatric population, is a pre-requisite for the reliable interpretation of immunophenotyping data. Aim of this study is to analyze the lymphocyte subsets and activation markers distribution in children aged 0-18 years referring to the University Hospital of Padova and to create age-matched reference values expressed by percentiles, thus providing a valuable guideline for the interpretation of the immunophenotype. PMID:25132325

  8. Investigating chromosome damage and gammaH2AX response in human lymphocytes and lymphocyte subsets as potential biomarkers of radiation sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaton, Lindsay A.

    This thesis examines in vitro irradiated blood samples from prostate cancer patients exhibiting late normal tissue damage after receiving radiotherapy, for lymphocyte response. Chromosomal aberrations, translocations and proliferation rate are measured, as well as gammaH2AX response in lymphocytes and lymphocyte subsets. The goal of this thesis is to determine whether the lymphocyte response to in vitro radiation could be used as a marker for radiosensitivity. Patients were selected from a randomized clinical trial evaluating the optimal timing of Dose Escalated Radiation and short course Androgen Deprivation Therapy. Of 438 patients, 3% developed Grade 3 late radiation proctitis and were considered to be radiosensitive. Blood was drawn from 10 of these patients along with 20 matched samples from patients with grade 0 proctitis. The samples were irradiated and were analyzed for dicentric chromosomes, excess fragments and proliferation rates (at 6 Gy), translocations, stable and unstable damage (at 4 Gy), and dose response (up to 10 Gy), along with time response after 2 Gy (0 -- 24 h). Chromosome aberrations, excess fragments per cell, translocations per cell and proliferation rates were analyzed by brightfield and fluorescent microscopy, while the gammaH2AX response in lymphocytes and lymphocyte subsets was analyzed by flow cytometry. Both groups were statistically similar for all endpoints at 0 Gy. At 6 Gy, there were statistically significant differences between the radiosensitive and control cohorts for three endpoints; the mean number of dicentric chromosomes per cell, the mean number of excess fragments per cell and the proportion of cells in second metaphase. At 4 Gy, there were statistically significant differences between the two cohorts for three endpoints; the mean number of translocations per cell, the mean number of dicentric chromosomes per cell and the mean number of deletions per cell. There were no significant differences between the gammaH2AX

  9. Lymphocytes subsets in children with febrile convulsions.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, Oğuz; Karaman, Sait; Caksen, Hüseyin; Oner, Ahmet Faik; Odabas, Dursun; Yilmaz, Cahide; Atas, Bülent

    2007-07-01

    In this study, lymphocytes subsets including blood CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD19, and CD56 values were analyzed in children with febrile convulsion (FC) to determine whether there was the association of lymphocytes subsets in the pathogenesis of FC. The study includes 48 children with FC, and 55 healthy age matched control subjects, followed in Yüzüncü Yil University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics between October 2003 and June 2004. Blood CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD19, and CD56 values were examined in the study and control groups. The analyses were performed in the Hematology Laboratory, Yüzüncü Yil University Faculty of Medicine, with flow cytometer device (Coulter Epics XL2, Flow Cytometer). A total of 48 children [17 girls (35.5%) and 31 boys (64.5%)], aged 6 months to 60 months (mean 22.20 +/- 13.75 months) with FC and 55 healthy children [28 girls (51%) and 27 boys (49%)], aged 6 months to 60 months (mean 28.87 +/- 17.04 months) were included in the study. When compared with the control group, the study found significantly decreased blood CD3 and CD4 values in the study group (p <.05). However, there was not significant difference in CD8, CD16, CD19, and CD56 values between the control and study groups (p >.05). When comparing the children with and without positive family history for FC, the study did not find any difference for all CD values between the groups (p >.05). Similarly, there was not significant difference in CD values between the children with simple and complex FC (p >.05). The findings suggested that decreased blood CD3 and CD4 values might be responsible for the infections connected with FC or that they might be related to the pathogenesis of FC in some children.

  10. Occupational exposure to formaldehyde and alterations in lymphocyte subsets

    PubMed Central

    Hosgood, H. Dean; Zhang, Luoping; Tang, Xiaojiang; Vermeulen, Roel; Hao, Zhenyue; Shen, Min; Qiu, Chuangyi; Ge, Yichen; Hua, Ming; Ji, Zhiying; Li, Senhua; Xiong, Jun; Reiss, Boris; Liu, Songwang; Xin, Kerry X.; Azuma, Mariko; Xie, Yuxuan; Freeman, Laura Beane; Ruan, Xiaolin; Guo, Weihong; Galvan, Noe; Blair, Aaron; Li, Laiyu; Huang, Hanlin; Smith, Martyn T.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Background Formaldehyde is used in many occupational settings, most notably in manufacturing, health care, and embalming. Formaldehyde has been classified as a human carcinogen, but its mechanism of action remains uncertain. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional study of 43 formaldehyde exposed-workers and 51 unexposed age and sex-matched controls in Guangdong, China to study formaldehyde’s early biologic effects. To follow-up our previous report that the total lymphocyte count was decreased in formaldehyde-exposed workers compared to controls, we evaluated each major lymphocyte subset (i.e., CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and B cells) and T cell lymphocyte subset (CD4+ naïve and memory T cells, CD8+ naïve and memory T cells, and regulatory T cells). Linear regression of each subset was used to test for differences between exposed workers and controls, adjusting for potential confounders. Results Total NK cell and T cell counts were about 24% (p=0.037) and 16% (p=0.0042) lower, respectively, among exposed workers. Among certain T cell subsets, decreased counts among exposed workers were observed for CD8+ T cells (p=0.026), CD8+ effector memory T cells (p=0.018), and regulatory T cells (CD4+FoxP3+: p=0.04; CD25+FoxP3+: p=0.008). Conclusions Formaldehyde exposed-workers experienced decreased counts of NK cells, regulatory T cells, and CD8+ effector memory T cells; however, due to the small sample size these findings need to be confirmed in larger studies. PMID:22767408

  11. CD4CD8αα lymphocytes, a novel human regulatory T cell subset induced by colonic bacteria and deficient in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Sarrabayrouse, Guillaume; Bossard, Céline; Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Jarry, Anne; Meurette, Guillaume; Quévrain, Elodie; Bridonneau, Chantal; Preisser, Laurence; Asehnoune, Karim; Labarrière, Nathalie; Altare, Frédéric; Sokol, Harry; Jotereau, Francine

    2014-04-01

    How the microbiota affects health and disease is a crucial question. In mice, gut Clostridium bacteria are potent inducers of colonic interleukin (IL)-10-producing Foxp3 regulatory T cells (Treg), which play key roles in the prevention of colitis and in systemic immunity. In humans, although gut microbiota dysbiosis is associated with immune disorders, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In contrast with mice, the contribution of Foxp3 Treg in colitis prevention has been questioned, suggesting that other compensatory regulatory cells or mechanisms may exist. Here we addressed the regulatory role of the CD4CD8 T cells whose presence had been reported in the intestinal mucosa and blood. Using colonic lamina propria lymphocytes (LPL) and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from healthy individuals, and those with colon cancer and irritable bowel disease (IBD), we demonstrated that CD4CD8αα (DP8α) T lymphocytes expressed most of the regulatory markers and functions of Foxp3 Treg and secreted IL-10. Strikingly, DP8α LPL and PBL exhibited a highly skewed repertoire toward the recognition of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a major Clostridium species of the human gut microbiota, which is decreased in patients with IBD. Furthermore, the frequencies of DP8α PBL and colonic LPL were lower in patients with IBD than in healthy donors and in the healthy mucosa of patients with colon cancer, respectively. Moreover, PBL and LPL from most patients with active IBD failed to respond to F. prausnitzii in contrast to PBL and LPL from patients in remission and/or healthy donors. These data (i) uncover a Clostridium-specific IL-10-secreting Treg subset present in the human colonic LP and blood, (ii) identify F. prausnitzii as a major inducer of these Treg, (iii) argue that these cells contribute to the control or prevention of colitis, opening new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for IBD, and (iv) provide new tools to address the systemic impact of both these Treg and the

  12. Peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Covas, M I; Esquerda, A; García-Rico, A; Mahy, N

    1992-01-01

    Interest in T-lymphocyte subsets has arisen because of their involvement in the autoimmune process. Contradictory results have been published in the literature about the number of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in autoimmune diseases. In order to investigate the number and distribution of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in autoimmune thyroid disease, the levels of total T-lymphocytes (CD3), T-helper (CD4) and T-suppressor/cytotoxic (CD8) lymphocytes were determined in 44 patients with Graves' disease (1), multinodular goiter (2) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (3). All patients had high levels of antithyroglobulin and thyroid antiperoxidase (antimicrosomal) antibodies. The T subset levels were related to the functional thyroid status, measured as serum free thyroxine (FT4) and thyrotropin (TSH). Our data show the existence of a strong influence of functional status on CD3, CD4 and CD8 levels, as reflected in the significant correlations obtained with FT4 (negative) and TSH (positive). A significant decrease in all populations was observed in Graves' disease hyperthyroid patients. A decrease in the CD4/CD8 ratio in Hashimoto's thyroiditis hypothyroid patients was observed, in contrast to an increase in the ratio in autoimmune hyperthyroid patients. This points to the CD4/CD8 ratio as a differential characteristic between the two autoimmune (hypothyroid and hyperthyroid) entities, independent of free thyroxine levels. No significant correlation was found between antithyroid antibody levels and peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets or serum levels of FT4 and TSH.

  13. Lymphocyte Subsets in a Population of Nonfrail Elderly Individuals.

    PubMed

    Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Sánchez-Flores, María; Maseda, Ana; Marcos-Pérez, Diego; Millán-Calenti, José C; Pásaro, Eduardo; Lorenzo-López, Laura; Laffon, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    Age-related frailty is characterized by increased vulnerability to stress due to decline in homeostatic reserve, which results in increased risk of adverse health outcomes including disability, hospitalization, and death. The relationship between frailty and immunological system alterations is well established. Thus, analysis of immunological changes, such as alterations in lymphocyte subsets, during senescence may provide useful markers for frailty and associated pathologies. Since reference ranges currently used for lymphocyte subsets do not specifically differentiate the elderly group, the aim of this study was to (1) establish reference ranges in nonfrail elderly individuals and (2) assess the evolution of these parameters with age. Further, the influence of other physiological and lifestyle factors was also evaluated. The study was performed on 144 elderly individuals (aged 65-95) from Galicia (in northwestern Spain). Percentages of lymphocyte subpopulations (CD3(+) T lymphocytes, CD4(+) T-helper lymphocytes, CD8(+) T-cytotoxic lymphocytes, CD19(+) B lymphocytes, and CD56(+)16(+) natural killer cells) were analyzed in peripheral blood by flow cytometry, and reference ranges were calculated. The individual status as nonfrail or prefrail did not markedly affect the immunological parameters, but an apparent influence of age was obtained for %CD3(+), %CD4(+), and %CD19(+) cells, all of which fell with increasing age. Women showed higher levels of %CD19(+) lymphocytes. No significant influence of smoking habits, physical activity, or drinking alcohol or caffeine beverages was observed. The results obtained may serve as a basis to establish comparisons between frail and nonfrail elderly individuals, in order to determine the usefulness of lymphocyte subsets as immunological biomarkers of frailty. PMID:26167746

  14. Effects of a Simulated Tennis Match on Lymphocyte Subset Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Mark; Kell, Holly; Navalta, James; Tibana, Ramires; Lyons, Scott; Arnett, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Tennis is an activity requiring both endurance and anaerobic components, which could have immunosuppressive effects postexercise. Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of a simulated tennis match on apoptotic and migratory markers on lymphocyte subsets. Method: Male high school (n = 5) and college (n = 3) tennis…

  15. Control Lymphocyte Subsets: Can one country's values serve for another's?

    PubMed Central

    Mandala, Wilson L.; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Apornpong, Tanakorn; Kerr, Stephen J; MacLennan, Jenny M.; Hanson, Celine; Jaimulwong, Tanyathip; Gondwe, Esther N.; Rosenblatt, Howard M.; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Spector, Stephen A.; Pancharoen, Chitsanu; Gelman, Rebecca S; MacLennan, Calman A.; Shearer, William T

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocyte subsets can be affected by host and environmental factors, yet direct comparisons of their patterns across continents are lacking. This work compares proportions and counts of lymphocyte subsets between healthy children from Thailand, Malawi and the USA. We analyzed subsets of 1,399 healthy children aged between 0 and 15 years: 281 Thai, 397 Malawian and 721American children. Existing data for five subsets were available for all three cohorts (Total T, CD4+ T, CD8+ T, natural killer (NK) and B cells), with data for another six subsets from the Thai and American cohorts (naïve, memory and activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells). Cellular patterns between cohorts differed mainly in children under two years. Compared to American children, Thai children had higher median numbers of total T cells, CD8+ T cells and NK cells while Malawian children under 18 months, on average, had more CD8+ T cells and B cells. Both Thai and Malawian children had lower median CD4+ T cell percentages and CD4/CD8 ratios than American children. Thai children had more memory and activated CD8+ T cells than American children. Approximately one-fifth of Thai and Malawian HIV-uninfected healthy children aged 0-3 years met WHO-defined CD4+ count criteria for immune-deficiency in HIV-infected children. Healthy children from Thailand, Malawi and the USA have differences in lymphocyte subsets that are likely to be due to differences in ethnicity, exposure to infectious diseases and environmental factors. These results indicate the need for country-specific reference ranges for diagnosis and management of immunologic disorders. PMID:25171870

  16. Preparation of Internal Quality Control Material for Lymphocyte Subset Analysis.

    PubMed

    Roh, Eun Youn; Shin, Sue; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Oh, Sohee; Park, Kyoung Un; Lee, Nuri; Song, Eun Young

    2016-07-01

    Lymphocyte subset analysis is widely used in clinical laboratories, and more than two levels of daily QC materials are required for reliable results. Commercially available, expensive QC materials have short shelf lives and may not be suitable in resource-poor settings. We compared different methods for preparing homemade QC material, including fixation with 1%, 2%, or 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA); freezing with 10% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), 0.1% bovine serum albumin-phosphate buffered saline, or after ethanolic dehydration; and using cryopreservation temperatures of -20°C, -80°C, or -196°C. We found an optimal experimental condition, which is 'fixation with 4% PFA, freezing with 10% DMSO, and storage at 80°C'. To evaluate long-term stability of QC materials prepared in this optimal condition, two levels of QC materials (QM1 and QM2) were thawed after 30, 33, 35, 37, 60, 62, 64, and 67 days of cryopreservation. Lymphocyte subset was analyzed with BD Multitest IMK kit (BD Biosciences, USA). QM1 and QM2 were stable after 1-2 months of cryopreservation (CV <3% for CD3, CD4, and CD8 and 5-7% for CD16/56 and CD19). We propose this method as an alternative cost-effective protocol for preparing homemade internal QC materials for lymphocyte subset analysis in resource-poor settings.

  17. T lymphocyte subset imbalances in patients contribute to ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenggong; Liao, Qiande; Hu, Yihe; Zhong, DA

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease, which is characterized by inflammation of the spine and the sacroiliac joints. To date, the disease etiology remains unclear. In the present study, the correlation of T lymphocyte subset changes with the progression of ankylosing spondylitis was investigated. A total of 55 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (22 severe and 23 mild cases) and 20 healthy individuals were selected. Firstly, the punctured cells in the lesions and the serum were collected, and the lymphocytes and the peripheral blood mononuclear cells were prepared. Secondly, quantitative PCR, ELISA and flow cytometry analyses were carried out to detect the levels of a series of immunoglobulins, complements, helper T cells, cytotoxic T cells, regulatory cells and cytokines. The expression levels of α-globulin, γ-globulin, immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA, IgM, serum complement C3, and complement C4 were found to be significantly increased in ankylosing spondylitis patients. In addition, the percentage of Th1 and Th17 cells was found to be significantly higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups (mild and severe) compared with the healthy individuals. As a result, the Th1/Th2 and Th17/Treg ratios were significantly higher in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. In addition, T lymphocyte subset ratio imbalances contributed to an increased expression of immune mediators, including interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17A. The mRNA and protein expression levels of IFN-γ and IL-17A were found to be higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups compared with the control group. The present study provided further evidence on the function and underlying mechanism of T lymphocyte subsets, which may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

  18. [Circadian variation of lymphocyte subsets in health subjects].

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, G; Bianco, G; Correra, M; Carella, A M; Balzanelli, M; Giuliani, A; Tarquini, R

    1998-11-01

    In our study cortisol and interleukin 2 (IL-2) levels were measured and lymphocyte sub-population analyses were performed on blood samples collected every four hours, for 24 hours from 10 healthy subjects aged 38-65 years. A clear circadian rhythm was validated for cortisol serum levels, for CD8, CD8 dim, CD16 and delta TcS1 with acrophase in the morning, and for CD2, CD4, CD/CD8 ratio, HLA-DR, CD20 and CD25 with acrophase at night. CD8 bright and TcR delta 1 presented higher levels in the morning without validation of the circadian rhythm. Changes of serum levels of IL-2 did not show circadian rhythmicity. The results show that specific lymphocyte subsets present different profiles of nyctohemeral changes and this may explain time related variations of immune responses.

  19. Cytokine profile and lymphocyte subsets in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, C.O.; Catai, A.M.; Moura-Tonello, S.C.G.; Arruda, L.C.M.; Lopes, S.L.B.; Benze, B.G.; Del Vale, A.M.; Malmegrim, K.C.R.; Leal, A.M.O.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a metabolic disease with inflammation as an important pathogenic background. However, the pattern of immune cell subsets and the cytokine profile associated with development of T2D are unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate different components of the immune system in T2D patients' peripheral blood by quantifying the frequency of lymphocyte subsets and intracellular pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by T cells. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 22 men (51.6±6.3 years old) with T2D and 20 nonsmoking men (49.4±7.6 years old) who were matched for age and sex as control subjects. Glycated hemoglobin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and the lipid profile were measured by a commercially available automated system. Frequencies of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood and intracellular production of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ cytokines by CD3+ T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. No differences were observed in the frequency of CD19+ B cells, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells, CD16+56+ NK cells, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells in patients with T2D compared with controls. The numbers of IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells were significantly higher in patients with T2D than in controls (P<0.05). The frequency of interferon-γ-producing CD3+ T cells was positively correlated with body mass index (r=0.59; P=0.01). In conclusion, this study shows increased numbers of circulating IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells in patients with T2D, suggesting that these cytokines are involved in the immune pathology of this disease. PMID:27007651

  20. Cytokine profile and lymphocyte subsets in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Francisco, C O; Catai, A M; Moura-Tonello, S C G; Arruda, L C M; Lopes, S L B; Benze, B G; Del Vale, A M; Malmegrim, K C R; Leal, A M O

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a metabolic disease with inflammation as an important pathogenic background. However, the pattern of immune cell subsets and the cytokine profile associated with development of T2D are unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate different components of the immune system in T2D patients' peripheral blood by quantifying the frequency of lymphocyte subsets and intracellular pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by T cells. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 22 men (51.6±6.3 years old) with T2D and 20 nonsmoking men (49.4±7.6 years old) who were matched for age and sex as control subjects. Glycated hemoglobin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and the lipid profile were measured by a commercially available automated system. Frequencies of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood and intracellular production of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ cytokines by CD3+ T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. No differences were observed in the frequency of CD19+ B cells, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells, CD16+56+ NK cells, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells in patients with T2D compared with controls. The numbers of IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells were significantly higher in patients with T2D than in controls (P<0.05). The frequency of interferon-γ-producing CD3+ T cells was positively correlated with body mass index (r=0.59; P=0.01). In conclusion, this study shows increased numbers of circulating IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells in patients with T2D, suggesting that these cytokines are involved in the immune pathology of this disease.

  1. Harnessing Human Dendritic Cell Subsets for Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Hideki; Schmitt, Nathalie; Klechevsky, Eynav; Pedroza-Gonzales, Alexander; Matsui, Toshimichi; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon; Fay, Joseph; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina

    2010-01-01

    Summary Immunity results from a complex interplay between the antigen-nonspecific innate immune system and the antigen-specific adaptive immune system. The cells and molecules of the innate system employ non-clonal recognition receptors including lectins, Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors and helicases. B and T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system employ clonal receptors recognizing antigens or their derived peptides in a highly specific manner. An essential link between innate and adaptive immunity is provided by dendritic cells (DCs). DCs can induce such contrasting states as immunity and tolerance. The recent years have brought a wealth of information on the biology of DCs revealing the complexity of this cell system. Indeed, DC plasticity and subsets are prominent determinants of the type and quality of elicited immune responses. Here we summarize our recent studies aimed at a better understanding of the DC system to unravel the pathophysiology of human diseases and design novel human vaccines. PMID:20193020

  2. Homeostasis of IL-15 dependent lymphocyte subsets in the liver.

    PubMed

    Cepero-Donates, Yuneivy; Rakotoarivelo, Volatiana; Mayhue, Marian; Ma, Averil; Chen, Yi-Guang; Ramanathan, Sheela

    2016-06-01

    IL-15 is a member of the gamma chain family of cytokines (γc - CD132). The IL-15 receptor (IL-15R) complex consists of 3 subunits: the ligand-binding IL-15Rα chain (CD215), the β chain (CD122; also used by IL-2), and the common γ chain. The biological activities of IL-15 are mostly mediated by the IL-15:IL-15Rα complex, produced by the same cell and 'trans-presented' to responder cells expressing the IL-15Rβγc. The peculiar and almost unique requirement for IL-15 to be trans-presented by IL-15Rα suggests that the biological effects of IL-15 signaling are tightly regulated even at the level of availability of IL-15. Tissue-specific deletion of IL-15Rα has shown macrophage-and dendritic cell-derived IL-15Rα mediate the homeostasis of different CD8(+) T cell subsets. Here we show that hepatocyte and macrophage- specific expression of IL-15Rα is required to maintain the homeostasis of NK and NKT cells in the liver. Thus, homeostasis of IL-15-dependent lymphocyte subsets is also regulated by trans-presentation of IL-15 by non-hematopoietic cells in the tissue environment. PMID:26778709

  3. Subpopulations of human T lymphocytes. XVI. Maldistribution of T cell subsets associated with abnormal locomotion of T cells in untreated adult patients with Hodgkin's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S.

    1980-01-01

    Peripheral blood and splenic T cells from adult patients with Hodgkin's disease were examined for the proportions and numbers of T cells with receptors for IgM (Tμ) or IgG (Tγ) and their locomotor responses to chemotactic stimuli of casein and endotoxin-activated serum (EAS). Thirty per cent of patients had absolute lymphopenia in the peripheral blood. The proportion of Tμ cells was comparable but the proportion of Tγ cells was significantly increased (P<0·001) resulting in an abnormally low ratio of Tμ/Tγ cells when compared to those for age- and sex-matched controls. In the spleens, the proportions of T cells and Tμ cells were significantly increased (P<0·001) and Tγ cells significantly decreased (P<0·001) resulting in an abnormally high ratio of Tμ/Tγ cells when compared with normal spleens. In the peripheral blood both Tμ and Tγ cells were increased and T cells lacking either receptor (Tφ) were significantly decreased in patients in whom spleens were involved by the tumour when compared to those in whom spleens were not involved by the tumour. Peripheral blood T cells from patients with Hodgkin's disease responded poorly to the chemotactic stimuli when compared to T cells from normal controls or T cells from the spleens of the same patients. Tμ cell proportions in patients with combined stages III and IV were significantly lower (P<0·025) than those in the peripheral blood of patients in combined stages I and II. No correlation was observed between the above parameters and histopathological types of Hodgkin's disease. This study demonstrates an abnormal distribution of T cell subsets and abnormality of locomotion of T cells between peripheral blood and spleens in patients with Hodgkin's disease. This might explain the cellular basis of at least certain immunodeficiencies so commonly associated with Hodgkin's disease. PMID:6970098

  4. Longterm decrease in the CD57 lymphocyte subset in a patient with chronic Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Raphael B; Burrascano, Joseph; Winger, Edward

    2002-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tickborne illness caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. In a previous report we described a decrease in the CD57 lymphocyte subset in patients with chronic Lyme disease. We have now identified a patient with chronic relapsing and remitting symptoms of Lyme disease who had decreased levels of CD57 lymphocytes over 10 years. This observation represents the longest duration of an immunologic abnormality ever documented in chronic Lyme disease. The CD57 lymphocyte subset appears to be a useful marker of longterm infection with the Lyme disease spirochete.

  5. Differential expression of CD8 epitopes amongst porcine CD8-positive functional lymphocyte subsets.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H; Parkhouse, R M

    1997-01-01

    The swine is a useful model for immunobiological studies as it has a highly heterogeneous lymphocyte pool, containing several subsets not easily accessible in humans and rodents. In particular, the CD8-positive (CD8+) cells contain a variety of lymphocyte subsets, such as alpha beta-T cells, gamma delta-T cells, CD4 CD8 double-positive (DP) cells and natural killer (NK) cells. In order to define these subsets further, we have selected four monoclonal antibodies (mAb) with differential reactivity on CD8+ cells. Thus, mAb CD8.1 (PPT20) bound to CD8hi and CD8lo subpopulations in a similar way to the conventional anti-CD8. The mAb CD8.2 (PPT21), though binding to all of the CD8+ cells, reacted preferably with CD8hi. Two other mAb, CD8.3 (PPT22) and CD8.4 (PPT23), were specific for CD8hi alpha beta-T-cell subpopulation. These results, complemented by immunoprecipitation, co-modulation and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay experiments, suggest that CD8.1 and CD8.2 react putatively with the CD8 alpha-chain and CD8.3 and CD8.4 with the CD8 beta-chain. Tissue distribution studies revealed that CD8+ thymocytes and peripheral CD8hi alpha beta-T cells expressed both putative CD8 alpha- and beta-chains while peripheral CD4+ CD8+ alpha beta-T cells, CD8lo gamma delta-T cells and NK cells expressed only putative CD8 alpha-chain. Functional studies indicated that the CD8hi alpha beta-T and CD8lo gamma delta-T cells were effector cells in the CD3-redirected cytotoxicity. Images Figure 4 PMID:9370923

  6. Effect of magnetic resonance imaging on lymphocyte subsets

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, A.C.; Reichard, S.M.; Dickinson, M.M.; Allison, J.D.; Figueroa-Ortiz, R.E. )

    1993-01-01

    Research reports in both the lay press and the scientific literature raise the question as to the role of long term exposure to low level electromagnetic fields (EMF) in inducing cancers. Although sutdies have shown that EMF may have some effects on cells in tissue culture, it has been very difficult to determine if there is an effect in vivo. Since currents induced in the body by environmental EMF are lower than naturally existing currents, e.g., heart and brain, the authors have studied the effect of the high EMF generated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It is also important for physicians to know if this procedure may have some effect on their patients since the use of this technique is growing rapidly. Blood samples were drawn by veinipuncture immediately prior to and just after patients were subjected to MRI scans of either their brain or lumbar regions. Samples were analyzed in the flow cytometer for various leukocyte subpopulations. Concentrations of monocytes, granulocytes, total T cells and helper T cells (p < 0.03) and the helper T cell/suppressor T cell ratio (a measure of immune system reactivity) increased (p < 0.05). There is a tendency toward an increase in the number of B cells following MRI (p < 0.13). Additional studies will correlate changes in leukocyte subset distribution with levels of various neurohormones that influence immune function.

  7. T cell receptor gamma/delta+ lymphocyte subsets during HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Autran, B; Triebel, F; Katlama, C; Rozenbaum, W; Hercend, T; Debre, P

    1989-01-01

    The gamma/delta T cell receptor is expressed on 1-15% of normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). This subpopulation is recognized by anti-TcR-delta 1 MoAb which is functionally defined as a pan-delta MoAb. Two other antibodies, anti-Ti-gamma A and anti-delta-TcS1 are directed at variable determinants of either the gamma or the delta chain, respectively. In normal individuals anti-Ti-gamma A characterizes two thirds of the TcR-delta 1+ subpopulation whereas anti-delta TcS1 reacts with most of the delta-TcR1+, Ti-gamma A- cells. In the present study, we have used these three MoAbs to characterize the TcR gamma/delta+ peripheral lymphocytes during HIV infection. Fifty patients at three distinct clinical stages (SPC/PGL, ARC, AIDS) of the infection have been studied. The Ti-gamma A+ subset in the whole group accounted for 3.45% of PBL and did not differ from controls; it was also unchanged when the three groups were analysed separately. The Ti-gamma A+ circulating cells were in a resting state as assessed by the absence of surface-expressed activation markers. In contrast, in some patients the proportion of circulating TcR-delta 1+, Ti-gamma A-, delta TcS1+ cells was increased (4.75%) leading to an inversion of the Ti-gamma A/delta-TcS1 ratio. Altogether, those data suggest a conservation of the Ti-gamma A+ subset during HIV infection, contrasting with an increase of the delta-TcS1+, Ti-gamma A- fraction in some cases. PMID:2522839

  8. Changes in lymphocyte subsets in the intestine and mesenteric lymph nodes in caprine paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Navarro, J A; Ramis, G; Seva, J; Pallarés, F J; Sánchez, J

    1998-02-01

    Changes in the number and distribution of lymphocyte subsets were investigated in the intestinal mucosa and mesenteric lymph nodes of three goats with natural paratuberculosis, comparisons being made with a single uninfected control animal. Lesions in the naturally infected goats varied from small granulomata with scarce epithelioid or multinucleated giant cells, containing few or no bacilli, in the intestine (tuberculoid type) to an extensive, diffuse epithelioid cell infiltrate containing numerous bacilli in the gut and mesenteric lymph nodes (lepromatous type). The number and distribution of lymphocyte subsets in the control were consistent with data reported from other non-infected goats. However, in the goats with paratuberculosis, significant changes were observed in the number and distribution of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, the changes being related to the severity of the lesions. In the intestinal mucosa of the goat with tuberculoid lesions no significant changes were observed, but in the cortical area of mesenteric lymph nodes the number of CD4+ T lymphocytes decreased and the number of CD8+ T lymphocytes increased. In the two goats with lepromatous lesions, there was a decrease in the CD4+ T subpopulation and an increase of CD8+ T lymphocytes in the lamina propria of the intestine and particularly in the cortical area of the mesenteric lymph nodes, the CD4:CD8 ratio (< 1) being the opposite of that observed in healthy goats. Because of the small numbers of animals, further studies including additional animals are needed to confirm these preliminary results, which suggest that the progression of paratuberculous lesions may be due to an ineffective host immune response attributable to the CD8+ T lymphocyte subset that "downregulates" the activity of the CD4+ T lymphocytes required for macrophage activation.

  9. The circulating microRNome demonstrates distinct lymphocyte subset-dependent signatures.

    PubMed

    de Candia, Paola; Torri, Anna; Fedeli, Maya; Viganò, Valentina; Carpi, Donatella; Gorletta, Tatiana; Casorati, Giulia; Pagani, Massimiliano; Dellabona, Paolo; Abrignani, Sergio

    2016-03-01

    Upon activation, lymphocytes release vesicles containing microRNAs (miRNAs). However, little is known as to whether this release results in modulation of circulating miRNAs (the miRNome) in the serum. The present work aims to identify lymphocyte subset-specific signatures of miRNAs within the serum circulating miRNome. We therefore assessed serum miRNA expression profiles in wild-type mice; in mice lacking either CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, or B cells; and, as a control, in mice in which Dicer has been ablated in T lymphocytes. We found that specific serum miRNAs are differentially modulated when different lymphocyte subsets are lacking. In particular, the serum level of miR-181b-5p, previously demonstrated to be fundamental for the development of iNKT cells, is specifically reduced in mice in which iNKT cells are absent. Interestingly, our results indicate a direct link between the biological role of a single miRNA in lymphocyte development and its serum level, and prove that even a population composed of relatively few cells in vivo, such as iNKT lymphocytes, has a measurable effect on the serum circulating miRNome. PMID:26639063

  10. Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte Subset Counts in Pre-menopausal Women with Iron-Deficiency Anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Reza Keramati, Mohammad; Sadeghian, Mohammad Hadi; Ayatollahi, Hossein; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Khajedaluea, Mohammad; Tavasolian, Houman; Borzouei, Anahita

    2011-01-01

    Background: Iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a major worldwide public health problem. Children and women of reproductive age are especially vulnerable to IDA, and it has been reported that these patients are more prone to infection. This study was done to evaluate alteration of lymphocyte subgroups in IDA. Methods: In this prospective study, we investigated lymphocyte subsets in pre-menopausal women with iron-deficiency anaemia; 50 normal subjects and 50 IDA (hypochromic microcytic) cases were enrolled. Experimental and control anticoagulated blood samples were evaluated using flow cytometry to determine the absolute and relative numbers of various lymphocyte subgroups. Finally, the results of the patient and control groups were compared. Results: Mean (SD) absolute counts of lymphocytes, CD3+ cells, CD3+/CD4+ subsets (T helper) and CD3+/CD8+ subsets (T cytotoxic) in the patient group were 2.08 (0.65) x 109/L, 1.53 (0.53) x 109/L, 0.87 (0.28) x 109/L, and 0.51 (0.24) x 109/L, respectively. The results showed significant differences between case and control groups in mean absolute counts of lymphocytes (P = 0.014), T lymphocytes (P = 0.009), helper T cells (P = 0.004), and cytotoxic T cells (P = 0.043). Conclusion: This study showed that absolute counts of peripheral blood T lymphocytes as a marker of cell-mediated immunity may be decreased in pre-menopausal women with iron-deficiency anaemia, and that these patients may be more prone to infection. PMID:22135572

  11. Neurobehavioral, autonomic nervous function and lymphocyte subsets among aluminum electrolytic workers.

    PubMed

    He, S C; Qiao, N; Sheng, W

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to determine the alteration of neurobehavioral parameters, autonomic nervous function and lymphocyte subsets in aluminum electrolytic workers of long-term aluminum exposure. 33 men who were 35.16 +/- 2.95 (mean +/- S.D) years old occupationally exposed to aluminum for 14.91 +/- 6.31 (mean +/- S.D) years. Air Al level and urinary aluminum concentration was measured by means of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Normal reference group were selected from a flour plant. Neurobehavioral core test battery (NCTB) recommended by WHO was utilized. Autonomic nervous function test battery recommended by Ewing DJ was conducted on subjects. FAC SCAN was used to measure the lymphocyte subsets of peripheral blood. The mean air aluminum level in the workshop was 6.36 mg/m3, ranged from 2.90 to 11.38 mg/m3. Urinary aluminum of the Al electrolytic workers (40.08 +/- 9.36 microgram/mg.cre) was obviously higher than that of control group (26.84 +/- 8.93 m/mg.cre). Neurobehavioral results showed that the scores of DSY, PAC and PA in Al electrolytic workers were significantly lower than those of control group, The score of POMSC, POMSF and SRT among Al exposed workers were significantly augmented in relation to those of control group. Autonomic nervous function test results showed that R-R interval variability of maximum ratio of immediately standing up in Al electrolytic workers were decreased compare with the control group, while the BP-IS, HR-V, HR-DB, R30:15 had no significant change. Peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets test showed that CD4-CD8+ T lymphocyte in Al electrolytic workers increased. This study suggests that Al exposure exerts adverse effects on neurobehavioral performance, especially movement coordination and negative mood, and parasympathetic nervous function; moreover it increase CD4-CD8+ T lymphocyte subsets.

  12. Subsets of T lymphocytes in relation to T lymphocyte function in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Craig, J C; Hawkins, S A; Swallow, M W; Lyttle, J A; Patterson, V H; Merrett, J D; Haire, M

    1985-01-01

    T lymphocyte control of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of autologous B lymphocytes was examined in parallel to the enumeration of subpopulations of mononuclear cells in 22 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and in 22 healthy individuals. All were seropositive for EBV. The incidence of lack of T cell control was significantly higher in patients than in controls, confirming previous published work. In the present study, we have shown in addition a significantly reduced proportion of OKT8+ cells and a significantly increased ratio of OKT4/OKT8 cells in the group of patients with lack of control. The findings point to abnormal immunoregulation in MS. PMID:3000660

  13. Isolation of Human Skin Dendritic Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, Merry; Jardine, Laura; Haniffa, Muzlifah

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized leukocytes with antigen-processing and antigen-presenting functions. DCs can be divided into distinct subsets by anatomical location, phenotype and function. In human, the two most accessible tissues to study leukocytes are peripheral blood and skin. DCs are rare in human peripheral blood (<1 % of mononuclear cells) and have a less mature phenotype than their tissue counterparts (MacDonald et al., Blood. 100:4512-4520, 2002; Haniffa et al., Immunity 37:60-73, 2012). In contrast, the skin covering an average total surface area of 1.8 m(2) has approximately tenfold more DCs than the average 5 L of total blood volume (Wang et al., J Invest Dermatol 134:965-974, 2014). DCs migrate spontaneously from skin explants cultured ex vivo, which provide an easy method of cell isolation (Larsen et al., J Exp Med 172:1483-1493, 1990; Lenz et al., J Clin Invest 92:2587-2596, 1993; Nestle et al., J Immunol 151:6535-6545, 1993). These factors led to the extensive use of skin DCs as the "prototype" migratory DCs in human studies. In this chapter, we detail the protocols to isolate DCs and resident macrophages from human skin. We also provide a multiparameter flow cytometry gating strategy to identify human skin DCs and to distinguish them from macrophages. PMID:27142012

  14. Influence of bestatin, an inhibitor of aminopeptidases, on T and B lymphocyte subsets in mice.

    PubMed

    Lis, M; Szczypka, M; Suszko, A; Obmińska-Mrukowicz, B

    2011-01-01

    Bestatin, a low-molecular weight dipeptide, is a potent inhibitor of aminopeptidase N which has been demonstrated to have antitumor and immunomodulatory effects. The effects of bestatin (10, 1 and 0.1 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally once, five or ten times to mice on the total number of lymphocytes in the thymus, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes and the percentage and the absolute number of T cell subsets (CD4+CD8+, CD4-CD8-, CD4+, CD8+) in the thymus and T (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+) and B (CD19+) lymphocytes in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes were studied. It has been found that bestatin administered ten times at doses of 10, 1 and 0.1 mg/kg increased the total number of thymocytes, splenocytes and lymphocytes of mesenteric lymph nodes. Bestatin also changed the percentage and the absolute number of T cell subsets in the thymus and T and B lymphocytes in the peripheral lymphatic organs. Five and ten exposures to bestatin (10, 1 and 0.1 mg/kg) increased the absolute count of both immature CD4+CD8+ and CD4-CD8- thymic cells. Moreover, both a single and multiple administration of bestatin (1 and 0.1 mg/kg) decreased the percentage and absolute count of CD3+ splenocytes and mesenteric lymph node cells with corresponding decreases in the percentage and absolute count of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. Both a single and multiple administration of bestatin at all the doses under investigation augmented the percentage and the absolute count of CD19+ (B lymphocytes) in the peripheral lymphatic organs. The results of the study show that there is a relationship between the effect induced by bestatin and the dose of the drug as well as the number of doses applied. The strongest effect on the T and B lymphocyte subsets was noted after five injections of bestatin at doses of 1 and 0.1 mg/kg.

  15. Peripheral lymphocyte subset variation predicts prostate cancer carbon ion radiotherapy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ze-Liang; Li, Bing-Xin; Wu, Xian-Wei; Li, Ping; Zhang, Qing; Wei, Xun-Bin; Fu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    The immune system plays a complementary role in the cytotoxic activity of radiotherapy. Here, we examined changes in immune cell subsets after heavy ion therapy for prostate cancer. The lymphocyte counts were compared with acute radiotherapy-related toxicity, defined according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, and short-term local efficacy, defined based on prostate-specific antigen concentrations. Confirmed prostate cancer patients who had not received previous radiotherapy were administered carbon ion radiotherapy (CIR) in daily fractions of 2.74 GyE with a total dose of 63-66 GyE. Lymphocyte subset counts were investigated before, during and after radiotherapy, and at a 1 month follow-up. Most notable among our findings, the CD4/CD8 ratio and CD19+ cell counts were consistently higher in patients with a complete response (CR) or partial response (PR) to CIR than in those classified in the stable disease (SD) group (P<0.05 for both). But CD3+ and CD8+ cell counts were lower in the CR and PR groups than in the SD group. These results indicate that variations in peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations are predictive of outcome after CIR for prostate cancer. PMID:27029063

  16. Lymphocyte subset recovery and outcome after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for plasma cell myeloma.

    PubMed

    Rueff, Jessica; Medinger, Michael; Heim, Dominik; Passweg, Jakob; Stern, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Rapid immune reconstitution--particularly of natural killer cells (NK cells)--after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is associated with protection from relapse. Whether such an association also exists after autologous stem cell transplantation is less clear. We retrospectively assessed lymphocyte subsets after autologous HSCT in 114 patients and correlated lymphocyte recovery with outcome. CD8 T cell and NK cell counts recovered rapidly to pretransplantation levels, whereas B cell and CD4 T cell recovery were delayed. Compared with patients with low NK cells (<100/uL), high NK cell count at 1 month after HSCT was associated with significantly prolonged progression-free survival: for NK cells 100 to 200/uL hazard ratio [HR], .33 (95% confidence interval [CI]; .16 to .80; P = .004); for NK cells > 200/μL HR, .27 (95% CI, .13 to .58; P = .001). No significant protective effects were associated with rapid recovery of any other lymphocyte subset. None influenced overall survival (OS) or time to next treatment. Early NK cell recovery is associated with better progression-free survival after autologous HSCT. The failure to detect an effect on OS might be due to the salvage strategies available to these patients.

  17. A rapid technique for lymphocyte preparation prior to two-color immunofluorescence analysis of lymphocyte subsets using flow cytometry. Comparison with density gradient separation.

    PubMed

    Mansour, I; Bourin, P; Rouger, P; Doinel, C

    1990-02-20

    A technique is described for lymphocyte preparation which permits analyses by two-color immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. It consists, briefly, of the lysis of red blood cells and washing of white blood cells prior to labeling. We tested this technique with a large panel of monoclonal antibodies in mono- and dual immunofluorescence. By comparing these results to those obtained after density gradient separation, we found the following statistically significant differences: the count of the phenotype B1+ was higher after whole blood lysis preparation than after density gradient separation; whereas, the corresponding counts of OKT4+ and Leu-4-Leu-7+ phenotypes were lower. No difference was detected with OKT8+, Leu-4+, OKT8+Leu-4+, OKT8+Leu-4-, OKT8-Leu-4+, OKT8+Leu-7+, Leu-4+Leu-7+, Leu-4-Leu-11c+, OKT8+Leu-11c+ and OKT8+Leu-15+ phenotypes. We have studied the reproducibility of both methods and the correlation between them. The disparity of the lymphocyte subset count between these two methods, though statistically significant, was relatively weak and seems to be due to the density gradient separation. Since the preparation of lymphocytes using the density gradient method is time consuming, we propose whole blood lysis as an alternative lymphocyte separation method when assessing immune status in human disease by flow cytometry. It offers the following advantages: (i) it does not require additional steps, (ii) it permits two-color immunofluorescence through the labeling of white blood cells after washing, (iii) it is reliable, (iv) it is reproducible, and (v) it is helpful in studies of lymphopenia since it offers the possibility of lymphocyte enrichment.

  18. Circulating lymphocyte and T memory subsets in glucocorticosteroid versus IVIG treated patients with CIDP.

    PubMed

    Klehmet, Juliane; Staudt, Max; Ulm, Lena; Unterwalder, Nadine; Meisel, Andreas; Meisel, Christian

    2015-06-15

    The present study compared lymphocyte and T memory subsets in currently untreated patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) to glucocorticosteroid (GS) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treated patients. Peripheral blood from 48 CIDP patients (21 untreated who were either treatment naïve or without treatment during the last 3 months, 17 IVIG and 10 GS treatment) and from 12 age-matched controls was evaluated using flow cytometric analysis. Our data demonstrate that long-term GS treatment is associated with reduced frequencies of total CD4+ T cells, CD4+ memory subsets and NK cells while long-term IVIG treatment is associated with alterations of the CD8+ memory compartment. Reduction of CD4+ naïve T cell counts may explain the observation that GS treatment induces prolonged clinical remission compared to IVIG treatment.

  19. Exercise Training, Lymphocyte Subsets and Their Cytokines Production: Experience of an Italian Professional Football Team and Their Impact on Allergy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. In recent years, numerous articles have attempted to shed light on our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of exercise-induced immunologic changes and their impact on allergy and asthma. It is known that lymphocyte subclasses, cytokines, and chemokines show modifications after exercise, but outcomes can be affected by the type of exercise as well as by its intensity and duration. Interesting data have been presented in many recent studies on mouse models, but few studies on humans have been performed to check the long-term effects of exercise over a whole championship season. Methods. This study evaluated lymphocyte subsets and their intracellular IL-2, IL-4, TNF-α, and IFN-γ production in professional football (soccer) players, at three stages of the season, to evaluate if alterations occur, particularly in relation to their allergic status. Results and Conclusion. Despite significant mid-season alterations, no significant lymphocyte subclasses count modifications, except for NKs that were significantly higher, were observed at the end. IL-2 and IL-4 producing cells showed a significant decrease (P = 0.018 and P = 0.001, but in a steady fashion for IL-4), confirming the murine data about the potential beneficial effects of aerobic exercise for allergic asthma. PMID:25050349

  20. Three consecutive days of interval runs to exhaustion affects lymphocyte subset apoptosis and migration.

    PubMed

    Navalta, James W; Tibana, Ramires Alsamir; Fedor, Elizabeth A; Vieira, Amilton; Prestes, Jonato

    2014-01-01

    This investigation assessed the lymphocyte subset response to three days of intermittent run exercise to exhaustion. Twelve healthy college-aged males (n = 8) and females (n = 4) (age = 26 ± 4 years; height = 170.2 ± 10 cm; body mass = 75 ± 18 kg) completed an exertion test (maximal running speed and VO2max) and later performed three consecutive days of an intermittent run protocol to exhaustion (30 sec at maximal running speed and 30 sec at half of the maximal running speed). Blood was collected before exercise (PRE) and immediately following the treadmill bout (POST) each day. When the absolute change from baseline was evaluated (i. e., Δ baseline), a significant change in CD4+ and CD8+ for CX3CR1 cells was observed by completion of the third day. Significant changes in both apoptosis and migration were observed following two consecutive days in CD19+ lymphocytes, and the influence of apoptosis persisted following the third day. Given these lymphocyte responses, it is recommended that a rest day be incorporated following two consecutive days of a high-intensity intermittent run program to minimize immune cell modulations and reduce potential susceptibility. PMID:24895602

  1. Influence of fingolimod on basic lymphocyte subsets frequencies in the peripheral blood of multiple sclerosis patients – preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Rudnicka, Julia; Czerwiec, Michał; Siwicka-Gieroba, Dorota; Walankiewicz, Monika; Grafka, Agnieszka; Zgurski, Michał; Surdacka, Agata; Bartosik-Psujek, Halina; Roliński, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Background Fingolimod is a drug administered orally to adult patients treated for relapsing remitting course of multiple sclerosis (MS). Mode of action of fingolimod is based on intense S1P1 receptor stimulation and “arresting” lymphocytes in lymphatic organs. Objective of the research was to assess changes in the frequencies of basic lymphocyte subsets in patients treated for multiple sclerosis with the use of fingolimod. Material and methods Study group comprised of 25 previously untreated adult patients with MS. Venous blood samples were collected from each patient before and one month, three months and six months after treatment initiation. Peripheral blood lymphocyte immunophenotype was assessed with a set of monoclonal antibodies bounded to appropriate fluorochromes and flow cytometer FACSC alibur. Statistical analysis of the results was conducted using Statistica 9.0 software. Results Before fingolimod administration median of lymphocyte subsets percentage in each patient was in reference range. After 1 month of treatment we noticed significant changes in frequencies of following lymphocyte subsets: NK cells – 51.22% (p = 0.016), T CD4+ cells – 11.58% (p = 0.01), T CD4+:T CD8+ cells ratio – 0.61 (p = 0.005). After 3 and 6 months of treatment there was further increase of deviation from normal state. Conclusions The use of fingolimod is associated with profound changes in lymphocyte subsets distribution, which might bear a risk of the development of cellular immune deficiency symptoms. PMID:26648781

  2. Myeloperoxidase in human peripheral blood lymphocytes: Production and subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Okada, Sabrina Sayori; de Oliveira, Edson Mendes; de Araújo, Tomaz Henrique; Rodrigues, Maria Rita; Albuquerque, Renata Chaves; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Taniwaki, Noemi Nosomi; Nakaya, Helder Imoto; Campa, Ana; Moreno, Ana Carolina Ramos

    2016-02-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an important enzyme in the front-line protection against microorganisms. In peripheral blood, it is accepted that MPO is only produced by myeloid-lineage cells. Thus, MPO presence is unexpected in lymphocytes. We showed recently that B1-lymphocytes from mice have MPO. Here, we showed that subsets of human peripheral B, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes express MPO. The content of MPO in lymphocytes was very low compared to neutrophils/monocytes with a preferential distribution in the nucleus and perinuclear region. Also, we performed a MPO mRNA expression analysis from human blood cells derived from microarray raw data publicly available, showing that MPO is modulated in infectious disease. MPO was increased in CD4(+) T lymphocytes from HIV chronic infection and in CD8(+) T lymphocytes from HCV-positive patients. Our study points out MPO as a multifunctional protein due to its subcellular localization and expression modulation in lymphocytes indicating alternative unknown functions for MPO in lymphocytes. PMID:26632272

  3. Influence of betulinic acid on lymphocyte subsets and humoral immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Jine, Y; Lis, M; Szczypka, M; Obmińska-Mrukowicz, B

    2012-01-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpene found in many plant species, among others, in the bark of white birch Betula alba. Betulinic acid was reported to display a wide range of biological effects, including antiviral, antiparasitic, antibacterial, anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. The effects of betulinic acid (50, 5, 0.5 mg/kg) administered orally five times at 24 hours intervals to non-immunized and red blood cells (SRBC)-immunized mice were determined. The present study examined the total number of lymphocytes in the thymus, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes, and the percentage of subsets of T cells (CD4+CD8+, CD4CD8, CD4+, CD8+) in thymus,T (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+) and B (CD19+) lymphocytes in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes, as well as white blood cell (WBC) and differential leukocyte counts in non-immunized mice, and humoral immune response in SRBC-immunized mice. SRBC was injected 24 hours after administration of the last dose of betulinic acid. It was found that betulinic acid administered orally five times at the dose of 0.5 mg/kg increased the total number of thymocytes, splenocytes, lymphocytes of mesenteric lymph node cells, and the weight ratio of the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes in non-immunized mice. Betulinic acid also changed the percentage of T cell subsets in the thymus and T and B lymphocytes in peripheral lymphatic organs. The effects of betulinic acid on T and B cell subpopulations depended on the dose applied. The strongest stimulating effect of betulinic acid was observed when the drug was administered at the dose of 0.5 mg/kg. Five exposures to betulinic acid (0.5 mg/kg) decreased the percentage of immature CD4+CD8+ thymic cells with corresponding increases in the percentage and absolute count of mature, single-positive CD4+ thymocytes and decreased the percentage and total count of CD3+ splenocytes and mesenteric lymph node cells with corresponding decreases in the percentage and absolute count of CD4+ and CD8+ cells

  4. [Reference intervals for peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in healthy adults in Lima, Peru].

    PubMed

    Cóndor, José M; Álvarez, Marco; Cano, Luis; Matos, Edgar; Leiva, Christian; Paredes, José A

    2013-04-01

    In order to establish the reference intervals (RIs) of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets (PBL) in healthy adults in Lima (Peru), a cross-sectional study was conducted among blood donors taken in between 2011 and 2012. Based on the criteria obtained from the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI C28-A3), 318 samples were processed, 61.9% (197/318) coming from male donors. For PBL count, a flow cytometer with a simple platform was used. The RIs are established for each PBL in adults based on sex with their respective reference limits and 90% confidence intervals. Differences were found in CD3+ percentage counts (p=0.001) and in CD3-CD56+ absolute (p=0.003) and percentage counts (p?0.001). The RIs found are different to those described in studies conducted in other countries due to the characteristics of the population and the study model.

  5. [Reference intervals for peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in healthy adults in Lima, Peru].

    PubMed

    Cóndor, José M; Álvarez, Marco; Cano, Luis; Matos, Edgar; Leiva, Christian; Paredes, José A

    2013-04-01

    In order to establish the reference intervals (RIs) of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets (PBL) in healthy adults in Lima (Peru), a cross-sectional study was conducted among blood donors taken in between 2011 and 2012. Based on the criteria obtained from the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI C28-A3), 318 samples were processed, 61.9% (197/318) coming from male donors. For PBL count, a flow cytometer with a simple platform was used. The RIs are established for each PBL in adults based on sex with their respective reference limits and 90% confidence intervals. Differences were found in CD3+ percentage counts (p=0.001) and in CD3-CD56+ absolute (p=0.003) and percentage counts (p?0.001). The RIs found are different to those described in studies conducted in other countries due to the characteristics of the population and the study model. PMID:23949508

  6. Expression of T-cell-activating protein in peripheral lymphocyte subsets.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, E T; Reiser, H; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1986-01-01

    T-cell-activating protein (TAP) is an allelic 12-kDa membrane protein that participates in T-cell activation. Soluble anti-TAP monoclonal antibodies can trigger antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex-restricted T-cell hybridomas to produce interleukin 2 and are mitogenic for normal T cells and thymocytes. TAP is expressed on 10% of thymocytes, which are mainly cortisone-resistant and mature. In the periphery, TAP is expressed on 70% of resting T cells but not on resting B cells. In this report, we analyze in detail the nature of TAP expression on peripheral lymphocyte subsets by immunofluorescence techniques. We show that all inducer (L3T4+) T cells are TAP+. In contrast, only 50% of Lyt-2+ T cells express detectable TAP. Functional studies demonstrated that at least part of the heterogeneity of TAP expression is present in the Lyt-2+ cytolytic T-cell (CTL) subset. Unstimulated CTL precursors are TAP- but are induced to express TAP in the effector state. Furthermore, this reflects actual synthesis of TAP, as TAP is detectable on activated Lyt-2+ CTLs passaged in vitro under conditions where passive acquisition can be ruled out. To extend this observation, we have studied the expression of TAP on activated T and B cells. Upon activation, all T and B cells became TAP+. Furthermore, the TAP molecules on B and T cells are indistinguishable by NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This suggests that TAP expression defines further heterogeneity of lymphocytes, with activation being one parameter influencing its expression. Images PMID:3020545

  7. Proteomics of Human Dendritic Cell Subsets Reveals Subset-Specific Surface Markers and Differential Inflammasome Function.

    PubMed

    Worah, Kuntal; Mathan, Till S M; Vu Manh, Thien Phong; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Schreibelt, Gerty; Tel, Jurjen; Duiveman-de Boer, Tjitske; Sköld, Annette E; van Spriel, Annemiek B; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Huynen, Martijn A; Wessels, Hans J; Gloerich, Jolein; Dalod, Marc; Lasonder, Edwin; Figdor, Carl G; Buschow, Sonja I

    2016-09-13

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in orchestrating adaptive immune responses. In human blood, three distinct subsets exist: plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and BDCA3+ and CD1c+ myeloid DCs. In addition, a DC-like CD16+ monocyte has been reported. Although RNA-expression profiles have been previously compared, protein expression data may provide a different picture. Here, we exploited label-free quantitative mass spectrometry to compare and identify differences in primary human DC subset proteins. Moreover, we integrated these proteomic data with existing mRNA data to derive robust cell-specific expression signatures with more than 400 differentially expressed proteins between subsets, forming a solid basis for investigation of subset-specific functions. We illustrated this by extracting subset identification markers and by demonstrating that pDCs lack caspase-1 and only express low levels of other inflammasome-related proteins. In accordance, pDCs were incapable of interleukin (IL)-1β secretion in response to ATP. PMID:27626665

  8. Identification of distinct lymphocyte subsets responding to subcellular fractions of Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG)

    PubMed Central

    Batoni, G; Esin, S; Pardini, M; Bottai, D; Senesi, S; Wigzell, H; Campa, M

    2000-01-01

    In order to investigate the ability of Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination to induce immune responses toward different classes of mycobacterial antigens and the cell populations involved in such responses, proliferation of distinct human lymphocyte subsets from BCG-vaccinated donors in response to different subcellular fractions of BCG was analysed and compared with that of not sensitized subjects. Proliferation of different cell subsets was evaluated by flow cytometric determination of bromodeoxyuridine incorporated into DNA of dividing cells and simultaneous identification of cell surface markers. Although a certain degree of variability was observed among different donors, after 6 days of in vitro stimulation BCG-vaccinated subjects displayed, as a mean, a stronger blastogenic response to all the classes of antigens compared with non-sensitized ones. PPD, culture filtrates and membrane antigens induced a predominant proliferation of CD4+ T cells. In contrast, preparations enriched in cytosolic antigens elicited strong proliferation of γδ+ T cells which, as a mean, represented 55% of the proliferating cells. Although to a lesser extent, proliferation of γδ+ T cells was also elicited by preparations enriched in membrane and cell wall antigens. In response to the latter preparation proliferation of CD4+ T cells and CD16+/CD3− (natural killer (NK)) cells was observed, as well. In particular, cell wall antigens were found to induce significantly higher levels of proliferation of NK cells compared with all the other classes of antigens. PMID:10632662

  9. Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Young, Emma; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Moysiadis, Theodoros; Plevova, Karla; Rossi, Davide; Kminkova, Jana; Stalika, Evangelia; Pedersen, Lone Bredo; Malcikova, Jitka; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Davis, Zadie; Mansouri, Larry; Scarfò, Lydia; Boudjoghra, Myriam; Navarro, Alba; Muggen, Alice F; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Larrayoz, Marta; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Niemann, Carsten Utoft; Belessi, Chrysoula; Campo, Elias; Strefford, Jonathan C; Langerak, Anton W; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pospisilova, Sarka; Davi, Frederic; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2016-08-01

    We report on markedly different frequencies of genetic lesions within subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying mutated or unmutated stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in the largest cohort (n=565) studied for this purpose. By combining data on recurrent gene mutations (BIRC3, MYD88, NOTCH1, SF3B1 and TP53) and cytogenetic aberrations, we reveal a subset-biased acquisition of gene mutations. More specifically, the frequency of NOTCH1 mutations was found to be enriched in subsets expressing unmutated immunoglobulin genes, i.e. #1, #6, #8 and #59 (22-34%), often in association with trisomy 12, and was significantly different (P<0.001) to the frequency observed in subset #2 (4%, aggressive disease, variable somatic hypermutation status) and subset #4 (1%, indolent disease, mutated immunoglobulin genes). Interestingly, subsets harboring a high frequency of NOTCH1 mutations were found to carry few (if any) SF3B1 mutations. This starkly contrasts with subsets #2 and #3 where, despite their immunogenetic differences, SF3B1 mutations occurred in 45% and 46% of cases, respectively. In addition, mutations within TP53, whilst enriched in subset #1 (16%), were rare in subsets #2 and #8 (both 2%), despite all being clinically aggressive. All subsets were negative for MYD88 mutations, whereas BIRC3 mutations were infrequent. Collectively, this striking bias and skewed distribution of mutations and cytogenetic aberrations within specific chronic lymphocytic leukemia subsets implies that the mechanisms underlying clinical aggressiveness are not uniform, but rather support the existence of distinct genetic pathways of clonal evolution governed by a particular stereotyped B-cell receptor selecting a certain molecular lesion(s). PMID:27198719

  10. Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Young, Emma; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Moysiadis, Theodoros; Plevova, Karla; Rossi, Davide; Kminkova, Jana; Stalika, Evangelia; Pedersen, Lone Bredo; Malcikova, Jitka; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Davis, Zadie; Mansouri, Larry; Scarfò, Lydia; Boudjoghra, Myriam; Navarro, Alba; Muggen, Alice F.; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Larrayoz, Marta; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Niemann, Carsten Utoft; Belessi, Chrysoula; Campo, Elias; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Langerak, Anton W.; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pospisilova, Sarka; Davi, Frederic; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We report on markedly different frequencies of genetic lesions within subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying mutated or unmutated stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in the largest cohort (n=565) studied for this purpose. By combining data on recurrent gene mutations (BIRC3, MYD88, NOTCH1, SF3B1 and TP53) and cytogenetic aberrations, we reveal a subset-biased acquisition of gene mutations. More specifically, the frequency of NOTCH1 mutations was found to be enriched in subsets expressing unmutated immunoglobulin genes, i.e. #1, #6, #8 and #59 (22–34%), often in association with trisomy 12, and was significantly different (P<0.001) to the frequency observed in subset #2 (4%, aggressive disease, variable somatic hypermutation status) and subset #4 (1%, indolent disease, mutated immunoglobulin genes). Interestingly, subsets harboring a high frequency of NOTCH1 mutations were found to carry few (if any) SF3B1 mutations. This starkly contrasts with subsets #2 and #3 where, despite their immunogenetic differences, SF3B1 mutations occurred in 45% and 46% of cases, respectively. In addition, mutations within TP53, whilst enriched in subset #1 (16%), were rare in subsets #2 and #8 (both 2%), despite all being clinically aggressive. All subsets were negative for MYD88 mutations, whereas BIRC3 mutations were infrequent. Collectively, this striking bias and skewed distribution of mutations and cytogenetic aberrations within specific chronic lymphocytic leukemia subsets implies that the mechanisms underlying clinical aggressiveness are not uniform, but rather support the existence of distinct genetic pathways of clonal evolution governed by a particular stereotyped B-cell receptor selecting a certain molecular lesion(s). PMID:27198719

  11. Membrane expression of NK receptors CD160 and CD158k contributes to delineate a unique CD4+ T-lymphocyte subset in normal and mycosis fungoides skin.

    PubMed

    Sako, Nouhoum; Schiavon, Valérie; Bounfour, Touda; Dessirier, Valérie; Ortonne, Nicolas; Olive, Daniel; Ram-Wolff, Caroline; Michel, Laurence; Sicard, Hélène; Marie-Cardine, Anne; Bagot, Martine; Bensussan, Armand; Schmitt, Christian

    2014-10-01

    CD160 is a GPI-anchored Ig-like receptor identified by the BY55 mAb on human circulating CD56dim+ NK cells and TCRγδ lymphocytes. In addition, while most intestinal T lymphocytes express it, only a minor circulating CD4+ or CD8+ T lymphocyte subset is CD160+. Here we describe a population of CD4+ CD160+ human blood T lymphocytes of circulating cutaneous T cells. These rare T lymphocytes represent 2.1 ± 1.9% of the circulating CD3+ CD4+ T cells, coexpress CD8αα, CD244, and perforin but lack CD28 expression, a phenotype corresponding to effector memory cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Functional studies further confirmed their cytotoxic potential. These cells lack αEβ7 integrin and CCR7 expression but do express skin-addressing molecules CLA, and CCR4. In normal human skin, CD4+ CD160+ cells represent 34.6 ± 14.7% of the CD4+ T lymphocytes extracted by collagenase treatment. These T cells coexpress CLA (81 ± 13.6%), CCR4 (62.3 ± 15.9%), and some CD8αα (19.6 ± 13%) or CCR7 (24.4 ± 11.7%) expression. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cells express the natural killer receptor KIR3DL2 (CD158k) used as a tumor marker. Not only we confirmed the expression of this marker in the blood and/or skin of mycosis fungoides patients but we also show for the first time CD158k expression (often associated with CD160) on cutaneous CD4+ T cells from healthy individuals (25.3 ± 15%). Therefore, CD4+ CD160+ T cells expressing CD158k might represent specialized cutaneous lymphocytes devoted to immune surveillance, from which could originate cutaneous T-cell lymphomas such as mycosis fungoides.

  12. Mixed lymphocyte reactivity of human lymphocytes primed in vitro. I. Secondary response to allogenic lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Fradelizi, D; Dausset, J

    1975-05-01

    In order to study the mixed lymphocyte culture reactivity of human lymphocytes primed in vitro, a nucleopore culture chamber technique allowing human lymphocytes to be cultured for a period of at least two weeks has been developed. During the primary culture period in nucleopore chambers, human lymphocytes were sensitized against mitomycin-treated allogenic stimulating cells. It was shown that the stimulated lymphocytes underwent a blastogenic reaction and the results suggest a reversion to the state of small, resting, primed lymphocytes. In vitro primed lymphocytes displayed allogenic memory. This was characteristic of a secondary response, which is shown by the following: 1) acceleration, the peak of thymidine incorporation occurring on day 4,2) specificity, the accelerated response was observed only when the primed lymphocytes were confronted with the cell used for priming. Contact with a third party cell did not produce this kind of activation. 3) Amplitude; the peak DNA synthesis response was greater than that of unprimed lymphocytes cultivated for the same length of time.

  13. Effects of formaldehyde on lymphocyte subsets and cytokines in the peripheral blood of exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaowei; Jia, Qiang; Zhang, Zhihu; Gao, Weimin; Zhang, Xianan; Niu, Yong; Meng, Tao; Feng, Bin; Duan, Huawei; Ye, Meng; Dai, Yufei; Jia, Zhongwei; Zheng, Yuxin

    2014-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a well-known irritant, and it is suggested to increase the risk of immune diseases and cancer. The present study aimed to evaluate the distribution of major lymphocyte subsets and cytokine expression profiles in the peripheral blood of FA-exposed workers. A total of 118 FA-exposed workers and 79 controls were enrolled in the study. High performance liquid chromatography, flow cytometry, and cytometric bead array were used to analyze FA in air sample and formic acid in urine, blood lymphocyte subpopulations, and serum cytokines, respectively. The FA-exposed workers were divided into low and high exposure groups according to their exposure levels. The results showed that both the low and high FA-exposed groups had a significant increase of formic acid in urine when compared to the controls. Both the low and high exposure groups had a significant increase in the percentage of B cells (CD19+) compared to the control group (p<0.01). A significant increase in the percentage of the natural killer (NK) cells (CD56+) was observed in the low exposure group compared to the control (p = 0.013). Moreover, the FA-exposed workers in both exposure groups showed a significant higher level of IL-10 but lower level of IL-8 than the control (p<0.01). Subjects in the high exposure group had a higher level of IL-4 but a lower level of IFN-γ than the control (p<0.05). Finally, there is a significant correlation between the levels of IL-10, IL-4, and IL-8 and formic acid (p<0.05). The findings from the present study may explain, at least in part, the association between FA exposure and immune diseases and cancer.

  14. The influence of cytomegalovirus carrier status on lymphocyte subsets and natural immunity.

    PubMed Central

    Gratama, J W; Kardol, M; Naipal, A M; Slats, J; Den Ouden, A; Stijnen, T; D'Amaro, J; The, T H; Bruning, J W

    1987-01-01

    The influence of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) carrier status on peripheral lymphocyte subsets was studied in 70 healthy individuals. IgG-class antibodies against CMV late antigen were used as markers for the presence of CMV in those individuals. The 39 CMV-seropositive individuals had significantly higher numbers of CD3+ (P = 0.009), CD8+ (P = 0.005) and HNK1+ (P = 0.002) cells than the 31 CMV-seronegative individuals. Two-colour immunofluorescence studies revealed that the HNK1+ cells coexpressing CD4 or high density CD8 were particularly increased in the number under the influence of CMV, but not the HNK1+ cells coexpressing CD16. Since HNK1 and CD16 are markers associated with natural killer (NK) activity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), we investigated the influence of the CMV carrier status on those functions. The NK and ADCC functions of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), HNK1+ and HNK1- cells were correlated with the percentages of CD16+ cells among those cells. Although CMV-seropositive individuals had significantly less CD16+ cells among their HNK1+ cells than CMV-seronegative individuals (mean and s.d.: 39 and 19%, versus 58 and 11%, P = 0.003), the NK and ADCC functions of the HNK1+ cells were similar in both groups. Also, the CMV carrier status did not influence significantly those functions of PBMC and HNK1- cells. We conclude that the CMV carrier status, i.e. CMV-seropositivity, is associated with a significant increase in the numbers of HNK1+ lymphocytes coexpressing T cell markers. That situation may reflect the continuing interaction between CMV and the immune system of its host. PMID:2820636

  15. Animal model of human disease: lymphocytic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Rubio, C A; Jarlnäs, M; Johnson, L

    1993-01-01

    Gastric specimens from 102 belonging to 11 different species were reviewed. Of the 11 species, only the gastric mucosa of pigs contained a large number of lymphocytes in the surface and in the foveolar epithelium (mean 82 lymphocytes/1000 epithelial cells, range 62-128 lymphocytes. The gastric specimens of the remaining 10 species revealed none or occasional lymphocytes in the surface or the foveolar epithelium. The occurrence of intraepithelial lymphocytes in the gastric mucosa of pigs mimics the human disease known as "lymphocytic gastritis". Since the etiology of this disease remains unknown, the apparently endemic nature of lymphocytic gastritis in pigs offer an alternative to investigate the possible cause(s), as well as the mechanism of, this disease.

  16. Metabolic Profile as a Potential Modifier of Long-Term Radiation Effects on Peripheral Lymphocyte Subsets in Atomic Bomb Survivors.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kengo; Nakashima, Eiji; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Hakoda, Masayuki; Hayashi, Tomonori; Hida, Ayumi; Ohishi, Waka; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2016-09-01

    Immune system impairments reflected by the composition and function of circulating lymphocytes are still observed in atomic bomb survivors, and metabolic abnormalities including altered blood triglyceride and cholesterol levels have also been detected in such survivors. Based on closely related features of immune and metabolic profiles of individuals, we investigated the hypothesis that long-term effects of radiation exposure on lymphocyte subsets might be modified by metabolic profiles in 3,113 atomic bomb survivors who participated in health examinations at the Radiation Effect Research Foundation, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in 2000-2002. The lymphocyte subsets analyzed involved T-, B- and NK-cell subsets, and their percentages in the lymphocyte fraction were assessed using flow cytometry. Health examinations included metabolic indicators, body mass index, serum levels of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, C-reactive protein and hemoglobin A1c, as well as diabetes and fatty liver diagnoses. Standard regression analyses indicated that several metabolic indicators of obesity/related disease, particularly high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, were positively associated with type-1 helper T- and B-cell percentages but were inversely associated with naïve CD4 T and NK cells. A regression analysis adjusted for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol revealed a radiation dose relationship with increasing NK-cell percentage. Additionally, an interaction effect was suggested between radiation dose and C-reactive protein on B-cell percentage with a negative coefficient of the interaction term. Collectively, these findings suggest that radiation exposure and subsequent metabolic profile changes, potentially in relationship to obesity-related inflammation, lead to such long-term alterations in lymphocyte subset composition. Because this study is based on cross-sectional and exploratory analyses, the implications regarding radiation exposure, metabolic

  17. Metabolic Profile as a Potential Modifier of Long-Term Radiation Effects on Peripheral Lymphocyte Subsets in Atomic Bomb Survivors.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kengo; Nakashima, Eiji; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Hakoda, Masayuki; Hayashi, Tomonori; Hida, Ayumi; Ohishi, Waka; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2016-09-01

    Immune system impairments reflected by the composition and function of circulating lymphocytes are still observed in atomic bomb survivors, and metabolic abnormalities including altered blood triglyceride and cholesterol levels have also been detected in such survivors. Based on closely related features of immune and metabolic profiles of individuals, we investigated the hypothesis that long-term effects of radiation exposure on lymphocyte subsets might be modified by metabolic profiles in 3,113 atomic bomb survivors who participated in health examinations at the Radiation Effect Research Foundation, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in 2000-2002. The lymphocyte subsets analyzed involved T-, B- and NK-cell subsets, and their percentages in the lymphocyte fraction were assessed using flow cytometry. Health examinations included metabolic indicators, body mass index, serum levels of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, C-reactive protein and hemoglobin A1c, as well as diabetes and fatty liver diagnoses. Standard regression analyses indicated that several metabolic indicators of obesity/related disease, particularly high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, were positively associated with type-1 helper T- and B-cell percentages but were inversely associated with naïve CD4 T and NK cells. A regression analysis adjusted for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol revealed a radiation dose relationship with increasing NK-cell percentage. Additionally, an interaction effect was suggested between radiation dose and C-reactive protein on B-cell percentage with a negative coefficient of the interaction term. Collectively, these findings suggest that radiation exposure and subsequent metabolic profile changes, potentially in relationship to obesity-related inflammation, lead to such long-term alterations in lymphocyte subset composition. Because this study is based on cross-sectional and exploratory analyses, the implications regarding radiation exposure, metabolic

  18. Stereotyped subset #1 chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a direct link between B-cell receptor structure, function, and patients' prognosis.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, Ilaria; Chiaretti, Sabina; Santangelo, Simona; Tavolaro, Simona; Peragine, Nadia; Marinelli, Marilisa; Ilari, Caterina; Raponi, Sara; Messina, Monica; Nanni, Mauro; Mauro, Francesca Romana; Piciocchi, Alfonso; Bontempi, Katia; Rossi, Davide; Gaidano, Gianluca; Guarini, Anna; Foà, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with stereotyped B-cell receptor (BCR) belonging to subset #1 (IGHV1-5-7/ IGKV1-39) display a poor outcome. To characterize their genetic and genomic features and BCR function, we selected 20 subset #1 CLL from a series of 579 cases. Subset #1 CLL, all showing unmutated IGHV, were associated with the presence of del(11q) (50%) in comparison with unmutated CLL, unmutated stereotyped CLL other than subset #1 and with cases using the same IGHV genes but a heterogeneous VH CDR3 (non-subset #1 CLL). There were no distinctive features regarding CD38, ZAP-70, and TP53 disruption. NOTCH1, SF3B1, and BIRC3 were mutated in 15%, 0%, and 5% of cases, respectively, while BIRC3 was deleted in 22% of cases. Microarray unsupervised analysis on 80 unmutated/mutated/stereotyped/non-stereotyped CLL showed a tight clustering of subset #1 cases. Their genomic signature exhibited several differentially expressed transcripts involved in BCR signal transduction, apoptosis regulation, cell proliferation, and oxidative processes, regardless of del(11q). Accordingly, BCR ligation with anti-IgM revealed a significant higher proliferation of subset #1 versus unmutated non-subset #1 CLL, both at baseline and after 24–48 hr stimulation. Subset #1 CLL represent a paradigmatic example of the direct link between BCR structure, function, and patients prognosis.

  19. Stimulation of human tonsillar lymphocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Oettgen, H. F.; Silber, R.; Miescher, P. A.; Hirschhorn, K.

    1966-01-01

    We have studied the in vitro behaviour of cultured human tonsillar lymphocytes. In comparison with peripheral blood lymphocytes these cells show a higher degree of formation of large cells and mitoses in control cultures without any additive. They behave in a manner similar to peripheral blood lymphocytes when cultured with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), streptolysin S (SLS) and specific antigens. The only exception is a lack of response to streptolysin O (SLO). PMID:5916348

  20. Sources of heterogeneity in human monocyte subsets

    PubMed Central

    Appleby, Laura J.; Nausch, Norman; Midzi, Nicholas; Mduluza, Takafira; Allen, Judith E.; Mutapi, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    Human monocytes are commonly defined and discriminated by the extent of their cell surface expression of CD14 and CD16, with associated differences in function and phenotype related to the intensity of expression of these markers. With increasing interest into the function and behaviour of monocytes, it is important to have a clear understanding of how differing strategies of analysis can affect results and how different protocols and population backgrounds can affect this highly morphogenic cell type. Using PBMCs from populations with differing ethnicities and histories of parasite exposure we have characterized monocyte phenotype based on intensity of CD14 and CD16 expression. Using the surface markers HLA-DR, CCR2 and CX3CR1, we compared monocyte phenotype between populations and further assessed changes in monocytes with freezing and thawing of PBMCs. Our results reveal that there is a progression of surface marker expression based on intensity of CD14 or CD16 expression, stressing the importance of careful gating of monocyte subtypes. Freezing and thawing of the PBMCs has no effect generally on the monocytes, although it does lead to a decrease in CD16 and CX3CR1 expression. We show that there are differences in the monocyte populations based on ethnicity and history of exposure to the common parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Schistosoma haematobium. This study highlights that blood monocytes consist of a continuous population of cells, within which the dominant phenotype may vary dependent on the background of the study population. Comparing results from monocyte studies therefore needs to be done with great care, as ethnic background of donor population, gating strategy and processing of PBMCs may all have an effect on outcome of monocyte phenotype. PMID:23557598

  1. Phenotypic study of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte subsets in relation to cytomegalovirus carrier status and its correlate with pokeweed mitogen-induced B lymphocyte differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Gratama, J W; Langelaar, R A; Oosterveer, M A; van der Linden, J A; den Ouden-Noordermeer, A; Naipal, A M; Visser, J W; de Gast, G C; Tanke, H J

    1989-01-01

    A characteristic of active cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is its suppressive effect on in vitro assays of immune function. The expression of CD11b by the Cd4+ and Cd8+ lymphocytes allows the identification of subsets with distinct regulatory functions of pokeweed mitogen (PWM) induced B cell differentiation. In order to relate that result with our previous observation that CMV carriers have significantly increased numbers of CD4+, HNK1+ and CD8+, HNK1+ lymphocytes in their peripheral blood compared with non-carriers, we performed a three-colour flow cytometric analysis of the co-expression of Cd11b and HNK1 by CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes obtained from 27 CMV carriers and 42 non-carriers. The differences between CMV carriers and non-carriers were significant for the CD4+, HNK1+ lymphocytes (median [5th and 95th percentiles], 59 [18 and 123 versus 24/7 and 73 per mm3, respectively; P less than 0.001) and CD8+, HNK1+ lymphocytes (59 [18 259] versus 52 [23 and 139] per mm3; P less than 0.001), but not for the CD4+, CD11b+ lymphocytes (59 [18 and 135] versus 52 [17 and 104] per mm3) and the CD8+, CD11b+ lymphocytes (85 [34 and 293] versus 82 [21 and 248] per mm3). The CD4+, HNK1+ and CD8+, HNK1+ lymphocytes that were increased in CMV carriers compared with non-carriers included mostly CD11b-, but also CD11b+ lymphocytes. After sorting CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes for four CMV carriers into HNK1+ and HNK1- fractions, we analyzed their regulatory functions on PWM-driven B cell Helper function to PWM-driven B cell differentiation was exclusively associated with the CD4+, HNK1- lymphocytes; the CD4+, HNK1+ generally did not show helper or suppressor activity in this assay. Both CD8+, HNK1+ and CD8+, HNK1- lymphocytes showed suppressor activity. Thus, the NHK1 marker does not constitute a phenotypical correlate for suppressor cells of PWM-driven B-cell differentiation. PMID:2476271

  2. Characterization of a human blood monocyte subset with low peroxidase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Y; Miller, P J; Thurman, G B; Neubauer, R H; Oliver, C; Favilla, T; Beman, J A; Oldham, R K; Stevenson, H C

    1983-01-01

    Two human monocyte subsets from the peripheral blood of healthy donors have been isolated in greater than 90% purity by countercurrent centrifugal elutration and human serum albumin gradients and their functional capabilities have been assessed. We have demonstrated that one subset ("regular" monocytes, RM) showed intense cytoplasmic peroxidase staining and contained substantial peroxidase activity. In contrast, another subset ("intermediate" monocytes, IM) stained poorly for peroxidase and had low peroxidase activity. By electron microscopic analysis combined with peroxidase localization, it was found that IM had fewer peroxidase-positive granules per cell than did RM. IM coelutriated with some lymphocytes and by cell sizing analysis were shown to be slightly smaller than RM. Functional and cytochemical analysis of these subsets indicated that IM had less activity than RM in assays such as accessory cell function for mitogen-induced T lymphocyte proliferation and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and that fewer IM expressed OKM1 antigen and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) receptors on their membranes than did RM. The subset of IM not bearing either the PWM receptor or the OKM1 antigen had very low peroxidase activity. IM also were found to have a greater sensitivity to polyriboinosinic and polyribocytidilic acid (100 micrograms/ml)-induced secretion of interferon. There was no significant difference in the phagocytic capability, the percentage of Fc receptor-positive cells, 5'-nucleotidase activity, DR antigen expression, or the responsiveness to migration inhibitory factor of IM as compared with RM. Furthermore, it was found that the ratio of IM to RM increased after prolonged cytapheresis, which suggests that IM are more mobilizable than RM from the extravascular reservoirs of human monocytes. Images FIGURE 5 PMID:6193141

  3. Immunohistochemical localization of T-lymphocyte subsets in the developing lymphoid tissues of the tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii).

    PubMed

    Duncan, Louise G; Nair, Sham V; Deane, Elizabeth M

    2012-12-01

    Research into marsupial adaptive immunity during ontogeny has been hampered by the lack of antibodies that react to marsupial immunological cell populations. In this study, newly synthesised polyclonal antibodies to the T cell marker, CD8, have been developed and used to investigate the ontogeny and distribution of this T cell population in the tammar wallaby. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that the distribution of the CD8 lymphocytes in the lymphoid tissues of tammar neonates during the first 144 days of pouch life was similar to that of the eutherian mammals. However, CD8α(+) lymphocytes were observed in the intestines of tammar neonates prior to their first appearance in the cervical thymus, an observation that has not been found in eutherians. A dual labelling immunohistochemical approach was used for the indirect demonstration of CD4 and enabled the simultaneous detection in the tammar wallaby tissues of the two major T-lymphocyte populations, CD4 and CD8 that are associated with adaptive immunity. As in eutherian mammals, CD4(+) cells were the predominant T cell lymphocyte subset observed in the spleen while in the nodal tissues, an age-related decrease in the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio was noted. These antibodies provide a new immunological tool to study the role of T cell subsets in marsupial immunity and disease pathogenesis studies. PMID:22929957

  4. Interaction of lactoferrin, monocytes, and T lymphocyte subsets in the regulation of steady-state granulopoiesis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bagby, G C; Rigas, V D; Bennett, R M; Vandenbark, A A; Garewal, H S

    1981-01-01

    Colony-stimulating activities (CSA) are potent granulopoietic stimulators in vitro. Using clonogenic assay techniques, we analyzed the degree to which mononuclear phagocytes and T lymphocytes cooperate in the positive (production/release of CSA) and feedback (inhibition of CSA production/release) regulation of granulopoiesis. We measured the effect of lactoferrin (a putative feedback regulator of CSA production) on CSA provision in three separate assay systems wherein granulocyte colony growth of marrow cells from 22 normal volunteers was stimulated by (a) endogenous CSA-producing cells in the marrow cells suspension, (b) autologous peripheral blood leukocytes in feeder layers, and (c) medium conditioned by peripheral blood leukocytes. The CSA-producing cell populations in each assay were varied by using cell separation techniques and exposure of isolated T lymphocytes to methylprednisolone or to monoclonal antibodies to surface antigens and complement. We noted that net CSA production increased more than twofold when a small number of unstimulated T lymphocytes were added to monocyte cultures. Lactoferrin's inhibitory effect was also T lymphocyte dependent. The T lymphocytes that interact with monocytes and lactoferrin to inhibit CSA production are similar to those that augment CSA production because their activities are neither genetically restricted not glucocorticoid sensitive, and both populations express HLA-DR (Ia-like) and T3 antigens but not T4 or T8 antigens. These findings are consistent with results of our studies on the mechanism of lactoferrin's inhibitory effect with indicate that mononuclear phagocytes produce both CSA and soluble factors that stimulate T lymphocytes to produce CSA, and that lactoferrin does not suppress monocyte CSA production, but does completely suppress production or release by monocytes of those factors that stimulate T lymphocytes to produce CSA. We conclude that mononuclear phagocytes and a subset of T lymphocytes exhibit

  5. A Reassessment of IgM Memory Subsets in Humans.

    PubMed

    Bagnara, Davide; Squillario, Margherita; Kipling, David; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Da Silva, Lucie; Weller, Sandra; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-10-15

    From paired blood and spleen samples from three adult donors, we performed high-throughput VH sequencing of human B cell subsets defined by IgD and CD27 expression: IgD(+)CD27(+) ("marginal zone [MZ]"), IgD(-)CD27(+) ("memory," including IgM ["IgM-only"], IgG and IgA) and IgD(-)CD27(-) cells ("double-negative," including IgM, IgG, and IgA). A total of 91,294 unique sequences clustered in 42,670 clones, revealing major clonal expansions in each of these subsets. Among these clones, we further analyzed those shared sequences from different subsets or tissues for VH gene mutation, H-CDR3-length, and VH/JH usage, comparing these different characteristics with all sequences from their subset of origin for which these parameters constitute a distinct signature. The IgM-only repertoire profile differed notably from that of MZ B cells by a higher mutation frequency and lower VH4 and higher JH6 gene usage. Strikingly, IgM sequences from clones shared between the MZ and the memory IgG/IgA compartments showed a mutation and repertoire profile of IgM-only and not of MZ B cells. Similarly, all IgM clonal relationships (among MZ, IgM-only, and double-negative compartments) involved sequences with the characteristics of IgM-only B cells. Finally, clonal relationships between tissues suggested distinct recirculation characteristics between MZ and switched B cells. The "IgM-only" subset (including cells with its repertoire signature but higher IgD or lower CD27 expression levels) thus appear as the only subset showing precursor-product relationships with CD27(+) switched memory B cells, indicating that they represent germinal center-derived IgM memory B cells and that IgM memory and MZ B cells constitute two distinct entities.

  6. T-lymphocyte subset dynamics in well-treated HIV-infected men during a bout of exhausting exercise.

    PubMed

    Dirksen, Carsten; Hansen, Birgitte R; Kolte, Lilian; Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove

    2015-01-01

    In healthy individuals the substantial lymphocytosis during a bout of exhausting exercise constitutes primarily mature T cells from the peripheral lymphoid organs but naïve T cells are also recruited. This study investigated whether the defective CD4 + T-lymphocyte count in peripheral blood during rest in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients would also be observed following a maximal output ergometer bicycle test. At rest, in 45 well-treated HIV-infected patients, mature and naïve CD4 + T-lymphocyte counts were decreased whereas the less immune active CD8 + T lymphocytes were increased compared with 10 healthy control subjects. In response to exercise mature and naïve CD4 + T lymphocytes increased less and mature and naïve CD8 + T lymphocytes increased most in HIV-infected patients. In conclusion, defective resting mature and naïve CD4 + T lymphocytes in well-treated HIV-infected patients are also reflected in defective acutely mobilized active immune cells following exhausting exercise. The CD4 + T-lymphocyte count is highly sensitive to physical activity.

  7. The effect of dietary lipid manipulation on rat lymphocyte subsets and proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Yaqoob, P; Newsholme, E A; Calder, P C

    1994-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been shown to suppress immune cell functions in vitro. Dietary studies investigating the effects of PUFA-containing oils on lymphocyte functions have yielded contradictory findings: such studies are difficult to compare as there are many variations in protocols. The present study investigated the effects of diets containing oils rich in saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, n-6 PUFA or n-3 PUFA on rat lymphocyte proliferation and on receptor and surface marker expression. Rats were fed for 10 weeks on a low-fat (LF) diet (approximately 2% fat by weight) or on one of five high-fat diets, which contained 20% (by weight) hydrogenated coconut oil (HCO), olive oil (OO), safflower oil (SO), evening primrose oil (EPO) or menhaden (fish) oil (MO). Compared with feeding the LF diet, all of the high-fat diets suppressed the proliferation of lymphocytes from the spleen: although there was no significant effect of diet on the proliferation of lymphocytes from the thymus, there was a trend towards decreased proliferation with high-fat feeding. Feeding the OO, EPO or MO diets significantly suppressed proliferation of mesenteric lymph node lymphocytes compared with feeding the LF, HCO or SO diets. Dietary lipid manipulation had no effect on the proportion of T cells, B cells or monocytes/macrophages in the spleen, thymus or lymph nodes. Dietary lipid manipulation also had no significant effect on the proportions of CD4+ or CD8+ lymphocytes in spleen, thymus or lymph nodes, either in freshly prepared cells or in cells cultured in the presence of mitogen. There were no significant effects of dietary lipid manipulation on the expression of IL-2 receptors or transferrin receptors by concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated lymphocytes. However, there was a trend towards a decrease in transferrin receptor expression by Con A-stimulated lymphocytes from the thymus and lymph nodes of the MO-fed rats and towards a decrease in the expression

  8. Characterization of autonomic nerve markers and lymphocyte subsets in the ileal Peyer's patch of pigs infected experimentally with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed

    Kaleczyc, J; Podlasz, P; Winnicka, A; Wasowicz, W; Sienkiewicz, W; Zmudzki, J; Lakomy, M

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate potential interrelationships between immune and neural elements of Peyer's patches in normal pigs (n=8) and in pigs infected experimentally with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and suffering from swine dysentery (n=8). Assessment of tissue concentration of neuropeptides by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay revealed increased levels of galanin (GAL) and substance P (SP) in samples from the infected animals. In contrast, concentrations of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and somatostatin (SOM) were similar in both groups. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated reactivity of nerve fibres with antibodies specific for dopamine β hydroxylase, vesicular acetylcholine transporter, SOM, GAL, VIP and SP in the interfollicular region and peripheral areas of the Peyer's patch lymphoid follicles. In the dysenteric pigs, the GAL-positive nerve fibres were more numerous and more intensely labelled than those in the normal animals. Flow cytometry revealed a decreased percentage of CD21(+) lymphocytes and lymphocytes expressing T-cell receptor (TCR)-γ, with or without CD8 (TCR-γ(+)CD8(-) and TCR-γ(+)CD8(+)), in the dysenteric pigs as compared with the normal animals. Percentages of other lymphocyte subsets (CD2(+), CD4(+), CD5(+), CD8(+), CD5(-)CD8(+)) were comparable between the groups. Immunohistochemical investigations generally correlated with results obtained by flow cytometry related to lymphocyte subpopulations. Swine dysentery can therefore affect neuroimmunomodulatory processes in the ileal Peyer's patch, in addition to the large intestine. GAL and SP may play a specific role in this neuroimmune cross-talk. PMID:20605161

  9. Changes in lymphocyte and macrophage subsets due to morphine and ethanol treatment during a retrovirus infection causing murine AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.R.; Prabhala, R.H.; Darban, H.R.; Yahya, M.D.; Smith, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    The number of lymphocytes of various subsets were not significantly changed by the ethanol exposure except those showing activation markers which were reduced. The percentage of peripheral blood cells showing markers for macrophage functions and their activation were significantly reduced after binge use of ethanol. Ethanol retarded suppression of cells by retroviral infection. However by 25 weeks of infection there was a 8.6% survival in the ethanol fed mice infected with retrovirus which was much less than virally infected controls. Morphine treatment also increased the percentage of cells with markers for macrophages and activated macrophages in virally infected mice, while suppressing them in uninfected mice. The second and third morphine injection series suppressed lymphocyte T-helper and T-suppressor cells, but not total T cells. However, suppression by morphine was significantly less during retroviral disease than suppression caused by the virus only. At 25 weeks of infection 44.8% of morphine treated, infected mice survived.

  10. Distribution of lymphocyte subsets in the small intestine lymphoid tissue of 1-month-old lambs.

    PubMed

    Corpa, J M; Juste, R A; García Marín, J F; Reyes, L E; González, J; Pérez, V

    2001-04-01

    Distribution of lymphocyte subpopulations along the small intestine lymphoid tissue has been examined in 1-month-old lambs using flow cytometric and immunohistochemical techniques. Monoclonal antibodies against CD4, CD8, gamma delta, CD45R and B receptors have been employed in samples from continuous ileal Peyer's patch (IPP), discrete jejunal Peyer's patches (JPP), ileocaecal valve lymphoid tissue (ICVPP), mesenteric lymph node (MLN) and intra-epithelial (IEL) and lamina propria (LPL) lymphocytes. Histological studies were also done. Differences in the lymphocyte distribution have been observed between some of the regions examined, especially between IPP and JPP for most of the markers. A remarkable feature was the existence of morphological and lymphocyte distribution differences between ICVPP and IPP, locations that had been traditionally considered as similar. The antibody against CD45R receptor used in this study, that was supposed to mark B cells and some T cells, detected cell populations located in the dome of the follicles in all the samples, whereas the centre was negative. Lymphocytes positive to the B marker employed were located mainly in the centre, suggesting that both antibodies would mark B cells in different maturation status.

  11. Plasticity of Human CD4 T Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Geginat, Jens; Paroni, Moira; Maglie, Stefano; Alfen, Johanna Sophie; Kastirr, Ilko; Gruarin, Paola; De Simone, Marco; Pagani, Massimiliano; Abrignani, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Human beings are exposed to a variety of different pathogens, which induce tailored immune responses and consequently generate highly diverse populations of pathogen-specific T cells. CD4+ T cells have a central role in adaptive immunity, since they provide essential help for both cytotoxic T cell- and antibody-mediated responses. In addition, CD4+ regulatory T cells are required to maintain self-tolerance and to inhibit immune responses that could damage the host. Initially, two subsets of CD4+ helper T cells were identified that secrete characteristic effector cytokines and mediate responses against different types of pathogens, i.e., IFN-γ secreting Th1 cells that fight intracellular pathogens, and IL-4 producing Th2 cells that target extracellular parasites. It is now well established that this dichotomy is insufficient to describe the complexity of CD4+ T cell differentiation, and in particular the human CD4 compartment contains a myriad of T cell subsets with characteristic capacities to produce cytokines and to home to involved tissues. Moreover, it has become increasingly clear that these T cell subsets are not all terminally differentiated cells, but that the majority is plastic and that in particular central memory T cells can acquire different properties and functions in secondary immune responses. In addition, there is compelling evidence that helper T cells can acquire regulatory functions upon chronic stimulation in inflamed tissues. The plasticity of antigen-experienced human T cell subsets is highly relevant for translational medicine, since it opens new perspectives for immune-modulatory therapies for chronic infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. PMID:25566245

  12. Virus-lymphocyte interaction: T cells of the helper subset are infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus during persistent infection in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, R; King, C C; Oldstone, M B

    1987-01-01

    The lifelong persistence of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) in neonatally or congenitally infected mice is accompanied by a suppression of virus-specific T-cell responses. In this study, we identified the subset of T cells infected with LCMV during persistent infection in vivo. Using specific monoclonal antibodies to separate the different lymphocyte cell populations and employing both an infectious center assay and immunofluorescence to detect the virus, we found that infection is confined primarily to T cells of the helper subset (L3T4+ Lyt2-), with minimal involvement of cytotoxic T cells (Lyt2+ L3T4-) and mature B cells. About 0.54 to 1.1% of L3T4+ T cells were producing the virus, as determined by the infectious center assay. In contrast, 9.1 to 12.2% of these L3T4+ T cells contained viral antigen, as shown by immunofluorescence studies. This finding suggested that, at any given time, a substantial number of infected T cells were not producing infectious virus. This infection of T helper cells may be involved in the suppression of LCMV-specific T-cell responses observed in persistently infected mice. Images PMID:2952807

  13. Specific lymphocyte subsets predict response to adoptive cell therapy using expanded autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in metastatic melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Radvanyi, Laszlo G.; Bernatchez, Chantale; Zhang, Minying; Fox, Patricia S.; Miller, Priscilla; Chacon, Jessica; Wu, Richard; Lizee, Gregory; Mahoney, Sandy; Alvarado, Gladys; Glass, Michelle; Johnson, Valen E.; McMannis, John D.; Shpall, Elizabeth; Prieto, Victor; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Kim, Kevin; Homsi, Jade; Bedikian, Agop; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Patel, Sapna; Ross, Merrick I.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Lucci, Anthony; Royal, Richard; Cormier, Janice N.; Davies, Michael A.; Mansaray, Rahmatu; Fulbright, Orenthial J.; Toth, Christopher; Ramachandran, Renjith; Wardell, Seth; Gonzalez, Audrey; Hwu, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) is a promising treatment for metastatic melanoma unresponsive to conventional therapies. We report here on the results of an ongoing Phase II clinical trial testing the efficacy of ACT using TIL in metastatic melanoma patients and the association of specific patient clinical characteristics and the phenotypic attributes of the infused TIL with clinical response. Experimental Design Altogether, 31 transiently lymphodepleted patients were treated with their expanded TIL followed by two cycles of high-dose (HD) IL-2 therapy. The effects of patient clinical features and the phenotypes of the T-cells infused on clinical response were determined. Results Overall, 15/31 (48.4%) patients had an objective clinical response using immune-related response criteria (irRC), with two patients (6.5%) having a complete response. Progression-free survival of >12 months was observed for 9/15 (60%) of the responding patients. Factors significantly associated with objective tumor regression included a higher number of TIL infused, a higher proportion of CD8+ T-cells in the infusion product, a more differentiated effector phenotype of the CD8+ population and a higher frequency of CD8+ T-cells co-expressing the negative costimulation molecule “B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator” (BTLA). No significant difference in telomere lengths of TIL between responders and non-responders was identified. Conclusion These results indicate that immunotherapy with expanded autologous TIL is capable of achieving durable clinical responses in metastatic melanoma patients and that CD8+ T-cells in the infused TIL, particularly differentiated effectors cells and cells expressing BTLA, are associated with tumor regression. PMID:23032743

  14. A Reassessment of IgM Memory Subsets in Humans.

    PubMed

    Bagnara, Davide; Squillario, Margherita; Kipling, David; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Da Silva, Lucie; Weller, Sandra; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-10-15

    From paired blood and spleen samples from three adult donors, we performed high-throughput VH sequencing of human B cell subsets defined by IgD and CD27 expression: IgD(+)CD27(+) ("marginal zone [MZ]"), IgD(-)CD27(+) ("memory," including IgM ["IgM-only"], IgG and IgA) and IgD(-)CD27(-) cells ("double-negative," including IgM, IgG, and IgA). A total of 91,294 unique sequences clustered in 42,670 clones, revealing major clonal expansions in each of these subsets. Among these clones, we further analyzed those shared sequences from different subsets or tissues for VH gene mutation, H-CDR3-length, and VH/JH usage, comparing these different characteristics with all sequences from their subset of origin for which these parameters constitute a distinct signature. The IgM-only repertoire profile differed notably from that of MZ B cells by a higher mutation frequency and lower VH4 and higher JH6 gene usage. Strikingly, IgM sequences from clones shared between the MZ and the memory IgG/IgA compartments showed a mutation and repertoire profile of IgM-only and not of MZ B cells. Similarly, all IgM clonal relationships (among MZ, IgM-only, and double-negative compartments) involved sequences with the characteristics of IgM-only B cells. Finally, clonal relationships between tissues suggested distinct recirculation characteristics between MZ and switched B cells. The "IgM-only" subset (including cells with its repertoire signature but higher IgD or lower CD27 expression levels) thus appear as the only subset showing precursor-product relationships with CD27(+) switched memory B cells, indicating that they represent germinal center-derived IgM memory B cells and that IgM memory and MZ B cells constitute two distinct entities. PMID:26355154

  15. Effects of deep saturation diving on the lymphocyte subsets of healthy divers.

    PubMed

    Shinomiya, N; Suzuki, S; Hashimoto, A; Oiwa, H

    1994-09-01

    We examined the effect of deep saturation diving on the host defense mechanisms of five healthy volunteers using fluorescein-dye-conjugated monoclonal antibodies. Six divers engaged in a 440-m saturation diving simulation with total hyperbaric exposure of 30 days; five served as subjects. Change in the expression of surface molecules on the lymphocytes was analyzed during that period. Blood samples were serially taken on Days 4, 6, 8, 15, 22, 29, and after surfacing. The total number of lymphocytes showed no remarkable change. However, the fraction of T (CD3+) cells decreased from 68.0 +/- 3.3% to 55.8 +/- 5.8% (Day 8), and B cells increased reciprocally. In these T cells, the CD4:CD8 ratio (normally > 1.0) became less than 1.0 during compression and thereafter. In spite of the prophylactic use of anti-external otitis agents, one of the divers revealed a remarkable growth of Pseudomonas in the external auditory meatus, showing a high level of blood endotoxin (10.2 pg/ml). These results suggest that decrease in CD4+ fraction of T lymphocytes might explain in part the decreased resistance of divers to infective microorganisms in deep saturation diving.

  16. Immunity to Pathogens Taught by Specialized Human Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Geginat, Jens; Nizzoli, Giulia; Paroni, Moira; Maglie, Stefano; Larghi, Paola; Pascolo, Steve; Abrignani, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that have a key role in immune responses because they bridge the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. They mature upon recognition of pathogens and upregulate MHC molecules and costimulatory receptors to activate antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. It is now well established that DCs are not a homogeneous population but are composed of different subsets with specialized functions in immune responses to specific pathogens. Upon viral infections, plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) rapidly produce large amounts of IFN-α, which has potent antiviral functions and activates several other immune cells. However, pDCs are not particularly potent APCs and induce the tolerogenic cytokine IL-10 in CD4+ T cells. In contrast, myeloid DCs (mDCs) are very potent APCs and possess the unique capacity to prime naive T cells and consequently to initiate a primary adaptive immune response. Different subsets of mDCs with specialized functions have been identified. In mice, CD8α+ mDCs capture antigenic material from necrotic cells, secrete high levels of IL-12, and prime Th1 and cytotoxic T-cell responses to control intracellular pathogens. Conversely, CD8α− mDCs preferentially prime CD4+ T cells and promote Th2 or Th17 differentiation. BDCA-3+ mDC2 are the human homologue of CD8α+ mDCs, since they share the expression of several key molecules, the capacity to cross-present antigens to CD8+ T-cells and to produce IFN-λ. However, although several features of the DC network are conserved between humans and mice, the expression of several toll-like receptors as well as the production of cytokines that regulate T-cell differentiation are different. Intriguingly, recent data suggest specific roles for human DC subsets in immune responses against individual pathogens. The biology of human DC subsets holds the promise to be exploitable in translational medicine, in particular for the development of vaccines against

  17. Human lymphocyte surface immunoglobulin capping. Normal characteristics and anomalous behavior of chronic lymphocytic leukemic lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, H J

    1975-01-01

    The phenomenon of redistribution of surface membrane immunoglobulin (Ig) components (capping) has been well described in mouse lymphoid cells. The characteristics of this process in human lymphocytes are less clear. This study characterizes the phenomenon of surface membrane Ig redistribution of normal and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) lymphocytes with the use of fluoroscein-labeled anti-Ig sera. Normal lymphocytes underwent rapid cap formation after incubation with anti-Ig serum in the cold and subsequent rewarming. The morphology was characteristic with aggregation over the pole of the cell opposite the nucleus and over the uropod when present. The process was energy dependent but independent of protein synthesis, and could be inhibited by vincristine, vinblastine, and colchicine but not by cytochalasin B. CLL cells, on the other hand, though showing fluorescent complex aggregation on the surface, rarely demonstrated unidirectional movement of these aggregates to form a cap. Cap formation in these cells could not be stimulated by supplementing the energy source or protein concentration of the medium nor by adding glutamic acid which could partially reverse the vincristine and vinblastine inhibition of normal capping. The failure of agents which inhibit motility to inhibit capping of the normal lymphocytes suggests that active locomotion is not a direct prerequisite for capping. The results also suggest the involvement of microtubules in normal capping and the possibility that abnormal membrane structure or microtubular function could explain the failure of CLL cells to behave normally in this regard. The role of this cellular defect in the immune deficiencies exhibited by many patients with CLL, however, is not established. Images PMID:1088910

  18. T-Lymphocyte Subsets in the Embryonic Spleen Undergoing a Graft-Versus-Host Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Vaigot, Pierre; Désveaux-Chabrol, Jacqueline; Gendreau, Marcelle; Kroemer, Guido; Dieterlen-Lièvre, Françoise

    1991-01-01

    Allogeneic immunocompetent T cells injected into chicken embryos induce a graft-versushost reaction (GVHR) whose most prominent manifestation is splenic hyperplasia. The highly inbred CC and CB strains of chickens used here are, respectively, homozygous for the B4 or B12 MHC haplotypes. By means of a panel of immunological reagents, including alloantisera and monoclonal antibodies against public domains of the T-cell receptor, CD4, CD8, and the inducible interleukin-2-receptor light chain (CD25), it is shown that the bulk of cells in the enlarged spleen are of host origin and do not express markers typical of mature T or B lymphocytes. Among recipient splenocytes, the quantitatively most important population consists of TCRαβ-TCRγδ-CD4-CD8+CD25+ (TCR0) lymphocytes. Donor cells encountered in the spleen prevalently exhibit a TCRαβ+CD4+CD8-CD25+ phenotype and proliferate in vivo. The data demonstrate that nonspecific host and potentially specific donorderived cellular elements contribute to splenomegaly. PMID:1821695

  19. Serum immunoglobulins and lymphocyte subset distributions in children and adults living in communities assessed for lead and cadmium exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Sarasua, S.M.; Vogt, R.F.; Henderson, L.O.; Jones, P.A.; Lybarger, J.A.

    2000-05-12

    This study assessed the impact of environmental cadmium and lead exposure on the immune system of more than 2,000 children and adults. Serum immunoglobulins [immunoglobulins (lg) A, G, and M] and peripheral blood lymphocyte phenotypes (T cells, B cells, NK cells, and CD4/CD8 subsets) were measured in a total of 2041 children and adults who lived either in sites with elevated soil levels of cadmium and lead (n = 1,561) or in comparison communities (n = 480). The blood lead and urine cadmium levels of participants were somewhat higher than national average mean blood lead levels were 7 {micro}g/dl for participants aged 6--35 mo; 6 {micro}g/dl for participants aged 36--71 mo, 4 {micro}g/dl for participants aged 6--15 yr; and 4.3 {micro}g/dl for participants aged 16--75 yr. Multivariate analysis indicated no marked differences in any of the immune marker distributions attributed to lead for adults or children over 3 yr of age. However, in children under age 3, increased blood lead levels, principally those over 15 {micro}g/dl were associated with increases in IgA, IgC, IgM, and circulating B/lymphocytes. Youth adults urine cadmium levels over 1.5 {micro}g/g were associated with higher levels of IgA and circulating B.

  20. Changes in lymphocyte subsets and macrophage functions from high, short-term dietary ethanol in C57/BL6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.R.; Prabhala, R.H.; Abril, E.; Smith, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic administration of a diet containing 7% ethanol (36% of total calories) for 8 days to male C57/BL6 mice resulted in significant changes in functioning of macrophages. Peritoneal exudate macrophages from the ethanol-fed mice released more tumor cell cytotoxic materials upon culturing in vitro than cells from controls. However, peritoneal exudate cells continued to respond to exogenous beta carotene in vitro to produce additional cytotoxic materials. Phagocytosis of sheep red blood cells in vitro was suppressed in cells from ethanol treated mice. The number of splenic lymphocytes of various subsets was significantly changed by the ethanol exposure. Total T cells and T suppressor cells were lower, with a significant decrease in B cells containing IgM on their surface. The percentage of spleen cells showing markers for macrophage functions and their activation were significantly reduced. It is concluded that short-term chronic consumption of dietary ethanol, which was sufficient to produce physical dependence, results in significant alterations in lymphocyte subtypes and suppression of some macrophage functions.

  1. Lymphocyte subset distribution in apparently normal and single intradermal test-positive water buffaloes analyzed by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Raj, G Dhinakar; Mathivanan, B; Matheswaran, K; Nachimuthu, K; Davis, W C

    2007-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against bovine lymphocyte cell surface antigens namely, MHC Class I, MHC class II (DP, DQ and DR), CD3, CD4, CD8, gamma delta TCR, WC1N1 and WC1N2, were tested for their reactivity on apparently normal buffalo mononuclear cells prepared from spleen, lymph nodes and peripheral blood. All the mAbs cross-reacted with the buffalo mononuclear cells. The mean (+/-SD) CD4:CD8 cell ratio in the peripheral blood of apparently normal buffaloes was 1.08+/-0.049 while in the spleen and lymph nodes it was 0.90+/-0.080 and 1.81+/-0.430, respectively. The lymphocyte subsets in the buffaloes positive for tuberculosis by the single intra dermal (SID) test was found to be altered; the CD4 cells were reduced while the CD8 and gamma delta cells were increased. The mean CD4:CD8 ratio in the SID positive buffaloes was 0.36+/-0.010.

  2. Effects of moderate and severe malnutrition in rats on splenic T lymphocyte subsets and activation assessed by flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Barberena, E; González-Márquez, H; Gómez-Olivares, J L; Ortiz-Muñiz, R

    2008-01-01

    Malnutrition is distributed widely throughout the world and is a particular problem in developing countries. Laboratory animals have been very useful in studying the effects of varying levels of malnutrition because non-nutritional factors that affect humans may be controlled. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of moderate and severe malnutrition on lymphocyte proportions and activation markers of T cells in experimentally malnourished rats during lactation by flow cytometry. Lower absolute (total) and relative (%) numbers of CD3+ and CD4+ lymphocyte subpopulations were observed in moderately (second degree) and severely (third degree) malnourished rats compared with well-nourished rats (P < 0·05). Both groups of malnourished rats showed a significant decrease in the percentage of CD71+ cells at 24 h post-activation with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). After 24 h activation of spleen cells with PHA, a lower percentage of CD25+ cells was observed in malnourished than well-nourished rats (P < 0·05). In conclusion, the results of this study indicated an altered expression of CD71 and CD25 during activation of T lymphocytes in malnourished rats and may partially explain increased susceptibility to infection associated with malnutrition. Moreover, these results demonstrated that moderate malnutrition affects the response of T lymphocytes as much as severe malnutrition. PMID:18373698

  3. Human Dermis Harbors Distinct Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Vaculik, Christine; Schuster, Christopher; Bauer, Wolfgang; Iram, Nousheen; Pfisterer, Karin; Kramer, Gero; Reinisch, Andreas; Strunk, Dirk; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2012-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are found in a variety of adult tissues including human dermis. These MSCs are morphologically similar to bone marrow–derived MSCs, but are of unclear phenotype. To shed light on the characteristics of human dermal MSCs, this study was designed to identify and isolate dermal MSCs by a specific marker expression profile, and subsequently rate their mesenchymal differentiation potential. Immunohistochemical staining showed that MSC markers CD73/CD90/CD105, as well as CD271 and SSEA-4, are expressed on dermal cells in situ. Flow cytometric analysis revealed a phenotype similar to bone marrow–derived MSCs. Human dermal cells isolated by plastic adherence had a lower differentiation capacity as compared with bone marrow–derived MSCs. To distinguish dermal MSCs from differentiated fibroblasts, we immunoselected CD271+ and SSEA-4+ cells from adherent dermal cells and investigated their mesenchymal differentiation capacity. This revealed that cells with increased adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic potential were enriched in the dermal CD271+ population. The differentiation potential of dermal SSEA-4+ cells, in contrast, appeared to be limited to adipogenesis. These results indicate that specific cell populations with variable mesenchymal differentiation potential can be isolated from human dermis. Moreover, we identified three different subsets of dermal mesenchymal progenitor cells. PMID:22048731

  4. Human dermis harbors distinct mesenchymal stromal cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Vaculik, Christine; Schuster, Christopher; Bauer, Wolfgang; Iram, Nousheen; Pfisterer, Karin; Kramer, Gero; Reinisch, Andreas; Strunk, Dirk; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2012-03-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are found in a variety of adult tissues including human dermis. These MSCs are morphologically similar to bone marrow-derived MSCs, but are of unclear phenotype. To shed light on the characteristics of human dermal MSCs, this study was designed to identify and isolate dermal MSCs by a specific marker expression profile, and subsequently rate their mesenchymal differentiation potential. Immunohistochemical staining showed that MSC markers CD73/CD90/CD105, as well as CD271 and SSEA-4, are expressed on dermal cells in situ. Flow cytometric analysis revealed a phenotype similar to bone marrow-derived MSCs. Human dermal cells isolated by plastic adherence had a lower differentiation capacity as compared with bone marrow-derived MSCs. To distinguish dermal MSCs from differentiated fibroblasts, we immunoselected CD271(+) and SSEA-4(+) cells from adherent dermal cells and investigated their mesenchymal differentiation capacity. This revealed that cells with increased adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic potential were enriched in the dermal CD271(+) population. The differentiation potential of dermal SSEA-4(+) cells, in contrast, appeared to be limited to adipogenesis. These results indicate that specific cell populations with variable mesenchymal differentiation potential can be isolated from human dermis. Moreover, we identified three different subsets of dermal mesenchymal progenitor cells.

  5. Age-Related Differences in Percentages of Regulatory and Effector T Lymphocytes and Their Subsets in Healthy Individuals and Characteristic STAT1/STAT5 Signalling Response in Helper T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Holcar, Marija; Goropevšek, Aleš; Ihan, Alojz; Avčin, Tadej

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic process of the development of the immune system can in itself result in age-related immune malfunctions. In this study, we analysed lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood of 60 healthy donors, divided into groups of children, adolescents, and adults, focusing on effector (Teff) and regulatory (Treg) T lymphocytes and STAT1/STAT5 signalling response in helper T lymphocytes (Th) in adults, using flow cytometry. Our results demonstrate a decrease in the percentage of total Tregs and an increase in the percentage of total Teffs with age and a consequential immense increase in the Teff/Treg ratio. The increase of Teffs was most apparent in Th1, Th1Th17, and Th17CD161− subsets. Significant Th lymphocyte STAT1 expression differences were observed between children and adolescents, which were associated with the decrease in activated Tregs. Higher expression of STAT1 was found in FoxP3hi than in FoxP3low Th lymphocytes, while significant IL-2 induced STAT5 phosphorylation differences were found among the subsets of Th lymphocytes in adults. Our study demonstrates age-related changes in circulating Teff and Treg, as well as significant differences in STAT5/STAT1 signalling among FoxP3+ Th lymphocytes, providing new advances in the understanding of immunosenescence. PMID:26525134

  6. Age-Related Differences in Percentages of Regulatory and Effector T Lymphocytes and Their Subsets in Healthy Individuals and Characteristic STAT1/STAT5 Signalling Response in Helper T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Holcar, Marija; Goropevšek, Aleš; Ihan, Alojz; Avčin, Tadej

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic process of the development of the immune system can in itself result in age-related immune malfunctions. In this study, we analysed lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood of 60 healthy donors, divided into groups of children, adolescents, and adults, focusing on effector (Teff) and regulatory (Treg) T lymphocytes and STAT1/STAT5 signalling response in helper T lymphocytes (Th) in adults, using flow cytometry. Our results demonstrate a decrease in the percentage of total Tregs and an increase in the percentage of total Teffs with age and a consequential immense increase in the Teff/Treg ratio. The increase of Teffs was most apparent in Th1, Th1Th17, and Th17CD161- subsets. Significant Th lymphocyte STAT1 expression differences were observed between children and adolescents, which were associated with the decrease in activated Tregs. Higher expression of STAT1 was found in FoxP3hi than in FoxP3low Th lymphocytes, while significant IL-2 induced STAT5 phosphorylation differences were found among the subsets of Th lymphocytes in adults. Our study demonstrates age-related changes in circulating Teff and Treg, as well as significant differences in STAT5/STAT1 signalling among FoxP3+ Th lymphocytes, providing new advances in the understanding of immunosenescence. PMID:26525134

  7. Functional capacities of T lymphocyte subsets from synovial fluid and blood in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, J

    1986-01-01

    A reverse haemolytic plaque forming cell (PFC) assay was employed to analyse the impact of T suppressor/cytotoxic and T helper cells on B cell function in 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In all cases T8-enriched cells from synovial fluid and blood suppressed the pokeweed mitogen (PWM) induced IgM, IgG, and IgA secretion by autologous lymphocytes to the same degree. The suppression was partly abolished by irradiation of T8-enriched cells. T4-enriched cells from blood increased the PWM induced Ig secretion by autologous blood B cells. In six of 10 patients responses 1.2 to four times higher were obtained with T4-enriched cells from synovial fluid, but in four of 10 patients synovial fluid T4-enriched cells did not increase the PWM responses of blood B cells. T4- and T8-enriched T cells from synovial fluid comprised more Ia+ cells than did T cells from blood (36% v 3% and 43% v 6%). Ia+ T helper and suppressor/cytotoxic cells may modulate in vivo activation of synovial B cells in RA. PMID:2943237

  8. Lymphocyte subset characterization associated with persistent hepatitis C virus infection and subsequent progression of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kengo; Ohishi, Waka; Nakashima, Eiji; Fujiwara, Saeko; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Chayama, Kazuaki; Hakoda, Masayuki; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Nakachi, Kei; Hayashi, Tomonori; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2011-10-01

    This study aims to deepen the understanding of lymphocyte phenotypes related to the course of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and progression of liver fibrosis in a cohort of atomic bomb survivors. The study subjects comprise 3 groups: 162 HCV persistently infected, 145 spontaneously cleared, and 3,511 uninfected individuals. We observed increased percentages of peripheral blood T(H)1 and total CD8 T cells and decreased percentages of natural killer (NK) cells in the HCV persistence group compared with the other 2 groups after adjustment for age, gender, and radiation exposure dose. Subsequently, we determined that increased T(H)1 cell percentages in the HCV persistence group were significantly associated with an accelerated time-course reduction in platelet counts-accelerated progression of liver fibrosis-whereas T(C)1 and NK cell percentages were inversely associated with progression. This study suggests that T(H)1 immunity is enhanced by persistent HCV infection and that percentages of peripheral T(H)1, T(C)1, and NK cells may help predict progression of liver fibrosis.

  9. Lymphocyte subset characterization associated with persistent hepatitis C virus infection and subsequent progression of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kengo; Ohishi, Waka; Nakashima, Eiji; Fujiwara, Saeko; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Chayama, Kazuaki; Hakoda, Masayuki; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Nakachi, Kei; Hayashi, Tomonori; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2011-10-01

    This study aims to deepen the understanding of lymphocyte phenotypes related to the course of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and progression of liver fibrosis in a cohort of atomic bomb survivors. The study subjects comprise 3 groups: 162 HCV persistently infected, 145 spontaneously cleared, and 3,511 uninfected individuals. We observed increased percentages of peripheral blood T(H)1 and total CD8 T cells and decreased percentages of natural killer (NK) cells in the HCV persistence group compared with the other 2 groups after adjustment for age, gender, and radiation exposure dose. Subsequently, we determined that increased T(H)1 cell percentages in the HCV persistence group were significantly associated with an accelerated time-course reduction in platelet counts-accelerated progression of liver fibrosis-whereas T(C)1 and NK cell percentages were inversely associated with progression. This study suggests that T(H)1 immunity is enhanced by persistent HCV infection and that percentages of peripheral T(H)1, T(C)1, and NK cells may help predict progression of liver fibrosis. PMID:21712057

  10. Association between Chemotherapy-Response Assays and Subsets of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Gastric Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Youn; Son, Taeil; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon; Kim, Choong-Bai; Park, Chung-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the association between adenosine triphosphate-based chemotherapy response assays (ATP-CRAs) and subsets of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in gastric cancer. Materials and Methods In total, 15 gastric cancer tissue samples were obtained from gastrectomies performed between February 2007 and January 2011. Chemotherapy response assays were performed on tumor cells from these samples using 11 chemotherapeutic agents, including etoposide, doxorubicin, epirubicin, mitomycin, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin, irinotecan, docetaxel, paclitaxel, methotrexate, and cisplatin. TILs in the tissue samples were evaluated using antibodies specific for CD3, CD4, CD8, Foxp3, and Granzyme B. Results The highest cancer cell death rates were induced by etoposide (44.8%), 5-FU (43.1%), and mitomycin (39.9%). Samples from 10 patients who were treated with 5-FU were divided into 5-FU-sensitive and -insensitive groups according to median cell death rate. No difference was observed in survival between the two groups (P=0.216). Only two patients were treated with a chemotherapeutic agent determined by an ATP-CRA and there was no significant difference in overall survival compared with that of patients treated with their physician's choice of chemotherapeutic agent (P=0.105). However, a high number of CD3 TILs was a favorable prognostic factor (P=0.008). Pearson's correlation analyses showed no association between cancer cell death rates in response to chemotherapeutic agents and subsets of TILs. Conclusions Cancer cell death rates in response to specific chemotherapeutic agents were not significantly associated with the distribution of TIL subsets. PMID:26819801

  11. Effects of C-reactive protein on human lymphocyte responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Vetter, M L; Gewurz, H; Hansen, B; James, K; Baum, L L

    1983-05-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a trace serum protein that increases markedly in concentration during inflammatory reactions, was recently shown to bind to a subset of human IgG-FcR-bearing peripheral blood lymphocytes in the presence of a ligand such as pneumococcal C-polysaccharide (CPS). CRP has also been detected on a small percentage of PBL that are associated with NK activity. In the present study, we assessed the effects of CRP and CRP-CPS complexes on a variety of human lymphocyte functions in vitro. CRP and CRP complexes significantly enhanced (generally two to threefold) cell-mediated cytotoxicity, minimally enhanced the MLC reaction, and induced a small but regularly detectable blastogenic response in resting PBL. CRP or CRP-CPS complexes had no effect on mitogen-induced blastogenesis, PWM-induced generation of IgM plaque-forming cells, E-rosette formation, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, or NK activity. The basis for the preferential ability of CRP to enhance cytotoxicity responses in vitro is under further investigation.

  12. Two maturation-associated mouse erythrocyte receptors of human B cells. I. Identification of four human B-cell subsets.

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, I J; Zalewski, P D; Valente, L; Gee, D

    1982-01-01

    Using rosetting tests with untreated mouse erythrocytes (M) and pronase-treated M (pro M), four human B cell subsets can be identified. Three of these, possessing the phenotypes BM+ pro M+, BM- pro M+ or BM- pro M-, constitute 17%, 61% and 22% of normal blood B cells respectively. The fourth subset, BM+ pro M-, does not occur in normal tissues but was found in the pre-B-cell line of Raji cells, indicating that this phenotype may be a marker for early B cells. Some differences in the proportion of each subset were found in cord blood, lymph nodes and tonsils. Surface-immunoglobulin-positive (SIg+) and -negative (SIg-) non-T cells were present in each subset. M and pro-M rosetting tests were applied to cells from blood of 27 cases of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and to cells from involved nodes, spleen or marrow in five cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). In 15 cases of CLL, there was considerable increase in the BM+ pro M+ subset (BM+ pro M+ type CLL); in seven cases, there was a predominance of BM- pro M+ cells and in another four cases, BM- pro M- cells predominated. All five cases of NHL were greatly enriched in BM- pro M- cells. There was no obvious correlation between rosetting and other surface markers but BM- pro M- clones in CLL or NHL always stained brightly with FITC-anti-Ig. This was not found in BM+ pro M+ or BM- pro M+ clones. Rosette formation of neuraminidase-treated B cells with M identifies the same subset as B-pro-M rosetting in normals and CLL. Evidence is presented that two types of receptors are involved in M and pro-M rosetting, designated R1 and R2, binding to corresponding M ligands L1 and L2. M rosetting is due to R1-L1 binding while R2-L2 binding mediates B-pro-M rosetting. Shifts between subsets within the same clone in some cases of CLL suggest that the subsets are distinct maturational stage of B-cell development rather than families of B cells of different lineage. The following B-cell maturation sequence is proposed: R1+ R2

  13. Radiosensitivity of human natural killer cells: Binding and cytotoxic activities of natural killer cell subsets

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, R.; Vitale, M.; Mazzotti, G.; Manzoli, L.; Papa, S. )

    1990-10-01

    The sensitivity of human natural killer (NK) cell activities (both binding and killing) after exposure of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to different doses of gamma radiation was studied. A panel of monoclonal antibodies was used to identify the NK and T-lymphocyte subsets and to evaluate their radiosensitivity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were irradiated with low (2-6 Gy) and high (10-30 Gy) doses and NK cell binding and cytotoxic activity against K562 target cells were studied after 3 h and 48 h in culture. The primary damage to NK cell activity was identified at the postbinding level and affected mainly the lytic machinery. After 48 h culture postirradiation, an overall depression of cytotoxic activity was observed, but ionizing radiation produced either a selection of the more cytotoxic NK cell subsets, which therefore might be considered more resistant to radiation damage than the less cytotoxic NK cells, or a long-term stimulation of cytotoxic activity in surviving cells.

  14. The association between CD2+ peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets and the relapse of bladder cancer in prophylactically BCG-treated patients

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, E; Carballido, J; Manzano, L; Moltó, L; Olivier, C; Alvarez-Mon, M

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the potential existence of differences in the distribution of T-lymphocyte subsets and in the proliferative response of these CD2+ cells to polyclonal mitogens in patients with transitional cell bladder carcinoma (SBTCC) treated with prophylactic intracavitary instillations of bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) according to their clinical response to this treatment. Before BCG treatment, different subset distribution (CD8+ and CD3+ CD56+), activation antigen expression (CD3+ HLA– DR+) and proliferative response to mitogenic signals were found in CD2+ cells from SBTCC patients prophylactically treated with BCG who remained free of disease or those who had recurrence of tumour. Otherwise, the prophylactic intracavitary BCG instillations in SBTCC patients are associated with a transitory variation of T-lymphocyte subset distribution (CD4 and CD8) and activation antigens expression (CD25). © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10098752

  15. Examination of the low proliferative capacity of human jejunal intraepithelial lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, E C; Roberts, A I; Brolin, R E; Raska, K

    1986-01-01

    The proliferation of human jejunal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) was examined to determine how it differed from that of peripheral blood (PB) T lymphocytes. The IEL were mainly T lymphocytes of the cytotoxic-suppressor (T8+) phenotype. They demonstrated lower proliferative responses to various stimuli (2,501 +/- 565 ct/min with phytohaemagglutinin; PHA) compared to unseparated PB T lymphocytes (73,678 +/- 2,495) or the T8+ subset (68,939 +/- 10,053 ct/min) (P less than 0.001). This low proliferative response was also a characteristic of the T8+ T lymphocytes in the lamina propria (4,606 +/- 1,226 ct/min) but not the T4+ subset (43,447 +/- 10,188 ct/min) (P less than 0.05). These findings were not due to isolation techniques or to differences in kinetics. Mixing experiments revealed that the IEL did not contain cells which suppressed proliferation. In addition, the IEL could be stimulated by mitogens, as they produced the same amount of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-2 receptors as did PB T lymphocytes. Although the lectin-induced proliferative response of IEL was unaltered by the addition of autologous macrophages and minimally increased by IL-2, it was markedly enhanced by the addition of sheep red blood cells (SRBC). The enhancing effect of SRBC was not due to T cell recognition of xenogenic antigens on the erythrocytes since neither allogeneic non-T lymphocytes nor other xenogenic erythrocytes produced the same effect. Both intact SRBC and membrane fragments from osmotically lysed cells augmented lymphocyte proliferation. Thus, jejunal IEL could be activated by mitogen and proliferated as much as PB T lymphocytes if exposed to a membrane component found on SRBC. PMID:2947761

  16. Pregnancy and Preeclampsia Affect Monocyte Subsets in Humans and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Borghuis, Theo; Klok, Pieter A.; Groen, Bart; Bolt, Annemarie; de Vos, Paul; van Pampus, Maria G.; Wong, Tsz Y.; van Goor, Harry; Bakker, Winston W.; Faas, Marijke M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Both nonclassical and intermediate monocytes have been implicated in different inflammatory conditions. We hypothesized that these monocytes would increase during pregnancy, a condition associated with generalized activation of inflammatory responses and that they would increase even more during preeclampsia, in which inflammatory responses are further stimulated. In the present study we investigated changes in monocyte subsets during healthy pregnancy and preeclampsia in humans and rats. Methods Blood monocyte subsets of nonpregnant, preeclamptic and healthy pregnant women were identified with CD14 and CD16. In nonpregnant and pregnant rats, blood monocytes were identified with CD172a and CD43, as well as in rats infused with adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a pro-inflammatory stimulus known to induce preeclampsia-like symptoms. Total and CD206-positive macrophages were quantified in placentas of these animals. Results Lower percentages of classical monocytes were found in pregnant women (91%–[83–98%]) compared to nonpregnant women (94%–[90–98%]) and even less in preeclamptic patients (90%–[61–92%]). In contrast, the percentage of combined nonclassical/intermediate monocytes was higher in pregnant women (8.5%–[2.3–16.6%] vs. 5.6%–[1.9–9.5%]) and even higher in preeclamptic patients (9.9%–[7.8–38.7%]), which was caused by a selective increase of intermediate monocytes. In rats, we also found lower percentages of classical monocytes and higher percentages of nonclassical monocytes in pregnant versus nonpregnant rats. ATP infusion increased the percentage of nonclassical monocytes in pregnant rats even further but not in nonpregnant rats. These nonclassical monocytes showed a more activated phenotype in pregnant ATP-infused rats only. Mesometrial triangles of ATP-infused rats had less CD206-positive macrophages as compared to those of saline-infused rats. Conclusion The higher percentage of nonclassical/intermediate monocytes found

  17. Mutations in TLR/MYD88 pathway identify a subset of young chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with favorable outcome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Pinyol, Magda; Navarro, Alba; Aymerich, Marta; Jares, Pedro; Juan, Manel; Rozman, María; Colomer, Dolors; Delgado, Julio; Giné, Eva; González-Díaz, Marcos; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Colado, Enrique; Rayón, Consolación; Payer, Angel R; Terol, Maria José; Navarro, Blanca; Quesada, Victor; Puente, Xosé S; Rozman, Ciril; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías; López-Guillermo, Armando; Villamor, Neus

    2014-06-12

    Mutations in Toll-like receptor (TLR) and myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MYD88) genes have been found in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at low frequency. We analyzed the incidence, clinicobiological characteristics, and outcome of patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations in 587 CLL patients. Twenty-three patients (3.9%) had mutations, 19 in MYD88 (one with concurrent IRAK1 mutation), 2 TLR2 (one with concomitant TLR6 mutation), 1 IRAK1, and 1 TLR5. No mutations were found in IRAK2 and IRAK4. TLR/MYD88-mutated CLL overexpressed genes of the nuclear factor κB pathway. Patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations were significantly younger (83% age ≤50 years) than those with no mutations. TLR/MYD88 mutations were the most frequent in young patients. Patients with mutated TLR/MYD88 CLL had a higher frequency of mutated IGHV and low expression of CD38 and ZAP-70. Overall survival (OS) was better in TLR/MYD88-mutated than unmutated patients in the whole series (10-year OS, 100% vs 62%; P = .002), and in the subset of patients age ≤50 years (100% vs 70%; P = .02). In addition, relative OS of TLR/MYD88-mutated patients was similar to that in the age- and gender-matched population. In summary, TLR/MYD88 mutations identify a population of young CLL patients with favorable outcome. PMID:24782504

  18. Mutations in TLR/MYD88 pathway identify a subset of young chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with favorable outcome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Pinyol, Magda; Navarro, Alba; Aymerich, Marta; Jares, Pedro; Juan, Manel; Rozman, María; Colomer, Dolors; Delgado, Julio; Giné, Eva; González-Díaz, Marcos; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Colado, Enrique; Rayón, Consolación; Payer, Angel R; Terol, Maria José; Navarro, Blanca; Quesada, Victor; Puente, Xosé S; Rozman, Ciril; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías; López-Guillermo, Armando; Villamor, Neus

    2014-06-12

    Mutations in Toll-like receptor (TLR) and myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MYD88) genes have been found in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at low frequency. We analyzed the incidence, clinicobiological characteristics, and outcome of patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations in 587 CLL patients. Twenty-three patients (3.9%) had mutations, 19 in MYD88 (one with concurrent IRAK1 mutation), 2 TLR2 (one with concomitant TLR6 mutation), 1 IRAK1, and 1 TLR5. No mutations were found in IRAK2 and IRAK4. TLR/MYD88-mutated CLL overexpressed genes of the nuclear factor κB pathway. Patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations were significantly younger (83% age ≤50 years) than those with no mutations. TLR/MYD88 mutations were the most frequent in young patients. Patients with mutated TLR/MYD88 CLL had a higher frequency of mutated IGHV and low expression of CD38 and ZAP-70. Overall survival (OS) was better in TLR/MYD88-mutated than unmutated patients in the whole series (10-year OS, 100% vs 62%; P = .002), and in the subset of patients age ≤50 years (100% vs 70%; P = .02). In addition, relative OS of TLR/MYD88-mutated patients was similar to that in the age- and gender-matched population. In summary, TLR/MYD88 mutations identify a population of young CLL patients with favorable outcome.

  19. Systematic and Cell Type-Specific Telomere Length Changes in Subsets of Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jue; Cheon, Joshua; Brown, Rashida; Coccia, Michael; Puterman, Eli; Aschbacher, Kirstin; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Epel, Elissa; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres, the protective DNA-protein complexes at the ends of linear chromosomes, are important for genome stability. Leukocyte or peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) telomere length is a potential biomarker for human aging that integrates genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors and is associated with mortality and risks for major diseases. However, only a limited number of studies have examined longitudinal changes of telomere length and few have reported data on sorted circulating immune cells. We examined the average telomere length (TL) in CD4+, CD8+CD28+, and CD8+CD28− T cells, B cells, and PBMCs, cross-sectionally and longitudinally, in a cohort of premenopausal women. We report that TL changes over 18 months were correlated among these three T cell types within the same participant. Additionally, PBMC TL change was also correlated with those of all three T cell types, and B cells. The rate of shortening for B cells was significantly greater than for the three T cell types. CD8+CD28− cells, despite having the shortest TL, showed significantly more rapid attrition when compared to CD8+CD28+ T cells. These results suggest systematically coordinated, yet cell type-specific responses to factors and pathways contribute to telomere length regulation. PMID:26977417

  20. Human B lymphocytes show greater susceptibility to H2O2 toxicity than T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Farber, C M; Liebes, L F; Kanganis, D N; Silber, R

    1984-05-01

    Lymphocytes from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and from normal subjects were incubated with a glucose-glucose oxidase hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generating system to study the effect of oxidant stress on these cells. Within 4 hr, 90% of normal but only 21% of CLL lymphocytes remained viable. When normal and CLL preparations enriched in B or T cells were exposed to H2O2, B lymphocytes from both groups were highly susceptible to oxidative damage while T lymphocytes were relatively resistant. The H2O2 scavenger catalase prevented the cytotoxicity. The present work identifies the human B lymphocyte as a cell that should be a suitable target for selective killing by H2O2-generating systems.

  1. Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase activity in human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, G.D.; Schuresko, D.D.

    1981-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase (AHM), an enzyme of key importance in metabolism of xenobiotic chemicals such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA), is present in human lymphocytes. Studies investing the relation of activity of AHM in human lymphocytes to parameters such as disease state, PNA exposure, in vitro mitogen stimulation, etc. have been summarized in this report. Some studies have demonstrated increased AHM activity in lymphocytes from cigarette smokers (compared to nonsmokers), and in lung cancer patients when compared to appropriate control groups. These observations are confused by extreme variability in human lymphocyte AHM activities, such variability arising from factors such as genetic variation in AHM activity, variation in in vitro culture conditions which affect AHM activity, and the problematical relationship of common AHM assays to actual PNA metabolism taking place in lymphocytes. If some of the foregoing problems can be adequately addressed, lymphocyte AHM activity could hold the promise of being a useful biomarker system for human PNA exposure.

  2. Characterization of a chromosome-specific chimpanzee alpha satellite subset: Evolutionary relationship to subsets on human chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Warburton, P.E.; Gosden, J.; Lawson, D.

    1996-04-15

    Alpha satellite DNA is a tandemly repeated DNA family found at the centromeres of all primate chromosomes examined. The fundamental repeat units of alpha satellite DNA are diverged 169- to 172-bp monomers, often found to be organized in chromosome-specific higher-order repeat units. The chromosomes of human (Homo sapiens (HSA)), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes (PTR) and Pan paniscus), and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) share a remarkable similarity and synteny. It is of interest to ask if alpha satellite arrays at centromeres of homologous chromosomes between these species are closely related (evolving in an orthologous manner) or if the evolutionary processes that homogenize and spread these arrays within and between chromosomes result in nonorthologous evolution of arrays. By using PCR primers specific for human chromosome 17-specific alpha satellite DNA, we have amplified, cloned, and characterized a chromosome-specific subset from the PTR chimpanzee genome. Hybridization both on Southern blots and in situ as well as sequence analysis show that this subset is most closely related, as expected, to sequences on HSA 17. However, in situ hybridization reveals that this subset is not found on the homologous chromosome in chimpanzee (PTR 19), but instead on PTR 12, which is homologous to HSA 2p. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Clinical features and T-cell subsets in HIV-infected children with and without lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Simmank, K; Meyers, T; Galpin, J; Cumin, E; Kaplan, A

    2001-09-01

    Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis (LIP) is a non-infective lung condition common in untreated older children with vertically acquired HIV infection. Little is known about the prognosis in children with LIP, and diagnosis remains a problem where lung biopsy is not feasible. Our aim was to determine which clinical features aid the diagnosis of LIP in conjunction with the typical reticulonodular radiological picture, and whether the prognosis in children with LIP is different from that in HIV-infected children of the same age without LIP. We retrospectively compared the clinical features and T-cell subsets of 49 children with LIP with those of 56 children of similar age without LIP. Diagnosis of LIP was made radiologically. All children were apyrexial at the time of X-ray and acute intercurrent infections and tuberculosis had been excluded as far as possible. Ages ranged from 24 to 112 months in the non-LIP group and from 24 to 120 months in the LIP group. Digital clubbing and reticulo-endothelial hyperplasia were significantly more common in children with LIP than in those without. Children with LIP tended to have lower CD4+ counts and CD4% and higher CD8+ counts and CD8%, which resulted in significantly lower CD4/CD8 ratios in children under 5 years with LIP. It is possible in most cases to diagnose LIP using a combination of clinical and X-ray findings, as long as every effort is made to exclude tuberculosis. Lower CD4+ counts and CD4% as well as more frequent hospital admissions suggest that LIP adversely affects prognosis in children with HIV. PMID:11579857

  4. Changes of human B and B-1a peripheral blood lymphocytes with age.

    PubMed

    Veneri, Dino; Franchini, Massimo; Vella, Antonio; Tridente, Giuseppe; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Ortolani, Riccardo

    2007-08-01

    In 2057 consecutive subjects admitted to the Department of Pathology, Section of Immunology of the Verona University Hospital, CD19+ and CD5/CD19 double positive cells were determined to assess the behaviour of total peripheral B-lymphocytes and B-1a (CD5+) compartments in humans during aging. We show that the absolute number of total B lymphocytes increases about three-fold from the baseline conditions in the first year of life and progressively decreases until adult age. A slower decrease was detected from the adult age onwards. A similar behaviour has been observed within the B-1a subset of B-lymphocytes, although the decrease after the adult age seems more pronounced. Possible physiological explanations and/or implications for the disease states are taken into account.

  5. Altered cytokine production by specific human peripheral blood cell subsets immediately following space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, B. E.; Cubbage, M. L.; Sams, C. F.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, flow cytometry was used to positively identify the specific lymphocyte subsets exhibiting space flight-induced alterations in cytokine production. Whole blood samples were collected from 27 astronauts at three points (one preflight, two postflight) surrounding four space shuttle missions. Assays performed included serum/urine stress hormones, white blood cell (WBC) phenotyping, and intracellular cytokine production following mitogenic stimulation. Absolute levels of peripheral granulocytes were significantly elevated following space flight, but the levels of circulating lymphocytes and monocytes were unchanged. Lymphocyte subset analysis demonstrated a decreased percentage of T cells, whereas percentages of B cells and natural killer (NK) cells remained unchanged after flight. Nearly all the astronauts exhibited an increased CD4/CD8 T cell ratio. Assessment of naive (CD45RA+) vs. memory (CD45RO+) CD4+ T cell subsets was ambiguous, and subjects tended to group within specific missions. Although no significant trend was seen in absolute monocyte levels, a significant decrease in the percentage of the CD14+ CD16+ monocytes was seen following space flight in all subjects tested. T cell (CD3+) production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) was significantly decreased after space flight, as was IL-2 production by both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets. Production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was not altered by space flight for the CD8+ cell subset, but there was a significant decrease in IFN-gamma production for the CD4+ T cell subset. Serum and urine stress hormone analysis indicated significant physiologic stresses in astronauts following space flight. Altered peripheral leukocyte subsets, altered serum and urine stress hormone levels, and altered T cell cytokine secretion profiles were all observed postflight. In addition, there appeared to be differential susceptibility to space flight regarding cytokine secretion by T cell subsets. These alterations may be the

  6. Vdelta1 T lymphocytes expressing a Th1 phenotype are the major gammadelta T cell subset infiltrating the liver of HCV-infected persons.

    PubMed Central

    Agrati, C.; D'Offizi, G.; Narciso, P.; Abrignani, S.; Ippolito, G.; Colizzi, V.; Poccia, F.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis C infection induces an acute and chronic liver inflammation that may lead to cirrhosis, liver failure, or hepatocarcinoma. Since the role of alphabeta T lymphocytes in hepatitis C virus (HCV) immunopathology has been analyzed extensively, we investigated the distribution and functional activation of gammadelta T cell subsets in chronically HCV-infected patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Blood samples and liver biopsies from 35 patients with compensated chronic HCV infection were compared in terms of T cell subset distribution, expression of activation markers, gammadelta T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire, and pattern of cytokine production. Moreover, we analyzed whether these immunological parameters were associated with other clinical observations (plasma viremia, ALT levels, Ishak index). RESULTS: Differing from peripheral blood distribution, a specific compartmentalization of Vdelta1 T cells (p < 0.001) was observed in the liver of HCV patients. These cells represented a relevant fraction of intrahepatic T lymphocytes (1.8-8.7%) and expressed the memory/effector phenotype (CD62-L- CD45-RO+CD95+). This phenotype was consistent with selective homing upon antigen recognition. Mitogenic stimulation of Vdelta1 + T lymphocytes recruited in the liver revealed the T helper cell type 1 (Th1) pattern of cytokine secretion. Interestingly, the frequency of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-producing Vdelta1 T cells was associated with an higher degree of liver necroinflammation, measured by the Ishak index. Finally, the T-cell repertoire analysis revealed the absence of Vgamma selection in the TCR repertoire of intrahepatic Vdelta1 T cells. CONCLUSIONS: gammadelta T cell distribution in the peripheral blood differs from the Vdelta1 T cell subset because it is policlonally activated and recruited in the liver of chronic HCV-infected patients. During HCV-infection, this T cell subset may release Th1 cytokines and contribute to the necroinflammatory liver disease

  7. Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNAs: Novel Drivers of Human Lymphocyte Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Panzeri, Ilaria; Rossetti, Grazisa; Abrignani, Sergio; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Upon recognition of a foreign antigen, CD4(+) naïve T lymphocytes proliferate and differentiate into subsets with distinct functions. This process is fundamental for the effective immune system function, as CD4(+) T cells orchestrate both the innate and adaptive immune response. Traditionally, this differentiation event has been regarded as the acquisition of an irreversible cell fate so that memory and effector CD4(+) T subsets were considered terminally differentiated cells or lineages. Consequently, these lineages are conventionally defined thanks to their prototypical set of cytokines and transcription factors. However, recent findings suggest that CD4(+) T lymphocytes possess a remarkable phenotypic plasticity, as they can often re-direct their functional program depending on the milieu they encounter. Therefore, new questions are now compelling such as which are the molecular determinants underlying plasticity and stability and how the balance between these two opposite forces drives the cell fate. As already mentioned, in some cases, the mere expression of cytokines and master regulators could not fully explain lymphocytes plasticity. We should consider other layers of regulation, including epigenetic factors such as the modulation of chromatin state or the transcription of non-coding RNAs, whose high cell-specificity give a hint on their involvement in cell fate determination. In this review, we will focus on the recent advances in understanding CD4(+) T lymphocytes subsets specification from an epigenetic point of view. In particular, we will emphasize the emerging importance of non-coding RNAs as key players in these differentiation events. We will also present here new data from our laboratory highlighting the contribution of long non-coding RNAs in driving human CD4(+) T lymphocytes differentiation.

  8. Designing vaccines based on biology of human dendritic cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Mellman, Ira

    2010-01-01

    The effective vaccines developed against a variety of infectious agents, including polio, measles and Hepatitis B, represent major achievements in medicine. These vaccines, usually composed of microbial antigens, are often associated with an adjuvant that activates dendritic cells (DCs). Many infectious diseases are still in need of an effective vaccine including HIV, malaria, hepatitis C and tuberculosis. In some cases, the induction of cellular rather than humoral responses may be more important as the goal is to control and eliminate the existing infection rather than to prevent it. Our increased understanding of the mechanisms of antigen presentation, particularly with the description of DC subsets with distinct functions, as well as their plasticity in responding to extrinsic signals, represent opportunities to develop novel vaccines. In addition, we foresee that this increased knowledge will permit us to design vaccines that will reprogram the immune system to intervene therapeutically in cancer, allergy and autoimmunity. PMID:21029958

  9. Mitogenic effect of Parkia speciosa seed lectin on human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Suvachittanont, W; Jaranchavanapet, P

    2000-12-01

    Mitogenic activity of a lectin, purified from Parkia speciosa seeds, on the isolated peripheral blood lymphocytes taken from normal blood donors and patients with esophageal carcinoma was examined using [3H]thymidine incorporation. The lectin increases the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA of human lymphocytes. The activity of the lectin increased as its concentration was increased and then declined once the concentration passed an optimum point. The stimulant effect was also expressed using a proliferation index (PI): the ratio of [3H]thymidine incorporated into lymphocytes in the presence and absence of the lectin. The mitogenic activity of the lectin is comparable to those of the known T-cell mitogens, such as concanavalin A, phytohaemagglutinin, and pokeweed mitogen. Only slightly less responsiveness was observed in the case of lymphocytes from esophageal cancer compared to lymphocytes from normal donors. PMID:11199124

  10. T lymphocytes subsets and cytokine pattern induced by vaccination against bovine brucellosis employing S19 calfhood vaccination and adult RB51 revaccination.

    PubMed

    Dorneles, Elaine M S; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Araújo, Márcio S S; Lima, Graciela Kunrath; Martins-Filho, Olindo A; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Lage, Andrey P

    2014-10-21

    The aims of this study were to address the protective immune response induced by S19 vaccination (n=10) and RB51 revaccination, in pregnant (n=9) and non-pregnant (n=10) S19 calfhood-vaccinated cattle as follows: evaluate the in vitro CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocytes specific proliferation, and in vitro expression of IFN-γ by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells and IL-4 by CD4(+), CD8(+) and CD21(+) lymphocytes subset. Upon in vitro stimulation with γ-irradiated Brucella abortus 2308, blood mononuclear cells from S19 vaccinated and RB51 revaccinated cows exhibited significantly higher proliferation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocytes and CD4(+)IFN-γ(+) T-cells compared to non-vaccinated animals. RB51 revaccination, regardless of the pregnancy status, did not enhance the proliferation of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T-cells nor IFN-γ or IL-4 production. Data from the present study suggest that cattle's cellular immune response induced after brucellosis vaccination and revaccination is due to CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocytes, being CD4(+) T-cells the main source of IFN-γ.

  11. Shen-Qi-Jie-Yu-Fang has antidepressant effects in a rodent model of postpartum depression by regulating the immune organs and subsets of T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Miao; Tang, Qisheng; Li, Xiaoli; Zhao, Ruizhen; Li, Jingya; Xu, Hong; Gao, Yushan; Mao, Yingqiu

    2015-01-01

    Background Shen-Qi-Jie-Yu-Fang (SJ Fang) is a herbal preparation used in traditional Chinese medicine, and is a potentially important new therapeutic agent in postpartum depression (PPD). Previously, we have elucidated the effects of SJ Fang on hormone receptors and monoamine neurotransmitters involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axes in PPD rats. However, the immune-modulating effects of SJ Fang in PPD are still unknown. In this study, we explored the effects of SJ Fang on the immune organs and subsets of T lymphocytes in PPD rats. Methods PPD was created in Sprague-Dawley rats by inducing hormone-simulated pregnancy followed by hormone withdrawal. After hormone withdrawal, the PPD rats were then treated with fluoxetine at 1, 2, and 4 weeks, and the SJ Fang rats were also treated at 1, 2, and 4 weeks. Depressive behavior in the rats was evaluated by the forced swim test, sucrose consumption test, and open field test. The thymus index and spleen index were calculated. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was used to identify pathological features in the thymus and spleen. CD3, CD4, and CD8 lymphocyte subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Both fluoxetine and SJ Fang decreased immobility time, increased sucrose consumption, an horizontal and vertical movement. After 4 weeks of treatment with fluoxetine or SJ Fang, the thymus index and spleen index were significantly higher than at baseline, and the morphology of the thymus and spleen were returning to normal. Two weeks after hormone withdrawal, subsets of T lymphocytes indicated a shift from immune activation to immune suppression, which was reversed by 4 weeks of treatment with fluoxetine or SJ Fang. Conclusion It is suggested that T-cell mediate immune responses which may play a role in the etiopathology of postpartum depression. SJ Fang had an antidepressant effect on the immune system in rats with PPD. PMID:26203247

  12. Circulating and in situ lymphocyte subsets and Langerhans cells in patients with compositae oleoresin dermatitis and increased ultraviolet A sensitivity during treatment with azathioprine

    SciTech Connect

    Baadsgaard, O.

    1986-04-01

    Circulating and in situ lymphocyte subsets and Langerhans cells in four patients with compositae oleoresin dermatitis and increased ultraviolet A sensitivity before and during treatment with azathioprine were estimated. It was found that the number of Leu 6+ Langerhans cells decreased during therapy. This decrease was accompanied by a reduction in the number of Leu 2a+, Leu 3a+, Leu 4+, DR+, and Leu M2+ cells in the blood and a reduction in the number of Leu 2a+, Leu 3a+, Leu 4+, and DR+ cells in the skin. Concomitantly with the changes in the number of immunocompetent cells, the eczema cleared.

  13. Activation of human lymphocytes by supernatants from human thymic epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Goust, J M; Vesole, D H; Fudenberg, H H

    1979-01-01

    Supernatants from human thymic epithelial cells (TS) were found to have a mitogenic effect on cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to potentiate their responses to lectins. This was not observed with culture supernatants from the human cell lines AV-3 and HeLa or from the murine cell line L-929. The maximum potentiating effects were observed with pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), whereas the response to concanavalin A (Con A) was only slightly enhanced. TS also potentiated the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) response of normal T cells and thymocytes cultured with mitomycin C-treated B lymphoid cell lines. The mitogenic effect of TS was time-dependent and paralleled the appearance of lymphoid colonies in semi-solid agar. Chromatographical separation of concentrated serum-free TS on Sephadex G-100 yielded an active fraction of molecular weight 15,000--25,000 which had all the activities of unseparated TS. PMID:160851

  14. Activation of human lymphocytes by supernatants from human thymic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Vesole, D H; Fudenberg, H H

    1979-11-01

    Supernatants from human thymic epithelial cells (TS) were found to have a mitogenic effect on cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to potentiate their responses to lectins. This was not observed with culture supernatants from the human cell lines AV-3 and HeLa or from the murine cell line L-929. The maximum potentiating effects were observed with pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), whereas the response to concanavalin A (Con A) was only slightly enhanced. TS also potentiated the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) response of normal T cells and thymocytes cultured with mitomycin C-treated B lymphoid cell lines. The mitogenic effect of TS was time-dependent and paralleled the appearance of lymphoid colonies in semi-solid agar. Chromatographical separation of concentrated serum-free TS on Sephadex G-100 yielded an active fraction of molecular weight 15,000--25,000 which had all the activities of unseparated TS. PMID:160851

  15. Effect of irradiation on human T-cell proliferation: low dose irradiation stimulates mitogen-induced proliferation and function of the suppressor/cytotoxic T-cell subset

    SciTech Connect

    Gualde, N.; Goodwin, J.S.

    1984-04-01

    Unfractionated human T cells exposed to 10-50 rad of X irradiation incorporated less (/sup 3/H)thymidine than nonirradiated T cells when subsequently cultured with PHA or Con A. The cytotoxic/suppressor T-cell subset, isolated as either OKT8(+) or OKT4(-) cells, demonstrated significantly enhanced (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation in PHA- or Con A-stimulated cultures after exposure to 10-50 rad, compared to unirradiated cells, while the proliferation of the OKT4(+) helper/inducer subset was inhibited by low dose irradiation. It has been previously reported that approximately 30% of the cytotoxic/suppressor subset also stains with OKM1. When the cytotoxic/suppressor subset was further subdivided into OKT4(-), OKM1(+), and OKT4(-), OKM1(-) cells, proliferation of the OKT4(-), OKM1(+) population was inhibited by exposure to 25 rad while proliferation of the OKT4(-), OKM1(-) population was stimulated. The increase in proliferation of the cytotoxic/suppressor T-cell subset after low dose irradiation is paralleled by an increase in suppressor activity of these cells. T cells exposed to 25 rad and then cultured with Con A for 48 hr caused greater inhibition of IgG production when added to fresh autologous lymphocytes stimulated by pokeweed mitogen than did unirradiated cells. Thus, low dose irradiation enhances both the proliferation and function of the human suppressor T-cell subset.

  16. Genotoxicity of the herbicide butachlor in cultured human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sinha, S; Panneerselvam, N; Shanmugam, G

    1995-08-01

    Butachlor, a pre-emergence herbicide was investigated for its ability to induce sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and chromosome aberrations (CA) in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes were treated with three different concentrations (5, 10 and 20 micrograms/ml) of butachlor for 24, 48 and 72 h. Our results indicate a dose-dependent increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations at 24, 48 and 72 h of treatment with butachlor. No SCE was promoted by butachlor.

  17. CD161 Expression Defines a Th1/Th17 Polyfunctional Subset of Resident Memory T Lymphocytes in Bronchoalveolar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Yolanda; Herrera, María Teresa; Juárez, Esmeralda; Salazar-Lezama, Miguel Angel; Bobadilla, Karen; Torres, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar resident memory T cells (TRM) comprise a currently uncharacterized mixture of cell subpopulations. The CD3+CD161+ T cell subpopulation resides in the liver, intestine and skin, but it has the capacity for tissue migration; however, the presence of resident CD3+CD161+ T cells in the bronchoalveolar space under normal conditions has not been reported. Bronchoalveolar cells (BACs) from healthy volunteers were evaluated and found that 8.6% (range 2.5%-21%) of these cells were CD3+ T lymphocytes. Within the CD3+ population, 4.6% of the cells (2.1–11.3) expressed CD161 on the cell surface, and 74.2% of the CD161+CD3+ T cells expressed CD45RO. The number of CD3+CD161+ T cells was significantly lower in the bronchoalveolar space than in the blood (4.6% of BACs vs 8.4% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs); P<0.05). We also found that 2.17% of CD4+ T lymphocytes and 1.52% of CD8+ T lymphocytes expressed CD161. Twenty-two percent of the alveolar CD3+CD161+ T lymphocytes produced cytokines upon stimulation by PMA plus ionomycin, and significantly more interferon gamma (IFN-γ) was produced compared with other cytokines (P = 0.05). Most alveolar CD3+CD161+ T cells produced interleukin-17 (IL-17) and IFN-γ simultaneously, and the percentage of these cells was significantly higher than the percentage of CD3+CD161− T cells. Moreover, the percentage of alveolar CD3+CD161+ T lymphocytes that produced IFN-γ/IL-17 was significantly higher than those in the peripheral blood (p<0.05). In conclusion, Th1/Th17-CD3+CD161+ TRM could contribute to compartment-specific immune responses in the lung. PMID:25906076

  18. Human malignant melanoma-derived progestagen-associated endometrial protein immunosuppresses T lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ren, Suping; Chai, Lina; Wang, Chunyan; Li, Changlan; Ren, Qiquan; Yang, Lihua; Wang, Fumei; Qiao, Zhixin; Li, Weijing; He, Min; Riker, Adam I; Han, Ying; Yu, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Progestagen-associated endometrial protein (PAEP) is a glycoprotein of the lipocalin family that acts as a negative regulator of T cell receptor-mediated activation. However, the function of tumor-derived PAEP on the human immune system in the tumor microenvironment is unknown. PAEP is highly expressed in intermediate and thick primary melanomas (Breslow's 2.5mm or greater) and metastatic melanomas, correlating with its expression in daughter cell lines established in vitro. The current study investigates the role of melanoma cell-secreted PAEP protein in regulating T cell function. Upon the enrichment of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, each subset was then mixed with either melanoma-derived PAEP protein or PAEP-poor supernatant of gene-silenced tumor cells. IL-2 and IFN-γ secretion of CD4+ T cells significantly decreased with the addition of PAEP-rich supernatant. And the addition of PAEP-positive cell supernatant to activated lymphocytes significantly inhibited lymphocyte proliferation and cytotoxic T cell activity, while increasing lymphocyte apoptosis. Our result suggests that melanoma cell-secreted PAEP protein immunosuppresses the activation, proliferation and cytotoxicity of T lymphocytes, which might partially explain the mechanism of immune tolerance induced by melanoma cells within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25785839

  19. Immune recognition of AIDS virus antigens by human and murine cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Langlade-Demoyen, P; Michel, F; Hoffenbach, A; Vilmer, E; Dadaglio, G; Garicia-Pons, F; Mayaud, C; Autran, B; Wain-Hobson, S; Plata, F

    1988-09-15

    The CTL response to HIV was analyzed in humans and in mice. By using a novel and strictly autologous lymphocyte culture system, human CTL lines were established with PBL from seropositive asymptomatic donors and from patients suffering from AIDS or presenting AIDS-related complex. CTL from HLA-A2 donors recognize and kill murine P815 mastocytoma cells doubly transfected with the human HLA-A2 gene and the HIV env gene; they also kill HLA-compatible human macrophages infected with HIV. CTL specific for the HIV env Ag were also generated in BALB/c mice by immunization with syngeneic murine cells transfected with the HIV env gene. Human and murine HIV-immune CTL populations belong to the CD8 subset of T lymphocytes and are restricted by class I HLA or H-2 transplantation Ag, respectively, in the recognition of HIV env Ag. The two different experimental systems presented here can be used to study CD8 lymphocyte immunity against HIV. The murine model of CTL immunity offers the additional advantage of avoiding the manipulation of infectious virus isolates.

  20. Interaction of nanosilver particles with human lymphocyte cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhornik, Alena; Baranova, Ludmila; Volotovski, Igor; Chizhik, Sergey; Drozd, Elizaveta; Sudas, Margarita; Buu Ngo, Quoc; Chau Nguyen, Hoai; Huynh, Thi Ha; Hien Dao, Trong

    2015-01-01

    The damaging effects of nanoparticles were hypothesized to be the oxidative stress caused by the formation of reactive oxygen species and initiation of inflammatory reactions. In this context a study on the effects of nanosilver particles on the formation of reactive oxygen species in human lymphocyte culture was carried out. The obtained results showed that fluorescence intensity considerably increased after cells had interacted with nanosilver particles of varying concentrations, indicating the formation of reactive oxygen species and their accumulation in lymphocyte cells. Morphological study of the lymphocyte cells under the effects of nanosilver particles showed that the change in morphology depends on the concentration and size of nanosilver particles: for a size ≤20 nm the lymphocyte cell significantly shrank with pronounced differences in the morphological structure of the cell membrane, but for a size ≥200 nm no change was observed.

  1. The effects of teriflunomide on lymphocyte subpopulations in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Liu, Jingchun; Delohery, Thomas; Zhang, Donghui; Arendt, Christopher; Jones, Catherine

    2013-12-15

    Teriflunomide is an inhibitor of dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase (DHODH), and is hypothesized to ameliorate multiple sclerosis by reducing proliferation of stimulated lymphocytes. We investigated teriflunomide's effects on proliferation, activation, survival, and function of stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cell subsets in vitro. Teriflunomide had little/no impact on lymphocyte activation but exerted significant dose-dependent inhibition of T- and B-cell proliferation, which was uridine-reversible (DHODH-dependent). Viability analyses showed no teriflunomide-associated cytotoxicity. Teriflunomide significantly decreased release of several pro-inflammatory cytokines from activated monocytes in a DHODH-independent fashion. In conclusion, teriflunomide acts on multiple immune cell types and processes via DHODH-dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:24182769

  2. Effects of dietary Fusarium mycotoxins on intestinal lymphocyte subset populations, cell proliferation and histological changes in avian lymphoid organs.

    PubMed

    Girish, C K; Smith, T K; Boermans, H J; Anil Kumar, P; Girgis, G N

    2010-10-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary Fusarium mycotoxins on gut immunity, cell proliferation, and histology of avian lymphoid organs. The efficacy of a polymeric glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent (GMA) was also determined. Seventy-two one-day-old male turkey poults were fed corn, wheat, and soybean meal-based diets for 21 days. Diets included control grains, contaminated grains and contaminated grains +0.2% GMA. The major contaminant was deoxynivalenol (3.9 μg/g) with lesser amounts of zearalenone (0.67-0.75 μg/g), 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (0.34 μg/g) and HT-2 toxin (0.078-0.085 μg/g). T- and B-lymphocyte populations and crypt cellular proliferation in duodenum, jejunum, ileum and cecal tonsil were measured immunohistochemically on day 14 and 21. Histological changes were recorded after 14 and 21 days of feeding. Feeding contaminated grains significantly increased the percentage of B-lymphocytes in ileum on day 14, and reduced (P<0.05) the percentages of CD8(+)-lymphocytes in cecal tonsil on day 21. GMA supplementation prevented these effects. The feeding of contaminated diets also caused a reduction (P<0.05) in ileal crypt proliferating cells and a significant increase in spleen secondary follicle on day 21. It was concluded that the feeding of grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins results in adverse effects on gut immunity and mucosal cell proliferation.

  3. Human gamma interferon production by cytotoxic T lymphocytes sensitized during hepatitis A virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, K.; Gabriel, P.; Koscielniak, E.; Stierhof, Y.D.; Wiedmann, K.H.; Flehmig, B.; Vallbracht, A.

    1988-10-01

    The production of interferon (IFN) during a chromium-51 release assay with hepatitis A virus (HAV)-infected fibroblasts and autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with acute HAV infection was studied to determine whether IFN plays a role in immunopathogenesis of hepatitis A infection in humans. Skin fibroblasts of eight patients after acute HAV infection and from two control persons without history of current of past HAV infection were infected with HAV. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were collected at different times after the onset of icterus and tested in a chromium-51 release assay against autologous HAV-infected skin fibroblasts for their cytolytic and IFN-producing activity. The IFN produced during the assay was characterized and found to have the properties of human gamma IFN. Cytotoxicity and gamma IFN release were virus specific. The cell types responsible for both functions were characterized and found to be in the HLA-dependent T8/sup +/ lymphocyte subset. Considering that gamma IFN has an antiviral effect on persistent HAV infection in vitro and that it probably accounts for stimulation of HLA class I antigen expression on hepatocytes, these experimental results presented here demonstrate that human gamma IFN produced by HAV-specific T cells may participate in pathogenesis of hepatitis A infection in humans.

  4. Human blood dendritic cell subsets exhibit discriminative pattern recognition receptor profiles

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Kristina; Rydnert, Frida; Greiff, Lennart; Lindstedt, Malin

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as the link between innate and adaptive immunity. Their expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), enables antigen recognition and mediates appropriate immune responses. Distinct subsets of human DCs have been identified; however their expression of PRRs is not fully clarified. Expressions of CLRs by DC subpopulations, in particular, remain elusive. This study aimed to identify and compare PRR expressions on human blood DC subsets, including CD1c+, CD141+ and CD16+ myeloid DCs and CD123+ plasmacytoid DCs, in order to understand their capacity to recognize different antigens as well as their responsiveness to PRR-directed targeting. Whole blood was obtained from 13 allergic and six non-allergic individuals. Mononuclear cells were purified and multi-colour flow cytometry was used to assess the expression of 10 CLRs and two TLRs on distinct DC subsets. PRR expression levels were shown to differ between DC subsets for each PRR assessed. Furthermore, principal component analysis and random forest test demonstrated that the PRR profiles were discriminative between DC subsets. Interestingly, CLEC9A was expressed at lower levels by CD141+ DCs from allergic compared with non-allergic donors. The subset-specific PRR expression profiles suggests individual responsiveness to PRR-targeting and supports functional specialization. PMID:24444310

  5. Human blood dendritic cell subsets exhibit discriminative pattern recognition receptor profiles.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Kristina; Rydnert, Frida; Greiff, Lennart; Lindstedt, Malin

    2014-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as the link between innate and adaptive immunity. Their expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), enables antigen recognition and mediates appropriate immune responses. Distinct subsets of human DCs have been identified; however their expression of PRRs is not fully clarified. Expressions of CLRs by DC subpopulations, in particular, remain elusive. This study aimed to identify and compare PRR expressions on human blood DC subsets, including CD1c(+) , CD141(+) and CD16(+) myeloid DCs and CD123(+) plasmacytoid DCs, in order to understand their capacity to recognize different antigens as well as their responsiveness to PRR-directed targeting. Whole blood was obtained from 13 allergic and six non-allergic individuals. Mononuclear cells were purified and multi-colour flow cytometry was used to assess the expression of 10 CLRs and two TLRs on distinct DC subsets. PRR expression levels were shown to differ between DC subsets for each PRR assessed. Furthermore, principal component analysis and random forest test demonstrated that the PRR profiles were discriminative between DC subsets. Interestingly, CLEC9A was expressed at lower levels by CD141(+) DCs from allergic compared with non-allergic donors. The subset-specific PRR expression profiles suggests individual responsiveness to PRR-targeting and supports functional specialization. PMID:24444310

  6. Effect of controlled ozone exposure on human lymphocyte function

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.L.; Smialowicz, R.; Harder, S.; Ketcham, B.; House, D.

    1981-04-01

    The effects of ozone (O/sub 3/) on cell-mediated immunity were studied in 16 human subjects exposed to 1176 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ O/sub 3/ (0.6 ppM) for 2 h in an environmentally controlled exposure chamber. Venous blood samples were taken before and immediately after controlled air and O/sub 3/ exposures, as well as at 72 h, 2 and 4 weeks, and at one random time at least 1 month after treatment. The relative frequency of T lymphocytes in blood and the in vitro blastogenic response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), pokeweed mitogen (PWM), and Candida albicans were determined. During the course of the experiment, no statistically significant changes were observed in the number of T lymphocytes that form spontaneous rosettes with sheep erythrocytes. The response of T lymphocytes to PHA was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in samples taken at 2 and 4 weeks, following O/sub 3/ exposure. Normal response to PHA was observed at 2 months post-O/sub 3/ exposure. No statistically significant changes in lymphocyte responses to Con A, PWM, or Candida were seen. These results show that one 2 h exposure of humans to 0.6 ppM O/sub 3/ may lead to a transient suppression of the PHA-stimulated blastogenic transformation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. The data indicate that the blastogenic response to PHA of human lymphocytes is exquisitely sensitive to O/sub 3/ exposure and could serve as a bioassay for evaluating subtle changes in cellular immunity induced by O/sub 3/ and possibly other pollutants.

  7. T Lymphocyte Density and Distribution in Human Colorectal Mucosa, and Inefficiency of Current Cell Isolation Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Preza, Gloria Cuevas; Yang, Otto O.; Elliott, Julie; Anton, Peter A.; Ochoa, Maria T.

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal tissues are critical immune effector sites containing complex populations of leukocytes in a tissue microenvironment that remains incompletely understood. We identify and quantify in human distal colorectal tissue absolute mucosal CD3+ lymphocytes, including CD4+ and CD8+ subsets, by direct visualization using immunohistochemistry (IHC), immunofluorescence (IF), and an automated counting protocol (r2=0.90). Sigmoid and rectal mucosal tissues are both densely packed with T lymphocytes in the mucosal compartment. Both compartments had similar densities of CD3+ T lymphocytes with 37,400 ± 2,801 cells/mm3 and 33,700 ± 4,324 cell/mm3, respectively. Sigmoid mucosa contained 57% CD3+CD4+ and 40% CD3+CD8+ T lymphocytes which calculates to 21,300 ± 1,476/mm3 and 15,000 ± 275/mm3 T lymphocytes, respectively. Rectal mucosa had 57% CD3+CD4+ and 42% CD3+CD8+ or 21,577 ± 332, and 17,090 ± 1,206 cells/mm3, respectively. By comparison, sigmoid mucosal biopsies subjected to conventional collagenase digestion, mononuclear cell (MMC) isolation and staining for flow cytometry yielded 4,549 ± 381/mm3 and 2,708 ± 245/mm3 CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. These data suggest only ~20.7% recovery compared to IHC results for these markers. Further studies will determine if this reflects a selective bias in only CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells or can be generalized to all flow-analyzed cells from mucosal tissues for phenotyping and functional testing. PMID:25856343

  8. Increase of both circulating Th1 and Th2 T lymphocyte subsets in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lai, K N; Ho, R T; Lai, C K; Chan, C H; Li, P K

    1994-04-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN), characterized by glomerular deposition of IgA and frequently elevated plasma IgA levels, has increased T helper cell activity. In vitro measurement of cytokines in supernatant of cultured peripheral lymphocytes revealed conflicting findings. We examined the profile of cytokine mRNA expressed in purified CD4+ cells in patients with IgAN in order to study their pattern of Th1 (releases IL-2 and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)) and Th2 (releases IL-4 and IL-5) T cell response. We assessed the circulating CD4+ T cells in patients and normal controls by the expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) for IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and IFN-gamma. The cytokine mRNAs were analysed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and were measured semiquantitatively by using a housekeeping gene, beta-actin. Compared with the control subjects, CD4+ T lymphocytes from patients with IgAN expressed a higher level of IL-2 mRNA (P = 0.007), IFN-gamma mRNA (P = 0.04), IL-4 mRNA (P = 0.048), and IL-5 mRNA (P = 0.016). Within these patients with IgAN, a good correlation was demonstrated between the gene expression of cytokines in Th1 or Th2 cells. The IL-2 mRNA levels in Th1 cells from these patients with IgAN also correlated significantly with the IL-4 or IL-5 mRNA levels in their Th2 cells. Our study revealed IgAN is associated with activation in circulating lymphocytes of the IL-2, IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-5 gene cluster, a pattern compatible with activation of both the Th1- and Th2-like T lymphocyte population. The increased transcription of these cytokines genes may be contributory to the immunopathologic findings in IgAN.

  9. Increase of both circulating Th1 and Th2 T lymphocyte subsets in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, K N; Ho, R T; Lai, C K; Chan, C H; Li, P K

    1994-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN), characterized by glomerular deposition of IgA and frequently elevated plasma IgA levels, has increased T helper cell activity. In vitro measurement of cytokines in supernatant of cultured peripheral lymphocytes revealed conflicting findings. We examined the profile of cytokine mRNA expressed in purified CD4+ cells in patients with IgAN in order to study their pattern of Th1 (releases IL-2 and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)) and Th2 (releases IL-4 and IL-5) T cell response. We assessed the circulating CD4+ T cells in patients and normal controls by the expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) for IL-2, IL-4, IL-5 and IFN-gamma. The cytokine mRNAs were analysed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and were measured semiquantitatively by using a housekeeping gene, beta-actin. Compared with the control subjects, CD4+ T lymphocytes from patients with IgAN expressed a higher level of IL-2 mRNA (P = 0.007), IFN-gamma mRNA (P = 0.04), IL-4 mRNA (P = 0.048), and IL-5 mRNA (P = 0.016). Within these patients with IgAN, a good correlation was demonstrated between the gene expression of cytokines in Th1 or Th2 cells. The IL-2 mRNA levels in Th1 cells from these patients with IgAN also correlated significantly with the IL-4 or IL-5 mRNA levels in their Th2 cells. Our study revealed IgAN is associated with activation in circulating lymphocytes of the IL-2, IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-5 gene cluster, a pattern compatible with activation of both the Th1- and Th2-like T lymphocyte population. The increased transcription of these cytokines genes may be contributory to the immunopathologic findings in IgAN. PMID:7908616

  10. Somatostatin receptors on human lymphocytes and leukaemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hiruma, K; Koike, T; Nakamura, H; Sumida, T; Maeda, T; Tomioka, H; Yoshida, S; Fujita, T

    1990-01-01

    Receptors for somatostatin were identified on mitogen-activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and human leukaemic cells in 87.5% of lymphoblastic leukaemia and in 12.5% of non-lymphocytic leukaemia, using a somatostatin radiobinding assay. The specific binding of 125I-somatostatin of these cells increased linearly with the cell numbers and was suppressed by non-iodinated somatostatin. We investigated the distribution of fluorescent somatostatin to mitogen-activated PBL by using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). Over 95% of the cell populations bound fluorescent somatostatin and no distinct predilection was found among certain lymphocyte subpopulations and somatostatin receptor-positive cells. Scatchard analysis showed a single class (low affinity) of binding site on mitogen-activated PBL and two classes (high and low affinity) of specific binding sites on lymphoblastic leukaemia cells. PMID:2177723

  11. D-ribose inhibits DNA repair synthesis in human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zunica, G.; Marini, M.; Brunelli, M.A.; Chiricolo, M.; Franceschi, C.

    1986-07-31

    D-ribose is cytotoxic for quiescent human lymphocytes and severely inhibits their PHA-induced proliferation at concentrations (25-50 mM) at which other simple sugars are ineffective. In order to explain these effects, DNA repair synthesis was evaluated in PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes treated with hydroxyurea and irradiated. D-ribose, in contrast to other reducing sugars, did not induce repair synthesis and therefore did not apparently damage DNA in a direct way, although it markedly inhibited gamma ray-induced repair. Taking into account that lymphocytes must rejoin physiologically-formed DNA strand breaks in order to enter the cell cycle, we suggest that D-ribose exerts its cytotoxic activity by interfering with metabolic pathways critical for the repair of DNA breaks.

  12. Human papilloma virus: a new risk factor in a subset of head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Bisht, Manisha; Bist, Sampan Singh

    2011-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common malignancy worldwide. Tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption are two well known behavioral risk factors associated with head and neck cancer. Recently, evidence is mounting that infection with human papilloma virus, most commonly human papilloma virus-16 is responsible for a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma especially tumors of tonsillar origin. The molecular pathway used by human papilloma virus to trigger malignant transformation of tissue is different from that of other well known risk factors, i.e. smoking and alcohol, associated with squamous cell carcinoma. Apparently, these subsets of patients with human papilloma virus positive tumor are more likely to have a better prognosis than human papilloma virus negative tumor. Considering this fact, the human papilloma virus infection should be determined in all oropharyngeal cancers since it can have a major impact on the decision making process of the treatment.

  13. Comparison of Human Neonatal and Adult Blood Leukocyte Subset Composition Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Savit B; Rathore, Deepak K; Nair, Deepa; Chaudhary, Anita; Raza, Saimah; Kanodia, Parna; Sopory, Shailaja; George, Anna; Rath, Satyajit; Bal, Vineeta; Tripathi, Reva; Ramji, Siddharth; Batra, Aruna; Aggarwal, Kailash C; Chellani, Harish K; Arya, Sugandha; Agarwal, Nidhi; Mehta, Umesh; Natchu, Uma Chandra Mouli; Wadhwa, Nitya; Bhatnagar, Shinjini

    2016-01-01

    The human peripheral leukocyte subset composition depends on genotype variation and pre-natal and post-natal environmental influence diversity. We quantified this composition in adults and neonates, and compared the median values and dispersal ranges of various subsets in them. We confirmed higher frequencies of monocytes and regulatory T cells (Tregs), similar frequencies of neutrophils, and lower frequencies of CD8 T cells, NKT cells, B1 B cells and gamma-delta T cells in neonatal umbilical cord blood. Unlike previous reports, we found higher frequencies of eosinophils and B cells, higher CD4:CD8 ratios, lower frequencies of T cells and iNKT cells, and similar frequencies of CD4 T cells and NK cells in neonates. We characterized monocyte subsets and dendritic cell (DC) subsets in far greater detail than previously reported, using recently described surface markers and gating strategies and observed that neonates had lower frequencies of patrolling monocytes and lower myeloid dendritic cell (mDC):plasmacytoid DC (pDC) ratios. Our data contribute to South Asian reference values for these parameters. We found that dispersal ranges differ between different leukocyte subsets, suggesting differential determination of variation. Further, some subsets were more dispersed in adults than in neonates suggesting influences of postnatal sources of variation, while some show the opposite pattern suggesting influences of developmental process variation. Together, these data and analyses provide interesting biological possibilities for future exploration. PMID:27610624

  14. Comparison of Human Neonatal and Adult Blood Leukocyte Subset Composition Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Deepak K.; Nair, Deepa; Chaudhary, Anita; Raza, Saimah; Kanodia, Parna; Sopory, Shailaja; George, Anna; Rath, Satyajit; Bal, Vineeta; Tripathi, Reva; Ramji, Siddharth; Batra, Aruna; Aggarwal, Kailash C.; Chellani, Harish K.; Arya, Sugandha; Agarwal, Nidhi; Mehta, Umesh; Natchu, Uma Chandra Mouli; Wadhwa, Nitya; Bhatnagar, Shinjini

    2016-01-01

    The human peripheral leukocyte subset composition depends on genotype variation and pre-natal and post-natal environmental influence diversity. We quantified this composition in adults and neonates, and compared the median values and dispersal ranges of various subsets in them. We confirmed higher frequencies of monocytes and regulatory T cells (Tregs), similar frequencies of neutrophils, and lower frequencies of CD8 T cells, NKT cells, B1 B cells and gamma-delta T cells in neonatal umbilical cord blood. Unlike previous reports, we found higher frequencies of eosinophils and B cells, higher CD4:CD8 ratios, lower frequencies of T cells and iNKT cells, and similar frequencies of CD4 T cells and NK cells in neonates. We characterized monocyte subsets and dendritic cell (DC) subsets in far greater detail than previously reported, using recently described surface markers and gating strategies and observed that neonates had lower frequencies of patrolling monocytes and lower myeloid dendritic cell (mDC):plasmacytoid DC (pDC) ratios. Our data contribute to South Asian reference values for these parameters. We found that dispersal ranges differ between different leukocyte subsets, suggesting differential determination of variation. Further, some subsets were more dispersed in adults than in neonates suggesting influences of postnatal sources of variation, while some show the opposite pattern suggesting influences of developmental process variation. Together, these data and analyses provide interesting biological possibilities for future exploration. PMID:27610624

  15. Human allospecific cytolytic T lymphocyte lysis of a murine cell transfected with HLA-A2.

    PubMed

    Koller, T D; Clayberger, C; Maryanski, J L; Krensky, A M

    1987-04-01

    A variety of molecules are involved in the interaction of human allospecific cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) with target cells. Monoclonal antibodies specific for these molecules inhibit CTL-target conjugate formation and/or lysis. To further study recognition and lysis of targets by human CTL, we used a murine mastocytoma cell line transfected with the histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 gene (P815-A2+) as a target for human HLA-A2-specific CTL. We find that only a subset of human HLA-A2-specific CTL can lyse murine P815-A2+ cells, suggesting that the murine cells may lack one or more accessory molecules needed for CTL recognition and lysis. PMID:3549894

  16. Population specific reference ranges of CD3, CD4 and CD8 lymphocyte subsets among healthy Kenyans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The enumeration of absolute CD4 counts is of primary importance for many medical conditions especially HIV infection where therapeutic initiation depends on the count. These ranges tend to vary across populations. However, these ranges have not been comprehensively established in the Kenyan population. Therefore, this study aimed at establishing the reference ranges for the CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocytes in normal healthy individuals in Kenya. Methods A total of 315 individuals of the ages between 16 and 60 years old, in 5 different regions of the country, were recruited into the study. They were screened for diseases that potentially cause lymphocyte homeostasis perturbation. CD4/CD8 Counts were performed by use of a FACSCalibur flow cytometer (Becton-Dickinson, NJ) equipped with automated acquisition and analysis software. Results were analysed according to age, sex and region. Results Results were presented as means and ranges (in parenthesis) generated non parametrically as 2.5 and 97.5 percentiles as follows; In general population; CD3 1655 (614-2685 cells/μL ), CD4 920 (343-1493 cells/μL), and CD8 646 (187-1139 cells/μL), while according to sex, females; CD3 1787 (697-2841 cells/μL), CD4 1010 (422-1572 cells/μL), CD8 659 (187-1180 cells/μL); males; CD3 1610 (581-2641 cells/μL), CD4 889(320-1459 cells/μL) and CD8 644 (185-1140 cells/μL). The general reference ranges for CD4/CD8 ratios were as follows; general population 1.57(0.50-2.74), males 1.51(0.49-2.64) and females 1.69(0.55-2.95). Conclusion The lymphocyte reference ranges for the Kenyan population are fairly comparable to those established in other African populations. The ranges also differ appreciably from those established in Germany, Italy and Switzerland. Furthermore, the study reported significant differences in the ranges of different population clusters within Kenya, as well us between males and females. PMID:24199645

  17. Altered Cytokine Production By Specific Human Peripheral Blood Cell Subsets Immediately Following Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Cubbage, Michael L.; Sams, Clarence F.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we have attempted to combine standard immunological assays with the cellular resolving power of the flow cytometer to positively identify the specific cell types involved in spaceflight-induced immune alterations. We have obtained whole blood samples from 27 astronauts collected at three timepoints (L-10, R+0 and R+3) surrounding four recent space shuttle missions. The duration of these missions ranged from 10 to 18 days. Assays performed included serum/urine cortisol, comprehensive subset phenotyping, assessment of cellular activation markers and intracellular cytokine production following mitogenic stimulation. Absolute levels of peripheral granulocytes were significantly elevated following spaceflight, but the levels of circulating lymphocytes and monocytes were unchanged. Lymphocyte subset analysis demonstrated trends towards a decreased percentage of T cells and an increased percentage of B cells. Nearly all of the astronauts exhibited an increased CD4:CD8 ratio, which was dramatic in some individuals. Assessment of memory (CD45RA+) vs. naive (CD45RO+) CD4+ T cell subsets was more ambiguous, with subjects tending to group more as a flight crew. All subjects from one mission demonstrated an increased CD45RA:CD45RO ratio, while all subjects from another Mission demonstrated a decreased ratio. While no significant trend was seen in the monocyte population as defined by scatter, a decreased percentage of the CD14+ CD16+ monocyte subset was seen following spaceflight in all subjects tested. In general, most of the cellular changes described above which were assessed at R+O and compared to L-10 trended to pre-flight levels by R+3. Although no significant differences were seen in the expression of the cellular activation markers CD69 and CD25 following exposure to microgravity, significant alterations were seen in cytokine production in response to mitogenic activation for specific subsets. T cell (CD3+) production of IL-2 was significantly decreased

  18. The role of a human antigen specific T8+ cell subset in antigen presentation, helper function and contrasuppression.

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, T; Avery, J; Jones, T

    1985-01-01

    Regulation of the human immune response was studied by sequential separation of subsets of T cells, followed by assessment of their helper and suppressor functions in a series of reconstitution experiments. T8+ lymphocytes were separated by panning on streptococcal antigen (SA) coated plates into T8+ SA-adherent cells (T8+SA+) and T8+ SA-non-adherent cells (T8+SA-). The helper and suppressor functions of the T8+SA+ and T8+SA- cells, reconstituted with T4+ helper cells were then studied by a direct antibody forming cell assay. T4+ cells will not induce helper activity by 1000 ng SA alone but require the accessory function of monocytes (Mo). However, replacing Mo by T8+SA+ cells will elicit a similar helper activity by T4+ cells and SA as that induced by Mo. In addition to the antigen-specific presentation and induction of helper activity, the T8+SA+ subset displays the properties of antigen-specific contrasuppressor cells. Thus, reconstitution of T4+ cells and T8+SA- (suppressor cells) with T8+SA+ and 1000 ng SA induces helper and no suppressor activity. Substitution of Mo for the T8+SA+ cells converts the helper to a predominantly suppressor-cell function. T8+SA- cells elicit suppression with 1 ng SA in the absence of accessory cells and reconstitution with Mo, T8+SA+ or T4+ cells failed to affect the suppressor activity. Total reconstitution of the four principle subsets of T4+, T8+SA+, T8+SA- cells and Mo elicited similar antigen dose-dependent responses as those of the unseparated mononuclear cells. It seems that all four cell subsets are required for optimal immunoregulation. We suggest that the T8+SA+ can present antigen to T4+ helper cells and induce helper activity, but in addition these cells can prevent the suppressor subset of T8+ cells from inhibiting T4+ helper cells and function as contrasuppressor cells. The mechanism of these functions is not known but HLA class II antigens might play an essential role in antigen binding, presentation and

  19. Ceruloplasmin expression by human peripheral blood lymphocytes: a new link between immunity and iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Banha, João; Marques, Liliana; Oliveira, Rita; Martins, Maria de Fátima; Paixão, Eleonora; Pereira, Dina; Malhó, Rui; Penque, Deborah; Costa, Luciana

    2008-02-01

    Ceruloplasmin (CP) is a multicopper oxidase involved in the acute phase reaction to stress. Although the physiological role of CP is uncertain, its role in iron (Fe) homeostasis and protection against free radical-initiated cell injury has been widely documented. Previous studies showed the existence of two molecular isoforms of CP: secreted CP (sCP) and a membrane glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored form of CP (GPI-CP). sCP is produced mainly by the liver and is abundant in human serum whereas GPI-CP is expressed in mammalian astrocytes, rat leptomeningeal cells, and Sertolli cells. Herein, we show using RT-PCR that human peripheral blood lymphocytes (huPBL) constitutively express the transcripts for both CP molecular isoforms previously reported. Also, expression of CP in huPBL is demonstrated by immunofluorescence with confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis using cells isolated from healthy blood donors with normal Fe status. Importantly, the results obtained show that natural killer cells have a significantly higher CP expression compared to all other major lymphocyte subsets. In this context, the involvement of lymphocyte-derived CP on host defense processes via its anti/prooxidant properties is proposed, giving further support for a close functional interaction between the immune system and the Fe metabolism.

  20. Rapid activation of spleen dendritic cell subsets following lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection of mice: analysis of the involvement of type 1 IFN.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Maria; Edwards, Matthew J; Reid, Delyth M; Borrow, Persephone

    2005-02-15

    In this study, we report the dynamic changes in activation and functions that occur in spleen dendritic cell (sDC) subsets following infection of mice with a natural murine pathogen, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Within 24 h postinfection (pi), sDCs acquired the ability to stimulate naive LCMV-specific CD8+ T cells ex vivo. Conventional (CD11chigh CD8+ and CD4+) sDC subsets rapidly up-regulated expression of costimulatory molecules and began to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Their tendency to undergo apoptosis ex vivo simultaneously increased, and in vivo the number of conventional DCs in the spleen decreased markedly, dropping approximately 2-fold by day 3 pi. Conversely, the number of plasmacytoid (CD11clowB220+) DCs in the spleen increased, so that they constituted almost 40% of sDCs by day 3 pi. Type 1 IFN production was up-regulated in plasmacytoid DCs by 24 h pi. Analysis of DC activation and maturation in mice unable to respond to type 1 IFNs implicated these cytokines in driving infection-associated phenotypic activation of conventional DCs and their enhanced tendency to undergo apoptosis, but also indicated the existence of type 1 IFN-independent pathways for the functional maturation of DCs during LCMV infection. PMID:15699111

  1. Influence of ethanol on human T-lymphocyte migration

    SciTech Connect

    Kaelin, R.M.; Semerjian, A.; Center, D.M.; Bernardo, J.

    1984-11-01

    Because ethanol consumption is associated with increased susceptibility to infection, an examination was made of the effects of ethanol and its metabolite acetaldehyde on human T-lymphocyte migration, an important functional component of cellular inflammatory responses. With a modified Boyden chamber system, ethanol at 0.25% and 0.50% (vol/vol) inhibited spontaneous motility of human T-lymphocytes, in a noncytotoxic manner, to 65% +/- 7% (mean +/- SEM) and 62% +/- 7% of control values of migration, respectively. When T-lymphocyte migration was stimulated by colchicine (10/sup -5/ mol/L), incubation with ethanol (0.25% and 0.50%, vol/vol) decreased migration to 80% +/- 4% and 66% +/- 8% of control values, respectively. Similar degrees of inhibition of migration were obtained with acetaldehyde at concentrations five to 10 times less than ethanol. Ethanol was similarly capable of inhibiting T cell migration induced by dibutyryl cyclic guanosine monophosphate, but it had no effect on stimulated migration induced by a human chemokinetic lymphokine. The study demonstrates that ethanol, at concentrations achievable in vivo, is capable of depressing T-lymphocyte migration. This effect might contribute to the immunosuppression associated with ethanol consumption. 36 references, 4 figures.

  2. Immunomodulating activity of seaweed extract on human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shan, B E; Yoshida, Y; Kuroda, E; Yamashita, U

    1999-01-01

    Effect of eight kinds of seaweed extract (SWE) on human lymphocytes was studied in vitro. The extracts of Hizikiafusiformis and Meristotheca papulosa (green) markedly stimulated human lymphocytes to proliferate, whereas Eucheuma muricatum and Meristotheca papulosa (red) weakly stimulated proliferation. The responder cells are T cells, because T cells purified by sheep red blood cell (SRBC) rosette-formation were significantly stimulated with SWE, but B cells were not. These extracts enhanced the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity, but failed to enhance natural killer (NK) cell activity. These extracts had a stimulatory effect on immunoglobulin (Ig) production by B cells and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production by monocytes. The activity of Hizikia fusiformis associated with polysaccharides which were extracted with ethanol and purified by ion-exchange and gel filtration chromatography, whose molecular weight was about 100 kDa. These results suggest that SWE has an immunomodulating activity on human lymphocytes and this ability might be useful for clinical application to treat several diseases such as tumors. PMID:10411282

  3. Stress-Induced In Vivo Recruitment of Human Cytotoxic Natural Killer Cells Favors Subsets with Distinct Receptor Profiles and Associates with Increased Epinephrine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Bigler, Marc B.; Egli, Simon B.; Hysek, Cédric M.; Hoenger, Gideon; Schmied, Laurent; Baldin, Fabian S.; Marquardsen, Florian A.; Recher, Mike; Liechti, Matthias E.; Hess, Christoph; Berger, Christoph T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute stress drives a ‘high-alert’ response in the immune system. Psychoactive drugs induce distinct stress hormone profiles, offering a sought-after opportunity to dissect the in vivo immunological effects of acute stress in humans. Methods 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), methylphenidate (MPH), or both, were administered to healthy volunteers in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover-study. Lymphocyte subset frequencies, natural killer (NK) cell immune-phenotypes, and changes in effector function were assessed, and linked to stress hormone levels and expression of CD62L, CX3CR1, CD18, and stress hormone receptors on NK cells. Results MDMA/MPH > MDMA > MPH robustly induced an epinephrine-dominant stress response. Immunologically, rapid redistribution of peripheral blood lymphocyte-subsets towards phenotypically mature NK cells occurred. NK cytotoxicity was unaltered, but they expressed slightly reduced levels of the activating receptor NKG2D. Preferential circulation of mature NK cells was associated with high epinephrine receptor expression among this subset, as well as expression of integrin ligands previously linked to epinephrine-induced endothelial detachment. Conclusion The acute epinephrine-induced stress response was characterized by rapid accumulation of mature and functional NK cells in the peripheral circulation. This is in line with studies using other acute stressors and supports the role of the acute stress response in rapidly mobilizing the innate immune system to counteract incoming threats. PMID:26700184

  4. De novo transcriptome profiling of highly purified human lymphocytes primary cells

    PubMed Central

    Bonnal, Raoul J.P.; Ranzani, Valeria; Arrigoni, Alberto; Curti, Serena; Panzeri, Ilaria; Gruarin, Paola; Abrignani, Sergio; Rossetti, Grazisa; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    To help better understand the role of long noncoding RNAs in the human immune system, we recently generated a comprehensive RNA-seq data set using 63 RNA samples from 13 subsets of T (CD4+ naive, CD4+ TH1, CD4+ TH2, CD4+ TH17, CD4+ Treg, CD4+ TCM, CD4+ TEM, CD8+ TCM, CD8+ TEM, CD8+ naive) and B (B naive, B memory, B CD5+) lymphocytes. There were five biological replicates for each subset except for CD8+ TCM and B CD5+ populations that included 4 replicates. RNA-Seq data were generated by an Illumina HiScanSQ sequencer using the TruSeq v3 Cluster kit. 2.192 billion of paired-ends reads, 2×100 bp, were sequenced and after filtering a total of about 1.7 billion reads were mapped. Using different de novo transcriptome reconstruction techniques over 500 previously unknown lincRNAs were identified. The current data set could be exploited to drive the functional characterization of lincRNAs, identify novel genes and regulatory networks associated with specific cells subsets of the human immune system. PMID:26451251

  5. One half of the CD11b+ human peripheral blood T lymphocytes coexpresses the S-100 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, C; Sansoni, P; Rowden, G; Manara, G C; Torresani, C; De Panfilis, G

    1988-01-01

    The expression of the CD11b antigen and the presence of the S-100 (and, specifically, its beta subunit) protein within the T4- subpopulation of normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes were investigated by panning techniques, immunofluorescence analysis and immunoelectronmicroscopy. Both antigens are known to be absent in the T4+ lymphocytes. However, CD11b+ T lymphocytes represented about 30% of the T4- population; a part of them (over 1/3) belonged to and completely filled up the T4- T8- subpopulation, whereas the remaining part (almost 2/3) shared the T8 positivity. Interestingly, S-100+ T lymphocytes, which always were CD11b+ too, represented about one half of the CD11b+ T cells, but were excluded from the T4- T8- CD11b+ subpopulation, whereas they represented up to 80% of the T4- T8+ CD11b+ subset. Such findings demonstrate that the S-100+ T lymphocytes are exclusively restricted to a discrete T cell compartment which shows the T8+ CD11b+ immunophenotype. Since such T8+ CD11b+ cells had been shown to possess suppressive capabilities, we herein propose that S-100+ lymphocytes might to some extent modulate the immune responses. However, the exact functional significance of the S-100 protein still remains unknown. Images Fig. 3 PMID:3048804

  6. A basophil-activating factor from human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Goetzl, E J; Foster, D W; Payan, D G

    1984-01-01

    Human T lymphocytes stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) or streptokinase-streptodornase (SK-SD) generate an activity which elicits non-cytotoxic histamine release from human basophils. Filtration of the T lymphocyte-derived activity on columns of Sephadex G-100 and Fractogel 55F sequentially revealed one predominant basophil-activating factor of mol. wt. 70,000-90,000, that was designated BAF-T. BAF-T was composed of two acidic proteins of approximate pI 4.4 and 5.2-5.5, as assessed by isoelectric focusing. The distinction of BAF-T from IgE was confirmed by the failure of BAF-T to bind to an anti-IgE affinity column and the capacity of BAF-T to release histamine maximally from basophils desensitized to IgE-dependent stimuli. The inability of BAF-T to release histamine from human lung mast cells and dog cutaneous mastocytoma cells suggests target cell specificity. The source and activity of BAF-T are consistent with a specific contribution of this mediator to human cellular immune and hypersensitivity responses involving T lymphocytes and basophils. PMID:6208144

  7. TGF-β affects development and differentiation of human natural killer cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Allan, David S.J.; Rybalov, Basya; Awong, Génève; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos; Kopcow, Hernan D.; Carlyle, James R.; Strominger, Jack L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Human peripheral blood NK cells may be divided into two main subsets: CD56brightCD16− and CD56dimCD16+. Since TGF-β is known to influence the development of many leukocyte lineages, its effects on NK cell differentiation either from human CD34+Lin− hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells in vitro or from peripheral blood NK cells were investigated. TGF-β represses development of NK cells from CD34+ progenitors and inhibits differentiation of CD16+ NK cells. Moreover, TGF-β also results in conversion of a minor fraction of CD56brightCD16+ cells found in peripheral blood into CD56brightCD16− cells, highlighting a possible role of the former as a developmental intermediate and of TGF-β in influencing the genesis of NK subsets found in blood. PMID:20540115

  8. Cellular and humoral immune reactions in chronic active liver disease. II. Lymphocyte subsets and viral antigens in liver biopsies of patients with acute and chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, H F; Houthoff, H J; Huitema, S; Wolters, G; Poppema, S; Gips, C H

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics and distribution of the inflammatory infiltrate in liver biopsies of 25 patients with hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection were studied in relation to the distribution and expression of HBV antigens. Mononuclear subsets were characterized with monoclonal (OKT, OKM, Leu) antibodies to surface antigens. For the demonstration of viral antigens directly conjugated antibodies to surface (HBsAg), core (HBcAg) and 'e' (HBeAg) antigen were used. For the study of mutual relations all methods were performed on serial cut tissue sections. In chronic active hepatitis B (CAH-B, n = 12) OKT8+ lymphocytes of T cell origin were the only cell type present in areas with liver cell degeneration and T cell cytotoxicity appears to be the only immune mechanism. In chronic persistent hepatitis B (CPH-B, n = 7) the only conspicuous feature was the presence of many Leu 3+ lymphocytes of the helper/inducer population in the portal tracts. In acute hepatitis B (AHB, n = 6) OKT8+ cells of non-T origin (OKT1-,3-) and Leu 7+ cells of presumed natural killer (NK) potential predominated in the areas with liver cell necrosis, and non-T cell cytotoxicity appears to be the predominant immune mechanism. In none of these disease entities a positive spatial relation could be established between the cytotoxic cells and the demonstrable expression of HBV antigens in hepatocytes. It is concluded that differences in immunological reaction pattern may explain the different course in the three forms of HBV infection studied. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6713726

  9. Mass Cytometry of the Human Mucosal Immune System Identifies Tissue- and Disease-Associated Immune Subsets.

    PubMed

    van Unen, Vincent; Li, Na; Molendijk, Ilse; Temurhan, Mine; Höllt, Thomas; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Verspaget, Hein W; Mearin, M Luisa; Mulder, Chris J; van Bergen, Jeroen; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; Koning, Frits

    2016-05-17

    Inflammatory intestinal diseases are characterized by abnormal immune responses and affect distinct locations of the gastrointestinal tract. Although the role of several immune subsets in driving intestinal pathology has been studied, a system-wide approach that simultaneously interrogates all major lineages on a single-cell basis is lacking. We used high-dimensional mass cytometry to generate a system-wide view of the human mucosal immune system in health and disease. We distinguished 142 immune subsets and through computational applications found distinct immune subsets in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and intestinal biopsies that distinguished patients from controls. In addition, mucosal lymphoid malignancies were readily detected as well as precursors from which these likely derived. These findings indicate that an integrated high-dimensional analysis of the entire immune system can identify immune subsets associated with the pathogenesis of complex intestinal disorders. This might have implications for diagnostic procedures, immune-monitoring, and treatment of intestinal diseases and mucosal malignancies.

  10. Interaction of synthetic peptide octarphin (TPLVTLFK) with human blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Nekrasova, Yuliia N; Navolotskaya, Elena V

    2013-08-01

    The synthetic peptide octarphin (TPLVTLFK) corresponding to the sequence 12-19 of β-endorphin, a selective agonist of non-opioid β-endorphin receptor, was labeled with tritium to specific activity of 29 Ci/mmol. The analysis of [(3) H]octarphin binding to human T and B lymphocytes separated from normal human blood revealed the existence of one type of high-affinity binding sites (receptors): Kd 3.0 and 3.2 nM, respectively. Besides unlabeled octarphin, unlabeled β-endorphin possessed the ability to inhibit the specific binding of [(3) H]octarphin to Т and B lymphocytes (Ki 1.9 and 2.2 nМ, respectively). Tests of the specificity of the receptors revealed that they are not sensitive to naloxone, α-endorphin, γ-endorphin, [Met(5) ]enkephalin, and [Leu(5) ]enkephalin. Thus, both T and B lymphocytes from normal human blood express non-opioid receptor for β-endorphin. Binding of the hormone to the receptor provides a fragment 12-19. PMID:23794487

  11. A Progenitor Cell Expressing Transcription Factor RORγt Generates All Human Innate Lymphoid Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Scoville, Steven D; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Zhang, Michael H; Chen, Li; Zhang, Xiaoli; Keller, Karen A; Hughes, Tiffany; Chen, Luxi; Cheng, Stephanie; Bergin, Stephen M; Mao, Hsiaoyin C; McClory, Susan; Yu, Jianhua; Carson, William E; Caligiuri, Michael A; Freud, Aharon G

    2016-05-17

    The current model of murine innate lymphoid cell (ILC) development holds that mouse ILCs are derived downstream of the common lymphoid progenitor through lineage-restricted progenitors. However, corresponding lineage-restricted progenitors in humans have yet to be discovered. Here we identified a progenitor population in human secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs) that expressed the transcription factor RORγt and was unique in its ability to generate all known ILC subsets, including natural killer (NK) cells, but not other leukocyte populations. In contrast to murine fate-mapping data, which indicate that only ILC3s express Rorγt, these human progenitor cells as well as human peripheral blood NK cells and all mature ILC populations expressed RORγt. Thus, all human ILCs can be generated through an RORγt(+) developmental pathway from a common progenitor in SLTs. These findings help establish the developmental signals and pathways involved in human ILC development.

  12. Characterizing primary human microglia: A comparative study with myeloid subsets and culture models.

    PubMed

    Melief, J; Sneeboer, M A M; Litjens, M; Ormel, P R; Palmen, S J M C; Huitinga, I; Kahn, R S; Hol, E M; de Witte, L D

    2016-11-01

    The biology of microglia has become subject to intense study, as they are widely recognized as crucial determinants of normal and pathologic brain functioning. While they are well studied in animal models, it is still strongly debated what specifies most accurately the phenotype and functioning of microglia in the human brain. In this study, we therefore isolated microglia from postmortem human brain tissue of corpus callosum (CC) and frontal cortex (CTX). The cells were phenotyped for a panel of typical microglia markers and genes involved in myeloid cell biology. Furthermore, their response to pro- and anti-inflammatory stimuli was assessed. The microglia were compared to key human myeloid cell subsets, including monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages and monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and several commonly used microglial cell models. Protein and mRNA expression profiles partly differed between microglia isolated from CC and frontal cortex and were clearly distinct from other myeloid subsets. Microglia responded to both pro- (LPS or poly I:C) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4 or dexamethasone) stimuli. Interestingly, pro-inflammatory responses differed between microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages, as the former responded more strongly to poly I:C and the latter more strongly to LPS. Furthermore, we defined a large phenotypic discrepancy between primary human microglia and currently used microglial cell models and cell lines. In conclusion, we further delineated the unique and specific features that discriminate human microglia from other myeloid subsets, and we show that currently used cellular models only partly reflect the phenotype of primary human microglia. GLIA 2016;64:1857-1868.

  13. Jacalin: a lectin mitogenic for human CD4 T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Pineau, N; Aucouturier, P; Brugier, J C; Preud'homme, J L

    1990-01-01

    The major protein component of seeds from jackfruit is the lectin jacalin. Jackfruit crude extracts are known to stimulate human lymphocytes, but the mitogenic properties of purified jacalin have not been studied in detail so far. Study of the proliferative response of cell populations from normal human peripheral blood to purified jacalin showed it to be mitogenic through an interaction with lymphocytes by its lectin-binding site, as shown by inhibition by IgA. Jacalin failed to stimulate B cells to proliferate and to undergo plasma cell maturation. It induced a proliferation of CD4 (and not CD8) lymphocytes, as shown by phenotypic analysis of cells recovered after culture and by studies of the response of isolated T cell subpopulations. The proliferative response to jacalin was autologous monocyte-dependent. The kinetics of jacalin-induced DNA synthesis, expression of CD25 and interleukin-2 secretion was shifted by comparison with that induced by phytohaemagglutinin. The reason for the restricted responsiveness of CD4 T cells is presently unclear; jacalin bound to all blood cells and did not significantly co-cap with CD1, CD2, CD3, CD4, CD8 and CD38, and jacalin response was neither enhanced nor inhibited by antibodies to these surface antigens. PMID:2372991

  14. Distinct Responses of Human Monocyte Subsets to Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia1

    PubMed Central

    Serbina, Natalya V.; Cherny, Mathew; Shi, Chao; Bleau, Sharon A.; Collins, Nancy H.; Young, James W.; Pamer, Eric G.

    2009-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an environmental fungus that causes life-threatening infections in neutropenic patients. In the absence of intact innate immunity, inhaled A. fumigatus spores (conidia) germinate in the lung, forming hyphae that invade blood vessels and disseminate to other tissues. Although macrophages and neutrophils are postulated to provide defense against invasive fungal infection, animal models and human studies suggest that circulating monocytes also contribute to antifungal immunity. Although human monocyte subsets, defined as either CD14+CD16− or CD14+ CD16+, have been extensively characterized, their respective roles during fungal infection remain undefined. We isolated CD14+CD16− and CD14+CD16+ monocytes from healthy allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation donors and compared their ability to phagocytose and inhibit A. fumigatus conidia. Both monocyte subsets efficiently phagocytose conidia, but only CD14+CD16− monocytes inhibit conidial germination yet secrete little TNF. In contrast CD14+CD16+ do not inhibit conidial germination and secrete large amounts of TNF. Although CD14+CD16− and CD14+CD16+ monocytes differ in their response to dormant conidia, responses are similar if conidia are already germinated at the time of monocyte uptake. Our study demonstrates that functional CD14+CD16− and CD14+CD16+ monocytes can be isolated from allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation donors and that these subsets differ in their response to A. fumigatus conidia. PMID:19635902

  15. Phenotypic Definition of Effector and Memory T-Lymphocyte Subsets in Mice Chronically Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Henao-Tamayo, Marcela I.; Ordway, Diane J.; Irwin, Scott M.; Shang, Shaobin; Shanley, Crystal; Orme, Ian M.

    2010-01-01

    The bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains one of the world's most successful pathogens, a situation that is aggravated by the fact that the existing vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis BCG, is not effective in adults. As with any vaccine, the purpose of giving BCG vaccination is to establish a long-lived state of memory immunity, but whether this is successfully completely established is still unclear. It is generally accepted that memory T cells can be divided into central and effector memory populations by function and by phenotype; however, the majority of data supporting this division have been generated using transgenic mouse models or mice that have recovered from acute viral infections. Tuberculosis, on the other hand, represents a persistent, chronic state of immunity in which the presence of memory T cells is far less well defined. We show here that mice vaccinated with BCG or chronically infected with M. tuberculosis establish antigen-specific populations of cells within the lungs that predominantly express a cellular phenotype consistent with their being effector or effector memory cells. In contrast, cells with a central memory phenotype exist in much lower numbers in the lungs but can be found in significantly larger numbers in the spleen, where they may represent a potential reservoir. These data suggest that the effector-to-central-memory T-cell transition may well be minimal in these persisting mycobacterial infections, and they support a novel hypothesis that this may explain the fundamental basis of the failure of the BCG vaccine in humans. PMID:20107011

  16. In vitro effect of fenthion on human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, M.V.U. ); Rao, M.S. )

    1991-08-01

    Fenthion is an organophosphorus insecticide which is extensively used in control of leaf hoppers, cutworms, mites on vegetable crops. It has been reported that organophosphorus pesticides cause a significant increase in sister chromatid exchanges in mammalian cell lines. A significant increase of chromosomal aberrations has been reported in rural population exposed to pesticides. Organosphosphorus pesticides malathion, diazinon, dimethoate, phosdrin and dursban induced sister chromatid exchanges in human lymphoid cells. Exchange type of aberration has been reported in fluoriculturist who were exposed to organophosphorus, organochlorine pesticides. In the present investigation an attempt has been made to evaluate the cytogenetic effect of fenthion in human lymphocyte cultures in vitro.

  17. Expression of complement regulatory proteins on human natural killer cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Halliday, Deborah; Johnson, Peter M; Christmas, Stephen E

    2007-10-15

    The cell surface complement regulatory (CReg) proteins CD46, CD55 and CD59 are widely distributed on human leucocytes and protect against complement-mediated damage. To investigate heterogeneity in CReg protein expression by human natural killer (NK) cells, levels were assessed on resting and activated NK cell subsets identified phenotypically on the basis of expression of CD56 and CD158 markers. Levels of all three CReg proteins on CD56+ cells were lower than on T cells (p<0.05). Freshly isolated CD56(bright) cells expressed higher levels of CD55 than CD56dim cells (p<0.05). CD158a+ cells expressed significantly lower levels of both CD46 and CD59, and CD158e+ cells expressed significantly lower levels of CD46, than CD158a(-) CD158e(-) cells, respectively (both p<0.05). Stimulation with PHA did not significantly alter NK cell surface CReg protein levels whereas, following culture with IL-2, CD46 and CD59 were decreased on both CD56bright and CD56dim subsets (p<0.05). In the case of CD59, this was independent of T cells. Only CD46 was significantly downregulated on CD158b+ (GL183+) and CD158e (NKB1+) subsets (p<0.05). However, culture in IL-15 significantly increased levels of all three CReg proteins. These observations that CReg proteins are downregulated on certain NK cell subsets following activation with IL-2 are opposite to previous findings for other leucocyte subpopulations. Activated NK cells may instead use other strategies for protection against complement-mediated damage in a local inflammatory response.

  18. [Early disturbance of the circadian rhythm of T and B lymphocytes in human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    PubMed

    Bourin, P; Mansour, I; Levi, F; Villette, J M; Roué, R; Fiet, J; Rouger, P; Doinel, C

    1989-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in circulating B and T (CD3, CD4, CD8) lymphocyte subsets and in plasma cortisol were studied in 13 HIV-infected men and 14 healthy male controls. The circadian maximum (acrophase) of plasma cortisol was similar in both groups, approximately 8.00 A.M., however, a statistically significant increase was found in the 24 hour-mean value (mesor) of infected patients as compared to healthy controls. Circadian rhythms were statistically validated in all lymphocyte subsets of healthy controls, whereas, large alterations were found in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), already in asymptomatic infected individuals. The alterations concern the mesor and the amplitude for B and CD4 lymphocytes and all cycle parameters for CD3 and CD8 lymphocytes.

  19. [Retarded excision of pyrimidine dimers in human unstimulated lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Snopov, S A; Roza, L; de Gruijl, F R

    2006-01-01

    Using immuno-labelling of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in nuclei of peripheral lymphocytes after their UVC-irradiation and cultivation, we have found that within the first four hours of cultivation the CPD-specific fluorescent signal from cell nuclei increased. Earlier, a similar increase in binding of antibody specific for pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts to undenatured DNA isolated from UV-irradiated Chinese hamster ovary cells was reported (Mitchell et al., 1986). Our experiments showed that nucleotide excision repair enzyme might induce such of DNA modification in lymphocyte nuclei that increased specific antibody binding to DNA fragments with lesions. We suggest that enzymatic formation of open structures in DNA predominated qualitatively over dual-incision and excision of these fragments, and resulted in the enhanced exposure of the pyrimidine dimers in nuclei to specific antibodies. The results evidence that nucleotid excision repair in unstimualted human lymphocytes being deficient in dual incision and removal of UV-induced DNA lesions appear to be capable of performing chromatin relaxation and pre-incision uncoiling of DNA fragments with lesions.

  20. Interference of CD95 expression on human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Petanova, Jitka; Fucikova, Terezie; Bencko, Vladimir

    2002-02-01

    The study presents the exogenous influence of cadmium in comparison with zinc on the apoptosis of human lymphocytes by CD95 expression and its kinetic changes. The salts of both metals were used in final concentrations of 20 microM in cell cultures with whole blood. The duration of cultivation was 18 and 90 hours. The expression of surface antigens was evaluated by flow cytometry with monoclonal antibodies. In cultures of not stimulated cells we found in average 51.54% CD95 positive lymphocytes. The kinetic study of untreated cells showed elevation after 18 hours of cultivation and a very low expression after 90 hours. The CD95 expression on lymphocytes in cell culture with cadmium and zinc was lower after 18 hours of cultivation than in untreated cells. After 90 hours cultivation we found low levels of CD95 expression on cells treated with cadmium and a great individual variability in the number of positive cells upon the influence of zinc.

  1. The interaction of human macrophage subsets with silicone as a biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Vijaya Bhaskar, Thanga Bhuvanesh; Ma, Nan; Lendlein, Andreas; Roch, Toralf

    2015-01-01

    Silicones are widely used as biomaterials for medical devices such as extracorporeal equipments. However, there is often conflicting evidence about their supposed cell- and histocompatibility. Macrophages could mediate silicone-induced adverse responses such as foreign body reaction and fibrous encapsulation. The polarization behaviour of macrophages could determine the clinical outcome after implantation of biomaterials. Induction of classically activated macrophages (CAM) may induce and support uncontrolled inflammatory responses and undesired material degradation. In contrast, polarization into alternatively activated macrophages (AAM) is assumed to support healing processes and implant integration.This study compared the interaction of non-polarized macrophages (M0), CAM, and AAM with commercially available tissue culture polystyrene (TCP) and a medical grade silicone-based biomaterial, regarding the secretion of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and chemokines. Firstly, by using the Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) test the silicone films were shown to be free of soluble endotoxins, which is the prerequisite to investigate their interaction with primary immune cells. Primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (M0) were polarized into CAM and AAM by addition of suitable differentiation factors. These macrophage subsets were incubated on the materials for 24 hours and their viability and cytokine secretion was assessed. In comparison to TCP, cell adhesion was lower on silicone after 24 hours for all three macrophage subsets. However, compared to TCP, silicone induced higher levels of certain inflammatory and chemotactic cytokines in M0, CAM, and AAM macrophage subsets.Conclusively, it was shown that silicone has the ability to induce a pro-inflammatory state to different magnitudes dependent on the macrophage subsets. This priming of the macrophage phenotype by silicone could explain the incidence of severe foreign body complications observed in vivo. PMID

  2. PKH26 Staining Defines Distinct Subsets of Normal Human Colon Epithelial Cells at Different Maturation Stages

    PubMed Central

    Pastò, Anna; Marchesi, Maddalena; Diamantini, Adamo; Frasson, Chiara; Curtarello, Matteo; Lago, Claudia; Pilotto, Giorgia; Parenti, Anna Rosita; Esposito, Giovanni; Agostini, Marco; Nitti, Donato; Amadori, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim Colon crypts are characterized by a hierarchy of cells distributed along the crypt axis. Aim of this paper was to develop an in vitro system for separation of epithelial cell subsets in different maturation stages from normal human colon. Methodology and Major Findings Dissociated colonic epithelial cells were stained with PKH26, which allows identification of distinct populations based on their proliferation rate, and cultured in vitro in the absence of serum. The cytofluorimetric expression of CK20, Msi-1 and Lgr5 was studied. The mRNA levels of several stemness-associated genes were also compared in cultured cell populations and in three colon crypt populations isolated by microdissection. A PKHpos population survived in culture and formed spheroids; this population included subsets with slow (PKHhigh) and rapid (PKHlow) replicative rates. Molecular analysis revealed higher mRNA levels of both Msi-1 and Lgr-5 in PKHhigh cells; by cytofluorimetric analysis, Msi-1+/Lgr5+ cells were only found within PKHhigh cells, whereas Msi-1+/Lgr5− cells were also observed in the PKHlow population. As judged by qRT-PCR analysis, the expression of several stemness-associated markers (Bmi-1, EphB2, EpCAM, ALDH1) was highly enriched in Msi-1+/Lgr5+ cells. While CK20 expression was mainly found in PKHlow and PKHneg cells, a small PKHhigh subset co-expressed both CK20 and Msi-1, but not Lgr5; cells with these properties also expressed Mucin, and could be identified in vivo in colon crypts. These results mirrored those found in cells isolated from different crypt portions by microdissection, and based on proliferation rates and marker expression they allowed to define several subsets at different maturation stages: PKHhigh/Lgr5+/Msi-1+/CK20−, PKHhigh/Lgr5−/Msi-1+/CK20+, PKHlow/Lgr5−/Msi-1+/Ck20−, and PKHlow/Lgr5−/Msi-1−/CK20+ cells. Conclusions Our data show the possibility of deriving in vitro, without any selection strategy, several distinct cell

  3. CCR4 versus CCR10 in human cutaneous TH lymphocyte trafficking.

    PubMed

    Soler, Dulce; Humphreys, Tricia L; Spinola, Stanley M; Campbell, James J

    2003-03-01

    The chemokine receptors (CCRs) CCR4 and CCR10, and the cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA), have each been proposed as critical mediators of skin-specific TH lymphocyte homing in mice and humans. CLA initiates skin homing by mediating E-selectin-dependent tethering and rolling within cutaneous venules, but the specific roles of CCR4 and CCR10 are unclear. We have generated an antihuman CCR10 monoclonal antibody (mAb; 1B5) to illuminate the individual contributions of these molecules. This mAb allows us to compare CCR10, CCR4, and CLA expression within human TH populations. The mAb 1B5 recognizes functional CCR10 expression, as chemotactic responsiveness to cutaneous T-cell-attracting chemokine (CTACK)/CCL27 (a CCR10 ligand) parallels the staining of TH subsets. We find CCR10 expressed by only a minority (approximately 30%) of blood-borne, skin-homing (CLA+/CCR4+) TH cells. However, essentially all members of the relatively small "effector" (CLA+/CCR4+/CD27-/CCR7-) skin-homing TH population express CCR10. Most skin-infiltrating lymphocytes in allergic delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and bacterial chancroid skin lesions express both CCR4 and CLA, but only about 10% express CCR10. This suggests for the 2 models of TH skin homing studied here that CCR10+ TH cells have no advantage over other CLA+/CCR4+ TH cells in homing to cutaneous sites. We conclude that the skin-homing TH compartment is itself divided into distinct subpopulations, the smaller of which expresses both CCR4 and CCR10, and the larger of which expresses only CCR4. Thus, CCR10 is unlikely to be necessary for cutaneous homing of TH cells in the models studied here. CCR10 may instead play a role in the movement of specialized "effector" cutaneous TH cells to and/or within epidermal microenvironments.

  4. Transcriptional specialization of human dendritic cell subsets in response to microbial vaccines.

    PubMed

    Banchereau, Romain; Baldwin, Nicole; Cepika, Alma-Martina; Athale, Shruti; Xue, Yaming; Yu, Chun I; Metang, Patrick; Cheruku, Abhilasha; Berthier, Isabelle; Gayet, Ingrid; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ohouo, Marina; Snipes, LuAnn; Xu, Hui; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Blankenship, Derek; Oh, Sangkon; Ramilo, Octavio; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina; Pascual, Virginia

    2014-10-22

    The mechanisms by which microbial vaccines interact with human APCs remain elusive. Herein, we describe the transcriptional programs induced in human DCs by pathogens, innate receptor ligands and vaccines. Exposure of DCs to influenza, Salmonella enterica and Staphylococcus aureus allows us to build a modular framework containing 204 transcript clusters. We use this framework to characterize the responses of human monocytes, monocyte-derived DCs and blood DC subsets to 13 vaccines. Different vaccines induce distinct transcriptional programs based on pathogen type, adjuvant formulation and APC targeted. Fluzone, Pneumovax and Gardasil, respectively, activate monocyte-derived DCs, monocytes and CD1c+ blood DCs, highlighting APC specialization in response to vaccines. Finally, the blood signatures from individuals vaccinated with Fluzone or infected with influenza reveal a signature of adaptive immunity activation following vaccination and symptomatic infections, but not asymptomatic infections. These data, offered with a web interface, may guide the development of improved vaccines.

  5. Transcriptional specialization of human dendritic cell subsets in response to microbial vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Banchereau, Romain; Baldwin, Nicole; Cepika, Alma-Martina; Athale, Shruti; Xue, Yaming; Yu, Chun I; Metang, Patrick; Cheruku, Abhilasha; Berthier, Isabelle; Gayet, Ingrid; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ohouo, Marina; Snipes, LuAnn; Xu, Hui; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Blankenship, Derek; Oh, Sangkon; Ramilo, Octavio; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina; Pascual, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms by which microbial vaccines interact with human APCs remain elusive. Herein, we describe the transcriptional programs induced in human DCs by pathogens, innate receptor ligands and vaccines. Exposure of DCs to influenza, Salmonella enterica and Staphylococcus aureus allows us to build a modular framework containing 204 transcript clusters. We use this framework to characterize the responses of human monocytes, monocyte-derived DCs and blood DC subsets to 13 vaccines. Different vaccines induce distinct transcriptional programs based on pathogen type, adjuvant formulation and APC targeted. Fluzone, Pneumovax and Gardasil, respectively, activate monocyte-derived DCs, monocytes and CD1c+ blood DCs, highlighting APC specialization in response to vaccines. Finally, the blood signatures from individuals vaccinated with Fluzone or infected with influenza reveal a signature of adaptive immunity activation following vaccination and symptomatic infections, but not asymptomatic infections. These data, offered with a web interface, may guide the development of improved vaccines. PMID:25335753

  6. Features of Memory-Like and PD-1(+) Human NK Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Della Chiesa, Mariella; Pesce, Silvia; Muccio, Letizia; Carlomagno, Simona; Sivori, Simona; Moretta, Alessandro; Marcenaro, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cells are distinguished into CD56(bright)CD16(-) cells and CD56(dim)CD16(+) cells. These two subsets are conventionally associated with differential functional outcomes and are heterogeneous with respect to the expression of KIR and CD94/NKG2 heterodimers that represent the two major types of HLA-class I-specific receptors. Recent studies indicated that immature CD56(bright) NK cells, homogeneously expressing the inhibitory CD94/NKG2A receptor, are precursors of CD56(dim) NK cells that, in turn, during their process of differentiation, lose expression of CD94/NKG2A and subsequentially acquire inhibitory KIRs and LIR-1. The terminally differentiated phenotype of CD56(dim) cells is marked by the expression of the CD57 molecule that is associated with poor responsiveness to cytokine stimulation, but retained cytolytic capacity. Remarkably, this NKG2A(-)KIR(+)LIR-1(+)CD57(+)CD56(dim) NK cell subset when derived from individuals previously exposed to pathogens, such as human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), may contain "memory-like" NK cells. These cells are generally characterized by an upregulation of the activating receptor CD94/NKG2C and a downregulation of the inhibitory receptor Siglec-7. The "memory-like" NK cells are persistent over time and display some hallmarks of adaptive immunity, i.e., clonal expansion, more effective antitumor and antiviral immune responses, longevity, as well as given epigenetic modifications. Interestingly, unknown cofactors associated with HCMV infection may induce the onset of a recently identified fully mature NK cell subset, characterized by marked downregulation of the activating receptors NKp30 and NKp46 and by the unexpected expression of the inhibitory PD-1 receptor. This phenotype correlates with an impaired antitumor NK cell activity that can be partially restored by antibody-mediated disruption of PD-1/PD-L interaction.

  7. slan/M-DC8+ cells constitute a distinct subset of dendritic cells in human tonsils

    PubMed Central

    Micheletti, Alessandra; Finotti, Giulia; Calzetti, Federica; Lonardi, Silvia; Zoratti, Elisa; Bugatti, Mattia; Stefini, Stefania; Vermi, William; Cassatella, Marco A.

    2016-01-01

    Human blood dendritic cells (DCs) include three main distinct subsets, namely the CD1c+ and CD141+ myeloid DCs (mDCs) and the CD303+ plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). More recently, a population of slan/M-DC8+ cells, also known as “slanDCs”, has been described in blood and detected even in inflamed secondary lymphoid organs and non-lymphoid tissues. Nevertheless, hallmarks of slan/M-DC8+ cells in tissues are poorly defined. Herein, we report a detailed characterization of the phenotype and function of slan/M-DC8+ cells present in human tonsils. We found that tonsil slan/M-DC8+ cells represent a unique DC cell population, distinct from their circulating counterpart and also from all other tonsil DC and monocyte/macrophage subsets. Phenotypically, slan/M-DC8+ cells in tonsils display a CD11c+HLA-DR+CD14+CD11bdim/negCD16dim/negCX3CR1dim/neg marker repertoire, while functionally they exhibit an efficient antigen presentation capacity and a constitutive secretion of TNFα. Notably, such DC phenotype and functions are substantially reproduced by culturing blood slan/M-DC8+ cells in tonsil-derived conditioned medium (TDCM), further supporting the hypothesis of a full DC-like differentiation program occurring within the tonsil microenvironment. Taken together, our data suggest that blood slan/M-DC8+ cells are immediate precursors of a previously unrecognizedcompetent DC subset in tonsils, and pave the way for further characterization of slan/M-DC8+ cells in other tissues. PMID:26695549

  8. Features of Memory-Like and PD-1(+) Human NK Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Della Chiesa, Mariella; Pesce, Silvia; Muccio, Letizia; Carlomagno, Simona; Sivori, Simona; Moretta, Alessandro; Marcenaro, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cells are distinguished into CD56(bright)CD16(-) cells and CD56(dim)CD16(+) cells. These two subsets are conventionally associated with differential functional outcomes and are heterogeneous with respect to the expression of KIR and CD94/NKG2 heterodimers that represent the two major types of HLA-class I-specific receptors. Recent studies indicated that immature CD56(bright) NK cells, homogeneously expressing the inhibitory CD94/NKG2A receptor, are precursors of CD56(dim) NK cells that, in turn, during their process of differentiation, lose expression of CD94/NKG2A and subsequentially acquire inhibitory KIRs and LIR-1. The terminally differentiated phenotype of CD56(dim) cells is marked by the expression of the CD57 molecule that is associated with poor responsiveness to cytokine stimulation, but retained cytolytic capacity. Remarkably, this NKG2A(-)KIR(+)LIR-1(+)CD57(+)CD56(dim) NK cell subset when derived from individuals previously exposed to pathogens, such as human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), may contain "memory-like" NK cells. These cells are generally characterized by an upregulation of the activating receptor CD94/NKG2C and a downregulation of the inhibitory receptor Siglec-7. The "memory-like" NK cells are persistent over time and display some hallmarks of adaptive immunity, i.e., clonal expansion, more effective antitumor and antiviral immune responses, longevity, as well as given epigenetic modifications. Interestingly, unknown cofactors associated with HCMV infection may induce the onset of a recently identified fully mature NK cell subset, characterized by marked downregulation of the activating receptors NKp30 and NKp46 and by the unexpected expression of the inhibitory PD-1 receptor. This phenotype correlates with an impaired antitumor NK cell activity that can be partially restored by antibody-mediated disruption of PD-1/PD-L interaction. PMID:27683578

  9. Features of Memory-Like and PD-1+ Human NK Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Della Chiesa, Mariella; Pesce, Silvia; Muccio, Letizia; Carlomagno, Simona; Sivori, Simona; Moretta, Alessandro; Marcenaro, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cells are distinguished into CD56brightCD16− cells and CD56dimCD16+ cells. These two subsets are conventionally associated with differential functional outcomes and are heterogeneous with respect to the expression of KIR and CD94/NKG2 heterodimers that represent the two major types of HLA-class I-specific receptors. Recent studies indicated that immature CD56bright NK cells, homogeneously expressing the inhibitory CD94/NKG2A receptor, are precursors of CD56dim NK cells that, in turn, during their process of differentiation, lose expression of CD94/NKG2A and subsequentially acquire inhibitory KIRs and LIR-1. The terminally differentiated phenotype of CD56dim cells is marked by the expression of the CD57 molecule that is associated with poor responsiveness to cytokine stimulation, but retained cytolytic capacity. Remarkably, this NKG2A−KIR+LIR-1+CD57+CD56dim NK cell subset when derived from individuals previously exposed to pathogens, such as human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), may contain “memory-like” NK cells. These cells are generally characterized by an upregulation of the activating receptor CD94/NKG2C and a downregulation of the inhibitory receptor Siglec-7. The “memory-like” NK cells are persistent over time and display some hallmarks of adaptive immunity, i.e., clonal expansion, more effective antitumor and antiviral immune responses, longevity, as well as given epigenetic modifications. Interestingly, unknown cofactors associated with HCMV infection may induce the onset of a recently identified fully mature NK cell subset, characterized by marked downregulation of the activating receptors NKp30 and NKp46 and by the unexpected expression of the inhibitory PD-1 receptor. This phenotype correlates with an impaired antitumor NK cell activity that can be partially restored by antibody-mediated disruption of PD-1/PD-L interaction. PMID:27683578

  10. Features of Memory-Like and PD-1+ Human NK Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Della Chiesa, Mariella; Pesce, Silvia; Muccio, Letizia; Carlomagno, Simona; Sivori, Simona; Moretta, Alessandro; Marcenaro, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cells are distinguished into CD56brightCD16− cells and CD56dimCD16+ cells. These two subsets are conventionally associated with differential functional outcomes and are heterogeneous with respect to the expression of KIR and CD94/NKG2 heterodimers that represent the two major types of HLA-class I-specific receptors. Recent studies indicated that immature CD56bright NK cells, homogeneously expressing the inhibitory CD94/NKG2A receptor, are precursors of CD56dim NK cells that, in turn, during their process of differentiation, lose expression of CD94/NKG2A and subsequentially acquire inhibitory KIRs and LIR-1. The terminally differentiated phenotype of CD56dim cells is marked by the expression of the CD57 molecule that is associated with poor responsiveness to cytokine stimulation, but retained cytolytic capacity. Remarkably, this NKG2A−KIR+LIR-1+CD57+CD56dim NK cell subset when derived from individuals previously exposed to pathogens, such as human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), may contain “memory-like” NK cells. These cells are generally characterized by an upregulation of the activating receptor CD94/NKG2C and a downregulation of the inhibitory receptor Siglec-7. The “memory-like” NK cells are persistent over time and display some hallmarks of adaptive immunity, i.e., clonal expansion, more effective antitumor and antiviral immune responses, longevity, as well as given epigenetic modifications. Interestingly, unknown cofactors associated with HCMV infection may induce the onset of a recently identified fully mature NK cell subset, characterized by marked downregulation of the activating receptors NKp30 and NKp46 and by the unexpected expression of the inhibitory PD-1 receptor. This phenotype correlates with an impaired antitumor NK cell activity that can be partially restored by antibody-mediated disruption of PD-1/PD-L interaction.

  11. Human lymphocyte polymorphisms detected by quantitative two-dimensional electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, D.; Merril, C.R.

    1983-09-01

    A survey of 186 soluble lymphocyte proteins for genetic polymorphism was carried out utilizing two-dimensional electrophoresis of /sup 14/C-labeled phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human lymphocyte proteins. Nineteen of these proteins exhibited positional variation consistent with independent genetic polymorphism in a primary sample of 28 individuals. Each of these polymorphisms was characterized by quantitative gene-dosage dependence insofar as the heterozygous phenotype expressed approximately 50% of each allelic gene product as was seen in homozygotes. Patterns observed were also identical in monozygotic twins, replicate samples, and replicate gels. The three expected phenotypes (two homozygotes and a heterozygote) were observed in each of 10 of these polymorphisms while the remaining nine had one of the homozygous classes absent. The presence of the three phenotypes, the demonstration of gene-dosage dependence, and our own and previous pedigree analysis of certain of these polymorphisms supports the genetic basis of these variants. Based on this data, the frequency of polymorphic loci for man is: P . 19/186 . .102, and the average heterozygosity is .024. This estimate is approximately 1/3 to 1/2 the rate of polymorphism previously estimated for man in other studies using one-dimensional electrophoresis of isozyme loci. The newly described polymorphisms and others which should be detectable in larger protein surveys with two-dimensional electrophoresis hold promise as genetic markers of the human genome for use in gene mapping and pedigree analyses.

  12. Immunological responsiveness of frozen-thawed human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Strong, D M; Woody, J N; Factor, M A; Ahmed, A; Sell, K W

    1975-01-01

    Mononuclear cells (10--20 X 10(6)) obtained from human peripheral blood by a standard Ficoll-Hypaque technique were suspended in RPMI 1640 media at 4 degrees C containing 10% foetal calf serum and 7-5% dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO). Two-millilitre aliquots were cooled at -1 degree C/min in a Cryoson BV-4 programmed freezing system to -30 degrees C, then -5 degrees C/min to -80 degrees C and stored in liquid nitrogen vapor. On the day of testing, cell suspensions were thawed rapidly in a 37 degree C water bath. DMSO was diluted slowly out of the sample and cells resuspended in fresh RPMI 1640. It was found that frozen stored human lymphocytes (FSHL) demonstrated all the characteristics of fresh unfrozen cells. These included their ability to form spontaneous rosettes with sheep erythrocytes ('E' rosettes) and sheep erythrocyte--antibody--complement rosettes ('EAC' rosettes). The presence of surface immunoglobulins and Fc receptors were shown by membrane immunofluorescence to be comparable. In addition, the results show that FSHL respond to mitogens, specific antigens; act as both stimulators and responders in the mixed lymphocyte culture reaction; and exhibit cell-mediated lymphocytotoxicity following in vitro sensitization, or against antibody-coated target cells. PMID:128429

  13. Binding of Synthetic LKEKK Peptide to Human T-Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Navolotskaya, E V; Zinchenko, D V; Zolotarev, Y A; Kolobov, A A; Lipkin, V M

    2016-08-01

    The synthetic peptide LKEKK corresponding to sequence 16-20 of human thymosin-α1 and 131-135 of human interferon-α2 was labeled with tritium to specific activity 28 Ci/mol. The [3H]LKEKK bound with high affinity (Kd = 3.7 ± 0.3 nM) to donor blood T-lymphocytes. Treatment of cells with trypsin or proteinase K did not abolish [3H]LKEKK binding, suggesting the non-protein nature of the peptide receptor. The binding was inhibited by thymosin-α1, interferon-α2, and cholera toxin B subunit (Ki = 2.0 ± 0.3, 2.2 ± 0.2, and 3.6 ± 0.3 nM, respectively). Using [3H]LKEKK, we demonstrated the existence of a non-protein receptor common for thymosin-α1, interferon-α2, and cholera toxin B-subunit on donor blood T-lymphocytes. PMID:27677554

  14. Flow cytometric assessment of the signaling status of human B lymphocytes from normal and autoimmune individuals.

    PubMed

    Grammer, Amrie C; Fischer, Randy; Lee, Olivia; Zhang, Xuan; Lipsky, Peter E

    2004-01-01

    Abnormalities in lymphocyte signaling cascades are thought to play an important role in the development of autoimmune disease. However, the large amount of cellular material needed for standard biochemical assessment of signaling status has made it difficult to evaluate putative abnormalities completely using primary lymphocytes. The development of technology to employ intracellular staining and flow cytometry to assess the signaling status of individual cells has now made it possible to delineate the perturbations that are present in lymphocytes from patients with autoimmune disease. As an example, human B cells from the Ramos B cell line and the periphery of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients or normal nonautoimmune controls were assessed for activation of the NF-kappaB and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades by intracellular multiparameter flow cytometric analysis and biochemical Western blotting. In combination with fluorochrome conjugated antibodies specific for surface proteins that define B cell subsets, antibodies that recognize activated, or phosphorylated inhibitors of kappaB (IkappaB) as well as the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) or p38 MAPKs were used to stain fixed and permeabilized human B cells and analyze them flow cytometrically. Examination of the known signaling pathways following engagement of CD40 on human B cells confirmed that intracellular flow cytometry and Western blotting equivalently assay CD154-induced phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaB proteins as well as phosphorylation of the MAPKs ERK, JNK and p38. In addition, B cells from the periphery of SLE patients had a more activated status immediately ex vivo as assessed by intracellular flow cytometric analysis of phosphorylated ERK, JNK and p38 when compared with B cells from the periphery of normal, nonautoimmune individuals. Together, these results indicate that multiparameter intracellular flow cytometric

  15. Flow cytometric assessment of the signaling status of human B lymphocytes from normal and autoimmune individuals

    PubMed Central

    Grammer, Amrie C; Fischer, Randy; Lee, Olivia; Zhang, Xuan; Lipsky, Peter E

    2004-01-01

    Abnormalities in lymphocyte signaling cascades are thought to play an important role in the development of autoimmune disease. However, the large amount of cellular material needed for standard biochemical assessment of signaling status has made it difficult to evaluate putative abnormalities completely using primary lymphocytes. The development of technology to employ intracellular staining and flow cytometry to assess the signaling status of individual cells has now made it possible to delineate the perturbations that are present in lymphocytes from patients with autoimmune disease. As an example, human B cells from the Ramos B cell line and the periphery of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients or normal nonautoimmune controls were assessed for activation of the NF-κB and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades by intracellular multiparameter flow cytometric analysis and biochemical Western blotting. In combination with fluorochrome conjugated antibodies specific for surface proteins that define B cell subsets, antibodies that recognize activated, or phosphorylated inhibitors of κB (IκB) as well as the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) or p38 MAPKs were used to stain fixed and permeabilized human B cells and analyze them flow cytometrically. Examination of the known signaling pathways following engagement of CD40 on human B cells confirmed that intracellular flow cytometry and Western blotting equivalently assay CD154-induced phosphorylation and degradation of IκB proteins as well as phosphorylation of the MAPKs ERK, JNK and p38. In addition, B cells from the periphery of SLE patients had a more activated status immediately ex vivo as assessed by intracellular flow cytometric analysis of phosphorylated ERK, JNK and p38 when compared with B cells from the periphery of normal, nonautoimmune individuals. Together, these results indicate that multiparameter intracellular flow cytometric analysis of

  16. Differential in vivo activation of monocyte subsets during low-grade inflammation through experimental endotoxemia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, B.; Hohensinner, P. J.; Krychtiuk, K. A.; Matzneller, P.; Koller, L.; Brekalo, M.; Maurer, G.; Huber, K.; Zeitlinger, M.; Jilma, B.; Wojta, J.; Speidl, W. S.

    2016-01-01

    Human monocytes are a heterogeneous cell population, which can be divided into a classical (CD14++CD16−), a non-classical (CD14+CD16+), and an intermediate (CD14++CD16+) subset. We hypothesized that low-grade inflammation may differentially affect monocyte subsets. We used a human lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion model to mimic low-grade inflammation to identify, which monocyte subsets are preferentially activated under these conditions. Monocyte subsets were identified by staining for CD14 and CD16, activation status of monocytes was analyzed by staining for CD11b and a novel in situ mRNA hybridization approach to detect IL-6 and IL-8 specific mRNA at the single-cell level by flow cytometry. After LPS challenge, cell numbers of monocyte subsets dropped after 2 h with cell numbers recovering after 6 h. Distribution of monocyte subsets was skewed dramatically towards the intermediate subset after 24 h. Furthermore, intermediate monocytes displayed the largest increase of CD11b expression after 2 h. Finally, IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA levels increased in intermediate and non-classical monocytes after 6 h whereas these mRNA levels in classical monocytes changed only marginally. In conclusion, our data indicates that the main responding subset of monocytes to standardized low-grade inflammation induced by LPS in humans is the CD14++CD16+ intermediate subset followed by the CD14+CD16+ non-classical monocyte subset. Circulating classical monocytes showed comparably less reaction to LPS challenge in vivo. PMID:27444882

  17. Differential in vivo activation of monocyte subsets during low-grade inflammation through experimental endotoxemia in humans.

    PubMed

    Thaler, B; Hohensinner, P J; Krychtiuk, K A; Matzneller, P; Koller, L; Brekalo, M; Maurer, G; Huber, K; Zeitlinger, M; Jilma, B; Wojta, J; Speidl, W S

    2016-01-01

    Human monocytes are a heterogeneous cell population, which can be divided into a classical (CD14++CD16-), a non-classical (CD14+CD16+), and an intermediate (CD14++CD16+) subset. We hypothesized that low-grade inflammation may differentially affect monocyte subsets. We used a human lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion model to mimic low-grade inflammation to identify, which monocyte subsets are preferentially activated under these conditions. Monocyte subsets were identified by staining for CD14 and CD16, activation status of monocytes was analyzed by staining for CD11b and a novel in situ mRNA hybridization approach to detect IL-6 and IL-8 specific mRNA at the single-cell level by flow cytometry. After LPS challenge, cell numbers of monocyte subsets dropped after 2 h with cell numbers recovering after 6 h. Distribution of monocyte subsets was skewed dramatically towards the intermediate subset after 24 h. Furthermore, intermediate monocytes displayed the largest increase of CD11b expression after 2 h. Finally, IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA levels increased in intermediate and non-classical monocytes after 6 h whereas these mRNA levels in classical monocytes changed only marginally. In conclusion, our data indicates that the main responding subset of monocytes to standardized low-grade inflammation induced by LPS in humans is the CD14++CD16+ intermediate subset followed by the CD14+CD16+ non-classical monocyte subset. Circulating classical monocytes showed comparably less reaction to LPS challenge in vivo. PMID:27444882

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to human lymphocyte homing receptors define a novel class of adhesion molecules on diverse cell types

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    A 90-kD lymphocyte surface glycoprotein, defined by monoclonal antibodies of the Hermes series, is involved in lymphocyte recognition of high endothelial venules (HEV). Lymphocyte gp90Hermes binds in a saturable, reversible fashion to the mucosal vascular addressin (MAd), a tissue-specific endothelial cell adhesion molecule for lymphocytes. We and others have recently shown that the Hermes antigen is identical to or includes CD44 (In[Lu]-related p80), human Pgp-1, and extracellular matrix receptor III-molecules reportedly expressed on diverse cell types. Here, we examine the relationship between lymphoid and nonlymphoid Hermes antigens using serologic, biochemical, and, most importantly, functional assays. Consistent with studies using mAbs to CD44 or Pgp-1, mAbs against five different epitopes on lymphocyte gp90Hermes reacted with a wide variety of nonhematolymphoid cells in diverse normal human tissues, including many types of epithelium, mesenchymal elements such as fibroblasts and smooth muscle, and a subset of glia in the central nervous system. To ask whether these non- lymphoid molecules might also be functionally homologous to lymphocyte homing receptors, we assessed their ability to interact with purified MAd using fluorescence energy transfer techniques. The Hermes antigen isolated from both glial cells and fibroblasts--which express a predominant 90-kD form similar in relative molecular mass, isoelectric point, and protease sensitivity to lymphocyte gp90Hermes--was able to bind purified MAd. In contrast, a 140-160-kD form of the Hermes antigen isolated from squamous epithelial cells lacked this capability. Like lymphocyte binding to mucosal HEV, the interaction between glial gp90Hermes and MAd is inhibited by mAb Hermes-3, but not Hermes-1, suggesting that similar molecular domains are involved in the two binding events. The observation that the Hermes/CD44 molecules derived from several nonlymphoid cell types display binding domains homologous to those

  19. The influence of transmeridian flight on human circulating lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ohkoshi, H; Asukata, I; Tajima, N; Yamamoto, K; Sasaki, M; Hokari, M; Sakai, T

    1991-01-01

    We studied the influence of transmeridian flight on the number of circulating lymphocytes, which have a circadian rhythm with low values in the daytime. The number of T lymphocytes was found to be higher than the baseline value, yet its rhythmicity was maintained after eastward flight with an 8-h time difference. The number of OKB2+ as well as Leu11+ cells were suppressed after the flight. The change in the number of T lymphocytes occurred due to the increased number of OKT4+ lymphocytes. There was no correlation between the number of OKT4+ lymphocytes and the plasma cortisol level, though plasma cortisol is a major factor in regulating the number of lymphocytes. These data showed that the number of helper/inducer T lymphocytes, B cells, and natural killer cells were affected by the physical conditions experienced after the flight. The changes in T lymphocytes were independent of those of plasma cortisol levels.

  20. Evaluation of gamma-Induced Apoptosis in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Baranova, Elena; Boreyko, Alla; Ravnachka, Ivanka; Saveleva, Maria

    2010-01-05

    Several experiments have been performed to study regularities in the induction of apoptotic cells in human lymphocytes by {sup 60}Cogamma-rays at different times after irradiation. Apoptosis induction by {sup 60}Cogamma-rays in human lymphocytes in different cell cycle phases (G{sub 0}, S, G{sub 1}, and G{sub 2}) has been studied. The maximal apoptosis output in lymphocyte cells was observed in the S phase. Modifying effect of replicative and reparative DNA synthesis inhibitors - 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (Ara-C) and hydroxyurea (Hu) - on the kinetics of {sup 60}Cogamma-rays induced apoptosis in human lymphocytes has been studied.

  1. Communication between Human Dendritic Cell Subsets in Tuberculosis: Requirements for Naive CD4+ T Cell Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lozza, Laura; Farinacci, Maura; Bechtle, Marina; Stäber, Manuela; Zedler, Ulrike; Baiocchini, Andrea; del Nonno, Franca; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    2014-01-01

    Human primary dendritic cells (DCs) are heterogeneous by phenotype, function, and tissue localization and distinct from inflammatory monocyte-derived DCs. Current information regarding the susceptibility and functional role of primary human DC subsets to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is limited. Here, we dissect the response of different primary DC subsets to Mtb infection. Myeloid CD11c+ cells and pDCs (C-type lectin 4C+ cells) were located in human lymph nodes (LNs) of tuberculosis (TB) patients by histochemistry. Rare CD141hi DCs (C-type lectin 9A+ cells) were also identified. Infection with live Mtb revealed a higher responsiveness of myeloid CD1c+ DCs compared to CD141hi DCs and pDCs. CD1c+ DCs produced interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor α, and IL-1β but not IL-12p70, a cytokine important for Th1 activation and host defenses against Mtb. Yet, CD1c+ DCs were able to activate autologous naïve CD4+ T cells. By combining cell purification with fluorescence-activated cell sorting and gene expression profiling on rare cell populations, we detected in responding CD4+ T cells, genes related to effector-cytolytic functions and transcription factors associated with Th1, Th17, and Treg polarization, suggesting multifunctional properties in our experimental conditions. Finally, immunohistologic analyses revealed contact between CD11c+ cells and pDCs in LNs of TB patients and in vitro data suggest that cooperation between Mtb-infected CD1c+ DCs and pDCs favors stimulation of CD4+ T cells. PMID:25071784

  2. Unstable high molecular weight inverted repetitive DNA in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, J C; Rucinsky, T E

    1982-01-01

    About 1% of newly synthesized DNA from PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes can be isolated as large (up to 90 kilobase pairs) double stranded fragments that resist sequential alkali and heat denaturation steps but are not closed circular. By electron microscopy about 1% have single-strand hairpin loops at one end and therefore present inverted repetitive sequences (IR-DNA). Most of the remainder have a blunt-appearing double-strand terminus at both ends (78%) or one end (18%). Indirect evidence indicates that these also are inverted complementary structures with terminal hairpin loops too small to be visualized: (1) Treatment with either a 5' or 3' single-strand exonuclease generates essentially only fragments with a single strand at one end; (2) with partial denaturation, the number of fragments with identifiable single-strand hairpin loops increases (to about 20%); (3) after S1 nuclease digestion, greater than 95% can be fully heat denatured. Cot analysis indicates that these fragments are derived from dispersed sites throughout the genome. Up to 25% of DNA released from lymphocytes during growth similarly resists denaturation, and released DNA and IR-DNA are both enriched in the same set of repetitive sequences. Thus at least a portion of IR-DNA appears to be unstable. Images PMID:7145706

  3. Spaceflight alters microtubules and increases apoptosis in human lymphocytes (Jurkat)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, M. L.; Reynolds, J. L.; Cubano, L. A.; Hatton, J. P.; Lawless, B. D.; Piepmeier, E. H.

    1998-01-01

    Alteration in cytoskeletal organization appears to underlie mechanisms of gravity sensitivity in space-flown cells. Human T lymphoblastoid cells (Jurkat) were flown on the Space Shuttle to test the hypothesis that growth responsiveness is associated with microtubule anomalies and mediated by apoptosis. Cell growth was stimulated in microgravity by increasing serum concentration. After 4 and 48 h, cells filtered from medium were fixed with formalin. Post-flight, confocal microscopy revealed diffuse, shortened microtubules extending from poorly defined microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs). In comparable ground controls, discrete microtubule filaments radiated from organized MTOCs and branched toward the cell membrane. At 4 h, 30% of flown, compared to 17% of ground, cells showed DNA condensation characteristic of apoptosis. Time-dependent increase of the apoptosis-associated Fas/ APO-1 protein in static flown, but not the in-flight 1 g centrifuged or ground controls, confirmed microgravity-associated apoptosis. By 48 h, ground cultures had increased by 40%. Flown populations did not increase, though some cells were cycling and actively metabolizing glucose. We conclude that cytoskeletal alteration, growth retardation, and metabolic changes in space-flown lymphocytes are concomitant with increased apoptosis and time-dependent elevation of Fas/APO-1 protein. We suggest that reduced growth response in lymphocytes during spaceflight is linked to apoptosis.

  4. Effects of budlein A on human neutrophils and lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    KNOB, Carollinie Dias; SILVA, Milena; GASPAROTO, Thaís Helena; OLIVEIRA, Carine Ervolino; AMÔR, Nádia Ghinelli; ARAKAWA, Nilton Syogo; COSTA, Fernando Batista; CAMPANELLI, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sesquiterpene lactones (SLs) are the active constituents of a variety of medicinal plants used in traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and other ailments. Objective In this study, we evaluated whether budlein A modulates the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells such as neutrophils and lymphocytes. Material and Methods Our research group has investigated several plant species and several compounds have been isolated, identified, and their medical potential evaluated. Budlein A is a SL isolated from the species Aldama buddlejiformis and A. robusta (Asteraceae) and shows anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities. Advances in understanding how plant-derived substances modulate the activation of innate and adaptive immune cells have led to the development of new therapies for human diseases. Results Budlein A inhibited MPO activity, IL-6, CXCL8, IL-10, and IL-12 production and induces neutrophil apoptosis. In contrast, budlein A inhibited lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2, IL-10, TGF-β, and IFN-γ production, but it did not lead to cell death. Conclusions Collectively, our results indicate that budlein A shows distinct immunomodulatory effects on immune cells. PMID:27383709

  5. Radiation-induced chromosome damage in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, D. C.; Dolphin, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    ABSTRACT Analysis for chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes has been developed as an indicator of dose from ionising radiation. This paper outlines the mechanism of production of aberrations, the technique for their analysis and the dose-effect relationships for various types of radiation. During the past ten years the National Radiological Protection Board has developed a service for the UK in which estimates of dose from chromosome aberration analysis are made on people known or suspected of being accidentally over-exposed. This service can provide estimates where no physical dosemeter was worn and is frequently able to resolve anomalous or disputed data from routine film badges. Several problems in the interpretation of chromosome aberration yields are reviewed. These include the effects of partial body irradiation and the response to variations in dose rate and the intermittent nature of some exposures. The dosimetry service is supported by a research programme which includes surveys of groups of patients irradiated for medical purposes. Two surveys are described. In the first, lymphocyte aberrations were examined in rheumatiod arthritis patients receiving intra-articular injections of colloidal radiogold or radioyttrium. A proportion of the nuclide leaked from the joint into the regional lymphatic system. In the second survey a comparison was made between the cytogenetic and physical estimates of whole body dose in patients receiving iodine 131 for thyroid carcinoma. Images PMID:338021

  6. Specific human B lymphocyte alloantigens linked to HL-A.

    PubMed Central

    Mann, D L; Abelson, L; Henkart, P; Harris, S D; Amos, D B

    1975-01-01

    Sera, previously found to react specifically with B lymphoid cultured cells, were tested on isolated T and B peripheral blood lymphocytes in a microcytotoxicity assay. Studies were performed on lymphocytes obtained from several large Amish families. The sera used in these studies were cytotoxic to peripheral blood, B lymphocytes, but not cytotoxic to T lymphocytes. The antigens detected followed the inheritance pattern of HL-A haplotypes. The strong linkage disequilibrium with HL-A antigens suggests that genes controlling the expression of B lymphocyte antigens are linked to genes controlling HL-A alloantigens. PMID:1082138

  7. In vitro sensitization of human lymphocytes to a myeloma cell-related antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Whitson, M.E.; Griffin, G.D.; Novelli, G.D.; Solomon, A.

    1981-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes from normal human donors were cocultivated with cells from two established human multiple myeloma cell lines, RPMI 8226 and K-737, and with lymphoblastoid cells from a third B cell line, RAMM. After a comparison of three methods of lymphocyte sensitization, a 6-day incubation protocol with equal numbers of normal lymphocytes and mitomycin C-treated tumor cells was selected. Cells fom the RPMI 8226 myeloma line stimulated the differentiation of lymphocytes into cytotoxic effector cells as measured by /sup 51/Cr release from labeled target cells. The RPMI 8226-sensitized lymphocytes were cytotoxic for myeloma cells (RPMI 8226 and K-737) and for lymphoblastoid cells (RAMM) but not for cells from human lung tumor lines (A549, A427, MB9812), a breast carcinoma line (ALAB), a normal diploid fibroblast line (HSBP), or normal lymphocytes.

  8. Carbamate Pesticide-Induced Apoptosis in Human T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Kobayashi, Maiko; Kawada, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    We previously found that carbamate pesticides induced significant apoptosis in human natural killer cells. To investigate whether carbamate pesticides also induce apoptosis in human T lymphocytes, in the present study Jurkat human T cells were treated in vitro with thiram, maneb, carbaryl or ziram. Apoptosis was determined by FITC-Annexin-V/PI staining. To explore the mechanism of apoptosis, intracellular levels of active caspase 3 and mitochondrial cytochrome-c release were determined by flow cytometry. We found that thiram, ziram, maneb and carbaryl also induced apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner in the human T cells. However, the strength of the apoptosis-inducing effect differed among the pesticides, with the: thiram > ziram > maneb > carbaryl. Moreover, thiram significantly increased the intracellular level of active caspase 3 and caspase inhibitors significantly inhibited apoptosis. Thiram also significantly caused mitochondrial cytochrome-c release. These findings indicate that carbamate pesticides can induce apoptosis in human T cells, and the apoptosis is mediated by the activation of caspases and the release of mitochondrial cytochrome-c. PMID:25837344

  9. Continuous versus discontinuous drinking of an ethanol liquid diet in peripubertal rats: effect on 24-h variation of lymph node and splenic mitogenic responses and lymphocyte subset populations.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ortega, Vanesa; Fernández-Mateos, María P; Barquilla, Pilar Cano; Cardinali, Daniel P; Esquifino, Ana I

    2011-03-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption continues to be a major public health problem, particularly in the adolescent and young adult populations. Generally, such a behavior tends to be confined to the weekends, to attain frequently binge drinking. This study in peripubertal male rats compares the effect of the discontinuous feeding of a liquid diet containing a moderate amount of ethanol (6.2% wt/vol) to that of continuous ethanol administration or a control diet, taking as end points the 24-h variations of plasma prolactin levels and mitogenic responses and lymphocyte subset populations in submaxillary lymph nodes and spleen. Animals received the ethanol liquid diet starting on day 35 of life, the diet being similar to that given to controls except for that maltose was isocalorically replaced by ethanol. Ethanol provided 36% of the total caloric content. Every week, the discontinuous ethanol group received the ethanol diet for 3 days and the control liquid diet for the remaining 4 days. After 4 weeks, rats were killed at six time intervals, beginning at 0900 h. A significant decrease of splenic cells' response to concanavalin A, and of lymph node and splenic cells' response to lipopolysaccharide was found in rats under the discontinuous ethanol regime, when compared with control- or ethanol-chronic rats. Under discontinuous ethanol feeding, mean values of lymph node and splenic CD8(+) and CD4(+)-CD8(+) cells decreased, whereas those of lymph node and splenic T cells, and splenic B cells, augmented. In rats chronically fed with ethanol, splenic mean levels of CD8(+) and CD4(+)-CD8(+) cells augmented. Both modalities of ethanol administration disrupted the 24 h variation in immune function seen in controls. Mean plasma prolactin levels increased by 3.6-fold and 8.5-fold in rats chronically or discontinuously fed with alcohol, respectively. The immune parameters examined in an additional group of rats fed regular chow and water ad libitum did not differ significantly from

  10. Porcine γδ T lymphocytes can be categorized into two functionally and developmentally distinct subsets according to expression of CD2 and level of TCR.

    PubMed

    Stepanova, Katerina; Sinkora, Marek

    2013-03-01

    Porcine γδ T cells have two levels of TCRγδ expression. Whereas TCRγδ(med) cells are mostly CD2(+)CD8(-) and CD2(+)CD8(+), TCRγδ(hi) cells are highly enriched for CD2(-)CD8(-). This distribution is independent of bacterial colonization and it is already established in the thymus prior to export of γδ cells to the periphery. Sorting and cultivation experiments revealed that CD2(-)CD8(-) γδ cells are unable to acquire CD2 and CD8, whereas CD2(+) subsets can gain or loose CD8. There is also differential susceptibility for proliferation between CD2(+) and CD2(-) γδ cells. Although CD2(-)CD8(-) almost do not proliferate, proliferation of CD2(+)CD8(-) and CD2(+)CD8(+) is substantial. Population of CD2(-) γδ cells is also absent in CD1(+) immature thymocytes. Additionally, subpopulations of CD2(+) and CD2(-) γδ cells in the thymus differ in expression of auxiliary surface molecules such as CD25, CD45RA/RC, and MHC class II. Moreover, TCRγδ(hi) cells can generate TCRγδ(med) cells but never the opposite. The only exception is the thymus, where a few TCRγδ(med) cells can be induced to TCRγδ(hi) but only under IL-2 influence. The repertoire of TCRδ is polyclonal in all subsets, indicating that there is the same extent of diversification and equal capability of immune responses. Results collectively indicate that CD2 expression determines two lineages of γδ cells that differ in many aspects. Because CD2(-) γδ cells are missing in the blood of humans and mice but are obvious in other members of γδ-high species such as ruminants and birds, our findings support the idea that circulating CD2(-) γδ T cells are a specific lineage.

  11. Effect of steady magnetic field on human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mileva, M.; Ivanov, B.; Bulanova, M.; Pantev, T.

    1983-01-01

    Exposure to steady magnetic field (SMF) for different periods of time did not elicit statistically reliable increase in chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Metaphase analysis of Crepis capilaris cells revealed that SMF (9 k0e, 200 0e/cm) for 2 days did not induce chromosome aberrations. Nor were any changes demonstrated in roots of beans, onions and L-fibroblasts of subcutaneous tissue of mice and Chinese hamsters. The obtained data are indicative of absence of cytogenetic effect of SMF. The level and spectrum of chromosome aberrations did not exceed the values for spontaneous chromatic fragments in cultures. Cytogenetic analysis of DEDE cells of the Chinese hamster revealed a mild mutagenic effect of SMF. Chromosomal aberrations were also demonstrated after exposure (5 min) of garlic roots.

  12. [Isolation of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus from human individuals].

    PubMed

    Saavedra, M C; Ambrosio, A M; Riera, L; Levis, S; Sottosanti, J; Sabattini, M

    2001-01-01

    The activity of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMv) in Argentina has been previously reported on the basis of serological evidence in rodents and humans and the isolation of only one strain of LCMv from a Mus domesticus captured in the province of Córdoba. The aim of this paper was to register patients with serological diagnosis of LCM, to isolate and to identify human strains of LCMv in Argentina. During the last 19 years, 15 cases were diagnosed as LCM by immunoflourescent indirect assay (IFI) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) but when neutralizing assay (NT) was incorporated, eight cases were classified as confirmed, three as probable and four as negative. The geographic distribution of the cases included three provinces: Córdoba, Buenos Aires and Santa Fe. Viral isolation was attempted in five patients classified as confirmed and only two resulted positive (P5226 and P8573). They were identified as LCMv by IFI and NT. The coexistence of LCMv with other arenaviruses, such as Junin and Oliveros viruses, in the same area, raises the probability of interactions between them, which could modify the virulence and/or pathogenicity for humans associated to genomic changes. Future studies of antigenic, genomic and virulence variability of different Argentine strains of LCMv, as well as the systematic search for human infection, will contribute to define the importance of this viral agent in our country and to implement control measures.

  13. The surface morphology of human B lymphocytes as revealed by immunoelectron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    Surface immunoglobulins (sIg) were detected on human lymphocytes by immunoelectron microscopy with peroxidase-conjugated antibodies. Blood, marrow, and thymus cells from normal individuals and patients with lymphoproliferative disorders were examined. Samples were fixed before exposure to specific reagents. Normal lymphocyts with detectable sIg, i.e. B lymphocytes, were characterized by a villous surface; nonlabeled blood lymphocytes and thymocytes were smooth cells. Intermediate cells were also found which in sections appeared moderately villous and labeled, thus identified as B lymphocytes. Further evidence for a relationship between villous surface and sIg was given by the finding of a few lymphocytes with polar concentration of labeled microvilli. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients, most cells exhibited a villous surface with parallel variations of the number of microvilli and of anti-immunoglobulin-binding capacity. However, some labeled smooth blastic cells were also observed. On the other hand, abnormal lymphocytes from Sezary's syndrome which could exhibit segments of villous membrane had no detectable sIg. This study confirms that in most cases human B lymphocytes have a characteristic surface appearance and that the detection of sIg in normal lymphocytes correlates with the presence of microvilli. PMID:123001

  14. TMEM119 marks a subset of microglia in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Jun-ichi; Kino, Yoshihiro; Asahina, Naohiro; Takitani, Mika; Miyoshi, Junko; Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Saito, Yuko

    2016-02-01

    Microglia are resident myeloid cells of the central nervous system (CNS), activated in the brains of various neurological diseases. Microglia are ontogenetically and functionally distinct from monocyte-derived macrophages that infiltrate the CNS under pathological conditions. However, a lack of specific markers that distinguish resident microglia from circulating blood-derived macrophages in human brain tissues hampers accurate evaluation of microglial contributions to the human brain pathology. By comparative analysis of five comprehensive microglial transcriptome datasets, we identified an evolutionarily conserved protein TMEM119 as the most promising candidate for human microglial markers. TMEM119 was expressed on immortalized human microglia, in which the expression levels were not elevated by exposure to lipopolysaccharide, IFNγ, IL-4, IL-13 or TGFβ1. Notably, TMEM119 immunoreactivity was expressed exclusively on a subset of Iba1(+) CD68(+) microglia with ramified and amoeboid morphologies in the brains of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), whereas Iba1(+) CD68(+) infiltrating macrophages do not express TMEM119 in demyelinating lesions of multiple sclerosis and necrotic lesions of cerebral infarction. TMEM119 mRNA levels were elevated in AD brains, although the protein levels were not significantly different between AD and non-AD cases by western blot and morphometric analyses. TMEM119-positive microglia did not consistently express polarized markers for M1 (CD80) or M2 (CD163, CD209) in AD brains. These results suggest that TMEM119 serves as a reliable microglial marker that discriminates resident microglia from blood-derived macrophages in the human brain.

  15. Human cytotoxic T lymphocytes against the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein.

    PubMed Central

    Malik, A; Egan, J E; Houghten, R A; Sadoff, J C; Hoffman, S L

    1991-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of malaria sporozoites protect against malaria in rodents. Although there is interest in developing human vaccines that induce CTL against the Plasmodium falciparum CS protein, humans have never been shown to produce CTL against any Plasmodium species protein or other parasite protein. We report that when peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from three of four volunteers immunized with irradiated P. falciparum sporozoites were stimulated in vitro with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the P. falciparum CS protein or a peptide including only amino acids 368-390 of the P. falciparum CS protein [CS-(368-390)], the PBMC lysed autologous Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells transfected with the P. falciparum CS protein gene or incubated with CS-(368-390) tricosapeptide. Activity was antigen specific, genetically restricted, and dependent on CD8+ T cells. In one volunteer, seven peptides reflecting amino acids 311-400 were tested, and, as in B10.BR mice, CTL activity was only associated with the CS-(368-390) peptide. Development of an assay for studying human CTL against the CS and other malaria proteins and a method for constructing target cells by direct gene transfection provide a foundation for studying the role of CTL in protection against malaria. PMID:1707538

  16. Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Infection of the Three Monocyte Subsets Contributes to Viral Burden in Humans

    PubMed Central

    de Castro-Amarante, Maria Fernanda; McKinnon, Katherine; Washington Parks, Robyn; Galli, Veronica; Omsland, Maria; Andresen, Vibeke; Massoud, Raya; Brunetto, Giovanna; Caruso, Breanna; Venzon, David; Jacobson, Steven

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because the viral DNA burden correlates with disease development, we investigated the contribution of monocyte subsets (classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocytes) to the total viral burden in 22 human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected individuals by assessing their infectivity status, frequency, as well as chemotactic and phagocytic functions. All three monocyte subsets sorted from HTLV-1-infected individuals were positive for viral DNA, and the frequency of classical monocytes was lower in the blood of HTLV-1-infected individuals than in that of uninfected individuals, while the expression levels of the chemokine receptors CCR5, CXCR3, and CX3CR1 in classical monocytes were higher in HTLV-1-infected individuals than uninfected individuals; the percentage of intermediate monocytes and their levels of chemokine receptor expression did not differ between HTLV-1-infected and uninfected individuals. However, the capacity of intermediate monocytes to migrate to CCL5, the ligand for CCR5, was higher, and a higher proportion of nonclassical monocytes expressed CCR1, CXCR3, and CX3CR1. The level of viral DNA in the monocyte subsets correlated with the capacity to migrate to CCL2, CCL5, and CX3CL1 for classical monocytes, with lower levels of phagocytosis for intermediate monocytes, and with the level of viral DNA in CD8+ and CD4+ T cells for nonclassical monocytes. These data suggest a model whereby HTLV-1 infection augments the number of classical monocytes that migrate to tissues and become infected and the number of infected nonclassical monocytes that transmit virus to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These results, together with prior findings in a macaque model of HTLV-1 infection, support the notion that infection of monocytes by HTLV-1 is likely a requisite for viral persistence in humans. IMPORTANCE Monocytes have been implicated in immune regulation and disease progression in patients with HTLV-1-associated inflammatory diseases. We detected

  17. Modeling adenovirus latency in human lymphocyte cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yange; Huang, Wen; Ornelles, David A; Gooding, Linda R

    2010-09-01

    Species C adenovirus establishes a latent infection in lymphocytes of the tonsils and adenoids. To understand how this lytic virus is maintained in these cells, four human lymphocytic cell lines that support the entire virus life cycle were examined. The T-cell line Jurkat ceased proliferation and died shortly after virus infection. BJAB, Ramos (B cells), and KE37 (T cells) continued to divide at nearly normal rates while replicating the virus genome. Viral genome numbers peaked and then declined in BJAB cells below one genome per cell at 130 to 150 days postinfection. Ramos and KE37 cells maintained the virus genome at over 100 copies per cell over a comparable period of time. BJAB cells maintained the viral DNA as a monomeric episome. All three persistently infected cells lost expression of the cell surface coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) within 24 h postinfection, and CAR expression remained low for at least 340 days postinfection. CAR loss proceeded via a two-stage process. First, an initial loss of cell surface staining for CAR required virus late gene expression and a CAR-binding fiber protein even while CAR protein and mRNA levels remained high. Second, CAR mRNA disappeared at around 30 days postinfection and remained low even after virus DNA was lost from the cells. At late times postinfection (day 180), BJAB cells could not be reinfected with adenovirus, even when CAR was reintroduced to the cells via retroviral transduction, suggesting that the expression of multiple genes had been stably altered in these cells following infection. PMID:20573817

  18. Chromosome aberrations in human blood lymphocytes exposed to energetic protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, Ms Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    During space flight, astronauts are exposed to space radiation consisting of high-energy protons, high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei, as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary particles have a higher LET value than primary protons and are therefore expected to have a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). To investigate this theory, we exposed human peripheral blood lymphocytes to protons with energies of 250 MeV, 800MeV, 2 GeV, or 2.5 GeV. LET values for these protons ranged from 0.4 to 0.2 keV/µm. and doses ranged from 0.2 to 3 Gy. Over this energy range the probability of nuclear reaction leading to secondary radiation, and the multiplicity of reaction products such as neutrons and mesons increases substantially. The effect of aluminum and polyethylene shielding was also assessed using the 2 GeV and 2.5GeV proton beams. After exposure lymphocytes were stimulated to divide and chromosomes were collected from cells in the first G2 and metaphase cell cycle after exposure using a chemical induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Dose response data for chromosome damage was analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting technique. Selected samples were also analyzed with multicolor FISH (mFISH) and multicolor banding FISH (mBAND) techniques. Data indicates that the dose response for simple-type exchanges is similar for proton and gamma exposure, whereas protons induce higher yields of complex exchanges that are energy dependent. RBE values will be presented for each proton energy, and the effects of shielding and possible cytogenetic signatures of proton exposure will be discussed.

  19. Chromosome Aberration in Human Blood Lymphocytes Exposed to Energetic Protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2008-01-01

    During space flight, astronauts are exposed to a space radiation consisting of high-energy protons, high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei, as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary particles have a higher LET value than primary protons and therefore expected to have a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). To investigate this theory, we exposed human peripheral blood lymphocytes to protons with energies of 250 MeV, 800MeV, 2 GeV, or 2.5 GeV. LET values for these protons ranged from 0.4 to 0.2 keV/micrometer. and doses ranged from 0.2 to 3 Gy. Over this energy the probability of nuclear reaction leading to secondary radiation, and the multiplicity of reaction produces such as neutrons and mesons increases substantially. The effect of aluminum and polyethylene shielding was also assessed using the 2 GeV and 2.5GeV proton beams. After exposure lymphocytes were stimulated to divide and chromosomes were collected from cells in the first G2 and metaphase cell cycle after exposure using a chemical induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Dose response data for chromosome damage was analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting technique. Selected samples were also analyzed with multicolor FISH (mFISH) and multicolor banding FISH (mBAND) techniques. Data indicates that the dose response for simple-type exchanges is similar for proton and gamma exposure, whereas protons induce higher yields of complex exchanges that are LET dependent. RBE values will be presented for each proton energy, and the effects of shielding and possible cytogenetic signatures of proton exposure will be discussed.

  20. Aging and cytomegalovirus infection differentially and jointly affect distinct circulating T cell subsets in humans.

    PubMed

    Wertheimer, Anne M; Bennett, Michael S; Park, Byung; Uhrlaub, Jennifer L; Martinez, Carmine; Pulko, Vesna; Currier, Noreen L; Nikolich-Žugich, Dragana; Kaye, Jeffrey; Nikolich-Žugich, Janko

    2014-03-01

    The impact of intrinsic aging upon human peripheral blood T cell subsets remains incompletely quantified and understood. This impact must be distinguished from the influence of latent persistent microorganisms, particularly CMV, which has been associated with age-related changes in the T cell pool. In a cross-sectional cohort of 152 CMV-negative individuals, aged 21-101 y, we found that aging correlated strictly to an absolute loss of naive CD8, but not CD4, T cells but, contrary to many reports, did not lead to an increase in memory T cell numbers. The loss of naive CD8 T cells was not altered by CMV in 239 subjects (range 21-96 y), but the decline in CD4(+) naive cells showed significance in CMV(+) individuals. These individuals also exhibited an absolute increase in the effector/effector memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells with age. That increase was seen mainly, if not exclusively, in older subjects with elevated anti-CMV Ab titers, suggesting that efficacy of viral control over time may determine the magnitude of CMV impact upon T cell memory, and perhaps upon immune defense. These findings provide important new insights into the age-related changes in the peripheral blood pool of older adults, demonstrating that aging and CMV exert both distinct and joint influence upon blood T cell homeostasis in humans. PMID:24501199

  1. A method for following human lymphocyte traffic using indium-111 oxine labelling.

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, J; Gibson, C; Thatcher, N; Ford, W L; Sharma, H; Benson, W; Crowther, D

    1981-01-01

    A method is described whereby large numbers of human lymphocytes are separated from peripheral blood and labelled in vitro with indium-111 oxine. Following autologous reinjection, the distribution within the body is followed by means of serial blood samples, surface-probe counting and gamma camera imaging. The distribution of radioactivity following reinjection of heat-damaged labelled lymphocytes and free indium-111 oxine is different from that of 'normal' lymphocytes. The results suggest that the separation and labelling procedure does not cause significant physical damage to the lymphocytes The importance of restricting the specific lymphocyte activity to 20-40 microCi per 10(8) cells in order to minimize radiation damage to the lymphocytes is emphasized. Good resolution of lymphoid structures is obtained using gamma camera imaging and the changes recorded in organ distribution correlate well with data from animal models of lymphocyte migration. Thus, indium-111 oxine labelling of human lymphocytes provides a non-invasive method whereby the migratory properties of human lymphocytes can be followed. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7285387

  2. Effect of asbestos exposure on differentiation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes in mixed lymphocyte reaction of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Maeda, Megumi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Otsuki, Takemi

    2013-07-01

    Asbestos fibers are associated with tumorigenicity, and are thought to cause mesothelioma. However, their effect on immune response remains unclear. We examined the effect of asbestos exposure on differentiation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) upon exposure to chrysotile B (CB) or crocidolite (CR) asbestos at 5 μg/ml for 7 days. Exposure to CB during MLR suppressed increases in the percentage and number of CD8⁺ T cells in response to allogenic cells. The cytotoxicity for allogenic targets decreased in PBMCs exposed to CB, but not CR, when compared with PBMCs without any exposure during MLR. Exposure to CB during MLR resulted in suppression of increases in granzyme B⁺ cells and IFN-γ⁺ cells. CB exposure also resulted in suppression of increases in CD45RO⁺ effector/memory cells and CD25⁺-activated cells in CD8⁺ lymphocytes, and a decrease in CD45RA⁺ cells. CB exposure suppressed the proliferation of CD8⁺ lymphocytes without an increase in annexin V⁺ apoptotic cells in CD8⁺ lymphocytes. Moreover, the production of IL-10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, but not IL-2, decreased in the presence of CB. These results suggest that exposure to asbestos potentially suppresses the differentiation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte, accompanied by decreases in IFN-γ and TNF-α.

  3. Effects of incense smoke on human lymphocyte DNA.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Yim Tong; Sok Wa Leong, Kosca; Keong Lam, Kason; Min Min Hong, Cynthia; Kai Mui Lee, Daphne; Teng Fun Chan, Yui; Benzie, Iris F F

    2009-01-01

    Incense burning is common in Southeast Asia, where it is a traditional and ceremonial practice in deity worship and paying respect to ancestors. However, incense emissions are an important source of indoor air pollution in Asia, and may induce health problems to those exposed. In this in vitro study the effects of incense emissions on human DNA were investigated using the comet assay. Particulates in smoke from six kinds of incense were trapped in saline or ethanol and human lymphocytes were exposed under controlled conditions. Results showed that DNA damage, including strand breaks, was induced by both aqueous and ethanolic extracts of two samples. The ethanolic extract of one sample induced DNA damage, while no significant DNA damage was found in the remaining three samples. The mechanisms underlying DNA damage induced by incense emissions were also investigated. Catalase (CAT), sodium azide, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were co-incubated with extract, which exerted significant DNA damaging effects. Results showed that CAT with or without SOD diminished DNA damage, whereas sodium azide did not seem able to reduce DNA damage. Data indicate there are potential adverse health effects of such exposure, particularly for temple workers.

  4. The synthesis of proteoglycans by human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Steward, W P; Christmas, S E; Lyon, M; Gallagher, J T

    1990-05-22

    We have examined the proteoglycans produced by highly-purified cultures of human T-lymphocytes. The proteoglycans were metabolically labelled with [35S]sulphate and analysed in cellular and medium fractions using DEAE-cellulose chromatography, gel filtration and specific enzymatic and chemical degradations. The results showed that the T cells synthesized a relatively homogeneous, proteinase-resistant chondroitin 4-sulphate proteoglycan that accumulated in the culture medium during a 48 h incubation period. The cellular fraction contained a significant amount of free chondroitin sulphate chains that were not secreted into the medium. These polysaccharides were formed by intracellular degradation of proteoglycan in a chloroquine-sensitive process, indicating a requirement for an acidic environment. In contrast to chondroitin sulphate derived from proteoglycan, chondroitin sulphates synthesized on the exogenous primer, beta-D-xyloside, were mainly secreted by the cells. beta-D-Xylosides caused an 8-fold stimulation in the synthesis of chondroitin sulphate, but decreased the synthesis of proteoglycan by about 50%. These proteoglycans contained shorter chondroitin sulphate chains than their normal counterparts. The results indicate that although proteoglycans are mainly secretory components in human T-cell cultures, a specific metabolic step leads to the intracellular accumulation of free glycosaminoglycans. Separate functions are likely to be associated with the intracellular and secretory pools of chondroitin sulphate.

  5. Viral Engineering of Chimeric Antigen Receptor Expression on Murine and Human T Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hammill, Joanne A; Afsahi, Arya; Bramson, Jonathan L; Helsen, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of a bolus of tumor-specific T lymphocytes into cancer patients is a promising therapeutic strategy. In one approach, tumor specificity is conferred upon T cells via engineering expression of exogenous receptors, such as chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Here, we describe the generation and production of both murine and human CAR-engineered T lymphocytes using retroviruses. PMID:27581020

  6. Vincristine-induced bystander effect in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Testi, Serena; Azzarà, Alessia; Giovannini, Caterina; Lombardi, Sara; Piaggi, Simona; Facioni, Maria Sole; Scarpato, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Bystander effect is a known radiobiological effect, widely described using ionizing radiations and which, more recently, has also been related to chemical mutagens. In this study, we aimed to assess whether or not a bystander response can be induced in cultured human peripheral lymphocytes by vincristine, a chemotherapeutic mutagen acting as spindle poison, and by mitomycin-C, an alkylating agent already known to induce this response in human lymphoblastoid cells. Designing a modified ad hoc protocol for the cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (MN) assay, we detected the presence of a dose-dependent bystander response in untreated cultures receiving the conditioned medium (CM) from mitomycin-C (MMC) or vincristine (VCR) treated cultures. In the case of MMC, MN frequencies, expressed as micronucleated binucleates, were: 13.5±1.41 at 6μM, 22±2.12 at 12μM or 28.25±5.13 at 15μM vs. a control value of 4.75±1.59. MN levels for VCR, expressed as micronucleated mononucleates were: 2.75±0.88 at 0.0μM, 27.25±2.30 at 0.4μM, 46.25±1.94 at 0.8μM, 98.25±7.25 at 1.6μM. To verify that no mutagen residual was transferred to recipient cultures together with the CM, we evaluated MN levels in cultures receiving the medium immediately after three washings following the chemical treatment (unconditioned medium). We further confirmed these results using a cell-mixing approach where untreated lymphocytes were co-cultured with donor cells treated with an effect-inducing dose of MMC or VCR. A distinct production pattern of both reactive oxygen species and soluble mediator proteins by treated cells may account for the differences observed in the manifestation of the bystander effect induced by VCR. In fact, we observed an increased level of ROS, IL-32 and TGF-β in the CM from VCR treated cultures, not present in MMC treated cultures. PMID:27050754

  7. Serum BAFF and APRIL Levels, T-Lymphocyte Subsets, and Immunoglobulins after B-Cell Depletion Using the Monoclonal Anti-CD20 Antibody Rituximab in Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Sigrid; Kristoffersen, Einar K; Sapkota, Dipak; Risa, Kristin; Dahl, Olav; Bruland, Ove; Mella, Olav; Fluge, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a disease of unknown etiology. We have previously suggested clinical benefit from B-cell depletion using the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in a randomized and placebo-controlled study. Prolonged responses were then demonstrated in an open-label phase-II study with maintenance rituximab treatment. Using blood samples from patients in the previous two clinical trials, we investigated quantitative changes in T-lymphocyte subsets, in immunoglobulins, and in serum levels of two B-cell regulating cytokines during follow-up. B-lymphocyte activating factor of the tumor necrosis family (BAFF) in baseline serum samples was elevated in 70 ME/CFS patients as compared to 56 healthy controls (p = 0.011). There were no significant differences in baseline serum BAFF levels between patients with mild, moderate, or severe ME/CFS, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) serum levels were not significantly different in ME/CFS patients compared to healthy controls at baseline, and no changes in serum levels were seen during follow-up. Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets and T-cell activation markers at multiple time points during follow-up showed no significant differences over time, between rituximab and placebo groups, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. Baseline serum IgG levels were significantly lower in patients with subsequent response after rituximab therapy compared to non-responders (p = 0.03). In the maintenance study, slight but significant reductions in mean serum immunoglobulin levels were observed at 24 months compared to baseline; IgG 10.6-9.5 g/L, IgA 1.8-1.5 g/L, and IgM 0.97-0.70 g/L. Although no functional assays were performed, the lack of significant associations of T- and NK-cell subset numbers with B-cell depletion, as well as the lack of associations to clinical responses, suggest that B

  8. Serum BAFF and APRIL Levels, T-Lymphocyte Subsets, and Immunoglobulins after B-Cell Depletion Using the Monoclonal Anti-CD20 Antibody Rituximab in Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lunde, Sigrid; Kristoffersen, Einar K.; Sapkota, Dipak; Risa, Kristin; Dahl, Olav; Bruland, Ove; Mella, Olav; Fluge, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a disease of unknown etiology. We have previously suggested clinical benefit from B-cell depletion using the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in a randomized and placebo-controlled study. Prolonged responses were then demonstrated in an open-label phase-II study with maintenance rituximab treatment. Using blood samples from patients in the previous two clinical trials, we investigated quantitative changes in T-lymphocyte subsets, in immunoglobulins, and in serum levels of two B-cell regulating cytokines during follow-up. B-lymphocyte activating factor of the tumor necrosis family (BAFF) in baseline serum samples was elevated in 70 ME/CFS patients as compared to 56 healthy controls (p = 0.011). There were no significant differences in baseline serum BAFF levels between patients with mild, moderate, or severe ME/CFS, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) serum levels were not significantly different in ME/CFS patients compared to healthy controls at baseline, and no changes in serum levels were seen during follow-up. Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets and T-cell activation markers at multiple time points during follow-up showed no significant differences over time, between rituximab and placebo groups, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. Baseline serum IgG levels were significantly lower in patients with subsequent response after rituximab therapy compared to non-responders (p = 0.03). In the maintenance study, slight but significant reductions in mean serum immunoglobulin levels were observed at 24 months compared to baseline; IgG 10.6–9.5 g/L, IgA 1.8–1.5 g/L, and IgM 0.97–0.70 g/L. Although no functional assays were performed, the lack of significant associations of T- and NK-cell subset numbers with B-cell depletion, as well as the lack of associations to clinical responses, suggest that B

  9. Human endotoxin tolerance is associated with enrichment of the CD14+ CD16+ monocyte subset.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Nieto, Aimée; Zentella, Alejandro; Moreno, José; Ventura, José L; Pedraza, Sigifredo; Velázquez, Juan R

    2015-01-01

    Prior exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induces a state of cell resistance to subsequent LPS restimulation, known as endotoxin tolerance, mainly by repressing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We established an endotoxin tolerance model in human monocytes Endotoxin-tolerant cells showed a decrease in IκBα degradation and diminished expression of Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) (both messenger RNA [mRNA] and protein content). The myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/MyD88 splice variant (MyD88s) ratio, an indirect way to test the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) MyD88-dependent signaling cascade, did not change in endotoxin-tolerant cells when compared to LPS-stimulated or -unstimulated ones. Remarkably, cell population analysis indicated a significant increase of the CD14+ CD16+ subset only under the endotoxin-tolerant condition. Furthermore, endotoxin-tolerant cells produced higher amounts of C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10), a typical MyD88-independent cytokine.

  10. Human endotoxin tolerance is associated with enrichment of the CD14+ CD16+ monocyte subset.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Nieto, Aimée; Zentella, Alejandro; Moreno, José; Ventura, José L; Pedraza, Sigifredo; Velázquez, Juan R

    2015-01-01

    Prior exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induces a state of cell resistance to subsequent LPS restimulation, known as endotoxin tolerance, mainly by repressing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We established an endotoxin tolerance model in human monocytes Endotoxin-tolerant cells showed a decrease in IκBα degradation and diminished expression of Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) (both messenger RNA [mRNA] and protein content). The myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/MyD88 splice variant (MyD88s) ratio, an indirect way to test the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) MyD88-dependent signaling cascade, did not change in endotoxin-tolerant cells when compared to LPS-stimulated or -unstimulated ones. Remarkably, cell population analysis indicated a significant increase of the CD14+ CD16+ subset only under the endotoxin-tolerant condition. Furthermore, endotoxin-tolerant cells produced higher amounts of C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10), a typical MyD88-independent cytokine. PMID:25172544

  11. Monoclonal rat anti-human lymphocyte antibody Campath-1 binds to T and B lymphocytes but effectively lyses only T cells.

    PubMed

    Gazitt, Y; Or, R; Mumcuoglu, M; Slavin, S

    1987-12-01

    Binding and human complement-mediated T and B lymphocyte lysis were investigated in bone marrow samples obtained from 15 normal donors and 12 patients with a variety of malignant disorders undergoing marrow cryopreservation prior to autologous bone marrow transplantation. All marrow samples were obtained during remission except for one patient with neuroblastoma. The mononuclear cell fractions were collected and the distribution of B cell restricted markers (surface Ig and GP-70) and T cell surface markers (Leu-1 and rosettes with sheep red blood cells) were studied before and after marrow purging with Campath-1, a monoclonal rat anti-human lymphocyte antibody, and autologous serum as complement. Effective lysis of T lymphocytes (greater than 99.5%) was documented in all cases. However, although effective binding of Campath-1 to B lymphocytes was uniform, no effective lysis occurred. The data suggest that effective lysis of mature T lymphocytes can be accomplished while leaving normal B lymphocytes intact.

  12. Expression Profiles of miRNA Subsets Distinguish Human Colorectal Carcinoma and Normal Colonic Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Pellatt, Daniel F; Stevens, John R; Wolff, Roger K; Mullany, Lila E; Herrick, Jennifer S; Samowitz, Wade; Slattery, Martha L

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-protein-coding RNA molecules that are commonly dysregulated in colorectal tumors. The objective of this study was to identify smaller subsets of highly predictive miRNAs. METHODS: Data come from population-based studies of colorectal cancer conducted in Utah and the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. Tissue samples were available for 1,953 individuals, of which 1,894 had carcinoma tissue and 1,599 had normal mucosa available for statistical analysis. Agilent Human miRNA Microarray V.19.0 was used to generate miRNA expression profiles; validation of expression levels was carried out using quantitative PCR. We used random forest analysis and verified findings with logistic modeling in separate data sets. Important microRNAs are identified and bioinformatics tools are used to identify target genes and related biological pathways. RESULTS: We identified 16 miRNAs for colon and 17 miRNAs for rectal carcinoma that appear to differentiate between carcinoma and normal mucosa; of these, 12 were important for both colon and rectal cancer, hsa-miR-663b, hsa-miR-4539, hsa-miR-17-5p, hsa-miR-20a-5p, hsa-miR-21-5p, hsa-miR-4506, hsa-miR-92a-3p, hsa-miR-93-5p, hsa-miR-145-5p, hsa-miR-3651, hsa-miR-378a-3p, and hsa-miR-378i. Estimated misclassification rates were low at 4.83% and 2.5% among colon and rectal observations, respectively. Among independent observations, logistic modeling reinforced the importance of these miRNAs, finding the primary principal components of their variation statistically significant (P<0.001 among both colon and rectal observations) and again producing low misclassification rates. Repeating our analysis without those miRNAs initially identified as important identified other important miRNAs; however, misclassification rates increased and distinctions between remaining miRNAs in terms of classification importance were reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Our data support the hypothesis that while many miRNAs are

  13. Flow cytometric and immunohistochemical characterization of the gamma/delta T-lymphocyte population in normal human lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood.

    PubMed Central

    Inghirami, G.; Zhu, B. Y.; Chess, L.; Knowles, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    We determined the quantitative and topographic distribution of gamma/delta lymphocytes in normal human lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood using a monoclonal antibody that detects a framework determinant on delta molecules and delineated the immunophenotypic characteristics of the gamma/delta lymphocyte population by one- and/or two-color immunohistochemical and two- and/or three-color flow cytometric analysis. Variable, but generally small, numbers of gamma/delta lymphocytes are present in peripheral blood and in all lymphoid tissues. The vast majority, greater than or equal to 90%, of lymphoid tissue delta lymphocytes reside in interfollicular (T-cell) zones. Approximately 90% of delta thymocytes are present in the thymic medulla. The percentage of CD3-positive T cells that express delta are: spleen 12.5 +/- 8.1%, peripheral blood 4.0 +/- 3.1%, appendix 2.9 +/- 1%, lymph node 2.2 +/- 1%, thymus 1.4 +/- 0.5%, and tonsil 0.7 +/- 0.5%. We further demonstrated that 1) gamma/delta-thymocytes and gamma/delta peripheral lymphocytes express T-cell lineage restricted antigens CD3 and CD2 but only a variable subset, 30% to 90%, express T-cell lineage associated antigens CD5 and/or CD8; (2) approximately 60% of gamma/delta thymocytes express low-density CD4 while all gamma/delta peripheral lymphocytes lack detectable CD4; 3) gamma/delta lymphocytes lack natural killer (NK), macrophage, and B-cell associated antigens CD16, CD14, and CD20, respectively, but greater than or equal to 70% of gamma/delta T lymphocytes express CD11b, Leu7, and NKH-1, antigens, which are also expressed by suppressor/cytotoxic and NK cells; and 4) a large subpopulation, approximately 25%, of gamma/delta thymocytes are in S1-G2 phase, while greater than or equal to 98% of gamma/delta peripheral lymphocytes are small lymphocytes in G0-G1 phase and lack activation/proliferation markers. Together these results indicate that gamma/delta lymphocytes are resting, mature T cells that probably play a

  14. CCR5 susceptibility to ligand-mediated down-modulation differs between human T lymphocytes and myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Fox, James M; Kasprowicz, Richard; Hartley, Oliver; Signoret, Nathalie

    2015-07-01

    CCR5 is a chemokine receptor expressed on leukocytes and a coreceptor used by HIV-1 to enter CD4(+) T lymphocytes and macrophages. Stimulation of CCR5 by chemokines triggers internalization of chemokine-bound CCR5 molecules in a process called down-modulation, which contributes to the anti-HIV activity of chemokines. Recent studies have shown that CCR5 conformational heterogeneity influences chemokine-CCR5 interactions and HIV-1 entry in transfected cells or activated CD4(+) T lymphocytes. However, the effect of CCR5 conformations on other cell types and on the process of down-modulation remains unclear. We used mAbs, some already shown to detect distinct CCR5 conformations, to compare the behavior of CCR5 on in vitro generated human T cell blasts, monocytes and MDMs and CHO-CCR5 transfectants. All human cells express distinct antigenic forms of CCR5 not detected on CHO-CCR5 cells. The recognizable populations of CCR5 receptors exhibit different patterns of down-modulation on T lymphocytes compared with myeloid cells. On T cell blasts, CCR5 is recognized by all antibodies and undergoes rapid chemokine-mediated internalization, whereas on monocytes and MDMs, a pool of CCR5 molecules is recognized by a subset of antibodies and is not removed from the cell surface. We demonstrate that this cell surface-retained form of CCR5 responds to prolonged treatment with more-potent chemokine analogs and acts as an HIV-1 coreceptor. Our findings indicate that the regulation of CCR5 is highly specific to cell type and provide a potential explanation for the observation that native chemokines are less-effective HIV-entry inhibitors on macrophages compared with T lymphocytes.

  15. Divalent ion trapping inside potassium channels of human T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Using the patch-clamp whole-cell recording technique, we investigated the influence of external Ca2+, Ba2+, K+, Rb+, and internal Ca2+ on the rate of K+ channel inactivation in the human T lymphocyte-derived cell line, Jurkat E6-1. Raising external Ca2+ or Ba2+, or reducing external K+, accelerated the rate of the K+ current decay during a depolarizing voltage pulse. External Ba2+ also produced a use-dependent block of the K+ channels by entering the open channel and becoming trapped inside. Raising internal Ca2+ accelerated inactivation at lower concentrations than external Ca2+, but increasing the Ca2+ buffering with BAPTA did not affect inactivation. Raising [K+]o or adding Rb+ slowed inactivation by competing with divalent ions. External Rb+ also produced a use-dependent removal of block of K+ channels loaded with Ba2+ or Ca2+. From the removal of this block we found that under normal conditions approximately 25% of the channels were loaded with Ca2+, whereas under conditions with 10 microM internal Ca2+ the proportion of channels loaded with Ca2+ increased to approximately 50%. Removing all the divalent cations from the external and internal solution resulted in the induction of a non-selective, voltage-independent conductance. We conclude that Ca2+ ions from the outside or the inside can bind to a site at the K+ channel and thereby block the channel or accelerate inactivation. PMID:2786551

  16. Subpopulation of human helper and suppressor T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Venkataraman, M.; Levin, R.D.; Westerman, M.P.

    1983-07-01

    Mitogen driven differentiation of normal human mononuclear cells is a well-established model for the study of antibody synthesis in man. In certain rare individuals who are clinically normal, unfractionated mononuclear cells or a mixture of purified B plus T lymphocytes differentiate into immunoglobulin producing cells in response to purified protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD) but not in response to pokeweed mitogen (PWM). To evaluate this observation we have irradiated T cells from such individuals to eliminate naturally occurring suppressor T cell activity and then added the irradiated T cells back to autologous B cells before culture. The B cells then responded to PWM. The original PPD responses of cells from these individuals were now significantly reduced. Although, there was no difference between PWM nonresponders and responders in the number of OKT-8 positive cells, elimination of OKT-8 positive cells in the PWM nonresponders with OKT-8 monoclonal antibody and complement resulted in a significantly increased response to PWM. This study indicates that there are suppressor T cells which specifically inhibit B cell response to PWM without affecting the PPD response. These results also show that the helper T cells involved in the PWM response are radioresistant and those involved in the PPD response are radiosensitive.

  17. Concomitant augmentation of CD4+ CD29+ helper inducer and diminution of CD4+ CD45RA+ suppressor inducer subset in patients infected with human T cell lymphotropic virus types I or II.

    PubMed Central

    Lal, R B; Rudolph, D L; Schmid, D S; Lairmore, M D

    1992-01-01

    To examine the immunomodulatory effects of HTLV infection, lymphocyte subset analysis was performed on patients infected with human T cell lymphotropic virus type-I (HTLV-I, n = 6) or -II (HTLV-II, n = 12) and on normal blood donors (n = 16). The percentages of total B lymphocytes (CD19), natural killer (NK) cells (CD16), T lymphocytes and their subsets (CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD7, CD8), and IL-2R (CD25) were found to be within the range found in normal donors. However, the expression of CD8+ HLA-DR+ increased significantly in patients with HTLV-I or HTLV-II infection (14.1 +/- 3.9% and 9.7 +/- 2.4% respectively; P less than 0.01) when compared with controls (3.2 +/- 1.1%). In addition, there was a significantly greater proportion of CD4+CD29+ T lymphocytes (29.3 +/- 6.1% and 31.1 +/- 9.0%; P less than 0.05) with concomitant diminution of CD4+CD45RA+ T lymphocytes (8.3 +/- 3.3% and 11.4 +/- 1.5%; P less than 0.01) in patients infected with HTLV-I or HTLV-II respectively, when compared with controls. The increased percentage of CD4+CD29+ subpopulations showed a direct correlation (rs = 0.86; P less than 0.001) with HTLV-specific antibody production. No difference in the CD8 population coexpressing CD29 and S6F1 (an epitope of LFA-1) were observed in the HTLV-infected group when compared with normal donors and functional analysis exhibited minimal cytotoxicity against lectin labelled heterologous target cells. Thus, the shift in the suppressor/cytotoxic to helper/inducer 'memory' CD4+ may be associated with immunoregulatory abnormalities often found in persons infected with HTLV-I or HTLV-II. PMID:1370929

  18. Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast™ chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultur...

  19. Unusually high frequencies of HIV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in humans.

    PubMed

    Hoffenbach, A; Langlade-Demoyen, P; Dadaglio, G; Vilmer, E; Michel, F; Mayaud, C; Autran, B; Plata, F

    1989-01-15

    CTL specific for the HIV belong to the CD8 subset of T lymphocytes, and their activity is restricted by class I HLA transplantation Ag. In this report, HIV-specific CTL and their precursor cells were quantified by limiting dilution analysis. CTL were recovered from the lungs, lymph nodes, and blood of asymptomatic seropositive carriers and of patients with AIDS. HIV was found to be very immunogenic. High frequencies of both HIV-specific CTL and CTL precursor cells were detected in infected individuals. These CTL killed autologous HIV-infected macrophages and T4 lymphoblasts. They also killed doubly transfected P815-A2-env-LAV mouse tumor cells, which express the human HLA-A2 gene and the HIV-1 env gene. In the longitudinal studies of two HIV-infected patients, CTL and CTL precursor cell frequencies decreased as the clinical and immunologic status of the patients deteriorated. Most surprisingly, PBL from seronegative donors also responded to HIV stimulation in vitro and generated large numbers of HLA-restricted, HIV-specific CTL.

  20. Antisera against leukaemia-associated antigens on human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, C C; Marti, G E; Mittal, K K

    1977-01-01

    Antisera were raised in rabbits against leukaemic lymphosarcoma (LSL) cells which carried surface markers of both thymus-derived T lymphocytes (T cells) and bone marrow-derived B lymphocytes (B cells). After absorption with leucocytes, erythrocytes and serum proteins from normal individuals, the antisera demonstrated significant complement-dependent cytotoxicity against leukaemic cells from patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) (9/11), LSL (7/9) and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) (9/12), with an antibody titre of 1:64 or greater. The antisera did not react with: (a) blood lymphocytes from clinically healthy individuals (0/23), patients with ono-lymphoproliferative disorders (0/8) and normal umbilical cords (0/3), (b) normal lymphocytes stimulated by pokeweed mitogen (0/7), allogeneic lymphocytes (0/3), fetuin (0/1), purified protein derivative (PPD) (0/2), and candida antigen (0/1); (C) normal marrow cells (0/3), (D) normal thymocytes (0/2) and (E) leukaemic cells from patients with acute myeloblastic (AML) (0/10) and chronic granulocytic leukaemia (CGL) (0/3). However, the antisera did react with lymphoblastoid cells from continuous B-cell lines derived from an AML patient and from a non-leukaemic individual and, to a lesser extent, with lymphocytes from patients with infectious mononucleosis. The antisera also reacted with lymphocytes from chronically infected tonsils. Cytotoxicity of the antisera against lymphoblastoid and tonsillar cells was inhibited by ALL and CLL cell-lysates; and, conversely, cytotoxicity against ALL cells was inhibited by the lymphoblastoid cell extract. In contrast, a cell lysate or extract from normal inhibited by the lymphoblastoid cell extract. In contrast, a cell lysate or extract from normal lymphocytes did not inhibit cytotoxicity toward lymphoblastoid, tonsillar or ALL cells. Cytotoxicity of the antisera was neutralized by a goat anti-rabbit IgG (GAR IgG). These results suggest that the antisera contained

  1. A global look into human T cell subsets before and after cryopreservation using multiparametric flow cytometry and two-dimensional visualization analysis.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Jennifer; Jobin, Christine; Simard, Carl; Néron, Sonia

    2016-07-01

    The cryopreservation of human lymphocytes is an essential step for the achievement of several cellular therapies. Besides, T cells are considered as promising actors in cancer therapy for their cytotoxic and regulatory properties. Consequently, the development of tools to monitor the impact of freezing and thawing processes on their fine distribution may be an asset to achieve quality control in cellular therapy. In this study, the phenotypes of freshly isolated human mononuclear cells were compared to those observed following one cycle of cryopreservation and rest periods 0h, 1h and 24h after thawing but before staining. T cells were scrutinized for their distribution according to naive, memory effector, regulatory and helper subsets. Flow cytometry analyses were done using eight-color antibody panels as proposed by the Human Immunophenotyping Consortium. Data were further analyzed by using conventional directed gating and clustering software, namely SPADE and viSNE. Overall, SPADE and viSNE tools were very efficient to monitor the outcome of PBMC populations and T cell subsets. T cells were more sensitive to cryopreservation than other cells. Our results indicated that submitting the thawed cells to a 1h rest period improved the detection of some cell markers when compared to fresh samples. In contrast, cells submitted to a 24h rest period, or to none, were less representative of fresh sample distribution. The heterogeneity of PBMC, as well as the effects of freeze-thaw cycle on their distribution, can be easily monitored by using SPADE and viSNE. PMID:27129808

  2. Novel Strategy for Phenotypic Characterization of Human B Lymphocytes from Precursors to Effector Cells by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Vettier, Claire; Laurin, David; Pernollet, Martine; Raskovalova, Tatiana; Cesbron, Jean-Yves; Dumestre-Pérard, Chantal; Jacob, Marie-Christine

    2016-01-01

    A precise identification and phenotypic characterization of human B-cell subsets is of crucial importance in both basic research and medicine. In the literature, flow cytometry studies for the phenotypic characterization of B-lymphocytes are mainly focused on the description of a particular cell stage, or of specific cell stages observed in a single type of sample. In the present work, we propose a backbone of 6 antibodies (CD38, CD27, CD10, CD19, CD5 and CD45) and an efficient gating strategy to identify, in a single analysis tube, a large number of B-cell subsets covering the whole B-cell differentiation from precursors to memory and plasma cells. Furthermore, by adding two antibodies in an 8-color combination, our approach allows the analysis of the modulation of any cell surface marker of interest along B-cell differentiation. We thus developed a panel of seven 8-colour antibody combinations to phenotypically characterize B-cell subpopulations in bone marrow, peripheral blood, lymph node and cord blood samples. Beyond qualitative information provided by biparametric representations, we also quantified antigen expression on each of the identified B-cell subsets and we proposed a series of informative curves showing the modulation of seventeen cell surface markers along B-cell differentiation. Our approach by flow cytometry provides an efficient tool to obtain quantitative data on B-cell surface markers expression with a relative easy-to-handle technique that can be applied in routine explorations. PMID:27657694

  3. Genotoxicity of food preservative sodium sorbate in human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mamur, Sevcan; Yüzbaşıoğlu, Deniz; Unal, Fatma; Aksoy, Hüseyin

    2012-10-01

    The genotoxic effects of antimicrobial food additive sodium sorbate (SS) was assessed by using chromosome aberrations (CAs), sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs), and micronucleus (MN) in cultured human lymphocytes and comet assay in isolated human lymphocytes. Lymphocytes were treated with four concentrations (100, 200, 400 and 800 μg/ml) of SS as well as a negative (sterile distilled water) and a positive control (Mitomycin-C: MMC for cultured lymphocytes and H(2)O(2) for isolated lymphocytes). The result of this study indicated that SS increased the frequency of CAs at both 24 and 48 h period compared to control. When gaps were included, this increase was significant at 200, 400 and 800 μg/ml concentrations at 24 h and, at all concentrations at 48 h treatment time. When gaps were excluded, this increase was significant at only 800 μg/ml concentration at both 24 and 48 h treatments. In addition, SS increased SCEs/cell and MN frequency at 400 and 800 μg/ml concentrations at both 24 and 48 h compared to negative control. Furthermore, this additive caused DNA damage at all concentrations in isolated human lymphocytes after 1 h in vitro exposure. The present results show that SS is genotoxic to the human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro at the highest concentrations.

  4. Genetically defined subsets of human pancreatic cancer demonstrate unique in vitro chemosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yunfeng; Brosnan, Jacqueline A.; Blackford, Amanda; Sur, Surojit; Hruban, Ralph H.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Maitra, Anirban; Diaz, Luis A.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Eshleman, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth cause of death from cancer in the western world. Majority of patients present with advanced unresectable disease responding poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Chemotherapy for PC might be improved by adjusting it to individual genetic profiles. We attempt to identify genetic predictors of chemosensitivity to broad classes of anticancer drugs. Experimental Design Using a panel of genetically defined human PC cell lines, we tested gemcitabine (anti-metabolite), docetaxel (anti-microtubule), mitomycin C (alkylating), irinotecan (topoisomerase I inhibitor), cisplatin (crosslinking), KU0058948 (Parp1 inhibitor), triptolide (terpenoid drug) and artemisinin (control). Results All PC cell lines were sensitive to triptolide and docetaxel. Most PC cells were also sensitive to gemcitabine and MMC. The vast majority of PC cell lines were insensitive to cisplatin, irinotecan, and a Parp1 inhibitor. However, individual cell lines were often sensitive to these compounds in unique ways. We found that DPC4/SMAD4 inactivation sensitized PC cells to cisplatin and irinotecan by 2–4 fold, but they were modestly less sensitive to gemcitabine. PC cells were all sensitive to triptolide and 18% were sensitive to the Parp1 inhibitor. P16/CDKN2A inactivated PC cells were 3–4 fold less sensitive to gemcitabine and MMC. Conclusions Chemosensitivity of PC cells correlated with some specific genetic profiles. These results support the hypothesis that genetic subsets of pancreatic cancer exist, and these genetic backgrounds may permit one to personalize the chemotherapy of PC in the future. Further work will need to confirm these responses and determine their magnitude in vivo. PMID:22753594

  5. IDO expression by human B lymphocytes in response to T lymphocyte stimuli and TLR engagement is biologically inactive.

    PubMed

    Godin-Ethier, Jessica; Hanafi, Laïla-Aïcha; Duvignaud, Jean-Baptiste; Leclerc, Denis; Lapointe, Réjean

    2011-10-01

    The immune system must be under tight control to avoid undesired responses. The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) can exert necessary regulating effects by catabolizing tryptophan, leading to the suppression of immune responses in different settings, such as pregnancy and tumor growth. IDO's immuno-suppressive actions are mediated by tryptophan starvation and the accumulation of toxic tryptophan metabolites, resulting in T cell anergy, inhibition of clonal expansion or apoptosis. IDO activity in human macrophages and dendritic cells has been observed after interaction with T lymphocytes, and is triggered by interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) as well as CD40-ligand (CD40L). However, it is unclear whether IDO activity is present in B lymphocytes, which have been identified as having suppressive properties involved in anti-tumor immunity inhibition. In this study, we investigated whether IDO expression is induced in human B cells after exposure to T lymphocyte stimuli and TLR ligands. We report IDO1 and IDO2 mRNA up-regulation by exogenous stimulation with CD40L and IFN-γ. IDO is also upregulated by imiquimod, a TLR 7/8 agonist. In addition, IDO protein is detected after treatment with these exogenous factors or with supernatant from activated CD4(+) T cells. We, however, report weak or absent enzymatic activity from these IDO-expressing cells, as assessed by tryptophan consumption. We conclude that IDO may not be a counter-regulatory mechanism utilized by B lymphocytes to down-regulate immune responses, although its expression is inducible.

  6. Diverse Gene Expression in Human Regulatory T Cell Subsets Uncovers Connection between Regulatory T Cell Genes and Suppressive Function.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jing; Davis, Scott P; Hill, Jonathan A; Yamagata, Tetsuya

    2015-10-15

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells have a critical role in the control of immunity, and their diverse subpopulations may allow adaptation to different types of immune responses. In this study, we analyzed human Treg cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood by performing genome-wide expression profiling of 40 Treg cell subsets from healthy donors. We found that the human peripheral blood Treg cell population is comprised of five major genomic subgroups, represented by 16 tractable subsets with a particular cell surface phenotype. These subsets possess a range of suppressive function and cytokine secretion and can exert a genomic footprint on target effector T (Teff) cells. Correlation analysis of variability in gene expression in the subsets identified several cell surface molecules associated with Treg suppressive function, and pharmacological interrogation revealed a set of genes having causative effect. The five genomic subgroups of Treg cells imposed a preserved pattern of gene expression on Teff cells, with a varying degree of genes being suppressed or induced. Notably, there was a cluster of genes induced by Treg cells that bolstered an autoinhibitory effect in Teff cells, and this induction appears to be governed by a different set of genes than ones involved in counteracting Teff activation. Our work shows an example of exploiting the diversity within human Treg cell subpopulations to dissect Treg cell biology. PMID:26371251

  7. Volume regulation by human lymphocytes. Role of calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Grinstein, S.; Dupre, A.; Rothstein, A.

    1982-05-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes regulate their volumes in hypotonic solutions. In hypotonic media in which Na+ is the predominant cation, an initial swelling phase is followed by a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) associated with a net loss of cellular K+. In media in which K+ is the predominant cation, the rapid initial swelling is followed by a slower second swelling phase. /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes increased during RVD and returned to normal when the original volume was approximately regained. Effects similar to those induced by hypotonic stress could also be produced by raising the intracellular Ca++ level. In isotonic, Ca++-containing media cells were found to shrink upon addition of the Ca++ ionophore A23187 in K+-free media, but to swell in K+-rich media. Exposure to Ca++ plus A23187 also increased /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes. Quinine (75 microM), an inhibitor of the Ca++-activated K+ pathway in other systems blocked RVD, the associated K+ loss, and the increase in /sup 86/Rb+ efflux. Quinine also inhibited the volume changes and the increased /sup 86/Rb fluxes induced by Ca++ plus ionophore. The calmodulin inhibitors trifluoperazine, pimozide and chlorpromazine blocked RVD as well as Ca++ plus A23187-induced volume changes. Trifluoperazine also prevented the increase in /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes and K+ loss induced by hypotonicity. Chlorpromazine sulfoxide, a relatively ineffective calmodulin antagonist, was considerably less potent as an inhibitor of RVD than chlorpromazine. It is suggested than an elevation in cytoplasmic (Ca++), triggered by cell swelling, increases the plasma membrane permeability to K+, the ensuing increased efflux of K+, associated anions, and osmotically obliged water, leading to cell shrinking (RVD).

  8. Simulated microgravity-induced epigenetic changes in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kamaleshwar P; Kumari, Ragini; Dumond, James W

    2010-09-01

    Real space flight and modeled microgravity conditions result in changes in the expression of genes that control important cellular functions. However, the mechanisms for microgravity-induced gene expression changes are not clear. The epigenetic changes of DNA methylation and chromatin histones modifications are known to regulate gene expression. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether simulated microgravity alters (a) the DNA methylation and histone acetylation, and (b) the expression of DNMT1, DNMT3a, DNMT3b, and HDAC1 genes that regulate epigenetic events. To achieve these objectives, human T-lymphocyte cells were grown in a rotary cell culture system (RCCS) that simulates microgravity, and in parallel under normal gravitational conditions as control. The microgravity-induced DNA methylation changes were detected by methylation sensitive-random amplified polymorphic DNA (MS-RAPD) analysis of genomic DNA. The gene expression was measured by Quantitative Real-time PCR. The expression of DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3b was found to be increased at 72 h, and decreased at 7 days in microgravity exposed cells. The MS-RAPD analysis revealed that simulated microgravity exposure results in DNA hypomethylation and mutational changes. Gene expression analysis revealed microgravity exposure time-dependent decreased expression of HDAC1. Decreased expression of HDAC1 should result in increased level of acetylated histone H3, however a decreased level of acetylated H3 was observed in microgravity condition, indicating thereby that other HDACs may be involved in regulation of H3 deacetylation. The findings of this study suggest that epigenetic events could be one of the mechanistic bases for microgravity-induced gene expression changes and associated adverse health effects.

  9. HIV-1 Interacts with Human Endogenous Retrovirus K (HML-2) Envelopes Derived from Human Primary Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Brinzevich, Daria; Young, George R.; Sebra, Robert; Ayllon, Juan; Maio, Susan M.; Deikus, Gintaras; Chen, Benjamin K.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Simon, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are viruses that have colonized the germ line and spread through vertical passage. Only the more recently acquired HERVs, such as the HERV-K (HML-2) group, maintain coding open reading frames. Expression of HERV-Ks has been linked to different pathological conditions, including HIV infection, but our knowledge on which specific HERV-Ks are expressed in primary lymphocytes currently is very limited. To identify the most expressed HERV-Ks in an unbiased manner, we analyzed their expression patterns in peripheral blood lymphocytes using Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing. We observe that three HERV-Ks (KII, K102, and K18) constitute over 90% of the total HERV-K expression in primary human lymphocytes of five different donors. We also show experimentally that two of these HERV-K env sequences (K18 and K102) retain their ability to produce full-length and posttranslationally processed envelope proteins in cell culture. We show that HERV-K18 Env can be incorporated into HIV-1 but not simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) particles. Moreover, HERV-K18 Env incorporation into HIV-1 virions is dependent on HIV-1 matrix. Taken together, we generated high-resolution HERV-K expression profiles specific for activated human lymphocytes. We found that one of the most abundantly expressed HERV-K envelopes not only makes a full-length protein but also specifically interacts with HIV-1. Our findings raise the possibility that these endogenous retroviral Env proteins could directly influence HIV-1 replication. IMPORTANCE Here, we report the HERV-K expression profile of primary lymphocytes from 5 different healthy donors. We used a novel deep-sequencing technology (PacBio SMRT) that produces the long reads necessary to discriminate the complexity of HERV-K expression. We find that primary lymphocytes express up to 32 different HERV-K envelopes, and that at least two of the most expressed Env proteins

  10. Signaling in Human and Murine Lymphocytes in Microgravity: Parallels and Contrasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, Pellis; Alamelu, Sundaresan; Kulkarni, A. D.; Yamauchi, K.

    2006-01-01

    Immune function in space undergoes dramatic changes, some of which are detrimental to lymphocyte function. These changes may lead to significant immune suppression. Studies with human lymphocytes both in space flight and with ground-based models (NASA in vitro ground-based microgravity analog) indicate that T cell activation is inhibited in microgravity. Other lymphocyte functions, such as locomotion, are also inhibited. There is about an 80 percent homology in the immune response of mice to that of humans. A murine model was investigated because of its ability to parallel some microgravity using hind limb suspension. In in vivo antiorthostatically (AOS)-suspended mice, T cell activation is greatly suppressed, with the majority of activation related cytokines being inhibited. PHA activation in lymphocytes derived from AOS mice (in vivo ground-based microgravity analog) is also suppressed. Calcium ionophore studies in human lymphocytes exposed to modeled microgravity indicate that the calcium pathways are probably unaffected in microgravity. IP3 (inositol triphosphate) receptor expression in both human and mouse lymphocytes cultured in modeled microgravity indicate no suppression of calcium signaling. In the human system, microgravity seems to inhibit signaling cascades either at the level of, or up-stream of, Protein Kinase C (PKC). In particular, a membrane event, such as phospholipase C gamma 1 activity in human lymphocytes is affected, with its direct upstream effector, LAT, being deficiently expressed. In the mouse pathway, LAT is undiminished while another critical intermediate, SLP-76, is diminished significantly. This study identifies critical stages in the human and mouse immune systems and in lymphocytes as a function of microgravity.

  11. Lack of permissivity of human monoclonal CD4+ lymphocytes to HIV.

    PubMed

    Chapel, A; Bourges, J F; Bensussan, A; d'Auriol, L; Vilmer, E; Dormont, D

    1990-01-01

    Although knowledge has accumulated about GP110-CD4 interaction, viral penetration into human CD4+ lymphocytes remains unclear, in spite of the fact that all studies on HIV infection were performed on cell-transformed lineages, or on human polyclonal CD4+ cells. In order to investigate this viral entrance into susceptible cells, we studied the permissivity of 13 human monoclonal CD4+ lymphocytes by means of reverse transcriptase (RT) assay and immunocapture. We demonstrated a differential susceptibility to HIV of these CD4+ clones. In a second experiment, HIV infection was studied: (1) sequentially by RT assay and P24 immunocapture on several clones; (2) by cocultivation of infected clones with umbilical cord lymphocytes. These experiments suggested existence of permissive and "nonpermissive" CD4+ monoclonal lymphocytes. Slot blot, then PCR, revealed that proviral DNA sequences were detectable in all clones, but were present at lower levels in nonpermissive clones.

  12. Clinically used selective oestrogen receptor modulators increase LDL receptor activity in primary human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cerrato, F; Fernández-Suárez, M E; Alonso, R; Alonso, M; Vázquez, C; Pastor, O; Mata, P; Lasunción, M A; Gómez-Coronado, D

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Treatment with selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. We assessed the effect of tamoxifen, raloxifene and toremifene and their combinations with lovastatin on LDL receptor activity in lymphocytes from normolipidaemic and familial hypercholesterolaemic (FH) subjects, and human HepG2 hepatocytes and MOLT-4 lymphoblasts. Experimental Approach Lymphocytes were isolated from peripheral blood, treated with different compounds, and 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labelled LDL uptake was analysed by flow cytometry. Key Results Tamoxifen, toremifene and raloxifene, in this order, stimulated DiI-LDL uptake by lymphocytes by inhibiting LDL-derived cholesterol trafficking and subsequent down-regulation of LDL receptor expression. Differently to what occurred in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells, only tamoxifen consistently displayed a potentiating effect with lovastatin in primary lymphocytes. The SERM-mediated increase in LDL receptor activity was not altered by the anti-oestrogen ICI 182 780 nor was it reproduced by 17β-oestradiol. However, the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen was equally effective as tamoxifen. The SERMs produced similar effects on LDL receptor activity in heterozygous FH lymphocytes as in normal lymphocytes, although none of them had a potentiating effect with lovastatin in heterozygous FH lymphocytes. The SERMs had no effect in homozygous FH lymphocytes. Conclusions and Implications Clinically used SERMs up-regulate LDL receptors in primary human lymphocytes. There is a mild enhancement between SERMs and lovastatin of lymphocyte LDLR activity, the potentiation being greater in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells. The effect of SERMs is independent of oestrogen receptors but is preserved in the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen. This mechanism may contribute to the cholesterol-lowering action of SERMs. PMID:25395200

  13. Sister chromatid exchange in human lymphocytes induced by propoxur following plant activation by Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Arroyo, S; Calderón-Segura, M E; Villalobos-Pietrini, R

    1995-01-01

    Because the carbamate insecticide propoxur induced sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in Vicia faba but was ineffective in producing SCE in lymphocytes in culture, it was hardly suspected that plant metabolism was involved. Experiments were conducted in which metabolic activation was afforded by Vicia faba roots, and SCE in human lymphocytes in vitro was used to assess cytogenetic damage. Several concentrations of propoxur (250, 500, 1,000, 1,500, and 2,000 ppm) were applied for 4 hr to the roots of Vicia faba. Extracts prepared from these treatments were added to the lymphocyte cultures and a significant increase of SCE frequencies with a concentration-response relationship could be detected. The lymphocyte proliferation kinetics and the proliferation rate index (PRI) were not affected (except in the highest concentration, of 2,000 ppm). This general behavior was in agreement with the presence of an enzymatic system (S10 fraction) in Vicia roots capable of metabolizing or activating the propoxur. With 2,000 ppm, cell necrosis was produced in Vicia; therefore, this extract did not induce SCE in lymphocytes. However, lymphocyte proliferation kinetics were delayed and PRI was significantly decreased. Ethanol, a promutagen activated by this plant, was applied directly to the lymphocyte cultures as a positive control, and the response was negative. On the other hand, the extracts of roots treated with ethanol increased the SCE to more than twice that of the negative control, but the lymphocyte proliferation kinetics and PRI were not affected.

  14. [Human chronic chagasic myocarditis: quantitative study of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes in inflammatory exudates].

    PubMed

    Tostes Júnior, S; Lopes, E R; Pereira, F E; Chapadeiro, E

    1994-01-01

    Myocardial exsudate CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes were counted in transmural left ventricular free wall frozen sections taken from 10 necropsied chronic cardiac chagasic patients. The cells were labeled with monoclonal antibodies using a streptavidin-biotin technique. We counted: 1) lymphocytes in the total exsudate (LTE) and, separately, 2) the lymphocytes touching or very near to myocells (LTVNM). Lymphocytes were considered very near whenever their own nuclear shortest nuclear diameter was larger than their distance from myocells. CD8+ lymphocytes were more numerous than CD4+ lymphocytes, especially among the LTVNM. The LTE CD4/CD8 ratio was 0.37 +/- 0.20, but the LTVNM CD4/CD8 ratio was smaller (0.23 +/- 0.11). Among the LTE, 34 +/- 11% of CD8+ (against 24 +/- 12% of CD4+) were LTVNM. All these differences were statistically significant. Both subtypes of T-lymphocytes were found to have an intimate relationship with both ruptured and unruptured myocells, and parasites were not seen. These findings are in accordance with the idea that the myocardial cell lesions in the cardiac form of human Chagas' disease are mediated mainly by T-cytotoxic lymphocytes.

  15. Identification and characterization of human dendritic cell subsets in the steady state: a review of our current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Metcalf, Jordan Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are generally categorized as a group of rare antigen presenting cells that are to the crucial development of immune responses to pathogens and also of tolerance to self-antigens. Therefore, having the ability to identify DC in specific tissues and to test their functional abilities in the steady state are scientific gaps needing attention. Research on primary human DC is lacking due to their rarity and the difficulty of obtaining tissue samples. However, recent findings have shown that several different DC subsets exist, and that these subsets vary both by markers expressed and functions depending on their specific microenvironment. After discriminating from other cell types, DC can be split into myeloid and plasmacytoid fractions. While plasmacytoid DC express definite markers, CD123 and BDCA-2, myeloid DC encompass several different subsets with overlapping markers expressed. Such markers include the blood DC antigens BDCA-1 and BDCA-3, along with Langerin, CD1a and CD14. Marker specificity is further reduced when accounting for microenvironmental differences, as observed in the blood, primary lymphoid tissues, skin and lungs. The mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR) has been used to measure the strength of antigen presentation by specific DC subsets. Surface markers and MLR require standardization to enable consistent identification of and comparisons between DC subsets. To alleviate these issues, researchers have begun comparing DC subsets at the transcriptional level. This has allowed degrees of relatedness to be determined between DC in different microenvironments, and should be a continued area of focus in years to come. PMID:26956785

  16. Radioprotective effect of mefenamic acid against radiation-induced genotoxicity in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nobakht, Reyhaneh; Ghasemi, Arash; Pourfallah, Tayyeb Allahverdi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mefenamic acid (MEF) as a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug is used as a medication for relieving of pain and inflammation. Radiation-induced inflammation process is involved in DNA damage and cell death. In this study, the radioprotective effect of MEF was investigated against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human blood lymphocytes. Materials and Methods Peripheral blood samples were collected from human volunteers and incubated with MEF at different concentrations (5, 10, 50, or 100 µM) for two hours. The whole blood was exposed to ionizing radiation at a dose 1.5 Gy. Lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronuclei in cytokinesis blocked binucleated lymphocyte. Results A significant decreasing in the frequency of micronuclei was observed in human lymphocytes irradiated with MEF as compared to irradiated lymphocytes without MEF. The maximum decreasing in frequency of micronuclei was observed at 100 µM of MEF (38% decrease), providing maximal protection against ionizing radiation. Conclusion The radioprotective effect of MEF is probably related to anti-inflammatory property of MEF on human lymphocytes. PMID:26484310

  17. Migration of human lymphocytes. I. A model using the mouse as host.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, K; Holt, P J

    1978-01-01

    The distribution of radioactivity after the intravenous injection of 51Cr-labelled human lymphocytes has been examined in normal mice, irradiated mice, mice treated with anti-platelet antiserum and in mice treated with colloidal carbon. Pre-treatment with carbon and anti-platelet antiserum appears to protect the human lymphocytes from uptake by the host's reticuloendothelial system (RES). Comparison of tissue radioactivity in carbon-treated mice after the injection of viable human lymphocytes with that found after the injection of dead cells and soluble or insoluble cell debris showed that radioactivity recovered in the spleen and lymph nodes is primarily due to the migration of viable lymphocytes into these tissues. Thus the measurement of radioactivity in lymph nodes of carbon-treated mice after the injection of 51Cr-labelled human lymphocytes can be used as a model of these lymphocytes' ability to migrate into the lymph nodes during recirculation and to study factors influencing this migration. PMID:721139

  18. A 90-Kilodalton Endothelial Cell Molecule Mediating Lymphocyte Binding in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmi, Marko; Jalkanen, Sirpa

    1992-09-01

    Interactions between leukocyte surface receptors and their ligands on vascular endothelial cells control lymphocyte traffic between the blood and various lymphoid organs, as well as extravasation of leukocytes into sites of inflammation. A heretofore undescribed 90-kilodalton human endothelial cell adhesion molecule (VAP-1) defined by a monoclonal antibody 1B2 is described. The expression pattern, molecular mass, functional properties, and an amino-terminal amino acid sequence define VAP-1 as an endothelial ligand for lymphocytes. VAP-1 helps to elucidate the complex heterotypic cell interactions that direct tissue-selective lymphocyte migration in man.

  19. Extracellular idiotypic immunoglobulin arising from human leukemic B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The peripheral blood lymphocytes of nine out of nine patients with typical surface Ig-positive chronic lymphocytic leukemia but no paraprotein visible on serum electrophoresis have been shown by radioimmunoassay to export small amounts of pentameric IgM during culture (in the range of 2.4-7.2 ng/10(7) cells per h); three out of nine also exported monomeric IgD (0.7-1.4 ng/10(7) cells per h). Immunoglobulin turned over on the cell surface did not appear to contribute to material in the culture fluid, except possibly as vesicle- bound Ig. In three cases, which included two of the IgD producers, anti- idiotypic antibody raised against the cell surface Fab mu was used to demonstrate the idiotypic nature of the exported Ig. Anti-idiotypic antibody was also used to measure levels of idiotypic Ig in the sera of these three patients as a proportion of the total Ig. Total serum IgM was depressed in all three patients, and the idiotypic IgM represented 43%, 65%, and 96% of the IgM. The findings suggest that in typical chronic lymphocytic leukemia involving B lymphocytes, the export of a small amount of idiotypic Ig by the neoplastic cells in a common or even usual occurrence. PMID:6969771

  20. Human transfer factor in vitro. II. Augmentation of lymphocyte transformation to phytohaemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Hamblin, Anne S.; Dumonde, D. C.; Maini, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes experiments in which human peripheral blood lymphocyte transformation by phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) is augmented by the addition of human dialysable transfer factor. Dextran-separated peripheral blood leucocytes were cultured for 4 days with a range of PHA concentrations so as to produce low, moderate, high or very high incorporation of [3H]thymidine. When transfer factor preparations were added to the cultures, in concentrations similar to those augmenting lymphocyte transformation to tuberculin PPD, augmentation of PHA responses was observed in two-thirds of the experiments (25/38). In these experiments the extent of augmentation was proportional to the level of DNA synthesis induced by PHA in the absence of added transfer factor. It appears that preparations of transfer factor are able to augment lymphocyte transformation responses to PHA in vitro, but that this effect occurs with less regularity than does augmentation of lymphocyte transformation to tuberculin PPD.

  1. [Ways of apoptosis development in human lymphocytes, induced by UV-irradiation].

    PubMed

    Nakvasina, M A; Trubitsyna, M S; Solov'eva, E V; Artiukhov, V G

    2012-01-01

    The level of DNA damage and cytochrome c content in human lymphocytes in the dynamics of apoptosis induced by UV-light (240-390 nm) at doses of 151, 1510 and 3020 J/m2 is studied. DNA fragmentation is revealed in 20 h after UV-irradiation of lymphocytes at doses mentioned above. It is shown that DNA damages (single strand breaks) appear immediately after UV-irradiation of lymphocytes at doses of 1510 and 3020 J/m2 (comets of C1 type) and reach their maximum 6 h after cell modification (comets of C2 and C3 types). It is concluded that p53-dependent and receptor caspase pathways are involved in apoptosis development in the human lymphocytes, modified after UV-irradiation. PMID:23035529

  2. Recognition of Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigens on Cultured Human Biliary Epithelial Cells by Alloreactive Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Saidman, Susan L.; Duquesnoy, Rene J.; Zeevi, Adriana; Fung, John J.; Starzl, Thomas E.; Demetris, A. Jake

    2010-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro system to study the interactions between biliary epithelium and lymphocytes using cultured human biliary epithelial cells. No class II antigens were detected by immunoperoxidase staining of the normal biliary epithelial cells, but alloactivated lymphocyte culture supernatants were able to induce class II expression. The activity of the supernatants was blocked with an anti-γ-interferon monoclonal antibody. In addition, recombinant human γ-interferon alone induced the expression of class II antigens and increased the intensity of class I staining of cultured biliary epithelial cells. Biliary epithelial cell–induced proliferation of alloreactive T lymphocytes demonstrated that the major histocompatibility complex molecules carry functional lymphocyte-activating determinants. The recognition of major histocompatibility complex determinants was confirmed by monoclonal antibody–blocking studies and by stimulation of an alloreactive T-cell clone. However, the biliary epithelial cells were much less potent stimulators than arterial endothelial cells tested in the same assay system. PMID:1704868

  3. Expression of CD27 and CD23 on peripheral blood B lymphocytes in humans of different ages

    PubMed Central

    Veneri, Dino; Ortolani, Riccardo; Franchini, Massimo; Tridente, Giuseppe; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Vella, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Background Due to the fact that the coexpression of CD23 and CD27 has been reported to occur in B lymphocytic leukaemic clones and that there is debate about CD23 expression on memory B cells, we evaluated the behaviour of naive B cells (CD23−/CD27−) and memory B cells (CD27+) in the peripheral blood of a large number of humans of all ages. B cells were also distinguished into B2 (CD5−) and B1-a cells (CD5+). Methods The cell surface expression of CD19, CD5, CD23 and CD27 was assessed on peripheral blood lymphocytes from 1,427 subjects of all ages undergoing peripheral blood immunophenotyping for a variety of reasons. Results The absolute number of B lymphocytes and the percentage of naive cells (CD23−/CD27−) decreased with age whereas there was an increase in memo ry cells (CD27+). A small subset of B cells co-expressing CD23 and CD27 was present in humans of all ages, although the majority of CD27+ cells were CD23−. The percentages and rate of increase with age of B1-a CD23+/CD27+ were slightly higher than those of B2 cell counterparts. Conclusions On the basis of our data, age-associated changes in surface markers of B cells seem to be finely balanced and probably related to functional changes after antigen encounters, while the whole peripheral blood B-cell compartment undergoes a quantitative regression. PMID:19290077

  4. Effects of doxycycline on haematology, blood chemistry and peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets of healthy dogs and dogs naturally infected with Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed

    Villaescusa, A; García-Sancho, M; Rodríguez-Franco, F; Tesouro, M Á; Sainz, Á

    2015-06-01

    Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME), caused by Ehrlichia canis, is a vector-borne disease with a worldwide distribution. It has been proposed that the pathogenesis, clinical severity and outcome of disease caused by Ehrlichia spp. can be attributed to the immune response rather than to any direct rickettsial effect. Moreover, doxycycline, the antimicrobial of choice for the treatment of CME, has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties associated with blood leukocyte proliferation function, cytokine synthesis, and matrix metalloproteinase activity. In order to assess the potential effects of doxycycline, dependent and independent of its antimicrobial activity, the present study compared changes in haematology, blood chemistry and circulating lymphocyte subpopulations in 12 healthy dogs and 20 dogs with CME after doxycycline therapy. Some changes were recorded only in the CME affected dogs, probably due to the antimicrobial effect of doxycycline. However, increases in mean corpuscular haemoglobin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, platelet count and α2-globulins, and decreased plasma creatinine were observed in both healthy and CME affected dogs. The absolute count of B lymphocytes (CD21(+)) increased initially, but then decreased until the end of the study period in both groups. A potential effect of doxycycline unrelated to its antimicrobial activity against E. canis is suggested, taking into account the results observed both in healthy dogs and in dogs with CME. PMID:25957920

  5. CXCR6 marks a novel subset of T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) natural killer cells residing in human liver.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, Kerstin A; Robertson, Francis; Hansi, Navjyot; Gill, Upkar; Pallant, Celeste; Christophides, Theodoros; Pallett, Laura J; Peppa, Dimitra; Dunn, Claire; Fusai, Giuseppe; Male, Victoria; Davidson, Brian R; Kennedy, Patrick; Maini, Mala K

    2016-05-23

    Natural killer cells (NK) are highly enriched in the human liver, where they can regulate immunity and immunopathology. We probed them for a liver-resident subset, distinct from conventional bone-marrow-derived NK. CXCR6+ NK were strikingly enriched in healthy and diseased liver compared to blood (p < 0.0001). Human hepatic CXCR6+ NK had an immature phenotype (predominantly CD56(bright)CD16-CD57-), and expressed the tissue-residency marker CD69. CXCR6+ NK produced fewer cytotoxic mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines than the non-liver-specific CXCR6- fraction. Instead CXCR6+ NK could upregulate TRAIL, a key death ligand in hepatitis pathogenesis. CXCR6 demarcated liver NK into two transcriptionally distinct populations: T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo)(CXCR6-) and T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi)(CXCR6+); the latter was virtually absent in the periphery. The small circulating CXCR6+ subset was predominantly T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo), suggesting its lineage was closer to CXCR6- peripheral than CXCR6+ liver NK. These data reveal a large subset of human liver-resident T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) NK, distinguished by their surface expression of CXCR6, adapted for hepatic tolerance and inducible anti-viral immunity.

  6. CXCR6 marks a novel subset of T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) natural killer cells residing in human liver.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, Kerstin A; Robertson, Francis; Hansi, Navjyot; Gill, Upkar; Pallant, Celeste; Christophides, Theodoros; Pallett, Laura J; Peppa, Dimitra; Dunn, Claire; Fusai, Giuseppe; Male, Victoria; Davidson, Brian R; Kennedy, Patrick; Maini, Mala K

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NK) are highly enriched in the human liver, where they can regulate immunity and immunopathology. We probed them for a liver-resident subset, distinct from conventional bone-marrow-derived NK. CXCR6+ NK were strikingly enriched in healthy and diseased liver compared to blood (p < 0.0001). Human hepatic CXCR6+ NK had an immature phenotype (predominantly CD56(bright)CD16-CD57-), and expressed the tissue-residency marker CD69. CXCR6+ NK produced fewer cytotoxic mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines than the non-liver-specific CXCR6- fraction. Instead CXCR6+ NK could upregulate TRAIL, a key death ligand in hepatitis pathogenesis. CXCR6 demarcated liver NK into two transcriptionally distinct populations: T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo)(CXCR6-) and T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi)(CXCR6+); the latter was virtually absent in the periphery. The small circulating CXCR6+ subset was predominantly T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo), suggesting its lineage was closer to CXCR6- peripheral than CXCR6+ liver NK. These data reveal a large subset of human liver-resident T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) NK, distinguished by their surface expression of CXCR6, adapted for hepatic tolerance and inducible anti-viral immunity. PMID:27210614

  7. A Comparative Study of the T Cell Stimulatory and Polarizing Capacity of Human Primary Blood Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Simone P.; Bakdash, Ghaith; Weiden, Jorieke; Sköld, Annette E.; Tel, Jurjen; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are central players of immune responses; they become activated upon infection or inflammation and migrate to lymph nodes, where they can initiate an antigen-specific immune response by activating naive T cells. Two major types of naturally occurring DCs circulate in peripheral blood, namely, myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). Myeloid DCs (mDCs) can be subdivided based on the expression of either CD1c or CD141. These human DC subsets differ in surface marker expression, Toll-like receptor (TLR) repertoire, and transcriptional profile, suggesting functional differences between them. Here, we directly compared the capacity of human blood mDCs and pDCs to activate and polarize CD4+ T cells. CD141+ mDCs show an overall more mature phenotype over CD1c+ mDC and pDCs; they produce less IL-10 and more IL-12 than CD1c+ mDCs. Despite these differences, all subsets can induce the production of IFN-γ in naive CD4+ T cells. CD1c+ and CD141+ mDCs especially induce a strong T helper 1 profile. Importantly, naive CD4+ T cells are not polarized towards regulatory T cells by any subset. These findings further establish all three human blood DCs—despite their differences—as promising candidates for immunostimulatory effectors in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27057096

  8. Exodus of 42K+ and 86Rb+ from rat thymic and human blood lymphocytes exposed to phytohemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Segel, G B; Gordon, B R; Lichtman, M A; Hollander, M M; Klemperer, M R

    1976-03-01

    We have found that PHA produces an alteration in the lymphocyte membrane which allows 86Rb+ or 42K+ in prelabeled lymphocytes to exchange for cations present in washing solutions. These observations suggested that PHA might induce an increase in the exodus of intracellular potassium during incubation in physiologic media. We, therefore, examined 86Rb+ and 42K+ efflux from rat and human lymphocytes during incubation in tissue culture medium. The rate constant for efflux, Ke, was significantly increased by PHA. 86Rb+ efflux was increased by 27% in rat thymic lymphocytes and by 78% in human blood lymphocytes following PHA treatment.

  9. Micronucleus assay in lymphocytes as a tool to biomonitor human exposure to aneuploidogens and clastogens.

    PubMed

    Norppa, H; Luomahaara, S; Heikanen, H; Roth, S; Sorsa, M; Renzi, L; Lindholm, C

    1993-10-01

    The analysis of micronuclei (MN) in cultured human lymphocytes is, in principle, able to detect exposure to clastogens and aneuploidogens alike. There is, however, no clear evidence from human biomonitoring studies or animal experiments showing that in vivo exposure of resting lymphocytes to an aneuploidogen could actually be expressed as MN in cultured lymphocytes. In vitro, a pulse treatment of human lymphocytes with vinblastine, an aneuploidogen, did result in MN induction even if performed before mitogen stimulation, although a much more pronounced effect was obtained in actively dividing lymphocyte cultures. On the other hand, it is probable that a considerable portion of "spontaneous" MN contain whole chromosomes, their contribution increasing with age. It also seems that cytochalasin B, used for the identification of second cell cycle interphase cells in the MN assay, is able to slightly increase the level of MN with whole chromosomes. If MN harboring chromosome fragments represent a minority of the total MN frequency, there may be difficulties in detecting a weak effect in this fraction of MN against the background of MN with whole chromosomes. This would reduce the sensitivity of the assay in detecting clastogens, unless MN with whole chromosomes and chromosome fragments are distinguished from each other. That a problem may exist in sensitivity is suggested by the difficulty in demonstrating MN induction by smoking, an exposure capable of inducing chromosome aberrations. The sensitivity of the lymphocyte MN assay could be increased by detecting kinetochore or centromere in MN, or by automation, allowing more cells to be analyzed.

  10. Human intestinal Vdelta1+ lymphocytes recognize tumor cells of epithelial origin

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    gammadelta T cells can be grouped into discrete subsets based upon their expression of T cell receptor (TCR) variable (V) region families, their tissue distribution, and their specificity. Vdelta2+ T cells constitute the majority of gammadelta T cells in peripheral blood whereas Vdelta1+T cells reside preferentially in skin epithelium and in the intestine. gammadelta T cells are envisioned as first line host defense mechanisms capable of providing a source of immune effector T cells and immunomodulating cytokines such as interleukin (IL) 4 or interferon (IFN) gamma. We describe here the fine specificity of three distinct gammadelta+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) obtained from patients with primary or metastatic colorectal cancer, that could be readily expanded in vitro in the presence of IL-1beta and IL-7. Irrespective of donor, these individual gammadelta T cells exhibited a similar pattern of reactivity defined by recognition of autologous and allogeneic colorectal cancer cells, renal cell cancer, pancreatic cancer, and a freshly isolated explant from human intestine as measured by cytolytic T cell responses and by IFN-gamma release. In contrast, tumors of alternate histologies were not lysed, including lung cancer, squamous cell cancer, as well as the natural/lymphocyte-activated killer cell-sensitive hematopoietic cell lines T2, C1R, or Daudi. The cell line K562 was only poorly lysed when compared with colorectal cancer targets. Target cell reactivity mediated by Vdelta1+ T cells was partially blocked with Abs directed against the TCR, the beta2 or beta7 integrin chains, or fibronectin receptor. Marker analysis using flow cytometry revealed that all three gammadelta T cell lines exhibit a similar phenotype. Analysis of the gammadelta TCR junctional suggested exclusive usage of the Vdelta1/Ddelta3/Jdelta1 TCR segments with extensive (< or = 29 bp) N/P region diversity. T cell recognition of target cells did not appear to be a major histocompatibility

  11. IL-10 Conditioning of Human Skin Affects the Distribution of Migratory Dendritic Cell Subsets and Functional T Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Lindenberg, Jelle J.; Oosterhoff, Dinja; Sombroek, Claudia C.; Lougheed, Sinéad M.; Hooijberg, Erik; Stam, Anita G. M.; Santegoets, Saskia J. A. M.; Tijssen, Henk J.; Buter, Jan; Pinedo, Herbert M.; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J. M.; Scheper, Rik J.; Koenen, Hans J. P. M.; van de Ven, Rieneke; de Gruijl, Tanja D.

    2013-01-01

    In cancer patients pervasive systemic suppression of Dendritic Cell (DC) differentiation and maturation can hinder vaccination efficacy. In this study we have extensively characterized migratory DC subsets from human skin and studied how their migration and T cell-stimulatory abilities were affected by conditioning of the dermal microenvironment through cancer-related suppressive cytokines. To assess effects in the context of a complex tissue structure, we made use of a near-physiological skin explant model. By 4-color flow cytometry, we identified migrated Langerhans Cells (LC) and five dermis-derived DC populations in differential states of maturation. From a panel of known tumor-associated suppressive cytokines, IL-10 showed a unique ability to induce predominant migration of an immature CD14+CD141+DC-SIGN+ DC subset with low levels of co-stimulatory molecules, up-regulated expression of the co-inhibitory molecule PD-L1 and the M2-associated macrophage marker CD163. A similarly immature subset composition was observed for DC migrating from explants taken from skin overlying breast tumors. Whereas predominant migration of mature CD1a+ subsets was associated with release of IL-12p70, efficient Th cell expansion with a Th1 profile, and expansion of functional MART-1-specific CD8+ T cells, migration of immature CD14+ DDC was accompanied by increased release of IL-10, poor expansion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and skewing of Th responses to favor coordinated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression and regulatory T cell differentiation and outgrowth. Thus, high levels of IL-10 impact the composition of skin-emigrated DC subsets and appear to favor migration of M2-like immature DC with functional qualities conducive to T cell tolerance. PMID:23875023

  12. [239Pu and chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Okladnikova, N D; Osovets, S V; Kudriavtseva, T I

    2009-01-01

    The genome status in somatic cells was assessed using the chromosomal aberration (CA) test in peripheral blood lymphocytes from 194 plutonium workers exposed to occupational radiation mainly from low-transportable compounds of airborne 230Pu. Pu body burden at the time of cytogenetic study varied from values close to the method sensitivity to values multiply exceeding the permissible level. Standard (routine) methods of peripheral blood lymphocytes cultivation were applied. Chromatid- and chromosomal-type structural changes were estimated. Aberrations were estimated per 100 examined metaphase cells. The quantitative relationship between the CA frequency and Pu body burden and the absorbed dose to the lung was found. Mathematical processing of results was carried out based on the phenomenological model. The results were shown as theoretical and experimental curves. The threshold of the CA yield was 0.43 +/- 0.03 kBq (Pu body burden) and 6.12 +/- 1.20 cGy (absorbed dose to the lung).

  13. The effect of background variables on human peripheral lymphocyte micronuclei.

    PubMed

    Yager, J W

    1990-01-01

    Application of biological methods for assessment of occupational and environmental exposure to single agents or complex mixtures is optimized by determination of the possible influence of background factors on the biological endpoint of interest. Analysis of micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes using the cytokinesis-block method was performed on healthy volunteers up to three times for each individual at intervals of approximately four months. Questionnaires were administered to ascertain recent health history and lifestyle factors such as smoking and drinking habits. Results to date indicate that age (r = 0.45, p = 0.001) and estimated number of diagnostic X-rays during the past year (r = 0.35, p = 0.01) contribute significantly to increased frequency of micronuclei. Information on the potential influence of background factors is critical for appropriate statistical analysis of data from occupational and population monitoring studies that utilize the cytokinesis block lymphocyte micronucleus assay to assess exposure to genotoxic agents.

  14. Composition of innate lymphoid cell subsets in the human skin: enrichment of NCR(+) ILC3 in lesional skin and blood of psoriasis patients.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, Marcel B M; Munneke, J Marius; Bernink, Jochem H; Spuls, Phyllis I; Res, Pieter C M; Te Velde, Anje; Cheuk, Stanley; Brouwer, Marijke W D; Menting, Stef P; Eidsmo, Liv; Spits, Hergen; Hazenberg, Mette D; Mjösberg, Jenny

    2014-09-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly appreciated as important regulators of tissue homeostasis and inflammation. However, their role in human skin remains obscure. We found that healthy peripheral blood CD117(+) ILC3, lacking the natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR) NKp44 (NCR(-) ILC3), CD117(-)NCR(-)CRTH2(-)CD161(+) ILC1, and CRTH2(+) ILC2, express the skin-homing receptor cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA). NCR(+) ILC3 were scarce in peripheral blood. Consistently, we identified in normal skin ILC2 and NCR(-) ILC3, a small proportion of CD161(+) ILC1, and hardly any NCR(+) ILC3, whereas NCR(+) ILC3 were present in cultured dermal explants. The skin ILC2 and NCR(+) ILC3 subsets produced IL-13 and IL-22, respectively, upon cytokine stimulation. Remarkably, dermal NCR(-) ILC3 converted to NCR(+) ILC3 upon culture in IL-1β plus IL-23, cytokines known to be involved in psoriatic inflammation. In line with this observation, significantly increased proportions of NCR(+) ILC3 were present in lesional skin and peripheral blood of psoriasis patients as compared with skin and blood of healthy individuals, respectively, whereas the proportions of ILC2 and CD161(+) ILC1 remained unchanged. NCR(+) ILC3 from skin and blood of psoriasis patients produced IL-22, which is regarded as a key driver of epidermal thickening, suggesting that NCR(+) ILC3 may participate in psoriasis pathology.

  15. LincRNA landscape in human lymphocytes highlights regulation of T cell differentiation by linc-MAF-4

    PubMed Central

    Curti, Serena; Gruarin, Paola; Provasi, Elena; Sugliano, Elisa; Marconi, Maurizio; De Francesco, Raffaele; Geginat, Jens; Bodega, Beatrice; Abrignani, Sergio; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding-RNAs are emerging as important regulators of cellular functions but little is known on their role in human immune system. Here we investigated long intergenic non-coding-RNAs (lincRNAs) in thirteen T and B lymphocyte subsets by RNA-seq analysis and de novo transcriptome reconstruction. Over five hundred new lincRNAs were identified and lincRNAs signatures were described. Expression of linc-MAF-4, a chromatin-associated TH1-specific lincRNA, was inversely correlated with MAF, a TH2-associated transcription factor. Linc-MAF-4 down-regulation skewed T cell differentiation toward TH2. We identified a long-distance interaction between linc-MAF-4 and MAF genomic regions, where linc-MAF-4 associates with LSD1 and EZH2, suggesting linc-MAF-4 regulated MAF transcription by recruitment of chromatin modifiers. Our results demonstrate a key role of lincRNAs in T lymphocyte differentiation. PMID:25621826

  16. Immunomodulation by neutrophil myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide: differential susceptibility of human lymphocyte functions.

    PubMed

    el-Hag, A; Lipsky, P E; Bennett, M; Clark, R A

    1986-05-01

    The coexistence of activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes and lymphocytes in tumor masses and inflammatory tissues suggests the possibility of interaction between secreted neutrophil products and nearby lymphocytes. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of neutrophil myeloperoxidase and H2O2 on lymphocytes. Human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes were exposed to myeloperoxidase, an H2O2-generating system (glucose + glucose oxidase), and a halide, and were then tested for functional activities. Natural killer activity against K562 cells, lymphocyte proliferation in response to mitogens, and generation of immunoglobulin-secreting cells were all susceptible to oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. The degree as well as the mechanism of suppression was dependent on the glucose oxidase concentration (i.e., the rate of H2O2 delivery). At low H2O2 flux, myeloperoxidase was essential for induction of lymphocyte suppression; as the rate of H2O2 generation increased, suppression became myeloperoxidase-independent and was mediated by H2O2 alone. Various lymphocyte functions were differentially susceptible to oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. The proliferative response to poke-weed mitogen was the least sensitive, whereas antibody formation was the most sensitive. Proliferative responses to concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin as well as natural killer activity displayed intermediate degrees of susceptibility. In all assays, lymphocyte viability was greater than 90%. Removal of monocytes from mononuclear leukocytes by adherence to glass increased susceptibility of lymphocytes to oxidative injury. Monocytes in proportions within the range present in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes protected lymphocyte functions against oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. This study demonstrates a differential susceptibility of various immune functions to oxidative injury by the neutrophil products myeloperoxidase and H2O2, and shows, in

  17. Studying the proliferation of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes in serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Tabakov, V U; Litvina, M M; Schepkina, J V; Jarilin, A A; Chestkov, V V

    2009-01-01

    We compared the cultivation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes in serum-free medium Hybris-2 and RPMI 1640 medium with 10% fetal bovine serum in the presence of phytohemagglutinin and interleukin-2. The optimal concentration of phytohemagglutinin significantly differed in serum-free and serum-containing media (0.5 and 5 microg/ml, [corrected] respectively). Both mitogens were more potent in stimulating the proliferation of lymphocytes in serum-free medium than in serum-containing medium. Strong proliferation of CD3(+) and CD4(+) T lymphocytes was observed in both media. The dynamics of other markers was similar in serum-free and serum-containing media. However, significant differences were revealed between individual donors. Our results indicate that the developed serum-free medium may be used in lymphocyte cultivation for scientific, diagnostic, and therapeutic purposes.

  18. Specific high-affinity binding sites for a synthetic gliadin heptapeptide of human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Payan, D.G.; Horvath, K.; Graf, L.

    1987-03-23

    The synthetic peptide containing residues 43-49 of ..cap alpha..-gliadin, the major protein component of gluten, has previously been shown to inhibit the production of lymphokine activities by mononuclear leukocytes. The authors demonstrate using radiolabeled ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) that human peripheral blood lymphocytes express approximately 20,000-25,000 surface receptors for this peptide, with a dissociation constant (K/sub D/) of 20 nM. In addition, binding is inhibited by naloxone and an enkephalin analog, thus confirming the functional correlate which demonstrates inhibition by these agents of ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) functional effects. Furthermore, B-lymphocytes bind specifically a greater amount of (/sup 125/I)..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) than T-lymphocytes. The lymphocyte ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) receptor may play an important role in mediating the immunological response to ..cap alpha..-gliadin. 16 references, 4 figures.

  19. Chromosomal aberrations induced by in vitro irradiation: comparisons between human sperm and lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Brandriff, B.F.; Gordon, L.A.; Ashworth, L.K.; Carrano, A.V.

    1988-01-01

    Types and frequencies of structural aberrations in human sperm and lymphocyte chromosomes from one donor were compared after in vitro irradiation with 100, 200, and 400 rad in order to determine if cells with dramatically different chromatin configurations are similarly affected and to investigate the feasibility of using lymphocytes as surrogates for germ cells in risk estimation. Sperm chromosomes were analyzed after fusion with eggs from the golden hamster. Total frequencies of induced aberrations were similar in the two cell types. However, the relative frequencies of rejoined lesions (dicentrics), compared with unrejoined lesions (chromosome breaks and acentric fragments), were different. At the three doses tested, a constant ratio of 5 dicentrics in lymphocytes for every dicentric in sperm was induced. Conversely, for every chromosome break or acentric fragment induced in lymphocytes, 1.7 such events were induced in sperm at the three doses tested.

  20. In vivo traffic of indium-111-oxine labeled human lymphocytes collected by automated apheresis

    SciTech Connect

    Read, E.J.; Keenan, A.M.; Carter, C.S.; Yolles, P.S.; Davey, R.J. )

    1990-06-01

    The in vivo traffic patterns of autologous lymphocytes were studied in five normal human volunteers using lymphocytes obtained by automated apheresis, separated on Ficoll-Hypaque gradients, and labeled ex vivo with {sup 111}In-oxine. Final lymphocyte infusions contained 1.8-3.1 X 10(9) cells and 270-390 microCi (9.99-14.43 MBq) {sup 111}In, or 11-17 microCi (0.41-0.63 MBq) per 10(8) lymphocytes. Gamma imaging showed transient lung uptake and significant retention of radioactivity in the liver and spleen. Progressive uptake of activity in normal, nonpalpable axillary and inguinal lymph nodes was seen from 24 to 96 hr. Accumulation of radioactivity also was demonstrated at the forearm skin test site, as well as in its associated epitrochlear and axillary lymph nodes, in a subject who had been tested for delayed hypersensitivity with tetanus toxoid. Indium-111-oxine labeled human lymphocytes may provide a useful tool for future studies of normal and abnormal lymphocyte traffic.

  1. Human T-cell subset requirements for the production of specific anti-influenza virus antibody in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yarchoan, R.; Biddison, W.E.; Schneider, H.S.; Nelson, D.L.

    1982-04-01

    Studies were undertaken to define the helper T-cell requirements for in vitro specific antibody production to influenza virus. Subpopulations of human T cells were separated on the basis of their reactivity with the monoclonal antibody OKT4. B cells cultured with OKT4+ T cells produced specific antibody to influenza virus, while B cells cultured with OKT4- T cells did not. Irradiation (1200 rads) of the OKT4- subset to potentially eliminate suppressor-cell activity did not augment the helper-cell function of that subset. Thus, unlike the cytotoxic T-cell response to influenza, help for an in vitro antibody response is mediated only by OKT4+ T cells.

  2. Ontogeny of Innate T Lymphocytes – Some Innate Lymphocytes are More Innate than Others

    PubMed Central

    Vermijlen, David; Prinz, Immo

    2014-01-01

    Innate lymphocytes have recently received a lot of attention. However, there are different ideas about the definition of what is “innate” in lymphocytes. Lymphocytes without V(D)J-rearranged antigen receptors are now termed innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and include cells formerly known as natural killer (NK) cells. Also, lymphocytes that are innate should be able to recognize microbial or stress-induced patterns and react rapidly without prior sensitization, as opposed to adaptive immune responses. Formally, genuine innate lymphocytes would be present before or at birth. Here, we review the ontogeny of human and mouse innate T lymphocyte populations. We focus on γδ T cells, which are prototype lymphocytes that often use their V(D)J rearrangement machinery to generate genetically encoded predetermined recombinations of antigen receptors. We make parallels between the development of γδ T cells with that of innate αβ T cells [invariant (i)NKT and mucosa-associated invariant T cells] and compare this with the ontogeny of innate B cells and ILCs (including NK cells). We conclude that some subsets are more innate than others, i.e., innate lymphocytes that are made primarily early in utero during gestation while others are made after birth. In practice, a ranking of innateness by ontogeny has implications for the reconstitution of innate lymphocyte subsets after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25346734

  3. COMPARATIVE GENOTOXIC RESPONSES TO ARSENITE IN GUINEA PIG, MOUSE, RAT AND HUMAN LYMPHOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative genotoxic responses to arsenite in guinea pig, mouse, rat and human
    lymphocytes.

    Inorganic arsenic is a known human carcinogen causing skin, lung, and bladder cancer following chronic exposures. Yet, long-term laboratory animal carcinogenicity studies have ...

  4. Cytostatic and genotoxic effect of temephos in human lymphocytes and HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Benitez-Trinidad, A B; Herrera-Moreno, J F; Vázquez-Estrada, G; Verdín-Betancourt, F A; Sordo, M; Ostrosky-Wegman, P; Bernal-Hernández, Y Y; Medina-Díaz, I M; Barrón-Vivanco, B S; Robledo-Marenco, M L; Salazar, A M; Rojas-García, A E

    2015-06-01

    Temephos is an organophosphorus pesticide that is used in control campaigns against Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which transmit dengue. In spite of the widespread use of temephos, few studies have examined its genotoxic potential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic, cytostatic and genotoxic effects of temephos in human lymphocytes and hepatoma cells (HepG2). The cytotoxicity was evaluated with simultaneous staining (FDA/EtBr). The cytostatic and genotoxic effects were evaluated using comet assays and the micronucleus technique. We found that temephos was not cytotoxic in either lymphocytes or HepG2 cells. Regarding the cytostatic effect in human lymphocytes, temephos (10 μM) caused a significant decrease in the percentage of binucleated cells and in the nuclear division index as well as an increase in the apoptotic cell frequency, which was not the case for HepG2 cells. The comet assay showed that temephos increased the DNA damage levels in human lymphocytes, but it did not increase the MN frequency. In contrast, in HepG2 cells, temephos increased the tail length, tail moment and MN frequency in HepG2 cells compared to control cells. In conclusion, temephos causes stable DNA damage in HepG2 cells but not in human lymphocytes. These findings suggest the importance of temephos biotransformation in its genotoxic effect.

  5. Cytostatic and genotoxic effect of temephos in human lymphocytes and HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Benitez-Trinidad, A B; Herrera-Moreno, J F; Vázquez-Estrada, G; Verdín-Betancourt, F A; Sordo, M; Ostrosky-Wegman, P; Bernal-Hernández, Y Y; Medina-Díaz, I M; Barrón-Vivanco, B S; Robledo-Marenco, M L; Salazar, A M; Rojas-García, A E

    2015-06-01

    Temephos is an organophosphorus pesticide that is used in control campaigns against Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which transmit dengue. In spite of the widespread use of temephos, few studies have examined its genotoxic potential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic, cytostatic and genotoxic effects of temephos in human lymphocytes and hepatoma cells (HepG2). The cytotoxicity was evaluated with simultaneous staining (FDA/EtBr). The cytostatic and genotoxic effects were evaluated using comet assays and the micronucleus technique. We found that temephos was not cytotoxic in either lymphocytes or HepG2 cells. Regarding the cytostatic effect in human lymphocytes, temephos (10 μM) caused a significant decrease in the percentage of binucleated cells and in the nuclear division index as well as an increase in the apoptotic cell frequency, which was not the case for HepG2 cells. The comet assay showed that temephos increased the DNA damage levels in human lymphocytes, but it did not increase the MN frequency. In contrast, in HepG2 cells, temephos increased the tail length, tail moment and MN frequency in HepG2 cells compared to control cells. In conclusion, temephos causes stable DNA damage in HepG2 cells but not in human lymphocytes. These findings suggest the importance of temephos biotransformation in its genotoxic effect. PMID:25746384

  6. Enhanced cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of gadolinium following ELF-EMF irradiation in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seunghyun; Lee, Younghyun; Lee, Sunyeong; Choi, Young Joo; Chung, Hai Won

    2014-10-01

    There are many studies of Gd nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity, whereas research on cyto- and genotoxicity in normal human lymphocytes is scarce. It is important to investigate the effect of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on Gd toxicity, as patients are co-exposed to Gd and ELF-EMF generated by MRI scanners. We investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoixcity of Gd and the possible enhancing effect of ELF-EMF on Gd toxicity in cultured human lymphocytes by performing a micronuclei (MN) assay, trypan blue dye exclusion, single cell gel electrophoresis, and apoptosis analyses using flow cytometry. Isolated lymphocytes were exposed to 0.2-1.2 mM of Gd only or in combination with a 60-Hz ELF-EMF of 0.8-mT field strength. Exposing human lymphocytes to Gd resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent decrease in cell viability and an increase in MN frequency, single strand DNA breakage, apoptotic cell death, and ROS production. ELF-EMF (0.8 mT) exposure also increased cell death, MN frequency, olive tail moment, and apoptosis induced by Gd treatment alone. These results suggest that Gd induces DNA damage and apoptotic cell death in human lymphocytes and that ELF-EMF enhances the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Gd. PMID:24479558

  7. Immortalization of human lymphocytes by transfection with DNA from mouse L929 cytoplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Abken, H.; Buetzler, C.; Willecke, K.

    1988-01-01

    Transfection of human peripheral blood lymphocytes with DNA from mouse L929 cytoplasts induced proliferation of lymphocytes and the formation of B and T cell-derived cell lines with apparently unlimited growth potential. The cell lines could be grown in serum-containing media as well as in chemically defined serum-free media, have a nearly normal human karyotype, did not form colonies in soft-agar medium, and were not tumorigenic after injection into nude mice. For immortalization of human lymphocytes DNA from L929 cytoplasts was 100-fold more efficient than L929 nuclear DNA. The ability of cytoplast DNA to immortalize lymphocytes could be consecutively transferred by using total cellular DNA from primary or secondary transfectants. Circular or linear mitochondrial DNA of L929 cells did not lead to immortilization of human lymphocytes. Since DNA with immortalizing activity could be isolated from cytoplasts, the Hirt supernatant, and a mitochondria-depleted cytoplasmic fraction of L929 cells. The authors conclude that the immortalizing DNA is located extramitochondrially in the cytoplasm of L929 cells.

  8. Assessment of in vitro genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of flurbiprofen on human cultured lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Timocin, Taygun; Ila, Hasan Basri; Dordu, Tuba; Husunet, Mehmet Tahir; Tazehkand, Mostafa Norizadeh; Valipour, Ebrahim; Topaktas, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Flurbiprofen is non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug which is commonly used for its analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory effects. The purpose of the study was to explore the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of flurbiprofen in human cultured lymphocytes by sister chromatid exchange, chromosome aberration, and cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus tests. 10, 20, 30, and 40 μg/mL concentrations of flurbiprofen (solvent is DMSO) were used to treatment of human cultured lymphocytes at two different treatment periods (24 and 48 h). Flurbiprofen had no significant genotoxic effect in any of these tests. But exposing to flurbiprofen for 24 and 48 h led to significant decrease on proliferation index, mitotic index, and nuclear division index (NDI). Also, all decreases were concentration-dependent (except NDI at 24 h treatment period). Consequently, the findings of this research showed that flurbiprofen had cytotoxic effects in human blood lymphocytes.

  9. Genotoxicity test of self-renovated ceramics in primary human peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hua, Nan; Zhu, Huifang; Zhuang, Jing; Chen, Liping

    2014-12-01

    Zirconia-based ceramics is widely used in dentistry. Different compositions of ceramics have different features. Our self-renovated ceramics become more machinable without scarifying its dental restoration properties after adjusting ratio of lanthanum phosphate (LaPO4)/yttrium oxide (Y2O3). In order to evaluate its safety, here, we tested its genotoxicity in primary human peripheral lymphocytes. The human lymphocytes cultured on three groups of different ratios of LaPO4/Y2O3 diphase ceramics for 6 days showed little effect of growth inhibition and similar effect of growth trend to the negative control. Furthermore, single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) indicated that there was no significant difference of the value of tail moment between the tested ceramics and negative control, the IPS Empress II (P > 0.05). Our findings implicate that our self-renovated ceramics do not induce DNA damages in human peripheral lymphocytes and support their future clinic application.

  10. Radioprotective effect of chicory seeds against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human normal lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hosseinimehr, S J; Ghaffari-Rad, V; Rostamnezhad, M; Ghasemi, A; Allahverdi Pourfallah, T; Shahani, S

    2015-01-01

    The search for less-toxic radioprotective agents has led to a growing trend towards natural products. Protective effect of the methanolic extract of chicory seeds (MCS) was investigated against genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes. Human peripheral blood samples were collected and incubated with MCS at different concentrations (10, 50, 100, and 200 μg/mL) for two hours. The whole blood samples were exposed in vitro to X-ray at dose 2.5 Gy. Then, the lymphocytes were cultured with mitogenic stimulation to determine the micronucleus in cytokinesis blocked binucleated cell. The methanolic extract at all doses significantly reduced the frequency of micronuclei in binucleated lymphocytes, as compared with similarly irradiated lymphocytes without any extract treatment. The maximum protection was observed at 200 μg/mL of MCS, it completely protected genotoxicity induced by ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes. The extract exhibited a concentration-dependent radical scavenging activity on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl free radicals. HPLC analysis of MCS showed this extract is containing chlorogenic acid as a phenolic compound. These data suggest that the radioprotective effect of methanolic extract of chicory seeds can be attributed to the presence of phenolic compounds such as chlorogenic acid which act as antioxidant agents. PMID:26278267

  11. Suppressive effect of Chinese medicinal herb, Acanthopanax gracilistylus, extract on human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shan, B E; Yoshita, Y; Sugiura, T; Yamashita, U

    1999-10-01

    We studied the effect of a Chinese medicinal herb, Acanthopanax gracilistylus, extract (AGE), on human lymphocytes in vitro. AGE markedly suppressed the proliferative responses of human peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated with mitogens concanavalin A (Con A) and Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I (SAC). Both T cell and B cell activities-production of interferon-gamma and immunoglobulin-were suppressed by AGE. The mechanism of AGE-induced suppression of lymphocytes is to arrest the cell cycle at the G0/G1 stage without a direct cytotoxic effect. AGE also suppressed the alloantigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response. However, natural killer cell activity was less sensitive to the suppressive activity of AGE. In contrast, AGE markedly enhanced monocyte function to produce cytokines. These activities of AGE were associated with a 60-kD protein which was sensitive to treatment with pronase E, but not with NaIO4. These results suggest that AGE has an immunomodulating activity on human lymphocytes and its properties could be clinically applied in the treatment of several diseases such as autoimmune and allergic diseases. PMID:10540158

  12. Suppressive effect of Chinese medicinal herb, Acanthopanax gracilistylus, extract on human lymphocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shan, B E; Yoshita, Y; Sugiura, T; Yamashita, U

    1999-01-01

    We studied the effect of a Chinese medicinal herb, Acanthopanax gracilistylus, extract (AGE), on human lymphocytes in vitro. AGE markedly suppressed the proliferative responses of human peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated with mitogens concanavalin A (Con A) and Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I (SAC). Both T cell and B cell activities—production of interferon-gamma and immunoglobulin—were suppressed by AGE. The mechanism of AGE-induced suppression of lymphocytes is to arrest the cell cycle at the G0/G1 stage without a direct cytotoxic effect. AGE also suppressed the alloantigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response. However, natural killer cell activity was less sensitive to the suppressive activity of AGE. In contrast, AGE markedly enhanced monocyte function to produce cytokines. These activities of AGE were associated with a 60-kD protein which was sensitive to treatment with pronase E, but not with NaIO4. These results suggest that AGE has an immunomodulating activity on human lymphocytes and its properties could be clinically applied in the treatment of several diseases such as autoimmune and allergic diseases. PMID:10540158

  13. RAG1 and RAG2 expression by B cell subsets from human tonsil and peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Girschick, H J; Grammer, A C; Nanki, T; Mayo, M; Lipsky, P E

    2001-01-01

    It has been suggested that B cells acquire the capacity for secondary V(D)J recombination during germinal center (GC) reactions. The nature of these B cells remains controversial. Subsets of tonsil and blood B cells and also individual B cells were examined for the expression of recombination-activating gene (RAG) mRNA. Semiquantitative analysis indicated that RAG1 mRNA was present in all tonsil B cell subsets, with the largest amount found in naive B cells. RAG2 mRNA was only found in tonsil naive B cells, centrocytes, and to a lesser extent in centroblasts. Neither RAG1 nor RAG2 mRNA was routinely found in normal peripheral blood B cells. In individual tonsil B cells, RAG1 and RAG2 mRNAs were found in 18% of naive B cells, 22% of GC founder cells, 0% of centroblasts, 13% of centrocytes, and 9% of memory B cells. Individual naive tonsil B cells containing both RAG1 and RAG2 mRNA were activated (CD69(+)). In normal peripheral blood approximately 5% of B cells expressed both RAG1 and RAG2. These cells were uniformly postswitch memory B cells as documented by the coexpression of IgG mRNA. These results indicate that coordinate RAG expression is not found in normal peripheral naive B cells but is up-regulated in naive B cells which are activated in the tonsil. With the exception of centroblasts, RAG1 and RAG2 expression can be found in all components of the GC, including postswitch memory B cells, some of which may circulate in the blood of normal subjects.

  14. Effects of cyclophosphamide on in vitro human lymphocyte culture and mitogenic stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, B.S.

    1983-02-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CY) has been reported to be inactive in vitro under certain conditions. In the present study, CY was tested for its ability to inhibit human lymphocyte proliferation and to modulate lymphocyte response to mitogens in vitro. The inhibition of or the increase in /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation in mitogen-stimulated and unstimulated lymphocytes by CY was used as a measure of CY activity in vitro. The results demonstrate that lymphocytes from 10 different persons had a mean decrease of 74% in /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation in the presence of CY (P less than 0.005). The effect was maximal at a concentration of 160 micrograms/ml. A mean inhibition of 35 and 55% was caused by 10 and 40 micrograms/ml concentrations of CY, respectively. CY also was able to reduce the number of viable cells during 5 days in culture and had a profound effect on mitogen stimulation of lymphocytes. In all cases, CY modulated the stimulation of lymphocytes by phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) either by augmenting or suppressing the responses. At low concentrations (10 micrograms/ml) it augmented mitogenic stimulation by 46 to 281%. At higher concentrations (20 to 160 micrograms/ml), CY had a suppressive effect with a maximum suppression of 99%. The CY-induced immunomodulation is perhaps caused by its action on the regulatory T cells. When tested in vitro, CY had inhibitory activity on T cells.

  15. Lymphocyte-conditioned medium protects human monocyte-macrophages from cholesteryl ester accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Fogelman, A M; Seager, J; Haberland, M E; Hokom, M; Tanaka, R; Edwards, P A

    1982-01-01

    Exposure of human monocyte-macrophages to as little as 50 microliters of cultured medium from lymphocytes stimulated by concanavalin A (Con A) resulted in a dramatic decrease in the activities of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor pathway, the LDL-dextran sulfate pathway, and the scavenger receptor pathway. This effect was not seen when the monocyte-macrophages were exposed to culture medium from lymphocytes cultured without Con A or with Con A together with alpha-methyl mannoside or control medium without lymphocytes. The activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase also decreased in monocyte-macrophages exposed to culture medium from stimulated lymphocytes. Acyl-CoA:cholesterol O-acyltransferase activity, protein synthesis, protein content, phagocytosis of heat-killed yeast, and non-receptor-mediated endocytosis were not inhibited. Monocyte-macrophages exposed to malondialdehyde altered-LDL in the presence of stimulated lymphocyte culture medium accumulated substantially less cholesteryl esters than did cells in control medium. We propose that substances produced by stimulated lymphocytes may be useful in protecting macrophages from cholesteryl ester accumulation. Images PMID:6278500

  16. Choline deficiency increases lymphocyte apoptosis and DNA damage in humans2,3

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Niculescu, Mihai D; Craciunescu, Corneliu N; Fischer, Leslie M; Zeisel, Steven H

    2008-01-01

    Background: Whereas deficiency of the essential nutrient choline is associated with DNA damage and apoptosis in cell and rodent models, it has not been shown in humans. Objective: The objective was to ascertain whether lymphocytes from choline-deficient humans had greater DNA damage and apoptosis than did those from choline-sufficient humans. Design: Fifty-one men and women aged 18–70 y were fed a diet containing the recommended adequate intake of choline (control) for 10 d. They then were fed a choline-deficient diet for up to 42 d before repletion with 138–550 mg choline/d. Blood was collected at the end of each phase, and peripheral lymphocytes were isolated. DNA damage and apoptosis were then assessed by activation of caspase-3, terminal deoxynucleotide transferase–mediated dUTP nick end-labeling, and single-cell gel electrophoresis (COMET) assays. Results: All subjects fed the choline-deficient diet had lymphocyte DNA damage, as assessed by COMET assay, twice that found when they were fed the control diet. The subjects who developed organ dysfunction (liver or muscle) when fed the choline-deficient diet had significantly more apoptotic lymphocytes, as assessed by the activated caspase-3 assay, than when fed the control diet. Conclusions: A choline-deficient diet increased DNA damage in humans. Subjects in whom these diets induced liver or muscle dys-function also had higher rates of apoptosis in their peripheral lymphocytes than did subjects who did not develop organ dysfunction. Assessment of DNA damage and apoptosis in lymphocytes appears to be a clinically useful measure in humans (such as those receiving parenteral nutrition) in whom choline deficiency is suspected. PMID:16825685

  17. Long-term study of the impact of methotrexate on serum cytokines and lymphocyte subsets in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis: correlation with pharmacokinetic measures

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Joel M; Lawrence, David A; Hamilton, Robert; McInnes, Iain B

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe changes in immune parameters observed during long-term methotrexate (MTX) therapy in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and explore correlations with simultaneously measured MTX pharmacokinetic (PKC) parameters. Design Prospective, open-label, long-term mechanism of action study. Setting University clinic. Methods MTX was initiated at a single weekly oral dose of 7.5 mg and dose adjusted for efficacy and toxicity for the duration of the study. Standard measures of disease activity were performed at baseline and every 6–36 months. Serum cytokine measurements in blood together with lymphocyte surface immunophenotypes and stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cytokine production were assessed at each clinical evaluation. Results Cytokine concentrations exhibited multiple significant correlations with disease activity measures over time. The strongest correlations observed were for interleukin (IL)-6 (r=0.45, p<0.0001 for swollen joints and r=0.32, p=0.002 for tender joints) and IL-8 (r=0.25, p=0.01 for swollen joints). Significant decreases from baseline were observed in serum IL-1B, IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations. The most significant changes were observed for IL-6 (p<0.001). Significant increases from baseline were observed in IL-2 release from PBMCs ex vivo (p<0.01). In parallel, multiple statistically significant correlations were observed between MTX PKC measures and immune parameters. The change in swollen joint count correlated inversely with the change in area under the curve (AUC) for MTX (r=−0.63, p=0.007). Conclusions MTX therapy of patients with RA is accompanied by a variety of changes in serum cytokine expression, which in turn correlate strongly with clinical disease activity and MTX pharmacokinetics (PKCs). These data strongly support the notion that MTX mediates profound and functionally relevant effects on the immunological hierarchy in the RA lesion. PMID:27335660

  18. Clonal and molecular characteristics of the human IgE-committed B cell subset

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have followed the pathway of the IgE-committed B lymphocyte from fresh, unstimulated peripheral blood, through EBV activation, transformation, and eventual cloning. Using cell sorting in conjunction with limiting dilution culture systems, we found that: (a) cells that are selected in the cell sorter and secrete IgE in culture are sIgM+/sIgD+. They secrete all three isotypes after EBV activation and continue to do so stably in culture; (b) individual IgE+ cells in culture coproduce IgM, IgD, and IgE and cytoplasmic Ig of each isotype can be detected in single cells; (c) no rearrangement was observed of VDJ to epsilon in any of six lines tested. DNA between the rearranged VDJ-mu and -epsilon appears to be overall intact, including a region 10.5 kb upstream and 18 kb downstream of the 2-kb epsilon coding region and; (d) mRNA of mu and epsilon species is of normal and comparable size. In contrast to IgG- and IgA-producing clones, multiple isotype expression appears to be both frequent and stable in cells committed to IgE production. We propose that IgE-committed cells represent a unique B cell sublineage whose differentiation pathway may be more strictly regulated than that of other isotypes with regard to the signals required for classical, deletional switch recombination that has been observed in rare IgE-producing myeloma cell lines. PMID:2536066

  19. Antibacterial activity of neem nanoemulsion and its toxicity assessment on human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jerobin, Jayakumar; Makwana, Pooja; Suresh Kumar, R S; Sundaramoorthy, Rajiv; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica) is recognized as a medicinal plant well known for its antibacterial, antimalarial, antiviral, and antifungal properties. Neem nanoemulsion (NE) (O/W) is formulated using neem oil, Tween 20, and water by high-energy ultrasonication. The formulated neem NE showed antibacterial activity against the bacterial pathogen Vibrio vulnificus by disrupting the integrity of the bacterial cell membrane. Despite the use of neem NE in various biomedical applications, the toxicity studies on human cells are still lacking. The neem NE showed a decrease in cellular viability in human lymphocytes after 24 hours of exposure. The neem NE at lower concentration (0.7-1 mg/mL) is found to be nontoxic while it is toxic at higher concentrations (1.2-2 mg/mL). The oxidative stress induced by the neem NE is evidenced by the depletion of catalase, SOD, and GSH levels in human lymphocytes. Neem NE showed a significant increase in DNA damage when compared to control in human lymphocytes (P<0.05). The NE is an effective antibacterial agent against the bacterial pathogen V. vulnificus, and it was found to be nontoxic at lower concentrations to human lymphocytes.

  20. Antibacterial activity of neem nanoemulsion and its toxicity assessment on human lymphocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jerobin, Jayakumar; Makwana, Pooja; Suresh Kumar, RS; Sundaramoorthy, Rajiv; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica) is recognized as a medicinal plant well known for its antibacterial, antimalarial, antiviral, and antifungal properties. Neem nanoemulsion (NE) (O/W) is formulated using neem oil, Tween 20, and water by high-energy ultrasonication. The formulated neem NE showed antibacterial activity against the bacterial pathogen Vibrio vulnificus by disrupting the integrity of the bacterial cell membrane. Despite the use of neem NE in various biomedical applications, the toxicity studies on human cells are still lacking. The neem NE showed a decrease in cellular viability in human lymphocytes after 24 hours of exposure. The neem NE at lower concentration (0.7–1 mg/mL) is found to be nontoxic while it is toxic at higher concentrations (1.2–2 mg/mL). The oxidative stress induced by the neem NE is evidenced by the depletion of catalase, SOD, and GSH levels in human lymphocytes. Neem NE showed a significant increase in DNA damage when compared to control in human lymphocytes (P<0.05). The NE is an effective antibacterial agent against the bacterial pathogen V. vulnificus, and it was found to be nontoxic at lower concentrations to human lymphocytes. PMID:26491309

  1. Antibacterial activity of neem nanoemulsion and its toxicity assessment on human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jerobin, Jayakumar; Makwana, Pooja; Suresh Kumar, R S; Sundaramoorthy, Rajiv; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica) is recognized as a medicinal plant well known for its antibacterial, antimalarial, antiviral, and antifungal properties. Neem nanoemulsion (NE) (O/W) is formulated using neem oil, Tween 20, and water by high-energy ultrasonication. The formulated neem NE showed antibacterial activity against the bacterial pathogen Vibrio vulnificus by disrupting the integrity of the bacterial cell membrane. Despite the use of neem NE in various biomedical applications, the toxicity studies on human cells are still lacking. The neem NE showed a decrease in cellular viability in human lymphocytes after 24 hours of exposure. The neem NE at lower concentration (0.7-1 mg/mL) is found to be nontoxic while it is toxic at higher concentrations (1.2-2 mg/mL). The oxidative stress induced by the neem NE is evidenced by the depletion of catalase, SOD, and GSH levels in human lymphocytes. Neem NE showed a significant increase in DNA damage when compared to control in human lymphocytes (P<0.05). The NE is an effective antibacterial agent against the bacterial pathogen V. vulnificus, and it was found to be nontoxic at lower concentrations to human lymphocytes. PMID:26491309

  2. Chemopreventive effect and lack of genotoxicity and mutagenicity of the exopolysaccharide botryosphaeran on human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Malini, M; Camargo, M S; Hernandes, L C; Vargas-Rechia, C G; Varanda, E A; Barbosa, A M; Dekker, R F H; Matsumoto, S T; Antunes, L M G; Cólus, I M S

    2016-10-01

    Carbohydrate biopolymers of fungal-origin are an important natural resource in the search for new bioagents with therapeutic and nutraceutical potential. In this study the mutagenic, genotoxic, antigenotoxic and antioxidant properties of the fungal exopolysaccharide botryosphaeran, a (1→3)(1→6)-β-D-glucan, from Botryosphaeria rhodina MAMB-05, was evaluated. The mutagenicity was assessed at five concentrations in Salmonella typhimurium by the Ames test. Normal and tumor (Jurkat cells) human T lymphocyte cultures were used to evaluate the genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity (Comet assay) of botryosphaeran alone and in combination with the mutagen methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). The ability of botryosphaeran to reduce the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) generated by hydrogen peroxide was assessed using the CM-H2DCFDA probe in lymphocyte cultures under different treatment times. None of the evaluated botryosphaeran concentrations were mutagenic in bacteria, nor induced genotoxicity in normal and tumor lymphocytes. Botryosphaeran protected lymphocyte DNA against damage caused by MMS under simultaneous treatment and post-treatment conditions. However, botryosphaeran was not able to reduce the RONS generated by H2O2. Besides the absence of genotoxicity, botryosphaeran exerted a protective effect on human lymphocytes against genotoxic damage caused by MMS. These results are important in the validation of botryosphaeran as a therapeutic agent targeting health promotion. PMID:27387458

  3. Chemopreventive effect and lack of genotoxicity and mutagenicity of the exopolysaccharide botryosphaeran on human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Malini, M; Camargo, M S; Hernandes, L C; Vargas-Rechia, C G; Varanda, E A; Barbosa, A M; Dekker, R F H; Matsumoto, S T; Antunes, L M G; Cólus, I M S

    2016-10-01

    Carbohydrate biopolymers of fungal-origin are an important natural resource in the search for new bioagents with therapeutic and nutraceutical potential. In this study the mutagenic, genotoxic, antigenotoxic and antioxidant properties of the fungal exopolysaccharide botryosphaeran, a (1→3)(1→6)-β-D-glucan, from Botryosphaeria rhodina MAMB-05, was evaluated. The mutagenicity was assessed at five concentrations in Salmonella typhimurium by the Ames test. Normal and tumor (Jurkat cells) human T lymphocyte cultures were used to evaluate the genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity (Comet assay) of botryosphaeran alone and in combination with the mutagen methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). The ability of botryosphaeran to reduce the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) generated by hydrogen peroxide was assessed using the CM-H2DCFDA probe in lymphocyte cultures under different treatment times. None of the evaluated botryosphaeran concentrations were mutagenic in bacteria, nor induced genotoxicity in normal and tumor lymphocytes. Botryosphaeran protected lymphocyte DNA against damage caused by MMS under simultaneous treatment and post-treatment conditions. However, botryosphaeran was not able to reduce the RONS generated by H2O2. Besides the absence of genotoxicity, botryosphaeran exerted a protective effect on human lymphocytes against genotoxic damage caused by MMS. These results are important in the validation of botryosphaeran as a therapeutic agent targeting health promotion.

  4. Differential response of human thymus cells to CD2 antibodies: fragmentation of DNA of CD45RO+ and proliferation of CD45RO- subsets.

    PubMed Central

    Li, J; Campbell, D; Hayward, A R

    1992-01-01

    Human thymocytes bearing the CD45RO 'memory' cell phenotype do not proliferate in concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated cultures and may be destined for intrathymic death. To determine whether this subset would exhibit characteristics of programmed cell death (apoptosis), we examined the integrity of the nuclear DNA by gel electrophoresis. DNA fragmentation was restricted to the CD45RO+ subset of human thymocytes following exposure to stimulating concentrations of anti-CD2 antibodies. Both CD45RO- and CD45RO+ subsets mobilized cytoplasmic Ca2+ following cell-surface CD2 ligation, but entry into the cell cycle and vigorous thymidine uptake were restricted to the CD45RO- subset. Our results provide a mechanism which may account for the failure of thymic CD45RO+ cells to respond to stimuli which elicit proliferation by the reciprocal CD45RA+ subset. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1348052

  5. Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinstreuer, N.C.; Smith, A.M.; West, P.R.; Conard, K.R.; Fontaine, B.R.; Weir-Hauptman, A.M.; Palmer, J.A.; Knudsen, T.B.; Dix, D.J.; Donley, E.L.R.; Cezar, G.G.

    2011-11-15

    Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast Trade-Mark-Sign chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultures were evaluated for known and novel signatures that may be indicative of developmental toxicity. Significant fold changes in endogenous metabolites were detected for 83 putatively annotated mass features in response to the subset of ToxCast chemicals. The annotations were mapped to specific human metabolic pathways. This revealed strong effects on pathways for nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism pathways. Predictivity for adverse outcomes in mammalian prenatal developmental toxicity studies used ToxRefDB and other sources of information, including Stemina Biomarker Discovery's predictive DevTox Registered-Sign model trained on 23 pharmaceutical agents of known developmental toxicity and differing potency. The model initially predicted developmental toxicity from the blinded ToxCast compounds in concordance with animal data with 73% accuracy. Retraining the model with data from the unblinded test compounds at one concentration level increased the predictive accuracy for the remaining concentrations to 83%. These preliminary results on a 11-chemical subset of the ToxCast chemical library indicate that metabolomics analysis of the hES secretome provides information valuable for predictive modeling and mechanistic understanding of mammalian developmental toxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested 11 environmental compounds in a hESC metabolomics platform. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant changes in secreted small molecule metabolites were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perturbed mass features map to pathways critical for normal development and

  6. Inorganic arsenic represses interleukin-17A expression in human activated Th17 lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Morzadec, Claudie; Macoch, Mélinda; Robineau, Marc; Sparfel, Lydie; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2012-08-01

    Trivalent inorganic arsenic [As(III)] is an efficient anticancer agent used to treat patients suffering from acute promyelocytic leukemia. Recently, experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that this metalloid can also cure lymphoproliferative and/or pro-inflammatory syndromes in different murine models of chronic immune-mediated diseases. T helper (Th) 1 and Th17 lymphocytes play a central role in development of these diseases, in mice and humans, especially by secreting the potent pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ and IL-17A, respectively. As(III) impairs basic functions of human T cells but its ability to modulate secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by differentiated Th lymphocytes is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that As(III), used at concentrations clinically achievable in plasma of patients, has no effect on the secretion of interferon-γ from Th1 cells but almost totally blocks the expression and the release of IL-17A from human Th17 lymphocytes co-stimulated for five days with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies, in the presence of differentiating cytokines. In addition, As(III) specifically reduces mRNA levels of the retinoic-related orphan receptor (ROR)C gene which encodes RORγt, a key transcription factor controlling optimal IL-17 expression in fully differentiated Th17 cells. The metalloid also blocks initial expression of IL-17 gene induced by the co-stimulation, probably in part by impairing activation of the JNK/c-Jun pathway. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that As(III) represses expression of the major pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17A produced by human Th17 lymphocytes, thus strengthening the idea that As(III) may be useful to treat inflammatory immune-mediated diseases in humans. -- Highlights: ► Arsenic inhibits secretion of IL-17A from human naïve and memory Th17 lymphocytes. ► Arsenic represses early expression of IL-17A gene in human activated T lymphocytes. ► Arsenic interferes with activation of

  7. Transfection of an immunoglobulin kappa gene into mature human B lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bich-Thuy, L.T.; Queen, C.

    1988-01-01

    The authors show in this report that the transcription induced by interleukin-2 or pokeweed mitogens of the kappa MOPC 41 immunoglobulin light-chain gene transfected into primary human or murine B lymphocytes initiates from a previously unobserved start site about 26 base pairs upstream of the start site used in myeloma cell lines.

  8. Differentiation of human monocytes and derived subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells by the HLDA10 monoclonal antibody panel

    PubMed Central

    Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Machacek, Christian; Fischer, Michael B; Stockinger, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte system, consisting of monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), has an important role in tissue homeostasis as well as in eliciting immune responses against invading pathogens. Blood monocytes have been viewed for decades as precursors of tissue macrophages. Although the newest data show that in the steady state resident macrophages of many organs are monocyte independent, blood monocytes critically contribute to tissue macrophage and DC pools upon inflammation. To better understand the relationship between these populations and their phenotype, we isolated and differentiated human blood CD14+ monocytes in vitro into immature and mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) as well as into seven different monocyte-derived macrophage subsets. We used the panel of 70 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) submitted to the 10th Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigen Workshop to determine the expression profiles of these 10 populations by flow cytometry. We now can compile subpanels of mAbs to differentiate the 10 monocyte/macrophage/MoDC subsets, providing the basis for novel diagnostic and therapeutic tools. PMID:26900469

  9. The Effect of a Grape Seed Extract on Radiation-Induced DNA Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicu, Tiberius; Postescu, Ion D.; Foriş, Vasile; Brie, Ioana; Fischer-Fodor, Eva; Cernea, Valentin; Moldovan, Mircea; Cosma, Constantin

    2009-05-01

    Plant-derived antioxidants due to their phenolic compounds content are reported as potential candidates for reducing the levels of oxidative stress in living organisms. Grape seed extracts are very potent antioxidants and exhibit numerous interesting pharmacologic activities. Hydroethanolic (50/50, v/v) standardized extract was obtained from red grape seed (Vitis vinifera, variety Burgund Mare—BM). The total polyphenols content was evaluated by Folin-Ciocalteu procedure and expressed as μEq Gallic Acid/ml. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential antioxidant effects of different concentrations of BM extract against 60Co γ-rays induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Samples of human lymphocytes were incubated with BM extract (12.5, 25.0 and 37.5 μEq GA/ml, respectively) administered at 30 minutes before in vitro irradiation with γ-rays (2 Gy). The DNA damage and repair in lymphocytes were evaluated using alkaline comet assay. Using the lesion score, the radiation-induced DNA damage was found to be significantly different (p<0.05) from control, both in the absence and presence of BM extract (except the lymphocytes treated with 37.5 μEq GA/ml BM extract). DNA repair analyzed by incubating the irradiated cells at 37° C and 5% CO2 atmosphere for 2 h, indicated a significant difference (p<0.05) in the lymphocytes group treated with 25.0 μEq GA/ml BM extract, immediately and two hours after irradiation. These results suggest radioprotective effects after treatment with BM extract in human lymphocytes.

  10. Differential expression of HLA-DR antigens in subsets of human CFU-GM.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J D; Sabbath, K D; Herrmann, F; Larcom, P; Nichols, K; Kornacki, M; Levine, H; Cannistra, S A

    1985-10-01

    Expression of HLA-DR surface antigens by granulocyte/monocyte colony-forming cells (CFU-GM) may be important in the regulation of proliferation of these cells. Using immunological techniques to enrich for progenitor cells, we investigated the expression of HLA-DR in subsets of CFU-GM. "Early" (day 14) CFU-GM express higher levels of HLA-DR than do "late" (day 7) CFU-GM. Among late CFU-GM, cells destined to form monocyte (alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase-positive) colonies express higher levels of HLA-DR than do CFU-GM destined to form granulocyte (chloroacetate esterase-positive) colonies. Because high-level expression of DR antigen was a marker for monocyte differentiation, we examined several lymphokines for their effects on both DR expression and in vitro commitment to monocyte differentiation by myeloid precursor cells. DR antigen density could be increased by more than twofold over 48 hours upon exposure to gamma-interferon (gamma-IFN), whereas colony-stimulating factors had no effect. This was associated with a dose-dependent inhibition of total CFU-GM number, and a relative, but not absolute, increase in the ratio of monocyte colonies to granulocyte colonies. Similarly, in day 7 suspension cultures of purified myeloid precursor cells, gamma-IFN inhibited cell proliferation and increased the ratio of monocytes to granulocytes. Thus, despite the induction of high levels of HLA-DR antigen on precursor cells (a marker of monocyte commitment), the dominant in vitro effect of gamma-IFN was inhibition of granulocyte differentiation.

  11. Loss of telomeric DNA during aging of normal and trisomy 21 human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Vaziri, H.; Uchida, I.; Lan Wei; Harley, C.B. ); Schaechter, F.; Cohen, D. ); Xiaoming Zhu; Effros, R. )

    1993-04-01

    The telomere hypothesis of cellular aging proposes that loss of telomeric DNA (TTAGGG) from human chromosomes may ultimately cause cell-cycle exit during replicative senescence. Since lymphocytes have a limited replicative capacity and since blood cells were previously shown to lose telomeric DNA during aging in vivo, the authors wished to determine (a) whether accelerated telomere loss is associated with the premature immunosenescence of lymphocytes in individuals with Down syndrome (DS) and (b) whether telomeric DNA is also lost during aging of lymphocytes in vitro. To investigate the effects of aging and trisomy 21 on telomere loss in vivo, genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood lymphocytes of 140 individuals (age 0--107 years), including 21 DS patients (age 0--45 years). Digestion with restriction enzymes HinfI and RsaI generated terminal restriction fragments (TRFs), which were detected by Southern analysis using a telomere-specific probe ([sup 32]P-(C[sub 3]TA[sub 2])[sub 3]). The rate of telomere loss was calculated from the decrease in mean TRF length, as a function of donor age. DS patients showed a significantly higher rate of telomere loss with donor age (133 [+-] 15 bp/year) compared with age-matched controls (41 [+-] 7.7 bp/year) (P < .0005), suggesting that accelerated telomere loss is a biomarker of premature immunosenescence of DS patients and that it may play a role in this process. Telomere loss during aging in vitro was calculated for lymphocytes from four normal individuals, grown in culture for 10--30 population doublings. The rate of telomere loss was [approximately]120 bp/cell doubling, comparable to that seen in other somatic cells. Moreover, telomere lengths of lymphocytes from centenarians and from older DS patients were similar to those of senescent lymphocytes in culture, which suggests that replicative senescence could partially account for aging of the immune system in DS patients and in elderly individuals. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Inhibition of the lymphocyte metabolic switch by the oxidative burst of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Philip A; Prichard, Lynn; Chacko, Balu; Ravi, Saranya; Overton, E Turner; Heath, Sonya L; Darley-Usmar, Victor

    2015-09-01

    Activation of the phagocytic NADPH oxidase-2 (NOX-2) in neutrophils is a critical process in the innate immune system and is associated with elevated local concentrations of superoxide, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hypochlorous acid. Under pathological conditions, NOX-2 activity has been implicated in the development of autoimmunity, indicating a role in modulating lymphocyte effector function. Notably, T-cell clonal expansion and subsequent cytokine production requires a metabolic switch from mitochondrial respiration to aerobic glycolysis. Previous studies demonstrate that H2O2 generated from activated neutrophils suppresses lymphocyte activation but the mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that activated neutrophils would prevent the metabolic switch and suppress the effector functions of T-cells through a H2O2-dependent mechanism. To test this, we developed a model co-culture system using freshly isolated neutrophils and lymphocytes from healthy human donors. Extracellular flux analysis was used to assess mitochondrial and glycolytic activity and FACS analysis to assess immune function. The neutrophil oxidative burst significantly inhibited the induction of lymphocyte aerobic glycolysis, caused inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation and suppressed lymphocyte activation through a H2O2-dependent mechanism. Hydrogen peroxide and a redox cycling agent, DMNQ, were used to confirm the impact of H2O2 on lymphocyte bioenergetics. In summary, we have shown that the lymphocyte metabolic switch from mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis is prevented by the oxidative burst of neutrophils. This direct inhibition of the metabolic switch is then a likely mechanism underlying the neutrophil-dependent suppression of T-cell effector function.

  13. Development of mature and functional human myeloid subsets in HSC engrafted NOD/SCID/IL2rγKO mice

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Saito, Yoriko; Kunisawa, Jun; Kurashima, Yosuke; Wake, Taichi; Suzuki, Nahoko; Shultz, Leonard D.; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Fumihiko

    2012-01-01

    While physiological development of human lymphoid subsets has become well documented in humanized mice, in vivo development of human myeloid subsets in a xenotransplantation setting has remained unevaluated. Therefore, we investigated in vivo differentiation and function of human myeloid subsets in NOD/SCID/IL2rγnull (NSG) mouse recipients transplanted with purified lineage−CD34+CD38− cord blood hematopoietic stem cells. At four to six months post-transplantation, we identified the development of human neutrophils, basophils, mast cells, monocytes, as well as conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in the recipient hematopoietic organs. The tissue distribution and morphology of these human myeloid cells were similar to those identified in humans. Following cytokine stimulation in vitro, phosphorylation of STAT molecules was observed in neutrophils and monocytes. In vivo administration of human G-CSF resulted in the recruitment of human myeloid cells into the recipient circulation. Flow cytometry and confocal imaging demonstrated that human bone marrow monocytes and alveolar macrophages in the recipients displayed intact phagocytic function. Human BM-derived monocytes/macrophages were further confirmed to exhibit phagocytosis and killing of Salmonella Typhimurium upon the IFN-γ stimulation. These findings demonstrate the development of mature and functionally intact human myeloid subsets in vivo in the NSG recipients. In vivo human myelopoiesis established in the NSG humanized mouse system may facilitate the investigation of human myeloid cell biology including in vivo analyses of infectious diseases and therapeutic interventions. PMID:22611244

  14. Helper activity by human large granular lymphocytes in in vitro immunoglobulin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M A; Blanca, I; Baroja, M L; Arama, S; Leon-Ponte, M; Abadi, I; Bianco, N E

    1987-09-01

    In the present study we have examined the effect of human large granular lymphocytes (LGL) from healthy donors on Ig synthesis by autologous B lymphocytes. The results showed that this cell population has a consistent helper activity in pokeweed mitogen-activated cultures even when added at very low numbers. LGL can mediate their effect by secreting soluble helper factors capable of modulating B-cell responses as evidenced by the enhancement of IgG and IgM production by supernatants obtained from LGL cultures. Preincubation with interferon gamma further potentiated the helper activity by LGL.

  15. [Supression of the lymphocyte blast transformation reaction evoked in human subjects by a fat load].

    PubMed

    Dil'man, V M; Fedorov, S N; Vishnevskiĭ, A S; Poroshina, T E

    1979-01-01

    It has been shown that "Intralipid"--triglycerides emulsion, used for parenteral feeding, administered intravenously in the amount of 200 ml would induce within 2 hours in human subjects a metabolic immunosuppression, estimated by a drop in the labelled thymidine and uridine incorporation into phytohemagglutinin stimulated lymphocytes. The dosage blood loss (25 ml of blood) would prevent the inhibition of lymphocytic blasttransformation reaction, that seems to prove the functional nature of metabolic immunosuppression, induced by the increased concentration of fatty acids in blood due to hydrolysis of administered triglycerides. The relationship between metabolic immunosuppression and the standard methods of treatment used in oncology is briefly discussed.

  16. Human transfer factor in vitro. I. Augmentation of lymphocyte transformation to tuberculin PPD

    PubMed Central

    Hamblin, Anne S.; Maini, R. N.; Dumonde, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    There is recent interest in whether dialysable transfer factor can specifically increase immune responses when added to lymphoid cells in vitro. This report demonstrates that transfer factor preparations (human leucocyte dialysates) `augment' rather than `transfer' lymphocyte transformation responses (DNA synthesis) to tuberculin PPD in vitro and that the magnitude of this augmentation is proportional to the level of DNA synthesis induced by PPD in the absence of added transfer factor. Experiments showed that transfer factor preparations from Mantoux-positive or Mantoux-negative `donors' were equally effective in augmenting `recipient' lymphocyte transformation responses to PPD. Thus the extent of augmentation was related, not to the tuberculin sensitivity of the transfer factor donors, but to that of the recipients. In the absence of tuberculin PPD, transfer factor preparations sometimes stimulated lymphocyte DNA synthesis, but the extent of this was small and inconstant. The results therefore provide evidence for an antigen-dependent, but not an antigen-specific effect of transfer factor in increasing lymphocyte DNA synthesis in vitro. It is suggested that leucocyte dialysates contain an augmenting factor which may facilitate the response of antigen-sensitive cells to PPD in vitro, or may facilitate the recruitment into DNA synthesis of cell populations responding to mitogenic lymphokine produced during lymphocyte transformation.

  17. [Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes at a various duration of cultivation after irradiation].

    PubMed

    Riabchenko, N I; Antoshchina, M M; Nasonova, V A; Fesenko, E V; Gotlib, V Ia

    2004-01-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were exposed to 60Co gamma-rays (a dose of 3 Gy) and cultivated during seven days in the presence of PHA and BrdU. It was shown that the metaphases of the first and second mitosises occurred during cultivation of the irradiated and unirradiated lymphocytes, being evidence about of irregularity of the coming into division of various fractions of lymphocytes. The time of cultivation did not influence a rate of aberrations in metaphases of the first and second mitosises of the irradiated lymphocytes. During the first and the subsequent mitosises the number of exchange chromosome aberrations decreased and reached a control level in metaphases of the fourth and fifth mitosises. The number of paired fragments at second and third mitosises increased a little and started to decrease only in metaphases of the fourth and fifth mitosises. The decrease in chromosome aberrations with prolongation of the cultivation of lymphocytes after irradiating is a consequence of elimination of cells with chromosome damages during sequential mitotic divisions.

  18. Cryopreservation and storage effects on cell numbers and DNA damage in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cyrus K; Choi, Siu-Wai; Siu, Parco M; Benzie, Iris F F

    2011-12-01

    The comet assay measures DNA damage in individual cells (usually lymphocytes) and is widely used in biomonitoring studies. Lymphocytes are harvested and are usually cryopreserved for batch testing. We investigated cell loss during harvesting, cryopreservation, thawing, and washing of human peripheral lymphocytes and compared DNA damage, using the Fpg-assisted comet assay for oxidation-induced DNA lesions, in freshly harvested cells and cells that were thawed and tested after cryopreservation of 2-3 days and 4 weeks. Lymphocyte numbers were measured in fresh venous blood and after the steps of harvesting, cryopreservation, and washing. Results showed that >50% of lymphocytes in whole blood were harvested, but ∼60% were lost during washing. Loss during washing was not different (P>0.05) between fresh cells and cells thawed and washed after 2-3 days or 4 weeks cryopreservation. No change in DNA damage was seen after cryopreservation and thawing: mean (SD) % DNA in comet tail was 11.2 (1.53) in freshly harvested cells, 12.9 (1.39) in 2-3 days cryopreserved cells, and 12.9 (2.0) in cells tested after 4 weeks cryopreservation (P>0.05). Results indicate that there is no predominant loss of more highly damaged cells during cryopreservation and thawing and there is no induction of oxidation-induced DNA lesions in cryopreserved cells stored for up to 4 weeks.

  19. Only a subset of C. canimorsus strains is dangerous for humans

    PubMed Central

    Renzi, Francesco; Dol, Melanie; Raymackers, Alice; Manfredi, Pablo; Cornelis, Guy Richard

    2015-01-01

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus are gram-negative bacteria living as commensals in the mouth of dogs and cats. C. canimorsus cause rare but life-threatening generalized infections in humans that have been in contact with a dog or a cat. Over the last years we collected 105 C. canimorsus strains from different geographical origins and from severe human infections or healthy dogs. All these strains were analyzed by 16S rDNA sequencing and a phylogenetic tree revealed two main groups of bacteria instead of one with no relation to the geographical origin. This branching was confirmed by the whole-genome sequencing of 10 strains, supporting the evidence of a new Capnocytophaga species in dogs. Interestingly, 19 out of 19 C. canimorsus strains isolated from human infections belonged to the same species. Furthermore, most strains from this species could grow in heat-inactivated human serum (HIHS) (40/46 tested), deglycosylate IgM (48/66) and were cytochrome-oxidase positive (60/66) while most strains from the other species could not grow in HIHS (22/23 tested), could not deglycosylate IgM (33/34) and were cytochrome-oxidase negative (33/34). Here, we propose to call Capnocytophaga canis (Latin: dog) the novel, presumably less virulent dog-hosted Capnocytophaga species and to keep the name C. canimorsus for the species including human pathogens. PMID:26421271

  20. Only a subset of C. canimorsus strains is dangerous for humans.

    PubMed

    Renzi, Francesco; Dol, Melanie; Raymackers, Alice; Manfredi, Pablo; Cornelis, Guy Richard

    2015-08-01

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus are gram-negative bacteria living as commensals in the mouth of dogs and cats. C. canimorsus cause rare but life-threatening generalized infections in humans that have been in contact with a dog or a cat. Over the last years we collected 105 C. canimorsus strains from different geographical origins and from severe human infections or healthy dogs. All these strains were analyzed by 16S rDNA sequencing and a phylogenetic tree revealed two main groups of bacteria instead of one with no relation to the geographical origin. This branching was confirmed by the whole-genome sequencing of 10 strains, supporting the evidence of a new Capnocytophaga species in dogs. Interestingly, 19 out of 19 C. canimorsus strains isolated from human infections belonged to the same species. Furthermore, most strains from this species could grow in heat-inactivated human serum (HIHS) (40/46 tested), deglycosylate IgM (48/66) and were cytochrome-oxidase positive (60/66) while most strains from the other species could not grow in HIHS (22/23 tested), could not deglycosylate IgM (33/34) and were cytochrome-oxidase negative (33/34). Here, we propose to call Capnocytophaga canis (Latin: dog) the novel, presumably less virulent dog-hosted Capnocytophaga species and to keep the name C. canimorsus for the species including human pathogens. PMID:26421271

  1. Expression profile of novel cell surface molecules on different subsets of human peripheral blood antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, Daniela; Andrés, Martín Pérez; van den Bossche, Wouter BL; Flores-Montero, Juan; de Bruin, Sandra; Teodosio, Cristina; van Dongen, Jacques JM; Orfao, Alberto; Almeida, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Although major steps have been recently made in understanding the role of the distinct subsets of dendritic cells (DC)/antigen-presenting cells (APC), further studies are required to unravel their precise role, including in-depth immunophenotypic characterisation of these cells. Here, we used eight-colour flow cytometry to investigate the reactivity of a panel of 72 monoclonal antibodies (including those clustered in seven new Cluster of Differentiation, CD) on different subsets of APC in peripheral blood (PB) samples from five healthy adults. These experiments were performed in the context of the Tenth International Workshop on Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens (HLDA10). Plasmacytoid DC was the only cell population that expressed CD85g and CD195, whereas they lacked all of the other molecules investigated. In contrast, myeloid DC mostly expressed inhibitory C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) and other inhibitory-associated molecules, whereas monocytes expressed both inhibitory and activating CLRs, together with other phagocytosis-associated receptors. Within monocytes, progressively lower levels of expression were generally observed from classical monocytes (cMo) to SLAN− and SLAN+ non-classical monocytes (ncMo) for most of the molecules expressed, except for the CD368 endocytic receptor. This molecule was found to be positive only in cMo, and the CD369 and CD371 modulating/signalling receptors. In addition, the CD101 inhibitory molecule was found to be expressed at higher levels in SLAN+ vs SLAN− ncMo. In summary, the pattern of expression of the different signalling molecules and receptors analysed in this work varies among the distinct subsets of PB APCs, with similar profiles for molecules within each functional group. These findings suggest unique pattern-recognition and signalling capabilities for distinct subpopulations of APCs, and therefore, diverse functional roles. PMID:27766148

  2. In vitro modeling of the interaction between human epithelial cells and lymphocytes upon influenza infection.

    PubMed

    Ilyushina, Natalia A; Wright, Peter F

    2016-09-01

    Influenza viruses are a continuous threat to humans because of their ability to cross species barriers and adapt to new hosts. Data from murine studies, along with limited human data, suggest that CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) that recognize conserved epitopes of structural influenza proteins are the main mediators of influenza virus clearance. Additionally, the fact that many CTLs recognize epitopes shared between different influenza strains offers the potential for broad cross-strain immunity. However, the mechanisms of cellular immunity against influenza viruses are poorly defined in humans, where the CTL response has been hard to measure and interpret. We developed a novel CTL assay that utilizes fully differentiated nasal human epithelial cells taken from volunteers as permissive targets for autologous peripheral blood-derived influenza virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. This in vitro system of human lymphocyte-epithelial cell co-cultures can be considered as the closest approximation to events in vivo and can be employed for studying the interactions between the pathogen and human host. Modeling of the natural interaction process between the primary cell type that supports the productive replication of influenza and immune cells may allow us to put in perspective CTLs as a correlate of immunity to influenza in humans.

  3. Differential transforming activity of the retroviral Tax oncoproteins in human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tong; Cheng, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 and type 2 (HTLV-1 and -2) are two closely related retroviruses. HTLV-1 causes adult T cell leukemia and lymphoma, whereas HTLV-2 infection is not etiologically linked to human disease. The viral genomes of HTLV-1 and -2 encode highly homologous transforming proteins, Tax-1 and Tax-2, respectively. Tax-1 is thought to play a central role in transforming CD4+ T lymphocytes. Expression of Tax-1 is crucial for promoting survival and proliferation of virally infected human T lymphocytes and is necessary for initiating HTLV-1-mediated oncogenesis. In transgenic mice and humanized mouse model, Tax-1 has proven to be leukemogenic. Although Tax-1 is able to efficiently transform rodent fibroblasts and to induce lymphoma in mouse model, it rarely transforms primary human CD4+ T lymphocytes. In contrast, Tax-2 efficiently immortalizes human CD4+ T cells though it exhibits a lower transforming activity in rodent cells as compared to Tax-1. We here discuss our recent observation and views on the differential transforming activity of Tax-1 and Tax-2 in human T cells.

  4. Early effects of low dose 12C6+ ion or X-ray irradiation on human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingtai; Li, Yumin; Zhang, Hong; Xie, Yi; Chen, Xuezhong; Ren, Jinyu; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Zijiang; Liu, Hongliang; Zhang, Yawei

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the acute effects of low dose 12C6+ ions or X-ray radiation on human immune function. The human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) of seven healthy donors were exposed to 0.05 Gy 12C6+ ions or X-ray radiation and cell responses were measured at 24 h after exposure. The cytotoxic activities of HPBL were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT); the percentages of T and NK cells subsets were detected by flow cytometry; mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ were examined by real time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR); and these cytokines protein levels in supernatant of cultured cells were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The results showed that the cytotoxic activity of HPBL, mRNA expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α in HPBL and their protein levels in supernatant were significantly increased at 24 h after exposure to 0.05 Gy 12C6+ ions radiation and the effects were stronger than observed for X-ray exposure. However, there was no significant change in the percentage of T and NK cells subsets of HPBL. These results suggested that 0.05 Gy high linear energy transfer (LET) 12C6+ radiation was a more effective approach to host immune enhancement than that of low LET X-ray. We conclude that cytokines production might be used as sensitive indicators of acute response to LDI.

  5. Xmrk, kras and myc transgenic zebrafish liver cancer models share molecular signatures with subsets of human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weiling; Li, Zhen; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Li, Caixia; Emelyanov, Alexander; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-01

    Previously three oncogene transgenic zebrafish lines with inducible expression of xmrk, kras or Myc in the liver have been generated and these transgenic lines develop oncogene-addicted liver tumors upon chemical induction. In the current study, comparative transcriptomic approaches were used to examine the correlation of the three induced transgenic liver cancers with human liver cancers. RNA profiles from the three zebrafish tumors indicated relatively small overlaps of significantly deregulated genes and biological pathways. Nevertheless, the three transgenic tumor signatures all showed significant correlation with advanced or very advanced human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Interestingly, molecular signature from each oncogene-induced zebrafish liver tumor correlated with only a small subset of human HCC samples (24-29%) and there were conserved up-regulated pathways between the zebrafish and correlated human HCC subgroup. The three zebrafish liver cancer models together represented nearly half (47.2%) of human HCCs while some human HCCs showed significant correlation with more than one signature defined from the three oncogene-addicted zebrafish tumors. In contrast, commonly deregulated genes (21 up and 16 down) in the three zebrafish tumor models generally showed accordant deregulation in the majority of human HCCs, suggesting that these genes might be more consistently deregulated in a broad range of human HCCs with different molecular mechanisms and thus serve as common diagnosis markers and therapeutic targets. Thus, these transgenic zebrafish models with well-defined oncogene-induced tumors are valuable tools for molecular classification of human HCCs and for understanding of molecular drivers in hepatocarcinogenesis in each human HCC subgroup.

  6. Toxicological Implications and Inflammatory Response in Human Lymphocytes Challenged with Oxytetracycline

    PubMed Central

    Di Cerbo, A.; Palatucci, A. T.; Rubino, V.; Centenaro, S.; Giovazzino, A.; Fraccaroli, E.; Cortese, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Guidetti, G.; Canello, S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibiotics are widely used in zoo technical and veterinary practices as feed supplementation to ensure wellness of farmed animals and livestock. Several evidences have been suggesting both the toxic role for tetracyclines, particularly for oxytetracycline (OTC). This potential toxicity appears of great relevance for human nutrition and for domestic animals. This study aimed to extend the evaluation of such toxicity. The biologic impact of the drug was assessed by evaluating the proinflammatory effect of OTC and their bone residues on cytokine secretion by in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Our results showed that both OTC and OTC‐bone residues significantly induced the T lymphocyte and non‐T cell secretion of interferon (IFN)‐γ, as cytokine involved in inflammatory responses in humans as well as in animals. These results may suggest a possible implication for new potential human and animal health risks depending on the entry of tetracyclines in the food‐processing chain. PMID:26537863

  7. Potassium currents inhibition by gambierol analogs prevents human T lymphocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Rubiolo, J A; Vale, C; Martín, V; Fuwa, H; Sasaki, M; Botana, L M

    2015-07-01

    Gambierol is a marine polycyclic ether toxin, produced along with ciguatoxin congeners by the dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus. We have recently reported that two truncated skeletal analogs of gambierol comprising the EFGH- and BCDEFGH-rings of the parent compound showed similar potency to gambierol on voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv) inhibition in neurons. Gambierol and its truncated analogs share the main crucial elements for biological activity, which are the C28=C29 double bond within the H-ring and the unsaturated side chain. Since Kv channels are critical for the regulation of calcium signaling, proliferation, secretion and migration in human T lymphocytes, we evaluated the activity of both the tetracyclic and heptacyclic analogs of gambierol on potassium currents in resting T lymphocyte and their effects on interleukin-2 (IL-2) release and gene expression in activated T lymphocytes. The results presented in this work clearly demonstrate that both truncated analogs of gambierol inhibit Kv channels present in resting T lymphocytes (Kv1.3) and prevented lymphocyte activation by concanavalin A. The main effects of the heptacyclic and tetracyclic analogs of gambierol in human T cells are: (1) inhibition of potassium channels in resting and concanavalin-activated T cells in the nanomolar range, (2) inhibition of IL-2 release from concanavalin-activated T cells and (3) negatively affect the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation and immune response observed in concanavalin-activated lymphocytes. These results together with the lack of toxicity in this cellular model, indicates that both analogs of gambierol have additional potential for the development of therapeutic tools in autoimmune diseases.

  8. Spontaneous secretion of interferon γ and interleukin 4 by human intraepithelial and lamina propria gut lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Carol, M; Lambrechts, A; Van Gossum, A; Libin, M; Goldman, M; Mascart-Lemone, F

    1998-01-01

    Background—Cytokines secreted by intestinal T lymphocytes probably play a critical role in regulation of the gut associated immune responses. 
Aims—To quantify interferon γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin 4 (IL-4) secreting cells (SC) among human intraepithelial (IEL) and lamina propria (LPL) lymphocytes from the duodenum and right colon in non-pathological situations and in the absence of in vitro stimulation. 
Patients—Duodenal and right colonic biopsy specimens were obtained from patients with no inflammation of the intestinal mucosa. 
Methods—Intraepithelial and lamina propria cell suspensions were assayed for numbers of cells spontaneously secreting IFN-γ and IL-4 by a two site reverse enzyme linked immunospot technique (ELISPOT). 
Results—The relatively high proportion of duodenal lymphocytes spontaneously secreting IFN-γ (IEL 3.6%; LPL 1.9%) and IL-4 (IEL 1.3%; LPL 0.7%) contrasted with the very low numbers of spontaneously IFN-γ SC and the absence of spontaneously IL-4 SC among peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In the basal state, both IFN-γ and IL-4 were mainly produced by CD4+ cells. Within the colon, only 0.2% of IEL and LPL secreted IFN-γ in the basal state, and 0.1% secreted IL-4. 
Conclusions—Compared with peripheral lymphocytes substantial proportions of intestinal epithelial and lamina propria lymphocytes spontaneously secrete IFN-γ and/or IL-4. These cytokines are probably involved in the normal homoeostasis of the human intestinal mucosa. Disturbances in their secretion could play a role in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal diseases. 

 Keywords: intestinal lymphocytes; ELISPOT; interferon γ; interleukin 4 PMID:9659157

  9. Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts Are Susceptible to Formation of Human Lymphocytic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Gennadiy; Ugolkov, Andrey; Rohan, Stephen; Kulesza, Piotr; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Gursel, Demirkan; Mathews, Jeremy; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Wei, Jian J; Mazar, Andrew P

    2015-09-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models have emerged as a new approach to evaluate the effects of cancer drugs on patients' personalized tumor grafts enabling to select the best treatment for the cancer patient and providing a new tool for oncology drug developers. Here, we report that human tumors engrafted in immunodeficient mice are susceptible to formation of B-and T-cell PDX tumors. We xenografted human primary and metastatic tumor samples into immunodeficient mice and found that a fraction of PDX tumors generated from patients' samples of breast, colon, pancreatic, bladder and renal cancer were histologically similar to lymphocytic neoplasms. Moreover, we found that the first passage of breast and pancreatic cancer PDX tumors after initial transplantation of the tumor pieces from the same human tumor graft could grow as a lymphocytic tumor in one mouse and as an adenocarcinoma in another mouse. Whereas subcutaneous PDX tumors resembling human adenocarcinoma histology were slow growing and non-metastatic, we found that subcutaneous PDX lymphocytic tumors were fast growing and formed large metastatic lesions in mouse lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and spleen. PDX lymphocytic tumors were comprised of B-cells which were Epstein-Barr virus positive and expressed CD45 and CD20. Because B-cells are typically present in malignant solid tumors, formation of B-cell tumor may evolve in a wide range of PDX tumor models. Although PDX tumor models show great promise in the development of personalized therapy for cancer patients, our results suggest that confidence in any given PDX tumor model requires careful screening of lymphocytic markers. PMID:26476081

  10. Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts Are Susceptible to Formation of Human Lymphocytic Tumors1

    PubMed Central

    Bondarenko, Gennadiy; Ugolkov, Andrey; Rohan, Stephen; Kulesza, Piotr; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Gursel, Demirkan; Mathews, Jeremy; O’Halloran, Thomas V.; Wei, Jian J.; Mazar, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models have emerged as a new approach to evaluate the effects of cancer drugs on patients’ personalized tumor grafts enabling to select the best treatment for the cancer patient and providing a new tool for oncology drug developers. Here, we report that human tumors engrafted in immunodeficient mice are susceptible to formation of B-and T-cell PDX tumors. We xenografted human primary and metastatic tumor samples into immunodeficient mice and found that a fraction of PDX tumors generated from patients’ samples of breast, colon, pancreatic, bladder and renal cancer were histologically similar to lymphocytic neoplasms. Moreover, we found that the first passage of breast and pancreatic cancer PDX tumors after initial transplantation of the tumor pieces from the same human tumor graft could grow as a lymphocytic tumor in one mouse and as an adenocarcinoma in another mouse. Whereas subcutaneous PDX tumors resembling human adenocarcinoma histology were slow growing and non-metastatic, we found that subcutaneous PDX lymphocytic tumors were fast growing and formed large metastatic lesions in mouse lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and spleen. PDX lymphocytic tumors were comprised of B-cells which were Epstein-Barr virus positive and expressed CD45 and CD20. Because B-cells are typically present in malignant solid tumors, formation of B-cell tumor may evolve in a wide range of PDX tumor models. Although PDX tumor models show great promise in the development of personalized therapy for cancer patients, our results suggest that confidence in any given PDX tumor model requires careful screening of lymphocytic markers. PMID:26476081

  11. Epstein-Barr virus receptor expression on human CD8+ (cytotoxic/suppressor) T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sauvageau, G; Stocco, R; Kasparian, S; Menezes, J

    1990-02-01

    In 1977 we showed that cells of a human lymphocytic leukaemia-derived T line (Molt-4) have receptors for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). More recently, EBV-positive human T cell lymphomas have been recognized and human T cell lines containing the EBV genome have been established in vitro. To understand better the interaction of EBV with T cells, we decided to determine first whether human peripheral blood T lymphocytes express receptors for EBV. Using flow cytometry we examined the binding of both lymphocyte-transforming (B95-8) and non-transforming (P3HR-1) strains of EBV to T lymphocyte subpopulations, using a double labelling technique with T cell-specific phycoerythrinated monoclonal antibodies (Leu 2a) and fluoresceinated viral preparation. Our results suggest that, in general, about 50% of the CD8+ (or suppressor/cytotoxic) T cell subpopulation from both EBV-seropositive and -seronegative individuals can bind EBV. EBV receptor expression on these T cells was about 10 and 51 times less than that on Molt-4 and Raji (an EBV receptor-positive B cell line) cells, respectively. The specificity of this binding was demonstrated by the inhibition of attachment of viral preparations preincubated with a monoclonal antibody directed against the viral ligand (gp240/350), and by preincubating these target T cells with unlabelled virus. We were unable to detect EBV-induced antigens in infected T cells, suggesting that, as in Molt-4 cells, virus internalization may not occur in fresh T cells and/or that the virus receptor may not be completely functional. We were also unable to detect C3d (or CR2) receptors on these T cells, or to inhibit virus attachment by treating the targets with an anti-CR2 monoclonal antibody (OKB7), suggesting that the EBV receptor on CD8+ peripheral blood lymphocytes is different from that on B cells. PMID:2155291

  12. 4-Quinolone drugs affect cell cycle progression and function of human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Forsgren, A; Schlossman, S F; Tedder, T F

    1987-01-01

    Most antibacterial agents do not affect human lymphocyte function, but a few are inhibitory. In contrast, a pronounced increase in the incorporation of [3H]thymidine in the presence of 4-quinolones was observed in these studies. The uptake of [3H]thymidine into DNA (trichloroacetic acid precipitable) was significantly increased in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes when they were exposed to eight new 4-quinolone derivatives, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, A-56619, A-56620, amifloxacin, enoxacin, and pefloxacin, at 1.6 to 6.25 micrograms/ml for 5 days. Four less antibacterially active 4-quinolones (nalidixic acid, cinoxacin, flumequine, and pipemidic acid) stimulated [3H]thymidine incorporation only at higher concentrations or not at all. Kinetic studies showed that incorporation of [3H]thymidine was not affected or slightly inhibited by ciprofloxacin 2 days after phytohemagglutinin stimulation but was increased on days 3 to 6. The total incorporation of [3H]thymidine from day 1 to day 6 after phytohemagglutinin stimulation was increased by 42 to 45% at 5 to 20 micrograms of ciprofloxacin per ml. Increased [3H]thymidine incorporation was also seen when human lymphocytes were stimulated with mitogens other than phytohemagglutinin. Ciprofloxacin added at the start of the culture had a more pronounced effect on [3H]thymidine incorporation than when added later. In spite of the apparent increase in DNA synthesis, lymphocyte growth was inhibited by 20 micrograms of ciprofloxacin per ml, and cell cycle analysis showed that ciprofloxacin inhibited progression through the cell cycle. In addition, immunoglobulin secretion by human lymphocytes stimulated by pokeweed mitogen for Epstein-Barr virus was inhibited by approximately 50% at 5 micrograms of ciprofloxacin per ml. These results suggest that the 4-quinolone drugs may also affect eucaryotic cell function in vitro, but additional studies are needed to establish an in vivo relevance. PMID:3606076

  13. Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts Are Susceptible to Formation of Human Lymphocytic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Gennadiy; Ugolkov, Andrey; Rohan, Stephen; Kulesza, Piotr; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Gursel, Demirkan; Mathews, Jeremy; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Wei, Jian J; Mazar, Andrew P

    2015-09-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models have emerged as a new approach to evaluate the effects of cancer drugs on patients' personalized tumor grafts enabling to select the best treatment for the cancer patient and providing a new tool for oncology drug developers. Here, we report that human tumors engrafted in immunodeficient mice are susceptible to formation of B-and T-cell PDX tumors. We xenografted human primary and metastatic tumor samples into immunodeficient mice and found that a fraction of PDX tumors generated from patients' samples of breast, colon, pancreatic, bladder and renal cancer were histologically similar to lymphocytic neoplasms. Moreover, we found that the first passage of breast and pancreatic cancer PDX tumors after initial transplantation of the tumor pieces from the same human tumor graft could grow as a lymphocytic tumor in one mouse and as an adenocarcinoma in another mouse. Whereas subcutaneous PDX tumors resembling human adenocarcinoma histology were slow growing and non-metastatic, we found that subcutaneous PDX lymphocytic tumors were fast growing and formed large metastatic lesions in mouse lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and spleen. PDX lymphocytic tumors were comprised of B-cells which were Epstein-Barr virus positive and expressed CD45 and CD20. Because B-cells are typically present in malignant solid tumors, formation of B-cell tumor may evolve in a wide range of PDX tumor models. Although PDX tumor models show great promise in the development of personalized therapy for cancer patients, our results suggest that confidence in any given PDX tumor model requires careful screening of lymphocytic markers.

  14. Efficient gene transfer into normal human B lymphocytes with the chimeric adenoviral vector Ad5/F35.

    PubMed

    Jung, Daniel; Néron, Sonia; Drouin, Mathieu; Jacques, Annie

    2005-09-01

    The failure to efficiently introduce genes into normal cells such as human B lymphocytes limits the characterization of their function on cellular growth, differentiation and survival. Recent studies have shown that a new adenoviral vector Ad5/F35 can efficiently transduce human haematopoietic CD34+ progenitor cells. In this study, we compared the gene transfer efficiencies of the Ad5/F35 vector to that of the parental vector Ad5 in human B lymphocytes. Peripheral blood B cells obtained from healthy individuals were cultured in vitro using CD40-CD154 system. Normal B lymphocytes were infected with replication-defectives Ad5 and Ad5/F35, both containing the GFP reporter gene, and transduction efficiencies were monitored by flow cytometry. Ad5 was highly ineffective, infecting only about 5% of human B lymphocytes. In contrast, Ad5/F35 transduced up to 60% of human B lymphocytes and GFP expression could be detected for up to 5 days post infection. Importantly, physiology of B lymphocytes such as proliferation, viability and antibodies secretion were unaffected following Ad5/F35 transduction. Finally, we observed that memory B lymphocytes were more susceptible to Ad5/F35 infection than naïve B lymphocytes. Thus, our results demonstrate that the adenoviral vector Ad5/F35 is an efficient tool for the functional characterization of genes in B lymphopoiesis.

  15. CD8 sup + T lymphocytes of patients with AIDS maintain normal broad cytolytic function despite the loss of human immunodeficiency virus-specific cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Pantaleo, G.; De Maria, A.; Koenig, S.; Butini, L.; Moss, B.; Lane, H.C.; Fauci, A.S. ); Baseler, M. )

    1990-06-01

    In this study, the authors have investigated the potential mechanisms responsible for the loss of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific cytolytic activity in the advanced stages of HIV-1 infection. They have demonstrated that HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes are predominantly contained within the CD8{sup +}DR{sup +} subset. Furthermore, they have shown by a redirected killing assay that there is a dichotomy between HIV-1-specific cytolytic activity and broad cytolytic potential since the cytolytic machinery of CD8{sup +}DR{sup +} cells is still functioning even in patients with AIDS who have lost their HIV-1-specific cytolytic activity. In addition, by comparative analysis of these two types of cytolytic activity over time they have demonstrated a progressive loss of HIV-1-specific cytolytic activity in the advanced stages of the disease, whereas the cytolytic potential remained unchanged regardless of the clinical stage. On the basis of these results, they propose that the loss of HIV-1-specific cytolytic activity in HIV-1-infected individuals may result at least in part from a progressive decrease in the pool of HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes belonging to the CD8{sup +}DR{sup +} subset whose ability to expand has been impaired.

  16. The effects of niacin on DNA repair after N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine treatment in normal human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ogata, S; Okumura, K; Taguchi, H

    1997-12-01

    We have investigated the effects of niacin on NAD levels and on DNA repair in human lymphocytes. When lymphocytes were incubated in culture medium with various concentrations of niacin, incubation of lymphocytes with nicotinic acid at 5 microM or nicotinamide at 10 mM caused a 2-3 fold increase in NAD content. Under these conditions lymphocytes were treated with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Interestingly, the rejoining of DNA strand breaks was promoted by nicotinic acid but nicotinamide inhibited the rejoining.

  17. Protective Effect of Onion Extract on Bleomycin-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon Hee; Lee, Joong Won; Woo, Hae Dong; Lee, Sunyeong; Kim, Yang Jee; Lee, Younghyun; Shin, Sangah; Joung, Hyojee; Chung, Hai Won

    2016-01-01

    Following one of the world’s largest nuclear accidents, occured at Fukushima, Japan in 2011, a significant scientific effort has focused on minimizing the potential adverse health effects due to radiation exposure. The use of natural dietary antioxidants to reduce the risk of radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage is a simple strategy for minimizing radiation-related cancer rates and improving overall health. The onion is among the richest sources of dietary flavonoids and is an important food for increasing their overall intake. Therefore, we examined the effect of an onion extract on cyto- and geno-toxicity in human lymphocytes treated with bleomycin (BLM), a radiomimetic agent. In addition, we measured the frequency of micronuclei (MN) and DNA damage following treatment with BLM using a cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay and a single cell gel electrophoresis assay. We observed a significant increase in cell viability in lymphocytes treated with onion extract then exposed to BLM compared to cells treated with BLM alone. The frequency of BLM induced MN and DNA damage increased in a dose-dependent manner; however, when lymphocytes were pretreated with onion extract (10 and 20 μL/mL), the frequency of BLM-induced MN was decreased at all doses of BLM and DNA damage was decreased at 3 μg/mL of BLM. These results suggest that onion extract may have protective effects against BLM-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in human lymphocytes. PMID:26907305

  18. Inhibitory effects of extracellular products from oral bacteria on human fibroblasts and stimulated lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Higerd, T B; Vesole, D H; Goust, J M

    1978-01-01

    Extracellular products of 12 strains of Streptococcus mutans and 5 additional species of oral bacteria were analyzed for their ability to inhibit proliferation of fibroblastoid cells (HeLa and AV3) and blast transformation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from normal individuals. Products from S. mutans strains AHT and BHT, Streptococcus intermedius, and Actinomyces viscosus inhibited [3H]thymidine uptake by fibroblastoid cells and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes. Products from S. mutans E49, Streptococcus salivarius, and Actinomyces naeslundii inhibited blast transformation of human lymphocytes but did not significantly inhibit the growth of fibroblastoid cells. Preparations from S. intermedius gave the greatest inhibitory activity against both target cell types; initial characterization of this preparation suggested a single factor active in both assays, in that the heat lability and Sephadex G-200 elution profile were similar for the inhibitory activity seen with the two cell types. The molecular weight of the inhibitor, estimated by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200 and Ultragel AcA34, was approximately 160,000. The results strongly suggest that oral bacteria produce heat-labile substances that interfere with fibroblast proliferation and alter the lymphocytic immunological response. Images PMID:689736

  19. Inhibitory effects of extracellular products from oral bacteria on human fibroblasts and stimulated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Higerd, T B; Vesole, D H; Goust, J M

    1978-08-01

    Extracellular products of 12 strains of Streptococcus mutans and 5 additional species of oral bacteria were analyzed for their ability to inhibit proliferation of fibroblastoid cells (HeLa and AV3) and blast transformation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from normal individuals. Products from S. mutans strains AHT and BHT, Streptococcus intermedius, and Actinomyces viscosus inhibited [3H]thymidine uptake by fibroblastoid cells and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes. Products from S. mutans E49, Streptococcus salivarius, and Actinomyces naeslundii inhibited blast transformation of human lymphocytes but did not significantly inhibit the growth of fibroblastoid cells. Preparations from S. intermedius gave the greatest inhibitory activity against both target cell types; initial characterization of this preparation suggested a single factor active in both assays, in that the heat lability and Sephadex G-200 elution profile were similar for the inhibitory activity seen with the two cell types. The molecular weight of the inhibitor, estimated by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200 and Ultragel AcA34, was approximately 160,000. The results strongly suggest that oral bacteria produce heat-labile substances that interfere with fibroblast proliferation and alter the lymphocytic immunological response. PMID:689736

  20. Protective Effect of Onion Extract on Bleomycin-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Human Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoon Hee; Lee, Joong Won; Woo, Hae Dong; Lee, Sunyeong; Kim, Yang Jee; Lee, Younghyun; Shin, Sangah; Joung, Hyojee; Chung, Hai Won

    2016-02-19

    Following one of the world's largest nuclear accidents, occured at Fukushima, Japan in 2011, a significant scientific effort has focused on minimizing the potential adverse health effects due to radiation exposure. The use of natural dietary antioxidants to reduce the risk of radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage is a simple strategy for minimizing radiation-related cancer rates and improving overall health. The onion is among the richest sources of dietary flavonoids and is an important food for increasing their overall intake. Therefore, we examined the effect of an onion extract on cyto- and geno-toxicity in human lymphocytes treated with bleomycin (BLM), a radiomimetic agent. In addition, we measured the frequency of micronuclei (MN) and DNA damage following treatment with BLM using a cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay and a single cell gel electrophoresis assay. We observed a significant increase in cell viability in lymphocytes treated with onion extract then exposed to BLM compared to cells treated with BLM alone. The frequency of BLM induced MN and DNA damage increased in a dose-dependent manner; however, when lymphocytes were pretreated with onion extract (10 and 20 μL/mL), the frequency of BLM-induced MN was decreased at all doses of BLM and DNA damage was decreased at 3 μg/mL of BLM. These results suggest that onion extract may have protective effects against BLM-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in human lymphocytes.

  1. The tax gene of human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 is essential for transformation of human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, T M; Pettiford, S M; Green, P L

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)-mediated transformation and induction of malignancy is unknown; however, several studies have implicated the viral gene product, Tax. Conclusive evidence for the role of Tax in the HTLV malignant process has been impeded by the inability to mutate tax in the context of an infectious virus and dissociate viral replication from cellular transformation. To circumvent this problem we constructed a mutant of HTLV type 2 (HTLV-2) that replicates by a Tax-independent mechanism. For these studies, the Tax response element in the viral long terminal repeat was replaced with the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter enhancer (C-enh). Transcription of the chimeric HTLV-2 (HTLVC-enh) was efficiently directed by this heterologous promoter. Also, the chimeric virus transformed primary human T lymphocytes with an efficiency similar to that of wild-type HTLV-2. A tax-knockout virus, termed HTLVC-enhDeltaTax, was constructed to directly assess the importance of Tax in cellular transformation. Transfection and infection studies indicated that HTLVC-enhDeltaTax was replication competent; however, HTLVC-enhDeltaTax failed to transform primary human T lymphocytes. We conclude that Tax is essential for HTLV-mediated transformation of human T lymphocytes. Furthermore, this chimeric HTLV, that replicates in the absence of Tax, should facilitate studies to determine the precise mechanism of T-lymphocyte transformation by HTLV. PMID:8764028

  2. Application of cytogenetic endpoints and Comet assay on human lymphocytes treated with vincristine in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kopjar, N; Garaj-Vrhovac, V

    2000-01-01

    The genotoxic potential of vincristine is assessed on human peripheral blood lymphocytes following administration of the drug at a dose 0.0875 microg/ml by use of single cell gel electrophoresis - Comet assay (SCGE), analysis of structural chromosome aberrations (CA), micronucleus assay (MN) and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis. In vitro treatment of human lymphocytes with vincristine was performed on cells in G0 phase, as well on lymphocyte cultures 24 hours after stimulation with mitogen phytohemagglutinine. For the Comet assay at 24, 48 and 72 h the treated cells were embedded in agarose on slides, lysed with alkaline lysis solution and exposed to an electric field. DNA migrated within the agarose and formed comets whose length depends on the amount of DNA damage. For the analysis of structural CA cells were grown on F-10 medium for 48 hours, and for MN and SCE analysis for 72 hours. The results on SCGE showed an increase in tail length compared to control both in cells treated in G0 and in cells treated 24 h after mitogen stimulation. The amount of DNA damage was higher in cells treated with vincristine 24 h after mitogen stimulation. Administered concentration of drug caused total inhibition of lymphocytes growth in 72-h cultures for MN and SCE analysis indicating strong microtubule distruptive effects of vincristine. Analysis of structural CA reveals chromatid breaks and acentric fragments as the main aberration types both in cells treated in G0 and in cells treated 24 h after mitogen stimulation. Number of these aberrations was higher in cells treated in G0 phase. Results obtained in this study by use of different cytogenetic endpoints confirmed that vincristine exhibits both aneugenic and clastogenic effects on human lymphocytes. PMID:11043839

  3. Met-regulated expression signature defines a subset of human hepatocellular carcinomas with poor prognosis and aggressive phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kaposi-Novak, Pal; Lee, Ju-Seog; Gòmez-Quiroz, Luis; Coulouarn, Cédric; Factor, Valentina M.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.

    2006-01-01

    Identification of specific gene expression signatures characteristic of oncogenic pathways is an important step toward molecular classification of human malignancies. Aberrant activation of the Met signaling pathway is frequently associated with tumor progression and metastasis. In this study, we defined the Met-dependent gene expression signature using global gene expression profiling of WT and Met-deficient primary mouse hepatocytes. Newly identified transcriptional targets of the Met pathway included genes involved in the regulation of oxidative stress responses as well as cell motility, cytoskeletal organization, and angiogenesis. To assess the importance of a Met-regulated gene expression signature, a comparative functional genomic approach was applied to 242 human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and 7 metastatic liver lesions. Cluster analysis revealed that a subset of human HCCs and all liver metastases shared the Met-induced expression signature. Furthermore, the presence of the Met signature showed significant correlation with increased vascular invasion rate and microvessel density as well as with decreased mean survival time of HCC patients. We conclude that the genetically defined gene expression signatures in combination with comparative functional genomics constitute an attractive paradigm for defining both the function of oncogenic pathways and the clinically relevant subgroups of human cancers. PMID:16710476

  4. Rosetting of activated human T lymphocytes with autologous erythrocytes. Definition of the receptor and ligand molecules as CD2 and lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3 (LFA-3).

    PubMed

    Plunkett, M L; Sanders, M E; Selvaraj, P; Dustin, M L; Springer, T A

    1987-03-01

    CD2, also known as LFA-2, T11, and the E rosette receptor, is a T lymphocyte surface protein functionally important in adhesion to target cells and T cell triggering. LFA-3 is a widely distributed cell surface protein that functions in adhesion on target cells. We find that LFA-3 is expressed on human E, and that CD2 is a receptor for LFA-3 that mediates T cell adhesion to human E. Pretreatment of T lymphocytes with CD2 mAb or of E with LFA-3 mAb inhibits rosetting. Purified CD2 molecules bind to human E and inhibit rosetting. 125I-CD2 binding to E is inhibited by LFA-3 mAb; reciprocally, binding of LFA-3 mAb to human E is inhibited by pretreatment with purified CD2. Higher concentrations of CD2 aggregate human E; aggregation is inhibited by mAb to LFA-3.

  5. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-enriched IgG induces adhesion of human T lymphocytes to extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Y; Lider, O; Gilburd, B; Hershkoviz, R; Meroni, P L; Wiik, A; Shoenfeld, Y

    1997-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) can activate neutrophils to adhere to endothelium, degranulate, and cause endothelial cell injury. These data have lead to the hypothesis that the T cell inflammatory response causing the vasculitis in Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is secondary to stimulation of neutrophils by ANCA. So far there is no evidence for a direct effect of ANCA on lymphocytes. The present study was designed to examine whether lymphocytes can be directly stimulated by ANCA to adhere to endothelial extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Human and mouse ANCA-enriched IgG were tested for their ability to increase adhesion of human T lymphocytes to fibronectin, laminin, and intact ECM. Incubation of human T lymphocytes with human ANCA-enriched IgG increased adhesion of the lymphocytes in a dose-dependent manner to fibronectin, laminin, and intact ECM (the percentage adhesion to intact ECM was 55.7 +/- 3.1 and 45.0 +/- 1.0% for lymphocytes incubated with human IgG containing ANCA or control human IgG, respectively; P = 0.0045). The same induction of adhesion to fibronectin, laminin, and intact ECM was observed when the cells were incubated with the F(ab)2 fragment of ANCA-enriched IgG. Similarly, ANCA-enriched IgG produced in mice increased the adhesion of lymphocytes to fibronectin (the percentage adhesion to fibronectin was 29.7 +/- 4.3 and 16.6 +/- 1.9% for lymphocytes incubated with mouse IgG-ANCA or control mouse IgG, respectively; P = 0.0008). These results may suggest that ANCA can directly stimulate lymphocytes to adhere to endothelial ECM and to induce the vasculitic lesions of WG. It remains to be shown by which mechanisms ANCA stimulate lymphocytes to adhere to ECM. PMID:9175913

  6. The Identification of Mitogen Responding Subpopulations of Human Lymphocytes by Flow Polarimeter Fluorescence Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Sandra Lynn

    I have developed a method to identify the mitogen responding subpopulation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes. This method employs a flow polarimeter to measure the distribution of the intensity and the polarization of intracellular fluorescein fluorescence in suspensions of mononuclear cells isolated on density gradients from the peripheral blood of donors. I have used the change in the fluorescence of cells exposed to the mitogens PHA and Con A to identify the responding cells and to quantitate this number. I have found that for most donors, the responding cells constitute about 20-40% of the lymphocyte population. The percent of responding cells decreases to zero in patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (2 patients) and chronic lymphocyte leukemia (10 patients). For a variety of patients with other types of cancer, the responding fraction was not significantly different from healthy controls. Moreover, the number of responding cells does not appear to be age dependent in the age range of 20-80 years. I also found that the change in fluorescence polarization correlated strongly with changes in fluorescence intensity induced by mitogens--the number of responding cells, therefore can be estimated either from the intensity or polarization distributions. The shapes of fluorescence distributions depend strongly on a number of variables including the composition and density of the lymphocyte isolating medium, the mitogen and dye concentrations, the length of incubation with mitogen or dye, and the potassium, calcium, and magnesium concentrations in the medium. In the case of fluorescein, I have worked out a methodology that allows a consistent estimate of the responding lymphocyte number. I have also investigated the use of the dye carbocyanine for the same purpose. This dye presumably identifies the mitogen responding lymphocytes on the basis of changes in membrane potential. The results with carbocyanine were found to depend on a number of variables and I could

  7. Expansion of human tumor infiltrating lymphocytes for use in immunotherapy trials.

    PubMed

    Topalian, S L; Muul, L M; Solomon, D; Rosenberg, S A

    1987-08-24

    The potential utility of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in the adoptive immunotherapy of human tumors has been suggested by murine experiments showing these cells to be 50-100 times more powerful than LAK cells in treating advanced metastatic disease. A method for the large-scale expansion of human TIL for the use of these cells in clinical trials is described in this report. TIL were successfully expanded on an experimental scale from 24 of 25 consecutive human tumors, including six melanomas, ten sarcomas, and eight adenocarcinomas. Tumors were digested enzymatically to yield single cell suspensions which were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium with 10% human serum and 1000 U/ml recombinant interleukin-2. Lymphocytes constituted from 3% to 74% of single cell tumor suspensions, and expanded from 2.9-fold to 9.1 X 10(8)-fold over a culture period ranging from 14 to 100 days. Nine of 24 TIL cultures lysed fresh autologous tumor targets in 4 h chromium release assays. Cell surface phenotyping identified cultured TIL as activated cytotoxic/suppressor T cells. Subsequently, large-scale expansion of TIL was successful in generating more than 10(10) lymphocytes in five of eight consecutive cases. Clinical trials employing the adoptive transfer of expanded TIL to patients with metastatic disease have begun. PMID:3305708

  8. Blister fluid T lymphocytes during toxic epidermal necrolysis are functional cytotoxic cells which express human natural killer (NK) inhibitory receptors

    PubMed Central

    Le Cleach, L; Delaire, S; Boumsell, L; Bagot, M; Bourgault-Villada, I; Bensussan, A; Roujeau, J C

    2000-01-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a rare life-threatening adverse drug reaction characterized by a massive destruction of the epidermis. Immunohistological studies of skin biopsies of TEN showed infiltrates of predominantly CD8+ T lymphocytes even though other authors reported a prominent involvement of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. The aim of this study was to characterize phenotypically and functionally the cells present in the cutaneous blister fluid of four patients with TEN. We first determined that lymphocytes were predominant in blister fluid obtained early, while monocytes/macrophages later became the most important population. We then showed that this lymphocyte population, mainly CD3+CD8+, corresponded to a peculiar cell subset as they expressed cutaneous leucocyte antigen, killer inhibitory receptors KIR/KAR and failed to express CD28 molecule. Functionally, we determined that blister T lymphocytes had a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)- and NK-like cytotoxicity. The role of this cytotoxic lymphocyte population present at the site of lesions during TEN remains to be understood. PMID:10606987

  9. Novel Observations From Next-Generation RNA Sequencing of Highly Purified Human Adult and Fetal Islet Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Blodgett, David M; Nowosielska, Anetta; Afik, Shaked; Pechhold, Susanne; Cura, Anthony J; Kennedy, Norman J; Kim, Soyoung; Kucukural, Alper; Davis, Roger J; Kent, Sally C; Greiner, Dale L; Garber, Manuel G; Harlan, David M; diIorio, Philip

    2015-09-01

    Understanding distinct gene expression patterns of normal adult and developing fetal human pancreatic α- and β-cells is crucial for developing stem cell therapies, islet regeneration strategies, and therapies designed to increase β-cell function in patients with diabetes (type 1 or 2). Toward that end, we have developed methods to highly purify α-, β-, and δ-cells from human fetal and adult pancreata by intracellular staining for the cell-specific hormone content, sorting the subpopulations by flow cytometry, and, using next-generation RNA sequencing, we report the detailed transcriptomes of fetal and adult α- and β-cells. We observed that human islet composition was not influenced by age, sex, or BMI, and transcripts for inflammatory gene products were noted in fetal β-cells. In addition, within highly purified adult glucagon-expressing α-cells, we observed surprisingly high insulin mRNA expression, but not insulin protein expression. This transcriptome analysis from highly purified islet α- and β-cell subsets from fetal and adult pancreata offers clear implications for strategies that seek to increase insulin expression in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25931473

  10. Unique and shared signaling pathways cooperate to regulate the differentiation of human CD4+ T cells into distinct effector subsets.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cindy S; Wong, Natalie; Rao, Geetha; Nguyen, Akira; Avery, Danielle T; Payne, Kathryn; Torpy, James; O'Young, Patrick; Deenick, Elissa; Bustamante, Jacinta; Puel, Anne; Okada, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; Elliott, Michael; Sebnem Kilic, Sara; El Baghdadi, Jamila; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki; Bousfiha, Aziz; Robertson, Nic; Hambleton, Sophie; Arkwright, Peter D; French, Martyn; Blincoe, Annaliesse K; Hsu, Peter; Campbell, Dianne E; Stormon, Michael O; Wong, Melanie; Adelstein, Stephen; Fulcher, David A; Cook, Matthew C; Stepensky, Polina; Boztug, Kaan; Beier, Rita; Ikincioğullari, Aydan; Ziegler, John B; Gray, Paul; Picard, Capucine; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Phan, Tri Giang; Grimbacher, Bodo; Warnatz, Klaus; Holland, Steven M; Uzel, Gulbu; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Tangye, Stuart G

    2016-07-25

    Naive CD4(+) T cells differentiate into specific effector subsets-Th1, Th2, Th17, and T follicular helper (Tfh)-that provide immunity against pathogen infection. The signaling pathways involved in generating these effector cells are partially known. However, the effects of mutations underlying human primary immunodeficiencies on these processes, and how they compromise specific immune responses, remain unresolved. By studying individuals with mutations in key signaling pathways, we identified nonredundant pathways regulating human CD4(+) T cell differentiation in vitro. IL12Rβ1/TYK2 and IFN-γR/STAT1 function in a feed-forward loop to induce Th1 cells, whereas IL-21/IL-21R/STAT3 signaling is required for Th17, Tfh, and IL-10-secreting cells. IL12Rβ1/TYK2 and NEMO are also required for Th17 induction. Strikingly, gain-of-function STAT1 mutations recapitulated the impact of dominant-negative STAT3 mutations on Tfh and Th17 cells, revealing a putative inhibitory effect of hypermorphic STAT1 over STAT3. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the requirements for human T cell effector function, and explain clinical manifestations of these immunodeficient conditions. Furthermore, they identify molecules that could be targeted to modulate CD4(+) T cell effector function in the settings of infection, vaccination, or immune dysregulation. PMID:27401342

  11. Defining antigen-specific plasmablast and memory B cell subsets in human blood after viral infection or vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ellebedy, Ali H; Jackson, Katherine J L; Kissick, Haydn T; Nakaya, Helder I; Davis, Carl W; Roskin, Krishna M; McElroy, Anita K; Oshansky, Christine M; Elbein, Rivka; Thomas, Shine; Lyon, George M; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Mehta, Aneesh K; Thomas, Paul G; Boyd, Scott D; Ahmed, Rafi

    2016-10-01

    Antigen-specific B cells bifurcate into antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) and memory B cells (MBCs) after infection or vaccination. ASCs (plasmablasts) have been extensively studied in humans, but less is known about B cells that become activated but do not differentiate into plasmablasts. Here we have defined the phenotype and transcriptional program of a subset of antigen-specific B cells, which we have called 'activated B cells' (ABCs), that were distinct from ASCs and were committed to the MBC lineage. We detected ABCs in humans after infection with Ebola virus or influenza virus and also after vaccination. By simultaneously analyzing antigen-specific ASCs and ABCs in human blood after vaccination against influenza virus, we investigated the clonal overlap and extent of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in the ASC (effector) and ABC (memory) lineages. Longitudinal tracking of vaccination-induced hemagglutinin (HA)-specific clones revealed no overall increase in SHM over time, which suggested that repeated annual immunization might have limitations in enhancing the quality of influenza-virus-specific antibody.

  12. Defining antigen-specific plasmablast and memory B cell subsets in human blood after viral infection or vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ellebedy, Ali H; Jackson, Katherine J L; Kissick, Haydn T; Nakaya, Helder I; Davis, Carl W; Roskin, Krishna M; McElroy, Anita K; Oshansky, Christine M; Elbein, Rivka; Thomas, Shine; Lyon, George M; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Mehta, Aneesh K; Thomas, Paul G; Boyd, Scott D; Ahmed, Rafi

    2016-10-01

    Antigen-specific B cells bifurcate into antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) and memory B cells (MBCs) after infection or vaccination. ASCs (plasmablasts) have been extensively studied in humans, but less is known about B cells that become activated but do not differentiate into plasmablasts. Here we have defined the phenotype and transcriptional program of a subset of antigen-specific B cells, which we have called 'activated B cells' (ABCs), that were distinct from ASCs and were committed to the MBC lineage. We detected ABCs in humans after infection with Ebola virus or influenza virus and also after vaccination. By simultaneously analyzing antigen-specific ASCs and ABCs in human blood after vaccination against influenza virus, we investigated the clonal overlap and extent of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in the ASC (effector) and ABC (memory) lineages. Longitudinal tracking of vaccination-induced hemagglutinin (HA)-specific clones revealed no overall increase in SHM over time, which suggested that repeated annual immunization might have limitations in enhancing the quality of influenza-virus-specific antibody. PMID:27525369

  13. CTLA4 blockade induces frequent tumor infiltration by activated lymphocytes regardless of clinical responses in humans

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rong Rong; Jalil, Jason; Economou, James S.; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Koya, Richard C.; Mok, Stephen; Sazegar, Hooman; Seja, Elizabeth; Villanueva, Arturo; Gomez-Navarro, Jesus; Glaspy, John A.; Cochran, Alistair J.; Ribas, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Background CTLA4 blocking monoclonal antibodies provide durable clinical benefit in a subset of patients with advanced melanoma mediated by intratumoral lymphocytic infiltrates. A key question is defining if the intratumoral infiltration is a differentiating factor between patients with and without tumor responses. Methods Paired baseline and post-dosing tumor biopsies from 19 subjects, including three patients with an objective tumor response, were prospectively collected from patients with metastatic melanoma receiving the anti-CTLA4 antibody tremelimumab within a clinical trial with primary endpoint of quantitating CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) infiltration in tumors. Samples were analyzed for cell density using automated imaging capture, and further characterized for functional lymphocyte properties by assessing the cell activation markers HLA-DR and CD45RO, the cell proliferation marker Ki67 and the T regulatory cell marker FOXP3. Results There was a highly significant increase in intratumoral infiltration by CD8+ cells in biopsies taken after tremelimumab treatment. This included increases between 1-fold and 100-fold changes in 14 out of 18 evaluable cases regardless of clinical tumor response or progression. There was no difference between the absolute number, location or cell density of infiltrating cells between clinical responders and patients with non-responding lesions that showed acquired intratumoral infiltrates. There were similar levels of expression of T cell activation markers (CD45RO, HLA-DR) in both groups, and no difference in markers for cell replication (Ki67) or the suppressor cell marker FOXP3. Conclusion CTLA4 blockade induces frequent increases in intratumoral T cell infiltration despite which only a minority of patients have objective tumor responses. PMID:21558401

  14. Dendritic cells with lymphocyte-stimulating activity differentiate from human CD133 positive precursors.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Maria Ida; Pieri, Laura; Domenici, Lola; Urbani, Serena; Romano, Giovanni; Aldinucci, Alessandra; Ballerini, Clara; Monici, Monica; Saccardi, Riccardo; Basile, Venere; Bosi, Alberto; Romagnoli, Paolo

    2011-04-14

    CD133 is a hallmark of primitive myeloid progenitors. We have addressed whether human cord blood cells selected for CD133 can generate dendritic cells, and Langerhans cells in particular, in conditions that promote that generation from CD34(+) progenitors. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and anti-TGF-β1 antibody, respectively, were added in some experiments. With TGF-β, monocytoid cells were recognized after 7 days. Immunophenotypically immature dendritic cells were present at day 14. After 4 more days, the cells expressed CD54, CD80, CD83, and CD86 and were potent stimulators in mixed lymphocyte reaction; part of the cells expressed CD1a and langerin, but not Birbeck granules. Without TGF-β, only a small fraction of cells acquired a dendritic shape and expressed the maturation-related antigens, and lymphocytes were poorly stimulated. With anti-TGF-β, the cell growth was greatly hampered, CD54 and langerin were never expressed, and lymphocytes were stimulated weakly. In conclusion, CD133(+) progenitors can give rise in vitro, through definite steps, to mature, immunostimulatory dendritic cells with molecular features of Langerhans cells, although without Birbeck granules. Addition of TGF-β1 helps to stimulate cell growth and promotes the acquisition of mature immunophenotypical and functional features. Neither langerin nor Birbeck granules proved indispensable for lymphocyte stimulation.

  15. In vitro protection of human lymphocytes from toxic effects of chlorpyrifos by selenium-enriched medicines

    PubMed Central

    Navaei-Nigjeh, Mona; Asadi, Hamidreza; Baeeri, Maryam; Pedram, Sahar; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Chlorpyrifos (CP) is a broad-spectrum organophosphorus pesticide used extensively in agricultural and domestic pest control, accounting for 50% of the global insecticidal use. In the present study, protective effects of two selenium-enriched strong antioxidative medicines IMOD and Angipars were examined in human lymphocytes treated with CP in vitro. Materials and Methods: Isolated lymphocytes were exposed to 12 µg/ml CP either alone or in combination with effective doses (ED50) of IMOD (0.2 µg/ml) and Angipars (1 µg/ml). After 3 days incubation, the viability and oxidative stress markers including cellular lipid peroxidation (LPO), myeloperoxidase (MPO), total thiol molecules (TTM), and total antioxidant power (TAP) were evaluated. Also, the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as inflammatory index along with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and cell apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry. Results: Results indicated that effective doses of IMOD and Angipars reduced CP-exposed lymphocyte mortality rate along with oxidative stress. Both agents restored CP-induced elevation of TNF-α and protected the lymphocytes from CP-induced apoptosis and necrosis. Conclusion: Overall, results confirm that IMOD and Angipars reduce the toxic effects associated with CP through free radical scavenging and protection from apoptosis and necrosis. PMID:25945242

  16. Effect of inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism on alpha-aminoisobutyric acid transport in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Udey, M C; Parker, C W

    1982-02-01

    The role of arachidonic acid metabolism (or metabolites) in the modulation of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid transport in resting and concanavalin A-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes was evaluated using previously characterized inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism. Nordihydroguairetic acid (a nonselective antioxidant), 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (an inhibitor of lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase activities), indomethacin and acetylsalicylic acid (selective cyclooxygenase inhibitors), and 1-benzylimidazole, Ro-22-3581 and Ro-22-3582 (thromboxane synthetase inhibitors) proved to be potent inhibitors of amino acid transport activity in normal resting and lectin-activated lymphocytes at concentrations known to decrease thromboxane A2 production. The rank order of effectiveness of these various inhibitors compared favorably with their relative potencies as inhibitors of thromboxane B2 synthesis under the same conditions, as determined by radioimmunoassay. Inhibitory effects noted were not due to overt cytotoxicity and seemed to involve changes primarily in the Vmax and not the Km of the transport process. Drug-induced alterations in the magnitude of concanavalin A binding were not observed. These results suggest that the activity of amino acid transport systems can be influenced by certain arachidonic acid metabolites, probably thromboxanes, in both stimulated and unstimulated lymphocytes. In addition, these findings may provide a partial explanation for the observation that inhibitors of thromboxane formation prevent lymphocyte mitogenesis.

  17. Antimutagenic effect of aqueous extract from Agaricus brasiliensis on culture of human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Gameiro, Paula H; Nascimento, José S; Rocha, Beatriz H G; Piana, Clause F B; Santos, Raquel A; Takahashi, Catarina S

    2013-02-01

    The mushroom Agaricus brasiliensis (sun mushroom), native from the southeast of Brazil, is well known by its medicinal properties that include effects on diabetes, cholesterol levels, and osteoporosis. The antimutagenic effects of A. brasiliensis has been investigated recently and revealed some controversial results depending on the temperature by which the A. brasiliensis tea is obtained. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of the A. brasiliensis extract prepared in two different temperatures, 4°C and 25°C, on the doxorubicin-induced DNA strand breaks and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in human lymphocytes. The results demonstrated that A. brasiliensis was able to reduce the DXR-induced DNA damage in both temperatures; however, the CA test was more sensitive to demonstrate a better reduction when the cells were treated with an extract obtained at 25°C. A. brasiliensis extract obtained in different temperatures exhibited antigenotoxic and anticlastogenic effects in human lymphocytes.

  18. Marked reduction of radiation-induced micronuclei in human blood lymphocytes pretreated with melatonin

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayalaxmi; Reiter, R.J.; Leal, B.Z.

    1995-07-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes which were pretreated in vitro with melatonin, and endogenously synthesized pineal hormone, for 20 min at 37 {plus_minus} 1{degrees}C exhibited a significant and concentration-dependent reduction in the frequency of {gamma}radiation-induced micronuclei compared with irradiated cells which did not receive the pretreatment. The extent of the reduction observed with 2.0 mM melatonin was similar to that found in lymphocytes pretreated for 20 min with 1.0 M dimethylsulfoxide, a known free radical scavenger. These observations indicate that melatonin may have an active role in protection of humans against genetic damage due to endogenously produced free radicals, and also may be of use in reducing damage due to exposure to physical and chemical mutagens and carcinogens which generate free radicals. 25 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Induction of chromosome aberrations in cultured human lymphocytes treated with ethoxyquin.

    PubMed

    Blaszczyk, A; Osiecka, R; Skolimowski, J

    2003-12-01

    The chromosomal aberration test was employed to investigate the effect in vitro of a known antioxidant and food preservative, ethoxyquin (EQ, 1,2-dihydro-6-ethoxy-2,2,4-trimethylquinoline) on human chromosomes. The studies were undertaken because there are no published in vitro data on genotoxicity of EQ in mammalian cells and there are many reports pointing out that it may be harmful to animals and human beings. Lymphocytes obtained from three healthy donors were incubated with EQ (0.01-0.5mM) both with and without metabolic activation. Stability studies performed by HPLC analysis showed that EQ was stable under the conditions of the lymphocyte cultures. The results of the chromosome aberration assay showed that EQ induces chromosome aberrations: gaps and breaks as well as dicentrics and atypical translocation chromosomes.

  20. Engineered human embryonic stem cell-derived lymphocytes to study in vivo trafficking and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Knorr, David A; Bock, Allison; Brentjens, Renier J; Kaufman, Dan S

    2013-07-01

    Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived natural killer (NK) cells are a promising source of antitumor lymphocytes for immunotherapeutics. They also provide a genetically tractable platform well suited for the study of antitumor immunotherapies in preclinical models. We have previously demonstrated the potency of hESC-derived NK cells in vivo. Here we use both bioluminescent and fluorescent imaging to demonstrate trafficking of hESC-derived NK cells to tumors in vivo. Our dual-imaging approach allowed us to more specifically define the kinetics of NK cell trafficking to tumor sites. NK cell persistence and trafficking were further evaluated by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. This integrated approach provides a unique system to apply the use of human pluripotent stem cells to study the kinetics and biodistribution of adoptively transferred lymphocytes, advances broadly applicable to the field of immunotherapy.

  1. Conversions of excision-repairable DNA lesions to micronuclei within one cell cycle in human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Fenech, M.; Neville, S. )

    1992-01-01

    The human lymphocyte micronucleus (MN) assay is relatively insensitive to genotoxic agents that predominantly induce excision-repairable lesions such as adducts and abasic sites. In this study the authors have explored the possibility of using cytosine arabinoside (ARA) to convert excision-repairable DNA lesions to micronuclei (MN) within one cell cycle. The system consisted of human lymphocytes as target cells, the cytokinesis-block (CB) method for identifying cells that had completed one nuclear division only, and X-rays, methylnitrosourea (MNU), and ultraviolet light (UV) as mutagens. With each mutagen they have observed significant increments induced MN in the cultures that had also been treated with ARA during G{sub 1}. These observations suggested that the combined ARA and cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) method may enhance the detection of exposure to genotoxic agents that predominantly induce excision-repairable lesions.

  2. Resveratrol affects DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Basso, Emiliano; Regazzo, Giulia; Fiore, Mario; Palma, Valentina; Traversi, Gianandrea; Testa, Antonella; Degrassi, Francesca; Cozzi, Renata

    2016-08-01

    Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene; RSV) acts on cancer cells in several ways, inducing cell cycle delay and apoptotic death, and enhancing ionizing radiation (IR)-mediated responses. However, fewer studies have examined RSV effects on normal cells. We have treated human lymphocytes in vitro with RSV, either alone or combined with IR, to evaluate its potential use as a radioprotector. We measured the effects of RSV on induction of DNA damage, repair kinetics, and modulation of histone deacetylase activity. PMID:27476334

  3. Microgravity simulations with human lymphocytes in the free fall machine and in the random positioning machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarzenberg, M.; Pippia, P.; Meloni, M. A.; Cossu, G.; Cogoli-Greuter, M.; Cogoli, A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the results obtained in our laboratory with both instruments, the FFM [free fall machine] and the RPM [random positioning machine], to compare them with the data from earlier experiments with human lymphocytes conducted in the FRC [fast rotating clinostat] and in space. Furthermore, the suitability of the FFM and RPM for research in gravitational cell biology is discussed.

  4. Heterogeneous accessory cell requirement for human peripheral blood T lymphocyte activation by PHA into IL-2-responsive colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Farcet, J P; Oudhriri, N; Gourdin, M F; Bouguet, J; Fradelizi, D; Reyes, F

    1984-08-01

    Mitogen-driven T cell proliferation in liquid culture requires accessory cells that cooperate in interleukin 2 production. We have investigated the accessory cell requirement for human lymphocyte colony formation under PHA stimulation. Semisolid medium limits cell-to-cell contact emphasizing the role of cooperating cells both in growth factor production and in triggering events. Culturing at high T cell density demonstrates that accessory cells can be substituted for colony formation by exogenous IL-2. Culturing at low T cell density in the presence of IL-2 also demonstrates that accessory cells are required for activation of a subset of progenitors into IL-2 responsive colony-forming cells. Consequently, T colony progenitors, contained in the E-rosetting cell fraction of peripheral blood, are heterogeneous in their triggering signals: a minor subset is directly inducible by PHA, and a major subset is inducible by PHA in the presence of accessory cells. We found that monocytes and some leukemic B cells support effective accessory function in both colony growth factor production and colony progenitor sensitization. PMID:6611211

  5. Physical association and functional interaction between beta1 integrin and CD98 on human T lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyamoto, Yuko J.; Mitchell, Jason S.; McIntyre, Bradley W.

    2003-01-01

    CD98 is a cell surface protein previously characterized as a cell activation marker, an amino acid transporter, and has recently been implicated in integrin-related functions. Integrins are cell surface proteins, important for homotypic cell aggregation, cell adhesion, and coactivation of T lymphocytes. We have previously shown that the anti-CD98 mAb 80A10, when coimmobilized with anti-CD3 mAb OKT3, is able to mediate human T cell coactivation that is inhibited by anti-beta1 integrin specific mAb 18D3. These results indicated a functional association of CD98 and beta1 integrin signaling but left open the question of a physical association. We now show the induction of homotypic aggregation through CD98 among human T cells and this aggregation was inhibited by anti-beta1 integrin mAb. Therefore, CD98-dependent lymphocyte proliferation and adhesion may involve integrins. Competitive binding assays and fluorescence colocalization analysis suggested that CD98 and beta1 integrin were physically associated. Differential extraction techniques and immunoprecipitations provided the first evidence that the alpha4beta1 integrin and CD98 are specifically associated on human T lymphocytes.

  6. Chromosomal aberrations in cultured human lymphocytes treated with the fungicide, Thiram.

    PubMed

    Santovito, Alfredo; Cervella, Piero; Delpero, Massimiliano

    2012-07-01

    In vitro effects of different concentrations of Thiram were tested on human lymphocytes to determine, by means of the chromosome aberrations (CAs) assay, whether this fungicide could induce clastogenic damage. Evidences of the effect of Thiram on human lymphocytes were limited to sister chromatid exchange, micronuclei formation, and comet assays. We evaluated 0.01, 0.1, 1.2, and 12.0 μg/mL of Thiram, where 0.01 μg/mL represent the acceptable daily intake dose set by the World Health Organization and the Food and Agriculture Organization for fruit and vegetables, whereas 0.1, 1.2, and 12.0 μg/mL are its multiple values. Results indicated that human lymphocytes treated in vitro with Thiram at concentrations of 1.20 and 12.0 μg/mL significantly increased CAs frequency, compared with the negative control, whereas at lower concentrations (0.01 and 0.1 μg/mL), this effect was not observed. However, Thiram showed a clastogenic effect also at the concentration value of 1.2 μg/mL that represents a lower value with respect to the residue limits found in Italy for grapes, strawberries, potatoes, tobacco, and other fruits and vegetables. Finally, according to some evidence obtained from the study of other fungicides, Thiram produced a significant reduction in the mitotic index with increasing concentration.

  7. A role for T-lymphocytes in human breast cancer and in canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Maria Isabel; Pires, Isabel; Prada, Justina; Queiroga, Felisbina L

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation in the tumor microenvironment has a prominent role in carcinogenesis and benefits the proliferation and survival of malignant cells, promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Mammary tumors are frequently infiltrated by a heterogeneous population of immune cells where T-lymphocytes have a great importance. Interestingly, similar inflammatory cell infiltrates, cytokine and chemokine expression in humans and canine mammary tumors were recently described. However, in both species, despite all the scientific evidences that appoint for a significant role of T-lymphocytes, a definitive conclusion concerning the effectiveness of T-cell dependent immune mechanisms has not been achieved yet. In the present review, we describe similarities between human breast cancer and canine mammary tumors regarding tumor T-lymphocyte infiltration, such as relationship of TILs and mammary tumors malignancy, association of ratio CD4+/ CD8+ T-cells with low survival rates, promotion of tumor progression by Th2 cells actions, and association of great amounts of Treg cells with poor prognostic factors. This apparent parallelism together with the fact that dogs develop spontaneous tumors in the context of a natural immune system highlight the dog as a possible useful biological model for studies in human breast cancer immunology. PMID:24672781

  8. Deoxynivalenol induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Yu, Miao; Fu, Juan; Bao, Wei; Wang, Di; Hao, Liping; Yao, Ping; Nüssler, Andreas K; Yan, Hong; Liu, Liegang

    2014-02-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is one of the most common mycotoxins. The aim of this study consists in using diverse cellular and molecular assays to evaluate cytotoxicity, genotoxicity as well as oxidative damage and to investigate their mechanisms in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The human lymphocytes were cultured in eight different doses of DON (0, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 250 and 500 ng/mL) during 6, 12 and 24 h. DON was able to decrease cell viability and cause damage to the membrane, the chromosomes or the DNA at all times of culture. It was also able to induce lipid peroxidation and raise the levels of 8-OHdG and ROS in 6, 12 and 24 h. The results of the RT-PCR and the Western Blot indicated that DON is able to enhance mRNA or protein expressions of DNA repair genes and HO-1 in 6 h and to inhibit these expressions in 24 h. DON potentially triggers genotoxicity in human lymphocytes. This mechanism is probably related to depletion of antioxidase and oxidative damage to the DNA that reduced expression of HO-1, thereby inhibiting the ability of DNA repair.

  9. KIT Signaling Promotes Growth of Colon Xenograft Tumors in Mice and is Upregulated in a Subset of Human Colon Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Evan C.; Karl, Taylor A.; Kalisky, Tomer; Gupta, Santosh K.; O’Brien, Catherine A.; Longacre, Teri A.; van de Rijn, Matt; Quake, Stephen R.; Clarke, Michael F.; Rothenberg, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitors have advanced colon cancer treatment. We investigated the role of the RTK KIT in development of human colon cancer. Methods An array of 137 patient-derived colon tumors and their associated xenografts were analyzed by immunohistochemistry to measure levels of KIT and its ligand KITLG. KIT and/or KITLG was stably knocked down by expression of small hairpin RNAs from lentiviral vectors in DLD1, HT29, LS174T, and COLO320 colon cancer cell lines, and in UM-COLON#8 and POP77 xenografts; cells transduced with only vector were used as controls. Cells were analyzed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR, single-cell gene expression analysis, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemical, immunoblot, and functional assays. Xenograft tumors were grown from control and KIT-knockdown DLD1 and UM-COLON#8 cells in immunocompromised mice and compared. Some mice were given the RTK inhibitor imatinib following injection of cancer cells; tumor growth was measured based on bioluminescence. We assessed tumorigenicity using limiting dilution analysis. Results KIT and KITLG were expressed heterogeneously by a subset of human colon tumors. Knockdown of KIT decreased proliferation of colon cancer cell lines and growth of xenograft tumors in mice, compared with control cells. KIT knockdown cells had increased expression of enterocyte markers, decreased expression of cycling genes, and, unexpectedly, increased expression of LGR5-associated genes. No activating mutations in KIT were detected in DLD1, POP77, or UM-COLON#8 cell lines. However, KITLG-knockdown DLD1 cells formed smaller xenograft tumors than control cells. Gene expression analysis of single CD44+ cells indicated that KIT may promote growth via KITLG autocrine and/or paracrine signaling. Imatinib inhibited growth of KIT+ colon cancer organoids in culture and growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Cancer cells with endogenous KIT expression were more tumorigenic in

  10. Ectopic lymphokine gene expression in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, C.A.; Kang, Joonsoo; Hozumi, Nobumichi Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario )

    1992-02-01

    An animal model to study the effects of ectopic expression of cytokines involved in cell growth and differentiation has been established. Retrovirus vectors containing the human interleukin 6 cDNA were used to produce high titer virus-producing lines. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (hPBLs) were successfully infected with the retrovirus and engrafted into severe combined immunodeficient mice. The majority of the animals were engrafted with hPBLs, as determined by the presence of human glucose phosphate isomerase. Furthermore, six of seven mice engrafted with hPBLs infected with high titer virus and detectable hPBLs present in the spleen expressed the retroviral human interleukin 6 gene. Importantly, human interleukin 6 protein was expressed at physiologically significant levels in these mice. These results demonstrate that models for human disease and immunotherapy involving retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into human cells can be developed in mice.

  11. Alterations in T Cell Subsets in Human Immunodeficiency Virus–Infected Adults with Co-infections in Southern Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Naniche, Denise; Letang, Emilio; Nhampossa, Tacilta; David, Catarina; Menendez, Clara; Alonso, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    T cell activation and depletion of naive T cells are hallmarks of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pathogenesis. This study explored the relationships between certain co-infections (including syphilis, hepatitis B and C, human T cell lymphotrophic viruses I and II [HTLV-I/II], Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus [KSHV], Plasmodium falciparum malaria, and tuberculosis), and levels of activated CD8 and CD4 T cell subsets as well as naive and memory CD4 T cells in HIV-infected adults in a rural area of southern Mozambique. We found that syphilis infection and to a lesser extent HTLV-I/II seropositivity were independently associated with higher CD8 T cell activation (CD8+ CD38+ HLA-DR+) whereas only syphilis was associated with higher CD4 T cell activation. Furthermore, KSHV and HTLV-I/II seropositivities were independently associated with a lower percentage of naive CD4 T cells (CD4+ CD45RA+ CD62L+). These results highlight the importance of screening and prompt treatment of syphilis, and raise questions as to whether HIV-positive persons with certain chronic viral co-infections should initiate combined antiretroviral therapy at higher CD4 cell counts. PMID:21976586

  12. Modeled microgravity-induced protein kinase C isoform expression in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, A; Risin, D; Pellis, N R

    2004-06-01

    In long-term space travel, the crew is exposed to microgravity and radiation that invoke potential hazards to the immune system. T cell activation is a critical step in the immune response. Receptor-mediated signaling is inhibited in both microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) as reflected by diminished DNA synthesis in peripheral blood lymphocytes and their locomotion through gelled type I collagen. Direct activation of protein kinase C (PKC) bypassing cell surface events using the phorbol ester PMA rescues MMG-inhibited lymphocyte activation and locomotion, whereas the calcium ionophore ionomycin had no rescue effect. Thus calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be affected in MMG-induced locomotion inhibition and rescue. Both calcium-dependent isoforms and calcium-independent PKC isoforms were investigated to assess their expression in lymphocytes in 1 g and MMG culture. Human lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h, and serial samples were assessed for locomotion by using type I collagen and expression of PKC isoforms. Expression of PKC-alpha, -delta, and -epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and immunoblotting. Results indicated that PKC isoforms delta and epsilon were downregulated by >50% at the transcriptional and translational levels in MMG-cultured lymphocytes compared with 1-g controls. Events upstream of PKC, such as phosphorylation of phospholipase Cgamma in MMG, revealed accumulation of inactive enzyme. Depressed calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be a consequence of an upstream lesion in the signal transduction pathway. The differential response among calcium-dependent and calcium-independent isoforms may actually result from MMG intrusion events earlier than PKC, but after ligand-receptor interaction.

  13. Modeled Microgravity-Induced Protein Kinase C Isoform Expression in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    2003-01-01

    In long-term space travel, the crew is exposed to microgravity and radiation that invoke potential hazards to the immune system. T cell activation is a critical step in the immune response. Receptor-mediated signaling is inhibited both in microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) as reflected in diminished DNA synthess in peripheral blood lymphocytes and their locomotion through gelled type 1 collagen. Direct activation of Protein Kinase C (PKC) bypassing cell surface events using the phorbol ester PMA rescues MMG-inhibited lymphocyte activation and locomotion, whereas calcium ionophore ionomycin had no rescue effect. Thus calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be affected in MMG-induced locomotion inhibition and rescue. Both calcium-dependent isoforms and calcium-independent PKC isoforms were investigated to assess their expression in lymphocytes in 19 and MMG-culture. Human lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours and serial samples assessed for locomotion using type I collagen and expression of PKC isoforms. Expression of PKC-alpha, -delta and -epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunoblotting. Results indicated that PKC isoforms delta and epsilon were down-regulated by more than 50% at the transcriptional and translational levels in MMG-cultured lymphocytes compared with 19 controls. Events upstream of PKC such as phosphorylation of Phospholipase C(gamma) (PLC-gamma) in MMG, revealed accumulation of inactive enzyme. Depressed Ca++ -independent PKC isoforms may be a consequence of an upstream lesion in the signal transduction pathway. The differential response among calcium-dependent and calcium-independent isoforms may actually result from MMG intrusion events earlier than, but after ligand-receptor interaction. Keywords: Signal transduction, locomotion, immunity

  14. Modeled microgravity-induced protein kinase C isoform expression in human lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    2004-01-01

    In long-term space travel, the crew is exposed to microgravity and radiation that invoke potential hazards to the immune system. T cell activation is a critical step in the immune response. Receptor-mediated signaling is inhibited in both microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) as reflected by diminished DNA synthesis in peripheral blood lymphocytes and their locomotion through gelled type I collagen. Direct activation of protein kinase C (PKC) bypassing cell surface events using the phorbol ester PMA rescues MMG-inhibited lymphocyte activation and locomotion, whereas the calcium ionophore ionomycin had no rescue effect. Thus calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be affected in MMG-induced locomotion inhibition and rescue. Both calcium-dependent isoforms and calcium-independent PKC isoforms were investigated to assess their expression in lymphocytes in 1 g and MMG culture. Human lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h, and serial samples were assessed for locomotion by using type I collagen and expression of PKC isoforms. Expression of PKC-alpha, -delta, and -epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and immunoblotting. Results indicated that PKC isoforms delta and epsilon were downregulated by >50% at the transcriptional and translational levels in MMG-cultured lymphocytes compared with 1-g controls. Events upstream of PKC, such as phosphorylation of phospholipase Cgamma in MMG, revealed accumulation of inactive enzyme. Depressed calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be a consequence of an upstream lesion in the signal transduction pathway. The differential response among calcium-dependent and calcium-independent isoforms may actually result from MMG intrusion events earlier than PKC, but after ligand-receptor interaction.

  15. The impact of adiposity on adipose tissue-resident lymphocyte activation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Travers, R L; Motta, A C; Betts, J A; Bouloumié, A; Thompson, D

    2015-01-01

    Background/objectives: The presence of T lymphocytes in human adipose tissue has only recently been demonstrated and relatively little is known of their potential relevance in the development of obesity-related diseases. We aimed to further characterise these cells and in particular to investigate how they interact with modestly increased levels of adiposity typical of common overweight and obesity. Subjects/methods: Subcutaneous adipose tissue and fasting blood samples were obtained from healthy males aged 35–55 years with waist circumferences in lean (<94 cm), overweight (94–102 cm) and obese (>102 cm) categories. Adipose tissue-resident CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes together with macrophages were identified by gene expression and flow cytometry. T lymphocytes were further characterised by their expression of activation markers CD25 and CD69. Adipose tissue inflammation was investigated using gene expression analysis and tissue culture. Results: Participants reflected a range of adiposity from lean to class I obesity. Expression of CD4 (T-helper cells) and CD68 (macrophage), as well as FOXP3 RNA transcripts, was elevated in subcutaneous adipose tissue with increased levels of adiposity (P<0.001, P<0.001 and P=0.018, respectively). Flow cytometry revealed significant correlations between waist circumference and levels of CD25 and CD69 expression per cell on activated adipose tissue-resident CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes (P-values ranging from 0.053 to <0.001). No such relationships were found with blood T lymphocytes. This increased T lymphocyte activation was related to increased expression and secretion of various pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines from subcutaneous whole adipose tissue explants. Conclusions: This is the first study to demonstrate that even modest levels of overweight/obesity elicit modifications in adipose tissue immune function. Our results underscore the importance of T lymphocytes during adipose tissue expansion, and the presence of

  16. Fas-mediated apoptosis of melanoma cells and infiltrating lymphocytes in human malignant melanomas.

    PubMed

    Shukuwa, Tetsuo; Katayama, Ichiro; Koji, Takehiko

    2002-04-01

    In a rodent system, melanoma cells expressing Fas ligand (FasL) could kill Fas-positive lymphocytes, suggesting that FasL expression was an essential factor for melanoma cell survival in vivo. These findings led us to investigate apoptosis, and to histochemically analyze involvement of Fas and FasL in the induction of apoptosis, in human malignant melanoma tissues. The percentages of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotin-dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive melanoma cells and of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive melanoma cells in melanoma tissues (n = 22) were greater than those in melanocytes in uninvolved skin (n = 6) and nevus cells in nevi tissues (n = 9). The infiltrating lymphocytes around melanomas were also TUNEL positive. Immunohistochemistry revealed expression of Fas and FasL in melanoma cells and lymphocytes, whereas no Fas or FasL expression was detected in normal skin melanocytes and nevus cells. There was significant correlation between Fas-positive indices and TUNEL indices in melanoma tissues. Moreover, TUNEL-, Fas-, and FasL-positive indices of melanoma cells from patients with Stage 3 melanomas were significantly lower than those with Stage 2 melanomas. The PCNA index of Stage 1 melanoma was significantly lower than that of the other stages, although the difference of PCNA index was insignificant among Stages 2 to 4. Among Stages 1 to 4, there was no difference in the PCNA, TUNEL-, and Fas-positive indices of lymphocytes, although the FasL-positive index of lymphocytes from Stage 3 melanomas was significantly lower than in that from Stage 2. These data reveal that melanoma cells and infiltrating lymphocytes have the potential to induce their own apoptosis regulated by Fas and FasL in an autocrine and/or paracrine fashion and that the decline of Fas-mediated apoptosis of melanoma cells, rather than the apoptosis of infiltrating lymphocytes, may affect the prognosis of melanoma patients, possibly through the

  17. Application of cytogenetic endpoints and comet assay on human lymphocytes treated with atorvastatin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gajski, Goran; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the genotoxic potential of atorvastatin on human lymphocytes using comet assay, structural chromosome aberrations (CA) and sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) analysis. Lymphocyte cultures were treated with a single drug at a concentration of 30.21 ng/mL. For comet assay, cells exposed to atorvastatin for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h were embedded in agarose slides, lysed with alkaline lysis solution and exposed to an electric field. DNA migrated within the agarose and formed comets whose length depends on the amount of DNA damage. For analysis of structural CA, cells were grown on medium for 48 h and for SCE analysis for 72 h. Structural CA did not induce significant damage to the genome, although a higher CA frequency was observed in cells treated with atorvastatin for 3 h, 20 h and 48 h than in control samples. Results of the SCE analysis did show statistically significant differences in the mean SCE number between atorvastatin-exposed and control human lymphocytes and between different exposure times. Comet assay also showed increased DNA damage caused in atorvastatin-exposed human lymphocytes than in corresponding control cells for exposure times of 24 h, 48 h and 72 h for the tail length and for 72 h for the tail moment. Results obtained in this study point to the significance of biological indicators providing information on the primary genome damage after long-term exposure, which can help to establish drug therapeutic concentrations that do not put patients with high blood cholesterol to a greater treatment-related risk. PMID:18161561

  18. Time-resolved fluorimetric probing of DNA structure in irradiated human lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maves, Shelley R.; Greenstock, Clive L.

    2005-02-01

    An in situ technique has been developed that detects genomic conformational changes in irradiated human cells. Cells are treated on ice with detergent, mild alkali and ethidium bromide (EB) and the resulting intact nuclei are examined using kinetic spectrofluorimetry. In the nuclei of unirradiated lymphocytes the fluorescence decay profile is tri-exponential with a long-lived component (˜23 ns) attributable to EB intercalated within double-stranded DNA, an intermediate life-time component (˜6 ns) indicative of a loosely bound DNA biomolecular-EB complex, and a short-lived component (˜2 ns) corresponding to unbound EB. Irradiated fresh human lymphocytes show three similar components but their relative contributions are changed. Results from a typical donor, show that after 1 Gy the intermediate component decreased with a concomitant increase in the long-lived component while the short-lived component remained essentially unchanged. Fresh whole blood from healthy donors was irradiated at doses of 0.1-1 Gy, and the samples analyzed with or without post-irradiation incubation at 37 °C for 24 h prior to lymphocyte extraction. For doses of 1.0 Gy in the absence of incubation there is good agreement between multiple samples of the same individual, or among the six donors, as compared with the results from irradiated isolated lymphocytes. Whole blood incubation was unreliable but results from one individual at 0.1 and 1.0 Gy were similar to those observed without incubation. Fluorescence lifetime analysis can detect DNA structural/topological damage in irradiated human lymphoid cells, and it may have potential application to in vivo bio-dosimetry and bio-monitoring.

  19. Volume-induced increase of anion permeability in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Grinstein, S; Clarke, C A; Dupre, A; Rothstein, A

    1982-12-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) readjust their volumes after swelling in hypotonic media. This regulatory volume decrease (RVD) is associated with a loss of cellular K+ and is thought to be promoted by an increased permeability to this ion. In contrast, no change in volume was observed when K+ permeability of PBM in isotonic media was increased to comparable or higher levels using valinomycin. Moreover, valinomycin-induced 86Rb+ loss in K+-free medium was considerably slower than in K+-rich medium. These results suggest that anion conductance limits net salt loss in isotonic media. Direct measurements of relative conductance confirmed that in volume-static cells, anion conductance is lower than that of K+. In volume-regulating cells depolarization occurred presumably as a result of increased anion conductance. Accordingly, the efflux of 36Cl from PBM was markedly increased by hypotonic stress. Since both membrane potential and intracellular 36Cl concentration are reduced in hypotonically swollen cells, the increased efflux is probably due to a change in Cl- permeability. Anions and cations seem to move independently through the volume-induced pathways: the initial rate of 86Rb uptake in swollen cells was not affected by replacement of external Cl- by SO=4; conversely, 36Cl fluxes were unaffected by substitution of K+ by Na+. The data indicate that anion conductance is rate-determining in salt and water loss from PBM. An increase in anion conductance is suggested to be the critical step of RVD of human PBM.

  20. Human gammadelta T lymphocytes exert natural and IL-2-induced cytotoxicity to neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Schilbach, K E; Geiselhart, A; Wessels, J T; Niethammer, D; Handgretinger, R

    2000-01-01

    Human gammadelta T lymphocytes play an important role in nonadaptive reactions to infection and early tumor defense. This is the first report that freshly isolated, native gammadelta T cells of some healthy donors can kill human neuroblastoma cells to varying degrees. Their killing ability was increased and maintained during expansion and cultivation with interleukin-2 (IL-2; 400 IU/mL) for as long as 30 days (100% specific lysis at an effector-to-target cell (E:T) ratio of 20:1). gammadelta T lymphocytes without this spontaneous killing ability gained a specific cytolytic activity of 81% +/- 10.4% SD after stimulation with IL-2 for 24 hours. gammadelta cells were isolated from peripheral blood by positive enrichment (using a magnetic cell sorting system; purity, 95.2% +/- 3.2% SD, n = 21). High natural cytotoxic activity against human neuroblastoma cell lines (>50% specific lysis at an E:T ratio of 20:1) was exhibited by one of 11 donors, whereas two of 11 showed medium cytotoxicity (30% to 50% specific lysis). Eight of 11 donors showed very slight or no lytic activity against human neuroblastoma cells (<30% specific lysis). gammadelta T cells were also cytotoxic against Daudi (32.7% specific lysis at an E:T ratio of 20:1), Raji (10.3%), Colo 205 (23.1%), A 204 (54%), K 562 (100%), and SK-N-MC (100%) cells. Isolated gammadelta T cells were grown in Iscove modified Dulbecco medium with IL-2 (400 IU/mL). Increased cell proliferation (38.5% to 182%) was induced with phytohemagglutinin, IL-15, Clodronat, OKT3, or various combinations of these. Results of cold target inhibition assays suggest a natural killer-like activity of the gammadelta T-cell killing mechanism. Peptidase or papain render neuroblastoma cells unsusceptible to gammadelta T-cell killing, suggesting the involvement of antigen peptide(s) in the process of neuroblastoma cell killing. Treatment with acid phosphatase reduced specific lysis by 66.5% +/- 34.1% SD, which suggests a binding to phosphorylated

  1. Evaluation of antigenotoxicity effects of umbelliprenin on human peripheral lymphocytes exposed to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Fatemeh; Mosaffa, Fatemeh; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Karimi, Gholamreza; Malekaneh, Mohammad; Haghighi, Fatemeh; Behravan, Javad

    2009-06-01

    The protective properties of a prenylated coumarin, umbelliprenin (UMB), on the human lymphocytes DNA lesions were tested. Lymphocytes were isolated from blood samples taken from healthy volunteers. DNA breaks and resistance to H(2)O(2)-induced damage were measured using a single-cell microgel electrophoresis technique under alkaline conditions (comet assay). Human lymphocytes were incubated in UMB (10, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 microM) alone or a combination of different concentrations of UMB (10, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 microM) and 25 microM H(2)O(2). Untreated cells, ascorbic acid (AA; 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 microM) and H(2)O(2) (25 microM) were considered as negative control, positive control, and the standard antioxidant agent for our study, respectively. Single cells were analyzed with "TriTek Cometscore version 1.5" software. The DNA damage was expressed as percent tail DNA. UMB exhibited a concentration-dependent increase in protection activity against DNA damage induced by 25 microM H(2)O(2) (from 67.28% to 39.17%). The antigenotoxic activity of AA, in the range 0-50 microM, was greater than that of UMB. However, no significant difference (p > 0.05) in the protective activity was found between UMB and AA at concentrations of approximately higher than 50 microM.

  2. Low doses of ochratoxin A induce micronucleus formation and delay DNA repair in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    González-Arias, Cyndia A; Benitez-Trinidad, Alma B; Sordo, Monserrat; Robledo-Marenco, Lourdes; Medina-Díaz, Irma M; Barrón-Vivanco, Briscia S; Marín, Sonia; Sanchis, Vicente; Ramos, Antonio J; Rojas-García, Aurora E

    2014-12-01

    The contamination of food commodities by fungal toxins has attracted great interest because many of these mycotoxins are responsible for different diseases, including cancer and other chronic illnesses. Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin naturally present in food, and long-term exposure to food contaminated with low levels of OTA has been associated with renal cancer. In the present study, the cytotoxicity, cytostaticity, and genotoxicity of OTA (0.075-15 µM) in human lymphocytes were evaluated. A comet assay, a modified comet assay (DNA repair assay), which uses N-hydroxyurea (NHU) to detect non-repaired lesions produced by OTA, and a cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay were used. Treatments with OTA were not cytotoxic, but OTA caused a cytostatic effect in human lymphocytes at a concentration of 15 µM. OTA (0.075-5 µM) produced a slight increase in the percentage of DNA in the comets and a delay in the DNA repair capacity of the lymphocytes. Micronucleus (MN) induction was observed at OTA concentrations of 1.5 and 5 µM. Our results indicate that OTA induces DNA stable damage at low doses that are neither cytotoxic nor cytostatic, and OTA delays the DNA repair kinetics. These findings indicate that OTA affects two pivotal events in the carcinogenesis pathway. PMID:25455892

  3. Genotoxic effect of Bothrops snake venoms and isolated toxins on human lymphocyte DNA.

    PubMed

    Marcussi, Silvana; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Santos-Filho, Norival A; Menaldo, Danilo L; Silva Pereira, Luciana L; Zuliani, Juliana P; Calderon, Leonardo A; da Silva, Saulo L; Antunes, Lusânia M Greggi; Soares, Andreimar M

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, micronucleus with cytokinesis blocking and comet assays were used to evaluate the genotoxic potential of Bothrops jararacussu, Bothrops atrox, Bothrops moojeni, Bothrops alternatus (Rhinocerophis alternatus) and Bothrops brazili snake venoms, and also of some isolated toxins (MjTX-I, BthTX-I and II myotoxins, BjussuMP-II metalloprotease, and BatxLAAO l-amino acid oxidase) on human lymphocytes. Significant DNA damages were observed, indicating genotoxic potential after exposure of the lymphocytes to the toxins BthTX-I, II and BatxLAAO compared to untreated and Cisplatin-treated controls, which were able to induce greater formation of micronuclei. B. brazili, B. jararacussu and B. atrox crude venoms also presented genotoxic potential, and the latter two induced DNA breakage 5 times more often than in normal environmental conditions (control without treatment). B. jararacussu venom and its isolated toxins, as well as an LAAO from B. atrox, were able to cause lymphocyte DNA breakage in the comet test with more than 85% damage levels. The DNA damage evaluation allows a widening of the toxic-pharmacological characterization of snake venoms and their toxins and also contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms of action of these molecules in several human pathologies. PMID:23333649

  4. S-antigen. Identification of human T-cell lymphocyte proliferation sites.

    PubMed

    Vrabec, T R; Reber, R N; Magargal, L E; Donoso, L A

    1990-10-01

    Immune responses to normal retinal proteins, including S-antigen, have been demonstrated in patients with a variety of retinal disorders, as well as in those who have received panretinal laser photocoagulation. T-cell lymphocytes (T cells) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several ocular inflammatory diseases of possible autoimmune etiology. We used synthetic peptides that correspond to the amino acid sequence of S-antigen in lymphocyte proliferation assays to identify specific sites in the molecule recognized by human T cells. Ten patients with type II diabetes were studied before and after initial panretinal laser photocoagulation for proliferative diabetic retinopathy. T-cell responses, expressed as a stimulation index, to S-antigen and peptides were negative in all patients before treatment. Three weeks after panretinal laser photocoagulation, eight of 10 assays were positive (stimulation index greater than 2; P less than .01) when lymphocytes were stimulated with peptide BSA(273-292); six of nine were positive (P less than .01) with peptide BSA(303-332); and six of six were positive (P less than .001) with peptide BSA(343-362). Our study identifies several specific sites in S-antigen that elicit human immune responses. The implications of these findings with regard to the pathogenesis and treatment of autoimmune uveitis are discussed. PMID:2222280

  5. A secreted form of the human lymphocyte cell surface molecule CD8 arises from alternative splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Giblin, P.; Kavathas, P. ); Ledbetter, J.A. )

    1989-02-01

    The human lymphocyte differentiation antigen CD8 is encoded by a single gene that gives rise to a 33- to 34-kDa glycoprotein expressed on the cell surface as a dimer and in higher molecular mass forms. The authors demonstrate that the mRNA is alternatively spliced so that an exon encoding a transmembrane domain is deleted. This gives rise to a 30-kDa molecule that is secreted and exists primarily as a monomer. mRNA corresponding to both forms is present in peripheral blood lymphocytes, Con A-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes, and three CD8{sup +} T-cell lines, with the membrane form being the major species. However, differences in the ratio of mRNA for membrane CD8 and secreted CD8 exist. In addition, the splicing pattern observed differs from the pattern found for the mouse CD8 gene. This mRNA is also alternatively spliced, but an exon encoding a cytoplasmic region is deleted, giving rise to a cell surface molecule that differs in its cytoplasmic tail from the protein encoded by the longer mRNA. Neither protein is secreted. This is one of the first examples of a different splicing pattern between two homologous mouse and human genes giving rise to very different proteins. This represents one mechanism of generating diversity during speciation.

  6. Recognition of a human T-lymphocyte differentiation antigen by an IgM monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Bastin, J M; Granger, S; Tidman, N; Janossy, G; McMichael, A J

    1981-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody directed at a determinant on human T cells was produced and characterized. This IgM antibody, MBG6, bound to human peripheral blood T lymphocytes and to medullary thymocytes. It was unreactive with normal B cells, B-cell lines and granulocytes. Apart from T lymphocytes, bone marrow cells (including cells positive for the terminal transferase marker, myeloid colony-forming cells, myeloblasts, and differentiating myeloid and erythroid cells) were negative. Peripheral blood cells that were treated with MBG6 and rabbit complement were no longer capable of proliferating in response to phytohaemagglutinin or concanavalin A; MBG6 did not have any direct mitogenic action on T lymphocytes. Double immunofluorescence studies using IgM MBG6 and OKT3, and IgG2a monoclonal antibody that recognizes all peripheral T cells, showed that these two antibodies identified exactly the same cell populations. Competitive binding studies, however, indicated that MBG6 and OKT3 recognized different epitopes. The antibody may have clinical applications in bone marrow transplantation. PMID:6802543

  7. Cardiomyocyte marker expression in a human lymphocyte cell line using mouse cardiomyocyte extract.

    PubMed

    Vojdani, Zahra; Tavakolinejad, Sima; Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Esmaeilpour, Tahereh; Rasooli, Manuchehr

    2011-03-01

    Cell transplantation shows potential for the treatment of cardiac diseases. Embryonic stem cells, cord blood and mesenchymal stem cells have been suggested as sources for transplantation therapy. Because of some technical limitations with the use of stem cells, transdifferentiation of fully differentiated cells is a potentially useful alternative. We investigated whether human peripheral blood cells could transdifferentiate into cardiomyocyte. Transdifferentiation was induced in a human B lymphocyte cell line (Raji). Cardiomyocyte extract was prepared from adult mouse cardiomyocytes. The cells were treated with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and trichostatin A, permeabilized with streptolysin O, and exposed to the mouse cardiomyocyte extract. They were cultured for 10 days, 3 weeks and 4 weeks. Cardiomyocyte markers were detected with immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Immunocytochemistry revealed that some cells expressed myosin heavy chain, α-actinin and cardiac troponin T after 3 and 4 weeks. Flow cytometry confirmed these data. In cells exposed to trichostatin A and 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and permeabilized in the presence of the cardiomyocyte extract, troponin T expression was seen in 3.53% of the cells and 3.11% of them expressed α-actinin. After exposure to the cardiomyocyte extract, some permeabilized cells adhered to the plate loosely; however, the morphology did not change significantly, and they continued to show a rounded shape after 4 weeks. Our treated lymphocytes expressed cardiomyocyte markers. Our results suggest that lymphocytes may be useful in future research as a source of cells for reprogramming procedures.

  8. Metabolic and cytoskeletal modulation of transferrin receptor mobility in mitogen-activated human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, G M; Galbraith, R M

    1980-01-01

    The transferrin receptors which appear on mitogen-activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes were found by the use of immunofluorescence techniques to display temperature-dependent patching and capping reactions upon binding of transferrin. Lateral mobility of ligand-occupied membrane sites was accompanied by both shedding and endocytosis of receptor-transferrin complexes. In the presence of sodium azide or the microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin B, cap formation and shedding were markedly inhibited. In contrast, endocytosis of patched receptor-ligand complexes was inhibited by azide and microtubule inhibitors, including colchicine, vinblastine and vincristine. Co-capping experiments performed to elucidate further the alterations in membrane configuration involved in these reactions failed to reveal any topographical relationship between transferrin receptors and lectin-binding sites in these cells. These studied indicate that temperature-dependent mobility of transferrin receptors upon mitogen-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes is dependent upon the integrity of the cytoskeletal system and metabolic function of the cell. PMID:6258830

  9. Assessment of genomic damage and repair on human lymphocytes by paint thinner in vitro.

    PubMed

    Londoño-Velasco, Elizabeth; Hidalgo-Cerón, Victor; Escobar-Hoyos, Luisa F; Hoyos-Giraldo, Luz Stella

    2014-05-01

    Paint thinners are organic-solvent complex mixtures frequently used by car painters around the world in industries and shops. Some studies have revealed the oxidative effect induced by thinner inhalation; however, its genotoxic effect is poorly studied. The aim of this study was to assess the cytotoxicity, genomic damage and DNA repair in vitro induced by commercial paint thinner 0.14 in human lymphocytes. Cytotoxicity was determined by cell-viability analysis with trypan blue after 4 h treatment with different thinner concentrations (0.025 to 1.2 µL/mL). Genomic damage was evaluated by means of the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE; pH > 13) in treated cultures after 1 h with three low-cytotoxic thinner concentrations (0.05, 0.1 and 0.2 µL/mL). In order to evaluate the genomic DNA repair, one set of SCGE slides was prepared immediately after treatment, and another one was prepared after 4 h of liquid-holding recovery. A significant level of cytotoxicity was observed over the entire concentration range of paint thinner in lymphocytes (F = 175.98; p ≤ 0.001). In the SCGE % tail DNA assessment, a significant increase of lymphocyte genomic damage was evidenced (F = 72.32; p < 0.001). In addition, we found a significant decrease in the % tail DNA in thinner-treated cells after liquid-holding recovery period (all p < 0.05), demonstrating that DNA primary lesions induced by low-cytotoxic thinner concentrations are efficiently repaired. In conclusion, thinner components induce cytotoxicity and genomic damage in human lymphocytes under the study conditions, possibly by oxidative and alkylative DNA damage. PMID:24236478

  10. Lymphocyte trafficking and HIV infection of human lymphoid tissue in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, L. B.; Fitzgerald, W.; Glushakova, S.; Hatfill, S.; Amichay, N.; Baibakov, B.; Zimmerberg, J.

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenesis of HIV infection involves a complex interplay between both the infected and noninfected cells of human lymphoid tissue, the release of free viral particles, the de novo infection of cells, and the recirculatory trafficking of peripheral blood lymphocytes. To develop an in vitro model for studying these various aspects of HIV pathogenesis we have utilized blocks of surgically excised human tonsils and a rotating wall vessel (RWV) cell culture system. Here we show that (1) fragments of the surgically excised human lymphoid tissue remain viable and retain their gross cytoarchitecture for at least 3 weeks when cultured in the RWV system; (2) such lymphoid tissue gradually shows a loss of both T and B cells to the surrounding growth medium; however, this cellular migration is reversible as demonstrated by repopulation of the tissue by labeled cells from the growth medium; (3) this cellular migration may be partially or completely inhibited by embedding the blocks of lymphoid tissue in either a collagen or agarose gel matrix; these embedded tissue blocks retain most of the basic elements of a normal lymphoid cytoarchitecture; and (4) both embedded and nonembedded RWV-cultured blocks of human lymphoid tissue are capable of productive infection by HIV-1 of at least three various strains of different tropism and phenotype, as shown by an increase in both p24 antigen levels and free virus in the culture medium, and by the demonstration of HIV-1 RNA-positive cells inside the tissue identified by in situ hybridization. It is therefore reasonable to suggest that gel-embedded and nonembedded blocks of human lymphoid tissue, cocultured with a suspension of tonsillar lymphocytes in an RWV culture system, constitute a useful model for simulating normal lymphocyte recirculatory traffic and provide a new tool for testing the various aspects of HIV pathogenesis.

  11. Adenovirus-specific T-cell Subsets in Human Peripheral Blood and After IFN-γ Immunomagnetic Selection.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chongsheng; Wang, Yingying; Cai, Huili; Laroye, Caroline; De Carvalho Bittencourt, Marcelo; Clement, Laurence; Stoltz, Jean-François; Decot, Véronique; Reppel, Loïc; Bensoussan, Danièle

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive antiviral cellular immunotherapy by infusion of virus-specific T cells (VSTs) is becoming an alternative treatment for viral infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The T memory stem cell (TSCM) subset was recently described as exhibiting self-renewal and multipotency properties which are required for sustained efficacy in vivo. We wondered if such a crucial subset for immunotherapy was present in VSTs. We identified, by flow cytometry, TSCM in adenovirus (ADV)-specific interferon (IFN)-γ+ T cells before and after IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection, and analyzed the distribution of the main T-cell subsets in VSTs: naive T cells (TN), TSCM, T central memory cells (TCM), T effector memory cell (TEM), and effector T cells (TEFF). In this study all of the different T-cell subsets were observed in the blood sample from healthy donor ADV-VSTs, both before and after IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection. As the IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection system sorts mainly the most differentiated T-cell subsets, we observed that TEM was always the major T-cell subset of ADV-specific T cells after immunomagnetic isolation and especially after expansion in vitro. Comparing T-cell subpopulation profiles before and after in vitro expansion, we observed that in vitro cell culture with interleukin-2 resulted in a significant expansion of TN-like, TCM, TEM, and TEFF subsets in CD4IFN-γ T cells and of TCM and TEM subsets only in CD8IFN-γ T cells. We demonstrated the presence of all T-cell subsets in IFN-γ VSTs including the TSCM subpopulation, although this was weakly selected by the IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic selection system. PMID:26641259

  12. Connexin expression in human acute myeloid leukemia cells: Identification of patient subsets based on protein and global gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    REIKVAM, HÅKON; RYNINGEN, ANITA; SÆTERDAL, LARS RUNE; NEPSTAD, INA; FOSS, BRYNJAR; BRUSERUD, ØYSTEIN

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells support both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Τhis support is mediated through the local cytokine network and by direct cell-cell interactions mediated via adhesion molecules and the formation of gap junctions by connexins. Previous studies on connexins in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have mainly focused on the investigation of leukemia cell lines. In the present study, we therefore investigated the expression of various connexins at the protein (i.e., cell surface expression) and mRNA level in primary human AML cells. The cell surface expression of the connexins, Cx26, Cx32, Cx37, Cx43 and Cx45, varied considerably between patients, and detectable levels were observed only for subsets of patients. On the whole, Cx43 and Cx45 showed the highest cell surface expression. Connexin expression was dependent on AML cell differentiation, but showed no association with cytogenetic abnormalities or mutations of the fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) or nucleophosmin (NPM)‑1 genes. By contrast, only Cx45 showed a significant variation between patients at the mRNA level. A high Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-17, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interferon-γ], whereas a low Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of protein functions (i.e., ligase activity, protein folding and catabolism). There was no significant correlation observed between the connexin mRNA and protein levels. Thus, differences in connexin expression can be used to subclassify AML patients. Differences in connexin cell surface expression profiles are not reflected at the mRNA level and have to be directly examined, whereas variations in Cx45 mRNA expression are associated with differences in cell signaling and the regulation of protein functions. PMID:25529637

  13. Connexin expression in human acute myeloid leukemia cells: identification of patient subsets based on protein and global gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Reikvam, Håkon; Ryningen, Anita; Sæterdal, Lars Rune; Nepstad, Ina; Foss, Brynjar; Bruserud, Øystein

    2015-03-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells support both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Τhis support is mediated through the local cytokine network and by direct cell‑cell interactions mediated via adhesion molecules and the formation of gap junctions by connexins. Previous studies on connexins in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have mainly focused on the investigation of leukemia cell lines. In the present study, we therefore investigated the expression of various connexins at the protein (i.e., cell surface expression) and mRNA level in primary human AML cells. The cell surface expression of the connexins, Cx26, Cx32, Cx37, Cx43 and Cx45, varied considerably between patients, and detectable levels were observed only for subsets of patients. On the whole, Cx43 and Cx45 showed the highest cell surface expression. Connexin expression was dependent on AML cell differentiation, but showed no association with cytogenetic abnormalities or mutations of the fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) or nucleophosmin (NPM)‑1 genes. By contrast, only Cx45 showed a significant variation between patients at the mRNA level. A high Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of the mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)‑17, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interferon‑γ], whereas a low Cx45 expression was associated with the altered regulation of protein functions (i.e., ligase activity, protein folding and catabolism). There was no significant correlation observed between the connexin mRNA and protein levels. Thus, differences in connexin expression can be used to subclassify AML patients. Differences in connexin cell surface expression profiles are not reflected at the mRNA level and have to be directly examined, whereas variations in Cx45 mRNA expression are associated with differences in cell signaling and the regulation of protein functions.

  14. Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. The objective of the research was to define a way to differentiate between effects due to microgravity and those due to possible stress from non-optimal spaceflight conditions.

  15. In vivo effect of an immunostimulating bacterial lysate on human B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lanzilli, G; Falchetti, R; Cottarelli, A; Macchi, A; Ungheri, D; Fuggetta, M P

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate in humans the mechanism by which the oral vaccine Polyvalent Mechanical Bacterial Lysate (PMBL) can rapidly mobilize specific immune response and evaluate the efficacy of its immunostimulating activity in preventing recurrent infections of the upper respiratory tract (URTIs) in a group of patients with a medical history of URTI recurrence. Patients received, by sublingual route, PBML, an immunostimulating lysate obtained by mechanical lysis of the most common bacteria responsible for upper respiratory tract infections. The treatment was administered for 10 consecutive days/month for 3 consecutive months. After the end of the treatment period the patients were followed up for an additional 3 months. The frequency of IgM memory B cells and the expression of the activation marker CD25 in peripheral blood lymphocytes were measured using the flow cytometric method before the start and at days 30 and 90 of the treatment cycle. To correlate clinical results to immunological parameters, the patients were monitored at different time-points during the treatment and at the end of follow-up period. The results showed that PMBL exerts a therapeutic and preventing effect in acute and recurrent infections of the upper respiratory tract and that this effect correlated with the activation and enhancement of both IgM memory B lymphocytes (CD24+/CD27+ cells) and IL2 receptor-expressing lymphocytes (CD25+ cells) involved either in humoral or cellular immunity. PMID:17026840

  16. Achyrocline satureioides (LAM.) DC (Marcela): antimicrobial activity on Staphylococcus spp. and immunomodulating effects on human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Calvo, D; Cariddi, L N; Grosso, M; Demo, M S; Maldonado, A M

    2006-01-01

    Achyrocline satureioides (LAM.) DC (Compositae) is a sub-bush original from America and distributed in Europe and Africa. It is mainly used in infusions, as digestive, sedative among others and has antimicrobial and antiviral properties. A research was made into the anti-microbial activity of the A. satureioides decoction on the Staphylococcus spp strains. They were isolated from 18 patients with acne lesions and from 7 patients infected with Staphylococcus spp. (5 strains were taken from catheters and 2 from wounds). The strains were classified through biochemical tests and then were seeded in triptein-soy agar with or without decoction to observe the antibacterial activity. On the other hand, cultures of lymphocytes were made from those patients who displayed infections caused by Staphylococcus spp. and from 12 control non-infected individuals. The lymphocytes were stimulated with decoction or PHA-M. Among the expanded, CD8+ T cells, with anti-human CD8 monoclonal antibody were the outstanding ones by indirect IF. The A. satureiodes decoction inhibited 95% of the isolated Staphylococcus spp. strains and stimulated the lymphocyte expansion, of which 40% were CD8+ T cells. The A. satureiodes decoction showed anti-microbial activity and resulted to be an immunostimulating agent on CD8+ T cells, with lesser mitogenic effects than PHA-M.

  17. Visualization of antigen-specific human cytotoxic T lymphocytes labeled with superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles.

    PubMed

    Beer, Ambros J; Holzapfel, Konstantin; Neudorfer, Juliana; Piontek, Guido; Settles, Marcus; Krönig, Holger; Peschel, Christian; Schlegel, Jürgen; Rummeny, Ernst J; Bernhard, Helga

    2008-06-01

    New technologies are needed to characterize the migration and survival of antigen-specific T cells in vivo. In this study, we developed a novel technique for the labeling of human cytotoxic T lymphocytes with superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles and the subsequent depiction with a conventional 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner. Antigen-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes were labeled with ferucarbotran by lipofection. The uptake of ferucarbotran was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy using a dextran-specific antibody, and the intracellular enrichment of iron was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. The imaging of T cells was performed by magnetic resonance on day 0, 2, 7 and 14 after the labeling procedure. On day 0 and 2 post labeling, a pronounced shortening of T2*-relaxation times was observed, which diminished after 7 days and was not detectable anymore after 14 days, probably due to the retained mitotic activity of the labeled T cells. Of importance, the antigen-specific cytolytic activity of the T cells was preserved following ferucarbotran labeling. Efficient ferucarbotran labeling of functionally active T lymphocytes and their detection by magnetic resonance imaging allows the in vivo monitoring of T cells and, subsequently, will impact the further development of T cell-based therapies. PMID:18286290

  18. Assessment of genotoxicity of Lannate-90® and its plant and animal metabolites in human lymphocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Quintana, Rafael; Gómez-Arroyo, Sandra; Sánchez-Alarcón, Juana; Milić, Mirta; Olivares, José Luis Gómez; Waliszewski, Stefan M; Cortés-Eslava, Josefina; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Calderón-Segura, María Elena

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated direct and metabolic genotoxic effects caused by Lannate-90®, a methomyl-based formulation (90 % active ingredient), in human lymphocyte cultures using sister chromatid exchange assay (SCE). Two processes were used for the plant promutagens evaluation: in vivo activation, applying the insecticide systemically in plants for 4 h and subsequently adding plant metabolites containing extracts to lymphocyte cultures; and in vitro activation, where the insecticide was incubated with Vicia faba S10 mix plus human lymphocyte culture. Direct treatment with the insecticide significantly increased SCE frequency in human lymphocytes (250-750 mgL-1), with cellular death observed at 1000 mgL-1 concentration. Using the extracts of Vicia faba treated with Lannate-90® to treat human lymphocytes, a dose-response relationship was observed. In lymphocyte cultures treated directly with the insecticide for 2 h, a negative response was obtained. When S10 mix was added, SCE frequency did not change significantly. Meanwhile, a mixture of S9 mammalian metabolic mix and Lannate-90® increased the SCE frequency, with an observed concentration-dependent response. Although Lannate-90® induced cellular death at the highest concentrations, it did not cause a delay in cell proliferation in any of the treatments, confirming its genotoxic action. This study is one of the first to evaluate and compare the direct effect of Lannate-90® in two bioassays, animal and vegetal, and the effect of plant and animal metabolism on its genotoxic potential. PMID:27331299

  19. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), -2, and -3 are chemotactic for human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Taub, D D; Proost, P; Murphy, W J; Anver, M; Longo, D L; van Damme, J; Oppenheim, J J

    1995-01-01

    Monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, -2, and -3 all have been shown to induce monocyte/macrophage migration in vitro and MCP-1, also known as MCAF, chemoattracts basophils and mast cells. We report here that natural MCP-1 as well as synthetic preparations of MCP-2 and MCP-3 stimulate significant in vitro chemotaxis of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes. This MCP-induced migration was dose-dependent and directional, but not chemokinetic. Phenotypic analysis of the T cell population responsive to MCP-1, MCP-2, and MCP-3 demonstrates that both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells migrated in response to these chemokines. Similar results were observed using human CD4+ and CD8+ T cell clones. Neutralizing antisera to MCAF or MCP-2 abrogated T cell migration in response to MCP-1 and MCP-2, respectively, but not to RANTES. Subcutaneous administration of purified MCP-1 into the hind flanks of SCID mice engrafted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) induced significant human CD3+ T cell infiltration into the site of injection at 4 h. These results demonstrate that MCP-1, MCP-2, and MCP-3 are inflammatory mediators that specifically stimulate the directional migration of T cells as well as monocytes and may play an important role in immune cell recruitment into sites of antigenic challenge. Images PMID:7883984

  20. Early and Late Damages in Chromosome 3 of Human Lymphocytes After Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Mangala, Lingegowda; Zhang, Ye; Kahdim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    Tumor formation in humans or animals is a multi-step process. An early stage of cancer development is believed to be genomic instability (GI) which accelerates the mutation rate in the descendants of the cells surviving radiation exposure. GI is defined as elevated or persistent genetic damages occurring many generations after the cells are exposed. While early studies have demonstrated radiation-induced GI in several cell types as detected in endpoints such as mutation, apoptosis and damages in chromosomes, the dependence of GI on the quality of radiation remains uncertain. To investigate GI in human lymphocytes induced by both low- and high-LET radiation, we initially exposed white blood cells collected from healthy subjects to gamma rays in vitro, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis post irradiation and at several intervals during the culture period. Among a number of biological endpoints planned for the project, the multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) allows identification of inversions that were expected to be stable. We present here early and late chromosome aberrations detected with mBAND in chromosome 3 after gamma exposure. Comparison of chromosome damages in between human lymphocytes and human epithelial cells is also discussed

  1. Characterization of effector and memory T cell subsets in the immune response to bovine tuberculosis in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccine-elicited long-term cultured IFN-gamma ELISPOT responses correlate with protection against bovine tuberculosis in cattle. With humans, cultured IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays are primarily a measure of central memory T cell (Tcm) responses; however, this important subset of lymphocytes is poorly ch...

  2. Automatic analysis of the micronucleus test in primary human lymphocytes using image analysis.

    PubMed

    Frieauff, W; Martus, H J; Suter, W; Elhajouji, A

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro micronucleus test (MNT) is a well-established test for early screening of new chemical entities in industrial toxicology. For assessing the clastogenic or aneugenic potential of a test compound, micronucleus induction in cells has been shown repeatedly to be a sensitive and a specific parameter. Various automated systems to replace the tedious and time-consuming visual slide analysis procedure as well as flow cytometric approaches have been discussed. The ROBIAS (Robotic Image Analysis System) for both automatic cytotoxicity assessment and micronucleus detection in human lymphocytes was developed at Novartis where the assay has been used to validate positive results obtained in the MNT in TK6 cells, which serves as the primary screening system for genotoxicity profiling in early drug development. In addition, the in vitro MNT has become an accepted alternative to support clinical studies and will be used for regulatory purposes as well. The comparison of visual with automatic analysis results showed a high degree of concordance for 25 independent experiments conducted for the profiling of 12 compounds. For concentration series of cyclophosphamide and carbendazim, a very good correlation between automatic and visual analysis by two examiners could be established, both for the relative division index used as cytotoxicity parameter, as well as for micronuclei scoring in mono- and binucleated cells. Generally, false-positive micronucleus decisions could be controlled by fast and simple relocation of the automatically detected patterns. The possibility to analyse 24 slides within 65h by automatic analysis over the weekend and the high reproducibility of the results make automatic image processing a powerful tool for the micronucleus analysis in primary human lymphocytes. The automated slide analysis for the MNT in human lymphocytes complements the portfolio of image analysis applications on ROBIAS which is supporting various assays at Novartis.

  3. Evaluation of the clastogenicity and anticlastogenicity of the carotenoid bixin in human lymphocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Lusânia M Greggi; Pascoal, Lívia M; Bianchi, Maria de Lourdes P; Dias, Francisca L

    2005-08-01

    Carotenoids are regarded as effective antioxidants, antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic agents. Annatto, a red-yellow extract obtained from seeds of Bixa orellana L. is a mixture of several carotenoids and one of them bixin (BXN), is known as its major coloring compound. Studies on BXN clastogenicity and anticlastogenicity in cultured human lymphocytes have not been reported so far. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the ability of BXN to induce chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes in vitro and to examine the possible anticlastogenic effect of this carotenoid in chromosomal damage induced by the clastogen cisplatin (cDDP). Human blood samples were obtained from six healthy, non-smoking volunteers; two females and four males aged 18-35 years. The concentrations of BXN (1.0; 2.5; 5.0 or 10 microg/mL) tested in combination with cDDP were established on the basis of mitotic index (MI) measurements. The data showed that BXN was not cytotoxic or clastogenic, when compared to untreated control. A marked decrease in the MI values compared to the untreated control and an increased percentage of aberrant metaphases was seen in all cultures treated with cDDP. The carotenoid efficiency in reducing the inhibitory effect of cDDP on lymphocyte MI is concentration-dependent. Cultures simultaneously treated with BXN and cDDP showed a statistically significant reduction in total chromosomal aberrations and aberrant metaphases. In our experiments, BXN may have acted as an antioxidant by intercepting free radicals generated by cDDP. The data obtained in the present study suggest that dietary carotenoids may act as protective agents against clastogenic effects of antitumor agents. However, extensive studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanism of action of BXN before its therapeutic use. PMID:15949968

  4. Perturbation of the natural killer cell compartment during primary human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection primarily involving the CD56bright subset

    PubMed Central

    Mantegani, Paola; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Galli, Laura; Din, Chiara Tassan; Lazzarin, Adriano; Fortis, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of natural killer (NK) cell subsets, their activating and inhibitory receptors, and their cytolytic potential, in primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (PHI) individuals at baseline and during 1 year of follow-up with or without antiretroviral therapy, and compared the results with those obtained in treatment-naïve, chronically HIV-infected (CHI) individuals, and HIV-seronegative (HN) healthy individuals. The proportion of the CD56dim and CD56bright subsets decreased with disease progression, whereas that of the CD56− CD16+ subset increased. In the CD56dim subset, the proportion of cells with natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs) decreased with disease progression, and their cytolytic potential was reduced. Conversely, the CD56bright subset was characterized by a high proportion of NCR-positive, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR)-positive NKG2A+ cells in both CHI and PHI individuals, which was associated with an increase in their cytolytic potential. During the 1 year of follow-up, the PHI individuals with high viraemia levels and low CD4+ T-cell counts who received highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) had a similar proportion of NK subsets to CHI individuals, while patients with low viraemia levels and high CD4+ T-cell counts who remained untreated had values similar to those of the HN individuals. Our results indicate a marked perturbation of the NK cell compartment during HIV-1 infection that is multifaceted, starts early and is progressive, primarily involves the CD56bright subset, and is partially corrected by effective HAART. PMID:19824914

  5. Differential human immunodeficiency virus expression in CD4+ cloned lymphocytes: from viral latency to replication.

    PubMed Central

    Chapel, A; Bensussan, A; Vilmer, E; Dormont, D

    1992-01-01

    By using cloning methodology, 13 CD4+, CD8-, CD45RO+, and CD29+ clones, isolated from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative donors, have been characterized and tested regarding their susceptibility to two strains of HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Infected clones possess integrated provirus. Only six are able to replicate HIV-1, while seven may normally grow without cytopathic effect and without viral replication. These results argue that all CD4+ lymphocyte clones may be infectable but that a heterogeneity exists regarding their abilities to replicate HIV-1. Images PMID:1374814

  6. Differential human immunodeficiency virus expression in CD4+ cloned lymphocytes: from viral latency to replication.

    PubMed

    Chapel, A; Bensussan, A; Vilmer, E; Dormont, D

    1992-06-01

    By using cloning methodology, 13 CD4+, CD8-, CD45RO+, and CD29+ clones, isolated from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative donors, have been characterized and tested regarding their susceptibility to two strains of HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Infected clones possess integrated provirus. Only six are able to replicate HIV-1, while seven may normally grow without cytopathic effect and without viral replication. These results argue that all CD4+ lymphocyte clones may be infectable but that a heterogeneity exists regarding their abilities to replicate HIV-1.

  7. Brucella fractions behave as nonspecific mitogens and polyclonal B-cell activators for human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Vendrell, J P; Rabesandratana, H; Huguet, M F; Cannat, A; Serre, A

    1985-01-01

    Two lipid-A-free fractions which were extracted from Brucella melitensis and were designated PI and SF stimulated human unsensitized mononuclear cells to proliferate and to secrete immunoglobulins. Both of these effects were observed in cultures of peripheral blood, tonsils, and cord blood lymphocytes. Neither B cells nor T cells alone proliferated in the presence of these fractions, whereas the proliferative response of T cells plus B cells was largely independent of accessory cells. Polyclonal activation was estimated by counting the cells which secreted immunoglobulins of different isotypes into culture supernatants. This phenomenon was strongly T dependent. PMID:3876286

  8. [Studies on the effect of an alkaloid extract of Symphytum officinale on human lymphocyte cultures].

    PubMed

    Behninger, C; Abel, G; Röder, E; Neuberger, V; Göggelmann, W

    1989-12-01

    An alkaloid extract of Symphytum officinale was investigated for its chromosome-damaging effect in human lymphocytes in vitro. In concentrations of 1.4 micrograms/ml and 14 micrograms/ml the alkaloids had no effect, in concentrations of 140 micrograms/ml and 1400 micrograms/ml the alkaloids induced sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) as well as chromosome aberrations. Additionally, the influence of rat liver enzymes (S9) was tested. The SCE-inducing capacity and the clastogenic effect of Symphytum alkaloids was increased by simultaneous application of S9-Mix. PMID:2616671

  9. Relative biological effectiveness of 280 keV neutrons for apoptosis in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ryan, L A; Wilkins, R C; McFarlane, N M; Sung, M M; McNamee, J P; Boreham, D R

    2006-07-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons varies from unity to greater than ten depending upon neutron energy and the biological endpoint measured. In our study, we examined apoptosis in human lymphocytes to assess the RBE of low energy 280 keV neutrons compared to Cs gamma radiation and found the RBE to be approximately one. Similar results have been observed for high energy neutrons using the same endpoint. As apoptosis is a major process that influences the consequences of radiation exposure, our results indicate that biological effect and the corresponding weighting factors for 280 keV neutrons may be lower in some cell types and tissues.

  10. The effects of lipid A on gamma-irradiated human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubničková, M.; Kuzmina, E. A.; Chausov, V. N.; Ravnachka, I.; Boreyko, A. V.; Krasavin, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The modulatory effects of lipid A (diphosphoryl lipid A (DLA) and monophosphoryl lipid A (MLA)) on apoptosis induction and DNA structure damage (single and double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs, respectively)) in peripheral human blood lymphocytes are studied for 60Co gamma-irradiation. It is shown that in the presence of these agents the amount of apoptotic cells increases compared with the irradiated control samples. The effect is most strongly pronounced for DLA. In its presence, a significant increase is observed in the number of radiation-induced DNA SSBs and DSBs. Possible mechanisms are discussed of the modifying influence of the used agents on radiation-induced cell reactions

  11. Human lymphocyte antigen CD38 catalyzes the production of cyclic ADP-ribose.

    PubMed

    Summerhill, R J; Jackson, D G; Galione, A

    1993-12-01

    The human lymphocyte antigen CD38 has been shown to share sequence homology with ADP-ribosyl cyclase, the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of NAD+ to cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), a potent Ca(2+)-mobilizing agent. In this study COS1 cells from African Green Monkey kidney were transiently transfected with CD38 cDNA, inducing expression of authentic CD38 on the cell surface. We demonstrate that CD38 expressed in this manner can convert NAD+ to cADPR in the extracellular medium as assessed by Ca2+ release from sea-urchin egg microsomes. PMID:8253202

  12. Human mast cells produce and release the cytotoxic lymphocyte associated protease granzyme B upon activation.

    PubMed

    Strik, Merel C M; de Koning, Pieter J A; Kleijmeer, Monique J; Bladergroen, Bellinda A; Wolbink, Angela M; Griffith, Janice M; Wouters, Dorine; Fukuoka, Yoshihiro; Schwartz, Lawrence B; Hack, C Erik; van Ham, S Marieke; Kummer, J Alain

    2007-07-01

    Mast cells are widely distributed throughout the body and express effector functions in allergic reactions, inflammatory diseases, and host defense. Activation of mast cells results in exocytosis of preformed chemical mediators and leads to novel synthesis and secretion of lipid mediators and cytokines. Here, we show that human mast cells also express and release the cytotoxic lymphocyte-associated protease, granzyme B. Granzyme B was active and localized in cytoplasmic granules, morphologically resembling those present in cytotoxic lymphocytes. Expression and release of granzyme B by mast cell-lines HMC-1 and LAD 2 and by cord blood- and mature skin-derived human mast cells depended on the mode of activation of these cells. In mast cell lines and cord blood-derived mast cells, granzyme B expression was mainly induced by non-physiological stimuli (A23187/PMA, Compound 48/80) and substance P. In contrast, mature skin-derived mast cells only produced granzyme B upon IgE-dependent stimulation. We conclude that granzyme B is expressed and released by human mast cells upon physiologic stimulation. This suggests a role for granzyme B as a novel mediator in mast cell biology.

  13. Autoreactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected subjects

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    A subtractive analysis of peptides eluted from major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)- A2.1 molecules purified from either human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-infected or uninfected cells was performed using micro high- performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Three peptides unique to infected cells were identified and found to derive from a single protein, human vinculin, a structural protein not known to be involved in viral pathogenesis. Molecular and cytofluorometric analyses revealed vinculin mRNA and vinculin protein overexpression in B and T lymphocytes from HIV-1-infected individuals. Vinculin peptide-specific CTL activity was readily elicited from peripheral blood lymphocytes of the majority of HLA-A2.1+, HIV+ patients tested. Our observations suggest that atypical vinculin expression and MHC class I-mediated presentation of vinculin-derived peptides accompany HIV infection of lymphoid cells in vivo, with a resultant induction of antivinculin CTL in a significant portion of HIV+ (HLA-A2.1+) individuals. PMID:8676071

  14. Crosstalk between human DC subsets promotes antibacterial activity and CD8+ T-cell stimulation in response to bacille Calmette-Guérin

    PubMed Central

    Lozza, Laura; Farinacci, Maura; Faé, Kellen; Bechtle, Marina; Stäber, Manuela; Dorhoi, Anca; Bauer, Mario; Ganoza, Christian; Weber, Stephan; Kaufmann, Stefan HE

    2014-01-01

    To date, little is known about the unique contributions of specialized human DC subsets to protection against tuberculosis (TB). Here, we focus on the role of human plasmacytoid (p)DCs and myeloid (m)DCs in the immune response to the TB vaccine bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Ex vivo DC subsets from human peripheral blood were purified and infected with BCG expressing GFP to distinguish between infected and noninfected cells. BDCA-1+ myeloid DCs were more susceptible than BDCA-3+ mDCs to BCG infection. Plasmacytoid DCs have poor phagocytic activity but are equipped with endocytic receptors and can be activated by bystander stimulation. Consequently, the mutual interaction of the two DC subsets in response to BCG was analyzed. We found that pDCs were activated by BCG-infected BDCA-1+ mDCs to upregulate maturation markers and to produce granzyme B, but not IFN-α. Reciprocally, the presence of activated pDCs enhanced mycobacterial growth control by infected mDCs and increased IL-1β availability. The synergy between the two DC subsets promoted BCG-specific CD8+ T-cell stimulation and the role of BCG-infected BDCA-1+ mDCs could not be efficiently replaced by infected BDCA-3+ mDCs in the crosstalk with pDCs. We conclude that mDC–pDC crosstalk should be exploited for rational design of next-generation TB vaccines. PMID:24114554

  15. Antibody-mediated depletion of lymphocyte-activation gene-3 (LAG-3(+) )-activated T lymphocytes prevents delayed-type hypersensitivity in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Poirier, N; Haudebourg, T; Brignone, C; Dilek, N; Hervouet, J; Minault, D; Coulon, F; de Silly, R V; Triebel, F; Blancho, G; Vanhove, B

    2011-05-01

    Lymphocyte-activation gene-3 (LAG-3, CD223) is a marker for recently activated effector T cells. Activated T lymphocytes are of major importance in many autoimmune diseases and organ transplant rejection. Therefore, specifically depleting LAG-3(+) T cells might lead to targeted immunosuppression that would spare resting T cells while eliminating pathogenic activated T cells. We have shown previously that anti-LAG-3 antibodies sharing depleting as well as modulating activities inhibit heart allograft rejection in rats. Here, we have developed and characterized a cytotoxic LAG-3 chimeric antibody (chimeric A9H12), and evaluated its potential as a selective therapeutic depleting agent in a non-human primate model of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH). Chimeric A9H12 showed a high affinity to its antigen and depleted both cytomegalovirus (CMV)-activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) human T lymphocytes in vitro. In vivo, a single intravenous injection at either 1 or 0·1 mg/kg was sufficient to deplete LAG-3(+) -activated T cells in lymph nodes and to prevent the T helper type 1 (Th1)-driven skin inflammation in a tuberculin-induced DTH model in baboons. T lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration into the skin was also reduced. The in vivo effect was long-lasting, as several weeks to months were required after injection to restore a positive reaction after antigen challenge. Our data confirm that LAG-3 is a promising therapeutic target for depleting antibodies that might lead to higher therapeutic indexes compared to traditional immunosuppressive agents in autoimmune diseases and transplantation. PMID:21352204

  16. Human cord blood suppressor T lymphocytes. II. Characterization of inducer of suppressor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.; Delespesse, G.

    1986-06-01

    Previously, we reported an antigen nonspecific inducer of T suppressor cell factor (TisF) produced by cord blood mononuclear cells (MNC) in 48-hr, two-way mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC). The target of this factor was a radiosensitive, T4+ (T8-) adult suppressor T cell subset. The cellular origin of this TisF was examined in the present study. IgG production by pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-stimulated adult MNC was used as an assay for TisF activity. It was found that TisF-producing cells formed rosettes with sheep erythrocytes (E+) and were independent of adherent cells (AC) in the production of TisF. They were resistant to irradiation (2500 rads) and phenotypic characterization with T cell reactive monoclonal antibodies indicated that they resided in the T8- (T4+) population. Furthermore, both TQ1- and TQ1+ cells were required for the production of TisF activity and such activity could not be reconstituted by supernatants from TQ1- MLC and TQ1+ MLC. These results indicate that the production of TisF is dependent upon interactions between radioresistant E+, T8-, TQ1- and radioresistant E+, T8-, TQ1+ cells.

  17. Protective effect of apigenin on radiation-induced chromosomal damage in human lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy; Tungjai, Montree; Whorton, Elbert B.

    2005-01-01

    The potential use of flavonoids as a radioprotector is of increasing interest because of their high antioxidant activity and abundance in the diet. The aim of this study is to examine genotoxic and radioprotective effects of one of the most common flavonoids, apigenin, on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was used to evaluate such effects of apigenin. Blood samples were collected from two non-smoking healthy male volunteers who had no history of previous exposure to other clastogenic agents. Isolated lymphocytes were cultured. There were two tubes per concentration for all treatments. To evaluate the genotoxicity of apigenin, cells were first treated with different concentrations of apigenin (0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 25 microg/mL) at 24 h after culture initiation, followed by cytochalasin-B (Cyt-B) treatment (3 microg/mL) and cell harvest at 44 and 72 h, respectively. Secondly, to investigate the radioprotective effect, cell cultures were exposed to different concentrations of apigenin as described above for 30 min before being irradiated to 2 Gy of 137Cs gamma rays (at a dose rate of 0.75 Gy/min). In all instances, the frequency of MN was scored in binucleated (BN) cells. The nuclear proliferation index also was calculated. We did not detect an increase in the frequency of MN in non-irradiated human lymphocyte cultures treated with 2.5, 5.0 or 10 microg/mL apigenin; although, we did observe an increase in cultures treated with 25 microg/mL apigenin (the highest concentration of apigenin used in our study). We also observed a significant increase in the frequency of MN in irradiated cells overall; however, the frequency was decreased as the concentration of apigenin increased, suggesting a radioprotective effect. These findings provide a basis for additional studies to help clarify the potential use and benefit of apigenin as a radioprotector.

  18. Differential effect of the immunomodulatory hormone somatostatin on replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Mercure, L; Phaneuf, D; Wainberg, M A

    1995-01-01

    The long-acting somatostatin analog octreotide (SMS 201-995) possesses immunosuppressive properties and has been successfully used for the management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated diarrhea, a condition commonly observed in the absence of known enteric pathogens. Since HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication can occur in both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes, we hypothesized that this benefit might be due to local effects on HIV-1 replication in these two T-cell subsets. As a model, we studied the effects of two synthetic molecules, SRIH 1-14 and SRIH 1-28, closely related to naturally occurring forms of somatostatin, as well as SMS 201-995 on HIV-1 replication in CD4+ and CD8+ cells derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We found that HIV-1 replication was inhibited in CD8+ cells but enhanced in infected CD4+ lymphocytes, as measured by p24 antigen levels in culture fluids. These differential effects were drug concentration dependent. We also observed that somatostatin inhibited the mitogen-induced proliferative responsiveness of both cell types. These effects on both HIV-1 replication and cell proliferation were independent of somatostatin gene expression, since somatostatin mRNAs were not detected in mitogen-stimulated PBMC, as determined by reverse transcription-PCR. PMID:7697528

  19. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production by human T lymphocytes upon Legionella pneumophila stimulation in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kitsukawa, K; Nakamoto, A; Koito, H; Matsuda, Y; Saito, A; Yamamoto, H

    1995-01-01

    In vitro immune responses to Legionella pneumophila were investigated. When human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from healthy volunteers were stimulated with formalin-killed L. pneumophila for 7 days in vitro, strong proliferative responses were observed. The responding cells were shown to be a CD4 T cell subset. It was also found that the CD4 T cells secreted significant amounts of IFN-gamma into the PBL culture supernatant. The production of IFN-gamma and IL-4 by PBL was measured semiquantitatively by reverse transcriptase-assisted polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) methods. Formalin-killed or live L. pneumophila-stimulated PBL expressed the mRNA for IFN-gamma but not the mRNA for IL-4. The results suggest that the whole bacterium, as opposed to the supernatant, predominantly stimulates Th1 type helper T cells. The cloned T cells specific for L. pneumophila expressed the mRNA for IFN-gamma but not for IL-4. In contrast to formalin-killed or live L. pneumophila stimulation, when PBL were stimulated with the bacterial culture supernatant, the proliferating T cells produced the mRNA for IL-4 as well as for IFN-gamma. A significant correlation between the proliferative response to formalin-killed L. pneumophila and IFN-gamma release in culture was observed (r = 0.6932, P < 0.001) in PBL from 30 healthy volunteers. From these in vitro studies, it is suggested that the whole L. pneumophila bacterium and their soluble antigens stimulate T cells in a manner which results in a different pattern of cytokine production. PMID:7813113

  20. Tetanus toxoid-specific T cell responses in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, R; Jacob, L; Herlyn, D

    1995-01-01

    SCID mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) have repeatedly been shown to produce antigen-specific B cell responses. We have derived tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific human T cell lines from cells of the peritoneal cavity, spleen and lymph nodes of SCID mice reconstituted with human PBL and boosted with TT. Establishment of these cell lines was dependent on the time interval between reconstitution of the mice with human PBL and initiation of lymphocyte cultures in vitro. When lymphocytes were collected from the mice 8 weeks after reconstitution, human lymphocytes with TT-specific proliferative activity in vitro were isolated from the peritoneal cavity and spleen, but long-term cell lines could not be established after repeated lymphocyte stimulation with TT, IL-2 and autologous Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells. In contrast, three long-term (> 10 months) TT-specific human T cell lines were established from lymphocytes collected from two of the eight mice in the group 4 weeks after reconstitution. The T cell lines were either CD4+ (two lines derived from peritoneal cavity and lymph node, respectively) or CD8+ (one line derived from spleen) and all expressed CD3, T cell receptor alpha/beta, and human histocompatibility leucocyte class I antigen. The T cell lines, however, lacked cytotoxic, helper and suppressor activities. Thus, SCID mice can support human T cells that actively migrate to various organs and respond to antigenic stimuli both in vivo and in vitro, but these T cells lack characteristic functions. PMID:7621599

  1. Plant polyphenols mobilize nuclear copper in human peripheral lymphocytes leading to oxidatively generated DNA breakage: implications for an anticancer mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Uzma; Hanif, Sarmad; Ullah, M F; Azmi, Asfar S; Bhat, Showket H; Hadi, S M

    2008-08-01

    It was earlier proposed that an important anti-cancer mechanism of plant polyphenols may involve mobilization of endogenous copper ions, possibly chromatin-bound copper and the consequent pro-oxidant action. This paper shows that plant polyphenols are able to mobilize nuclear copper in human lymphocytes, leading to degradation of cellular DNA. A cellular system of lymphocytes isolated from human peripheral blood and comet assay was used for this purpose. Incubation of lymphocytes with neocuproine (a cell membrane permeable copper chelator) inhibited DNA degradation in intact lymphocytes. Bathocuproine, which is unable to permeate through the cell membrane, did not cause such inhibition. This study has further shown that polyphenols are able to degrade DNA in cell nuclei and that such DNA degradation is inhibited by neocuproine as well as bathocuproine (both of which are able to permeate the nuclear pore complex), suggesting that nuclear copper is mobilized in this reaction. Pre-incubation of lymphocyte nuclei with polyphenols indicates that it is capable of traversing the nuclear membrane. This study has also shown that polyphenols generate oxidative stress in lymphocyte nuclei which is inhibited by scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and neocuproine. These results indicate that the generation of ROS occurs through mobilization of nuclear copper resulting in oxidatively generated DNA breakage.

  2. Origin and Role of a Subset of Tumor-Associated Neutrophils with Antigen-Presenting Cell Features in Early-Stage Human Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sunil; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik S; O'Brien, Shaun; Moon, Edmund K; Garfall, Alfred L; Rao, Abhishek S; Quatromoni, Jon G; Stephen, Tom Li; Litzky, Leslie; Deshpande, Charuhas; Feldman, Michael D; Hancock, Wayne W; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R; Albelda, Steven M; Eruslanov, Evgeniy B

    2016-07-11

    Based on studies in mouse tumor models, granulocytes appear to play a tumor-promoting role. However, there are limited data about the phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in humans. Here, we identify a subset of TANs that exhibited characteristics of both neutrophils and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in early-stage human lung cancer. These APC-like "hybrid neutrophils," which originate from CD11b(+)CD15(hi)CD10(-)CD16(low) immature progenitors, are able to cross-present antigens, as well as trigger and augment anti-tumor T cell responses. Interferon-γ and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor are requisite factors in the tumor that, working through the Ikaros transcription factor, synergistically exert their APC-promoting effects on the progenitors. Overall, these data demonstrate the existence of a specialized TAN subset with anti-tumor capabilities in human cancer.

  3. The potent oncogene NPM-ALK mediates malignant transformation of normal human CD4(+) T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wei, Fang; Wang, Hong Yi; Liu, Xiaobin; Roy, Darshan; Xiong, Qun-Bin; Jiang, Shuguang; Medvec, Andrew; Danet-Desnoyers, Gwenn; Watt, Christopher; Tomczak, Ewa; Kalos, Michael; Riley, James L; Wasik, Mariusz A

    2013-12-01

    With this study we have demonstrated that in vitro transduction of normal human CD4(+) T lymphocytes with NPM-ALK results in their malignant transformation. The transformed cells become immortalized and display morphology and immunophenotype characteristic of patient-derived anaplastic large-cell lymphomas. These unique features, which are strictly dependent on NPM-ALK activity and expression, include perpetual cell growth, proliferation, and survival; activation of the key signal transduction pathways STAT3 and mTORC1; and expression of CD30 (the hallmark of anaplastic large-cell lymphoma) and of immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 and cell-surface protein PD-L1/CD274. Implantation of NPM-ALK-transformed CD4(+) T lymphocytes into immunodeficient mice resulted in formation of tumors indistinguishable from patients' anaplastic large-cell lymphomas. Our findings demonstrate that the key aspects of human carcinogenesis closely recapitulating the features of the native tumors can be faithfully reproduced in vitro when an appropriate oncogene is used to transform its natural target cells; this in turn points to the fundamental role in malignant cell transformation of potent oncogenes expressed in the relevant target cells. Such transformed cells should permit study of the early stages of carcinogenesis, and in particular the initial oncogene-host cell interactions. This experimental design could also be useful for studies of the effects of early therapeutic intervention and likely also the mechanisms of malignant progression.

  4. Assessment of genotoxicity of vincristine, vinblastine and vinorelbine in human cultured lymphocytes: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Alzoubi, KH; Khabour, OF; Alawneh, KZ; Raffee, LA; Alsatari, ES; Hussein, EI; Bani-Hani, KE

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vincristine (VCR), vinblastine (VBL) and vinorelbine (VRL) are anticancer agents from the Vinca alkaloid family that have the potential to induce genotoxic effect. The aim of the present study was to compare the genotoxic effect of VCR, VBL and VRL. Levels of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy guanosine (8-OHdG) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) were measured in cultured human blood lymphocytes treated with VCR, VBL and VRL at concentrations of 0.01 and 0.1 μg/mL. Results showed that VCR, VBL and VRL significantly increased the 8-OHdG levels (p <0.05), whereas it did not cause a significant increase in the frequencies of SCEs in human blood lymphocytes as compared to controls. On the other hand, all three agents significantly increased cells mitotic index (p <0.05). At both tested concentrations, the magnitude of the increase in 8-OHdG was VBL>VCR>VRL. In conclusion, VCR, VBL and VRL induce DNA damage as indicated by the increase in the 8-OHdG biomarker but with different magnitude. PMID:27785403

  5. Evaluation of Possible Genotoxic Activity of Dirithromycin in Cultured Human Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kayraldız, Ahmet; Dönbak, Lale; Yavuz Kocaman, Ayşe; Köker, Esra; Gökçe, Şule

    2015-01-01

    Dirithromycin antibiotic is a 14-membered lactone ring macrolide and is widely used in medicine to treat many different types of bacterial infections. In the present study, the possible genotoxicity of dirithromycin was evaluated in cultured human lymphocytes by using sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), chromosome aberration (CA), and micronucleus (MN) tests and also cell proliferation kinetics such as mitotic index (MI), replication index (RI), and nuclear division index (NDI) were analyzed for cytotoxicity. Cell cultures were treated with four different concentrations of dirithromycin (37.75, 67.50, 125, and 250 µg/mL) for 24 and 48 h periods. Dirithromycin significantly induced SCE and MN frequency at all concentrations in both 24 and 48 h treated cells. In addition, CA level has been markedly increased in the cells treated with almost all concentrations of dirithromycin for 24 (except 37.75 µg/mL) and 48 h treatment periods as compared to control. However, MI, RI, and NDI values were not affected by the dirithromycin treatment (p > 0.05). The results of this study indicated that dirithromycin treatment caused genetic damage by increasing the level of cytogenetic endpoints, suggesting its genotoxic and mutagenic action on human lymphocytes in vitro. PMID:26576152

  6. Lead and cadmium at very low doses affect in vitro immune response of human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Borella, P.; Giardino, A. )

    1991-08-01

    The effect of lead chloride and cadmium chloride on in vitro immunoglobulin (Ig) production by human lymphocytes was investigated. After 7 days in culture, lead added in the range of human exposure (207-1035 {mu}g/liter) significantly enhanced Ig production either when cells were activated by pokeweed mitogen (PWM) or not. The effect was dose-dependent and was related to the Pb were measured in the extracellular medium and in the cells. Independently of the mitogen addition, about 2% of the Pb added was accumulated in the cells, most being associated with the nuclear fraction. Those findings suggest that the Pb effects could depend on its uptake and distribution in the cells. Cadmium added in the 50-500 nM range exhibited a dose-independent mitogenic activity in unstimulated cells, whereas the Ig secretion was not significantly affected by Cd when cells were PWM-activated. A considerable intraindividual variability, however, was observed when blood donors were separately examined, with both an increase, a decrease, or no variation on Ig production. Furthermore, higher percentages of Cd were accumulated in the nuclear fraction, and lower in the cytosol and precipitate, in PWM-activated compared to resting lymphocytes. Genetic factors could be of importance for the observed variability of the immune response to cadmium, and the authors support the hypothesis that differences in the metallothionein (MT) inducibility could play a role.

  7. 50 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields do not affect human lymphocyte activation and proliferation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capri, Miriam; Mesirca, Pietro; Remondini, Daniel; Carosella, Simona; Pasi, Sara; Castellani, Gastone; Franceschi, Claudio; Bersani, Ferdinando

    2004-12-01

    In the last 30 years, an increasing public concern about the possible harmful effects of electromagnetic fields generated by power lines and domestic appliances has pushed the scientific community to search for a correct and comprehensive answer to this problem. In this work the effects of exposure to 50 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields, with a magnetic flux density of 0.05 mT and 2.5 mT (peak values), were studied on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected from healthy young and elderly donors. Cell activation and proliferation were investigated by using flow cytometry techniques and 3H-TdR incorporation assays, respectively. The results obtained indicated that exposure to the fields altered neither DNA synthesis nor the capacity of lymphocytes to enter the activation phase and progress into the cell cycle. Thus, the conclusions are that two important functional phases of human lymphocytes, such as activation and proliferation, are not affected by exposures to 50 Hz magnetic fields similar to those found under power lines.

  8. Evaluation of the DNA damaging effects of amitraz on human lymphocytes in the Comet assay.

    PubMed

    Radakovic, Milena; Stevanovic, Jevrosima; Djelic, Ninoslav; Lakic, Nada; Knezevic-Vukcevic, Jelena; Vukovic-Gacic, Branka; Stanimirovic, Zoran

    2013-03-01

    Amitraz is formamidine pesticide widely used as insecticide and acaricide. In veterinary medicine, amitraz has important uses against ticks, mites and lice on animals. Also, amitraz is used in apiculture to control Varroa destructor. It this study, the alkaline Comet assay was used to evaluate DNA damaging effects of amitraz in human lymphocytes. Isolated human lymphocytes were incubated with varying concentrations of amitraz (0.035, 0.35, 3.5, 35 and 350 mu g/mL). The Comet assay demonstrated that all concentrations of amitraz caused statistically significant increase in the level of DNA damage, thus indicating that amitraz possesses genotoxic potential. The concentration of amitraz that produced the highest DNA damage (3.5 mu g/mL) was chosen for further analysis with the antioxidant catalase. The obtained results showed that co-treatment with antioxidant catalase (100 IU/mL or 500 IU/mL) significantly reduced the level of DNA damage, indicating the possible involvement of reactive oxygen species in DNA damaging effects of amitraz. Flow cytometric analysis revealed increase of the apoptotic index following treatment with amitraz. However, co-treatment with catalase reduced the apoptotic index, while treatment with catalase alone reduced the percentage of apoptotoc cells even in comparison with the negative control. Therefore, catalase had protective effects against ROS-mediated DNA damage and apoptosis.

  9. Chlorophenols, chlorocatechols and chloroguaiacols induce DNA base oxidation in human lymphocytes (in vitro).

    PubMed

    Michałowicz, Jaromir; Majsterek, Ireneusz

    2010-02-01

    Phenolic compounds are strong environmental toxicants, which are found in food, drinking water as well as in the indoor and outdoor air environment. In this work we investigated the effect of low concentrations of 0.2, 1 and 5 microg/ml of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (2,4,5-TCP), pentachlorophenol (PCP), 4,6-dichloroguaiacol (4,6-DCG), tetrachloroguaiacol (TeCG), 4,5-dichlorocatechol (4,5-DCC) and tetrachlorocatechol (TeCC) on DNA bases oxidation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The analysis was performed using alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (the comet assay). To detect oxidized pyrimidynes and purines we used the repair enzymes such as endonuclease III and formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase. DNA oxidation was expressed as a percentage of comet tail, which was formed after the xenobiotics treatment. The obtained results showed that all the compounds examined were able to oxidize DNA bases in human lymphocytes. It was also observed that pyrimidine bases were more strongly oxidized in comparison to purine ones. Finally, it was found that chlorinated catechols and TeCC in particular, revealed a higher oxidative potential in comparison to chlorophenols and chloroguaiacols, and a rise in the number of chlorine atoms in the compound from each group examined led to an increase in DNA bases damage.

  10. DNA damage in human lymphocytes exposed to four food additives in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Serkan; Unal, Fatma; Yüzbaşıoğlu, Deniz; Celik, Mustafa

    2014-11-01

    In vitro genotoxic effects of antioxidant additives, such as citric acid (CA) and phosphoric acid (PA) and their combination, as well as antimicrobial additives, such as benzoic acid (BA) and calcium propionate (CP), on human lymphocytes were determined using alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis. There was a significant increase in the DNA damage in human lymphocytes after 1 h of in vitro exposure to CA, PA, BA and CP (200, 25-200, 50-500, 50-1000 μg/mL, respectively). The combination of CA and PA significantly increased the mean tail intensity at all the concentrations used (25-200 μg/mL) and significantly increased the mean tail length mainly after higher concentrations (100 and 200 μg/mL). Data in this study showed that the concentrations of food additives used induce DNA damage and PA was the most genotoxic and CA was less genotoxic additives among them.

  11. Cytogenetic response to coffee in Chinese hamster ovary AUXB1 cells and human peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Tucker, J D; Taylor, R T; Christensen, M L; Strout, C L; Hanna, M L

    1989-09-01

    We have investigated the genotoxic effects of three different brands and three types of coffee (freshly brewed regular, instant regular and freshly brewed decaffeinated) in two mammalian systems: the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) AUXB1 cell line and human peripheral lymphocytes. Sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and endoreduplicated cells (ERCs) were used as the endpoints. Coffee was prepared according to the manufacturer's suggestions, and after cooling, administered to cultured cells at dilutions ranging up to 11% that of full-strength coffee. Each brand and type of coffee induced significant levels of SCEs and ERCs in AUXB1 cells. SCEs, but not ERCs, were induced in human peripheral lymphocytes. Bisulfite, which complexes with carbonyls and reduces their genotoxicity, significantly diminished the number of SCEs and ERCs found after administration of coffee. Catalase and peroxidase, enzymes that destroy hydrogen peroxide activity, had no significant effect upon the SCE and ERC frequencies in AUXB1 cultures treated with freshly brewed regular coffee. These experiments indicate that different brands and types of coffee have sufficient genotoxic activity to increase SCEs and ERCs at levels only a fraction of those normally consumed. 1,2-Dicarbonyls alone and peroxides alone do not appear to be responsible for the majority of SCEs and ERCs that were observed to be induced by dilute coffee.

  12. Intraepithelial lymphocytes in normal human intestine do not express proteins associated with cytolytic function.

    PubMed Central

    Chott, A.; Gerdes, D.; Spooner, A.; Mosberger, I.; Kummer, J. A.; Ebert, E. C.; Blumberg, R. S.; Balk, S. P.

    1997-01-01

    Human small intestine contains a very large population of intraepithelial T lymphocytes (IELs) that are oligoclonal, appear functionally to be cytolytic T cells, and may contribute to the normal and pathological turnover of intestinal epithelial cells. This report addresses the cytolytic function of IELs in normal small intestine by examining their expression of molecules that carry out cell-mediated cytolysis. Immunohistochemical analyses of granzyme B, perforin, Fas ligand, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha demonstrated these proteins were not expressed by small intestinal IELs in situ. These proteins also were not expressed by colonic IELs or by lamina propria lymphocytes in the small or large intestine. Granzyme A, however, was expressed by a large fraction of IELs. In contrast to these in situ results, isolated and in vitro activated IELs were shown to express effector proteins consistent with cytolytic T cells, including granzyme B, Fas ligand, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma. These results are most consistent with the vast majority of IELs in normal human small intestine being resting cytolytic T cells and suggest that these cells do not contribute to the apoptotic cell death of epithelial cells in normal intestine. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9250156

  13. Human neonatal lymphocytes immortalized after microinjection of Epstein-Barr virus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, C; Raab-Traub, N

    1987-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a highly efficient acute transforming agent in human cells, provided that the intact virus is used. To investigate the ability of viral DNA alone to transform cells, we introduced the EBV genome into human lymphocytes. After microinjection of EBV DNA into neonatal B lymphocytes, we established a cell line that in early passages contained multiple viral fragments. This cell line retained sequences from the short, unique (Us) region of the EBV genome and sequences from EcoRI-E. The viral sequences were not expressed; however, the cells expressed a 2.3-kilobase polyadenylated message homologous to the c-fgr oncogene, a cellular locus believed to be activated by EBV infection [M. S. C. Cheah, T. J. Ley, S. R. Tronick, and K. C. Robbins, Nature (London) 319:238-240.]. The cell line was monoclonal with rearrangement at the immunoglobulin locus and had a reciprocal translocation t(1;7)(p34;q34) and a deletion of sequences within the locus for the beta chain of the T-cell receptor. The close proximity of the translocation to the chromosomal loci for c-fgr on chromosome 1 and the T-cell receptor beta chain on chromosome 7 suggests that structural alteration of these genes was critical to this transformation event. Images PMID:3033282

  14. Cytogenetic effects of styrene and styrene oxide on human lymphocytes and Allium cepa.

    PubMed

    Linnainmaa, K; Meretoja, T; Sorsa, M; Vainio, H

    1978-01-01

    Styrene and styrene oxide induce cytogenetic effects already at very low concentrations (0.01% v/v or even less); the effects are similar in both in vitro human lymphocytes and in vivo onion root tip cells (Allium cepa L.). It is characteristic that styrene treatment is more potent in causing chromosome breakage in both systems. In Allium styrene induced inhibition of mitotic spindle action as revealed by a strong c-mitotic effect. Also the number of micronuclei and nuclear bridges increased in both test systems, especially after styrene oxide treatment. Furthermore, the metaphase chromosome morphology in the cells treated with styrene oxide was strongly affected. In both systems, chromosome destruction was observed, or else the chromosome material was decondensed and resulted in a characteristic fuzzy appearance of Allium chromosomes or a banded appearance of human lymphocyte chromosomes. A specific effect of styrene oxide on the chromosomal proteins is thus suggested. The data obtained from the autoradiographic studies with Allium support the idea that [7--3H] styrene oxide binds irreversibly to the cytoplasmic and nuclear macromolecules. PMID:734401

  15. Human-mouse mixed lymphocyte cultures. II. Partial separation of functionally distinct populations on discontinuous albumin gradients.

    PubMed Central

    Boylston, A W; Anderson, R L

    1979-01-01

    Human-mouse mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC) develop stable, strain-specific responses directed towards antigens determined by the mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC). By restimulation in vitro a two- to four-fold increase in total cell numbers can be achieved. Sensitized cells can be fractionated on discontinuous BSA gradients to produce fractions with predominantly proliferative or cytotoxic activity towards the intiating antigens. Mixing experiments show that fractionation of biological activity is the result of fractination of specifically sensitized effector cells rather than fractionation of inhibitory or collaborative elements. Since biological activities or can be separated on the basis of physical properties into distinct cell populations these experiments support the idea that these functions are the properties of distinct subclasses of human T lymphocyte. Xenogeneic MLC coupled to physical separation measures is a useful approach to the study of antigen-specific human T lymphocytes. PMID:155651

  16. Human-mouse mixed lymphocyte cultures. II. Partial separation of functionally distinct populations on discontinuous albumin gradients.

    PubMed

    Boylston, A W; Anderson, R L

    1979-02-01

    Human-mouse mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC) develop stable, strain-specific responses directed towards antigens determined by the mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC). By restimulation in vitro a two- to four-fold increase in total cell numbers can be achieved. Sensitized cells can be fractionated on discontinuous BSA gradients to produce fractions with predominantly proliferative or cytotoxic activity towards the intiating antigens. Mixing experiments show that fractionation of biological activity is the result of fractination of specifically sensitized effector cells rather than fractionation of inhibitory or collaborative elements. Since biological activities or can be separated on the basis of physical properties into distinct cell populations these experiments support the idea that these functions are the properties of distinct subclasses of human T lymphocyte. Xenogeneic MLC coupled to physical separation measures is a useful approach to the study of antigen-specific human T lymphocytes.

  17. Augmentation of mitogen responsiveness in human lymphocytes by a humoral factor obtained from thymic epithelial cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Hensen, E J; Hoefsmit, E C; Van Den Tweel, J G

    1978-01-01

    Supernatants derived from thymic epithelial cultures were studied for their effect in augmenting mitogen responsiveness in human thymocytes and lymphocytes. Incubation of these cells for 20 hr in diluted supernatants obtained from 14 to 25 day old cultures of thymic epithelium resulted in a significant increase in the response to Con A. The epithelial nature of the cells was confirmed by electron microscopy. Supernatants from fibroblast cultures or thymic epithelial cultures overgrown by fibroblasts were not effective, nor were supernatants from secondary epithelial outgrowths. The molecular weight of the active fraction appeared to be between 17,000 and 45,000 daltons. The data indicated that human thymus epithelium produced one or more humoral factors which were identical to, or shared properties with, thymic hormones. Images FIG. 1 p312-a PMID:307466

  18. cAMP inducibility of transcriptional repressor ICER in developing and mature human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bodor, J; Spetz, A L; Strominger, J L; Habener, J F

    1996-04-16

    Stimulation of the cAMP-dependent signaling pathway exerts an inhibitory effect on the proliferation and effector functions of T cells. The ability of T cells to form high intracellular levels of cAMP is acquired during development in the human thymus and is retained by the majority of mature peripheral T lymphocytes. Here we show that elevated cAMP levels in T cells correlate with the expression of the potent transcriptional repressor ICER (inducible cAMP early repressor) previously described in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Further, in transcriptional assays in vivo, ICER inhibits calcineurin-mediated expression of the interleukin 2 promoter as well as Tax-mediated transactivation of the human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) promoter. Thus, the induction of ICER in T cells may play an important role in the cAMP-induced quiescence and the persistent latency of HTLV-I.

  19. Loss of Telomeres in the Progeny of Human Lymphocytes Exposed to Energetic Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F.A.; George, K.; Durante, M.

    2006-01-01

    We have used cross-species multi-color banding (RxFISH) combined with telomere FISH probes, to measure chromosomal aberrations in the progeny of human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to ionizing radiation. Accelerated iron particles (energy 1 GeV/nucleon) induced many more terminal deletions than the same dose of gamma-rays. We found that truncated chromosomes without telomeres could be transmitted for at least three cell cycles following exposure, and represented about 10% of all aberrations observed in the progeny of cells exposed to iron ions. High energy heavy ions generate the most significant health risk for human space exploration and the results suggest that telomere loss may be the leading mechanism for their high efficiency in the induction of late effects.

  20. Evaluation of toxicity of essential oils palmarosa, citronella, lemongrass and vetiver in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sonali; Jothiramajayam, Manivannan; Ghosh, Manosij; Mukherjee, Anita

    2014-06-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to study the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of the essential oils (palmarosa, citronella, lemongrass and vetiver) and monoterpenoids (citral and geraniol) in human lymphocytes. Trypan blue dye exclusion and MTT test was used to evaluate cytotoxicity. The genotoxicity studies were carried out by comet and DNA diffusion assays. Apoptosis was confirmed by Annexin/PI double staining. In addition, generation of reactive oxygen species was evaluated by DCFH-DA staining using flow cytometry. The results demonstrated that the four essential oils and citral induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity at higher concentrations. The essential oils were found to induce oxidative stress evidenced by the generation of reactive oxygen species. With the exception of geraniol, induction of apoptosis was confirmed at higher concentrations of the test substances. Based on the results, the four essential oils are considered safe for human consumption at low concentrations.

  1. Persistent nonproductive infection of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human B lymphocytes by human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, K E; Burrage, T; Jones, F; Miller, G

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the interaction of different strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with an Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human B-lymphocyte line, X50-7. Previously we found that some HIV-1 strains replicated rapidly and were exclusively cytolytic; others induced persistent noncytopathic infection associated with continued shedding of extracellular virus (K. Dahl, K. Martin, and G. Miller, J. Virol. 61:1602-1608, 1987). We now describe a third form of cell-virus relationship in which infection by strain IIIB is maintained in a highly cell-associated state in a small subpopulation (less than 2%) of X50-7 cells. Neither viral subcomponents nor infectious virus was detectable in culture supernatants; however, the carrier lines were fusogenic and HIV-1 could be recovered following prolonged cocultivation with susceptible cells. In these chronic carrier cultures, virions were not seen budding at the cell surface, but a few were found within cytoplasmic vesicles. HIV-1 infection of first- and second-generation cell subclones of the carrier cell line rapidly evolved from a productive to a cell-associated state. There were low levels of HIV DNA, and RNA in the fusogenic secondary clones, but most clones lacked HIV-1 DNA, failed to express HIV-1 RNA, and exhibited no properties associated with HIV-1 infection. The experiments indicate that HIV-1 can be sequestered in human B lymphocytes. The cell cloning experiments introduce the possibility that the HIV-1 provirus may be lost from some lymphocytes. Images PMID:2157058

  2. Regulation of interferon receptor expression in human blood lymphocytes in vitro and during interferon therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, A.S.; Hannigan, G.E.; Freedman, M.H.; Williams, B.R.

    1986-05-01

    Interferons (IFN) elicit antiviral and antineoplastic activities by binding to specific receptors on the cell surface. The binding characteristics of IFN to human lymphocytes were studied using IFN alpha 2 labeled with /sup 125/I to high specific activity. The specific binding curves generated were analyzed by the LIGAND program of Munson and Rodbard to determine receptor numbers. The number of receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and tonsillar B-lymphocytes (TBL) from normal individuals were 505 +/- 293 (n = 10) and 393 +/- 147 (n = 3) respectively. When these cells were preincubated in vitro with unlabeled IFN alpha 2, the receptor number decreased to 82 +/- 45 and 61 +/- 16 respectively. Receptor binding activities recovered gradually over a period of 72 h when the cells were incubated in IFN-free medium. This recovery of receptors could be blocked by the addition of actinomycin D to the incubation medium. A similar decrease in receptor expression was observed in vivo in PBL from patients being treated daily with 5 X 10(6) units/m2 per d of IFN alpha 2 by subcutaneous injection, for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or papilloma virus infections. Receptor numbers in PBL in vivo were further reduced concurrent with the progression of IFN therapy. Thus, the reduction in IFN receptor expression observed in vitro can be demonstrated in vivo. These studies indicate that monitoring IFN receptor expression in vivo can provide information regarding the availability of IFN receptors at the cell surface for the mediation of IFN actions during the course of IFN therapy.

  3. Stability of Radiation Induced Chromosome Damage in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; George, K.; Willingham, V.

    2006-01-01

    Chromosome damage in an individual's peripheral blood lymphocytes can be an indicator of radiation exposure and this data can be used to evaluate dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Evidence suggests that the yield of chromosome damage in lymphocytes is also a relevant biomarker of cancer risk in humans that reflects individual cancer susceptibility. It follows that biomonitoring studies can be used to uncover subjects who are particularly susceptible to radiation damage and therefore at higher risk of cancer. Translocations and other stable aberrations are commonly believed to persist in peripheral blood cells for many years after exposure, and it has been suggested that translocations can be used for assessing retrospective radiation doses or chronic exposures. However, recent investigations suggest that translocations might not always persist indefinitely. We measured chromosome aberrations in the blood lymphocytes of six astronauts before their respective missions of approximately 3 to 6 months onboard the international space station, and again at various intervals up to 5 years after flight. In samples collected a few days after return to earth, the yield of chromosome translocations had significantly increased compared with preflight values, and results indicate that biodosimetry estimates lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. However, for five of the astronauts, follow up analysis revealed a temporal decline in translocations with half-lives ranging from 10 to 58 months. The yield of exchanges remained unchanged for the sixth astronaut during an observation period of 5 months post-flight. These results may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction and could affect cancer risk predictions that are estimated from yields of chromosome damage obtained shortly after exposure.

  4. Survival of activated human T lymphocytes is promoted by retinoic acid via induction of IL-2.

    PubMed

    Engedal, Nikolai; Ertesvag, Aase; Blomhoff, Heidi Kiil

    2004-03-01

    At the end of an immune response, most activated T cells spontaneously undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis). In the present study we show that all-trans retinoic acid (atRA), a major vitamin A metabolite, can inhibit the spontaneous apoptosis of activated human T lymphocytes in vitro. Isolated peripheral blood T lymphocytes were activated by 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate and cultured for up to 11 days without any further stimuli. With time, a gradual increase in cell death was observed. This spontaneous death of activated T cells was apoptotic, as demonstrated by cell shrinkage, DNA fragmentation and depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane. In the presence of physiological concentrations of atRA, the percentage of T cells exhibiting these apoptotic features was significantly reduced. After 5 days of stimulation, the percentage of TUNEL+ T cells decreased from 28 to 12% in the presence of atRA. The anti-apoptotic effect of atRA was mimicked by the retinoic acid receptor (RAR)-selective agonists 4-[(E)-2-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2-naphthalenyl)-1-propenyl]benzoic acid and AM-580, and totally abrogated by the RAR-selective antagonist Ro 41-5253. Cytokines of the IL-2 family have been shown to improve the survival of activated T cells. Strikingly, we found that the ability of atRA to inhibit apoptosis was significantly correlated with its ability to increase the production of IL-2. Furthermore, a blocking anti-IL-2 receptor antibody completely abrogated the anti-apoptotic effect of atRA. Together, these results suggest that retinoic acid inhibits spontaneous apoptosis of activated T lymphocytes through a RAR-dependent increase in IL-2 production.

  5. Long-Lived Plasma Cells Are Contained within the CD19(-)CD38(hi)CD138(+) Subset in Human Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Halliley, Jessica L; Tipton, Christopher M; Liesveld, Jane; Rosenberg, Alexander F; Darce, Jaime; Gregoretti, Ivan V; Popova, Lana; Kaminiski, Denise; Fucile, Christopher F; Albizua, Igor; Kyu, Shuya; Chiang, Kuang-Yueh; Bradley, Kyle T; Burack, Richard; Slifka, Mark; Hammarlund, Erika; Wu, Hao; Zhao, Liping; Walsh, Edward E; Falsey, Ann R; Randall, Troy D; Cheung, Wan Cheung; Sanz, Iñaki; Lee, F Eun-Hyung

    2015-07-21

    Antibody responses to viral infections are sustained for decades by long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs). However, LLPCs have yet to be characterized in humans. Here we used CD19, CD38, and CD138 to identify four PC subsets in human bone marrow (BM). We found that the CD19(-)CD38(hi)CD138(+) subset was morphologically distinct, differentially expressed PC-associated genes, and exclusively contained PCs specific for viral antigens to which the subjects had not been exposed for more than 40 years. Protein sequences of measles- and mumps-specific circulating antibodies were encoded for by CD19(-)CD38(hi)CD138(+) PCs in the BM. Finally, we found that CD19(-)CD38(hi)CD138(+) PCs had a distinct RNA transcriptome signature and human immunoglobulin heavy chain (VH) repertoire that was relatively uncoupled from other BM PC subsets and probably represents the B cell response's "historical record" of antigenic exposure. Thus, our studies define human LLPCs and provide a mechanism for the life-long maintenance of anti-viral antibodies in the serum.

  6. Rapid alterations of cell cycle control proteins in human T lymphocytes in microgravity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In our study we aimed to identify rapidly reacting gravity-responsive mechanisms in mammalian cells in order to understand if and how altered gravity is translated into a cellular response. In a combination of experiments using "functional weightlessness" provided by 2D-clinostats and real microgravity provided by several parabolic flight campaigns and compared to in-flight-1g-controls, we identified rapid gravity-responsive reactions inside the cell cycle regulatory machinery of human T lymphocytes. In response to 2D clinorotation, we detected an enhanced expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1 protein within minutes, less cdc25C protein expression and enhanced Ser147-phosphorylation of cyclinB1 after CD3/CD28 stimulation. Additionally, during 2D clinorotation, Tyr-15-phosphorylation occurred later and was shorter than in the 1 g controls. In CD3/CD28-stimulated primary human T cells, mRNA expression of the cell cycle arrest protein p21 increased 4.1-fold after 20s real microgravity in primary CD4+ T cells and 2.9-fold in Jurkat T cells, compared to 1 g in-flight controls after CD3/CD28 stimulation. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitor curcumin was able to abrogate microgravity-induced p21 mRNA expression, whereas expression was enhanced by a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Therefore, we suppose that cell cycle progression in human T lymphocytes requires Earth gravity and that the disturbed expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins could contribute to the breakdown of the human immune system in space. PMID:22273506

  7. Early events of human T lymphocyte activation are associated with type I protein kinase A activity.

    PubMed Central

    Laxminarayana, D; Berrada, A; Kammer, G M

    1993-01-01

    Human T lymphocytes possess both the type I and II isozymes of protein kinase A (PKA). The type I (PKA-I) isozyme is predominantly associated with the plasma membrane, whereas the type II (PKA-II) isozyme is primarily localized to the cytosol. Because the functions of both PKA-I and PKA-II isozymes in the biochemical events of T lymphocyte activation have not been clearly elucidated, we tested the hypothesis that very early events of normal human T lymphocyte activation are mediated by the PKA-I and/or PKA-II isozyme(s). Fresh normal human T cells and a normal human CD4+ T cell line (GK606) activated with anti-CD3-epsilon and recombinant interleukin 1 alpha (rIL-1 alpha) exhibited a peak six- to sevenfold increase of PKA phosphotransferase activity at 5 min that returned to baseline by 60 min. Similarly, both fresh T cells and the T cell line activated by phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin demonstrated a peak eightfold increase of PKA activity by 15 min that returned toward baseline by 60 min. Chromatographic separation of the PKA isozymes and quantification of phosphotransferase activities after T cell activation by either agonist pair showed preferential activation of the PKA-I isozyme, resulting in a significant reduction in the ratio of PKA-I to PKA-II isozyme activity from 3.1:1-6.2:1 to 1.1:1-3.2:1. PKA-I isozyme activation resulted in the release of free catalytic (C) subunit, an increase in C subunit phosphotransferase activity, and the phosphorylation of T cell plasma membrane-associated proteins, p14, p17, p20, p21, p38, and p48. However, activation of the PKA-I isozyme did not appear to be required for the transcription of IL-2 mRNA, an event necessary for mitosis. These data indicate that ligand-induced T cell activation is associated with rapid activation of the PKA-I, but not PKA-II, isozyme that results in phosphorylation of plasma membrane-associated proteins. The involvement of the PKA-I isozyme during the very early events of T cell

  8. Effect of deoxyribonucleosides on the hypersensitivity of human peripheral blood lymphocytes to UV-B and UV-C irradiation.

    PubMed

    Green, M H; Waugh, A P; Lowe, J E; Harcourt, S A; Cole, J; Arlett, C F

    1994-07-01

    We have previously shown that non-cycling (unstimulated) human lymphocytes from normal donors show extreme hypersensitivity to UV-B irradiation, and are killed by an excisable lesion which is not a pyrimidine dimer or 6-4 photoproduct. In this paper we show that addition of the 4 deoxyribonucleosides to the medium, each at 10(-5) M, substantially increased the survival of non-cycling normal human T-lymphocytes following UV-B irradiation and substantially reduced the frequency of excision-related strand breaks in human mononuclear cells. Addition of ribonucleosides to the medium did not enhance excision-break rejoining. The survival of fibroblasts, of cycling T-lymphocytes and of unstimulated xeroderma pigmentosum T-lymphocytes was not enhanced by deoxyribonucleosides. This suggests that the hypersensitivity is due to reduced rejoining of excision breaks as a consequence of low intracellular deoxyribonucleotide pools and that it can be redressed by supplementation of the medium with deoxyribonucleosides or upregulation of ribonucleotide reductase following mitogen stimulation. We suggest that UV-B forms an additional DNA lesion which is not a pyrimidine dimer or 6-4 photoproduct, which is relatively common, and at which incision is particularly efficient. In fibroblasts, repair of this lesion is completed with high efficiency, whereas in normal unstimulated T-lymphocytes, rapid incision exacerbates the effects of the reduced rate of strand rejoining and leads to cell death. PMID:7517007

  9. Functional analysis of human T cell subsets defined by monoclonal antibodies. IV. Induction of suppressor cells within the OKT4+ population

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Y.; Rogozinski, L.; Irigoyen, O.H.; Friedman, S.M.; Kung, P.C.; Goldstein, G.; Chess, L.

    1981-08-01

    In this report, we explored the functional heterogeneity within the OKT4+ subset of human T cells. Evidence was obtained that although in vitro pokeweed mitogen-activated OKT4+ cells can function as radioresistant helper cells, these activated OKT4+ cells could also exert potent feedback suppression. Despite the induction of suppressor cells after pokeweed mitogen activation, the OKT4+ population maintains its original OKT3+, OKT4+, nd OKT8- surface phenotype. The suppressor cells contained within the activated OKT4+ population were found to be radiosensitive. Importantly, the suppression mediated by activated OKT4+ cells required the presence of radiosensitive cells contained within the resting OKT4+ population. Taken together, these results suggest that the OKT4+ subset of human T cells contains cells that can be activated to differentiate into suppressor cells independent of OKT8+ cells.

  10. Lymphocyte transformation and interferon production in human mononuclear cell microcultures for assay of cellular immunity to herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Haahr, S; Rasmussen, L; Merigan, T C

    1976-01-01

    Interferon production and transformation in response to herpes simplex virus antigen were studied in microcultures of human mononuclear cells. Mononuclear cells consisting of monocytes and both T and B lymphocytes were purified by Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Lymphocytes, predominantly T with 5% B, were obtained by passage of buffy-coat cells through nylon fiber columns. For some experiments, autochthonous macrophages and column-purified lymphocytes were stimulated with herpesvirus antigen. The effect of specific antibody and cell concentration on reactivity is described. Crude and purified antigens were compared as cell culture stimulants. Significant differences in transformation and interferon were observed between donors with a history of herpes labialis and donors with no detectable antibody, both in cultures prepared by Ficoll-Hypaque gradients and by column purification of lymphocytes. Cultures from seronegative donors prepared by Ficoll-Hypaque gradients produced interferon but did not transform when stimulated by herpes simplex antigen. "Immune" interferon production, that is, type II as opposed to type I, occurred only with autochthonous macrophage and column-purified lymphocyte cultures. Interferon produced by Ficoll-Hypaque-purified mononuclear cultures was type I, and its production was unrelated to immune status. Similarly, column-purified lymphocytes responded to herpes simplex virus antigen with type I interferon if obtained from a seropositive donor. PMID:181328

  11. Receptor-mediated Modulation of Human Monocyte, Neutrophil, Lymphocyte, and Platelet Function by Phorbol Diesters

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Bonnie J.; Weinberg, J. Brice

    1982-01-01

    The tumor promoting phorbol diesters elicit a variety of responses from normal and leukemic blood cells in vitro by apparently interacting with cellular receptors. The biologically active ligand [20-3H] phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate ([3H]PDBu) bound specifically to intact human lymphocytes, monocytes, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), and platelets, but not to erythrocytes. Binding, which was comparable for all four blood cell types, occurred rapidly at 23° and 37°C, reaching a maximum by 20-30 min usually followed by a 30-40% decrease in cell associated radioactivity over the next 30-60 min. The time course for binding was temperature dependent with equilibrium binding occurring after 120-150 min at 4°C, with no subsequent loss of cell-associated radioactivity at this temperature. Bound [3H]PDBu could be eluted by addition of unlabeled PDBu. Scatchard analysis of data from 4°C binding studies revealed linear plots with high affinity receptors in these cell types with dissociation constants and receptors per cell of 60 nM and 7.8 × 105/cell for lymphocytes, 51 nM and 15.5 × 105/cell for monocytes, 38 nM and 4.0 × 105/cell for PMN, and 19 nM and 2.9 × 104/cell for platelets. Structure-activity studies using unlabeled phorbol-related compounds demonstrated a close correlation between their abilities to inhibit binding of [3H]PDBu to cells and their abilities to induce cellular responses (monocyte and PMN H2O2 secretion, lymphocyte 3HTdR incorporation, and platelet tritiated serotonin release); phorbol and 4-alpha phorbol were inactive while phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), PDBu, mezerein, and phorbol 12,13-diacetate (in decreasing order of potency) inhibited [3H]PDBu binding and elicited the various responses. Thus, these high affinity, specific receptors for the phorbol diesters, present on monocytes, lymphocytes, PMN, and platelets, mediate the pleiotypic effects induced by these ligands. PMID:6956584

  12. Potentiation by caffeine of cytogenetic damage induced by steroidal derivatives in human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mourelatos, C; Nikolaropoulos, S; Fousteris, M; Pairas, G; Argyraki, M; Lykidis, D; Fidani, S; Mourelatos, D; Lialiaris, Th

    2014-05-15

    We studied the effects of three newly synthesized steroidal derivatives of nitrogen mustards, alone or in combination with caffeine, on sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequencies and on human lymphocyte proliferation kinetics. The agents have as alkylator functionalities either P-N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)aminophenyl-buturate (CHL) or P-N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)aminophenyl-acetate (PHE), esterified with a modified steroidal nucleus. An enhancement of SCE frequency was seen with compounds which contain either PHE or CHL as alkylators and are esterified with a steroidal nucleus having added a cholestene group in the 17-position of the D-ring. The exocyclic insertion of an -NHCO- group in the D-ring of the steroidal nucleus esterified with PHE (amide ester of PHE) gave a compound showing increased SCE frequency. Enhanced cytogenetic damage was observed when lymphocytes were exposed in vitro to caffeine. The compounds, alone or in combination with caffeine, caused a concentration-dependent increase in SCE frequencies and cell division delays, and caffeine was found to act synergistically with the steroidal alkylators.

  13. Toxicological evaluation of dextran stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Easo, Sheeja Liza; Mohanan, Parayanthala Valappil

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles present an attractive choice for carcinogenic cell destruction via hyperthermia treatment due to its small size and magnetic susceptibility. Dextran stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles (DIONPs) synthesized and characterized for this purpose were used to evaluate its effect on cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and oxidative stress response in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. In the absence of efficient internalization and perceptible apoptosis, DIONPs were still capable of inducing significant levels of reactive oxygen species formation shortly after exposure. Although these particles did not cause any genotoxic effect, they enhanced the expression of a few relevant oxidative stress and antioxidant defense related genes, accompanied by an increase in the glutathione peroxidase activity. These results indicate that under the tested conditions, DIONPs induced only minimal levels of oxidative stress in lymphocytes. Understanding the biological interaction of DIONPs, the consequences as well as the associated mechanisms in vitro, together with information obtained from systemic studies, could be expected to advance the use of these particles for further clinical trials. PMID:27629807

  14. Effects of halothane on the human beta-adrenergic receptor of lymphocyte membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Marty, J.; Nivoche, Y.; Nimier, M.; Rocchiccioli, C.; Luscombe, F.; Henzel, D.; Loiseau, A.; Desmonts, J.M.

    1987-12-01

    The effects of halothane on beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist interaction were studied using the membranes of human lymphocytes as a model. Membrane preparations of lymphocytes were obtained from blood samples withdrawn from seven healthy young volunteers. Beta-receptor studies were performed using (-)/sup 125/I iodocyanopindolol (/sup 125/ICP) binding. Non-specific binding was determined in the presence of (-)isoproterenol. Beta-receptor density (Bmax) and the dissociation constant (KD) for /sup 125/ICP were determined from saturation curves. Beta-receptor affinity for agonists evaluated by the IC50 (the concentration of isoproterenol required to inhibit 50% of specific /sup 125/ICP binding) and the dissociation constant (KL) for isoproterenol was established from competition curves. The effect of halothane 1%, in an air oxygen mixture (oxygen fraction: 0.3) administered by tonometry during ligand membrane incubation, on beta-adrenergic receptor, was compared to that of control experiments not exposed to halothane. Halothane produced a moderate but significant decrease of Bmax (-10%) and a significant increase in non-specific binding (+30%), while KD, IC50, and KL were unchanged. The authors conclude that halothane, in vitro, decreases beta-adrenergic receptor density. This effect could be mediated by an alteration of the receptor in the membrane due to action of halothane on the lipid phase of the membrane.

  15. Correlation between radiation dose and p53 protein expression levels in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Mariana B; Fernandes, Thiago S; Silva, Edvane B; Amaral, Ademir

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the relationship between p53 protein levels and absorbed doses from in vitro irradiated human lymphocytes. For this, samples of blood from 23 donors were irradiated with 0.5; 1; 2; and 4 Gy from a Cobalt-60 source, and the percentages of lymphocytes expressing p53 were scored using Flow Cytometry. The subjects were divided into 3 groups, in accordance with the p53 levels expressed per radiation dose: low (Group I), high (Group II), and excessive levels (Group III). For all groups, the analyses showed that the p53 expression levels increase with the absorbed dose. Particularly for groups I and II, the correlation between this protein expression and the dose follows the linear-quadratic model, such as for radioinduced chromosomal aberrations. In conclusion, our findings indicate possible applications of this approach in evaluating individual radiosensitivity prior to radiotherapeutical procedures as well as in medical surveillance of occupationally exposed workers. Furthermore, due to the rapidity of flow-cytometric analyses, the methodology here employed would play an important role in emergency responses to a large-scale radiation incident where many people may have been exposed. PMID:26312422

  16. Human yeast-specific CD8 T lymphocytes show a nonclassical effector molecule profile.

    PubMed

    Breinig, Tanja; Scheller, Nicoletta; Glombitza, Birgit; Breinig, Frank; Meyerhans, Andreas

    2012-05-01

    Pathogenic yeast and fungi represent a major group of human pathogens. The consequences of infections are diverse and range from local, clinically uncomplicated mycosis of the skin to systemic, life-threatening sepsis. Despite extensive MHC class I-restricted frequencies of yeast-specific CD8 T lymphocytes in healthy individuals and the essential role of the cell-mediated immunity in controlling infections, the characteristics and defense mechanisms of antifungal effector cells are still unclear. Here, we describe the direct analysis of yeast-specific CD8 T lymphocytes in whole blood from healthy individuals. They show a unique, nonclassical phenotype expressing granulysin and granzyme K in lytic granules instead of the major effector molecules perforin and granzyme B. After stimulation in whole blood, yeast-specific CD8 T cells degranulated and, upon cultivation in the presence of IL-2, their granula were refilled with granulysin rather than with perforin and granzyme B. Moreover, yeast-specific stimulation through dendritic cells but not by yeast cells alone led to degranulation of the effector cells. As granulysin is the only effector molecule in lytic granules known to have antifungal properties, our data suggest yeast-specific CD8 T cells to be a nonclassical effector population whose antimicrobial effector machinery seems to be tailor-made for the efficient elimination of fungi as pathogens.

  17. Induction of sister chromatid exchanges by coal dust and tobacco snuff extracts in human peripheral lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, J.D.; Ong, T.

    1985-01-01

    The organic solvent extracts of sub-bituminous coal dust and tobacco snuff, both together and separately, were tested for the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in human peripheral lymphocytes. The results indicate that these extracts induced SCEs, and that when tested together synergistically induced SCEs in two of three donors. Studies with the organic solvent extracts of all five ranks of coal indicate that the extracts of bituminous, lignite, and peat, but not anthracite, induced SCEs. Similar experiments conducted with water extracts, induced SCEs, and that anthracite was equivocal. To determine whether individuals differed in their SCE responses to coal dust extracts, lymphocytes from five donors were tested with organic solvent extracts of bituminous and sub-bituminous coal. An analysis of variance indicates that the SCE response was significantly influenced by the donor and each of the two coal extracts. The findings presented here suggest that coal dust, with or without tobacco snuff, may play a role in the elevated incidence of gastric cancer in coal miners. Because water extracts of some ranks of coal induced SCEs, there exists the possibility of adverse environmental effects due to coal leachates.

  18. Mutations in human lymphocytes commonly involve gene duplication and resemble those seen in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.R.; Grist, S.A.; Janatipour, M.; Morley, A.A.

    1988-05-01

    Mutations in human lymphocytes are commonly due to gene deletion. To investigate the mechanism of deletion for autosomal genes, the authors immunoselected lymphocytes mutated at the HLA-A locus and clones them for molecular analysis. Of 36 mutant clones that showed deletion of the selected HLA-A allele, 8 had resulted from a simple gene deletion, whereas 28 had resulted from a more complex mutational event involving reduplication of the nonselected HLA-A allele as indicated by hybridization intensity on Southern blots. In 3 of the 28 clones, retention of heterozygosity at the HLA-B locus indicated that the reduplication was due to recombination between the two chromosomes 6; but in the remaining 25 clones, distinction could not be made between recombination and chromosome reduplication. The results indicate that mutations in normal somatic cells frequently result in hemizygosity or homozygosity at gene loci and, thereby, resemble the mutations thought to be important in the etiology of various forms of cancer.

  19. In-vitro carbofuran induced micronucleus formation in human blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R K; Rai, D K; Sharma, B

    2012-12-22

    The farmers in general get exposed to different chemicals including pesticides. Many of these compounds are capable of inducing mutations in DNA and lead to several diseases including cancer. Carbofuran is a broad spectrum pesticide and frequently used in agricultural practices in India. In this study we intended to evaluate DNA damage inflicted by pesticide exposure in human blood lymphocytes under in vitro condition. The lymphocytes were exposed to varying concentrations of carbofuran (0—50μM) and analyzed by means of the micronucleus (MN) test. The results obtained showed significant increase in MN frequency after exposure to 5, 10, 25 and 50μM of carbofuran as compared to the control group. The frequencies of MN were observed to be in concentration dependent manner. As we further increase the concentration of carbofuran, we observed significant decrease in the mean percentage of binucleated cells (70—49%) and increase in the number of micronuclei formed per 1000 binucleated cells. Simultaneously, we also observed reduction in Cytokinesis—Block Proliferation index (CBPI) with increase in the carbofuran concentrations. The results indicate that this pesticide may exhibit genotoxic effect at higher concentrations. This study emphasizes the need to reinforce the good practices campaigns in order to enlighten those who work with pesticides and also to make them aware about the importance of using protective measures.

  20. Karyotypes of Human Lymphocytes Exposed to High-Energy Iron Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2002-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to gamma rays or accelerated (56)Fe ions (1 GeV/nucleon, 145 keV/microm) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY). Doses of 0.3 and 3 Gy were used for both radiation types. Chromosomes were prematurely condensed by a phosphatase inhibitor (calyculin A) to avoid the population selection bias observed at metaphase as a result of the severe cell cycle delays induced by heavy ions. A total of 1053 karyotypes (G(2) and M phases) were analyzed in irradiated lymphocytes. Results revealed different distribution patterns for chromosomal aberrations after low- and high-LET radiation exposures: Heavy ions induced a much higher fraction of cells with multiple aberrations, while the majority of the aberrant cells induced by low doses of gamma rays contained a single aberration. The high fraction of complex-type exchanges after heavy ions leads to an overestimation of simple-type asymmetrical interchanges (dicentrics) from analysis of Giemsa-stained samples. However, even after a dose of 3 Gy iron ions, about 30% of the cells presented no complex-type exchanges. The involvement of individual chromosomes in exchanges was similar for densely and sparsely ionizing radiation, and no statistically significant evidence of a nonrandom involvement of specific chromosomes was detected.

  1. Clastogenic effect of atranorin, evernic acid, and usnic acid on human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Stojanović, Gordana S; Stanković, Miroslava; Stojanović, Igor Z; Palić, Ivan; Milovanović, Vesna; Rancić, Sofija

    2014-04-01

    Three lichen secondary metabolites atranorin (1), evernic acid (2), and usnic acid (3), were evaluated for their in vitro clastogenic and antiproliferative effects on human lymphocytes using the cytochalasin-B blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay at concentrations of 2 microg/mL, 4 microg/mL and 6 microg/mL of final culture solution. The frequency of micronucleus (MN) was scored in binucleated cells, and cytokinesis-block proliferation index (CBPI) was calculated. Among the tested compounds, 3 exhibited the most prominent effect decreasing the frequency of MN in the range of 42.5% - 48.9%, that is about double of the positive control amifostin WR-2721 that reduces MN frequency for 22.0%. The effect of evernic acid was approximately equal to action of amifostin (23.2% -32.9%). Atranorin at concentrations of 2 microg/mL and 4 microg/mL decreasing the frequency of MN only for 11.1% and 1.8%, while in concentration of 6 microg/mL increases the frequency of MN for 9.6 %. The comparable CBPI values of the investigated compounds and control suggested that they did not show a statistically significant inhibitory effect on lymphocyte cell proliferation at applied concentrations. PMID:24868868

  2. Modulation of microenvironment acidity reverses anergy in human and murine tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Calcinotto, Arianna; Filipazzi, Paola; Grioni, Matteo; Iero, Manuela; De Milito, Angelo; Ricupito, Alessia; Cova, Agata; Canese, Rossella; Jachetti, Elena; Rossetti, Monica; Huber, Veronica; Parmiani, Giorgio; Generoso, Luca; Santinami, Mario; Borghi, Martina; Fais, Stefano; Bellone, Matteo; Rivoltini, Licia

    2012-06-01

    Stimulating the effector functions of tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes (TIL) in primary and metastatic tumors could improve active and adoptive T-cell therapies for cancer. Abnormal glycolysis, high lactic acid production, proton accumulation, and a reversed intra-extracellular pH gradient are thought to help render tumor microenvironments hostile to roving immune cells. However, there is little knowledge about how acidic microenvironments affect T-cell immunity. Here, we report that lowering the environmental pH to values that characterize tumor masses (pH 6-6.5) was sufficient to establish an anergic state in human and mouse tumor-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes. This state was characterized by impairment of cytolytic activity and cytokine secretion, reduced expression of IL-2Rα (CD25) and T-cell receptors (TCR), and diminished activation of STAT5 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) after TCR activation. In contrast, buffering pH at physiologic values completely restored all these metrics of T-cell function. Systemic treatment of B16-OVA-bearing mice with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) significantly increased the therapeutic efficacy of both active and adoptive immunotherapy. Our findings show that acidification of the tumor microenvironment acts as mechanism of immune escape. Furthermore, they illustrate the potential of PPIs to safely correct T-cell dysfunction and improve the efficacy of T-cell-based cancer treatments.

  3. Biodosimetry of ionizing radiation by selective painting of prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Painting of interphase chromosomes can be useful for biodosimetric purposes in particular cases such as radiation therapy, accidental exposure to very high radiation doses and exposure to densely ionizing radiation, for example during space missions. Biodosimetry of charged-particle radiation is analyzed in the present paper. Target cells were human peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with gamma rays, protons and iron ions. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated for different times to allow repair of radiation-induced damage and then fused to mitotic hamster cells to promote premature condensation in the interphase chromosomes. Chromosome spreads were then hybridized with whole-chromosome DNA probes labeled with fluorescent stains. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromatin fragments shortly after exposure, as well as the kinetics of rejoining and misrejoining, were not markedly dependent on linear energy transfer. However, after exposure to heavy ions, more aberrations were scored in the interphase cells after incubation for repair than in metaphase samples harvested at the first postirradiation mitosis. On the other hand, no significant differences were observed in the two samples after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation. These results suggest that interphase chromosome painting can be a useful tool for biodosimetry of particle radiation.

  4. Production of interferon and tumour necrosis factor by cloned human natural cytotoxic lymphocytes and T cells.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Meager, A; Moore, M

    1987-08-01

    Cell lines and clones, derived from natural killer (NK) cell-enriched (B73.1+) peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from several human donors, that expressed distinct surface phenotypes and were cytolytically active against K562 target cells were tested for their capacity to produce interferon (IFN) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF), IFN and TNF were measured firstly in biological assays and secondly in specific immunoassays for alpha-IFN, gamma-IFN and tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha). It was found that the majority of NK-derived lines and clones were highly cytotoxic towards K562, but generally produced relatively low or undetectable levels of gamma-IFN and TNF alpha following stimulation with phytohaemagglutinin. No alpha-IFN was detected in supernatants from these cells. In comparison, cell lines and clones, derived from T lymphocyte (B73.1-) enriched PBL from the same donors were poorly cytotoxic towards K562, but generally produced higher levels of gamma-IFN and TNF than NK-derived cells. Thus, neither gamma-IFN nor TNF production were shown to correlate well with the capacity of NK-derived or T cell clones to effect cytotoxic action towards K562 in vitro. These results suggest that the co-production of gamma-IFN and TNF is not indicative of cytotoxic potential.

  5. Age-related decline of perforin expression in human cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Rukavina, D; Laskarin, G; Rubesa, G; Strbo, N; Bedenicki, I; Manestar, D; Glavas, M; Christmas, S E; Podack, E R

    1998-10-01

    In this study a flow cytometric technique for detecting cytoplasmic perforin (P) has been used to quantify age-related changes in perforin expression in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). Proportions of P+ lymphocytes increased after birth, but declined rapidly after the age of 70 years. This was true for both T cells and CD16(+) and CD56(+) natural killer (NK) cells. Children showed in addition to high levels of perforin positive CD8(+) cells a much higher proportion of CD4(+)P+ cells than the other age groups. In elderly individuals there was also a highly significant reduction in mean levels of perforin per cell as compared with all other groups (P < .05 to .001). Adult women had consistently higher mean levels of perforin per cell than adult men for all P+ cell phenotypes. Functional tests clearly showed the deficiency in early spontaneous cytotoxic potential of PBL from elderly persons due to relative P deficiency, which can be corrected by stimulation of cytolytic cells with target cells and interleukin-2 (IL-2). The deficiency in cytolytic activity on the contact with target cells may have implications for antiviral and antitumor immunity in elderly persons.

  6. DNA repair capacity of cultured human lymphocytes exposed to mutagens measured by the comet assay and array expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Bausinger, Julia; Speit, Günter

    2015-11-01

    Repair of mutagen-induced DNA lesions during transportation, storage and cultivation of lymphocytes may have a significant impact on results obtained in human biomonitoring after occupational and environmental exposure of human populations to genotoxic chemicals. Using the comet assay in combination with the repair inhibitor aphidicolin and array gene expression analysis of 92 DNA repair genes, we investigated the repair of DNA lesions induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and benzo[a]pyrenediolepoxide (BPDE) in phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated cultured human lymphocytes in the time segment before replication. The comet assay indicated fast repair of MMS-induced damage during the first hours of cultivation. In contrast, removal of BPDE-induced lesions was slower and significant amounts of damage seem to persist until S-phase. Gene expression analysis revealed that PHA stimulation had a clear effect on gene regulation in lymphocytes already during the first 18h of cultivation. Under the conditions of this study, genotoxic concentrations of MMS did not induce significant changes in gene expression. In contrast, exposure to BPDE led to altered expression of several genes in a time- and concentration-related manner. Of the significantly up-regulated genes, only two genes (XPA and XPC) were directly related to nucleotide excision repair. Our results suggest that PHA stimulation of human lymphocytes influences the expression of DNA repair genes in human lymphocytes. The effect of induced DNA damage on gene expression is comparatively low and depends on the mutagens used. PHA-stimulated lymphocytes repair induced DNA damage before they start to replicate but the repair activity during the first 18h of cultivation is not affected by changes in the expression of DNA repair genes during this period of time.

  7. T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia in a 63-year-old female with a pre-existing T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia: metachronous T-cell leukemias with discordant subset restrictions (CD4 versus CD8) and distinct clonal identities.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiang; Papavassiliou, Paulie; Rehder, Catherine; Sebastian, Siby; Wang, Endi

    2014-12-01

    A 55-year-old female with T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia (T-LGL) (CD8+) was initially treated with anti-thymocyte globulin and then cyclosporine due to anemia/neutropenia. While the severity of cytopenia varied with the therapy, the T-LGL persisted. Eight years after the initial diagnosis, she developed lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. A complete blood cell count revealed leukocytosis, anemia and thrombocytopenia with ∼ 80% lymphocytes. In contrast to the LGL cells, the blood lymphocytes at this time were medium-large in size and had oval/irregular nuclei, condensed chromatin, indistinct nucleoli and a moderate amount of basophilic cytoplasm, many with elongated vacuoles, and some with cytoplasmic projections. The abnormal lymphocytes comprised ∼ 30% of the bone marrow cellularity with interstitial infiltrates/aggregates. Immunophenotypic analyses demonstrated a T-cell neoplasm with features suggestive of T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) (CD4+). Cytogenetic analysis revealed a novel clone with complex abnormalities. PCR-based TRG gene rearrangement studies detected a clonal amplicon distinct from that of the preexisting T-LGL. Because of the chronological sequence of the two T-cell neoplasms, this case was initially considered an aggressive transformation of T-LGL. However, this was ultimately excluded by a discordant CD4-subset restriction and the presence of a distinct clonal identity. While these two T-cell neoplasms may have intrinsic connections, the underlying pathogenesis remains to be investigated.

  8. Rejoining and misrejoining of radiation-induced chromatin breaks. I. experiments with human lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Yang, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a composite probe for human chromosome 4 and a probe that stained all centromeres was used to study gamma-ray induced breakage, rejoining and misrejoining in prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes. Dose-response curves for the induction of all types of aberrations in prematurely condensed human chromosomes 4 were determined immediately after irradiation and after 8 h postirradiation incubation. In addition, aberrations were measured after various incubation times from 0 to 18 h after a dose of 7 Gy. Unrejoined chromosome breaks were the most frequent type of aberration observed immediately after irradiation. Approximately 15% of total aberrations observed were chromosome exchanges. After 8 h postirradiation incubation, the frequency of breaks in prematurely condensed chromosomes declined to about 20% of the initial value, and chromosomal exchanges became the most frequent aberration. Results of metaphase analysis were similar to those for prematurely condensed chromosomes after 8 h incubation with the exception that a significantly lower frequency of fragments was observed. Symmetrical and asymmetrical interchanges were found at similar frequencies at all doses. No complex exchanges were observed in lymphocyte chromosomes immediately after exposure. They accounted for about 1% of total exchanges in metaphase chromosomes at doses <3 Gy and about 14% at 7 Gy. Incomplete exchanges amounted to approximately 15% of total exchanges at all doses. The kinetics of break rejoining was exponential, and the frequency of exchanges increased with kinetics similar to that observed for the rejoining of the breaks. This increase in the total exchanges as a function of the time between irradiation and fusion was due to a rapid increase in reciprocal interchanges, and a slower increase in complex exchanges; the frequency of incomplete exchanges increased initially, then decreased with prolonged incubation to the level observed

  9. Effect of insulin and glucose on adenosine metabolizing enzymes in human B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kocbuch, Katarzyna; Sakowicz-Burkiewicz, Monika; Grden, Marzena; Szutowicz, Andrzej; Pawelczyk, Tadeusz

    2009-01-01

    In diabetes several aspects of immunity are altered, including the immunomodulatory action of adenosine. Our study was undertaken to investigate the effect of different glucose and insulin concentrations on activities of adenosine metabolizing enzymes in human B lymphocytes line SKW 6.4. The activity of adenosine deaminase in the cytosolic fraction was very low and was not affected by different glucose concentration, but in the membrane fraction of cells cultured with 25 mM glucose it was decreased by about 35% comparing to the activity in cells maintained in 5 mM glucose, irrespective of insulin concentration. The activities of 5'-nucleotidase (5'-NT) and ecto-5'-NT in SKW 6.4 cells depended on insulin concentration, but not on glucose. Cells cultured with 10(-8) M insulin displayed an about 60% lower activity of cytosolic 5'-NT comparing to cells maintained at 10(-11) M insulin. The activity of ecto-5'-NT was decreased by about 70% in cells cultured with 10(-8) M insulin comparing to cells grown in 10(-11) M insulin. Neither insulin nor glucose had an effect on adenosine kinase (AK) activity in SKW 6.4 cells or in human B cells isolated from peripheral blood. The extracellular level of adenosine and inosine during accelerated catabolism of cellular ATP depended on glucose, but not on insulin concentration. Concluding, our study demonstrates that glucose and insulin differentially affect the activities of adenosine metabolizing enzymes in human B lymphocytes, but changes in those activities do not correlate with the adenosine level in cell media during accelerated ATP catabolism, implying that nucleoside transport is the primary factor determining the extracellular level of adenosine.

  10. In vitro mitigation of arsenic toxicity by tea polyphenols in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Dona; Dey, Subhabrata; Bhattacharya, Rathindra Kumar; Roy, Madhumita

    2007-01-01

    The groundwater arsenicals have brought dreadful misery for the people residing in the endemic regions of West Bengal, India. Arsenic-related anomalies include arsenicosis, hyperkera-tosis, gastric complications, liver fibrosis, peripheral neuropathy, and cancer. Some of these diseases have been frequently associated with overproduction of reactive oxygen species that cause DNA damage and improper functioning of body's antioxidant defense mechanism. Natural polyphenols present in tea serve as excellent antioxidants. In the present study, an attempt has been made to elucidate the role of representative polyphenols and extracts of green and black tea in modulating sodium arsenite (As III)-induced DNA damage in normal human lymphocytes. Comet assay was used to detect the DNA damage. Arsenic-induced oxidative stress was measured with generation of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and activity of some antioxidant enzymes. Expression of some repair enzymes such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and DNA polymerase beta was measured to assess the effect of tea on DNA repair. Tea afforded efficient reduction of As III-induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. Tea also quenched the excessive production of reactive oxygen species by arsenic, reduced the elevated levels of lipid peroxidation, and increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase. Furthermore, tea enhanced recovery of DNA damage, which was indicative of repair as confirmed by unscheduled DNA synthesis and pronounced expression of DNA repair enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. It is speculated that the antioxidant potential and repair-inducing capacity of tea might help in combating the severe genotoxic effects induced by arsenic in the human population.

  11. Gene expression profile of human lymphocytes exposed to (211)At alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Turtoi, A; Brown, I; Schläger, M; Schneeweiss, F H A

    2010-08-01

    In this study, the Whole Human Genome 44K DNA microarray assay was used for the first time to obtain gene expression profiles in human peripheral blood lymphocytes 2 h after exposure (in suspension) to 6.78 MeV mean energy alpha particles from extracellular (211)At. Lymphocytes were exposed to fluences of 0.3-9.6 x 10(6) alpha particles/cm(2) [corresponding to mean absorbed alpha-particle doses (D(alpha)) of 0.05-1.60 Gy] over 30 min. Significantly modulated expression was identified in 338 early-response genes. Up-regulated expression was evident in 183 early-response genes, while the remaining 155 were down-regulated. Over half of the up-regulated genes and 40% of the down-regulated genes had a known biological process related primarily to cell growth and maintenance and cell communication. Genes associated with cell death were found only in the up-regulated genes and those with development only in the down-regulated genes. Eight selected early-response genes that displayed a sustained up- or down-regulation (CD36, HSPA2, MS4A6A, NFIL3, IL1F9, IRX5, RASL11B and SULT1B1) were further validated in alpha-particle-irradiated lymphocytes of two human individuals using the TaqMan(R) RT-qPCR technique. The results confirmed the observed microarray gene expression patterns. The expression modulation profiles of IL1F9, IRX5, RASL11B and SULT1B1 genes demonstrated similar trends in the two individuals studied. However, no significant linear correlation between increasing relative gene expression and the alpha-particle dose was evident. The results suggest the possibility that a panel of genes that react to alpha-particle radiation does exist and that they merit further study in a greater number of individuals to determine their possible value regarding alpha-particle biodosimetry. PMID:20681779

  12. [Effects of oil-refining microbes (genus Acinetobacter) on cytogenetical structures of human lymphocytes in cell cultures].

    PubMed

    Il'inskikh, N N; Il'inskikh, E N; Il'inskikh, I N

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess ability of oil-refining bacteria Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and A. valentis to induce karyopathological abnormalities and chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocyte cultures. It was found that the cultures infected with A. calcoaceticus showed significantly high frequencies of cytogenetical effects and chromosomal aberrant cells as compared to the intact cultures and cultures infected with A. valentis. The most of chromosomal aberrations, mainly chromatid aberrations, were located in 1 and 2 chromosomes. Moreover, the aberrations were detected in some specific chromosome areas. Abnormalities of mitotic cell division and nucleus morphology were determined in lymphocyte cultures infected with A. calcoaceticus. There were found significantly high frequencies of cells with micronuclei, nucleus protrusions, anaphase or metaphase chromosome and chromosomal fragments lagging as well as multipolar and C-mitoses. Thus, the oil-refining bacteria A. calcoaceticus in contrast to A. valentis demonstrated strong genotoxic effects in human lymphocyte cultures in vitro.

  13. Impaired human responses to tetanus toxoid in vitamin A-deficient SCID mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Molrine, D C; Polk, D B; Ciamarra, A; Phillips, N; Ambrosino, D M

    1995-08-01

    Vitamin A deficiency is associated with increased childhood morbidity and mortality from respiratory and diarrheal diseases. In order to evaluate the effect of vitamin A on human antibody responses, we developed a vitamin A-deficient severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. Vitamin A-deficient mice were produced by depriving them of vitamin A at day 7 of gestation. Mice were reconstituted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes (huPBL) from tetanus toxoid immune donors at 6 weeks of age and immunized with tetanus toxoid at 6 and 8 weeks of age. Secondary human antibody responses were determined 10 days later. The geometric mean human anti-tetanus toxoid immunoglobulin G concentrations were 3.75 micrograms/ml for the deficient mice and 148 micrograms/ml for controls (P = 0.0005). Vitamin A-deficient mice had only a 2.9-fold increase in human anti-tetanus toxoid antibody compared with a 74-fold increase in controls (P < 0.01). Supplementation with vitamin A prior to reconstitution restored human antibody responses to normal. These data suggest that vitamin A deficiency impairs human antibody responses. We speculate that impaired responses could increase susceptibility to certain infections. Furthermore, we propose that effects of other nutritional deficiencies on the human immune system could be evaluated in the SCID-huPBL model.

  14. The impact of lymphocyte isolation on induced DNA damage in human blood samples measured by the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Bausinger, Julia; Speit, Günter

    2016-09-01

    The comet assay is frequently used in human biomonitoring for the detection of exposure to genotoxic agents. Peripheral blood samples are most frequently used and tested either as whole blood or after isolation of lymphocytes (i.e. peripheral blood mononuclear cells, PBMC). To investigate a potential impact of lymphocyte isolation on induced DNA damage in human blood samples, we exposed blood ex vivo to mutagens with different modes of genotoxic action. The comet assay was performed either directly with whole blood at the end of the exposure period or with lymphocytes isolated directly after exposure. In addition to the recommended standard protocol for lymphocyte isolation, a shortened protocol was established to optimise the isolation procedure. The results indicate that the effects of induced DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites induced by ionising radiation and alkylants, respectively, are significantly reduced in isolated lymphocytes. In contrast, oxidative DNA base damage (induced by potassium bromate) and stable bulky adducts (induced by benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide; BPDE) seem to be less affected. Our findings suggest that in vivo-induced DNA damage might also be reduced in isolated lymphocytes in comparison with the whole blood depending of the types of DNA damage induced. Because only small genotoxic effects can generally be expected in human biomonitoring studies with the comet assay after occupational and environmental exposure to genotoxic agents, any loss might be relevant and should be avoided. The possibility of such effects and their potential impact on variability of comet assay results in human biomonitoring should be considered when performing or evaluating such kind of studies.

  15. Setae from Larvae of the Northern Processionary Moth (Thaumetopoea pinivora, TP) Stimulate Proliferation of Human Blood Lymphocytes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Göran; Andersson, Margareta; Ekberg, Monica; Fagrell, Bengt; Sjöberg, Jan; Bottai, Matteo; Björkholm, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Larvae of the Northern pine processionary moth (Thaumetopoea pinivora, TP) carry microscopic needles (setae), which by penetrating skin and mucous membranes, may cause inflammatory/immune derived symptoms in man. In the present study the stimulatory effects of setae on human blood lymphocytes in vitro was investigated. Blood mononuclear cells were separated from venous blood or buffy coat of ten healthy individuals, six previously exposed to setae and four with no known exposure. Lymphoproliferation was measured as uptake of 3H-thymidine. Setae were prepared from TP larvae. Setae and saline setae extracts stimulated proliferation of T-lymphocytes in the presence of monocytic cells. Stimulation was pronounced in cells from persons who had been exposed to setae, and weak in cells from non-exposed donors. Chitin also induced lymphocyte proliferation in most donors, but to a lesser extent and independently of donor's previous exposure to setae. In conclusion, setae contain molecules that in the presence of monocytes activate human T-lymphocytes to proliferation. The antigenic nature of stimulatory molecules was supported by the significantly stronger lymphocyte response in persons previously exposed to setae than in non-exposed donors. The nature of such molecules remains to be defined. PMID:25531291

  16. Adenylate pool and energy charge in human lymphocytes and granulocytes irradiated at 632 nm (HeNe laser)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolognani, Lorenzo; Venturelli, T.; Volpi, N.; Zirilli, O.

    1995-05-01

    Aim of this report was to investigate the adenylate pool and the energy charge in human white blood cells exposed to increasing time (15, 30 and 60 min) of HeNe laser treatment. EDTA treated human blood diluted 1:1 with 0.88% KCl was added (1:5) with NaCl-dextran solution to allow sedimentation of red blood cells. 6 ml of the white cells floating in the supernatant were layered on 3 ml of Lymphoprep in plastic tubes and each tube was centrifuged (from 50 to 5000 X g for 5 min). Granulocytes were concentrated in the lower phase, whilst lymphocytes were in the intermediated phase. After further purification cytological homogeneity was tested by a cell counter. Granulocytes and lymphocytes were irradiated at +22°C with HeNe (Space, Valfivre equipment). On these population ATP was tested by luminometric procedure, the adenylate pool was separated by HPLC (Jasco) on neutralyzed perchloric extracts. ATP concentration increased in lymphocytes (+63.9%, p < 0.01) and in granulocytes (+25.0%, p < 0.05) after 60 min irradiation. The adenylate pool (tested by HPLC) does not change significatively in lymphocytes or granulocytes after 30 min irradiation, whilst in 60 min irradiated lymphocytes and granulocytes a significative increment was observed in nucleotide concentration. No changes were observed in energy charge according to Atkinson.

  17. Flow cytometric analysis of micronuclei in cell cultures and human lymphocytes: advantages and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Nüsse, M; Marx, K

    1997-08-01

    Flow cytometric techniques are described to quantify micronucleus (MN) induction in cell cultures and human lymphocytes. The advantages and disadvantages of these techniques are discussed. Because a suspension of nuclei and MN has to be prepared for flow cytometric measurements, care has to be taken to avoid unspecific debris that can influence the results. Using additional flow cytometric parameters, most of the unspecific particles in the suspension can, however, be gated out. Apoptotic cells and apoptotic bodies can overlap the MN during measurement, it is, therefore, proposed not to use the technique if apoptosis is induced by the respective treatment. Advantages of the automated flow cytometric techniques are that results can be obtained in short time intervals, the frequency of MN and the DNA distribution of MN can be measured simultaneously and flow sorting can be used for a further analysis of MN using other techniques.

  18. Alteration of membrane transductive mechanisms induced by ethanol in human lymphocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Fanò, G; Belia, S; Mariggiò, M A; Antonica, A; Agea, E; Spinozzi, F

    1993-03-01

    Ethanol, in millimolar concentrations, significantly modifies different transductive systems in