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Sample records for human malignant meningioma

  1. Meningioma after radiotherapy for malignancy.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Peter F; Shah, Kalee; Dunkel, Ira J; Reiner, Anne S; Khakoo, Yasmin; Rosenblum, Marc K; Gutin, Philip

    2016-08-01

    Complications of radiation exposure have gained importance with increasing cancer survivorship. Secondary malignancies have been associated with cranial radiation exposure. We present our experience with intracranial radiation-induced meningioma (RIM) and discuss the implications of its presentation and natural history for patient management. Patients diagnosed with meningioma who had received radiation therapy between 1960 and 2014 were identified. Records were retrospectively reviewed for details of radiation exposure, previous malignancies, meningioma subtypes, multiplicity and pathologic descriptions, treatment and follow-up. Thirty patients were diagnosed with RIM. Initial malignancies included acute lymphocytic leukemia (33.3%), medulloblastoma (26.7%) and glioma (16.7%) at a mean age of 8.1years (range 0.04-33years). The mean radiation dose was 34Gy (range 16-60Gy) and latency time to meningioma was 26years (range 8-51years). Twenty-one patients (70%) underwent surgery. Of these, 57.1% of tumors were World Health Organization (WHO) grade I while 42.9% were WHO II (atypical). The mean MIB-1 labeling index for patients with WHO I tumors was 5.44%, with 33.3% exhibiting at least 5% staining. Mean follow-up after meningioma diagnosis was 5.8years. Mortality was zero during the follow-up period. Meningioma is an important long-term complication of therapeutic radiation. While more aggressive pathology occurs more frequently in RIM than in sporadic meningioma, it remains unclear whether this translates into an effect on survival. Further study should be aimed at delineating the risks and benefits of routine surveillance for the development of secondary neoplasms after radiation therapy.

  2. Parotid gland metastasis originating from malignant meningioma.

    PubMed

    Dmytriw, Adam A; Gullane, Patrick; Bartlett, Eric; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Yu, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    A case of malignant meningioma with metastasis to the parotid gland is reported. A 60-year-old woman with right-sided neurological symptoms secondary to malignant meningioma developed bilateral parotid masses with identical histology to the primary lesion. The primary lesion was differentiated from a benign oligodendroma with MRI, and the radiological features of this extraordinarily rare metastasis are chronicled with MRI and computed tomography.

  3. Reduced expression of neurofibromin in human meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, V; Lee, J H; Harwalkar, J A; Stein, D J; Roudebush, M; Stacey, D W; Golubic, M

    1997-01-01

    Meningiomas are common, mostly benign, tumours arising from leptomeningeal cells of the meninges, which frequently contain mutations in the neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene. In this study, we analysed a protein product of the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene, neurofibromin, in human established leptomeningeal cells LTAg2B, in 17 sporadic meningiomas and in a meningioma from a patient affected by NF2. The expression level of neurofibromin was determined by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation with anti-neurofibromin antibodies. The functional status of neurofibromin was analysed through its ability to stimulate the intrinsic GTPase activity of p21 ras. In the cytosolic extracts of four sporadic meningiomas and in the NF2-related meningioma, the expression level and the GTPase stimulatory activity of neurofibromin were drastically reduced compared with the level present in the human brain, human established leptomeningeal cells LTAg2B and the remaining 13 meningiomas. Our results suggest that neurofibromin is expressed in leptomeningeal cells LTAg2B and in most meningiomas, i.e. tumours derived from these cells. The reduced expression and GTPase stimulatory activity of neurofibromin was found in about 23% of meningiomas and in the single NF2-related meningioma analysed. These results suggest that decreased levels of neurofibromin in these tumours may contribute to their tumorigenesis.

  4. MENINGIOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Leland; Barani, Igor; Chamberlain, Marc; Kaley, Thomas; McDermott, Michael; Raizer, Jeffrey; Schiff, David; Weber, Damien C.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Evolving interest in meningioma, the most common primary brain tumor, has refined contemporary management of these tumors. Problematic, however, is the paucity of prospective clinical trials that provide an evidence-based algorithm for managing meningioma. The current review summarizes the published literature regarding the treatment of newly diagnosed and recurrent meningioma, with an emphasis on outcomes stratified by World Health Organization (WHO) tumor grade. In particular this review focuses on patient outcomes following treatment (either adjuvant or at recurrence) with surgery or radiation therapy inclusive of radiosurgery and fractionated irradiation. Phase II trials for patients with meningioma have recently completed accrual within the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) consortia, and phase III studies are being developed. However, at present, there are no completed prospective, randomized trials assessing the role of either surgery or radiotherapy. Successful completion of future studies will require a multidisciplinary effort, dissemination of the current knowledge base, improved implementation of WHO grading criteria, standardization of response criteria and other outcome endpoints, and concerted efforts to address weaknesses in present treatment paradigms, particularly for patients with progressive or recurrent low grade meningioma, or with high-grade meningioma. In parallel efforts, Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) subcommittees are developing a manuscript on systemic therapies for meningioma, and a separate article proposing standardized endpoint and response criteria for meningioma. PMID:25343186

  5. Pseudoprogression in boron neutron capture therapy for malignant gliomas and meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kawabata, Shinji; Nonoguchi, Naosuke; Yokoyama, Kunio; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Matsui, Hideki; Ono, Koji

    2009-01-01

    Pseudoprogression has been recognized and widely accepted in the treatment of malignant gliomas, as transient increases in the volume of the enhanced area just after chemoradiotherapy, especially using temozolomide. We experienced a similar phenomenon in the treatment of malignant gliomas and meningiomas using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a cell-selective form of particle radiation. Here, we introduce representative cases and analyze the pathogenesis. Fifty-two cases of malignant glioma and 13 cases of malignant meningioma who were treated by BNCT were reviewed retrospectively mainly via MR images. Eleven of 52 malignant gliomas and 3 of 13 malignant meningiomas showed transient increases of enhanced volume in MR images within 3 months after BNCT. Among these cases, five patients with glioma underwent surgery because of suspicion of relapse. In histology, most of the specimens showed necrosis with small amounts of residual tumor cells. Ki-67 labeling showed decreased positivity compared with previous samples from the individuals. Fluoride-labeled boronophenylalanine PET was applied in four and two cases of malignant gliomas and meningiomas, respectively, at the time of transient increase of lesions. These PET scans showed decreased lesion:normal brain ratios in all cases compared with scans obtained prior to BNCT. With or without surgery, all lesions were decreased or stable in size during observation. Transient increases in enhanced volume in malignant gliomas and meningiomas immediately after BNCT seemed to be pseudoprogression. This pathogenesis was considered as treatment-related intratumoral necrosis in the subacute phase after BNCT. PMID:19289492

  6. Long Term Surgical Outcome and Prognostic Factors of Atypical and Malignant Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Chi; Chuang, Chi-Cheng; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Chang, Cheng-Nen; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wu, Chieh-Tsai; Hsu, Yung-Hsin; Lin, Tzu-Kan; Hsu, Peng-Wei; Huang, Yin-Cheng; Tseng, Chen-Kan; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chen, Yao-Liang; Chen, Pin-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Atypical and malignant meningiomas are rare. Our aim was to examine the treatment outcomes following surgical resection, and analyze associations between clinical characteristics and overall survival (OS) or relapse free survival (RFS). 102 patients with atypical or malignant meningiomas underwent microsurgical resection between June 2001 and November 2009 were analyzed retrospectively. We compared demographics, clinical characteristics, treatment, and complications. The five-year and ten-year overall survival rates were 93.5% and 83.4%, respectively. Three factors significantly reduced OS: Malignant meningiomas (p < 0.001), which also decreased RFS (p < 0.001); female patients (p = 0.049), and patients with Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) < 70 at diagnosis (p = 0.009). Fifty two patients (51%) experienced tumor relapse. Total resection of tumors significantly impacted RFS (p = 0.013). Tumors located at parasagittal and posterior fossa area lead to higher relapse rate (p = 0.004). Subtotal resection without adjuvant radiotherapy lead to the worst local control of tumor (p = 0.030). An MIB-1 index <8% improved OS and RFS (p = 0.003). Total resection of atypical and malignant meningiomas provided better outcome and local control. Adjuvant radiation therapy is indicated for patients with malignant meningiomas, with incompletely excised tumors; or with tumors in the parasagittal or posterior fossa area. The MIB-1 index of the tumor is an independent prognostic factor of clinical outcome. PMID:27760993

  7. MicroRNA-224 targets ERG2 and contributes to malignant progressions of meningioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Maomao; Deng, Xiaodong; Ying, Qi; Jin, Tingyan; Li, Ming; Liang, Chong

    2015-05-01

    MicroRNA-224 is overexpressed in various malignant tumors with poor prognosis, which plays a critical role in biological processes including cell proliferation, apoptosis and several developmental and physiological progressions. However, the potential association between miR-224 and clinical outcome in patients with meningiomas remains unknown. Here, we investigate miR-224 expression and biological functions in meningiomas. MiR-224 expression was measured by Northern blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in meningioma and normal brain tissues. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression analysis were used to exam its correlation with clinicopathological features and prognostic value. The biological effects of miR-224 on the cell proliferation and apoptosis in meningioma cells were examined by MTT assay and apoptosis assay. We found the expression levels of miR-224 were significantly higher in meningioma tissues than that in normal brain, positively correlated with advanced pathological grade. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that meningioma patients with low miR-224 expression exhibited significantly prolonged overall and recurrence-free survival. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ERG2 was an identical candidate target gene of MiR-224 in vitro. Our results indicated that downregulation of miR-224 suppressed cell growth and resulted in the enhancement of cell apoptosis through activation of the ERG2-BAK-induced apoptosis pathway. Our findings imply the miR-224 expression could predict the overall survival and recurrence-free survival of patients with meningioma and it might be a promising therapeutic target for treating malignant meningiomas.

  8. Radiation-induced meningiomas after BNCT in patients with malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Kageji, T; Sogabe, S; Mizobichi, Y; Nakajima, K; Shinji, N; Nakagawa, Y

    2015-12-01

    Of the 180 patients with malignant brain tumors whom we treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) since 1968, only one (0.56%) developed multiple radiation-induced meningiomas. The parasagittal meningioma that had received 42 Gy (w) for BNCT showed more rapid growth on Gd-enhanced MRI scans and more atypical features on histopathologic studies than the temporal convexity tumor that had received 20 Gy (w). Long-term follow up MRI studies are necessary in long-survivors of malignant brain tumors treated by BNCT. PMID:26122975

  9. Differentially Expressed MicroRNAs in Meningiomas Grades I and II Suggest Shared Biomarkers with Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    El-Gewely, Mohamed Raafat; Andreassen, Morten; Walquist, Mari; Ursvik, Anita; Knutsen, Erik; Nystad, Mona; Coucheron, Dag H.; Myrmel, Kristin Smistad; Hennig, Rune; Johansen, Steinar D.

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas represent the most common primary tumors of the central nervous system, but few microRNA (miRNA) profiling studies have been reported so far. Deep sequencing of small RNA libraries generated from two human meningioma biopsies WHO grades I (benign) and II (atypical) were compared to excess dura controls. Nineteen differentially expressed miRNAs were validated by RT-qPCR using tumor RNA from 15 patients and 5 meninges controls. Tumor suppressor miR-218 and miR-34a were upregulated relative to normal controls, however, miR-143, miR-193b, miR-451 and oncogenic miR-21 were all downregulated. From 10 selected putative mRNA targets tested by RT-qPCR only four were differentially expressed relative to normal controls. PTEN and E-cadherin (CDH1) were upregulated, but RUNX1T1 was downregulated. Proliferation biomarker p63 was upregulated with nuclear localization, but not detected in most normal arachnoid tissues. Immunoreactivity of E-cadherin was detected in the outermost layer of normal arachnoids, but was expressed throughout the tumors. Nuclear Cyclin D1 expression was positive in all studied meningiomas, while its expression in arachnoid was limited to a few trabecular cells. Meningiomas of grades I and II appear to share biomarkers with malignant tumors, but with some additional tumor suppressor biomarkers expression. Validation in more patients is of importance. PMID:26950155

  10. Expression of androgen and progesterone receptors in primary human meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, M; Galanopoulos, T; Neville-Golden, J; Antoniades, H N

    1993-03-01

    Meningiomas are common brain tumors that show a predilection for females and become more aggressive during pregnancy and menses. The existence of gender-specific hormone receptors in meningiomas has long been a matter of controversy; the recent cloning of androgen, estrogen, and progesterone receptors has facilitated their direct evaluation. The authors have demonstrated the expression of androgen and progesterone receptor messenger ribonucleic acid and protein product in nine primary human meningiomas by Northern blot analysis. Cellular localization was achieved by in situ hybridization analysis. Estrogen receptor expression was not detected. Normal adult meninges were shown to express very low levels of both androgen and progesterone receptors.

  11. MicroRNA-224 targets ERG2 and contributes to malignant progressions of meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Maomao; Deng, Xiaodong; Ying, Qi; Jin, Tingyan; Li, Ming; Liang, Chong

    2015-05-01

    MicroRNA-224 is overexpressed in various malignant tumors with poor prognosis, which plays a critical role in biological processes including cell proliferation, apoptosis and several developmental and physiological progressions. However, the potential association between miR-224 and clinical outcome in patients with meningiomas remains unknown. Here, we investigate miR-224 expression and biological functions in meningiomas. MiR-224 expression was measured by Northern blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in meningioma and normal brain tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox regression analysis were used to exam its correlation with clinicopathological features and prognostic value. The biological effects of miR-224 on the cell proliferation and apoptosis in meningioma cells were examined by MTT assay and apoptosis assay. We found the expression levels of miR-224 were significantly higher in meningioma tissues than that in normal brain, positively correlated with advanced pathological grade. Kaplan–Meier analysis indicated that meningioma patients with low miR-224 expression exhibited significantly prolonged overall and recurrence-free survival. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ERG2 was an identical candidate target gene of MiR-224 in vitro. Our results indicated that downregulation of miR-224 suppressed cell growth and resulted in the enhancement of cell apoptosis through activation of the ERG2-BAK-induced apoptosis pathway. Our findings imply the miR-224 expression could predict the overall survival and recurrence-free survival of patients with meningioma and it might be a promising therapeutic target for treating malignant meningiomas. - Highlights: • MiR-224 expression is correlates with prognosis in meningioma patients. • ERG2 is a novel downstream target of miR-224. • MiR-224 suppressed cell growth and enhanced apoptosis in IOMM-Lee and CH157 cells. • MiR-224 is an upstream regulator of the ERG2

  12. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu protein expression in meningiomas: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Telugu, Ramesh Babu; Chowhan, Amit Kumar; Rukmangadha, Nandyala; Patnayak, Rashmi; Phaneendra, Bobbidi Venkata; Prasad, Bodapati Chandra Mowliswara; Reddy, Mandyam Kumaraswamy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Meningiomas are common slow-growing primary central nervous system tumors that arise from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid and spinal cord. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) or HER2/neu (also known as c-erbB2) is a 185-kD transmembrane glycoprotein with tyrosine kinase activity expressed in meningiomas and various other tumors. It can be used in targeted therapy for HER2/neu positive meningiomas. Aim: To correlate the expression of HER2/neu protein in meningiomas with gender, location, histological subtypes, and grade. Materials and Methods: It was 3½ years prospective (March 2010–October 2011) and retrospective (May 2008–February 2010) study of histopathologically diagnosed intracranial and intraspinal meningiomas. Clinical details of all the cases were noted from the computerized hospital information system. Immunohistochemistry for HER2/neu protein was performed along with scoring. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test to look for any association of HER2/neu with gender, location, grade, and various histological subtypes of meningiomas at 5% level of significance. Results: A total of 100 cases of meningiomas were found during the study period. Of which, 80 were Grade I, 18 were Grade II, and 2 were Grade III meningiomas as per the World Health Organization 2007 criteria. The female-male ratio was 1.9:1 and the mean age was 47.8 years. HER2/neu protein was expressed in 75% of Grade I and 72.2% of Grade II and none of Grade III meningiomas. About 72.7% brain invasive meningiomas showed HER2/neu immunopositivity. Conclusion: HER2/neu protein was expressed in 73% of meningiomas. Statistically significant difference of HER2/neu expression was not seen between females and males of Grade I and Grade II/III meningiomas, intracranial and spinal tumors, Grade I and Grade II/III cases, and various histological subtypes of meningiomas.

  13. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu protein expression in meningiomas: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Telugu, Ramesh Babu; Chowhan, Amit Kumar; Rukmangadha, Nandyala; Patnayak, Rashmi; Phaneendra, Bobbidi Venkata; Prasad, Bodapati Chandra Mowliswara; Reddy, Mandyam Kumaraswamy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Meningiomas are common slow-growing primary central nervous system tumors that arise from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid and spinal cord. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) or HER2/neu (also known as c-erbB2) is a 185-kD transmembrane glycoprotein with tyrosine kinase activity expressed in meningiomas and various other tumors. It can be used in targeted therapy for HER2/neu positive meningiomas. Aim: To correlate the expression of HER2/neu protein in meningiomas with gender, location, histological subtypes, and grade. Materials and Methods: It was 3½ years prospective (March 2010–October 2011) and retrospective (May 2008–February 2010) study of histopathologically diagnosed intracranial and intraspinal meningiomas. Clinical details of all the cases were noted from the computerized hospital information system. Immunohistochemistry for HER2/neu protein was performed along with scoring. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test to look for any association of HER2/neu with gender, location, grade, and various histological subtypes of meningiomas at 5% level of significance. Results: A total of 100 cases of meningiomas were found during the study period. Of which, 80 were Grade I, 18 were Grade II, and 2 were Grade III meningiomas as per the World Health Organization 2007 criteria. The female-male ratio was 1.9:1 and the mean age was 47.8 years. HER2/neu protein was expressed in 75% of Grade I and 72.2% of Grade II and none of Grade III meningiomas. About 72.7% brain invasive meningiomas showed HER2/neu immunopositivity. Conclusion: HER2/neu protein was expressed in 73% of meningiomas. Statistically significant difference of HER2/neu expression was not seen between females and males of Grade I and Grade II/III meningiomas, intracranial and spinal tumors, Grade I and Grade II/III cases, and various histological subtypes of meningiomas. PMID:27695231

  14. Meningiomas With Rhabdoid Features Lacking Other Histologic Features of Malignancy: A Study of 44 Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Vaubel, Rachael A; Chen, Selby G; Raleigh, David R; Link, Michael J; Chicoine, Michael R; Barani, Igor; Jenkins, Sarah M; Aleff, Patrice Abell; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Burger, Peter C; Dahiya, Sonika; Perry, Arie; Giannini, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of rhabdoid meningiomas otherwise lacking malignant features remains unknown as most of the originally reported aggressive cases showed anaplastic histologic features independently of rhabdoid phenotype. We studied 44 patients with rhabdoid meningiomas lacking anaplastic features. Median age at diagnosis was 48.6 years (range 10-79). Location was supratentorial in 28 (63.6%), skull base in 15 (34.1%), and spinal in 1 (2.3%). Tumor grade was otherwise World Health Organization grade I (n = 22, 50%) or II (n = 22, 50%). Rhabdoid cells represented <20% of the tumor in 12 cases (27.3%), 20% to 50% in 18 (40.9%), and >50% in 14 (31.8%). Median clinical follow-up, available for 38 patients, was 5.0 years (range 0.17-14.2). Recurrence occurred in 9 patients (5-year recurrence-free survival, 73.7%) with a significantly higher risk in subtotally resected tumors (p = 0.043). Rhabdoid cell percentage was not associated with recurrence. Six patients died (4 of disease, 2 of unclear causes); 5-year overall survival was 86.7%, a mortality in excess of that expected in grade I-II meningiomas but much lower than originally reported. Review of 50 similar previously reported cases confirmed our findings. We suggest that rhabdoid meningiomas be graded analogously to nonrhabdoid tumors, with caution that some may still behave aggressively and close follow-up is recommended. PMID:26705409

  15. The role of MAPK signaling pathway in the Her-2-positive meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoyin; Wang, Weijia; Xu, Shan; Wang, Shanshan; Tu, Yi; Xiong, Yifeng; Mei, Jinhong; Wang, Chunliang

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are common types of adult nerve system tumors. Although most cases are considered benign, due to its high rate of recurrence and easy malignant progression to anaplastic meningioma they present a puzzle for the current treatment. The HER-2 oncogene has important value for meningioma cells development and progression. So far, little is known about the effect on the exact underlying signal pathway and molecular mechanisms of HER-2-positive meningioma cells. The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of HER-2 gene and possible involvement of MAPK signal pathway in human malignant meningioma. We applied q-PCR analysis, immunofluorescence (IF) staining, western blot analysis, animal model, MAPK inhibition, MTT assay and cell invasion analysis for the investigation. The results demonstrated that the downregulation of the expression of HER-2 significantly inhibited cell motility and proliferation of human meningioma cells in vivo. Accordingly, in the HER-2-overexpression meningioma cells with the inhibition of ERK1/2, ERK5, JNK, in the cells with the ERK1/2, ERK5 inhibition, protein expression was markedly suppressed as well as the cell proliferation resistance. No difference was observed in the HER-2-overexpression meningioma cells with the inhibition of JNK. These findings suggest that HER-2 gene can affect the proliferation ability of human meningioma cells in vivo and MAPK signal pathway may contribute to the carcinogenesis and development of human meningiomas combinating with HER-2. PMID:27279438

  16. The role of MAPK signaling pathway in the Her-2-positive meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoyin; Wang, Weijia; Xu, Shan; Wang, Shanshan; Tu, Yi; Xiong, Yifeng; Mei, Jinhong; Wang, Chunliang

    2016-08-01

    Meningiomas are common types of adult nerve system tumors. Although most cases are considered benign, due to its high rate of recurrence and easy malignant progression to anaplastic meningioma they present a puzzle for the current treatment. The HER-2 oncogene has important value for meningioma cells development and progression. So far, little is known about the effect on the exact underlying signal pathway and molecular mechanisms of HER-2-positive meningioma cells. The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of HER-2 gene and possible involvement of MAPK signal pathway in human malignant meningioma. We applied q-PCR analysis, immunofluorescence (IF) staining, western blot analysis, animal model, MAPK inhibition, MTT assay and cell invasion analysis for the investigation. The results demonstrated that the downregulation of the expression of HER-2 significantly inhibited cell motility and proliferation of human meningioma cells in vivo. Accordingly, in the HER-2-overexpression meningioma cells with the inhibition of ERK1/2, ERK5, JNK, in the cells with the ERK1/2, ERK5 inhibition, protein expression was markedly suppressed as well as the cell proliferation resistance. No difference was observed in the HER-2-overexpression meningioma cells with the inhibition of JNK. These findings suggest that HER-2 gene can affect the proliferation ability of human meningioma cells in vivo and MAPK signal pathway may contribute to the carcinogenesis and development of human meningiomas combinating with HER-2. PMID:27279438

  17. A rare intracranial tumor consisting of malignant anaplastic and papillary meningioma subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Kochanski, Ryan B.; Byrne, Nika; Arvanitis, Leonidas; Bhabad, Sudeep; Byrne, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intracranial tumors with heterogeneous histopathology are a well-described pathologic entity. Pathologically, distinct tumors in direct contact with one another, also known as collision tumors are exceptionally rare, and collision between meningioma subtypes has not been previously described in the literature. Case Description: A 79-year-old female with a history of breast carcinoma presenting with visual and motor deficits and imaging/intraoperative findings consistent with separate, distinct lesions. Histopathologic findings provided evidence for a collision between World Health Organization Grade III anaplastic and papillary meningioma. Conclusion: We report a possible collision tumor between two separate meningioma subtypes based on the unique radiologic, intraoperative, and histopathologic findings. Submission of multiple pathologic specimens during surgical resection is key for accurate histopathologic diagnosis. PMID:26981322

  18. Hyaluronan in human malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Sironen, R.K.; Tammi, M.; Tammi, R.; Auvinen, P.K.; Anttila, M.; Kosma, V-M.

    2011-02-15

    Hyaluronan, a major macropolysaccharide in the extracellular matrix of connective tissues, is intimately involved in the biology of cancer. Hyaluronan accumulates into the stroma of various human tumors and modulates intracellular signaling pathways, cell proliferation, motility and invasive properties of malignant cells. Experimental and clinicopathological evidence highlights the importance of hyaluronan in tumor growth and metastasis. A high stromal hyaluronan content is associated with poorly differentiated tumors and aggressive clinical behavior in human adenocarcinomas. Instead, the squamous cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas tend to have a reduced hyaluronan content. In addition to the stroma-cancer cell interaction, hyaluronan can influence stromal cell recruitment, tumor angiogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Hyaluronan receptors, hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronan degrading enzymes, hyaluronidases, are involved in the modulation of cancer progression, depending on the tumor type. Furthermore, intracellular signaling and angiogenesis are affected by the degradation products of hyaluronan. Hyaluronan has also therapeutic implications since it is involved in multidrug resistance.

  19. Endogenous production of infectious Inoue-Melnick virus in a human meningioma cell line.

    PubMed

    Nishibe, Y; Inoue, Y K; Hollinshead, A C

    1987-11-01

    We investigated continuous production of Inoue-Melnick virus (IMV) in the MG-1 cell line, established from human meningioma. The infectious virus, identified as a type 1 virus, was mostly recovered extracellularly. Assay of MG-1 cells as infective centers indicated that most of the cells were capable of producing infectious virus. By immunofluorescence, more than 90% of the cells were found to have IMV-associated cytoplasmic antigen(s) (IMCA).

  20. The neurofibromatosis 2 tumor suppressor gene product, merlin, regulates human meningioma cell growth by signaling through YAP.

    PubMed

    Striedinger, Katherine; VandenBerg, Scott R; Baia, Gilson S; McDermott, Michael W; Gutmann, David H; Lal, Anita

    2008-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the occurrence of schwannomas and meningiomas. Several studies have examined the ability of the NF2 gene product, merlin, to function as a tumor suppressor in diverse cell types; however, little is known about merlin growth regulation in meningiomas. In Drosophila, merlin controls cell proliferation and apoptosis by signaling through the Hippo pathway to inhibit the function of the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie. The Hippo pathway is conserved in mammals. On the basis of these observations, we developed human meningioma cell lines matched for merlin expression to evaluate merlin growth regulation and investigate the relationship between NF2 status and Yes-associated protein (YAP), the mammalian homolog of Yorkie. NF2 loss in meningioma cells was associated with loss of contact-dependent growth inhibition, enhanced anchorage-independent growth and increased cell proliferation due to increased S-phase entry. In addition, merlin loss in both meningioma cell lines and primary tumors resulted in increased YAP expression and nuclear localization. Finally, siRNA-mediated reduction of YAP in NF2-deficient meningioma cells rescued the effects of merlin loss on cell proliferation and S-phase entry. Collectively, these results represent the first demonstration that merlin regulates cell growth in human cancer cells by suppressing YAP.

  1. Atypical and Malignant Meningioma: Outcome and Prognostic Factors in 119 Irradiated Patients. A Multicenter, Retrospective Study of the Rare Cancer Network

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquier, David Bijmolt, Stefan; Veninga, Theo; Rezvoy, Nicolas; Villa, Salvador; Krengli, Marco; Weber, Damien C.; Baumert, Brigitta G.; Canyilmaz, Emine; Yalman, Deniz; Szutowicz, Ewa; Tzuk-Shina, Tzahala; Mirimanoff, Rene O.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze and assess the outcomes and prognostic factors in a large number of patients with atypical and malignant meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Ten academic medical centers participating in this Rare Cancer Network contributed 119 cases of patients with atypical or malignant meningiomas treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after surgery or for recurrence. Eligibility criteria were histologically proven atypical or anaplastic (malignant) meningioma (World Health Organization Grade 2 and 3) treated with fractionated EBRT after initial resection or for recurrence, and age >18 years. Sex ratio (male/female) was 1.3, and mean ({+-}SD) age was 57.6 {+-} 12 years. Surgery was macroscopically complete (Simpson Grades 1-3) in 71% of patients; histology was atypical and malignant in 69% and 31%, respectively. Mean dose of EBRT was 54.6 {+-} 5.1 Gy (range, 40-66 Gy). Median follow-up was 4.1 years. Results: The 5- and 10-year actuarial overall survival rates were 65% and 51%, respectively, and were significantly influenced by age >60 years (p = 0.005), Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (p = 0.01), and high mitotic rate (p = 0.047) on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis age >60 years (p = 0.001) and high mitotic rate (p = 0.02) remained significant adverse prognostic factors. The 5- and 10-year disease-free survival rates were 58% and 48%, respectively, and were significantly influenced by KPS (p 0.04) and high mitotic rate (p = 0.003) on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis only high mitotic rate (p = 0.003) remained a significant prognostic factor. Conclusions: In this multicenter retrospective study, age, KPS, and mitotic rate influenced outcome. Multicenter prospective studies are necessary to clarify the management and prognostic factors of such a rare disease.

  2. Spatio-temporal anomalous diffusion imaging: results in controlled phantoms and in excised human meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Capuani, Silvia; Palombo, Marco; Gabrielli, Andrea; Orlandi, Augusto; Maraviglia, Bruno; Pastore, Francesco S

    2013-04-01

    Recently, we measured two anomalous diffusion (AD) parameters: the spatial and the temporal AD indices, called γ and α, respectively, by using spectroscopic pulse gradient field methods. We showed that γ quantifies pseudo-superdiffusion processes, while α quantifies subdiffusion processes. Here, we propose γ and α maps obtained in a controlled heterogeneous phantom, comprised of packed micro-beads in water and in excised human meningiomas. In few words, α maps represent the multi-scale spatial distribution of the disorder degree in the system, while γ maps are influenced by local internal gradients, thus highlighting the interface between compartments characterized by different magnetic susceptibility. γ maps were already obtained by means of AD stretched exponential imaging and α-type maps have been recently achieved for fixed rat brain with the aim of highlighting the fractal dimension of specific brain regions. However, to our knowledge, the maps representative of the spatial distribution of α and γ obtained on the same controlled sample and in the same excised tissue have never been compared. Moreover, we show here, for the first time, that α maps are representative of the spatial distribution of the disorder degree of the system. In a first phase, γ and α maps of controlled phantom characterized by an ordered and a disordered rearrangement of packed micro-beads of different sizes in water and by different magnetic susceptibility (Δχ) between beads and water were obtained. In a second phase, we investigated excised human meningiomas of different consistency. Results reported here, obtained at 9.4T, show that α and γ maps are characterized by a different image contrast. Indeed, unlike γ maps, α maps are insensible to (Δχ) and they are sensible to the disorder degree of the microstructural rearrangement. These observations strongly suggest that AD indices α and γ reflect some additional microstructural information which cannot be obtained

  3. Long-Term Outcome After Radiotherapy in Patients With Atypical and Malignant Meningiomas-Clinical Results in 85 Patients Treated in a Single Institution Leading to Optimized Guidelines for Early Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Adeberg, Sebastian; Hartmann, Christian; Welzel, Thomas; Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Deimling, Andreas von; Debus, Juergen; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Previously, we could show that the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of meningiomas significantly correlated with outcome in patients with atypical and anaplastic histology. In the present work, we analyzed our long-term experience in radiotherapy for atypical and malignant meningioma diagnosed according to the most recent WHO categorization system. Patients and Methods: Sixty-two patients with atypical and 23 patients with malignant meningioma have been treated with radiotherapy. Sixty percent of all patients received radiotherapy (RT) after surgical resection, 19% at disease progression and 8.3% as a primary treatment. Radiation was applied using different techniques including fractionated stereotactic RT (FSRT), intensity-modulated RT, and combination treatment with carbon ions. The median PTV was 156.0 mL. An average dose of 57.6 Gy (range, 30-68.4 Gy) in 1.8-3 Gy fractions was applied. All patients were followed regularly including clinical-neurological follow-up as well as computed tomographies or magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Overall survival was impacted significantly by histological grade, with 81% and 53% at 5 years for atypical or anaplastic meningiomas, respectively. This difference was significant at p = 0.022. Eighteen patients died of tumor progression during follow-up. Progression-free survival was 95% and 50% for atypical, and 63% and 13% for anaplastic histology at 2 and 5 years. This difference was significant at p = 0.017. Despite histology, we could not observe any prognostic factors including age, resection status, or Karnofsky performance score. However, preexisting clinical symptoms observed in 63 patients improved in 29.3% of these patients. Conclusion: RT resulted in improvement of preexisting clinical symptoms; outcome is comparable to other series reported in the literature. RT should be offered after surgical resection after initial diagnosis to increase progression-free survival as well as overall

  4. Expression of nestin, mesothelin and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) in developing and adult human meninges and meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Petricevic, Josko; Forempoher, Gea; Ostojic, Ljerka; Mardesic-Brakus, Snjezana; Andjelinovic, Simun; Vukojevic, Katarina; Saraga-Babic, Mirna

    2011-11-01

    The spatial and temporal pattern of appearance of nestin, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and mesothelin proteins was immunohistochemically determined in the cells of normal developing and adult human meninges and meningiomas. Human meninges developed as two mesenchymal condensations in the head region. The simple squamous epithelium on the surface of leptomeninges developed during mesenchymal to epithelial transformation. Nestin appeared for the first time in week 7, EMA in week 8, while mesothelin appeared in week 22 of development. In the late fetal period and after birth, nestin expression decreased, whereas expression of EMA and mesothelin increased. EMA appeared in all surface epithelial cells and nodules, while mesothelin was found only in some of them. In adult meninges, all three proteins were predominantly localized in the surface epithelium and meningeal nodules. In meningothelial meningiomas (WHO grade I), EMA was detected in all tumor cells except in the endothelial cells, mesothelin characterized nests of tumor cells, while nestin was found predominantly in the walls of blood vessels. The distribution pattern of those proteins in normal meningeal and tumor cells indicates that nestin might characterize immature cells, while EMA and mesothelin appeared in maturing epithelial cells. Neoplastic transformation of these specific cell lineages contributes to the cell population in meningiomas.

  5. Expression of Cellular Oncogenes in Human Malignancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamon, Dennis J.; Dekernion, Jean B.; Verma, Inder M.; Cline, Martin J.

    1984-04-01

    Cellular oncogenes have been implicated in the induction of malignant transformation in some model systems in vitro and may be related to malignancies in vivo in some vertebrate species. This article describes a study of the expression of 15 cellular oncogenes in fresh human tumors from 54 patients, representing 20 different tumor types. More than one cellular oncogene was transcriptionally active in all of the tumors examined. In 14 patients it was possible to study normal and malignant tissue from the same organ. In many of these patients, the transcriptional activity of certain oncogenes was greater in the malignant than the normal tissue. The cellular fes (feline sarcoma) oncogene, not previously known to be transcribed in mammalian tissue, was found to be active in lung and hematopoietic malignancies.

  6. Vaccination for invasive canine meningioma induces in situ production of antibodies capable of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Brian M; Pluhar, G Elizabeth; Seiler, Charles E; Goulart, Michelle R; SantaCruz, Karen S; Schutten, Melissa M; Meints, Joyce P; O'Sullivan, M Gerard; Bentley, R Timothy; Packer, Rebecca A; Thomovsky, Stephanie A; Chen, Annie V; Faissler, Dominik; Chen, Wei; Hunt, Matthew A; Olin, Michael R; Ohlfest, John R

    2013-05-15

    Malignant and atypical meningiomas are resistant to standard therapies and associated with poor prognosis. Despite progress in the treatment of other tumors with therapeutic vaccines, this approach has not been tested preclinically or clinically in these tumors. Spontaneous canine meningioma is a clinically meaningful but underutilized model for preclinical testing of novel strategies for aggressive human meningioma. We treated 11 meningioma-bearing dogs with surgery and vaccine immunotherapy consisting of autologous tumor cell lysate combined with toll-like receptor ligands. Therapy was well tolerated, and only one dog had tumor growth that required intervention, with a mean follow up of 585 days. IFN-γ-elaborating T cells were detected in the peripheral blood of 2 cases, but vaccine-induced tumor-reactive antibody responses developed in all dogs. Antibody responses were polyclonal, recognizing both intracellular and cell surface antigens, and HSP60 was identified as one common antigen. Tumor-reactive antibodies bound allogeneic canine and human meningiomas, showing common antigens across breed and species. Histologic analysis revealed robust infiltration of antibody-secreting plasma cells into the brain around the tumor in posttreatment compared with pretreatment samples. Tumor-reactive antibodies were capable of inducing antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity to autologous and allogeneic tumor cells. These data show the feasibility and immunologic efficacy of vaccine immunotherapy for a large animal model of human meningioma and warrant further development toward human trials.

  7. Anaplastic meningioma with extremely rapid recurrence.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Yosuke; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Hayashi, Yutaka; Watanabe, Takuya; Tamase, Akira; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Uchiyama, Naoyuki; Nitta, Hisashi; Hamada, Jun-Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman presented with an uncommon case of anaplastic meningioma manifesting as recent memory disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass located in the right temporal lobe. She became unconscious because of uncal herniation and underwent urgent surgery. The tumor was completely resected, except for a lesion tightly attached to arteries. Histological examination indicated the presence of anaplastic meningioma with an extremely high MIB-1 labeling index (70%). After 43 days, the patient developed local recurrence and dissemination in the left temporal lobe. The exceptionally high MIB-1 labeling index corresponded with a short tumor doubling time (8.2 days). Whole-brain irradiation and linear accelerator surgery for disseminated lesions were performed, and the tumor growth halted. Although meningiomas rarely show malignant behavior, corresponding to World Health Organization grade III, it is necessary to consider malignant behavior when treating meningiomas. PMID:21613768

  8. A hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-3α splicing variant, HIF-3α4 impairs angiogenesis in hypervascular malignant meningiomas with epigenetically silenced HIF-3α4

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Hitoshi; Natsume, Atsushi; Iwami, Kenichiro; Ohka, Fumiharu; Kuchimaru, Takahiro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Ito, Kengo; Saito, Kiyoshi; Sugita, Sachi; Hoshino, Tsuneyoshi; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► HIF-3α4 is silenced by DNA methylation in meningiomas. ► Induction of HIF-3α4 impaired angiogenesis in meningiomas. ► Induction of HIF-3α4 impaired proliferation and oxygen-dependent metabolism. -- Abstract: Hypoxia inducible factor is a dominant regulator of adaptive cellular responses to hypoxia and controls the expression of a large number of genes regulating angiogenesis as well as metabolism, cell survival, apoptosis, and other cellular functions in an oxygen level-dependent manner. When a neoplasm is able to induce angiogenesis, tumor progression occurs more rapidly because of the nutrients provided by the neovasculature. Meningioma is one of the most hypervascular brain tumors, making anti-angiogenic therapy an attractive novel therapy for these tumors. HIF-3α has been conventionally regarded as a dominant-negative regulator of HIF-1α, and although alternative HIF-3α splicing variants are extensively reported, their specific functions have not yet been determined. In this study, we found that the transcription of HIF-3α4 was silenced by the promoter DNA methylation in meningiomas, and inducible HIF-3α4 impaired angiogenesis, proliferation, and metabolism/oxidation in hypervascular meningiomas. Thus, HIF-3α4 could be a potential molecular target in meningiomas.

  9. Pathology and Molecular Genetics of Meningioma: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    SHIBUYA, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common intracranial primary neoplasm in adults. Although the spectrum of clinical and molecular genetic issues regarding meningiomas remains undefined, novel genetic alterations that are associated with tumor morphology, malignancy, or location have recently been discovered. This review focuses on recent advances in understanding of the heterogenous pathology of meningiomas, particularly on associations between the clinical, histological, etiological, epidemiological, and molecular genetical aspects of the neoplasm. PMID:25744347

  10. Meningioma Genomics: Diagnostic, Prognostic, and Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Wenya Linda; Zhang, Michael; Wu, Winona W.; Mei, Yu; Dunn, Ian F.

    2016-01-01

    There has been a recent revolution in our understanding of the genetic factors that drive meningioma, punctuating an equilibrium that has existed since Cushing’s germinal studies nearly a century ago. A growing appreciation that meningiomas share similar biologic features with other malignancies has allowed extrapolation of management strategies and lessons from intra-axial central nervous system neoplasms and systemic cancers to meningiomas. These features include a natural proclivity for invasion, frequent intratumoral heterogeneity, and correlation between biologic profile and clinical behavior. Next-generation sequencing has characterized recurrent somatic mutations in NF2, TRAF7, KLF4, AKT1, SMO, and PIK3CA, which are collectively present in ~80% of sporadic meningiomas. Genomic features of meningioma further associate with tumor location, histologic subtype, and possibly clinical behavior. Such genomic decryption, along with advances in targeted pharmacotherapy, provides a maturing integrated view of meningiomas. We review recent advances in meningioma genomics and probe their potential applications in diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic frontiers. PMID:27458586

  11. Spinal metastases from pituitary hemangiopericytic meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, P.P.; Good, R.R.; Skultety, F.M.; Masih, A.S.; McComb, R.D.

    1987-10-01

    A rare, previously irradiated, recurrent malignant angioblastic meningioma of the pituitary, hemangiopericytic type, was locally controlled by a new endocurietherapy technique that allows delivery of very high (10,000 cGy), sharply localized irradiation. Rather than succumbing to the local tumor recurrence, as would otherwise be expected, the patient developed distant spinal metastases several years later.

  12. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in canine intracranial meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, J H; Robertson, J L; Zimmerman, K L; Higgins, M A; Geiger, D A

    2009-09-01

    Meningiomas are the most common canine intracranial tumour. Neurologic disability and death from treatment failure remain problematic despite current surgical and radiotherapeutic treatments for canine intracranial meningiomas. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) over-expression has been demonstrated in multiple canine malignancies, and COX-2 inhibitory treatment strategies have been shown to have both preventative and therapeutic effects in spontaneous and experimental models of cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate COX-2 expression in canine intracranial meningiomas. Immunohistochemical and Western blot (WB) analyses showed COX-2 expression in multiple tissues of the normal canine brain, and 87% (21/24) of intracranial meningiomas studied were immunoreactive to COX-2. No significant associations between COX-2 immunoreactivity and tumour grade were identified. Further studies are required to elucidate the physiologic roles of constitutive COX-2 expression in the central nervous system as well as its participation in meningioma tumourigenesis. PMID:19691646

  13. Checkpoint inhibition in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Bi, Wenya Linda; Wu, Winona W; Santagata, Sandro; Reardon, David A; Dunn, Ian F

    2016-06-01

    Meningiomas are increasingly appreciated to share similar features with other intra-axial central nervous system neoplasms as well as systemic cancers. Immune checkpoint inhibition has emerged as a promising therapy in a number of cancers, with durable responses of years in a subset of patients. Several lines of evidence support a role for immune-based therapeutic strategies in the management of meningiomas, especially high-grade subtypes. Meningiomas frequently originate juxtaposed to venous sinuses, where an anatomic conduit for lymphatic drainage resides. Multiple populations of immune cells have been observed in meningiomas. PD-1/PD-L1 mediated immunosuppression has been implicated in high-grade meningiomas, with association between PD-L1 expression with negative prognostic outcome. These data point to the promise of future combinatorial therapeutic strategies in meningioma. PMID:27197540

  14. Immunoprevention of human papillomavirus-associated malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Wang1, Joshua W.; Hung, Chein-fu; Huh, Warner K.; Trimble, Cornelia L.; Roden, Richard B.S.

    2014-01-01

    Persistent infection by one of fifteen high risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) types is a necessary but not sufficient cause of 5% of all human cancers. This provides a remarkable opportunity for cancer prevention via immunization. Since Harald zur Hausen’s pioneering identification of hrHPV types 16 and 18, found in ~50% and ~20% of cervical cancers respectively, two prophylactic HPV vaccines containing virus-like particles (VLP) of each genotype have been widely licensed. These vaccines are beginning to impact infection and HPV-associated neoplasia rates after immunization campaigns in adolescents. Here we review recent progress and opportunities to better prevent HPV-associated cancers, including: broadening immune-protection to cover all hrHPV types, reducing the cost of HPV vaccines especially for developing countries that have the highest rates of cervical cancer, and immune-based treatment of established HPV infections. Screening based upon George Papanicolaou’s cervical cytology testing, and more recently detection of hrHPV DNA/RNA, followed by ablative treatment of high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2/3) have substantially reduced cervical cancer rates, and we examine their interplay with immune-based modalities for the prevention and eventual elimination of cervical cancer and other HPV-related malignancies. PMID:25488410

  15. Dorsal extradural meningioma: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dehcordi, Soheila Raysi; Ricci, Alessandro; Chiominto, Alessandro; De Paulis, Danilo; Di Vitantonio, Hambra; Galzio, Renato J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extradural spinal mass lesions are most commonly metastatic tumors. Extradural meningiomas are rare, accounting for approximately 2.5–3.5% of spinal meningiomas; intraoperatively, they are easily mistaken for malignant tumors, especially in the en plaque variety, resulting in inadequate surgical treatment. Case Description: Our case is one of the first to describe a patient with two purely extradural meningiomas, one each between D3–D4 and between D5–D6 vertebral levels. Surgical resection was radical, and pathologically both lesions were meningothelialmeningiomas. Conclusions: Reviewing the literature, we discuss the pathogenesis, treatment strategies, and long-term behavior of these uncommon lesions.

  16. Lectin binding in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, R; Radner, H

    1987-01-01

    Forty-two meningiomas of different morphological sub-type were examined to determine their pattern of binding to 11 different lectins which characterize cell surface components such as carbohydrate residues. Histiocytic and xanthoma cells within meningiomas could be demonstrated with six different lectins: wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), peanut agglutinin (PNA) Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin (BPA), Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Vicia fava agglutinin (VFA) and Soyabean agglutinin (SBA). Vascular elements including endothelial cells and intimal cells, bound Ulex europaeus agglutinin type 1 (UEA 1), WGA and HPA. The fibrous stroma in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound PNA, Laburnum alpinum agglutinin (LAA) and SBA. Tumour cells in meningotheliomatous meningiomas and some areas of anaplastic meningiomas bound Concanavalin A, PNA, LAA and VFA whereas tumour cells in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound BPA, LAA and VFA. Lectin binding has proved to be of value in detecting histiocytic and xanthoma cells together with vascular elements within meningiomas. In addition, the different lectin binding patterns allow different histological sub-types of meningioma to be distinguished although the biological significance of the binding patterns is unclear. PMID:3658105

  17. Management of Spinal Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Schmidt, Meic H

    2016-04-01

    Spinal meningiomas are the most common spinal tumors encountered in adults, and account for 6.5% of all craniospinal tumors. The treatment for these lesions is primarily surgical, but emerging modalities may include chemotherapy and radiosurgery. In this article, the current management of spinal meningiomas and the body of literature surrounding conventional treatment is reviewed and discussed.

  18. PTEN: Multiple Functions in Human Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Milella, Michele; Falcone, Italia; Conciatori, Fabiana; Cesta Incani, Ursula; Del Curatolo, Anais; Inzerilli, Nicola; Nuzzo, Carmen M. A.; Vaccaro, Vanja; Vari, Sabrina; Cognetti, Francesco; Ciuffreda, Ludovica

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is the most important negative regulator of the PI3K signaling pathway. In addition to its canonical, PI3K inhibition-dependent functions, PTEN can also function as a tumor suppressor in a PI3K-independent manner. Indeed, the PTEN network regulates a broad spectrum of biological functions, modulating the flow of information from membrane-bound growth factor receptors to nuclear transcription factors, occurring in concert with other tumor suppressors and oncogenic signaling pathways. PTEN acts through its lipid and protein phosphatase activity and other non-enzymatic mechanisms. Studies conducted over the past 10 years have expanded our understanding of the biological role of PTEN, showing that in addition to its ability to regulate proliferation and cell survival, it also plays an intriguing role in regulating genomic stability, cell migration, stem cell self-renewal, and tumor microenvironment. Changes in PTEN protein levels, location, and enzymatic activity through various molecular mechanisms can generate a continuum of functional PTEN levels in inherited syndromes, sporadic cancers, and other diseases. PTEN activity can indeed, be modulated by mutations, epigenetic silencing, transcriptional repression, aberrant protein localization, and post-translational modifications. This review will discuss our current understanding of the biological role of PTEN, how PTEN expression and activity are regulated, and the consequences of PTEN dysregulation in human malignant tumors. PMID:25763354

  19. Molecular genetics of meningiomas: from basic research to potential clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Simon, Matthias; Boström, Jan P; Hartmann, Christian

    2007-05-01

    To review our current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of meningiomas, to suggest topics for future investigations, and to present perspectives for clinical application. Significant progress has been made in recent years in delineating the molecular mechanisms involved in meningioma formation, growth, and malignant progression. However, many questions remain unanswered. Mutations in the NF2 gene probably account for the formation of more than half of all meningiomas. On the other hand, the molecular events underlying the initiation of meningiomas without NF2 mutations have yet to be identified. Investigating hereditary conditions associated with an increased meningioma incidence and the mechanisms underlying the development of radiation-induced meningiomas could potentially yield relevant insights. Meningioma growth is sustained by the dysregulated expression of steroid hormones, growth factors, their receptors, and activation of signal transduction cascades. The underlying genetic causes are unknown. Malignant progression of meningiomas probably involves the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes on chromosomes 1p, 9p, 10q, and 14q. However, with the possible exception of INK4A/INK4B, the actual targets of these chromosomal losses have remained largely elusive. Cell cycle dysregulation and telomerase activation have been recognized as important steps in meningioma progression. Telomere dynamics, cell cycle control, and the mechanisms responsible for deoxyribonucleic acid damage control are tightly interwoven. Investigating genes involved in the maintenance of genomic integrity might significantly deepen the understanding of meningioma progression. An area that has received relatively little attention thus far is the genetic background of meningioma spread and invasion. Possible clinical applications of the molecular data available may include a meningioma grading system based on genetic alterations, as well as therapeutic strategies for refractory

  20. Human herpesvirus 6 in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masao

    2009-11-01

    Pathogenetic roles of human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 in lymphoproliferative diseases have been of continued interest. Many molecular studies have tried to establish a pathogenic role for HHV-6 in lymphoid malignancies. However, whether HHV-6 plays a role in these pathologies remains unclear, as positive polymerase chain reaction results for HHV-6 in those studies may reflect latent infection or reactivation rather than presence of HHV-6 in neoplastic cells. A small number of studies have investigated HHV-6 antigen expression in pathologic specimens. As a result, the lack of HHV-6 antigen expression on neoplastic cells argues against any major pathogenic role of HHV-6. The role of HHV-6 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has also been of interest but remains controversial, with 2 studies documenting higher levels of HHV-6 antibody in ALL patients, and another 2 large-scale studies finding no significant differences in HHV-6 seroprevalences between ALL patients and controls. Alternatively, HHV-6 is increasingly recognized as an important opportunistic pathogen. HHV-6 reactivation is common among recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), and is linked to various clinical manifestations. In particular, HHV-6 encephalitis appears to be significant, life-threatening complication. Most HHV-6 encephalitis develops in patients receiving transplant from an unrelated donor, particularly cord blood, typically around the time of engraftment. Symptoms are characterized by short-term memory loss and seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging typically shows limbic encephalitis. Prognosis for HHV-6 encephalitis is poor, but appropriate prophylactic measures have not been established. Establishment of preventive strategies against HHV-6 encephalitis represents an important challenge for physicians involved with SCT.

  1. Infrared absorption spectra of human malignant tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skornyakov, I. V.; Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Butra, V. A.

    2008-05-01

    We used infrared spectroscopy methods to study the molecular structure of tissues from human organs removed during surgery. The IR spectra of the surgical material from breast, thyroid, and lung are compared with data from histological examination. We show that in malignant neoplasms, a change occurs in the hydrogen bonds of protein macromolecules found in the tissue of the studied organs. We identify the spectral signs of malignant pathology.

  2. Molecular Genetics of Intracranial Meningiomas with Emphasis on Canonical Wnt Signalling.

    PubMed

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Lechpammer, Mirna

    2016-07-15

    Research over the last decade recognized the importance of novel molecular pathways in pathogenesis of intracranial meningiomas. In this review, we focus on human brain tumours meningiomas and the involvement of Wnt signalling pathway genes and proteins in this common brain tumour, describing their known functional effects. Meningiomas originate from the meningeal layers of the brain and the spinal cord. Most meningiomas have benign clinical behaviour and are classified as grade I by World Health Organization (WHO). However, up to 20% histologically classified as atypical (grade II) or anaplastic (grade III) are associated with higher recurrent rate and have overall less favourable clinical outcome. Recently, there is emerging evidence that multiple signalling pathways including Wnt pathway contribute to the formation and growth of meningiomas. In the review we present the synopsis on meningioma histopathology and genetics and discuss our research regarding Wnt in meningioma. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a process in which Wnt signalling plays an important role, is shortly discussed.

  3. Ultrastructure of human malignant diffuse mesothelioma.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Y.; Kannerstein, M.

    1976-01-01

    Eleven cases of malignant diffuse mesotheliomas, histologically classified into two groups, epithelial (5 pleural and 3 peritoneal) and biphasic or mixed (2 pleural and 1 peritoneal) forms, were stuied by electron microscopy to elucidate their ultrastructural characteristics. The neoplastic cells of the epithelial forms were varied in ultrastructure, from well differentiated (marked by polarity, micovilli, glycogen granules, junctional structures, tonofilaments, intracellular vacuoles, and a basement membrane) to poorly differentiated (which lacked some of these epithelial characteristics). In four of eight instances in epithelial type tumors, nonepithelial or mesenchymal neoplastic cells were recognized. The biphasic or mixed cases included three major cell types: epithelial, atypical epithelial, and mesenchymal. It appeared that there were transitional forms among the three cell types. The observations support the concept that the neoplastic cell of malignant mesothelioma can differentiate into a number of cell lines. Images Figures 20 and 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figures 24 and 25 Figure 26 Figure 27A Figure 27B and C Figure 28 Figure 29 Figure 30 Figure 31 Figures 32 and 33 Figure 34 Figure 35 Figure 36 Figures 1-4 Figures 5 and 6 Figure 37 Figures 7-10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figures 17 and 18 Figure 19 PMID:998721

  4. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of a primary ectopic meningioma.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Arif; Gokden, Murat; Hanna, Ehab Y

    2002-05-01

    Meningiomas are benign tumors derived from arachnoid cells. Most commonly an intracranial lesion, meningiomas may be found extracranially in various anatomic sites. A 23-yr-old white female presented with left-sided palpable mass located submucosally in the floor of the mouth. CT scan revealed no evidence of mass elsewhere in the head and neck region. Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) showed loose and cohesive cellular fragments with lobular growth pattern and uniform round or ovoid cells. The diagnosis of low-grade salivary gland neoplasm, not further classified, was made. The tumor was locally excised. The differential diagnoses of an extracranial meningioma and pleomorphic adenoma were discussed at the frozen section. Based on light microscopic, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic (EM) findings, the final diagnosis of an ectopic meningioma was rendered. Ectopic meningiomas may pose a diagnostic challenge to clinicians and cytopathologists. It is easily forgotten in the list of differential diagnosis at an ectopic site. Primary ectopic meningioma in a region containing salivary gland(s) may mimic benign and low-grade malignant salivary gland tumors in FNAC.

  5. Treatment recommendations for primary extradural meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Austin; Hughes, Betsy; Oleson, James; Reardon, David; McLendon, Roger; Adamson, Cory

    2011-01-01

    Primary extradural meningiomas (PEMs) represent about 2% of all meningiomas and are often encountered by non-neurosurgeons. These lesions typically present as enlarging, painless, benign masses that can be surgically cured. Imaging is critical for defining involvement of adjacent structures; however, diagnosis depends on classic histologic patterns. Treatment for benign PEMs (WHO I) consists of resection with wide margins, whereas adjuvant therapy after resection of atypical (WHO II) or malignant (WHO III) PEMs should be considered. By using the collective experience from our comprehensive cancer center, including neuro-oncologists, neuroradiologists, and neurosurgeons, in addition to a complete literature review, the authors have established treatment guidelines not previously reported. This manuscript describes key features of these challenging tumors to aid in diagnosis, presents the largest published review of all reported PEMs (n = 163), and provides salient treatment guidelines to surgeons unfamiliar with these challenging tumors.

  6. Radiation-induced meningioma: a distinct molecular genetic pattern?

    PubMed

    Shoshan, Y; Chernova, O; Juen, S S; Somerville, R P; Israel, Z; Barnett, G H; Cowell, J K

    2000-07-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas arise after low-dose irradiation treatment of certain medical conditions and are recognized as clinically separate from sporadic meningioma. These tumors are often aggressive or malignant, they are likely to be multiple, and they have a high recurrence rate following treatment compared with sporadic meningiomas. To understand the molecular mechanism by which radiation-induced meningioma (RIM) arise, we compared genetic changes in 7 RIM and 8 sporadic meningioma (SM) samples. The presence of mutations in the 17 exons of the neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene, which has been shown to be inactivated in sporadic meningiomas, was analyzed in RIM and SM using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and DNA sequencing. In contrast to SM, which showed NF2 mutations in 50% of specimens, no mutations were found in RIM. In addition, Western blot analysis of schwannomin/merlin protein, the NF2 gene product, demonstrated protein levels comparable to normal brain in 4/4 RIM tumor samples analyzed. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of genomic regions, which were reported for SM, was also analyzed in all cases of RIM using 22 polymorphic DNA markers. Allele losses were found on chromosomes 1p (4/7), 9p (2/7), 19q (2/7), 22q (2/7), and 18q (1/7). From these observations we conclude that unlike sporadic meningiomas, NF2 gene inactivation and chromosome 22q deletions are far less frequent in RIM, and their role in meningioma development following low dose irradiation is less significant. Other chromosomal lesions, especially loss of 1p, possibly induced by irradiation, may be more important in the development of these tumors. PMID:10901233

  7. Rhabdoid papillary meningioma: a clinicopathologic case series study.

    PubMed

    Wu, You-Ting; Ho, Jih-Tsun; Lin, Yu-Jun; Lin, Jui-Wei

    2011-12-01

    World Health Organization (WHO) grade III meningiomas are subclassified on the basis of their architectural pattern into papillary and rhabdoid subtypes. Some meningiomas even combine papillary architecture with rhabdoid cytology. Additionally, they always show malignant histological features, follow an aggressive clinical course and tend to spread through the CSF after frequent local recurrence. We render the first series of rhabdoid papillary meningioma with review of the literature to further elucidate its biological behavior. From six patients (three male, three female), nine specimens of rhabdoid papillary meningioma were obtained between 1994 and 2010. Correlations of histologic parameters, immunohistochemical study, and clinical features were assessed. The mean age of patients was 44.7 years at their first operation. The mean postoperative follow-up period was 63.2 months. Five patients experienced tumor recurrence, and one of them died from the disease after diffuse leptomeningeal dissemination. The mean time to first recurrence was 28 months. Only one patient was free of tumoral recurrence after an 8-year follow-up. Immunohistochemically, all tumors were positive for vimentin and epithelial membrane antigen. MIB-1 labeling indices were higher following tumor recurrence. The present study expands the clinicopathologic horizon of rhabdoid papillary meningioma and suggests that it will behave aggressively based on its histology and concomitant features of atypia or malignancy or high MIB-1 labeling indices. Close follow-up and aggressive treatments of these tumors are warranted.

  8. Ultrastructure of psammoma bodies of meningioma in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Lipper, S; Dalzell, J C; Watkins, P J

    1979-12-01

    An 8-day-old tissue culture of a human meningioma was studied by electron microscopy. Psammoma bodies were detected in all stages of evolution, affording a unique opportunity for observing the genesis of these structures. Matrix vesicles appeared instrumental in the calcification of a granular extracellular material. Although matrix vesicles are described in both physiologic and pathologic calcification, they have not been previously reported in the very few ultrastructural studies of psammoma bodies in meningiomas.

  9. Phagocytes as Carcinogens: Malignant Transformation Produced by Human Neutrophils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitzman, Sigmund A.; Weitberg, Alan B.; Clark, Edward P.; Stossel, Thomas P.

    1985-03-01

    In a study of the relation between chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis, C3H mouse fibroblasts of the 10T 1/2 clone 8 line (10T 1/2 cells) were exposed to human neutrophils stimulated to synthesize reactive oxygen intermediates or to a cell-free enzymatic system generating superoxide (xanthine oxidase plus hypoxanthine). After exposure, the 10T 1/2 cells were either placed in tissue culture or immediately injected into athymic nude mice. Both malignant and benign tumors developed in the mice injected with treated cells, but not in those injected with control cells; in one instance cells grown from one of the benign tumors subsequently developed a malignant phenotype. Malignant transformation was also observed in treated cells in the experiments in vitro.

  10. Surgical Treatment for Falcotentorial Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chang Ki; Hong, Je Beom; Park, Hunho; Moon, Ju Hyung; Chang, Jong Hee; Lee, Kyu Sung

    2016-01-01

    Among intracranial meningiomas, falcotentorial meningiomas, occurring at the junction of the falx cerebri and tentorial dural folds, are extremely rare. Because of their deep location, they are surrounded by critical structures, and have been regarded as one of the most challenging lesions for surgical treatment. In this study, we describe our surgical strategy for falcotentorial meningiomas and provide a review of our experience. PMID:27189300

  11. Dorsal extradural meningioma: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dehcordi, Soheila Raysi; Ricci, Alessandro; Chiominto, Alessandro; De Paulis, Danilo; Di Vitantonio, Hambra; Galzio, Renato J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extradural spinal mass lesions are most commonly metastatic tumors. Extradural meningiomas are rare, accounting for approximately 2.5–3.5% of spinal meningiomas; intraoperatively, they are easily mistaken for malignant tumors, especially in the en plaque variety, resulting in inadequate surgical treatment. Case Description: Our case is one of the first to describe a patient with two purely extradural meningiomas, one each between D3–D4 and between D5–D6 vertebral levels. Surgical resection was radical, and pathologically both lesions were meningothelialmeningiomas. Conclusions: Reviewing the literature, we discuss the pathogenesis, treatment strategies, and long-term behavior of these uncommon lesions. PMID:27625886

  12. Immunohistochemical characterization of brain-invasive meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Backer-Grøndahl, Thomas; Moen, Bjørnar H; Arnli, Magnus B; Torseth, Kathrin; Torp, Sverre H

    2014-01-01

    Brain-invasive meningiomas have an adverse prognosis, so it is important to detect and correctly evaluate brain invasion by light microscopy. Furthermore, the underlying biological mechanisms responsible for brain-invasive growth are incompletely understood. The primary aim of this study was to identify immunohistochemical markers that could improve identification and evaluation of brain invasion in meningiomas. A second aim was to investigate the process of brain invasion using immunohistochemical markers of proliferation, extracellular matrix modulation, and cell adhesion. From a series of 196 human meningiomas, 67 cases were selected for analysis because of the presence of brain tissue in tumor specimens. Fourteen of these 67 meningiomas were brain-invasive. Invasiveness was determined primarily by evaluation of hematoxylin-erytrosin-saffron- (HES-) stained specimens, although glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), anti-collagen IV, and cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) markers provided additional information. It was important to examine microscopic sections from various levels of the paraffin-embedded tissue block to adequately assess invasiveness. Sections stained using antibodies against Ki-67/MIB-1, phospohistone-H3 (PHH3), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), cathepsin D, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and E-cadherin antigens were used to characterize brain-invasive meningiomas and to investigate the process of brain invasion. Only increased expression of the extracellular matrix modulator MMP-9 correlated with brain-invasive growth (p=0.025). Examination of HES-stained sections identified brain invasion. Use of relevant immunohistochemical markers did not contribute substantially to this evaluation. Evaluation of stepwise sections should be considered when brain-invasive growth is suspected. MMP-9 may be an important mediator of brain-invasive growth. PMID:25400818

  13. Hemoglobin enhances tissue factor expression on human malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, F A; Amirkhosravi, A; Amaya, M; Meyer, T; Biggerstaff, J; Desai, H; Francis, J L

    2001-04-01

    Tissue Factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that complexes with factor VII/activated factor VII to initiate blood coagulation. TF may be expressed on the surface of various cells including monocytes and endothelial cells. Over-expression of TF in human tumor cell lines promotes metastasis. We recently showed that hemoglobin (Hb) forms a specific complex with TF purified from human malignant melanoma cells and enhances its procoagulant activity (PCA). To further study this interaction, we examined the effect of Hb on the expression of TF on human malignant (TF+) cells and KG1 myeloid leukemia (TF-) cells. Human melanoma A375 and J82 bladder carcinoma cells, which express TF at moderate and relatively high levels, respectively, were incubated with varying concentrations (0-1.5 mg/ml) of Hb. After washing, cells were analyzed for Hb binding and TF expression using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Hb bound to the cells in a concentration-dependent manner, and increased both TF expression and PCA. The human A375 malignant melanoma cells incubated with Hb (1 mg/ml) expressed up to six times more TF antigen than cells without Hb. This increase in TF expression and PCA of intact cells incubated with Hb was significantly inhibited by cycloheximide at a concentration of 10 microg/ml (P < 0.01). An increase in total cellular TF antigen content was demonstrated by specific immunoassay. In contrast, Hb (5 mg/ml) did not induce TF expression and PCA on KG1 cells as determined by flow cytometry and TF (FXAA) activity. We conclude that Hb specifically binds to TF-bearing malignant cells and increases their PCA. This effect seems to be at least partly due to de novo synthesis of TF and increased surface expression. However, the exact mechanism by which Hb binds and upregulates TF expression remains to be determined.

  14. Hemoglobin enhances tissue factor expression on human malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, F A; Amirkhosravi, A; Amaya, M; Meyer, T; Biggerstaff, J; Desai, H; Francis, J L

    2001-04-01

    Tissue Factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that complexes with factor VII/activated factor VII to initiate blood coagulation. TF may be expressed on the surface of various cells including monocytes and endothelial cells. Over-expression of TF in human tumor cell lines promotes metastasis. We recently showed that hemoglobin (Hb) forms a specific complex with TF purified from human malignant melanoma cells and enhances its procoagulant activity (PCA). To further study this interaction, we examined the effect of Hb on the expression of TF on human malignant (TF+) cells and KG1 myeloid leukemia (TF-) cells. Human melanoma A375 and J82 bladder carcinoma cells, which express TF at moderate and relatively high levels, respectively, were incubated with varying concentrations (0-1.5 mg/ml) of Hb. After washing, cells were analyzed for Hb binding and TF expression using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Hb bound to the cells in a concentration-dependent manner, and increased both TF expression and PCA. The human A375 malignant melanoma cells incubated with Hb (1 mg/ml) expressed up to six times more TF antigen than cells without Hb. This increase in TF expression and PCA of intact cells incubated with Hb was significantly inhibited by cycloheximide at a concentration of 10 microg/ml (P < 0.01). An increase in total cellular TF antigen content was demonstrated by specific immunoassay. In contrast, Hb (5 mg/ml) did not induce TF expression and PCA on KG1 cells as determined by flow cytometry and TF (FXAA) activity. We conclude that Hb specifically binds to TF-bearing malignant cells and increases their PCA. This effect seems to be at least partly due to de novo synthesis of TF and increased surface expression. However, the exact mechanism by which Hb binds and upregulates TF expression remains to be determined. PMID:11414630

  15. Meningiomas of the Pediatric Skull Base: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gump, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric skull base meningiomas are rare and complex clinical entities. Meningioma is a relatively uncommon brain tumor in children, and only ∼ 27% involve the skull base. Some evidence suggests that these tumors are more likely to be atypical or malignant in children than adults. The absence of female preponderance in pediatric meningiomas is reflected in the skull base subpopulation. Skull base meningiomas in children are most likely to be found in the anterior or middle fossa base, or involving the orbit and optic nerve sheath. Petroclival, suprasellar/parasellar, cerebellopontine angle, cavernous sinus, and foramen magnum tumors are very rare. Meningiomas constitute a small proportion of reported cases of pediatric skull base pathology, and they are entirely absent from many case series. Initial gross total resection is consistently associated with superior outcomes. Surgical approaches to the pediatric skull base must take additional factors into consideration including relatively smaller anatomy, immature dentition, incompletely aerated sinuses and air cells, and altered configurations of structures such as the pterional bony complex. Multidisciplinary expertise is essential to optimizing treatment outcomes. PMID:25685652

  16. Eliminating malignant contamination from therapeutic human spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Dovey, Serena L.; Valli, Hanna; Hermann, Brian P.; Sukhwani, Meena; Donohue, Julia; Castro, Carlos A.; Chu, Tianjiao; Sanfilippo, Joseph S.; Orwig, Kyle E.

    2013-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) transplantation has been shown to restore fertility in several species and may have application for treating some cases of male infertility (e.g., secondary to gonadotoxic therapy for cancer). To ensure safety of this fertility preservation strategy, methods are needed to isolate and enrich SSCs from human testis cell suspensions and also remove malignant contamination. We used flow cytometry to characterize cell surface antigen expression on human testicular cells and leukemic cells (MOLT-4 and TF-1a). We demonstrated via FACS that EpCAM is expressed by human spermatogonia but not MOLT-4 cells. In contrast, HLA-ABC and CD49e marked >95% of MOLT-4 cells but were not expressed on human spermatogonia. A multiparameter sort of MOLT-4–contaminated human testicular cell suspensions was performed to isolate EpCAM+/HLA-ABC–/CD49e– (putative spermatogonia) and EpCAM–/HLA-ABC+/CD49e+ (putative MOLT-4) cell fractions. The EpCAM+/HLA-ABC–/CD49e– fraction was enriched for spermatogonial colonizing activity and did not form tumors following human-to–nude mouse xenotransplantation. The EpCAM–/HLA-ABC+/CD49e+ fraction produced tumors following xenotransplantation. This approach could be generalized with slight modification to also remove contaminating TF-1a leukemia cells. Thus, FACS provides a method to isolate and enrich human spermatogonia and remove malignant contamination by exploiting differences in cell surface antigen expression. PMID:23549087

  17. Osteoblastic meningioma with turtle shell: Different entity from calcified meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Salunke, Pravin; Aggarwal, Ashish; Futane, Sameer; Nada, Ritambhara; Gochhait, Debasis

    2016-01-01

    Bone formation within meningioma is secondary to metaplasia of the meningothelial cells into osteoblastic cells. This needs to be differentiated form the commonly seen calcification. We describe a rare case of osteobalstic meningioma in which bony trabeculae were seen within meningothelial cells. PMID:27695563

  18. Osteoblastic meningioma with turtle shell: Different entity from calcified meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Salunke, Pravin; Aggarwal, Ashish; Futane, Sameer; Nada, Ritambhara; Gochhait, Debasis

    2016-01-01

    Bone formation within meningioma is secondary to metaplasia of the meningothelial cells into osteoblastic cells. This needs to be differentiated form the commonly seen calcification. We describe a rare case of osteobalstic meningioma in which bony trabeculae were seen within meningothelial cells.

  19. Clinical significance of HuR expression in human malignancy.

    PubMed

    Kotta-Loizou, Ioly; Giaginis, Constantinos; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2014-09-01

    Hu-antigen R (HuR) is an RNA-binding protein that regulates the stability, translation, and nucleus-to-cytoplasm translocation of target mRNAs. The aim of the present review was to summarize and present the currently available information in the English literature on HuR expression in various human tumors, verifying its possible clinical significance. HuR function is directly linked to its subcellular localization. In normal cells, HuR is mostly localized in the nucleus, while in malignant cells, an increase in cytoplasmic HuR levels has been noted, in both cell lines and tissue samples. Moreover, in malignancy, elevated HuR expression levels and cytoplasmic immunohistochemical pattern have been correlated with advanced clinicopathological parameters and altered expression levels of proteins implicated in neoplasia. Additionally, elevated HuR expression levels and mainly cytoplasmic immunohistochemical pattern were correlated with decreased patients' survival rate in various human tumors. HuR is a putative drug target for cancer therapy, since it is expressed ubiquitously in malignant clinical samples and has an apparently consistent role in tumor formation and progression.

  20. Chordoid meningioma: a case report.

    PubMed Central

    Yeon, Je-young; Lee, Jung-Il; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Suh, Yeon-Lim

    2003-01-01

    The term "chordoid meningioma" means meningioma, which is pathologically similar to chordoma, and previously reported that rarely associated with microcytic anemia and/or dysgammaglobulinemia especially in pediatric population. We present a case of this rare variant, which comprises less than 0.5% of all meningiomas. A 33-yr-old man visited our hospital, complaining visual field defect worsening over 7 yr. Neurological examination showed left homonymous hemianopsia. The brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed well enhancing right temporo-occipital mass with cystic portion. Histopathologic findings of resected tumor were compatible with chordoid meningioma which included trabeculae of eosinophilic, vacuolated cells in a myxoid matrix with prominent lymphoplasmacellular infiltration. The neoplastic cells were positive for vimentin and epithelial membrane antigen and negative for glial fibrillary acidic protein and cytokeratin. This is an adult case of chordoid meningioma without anemia or dysgammaglobulinemia. PMID:14555838

  1. Expressions of Endocan in Patients with Meningiomas and Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Okan; Turkmen Inanir, Nursel

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Endocan has been shown to be a marker for several cancers and may show degree of malignancy. The aim of this study is to assess tissue levels of endocan in common brain tumors, namely, meningiomas, low-grade gliomas (LGGs), and high-grade gliomas (HGGs). Patients and Methods. Endocan was assayed by commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits in a total of 50 brain tumors (20 meningiomas, 19 LGGs, and 20 HGGs) and 15 controls. The results were compared to control brain tissues. Results. Each tumor group showed significant higher levels of endocan compared to controls (p < 0.05). In addition, endocan levels showed steady increase from the least (meningiomas) to the most (HGGs) malignant tumors and positive correlation was noted between the degree of malignancy and endocan level (p = 0.0001). Conclusion. Endocan, a vital molecule for angiogenesis, is expressed in common brain tumors and results suggest that endocan could be a marker for malignancy. PMID:27528791

  2. Heterogeneity and immunophenotypic plasticity of malignant cells in human liposarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Young, Eric D.; Bill, Katelynn; Belousov, Roman; Peng, Tingsheng; Lazar, Alexander J; Pollock, Raphael E; Simmons, Paul J.; Lev, Dina; Kolonin, Mikhail G.

    2013-01-01

    Liposarcomas are tumors arising in white adipose tissue (WAT) with avidity for local recurrence. Aggressive dedifferentiated liposarcomas (DDLS) may arise from well-differentiated subtypes (WDLS) upon disease progression, however, this key issue is unresolved due in large part to knowledge gaps about liposarcoma cellular composition. Here, we wished to improve insights into liposarcoma cellular hierarchy. Tumor section analysis indicated that the populations, distinguishable based on expression of CD34 (a marker of adipocyte progenitors) and CD36 (a marker of adipocyte differentiation), occupy distinct intra-tumoral locations in both WDLS and DDLS. Taking advantage of these markers, we separated cells from a panel of fresh human surgical specimens by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Based on chromosome analysis and the culture phenotypes of the composing populations, we demonstrate that malignant cells comprise four mesenchymal populations distinguished by expression of CD34 and CD36, while vascular (CD31+) and hematopoietic (CD45+) components are non-neoplastic. Finally, we show that mouse xenografts are derivable from both CD36-negative and CD36-positive DDLS cells, and that each population recreates the heterogeneity of CD36 expression in vivo. Combined, our results show that malignant cells in WDLS and DDLS can be classified according to distinct stages of adipogenesis and indicate immonophenotypic plasticity of malignant liposarcoma cells. PMID:23770802

  3. Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Progressive Meningiomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-26

    Acoustic Schwannoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Neurofibromatosis Type 1; Neurofibromatosis Type 2; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  4. Anticancer activity of glucomoringin isothiocyanate in human malignant astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Thangavelu Soundara; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Iori, Renato; Rollin, Patrick; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2016-04-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) released from their glucosinolate precursors have been shown to inhibit tumorigenesis and they have received significant attention as potential chemotherapeutic agents against cancer. Astrocytoma grade IV is the most frequent and most malignant primary brain tumor in adults without any curative treatment. New therapeutic drugs are therefore urgently required. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antitumor activity of the glycosylated isothiocyanate moringin [4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)benzyl isothiocyanate] produced from quantitative myrosinase-induced hydrolysis of glucomoringin (GMG) under neutral pH value. We have evaluated the potency of moringin on apoptosis induction and cell death in human astrocytoma grade IV CCF-STTG1 cells. Moringin showed to be effective in inducing apoptosis through p53 and Bax activation and Bcl-2 inhibition. In addition, oxidative stress related Nrf2 transcription factor and its upstream regulator CK2 alpha expressions were modulated at higher doses, which indicated the involvement of oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis induced by moringin. Moreover, significant reduction in 5S rRNA was noticed with moringin treatment. Our in vitro results demonstrated the antitumor efficacy of moringin derived from myrosinase-hydrolysis of GMG in human malignant astrocytoma cells. PMID:26882972

  5. Group I Paks as therapeutic targets in NF2-deficient meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Duron, Sergio G.; Campbell, David A.; Ong, Christy C.; Hoeflich, Klaus P.; Chang, Long-Sheng; Welling, D. Bradley; Yang, Zeng-jie; Chernoff, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the development of multiple tumors in the central nervous system, most notably schwannomas and meningiomas. Mutational inactivation of NF2 is found in 40–60% of sporadic meningiomas, but the molecular mechanisms underlying malignant changes of meningioma cells remain unclear. Because group I p21-activated kinases (Paks) bind to and are inhibited by the NF2-encoded protein Merlin, we assessed the signaling and anti-tumor effects of three group-I specific Pak inhibitors - Frax597, 716 and 1036 - in NF2−/− meningiomas in vitro and in an orthotopic mouse model. We found that these Pak inhibitors suppressed the proliferation and motility of both benign (Ben-Men1) and malignant (KT21-MG1) meningiomas cells. In addition, we found a strong reduction in phosphorylation of Mek and S6, and decreased cyclin D1 expression in both cell lines after treatment with Pak inhibitors. Using intracranial xenografts of luciferase-expressing KT21-MG1 cells, we found that treated mice showed significant tumor suppression for all three Pak inhibitors. Similar effects were observed in Ben-Men1 cells. Tumors dissected from treated animals exhibited an increase in apoptosis without notable change in proliferation. Collectively, these results suggest that Pak inhibitors might be useful agents in treating NF2-deficient meningiomas. PMID:25596744

  6. Secreted primary human malignant mesothelioma exosome signature reflects oncogenic cargo.

    PubMed

    Greening, David W; Ji, Hong; Chen, Maoshan; Robinson, Bruce W S; Dick, Ian M; Creaney, Jenette; Simpson, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a highly-aggressive heterogeneous malignancy, typically diagnosed at advanced stage. An important area of mesothelioma biology and progression is understanding intercellular communication and the contribution of the secretome. Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles shown to shuttle cellular cargo and direct intercellular communication in the tumour microenvironment, facilitate immunoregulation and metastasis. In this study, quantitative proteomics was used to investigate MM-derived exosomes from distinct human models and identify select cargo protein networks associated with angiogenesis, metastasis, and immunoregulation. Utilising bioinformatics pathway/network analyses, and correlation with previous studies on tumour exosomes, we defined a select mesothelioma exosomal signature (mEXOS, 570 proteins) enriched in tumour antigens and various cancer-specific signalling (HPGD/ENO1/OSMR) and secreted modulators (FN1/ITLN1/MAMDC2/PDGFD/GBP1). Notably, such circulating cargo offers unique insights into mesothelioma progression and tumour microenvironment reprogramming. Functionally, we demonstrate that oncogenic exosomes facilitate the migratory capacity of fibroblast/endothelial cells, supporting the systematic model of MM progression associated with vascular remodelling and angiogenesis. We provide biophysical and proteomic characterisation of exosomes, define a unique oncogenic signature (mEXOS), and demonstrate the regulatory capacity of exosomes in cell migration/tube formation assays. These findings contribute to understanding tumour-stromal crosstalk in the context of MM, and potential new diagnostic and therapeutic extracellular targets.

  7. Secreted primary human malignant mesothelioma exosome signature reflects oncogenic cargo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greening, David W.; Ji, Hong; Chen, Maoshan; Robinson, Bruce W. S.; Dick, Ian M.; Creaney, Jenette; Simpson, Richard J.

    2016-09-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a highly-aggressive heterogeneous malignancy, typically diagnosed at advanced stage. An important area of mesothelioma biology and progression is understanding intercellular communication and the contribution of the secretome. Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles shown to shuttle cellular cargo and direct intercellular communication in the tumour microenvironment, facilitate immunoregulation and metastasis. In this study, quantitative proteomics was used to investigate MM-derived exosomes from distinct human models and identify select cargo protein networks associated with angiogenesis, metastasis, and immunoregulation. Utilising bioinformatics pathway/network analyses, and correlation with previous studies on tumour exosomes, we defined a select mesothelioma exosomal signature (mEXOS, 570 proteins) enriched in tumour antigens and various cancer-specific signalling (HPGD/ENO1/OSMR) and secreted modulators (FN1/ITLN1/MAMDC2/PDGFD/GBP1). Notably, such circulating cargo offers unique insights into mesothelioma progression and tumour microenvironment reprogramming. Functionally, we demonstrate that oncogenic exosomes facilitate the migratory capacity of fibroblast/endothelial cells, supporting the systematic model of MM progression associated with vascular remodelling and angiogenesis. We provide biophysical and proteomic characterisation of exosomes, define a unique oncogenic signature (mEXOS), and demonstrate the regulatory capacity of exosomes in cell migration/tube formation assays. These findings contribute to understanding tumour-stromal crosstalk in the context of MM, and potential new diagnostic and therapeutic extracellular targets.

  8. Secreted primary human malignant mesothelioma exosome signature reflects oncogenic cargo

    PubMed Central

    Greening, David W.; Ji, Hong; Chen, Maoshan; Robinson, Bruce W. S.; Dick, Ian M.; Creaney, Jenette; Simpson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a highly-aggressive heterogeneous malignancy, typically diagnosed at advanced stage. An important area of mesothelioma biology and progression is understanding intercellular communication and the contribution of the secretome. Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles shown to shuttle cellular cargo and direct intercellular communication in the tumour microenvironment, facilitate immunoregulation and metastasis. In this study, quantitative proteomics was used to investigate MM-derived exosomes from distinct human models and identify select cargo protein networks associated with angiogenesis, metastasis, and immunoregulation. Utilising bioinformatics pathway/network analyses, and correlation with previous studies on tumour exosomes, we defined a select mesothelioma exosomal signature (mEXOS, 570 proteins) enriched in tumour antigens and various cancer-specific signalling (HPGD/ENO1/OSMR) and secreted modulators (FN1/ITLN1/MAMDC2/PDGFD/GBP1). Notably, such circulating cargo offers unique insights into mesothelioma progression and tumour microenvironment reprogramming. Functionally, we demonstrate that oncogenic exosomes facilitate the migratory capacity of fibroblast/endothelial cells, supporting the systematic model of MM progression associated with vascular remodelling and angiogenesis. We provide biophysical and proteomic characterisation of exosomes, define a unique oncogenic signature (mEXOS), and demonstrate the regulatory capacity of exosomes in cell migration/tube formation assays. These findings contribute to understanding tumour-stromal crosstalk in the context of MM, and potential new diagnostic and therapeutic extracellular targets. PMID:27605433

  9. Secreted primary human malignant mesothelioma exosome signature reflects oncogenic cargo.

    PubMed

    Greening, David W; Ji, Hong; Chen, Maoshan; Robinson, Bruce W S; Dick, Ian M; Creaney, Jenette; Simpson, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a highly-aggressive heterogeneous malignancy, typically diagnosed at advanced stage. An important area of mesothelioma biology and progression is understanding intercellular communication and the contribution of the secretome. Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles shown to shuttle cellular cargo and direct intercellular communication in the tumour microenvironment, facilitate immunoregulation and metastasis. In this study, quantitative proteomics was used to investigate MM-derived exosomes from distinct human models and identify select cargo protein networks associated with angiogenesis, metastasis, and immunoregulation. Utilising bioinformatics pathway/network analyses, and correlation with previous studies on tumour exosomes, we defined a select mesothelioma exosomal signature (mEXOS, 570 proteins) enriched in tumour antigens and various cancer-specific signalling (HPGD/ENO1/OSMR) and secreted modulators (FN1/ITLN1/MAMDC2/PDGFD/GBP1). Notably, such circulating cargo offers unique insights into mesothelioma progression and tumour microenvironment reprogramming. Functionally, we demonstrate that oncogenic exosomes facilitate the migratory capacity of fibroblast/endothelial cells, supporting the systematic model of MM progression associated with vascular remodelling and angiogenesis. We provide biophysical and proteomic characterisation of exosomes, define a unique oncogenic signature (mEXOS), and demonstrate the regulatory capacity of exosomes in cell migration/tube formation assays. These findings contribute to understanding tumour-stromal crosstalk in the context of MM, and potential new diagnostic and therapeutic extracellular targets. PMID:27605433

  10. Proteomics Analysis of Brain Meningiomas in Pursuit of Novel Biomarkers of the Aggressive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Barkhoudarian, Garni; Whitelegge, Julian P; Kelly, Daniel F; Simonian, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the use of advanced proteomics techniques to identify novel protein markers that contribute to the transformation of benign meningiomas to more aggressive and malignant subtypes. Multiplex peptide stable isotope dimethyl labelling and nano-LCMS was used to identify and quantify the differentially expressed proteins in WHO Grade I, II and III meningioma tissues. The proteins identified will help elucidate the process of transformation to malignancy and may contribute to improved diagnosis and treatment of these aggressive tumors PMID:27019568

  11. KINOMIC ALTERATIONS IN ATYPICAL MENINGIOMA

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Joshua C.; Taylor, Robert B.; Fiveash, John B.; de Wijn, Rik; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Willey, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to profile Atypical Meningioma in a high-throughput manner to better understand the altered signaling within these tumors and specifically the kinases altered in recurrent atypical meningioma. Kinomic Profiles could be used to identify prognostic biomarkers for responders/non-responders to classify future patients that are unlikely to benefit from current therapies. Directly these results could be used to identify drug-actionable kinase targets as well. Methods Peptide-substrate microarray kinase activity analysis was conducted with a PamStation®12 analyzing the tyrosine kinome in each tumor kinetically against ~144 target peptides. These data were then analyzed relative to clinical outcome (e.g., tumor recurrence). Results 3 major clusters of atypical meningiomas were identified with highly variant peptides primarily being targets of EGFR family, ABL, BRK and BMX kinases. Kinomic analysis of recurrent atypical meningiomas indicated patterns of increased phosphorylation of BMX, TYRO3 and FAK substrates as compared to non-recurrent tumors. Conclusion The atypical meningiomas profiled here exhibited molecular sub-clustering that may have phenotypic corollaries predictive of outcome. Recurrent tumors had increases in kinase activity that may predict resistance to current therapies, and may guide selection of directed therapies. Taken together these data further the understanding of kinomic alteration in atypical meningioma, and the processes that may not only mediate recurrence, but additionally may identify kinase targets for intervention. PMID:27158663

  12. Medical treatment of recurrent meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Marc C; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S

    2011-10-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common primary brain tumor and are primarily treated with surgery (with or without embolization) and radiotherapy. Increasingly today, meningiomas undergo multiple resections and two radiotherapy treatments (either stereotactic or conventional external beam) before consideration for hormonal, chemotherapy or targeted therapy. The failure of hormonal and cytotoxic chemotherapy in the treatment of recurrent meningioma and increasing understanding of potential molecular targets in meningioma has resulted in multiple studies utilizing single-agent targeted therapy directed at biologically relevant signaling pathways, such as somatostatin (Sandostatin(®) LAR, SOM230c), PDGF (imatinib), EGF (erlotinib) and VEGF (sunitinib and vatalanib). Early results using a targeted approach have been modest at best and are often associated with significant toxicity. Consequently and at present, the brain tumor guidelines recognize only three medical therapies for inoperable and radiation-refractory meningiomas: hydroxyurea, IFN-α and Sandostatin LAR, a somatostatin analogue. Clearly, there remains an unmet need in neuro-oncology with respect to the medical treatment of recurrent meningiomas. PMID:21955199

  13. Butyrate modulates antioxidant enzyme expression in malignant and non-malignant human colon tissues.

    PubMed

    Jahns, Franziska; Wilhelm, Anne; Jablonowski, Nadja; Mothes, Henning; Greulich, Karl Otto; Glei, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The induction of antioxidant enzymes is an important mechanism in colon cancer chemoprevention, but the response of human colon tissue to butyrate, a gut fermentation product derived from dietary fiber, remains largely unknown. Therefore, our study investigated the effect of a butyrate treatment on catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in matched human colon tissues of different transformation stages (n = 3-15 in each group) ex vivo. By performing quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot, and spectrophotometric measurements, we found an increase in SOD2 at expression and activity level in colonic adenocarcinomas (mRNA: 1.96-fold; protein: 1.41-fold, activity: 1.8-fold; P < 0.05). No difference was detectable for CAT between normal, adenoma, and carcinoma colon tissues. Treatment of normal colon epithelium (12 h) with a physiologically relevant concentration of butyrate (10 mM) resulted in a significant increase (P < 0.05) in CAT mRNA (1.24-fold) and protein (1.39-fold), without affecting the enzymatic activity. Consequently, preliminary experiments failed to show any protective effect of butyrate against H2 O2 -mediated DNA damage. Despite a significantly lowered SOD2 transcript (0.51-fold, P < 0.01) and, to a lesser extent, protein level (0.86-fold) after butyrate exposure of normal colon cells, the catalytic activity was significantly enhanced (1.19-fold, P < 0.05), suggesting an increased protection against tissue superoxide radicals. In malignant tissues, greater variations in response to butyrate were observed. Furthermore, both enzymes showed an age-dependent decrease in activity in normal colon epithelium (CAT: r = -0.49, P = 0.09; SOD2: r = -0.58, P = 0.049). In conclusion, butyrate exhibited potential antioxidant features ex vivo but cellular consequences need to be investigated more in depth.

  14. The role of human papilloma virus in urological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Isabel; Borena, Wegene; Pichler, Renate

    2015-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with cancer of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx. However, the role of HPV infection in urological tumors is not yet clarified. HPV appears not to play a major causative role in renal and testicular carcinogenesis. However, HPV infection should be kept in mind regarding cases of prostate cancer, as well as in a sub-group of patients with bladder cancer with squamous differentiation. Concerning the role of HPV in penile cancer incidence, it is a recognized risk factor proven in a large number of studies. This short review provides an update regarding recent literature on HPV in urological malignancies, thereby, also discussing possible limitations on HPV detection in urological cancer.

  15. Distinguishing grade I meningioma from higher grade meningiomas without biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Varlotto, John; Flickinger, John; Pavelic, Martin T.; Specht, Charles S.; Sheehan, Jonas M.; Timek, Dana T.; Glantz, Michael J.; Sogge, Steven; Dimaio, Christopher; Moser, Richard; Yunus, Shakeeb; Fitzgerald, Thomas J.; Upadhyay, Urvashi; Rava, Paul; Tangel, Matthew; Yao, Aaron; Kanekar, Sangam

    2015-01-01

    Background Many meningiomas are identified by imaging and followed, with an assumption that they are WHO Grade I tumors. The purpose of our investigation is to find clinical or imaging predictors of WHO Grade II/III tumors to distinguish them from Grade I meningiomas. Methods Patients with a pathologic diagnosis of meningioma from 2002–2009 were included if they had pre-operative MRI studies and pathology for review. A Neuro-Pathologist reviewed and classified all tumors by WHO 2007. All Brain MRI imaging was reviewed by a Neuro-radiologist. Pathology and Radiology reviews were blinded from each other and clinical course. Recursive partitioning was used to create predictive models for identifying meningioma grades. Results Factors significantly correlating with a diagnosis of WHO Grade II-III tumors in univariate analysis: prior CVA (p = 0.005), CABG (p = 0.010), paresis (p = 0.008), vascularity index = 4/4: (p = 0.009), convexity vs other (p = 0.014), metabolic syndrome (p = 0.025), non-skull base (p = 0.041) and non-postmenopausal female (p = 0.045). Recursive partitioning analysis identified four categories: 1. prior CVA, 2. vascular index (vi) = 4 (no CVA), 3. premenopausal or male, vi < 4, no CVA. 4. Postmenopausal, vi < 4, no CVA with corresponding rates of 73, 54, 35 and 10% of being Grade II-III meningiomas. Conclusions Meningioma patients with prior CVA and those grade 4/4 vascularity are the most likely to have WHO Grade II-III tumors while post-menopausal women without these features are the most likely to have Grade I meningiomas. Further study of the associations of clinical and imaging factors with grade and clinical behavior are needed to better predict behavior of these tumors without biopsy. PMID:26472106

  16. Radiosensitization effect of zidovudine on human malignant glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Fuxiang; Liao Zhengkai; Dai Jing; Xiong Jie; Xie CongHua; Luo Zhiguo; Liu Shiquan; Zhou Yunfeng . E-mail: yfzhouwhu@163.com

    2007-03-09

    Telomeres are shortened with each cell division and play an important role in maintaining chromosomal integrity and function. Telomerase, responsible for telomere synthesis, is activated in 90% of human tumor cells but seldom in normal somatic cells. Zidovudine (AZT) is a reverse transcriptase inhibitor. In this study, we have investigated the effects of {gamma}-radiation in combination with AZT on telomerase activity (TA), telomere length, DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs), DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and the changes in radiosensitivity of human malignant glioma cell line U251. The results showed that the TA was suppressed by AZT but enhanced by irradiation, resulting in a deceleration of restored rate of shortened telomere, decreased repair rate of DNA strand breaks, and increased radiosensitivity of U251 cells. Our results suggested that telomerase activity and telomere length may serve as markers for estimating the efficacy of cancer radiotherapy and reverse transcriptase inhibitors, such as AZT, may be used clinically as a new radiosensitizer in cancer radiotherapy.

  17. RO4929097, Temozolomide, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Malignant Glioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Acoustic Schwannoma; Adult Anaplastic (Malignant) Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Neoplasm; Adult Craniopharyngioma; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade I Meningioma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Myxopapillary Ependymoma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pilocytic Astrocytoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Primary Melanocytic Lesion of Meninges; Adult Subependymal Giant Cell Astrocytoma; Adult Subependymoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Malignant Adult Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma

  18. Malignant transformation of diploid human fibroblasts by transfection of oncogenes

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    This document consist of brief reports prepared by postdoctoral students supported by the project, each describing his accomplishments under the grant. Topics include (1) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1. 1 Cells by Gamma Radiation, (2) Correlation between Levels of ras Expression and Presence of Transformed Phenotypes Including Tumorigenicity, Using a Modulatable Promoter, (3) Relation between Specific rad Oncogene Expression, (4) Correlation of Genetic Changes in Fibroblastic Tumors with Malignancies, (5)Transformation of MSU-1.1 Cells by sis Oncogene, (6) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1.0 Cells, (7) Correlation of Urokinase Plasminogen Activation (mu-PA) with Malignant Phenotype, (8)Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Studies of the Proteins of the Major Cell Strains of the MSU-1 Family of Cells, and (9) Correlation between Proteinase Activity Levels and Malignancy.

  19. Surgical Resectability of Skull Base Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    GOTO, Takeo; OHATA, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in surgical technology such as preoperative imaging, neuro-monitoring, and surgical instruments, the surgical resectability of intracranial meningiomas has increased over the last two decades. This study reviewed clinical articles regarding the surgical treatment of meningiomas to clarify the role of surgical excision, with a focus on skull base meningiomas. We sub-classified clinical articles about skull base meningiomas into two categories (anterior and middle fossa meningiomas; and posterior fossa meningiomas) and reviewed papers in each category. In cases with anterior and middle fossa meningiomas, surgical resectability has reached a sufficient level to maximize functional preservation. In cases of posterior fossa meningioma, however, surgical respectability remains insufficient even with full use of recent surgical modalities. Continuous refining of operative procedures is required to obtain more satisfactory outcomes, especially for posterior fossa meningioma. In addition, recent long-term outcomes of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) were acceptable for controlling the skull base meningiomas. Therefore, combination with surgical excision and SRS should be considered in complicated skull base meningiomas. PMID:27076382

  20. Molecular Genetics of Intracranial Meningiomas with Emphasis on Canonical Wnt Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Lechpammer, Mirna

    2016-01-01

    Research over the last decade recognized the importance of novel molecular pathways in pathogenesis of intracranial meningiomas. In this review, we focus on human brain tumours meningiomas and the involvement of Wnt signalling pathway genes and proteins in this common brain tumour, describing their known functional effects. Meningiomas originate from the meningeal layers of the brain and the spinal cord. Most meningiomas have benign clinical behaviour and are classified as grade I by World Health Organization (WHO). However, up to 20% histologically classified as atypical (grade II) or anaplastic (grade III) are associated with higher recurrent rate and have overall less favourable clinical outcome. Recently, there is emerging evidence that multiple signalling pathways including Wnt pathway contribute to the formation and growth of meningiomas. In the review we present the synopsis on meningioma histopathology and genetics and discuss our research regarding Wnt in meningioma. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a process in which Wnt signalling plays an important role, is shortly discussed. PMID:27429002

  1. Molecular Genetics of Intracranial Meningiomas with Emphasis on Canonical Wnt Signalling.

    PubMed

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Lechpammer, Mirna

    2016-01-01

    Research over the last decade recognized the importance of novel molecular pathways in pathogenesis of intracranial meningiomas. In this review, we focus on human brain tumours meningiomas and the involvement of Wnt signalling pathway genes and proteins in this common brain tumour, describing their known functional effects. Meningiomas originate from the meningeal layers of the brain and the spinal cord. Most meningiomas have benign clinical behaviour and are classified as grade I by World Health Organization (WHO). However, up to 20% histologically classified as atypical (grade II) or anaplastic (grade III) are associated with higher recurrent rate and have overall less favourable clinical outcome. Recently, there is emerging evidence that multiple signalling pathways including Wnt pathway contribute to the formation and growth of meningiomas. In the review we present the synopsis on meningioma histopathology and genetics and discuss our research regarding Wnt in meningioma. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a process in which Wnt signalling plays an important role, is shortly discussed. PMID:27429002

  2. The incidence of multiple meningiomas--do solitary meningiomas exist?

    PubMed

    Borovich, B; Doron, Y; Braun, J; Feinsod, M; Goldsher, D; Gruszkiewicz, J; Guilburd, J N; Zaaroor, M; Levi, L; Soustiel, J F

    1988-01-01

    Since the advent of computed tomography (CT) the recognition of the occurrence of multiple intracranial meningiomas (MIM) in the same individual has been on the increase. In our material the incidence of MIM at first assessment of CT films was 20%, with distant multiplicity prevailing over the regional one. This incidence will probably change in the course of time as MIM develop not only concurrently but also consecutively. On the other hand our surgical macroscopic incidence of regional multiplicity alone was 49%. The discrepancy between the CT and surgical findings prompted us to reevaluate the CT studies of 100 consecutive patients. This reevaluation demonstrated: 1. in two cases, small meningiomas were overlooked at first assessment; 2. nineteen cases of solitary globoid meningiomas seemed to be the consequence of the coalescence of adjacent smaller masses. Thus, the CT incidence of MIM increased to 40%, with regional multiplicity prevailing over the distant one. The authors think that the aforesaid findings question the very existence of solitary meningiomas as a pathological entity. They would be the end product of a coalescence of multiple adjacent smaller growths. Accordingly, a more aggressive surgical approach is suggested to include the resection of a generous fringe of dura mater around the main tumour. As this is not always possible, or too risky, a comprehensive complement to surgery like radiotherapy could be given a reasonable randomized trial.

  3. Favorable Outcomes of Pediatric Patients Treated With Radiotherapy to the Central Nervous System Who Develop Radiation-Induced Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, Thomas J.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Amdur, Robert J.; Swanson, Erika L.; Morris, Christopher G.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report the outcome of patients treated at the University of Florida who developed meningiomas after radiation to the central nervous system (CNS) for childhood cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 10 patients aged {<=}19 years who received radiotherapy to sites in the craniospinal axis and subsequently developed a meningioma. We report the histology of the radiation-induced meningioma, treatment received, and ultimate outcome among this cohort of patients. Results: Meningioma was diagnosed at a median of 23.5 years after completion of the primary radiation. Fifty percent of second meningiomas were World Health Organization Grade 2 (atypical) or higher. All cases were managed with a single modality: resection alone (n = 7), fractionated radiotherapy (n = 2), and stereotactic radiosurgery (n = 1). The actuarial event-free survival and overall survival rate at 5 years after treatment for a radiation-induced meningioma was 89%. Three patients who underwent resection for retreatment experienced a Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusions: Radiation-induced meningiomas after treatment of pediatric CNS tumors are effectively managed with single-modality therapy. Such late-effect data inform the overall therapeutic ratio and support the continued role of selective irradiation in managing pediatric CNS malignancies.

  4. Phase II Trials of Erlotinib or Gefitinib in Patients with Recurrent Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Norden, Andrew D.; Raizer, Jeffrey J.; Abrey, Lauren E.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Lassman, Andrew B.; Chang, Susan M.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Gilbert, Mark R.; Fine, Howard A.; Mehta, Minesh; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Robins, H. Ian; Aldape, Kenneth; Dancey, Janet; Prados, Michael D.; Lieberman, Frank; Wen, Patrick Y.

    2013-01-01

    There are no established treatments for recurrent meningioma when surgical and radiation options are exhausted. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is often over-expressed in meningiomas and may promote tumor growth. In open label, single arm phase II studies of the EGFR inhibitors gefitinib (NABTC 00-01) and erlotinib (NABTC 01-03) for recurrent malignant gliomas, we included exploratory subsets of recurrent meningioma patients. We have pooled the data and report the results here. Patients with recurrent histologically confirmed meningiomas with no more than 2 previous chemotherapy regimens were treated with gefitinib 500 mg/day or erlotinib 150 mg/day until tumor progression or unacceptable toxicity. Twenty-five eligible patients were enrolled with median age 57 years (range 29–81) and median Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score 90 (range 60–100). Sixteen patients (64%) received gefitinib and 9 (36%) erlotinib. Eight patients (32%) had benign tumors, 9 (36%) atypical, and 8 (32%) malignant. For benign tumors, the 6-month progression-free survival (PFS6) was 25%, 12-month PFS (PFS12) 13%, 6-month overall survival (OS6) 63%, and 12-month OS (OS12) 50%. For atypical and malignant tumors, PFS6 was 29%, PFS12 18%, OS6 71%, and OS12 65%. The PFS and OS were not significantly different by histology. There were no objective imaging responses, but 8 patients (32%) maintained stable disease. Although treatment was well-tolerated, neither gefitinib nor erlotinib appear to have significant activity against recurrent meningioma. The role of EGFR inhibitors in meningiomas is unclear. Evaluation of multi-targeted inhibitors and EGFR inhibitors in combination with other targeted molecular agents may be warranted. PMID:19562255

  5. Role of human papillomavirus and its detection in potentially malignant and malignant head and neck lesions: updated review.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Ajay Kumar; Singh, Mamta; Sundaram, Shanthy; Mehrotra, Ravi

    2009-06-25

    Head and neck malignancies are characterized by a multiphasic and multifactorial etiopathogenesis. Tobacco and alcohol consumption are the most common risk factors for head and neck malignancy. Other factors, including DNA viruses, especially human papilloma virus (HPV), may also play a role in the initiation or development of these lesions. The pathways of HPV transmission in the head and neck mucosal lesions include oral-genital contact, more than one sexual partner and perinatal transmission of HPV to the neonatal child. The increase in prevalence of HPV infection in these lesions may be due to wider acceptance of oral sex among teenagers and adults as this is perceived to be a form of safe sex. The prevalence of HPV in benign lesions as well as malignancies has been assessed by many techniques. Among these, the polymerase chain reaction is the most sensitive method. Review of literature reveals that HPV may be a risk factor for malignancies, but not in all cases. For confirmation of the role of HPV in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, large population studies are necessary in an assortment of clinical settings. Prophylactic vaccination against high-risk HPV types eventually may prevent a significant number of cervical carcinomas. Of the two vaccines currently available, Gardasil (Merck & Co., Inc.) protects against HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18, while the other vaccine, Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline, Rixensart, Belgium) protects against HPV types 16 and 18 only. However, the HPV vaccine has, to the best of our knowledge, not been tried in head and neck carcinoma. The role of HPV in etiopathogenesis, prevalence in benign and malignant lesions of this area and vaccination strategies are briefly reviewed here.

  6. Metastatic meningioma: The role of whole‑body diffusion-weighted imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cabada, Teresa; Bermejo, Rebeca; Bacaicoa, Carmen; Martínez-Peñuela, Ana

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 74-year-old male patient with a completely resected anaplastic meningioma who developed multiple metastases two years later (subcutaneous tissue near the surgical area, cervical lymph nodes, lung, pleura and bones). The primary tumor and all of the metastases showed a significant restricted diffusion. Whole‑body diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed for assessment of the metastases. This case demonstrated the usefulness of this technique in screening extracranial metastases in patients with malignant meningiomas. PMID:22866153

  7. A high-throughput kinome screen reveals serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 as a therapeutic target for NF2-deficient meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Roberta L.; James, Marianne F.; DeSouza, Patrick A.; Wagh, Vilas; Zhao, Wen-Ning; Jordan, Justin T.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Plotkin, Scott R.; Gusella, James F.; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Ramesh, Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common primary intracranial adult tumor. All Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2)-associated meningiomas and ~60% of sporadic meningiomas show loss of NF2 tumor suppressor protein. There are no effective medical therapies for progressive and recurrent meningiomas. Our previous work demonstrated aberrant activation of mTORC1 signaling that led to ongoing clinical trials with rapamycin analogs for NF2 and sporadic meningioma patients. Here we performed a high-throughput kinome screen to identify kinases responsible for mTORC1 pathway activation in NF2-deficient meningioma cells. Among the emerging top candidates were the mTORC2-specific target serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (SGK1) and p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1). In NF2-deficient meningioma cells, inhibition of SGK1 rescues mTORC1 activation, and SGK1 activation is sensitive to dual mTORC1/2 inhibitor AZD2014, but not to rapamycin. PAK1 inhibition also leads to attenuated mTORC1 but not mTORC2 signaling, suggesting that mTORC2/SGK1 and Rac1/PAK1 pathways are independently responsible for mTORC1 activation in NF2-deficient meningiomas. Using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, we generated isogenic human arachnoidal cell lines (ACs), the origin cell type for meningiomas, expressing or lacking NF2. NF2-null CRISPR ACs recapitulate the signaling of NF2-deficient meningioma cells. Interestingly, we observe increased SGK1 transcription and protein expression in NF2-CRISPR ACs and in primary NF2-negative meningioma lines. Moreover, we demonstrate that the dual mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitor, AZD2014 is superior to rapamycin and PAK inhibitor FRAX597 in blocking proliferation of meningioma cells. Importantly, AZD2014 is currently in use in several clinical trials of cancer. Therefore, we believe that AZD2014 may provide therapeutic advantage over rapalogs for recurrent and progressive meningiomas. PMID:26219339

  8. Recurrence of meningiomas versus proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positivity and AgNOR counting.

    PubMed

    Demirtaş, E; Yilmaz, F; Ovül, I; Oner, K

    1996-01-01

    Meningiomas have a wide range of biological potential and clinical behaviour. Histological findings are helpful in recognizing the malignant potential but often fail to correlate with clinical behaviour. This study attempts to correlate the silver nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) with clinicopathological features of biological activity. Thirty-four completely resected meningiomas were classified as benign [19], atypical [6] and malignant [9]. Forty-eight initial and recurrent tumour materials were investigated for staining of AgNORs and immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies against PCNA (clone 19A2 and PC10). There were no difference between the recurrent and non-recurrent cases with regards to AgNOR, PC10 and 19A2 values. Also, no significant difference was found between the primary and recurrent tumours. Both PC10 and 19A2 labelling indices (LI) showed a significant difference between benign and malignant meningiomas. The 19A2 LI was 0.56 +/- 0.21 in benign and 2.45 +/- 16 in atypical meningiomas. The 19 A2 counts showed significant difference between benign and atypical tumours but PC10 values failed to show such a correlation AgNOR and PCNA indices were not found to be useful in predicting recurrences compared to the surgical procedure and histopathological criteria.

  9. Loss of p53 expression is accompanied by upregulation of beta-catenin in meningiomas: a concomitant reciprocal expression.

    PubMed

    Pećina-Šlaus, Nives; Kafka, Anja; Vladušić, Tomislav; Tomas, Davor; Logara, Monika; Skoko, Josip; Hrašćan, Reno

    2016-04-01

    Crosstalk between Wnt and p53 signalling pathways in cancer has long been suggested. Therefore in this study we have investigated the involvement of these pathways in meningiomas by analysing their main effector molecules, beta-catenin and p53. Cellular expression of p53 and beta-catenin proteins and genetic changes in TP53 were analysed by immunohistochemistry, PCR/RFLP and direct sequencing of TP53 exon 4. All the findings were analysed statistically. Our analysis showed that 47.5% of the 59 meningiomas demonstrated loss of expression of p53 protein. Moderate and strong p53 expression in the nuclei was observed in 8.5% and 6.8% of meningiomas respectively. Gross deletion of TP53 gene was observed in one meningioma, but nucleotide alterations were observed in 35.7% of meningiomas. In contrast, beta-catenin, the main Wnt signalling molecule, was upregulated in 71.2%, while strong expression was observed in 28.8% of meningiomas. The concomitant expressions of p53 and beta-catenin were investigated in the same patients. In the analysed meningiomas, the levels of the two proteins were significantly negatively correlated (P = 0.002). This indicates that meningiomas with lost p53 upregulate beta-catenin and activate Wnt signalling. Besides showing the reciprocal relationship between proteins, we also showed that the expression of p53 was significantly (P = 0.021) associated with higher meningioma grades (II and III), while beta-catenin upregulation was not associated with malignancy grades. Additionally, women exhibited significantly higher values of p53 loss when compared to males (P = 0.005). Our findings provide novel information about p53 involvement in meningeal brain tumours and reveal the complex relationship between Wnt and p53 signalling, they suggest an important role for beta-catenin in these tumours.

  10. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

    1988-04-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature.

  11. Management of pregnant female with meningioma for craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Sandeep; Lata, Indu; Gupta, Devendra

    2010-01-01

    Intracranial meningioma during pregnancy challenges the skill of obstetricians, neurosurgeons and neuroanesthesiologists in resection of the tumor and to secure delivery of the baby. Advances in fetal and maternal monitoring, neuroanesthesia, and microsurgical techniques allow safe neurosurgical management of these patients. Urgent neurosurgical intervention is reserved for the management of malignancies, active hydrocephalus, and benign brain tumors associated with signs of impending herniation or progressive neurological deficit. Particular attention is given to maintain stable maternal hemodynamics to avoid uterine hypo perfusion and fetal hypoxia intraoperatively. Therefore, the major challenge of neuroanesthesia during pregnancy is to provide an appropriate balance between competing, and even contradictory, clinical goals of neuroanesthesiology and obstetric practice. PMID:21799618

  12. AN UNUSUAL PRESENTATION OF HUGE MENINGIOMA EXTRUDING OUT OF SKULL.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Mirza Faisal Ahmed; Khaleeq-uz-Zaman; Ibrahima, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Scalp masses are commonly seen in clinical practice. They range from simple sebaceous cyst to malignant neoplasms. Clinical presentation is straight forward in most of the cases. Simple subcutaneous swelling till erosion of scalp and skull all can occur. However very few intracranial masses present with exophytic scalp swelling. This is because they have to erode dura, thick skull bone and all the layers of scalp to appear out on scalp. It is very unusual that an intracranial mass present like a scalp swelling. Some of the intracranial masses have tendency to erode skull. Dermoid & meningioma are among the most common. PMID:27323599

  13. Primary intraosseous meningioma: CT and MRI appearance.

    PubMed

    Tokgoz, Nil; Oner, Yusuf A; Kaymaz, Memduh; Ucar, Murat; Yilmaz, Guldal; Tali, Turgut E

    2005-09-01

    Benign primary intraosseous meningioma presenting with osteolytic skull lesion and soft-tissue component is rare. CT and MR imaging of a patient with frontoparietal scalp swelling showed an osteolytic intracalvarial lesion with an extradural soft-tissue component. Following wide surgical resection, the histological examination revealed an intraosseous chordoid meningioma. The clinical and radiological findings of primary intraosseous meningioma are discussed and the relevant literature is reviewed.

  14. Incidental Meningiomas: Management in the Neuroimaging Era.

    PubMed

    Spasic, Marko; Pelargos, Panayiotis E; Barnette, Natalie; Bhatt, Nikhilesh S; Lee, Seung James; Ung, Nolan; Gopen, Quinton; Yang, Isaac

    2016-04-01

    The number of patient imaging studies has increased because of precautious physicians ordering scans when a vague symptom is presented; subsequently, the number of incidental meningiomas detected has increased as well. These brain tumors do not present with related symptoms and are usually small. MRI and computed tomographic scans most frequently capture incidental meningiomas. Incidental meningiomas are managed with observation, radiation, and surgical resection. Ultimately, a conservative approach is recommended, such as observing an incidental meningioma and then only radiating if the tumor displays growth, whereas a surgical approach is to be used only when proven necessary. PMID:27012387

  15. Phenotypic characterization of telomerase-immortalized primary non-malignant and malignant tumor-derived human prostate epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Yongpeng; Li Hongzhen; Miki, Jun; Kim, Kee-Hong; Furusato, Bungo; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Chu, Wei-Sing; McLeod, David G.; Srivastava, Shiv; Ewing, Charles M.; Isaacs, William B.; Rhim, Johng S. . E-mail: jrhim@cpdr.org

    2006-04-01

    In vitro human prostate cell culture models are critical for clarifying the mechanism of prostate cancer progression and for testing preventive and therapeutic agents. Cell lines ideal for the study of human primary prostate tumors would be those derived from spontaneously immortalized tumor cells; unfortunately, explanted primary prostate cells survive only short-term in culture, and rarely immortalize spontaneously. Therefore, we recently have generated five immortal human prostate epithelial cell cultures derived from both the benign and malignant tissues of prostate cancer patients with telomerase, a gene that prevents cellular senescence. Examination of these cell lines for their morphologies and proliferative capacities, their abilities to grow in low serum, to respond to androgen stimulation, to grow above the agar layer, to form tumors in SCID mice, suggests that they may serve as valid, useful tools for the elucidation of early events in prostate tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the chromosome alterations observed in these immortalized cell lines expressing aspects of the malignant phenotypes imply that these cell lines accurately recapitulate the genetic composition of primary tumors. These novel in vitro models may offer unique models for the study of prostate carcinogenesis and also provide the means for testing both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents.

  16. Transcriptomic analysis of aggressive meningiomas identifies PTTG1 and LEPR as prognostic biomarkers independent of WHO grade

    PubMed Central

    Jungk, Christine; Sahm, Felix; Ull, Anna Theresa; Warta, Rolf; Lamszus, Katrin; Gousias, Konstantinos; Ketter, Ralf; Roesch, Saskia; Rapp, Carmen; Schefzyk, Sebastian; Urbschat, Steffi; Lahrmann, Bernd; Kessler, Almuth F.; Löhr, Mario; Senft, Christian; Grabe, Niels; Reuss, David; Beckhove, Philipp; Westphal, Manfred; von Deimling, Andreas; Unterberg, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are frequent central nervous system tumors. Although most meningiomas are benign (WHO grade I) and curable by surgery, WHO grade II and III tumors remain therapeutically challenging due to frequent recurrence. Interestingly, relapse also occurs in some WHO grade I meningiomas. Hence, we investigated the transcriptional features defining aggressive (recurrent, malignantly progressing or WHO grade III) meningiomas in 144 cases. Meningiomas were categorized into non-recurrent (NR), recurrent (R), and tumors undergoing malignant progression (M) in addition to their WHO grade. Unsupervised transcriptomic analysis in 62 meningiomas revealed transcriptional profiles lining up according to WHO grade and clinical subgroup. Notably aggressive subgroups (R+M tumors and WHO grade III) shared a large set of differentially expressed genes (n=332; p<0.01, FC>1.25). In an independent multicenter validation set (n=82), differential expression of 10 genes between WHO grades was confirmed. Additionally, among WHO grade I tumors differential expression between NR and aggressive R+M tumors was affirmed for PTTG1, AURKB, ECT2, UBE2C and PRC1, while MN1 and LEPR discriminated between NR and R+M WHO grade II tumors. Univariate survival analysis revealed a significant association with progression-free survival for PTTG1, LEPR, MN1, ECT2, PRC1, COX10, UBE2C expression, while multivariate analysis identified a prediction for PTTG1 and LEPR mRNA expression independent of gender, WHO grade and extent of resection. Finally, stainings of PTTG1 and LEPR confirmed malignancy-associated protein expression changes. In conclusion, based on the so far largest study sample of WHO grade III and recurrent meningiomas we report a comprehensive transcriptional landscape and two prognostic markers. PMID:26894859

  17. Pleiotropic roles of Notch signaling in normal, malignant, and developmental hematopoiesis in the human

    PubMed Central

    Kushwah, Rahul; Guezguez, Borhane; Lee, Jung Bok; Hopkins, Claudia I; Bhatia, Mickie

    2014-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is evolutionarily conserved across species and plays an important role in regulating cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. It has been implicated in several different hematopoietic processes including early hematopoietic development as well as adult hematological malignancies in humans. This review focuses on recent developments in understanding the role of Notch signaling in the human hematopoietic system with an emphasis on hematopoietic initiation from human pluripotent stem cells and regulation within the bone marrow. Based on recent insights, we summarize potential strategies for treatment of human hematological malignancies toward the concept of targeting Notch signaling for fate regulation. PMID:25252682

  18. Oncolytic virotherapy for human malignant mesothelioma: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Boisgerault, Nicolas; Achard, Carole; Delaunay, Tiphaine; Cellerin, Laurent; Tangy, Frédéric; Grégoire, Marc; Fonteneau, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Cancer virotherapy is an attractive alternative to conventional treatments because it offers a wide range of antitumor effects due to 1) the diversity of the oncolytic viruses that are now available and 2) their multifaceted activities against both tumor cells and tumor vessels, in addition to their ability to induce antitumor immune responses. In this review, we summarize preclinical and clinical data regarding the targeting of malignant mesothelioma (MM) by oncolytic viruses. We also discuss the potential of other oncolytic viruses that have already shown antitumor effects against several malignancies in advanced clinical trials but are yet to be tested against MM cells. Finally, we review how the activation of the immune system and combinations with other types of anticancer treatments could support the development of oncolytic virotherapy for the treatment of MM. PMID:27512676

  19. AR42, a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, as a potential therapy for vestibular schwannomas and meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Matthew L.; Oblinger, Janet; Brendel, Victoria; Santarelli, Griffin; Huang, Jie; Akhmametyeva, Elena M.; Burns, Sarah S.; Wheeler, Justin; Davis, Jeremy; Yates, Charles W.; Chaudhury, Abhik R.; Kulp, Samuel; Chen, Ching-Shih; Chang, Long-Sheng; Welling, D. Bradley; Jacob, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is an autosomal-dominant disease that results in the formation of bilateral vestibular schwannomas (VSs) and multiple meningiomas. Treatment options for NF2-associated tumors are limited, and to date, no medical therapies are FDA approved. The ideal chemotherapeutic agent would inhibit both VS and meningiomas simultaneously. The objectives of this study are (1) to test the efficacy of AR42, a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, to inhibit VS and meningioma growth and (2) to investigate this drug's mechanisms of action. Primary cultures of human VS and meningioma cells were established. Nf2-deficient mouse schwannoma and benign human meningioma Ben-Men-1 cells were also cultured. Cells were treated with AR42, and the drug's effects on proliferation and the cell cycle were analyzed using a methanethiosulfonate assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Human phospho-kinase arrays and Western blots were used to evaluate the effects of AR42 on intracellular signaling. The in vivo efficacy of AR42 was investigated using schwannoma xenografts. Tumor volumes were quantified using high-field, volumetric MRI, and molecular target analysis was performed using immunohistochemistry. AR42 inhibited the growth of primary human VS and Nf2-deficient mouse schwannoma cells with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 500 nM and 250–350 nM, respectively. AR42 also inhibited primary meningioma cells and the benign meningioma cell line, Ben-Men-1, with IC50 values of 1.5 µM and 1.0 µM, respectively. AR42 treatment induced cell-cycle arrest at G2 and apoptosis in both VS and meningioma cells. Also, AR42 exposure decreased phosphorylated Akt in schwannoma and meningioma cells. In vivo treatment with AR42 inhibited the growth of schwannoma xenografts, induced apoptosis, and decreased Akt activation. The potent growth inhibitory activity of AR42 in schwannoma and meningioma cells suggests that AR42 should be further evaluated as a potential

  20. Malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients in India: Initial experience in the HAART era

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Surendra K.; Soneja, Manish; Ranjan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Limited data are available on malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients from India. We undertook this study to assess the frequency and spectrum of malignancies in HIV-infected adult patients during the first eight years of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) rollout under the National ART Programme at a tertiary care centre in New Delhi, India. Methods: Retrospective analysis of records of patients registered at the ART clinic between May 2005 and December 2013 was done. Results: The study included 2598 HIV-infected adult patients with 8315 person-years of follow up. Malignancies were diagnosed in 26 patients with a rate of 3.1 (IQR 2.1-4.5) cases per 1000 person-years. The median age for those diagnosed with malignancy was 45 (IQR 36-54) yr, which was significantly (P<0.01) higher compared with those not developing malignancies 35 (IQR 30-40) yr. The median baseline CD4+ T-cell count in patients with malignancy was 135 (IQR 68-269) cells/µl compared to 164 (IQR 86-243) cells/µl in those without malignancies. AIDS-defining cancers (ADCs) were seen in 19 (73%) patients, while non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADCs) were observed in seven (27%) patients. Malignancies diagnosed included non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (16), carcinoma cervix (3), Hodgkin's lymphoma (2), carcinoma lung (2), hepatocellular carcinoma (1), and urinary bladder carcinoma (1). One patient had primary central nervous system lymphoma. There was no case of Kaposi's sarcoma. Interpretation & conclusions: Malignancies in HIV-infected adult patients were infrequent in patients attending the clinic. Majority of the patients presented with advanced immunosuppression and the ADCs, NHL in particular, were the commonest malignancies. PMID:26658591

  1. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yingbin; Cai, Shaoxi; Yang, Li; Yu, Shuhui; Jiang, Jiahuan; Yan, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Haoxing; Liu, Lan; Liu, Qun; Du, Jun; Cai, Shaohui; Sung, K.L. Paul

    2010-12-10

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  2. Cell-mediated immune response of patients with meningiomas defined in vitro by a [3H]proline microcytotoxicity test.

    PubMed Central

    Pees, H W; Seidel, B

    1976-01-01

    Cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CTX) of meningioma patients was assessed postoperatively by a [3H]proline microcytotoxicity test. Autologous and allogeneic tumour cells were used for prelabelling with isotope and peripheral blood lymphocytes added in a ratio of 200:1. After 60 hg the plates were washed and residual CMP counted. Control target cells consisted of normal skin fibroblasts. CTX was calculated in percentage reduction compared to cultures incubated with control lymphocytes. Specific CTX on meningioma cells (i.e. not destroying control cells) greater than 20% was considered 'positive' if significant at P less than 0-05. Fifteen of twenty-three meningiomas showed specific CTX (65%). Among eight CNS tumours of different type and thirteen non-malignant diseases and normals only three (14%) were specifically cytotoxic for meningioma cells. A cross-reaction could be demonstrated between autologous and allogeneic meningioma target cells. However, no activity of lymphocytes from patients with meningiomas on glioblastoma cells and foetal brain tissue could be found at the ratio used for evaluation. Evidence is presented indicating that a cellular immune response as measured in the microcytotoxic test may be dependent on a residual or recurrent tumour in the body. PMID:1277580

  3. CHIP: A new modulator of human malignant disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qianqian; Yang, Gang; Zheng, Lianfang; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) is known as a chaperone-associated E3 for a variety of protein substrates. It acts as a link between molecular chaperones and ubiquitin–proteasome system. Involved in the process of protein clearance, CHIP plays a critical role in maintaining protein homeostasis in diverse conditions. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of our current understanding of CHIP and summarize recent advances in CHIP biology, with a focus on CHIP in the setting of malignancies. PMID:27007160

  4. CHIP: A new modulator of human malignant disorders.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhe; Li, Guanqiao; Shao, Qianqian; Yang, Gang; Zheng, Lianfang; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-05-17

    Carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) is known as a chaperone-associated E3 for a variety of protein substrates. It acts as a link between molecular chaperones and ubiquitin-proteasome system. Involved in the process of protein clearance, CHIP plays a critical role in maintaining protein homeostasis in diverse conditions. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of our current understanding of CHIP and summarize recent advances in CHIP biology, with a focus on CHIP in the setting of malignancies.

  5. Malignant Potential of Murine Stromal Cells after Transplantation of Human Tumors into Nude Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenberg, David M.; Pavia, Rose A.

    1981-04-01

    Human malignant cancer tumors grafted into nude mice produce tumors containing both human cancer cells and the host's stromal cells. After short-term propagation of these tumors in vitro, the murine mesenchymal cells appear transformed and are tumorigenic in nude mice. However, established human cancer cell lines fail to similarly alter adjacent murine stromal cells when used to produce tumors in nude mice. These experiments suggest that cancer cells may recruit normal cells to become malignant, qualifying the view of the clonal (unicellular) origin of cancer.

  6. Extracranial sinonasal tract meningioma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Serry, P; Rombaux, Ph; Ledeghen, S; Collet, S; Eloy, Ph; Hamoir, M; Bertrand, B

    2004-01-01

    Extracranial meningioma is an unusual tumor, mainly found in the head and neck area. Before surgical removal and histopathological examination, this diagnosis is rarely considered. We report a case of an extracranial meningioma located in the frontal sinuses of a 65-year-old-woman. Symptomatology included trouble of vision due to bilateral exophtalmos and mild headaches. Bilateral exophtalmos was secondary to the development of huge frontal mucoceles. These mucoceles grew slowly due to the frontal recesses blockage by the extracranial meningioma. External approach was performed with removal of the mucocele walls and of the extracranial meningioma itself. The frontal recesses were blocked with synthetic cement, and orbital roofs were reconstructed with a polydioxanon-sheet (PDS). Frontal sinuses were excluded and filled with bone bank grafts. A review of the literature on extracranial meningioma and a discussion about the surgical management of this case are proposed in this paper.

  7. Cancer procoagulant (CP) analysis in human WM 115 malignant melanoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kaplinska, Katarzyna; Rozalski, Marek; Krajewska, Urszula; Mielicki, Wojciech P

    2009-07-01

    Neoplastic cells produce procoagulants responsible for hypercoagulation states frequently observed in cancer patients. It is accepted that two major procoagulants from malignant tissue are tissue factor (TF) and a direct activator of coagulation factor X called cancer procoagulant (CP). Direct factor X-activating activity of cultured human malignant melanoma WM 115 cells has been analyzed in the cell extracts, whole cells and in the medium after the cell culture. The factor X-activating activity was detected in the malignant cell lysates but not in the cultured medium or intact malignant cells. The lysates contained no TF as determined by Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using anti-TF monoclonal antibody. The enzymatic characteristics of the activity was typical for CP. The results suggest that cancer procoagulant is an intracellular protein.

  8. Granulofilamentous inclusions in a meningioma.

    PubMed

    Goldman, J E; Horoupian, D S; Johnson, A B

    1980-07-01

    We have studied the histology, immunocytochemistry, and ultrastructure of a syncytial meningioma which contained the unusual feature of large eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusions. Electron microscopic examination revealed that these bodies were granular, osmiophilic masses, closely associated with cytoplasmic filaments of intermediate size. Desmosomal junctions with a somewhat abnormal morphology were also observed, and the possible relationship between the inclusions and the dense components of desmosomes is discussed. This tumor is also compared to other tumors of the central nervous system with hyaline and granulofilamentous inclusions.

  9. SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling and human malignancies.

    PubMed

    Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Bièche, Ivan; Guinebretière, Jean-Marc; Bourdeaut, Franck; Delattre, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The SWI/SNF complexes, initially identified in yeast 20 years ago, are a family of multi-subunit complexes that use the energy of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis to remodel nucleosomes. Chromatin remodeling processes mediated by the SWI/SNF complexes are critical to the modulation of gene expression across a variety of cellular processes, including stemness, differentiation, and proliferation. The first evidence of the involvement of these complexes in carcinogenesis was provided by the identification of biallelic, truncating mutations of the SMARCB1 gene in malignant rhabdoid tumors, a highly aggressive childhood cancer. Subsequently, genome-wide sequencing technologies have identified mutations in genes encoding different subunits of the SWI/SNF complexes in a large number of tumors. SWI/SNF mutations, and the subsequent abnormal function of SWI/SNF complexes, are among the most frequent gene alterations in cancer. The mechanisms by which perturbation of the SWI/SNF complexes promote oncogenesis are not fully elucidated; however, alterations of SWI/SNF genes obviously play a major part in cancer development, progression, and/or resistance to therapy.

  10. Primary leptomeningeal melanoma of the cervical spine mimicking a meningioma-a case report.

    PubMed

    Marx, Sascha; Fleck, Steffen K; Manwaring, Jotham; Vogelgesang, Silke; Langner, Soenke; Schroeder, Henry W S

    2014-08-01

    Background and Importance Primary leptomeningeal melanoma (PLM) is highly malignant and exceedingly rare. Due to its rarity, diagnostic and treatment paradigms have been slow to evolve. We report the first case of a PLM that mimics a cervical spine meningioma and then discuss the current clinical, radiologic, and pathologic diagnostic methodologies as well as expected outcomes related to this disease. Clinical Presentation A 54-year-old woman presented a dural-based extramedullary solid mass ventral to the C2-C3 spinal cord causing spinal cord compression without cord signal changes, characteristic of meningioma. Intraoperative microscopic inspection revealed numerous black spots littering the surface of the dura; the tumor itself was yellow in appearance and had a soft consistency. Pathologic analysis of the specimen revealed a malignant melanin-containing tumor. No primary site was found, so a diagnosis of primary leptomeningeal melanoma was made, and the patient subsequently received interferon therapy. To date (2 years postoperatively), no local or systemic recurrence of the tumor has been identified. Conclusion As with most rare tumors, case reports constitute the vast majority of references to PLM. Only an increased awareness and an extensive report of each individual case can help diagnose and clarify the nature of PLM. Clinicians need to be aware of such malignant conditions when diagnosing benign tumoral lesions of the spine such as meningiomas.

  11. Meningioma of the Posterior Skull Base

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Michael Thomas; Fagan, Paul A.; Sheehy, John P.R.; Bentivoglio, Peter J.; Doust, Bruce D.; Tonkin, John

    1991-01-01

    Combined intratemporal and cerebellopontine angle meningiomas are rejatively rare. There are unsolved problems with the stability of the skull and spine and the lower cranial nerves and there is a marked tendency for the tumor to involve the spinal cord. This article reports on five cases of combined intratemporal and cerebellopontine angle meningiomas. ImagesFigure 1p44-bFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17170820

  12. Extradural spinal meningioma: Revisiting a rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Bettaswamy, Guruprasad; Ambesh, Paurush; Das, Kuntal Kanti; Sahu, Rabi; Srivastava, Arun; Mehrotra, Anant; Jaiswal, Awadhesh; Jaiswal, Sushila; Behari, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Spinal meningiomas are mostly intradural in location although at times these are associated with some extradural extensions. Purely extradural spinal meningiomas (EDSMs) are however, extremely rare and when present, may cause diagnostic dilemma preoperatively. Only seven cases of pure EDSM have been reported till date. In this paper, we describe two cases of EDSM affecting the cervical spine and present their clinical profiles, radiological findings, operative management, and follow-up data, along with a review of the literature. PMID:27041890

  13. Zebrafish as a Model for the Study of Human Myeloid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jeng-Wei; Hsieh, Meng-Shan; Liao, Heng-An; Yang, Yi-Ju; Ho, Yi-Jung; Lin, Liang-In

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid malignancies are heterogeneous disorders characterized by uncontrolled proliferation or/and blockage of differentiation of myeloid progenitor cells. Although a substantial number of gene alterations have been identified, the mechanism by which these abnormalities interact has yet to be elucidated. Over the past decades, zebrafish have become an important model organism, especially in biomedical research. Several zebrafish models have been developed to recapitulate the characteristics of specific myeloid malignancies that provide novel insight into the pathogenesis of these diseases and allow the evaluation of novel small molecule drugs. This report will focus on illustrative examples of applications of zebrafish models, including transgenesis, zebrafish xenograft models, and cell transplantation approaches, to the study of human myeloid malignancies. PMID:26064935

  14. [Meningiomas: anatomical pathology and molecular biology].

    PubMed

    Bekiashev, A Kh; Korshunov, A G; Cherekaev, V A

    2007-01-01

    In the past 5-10 years, there has been a considerable progress the understanding of the biology of meningioma. The most important advances have been made by comprehensive studies of the pathogenesis of meningioma in molecular genetics. Several target genes could be identified for mutation or inactivation. Additional chromosomal regions that are usually subject to deletion or amplification and point to the presence of tumor suppressor genes or proto-oncogenes were found. The revised and updated 2000 WHO Classification is a major innovation in the histopathology of meningiomas. The new classification system more precisely and objectively determines the grade of meningioma, which allows one to more logically make a prognosis of the recurrence and aggressive behavior of the tumor. The present overview places particular emphasis on recent advances in its molecular biology. It summarizes the most important aspects of the classification of meningiomas, which makes it possible to include the results of biological observations into the respective context, and also considers the mechanisms of angiogenesis and edema development and the role of hormonal receptors in meningiomas.

  15. Atypical Growth Pattern of an Intraparenchymal Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoxi

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common primary nonneuroglial extra-axial neoplasms, which commonly present as spherical or oval masses with a dural attachment. Meningiomas without dural attachment are rare and, according to their locations, are classified into 5 varieties, including intraventricular, deep Sylvain fissure, pineal region, intraparenchymal, or subcortical meningiomas. To the best of our knowledge, intraparenchymal meningioma with cerebriform pattern has never been reported. In this paper, we report a 34-year-old Chinese male patient who presented with paroxysmal headaches and progressive loss of vision for 10 months and blindness for 2 weeks. A thorough physical examination revealed loss of bilateral direct and indirect light reflex. No other relevant medical history and neurologic deficits were noted. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans showed an irregular mass with a unique cerebriform pattern and extensive peritumoral edema in the parietal-occipital-temporal region of the right cerebral hemisphere. The initial diagnosis was lymphoma. Intraoperatively, the tumor was completely buried in a sulcus in the parietal-occipital-temporal region without connecting to the dura. The histological diagnosis was intracranial meningioma based on pathological examination. Therefore, when an unusual cerebriform growth pattern of a tumor is encountered, an intraparenchymal meningioma should be considered as a differential diagnosis. PMID:27752384

  16. CDK4 coexpression with Ras generates malignant human epidermal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Lazarov, Mirella; Kubo, Yoshiaki; Cai, Ti; Dajee, Maya; Tarutani, Masahito; Lin, Qun; Fang, Min; Tao, Shiying; Green, Cheryl L; Khavari, Paul A

    2002-10-01

    Ras acts with other proteins to induce neoplasia. By itself, however, strong Ras signaling can suppress proliferation of normal cells. In primary epidermal cells, we found that oncogenic Ras transiently decreases cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 expression in association with cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. CDK4 co-expression circumvents Ras growth suppression and induces invasive human neoplasia resembling squamous cell carcinoma. Tumorigenesis is dependent on CDK4 kinase function, with cyclin D1 required but not sufficient for this process. In facilitating escape from G1 growth restraints, Ras and CDK4 alter the composition of cyclin D and cyclin E complexes and promote resistance to growth inhibition by INK4 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. These data identify a new role for oncogenic Ras in CDK4 regulation and highlight the functional importance of CDK4 suppression in preventing uncontrolled growth.

  17. Phase II study of imatinib mesylate for recurrent meningiomas (North American Brain Tumor Consortium study 01–08)

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Patrick Y.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Norden, Andrew D.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Abrey, Lauren E.; Fine, Howard A.; Chang, Susan M.; Robins, H. Ian; Fink, Karen; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Mehta, Minesh; Di Tomaso, Emmanuelle; Drappatz, Jan; Kesari, Santosh; Ligon, Keith L.; Aldape, Ken; Jain, Rakesh K.; Stiles, Charles D.; Egorin, Merrill J.; Prados, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and its receptors (PDGFR) are frequently coexpressed in meningiomas, potentially contributing to their pathogenesis. The North American Brain Tumor Consortium conducted a phase II study to evaluate the therapeutic potential of imatinib mesylate (Gleevec), a PDGFR inhibitor, in patients with recurrent meningiomas. Patients were stratified into benign (WHO grade I) meningiomas or atypical (WHO grade II) and malignant (WHO grade III) meningiomas. The primary end point was 6-month progression-free survival (6M-PFS). Patients requiring enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs were ineligible. Patients received imatinib at a dose of 600 mg/day for the first 4-week cycle and then gradually increased to 800 mg/day for subsequent cycles, if there were no unacceptable toxicities. Plasma concentrations of imatinib and its active metabolite, CGP74588, were assessed. Twenty-three heavily pre-treated patients were enrolled into the study (13 benign, 5 atypical, and 5 malignant meningiomas), of whom 22 were eligible. The study was closed prematurely due to slow accrual. Tissue was available only from a minority of patients, but in these specimens there was uniform distribution of PDGFR, the drug target. Imatinib was generally well tolerated. Of 19 patients evaluable for response, 10 progressed at the first scan, and 9 were stable. There were no complete or partial responses. Overall median PFS was 2 months (range, 0.7–34 months); 6M-PFS was 29.4%. For benign meningiomas, median PFS was 3 months (range, 1.1–34 months); 6M-PFS was 45%. For atypical and malignant meningiomas, median PFS was 2 months (range, 0.7–3.7 months); 6M-PFS was 0%. Cycle 1 trough concentrations of imatinib and CGP74588 were 2,129 ± 1,600 ng/ml and 517 ± 326 ng/ml, respectively. Single-agent imatinib was well tolerated but had no significant activity in recurrent meningiomas. Trough plasma concentrations of imatinib exceeded those associated with imatinib activity in

  18. Meningiomas with Rhabdoid or Papillary Components : Prognosis and Comparison with Anaplastic Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Kwon; Jung, Shin; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Seul-Kee; Lee, Eun Jung

    2016-01-01

    Papillary and rhabdoid meningiomas are pathologically World Health Organization (WHO) grade III. Any correlation between clinical prognosis and pathologic component is not clear. We analyzed the prognoses of patients with meningiomas with a rhabdoid or papillary component compared to those of patients with anaplastic meningiomas. From 1994 to June 2013, 14 anaplastic meningiomas, 6 meningiomas with a rhabdoid component, and 5 meningiomas with papillary component were pathologically diagnosed. We analyzed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, extent of removal, adjuvant treatment, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and pathologic features of 14 anaplastic meningiomas (group A), 5 meningiomas with a predominant (≥50%) papillary or rhabdoid component (group B1), and 6 meningiomas without a predominant (<50%) rhabdoid or papillary component (group B2). Homogeneous enhancement on MRI was associated with improved PFS compared to heterogeneous enhancement (p=0.025). Depending on pathology, the mean PFS was 134.9±31.6 months for group A, 46.6±13.4 months for group B1, and 118.7±19.2 months for group B2. The mean OS was 138.5±24.6 months for group A and 59.7±16.8 months for group B1. All recurrent tumors were of the previously diagnosed pathology, except for one tumor from group B1, which recurred as an atypical meningioma without a papillary component. Group B1 tumors showed a more aggressive behavior than group B2 tumors. In group B2 cases, the pathologic findings of non-rhabdoid/papillary portion could be considered for further adjuvant treatment. PMID:27446516

  19. Selective induction of apoptosis through the FADD/caspase-8 pathway by a p53 c-terminal peptide in human pre-malignant and malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yin; Mao, Yuehua; Rosal, Ramon V; Dinnen, Richard D; Williams, Ann C; Brandt-Rauf, Paul W; Fine, Robert L

    2005-05-20

    A p53 C-terminal peptide (aa 361-382, p53p), fused at its C-terminus to the minimal carrier peptide of antennapedia (17 aa, Ant; p53p-Ant), induced rapid apoptosis in human cancer cells, via activation of the Fas pathway. We examined p53p-Ant mechanism of action, toxicity in various human normal, non-malignant, pre-malignant and malignant cancer cells and investigated its biophysical characteristics. p53p-Ant selectively induced cell death in only pre-malignant or malignant cells in a p53-dependent manner and was not toxic to normal and non-malignant cells. p53p-Ant was more toxic to the mutant p53 than wild-type p53 phenotype in H1299 lung cancer cells stably expressing human temperature-sensitive p53 mutant 143Ala. Surface plasmon resonance (BIACORE) analysis demonstrated that this peptide had higher binding affinity to mutant p53 as compared to wild-type p53. p53p-Ant induced-cell death had the classical morphological characteristics of apoptosis and had no features of necrosis. The mechanism of cell death by p53p-Ant was through the FADD/caspase-8-dependent pathway without the involvement of the TRAIL pathway, Bcl-2 family and cell cycle changes. Blocking Fas with antibody did not alter the peptide's effect, suggesting that Fas itself did not interact with the peptide. Transfection with a dominant-negative FADD with a deleted N-terminus inhibited p53p-Ant-induced apoptosis. Its mechanism of action is related to the FADD-induced pathway without restoration of other p53 functions. p53p-Ant is a novel anticancer agent with unique selectivity for human cancer cells and could be useful as a prototype for the development of new anti-cancer agents. PMID:15645452

  20. From The Cover: Reconstruction of functionally normal and malignant human breast tissues in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Chavarria, Tony; Wu, Min; Magrane, Greg; Gray, Joe W.; Carey, Loucinda; Richardson, Andrea; Weinberg, Robert A.

    2004-04-01

    The study of normal breast epithelial morphogenesis and carcinogenesis in vivo has largely used rodent models. Efforts at studying mammary morphogenesis and cancer with xenotransplanted human epithelial cells have failed to recapitulate the full extent of development seen in the human breast. We have developed an orthotopic xenograft model in which both the stromal and epithelial components of the reconstructed mammary gland are of human origin. Genetic modification of human stromal cells before the implantation of ostensibly normal human mammary epithelial cells resulted in the outgrowth of benign and malignant lesions. This experimental model allows for studies of human epithelial morphogenesis and differentiation in vivo and underscores the critical role of heterotypic interactions in human breast development and carcinogenesis.

  1. Meningioma and schwannoma risk in adults in relation to family history of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Deirdre A.; Linet, Martha S.; Black, Peter M.; Fine, Howard A.; Selker, Robert G.; Shapiro, William R.; Inskip, Peter D.

    2004-01-01

    Relatively little is known about factors that contribute to the development of meningioma and vestibular schwannoma, two intracranial nervous system tumors. We evaluated the risk of these tumors in relation to family history of malignant or benign tumors. Incident cases of meningioma (n = 197) or schwannoma (n = 96) were identified at three U.S. referral hospitals between June 1994 and August 1998. Controls (n = 799) admitted to the same hospitals for nonmalignant conditions were matched to cases on age, sex, race/ethnicity, hospital, and proximity of residence to hospital. We found that risk of meningioma was increased among persons reporting a family history of a benign brain tumor (odds ratio [OR], 4.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0–21.0; n = 5) or melanoma (OR, 4.2; 95% CI, 1.2–15.0; n = 5). A family history of breast cancer was associated with an elevated meningioma risk among participants aged 18 to 49 years (OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.4 –11.0; n = 8) but a reduced risk among older respondents (OR, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.1–0.7; n = 3). Family history of cancer did not differ between schwannoma cases and controls, although the statistical power to detect associations was limited. Some relative risk estimates were based on a small number of observations and may have arisen by chance. Inheritance of predisposing genes, shared environmental factors, or both within families with a history of benign brain tumors, melanoma, or possibly breast cancer may be related to altered meningioma risk. PMID:15494094

  2. NY-ESO-1 expression in meningioma suggests a rationale for new immunotherapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Baia, Gilson S; Caballero, Otavia L; Ho, Janelle S Y; Zhao, Qi; Cohen, Tzeela; Binder, Zev A; Salmasi, Vafi; Gallia, Gary L; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Olivi, Alessandro; Brem, Henry; Burger, Peter; Strausberg, Robert L; Simpson, Andrew J G; Eberhart, Charles G; Riggins, Gregory J

    2013-11-01

    Meningiomas are the most common primary intracranial tumors. Surgical resection remains the treatment of choice for these tumors. However, a significant number of tumors are not surgically accessible, recur, or become malignant, necessitating the repetition of surgery and sometimes radiation. Chemotherapy is rarely used and is generally not recognized as an effective treatment. Cancer/testis (CT) genes represent a unique class of genes, which are expressed by germ cells, normally silenced in somatic cells, but activated in various cancers. CT proteins can elicit spontaneous immune responses in patients with cancer and this feature makes them attractive targets for immunotherapy-based approaches. We analyzed mRNA expression of 37 testis-restricted CT genes in a discovery set of 18 meningiomas by reverse transcription PCR. The overall frequency of expression of CT genes ranged from 5.6% to 27.8%. The most frequently expressed was NY-ESO-1, in 5 patients (27.8%). We subsequently analyzed NY-ESO-1 protein expression in a larger set of meningiomas by immunohistochemistry and found expression in 108 of 110 cases. In some cases, NY-ESO-1 expression was diffused and homogenous, but in most instances it was heterogeneous. Importantly, NY-ESO-1 expression was positively correlated with higher grade and patients presenting with higher levels of NY-ESO-1 staining had significantly worse disease-free and overall survival. We have also shown that NY-ESO-1 expression may lead to humoral immune response in patients with meningioma. Considering the limited treatment options for patients with meningioma, the potential of NY-ESO-1-based immunotherapy should be explored.

  3. Ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI differentiation of meningioma from dural metastases: a pilot study with immunohistochemical observations.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Bronwyn E; Woltjer, Randall L; Prola-Netto, Joao; Nesbit, Gary M; Gahramanov, Seymur; Pham, Thao; Wagner, Jaime; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2016-09-01

    Malignant dural neoplasms are not reliably distinguished from benign dural neoplasms with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI enhancement in central nervous system (CNS) diseases imaged with ferumoxytol has been attributed to intracellular uptake in macrophages rather than vascular leakage. We compared imaging to histopathology and immunohistochemistry in meningiomas and dural metastases having ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI (FeMRI) and gadolinium-enhanced MRI (GdMRI) in order to correlate enhancement patterns to macrophage presence and vascular state. All patients having extraaxial CNS tumors were retrospectively selected from one of two ongoing FeMRI studies. Enhancement was compared between GdMRI and FeMRI. Diagnoses were confirmed histologically and/or by characteristic imaging. Tumor and vascular histology was reviewed. Immunohistochemical staining for CD68 (a macrophage marker), Connexin-43 (Cx43) (a marker of normal gap junctions), and smooth muscle actin (SMA) as a marker of vascularity, was performed in seven study cases with available tissue. Immunohistochemistry was performed on archival material from 33 subjects outside of the current study as controls: 20 WHO grade I cases of meningioma and 13 metastatic tumors. Metastases displayed marked delayed enhancement on FeMRI, similar to GdMRI. Four patients with dural metastases and one patient with meningioma showed similar enhancement on FeMRI and GdMRI. Five meningiomas with typical enhancement on GdMRI lacked enhancement on FeMRI. Enhancement on FeMRI was better associated with decreased Cx43 expression than intralesional macrophages. These pilot data suggest that FeMRI may better differentiate metastatic disease from meningiomas than GdMRI, and that differences in tumor vasculature rather than macrophage presence could underlie differences in contrast enhancement. PMID:27393348

  4. The softening of human bladder cancer cells happens at an early stage of the malignancy process.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Jorge R; Pabijan, Joanna; Garcia, Ricardo; Lekka, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have demonstrated that alterations in the deformability of cancerous cells are strongly linked to the actin cytoskeleton. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM), it is possible to determine such changes in a quantitative way in order to distinguish cancerous from non-malignant cells. In the work presented here, the elastic properties of human bladder cells were determined by means of AFM. The measurements show that non-malignant bladder HCV29 cells are stiffer (higher Young's modulus) than cancerous cells (HTB-9, HT1376, and T24 cell lines). However, independently of the histological grade of the studied bladder cancer cells, all cancerous cells possess a similar level of the deformability of about a few kilopascals, significantly lower than non-malignant cells. This underlines the diagnostic character of stiffness that can be used as a biomarker of bladder cancer. Similar stiffness levels, observed for cancerous cells, cannot be fully explained by the organization of the actin cytoskeleton since it is different in all malignant cells. Our results underline that it is neither the spatial organization of the actin filaments nor the presence of stress fibers, but the overall density and their 3D-organization in a probing volume play the dominant role in controlling the elastic response of the cancerous cell to an external force. PMID:24778971

  5. The softening of human bladder cancer cells happens at an early stage of the malignancy process

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Jorge R; Pabijan, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Summary Various studies have demonstrated that alterations in the deformability of cancerous cells are strongly linked to the actin cytoskeleton. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM), it is possible to determine such changes in a quantitative way in order to distinguish cancerous from non-malignant cells. In the work presented here, the elastic properties of human bladder cells were determined by means of AFM. The measurements show that non-malignant bladder HCV29 cells are stiffer (higher Young’s modulus) than cancerous cells (HTB-9, HT1376, and T24 cell lines). However, independently of the histological grade of the studied bladder cancer cells, all cancerous cells possess a similar level of the deformability of about a few kilopascals, significantly lower than non-malignant cells. This underlines the diagnostic character of stiffness that can be used as a biomarker of bladder cancer. Similar stiffness levels, observed for cancerous cells, cannot be fully explained by the organization of the actin cytoskeleton since it is different in all malignant cells. Our results underline that it is neither the spatial organization of the actin filaments nor the presence of stress fibers, but the overall density and their 3D-organization in a probing volume play the dominant role in controlling the elastic response of the cancerous cell to an external force. PMID:24778971

  6. Angiomatous meningioma in Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zubair; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-06-01

    We report a case of an intraventricular angiomatous meningioma arising in a 3-year-old boy diagnosed with Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) who presented with intractable epilepsy and right-sided hemiparesis. He underwent surgical resection of the epileptogenic focus. Histologic sections showed the typical findings of SWS accompanied by adjacent mild focal cortical dysplasia (International League Against Epilepsy Type Ib pattern; Palmini et al. Type IA). A small intraventricular mass, which was incidentally noted on imaging studies, was also excised. The mass showed a prominent venous vasculature with intermixed meningothelial cells, consistent with an angiomatous meningioma World Health Organization Grade I. SWS is a rare, sporadically occurring disorder marked by a port wine stain (hemangioma of the skin) arising in the distribution of the trigeminal nerve accompanied by an angiomatous proliferation in the leptomeninges. The underlying cortex often shows prominent dystrophic mineralization and gliosis. Patients often present with seizures and may require surgical resection when seizures prove to be pharmacoresistant. Meningiomas in SWS are a rare occurrence (only one known previously reported case) and angiomatous meningioma in SWS has never been described. The literature is briefly reviewed and the pathogenesis of hemangiomas in SWS and its implication in angiomatous meningioma is discussed. PMID:25766367

  7. Suprasellar Clear Cell Meningioma in an Infant.

    PubMed

    Anunobi, Charles C; Bankole, Olufemi; Ikeri, Nzechukwu Z; Adeleke, Nurudeen A

    2016-08-01

    Clear cell meningiomas are an uncommon subtype of meningioma rarely seen in infancy. We report a case of clear cell meningioma in an 8-month-old male infant. He presented at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria, in 2015 with persistent vomiting, poor feeding and failure to thrive over a four month period. Generalised hypertonia and hyperreflexia were noted on examination. Computed tomography of the brain revealed a huge largely isodense suprasellar mass with a hypodense core. The tumour, which measured 6 × 5 × 4 cm, enhanced non-uniformly with contrast injection and extended to occlude the third ventricle. The patient underwent a bifrontal craniotomy with subtotal tumour excision. Six hours postoperatively, he went into cardiac arrest and could not be resuscitated. A histological diagnosis of clear cell meningioma was made as the tumour cells were immunoreactive to epithelial membrane antigen, S100 protein and vimentin. This case of clear cell meningioma was unusual due to its early occurrence and supratentorial location. PMID:27606120

  8. Radiation therapy for primary optic nerve meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.L.; Vuksanovic, M.M.; Yates, B.M.; Bienfang, D.C.

    1981-06-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningiomas, formerly thought to be rare, have been encountered with surprising frequency since the widespread use of computed tomography. Early diagnosis led to an enthusiastic surgical approach to these lesions, but this has been tempered by the realization that even in the best of hands, blindness followed such surgery with distressing frequency. Optic nerve sheath meningiomas may be divided into primary, secondary, and multiple meningioma groups. Five patients with primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas treated with irradiation therapy are presented in this report. Improvement in visual acuity, stabilization to increase in the visual field, and decrease in size to total regression of optociliary veins, have been documented following irradiation therapy of the posterior orbital and intracanalicular portions of the optic nerve in some of these cases. Although each patient must be carefully individualized, there is no question that visual palliation can be achieved in some cases of optic nerve sheath meningioma. Further investigation of this therapeutic modality in selected cases in advised.

  9. Transformation of a meningioma with atypical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashish; Deopujari, Chandrashekhar; Karmarkar, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are benign tumors of the central nervous system. They have long term curability if they are excised completely. If not, they can recur after a prolonged period and can lead to increased morbidity during re-surgery. Recurrence is rarely associated with invasiveness. Usually de-differentiation in case of meningiomas is uncommon without any predisposing factors including different genetic mutations or radiation to the involved region. We report a case of a 38-year-old female who was operated for a benign para-sagittal meningioma 8 years back and subsequently developed an invasive recurrence off late. Also this time, the imaging morphology was slightly different for a meningioma and gross as well as microscopic findings were very atypical. Awareness for such cases must be there while dealing with recurrent meningiomas as invasiveness may not always be associated with adverse predisposing factors like radiation. As invasiveness is always a histopathological diagnosis, picking up such features on imaging is a daunting task and if done, can help neurosurgeons prognosticate such invasive recurrences in a better fashion. PMID:27366271

  10. Suprasellar Clear Cell Meningioma in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Anunobi, Charles C.; Bankole, Olufemi; Ikeri, Nzechukwu Z.; Adeleke, Nurudeen A.

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell meningiomas are an uncommon subtype of meningioma rarely seen in infancy. We report a case of clear cell meningioma in an 8-month-old male infant. He presented at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria, in 2015 with persistent vomiting, poor feeding and failure to thrive over a four month period. Generalised hypertonia and hyperreflexia were noted on examination. Computed tomography of the brain revealed a huge largely isodense suprasellar mass with a hypodense core. The tumour, which measured 6 × 5 × 4 cm, enhanced non-uniformly with contrast injection and extended to occlude the third ventricle. The patient underwent a bifrontal craniotomy with subtotal tumour excision. Six hours postoperatively, he went into cardiac arrest and could not be resuscitated. A histological diagnosis of clear cell meningioma was made as the tumour cells were immunoreactive to epithelial membrane antigen, S100 protein and vimentin. This case of clear cell meningioma was unusual due to its early occurrence and supratentorial location. PMID:27606120

  11. Suprasellar Clear Cell Meningioma in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Anunobi, Charles C.; Bankole, Olufemi; Ikeri, Nzechukwu Z.; Adeleke, Nurudeen A.

    2016-01-01

    Clear cell meningiomas are an uncommon subtype of meningioma rarely seen in infancy. We report a case of clear cell meningioma in an 8-month-old male infant. He presented at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria, in 2015 with persistent vomiting, poor feeding and failure to thrive over a four month period. Generalised hypertonia and hyperreflexia were noted on examination. Computed tomography of the brain revealed a huge largely isodense suprasellar mass with a hypodense core. The tumour, which measured 6 × 5 × 4 cm, enhanced non-uniformly with contrast injection and extended to occlude the third ventricle. The patient underwent a bifrontal craniotomy with subtotal tumour excision. Six hours postoperatively, he went into cardiac arrest and could not be resuscitated. A histological diagnosis of clear cell meningioma was made as the tumour cells were immunoreactive to epithelial membrane antigen, S100 protein and vimentin. This case of clear cell meningioma was unusual due to its early occurrence and supratentorial location.

  12. Yes-Associated Protein 1 Is Activated and Functions as an Oncogene in Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Baia, Gilson S.; Caballero, Otavia L.; Orr, Brent A.; Lal, Anita; Ho, Janelle S.Y.; Cowdrey, Cynthia; Tihan, Tarik; Mawrin, Christian; Riggins, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is functionally conserved in Drosophila melanogaster and mammals, and its proposed function is to control tissue homeostasis by regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis. The core components are composed of a kinase cascade that culminates with the phosphorylation and inhibition of Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1). Phospho-YAP1 is retained in the cytoplasm. In the absence of Hippo signaling, YAP1 translocates to the nucleus, associates with co-activators TEAD1-4, and functions as a transcriptional factor promoting the expression of key target genes. Components of the Hippo pathway are mutated in human cancers, and deregulation of this pathway plays a role in tumorigenesis. Loss of the NF2 tumor suppressor gene is the most common genetic alteration in meningiomas, and the NF2 gene product, Merlin, acts upstream of the Hippo pathway. Here, we show that primary meningioma tumors have high nuclear expression of YAP1. In meningioma cells, Merlin expression is associated with phosphorylation of YAP1. Using an siRNA transient knockdown of YAP1 in NF2-mutant meningioma cells, we show that suppression of YAP1 impaired cell proliferation and migration. Conversely, YAP1 overexpression led to a strong augment of cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth and restriction of cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In addition, expression of YAP1 in nontransformed arachnoidal cells led to the development of tumors in nude mice. Together, these findings suggest that in meningiomas, deregulation of the Hippo pathway is largely observed in primary tumors and that YAP1 functions as an oncogene promoting meningioma tumorigenesis. PMID:22618028

  13. Primary meningioma of the ethmoid sinus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Daneshi, Ahmad; Asghari, Alimohamad; Bahramy, Eshagh

    2003-04-01

    Meningioma is a well-recognized tumor of the central nervous system, but it rarely appears as a primary extracranial tumor of the paranasal sinuses. We report a case of a primary right anterior ethmoid meningioma that resembled a mucocele in its presentation. A primary meningioma can be differentiated from a secondary meningioma in three ways: (1) by observing an intact bony wall of the sinus on imaging or on inspection during surgery, (2) by noting the absence of a simultaneous intracranial meningioma on imaging or on inspection during surgery, and (3) by identifying a bulging of the sinus wall toward the cranium rather than in the opposite direction.

  14. Significance of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in predicting recurrence of intracranial meningioma.

    PubMed

    Cobb, M A; Husain, M; Andersen, B J; al-Mefty, O

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that the histological appearance of meningiomas often fails to predict accurately the clinical behavior of the tumor. Therefore, attention has turned from tumor histology to tumor biology. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a cell cycle-regulated protein, has been recently characterized as the cofactor of DNA polymerase-delta, an enzyme required for DNA replication. The rate of synthesis of PCNA directly correlates with the proliferative state of cells. Immunohistochemical labeling of this antigen is now possible with monoclonal antibodies that allow for its demonstration in routinely fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens. In this study, the PCNA labeling index (LI) was determined for 83 meningiomas, including tumors with both benign and malignant clinical courses and with benign, atypical, and malignant histologies, apparent after total or subtotal resections. No statistical difference was found between the LI on recurrence and that found at initial presentation. In addition, stepwise multivariate regression analysis failed to identify any combination of factors (age, gender, race, age of specimen, tumor histology, Simpson grade of resection) that contributes to the predictive strength of the PCNA LI for tumor recurrence. However, for LIs less than 2%, only one of 26 gross totally resected tumors recurred (mean follow up 53 months); for LIs more than 7%, five of 13 gross totally resected tumors recurred (mean follow up 55 months). The difference in recurrence rates between gross totally resected meningiomas with PCNA LIs less than 2% and those with PCNA LIs more than 7% achieved statistical significance with a Fisher's exact probability equaling 0.011. The authors conclude that quantitative PCNA labeling of meningiomas is a promising technique that can provide meaningful prognostic information.

  15. The potent oncogene NPM-ALK mediates malignant transformation of normal human CD4(+) T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wei, Fang; Wang, Hong Yi; Liu, Xiaobin; Roy, Darshan; Xiong, Qun-Bin; Jiang, Shuguang; Medvec, Andrew; Danet-Desnoyers, Gwenn; Watt, Christopher; Tomczak, Ewa; Kalos, Michael; Riley, James L; Wasik, Mariusz A

    2013-12-01

    With this study we have demonstrated that in vitro transduction of normal human CD4(+) T lymphocytes with NPM-ALK results in their malignant transformation. The transformed cells become immortalized and display morphology and immunophenotype characteristic of patient-derived anaplastic large-cell lymphomas. These unique features, which are strictly dependent on NPM-ALK activity and expression, include perpetual cell growth, proliferation, and survival; activation of the key signal transduction pathways STAT3 and mTORC1; and expression of CD30 (the hallmark of anaplastic large-cell lymphoma) and of immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 and cell-surface protein PD-L1/CD274. Implantation of NPM-ALK-transformed CD4(+) T lymphocytes into immunodeficient mice resulted in formation of tumors indistinguishable from patients' anaplastic large-cell lymphomas. Our findings demonstrate that the key aspects of human carcinogenesis closely recapitulating the features of the native tumors can be faithfully reproduced in vitro when an appropriate oncogene is used to transform its natural target cells; this in turn points to the fundamental role in malignant cell transformation of potent oncogenes expressed in the relevant target cells. Such transformed cells should permit study of the early stages of carcinogenesis, and in particular the initial oncogene-host cell interactions. This experimental design could also be useful for studies of the effects of early therapeutic intervention and likely also the mechanisms of malignant progression.

  16. Dielectric spectroscopy of normal and malignant human lung cells at ultra-high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Egot-Lemaire, S; Pijanka, J; Sulé-Suso, J; Semenov, S

    2009-04-21

    Microwave techniques for biomedical applications aimed at cancer treatment or diagnosis, either by imaging or spectroscopy, are promising. Their use relies on knowledge of the dielectric properties of tissues, especially on a detectable difference between malignant and normal tissues. As most studies investigated the dielectric properties of ex vivo tissues, there is a need for better biophysical understanding of human tissues in their living state. As an essential component of tissues, cells represent valuable objects of analysis. The approach developed in this study is an investigation at cell level. Its aim was to compare human lung normal and malignant cells by dielectric spectroscopy in the beginning of the microwave range, where such information is of substantial biomedical importance. These cells were embedded in small and low-conductivity agarose hydrogels and laid on an open-ended coaxial probe connected to a vector network analyser operated from 200 MHz to 2 GHz. The comparison between normal and malignant cells was drawn using the variation of measured dielectric properties and fitting the measurements using the Maxwell-Wagner equation. Both methods revealed slight differences between the two cell lines, which were statistically significant regarding conductivities of composite gels and cells. PMID:19321925

  17. Folate receptors in malignant and benign tissues of human female genital tract.

    PubMed

    Holm, J; Hansen, S I; Høier-Madsen, M; Helkjaer, P E; Nichols, C W

    1997-08-01

    We have characterized the folate receptor in malignant and benign tissues of human female genital tract (Fallopian tube and benign and malignant tissues of uterus). Radioligand binding displayed characteristics similar to those of other folate binding proteins. Those include a high-affinity type of binding (K = 10(10)M-1), apparent positive cooperativity, a slow dissociation at pH 7.4 becoming rapid at pH 3.5, and inhibition of binding by folate analogues. The gel filtration profile of Triton X-100 solubilized tissue contained two large peaks of 3H-folate labelled protein (> = 130 and 100 kDa) as well as a 25 kDa peak. Only a single band of 70 kDa was seen on SDS-PAGE immunoblotting. The large molecular size forms on gel filtration appear to represent folate receptors having a hydrophobic membrane anchor inserted into Triton X-100 micelles. The folate receptor of female genital tract showed cross-reactivity in ELISA and positive immunostaining with rabbit antibodies against human milk folate binding protein. Variations in the ratio of immunoresponse to total high affinity folic acid binding suggests the presence of multiple isoforms of the receptor in different types of malignant and benign tissues.

  18. Classification of normal and malignant human gastric mucosa tissue with confocal Raman microspectroscopy and wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yaogai; Shen, Aiguo; Jiang, Tao; Ai, Yong; Hu, Jiming

    2008-02-01

    Thirty-two samples from the human gastric mucosa tissue, including 13 normal and 19 malignant tissue samples were measured by confocal Raman microspectroscopy. The low signal-to-background ratio spectra from human gastric mucosa tissues were obtained by this technique without any sample preparation. Raman spectral interferences include a broad featureless sloping background due to fluorescence and noise. They mask most Raman spectral feature and lead to problems with precision and quantitation of the original spectral information. A preprocessed algorithm based on wavelet analysis was used to reduce noise and eliminate background/baseline of Raman spectra. Comparing preprocessed spectra of malignant gastric mucosa tissues with those of counterpart normal ones, there were obvious spectral changes, including intensity increase at ˜1156 cm -1 and intensity decrease at ˜1587 cm -1. The quantitative criterion based upon the intensity ratio of the ˜1156 and ˜1587 cm -1 was extracted for classification of the normal and malignant gastric mucosa tissue samples. This could result in a new diagnostic method, which would assist the early diagnosis of gastric cancer.

  19. Imidazoline I2 receptor density increases with the malignancy of human gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Callado, L; Martin-Gomez, J; Ruiz, J; Garibi, J; Meana, J

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of using the measurement of imidazoline I2 receptor expression to differentiate glial tumours from other types of brain tumours and for grading the different gliomas. Methods: The specific binding of [3H]idazoxan to imidazoline I2 receptors was measured in homogenates from human gliomas of different grades. Results: The density of imidazoline I2 receptors was significantly greater in the three types of malignant glial tumours than in postmortem control brain or non-glial tumours. The increase in density correlated with the malignancy grade of the gliomas. No significant differences in affinity values were observed. Conclusion: These results suggest that the density of imidazoline I2 receptors may be a useful radioligand parameter for the differentiation of glial tumours from other types of brain tumours and for grading the different gliomas. PMID:15090584

  20. Dynamic holographic endoscopy--ex vivo investigations of malignant tumors in the human stomach.

    PubMed

    Avenhaus, Wolfgang; Kemper, Björn; Knoche, Sabine; Domagk, Dirk; Poremba, Christopher; von Bally, Gert; Domschke, Wolfram

    2005-01-01

    Laser holographic interferometry is based on the superimposition of the holograms of different motional states of an object on a single holographic storing medium. Using a combination of holographic interferometry and endoscopic imaging, we tried to detect areas of focally disturbed tissue elasticity in gastric cancer preparations. By connecting a mobile electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) camera system (light source: double frequency Nd:YAG laser, lambda = 532 nm) to different types of endoscopes, ex vivo experiments were performed on ten formalin fixed human stomachs, nine containing adenocarcinomas and one with a gastric lymphoma. Linking the endoscopic ESPI camera complex to a fast image processing system, the method of double pulse exposure image subtraction was applied at a video frame rate of 12.5 Hz. Speckle correlation patterns and corresponding phase difference distributions resulting from gastric wall deformation by gentle touch with a guide wire were analyzed. Tumor-free gastric areas showed high-contrast concentric fringes around the point of stimulation. In contrast, fringe patterns and filtered phase difference distributions corresponding to the areas of malignancy in all the cases were characterized by largely parallel lines, indicating that stimulation of rigid tumor tissue primarily led to tilting. Our ex vivo investigations of malignant gastric tumors show that the application of dynamic holographic endoscopy makes it possible to distinguish areas of malignancy from surrounding healthy tissue based on the differences in tissue elasticity. PMID:15726298

  1. Expression of beta 2-microglobulin by human benign and malignant mesenchymal and neurogenic tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, B. L.; Braendstrup, O.

    1993-01-01

    Human myosarcomas, liposarcomas, meningosarcomas, glioblastomas and malignant schwannomas, their benign counterparts and normal cells from which these tumours derive, were examined for the expression of beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m). Formalin fixed specimens from these tumours were studied by light microscopy employing the immunoperoxidase method with the use of antibodies directed towards beta 2m. The malignant tumours showed a broad spectrum from unstained to strongly stained tumours, most pronounced among myosarcomas. In addition, most stained tumours displayed a mosaic staining pattern in that unstained areas alternated with stained. There was a tendency towards increased staining for beta 2m in malignant compared to normal cells; this was also observed in the benign tumours although to a lesser degree. The results differ from most earlier studies, mainly of carcinomas which have shown a tendency towards down-regulation of MHC I molecules on the tumour cells. The results are discussed in relation to concepts of immune surveillance of tumours. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8398813

  2. EBV-induced human CD8+ NKT cells suppress tumorigenesis by EBV-associated malignancies.

    PubMed

    Yuling, He; Ruijing, Xiao; Li, Li; Xiang, Ji; Rui, Zhou; Yujuan, Wang; Lijun, Zhang; Chunxian, Du; Xinti, Tan; Wei, Xiao; Lang, Chen; Yanping, Jiang; Tao, Xiong; Mengjun, Wu; Jie, Xiong; Youxin, Jin; Jinquan, Tan

    2009-10-15

    The underlying mechanism of the protective and suppressive role of NKT cells in human tumor immunosurveillance remains to be fully elucidated. We show that the frequencies of CD8(+) NKT cells in patients with EBV-associated Hodgkin's lymphoma or nasopharyngeal carcinoma are significantly lower than those in healthy EBV carriers. These CD8(+) NKT cells in tumor patients are also functionally impaired. In human-thymus-severe combined immunodeficient (hu-thym-SCID) chimeras, EBV challenge efficiently promotes the generation of IFN-gamma-biased CD8(+) NKT cells. These cells are strongly cytotoxic, drive syngeneic T cells into a Th1 bias, and enhance T-cell cytotoxicity to EBV-associated tumor cells. Interleukin-4-biased CD4(+) NKT cells are predominately generated in unchallenged chimeras. These cells are noncytotoxic, drive syngeneic T cells into a Th2 bias, and do not affect T-cell cytotoxicity. In humanized xenogeneic tumor-transplanted hu-thym-SCID chimeras, adoptive transfer with EBV-induced CD8(+) NKT cells significantly suppresses tumorigenesis by EBV-associated malignancies. EBV-induced CD8(+) NKT cells are necessary and sufficient to enhance the T-cell immunity to EBV-associated malignancies in the hu-thym-SCID chimeras. CD4(+) NKT cells are synergetic with CD8(+) NKT cells, leading to a more pronounced T-cell antitumor response in the chimeras cotransferred with CD4(+) and CD8(+) NKT cells. Thus, immune reconstitution with EBV-induced CD8(+) NKT cells could be a useful strategy in management of EBV-associated malignancies. PMID:19808969

  3. Response of human malignant melanoma xenografts to hyperthermia: effect of vascular occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rofstad, E.K.; Brustad, T.

    1981-12-01

    Two human malignant melanomas from two patients, grown subcutaneously in the leg of athymic nude mice, were exposed to hyperthermia (42.5/sup o/C) for varying times. Single cell survival was assayed in vitro in soft agar. The sensitivity to heat of the tumor cells was considerably enhanced when the blood supply to the tumors was occluded 15 min before and during treatment. The D/sub 0/-values of the survival curves were 86 min (unclamped) and 13 min (clamped) for E.E. melanoma and 25 min (unclamped) and 11 min (clamped) for V.N. melanoma.

  4. Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome following resection of meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Clifford Leigh; Smith, Timothy; Karabatsou, Konstantina; Ajdukiewicz, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    In this report, we present the case of a patient who developed the strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome 3 weeks after an uneventful resection of a sphenoid wing meningioma. She originally presented with symptoms of raised intracranial pressure and was given dexamethasone before surgery. The pathology, diagnosis and management of Strongyloides stercoralis are reviewed. PMID:22717933

  5. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) Reprogram Gene Expression in Human Malignant Epithelial and Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Astakhova, Lidiia; Ngara, Mtakai; Babich, Olga; Prosekov, Aleksandr; Asyakina, Lyudmila; Dyshlyuk, Lyubov; Midtvedt, Tore; Zhou, Xiaoying; Ernberg, Ingemar; Matskova, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    The effect of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on gene expression in human, malignant cell lines was investigated, with a focus on signaling pathways. The commensal microbial flora produce high levels of SCFAs with established physiologic effects in humans. The most abundant SCFA metabolite in the human microflora is n-butyric acid. It is well known to activate endogenous latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), that was used as a reference read out system and extended to EBV+ epithelial cancer cell lines. N-butyric acid and its salt induced inflammatory and apoptotic responses in tumor cells of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Epithelial cell migration was inhibited. The n-butyric gene activation was reduced by knock-down of the cell membrane transporters MCT-1 and -4 by siRNA. N-butyric acid show biologically significant effects on several important cellular functions, also with relevance for tumor cell phenotype. PMID:27441625

  6. Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA) Reprogram Gene Expression in Human Malignant Epithelial and Lymphoid Cells.

    PubMed

    Astakhova, Lidiia; Ngara, Mtakai; Babich, Olga; Prosekov, Aleksandr; Asyakina, Lyudmila; Dyshlyuk, Lyubov; Midtvedt, Tore; Zhou, Xiaoying; Ernberg, Ingemar; Matskova, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    The effect of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on gene expression in human, malignant cell lines was investigated, with a focus on signaling pathways. The commensal microbial flora produce high levels of SCFAs with established physiologic effects in humans. The most abundant SCFA metabolite in the human microflora is n-butyric acid. It is well known to activate endogenous latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), that was used as a reference read out system and extended to EBV+ epithelial cancer cell lines. N-butyric acid and its salt induced inflammatory and apoptotic responses in tumor cells of epithelial and lymphoid origin. Epithelial cell migration was inhibited. The n-butyric gene activation was reduced by knock-down of the cell membrane transporters MCT-1 and -4 by siRNA. N-butyric acid show biologically significant effects on several important cellular functions, also with relevance for tumor cell phenotype. PMID:27441625

  7. Expression of protein kinase A regulatory subunits in benign and malignant human thyroid tissues: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Del Gobbo, Alessandro; Peverelli, Erika; Treppiedi, Donatella; Lania, Andrea; Mantovani, Giovanna; Ferrero, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms and prognostic implications of the protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway in human tumors, with special emphasis on the malignant thyroid. The PKA signaling pathway is differentially activated by the expression of regulatory subunits 1 (R1) and 2 (R2), whose levels change during development, differentiation, and neoplastic transformation. Following the identification of gene mutations within the PKA regulatory subunit R1A (PRKAR1A) that cause Carney complex-associated neoplasms, several investigators have studied PRKAR1A expression in sporadic thyroid tumors. The PKA regulatory subunit R2B (PRKAR2B) is highly expressed in benign, as well as in malignant differentiated and undifferentiated lesions. PRKAR1A is highly expressed in follicular adenomas and malignant lesions with a statistically significant gradient between benign and malignant tumors; however, it is not expressed in hyperplastic nodules. Although the importance of PKA in human malignancy outcomes is not completely understood, PRKAR1A expression correlates with tumor dimension in malignant lesions. Additional studies are needed to determine whether a relationship exists between PKA subunit expression and clinical outcomes, particularly in undifferentiated tumors. In conclusion, the R1A subunit might be a good molecular candidate for the targeted treatment of malignant thyroid tumors. PMID:27321957

  8. ETM study of electroporation influence on cell morphology in human malignant melanoma and human primary gingival fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Skolucka, Nina; Daczewska, Malgorzata; Saczko, Jolanta; Chwilkowska, Agnieszka; Choromanska, Anna; Kotulska, Malgorzata; Kaminska, Iwona; Kulbacka, Julita

    2011-01-01

    Objective To estimate electroporation (EP) influence on malignant and normal cells. Methods Two cell lines including human malignant melanoma (Me-45) and normal human gingival fibroblast (HGFs) were used. EP parameters were the following: 250, 1 000, 1 750, 2 500 V/cm; 50 µs by 5 impulses for every case. The viability of cells after EP was estimated by MTT assay. The ultrastructural analysis was observed by transmission electron microscope (Zeiss EM 900). Results In the current study we observed the intracellular effect following EP on Me-45 and HGF cells. At the conditions applied, we did not observe any significant damage of mitochondrial activity in both cell lines treated by EP. Conversely, we showed that EP in some conditions can stimulate cells to proliferation. Some changes induced by EP were only visible in electron microscopy. In fibroblast cells we observed significant changes in lower parameters of EP (250 and 1 000 V/cm). After applying higher electric field intensities (2 500 V/cm) we detected many vacuoles, myelin-like bodies and swallowed endoplasmic reticulum. In melanoma cells such strong pathological modifications after EP were not observed, in comparison with control cells. The ultrastructure of both treated cell lines was changed according to the applied parameters of EP. Conclusions We can claim that EP conditions are cell line dependent. In terms of the intracellular morphology, human fibroblasts are more sensitive to electric field as compared with melanoma cells. Optimal conditions should be determined for each cell line. Summarizing our study, we can conclude that EP is not an invasive method for human normal and malignant cells. This technique can be safely applied in chemotherapy for delivering drugs into tumor cells. PMID:23569735

  9. MicroRNAs Induce Epigenetic Reprogramming and Suppress Malignant Phenotypes of Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hisataka; Wu, Xin; Kawamoto, Koichi; Nishida, Naohiro; Konno, Masamitsu; Koseki, Jun; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Noguchi, Kozou; Gotoh, Noriko; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Miyata, Kanjiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Nagano, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Obika, Satoshi; Kataoka, Kazunori; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Hideshi

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer is a genetic disease, epigenetic alterations are involved in its initiation and progression. Previous studies have shown that reprogramming of colon cancer cells using Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc reduces cancer malignancy. Therefore, cancer reprogramming may be a useful treatment for chemo- or radiotherapy-resistant cancer cells. It was also reported that the introduction of endogenous small-sized, non-coding ribonucleotides such as microRNA (miR) 302s and miR-369-3p or -5p resulted in the induction of cellular reprogramming. miRs are smaller than the genes of transcription factors, making them possibly suitable for use in clinical strategies. Therefore, we reprogrammed colon cancer cells using miR-302s and miR-369-3p or -5p. This resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation and invasion and the stimulation of the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition phenotype in colon cancer cells. Importantly, the introduction of the ribonucleotides resulted in epigenetic reprogramming of DNA demethylation and histone modification events. Furthermore, in vivo administration of the ribonucleotides in mice elicited the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, which involves the mitochondrial Bcl2 protein family. The present study shows that the introduction of miR-302s and miR-369s could induce cellular reprogramming and modulate malignant phenotypes of human colorectal cancer, suggesting that the appropriate delivery of functional small-sized ribonucleotides may open a new avenue for therapy against human malignant tumors. PMID:25970424

  10. Combinatorial anti-angiogenic gene therapy in a human malignant mesothelioma model.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Shuji; Takagi-Kimura, Misato; Kasahara, Noriyuki

    2015-08-01

    Anti-angiogenic gene therapy represents a promising strategy for cancer; however, it has rarely been tested in malignant mesothelioma, a highly aggressive tumor associated with asbestos with poor prognosis. In the present study, we investigated whether anti-angiogenic factors such as angiostatin, endostatin and the soluble form of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (sFlk1) were able to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation via lentivirus-mediated gene transfer into malignant mesothelioma cells in culture. We also assessed whether a dual-agent strategy had greater therapeutic benefit. Human malignant pleural mesothelioma MSTO-211H cells were transduced using lentiviral vectors that individually expressed angiostatin, endostatin and sFlk1 and linked to enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) marker gene expression via an internal ribosome entry site. The lentivirus expressing EGFP alone was used as a control. The resultant cells designated as MSTO-A, MSTO-E, MSTO-F and MSTO-C were confirmed by western blot analysis and fluorescence microscopy to stably express the corresponding proteins. No differences were observed in the in vitro growth rates between any of these cells. However, co-culture of MSTO-A, MSTO-E and MSTO-F showed significant suppression of human umbilical endothelial cell growth in vitro compared with that of MSTO-C. Furthermore, a combination of any two among MSTO-A, MSTO-E and MSTO-F significantly enhanced efficacy. These results suggest that combinatorial anti-angiogenic gene therapy targeting different pathways of endothelial growth factor signaling has the potential for greater therapeutic efficacy than that of a single-agent regimen.

  11. Relation between enzymatic activities and the degree of malignancy of human lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Vezzoni, P; Giardini, R; Raineri, M; Pozzi, M R; Lucchini, R; Vezzoni, M A; Clerici, L; Besana, C; Rugarli, C; Rilke, F

    1985-08-01

    The relationship between the intracellular levels of DNA polymerase alpha (DP-alpha), adenosine deaminase (ADA) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and the degree of malignancy of human lymphomas was investigated. Twelve non-neoplastic lymph nodes and 88 malignant lymphomas were examined. For non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) the low or high grade of malignancy was established according to three classifications: the Rappaport, the Kiel and the Working Formulation for Clinical Usage, with the latter also recognizing an intermediate grade group. Non-neoplastic lymph nodes had significantly lower levels of all the three enzymes than those found in high-grade malignant NHL (the P value ranged from less than 0.02 to less than 0.001). Hodgkin's disease, a slowly evolving neoplasia, showed lower levels of DP-alpha (P less than 0.001) and ADA (P less than 0.001), but not of LDH, than high-grade NHL. Among NHL, whatever classification was used, the low-grade malignant lymphomas had significantly lower levels than the high-grade ones for all the three enzymes (P less than 0.005 or P less than 0.001). The intermediate-grade group of the Working Formulation differed from the high-grade group for DP-alpha (P less than 0.01) and ADA (P less than 0.02) but not for LDH. It differed from the low-grade group only for ADA (P less than 0.005). Lymphoblastic and Burkitt's lymphomas were the groups with the highest levels of the three enzymes. Among low-grade lymphomas very low values were found in the histological entities defined as DLWD in the Rappaport classification, CLL and lymphoplasmacytoid immunocytoma in the Kiel classification and small lymphocytic (group A) in the WF. The levels of all enzymes in these histotypes were always significantly different from the other low-grade histotypes, and from the intermediate-grade ones of the WF. In the Kiel classification polymorphous lymphoplasmacytoid lymphoma, recently recognized as a group with a quite aggressive clinical course, was

  12. Withania somnifera Root Extract Has Potent Cytotoxic Effect against Human Malignant Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Halder, Babli; Singh, Shruti; Thakur, Suman S

    2015-01-01

    In Ayurveda, Withania somnifera is commonly known as Ashwagandha, its roots are specifically used in medicinal and clinical applications. It possesses numerous therapeutic actions which include anti-inflammatory, sedative, hypnotic and narcotic. Extracts from this plant have been reported for its anticancer properties. In this study we evaluated for the first time, the cytotoxic effect of Withania root extract on human malignant melanoma A375 cells. The crude extract of Withania was tested for cytotoxicity against A375 cells by MTT assay. Cell morphology of treated A375 cells was visualized through phase contrast as well as fluorescence microscopy. Agarose gel electrophoresis was used to check DNA fragmentation of the crude extract treated cells. Crude extract of Withania root has the potency to reduce viable cell count in dose as well as time dependent manner. Morphological change of the A375 cells was also observed in treated groups in comparison to untreated or vehicle treated control. Apoptotic body and nuclear blebbing were observed in DAPI stained treated cells under fluorescence microscope. A ladder of fragmented DNA was noticed in treated cells. Thus it might be said that the crude water extract of Withania somnifera has potent cytotoxic effect on human malignant melanoma A375 cells.

  13. Two cystic cavernous angiomas after radiotherapy for atypical meningioma in adult woman : case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Andrea Gennaro; Donnarumma, Pasquale; Pichierri, Angelo; Delfini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    A correlation between radiation therapy and cavernoma has been suspected since 1994. Since then, only a few cases of radio-induced cavernomas have been reported in the literature (85 patients). Most of them were children, and the most frequent original tumour had been medulloblastoma. The authors report a case of two cystic cavernous angiomas after radiation therapy for atypical meningioma in adult woman. This is the first case of cavernous angioma after radiotherapy for low grade meningioma. A 39-year-old, Latin american woman was operated on for a frontal atypical meningioma with intradiploic component and adjuvant radiotherapy was delivered (6000 cGy local brain irradiation, fractionated over 6 weeks). Follow-up MR imaging showed no recurrences of the tumour and no other lesions. Ten years later, at the age of 49, she consulted for progressive drug-resistant headache. MR imaging revealed two new well defined areas of different signal intensity at the surface of each frontal pole. Both lesions were surgically removed; the histopathological diagnosis was cavernous angioma. This is the first case of cavernous angioma after radiation therapy for atypical meningioma : it confirms the development of these lesions after standard radiation therapy also in patients previously affected by non-malignant tumours.

  14. Two Cystic Cavernous Angiomas after Radiotherapy for Atypical Meningioma in Adult Woman : Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Andrea Gennaro; Pichierri, Angelo; Delfini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    A correlation between radiation therapy and cavernoma has been suspected since 1994. Since then, only a few cases of radio-induced cavernomas have been reported in the literature (85 patients). Most of them were children, and the most frequent original tumour had been medulloblastoma. The authors report a case of two cystic cavernous angiomas after radiation therapy for atypical meningioma in adult woman. This is the first case of cavernous angioma after radiotherapy for low grade meningioma. A 39-year-old, Latin american woman was operated on for a frontal atypical meningioma with intradiploic component and adjuvant radiotherapy was delivered (6000 cGy local brain irradiation, fractionated over 6 weeks). Follow-up MR imaging showed no recurrences of the tumour and no other lesions. Ten years later, at the age of 49, she consulted for progressive drug-resistant headache. MR imaging revealed two new well defined areas of different signal intensity at the surface of each frontal pole. Both lesions were surgically removed; the histopathological diagnosis was cavernous angioma. This is the first case of cavernous angioma after radiation therapy for atypical meningioma : it confirms the development of these lesions after standard radiation therapy also in patients previously affected by non-malignant tumours. PMID:24570817

  15. Multiple Meningiomas in a Patient with Cowden Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pain, Margaret; Darbinyan, Armine; Fowkes, Mary; Shrivastava, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Background  Cowden syndrome is a rare, multisystem disease manifesting with increased hamartomas and neoplasms. Though meningioma has been documented in patients with Cowden syndrome, the relationship between these two phenomena is still unclear. Case Description  We report a case of a 43-year-old female patient with a known PTEN mutation and clinical history of Cowden syndrome. A workup of headache demonstrated two skull base meningiomas. At the time of surgery, several additional tiny meningiomas were detected in the same region. Conclusions  The development of multiple meningiomas in a patient with predisposition for tumor is more than coincidental. Though PTEN mutations and deletions have not been shown to be critical for meningioma development, this case challenges that conclusion. In light of recent genetic advances in meningioma molecular pathogenesis, the role of the PTEN/AKT/PI3K pathway is discussed. PMID:27563534

  16. Characterization of phosphodiesterase 2A in human malignant melanoma PMP cells.

    PubMed

    Morita, Hiroshi; Murata, Taku; Shimizu, Kasumi; Okumura, Kenya; Inui, Madoka; Tagawa, Toshiro

    2013-04-01

    The prognosis for malignant melanoma is poor; therefore, new diagnostic methods and treatment strategies are urgently needed. Phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2) is one of 21 phosphodiesterases, which are divided into 11 families (PDE1-PDE11). PDE2 hydrolyzes cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP), and its binding to cGMP enhances the hydrolysis of cAMP. We previously reported the expression of PDE1, PDE3 and PDE5 in human malignant melanoma cells. However, the expression of PDE2 in these cells has not been investigated. Herein, we examined the expression of PDE2A and its role in human oral malignant melanoma PMP cells. Sequencing of RT-PCR products revealed that PDE2A2 was the only variant expressed in PMP cells. Four point mutations were detected; one missense mutation at nucleotide position 734 (from C to T) resulted in the substitution of threonine with isoleucine at amino acid position 214. The other three were silent mutations. An in vitro migration assay and a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay revealed that suppressing PDE2 activity with its specific inhibitor, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA), had no impact on cell motility or apoptosis. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of EHNA, assessed using a trypan blue exclusion assay, was negligible. On the other hand, assessment of cell proliferation by BrdU incorporation and cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry revealed that EHNA treatment inhibited DNA synthesis and increased the percentage of G2/M-arrested cells. Furthermore, cyclin A mRNA expression was downregulated, while cyclin E mRNA expression was upregulated in EHNA-treated cells. Our results demonstrated that the PDE2A2 variant carrying point mutations is expressed in PMP cells and may affect cell cycle progression by modulating cyclin A expression. Thus, PDE2A2 is a possible new molecular target for the treatment of malignant melanoma.

  17. The embryonic morphogen, Nodal, is associated with channel-like structures in human malignant melanoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Josephine C; Zhan, Qian; Weishaupt, Carsten; Hsu, Mei-Yu; Murphy, George F

    2010-04-01

    Formation of channel-like structures, also termed vasculogenic mimicry (VM), describes the ability of aggressive melanoma cells to form PAS-positive anastomosing structures that correlate with tumor virulence. This phenomenon may indicate differentiation plasticity, a feature melanoma cells may share with stem cells in the developing embryo. Recent studies have indicated that VM and tumorigenicity of human malignant melanoma may depend on the signaling pathways of an embryonic morphogen, Nodal. However, given the secretory nature of Nodal protein and melanoma cell heterogeneity, it remains unclear whether the Nodal-expressing cells participate directly or indirectly in VM that is potentially related to tumorigenic growth. We have developed a humanized murine xenograft model in which developing human melanomas may be sequentially studied during early stages of tumorigenic growth within a physiological human dermal microenvironment. Nodal protein localized diffusely to melanoma cell membranes, with occasional foci of accentuated reactivity in patterns suggestive of channel formation. Similar findings were detected in a limited number of patient-derived tumors. In situ hybridization confirmed Nodal mRNA to be restricted to tumor cells within xenografts that formed arborizing networks in patterns consistent with VM. These data indicate that Nodal gene expression is associated with formation of VM-like structures in a physiologically relevant model of human melanoma tumorigenesis, and further support a key role for Nodal expression in the formation of channel-like structures. The humanized xenograft model should be useful in future studies to define the mechanistic pathways responsible for VM and melanoma progression.

  18. Loss of SUFU Function in Familial Multiple Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Aavikko, Mervi; Li, Song-Ping; Saarinen, Silva; Alhopuro, Pia; Kaasinen, Eevi; Morgunova, Ekaterina; Li, Yilong; Vesanen, Kari; Smith, Miriam J.; Evans, D. Gareth R.; Pöyhönen, Minna; Kiuru, Anne; Auvinen, Anssi; Aaltonen, Lauri A.; Taipale, Jussi; Vahteristo, Pia

    2012-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common primary tumors of the CNS and account for up to 30% of all CNS tumors. An increased risk of meningiomas has been associated with certain tumor-susceptibility syndromes, especially neurofibromatosis type II, but no gene defects predisposing to isolated familial meningiomas have thus far been identified. Here, we report on a family of five meningioma-affected siblings, four of whom have multiple tumors. No NF2 mutations were identified in the germline or tumors. We combined genome-wide linkage analysis and exome sequencing, and we identified in suppressor of fused homolog (Drosophila), SUFU, a c.367C>T (p.Arg123Cys) mutation segregating with the meningiomas in the family. The variation was not present in healthy controls, and all seven meningiomas analyzed displayed loss of the wild-type allele according to the classic two-hit model for tumor-suppressor genes. In silico modeling predicted the variant to affect the tertiary structure of the protein, and functional analyses showed that the activity of the altered SUFU was significantly reduced and therefore led to dysregulated hedgehog (Hh) signaling. SUFU is a known tumor-suppressor gene previously associated with childhood medulloblastoma predisposition. Our genetic and functional analyses indicate that germline mutations in SUFU also predispose to meningiomas, particularly to multiple meningiomas. It is possible that other genic mutations resulting in aberrant activation of the Hh pathway might underlie meningioma predisposition in families with an unknown etiology. PMID:22958902

  19. Cavernous Hemangioma of the Skull and Meningioma: Association or Coincidence?

    PubMed Central

    Kilani, M.; Darmoul, M.; Hammedi, F.; Ben Nsir, A.; Hattab, M. N.

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous cavernous hemangiomas of the skull are rare. Meningiomas are quite frequently encountered in a neurosurgical practice. The association between these two entities is nevertheless very uncommon. The authors present a case of a 72-year-old woman suffering from headache. The MRI showed a parietal meningioma with adjacent thick bone. The meningioma and the bone were removed. The histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of meningioma and revealed a cavernoma of the skull. The relationship between the lesions suggests more than a coincidental association. Several hypotheses are proposed to explain common causal connections. PMID:25960899

  20. Activation of Yes-Associated Protein in Low-Grade Meningiomas Is Regulated by Merlin, Cell Density, and Extracellular Matrix Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Tanahashi, Kuniaki; Natsume, Atsushi; Ohka, Fumiharu; Motomura, Kazuya; Alim, Adiljan; Tanaka, Ichidai; Senga, Takeshi; Harada, Ichiro; Fukuyama, Ryuichi; Sumiyoshi, Naoyuki; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2015-07-01

    The NF2 gene product Merlin is a protein containing ezrin, radixin, and moesin domains; it is a member of the 4.1 protein superfamily associated with the membrane cytoskeleton and also interacts with cell surface molecules. The mammalian Hippo cascade, a downstream signaling cascade of merlin, inactivates the Yes-associated protein (YAP). Yes-associated protein is activated by loss of the NF2 gene and functions as an oncogene in meningioma cells; however, the factors controlling YAP expression, phosphorylation, and subcellular localization in meningiomas have not been fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that merlin expression is heterogeneous in 1 NF2 gene-negative and 3 NF2 gene-positive World Health Organization grade I meningiomas. In the NF2 gene-positive meningiomas, regions with low levels of merlin (tumor rims) had greater numbers of cells with nuclear YAP versus regions with high merlin levels (tumor cores). Merlin expression and YAP phosphorylation were also affected by cell density in the IOMM-Lee and HKBMM human meningioma cell lines; nuclear localization of YAP was regulated by cell density and extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness in IOMM-Lee cells. These results suggest that cell density and ECM stiffness may contribute to the heterogeneous loss of merlin and increased nuclear YAP expression in human meningiomas.

  1. Isolation of alpha 1-protease inhibitor from human normal and malignant ovarian tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Bagdasarian, A; Wheeler, J; Stewart, G J; Ahmed, S S; Colman, R W

    1981-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are associated with normal and neoplastic tissues. Therefore protease inhibitors might also be involved in the control of cell function. alpha 1-protease antigen and antitryptic activity have been found in normal and neoplastic human ovarian homogenate. The inhibitor has been localized to ovarian stromal cells or tumor cells by immunoperoxidase staining. The protein was purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by alkaline gel and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis. Immunochemical studies revealed antigenic similarity of plasma alpha 1-protease inhibitor by double immunodiffusion and similar mobility on immunoelectrophoresis and two-dimensional electroimmunodiffusion. The molecular weight was similar to that described for plasma alpha 1-protease inhibitor: 60,000 by gel filtration and 53,500 by SDS electrophoresis. Furthermore, the phenotypic pattern as determined by acid starch gel electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation was PiMM, which is the predominant genetic variant in normal plasma alpha 1-protease inhibitor. An inhibitor ws isolated and purified from an ovarian carcinoma that exhibited functional, immunochemical, and physical similarity to the normal ovarian alpha 1-protease inhibitor. alpha 1-protease inhibitor from normal and malignant ovaries competitively inhibited bovine pancreatic trypsin at incubation times of 5 min at 30 degrees C. Inhibition constant (Ki) values were calculated at 0.67 and 0.51 inhibitory units, respectively. The alpha 1-protease inhibitor in malignant cells may be a factor in the control of proliferation in this tissue. Since ovulation is in part a proteolytic event, the alpha 1-protease inhibitor in ovarian cells may play a role in the control of this specialized tissue. Persistance of this protein in malignant ovarian tissue may be a vestige of its differentiated origin. Images PMID:6161137

  2. Stereotactic radiotherapy of meningiomas compressing optical pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, Klaus-Detlef . E-mail: khamm@erfurt.helios-kliniken.de; Henzel, Martin; Gross, Markus W.; Surber, Gunnar; Kleinert, Gabriele; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Microsurgical resection is usually the treatment of choice for meningiomas, especially for those that compress the optical pathways. However, in many cases of skull-base meningiomas a high risk of neurological deficits and recurrences exist in cases where the complete tumor removal was not possible. In such cases (fractionated) stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) can offer an alternative treatment option. We evaluated the local control rate, symptomatology, and toxicity. Patients and Methods: Between 1997 and 2003, 183 patients with skull-base meningiomas were treated with SRT, among them were 65 patients with meningiomas that compressed optical pathways (64 benign, 1 atypical). Of these 65 cases, 20 were treated with SRT only, 27 were subtotally resected before SRT, and 18 underwent multiple tumor resections before SRT. We investigated the results until 2005, with a median follow-up of 45 months (range, 22-83 months). The tumor volume (TV = gross tumor volume) ranged from 0.61 to 90.20 cc (mean, 18.9 cc). Because of the risk of new visual disturbances, the dose per fraction was either 2 or 1.8 Gy for all patients, to a total dose of 50 to 60 Gy. Results: The overall survival and the progression-free survival rates for 5 years were assessed to 100% in this patient group. To date, no progression for these meningiomas have been observed. Quantitatively, tumor shrinkage of more than 20%, or more than 2 mm in diameter, was proved in 35 of the 65 cases after SRT. In 29 of the 65 patients, at least 1 of the symptoms improved. On application of the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), acute toxicity (Grade 3) was seen in 1 case (worsening of conjunctivitis). Another 2 patients developed late toxicity by LENT-SOMA score, 1 x Grade 1 and 1 x Grade 3 (field of vision loss). Conclusion: As a low-risk and effective treatment option for tumor control, SRT with 1.8 to 2.0 Gy per fraction can also be recommended in case of meningiomas that compress optical pathways. An

  3. High in vivo rates of methionine biosynthesis in transformed human and malignant rat cells auxotrophic for methionine.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, R M; Erbe, R W

    1976-05-01

    Unlike normal cells, malignant rat and two simian virus 40-transformed human cell lines can neither grow nor survive in B12-and folate-supplemented media in which methionine is replaced by homocysteine. Yet three lines of evidence indicate that the malignant and transformed cells synthesize large amounts of methionine endogenously through the reaction catalyzed by 5-methyltetrahydropteroyl-L-glutamate; L-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.13). (1) The activities of this methyltransferase were comparable in extracts of malignant and normal cells. (2) The uptake of radioactive label from [5-14C]methyltetrahydropteroyl-L-glutamic acid (5-Me-H4PteGlu) was at least as great in the malignant cells as in the normals and was nearly totally dependent on the addition of homocysteine, the methyl acceptor; furthermore, 59-84% of the label incorporated by cells was recovered as methionine.

  4. Overexpression of CD99 Increases the Migration and Invasiveness of Human Malignant Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Seol, Ho Jun; Chang, Jong Hee; Yamamoto, Junkoh; Romagnuolo, Rocco; Suh, Youngchul; Weeks, Adrienne; Agnihotri, Sameer; Smith, Christian A; Rutka, James T

    2012-09-01

    The malignant glioma is the most common primary human brain tumor, and its migration and invasiveness away from the primary tumor mass are considered a leading cause of tumor recurrence and treatment failure. Recently, gene expression profiling revealed that the transmembrane glycoprotein CD99 is more highly expressed in malignant glioma than in normal brain. Although its function is not completely understood, CD99 is implicated in cell adhesion and migration in a variety of different cell types. CD99 has wild-type and splice variant isoforms. Previous studies have shown that wild-type CD99 may be an oncosuppressor in some tumors, distinct from the role of the splice variant isoform. In this study, our data reveal that only wild-type CD99 is expressed in human glioma cells and tissues. Using a tissue microarray, we validated that gliomas demonstrate higher expression of CD99 compared with nonneoplastic brain. To assess the role of CD99 in glioma migration and invasion, we inhibited CD99 expression by siRNA and demonstrated decreased glioma migration and invasion. In contrast, when CD99 was overexpressed in glioma cells, we observed enhancement of cell migration and invasiveness. An orthotopic brain tumor model demonstrates that CD99 overexpression significantly increases invasiveness and decreases survival rate. Interestingly, Rac activity was decreased and Rho activity was increased in CD99 overexpressing glioma cells, and the proportion of amoeboid cells to mesenchymal cells was significantly increased. Taken together, our findings suggest that CD99 may play an important role in the migration and invasion of human gliomas independent of Akt, ERK, or JNK signaling pathways. Moreover, CD99 might be involved in amoeboid-mesenchymal transition in glioma migration. CD99 may be an important future target to inhibit migration and invasion, especially in CD99-expressing gliomas. PMID:23486730

  5. The Microbiome of Aseptically Collected Human Breast Tissue in Benign and Malignant Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hieken, Tina J.; Chen, Jun; Hoskin, Tanya L.; Walther-Antonio, Marina; Johnson, Stephen; Ramaker, Sheri; Xiao, Jian; Radisky, Derek C.; Knutson, Keith L.; Kalari, Krishna R.; Yao, Janet Z.; Baddour, Larry M.; Chia, Nicholas; Degnim, Amy C.

    2016-01-01

    Globally breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women. The breast consists of epithelium, stroma and a mucosal immune system that make up a complex microenvironment. Growing awareness of the role of microbes in the microenvironment recently has led to a series of findings important for human health. The microbiome has been implicated in cancer development and progression at a variety of body sites including stomach, colon, liver, lung, and skin. In this study, we assessed breast tissue microbial signatures in intraoperatively obtained samples using 16S rDNA hypervariable tag sequencing. Our results indicate a distinct breast tissue microbiome that is different from the microbiota of breast skin tissue, breast skin swabs, and buccal swabs. Furthermore, we identify distinct microbial communities in breast tissues from women with cancer as compared to women with benign breast disease. Malignancy correlated with enrichment in taxa of lower abundance including the genera Fusobacterium, Atopobium, Gluconacetobacter, Hydrogenophaga and Lactobacillus. This work confirms the existence of a distinct breast microbiome and differences between the breast tissue microbiome in benign and malignant disease. These data provide a foundation for future investigation on the role of the breast microbiome in breast carcinogenesis and breast cancer prevention. PMID:27485780

  6. Selective growth inhibition of a human malignant melanoma cell line by sesame oil in vitro.

    PubMed

    Smith, D E; Salerno, J W

    1992-06-01

    Ayurveda, an ancient and comprehensive system of natural medicine, recommends regular topical application to the skin of sesame oil, above all other oils, as a health-promoting procedure. We examined the effect of sesame oil and several other vegetable oils and their major component fatty acids on the proliferation rate of human normal and malignant melanocytes growing at similar rates in serum-free media. We found that sesame and safflower oils, both of which contain large amounts of linoleate in triglyceride form, selectively inhibited malignant melanoma growth over normal melanocytes whereas coconut, olive and mineral oils, which contain little or no linoleate as triglyceride, did not. These oils were tested at a range of 10-300 micrograms/ml. We found that of the fatty acids tested, only linoleic acid was selectively inhibitory while palmitic and oleic were not. These fatty acids were tested in the range of 3-100 micrograms/ml. These results suggest that certain vegetable oils rich in linoleic acid, such as the sesame oil, recommended for topical use by Ayurveda, may contain selective antineoplastic properties which are similar to those demonstrated for essential polyunsaturated fatty acids and their metabolites. This suggests that whole vegetable oils may have potential clinical usefulness.

  7. Human pregnane X receptor compromises the function of p53 and promotes malignant transformation

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, D; Cherian, M; Wu, J; Chen, T

    2016-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is well established as a nuclear receptor that has a central role in xenobiotic metabolism and disposition. However, emerging evidence suggests that PXR is also a regulator of apoptosis, promoting a malignant phenotype both in vitro and in vivo. The tumor suppressor p53 can be activated in the presence of DNA damage and induce cell cycle arrest to allow for DNA repair or, ultimately, apoptosis to suppress tumor formation. We previously identified p53 as a novel PXR-associated protein by using a mass spectrometric approach. In the current study, we identified a novel inhibitory effect of PXR on p53, revealing an anti-apoptotic function of PXR in colon carcinogenesis. PXR expression reduced p53 transactivation and the expression of its downstream target genes involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by decreasing p53 recruitment to the promoter regions of these genes. Consistent with the inhibitory effect of PXR on p53, elevated PXR levels decreased doxorubicin- or nutlin-3a-mediated toxicity and promoted malignant transformation in colon cancer cells. Our findings show for the first time that PXR expression modulates p53 target gene promoter binding and contributes to the downregulation of p53 function in human colon cancer cells. These results define the functional significance of PXR expression in modulating p53-mediated mechanisms of tumor suppression. PMID:27547448

  8. Role of p53 family members p73 and p63 in human hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Alexandrova, Evguenia M; Moll, Ute M

    2012-11-01

    p53, mutated in over half of human cancers and about 13% of all hematological malignancies, maintains genomic integrity and triggers cellular senescence and apoptosis of damaged cells. In contrast to p53, the homologs p73 and p63 play critical roles in development of the central nervous system and skin/limbs, respectively. Moreover, dependent on the context they can exert tumor suppressor activities that cooperate with p53. Unlike p53, p73 and p63 are rarely mutated in cancers. Instead, up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic dominant-negative ΔNp73 and ΔNp63 isoforms is the most frequent abnormality in solid cancers. In hematological malignancies the most frequent p73 defect is promoter methylation and loss of expression, associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes. This suggests an essential tumor suppressor role of p73 in blood cells, also supported by genetic mouse models. Many therapeutic approaches aiming to restore p73 activity are currently being investigated. In contrast, the most frequent p63 abnormality is protein overexpression, associated with higher disease grade and poorer prognosis. Surprisingly, although available data are still scarce, the emerging picture is up-regulation of transactivation-competent TAp63 isoforms, suggesting a tumor-promoting role in this context. PMID:22497596

  9. Proton beam irradiation stimulates migration and invasion of human U87 malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zaboronok, Alexander; Isobe, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Sato, Eisuke; Takada, Kenta; Sakae, Takeji; Tsurushima, Hideo; Matsumura, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Migration and invasion of malignant glioma play a major role in tumor progression and can be increased by low doses of gamma or X-ray irradiation, especially when the migrated tumor cells are located at a distance from the main tumor mass or postoperative cavity and are irradiated in fractions. We studied the influence of proton beam irradiation on migration and invasion of human U87 malignant glioma (U87MG) cells. Irradiation at 4 and 8 Gy increased cell migration by 9.8% (±4, P = 0.032) and 11.6% (±6.6, P = 0.031) and invasion by 45.1% (±16.5, P = 0.04) and 40.5% (±12.7, P = 0.041), respectively. After irradiation at 2 and 16 Gy, cell motility did not differ from that at 0 Gy. We determined that an increase in proton beam irradiation dose to over 16 Gy might provide tumor growth control, although additional specific treatment might be necessary to prevent the potentially increased motility of glioma cells during proton beam therapy. PMID:24187331

  10. The Microbiome of Aseptically Collected Human Breast Tissue in Benign and Malignant Disease.

    PubMed

    Hieken, Tina J; Chen, Jun; Hoskin, Tanya L; Walther-Antonio, Marina; Johnson, Stephen; Ramaker, Sheri; Xiao, Jian; Radisky, Derek C; Knutson, Keith L; Kalari, Krishna R; Yao, Janet Z; Baddour, Larry M; Chia, Nicholas; Degnim, Amy C

    2016-01-01

    Globally breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women. The breast consists of epithelium, stroma and a mucosal immune system that make up a complex microenvironment. Growing awareness of the role of microbes in the microenvironment recently has led to a series of findings important for human health. The microbiome has been implicated in cancer development and progression at a variety of body sites including stomach, colon, liver, lung, and skin. In this study, we assessed breast tissue microbial signatures in intraoperatively obtained samples using 16S rDNA hypervariable tag sequencing. Our results indicate a distinct breast tissue microbiome that is different from the microbiota of breast skin tissue, breast skin swabs, and buccal swabs. Furthermore, we identify distinct microbial communities in breast tissues from women with cancer as compared to women with benign breast disease. Malignancy correlated with enrichment in taxa of lower abundance including the genera Fusobacterium, Atopobium, Gluconacetobacter, Hydrogenophaga and Lactobacillus. This work confirms the existence of a distinct breast microbiome and differences between the breast tissue microbiome in benign and malignant disease. These data provide a foundation for future investigation on the role of the breast microbiome in breast carcinogenesis and breast cancer prevention. PMID:27485780

  11. Value of human chorionic gonadotropin compared to CEA in discriminating benign from malignant effusions.

    PubMed

    Lamerz, R; Stoetzer, O J; Mezger, J; Brandt, A; Darsow, M; Wilmanns, W

    1999-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) is expressed in germ cell tumors and urothelial, breast, lung and colon cancers. The aim of the study was to investigate if the determination of HCG in comparison with CEA is able to discriminate between malignant and benign effusions. Effusion and partially serum samples of 61 patients with benign (g.i., heart/kidney isnuff.) and 116 patients with malignant diseases (g.i., gynec., lung, misc., CUP) were investigated. HCG was specifically determined by an IRMA using 2 monoclonal antibodies, CEA by a conventional double Ab RIA. Cytological staining was preformed using the Pappenheim-method on cytospin preparations. Significant differences (p < 0.001) were found for HCG between benign and malignant ascitic effusions with the best discrimination at 5 IU/l (ROC) and an overall sensitivity of 31.3% (spec. vs benign eff. 93.4%) increasing in subgroups from hematol. (5.8%) < misc. (31.3%) < gynec. (32.1%) < g.i. (36%) < lung (38.1%) to CUP (50%). CEA also showed significant differences between benign and malignant total and ascitic effusions, and weaker for the pleural subgroup (cutoff 9 ng/ml) with a total sensitivity of 44.6% (sp = 100%) increasing from misc. (30.8%) < lung (47.1%) < CUP (50%) < gynec. (60%) < g.i. (60.9%). Comparative cytology and TM determinations increased the positiverate of cytology (45.2%) to 58.3% for either cytology or HCG positive cases, or to 61.6% for either cytology or CEA positive cases. For the combined determination of cytologoy and HCG and CEA, the overall TM positive rate for 33 cytology-pos. cases was 78.8%, but in 40 cytology-negative cases 37.5% for TM positive cases. In conclusion HCG is useful in ascitic > pleural effusions with high specificity (90% at 5 IU/l) but low sensitivity of 31% increasing in g.i., lung and gynecologic cases, CEA a more general TM with higher sensitivity of 45% increasing in g.i., gynecologic and lung cases (sp. 100% at 9 ng/ml) both adding significantly to cytology

  12. Fourth ventricle meningiomas: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Pichierri, Angelo; Ruggeri, Andrea; Morselli, Carlotta; Delfini, Roberto

    2011-08-01

    Fourth ventricle meningiomas (FVMs) are rare, often misdiagnosed, lesions. To the best of our knowledge, 47 cases have been reported in the literature: we describe our series of three cases treated at our Institution, focusing on some diagnostic tips and intraoperative features of these tumours. Our three patients have a history of headache. Gait disturbances, vomiting and/or diplopia complicated the clinical picture before the referral at our Department. The operations were uneventful, and the patients fully recovered from neurological symptoms. They are free of recurrence at a median follow-up of 19 years. FVMs are rare lesions, which are difficult to differentiate preoperatively from the much more common ependymomas. A preoperative distinction would be extremely advantageous: indeed, although both tumours share similar radiological and clinical patterns, they clearly differ as to surgical difficulty and outcome. In fact, meningiomas are comparatively easier to remove, granting better clinical results.

  13. Olfactory groove meningiomas: approaches and complications.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Pires de; Tahara, Adriana; Almeida, Antonio Nogueira; Simm, Renata; Silva, Arnaldo Neves da; Maldaun, Marcos Vinicius Calfatt; Panagopoulos, Alexandros Theodoros; Zicarelli, Carlos Alexandre; Silva, Pedro Gabriel

    2009-09-01

    Olfactory groove meningiomas (OGM) account for 4.5% of all intracranial meningiomas. We report 21 patients with OGMs. Tumors were operated on using three surgical approaches: bifrontal (7 patients), fronto-pterional (11 patients) and fronto-orbital (3 patients). Total tumor removal (Simpson Grade 1) was achieved in 13 patients and Simpson II in 8 patients. Perioperative mortality was 4.76%. The average size of the OGM was 4.3+/-1.1cm. The overall recurrence rate was 19%. We preferred to use the pterional approach, which provides quick access to the tumor with less brain exposure. It also allows complete drainage of cisternal cerebrospinal fluid, providing a good level of brain relaxation during surgery. However, for long, thin tumors, hemostasis can be difficult using this approach.

  14. Proteomic and bioinformatic analysis of mammalian SWI/SNF complexes identifies extensive roles in human malignancy.

    PubMed

    Kadoch, Cigall; Hargreaves, Diana C; Hodges, Courtney; Elias, Laura; Ho, Lena; Ranish, Jeff; Crabtree, Gerald R

    2013-06-01

    Subunits of mammalian SWI/SNF (mSWI/SNF or BAF) complexes have recently been implicated as tumor suppressors in human malignancies. To understand the full extent of their involvement, we conducted a proteomic analysis of endogenous mSWI/SNF complexes, which identified several new dedicated, stable subunits not found in yeast SWI/SNF complexes, including BCL7A, BCL7B and BCL7C, BCL11A and BCL11B, BRD9 and SS18. Incorporating these new members, we determined mSWI/SNF subunit mutation frequency in exome and whole-genome sequencing studies of primary human tumors. Notably, mSWI/SNF subunits are mutated in 19.6% of all human tumors reported in 44 studies. Our analysis suggests that specific subunits protect against cancer in specific tissues. In addition, mutations affecting more than one subunit, defined here as compound heterozygosity, are prevalent in certain cancers. Our studies demonstrate that mSWI/SNF is the most frequently mutated chromatin-regulatory complex (CRC) in human cancer, exhibiting a broad mutation pattern, similar to that of TP53. Thus, proper functioning of polymorphic BAF complexes may constitute a major mechanism of tumor suppression.

  15. Management of Intracranial Meningiomas Using Keyhole Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Joshua D; Conner, Andrew K; Bonney, Phillip A; Archer, Jacob B; Christensen, Blake; Smith, Jacqueline; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Keyhole craniotomies are increasingly being used for lesions of the skull base. Here we review our recent experience with these approaches for resection of intracranial meningiomas. Methods: Clinical and operative data were gathered on all patients treated with keyhole approaches by the senior author from January 2012 to June 2013. Thirty-one meningiomas were resected in 27 patients, including 9 supratentorial, 5 anterior fossa, 7 middle fossa, 6 posterior fossa, and 4 complex skull base tumors. Twenty-nine tumors were WHO Grade I, and 2 were Grade II.  Results: The mean operative time was 8 hours, 22 minutes (range, 2:55-16:14) for skull-base tumors, and 4 hours, 27 minutes (range, 1:45-7:13) for supratentorial tumors. Simpson Resection grades were as follows: Grade I = 8, II = 8, III = 1, IV = 15, V = 0. The median postoperative hospital stay was 4 days (range, 1-20 days). In the 9 patients presenting with some degree of visual loss, 7 saw improvement or complete resolution. In the 6 patients presenting with cranial nerve palsies, 4 experienced improvement or resolution of the deficit postoperatively. Four patients experienced new neurologic deficits, all of which were improved or resolved at the time of the last follow-up. Technical aspects and surgical nuances of these approaches for management of intracranial meningiomas are discussed.  Conclusions: With careful preoperative evaluation, keyhole approaches can be utilized singly or in combination to manage meningiomas in a wide variety of locations with satisfactory results. PMID:27284496

  16. Radiosurgery of Spinal Meningiomas and Schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Kufeld, M.; Wowra, B.; Muacevic, A.; Zausinger, Stefan; Tonn, Jörg-Christian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of this study is to analyze local control, clinical symptoms and toxicity after image-guided radiosurgery of spinal meningiomas and schwannomas. Standard treatment of benign spinal lesions is microsurgical resection. While a few publications have reported about radiosurgery for benign spinal lesions, this is the first study analyzing the outcome of robotic radiosurgery for benign spinal tumors, treated exclusively with a non-invasive, fiducial free, single-fraction setup. Thirty-six patients with spinal meningiomas or schwannomas were treated, utilizing a robotic radiosurgery system (CyberKnife®, Accuray Inc. Sunnyvale CA), and were followed prospectively. Medical history, histology, clinical symptoms and radiographic outcome were recorded. Thirty-nine spinal lesions were treated because of tumor recurrence, remnants after microsurgery, multiple lesions, or rejection of open surgery. Median age was 45 years (range 18–80 years). Median target volume was 3.4 cm3 (range 0.2–43.4 cm3). Histology revealed 28 schwannomas and 11 meningiomas (WHO grade I). All spinal levels were affected. Median prescription dose was 14 Gray (95% C.I. 13.4–14 Gy) to the 70% isodose. After a median follow-up of 18 months (range 6–50 months) no local tumor progression was detected. 20 lesions (51%) remained stable, 19 tumors (49%) decreased in size. One patient with schwannomatosis was treated repeatedly for three new tumor locations. Pain was the initial symptom in 16 of 25 schwannoma patients, and in 3 of 11 patients with meningiomas. Pain levels decreased in 8/19 patients. All but one patient with motor deficits remained clinically stable. No myelopathic signs where found. Single-session radiosurgery for benign spinal tumors in selected patients has proven to inhibit tumor progression within the observed period without signs of early toxicity. Radiosurgery offers an additional treatment option, if microsurgery is not feasible in cases of tumor recurrence, post

  17. FTIR microscopic comparative study on normal, premalignant, and malignant tissues of human intenstine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordechai, Shaul; Argov, Shmuel; Salman, Ahmad O.; Cohen, Beny; Ramesh, Jagannathan; Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Goldstein, Jed; Sinelnikov, Igor

    2000-07-01

    Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) employs a unique approach to optical diagnosis of tissue pathology based on the characteristic molecular vibrational spectra of the tissue. The architectural changes in the cellular and sub-cellular levels developing in abnormal tissue, including a majority of cancer forms, manifest themselves in different optical signatures, which can be detected in infrared spectroscopy. The biological systems we have studied include normal, premalignant (polyp) and malignant human colonic tissues from three patients. Our method is based on microscopic infrared study (FTIR-microscopy) of thin tissue specimens and a direct comparison with normal histopathological analysis, which serves as a `gold' reference. The normal intestine tissue has a stronger absorption than polyp and cancerous types over a wide region in all three cases. The detailed analysis showed that there is a significant decrease in total phosphate and creatine contents for polyp and cancerous tissue types in comparison to the controls.

  18. Supratentorial meningiomas of the skull base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maira, G.; Amante, P. R.; Anile, C.; Carletti, S.

    1996-12-01

    Different lasers are today used in many neurosurgical centers, in clinical practice or in basic and clinical research. Even if the laser effects have been studied in other pathological conditions, the laser technology has been mostly applied to the treatment of intracranial tumors. This paper will be mainly concerned with the aspects of surgical technique regarding the supratentorial meningiomas of the skull base, derived from our experience with a series of skull base meningiomas operated on between January 1981 and July 1996. The subject of our analysis are 110 patients who underwent a total of 121 operations. In addition to simple bipolar coagulation and removal of the mass in small coagulated fragments, we have utilized various lasers with different sources of emission, namely CO2, Argon and Nd:YAG. The CO2 laser was utilized in 10 cases, the Argon laser in 2 cases and the Nd:YAG laser in 27 cases in both the contact and remote modalities. Among these last 27 patients a total removal was achieved in 96 percent, against 86 percent obtained in the remaining 83 meningiomas. Six patients were reoperated on for recurrences; none of them had been operated on using the Nd:YAG laser.

  19. A B-Cell Superantigen Induces the Apoptosis of Murine and Human Malignant B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Daniela; Duarte, Alejandra; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    B-cell superantigens (Sags) bind to conserved sites of the VH or VL regions of immunoglobulin molecules outside their complementarity-determining regions causing the apoptosis of normal cognate B cells. No attempts to investigate whether B-cell Sags are able to induce the apoptosis of cognate malignant B cells were reported. In the present study we show that protein L (PpL), secreted by Finegoldia magna, a B-cell Sag which interacts with κ+ bearing cells, induces the apoptosis of murine and human κ+ lymphoma B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis was not altered by caspase-8 inhibitor. No alterations in the levels of Bid, Fas and Fas-L were found suggesting that PpL does not activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was clearly indicated by: i) alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) both in murine and human lymphoma cells exposed to PpL; ii) decreased levels of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor; iii) significant increases of Bim and Bax protein levels and downregulation of Bcl-2; iv) the translocation from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria of Bax and Bim pro-apoptotic proteins and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor and v) the translocation of Bcl-2 protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor. The possibility of a therapeutic use of Sags in lymphoma/leukemia B cell malignancies is discussed. PMID:27603942

  20. A B-Cell Superantigen Induces the Apoptosis of Murine and Human Malignant B Cells.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Daniela; Duarte, Alejandra; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    B-cell superantigens (Sags) bind to conserved sites of the VH or VL regions of immunoglobulin molecules outside their complementarity-determining regions causing the apoptosis of normal cognate B cells. No attempts to investigate whether B-cell Sags are able to induce the apoptosis of cognate malignant B cells were reported. In the present study we show that protein L (PpL), secreted by Finegoldia magna, a B-cell Sag which interacts with κ+ bearing cells, induces the apoptosis of murine and human κ+ lymphoma B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis was not altered by caspase-8 inhibitor. No alterations in the levels of Bid, Fas and Fas-L were found suggesting that PpL does not activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was clearly indicated by: i) alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) both in murine and human lymphoma cells exposed to PpL; ii) decreased levels of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor; iii) significant increases of Bim and Bax protein levels and downregulation of Bcl-2; iv) the translocation from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria of Bax and Bim pro-apoptotic proteins and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor and v) the translocation of Bcl-2 protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor. The possibility of a therapeutic use of Sags in lymphoma/leukemia B cell malignancies is discussed. PMID:27603942

  1. Role of malignant ascites on human mesothelial cells and their gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Malignant ascites is often present at diagnostic in women with advanced ovarian cancer (OC) and its presence is associated with a worse outcome. Human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs) are key components of malignant ascites. Although the interplay between HPMCs and OC cells is believed to be critical for tumor progression, it has not been well characterized. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of ascites on HPMCs and clarify the role of HPMCs in OC progression. Methods Human OC ascites and benign peritoneal fluids were assessed for their ability to stimulate HPMC proliferation. Conditioned medium from ascites- and benign fluid-stimulated HPMCs were compared for their ability to attenuate apoptosis induced by TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). We conducted a comparative analysis of global expression changes in ascites-stimulated HPMCs using Agilent oligonucleotide microarrays. Results As compared to benign peritoneal fluids, malignant ascites stimulated the proliferation of HPMCs. TRAIL-induced apoptosis was attenuated in OC cells exposed to conditioned medium from ascites-stimulated HPMCs as compared to OC cells exposed to conditioned medium from benign fluid-stimulated HPMCs. A total of 649 genes were differentially expressed in ascites-stimulated HPMCs. Based on a ratio of more than 1.5-fold and a P < 0.05, 484 genes were up-regulated and 165 genes were down-regulated in ascites-exposed HPMCs. Stimulation of HPMCs with OC ascites resulted in differential expression of genes mainly associated with the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, cell death, cell cycle and cell assembly and organization, compared to benign peritoneal fluids. Top networks up-regulated by OC ascites included Akt and NF-κB survival pathways whereas vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway was down-regulated. Conclusions The results of this study not only provide evidence supporting the importance of the interplay between cancer

  2. Functional Expression of TWEAK and the Receptor Fn14 in Human Malignant Ovarian Tumors: Possible Implication for Ovarian Tumor Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing; Ding, Chuanwei; Xu, Hai-bo; Qiu, Lihua; Di, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this current study was to investigate the expression of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) and its receptor fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) in human malignant ovarian tumors, and test TWEAK’s potential role on tumor progression in cell models in-vitro. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC), we found that TWEAK and its receptor Fn14 were expressed in human malignant ovarian tumors, but not in normal ovarian tissues or in borderline/benign epithelial ovarian tumors. High levels of TWEAK expression was detected in the majority of malignant tumors (36 out of 41, 87.80%). Similarly, 35 out of 41 (85.37%) malignant ovarian tumors were Fn14 positive. In these malignant ovarian tumors, however, TWEAK/Fn14 expression was not corrected with patients’ clinical subtype/stages or pathological features. In vitro, we demonstrated that TWEAK only inhibited ovarian cancer HO-8910PM cell proliferation in combination with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), whereas either TWEAK or TNF-α alone didn’t affect HO-8910PM cell growth. TWEAK promoted TNF-α production in cultured THP-1 macrophages. Meanwhile, conditioned media from TWEAK-activated macrophages inhibited cultured HO-8910PM cell proliferation and invasion. Further, TWEAK increased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) production in cultured HO-8910PM cells to possibly recruit macrophages. Our results suggest that TWEAK/Fn14, by activating macrophages, could be ovarian tumor suppressors. The unique expression of TWEAK/Fn14 in malignant tumors indicates that it might be detected as a malignant ovarian tumor marker. PMID:23469193

  3. Combination effect of photodynamic therapy using NPe6 with pemetrexed for human malignant pleural mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed

    Maehara, Sachio; Usuda, Jitsuo; Ishizumi, Taichiro; Ichinose, Shuji; Ohtani, Keishi; Inoue, Tatsuya; Imai, Kentaro; Furumoto, Hideyuki; Kudo, Yujin; Kajiwara, Naohiro; Ohira, Tatsuya; Ikeda, Norihiko

    2015-02-01

    To identify a possible new treatment modality for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), we examined whether combination treatment consisting of pemetrexed chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT) using the photosensitizer NPe6, enhanced the antitumor effect in both in vitro and in vivo models. We also investigated preclinical treatment schedules. Four human malignant mesothelioma cell lines (MSTO‑211H, H2052, H2452 and H28) were assayed using the WST assay after treatment with pemetrexed and NPe6‑PDT. The treatment schedule for the combination treatment was examined using nude mice. Pemetrexed pre‑treatment enhanced the lethal effect of NPe6‑PDT in the four malignant mesothelioma cell lines, but NPe6‑PDT followed by pemetrexed treatment did not enhance cell lethality in the in vitro assay. Pemetrexed pre‑treatment did not enhance the intracellular accumulation of NPe6, which is one of the determinants of the antitumor effect of PDT. In nude mice injected with MSTO‑211H cells and then treated using a combination of pemetrexed and NPe6‑PDT (10 mg/kg NPe6, 10 J/cm(2) laser irradiation), the tumor volume decreased by 50% but subsequently increased, reaching the pre‑treatment value after 14 days. Pemetrexed treatment followed by NPe6‑PDT resulted in an 80% reduction in the tumor size and inhibited re‑growth. NPe6‑PDT followed by pemetrexed treatment resulted in a 60% reduction in tumor size but did not inhibit re‑growth. NPe6‑PDT induced the expression of thymidylate synthase (TS), which confers resistance to pemetrexed, and NPe6‑PDT followed by pemetrexed treatment did not enhance the treatment outcome in vivo. In conclusion, combination treatment, consisting of pemetrexed followed by NPe6‑PDT, should be further investigated as a new treatment modality for MPM. In the future, this combination treatment may contribute to a reduction in local recurrence and a prolonged survival period in patients with MPM.

  4. Influence of zinc deficiency on AKT-MDM2-P53 signaling axes in normal and malignant human prostate cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With prostate being the highest zinc-accumulating tissue before the onset of cancer, the effects of physiologic levels of zinc on Akt-Mdm2-p53 and Akt-p21 signaling axes in human normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) and malignant prostate LNCaP cells were examined. Cells were cultured for 6 d in...

  5. Preclinical studies identify novel targeted pharmacological strategies for treatment of human malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Favoni, Roberto E; Daga, Antonio; Malatesta, Paolo; Florio, Tullio

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of human malignant pleural mesothelioma (hMPM) is still increasing worldwide. hMPM prognosis is poor even if the median survival time has been slightly improved after the introduction of the up-to-date chemotherapy. Nevertheless, large phase II/III trials support the combination of platinum derivatives and pemetrexed or raltitrexed, as preferred first-line schedule. Better understanding of the molecular machinery of hMPM will lead to the design and synthesis of novel compounds targeted against pathways identified as crucial for hMPM cell proliferation and spreading. Among them, several receptors tyrosine kinase show altered activity in subsets of hMPM. This observation suggests that these kinases might represent novel therapeutic targets in this chemotherapy-resistant disease. Over these foundations, several promising studies are ongoing at preclinical level and novel molecules are currently under evaluation as well. Yet, established tumour cell lines, used for decades to investigate the efficacy of anticancer agents, although still the main source of drug efficacy studies, after long-term cultures tend to biologically diverge from the original tumour, limiting the predictive potential of in vivo efficacy. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of malignant cells capable of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, are believed to play an essential role in cancer initiation, growth, metastasization and relapse, being responsible of chemo- and radiotherapy refractoriness. According to the current carcinogenesis theory, CSCs represent the tumour-initiating cell (TIC) fraction, the only clonogenic subpopulation able to originate a tumour mass. Consequently, the recently described isolation of TICs from hMPM, the proposed main pharmacological target for novel antitumoural drugs, may contribute to better dissect the biology and multidrug resistance pathways controlling hMPM growth. PMID:22289125

  6. Nrf2 Expressions Correlate with WHO Grades in Gliomas and Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wen-Chiuan; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Lin, Chii-Ruey; Yang, Thomas C. K.; Gao, Hong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NFE2L2, also known as Nrf2) is associated with cellular progression and chemotherapeutic resistance in some human cancers. We tested the relationship between Nrf2 expression and survival of patients with primary brain tumors (PBTs). Methods: In order to realize Nrf2 protein expression in gliomas, Western blot analysis was performed in normal brain tissue and U87MG, LN229, GBM8401 and U118MG glioma cell lines protein lysates. Then, U87MG, LN229, and GBM8401 mRNA were applied to performed quantitative RT-PCR for detect Nrf2 gene expression in glioma cell lines. At last, immunohistochemical analysis was used to determine the expression of Nrf2 in samples from 178 PBTs and 10 non-neoplastic brain tissues. Results: In these included in vitro studies, both Nrf2 protein and mRNA expression in all human glioma cell lines were higher than normal brain tissue. Similarly, on the viewpoint of immunohistochemistry, Nrf2 expression in gliomas were positively correlated with World Health Organization (WHO) grades. Additionally, compared with the expression of Nrf2 in non-neoplastic brain tissue, expression in meningiomas was of a stronger intensity and was present in a higher percentage of cells. Furthermore, scores were significantly higher in WHO grade II than in WHO grade I meningiomas. Finally, overall survival tended to be shorter in patients whose PBTs had higher expression of Nrf2, although the correlation was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Nrf2 overexpression positively correlated with WHO grade in gliomas and meningiomas. On the other hand, Nrf2 immunohistochemical stain could help pathologists to differentiate atypical meningiomas from benign tumors. Therefore, Nrf2 expression may be a useful biomarker to predict WHO grade and cellular behavior of PBTs. PMID:27187376

  7. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and lymphoid malignancies in Dominica: a seroprevalence study.

    PubMed

    Adedayo, Olayinka A; Shehu, Sani M

    2004-12-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is endemic in certain regions of the world where it is associated with lymphoid malignancies. Herein we aim to describe the seroprevalence of HTLV-1 in lymphoid malignancies in Dominica. We carried out a 10-year retrospective study of histologically proven hematologic malignancies and HTLV-1 seropositivity at the Princess Margaret Hospital, Dominica. Ninety-eight cases were reviewed (59% males, 41% females), ranging in age from 3 to 91 years. HTLV-1 was seropositive in 38.6% (31/80) of all hematologic malignancies. Three of 6 cases of Hodgkin disease (50%), 16 of 36 (44.4%) of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and 3 out of 8 unclassified lymphomas (37.5%) were seropositive; all 6 cases (100%) of acute adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) were seropositive. One case each of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and myeloproliferative disorder was seropositive. HTLV-1-seropositive lymphomas presented at a younger age than did seronegative cases. Thus, HTLV-1 is significantly associated with lymphoid malignancies in Dominica, and further studies are needed before a causal relationship with Hodgkin disease can be established.

  8. uPAR and cathepsin B shRNA impedes TGF-β1-driven proliferation and invasion of meningioma cells in a XIAP-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gogineni, V R; Gupta, R; Nalla, A K; Velpula, K K; Rao, J S

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) has been linked to immune suppression, tumor angiogenesis, tumor cell migration, tumor cell survival, and tumor cell invasion in many cancers. In the present study, we found abundant expression of TGF-β1 in the microenvironment of four different pathological types of meningioma tumors. TGF-β1 induced invasion in malignant meningioma cells with an associated upregulation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPAR, cathepsin B, and MMP-9, and this increase in proliferation was coupled with the expression of anti-apoptotic and pro-survival signaling molecules. In addition to the intense immunoreactivity of meningioma tumors to X-linked inhibitor to apoptosis (XIAP), its knockdown abolished the TGF-β1-induced proliferation of these cells. The stimulation of XIAP expression and the activation of pSMAD-2 is mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)- and MEK-dependent pathways, and the addition of anti-TGF-β1 antibodies prevented their expression with a consequent decrease in invasion. Bicistronic shRNA constructs targeting uPAR and cathepsin B (pUC) quenched TGF-β1-driven invasion and survival of meningioma cells by downregulation of XIAP and pSMAD-2 expression. Animal models with intracranial tumors showed elevated levels of TGF-β1, XIAP and pSMAD-2, and pUC treatment prevented this increased expression. Thus, targeted silencing of TGF-β1-induced signaling by pUC in meningioma would provide new treatment approaches for management of meningioma. PMID:23222509

  9. Malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Taiclet, L

    1985-01-01

    Despite numerous reviews and clinical reports, much remains to be learned about the cause, treatment, and prevention of malignant hyperthermia.Among the most worrisome concerns of the clinician administering anesthesia is the malignant hyperthermia crisis. When it arises, it is always frightening-and sometimes fatal. Usually occurring very suddenly and without warning, malignant hyperthermia is considered to be a hypercatabolic crisis; the condition is known to affect humans and certain breeds of pigs. The exact triggering mechanisms of malignant hyperthermia (MH) in humans are not known, but a crisis can be initiated by volatile general anesthetics, neuromuscular blocking agents, and amide local anesthetics. Although a history of an MH crisis is a diagnostic aid, previous uneventful exposure to anesthesia does not guarantee the safety of the patient in subsequent anesthetic procedures.(1) For these reasons, it is important for the anesthesiologist to be aware of the initial signs of MH and to be prepared to provide immediate treatment to reverse such a crisis. PMID:3865561

  10. Meningeal fibroma: a rare meningioma mimic.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Aanchal; Sharma, Mehar C; Goyal, Nishant; Sarkar, Chitra; Suri, Vaishali; Garg, Ajay; Kale, Shashank S; Suri, Ashish

    2014-08-01

    Meningeal fibromas are rare intracranial tumors that mimic meningiomas radiologically as well as histologically. The authors report 2 cases of meningeal fibroma with detailed clinical, radiological, histopathological, and immunohistochemical features, and discuss the differential diagnosis of this entity. Knowledge of this rare tumor is essential for pathologists to be able distinguish it from more common meningeal tumors, especially in younger patients. This knowledge is also essential for neurosurgeons, as incomplete resection may lead to tumor recurrence, and such patients require close follow-up.

  11. An optometric purview of intraorbital meningioma.

    PubMed

    Newsome, P R

    1984-04-01

    A 34-year-old black male presented with marked unilateral proptosis and pain in the left eye. Visual acuities were OD 6/7.5 (20/25) and OS 6/120 (20/400). His left eye was exophthalmic , had a Marcus Gunn pupil, and exposure keratitis. Sectorial pallor and a decreased Kestenbaum count were evident on the left optic nerve head. A tentative diagnosis of orbital meningioma was made and later confirmed. Optometric management of the patient, including appropriate screening tests and referrals, are discussed.

  12. Adenovirus-mediated suppression of HMGI(Y) protein synthesis as potential therapy of human malignant neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Scala, Stefania; Portella, Giuseppe; Fedele, Monica; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Fusco, Alfredo

    2000-01-01

    High mobility group I (HMGI) proteins are overexpressed in several human malignant tumors. We previously demonstrated that inhibition of HMGI synthesis prevents thyroid cell transformation. Here, we report that an adenovirus carrying the HMGI(Y) gene in an antisense orientation (Ad-Yas) induced programmed cell death of two human thyroid anaplastic carcinoma cell lines (ARO and FB-1), but not normal thyroid cells. The Ad-Yas virus led to death of lung, colon, and breast carcinoma cells. A control adenovirus carrying the lacZ gene did not inhibit the growth of either normal or neoplastic cells. Ad-Yas treatment of tumors induced in athymic mice by ARO cells caused a drastic reduction in tumor size. Therefore, suppression of HMGI(Y) protein synthesis by an HMGI(Y) antisense adenoviral vector may be a useful treatment strategy in a variety of human malignant neoplasias, in which HMGI(Y) gene overexpression is a general event. PMID:10759549

  13. Human Cytomegalovirus Antigens in Malignant Gliomas as Targets for Adoptive Cellular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Landi, Daniel; Hegde, Meenakshi; Ahmed, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumor in adults, with over 12,000 new cases diagnosed in the United States each year. Over the last decade, investigators have reliably identified human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) proteins, nucleic acids, and virions in most high-grade gliomas, including glioblastoma (GBM). This discovery is significant because HCMV gene products can be targeted by immune-based therapies. In this review, we describe the current level of understanding regarding the presence and role in pathogenesis of HCMV in GBM. We describe our success detecting and expanding HCMV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes to kill GBM cells and explain how these cells can be used as a platform for enhanced cellular therapies. We discuss alternative approaches that capitalize on HCMV infection to treat patients with HCMV-positive tumors. Adoptive cellular therapy for HCMV-positive GBM has been tried in a small number of patients with some benefit, but we reason why, to date, these approaches generally fail to generate long-term remission or cure. We conjecture how cellular therapy for GBM can be improved and describe the barriers that must be overcome to cure these patients. PMID:25505736

  14. β-lapachone suppresses the proliferation of human malignant melanoma cells by targeting specificity protein 1.

    PubMed

    Bang, Woong; Jeon, Young-Joo; Cho, Jin Hyoung; Lee, Ra Ham; Park, Seon-Min; Shin, Jae-Cheon; Choi, Nag-Jin; Choi, Yung Hyun; Cho, Jung-Jae; Seo, Jae-Min; Lee, Seung-Yeop; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Chae, Jung-Il

    2016-02-01

    β-lapachone (β-lap), a novel natural quinone derived from the bark of the Pink trumpet tree (Tabebuia avellanedae) has been demonstrated to have anticancer activity. In this study, we investigated whether β-lap exhibits anti-proliferative effects on two human malignant melanoma (HMM) cell lines, G361 and SK-MEL-28. The effects of β-lap on the HMM cell lines were investigated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)‑5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)‑2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, Annexin V and Dead cell assay, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) assay and western blot analysis. We demonstrated that β-lap significantly induced apoptosis and suppressed cell viability in the HMM cells. Intriguingly, the transcription factor specificity protein 1 (Sp1) was significantly downregulated by β-lap in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, β-lap modulated the protein expression level of the Sp1 regulatory genes including cell cycle regulatory proteins and apoptosis-associated proteins. Taken together, our findings indicated that β-lap modulates Sp1 transactivation and induces apoptotic cell death through the regulation of cell cycle- and apoptosis-associated proteins. Thus, β-lap may be used as a promising anticancer drug for cancer prevention and may improve the clinical outcome of patients with cancer. PMID:26718788

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Malignant Transformation by Low Dose Cadmium in Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kluz, Thomas; Cohen, Lisa; Shen, Steven S.; Costa, Max

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium is a carcinogenic metal, the mechanisms of which are not fully understood. In this study, human bronchial epithelial cells were transformed with sub-toxic doses of cadmium (0.01, 0.05, and 0.1 μM) and transformed clones were characterized for gene expression changes using RNA-seq, as well as other molecular measurements. 440 genes were upregulated and 47 genes were downregulated in cadmium clones relative to control clones over 1.25-fold. Upregulated genes were associated mostly with gene ontology terms related to embryonic development, immune response, and cell movement, while downregulated genes were associated with RNA metabolism and regulation of transcription. Several embryonic genes were upregulated, including the transcription regulator SATB2. SATB2 is critical for normal skeletal development and has roles in gene expression regulation and chromatin remodeling. Small hairpin RNA knockdown of SATB2 significantly inhibited growth in soft agar, indicating its potential as a driver of metal-induced carcinogenesis. An increase in oxidative stress and autophagy was observed in cadmium clones. In addition, the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase was depleted by transformation with cadmium. MGMT loss caused significant decrease in cell viability after treatment with the alkylating agent temozolomide, demonstrating diminished capacity to repair such damage. Results reveal various mechanisms of cadmium-induced malignant transformation in BEAS-2B cells including upregulation of SATB2, downregulation of MGMT, and increased oxidative stress. PMID:27186882

  16. The diagnostic value of hyperostosis in midline subfrontal meningioma.

    PubMed

    Lee, K F

    1976-04-01

    Roentgenologic analysis of 66 patients with proved midline subfrontal meningioma indicates a very high incidence of hyperostosis. A total of 63 patients (95%) showed varying degrees of hyperostosis involving the cribiform plate, planum sphenoidale, or tuberculum sellae (including the chiasmatic sulcus). The planum sphenoidale is the most common site of hyperostosis (59%). In 19 cases (29%), the region of hyperostosis did not correspond to the site of tumor attachment. Mild or localized hyperostosis may be apparent only on tomograms. Small "blistering" and "saw-tooth-like" osteoma formation are reliable early signs of midline subfrontal meningioma; conversely, midline subfrontal meningioma can be virtually ruled out if hyperostosis is absent.

  17. Foramen Magnum Meningioma: a Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jurinovic, Pavao; Bulicic, Ana Repic; Marcic, Marino; Mise, Nikolina Ivica; Titlic, Marina; Suljic, Enra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Meningiomas are slow-growing benign tumors that arise at any location where arachnoid cells reside. Although meningiomas account for a sizable proportion of all primary intracranial neoplasms (14.3–19%), only 1.8 to 3.2% arise at the foramen magnum. Their indolent development at the craniocervical junction makes clinical diagnosis complex and often leads to a long interval between onset of symptoms and diagnosis. Case report: We report a case of a 79-year-old male patient, presented with ataxia and sense of threatening fainting during verticalization. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the presence of meningioma in the right side of craniospinal junction. PMID:27041817

  18. Metastatic meningioma: positron emission tomography CT imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, C; O'Connor, O J; O'Regan, K N; Keohane, C; Dineen, J; Hinchion, J; Sweeney, B; Maher, M M

    2010-01-01

    The imaging findings of a case of metastasing meningioma are described. The case illustrates a number of rare and interesting features. The patient presented with haemoptysis 22 years after the initial resection of an intracranial meningioma. CT demonstrated heterogeneous masses with avid peripheral enhancement without central enhancement. Blood supply to the larger lesion was partially from small feeding vessels from the inferior pulmonary vein. These findings correlate with a previously published case in which there was avid uptake of fluoro-18-deoxyglucose peripherally with lesser uptake centrally. The diagnosis of metastasing meningioma was confirmed on percutaneous lung tissue biopsy. PMID:21088084

  19. Cystic change in primary paediatric optic nerve sheath meningioma.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Daniel; Rajak, Saul; Patel, Sandy; Selva, Dinesh

    2016-08-01

    Primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas (PONSM) are rare in children. Cystic meningiomas are an uncommon subgroup of meningiomas. We report a case of paediatric PONSM managed using observation alone that underwent cystic change and radiological regression. A 5-year-old girl presented with visual impairment and proptosis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated a PONSM. The patient was left untreated and followed up with regular MR imaging. Repeat imaging at 16 years of age showed the tumour had started to develop cystic change. Repeat imaging at 21 years of age showed the tumour had decreased in size. PMID:27310300

  20. Natural Compounds as Potential Treatments of NF2-Deficient Schwannoma and Meningioma: Cucurbitacin D and Goyazensolide

    PubMed Central

    Spear, Samuel A.; Burns, Sarah S.; Oblinger, Janet L.; Ren, Yulin; Pan, Li; Kinghorn, A. Douglas; Welling, D. Bradley; Chang, Long-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis Cucurbitacin D and goyazensolide, two plant-derived natural compounds, possess potent growth-inhibitory activity in schwannoma and meningioma cells. Background Currently, no FDA-approved drugs are available for neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2)-associated schwannomas and meningiomas. Selected natural compounds with antineoplastic activity, such as cucurbitacin and goyazensolide, may be developed as potential treatments for these tumors. Methods The Nf2-deficient mouse schwannoma Sch10545 and human benign meningioma Ben-Men-1 cells were treated with various concentrations of cucurbitacin D and goyazensolide. The effect on cell proliferation was determined using resazurin assays. Flow cytometry was used to assess the cell cycle profiles. Western blot analysis was performed to investigate the expression of various signal molecules related to the cell cycle and the AKT pathway. Results Cucurbitacin D inhibited proliferation of Sch10545 cells (IC50 ~0.75 μM) and Ben-Men-1 cells (IC50 ~0.2 μM). Goyazensolide also reduced cell proliferation of Sch10545 cells (IC50 ~0.9 μM) and Ben-Men-1 cells (IC50 ~1 μM). The G2/M population increased in both Sch10545 and Ben-Men-1 cells treated with cucurbitacin D or goyazensolide around the IC50. Cucurbitacin and goyazensolide substantially reduced the levels of cyclins E and A in treated Sch10545 and Ben-Men-1 cells. Cucurbitacin D also inhibited cyclin B, phospho-AKT and phospho-PRAS40 expression. In addition, goyazensolide reduced the levels of phospho-AKT and NFκB and increased the expression of pro-apoptotic Bim in Sch10545 and Ben-Men-1 cells. Conclusions Both cucurbitacin D and goyazensolide effectively inhibit proliferation of NF2-deficient schwannoma and meningioma cells, suggesting that these natural compounds should be further evaluated as potential treatments for NF2-related tumors. PMID:23928514

  1. Recurrent somatic mutations in POLR2A define a distinct subset of meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Clark, Victoria E; Harmancı, Akdes Serin; Bai, Hanwen; Youngblood, Mark W; Lee, Tong Ihn; Baranoski, Jacob F; Ercan-Sencicek, A Gulhan; Abraham, Brian J; Weintraub, Abraham S; Hnisz, Denes; Simon, Matthias; Krischek, Boris; Erson-Omay, E Zeynep; Henegariu, Octavian; Carrión-Grant, Geneive; Mishra-Gorur, Ketu; Durán, Daniel; Goldmann, Johanna E; Schramm, Johannes; Goldbrunner, Roland; Piepmeier, Joseph M; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Günel, Jennifer Moliterno; Bilgüvar, Kaya; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Young, Richard A; Günel, Murat

    2016-10-01

    RNA polymerase II mediates the transcription of all protein-coding genes in eukaryotic cells, a process that is fundamental to life. Genomic mutations altering this enzyme have not previously been linked to any pathology in humans, which is a testament to its indispensable role in cell biology. On the basis of a combination of next-generation genomic analyses of 775 meningiomas, we report that recurrent somatic p.Gln403Lys or p.Leu438_His439del mutations in POLR2A, which encodes the catalytic subunit of RNA polymerase II (ref. 1), hijack this essential enzyme and drive neoplasia. POLR2A mutant tumors show dysregulation of key meningeal identity genes, including WNT6 and ZIC1/ZIC4. In addition to mutations in POLR2A, NF2, SMARCB1, TRAF7, KLF4, AKT1, PIK3CA, and SMO, we also report somatic mutations in AKT3, PIK3R1, PRKAR1A, and SUFU in meningiomas. Our results identify a role for essential transcriptional machinery in driving tumorigenesis and define mutually exclusive meningioma subgroups with distinct clinical and pathological features. PMID:27548314

  2. Recurrent somatic mutations in POLR2A define a distinct subset of meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Clark, Victoria E; Harmancı, Akdes Serin; Bai, Hanwen; Youngblood, Mark W; Lee, Tong Ihn; Baranoski, Jacob F; Ercan-Sencicek, A Gulhan; Abraham, Brian J; Weintraub, Abraham S; Hnisz, Denes; Simon, Matthias; Krischek, Boris; Erson-Omay, E Zeynep; Henegariu, Octavian; Carrión-Grant, Geneive; Mishra-Gorur, Ketu; Durán, Daniel; Goldmann, Johanna E; Schramm, Johannes; Goldbrunner, Roland; Piepmeier, Joseph M; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Günel, Jennifer Moliterno; Bilgüvar, Kaya; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Young, Richard A; Günel, Murat

    2016-10-01

    RNA polymerase II mediates the transcription of all protein-coding genes in eukaryotic cells, a process that is fundamental to life. Genomic mutations altering this enzyme have not previously been linked to any pathology in humans, which is a testament to its indispensable role in cell biology. On the basis of a combination of next-generation genomic analyses of 775 meningiomas, we report that recurrent somatic p.Gln403Lys or p.Leu438_His439del mutations in POLR2A, which encodes the catalytic subunit of RNA polymerase II (ref. 1), hijack this essential enzyme and drive neoplasia. POLR2A mutant tumors show dysregulation of key meningeal identity genes, including WNT6 and ZIC1/ZIC4. In addition to mutations in POLR2A, NF2, SMARCB1, TRAF7, KLF4, AKT1, PIK3CA, and SMO, we also report somatic mutations in AKT3, PIK3R1, PRKAR1A, and SUFU in meningiomas. Our results identify a role for essential transcriptional machinery in driving tumorigenesis and define mutually exclusive meningioma subgroups with distinct clinical and pathological features.

  3. Expression of Human Herpesvirus-6 Antigens in Benign and Malignant Lymphoproliferative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Luppi, Mario; Barozzi, Patrizia; Garber, Richard; Maiorana, Antonio; Bonacorsi, Goretta; Artusi, Tullio; Trovato, Raffaella; Marasca, Roberto; Torelli, Giuseppe

    1998-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry was used to look for the expression of human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) antigens in a well characterized series of benign, atypical, and malignant lymphoid lesions, which tested positive for the presence of HHV-6 DNA. A panel of specific antibodies against HHV-6 antigens, characteristic either of the early (p41) or late (p101K, gp106, and gp116) phases of the viral cycle, was applied to the lymphoid tissues from 15 non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas, 14 Hodgkin’s disease cases, 5 angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathies with dysproteinemia, 14 reactive lymphadenopathies, and 2 cases of sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (Rosai-Dorfman disease). In lymphomatous tissues, the expression of late antigens was documented only in reactive cells, and mainly in plasma cells. Of interest, the expression of the early p41 antigen was detected in the so-called “mummified” Reed-Sternberg cells, in two Hodgkin’s disease cases. In reactive lymphadenopathies, the HHV-6 late antigen-expressing cells were plasma cells, histiocytes, and rare granulocytes distributed in interfollicular areas. In both cases of Rosai-Dorfman disease, the p101K showed an intense staining in follicular dendritic cells of germinal centers, whereas the gp106 exhibited an intense cytoplasmic reaction in the abnormal histiocytes, which represent the histological hallmark of the disease. The expression of HHV-6 antigens is tightly controlled in lymphoid tissues. The lack of HHV-6 antigen expression in neoplastic cells and the limited expression in degenerating Reed-Sternberg cells argue against a major pathogenetic role of the virus in human lymphomagenesis. The detection of a rather unique pattern of viral late antigen expression in Rosai-Dorfman disease suggests a possible pathogenetic involvement of HHV-6 in some cases of this rare lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:9736030

  4. A Three-dimensional Tissue Culture Model to Study Primary Human Bone Marrow and its Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Mukti R.; Belch, Andrew R.; Pilarski, Linda M; Kirshner, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Tissue culture has been an invaluable tool to study many aspects of cell function, from normal development to disease. Conventional cell culture methods rely on the ability of cells either to attach to a solid substratum of a tissue culture dish or to grow in suspension in liquid medium. Multiple immortal cell lines have been created and grown using such approaches, however, these methods frequently fail when primary cells need to be grown ex vivo. Such failure has been attributed to the absence of the appropriate extracellular matrix components of the tissue microenvironment from the standard systems where tissue culture plastic is used as a surface for cell growth. Extracellular matrix is an integral component of the tissue microenvironment and its presence is crucial for the maintenance of physiological functions such as cell polarization, survival, and proliferation. Here we present a 3-dimensional tissue culture method where primary bone marrow cells are grown in extracellular matrix formulated to recapitulate the microenvironment of the human bone (rBM system). Embedded in the extracellular matrix, cells are supplied with nutrients through the medium supplemented with human plasma, thus providing a comprehensive system where cell survival and proliferation can be sustained for up to 30 days while maintaining the cellular composition of the primary tissue. Using the rBM system we have successfully grown primary bone marrow cells from normal donors and patients with amyloidosis, and various hematological malignancies. The rBM system allows for direct, in-matrix real time visualization of the cell behavior and evaluation of preclinical efficacy of novel therapeutics. Moreover, cells can be isolated from the rBM and subsequently used for in vivo transplantation, cell sorting, flow cytometry, and nucleic acid and protein analysis. Taken together, the rBM method provides a reliable system for the growth of primary bone marrow cells under physiological conditions

  5. Comprehensive Glycomics of a Multistep Human Brain Tumor Model Reveals Specific Glycosylation Patterns Related to Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kazue; Kimura, Taichi; Piao, Jinhua; Tanaka, Shinya; Shinohara, Yasuro

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells frequently express glycans at different levels and/or with fundamentally different structures from those expressed by normal cells, and therefore elucidation and manipulation of these glycosylations may provide a beneficial approach to cancer therapy. However, the relationship between altered glycosylation and causal genetic alteration(s) is only partially understood. Here, we employed a unique approach that applies comprehensive glycomic analysis to a previously described multistep tumorigenesis model. Normal human astrocytes were transformed via the serial introduction of hTERT, SV40ER, H-RasV12, and myrAKT, thereby mimicking human brain tumor grades I-IV. More than 160 glycans derived from three major classes of cell surface glycoconjugates (N- and O-glycans on glycoproteins, and glycosphingolipids) were quantitatively explored, and specific glycosylation patterns related to malignancy were systematically identified. The sequential introduction of hTERT, SV40ER, H-RasV12, and myrAKT led to (i) temporal expression of pauci-mannose/mono-antennary type N-glycans and GD3 (hTERT); (ii) switching from ganglio- to globo-series glycosphingolipids and the appearance of Neu5Gc (hTERT and SV40ER); (iii) temporal expression of bisecting GlcNAc residues, α2,6-sialylation, and stage-specific embryonic antigen-4, accompanied by suppression of core 2 O-glycan biosynthesis (hTERT, SV40ER and Ras); and (iv) increased expression of (neo)lacto-series glycosphingolipids and fucosylated N-glycans (hTERT, SV40ER, Ras and AKT). These sequential and transient glycomic alterations may be useful for tumor grade diagnosis and tumor prognosis, and also for the prediction of treatment response. PMID:26132161

  6. Clinical Significance of Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Expression in Human Malignant and Benign Thyroid Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lakiotaki, Eleftheria; Giaginis, Constantinos; Tolia, Maria; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Giannopoulou, Ioanna; Kyrgias, George; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is comprised of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and proteins responsible for their metabolism participate in many different functions indispensable to homeostatic regulation in several tissues, exerting also antitumorigenic effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of CB1 and CB2 expression in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions. CB1 and CB2 proteins' expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 87 patients with benign (n = 43) and malignant (n = 44) lesions and was statistically analyzed with clinicopathological parameters, follicular cells' proliferative capacity, and risk of recurrence rate estimated according to the American Thyroid Association (ATA) staging system. Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was significantly more frequently observed in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0005, resp.). Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was also significantly more frequently observed in papillary carcinomas compared to hyperplastic nodules (p = 0.0097 and p = 0.0110, resp.). In malignant thyroid lesions, elevated CB2 expression was significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases (p = 0.0301). Enhanced CB2 expression was also more frequently observed in malignant thyroid cases with presence of capsular (p = 0.1165), lymphatic (p = 0.1989), and vascular invasion (p = 0.0555), as well as in those with increased risk of recurrence rate (p = 0.1165), at a nonsignificant level though, whereas CB1 expression was not associated with any of the clinicopathological parameters examined. Our data suggest that CB receptors may be involved in malignant thyroid transformation and especially CB2 receptor could serve as useful biomarker and potential therapeutic target in thyroid neoplasia. PMID:26539529

  7. Clinical Significance of Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Expression in Human Malignant and Benign Thyroid Lesions.

    PubMed

    Lakiotaki, Eleftheria; Giaginis, Constantinos; Tolia, Maria; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Giannopoulou, Ioanna; Kyrgias, George; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is comprised of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and proteins responsible for their metabolism participate in many different functions indispensable to homeostatic regulation in several tissues, exerting also antitumorigenic effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of CB1 and CB2 expression in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions. CB1 and CB2 proteins' expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 87 patients with benign (n = 43) and malignant (n = 44) lesions and was statistically analyzed with clinicopathological parameters, follicular cells' proliferative capacity, and risk of recurrence rate estimated according to the American Thyroid Association (ATA) staging system. Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was significantly more frequently observed in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0005, resp.). Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was also significantly more frequently observed in papillary carcinomas compared to hyperplastic nodules (p = 0.0097 and p = 0.0110, resp.). In malignant thyroid lesions, elevated CB2 expression was significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases (p = 0.0301). Enhanced CB2 expression was also more frequently observed in malignant thyroid cases with presence of capsular (p = 0.1165), lymphatic (p = 0.1989), and vascular invasion (p = 0.0555), as well as in those with increased risk of recurrence rate (p = 0.1165), at a nonsignificant level though, whereas CB1 expression was not associated with any of the clinicopathological parameters examined. Our data suggest that CB receptors may be involved in malignant thyroid transformation and especially CB2 receptor could serve as useful biomarker and potential therapeutic target in thyroid neoplasia.

  8. Modulation of human leukocyte antigen and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 surface expression in malignant and nonmalignant human thyroid cells by cytokines in the context of extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Miller, A; Kraiem, Z; Sobel, E; Lider, O; Lahat, N

    2000-11-01

    Interactions between malignant cells and their environment are achieved via cell-surface receptors and adhesion molecules. The extracellular matrix (ECM) and ECM-bound cytokines modulate the expression of cell-surface molecules on target malignant cells, which may lead to changes in their susceptibility to cytolysis, in their ability to present antigens, and in the induction of local immune-cell activation and patrol. Eventually, these alterations may culminate in either the destruction, or escape and proliferation, of the tumor. We studied the effects of the ECM and its components in a "naive" form or following binding of the inflammatory cytokines interferon gamma (IFNgamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) on the surface expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class-I, HLA class-II (HLA-DR), and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), on nonmalignant and malignant thyroid cells. The basal expression of HLA class-I molecules was not significantly changed either by naive ECM and its components or by ECM-bound cytokines. ECM synergized with IFNgamma and TNFalpha in inducing HLA-DR molecules on nonmalignant and malignant thyrocytes, with higher HLA-DR levels on the malignant cells. The laminin component, in particular, synergized with IFNgamma. Basal ICAM-1 expression on nonneoplastic cells was not significantly affected by the cytokines when grown in the absence of ECM, but was significantly upregulated when cells were cultured on ECM. In contrast, in malignant thyrocyte cultures, ECM significantly attenuated IFNgamma- and TNFalpha-mediated enhancement of ICAM-1 expression. We concluded that signals derived from ECM-embedded cytokines participate in the regulation of key thyroid cell surface molecules and, thus, may affect the final outcome of human thyroid malignancies. PMID:11128721

  9. Radioimmunoassay for human pancreatic ribonuclease and measurement of serum immunoreactive pancreatic ribonuclease in patients with malignant tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kurihara, M.; Ogawa, M.; Ohta, T.; Kurokawa, E.; Kitahara, T.; Murata, A.; Matsuda, K.; Kosaki, G.; Watanabe, T.; Wada, H.

    1984-05-01

    A method for radioimmunoassay of human pancreatic RNase was developed. The method is sensitive, reproducible, and specific. Almost no cross-reactivity exists between human pancreatic and liver RNases. A good correlation was observed between the serum concentration of pancreatic RNase as measured by radioimmunoassay and its enzymatic activity using polycytidylic acid as substrate. The concentration of serum pancreatic RNase correlates well with age, blood urea nitrogen, and albumin contents but does not correlate with serum amylase activity. Using the data of 52 patients with malignant tumors except pancreatic cancer, serum RNase level could be expressed by a multiple regression equation: Immunoreactive RNase content in pancreatic cancer was elevated in patients with complications from renal failure. Serum pancreatic RNase contents in patients with pancreatic cancer measured by radioimmunoassay agreed well with the values calculated using the equation derived from the data of patients with other malignant tumors.

  10. Prognostic significance of the labeling index in non-Hodgkin human malignant lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Silvestrini, R; Costa, A; Daidone, M G; Rilke, F

    1978-01-01

    The labeling index has been determined in 34 non-Hodgkin malignant lymphomas. The kinetic parameter has been analyzed in relation to the different histologic types, according to the Kiel calssification, and a kinetic classification with three main groups at low, intermediate, and high proliferative activity has been proposed. The analysis of the survival of the patients in relation to the labeling index of the malignant lymphoma cell population has shown that the potential proliferative activity has an important prognostic significance.

  11. In vivo diagnosis of human malignant melanoma with positron emission tomography using specific melanoma-seeking 18F-DOPA analogue.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Y; Imahori, Y; Honda, C; Hiratsuka, J; Ueda, S; Ido, T

    1997-05-01

    Detection and diagnosis of human malignant melanoma by Positron Emission Tomography (PET) using 18F-10B-L-BPA, a specific melanogenesis-seeking compound synthesized for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for malignant melanoma (NCT), has been developed. This resulted in a novel, highly effective methodology for the selective three dimensional imaging of metastatic malignant melanomas, and for accurate determination of 10B concentration in the tumor and surrounding tissue, providing almost all diagnostic information necessary for complete non-invasive radiation dose planning in the treatment of malignant melanoma both for NCT as well as other therapeutic modalities.

  12. Emergence of fractal behavior and other changes of cell surface during malignant transformation: AFM study of human cervical epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokukin, Maxim; Guz, Nataliia; Woodworth, Craig; Sokolov, Igor

    2012-02-01

    Fractal behavior, self-similarity when zooming in or out, is frequently found in natural patterns emerged from chaos or any far from equilibrium systems. While expected and observed for tissues, the emergence of fractal behavior associated with malignant transformations was not observed at the level of single cell. Here report on the appearance of fractal behavior when normal human cervical epithelial cells become malignant. This was found by analyzing the adhesion maps imaged with AFM working in HarmoniX mode. Normal and malignant (a mix of cancerous and precancerous) cells were enzymatic only extracted from cervical tissue of healthy individuals and cancer patients, respectively. A surprising 100% discrimination of malignant and normal cells was observed. Although we previously reported differences in surface (brush) layer of cancer cells, the unambiguous quantitative divergence of the fractal behavior of the adhesion maps is a surprise (in particular, when compared to no difference found in the regular AFM images). The nature of the observed difference in the adhesion behavior will be discussed. These results may suggest that the fractal dimensionality can be treated as a new potential ``physicomarker'' for detection of individual cervical cancer cells.

  13. [An operated case of a meningioma causing acute subdural hematoma].

    PubMed

    Chonan, Masashi; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Koyama, Shinya; Kon, Hiroyuki; Sannohe, Seiya; Kurotaki, Hidekachi; Midorikawa, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Nishijima, Michiharu

    2013-03-01

    We report a rare case of a meningioma causing acute hematoma. A 67-year-old woman presented with sudden headache. No evidence of trauma was seen. CT demonstrated a subdural hematoma in the convexity of the fronto-temporal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging showed marked signal heterogeneity in the convexity of the frontal lobe. One week later, the patient underwent hematoma evacuation and tumor resection including the attached dura mater. The histological diagnosis was meningothelial meningioma. The clot was connected directly to the tumor and the origin of the subdural hematoma was identified as the meningioma. Postoperative course was uneventful, and the headache improved. Meningiomas have a relatively benign course but rarely present with hemorrhage. Surgical exploration is the effective and recommended treatment.

  14. Foster Kennedy Syndrome Due to Meningioma Growth during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Porcel, Federico; Hughes, Ian; Anderson, Douglas; Lee, John; Biller, José

    2013-01-01

    Tumors of the olfactory groove may cause unilateral optic atrophy with contralateral papilledema and anosmia (Foster Kennedy syndrome). We describe a case of a young pregnant woman with Foster Kennedy syndrome due to an olfactory groove meningioma. PMID:24273529

  15. Virus-like particles for the prevention of human papillomavirus-associated malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joshua W.; Roden, Richard B.S.

    2013-01-01

    As compared to peptide/protein-based vaccines, naked DNA vectors and even traditional attenuated or inactived virus vaccines, virus-like particles (VLPs) are an attractive vaccine platform because they offer a combination of safety, ease of production, and both high density B cell epitope display and intracellular presentation of T cell epitopes that induce potent humoral and cellular immune responses respectively. Indeed, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines based on VLP production by recombinant expression of major capsid antigen L1 in yeast (Gardasil®, Merck & Co.) or insect cells (Cervarix®, GlaxoSmithKline) have been licensed for the prevention of cervical and anogenital infection and disease associated with the genotypes targeted by each vaccine. These HPV vaccines however have not been demonstrated as effective to treat existing infections, and efforts to develop a therapeutic HPV vaccine continue. Furthermore, current HPV L1-VLP vaccines provide type-restricted protection, requiring highly multivalent formulations to broaden coverage to the dozen or more oncogenic HPV genotypes. This raises the complexity and cost of vaccine production. The lack of access to screening and high disease burden in developing countries has spurred efforts to develop second generation HPV vaccines that are more affordable, induce wider protective coverage and offer therapeutic coverage against HPV-associated malignancies. Given the previous success with L1 VLP-based vaccines against HPV, VLPs have been also adopted as platforms for many second generation HPV and non-HPV vaccine candidates with both prophylactic and therapeutic intent. Here we examine the progress and challenges of these efforts, with a focus on how they inform VLP vaccine design. PMID:23414405

  16. The Biology of Human Lymphoid Malignancies Revealed by Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Sandeep

    2005-01-01

    Gene expression profiling provides a quantitative molecular framework for the study of human lymphomas. This genomic technology has revealed that existing diagnostic categories are comprised of multiple molecularly and clinically distinct diseases. Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), for example, consists of three gene expression subgroups, termed germinal center B cell-like (GCB) DLBCL, activated B cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, and primary mediastinal be cell lymphoma (PMBL). These DLBCL subgroups arise from different stages of normal B cell differentiation, utilize distinct oncogenic mechanisms, and differ in their ability to be cured by chemotherapy. Key regulatory factors and their target genes are differentially expressed among these subgroups, including BCL-6, Blimp-1, and XBP1. ABC DLBCL and PMBL depend upon constitutive activation of the NF-κB pathway for their survival but GCB DLBCL does not, demonstrating that this pathway is a potential therapeutic target for certain DLBCL subgroups. In DLBCL, mantle cell lymphoma, and follicular lymphoma, gene expression profiling has also been used to create gene expression-based models of survival, which have identified the biological characteristics of the tumors that influence their clinical behavior. In mantle cell lymphoma, the length of survival following diagnosis is primarily influenced by the tumor proliferation rate, which can be quantitatively measured by a proliferation gene expression “signature”. Based on this accurate measure, the proliferation rate can now be viewed as an integration of several oncogenic lesions that each increase progression from G1 to S phase of the cell cycle. In DLBCL and follicular lymphoma, gene expression profiling has revealed that the molecular characteristics of non-malignant tumor-infiltrating immune cells have a major influence on the length of survival. The implications of these insights for the diagnosis and treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphomas are discussed. PMID:16102574

  17. The biology of human lymphoid malignancies revealed by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Staudt, Louis M; Dave, Sandeep

    2005-01-01

    Gene expression profiling provides a quantitative molecular framework for the study of human lymphomas. This genomic technology has revealed that existing diagnostic categories are comprised of multiple molecularly and clinically distinct diseases. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), for example, consists of three gene expression subgroups, termed germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL, activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL). These DLBCL subgroups arise from different stages of normal B-cell differentiation, utilize distinct oncogenic mechanisms, and differ in their ability to be cured by chemotherapy. Key regulatory factors and their target genes are differentially expressed among these subgroups, including BCL-6, Blimp-1, and XBP1. ABC DLBCL and PMBL depend upon constitutive activation of the NF-kappaB pathway for their survival but GCB DLBCL does not, demonstrating that this pathway is a potential therapeutic target for certain DLBCL subgroups. In DLBCL, mantle cell lymphoma, and follicular lymphoma, gene expression profiling has also been used to create gene expression-based models of survival, which have identified the biological characteristics of the tumors that influence their clinical behavior. In mantle cell lymphoma, the length of survival following diagnosis is primarily influenced by the tumor proliferation rate, which can be quantitatively measured by a proliferation gene expression "signature." Based on this accurate measure, the proliferation rate can now be viewed as an integration of several oncogenic lesions that each increase progression from the G1 to the S phase of the cell cycle. In DLBCL and follicular lymphoma, gene expression profiling has revealed that the molecular characteristics of non-malignant tumor-infiltrating immune cells have a major influence on the length of survival. The implications of these insights for the diagnosis and treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphomas are discussed. PMID

  18. Cystic meningioma simulating arachnoid cyst: report of an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Docampo, Jorge; Jorge, Docampo; Gonzalez, Nadia; Nadia, Gonzalez; Vazquez, Claudio; Claudio, Vazquez; Morales, Carlos; Carlos, Morales; Gonzalez-Toledo, Eduardo; Eduardo, Gonzalez-Toledo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show an unusual case of meningioma simulating arachnoid cyst on CT scan and MRI, diagnosed in a 63-year-old woman evaluated for headache and vision disorders. The meningioma shown is predominantly cystic with a small mural nodule enhancing after gadolinium and exhibiting diffusion restriction. Cystic portion of the tumor is hypodense on CT, and evidences fluid signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging.

  19. Temporal bone meningioma involving the middle ear: A case report

    PubMed Central

    RICCIARDIELLO, FILIPPO; FATTORE, LUCIA; LIGUORI, MARIA ESTER; OLIVA, FLAVIA; LUCE, AMALIA; ABATE, TERESA; CARAGLIA, MICHELE; PIANESE, ANNALISA; RAUCCI, ALDO FALCO

    2015-01-01

    Meningioma is a common intracranial tumor involving the meninges. The localization of this type of tumor is rarely extracranial due to its typically low invasive properties. Furthermore, invasion of the middle ear is exceptional. The present study reported a case of meningioma extending into the middle ear from the middle cranial fossa through the tegmen tympani. The clinical and pathological characteristics, as well as the outcome of the patient, were described. PMID:26622828

  20. Functional outcome of patients with benign meningioma treated by 3D conformal irradiation with a combination of photons and protons

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Georges . E-mail: noel@ipno.in2p3.fr; Bollet, Marc A.; Calugaru, Valentin; Feuvret, Loic; Haie-Meder, Christine; Dhermain, Frederic; Ferrand, Regis; Boisserie, Gilbert; Beaudre, Anne; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Habrand, Jean-Louis

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate efficacy and tolerance of external fractionated combination of photon and proton radiation therapy (RT) for intracranial benign meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2002, 51 patients with intracranial meningiomas of the base of the skull were treated with a combination of photon and proton RT. Median total dose was 60.6 cobalt Gy equivalent (54-64). One hundred eight eye-related symptoms were collected; 80 other symptoms were noted and followed up. Results: Mean follow-up was 25.4 months. Acute tolerance was excellent. Out of the 108 eye-related symptoms, 106 (96%) were evaluated. Improvements were reported for 73 (68.8%) of them. Out of the 88 other miscellaneous symptoms, 81 (92%) were evaluated. Improvements were reported in 54 cases (67%). Median time to improvement ranged from 1 to 24 months after completion of the radiotherapy, depending on the symptom. We did not observe any worsening of primary clinical signs. Radiologically, 1 patient relapsed 4 months after the end of irradiation. Pathology revealed a malignant (Grade 3) transformation of the initial Grade 1 meningioma. Four-year local control and overall survival rates were, respectively, 98% and 100%. Stabilization of the tumor was observed in 38 cases (72%), volume reduction in 10 cases (20%), and intratumor necrosis in 3 cases. Two patients complained of Grade 3 side effects: 1 unilateral hearing loss requiring aid and 1 case of complete pituitary deficiency. Conclusion: These results stressed the clinical efficacy of fractionated-associated photon-proton RT in the treatment of meningiomas, especially on cranial nerve palsies, without severe toxicity in almost all patients.

  1. Hidden association of Cowden syndrome, PTEN mutation and meningioma frequency

    PubMed Central

    Yakubov, Eduard; Ghoochani, Ali; Buslei, Rolf; Buchfelder, Michael; Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y.; Savaskan, Nicolai

    2016-01-01

    Cowden syndrome (CS) is clinically presented by multiple hamartomas, often with mucocutaneous lesions, goiter, breast cancer and gastrointestinal polyps. CS is a genetic disorder of autosomal dominant inheritance and is one distinct syndrome of the phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10 (PTEN) hamartoma tumor spectrum. Noteworthy, PTEN germline mutations are related to a wide range of brain tumors. We performed a systematic analysis and review of the medical literature for Cowden syndrome and meningioma and additionally present the case of a 29-year- old CS patient diagnosed with multiple meningiomas. We found strong evidence for high incidence of brain tumors in CS patients. In particular meningiomas and gangliocytomas/Lhermitte-Duclos disease were often associated with 8% and 9% respectively in CS patients. Since aberrations in chromosome 10q are associated with meningiomas, it is likely that the underlying mutations in CS drive to a certain extent neoplastic meningioma growth. We propose to include meningiomas and brain tumors in the major criteria spectrum of CS-related disorders. This could warrant early diagnosis of brain lesions and close therapy, as well as better monitoring of patients with CS. PMID:27489861

  2. EANO guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Goldbrunner, Roland; Minniti, Giuseppe; Preusser, Matthias; Jenkinson, Michael D; Sallabanda, Kita; Houdart, Emmanuel; von Deimling, Andreas; Stavrinou, Pantelis; Lefranc, Florence; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Moyal, Elizabeth Cohen-Jonathan; Brandsma, Dieta; Henriksson, Roger; Soffietti, Riccardo; Weller, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Although meningiomas are the most common intracranial tumours, the level of evidence to provide recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of meningiomas is low compared with other tumours such as high-grade gliomas. The meningioma task force of the European Association of Neuro-Oncology (EANO) assessed the scientific literature and composed a framework of the best possible evidence-based recommendations for health professionals. The provisional diagnosis of meningioma is mainly made by MRI. Definitive diagnosis, including histological classification, grading, and molecular profiling, requires a surgical procedure to obtain tumour tissue. Therefore, in many elderly patients, observation is the best therapeutic option. If therapy is deemed necessary, the standard treatment is gross total surgical resection including the involved dura. As an alternative, radiosurgery can be done for small tumours, or fractionated radiotherapy in large or previously treated tumours. Treatment concepts combining surgery and radiosurgery or fractionated radiotherapy, which enable treatment of the complete tumour volume with low morbidity, are being developed. Pharmacotherapy for meningiomas has remained largely experimental. However, antiangiogenic drugs, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, and targeted agents are promising candidates for future pharmacological approaches to treat refractory meningiomas across all WHO grades. PMID:27599143

  3. 5α-Reductase Type 3 Expression in Human Benign and Malignant Tissues: A Comparative Analysis During Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Alejandro; Kawinski, Elzbieta; Li, Yun; Oka, Daizo; Alexiev, Borislav; Azzouni, Faris; Titus, Mark A.; Mohler, James L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND A third isozyme of human 5α-steroid reductase, 5α-reductase-3, was identified in prostate tissue at the mRNA level. However, the levels of 5α-reductase-3 protein expression and its cellular localization in human tissues remain unknown. METHODS A specific monoclonal antibody was developed, validated, and used to characterize for the first time the expression of 5α-reductase-3 protein in 18 benign and 26 malignant human tissue types using immunostaining analyses. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS In benign tissues, 5α-reductase-3 immunostaining was high in conventional androgen-regulated human tissues, such as skeletal muscle and prostate. However, high levels of expression also were observed in non-conventional androgen-regulated tissues, which suggest either multiples target tissues for androgens or different functions of 5α-reductase-3 among human tissues. In malignant tissues, 5α-reductase-3 immunostaining was ubiquitous but particularly over-expressed in some cancers compared to their benign counterparts, which suggests a potential role for 5α-reductase-3 as a biomarker of malignancy. In benign prostate, 5α-reductase-3 immunostaining was localized to basal epithelial cells, with no immunostaining observed in secretory/luminal epithelial cells. In high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), 5α-reductase-3 immunostaining was localized in both basal epithelial cells and neoplastic epithelial cells characteristic of HGPIN. In androgen-stimulated and castration-recurrent prostate cancer (CaP), 5α-reductase-3 immunostaining was present in most epithelial cells and at similar levels, and at levels higher than observed in benign prostate. Analyses of expression and functionality of 5α-reductase-3 in human tissues may prove useful for development of treatment for benign prostatic enlargement and prevention and treatment of CaP. PMID:21557268

  4. The activation of human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) is implicated in melanoma cell malignant transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Serafino, A. Balestrieri, E.; Pierimarchi, P.; Matteucci, C.; Moroni, G.; Oricchio, E.; Rasi, G.; Mastino, A.; Spadafora, C.; Garaci, E.; Vallebona, P. Sinibaldi

    2009-03-10

    Melanoma development is a multi-step process arising from a series of genetic and epigenetic events. Although the sequential stages involved in progression from melanocytes to malignant melanoma are clearly defined, our current understanding of the mechanisms leading to melanoma onset is still incomplete. Growing evidence show that the activation of endogenous retroviral sequences might be involved in transformation of melanocytes as well as in the increased ability of melanoma cells to escape immune surveillance. Here we show that human melanoma cells in vitro undergo a transition from adherent to a more malignant, non-adherent phenotype when exposed to stress conditions. Melanoma-derived non-adherent cells are characterized by an increased proliferative potential and a decreased expression of both HLA class I molecules and Melan-A/MART-1 antigen, similarly to highly malignant cells. These phenotypic and functional modifications are accompanied by the activation of human endogenous retrovirus K expression (HERV-K) and massive production of viral-like particles. Down-regulation of HERV-K expression by RNA interference prevents the transition from the adherent to the non-adherent growth phenotype in low serum. These results implicate HERV-K in at least some critical steps of melanoma progression.

  5. Global expression profile in low grade meningiomas and schwannomas shows upregulation of PDGFD, CDH1 and SLIT2 compared to their healthy tissue

    PubMed Central

    TORRES-MARTIN, MIGUEL; LASSALETTA, LUIS; ISLA, ALBERTO; DE CAMPOS, JOSE M.; PINTO, GIOVANNY R.; BURBANO, ROMMEL R.; CASTRESANA, JAVIER S.; MELENDEZ, BARBARA; REY, JUAN A.

    2014-01-01

    Schwannomas and grade I meningiomas are non-metastatic neoplasms that share the common mutation of gene NF2. They usually appear in neurofibromatosis type 2 patients. Currently, there is no drug treatment available for both tumors, thus the use of wide expression technologies is crucial to identify therapeutic targets. Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST was used to test global gene expression in 22 meningiomas, 31 schwannomas and, as non-tumoral controls, 3 healthy meningeal tissues, 8 non-tumoral nerves and 1 primary Schwann cell culture. A non-stringent P-value cut-off and fold change were used to establish deregulated genes. We identified a subset of genes that were upregulated in meningiomas and schwannomas when compared to their respectively healthy tissues, including PDGFD, CDH1 and SLIT2. Thus, these genes should be thoroughly studied as targets in a possible combined treatment. PMID:25333347

  6. Global expression profile in low grade meningiomas and schwannomas shows upregulation of PDGFD, CDH1 and SLIT2 compared to their healthy tissue.

    PubMed

    Torres-Martin, Miguel; Lassaletta, Luis; Isla, Alberto; De Campos, Jose M; Pinto, Giovanny R; Burbano, Rommel R; Castresana, Javier S; Melendez, Barbara; Rey, Juan A

    2014-12-01

    Schwannomas and grade I meningiomas are non‑metastatic neoplasms that share the common mutation of gene NF2. They usually appear in neurofibromatosis type 2 patients. Currently, there is no drug treatment available for both tumors, thus the use of wide expression technologies is crucial to identify therapeutic targets. Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST was used to test global gene expression in 22 meningiomas, 31 schwannomas and, as non-tumoral controls, 3 healthy meningeal tissues, 8 non-tumoral nerves and 1 primary Schwann cell culture. A non-stringent P-value cut-off and fold change were used to establish deregulated genes. We identified a subset of genes that were upregulated in meningiomas and schwannomas when compared to their respectively healthy tissues, including PDGFD, CDH1 and SLIT2. Thus, these genes should be thoroughly studied as targets in a possible combined treatment. PMID:25333347

  7. Increased age of transformed mouse neural progenitor/stem cells recapitulates age-dependent clinical features of human glioma malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Mikheev, Andrei M.; Ramakrishna, Rohan; Stoll, Elizabeth A.; Mikheeva, Svetlana A.; Beyer, Richard P.; Plotnik, David A.; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Rockhill, Jason K.; Silber, John R.; Born, Donald E.; Kosai, Yoshito; Horner, Philip J.; Rostomily, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing age is the most robust predictor of greater malignancy and treatment resistance in human gliomas. However, the adverse association of clinical course with aging is rarely considered in animal glioma models, impeding delineation of the relative importance of organismal versus progenitor cell aging in the genesis of glioma malignancy. To address this limitation, we implanted transformed neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs), the presumed cells of glioma origin, from 3 and 18month old mice into 3 and 20-month host animals. Transplantation with progenitors from older animals resulted in significantly shorter (p ≤ 0.0001) median survival in both 3month (37.5 vs 83 days) and 20-month (38 vs 67 days) hosts, indicating that age-dependent changes intrinsic to NSPCs rather than host animal age accounted for greater malignancy. Subsequent analyses revealed that increased invasiveness, genomic instability, resistance to therapeutic agents and tolerance to hypoxic stress accompanied aging in transformed NSPCs. Greater tolerance to hypoxia in older progenitor cells, as evidenced by elevated HIF-1 promoter reporter activity and hypoxia response gene (HRG) expression, mirror the upregulation of HRGs in cohorts of older vs younger glioma patients revealed by analysis of gene expression databases, suggesting that differential response to hypoxic stress may underlie age-dependent differences in invasion, genomic instability and treatment resistance. Our study provides strong evidence that progenitor cell aging is responsible for promoting the hallmarks of age-dependent glioma malignancy and that consideration of progenitor aging will facilitate development of physiologically and clinically relevant animal models of human gliomas. PMID:22958206

  8. Fas-mediated apoptosis of melanoma cells and infiltrating lymphocytes in human malignant melanomas.

    PubMed

    Shukuwa, Tetsuo; Katayama, Ichiro; Koji, Takehiko

    2002-04-01

    In a rodent system, melanoma cells expressing Fas ligand (FasL) could kill Fas-positive lymphocytes, suggesting that FasL expression was an essential factor for melanoma cell survival in vivo. These findings led us to investigate apoptosis, and to histochemically analyze involvement of Fas and FasL in the induction of apoptosis, in human malignant melanoma tissues. The percentages of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotin-dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive melanoma cells and of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive melanoma cells in melanoma tissues (n = 22) were greater than those in melanocytes in uninvolved skin (n = 6) and nevus cells in nevi tissues (n = 9). The infiltrating lymphocytes around melanomas were also TUNEL positive. Immunohistochemistry revealed expression of Fas and FasL in melanoma cells and lymphocytes, whereas no Fas or FasL expression was detected in normal skin melanocytes and nevus cells. There was significant correlation between Fas-positive indices and TUNEL indices in melanoma tissues. Moreover, TUNEL-, Fas-, and FasL-positive indices of melanoma cells from patients with Stage 3 melanomas were significantly lower than those with Stage 2 melanomas. The PCNA index of Stage 1 melanoma was significantly lower than that of the other stages, although the difference of PCNA index was insignificant among Stages 2 to 4. Among Stages 1 to 4, there was no difference in the PCNA, TUNEL-, and Fas-positive indices of lymphocytes, although the FasL-positive index of lymphocytes from Stage 3 melanomas was significantly lower than in that from Stage 2. These data reveal that melanoma cells and infiltrating lymphocytes have the potential to induce their own apoptosis regulated by Fas and FasL in an autocrine and/or paracrine fashion and that the decline of Fas-mediated apoptosis of melanoma cells, rather than the apoptosis of infiltrating lymphocytes, may affect the prognosis of melanoma patients, possibly through the

  9. PTHrP promotes malignancy of human oral cancer cell downstream of the EGFR signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Tamaki; Tsuda, Masumi; Ohba, Yusuke Kawaguchi, Hideaki; Totsuka, Yasunori; Shindoh, Masanobu

    2008-04-11

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is detected in many aggressive tumors and involved in malignant conversion; however, the underlying mechanism remains obscure. Here, we identified PTHrP as a mediator of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling to promote the malignancies of oral cancers. PTHrP mRNA was abundantly expressed in most of the quiescent oral cancer cells, and was significantly upregulated by EGF stimulation via ERK and p38 MAPK. PTHrP silencing by RNA interference, as well as EGFR inhibitor AG1478 treatment, significantly suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasiveness. Furthermore, combined treatment of AG1478 and PTHrP knockdown achieved synergistic inhibition of malignant phenotypes. Recombinant PTHrP substantially promoted cell motility, and rescued the inhibition by PTHrP knockdown, suggesting the paracrine/autocrine function of PTHrP. These data indicate that PTHrP contributes to the malignancy of oral cancers downstream of EGFR signaling, and may thus provide a therapeutic target for oral cancer.

  10. Sphenoid wing meningioma progression after placement of a subcutaneous progesterone agonist contraceptive implant.

    PubMed

    Piper, J G; Follett, K A; Fantin, A

    1994-04-01

    A causal relationship between sex steroids and meningioma proliferation has long been suspected. We report a case of the clinical progression of a sphenoid wing meningioma after the placement of Norplant, a subcutaneous contraceptive implant containing levonorgestrel, a progesterone agonist. Although not proof of causation, this observation lends further credence to the importance of progesterone receptors in the growth and possible treatment of meningiomas.

  11. Single cell genomics reveals activation signatures of endogenous SCAR's networks in aneuploid human embryos and clinically intractable malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2016-10-10

    Somatic mutations and chromosome instability are hallmarks of genomic aberrations in cancer cells. Aneuploidies represent common manifestations of chromosome instability, which is frequently observed in human embryos and malignant solid tumors. Activation of human endogenous retroviruses (HERV)-derived loci is documented in preimplantation human embryos, hESC, and multiple types of human malignancies. It remains unknown whether the HERV activation may highlight a common molecular pathway contributing to the frequent occurrence of chromosome instability in the early stages of human embryonic development and the emergence of genomic aberrations in cancer. Single cell RNA sequencing analysis of human preimplantation embryos reveals activation of specific LTR7/HERVH loci during the transition from the oocytes to zygotes and identifies HERVH network signatures associated with the aneuploidy in human embryos. The correlation patterns' analysis links transcriptome signatures of the HERVH network activation of the in vivo matured human oocytes with gene expression profiles of clinical samples of prostate tumors supporting the existence of a cancer progression pathway from putative precursor lesions (prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia) to localized and metastatic prostate cancers. Tracking signatures of HERVH networks' activation in tumor samples from cancer patients with known long-term therapy outcomes enabled patients' stratification into sub-groups with markedly distinct likelihoods of therapy failure and death from cancer. Genome-wide analyses of human-specific genetic elements of stem cell-associated retroviruses (SCARs)-regulated networks in 12,093 clinical tumor samples across 29 cancer types revealed pan-cancer genomic signatures of clinically-lethal therapy resistant disease defined by the presence of somatic non-silent mutations (SNMs), gene-level copy number changes, and transcripts and proteins' expression of SCARs-regulated host genes. More than 73% of all

  12. The casein kinase 2 inhibitor, CX-4945, as an anti-cancer drug in treatment of human hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Chon, Hae J; Bae, Kyoung J; Lee, Yura; Kim, Jiyeon

    2015-01-01

    The casein kinase 2 (CK2) protein kinase is a pro-survival kinase and therapeutic target in treatment of various human cancers. CK2 overexpression has been demonstrated in hematological malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and multiple myeloma. CX-4945, also known as Silmitasertib, is an orally administered, highly specific, ATP-competitive inhibitor of CK2. CX-4945 induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis and is currently being evaluated in clinical trials for treatment of many cancer types. In the past 2 years, the focus on the therapeutic potential of CX-4945 has shifted from solid tumors to hematological malignancies. CX-4945 exerts anti-proliferative effects in hematological tumors by downregulating CK2 expression and suppressing activation of CK2-mediated PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. Furthermore, combination of CX-4945 with other inhibitors yielded synergistic effects in cell death induction. These new findings demonstrate that CK2 overexpression contributes to blood cancer cell survival and resistance to chemotherapy. Combinatorial use of CX-4945 is a promising therapeutic tool for treatment of hematological malignancies.

  13. A molecular targeting against nuclear factor-κB, as a chemotherapeutic approach for human malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Sho; Tanaka, Akane; Matsuda, Akira; Oida, Kumiko; Jang, Hyosun; Jung, Kyungsook; Amagai, Yosuke; Ahn, Ginae; Okamoto, Noriko; Ishizaka, Saori; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Chronic inflammation due to the absorption of asbestos is an important cause of mesothelioma. Although the increased prevalence of mesothelioma is a serious problem, the development of effective chemotherapeutic agents remains incomplete. As the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway contributes to malignant transformation of various types of cells, we explored NF-κB activity in three different pathological types of malignant mesothelioma cells, and evaluated the therapeutic potential of a recently reported NF-κB inhibitor, IMD-0354. NF-κB was constantly activated in MSTO-211H, NCI-H28, and NCI-H2052 cells, and the proliferation of these cell lines was inhibited by IMD-0354. D-type cyclins were effectively suppressed in mixed tissue type MSTO-211H, leading to cell cycle arrest at sub G1 /G1 phase. IMD-0354 reduced cyclin D3 in both epithelial tissue type NCI-H28 and sarcomatoid tissue type NCI-H2052. In a sphere formation assay, IMD-0354 effectively decreased the number and diameter of MSTO-211H spheres. Preincubation of MSTO-211H cells with IMD-0354 delayed tumor formation in transplanted immunodeficient mice. Furthermore, administration of IMD-0354 markedly rescued the survival rate of mice that received intrathoracic injections of MSTO-211H cells. These results indicate that a targeted drug against NF-κB might have therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of human malignant mesothelioma.

  14. SERMs attenuate estrogen-induced malignant transformation of human mammary epithelial cells by upregulating detoxification of oxidative metabolites.

    PubMed

    Hemachandra, L P Madhubhani P; Patel, Hitisha; Chandrasena, R Esala P; Choi, Jaewoo; Piyankarage, Sujeewa C; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yijin; Thayer, Emily N; Scism, Robert A; Michalsen, Bradley T; Xiong, Rui; Siklos, Marton I; Bolton, Judy L; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2014-05-01

    The risk of developing hormone-dependent cancers with long-term exposure to estrogens is attributed both to proliferative, hormonal actions at the estrogen receptor (ER) and to chemical carcinogenesis elicited by genotoxic, oxidative estrogen metabolites. Nontumorigenic MCF-10A human breast epithelial cells are classified as ER(-) and undergo estrogen-induced malignant transformation. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERM), in use for breast cancer chemoprevention and for postmenopausal osteoporosis, were observed to inhibit malignant transformation, as measured by anchorage-independent colony growth. This chemopreventive activity was observed to correlate with reduced levels of oxidative estrogen metabolites, cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and DNA oxidation. The ability of raloxifene, desmethylarzoxifene (DMA), and bazedoxifene to inhibit this chemical carcinogenesis pathway was not shared by 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Regulation of phase II rather than phase I metabolic enzymes was implicated mechanistically: raloxifene and DMA were observed to upregulate sulfotransferase (SULT 1E1) and glucuronidase (UGT 1A1). The results support upregulation of phase II metabolism in detoxification of catechol estrogen metabolites leading to attenuated ROS formation as a mechanism for inhibition of malignant transformation by a subset of clinically important SERMs.

  15. MS-31INTRACRANIAL MENINGIOMAS COMPLICATED BY HYPERTENSION: FOUR CASE REPORTS

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Haining; Zhao, Wei; Yang, Xin; Wang, Jiang; Zhao, Jun; Huo, Junli; Zhang, Xiang; Fei, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The etiology and mechanism of both meningioma and hypertension are still not fully understood, and their diagnosis and treatment still need to be improved. The phenomenon that some meningiomas can directly lead hypertension was never reported previously. Here we reported four consecutive cases with hypertension secondary to intracranial meningiomas. CASE PRESENTATION: Case 1 was a 62-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 2.0 cm × 1.6 cm × 1.5 cm) at left frontal lobe and with a medical history of hypertension for 10 years; Case 2 was a 50-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 1.5 cm × 1.2 cm × 1.1 cm) at right parietal lobe and with a medical history of hypertension for 4 years; Case 3 was a 42-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 2.7 cm × 2.6 cm × 2.3 cm) in trigonum of left lateral ventricle and with a medical history of hypertension for 3 months; Case 4 was a 56-year-old woman with a meningioma (size: about 2.0 cm × 1.8 cm × 1.5 cm) at bilateral falx of frontal lobe and with a medical history of hypertension for 8 years. All the four cases were treated in our hospital from April to June in 2013. After surgical resection of the tumors, blood pressure of all the patients returned to normal level in a short term, and it remained stable for 10 to 12 months of postoperative follow-up period. CONCLUSION: These four cases may present a new clinical syndrome and provide important clinical insights, and also should attract the attention of clinicians, i.e. in patients with hypertension, coexisting intracranial meningiomas should be suspected, and appropriate diagnosis and aggressive surgical treatment should be provided; for patients with hypertension secondary to meningiomas, their hypertension can be cured after surgical removal of the tumors.

  16. Targeting the Interleukin-6/Jak/Stat Pathway in Human Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Pasquale; Bromberg, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    The Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (Jak/Stat) pathway was discovered 20 years ago as a mediator of cytokine signaling. Since this time, more than 2,500 articles have been published demonstrating the importance of this pathway in virtually all malignancies. Although there are dozens of cytokines and cytokine receptors, four Jaks, and seven Stats, it seems that interleukin-6–mediated activation of Stat3 is a principal pathway implicated in promoting tumorigenesis. This transcription factor regulates the expression of numerous critical mediators of tumor formation and metastatic progression. This review will examine the relative importance and function of this pathway in nonmalignant conditions as well as malignancies (including tumor intrinsic and extrinsic), the influence of other Stats, the development of inhibitors to this pathway, and the potential role of inhibitors in controlling or eradicating cancers. PMID:22355058

  17. Spinal meningiomas: clinicoradiological factors predicting recurrence and functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Tanmoy K; Bir, Shyamal C; Patra, Devi Prasad; Kalakoti, Piyush; Guthikonda, Bharat; Nanda, Anil

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Spinal meningiomas are benign tumors with a wide spectrum of clinical and radiological features at presentation. The authors analyzed multiple clinicoradiological factors to predict recurrence and functional outcome in a cohort with a mean follow-up of more than 4 years. The authors also discuss the results of clinical studies regarding spinal meningiomas in the last 15 years. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiological details of patients who underwent surgery for spinal tumors between 2001 and 2015 that were histopathologically confirmed as meningiomas. Demographic parameters, such as age, sex, race, and association with neurofibromatosis Type 2, were considered. Radiological parameters, such as tumor size, signal changes of spinal cord, spinal level, number of levels, location of tumor attachment, shape of tumor, and presence of dural tail/calcification, were noted. These factors were analyzed to predict recurrence and functional outcome. Furthermore, a pooled analysis was performed from 13 reports of spinal meningiomas in the last 15 years. RESULTS A total of 38 patients were included in this study. Male sex and tumors with radiological evidence of a dural tail were associated with an increased risk of recurrence at a mean follow-up of 51.2 months. Ventral or ventrolateral location, large tumors, T2 cord signal changes, and poor preoperative functional status were associated with poor functional outcome at 1-year follow-up. CONCLUSIONS Spine surgeons must be aware of the natural history and risk factors of spinal meningiomas to establish a prognosis for their patients.

  18. DREMECELS: A Curated Database for Base Excision and Mismatch Repair Mechanisms Associated Human Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Ankita; Moussa, Ahmed; Singh, Tiratha Raj

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms act as a warrior combating various damaging processes that ensue critical malignancies. DREMECELS was designed considering the malignancies with frequent alterations in DNA repair pathways, that is, colorectal and endometrial cancers, associated with Lynch syndrome (also known as HNPCC). Since lynch syndrome carries high risk (~40-60%) for both cancers, therefore we decided to cover all three diseases in this portal. Although a large population is presently affected by these malignancies, many resources are available for various cancer types but no database archives information on the genes specifically for only these cancers and disorders. The database contains 156 genes and two repair mechanisms, base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR). Other parameters include some of the regulatory processes that have roles in these disease progressions due to incompetent repair mechanisms, specifically BER and MMR. However, our unique database mainly provides qualitative and quantitative information on these cancer types along with methylation, drug sensitivity, miRNAs, copy number variation (CNV) and somatic mutations data. This database would serve the scientific community by providing integrated information on these disease types, thus sustaining diagnostic and therapeutic processes. This repository would serve as an excellent accompaniment for researchers and biomedical professionals and facilitate in understanding such critical diseases. DREMECELS is publicly available at http://www.bioinfoindia.org/dremecels.

  19. DREMECELS: A Curated Database for Base Excision and Mismatch Repair Mechanisms Associated Human Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Ankita; Moussa, Ahmed; Singh, Tiratha Raj

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms act as a warrior combating various damaging processes that ensue critical malignancies. DREMECELS was designed considering the malignancies with frequent alterations in DNA repair pathways, that is, colorectal and endometrial cancers, associated with Lynch syndrome (also known as HNPCC). Since lynch syndrome carries high risk (~40-60%) for both cancers, therefore we decided to cover all three diseases in this portal. Although a large population is presently affected by these malignancies, many resources are available for various cancer types but no database archives information on the genes specifically for only these cancers and disorders. The database contains 156 genes and two repair mechanisms, base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR). Other parameters include some of the regulatory processes that have roles in these disease progressions due to incompetent repair mechanisms, specifically BER and MMR. However, our unique database mainly provides qualitative and quantitative information on these cancer types along with methylation, drug sensitivity, miRNAs, copy number variation (CNV) and somatic mutations data. This database would serve the scientific community by providing integrated information on these disease types, thus sustaining diagnostic and therapeutic processes. This repository would serve as an excellent accompaniment for researchers and biomedical professionals and facilitate in understanding such critical diseases. DREMECELS is publicly available at http://www.bioinfoindia.org/dremecels. PMID:27276067

  20. DREMECELS: A Curated Database for Base Excision and Mismatch Repair Mechanisms Associated Human Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Ankita; Singh, Tiratha Raj

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms act as a warrior combating various damaging processes that ensue critical malignancies. DREMECELS was designed considering the malignancies with frequent alterations in DNA repair pathways, that is, colorectal and endometrial cancers, associated with Lynch syndrome (also known as HNPCC). Since lynch syndrome carries high risk (~40–60%) for both cancers, therefore we decided to cover all three diseases in this portal. Although a large population is presently affected by these malignancies, many resources are available for various cancer types but no database archives information on the genes specifically for only these cancers and disorders. The database contains 156 genes and two repair mechanisms, base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR). Other parameters include some of the regulatory processes that have roles in these disease progressions due to incompetent repair mechanisms, specifically BER and MMR. However, our unique database mainly provides qualitative and quantitative information on these cancer types along with methylation, drug sensitivity, miRNAs, copy number variation (CNV) and somatic mutations data. This database would serve the scientific community by providing integrated information on these disease types, thus sustaining diagnostic and therapeutic processes. This repository would serve as an excellent accompaniment for researchers and biomedical professionals and facilitate in understanding such critical diseases. DREMECELS is publicly available at http://www.bioinfoindia.org/dremecels. PMID:27276067

  1. Surgically resected skull base meningiomas demonstrate a divergent postoperative recurrence pattern compared with non-skull base meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Alireza; Klironomos, George; Taslimi, Shervin; Kilian, Alex; Gentili, Fred; Khan, Osaama H; Aldape, Kenneth; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to identify the natural history and clinical predictors of postoperative recurrence of skull base and non-skull base meningiomas. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective hospital-based study of all patients with meningioma referred to their institution from September 1993 to January 2014. The cohort constituted both patients with a first-time presentation and those with evidence of recurrence. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed for analysis of recurrence and differences were assessed using the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to identify potential predictors of recurrence. RESULTS Overall, 398 intracranial meningiomas were reviewed, including 269 (68%) non-skull base and 129 (32%) skull base meningiomas (median follow-up 30.2 months, interquartile range [IQR] 8.5-76 months). The 10-year recurrence-free survival rates for patients with gross-total resection (GTR) and subtotal resection (STR) were 90% and 43%, respectively. Skull base tumors were associated with a lower proliferation index (0.041 vs 0.062, p = 0.001), higher likelihood of WHO Grade I (85.3% vs 69.1%, p = 0.003), and younger patient age (55.2 vs 58.3 years, p = 0.01). Meningiomas in all locations demonstrated an average recurrence rate of 30% at 100 months of follow-up. Subsequently, the recurrence of skull base meningiomas plateaued whereas non-skull base lesions had an 80% recurrence rate at 230 months follow-up (p = 0.02). On univariate analysis, a prior history of recurrence (p < 0.001), initial WHO grade following resection (p < 0.001), and the inability to obtain GTR (p < 0.001) were predictors of future recurrence. On multivariate analysis a prior history of recurrence (p = 0.02) and an STR (p < 0.01) were independent predictors of a recurrence. Assessing only patients with primary presentations, STR and WHO Grades II and III were independent predictors of recurrence (p < 0.001 for both). CONCLUSIONS Patients with skull

  2. Surgically resected skull base meningiomas demonstrate a divergent postoperative recurrence pattern compared with non-skull base meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Alireza; Klironomos, George; Taslimi, Shervin; Kilian, Alex; Gentili, Fred; Khan, Osaama H; Aldape, Kenneth; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to identify the natural history and clinical predictors of postoperative recurrence of skull base and non-skull base meningiomas. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective hospital-based study of all patients with meningioma referred to their institution from September 1993 to January 2014. The cohort constituted both patients with a first-time presentation and those with evidence of recurrence. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed for analysis of recurrence and differences were assessed using the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to identify potential predictors of recurrence. RESULTS Overall, 398 intracranial meningiomas were reviewed, including 269 (68%) non-skull base and 129 (32%) skull base meningiomas (median follow-up 30.2 months, interquartile range [IQR] 8.5-76 months). The 10-year recurrence-free survival rates for patients with gross-total resection (GTR) and subtotal resection (STR) were 90% and 43%, respectively. Skull base tumors were associated with a lower proliferation index (0.041 vs 0.062, p = 0.001), higher likelihood of WHO Grade I (85.3% vs 69.1%, p = 0.003), and younger patient age (55.2 vs 58.3 years, p = 0.01). Meningiomas in all locations demonstrated an average recurrence rate of 30% at 100 months of follow-up. Subsequently, the recurrence of skull base meningiomas plateaued whereas non-skull base lesions had an 80% recurrence rate at 230 months follow-up (p = 0.02). On univariate analysis, a prior history of recurrence (p < 0.001), initial WHO grade following resection (p < 0.001), and the inability to obtain GTR (p < 0.001) were predictors of future recurrence. On multivariate analysis a prior history of recurrence (p = 0.02) and an STR (p < 0.01) were independent predictors of a recurrence. Assessing only patients with primary presentations, STR and WHO Grades II and III were independent predictors of recurrence (p < 0.001 for both). CONCLUSIONS Patients with skull

  3. Uniform expression of alcohol dehydrogenase 3 in epithelia regenerated with cultured normal, immortalised and malignant human oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, J J; Hansson, A; Nilsson, J A; Höög, J O; Grafström, R C

    2001-01-01

    The human oral epithelium is a target for damage from the inhalation of formaldehyde. However, most experimental studies on this chemical have relied on laboratory animals that are obligatory nose breathers, including rats and mice. Therefore, in vitro model systems that mimic the structure of the human oral epithelium and which retain normal tissue-specific metabolic competence are desirable. Based on the established role of alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3), also known as glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase, as the primary enzyme catalysing the detoxification of formaldehyde, the aim of this study was to investigate the expression of ADH3 in organotypic epithelia regenerated with normal (NOK), immortalised (SVpgC2a) and malignant (SqCC/Y1) human oral keratinocytes. Organotypic epithelia, usually consisting of 5-10 cell layers, were produced at the air-liquid interface of collagen gels containing human oral fibroblasts, after culture for 10 days in a standardised serum-free medium. Immunochemical staining demonstrated uniform expression of ADH3 in these organotypic epithelia, as well as in the epithelial cells of oral tissue. The specificity of the ADH3 antiserum was ascertained from the complete neutralisation of the immunochemical reaction with purified ADH3 protein. Assessment of the staining intensities indicated that the expression levels were similar among the regenerated epithelia. Furthermore, the regenerated epithelia showed similar ADH3 expression to the epithelium in oral tissue. Therefore, a tissue-like expression pattern for ADH3 can be generated from the culture of various oral keratinocyte lines in an organotypic state. Similar expression levels among the various cell lines indicate the preservation of ADH3 during malignant transformation, and therefore that NOK, SVpgC2a and SqCC/Y1 represent functional models for in vitro studies of formaldehyde metabolism in human oral mucosa.

  4. Meningioma in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Akin, Erin Y; Baumgartner, Wes A; Lee, Jung Keun; Beasley, Michaela J

    2013-09-01

    A 17-yr-old female ovariectomized Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) was presented dead on arrival to the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. The tiger was a resident of a sanctuary for big cats and had a history of juvenile-onset blindness of unknown cause. The tiger suffered two seizures the morning of presentation and expired shortly after resolution of the second seizure. Gross necropsy findings included a meningioma attached to the left frontal bone and associated with the left frontal lobe. Histologically, the mass was composed of meningothelial cells arising from the meninges, forming whorls and streams. Cells often formed syncytia and psammoma bodies were present. Neoplastic cells were immunohistochemically positive for vimentin, S100, and cytokeratin, but negative for GFAP. All findings were consistent with a meningioma. This is the first documentation of a meningioma in a Bengal tiger.

  5. Meningioma in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Akin, Erin Y; Baumgartner, Wes A; Lee, Jung Keun; Beasley, Michaela J

    2013-09-01

    A 17-yr-old female ovariectomized Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) was presented dead on arrival to the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. The tiger was a resident of a sanctuary for big cats and had a history of juvenile-onset blindness of unknown cause. The tiger suffered two seizures the morning of presentation and expired shortly after resolution of the second seizure. Gross necropsy findings included a meningioma attached to the left frontal bone and associated with the left frontal lobe. Histologically, the mass was composed of meningothelial cells arising from the meninges, forming whorls and streams. Cells often formed syncytia and psammoma bodies were present. Neoplastic cells were immunohistochemically positive for vimentin, S100, and cytokeratin, but negative for GFAP. All findings were consistent with a meningioma. This is the first documentation of a meningioma in a Bengal tiger. PMID:24063109

  6. Gene expression analysis of aberrant signaling pathways in meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    TORRES-MARTÍN, MIGUEL; MARTINEZ-GLEZ, VICTOR; PEÑA-GRANERO, CAROLINA; ISLA, ALBERTO; LASSALETTA, LUIS; DE CAMPOS, JOSE M.; PINTO, GIOVANNY R.; BURBANO, ROMMEL R.; MELÉNDEZ, BÁRBARA; CASTRESANA, JAVIER S.; REY, JUAN A.

    2013-01-01

    Examining aberrant pathway alterations is one method for understanding the abnormal signals that are involved in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. In the present study, expression arrays were performed on tumor-related genes in meningiomas. The GE Array Q Series HS-006 was used to determine the expression levels of 96 genes that corresponded to six primary biological regulatory pathways in a series of 42 meningiomas, including 32 grade I, four recurrent grade I and six grade II tumors, in addition to three normal tissue controls. Results showed that 25 genes that were primarily associated with apoptosis and angiogenesis functions were downregulated and 13 genes frequently involving DNA damage repair functions were upregulated. In addition to the inactivation of the neurofibromin gene, NF2, which is considered to be an early step in tumorigenesis, variations of other biological regulatory pathways may play a significant role in the development of meningioma. PMID:23946817

  7. Gene expression analysis of aberrant signaling pathways in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Torres-Martín, Miguel; Martinez-Glez, Victor; Peña-Granero, Carolina; Isla, Alberto; Lassaletta, Luis; DE Campos, Jose M; Pinto, Giovanny R; Burbano, Rommel R; Meléndez, Bárbara; Castresana, Javier S; Rey, Juan A

    2013-07-01

    Examining aberrant pathway alterations is one method for understanding the abnormal signals that are involved in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. In the present study, expression arrays were performed on tumor-related genes in meningiomas. The GE Array Q Series HS-006 was used to determine the expression levels of 96 genes that corresponded to six primary biological regulatory pathways in a series of 42 meningiomas, including 32 grade I, four recurrent grade I and six grade II tumors, in addition to three normal tissue controls. Results showed that 25 genes that were primarily associated with apoptosis and angiogenesis functions were downregulated and 13 genes frequently involving DNA damage repair functions were upregulated. In addition to the inactivation of the neurofibromin gene, NF2, which is considered to be an early step in tumorigenesis, variations of other biological regulatory pathways may play a significant role in the development of meningioma. PMID:23946817

  8. Atypical growth pattern of a meningioma in an adult.

    PubMed

    Lanotte, Michele; Perez, Rosa; Boccaletti, Riccardo; Castellano, Isabella; Cassoni, Paola; Ducati, Alessandro

    2007-08-01

    A 49-year-old woman presented with a rare atypical growth pattern of meningioma without evidence of dural attachment manifesting as chronic headache associated with transient paresthesia and left motor disorders. On admission, neurological examination showed no abnormalities. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a right temporo-parieto-occipital lesion, which appeared to involve the subdural space and filling the cortical sulci. The lesion caused peritumoral white matter edema. The tumor appeared hypointense on T(1)-weighted and hyperintense on T(2)-weighted MR images, with homogeneous enhancement after contrast administration. A biopsy of the lesion was performed. Histological examination indicated that the lesion was a meningioma. Intraparenchymal meningiomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraaxial lesions in patients of any age.

  9. Olfactory function in patients with olfactory groove meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Welge-Luessen, A; Temmel, A; Quint, C; Moll, B; Wolf, S; Hummel, T

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Olfactory meningiomas are rare benign tumours and represent about 12% of all basal meningiomas. Anosmia is thought to be among the first symptoms, even though patients often present with headaches or visual problems. However, so far no detailed physophysical tests of olfactory function have been performed in a large number of those patients.
METHODS—Twelve patients (five men, seven women; mean age 52 years) with olfactory meningiomas were examined. In all patients extensive preoperative and postoperative lateralised olfactory testing was performed using the "Sniffin' Sticks" test battery, a psychometric testing tool. In eight cases the meningioma was lateralised (five left, three right), in four patients a bilateral meningioma was found. In addition to a detailed ear, nose, and throat examination MRI was performed in all patients.
RESULTS—In preoperative testing six patients were found to be anosmic on the side of the tumour, two were hyposmic. Four patients were normosmic. Postoperative investigations showed lateralised anosmia in four patients on the operated side, three were normosmic on the contralateral side and one hyposmic. The remaining eight patients were completely anosmic postoperatively.
CONCLUSIONS—(1) Contrary to expectations, olfactory testing seems to be of little help in detecting olfactory meningiomas. (2) The likelihood of normal postoperative olfactory function contralateral to the tumour was high when the tumour was less than 3 cm in diameter and preoperative normosmia had been established. (3) Preservation of olfactory function ipsilateral to the tumour seems to be extremely difficult, irrespective of tumour size or surgical approach.

 PMID:11160471

  10. Recurrent prolactinoma and meningioma following irradiation and bromocriptine treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kolodny, J.; Dluhy, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    This case report describes a 45-year-old man with a massive extrasellar prolactinoma, treated initially with surgery and radiotherapy, who experienced a dramatic reduction of the bulk of his tumor but persistence and subsequent progression of an extrasellar portion while receiving long-term bromocriptine therapy, despite stable, suppressed prolactin levels. Although the residual tumor was thought to be adenomatous tissue unresponsive to bromocriptine, a meningioma was ultimately diagnosed. Because the meningioma may have been radiation-induced, clinicians are reminded to consider a second neoplasm in cases of apparent bromocriptine treatment failures, especially when prolactin levels are stable.

  11. Intracranial meningioma with ophthalmoplegia in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Canfield, Don R

    2012-10-01

    A 21-y-old female rhesus macaque presented with signs of internal and external ophthamoplegia, including anisocoria and ptosis. Ophthalmoplegia is the paralysis or weakness of one or more intraocular or extraocular muscles that control the movement of eye; this condition can be caused by neurologic or muscle disorders. The macaque was euthanized due to progression of clinical symptoms, and postmortem gross examination revealed a mass at the base of the brain attached to the meninges. Histopathologic examination led to the diagnosis of intracranial meningioma. Here we describe a case of intracranial meningioma with internal and external ophthalmoplegia in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

  12. Coincidental Optic Nerve Meningioma and Thyroid Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Garg, Aakriti; Patel, Payal; Lignelli, Angela; Baron, Edward; Kazim, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, and Graves disease presented with clinical evidence of thyroid eye disease (TED) and optic neuropathy. She was referred when a tapered dose of steroids prompted worsening of her TED. CT and MRI were consistent with TED and bilateral optic nerve meningioma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of concurrent TED and unsuspected bilateral optic nerve meningioma. When investigating the etiology of TED-associated optic neuropathy, careful attention to orbital imaging is required because coexisting pathology may exist.

  13. Intraosseous meningioma: a rare tumor reconstructed with porous polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Kucukyuruk, Baris; Biceroglu, Huseyin; Abuzayed, Bashar; Ulu, Mustafa Onur; Sanus, Galip Zihni

    2010-05-01

    A 45-year-old woman described the pain and the swelling at the left frontoparietal region. No significant findings were noted on physical examination, except a heterogeneous palpable lesion at the described region. Computed tomographic scan revealed an expansive bone lesion with homogeneous density, whereas magnetic resonance imaging revealed similar findings with no contrast enhancement. The lesion was totally resected, and cranioplasty with a porous polyethylene sheet (Medpor Biomaterial; Porex Surgical, Newnan, GA) was achieved. Histopathologic examination revealed an intraosseous meningioma. As far as we know, this case is the first case, in which total excision of the interosseous meningioma is followed by reconstruction with Medpor.

  14. A case report of meningioma extending to the middle ear

    PubMed Central

    Kusunoki, Takeshi; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Miyashita, Mie

    2012-01-01

    Extracranial meningioma with extension into a middle ear is very uncommon. A 74-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with right ear bleeding when removing earwax. In this case, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, her past history and operative findings would consider as infiltrative growth from the right sphenoid ridge meningioma to the right middle ear via the right petrous pyramid and bilateral optic nerve. She underwent only partial extirpation with decompression for optic nerve, rather than total extirpation including middle ear and temporal bone, due to wide invasion of the middle cranial fossa and caversinus sinus. PMID:24765466

  15. GPER mediates estrogen-induced signaling and proliferations in human breast epithelial cells, and normal and malignant breast

    PubMed Central

    Scaling, Allison L.

    2014-01-01

    17β-estradiol (estrogen), through receptor binding and activation, is required for mammary gland development. Estrogen stimulates epithelial proliferation in the mammary gland, promoting ductal elongation and morphogenesis. In addition to a developmental role, estrogen promotes proliferation in tumorigenic settings, particularly breast cancer. The proliferative effects of estrogen in the normal breast and breast tumors are attributed to estrogen receptor α. Although in vitro studies have demonstrated that the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER, previously called GPR30) can modulate proliferation in breast cancer cells both positively and negatively depending on cellular context, its role in proliferation in the intact normal or malignant breast remains unclear. Estrogen-induced GPER-dependent proliferation was assessed in the immortalized non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cell line, MCF10A, and an ex vivo organ culture model employing human breast tissue from reduction mammoplasty or tumor resections. Stimulation by estrogen and the GPER-selective agonist G-1 increased the mitotic index in MCF10A cells and proportion of cells in the cell cycle in human breast and breast cancer explants, suggesting increased proliferation. Inhibition of candidate signaling pathways that may link GPER activation to proliferation revealed a dependence on Src, epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by heparin-bound EGF and subsequent ERK phosphorylation. Proliferation was not dependent on matrix metalloproteinase cleavage of membrane bound pro-HB-EGF. The contribution of GPER to estrogen-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells and breast tissue was confirmed by the ability of GPER-selective antagonist G36 to abrogate estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation, and the ability of siRNA knockdown of GPER to reduce estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells. This is the first study to demonstrate GPER-dependent proliferation in primary normal and malignant

  16. GPER mediates estrogen-induced signaling and proliferation in human breast epithelial cells and normal and malignant breast.

    PubMed

    Scaling, Allison L; Prossnitz, Eric R; Hathaway, Helen J

    2014-06-01

    17β-Estradiol (estrogen), through receptor binding and activation, is required for mammary gland development. Estrogen stimulates epithelial proliferation in the mammary gland, promoting ductal elongation and morphogenesis. In addition to a developmental role, estrogen promotes proliferation in tumorigenic settings, particularly breast cancer. The proliferative effects of estrogen in the normal breast and breast tumors are attributed to estrogen receptor α. Although in vitro studies have demonstrated that the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER, previously called GPR30) can modulate proliferation in breast cancer cells both positively and negatively depending on cellular context, its role in proliferation in the intact normal or malignant breast remains unclear. Estrogen-induced GPER-dependent proliferation was assessed in the immortalized nontumorigenic human breast epithelial cell line, MCF10A, and an ex vivo organ culture model employing human breast tissue from reduction mammoplasty or tumor resections. Stimulation by estrogen and the GPER-selective agonist G-1 increased the mitotic index in MCF10A cells and proportion of cells in the cell cycle in human breast and breast cancer explants, suggesting increased proliferation. Inhibition of candidate signaling pathways that may link GPER activation to proliferation revealed a dependence on Src, epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by heparin-bound EGF and subsequent ERK phosphorylation. Proliferation was not dependent on matrix metalloproteinase cleavage of membrane-bound pro-HB-EGF. The contribution of GPER to estrogen-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells and breast tissue was confirmed by the ability of GPER-selective antagonist G36 to abrogate estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation, and the ability of siRNA knockdown of GPER to reduce estrogen- and G-1-induced proliferation in MCF10A cells. This is the first study to demonstrate GPER-dependent proliferation in primary normal and malignant

  17. Repair of chromosome damage induced by X-irradiation during G2 phase in a line of normal human fibroblasts and its malignant derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Parshad, R.; Gantt, R.; Sanford, K.K.; Jones, G.M.; Tarone, R.E.

    1982-08-01

    A line of normal human skin fibroblasts (KD) differed from its malignant derivative (HUT-14) in the extent of cytogenetic damage induced by X-irradiation during G2 phase. Malignant cells had significantly more chromatid breaks and gaps after exposure to 25, 50, or 100 rad. The gaps may represent single-strand breaks. Results from alkaline elution of cellular DNA immediately after irradiation showed that the normal and malignant cells in asynchronous population were equally sensitive to DNA single-strand breakage by X-irradiation. Caffeine or beta-cytosine arabinoside (ara-C), inhibitors of DNA repair, when added directly following G2 phase exposure, significantly increased the incidence of radiation-induced chromatid damage in the normal cells. In contrast, similar treatment of the malignant cells had little influence. Ara-C differed from caffeine in its effects; whereas both agents increased the frequency of chromatid breaks and gaps, only ara-C increased the frequency of gaps to the level observed in the irradiated malignant cells. Addition of catalase, a scavenger of the derivative free hydroxyl radical (.OH), to the cultures of malignant cells before, during, and following irradiation significantly reduced the chromatid damage; and catalase prevented formation of chromatid gaps. The DNA damage induced by X-ray during G2 phase in the normal KD cells was apparently repaired by a caffeine- and ara-C-sensitive mechanism(s) that was deficient or absent in their malignant derivatives.

  18. Construction of Ang2-siRNA chitosan magnetic nanoparticles and the effect on Ang2 gene expression in human malignant melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, ZHAO-LIANG; YOU, CAI-LIAN; WANG, BIAO; LIN, JIAN-HONG; HU, XUE-FENG; SHAN, XIU-YING; WANG, MEI-SHUI; ZHENG, HOU-BING; ZHANG, YAN-DING

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to construct angiopoietin-2 (Ang2)-small interfering (si)RNA chitosan magnetic nanoparticles and to observe the interference effects of the nanoparticles on the expression of the Ang2 gene in human malignant melanoma cells. Ang2-siRNA chitosan magnetic nanoparticles were constructed and transfected into human malignant melanoma cells in vitro. Red fluorescent protein expression was observed, and the transfection efficiency was analyzed. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to assess the inhibition efficiency of Ang2 gene expression. Ang2-siRNA chitosan magnetic nanoparticles were successfully constructed, and at a mass ratio of plasmid to magnetic chitosan nanoparticles of 1:100, the transfection efficiency into human malignant melanoma cells was the highest of the ratios assessed, reaching 61.17%. RT-qPCR analysis showed that the magnetic chitosan nanoparticles effectively inhibited Ang2 gene expression in cells, and the inhibition efficiency reached 59.56% (P<0.05). Ang2-siRNA chitosan magnetic nanoparticles were successfully constructed. The in vitro studies showed that the nanoparticles inhibited Ang2 gene expression in human malignant melanoma tumor cells, which laid the foundation and provided experimental evidence for additional future in vivo studies of intervention targeting malignant melanoma tumor growth in nude mice. PMID:27313729

  19. Alcohol metabolism by oral streptococci and interaction with human papillomavirus leads to malignant transformation of oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lin; Pavlova, Sylvia I; Gasparovich, Stephen R; Jin, Ling; Schwartz, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Poor oral hygiene, ethanol consumption, and human papillomavirus (HPV) are associated with oral and esophageal cancers. However, the mechanism is not fully known. This study examines alcohol metabolism in Streptococcus and its interaction with HPV-16 in the malignant transformation of oral keratinocytes. The acetaldehyde-producing strain Streptococcus gordonii V2016 was analyzed for adh genes and activities of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases. Streptococcus attachment to immortalized HPV-16 infected human oral keratinocytes, HOK (HPV/HOK-16B), human oral buccal keratinocytes, and foreskin keratinocytes was studied. Acetaldehyde, malondialdehyde, DNA damage, and abnormal proliferation among keratinocytes were also quantified. We found that S. gordonii V2016 expressed three primary alcohol dehydrogenases, AdhA, AdhB, and AdhE, which all oxidize ethanol to acetaldehyde, but their preferred substrates were 1-propanol, 1-butanol, and ethanol, respectively. S. gordonii V2016 did not show a detectable aldehyde dehydrogenase. AdhE is the major alcohol dehydrogenase in S. gordonii. Acetaldehyde and malondialdehyde production from permissible Streptococcus species significantly increased the bacterial attachment to keratinocytes, which was associated with an enhanced expression of furin to facilitate HPV infection and several malignant phenotypes including acetaldehyde adduct formation, abnormal proliferation, and enhanced migration through integrin-coated basement membrane by HPV-infected oral keratinocytes. Therefore, expression of multiple alcohol dehydrogenases with no functional aldehyde dehydrogenase contributes to excessive production of acetaldehyde from ethanol by oral streptococci. Oral Streptococcus species and HPV may cooperate to transform oral keratinocytes after ethanol exposure. These results suggest a significant clinical interaction, but further validation is warranted. PMID:25427911

  20. Expression of human intestinal trefoil factor in malignant cells and its regulation by oestrogen in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    May, F E; Westley, B R

    1997-08-01

    Human intestinal trefoil factor (hITF) is a small cysteine-rich protein expressed in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Its sequence is related to that of other trefoil peptides including the pNR-2/pS2 protein, which is regulated by oestrogen in breast cancer. This study was designed to investigate whether hITF is expressed in human carcinoma cells. cDNA was obtained by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of gastric mucosal RNA and sequenced, establishing that this mRNA is expressed in the stomach. Expression of hITF was detected in a proportion of cell lines derived from malignancies of the GI tract, in hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and at highest levels in a small cell lung carcinoma cell line. Amongst breast cancer cell lines, it was expressed in all the oestrogen-responsive but in none of the oestrogen-nonresponsive breast cancer cell lines. The possibility that hITF expression in breast cells is controlled by oestradiol was then tested. Oestradiol treatment increased hITF expression between three- and ten-fold in the oestrogen-responsive breast cancer cell lines, demonstrating that, like pNR-2/pS2, hITF is regulated by oestrogen in breast cancer cells. Tamoxifen inhibited the induction of hITF expression by oestradiol but tamoxifen alone was a partial oestrogen agonist for hITF expression. These results show that hITF is expressed, sometimes ectopically, in several human malignancies, which suggests that trefoil peptides may have a more general role in tumourigenesis than hitherto appreciated. That the expression of hITF is regulated by oestrogen in breast cancer cells suggests that hITF expression may provide a novel marker for oestrogen responsiveness in breast cancer.

  1. Alcohol metabolism by oral streptococci and interaction with human papillomavirus leads to malignant transformation of oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lin; Pavlova, Sylvia I; Gasparovich, Stephen R; Jin, Ling; Schwartz, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Poor oral hygiene, ethanol consumption, and human papillomavirus (HPV) are associated with oral and esophageal cancers. However, the mechanism is not fully known. This study examines alcohol metabolism in Streptococcus and its interaction with HPV-16 in the malignant transformation of oral keratinocytes. The acetaldehyde-producing strain Streptococcus gordonii V2016 was analyzed for adh genes and activities of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases. Streptococcus attachment to immortalized HPV-16 infected human oral keratinocytes, HOK (HPV/HOK-16B), human oral buccal keratinocytes, and foreskin keratinocytes was studied. Acetaldehyde, malondialdehyde, DNA damage, and abnormal proliferation among keratinocytes were also quantified. We found that S. gordonii V2016 expressed three primary alcohol dehydrogenases, AdhA, AdhB, and AdhE, which all oxidize ethanol to acetaldehyde, but their preferred substrates were 1-propanol, 1-butanol, and ethanol, respectively. S. gordonii V2016 did not show a detectable aldehyde dehydrogenase. AdhE is the major alcohol dehydrogenase in S. gordonii. Acetaldehyde and malondialdehyde production from permissible Streptococcus species significantly increased the bacterial attachment to keratinocytes, which was associated with an enhanced expression of furin to facilitate HPV infection and several malignant phenotypes including acetaldehyde adduct formation, abnormal proliferation, and enhanced migration through integrin-coated basement membrane by HPV-infected oral keratinocytes. Therefore, expression of multiple alcohol dehydrogenases with no functional aldehyde dehydrogenase contributes to excessive production of acetaldehyde from ethanol by oral streptococci. Oral Streptococcus species and HPV may cooperate to transform oral keratinocytes after ethanol exposure. These results suggest a significant clinical interaction, but further validation is warranted.

  2. Preclinical targeting of human T-cell malignancies using CD4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Pinz, K; Liu, H; Golightly, M; Jares, A; Lan, F; Zieve, G W; Hagag, N; Schuster, M; Firor, A E; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive lymphomas with no effective upfront standard treatment and ineffective options in relapsed disease, resulting in poorer clinical outcomes as compared with B-cell lymphomas. The adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach for treatment of hematological malignancies. However, preclinical reports of targeting T-cell lymphoma with CARs are almost non-existent. Here we have designed a CAR, CD4CAR, which redirects the antigen specificity of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to CD4-expressing cells. CD4CAR T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cord blood effectively redirected T-cell specificity against CD4+ cells in vitro. CD4CAR T cells efficiently eliminated a CD4+ leukemic cell line and primary CD4+ PTCL patient samples in co-culture assays. Notably, CD4CAR T cells maintained a central memory stem cell-like phenotype (CD8+CD45RO+CD62L+) under standard culture conditions. Furthermore, in aggressive orthotropic T-cell lymphoma models, CD4CAR T cells efficiently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells while also significantly prolonging mouse survival. Combined, these studies demonstrate that CD4CAR-expressing CD8+ T cells are efficacious in ablating malignant CD4+ populations, with potential use as a bridge to transplant or stand-alone therapy for the treatment of PTCLs.

  3. Radon-induced alterations in p53-mediated energy metabolism of malignantly transformed human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Wang, Xu; Tong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Radon and its progeny were confirmed to be a category I carcinogenic agent. However, the molecular basis underlying carcinogenesis induced by radon has not been fully elucidated. Expression of p53, a key regulator in glycolysis, is known to be decreased in carcinogenesis. The aim of this investigation was to determine changes in energy metabolism mediated by p53-related metabolic pathway using radon-induced transformation of human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. HBE cells were exposed to radon for 20 min at a concentration of 20,000 Bq/m(3) and cultured for 3 d, and exposed again at the same concentration and duration. This was repeated 10 times with culture for 35 passages until malignant transformation occurred. During the culturing process, the levels of lactate and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and ratio of NAD(+)/NADH gradually increased between passages. Between passages 30 and 35, p53 target gene synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase 2 (SCO2), TP53-induced glycolysis, and apoptosis regulator (TIGAR) expression were significantly decreased. Data demonstrated that p53-associated metabolic pathways may be altered in radon-mediated malignant transformation. PMID:27267826

  4. Preclinical targeting of human T-cell malignancies using CD4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Pinz, K; Liu, H; Golightly, M; Jares, A; Lan, F; Zieve, G W; Hagag, N; Schuster, M; Firor, A E; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive lymphomas with no effective upfront standard treatment and ineffective options in relapsed disease, resulting in poorer clinical outcomes as compared with B-cell lymphomas. The adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach for treatment of hematological malignancies. However, preclinical reports of targeting T-cell lymphoma with CARs are almost non-existent. Here we have designed a CAR, CD4CAR, which redirects the antigen specificity of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to CD4-expressing cells. CD4CAR T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cord blood effectively redirected T-cell specificity against CD4+ cells in vitro. CD4CAR T cells efficiently eliminated a CD4+ leukemic cell line and primary CD4+ PTCL patient samples in co-culture assays. Notably, CD4CAR T cells maintained a central memory stem cell-like phenotype (CD8+CD45RO+CD62L+) under standard culture conditions. Furthermore, in aggressive orthotropic T-cell lymphoma models, CD4CAR T cells efficiently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells while also significantly prolonging mouse survival. Combined, these studies demonstrate that CD4CAR-expressing CD8+ T cells are efficacious in ablating malignant CD4+ populations, with potential use as a bridge to transplant or stand-alone therapy for the treatment of PTCLs. PMID:26526988

  5. Tannic acid binding of cell surfaces in normal, premalignant, and malignant squamous epithelium of the human uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Davina, J H; Lamers, G E; van Haelst, U J; Kenemans, P; Stadhouders, A M

    1984-01-01

    Alterations in tannic acid (TA) binding capacity of cell surface carbohydrates in normal, premalignant, and malignant squamous epithelium of the human uterine cervix have been studied using electron microscopic visualization in combination with microdensitometric evaluation. While in normal epithelium there is distinct binding in four to five cell layers of the deep intermediate zone, cells of carcinoma in situ and invasive cancer lesions lack TA binding. In moderate dysplasia an intermediate reacting pattern is found. Deep intermediate cells in areas bordering the carcinoma in situ lesions do not show any binding, although their ultrastructure cannot be distinguished from similar cells in normal tissue. The TA deposition within the deep intermediate zone is probably related to the presence here of glycoprotein-containing membrane-coating granules. The finding that TA binding discriminates between cells in normal squamous epithelium and morphologically normal cells in juxtaposition with lesional areas in premalignant and malignant epithelium opens the possibility for a more reliable cytologic diagnosis of cervical epithelial neoplasia.

  6. MicroRNA-3151 inactivates TP53 in BRAF-mutated human malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, Malori A.; Patel, Ravi; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Maharry, Sophia E.; Hoag, Kevin W.; Duggan, Megan; Walker, Christopher J.; Markowitz, Joseph; Carson, William E.; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The B-Raf proto-oncogene serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) gene is the most frequently mutated gene in malignant melanoma (MM) and papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and is causally involved in malignant cell transformation. Mutated BRAF is associated with an aggressive disease phenotype, thus making it a top candidate for targeted treatment strategies in MM and PTC. We show that BRAF mutations in both MM and PTC drive increased expression of oncomiR-3151, which is coactivated by the SP1/NF-κB complex. Knockdown of microRNA-3151 (miR-3151) with short hairpin RNAs reduces cell proliferation and increases apoptosis of MM and PTC cells. Using a targeted RNA sequencing approach, we mechanistically determined that miR-3151 directly targets TP53 and other members of the TP53 pathway. Reducing miR-3151’s abundance increases TP53’s mRNA and protein expression and favors its nuclear localization. Consequently, knockdown of miR-3151 also leads to caspase-3–dependent apoptosis. Simultaneous inhibition of aberrantly activated BRAF and knockdown of miR-3151 potentiates the effects of sole BRAF inhibition with the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib and may provide a novel targeted therapeutic approach in BRAF-mutated MM and PTC patients. In conclusion, we identify miR-3151 as a previously unidentified player in MM and PTC pathogenesis, which is driven by BRAF-dependent and BRAF-independent mechanisms. Characterization of TP53 as a downstream effector of miR-3151 provides evidence for a causal link between BRAF mutations and TP53 inactivation. PMID:26582795

  7. Identification of cancer stem cell markers in human malignant mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ghani, Farhana Ishrat; Yamazaki, Hiroto; Iwata, Satoshi; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Aoe, Keisuke; Okabe, Kazunori; Mimura, Yusuke; Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Kishimoto, Takumi; Yamada, Taketo; Xu, C. Wilson; Morimoto, Chikao

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} We performed serial transplantation of surgical samples and established new cell lines of malignant mesothelioma. {yields} SP cell and expressions of CD9/CD24/CD26 were often observed in mesothelioma cell lines. {yields} SP and CD24{sup +} cells proliferated by asymmetric cell division-like manner. CD9{sup +} and CD24{sup +} cells have higher potential to generate spheroid colony. {yields} The marker-positive cells have clear tendency to generate larger tumors in mice. -- Abstract: Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive and therapy-resistant neoplasm arising from the pleural mesothelial cells and usually associated with long-term asbestos exposure. Recent studies suggest that tumors contain cancer stem cells (CSCs) and their stem cell characteristics are thought to confer therapy-resistance. However, whether MM cell has any stem cell characteristics is not known. To understand the molecular basis of MM, we first performed serial transplantation of surgical samples into NOD/SCID mice and established new cell lines. Next, we performed marker analysis of the MM cell lines and found that many of them contain SP cells and expressed several putative CSC markers such as CD9, CD24, and CD26. Interestingly, expression of CD26 closely correlated with that of CD24 in some cases. Sorting and culture assay revealed that SP and CD24{sup +} cells proliferated by asymmetric cell division-like manner. In addition, CD9{sup +} and CD24{sup +} cells have higher potential to generate spheroid colony than negative cells in the stem cell medium. Moreover, these marker-positive cells have clear tendency to generate larger tumors in mouse transplantation assay. Taken together, our data suggest that SP, CD9, CD24, and CD26 are CSC markers of MM and could be used as novel therapeutic targets.

  8. Inhibition of transient receptor potential canonical channels impairs cytokinesis in human malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Bomben, V. C.; Sontheimer, H. W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Glial-derived primary brain tumours, gliomas, are among the fastest growing malignancies and present a huge clinical challenge. Research suggests an important, yet poorly understood, role of ion channels in growth control of normal and malignant cells. In this study, we sought to functionally characterize Transient Receptor Potential Canoncial (TRPC) channels in glioma cell proliferation. TRPC channels form non-selective cation channels that have been suggested to represent a Ca2+ influx pathway impacting cellular growth. Materials and Methods Employing a combination of molecular, biochemical and biophysical techniques, we characterized TRPC channels in glioma cells. Results We showed consistent expression of four channel family members (TRPC-1, -3, -5, -6) in glioma cell lines and acute patient-derived tissues. These channels gave rise to small, non-voltage-dependent cation currents that were blocked by the TRPC inhibitors GdCl3, 2-APB, or SKF96365. Importantly, TRPC channels contributed to the resting conductance of glioma cells and their acute pharmacological inhibition caused an ~10 mV hyperpolarization of the cells’ resting potential. Additionally, chronic application of the TRPC inhibitor SKF96365 caused near complete growth arrest. A detailed analysis, by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and time-lapse microscopy, showed that growth inhibition occurred at the G2 + M phase of the cell cycle with cytokinesis defects. Cells underwent incomplete cell divisions and became multinucleate, enlarged cells. Conclusions Nuclear atypia and enlarged cells are histopathological hallmarks for glioblastoma multiforme, the highest grade glioma, suggesting that a defect in TRPC channel function may contribute to cellular abnormalities in these tumours. PMID:18211288

  9. Photodynamic therapy of human malignant tumors: a comparative study between photohem and tetrasulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranadko, Eugeny P.; Skobelkin, Oleg K.; Litvin, Grigory D.; Astrakhankina, Tamara A.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of the results of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for treating malignant neoplasms of the skin, mammary glands, tongue, oral mucous, lower lip, larynx, lungs, urinary bladder, rectum and other locations has been made. During 1992-1995 543 tumoral foci in 146 patients have been treated with PDT. All patients were previously treated with conventional techniques without effect or they were not treated due to contraindications either because of severe accompanying diseases or because of old age. A part of the patients had PDT because of recurrences or intradermal metastases in 1-2 years after surgical, radial or combined treatment. Two home-made preparations were used as photosensitizers: Photohem (hematoporphyrine derivative) and Photosense (aluminum sulfonated phthalocyanine). Light sources were: the argon pumped dye laser ('Innova-200,' 'Coherent') and home-made laser devices: copper-vapor laser-pumped dye laser ('Yakhroma-2,' Frjazino), gas-discharge unit 'Xenon' (wavelength 630 nm), gold-vapor laser (wavelength 627.8 nm) for Photohem; while for Photosense sessions we used solid-state laser on ittrium aluminate 'Poljus-1' (wavelength 670 mn). Up to now we have follow-up control data within 2 months and 3 years. Positive effect of PDT was seen in 92.4% of patients including complete regression of tumors in 62.3% and partial -- in 30.1%. Currently, this new perspective technique of treating malignant neoplasms is successfully being used in Russia; new photosensitizers and light sources for PDT and fluorescent tumour diagnostics are being developed as well.

  10. [Prognostic factors in elderly patient meningioma].

    PubMed

    Villalpando-Navarrete, Edgar; Rosas-Peralta, Víctor Hugo; Sandoval-Balanzario, Miguel Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: frecuentemente debe tomarse una decisión terapéutica para el manejo del meningioma en el paciente geriátrico. El presente estudio analiza factores pronósticos, así como la escala Clinical- Radiological Grading Score (CRGS) como auxiliar para la decisión terapéutica. Métodos: se realizó un estudio retrospectivo entre 2009 y 2010. La población estudiada fue de 28 pacientes mayores de 65 años de edad. Se analizaron factores clínicos, imagenológicos e histopatológicos. Se utilizó la prueba chi cuadrada y la exacta de Fisher para variables cuantitativas y U de Mann-Whitney para variables cualitativas. Resultados: la mortalidad global a los 3, 6 y 12 meses de seguimiento fue del 7.14, 10.71 y 14.28 %, respectivamente. El análisis reveló que el estado funcional con la escala de Karnofsky (p = 0.02), la localización de la lesión (p = 0.002), el grado de malignidad histopatológico (p = 0.038) y una puntuación menor de 10 en la escala CRGS (p = 0.003) se asocian con un mal pronóstico. Conclusión: el manejo neuroquirúrgico del paciente geriátrico es una posibilidad terapéutica con un pronóstico favorable en pacientes con una puntuación igual o mayor de 10 y en aquellos con un adecuado estado funcional.

  11. Bevacizumab treatment for meningiomas in NF2: a retrospective analysis of 15 patients.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Fabio P; Merker, Vanessa L; Jennings, Dominique; Caruso, Paul A; di Tomaso, Emmanuelle; Muzikansky, Alona; Barker, Fred G; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Plotkin, Scott R

    2013-01-01

    Bevacizumab treatment can result in tumor shrinkage of progressive vestibular schwannomas in some neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2) patients but its effect on meningiomas has not been defined. To determine the clinical activity of bevacizumab against NF2-related meningiomas, we measured changes in volume of meningiomas in NF2 patients who received bevacizumab for treatment of progressive vestibular schwannomas. A radiographic response was defined as a 20% decrease in tumor size by volumetric MRI analysis. In addition, we determined the expression pattern of growth factors associated with tumor angiogenesis in paraffin-embedded tissues from 26 unrelated meningiomas. A total of 48 meningiomas in 15 NF2 patients were included in this study with a median follow up time of 18 months. A volumetric radiographic response was seen in 29% of the meningiomas (14/48). Tumor shrinkage was not durable: the median duration of response was 3.7 months and the median time to progression was 15 months. There was no significant correlation between pre-treatment growth rate and meningioma response in regression models. Tissue analysis showed no correlation between tumor microvascular density and expression of VEGF pathway components. This data suggests that, in contrast to schwannomas, activation of VEGF pathway is not the primary driver of angiogenesis in meningiomas. Our results suggest that a minority of NF2-associated meningiomas shrink during bevacizumab therapy and that these responses were of short duration. These results are comparable to previous studies of bevacizumab in sporadic meningiomas. PMID:23555840

  12. Posttranscriptional deregulation of signaling pathways in meningioma subtypes by differential expression of miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Nicole; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Mueller, Sabine C.; Backes, Christina; Werner, Tamara V.; Galata, Valentina; Sartorius, Elke; Bohle, Rainer M.; Keller, Andreas; Meese, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Background Micro (mi)RNAs are key regulators of gene expression and offer themselves as biomarkers for cancer development and progression. Meningioma is one of the most frequent primary intracranial tumors. As of yet, there are limited data on the role of miRNAs in meningioma of different histological subtypes and the affected signaling pathways. Methods In this study, we compared expression of 1205 miRNAs in different meningioma grades and histological subtypes using microarrays and independently validated deregulation of selected miRNAs with quantitative real-time PCR. Clinical utility of a subset of miRNAs as biomarkers for World Health Organization (WHO) grade II meningioma based on quantitative real-time data was tested. Potential targets of deregulated miRNAs were discovered with an in silico analysis. Results We identified 13 miRNAs deregulated between different subtypes of benign meningiomas, and 52 miRNAs deregulated in anaplastic meningioma compared with benign meningiomas. Known and putative target genes of deregulated miRNAs include genes involved in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition for benign meningiomas, and Wnt, transforming growth factor–β, and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling for higher-grade meningiomas. Furthermore, a 4-miRNA signature (miR-222, -34a*, -136, and -497) shows promise as a biomarker differentiating WHO grade II from grade I meningiomas with an area under the curve of 0.75. Conclusions Our data provide novel insights into the contribution of miRNAs to the phenotypic spectrum in benign meningiomas. By deregulating translation of genes belonging to signaling pathways known to be important for meningioma genesis and progression, miRNAs provide a second in line amplification of growth promoting cellular signals. MiRNAs as biomarkers for diagnosis of aggressive meningiomas might prove useful and should be explored further in a prospective manner. PMID:25681310

  13. The Tsukuba hypertensive mouse (transgenic mouse carrying human genes for both renin and angiotensinogen) as a model of human malignant hypertension: development of lesions and morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Shimokama, T; Haraoka, S; Horiguchi, H; Sugiyama, F; Murakami, K; Watanabe, T

    1998-02-01

    The renin-angiotensin system has a pivotal role in hypertension. The Tsukuba hypertensive mouse (THM; a transgenic mouse carrying human genes for both renin and angiotensinogen) was generated to allow further examination of the renin-angiotensin system in a variety of pathologic conditions. We evaluated the development of renal lesions in these mice and in controls by morphometric, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural methods. Blood pressure was significantly higher in THM than in control mice; 1 year after birth, it was approximately 40 mmHg higher. The kidney-to-body weight ratio was also higher in THM than in control. Morphometrical analysis revealed that the glomerular sclerosis index was significantly elevated in THM with 10% of the glomeruli sclerotic at 18 months. The grade of vascular lesion and the frequency of fibronoid arteritis of the kidney exhibited the same tendency as the glomerular sclerosis index. Murine renin was located exclusively in the juxtaglomerular apparatus, whereas human renin was expressed not only in the juxtaglomerular apparatus, but also in periarteriolar smooth muscle cells and in mesangial and epithelial cells of the glomeruli. Light and electron microscopy revealed significant fibrinoid arteritis of the kidney in THM and also "onion skinning", both pathognomonic for malignant nephrosclerosis. THM may be an excellent model of human malignant hypertension. PMID:9504863

  14. Intracerebral metaplastic meningioma with prominent ossification and extensive calcification

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingxiang; Petersson, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    We present a patient (male 26 years) with a short history of recurrent seizures induced by a largely intracerebrally located frontal lobe meningioma. The tumor displayed a heretofore unpublished combination of extensive metaplastic bone formation and prominent non-psammomatous calcifications with focal chicken-wire pattern. PMID:21769319

  15. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition: possible role in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Pecina-Slaus, Nives; Cicvara-Pecina, Tatjana; Kafka, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchimal transition (EMT) is a process involved in invasion and metastasis of tumors. The occurrence of EMT during tumor progression resembles the developmental scenario and sheds light on important mechanisms for the initial step of metastasis - invasion where noninvasive tumor cells acquire motility and ultimately disseminate to distant organs. The hallmark of EMT is the loss of expression of the cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. The numerous reports by many authors as well as our own results indicate that E-cadherin plays a role in CNS tumors - meningiomas. Our studies showed that 73 % of meningiomas had downregulation of E-cadherin. Moreover, loss of heterozygosity of E-cadherin was observed in 32 % of meningiomas. Bound to E-cadherin in adherens junctions is beta-catenin, whose translocation to the nucleus is yet another molecular event involved in EMT. In our study beta-catenin was progressively upregulated from meningothelial to atypical, while 60 % of anaplastic meningiomas showed upregulation and nuclear localization of the protein. The elucidation of molecular mechanisms that govern EMT will offer new approaches and targets to restrain metastasis.

  16. Psychiatric symptoms and an anterior cranial fossa meningioma.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, G; Austin, H; Neehall, J E

    1998-09-01

    We present a case of a patient admitted to a psychiatric hospital with psychotic symptoms and cognitive impairment but who was subsequently found to have an anterior interhemispheric falx meningioma. There must be a high index of suspicion for organic brain disease in patients over age 45 years presenting with psychotic symptoms and seizures for the first time.

  17. Analysis of aberrant methylation in DNA repair genes during malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells induced by cadmium.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi-heng; Lei, Yi-xiong; Wang, Cai-xia

    2012-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and its compounds are well-known human carcinogens, but the mechanisms underlying the carcinogenesis are not entirely understood yet. Aberrant methylation was investigated in order to obtain insight into the DNA repair-related epigenetic mechanisms underlying CdCl(2)-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE). Gene expression and DNA methylation were assessed in untreated control cells; 5th, 15th, and 35th passage of CdCl2-treated cells and tumorigenic cells (TCs) from nude mice by using high-performance liquid chromatography, real-time PCR, Western blot analysis, and methylation-specific PCR assay. During Cd-induced malignant transformation, global DNA methylation progressively increased and was associated with the overexpression of the DNA methyltransferase genes DNMT1 and DNMT3a but not DNMT3b. Expression of both the messenger RNA and proteins of the DNA repair genes (hMSH2, ERCC1, XRCC1, and hOGG1) progressively reduced and DNA damage increased with Cd-induced transformation. The promoter regions of hMSH2, ERCC1, XRCC1, and hOGG1 were heavily methylated in the 35th passage transformed cells and the TCs. The DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine could reverse the Cd-induced global DNA hypermethylation, DNMT hyperactivity, and the silencing of hMSH2, ERCC1, XRCC1, and hOGG1 in a time-dependent manner. The results indicate that DNMT1 and DNMT3a overexpression can result in global DNA hypermethylation and silencing of the hMSH2, ERCC1, XRCC1, and hOGG1 genes. They may partly explain the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the carcinogenesis due to Cd.

  18. Mucosal Human Papillomaviruses Encode Four Different E5 Proteins Whose Chemistry and Phylogeny Correlate with Malignant or Benign Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Ignacio G.; Alonso, Ángel

    2004-01-01

    We performed a phylogenetic study of the E2-L2 region of human mucosal papillomaviruses (PVs) and of the proteins therein encoded. Hitherto, proteins codified in this region were known as E5 proteins. We show that many of these proteins could be spurious translations, according to phylogenetic and chemical coherence criteria between similar protein sequences. We show that there are four separate families of E5 proteins, with different characteristics of phylogeny, chemistry, and rate of evolution. For the sake of clarity, we propose a change in the present nomenclature. E5α is present in groups A5, A6, A7, A9, and A11, PVs highly associated with malignant carcinomas of the cervix and penis. E5β is present in groups A2, A3, A4, and A12, i.e., viruses associated with certain warts. E5γ is present in group A10, and E5δ is encoded in groups A1, A8, and A10, which are associated with benign transformations. The phylogenetic relationships between mucosal human PVs are the same when considering the oncoproteins E6 and E7 and the E5 proteins and differ from the phylogeny estimated for the structural proteins L1 and L2. Besides, the protein divergence rate is higher in early proteins than in late proteins, increasing in the order L1 < L2 < E6 ≈ E7 < E5. Moreover, the same proteins have diverged more rapidly in viruses associated with malignant transformations than in viruses associated with benign transformations. The E5 proteins display, therefore, evolutionary characteristics similar to those of the E6 and E7 oncoproteins. This could reflect a differential involvement of the E5 types in the transformation processes. PMID:15564472

  19. Antiproliferative Activity of Double Point Modified Analogs of 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D2 Against Human Malignant Melanoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska, Anna; Wierzbicka, Justyna; Nadkarni, Sharmin; Brown, Geoffrey; Kutner, Andrzej; Żmijewski, Michał A.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is a lipid soluble steroid hormone with pleiotropic biological properties, including regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. As to these desirable anticancer actions, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamins D and analogs have been reported to inhibit the proliferation and to induce differentiation of a wide variety of cancer cell types, including human malignant melanoma. However, there is a need for novel and more efficacious vitamin D analogs, and how best to design such is still an open issue. A series of double point modified (DPM) analogs of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2 (1,25(OH)2D2) induced differentiation of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) positive A375 and VDR negative SK-MEL 188b human malignant melanoma cell lines. Surprisingly, the dose of 1,25(OH)2D2 required to inhibit the proliferation of the A375 melanoma cell line by was several fold lower than that required in the case of 1,25(OH)2D3. To evaluate the impact of the modification in the side chain (additional 22-hydroxyl) and in the A-ring (5,6-trans modification), the regular side-chain of vitamin D2 or D3 was retained in the structure of our analogs. As expected, 5,6-trans modification was advantageous to enhancing the anti-proliferative activity of analogs, but not as a single point modification (SPM). Very unexpectedly, the additional 22-hydroxyl in the side-chain reduced significantly the anti-proliferative activity of both the natural and 5,6-trans series analogs. Finally, an induction of pigmentation in melanoma SK-MEL 188b cells was observed to sensitized cells to the effect of vitamin D analogs. PMID:26760999

  20. Up-regulation of DDX39 in human malignant pleural mesothelioma cell lines compared to normal pleural mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Tominaga, Waka; Baron, Byron; Tokuda, Kazuhiro; Wang, Yufeng; Kitagawa, Takao; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2013-06-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a malignant tumor originating from mesothelial cells existing in pleura. Since its incidence, it is closely related to the amount and time of exposure to asbestos, and the latency period after exposure to asbestos is very long, the incidence may increase over the next two decades. Since early detection is very difficult and there is no standard curative therapy, it is important to understand the biology of MPM, and to find biomarkers and molecular targets for its therapy. DDX39 is one of the Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp (DEAD)-box RNA helicases, which are required for the export of mRNA out of the nucleus, and transcription, splicing and transport of mRNA. Some reports have shown differential expression of DDX39 in tumor cells or tissues such as lung squamous cell cancer, gastrointestinal stromal tumor and urinary bladder cancer. In the present study, the protein levels of DDX39 in the human MPM cell lines NCI-H28, NCI-H2052 and NCI-H2452, and the human pleural mesothelial cell line MeT-5A were investigated by western blotting. The protein levels of DDX39 were found to be higher in NCI-H28, NCI-H2052 and NCI-H2452 compared to MeT-5A. The intensity of the bands of DDX39 in NCI-H28, NCI-H2052 and NCI-H2452 cells were increased by 1.351-, 1.887- and 2.024-fold, respectively, compared to MPM cells. These results suggest that DDX39 is a possible candidate biomarker for molecular-targeting of MPM.

  1. Down-regulation of malignant potential by alpha linolenic acid in human and mouse colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chamberland, John P; Moon, Hyun-Seuk

    2015-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (also called ω-3 fatty acis or n-3 fatty acid) are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with a double bond (C=C) at the third carbon atom from the end of the carbon chain. Numerous test tube and animal studies have shown that omega-3 fatty acids may prevent or inhibit the growth of cancers, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids are important in cancer physiology. Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is one of an essential omega-3 fatty acid and organic compound found in seeds (chia and flaxseed), nuts (notably walnuts), and many common vegetable oils. ALA has also been shown to down-regulate cell proliferation of prostate, breast, and bladder cancer cells. However, direct evidence that ALA suppresses to the development of colon cancer has not been studied. Also, no previous studies have evaluated whether ALA may regulate malignant potential (adhesion, invasion and colony formation) in colon cancer cells. In order to address the questions above, we conducted in vitro studies and evaluated whether ALA may down-regulate malignant potential in human (HT29 and HCT116) and mouse (MCA38) colon cancer cell lines. We observed that treatment with 1-5 mM of ALA inhibits cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion in both human and mouse colon cancer cell lines. Interestingly, we observed that ALA did not decrease total colony numbers when compared to control. By contrast, we found that size of colony was significantly changed by ALA treatment when compared to control in all colon cancer cell lines. We suggest that our data enhance our current knowledge of ALA's mechanism and provide crucial information to further the development of new therapies for the management or chemoprevention of colon cancer.

  2. L1CAM promotes enrichment of immunosuppressive T cells in human pancreatic cancer correlating with malignant progression.

    PubMed

    Grage-Griebenow, Evelin; Jerg, Elfi; Gorys, Artur; Wicklein, Daniel; Wesch, Daniela; Freitag-Wolf, Sandra; Goebel, Lisa; Vogel, Ilka; Becker, Thomas; Ebsen, Michael; Röcken, Christoph; Altevogt, Peter; Schumacher, Udo; Schäfer, Heiner; Sebens, Susanne

    2014-07-01

    Regulatory T cell (T-reg) enrichment in the tumor microenvironment is regarded as an important mechanism of tumor immune escape. Hence, the presence of T-regs in highly malignant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is correlated with short survival. Likewise, the adhesion molecule L1CAM is upregulated during PDAC progression in the pancreatic ductal epithelium also being associated with poor prognosis. To investigate whether L1CAM contributes to enrichment of T-regs in PDAC, human CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(-)CD49d(-) T-regs and CD4(+)CD25(-) T-effector cells (T-effs) were isolated by magnetic bead separation from blood of healthy donors. Their phenotype and functional behavior were analyzed in dependence on human premalignant (H6c7) or malignant (Panc1) pancreatic ductal epithelial cells, either exhibiting or lacking L1CAM expression. T cells derived from blood and tumors of PDAC patients were analyzed by flow cytometry and findings were correlated with clinical parameters. Predominantly T-regs but not T-effs showed an increased migration on L1CAM expressing H6c7 and Panc1 cells. Whereas proliferation of T-regs did not change in the presence of L1CAM, T-effs proliferated less, exhibited a decreased CD25 expression and an increased expression of CD69. Moreover, these T-effs exhibited a regulatory phenotype as they inhibited proliferation of autologous T cells. Accordingly, CD4(+)CD25(-)CD69(+) T cells were highly abundant in PDAC tissues compared to blood being associated with nodal invasion and higher grading in PDAC patients. Overall, these data point to an important role of L1CAM in the enrichment of immunosuppressive T cells in particular of a CD4(+)CD25(-)CD69(+)-phenotype in PDAC providing a novel mechanism of tumor immune escape which contributes to tumor progression. PMID:24746181

  3. Primary malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Mısır, A. Ferhat; Durmuşlar, Mustafa C.; Zerener, Tamer; Gün, Banu D.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanomas (MM) of the oral cavity are extremely rare, accounting for 0.2% to 8.0% of all malignant melanomas. Malignant melanomas is more frequently seen at the level of the hard palate and gingiva. Early diagnosis and treatment are important for reducing morbidity. Malignant melanoma cells stain positively with antibodies to human melanoma black 45, S-100 protein, and vimentin; therefore, immunohistochemistry can play an important role in evaluating the depth of invasion and the location of metastases. A 76-year-old man developed an oral malignant melanoma, which was originally diagnosed as a bluish reactive denture hyperplasia caused by an ill-fitting lower denture. The tumor was removed surgically, and histopathological examination revealed a nodular-type MM. There was no evidence of recurrence over a 4-year follow-up period. PMID:27052289

  4. Assessment of candidate immunohistochemical prognostic markers of meningioma recurrence.

    PubMed

    Csonka, T; Murnyák, B; Szepesi, R; Bencze, J; Bognár, L; Klekner, A; Hortobágyi, T

    2016-01-01

    Although tumour recurrence is an important and not infrequent event in meningiomas, predictive immunohistochemical markers have not been identified yet. The aim of this study was to address this clinically relevant problem by systematic retrospective analysis of surgically completely resected meningiomas with and without recurrence, including tumour samples from patients who underwent repeat surgeries. Three established immunohistochemical markers of routine pathological meningioma work-up have been assessed: the proliferative marker Ki-67 (clone Mib1), the tumour suppressor gene p53 and progesterone receptor (PR). All these proteins correlate with the tumour WHO grade, however the predictive value regarding recurrence and progression in tumour grade is unknown. One hundred and fourteen surgical specimens of 70 meningioma patients (16 male and 54 female) in a 16 years' interval have been studied. All tumours had apparently complete surgical removal. On Mib1, PR and p53 immunostained sections, the percentage of labelled tumour cells, the staining intensity and the multiplied values of these parameters (the histoscore) was calculated. Results were statistically correlated with tumour WHO grade, (sub)type, recurrence and progression in WHO grade at subsequent biopsies. Our results confirmed previous findings that the WHO grade is directly proportional to Mib1 and p53 and is inversely proportional to the PR immunostain. We have demonstrated that Mib1 and p53 have a significant correlation with and predictive value of relapse/recurrence irrespective of the histological subtype of the same WHO grade. As a quantitative marker, Mib1 has the best correlation with a percentage of labelled cells, whereas p53 with intensity and histoscore. In conclusion, the immunohistochemical panel of PR, p53, Mib1 in parallel with applying standard diagnostic criteria based on H and E stained sections is sufficient and reliable to predict meningioma recurrence in surgically completely

  5. The results of radiosurgical management of 72 middle fossa meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Valentino, V; Schinaia, G; Raimondi, A J

    1993-01-01

    Of 812 patients with intracranial tumours treated by radiosurgery during the period 1984-1990, 129 had meningiomas. Of these latter, 72 had middle fossa meningiomas. Patients with meningiomas treated by us since March 1990 are not included in this report since we established the investigative principle of a minimum of 30 months follow-up. Seventeen of the 72 patients were treated after incomplete surgical resection, and 21 for tumour regrowth. In 34 patients, radiosurgery was the primary treatment. The tumour volume was calculated by the ellipsoid method. It ranged from 0.588-76.346 ml. Radiosurgery was performed using the non-invasive stereotactic fixation head device (Greitz-Bergström) adapted to the Fixster frame, and dynamic irradiation performed with the linear accelerator, using especially designed collimators. The total tumour dose for each patient ranged from 15-45 Gy. The minimum follow-up was 2 1/2 years and the maximum 8 years. In 50 patients there was tumour shrinkage ranging from 24-91% of the initial tumour volume. Shrinkage was associated with central tumour necrosis in 11 of these 50 patients. In 18 patients the tumour volume remained stable. In 2 patients there was tumour progression and in 2 there was regrowth after initial reduction of tumour volume. There were no significant treatment complications. Radiosurgery is preferable to re-operation in recurrent meningiomas and indicated after incomplete surgical removal. In high risk patients, as well as in "unresectable" meningiomas, it is an obvious alternative to microsurgery.

  6. Rare Parenchyma Meningioma in an Adolescent Female With Cheek Tingling

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wenjie; Li, Meirong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The following is a report on a rare parenchyma meningioma and the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. To our knowledge, this was the first characterization of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in a parenchyma meningioma. Three days after initial presentation, a 14-year-old female student reported feeling tingling in her cheek, grading 3 to 4 points. Two hours later, the tingling had disappeared. The patient was admitted to hospital with stable vital signs and no abnormal presentations upon physical examination. A routine CT scan of the brain showed a quasicircular region of the left occipital lobe was homogenous hyperdense and an arcualia calcification was found on the lesion's margin and the boundary was ill-defined. Further MRI and contrast-enhanced scanning of the brain showed that a lobulated nidus with abnormal signaling was present in the left occipital lobe and was approximately 1.9 × 2.0 cm. Hypointensity on T1-weighted imaging and a slight hyperintensity on T2-weighted imaging was also observed. A short T2 signal appeared on the margin and a few longer T2 edema zones appeared around the nidus, whereas the lesion showed homogenous enhancement. MRS was characterized by a slight or moderate increase of a choline (Cho) peak and a small reduction of the N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) peak. After completing the preoperative preparation, the excision of the supratentorial deep lesions was performed on the patient. The pathology led to a diagnosis of a left occipital lobe meningioma, WHO I. The patient was followed-up for 14 months postoperation, and had no reoccurrences. Intraparenchymal meningioma rarely occurs in brain parenchyma, and is characterized by lesions with abundant blood supply and requires a glioma to be identified. MRS is a potential tool for preoperative diagnosis of intraparenchymal meningioma. PMID:27082619

  7. Repeat-element driven activation of proto-oncogenes in human malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Björn; Bonifer, Constanze; Mathas, Stephan

    2010-11-01

    Recent data demonstrated that the aberrant activity of endogenous repetitive elements of the DNA in humans can drive the expression of proto-oncogenes. This article summarizes these results and gives an outlook on the impact of these findings on the pathogenesis and therapy of human cancer.

  8. Culture of normal and malignant primary human mammary epithelial cells in a physiological manner simulates in vivo growth patterns and allows discrimination of cell type.

    PubMed

    Bergstraesser, L M; Weitzman, S A

    1993-06-01

    We cultured primary human mammary epithelial cells from five reduction mammoplasties and five breast carcinomas and attempted to improve culture conditions and define cell populations grown. Normal cells cultured on Matrigel basement membrane-like substance formed multicellular three-dimensional structures reminiscent of tissue ducts and alveoli, while malignant cells remained as single cells crawling through Matrigel much as malignant cells separate and invade basement membrane in vivo. This re-creation of normal and malignant breast cell morphology may facilitate studies of breast cancer cell biology and determination of malignant cell authenticity in culture. Growth of cells in a reduced oxygen concentration of 12% improved cell proliferation over room air (21%); however, cells could not proliferate in a completely physiological oxygen concentration of 6%, perhaps because of the medium used. We developed an improved medium for malignant cell growth, which lengthened their life span in culture, and a completely defined medium which supported cell proliferation for six passages. Methods to determine the epithelial nature of mammary epithelial cells are illustrated and discussed. The authenticity of malignant cells in culture was suggested by their proliferation without certain growth factors required for normal cell growth or with transforming growth factor-beta, which arrests normal cell proliferation, and by their contact independence.

  9. c-myc, ras p21 and p53 expression in pleomorphic adenoma and its malignant form of the human salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, H; Hamano, H; Hayashi, Y

    1993-01-01

    Using an immunohistochemical study and an immunoblot analysis, the expression of cellular oncogenes of the human salivary glands such as c-myc, ras p21, and p53 tumor-suppressor gene in pleomorphic adenomas and its malignant form, carcinoma in pleomorphic adenomas was examined to evaluate a differential biological significance, in comparison with that in normal salivary gland tissues. Immunohistochemically, the c-myc product was detected in 42% of the pleomorphic adenomas and in 56% of the carcinomas in pleomorphic adenoma. The ras p21 expression was observed in 24% of pleomorphic adenomas, and in 50% of carcinomas in pleomorphic adenoma. The p53 protein was detected in 18% of the pleomorphic adenomas and in 67% of the carcinomas in pleomorphic adenoma. Although there was no significant difference between the benign and malignant forms for the expression of c-myc, a statistical significance in ras p21 and p53 expression was found between the pleomorphic adenoma and its malignant form (P < 0.05) and P < 0.001, respectively). An immunoblotting assay clearly demonstrated the expression of c-myc and p53 gene products in both the benign and malignant forms of the pleomorphic adenoma, and that of ras p21 in the malignant form. These results indicate that activation of c-myc and ras p21 proto-oncogenes and the involvement of p53 mutation may play important roles in the malignant transformation of salivary gland pleomorphic adenoma.

  10. Microwave-induced local hyperthermia in combination with radiotherapy of human malignant tumors

    SciTech Connect

    U, R.; Noell, K.T.; Woodward, K.T.; Worde, B.T.; Fishburn, R.I.; Miller, L.S.

    1980-02-15

    Since 1976, two groups of patients have been treated with local microwave hyperthermia immediately following ionizing radiation. Group A patients had measurable multiple lesions assigned radiotherapy only, microwave hyperthermia only, or combined treatment. Ionizing radiation in 200 to 600 rad fractions was used 2 to 5 times per week to a total of 1800 to 4200 rad in 5 to 14 fractions. Group B patients had combination treatment only, with radiation fractions of 200 to 600 rad 2 to 5 times per week to a total of 200 to 4800 rad total in 6 to 20 fractions. Both groups received hyperthermia (42 to 44 C) 2 to 3 times per week, maximum ten sessions in four weeks. The 19 patients treated have had squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, malignant melanoma, plasmacytoma, epithelioid sarcoma, and undifferentiated carcinoma. After more than 150 hyperthermia sessions, we find: (1) local hyperthermia with microwave alone or in combination with ionizing radiation can be used with excellent normal tissue tolerance provided local tissue temperatures are carefully monitored and controlled; (2) a higher level of heat induction in tumor tissue as compared to surrounding normal tissues; and (3) repeated hyperthermia at 42 to 43.5 C for 45 minutes per session immediately following photon irradiation yields a favorable therapeutic result, occasionally dramatic. Local microwave hyperthermia in combination withradiotherapy offers the possibility of substantial impact on clinical cancer therapy, whether of curative or palliative intent.

  11. Agonist antibody that induces human malignant cells to kill one another

    PubMed Central

    Yea, Kyungmoo; Zhang, Hongkai; Xie, Jia; Jones, Teresa M.; Lin, Chih-Wei; Francesconi, Walter; Berton, Fulvia; Fallahi, Mohammad; Sauer, Karsten; Lerner, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    An attractive, but as yet generally unrealized, approach to cancer therapy concerns discovering agents that change the state of differentiation of the cancer cells. Recently, we discovered a phenomenon that we call “receptor pleiotropism” in which agonist antibodies against known receptors induce cell fates that are very different from those induced by the natural agonist to the same receptor. Here, we show that one can take advantage of this phenomenon to convert acute myeloblastic leukemic cells into natural killer cells. Upon induction with the antibody, these leukemic cells enter into a differentiation cascade in which as many as 80% of the starting leukemic cells can be differentiated. The antibody-induced killer cells make large amounts of perforin, IFN-γ, and granzyme B and attack and kill other members of the leukemic cell population. Importantly, induction of killer cells is confined to transformed cells, in that normal bone marrow cells are not induced to form killer cells. Thus, it seems possible to use agonist antibodies to change the differentiation state of cancer cells into those that attack and kill other members of the malignant clone from which they originate. PMID:26487683

  12. Implementation of a molecular epidemiology approach to human pleural malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Puntoni, Riccardo; Filiberti, Rosangela; Cerrano, Paolo G; Neri, Monica; Andreatta, Rossana; Bonassi, Stefano

    2003-11-01

    The carcinogenic effect of asbestos has been reported in the literature since 40 years, and early studies describing the epidemic occurrence of malignant mesothelioma (MM) in asbestos workers, have become a paradigm of occupational cancer research. Research on MM was abandoned for many years since MM was considered as an asbestos-related disease, interesting only from a perspective of disease control and preventive policies. The introduction of new biological endpoints in the epidemiological studies has boosted research in the field, providing new tools for the study of emerging priority in cancer research and in public health. This approach, known as molecular epidemiology has a great potential in the study of MM, contributing to the understanding of susceptibility factors, to the evaluation of cancer risk in people occupationally or environmentally exposed to carcinogens, and to the enhancement of diagnosis and therapy. A comprehensive approach based on the use of banks of biological samples is presented and its advantages discussed here. The application of innovative endpoints, such as oncoproteins in biologic fluids, genetic polimorphisms, or gene function is discussed, and relevant literature reviewed.

  13. SV40 replication in human mesothelial cells induces HGF/Met receptor activation: A model for viral-related carcinogenesis of human malignant mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Cacciotti, Paola; Libener, Roberta; Betta, Piergiacomo; Martini, Fernanda; Porta, Camillo; Procopio, Antonio; Strizzi, Luigi; Penengo, Lorenza; Tognon, Mauro; Mutti, Luciano; Gaudino, Giovanni

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies suggested that simian virus 40 (SV40) may cause malignant mesothelioma, although the pathogenic mechanism is unclear. We found that in SV40-positive malignant mesothelioma cells, the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor (Met) was activated. In human mesothelial cells (HMC) transfected with full-length SV40 DNA (SV40-HMC), Met receptor activation was associated with S-phase entry, acquisition of a fibroblastoid morphology, and the assembly of viral particles. Coculture experiments revealed the ability of SV40-HMC to infect permissive monkey cells (CV-1), HMC, and murine BNL CL cells. Cocultured human and murine SV40-positive cells expressed HGF, showed Met tyrosine phosphorylation and S-phase entry, and acquired a spindle-shaped morphology (spBNL), whereas CV-1 cells were lysed. Cocultured HMC inherited from SV40-HMC the infectivity, as they induced lysis in cocultured CV-1 cells. Treatment with suramin or HGF-blocking antibodies inhibited Met tyrosine phosphorylation in all large T antigen (Tag)-positive cells and reverted the spindle-shaped morphology of spBNL. This finding indicated that Met activation and subsequent biological effects were mediated by an autocrine HGF circuit. This, in turn, was causally related to Tag expression, being induced by transfection with the SV40 early region alone. Our findings suggest that when SV40 infects HMC it causes Met activation via an autocrine loop. Furthermore, SV40 replicates in HMC and infects the adjacent HMC, inducing an HGF-dependent Met activation and cell-cycle progression into S phase. This may explain how a limited number of SV40-positive cells may be sufficient to direct noninfected HMC toward malignant transformation. PMID:11572935

  14. Long-term malignant hematopoiesis in human acute leukemia bone marrow biopsies implanted in severe combined immunodeficiency mice.

    PubMed

    Legrand, F; Khazaal, I; Peuchmaur, M; Fenneteau, O; Cavé, H; Rohrlich, P; Vilmer, E; Péault, B

    1997-09-01

    Bone marrow (BM) trephine biopsies from 15 pediatric patients with acute lymphoid (ALL) or myeloid (AML) leukemia were engrafted subcutaneously into severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice conditioned by 200 cGy total-body irradiation. Implants were harvested 5 to 19 weeks later for histologic, cytologic, and/or flow cytometric analysis of the residing marrow. Eighteen of 19 grafts contained viable human leukemic cells to various extents as assessed by one or more of these methods. Thirteen of 14 implants analyzed by flow cytometry included high numbers of tumor cells, accounting for 85% to 100% of the total nucleated cells in seven of them. Histologically, engrafted marrow samples exhibited areas of blastic infiltration, and tumor-specific gene rearrangements were retrieved in long-term engrafted biopsies. Importantly, engrafted mice remained perfectly healthy even 5 months posttransplantation, and no human tumor cell dissemination was detected in the hematolymphoid and nonhematopoietic tissues at the time of autopsy. These results demonstrate that human malignant hematopoiesis can be sustained long-term in its original, intact marrow stromal environment transplanted in appropriately conditioned immunodeficient mice.

  15. Apoptotic effects of γ-mangostin from the fruit hull of Garcinia mangostana on human malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Fang; Huang, Wen-Tsung; Chen, Hui-Ju; Yang, Ling-Ling

    2010-12-07

    Gliomas are a common type of primary brain tumor with glioblastoma multiforme accounting for the majority of human brain tumors. In this paper, high grade human malignant glioblastomas (MGs) including U87 MG and GBM 8401 were used to evaluate the antitumor effects of γ-mangostin, a xanthone derivative isolated and purified from the hull of the tropical fruit Garcinia mangostana. The γ-mangostin showed potent antiproliferative activity toward MGs in dose- and time-dependent manners. In addition, flow cytometric analysis of cell morphology in the apoptotic cells revealed an increase in hypodiploid cells in γ-mangostin treated U87 MG and GBM 8401 cells, while significant enhancement of intracellular peroxide production was detected in the same γ-mangostin treated cells by DCHDA assay and DiOC(6)(3) stain. g-Mangostin induced apoptosis, which in turn mediates cytotoxicity in human MG cells was prevented by the addition of catalase. Naturally derived medicines and herbal therapies are drawing increasing attention in regard to the treatment of many health issues, and this includes the testing of new phytochemicals or nutrients for brain tumor patients. This has led to γ-mangostin being identified as a potential leading compound for the development of an anti-brain tumor agent.

  16. Unusual Intracranial Parasagittal Meningioma Extending into the Internal Jugular Vein through the Sinuses.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eui-Kyo; Cho, Yong-Jae; Koo, Heasoo; Lim, Soo-Mee

    2008-05-01

    Meningiomas frequently invade cerebral venus sinuses, especially parasagittal meningioma to superior sagittal sinus. However, most invasions do not reach internal jugular vein. We present a case of parasagittal meningioma extending into the internal jugular vein through the sinuses. Radiological investigation revealed that the tumor was invading the sagittal, transverse, sigmoid sinus and junction of the internal jugular vein to subclavian vein, which was filled with tumor. The histopathological examinations revealed that both the cerebral tumor and mass in the internal jugular vein contributed to the transitional meningioma. This is a rare case of a meningioma extending into the internal jugular vein through the sinuses. According to this case, the frontal parasagittal meningioma could invade directly the internal jugular vein. The significance of this association to cerebral venus sinuses and internal jugular vein are discussed. PMID:19096607

  17. Multiple pulmonary metastases in recurrent intracranial meningioma: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Zhan, Renya; Zhang, Chong; Zhou, Yongqing

    2016-06-01

    Multiple pulmonary metastases from meningioma are rare. We report here a 59-year-old man with multiple pulmonary metastases from a recurrent intracranial meningioma. The primary intracranial tumour in the left occiput was totally excised in 2009. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of atypical meningioma and adjuvant radiotherapy was given to help prevent recurrence. However, recurrence occurred in the left occipital region in 2011 and the meningioma was re-excised in 2012. At the same time, multiple metastases in the right pulmonary lobe were found and excised 3 months after the second craniotomy. The patient has not developed any further recurrence or metastases to date. Neurosurgeons should be aware of the occurrence of pulmonary metastases in patients with intracranial meningioma; potential predictive factors include atypical meningioma, venous sinus invasion, recurrence or previous intracranial surgery, and loss of heterozygosity. PMID:26944388

  18. Cystathionine β-synthase-derived hydrogen sulfide is involved in human malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Vellecco, Valentina; Mancini, Antonio; Ianaro, Angela; Calderone, Vincenzo; Attanasio, Chiara; Cantalupo, Anna; Andria, Barbara; Savoia, Gennaro; Panza, Elisabetta; Di Martino, Antonietta; Cirino, Giuseppe; Bucci, Mariarosaria

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an endogenous gasotransmitter and its mechanism of action involves activation of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels and phosphodiesterase inhibition. As both mechanisms are potentially involved in malignant hyperthermia (MH), in the present study we addressed the involvement of the L-cysteine/hydrogen sulfide pathway in MH. Skeletal muscle biopsies obtained from 25 MH-susceptible (MHS) and 56 MH-negative (MHN) individuals have been used to perform the in vitro contracture test (IVCT). Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and Western blotting studies have also been performed. Hydrogen sulfide levels are measured in both tissue samples and plasma. In MHS biopsies an increase in cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) occurs, as both mRNA and protein expression compared with MHN biopsies. Hydrogen sulfide biosynthesis is increased in MHS biopsies (0.128±0.12 compared with 0.943±0.13 nmol/mg of protein per min for MHN and MHS biopsies, respectively; P<0.01). Addition of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) to MHS samples evokes a response similar, in the IVCT, to that elicited by either caffeine or halothane. Incubation of MHN biopsies with NaHS, before caffeine or halothane challenge, switches an MHN to an MHS response. In conclusion we demonstrate the involvement of the L-cysteine/hydrogen sulfide pathway in MH, giving new insight into MH molecular mechanisms. This finding has potential implications for clinical care and could help to define less invasive diagnostic procedures. PMID:26460077

  19. Role of androgen and vitamin D receptors in endothelial cells from benign and malignant human prostate

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ivy; Montecinos, Viviana P.; Buttyan, Ralph; Johnson, Candace S.; Smith, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    Forty years ago, Judah Folkman (Folkman. N Engl J Med 285: 1182–1186, 1971) proposed that tumor growth might be controlled by limiting formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) needed to supply a growing tumor with oxygen and nutrients. To this end, numerous “antiangiogenic” agents have been developed and tested for therapeutic efficacy in cancer patients, including prostate cancer (CaP) patients, with limited success. Despite the lack of clinical efficacy of lead anti-angiogenic therapeutics in CaP patients, recent published evidence continues to support the idea that prostate tumor vasculature provides a reasonable target for development of new therapeutics. Particularly relevant to antiangiogenic therapies targeted to the prostate is the observation that specific hormones can affect the survival and vascular function of prostate endothelial cells within normal and malignant prostate tissues. Here, we review the evidence demonstrating that both androgen(s) and vitamin D significantly impact the growth and survival of endothelial cells residing within prostate cancer and that systemic changes in circulating androgen or vitamin D drastically affect blood flow and vascularity of prostate tissue. Furthermore, recent evidence will be discussed about the expression of the receptors for both androgen and vitamin D in prostate endothelial cells that argues for direct effects of these hormone-activated receptors on the biology of endothelial cells. Based on this literature, we propose that prostate tumor vasculature represents an unexplored target for modulation of tumor growth. A better understanding of androgen and vitamin D effects on prostate endothelial cells will support development of more effective angiogenesis-targeting therapeutics for CaP patients. PMID:23548616

  20. Cystathionine β-synthase-derived hydrogen sulfide is involved in human malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Vellecco, Valentina; Mancini, Antonio; Ianaro, Angela; Calderone, Vincenzo; Attanasio, Chiara; Cantalupo, Anna; Andria, Barbara; Savoia, Gennaro; Panza, Elisabetta; Di Martino, Antonietta; Cirino, Giuseppe; Bucci, Mariarosaria

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an endogenous gasotransmitter and its mechanism of action involves activation of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels and phosphodiesterase inhibition. As both mechanisms are potentially involved in malignant hyperthermia (MH), in the present study we addressed the involvement of the L-cysteine/hydrogen sulfide pathway in MH. Skeletal muscle biopsies obtained from 25 MH-susceptible (MHS) and 56 MH-negative (MHN) individuals have been used to perform the in vitro contracture test (IVCT). Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and Western blotting studies have also been performed. Hydrogen sulfide levels are measured in both tissue samples and plasma. In MHS biopsies an increase in cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) occurs, as both mRNA and protein expression compared with MHN biopsies. Hydrogen sulfide biosynthesis is increased in MHS biopsies (0.128±0.12 compared with 0.943±0.13 nmol/mg of protein per min for MHN and MHS biopsies, respectively; P<0.01). Addition of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) to MHS samples evokes a response similar, in the IVCT, to that elicited by either caffeine or halothane. Incubation of MHN biopsies with NaHS, before caffeine or halothane challenge, switches an MHN to an MHS response. In conclusion we demonstrate the involvement of the L-cysteine/hydrogen sulfide pathway in MH, giving new insight into MH molecular mechanisms. This finding has potential implications for clinical care and could help to define less invasive diagnostic procedures.

  1. Photoacoustic tomography of human hepatic malignancies using intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Akinori; Ishizawa, Takeaki; Kamiya, Mako; Shimizu, Atsushi; Kaneko, Junichi; Ijichi, Hideaki; Shibahara, Junji; Fukayama, Masashi; Midorikawa, Yutaka; Urano, Yasuteru; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    Recently, fluorescence imaging following the preoperative intravenous injection of indocyanine green has been used in clinical settings to identify hepatic malignancies during surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of photoacoustic tomography using indocyanine green as a contrast agent to produce representative fluorescence images of hepatic tumors by visualizing the spatial distribution of indocyanine green on ultrasonographic images. Indocyanine green (0.5 mg/kg, intravenous) was preoperatively administered to 9 patients undergoing hepatectomy. Intraoperatively, photoacoustic tomography was performed on the surface of the resected hepatic specimens (n = 10) under excitation with an 800 nm pulse laser. In 4 hepatocellular carcinoma nodules, photoacoustic imaging identified indocyanine green accumulation in the cancerous tissue. In contrast, in one hepatocellular carcinoma nodule and five adenocarcinoma foci (one intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and 4 colorectal liver metastases), photoacoustic imaging delineated indocyanine green accumulation not in the cancerous tissue but rather in the peri-cancerous hepatic parenchyma. Although photoacoustic tomography enabled to visualize spatial distribution of ICG on ultrasonographic images, which was consistent with fluorescence images on cut surfaces of the resected specimens, photoacoustic signals of ICG-containing tissues decreased approximately by 40% even at 4 mm depth from liver surfaces. Photoacoustic tomography using indocyanine green also failed to identify any hepatocellular carcinoma nodules from the body surface of model mice with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In conclusion, photoacoustic tomography has a potential to enhance cancer detectability and differential diagnosis by ultrasonographic examinations and intraoperative fluorescence imaging through visualization of stasis of bile-excreting imaging agents in and/or around hepatic tumors. However, further technical advances are needed

  2. Specific and non-specific folate binding protein in normal and malignant human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Corrocher, R.; De Sandre, G.; Ambrosetti, A.; Pachor, M. L.; Bambara, L. M.; Hoffbrand, A. V.

    1978-01-01

    Binding of tritiated folic acid by supernatants prepared from extracts of normal and leukaemic leucocytes, normal mucosa, and malignant tumours from different parts of the gastrointestinal tract has been measured using Sephadex-gel filtration and albumin-coated charcoal techniques. Non-specific binding (measured by Sephadex G-75 gel filtration) was almost invariably greater than specific binding measured by albumin-coated charcoal separation of bound and unbound folate. In nine normal leucocyte extracts, binding measured by Sephadex G-75 filtration ranged from 1·3 to 18·2 (mean 8·2) pg/mg protein and by albumin-coated charcoal from 1·0 to 14·8 (mean 6·7) pg/mg protein. Raised specific binding was found in the extracts from leucocytes of eight of 14 patients with chronic granulocytic leukaemia, in four substantially so (389, 121, 108, 59·7 pg/mg protein), but was only marginally increased in one of eight cases of acute myeloid leukaemia and in two of five cases of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Binding was normal in the extracts of all three cases of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia tested. Among the tissues of the gastrointestinal tract binding was greatest by the duodenal mucosa and liver. Extracts of carcinoma of the stomach and colon bound greater amounts of 3H-folic acid than the corresponding normal mucosal extracts but the differences were not large. Sephadex G-200 gel chromatography showed more than one binding peak in the extracts of liver and duodenum but only one peak in the other tissues of the gastrointestinal tract, and only one peak, of molecular weight either about 50 000 or over 200 000, in the leucocyte extracts. PMID:670421

  3. Molecular sequelae of histone deacetylase inhibition in human malignant B cells.

    PubMed

    Mitsiades, Nicholas; Mitsiades, Constantine S; Richardson, Paul G; McMullan, Ciaran; Poulaki, Vassiliki; Fanourakis, Galinos; Schlossman, Robert; Chauhan, Dharminder; Munshi, Nikhil C; Hideshima, Teru; Richon, Victoria M; Marks, Paul A; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2003-05-15

    Histone acetylation modulates gene expression, cellular differentiation, and survival and is regulated by the opposing activities of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). HDAC inhibition results in accumulation of acetylated nucleosomal histones and induces differentiation and/or apoptosis in transformed cells. In this study, we characterized the effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), the prototype of a series of hydroxamic acid-based HDAC inhibitors, in cell lines and patient cells from B-cell malignancies, including multiple myeloma (MM) and related disorders. SAHA induced apoptosis in all tumor cells tested, with increased p21 and p53 protein levels and dephosphorylation of Rb. We also detected cleavage of Bid, suggesting a role for Bcl-2 family members in regulation of SAHA-induced cell death. Transfection of Bcl-2 cDNA into MM.1S cells completely abrogated SAHA-induced apoptosis, confirming its protective role. SAHA did not induce cleavage of caspase-8, -9, or -3 in MM.1S cells during the early phase of apoptosis, and the pan-caspase inhibitor ZVAD-FMK did not protect against SAHA. Conversely, poly(ADP)ribose polymerase (PARP) was cleaved in a pattern indicative of calpain activation, and the calpain inhibitor calpeptin abrogated SAHA-induced cell death. Importantly, SAHA sensitized MM.1S cells to death receptor-mediated apoptosis and inhibited the secretion of interleukin 6 (IL-6) induced in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) by binding of MM cells, suggesting that it can overcome cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance. Our studies delineate the mechanisms whereby HDAC inhibitors mediate anti-MM activity and overcome drug resistance in the BM milieu and provide the framework for clinical evaluation of SAHA, which is bioavailable, well tolerated, and bioactive after oral administration, to improve patient outcome.

  4. Common variation at 10p12.31 near MLLT10 influences meningioma risk

    PubMed Central

    Dobbins, Sara E; Broderick, Peter; Melin, Beatrice; Feychting, Maria; Johansen, Christoffer; Andersson, Ulrika; Brännström, Thomas; Schramm, Johannes; Olver, Bianca; Lloyd, Amy; Ma, Yussanne P; Hosking, Fay J; Lönn, Stefan; Ahlbom, Anders; Henriksson, Roger; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Hepworth, Sarah J; Hoffmann, Per; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nöthen, Markus M; Moebus, Susanne; Eisele, Lewin; Kosteljanetz, Michael; Muir, Kenneth; Swerdlow, Anthony; Simon, Matthias; Houlston, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    To identify predisposition loci for meningioma we conducted a genome-wide association study of 859 cases and 704 controls with validation in two independent sample sets totaling 774 cases and 1,764 controls. We identified a novel susceptibility locus for meningioma at 10p12.31 (MLLT10; rs11012732, OR=1.46, Pcombined=1.88x10-14). This finding advances our understanding of the genetic basis of meningioma development. PMID:21804547

  5. The specific role of pRb in p16 (INK4A) -mediated arrest of normal and malignant human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Bazarov, Alexey V; Lee, Won Jae; Bazarov, Irina; Bosire, Moses; Hines, William C; Stankovich, Basha; Chicas, Agustin; Lowe, Scott W; Yaswen, Paul

    2012-03-01

    RB family proteins pRb, p107 and p130 have similar structures and overlapping functions, enabling cell cycle arrest and cellular senescence. pRb, but not p107 or p130, is frequently mutated in human malignancies. In human fibroblasts acutely exposed to oncogenic ras, pRb has a specific role in suppressing DNA replication, and p107 or p130 cannot compensate for the loss of this function; however, a second p53/p21-dependent checkpoint prevents escape from growth arrest. This model of oncogene-induced senescence requires the additional loss of p53/p21 to explain selection for preferential loss of pRb function in human malignancies. We asked whether similar rules apply to the role of pRb in growth arrest of human epithelial cells, the source of most cancers. In two malignant human breast cancer cell lines, we found that individual RB family proteins were sufficient for the establishment of p16-initiated senescence, and that growth arrest in G 1 was not dependent on the presence of functional pRb or p53. However, senescence induction by endogenous p16 was delayed in primary normal human mammary epithelial cells with reduced pRb but not with reduced p107 or p130. Thus, under these circumstances, despite the presence of functional p53, p107 and p130 were unable to completely compensate for pRb in mediating senescence induction. We propose that early inactivation of pRb in pre-malignant breast cells can, by itself, extend proliferative lifespan, allowing acquisition of additional changes necessary for malignant transformation.

  6. Comparison of 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities in the microsomal fractions of hyperplastic, malignant and normal human prostatic tissues.

    PubMed

    Hudson, R W

    1984-04-01

    The conversion of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) to 3 alpha-androstanediol (3 alpha-adiol) was studied using the microsomal fractions of 15 hyperplastic, 5 malignant and 6 normal human prostatis tissues. Standard assay conditions were: 0.2 microM DHT, 1.0 mM NADPH, 1.0 mM NADH, 2.0 mM EDTA and the microsomal fractions equivalent to 200 mg of prostatic tissue, in 0.1 M MES buffer, pH 6.5. Under the conditions of this assay, the back-conversion of 3 alpha-adiol to DHT or the conversion of DHT to androstanediol were negligible. Optimum enzyme activity was achieved under standard assay conditions. In the absence of EDTA: enzyme activity was 65% of the standard assay; activity was diminished further by 2 mM Ca2+ and virtually eliminated by 2 mM Mg2+ or 2 microM Zn2+. Activity in the absence of either NADPH or NADH was only 50% of the activities seen in the presence of both cofactors. The pH optimum of the enzyme was between 6.0 and 6.5. The apparent Km values of the enzymes in hyperplastic, malignant and normal tissues were 0.03, 0.02 and 0.03 microM, respectively. The Vmax values for these tissues were 6.0 +/- 2.1, 1.6 +/- 0.5 and 14.0 +/- 3.0 pmol/mg protein/20 min incubation, respectively. The results of these experiments offer further explanation for the differences in DHT and 3 alpha-adiol levels seen in the 3 prostatic tissues.

  7. Preferential cytotoxicity of bortezomib toward highly malignant human liposarcoma cells via suppression of MDR1 expression and function

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yamei; Wang, Lingxian; Wang, Lu; Wu, Xuefeng; Wu, Xudong; Gu, Yanhong; Shu, Yongqian; Sun, Yang; Shen, Yan; Xu, Qiang

    2015-02-15

    Liposarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma with a high risk of relapse. Few therapeutic options are available for the aggressive local or metastatic disease. Here, we report that the clinically used proteasome inhibitor bortezomib exhibits significantly stronger cytotoxicity toward highly malignant human liposarcoma SW872-S cells compared with its parental SW872 cells, which is accompanied by enhanced activation of apoptotic signaling both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of cells with Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP60015 or the translation inhibitor cycloheximide ameliorated this enhanced apoptosis. Bortezomib inhibited MDR1 expression and function more effectively in SW872-S cells than in SW872 cells, indicating that the increased cytotoxicity relies on the degree of proteasome inhibition. Furthermore, the pharmacological or genetic inhibition of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase (SERCA) 2, which is highly expressed in SW872-S cells, resulted in partial reversal of cell growth inhibition and increase of MDR1 expression in bortezomib-treated SW872-S cells. These results show that bortezomib exhibits preferential cytotoxicity toward SW872-S cells possibly via highly expressed SERCA2-associated MDR1 suppression and suggest that bortezomib may serve as a potent agent for treating advanced liposarcoma. - Highlights: • We compare the cytotoxicity of different drugs between SW872-S and SW872 cells. • Highly malignant liposarcoma cells SW872-S show hypersensitivity to bortezomib. • Apoptotic signaling is robustly enhanced in bortezomib-treated SW872-S cells. • Bortezomib has strong suppression on MDR1 expression and function in SW872-S cells. • Inhibition of SERCA2 protects SW872-S cells from bortezomib.

  8. Ionizing radiation predisposes non-malignant human mammaryepithelial cells to undergo TGF beta-induced epithelial to mesenchymaltransition

    SciTech Connect

    Andarawewa, Kumari L.; Erickson, Anna C.; Chou, William S.; Costes, Sylvain; Gascard, Philippe; Mott, Joni D.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2007-04-06

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}) is a tumor suppressor during the initial stage of tumorigenesis, but it can switch to a tumor promoter during neoplastic progression. Ionizing radiation (IR), both a carcinogen and a therapeutic agent, induces TGF{beta}, activation in vivo. We now show that IR sensitizes human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to undergo TGF{beta}-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Non-malignant HMEC (MCF10A, HMT3522 S1 and 184v) were irradiated with 2 Gy shortly after attachment in monolayer culture, or treated with a low concentration of TGF{beta} (0.4 ng/ml), or double-treated. All double-treated (IR+TGF{beta}) HMEC underwent a morphological shift from cuboidal to spindle-shaped. This phenotype was accompanied by decreased expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin, {beta}-catenin and ZO-1, remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, and increased expression of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, fibronectin and vimentin. Furthermore, double-treatment increased cell motility, promoted invasion and disrupted acinar morphogenesis of cells subsequently plated in Matrigel{trademark}. Neither radiation nor TGF{beta} alone elicited EMT, even though IR increased chronic TGF{beta} signaling and activity. Gene expression profiling revealed that double treated cells exhibit a specific 10-gene signature associated with Erk/MAPK signaling. We hypothesized that IR-induced MAPK activation primes non-malignant HMEC to undergo TGF{beta}-mediated EMT. Consistent with this, Erk phosphorylation were transiently induced by irradiation, persisted in irradiated cells treated with TGF{beta}, and treatment with U0126, a Mek inhibitor, blocked the EMT phenotype. Together, these data demonstrate that the interactions between radiation-induced signaling pathways elicit heritable phenotypes that could contribute to neoplastic progression.

  9. Basic and clinical aspects of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nathanson, L. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the following 10 chapters: The role of oncogenes in the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma; Laminin and fibronectin modulate the metastatic activity of melanoma cells; Structure, function and biosynthesis of ganglioside antigens associated with human tumors derived from the neuroectoderm; Epidemiology of ocular melanoma; Malignant melanoma: Prognostic factors; Endocrine influences on the natural history of human malignant melanoma; Psychosocial factors associated with prognostic indicators, progression, psychophysiology, and tumor-host response in cutaneous malignant melanoma; Central nervous system metastases in malignant melanoma; Interferon trials in the management of malignant melanoma and other neoplasms: an overview; and The treatment of malignant melanoma by fast neutrons.

  10. A strongly CD34-positive meningioma that was difficult to distinguish from a solitary fibrous tumor.

    PubMed

    Okada, Tomu; Fujitsu, Kazuhiko; Ichikawa, Teruo; Mukaihara, Shigeo; Miyahara, Kousuke; Tanino, Shin; Uriu, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Takahiro; Hataoka, Syunsuke; Kubota, Jyunichi; Suzuki, Kouji; Niino, Hitoshi; Yagishita, Saburou

    2014-08-01

    Fibrous or transitional meningioma and solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) are frequently difficult to differentiate from each other on the basis of histopathology. It is extremely unusual for a meningioma to exhibit diffuse, strongly positive immunoreactivity for cluster of differentiation 34 (CD34), and this has never been previously reported from a histopathological specimen. A patient with transitional meningioma that exhibited strongly positive for CD34, which has been regarded as characteristic of SFT and is considered to be useful for distinguishing the latter from meningioma, is reported.

  11. Infratentorial benign cystic meningioma mimicking a hemangioblastoma radiologically and a pilocytic astrocytoma intraoperatively: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cystic meningiomas are rare variants of meningiomas; they can pose a radiological diagnostic dilemma. Case presentation We present a rare case of a 30-year-old Chinese woman with a histopathological diagnosis of infratentorial cystic meningioma (World Health Organization Grade 1) in which the features in imaging modalities were suggestive of a hemangioblastoma. Intraoperatively, however, the gross macroscopic features were more in keeping with a pilocytic astrocytoma. Conclusion In benign cystic meningiomas, particularly the infratentorial variety, radiological findings utilizing the various imaging modalities and intraoperative impressions may not be reflective of or in keeping with the final histopathological diagnosis. PMID:23537099

  12. Study of immortalization and malignant transformation of human embryonic esophageal epithelial cells induced by HPV18 E6E7.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z; Cen, S; Shen, J; Cai, W; Xu, J; Teng, Z; Hu, Z; Zeng, Y

    2000-10-01

    In order to study the effect of viruses and tumor promoters on the tumorigenicity of the esophagus, human embryonic esophageal epithelial cells were infected with human papilloma virus HPV18 E6E7-AAV in synergy with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) to observe their malignant transformation. The cultured esophageal epithelial cells incubated with HPV18 E6E7-AAV were divided into two groups: the SHEEC1 group was exposed to TPA (5 ng/ml) for 4 weeks at the 5th passage of the cells; the SHEE group served as the control and was cultured in the same medium without TPA. The morphological phenotype, the DNA content during the cell cycle and the chromosomes were analyzed. The tumorigenicity was assessed by colony formation after cultivation in soft agar and transplanting the cells into nude mice. HPV18 E6E7 DNA was assayed by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The SHEE group, at its 20th passage, grew as a monolayer with the cells showing anchorage dependence and contact inhibition. The chromosome analysis showed diploidy, and soft-agar cultivation and injection into nude mice showed the cells to be non-tumorigenic. They were therefore immortalized cells. In contrast, the SHEEC1 group (TPA group) showed increased DNA synthesis and a proliferative index that was higher (45%) than that of the SHEE group (34%). The number of large colonies of dense multilayer cells (positively transformed foci) in soft agar was high in SHEEC1 group (4.0%) but low in the SHEE group (0.1%). Tumors resulting from transplantation were observed in all six nude mice injected subcutaneously with cells of the SHEEC1 group but no tumor developed in mice receiving cells of the SHEE group. In both groups of cells, HPV18 E6E7 DNA was positively detected by FISH and PCR. The malignant transformation of human embryonic epithelial cells was induced in vitro by HPV18 E6E7 in synergy with TPA. This is a good evidence for the close relationship between

  13. A survey of human T-cell leukaemia virus type I antibodies in patients with malignant disease in the Witwatersrand area.

    PubMed

    Dansey, R D; Mansoor, N; Cohn, R J; MacDougall, L G; Bezwoda, W R

    1986-10-11

    The prevalence of antibodies to human T-cell leukaemia virus type I in Africa ranges from 2% to 21% according to the geographical area surveyed. Most studies suggest that the background infection rate in children is low. In paediatric patients with malignant disease in the Witwatersrand area the prevalence is low (1%), whereas a seemingly high rate is found in healthy black children from a restricted rural area (7%). Further, the antibody prevalence in adult whites with lymphoproliferative disease is low (1%) compared with that in blacks with malignant disease (6%). There also appears to be a higher prevalence of positive results in black women (7%) than in black men (4%).

  14. Telomerase-immortalized non-malignant human prostate epithelial cells retain the properties of multipotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongzhen; Zhou Jianjun; Miki, Jun; Furusato, Bungo; Gu Yongpeng; Srivastava, Shiv; McLeod, David G.; Vogel, Jonathan C.; Rhim, Johng S.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding prostate stem cells may provide insight into the origin of prostate cancer. Primary cells have been cultured from human prostate tissue but they usually survive only 15-20 population doublings before undergoing senescence. We report here that RC-170N/h/clone 7 cells, a clonal cell line from hTERT-immortalized primary non-malignant tissue-derived human prostate epithelial cell line (RC170N/h), retain multipotent stem cell properties. The RC-170N/h/clone 7 cells expressed a human embryonic stem cell marker, Oct-4, and potential prostate epithelial stem cell markers, CD133, integrin {alpha}2{beta}1{sup hi} and CD44. The RC-170N/h/clone 7 cells proliferated in KGM and Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium with 10% fetal bovine serum and 5 {mu}g/ml insulin (DMEM + 10% FBS + Ins.) medium, and differentiated into epithelial stem cells that expressed epithelial cell markers, including CK5/14, CD44, p63 and cytokeratin 18 (CK18); as well as the mesenchymal cell markers, vimentin, desmin; the neuron and neuroendocrine cell marker, chromogranin A. Furthermore the RC170 N/h/clone 7 cells differentiated into multi tissues when transplanted into the sub-renal capsule and subcutaneously of NOD-SCID mice. The results indicate that RC170N/h/clone 7 cells retain the properties of multipotent stem cells and will be useful as a novel cell model for studying the mechanisms of human prostate stem cell differentiation and transformation.

  15. Repair of chromosome damage induced by X-irradiation during G/sub 2/ phase in a line of normal human fibroblasts and its malignant derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Parshad, R.; Gantt, R.; Sanford, K.K.; Jones, G.M.; Tarone, R.E.

    1982-08-01

    A line of normal human skin fibroblasts (KD) differed from its malignant derivative (HUT-14) in the extent of cytogenetic damage induced by X-irradiation during G/sub 2/ phase. Malignant cells had significantly more chromatid breaks and gaps after exposure to 25, 50, or 100 rad. Results from alkaline elution of cellular DNA immediately after irradiation showed that the normal and malignant cells in asynchronous population were equally sensitive to DNA single-strand breakage by X-irradiation. Caffeine or ..beta..-cytosine arabinoside (ara-C), inhibitors of DNA repair, when added directly following G/sub 2/ phase exposure, significantly increased the incidence of radiation-induced chromatid damage in the normal cells. In contrast, similar treatment of the malignant cells had little influence. Ara-C differed from caffeine in its effects; whereas both agents increased the frequency of chromatid breaks and gaps, only ara-C increased the frequency of gaps to the level observed in the irradiated malignant cells. Addition of catalase, which destroys H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, or mannitol, a scavenger of the derivative free hydroxyl radical (.OH), to the cultures of malignant cells before, during, and following irradiation significantly reduced the chromatid damage; and catalase prevented formation of chromatid gaps. The DNA damage induced by X-ray during G/sub 2/ phase in the normal KD cells was apparently repaired by a caffeine- and ara-C-sensitive mechanism(s) that was deficient or absent in their malignant derivatives.

  16. Distinct host cell fates for human malignant melanoma targeted by oncolytic rodent parvoviruses.

    PubMed

    Vollmers, Ellen M; Tattersall, Peter

    2013-11-01

    The rodent parvoviruses are known to be oncoselective, and lytically infect many transformed human cells. Because current therapeutic regimens for metastatic melanoma have low response rates and have little effect on improving survival, this disease is a prime candidate for novel approaches to therapy, including oncolytic parvoviruses. Screening of low-passage, patient-derived melanoma cell lines for multiplicity-dependent killing by a panel of five rodent parvoviruses identified LuIII as the most melanoma-lytic. This property was mapped to the LuIII capsid gene, and an efficiently melanoma tropic chimeric virus shown to undergo three types of interaction with primary human melanoma cells: (1) complete lysis of cultures infected at very low multiplicities; (2) acute killing resulting from viral protein synthesis and DNA replication, without concomitant expansion of the infection, due to failure to export progeny virions efficiently; or (3) complete resistance that operates at an intracellular step following virion uptake, but preceding viral transcription.

  17. Exogenous delta-animolevulinic acid induces the porphyrin biosynthesis in human skin organ cultures with different porphyrin patterns in normal and malignant human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Clemens; Batz, Janine; Bolsen, Klaus; Schulte, Klaus; Ruzicka, Thomas; Goerz, Guenter

    1995-03-01

    The carboxylation state of porphyrin metabolites causes their hydrophilic or lipophilic properties and subsequently their distribution in tissues, cells, and subcellular compartments. The profile of porphyrin metabolites either in normal skin or in malignant skin tumors after administration of (delta) -aminolevulinic acid has been studied in detail, yet. Explant cultures of normal skin and neoplastic tissues, e.g., keratoakanthoma and basal cell carcinoma, were incubated with 1 mM ALA for 36 h. Total porphyrin concentration and percentage of porphyrin metabolites were determined quantitatively in tissues and corresponding supernatants. Seventy - ninety percent of total porphyrins could be detected in the supernatants of all samples. The highly carboxylated porphyrins were the prevailing metabolites in the supernatants as well as in the tissues. The basal cell carcinoma produced significantly more protoporphyrin and the keratoakanthoma significantly more coproporphyrin as compared to normal skin. The results show that explant cultures offer an easy approach to examine the enzymatic capacity in porphyrin biosynthesis of various tissues. Benign and malignant human tissues produce different porphyrin metabolites, which may be useful for selective and more effective photodynamic diagnosis or therapy.

  18. Human BK Polyomavirus—The Potential for Head and Neck Malignancy and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Burger-Calderon, Raquel; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Members of the human Polyomaviridae family are ubiquitous and pathogenic among immune-compromised individuals. While only Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) has conclusively been linked to human cancer, all members of the polyomavirus (PyV) family encode the oncoprotein T antigen and may be potentially carcinogenic. Studies focusing on PyV pathogenesis in humans have become more abundant as the number of PyV family members and the list of associated diseases has expanded. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) in particular has emerged as a new opportunistic pathogen among HIV positive individuals, carrying harmful implications. Increasing evidence links BKPyV to HIV-associated salivary gland disease (HIVSGD). HIVSGD is associated with elevated risk of lymphoma formation and its prevalence has increased among HIV/AIDS patients. Determining the relationship between BKPyV, disease and tumorigenesis among immunosuppressed individuals is necessary and will allow for expanding effective anti-viral treatment and prevention options in the future. PMID:26184314

  19. Heparan sulfate sulfatase SULF2 regulates PDGFRα signaling and growth in human and mouse malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Joanna J.; Huillard, Emmanuelle; Robinson, Aaron E.; Ward, Anna; Lum, David H.; Polley, Mei-Yin; Rosen, Steven D.; Rowitch, David H.; Werb, Zena

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), a uniformly lethal brain cancer, is characterized by diffuse invasion and abnormal activation of multiple receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways, presenting a major challenge to effective therapy. The activation of many RTK pathways is regulated by extracellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), suggesting these molecules may be effective targets in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we demonstrated that the extracellular sulfatase, SULF2, an enzyme that regulates multiple HSPG-dependent RTK signaling pathways, was expressed in primary human GBM tumors and cell lines. Knockdown of SULF2 in human GBM cell lines and generation of gliomas from Sulf2–/– tumorigenic neurospheres resulted in decreased growth in vivo in mice. We found a striking SULF2 dependence in activity of PDGFRα, a major signaling pathway in GBM. Ablation of SULF2 resulted in decreased PDGFRα phosphorylation and decreased downstream MAPK signaling activity. Interestingly, in a survey of SULF2 levels in different subtypes of GBM, the proneural subtype, characterized by aberrations in PDGFRα, demonstrated the strongest SULF2 expression. Therefore, in addition to its potential as an upstream target for therapy of GBM, SULF2 may help identify a subset of GBMs that are more dependent on exogenous growth factor–mediated signaling. Our results suggest the bioavailability of growth factors from the microenvironment is a significant contributor to tumor growth in a major subset of human GBM. PMID:22293178

  20. Human BK Polyomavirus-The Potential for Head and Neck Malignancy and Disease.

    PubMed

    Burger-Calderon, Raquel; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer

    2015-07-08

    Members of the human Polyomaviridae family are ubiquitous and pathogenic among immune-compromised individuals. While only Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) has conclusively been linked to human cancer, all members of the polyomavirus (PyV) family encode the oncoprotein T antigen and may be potentially carcinogenic. Studies focusing on PyV pathogenesis in humans have become more abundant as the number of PyV family members and the list of associated diseases has expanded. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) in particular has emerged as a new opportunistic pathogen among HIV positive individuals, carrying harmful implications. Increasing evidence links BKPyV to HIV-associated salivary gland disease (HIVSGD). HIVSGD is associated with elevated risk of lymphoma formation and its prevalence has increased among HIV/AIDS patients. Determining the relationship between BKPyV, disease and tumorigenesis among immunosuppressed individuals is necessary and will allow for expanding effective anti-viral treatment and prevention options in the future.

  1. Penetration and Splitting of Optic Nerve by Tuberculum Sellae Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Preservation of the optic nerves is an important issue in the resection of tuberculum sellae meningiomas. We report the case of a patient whose optic nerve was penetrated by a tuberculum sellae meningioma. During surgery, a bulging tumor was found to penetrate the right optic nerve. The tumor was gross totally removed, including tumors bulging through the optic nerve. Two trunks of the split optic nerve were preserved. The penetrated shape of the optic nerve may lead to misjudgment and its damage. Divided trunks of optic nerves are difficult to recognize and may be confused for the tumor capsule, because they may be thinned and seem to contain tumors. In addition, a single trunk may be confused for the whole nerve; thus, the other trunk may be easily damaged if not dissected cautiously. Treatment strategy according to the remnant visual acuity was suggested. PMID:27651874

  2. Primary intra-fourth ventricular meningioma: Report two cases

    PubMed Central

    Sadashiva, Nishanth; Rao, Shilpa; Srinivas, Dwarakanath; Shukla, Dhaval

    2016-01-01

    Meningioma's occurring intraventricular region are rare and these occurring in the fourth ventricle is even rare. Because of the rarity, it is not usually considered as a differential diagnosis in any age group. Clinical features and Imaging is not characteristic, and most of them are thought to be some different tumor. Here, we discuss two cases harboring a primary fourth ventricular meningioma Grade II, which was surgically excised successfully. Total excision was achieved in both cases and as the tumor was firm to soft and vermian splitting was not required. Understanding the clinical features and a careful preoperative radiological examination is required to differentiate this tumor from more commonly occurring lesions at this location. PMID:27114661

  3. Potential to involve multiple effector cells with human recombinant interleukin-2 and antiganglioside monoclonal antibodies in a canine malignant melanoma immunotherapy model.

    PubMed

    Helfand, S C; Soergel, S A; Donner, R L; Gan, J; Hank, J A; Lindstrom, M J; Sondel, P M

    1994-10-01

    Human tumors originating from neuroectodermal cells such as malignant melanoma and neuroblastoma express high levels of disialogangliosides GD2 and GD3, making these antigens ideal for targeting by monoclonal antibodies (Mabs). The purpose of this study was to investigate expression and targeting of gangliosides on canine melanoma. Using immunohistochemical methods, we analyzed the expression of disialogangliosides GD2 and GD3 on canine oral malignant melanomas with murine Mabs 14.G2a and R24 that recognize GD2 and GD3 disialogangliosides, respectively, on human tumors. We also assessed the ability of Mab 14.G2a (and its mouse-human chimera, ch 14.18) to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro against a canine malignant melanoma cell line with human recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) activated canine peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), or canine neutrophil effector cells. Our data show that Mabs 14.G2a and R24 recognized fresh frozen canine oral melanoma. Mabs 14.G2a or ch 14.18, or IL-2, potentiated lysis of the canine malignant melanoma cell line by canine PBL. The killing effect observed using the combination of either Mab with IL-2 was additive. Mab 14.G2a mediated potent ADCC of canine melanoma by canine neutrophils. These studies indicate that disialogangliosides are expressed on fresh canine melanoma cells. Mabs reactive with these antigens can target and trigger tumor killing by multiple canine effector populations and IL-2 can potentiate these effects by canine lymphocytes. Thus, canine oral malignant melanoma, a spontaneously occurring, metastatic cancer in the dog, may be a relevant animal model to investigate combination immunotherapy using antitumor Mab and IL-2.

  4. The cavernous sinus meningiomas' dilemma: Surgery or stereotactic radiosurgery?

    PubMed

    Fariselli, Laura; Biroli, Antonio; Signorelli, Antonio; Broggi, Morgan; Marchetti, Marcello; Biroli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advances in techniques and technologies, the management of cavernous sinus (CS) meningiomas still remains a challenge for both neurosurgeons and radiation oncologists. On the other hand, the improvement of the anatomical knowledge and the microsurgical techniques together with diffusion of radiosurgery are currently changing the treatment strategy, opening new perspectives to the patients which are suffering from such lesions. The authors reviewed here the literature data. A multidisciplinary treatment algorithm is also proposed. PMID:27330423

  5. Meningiomas of the lateral ventricle - a report of 15 cases.

    PubMed

    Menon, G; Nair, S; Sudhir, J; Rao, R; Easwer, H V; Krishnakumar, K

    2009-06-01

    Lateral ventricular meningiomas are rare tumours that pose considerable surgical challenge. This study attempts to analyse some of the important clinical features of these tumours and review technical considerations in surgery for lateral ventricular meningiomas. A retrospective analysis of the case records of patients with lateral ventricular meningiomas operated in our institute since 1998 with a minimum of one year follow up was done. The variables analysed included age, sex, clinical presentation, imaging characteristics, histopathology and operative details. Outcome was analysed using the Glasgow outcome score (GOS). Fifteen patients with a mean age of 40.6 years formed the study group. A female preponderance was observed (M:F 5:10). Raised intracranial pressure was the predominant symptom at presentation (10/15; 66%) followed by visual field deficits (6/15; 40%) and contralateral motor deficits (5/15; 33.3%). One patient presented with evidence of intratumoural bleed. The tumour was on the right side in 7 patients and on the left side in 8 patients. The lesion was located in the trigone of the lateral ventricle in 13 patients and in the body of the ventricle in two. The tumours were excised through a parietooccipital approach in 11 (73.33%) patients and through a middle temporal gyrus approach in 4 (26.66%).The tumour recurred in 2 patients, both tumours being histologically fibroblastic variants. Fresh operative complications included motor deficits in 3, contralateral homonymous hemianopia in 2, dysphasia in 1, refractory seizures in 2 and loculated hydrocephalus in one. We had no operative mortality. At last follow-up for 10 patients were in GOS 5, two were in GOS 4 and three in GOS 3. Lateral ventricular meningiomas are difficult tumours to operate. Total surgical excision through a superior parietal lobule or middle temporal gyrus approach is possible in most cases with minimal morbidity.

  6. Presentation and Patterns of Late Recurrence of Olfactory Groove Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, William E.; Shah, Mitesh V.; Weisberger, Edward C.; Campbell, Robert L.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this article is to present the recurrence pattern of olfactory groove meningiomas after surgical resection. Four patients, one female and three males, with surgically resected olfactory groove meningiomas presented with tumor recurrence. All patients underwent resection of an olfactory groove meningioma and later presented with recurrent tumors. The mean age at initial diagnosis was 47 years. All presented initially with vision changes, anosmia, memory dysfunction, and personality changes. Three patients had a preoperative MRI scan. All patients had a craniotomy, with gross total resection achieved in three, and 90% tumor removal achieved in the fourth. Involved dura was coagulated, but not resected, in all cases. Three patients were followed with routine head CT scans postoperatively, and none was followed with MRI scan. The mean time to recurrence was 6 years. Three patients presented with recurrent visual deterioration, and one presented with symptoms of nasal obstruction. Postoperative CT scans failed to document early tumor recurrence, whereas MRI documented tumor recurrence in all patients. Tumor resection and optic nerve decompression improved vision in two patients and stabilized vision in two. Complete resection was not possible because of extensive bony involvement around the anterior clinoid and inferior to the anterior cranial fossa in all cases. Evaluation of four patients with recurrent growth of olfactory groove meningiomas showed the epicenter of recurrence to be inferior to the anterior cranial fossa, with posterior extension involving the optic canals, leading to visual deterioration. This location led to a delay in diagnosis in patients who were followed only with routine CT scans. Initial surgical procedures should include removal of involved dura and bone, and follow-up evaluation should include formal ophthalmologic evaluations and routine head MRI scans. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID

  7. Mature posterior fossa teratoma mimicking infratentorial meningioma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Coulibaly, O; El Kacemi, I; Fatemi, N; Gana, R; Saïdi, A; Maaqili, R; Jiddane, M; Bellakhdar, F

    2012-02-01

    Intracranial teratomas are congenital neoplasms mostly diagnosed in the pediatric hood and usually involve supratentorial midline structures. These teratomas, especially those involving the posterior fossa are an uncommon and representing less than 0.5% of all intracranial tumors. We report a case of mature posterior fossa teratoma in an adult patient diagnosed in the 4th decade of life. This lesion was taken for a huge infratentorial meningioma.

  8. Tumor infiltrating immune cells in gliomas and meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Patrícia; González-Tablas, María; Otero, Álvaro; Pascual, Daniel; Miranda, David; Ruiz, Laura; Sousa, Pablo; Ciudad, Juana; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Lopes, María Celeste; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, María Dolores

    2016-03-01

    Tumor-infiltrating immune cells are part of a complex microenvironment that promotes and/or regulates tumor development and growth. Depending on the type of cells and their functional interactions, immune cells may play a key role in suppressing the tumor or in providing support for tumor growth, with relevant effects on patient behavior. In recent years, important advances have been achieved in the characterization of immune cell infiltrates in central nervous system (CNS) tumors, but their role in tumorigenesis and patient behavior still remain poorly understood. Overall, these studies have shown significant but variable levels of infiltration of CNS tumors by macrophage/microglial cells (TAM) and to a less extent also lymphocytes (particularly T-cells and NK cells, and less frequently also B-cells). Of note, TAM infiltrate gliomas at moderate numbers where they frequently show an immune suppressive phenotype and functional behavior; in contrast, infiltration by TAM may be very pronounced in meningiomas, particularly in cases that carry isolated monosomy 22, where the immune infiltrates also contain greater numbers of cytotoxic T and NK-cells associated with an enhanced anti-tumoral immune response. In line with this, the presence of regulatory T cells, is usually limited to a small fraction of all meningiomas, while frequently found in gliomas. Despite these differences between gliomas and meningiomas, both tumors show heterogeneous levels of infiltration by immune cells with variable functionality. In this review we summarize current knowledge about tumor-infiltrating immune cells in the two most common types of CNS tumors-gliomas and meningiomas-, as well as the role that such immune cells may play in the tumor microenvironment in controlling and/or promoting tumor development, growth and control.

  9. Malignant human cell transformation of Marcellus Shale gas drilling flow back water.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yixin; Chen, Tingting; Shen, Steven S; Niu, Yingmei; DesMarais, Thomas L; Linn, Reka; Saunders, Eric; Fan, Zhihua; Lioy, Paul; Kluz, Thomas; Chen, Lung-Chi; Wu, Zhuangchun; Costa, Max; Zelikoff, Judith

    2015-10-01

    The rapid development of high-volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing for mining natural gas from shale has posed potential impacts on human health and biodiversity. The produced flow back waters after hydraulic stimulation are known to carry high levels of saline and total dissolved solids. To understand the toxicity and potential carcinogenic effects of these wastewaters, flow back waters from five Marcellus hydraulic fracturing oil and gas wells were analyzed. The physicochemical nature of these samples was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. A cytotoxicity study using colony formation as the endpoint was carried out to define the LC50 values of test samples using human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B). The BEAS-2B cell transformation assay was employed to assess the carcinogenic potential of the samples. Barium and strontium were among the most abundant metals in these samples and the same metals were found to be elevated in BEAS-2B cells after long-term treatment. BEAS-2B cells treated for 6weeks with flow back waters produced colony formation in soft agar that was concentration dependent. In addition, flow back water-transformed BEAS-2B cells show better migration capability when compared to control cells. This study provides information needed to assess the potential health impact of post-hydraulic fracturing flow back waters from Marcellus Shale natural gas mining.

  10. ROR1 and ROR2 in Human Malignancies: Potentials for Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rebagay, Guilly; Yan, Su; Liu, Cheng; Cheung, Nai-Kong

    2012-01-01

    Targeted therapies require cellular protein expression that meets specific requirements that will maximize effectiveness, minimize off-target toxicities, and provide an opportunity for a therapeutic effect. The receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptors (ROR) are possible targets for therapy that may meet such requirements. RORs are transmembrane proteins that are part of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family. The RORs have been shown to play a role in tumor-like behavior, such as cell migration and cell invasiveness and are normally not expressed in normal adult tissue. As part of the large effort in target discovery, ROR proteins have recently been found to be expressed in human cancers. Their unique expression profiles may provide a novel class of therapeutic targets for small molecules against the kinase or for antibody-based therapies against these receptors. Being restricted on tumor cells and not on most normal tissues, RORs are excellent targets for the treatment of minimal residual disease, the final hurdle in the curative approach to many cancers, including solid tumors such as neuroblastoma. In this review, we summarize the biology of RORs as they relate to human cancer, and highlight the therapeutic approaches directed toward them.

  11. Malignant human cell transformation of Marcellus Shale gas drilling flow back water.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yixin; Chen, Tingting; Shen, Steven S; Niu, Yingmei; DesMarais, Thomas L; Linn, Reka; Saunders, Eric; Fan, Zhihua; Lioy, Paul; Kluz, Thomas; Chen, Lung-Chi; Wu, Zhuangchun; Costa, Max; Zelikoff, Judith

    2015-10-01

    The rapid development of high-volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing for mining natural gas from shale has posed potential impacts on human health and biodiversity. The produced flow back waters after hydraulic stimulation are known to carry high levels of saline and total dissolved solids. To understand the toxicity and potential carcinogenic effects of these wastewaters, flow back waters from five Marcellus hydraulic fracturing oil and gas wells were analyzed. The physicochemical nature of these samples was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. A cytotoxicity study using colony formation as the endpoint was carried out to define the LC50 values of test samples using human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B). The BEAS-2B cell transformation assay was employed to assess the carcinogenic potential of the samples. Barium and strontium were among the most abundant metals in these samples and the same metals were found to be elevated in BEAS-2B cells after long-term treatment. BEAS-2B cells treated for 6weeks with flow back waters produced colony formation in soft agar that was concentration dependent. In addition, flow back water-transformed BEAS-2B cells show better migration capability when compared to control cells. This study provides information needed to assess the potential health impact of post-hydraulic fracturing flow back waters from Marcellus Shale natural gas mining. PMID:26210350

  12. Human malignant melanoma-derived progestagen-associated endometrial protein immunosuppresses T lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ren, Suping; Chai, Lina; Wang, Chunyan; Li, Changlan; Ren, Qiquan; Yang, Lihua; Wang, Fumei; Qiao, Zhixin; Li, Weijing; He, Min; Riker, Adam I; Han, Ying; Yu, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Progestagen-associated endometrial protein (PAEP) is a glycoprotein of the lipocalin family that acts as a negative regulator of T cell receptor-mediated activation. However, the function of tumor-derived PAEP on the human immune system in the tumor microenvironment is unknown. PAEP is highly expressed in intermediate and thick primary melanomas (Breslow's 2.5mm or greater) and metastatic melanomas, correlating with its expression in daughter cell lines established in vitro. The current study investigates the role of melanoma cell-secreted PAEP protein in regulating T cell function. Upon the enrichment of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, each subset was then mixed with either melanoma-derived PAEP protein or PAEP-poor supernatant of gene-silenced tumor cells. IL-2 and IFN-γ secretion of CD4+ T cells significantly decreased with the addition of PAEP-rich supernatant. And the addition of PAEP-positive cell supernatant to activated lymphocytes significantly inhibited lymphocyte proliferation and cytotoxic T cell activity, while increasing lymphocyte apoptosis. Our result suggests that melanoma cell-secreted PAEP protein immunosuppresses the activation, proliferation and cytotoxicity of T lymphocytes, which might partially explain the mechanism of immune tolerance induced by melanoma cells within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25785839

  13. Malignant human cell transformation of Marcellus shale gas drilling flow back water

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yixin; Chen, Tingting; Shen, Steven S.; Niu, Yingmei; DesMarais, Thomas L; Linn, Reka; Saunders, Eric; Fan, Zhihua; Lioy, Paul; Kluz, Thomas; Chen, Lung-Chi; Wu, Zhuangchun; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of high-volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing for mining natural gas from shale has posed potential impacts on human health and biodiversity. The produced flow back waters after hydraulic stimulation is known to carry high levels of saline and total dissolved solids. To understand the toxicity and potential carcinogenic effects of these waste waters, flow back water from five Marcellus hydraulic fracturing oil and gas wells were analyzed. The physicochemical nature of these samples was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy / energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. A cytotoxicity study using colony formation as the endpoint was carried out to define the LC50 values of test samples using human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B). The BEAS-2B cell transformation assay was employed to assess the carcinogenic potential of the samples. Barium and strontium were among the most abundant metals in these samples and the same metals were found elevated in BEAS-2B cells after long-term treatment. BEAS-2B cells treated for 6 weeks with flow back waters produced colony formation in soft agar that was concentration dependant. In addition, flow back water-transformed BEAS-2B cells show a better migration capability when compared to control cells. This study provides information needed to assess the potential health impact of post-hydraulic fracturing flow back waters from Marcellus Shale natural gas mining. PMID:26210350

  14. Monitoring the Bystander Killing Effect of Human Multipotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Leten, Cindy; Trekker, Jesse; Struys, Tom; Roobrouck, Valerie D.; Dresselaers, Tom; Vande Velde, Greetje; Lambrichts, Ivo; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Tumor infiltrating stem cells have been suggested as a vehicle for the delivery of a suicide gene towards otherwise difficult to treat tumors like glioma. We have used herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase expressing human multipotent adult progenitor cells in two brain tumor models (hU87 and Hs683) in immune-compromised mice. In order to determine the best time point for the administration of the codrug ganciclovir, the stem cell distribution and viability were monitored in vivo using bioluminescence (BLI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Treatment was assessed by in vivo BLI and MRI of the tumors. We were able to show that suicide gene therapy using HSV-tk expressing stem cells can be followed in vivo by MRI and BLI. This has the advantage that (1) outliers can be detected earlier, (2) GCV treatment can be initiated based on stem cell distribution rather than on empirical time points, and (3) a more thorough follow-up can be provided prior to and after treatment of these animals. In contrast to rodent stem cell and tumor models, treatment success was limited in our model using human cell lines. This was most likely due to the lack of immune components in the immune-compromised rodents. PMID:26880961

  15. Monitoring the Bystander Killing Effect of Human Multipotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Leten, Cindy; Trekker, Jesse; Struys, Tom; Roobrouck, Valerie D; Dresselaers, Tom; Vande Velde, Greetje; Lambrichts, Ivo; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Tumor infiltrating stem cells have been suggested as a vehicle for the delivery of a suicide gene towards otherwise difficult to treat tumors like glioma. We have used herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase expressing human multipotent adult progenitor cells in two brain tumor models (hU87 and Hs683) in immune-compromised mice. In order to determine the best time point for the administration of the codrug ganciclovir, the stem cell distribution and viability were monitored in vivo using bioluminescence (BLI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Treatment was assessed by in vivo BLI and MRI of the tumors. We were able to show that suicide gene therapy using HSV-tk expressing stem cells can be followed in vivo by MRI and BLI. This has the advantage that (1) outliers can be detected earlier, (2) GCV treatment can be initiated based on stem cell distribution rather than on empirical time points, and (3) a more thorough follow-up can be provided prior to and after treatment of these animals. In contrast to rodent stem cell and tumor models, treatment success was limited in our model using human cell lines. This was most likely due to the lack of immune components in the immune-compromised rodents. PMID:26880961

  16. Malignant transformation of diploid human fibroblasts by transfection of oncogenes. Part 2, Progress report, July 1989--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, J.J.

    1992-12-31

    This document consist of brief reports prepared by postdoctoral students supported by the project, each describing his accomplishments under the grant. Topics include (1) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1. 1 Cells by Gamma Radiation, (2) Correlation between Levels of ras Expression and Presence of Transformed Phenotypes Including Tumorigenicity, Using a Modulatable Promoter, (3) Relation between Specific rad Oncogene Expression, (4) Correlation of Genetic Changes in Fibroblastic Tumors with Malignancies, (5)Transformation of MSU-1.1 Cells by sis Oncogene, (6) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1.0 Cells, (7) Correlation of Urokinase Plasminogen Activation (mu-PA) with Malignant Phenotype, (8)Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Studies of the Proteins of the Major Cell Strains of the MSU-1 Family of Cells, and (9) Correlation between Proteinase Activity Levels and Malignancy.

  17. Reduced activity of CD13/aminopeptidase N (APN) in aggressive meningiomas is associated with increased levels of SPARC.

    PubMed

    Mawrin, Christian; Wolke, Carmen; Haase, Daniela; Krüger, Sabine; Firsching, Raimund; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Paulus, Werner; Gutmann, David H; Lal, Anita; Lendeckel, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common brain tumors in adults, and meningiomas exhibit a tendency to invade adjacent structures. Compared with high-grade gliomas, little is known about the molecular changes that potentially underlie the invasive behavior of meningiomas. In this study, we examined the expression and function of the membrane alanyl-aminopeptidase [mAAP, aminopeptidase N (APN), CD13, EC3.4.11.2] zinc-dependent ectopeptidase in meningiomas and meningioma cell lines, based on its prior association with tumor invasion in colorectal and renal carcinomas. We found a significant reduction of APNmRNA and protein expression, as well as enzymatic activity, in high-grade meningiomas. While meningioma tumor cell proliferation was not affected by either pharmacologic APN inhibition or siRNA-mediated APN silencing, APN pharmacologic and siRNA knockdown significantly reduced meningioma cell invasion in vitro. Next, we employed pathway-specific cDNA microarray analyses to identify extracellular matrix and adhesion molecules regulated by APN, and found that APN-siRNA knockdown substantially increased the expression of secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC)/osteonectin. Finally, we demonstrated that SPARC, which has been previously associated with meningioma invasiveness, was increased in aggressive meningiomas. Collectively, these results suggest that APN expression and enzymatic function is reduced in aggressive meningiomas, and that alterations in the balance between APN and SPARC might favor meningioma invasion.

  18. Fractionated Proton Radiotherapy for Benign Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Jerry D.; Loredo, Lilia N.; Chung, Arthur; Bush, David A.; Patyal, Baldev; Johnson, Walter D.; Hsu, Frank P.K.; Slater, James M.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of fractionated proton radiotherapy for a population of patients with benign cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2002, 72 patients were treated at Loma Linda University Medical Center with proton therapy for cavernous sinus meningiomas. Fifty-one patients had biopsy or subtotal resection; 47 had World Health Organization grade 1 pathology. Twenty-one patients had no histologic verification. Twenty-two patients received primary proton therapy; 30 had 1 previous surgery; 20 had more than 1 surgery. The mean gross tumor volume was 27.6 cm{sup 3}; mean clinical target volume was 52.9 cm{sup 3}. Median total doses for patients with and without histologic verification were 59 and 57 Gy, respectively. Mean and median follow-up periods were 74 months. Results: The overall 5-year actuarial control rate was 96%; the control rate was 99% in patients with grade 1 or absent histologic findings and 50% for those with atypical histology. All 21 patients who did not have histologic verification and 46 of 47 patients with histologic confirmation of grade 1 tumor demonstrated disease control at 5 years. Control rates for patients without previous surgery, 1 surgery, and 2 or more surgeries were 95%, 96%, and 95%, respectively. Conclusions: Fractionated proton radiotherapy for grade 1 cavernous sinus meningiomas achieves excellent control rates with minimal toxicities, regardless of surgical intervention or use of histologic diagnosis. Disease control for large lesions can be achieved by primary fractionated proton therapy.

  19. Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of benign meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Candish, Charles; McKenzie, Michael . E-mail: mmckenzi@bccancer.bc.edu; Clark, Brenda G.; Ma, Roy; Lee, Richard; Vollans, Emily; Robar, James; Gete, Ermias; Martin, Monty

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the use of stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) for the treatment of meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between April 1999 and October 2004, 38 patients underwent SRT. Of 34 patients (36 tumors) assessed, the median age was 53 years. The indication was primary treatment in 26 cases (no histology) and postoperative in 10 cases. The most common sites were cavernous sinus (17), optic nerve (6), and cerebellopontine angle (5). The median gross target volume and planning target volume were 8.9 cm{sup 3} and 18.9 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Stereotactic treatment was delivered with 6-MV photons with static conformal fields (custom-made blocks, 9 patients, and micromultileaf collimator, 25 patients). Median number of fields was six. The median dose prescribed was 50 Gy (range, 45-50.4 Gy) in 28 fractions. The median homogeneity and conformality indices were 1.1 and 1.79, respectively. Results: Treatment was well tolerated. Median follow-up was 26 months with 100% progression-free survival. One patient developed an area of possible radionecrosis related to previous radiotherapy, and 2 men developed mild hypogonadism necessitating testosterone replacement. The vision of 5 of 6 patients with optic pathway meningiomas improved or remained static. Conclusions: Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of meningiomas is practical, and with early follow-up, seems to be effective.

  20. Craniotomy for anterior cranial fossa meningiomas: historical overview.

    PubMed

    Morales-Valero, Saul F; Van Gompel, Jamie J; Loumiotis, Ioannis; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    The surgical treatment of meningiomas located at the base of the anterior cranial fossa is often challenging, and the evolution of the surgical strategy to resect these tumors parallels the development of craniotomy, and neurosurgery in general, over the past century. Early successful operations to treat these tumors were pioneered by prominent figures such as Sir William Macewen and Francesco Durante. Following these early reports, Harvey Cushing made significant contributions, allowing a better understanding and treatment of meningiomas in general, but particularly those involving the anterior cranial base. Initially, large-sized unilateral or bilateral craniotomies were necessary to approach these deep-seated lesions. Technical advances such as the introduction of electrosurgery, the operating microscope, and refined microsurgical instruments allowed neurosurgeons to perform less invasive surgical procedures with better results. Today, a wide variety of surgical strategies, including endoscopic surgery and radiosurgery, are used to treat these tumors. In this review, the authors trace the evolution of craniotomy for anterior cranial fossa meningiomas. PMID:24684326

  1. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA-induced malignant transformation of NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yasumoto, S.; Burkhardt, A.L.; Doniger, J.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    A biological function for human papillomavirus 16 (HPV 16) DNA was demonstrated by transformation of NIH 3T3 cells. HPV 16 DNA has been found frequently in genital cancer and has been classified as a papillomavirus on the basis of DNA homology. A recombinant HPV 16 DNA (pSHPV16d), which contains a head-to-tail dimer of the full-length HPV 16 genome, induced morphologic transformation; the transformed cells were tumorigenic in nude mice. Expression of transforming activity was unique because of the long latency period (more than 4 weeks) required for induction of morphologic transformation and because the transfected DNA existed primarily in a multimeric form with some rearrangement. Furthermore, virus-specific RNAs were expressed in the transformants. The transformation of NIH 3T3 cells provides a model for analyzing the functions of HPV 16, which is associated with cervical carcinomas.

  2. Malignant adenolymphoma.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, H; Ryan, C; Schwartz, S; Donnelly, J A

    1980-01-01

    Adenolymphoma (Warthin's tumor) is a well studied benign tumor of the salivary gland. Malignant transformation of such a tumor is rare and not well documented in the literature. The light microscopic and ultrastructural features of an undifferentiated carcinoma arising in an adenolymphoma in the parotid gland of a middle aged male are described, and the relevant literature is reviewed. Similarities between the benign adenolymphoma and the undifferentiated malignant tumor, such as the presence of interstitial lymphoplasmacytic cell infiltrates, dark and light epithelial cells, similar cytoplasmic organelles, and nuclear morphology, suggest a malignant transformation of a previously existing benign adenolymphoma.

  3. Prognostic role of microRNA-205 in multiple human malignant neoplasms: a meta-analysis of 17 studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia-yi; Sun, Meng-yan; Song, Ning-hong; Deng, Zhong-lei; Xue, Chun-yu; Yang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Objective MicroRNA-205 (miRNA-205) was revealed as an attractive prognostic tumour biomarker in recent studies. However, the results of different studies have been inconsistent. We conducted a meta-analysis to elucidate the precise predictive value of miRNA-205 in various human malignant neoplasms. Design Meta-analysis. Data sources Qualified studies were identified up to 5 June 2014 by performing online searches in PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science, and additional quality evaluations. Participants Seventeen eligible studies with 4827 patients were ultimately enrolled in this meta-analysis. Outcome measures The heterogeneity between studies was assessed using I2 statistics. Pooled HRs with 95% CIs for patient survival and disease recurrence were calculated to investigate the correlation between miRNA-205 expression and cancer prognosis. Results Our results indicate that elevated miRNA-205 was significantly associated with enhanced overall survival in the breast cancer subgroup (HR=0.78, 95% CI 0.67 to 0.91) and superior disease-free survival/recurrence-free survival in the adenocarcinoma subgroup (HR=0.68, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.94). Conclusions miRNA-205 is a promising biomarker for predicting the recurrence and progression of patients with adenocarcinomas or breast cancer. Owing to its complex roles, further relevant studies are warranted. PMID:25613953

  4. Dynamic cell adhesion and viscoelastic signatures distinguish normal from malignant human mammary cells using quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tiean; Marx, Kenneth A; Dewilde, Abiche H; McIntosh, Donna; Braunhut, Susan J

    2012-02-01

    During transformation of a normal cell to a cell capable of forming a cancerous growth, cellular morphology, the cytoskeleton, and focal contacts undergo significant changes. These changes should be capable of being characterized via real-time monitoring of the dynamic cell adhesion process and viscoelastic properties of cells. Here, we describe use of the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to distinguish the dynamic cell adhesion signatures of human normal (HMEC) versus malignant (MCF-7) mammary epithelial cells. The significantly reduced QCM responses (changes in frequency [Δf] and motional resistance ΔR) of MCF-7 cells compared with those of HMECs mirror the cancer cells' morphological features as observed via optical microscope. We analyzed the initial 2-h cell adhesion kinetics, suggesting cell-cell cooperativity for HMECs and no or weak cell-cell interactions for MCF-7 cells. We propose that changes of the ΔR/Δf ratio, which we term the cell viscoelastic index (CVI), reflect the establishment of cytoskeleton structure and dynamic viscoelastic properties of living cells. The CVI decreases significantly on initiation of cell to surface interactions as cells establish their cytoskeletal structures. During the cell adhesion process, MCF-7 cells were consistently softer, exhibiting up to a 2.5-fold smaller CVI when compared with HMECs.

  5. Value of combined 67Ga and 99Tc(m)-human immunoglobulin G whole-body scanning in malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Küçük, N O; Aras, G; Soylu, A; Ozcan, M; Ibis, E; Dinçol, D

    2001-03-01

    Human immunoglobulin G labelled with 99Tc(m) (99Tc(m)-HIG) is an agent introduced for the localization of inflammatory lesions. There is also a limited number of reports concerning the uptake of this agent by malignant lesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the uptake of 99Tc(m)-HIG by lymphoma. Twenty-three patients (five female, 18 male) with known Hodgkin's or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma for a period of 2-6 years (mean 4.2 years) and which, by using computed tomography (CT), showed recurrence, were included in the study. The patients were aged between 32 and 68 years (mean 38 +/- 5 years). No evidence of inflammation or infection was seen in any of these patients. CT, 99Tc(m)-HIG and a 67Ga scan were performed in the same week. CT showed abdominal involvement in 17 patients, pelvic involvement in 11, and thorax involvement in 11. 99Tc(m)-HIG showed higher sensitivity (94.1%) in the abdomen, a similar sensitivity (63.6%) in thorax, but lower (18.1%) in pelvic area than for 67Ga. 99Tc(m)-HIG was found to be more useful for the evaluation of abdominal involvement compared to 67Ga due to gastrointestinal excretion of the latter. The resolution of 67Ga was better than 99Tc(m)-HIG in thorax and pelvis. Using 99Tc(m)-HIG and 67Ga together in lymphoma may increase sensitivity.

  6. Long Noncoding RNA CUDR Regulates HULC and β-Catenin to Govern Human Liver Stem Cell Malignant Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gui, Xin; Li, Haiyan; Li, Tianming; Pu, Hu; Lu, Dongdong

    2015-12-01

    Long noncoding RNA cancer upregulated drug resistant (CUDR) is overexpressed in many tumors and promotes tumorigenesis. Herein, we demonstrate CUDR could enhance the human embryonic stem cells (ESC) differentiation into hepatocyte-like cells by reducing trimethylation on histone H3 twenty-seventh lysine (H3K27me3). On the other hand, excessive CUDR triggers hepatocyte-like cells malignant transformation. Mechanistically, we identify CUDR causes highly upregulated in liver cancer (HULC) and β-catenin abnormal expression by inhibiting HULC promoter methylation and promoting β-catenin promoter-enhancer chromatin looping formation mediated by CUDR-ccctc-binding factor (CTCF) complex, which recruits more RNA polII and P300. Strikingly, HULC and β-catenin activity are crucial for CUDR oncogenic function. These findings provide the first demonstration that CUDR plays a positive potential role in liver cancer stem cell through the cascade of CUDR-HULC/CUDR-β-catenin signaling, and offer insights into a novel link between long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) and the epigenetic modification in cancer stem cells.

  7. Comparative Genomic Hybridization of Human Malignant Gliomas Reveals Multiple Amplification Sites and Nonrandom Chromosomal Gains and Losses

    PubMed Central

    Schròck, Evelin; Thiel, Gundula; Lozanova, Tanka; du Manoir, Stanislas; Meffert, Marie-Christine; Jauch, Anna; Speicher, Michael R.; Nürnberg, Peter; Vogel, Siegfried; Janisch, Werner; Donis-Keller, Helen; Ried, Thomas; Witkowski, Regine; Cremer, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    Nine human malignant gliomas (2 astrocytomas grade III and 7 glioblastomas) were analyzed using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). In addition to the amplification of the EGFR gene at 7p12 in 4 of 9 cases, six new amplification sites were mapped to 1q32, 4q12, 7q21.1, 7q21.2-3, 12p, and 22q12. Nonrandom chromosomal gains and losses were identified with overrepresentation of chromosome 7 and underrepresentation of chromosome 10 as the most frequent events (1 of 2 astrocytomas, 7 of 7 glioblastomas). Gain of a part or the whole chromosome 19 and losses of chromosome bands 9pter-23 and 22q13 were detected each in five cases. Loss of chromosome band 17p13 and gain of chromosome 20 were revealed each in three cases. The validity of the CGH data was confirmed using interphase cytogenetics with YAC clones, chromosome painting in tumor metaphase spreads, and DNA fingerprinting. A comparison of CGH data with the results of chromosome banding analyses indicates that metaphase spreads accessible in primary tumor cell cultures may not represent the clones predominant in the tumor tissue ImagesFigure 1Figure 4Figure 6 PMID:8203461

  8. Health Disparities in the Immunoprevention of Human Papillomavirus Infection and Associated Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bakir, Amira H.; Skarzynski, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes roughly 1.6% of the plus 1.6 million cases of cancer that are diagnosed in the United States each year. Despite the proven safety and efficacy of available vaccines, HPV remains the most common sexually transmitted infection. Underlying the high prevalence of HPV infection is the poor adherence to the Centers for Disease Control recommendation to vaccinate all 11- to 12-year-old males and females. In fact, only about 38 and 14% of eligible females and males, respectively, receive the complete, three-dose immunization. The many factors associated with missed HPV vaccination opportunities – including race, age, family income, and patient education – contribute to widespread disparities in vaccine completion and related health outcomes. Beyond patient circumstance, however, research indicates that the rigor and consistency of recommendation by primary care providers also plays a significant role in uptake of HPV immunization. Health disparities data are of vital importance to HPV vaccination campaigns because they can provide insight into how to address current problems and allocate limited resources where they are most needed. Furthermore, even modest gains in populations with low vaccination rates may yield great benefits because HPV immunization has been shown to provide herd immunity, indirect protection for non-immunized individuals achieved by limiting the spread of an infectious agent through a population. However, the impact of current HPV vaccination campaigns is hindered by stagnant immunization rates, which remain far below target levels despite a slow overall increase. Furthermore, gains in immunization are not equally distributed across gender, age, demographic, and socioeconomic divisions within the recommended group of vaccine recipients. To achieve the greatest impact, public health campaigns should focus on improving immunization coverage where it is weakest. They should also explore more subtle but potentially

  9. Health Disparities in the Immunoprevention of Human Papillomavirus Infection and Associated Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Bakir, Amira H; Skarzynski, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes roughly 1.6% of the plus 1.6 million cases of cancer that are diagnosed in the United States each year. Despite the proven safety and efficacy of available vaccines, HPV remains the most common sexually transmitted infection. Underlying the high prevalence of HPV infection is the poor adherence to the Centers for Disease Control recommendation to vaccinate all 11- to 12-year-old males and females. In fact, only about 38 and 14% of eligible females and males, respectively, receive the complete, three-dose immunization. The many factors associated with missed HPV vaccination opportunities - including race, age, family income, and patient education - contribute to widespread disparities in vaccine completion and related health outcomes. Beyond patient circumstance, however, research indicates that the rigor and consistency of recommendation by primary care providers also plays a significant role in uptake of HPV immunization. Health disparities data are of vital importance to HPV vaccination campaigns because they can provide insight into how to address current problems and allocate limited resources where they are most needed. Furthermore, even modest gains in populations with low vaccination rates may yield great benefits because HPV immunization has been shown to provide herd immunity, indirect protection for non-immunized individuals achieved by limiting the spread of an infectious agent through a population. However, the impact of current HPV vaccination campaigns is hindered by stagnant immunization rates, which remain far below target levels despite a slow overall increase. Furthermore, gains in immunization are not equally distributed across gender, age, demographic, and socioeconomic divisions within the recommended group of vaccine recipients. To achieve the greatest impact, public health campaigns should focus on improving immunization coverage where it is weakest. They should also explore more subtle but potentially

  10. Accumulation of 99mTc-low-density lipoprotein in human malignant glioma.

    PubMed Central

    Leppälä, J.; Kallio, M.; Nikula, T.; Nikkinen, P.; Liewendahl, K.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Savolainen, S.; Gylling, H.; Hiltunen, J.; Callaway, J.

    1995-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake in gliomas was studied to find out if LDL has potential as a drug carrier of boron, especially for boron neutron capture therapy. Single photon emission tomography (SPET) was performed 2 h and 20 h after intravenous injection of autologous 99mTc-labelled LDL in four patients with untreated and five patients with recurrent glioma. 99mTc-LDL uptake was compared with the uptake of 99mTc-labelled human serum albumin (HSA), an established blood pool marker. The intra- and peritumoral distributions of radioactivity in the SPET images were not identical for radiolabelled LDL and HSA. The mean LDL tumour to brain ratio, determined from transversal SPET slices at 20 h post injection, was 1.5 in untreated and 2.2 in recurrent gliomas; the corresponding ratios for HSA were 1.6 and 3.4. The brain to blood ratio remained constant at 2 h and 20 h in both types of tumours. These data are not consistent with highly selective, homogeneous uptake of LDL in gliomas. However, the different tumoral distribution and rate of uptake of 99mTc-LDL, as compared with 99mTc-HSA, indicate that the uptake of LDL is different from that of HSA and that further studies on the mechanism of LDL uptake in glioma are warranted. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7841057

  11. Isolation and genome-wide expression and methylation characterization of CD31+ cells from normal and malignant human prostate tissue

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Deeb, Kristin K.; Ma, Yingyu; Morrison, Carl D.; Liu, Song; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an important component involved in the angiogenesis. Little is known about the global gene expression and epigenetic regulation in tumor endothelial cells. The identification of gene expression and epigenetic difference between human prostate tumor-derived endothelial cells (TdECs) and those in normal tissues may uncover unique biological features of TdEC and facilitate the discovery of new anti-angiogenic targets. We established a method for isolation of CD31+ endothelial cells from malignant and normal prostate tissues obtained at prostatectomy. TdECs and normal-derived ECs (NdECs) showed >90% enrichment in primary culture and demonstrated microvascular endothelial cell characteristics such as cobblestone morphology in monolayer culture, diI-acetyl-LDL uptake and capillary-tube like formation in Matrigel®. In vitro primary cultures of ECs maintained expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. We then conducted a pilot study of transcriptome and methylome analysis of TdECs and matched NdECs from patients with prostate cancer. We observed a wide spectrum of differences in gene expression and methylation patterns in endothelial cells, between malignant and normal prostate tissues. Array-based expression and methylation data were validated by qRT-PCR and bisulfite DNA pyrosequencing. Further analysis of transcriptome and methylome data revealed a number of differentially expressed genes with loci whose methylation change is accompanied by an inverse change in gene expression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of isolation of ECs from histologically normal prostate and prostate cancer via CD31+ selection. The data, although preliminary, indicates that there exist widespread differences in methylation and transcription between TdECs and NdECs. Interestingly, only a small

  12. Isolation and genome-wide expression and methylation characterization of CD31+ cells from normal and malignant human prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Deeb, Kristin K; Ma, Yingyu; Morrison, Carl D; Liu, Song; Johnson, Candace S; Trump, Donald L

    2013-09-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an important component involved in the angiogenesis. Little is known about the global gene expression and epigenetic regulation in tumor endothelial cells. The identification of gene expression and epigenetic difference between human prostate tumor-derived endothelial cells (TdECs) and those in normal tissues may uncover unique biological features of TdEC and facilitate the discovery of new anti-angiogenic targets. We established a method for isolation of CD31+ endothelial cells from malignant and normal prostate tissue obtained at prostatectomy. TdECs and normal-derived ECs (NdECs) showed >90% enrichment in primary culture and demonstrated microvascular endothelial cell characteristics such as cobblestone morphology in monolayer culture, diI-acetyl-LDL uptake and capillary-tube like formation in Matrigel®. In vitro primary cultures of ECs maintained expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. We then conducted a pilot study of transcriptome and methylome analysis of TdECs and matched NdECs from patients with prostate cancer. We observed a wide spectrum of differences in gene expression and methylation patterns in endothelial cells, between malignant and normal prostate tissues. Array-based expression and methylation data were validated by qRT-PCR and bisulfite DNA pyrosequencing. Further analysis of transcriptome and methylome data revealed a number of differentially expressed genes with loci whose methylation change is accompanied by an inverse change in gene expression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of isolation of ECs from histologically normal prostate and prostate cancer via CD31+ selection. The data, although preliminary, indicates that there exist widespread differences in methylation and transcription between TdECs and NdECs. Interestingly, only a small proportion

  13. A rare case of atypical skull base meningioma with perineural spread

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Henry; Morley, Simon; Alegre-Abarrategui, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Atypical meningioma is a rare cause of perineural tumour spread. In this report, we present the case of a 46-year-old female with an atypical meningioma of the skull base demonstrating perineural tumour spread. We describe the imaging features of this condition and its distinguishing features from other tumours exhibiting perineural spread. PMID:27200171

  14. Histopathological and Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Meningiomas with Reference to Proliferative Markers p53 and Ki-67

    PubMed Central

    Telugu, Ramesh Babu; Rukmangadha, Nandyala; Patnayak, Rashmi; Phaneendra, Bobbidi Venkata; Prasad, Bodapati Chandra Mowliswara; Reddy, Mandyam Kumaraswamy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Meningiomas are slow growing primary central nervous system (CNS) tumours attached to the duramater, which arise from the meningothelial cells of the arachnoid. Grading of meningioma based on histological findings assisted with supplementary immunohistochemical studies, predicts the prognosis of meningioma with good precision. Aim To evaluate proliferative markers and correlate with various histological subtypes and grade. Materials and Methods A total of 224 meningiomas, diagnosed between January1995 and October 2011were graded according to WHO 2007 criteria. Immunostaining for p53 and Ki-67 markers were performed on 100 cases. Results There was female predominance. There were 194 Grade I, 24 Grade II and 6 Grade III meningiomas. Brain invasion noted in 18(8%) meningiomas predominantly in grade III followed by grade II. Recurrence was seen in 7 (3.1%) cases, most common in psammomatous followed by angiomatous meningioma. Immunostaining showed p53 positivity in 72.5% of grade I, 83.3% of grade II and all the cases of grade III tumours. Ki-67 Labelling Index (LI) consistently increased from grade I to grade III tumours. Conclusion p53 and Ki-67 LI correlated well with increasing histological grade and biological behaviour of meningioma. PMID:26894073

  15. Household Chemical Exposures and the Risk of Canine Malignant Lymphoma, a Model for Human Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Takashima-Uebelhoer, Biki B.; Barber, Lisa G.; Zagarins, Sofija E.; Procter-Gray, Elizabeth; Gollenberg, Audra L.; Moore, Antony S.; Bertone-Johnson, Elizabeth R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic studies of companion animals offer an important opportunity to identify risk factors for cancers in animals and humans. Canine malignant lymphoma (CML) has been established as a model for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Previous studies have suggested that exposure to environmental chemicals may relate to development of CML. Methods We assessed the relation of exposure to flea and tick control products and lawn-care products and risk of CML in a case-control study of dogs presented to a tertiary-care veterinary hospital (2000–2006). Cases were 263 dogs with biopsy-confirmed CML. Controls included 240 dogs with benign tumors and 230 dogs undergoing surgeries unrelated to cancer. Dog owners completed a 10-page questionnaire measuring demographic, environmental, and medical factors. Results After adjustment for age, weight, and other factors, use of specific lawn care products was associated with greater risk of CML. Specifically, the use of professionally applied pesticides was associated with a significant 70% higher risk of CML (odds ratio(OR)=1.7; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.1–2.7). Risk was also higher in those reporting use of self-applied insect growth regulators (OR = 2.7; 95% CI=1.1–6.8). The use of flea and tick control products was unrelated to risk of CML. Conclusions Results suggest that use of some lawn care chemicals may increase the risk of CML. Additional analyses are needed to evaluate whether specific chemicals in these products may be related to risk of CML, and perhaps to human NHL as well. PMID:22222006

  16. Argon laser phototherapy of human malignancies using rhodamine-123 as a new laser dye: The intracellular role of oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, D.J.; Saxton, R.E.; Markley, J.; Foote, C.S.; Fetterman, H.R.; Castro, D.J.; Ward, P.H. )

    1990-08-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that the cationic, mitochondrial-specific dye Rhodamine-123 (Rh-123), is an efficient tumor photosensitizer for Argon laser treatment of human cancer cells both in vitro and in tumors grown as xenografts in athymic mice. To demonstrate the photodynamic mechanism of action of this reaction, the intracellular role of oxygen and temperature changes in treated cells have to be defined. In the current study, a large panel of human tumor cell lines of diverse histologic origin were tested for in vitro sensitivity to Rh-123 and the Argon laser (514.5 nm) in oxygen, deuterium oxide (D2O), and nitrogen (N2) environment. Tumor cells in suspension were first sensitized to Rh-123 (1 or 20 micrograms/ml for 1 hour), cooled on ice to 4 degrees C, and then exposed to the Argon laser (delta T = 14 +/- 1 degree C). Cell proliferation measured by (3H)-thymidine uptake 24 hours after sensitization with Rh-123 and laser treatment was significantly decreased in tumor cells kept in oxygen and D2O atmospheres. No decrease in DNA synthesis was seen in Rh-123 and laser treated cells kept in an N2 environment. Control tumor cells treated with Rh-123 or the Argon laser separately did not show any decreased (3H)-thymidine uptake in oxygen, D2O or N2 environment. These results provide evidence of a photodynamic process since Rh-123 sensitization and Argon laser activation occur at nonthermal levels of energy and are oxygen dependent. The high effectiveness of this technique of photodynamic therapy with the Argon laser, and low toxicity of Rh-123 could make its clinical use very attractive for the treatment of superficial malignancies.

  17. Connexin 30 expression inhibits growth of human malignant gliomas but protects them against radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Artesi, Maria; Kroonen, Jerome; Bredel, Markus; Nguyen-Khac, Minh; Deprez, Manuel; Schoysman, Laurent; Poulet, Christophe; Chakravarti, Arnab; Kim, Hyunsoo; Scholtens, Denise; Seute, Tatjana; Rogister, Bernard; Bours, Vincent; Robe, Pierre A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Glioblastomas remain ominous tumors that almost invariably escape treatment. Connexins are a family of transmembrane, gap junction-forming proteins, some members of which were reported to act as tumor suppressors and to modulate cellular metabolism in response to cytotoxic stress. Methods We analyzed the copy number and expression of the connexin (Cx)30 gene gap junction beta-6 (GJB6), as well as of its protein immunoreactivity in several public and proprietary repositories of glioblastomas, and their influence on patient survival. We evaluated the effect of the expression of this gap junction protein on the growth, DNA repair and energy metabolism, and treatment resistance of these tumors. Results The GJB6 gene was deleted in 25.8% of 751 analyzed tumors and mutated in 15.8% of 158 tumors. Cx30 immunoreactivity was absent in 28.9% of 145 tumors. Restoration of Cx30 expression in human glioblastoma cells reduced their growth in vitro and as xenografts in the striatum of immunodeficient mice. Cx30 immunoreactivity was, however, found to adversely affect survival in 2 independent retrospective cohorts of glioblastoma patients. Cx30 was found in clonogenic assays to protect glioblastoma cells against radiation-induced mortality and to decrease radiation-induced DNA damage. This radioprotection correlated with a heat shock protein 90–dependent mitochondrial translocation of Cx30 following radiation and an improved ATP production following this genotoxic stress. Conclusion These results underline the complex relationship between potential tumor suppressors and treatment resistance in glioblastomas and single out GJB6/Cx30 as a potential biomarker and target for therapeutic intervention in these tumors. PMID:25155356

  18. Wnt interaction and extracellular release of prominin-1/CD133 in human malignant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rappa, Germana; Mercapide, Javier; Anzanello, Fabio; Le, Thuc T; Johlfs, Mary G; Fiscus, Ronald R; Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela; Corbeil, Denis; Lorico, Aurelio

    2013-04-01

    Prominin-1 (CD133) is the first identified gene of a novel class of pentaspan membrane glycoproteins. It is expressed by various epithelial and non-epithelial cells, and notably by stem and cancer stem cells. In non-cancerous cells such as neuro-epithelial and hematopoietic stem cells, prominin-1 is selectively concentrated in plasma membrane protrusions, and released into the extracellular milieu in association with small vesicles. Previously, we demonstrated that prominin-1 contributes to melanoma cells pro-metastatic properties and suggested that it may constitute a molecular target to prevent prominin-1-expressing melanomas from colonizing and growing in lymph nodes and distant organs. Here, we report that three distinct pools of prominin-1 co-exist in cultures of human FEMX-I metastatic melanoma. Morphologically, in addition to the plasma membrane localization, prominin-1 is found within the intracellular compartments, (e.g., Golgi apparatus) and in association with extracellular membrane vesicles. The latter prominin-1-positive structures appeared in three sizes (small, ≤40 nm; intermediates ~40-80 nm, and large, >80 nm). Functionally, the down-regulation of prominin-1 in FEMX-I cells resulted in a significant reduction of number of lipid droplets as observed by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering image analysis and Oil red O staining, and surprisingly in a decrease in the nuclear localization of beta-catenin, a surrogate marker of Wnt activation. Moreover, the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) promoter activity was 2 to 4 times higher in parental than in prominin-1-knockdown cells. Collectively, our results point to Wnt signaling and/or release of prominin-1-containing membrane vesicles as mediators of the pro-metastatic activity of prominin-1 in FEMX-I melanoma. PMID:23318676

  19. arrayMap: A Reference Resource for Genomic Copy Number Imbalances in Human Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Baudis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background The delineation of genomic copy number abnormalities (CNAs) from cancer samples has been instrumental for identification of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes and proven useful for clinical marker detection. An increasing number of projects have mapped CNAs using high-resolution microarray based techniques. So far, no single resource does provide a global collection of readily accessible oncogenomic array data. Methodology/Principal Findings We here present arrayMap, a curated reference database and bioinformatics resource targeting copy number profiling data in human cancer. The arrayMap database provides a platform for meta-analysis and systems level data integration of high-resolution oncogenomic CNA data. To date, the resource incorporates more than 40,000 arrays in 224 cancer types extracted from several resources, including the NCBI’s Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), EBI’s ArrayExpress (AE), The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), publication supplements and direct submissions. For the majority of the included datasets, probe level and integrated visualization facilitate gene level and genome wide data review. Results from multi-case selections can be connected to downstream data analysis and visualization tools. Conclusions/Significance To our knowledge, currently no data source provides an extensive collection of high resolution oncogenomic CNA data which readily could be used for genomic feature mining, across a representative range of cancer entities. arrayMap represents our effort for providing a long term platform for oncogenomic CNA data independent of specific platform considerations or specific project dependence. The online database can be accessed at http//www.arraymap.org. PMID:22629346

  20. Uncovering the role of p53 splice variants in human malignancy: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Surget, Sylvanie; Khoury, Marie P; Bourdon, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Thirty-five years of research on p53 gave rise to more than 68,000 articles and reviews, but did not allow the uncovering of all the mysteries that this major tumor suppressor holds. How p53 handles the different signals to decide the appropriate cell fate in response to a stress and its implication in tumorigenesis and cancer progression remains unclear. Nevertheless, the uncovering of p53 isoforms has opened new perspectives in the cancer research field. Indeed, the human TP53 gene encodes not only one but at least twelve p53 protein isoforms, which are produced in normal tissues through alternative initiation of translation, usage of alternative promoters, and alternative splicing. In recent years, it became obvious that the different p53 isoforms play an important role in regulating cell fate in response to different stresses in normal cells by differentially regulating gene expression. In cancer cells, abnormal expression of p53 isoforms contributes actively to cancer formation and progression, regardless of TP53 mutation status. They can also be associated with response to treatment, depending on the cell context. The determination of p53 isoform expression and p53 mutation status helps to define different subtypes within a particular cancer type, which would have different responses to treatment. Thus, the understanding of the regulation of p53 isoform expression and their biological activities in relation to the cellular context would constitute an important step toward the improvement of the diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive values of p53 in cancer treatment. This review aims to summarize the involvement of p53 isoforms in cancer and to highlight novel potential therapeutic targets. PMID:24379683

  1. Clinical Significance of Hu-Antigen Receptor (HuR) and Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) Expression in Human Malignant and Benign Thyroid Lesions.

    PubMed

    Giaginis, Constantinos; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Karavokyros, Ioannis; Danas, Eugene; Giagini, Athina; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2016-01-01

    Hu-antigen R (HuR) is considered to play a crucial role in tumor formation and growth by binding to mRNAs encoding proteins such as Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducing their expression via mRNA stabilization and/or altered translation. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of HuR and COX-2 proteins’ expression in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions. HuR and COX-2 proteins’ expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 98 patients with benign (n = 48) and malignant (n = 50) lesions and was statistically analyzed with clinicopathological parameters, follicular cells’ proliferative capacity and recurrence risk rate. Enhanced HuR and COX-2 expression was significantly more frequently observed in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p = 0.0073 and p = 0.0016, respectively), as well as in papillary carcinomas compared to hyperplastic nodules (p = 0.0039 and p = 0.0009, respectively). Positive associations of both HuR and COX-2 expression with follicular cells’ proliferation rate were also noted (p = 0.0087 and p = 0.0127, respectively). In malignant thyroid lesions, elevated COX-2 expression was significantly associated with female patients’ gender (p = 0.0381) and the presence of lymph node metastases (p = 0.0296). The present data support evidence that both HuR and COX-2 may be involved in the malignant state of thyroid neoplasia and may be utilized in the diagnosis of malignant thyroid tumors.

  2. New pterocarpanquinones: synthesis, antineoplasic activity on cultured human malignant cell lines and TNF-alpha modulation in human PBMC cells.

    PubMed

    Netto, Chaquip D; da Silva, Alcides J M; Salustiano, Eduardo J S; Bacelar, Thiago S; Riça, Ingred G; Cavalcante, Moises C M; Rumjanek, Vivian M; Costa, Paulo R R

    2010-02-15

    A new pterocarpanquinone (5a) was synthesized through a palladium catalyzed oxyarylation reaction and was transformed, through electrophilic substitution reaction, into derivatives 5b-d. These compounds showed to be active against human leukemic cell lines and human lung cancer cell lines. Even multidrug resistant cells were sensitive to 5a, which presented low toxicity toward peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cells and decreased the production of TNF-alpha by these cells. In the laboratory these pterocarpanquinones were reduced by sodium dithionite in the presence of thiophenol at physiological pH, as NAD(P)H quinone oxidoredutase-1 (NQO1) catalyzed two-electron reduction, and the resulting hydroquinone undergo structural rearrangements, leading to the formation of Michael acceptors, which were intercepted as adducts of thiophenol. These results suggest that these compounds could be activated by bioreduction. PMID:20117936

  3. Malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Brockhouse, R T

    1979-04-01

    A case has been presented that illustrates successful managment of a patient with suspected malignant hyperthermia. The causes of this disorder are uncertain. If screening procedures identify a patient as susceptible to this disorder, careful planning in the preoperative stage is indicated. Preparedness during the operative procedure for any emergency is mandatory. Early and effective treatment seems to be the only method of preventing mortality with patients experiencing malignant hyperthermia. PMID:285135

  4. Malignant oncocytoma.

    PubMed

    Laurian, N; Zohar, Y; Kende, L

    1977-09-01

    A case of malignant oncocytoma of the parotid gland in a 32-year-old male is presented. Ten months after parotidectomy an undifferentiated carcinoma, in which oncocytes still could be recognized, developed in the operated area. According to the literature available to us, this is the second reported case in which malignant transformation in a benign oncocytoma of the salivary gland has been observed.

  5. Wnt interaction and extracellular release of prominin-1/CD133 in human malignant melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rappa, Germana; Mercapide, Javier; Anzanello, Fabio; Le, Thuc T.; Johlfs, Mary G.; Fiscus, Ronald R.; Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela; Corbeil, Denis; Lorico, Aurelio

    2013-04-01

    Prominin-1 (CD133) is the first identified gene of a novel class of pentaspan membrane glycoproteins. It is expressed by various epithelial and non-epithelial cells, and notably by stem and cancer stem cells. In non-cancerous cells such as neuro-epithelial and hematopoietic stem cells, prominin-1 is selectively concentrated in plasma membrane protrusions, and released into the extracellular milieu in association with small vesicles. Previously, we demonstrated that prominin-1 contributes to melanoma cells pro-metastatic properties and suggested that it may constitute a molecular target to prevent prominin-1-expressing melanomas from colonizing and growing in lymph nodes and distant organs. Here, we report that three distinct pools of prominin-1 co-exist in cultures of human FEMX-I metastatic melanoma. Morphologically, in addition to the plasma membrane localization, prominin-1 is found within the intracellular compartments, (e.g., Golgi apparatus) and in association with extracellular membrane vesicles. The latter prominin-1–positive structures appeared in three sizes (small, ≤40 nm; intermediates ∼40–80 nm, and large, >80 nm). Functionally, the down-regulation of prominin-1 in FEMX-I cells resulted in a significant reduction of number of lipid droplets as observed by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering image analysis and Oil red O staining, and surprisingly in a decrease in the nuclear localization of beta-catenin, a surrogate marker of Wnt activation. Moreover, the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) promoter activity was 2 to 4 times higher in parental than in prominin-1-knockdown cells. Collectively, our results point to Wnt signaling and/or release of prominin-1–containing membrane vesicles as mediators of the pro-metastatic activity of prominin-1 in FEMX-I melanoma. - Highlights: ► First report of release of prominin-1–containing microvesicles from cancer cells. ► Pro-metastatic role of prominin-1–containing microvesicles in

  6. Effect of boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent anaplastic meningioma: an autopsy case report.

    PubMed

    Kawaji, Hiroshi; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Shinmura, Kazuya; Kawabata, Shinji; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman died of systemic metastasis from anaplastic meningioma and underwent autopsy. The patient underwent twice total removal of the right sphenoid ridge meningioma 2 years ago. The tumor recurred 3 times, and then stereotactic radiotherapy was employed. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was performed for the fourth local recurrence and an additional new lesion. Proliferative activity of the newly developed meningioma, which had been treated with BNCT only, was significantly lower than that of untreated metastatic liver tumor, as well as that of the meningioma specimen obtained at the second surgery. Our pathological findings demonstrated, for the first time, the therapeutic effect of BNCT on anaplastic meningioma at an early stage (2.5 months).

  7. Lymphoplasmacyte-rich meningioma with invasion of bone: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kurmi, Dhruba J.; Sharma, Achal; Mittal, R. S.; Singhvi, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoplasmacyte-rich (LPR) meningioma is a rare variant of meningioma, which is characterized by conspicuous infiltration of plasma cells and lymphocytes and a variable proportion of meningothelial elements, and is classified as a grade I tumor in World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of central nervous system. The origin and biological behavior of this rare variant of meningioma is still not clear. Till date, very few cases of LPR meningioma have been reported globally. Here, we are presenting a case of right parietal convexity LPR meningioma with invasion of bone in a 32-year-old male patient, who presented to us with complaints of focal seizures and weakness in left upper limb. PMID:27695559

  8. Lymphoplasmacyte-rich meningioma with invasion of bone: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kurmi, Dhruba J.; Sharma, Achal; Mittal, R. S.; Singhvi, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoplasmacyte-rich (LPR) meningioma is a rare variant of meningioma, which is characterized by conspicuous infiltration of plasma cells and lymphocytes and a variable proportion of meningothelial elements, and is classified as a grade I tumor in World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of central nervous system. The origin and biological behavior of this rare variant of meningioma is still not clear. Till date, very few cases of LPR meningioma have been reported globally. Here, we are presenting a case of right parietal convexity LPR meningioma with invasion of bone in a 32-year-old male patient, who presented to us with complaints of focal seizures and weakness in left upper limb.

  9. Primary intraosseous atypical inflammatory meningioma presenting as a lytic skull lesion: Case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Bohara, Sangita; Agarwal, Swapnil; Khurana, Nita; Pandey, P N

    2016-01-01

    Primary extradural meningiomas of the skull comprise 1% of all meningiomas, and lytic skull meningiomas are still rarer and are said to be more aggressive. We present a case of 38-year-old male with an extradural tumor which on histopathological examination showed features of inflammatory atypical meningioma (WHO Grade II). The intense inflammatory nature of osteolytic primary intraosseous meningioma has not been reported before. This entity deserves special mention because of the need for adjuvant therapy and proper follow-up. PMID:27510685

  10. Induction of ovarian function by using short-term human menopausal gonadotrophin in patients with ovarian failure following cytotoxic chemotherapy for haematological malignancy.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, R; Mills, W; Katz, M; McGarrigle, H H; Goldstone, A H

    1993-07-01

    Currently no treatment has proved successful in inducing ovarian steroidogenic and/or gametogenic recovery in patients with haematological malignancies treated by cytotoxic chemotherapy once biochemical failure becomes manifest i.e., when FSH levels exceed 40 IU/L. This paper reports two such cases with classical biochemical ovarian failure in which ovarian function was induced by brief stimulation with Human Menopausal Gonadotrophin (HMG). PMID:7693105

  11. Survivin knockdown increased anti-cancer effects of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate in human malignant neuroblastoma SK-N-BE2 and SH-SY5Y cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Md. Motarab; Banik, Naren L.; Ray, Swapan K.

    2012-08-01

    network formation ability of cells was significantly inhibited by survivin silencing and completely by combination of survivin silencing and EGCG treatment. Collectively, survivin silencing potentiated anti-cancer effects of EGCG in human malignant neuroblastoma cells having survivin overexpression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin shRNA + EGCG controlled growth of human malignant neuroblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin knockdown induced neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin shRNA + EGCG induced morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination therapy inhibited invasion, proliferation, and angiogenesis as well. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer So, combination therapy showed multiple anti-cancer mechanisms in neuroblastoma.

  12. SV40 expression in human neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissues: perspectives on diagnosis, prognosis and therapy of human malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Procopio, A; Marinacci, R; Marinetti, M R; Strizzi, L; Paludi, D; Iezzi, T; Tassi, G; Casalini, A; Modesti, A

    1998-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated the association of SV40 and human pleural malignant mesothelioma. Here, we have investigated whether SV40 viral sequences may be associated with other human tumours or other non-neoplastic pathology and whether SV40 DNA or protein expression may be of diagnostic, prognostic or therapeutic relevance. DNA was extracted from paraffin embedded tissues. SV40, JC and BK viral sequences were detected by the polymerase chain reaction and molecular hybridization with specific probes. The screening with three different sets of SV40-related primers demonstrated that 7/18 (38.8%) mesothelioma specimens were SV40 positive as well as 5/18 (27.7%) tubercular pleural lesions. None of the 18 lung cancers, nor the 20 pleural non-specific inflammatory specimens tested were positive. Twenty-five blood samples and 18 urinary sediments from MM patients were also negative. We have also found that SV40 Tag proteins are present in mesothelioma cells and tumours. Tag proteins may interfere with tumour suppressor gene products, such as p53. Preliminary results suggest that wild type p53 transgene expression, obtained after infection with recombinant adenovirus (AdCMV.p53), inhibited in vitro and in vivo proliferation, inducing apoptosis of mesothelioma cells. Infections with control viruses were ineffective. Thus, SV40 DNA and Tag expression in mesothelioma tumour cells, though probably not relevant for diagnostic or prognostic purposes, may be crucial for innovative gene therapy strategies.

  13. SV40 expression in human neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissues: perspectives on diagnosis, prognosis and therapy of human malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Procopio, A; Marinacci, R; Marinetti, M R; Strizzi, L; Paludi, D; Iezzi, T; Tassi, G; Casalini, A; Modesti, A

    1998-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated the association of SV40 and human pleural malignant mesothelioma. Here, we have investigated whether SV40 viral sequences may be associated with other human tumours or other non-neoplastic pathology and whether SV40 DNA or protein expression may be of diagnostic, prognostic or therapeutic relevance. DNA was extracted from paraffin embedded tissues. SV40, JC and BK viral sequences were detected by the polymerase chain reaction and molecular hybridization with specific probes. The screening with three different sets of SV40-related primers demonstrated that 7/18 (38.8%) mesothelioma specimens were SV40 positive as well as 5/18 (27.7%) tubercular pleural lesions. None of the 18 lung cancers, nor the 20 pleural non-specific inflammatory specimens tested were positive. Twenty-five blood samples and 18 urinary sediments from MM patients were also negative. We have also found that SV40 Tag proteins are present in mesothelioma cells and tumours. Tag proteins may interfere with tumour suppressor gene products, such as p53. Preliminary results suggest that wild type p53 transgene expression, obtained after infection with recombinant adenovirus (AdCMV.p53), inhibited in vitro and in vivo proliferation, inducing apoptosis of mesothelioma cells. Infections with control viruses were ineffective. Thus, SV40 DNA and Tag expression in mesothelioma tumour cells, though probably not relevant for diagnostic or prognostic purposes, may be crucial for innovative gene therapy strategies. PMID:9776257

  14. Human papillomavirus type 16 E6/E7-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes for adoptive immunotherapy of HPV-associated malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Carlos A; Narala, Neeharika; Vyas, Gayatri M; Leen, Ann M; Gerdemann, Ulrike; Sturgis, Erich M; Anderson, Matthew L; Savoldo, Barbara; Heslop, Helen E; Brenner, Malcolm K; Rooney, Cliona M

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines prevent human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancer but, although these tumors express foreign, viral antigens (E6 and E7 proteins), they have little benefit in established malignancies, likely due to negative environmental cues that block tumor recognition and induce T-cell anergy in vivo. We postulated that we could identify mechanisms by which ex vivo stimulation of T cells could reactivate and expand tumor-directed T-cell lines from HPV cancer patients for subsequent adoptive immunotherapy. A total of 68 patients with HPV-associated cancers were studied. Peripheral blood T cells were stimulated with monocyte-derived dendritic cells loaded with pepmixes [peptide libraries of 15-mers overlapping by 11 amino acids (aa)] spanning E6/E7, in the presence or absence of specific accessory cytokines. The resulting T-cell lines were further expanded with pepmix-loaded activated B-cell blasts. Interferon-γ release and cytotoxic responses to E6/E7 were assessed. We successfully reactivated and expanded (>1200-fold) E6-specific/E7-specific T cells from 8/16 cervical and 33/52 oropharyngeal cancer patients. The presence of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, IL-7, IL-12, and IL-15 is critical for this process. These T-cell lines possess the desirable characteristics of polyclonality, multiple T-cell subset representation (including the memory compartment) and a TH1 bias, and may eliminate E6/E7 targets. In conclusion, we have shown it is possible to robustly generate HPV16 E6/E7-directed T-cell lines from patients with HPV16-associated cancers. Because our technique is scalable and good-manufacturing procedures-compliant, these lines could be used for adoptive cellular immunotherapy of patients with HPV16 cancers.

  15. Effects of simultaneous knockdown of HER2 and PTK6 on malignancy and tumor progression in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ludyga, Natalie; Anastasov, Natasa; Rosemann, Michael; Seiler, Jana; Lohmann, Nadine; Braselmann, Herbert; Mengele, Karin; Schmitt, Manfred; Höfler, Heinz; Aubele, Michaela

    2013-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women of the Western world. One prominent feature of breast cancer is the co- and overexpression of HER2 and protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6). According to the current clinical cancer therapy guidelines, HER2-overexpressing tumors are routinely treated with trastuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting HER2. Approximately, 30% of HER2-overexpressing breast tumors at least initially respond to the anti-HER2 therapy, but a subgroup of these tumors develops resistance shortly after the administration of trastuzumab. A PTK6-targeted therapy does not yet exist. Here, we show for the first time that the simultaneous knockdown in vitro, compared with the single knockdown of HER2 and PTK6, in particular in the trastuzumab-resistant JIMT-1 cells, leads to a significantly decreased phosphorylation of crucial signaling proteins: mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/3 (MAPK 1/3, ERK 1/2) and p38 MAPK, and (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten) PTEN that are involved in tumorigenesis. In addition, dual knockdown strongly reduced the migration and invasion of the JIMT-1 cells. Moreover, the downregulation of HER2 and PTK6 led to an induction of p27, and the dual knockdown significantly diminished cell proliferation in JIMT-1 and T47D cells. In vivo experiments showed significantly reduced levels of tumor growth following HER2 or PTK6 knockdown. Our results indicate a novel strategy also for the treatment of trastuzumab resistance in tumors. Thus, the inhibition of these two signaling proteins may lead to a more effective control of breast cancer.

  16. MicroRNA-93 promotes the malignant phenotypes of human glioma cells and induces their chemoresistance to temozolomide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Liu, Huan; Cheng, Quan; Jiang, Bing; Peng, Renjun; Zou, Qin; Yang, Wenren; Yang, Xiaosheng; Wu, Xiaobing; Chen, Zigui

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNAs, can induce mRNA degradation or repress translation by binding to the 3′-untranslated region (UTR) of its target mRNA. Recently, some specific miRNAs, e.g. miR-93, have been found to be involved in pathological processes by targeting some oncogenes or tumor suppressors in glioma. However, the regulatory mechanism of miR-93 in the biological behaviors and chemoresistance of glioma cells remains unclear. In the present study, in situ hybridization and real-time RT-PCR data indicated that miR-93 was significantly upregulated in glioma patients (n=43) compared with normal brain tissues (n=8). Moreover, the upregulated miR-93 level was significantly associated with the advanced malignancy. We also found that upregulation of miR-93 promoted the proliferation, migration and invasion of glioma cells, and that miR-93 was involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression by mediating the protein levels of P21, P27, P53 and Cyclin D1. P21 was further identified as a direct target of miR-93. Knockdown of P21 attenuated the suppressive effects of miR-93 inhibition on cell cycle progression and colony formation. In addition, inhibition of miR-93 enhanced the chemosensitization of glioma cells to temozolomide (TMZ). Based on these above data, our study demonstrates that miR-93, upregulated in glioma, promotes the proliferation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion of human glioma cells and suppresses their chemosensitivity to TMZ. Therefore, miR-93 may become a promising diagnostic marker and therapeutic target for glioma. PMID:27185265

  17. Pleural malignancies.

    PubMed

    Vargas, F S; Teixeira, L R

    1996-07-01

    Carcinoma of the lung, metastatic breast carcinoma, and lymphoma are responsible for approximately 75% of all malignant pleural effusions. The presence of malignant cells in the pleural fluid or in the parietal pleura confirms the diagnosis. Recently, several authors have proposed the combination of morphometric procedures and quantitative analysis of nucleolar organizer regions stained by silver nitrate. Videothoracoscopy is recommended for patients suspected of having a malignant pleural effusion in whom the diagnosis is not established after two cytologic studies of the fluid and one needle biopsy. The standard treatment is the intrapleural instillation of a chemical agent to produce a pleurodesis. The recommended sclerosant is talc, a tetracycline derivative, or Corynebacterium parvum where it is available. When a patient is not an ideal candidate for chemical pleurodesis, the options include symptomatic treatment, serial thoracentesis, implantation of a pleuroperitoneal shunt, and pleurectomy. PMID:9363162

  18. Cigarette smoke induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response in normal and malignant human lung cells

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Ellen; Stinson, Andy; Shan, Lin; Yang, Jin; Gietl, Diana; Albino, Anthony P

    2008-01-01

    Background Although lung cancer is among the few malignancies for which we know the primary etiological agent (i.e., cigarette smoke), a precise understanding of the temporal sequence of events that drive tumor progression remains elusive. In addition to finding that cigarette smoke (CS) impacts the functioning of key pathways with significant roles in redox homeostasis, xenobiotic detoxification, cell cycle control, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) functioning, our data highlighted a defensive role for the unfolded protein response (UPR) program. The UPR promotes cell survival by reducing the accumulation of aberrantly folded proteins through translation arrest, production of chaperone proteins, and increased degradation. Importance of the UPR in maintaining tissue health is evidenced by the fact that a chronic increase in defective protein structures plays a pathogenic role in diabetes, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's syndromes, and cancer. Methods Gene and protein expression changes in CS exposed human cell cultures were monitored by high-density microarrays and Western blot analysis. Tissue arrays containing samples from 110 lung cancers were probed with antibodies to proteins of interest using immunohistochemistry. Results We show that: 1) CS induces ER stress and activates components of the UPR; 2) reactive species in CS that promote oxidative stress are primarily responsible for UPR activation; 3) CS exposure results in increased expression of several genes with significant roles in attenuating oxidative stress; and 4) several major UPR regulators are increased either in expression (i.e., BiP and eIF2α) or phosphorylation (i.e., phospho-eIF2α) in a majority of human lung cancers. Conclusion These data indicate that chronic ER stress and recruitment of one or more UPR effector arms upon exposure to CS may play a pivotal role in the etiology or progression of lung cancers, and that phospho-eIF2α and BiP may have diagnostic and

  19. Posterolateral approach for spinal intradural meningioma with ventral attachment

    PubMed Central

    Takami, Toshihiro; Naito, Kentaro; Yamagata, Toru; Yoshimura, Masaki; Arima, Hironori; Ohata, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal meningioma with ventral attachment is a challenging pathology. Several technical modifications have been proposed to secure safe and precise resection of these tumors. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study focused on the precise and safe surgery of spinal meningiomas with strictly ventral attachment of cervical or thoracic spine. The surgical technique included a lateral oblique position for the patient, laminectomy with unilateral medial facetectomy on the tumor side, and spinal cord rotation with the dentate ligament. The neurological status of patients was assessed using the modified McCormick functional schema (mMFS) and sensory pain scale (SPS) before and at least 3 months after surgery. Patients were followed-up for a mean of 23.7 months. Tumor removal was graded using the Simpson grade for removal of meningiomas, and the extent of excision was confirmed using early postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Simpson grade 1 or 2 resections were achieved in all cases. No major surgery-related complications were encountered, postoperatively. The mean mMFS score before surgery was 3.1, improving significantly to 1.7 after surgery (P < 0.05). The mean SPS score before surgery was 2.4, improving significantly to 1.6 after surgery (P < 0.05). Conclusions: This surgical technique offers a posterolateral surgical corridor to the ventral canal of both cervical and thoracic spine. The present preliminary analysis suggests that functional outcomes were satisfactory with minimal surgery-related complications, although considerable surgical experience is needed to achieve a high level of surgical confidence. PMID:26692694

  20. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the frontal bone mimicking meningioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Shu, Hansheng; Tian, Xuping; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Qiujian; Guo, Liemei

    2015-03-01

    Chondromyxoid fibroma (CMF) is a rare benign cartilaginous tumor that usually arises from lower-extremity long-bone metaphyses, with approximately 5.4% of all CMFs presenting in the craniofacial bones. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the frontal bone is exceedingly rare, with only a few cases reported. Herein, we report another case of CMF arising from the frontal bone mimicking meningioma. We suggest that histopathologic examination is of vital importance for the diagnosis of CMF; complete surgical resection is the best treatment option for frontal CMF.

  1. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Meningioma and Vestibular Schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral vestibular schwannomata and meningiomata are the tumours most commonly associated with neurofibromatosis type II (NF2). These tumours may also be seen in patients with schwannomatosis and familial meningioma, but these phenotypes are usually easy to distinguish. The main diagnostic challenge when managing these tumours is distinguishing between sporadic disease which carries low risk of subsequent tumours or NF2 with its associated morbidities and reduced life expectancy. This chapter outlines some of the diagnostic and management considerations along with associated evidence. PMID:27075346

  2. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the frontal bone mimicking meningioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Shu, Hansheng; Tian, Xuping; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Qiujian; Guo, Liemei

    2015-03-01

    Chondromyxoid fibroma (CMF) is a rare benign cartilaginous tumor that usually arises from lower-extremity long-bone metaphyses, with approximately 5.4% of all CMFs presenting in the craniofacial bones. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the frontal bone is exceedingly rare, with only a few cases reported. Herein, we report another case of CMF arising from the frontal bone mimicking meningioma. We suggest that histopathologic examination is of vital importance for the diagnosis of CMF; complete surgical resection is the best treatment option for frontal CMF. PMID:25748938

  3. Endoscopic Endonasal Approach for Transclival Resection of a Petroclival Meningioma: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Walter C; Anaizi, Amjad; DeKlotz, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    The endoscopic endonasal transclival approach has been widely described for its use to resect clivus chordomas, but there have only been isolated reports of its use for petroclival meningiomas. These tumors are most often resected utilizing open transpetrosal approaches, but these operations, difficult even in the hands of dedicated skull base surgeons, are particularly challenging if the meningiomas are medially-situated and positioned mainly behind the clivus. For this subset of petroclival meningiomas, a transclival approach may be preferable. We report a meningioma resected via an endoscopic endonasal transclival technique. The patient was a 63-year-old man who presented originally for medical attention because of diplopia related to an abducens palsy on the left. A workup at that time revealed a meningioma contained entirely in the left cavernous sinus, and this was treated with stereotactic radiosurgery. His symptoms resolved and his meningioma was stable on MRI for several years after treatment. The patient was then lost to follow-up until 13 years after radiosurgery when he experienced intermittent diplopia again. At this point, workup revealed a large petroclival meningioma compressing the brainstem. He underwent a successful endoscopic endonasal transclival resection of this tumor. A demonstration of the step-by-step surgical technique, discussion of the nuances of the operation, and a comparison with the open transpetrosal approaches are included in our report. PMID:27433420

  4. Gain of chromosome arm 1q in atypical meningioma correlates with shorter progression-free survival

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, M.; Mohapatra, G.; Betensky, R.A.; Keohane, C.; Louis, D.N.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Atypical (WHO grade II) meningiomas have moderately high recurrence rates; even for completely resected tumours, approximately one-third will recur. Postoperative radiotherapy (RT) may aid local control and improve survival, but carries the risk of side effects. More accurate prediction of recurrence risk is therefore needed for patients with atypical meningioma. Previously, we used high-resolution array CGH to identify genetic variations in 47 primary atypical meningiomas and found that approximately 60% of tumors show gain of 1q at 1q25.1 and 1q25.3 to 1q32.1 and that 1q gain appeared to correlate with shorter progression-free survival. This study aimed to validate and extend these findings in an independent sample. Methods 86 completely resected atypical meningiomas (with 25 recurrences) from two neurosurgical centres in Ireland were identified and clinical follow up was obtained. Utilizing a dual-colour interphase FISH assay, 1q gain was assessed using BAC probes directed against 1q25.1 and 1q32.1. Results The results confirm the high prevalence of 1q gain at these loci in atypical meningiomas. We further show that gain at 1q32.1 and age each correlate with progression-free survival in patients who have undergone complete surgical resection of atypical meningiomas. Conclusions These independent findings suggest that assessment of 1q copy number status can add clinically useful information for the management of patients with atypical meningiomas. PMID:21988727

  5. Genomic sequencing of meningiomas identifies oncogenic SMO and AKT1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Horowitz, Peleg M.; Santagata, Sandro; Jones, Robert T.; McKenna, Aaron; Getz, Gad; Ligon, Keith L.; Palescandolo, Emanuele; Van Hummelen, Paul; Ducar, Matthew D.; Raza, Alina; Sunkavalli, Ashwini; MacConaill, Laura E.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O.; Louis, David N.; Hahn, William C.; Dunn, Ian F.; Beroukhim, Rameen

    2013-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common primary nervous system tumor. The tumor suppressor NF2 is disrupted in approximately half of meningiomas1 but the complete spectrum of genetic changes remains undefined. We performed whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing on 17 meningiomas and focused sequencing on an additional 48 tumors to identify and validate somatic genetic alterations. Most meningiomas exhibited simple genomes, with fewer mutations, rearrangements, and copy-number alterations than reported in other adult tumors. However, several meningiomas harbored more complex patterns of copy-number changes and rearrangements including one tumor with chromothripsis. We confirmed focal NF2 inactivation in 43% of tumors and found alterations in epigenetic modifiers among an additional 8% of tumors. A subset of meningiomas lacking NF2 alterations harbored recurrent oncogenic mutations in AKT1 (E17K) and SMO (W535L) and exhibited immunohistochemical evidence of activation of their pathways. These mutations were present in therapeutically challenging tumors of the skull base and higher grade. These results begin to define the spectrum of genetic alterations in meningiomas and identify potential therapeutic targets. PMID:23334667

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema.

    PubMed

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten; Thomsen, Carsten; Juhler, Marianne; Laursen, Henning; Broholm, Helle

    2011-12-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common primary intracranial tumors in adults. Although meningiomas are mostly benign, more than 50% of patients with meningioma develop peritumoral brain edema (PTBE), which may be fatal because of increased intracranial pressure. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial cell-specific mitogen and angiogen. VEGF-A protein, which is identical to vascular permeability factor, is a regulator of angiogenesis. In this study, 101 patients with meningiomas, and possible co-factors to PTBE, such as meningioma subtypes and tumor location, were examined. Forty-three patients had primary, solitary, supratentorial meningiomas with PTBE. In these, correlations in PTBE, edema index, VEGF-A protein, VEGF gene expression, capillary length, and tumor water content were investigated. DNA-branched hybridization was used for measuring VEGF gene expression in tissue homogenates prepared from frozen tissue samples. The method for VEGF-A analysis resembled an ELISA assay, but was based on chemiluminescence. The edema index was positively correlated to VEGF-A protein (p = 0.014) and VEGF gene expression (p < 0.05). The capillary length in the meningiomas was positively correlated to the PTBE (p = 0.038). If VEGF is responsible for the formation of PTBE, the edema may be treated with the anti-VEGF drug Bevacizumab (Avastin), which has been shown to reduce PTBE in patients with glioblastoma multiforme. PMID:22085359

  7. Endoscopic Endonasal Approach for Transclival Resection of a Petroclival Meningioma: A Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Jean, Walter C; Felbaum, Daniel R; Anaizi, Amjad; DeKlotz, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    The endoscopic endonasal transclival approach has been widely described for its use to resect clivus chordomas, but there have only been isolated reports of its use for petroclival meningiomas. These tumors are most often resected utilizing open transpetrosal approaches, but these operations, difficult even in the hands of dedicated skull base surgeons, are particularly challenging if the meningiomas are medially-situated and positioned mainly behind the clivus. For this subset of petroclival meningiomas, a transclival approach may be preferable. We report a meningioma resected via an endoscopic endonasal transclival technique. The patient was a 63-year-old man who presented originally for medical attention because of diplopia related to an abducens palsy on the left. A workup at that time revealed a meningioma contained entirely in the left cavernous sinus, and this was treated with stereotactic radiosurgery. His symptoms resolved and his meningioma was stable on MRI for several years after treatment. The patient was then lost to follow-up until 13 years after radiosurgery when he experienced intermittent diplopia again. At this point, workup revealed a large petroclival meningioma compressing the brainstem. He underwent a successful endoscopic endonasal transclival resection of this tumor. A demonstration of the step-by-step surgical technique, discussion of the nuances of the operation, and a comparison with the open transpetrosal approaches are included in our report. PMID:27433420

  8. Intracranial meningiomas managed at Memfys hospital for neurosurgery in Enugu, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Mezue, Wilfred C; Ohaegbulam, Samuel C; Ndubuisi, Chika C; Chikani, Mark C; Achebe, David S

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The epidemiology and pathology of meningioma in Nigeria are still evolving and little has been published about this tumor in Nigeria, especially in the southeast region. The aim of this paper is to compare the characteristics of intracranial meningioma managed in our center with the pattern reported in the literature worldwide. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of prospectively recorded data of patients managed for intracranial meningioma between January 2002 and December 2010 at a Private neurosurgery Hospital in Enugu, Nigeria. We excluded patients whose histology results were inconclusive. Results: Meningiomas constituted 23.8% of all intracranial tumors seen in the period. The male to female ratio was 1:1.1. The peak age range for males and females were in the fifth and sixth decades, respectively. The most common location is the Olfactory groove in 26.5% of patients followed by convexity in 23.5%. Presentation varied with anatomical location of tumor. Patients with olfactory groove meningioma (OGM) mostly presented late with personality changes and evidence of raised ICP. Tuberculum sellar and sphenoid region tumors presented earlier with visual impairment with or without hormonal abnormalities. Seizures occurred in 30.9% of all patients and in 45% of those with convexity meningiomas. Only 57.4% of the patients were managed surgically and there was no gender difference in this group. WHO grade1 tumors were the most common histological types occurring in 84.6%. One patient had atypical meningioma and two had anaplastic tumors. Conclusion: The pattern of meningioma in our area may have geographical differences in location and histology. Childhood meningioma was rare. PMID:23188985

  9. Hematologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogstraten, B.

    1986-01-01

    The principle aim of this book is to give practical guidelines to the modern treatment of the six important hematologic malignancies. Topics considered include the treatment of the chronic leukemias; acute leukemia in adults; the myeloproliferative disorders: polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and idiopathic myelofibrosis/agnogenic myeloid metaplasia; Hodgkin's Disease; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; and Multiple Myeloma.

  10. Malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed Central

    Ben Abraham, R.; Adnet, P.; Glauber, V.; Perel, A.

    1998-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia is a rare autosomal dominant trait that predisposes affected individuals to great danger when exposed to certain anaesthetic triggering agents (such as potent volatile anaesthetics and succinylcholine). A sudden hypermetabolic reaction in skeletal muscle leading to hyperthermia and massive rhabdomyolysis can occur. The ultimate treatment is dantrolene sodium a nonspecific muscle relaxant. Certain precautions should be taken before anaesthesia of patients known to be susceptible to malignant hyperthermia. These include the prohibition of the use of triggering agents, monitoring of central body temperature and expired CO2, and immediate availability of dantrolene. In addition, careful cleansing of the anaesthesia machine of vapours of halogenated agents is recommended. If these measures are taken, the chances of an MH episode are greatly reduced. When malignant hyperthermia-does occur in the operating room, prompt recognition and treatment usually prevent a potentially fatal outcome. The most reliable test to establish susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia is currently the in vitro caffeine-halothane contracture test. It is hoped that in the future a genetic test will be available. PMID:9538480

  11. Hemostasis and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Francis, J L; Biggerstaff, J; Amirkhosravi, A

    1998-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that the hemostatic system is involved in the growth and spread of malignant disease. There is an increased incidence of thromboembolic disease in patients with cancers and hemostatic abnormalities are extremely common in such patients. Antihemostatic agents have been successfully used to treat a variety of experimental tumors, and several clinical trials in humans have been initiated. Although metastasis is undoubtedly multifactorial, intravascular coagulation activation and peritumor fibrin deposition seem to be important. The mechanisms by which hemostatic activation facilitates the malignant process remain to be completely elucidated. Of central importance may be the presence on malignant cells of tissue factor and urokinase receptor. Recent studies have suggested that these proteins, and others, may be involved at several stages of metastasis, including the key event of neovascularization. Tissue factor, the principal initiator of coagulation, may have additional roles, outside of fibrin formation, that are central to the biology of some solid tumors.

  12. Hemostasis and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Francis, J L; Biggerstaff, J; Amirkhosravi, A

    1998-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that the hemostatic system is involved in the growth and spread of malignant disease. There is an increased incidence of thromboembolic disease in patients with cancers and hemostatic abnormalities are extremely common in such patients. Antihemostatic agents have been successfully used to treat a variety of experimental tumors, and several clinical trials in humans have been initiated. Although metastasis is undoubtedly multifactorial, intravascular coagulation activation and peritumor fibrin deposition seem to be important. The mechanisms by which hemostatic activation facilitates the malignant process remain to be completely elucidated. Of central importance may be the presence on malignant cells of tissue factor and urokinase receptor. Recent studies have suggested that these proteins, and others, may be involved at several stages of metastasis, including the key event of neovascularization. Tissue factor, the principal initiator of coagulation, may have additional roles, outside of fibrin formation, that are central to the biology of some solid tumors. PMID:9579631

  13. Long-term low-dose α-particle enhanced the potential of malignant transformation in human bronchial epithelial cells through MAPK/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Weili; Xiao, Linlin; Dong, Chen; He, Mingyuan; Pan, Yan; Xie, Yuexia; Tu, Wenzhi; Fu, Jiamei; Shao, Chunlin

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Multi-exposures of 25 mGy α-ray enhanced cell proliferation, adhesion, and invasion. • MAPK/Akt but not JNK/P66 was positively correlated with cell invasive phenotypes. • LDR of α-irradiation triggers cell malignant transformation through MAPK/Akt. - Abstract: Since the wide usage of ionizing radiation, the cancer risk of low dose radiation (LDR) (<0.1 Gy) has become attractive for a long time. However, most results are derived from epidemiologic studies on atomic-bomb survivors and nuclear accidents surrounding population, and the molecular mechanism of this risk is elusive. To explore the potential of a long-term LDR-induced malignant transformation, human bronchial epithelial cells Beas-2B were fractionally irradiated with 0.025 Gy α-particles for 8 times in total and then further cultured for 1–2 months. It was found that the cell proliferation, the abilities of adhesion and invasion, and the protein expressions of p-ERK, p-Akt, especially p-P38 were not only increased in the multiply-irradiated cells but also in their offspring 1–2 months after the final exposure, indicating high potentiality of cell malignant transformation. On opposite, the expressions of p-JNK and p-P66 were diminished in the subcultures of irradiated cells and thus may play a role of negative regulation in canceration. When the cells were transferred with p38 siRNA, the LDR-induced enhancements of cell adhesion and invasion were significantly reduced. These findings suggest that long-term LDR of α-particles could enhance the potential of malignant transformation incidence in human bronchial epithelial cells through MAPK/Akt pathway.

  14. Spinal osteoblastic meningioma with hematopoiesis: radiologic-pathologic correlation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Elizabeth J; Schlauderaff, Abraham; Rand, Scott D; Eckardt, Gerald W; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-10-01

    Spinal meningiomas associated with bone formation and hematopoiesis are rare tumors with only 3 prior case reports in the literature. We describe a case report of a woman who presented with back pain and an isolated event of urinary incontinence. A calcified spinal canal mass at T8 was identified on computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging. A gross total resection of the tumor was performed and pathologic examination showed a meningioma, World Health Organization grade 1, containing bone and bone marrow elements. A review of previously reported cases and a discussion of possible mechanisms of bone and hematopoiesis development in meningioma are presented. PMID:27649951

  15. Systemic cancer metastasis in a meningioma: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lanotte, Michele; Benech, Franco; Panciani, Pier Paolo; Cassoni, Paola; Ducati, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    "Tumour-to-tumour" phenomenon is a rare event; meningioma has been reported as the most common primary intracranial tumour to harbour metastases, the majority of which arise from breast and lung carcinomas. Several hypotheses have been previously proposed to explain this occurrence, but the exact mechanisms responsible for the development of metastases in meningiomas are not known. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy could be useful to hypothesize this uncommon event, but its preoperative diagnosis remains highly difficult. Two patients are reported, with breast and renal carcinoma metastases in an intracranial meningioma. Pathogenetic mechanisms and neuroimaging features are discussed. A brief review of the literature is presented.

  16. A case of a temporal bone meningioma presenting as a serous otitis media

    PubMed Central

    De Foer, Bert; Bernaerts, Anja; Van Dinther, Joost; Parizel, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    We report the imaging features of a case of a temporal bone meningioma extending into the middle ear cavity and clinically presenting as a serous otitis media. Temporal bone meningioma extending in the mastoid or the middle ear cavity, however, is very rare. In case of unexplained or therapy-resistant serous otitis media and a nasopharyngeal tumor being ruled out, a temporal bone computed tomography (CT) should be performed. If CT findings are suggestive of a temporal bone meningioma, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination with gadolinium will confirm diagnosis and show the exact extension of the lesion. PMID:25535569

  17. Cerebral venous malformation with meningioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    MU, QINGCHUN; ZHANG, KUN; WANG, JUSTIN; SAYARI, ARASH; HUANG, HAIYAN

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old female patient was admitted to The First Hospital of Jilin University (Changchun, China) on 1st October 2011 with a 10-day history of discontinuous, whole-brain headache and a 1-year history of impaired vision and memory deterioration, accompanied by right facial numbness. Clinical signs and radiological features observed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) led to the diagnosis of an intracranial meningioma accompanied by a cerebral venous malformation (CVM). The patient underwent neurosurgical resection of the meningioma, but required no further treatment for the CVM. At a 1-year follow-up examination, the patient continued to complain of discontinuous headache. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was used to reconfirm the CVM diagnosis; however, no treatment was administered due to the high risks of treatment and only mild symptoms experienced by the patient. The present case demonstrates the efficacy of DSA for detecting the presence and specific nature of CVM, and compares the value of MRI and DSA in the diagnosis of CVM. The majority of CVM patients exhibit no clinical symptoms, and the disease prognosis is typically favorable. PMID:26998016

  18. Extra-axial isolated cerebral varix misdiagnosed as convexity meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Qian; Cui, Yan; Yi, Lei; Ouyang, Yian; Jiang, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Isolated cerebral varix is a rare cerebrovascular anomaly, which is easily misdiagnosed as other brain tumors. A 59-year-old female patient with noncontributory medical history presented with headache and insomnia for the last 2 months. Upon admission, her neurological examination was unremarkable. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-demarcated extra medullary mass, 11 × 11 mm in size, within the subdural space at the right frontal lobe. The lesion was initially interpreted as a convexity meningioma. After conducting a craniotomy on the patient, an extra-axial varix was exposed and resected subsequently. The patient's headache was resolved soon after surgery and charged without neurologic sequelae. Extra-axial isolated cerebral varix is mimicking convexity meningioma on MR images and should be considered as a differential diagnosis. The focal erosion in the inner table of the skull could be an important character of extra-axial isolated cerebral varix. An extremely round shape and smooth contour of the lesion was another important character. Isolated cerebral varix is rare vascular lesion that is treated surgically in the case of rupture or compression of adjacent structures. The information obtained with noninvasive imaging techniques should include CTA to make a clinical decision. PMID:27368037

  19. FOXM1 Upregulation Is an Early Event in Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma and it Is Enhanced by Nicotine during Malignant Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Gemenetzidis, Emilios; Bose, Amrita; Riaz, Adeel M.; Chaplin, Tracy; Young, Bryan D.; Ali, Muhammad; Sugden, David; Thurlow, Johanna K.; Cheong, Sok-Ching; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Wan, Hong; Waseem, Ahmad; Parkinson, Eric K.; Fortune, Farida; Teh, Muy-Teck

    2009-01-01

    Background Cancer associated with smoking and drinking remains a serious health problem worldwide. The survival of patients is very poor due to the lack of effective early biomarkers. FOXM1 overexpression is linked to the majority of human cancers but its mechanism remains unclear in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methodology/Principal Findings FOXM1 mRNA and protein expressions were investigated in four independent cohorts (total 75 patients) consisting of normal, premalignant and HNSCC tissues and cells using quantitative PCR (qPCR), expression microarray, immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry. Effect of putative oral carcinogens on FOXM1 transcriptional activity was dose-dependently assayed and confirmed using a FOXM1-specific luciferase reporter system, qPCR, immunoblotting and short-hairpin RNA interference. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array was used to ‘trace’ the genomic instability signature pattern in 8 clonal lines of FOXM1-induced malignant human oral keratinocytes. Furthermore, acute FOXM1 upregulation in primary oral keratinocytes directly induced genomic instability. We have shown for the first time that overexpression of FOXM1 precedes HNSCC malignancy. Screening putative carcinogens in human oral keratinocytes surprisingly showed that nicotine, which is not perceived to be a human carcinogen, directly induced FOXM1 mRNA, protein stabilisation and transcriptional activity at concentrations relevant to tobacco chewers. Importantly, nicotine also augmented FOXM1-induced transformation of human oral keratinocytes. A centrosomal protein CEP55 and a DNA helicase/putative stem cell marker HELLS, both located within a consensus loci (10q23), were found to be novel targets of FOXM1 and their expression correlated tightly with HNSCC progression. Conclusions/Significance This study cautions the potential co-carcinogenic effect of nicotine in tobacco replacement therapies. We hypothesise that aberrant upregulation

  20. Identification of Proteins Related to Epigenetic Regulation in the Malignant Transformation of Aberrant Karyotypic Human Embryonic Stem Cells by Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Yang, Yixuan; Zeng, Sicong; Tan, Yueqiu; Lu, Guangxiu; Lin, Ge

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports have demonstrated that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) tend to develop genomic alterations and progress to a malignant state during long-term in vitro culture. This raises concerns of the clinical safety in using cultured hESCs. However, transformed hESCs might serve as an excellent model to determine the process of embryonic stem cell transition. In this study, ITRAQ-based tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantify normal and aberrant karyotypic hESCs proteins from simple to more complex karyotypic abnormalities. We identified and quantified 2583 proteins, and found that the expression levels of 316 proteins that represented at least 23 functional molecular groups were significantly different in both normal and abnormal hESCs. Dysregulated protein expression in epigenetic regulation was further verified in six pairs of hESC lines in early and late passage. In summary, this study is the first large-scale quantitative proteomic analysis of the malignant transformation of aberrant karyotypic hESCs. The data generated should serve as a useful reference of stem cell-derived tumor progression. Increased expression of both HDAC2 and CTNNB1 are detected as early as the pre-neoplastic stage, and might serve as prognostic markers in the malignant transformation of hESCs. PMID:24465727

  1. Determination of hyperglycosylated human chorionic gonadotropin produced by malignant gestational trophoblastic neoplasias and male germ cell tumors using a lectin-based immunoassay and surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Lisa S.; Birken, Steven; Puett, David

    2007-01-01

    The ability to reliably detect aberrant glycosylation of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) may have profound implications for the diagnosis and monitoring of malignant gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, germ cell tumors, other malignancies, and pregnancy complications. To become a clinically useful assay, however, this discrimination of glycoforms should be possible on minimally treated biological specimens. Towards this end, we have developed a lectin-based sandwich-type immunoassay to compare the glycosylation patterns of hCG among urine specimens from patients presenting with a normal pregnancy, invasive mole, choriocarcinoma, and male germ cell tumors using carbohydrate-free antibody fragments as capture reagents and a panel of eight lectins, five recognizing neutral sugars and three recognizing sialic acid. There was no significant difference in the binding of any of the lectins to hCG in the urine of women over the gestational range of 6 – 38 weeks. Three lectins, however, exhibited differential binding to urinary hCG derived from these normal pregnant controls and that from patients with malignant forms of gestational trophoblastic disease and male germ cell tumors. Galanthus nivalis agglutinin and Maackia amurensis lectin, which bind terminal mannose and α(2–3)sialic acid, respectively, preferentially bound pregnancy-derived hCG, whereas the lectin, wheat germ agglutinin, which binds sialic acid and β(1–4)N-acetylglucosamine, exhibited decreased binding to pregnancy-derived hCG compared to that from patients with male germ cell tumors and malignant gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. The differential binding observed with these three promising lectins is most encouraging and warrants further examination. The experimental paradigm also holds promise for the development of comparable assays for other glycosylated tumor markers. PMID:17081681

  2. Unilateral vocal cord palsy and dysphagia: an unusual presentation of cerebellopontine angle meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Andrew; Douglas, James Andrew; Thompson, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumours are the most common neoplasms in the posterior fossa, accounting for 5–10% of intracranial tumours. Most CPA tumours are benign, with most being vestibular schwannomas. Meningiomas arising from the jugular foramen are among the rarest of all with very few being described in the literature. Treatment options vary considerably as experience with these tumours is limited. One option is a skull base approach, but this depends on size, location and ability to preserve lower cranial nerve function. This can be extremely challenging and is accompanied by high mortality risk; therefore, a more conservative option must be considered. This case report highlights the difficulty in management of patients with jugular fossa meningiomas, including appropriate investigations, analysis of surgical versus conservative treatment and associated complications. Furthermore, we elaborate the decision-making process pertaining to the tailoring of the surgical route used for the resection of jugular foramen meningiomas. (Jugular Foramen Meningioma, cerebellopontine angle). PMID:26486157

  3. Meningioma: The role of a foreign body and irradiation in tumor formation

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, J.; Silberstein, H.J.; Salner, A.L.; Uphoff, D.F. )

    1991-07-01

    A case of meningioma is reported. At the age of 18 years, the patient had undergone insertion of a Torkildsen shunt through a posteroparietal burr hole for obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to a tumor of the pineal region, of which no biopsy had been made. After the hydrocephalus was relieved, he underwent irradiation of the tumor. Thirty years later, he was treated for an intracranial meningioma wrapped around the shunt. The tumor followed the shunt in all of its intracranial course. Microscopy disclosed pieces of the shunt tube within the meningioma. The role of a foreign body and irradiation in the induction of meningiomas is discussed, and a comprehensive review of the literature is presented. 47 references.

  4. Regression of Intracranial Meningioma during Treatment with α1-Adrenoceptor Blocker

    PubMed Central

    Hoegestoel, Einar August; Berg-Johnsen, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Background Regression of meningioma has been reported after hemorrhage or hormonal withdrawal. Here, we report a case of an incidentally diagnosed meningioma that regressed in association with α1-adrenoceptor antagonist. Case report A 59-year old male patient with an incidentally diagnosed lateral sphenoid wing meningioma was followed with serial magnetic resonance imaging. The tumor with a maximum diameter of 43 mm showed progressive regression, and after 3 years the size was reduced to 22% of the initial volume. During follow-up the patient was treated with an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist (tamsulosin) for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Possible mechanisms are discussed, including our main hypothesis of reduced mitogenic effects through phospholipase C-signal transduction. Conclusion This is the first report of regression of an incidentally diagnosed meningioma associated with α1-adrenoceptor antagonist treatment. PMID:27175325

  5. Unilateral proptosis and blindness caused by meningioma in a patient treated with cyproterone acetate

    PubMed Central

    Sys, Celine; Kestelyn, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Cyproterone has antiandrogenic, antigonadotropic, and progestagenic activity. High-dose preparations are used for treatment of prostate cancer and for treatment of hypersexuality. We describe a patient who was referred to our clinic with slowly progressive unilateral proptosis and blindness of the left eye. He had been treated with high-dose cyproterone actate (CPA) for 23 years. An obvious proptosis and exodeviation of his left eye was noted on ophthalmic examination. Fundoscopy showed left optic atrophy. The literature suggests a link between long-term high-dose exogenous progesterone agonist exposure and the progression and/or development of meningioma. MRI of the brain was performed and revealed multiple meningiomas. One large meningioma located in the anterior temporal lobe extended into the left orbit and caused the proptosis and blindness. Treatment with CPA was stopped and follow-up imaging 11 months later showed a significant decrease in size of the largest meningiomas.

  6. Endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for resection of a coexistent pituitary macroadenoma and a tuberculum sellae meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Mahvash, Mehran; Igressa, Ahadi; Pechlivanis, Ioannis; Weber, Friedrich; Charalampaki, Patra

    2014-01-01

    The coexistence of a pituitary macroadenoma and a tuberculum sellae meningioma is very rare. This article demonstrates the surgical technique of the simultaneous resection of a pituitary macroadenoma and a tuberculum sellae meningioma using an endoscopic, endonasal, biportal, transsphenoidal approach. A 36-year-old woman presented with frontal headache and extended visual field loss of the right eye. She underwent cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealing a 2 × 2 × 2.5 mm contrast-enhancing intrasellar and suprasellar lesion with compression of the optic chiasma. The coexistence of a pituitary macroadenoma and meningioma was suggested. A biportal endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach was performed to remove both lesions. The histological results confirmed the coexistence of the pituitary macroadenoma and meningioma, World Health Organization (WHO) grade I. The endoscopic, endonasal, transsphenoidal approach is a safe and reliable minimal invasive surgical alternative for resection of the intra-, supra- and parasellar lesions, avoiding additional craniotomy. PMID:25685225

  7. Genetic/molecular alterations of meningiomas and the signaling pathways targeted

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Patrícia; González-Tablas, María; Otero, Álvaro; Pascual, Daniel; Ruiz, Laura; Miranda, David; Sousa, Pablo; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Lopes, María Celeste; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, María Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Meningiomas are usually considered to be benign central nervous system tumors; however, they show heterogenous clinical, histolopathological and cytogenetic features associated with a variable outcome. In recent years important advances have been achieved in the identification of the genetic/molecular alterations of meningiomas and the signaling pathways involved. Thus, monosomy 22, which is often associated with mutations of the NF2 gene, has emerged as the most frequent alteration of meningiomas; in addition, several other genes (e.g. AKT1, KLF4, TRAF7, SMO) and chromosomes have been found to be recurrently altered often in association with more complex karyotypes and involvement of multiple signaling pathways. Here we review the current knowledge about the most relevant genes involved and the signaling pathways targeted by such alterations. In addition, we summarize those proposals that have been made so far for classification and prognostic stratification of meningiomas based on their genetic/genomic features. PMID:25965831

  8. Meningiomas and Proteomics: Focus on New Potential Biomarkers and Molecular Pathways.

    PubMed

    Abbritti, Rosaria Viola; Polito, Francesca; Cucinotta, Maria; Lo Giudice, Claudio; Caffo, Maria; Tomasello, Chiara; Germanò, Antonino; Aguennouz, Mohammed

    Meningiomas are one of the most common tumors affecting the central nervous system, exhibiting a great heterogeneity in grading, treatment and molecular background. This article provides an overview of the current literature regarding the molecular aspect of meningiomas. Analysis of potential biomarkers in serum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and pathological tissues was reported. Applying bioinformatic methods and matching the common proteic profile, arising from different biological samples, we highlighted the role of nine proteins, particularly related to tumorigenesis and grading of meningiomas: serpin peptidase inhibitor alpha 1, ceruloplasmin, hemopexin, albumin, C3, apolipoprotein, haptoglobin, amyloid-P-component serum and alpha-1-beta-glycoprotein. These proteins and their associated pathways, including complement and coagulation cascades, plasma lipoprotein particle remodeling and lipid metabolism could be considered possible diagnostic, prognostic biomarkers, and eventually therapeutic targets. Further investigations are needed to better characterize the role of these proteins and pathways in meningiomas. The role of new therapeutic strategies are also discussed. PMID:27566655

  9. Differential Diagnosis of Meningeal SFT-HPC and Meningioma: Which Immunohistochemical Markers Should Be Used?

    PubMed

    Macagno, Nicolas; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Mokthari, Karima; Metellus, Philippe; Jouvet, Anne; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Loundou, Anderson; Bouvier, Corinne

    2016-02-01

    Meningeal solitary fibrous tumors-hemangiopericytomas (SFT-HPC) and meningiomas can be difficult to distinguish on histologic examination. STAT6 immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a reliable diagnostic marker of SFT-HPCs. Recently, GRIA2 has also been reported to be a diagnostic marker of SFT-HPC, although no extensive data are available for meningeal SFT-HPCs yet. The aim of this study was to test their diagnostic performance in a large cohort of SFT-HPCs and meningiomas. IHC analyses for GRIA2 and STAT6 were performed on tissue microarrays containing 76 SFT-HPCs and 181 meningiomas. Results were compared with previous data with ALDH1 and CD34. Two different anti-STAT6 antibodies were tested: SC-20 polyclonal and YE361 monoclonal antibody. Ninety-six percent of meningeal SFT-HPCs but no meningioma displayed nuclear STAT6 positivity. With SC-20 antibody, concomitant cytoplasmic staining for STAT6 was observed in >50% of all cases, including meningiomas. However, using YE361 antibody, cytoplasmic staining was absent, and nuclear signal intensity was stronger leading to better interpretation of STAT6 IHC. GRIA2 was positive in 84% of SFT-HPCs and in 16% of meningiomas. STAT6 had excellent sensitivity (96%) and specificity (100%), ALDH1 and GRIA2 had same sensitivity (84%), but ALDH1 and CD34 had better specificity than GRIA2 (97% and 96% vs. 84%, respectively). For the differential diagnosis of SFT-HPCs versus meningiomas, the best diagnostic approach is to perform STAT6, followed by ALDH1 and CD34 in the case of uncommon STAT6-negative cases. Because of meningioma positivity, GRIA2 seems less useful in this indication. PMID:26448189

  10. Probable Drug-Related Meningioma Detected During the Course of Medication Review Services.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Christopher P

    2016-09-01

    There is evidence to support a link between treatment with high-dose cyproterone acetate and the development of meningioma. This report describes a case where an elderly man with intellectual disability who was treated with cyproterone for problematic sexual behavior developed a meningioma. The case was the subject of a residential medication management review provided under the auspices of a program funded by the Commonwealth Government of Australia. A discussion of clinical and ethical implications of the case is provided. PMID:27636874

  11. Differential Diagnosis of Meningeal SFT-HPC and Meningioma: Which Immunohistochemical Markers Should Be Used?

    PubMed

    Macagno, Nicolas; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Mokthari, Karima; Metellus, Philippe; Jouvet, Anne; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Loundou, Anderson; Bouvier, Corinne

    2016-02-01

    Meningeal solitary fibrous tumors-hemangiopericytomas (SFT-HPC) and meningiomas can be difficult to distinguish on histologic examination. STAT6 immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a reliable diagnostic marker of SFT-HPCs. Recently, GRIA2 has also been reported to be a diagnostic marker of SFT-HPC, although no extensive data are available for meningeal SFT-HPCs yet. The aim of this study was to test their diagnostic performance in a large cohort of SFT-HPCs and meningiomas. IHC analyses for GRIA2 and STAT6 were performed on tissue microarrays containing 76 SFT-HPCs and 181 meningiomas. Results were compared with previous data with ALDH1 and CD34. Two different anti-STAT6 antibodies were tested: SC-20 polyclonal and YE361 monoclonal antibody. Ninety-six percent of meningeal SFT-HPCs but no meningioma displayed nuclear STAT6 positivity. With SC-20 antibody, concomitant cytoplasmic staining for STAT6 was observed in >50% of all cases, including meningiomas. However, using YE361 antibody, cytoplasmic staining was absent, and nuclear signal intensity was stronger leading to better interpretation of STAT6 IHC. GRIA2 was positive in 84% of SFT-HPCs and in 16% of meningiomas. STAT6 had excellent sensitivity (96%) and specificity (100%), ALDH1 and GRIA2 had same sensitivity (84%), but ALDH1 and CD34 had better specificity than GRIA2 (97% and 96% vs. 84%, respectively). For the differential diagnosis of SFT-HPCs versus meningiomas, the best diagnostic approach is to perform STAT6, followed by ALDH1 and CD34 in the case of uncommon STAT6-negative cases. Because of meningioma positivity, GRIA2 seems less useful in this indication.

  12. Triad of Intraspinal Meningioma, Schwannoma, and Ependymoma: Report of an Extremely Rare Case.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Faiza; Fatima, Saira; Ahmad, Zubair

    2016-02-01

    Mixed tumors composed of schwannoma and meningioma are extremely rare and are usually associated with neurofibromatosis type 2. So far, all the cases reported have involved the cerebellopontine angle. Only 3 reported cases did not have a clear association with neurofibromatosis type 2. We report a mixed tumor comprising schwannoma admixed with meningioma and ependymoma in the cervical spinal cord of a 22-year-old male. PMID:26316051

  13. Characterization of chromosome 14 abnormalities by interphase in situ hybridization and comparative genomic hybridization in 124 meningiomas: correlation with clinical, histopathologic, and prognostic features.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, María Dolores; Espinosa, Ana Belén; Maíllo, Angel; Sayagués, José María; Alguero, María del Carmen; Lumbreras, Eva; Díaz, Pedro; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Onzain, Ignacio; Merino, Marta; Morales, Francisco; Orfao, Alberto

    2005-05-01

    We analyzed quantitative chromosome 14 abnormalities in 124 meningiomas by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (iFISH) and confirmed the nature of abnormalities by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). We correlated the abnormalities with clinical, histopathologic, and prognostic factors. Of 124 cases, 50 (40.3%) showed loss (14.5%) or gain (25.8%) of the 14q32 chromosome region by iFISH. Most corresponded to numeric abnormalities: monosomy (12.9%), trisomy (1.6%), or tetrasomy (24.2%); in only 2 cases (1.6%), chromosome 14 loss did not involve the whole chromosome and was restricted to the 14q31-q32 region (confirmed by CGH). Cases with gain or monosomy corresponded more frequently to histologically malignant tumors (P = .009). Patients with monosomy 14/14q-, but not those with gain, more often were male (P = .04) and had a greater incidence of recurrence (P = .003) and shorter relapse-free survival (P = .03). The 2 patients with loss limited to 14q31-q32 had histologically benign tumors and no relapse after more than 5 years' follow-up. Most meningiomas with chromosome 14 abnormalities have numeric changes, with interstitial deletions of 14q31-q32 present in few cases. Of the abnormalities detected, only monosomy 14 showed an adverse prognostic impact. PMID:15981814

  14. Reappraisal of p53 mutations in human malignant astrocytic neoplasms by p53 functional assay: comparison with conventional structural analyses.

    PubMed

    Tada, M; Iggo, R D; Waridel, F; Nozaki, M; Matsumoto, R; Sawamura, Y; Shinohe, Y; Ikeda, J; Abe, H

    1997-03-01

    We previously reported clonal expansion of p53 mutations in malignant astrocytic tumors detected with a yeast p53 functional assay that measures mutant p53 alleles quantitatively and loss of p53 transcriptional competence qualitatively (Tada et al., Int J Cancer 67:447-450, 1996). This method selectively detects inactivating mutations and is relatively insensitive to contamination of tumor samples with normal tissue. To determine whether the mutation frequency and spectrum detected in this way differ from those seen with conventional techniques, 54 malignant astrocytomas were tested with the yeast assay, and the abnormalities detected were characterized by DNA sequencing. Inactivating p53 mutations were found in 67% of anaplastic astrocytomas and 41% of glioblastomas. Overall, mutations were found in 48% of tumors, compared with only 29% in previous studies (P < 0.005), a difference that probably reflects the greater sensitivity of the yeast assay than of conventional techniques. The frequency of mutations in anaplastic astrocytomas (in our study plus published studies) was significantly higher than in glioblastomas (39% vs 29%; P < 0.05). This suggests that acquisition of p53 mutations is not rate limiting for progression to glioblastoma and that many glioblastomas develop by p53-independent pathways. Sequencing of mutant p53 cDNAs rescued from yeast showed that the mutation spectrum for functionally inactive mutants was nearly identical to the spectra from previous studies on structural mutants, indicating that transcriptional activity is the critical biological target of p53 mutation in malignant astrocytomas.

  15. Underexpression of LKB1 tumor suppressor is associated with enhanced Wnt signaling and malignant characteristics of human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinghan; Zhang, Keqiang; Wang, Jinhui; Wu, Xiwei; Liu, Xiyong; Li, Bin; Zhu, Yan; Yu, Yong; Cheng, Qingbao; Hu, Zhenli; Guo, Chao; Hu, Shuya; Mu, Bing; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Li, Jie; Smith, Lynne; Yang, Lu; Liu, Qi; Chu, Peiguo; Chang, Vincent; Zhang, Baihe; Wu, Mengchao; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Yen, Yun

    2015-08-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is a rare and highly aggressive malignancy. In this study, we identified the presence of gene deletion and missense mutation leading to inactivation or underexpression of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor and excluded the involvement of LKB1 gene hypermethylation in ICC tissues. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that LKB1 was underexpressed in a portion of 326 ICC tissues compared to their adjacent normal tissues. By statistical analysis underexpression of LKB1 in ICC tissues significantly correlated with poor survival and malignant disease characteristics in ICC patients. Moreover, we showed that knockdown of LKB1 significantly enhanced growth, migration, and invasion of three LKB1-competent ICC cell lines. Global transcriptional profiling analysis identified multiple malignancy-promoting genes, such as HIF-1α, CD24, Talin1, Vinculin, Wnt5, and signaling pathways including Hedgehog, Wnt/β-catenin, and cell adhesion as novel targets of LKB1 underexpression in ICC cells. Furthermore, knockdown of LKB1 gene expression dramatically enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling in ICC cells, while an inverse correlation between LKB1 and nuclear β-catenin was observed in ICC tissues. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism for ICC carcinogenesis in which LKB1 underexpression enhances multiple signaling pathways including Wnt/β-catenin to promote disease progression.

  16. Application of oncogenetic trees mixtures as a biostatistical model of the clonal cytogenetic evolution of meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Ketter, Ralf; Urbschat, Steffi; Henn, Wolfram; Feiden, Wolfgang; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Lengauer, Thomas; Steudel, Wolf-Ingo; Zang, Klaus D; Rahnenführer, Jörg

    2007-10-01

    Meningiomas are mostly benign tumors that originate from the coverings of brain and spinal cord. Typically, they reveal a normal karyotype or monosomy for chromosome 22. Rare clinical progression of meningiomas is associated with a nonrandom pattern of secondary losses of other autosomes. Deletion of the short arm of one chromosome 1 appears to be a decisive step for anaplastic growth in meningiomas. We calculated an oncogenetic tree model that estimates the most likely cytogenetic pathways of 661 meningioma patients in terms of accumulation of somatic chromosome changes in tumor cells. The genetic progression score (GPS) estimates the genetic status of a tumor as progression in the corresponding tumor cells along this model. Large GPS values are highly correlated with early recurrence of meningiomas [p < 10(-4)]. This correlation holds even if patients are stratified by WHO grade. We show that tumor location also has an impact on genetic progression. Clinical relevance of the GPS is thus demonstrated with respect to origin, WHO grade and recurrence of the tumor. As a quantitative measure the GPS allows a more precise assessment of the prognosis of meningiomas than categorical cytogenetic markers based on single chromosomal aberrations.

  17. The heterogeneity of meningioma revealed by multiparameter analysis: infiltrative and non-infiltrative clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gay, Emmanuel; Lages, Elodie; Ramus, Claire; Guttin, Audrey; El Atifi, Michèle; Dupré, Isabelle; Bouamrani, Ali; Salon, Caroline; Ratel, David; Wion, Didier; Berger, François; Issartel, Jean-Paul

    2011-05-01

    Tumor invasion or infiltration of adjacent tissues is the source of clinical challenges in diagnosis as well as prevention and treatment. Among brain tumors, infiltration of the adjacent tissues with diverse pleiotropic mechanisms is frequently encountered in benign meningiomas. We assessed whether a multiparametric analysis of meningiomas based on data from both clinical observations and molecular analyses could provide a consistent and accurate appraisal of invasive and infiltrative phenotypes and help determine the diagnosis of these tumors. Tissue analyses of 37 meningiomas combined enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (SELDI-TOF) assays of two different protein biomarkers (thrombospondin 1 and a phosphorylated form of vimentin) as well as gene expression analyses with oligonucleotide micro-arrays. Up to four different clinical and molecular parameters were then examined for tumor classification. From this study, we were able to cluster 36 out of the 37 tumors into two different subsets corresponding to infiltrative/invasive and non-infiltrative tumors. In addition, meningiomas that invade brain and those that infiltrate the neighboring skull bone exhibited no distinguishable molecular features. Our multi-parameter analysis that combines clinical data, transcriptomic and molecular assays clearly reveals the heterogeneity of meningiomas and distinguishes the intrinsically infiltrative/invasive tumors from the non-infiltrative meningiomas. PMID:21318223

  18. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase in Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, Rodney E.; Mayhall, Kim; Maxwell, Nicole M.; Kandil, Emad

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthesis. Both intracellular and extracellular Nampt (iNampt and eNampt) levels are increased in several human malignancies and some studies demonstrate increased iNampt in more aggressive/invasive tumors and in tumor metastases. Several different molecular targets have been identified that promote carcinogenesis following iNampt overexpression, including SirT1, CtBP, and PARP-1. Additionally, eNampt is elevated in several human cancers and is often associated with a higher tumor stage and worse prognoses. Here we review the roles of Nampt in malignancy, some of the known mechanisms by which it promotes carcinogenesis, and discuss the possibility of employing Nampt inhibitors in cancer treatment. PMID:24386506

  19. Risk factors predicting recurrence in patients operated on for intracranial meningioma. A multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Ayerbe, J; Lobato, R D; de la Cruz, J; Alday, R; Rivas, J J; Gómez, P A; Cabrera, A

    1999-01-01

    The authors undertook a follow-up study of 286 patients who underwent surgical treatment for intracranial meningioma between 1973 and 1994, in order to analyse clinical, radiological, topographic, histopathological and therapeutic factors significantly influencing tumour recurrence. All patients were followed by using either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance from 3 months to 17 years since first surgery (mean follow-up: 4.1 years). Forty-four (15.4%) recurrences were detected during this time period. Overall recurrence rates were 14%, 37% and 61% at 5, 10 and 15 years, respectively. Factors significantly associated with tumour relapse in bivariate analysis were: tumour location at petroclival and parasagittal (middle third) regions, incomplete surgical resection (assessed by Simpson's classification), atypical and malignant histological types (WHO classification), presence of nucleolar prominence, presence of more than 2 mitosis per 10 high-power fields, and heterogeneous tumour contrast enhancement on the CT scan. The multivariate analysis using the Cox's proportional hazards model identified the following risk factors for recurrence: incomplete surgical resection (Relative risk: 2.2; 95% Confidence interval: 1.33-3.64), non conventional histological type (RR: 2.13; 95%CI: 1-4.53), heterogeneous contrast enhancement on the CT scan (RR: 2.25; 95%CI: 1.1-4.72) and presence of more than 2 mitosis per 10 high-power fields (RR: 2.28; 95%CI: 0.99-5.27). Patients without any of these features showed low recurrence rates (4% and 18% at 5 and 10 years), and thus, they need less clinical and radiological controls through the follow-up than patients with some of these risk factors. PMID:10526073

  20. Malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Cantin, R Y; Poole, A; Ryan, J F

    1986-10-01

    The increasing use of intravenous and inhalation sedation in the dental office has the potential of increasing the incidence of malignant hyperthermia (MH) in susceptible subjects. The object of this article is to present two cases of MH and to discuss its pathophysiology, its clinical picture, and its management in the light of the current literature. Stringent screening procedures should be adopted and maintained in order to channel suspected cases to appropriate centers for expert consultation and management. It is further advocated that a program of education for patients and their families be instituted, as it is an essential prerequisite of effective prophylaxis. PMID:2946013

  1. Laser-induced photodynamic therapy with aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate as the photosensitizer: Differential phototoxicity in normal and malignant human cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Glassberg, E.; Lewandowski, L.; Lask, G.; Uitto, J. )

    1990-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the use of laser or noncoherent light energy with photosensitizing dyes to induce a cytotoxic reaction in the target cells, resulting in cell injury and/or death. In this study, we have examined laser-induced phototoxicity in normal human skin fibroblasts and HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells incubated with aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (AlPcS) in vitro. The culture, laser, and photosensitizer parameters were varied in attempts to establish the conditions for differential cytotoxicity between normal and malignant human fibroblasts. Biochemical assays, as a measure of cytotoxicity, included (3H)thymidine incorporation (an index of DNA replication), (35S)methionine incorporation (a measure of protein synthetic activity), and the MTT assay (an indirect index of mitochondrial activity). In the absence of laser irradiation, AlPcS was non-toxic to both cell lines in concentrations up to 25 micrograms/ml. Laser light alone at 675 nm (the absorption maximum of AlPcS) had no effect on the cells at energy densities up to 16 J/cm2. In the presence of 3 or 10 micrograms/ml of AlPcS, both cell lines demonstrated marked energy-dependent toxicity. If an 8-h or a 24-h efflux period in AlPcS-free medium was allowed to take place prior to laser irradiation, normal fibroblasts were much less sensitive to PDT, whereas fibrosarcoma cells still exhibited a marked degree of toxicity. The results indicate that, under appropriate treatment conditions, AlPcS is capable of preferentially sensitizing a malignant mesenchymal cell line, while sparing its non-malignant normal cell counterpart.

  2. Primary Intracranial Myoepithelial Neoplasm: A Potential Mimic of Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Choy, Bonnie; Pytel, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Myoepithelial neoplasms were originally described in the salivary glands but their spectrum has been expanding with reports in other locations, including soft tissue. Intracranial cases are exceptionally rare outside the sellar region where they are assumed to be arising from Rathke pouch rests. Two cases of pediatric intracranial myoepithelial neoplasm in the interhemispheric fissure and the right cerebral hemisphere are reported here. Imaging studies suggest that the second case was associated with cerebrospinal fluid dissemination. Both cases showed typical variation in morphology and immunophenotype between more epithelioid and more mesenchymal features. The differential diagnosis at this particular anatomic location includes meningioma, which can show some overlap in immunophenotype since both tumors express EMA as well as GLUT1. One case was positive for EWSR1 rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization. One patient is disease free at last follow-up while the other succumbed to the disease within days illustrating the clinical spectrum of these tumors.

  3. Intracranial meningiomas, the VEGF-A pathway, and peritumoral brain oedema.

    PubMed

    Nassehi, Damoun

    2013-04-01

    Meningiomas are the second-most common intracranial tumours in adults. They are derived from the arachnoid cells, and although approximately 90% of meningiomas are benign, more than half of all meningiomas develop peritumoral brain oedema (PTBE), which increases morbidity. The PTBE can be treated with steroid therapy, but this treatment is not specific, is not always effective, and involves long-term side-effects. Meningiomas are treated with radiation therapy, stereotactic radio-surgery or surgical resection. At the moment surgical resection is the only definite treatment, and the removal of the tumour also removes the PTBE. Based on the localization of the meningioma, surgery can be complicated. Although PTBE around meningiomas is frequent, the mechanisms behind its development are not clearly understood. It is believed that due to tumour growth and local tissue hypoxia, angiogenesis is increased and leads to the formation of PTBE. The angiogenic protein vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is believed to be involved in the formation of PTBE around meningiomas, as several studies have found that it is increased in meningiomas with PTBE. VEGF-A is also known as vascular permeability factor due to its ability to increase the permeability of capillaries. Paper I examines the VEGF-A protein and mRNA levels in 101 intracranial meningiomas. The PTBE is quantified on MRI, and capillary length and tumour water content are measured and compared to control brain tissue. Possible co-factors to PTBE like meningioma localization and subtypes are also examined. Forty-three of the patients have primary, solitary, supratentorial meningiomas with PTBE. The correlation between PTBE or edema index with the VEGF-A protein and mRNA, capillary length, and tumour water content is investigated in these patients. A novel method is used for mRNA quantification. It involves direct amplification of the mRNA with probes and branched DNA in order to produce a chemiluminescence signal

  4. Malignant hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is an uncommon, life-threatening pharmacogenetic disorder of the skeletal muscle. It presents as a hypermetabolic response in susceptible individuals to potent volatile anesthetics with/without depolarizing muscle relaxants; in rare cases, to stress from exertion or heat stress. Susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia (MHS) is inherited as an autosomally dominant trait with variable expression and incomplete penetrance. It is known that the pathophysiology of MH is related to an uncontrolled rise of myoplasmic calcium, which activates biochemical processes resulting in hypermetabolism of the skeletal muscle. In most cases, defects in the ryanodine receptor are responsible for the functional changes of calcium regulation in MH, and more than 300 mutations have been identified in the RYR1 gene, located on chromosome 19q13.1. The classic signs of MH include increase of end-tidal carbon dioxide, tachycardia, skeletal muscle rigidity, tachycardia, hyperthermia and acidosis. Up to now, muscle contracture test is regarded as the gold standard for the diagnosis of MHS though molecular genetic test is used, on a limited basis so far to diagnose MHS. The mortality of MH is dramatically decreased from 70-80% to less than 5%, due to an introduction of dantrolene sodium for treatment of MH, early detection of MH episode using capnography, and the introduction of diagnostic testing for MHS. This review summarizes the clinically essential and important knowledge of MH, and presents new developments in the field. PMID:23198031

  5. Sialylation and glycosylation modulate cell adhesion and invasion to extracellular matrix in human malignant lymphoma: Dependency on integrin and the Rho GTPase family.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi; Hashimoto, Yuko

    2015-12-01

    To determine the biological roles of cell surface glycosylation, we modified the surface glycosylation of human malignant lymphoma cell lines using glycosylation inhibitors. The O-glycosylation inhibitor, benzyl-α-GalNAc (BZ) enhanced the fibronectin adhesion of HBL-8 cells, a human Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, and of H-ALCL cells, a human anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line, both of which were established in our laboratory. The N-glycosylation inhibitor, tunicamycin (TM) inhibited the surface expression of Phaseolus vulgaris leukoagglutinating (L-PHA) lectin- and Canavalia ensiformis (ConA) lectin-reactive oligosaccharides in the HBL-8 cell line. Assay of the adhesion of HBL-8 cells to fibronectin showed that fibronectin adhesion is mediated by the integrin very late antigen (VLA)-4 and that not only BZ but also TM treatment enhanced HBL-8 cell adhesion to fibronectin. Furthermore, although BZ treatment also enhanced H-ALCL cell adhesion to fibronectin, this effect was not mediated by VLA-5 or the RGD sequence of fibronectin. We also showed that H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-3 was enhanced by pre-treatment with neuraminidase, which cleaves cell surface sialic acid. Additionally, H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-3 was inhibited by pre‑treatment with the RGD peptide suggesting that cell adhesion to galectin-3 is mediated by integrin (VLA-5). Furthermore, H-ALCL cell invasion of galectin-1 and galectin-3 was inhibited by pre-treatment with the RGD peptide. Therefore, cell adhesion to and invasion of galectin-1 and galectin-3 are integrin-dependent. In addition to these findings, cell adhesion to galectin-3 was markedly inhibited by treatment with β-lactose compared to treatment with sucrose. Therefore, interactions between integrins and galectin-3 may be mediated through β-galactose that is linked to glycans of integrins. AZA1, an inhibitor of Ras homolog oncoprotein (Rho) GTPase family proteins, RAS-related C3 botulinus toxin substrate 1 (Rac 1) and

  6. Deoxycytidine kinase-mediated toxicity of deoxyadenosine analogs toward malignant human lymphoblasts in vitro and toward murine L1210 leukemia in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Carson, D A; Wasson, D B; Kaye, J; Ullman, B; Martin, D W; Robins, R K; Montgomery, J A

    1980-01-01

    An inherited deficiency of adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) produces selective lymphopenia and immunodeficiency disease in humans. Previous experiments have suggested that lymphospecific toxicity in this condition might result from the selective accumulation of toxic deoxyadenosine nucleotides by lymphocytes with high deoxycytidine kinase, levels and low deoxynucleotide dephosphorylating activity. The present experiments were designed to determine if deoxyadenosine analogs which are not substrates for adenosine deaminase might similarly be toxic toward lymphocytes and lymphoid tumors. Two such compounds, 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine and 2-fluorodeoxyadenosine, at concentrations of 3 nM and 0.15 microM, respectively, inhibited by 50% the growth of human CCRF-CEM malignant lymphoblasts in vitro. Each was phosphorylated in intact cells by deoxycytidine kinase accumulated as the nucleoside triphosphate, and inhibited DNA synthesis more than RNA synthesis. Both deoxynucleosides had significant chemotherapeutic activity against lymphoid leukemia L1210 in mice. PMID:6256765

  7. Molecular cloning and characterization of the human folate-binding protein cDNA from placenta and malignant tissue culture (KB) cells.

    PubMed

    Elwood, P C

    1989-09-01

    Human folate-binding proteins (FBPs) are single chain glycoproteins that contain a high affinity binding site for folates and methotrexate and occur in a soluble or membrane-associated form. The membrane-associated FBP is involved in the uptake of physiologic folates and methotrexate. In this study, human FBP cDNA clones were isolated from human malignant nasopharyngeal carcinoma (KB) cell and placental cDNA libraries by means of oligonucleotide probes derived from determined internal amino acid sequences. The longest cDNA nucleotide sequence is 1126 base pairs and encodes a polypeptide that contains 257 amino acid residues (calculated molecular mass = 29,817). The deduced amino acid sequence is 80% homologous to a bovine soluble FBP, is greater than 99% homologous to the reported partial amino acid sequence of the human soluble FBP, contains three potential N-linked glycosylation sites, and has hydrophobic amino- and carboxylterminal regions which are consistent with a signal peptide and a potential membrane-anchoring domain, respectively. On Northern blot analysis, radiolabeled cDNA probes hybridize to a single 1100-base pair mRNA species that is expressed to a variable degree in human KB cells, placenta, brain, and epithelial mRNA but is not detectable in human liver mRNA. In vitro translation of RNA transcripts from the FBP cDNA inserts yields a 30-kDa and a 42-kDa polypeptide in the absence and presence of microsomal membranes, respectively. PMID:2768245

  8. Telomerase Activation in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ropio, Joana; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Soares, Paula; Chevret, Edith

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase expression and telomere maintenance are critical for cell proliferation and survival, and they play important roles in development and cancer, including hematological malignancies. Transcriptional regulation of the rate-limiting subunit of human telomerase reverse transcriptase gen (hTERT) is a complex process, and unveiling the mechanisms behind its reactivation is an important step for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here, we review the main mechanisms of telomerase activation and the associated hematologic malignancies. PMID:27618103

  9. Telomerase Activation in Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ropio, Joana; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Soares, Paula; Chevret, Edith

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase expression and telomere maintenance are critical for cell proliferation and survival, and they play important roles in development and cancer, including hematological malignancies. Transcriptional regulation of the rate-limiting subunit of human telomerase reverse transcriptase gen (hTERT) is a complex process, and unveiling the mechanisms behind its reactivation is an important step for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here, we review the main mechanisms of telomerase activation and the associated hematologic malignancies. PMID:27618103

  10. Genetics and biology of human ovarian teratomas. III. Cytogenetics and origins of malignant ovarian germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Hoffner, L; Shen-Schwarz, S; Deka, R; Chakravarti, A; Surti, U

    1992-08-01

    This report presents cytogenetic data on three cases of malignant ovarian germ cell tumors. All were diagnosed as malignant teratoma; case 1 with yolk sac elements; case 2 with elements of endodermal sinus tumor, embryonal carcinoma, and choriocarcinoma; and case 3 with yolk sac elements and embryonal carcinoma. Metaphase cells from each tumor, and normal tissue from the host, were karyotyped and scored for centromeric heteromorphisms in an attempt to determine the mechanism of origin. The karyotypes were 79,XXX,+1,+3,-6,+8,+12,+14,-15,+17, +20,+21,+22;49,XX,+8,+12,+22; and 48,XX,+3,+14, respectively. The analysis of centromeric heteromorphisms and DNA fingerprints of host and teratoma using the M13 probe revealed that one case originated from a germ cell before the first meiotic division. Normal host tissue was not available in case 2, but several centromeric markers were heterozygous in the tumor, indicating either meiosis I error or complete failure of germ cell meiosis. In the third case the centromeric heteromorphisms that were heterozygous in the host appeared to be homozygous for certain chromosomes and heterozygous for others in the tumor. These results suggest that germ cell teratomas could arise by the fusion of two ova. PMID:1521236

  11. Identification of a third protein 4.1 tumor suppressor, protein 4.1R, in meningioma pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Robb, Victoria A.; Li, Wen; Gascard, Philippe; Perry, Arie; Mohandas, Narla; Gutmann, David H.

    2003-06-11

    Meningiomas are common tumors of the central nervous system, however, the mechanisms under lying their pathogenesis are largely undefined. Two members of the Protein 4.1 super family, the neuro fibromatosis 2 (NF2) gene product (merlin/schwannomin) and Protein 4.1B have been implicated as meningioma tumor suppressors. In this report, we demonstrate that another Protein 4.1 family member, Protein 4.1R, also functions as a meningioma tumor suppressor. Based on the assignment of the Protein 4.1R gene to chromosome 1p32-36, a common region of deletion observed in meningiomas, we analyzed Protein 4.1R expression in meningioma cell lines and surgical tumor specimens. We observed loss of Protein 4.1R protein expression in two meningioma cell lines (IOMM-Lee, CH157-MN) by Western blotting as well as in 6 of 15 sporadic meningioma as by immuno histo chemistry (IHC). Analysis of a subset of these sporadic meningiomas by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a Protein 4.1R specific probe demonstrated 100 percent concordance with the IHC results. In support of a meningioma tumor suppressor function, over expression of Protein 4.1R resulted in suppression of IOMM-Lee and CH157MN cell proliferation. Similar to the Protein 4.1B and merlin meningioma tumor suppressors, Protein 4.1R localization in the membrane fraction increased significantly under conditions of growth arrest in vitro. Lastly, Protein 4.1R interacted with some known merlin/Protein 4.1B interactors such as CD44 and bII-spectrin, but did not associate with the Protein 4.1B interactors 14-3-3 and PRMT3 or the merlin binding proteins SCHIP-1 and HRS. Collectively, these results suggest that Protein 4.1R functions as an important tumor suppressor important in the molecular pathogenesis of meningioma.

  12. Malignant mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Ahmed Tipu, Salman; Ishtiaq, Sundas

    2013-01-01

    Malignant Mesothelioma (MM) is a rare but rapidly fatal and aggressive tumor of the pleura and peritoneum with limited knowledge of its natural history. The incidence has increased in the past two decades but still it is a rare tumor. Etiology of all forms of mesothelioma is strongly associated with industrial pollutants, of which asbestos is the principal carcinogen. Mesothelioma is an insidious neoplasm arising from mesothelial surfaces i.e., pleura (65%-70%), peritoneum (30%), tunica vaginalis testis, and pericardium (1%-2%). The diagnosis of peritoneal and Pleural mesothelioma is often delayed, due to a long latent period between onset and symptoms and the common and nonspecific clinical presentation. The definite diagnosis can only be established by diagnostic laparoscopy or open surgery along with biopsy to obtain histological examination and immunocytochemical analysis. Different treatment options are available but Surgery can achieve a complete or incomplete resection and Radical resection is the preferred treatment. Chemotherapy has an important role in palliative treatment. Photodynamic therapy is also an option under trial. Patients who successfully underwent surgical resection had a considerably longer median survival as well as a significantly higher 5-year survival. Source of Data/Study Selection: The data were collected from case reports, cross-sectional studies, Open-label studies and phase –II trials between 1973-2012. Data Extraction: Web sites and other online resources of American college of surgeons, Medline, NCBI and Medscape resource centers were used to extract data. Conclusion: Malignant Mesothelioma (MM) is a rare but rapidly fatal and aggressive tumor with limited knowledge of its natural history. The diagnosis of peritoneal and Pleural mesothelioma is often delayed, so level of index of suspicion must be kept high. PMID:24550969

  13. Microarray Expression Data Identify DCC as a Candidate Gene for Early Meningioma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Schulten, Hans-Juergen; Hussein, Deema; Al-Adwani, Fatima; Karim, Sajjad; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah; Al-Sharif, Mona; Jamal, Awatif; Al-Ghamdi, Fahad; Baeesa, Saleh S.; Bangash, Mohammed; Chaudhary, Adeel; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common primary brain tumors bearing in a minority of cases an aggressive phenotype. Although meningiomas are stratified according to their histology and clinical behavior, the underlying molecular genetics predicting aggressiveness are not thoroughly understood. We performed whole transcript expression profiling in 10 grade I and four grade II meningiomas, three of which invaded the brain. Microarray expression analysis identified deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) as a differentially expressed gene (DEG) enabling us to cluster meningiomas into DCC low expression (3 grade I and 3 grade II tumors), DCC medium expression (2 grade I and 1 grade II tumors), and DCC high expression (5 grade I tumors) groups. Comparison between the DCC low expression and DCC high expression groups resulted in 416 DEGs (p-value < 0.05; fold change > 2). The most significantly downregulated genes in the DCC low expression group comprised DCC, phosphodiesterase 1C (PDE1C), calmodulin-dependent 70kDa olfactomedin 2 (OLFM2), glutathione S-transferase mu 5 (GSTM5), phosphotyrosine interaction domain containing 1 (PID1), sema domain, transmembrane domain (TM) and cytoplasmic domain, (semaphorin) 6D (SEMA6D), and indolethylamine N-methyltransferase (INMT). The most significantly upregulated genes comprised chromosome 5 open reading frame 63 (C5orf63), homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2), and basic helix-loop-helix family, member e40 (BHLHE40). Biofunctional analysis identified as predicted top upstream regulators beta-estradiol, TGFB1, Tgf beta complex, LY294002, and dexamethasone and as predicted top regulator effectors NFkB, PIK3R1, and CREBBP. The microarray expression data served also for a comparison between meningiomas from female and male patients and for a comparison between brain invasive and non-invasive meningiomas resulting in a number of significant DEGs and related biofunctions. In conclusion, based on its expression levels, DCC may constitute

  14. Visual Outcome in Meningiomas Around Anterior Visual Pathways Treated With Linear Accelerator Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas; Reich, Ehud; Gal, Lior; Rappaport, Zvi Harry; Nissim, Ouzi; Pfeffer, Raphael; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Meningiomas threatening the anterior visual pathways (AVPs) and not amenable for surgery are currently treated with multisession stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotactic radiotherapy is available with a number of devices. The most ubiquitous include the gamma knife, CyberKnife, tomotherapy, and isocentric linear accelerator systems. The purpose of our study was to describe a case series of AVP meningiomas treated with linear accelerator fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) using the multiple, noncoplanar, dynamic conformal rotation paradigm and to compare the success and complication rates with those reported for other techniques. Patients and Methods: We included all patients with AVP meningiomas followed up at our neuro-ophthalmology unit for a minimum of 12 months after FSRT. We compared the details of the neuro-ophthalmologic examinations and tumor size before and after FSRT and at the end of follow-up. Results: Of 87 patients with AVP meningiomas, 17 had been referred for FSRT. Of the 17 patients, 16 completed >12 months of follow-up (mean 39). Of the 16 patients, 11 had undergone surgery before FSRT and 5 had undergone FSRT as first-line management. Tumor control was achieved in 14 of the 16 patients, with three meningiomas shrinking in size after RT. Two meningiomas progressed, one in an area that was outside the radiation field. The visual function had improved in 6 or stabilized in 8 of the 16 patients (88%) and worsened in 2 (12%). Conclusions: Linear accelerator fractionated RT using the multiple noncoplanar dynamic rotation conformal paradigm can be offered to patients with meningiomas that threaten the anterior visual pathways as an adjunct to surgery or as first-line treatment, with results comparable to those reported for other stereotactic RT techniques.

  15. miR-148b-3p inhibits malignant biological behaviors of human glioma cells induced by high HOTAIR expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guan; Li, Zhaohui; Tian, Nan; Han, Liang; Fu, Yao; Guo, Zhigang; Tian, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that long non coding (lnc)RNA and microRNA (miRNA/miR) both regulate the expression of key genes in tumorigenesis and have considerable theranostic potential. Rapid advances in bioinformatics indicate that miRNA may potentially interact with lncRNA to modulate their regulatory roles. miR-148b-3p has been reported to have a vital role in regulating tumor progression. However, the expression pattern of miR-148b-3p in glioma remains largely unknown, and interactions between miR-148b-3p and lncRNA has yet to be identified. The aim of the present study was to insight into the regulatory role of miR-148b-3p in glioma. Using online software, the HOTAIR gene was identified as a possible lncRNA target of miR-148b-3p in the present study. siRNA was used to suppress the expression of HOTAIR and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the expression of miR-148b-3p. The results confirmed that HOTAIR mRNA expression was inversely correlated with miR-148b-3p expression in A172 glioma cells. Furthermore, a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was performed to detect the viability of cells, flow cytometry was performed to test cell cycle and a matrigel invasion assay was performed to test cell invasion. The results showed that HOTAIR promotes factors associated with malignancy, including cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and invasion, whereas miR-148b-3p suppresses malignancy. Bioinformatics and luciferase reporter assays showed that miR-148b-3p modulates HOTAIR expression by directly targeting the HOTAIR gene sequence. In summary, the results indicated that miR-148b-3p inhibits malignant biological behaviors of glioma cells by directly targeting HOTAIR. The current data provide important evidence for understanding the key roles of the lncRNA miRNA functional network in glioma. PMID:27446363

  16. The Origin of Malignant Malaria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasmodium falciparum is the causative agent of malignant malaria, which is among the most severe human infectious diseases. Despite its overwhelming significance to human health, the parasite’s origins remain unclear. The favored origin hypothesis holds that P. falciparum and its closest known rel...

  17. MLL1 and DOT1L cooperate with meningioma-1 to induce acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Simone S.; Haladyna, Jessica N.; Bezzant, Matthew; Stevens, Brett; Pollyea, Daniel A.; Sinha, Amit U.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Wei, Qi; Pollock, Roy M.; Daigle, Scott R.; Jordan, Craig T.; Ernst, Patricia; Bernt, Kathrin M.

    2016-01-01

    Meningioma-1 (MN1) overexpression is frequently observed in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is predictive of poor prognosis. In murine models, forced expression of MN1 in hematopoietic progenitors induces an aggressive myeloid leukemia that is strictly dependent on a defined gene expression program in the cell of origin, which includes the homeobox genes Hoxa9 and Meis1 as key components. Here, we have shown that this program is controlled by two histone methyltransferases, MLL1 and DOT1L, as deletion of either Mll1 or Dot1l in MN1-expressing cells abrogated the cell of origin–derived gene expression program, including the expression of Hoxa cluster genes. In murine models, genetic inactivation of either Mll1 or Dot1l impaired MN1-mediated leukemogenesis. We determined that HOXA9 and MEIS1 are coexpressed with MN1 in a subset of clinical MN1hi leukemia, and human MN1hi/HOXA9hi leukemias were sensitive to pharmacologic inhibition of DOT1L. Together, these data point to DOT1L as a potential therapeutic target in MN1hi AML. In addition, our findings suggest that epigenetic modulation of the interplay between an oncogenic lesion and its cooperating developmental program has therapeutic potential in AML. PMID:26927674

  18. The human Rgr oncogene is overexpressed in T cell malignancies and induces transformation by acting as a GEF for Ras and Ral

    PubMed Central

    Osei-Sarfo, Kwame; Martello, Laura; Ibrahim, Sherif; Pellicer, Angel

    2011-01-01

    The Ras superfamily of GTPases is involved in the modification of many cellular processes including cellular motility, proliferation and differentiation. Our laboratory has previously identified the RalGDS related (Rgr) oncogene in a DMBA-induced rabbit squamous cell carcinoma and its human orthologue, hRgr. In the present study, we analyzed the expression levels of the human hRgr transcript in a panel of human hematopoietic malignancies and found that a truncated form (diseased-truncated; Dtr-hrgr) was significantly overexpressed in many T-cell derived neoplasms. Although the Rgr proto-oncogene belongs to the RalGDS family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), we show that upon the introduction of hRgr into fibroblast cell lines it is able to elicit the activation of both Ral and Ras GTPases. Moreover, in vitro guanine nucleotide exchange assays confirm that hRgr promotes Ral and Ras activation through GDP dissociation, which is a critical characteristic of GEF proteins. hRgr has guanine nucleotide exchange activity for both small GTPases and this activity was reduced when a point mutation within the catalytic domain (CDC25) of the protein, (cd) Dtr-hRgr, was utilized. These observations prompted the analysis of the biological effects of hRgr and (cd) hRgr expression in cultured cells. Here, we show that hRgr increases proliferation in low serum, increases invasion, reduces anchorage dependence, and promotes the progression into S phase of the cell cycle; properties that are abolished or severely reduced in the presence of the catalytic dead mutant. We conclude that the ability of hRgr to activate both Ral and Ras is responsible for its transformation-inducing phenotype and it could be an important contributor in the development of some T cell malignancies. PMID:21441953

  19. Artemether Combined with shRNA Interference of Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Significantly Inhibited the Malignant Biological Behavior of Human Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Xue, Yi-Xue; Yao, Yi-Long; Yu, Bo; Liu, Yun-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Artemether is the derivative extracted from Chinese traditional herb and originally used for malaria. Artemether also has potential therapeutic effects against tumors. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) is an important cell surface adhesion molecule associated with malignancy of gliomas. In this work, we investigated the role and mechanism of artemether combined with shRNA interference of VCAM-1 (shRNA-VCAM-1) on the migration, invasion and apoptosis of glioma cells. U87 human glioma cells were treated with artemether at various concentrations and shRNA interfering technology was employed to silence the expression of VCAM-1. Cell viability, migration, invasiveness and apoptosis were assessed with MTT, wound healing, Transwell and Annexin V-FITC/PI staining. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) was checked by Western blot assay. Results showed that artemether and shRNA-VCAM-1 not only significantly inhibited the migration, invasiveness and expression of MMP-2/9 and p-Akt, but also promoted the apoptosis of U87 cells. Combined treatment of both displayed the maximum inhibitory effects on the malignant biological behavior of glioma cells. Our work revealed the potential therapeutic effects of artemether and antiVCAM-1 in the treatments of gliomas. PMID:23593320

  20. Characterization of cancer stem cell properties of CD24 and CD26-positive human malignant mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Hiroto; Naito, Motohiko; Ghani, Farhana Ishrat; Dang, Nam H.; Morimoto, Chikao

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We focused on CD24 and CD26 for further analysis of CSC properties in MM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Their expressions were correlated with chemoresistance, cell growth, and invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Their expressions were also correlated with several cancer related genes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression of each marker was correlated with different CSC property in Meso1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation of ERK by EGF was regulated by expression of CD26, but not CD24. -- Abstract: Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an asbestos-related malignancy characterized by rapid growth and poor prognosis. In our previous study, we have demonstrated that several cancer stem cell (CSC) markers correlated with CSC properties in MM cells. Among these markers, we focused on two: CD24, the common CSC marker, and CD26, the additional CSC marker. We further analyzed the CSC properties of CD24 and CD26-positve MM cells. We established RNAi-knockdown cells and found that these markers were significantly correlated with chemoresistance, proliferation, and invasion potentials in vitro. Interestingly, while Meso-1 cells expressed both CD24 and CD26, the presence of each of these two markers was correlated with different CSC property. In addition, downstream signaling of these markers was explored by microarray analysis, which revealed that their expressions were correlated with several cancer-related genes. Furthermore, phosphorylation of ERK by EGF stimulation was significantly affected by the expression of CD26, but not CD24. These results suggest that CD24 and CD26 differentially regulate the CSC potentials of MM and could be promising targets for CSC-oriented therapy.

  1. Cerebral cavernous malformations associated to meningioma: High penetrance in a novel family mutated in the PDCD10 gene.

    PubMed

    Garaci, Francesco; Marsili, Luisa; Riant, Florence; Marziali, Simone; Cécillon, Michaelle; Pasquarelli, Roberto; Sangiuolo, Federica; Floris, Roberto; Novelli, Giuseppe; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth; Brancati, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Multiple familial meningiomas occur in rare genetic syndromes, particularly neurofibromatosis type 2. The association of meningiomas and cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) has been reported in few patients in the medical literature. The purpose of our study is to corroborate a preferential association of CCMs and multiple meningiomas in subjects harbouring mutations in the PDCD10 gene (also known as CCM3). Three members of an Italian family affected by seizures underwent conventional brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with gadolinium contrast agent including gradient echo (GRE) imaging. The three CCM-causative genes were sequenced by Sanger method. Literature data reporting patients with coexistence of CCMs and meningiomas were reviewed. MRI demonstrated dural-based meningioma-like lesions associated to multiple parenchymal CCMs in all affected individuals. A disease-causative mutation in the PDCD10 gene (p.Gln112PhefsX13) was identified. Based on neuroradiological and molecular data as well as on literature review, we outline a consistent association between PDCD10 mutations and a syndrome of CCMs with multiple meningiomas. This condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis of multiple/familial meningioma syndromes. In case of multiple/familial meningioma the use of appropriate MRI technique may include GRE and/or susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to rule out CCM. By contrast, proper post-gadolinium scans may aid defining dural lesions in CCM patients and are indicated in PDCD10-mutated individuals. PMID:26246098

  2. Cerebral cavernous malformations associated to meningioma: High penetrance in a novel family mutated in the PDCD10 gene

    PubMed Central

    Garaci, Francesco; Marsili, Luisa; Riant, Florence; Marziali, Simone; Cécillon, Michaelle; Pasquarelli, Roberto; Sangiuolo, Federica; Floris, Roberto; Novelli, Giuseppe; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Multiple familial meningiomas occur in rare genetic syndromes, particularly neurofibromatosis type 2. The association of meningiomas and cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) has been reported in few patients in the medical literature. The purpose of our study is to corroborate a preferential association of CCMs and multiple meningiomas in subjects harbouring mutations in the PDCD10 gene (also known as CCM3). Three members of an Italian family affected by seizures underwent conventional brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with gadolinium contrast agent including gradient echo (GRE) imaging. The three CCM-causative genes were sequenced by Sanger method. Literature data reporting patients with coexistence of CCMs and meningiomas were reviewed. MRI demonstrated dural-based meningioma-like lesions associated to multiple parenchymal CCMs in all affected individuals. A disease-causative mutation in the PDCD10 gene (p.Gln112PhefsX13) was identified. Based on neuroradiological and molecular data as well as on literature review, we outline a consistent association between PDCD10 mutations and a syndrome of CCMs with multiple meningiomas. This condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis of multiple/familial meningioma syndromes. In case of multiple/familial meningioma the use of appropriate MRI technique may include GRE and/or susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to rule out CCM. By contrast, proper post-gadolinium scans may aid defining dural lesions in CCM patients and are indicated in PDCD10-mutated individuals. PMID:26246098

  3. Expression of NF2 gene product merlin in arachnoid villi and meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Sakuda, K; Kohda, Y; Matsumoto, T; Park, C; Seto, A; Tohma, Y; Hasegawa, M; Kida, S; Nitta, H; Yamashima, T; Yamashita, J

    1996-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene encodes a novel 595 amino acid protein named merlin. Recently, Ruttledge et al demonstrated inactivation of NF2 gene in approximately 60% of sporadically occurring meningiomas. Merlin is thought to physiologically exist beneath the cell membrane, and to form a part of modulation in signal transduction, for example, information concerning contact inhibition. In NF2-related tumors, it is supposed that the mutation of merlin results in loss of this signal transduction leading to tumorigenesis. In this paper, we investigated the expression of NF2 gene product merlin in arachnoid villi and meningiomas. The immunohistochemical staining of merlin showed a striking contrast between arachnoid villi and meningiomas. In arachnoid cells, merlin was labeled in the whole cytoplasm, but not within the nuclei. In contrast, in meningiomas, immunoreactivity of merlin was mainly seen in the nuclei. These results suggest that arachnoid cells with normal merlin are capable of normal signal transduction, whereas meningioma cells with mutated merlin show impairment of signal transduction which may lead to tumorigenesis.

  4. Meningioma Causing Visual Impairment: Outcomes and Toxicity After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maclean, Jillian; Fersht, Naomi; Bremner, Fion; Stacey, Chris; Sivabalasingham, Suganya; Short, Susan

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate ophthalmologic outcomes and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with meningiomas causing visual deficits. Methods and Materials: A prospective observational study with formal ophthalmologic and clinical assessment of 30 consecutive cases of meningioma affecting vision treated with IMRT from 2007 to 2011. Prescriptions were 50.4 Gy to mean target dose in 28 daily fractions. The median follow-up time was 28 months. Twenty-six meningiomas affected the anterior visual pathway (including 3 optic nerve sheath meningiomas); 4 were posterior to the chiasm. Results: Vision improved objectively in 12 patients (40%). Improvements were in visual field (5/16 patients), color vision (4/9 patients), acuity (1/15 patients), extraocular movements (3/11 patients), ptosis (1/5 patients), and proptosis (2/6 patients). No predictors of clinical response were found. Two patients had minor reductions in tumor dimensions on magnetic resonance imaging, 1 patient had radiological progression, and the other patients were stable. One patient experienced grade 2 keratitis, 1 patient had a minor visual field loss, and 5 patients had grade 1 dry eye. Conclusion: IMRT is an effective method for treating meningiomas causing ophthalmologic deficits, and toxicity is minimal. Thorough ophthalmologic assessment is important because clinical responses often occur in the absence of radiological change.

  5. Mitotic Index is an Independent Predictor of Recurrence-Free Survival in Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Olar, Adriana; Wani, Khalida M; Sulman, Erik P; Mansouri, Alireza; Zadeh, Gelareh; Wilson, Charmaine D; DeMonte, Franco; Fuller, Gregory N; Aldape, Kenneth D

    2015-05-01

    While World Health Organization (WHO) grading of meningioma stratifies patients according to recurrence risk overall, there is substantial within-grade heterogeneity with respect to recurrence-free survival (RFS). Most meningiomas are graded according to mitotic counts per unit area on hematoxylin and eosin sections, a method potentially confounded by tumor cellularity, as well as potential limitations of accurate mitotic figure detection on routine histology. To refine mitotic figure assessment, we evaluated 363 meningiomas with phospho-histone H3 (Ser10) and determined the mitotic index (number of mitoses per 1000 tumor cells). The median mitotic indices among WHO grade I (n = 268), grade II (n = 84) and grade III (n = 11) tumors were 1, 4 and 12. Classification and regression tree analysis to categorize cut-offs identified three subgroups defined by mitotic indices of 0-2, 3-4 and ≥5, which on univariate analysis were associated with RFS (P < 0.01). In multivariate analysis, mitotic index subgrouped in this manner was significantly associated with RFS (P < 0.01) after adjustment for Simpson grade, WHO grade and MIB-1 index. Mitotic index was then examined within individual WHO grade, showing that for grade I and grade II meningiomas, mitotic index can add additional information to RFS risk. The results suggest that the use of a robust mitotic marker in meningioma could refine risk stratification. PMID:25040885

  6. Infratentorial meningioma in an 8-year-old child as first sign of neurofibromatosis type 2.

    PubMed

    Stettner, G M; Rostasy, K M; Ludwig, H C; Merkler, D; Fahsold, R; Gärtner, J

    2007-02-01

    Meningiomas are rare intracranial tumors in pediatric patients. In contrast to meningiomas in adults, childhood ones have a poorer prognosis because of their high growth potential and tendency to recur. Meningiomas are often associated with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) which is an autosomal-dominant disorder. In contrast to adults who primarily present with symptoms due to vestibular tumors, the initial symptoms in children with NF2 are subtle skin tumors, posterior capsular cataracts, or neurological signs secondary to cranial nerve(s) schwannoma excluding vestibular nerve, and/or brainstem or spinal cord compression. Here we report on the clinical, radiological, and histological findings in an 8-year-old boy who was diagnosed with an isolated infratentorial meningioma and a novel splice site mutation in the NF2 gene. The same mutation was detected in the boy's mother who suffered from hearing loss and tinnitus due to a bilateral vestibular schwannoma. Our patient demonstrates the need for molecular testing for NF2 gene mutations even in isolated childhood meningiomas although they do not fulfill the clinical criteria of NF2.

  7. [Malignant hyperthermia].

    PubMed

    Metterlein, T; Schuster, F; Graf, B M; Anetseder, M

    2014-12-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a rare hereditary, mostly subclinical myopathy. Trigger substances, such as volatile anesthetic agents and the depolarizing muscle relaxant succinylcholine can induce a potentially fatal metabolic increase in predisposed patients caused by a dysregulation of the myoplasmic calcium (Ca) concentration. Mutations in the dihydropyridine ryanodine receptor complex in combination with the trigger substances are responsible for an uncontrolled release of Ca from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This leads to activation of the contractile apparatus and a massive increase in cellular energy production. Exhaustion of the cellular energy reserves ultimately results in local muscle cell destruction and subsequent cardiovascular failure. The clinical picture of MH episodes is very variable. Early symptoms are hypoxia, hypercapnia and cardiac arrhythmia whereas the body temperature rise, after which MH is named, often occurs later. Decisive for the course of MH episodes is a timely targeted therapy. Following introduction of the hydantoin derivative dantrolene, the previously high mortality of fulminant MH episodes could be reduced to well under 10 %. An MH predisposition can be detected using the invasive in vitro contracture test (IVCT) or mutation analysis. Few elaborate diagnostic procedures are in the developmental stage. PMID:25384957

  8. Establishment of a human malignant fibrous histiocytoma cell line, COMA. Characterization By conventional cytogenetics, comparative genomic hybridization, and multiplex fluorescence In situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Mairal, A; Chibon, F; Rousselet, A; Couturier, J; Terrier, P; Aurias, A

    2000-09-01

    The human COMA cell line has been established from a storiform pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH). As expected for this tumor type, a very complex karyotype was observed after R-banding analysis. An extensive analysis by 24-color painting, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed. Twelve complex marker chromosomes recurrently observed were clearly identified; among them, three were systematically present in all analyzed metaphases. Amplifications detected by CGH were refined by FISH with probes specific for various candidate loci. A significant aneuploidy and numerous micronuclei were observed, which could be related to the anomalies of centriole numbers detected in a proportion of cells. Such an analysis, performed on a series of MFH cell lines, would allow the delineation of the genomic alterations specific for the oncogenesis or progression of this complex tumor type or both. PMID:11063793

  9. Simultaneous estimation of size, radial and angular locations of a malignant tumor in a 3-D human breast - A numerical study.

    PubMed

    Das, Koushik; Mishra, Subhash C

    2015-08-01

    This article reports a numerical study pertaining to simultaneous estimation of size, radial location and angular location of a malignant tumor in a 3-D human breast. The breast skin surface temperature profile is specific to a tumor of specific size and location. The temperature profiles are always the Gaussian one, though their peak magnitudes and areas differ according to the size and location of the tumor. The temperature profiles are obtained by solving the Pennes bioheat equation using the finite element method based solver COMSOL 4.3a. With temperature profiles known, simultaneous estimation of size, radial location and angular location of the tumor is done using the curve fitting method. Effect of measurement errors is also included in the study. Estimations are accurate, and since in the inverse analysis, the curve fitting method does not require solution of the governing bioheat equation, the estimation is very fast. PMID:26267509

  10. Luteolin inhibits Cr(VI)-induced malignant cell transformation of human lung epithelial cells by targeting ROS mediated multiple cell signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; Roy, Ram Vinod; Hitron, John Andrew; Wang, Lei; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Asha, Padmaja; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Yitao; Shi, Xianglin

    2014-12-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a well-known human carcinogen associated with the incidence of lung cancer. Inhibition of metal induced carcinogenesis by a dietary antioxidant is a novel approach. Luteolin, a natural dietary flavonoid found in fruits and vegetables, possesses potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. We found that short term exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to Cr(VI) (5μM) showed a drastic increase in ROS generation, NADPH oxidase (NOX) activation, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione depletion, which were significantly inhibited by the treatment with luteolin in a dose dependent manner. Treatment with luteolin decreased AP-1, HIF-1α, COX-2, and iNOS promoter activity induced by Cr(VI) in BEAS-2B cells. In addition, luteolin protected BEAS-2B cells from malignant transformation induced by chronic Cr(VI) exposure. Moreover, luteolin also inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α) and VEGF in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Western blot analysis showed that luteolin inhibited multiple gene products linked to survival (Akt, Fak, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL), inflammation (MAPK, NF-κB, COX-2, STAT-3, iNOS, TNF-α) and angiogenesis (HIF-1α, VEGF, MMP-9) in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Nude mice injected with BEAS-2B cells chronically exposed to Cr(VI) in the presence of luteolin showed reduced tumor incidence compared to Cr(VI) alone treated group. Overexpression of catalase (CAT) or SOD2, eliminated Cr(VI)-induced malignant transformation. Overall, our results indicate that luteolin protects BEAS-2B cells from Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis by scavenging ROS and modulating multiple cell signaling mechanisms that are linked to ROS. Luteolin, therefore, serves as a potential chemopreventive agent against Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis.

  11. Isolation and fine mapping of 16 novel human zinc finger-encoding cDNAs identify putative candidate genes for developmental and malignant disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Tommerup, N.; Vissing, H.

    1995-05-20

    The authors have isolated and chromosomally fine-mapped 16 novel genes belonging to the human zinc finger Krueppel family (ZNF131-140, 142, 143, 148, 151, 154, and 155), including 1 of the GLI type (ZNF143) and 3 containing a KRAB (Krueppel-associated box) segment (ZNF133, 136, and 140). Based on their map position, several of these ZNF genes are putative candidate genes for both developmental and malignant disorders: ZNF138, ZNF139, and ZNF143 were localized to 7q11.2, 7q21.3-q22.1, and 11p15.3-p15.4, regions involved in deletions and/or translocations associated with Williams syndrome, split hand and foot disease (SHFD1), and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, respectively. ZNF133 was localized to 20p11.2, close to, but probably distinct from, the region deleted in Alagille syndrome. Zinc finger genes mapping to regions commonly deleted in solid tumors included ZNF132, 134, 135, 137, 154, and 155, all located on 19q13 (thyroid adenoma), and ZNF151, at 1p36.1-p36.2 (neuroblastoma, colon cancer, and other tumors). In addition, several of the ZNFs mapped to regions implicated in recurrent chromosomal rearrangements in hematological malignancies (ZNF139, 7q21.3-q22.1; ZNF148, 3q21-q22; ZNF151, 1p36.1-p36.2). The study indicates that the number of ZNF genes in human is large and that systematic isolation and mapping of ZNF genes is a straightforward approach for the identification of novel candidate disease genes. 47 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Luteolin inhibits Cr(VI)-induced malignant cell transformation of human lung epithelial cells by targeting ROS mediated multiple cell signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; Roy, Ram Vinod; Hitron, John Andrew; Wang, Lei; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Asha, Padmaja; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Yitao; Shi, Xianglin

    2014-12-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a well-known human carcinogen associated with the incidence of lung cancer. Inhibition of metal induced carcinogenesis by a dietary antioxidant is a novel approach. Luteolin, a natural dietary flavonoid found in fruits and vegetables, possesses potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. We found that short term exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to Cr(VI) (5 μM) showed a drastic increase in ROS generation, NADPH oxidase (NOX) activation, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione depletion, which were significantly inhibited by the treatment with luteolin in a dose dependent manner. Treatment with luteolin decreased AP-1, HIF-1α, COX-2, and iNOS promoter activity induced by Cr(VI) in BEAS-2B cells. In addition, luteolin protected BEAS-2B cells from malignant transformation induced by chronic Cr(VI) exposure. Moreover, luteolin also inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α) and VEGF in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Western blot analysis showed that luteolin inhibited multiple gene products linked to survival (Akt, Fak, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL), inflammation (MAPK, NF-κB, COX-2, STAT-3, iNOS, TNF-α) and angiogenesis (HIF-1α, VEGF, MMP-9) in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Nude mice injected with BEAS-2B cells chronically exposed to Cr(VI) in the presence of luteolin showed reduced tumor incidence compared to Cr(VI) alone treated group. Overexpression of catalase (CAT) or SOD2, eliminated Cr(VI)-induced malignant transformation. Overall, our results indicate that luteolin protects BEAS-2B cells from Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis by scavenging ROS and modulating multiple cell signaling mechanisms that are linked to ROS. Luteolin, therefore, serves as a potential chemopreventive agent against Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Luteolin inhibited Cr(VI)-induced oxidative stress. • Luteolin inhibited chronic Cr(VI)-induced malignant transformation.

  13. Asbestos-related malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Talcott, J.A.; Antman, K.H.

    1988-05-01

    Asbestos-associated malignancies have received significant attention in the lay and medical literature because of the increasing frequency of two asbestos-associated tumors, lung carcinoma and mesothelioma; the wide distribution of asbestos; its status as a prototype environmental carcinogen; and the many recent legal compensation proceedings, for which medical testimony has been required. The understanding of asbestos-associated carcinogenesis has increased through study of animal models, human epidemiology, and, recently, the application of modern molecular biological techniques. However, the detailed mechanisms of carcinogenesis remain unknown. A wide variety of malignancies have been associated with asbestos, although the strongest evidence for a causal association is confined to lung cancer and mesothelioma. Epidemiological studies have provided evidence that both the type of asbestos fiber and the industry in which the exposure occurs may affect the rates of asbestos-associated cancers. It has been shown that asbestos exerts a carcinogenic effect independent of exposure to cigarette smoking that, for lung cancers, is synergistically enhanced by smoking. Other questions remain controversial, such as whether pulmonary fibrosis necessarily precedes asbestos-associated lung cancer and whether some threshold level of exposure to asbestos (including low-dose exposures that may occur in asbestos-associated public buildings) may be safe. Mesothelioma, the most closely asbestos-associated malignancy, has a dismal natural history and has been highly resistant to therapy. However, investigational multi-modality therapy may offer benefit to some patients. 179 references.

  14. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    MIYATAKE, Shin-Ichi; KAWABATA, Shinji; HIRAMATSU, Ryo; KUROIWA, Toshihiko; SUZUKI, Minoru; KONDO, Natsuko; ONO, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting. PMID:27250576

  15. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kawabata, Shinji; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kondo, Natsuko; Ono, Koji

    2016-07-15

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting.

  16. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kawabata, Shinji; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kondo, Natsuko; Ono, Koji

    2016-07-15

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting. PMID:27250576

  17. Asbestos-related malignancy.

    PubMed

    Talcott, J A; Antman, K H

    1988-01-01

    Asbestos-associated malignancies have received significant attention in the lay and medical literature because of the increasing frequency of two asbestos-associated tumors, lung carcinoma and mesothelioma; the wide distribution of asbestos; its status as a prototype environmental carcinogen; and the many recent legal compensation proceedings, for which medical testimony has been required. The understanding of asbestos-associated carcinogenesis has increased through study of animal models, human epidemiology, and, recently, the application of modern molecular biological techniques. However, the detailed mechanisms of carcinogenesis remain unknown. A wide variety of malignancies have been associated with asbestos, although the strongest evidence for a causal association is confined to lung cancer and mesothelioma. Epidemiological studies have provided evidence that both the type of asbestos fiber and the industry in which the exposure occurs may affect the rates of asbestos-associated cancers. It has been shown that asbestos exerts a carcinogenic effect independent of exposure to cigarette smoking that, for lung cancers, is synergistically enhanced by smoking. Other questions remain controversial, such as whether pulmonary fibrosis necessarily precedes asbestos-associated lung cancer and whether some threshold level of exposure to asbestos (including low-dose exposures that may occur in asbestos-associated public buildings) may be safe. Mesothelioma, the most closely asbestos-associated malignancy, has a dismal natural history and has been highly resistant to therapy. However, investigational multi-modality therapy may offer benefit to some patients. A description of the processes through which compensation claims for asbestos-associated malignancies are evaluated illustrates for physicians the legal system's approach to possible injury from toxic substances. The differences between scientific and legal reasoning about the causes of diseases with long latency

  18. Onyx Embolization of a Meningioma with a Dysplastic Aneurysmal Anterior Cerebral Artery Vessel

    PubMed Central

    Felbaum, Daniel R; Liu, Ai-Hsi; Armonda, Rocco A

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative embolization of meningiomas can be safely performed using a variety of embolic agents. Most commonly, the vascular supply from branches of the external carotid artery is the target of embolization. In our report, we detail the treatment of a patient with a parafalcine meningioma that received its supply via branches of the anterior cerebral artery. One of the feeder vessels appeared to contain a dysplastic aneurysmal dilatation of the vessel. Due to patient circumstances, embolization was performed using standard microcatheterization techniques to minimize intraoperative blood loss. We report a rare instance of endovascular treatment of a pial vessel to treat an intracranial meningioma using Onyx. PMID:27738575

  19. Preoperative embolization of meningiomas with low-concentration n-butyl cyanoacrylate.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Taiki; Ohshima, Tomotaka; Nishihori, Masahiro; Goto, Shunsaku; Nishizawa, Toshihisa; Shimato, Shinji; Kato, Kyozo

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical safety and efficacy of preoperative embolization of meningiomas with low-concentration n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA). Nineteen cases of hypervascular intracranial meningiomas were treated by preoperative embolization with 14% NBCA, using a wedged superselective catheterization of feeding arteries and reflux-hold-reinjection technique. Clinical data of the patients and radiological and intra-surgical findings were reviewed. All tumors were successfully devascularized without any neurological complications. Marked reduction of tumor staining with extensive NBCA penetration was achieved in 13 cases. Perioperative blood transfusion was only required in two cases. These results indicate that preoperative embolization of meningiomas with low-concentration NBCA is both safe and effective.

  20. Electroconvulsive therapy in the presence of a metallic skull plate after meningioma resection.

    PubMed

    Ling, Ted; Manepalli, Jothika; Grossberg, George

    2010-06-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective and safe treatment even in the frail and in the medically ill. A case report of ECT being administered to a patient with a history of a recently resected meningioma and the presence of a metallic skull plate is presented here. The patient has a history of bipolar disorder in remission but had an acute manic episode with psychotic features after resection of suprasellar meningioma. He presented with superimposed delirium that complicated the presentation. Because there was no effective resolution with medications, ECT was administered. This case documents the safe administration of ECT in complicated situations such as these. This case also demonstrates that ECT can be successfully administered in the presence of superimposed delirium and after a recent meningioma resection. Clinical skills and expertise are required to safely and effectively administer ECT in such cases. PMID:19935094

  1. Intraoral malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Babburi, Suresh; Subramanyam, R. V.; Aparna, V.; Sowjanya, P.

    2013-01-01

    Primary oral mucosal melanoma is a rare aggressive neoplasm and accounts for only 0.2-8% of all reported melanomas. It is a malignant neoplasm of melanocytes that may arise from a benign melanocytic lesion or de novo from melanocytes within normal skin or mucosa. It is considered to be the most deadly and biologically unpredictable of all human neoplasms, having the worst prognosis. In this article, we report a case of oral melanoma in a 52-year-old female patient with a chief complaint of black discolouration of the maxillary gingiva and palate. PMID:24249959

  2. Meningiomas: A Comparative Study of 68Ga-DOTATOC, 68Ga-DOTANOC and 68Ga-DOTATATE for Molecular Imaging in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Montenegro, María Luisa; Peña-Zalbidea, Santiago; Mateos-Pérez, Jose María; Oteo, Marta; Romero, Eduardo; Morcillo, Miguel Ángel; Desco, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to compare the tumor uptake kinetics and diagnostic value of three 68Ga-DOTA-labeled somatostatin analogues (68Ga-DOTATOC, 68Ga-DOTANOC, and 68Ga-DOTATATE) using PET/CT in a murine model with subcutaneous meningioma xenografts. Methods The experiment was performed with 16 male NUDE NU/NU mice bearing xenografts of a human meningioma cell line (CH-157MN). 68Ga-DOTATOC, 68Ga-DOTANOC, and 68Ga-DOTATATE were produced in a FASTLab automated platform. Imaging was performed on an Argus small-animal PET/CT scanner. The SUVmax of the liver and muscle, and the tumor-to-liver (T/L) and tumor-to-muscle (T/M) SUV ratios were computed. Kinetic analysis was performed using Logan graphical analysis for a two-tissue reversible compartmental model, and the volume of distribution (Vt) was determined. Results Hepatic SUVmax and Vt were significantly higher with 68Ga-DOTANOC than with 68Ga-DOTATOC and 68Ga-DOTATATE. No significant differences between tracers were found for SUVmax in tumor or muscle. No differences were found in the T/L SUV ratio between 68Ga-DOTATATE and 68Ga-DOTATOC, both of which had a higher fraction than 68Ga-DOTANOC. The T/M SUV ratio was significantly higher with 68Ga-DOTATATE than with 68Ga-DOTATOC and 68Ga-DOTANOC. The Vt for tumor was higher with 68Ga-DOTATATE than with 68Ga-DOTANOC and relatively similar to that of 68Ga-DOTATOC. Conclusions This study demonstrates, for the first time, the ability of the three radiolabeled somatostatin analogues tested to image a human meningioma cell line. Although Vt was relatively similar with 68Ga-DOTATATE and 68Ga-DOTATOC, uptake was higher with 68Ga-DOTATATE in the tumor than with 68Ga-DOTANOC and 68Ga-DOTATOC, suggesting a higher diagnostic value of 68Ga-DOTATATE for detecting meningiomas. PMID:25369268

  3. Epidural angiomatous meningioma of the thoracic spine: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YANG, TAO; WU, LIANG; YANG, CHENLONG; XU, YULUN

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural angiomatous meningiomas (AMs) are extremely rare lesions. Here, we report on a case of an epidural AM of the thoracic spine with chronic but severe cord compression. The patient underwent a T6-T8 laminectomy through the posterior approach. En bloc resection was achieved, and histopathological examination demonstrated an AM. Delayed paraplegia occurred 4 h postoperatively. The patient was treated with methylprednisolone, hyperbaric oxygen and rehabilitation. Gradually, over the next six months, the bilateral leg strength was improved compared with the preoperative status, and no tumor recurrence was noted. Although epidural AM is extremely rare, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural lesions. A definitive diagnosis is difficult based on magnetic resonance imaging alone due to the nonspecific characteristics of the tumor. Since AM is a histologically benign and highly vascularized tumor, timely gross total resection (GTR) is the most effective treatment. A good clinical outcome may be expected following GTR (Simpson grade I and II resection). PMID:26870233

  4. Frequent NF2 gene transcript mutations in sporadic meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Deprez, R.H.L.; Groen, N.A.; Zwarthoff, E.C.; Hagemeijer, A.; Van Drunen, E.; Bootsma, D.; Koper, J.W.; Avezaat, C.J.J. ); Bianchi, A.B.; Seizinger, B.R. )

    1994-06-01

    The gene for the hereditary disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), which predisposes for benign CNS tumors such as vestibular schwannomas and meningiomas, has been assigned to chromosome 22 and recently has been isolated. Mutations in the NF2 gene were found in both sporadic meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas. However, so far only 6 of the 16 exons of the gene have been analyzed. In order to extend the analysis of an involvement of the NF2 gene in the sporadic counterparts of these NF2-related tumors, the authors have used reverse transcriptase-PCR amplification followed by SSCP and DNA sequence analysis to screen for mutations in the coding region of the NF2 gene. Analysis of the NF2 gene transcript in 53 unrelated patients with meningiomas and vestibular schwannomas revealed mutations in 32% of the sporadic meningiomas (n = 44), in 50% of the sporadic vestibular schwannomas (n = 4), in 100% of the tumors found in NF2 patients (n = 2), and in one of three tumors from multiple-meningioma patients. Of the 18 tumors in which a mutation in the NF2 gene transcript was observed and the copy number of chromosome 22 could be established, 14 also showed loss of (parts of) chromosome 22. This suggests that in sporadic meningiomas and NF2-associated tumors the NF2 gene functions as a recessive tumor-suppressor gene. The mutations detected resulted mostly in frameshifts, predicting truncations starting within the N-terminal half of the putative protein. 23 refs., 2 figs. 3 tabs.

  5. Differentiation between meningiomas and other CNS tumors by simultaneous somatostatin receptor and brain scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Haldemann, A.R.; Luescher, D.; Sulzer, M.

    1994-05-01

    Since the differentiation between meningiomas and some other CNS tumors may be difficult in certain localizations, biopsy is mandatory, even in patients with meningiomas who are to be treated with percutaneous radiotherapy alone. The high density of somatostatin receptors (SSR) in meningiomas has led us to compare patients with meningiomas and other CNS tumors by simultaneous SSR and brain scintigraphy (BS) using 74 MBq 111In octreotide and 740 MBq 99mTc DTPA injected two hours later. SPECT was performed on a 3-head gamma camera 4 hours after 111In octreotide injection in multiple peak acquisition mode in 35 patients with radiologically documented CNS tumors. In positive scans, a tumor ROI was defined manually in the transverse 111In slice with highest tumor contrast and the identical tumor ROI was transferred to the corresponding 99mTc slice. A SSR to BS index was then calculated from the ratio of 111In to 99mTc counts after normalizing for identical total counts in the slices. in negative scans, the SSR to BS index was set to be 1.0. In 7 meningiomas, the SSR to BS index was 2.64{plus_minus}0.76. In 28 other CNS tumors (7 gliomas I-111, 4 neurinomas, 3 glial reactions, 3 metastases, 3 gliomas IV, 2 ependymomas, 1 chordoma, 1 NHL; plus 4 inoperable, radiologically diagnosed glioblastomas) 1.06{plus_minus}0.13. Thus, a highly significant difference was found between these two groups (p<0.0001). It is concluded that combined SSR and BS allows excellent discrimination between meningiomas and other CNS tumors and may become a non-invasive alternative to biopsy in selected clinical situations.

  6. Northwestern profiling of potential translation-regulatory proteins in human breast epithelial cells and malignant breast tissues: evidence for pathological activation of the IGF1R IRES.

    PubMed

    Blume, Scott W; Jackson, Nateka L; Frost, Andra R; Grizzle, William E; Shcherbakov, Oleg D; Choi, Hyoungsoo; Meng, Zheng

    2010-06-01

    Genes involved in the control of cell proliferation and survival (those genes most important to cancer pathogenesis) are often specifically regulated at the translational level, through RNA-protein interactions involving the 5'-untranslated region of the mRNA. IGF1R is a proto-oncogene strongly implicated in human breast cancer, promoting survival and proliferation of tumor cells, as well as metastasis and chemoresistance. Our lab has focused on the molecular mechanisms regulating IGF1R expression at the translational level. We previously discovered an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) within the 5'-untranslated region of the human IGF1R mRNA, and identified and functionally characterized two individual RNA-binding proteins, HuR and hnRNP C, which bind the IGF1R 5'-UTR and differentially regulate IRES activity. Here we have developed and implemented a high-resolution northwestern profiling strategy to characterize, as a group, the full spectrum of sequence-specific RNA-binding proteins potentially regulating IGF1R translational efficiency through interaction with the 5'-untranslated sequence. The putative IGF1R IRES trans-activating factors (ITAFs) are a heterogeneous group of RNA-binding proteins including hnRNPs originating in the nucleus as well as factors tightly associated with ribosomes in the cytoplasm. The IGF1R ITAFs can be categorized into three distinct groups: (a) high molecular weight external ITAFs, which likely modulate the overall conformation of the 5'-untranslated region of the IGF1R mRNA and thereby the accessibility of the core functional IRES; (b) low molecular weight external ITAFs, which may function as general chaperones to unwind the RNA, and (c) internal ITAFs which may directly facilitate or inhibit the fundamental process of ribosome recruitment to the IRES. We observe dramatic changes in the northwestern profile of non-malignant breast cells downregulating IGF1R expression in association with acinar differentiation in 3-D culture

  7. The roles of tricellular tight junction protein lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor in malignancy of human endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Hiroshi; Satohisa, Seiro; Kohno, Takayuki; Takahashi, Syunta; Hatakeyama, Tsubasa; Konno, Takumi; Tsujiwaki, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Kojima, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) has been identified as a novel molecular constituent of tricellular contacts that have a barrier function for the cellular sheet. LSR recruits tricellulin (TRIC), which is the first molecular component of tricellular tight junctions. Knockdown of LSR increases cell motility and invasion of certain cancer cells. However, the behavior and the roles of LSR in endometrial cancer remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the behavior and roles of LSR in normal and endometrial cancer cells in vivo and in vitro. In endometriosis and endometrial cancer, LSR was observed not only in the subapical region but also throughout the lateral region as well as in normal endometrial epithelial cells in the secretory phase, and LSR in the cancer was reduced in correlation with the malignancy. Knockdown of LSR by the siRNA in cells of the endometrial cancer cell line Sawano, induced cell migration, invasion and proliferation, while TRIC relocalized from the tricellular region to the bicellular region at the membrane. In Sawano cells and normal HEEs, a decrease of LSR induced by leptin and an increase of LSR induced by adiponectin and the drugs for type 2 diabetes metformin and berberine were observed via distinct signaling pathways including JAK2/STAT. In Sawano cells, metformin and berberine prevented cell migration and invasion induced by downregulation of LSR by the siRNA and leptin treatment. The dissection of the mechanism in the downregulation of endometrial LSR during obesity is important in developing new diagnostic and therapy for endometrial cancer. PMID:27036040

  8. Strategic and Technical Considerations for the Endovascular Embolization of Intracranial Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    James, Robert F; Kramer, Daniel R; Page, Paul S; Gaughen, John R; Martin, Lacey B; Mack, William J

    2016-04-01

    Endovascular embolization is a frequently used adjunct to operative resection of meningiomas. Embolization may decrease intraoperative blood loss, operative time, and surgical difficulty associated with resection. The specific clinical applications of this treatment have not been defined clearly. Procedural indications, preferred embolic agent, and latency until tumor resection all differ across operators. It is clear that strategic patient selection, comprehensive anatomic understanding, and sound operative technique are critical to the success of the embolization procedure. This article reviews the management and technical considerations associated with preoperative meningioma embolization. PMID:27012380

  9. Management of Vascular Invasion During Radical Resection of Medial Sphenoid Wing Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Kattner, Keith A.; Fukushima, Takanori

    2001-01-01

    Invasive meningiomas involving the medial sphenoid wing are difficult tumors to resect completely. They often have invaded the surrounding arteries at the time of diagnosis making total resection challenging. Attempts at removing these tumors from adherent carotid or middle cerebral arteries have resulted in high complication rates. Nine cases of medial sphenoid wing meningiomas with arterial invasion were operated between March 1994 and August 1998. Total resection was possible in only four cases. Two arterial-related complications occurred during resection with one resulting in permanent hemiplegia. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17167608

  10. Diagnostic and prognostic significance of genetic regional heterogeneity in meningiomas1

    PubMed Central

    Pfisterer, Wolfgang K.; Hank, Nicole C.; Preul, Mark C.; Hendricks, William P.; Pueschel, Jeanette; Coons, Stephen W.; Scheck, Adrienne C.

    2004-01-01

    We analyzed the frequency and regional distribution of cells with genetic abnormalities of chromosomes 1, 14, and 22 in meningiomas. This data was evaluated for correlation to the clinical outcome of the patients. Eight defined areas of each of 77 paraffin-embedded meningioma samples (59 grade I, 13 grade II, and 5 grade III) were analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization using bacterial artificial chromosome probes localized to chromosomes 1p36.32, 1q25.3, 14q13.3, 14q32.12, 22q11.2, and 22q12.1-3. Chromosome deletion was considered to be regionally heterogeneous if <7 regions showed cells with chromosome deletions. Deletion of 1p occurred in 35% of the grade I tumors. Distribution of cells with 1p deletion was regionally heterogeneous in 25% and homogeneous in 10% of grade I tumors. Distribution of cells with deletion of 1p was regionally heterogeneous in 23% and homogeneous in 69% of the grade II tumors. All grade III meningiomas had homogeneous distribution of cells with deletion of chromosome 1p. Distribution of cells with deletion of 14q was regionally heterogeneous in 27% and homogeneous in 2% of the grade I meningiomas, heterogeneous in 31% and homogeneous in 62% of the grade II tumors, and heterogeneous in 40% and homogeneous in 60% of the grade III meningiomas. Distribution of cells with deletion of 22q was regionally heterogeneous in 15% and homogeneous in 3% of the grade I tumors, heterogeneous in 15% and homogeneous in 31% of grade II tumors, and homogeneous in 20% of the grade III meningiomas. Distribution of cells with trisomy 22q was regionally heterogeneous in 10% of grade I tumors, heterogeneous in 23% of grade II, and homogeneous in 80% of grade III meningiomas. The proportion of patients with a deletion of 22q (either homogeneous or heterogeneous) who had recurrence was greater than the proportion of those without 22q deletion who had recurrence, and deletion of 22q was significantly associated with radiologically detected recurrence (P < 0

  11. Obesity and Risk for Brain/CNS Tumors, Gliomas and Meningiomas: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sergentanis, Theodoros N.; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Perlepe, Christina; Ntanasis-Stathopoulos, Ioannis; Tzanninis, Ioannis-Georgios; Sergentanis, Ioannis N.; Psaltopoulou, Theodora

    2015-01-01

    Objective This meta-analysis aims to examine the association between being overweight/obese and risk of meningiomas and gliomas as well as overall brain/central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Study Design Potentially eligible publications were sought in PubMed up to June 30, 2014. Random-effects meta-analysis and dose-response meta-regression analysis was conducted. Cochran Q statistic, I-squared and tau-squared were used for the assessment of between-study heterogeneity. The analysis was performed using Stata/SE version 13 statistical software. Results A total of 22 studies were eligible, namely 14 cohort studies (10,219 incident brain/CNS tumor cases, 1,319 meningioma and 2,418 glioma cases in a total cohort size of 10,143,803 subjects) and eight case-control studies (1,009 brain/CNS cases, 1,977 meningioma cases, 1,265 glioma cases and 8,316 controls). In females, overweight status/obesity was associated with increased risk for overall brain/CNS tumors (pooled RR = 1.12, 95%CI: 1.03–1.21, 10 study arms), meningiomas (pooled RR = 1.27, 95%CI: 1.13–1.43, 16 study arms) and gliomas (pooled RR = 1.17, 95%CI: 1.03–1.32, six arms). Obese (BMI>30 kg/m2) females seemed particularly aggravated in terms of brain/CNS tumor (pooled RR = 1.19, 95%CI: 1.05–1.36, six study arms) and meningioma risk (pooled RR = 1.48, 95%CI: 1.28–1.71, seven arms). In males, overweight/obesity status correlated with increased meningioma risk (pooled RR = 1.58, 95%CI: 1.22–2.04, nine study arms), whereas the respective association with overall brain/CNS tumor or glioma risk was not statistically significant. Dose-response meta-regression analysis further validated the findings. Conclusion Our findings highlight obesity as a risk factor for overall brain/CNS tumors, meningiomas and gliomas among females, as well as for meningiomas among males. PMID:26332834

  12. Intra-operative N-butyl cyanoacrylate embolization arrest of uncontrollable hemorrhage during meningioma resection.

    PubMed

    Gordhan, Ajeet

    2016-01-01

    During the surgical resection of a convexity meningioma in a 63-year-old woman, an uncontrollable active hemorrhage from the operative bed was arrested with microcatheter N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization after superselective angiography. To date, an uncontrollable neurosurgical intraprocedural hemorrhage terminated by NBCA embolization has not been previously reported. The embolization risk relative to the benefit needs to be carefully considered prior to the surgical removal of a meningioma. This report emphasizes the potential value of embolization with NBCA for arresting active bleeding intraoperatively.

  13. Endovascular angioplasty before resection of a sphenoidal meningioma with vascular encasement.

    PubMed

    Chivoret, N; Fontaine, D; Lachaud, S; Chau, Y; Sedat, J

    2011-09-01

    We describe a case of sphenoid wing meningioma presenting with cerebral infarction due to extended vascular encasement in which endovascular angioplasty was performed before surgery to avoid perioperative ischemia. A severe stenosis involved the intracranial internal carotid artery and the proximal segments of the middle and anterior cerebral arteries. Endovascular dilatation was followed by complete surgical resection. Preoperative mild aphasia and hemiparesia resolved completely after surgery. Endovascular angioplasty of arterial trunks and their branches can be proposed before the resection of skull base meningiomas encasing these arteries to decrease the risk of perioperative brain ischemia related to their surgical manipulation or vasospasm. PMID:22005706

  14. Endovascular angioplasty before resection of a sphenoidal meningioma with vascular encasement.

    PubMed

    Chivoret, N; Fontaine, D; Lachaud, S; Chau, Y; Sedat, J

    2011-09-01

    We describe a case of sphenoid wing meningioma presenting with cerebral infarction due to extended vascular encasement in which endovascular angioplasty was performed before surgery to avoid perioperative ischemia. A severe stenosis involved the intracranial internal carotid artery and the proximal segments of the middle and anterior cerebral arteries. Endovascular dilatation was followed by complete surgical resection. Preoperative mild aphasia and hemiparesia resolved completely after surgery. Endovascular angioplasty of arterial trunks and their branches can be proposed before the resection of skull base meningiomas encasing these arteries to decrease the risk of perioperative brain ischemia related to their surgical manipulation or vasospasm.

  15. Endovascular Angioplasty before Resection of a Sphenoidal Meningioma with Vascular Encasement

    PubMed Central

    Chivoret, N.; Fontaine, D.; Lachaud, S.; Chau, Y.; Sedat, J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We describe a case of sphenoid wing meningioma presenting with cerebral infarction due to extended vascular encasement in which endovascular angioplasty was performed before surgery to avoid perioperative ischemia. A severe stenosis involved the intracranial internal carotid artery and the proximal segments of the middle and anterior cerebral arteries. Endovascular dilatation was followed by complete surgical resection. Preoperative mild aphasia and hemiparesia resolved completely after surgery. Endovascular angioplasty of arterial trunks and their branches can be proposed before the resection of skull base meningiomas encasing these arteries to decrease the risk of perioperative brain ischemia related to their surgical manipulation or vasospasm. PMID:22005706

  16. Differential expression and biochemical activity of the immune receptor Tim-3 in healthy and malignant human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Bardelli, Marco; Varani, Luca; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2015-10-20

    The T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (Tim-3) is a plasma membrane-associated receptor which is involved in a variety of biological responses in human immune cells. It is highly expressed in most acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells and therefore may serve as a possible target for AML therapy. However, its biochemical activities in primary human AML cells remain unclear. We therefore analysed the total expression and surface presence of the Tim-3 receptor in primary human AML blasts and healthy primary human leukocytes isolated from human blood. We found that Tim-3 expression was significantly higher in primary AML cells compared to primary healthy leukocytes. Tim-3 receptor molecules were distributed largely on the surface of primary AML cells, whereas in healthy leukocytes Tim-3 protein was mainly expressed intracellularly. In primary human AML blasts, both Tim-3 agonistic antibody and galectin-9 (a Tim-3 natural ligand) significantly upregulated mTOR pathway activity. This was in line with increased accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) and secretion of VEGF and TNF-α. Similar results were obtained in primary human healthy leukocytes. Importantly, in both types of primary cells, Tim-3-mediated effects were compared with those induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and stem cell factor (SCF). Tim-3 induced comparatively moderate responses in both AML cells and healthy leukocytes. However, Tim-3, like LPS, mediated the release of both TNF-α and VEGF, while SCF induced mostly VEGF secretion and did not upregulate TNF-α release.

  17. Induction of calcium sensing receptor in human colon cancer cells by calcium, vitamin D and aquamin: Promotion of a more differentiated, less malignant and indolent phenotype.

    PubMed

    Singh, Navneet; Aslam, Muhammad N; Varani, James; Chakrabarty, Subhas

    2015-07-01

    The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) is a robust promoter of differentiation in colonic epithelial cells and functions as a tumor suppressor. Cancer cells that do not express CaSR (termed CaSR null) are highly malignant while acquisition of CaSR expression in these cells circumvents the malignant phenotype. We hypothesize that chemopreventive agents mediate their action through the induction of CaSR. Here, we compare the effectiveness of Ca(2+), vitamin D, and Aquamin (a marine algae product containing Ca(2+), magnesium and detectable levels of 72 additional minerals) on the induction of CaSR in the CBS and HCT116 human colon carcinoma cell lines and the corresponding CaSR null cells isolated from these lines. All three agonists induced CaSR mRNA and protein expression and inhibited cellular proliferation in the parental and CaSR null cells. Aquamin was found to be most potent in this regard. Induction of CaSR expression by these agonists resulted in demethylation of the CaSR gene promoter with a concurrent increase in CaSR promoter reporter activity. However, demethylation per se did not induce CaSR transcription. Induction of CaSR expression resulted in a down-regulated expression of tumor inducers and up-regulated expression of tumor suppressors. Again, Aquamin was found to be most potent in these biologic effects. This study provides a rationale for the use of a multi-mineral approach in the chemoprevention of colon cancer and suggests that induction of CaSR may be a measure of the effectiveness of chemopreventive agents.

  18. Upregulation of SQSTM1/p62 contributes to nickel-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haishan; Zhu, Junlan; Li, Yang; Zhang, Liping; Gu, Jiayan; Xie, Qipeng; Jin, Honglei; Che, Xun; Li, Jingxia; Huang, Chao; Chen, Lung-Chi; Lyu, Jianxin; Gao, Jimin; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic lung inflammation is accepted as being associated with the development of lung cancer caused by nickel exposure. Therefore, identifying the molecular mechanisms that lead to a nickel-induced sustained inflammatory microenvironment that causes transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells is of high significance. In the current studies, we identified SQSTM1/p62 as a novel nickel-upregulated protein that is important for nickel-induced inflammatory TNF expression, subsequently resulting in transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells. We found that nickel exposure induced SQSTM1 protein upregulation in human lung epithelial cells in vitro and in mouse lung tissues in vivo. The SQSTM1 upregulation was also observed in human lung squamous cell carcinoma. Further studies revealed that the knockdown of SQSTM1 expression dramatically inhibited transformation of human lung epithelial cells upon chronic nickel exposure, whereas ectopic expression of SQSTM1 promoted such transformation. Mechanistic studies showed that the SQSTM1 upregulation by nickel was the compromised result of upregulating SQSTM1 mRNA transcription and promoting SQSTM1 protein degradation. We demonstrated that nickel-initiated SQSTM1 protein degradation is mediated by macroautophagy/autophagy via an MTOR-ULK1-BECN1 axis, whereas RELA is important for SQSTM1 transcriptional upregulation following nickel exposure. Furthermore, SQSTM1 upregulation exhibited its promotion of nickel-induced cell transformation through exerting an impetus for nickel-induced inflammatory TNF mRNA stability. Consistently, the MTOR-ULK1-BECN1 autophagic cascade acted as an inhibitory effect on nickel-induced TNF expression and cell transformation. Collectively, our results demonstrate a novel SQSTM1 regulatory network that promotes a nickel-induced tumorigenic effect in human bronchial epithelial cells, which is negatively controlled by an autophagic cascade following nickel exposure. PMID:27467530

  19. [Therapeutical effects of pleural injecting recombinant human endostain to 
malignant pleural effusion nude mice model].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Li, Min; Yang, Huaping; Hu, Chengping

    2015-05-01

    背景与目的 恶性胸腔积液(malignant pleural effusion, MPE)临床预后不佳,胸腔内抗血管治疗可能对恶性胸腔积液具有治疗作用,本研究旨在探讨胸腔内注射重组人血管内皮抑素、顺铂、重组人血管内皮抑素联合顺铂对裸鼠恶性胸腔积液的治疗作用。方法 BALB/c裸鼠胸膜腔内注射Lewis肺癌细胞(Lewis lung cancer cell, LCC)构建恶性胸腔积液模型,造模后分别胸腔内注射重组人血管内皮抑素(E)、顺铂(P)以及重组人血管内皮抑素联合顺铂(EP)并分析各组裸鼠胸腔积液量、胸膜肿瘤微血管密度(micro vessel density, MVD)以及血管生成、凋亡相关基因的表达变化。结果 重组人血管内皮抑素及重组人血管内皮抑素联合顺铂胸腔内注射可以使裸鼠MPE量减少,且与裸鼠胸腔肿瘤组织MVD下降呈正相关;且重组人血管内皮抑素及重组人血管内皮抑素联合顺铂胸腔内注射后,MPE裸鼠胸腔肿瘤组织血管内皮生长因子(Vescular epidermal growth factor-α, VEGF-α)表达下降、低氧诱导因子-α(hypoxia induced factor-1, HIF1-α)表达升高。结论 胸腔内注射LLC细胞可成功制作裸鼠MPE模型。重组人血管内皮抑素裸鼠胸膜腔内注射对MPE裸鼠具有治疗作用,其治疗作用可能是通过下调VEGF-α,抑制肿瘤新生血管生成,下调微血管密度而达成的。.

  20. A new treatment for human malignant melanoma targeting L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1): A pilot study in a canine model

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, Shinya; Hanazono, Kiwamu; Fu, Dah-Renn; Endo, Yoshifumi; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi; Iwano, Hidetomo; Uchide, Tsuyoshi

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •LAT1 is highly expressed in tumors but at low levels in normal tissues. •We examine LAT1 expression and function in malignant melanoma (MM). •LAT1 expression in MM tissues and cell lines is higher than those in normal tissues. •LAT1 selective inhibitors inhibit amino acid uptake and cell growth in MM cells. •New chemotherapeutic protocols including LAT1 inhibitors are effective for treatment. -- Abstract: L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), an isoform of amino acid transport system L, transports branched or aromatic amino acids essential for fundamental cellular activities such as cellular growth, proliferation and maintenance. This amino acid transporter recently has received attention because of its preferential and up-regulated expression in a variety of human tumors in contrast to its limited distribution and low-level expression in normal tissues. In this study, we explored the feasibility of using LAT1 inhibitor as a new therapeutic agent for human malignant melanomas (MM) using canine spontaneous MM as a model for human MM. A comparative study of LAT expression was performed in 48 normal tissues, 25 MM tissues and five cell lines established from MM. The study observed LAT1 mRNA levels from MM tissues and cell lines that were significantly (P < 0.01) higher than in normal tissues. Additionally, MM with distant metastasis showed a higher expression than those without distant metastasis. Functional analysis of LAT1 was performed on one of the five cell lines, CMeC-1. [{sup 3}H]L-Leucine uptake and cellular growth activities in CMeC-1 were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by selective LAT1 inhibitors (2-amino-2