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Sample records for human mdm2 correlates

  1. The p53–Mdm2 interaction and the E3 ligase activity of Mdm2/Mdm4 are conserved from lampreys to humans

    PubMed Central

    Coffill, Cynthia R.; Lee, Alison P.; Siau, Jia Wei; Chee, Sharon M.; Joseph, Thomas L.; Tan, Yaw Sing; Madhumalar, Arumugam; Tay, Boon-Hui; Brenner, Sydney; Verma, Chandra S.; Ghadessy, Farid J.; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Lane, David P.

    2016-01-01

    The extant jawless vertebrates, represented by lampreys and hagfish, are the oldest group of vertebrates and provide an interesting genomic evolutionary pivot point between invertebrates and jawed vertebrates. Through genome analysis of one of these jawless vertebrates, the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum), we identified all three members of the important p53 transcription factor family—Tp53, Tp63, and Tp73—as well as the Mdm2 and Mdm4 genes. These genes and their products are significant cellular regulators in human cancer, and further examination of their roles in this most distant vertebrate relative sheds light on their origin and coevolution. Their important role in response to DNA damage has been highlighted by the discovery of multiple copies of the Tp53 gene in elephants. Expression of lamprey p53, Mdm2, and Mdm4 proteins in mammalian cells reveals that the p53–Mdm2 interaction and the Mdm2/Mdm4 E3 ligase activity existed in the common ancestor of vertebrates and have been conserved for >500 million years of vertebrate evolution. Lamprey Mdm2 degrades human p53 with great efficiency, but this interaction is not blocked by currently available small molecule inhibitors of the human HDM2 protein, suggesting utility of lamprey Mdm2 in the study of the human p53 signaling pathway. PMID:26798135

  2. The p53-Mdm2 interaction and the E3 ligase activity of Mdm2/Mdm4 are conserved from lampreys to humans.

    PubMed

    Coffill, Cynthia R; Lee, Alison P; Siau, Jia Wei; Chee, Sharon M; Joseph, Thomas L; Tan, Yaw Sing; Madhumalar, Arumugam; Tay, Boon-Hui; Brenner, Sydney; Verma, Chandra S; Ghadessy, Farid J; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Lane, David P

    2016-02-01

    The extant jawless vertebrates, represented by lampreys and hagfish, are the oldest group of vertebrates and provide an interesting genomic evolutionary pivot point between invertebrates and jawed vertebrates. Through genome analysis of one of these jawless vertebrates, the Japanese lamprey (Lethenteron japonicum), we identified all three members of the important p53 transcription factor family--Tp53, Tp63, and Tp73--as well as the Mdm2 and Mdm4 genes. These genes and their products are significant cellular regulators in human cancer, and further examination of their roles in this most distant vertebrate relative sheds light on their origin and coevolution. Their important role in response to DNA damage has been highlighted by the discovery of multiple copies of the Tp53 gene in elephants. Expression of lamprey p53, Mdm2, and Mdm4 proteins in mammalian cells reveals that the p53-Mdm2 interaction and the Mdm2/Mdm4 E3 ligase activity existed in the common ancestor of vertebrates and have been conserved for >500 million years of vertebrate evolution. Lamprey Mdm2 degrades human p53 with great efficiency, but this interaction is not blocked by currently available small molecule inhibitors of the human HDM2 protein, suggesting utility of lamprey Mdm2 in the study of the human p53 signaling pathway.

  3. Expression of p14ARF, MDM2, and MDM4 in human retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Pajovic, Sanja; Gallie, Brenda L

    2008-10-10

    It is still not clear whether the p53 pathway is altered in retinoblastoma development. We assessed the expression of the p53 pathway genes p14(ARF), mouse double minute 2 (MDM2), and mouse double minute 4 (MDM4) in human retinoblastoma compared to normal retina. Primary human retinoblastomas, retinoblastoma cell lines and normal retinas were assessed for p14(ARF) and MDM4 mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR. p14(ARF), MDM2, and MDM4 protein were measured by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. Compared to retina, p14(ARF) mRNA expression was notably increased in retinoblastoma but p14(ARF) protein was undetectable. MDM2 and MDM4 proteins were expressed in 22/22 retinoblastomas. MDM2 was expressed in 3/10 retinas tested, and MDM4 in 10/10 retinas. The expression level of MDM2 protein in retinoblastomas and retina was comparable, while MDM4 protein was overexpressed in one retinoblastoma cell line Y79 and two primary retinoblastomas. We observe that overexpression of MDM2 and MDM4 is not a necessary step in retinoblastoma development. However, loss of detectable p14(ARF) protein and resultant lack of functional inactivation of these p53 inhibitors may contribute to retinoblastoma development by constitutive inhibition of p53. PMID:18644346

  4. Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα/ESR1) mediates the p53-independent overexpression of MDM4/MDMX and MDM2 in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Swetzig, Wendy M.; Wang, Jianmin; Das, Gokul M.

    2016-01-01

    MDM2 and MDM4 are heterodimeric, non-redundant oncoproteins that potently inhibit the p53 tumor suppressor protein. MDM2 and MDM4 also enhance the tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells in in vitro and in vivo models and are overexpressed in primary human breast cancers. Prior studies have characterized Estrogen Receptor Alpha (ERα/ESR1) as a regulator of MDM2 expression and an MDM2- and p53-interacting protein. However, similar crosstalk between ERα and MDM4 has not been investigated. Moreover, signaling pathways that mediate the overexpression of MDM4 in human breast cancer remain to be elucidated. Using the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) breast invasive carcinoma patient cohort, we have analyzed correlations between ERα status and MDM4 and MDM2 expression in primary, treatment-naïve, invasive breast carcinoma samples. We report that the expression of MDM4 and MDM2 is elevated in primary human breast cancers of luminal A/B subtypes and associates with ERα-positive disease, independently of p53 mutation status. Furthermore, in cell culture models, ERα positively regulates MDM4 and MDM2 expression via p53-independent mechanisms, and these effects can be blocked by the clinically-relevant endocrine therapies fulvestrant and tamoxifen. Additionally, ERα also positively regulates p53 expression. Lastly, we report that endogenous MDM4 negatively regulates ERα expression and forms a protein complex with ERα in breast cancer cell lines and primary human breast tumor tissue. This suggests direct signaling crosstalk and negative feedback loops between ERα and MDM4 expression in breast cancer cells. Collectively, these novel findings implicate ERα as a central component of the p53-MDM2-MDM4 signaling axis in human breast cancer. PMID:26909605

  5. Structure of human MDM2 complexed with RPL11 reveals the molecular basis of p53 activation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiangge; Lang, Yue; Zhang, Qi; Cui, Di; Sun, Haili; Jiang, Lun; Chen, Zhenhang; Zhang, Rui; Gao, Yina; Tian, Wenli; Wu, Wei; Tang, Jun; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2015-01-01

    The central region of MDM2 is critical for p53 activation and tumor suppression. Upon ribosomal stress, this region is bound by ribosomal proteins, particularly ribosomal protein L11 (RPL11), leading to MDM2 inactivation and subsequent p53 activation. Here, we solved the complex structure of human MDM2–RPL11 at 2.4 Å. MDM2 extensively interacts with RPL11 through an acidic domain and two zinc fingers. Formation of the MDM2–RPL11 complex induces substantial conformational changes in both proteins. RPL11, unable to bind MDM2 mutants, fails to induce the activation of p53 in cells. MDM2 mimics 28S rRNA binding to RPL11. The C4 zinc finger determines RPL11 binding to MDM2 but not its homolog, MDMX. Our results highlight the essential role of the RPL11–MDM2 interaction in p53 activation and tumor suppression and provide a structural basis for potential new anti-tumor drug development. PMID:26220995

  6. Downregulation of MDM2 expression by RNAi inhibits LoVo human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells growth and the treatment of LoVo cells with mdm2siRNA3 enhances the sensitivity to cisplatin

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yan . E-mail: gyfyuyan@hotmail.com; Sun Ping . E-mail: sunny19750502@hotmail.com; Sun Lichun; Liu Guoyi; Chen Guohua . E-mail: olivebranch_82@hotmail.com; Shang Lihua . E-mail: leval1000@sina.com; Wu Hongbo . E-mail: whpwl@sina.com; Hu Jing; Li Yue; Mao Yinling; Sui Guangjie; Sun Xiwen

    2006-01-06

    To investigate the biological effect of mdm2 in human colorectal adenocarcinoma LoVo cells, three mdm2siRNA constructions were recombinated and transient transfected into human colorectal adenocarcinoma LoVo cells with low differentiation character in vitro. The results showed that mdm2siRNA3 reduced mRNA level of mdm2 and protein level of mdm2, leading to proliferation inhibition on LoVo cells, and reduced tumor growth in nude mice. It was found that depletion of MDM2 in this pattern promoted apoptosis of LoVo cells and Cisplatin (DDP) treated in the mdm2siRNA3 transfected cell population would result in a substantial decrease by MTT colorimetry. Decreasing the MDM2 protein level in LoVo cells by RNAi could significantly inhibit tumor growth both in vitro and in vivo, which indicated that mdm2 gene played a definite role in the development and aggressiveness of human colon carcinoma. It also could be a therapeutic target in colorectal carcinoma. The synergistic activation of RNAi and cell toxicity agents indicated that the combination of chemotherapy and gene therapy will be a promising approach in the future.

  7. Human Glioblastoma Multiforme: p53 Reactivation by a Novel MDM2 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Barbara; Bendinelli, Sara; Gabelloni, Pamela; Da Pozzo, Eleonora; Daniele, Simona; Scatena, Fabrizio; Vanacore, Renato; Campiglia, Pietro; Bertamino, Alessia; Gomez-Monterrey, Isabel; Sorriento, Daniela; Del Giudice, Carmine; Iaccarino, Guido; Novellino, Ettore; Martini, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Cancer development and chemo-resistance are often due to impaired functioning of the p53 tumor suppressor through genetic mutation or sequestration by other proteins. In glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), p53 availability is frequently reduced because it binds to the Murine Double Minute-2 (MDM2) oncoprotein, which accumulates at high concentrations in tumor cells. The use of MDM2 inhibitors that interfere with the binding of p53 and MDM2 has become a valid approach to inhibit cell growth in a number of cancers; however little is known about the efficacy of these inhibitors in GBM. We report that a new small-molecule inhibitor of MDM2 with a spirooxoindolepyrrolidine core structure, named ISA27, effectively reactivated p53 function and inhibited human GBM cell growth in vitro by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In immunoincompetent BALB/c nude mice bearing a human GBM xenograft, the administration of ISA27 in vivo activated p53, inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in tumor tissue. Significantly, ISA27 was non-toxic in an in vitro normal human cell model and an in vivo mouse model. ISA27 administration in combination with temozolomide (TMZ) produced a synergistic inhibitory effect on GBM cell viability in vitro, suggesting the possibility of lowering the dose of TMZ used in the treatment of GBM. In conclusion, our data show that ISA27 releases the powerful antitumor capacities of p53 in GBM cells. The use of this MDM2 inhibitor could become a novel therapy for the treatment of GBM patients. PMID:23977270

  8. Genome-scale functional analysis of the human genes modulating p53 activity by regulating MDM2 expression in a p53-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Min; Choi, Seung-Hyun; Yeom, Young Il; Min, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Il-Chul

    2016-09-16

    MDM2, a critical negative regulator of p53, is often overexpressed in leukemia, but few p53 mutations are found, suggesting that p53-independent MDM2 expression occurs due to alterations in MDM2 upstream regulators. In this study, a high MDM2 transcription level was observed (41.17%) regardless of p53 expression in patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Therefore, we performed genome-scale functional screening of the human genes modulating MDM2 expression in a p53-independent manner. We searched co-expression profiles of genes showing a positive or negative pattern with MDM2 expression in a DNA microarray database, selected1089 links, and composed a screening library of 368 genes. Using MDM2 P1 and P2 promoter-reporter systems, we screened clones regulating MDM2 transcriptions in a p53-independent manner by overexpression. Nine clones from the screening library showed enhanced MDM2 promoter activity and MDM2 expression in p53-deficient HCT116 cells. Among them, six clones, including NTRK2, GNA15, SFRS2, EIF5A, ELAVL1, and YWHAB mediated MAPK signaling for expressing MDM2. These results indicate that p53-independent upregulation of MDM2 by increasing selected clones may lead to oncogenesis in AML and that MDM2-modulating genes are novel potential targets for AML treatment. PMID:27524244

  9. Genome-scale functional analysis of the human genes modulating p53 activity by regulating MDM2 expression in a p53-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Min; Choi, Seung-Hyun; Yeom, Young Il; Min, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Il-Chul

    2016-09-16

    MDM2, a critical negative regulator of p53, is often overexpressed in leukemia, but few p53 mutations are found, suggesting that p53-independent MDM2 expression occurs due to alterations in MDM2 upstream regulators. In this study, a high MDM2 transcription level was observed (41.17%) regardless of p53 expression in patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Therefore, we performed genome-scale functional screening of the human genes modulating MDM2 expression in a p53-independent manner. We searched co-expression profiles of genes showing a positive or negative pattern with MDM2 expression in a DNA microarray database, selected1089 links, and composed a screening library of 368 genes. Using MDM2 P1 and P2 promoter-reporter systems, we screened clones regulating MDM2 transcriptions in a p53-independent manner by overexpression. Nine clones from the screening library showed enhanced MDM2 promoter activity and MDM2 expression in p53-deficient HCT116 cells. Among them, six clones, including NTRK2, GNA15, SFRS2, EIF5A, ELAVL1, and YWHAB mediated MAPK signaling for expressing MDM2. These results indicate that p53-independent upregulation of MDM2 by increasing selected clones may lead to oncogenesis in AML and that MDM2-modulating genes are novel potential targets for AML treatment.

  10. Antisense anti-MDM2 oligonucleotides as a novel therapeutic approach to human breast cancer: in vitro and in vivo activities and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Nan, L; Yu, D; Agrawal, S; Zhang, R

    2001-11-01

    The mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) oncogene has been suggested as a target for cancer therapy. It is amplified or overexpressed in many human cancers, including breast cancer, and MDM2 levels are associated with poor prognosis of several human cancers, including breast cancer, ovarian cancer, osteosarcoma, and lymphoma. In the present study, we investigated the functions of MDM2 oncogene in the growth of breast cancer and the potential value of MDM2 as a drug target for cancer therapy by inhibiting MDM2 expression with a specific antisense antihuman-MDM2 oligonucleotide (oligo). The selected antisense mixed-backbone oligo was evaluated for its in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity in human breast cancer models: MCF-7 cell line containing wild-type p53 and MDA-MB-468 cell line containing mutant p53. In MCF-7 cells, p53 and p21 levels were elevated, resulting from specific inhibition of MDM2 expression by the antisense oligo (AS). In MDA-MB-468 cells, after inhibition of MDM2 expression, p21 levels were elevated, although p53 levels remained unchanged. After i.p. administration of the antisense anti-MDM2 oligo, in vivo antitumor activity occurred in a dose-dependent manner in nude mice bearing MCF-7 or MDA-MB-468 xenografts. In both models, in vivo synergistically or additive therapeutic effects of MDM2 inhibition and the clinically used cancer chemotherapeutic agents irinotecan, 5-fluorouracil, and paclitaxel (Taxol) were observed. These results suggest that MDM2 have a role in tumor growth through both p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. We speculate that MDM2 inhibitors, such as ASs, have a broad spectrum of antitumor activities in human breast cancers, regardless of p53 status. This study should provide a basis for future development of anti-MDM2 ASs as cancer therapeutic agents used alone or in combination with conventional chemotherapeutics.

  11. Identification of lineariifolianoid A as a novel dual NFAT1 and MDM2 inhibitor for human cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jiang-Jiang; Sarkar, Sushanta; Voruganti, Sukesh; Agarwal, Rajesh; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There is an increasing interest in development of novel anticancer agents that target oncogenes. We have recently discovered that nuclear factor of activated T cells 1 (NFAT1) is a novel regulator of the Mouse Double Minute 2 (MDM2) oncogene and the NFAT1-MDM2 pathway has been implicated in human cancer development and progression, justifying that targeting the NFAT1-MDM2 pathway could be a novel strategy for discovery and development of novel cancer therapeutics. The present study was designed to examine the anticancer activity and underlying mechanisms of action of lineariifolianoid A (LinA), a novel natural product inhibitor of the NFAT1-MDM2 pathway. The cytotoxicity of LinA was first tested in various human cancer cell lines in comparison with normal cell lines. The results showed that the breast cancer cells were highly sensitive to LinA treatment. We next demonstrated the effects of LinA on cell proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis in breast cancer MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, in dose-dependent and p53-independent manners. LinA also inhibited the migration and invasion of these cancer cells. Our mechanistic studies further indicated that its anticancer activities were attributed to its inhibitory effects on the NFAT1-MDM2 pathway and modulatory effects on the expression of key proteins involved in cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and DNA damage. In summary, LinA is a novel NFAT1-MDM2 inhibitor and may be developed as a preventive and therapeutic agent against human cancer. PMID:27533941

  12. Influence of zinc deficiency on AKT-MDM2-P53 signaling axes in normal and malignant human prostate cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With prostate being the highest zinc-accumulating tissue before the onset of cancer, the effects of physiologic levels of zinc on Akt-Mdm2-p53 and Akt-p21 signaling axes in human normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) and malignant prostate LNCaP cells were examined. Cells were cultured for 6 d in...

  13. P15, MDM2, NF-κB, and Bcl-2 expression in primary bone tumor and correlation with tumor formation and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Guibin; Hao, Songnan; Yang, Dawei; Meng, Qinggang

    2015-01-01

    Primary bone tumor is one of the most common malignant tumors in skeletal system. It seriously affected bone movement and development with unclear pathogenesis. In this paper, rabbit VX-2 malignant bone tumor model was applied to explore apoptotic genes P15, MDM2, NF-κB and Bcl-2 correlation with primary bone tumor occurrence and metastasis. 0.3 ml rabbit VX-2 tumor cell suspension (1×106/ml) was injected to the marrow cavity of the right tibia condyle to establish the rabbit malignant bone tumor model, while equal amount of the saline was injected to the left tibia as control. Real-time PCR was applied to determine P15, MDM2, NF-κB and Bcl-2 expression level. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the abovementioned genes expression in lung, stomach, kidney and bladder. Compared with control, P15 expression level in the inoculation site surrounding tissues decreased obviously following the inoculate time elongation (P<0.05), while Bcl-2, MDM2 and NF-κB expression significantly increased (P<0.05). Bcl-2 showed significant correlation with MDM2 and NF-κB (P<0.05). At the 2, 4, 6 weeks, Bcl-2, MDM2 and NF-κB in lung, Bcl-2 in kidney, and Bcl-2 and MDM2 in bladder positively expressed (P<0.05), whereas P15 gene exhibited no significant positive expression in these tissues (P>0.05). P15, MDM2, NF-κB, and Bcl-2 genes expression levels can effectively reflect malignant bone tumor growth of rabbit tibia. MDM2, NF-κB and Bcl-2 genes involved in primary bone tumors metastasis directly. It has important clinical significance for early diagnosis and treatment of primary bone tumor. PMID:26823818

  14. Triptolide has anticancer and chemosensitization effects by down-regulating Akt activation through the MDM2/REST pathway in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jing; Su, Tiefen; Qu, Zhiling; Yang, Qin; Wang, Yu; Li, Jiansha; Zhou, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Triptolide has been shown to exhibit anticancer activity. However, its mechanism of action is not clearly defined. Herein we report a novel signaling pathway, MDM2/Akt, is involved in the anticancer mechanism of triptolide. We observed that triptolide inhibits MDM2 expression in human breast cancer cells with either wild-type or mutant p53. This MDM2 inhibition resulted in decreased Akt activation. More specifically, triptolide interfered with the interaction between MDM2 and the transcription factor REST to increase expression of the regulatory subunit of PI3-kinase p85 and consequently inhibit Akt activation. We further showed that, regardless of p53 status, triptolide inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, and caused G1 phase cell cycle arrest. Triptolide also enhanced the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin. MDM2 inhibition plays a causative role in these effects. The inhibitory effect of triptolide on MDM2-mediated Akt activation was eliminated with MDM2 overexpression. MDM2-overexpressing tumor cells, in turn, were less susceptible to the anticancer and chemosensitization effects of triptolide than control cells. Triptolide also exhibited anticancer and chemosensitization effects in nude mouse xenograft model. When it was administered to tumor-bearing nude mice, triptolide inhibited tumor growth and enhanced the antitumor effects of doxorubicin. In summary, triptolide has anticancer and chemosensitization effects by down-regulating Akt activation through the MDM2/REST pathway in human breast cancer. Our study helps to elucidate the p53-independent regulatory function of MDM2 in Akt signaling, offering a novel view of the mechanism by which triptolide functions as an anticancer agent. PMID:27004407

  15. Flexible lid to the p53-binding domain of human Mdm2: implications for p53 regulation.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Mark A; Gesell, Jennifer J; Senior, Mary M; Wyss, Daniel F

    2003-02-18

    The stabilization of p53 against Mdm2-mediated degradation is an important event in DNA damage response. Initial models of p53 stabilization focused on posttranslational modification of p53 that would disrupt the p53-Mdm2 interaction. The N-terminal regions of both p53 and Mdm2 are modified in vivo in response to cellular stress, suggesting that modifications to Mdm2 also may affect the p53-Mdm2 interaction. Our NMR studies of apo-Mdm2 have found that, in addition to Mdm2 residues 25-109 that form the well ordered p53-binding domain that was observed in the p52-Mdm2 complex, Mdm2 residues 16-24 form a lid that closes over the p53-binding site. The Mdm2 lid, which is strictly conserved in mammals, may help to stabilize apo-Mdm2. It also competes weakly with peptidic and nonpeptidic antagonists. Modifications to the Mdm2 lid may disrupt p53-Mdm2 binding leading to p53 stabilization. Mdm2 and Mdm4 possess nearly identical p53-binding domains but different lids suggesting that lid modifications may select for p53 binding.

  16. The MDM2 gene amplification database.

    PubMed Central

    Momand, J; Jung, D; Wilczynski, S; Niland, J

    1998-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is inactivated in human tumors by several distinct mechanisms. The best characterized inactivation mechanisms are: (i) gene mutation; (ii) p53 protein association with viral proteins; (iii) p53 protein association with the MDM2 cellular oncoprotein. The MDM2 gene has been shown to be abnormally up-regulated in human tumors and tumor cell lines by gene amplification, increased transcript levels and enhanced translation. This communication presents a brief review of the spectrum of MDM2 abnormalities in human tumors and compares the tissue distribution of MDM2 amplification and p53 mutation frequencies. In this study, 3889 samples from tumors or xenografts from 28 tumor types were examined for MDM2 amplification from previously published sources. The overall frequency of MDM2 amplification in these human tumors was 7%. Gene amplification was observed in 19 tumor types, with the highest frequency observed in soft tissue tumors (20%), osteosarcomas (16%) and esophageal carcinomas (13%). Tumors which showed a higher incidence of MDM2 amplification than p53 mutation were soft tissue tumors, testicular germ cell cancers and neuro-blastomas. Data from studies where both MDM2 amplification and p53 mutations were analyzed within the same samples showed that mutations in these two genes do not generally occur within the same tumor. In these studies, 29 out of a total of 33 MDM2 amplification-positive tumors had wild-type p53. We hypothesize that heretofore uncharacterized carcinogens favor MDM2 amplification over p53 mutations in certain tumor types. A database listing the MDM2 gene amplifications is available on the World Wide Web at http://www. infosci.coh.org/mdm2 . Charts of MDM2 amplification frequencies and comparisons with p53 genetic alterations are also available at this Web site. PMID:9671804

  17. Chemosensitization by antisense oligonucleotides targeting MDM2.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Roberto; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2005-02-01

    The MDM2 oncogene is overexpressed in many human cancers, including sarcomas, certain hematologic malignancies, and breast, colon and prostate cancers. The p53-MDM2 interaction pathway has been suggested as a novel target for cancer therapy. To that end, several strategies have been explored, including the use of small polypeptides targeted to the MDM2-p53 binding domain, anti-MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides, and natural agents. Different generations of anti-human-MDM2 oligonucleotides have been tested in in vitro and in vivo human cancer models, revealing specific inhibition of MDM2 expression and significant antitumor activity. Use of antisense oligos potentiated the effects of growth inhibition, p53 activation and p21 induction by several chemotherapeutic agents. Increased therapeutic effectiveness of chemotherapeutic drugs in human cancer cell lines carrying p53 mutations or deletions have shown the ability of MDM2 inhibitors to act as chemosensitizers in various types of tumors through both p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. Inhibiting MDM2 appears to also have a role in radiation therapy for human cancer, regardless of p53 status, providing a rationale for the development of a new class of radiosensitizers. Moreover, MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides potentiate the effect of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors by affecting in vitro and in vivo proliferation, apoptosis and protein expression in hormone-refractory and hormone-dependent human prostate cancer cells. These data support the development, among other MDM2 inhibitors, of anti-MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides as a novel class of anticancer agents, and suggest a potentially relevant role for the oligonucleotides when integrated with conventional treatments and/or other signaling inhibitors in novel therapeutic strategies.

  18. Np9, a cellular protein of retroviral ancestry restricted to human, chimpanzee and gorilla, binds and regulates ubiquitin ligase MDM2.

    PubMed

    Heyne, Kristina; Kölsch, Kathrin; Bruand, Marine; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Grässer, Friedrich A; Mayer, Jens; Roemer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Humans and primates are long-lived animals with long reproductive phases. One factor that appears to contribute to longevity and fertility in humans, as well as to cancer-free survival, is the transcription factor and tumor suppressor p53, controlled by its main negative regulator MDM2. However, p53 and MDM2 homologs are found throughout the metazoan kingdom from Trichoplacidae to Hominidae. Therefore the question arises, if p53/MDM2 contributes to the shaping of primate features, then through which mechanisms. Previous findings have indicated that the appearances of novel p53-regulated genes and wild-type p53 variants during primate evolution are important in this context. Here, we report on another mechanism of potential relevance. Human endogenous retrovirus K subgroup HML-2 (HERV-K(HML-2)) type 1 proviral sequences were formed in the genomes of the predecessors of contemporary Hominoidea and can be identified in the genomes of Nomascus leucogenys (gibbon) up to Homo sapiens. We previously reported on an alternative splicing event in HERV-K(HML-2) type 1 proviruses that can give rise to nuclear protein of 9 kDa (Np9). We document here the evolution of Np9-coding capacity in human, chimpanzee and gorilla, and show that the C-terminal half of Np9 binds directly to MDM2, through a domain of MDM2 that is known to be contacted by various cellular proteins in response to stress. Np9 can inhibit the MDM2 ubiquitin ligase activity toward p53 in the cell nucleus, and can support the transactivation of genes by p53. Our findings point to the possibility that endogenous retrovirus protein Np9 contributes to the regulation of the p53-MDM2 pathway specifically in humans, chimpanzees and gorillas.

  19. Investigating the effect of autoinduction in cynomolgus monkeys of a novel anticancer MDM2 antagonist, idasanutlin, and relevance to humans.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Kelli J; Yu, Li J; Reddy, Micaela B; Fretland, Adrian J; Parrott, Neil; Hussain, Sazzad; Palacios, Mary; Vazvaei, Faye; Zhi, Jianguo; Tuerck, Dietrich

    2016-08-01

    1. Idasanutlin (RG7388) is a potent p53-MDM2 antagonist currently in clinical development for treatment of cancer. The purpose of the present studies was to investigate the cause of marked decrease in plasma exposure after repeated oral administration of RG7388 in monkeys and whether the autoinduction observed in monkeys is relevant to humans. 2. In monkey liver and intestinal microsomes collected after repeated oral administration of RG7388 to monkeys, significantly increased activities of homologue CYP3A8 were observed (ex vivo). Investigation using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model suggested that the loss of exposure was primarily due to induction of metabolism in the gut of monkeys. 3. Studies in monkey and human primary hepatocytes showed that CYP3A induction by RG7388 only occurred in monkey hepatocytes but not in human hepatocytes, which suggests the observed CYP3A induction is monkey specific. 4. The human PK data obtained from the first cohorts confirmed the lack of relevant induction as predicted by the human hepatocytes and the PBPK modelling based on no induction in humans. PMID:26586447

  20. Differential response between the p53 ubiquitin-protein ligases Pirh2 and MdM2 following DNA damage in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duan Wenrui; Gao, Li; Wu Xin; Zhang Yang; Otterson, Gregory A.; Villalona-Calero, Miguel A. . E-mail: Miguel.villalona@osumc.edu

    2006-10-15

    Pirh2, a recently identified ubiquitin-protein ligase, has been reported to promote p53 degradation. Pirh2 physically interacts with p53 and promotes ubiquitination of p53 independently of MDM2. Like MDM2, Pirh2 is thought to participate in an autoregulatory feedback loop that controls p53 function. We have previously reported that Pirh2 was overexpressed in human and murine lung cancers as compared to uninvolved lung tissue. Pirh2 increase could potentially cause degradation of wildtype p53 and reduce its tumor suppression function in the lung tumor cells. Since Pirh2 has been reported to be transactivated by p53, however, the mechanisms by which a high level of Pirh2 expression is maintained in tumor cells despite low level of wildtype p53 protein are unclear. In order to evaluate p53 involvement in the transactivation of Pirh2, we evaluated Pirh2, MDM2, p53 and p21 expression with Western blot analysis and real time PCR after {gamma} irradiation or cisplatin DNA damage treatment using human cancer cell lines containing wildtype (A549, MCF-7), mutant (H719) and null (H1299) p53. Surprisingly, Pirh2 expression was not affected by the presence of wildtype p53 in the cancer cells. In contrast, MDM2 was upregulated by wildtype p53 in A549 and MCF-7 cells and was absent from the H1299 and the H719 cells. We conclude that Pirh2 operates in a distinct manner from MDM2 in response to DNA damage in cancer cells. Pirh2 elevation in p53 null cells indicates the existence of additional molecular mechanisms for Pirh2 upregulation and suggests that p53 is not the sole target of Pirh2 ubiquitin ligase activity.

  1. Functional inactivation of endogenous MDM2 and CHIP by HSP90 causes aberrant stabilization of mutant p53 in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Dun; Marchenko, Natalia D; Schulz, Ramona; Fischer, Victoria; Velasco-Hernandez, Talia; Talos, Flaminia; Moll, Ute M

    2011-05-01

    The tight control of wild-type p53 by mainly MDM2 in normal cells is permanently lost in tumors harboring mutant p53, which exhibit dramatic constitutive p53 hyperstabilization that far exceeds that of wild-type p53 tumors. Importantly, mutant p53 hyperstabilization is critical for oncogenic gain of function of mutant p53 in vivo. Current insight into the mechanism of this dysregulation is fragmentary and largely derived from ectopically constructed cell systems. Importantly, mutant p53 knock-in mice established that normal mutant p53 tissues have sufficient enzymatic reserves in MDM2 and other E3 ligases to maintain full control of mutant p53. We find that in human cancer cells, endogenous mutant p53, despite its ability to interact with MDM2, suffers from a profound lack of ubiquitination as the root of its degradation defect. In contrast to wild-type p53, the many mutant p53 proteins which are conformationally aberrant are engaged in complexes with the HSP90 chaperone machinery to prevent its aggregation. In contrast to wild-type p53 cancer cells, we show that in mutant p53 cancer cells, this HSP90 interaction blocks the endogenous MDM2 and CHIP (carboxy-terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein) E3 ligase activity. Interference with HSP90 either by RNA interference against HSF1, the transcriptional regulator of the HSP90 pathway, or by direct knockdown of Hsp90 protein or by pharmacologic inhibition of Hsp90 activity with 17AAG (17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) destroys the complex, liberates mutant p53, and reactivates endogenous MDM2 and CHIP to degrade mutant p53. Of note, 17AAG induces a stronger viability loss in mutant p53 than in wild-type p53 cancer cells. Our data support the rationale that suppression of mutant p53 levels in vivo in established cancers might achieve clinically significant effects.

  2. The RP-Mdm2-p53 Pathway and Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; Zhang, Yanping

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic processes of cell growth and division are under constant surveillance. As one of the primary “gatekeepers” of the cell, the p53 tumor suppressor plays a major role in sensing and responding to a variety of stressors to maintain cellular homeostasis. Recent studies have shown that inhibition of ribosomal biogenesis can activate p53 through ribosomal protein (RP)-mediated suppression of Mdm2 E3 ligase activity. Mutations in Mdm2 that disrupt RP binding have been detected in human cancers; however, the physiological significance of the RP-Mdm2 interaction is not completely understood. We generated mice carrying a single cysteine-to-phenylalanine substitution in the central zinc finger of Mdm2 (Mdm2C305F) that disrupts Mdm2’s binding to RPL11 and RPL5. Despite being developmentally normal and maintaining an intact p53 response to DNA damage, the Mdm2C305F mice demonstrate a diminished p53 response to perturbations in ribosomal biogenesis, providing the first in vivo evidence for an RP-Mdm2-p53 signaling pathway. Here we review some recent studies about RP-Mdm2-p53 signaling and speculate on the relevance of this pathway to human cancer. PMID:21406728

  3. The MDM2 gene family.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Michael; Mandani, Garni; Momand, Jamil

    2014-03-01

    MDM2 is an oncoprotein that blocks p53 tumor suppressor-mediated transcriptional transactivation, escorts p53 from the cell nucleus to the cytoplasm, and polyubiquitylates p53. Polyubiquitylated p53 is rapidly degraded in the cytoplasm by the 26S proteasome. MDM2 is abnormally upregulated in several types of cancers, especially those of mesenchymal origin. MDM4 is a homolog of MDM2 that also inhibits p53 by blocking p53-mediated transactivation. MDM4 is required for MDM2-mediated polyubiquitylated of p53 and is abnormally upregulated in several cancer types. MDM2 and MDM4 genes have been detected in all vertebrates to date and only a single gene homolog, named MDM, has been detected in some invertebrates. MDM2, MDM4, and MDM have similar gene structures, suggesting that MDM2 and MDM4 arose through a duplication event more than 440 million years ago. All members of this small MDM2 gene family contain a single really interesting new gene (RING) domain (with the possible exception of lancelet MDM) which places them in the RING-domain superfamily. Similar to MDM2, the vast majority of proteins with RING domains are E3 ubiquitin ligases. Other RING domain E3 ubiquitin ligases that target p53 are COP1, Pirh2, and MSL2. In this report, we present evidence that COP1, Pirh2, and MSL2 evolved independently of MDM2 and MDM4. We also show, through structure homology models of invertebrate MDM RING domains, that MDM2 is more evolutionarily conserved than MDM4. PMID:25372739

  4. Long lasting MDM2/Translocator protein modulator: a new strategy for irreversible apoptosis of human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zappelli, Elisa; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Da Settimo, Federico; Taliani, Sabrina; Trincavelli, Maria L.; Martini, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The development of multi-target drugs and irreversible modulators of deregulated signalling proteins is the major challenge for improving glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treatment. Reversible single-target drugs are not sufficient to sustain a therapeutic effect over time and may favour the activation of alternative signalling pathways and the onset of resistance phenomena. Thus, a multi-target compound that has a long-lasting mechanism of action might have a greater and longer life span of anti-proliferative activity. Recently, a dual-target indol-3ylglyoxyldipeptide derivative, designed to bind to the Translocator Protein (TSPO) and reactivate p53 function via dissociation from its physiological inhibitor, murine double minute 2 (MDM2), has been developed as a potent GBM pro-apoptotic agent. In this study, this derivative was chemically modified to irreversibly bind MDM2 and TSPO. The new compound elicited a TSPO-mediated mitochondrial membrane dissipation and restored p53 activity, triggering a long-lasting apoptosis of GBM cells. These effects were sustained over time, involved a stable activation of extracellular signal regulated kinases and were specifically observed in cancer cells, in which these protein kinases are deregulated. Dual-targeting and irreversible binding properties combined in the same molecule may represent a useful strategy to overcome the time-limited effects elicited by classical chemotherapies. PMID:26761214

  5. Stress-Induced Isoforms of MDM2 and MDM4 Correlate with High-Grade Disease and an Altered Splicing Network in Pediatric Rhabdomyosarcoma12

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Aishwarya G; O'Brien, Dennis; Singh, Ravi K; Comiskey, Daniel F; Littleton, Robert M; Mohammad, Fuad; Gladman, Jordan T; Widmann, Maria C; Jeyaraj, Selvi C; Bolinger, Cheryl; Anderson, James R; Barkauskas, Donald A; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen; Chandler, Dawn S

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a morphologically and genetically heterogeneous malignancy commonly classified into three histologic subtypes, namely, alveolar, embryonal, and anaplastic. An issue that continues to challenge effective RMS patient prognosis is the dearth of molecular markers predictive of disease stage irrespective of tumor subtype. Our study involving a panel of 70 RMS tumors has identified specific alternative splice variants of the oncogenes Murine Double Minute 2 (MDM2) and MDM4 as potential biomarkers for RMS. Our results have demonstrated the strong association of genotoxic-stress inducible splice forms MDM2-ALT1 (91.6% Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group stage 4 tumors) and MDM4-ALT2 (90.9% MDM4-ALT2-positive T2 stage tumors) with high-risk metastatic RMS. Moreover, MDM2-ALT1-positive metastatic tumors belonged to both the alveolar (50%) and embryonal (41.6%) subtypes, making this the first known molecular marker for high-grade metastatic disease across the most common RMS subtypes. Furthermore, our results show that MDM2-ALT1 expression can function by directly contribute to metastatic behavior and promote the invasion of RMS cells through a matrigel-coated membrane. Additionally, expression of both MDM2-ALT1 and MDM4-ALT2 increased anchorage-independent cell-growth in soft agar assays. Intriguingly, we observed a unique coordination in the splicing of MDM2-ALT1 and MDM4-ALT2 in approximately 24% of tumor samples in a manner similar to genotoxic stress response in cell lines. To further explore splicing network alterations with possible relevance to RMS disease, we used an exon microarray approach to examine stress-inducible splicing in an RMS cell line (Rh30) and observed striking parallels between stress-responsive alternative splicing and constitutive splicing in RMS tumors. PMID:24027430

  6. Splicing factor SRSF1 negatively regulates alternative splicing of MDM2 under damage

    PubMed Central

    Comiskey, Daniel F.; Jacob, Aishwarya G.; Singh, Ravi K.; Tapia-Santos, Aixa S.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic stress induces alternative splicing of the oncogene MDM2 generating MDM2-ALT1, an isoform attributed with tumorigenic properties. However, the mechanisms underlying this event remain unclear. Here we explore MDM2 splicing regulation by utilizing a novel minigene that mimics endogenous MDM2 splicing in response to UV and cisplatinum-induced DNA damage. We report that exon 11 is necessary and sufficient for the damage-specific alternative splicing of the MDM2 minigene and that the splicing factor SRSF1 binds exon 11 at evolutionarily conserved sites. Interestingly, mutations disrupting this interaction proved sufficient to abolish the stress-induced alternative splicing of the MDM2 minigene. Furthermore, SRSF1 overexpression promoted exclusion of exon 11, while its siRNA-mediated knockdown prevented the stress-induced alternative splicing of endogenous MDM2. Additionally, we observed elevated SRSF1 levels under stress and in tumors correlating with the expression of MDM2-ALT1. Notably, we demonstrate that MDM2-ALT1 splicing can be blocked by targeting SRSF1 sites on exon 11 using antisense oligonucleotides. These results present conclusive evidence supporting a negative role for SRSF1 in MDM2 alternative splicing. Importantly, we define for the first time, a clear-cut mechanism for the regulation of damage-induced MDM2 splicing and present potential strategies for manipulating MDM2 expression via splicing modulation. PMID:25845590

  7. MDM2 polymorphism associated with the development of cervical lesions in women infected with Human papillomavirus and using of oral contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The MDM2 gene is the major negative regulator of p53, a tumor suppressor protein. Single nucleotide polymorphism in promoter region of MDM2 gene leads to increased expression resulting in higher levels of MDM2 protein. This event increases the attenuation of the p53 pathway. Polymorphisms in this gene can interfere in the regulation of cellular proliferation. We evaluated whether MDM2 SNP309 (rs2278744) associated or not with the use of oral contraceptive can heighten susceptibility to development of cervical lesions in women HPV infected. Methods MDM2 SNP309 (rs2278744) was genotyped in a total of 287 patients using the PCR-RFLP technique. The results were analyzed by UNPHASED v.3.121 and SNPStats programs. Results The three groups (SIL, LSIL and HSIL) showed no significant differences in either genotype or allelic frequencies for MDM2 polymorphisms, except when HSIL was compared with LSIL (p = 0.037; OR = 1.81). Furthermore, in the analysis of contraceptives, a significant association was found between the use of contraceptives and the MDM2 variant in the development of high-grade cervical lesions for the TG genotype (p = 0.019; OR = 2.21) when HSIL was compared with control. When HSIL was compared with LSIL (p = 0.006; OR = 2.27). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that MDM2 SNP309 might be a good marker for assessing the progression of LSIL to HSIL. In addition, they also show that oral contraceptives alone, did not have any effect on the progression or development of cervical lesions. However, they may act synergistically with MDM2 SNP309 (rs2278744) and HPV infection in the development of cervical lesions. PMID:25075210

  8. Downregulation of LRRC8A protects human ovarian and alveolar carcinoma cells against Cisplatin-induced expression of p53, MDM2, p21Waf1/Cip1, and Caspase-9/-3 activation

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Belinda Halling; Nielsen, Dorthe; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur Arna; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2016-01-01

    The leucine-rich repeat containing 8A (LRRC8A) protein is an essential component of the volume-sensitive organic anion channel (VSOAC), and using pharmacological anion channel inhibitors (NS3728, DIDS) and LRRC8A siRNA we have investigated its role in development of Cisplatin resistance in human ovarian (A2780) and alveolar (A549) carcinoma cells. In Cisplatin-sensitive cells Cisplatin treatment increases p53-protein level as well as downstream signaling, e.g., expression of p21Waf1/Cip1, Bax, Noxa, MDM2, and activation of Caspase-9/-3. In contrast, Cisplatin-resistant cells do not enter apoptosis, i.e., their p53 and downstream signaling are reduced and caspase activity unaltered following Cisplatin exposure. Reduced LRRC8A expression and VSOAC activity are previously shown to correlate with Cisplatin resistance, and here we demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition and transient knockdown of LRRC8A reduce the protein level of p53, MDM2, and p21Waf1/Cip1 as well as Caspase-9/-3 activation in Cisplatin-sensitive cells. Cisplatin resistance is accompanied by reduction in total LRRC8A expression (A2780) or LRRC8A expression in the plasma membrane (A549). Activation of Caspase-3 dependent apoptosis by TNFα-exposure or hyperosmotic cell shrinkage is almost unaffected by pharmacological anion channel inhibition. Our data indicate 1) that expression/activity of LRRC8A is essential for Cisplatin-induced increase in p53 protein level and its downstream signaling, i.e., Caspase-9/-3 activation, expression of p21Waf1/Cip1 and MDM2; and 2) that downregulation of LRRC8A-dependent osmolyte transporters contributes to acquirement of Cisplatin resistance in ovarian and lung carcinoma cells. Activation of LRRC8A-containing channels is upstream to apoptotic volume decrease as hypertonic cell shrinkage induces apoptosis independent of the presence of LRRC8A. PMID:26984736

  9. Ribosomal protein S7 as a novel modulator of p53-MDM2 interaction: binding to MDM2, stabilization of p53 protein, and activation of p53 function.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Zhang, Z; Li, M; Wang, W; Li, Y; Rayburn, E R; Hill, D L; Wang, H; Zhang, R

    2007-08-01

    As a major negative regulator of p53, the MDM2 oncogene plays an important role in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. MDM2 promotes p53 proteasomal degradation and negatively regulates p53 function. The mechanisms by which the MDM2-p53 interaction is regulated are not fully understood, although several MDM2-interacting molecules have recently been identified. To search for novel MDM2-binding partners, we screened a human prostate cDNA library by the yeast two-hybrid assay using full-length MDM2 protein as the bait. Among the candidate proteins, ribosomal protein S7 was identified and confirmed as a novel MDM2-interacting protein. Herein, we demonstrate that S7 binds to MDM2, in vitro and in vivo, and that the interaction between MDM2 and S7 leads to modulation of MDM2-p53 binding by forming a ternary complex among MDM2, p53 and S7. This results in the stabilization of p53 protein through abrogation of MDM2-mediated p53 ubiquitination. Consequently, S7 overexpression increases p53 transactivational activities, induces apoptosis, and inhibits cell proliferation. The identification of S7 as a novel MDM2-interacting partner contributes to elucidation of the complex regulation of the MDM2-p53 interaction and has implications in cancer prevention and therapy.

  10. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the MDM2–p53 Protein–Protein Interaction (MDM2 Inhibitors) in Clinical Trials for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Design of small-molecule inhibitors (MDM2 inhibitors) to block the MDM2–p53 protein–protein interaction has been pursued as a new cancer therapeutic strategy. In recent years, potent, selective, and efficacious MDM2 inhibitors have been successfully obtained and seven such compounds have been advanced into early phase clinical trials for the treatment of human cancers. Here, we review the design, synthesis, properties, preclinical, and clinical studies of these clinical-stage MDM2 inhibitors. PMID:25396320

  11. Proneness to UV-induced apoptosis in human fibroblasts defective in transcription coupled repair is associated with the lack of Mdm2 transactivation.

    PubMed

    Conforti, G; Nardo, T; D'Incalci, M; Stefanini, M

    2000-05-18

    The apoptotic response and the level of expression of p53 and of three genes transcriptionally activated by p53 (Mdm2, p21 and bax) were investigated in UV-sensitive cells from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or Cockayne syndrome (CS). These disorders are due to different genetic defects affecting transcription-coupled repair (TCR) and/or global genome repair (GGR), the nucleotide excision repair subpathways which remove UV-induced lesions from the transcribed strand of active genes or from the rest of the genome, respectively. After 20 J/m2 UV light, normal and GGR-defective XP-C fibroblasts showed rapid increase in p53, late induction of Mdm2 and no evidence of apoptosis even 96 h after irradiation. In contrast, in XP-A (defective in GGR and TCR), CS-A and CS-B (defective only in TCR) fibroblasts, the p53 increase was not followed by Mdm2 induction and the persistence of high levels of p53, due to the lack of its degradation by Mdm2, was associated with the appearance of apoptosis. Besides indicating that the persistence of DNA damage in the transcribed strand of active genes leads to apoptosis, these findings provide the first evidence that the lack of activation of Mdm2 plays a key role in the cascade of events leading to apoptosis. Oncogene (2000). PMID:10851071

  12. Population distribution and ancestry of the cancer protective MDM2 SNP285 (rs117039649).

    PubMed

    Knappskog, Stian; Gansmo, Liv B; Dibirova, Khadizha; Metspalu, Andres; Cybulski, Cezary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Aaltonen, Lauri; Vatten, Lars; Romundstad, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Devilee, Peter; Evans, Gareth D; Lin, Dongxin; Van Camp, Guy; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G; Osorio, Ana; Milani, Lili; Ozcelik, Tayfun; Zalloua, Pierre; Mouzaya, Francis; Bliznetz, Elena; Balanovska, Elena; Pocheshkova, Elvira; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Atramentova, Lubov; Nymadawa, Pagbajabyn; Titov, Konstantin; Lavryashina, Maria; Yusupov, Yuldash; Bogdanova, Natalia; Koshel, Sergey; Zamora, Jorge; Wedge, David C; Charlesworth, Deborah; Dörk, Thilo; Balanovsky, Oleg; Lønning, Per E

    2014-09-30

    The MDM2 promoter SNP285C is located on the SNP309G allele. While SNP309G enhances Sp1 transcription factor binding and MDM2 transcription, SNP285C antagonizes Sp1 binding and reduces the risk of breast-, ovary- and endometrial cancer. Assessing SNP285 and 309 genotypes across 25 different ethnic populations (>10.000 individuals), the incidence of SNP285C was 6-8% across European populations except for Finns (1.2%) and Saami (0.3%). The incidence decreased towards the Middle-East and Eastern Russia, and SNP285C was absent among Han Chinese, Mongolians and African Americans. Interhaplotype variation analyses estimated SNP285C to have originated about 14,700 years ago (95% CI: 8,300 - 33,300). Both this estimate and the geographical distribution suggest SNP285C to have arisen after the separation between Caucasians and modern day East Asians (17,000 - 40,000 years ago). We observed a strong inverse correlation (r = -0.805; p < 0.001) between the percentage of SNP309G alleles harboring SNP285C and the MAF for SNP309G itself across different populations suggesting selection and environmental adaptation with respect to MDM2 expression in recent human evolution. In conclusion, we found SNP285C to be a pan-Caucasian variant. Ethnic variation regarding distribution of SNP285C needs to be taken into account when assessing the impact of MDM2 SNPs on cancer risk.

  13. Defects in transcription coupled repair interfere with expression of p90(MDM2) in response to ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Michalowski, J; Seavey, S E; Mendrysa, S M; Perry, M E

    2001-09-13

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation transiently stabilizes p53 through a mechanism that may require a decrease in the activity of the ubiquitin ligase, p90(MDM2). Conversely, the recovery of low levels of p53 following UV exposure may depend on an increase in p90(MDM2). The level of p90(MDM2) is increased by UV light following the p53-dependent induction of an internal mdm2 promoter, P2. If this induction of mdm2 were critical for the recovery of low levels of p53 following UV exposure, defects in mdm2's transcription would result in a prolonged increase in p53. Cells defective in transcription coupled repair (TCR) maintain high levels of p53 for a prolonged period following UV exposure. Such cells also have defects in general transcription after UV irradiation. We investigated whether TCR-deficient cells express diminished levels of mdm2 mRNA and p90(MDM2) following UV exposure. We found that transcription of mdm2 was reduced in TCR-deficient cells. The uninducible mdm2 promoter, P1, was more sensitive to the inhibitory effects of UV irradiation than the P2 promoter. The decrease in transcription from the P1 promoter was sufficient to reduce the level of p90(MDM2) and correlated with a prolonged increase in p53. Thus, p53-independent transcription of mdm2 appears critical to p53's regulation.

  14. Controlling the Mdm2-Mdmx-p53 Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Waning, David L.; Lehman, Jason A.; Batuello, Christopher N.; Mayo, Lindsey D.

    2010-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a key protein in maintaining the integrity of the genome by inducing either cell cycle arrest or apoptosis following cellular stress signals. Two human family members, Mdm2 and Mdmx, are primarily responsible for inactivating p53 transcription and targeting p53 protein for ubiquitin-mediated degradation. In response to genotoxic stress, post-translational modifications to p53, Mdm2 and Mdmx stabilize and activate p53. The role that phosphorylation of these molecules plays in the cellular response to genotoxic agents has been extensively studied with respect to cancer biology. In this review, we discuss the main phosphorylation events of p53, Mdm2 and Mdmx in response to DNA damage that are important for p53 stability and activity. In tumors that harbor wild-type p53, reactivation of p53 by modulating both Mdm2 and Mdmx signaling is well suited as a therapeutic strategy. However, the rationale for development of kinase inhibitors that target the Mdm2-Mdmx-p53 axis must be carefully considered since modulation of certain kinase signaling pathways has the potential to destabilize and inactivate p53. PMID:20651945

  15. Ubiquitination and degradation of the anti-apoptotic protein ARC by MDM2.

    PubMed

    Foo, Roger S-Y; Chan, Lennard K W; Kitsis, Richard N; Bennett, Martin R

    2007-02-23

    Current evidence shows that cardiomyocyte apoptosis plays a central role in the pathogenesis of myocardial disease and that reactive oxygen species is critically responsible for mediating cardiomyocyte apoptosis in both ischemia-reperfusion injury and dilated cardiomyopathy. ARC (Apoptosis Repressor with Caspase recruitment domain) is an anti-apoptotic protein that is found abundantly in terminally differentiated cells such as cardiomyocytes. The ARC knock-out mouse developed larger infarct in response to ischemia-reperfusion and transitioned more rapidly and severely to dilated cardiomyopathy following aortic constriction. In addition, ARC protein levels are decreased in human dilated cardiomyopathy and when cardiomyocytes are exposed to oxidative stress in vitro, but the mechanisms regulating ARC protein levels are not known. Here we show that degradation of ARC is dependent on the p53-induced ubiquitin E3 ligase, MDM2. Oxidative stress reduced ARC levels and up-regulated MDM2. MDM2 directly accelerated ARC protein turnover via ubiquitination and proteasomal-dependent degradation. This activity requires a functioning MDM2 ring finger domain because the MDM2(C464A) mutant was unable to direct ARC degradation. Furthermore, ARC degradation requires MDM2, because MDM2 knock-out fibroblasts showed defective ARC degradation that could be rescued by MDM2. Proteasomal inhibitors rescued both MDM2 and H(2)O(2)-induced degradation of ARC and inhibited cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Dilated cardiomyopathic hearts from mice that have undergone transverse aortic banding have increased MDM2 levels associated with decreased ARC levels. We conclude that MDM2 is a critical regulator of ARC levels in cardiomyocytes. Prevention of MDM2-induced degradation of ARC represents a potential therapeutic target to prevent cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

  16. MDM2 overexpression generates a skin phenotype in both wild type and p53 null mice.

    PubMed

    Alkhalaf, M; Ganguli, G; Messaddeq, N; Le Meur, M; Wasylyk, B

    1999-02-18

    The MDM2 proto-oncogene is overexpressed in human tumours and regulates the activities of the tumour suppressors p53 and pRB. We created mice that overexpress MDM2 under the control of the CMV promoter. These mice did not display an increased tumour incidence, but rather a specific skin phenotype, characterized by desquamation and hyperkeratosis. Transgenic MDM2 was found to be overexpressed in the epidermis, a tissue that normally expresses high levels of MDM2. The phenotype appeared during the first week after birth and then lessened with age, closely following the level of expression of the transgene. MDM2 overexpression was associated with an increase in proliferation in the basal layer, thickening of the epidermis, altered expression of the differentiation markers cytokeratin CK14, CK10 and CK1, and a decrease in the size and the number of granules that contain products of differentiation. Transgenic mice on a p53 null background displayed similar although not identical changes, showing that the effects of MDM2 are to a certain degree p53 independent. The skin is a major site of MDM2 expression in mice, raising the possibility that MDM2 overexpression perturbs the normal pattern of MDM2 expression and inhibits differentiation of the epidermis. PMID:10050879

  17. Iron-Dependent Regulation of MDM2 Influences p53 Activity and Hepatic Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dongiovanni, Paola; Fracanzani, Anna Ludovica; Cairo, Gaetano; Megazzini, Chiara Paola; Gatti, Stefano; Rametta, Raffaela; Fargion, Silvia; Valenti, Luca

    2010-01-01

    Iron overload is a risk factor for hepatocarcinoma, but the pathways involved are poorly characterized. Gene expression analysis in immortalized mouse hepatocytes exposed to iron or the iron chelator deferoxamine revealed that iron downregulated, whereas deferoxamine upregulated, mRNA levels of mouse double minute gene 2 (MDM2), the ubiquitin ligase involved in the degradation of the oncosuppressor p53. Regulation of MDM2 by iron status was observed at protein levels in mouse hepatocytes and rat liver, and was associated with specular changes in p53 expression. Iron dependent regulation of MDM2/p53 was confirmed ex-vivo in human monocytes, by manipulation of iron pool and in a genetic model of iron deficiency, leading to modulation of p53 target genes involved in the antioxidant response and apoptosis. Iron status influenced p53 ubiquitination and degradation rate, and the MDM2 inhibitor nutlin increased p53 levels in iron-depleted cells. Furthermore, nutlin enhanced the antiproliferative activity of deferoxamine in HepG2 hepatoblastoma cells. The MDM2 −309T > G promoter polymorphism, determining increased MDM2 and lower p53 activity, was associated with higher risk of hepatocarcinoma in cirrhotic patients with hemochromatosis, and with HFE mutations in patients with hepatocarcinoma without hemochromatosis, suggesting an interaction between MDM2 and iron in the pathogenesis of hepatocarcinoma. In conclusion, iron status influences p53 activity and antioxidant response by modulating MDM2 expression. MDM2 inhibitors may enhance the antiproliferative activity of iron chelators. PMID:20019189

  18. Novel insights about the MDM2/MDM4 heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Fabiola

    2016-03-01

    MDM2 (mouse double minute 2 homolog) and MDM4 (double minute 4 human homolog, also known as MDMX) inhibit the activity of tumor protein p53 (TP53, best known as p53) through their heterodimerization. New evidence indicates that under stress conditions the heterodimer is modified, leading to different activities of the single molecules. In particular, following lethal DNA damage, MDM2 and MDM4 dissociate and MDM4 promotes the stabilization of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) and the phosphorylation of p53, resulting in transcriptional repression of antiapoptotic targets of p53/HIPK2. PMID:27308591

  19. Population distribution and ancestry of the cancer protective MDM2 SNP285 (rs117039649).

    PubMed

    Knappskog, Stian; Gansmo, Liv B; Dibirova, Khadizha; Metspalu, Andres; Cybulski, Cezary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Aaltonen, Lauri; Vatten, Lars; Romundstad, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Devilee, Peter; Evans, Gareth D; Lin, Dongxin; Van Camp, Guy; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G; Osorio, Ana; Milani, Lili; Ozcelik, Tayfun; Zalloua, Pierre; Mouzaya, Francis; Bliznetz, Elena; Balanovska, Elena; Pocheshkova, Elvira; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Atramentova, Lubov; Nymadawa, Pagbajabyn; Titov, Konstantin; Lavryashina, Maria; Yusupov, Yuldash; Bogdanova, Natalia; Koshel, Sergey; Zamora, Jorge; Wedge, David C; Charlesworth, Deborah; Dörk, Thilo; Balanovsky, Oleg; Lønning, Per E

    2014-09-30

    The MDM2 promoter SNP285C is located on the SNP309G allele. While SNP309G enhances Sp1 transcription factor binding and MDM2 transcription, SNP285C antagonizes Sp1 binding and reduces the risk of breast-, ovary- and endometrial cancer. Assessing SNP285 and 309 genotypes across 25 different ethnic populations (>10.000 individuals), the incidence of SNP285C was 6-8% across European populations except for Finns (1.2%) and Saami (0.3%). The incidence decreased towards the Middle-East and Eastern Russia, and SNP285C was absent among Han Chinese, Mongolians and African Americans. Interhaplotype variation analyses estimated SNP285C to have originated about 14,700 years ago (95% CI: 8,300 - 33,300). Both this estimate and the geographical distribution suggest SNP285C to have arisen after the separation between Caucasians and modern day East Asians (17,000 - 40,000 years ago). We observed a strong inverse correlation (r = -0.805; p < 0.001) between the percentage of SNP309G alleles harboring SNP285C and the MAF for SNP309G itself across different populations suggesting selection and environmental adaptation with respect to MDM2 expression in recent human evolution. In conclusion, we found SNP285C to be a pan-Caucasian variant. Ethnic variation regarding distribution of SNP285C needs to be taken into account when assessing the impact of MDM2 SNPs on cancer risk. PMID:25327560

  20. Population distribution and ancestry of the cancer protective MDM2 SNP285 (rs117039649)

    PubMed Central

    Knappskog, Stian; Gansmo, Liv B.; Dibirova, Khadizha; Metspalu, Andres; Cybulski, Cezary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Aaltonen, Lauri; Vatten, Lars; Romundstad, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Devilee, Peter; Evans, Gareth D.; Lin, Dongxin; Camp, Guy Van; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G.; Osorio, Ana; Milani, Lili; Ozcelik, Tayfun; Zalloua, Pierre; Mouzaya, Francis; Bliznetz, Elena; Balanovska, Elena; Pocheshkova, Elvira; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Atramentova, Lubov; Nymadawa, Pagbajabyn; Titov, Konstantin; Lavryashina, Maria; Yusupov, Yuldash; Bogdanova, Natalia; Koshel, Sergey; Zamora, Jorge; Wedge, David C.; Charlesworth, Deborah; Dörk, Thilo; Balanovsky, Oleg; Lønning, Per E.

    2014-01-01

    The MDM2 promoter SNP285C is located on the SNP309G allele. While SNP309G enhances Sp1 transcription factor binding and MDM2 transcription, SNP285C antagonizes Sp1 binding and reduces the risk of breast-, ovary- and endometrial cancer. Assessing SNP285 and 309 genotypes across 25 different ethnic populations (>10.000 individuals), the incidence of SNP285C was 6-8% across European populations except for Finns (1.2%) and Saami (0.3%). The incidence decreased towards the Middle-East and Eastern Russia, and SNP285C was absent among Han Chinese, Mongolians and African Americans. Interhaplotype variation analyses estimated SNP285C to have originated about 14,700 years ago (95% CI: 8,300 – 33,300). Both this estimate and the geographical distribution suggest SNP285C to have arisen after the separation between Caucasians and modern day East Asians (17,000 - 40,000 years ago). We observed a strong inverse correlation (r = -0.805; p < 0.001) between the percentage of SNP309G alleles harboring SNP285C and the MAF for SNP309G itself across different populations suggesting selection and environmental adaptation with respect to MDM2 expression in recent human evolution. In conclusion, we found SNP285C to be a pan-Caucasian variant. Ethnic variation regarding distribution of SNP285C needs to be taken into account when assessing the impact of MDM2 SNPs on cancer risk. PMID:25327560

  1. Systems biology analysis reveals role of MDM2 in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Rintaro; Rocanin-Arjo, Anaïs; You, Young-Hyun; Darshi, Manjula; Van Espen, Benjamin; Miyamoto, Satoshi; Pham, Jessica; Pu, Minya; Romoli, Simone; Natarajan, Loki; Ju, Wenjun; Kretzler, Matthias; Nelson, Robert; Ono, Keiichiro; Thomasova, Dana; Mulay, Shrikant R.; Ideker, Trey; D’Agati, Vivette; Beyret, Ergin; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua; Anders, Hans Joachim

    2016-01-01

    To derive new insights in diabetic complications, we integrated publicly available human protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks with global metabolic networks using metabolomic data from patients with diabetic nephropathy. We focused on the participating proteins in the network that were computationally predicted to connect the urine metabolites. MDM2 had the highest significant number of PPI connections. As validation, significant downregulation of MDM2 gene expression was found in both glomerular and tubulointerstitial compartments of kidney biopsy tissue from 2 independent cohorts of patients with diabetic nephropathy. In diabetic mice, chemical inhibition of MDM2 with Nutlin-3a led to reduction in the number of podocytes, increased blood urea nitrogen, and increased mortality. Addition of Nutlin-3a decreased WT1+ cells in embryonic kidneys. Both podocyte- and tubule-specific MDM2-knockout mice exhibited severe glomerular and tubular dysfunction, respectively. Interestingly, the only 2 metabolites that were reduced in both podocyte and tubule-specific MDM2-knockout mice were 3-methylcrotonylglycine and uracil, both of which were also reduced in human diabetic kidney disease. Thus, our bioinformatics tool combined with multi-omics studies identified an important functional role for MDM2 in glomeruli and tubules of the diabetic nephropathic kidney and links MDM2 to a reduction in 2 key metabolite biomarkers. PMID:27777973

  2. NORE1A Regulates MDM2 Via β-TrCP

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, M. Lee; Calvisi, Diego F.; Clark, Geoffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse Double Minute 2 Homolog (MDM2) is a key negative regulator of the master tumor suppressor p53. MDM2 regulates p53 on multiple levels, including acting as an ubiquitin ligase for the protein, thereby promoting its degradation by the proteasome. MDM2 is oncogenic and is frequently found to be over-expressed in human tumors, suggesting its dysregulation plays an important role in human cancers. We have recently found that the Ras effector and RASSF (Ras Association Domain Family) family member RASSF5/NORE1A enhances the levels of nuclear p53. We have also found that NORE1A (Novel Ras Effector 1A) binds the substrate recognition component of the SCF-ubiquitin ligase complex β-TrCP. Here, we now show that NORE1A regulates MDM2 protein levels by targeting it for ubiquitination by SCF-β-TrCP. We also show the suppression of NORE1A protein levels enhances MDM2 protein expression. Finally, we show that MDM2 can suppress the potent senescence phenotype induced by NORE1A over-expression. Thus, we identify a mechanism by which Ras/NORE1A can modulate p53 protein levels. As MDM2 has several important targets in addition to p53, this finding has broad implications for cancer biology in tumor cells that have lost expression of NORE1A due to promoter methylation. PMID:27023610

  3. The p53 inhibitor MDM2 facilitates Sonic Hedgehog-mediated tumorigenesis and influences cerebellar foliation.

    PubMed

    Malek, Reem; Matta, Jennifer; Taylor, Natalie; Perry, Mary Ellen; Mendrysa, Susan M

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of cerebellar granular neuronal precursor (GNP) maturation can result in defects in motor coordination and learning, or in medulloblastoma, the most common childhood brain tumor. The Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathway is important for GNP proliferation; however, the factors regulating the extent and timing of GNP proliferation, as well as GNP differentiation and migration are poorly understood. The p53 tumor suppressor has been shown to negatively regulate the activity of the Shh effector, Gli1, in neural stem cells; however, the contribution of p53 to the regulation of Shh signaling in GNPs during cerebellar development has not been determined. Here, we exploited a hypomorphic allele of Mdm2 (Mdm2(puro)), which encodes a critical negative regulator of p53, to alter the level of wild-type MDM2 and p53 in vivo. We report that mice with reduced levels of MDM2 and increased levels of p53 have small cerebella with shortened folia, reminiscent of deficient Shh signaling. Indeed, Shh signaling in Mdm2-deficient GNPs is attenuated, concomitant with decreased expression of the Shh transducers, Gli1 and Gli2. We also find that Shh stimulation of GNPs promotes MDM2 accumulation and enhances phosphorylation at serine 166, a modification known to increase MDM2-p53 binding. Significantly, loss of MDM2 in Ptch1(+/-) mice, a model for Shh-mediated human medulloblastoma, impedes cerebellar tumorigenesis. Together, these results place MDM2 at a major nexus between the p53 and Shh signaling pathways in GNPs, with key roles in cerebellar development, GNP survival, cerebellar foliation, and MB tumorigenesis. PMID:21437245

  4. p38 MAPK-induced MDM2 degradation confers paclitaxel resistance through p53-mediated regulation of EGFR in human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Seong, Myeong-A; Lee, Ho-Young

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is a chemotherapeutic agent that is used to treat a variety of cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the emergence of drug resistance limits the utility of PTX. This study determined the signaling pathway that contributes to PTX resistance. We first established PTX resistant cell lines (H460/R and 226B/R) using a dose-escalating maintenance of PTX. We found that p38 MAPK and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were constitutively activated in these cell lines. The inhibition of p38 MAPK activity by SB203580 treatment or the transfection of dominant-negative p38 MAPK sensitized both cell lines to PTX treatment. Erlotinib, an EGFR inhibitor, also increased PTX-induced apoptosis in PTX resistant cells, which suggests a role for p38 MAPK and EGFR in the development of PTX resistance. We demonstrated that p38 MAPK enhanced EGFR expression via the induction of the rapid degradation of mouse double-minute 2 homolog (MDM2) and the consequent stabilization of p53, a transcription factor of EGFR. These results suggest for the first time that the p38 MAPK/p53/EGFR axis is crucial for the facilitation of PTX resistance in NSCLCs. We also propose a mechanism for the role of the tumor-suppressor p53 in drug resistance. These results provide a foundation for the future development of potential therapeutic strategies to regulate the p38 MAPK/p53/EGFR pathway for the treatment of lung cancer patients with PTX resistance. PMID:26799187

  5. Synergistic roles of p53 and HIF1α in human renal cell carcinoma-cell apoptosis responding to the inhibition of mTOR and MDM2 signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing-jun; Shen, Hong-liang; Lin, Jun; Xu, Xiu-hong; Ji, Zheng-guo; Han, Xiao; Shang, Dong-hao; Yang, Pei-qian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction mTOR and MDM2 signaling pathways are frequently deregulated in cancer development, and inhibition of mTOR or MDM2 independently enhances carcinoma-cell apoptosis. However, responses to mTOR and MDM2 antagonists in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) remain unknown. Materials and methods A498 cells treated with MDM2 antagonist MI-319 and/or mTOR inhibitor rapamycin were employed in the present study. Cell apoptosis and Western blot analysis were performed. Results and conclusion We found that the MDM2 inhibitor MI-319 induced RCC cell apoptosis mainly dependent on p53 overexpression, while the mTOR antagonist rapamycin promoted RCC cell apoptosis primarily through upregulation of HIF1α expression. Importantly, strong synergistic effects of MI-319 and rapamycin combinations at relatively low concentrations on RCC cell apoptosis were observed. Depletion of p53 or HIF1α impaired both antagonist-elicited apoptoses to differential extents, corresponding to their expression changes responding to chemical treatments, and double knockdown of p53 and HIF1α remarkably hindered MI-319- or rapamycin-induced apoptosis, suggesting that both p53 and HIF1α are involved in MDM2 or mTOR antagonist-induced apoptosis. Collectively, we propose that concurrent activation of p53 and HIF1α may effectively result in cancer-cell apoptosis, and that combined MDM2 antagonists and mTOR inhibitors may be useful in RCC therapy. PMID:26937175

  6. MDM2 E3 ligase-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of HDAC1 in vascular calcification

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Duk-Hwa; Eom, Gwang Hyeon; Ko, Jeong Hyeon; Shin, Sera; Joung, Hosouk; Choe, Nakwon; Nam, Yoon Seok; Min, Hyun-Ki; Kook, Taewon; Yoon, Somy; Kang, Wanseok; Kim, Yong Sook; Kim, Hyung Seok; Choi, Hyuck; Koh, Jeong-Tae; Kim, Nacksung; Ahn, Youngkeun; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Lee, In-Kyu; Park, Dong Ho; Suk, Kyoungho; Seo, Sang Beom; Wissing, Erin R.; Mendrysa, Susan M.; Nam, Kwang-Il; Kook, Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is often associated with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms linking VC to these diseases have yet to be elucidated. Here we report that MDM2-induced ubiquitination of histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) mediates VC. Loss of HDAC1 activity via either chemical inhibitor or genetic ablation enhances VC. HDAC1 protein, but not mRNA, is reduced in cell and animal calcification models and in human calcified coronary artery. Under calcification-inducing conditions, proteasomal degradation of HDAC1 precedes VC and it is mediated by MDM2 E3 ubiquitin ligase that initiates HDAC1 K74 ubiquitination. Overexpression of MDM2 enhances VC, whereas loss of MDM2 blunts it. Decoy peptide spanning HDAC1 K74 and RG 7112, an MDM2 inhibitor, prevent VC in vivo and in vitro. These results uncover a previously unappreciated ubiquitination pathway and suggest MDM2-mediated HDAC1 ubiquitination as a new therapeutic target in VC. PMID:26832969

  7. The Clustered, Regularly Interspaced, Short Palindromic Repeats-associated Endonuclease 9 (CRISPR/Cas9)-created MDM2 T309G Mutation Enhances Vitreous-induced Expression of MDM2 and Proliferation and Survival of Cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yajian; Ma, Gaoen; Huang, Xionggao; D'Amore, Patricia A; Zhang, Feng; Lei, Hetian

    2016-07-29

    The G309 allele of SNPs in the mouse double minute (MDM2) promoter locus is associated with a higher risk of cancer and proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), but whether SNP G309 contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR is to date unknown. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease (Cas) 9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) can be harnessed to manipulate a single or multiple nucleotides in mammalian cells. Here we delivered SpCas9 and guide RNAs using dual adeno-associated virus-derived vectors to target the MDM2 genomic locus together with a homologous repair template for creating the mutation of MDM2 T309G in human primary retinal pigment epithelial (hPRPE) cells whose genotype is MDM2 T309T. The next-generation sequencing results indicated that there was 42.51% MDM2 G309 in the edited hPRPE cells using adeno-associated viral CRISPR/Cas9. Our data showed that vitreous induced an increase in MDM2 and subsequent attenuation of p53 expression in MDM2 T309G hPRPE cells. Furthermore, our experimental results demonstrated that MDM2 T309G in hPRPE cells enhanced vitreous-induced cell proliferation and survival, suggesting that this SNP contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR.

  8. Mdm2 ligase dead mutants did not act in a dominant negative manner to re-activate p53, but promoted tumor cell growth.

    PubMed

    Swaroop, Manju; Sun, Yi

    2003-01-01

    Mdm2 (murine double minute 2) is an oncogene, first identified in BALB/c 3T3 cells. Over-expression and gene amplification of Mdm2 were found in a variety of human cancers. Recently, Mdm2 was found to be an E3 ubiquitin ligase that promotes degradation of p53, which contributes significantly to its oncogenic activity. In this study, we test a hypothesis that Mdm2 ligase dead mutants, which retained p53 binding activity but lost degradation activity, would act in a dominant negative manner to re-activate p53, especially upon stressed conditions. Five Mdm2 constructs expressing wild-type and E3 ligase-dead Mdm2 proteins were generated in a Tet-Off system and transfected into MCF-7 breast cancer cells (p53+/+ with Mdm2 overexpression) as well as MCF10A immortalized breast cells (p53+/+ without Mdm2 overexpression) as a normal control. We found that expression of Mdm2 mutants were tightly regulated by doxycycline. Withdrawal of doxycycline in culture medium triggered overexpression of Mdm2 mutants. However, expression of ligase dead mutants in MCF7 and MCF10A cells did not reactivate p53 as shown by a luciferase-reporter transcription assay and Western blot of p53 and its downstream target p21 under either unstressed condition or after exposure to DNA damaging agents. Biologically, over-expression of Mdm2 mutants had no effect on p53-induced apoptosis following DNA damage. Interestingly, over-expression of Mdm2 mutants promoted growth of MCF7 tumor cells probably via a p53-independent mechanism. Over-expression of Mdm2 mutants, however, had no effect on the growth of normal MCF10A cells and did not cause their transformation. Thus, ligase dead mutants of Mdm2 did not act in a dominant negative manner to reactivate p53 and they are not oncogenes in MCF10A cells.

  9. Homozygous mdm2 SNP309 cancer cells with compromised transcriptional elongation at p53 target genes are sensitive to induction of p53-independent cell death.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Melissa; Polotskaia, Alla; Bargonetti, Jill

    2015-10-27

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (T to G) in the mdm2 P2 promoter, mdm2 SNP309, leads to MDM2 overexpression promoting chemotherapy resistant cancers. Two mdm2 G/G SNP309 cancer cell lines, MANCA and A875, have compromised wild-type p53 that co-localizes with MDM2 on chromatin. We hypothesized that MDM2 in these cells inhibited transcription initiation at the p53 target genes p21 and puma. Surprisingly, following etoposide treatment transcription initiation occurred at the compromised target genes in MANCA and A875 cells similar to the T/T ML-1 cell line. In all cell lines tested there was equally robust recruitment of total and initiated RNA polymerase II (Pol II). We found that knockdown of MDM2 in G/G cells moderately increased expression of subsets of p53 target genes without increasing p53 stability. Importantly, etoposide and actinomycin D treatments increased histone H3K36 trimethylation in T/T, but not G/G cells, suggesting a G/G correlated inhibition of transcription elongation. We therefore tested a chemotherapeutic agent (8-amino-adenosine) that induces p53-independent cell death for higher clinically relevant cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that T/T and G/G mdm2 SNP309 cells were equally sensitive to 8-amino-adenosine induced cell death. In conclusion for cancer cells overexpressing MDM2, targeting MDM2 may be less effective than inducing p53-independent cell death.

  10. p53 expression and relationship with MDM2 amplification in breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Buyukpinarbasili, Nur; Gucin, Zuhal; Ersoy, Yeliz Emine; İlbak, Ayca; Kadioglu, Huseyin; Muslumanoglu, Mahmut

    2016-04-01

    Carcinoma of the breast, like other malignancies, is a genetic disease with multiple genetic events leading to the malignant phenotype. p53 mutations are the most common genetic events in human cancer. Inactivation of p53 can be a result of mutation in gene sequence. One of the main structures that regulate p53 stabilization is MDM2. It suppresses p53 transcriptional activation by recognizing transactivation domain of p53. The loss of MDM2 function on p53 regulation results in deprivation of p53 tumor suppressor ability. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP309 T->G exchange) or MDM2 amplification has been proposed to play a role in this issue. In the present study, our aim is to analyze p53 and MDM2 status and investigate their interactions in human sporadic breast carcinoma. The study groups were separated according to their molecular classifications. In each group, histologic type of the tumor, conventional prognostic parameters, p53, and MDM2 interactions were compared statistically. Tumors are divided into 4 subtypes due to estrogen and progesterone receptor status, HER-2, and Ki-67 proliferation index results. According to this classification, 23 cases are in the luminal A, 32 cases are in the luminal B, 15 cases are in the HER-2 positive, and 22 cases are in the triple-negative group, with a total of 92 cases. p53 expression is low in luminal breast carcinomas than HER-2 and triple-negative subtypes. MDM2 amplification frequency was found to be 5.4% in total. MDM2 gene amplification does not have a significant role in breast carcinogenesis, but other possible mechanisms may play a role in its inactivation. PMID:27040927

  11. Regulation of p53 and MDM2 Activity by MTBP

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Mark; Vlatković, Nikolina; Boyd, Mark T.

    2005-01-01

    p53 is a critical coordinator of a wide range of stress responses. To facilitate a rapid response to stress, p53 is produced constitutively but is negatively regulated by MDM2. MDM2 can inhibit p53 in multiple independent ways: by binding to its transcription activation domain, inhibiting p53 acetylation, promoting nuclear export, and probably most importantly by promoting proteasomal degradation of p53. The latter is achieved via MDM2's E3 ubiquitin ligase activity harbored within the MDM2 RING finger domain. We have discovered that MTBP promotes MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of p53 and also MDM2 stabilization in an MDM2 RING finger-dependent manner. Moreover, using small interfering RNA to down-regulate endogenous MTBP in unstressed cells, we have found that MTBP significantly contributes to MDM2-mediated regulation of p53 levels and activity. However, following exposure of cells to UV, but not γ-irradiation, MTBP is destabilized as part of the coordinated cellular response. Our findings suggest that MTBP differentially regulates the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of MDM2 towards two of its most critical targets (itself and p53) and in doing so significantly contributes to MDM2-dependent p53 homeostasis in unstressed cells. PMID:15632057

  12. MDM2 Associates with Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 and Enhances Stemness-Promoting Chromatin Modifications Independent of p53.

    PubMed

    Wienken, Magdalena; Dickmanns, Antje; Nemajerova, Alice; Kramer, Daniela; Najafova, Zeynab; Weiss, Miriam; Karpiuk, Oleksandra; Kassem, Moustapha; Zhang, Yanping; Lozano, Guillermina; Johnsen, Steven A; Moll, Ute M; Zhang, Xin; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The MDM2 oncoprotein ubiquitinates and antagonizes p53 but may also carry out p53-independent functions. Here we report that MDM2 is required for the efficient generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from murine embryonic fibroblasts, in the absence of p53. Similarly, MDM2 depletion in the context of p53 deficiency also promoted the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells and diminished clonogenic survival of cancer cells. Most of the MDM2-controlled genes also responded to the inactivation of the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 (PRC2) and its catalytic component EZH2. MDM2 physically associated with EZH2 on chromatin, enhancing the trimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 27 and the ubiquitination of histone 2A at lysine 119 (H2AK119) at its target genes. Removing MDM2 simultaneously with the H2AK119 E3 ligase Ring1B/RNF2 further induced these genes and synthetically arrested cell proliferation. In conclusion, MDM2 supports the Polycomb-mediated repression of lineage-specific genes, independent of p53. PMID:26748827

  13. Mdm2, p53, p21 and pAKT protein pathways in benign neoplasms of the salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Marques, Yonara Maria Freire Soares; de Lima, Marina de Deus Moura; de Melo Alves, Sérgio de Melo; Soares, Fernando Augusto; de Araújo, Vera Cavalcanti; Pinto, Décio dos Santos; Mantesso, Andrea

    2008-09-01

    The p53 protein can be altered virtually in all human cancers. In the absence of p53 mutations, p53 inactivation is possible via complex formation with other proteins, such as Mdm2. Previous studies have shown an overexpression of Mdm2 and lack of p53 expression in pleomorphic adenomas. The pAkt protein is closely related to Mdm2, and has not been previously reported in salivary gland tumors. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of Mdm2, p53, p21 and pAkt proteins in pleomorphic adenomas and myoepitheliomas by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and immunofluorescence techniques. Overexpression of Mdm2 and pAkt was present in all the cell lines and tumors studied, whereas the expression of p53 and p21 proteins was considered absent. In conclusion, the signaling pathway in benign salivary gland neoplasm showed an important participation of Mdm2 overexpression protein in tumor formation, progression through inactivation of p53 action, or both, and of pAkt overexpression through increased translocation of Mdm2 protein to cellular nuclei.

  14. The central acidic domain of MDM2 is critical in inhibition of retinoblastoma-mediated suppression of E2F and cell growth.

    PubMed

    Sdek, Patima; Ying, Haoqiang; Zheng, Hongwu; Margulis, Alexander; Tang, Xiaoren; Tian, Kui; Xiao, Zhi-Xiong Jim

    2004-12-17

    Retinoblastoma (Rb) protein is a paradigm of tumor suppressors. Inactivation of Rb plays a critical role in the development of human malignancies. MDM2, an oncogene frequently found amplified and overexpressed in a variety of human tumors and cancers, directly interacts and inhibits the p53 tumor suppressor protein. In addition, MDM2 has been shown to stimulate E2F transactivation activity and promote S-phase entry independent of p53, yet the mechanism of which is still not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate that MDM2 specifically binds to Rb C-pocket and that the central acidic domain of MDM2 is essential for Rb interaction. In addition, we show that overexpression of MDM2 reduces Rb-E2F complexes in vivo. Moreover, the ectopic expression of the wild type MDM2, but not mutant MDM2 defective in Rb interaction, stimulates E2F transactivation activity and inhibits Rb growth suppression function. Taken together, these results suggest that MDM2-mediated inhibition of Rb likely contributes to MDM2 oncogenic activity. PMID:15485814

  15. MDM2/MDMX: Master negative regulators for p53 and RB.

    PubMed

    Hu, Linshan; Zhang, Haibo; Bergholz, Johann; Sun, Shengnan; Xiao, Zhi-Xiong Jim

    2016-03-01

    MDM2 (mouse double minute 2 homolog) and MDMX (double minute X human homolog, also known as MDM4) are critical negative regulators of tumor protein p53. Our recent work shows that MDMX binds to and promotes degradation of retinoblastoma protein (RB) in an MDM2-dependent manner. In a xenograft tumor growth mouse model, silencing of MDMX results in inhibition of p53-deficient tumor growth, which can be effectively reversed by concomitant RB silencing. Thus, MDMX exerts its oncogenic activity via suppression of RB.

  16. MDM2/MDMX: Master negative regulators for p53 and RB.

    PubMed

    Hu, Linshan; Zhang, Haibo; Bergholz, Johann; Sun, Shengnan; Xiao, Zhi-Xiong Jim

    2016-03-01

    MDM2 (mouse double minute 2 homolog) and MDMX (double minute X human homolog, also known as MDM4) are critical negative regulators of tumor protein p53. Our recent work shows that MDMX binds to and promotes degradation of retinoblastoma protein (RB) in an MDM2-dependent manner. In a xenograft tumor growth mouse model, silencing of MDMX results in inhibition of p53-deficient tumor growth, which can be effectively reversed by concomitant RB silencing. Thus, MDMX exerts its oncogenic activity via suppression of RB. PMID:27308631

  17. Medicinal Chemistry Strategies to Disrupt the p53-MDM2/MDMX Interaction.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Agostinho; Leão, Mariana; Soares, Joana; Palmeira, Andreia; Pinto, Madalena; Saraiva, Lucília; Sousa, Maria Emília

    2016-09-01

    The growth inhibitory activity of p53 tumor suppressor is tightly regulated by interaction with two negative regulatory proteins, murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and X (MDMX), which are overexpressed in about half of all human tumors. The elucidation of crystallographic structures of MDM2/MDMX complexes with p53 has been pivotal for the identification of several classes of inhibitors of the p53-MDM2/MDMX interaction. The present review provides in silico strategies and screening approaches used in drug discovery as well as an overview of the most relevant classes of small-molecule inhibitors of the p53-MDM2/MDMX interaction, their progress in pipeline, and highlights particularities of each class of inhibitors. Most of the progress made with high-throughput screening has led to the development of inhibitors belonging to the cis-imidazoline, piperidinone, and spiro-oxindole series. However, novel potent and selective classes of inhibitors of the p53-MDM2 interaction with promising antitumor activity are emerging. Even with the discovery of the 3D structure of complex p53-MDMX, only two small molecules were reported as selective p53-MDMX antagonists, WK298 and SJ-172550. Dual inhibition of the p53-MDM2/MDMX interaction has shown to be an alternative approach since it results in full activation of the p53-dependent pathway. The knowledge of structural requirements crucial to the development of small-molecule inhibitors of the p53-MDMs interactions has enabled the identification of novel antitumor agents with improved in vivo efficacy.

  18. Medicinal Chemistry Strategies to Disrupt the p53-MDM2/MDMX Interaction.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Agostinho; Leão, Mariana; Soares, Joana; Palmeira, Andreia; Pinto, Madalena; Saraiva, Lucília; Sousa, Maria Emília

    2016-09-01

    The growth inhibitory activity of p53 tumor suppressor is tightly regulated by interaction with two negative regulatory proteins, murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and X (MDMX), which are overexpressed in about half of all human tumors. The elucidation of crystallographic structures of MDM2/MDMX complexes with p53 has been pivotal for the identification of several classes of inhibitors of the p53-MDM2/MDMX interaction. The present review provides in silico strategies and screening approaches used in drug discovery as well as an overview of the most relevant classes of small-molecule inhibitors of the p53-MDM2/MDMX interaction, their progress in pipeline, and highlights particularities of each class of inhibitors. Most of the progress made with high-throughput screening has led to the development of inhibitors belonging to the cis-imidazoline, piperidinone, and spiro-oxindole series. However, novel potent and selective classes of inhibitors of the p53-MDM2 interaction with promising antitumor activity are emerging. Even with the discovery of the 3D structure of complex p53-MDMX, only two small molecules were reported as selective p53-MDMX antagonists, WK298 and SJ-172550. Dual inhibition of the p53-MDM2/MDMX interaction has shown to be an alternative approach since it results in full activation of the p53-dependent pathway. The knowledge of structural requirements crucial to the development of small-molecule inhibitors of the p53-MDMs interactions has enabled the identification of novel antitumor agents with improved in vivo efficacy. PMID:27302609

  19. The Mdm2 and p53 genes are conserved in the Arachnids.

    PubMed

    Lane, David P; Cheok, Chit Fang; Brown, Christopher J; Madhumalar, Arumugam; Ghadessy, Farid J; Verma, Chandra

    2010-02-15

    The p53 protein and its negative regulator the ubiquitin E3 ligase Mdm2 have been shown to be conserved from the T. adhaerens to man. In common with D. melanogaster and C. elegans, there is a single copy of the p53 gene in T. adhaerens, while in the vertebrates three p53-like genes can be found: p53, p63 and p73. The Mdm2 gene is not present within the fully sequenced and highly annotated genomes of C. elegans and D. melanogaster. However, it is present in Placazoanand the presence of multiple distinct p53 genes in the Sea anemone N. vectensis led us to examine the genomes of other phyla for p53 and Mdm2-like genes. We report here the discovery of an Mdm2-like gene and two distinct p53-like genes in the Arachnid Ioxodes scapularis (Northern Deer Tick). The two predicted Deer Tick p53 proteins are much more highly related to the human p53 protein in sequence than are the fruit fly and nematode proteins. One of the Deer Tick genes encodes a p53 protein that is initiated within the DNA binding domain of p53 and shows remarkable homology to the newly described N-terminally truncated delta isoforms of human and zebrafish p53. PMID:20160485

  20. Chlamydia infection depends on a functional MDM2-p53 axis.

    PubMed

    González, Erik; Rother, Marion; Kerr, Markus C; Al-Zeer, Munir A; Abu-Lubad, Mohammad; Kessler, Mirjana; Brinkmann, Volker; Loewer, Alexander; Meyer, Thomas F

    2014-11-13

    Chlamydia, a major human bacterial pathogen, assumes effective strategies to protect infected cells against death-inducing stimuli, thereby ensuring completion of its developmental cycle. Paired with its capacity to cause extensive host DNA damage, this poses a potential risk of malignant transformation, consistent with circumstantial epidemiological evidence. Here we reveal a dramatic depletion of p53, a tumor suppressor deregulated in many cancers, during Chlamydia infection. Using biochemical approaches and live imaging of individual cells, we demonstrate that p53 diminution requires phosphorylation of Murine Double Minute 2 (MDM2; a ubiquitin ligase) and subsequent interaction of phospho-MDM2 with p53 before induced proteasomal degradation. Strikingly, inhibition of the p53-MDM2 interaction is sufficient to disrupt intracellular development of Chlamydia and interferes with the pathogen's anti-apoptotic effect on host cells. This highlights the dependency of the pathogen on a functional MDM2-p53 axis and lends support to a potentially pro-carcinogenic effect of chlamydial infection.

  1. Structural Exploration and Conformational Transitions in MDM2 upon DHFR Interaction from Homo sapiens: A Computational Outlook for Malignancy via Epigenetic Disruption.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Arundhati; Ray, Sujay

    2016-01-01

    Structural basis for exploration into MDM2 and MDM2-DHFR interaction plays a vital role in analyzing the obstruction in folate metabolism, nonsynthesis of purines, and further epigenetic regulation in Homo sapiens. Therefore, it leads to suppression of normal cellular behavior and malignancy. This has been earlier documented via yeast two-hybrid assays. So, with a novel outlook, this study explores the molecular level demonstration of the best satisfactory MDM2 model selection after performing manifold modeling techniques. Z-scores and other stereochemical features were estimated for comparison. Further, protein-protein docking was executed with MDM2 and the experimentally validated X-ray crystallographic DHFR. Residual disclosure from the best suited simulated protein complex disclosed 18 side chain and 3 ionic interactions to strongly accommodate MDM2 protein into the pocket-like zone in DHFR due to the positive environment by charged residues. Lysine residues from MDM2 played a predominant role. Moreover, evaluation from varied energy calculations, folding rate, and net area for solvent accessibility implied the active participation of MDM2 with DHFR. Fascinatingly, conformational transitions from coils to helices and β-sheets after interaction with DHFR affirm the conformational strength and firmer interaction of human MDM2-DHFR. Therefore, this probe instigates near-future clinical research and interactive computational investigations with mutations. PMID:27213086

  2. Structural Exploration and Conformational Transitions in MDM2 upon DHFR Interaction from Homo sapiens: A Computational Outlook for Malignancy via Epigenetic Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Arundhati; Ray, Sujay

    2016-01-01

    Structural basis for exploration into MDM2 and MDM2-DHFR interaction plays a vital role in analyzing the obstruction in folate metabolism, nonsynthesis of purines, and further epigenetic regulation in Homo sapiens. Therefore, it leads to suppression of normal cellular behavior and malignancy. This has been earlier documented via yeast two-hybrid assays. So, with a novel outlook, this study explores the molecular level demonstration of the best satisfactory MDM2 model selection after performing manifold modeling techniques. Z-scores and other stereochemical features were estimated for comparison. Further, protein-protein docking was executed with MDM2 and the experimentally validated X-ray crystallographic DHFR. Residual disclosure from the best suited simulated protein complex disclosed 18 side chain and 3 ionic interactions to strongly accommodate MDM2 protein into the pocket-like zone in DHFR due to the positive environment by charged residues. Lysine residues from MDM2 played a predominant role. Moreover, evaluation from varied energy calculations, folding rate, and net area for solvent accessibility implied the active participation of MDM2 with DHFR. Fascinatingly, conformational transitions from coils to helices and β-sheets after interaction with DHFR affirm the conformational strength and firmer interaction of human MDM2-DHFR. Therefore, this probe instigates near-future clinical research and interactive computational investigations with mutations. PMID:27213086

  3. Potential Landscape and Flux of p53-Mdm2 Oscillator Mediated by Mdm2 Degradation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Yuanhong; Yang, Zhuoqin

    The dynamics of the tumor suppressor p53 can play a crucial role in deciding cell fate after DNA damage. In this paper, we explore the dynamics and stability of p53 mediated by Mdm2 degradation rate in p53-Mdm2 oscillator through bifurcation, the potential landscape and flux. Based on the investigation of the bifurcation, we find that p53 can exhibit rich dynamics including monostability, bistability of two stable steady states and oscillation behaviors as well as bistability between a stable steady state and an oscillatory state. The stability of these states are further validated by the potential landscape. In addition, oscillatory behaviors of p53 are explored by means of the negative gradient of the potential landscape and the probability flux. It is shown that the negative gradient of the potential landscape can attract the system towards the oscillatory path and the flux can drive oscillation along the path. Moreover, the quicker the flux runs, the smaller the period is. Besides, stability and sensitivity of the system are explored by the barrier height and the entropy production rate in a single cell level, and we further compare the potential landscapes at single and population cell levels. Our results may be useful for understanding the regulation of p53 signaling pathways in response to DNA damage.

  4. Amplification of MDM2 inhibits MyoD-mediated myogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Fiddler, T A; Smith, L; Tapscott, S J; Thayer, M J

    1996-01-01

    One obvious phenotype of tumor cells is the lack of terminal differentiation. We previously classified rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines as having either a recessive or a dominant nondifferentiating phenotype. To study the genetic basis of the dominant nondifferentiating phenotype, we utilized microcell fusion to transfer chromosomes from rhabdomyosarcoma cells into C2C12 myoblasts. Transfer of a derivative chromosome 14 inhibits differentiation. The derivative chromosome 14 contains a DNA amplification. MDM2 is amplified and overexpressed in these nondifferentiating hybrids and in the parental rhabdomyosarcoma. Forced expression of MDM2 inhibits MyoD-dependent transcription. Expression of antisense MDM2 restores MyoD-dependent transcriptional activity. We conclude that amplification and overexpression of MDM2 inhibit MyoD function, resulting in a dominant nondifferentiating phenotype. PMID:8756663

  5. Clinical Overview of MDM2/X-Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Andrew; Chia, Kee Ming; Haupt, Sue; Thomas, David; Haupt, Ygal; Lim, Elgene

    2016-01-01

    MDM2 and MDMX are the primary negative regulators of p53, which under normal conditions maintain low intracellular levels of p53 by targeting it to the proteasome for rapid degradation and inhibiting its transcriptional activity. Both MDM2 and MDMX function as powerful oncogenes and are commonly over-expressed in some cancers, including sarcoma (~20%) and breast cancer (~15%). In contrast to tumors that are p53 mutant, whereby the current therapeutic strategy restores the normal active conformation of p53, MDM2 and MDMX represent logical therapeutic targets in cancer for increasing wild-type (WT) p53 expression and activities. Recent preclinical studies suggest that there may also be situations that MDM2/X inhibitors could be used in p53 mutant tumors. Since the discovery of nutlin-3a, the first in a class of small molecule MDM2 inhibitors that binds to the hydrophobic cleft in the N-terminus of MDM2, preventing its association with p53, there is now an extensive list of related compounds. In addition, a new class of stapled peptides that can target both MDM2 and MDMX have also been developed. Importantly, preclinical modeling, which has demonstrated effective in vitro and in vivo killing of WT p53 cancer cells, has now been translated into early clinical trials allowing better assessment of their biological effects and toxicities in patients. In this overview, we will review the current MDM2- and MDMX-targeted therapies in development, focusing particularly on compounds that have entered into early phase clinical trials. We will highlight the challenges pertaining to predictive biomarkers for and toxicities associated with these compounds, as well as identify potential combinatorial strategies to enhance its anti-cancer efficacy. PMID:26858935

  6. Energetic Landscape of MDM2-p53 Interactions by Computational Mutagenesis of the MDM2-p53 Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Thayer, Kelly M.; Beyer, George A.

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligase MDM2, a principle regulator of the tumor suppressor p53, plays an integral role in regulating cellular levels of p53 and thus a prominent role in current cancer research. Computational analysis used MUMBO to rotamerize the MDM2-p53 crystal structure 1YCR to obtain an exhaustive search of point mutations, resulting in the calculation of the ΔΔG comprehensive energy landscape for the p53-bound regulator. The results herein have revealed a set of residues R65-E69 on MDM2 proximal to the p53 hydrophobic binding pocket that exhibited an energetic profile deviating significantly from similar residues elsewhere in the protein. In light of the continued search for novel competitive inhibitors for MDM2, we discuss possible implications of our findings on the drug discovery field. PMID:26992014

  7. Energetic Landscape of MDM2-p53 Interactions by Computational Mutagenesis of the MDM2-p53 Interaction.

    PubMed

    Thayer, Kelly M; Beyer, George A

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligase MDM2, a principle regulator of the tumor suppressor p53, plays an integral role in regulating cellular levels of p53 and thus a prominent role in current cancer research. Computational analysis used MUMBO to rotamerize the MDM2-p53 crystal structure 1YCR to obtain an exhaustive search of point mutations, resulting in the calculation of the ΔΔG comprehensive energy landscape for the p53-bound regulator. The results herein have revealed a set of residues R65-E69 on MDM2 proximal to the p53 hydrophobic binding pocket that exhibited an energetic profile deviating significantly from similar residues elsewhere in the protein. In light of the continued search for novel competitive inhibitors for MDM2, we discuss possible implications of our findings on the drug discovery field. PMID:26992014

  8. ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Mdm2 on serine 395: role in p53 activation by DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Maya, R; Balass, M; Kim, S T; Shkedy, D; Leal, J F; Shifman, O; Moas, M; Buschmann, T; Ronai, Z; Shiloh, Y; Kastan, M B; Katzir, E; Oren, M

    2001-05-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein, a key regulator of cellular responses to genotoxic stress, is stabilized and activated after DNA damage. The rapid activation of p53 by ionizing radiation and radiomimetic agents is largely dependent on the ATM kinase. p53 is phosphorylated by ATM shortly after DNA damage, resulting in enhanced stability and activity of p53. The Mdm2 oncoprotein is a pivotal negative regulator of p53. In response to ionizing radiation and radiomimetic drugs, Mdm2 undergoes rapid ATM-dependent phosphorylation prior to p53 accumulation. This results in a decrease in its reactivity with the 2A10 monoclonal antibody. Phage display analysis identified a consensus 2A10 recognition sequence, possessing the core motif DYS. Unexpectedly, this motif appears twice within the human Mdm2 molecule, at positions corresponding to residues 258-260 and 393-395. Both putative 2A10 epitopes are highly conserved and encompass potential phosphorylation sites. Serine 395, residing within the carboxy-terminal 2A10 epitope, is the major target on Mdm2 for phosphorylation by ATM in vitro. Mutational analysis supports the conclusion that Mdm2 undergoes ATM-dependent phosphorylation on serine 395 in vivo in response to DNA damage. The data further suggests that phosphorylated Mdm2 may be less capable of promoting the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of p53 and its subsequent degradation, thereby enabling p53 accumulation. Our findings imply that activation of p53 by DNA damage is achieved, in part, through attenuation of the p53-inhibitory potential of Mdm2.

  9. Regulation of the Abundance of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF50 Protein by Oncoprotein MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Chen, Lee-Wen; Shih, Ying-Ju; Chang, Li-Kwan; Liu, Shih-Tung; Chang, Pey-Jium

    2016-01-01

    The switch between latency and the lytic cycle of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is controlled by the expression of virally encoded ORF50 protein. Thus far, the regulatory mechanism underlying the protein stability of ORF50 is unknown. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that a protein abundance regulatory signal (PARS) at the ORF50 C-terminal region modulates its protein abundance. The PARS region consists of PARS-I (aa 490–535) and PARS-II (aa 590–650), and mutations in either component result in abundant expression of ORF50. Here, we show that ORF50 protein is polyubiquitinated and its abundance is controlled through the proteasomal degradation pathway. The PARS-I motif mainly functions as a nuclear localization signal in the control of ORF50 abundance, whereas the PARS-II motif is required for the binding of ubiquitin enzymes in the nucleus. We find that human oncoprotein MDM2, an ubiquitin E3 ligase, is capable of interacting with ORF50 and promoting ORF50 degradation in cells. The interaction domains between both proteins are mapped to the PARS region of ORF50 and the N-terminal 220-aa region of MDM2. Additionally, we identify lysine residues at positions 152 and 154 in the N-terminal domain of ORF50 critically involved in MDM2-mediated downregulation of ORF50 levels. Within KSHV-infected cells, the levels of MDM2 were greatly reduced during viral lytic cycle and genetic knockdown of MDM2 in these cells favored the enhancement of ORF50 expression, supporting that MDM2 is a negative regulator of ORF50 expression. Collectively, the study elucidates the regulatory mechanism of ORF50 stability and implicates that MDM2 may have a significant role in the maintenance of viral latency by lowering basal level of ORF50. PMID:27698494

  10. Discovery of Dual Inhibitors of MDM2 and XIAP for Cancer Treatment | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    MDM2 and XIAP are mutually regulated. Binding of MDM2 RING protein to the IRES region on XIAP mRNA results in MDM2 protein stabilization and enhanced XIAP translation. In this study, we developed a protein-RNA fluorescence polarization (FP) assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) of chemical libraries. Our FP-HTS identified eight inhibitors that blocked the MDM2 protein-XIAP RNA interaction, leading to MDM2 degradation.

  11. Characterization of the 5' and 3' untranslated regions in murine mdm2 mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Mendrysa, S M; McElwee, M K; Perry, M E

    2001-02-01

    The murine double minute 2 (mdm2) gene is essential for embryogenesis in mice that express the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Mdm2 levels must be regulated tightly because overexpression of mdm2 contributes to tumorigenesis. We investigated whether the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) of murine mdm2 affect the expression of MDM2 proteins. Induction of mdm2 expression by p53 results in synthesis of an mdm2 mRNA with a short 5' UTR. The long 5' UTR increases internal initiation of translation of a minor MDM2 protein, p76(MDM2), without affecting the efficiency of translation of the full-length p90(MDM2). We discovered two alternative 3' untranslated regions in murine mdm2 mRNA expressed in the testis. The longer 3' UTR contains a consensus instability element, but mdm2 mRNAs containing the long and short 3' UTRs have comparable half-lives. The 3' UTRs do not affect either initiation codon use or translation efficiency. Thus, the murine 5' UTR, but not the 3'UTR, influences the ratio of the two MDM2 proteins but neither UTR affects MDM2 abundance significantly.

  12. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of sulfamide and triazole benzodiazepines as novel p53-MDM2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiliang; Zhuang, Chunlin; Wu, Yuelin; Guo, Zizhao; Li, Jin; Dong, Guoqiang; Yao, Jianzhong; Sheng, Chunquan; Miao, Zhenyuan; Zhang, Wannian

    2014-01-01

    A series of sulfamide and triazole benzodiazepines were obtained with the principle of bioisosterism. The p53-murine double minute 2 (MDM2) inhibitory activity and in vitro antitumor activity were evaluated. Most of the novel benzodiazepines exhibited moderate protein binding inhibitory activity. Particularly, triazole benzodiazepines showed good inhibitory activity and antitumor potency. Compound 16 had promising antitumor activity against the U-2 OS human osteosarcoma cell line with an IC50 value of 4.17 μM, which was much better than that of nutlin-3. The molecular docking model also successfully predicted that this class of compounds mimicked the three critical residues of p53 binding to MDM2.

  13. Therapeutic considerations for Mdm2: not just a one trick pony

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Jason A.; Eitel, Jacob A.; Batuello, Christopher N.; Mayo, Lindsey D.

    2008-01-01

    Background The mdm2 proto-oncogene is elevated in numerous late stage cancers. The Mdm2 protein manifests its oncogenic properties in part through inactivation of the tumor suppressor protein p53. Recent efforts in anti-cancer drug design have focused on the identification of small molecules that disrupt the Mdm2-p53 interaction, in hopes of re-engaging the p53 pathway. Objective In addition to binding p53, Mdm2 complexes with numerous proteins involved in DNA repair, translation, metabolic activities, tumor growth and apoptosis. Additional biochemical analysis is required to understand how Mdm2 integrates into all of these cellular processes. Post-translational modifications to Mdm2 can alter its ability to associate with numerous proteins. Changes in protein structure may also affect the ability of small molecule inhibitors to effectively antagonize Mdm2. Conclusion The complexity of Mdm2 modification has been largely neglected during the development of previous Mdm2 inhibitors. Future high-throughput or in silico screening efforts will need to recognize the importance of post-translational modifications to Mdm2. Furthermore, the identification of molecules that target other domains in Mdm2 may provide a tool to prevent other pivotal p53-independent functions of Mdm2. These aims provide a useful roadmap for the discovery of new Mdm2 binding compounds with therapeutic potency that may exceed its predecessors. PMID:19738896

  14. Transcriptional repressor NIR interacts with the p53-inhibiting ubiquitin ligase MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Heyne, Kristina; Förster, Juliane; Schüle, Roland; Roemer, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    NIR (novel INHAT repressor) can bind to p53 at promoters and inhibit p53-mediated gene transactivation by blocking histone acetylation carried out by p300/CBP. Like NIR, the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 can also bind and inhibit p53 at promoters. Here, we present data indicating that NIR, which shuttles between the nucleolus and nucleoplasm, not only binds to p53 but also directly to MDM2, in part via the central acidic and zinc finger domain of MDM2 that is also contacted by several other nucleolus-based MDM2/p53-regulating proteins. Like some of these, NIR was able to inhibit the ubiquitination of MDM2 and stabilize MDM2; however, unlike these nucleolus-based MDM2 regulators, NIR did not inhibit MDM2 to activate p53. Rather, NIR cooperated with MDM2 to repress p53-induced transactivation. This cooperative repression may at least in part involve p300/CBP. We show that NIR can block the acetylation of p53 and MDM2. Non-acetylated p53 has been documented previously to more readily associate with inhibitory MDM2. NIR may thus help to sustain the inhibitory p53:MDM2 complex, and we present evidence suggesting that all three proteins can indeed form a ternary complex. In sum, our findings suggest that NIR can support MDM2 to suppress p53 as a transcriptional activator. PMID:24413661

  15. A Novel Interaction between TFII-I and Mdm2 with a Negative Effect on TFII-I Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cetkovská, Kateřina; Šustová, Hana; Kosztyu, Pavlína; Uldrijan, Stjepan

    2015-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome-associated transcription factor TFII-I plays a critical regulatory role in bone and neural tissue development and in immunity, in part by regulating cell proliferation in response to mitogens. Mdm2, a cellular oncogene responsible for the loss of p53 tumor suppressor activity in a significant proportion of human cancers, was identified in this study as a new binding partner for TFII-I and a negative regulator of TFII-I-mediated transcription. These findings suggest a new p53-independent mechanism by which increased Mdm2 levels found in human tumors could influence cancer cells. In addition to that, we present data indicating that TFII-I is an important cellular regulator of transcription from the immediate-early promoter of human cytomegalovirus, a promoter sequence frequently used in mammalian expression vectors, including vectors for gene therapy. Our observation that Mdm2 over-expression can decrease the ability of TFII-I to activate the CMV promoter might have implications for the efficiency of experimental gene therapy based on CMV promoter–derived vectors in cancers with Mdm2 gene amplification. PMID:26656605

  16. A Novel Interaction between TFII-I and Mdm2 with a Negative Effect on TFII-I Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Cetkovská, Kateřina; Šustová, Hana; Kosztyu, Pavlína; Uldrijan, Stjepan

    2015-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome-associated transcription factor TFII-I plays a critical regulatory role in bone and neural tissue development and in immunity, in part by regulating cell proliferation in response to mitogens. Mdm2, a cellular oncogene responsible for the loss of p53 tumor suppressor activity in a significant proportion of human cancers, was identified in this study as a new binding partner for TFII-I and a negative regulator of TFII-I-mediated transcription. These findings suggest a new p53-independent mechanism by which increased Mdm2 levels found in human tumors could influence cancer cells. In addition to that, we present data indicating that TFII-I is an important cellular regulator of transcription from the immediate-early promoter of human cytomegalovirus, a promoter sequence frequently used in mammalian expression vectors, including vectors for gene therapy. Our observation that Mdm2 over-expression can decrease the ability of TFII-I to activate the CMV promoter might have implications for the efficiency of experimental gene therapy based on CMV promoter-derived vectors in cancers with Mdm2 gene amplification. PMID:26656605

  17. Ling Zhi-8 mediates p53-dependent growth arrest of lung cancer cells proliferation via the ribosomal protein S7-MDM2-p53 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Ting; Lin, Tung-Yi; Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Sheu, Fuu; Ho, Chau-Mei; Chen, Edmund I-T

    2011-12-01

    Ling Zhi-8 (LZ-8), an immunomodulatory protein, is derived from and has been cloned from the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi or Ling Zhi); this protein exhibits immunomodulating and antitumor properties. We investigated the effects of recombinant LZ-8 protein (rLZ-8) on the proliferation of A549 human lung cancer cells. Here, we showed that rLZ-8 inhibits cell growth and that this is correlated with increased G(1) arrest. The treatment of A549 cells with rLZ-8 activated p53 and p21 expression, and both the G(1) arrest and the antigrowth effect were found to be p53 dependent. It was further demonstrated that rLZ-8 inhibited tumor growth in mice transplanted with Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Interestingly, rLZ-8 treatment was found to lead to nucleolar stress (or ribosomal stress) as evidenced by inhibition of precursor ribosomal RNA synthesis and reduced polysome formation in A549 cells. These changes resulted in an increasing binding of ribosomal protein S7 to MDM2 and a decreased interaction between MDM2 and p53. Taking these results together, we have identified a novel rLZ-8 antitumor function that positively modulates p53 via ribosomal stress and inhibits lung cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Our current results suggest that rLZ-8 may have potential as a therapeutic intervention for the treatment of cancers that contain wild-type p53 and high expression of MDM2.

  18. Induction of apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer by downregulation of MDM2 using pH-responsive PMPC-b-PDPA/siRNA complex nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haijun; Zou, Yonglong; Jiang, Lei; Yin, Qi; He, Xinyu; Chen, Lingli; Zhang, Zhiwen; Gu, Wangwen; Li, Yaping

    2013-04-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for the majority of lung cancer caused human death. In this work, we selected oncogene mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) as a therapeutic target for NSCLC treatment and proposed that sufficient MDM2 knockdown could inhibit tumor growth via induction of cell cycle arrest and cancer cell apoptosis. On this regard, a new pH-responsive diblock copolymer of poly(methacryloyloxy ethyl phosphorylcholine)-block-poly(diisopropanolamine ethyl methacrylate) (PMPC-b-PDPA)/siRNA-MDM2 complex nanoparticle with minimized surface charge and suitable particle size was designed and developed for siRNA-MDM2 delivery in vitro and in vivo. The experimental results showed that the nanoparticles were spherical with particle size around 50 nm. MDM2 knockdown in p53 mutant NSCLC H2009 cells induced significant cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and growth inhibition through upregulation of p21 and activation of caspase-3. Furthermore, the growth of H2009 xenograft tumor in nude mice was inhibited via repeated injection of PMPC-b-PDPA/siRNA-MDM2 complex nanoparticles. These results suggested that PMPC-b-PDPA/siRNA complex nanoparticles targeting a unique set of oncogenes could be developed into a new therapeutic approach for NSCLC treatment. PMID:23352573

  19. NAT10 regulates p53 activation through acetylating p53 at K120 and ubiquitinating Mdm2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Tan, Yuqin; Zhang, Chunfeng; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Liangliang; Ren, Pengwei; Deng, Hongkui; Luo, Jianyuan; Ke, Yang; Du, Xiaojuan

    2016-03-01

    As a genome guardian, p53 maintains genome stability by arresting cells for damage repair or inducing cell apoptosis to eliminate the damaged cells in stress response. Several nucleolar proteins stabilize p53 by interfering Mdm2-p53 interaction upon cellular stress, while other mechanisms by which nucleolar proteins activate p53 remain to be determined. Here, we identify NAT10 as a novel regulator for p53 activation. NAT10 acetylates p53 at K120 and stabilizes p53 by counteracting Mdm2 action. In addition, NAT10 promotes Mdm2 degradation with its intrinsic E3 ligase activity. After DNA damage, NAT10 translocates to nucleoplasm and activates p53-mediated cell cycle control and apoptosis. Finally, NAT10 inhibits cell proliferation and expression of NAT10 decreases in human colorectal carcinomas. Thus, our data demonstrate that NAT10 plays a critical role in p53 activation via acetylating p53 and counteracting Mdm2 action, providing a novel pathway by which nucleolar protein activates p53 as a cellular stress sensor. PMID:26882543

  20. Aberrant splicing of the DMP1-ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway in cancer.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kazushi; Fry, Elizabeth A

    2016-07-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) of mRNA precursors is a ubiquitous mechanism for generating numerous transcripts with different activities from one genomic locus in mammalian cells. The gene products from a single locus can thus have similar, dominant-negative or even opposing functions. Aberrant AS has been found in cancer to express proteins that promote cell growth, local invasion and metastasis. This review will focus on the aberrant splicing of tumor suppressor/oncogenes that belong to the DMP1-ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway. Our recent study shows that the DMP1 locus generates both tumor-suppressive DMP1α (p53-dependent) and oncogenic DMP1β (p53-independent) splice variants, and the DMP1β/α ratio increases with neoplastic transformation of breast epithelial cells. This process is associated with high DMP1β protein expression and shorter survival of breast cancer (BC) patients. Accumulating pieces of evidence show that ARF is frequently inactivated by aberrant splicing in human cancers, demonstrating its involvement in human malignancies. Splice variants from the MDM2 locus promote cell growth in culture and accelerate tumorigenesis in vivo. Human cancers expressing these splice variants are associated with advanced stage/metastasis, and thus have negative clinical impacts. Although they lack most of the p53-binding domain, their activities are mostly dependent on p53 since they bind to wild-type MDM2. The p53 locus produces splice isoforms that have either favorable (β/γ at the C-terminus) or negative impact (Δ40, Δ133 at the N-terminus) on patients' survival. As the oncogenic AS products from these loci are expressed only in cancer cells, they may eventually become targets for molecular therapies.

  1. The Wip1 Phosphatase acts as a gatekeeper in the p53-Mdm2 autoregulatory loop.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiongbin; Ma, Ou; Nguyen, Thuy-Ai; Jones, Stephen N; Oren, Moshe; Donehower, Lawrence A

    2007-10-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a transcription factor that responds to cellular stresses by initiating cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. One transcriptional target of p53 is Mdm2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that interacts with p53 to promote its proteasomal degradation in a negative feedback regulatory loop. Here we show that the wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 (Wip1), or PPM1D, downregulates p53 protein levels by stabilizing Mdm2 and facilitating its access to p53. Wip1 interacts with and dephosphorylates Mdm2 at serine 395, a site phosphorylated by the ATM kinase. Dephosphorylated Mdm2 has increased stability and affinity for p53, facilitating p53 ubiquitination and degradation. Thus, Wip1 acts as a gatekeeper in the Mdm2-p53 regulatory loop by stabilizing Mdm2 and promoting Mdm2-mediated proteolysis of p53.

  2. Synergistic cooperation of MDM2 and E2F1 contributes to TAp73 transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kasim, Vivi; Huang, Can; Zhang, Jing; Jia, Huizhen; Wang, Yunxia; Yang, Li; Miyagishi, Makoto; Wu, Shourong

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • MDM2 is a novel positive regulator of TAp73 transcriptional activity. • MDM2 colocalizes together and physically interacts with E2F1. • Synergistic cooperation of MDM2 and E2F1 is crucial for TAp73 transcription. • MDM2 regulates TAp73 transcriptional activity in a p53-independent manner. - Abstract: TAp73, a structural homologue of p53, plays an important role in tumorigenesis. E2F1 had been reported as a transcriptional regulator of TAp73, however, the detailed mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here we reported that MDM2-silencing reduced the activities of the TAp73 promoters and the endogenous TAp73 expression level significantly; while MDM2 overexpression upregulated them. We further revealed that the regulation of TAp73 transcriptional activity occurs as a synergistic effect of MDM2 and E2F1, most probably through their physical interaction in the nuclei. Furthermore, we also suggested that MDM2 might be involved in DNA damage-induced TAp73 transcriptional activity. Finally, we elucidated that MDM2-silencing reduced the proliferation rate of colon carcinoma cells regardless of the p53 status. Our data show a synergistic effect of MDM2 and E2F1 on TAp73 transcriptional activity, suggesting a novel regulation pathway of TAp73.

  3. Ribosomal protein S7 is both a regulator and a substrate of MDM2.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Poyurovsky, Masha V; Li, Yingchun; Biderman, Lynn; Stahl, Joachim; Jacq, Xavier; Prives, Carol

    2009-08-14

    MDM2 associates with ribosomal protein S7, and this interaction is required to inhibit MDM2's E3 ligase activity, leading to stabilization of MDM2 and p53. Notably, the MDM2 homolog MDMX facilitates the inhibition of MDM2 E3 ligase activity by S7. Further, ablation of S7 inhibits MDM2 and p53 accumulation induced by different stress signals in some cell types. Thus, ribosomal/nucleolar stress is likely a key integrating event in DNA damage signaling to p53. Interestingly, S7 is itself a substrate for MDM2 E3 ligase activity both in vitro and in vivo. An S7-ubiquitin fusion protein (S7-Ub) selectively inhibits MDM2 degradation of p53 and is unaffected by MDMX. S7-Ub promotes apoptosis to a greater extent than S7 alone. This indicates that MDM2 ubiquitination of S7 is involved in sustaining the p53 response. Thus, S7 functions as both effector and affector of MDM2 to ensure a proper cellular response to different stress signals.

  4. Escape, or Vanish: Control the Fate of p53 through MDM2-Mediated Ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinlian; Yang, Yingrui; Lu, Mengchen; Xu, Lili; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Zhenwei; Bao, Qichao; Jiang, Zhengyu; Xu, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaoke; Zhang, Xiaojin; You, Qidong; Sun, Haopeng

    2015-01-01

    p53 protein is a prominent tumor suppressor to induce cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and senescence, which attracts significant interest to cancer treatment. Therefore, it would be particularly important to restore the wild-type p53 that retains latent functions in the approximately 50% of tumors. MDM2 (murine double minute 2), the principal cellular antagonist of p53, has long been believed to suppress p53 activity through two main mechanisms: promoting degradation via its E3 ligase activity and masking p53 transcriptional activation by direct binding. Targeting MDM2 E3 ligase activity is becoming a potential antitumor strategy resulting from MDM2's decisive role in controlling the fate of p53: p53 is going to degradation when entrapped into MDM2-mediated ubiquitination, where p53 can escape by abrogating MDM2 E3 ligase activity using regulators. The intensive focus on regulating MDM2 ubiquitin E3 ligase activity has led to the rapid progress of its inhibitors, which may be possible to help p53 escape from degradation and restore its function to control tumor growth. This review summarizes the current inhibitors of MDM2 E3 ligase in cancer therapy based on the understanding the regulation of MDM2 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, including post-translational modification, interactions between MDM2 and its cofactors, and regulation of MDM2 stability. PMID:26343143

  5. A dynamic P53-MDM2 model with time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalaş, Gh. I.; Neamţu, M.; Opriş, D.; Horhat, R. F.

    2006-11-01

    Specific activator and repressor transcription factors which bind to specific regulator DNA sequences, play an important role in gene activity control. Interactions between genes coding such transcription factors should explain the different stable or sometimes oscillatory gene activities characteristic for different tissues. Starting with the model P53-MDM2 described into [6] and the process described into [5] we developed a new model of this interaction. Choosing the delay as a bifurcation parameter we study the direction and stability of the bifurcating periodic solutions. Some numerical examples are finally given for justifying the theoretical results.

  6. A dynamic p53-mdm2 model with distributed delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horhat, Raluca; Horhat, Raul Florin

    2014-12-01

    Specific activator and repressor transcription factors which bind to specific regulator DNA sequences, play an important role in gene activity control. Interactions between genes coding such transcripion factors should explain the different stable or sometimes oscillatory gene activities characteristic for different tissues. In this paper, the dynamic P53-Mdm2 interaction model with distributed delays is investigated. Both weak and Dirac kernels are taken into consideration. For Dirac case, the Hopf bifurcation is investigated. Some numerical examples are finally given for justifying the theoretical results.

  7. Oxazoloisoindolinones with in vitro antitumor activity selectively activate a p53-pathway through potential inhibition of the p53-MDM2 interaction.

    PubMed

    Soares, Joana; Pereira, Nuno A L; Monteiro, Ângelo; Leão, Mariana; Bessa, Cláudia; Dos Santos, Daniel J V A; Raimundo, Liliana; Queiroz, Glória; Bisio, Alessandra; Inga, Alberto; Pereira, Clara; Santos, Maria M M; Saraiva, Lucília

    2015-01-23

    One of the most appealing targets for anticancer treatment is the p53 tumor suppressor protein. In half of human cancers, this protein is inactivated due to endogenous negative regulators such as MDM2. Actually, restoring the p53 activity, particularly through the inhibition of its interaction with MDM2, is considered a valuable therapeutic strategy against cancers with a wild-type p53 status. In this work, we report the synthesis of nine enantiopure phenylalaninol-derived oxazolopyrrolidone lactams and the evaluation of their biological effects as p53-MDM2 interaction inhibitors. Using a yeast-based screening assay, two oxazoloisoindolinones, compounds 1b and 3a, were identified as potential p53-MDM2 interaction inhibitors. The molecular mechanism of oxazoloisoindolinone 3a was further validated in human colon adenocarcinoma HCT116 cells with wild-type p53 (HCT116 p53(+/+)) and in its isogenic derivative without p53 (HCT116 p53(-/-)). Indeed, using these cells, we demonstrated that oxazoloisoindolinone 3a exhibited a p53-dependent in vitro antitumor activity through induction of G0/G1-phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The selective activation of a p53-apoptotic pathway by oxazoloisoindolinone 3a was further supported by the occurrence of PARP cleavage only in p53-expressing HCT116 cells. Moreover, oxazoloisoindolinone 3a led to p53 protein stabilization and to the up-regulation of p53 transcriptional activity with increased expression levels of several p53 target genes, as p21(WAF1/CIP1), MDM2, BAX and PUMA, in p53(+/+) but not in p53(-/-) HCT116 cells. Additionally, the ability of oxazoloisoindolinone 3a to block the p53-MDM2 interaction in HCT116 p53(+/+) cells was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Finally, the molecular docking analysis of the interactions between the synthesized compounds and MDM2 revealed that oxazoloisoindolinone 3a binds to MDM2. Altogether, this work adds, for the first time, the oxazoloisoindolinone scaffold to the list of

  8. Oxazoloisoindolinones with in vitro antitumor activity selectively activate a p53-pathway through potential inhibition of the p53-MDM2 interaction.

    PubMed

    Soares, Joana; Pereira, Nuno A L; Monteiro, Ângelo; Leão, Mariana; Bessa, Cláudia; Dos Santos, Daniel J V A; Raimundo, Liliana; Queiroz, Glória; Bisio, Alessandra; Inga, Alberto; Pereira, Clara; Santos, Maria M M; Saraiva, Lucília

    2015-01-23

    One of the most appealing targets for anticancer treatment is the p53 tumor suppressor protein. In half of human cancers, this protein is inactivated due to endogenous negative regulators such as MDM2. Actually, restoring the p53 activity, particularly through the inhibition of its interaction with MDM2, is considered a valuable therapeutic strategy against cancers with a wild-type p53 status. In this work, we report the synthesis of nine enantiopure phenylalaninol-derived oxazolopyrrolidone lactams and the evaluation of their biological effects as p53-MDM2 interaction inhibitors. Using a yeast-based screening assay, two oxazoloisoindolinones, compounds 1b and 3a, were identified as potential p53-MDM2 interaction inhibitors. The molecular mechanism of oxazoloisoindolinone 3a was further validated in human colon adenocarcinoma HCT116 cells with wild-type p53 (HCT116 p53(+/+)) and in its isogenic derivative without p53 (HCT116 p53(-/-)). Indeed, using these cells, we demonstrated that oxazoloisoindolinone 3a exhibited a p53-dependent in vitro antitumor activity through induction of G0/G1-phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The selective activation of a p53-apoptotic pathway by oxazoloisoindolinone 3a was further supported by the occurrence of PARP cleavage only in p53-expressing HCT116 cells. Moreover, oxazoloisoindolinone 3a led to p53 protein stabilization and to the up-regulation of p53 transcriptional activity with increased expression levels of several p53 target genes, as p21(WAF1/CIP1), MDM2, BAX and PUMA, in p53(+/+) but not in p53(-/-) HCT116 cells. Additionally, the ability of oxazoloisoindolinone 3a to block the p53-MDM2 interaction in HCT116 p53(+/+) cells was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Finally, the molecular docking analysis of the interactions between the synthesized compounds and MDM2 revealed that oxazoloisoindolinone 3a binds to MDM2. Altogether, this work adds, for the first time, the oxazoloisoindolinone scaffold to the list of

  9. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Sulfamide and Triazole Benzodiazepines as Novel p53-MDM2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhiliang; Zhuang, Chunlin; Wu, Yuelin; Guo, Zizhao; Li, Jin; Dong, Guoqiang; Yao, Jianzhong; Sheng, Chunquan; Miao, Zhenyuan; Zhang, Wannian

    2014-01-01

    A series of sulfamide and triazole benzodiazepines were obtained with the principle of bioisosterism. The p53-murine double minute 2 (MDM2) inhibitory activity and in vitro antitumor activity were evaluated. Most of the novel benzodiazepines exhibited moderate protein binding inhibitory activity. Particularly, triazole benzodiazepines showed good inhibitory activity and antitumor potency. Compound 16 had promising antitumor activity against the U-2 OS human osteosarcoma cell line with an IC50 value of 4.17 μM, which was much better than that of nutlin-3. The molecular docking model also successfully predicted that this class of compounds mimicked the three critical residues of p53 binding to MDM2. PMID:25198897

  10. Mice with a Mutation in the Mdm2 Gene That Interferes with MDM2/Ribosomal Protein Binding Develop a Defect in Erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Kamio, Takuya; Gu, Bai-wei; Olson, Timothy S.; Zhang, Yanping; Mason, Philip J.; Bessler, Monica

    2016-01-01

    MDM2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is an important negative regulator of tumor suppressor p53. In turn the Mdm2 gene is a transcriptional target of p53, forming a negative feedback loop that is important in cell cycle control. It has recently become apparent that the ubiquitination of p53 by MDM2 can be inhibited when certain ribosomal proteins, including RPL5 and RPL11, bind to MDM2. This inhibition, and the resulting increase in p53 levels has been proposed to be responsible for the red cell aplasia seen in Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) and in 5q- myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). DBA and 5q- MDS are associated with inherited (DBA) or acquired (5q- MDS) haploinsufficiency of ribosomal proteins. A mutation in Mdm2 causing a C305F amino acid substitution blocks the binding of ribosomal proteins. Mice harboring this mutation (Mdm2C305F), retain a normal p53 response to DNA damage, but lack the p53 response to perturbations in ribosome biogenesis. While studying the interaction between RP haploinsufficiency and the Mdm2C305F mutation we noticed that Mdm2C305F homozygous mice had altered hematopoiesis. These mice developed a mild macrocytic anemia with reticulocytosis. In the bone marrow (BM), these mice showed a significant decrease in Ter119hi cells compared to wild type (WT) littermates, while no decrease in the number of mature erythroid cells (Ter119hiCD71low) was found in the spleen, which showed compensated bone marrow hematopoiesis. In methylcellulose cultures, BFU-E colonies from the mutant mice were slightly reduced in number and there was a significant reduction in CFU-E colony numbers in mutant mice compared with WT controls (p < 0.01). This erythropoietic defect was abrogated by concomitant p53 deficiency (Trp53ko/ko). Further investigation revealed that in Mdm2C305F animals, there was a decrease in Lin-Sca-1+c-Kit+ (LSK) cells, accompanied by significant decreases in multipotent progenitor (MPP) cells (p < 0.01). Competitive BM repopulation experiments showed

  11. TP53 and MDM2 single nucleotide polymorphisms influence survival in non-del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sallman, David A.; Basiorka, Ashley A.; Irvine, Brittany A.; Zhang, Ling; Epling-Burnette, P.K.; Rollison, Dana E.; Mallo, Mar; Sokol, Lubomir; Solé, Francesc; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; List, Alan F.

    2015-01-01

    P53 is a key regulator of many cellular processes and is negatively regulated by the human homolog of murine double minute-2 (MDM2) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of either gene alone, and in combination, are linked to cancer susceptibility, disease progression, and therapy response. We analyzed the interaction of TP53 R72P and MDM2 SNP309 SNPs in relationship to outcome in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Sanger sequencing was performed on DNA isolated from 208 MDS cases. Utilizing a novel functional SNP scoring system ranging from +2 to −2 based on predicted p53 activity, we found statistically significant differences in overall survival (OS) (p = 0.02) and progression-free survival (PFS) (p = 0.02) in non-del(5q) MDS patients with low functional scores. In univariate analysis, only IPSS and the functional SNP score predicted OS and PFS in non-del(5q) patients. In multivariate analysis, the functional SNP score was independent of IPSS for OS and PFS. These data underscore the importance of TP53 R72P and MDM2 SNP309 SNPs in MDS, and provide a novel scoring system independent of IPSS that is predictive for disease outcome. PMID:26416416

  12. TP53 and MDM2 single nucleotide polymorphisms influence survival in non-del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Kathy L; Cluzeau, Thomas; Sallman, David A; Basiorka, Ashley A; Irvine, Brittany A; Zhang, Ling; Epling-Burnette, P K; Rollison, Dana E; Mallo, Mar; Sokol, Lubomir; Solé, Francesc; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; List, Alan F

    2015-10-27

    P53 is a key regulator of many cellular processes and is negatively regulated by the human homolog of murine double minute-2 (MDM2) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of either gene alone, and in combination, are linked to cancer susceptibility, disease progression, and therapy response. We analyzed the interaction of TP53 R72P and MDM2 SNP309 SNPs in relationship to outcome in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Sanger sequencing was performed on DNA isolated from 208 MDS cases. Utilizing a novel functional SNP scoring system ranging from +2 to -2 based on predicted p53 activity, we found statistically significant differences in overall survival (OS) (p = 0.02) and progression-free survival (PFS) (p = 0.02) in non-del(5q) MDS patients with low functional scores. In univariate analysis, only IPSS and the functional SNP score predicted OS and PFS in non-del(5q) patients. In multivariate analysis, the functional SNP score was independent of IPSS for OS and PFS. These data underscore the importance of TP53 R72P and MDM2 SNP309 SNPs in MDS, and provide a novel scoring system independent of IPSS that is predictive for disease outcome. PMID:26416416

  13. MDM2 restrains estrogen-mediated AKT activation by promoting TBK1-dependent HPIP degradation.

    PubMed

    Shostak, K; Patrascu, F; Göktuna, S I; Close, P; Borgs, L; Nguyen, L; Olivier, F; Rammal, A; Brinkhaus, H; Bentires-Alj, M; Marine, J-C; Chariot, A

    2014-05-01

    Restoration of p53 tumor suppressor function through inhibition of its interaction and/or enzymatic activity of its E3 ligase, MDM2, is a promising therapeutic approach to treat cancer. However, because the MDM2 targetome extends beyond p53, MDM2 inhibition may also cause unwanted activation of oncogenic pathways. Accordingly, we identified the microtubule-associated HPIP, a positive regulator of oncogenic AKT signaling, as a novel MDM2 substrate. MDM2-dependent HPIP degradation occurs in breast cancer cells on its phosphorylation by the estrogen-activated kinase TBK1. Importantly, decreasing Mdm2 gene dosage in mouse mammary epithelial cells potentiates estrogen-dependent AKT activation owing to HPIP stabilization. In addition, we identified HPIP as a novel p53 transcriptional target, and pharmacological inhibition of MDM2 causes p53-dependent increase in HPIP transcription and also prevents HPIP degradation by turning off TBK1 activity. Our data indicate that p53 reactivation through MDM2 inhibition may result in ectopic AKT oncogenic activity by maintaining HPIP protein levels. PMID:24488098

  14. Fluorescence polarization assay and inhibitor design for MDM2/p53 interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rumin; Mayhood, Todd; Lipari, Philip; Wang, Yaolin; Durkin, James; Syto, Rosalinda; Gesell, Jennifer; McNemar, Charles; Windsor, William

    2004-08-01

    MDM2 is an important negative regulator of the tumor suppressor protein p53 which regulates the expression of many genes including MDM2. The delicate balance of this autoregulatory loop is crucial for the maintenance of the genome and control of the cell cycle and apoptosis. MDM2 hyperactivity, due to amplification/overexpression or mutational inactivation of the ARF locus, inhibits the function of wild-type p53 and can lead to the development of a wide variety of cancers. Thus, the development of anti-MDM2 therapies may restore normal p53 function in tumor cells and induce growth suppression and apoptosis. We report here a novel high-throughput fluorescence polarization binding assay and its application in rank ordering small-molecule inhibitors that block the binding of MDM2 to a p53-derived fluorescent peptide.

  15. The Role of p53 and MDM2 in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Denaro, N.; Lo Nigro, C.; Natoli, G.; Russi, E. G.; Adamo, V.; Merlano, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is a complex disorder that includes mostly squamous cell carcinomas that can develop in the throat, larynx, nose, sinuses, and mouth. Etiopathogenesis is due to tobacco and alcohol consumption and to infection by human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16/18. Tumors often develop within preneoplastic fields of genetically altered cells. Most head and neck cancers result from multistep accumulation of genetic alterationsm resulting in clonal outgrowth of transformed cells. These DNA changes are caused by a variety of mechanisms like endogenous mutations and exogenous mutations. Dysregulated molecular pathway includes alterations of critical inhibitor of cyclin CDK complexes, inactivating mutations of p53 gene, and activation of oncogenes and growth factors. This paper attempts to review the role of p53 and MDM2 genetic aberrations and pathways in head and neck cancer. PMID:23724261

  16. The Role of miR-18b in MDM2-p53 Pathway Signaling and Melanoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although p53 is inactivated by point mutations in many tumors, melanomas infrequently harbor mutations in the p53 gene. Here we investigate the biological role of microRNA-18b (miR-18b) in melanoma by targeting the MDM2-p53 pathway. Methods Expression of miR-18b was examined in nevi (n = 48) and melanoma (n = 92) samples and in melanoma cell lines and normal melanocytes. Immunoblotting was performed to determine the expression of various proteins regulated by miR-18b. The effects of miR-18b overexpression in melanoma cell lines were investigated using assays of colony formation, cell viability, migration, invasion, and cell cycle and in a xenograft model (n = 10 mice per group). Chromatin immunoprecipitation and methylation assays were performed to determine the mechanism of microRNA silencing. Results Expression of miR-18b was substantially reduced in melanoma specimens and cell lines by virtue of hypermethylation and was reinduced (by 1.5- to 5.3-fold) in melanoma cell lines after 5-AZA-deoxycytidine treatment. MDM2 was identified as a target of miR-18b action, and overexpression of miR-18b in melanoma cells was accompanied by 75% reduced MDM2 expression and 2.5-fold upregulation of p53, resulting in 70% suppression of melanoma cell colony formation. The effects of miR-18b overexpression on the p53 pathway and on melanoma cell growth were reversed by MDM2 overexpression. Stable overexpression of miR-18b produced potent tumor suppressor activity, as evidenced by suppressed melanoma cell viability, induction of apoptosis, and reduced tumor growth in vivo. miR-18b overexpression suppressed melanoma cell migration and invasiveness and reversed epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Conclusions Our results demonstrate a novel role for miR-18b as a tumor suppressor in melanoma, identify the MDM2-p53 pathway as a target of miR-18b action, and suggest miR-18b overexpression as a novel strategy to reactivate the p53 pathway in human tumors. PMID:23365201

  17. Ubiquitin ligase parkin promotes Mdm2-arrestin interaction but inhibits arrestin ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, M. Rafiuddin; Zhan, Xuanzhi; Song, Xiufeng; Kook, Seunghyi; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous mutations in E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin were shown to associate with familial Parkinson's disease. Here we show that parkin binds arrestins, versatile regulators of cell signaling. Arrestin-parkin interaction was demonstrated by coimmuno-precipitation of endogenous proteins from brain tissue, and shown to be direct using purified proteins. Parkin binding enhances arrestin interactions with another E3 ubiquitin ligase, Mdm2, apparently by shifting arrestin conformational equilibrium to the basal state preferred by Mdm2. Although Mdm2 was reported to ubiquitinate arrestins, parkin-dependent increase in Mdm2 binding dramatically reduces the ubiquitination of both non-visual arrestins, basal and stimulated by receptor activation, without affecting receptor internalization. Several disease-associated parkin mutations differentially affect the stimulation of Mdm2 binding. All parkin mutants tested effectively suppress arrestin ubiquitination, suggesting that bound parkin shields arrestin lysines targeted by Mdm2. Parkin binding to arrestins along with its effects on arrestin interaction with Mdm2 and ubiquitination is a novel function of this protein with implications for Parkinson's disease pathology. PMID:21466165

  18. Ribosomal protein L4 is a novel regulator of the MDM2-p53 loop

    PubMed Central

    He, Xia; Li, Yuhuang; Dai, Mu-Shui; Sun, Xiao-Xin

    2016-01-01

    A number of ribosomal proteins (RPs) have been shown to play a critical role in coordinating ribosome biogenesis with cell growth and proliferation by suppressing MDM2 to induce p53 activation. While how the MDM2-p53 pathway is regulated by multiple RPs is unclear, it remains to be interesting to identify additional RPs that can regulate this pathway. Here we report that ribosomal protein L4 (RPL4) directly interacts with MDM2 at the central acidic domain and suppresses MDM2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation, leading to p53 stabilization and activation. Interestingly, overexpression of RPL4 promotes the binding of MDM2 to RPL5 and RPL11 and forms a complex with RPL5, RPL11 and MDM2 in cells. Conversely, knockdown of RPL4 also induces p53 levels and p53-dependent cell cycle arrest. This p53-dependent effect requires both RPL5 and RPL11, suggesting that depletion of RPL4 triggers ribosomal stress. Together, our results reveal that balanced levels of RPL4 are critical for normal cell growth and proliferation via regulating the MDM2-p53 loop. PMID:26908445

  19. Transient Protein States in Designing Inhibitors of the MDM2-p53 Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bista, Michal; Wolf, Siglinde; Khoury, Kareem; Kowalska, Kaja; Huang, Yijun; Wrona, Ewa; Arciniega, Marcelino; Popowicz, Grzegorz M.; Holak, Tad A.; Dömling, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Reactivation of p53 by release of the functional protein from its inhibition by MDM2 provides an efficient, nongenotoxic approach to a wide variety of cancers. We present the cocrystal structures of two complexes of MDM2 with inhibitors based on 6-chloroindole scaffolds. Both molecules bound to a distinct conformational state of MDM2 with nM-μM affinities. In contrast to other structurally characterized antagonists, which mimic three amino acids of p53 (Phe19, Trp23, and Leu26), the compounds induced an additional hydrophobic pocket on the MDM2 surface and unveiled a four-point binding mode. The enlarged interaction interface of the inhibitors resulted in extension of small molecules binding toward the “lid” segment of MDM2 (residues 19–23)—a nascent element that interferes with p53 binding. As supported by protein engineering and molecular dynamics studies, employing these unstable elements of MDM2 provides an efficient and yet unexplored alternative in development of MDM2-p53 association inhibitors. PMID:24207125

  20. The expression of MDM2/CDK4 gene product in the differential diagnosis of well differentiated liposarcoma and large deep-seated lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Pilotti, S; Torre, G Della; Mezzelani, A; Tamborini, E; Azzarelli, A; Sozzi, G; Pierotti, M A

    2000-01-01

    Ordinary lipomas are cytogenetically characterized by a variety of balanced rearrangements involving chromosome segment 12q13–15, whereas well differentiated liposarcomas (WDL) show supernumerary ring and giant marker chromosomes, known to contain amplified 12q sequences. The tight correlation between the presence of ring chromosomes and both amplification and overexpression of MDM2 and CDK4 genes suggests the exploration of the possibility that immunocytochemistry (ICC) might assist in the differential diagnosis of lipoma-like well differentiated liposarcomas (LL-WDL) and large deep-seated lipomas (LDSL). For this purpose, 21 cases of the former and 19 cases of the latter tumours were analysed by ICC and, according to the availability of material, by molecular and cytogenetic approaches. All lipomas displayed a null MDM2/CDK4 phenotype, whereas all LL-WDL showed MDM2/CDK4 or CDK4 phenotypes. Southern blot analysis performed on 16 suitable cases, complemented by fluorescence in situ hybridization and classical cytogenetic analysis in 11 cases, was consistent with, and further supported the immunophenotyping data. In conclusion, MDM2/CDK4 product-based immunophenotyping appears to represent a valuable method for the categorization of arguable LDSL. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10755400

  1. Inhibition of MDM2 by nilotinib contributes to cytotoxicity in both Philadelphia-positive and negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hailong; Gu, Lubing; Liu, Tao; Chiang, Kuang-Yueh; Zhou, Muxiang

    2014-01-01

    Nilotinib is a selective BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor related to imatinib that is more potent than imatinib. Nilotinib is widely used to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and Philadelphia-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The present study identifies Mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2) as a target of nilotinib. In studying ALL cell lines, we found that the expression of MDM2 in both Philadelphia positive (Ph+) and Philadelphia negative (Ph-) ALL cells was remarkably inhibited by nilotinib, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further studies demonstrated that nilotinib inhibited MDM2 at the post-translational level by inducing MDM2 self-ubiquitination and degradation. Nilotinib-mediated MDM2 downregulation did not result in accumulation and activation of p53. Inhibition of MDM2 in nilotinib-treated ALL cells led to downregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), a translational target of MDM2, resulting in activation of caspases. Inhibition of XIAP following nilotinib-mediated downregulation of MDM2 resulted in apoptosis of MDM2-expressing ALL; however, similar nilotinib treatment induced stronger apoptosis in Ph+/MDM2+ ALL than in Ph-/MDM2+ or Ph+/MDM2- ALL. The ALL cells that were Ph-/MDM2- were totally resistant to nilotinib. These results suggested that nilotinib can inhibit MDM2 and induce a p53-independent apoptosis pathway by downregulating XIAP; thus, nilotinib can treat not only Ph+, but also Ph- ALL patients whose cancer cells overexpress MDM2.

  2. Polymorphism of MDM2 promoter 309 (rs 2279744) and the risk of PCOS.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ying; Jiang, Hongguo; Yang, Xiaoling; Li, Dongya; Ma, Lan; Luo, Ying; Tang, Wenru

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating possible association between MDM2 SNP309 polymorphism (rs 2279744) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). One hundred and twenty-five women with PCOS and two hundred and fifty women without PCOS were collected from the department of reproductive medicine of college hospital in this case-control study. Peripheral blood samples were collected from all participants and DNA was extracted, MDM2 SNP309 polymorphism (rs 2279744) was determined from the 125 cases and 250 controls. Women were grouped into PCOS (n = 125) group and control group (n = 250). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to evaluate the association between MDM2 SNP309 polymorphism (rs 2279744) and PCOS. The distribution of T allele was significant higher in PCOS cases than controls. MDM2 SNP 309 T allele is associated with PCOS.

  3. Mdm2 Phosphorylation Regulates Its Stability and Has Contrasting Effects on Oncogene and Radiation-Induced Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Carr, Michael I; Roderick, Justine E; Gannon, Hugh S; Kelliher, Michelle A; Jones, Stephen N

    2016-09-01

    ATM phosphorylation of Mdm2-S394 is required for robust p53 stabilization and activation in DNA-damaged cells. We have now utilized Mdm2(S394A) knockin mice to determine that phosphorylation of Mdm2-S394 regulates p53 activity and the DNA damage response in lymphatic tissues in vivo by modulating Mdm2 stability. Mdm2-S394 phosphorylation delays lymphomagenesis in Eμ-myc transgenic mice, and preventing Mdm2-S394 phosphorylation obviates the need for p53 mutation in Myc-driven tumorigenesis. However, irradiated Mdm2(S394A) mice also have increased hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell functions, and we observed decreased lymphomagenesis in sub-lethally irradiated Mdm2(S394A) mice. These findings document contrasting effects of ATM-Mdm2 signaling on p53 tumor suppression and reveal that destabilizing Mdm2 by promoting its phosphorylation by ATM would be effective in treating oncogene-induced malignancies, while inhibiting Mdm2-S394 phosphorylation during radiation exposure or chemotherapy would ameliorate bone marrow failure and prevent the development of secondary hematological malignancies. PMID:27568562

  4. Mdm2 is a novel activator of ApoCIII promoter which is antagonized by p53 and SHP inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhihong; Zhang, Yuxia; Wang, Li

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mdm2 enhances HNF4{alpha} activation of the ApoCIII promoter via interaction with HNF4{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p53 antagonizes the effect of Mdm2 activation of the ApoCIII promoter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SHP strengthens p53 inhibition but abolishes Mdm2 activation of the ApoCIII promoter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mdm2 alters the enrichment of HNF4{alpha}, p53 and SHP to the ApoCIII promoter. -- Abstract: We examined the effect of Mdm2 on regulation of the ApoCIII promoter and its cross-talk with p53 and nuclear receptor SHP. Overexpression of Mdm2 markedly enhanced ApoCIII promoter activity by HNF4{alpha}. A direct association of Mdm2 protein with the HNF4{alpha} protein was observed by co-immunoprecipitation. Ectopic expression of p53 decreased HNF4{alpha} activation of the ApoCIII promoter and antagonized the effect of Mdm2. Co-expression of SHP further strengthened p53 inhibition and abolished Mdm2 activation of the ApoCIII promoter. Mdm2 inhibited p53-mediated enrichment of HNF4{alpha} to the ApoCIII promoter while simultaneously reducing p53 binding and increasing recruitment of SHP to the ApoCIII promoter. The results from this study implicate a potentially important function of Mdm2 in regulation of lipoprotein metabolism.

  5. Challenging dedifferentiated liposarcoma identified by MDM2-amplification, a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Liposarcoma is the most frequent soft tissue sarcoma. Well differentiated liposarcoma may progress into dedifferentiated liposarcoma with pleomorphic histology. A minority additionally features myogenic, osteo- or chondrosarcomatous heterologous differentiation. Genomic amplification of the Mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2) locus is characteristic for well differentiated and dedifferentiated liposarcomas. Detection of MDM2 amplification may supplement histopathology and aid to distinguish liposarcoma from other soft tissue neoplasia. Case presentation Here we present two cases of dedifferentiated liposarcoma with challenging presentation. Case 1 features a myogenic component. As the tumour infiltrated the abdominal muscles and showed immunohistochemical expression of myogenic proteins, rhabdomyosarcoma had to be ruled out. Case 2 has an osteosarcomatous component resembling extraosseous osteosarcoma. The MDM2 status was determined in both cases and helped making the correct diagnosis. Overexpression of MDM2 and co-overexpression of Cyclin-dependent kinase 4 is demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. The underlying MDM2 amplification is shown by fluorescence in situ hybridisation. Since low grade osteosarcoma may also harbour MDM2 amplification it is emphasised that the amplification has to be present in the lipomatous parts of the tumour to distinguish liposarcoma from extraosseous osteosarcoma. Conclusions The two cases exemplify challenges in the diagnoses of dedifferentiated liposarcoma. Liposarcoma often has pleomorphic histology and additionally may feature heterologous components that mimic other soft tissue neoplasms. Amplification of MDM2 is characteristic for well differentiated and dedifferentiated liposarcomas. Determination of the MDM2 status by in situ hybridisation may assist histopathology and help to rule out differential diagnoses. PMID:25126005

  6. A Functional Polymorphism (rs937283) in the MDM2 Promoter Region is Associated with Poor Prognosis of Retinoblastoma in Chinese Han Population.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yongfa; Jiang, Zhongming; Wu, Yuxia; Chen, Xiaochong; Xiao, Xing; Yu, Haiying

    2016-01-01

    The effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at MDM2 has been investigated in several cancer types. Three MDM2 SNPs(rs937283, rs2270744 and rs769412) have previously been suggested to be positively correlated with cancer. In this study, we aimed to explore the association of rs937283, rs2270744 and rs769412 polymorphisms with retinoblastoma (RB) risk, clinicopathological characteristics, and prognosis. Compared with wild-type genotype AA at rs937283, individuals carrying AG and GG genotype had a significantly increased risk for developing RB (OR = 1.86, 95% CI 1.13-3.08; OR = 2.48, 95% CI 1.10-5.62, respectively). RB patients with allele G at rs937283 were more susceptible to invasion and high tumor aggression (OR = 2.42, 95% CI 1.43-4.11; OR = 2.15, 95% CI 1.27-3.64, respectively). Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank results revealed that RB patients harboring genotype GG and G allele at rs937283 had worse survival (P < 0.02 and P < 0.01, respectively). In addition, the A to G substitution at rs937283 significantly enhanced the transcription activity of the MDM2 gene in vitro. In vivo, we found that MDM2 mRNA and protein were overexpressed in individuals who carried the G allele at rs937283. This study suggested that the MDM2 rs937283 polymorphism is a novel functional SNP both in vitro and in vivo as well as a biomarker for poor prognosis in RB. PMID:27506496

  7. A Functional Polymorphism (rs937283) in the MDM2 Promoter Region is Associated with Poor Prognosis of Retinoblastoma in Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yongfa; Jiang, Zhongming; Wu, Yuxia; Chen, Xiaochong; Xiao, Xing; Yu, Haiying

    2016-01-01

    The effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at MDM2 has been investigated in several cancer types. Three MDM2 SNPs(rs937283, rs2270744 and rs769412) have previously been suggested to be positively correlated with cancer. In this study, we aimed to explore the association of rs937283, rs2270744 and rs769412 polymorphisms with retinoblastoma (RB) risk, clinicopathological characteristics, and prognosis. Compared with wild-type genotype AA at rs937283, individuals carrying AG and GG genotype had a significantly increased risk for developing RB (OR = 1.86, 95% CI 1.13–3.08; OR = 2.48, 95% CI 1.10–5.62, respectively). RB patients with allele G at rs937283 were more susceptible to invasion and high tumor aggression (OR = 2.42, 95% CI 1.43–4.11; OR = 2.15, 95% CI 1.27–3.64, respectively). Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank results revealed that RB patients harboring genotype GG and G allele at rs937283 had worse survival (P < 0.02 and P < 0.01, respectively). In addition, the A to G substitution at rs937283 significantly enhanced the transcription activity of the MDM2 gene in vitro. In vivo, we found that MDM2 mRNA and protein were overexpressed in individuals who carried the G allele at rs937283. This study suggested that the MDM2 rs937283 polymorphism is a novel functional SNP both in vitro and in vivo as well as a biomarker for poor prognosis in RB. PMID:27506496

  8. MDM2-MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2-MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD ) in the micromolar range for the MDM2-MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2-MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation. PMID:27621617

  9. Nucleoplasmic Mobilization of Nucleostemin Stabilizes MDM2 and Promotes G2/M Progression and Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingjun; Lin, Tao; Tsai, Robert Y.L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Nucleolar disassembly occurs during mitosis and nucleolar stress, releasing several MDM2-interactive proteins residing in the nucleolus that share the common activity of p53 stabilization. Here, we demonstrated that mobilization of nucleostemin (NS), a cancer and stem cell-enriched nucleolar protein, plays the opposite role by stabilizing MDM2 and suppressing p53 functions. Our results showed that NS increases the protein stability and nucleoplasmic retention of MDM2, and competes with L23 for MDM2 binding. These activities are significantly elevated when NS is released into the nucleoplasm by mutations that abolish its nucleolar localization or by chemotherapeutic agents that disassemble the nucleoli. NS depletion decreases MDM2 protein, increases the transcriptional activities without changing the protein level of p53, and triggers G2/M arrest and cell death in U2OS but not in H1299 cells. This work reveals that nucleoplasmic relocation of NS during nucleolar disassembly safeguards the G2/M transit and survival of continuously dividing cells by MDM2 stabilization and p53 inhibition. PMID:19033382

  10. Multiple murine double minute gene 2 (MDM2) proteins are induced by ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Saucedo, L J; Myers, C D; Perry, M E

    1999-03-19

    The mdm2 (murine double minute 2) oncogene encodes several proteins, the largest of which (p90) binds to and inactivates the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Multiple MDM2 proteins have been detected in tumors and in cell lines expressing high levels of mdm2 mRNAs. Here we show that one of these proteins (p76) is expressed, along with p90, in wild-type and p53-null mouse embryo fibroblasts, indicating that it may have an important physiological role in normal cells. Expression of this protein is induced, as is that of p90, by UV light in a p53-dependent manner. The p76 protein is synthesized via translational initiation at AUG codon 50 and thus lacks the N terminus of p90 and does not bind p53. In cells, p90 and p76 can be synthesized from mdm2 mRNAs transcribed from both the P1 (constitutive) and P2 (p53-responsive) promoters. Site-directed mutagenesis reveals that these RNAs give rise to p76 via internal initiation of translation. In addition, mdm2 mRNAs lacking exon 3 give rise to p76 exclusively, and such mRNAs are induced by p53 in response to UV light. These data indicate that p76 may be an important product of the mdm2 gene and a downstream effector of p53.

  11. Melatonin down-regulates MDM2 gene expression and enhances p53 acetylation in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Sara; Cucina, Alessandra; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; D'Anselmi, Fabrizio; Dinicola, Simona; Masiello, Maria Grazia; Pasqualato, Alessia; Palombo, Alessandro; Morini, Veronica; Reiter, Russel J; Bizzarri, Mariano

    2014-08-01

    Compelling evidence demonstrated that melatonin increases p53 activity in cancer cells. p53 undergoes acetylation to be stabilized and activated for driving cells destined for apoptosis/growth inhibition. Over-expression of p300 induces p53 acetylation, leading to cell growth arrest by increasing p21 expression. In turn, p53 activation is mainly regulated in the nucleus by MDM2. MDM2 also acts as E3 ubiquitin ligase, promoting the proteasome-dependent p53 degradation. MDM2 entry into the nucleus is finely tuned by two different modulations: the ribosomal protein L11, acts by sequestering MDM2 in the cytosol, whereas the PI3K-AkT-dependent MDM2 phosphorylation is mandatory for MDM2 translocation across the nuclear membrane. In addition, MDM2-dependent targeting of p53 is regulated in a nonlinear fashion by MDM2/MDMX interplay. Melatonin induces both cell growth inhibition and apoptosis in MCF7 breast cancer cells. We previously reported that this effect is associated with reduced MDM2 levels and increased p53 activity. Herein, we demonstrated that melatonin drastically down-regulates MDM2 gene expression and inhibits MDM2 shuttling into the nucleus, given that melatonin increases L11 and inhibits Akt-PI3K-dependent MDM2 phosphorylation. Melatonin induces a 3-fold increase in both MDMX and p300 levels, decreasing simultaneously Sirt1, a specific inhibitor of p300 activity. Consequently, melatonin-treated cells display significantly higher values of both p53 and acetylated p53. Thus, a 15-fold increase in p21 levels was observed in melatonin-treated cancer cells. Our results provide evidence that melatonin enhances p53 acetylation by modulating the MDM2/MDMX/p300 pathway, disclosing new insights for understanding its anticancer effect. PMID:24920214

  12. MDM2 SNP309 promoter polymorphism confers risk for hereditary melanoma.

    PubMed

    Thunell, Lena K; Bivik, Cecilia; Wäster, Petra; Fredrikson, Mats; Stjernström, Annika; Synnerstad, Ingrid; Rosdahl, Inger; Enerbäck, Charlotta

    2014-06-01

    The p53 pathway regulates stress response, and variations in p53, MDM2, and MDM4 may predispose an individual to tumor development. The aim of this study was to study the impact of genetic variation on sporadic and hereditary melanoma. We have analyzed a combination of three functionally relevant variants of the p53 pathway in 258 individuals with sporadic malignant melanomas, 50 with hereditary malignant melanomas, and 799 healthy controls. Genotyping was performed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, pyrosequencing, and allelic discrimination. We found an increased risk for hereditary melanoma in MDM2 GG homozygotes, which was more pronounced among women (P=0.035). In the event of pairwise combinations of the single nucleotide polymorphisms, a risk elevation was shown for MDM2 GG homozygotes/p53 wild-type Arg in hereditary melanoma (P=0.01). Individuals with sporadic melanomas of the superficial spreading type, including melanoma in situ, showed a slightly higher frequency of the MDM2 GG genotype compared with those with nodular melanomas (P=0.04). The dysplastic nevus phenotype, present in the majority of our hereditary melanoma cases and also in some sporadic cases, further enhanced the effect of the MDM2 GG genotype on melanoma risk (P=0.005). In conclusion, the results show an association between MDM2 SNP309 and an increased risk for hereditary melanoma, especially among women. Analysis of sporadic melanoma also shows an association between MDM2 and the superficial spreading melanoma subtype, as well as an association with the presence of dysplastic nevi in sporadic melanoma. PMID:24625390

  13. Interplay between Mdm2 and HIPK2 in the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The tumour suppressor p53 is activated to induce cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis in the DNA damage response (DDR). p53 phosphorylation at Ser46 by HIPK2 (homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2) is a critical event in apoptosis induction. Interestingly, HIPK2 is degraded by Mdm2 (a negative regulator of p53), whereas Mdm2 is downregulated by HIPK2 through several mechanisms. Here, we develop a four-module network model for the p53 pathway to clarify the role of interplay between Mdm2 and HIPK2 in the DDR evoked by ultraviolet radiation. By numerical simulations, we reveal that Mdm2-dependent HIPK2 degradation promotes cell survival after mild DNA damage and that inhibition of HIPK2 degradation is sufficient to trigger apoptosis. In response to severe damage, p53 phosphorylation at Ser46 is promoted by the accumulation of HIPK2 due to downregulation of nuclear Mdm2 in the later phase of the response. Meanwhile, the concentration of p53 switches from moderate to high levels, contributing to apoptosis induction. We show that the presence of three mechanisms for Mdm2 downregulation, i.e. repression of mdm2 expression, inhibition of its nuclear entry and HIPK2-induced degradation, guarantees the apoptosis of irreparably damaged cells. Our results agree well with multiple experimental observations, and testable predictions are also made. This work advances our understanding of the regulation of p53 activity in the DDR and suggests that HIPK2 should be a significant target for cancer therapy. PMID:24829283

  14. TRIM25 has a dual function in the p53/Mdm2 circuit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Elabd, S; Hammer, S; Solozobova, V; Yan, H; Bartel, F; Inoue, S; Henrich, T; Wittbrodt, J; Loosli, F; Davidson, G; Blattner, C

    2015-11-12

    P53 is an important tumor suppressor that, upon activation, induces growth arrest and cell death. Control of p53 is thus of prime importance for proliferating cells, but also for cancer therapy, where p53 activity contributes to the eradication of tumors. Mdm2 functionally inhibits p53 and targets the tumor suppressor protein for degradation. In a genetic screen, we identified TRIM25 as a novel regulator of p53 and Mdm2. TRIM25 increased p53 and Mdm2 abundance by inhibiting their ubiquitination and degradation in 26 S proteasomes. TRIM25 co-precipitated with p53 and Mdm2 and interfered with the association of p300 and Mdm2, a critical step for p53 polyubiquitination. Despite the increase in p53 levels, p53 activity was inhibited in the presence of TRIM25. Downregulation of TRIM25 resulted in an increased acetylation of p53 and p53-dependent cell death in HCT116 cells. Upon genotoxic insults, TRIM25 dampened the p53-dependent DNA damage response. The downregulation of TRIM25 furthermore resulted in massive apoptosis during early embryogenesis of medaka, which was rescued by the concomitant downregulation of p53, demonstrating the functional relevance of the regulation of p53 by TRIM25 in an organismal context. PMID:25728675

  15. Autoactivation of the MDM2 E3 Ligase by Intramolecular Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qian; Song, Tanjing; Chen, Lihong

    2014-01-01

    The RING domain ubiquitin E3 ligase MDM2 is a key regulator of p53 degradation and a mediator of signals that stabilize p53. The current understanding of the mechanisms by which MDM2 posttranslational modifications and protein binding cause p53 stabilization remains incomplete. Here we present evidence that the MDM2 central acidic region is critical for activating RING domain E3 ligase activity. A 30-amino-acid minimal region of the acidic domain binds to the RING domain through intramolecular interactions and stimulates the catalytic function of the RING domain in promoting ubiquitin release from charged E2. The minimal activation sequence is also the binding site for the ARF tumor suppressor, which inhibits ubiquitination of p53. The acidic domain-RING domain intramolecular interaction is modulated by ATM-mediated phosphorylation near the RING domain or by binding of ARF. These results suggest that MDM2 phosphorylation and association with protein regulators share a mechanism in inhibiting the E3 ligase function and stabilizing p53 and suggest that targeting the MDM2 autoactivation mechanism may be useful for therapeutic modulation of p53 levels. PMID:24842904

  16. Lead Optimization of 2-Phenylindolylglyoxylyldipeptide Murine Double Minute (MDM)2/Translocator Protein (TSPO) Dual Inhibitors for the Treatment of Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Simona; La Pietra, Valeria; Barresi, Elisabetta; Di Maro, Salvatore; Da Pozzo, Eleonora; Robello, Marco; La Motta, Concettina; Cosconati, Sandro; Taliani, Sabrina; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Martini, Claudia; Da Settimo, Federico

    2016-05-26

    In glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), translocator protein (TSPO) and murine double minute (MDM)2/p53 complex represent two druggable targets. We recently reported the first dual binder 3 possessing a higher anticancer effect in GBM cells than the standards PK11195 1 or Nutlin-3 2 singularly applied. Herein, through a structure-activity relationship study, we developed derivatives 4-10 with improved potencies toward both TSPO and MDM2. As a result, compound 9: (i) reactivated the p53 functionality; (ii) inhibited the viability of two human GBM cells; (iii) impaired the proliferation of glioma cancer stem cells (CSCs), more resistant to chemotherapeutics and responsible of GBM recurrence; (iv) sensitized GBM cells and CSCs to the activity of temozolomide; (v) directed its effects preferentially toward tumor cells with respect to healthy ones. Thus, 9 may represent a promising cytotoxic agent, which is worthy of being further developed for a therapeutic approach against GBM, where the downstream p53 signaling is intact and TSPO is overexpressed.

  17. A stapled peptide antagonist of MDM2 carried by polymeric micelles sensitizes glioblastoma to temozolomide treatment through p53 activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xishan; Tai, Lingyu; Gao, Jie; Qian, Jianchang; Zhang, Mingfei; Li, Beibei; Xie, Cao; Lu, Linwei; Lu, Wuyuan; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-11-28

    Antagonizing MDM2 and MDMX to activate the tumor suppressor protein p53 is an attractive therapeutic paradigm for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, challenges remain with respect to the poor ability of p53 activators to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier and/or blood-brain tumor barrier and to specifically target tumor cells. To circumvent these problems, we developed a cyclic RGD peptide-conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-co-poly(lactic acid) polymeric micelle (RGD-M) that carried a stapled peptide antagonist of both MDM2 and MDMX (sPMI). The peptide-carrying micelle RGD-M/sPMI was prepared via film-hydration method with high encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity as well as ideal size distribution. Micelle encapsulation dramatically increased the solubility of sPMI, thus alleviating its serum sequestration. In vitro studies showed that RGD-M/sPMI efficiently inhibited the proliferation of glioma cells in the presence of serum by activating the p53 signaling pathway. Further, RGD-M/sPMI exerted potent tumor growth inhibitory activity against human glioblastoma in nude mouse xenograft models. Importantly, the combination of RGD-M/sPMI and temozolomide--a standard chemotherapy drug for GBM increased antitumor efficacy against glioblastoma in experimental animals. Our results validate a combination therapy using p53 activators with temozolomide as a more effective treatment for GBM. PMID:26428461

  18. Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of 2,5-Diketopiperazines as Inhibitors of the MDM2-p53 Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, Mariell; Quant, Maria; Min, Jaeki; Iconaru, Luigi; Kriwacki, Richard W.; Waddell, M. Brett; Guy, R. Kiplin; Luthman, Kristina; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor p53 is the main tumour suppressor in cells and many cancer types have p53 mutations resulting in a loss of its function. In tumours that retain wild-type p53 function, p53 activity is down-regulated by MDM2 (human murine double minute 2) via a direct protein—protein interaction. We have designed and synthesised two series of 2,5-diketopiperazines as inhibitors of the MDM2-p53 interaction. The first set was designed to directly mimic the α-helical region of the p53 peptide, containing key residues in the i, i+4 and i+7 positions of a natural α-helix. Conformational analysis indicated that 1,3,6-trisubstituted 2,5-diketopiperazines were able to place substituents in the same spatial orientation as an α-helix template. The key step of the synthesis involved the cyclisation of substituted dipeptides. The other set of tetrasubstituted 2,5-diketopiperazines were designed based on structure-based docking studies and the Ugi multicomponent reaction was used for the synthesis. This latter set comprised the most potent inhibitors which displayed micromolar IC50-values in a biochemical fluorescence polarisation assay. PMID:26427060

  19. Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of 2,5-Diketopiperazines as Inhibitors of the MDM2-p53 Interaction.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Mariell; Quant, Maria; Min, Jaeki; Iconaru, Luigi; Kriwacki, Richard W; Waddell, M Brett; Guy, R Kiplin; Luthman, Kristina; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor p53 is the main tumour suppressor in cells and many cancer types have p53 mutations resulting in a loss of its function. In tumours that retain wild-type p53 function, p53 activity is down-regulated by MDM2 (human murine double minute 2) via a direct protein-protein interaction. We have designed and synthesised two series of 2,5-diketopiperazines as inhibitors of the MDM2-p53 interaction. The first set was designed to directly mimic the α-helical region of the p53 peptide, containing key residues in the i, i+4 and i+7 positions of a natural α-helix. Conformational analysis indicated that 1,3,6-trisubstituted 2,5-diketopiperazines were able to place substituents in the same spatial orientation as an α-helix template. The key step of the synthesis involved the cyclisation of substituted dipeptides. The other set of tetrasubstituted 2,5-diketopiperazines were designed based on structure-based docking studies and the Ugi multicomponent reaction was used for the synthesis. This latter set comprised the most potent inhibitors which displayed micromolar IC50-values in a biochemical fluorescence polarisation assay.

  20. Controlled access of p53 to the nucleus regulates its proteasomal degradation by MDM2.

    PubMed

    Davis, James R; Mossalam, Mohanad; Lim, Carol S

    2013-04-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 can be sent to the proteasome for degradation by placing its nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling under ligand control. Endogenous p53 is ubiquitinated by MDM2 in the nucleus, and controlling the access of p53 to the nuclear compartment regulates its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. This was accomplished by the use of a protein switch that places nuclear translocation under the control of externally applied dexamethasone. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that sending protein switch p53 (PS-p53) to the nucleus produces a distinct punctate distribution in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. The nuclear role in accessing the proteasome was investigated by inhibiting classical nuclear export with leptomycin B. Trapping PS-p53 in the nucleus only allows this punctate staining in that compartment, suggesting that PS-p53 must translocate first to the nuclear compartment for cytoplasmic punctate staining to occur. The role of MDM2 binding was explored by inhibiting MDM2/p53 binding with nutlin-3. Inhibition of this interaction blocked both nuclear export and cytoplasmic and nuclear punctate staining, providing evidence that any change in localization after nuclear translocation is due to MDM2 binding. Further, blocking the proteolytic activity of the proteasome maintained the nuclear localization of the construct. Truncations of p53 were made to determine smaller constructs still capable of interacting with MDM2, and their subcellular localization and degradation potential was observed. PS-p53 and a smaller construct containing the two MDM2 binding regions of p53 (Box I + V) were indeed degraded by the proteasome as measured by loss of enhanced green fluorescent protein that was also fused to the construct. The influence of these constructs on p53 gene transactivation function was assessed and revealed that PS-p53 decreased gene transactivation, while PS-p53(Box I + V) did not significantly change baseline gene transactivation.

  1. A spatiotemporal characterization of the effect of p53 phosphorylation on its interaction with MDM2

    PubMed Central

    ElSawy, Karim M; Sim, Adelene; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S; Caves, Leo SD

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of p53 and MDM2 is modulated by the phosphorylation of p53. This mechanism is key to activating p53, yet its molecular determinants are not fully understood. To study the spatiotemporal characteristics of this molecular process we carried out Brownian dynamics simulations of the interactions of the MDM2 protein with a p53 peptide in its wild type state and when phosphorylated at Thr18 (pThr18) and Ser20 (pSer20). We found that p53 phosphorylation results in concerted changes in the topology of the interaction landscape in the diffusively bound encounter complex domain. These changes hinder phosphorylated p53 peptides from binding to MDM2 well before reaching the binding site. The underlying mechanism appears to involve shift of the peptide away from the vicinity of the MDM2 protein, peptide reorientation, and reduction in peptide residence time relative to wild-type p53 peptide. pThr18 and pSr20 p53 peptides experience reduction in residence times by factors of 13.6 and 37.5 respectively relative to the wild-type p53 peptide, indicating a greater role for Ser20 phosphorylation in abrogating p53 MDM2 interactions. These detailed insights into the effect of phosphorylation on molecular interactions are not available from conventional experimental and theoretical approaches and open up new avenues that incorporate molecular interaction dynamics, for stabilizing p53 against MDM2, which is a major focus of anticancer drug lead development. PMID:25584963

  2. Influence of MDM2 polymorphisms on squamous cell carcinoma susceptibility: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huanxin; Li, Haiyan; Zhang, Jinling; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Controversial associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (rs2279744, rs937283, rs3730485) of the MDM2 gene and the etiology of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) have been reported. This merits further comprehensive assessment. Materials and methods We systematically reviewed the available data and conducted an updated meta-analysis to evaluate the genetic effect of MDM2 polymorphisms in SCC susceptibility, using Stata/SE 12.0 software. Results After screening, 7,987 SCC cases and 12,954 controls from 26 eligible case–control studies were enrolled. Overall, compared with the control group, a significantly increased SCC risk was observed for the MDM2 rs2279744 polymorphism in the Asian population (test of association: odds ratio [OR] 1.12, P=0.027 for G vs T; OR 1.26, P=0.016 for GG vs TT; OR 1.25, P<0.001 for GG vs TT + TG; and OR 1.08, P=0.023 for carrier G vs T). In subgroup analysis by SCC type, a similarly increased esophageal SCC risk was detected (OR 1.19, P<0.001 for G vs T; OR 1.46, P<0.001 for GG vs TT; and OR 1.48, P=0.005 for GG vs TT + TG). Furthermore, MDM2–TP53 double mutation was statistically associated with increased SCC susceptibility overall (OR 1.52, P=0.001), especially in the Asian population (OR 1.49, P=0.022). However, no significant difference between the control and case groups was obtained for MDM2 rs937283 or rs3730485 under any genetic model (all P>0.05). Conclusion Our results highlight a positive association between the GG genotype of MDM2 rs2279744 polymorphism and an increased risk of esophageal SCC in the Asian population, which needs to be clarified by more large-scale studies. PMID:27785069

  3. A spatiotemporal characterization of the effect of p53 phosphorylation on its interaction with MDM2.

    PubMed

    ElSawy, Karim M; Sim, Adelene; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S; Caves, Leo Sd

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of p53 and MDM2 is modulated by the phosphorylation of p53. This mechanism is key to activating p53, yet its molecular determinants are not fully understood. To study the spatiotemporal characteristics of this molecular process we carried out Brownian dynamics simulations of the interactions of the MDM2 protein with a p53 peptide in its wild type state and when phosphorylated at Thr18 (pThr18) and Ser20 (pSer20). We found that p53 phosphorylation results in concerted changes in the topology of the interaction landscape in the diffusively bound encounter complex domain. These changes hinder phosphorylated p53 peptides from binding to MDM2 well before reaching the binding site. The underlying mechanism appears to involve shift of the peptide away from the vicinity of the MDM2 protein, peptide reorientation, and reduction in peptide residence time relative to wild-type p53 peptide. pThr18 and pSr20 p53 peptides experience reduction in residence times by factors of 13.6 and 37.5 respectively relative to the wild-type p53 peptide, indicating a greater role for Ser20 phosphorylation in abrogating p53 MDM2 interactions. These detailed insights into the effect of phosphorylation on molecular interactions are not available from conventional experimental and theoretical approaches and open up new avenues that incorporate molecular interaction dynamics, for stabilizing p53 against MDM2, which is a major focus of anticancer drug lead development. PMID:25584963

  4. Quantitative assessment of the p53-Mdm2 feedback loop using protein lysate microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Sundhar; Honkanen, Peter; Young, Lynn; Shimura, Tsutomu; Austin, John; Steeg, Patricia S; Nishizuka, Satoshi

    2007-07-01

    Mathematical simulations of the p53-Mdm2 feedback loop suggest that both proteins will exhibit impulsive expression characteristics in response to high cellular stress levels. However, little quantitative experimental evaluation has been done, particularly of the phosphorylated forms. To evaluate the mathematical models experimentally, we used lysate microarrays from an isogenic pair of gamma-ray-irradiated cell lysates from HCT116 (p53(+/+) and p53(-/-)). Both p53 and Mdm2 proteins showed expected pulses in the wild type, whereas no pulses were seen in the knockout. Based on experimental observations, we determined model parameters and generated an in silico "knockout," reflecting the experimental data, including phosphorylated proteins.

  5. The use of ion mobility mass spectrometry to probe modulation of the structure of p53 and of MDM2 by small molecule inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Eleanor R.; Jurneczko, Ewa; Nicholson, Judith; Hupp, Ted R.; Zawacka-Pankau, Joanna; Selivanova, Galina; Barran, Perdita E.

    2015-01-01

    Developing drug-like molecules to inhibit the interactions formed by disordered proteins is desirable due to the high correlation of disorder with protein implicated in disease, but is challenging due in part to the lack of atomistically resolved and resolvable structures from conformationally dynamic systems. Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is well-positioned to assess protein ligand interactions along with the effect of a given inhibitor on conformation. Here we demonstrate the use of IM-MS to characterize the effect of two inhibitors RITA and Nutlin-3 on their respective binding partners: p53 and MDM2. RITA binds N-terminal transactivation domain of p53 (Np53) weakly, preventing direct observation of the complex in the gas phase. Nonetheless, upon incubation with RITA, we observe an alteration in the charge state distribution and in the conformational distributions adopted by Np53 in the gas phase. This finding supports the hypothesis that RITAs mode of action proceeds via a conformational change in p53. Circular dichroism corroborates our gas phase findings, showing a slight increase in secondary structure content on ligand incubation, and HDX-MS experiments also highlight the dynamic properties of this protein. Using the same approach we present data to show the effect of Nutlin-3 binding to the N-terminal domain of MDM2 (N-MDM2), N-MDM2 presents as at least two conformational families in the absence of Nutlin-3. Upon Nutlin-3 binding, the protein undergoes a compaction event similar to that exhibited by RITA on Np53. This multi-technique approach highlights the inherent disorder in these systems; and in particular exemplifies the power of IM-MS as a technique to study transient interactions between small molecule inhibitors and intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:26217671

  6. p21-Activated kinase 6 (PAK6) inhibits prostate cancer growth via phosphorylation of androgen receptor and tumorigenic E3 ligase murine double minute-2 (Mdm2).

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Li, Yang; Gu, Hui; Zhu, Ge; Li, Jiabin; Cao, Liu; Li, Feng

    2013-02-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathway plays a crucial role in the development and growth of prostate malignancies. Regulation of AR homeostasis in prostate tumorigenesis has not yet been fully characterized. In this study, we demonstrate that p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6) inhibits prostate tumorigenesis by regulating AR homeostasis. First, we demonstrated that in normal prostate epithelium, AR co-localizes with PAK6 in the cytoplasm and translocates into the nucleus in malignant prostate. Furthermore, AR phosphorylation at Ser-578 by PAK6 promotes AR-E3 ligase murine double minute-2 (Mdm2) association, causing AR degradation upon androgen stimuli. We also showed that PAK6 phosphorylates Mdm2 on Thr-158 and Ser-186, which is critical for AR ubiquitin-mediated degradation. Moreover, we found that Thr-158 collaborates with Ser-186 for AR-Mdm2 association and AR ubiquitin-mediated degradation as it facilitates PAK6-mediated AR homeostasis. PAK6 knockdown promotes prostate tumor growth in vivo. Interestingly, we found a strong inverse correlation between PAK6 and AR expression in the cytoplasm of prostate cancer cells. These observations indicate that PAK6 may be important for the maintenance of androgen-induced AR signaling homeostasis and in prostate malignancy, as well as being a possible new therapeutic target for AR-positive and hormone-sensitive prostate cancer.

  7. MDM2 T309G polymorphism and esophageal cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lei, Caipeng; Zhang, Weiguo; Fan, Junli; Qiao, Bin; Chen, Qiang; Liu, Qin; Zhao, Chunling

    2015-01-01

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) has suggested to play an important role in esophageal cancer. The association between MDM2 T309G polymorphism and esophageal cancer risk was inconclusive. To clarify the possible association, we conducted a meta-analysis. We searched in the PubMed, Embase, and Wanfang databases. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of association. A total of 6 studies with 4909 cases and controls were included based on the search criteria. The MDM2 T309G polymorphism was associated with a significantly decreased risk of esophageal cancer (OR=0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.96; I(2)=22%). When stratified by type of race, a significantly decreased esophageal cancer risk were observed in Asians (OR=0.85; 95% CI, 0.78-0.93; I(2)=0%). In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested that MDM2 T309G polymorphism was associated with a significantly decreased risk of esophageal cancer. PMID:26550276

  8. MDM2 T309G polymorphism and esophageal cancer risk: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Caipeng; Zhang, Weiguo; Fan, Junli; Qiao, Bin; Chen, Qiang; Liu, Qin; Zhao, Chunling

    2015-01-01

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) has suggested to play an important role in esophageal cancer. The association between MDM2 T309G polymorphism and esophageal cancer risk was inconclusive. To clarify the possible association, we conducted a meta-analysis. We searched in the PubMed, Embase, and Wanfang databases. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of association. A total of 6 studies with 4909 cases and controls were included based on the search criteria. The MDM2 T309G polymorphism was associated with a significantly decreased risk of esophageal cancer (OR=0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.96; I2=22%). When stratified by type of race, a significantly decreased esophageal cancer risk were observed in Asians (OR=0.85; 95% CI, 0.78-0.93; I2=0%). In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested that MDM2 T309G polymorphism was associated with a significantly decreased risk of esophageal cancer. PMID:26550276

  9. KMT Set7/9 affects genotoxic stress response via the Mdm2 axis

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, Olga; Malikova, Daria; Shuvalov, Oleg; Antonov, Alexey V.; Tentler, Dmitri; Garabadgiu, Alexander V.; Melino, Gerry; Barlev, Nikolai A.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic stress inflicted by anti-cancer drugs causes DNA breaks and genome instability. DNA double strand breaks induced by irradiation or pharmacological inhibition of Topoisomerase II activate ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated) kinase signalling pathway that in turn triggers cell cycle arrest and DNA repair. ATM-dependent gamma-phosphorylation of histone H2Ax and other histone modifications, including ubiquitnylation, promote exchange of histones and recruitment of DNA damage response (DDR) and repair proteins. Signal transduction pathways, besides DDR itself, also control expression of genes whose products cause cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis thus ultimately affecting the sensitivity of cells to genotoxic stress. In this study, using a number of experimental approaches we provide evidence that lysine-specific methyltransferase (KMT) Set7/9 affects DDR and DNA repair, at least in part, by regulating the expression of an E3 ubiquitin ligase, Mdm2. Furthermore, we show that Set7/9 physically interacts with Mdm2. Several cancer cell lines with inverse expression of Set7/9 and Mdm2 displayed diminished survival in response to genotoxic stress. These findings are signified by our bioinformatics studies suggesting that the unleashed expression of Mdm2 in cancer patients with diminished expression of Set7/9 is associated with poor survival outcome. PMID:26317544

  10. MDM2 facilitates adipocyte differentiation through CRTC-mediated activation of STAT3.

    PubMed

    Hallenborg, P; Siersbæk, M; Barrio-Hernandez, I; Nielsen, R; Kristiansen, K; Mandrup, S; Grøntved, L; Blagoev, B

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligase MDM2 is best known for balancing the activity of the tumor suppressor p53. We have previously shown that MDM2 is vital for adipocyte conversion through controlling Cebpd expression in a p53-independent manner. Here, we show that the proadipogenic effect of MDM2 relies on activation of the STAT family of transcription factors. Their activation was required for the cAMP-mediated induction of target genes. Interestingly, rather than influencing all cAMP-stimulated genes, inhibition of the kinases directly responsible for STAT activation, namely JAKs, or ablation of MDM2, each resulted in abolished induction of a subset of cAMP-stimulated genes, with Cebpd being among the most affected. Moreover, STATs were able to interact with the transcriptional cofactors CRTC2 and CRTC3, hitherto only reported to associate with the cAMP-responsive transcription factor CREB. Last but not least, the binding of CRTC2 to a transcriptional enhancer that interacts with the Cebpd promoter was dramatically decreased upon JAK inhibition. Our data reveal the existence of an unusual functional interplay between STATs and CREB at the onset of adipogenesis through shared CRTC cofactors. PMID:27362806

  11. MDM2 facilitates adipocyte differentiation through CRTC-mediated activation of STAT3.

    PubMed

    Hallenborg, P; Siersbæk, M; Barrio-Hernandez, I; Nielsen, R; Kristiansen, K; Mandrup, S; Grøntved, L; Blagoev, B

    2016-06-30

    The ubiquitin ligase MDM2 is best known for balancing the activity of the tumor suppressor p53. We have previously shown that MDM2 is vital for adipocyte conversion through controlling Cebpd expression in a p53-independent manner. Here, we show that the proadipogenic effect of MDM2 relies on activation of the STAT family of transcription factors. Their activation was required for the cAMP-mediated induction of target genes. Interestingly, rather than influencing all cAMP-stimulated genes, inhibition of the kinases directly responsible for STAT activation, namely JAKs, or ablation of MDM2, each resulted in abolished induction of a subset of cAMP-stimulated genes, with Cebpd being among the most affected. Moreover, STATs were able to interact with the transcriptional cofactors CRTC2 and CRTC3, hitherto only reported to associate with the cAMP-responsive transcription factor CREB. Last but not least, the binding of CRTC2 to a transcriptional enhancer that interacts with the Cebpd promoter was dramatically decreased upon JAK inhibition. Our data reveal the existence of an unusual functional interplay between STATs and CREB at the onset of adipogenesis through shared CRTC cofactors.

  12. Effects of the MDM2 promoter SNP285 and SNP309 on Sp1 transcription factor binding and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Knappskog, Stian; Lønning, Per E

    2011-01-01

    The proto-oncogene MDM2 inhibits p53 and plays a key role in cell growth control and apoptosis. Identification of two antagonizing MDM2 polymorphisms, SNP285 and SNP309, affecting cancer risk through modulation of Sp1 transcription factor binding, shed new light on the biological activity and phylogeny of this gene.

  13. Antisense-MDM2 Sensitizes LNCaP Prostate Cancer Cells to Androgen Deprivation, Radiation, and the Combination In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyanova, Radka; Hachem, Paul; Hensley, Harvey; Khor, L.-Y.; Mu Zhaomei; Hammond, M. Elizabeth H.; Agrawal, Sudhir; Pollack, Alan . E-mail: Alan.Pollack@fccc.edu

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To test the effects of antisense (AS)-MDM2 alone and with androgen deprivation (AD), radiotherapy (RT), and AD + RT on wild-type LNCaP cells in an orthotopic in vivo model. Methods: Androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells were grown in the prostates of nude mice. Magnetic resonance imaging-based tumor volume and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurements were used to assess effects on tumor response. Tumor response was measured by biochemical and tumor volume failure definitions and doubling time estimates from fitted PSA and tumor volume growth curves. Expression of MDM2, p53, p21, and Ki-67 was quantified using immunohistochemical staining and image analysis of formalin-fixed tissue, analogous to methods used clinically. Results: Antisense-MDM2 significantly inhibited the growth of LNCaP tumors over the mismatch controls. The most significant increase in tumor growth delay and tumor doubling time was from AS-MDM2 + AD + RT, although the effect of AS-MDM2 + AD was substantial. Expression of MDM2 was significantly reduced by AS-MDM2 in the setting of RT. Conclusions: This is the first in vivo investigation of the effects of AS-MDM2 in an orthotopic model and the first to demonstrate incremental sensitization when added to AD and AD + RT. The results with AD underscore the potential to affect micrometastatic disease, which is probably responsible for treatment failure in 30-40% of men with high-risk disease.

  14. Targeting the MDM2/MDM4 interaction interface as a promising approach for p53 reactivation therapy.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Marsha; Mancini, Francesca; Lucà, Rossella; Coletti, Alice; Giacchè, Nicola; Manni, Isabella; Arisi, Ivan; Florenzano, Fulvio; Teveroni, Emanuela; Buttarelli, Marianna; Fici, Laura; Brandi, Rossella; Bruno, Tiziana; Fanciulli, Maurizio; D'Onofrio, Mara; Piaggio, Giulia; Pellicciari, Roberto; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Marine, Jean Christophe; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Moretti, Fabiola

    2015-11-01

    Restoration of wild-type p53 tumor suppressor function has emerged as an attractive anticancer strategy. Therapeutics targeting the two p53-negative regulators, MDM2 and MDM4, have been developed, but most agents selectively target the ability of only one of these molecules to interact with p53, leaving the other free to operate. Therefore, we developed a method that targets the activity of MDM2 and MDM4 simultaneously based on recent studies indicating that formation of MDM2/MDM4 heterodimer complexes are required for efficient inactivation of p53 function. Using computational and mutagenesis analyses of the heterodimer binding interface, we identified a peptide that mimics the MDM4 C-terminus, competes with endogenous MDM4 for MDM2 binding, and activates p53 function. This peptide induces p53-dependent apoptosis in vitro and reduces tumor growth in vivo. Interestingly, interfering with the MDM2/MDM4 heterodimer specifically activates a p53-dependent oxidative stress response. Consistently, distinct subcellular pools of MDM2/MDM4 complexes were differentially sensitive to the peptide; nuclear MDM2/MDM4 complexes were particularly highly susceptible to the peptide-displacement activity. Taken together, these data identify the MDM2/MDM4 interaction interface as a valuable molecular target for therapeutic reactivation of p53 oncosuppressive function. PMID:26359458

  15. MDM4 expression as an indicator of TP53 reactivation by combined targeting of MDM2 and MDM4 in cancer cells without TP53 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Mitsuaki; Yamato, Kenji; Endo, Shinji; Saito, Rie; Ueno, Takunori; Hirai, Sachiko; Suzuki, Hideo; Abei, Masato; Natori, Yukikazu; Hyodo, Ichinosuke

    2014-01-01

    MDM2 and MDM4, a structurally related MDM2 homolog, negatively regulates expression and functions of TP53 tumor suppressor gene. To explore the precise expression patterns and function of MDM2 and MDM4 in wild-type (wt) TP53 cancer cells, we analyzed 11 various cancer cell lines with wt TP53. All cell lines exhibited deregulated expression of MDM2 and MDM4, and were divided into two distinct types; the one expressing high levels of MDM4 and another expressing low levels of MDM4. The low MDM4 type expressed higher MDM2 levels than the high MDM4 type. In cells with high MDM4 expression, knockdown of MDM4 or MDM2 reactivated TP53, and simultaneous knockdown of MDM2 and MDM4 synergistically reactivated TP53. In contrast, in cells with low MDM4 expression, knockdown of only MDM2 reactivated TP53. These results suggest that both MDM2 and MDM4 are closely involved in TP53 inactivation in cancer cells with high MDM4 expression, whereas only MDM2, and not MDM4, is a regulator of TP53 in cells with low MDM4 expression. MDM4 expression in wt TP53-tumors is a potential indicator for TP53 reactivation cancer therapy by simultaneous targeting of MDM4 and MDM2. Specific knockdown of MDM2 and MDM4 might be applicable for TP53 restoration therapy. PMID:25621298

  16. Mdm2 is required for survival of hematopoietic stem cells/progenitors via dampening of ROS-induced p53 activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mdm2 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets p53 for degradation. p53(515C) (encoding p53R172P) is a hypomorphic allele of p53 that rescues the embryonic lethality of Mdm2(-/-) mice. Mdm2(-/-) p53(515C/515C) mice, however, die by postnatal day 13 resulting from hematopoietic failure. Hematopoietic st...

  17. Rearrangement of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase protein-protein interactions by the MDM2 ligand nutlin-3.

    PubMed

    Way, Luke; Faktor, Jakub; Dvorakova, Petra; Nicholson, Judith; Vojtesek, Borek; Graham, Duncan; Ball, Kathryn L; Hupp, Ted

    2016-09-01

    Drugs targeting MDM2's hydrophobic pocket activate p53. However, these agents act allosterically and have agonist effects on MDM2's protein interaction landscape. Dominant p53-independent MDM2-drug responsive-binding proteins have not been stratified. We used as a variable the differential expression of MDM2 protein as a function of cell density to identify Nutlin-3 responsive MDM2-binding proteins that are perturbed independent of cell density using SWATH-MS. Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, the E3 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, was one of two Nutlin-3 perturbed proteins identified fours hour posttreatment at two cell densities. Immunoblotting confirmed that dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase was induced by Nutlin-3. Depletion of MDM2 using siRNA also elevated dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase in Nutlin-3 treated cells. Mitotracker confirmed that Nutlin-3 inhibits mitochondrial activity. Enrichment of mitochondria using TOM22+ immunobeads and TMT labeling defined key changes in the mitochondrial proteome after Nutlin-3 treatment. Proximity ligation identified rearrangements of cellular protein-protein complexes in situ. In response to Nutlin-3, a reduction of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase/dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase protein complexes highlighted a disruption of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. This coincides with an increase in MDM2/dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase complexes in the nucleus that was further enhanced by the nuclear export inhibitor Leptomycin B. The data suggest one therapeutic impact of MDM2 drugs might be on the early perturbation of specific protein-protein interactions within the mitochondria. This methodology forms a blueprint for biomarker discovery that can identify rearrangements of MDM2 protein-protein complexes in drug-treated cells. PMID:27273042

  18. Rearrangement of mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase protein–protein interactions by the MDM2 ligand nutlin‐3

    PubMed Central

    Way, Luke; Faktor, Jakub; Dvorakova, Petra; Nicholson, Judith; Vojtesek, Borek; Graham, Duncan; Ball, Kathryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Drugs targeting MDM2's hydrophobic pocket activate p53. However, these agents act allosterically and have agonist effects on MDM2's protein interaction landscape. Dominant p53‐independent MDM2‐drug responsive‐binding proteins have not been stratified. We used as a variable the differential expression of MDM2 protein as a function of cell density to identify Nutlin‐3 responsive MDM2‐binding proteins that are perturbed independent of cell density using SWATH‐MS. Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, the E3 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, was one of two Nutlin‐3 perturbed proteins identified fours hour posttreatment at two cell densities. Immunoblotting confirmed that dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase was induced by Nutlin‐3. Depletion of MDM2 using siRNA also elevated dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase in Nutlin‐3 treated cells. Mitotracker confirmed that Nutlin‐3 inhibits mitochondrial activity. Enrichment of mitochondria using TOM22+ immunobeads and TMT labeling defined key changes in the mitochondrial proteome after Nutlin‐3 treatment. Proximity ligation identified rearrangements of cellular protein–protein complexes in situ. In response to Nutlin‐3, a reduction of dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase/dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase protein complexes highlighted a disruption of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. This coincides with an increase in MDM2/dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase complexes in the nucleus that was further enhanced by the nuclear export inhibitor Leptomycin B. The data suggest one therapeutic impact of MDM2 drugs might be on the early perturbation of specific protein–protein interactions within the mitochondria. This methodology forms a blueprint for biomarker discovery that can identify rearrangements of MDM2 protein–protein complexes in drug‐treated cells. PMID:27273042

  19. Rare Aggressive Behavior of MDM2-Amplified Retroperitoneal Dedifferentiated Liposarcoma, with Brain, Lung and Subcutaneous Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Ben Salha, Imen; Zaidi, Shane; Noujaim, Jonathan; Miah, Aisha B.; Fisher, Cyril; Jones, Robin L.; Thway, Khin

    2016-01-01

    Dedifferentiated liposarcoma (DDL) is a histologically pleomorphic sarcoma, traditionally defined as well-differentiated liposarcoma with abrupt transition to high grade, non-lipogenic sarcoma. It can occur as part of recurrent well-differentiated liposarcoma, or may arise de novo. DDL most frequently occurs within the retroperitoneum, and while it is prone to local recurrence, it usually has a lower rate of metastasis than other pleomorphic sarcomas. We describe a case of retroperitoneal dedifferentiated liposarcoma in a 63-year-old male, who showed MDM2 amplification with fluorescence in situ hybridization, which displayed unusually aggressive behavior, with brain, lung and subcutaneous soft tissue metastases. As previous reports of metastatic liposarcoma have largely grouped DDL in with other (genetically and clinically distinct) liposarcoma subtypes, we highlight and discuss the rare occurrence of brain metastasis in MDM2-amplified retroperitoneal liposarcoma. PMID:27746879

  20. The inhibition of calcium carbonate crystal growth by the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide.

    PubMed

    Dalas, E; Chalias, A; Gatos, D; Barlos, K

    2006-08-15

    The crystal growth of calcite, the most stable calcium carbonate polymorph, in the presence of the cysteine-rich Mdm2 peptide (containing 48 amino acids in the ring finger configuration), has been investigated by the constant composition technique. Crystallization took place exclusively on well-characterized calcite crystals in solutions supersaturated only with respect to this calcium carbonate salt. The kinetic results indicated a surface diffusion spiral growth mechanism. The presence of the Mdm2 peptide inhibited the crystal growth of calcite by 22-58% in the concentration range tested, through adsorption onto the active growth sites of the calcite crystal surface. The kinetic results favored a Langmuir-type adsorption model, and the value of the calculated affinity constant was k(aff)=147x10(4) dm(3)mol(-1), a(ads)=0.29. PMID:16678843

  1. Assessing the Efficacy of Mdm2/Mdm4-Inhibiting Stapled Peptides Using Cellular Thermal Shift Assays

    PubMed Central

    Xiong Tan, Ban; Brown, Christopher J.; Ferrer, Fernando J.; Yuen, Tsz Ying; Quah, Soo Tng; Chan, Boon Hong; Jansson, Anna E.; Teo, Hsiang Ling; Nordlund, Pär; Lane, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous publications on stapled peptide inhibitors against Mdm2/Mdm4-p53 interactions have established that this new class of drugs have the potential to be easily optimised to attain high binding affinity and specificity, but the mechanisms controlling their cellular uptake and target engagement remain elusive and controversial. To aid in understanding the rules of peptide and staple design, and to enable rapid optimisation, we employed the newly-developed cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA). CETSA was able to validate stapled peptide binding to Mdm2 and Mdm4, and the method was also used to determine the extent of cellular uptake, cellular availability, and intracellular binding of the endogenous target proteins in its native environment. Our data suggest that while the stapled peptides engage their targets intracellularly, more work is needed to improve their cellular entry and target engagement efficiency in vivo. CETSA now provides a valuable tool to optimize such in vivo properties of stapled peptides. PMID:26159518

  2. The Ribosomal Protein-Mdm2-p53 Pathway and Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Deisenroth, Chad; Zhang, Yanping

    2011-01-01

    Cellular growth and division are two fundamental processes that are exquisitely sensitive and responsive to environmental fluctuations. One of the most energetically demanding functions of these processes is ribosome biogenesis, the key component to regulating overall protein synthesis and cell growth. Perturbations to ribosome biogenesis have been demonstrated to induce an acute stress response leading to p53 activation through the inhibition of Mdm2 by a number of ribosomal proteins. The energy status of a cell is a highly dynamic variable that naturally contributes to metabolic fluctuations, which can affect both the rates of ribosome biogenesis and p53 function. This, in turn, determines whether a cell is in an anabolic, growth-promoting state or a catabolic, growth-suppressing state. Here the authors integrate the known functions of p53 to postulate how changes in nutrient availability may induce the ribosomal protein–Mdm2-p53 signaling pathway to modulate p53-dependent metabolic regulation. PMID:21779508

  3. High frequency of p53/MDM2/p14ARF pathway abnormalities in relapsed neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Carr-Wilkinson, Jane; O' Toole, Kieran; Wood, Katrina M.; Challen, Christine C.; Baker, Angela G.; Board, Julian R.; Evans, Laura; Cole, Michael; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Boos, Joachim; Köhler, Gabriele; Leuschner, Ivo; Pearson, Andrew D.J.; Lunec, John; Tweddle, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Most neuroblastomas initially respond to therapy but many relapse with chemoresistant disease. p53 mutations are rare in diagnostic neuroblastomas, but we have previously reported inactivation of the p53/MDM2/p14ARF pathway in 9/17 (53%) neuroblastoma cell lines established at relapse. Hypothesis: Inactivation of the p53/MDM2/p14ARF pathway develops during treatment and contributes to neuroblastoma relapse. Methods: Eighty-four neuroblastomas were studied from 41 patients with relapsed neuroblastoma including 38 paired neuroblastomas at different stages of therapy. p53 mutations were detected by automated sequencing, p14ARF methylation and deletion by methylation-specific PCR and duplex PCR respectively, and MDM2 amplification by fluorescent in-situ hybridisation. Results: Abnormalities in the p53 pathway were identified in 20/41(49%) cases. Downstream defects due to inactivating missense p53 mutations were identified in 6/41 (15%) cases, 5 following chemotherapy and/or at relapse and 1 at diagnosis, post chemotherapy and relapse. The presence of a p53 mutation was independently prognostic for overall survival (hazard ratio 3.4, 95% confidence interval 1.2, 9.9; p = 0.02). Upstream defects were present in 35% cases: MDM2 amplification in 3 cases, all at diagnosis & relapse and p14ARF inactivation in 12/41 (29%) cases: 3 had p14ARF methylation, 2 after chemotherapy, and 9 had homozygous deletions, 8 at diagnosis and relapse. Conclusions: These results show that a high proportion of neuroblastomas which relapse have an abnormality in the p53 pathway. The majority have upstream defects suggesting that agents which reactivate wild-type p53 would be beneficial, in contrast to those with downstream defects where p53 independent therapies are indicated. PMID:20145180

  4. ARF Impedes NPM/B23 Shuttling in an Mdm2-Sensitive Tumor Suppressor Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Suzanne N.; Yu, Yue; Maggi, Leonard B.; Weber, Jason D.

    2004-01-01

    The ARF tumor suppressor is widely regarded as an upstream activator of p53-dependent growth arrest and apoptosis. However, recent findings indicate that ARF can also regulate the cell cycle in the absence of p53. In search of p53-independent ARF targets, we isolated nucleophosmin (NPM/B23), a protein we show is required for proliferation, as a novel ARF binding protein. In response to hyperproliferative signals, ARF is upregulated, resulting in the nucleolar retention of NPM and concomitant cell cycle arrest. The Mdm2 oncogene outcompetes NPM/B23 for ARF binding, and introduction of Mdm2 reverses ARF's p53-independent properties: in vitro, NPM is released from ARF-containing protein complexes, and in vivo S phase progression ensues. ARF induction by oncogenes or replicative senescence does not alter NPM/B23 protein levels but rather prevents its nucleocytoplasmic shuttling without inhibiting rRNA processing. By actively sequestering NPM in the nucleolus, ARF utilizes an additional mechanism of tumor suppression, one that is readily antagonized by Mdm2. PMID:15485902

  5. Bcl-2/MDM2 Dual Inhibitors Based on Universal Pyramid-Like α-Helical Mimetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziqian; Song, Ting; Feng, Yingang; Guo, Zongwei; Fan, Yudan; Xu, Wenjie; Liu, Lu; Wang, Anhui; Zhang, Zhichao

    2016-04-14

    No α-helical mimetic that exhibits Bcl-2/MDM2 dual inhibition has been rationally designed due to the different helicities of the α-helixes at their binding interfaces. Herein, we extracted a one-turn α-helix-mimicking ortho-triarene unit from o-phenylene foldamers. Linking benzamide substrates with a rotatable C-N bond, we constructed a novel semirigid pyramid-like scaffold that could support its two-turn α-helix mimicry without aromatic stacking interactions and could adopt the different dihedral angles of the key residues of p53 and BH3-only peptides. On the basis of this universal scaffold, a series of substituent groups were installed to capture the key residues of both p53TAD and BimBH3 and balance the differences of the bulks between them. Identified by FP, ITC, and NMR spectroscopy, a compound 6e (zq-1) that directly binds to Mcl-1, Bcl-2, and MDM2 with balanced submicromolar affinities was obtained. Cell-based experiments demonstrated its antitumor ability through Bcl-2/MDM2 dual inhibition simultaneously.

  6. Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Demoted MDM2 Expression to Suppress TSLP-Induced Mast Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ho; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2016-03-01

    Activation of murine double minute 2 (MDM2) through thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP)-induced signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT6) phosphorylation plays a critical role in proliferation and survival of mast cells. Previously, we reported that zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NP) effectively decrease the mast cell-mediated allergic inflammatory reactions. Here, we evaluated the effect of ZnO-NP on TSLP-induced proliferation of mast cells. ZnO-NP significantly reduced the number of BrdU-incorporating mast cells increased by TSLP. ZnO-NP decreased the expression of MDM2 through the blockade of STAT6 phosphorylation. TSLP increased the production and mRNA expression of interleukin-13 (a growth factor of mast cells), its increase was significantly decreased by ZnO-NP (10 μg/mL). ZnO-NP induced the down-regulation of Bcl2 (an anti-apoptotic factor) and up-regulation of Bax (an apoptotic factor) through the stabilization of p53 protein. However, ZnO-NP has no effect on caspase-3 activation, cytochrome c release into cytosol, and apoptosis-inducing factor translocation into nucleus in TSLP-stimulated cells. The results of the present study demonstrated that ZnO-NP inhibited the proliferation of mast cells through the regulation of MDM2 and p53 protein levels. These finding suggest that ZnO-NP could be improved mast cell-mediated various diseases.

  7. KAP1 dictates p53 response induced by chemotherapeutic agents via Mdm2 interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Koji . E-mail: kojokamo@gan2.res.ncc.go.jp; Kitabayashi, Issay; Taya, Yoichi . E-mail: ytaya@gan2.res.ncc.go.jp

    2006-12-08

    KAP1 recruits many proteins involved in gene silencing and functions as an integral part of co-repressor complex. KAP1 was identified as Mdm2-binding protein and shown to form a complex with Mdm2 and p53 in vivo. We examined the role of KAP1 in p53 activation after the treatment of cells with different types of external stresses. KAP1 reduction markedly enhanced the induction of p21, a product of the p53 target gene, after treatment with actinomycin D or {gamma}-irradiation, but not with camptothecin. Treatment with actinomycin D, but not with camptothecin, augmented the interaction of p53 with Mdm2 and KAP1. Further, KAP1 reduction in actinomycin D-treated cells facilitated cell cycle arrest and negatively affected clonal cell growth. Thus, the reduction of KAP1 levels promotes p53-dependent p21 induction and inhibits cell proliferation in actinomycin D-treated cells. KAP1 may serve as a therapeutic target against cancer in combination with actinomycin D.

  8. 8-Triazolylpurines: Towards Fluorescent Inhibitors of the MDM2/p53 Interaction.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Mariell; Bliman, David; Jacobsson, Jimmy; Nilsson, Jesper R; Min, Jaeki; Iconaru, Luigi; Guy, R Kiplin; Kriwacki, Richard W; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule nonpeptidic mimics of α-helices are widely recognised as protein-protein interaction (PPIs) inhibitors. Protein-protein interactions mediate virtually all important regulatory pathways in a cell, and the ability to control and modulate PPIs is therefore of great significance to basic biology, where controlled disruption of protein networks is key to understanding network connectivity and function. We have designed and synthesised two series of 2,6,9-substituted 8-triazolylpurines as α-helix mimetics. The first series was designed based on low energy conformations but did not display any biological activity in a biochemical fluorescence polarisation assay targeting MDM2/p53. Although solution NMR conformation studies demonstrated that such molecules could mimic the topography of an α-helix, docking studies indicated that the same compounds were not optimal as inhibitors for the MDM2/p53 interaction. A new series of 8-triazolylpurines was designed based on a combination of docking studies and analysis of recently published inhibitors. The best compound displayed low micromolar inhibitory activity towards MDM2/p53 in a biochemical fluorescence polarisation assay. In order to evaluate the applicability of these compounds as biologically active and intrinsically fluorescent probes, their absorption/emission properties were measured. The compounds display fluorescent properties with quantum yields up to 50%.

  9. Convergent solid-phase and solution approaches in the synthesis of the cysteine-rich Mdm2 RING finger domain.

    PubMed

    Vasileiou, Zoe; Barlos, Kostas; Gatos, Dimitrios

    2009-12-01

    The RING finger domain of the Mdm2, located at the C-terminus of the protein, is necessary for regulation of p53, a tumor suppressor protein. The 48-residues long Mdm2 peptide is an important target for studying its interaction with small anticancer drug candidates. For the chemical synthesis of the Mdm2 RING finger domain, the fragment condensation on solid-phase and the fragment condensation in solution were studied. The latter method was performed using either protected or free peptides at the C-terminus as the amino component. Best results were achieved using solution condensation where the N-component was applied with the C-terminal carboxyl group left unprotected. The developed method is well suited for large-scale synthesis of Mdm2 RING finger domain, combining the advantages of both solid-phase and solution synthesis. PMID:19824037

  10. MDM2–MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2–MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) in the micromolar range for the MDM2–MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2–MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation. PMID:27621617

  11. Opposite regulation of MDM2 and MDMX expression in acquisition of mesenchymal phenotype in benign and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Slabáková, Eva; Kharaishvili, Gvantsa; Smějová, Monika; Pernicová, Zuzana; Suchánková, Tereza; Remšík, Ján; Lerch, Stanislav; Straková, Nicol; Bouchal, Jan; Král, Milan; Culig, Zoran; Kozubík, Alois; Souček, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Plasticity of cancer cells, manifested by transitions between epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes, represents a challenging issue in the treatment of neoplasias. Both epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) are implicated in the processes of metastasis formation and acquisition of stem cell-like properties. Mouse double minute (MDM) 2 and MDMX are important players in cancer progression, as they act as regulators of p53, but their function in EMT and metastasis may be contradictory. Here, we show that the EMT phenotype in multiple cellular models and in clinical prostate and breast cancer samples is associated with a decrease in MDM2 and increase in MDMX expression. Modulation of EMT-accompanying changes in MDM2 expression in benign and transformed prostate epithelial cells influences their migration capacity and sensitivity to docetaxel. Analysis of putative mechanisms of MDM2 expression control demonstrates that in the context of defective p53 function, MDM2 expression is regulated by EMT-inducing transcription factors Slug and Twist. These results provide an alternative context-specific role of MDM2 in EMT, cell migration, metastasis, and therapy resistance. PMID:26416355

  12. MDM2–MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2–MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) in the micromolar range for the MDM2–MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2–MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2–MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation.

  13. Genetic polymorphisms of MDM2 and TP53 genes are associated with risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The tumor suppressor TP53 and its negative regulator MDM2 play crucial roles in carcinogenesis. Previous case-control studies also revealed TP53 72Arg>Pro and MDM2 309T>G polymorphisms contribute to the risk of common cancers. However, the relationship between these two functional polymorphisms and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) susceptibility has not been explored. Methods In this study, we performed a case-control study between 522 NPC patients and 722 healthy controls in a Chinese population by using PCR-RFLP. Results We found an increased NPC risk associated with the MDM2 GG (odds ratio [OR] = 2.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.08-3.96) and TG (OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.16-2.06) genotypes. An increased risk was also associated with the TP53 Pro/Pro genotype (OR = 2.22, 95% CI = 1.58-3.10) compared to the Arg/Arg genotype. The gene-gene interaction of MDM2 and TP53 polymorphisms increased adult NPC risk in a more than multiplicative manner (OR for the presence of both MDM2 GG and TP53 Pro/Pro genotypes = 7.75, 95% CI = 3.53-17.58). Conclusion The findings suggest that polymorphisms of MDM2 and TP53 genes may be genetic modifier for developing NPC. PMID:20398418

  14. HAUSP-nucleolin interaction is regulated by p53-Mdm2 complex in response to DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Key-Hwan; Park, Jang-Joon; Gu, Bon-Hee; Kim, Jin-Ock; Park, Sang Gyu; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    HAUSP (herpes virus-associated ubiquitin specific protease, known as ubiquitin specific protease 7), one of DUBs, regulates the dynamics of the p53 and Mdm2 network in response to DNA damage by deubiquitinating both p53 and its E3 ubiquitin ligase, Mdm2. Its concerted action increases the level of functional p53 by preventing proteasome-dependent degradation of p53. However, the protein substrates that are targeted by HAUSP to mediate DNA damage responses in the context of the HAUSP-p53-Mdm2 complex are not fully identified. Here, we identified nucleolin as a new substrate for HAUSP by proteomic analysis. Nucleolin has two HAUSP binding sites in its N- and C-terminal regions, and the mutation of HAUSP interacting peptides on nucleolin disrupts their interaction and it leads to the increased level of nucleolin ubiquitination. In addition, HAUSP regulates the stability of nucleolin by removing ubiquitin from nucleolin. Nucleolin exists as a component of the HAUSP-p53-Mdm2 complex, and both Mdm2 and p53 are required for the interaction between HAUSP and nucleolin. Importantly, the irradiation increases the HAUSP-nucleolin interaction, leading to nucleolin stabilization significantly. Taken together, this study reveals a new component of the HAUSP-p53-Mdm2 complex that governs dynamic cellular responses to DNA damage. PMID:26238070

  15. HAUSP-nucleolin interaction is regulated by p53-Mdm2 complex in response to DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Lim, Key-Hwan; Park, Jang-Joon; Gu, Bon-Hee; Kim, Jin-Ock; Park, Sang Gyu; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2015-08-04

    HAUSP (herpes virus-associated ubiquitin specific protease, known as ubiquitin specific protease 7), one of DUBs, regulates the dynamics of the p53 and Mdm2 network in response to DNA damage by deubiquitinating both p53 and its E3 ubiquitin ligase, Mdm2. Its concerted action increases the level of functional p53 by preventing proteasome-dependent degradation of p53. However, the protein substrates that are targeted by HAUSP to mediate DNA damage responses in the context of the HAUSP-p53-Mdm2 complex are not fully identified. Here, we identified nucleolin as a new substrate for HAUSP by proteomic analysis. Nucleolin has two HAUSP binding sites in its N- and C-terminal regions, and the mutation of HAUSP interacting peptides on nucleolin disrupts their interaction and it leads to the increased level of nucleolin ubiquitination. In addition, HAUSP regulates the stability of nucleolin by removing ubiquitin from nucleolin. Nucleolin exists as a component of the HAUSP-p53-Mdm2 complex, and both Mdm2 and p53 are required for the interaction between HAUSP and nucleolin. Importantly, the irradiation increases the HAUSP-nucleolin interaction, leading to nucleolin stabilization significantly. Taken together, this study reveals a new component of the HAUSP-p53-Mdm2 complex that governs dynamic cellular responses to DNA damage.

  16. Is MDM2 SNP309 Variation a Risk Factor for Head and Neck Carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Xianlu; Ye, Huiping; Li, Qi; Xiang, Zhaolan; Zhang, Xueyuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Murine double minute-2 (MDM2) is a negative regulator of P53, and its T309G polymorphism has been suggested as a risk factor for a variety of cancers. Increasing evidence has shown the association of MDM2 T309G polymorphism with head and neck carcinoma (HNC) risk. However, the results are inconsistent. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to elucidate the association. The meta-analysis retrieved studies published up to August 2015, and essential information was extracted for analysis. Separate analyses on ethnicity, source of controls, sample size, detection method, and cancer types were also conducted. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to estimate the association. Pooled data from 16 case–control studies including 4625 cases and 6927 controls failed to indicate a significant association. However, in the subgroup analysis of sample sizes, an increased risk was observed in the largest sample size group (>1000) under a recessive model (OR = 1.52; 95% CI = 1.08–2.13). Increased risks were also found in the nasopharyngeal cancer in the subgroup analysis of cancer types (GG vs TT: OR = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.38–3.12; dominant model: OR = 1.48; 95% CI = 1.13–1.93; recessive model: OR = 1.76; 95% CI = 1.17–2.65). The results suggest that homozygote GG alleles of MDM2 SNP309 may be a low-penetrant risk factor for HNC, and G allele may confer nasopharyngeal cancer susceptibility. PMID:26945408

  17. The importance of ribosome production, and the 5S RNP-MDM2 pathway, in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Pelava, Andria; Schneider, Claudia; Watkins, Nicholas J

    2016-08-15

    Ribosomes are abundant, large RNA-protein complexes that are the source of all protein synthesis in the cell. The production of ribosomes is an extremely energetically expensive cellular process that has long been linked to human health and disease. More recently, it has been shown that ribosome biogenesis is intimately linked to multiple cellular signalling pathways and that defects in ribosome production can lead to a wide variety of human diseases. Furthermore, changes in ribosome production in response to nutrient levels in the diet lead to metabolic re-programming of the liver. Reduced or abnormal ribosome production in response to cellular stress or mutations in genes encoding factors critical for ribosome biogenesis causes the activation of the tumour suppressor p53, which leads to re-programming of cellular transcription. The ribosomal assembly intermediate 5S RNP (ribonucleoprotein particle), containing RPL5, RPL11 and the 5S rRNA, accumulates when ribosome biogenesis is blocked. The excess 5S RNP binds to murine double minute 2 (MDM2), the main p53-suppressor in the cell, inhibiting its function and leading to p53 activation. Here, we discuss the involvement of ribosome biogenesis in the homoeostasis of p53 in the cell and in human health and disease. PMID:27528756

  18. The importance of ribosome production, and the 5S RNP-MDM2 pathway, in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Pelava, Andria; Schneider, Claudia; Watkins, Nicholas J

    2016-08-15

    Ribosomes are abundant, large RNA-protein complexes that are the source of all protein synthesis in the cell. The production of ribosomes is an extremely energetically expensive cellular process that has long been linked to human health and disease. More recently, it has been shown that ribosome biogenesis is intimately linked to multiple cellular signalling pathways and that defects in ribosome production can lead to a wide variety of human diseases. Furthermore, changes in ribosome production in response to nutrient levels in the diet lead to metabolic re-programming of the liver. Reduced or abnormal ribosome production in response to cellular stress or mutations in genes encoding factors critical for ribosome biogenesis causes the activation of the tumour suppressor p53, which leads to re-programming of cellular transcription. The ribosomal assembly intermediate 5S RNP (ribonucleoprotein particle), containing RPL5, RPL11 and the 5S rRNA, accumulates when ribosome biogenesis is blocked. The excess 5S RNP binds to murine double minute 2 (MDM2), the main p53-suppressor in the cell, inhibiting its function and leading to p53 activation. Here, we discuss the involvement of ribosome biogenesis in the homoeostasis of p53 in the cell and in human health and disease.

  19. The importance of ribosome production, and the 5S RNP–MDM2 pathway, in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Pelava, Andria; Schneider, Claudia; Watkins, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomes are abundant, large RNA–protein complexes that are the source of all protein synthesis in the cell. The production of ribosomes is an extremely energetically expensive cellular process that has long been linked to human health and disease. More recently, it has been shown that ribosome biogenesis is intimately linked to multiple cellular signalling pathways and that defects in ribosome production can lead to a wide variety of human diseases. Furthermore, changes in ribosome production in response to nutrient levels in the diet lead to metabolic re-programming of the liver. Reduced or abnormal ribosome production in response to cellular stress or mutations in genes encoding factors critical for ribosome biogenesis causes the activation of the tumour suppressor p53, which leads to re-programming of cellular transcription. The ribosomal assembly intermediate 5S RNP (ribonucleoprotein particle), containing RPL5, RPL11 and the 5S rRNA, accumulates when ribosome biogenesis is blocked. The excess 5S RNP binds to murine double minute 2 (MDM2), the main p53-suppressor in the cell, inhibiting its function and leading to p53 activation. Here, we discuss the involvement of ribosome biogenesis in the homoeostasis of p53 in the cell and in human health and disease. PMID:27528756

  20. A systematic review and meta-analysis of MDM2 polymorphisms in osteosarcoma susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bilbao-Aldaiturriaga, Nerea; Askaiturrieta, Ziortza; Granado-Tajada, Itsasne; Goričar, Katja; Dolžan, Vita; For The Slovenian Osteosarcoma Study Group; Garcia-Miguel, Purificación; Garcia de Andoin, Nagore; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Garcia-Orad, Africa

    2016-10-01

    Two polymorphisms in the murine double minute 2 (MDM2) gene (rs1690916 and rs2279744) have been associated with the risk of osteosarcoma (OS). When we analyzed these two polymorphisms in two new independents cohorts (Spanish and Slovenian), we found no association. In order to clarify this, we conducted a meta-analysis including six populations, with a total of 246 OS patients and 1,760 controls for rs1690916; and 433 OS patients and 1,959 controls for rs2279744. Pooled odds ratio risks and corresponding 95% CI were estimated to assess the possible associations. Our results showed that these two polymorphisms were not associated with the susceptibility of OS under any genetic model studied. In conclusion, the present meta-analysis indicates that MDM2 rs1690916 and rs2279744 cannot be considered as genetic risk factors for OS susceptibility in the different populations. Therefore, the influence of these two polymorphisms on the risk of OS may be less important than previously suggested. Future studies are needed to confirm these results. PMID:27438225

  1. MUC1 oncoprotein suppresses activation of the ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Deepak; Ahmad, Rehan; Chen, Dongshu; Kumar, Shailendra; Kharbanda, Surender; Kufe, Donald

    2011-01-01

    The MUC1 oncoprotein interacts with the c-Abl tyrosine kinase and blocks nuclear targeting of c-Abl in the apoptotic response to DNA damage. Mutation of the MUC1 cytoplasmic domain at Tyr-60 disrupts the MUC1-c-Abl interaction. The present results demonstrate that the MUC1(Y60F) mutant is a potent inducer of the ARF tumor suppressor. MUC1(Y60F) induces transcription of the ARF locus by a c-Abl-dependent mechanism that promotes CUL-4A-mediated nuclear export of the replication protein Cdc6. The functional significance of these findings is that MUC1(Y60F)-induced ARF expression and thereby inhibition of MDM2 results in the upregulation of p53 and the homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) serine/threonine kinase. HIPK2-mediated phosphorylation of p53 on Ser-46 was further associated with a shift from expression of the cell cycle arrest-related p21 gene to the apoptosis-related PUMA gene. We also show that the MUC1(Y60F) mutant functions as dominant negative inhibitor of tumorigenicity. These findings indicate that the oncogenic function of MUC1 is conferred by suppressing activation of the ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway. PMID:18981727

  2. PTCH-1 and MDM2 expression in ameloblastoma from a West African sub-population: implication for chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Udeabor, Samuel Ebele; Adisa, Akinyele Olumuyiwa; Lawal, Ahmed Oluwatoyin; Barbeck, Mike; Booms, Patrick; Sader, Robert Alexander; Ghanaati, Shahram

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ameloblastoma is a slow growing, painless odontogenic swelling which can attain sizes that result in severe deformities of the craniofacial complex. It is the most commonly encountered odontogenic tumor in Nigeria. Surgical intervention is currently the method of treatment; however identification of altered molecular pathways may inform chemotherapeutic potential. The Protein Patched homolog 1 (PTCH-1) is overexpressed in ameloblastoma. Also, mutation in the MDM2 gene can reduce the tumor suppressor function of p53 and promote ameloblastoma growth. No study however has characterized the molecular profile of African cases of ameloblastoma with a view to developing chemotherapeutic alternatives. The objective was to characterize the PTCH-1 genetic profile of Ameloblastoma in Nigerian patients as a first step in investigating its potential for chemotherapeutic intervention. Methods Twenty-eight FFPE blocks of ameloblastoma cases from Nigerian patients were prepared for antibody processing to PTCH-1 (Polyclonal Anti-PTCH antibody ab39266) and MDM2 (Monoclonal Anti-MDM2 antibody (2A10) ab16895). Cytoplasmic brown staining was considered as positive for PTCH while nuclear staining was positive for MDM2. Results Moderate and strong expressions for PTCH in ameloblast and stellate reticulum were 78.6% and 60.7% respectively. Only 3 (10.7%) cases expressed MDM2. Conclusion The importance of our study is that it supports, in theory, anti-PTCH/SHH chemotherapeutics for Nigerian ameloblastoma cases and also infers the possible additional use of anti-p53 agents. PMID:27386018

  3. Discovery of Highly Potent p53-MDM2 Antagonists and Structural Basis for Anti-Acute Myeloid Leukemia Activities

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The inhibition of p53-MDM2 interaction is a promising new approach to non-genotoxic cancer treatment. A potential application for drugs blocking the p53-MDM2 interaction is acute myeloid leukemia (AML) due to the occurrence of wild type p53 (wt p53) in the majority of patients. Although there are very promising preclinical results of several p53-MDM2 antagonists in early development, none of the compounds have yet proven the utility as a next generation anticancer agent. Herein we report the design, synthesis and optimization of YH239-EE (ethyl ester of the free carboxylic acid compound YH239), a potent p53-MDM2 antagonizing and apoptosis-inducing agent characterized by a number of leukemia cell lines as well as patient-derived AML blast samples. The structural basis of the interaction between MDM2 (the p53 receptor) and YH239 is elucidated by a co-crystal structure. YH239-EE acts as a prodrug and is the most potent compound that induces apoptosis in AML cells and patient samples. The observed superior activity compared to reference compounds provides the preclinical basis for further investigation and progression of YH239-EE. PMID:24405416

  4. How To Design a Successful p53-MDM2/X Interaction Inhibitor: A Thorough Overview Based on Crystal Structures.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Ortiz, Natalia; Neochoritis, Constantinos G; Dömling, Alexander

    2016-04-19

    A recent therapeutic strategy in oncology is based on blocking the protein-protein interaction between the murine double minute (MDM) homologues MDM2/X and the tumor-suppressor protein p53. Inhibiting the binding between wild-type (WT) p53 and its negative regulators MDM2 and/or MDMX has become an important target in oncology to restore the antitumor activity of p53, the so-called guardian of our genome. Interestingly, based on the multiple disclosed compound classes and structural analysis of small-molecule-MDM2 adducts, the p53-MDM2 complex is perhaps the best studied and most targeted protein-protein interaction. Several classes of small molecules have been identified as potent, selective, and efficient inhibitors of the p53-MDM2/X interaction, and many co-crystal structures with the protein are available. Herein we review the properties as well as preclinical and clinical studies of these small molecules and peptides, categorized by scaffold type. A particular emphasis is made on crystallographic structures and the observed binding modes of these compounds, including conserved water molecules present.

  5. Relationship Between Murine Double Minute 2 (MDM2) T309G Polymorphism and Endometrial Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zhuowei; Zhu, Xiaolu; Teng, Yincheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is one of the most common cancers in female patients. Many studies have investigated the association between the MDM2 T309G genotype and endometrial cancer incidence, but the results have been inconclusive. Material/Methods We performed a systematic search in PubMed and Web of Science databases (update until October 21, 2015) for all English-language publications. The associations are indicated as pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results We identified 8 relevant publications (9 case-control studies), including 2188 cases and 4654 controls, that assessed the relationship between MDM2 T309G polymorphism and endometrial cancer risk. There was a significant association between MDM2 T309G polymorphism and endometrial cancer risk in the overall population in the recessive model (OR=1.61; 95% CI: 1.19–2.19; P=0.002). In the subgroup of different ethnic populations, the subgroup analysis showed MDM2 T309G polymorphism was significantly associated with increased endometrial cancer risk in Caucasians (OR=1.75; 95% CI: 1.16–2.63; P=0.007). No similar result was found in Asians. Conclusions Our meta-analysis provides evidence that MDM2 T309G polymorphism is associated with endometrial cancer, especially in Caucasians. PMID:27604213

  6. Relationship Between Murine Double Minute 2 (MDM2) T309G Polymorphism and Endometrial Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhuowei; Zhu, Xiaolu; Teng, Yincheng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Endometrial cancer is one of the most common cancers in female patients. Many studies have investigated the association between the MDM2 T309G genotype and endometrial cancer incidence, but the results have been inconclusive. MATERIAL AND METHODS We performed a systematic search in PubMed and Web of Science databases (update until October 21, 2015) for all English-language publications. The associations are indicated as pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS We identified 8 relevant publications (9 case-control studies), including 2188 cases and 4654 controls, that assessed the relationship between MDM2 T309G polymorphism and endometrial cancer risk. There was a significant association between MDM2 T309G polymorphism and endometrial cancer risk in the overall population in the recessive model (OR=1.61; 95% CI: 1.19-2.19; P=0.002). In the subgroup of different ethnic populations, the subgroup analysis showed MDM2 T309G polymorphism was significantly associated with increased endometrial cancer risk in Caucasians (OR=1.75; 95% CI: 1.16-2.63; P=0.007). No similar result was found in Asians. CONCLUSIONS Our meta-analysis provides evidence that MDM2 T309G polymorphism is associated with endometrial cancer, especially in Caucasians. PMID:27604213

  7. In vitro and in silico studies of MDM2/MDMX isoforms predict Nutlin-3A sensitivity in well/de-differentiated liposarcomas.

    PubMed

    Bozzi, Fabio; Conca, Elena; Laurini, Erik; Posocco, Paola; Lo Sardo, Alessandra; Jocollè, Genny; Sanfilippo, Roberta; Gronchi, Alessandro; Perrone, Federica; Tamborini, Elena; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Pierotti, Marco A; Maestro, Roberta; Pricl, Sabrina; Pilotti, Silvana

    2013-11-01

    The molecular marker of well-differentiated/de-differentiated liposarcomas is MDM2 gene amplification coupled with protein overexpression and wild-type TP53. MDMX is a recently identified MDM2 homolog and its presence in this tumor is unexplored. Our aim was to investigate the role of full-length MDM2 and MDMX proteins and their isoforms in surgical specimens of well-differentiated/de-differentiated liposarcomas in view of Nutlin-3A (a MDM2 inhibitor) treatment. Frozen and matched formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material from surgical specimens was examined by means of: (1) fluorescence in situ hybridization to determine MDM2 and MDMX gene copy numbers; (2) RT-PCR and densitometry to analyze alternative splicing forms of mdm2 and mdmx; (3) immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry to assess the corresponding translated proteins; and (4) in vitro and in silico assays to determine their affinity for Nutlin-3A. All these cases showed MDM2 gene amplification with an MDMX disomic pattern. In all cases, the full-length mdm2 transcript was associated with the mdm2-b transcript, with ratios ranging from 0.07 to 5.6, and both were translated into protein; mdmx and mdmx-s were co-transcripted, with ratios ranging from 0.1 to 5.6. MDMX-S was frequently more upregulated than MDMX at both transcriptional and protein level. Each case showed different amounts of mdm2, mdm2-b, mdmx, and mdmx-s transcripts and the corresponding proteins. In vitro assays showed that Nutlin-3A was ineffective against MDM2-B and was unable to disrupt the MDMX/TP53 and MSMX-S/TP53 complexes. Molecular simulations confirmed these in vitro findings by showing that MDM2 has high Nutlin-3A affinity, followed by MDMX-S, MDMX, and MDM2-B. Nutlin-3A is predicted to be a good therapeutic option for well-differentiated/de-differentiated liposarcomas. However, our findings predict heterogeneous responses depending on the relative expression of mdm2, mdm2-b, mdmx, and mdmx-s transcripts and proteins. PMID

  8. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (c.309T>G) in the MDM2 gene and lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Enokida, Yasuaki; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Kakegawa, Seiichi; Atsumi, Jun; Takase, Yoshiaki; Miyamae, Yohei; Nagashima, Toshiteru; Ohtaki, Yoichi; Kaira, Kyoichi; Sunaga, Noriaki; Yanagitani, Noriko; Yoshino, Reiko; Tsunekawa, Katsuhiko; Igai, Hitoshi; Kamiyoshihara, Mitsuhiro; Usui, Kengo; Lezhava, Alexander; Tomizawa, Yoshio; Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Murakami, Masami; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Takeyoshi, Izumi

    2014-09-01

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) is a negative regulator of p53. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (rs2279744: c.309T>G) in the promoter region of the MDM2 gene has been shown to result in higher levels of MDM2 RNA and protein. Regarding the contribution of c.309T>G in the MDM2 gene to the lung cancer risk, previous studies are conflicting. In order to evaluate the association between c.309T>G and the lung cancer risk, a case-control study was performed. The MDM2 genotypes were determined in 762 lung cancer patients and in 700 cancer-free control subjects using the Smart Amplification Process. Statistical adjustment was performed for gender, age and pack-years of smoking. The distributions of c.309T>G (T/T, T/G, G/G) were 20.1, 49.7, 30.2% in the case group and 21.7, 47.9, 30.4% in the healthy-control group. There were no overall associations between the MDM2 genotypes and the risk of lung cancer [T/G genotype: Adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 1.30; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.88-1.93; and G/G genotype: AOR, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.78-1.80]. The subgroup analysis of gender, histology, smoking status and epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status also indicated that there was no association with lung cancer. Additionally, the genotypes did not have an effect on the age at the time of diagnosis of lung cancer (P=0.25). In conclusion, the G allele frequency in the lung cancer cases was 0.551, which was similar to other studies. The results of the present study suggest that the c.309T>G is not significantly associated with lung cancer.

  9. A re-examination of the MDM2/p53 interaction leads to revised design criteria for novel inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vasilevich, Natalya I; Afanasyev, Ilya I; Kovalskiy, Dmitry A; Genis, Dmitry V; Kochubey, Valery S

    2014-11-01

    The general model of epitope-type MDM2 inhibitor was developed based on the structural information on the complexes between MDM2 and various low molecular weight ligands found in the PDB database. Application of this model to our in-house library has led us to a new scaffold capable of interrupting protein-protein interactions. A synthetic library based on this and related scaffolds resulted in new classes of compounds that possess biochemical and cellular activity and good pharmacokinetic properties. We assume that such general approach to PPI inhibitors design may be useful for the development of inhibitors of various PPI types, including Bcl/XL.

  10. The nucleolar SUMO-specific protease SMT3IP1/SENP3 attenuates Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Tamotsu; Yamada, Yoshiji

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} SMT3IP1 interacts with p53 and Mdm2, and desumoylates both proteins. {yields} SMT3IP1 competes with p53 for binding to the central acidic domain of Mdm2. {yields} SMT3IP1 binding to Mdm2 inhibits Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation. {yields} We postulate that SMT3IP1 acts as a new regulator of the p53-Mdm2 pathway. -- Abstract: SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification plays multiple roles in several cellular processes. Sumoylation is reversibly regulated by SUMO-specific proteases. SUMO-specific proteases have recently been implicated in cell proliferation and early embryogenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we show that a nucleolar SUMO-specific protease, SMT3IP1/SENP3, controls the p53-Mdm2 pathway. We found that SMT3IP1 interacts with p53 and Mdm2, and desumoylates both proteins. Overexpression of SMT3IP1 in cells resulted in the accumulation of Mdm2 in the nucleolus and increased stability of the p53 protein. In addition, SMT3IP1 bound to the acidic domain of Mdm2, which also mediates the p53 interaction, and competed with p53 for binding. Increasing expression of SMT3IP1 suppressed Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. Interestingly, the desumoylation activity of SMT3IP1 was not necessary for p53 stabilization. These results suggest that SMT3IP1 is a new regulator of the p53-Mdm2 pathway.

  11. Impact of MDM2 309T>G polymorphism on sarcomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Chai, Wei; Xu, Meng; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background: A series of epidemiological studies have attempted to evaluate the impact of 309T>G polymorphism in MDM2 gene frequently identified as a susceptibility loci for various cancers on malignant sarcomas, however the reported conclusions remain inconsistent and elusive. We pooled all usable data sets in order to systematically assess the association between 309T>G polymorphism and sarcoma risk. Methods: To identify as many informative studies with complete data as possible, we searched a number of databases (PubMed, EBSCO, BIOSIS, the Cochrane Library, ISI Web of Science, Wiley Online Library and Embase). Inclusion criteria were defined to select the eligible studies. The fixed effects meta-analysis was properly used to calculate the pooled ORs and 95% CIs. Major findings: We eventually identified six studies evaluating the association of sarcoma risk with 309T>G polymorphism. People with 309-GG were found to have 43% greater risk of sarcoma relative to people with 309-TT (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.01~2.03; Pheterogeneity, 0.45). In the G vs. T genetic model, the risk reduced to 19% (OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.01~1.40; Pheterogeneity, 0.50). Statistical data showed no significant heterogeneity or publication bias in the meta-analysis. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that 309T>G polymorphism located within the MDM2 gene may act as modifier factor for sarcomas. A weakness of this analysis is that the findings cannot be explainable when the subtypes are separated and additional larger investigations are needed to identify the role of 309T>G polymorphism in each form of sarcoma. PMID:26550195

  12. Differential regulation of the p21/WAF-1 and mdm2 genes after high-dose UV irradiation: p53-dependent and p53-independent regulation of the mdm2 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, L.; Levine, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: DNA damage in mammalian cells stabilizes the p53 protein which then functions as a cell cycle checkpoint by leading to growth arrest or apoptosis. p53 is a transcription factor and positively regulates the expression of the p21/WAF-1 gene and the mdm2 gene. After high-dose UV irradiation, p53 increases the expression of the p21/WAF-1 gene immediately (2 to 5 hours after irradiation) while the induction of the mdm2 gene is delayed (8 to 12 hours after irradiation). Experiments presented here explore this differential expression of two different p53-regulated genes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: IP-Western (protein) and Northern (mRNA) blot experiments are used to follow mdm2 and p21/WAF-1 expression in primary rat or mouse cells after a low-dose (4 J/m2) or a high-dose (20 J/M2) of UV irradiation. Northern blot and nuclear run-on experiments are employed to study mRNA stability as well as transcription rates of selected genes. RESULTS: After high-dose UV irradiation, p53 is rapidly stabilized and the expression of p21/WAF1 is immediately increased. By contrast, both protein and mRNA levels of mdm2 first decrease in a p53-independent manner, and later increase in a p53-dependent manner. The initial decline of mdm2 expression following high-dose UV irradiation is UV-dosage dependent and regulated at the level of transcription. CONCLUSION: p53 regulates two genes, p21/WAF1 (blocks cell cycle progression) and mdm2 (reverses p53 activity), that mediate opposite actions. This process is regulated in a temporal fashion after high-dose UV irradiation, so that cell cycle progression can be halted while DNA repair continues prior to reversal of p53-mediated arrest by mdm2. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:9260156

  13. Probing the origin of structural stability of single and double stapled p53 peptide analogs bound to MDM2.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zuojun; Streu, Kristina; Krilov, Goran; Mohanty, Udayan

    2014-06-01

    The stabilization of secondary structure is believed to play an important role in the peptide-protein binding interaction. In this study, the α-helical conformation and structural stability of single and double stapled all-hydrocarbon cross-linked p53 peptides when bound and unbound to MDM2 are investigated. We determined the effects of the peptide sequence, the stereochemistry of the cross-linker, the conformation of the double bond in the alkene bridge, and the length of the bridge, to the relative stability of the α-helix structure. The binding affinity calculations by WaterMap provided over one hundred hydration sites in the MDM2 binding pocket where water density is greater than twice that of the bulk, and the relative value of free energy released by displacing these hydration sites. In agreement with the experimental data, potentials of mean force obtained by weighted histogram analysis methods indicated the order of peptides from lowest to highest binding affinity. Our study provides a comprehensive rationalization of the relationship between peptide stapling strategy, the secondary structural stability, and the binding affinity of p53/MDM2 complex. We hope our efforts can help to further the development of a new generation p53/MDM2 inhibitors that can reactivate the function of p53 as tumor suppressor gene.

  14. The role of NPM, p14arf and MDM2 in precursors of bronchial squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mascaux, C; Bex, F; Martin, B; Burny, A; Haller, A; Paesmans, M; Willard-Gallo, K; Ninane, V; Sculier, J-P

    2008-09-01

    Murine double minute clone 2 (MDM2), p14 alternate reading frame (p14arf), and nucleophosmin (NPM) regulate p53 activity. A total of 200 biopsies, including normal bronchial, pre-invasive and invasive tissues, were examined for changes in NPM, p14arf, MDM2 and p53 expression patterns by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence with confocal microscopy. NPM and p14arf displayed a diffuse nuclear staining in most normal bronchial tissue. The fraction of biopsies displaying an increased MDM2 staining or a nucleolar relocalisation of NPM increased at mild and moderate dysplasia, respectively. Two different modifications occurred in p14arf expression, i.e. its loss or its nucleolar relocalisation, both increasing at severe dysplasia and both being associated with high MDM2 expression. In addition, the nucleolar relocalisation of p14arf was associated with that of NPM. Immunofluorescence staining indicated that NPM and p14arf either co-localised in the nucleoplasm or in the nucleoli, before and as a result of severe dysplasia, respectively. MDM2 was not detected in the nucleoli. Thus, changes occur in murine double minute clone 2, p14 alternate reading frame and nucleophosmin level of expression and/or cellular distribution during early steps of lung carcinogenesis. Their relative localisation as determined by immunofluorescence, supports the hypothesis that p14 alternate reading frame nucleolar relocalisation impairs p14 alternate reading frame-murine double minute clone 2 complex formation and that nucleophosmin might sequester p14 alternate reading frame. The demonstration of this hypothesis requires further functional studies.

  15. p53-independent roles of MDM2 in NF-κB signaling: implications for cancer therapy, wound healing, and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Thomasova, Dana; Mulay, Shrikant R; Bruns, Hauke; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2012-12-01

    Murine double minute-2 (MDM2) is an intracellular molecule with multiple biologic functions. It serves as a negative regulator of p53 and thereby limits cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Because MDM2 blockade suppresses tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo, respective MDM2 inhibition is currently evaluated as anti-cancer therapy in clinical trials. However, the anti-proliferative effects of MDM2 inhibition also impair regenerative cell growth upon tissue injury. This was so far documented for tubular repair upon postischemic acute kidney injury and might apply to wound healing responses in general. Furthermore, MDM2 has numerous p53-independent effects. As a new entry, MDM2 was identified to act as a co-transcription factor for nuclear factor-kappa-light-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) at cytokine promoters. This explains the potent anti-inflammatory effects of MDM2 inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. For example, the NF-κB-antagonistic and p53-agonistic activities of MDM2 inhibitors elicit potent therapeutic effects on experimental lymphoproliferative autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus. In this review, we discuss the classic p53-dependent, the recently discovered p53-independent, and the NF-κB-agonistic biologic functions of MDM2. We describe its complex regulatory role on p53 and NF-κB signaling and name areas of research that may help to foresee previously unexpected effects or potential alternative indications of therapeutic MDM2 blockade. PMID:23308042

  16. Ewing Sarcoma: influence of TP53 Arg72Pro and MDM2 T309G SNPs.

    PubMed

    Thurow, Helena S; Hartwig, Fernando P; Alho, Clarice S; Silva, Deborah S B S; Roesler, Rafael; Abujamra, Ana Lucia; de Farias, Caroline Brunetto; Brunetto, Algemir Lunardi; Horta, Bernardo L; Dellagostin, Odir A; Collares, Tiago; Seixas, Fabiana K

    2013-08-01

    The Ewing Sarcoma is an important tumor of bone and soft tissue. The SNPs Arg72Pro of TP53 and T309G of MDM2 have been associated with many cancer types and have been differently distributed among populations worldwide. Based on a case-control design, this study aimed to assess the role of these SNPs in 24 Ewing Sarcoma patients, compared to 91 control individuals. DNA samples were extracted from blood and genotyped for both SNPs by PCR-RFLP and confirmed by DNA sequencing. The results showed an association between the G allele of the T309G and Ewing Sarcoma (P=0.02). Comparing to the TT carriers, the risk of G allele carriers was 3.35 (95% CI=1.22-9.21) with P=0.02. At the genotypic level, an association of the TT genotype with the control group (P=0.03) was found. Comparing to the TT genotype, the risk of TG and GG was 2.97 (95% CI=1.03-8.58) with P=0.04 and 5.00 (95% CI=1.23-20.34) with P=0.02, respectively. No associations regarding the Arg72Pro SNP were found. Considering that the T309G has been associated with several types of cancer, including sarcomas, our results indicate that this SNP may also be important to Ewing Sarcoma predisposition.

  17. Targeting the p53-MDM2 interaction by the small-molecule MDM2 antagonist Nutlin-3a: a new challenged target therapy in adult Philadelphia positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Trino, Stefania; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Erriquez, Daniela; Laurenzana, Ilaria; De Luca, Luciana; Ferrari, Anna; Luserna Di Rorà, Andrea Ghelli; Papayannidis, Cristina; Derenzini, Enrico; Simonetti, Giorgia; Lonetti, Annalisa; Venturi, Claudia; Cattina, Federica; Ottaviani, Emanuela; Abbenante, Maria Chiara; Russo, Domenico; Perini, Giovanni; Musto, Pellegrino; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    MDM2 is an important negative regulator of p53 tumor suppressor. In this study, we sought to investigate the preclinical activity of the MDM2 antagonist, Nutlin-3a, in Philadelphia positive (Ph+) and negative (Ph−) leukemic cell line models, and primary B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patient samples. We demonstrated that Nutlin-3a treatment reduced viability and induced p53-mediated apoptosis in ALL cells with wild-type p53 protein, in a time and dose-dependent manner, resulting in the increased expression of pro-apoptotic proteins and key regulators of cell cycle arrest. The dose-dependent reduction in cell viability was confirmed in primary blast cells from B-ALL patients, including Ph+ ALL resistant patients carrying the T315I BCR-ABL1 mutation. Our findings provide a strong rational for further clinical investigation of Nutlin-3a in Ph+ and Ph− ALL. PMID:26887044

  18. Targeting the p53-MDM2 interaction by the small-molecule MDM2 antagonist Nutlin-3a: a new challenged target therapy in adult Philadelphia positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Trino, Stefania; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Erriquez, Daniela; Laurenzana, Ilaria; De Luca, Luciana; Ferrari, Anna; Di Rorà, Andrea Ghelli Luserna; Papayannidis, Cristina; Derenzini, Enrico; Simonetti, Giorgia; Lonetti, Annalisa; Venturi, Claudia; Cattina, Federica; Ottaviani, Emanuela; Abbenante, Maria Chiara; Russo, Domenico; Perini, Giovanni; Musto, Pellegrino; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2016-03-15

    MDM2 is an important negative regulator of p53 tumor suppressor. In this study, we sought to investigate the preclinical activity of the MDM2 antagonist, Nutlin-3a, in Philadelphia positive (Ph+) and negative (Ph-) leukemic cell line models, and primary B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patient samples. We demonstrated that Nutlin-3a treatment reduced viability and induced p53-mediated apoptosis in ALL cells with wild-type p53 protein, in a time and dose-dependent manner, resulting in the increased expression of pro-apoptotic proteins and key regulators of cell cycle arrest. The dose-dependent reduction in cell viability was confirmed in primary blast cells from B-ALL patients, including Ph+ ALL resistant patients carrying the T315I BCR-ABL1 mutation. Our findings provide a strong rational for further clinical investigation of Nutlin-3a in Ph+ and Ph- ALL. PMID:26887044

  19. Loss of oocytes due to conditional ablation of Murine double minute 2 (Mdm2) gene is p53-dependent and results in female sterility.

    PubMed

    Livera, Gabriel; Uzbekov, Rustem; Jarrier, Peggy; Fouchécourt, Sophie; Duquenne, Clotilde; Parent, Anne-Simone; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Monget, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    Murine double minute 2 and 4 (Mdm2, Mdm4) are major p53-negative regulators, preventing thus uncontrolled apoptosis induction in numerous cell types, although their function in the female germ line has received little attention. In the present work, we have generated mice with specific invalidation of Mdm2 and Mdm4 genes in the mouse oocyte (Mdm2(Ocko) and Mdm4(Ocko) mice), to test their implication in survival of these germ cells. Most of the Mdm2(Ocko) but not Mdm4(Ocko) mice were sterile, with a dramatic reduction of the weight of ovaries and genital tract, a strong increase in follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone serum levels, and a reduction of anti-mullerian hormone serum levels. Histological analyses revealed an obvious decrease of the number of growing follicles beyond the primary stage in Mdm2(Ocko) ovaries in comparison to controls, with a pronounced increase in the apparition of primary atretic follicles, most being devoid of oocyte. Similar phenotypes were observed with Mdm2(Ocko) Mdm4(Ocko) ovaries, with no worsening of the phenotype. However, we failed to detect any increase in p53 level in mutant oocytes, nor any other apoptotic marker, introgression of this targeted invalidation in p53-/- mice restored the fertility of females. This study is the first to show that Mdm2, but not Mdm4, has a critical role in oocyte survival and would be involved in premature ovarian insufficiency phenotype. PMID:27364741

  20. Disruption of the 5S RNP-Mdm2 interaction significantly improves the erythroid defect in a mouse model for Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Jaako, P; Debnath, S; Olsson, K; Zhang, Y; Flygare, J; Lindström, M S; Bryder, D; Karlsson, S

    2015-11-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital erythroid hypoplasia caused by haploinsufficiency of genes encoding ribosomal proteins (RPs). Perturbed ribosome biogenesis in DBA has been shown to induce a p53-mediated ribosomal stress response. However, the mechanisms of p53 activation and its relevance for the erythroid defect remain elusive. Previous studies have indicated that activation of p53 is caused by the inhibition of mouse double minute 2 (Mdm2), the main negative regulator of p53, by the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP). Meanwhile, it is not clear whether this mechanism solely mediates the p53-dependent component found in DBA. To approach this question, we crossed our mouse model for RPS19-deficient DBA with Mdm2(C305F) knock-in mice that have a disrupted 5S RNP-Mdm2 interaction. Upon induction of the Rps19 deficiency, Mdm2(C305F) reversed the p53 response and improved expansion of hematopoietic progenitors in vitro, and ameliorated the anemia in vivo. Unexpectedly, disruption of the 5S RNP-Mdm2 interaction also led to selective defect in erythropoiesis. Our findings highlight the sensitivity of erythroid progenitor cells to aberrations in p53 homeostasis mediated by the 5S RNP-Mdm2 interaction. Finally, we provide evidence indicating that physiological activation of the 5S RNP-Mdm2-p53 pathway may contribute to functional decline of the hematopoietic system in a cell-autonomous manner over time.

  1. Ribosomal protein S7 regulates arsenite-induced GADD45α expression by attenuating MDM2-mediated GADD45α ubiquitination and degradation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ming; Li, Xiaoguang; Dong, Wen; Jin, Rui; Ma, Hanghang; Yang, Pingxun; Hu, Meiru; Li, Yi; Hao, Yi; Yuan, Shengtao; Huang, Junjian; Song, Lun

    2013-05-01

    The stress-responding protein, GADD45α, plays important roles in cell cycle checkpoint, DNA repair and apoptosis. In our recent study, we demonstrate that GADD45α undergoes a dynamic ubiquitination and degradation in vivo, which process can be blocked by the cytotoxic reagent, arsenite, resulting in GADD45α accumulation to activate JNKs cell death pathway, thereby revealing a novel mechanism for the cellular GADD45α functional regulation. But the factors involved in GADD45α stability modulations are unidentified. Here, we demonstrated that MDM2 was an E3 ubiquitin ligase for GADD45α. One of MDM2-binding partner, ribosomal protein S7, interacted with and stabilized GADD45α through preventing the ubiquitination and degradation of GADD45α mediated by MDM2. This novel function of S7 is unrelated to p53 but seems to depend on S7/MDM2 interaction, for the S7 mutant lacking MDM2-binding ability lost its function to stabilize GADD45α. Further investigations indicated that arsenite treatment enhanced S7-MDM2 interaction, resulting in attenuation of MDM2-dependent GADD45α ubiquitination and degradation, thereby leading to GADD45α-dependent cell death pathway activation. Silencing S7 expression suppressed GADD45α-dependent cytotoxicity induced by arsenite. Our findings thus identify a novel function of S7 in control of GADD45α stabilization under both basal and stress conditions and its significance in mediating arsenite-induced cellular stress.

  2. Targeting RING domains of Mdm2-MdmX E3 complex activates apoptotic arm of the p53 pathway in leukemia/lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Xu, C; Ling, X; Fan, C; Buckley, B P; Chernov, M V; Ellis, L; Li, F; Muñoz, I G; Wang, X

    2015-12-31

    Reactivation of tumor-suppressor p53 for targeted cancer therapy is an attractive strategy for cancers bearing wild-type (WT) p53. Targeting the Mdm2-p53 interface or MdmX ((MDM4), mouse double minute 4)-p53 interface or both has been a focus in the field. However, targeting the E3 ligase activity of Mdm2-MdmX really interesting new gene (RING)-RING interaction as a novel anticancer strategy has never been explored. In this report, we describe the identification and characterization of small molecule inhibitors targeting Mdm2-MdmX RING-RING interaction as a new class of E3 ligase inhibitors. With a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based E3 activity assay in high-throughput screening of a chemical library, we identified inhibitors (designated as MMRis (Mdm2-MdmX RING domain inhibitors)) that specifically inhibit Mdm2-MdmX E3 ligase activity toward Mdm2 and p53 substrates. MMRi6 and its analog MMRi64 are capable of disrupting Mdm2-MdmX interactions in vitro and activating p53 in cells. In leukemia cells, MMRi64 potently induces downregulation of Mdm2 and MdmX. In contrast to Nutlin3a, MMRi64 only induces the expression of pro-apoptotic gene PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) with minimal induction of growth-arresting gene p21. Consequently, MMRi64 selectively induces the apoptotic arm of the p53 pathway in leukemia/lymphoma cells. Owing to the distinct mechanisms of action of MMRi64 and Nutlin3a, their combination synergistically induces p53 and apoptosis. Taken together, this study reveals that Mdm2-MdmX has a critical role in apoptotic response of the p53 pathway and MMRi64 may serve as a new pharmacological tool for p53 studies and a platform for cancer drug development.

  3. On the interaction mechanisms of a p53 peptide and nutlin with the MDM2 and MDMX proteins: a Brownian dynamics study.

    PubMed

    ElSawy, Karim M; Verma, Chandra S; Joseph, Thomas L; Lane, David P; Twarock, Reidun; Caves, Leo S D

    2013-02-01

    The interaction of p53 with its regulators MDM2 and MDMX plays a major role in regulating the cell cycle. Inhibition of this interaction has become an important therapeutic strategy in oncology. Although MDM2 and MDMX share a very high degree of sequence/structural similarity, the small-molecule inhibitor nutlin appears to be an efficient inhibitor only of the p53-MDM2 interaction. Here, we investigate the mechanism of interaction of nutlin with these two proteins and contrast it with that of p53 using Brownian dynamics simulations. In contrast to earlier attempts to examine the bound states of the partners, here we locate initial reaction events in these interactions by identifying the regions of space around MDM2/MDMX, where p53/nutlin experience associative encounters with prolonged residence times relative to that in bulk solution. We find that the initial interaction of p53 with MDM2 is long-lived relative to nutlin, but, unlike nutlin, it takes place at the N- and C termini of the MDM2 protein, away from the binding site, suggestive of an allosteric mechanism of action. In contrast, nutlin initially interacts with MDM2 directly at the clefts of the binding site. The interaction of nutlin with MDMX, however, is very short-lived compared with MDM2 and does not show such direct initial interactions with the binding site. Comparison of the topology of the electrostatic potentials of MDM2 and MDMX and the locations of the initial encounters with p53/nutlin in tandem with structure-based sequence alignment revealed that the origin of the diminished activity of nutlin toward MDMX relative to MDM2 may stem partly from the differing topologies of the electrostatic potentials of the two proteins. Glu25 and Lys51 residues underpin these topological differences and appear to collectively play a key role in channelling nutlin directly toward the binding site on the MDM2 surface and are absent in MDMX. The results, therefore, provide new insight into the mechanism of p53

  4. Regulation of the p14ARF-Mdm2-p53 pathway: an overview in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anshu; Yang, Jianhui; Murphy, Richard F; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2006-10-01

    Knowledge of the roles of proteins that are abnormally suppressed or activated due to mutation in the DNA sequences of the common tumor suppressor genes, p14ARF and p53, is critical to the understanding the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Mdm2 is a mediator for the function of both p14ARF and p53. In this review article factors including Pokemon, Geminin, Twist, and Apigenin, which control the action of individual proteins in the p14ARF-Mdm2-p53 pathway in breast cancer as well the consequences of mutation 7 of p53 are discussed. The complexity of interaction of components of the pathway and the underlying development of cancer is emphasized. Opportunities for future therapeutic innovations are indicated. PMID:16919268

  5. Regulation of the p14ARF-Mdm2-p53 pathway: an overview in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anshu; Yang, Jianhui; Murphy, Richard F; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2006-10-01

    Knowledge of the roles of proteins that are abnormally suppressed or activated due to mutation in the DNA sequences of the common tumor suppressor genes, p14ARF and p53, is critical to the understanding the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Mdm2 is a mediator for the function of both p14ARF and p53. In this review article factors including Pokemon, Geminin, Twist, and Apigenin, which control the action of individual proteins in the p14ARF-Mdm2-p53 pathway in breast cancer as well the consequences of mutation 7 of p53 are discussed. The complexity of interaction of components of the pathway and the underlying development of cancer is emphasized. Opportunities for future therapeutic innovations are indicated.

  6. Association of MDM2 SNP309 and TP53 Arg72Pro polymorphisms with risk of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    YONEDA, TOMOKO; KUBOYAMA, AYUMI; KATO, KIYOKO; OHGAMI, TATSUHIRO; OKAMOTO, KANAKO; SAITO, TOSHIAKI; WAKE, NORIO

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of endometrial cancer, a common gynecological malignancy, is increasing in Japan. We have previously shown that the ER/MDM2/p53/p21 pathway plays an important role in endometrial carcinogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of germline single nucleotide polymorphisms in murine double minute 2 (MDM2) SNP309, TP53 Arg72Pro, ESR1 PvuII and XbaI, and p21 codon 31 on endometrial cancer risk. We evaluated these polymorphisms in DNA samples from 125 endometrial cancer cases and 200 controls using polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism. The association of each genetic polymorphism with endometrial cancer was examined by the odds ratio and 95% confidence interval, which were obtained using logistic regression analysis. The SNP309 GG genotype non-significantly increased the risk of endometrial cancer. The 95% confidence interval for the GG genotype vs. the TT genotype of MDM2 SNP309 was 1.76 (0.93–3.30). Endometrial cancer was not associated with tested SNP genotypes for TP53, ESR1 and p21. The combination of SNP309 GG + TG and TP53 codon 72 Arg/Arg significantly increased endometrial cancer risk. The adjusted OR was 2.53 (95% confidence interval, 1.03–6.21) and P for the interaction was 0.04. This result was supported by in vitro data showing that endometrial cancer cell lines with the SNP309 G allele failed to show growth inhibition by treatment with RITA, which reduces p53-MDM2 binding. The presence of the SNP309 G allele and TP53 codon 72 Arg/Arg genotype is associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer in Japanese women. PMID:23624782

  7. NOLC1, an Enhancer of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Progression, Is Essential for TP53 to Regulate MDM2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yu-Chyi; Lu, Tung-Ying; Huang, Dah-Yeou; Kuo, Yuan-Sung; Kao, Cheng-Fu; Yeh, Ning-Hsing; Wu, Han-Chung; Lin, Chin-Tarng

    2009-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of the most common cancers among Chinese living in South China, Singapore, and Taiwan. At present, its etiological factors are not well defined. To identify which genetic alterations might be involved in NPC pathogenesis, we identified genes that were differentially expressed in NPC cell lines and normal nasomucosal cells using subtractive hybridization and microarray analysis. Most NPC cell lines and biopsy specimens were found to have higher expression levels of the gene encoding nucleolar and coiled-body phosphoprotein 1 (NOLC1) as compared with normal cells. Severe combined immunodeficiency mice bearing NPC xenografts derived from NOLC1-short hairpin-RNA-transfected animals were found to have 82% lower levels of tumor growth than control mice as well as marked tumor cell apoptosis. Measuring the expression levels of genes related to cell growth, apoptosis, and angiogenesis, we found that the MDM2 gene was down-regulated in the transfectants. Both co-transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments showed that tumor protein 53-regulated expression of the MDM2 gene requires co-activation of NOLC1. These findings suggest that NOLC1 plays a role in the regulation of tumorigenesis of NPC and demonstrate that both NOLC1 and tumor protein 53 work together synergistically to activate the MDM2 promoter in NPC cells. PMID:19541936

  8. Mdm2-p53 signaling regulates epidermal stem cell senescence and premature aging phenotypes in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Hugh S; Donehower, Lawrence A; Lyle, Stephen; Jones, Stephen N

    2011-05-01

    The p53 transcription factor is activated by various types of cell stress or DNA damage and induces the expression of genes that control cell growth and inhibit tumor formation. Analysis of mice that express mutant forms of p53 suggest that inappropriate p53 activation can alter tissue homeostasis and life span, connecting p53 tumor suppressor functions with accelerated aging. However, other mouse models that display increased levels of wildtype p53 in various tissues fail to corroborate a link between p53 and aging phenotypes, possibly due to the retention of signaling pathways that negatively regulate p53 activity in these models. In this present study, we have generated mice lacking Mdm2 in the epidermis. Deletion of Mdm2, the chief negative regulator of p53, induced an aging phenotype in the skin of mice, including thinning of the epidermis, reduced wound healing, and a progressive loss of fur. These phenotypes arise due to an induction of p53-mediated senescence in epidermal stem cells and a gradual loss of epidermal stem cell function. These results reveal that activation of endogenous p53 by ablation of Mdm2 can induce accelerated aging phenotypes in mice.

  9. Discovery of a novel class of highly potent inhibitors of the p53-MDM2 interaction by structure-based design starting from a conformational argument.

    PubMed

    Furet, Pascal; Masuya, Keiichi; Kallen, Joerg; Stachyra-Valat, Thérèse; Ruetz, Stephan; Guagnano, Vito; Holzer, Philipp; Mah, Robert; Stutz, Stefan; Vaupel, Andrea; Chène, Patrick; Jeay, Sébastien; Schlapbach, Achim

    2016-10-01

    The p53-MDM2 interaction is an anticancer drug target under investigation in the clinic. Our compound NVP-CGM097 is one of the small molecule inhibitors of this protein-protein interaction currently evaluated in cancer patients. As part of our effort to identify new classes of p53-MDM2 inhibitors that could lead to additional clinical candidates, we report here the design of highly potent inhibitors having a pyrazolopyrrolidinone core structure. The conception of these new inhibitors originated in a consideration on the MDM2 bound conformation of the dihydroisoquinolinone class of inhibitors to which NVP-CGM097 belongs. This work forms the foundation of the discovery of HDM201, a second generation p53-MDM2 inhibitor that recently entered phase I clinical trial.

  10. Exploiting the MDM2-CK1α protein-protein interface to develop novel biologics that induce UBL-kinase-modification and inhibit cell growth.

    PubMed

    Huart, Anne-Sophie; MacLaine, Nicola J; Narayan, Vikram; Hupp, Ted R

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions forming dominant signalling events are providing ever-growing platforms for the development of novel Biologic tools for controlling cell growth. Casein Kinase 1 α (CK1α) forms a genetic and physical interaction with the murine double minute chromosome 2 (MDM2) oncoprotein resulting in degradation of the p53 tumour suppressor. Pharmacological inhibition of CK1 increases p53 protein level and induces cell death, whilst small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of CK1α stabilizes p53 and induces growth arrest. We mapped the dominant protein-protein interface that stabilizes the MDM2 and CK1α complex in order to determine whether a peptide derived from the core CK1α-MDM2 interface form novel Biologics that can be used to probe the contribution of the CK1-MDM2 protein-protein interaction to p53 activation and cell viability. Overlapping peptides derived from CK1α were screened for dominant MDM2 binding sites using (i) ELISA with recombinant MDM2; (ii) cell lysate pull-down towards endogenous MDM2; (iii) MDM2-CK1α complex-based competition ELISA; and (iv) MDM2-mediated ubiquitination. One dominant peptide, peptide 35 was bioactive in all four assays and its transfection induced cell death/growth arrest in a p53-independent manner. Ectopic expression of flag-tagged peptide 35 induced a novel ubiquitin and NEDD8 modification of CK1α, providing one of the first examples whereby NEDDylation of a protein kinase can be induced. These data identify an MDM2 binding motif in CK1α which when isolated as a small peptide can (i) function as a dominant negative inhibitor of the CK1α-MDM2 interface, (ii) be used as a tool to study NEDDylation of CK1α, and (iii) reduce cell growth. Further, this approach provides a technological blueprint, complementing siRNA and chemical biology approaches, by exploiting protein-protein interactions in order to develop Biologics to manipulate novel types of signalling pathways such as cross-talk between

  11. The polymorphisms of P53 codon 72 and MDM2 SNP309 and renal cell carcinoma risk in a low arsenic exposure area

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chao-Yuan; Su, Chien-Tien; Chu, Jan-Show; Huang, Shu-Pin; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Yang, Hsiu-Yuan; Chung, Chi-Jung; Wu, Chia-Chang; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2011-12-15

    Our recent study demonstrated the increased risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associated with high urinary total arsenic levels among people living in a low arsenic exposure area. Genomic instability is important in arsenic carcinogenesis. This study evaluated the relationship between the polymorphisms of p53, p21, and MDM2, which plays a role in gene stability, and the arsenic-related RCC risk. Here, we found that p53 Pro/Pro genotype and MDM2 SNP309 GG genotype significantly increased RCC risk compared to the p53 Arg/Arg genotype and MDM2 SNP309 TT genotype. RCC patients with the p53Arg/Arg genotype had a signicantly low percentage of inorganic arsenic, a low percentage of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and a high percentage of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), which indicates efcient arsenic methylation capacity. Subjects with the p53 Arg/Pro + Pro/Pro genotype or MDM2 SNP309 TG + GG genotype, in conjunction with high urinary total arsenic ({>=} 14.02 {mu}g/L), had a signicantly higher RCC risk than those with the p53 Arg/Arg or MDM2 SNP309 TT genotypes and low urinary total arsenic. Taken together, this is the first study to show that a variant genotype of p53 Arg{sup 72}Pro or MDM2 SNP309 may modify the arsenic-related RCC risk even in a non-obvious arsenic exposure area. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subjects with p53 Pro/Pro or MDM2 GG genotype significantly increased RCC risk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A significant multiplicative joint effect of p53 and p21 on RCC risk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RCC patients with p53 Arg/Arg genotype had efficient arsenic methylation capacity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Joint effect of p53 or MDM2 genotype and high urinary total arsenic on RCC risk.

  12. Apoptosis of Sertoli cells after conditional ablation of murine double minute 2 (Mdm2) gene is p53-dependent and results in male sterility

    PubMed Central

    Fouchécourt, S; Livera, G; Messiaen, S; Fumel, B; Parent, A-S; Marine, J-C; Monget, P

    2016-01-01

    Beside its well-documented role in carcinogenesis, the function of p53 family has been more recently revealed in development and female reproduction, but it is still poorly documented in male reproduction. We specifically tested this possibility by ablating Mdm2, an E3 ligase that regulates p53 protein stability and transactivation function, specifically in Sertoli cells (SCs) using the AMH-Cre line and created the new SC-Mdm2−/− line. Heterozygous SC-Mdm2−/+ adult males were fertile, but SC-Mdm2−/− males were infertile and exhibited: a shorter ano-genital distance, an extra duct along the vas deferens that presents a uterus-like morphology, degenerated testes with no organized seminiferous tubules and a complete loss of differentiated germ cells. In adults, testosterone levels as well as StAR, P450c17 (Cyp17a1) and P450scc (Cyp11a1) mRNA levels decreased significantly, and both plasma LH and FSH levels increased. A detailed investigation of testicular development indicated that the phenotype arose during fetal life, with SC-Mdm2−/− testes being much smaller at birth. Interestingly, Leydig cells remained present until adulthood and fetal germ cells abnormally initiated meiosis. Inactivation of Mdm2 in SCs triggered p53 activation and apoptosis as early as 15.5 days post conception with significant increase in apoptotic SCs. Importantly, testis development occurred normally in SC-Mdm2−/− lacking p53 mice (SC-Mdm2−/−p53−/−) and accordingly, these mice were fertile indicating that the aforementioned phenotypes are entirely p53-dependent. These data not only highlight the importance of keeping p53 in check for proper testicular development and male fertility but also certify the critical role of SCs in the maintenance of meiotic repression. PMID:26470726

  13. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibitors protect hippocampal neurons from radiation-induced apoptosis by regulating MDM2-p53 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Thotala, D K; Hallahan, D E; Yazlovitskaya, E M

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of the brain to ionizing radiation can cause neurocognitive deficiencies. The pathophysiology of these neurological changes is complex and includes radiation-induced apoptosis in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus. We have recently found that inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) resulted in significant protection from radiation-induced apoptosis in hippocampal neurons. The molecular mechanisms of this cytoprotection include abrogation of radiation-induced accumulation of p53. Here we show that pretreatment of irradiated HT-22 hippocampal-derived neurons with small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3β SB216763 or SB415286, or with GSK-3β-specific shRNA resulted in accumulation of the p53-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2. Knockdown of MDM2 using specific shRNA or chemical inhibition of MDM2-p53 interaction prevented the protective changes triggered by GSK-3β inhibition in irradiated HT-22 neurons and restored radiation cytotoxicity. We found that this could be due to regulation of apoptosis by subcellular localization and interaction of GSK-3β, p53 and MDM2. These data suggest that the mechanisms of radioprotection by GSK-3β inhibitors in hippocampal neurons involve regulation of MDM2-dependent p53 accumulation and interactions between GSK-3β, MDM2 and p53. PMID:21738215

  14. Stabilization of p53 in Influenza A Virus-infected Cells Is Associated with Compromised MDM2-mediated Ubiquitination of p53*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaodu; Deng, Xufang; Yan, Wenjun; Zhu, Zixiang; Shen, Yang; Qiu, Yafeng; Shi, Zixue; Shao, Donghua; Wei, Jianchao; Xia, Xianzhu; Ma, Zhiyong

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) induces apoptosis of infected cells. In response to IAV infection, p53, a tumor suppressor involved in regulating apoptosis and host antiviral defense, accumulates and becomes activated. This study was undertaken to examine the mechanism of p53 accumulation in IAV-infected cells. Here we show that p53 accumulation in IAV-infected cells results from protein stabilization, which was associated with compromised Mdm2-mediated ubiquitination of p53. In IAV-infected cells, p53 was stabilized and its half-life was remarkably extended. The ladders of polyubiquitinated p53 were not detectable in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 and were less sensitive to proteasome-mediated degradation. IAV infection did not affect the abundance of Mdm2, a major ubiquitin E3 ligase responsible for regulating p53 ubiquitination and degradation, but weakened the interaction between p53 and Mdm2. Viral nucleoprotein (NP) was able to increase the transcriptional activity and stability of p53. Furthermore, NP was found to associate with p53 and to impair the p53-Mdm2 interaction and Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination, demonstrating its role in inhibiting Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination and degradation. PMID:22474335

  15. Mdm2 inhibition confers protection of p53-proficient cells from the cytotoxic effects of Wee1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yizhu; Saini, Priyanka; Sriraman, Anusha; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2015-10-20

    Pharmacological inhibition of the cell cycle regulatory kinase Wee1 represents a promising strategy to eliminate cancer cells. Wee1 inhibitors cooperate with chemotherapeutics, e. g. nucleoside analogues, pushing malignant cells from S phase towards premature mitosis and death. However, considerable toxicities are observed in preclinical and clinical trials. A high proportion of tumor cells can be distinguished from all other cells of a patient's body by inactivating mutations in the tumor suppressor p53. Here we set out to develop an approach for the selective protection of p53-proficient cells against the cytotoxic effects of Wee1 inhibitors. We pretreated such cells with Nutlin-3a, a prototype inhibitor of the p53-antagonist Mdm2. The resulting transient cell cycle arrest effectively increased the survival of cells that were subsequently treated with combinations of the Wee1 inhibitor MK-1775 and/or the nucleoside analogue gemcitabine. In this constellation, Nutlin-3a reduced caspase activation and diminished the phosphorylation of Histone 2AX, an indicator of the DNA damage response. Both effects were strictly dependent on the presence of p53. Moreover, Nutlin pre-treatment reduced the fraction of cells that were undergoing premature mitosis in response to Wee1 inhibition. We conclude that the pre-activation of p53 through Mdm2 antagonists serves as a viable option to selectively protect p53-proficient cells against the cytotoxic effects of Wee1 inhibitors, especially when combined with a nucleoside analogue. Thus, Mdm2 antagonists might prove useful to avoid unwanted side effects of Wee1 inhibitors. On the other hand, when a tumor contains wild type p53, care should be taken not to induce its activity before applying Wee1 inhibitors. PMID:26431163

  16. Mdm2 inhibition confers protection of p53-proficient cells from the cytotoxic effects of Wee1 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of the cell cycle regulatory kinase Wee1 represents a promising strategy to eliminate cancer cells. Wee1 inhibitors cooperate with chemotherapeutics, e. g. nucleoside analogues, pushing malignant cells from S phase towards premature mitosis and death. However, considerable toxicities are observed in preclinical and clinical trials. A high proportion of tumor cells can be distinguished from all other cells of a patient's body by inactivating mutations in the tumor suppressor p53. Here we set out to develop an approach for the selective protection of p53-proficient cells against the cytotoxic effects of Wee1 inhibitors. We pretreated such cells with Nutlin-3a, a prototype inhibitor of the p53-antagonist Mdm2. The resulting transient cell cycle arrest effectively increased the survival of cells that were subsequently treated with combinations of the Wee1 inhibitor MK-1775 and/or the nucleoside analogue gemcitabine. In this constellation, Nutlin-3a reduced caspase activation and diminished the phosphorylation of Histone 2AX, an indicator of the DNA damage response. Both effects were strictly dependent on the presence of p53. Moreover, Nutlin pre-treatment reduced the fraction of cells that were undergoing premature mitosis in response to Wee1 inhibition. We conclude that the pre-activation of p53 through Mdm2 antagonists serves as a viable option to selectively protect p53-proficient cells against the cytotoxic effects of Wee1 inhibitors, especially when combined with a nucleoside analogue. Thus, Mdm2 antagonists might prove useful to avoid unwanted side effects of Wee1 inhibitors. On the other hand, when a tumor contains wild type p53, care should be taken not to induce its activity before applying Wee1 inhibitors. PMID:26431163

  17. Probing Origin of Binding Difference of inhibitors to MDM2 and MDMX by Polarizable Molecular Dynamics Simulation and QM/MM-GBSA Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianzhong; Wang, Jinan; Zhang, Qinggang; Chen, Kaixian; Zhu, Weiliang

    2015-11-01

    Binding abilities of current inhibitors to MDMX are weaker than to MDM2. Polarizable molecular dynamics simulations (MD) followed by Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (QM//MM-GBSA) calculations were performed to investigate the binding difference of inhibitors to MDM2 and MDMX. The predicted binding free energies not only agree well with the experimental results, but also show that the decrease in van der Walls interactions of inhibitors with MDMX relative to MDM2 is a main factor of weaker bindings of inhibitors to MDMX. The analyses of dihedral angles based on MD trajectories suggest that the closed conformation formed by the residues M53 and Y99 in MDMX leads to a potential steric clash with inhibitors and prevents inhibitors from arriving in the deep of MDMX binding cleft, which reduces the van der Waals contacts of inhibitors with M53, V92, P95 and L98. The calculated results using the residue-based free energy decomposition method further prove that the interaction strength of inhibitors with M53, V92, P95 and L98 from MDMX are obviously reduced compared to MDM2. We expect that this study can provide significant theoretical guidance for designs of potent dual inhibitors to block the p53-MDM2/MDMX interactions.

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate suppresses proliferation and promotes apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells by regulation of the MDM2–p53 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chuhai; Wu, Boyi; Chen, Binwei; Shi, Qunwei; Guo, Jianhong; Fan, Ziwen; Huang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been reported to induce tumor cell growth arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate the effects of one histone deacetylase inhibitor – sodium butyrate (SB) – on osteosarcoma (OS) cell proliferation and apoptosis and also the molecular mechanisms by which SB exerts regulatory effects on OS cells. U2OS and MG63 cells were treated with SB at various concentrations. Then, cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and flow cytometry assays, respectively; the expression of Ki67, Bax, Bcl-2, MDM2, and p53 proteins was determined by using Western blot assay. The results showed that SB suppressed proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner and promoted apoptosis of OS cells. In addition, SB enhanced p53 expression and decreased MDM2 expression, indicating that SB can regulate MDM2–p53 feedback loop. p53 inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis, whereas MDM2 promoted proliferation and suppressed apoptosis, which indicated that functional effect of SB on OS cell lines at least in part depended on the MDM2–p53 signaling. We also explored the effect of SB on OS cells in vivo and found that SB suppressed the growth of OS cells with no noticeable effect on activity and body weight of mice in vivo. These findings will offer new clues for OS development and progression and offer SB as a potent targeted agent for OS treatment. PMID:27445491

  19. Probing Origin of Binding Difference of inhibitors to MDM2 and MDMX by Polarizable Molecular Dynamics Simulation and QM/MM-GBSA Calculation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianzhong; Wang, Jinan; Zhang, Qinggang; Chen, Kaixian; Zhu, Weiliang

    2015-01-01

    Binding abilities of current inhibitors to MDMX are weaker than to MDM2. Polarizable molecular dynamics simulations (MD) followed by Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (QM//MM-GBSA) calculations were performed to investigate the binding difference of inhibitors to MDM2 and MDMX. The predicted binding free energies not only agree well with the experimental results, but also show that the decrease in van der Walls interactions of inhibitors with MDMX relative to MDM2 is a main factor of weaker bindings of inhibitors to MDMX. The analyses of dihedral angles based on MD trajectories suggest that the closed conformation formed by the residues M53 and Y99 in MDMX leads to a potential steric clash with inhibitors and prevents inhibitors from arriving in the deep of MDMX binding cleft, which reduces the van der Waals contacts of inhibitors with M53, V92, P95 and L98. The calculated results using the residue-based free energy decomposition method further prove that the interaction strength of inhibitors with M53, V92, P95 and L98 from MDMX are obviously reduced compared to MDM2. We expect that this study can provide significant theoretical guidance for designs of potent dual inhibitors to block the p53-MDM2/MDMX interactions. PMID:26616018

  20. Histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate suppresses proliferation and promotes apoptosis in osteosarcoma cells by regulation of the MDM2-p53 signaling.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chuhai; Wu, Boyi; Chen, Binwei; Shi, Qunwei; Guo, Jianhong; Fan, Ziwen; Huang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been reported to induce tumor cell growth arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis. This study aimed to investigate the effects of one histone deacetylase inhibitor - sodium butyrate (SB) - on osteosarcoma (OS) cell proliferation and apoptosis and also the molecular mechanisms by which SB exerts regulatory effects on OS cells. U2OS and MG63 cells were treated with SB at various concentrations. Then, cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and flow cytometry assays, respectively; the expression of Ki67, Bax, Bcl-2, MDM2, and p53 proteins was determined by using Western blot assay. The results showed that SB suppressed proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner and promoted apoptosis of OS cells. In addition, SB enhanced p53 expression and decreased MDM2 expression, indicating that SB can regulate MDM2-p53 feedback loop. p53 inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis, whereas MDM2 promoted proliferation and suppressed apoptosis, which indicated that functional effect of SB on OS cell lines at least in part depended on the MDM2-p53 signaling. We also explored the effect of SB on OS cells in vivo and found that SB suppressed the growth of OS cells with no noticeable effect on activity and body weight of mice in vivo. These findings will offer new clues for OS development and progression and offer SB as a potent targeted agent for OS treatment. PMID:27445491

  1. The NEDD8 inhibitor MLN4924 increases the size of the nucleolus and activates p53 through the ribosomal-Mdm2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Bailly, A; Perrin, A; Bou Malhab, L J; Pion, E; Larance, M; Nagala, M; Smith, P; O'Donohue, M-F; Gleizes, P-E; Zomerdijk, J; Lamond, A I; Xirodimas, D P

    2016-01-28

    The ubiquitin-like molecule NEDD8 is essential for viability, growth and development, and is a potential target for therapeutic intervention. We found that the small molecule inhibitor of NEDDylation, MLN4924, alters the morphology and increases the surface size of the nucleolus in human and germline cells of Caenorhabditis elegans in the absence of nucleolar fragmentation. SILAC proteomics and monitoring of rRNA production, processing and ribosome profiling shows that MLN4924 changes the composition of the nucleolar proteome but does not inhibit RNA Pol I transcription. Further analysis demonstrates that MLN4924 activates the p53 tumour suppressor through the RPL11/RPL5-Mdm2 pathway, with characteristics of nucleolar stress. The study identifies the nucleolus as a target of inhibitors of NEDDylation and provides a mechanism for p53 activation upon NEDD8 inhibition. It also indicates that targeting the nucleolar proteome without affecting nucleolar transcription initiates the required signalling events for the control of cell cycle regulators.

  2. Hydrophobic Interactions Are a Key to MDM2 Inhibition by Polyphenols as Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and MM/PBSA Free Energy Calculations.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sharad; Grover, Sonam; Tyagi, Chetna; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Singh, Aditi; Grover, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    p53, a tumor suppressor protein, has been proven to regulate the cell cycle, apoptosis, and DNA repair to prevent malignant transformation. MDM2 regulates activity of p53 and inhibits its binding to DNA. In the present study, we elucidated the MDM2 inhibition potential of polyphenols (Apigenin, Fisetin, Galangin and Luteolin) by MD simulation and MM/PBSA free energy calculations. All polyphenols bind to hydrophobic groove of MDM2 and the binding was found to be stable throughout MD simulation. Luteolin showed the highest negative binding free energy value of -173.80 kJ/mol followed by Fisetin with value of -172.25 kJ/mol. It was found by free energy calculations, that hydrophobic interactions (vdW energy) have major contribution in binding free energy.

  3. Hydrophobic Interactions Are a Key to MDM2 Inhibition by Polyphenols as Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and MM/PBSA Free Energy Calculations.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sharad; Grover, Sonam; Tyagi, Chetna; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Singh, Aditi; Grover, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    p53, a tumor suppressor protein, has been proven to regulate the cell cycle, apoptosis, and DNA repair to prevent malignant transformation. MDM2 regulates activity of p53 and inhibits its binding to DNA. In the present study, we elucidated the MDM2 inhibition potential of polyphenols (Apigenin, Fisetin, Galangin and Luteolin) by MD simulation and MM/PBSA free energy calculations. All polyphenols bind to hydrophobic groove of MDM2 and the binding was found to be stable throughout MD simulation. Luteolin showed the highest negative binding free energy value of -173.80 kJ/mol followed by Fisetin with value of -172.25 kJ/mol. It was found by free energy calculations, that hydrophobic interactions (vdW energy) have major contribution in binding free energy. PMID:26863418

  4. Hydrophobic Interactions Are a Key to MDM2 Inhibition by Polyphenols as Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and MM/PBSA Free Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sharad; Grover, Sonam; Tyagi, Chetna; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Singh, Aditi; Grover, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    p53, a tumor suppressor protein, has been proven to regulate the cell cycle, apoptosis, and DNA repair to prevent malignant transformation. MDM2 regulates activity of p53 and inhibits its binding to DNA. In the present study, we elucidated the MDM2 inhibition potential of polyphenols (Apigenin, Fisetin, Galangin and Luteolin) by MD simulation and MM/PBSA free energy calculations. All polyphenols bind to hydrophobic groove of MDM2 and the binding was found to be stable throughout MD simulation. Luteolin showed the highest negative binding free energy value of -173.80 kJ/mol followed by Fisetin with value of -172.25 kJ/mol. It was found by free energy calculations, that hydrophobic interactions (vdW energy) have major contribution in binding free energy. PMID:26863418

  5. MDM2 promoter SNP55 (rs2870820) affects risk of colon cancer but not breast-, lung-, or prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Helwa, Reham; Gansmo, Liv B; Romundstad, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Vatten, Lars; Ryan, Bríd M; Harris, Curtis C; Lønning, Per E; Knappskog, Stian

    2016-01-01

    Two functional SNPs (SNP285G > C; rs117039649 and SNP309T > G; rs2279744) have previously been reported to modulate Sp1 transcription factor binding to the promoter of the proto-oncogene MDM2, and to influence cancer risk. Recently, a third SNP (SNP55C > T; rs2870820) was also reported to affect Sp1 binding and MDM2 transcription. In this large population based case-control study, we genotyped MDM2 SNP55 in 10,779 Caucasian individuals, previously genotyped for SNP309 and SNP285, including cases of colon (n = 1,524), lung (n = 1,323), breast (n = 1,709) and prostate cancer (n = 2,488) and 3,735 non-cancer controls, as well as 299 healthy African-Americans. Applying the dominant model, we found an elevated risk of colon cancer among individuals harbouring SNP55TT/CT genotypes compared to the SNP55CC genotype (OR = 1.15; 95% CI = 1.01-1.30). The risk was found to be highest for left-sided colon cancer (OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.00-1.45) and among females (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 1.01-1.74). Assessing combined genotypes, we found the highest risk of colon cancer among individuals harbouring the SNP55TT or CT together with the SNP309TG genotype (OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.00-1.46). Supporting the conclusions from the risk estimates, we found colon cancer cases carrying the SNP55TT/CT genotypes to be diagnosed at younger age as compared to SNP55CC (p = 0.053), in particular among patients carrying the SNP309TG/TT genotypes (p = 0.009). PMID:27624283

  6. MDM2 promoter SNP55 (rs2870820) affects risk of colon cancer but not breast-, lung-, or prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Helwa, Reham; Gansmo, Liv B.; Romundstad, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Vatten, Lars; Ryan, Bríd M.; Harris, Curtis C.; Lønning, Per E.; Knappskog, Stian

    2016-01-01

    Two functional SNPs (SNP285G > C; rs117039649 and SNP309T > G; rs2279744) have previously been reported to modulate Sp1 transcription factor binding to the promoter of the proto-oncogene MDM2, and to influence cancer risk. Recently, a third SNP (SNP55C > T; rs2870820) was also reported to affect Sp1 binding and MDM2 transcription. In this large population based case-control study, we genotyped MDM2 SNP55 in 10,779 Caucasian individuals, previously genotyped for SNP309 and SNP285, including cases of colon (n = 1,524), lung (n = 1,323), breast (n = 1,709) and prostate cancer (n = 2,488) and 3,735 non-cancer controls, as well as 299 healthy African-Americans. Applying the dominant model, we found an elevated risk of colon cancer among individuals harbouring SNP55TT/CT genotypes compared to the SNP55CC genotype (OR = 1.15; 95% CI = 1.01–1.30). The risk was found to be highest for left-sided colon cancer (OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.00–1.45) and among females (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 1.01–1.74). Assessing combined genotypes, we found the highest risk of colon cancer among individuals harbouring the SNP55TT or CT together with the SNP309TG genotype (OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.00–1.46). Supporting the conclusions from the risk estimates, we found colon cancer cases carrying the SNP55TT/CT genotypes to be diagnosed at younger age as compared to SNP55CC (p = 0.053), in particular among patients carrying the SNP309TG/TT genotypes (p = 0.009). PMID:27624283

  7. AMPK Reverses the Mesenchymal Phenotype of Cancer Cells by Targeting the Akt-MDM2-Foxo3a Signaling Axis

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chih-Chien; Lee, Kuen-Haur; Lai, I-Lu; Wang, Dasheng; Mo, Xiaokui; Kulp, Samuel K.; Shapiro, Charles L.; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2014-01-01

    In cancer cells, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) confers the ability to invade basement membranes and metastasize to distant sites, establishing it as an appealing target for therapeutic intervention. Here, we report a novel function of the master metabolic kinase AMPK in suppressing EMT by modulating the Akt-MDM2-Foxo3 signaling axis. This mechanistic link was supported by the effects of siRNA-mediated knockdown and pharmacological activation of AMPK on epithelial and mesenchymal markers in established breast and prostate cancer cells. Exposure of cells to OSU-53, a novel allosteric AMPK activator, as well as metformin and AICAR, was sufficient to reverse their mesenchymal phenotype. These effects were abrogated by AMPK silencing. Phenotypic changes were mediated by Foxo3a activation, insofar as silencing or overexpressing Foxo3a mimicked the effects of AMPK silencing or OSU-53 treatment on EMT, respectively. Mechanistically, Foxo3a activation led to the transactivation of the E-cadherin gene and repression of genes encoding EMT-inducing transcription factors. OSU-53 activated Foxo3a through two Akt-dependent pathways, one at the level of nuclear localization by blocking Akt- and IKKβ-mediated phosphorylation, and a second at the level of protein stabilization via cytoplasmic sequestration of MDM2, an E3 ligase responsible for Foxo3a degradation. The suppressive effects of OSU-53 on EMT had therapeutic implications illustrated by its ability to block invasive phenotypes in vitro and metastatic properties in vivo. Overall, our work illuminates a mechanism of EMT regulation in cancer cells mediated by AMPK, along with preclinical evidence supporting a tractable therapeutic strategy to reverse mesenchymal phenotypes associated with invasion and metastasis. PMID:24994714

  8. AMPK reverses the mesenchymal phenotype of cancer cells by targeting the Akt-MDM2-Foxo3a signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chih-Chien; Lee, Kuen-Haur; Lai, I-Lu; Wang, Dasheng; Mo, Xiaokui; Kulp, Samuel K; Shapiro, Charles L; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2014-09-01

    In cancer cells, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) confers the ability to invade basement membranes and metastasize to distant sites, establishing it as an appealing target for therapeutic intervention. Here, we report a novel function of the master metabolic kinase AMPK in suppressing EMT by modulating the Akt-MDM2-Foxo3 signaling axis. This mechanistic link was supported by the effects of siRNA-mediated knockdown and pharmacologic activation of AMPK on epithelial and mesenchymal markers in established breast and prostate cancer cells. Exposure of cells to OSU-53, a novel allosteric AMPK activator, as well as metformin and AICAR, was sufficient to reverse their mesenchymal phenotype. These effects were abrogated by AMPK silencing. Phenotypic changes were mediated by Foxo3a activation, insofar as silencing or overexpressing Foxo3a mimicked the effects of AMPK silencing or OSU-53 treatment on EMT, respectively. Mechanistically, Foxo3a activation led to the transactivation of the E-cadherin gene and repression of genes encoding EMT-inducing transcription factors. OSU-53 activated Foxo3a through two Akt-dependent pathways, one at the level of nuclear localization by blocking Akt- and IKKβ-mediated phosphorylation, and a second at the level of protein stabilization via cytoplasmic sequestration of MDM2, an E3 ligase responsible for Foxo3a degradation. The suppressive effects of OSU-53 on EMT had therapeutic implications illustrated by its ability to block invasive phenotypes in vitro and metastatic properties in vivo. Overall, our work illuminates a mechanism of EMT regulation in cancer cells mediated by AMPK, along with preclinical evidence supporting a tractable therapeutic strategy to reverse mesenchymal phenotypes associated with invasion and metastasis.

  9. AMPK reverses the mesenchymal phenotype of cancer cells by targeting the Akt-MDM2-Foxo3a signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chih-Chien; Lee, Kuen-Haur; Lai, I-Lu; Wang, Dasheng; Mo, Xiaokui; Kulp, Samuel K; Shapiro, Charles L; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2014-09-01

    In cancer cells, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) confers the ability to invade basement membranes and metastasize to distant sites, establishing it as an appealing target for therapeutic intervention. Here, we report a novel function of the master metabolic kinase AMPK in suppressing EMT by modulating the Akt-MDM2-Foxo3 signaling axis. This mechanistic link was supported by the effects of siRNA-mediated knockdown and pharmacologic activation of AMPK on epithelial and mesenchymal markers in established breast and prostate cancer cells. Exposure of cells to OSU-53, a novel allosteric AMPK activator, as well as metformin and AICAR, was sufficient to reverse their mesenchymal phenotype. These effects were abrogated by AMPK silencing. Phenotypic changes were mediated by Foxo3a activation, insofar as silencing or overexpressing Foxo3a mimicked the effects of AMPK silencing or OSU-53 treatment on EMT, respectively. Mechanistically, Foxo3a activation led to the transactivation of the E-cadherin gene and repression of genes encoding EMT-inducing transcription factors. OSU-53 activated Foxo3a through two Akt-dependent pathways, one at the level of nuclear localization by blocking Akt- and IKKβ-mediated phosphorylation, and a second at the level of protein stabilization via cytoplasmic sequestration of MDM2, an E3 ligase responsible for Foxo3a degradation. The suppressive effects of OSU-53 on EMT had therapeutic implications illustrated by its ability to block invasive phenotypes in vitro and metastatic properties in vivo. Overall, our work illuminates a mechanism of EMT regulation in cancer cells mediated by AMPK, along with preclinical evidence supporting a tractable therapeutic strategy to reverse mesenchymal phenotypes associated with invasion and metastasis. PMID:24994714

  10. Celecoxib Treatment Alters p53 and MDM2 Expression via COX-2 Crosstalk in A549 Cells.

    PubMed

    Gharghabi, Mehdi; Rezaei, Farhang; Mir Mohammadrezaei, Fereshteh; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of the lung cancer. It is known that COX-2 negatively regulates the activity of a number of tumor suppressors, including p53. Consequently, inhibition of COX-2 signaling is anticipated to be a promising approach to stabilize p53 functionality. In this regard, we investigated the effect of COX-2 signaling blockade on p53 and COX-2expression in A549 cells. Cell viability was assessed using MTT and protein expression was measured using Western Blot assay. Results revealed that Celecoxib dose-dependently induced growth inhibition within 24 h. However, prolonged exposure to the drug up to 48 h led to increase cell viability compared to the corresponding control. Western blot analysis demonstrated that Celecoxib could augment p53 expression within 24 h, independently of COX-2 inhibition. In contrast, Celecoxib treatment not only returned p53 to the control level, but also strikingly induced COX-2 expression within 48 h. Of further relevance, Celecoxib exposure could significantly result in MDM2 elevation at 48 h. These findings represent p53 as a molecular target being interconnected with COX-2 signaling axis upon Celecoxib treatment. Moreover, our data point toward the possibility that Celecoxib treatment may not be a proper therapeutic strategy in lung cancer cells owing to its potential role in the activation of oncogenes, including COX-2 and MDM2 which seemingly confers a chemoresistance circumstance to the cell. Consequently, these results underscore intensive preclinical assessment prior to applying COX-2 inhibitors in the treatment of lung tumors. PMID:27642319

  11. Associations between the MDM2 promoter P1 polymorphism del1518 (rs3730485) and incidence of cancer of the breast, lung, colon and prostate

    PubMed Central

    Gansmo, Liv B.; Vatten, Lars; Romundstad, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Ryan, Bríd M.; Harris, Curtis C.; Knappskog, Stian; Lønning, Per E.

    2016-01-01

    The MDM2 promoter region contains several polymorphisms, some of which have been associated with MDM2 expression, cancer risk and age at cancer onset. del1518 (rs3730485) is an indel polymorphism residing in the MDM2 promoter P1 and is in almost complete linkage disequilibrium with the MDM2 promoter P2 polymorphism SNP309T>G (rs2279744). Cancer risk assessments of del1518 have previously been conducted in relatively small Chinese populations only. In this study we assessed the genotype distribution of del1518 among healthy Caucasians, African Americans and Chinese, and we estimated the Odds Ratios (OR) for incident cancer of the breast, colon, lung and prostate (n=7,081) as compared to controls (n=3,749) in a large Caucasian (Norwegian) cohort. We found the genotypes of the del1518 to vary significantly between healthy Caucasians, African-Americans and Chinese (p< 1×10−5). Further, we found a positive association of the del1518 del-allele with risk of colon cancer (dominant model: OR = 1.15; 95 % CI = 1.01 – 1.31). Stratifying according to SNP309 status, this association remained among carriers of the SNP309TG genotype (OR = 1.21; 95 % CI = 1.01 – 1.46), but with no clear association among carriers of the SNP309TT genotype. In conclusion, our findings suggest del1518 to be associated with increased risk of colon cancer. PMID:27081698

  12. The MDM2–p53–pyruvate carboxylase signalling axis couples mitochondrial metabolism to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaomu; Cheng, Kenneth K. Y.; Liu, Zhuohao; Yang, Jin-Kui; Wang, Baile; Jiang, Xue; Zhou, Yawen; Hallenborg, Philip; Hoo, Ruby L. C.; Lam, Karen S. L.; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Gao, Xin; Xu, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is pivotal for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in pancreatic β-cells. However, little is known about the molecular machinery that controls the homeostasis of intermediary metabolites in mitochondria. Here we show that the activation of p53 in β-cells, by genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of its negative regulator MDM2, impairs GSIS, leading to glucose intolerance in mice. Mechanistically, p53 activation represses the expression of the mitochondrial enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (PC), resulting in diminished production of the TCA cycle intermediates oxaloacetate and NADPH, and impaired oxygen consumption. The defective GSIS and mitochondrial metabolism in MDM2-null islets can be rescued by restoring PC expression. Under diabetogenic conditions, MDM2 and p53 are upregulated, whereas PC is reduced in mouse β-cells. Pharmacological inhibition of p53 alleviates defective GSIS in diabetic islets by restoring PC expression. Thus, the MDM2–p53–PC signalling axis links mitochondrial metabolism to insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis, and could represent a therapeutic target in diabetes. PMID:27265727

  13. Non-linear feedback control of the p53 protein-mdm2 inhibitor system using the derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Rigatos, Gerasimos G

    2016-06-01

    It is proven that the model of the p53-mdm2 protein synthesis loop is a differentially flat one and using a diffeomorphism (change of state variables) that is proposed by differential flatness theory it is shown that the protein synthesis model can be transformed into the canonical (Brunovsky) form. This enables the design of a feedback control law that maintains the concentration of the p53 protein at the desirable levels. To estimate the non-measurable elements of the state vector describing the p53-mdm2 system dynamics, the derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter is used. Moreover, to compensate for modelling uncertainties and external disturbances that affect the p53-mdm2 system, the derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter is re-designed as a disturbance observer. The derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter consists of the Kalman filter recursion applied on the linearised equivalent of the protein synthesis model together with an inverse transformation based on differential flatness theory that enables to retrieve estimates for the state variables of the initial non-linear model. The proposed non-linear feedback control and perturbations compensation method for the p53-mdm2 system can result in more efficient chemotherapy schemes where the infusion of medication will be better administered. PMID:27187988

  14. Non-linear feedback control of the p53 protein-mdm2 inhibitor system using the derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Rigatos, Gerasimos G

    2016-06-01

    It is proven that the model of the p53-mdm2 protein synthesis loop is a differentially flat one and using a diffeomorphism (change of state variables) that is proposed by differential flatness theory it is shown that the protein synthesis model can be transformed into the canonical (Brunovsky) form. This enables the design of a feedback control law that maintains the concentration of the p53 protein at the desirable levels. To estimate the non-measurable elements of the state vector describing the p53-mdm2 system dynamics, the derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter is used. Moreover, to compensate for modelling uncertainties and external disturbances that affect the p53-mdm2 system, the derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter is re-designed as a disturbance observer. The derivative-free non-linear Kalman filter consists of the Kalman filter recursion applied on the linearised equivalent of the protein synthesis model together with an inverse transformation based on differential flatness theory that enables to retrieve estimates for the state variables of the initial non-linear model. The proposed non-linear feedback control and perturbations compensation method for the p53-mdm2 system can result in more efficient chemotherapy schemes where the infusion of medication will be better administered.

  15. Long non-coding RNA LOC572558 inhibits bladder cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth by regulating the AKT-MDM2-p53 signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yiping; Dai, Bo; Zhang, Hailiang; Shi, Guohai; Shen, Yijun; Ye, Dingwei

    2016-10-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been suggested to play important roles in the progression of many cancers such as bladder cancer. However, the detailed mechanism has not been fully understood. We have previously identified a collection of aberrantly expressed lncRNAs in bladder cancer using microarray gene profiling assay. In the current study, we aim to further explore the expression profile and the function of LOC572558, one of the most deregulated lncRNAs in bladder cancer. A large cohort of human bladder cancer tissue samples with benign controls, as well as established human bladder cancer cell lines, has been examined for the expression of LOC572558. The biological functions of LOC572558 were examined by CCK-8 assay, flow cytometry analysis, and wound healing and transwell assays. Using a high-throughput phospho-proteome array, we identified proteins that were ectopic phosphorylated in bladder cancer cells where LOC572558 expression was upregulated. We demonstrated that LOC572558 expression was markedly decreased in bladder cancer tissues and bladder cancer cell lines. Moreover, ectopic expression of LOC572558 inhibited cell proliferation and motility, induced S phase arrest of the cell cycle and promoted cell apoptosis in T24 and 5637 bladder cancer cell lines. We further verified that overexpression of LOC572558 was associated with dephosphorylation of AKT, MDM2 and phosphorylation of p53 protein. Our data clearly demonstrated that LOC572558 is a tumor suppressor and regulates the p53 signaling pathway in bladder cancer. Thus, it may serve as a promising new diagnostic marker and therapeutic target in bladder cancer.

  16. Whole genome sequence analysis links chromothripsis to EGFR, MDM2, MDM4, and CDK4 amplification in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Furgason, John M.; Koncar, Robert F.; Michelhaugh, Sharon K.; Sarkar, Fazlul H.; Mittal, Sandeep; Sloan, Andrew E.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Bahassi, El Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    Background Findings based on recent advances in next-generation sequence analysis suggest that, in some tumors, a single catastrophic event, termed chromothripsis, results in several simultaneous tumorigenic alterations. Previous studies have suggested that glioblastoma (GBM) may exhibit chromothripsis at a higher rate (39%) than other tumors (9%). Primary glioblastoma is an aggressive form of brain cancer that typically appears suddenly in older adults. With aggressive treatment, the median survival time is only 15 months. Their acute onset and widespread genomic instability indicates that chromothripsis may play a key role in their initiation and progression. GBMs are often characterized by EGFR amplification, CDKN2A and PTEN deletion, although approximately 20% of GBMs harbor additional amplifications in MDM2 or MDM4 with CDK4. Methods We used the chromothripsis prediction tool, Shatterproof, in conjunction with a custom whole genome sequence analysis pipeline in order to generate putative regions of chromothripsis. The data derived from this study was further expanded on using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and susceptibility studies with colony formation assays. Results We show that primary GBMs are associated with higher chromothripsis scores and establish a link between chromothripsis and gene amplification of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), as well as modulators of the TP53 and RB1 pathways. Conclusions Utilizing a newly introduced bioinformatic tool, we provide evidence that chromothripsis is associated with the formation of amplicons containing several oncogenes involved in key pathways that are likely essential for post-chromothriptic cell survival. PMID:26328271

  17. An EBV recombinant deleted for residues 130-159 in EBNA3C can deregulate p53/Mdm2 and Cyclin D1/CDK6 which results in apoptosis and reduced cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    El-Naccache, Darine W.; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a gamma herpes virus is associated with B-cell malignancies. EBNA-3C is critical for in vitro primary B-cell transformation. Interestingly, the N terminal domain of EBNA3C which contains residues 130–159, interacts with various cellular proteins, such as p53, Mdm2, CyclinD1/Cdk6 complex, and E2F1. In the current reverse genetics study, we deleted the residues 130-159 aa within EBNA3C open reading frame (ORF) by BACmid recombinant engineering methodology. Our experiments demonstrated that deletion of the 130-159 aa showed a reduction in cell proliferation. Also, this recombinant virus showed with higher infectivity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) compared to wild type EBV. PBMCs- infected with recombinant EBV deleted for 130-159 residues have differential expression patterns for the p53/Mdm2, CyclinD1/Cdk6 and pRb/E2F1 pathways compared to wild type EBV-infected PBMCs. PBMCs infected with recombinant virus showed increased apoptotic cell death which further resulted in activation of polymerase 1 (PARP1), an important contributor to apoptotic signaling. Interestingly, cells infected with this recombinant virus showed a dramatic decrease in chromosomal instability, indicated by the presence of increased multinucleation and micronucleation. In addition infection with recombinant virus have increased cells in G0/G1 phase and decreased cells in S-G2M phase when compared to wild type infected cells. Thus, these differences in signaling activities due to 29 amino acid residues of EBNA3C is of particular significance in deregulation of cell proliferation in EBV-infected cells. PMID:26908453

  18. Epithelial cell-derived periostin functions as a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer through stabilizing p53 and E-cadherin proteins via the Rb/E2F1/p14ARF/Mdm2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hongjun; Liu, Rui; Fu, Jiao; Yang, Qi; Shi, Jing; Chen, Pu; Ji, Meiju; Shi, Bingyin; Hou, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Periostin is usually considered as an oncogene in diverse human cancers, including breast, prostate, colon, esophagus, and pancreas cancers, whereas it acts as a tumor suppressor in bladder cancer. In gastric cancer, it has been demonstrated that periglandular periostin expression is decreased whereas stromal periostin expression is significantly increased as compared with normal gastric tissues. Moreover, periostin produced by stromal myofibroblasts markedly promotes gastric cancer cell growth. These observations suggest that periostin derived from different types of cells may play distinct biological roles in gastric tumorigenesis. The aim of this study was to explore the biological functions and related molecular mechanisms of epithelial cell-derived periostin in gastric cancer. Our data showed that periglandular periostin was significantly down-regulated in gastric cancer tissues as compared with matched normal gastric mucosa. In addition, its expression in metastatic lymph nodes was significantly lower than that in their primary cancer tissues. Our data also demonstrated that periglandular periostin expression was negatively associated with tumor stage. More importantly, restoration of periostin expression in gastric cancer cells dramatically suppressed cell growth and invasiveness. Elucidation of the mechanisms involved revealed that periostin restoration enhanced Rb phosphorylation and sequentially activated the transcription of E2F1 target gene p14(ARF), leading to Mdm2 inactivation and the stabilization of p53 and E-cadherin proteins. Strikingly, these effects of periostin were abolished upon Rb deletion. Collectively, we have for the first time demonstrated that epithelial cell-derived periostin exerts tumor-suppressor activities in gastric cancer through stabilizing p53 and E-cadherin proteins via the Rb/E2F1/p14(ARF)/Mdm2 signaling pathway. PMID:25486483

  19. In vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo efficacy, pharmacokinetics and metabolism of pyrazole-based small-molecule inhibitors of Mdm2/4-p53 interaction

    PubMed Central

    Christner, Susan M.; Clausen, Dana M.; Beumer, Jan H.; Parise, Robert A.; Guo, Jianxia; Huang, Yijun; Dömling, Alexander S; Eiseman, Julie L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The interaction of p53, with its negative regulators Mdm2/4 has been widely studied [1]. In p53+/+ cells, expression of Mdm2/4 leads to p53 turnover, inhibition of downstream transcription, decreasing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. We report in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and metabolism of YH264, YH263 and WW751, three proposed small molecule inhibitors of the Mdm2/4-p53 interaction. Methods MTT cytotoxicity assays were performed and alterations in proteins were examined using Western blots. Mice were dosed 150 mg/kg YH264 or YH263 iv or po QDx5. Mice were iv dosed 88 mg/kg, 57 mg/kg, or 39 mg/kg WW751 for three, five, or five days. YH264, YH263 and WW751 and metabolites were quantitated by LC-MS/MS. Results IC50 values for YH264, YH263 and WW751 against p53 wild type HCT 116 cells after 72 h of incubation were 18.3 ± 2.3 μM, 8.9 ± 0.6 μM, and 3.1 ± 0.2 μM respectively. Only YH264 appeared to affect p53 expression in vitro. None of the compounds affected the growth of HCT 116 xenografts in C.B-17 SCID mice. YH264 plasma half-life was 147 min; YH263 plasma half-life was 263 min; and WW751 plasma half-life was less than 120 min. Conclusions Despite dosing the mice at the maximum soluble doses, we could not achieve tumor concentrations equivalent to the intracellular concentrations required to inhibit cell growth in vitro. YH263 and WW751 do not appear to affect p53/Mdm2 and none of the three were active in a subcutaneous HCT116 p53+/+ xenograft model. PMID:26050209

  20. Markov models of the apo-MDM2 lid region reveal diffuse yet two-state binding dynamics and receptor poses for computational docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sudipto; Pantelopulos, George A.; Voelz, Vincent A.

    2016-08-01

    MDM2 is a negative regulator of p53 activity and an important target for cancer therapeutics. The N-terminal lid region of MDM2 modulates interactions with p53 via competition for its binding cleft, exchanging slowly between docked and undocked conformations in the absence of p53. To better understand these dynamics, we constructed Markov State Models (MSMs) from large collections of unbiased simulation trajectories of apo-MDM2, and find strong evidence for diffuse, yet two-state folding and binding of the N-terminal region to the p53 receptor site. The MSM also identifies holo-like receptor conformations highly suitable for computational docking, despite initiating trajectories from closed-cleft receptor structures unsuitable for docking. Fixed-anchor docking studies using a test set of high-affinity small molecules and peptides show simulated receptor ensembles achieve docking successes comparable to cross-docking studies using crystal structures of receptors bound by alternative ligands. For p53, the best-scoring receptor structures have the N-terminal region lid region bound in a helical conformation mimicking the bound structure of p53, suggesting lid region association induces receptor conformations suitable for binding. These results suggest that MD + MSM approaches can sample binding-competent receptor conformations suitable for computational peptidomimetic design, and that inclusion of disordered regions may be essential to capturing the correct receptor dynamics.

  1. Influence of the nuclear membrane, active transport, and cell shape on the Hes1 and p53-Mdm2 pathways: insights from spatio-temporal modelling.

    PubMed

    Sturrock, Marc; Terry, Alan J; Xirodimas, Dimitris P; Thompson, Alastair M; Chaplain, Mark A J

    2012-07-01

    There are many intracellular signalling pathways where the spatial distribution of the molecular species cannot be neglected. These pathways often contain negative feedback loops and can exhibit oscillatory dynamics in space and time. Two such pathways are those involving Hes1 and p53-Mdm2, both of which are implicated in cancer. In this paper we further develop the partial differential equation (PDE) models of Sturrock et al. (J. Theor. Biol., 273:15-31, 2011) which were used to study these dynamics. We extend these PDE models by including a nuclear membrane and active transport, assuming that proteins are convected in the cytoplasm towards the nucleus in order to model transport along microtubules. We also account for Mdm2 inhibition of p53 transcriptional activity. Through numerical simulations we find ranges of values for the model parameters such that sustained oscillatory dynamics occur, consistent with available experimental measurements. We also find that our model extensions act to broaden the parameter ranges that yield oscillations. Hence oscillatory behaviour is made more robust by the inclusion of both the nuclear membrane and active transport. In order to bridge the gap between in vivo and in silico experiments, we investigate more realistic cell geometries by using an imported image of a real cell as our computational domain. For the extended p53-Mdm2 model, we consider the effect of microtubule-disrupting drugs and proteasome inhibitor drugs, obtaining results that are in agreement with experimental studies.

  2. Markov models of the apo-MDM2 lid region reveal diffuse yet two-state binding dynamics and receptor poses for computational docking

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sudipto; Pantelopulos, George A.; Voelz, Vincent A.

    2016-01-01

    MDM2 is a negative regulator of p53 activity and an important target for cancer therapeutics. The N-terminal lid region of MDM2 modulates interactions with p53 via competition for its binding cleft, exchanging slowly between docked and undocked conformations in the absence of p53. To better understand these dynamics, we constructed Markov State Models (MSMs) from large collections of unbiased simulation trajectories of apo-MDM2, and find strong evidence for diffuse, yet two-state folding and binding of the N-terminal region to the p53 receptor site. The MSM also identifies holo-like receptor conformations highly suitable for computational docking, despite initiating trajectories from closed-cleft receptor structures unsuitable for docking. Fixed-anchor docking studies using a test set of high-affinity small molecules and peptides show simulated receptor ensembles achieve docking successes comparable to cross-docking studies using crystal structures of receptors bound by alternative ligands. For p53, the best-scoring receptor structures have the N-terminal region lid region bound in a helical conformation mimicking the bound structure of p53, suggesting lid region association induces receptor conformations suitable for binding. These results suggest that MD + MSM approaches can sample binding-competent receptor conformations suitable for computational peptidomimetic design, and that inclusion of disordered regions may be essential to capturing the correct receptor dynamics. PMID:27538695

  3. Markov models of the apo-MDM2 lid region reveal diffuse yet two-state binding dynamics and receptor poses for computational docking.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sudipto; Pantelopulos, George A; Voelz, Vincent A

    2016-01-01

    MDM2 is a negative regulator of p53 activity and an important target for cancer therapeutics. The N-terminal lid region of MDM2 modulates interactions with p53 via competition for its binding cleft, exchanging slowly between docked and undocked conformations in the absence of p53. To better understand these dynamics, we constructed Markov State Models (MSMs) from large collections of unbiased simulation trajectories of apo-MDM2, and find strong evidence for diffuse, yet two-state folding and binding of the N-terminal region to the p53 receptor site. The MSM also identifies holo-like receptor conformations highly suitable for computational docking, despite initiating trajectories from closed-cleft receptor structures unsuitable for docking. Fixed-anchor docking studies using a test set of high-affinity small molecules and peptides show simulated receptor ensembles achieve docking successes comparable to cross-docking studies using crystal structures of receptors bound by alternative ligands. For p53, the best-scoring receptor structures have the N-terminal region lid region bound in a helical conformation mimicking the bound structure of p53, suggesting lid region association induces receptor conformations suitable for binding. These results suggest that MD + MSM approaches can sample binding-competent receptor conformations suitable for computational peptidomimetic design, and that inclusion of disordered regions may be essential to capturing the correct receptor dynamics. PMID:27538695

  4. mTOR inhibitors blunt the p53 response to nucleolar stress by regulating RPL11 and MDM2 levels.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Kaveh M; Nistér, Monica; Lindström, Mikael S

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a master regulator of cell growth through its ability to stimulate ribosome biogenesis and mRNA translation. In contrast, the p53 tumor suppressor negatively controls cell growth and is activated by a wide range of insults to the cell. The mTOR and p53 signaling pathways are connected by a number of different mechanisms. Chemotherapeutics that inhibit ribosome biogenesis often induce nucleolar stress and activation of p53. Here we have investigated how the p53 response to nucleolar stress is affected by simultaneous mTOR inhibition in osteosarcoma and glioma cell lines. We found that inhibitors of the mTOR pathway including rapamycin, wortmannin, and caffeine blunted the p53 response to nucleolar stress induced by actinomycin D. Synthetic inhibitors of mTOR (temsirolimus, LY294.002 and PP242) also impaired actinomycin D triggered p53 stabilization and induction of p21. Ribosomal protein (RPL11) is known to be required for p53 protein stabilization following nucleolar stress. Treatment of cells with mTOR inhibitors may lead to reduced synthesis of RPL11 and thereby destabilize p53. We found that rapamycin mimicked the effect of RPL11 depletion in terms of blunting the p53 response to nucleolar stress. However, the extent to which the levels of p53 and RPL11 were reduced by rapamycin varied between cell lines. Additional mechanisms whereby rapamycin blunts the p53 response to nucleolar stress are likely to be involved. Indeed, rapamycin increased the levels of endogenous MDM2 despite inhibition of its phosphorylation at Ser-166. Our findings may have implications for the design of combinatorial cancer treatments with mTOR pathway inhibitors.

  5. Pokemon enhances proliferation, cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis activity of colorectal cancer independently of p14ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Yao, Yun-hong; Li, Li; An, Wei-fang; Chen, Hong-zen; Sun, Li-ping; Kang, Hai-xian; Wang, Sen; Hu, Xin-rong

    2014-12-01

    Pokemon has been showed to directly suppress p14(ARF) expression and also to overexpress in multiple cancers. However, p14(ARF)-MDM2-p53 pathway is usually aberrant in colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim is to confirm whether Pokemon plays a role in CRC and explore whether Pokemon works through p14(ARF)-MDM2-p53 pathway in CRC. Immunohistochemistry for Pokemon, p14(ARF) and Mtp53 protein was applied to 45 colorectal epitheliums (CREs), 42 colorectal adenomas (CRAs) and 66 CRCs. Pokemon was knocked down with RNAi technique in CRC cell line Lovo to detect mRNA expression of p14(ARF) with qRT-PCR, cell proliferation with CCK8 assay, and cell cycle and apoptosis with flowcytometry analysis. The protein expression rates were significantly higher in CRC (75.8%) than in CRE (22.2 %) or CRA (38.1%) for Pokemon and higher in CRC (53.0%) than in CRE (0) or CRA (4.8%) for Mtp53, but not significantly different in CRC (86.4 %) versus CRE (93.3%) or CRA (90.5 %) for p14(ARF). Higher expression rate of Pokemon was associated with lymph node metastasis and higher Duke's stage. After knockdown of Pokemon in Lovo cells, the mRNA level of p14(ARF) was not significantly changed, the cell proliferation ability was decreased by 20.6%, cell cycle was arrested by 55.7% in G0/G1 phase, and apoptosis rate was increased by 19.0%. Pokemon enhanced the oncogenesis of CRC by promoting proliferation, cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis activity of CRC cells independently of p14(ARF)-MDM2-p53 pathway. This finding provided a novel idea for understanding and further studying the molecular mechanism of Pokemon on carcinogenesis of CRC. PMID:25367850

  6. Pokemon enhances proliferation, cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis activity of colorectal cancer independently of p14ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Yao, Yun-hong; Li, Li; An, Wei-fang; Chen, Hong-zen; Sun, Li-ping; Kang, Hai-xian; Wang, Sen; Hu, Xin-rong

    2014-12-01

    Pokemon has been showed to directly suppress p14(ARF) expression and also to overexpress in multiple cancers. However, p14(ARF)-MDM2-p53 pathway is usually aberrant in colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim is to confirm whether Pokemon plays a role in CRC and explore whether Pokemon works through p14(ARF)-MDM2-p53 pathway in CRC. Immunohistochemistry for Pokemon, p14(ARF) and Mtp53 protein was applied to 45 colorectal epitheliums (CREs), 42 colorectal adenomas (CRAs) and 66 CRCs. Pokemon was knocked down with RNAi technique in CRC cell line Lovo to detect mRNA expression of p14(ARF) with qRT-PCR, cell proliferation with CCK8 assay, and cell cycle and apoptosis with flowcytometry analysis. The protein expression rates were significantly higher in CRC (75.8%) than in CRE (22.2 %) or CRA (38.1%) for Pokemon and higher in CRC (53.0%) than in CRE (0) or CRA (4.8%) for Mtp53, but not significantly different in CRC (86.4 %) versus CRE (93.3%) or CRA (90.5 %) for p14(ARF). Higher expression rate of Pokemon was associated with lymph node metastasis and higher Duke's stage. After knockdown of Pokemon in Lovo cells, the mRNA level of p14(ARF) was not significantly changed, the cell proliferation ability was decreased by 20.6%, cell cycle was arrested by 55.7% in G0/G1 phase, and apoptosis rate was increased by 19.0%. Pokemon enhanced the oncogenesis of CRC by promoting proliferation, cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis activity of CRC cells independently of p14(ARF)-MDM2-p53 pathway. This finding provided a novel idea for understanding and further studying the molecular mechanism of Pokemon on carcinogenesis of CRC.

  7. Dual inhibition of protein kinase C and p53-MDM2 or PKC and mTORC1 are novel efficient therapeutic approaches for uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Dahmani, Ahmed; Raymondie, Chloé; Cassoux, Nathalie; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Némati, Fariba; Laurent, Cécile; De Koning, Leanne; Halilovic, Ensar; Jeay, Sebastien; Wylie, Andrew; Emery, Caroline; Roman-Roman, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is the most common cancer of the eye in adults. Many UM patients develop metastases for which no curative treatment has been identified. Novel therapeutic approaches are therefore urgently needed. UM is characterized by mutations in the genes GNAQ and GNA11 which activate the PKC pathway, leading to the use of PKC inhibitors as a rational strategy to treat UM tumors. Encouraging clinical activity has been noted in UM patients treated with PKC inhibitors. However, it is likely that curative treatment regimens will require a combination of targeted therapeutic agents. Employing a large panel of UM patient-derived xenograft models (PDXs), several PKC inhibitor-based combinations were tested in vivo using the PKC inhibitor AEB071. The most promising approaches were further investigated in vitro using our unique panel of UM cell lines. When combined with AEB071, the two agents CGM097 (p53-MDM2 inhibitor) and RAD001 (mTORC1 inhibitor) demonstrated greater activity than single agents, with tumor regression observed in several UM PDXs. Follow-up studies in UM cell lines on these two drug associations confirmed their combination activity and ability to induce cell death. While no effective treatment currently exists for metastatic uveal melanoma, we have discovered using our unique panel of preclinical models that combinations between PKC/mTOR inhibitors and PKC/p53-MDM2 inhibitors are two novel and very effective therapeutic approaches for this disease. Together, our study reveals that combining PKC and p53-MDM2 or mTORC1 inhibitors may provide significant clinical benefit for UM patients. PMID:27507190

  8. Genetic Variants in the p14ARF/MDM2/TP53 Pathway Are Associated with the Prognosis of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Treated with Radical Resection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Tang, Yang; Huang, Liu; Yu, Qianqian; Hu, Guangyuan; Yuan, Xianglin

    2016-01-01

    The p14ARF/MDM2/ TP53 pathway is known to play an important role in tumor progression by cell cycle control, although the association between this pathway and the prognosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is unclear. In this study, we explored the association between genetic variants in the p14ARF/MDM2/TP53 pathway and prognosis in ESCC patients with radical resection. 124 ESCC patients with radical resection were included in this retrospective study and genotyped using the MassArray method. According to multivariate Cox hazard analysis and multiple testing, the TC/CC genotype of p14ARF rs3814960 was shown to be strongly related to a decreased overall survival (OS) (HR = 2.77, 95% CI: 1.33–5.75, P = 0.006, Pc = 0.030) and disease-free survival (DFS) (HR = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.30–4.61, P = 0.005, Pc = 0.025). Moreover, patients with the DEL/A +AA genotype of MDM2 rs34886328 had a notably increased OS (HR = 0.27, 95% CI: 0.13–0.56, P = 4.7×10−4, Pc = 0.003) and DFS (HR = 0.22, 95% CI: 0.11–0.43, P = 1.1×10−5, Pc = 6.6×10−5). We also found that these two SNPs had a cumulative effect on the prognosis of ESCC, with the OS (P < 0.001) and DFS (P < 0.001) being shortest for patients carrying both of these unfavorable genotypes. In conclusion, genetic variants of the p14ARF/MDM2/TP53 pathway are significantly related to OS and DFS, and may be predictors of the prognosis of ESCC after surgery. We speculate the individuals with the TC/CC genotype of p14ARF rs3814960 and/or the DEL/DEL genotype of MDMD2 rs34886328 should have more aggressive treatment and may greatly benefit from early prediction and prevention of an unfavorable prognosis by genotyping before the initiation of therapy. These findings should be further validated in a larger population. PMID:27414035

  9. Genetic Variants in the p14ARF/MDM2/TP53 Pathway Are Associated with the Prognosis of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Treated with Radical Resection.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Tang, Yang; Huang, Liu; Yu, Qianqian; Hu, Guangyuan; Yuan, Xianglin

    2016-01-01

    The p14ARF/MDM2/ TP53 pathway is known to play an important role in tumor progression by cell cycle control, although the association between this pathway and the prognosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is unclear. In this study, we explored the association between genetic variants in the p14ARF/MDM2/TP53 pathway and prognosis in ESCC patients with radical resection. 124 ESCC patients with radical resection were included in this retrospective study and genotyped using the MassArray method. According to multivariate Cox hazard analysis and multiple testing, the TC/CC genotype of p14ARF rs3814960 was shown to be strongly related to a decreased overall survival (OS) (HR = 2.77, 95% CI: 1.33-5.75, P = 0.006, Pc = 0.030) and disease-free survival (DFS) (HR = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.30-4.61, P = 0.005, Pc = 0.025). Moreover, patients with the DEL/A +AA genotype of MDM2 rs34886328 had a notably increased OS (HR = 0.27, 95% CI: 0.13-0.56, P = 4.7×10-4, Pc = 0.003) and DFS (HR = 0.22, 95% CI: 0.11-0.43, P = 1.1×10-5, Pc = 6.6×10-5). We also found that these two SNPs had a cumulative effect on the prognosis of ESCC, with the OS (P < 0.001) and DFS (P < 0.001) being shortest for patients carrying both of these unfavorable genotypes. In conclusion, genetic variants of the p14ARF/MDM2/TP53 pathway are significantly related to OS and DFS, and may be predictors of the prognosis of ESCC after surgery. We speculate the individuals with the TC/CC genotype of p14ARF rs3814960 and/or the DEL/DEL genotype of MDMD2 rs34886328 should have more aggressive treatment and may greatly benefit from early prediction and prevention of an unfavorable prognosis by genotyping before the initiation of therapy. These findings should be further validated in a larger population.

  10. Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma: clinicopathologic study of 15 cases with emphasis on novel expression of MDM2, somatostatin receptor 2A, and PD-L1.

    PubMed

    Agaimy, Abbas; Michal, Michael; Hadravsky, Ladislav; Michal, Michal

    2016-08-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is a rare low-grade neoplasm with the phenotype of FDC cells. This rare sarcoma has been well known for being mistaken for a variety of neoplasms (mainly meningioma), particularly at extranodal sites. Diagnosis of FDCS mainly relies on characteristic histologic appearance supplemented by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. In this study, we reviewed 15 FDCSs retrieved from our consultation files and stained them for newly reported or novel markers (PD-L1, Rb1, MDM2, and somatostatin receptor 2A [SSTR2A]) in addition to conventional FDC markers. Patients were 7 men and 7 women (1 unspecified) with a mean age of 47 years (20-75 years). The tumor site was lymph nodes (6) or spleen (2), both (1) and extranodal sites of head and neck (4) or abdominal cavity (2). Treatment was variable combinations of surgery and aggressive chemotherapy/radiotherapy. Four of 8 patients with follow-up died of disease within 1 to 10 years. All tumors expressed at least 1 FDC marker: CD21 (8/13), CD23 (2/13), CD35 (8/12), CNA.42 (13/14), Clusterin (8/13), Fascin (15/15) and D2-40/podoplanin (7/14). Epstein-Barr virus (EBER-1/2 in situ hybridization) was performed successfully in 10 conventional variants; all were negative. Five of 14 cases (36%) stained strongly for SSTR2A with a distinctive membranous pattern. Residual lymphoid follicles surrounding some of the tumors stained similarly for SSTR2A. Seven (54%) of 13 assessable cases showed moderate to strong membranous staining for PD-L1 in greater than 5% of the neoplastic cells. The Rb1 antigen was lost in 4 (28%) of 14 cases. MDM2 stained less than 5% to 20% of the tumor cells in 5 (36%) of 14 cases; 2 of them showed amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). CDK4 was negative except for weak staining in 1 of 14 cases. This study adds to the existing few clinicopathologic series on FDCS and represents the first study to show MDM2 amplification in this entity. Our results

  11. The isolation, total synthesis and structure elucidation of chlorofusin, a natural product inhibitor of the p53-MDM2 protein-protein interaction

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ryan C.; Lee, Sang Yeul; Searcey, Mark; Boger, Dale L.

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of key protein-protein interactions are emerging as exciting therapeutic targets for the treatment of cancer. One such interaction between MDM2 (HDM2) and p53, that silences the tumour suppression activities of p53, was found to be inhibited by the recently isolated natural product chlorofusin. Synthetic studies on this complex natural product summarized herein have served to reassign its chromophore relative stereochemistry, assign its absolute stereochemistry, and provided access to a series of key analogues and partial structures for biological evaluation. PMID:19642417

  12. UVB-Induced Cell Death Signaling Is Associated with G1-S Progression and Transcription Inhibition in Primary Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ortolan, Tatiana Grohmann; Menck, Carlos Frederico M.

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV) radiation can be removed by nucleotide excision repair through two sub-pathways, one general (GGR) and the other specific for transcribed DNA (TCR), and the processing of unrepaired lesions trigger signals that may lead to cell death. These signals involve the tumor suppressor p53 protein, a central regulator of cell responses to DNA damage, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, that forms a feedback regulatory loop with p53. The involvement of cell cycle and transcription on the signaling to apoptosis was investigated in UVB-irradiated synchronized, DNA repair proficient, CS-B (TCR-deficient) and XP-C (GGR-deficient) primary human fibroblasts. Cells were irradiated in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, with two doses with equivalent levels of apoptosis (low and high), defined for each cell line. In the three cell lines, the low doses of UVB caused only a transient delay in progression to the S phase, whereas the high doses induced permanent cell cycle arrest. However, while accumulation of Mdm2 correlated well with the recovery from transcription inhibition at the low doses for normal and CS-B fibroblasts, for XP-C cells this protein was shown to be accumulated even at UVB doses that induced high levels of apoptosis. Thus, UVB-induced accumulation of Mdm2 is critical for counteracting p53 activation and apoptosis avoidance, but its effect is limited due to transcription inhibition. However, in the case of XP-C cells, an excess of unrepaired DNA damage would be sufficient to block S phase progression, which would signal to apoptosis, independent of Mdm2 accumulation. The data clearly discriminate DNA damage signals that lead to cell death, depending on the presence of UVB-induced DNA damage in replicating or transcribing regions. PMID:24155908

  13. UVB-induced cell death signaling is associated with G1-S progression and transcription inhibition in primary human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ortolan, Tatiana Grohmann; Menck, Carlos Frederico M

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV) radiation can be removed by nucleotide excision repair through two sub-pathways, one general (GGR) and the other specific for transcribed DNA (TCR), and the processing of unrepaired lesions trigger signals that may lead to cell death. These signals involve the tumor suppressor p53 protein, a central regulator of cell responses to DNA damage, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, that forms a feedback regulatory loop with p53. The involvement of cell cycle and transcription on the signaling to apoptosis was investigated in UVB-irradiated synchronized, DNA repair proficient, CS-B (TCR-deficient) and XP-C (GGR-deficient) primary human fibroblasts. Cells were irradiated in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, with two doses with equivalent levels of apoptosis (low and high), defined for each cell line. In the three cell lines, the low doses of UVB caused only a transient delay in progression to the S phase, whereas the high doses induced permanent cell cycle arrest. However, while accumulation of Mdm2 correlated well with the recovery from transcription inhibition at the low doses for normal and CS-B fibroblasts, for XP-C cells this protein was shown to be accumulated even at UVB doses that induced high levels of apoptosis. Thus, UVB-induced accumulation of Mdm2 is critical for counteracting p53 activation and apoptosis avoidance, but its effect is limited due to transcription inhibition. However, in the case of XP-C cells, an excess of unrepaired DNA damage would be sufficient to block S phase progression, which would signal to apoptosis, independent of Mdm2 accumulation. The data clearly discriminate DNA damage signals that lead to cell death, depending on the presence of UVB-induced DNA damage in replicating or transcribing regions. PMID:24155908

  14. Detection of MDM2/CDK4 amplification in lipomatous soft tissue tumors from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue: comparison of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Creytens, David; van Gorp, Joost; Ferdinande, Liesbeth; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Libbrecht, Louis

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the detection of MDM2 and CDK4 amplification was evaluated in lipomatous soft tissue tumors using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), a PCR-based technique, in comparison with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These 2 techniques were evaluated in a series of 77 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lipomatous tumors (27 benign adipose tumors, 28 atypical lipomatous tumors/well-differentiated liposarcomas, 18 dedifferentiated liposarcomas, and 4 pleomorphic liposarcomas). Using MLPA, with a cut-off ratio of >2, 36/71 samples (22 atypical lipomatous tumors/well-differentiated liposarcomas, and 14 dedifferentiated liposarcomas) showed MDM2 and CDK4 amplification. Using FISH as gold standard, MLPA showed a sensitivity of 90% (36/40) and a specificity of 100% (31/31) in detecting amplification of MDM2 and CDK4 in lipomatous soft tissue tumors. In case of high-level amplification (MDM2-CDK4/CEP12 ratio >5), concordance was 100%. Four cases of atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma (4/26, 15%) with a low MDM2 and CDK4 amplification level (MDM2-CDK4/CEP12 ratio ranging between 2 and 2.5) detected by FISH showed no amplification by MLPA, although gain of MDM2 and CDK4 (ratios ranging between 1.6 and 1.9) was seen with MLPA. No amplification was detected in benign lipomatous tumors and pleomorphic liposarcomas. Furthermore, there was a very high concordance between the ratios obtained by FISH and MLPA. In conclusion, MLPA proves to be an appropriate and straightforward technique for screening MDM2/CDK4 amplification in lipomatous tumors, especially when a correct cut-off value and reference samples are chosen, and could be considered a good alternative to FISH to determine MDM2 and CDK4 amplification in liposarcomas. Moreover, because MLPA, as a multiplex technique, allows simultaneous detection of multiple chromosomal changes of interest, it could be in the future a very reliable and fast molecular analysis on

  15. Gait correlation analysis based human identification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinyan

    2014-01-01

    Human gait identification aims to identify people by a sequence of walking images. Comparing with fingerprint or iris based identification, the most important advantage of gait identification is that it can be done at a distance. In this paper, silhouette correlation analysis based human identification approach is proposed. By background subtracting algorithm, the moving silhouette figure can be extracted from the walking images sequence. Every pixel in the silhouette has three dimensions: horizontal axis (x), vertical axis (y), and temporal axis (t). By moving every pixel in the silhouette image along these three dimensions, we can get a new silhouette. The correlation result between the original silhouette and the new one can be used as the raw feature of human gait. Discrete Fourier transform is used to extract features from this correlation result. Then, these features are normalized to minimize the affection of noise. Primary component analysis method is used to reduce the features' dimensions. Experiment based on CASIA database shows that this method has an encouraging recognition performance. PMID:24592144

  16. Oral delivery of anti-MDM2 inhibitor SP141-loaded FcRn-targeted nanoparticles to treat breast cancer and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jiang-Jiang; Wang, Wei; Sarkar, Sushanta; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2016-09-10

    We have recently discovered a specific Murine Double Minute 2 (MDM2) oncogene inhibitor, called SP141, which exerts potent anticancer activity in various breast cancer models. However, its low oral bioavailability is the major hurdle for moving this drug to clinical trial. The present study was designed to discover and validate a novel nano-oral delivery system for this promising anticancer agent. Herein, we report the preparation, characterization, and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of the SP141-loaded IgG Fc-conjugated maleimidyl-poly(ethylene glycol)-co-poly(ε-caprolactone) (Mal-PEG-PCL) nanoparticles (SP141FcNP) as an orally cancer therapeutic agent. Our results indicated that SP141FcNP showed a biphasic release pattern and increased transepithelial transport in vitro and in vivo with the involvement of FcRn-mediated transcytosis. SP141FcNP also exhibited increased intestinal epithelial permeability, cellular uptake, and oral bioavailability, with extended blood circulation time, increased tumor accumulation, enhanced MDM2 inhibition, and stronger responses in anti-tumor growth and metastasis effects in vitro and in vivo, without apparent host toxicity. Collectively, this newly developed nanoparticle oral delivery system provides a basis for evaluation of SP141 as a potential clinical candidate for cancer therapy. PMID:27394681

  17. Luteolin Prevents H2O2-Induced Apoptosis in H9C2 Cells through Modulating Akt-P53/Mdm2 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hong; Li, Chun; Huo, Kuiyuan; Wang, Qiyan; Lu, Linghui; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Yong; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Luteolin, a falconoid compound in many Chinese herbs and formula, plays important roles in cardiovascular diseases. The underlying mechanism of luteolin remains to be further elaborated. Methods. A model of hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced H9C2 cells apoptosis was established. Cell viabilities were examined with an MTT assay. 2',7'-Dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) and flow cytometry were used to detect ROS level and apoptosis rate, respectively. The expressions of signaling proteins related to apoptosis were analyzed by western blot and mRNA levels were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Quercetin was applied as positive drug. Results. Incubation with various concentrations of H2O2 (0, 50, 100, and 200 μM) for 1 h caused dose-dependent loss of cell viability and 100 μM H2O2 reduced the cell viability to approximately 50%. Treatments with luteolin and quercetin protected cells from H2O2-induced cytotoxicity and reduced cellular ROS level and apoptosis rate. Moreover, luteolin could downregulate the expressions of Bax, caspase-8, cleaved-caspase-3, and p53 in apoptotic signaling pathway. Further study showed that the expressions of Akt, Bcl-2, and Mdm2 were upregulated by luteolin. Conclusion. Luteolin protects H9C2 cells from H2O2-induced apoptosis. The protective and antiapoptotic effects of luteolin could be mediated by regulating the Akt-P53/Mdm2 apoptotic pathway. PMID:27525270

  18. Neuroendocrine correlates of temperamental traits in humans.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Zaimovic, A; Timpano, M; Zambelli, U; Delsignore, R; Brambilla, F

    2000-07-01

    Studies investigating temperament traits in humans and their biological correlates have found high levels of novelty seeking (NS) linked with dopaminergic system changes, and particularly a deficit of dopamine transporter. Harm avoidance and reward dependence, on the other hand, appeared to be associated, respectively with serotonin and noradrenaline changes. In the present study, we have investigated the dopaminergic (DA), serotonergic (5-HT), and noradrenergic (NE) functions in healthy volunteers by challenging the monoamine systems with the DA agonist bromocriptine, the 5-HT agonist D-fenfluramine, and the NE agonist clonidine, respectively. Parallel to this investigation, we examined the temperament traits of our subjects by measuring NS, harm avoidance (HA) and reward dependence (RD) using the 'Three-dimensional Personality Questionnaire' (TPQ). The aims of the study were to see whether or not the monoamine functions were correlated with temperament traits. Bromocriptine challenge induced a significant GH increase and a significant suppression of PRL. D-fenfluramine test significantly increased PRL and cortisol plasma levels and Clonidine test induced a significant rise in GH values. NS scores showed a significant direct correlation with brom-stimulated GH values (r=0.426, P<0.05) and a significant inverse correlation with brom-inhibited PRL values (r=-0.498, P<0.01). HA scores correlated significantly with D-fen-stimulated PRL and CORT AUCs, (PRL: r=0.424, P<0.05; CORT: r=0. 595, P<0.005). RD scores correlated positively with clon-stimulated GH values (r=0.55; F=8.6; P<0.01) and negatively with brom-inhibited-PRL AUCs (r=-0.439, P<0.05). Our data support Cloninger theory concerning the biological correlates of temperamental traits, and evidence the link between the neuroendocrine responses to dynamic challenges and stable temperament features.

  19. Design, synthesis and in vitro and in vivo antitumour activity of 3-benzylideneindolin-2-one derivatives, a novel class of small-molecule inhibitors of the MDM2-p53 interaction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guang-hui; Shen, Jia-jia; Zhan, Yue-chen; Yi, Hong; Xue, Si-tu; Wang, Zhen; Ji, Xing-yue; Li, Zhuo-rong

    2014-06-23

    A novel class of small-molecule inhibitors of MDM2-p53 interaction with a (E)-3-benzylideneindolin-2-one scaffold was identified using an integrated virtual screening strategy that combined both pharmacophore- and structure-based approaches. The hit optimisation identified several compounds with more potent activity than the hit compound and the positive drug nutlin-3a, especially compound 1b, which exhibited both the highest binding affinity to MDM2 (Ki = 0.093 μM) and the most potent antiproliferative activity against HCT116 (wild type p53) cells (GI50 = 13.42 μM). Additionally, 1b dose-dependently inhibited tumour growth in BALB/c mice bearing CT26 colon carcinoma, with no visible sign of toxicity. In summary, compound 1b represents a novel and promising lead structure for the development of anticancer drugs as MDM2-p53 interaction disruptors.

  20. The TP53 Arg72Pro and MDM2 309G>T polymorphisms are not associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Sinilnikova, O M; Antoniou, A C; Simard, J; Healey, S; Léoné, M; Sinnett, D; Spurdle, A B; Beesley, J; Chen, X; Greene, M H; Loud, J T; Lejbkowicz, F; Rennert, G; Dishon, S; Andrulis, I L; Domchek, S M; Nathanson, K L; Manoukian, S; Radice, P; Konstantopoulou, I; Blanco, I; Laborde, A L; Durán, M; Osorio, A; Benitez, J; Hamann, U; Hogervorst, F B L; van Os, T A M; Gille, H J P; Peock, S; Cook, M; Luccarini, C; Evans, D G; Lalloo, F; Eeles, R; Pichert, G; Davidson, R; Cole, T; Cook, J; Paterson, J; Brewer, C; Hughes, D J; Coupier, I; Giraud, S; Coulet, F; Colas, C; Soubrier, F; Rouleau, E; Bièche, I; Lidereau, R; Demange, L; Nogues, C; Lynch, H T; Schmutzler, R K; Versmold, B; Engel, C; Meindl, A; Arnold, N; Sutter, C; Deissler, H; Schaefer, D; Froster, U G; Aittomäki, K; Nevanlinna, H; McGuffog, L; Easton, D F; Chenevix-Trench, G; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D

    2009-01-01

    Background: The TP53 pathway, in which TP53 and its negative regulator MDM2 are the central elements, has an important role in carcinogenesis, particularly in BRCA1- and BRCA2-mediated carcinogenesis. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the promoter region of MDM2 (309T>G, rs2279744) and a coding SNP of TP53 (Arg72Pro, rs1042522) have been shown to be of functional significance. Methods: To investigate whether these SNPs modify breast cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, we pooled genotype data on the TP53 Arg72Pro SNP in 7011 mutation carriers and on the MDM2 309T>G SNP in 2222 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Data were analysed using a Cox proportional hazards model within a retrospective likelihood framework. Results: No association was found between these SNPs and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 (TP53: per-allele hazard ratio (HR)=1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93–1.10, Ptrend=0.77; MDM2: HR=0.96, 95%CI: 0.84–1.09, Ptrend=0.54) or for BRCA2 mutation carriers (TP53: HR=0.99, 95%CI: 0.87–1.12, Ptrend=0.83; MDM2: HR=0.98, 95%CI: 0.80–1.21, Ptrend=0.88). We also evaluated the potential combined effects of both SNPs on breast cancer risk, however, none of their combined genotypes showed any evidence of association. Conclusion: There was no evidence that TP53 Arg72Pro or MDM2 309T>G, either singly or in combination, influence breast cancer risk in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:19707196

  1. Structural brain correlates of human sleep oscillations.

    PubMed

    Saletin, Jared M; van der Helm, Els; Walker, Matthew P

    2013-12-01

    Sleep is strongly conserved within species, yet marked and perplexing inter-individual differences in sleep physiology are observed. Combining EEG sleep recordings and high-resolution structural brain imaging, here we demonstrate that the morphology of the human brain offers one explanatory factor of such inter-individual variability. Gray matter volume in interoceptive and exteroceptive cortices correlated with the expression of slower NREM sleep spindle frequencies, supporting their proposed role in sleep protection against conscious perception. Conversely, and consistent with an involvement in declarative memory processing, gray matter volume in bilateral hippocampus was associated with faster NREM sleep spindle frequencies. In contrast to spindles, gray matter volume in the homeostatic sleep-regulating center of the basal forebrain/hypothalamus, together with the medial prefrontal cortex, accounted for individual differences in NREM slow wave oscillations. Together, such findings indicate that the qualitative and quantitative expression of human sleep physiology is significantly related to anatomically specific differences in macroscopic brain structure.

  2. Luteolin Prevents H2O2-Induced Apoptosis in H9C2 Cells through Modulating Akt-P53/Mdm2 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun; Wang, Qiyan; Lu, Linghui; Zhang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Luteolin, a falconoid compound in many Chinese herbs and formula, plays important roles in cardiovascular diseases. The underlying mechanism of luteolin remains to be further elaborated. Methods. A model of hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced H9C2 cells apoptosis was established. Cell viabilities were examined with an MTT assay. 2′,7′-Dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) and flow cytometry were used to detect ROS level and apoptosis rate, respectively. The expressions of signaling proteins related to apoptosis were analyzed by western blot and mRNA levels were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Quercetin was applied as positive drug. Results. Incubation with various concentrations of H2O2 (0, 50, 100, and 200 μM) for 1 h caused dose-dependent loss of cell viability and 100 μM H2O2 reduced the cell viability to approximately 50%. Treatments with luteolin and quercetin protected cells from H2O2-induced cytotoxicity and reduced cellular ROS level and apoptosis rate. Moreover, luteolin could downregulate the expressions of Bax, caspase-8, cleaved-caspase-3, and p53 in apoptotic signaling pathway. Further study showed that the expressions of Akt, Bcl-2, and Mdm2 were upregulated by luteolin. Conclusion. Luteolin protects H9C2 cells from H2O2-induced apoptosis. The protective and antiapoptotic effects of luteolin could be mediated by regulating the Akt-P53/Mdm2 apoptotic pathway. PMID:27525270

  3. Ling Zhi-8 reduces lung cancer mobility and metastasis through disruption of focal adhesion and induction of MDM2-mediated Slug degradation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tung-Yi; Hsu, Hsien-Yeh

    2016-06-01

    We recently reported that recombinant Ling Zhi-8 (rLZ-8), a medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum recombinant protein, effectively prevents lung cancer cells proliferation in vivo mice model. In our current study, we demonstrated that rLZ-8 suppressed tumor metastasis and increased the survival rate in Lewis lung carcinoma cell-bearing mice. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) process is regarded as the critical event in tumor metastasis. Herein, we showed that rLZ-8 effectively induced changes in EMT by interfering with cell adhesion and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) functions in lung cancer cells. Slug, a transcription factor, represses E-cadherin transcription and is regarded as a critical event in EMT and tumor metastasis. Functional studies revealed that downregulation of Slug as a result of rLZ-8-induced FAK inactivation enhanced E-cadherin expression and repressed cancer cell mobility. Moreover, we found that rLZ-8 enhanced the ubiquitination proteasome pathway (UPP)-mediated degradation of Slug in CL1-5 cells. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that rLZ-8 promoted the interaction between MDM2 and Slug, resulting in Slug degradation; however, MDM2-shRNA abolished rLZ-8-enhanced Slug degradation. This study is the first to determine anti-metastatic activity of rLZ-8 and its potential mechanism, with how the regulation of EMT and cell mobility is via the negative modulation of FAK, and thereby leading to the ubiquitination and degradation of Slug. Our findings suggest that the targets of FAK play a key role in metastasis. Moreover, rLZ-8 may be useful as a chemotherapeutic agent for treating lung cancer. PMID:26992741

  4. HBP1-mediated Regulation of p21 Protein through the Mdm2/p53 and TCF4/EZH2 Pathways and Its Impact on Cell Senescence and Tumorigenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yifan; Pan, Kewu; Wang, Pingzhang; Cao, Zhengyi; Wang, Weibin; Wang, Shuya; Hu, Ningguang; Xue, Junhui; Li, Hui; Jiang, Wei; Li, Gang; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    The activity of the CDK inhibitor p21 is associated with diverse biological activities, including cell proliferation, senescence, and tumorigenesis. However, the mechanisms governing transcription of p21 need to be extensively studied. In this study, we demonstrate that the high-mobility group box-containing protein 1 (HBP1) transcription factor is a novel activator of p21 that works as part of a complex mechanism during senescence and tumorigenesis. We found that HBP1 activates the p21 gene through enhancing p53 stability by inhibiting Mdm2-mediated ubiquitination of p53, a well known positive regulator of p21. HBP1 was also found to enhance p21 transcription by inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We identified histone methyltransferase EZH2, the catalytic subunit of polycomb repressive complex 2, as a target of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. HBP1-mediated repression of EZH2 through Wnt/β-catenin signaling decreased the level of trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 of overall and specific histone on the p21 promoter, resulting in p21 transactivation. Although intricate, the reciprocal partnership of HBP1 and p21 has exceptional importance. HBP1-mediated elevation of p21 through the Mdm2/p53 and TCF4/EZH2 pathways contributes to both cellular senescence and tumor inhibition. Together, our results suggest that the HBP1 transcription factor orchestrates a complex regulation of key genes during cellular senescence and tumorigenesis with an impact on protein ubiquitination and overall histone methylation state. PMID:27129219

  5. Hemodynamic Correlates of Cognition in Human Infants

    PubMed Central

    Aslin, Richard N.; Shukla, Mohinish; Emberson, Lauren L.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the field of cognitive neuroscience has relied heavily on hemodynamic measures of blood oxygenation in local regions of the brain to make inferences about underlying cognitive processes. These same functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) techniques have recently been adapted for use with human infants. We review the advantages and disadvantages of these two neuroimaging methods for studies of infant cognition, with a particular emphasis on their technical limitations and the linking hypotheses that are used to draw conclusions from correlational data. In addition to summarizing key findings in several domains of infant cognition, we highlight the prospects of improving the quality of fNIRS data from infants to address in a more sophisticated way how cognitive development is mediated by changes in underlying neural mechanisms. PMID:25251480

  6. Tryptophan in human hair: correlation with pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bertazzo, A; Biasiolo, M; Costa, C V; Cardin de Stefani, E; Allegri, G

    2000-08-01

    The distribution of tryptophan content in human hair of various colours was evaluated, in order to study the accumulation of this amino acid, precursor of serotonin, melatonin and niacin, in hair and the influence on hair pigmentation. Pigmentation is an important factor in determining drug incorporation into hair. Results from 1211 samples of hair from healthy subjects (577 men and 634 women) show that tryptophan levels are significantly higher in males (37.83 +/- 3.45 microg/g dry hair) than in females (26.62 +/- 2.40 microg/g hair). Besides sex, age also influences the distribution of tryptophan in human hair, the highest levels being found in both sexes in the first few years of life, probably due to the influence of milk, and in aging subjects in the groups of 61-80 and > 80 years. In order to investigate the influence of hair colour, hair samples were subdivided according to colour into blond, dark blond, red, light brown, brown, black, grey and white. The hair contents of tryptophan in both sexes was higher in brown and black hair than in blond hair, but in grey and white hair concentrations were the highest, demonstrating that tryptophan accumulates among hair fibres with age. Grouping subjects by age in relation to hair colour, we observed that at ages 1-5 and 6-12 years, colour did not influence tryptophan contents, but at ages 13-19 and 20-40 years tryptophan content increased significantly from blond to brown at 13-19 years and from blond to black at 20-40 years in both sexes. Therefore, variations in tryptophan levels of human hair appear to be correlated with differences in hair colour in both sexes. Tryptophan also accumulates in hair during keratinization, as shown by the presence of high levels of this amino acid in grey and white hair. PMID:11132729

  7. Evaluation of MDM2 and CDK4 amplification by real-time PCR on paraffin wax-embedded material: a potential tool for the diagnosis of atypical lipomatous tumours/well-differentiated liposarcomas.

    PubMed

    Hostein, I; Pelmus, M; Aurias, A; Pedeutour, F; Mathoulin-Pélissier, S; Coindre, J M

    2004-01-01

    Atypical lipomatous tumours/well-differentiated liposarcomas and dedifferentiated liposarcomas are characterized by 12q13-15 region amplification. In contrast, this molecular event has not been reported in benign lipomas. Within the 12q13-15 chromosomal region, the MDM2, SAS, HMGA2, and CDK4 genes are the most frequent targets of amplification. A series of lipomas (36 cases) and liposarcomas (48 cases) was analysed for MDM2 and CDK4 gene amplification by real-time PCR. MDM2 and CDK4 gene amplification was detected in 2.8% and 5.6% of lipomas and 98.2% and 82.4% of liposarcomas, respectively. Moreover, co-amplification of the two genes as well as a higher-level amplification was observed more frequently in dedifferentiated liposarcomas than in atypical lipomatous tumours/well-differentiated liposarcomas. Real-time PCR proved to be a fast and reliable method to characterize lipomas and liposarcomas by quantification of MDM2 and CDK4 gene amplification. It is applicable to paraffin wax-embedded tissues and could be useful when histological diagnosis is difficult.

  8. The ubiquitin ligase Mdm2 controls oligodendrocyte maturation by intertwining mTOR with G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 in the regulation of GPR17 receptor desensitization.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Marta; Bonfanti, Elisabetta; Daniele, Simona; Zappelli, Elisa; Lecca, Davide; Martini, Claudia; Trincavelli, Maria L; Abbracchio, Maria P

    2015-12-01

    During oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) differentiation, defective control of the membrane receptor GPR17 has been suggested to block cell maturation and impair remyelination under demyelinating conditions. After the immature oligodendrocyte stage, to enable cells to complete maturation, GPR17 is physiologically down-regulated via phosphorylation/desensitization by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs); conversely, GRKs are regulated by the "mammalian target of rapamycin" mTOR. However, how GRKs and mTOR are connected to each other in modulating GPR17 function and oligodendrogenesis has remained elusive. Here we show, for the first time, a role for Murine double minute 2 (Mdm2), a ligase previously involved in ubiquitination/degradation of the onco-suppressor p53 protein. In maturing OPCs, both rapamycin and Nutlin-3, a small molecule inhibitor of Mdm2-p53 interactions, increased GRK2 sequestration by Mdm2, leading to impaired GPR17 down-regulation and OPC maturation block. Thus, Mdm2 intertwines mTOR with GRK2 in regulating GPR17 and oligodendrogenesis and represents a novel actor in myelination.

  9. Altered expression of the cell cycle regulatory molecules pRb, p53 and MDM2 exert a synergetic effect on tumor growth and chromosomal instability in non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs).

    PubMed Central

    Gorgoulis, V. G.; Zacharatos, P.; Kotsinas, A.; Mariatos, G.; Liloglou, T.; Vogiatzi, T.; Foukas, P.; Rassidakis, G.; Garinis, G.; Ioannides, T.; Zoumpourlis, V.; Bramis, J.; Michail, P. O.; Asimacopoulos, P. J.; Field, J. K.; Kittas, C.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent in vitro studies provide evidence that the cell cycle molecules pRb, p53 and MDM2 form a tightly regulated protein network. In this study, we examined the relationship of this protein network in a series of non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs), with the kinetic parameters, including proliferative activity or proliferation index (PI) and apoptotic index (AI), and ploidy status of the tumors. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 87 NSCLCs were examined using immunohistochemical and molecular methods in order to estimate the status of the pRb-p53-MDM2 network. The kinetic parameters and the ploidy status of the tumors were assessed by in situ assays. The possible associations between alterations of the network, kinetic parameters and ploidy status of the carcinomas were assessed with a series of statistical methods. RESULTS: Aberrant expression of pRb (Ab) and overexpression of p53 (P) and MDM2 (P) proteins were observed in 39%, 57%, and 68% of the carcinomas, respectively. The comprehensive analysis revealed that concurrent alterations in all three cell cycle regulatory molecules were the most frequent pattern, pRb(Ab)/p53(P)/MDM2(P); this "full abnormal" phenotype represented approximately 27% of the cases. This immunoprofile obtained the highest PI/AI value; whereas, the "normal" phenotype was the lowest one (p = 0.004). Furthermore, the pattern pRb(Ab)/p53(P)/MDM2(P) acquired the highest PI (p < 0.001) and lowest AI (p < 0.001) scores. Interestingly, the groups of carcinomas with impaired expression of one or two molecules attained PI/AI ratio values clustered in a narrow range placed in the middle of the scores exhibited by the "normal" and "full abnormal" phenotypes. These tumors had significantly lower AI, but similar PI values, compared with those noticed in the normal pattern. In addition, it was observed that the pRb(Ab)/p53(P)/MDM2(P) phenotype was also significantly associated with aneuploidy (p = 0.002) and a tendency was observed when

  10. Efficacy and Mechanism of Action of Low Dose Emetine against Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Rupkatha; Roy, Sujayita; Venkatadri, Rajkumar; Su, Yu-Pin; Ye, Wenjuan; Barnaeva, Elena; Mathews Griner, Lesley; Southall, Noel; Hu, Xin; Wang, Amy Q.; Xu, Xin; Dulcey, Andrés E.; Marugan, Juan J.; Ferrer, Marc; Arav-Boger, Ravit

    2016-01-01

    Infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a threat for pregnant women and immunocompromised hosts. Although limited drugs are available, development of new agents against HCMV is desired. Through screening of the LOPAC library, we identified emetine as HCMV inhibitor. Additional studies confirmed its anti-HCMV activities in human foreskin fibroblasts: EC50−40±1.72 nM, CC50−8±0.56 μM, and selectivity index of 200. HCMV inhibition occurred after virus entry, but before DNA replication, and resulted in decreased expression of viral proteins. Synergistic virus inhibition was achieved when emetine was combined with ganciclovir. In a mouse CMV (MCMV) model, emetine was well-tolerated, displayed long half-life, preferential distribution to tissues over plasma, and effectively suppressed MCMV. Since the in vitro anti-HCMV activity of emetine decreased significantly in low-density cells, a mechanism involving cell cycle regulation was suspected. HCMV inhibition by emetine depended on ribosomal processing S14 (RPS14) binding to MDM2, leading to disruption of HCMV-induced MDM2-p53 and MDM2-IE2 interactions. Irrespective of cell density, emetine induced RPS14 translocation into the nucleus during infection. In infected high-density cells, MDM2 was available for interaction with RPS14, resulting in disruption of MDM2-p53 interaction. However, in low-density cells the pre-existing interaction of MDM2-p53 could not be disrupted, and RPS14 could not interact with MDM2. In high-density cells the interaction of MDM2-RPS14 resulted in ubiquitination and degradation of RPS14, which was not observed in low-density cells. In infected-only or in non-infected emetine-treated cells, RPS14 failed to translocate into the nucleus, hence could not interact with MDM2, and was not ubiquitinated. HCMV replicated similarly in RPS14 knockdown or control cells, but emetine did not inhibit virus replication in the former cell line. The interaction of MDM2-p53 was maintained in infected

  11. Efficacy and Mechanism of Action of Low Dose Emetine against Human Cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Rupkatha; Roy, Sujayita; Venkatadri, Rajkumar; Su, Yu-Pin; Ye, Wenjuan; Barnaeva, Elena; Mathews Griner, Lesley; Southall, Noel; Hu, Xin; Wang, Amy Q; Xu, Xin; Dulcey, Andrés E; Marugan, Juan J; Ferrer, Marc; Arav-Boger, Ravit

    2016-06-01

    Infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a threat for pregnant women and immunocompromised hosts. Although limited drugs are available, development of new agents against HCMV is desired. Through screening of the LOPAC library, we identified emetine as HCMV inhibitor. Additional studies confirmed its anti-HCMV activities in human foreskin fibroblasts: EC50-40±1.72 nM, CC50-8±0.56 μM, and selectivity index of 200. HCMV inhibition occurred after virus entry, but before DNA replication, and resulted in decreased expression of viral proteins. Synergistic virus inhibition was achieved when emetine was combined with ganciclovir. In a mouse CMV (MCMV) model, emetine was well-tolerated, displayed long half-life, preferential distribution to tissues over plasma, and effectively suppressed MCMV. Since the in vitro anti-HCMV activity of emetine decreased significantly in low-density cells, a mechanism involving cell cycle regulation was suspected. HCMV inhibition by emetine depended on ribosomal processing S14 (RPS14) binding to MDM2, leading to disruption of HCMV-induced MDM2-p53 and MDM2-IE2 interactions. Irrespective of cell density, emetine induced RPS14 translocation into the nucleus during infection. In infected high-density cells, MDM2 was available for interaction with RPS14, resulting in disruption of MDM2-p53 interaction. However, in low-density cells the pre-existing interaction of MDM2-p53 could not be disrupted, and RPS14 could not interact with MDM2. In high-density cells the interaction of MDM2-RPS14 resulted in ubiquitination and degradation of RPS14, which was not observed in low-density cells. In infected-only or in non-infected emetine-treated cells, RPS14 failed to translocate into the nucleus, hence could not interact with MDM2, and was not ubiquitinated. HCMV replicated similarly in RPS14 knockdown or control cells, but emetine did not inhibit virus replication in the former cell line. The interaction of MDM2-p53 was maintained in infected RPS14

  12. Automated Essay Scoring versus Human Scoring: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jinhao; Brown, Michelle Stallone

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to analyze the relationship between automated essay scoring (AES) and human scoring in order to determine the validity and usefulness of AES for large-scale placement tests. Specifically, a correlational research design was used to examine the correlations between AES performance and human raters' performance.…

  13. Detection of MDM2-CDK4 amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 200 paraffin-embedded tumor samples: utility in diagnosing adipocytic lesions and comparison with immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Sirvent, Nicolas; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Maire, Georges; Hostein, Isabelle; Keslair, Frédérique; Guillou, Louis; Ranchere-Vince, Dominique; Terrier, Philippe; Pedeutour, Florence

    2007-10-01

    Atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcomas and dedifferentiated liposarcomas are characterized by the amplification of MDM2 and CDK4 genes. To evaluate the accuracy of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis in the differential diagnosis of adipose tissue tumors, we investigated MDM2-CDK4 status by FISH, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) [quantitative PCR (Q-PCR)] and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in a series of 200 adipose tumors. First, we evaluated MDM2-CDK4 amplification and expression in a series of 94 well-defined adipose tissue tumors. Results showed that FISH was interpretable in 45 of 50 cases (90%), and was more specific and sensitive than Q-PCR and IHC. We then used the same techniques as complementary diagnostic tools in a series of 106 adipose and soft tissue tumors of unclear diagnosis to distinguish between (i) lipomas and atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcomas, (ii) malignant undifferentiated tumors and dedifferentiated liposarcomas, and (iii) a variety of benign tumors and liposarcomas. Our results indicate that although helpful, IHC alone is often insufficient to solve diagnostic problems. FISH and Q-PCR methods gave concordant results and were equally informative in most cases. However, the proportion of noninterpretable cases was slightly higher with FISH than with Q-PCR. When tumor cells represented a minor component of the tumor tissue, such as with inflammatory tumors, FISH was more powerful than Q-PCR by allowing visualization of individual cells. In conclusion, we recommend that the evaluation of MDM2-CDK4 amplification using FISH or Q-PCR be used to supplement IHC analysis when diagnosis of adipose tissue tumors is not possible based on clinical and histologic information alone.

  14. The viral non-structural protein 1 alpha (Nsp1α) inhibits p53 apoptosis activity by increasing murine double minute 2 (mdm2) expression in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) early-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaodu; Shao, Chunyan; Wang, Luyan; Li, Qunjing; Song, Houhui; Fang, Weihuan

    2016-02-29

    Apoptosis is one of the most important mechanisms of pathogenesis in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-infected cells. The tumor suppressor p53 plays a critical role in apoptotic induction in viral infections. In the present study, we found that p53 activity was inhibited at the early stage of PRRSV infection in both the highly pathogenic (HP) and lowly pathogenic (LP) PRRSV isolates. Bax expression showed a similar change pattern to that of p53. Murine double minute 2 (mdm2) expressed higher in PRRSV-infected cells than in uninfected cells at the early stage of infection and promoted p53 degradation. We show for the first time that the non-structural protein 1 alpha (Nsp1α) of PRRSV is a negative regulator of p53 activity through increasing mdm2 expression and p53 ubiquitination, while p53 is inhibitory to PRRSV replication at the early stage of infection. We conclude that PRRSV manipulates the host factors mdm2 and p53 via its Nsp1α for increased replication at the early stage of infection. These provide a novel perspective to understand the interaction between apoptosis and replication of PRRSV.

  15. Genomic correlates of atherosclerosis in ancient humans.

    PubMed

    Zink, Albert; Wann, L Samuel; Thompson, Randall C; Keller, Andreas; Maixner, Frank; Allam, Adel H; Finch, Caleb E; Frohlich, Bruno; Kaplan, Hillard; Lombardi, Guido P; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Watson, Lucia; Cox, Samantha L; Miyamoto, Michael I; Narula, Jagat; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Thomas, Gregory S; Krause, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Paleogenetics offers a unique opportunity to study human evolution, population dynamics, and disease evolution in situ. Although histologic and computed x-ray tomographic investigations of ancient mummies have clearly shown that atherosclerosis has been present in humans for more than 5,000 years, limited data are available on the presence of genetic predisposition for cardiovascular disease in ancient human populations. In a previous whole-genome study of the Tyrolean Iceman, a 5,300-year-old glacier mummy from the Alps, an increased risk for coronary heart disease was detected. The Iceman's genome revealed several single nucleotide polymorphisms that are linked with cardiovascular disease in genome-wide association studies. Future genetic studies of ancient humans from various geographic origins and time periods have the potential to provide more insights into the presence and possible changes of genetic risk factors in our ancestors. The study of ancient humans and a better understanding of the interaction between environmental and genetic influences on the development of heart diseases may lead to a more effective prevention and treatment of the most common cause of death in the modern world. PMID:25667090

  16. Genomic correlates of atherosclerosis in ancient humans.

    PubMed

    Zink, Albert; Wann, L Samuel; Thompson, Randall C; Keller, Andreas; Maixner, Frank; Allam, Adel H; Finch, Caleb E; Frohlich, Bruno; Kaplan, Hillard; Lombardi, Guido P; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Watson, Lucia; Cox, Samantha L; Miyamoto, Michael I; Narula, Jagat; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Thomas, Gregory S; Krause, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Paleogenetics offers a unique opportunity to study human evolution, population dynamics, and disease evolution in situ. Although histologic and computed x-ray tomographic investigations of ancient mummies have clearly shown that atherosclerosis has been present in humans for more than 5,000 years, limited data are available on the presence of genetic predisposition for cardiovascular disease in ancient human populations. In a previous whole-genome study of the Tyrolean Iceman, a 5,300-year-old glacier mummy from the Alps, an increased risk for coronary heart disease was detected. The Iceman's genome revealed several single nucleotide polymorphisms that are linked with cardiovascular disease in genome-wide association studies. Future genetic studies of ancient humans from various geographic origins and time periods have the potential to provide more insights into the presence and possible changes of genetic risk factors in our ancestors. The study of ancient humans and a better understanding of the interaction between environmental and genetic influences on the development of heart diseases may lead to a more effective prevention and treatment of the most common cause of death in the modern world.

  17. Neural correlates of human body perception.

    PubMed

    Aleong, Rosanne; Paus, Tomás

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate potential sex differences in the neural response to human bodies using fMRI carried out in healthy young adults. We presented human bodies in a block-design experiment to identify body-responsive regions of the brain, namely, extrastriate body area (EBA) and fusiform body area (FBA). In a separate event-related "adaptation" experiment, carried out in the same group of subjects, we presented sets of four human bodies of varying body size and shape. Varying levels of body morphing were introduced to assess the degree of morphing required for adaptation release. Analysis of BOLD signal in the block-design experiment revealed significant Sex x Hemisphere interactions in the EBA and the FBA responses to human bodies. Only women showed greater BOLD response to bodies in the right hemisphere compared with the left hemisphere for both EBA and FBA. The BOLD response in right EBA was higher in women compared with men. In the adaptation experiment, greater right versus left hemisphere response for EBA and FBA was also identified among women but not men. These findings are particularly novel in that they address potential sex differences in the lateralization of EBA and FBA responses to human body images. Although previous studies have found some degree of right hemisphere dominance in body perception, our results suggest that such a functional lateralization may differ between men and women.

  18. Association of genetic polymorphisms in GADD45A, MDM2, and p14{sup ARF} with the risk of chronic benzene poisoning in a Chinese occupational population

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Pin; Zhang Zhongbin; Wan Junxiang; Zhao Naiqing; Jin Xipeng; Xia Zhaolin

    2009-10-01

    Benzene reactive metabolites can lead to DNA damage and trigger the p53-dependent defense responses to maintain genomic stability. We hypothesized that the p53-dependent genes may play a role in the development of chronic benzene poisoning (CBP). In a case-control study of 303 patients with benzene poisoning and 295 workers occupationally exposed to benzene in south China, we investigated associations between the risk of CBP and polymorphisms in three p53-dependent genes. Potential interactions of these polymorphisms with lifestyle factors were also explored. We found p14{sup ARF} rs3731245 polymorphism was associated with risk of CBP (P = 0.014). Compared with those carrying the GG genotype, individuals carrying p14{sup ARF} rs3731245 GA+AA genotypes had a reduced risk of CBP ([adjusted odds ratio (OR{sub adj}) = 0.57, 95%CI = 0.36-0.89]. Further analysis showed p14{sup ARF} TGA/TAG diplotype was associated with an increased risk of CBP (P = 0.0006), whereas p14{sup ARF} TGG/TAA diplotype was associated with a decreased risk of CBP (P = 0.0000001). In addition, we found individuals carrying both MDM2 Del1518 WW genotype and p14{sup ARF} rs3731245 GA+AA genotypes had a lower risk of CBP (OR{sub adj} = 0.25; 95%CI = 0.10-0.62; P = 0.003). Although these results require confirmation and extension, our findings suggest that genetic polymorphisms in p14{sup ARF} may have an impact on the risk of CBP in the study population.

  19. Frequency and Correlation of Nearest Neighboring Nucleotides in Human Genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Neng-zhi; Liu, Zi-xian; Qiu, Wen-yuan

    2009-02-01

    Zipf's approach in linguistics is utilized to analyze the statistical features of frequency and correlation of 16 nearest neighboring nucleotides (AA, AC, AG, ..., TT) in 12 human chromosomes (Y, 22, 21, 20, 19, 18, 17, 16, 15, 14, 13, and 12). It is found that these statistical features of nearest neighboring nucleotides in human genome: (i) the frequency distribution is a linear function, and (ii) the correlation distribution is an inverse function. The coefficients of the linear function and inverse function depend on the GC content. It proposes the correlation distribution of nearest neighboring nucleotides for the first time and extends the descriptor about nearest neighboring nucleotides.

  20. Repeat Sequences and Base Correlations in Human Y Chromosome Palindromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Neng-zhi; Liu, Zi-xian; Qi, Yan-jiao; Qiu, Wen-yuan

    2009-06-01

    On the basis of information theory and statistical methods, we use mutual information, n-tuple entropy and conditional entropy, combined with biological characteristics, to analyze the long range correlation and short range correlation in human Y chromosome palindromes. The magnitude distribution of the long range correlation which can be reflected by the mutual information is P5>P5a>P5b (P5a and P5b are the sequences that replace solely Alu repeats and all interspersed repeats with random uncorrelated sequences in human Y chromosome palindrome 5, respectively); and the magnitude distribution of the short range correlation which can be reflected by the n-tuple entropy and the conditional entropy is P5>P5a>P5b>random uncorrelated sequence. In other words, when the Alu repeats and all interspersed repeats replace with random uncorrelated sequence, the long range and short range correlation decrease gradually. However, the random uncorrelated sequence has no correlation. This research indicates that more repeat sequences result in stronger correlation between bases in human Y chromosome. The analyses may be helpful to understand the special structures of human Y chromosome palindromes profoundly.

  1. Correlation between carcinogenic potency of chemicals in animals and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.C.; Crump, K.S.; Shipp, A.M.

    1988-12-01

    Twenty-three chemicals were selected for comparison of the carcinogenic potencies estimated from epidemiological data to those estimated from animal carcinogenesis bioassays. The chemicals were all those for which reasonably strong evidence of carcinogenicity could be found in humans or animals and for which suitable data could be obtained for quantifying carcinogenic potencies in both humans and animals. Many alternative methods of analyzing the bioassay data were investigated. Almost all of the methods yielded potency estimates that were highly correlated with potencies estimated from epidemiological data; correlations were highly statistically significant (p < 0.001), with the corresponding correlation coefficients ranging as high as 0.9. These findings provide support for the general use of animal data to evaluate carcinogenic potential in humans and also for the use of animal data to quantify human risk.

  2. Correlation between three color coordinates of human teeth.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2014-11-01

    The objective was to determine whether there were significant correlations in the three color coordinates within each of two color coordinate systems, such as the Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage (CIE) L*a*b* system, and the lightness, chroma, and hue angle system, of human vital teeth. The color of six maxillary and six mandibular anterior teeth was measured by the Shade Vision System. Pearson correlations between each pair of the color coordinates were determined (α=0.01 ). The influence of two color coordinates on the other color coordinate was determined with a multiple regression analysis (α=0.01 ). Based on correlation analyses, all the color coordinate pairs showed significant correlations except for the chroma and hue angle pair. The CIE L* was negatively correlated with the CIE a*,b*, and chroma, but positively correlated with the hue angle. The CIE a* was positively correlated with the CIE b* and chroma. Tooth color coordinates were correlated each other. Lighter teeth were less chromatic both in the CIE a* and b* coordinates. Therefore, it was postulated that the three color coordinates of human teeth were harmonized within certain color attribute ranges, and a lack of correlations in these coordinates might indicate external/internal discolorations and/or anomalies of teeth.

  3. Efficient Atomistic Simulation of Pathways and Calculation of Rate Constants for a Protein-Peptide Binding Process: Application to the MDM2 Protein and an Intrinsically Disordered p53 Peptide.

    PubMed

    Zwier, Matthew C; Pratt, Adam J; Adelman, Joshua L; Kaus, Joseph W; Zuckerman, Daniel M; Chong, Lillian T

    2016-09-01

    The characterization of protein binding processes - with all of the key conformational changes - has been a grand challenge in the field of biophysics. Here, we have used the weighted ensemble path sampling strategy to orchestrate molecular dynamics simulations, yielding atomistic views of protein-peptide binding pathways involving the MDM2 oncoprotein and an intrinsically disordered p53 peptide. A total of 182 independent, continuous binding pathways were generated, yielding a kon that is in good agreement with experiment. These pathways were generated in 15 days using 3500 cores of a supercomputer, substantially faster than would be possible with "brute force" simulations. Many of these pathways involve the anchoring of p53 residue F19 into the MDM2 binding cleft when forming the metastable encounter complex, indicating that F19 may be a kinetically important residue. Our study demonstrates that it is now practical to generate pathways and calculate rate constants for protein binding processes using atomistic simulation on typical computing resources. PMID:27532687

  4. Neural correlate of human reciprocity in social interactions.

    PubMed

    Sakaiya, Shiro; Shiraito, Yuki; Kato, Junko; Ide, Hiroko; Okada, Kensuke; Takano, Kouji; Kansaku, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Reciprocity plays a key role maintaining cooperation in society. However, little is known about the neural process that underpins human reciprocity during social interactions. Our neuroimaging study manipulated partner identity (computer, human) and strategy (random, tit-for-tat) in repeated prisoner's dilemma games and investigated the neural correlate of reciprocal interaction with humans. Reciprocal cooperation with humans but exploitation of computers by defection was associated with activation in the left amygdala. Amygdala activation was also positively and negatively correlated with a preference change for human partners following tit-for-tat and random strategies, respectively. The correlated activation represented the intensity of positive feeling toward reciprocal and negative feeling toward non-reciprocal partners, and so reflected reciprocity in social interaction. Reciprocity in social interaction, however, might plausibly be misinterpreted and so we also examined the neural coding of insight into the reciprocity of partners. Those with and without insight revealed differential brain activation across the reward-related circuitry (i.e., the right middle dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and dorsal caudate) and theory of mind (ToM) regions [i.e., ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) and precuneus]. Among differential activations, activation in the precuneus, which accompanied deactivation of the VMPFC, was specific to those without insight into human partners who were engaged in a tit-for-tat strategy. This asymmetric (de)activation might involve specific contributions of ToM regions to the human search for reciprocity. Consequently, the intensity of emotion attached to human reciprocity was represented in the amygdala, whereas insight into the reciprocity of others was reflected in activation across the reward-related and ToM regions. This suggests the critical role of mentalizing, which was not equated with reward expectation during social interactions.

  5. Neural correlate of human reciprocity in social interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sakaiya, Shiro; Shiraito, Yuki; Kato, Junko; Ide, Hiroko; Okada, Kensuke; Takano, Kouji; Kansaku, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Reciprocity plays a key role maintaining cooperation in society. However, little is known about the neural process that underpins human reciprocity during social interactions. Our neuroimaging study manipulated partner identity (computer, human) and strategy (random, tit-for-tat) in repeated prisoner's dilemma games and investigated the neural correlate of reciprocal interaction with humans. Reciprocal cooperation with humans but exploitation of computers by defection was associated with activation in the left amygdala. Amygdala activation was also positively and negatively correlated with a preference change for human partners following tit-for-tat and random strategies, respectively. The correlated activation represented the intensity of positive feeling toward reciprocal and negative feeling toward non-reciprocal partners, and so reflected reciprocity in social interaction. Reciprocity in social interaction, however, might plausibly be misinterpreted and so we also examined the neural coding of insight into the reciprocity of partners. Those with and without insight revealed differential brain activation across the reward-related circuitry (i.e., the right middle dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and dorsal caudate) and theory of mind (ToM) regions [i.e., ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) and precuneus]. Among differential activations, activation in the precuneus, which accompanied deactivation of the VMPFC, was specific to those without insight into human partners who were engaged in a tit-for-tat strategy. This asymmetric (de)activation might involve specific contributions of ToM regions to the human search for reciprocity. Consequently, the intensity of emotion attached to human reciprocity was represented in the amygdala, whereas insight into the reciprocity of others was reflected in activation across the reward-related and ToM regions. This suggests the critical role of mentalizing, which was not equated with reward expectation during social interactions

  6. Mapping correlated membrane pulsations and fluctuations in human cells.

    PubMed

    Pelling, Andrew E; Veraitch, Farlan S; Pui-Kei Chu, Carol; Nicholls, Brian M; Hemsley, Alexandra L; Mason, Chris; Horton, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    The cell membrane and cytoskeleton are dynamic structures that are strongly influenced by the thermo-mechanical background in addition to biologically driven mechanical processes. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure the local membrane motion of human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) which were found to be governed by random and non-random correlated mechanical processes. Interphase cells displayed distinct membrane pulsations in which the membrane was observed to slowly contract upwards followed by a recovery to its initial position. These pulsations occurred one to three times per minute with variable amplitudes (20-100 pN) separated by periods of random baseline fluctuations with amplitudes of <20 pN. Cells were exposed to actin and microtubule (MT) destabilizing drugs and induced into early apoptosis. Mechanical pulsations (20-80 pN) were not prevented by actin or MT depolymerization but were prevented in early apoptotic cells which only displayed small amplitude baseline fluctuations (<20 pN). Correlation analysis revealed that the cell membrane motion is largely random; however several non-random processes, with time constants varying between approximately 2 and 35 s are present. Results were compared to measured cardiomyocyte motion which was well defined and highly correlated. Employing automated positioning of the AFM tip, interphase HFF correlation time constants were also mapped over a 10 microm2 area above the nucleus providing some insights into the spatial variability of membrane correlations. Here, we are able to show that membrane pulsations and fluctuations can be linked to physiological state and cytoskeletal dynamics through distinct sets of correlation time constants in human cells.

  7. High frequency activity correlates of robust movement in humans.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Matthew S D; Kahn, Kevin; Hyun-Joo Park; Thompson, Susan; Hao, Stephanie; Bulacio, Juan; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge A; Gale, John; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2014-01-01

    The neural circuitry underlying fast robust human motor control is not well understood. In this study we record neural activity from multiple stereotactic encephalograph (SEEG) depth electrodes in a human subject while he/she performs a center-out reaching task holding a robotic manipulandum that occasionally introduces an interfering force field. Collecting neural data from humans during motor tasks is rare, and SEEG provides an unusual opportunity to examine neural correlates of movement at a millisecond time scale in multiple brain regions. Time-frequency analysis shows that high frequency activity (50-150 Hz) increases significantly in the left precuneus and left hippocampus when the subject is compensating for a perturbation to their movement. These increases in activity occur with different durations indicating differing roles in the motor control process.

  8. Dynamically correlated mutations drive human Influenza A evolution.

    PubMed

    Tria, F; Pompei, S; Loreto, V

    2013-01-01

    Human Influenza A virus undergoes recurrent changes in the hemagglutinin (HA) surface protein, primarily involved in the human antibody recognition. Relevant antigenic changes, enabling the virus to evade host immune response, have been recognized to occur in parallel to multiple mutations at antigenic sites in HA. Yet, the role of correlated mutations (epistasis) in driving the molecular evolution of the virus still represents a challenging puzzle. Further, though circulation at a global geographic level is key for the survival of Influenza A, its role in shaping the viral phylodynamics remains largely unexplored. Here we show, through a sequence based epidemiological model, that epistatic effects between amino acids substitutions, coupled with a reservoir that mimics worldwide circulating viruses, are key determinants that drive human Influenza A evolution. Our approach explains all the up-to-date observations characterizing the evolution of H3N2 subtype, including phylogenetic properties, nucleotide fixation patterns, and composition of antigenic clusters.

  9. Dynamic BOLD functional connectivity in humans and its electrophysiological correlates.

    PubMed

    Tagliazucchi, Enzo; von Wegner, Frederic; Morzelewski, Astrid; Brodbeck, Verena; Laufs, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    Neural oscillations subserve many human perceptual and cognitive operations. Accordingly, brain functional connectivity is not static in time, but fluctuates dynamically following the synchronization and desynchronization of neural populations. This dynamic functional connectivity has recently been demonstrated in spontaneous fluctuations of the Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent (BOLD) signal, measured with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). We analyzed temporal fluctuations in BOLD connectivity and their electrophysiological correlates, by means of long (≈50 min) joint electroencephalographic (EEG) and fMRI recordings obtained from two populations: 15 awake subjects and 13 subjects undergoing vigilance transitions. We identified positive and negative correlations between EEG spectral power (extracted from electrodes covering different scalp regions) and fMRI BOLD connectivity in a network of 90 cortical and subcortical regions (with millimeter spatial resolution). In particular, increased alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (15-30 Hz) power were related to decreased functional connectivity, whereas gamma (30-60 Hz) power correlated positively with BOLD connectivity between specific brain regions. These patterns were altered for subjects undergoing vigilance changes, with slower oscillations being correlated with functional connectivity increases. Dynamic BOLD functional connectivity was reflected in the fluctuations of graph theoretical indices of network structure, with changes in frontal and central alpha power correlating with average path length. Our results strongly suggest that fluctuations of BOLD functional connectivity have a neurophysiological origin. Positive correlations with gamma can be interpreted as facilitating increased BOLD connectivity needed to integrate brain regions for cognitive performance. Negative correlations with alpha suggest a temporary functional weakening of local and long-range connectivity, associated with an idling state. PMID

  10. Flow distributions and spatial correlations in human brain capillary networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorthois, Sylvie; Peyrounette, Myriam; Larue, Anne; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-11-01

    The vascular system of the human brain cortex is composed of a space filling mesh-like capillary network connected upstream and downstream to branched quasi-fractal arterioles and venules. The distribution of blood flow rates in these networks may affect the efficiency of oxygen transfer processes. Here, we investigate the distribution and correlation properties of blood flow velocities from numerical simulations in large 3D human intra-cortical vascular network (10000 segments) obtained from an anatomical database. In each segment, flow is solved from a 1D non-linear model taking account of the complex rheological properties of blood flow in microcirculation to deduce blood pressure, blood flow and red blood cell volume fraction distributions throughout the network. The network structural complexity is found to impart broad and spatially correlated Lagrangian velocity distributions, leading to power law transit time distributions. The origins of this behavior (existence of velocity correlations in capillary networks, influence of the coupling with the feeding arterioles and draining veins, topological disorder, complex blood rheology) are studied by comparison with results obtained in various model capillary networks of controlled disorder. ERC BrainMicroFlow GA615102, ERC ReactiveFronts GA648377.

  11. Correlation between experimental human and murine skin sensitization induction thresholds.

    PubMed

    Api, Anne Marie; Basketter, David; Lalko, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative risk assessment for skin sensitization is directed towards the determination of levels of exposure to known sensitizing substances that will avoid the induction of contact allergy in humans. A key component of this work is the predictive identification of relative skin sensitizing potency, achieved normally by the measurement of the threshold (the "EC3" value) in the local lymph node assay (LLNA). In an extended series of studies, the accuracy of this murine induction threshold as the predictor of the absence of a sensitizing effect has been verified by conduct of a human repeated insult patch test (HRIPT). Murine and human thresholds for a diverse set of 57 fragrance chemicals spanning approximately four orders of magnitude variation in potency have been compared. The results confirm that there is a useful correlation, with the LLNA EC3 value helping particularly to identify stronger sensitizers. Good correlation (with half an order of magnitude) was seen with three-quarters of the dataset. The analysis also helps to identify potential outlier types of (fragrance) chemistry, exemplified by hexyl and benzyl salicylates (an over-prediction) and trans-2-hexenal (an under-prediction).

  12. Correlation of physical and genetic maps of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    This project aimed to divide chromosome 16 into approximately 50 intervals of {approximately}2Mb in size by constructing a series of mouse/human somatic cell hybrids each containing a rearranged chromosome 16. Using these hybrids, DNA probes would be regionally mapped by Southern blot or PCR analysis. Preference would be given to mapping probes which demonstrated polymorphisms for which the CEPH panel of families had been typed. This would allow a correlation of the physical and linkage maps of this chromosome. The aims have been substantially achieved. 49 somatic cell hybrids have been constructed which have allowed definition of 46, and potentially 57, different physical intervals on the chromosome. 164 loci have been fully mapped into these intervals. A correlation of the physical and genetic maps of the chromosome is in an advanced stage of preparation. The somatic cell hybrids constructed have been widely distributed to groups working on chromosome 16 and other genome projects.

  13. Diaryl- and triaryl-pyrrole derivatives: inhibitors of the MDM2-p53 and MDMX-p53 protein-protein interactions†Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details for compound synthesis, analytical data for all compounds and intermediates. Details for the biological evaluation. Further details for the modeling. Table of combustion analysis data. See DOI: 10.1039/c3md00161jClick here for additional data file.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Tim J; Ahmed, Shafiq; Coxon, Christopher R; Liu, Junfeng; Lu, Xiaohong; Golding, Bernard T; Griffin, Roger J; Hutton, Claire; Newell, David R; Ojo, Stephen; Watson, Anna F; Zaytzev, Andrey; Zhao, Yan; Lunec, John; Hardcastle, Ian R

    2013-09-21

    Screening identified 2-(3-((4,6-dioxo-2-thioxotetrahydropyrimidin-5(2H)-ylidene)methyl)-2,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[b]thiophene-3-carbonitrile as an MDM2-p53 inhibitor (IC50 = 12.3 μM). MDM2-p53 and MDMX-p53 activity was seen for 5-((1-(4-chlorophenyl)-2,5-diphenyl-1H-pyrrol-3-yl)methylene)-2-thioxodihydropyrimidine-4,6(1H,5H)-dione (MDM2 IC50 = 0.11 μM; MDMX IC50 = 4.2 μM) and 5-((1-(4-nitrophenyl)-2,5-diphenyl-1H-pyrrol-3-yl)methylene)pyrimidine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (MDM2 IC50 = 0.15 μM; MDMX IC50 = 4.2 μM), and cellular activity consistent with p53 activation in MDM2 amplified cells. Further SAR studies demonstrated the requirement for the triarylpyrrole moiety for MDMX-p53 activity but not for MDM2-p53 inhibition.

  14. Noncontact diffuse correlation tomography of human breast tumor

    PubMed Central

    He, Lian; Lin, Yu; Huang, Chong; Irwin, Daniel; Szabunio, Margaret M.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Our first step to adapt our recently developed noncontact diffuse correlation tomography (ncDCT) system for three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of blood flow distribution in human breast tumors is reported. A commercial 3-D camera was used to obtain breast surface geometry, which was then converted to a solid volume mesh. An ncDCT probe scanned over a region of interest on the mesh surface and the measured boundary data were combined with a finite element framework for 3-D image reconstruction of blood flow distribution. This technique was tested in computer simulations and in vivo human breasts with low-grade carcinoma. Results from computer simulations suggest that relatively high accuracy can be achieved when the entire tumor is within the sensitive region of diffuse light. Image reconstruction with a priori knowledge of the tumor volume and location can significantly improve the accuracy in recovery of tumor blood flow contrasts. In vivo imaging results from two breast carcinomas show higher average blood flow contrasts (5.9- and 10.9-fold) in the tumor regions compared to the surrounding tissues, which are comparable with previous findings using diffuse correlation spectroscopy. The ncDCT system has the potential to image blood flow distributions in soft and vulnerable tissues without distorting tissue hemodynamics. PMID:26259706

  15. Human erythrocytes analyzed by generalized 2D Raman correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesełucha-Birczyńska, Aleksandra; Kozicki, Mateusz; Czepiel, Jacek; Łabanowska, Maria; Nowak, Piotr; Kowalczyk, Grzegorz; Kurdziel, Magdalena; Birczyńska, Malwina; Biesiada, Grażyna; Mach, Tomasz; Garlicki, Aleksander

    2014-07-01

    The most numerous elements of the blood cells, erythrocytes, consist mainly of two components: homogeneous interior filled with hemoglobin and closure which is the cell membrane. To gain insight into their specific properties we studied the process of disintegration, considering these two constituents, and comparing the natural aging process of human healthy blood cells. MicroRaman spectra of hemoglobin within the single RBC were recorded using 514.5, and 785 nm laser lines. The generalized 2D correlation method was applied to analyze the collected spectra. The time passed from blood donation was regarded as an external perturbation. The time was no more than 40 days according to the current storage limit of blood banks, although, the average RBC life span is 120 days. An analysis of the prominent synchronous and asynchronous cross peaks allow us to get insight into the mechanism of hemoglobin decomposition. Appearing asynchronous cross-peaks point towards globin and heme separation from each other, while synchronous shows already broken globin into individual amino acids. Raman scattering analysis of hemoglobin “wrapping”, i.e. healthy erythrocyte ghosts, allows for the following peculiarity of their behavior. The increasing power of the excitation laser induced alterations in the assemblage of membrane lipids. 2D correlation maps, obtained with increasing laser power recognized as an external perturbation, allows for the consideration of alterations in the erythrocyte membrane structure and composition, which occurs first in the proteins. Cross-peaks were observed indicating an asynchronous correlation between the senescent-cell antigen (SCA) and heme or proteins vibrations. The EPR spectra of the whole blood was analyzed regarding time as an external stimulus. The 2D correlation spectra points towards participation of the selected metal ion centers in the disintegration process.

  16. Projecting Human Development and CO2 emissions employing correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybski, D.; Costa, L.; Kropp, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    We find positive and time dependent correlation between the Human Development Index (HDI) and per capita CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion. Based on this empirical relation, extrapolated HDI, and three population scenarios extracted from the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment report, we estimate future cumulative CO2 emissions. If current demographic and development trends are maintained, we estimate that by 2050 around 85% of the world's population will live in countries with high HDI (above 0.8) as defined in the United Nations Human Development Report 2009. In particular, we estimate that at least 300Gt of cumulative CO2 emissions between 2000 and 2050 are necessary for the development of developing countries in the year 2000. This value represents 30% of a previously calculated CO2 budget yielding a 75% probability of limiting global warming to 2°C. Since human development has been proved to be time and country dependent, we plead for future climate negotiations to consider a differentiated CO2 emissions reduction scheme for developing countries based on the achievement of concrete development goals.

  17. Correlation between Gene Expression and Osteoarthritis Progression in Human

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, Xiaobin; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease characterized by gradual degradation of joint cartilage. This study aimed to quantify major pathogenetic factors during OA progression in human cartilage. Cartilage specimens were isolated from OA patients and scored 0–5 according to the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) guidelines. Protein and gene expressions were measured by immunohistochemistry and qPCR, respectively. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays were used to detect apoptotic cells. Cartilage degeneration in OA is a gradual progress accompanied with gradual loss of collagen type II and a gradual decrease in mRNA expression of SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1. Expression of WNT antagonists DKK1 and FRZB was lost, while hypertrophic markers (RUNX2, COL10A1 and IHH) increased during OA progression. Moreover, DKK1 and FRZB negatively correlated with OA grading, while RUNX2 and IHH showed a significantly positive correlation with OA grading. The number of apoptotic cells was increased with the severity of OA. Taken together, our results suggested that genetic profiling of the gene expression could be used as markers for staging OA at the molecular level. This helps to understand the molecular pathology of OA and may lead to the development of therapies based on OA stage. PMID:27428952

  18. Regionally Specific Human GABA Concentration Correlates with Tactile Discrimination Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Puts, Nicolaas A. J.; Edden, Richard A. E.; Evans, C. John; McGlone, Francis; McGonigle, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying variability in human sensory perception remain incompletely understood. In particular, few studies have attempted to investigate the relationship between in vivo measurements of neurochemistry and individuals’ behavioral performance. Our previous work found a relationship between GABA concentration in the visual cortex and orientation discrimination thresholds (Edden et al., 2009). In the present study, we used magnetic resonance spectroscopy of GABA and psychophysical testing of vibrotactile frequency thresholds to investigate whether individual differences in tactile frequency discrimination performance are correlated with GABA concentration in sensorimotor cortex. Behaviorally, individuals showed a wide range of discrimination thresholds ranging from 3 to 7.6 Hz around the 25 Hz standard. These frequency discrimination thresholds were significantly correlated with GABA concentration (r = −0.58; p < 0.05) in individuals’ sensorimotor cortex, but not with GABA concentration in an occipital control region (r = −0.04). These results demonstrate a link between GABA concentration and frequency discrimination in vivo, and support the hypothesis that GABAergic mechanisms have an important role to play in sensory discrimination. PMID:22090482

  19. Correlation between infectivity and physical virus particles in human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Benyesh-Melnick, M; Probstmeyer, F; McCombs, R; Brunschwig, J P; Vonka, V

    1966-11-01

    Benyesh-Melnick, Matilda (Baylor University College of Medicine, Houston, Tex.), Fern Probstmeyer, Robert McCombs, Jean P. Brunschwig, and Vladimir Vonka. Correlation between infectivity and physical virus particles in human cyto-megalovirus. J. Bacteriol. 92:1555-1561. 1966.-Infectivity titers [measured as plaque-forming units (PFU)] and particle counts by the sedimentation pseudo-replication technique were determined for crude, unpurified, intracellular preparations of two different strains of human cytomegalovirus. Unlike the high particle-infectivity ratio of 10(6) to 10(8) previously reported for these viruses, the number of total particles per PFU ranged from 160 to 490 with strain AD-169 and from 176 to 1,050 for strain C-87. Interpretation of particle-PFU ratios of intracellular cytomegalovirus in terms of particle morphology is not conclusive at this time. The number of enveloped forms found varied between 0 and 34% of the total particles counted. However, the true proportion is probably greater, because envelopes were found to be destroyed by the enzyme treatment used in preparing the specimens for examination in the electron microscope. The number of full particles found ranged between 4 and 31% of the total particles counted. The particle per PFU ratio of extracellular virus was found to be three- to fivefold lower than that of intracellular virus.

  20. Correlations between isochores and chromosomal bands in the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Saccone, S.; Della Valle, G. ); De Sario, A.; Bernardi, G. ); Wiegant, J.; Raap, A.K. )

    1993-11-15

    The human genome is made up of long DNA segments, the isochores, which are compositionally homogeneous and can be subdivided into a small number of families characterized by different G+C levels. Chromosome in situ suppression hybridization (in which excess unlabeled human DNA is added to suppress hybridization of repeated sequences present in the probe, enabling enhanced observation of single-copy sequences) of DNA fractions characterized by an increasing G+C level was carried out to determine the distribution of [open quotes]single-copy[close quotes] sequences corresponding to isochore families L1 + L2, H1, H2, and H3 on metaphase chromosomes. This produced a banding pattern progressing from a relatively diffuse staining to an R-banding, to a T-banding. More specifically, the results showed that (i) T-bands are formed by the G+C-richest isochores of the H3 family and by part of the G+C-rich isochores of the H1 and H2 families (with a predominance of the latter); (ii) R[prime]-bands (namely, R-bands exclusive of T-bands) are formed to almost equal extents by G+C-rich isochores of the H1 families (with a minor contribution of the H2 and H3 families) and by G+C-poor isochores of the L1 + L2 families; (iii) G-bands essentially consist of G+C-poor isochores from the L1 + L2 families, with a minor contribution of isochores from the H1 family. These results not only clarify the correlations between DNA base composition and chromosomal bands but also provide information on the distribution of genes in chromosomes, gene concentration increasing with the G+C levels of isochores.

  1. Theaflavin-3, 3′-digallate induces apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest through the Akt/MDM2/p53 pathway in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer A2780/CP70 cells

    PubMed Central

    TU, YOUYING; KIM, EUNHYE; GAO, YING; RANKIN, GARY O.; LI, BO; CHEN, YI CHARLIE

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological cancer among women worldwide. Adverse side effects and acquired resistance to conventional platinum based chemotherapy are major impediments in ovarian cancer treatment, and drive the development of more selective anticancer drugs that target cancer-specific defects. In this study, theaflavin-3, 3′-digallate (TF3), the major theaflavin monomer in black tea, exhibited a potent growth inhibitory effect on the cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer A2780/CP70 cells (IC50, 23.81 μM), and was less cytotoxic to a normal ovarian IOSE-364 cells (IC50, 59.58 μM) than to the cancer cells. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that TF3 induced preferential apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest in A2780/CP70 cells with respect to IOSE-364 cells. TF3 induced apoptosis through both the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways, and caused G2 cell cycle arrest via cyclin B1 in A2780/CP70 cells. The p53 protein played an important role in TF3-induced apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest. TF3 might upregulate the p53 expression via the Akt/MDM2 pathway. Our findings help elucidate the mechanisms by which TF3 may contribute to the prevention and treatment of platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:27082635

  2. Combination treatment in vitro with Nutlin, a small-molecule antagonist of MDM2, and pegylated interferon-α 2a specifically targets JAK2V617F-positive polycythemia vera cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min; Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Yan; Tripodi, Joseph; Mosoyan, Goar; Mascarenhas, John; Kremyanskaya, Marina; Najfeld, Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Interferon (IFN-α) is effective therapy for polycythemia vera (PV) patients, but it is frequently interrupted because of adverse events. To permit the long-term use of IFN, we propose combining low doses of IFN with Nutlin-3, an antagonist of MDM2, which is also capable of promoting PV CD34+ cell apoptosis. Combination treatment with subtherapeutic doses of Peg IFN-α 2a and Nutlin-3 inhibited PV CD34+ cell proliferation by 50% while inhibiting normal CD34+ cells by 30%. Combination treatment with Nutlin-3 and Peg IFN-α 2a inhibited PV colony formation by 55%-90% while inhibiting normal colony formation by 22%-30%. The combination of these agents also decreased the proportion of JAK2V617F-positive hematopoietic progenitor cells in 6 PV patients studied. Treatment with low doses of Peg IFN-α 2a combined with Nutlin-3 increased phospho-p53 and p21 protein levels in PV CD34+ cells and increased the degree of apoptosis. These 2 reagents affect the tumor suppressor p53 through different pathways with Peg IFN-α 2a activating p38 MAP kinase and STAT1, leading to increased p53 transcription, whereas Nutlin-3 prevents the degradation of p53. These data suggest that treatment with low doses of both Nutlin-3 combined with Peg IFN-α 2a can target PV hematopoietic progenitor cells, eliminating the numbers of malignant hematopoietic progenitor cells. PMID:22872685

  3. Correlates of spreading depolarization in human scalp electroencephalography

    PubMed Central

    Drenckhahn, Christoph; Winkler, Maren K. L.; Major, Sebastian; Scheel, Michael; Kang, Eun-Jeung; Pinczolits, Alexandra; Grozea, Cristian; Hartings, Jed A.; Woitzik, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    showed clusters of spreading depolarizations with persistent depression of spontaneous activity. Alternating current electroencephalography similarly displayed persistent depression of spontaneous activity, and direct current electroencephalography slow potential changes riding on a shallow negative ultraslow potential. Isolated spreading depolarizations with depression of both spontaneous electrocorticographic and electroencephalographic activity displayed significantly longer intervals between successive spreading depolarizations than isolated depolarizations with only depression of electrocorticographic activity [44.0 (28.0, 132.0) min, n = 96, versus 30.0 (26.5, 51.5) min, n = 109, P = 0.001]. This suggests fusion of electroencephalographic depression periods at high depolarization frequency. No propagation of electroencephalographic depression was seen between scalp electrodes. Durations/magnitudes of isolated electroencephalographic and corresponding electrocorticographic depression periods correlated significantly. Fewer spreading depolarizations were recorded in patients with malignant hemispheric stroke but characteristics were similar to those after subarachnoid haemorrhage. In conclusion, spreading depolarizations and depressions of spontaneous activity display correlates in time-compressed human scalp direct and alternating current electroencephalography that may serve for their non-invasive detection. PMID:22366798

  4. Stress response of glioblastoma cells mediated by miR-17-5p targeting PTEN and the passenger strand miR-17-3p targeting MDM2.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoran; Yang, Burton B

    2012-12-01

    Tumor development not only destroys the homeostasis of local tissues but also the whole body, and thus the tumor cells have to face the body's defense system, a shortage of nutrition and oxygen, and chemotherapeutic drug treatment. In response to these stresses, tumor cells often alter gene expression and microRNA levels to facilitate survival. We have demonstrated that glioblastoma cells deprived of nutrition or treated with chemotherapeutics drugs expressed increased levels of miR-17. Ectopic transfection of miR-17 prolonged glioblastoma cell survival when the cells were deprived with nutrition or treated with chemotherapeutic drugs. Expression of miR-17 also promoted cell motility, invasion, and tube-like structure formation. We found that these phenotypes were the results of miR-17 targeting PTEN. As a consequence, HIF1α and VEGF were up-regulated. Ectopic expression of miR-17 was found to facilitate enrichment of stem-like tumor cells, since the cells became drug-resistant, showed increased capacity to form colonies and neurospheres, and expressed higher levels of CD133, a phenotype similar to ectopic expression of HIF1α. To further confirm the phenotypic property of stem cells, we demonstrated that glioblastoma cells transfected with miR-17 proliferated slower in different nutritional conditions by facilitating more cells staying in the G1 phase than the control cells. Finally, we demonstrated that miR-17 could repress MDM2 levels, resulting in decreased cell proliferation and drug-resistance. Our results added a new layer of functional mechanism for the well-studied miRNA miR-17.

  5. Analysis of Genotype-Phenotype Correlations in Human Holoprosencephaly

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Benjamin D.; Mercier, Sandra; Vélez, Jorge I.; Pineda-Alvarez, Daniel E.; Wyllie, Adrian; Zhou, Nan; Dubourg, Christèle; David, Veronique; Odent, Sylvie; Roessler, Erich; Muenke, Maximilian

    2009-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first gene causing holoprosencephaly (HPE), over 500 patients with mutations in genes associated with non-chromosomal, non-syndromic HPE have been described, with detailed descriptions available in over 300. Comprehensive clinical analysis of these individuals allows examination for the presence of genotype-phenotype correlations. These correlations allow a degree of differentiation between patients with mutations in different HPE-associated genes and for the application of functional studies to determine intragenic correlations. These early correlations are an important advance in the understanding of the clinical aspects of this disease, and in general argue for continued analysis of the genetic and clinical findings of large cohorts of patients with rare diseases in order to better inform both basic biological insight and care and counseling for affected patients and families. PMID:20104608

  6. Electrophysiological Correlates of Morphological Neuroplasticity in Human Callosal Dysgenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lazarev, Vladimir V.; de Carvalho Monteiro, Myriam; Vianna-Barbosa, Rodrigo; deAzevedo, Leonardo C.; Lent, Roberto; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    In search for the functional counterpart of the alternative Probst and sigmoid bundles, considered as morphological evidence of neuroplasticity in callosal dysgenesis, electroencephalographic (EEG) coherence analysis was combined with high resolution and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. Data of two patients with callosal agenesis, plus two with typical partial dysgenesis with a remnant genu, and one atypical patient with a substantially reduced genu were compared to those of fifteen neurotypic controls. The interhemispheric EEG coherence between homologous nontemporal brain regions corresponded to absence or partial presence of callosal connections. A generalized coherence reduction was observed in complete acallosal patients, as well as coherence preservation in the anterior areas of the two patients with a remnant genu. jThe sigmoid bundles found in three patients with partial dysgenesis correlated with augmented EEG coherence between anterior regions of one hemisphere and posterior regions of the other. These heterologous (crossed) interhemispheric connections were asymmetric in both imaging and EEG patterns, with predominance of the right-anterior-to-left-posterior connections over the mirror ones. The Probst bundles correlated with higher intrahemispheric long-distance coherence in all patients. The significant correlations observed for the delta, theta and alpha bands indicate that these alternative pathways are functional, although the neuropsychological nature of this function is still unknown. PMID:27055255

  7. Correlating human color similarity judgments and colorimetric representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertan, Constantin C.; Ciuc, Mihai; Stoica, A.; Zamfir, Marta; Buzuloiu, Vasile V.; Fernandez-Maloigne, Christine

    2003-10-01

    A color similarity test was conducted on the 24 color patches of a Gretag Macbeth color checker. Color similarities were measured either by distances between standard colorimetric representations (such as RGB, Lab or spectral reflectance curves) or by human observer judgments. In each case, the dissimilarity matrix was processed by a classical, metric, multidimensional scaling algorithm, in order to produce a visually-interpretable two-dimensional plot of color dissimilarity. The analysis of the plots produces some interesting conclusions. First, the plots produced by the Lab, RGB and spectral representations exhibit very evident variation axes according to the luminance and basic chromatic differences (red-green, blue-yellow). This behavior (trivial for the Lab representation) suggests that the color similarity measurement by chromatic differences is implicitly embedded in the RGB and spectral representations. The color dissimilarity plots associated to the human judgments (for any individual, as well as for an "average" observer) exhibit a different organization, which mixes hue, saturation and luminance (HSV). According to these plots, the human similarity judgment is not entirely HSV-based. We prove that it is possible to obtain the same color dissimilarity plots if a fuzzy color model is assumed. The fuzzy color model provides similarity coefficients (similarity degrees) between pairs of colors, based on their inter-distance, according to an imposed "color confusion" control parameter, which seems to be relevant for the human vision.

  8. [Progress in Association between Genetic Correlation and Human Violent Behavior].

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Li, Lei; Xu, Hong-mei; Zhao, Zi-qin; Liu, Wen-bin; Zhou, Huai-gu

    2015-10-01

    Human violent behavior is a complex behavior which is influenced by genetic and environmental factors. There is a trend in investigating the mechanism of violent behavior by using the genetic methods. This article reviews several candidate genes and advances in epigenetics which are associated with violent behavior. The prospects and significance of violent behavior research from the view of gene polymorphism and epigenetics are also discussed. PMID:26821483

  9. Neural Correlates of the Cortisol Awakening Response in Humans.

    PubMed

    Boehringer, Andreas; Tost, Heike; Haddad, Leila; Lederbogen, Florian; Wüst, Stefan; Schwarz, Emanuel; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    The cortisol rise after awakening (cortisol awakening response, CAR) is a core biomarker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation related to psychosocial stress and stress-related psychiatric disorders. However, the neural regulation of the CAR has not been examined in humans. Here, we studied neural regulation related to the CAR in a sample of 25 healthy human participants using an established psychosocial stress paradigm together with multimodal functional and structural (voxel-based morphometry) magnetic resonance imaging. Across subjects, a smaller CAR was associated with reduced grey matter volume and increased stress-related brain activity in the perigenual ACC, a region which inhibits HPA axis activity during stress that is implicated in risk mechanisms and pathophysiology of stress-related mental diseases. Moreover, functional connectivity between the perigenual ACC and the hypothalamus, the primary controller of HPA axis activity, was associated with the CAR. Our findings provide support for a role of the perigenual ACC in regulating the CAR in humans and may aid future research on the pathophysiology of stress-related illnesses, such as depression, and environmental risk for illnesses such as schizophrenia. PMID:25781268

  10. An anthraquinone derivative from Luffa acutangula induces apoptosis in human lung cancer cell line NCI-H460 through p53-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Vanajothi, Ramar; Srinivasan, Pappu

    2016-01-01

    The current study was designed to evaluate the in vitro antiproliferative activity of 1,8-dihydroxy-4-methylanthracene-9,10-dione (DHMA) isolated from the Luffa acutangula against human non-small cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-H460). Induction of apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was determined through fluorescence microscopic technique. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting analysis was carried out to detect the expression of pro-apoptotic (p53, p21, caspase-3, Bax, GADD45A, and ATM) and anti-apoptotic (NF-κB) proteins in NCI-H460 cell line. In silico studies also performed to predict the binding mechanism of DHMA with MDM2-p53 protein. The DHMA inhibited the cell viability of NCI-H460 cells in a dose-dependent manner with an IC(50) of about 50 µg/ml. It significantly reduced cell viability correlated with induction of apoptosis, which was associated with ROS generation. The apoptotic cell death was further confirmed through dual staining and DNA fragmentation assay. DHMA significantly increased the expression of anti-apoptotic protein such as p53, p21, Bax, and caspase-3 but downregulated the expression of NF-κB in NCI-H460 cell line. In silico studies demonstrate that DHMA formed hydrogen bond interaction with key residues Trp26, Phe55 and Lys24 by which it disrupt the binding of p53 with MDM2 receptor. These findings suggested that DHMA induces apoptosis in NCI-H460 via a p53-dependent pathway. This the first study on cytotoxic and apoptosis inducing activity of DHMA from L. acutangula against NCI-H460 cell line. Therefore, DHMA has therapeutic potential for lung cancer treatment.

  11. Human Peripheral Lung Tumours: Light and Electron Microscopic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Mollo, Franco; Canese, Maria G.; Campobasso, Onofrio

    1973-01-01

    Thirteen human peripheral lung tumours have been studied in both light and electron microscopy. They were classified as epidermoid carcinoma, mucus-secreting cell adenocarcinoma, and alveolar cell adenocarcinoma, the latter made up of granular pneumocytes. Alveolar cell cancer, as defined by ultrastructural features, could assume different gross histological patterns in light microscopy, and therefore electron microscopy is required for its identification. Since neither squamous nor mucous metaplasia was observed in any alveolar cell tumour, it is tentatively suggested that all peripheral lung tumours which lack these features may be derived from granular pneumocytes, irrespective of whether they appear to be adenocarcinomata or large cell carcinomata when examined by light microscopy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14 PMID:4348471

  12. Physiological correlates and emotional specificity of human piloerection

    PubMed Central

    Benedek, Mathias; Kaernbach, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Piloerection is known as an indicator of strong emotional experiences. However, little is known about the physiological and emotional specificity of this psychophysiological response. In the presented study, piloerection was elicited by audio stimuli taken from music and film episodes. The physiological response accompanying the incidence of piloerection was recorded with respect to electrodermal, cardiovascular and respiratory measures and compared to a matched control condition. The employment of an optical recording system allowed for a direct and objective assessment of visible piloerection. The occurrence of piloerection was primarily accompanied by an increase of phasic electrodermal activity and increased respiration depth as compared to a matched control condition. This physiological response pattern is discussed in the context of dominant theories of human piloerection. Consideration of all available evidence suggests that emotional piloerection represents a valuable indicator of the state of being moved or touched. PMID:21276827

  13. Human Hemorrhagic Pulmonary Leptospirosis: Pathological Findings and Pathophysiological Correlations

    PubMed Central

    De Brito, Thales; Aiello, Vera Demarchi; da Silva, Luis Fernando Ferraz; Gonçalves da Silva, Ana Maria; Ferreira da Silva, Wellington Luiz; Castelli, Jussara Bianchi; Seguro, Antonio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is a re-emerging zoonosis with protean clinical manifestations. Recently, the importance of pulmonary hemorrhage as a lethal complication of this disease has been recognized. In the present study, five human necropsies of leptospirosis (Weil‘s syndrome) with extensive pulmonary manifestations were analysed, and the antibodies expressed in blood vessels and cells involved in ion and water transport were used, seeking to better understand the pathophysiology of the lung injury associated with this disease. Principal Findings Prominent vascular damage was present in the lung microcirculation, with decreased CD34 and preserved aquaporin 1 expression. At the periphery and even inside the extensive areas of edema and intraalveolar hemorrhage, enlarged, apparently hypertrophic type I pneumocytes (PI) were detected and interpreted as a non-specific attempt of clearence of the intraalveolar fluid, in which ionic transport, particularly of sodium, plays a predominant role, as suggested by the apparently increased ENaC and aquaporin 5 expression. Connexin 43 was present in most pneumocytes, and in the cytoplasm of the more preserved endothelial cells. The number of type II pneumocytes (PII) was slightly decreased when compared to normal lungs and those of patients with septicemia from other causes, a fact that may contribute to the progressively low PI count, resulting in deficient restoration after damage to the alveolar epithelial integrity and, consequently, a poor outcome of the pulmonary edema and hemorrhage. Conclusions Pathogenesis of lung injury in human leptospirosis was discussed, and the possibility of primary non-inflammatory vascular damage was considered, so far of undefinite etiopathogenesis, as the initial pathological manifestation of the disease. PMID:23951234

  14. False memory susceptibility is correlated with categorisation ability in humans.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Kathryn; Chittka, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Our memory is often surprisingly inaccurate, with errors ranging from misremembering minor details of events to generating illusory memories of entire episodes. The pervasiveness of such false memories generates a puzzle: in the face of selection pressure for accuracy of memory, how could such systematic failures have persisted over evolutionary time? It is possible that memory errors are an inevitable by-product of our adaptive memories and that semantic false memories are specifically connected to our ability to learn rules and concepts and to classify objects by category memberships. Here we test this possibility using a standard experimental false memory paradigm and inter-individual variation in verbal categorisation ability. Indeed it turns out that the error scores are significantly negatively correlated, with those individuals scoring fewer errors on the categorisation test being more susceptible to false memory intrusions in a free recall test. A similar trend, though not significant, was observed between individual categorisation ability and false memory susceptibility in a word recognition task. Our results therefore indicate that false memories, to some extent, might be a by-product of our ability to learn rules, categories and concepts. PMID:25254105

  15. Correlation of human sperm centrosomal proteins with fertility

    PubMed Central

    Hinduja, Indira; Baliga, Nishitha B; Zaveri, Kusum

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The centrosome is the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) paternally inherited by the zygote during fertilization. As the centrosome is located in the midpiece of the sperm tail, we presume that oligoasthenozoospermic sperm samples should also have abnormal concentrations of centrosomal proteins. This study therefore aims to determine if there is any correlation between sperm centrosomal proteins, centrin, α and γ-tubulin, in sperm samples from normozoospermic and oligoasthenozoospermic men. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Proteins were extracted from the normozoospermic and oligoasthenozoospermic sperm samples and analyzed by Western Blot and ELISA for centrin, α and γ-tubulin. RESULTS: The levels of centrin, α and γ-tubulin are markedly lower in oligoasthenozoospermic sperm samples as compared to the normozoospermic sperm samples. CONCLUSIONS: Lower centrosomal protein expression in sperm samples of oligoasthenozoospermic infertile males may be a possible cause for their reduced fertility status. Further studies on these proteins are warranted to design rational approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of male infertility. PMID:21209754

  16. Subcortical correlates of auditory perceptual organization in humans.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Shimpei; Otsuka, Sho; Furukawa, Shigeto; Kashino, Makio

    2016-09-01

    To make sense of complex auditory scenes, the auditory system sequentially organizes auditory components into perceptual objects or streams. In the conventional view of this process, the cortex plays a major role in perceptual organization, and subcortical mechanisms merely provide the cortex with acoustical features. Here, we show that the neural activities of the brainstem are linked to perceptual organization, which alternates spontaneously for human listeners without any stimulus change. The stimulus used in the experiment was an unchanging sequence of repeated triplet tones, which can be interpreted as either one or two streams. Listeners were instructed to report the perceptual states whenever they experienced perceptual switching between one and two streams throughout the stimulus presentation. Simultaneously, we recorded event related potentials with scalp electrodes. We measured the frequency-following response (FFR), which is considered to originate from the brainstem. We also assessed thalamo-cortical activity through the middle-latency response (MLR). The results demonstrate that the FFR and MLR varied with the state of auditory stream perception. In addition, we found that the MLR change precedes the FFR change with perceptual switching from a one-stream to a two-stream percept. This suggests that there are top-down influences on brainstem activity from the thalamo-cortical pathway. These findings are consistent with the idea of a distributed, hierarchical neural network for perceptual organization and suggest that the network extends to the brainstem level. PMID:27371867

  17. MHC-correlated mate choice in humans: a review.

    PubMed

    Havlicek, Jan; Roberts, S Craig

    2009-05-01

    Extremely high variability in genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in vertebrates is assumed to be a consequence of frequency-dependent parasite-driven selection and mate preferences based on promotion of offspring heterozygosity at MHC, or potentially, genome-wide inbreeding avoidance. Where effects have been found, mate choice studies on rodents and other species usually find preference for MHC-dissimilarity in potential partners. Here we critically review studies on MHC-associated mate choice in humans. These are based on three broadly different aspects: (1) odor preferences, (2) facial preferences and (3) actual mate choice surveys. As in animal studies, most odor-based studies demonstrate disassortative preferences, although there is variation in the strength and nature of the effects. In contrast, facial attractiveness research indicates a preference for MHC-similar individuals. Results concerning MHC in actual couples show a bias towards similarity in one study, dissimilarity in two studies and random distribution in several other studies. These vary greatly in sample size and heterogeneity of the sample population, both of which may significantly bias the results. This pattern of mixed results across studies may reflect context-dependent and/or life history sensitive preference expression, in addition to higher level effects arising out of population differences in genetic heterogeneity or cultural and ethnic restrictions on random mating patterns. Factors of special relevance in terms of individual preferences are reproductive status and long- vs. short-term mating context. We discuss the idea that olfactory and visual channels may work in a complementary way (i.e. odor preference for MHC-dissimilarity and visual preference for MHC-similarity) to achieve an optimal level of genetic variability, methodological issues and interesting avenues for further research.

  18. Expression of the alpha subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin is specifically correlated with tumorigenic expression in human cell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Stanbridge, E J; Rosen, S W; Sussman, H H

    1982-01-01

    The expression of HeLa parent phenotype protein markers, the alpha subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin and placental alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes, has been evaluated in paired tumorigenic and nontumorigenic HeLa-fibroblast human cell hybrids. Both of these proteins have been used clinically as markers of malignancy. The results showed that both are expressed in the hybrids. Expression of the gonadotropin subunit in the hybrids is specifically correlated with tumorigenicity; the placental alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme showed no such correlation and was expressed in both tumorigenic and nontumorigenic hybrids. PMID:6959112

  19. The Human ARF Cell Cycle Regulatory Gene Promoter Is a CpG Island Which Can Be Silenced by DNA Methylation and Down-Regulated by Wild-Type p53

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Keith D.; Jones, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    The INK4a/ARF locus encodes two proteins involved in tumor suppression in a manner virtually unique in mammalian cells. Distinct first exons, driven from separate promoters, splice onto a common exon 2 and 3 but utilize different reading frames to produce two completely distinct proteins, both of which play roles in cell cycle control. INK4a, a critical element of the retinoblastoma gene pathway, binds to and inhibits the activities of CDK4 and CDK6, while ARF, a critical element of the p53 pathway, increases the level of functional p53 via interaction with MDM2. Here we clone and characterize the promoter of the human ARF gene and show that it is a CpG island characteristic of a housekeeping gene which contains numerous Sp1 sites. Both ARF and INK4a are coordinately expressed in cells except when their promoter regions become de novo methylated. In one of these situations, ARF transcription could be reactivated by treatment with the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, and the reactivation kinetics of ARF and INK4a were found to differ slightly in a cell line in which both genes were silenced by methylation. The ARF promoter was also found to be highly responsive to E2F1 expression, in keeping with previous results at the RNA level. Lastly, transcription from the ARF promoter was down-regulated by wild-type p53 expression, and the magnitude of the effect correlated with the status of the endogenous p53 gene. This finding points to the existence of an autoregulatory feedback loop between p53, MDM2, and ARF, aimed at keeping p53 levels in check. PMID:9774662

  20. Connectedness to Nature and to Humanity: their association and personality correlates

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kibeom; Ashton, Michael C.; Choi, Julie; Zachariassen, Kayla

    2015-01-01

    People differ in the extent to which they identify with humans beyond their ingroup and with non-human living things. We refer to the former as the Connectedness to Humanity (CH) and to the latter as the Connectedness to Nature (CN). In a sample of 324 undergraduate students, CH and CN were operationalized using the Identification with All Humanity Scale (McFarland et al., 2012) and the CN Scale (Mayer and Frantz, 2004), respectively. These variables correlated moderately with each other (r = 0.44) and shared Openness to Experience and Honesty–Humility as their primary personality correlates. CN was found to play an important role in mediating the relationships between the two personality variables and some specific pro-environmental/pro-animal attitudes and ecological behaviors. PMID:26257669

  1. HUMAN AND ECOLOGICAL RISK: CORRELATIONS AMONG HUMAN HEALTH, ECOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    While all life is affected by the quality of the environment, environmental risk factors for human and wildlife health are typically assessed using independent processes that are dissimilar in scale and scope. However, the integrated analysis of human, ecological, and environmen...

  2. HUMAN AND ECOLOIGCAL RISK: CORRELATIONS AMONG HUMAN HEALTH, ECOLOGICAL AND ENVIORNMENTAL MONITORING DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    While all life is affected by the quality of the environment, environmental risk factors for human and wildlife health are typically assessed using independent processes that are dissimilar in scale and scope. However, the integrated analysis of human, ecological, and environmen...

  3. Attitudes to animal euthanasia do not correlate with acceptance of human euthanasia or suicide.

    PubMed

    Ogden, U; Kinnison, T; May, S A

    2012-08-18

    Several reasons have been suggested for the elevated risk of suicide experienced by those in the veterinary profession. The current study aimed to investigate possible links between veterinarians' attitudes to 'convenience' or non-justified animal euthanasia and attitudes towards human euthanasia and suicide. Veterinary students and graduates had a negative attitude towards convenience animal euthanasia, but their attitudes changed over time (pre-clinical studies, clinical studies and recently graduated). A greater tolerance to euthanasia was displayed in the later years of study and post qualification - primarily by males. Attitudes towards both human euthanasia and suicide, however, remained stable over time and indicated on average a neutral stance. No correlations were found between attitudes to convenience euthanasia and either human euthanasia or suicide, suggesting a tolerance to convenience euthanasia of animals does not lead to desensitisation in valuing human life and a changed attitude to human euthanasia or suicide, or vice versa. Attitudes to human euthanasia and suicide were predictably correlated, perhaps suggesting an overarching attitude towards control over human death. The results of the current study throw into question the argument that it is the changes in attitudes to animal life that affect veterinarian's attitudes to human life and contribute to the high suicide rate. PMID:22791520

  4. The Human Factor: Behavioral and Neural Correlates of Humanized Perception in Moral Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Majdandžić, Jasminka; Bauer, Herbert; Windischberger, Christian; Moser, Ewald; Engl, Elisabeth; Lamm, Claus

    2012-01-01

    The extent to which people regard others as full-blown individuals with mental states (“humanization”) seems crucial for their prosocial motivation towards them. Previous research has shown that decisions about moral dilemmas in which one person can be sacrificed to save multiple others do not consistently follow utilitarian principles. We hypothesized that this behavior can be explained by the potential victim’s perceived humanness and an ensuing increase in vicarious emotions and emotional conflict during decision making. Using fMRI, we assessed neural activity underlying moral decisions that affected fictitious persons that had or had not been experimentally humanized. In implicit priming trials, participants either engaged in mentalizing about these persons (Humanized condition) or not (Neutral condition). In subsequent moral dilemmas, participants had to decide about sacrificing these persons’ lives in order to save the lives of numerous others. Humanized persons were sacrificed less often, and the activation pattern during decisions about them indicated increased negative affect, emotional conflict, vicarious emotions, and behavioral control (pgACC/mOFC, anterior insula/IFG, aMCC and precuneus/PCC). Besides, we found enhanced effective connectivity between aMCC and anterior insula, which suggests increased emotion regulation during decisions affecting humanized victims. These findings highlight the importance of others’ perceived humanness for prosocial behavior - with aversive affect and other-related concern when imagining harming more “human-like” persons acting against purely utilitarian decisions. PMID:23082194

  5. Human colorectal mucosal microbiota correlates with its host niche physiology revealed by endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ai-Hua; Li, Ming; Li, Chang-Qing; Kou, Guan-Jun; Zuo, Xiu-Li; Li, Yan-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The human gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of health, but how the microbiota interacts with the host at the colorectal mucosa is poorly understood. We proposed that confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) might help to untangle this relationship by providing in vivo physiological information of the mucosa. We used CLE to evaluate the in vivo physiology of human colorectal mucosa, and the mucosal microbiota was quantified using 16 s rDNA pyrosequencing. The human mucosal microbiota agglomerated to three major clusters dominated by Prevotella, Bacteroides and Lactococcus. The mucosal microbiota clusters did not significantly correlate with the disease status or biopsy sites but closely correlated with the mucosal niche physiology, which was non-invasively revealed by CLE. Inflammation tilted two subnetworks within the mucosal microbiota. Infiltration of inflammatory cells significantly correlated with multiple components in the predicted metagenome, such as the VirD2 component of the type IV secretory pathway. Our data suggest that a close correlation exists between the mucosal microbiota and the colorectal mucosal physiology, and CLE is a clinically available tool that can be used to facilitate the study of the in vivo correlation between colorectal mucosal physiology and the mucosal microbiota. PMID:26916597

  6. Diffractive-optical correlators: chances to make optical image preprocessing as intelligent as human vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauinger, Norbert

    2004-10-01

    The human eye is a good model for the engineering of optical correlators. Three prominent intelligent functionalities in human vision could in the near future become realized by a new diffractive-optical hardware design of optical imaging sensors: (1) Illuminant-adaptive RGB-based color Vision, (2) Monocular 3D Vision based on RGB data processing, (3) Patchwise fourier-optical Object-Classification and Identification. The hardware design of the human eye has specific diffractive-optical elements (DOE's) in aperture and in image space and seems to execute the three jobs at -- or not far behind -- the loci of the images of objects.

  7. Activated inflammatory T cells correlate with lesion size in human cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Lis R V; Dutra, Walderez O; Almeida, Roque P; Bacellar, Olivia; Carvalho, Edgar M; Gollob, Kenneth J

    2005-11-15

    Leishmaniasis is an important parasitic disease affecting millions worldwide. In attempts to understand the clinical relevance of immunological measurements as determined using flow cytometry, several immunological phenotypes were determined for a group of well defined human leishmaniasis patients and correlated with clinical measurements of the disease (Montenegro skin test (MST) and lesion area). The analysis demonstrated a positive correlation between the MST size and the frequency of ex vivo recent activated CD4(+) T cells. In contrast, higher frequencies of recent activated CD8(+) T cells were correlated with a smaller MST size. Moreover, a positive correlation was observed between the lesion total area and the frequency of activated CD69(+) (ex vivo) and CD40L(+) (cultured with Leishmania soluble antigen (SLA)) T lymphocytes. Finally, larger lesions were also correlated with a higher frequency of SLA specific inflammatory cytokine (IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha) producing lymphocytes. These studies demonstrate that immunological markers are correlated with clinical indicators of human leishmaniasis and serve to better understand the evolution of this important parasitic disease.

  8. Altered tumor formation and evolutionary selection of genetic variants in the human MDM4 oncogene.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Gurinder Singh; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Bond, Elisabeth E; Montagna, Marco; Monagna, Marco; Menin, Chiara; Bertorelle, Roberta; Scaini, Maria Chiara; Bartel, Frank; Böhnke, Anja; Pempe, Christina; Gradhand, Elise; Hauptmann, Steffen; Offit, Kenneth; Levine, Arnold J; Bond, Gareth L

    2009-06-23

    A large body of evidence strongly suggests that the p53 tumor suppressor pathway is central in reducing cancer frequency in vertebrates. The protein product of the haploinsufficient mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) oncogene binds to and inhibits the p53 protein. Recent studies of human genetic variants in p53 and MDM2 have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can affect p53 signaling, confer cancer risk, and suggest that the pathway is under evolutionary selective pressure (1-4). In this report, we analyze the haplotype structure of MDM4, a structural homolog of MDM2, in several different human populations. Unusual patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the haplotype distribution of MDM4 indicate the presence of candidate SNPs that may also modify the efficacy of the p53 pathway. Association studies in 5 different patient populations reveal that these SNPs in MDM4 confer an increased risk for, or early onset of, human breast and ovarian cancers in Ashkenazi Jewish and European cohorts, respectively. This report not only implicates MDM4 as a key regulator of tumorigenesis in the human breast and ovary, but also exploits for the first time evolutionary driven linkage disequilibrium as a means to select SNPs of p53 pathway genes that might be clinically relevant.

  9. Correlation between human observer performance and model observer performance in differential phase contrast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ke; Garrett, John; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: With the recently expanding interest and developments in x-ray differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT), the evaluation of its task-specific detection performance and comparison with the corresponding absorption CT under a given radiation dose constraint become increasingly important. Mathematical model observers are often used to quantify the performance of imaging systems, but their correlations with actual human observers need to be confirmed for each new imaging method. This work is an investigation of the effects of stochastic DPC-CT noise on the correlation of detection performance between model and human observers with signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection tasks.Methods: The detectabilities of different objects (five disks with different diameters and two breast lesion masses) embedded in an experimental DPC-CT noise background were assessed using both model and human observers. The detectability of the disk and lesion signals was then measured using five types of model observers including the prewhitening ideal observer, the nonprewhitening (NPW) observer, the nonprewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (NPWEi), the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (PWEi), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). The same objects were also evaluated by four human observers using the two-alternative forced choice method. The results from the model observer experiment were quantitatively compared to the human observer results to assess the correlation between the two techniques.Results: The contrast-to-detail (CD) curve generated by the human observers for the disk-detection experiments shows that the required contrast to detect a disk is inversely proportional to the square root of the disk size. Based on the CD curves, the ideal and NPW observers tend to systematically overestimate the performance of the human observers. The NPWEi and PWEi observers did not predict human performance well either, as the slopes of their CD

  10. WESBES: A Wireless Embedded Sensor for Improving Human Comfort Metrics using Temporospatially Correlated Data

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Hewlett; Milos Manic; Craig Rieger

    2012-08-01

    When utilized properly, energy management systems (EMS) can offer significant energy savings by optimizing the efficiency of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. However, difficulty often arises due to the constraints imposed by the need to maintain an acceptable level of comfort for a building’s occupants. This challenge is compounded by the fact that human comfort is difficult to define in a measurable way. One way to address this problem is to provide a building manager with direct feedback from the building’s users. Still, this data is relative in nature, making it difficult to determine the actions that need to be taken, and while some useful comfort correlations have been devised, such as ASHRAE’s Predicted Mean Vote index, they are rules of thumb that do not connect individual feedback with direct, diverse feedback sensing. As they are a correlation, quantifying effects of climate, age of buildings and associated defects such as draftiness, are outside the realm of this correlation. Therefore, the contribution of this paper is the Wireless Embedded Smart Block for Environment Sensing (WESBES); an affordable wireless sensor platform that allows subjective human comfort data to be directly paired with temporospatially correlated objective sensor measurements for use in EMS. The described device offers a flexible research platform for analyzing the relationship between objective and subjective occupant feedback in order to formulate more meaningful measures of human comfort. It could also offer an affordable and expandable option for real world deployment in existing EMS.

  11. A Single Mechanism Can Account for Human Perception of Depth in Mixed Correlation Random Dot Stereograms.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Sid; Cumming, Bruce G; Read, Jenny C A

    2016-05-01

    In order to extract retinal disparity from a visual scene, the brain must match corresponding points in the left and right retinae. This computationally demanding task is known as the stereo correspondence problem. The initial stage of the solution to the correspondence problem is generally thought to consist of a correlation-based computation. However, recent work by Doi et al suggests that human observers can see depth in a class of stimuli where the mean binocular correlation is 0 (half-matched random dot stereograms). Half-matched random dot stereograms are made up of an equal number of correlated and anticorrelated dots, and the binocular energy model-a well-known model of V1 binocular complex cells-fails to signal disparity here. This has led to the proposition that a second, match-based computation must be extracting disparity in these stimuli. Here we show that a straightforward modification to the binocular energy model-adding a point output nonlinearity-is by itself sufficient to produce cells that are disparity-tuned to half-matched random dot stereograms. We then show that a simple decision model using this single mechanism can reproduce psychometric functions generated by human observers, including reduced performance to large disparities and rapidly updating dot patterns. The model makes predictions about how performance should change with dot size in half-matched stereograms and temporal alternation in correlation, which we test in human observers. We conclude that a single correlation-based computation, based directly on already-known properties of V1 neurons, can account for the literature on mixed correlation random dot stereograms.

  12. Preliminary report on the correlations among pineal concretions, prostatic calculi and age in human adult males.

    PubMed

    Mori, Ryoichi; Kodaka, Tetsuo; Sano, Tsuneyoshi

    2003-09-01

    By using quantitative image analysis of soft X-ray photographs on the bulk of extracted pineal glands and prostates, we made a preliminary investigation into the correlations among pineal concretions (% by mass), prostatic calculi (% by mass) and age (years) in 40 human adult males, ranging in age from 31 to 95 years (mean (+/-SD) 69.9 +/- 15.2 years), who died and underwent the routine dissection course. The mass concentrations of pineal concretions and prostatic calculi were 17.68 +/- 13.56% (range 0-51.34%) and 0.93 +/- 1.31% (range 0-5.82%), respectively. There was no correlation between the mass concentration of pineal concretions and aging (r = 0.03; P < 1.0). There was no correlation between mass concentration of prostatic calculi and aging (r = 0.28; P < 0.5). No pineal concretions and no prostatic calculi were observed in seven and 10 cases, respectively; in addition, in one case, neither-concretions nor calculi were seen. From such data and from the previously reported suggestion on the counteracting functions between the pineal gland and prostate, a negative correlation between the mass concentrations of pineal concretions and prostatic calculi was expected. This was certainly obtained, but the correlation was low (r = -0.39; P < 0.05). Such a low correlation and no correlations between the concentrations of pineal concretions and aging or between prostatic calculi and aging may have been caused by the examination of relatively older humans. Therefore, further investigations using a number of pair samples collected from males including younger age generations will be necessary. PMID:14527133

  13. Preliminary report on the correlations among pineal concretions, prostatic calculi and age in human adult males.

    PubMed

    Mori, Ryoichi; Kodaka, Tetsuo; Sano, Tsuneyoshi

    2003-09-01

    By using quantitative image analysis of soft X-ray photographs on the bulk of extracted pineal glands and prostates, we made a preliminary investigation into the correlations among pineal concretions (% by mass), prostatic calculi (% by mass) and age (years) in 40 human adult males, ranging in age from 31 to 95 years (mean (+/-SD) 69.9 +/- 15.2 years), who died and underwent the routine dissection course. The mass concentrations of pineal concretions and prostatic calculi were 17.68 +/- 13.56% (range 0-51.34%) and 0.93 +/- 1.31% (range 0-5.82%), respectively. There was no correlation between the mass concentration of pineal concretions and aging (r = 0.03; P < 1.0). There was no correlation between mass concentration of prostatic calculi and aging (r = 0.28; P < 0.5). No pineal concretions and no prostatic calculi were observed in seven and 10 cases, respectively; in addition, in one case, neither-concretions nor calculi were seen. From such data and from the previously reported suggestion on the counteracting functions between the pineal gland and prostate, a negative correlation between the mass concentrations of pineal concretions and prostatic calculi was expected. This was certainly obtained, but the correlation was low (r = -0.39; P < 0.05). Such a low correlation and no correlations between the concentrations of pineal concretions and aging or between prostatic calculi and aging may have been caused by the examination of relatively older humans. Therefore, further investigations using a number of pair samples collected from males including younger age generations will be necessary.

  14. Correlation between human and model observer performance for discrimination task in CT.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Carter, Rickey E; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2014-07-01

    Although physical metrics can objectively characterize computed tomography (CT) image quality, quantitative approaches to predict human observer performance are more accurate and clinically relevant. This study compared a modified channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO) with human observers in a shape discrimination task. Eight lesion-mimicking rods (two contrasts, two sizes and two shapes) were inserted into a 35 × 26 cm(2) torso-shaped water phantom and scanned 100 times on a 128-slice CT scanner at five dose levels. CT images were reconstructed using filtered backprojection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques. Two-alternative forced choice studies were constructed with hexagonal and circular rod images put side-by-side in a randomized order. An edge mask was introduced to CHO to reflect the human observers' emphasis on lesion boundaries in discriminating shape. For small size lesions, the performance of three human observers and the modified CHO was highly correlated across lesion contrasts, CT doses and reconstruction algorithms; while for large size lesions, a ceiling effect was observed for both human and model observers' performance at high doses. Our result suggests the potential of CHO to predict human observer performance for both FBP and IR. For this shape discrimination task with uniform background, IR significantly improved human and model observer performance compared to FBP, with the amount of improvement depending on lesion size, contrast and dose.

  15. Flavonoid C-glucosides Derived from Flax Straw Extracts Reduce Human Breast Cancer Cell Growth In vitro and Induce Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Czemplik, Magdalena; Mierziak, Justyna; Szopa, Jan; Kulma, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Flax straw of flax varieties that are grown for oil production is a by product which represents a considerable biomass source. Therefore, its potential application for human use is of high interest. Our research has revealed that flax straw is rich in flavonoid C-glucosides, including vitexin, orientin, and isoorientin. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity and possible proapoptotic effect of flax straw derived C-glucosides of flavonoids in the human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7). The effects of flax straw derived flavonoid C-glucosides on cell proliferation of MCF-7 cells were evaluated by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and sulforhodamine B assays. The expression of apoptosis-related genes was assessed by real-time PCR. Our data revealed that flax C-glucosides as well as pure compounds are cytotoxic toward MCF-7 cells and inhibit their proliferation. Moreover, the induction of apoptosis was correlated with the changes in the mRNA level of pro-apoptotic genes. Increased expression of bax and caspase-7, -8, and -9 and decreased mRNA expression of bcl-2 was observed, whereas the mRNA levels of p53 and mdm2 were not altered. These results clearly demonstrated that flax straw metabolites effectively induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in human breast adenocarcinoma cells.

  16. Flavonoid C-glucosides Derived from Flax Straw Extracts Reduce Human Breast Cancer Cell Growth In vitro and Induce Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Czemplik, Magdalena; Mierziak, Justyna; Szopa, Jan; Kulma, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Flax straw of flax varieties that are grown for oil production is a by product which represents a considerable biomass source. Therefore, its potential application for human use is of high interest. Our research has revealed that flax straw is rich in flavonoid C-glucosides, including vitexin, orientin, and isoorientin. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity and possible proapoptotic effect of flax straw derived C-glucosides of flavonoids in the human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7). The effects of flax straw derived flavonoid C-glucosides on cell proliferation of MCF-7 cells were evaluated by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and sulforhodamine B assays. The expression of apoptosis-related genes was assessed by real-time PCR. Our data revealed that flax C-glucosides as well as pure compounds are cytotoxic toward MCF-7 cells and inhibit their proliferation. Moreover, the induction of apoptosis was correlated with the changes in the mRNA level of pro-apoptotic genes. Increased expression of bax and caspase-7, -8, and -9 and decreased mRNA expression of bcl-2 was observed, whereas the mRNA levels of p53 and mdm2 were not altered. These results clearly demonstrated that flax straw metabolites effectively induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in human breast adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:27630565

  17. Flavonoid C-glucosides Derived from Flax Straw Extracts Reduce Human Breast Cancer Cell Growth In vitro and Induce Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Czemplik, Magdalena; Mierziak, Justyna; Szopa, Jan; Kulma, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Flax straw of flax varieties that are grown for oil production is a by product which represents a considerable biomass source. Therefore, its potential application for human use is of high interest. Our research has revealed that flax straw is rich in flavonoid C-glucosides, including vitexin, orientin, and isoorientin. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity and possible proapoptotic effect of flax straw derived C-glucosides of flavonoids in the human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7). The effects of flax straw derived flavonoid C-glucosides on cell proliferation of MCF-7 cells were evaluated by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and sulforhodamine B assays. The expression of apoptosis-related genes was assessed by real-time PCR. Our data revealed that flax C-glucosides as well as pure compounds are cytotoxic toward MCF-7 cells and inhibit their proliferation. Moreover, the induction of apoptosis was correlated with the changes in the mRNA level of pro-apoptotic genes. Increased expression of bax and caspase-7, -8, and -9 and decreased mRNA expression of bcl-2 was observed, whereas the mRNA levels of p53 and mdm2 were not altered. These results clearly demonstrated that flax straw metabolites effectively induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in human breast adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:27630565

  18. Flavonoid C-glucosides Derived from Flax Straw Extracts Reduce Human Breast Cancer Cell Growth In vitro and Induce Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Czemplik, Magdalena; Mierziak, Justyna; Szopa, Jan; Kulma, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Flax straw of flax varieties that are grown for oil production is a by product which represents a considerable biomass source. Therefore, its potential application for human use is of high interest. Our research has revealed that flax straw is rich in flavonoid C-glucosides, including vitexin, orientin, and isoorientin. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity and possible proapoptotic effect of flax straw derived C-glucosides of flavonoids in the human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7). The effects of flax straw derived flavonoid C-glucosides on cell proliferation of MCF-7 cells were evaluated by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and sulforhodamine B assays. The expression of apoptosis-related genes was assessed by real-time PCR. Our data revealed that flax C-glucosides as well as pure compounds are cytotoxic toward MCF-7 cells and inhibit their proliferation. Moreover, the induction of apoptosis was correlated with the changes in the mRNA level of pro-apoptotic genes. Increased expression of bax and caspase-7, -8, and -9 and decreased mRNA expression of bcl-2 was observed, whereas the mRNA levels of p53 and mdm2 were not altered. These results clearly demonstrated that flax straw metabolites effectively induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in human breast adenocarcinoma cells.

  19. Serum Autotaxin/ENPP2 Correlates with Insulin Resistance in Older Humans with Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Valerie L.; Trybula, Joy S.; Wills, Rachel C.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Dubé, John J.; Kienesberger, Petra C.; Kershaw, Erin E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Autotaxin (ATX) is an adipocyte-derived lysophospholipase D that generates the lipid signaling molecule lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). The ATX/LPA pathway in adipose tissue has recently been implicated in obesity and insulin resistance in animal models, but the role of circulating ATX in humans remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between serum ATX and insulin resistance. Methods In this retrospective study, older (60–75 years), non-diabetic human participants with overweight or obesity (BMI 25–37 kg/m2), were characterized for metabolic phenotype including measures of energy, glucose, and lipid homeostasis. The relationship between serum ATX and metabolic parameters was then determined using correlative and predictive statistics. Results Serum ATX was higher in females than in males. After controlling for sex, serum ATX correlated with multiple measures of adiposity and glucose homeostasis/insulin action. Serum ATX and BMI also independently predicted glucose infusion rate during a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance after controlling for sex and medication use. Conclusion Serum ATX correlates with and predicts measures of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in older humans, suggesting that it may be a potential pathogenic factor and/or diagnostic/therapeutic target for insulin resistance in this population. PMID:26727116

  20. Developmental Changes of BOLD Signal Correlations with Global Human EEG Power and Synchronization during Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Lars; Lüchinger, Rafael; Koenig, Thomas; Martin, Ernst; Brandeis, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    In humans, theta band (5–7 Hz) power typically increases when performing cognitively demanding working memory (WM) tasks, and simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings have revealed an inverse relationship between theta power and the BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) signal in the default mode network during WM. However, synchronization also plays a fundamental role in cognitive processing, and the level of theta and higher frequency band synchronization is modulated during WM. Yet, little is known about the link between BOLD, EEG power, and EEG synchronization during WM, and how these measures develop with human brain maturation or relate to behavioral changes. We examined EEG-BOLD signal correlations from 18 young adults and 15 school-aged children for age-dependent effects during a load-modulated Sternberg WM task. Frontal load (in-)dependent EEG theta power was significantly enhanced in children compared to adults, while adults showed stronger fMRI load effects. Children demonstrated a stronger negative correlation between global theta power and the BOLD signal in the default mode network relative to adults. Therefore, we conclude that theta power mediates the suppression of a task-irrelevant network. We further conclude that children suppress this network even more than adults, probably from an increased level of task-preparedness to compensate for not fully mature cognitive functions, reflected in lower response accuracy and increased reaction time. In contrast to power, correlations between instantaneous theta global field synchronization and the BOLD signal were exclusively positive in both age groups but only significant in adults in the frontal-parietal and posterior cingulate cortices. Furthermore, theta synchronization was weaker in children and was –in contrast to EEG power– positively correlated with response accuracy in both age groups. In summary we conclude that theta EEG-BOLD signal correlations differ between spectral power and synchronization and

  1. Potency of irritation by benzylidenemalononitriles in humans correlates with TRPA1 ion channel activation

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Christopher D.; Green, Christopher; Bird, Mike; Jones, James T. A.; Riches, James R.; McKee, Katherine K.; Sandford, Mark S.; Wakefield, Debra A.; Timperley, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    We show that the physiological activity of solid aerosolized benzylidenemalononitriles (BMNs) including ‘tear gas’ (CS) in historic human volunteer trials correlates with activation of the human transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 ion channel (hTRPA1). This suggests that the irritation caused by the most potent of these compounds results from activation of this channel. We prepared 50 BMNs and measured their hTRPA1 agonist potencies. A mechanism of action consistent with their physiological activity, involving their dissolution in water on contaminated body surfaces, cell membrane penetration and reversible thiolation by a cysteine residue of hTRPA1, supported by data from nuclear magnetic resonance experiments with a model thiol, explains the structure–activity relationships. The correlation provides evidence that hTRPA1 is a receptor for irritants on nociceptive neurons involved in pain perception; thus, its activation in the eye, nose, mouth and skin would explain the symptoms of lachrymation, sneezing, coughing and stinging, respectively. The structure–activity results and the use of the BMNs as pharmacological tools in future by other researchers may contribute to a better understanding of the TRPA1 channel in humans (and other animals) and help facilitate the discovery of treatments for human diseases involving this receptor. PMID:26064575

  2. Correlations of trace elements in breast human tissues: Evaluation of spatial distribution using μ-XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Marina Piacenti da; Silva, Deisy Mara da; Ribeiro-Silva, Alfredo; Poletti, Martin Eduardo

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate microscopic correlations between trace elements in breast human tissues. A synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe system (μ-XRF) was used to obtain two-dimensional distribution of trace element Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in normal (6 samples) and malignant (14 samples) breast tissues. The experiment was performed in X-ray Fluorescence beam line at Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron (LNLS), Campinas, Brazil. The white microbeam was generated with a fine conical capillary with a 20 μm output diameter. The samples were supported on a XYZ table. An optical microscope with motorized zoom was used for sample positioning and choice the area to be scanned. Automatic two-dimensional scans were programmed and performed with steps of 30 μm in each direction (x, y) on the selected area. The fluorescence signals were recorded using a Si(Li) detector, positioned at 90 degrees with respect to the incident beam, with a collection time of 10 s per point. The elemental maps obtained from each sample were overlap to observe correlation between trace elements. Qualitative results showed that the pairs of elements Ca-Zn and Fe-Cu could to be correlated in malignant breast tissues. Quantitative results, achieved by Spearman correlation tests, indicate that there is a spatial correlation between these pairs of elements (p < 0.001) suggesting the importance of these elements in metabolic processes associated with the development of the tumor.

  3. Correlations of trace elements in breast human tissues: Evaluation of spatial distribution using {mu}-XRF

    SciTech Connect

    Piacenti da Silva, Marina; Silva, Deisy Mara da; Ribeiro-Silva, Alfredo; Poletti, Martin Eduardo

    2012-05-17

    The aim of this work is to investigate microscopic correlations between trace elements in breast human tissues. A synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe system ({mu}-XRF) was used to obtain two-dimensional distribution of trace element Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in normal (6 samples) and malignant (14 samples) breast tissues. The experiment was performed in X-ray Fluorescence beam line at Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, Brazil. The white microbeam was generated with a fine conical capillary with a 20 {mu}m output diameter. The samples were supported on a XYZ table. An optical microscope with motorized zoom was used for sample positioning and choice the area to be scanned. Automatic two-dimensional scans were programmed and performed with steps of 30 {mu}m in each direction (x, y) on the selected area. The fluorescence signals were recorded using a Si(Li) detector, positioned at 90 degrees with respect to the incident beam, with a collection time of 10 s per point. The elemental maps obtained from each sample were overlap to observe correlation between trace elements. Qualitative results showed that the pairs of elements Ca-Zn and Fe-Cu could to be correlated in malignant breast tissues. Quantitative results, achieved by Spearman correlation tests, indicate that there is a spatial correlation between these pairs of elements (p < 0.001) suggesting the importance of these elements in metabolic processes associated with the development of the tumor.

  4. Correlation of Wissler Human Thermal Model Blood Flow and Shiver Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Makinen, Janice; Cognata, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The Wissler Human Thermal Model (WHTM) is a thermal math model of the human body that has been widely used to predict the human thermoregulatory response to a variety of cold and hot environments. The model has been shown to predict core temperature and skin temperatures higher and lower, respectively, than in tests of subjects in crew escape suit working in a controlled hot environments. Conversely the model predicts core temperature and skin temperatures lower and higher, respectively, than in tests of lightly clad subjects immersed in cold water conditions. The blood flow algorithms of the model has been investigated to allow for more and less flow, respectively, for the cold and hot case. These changes in the model have yielded better correlation of skin and core temperatures in the cold and hot cases. The algorithm for onset of shiver did not need to be modified to achieve good agreement in cold immersion simulations

  5. Post-event human decision errors: operator action tree/time reliability correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R E; Fragola, J; Wreathall, J

    1982-11-01

    This report documents an interim framework for the quantification of the probability of errors of decision on the part of nuclear power plant operators after the initiation of an accident. The framework can easily be incorporated into an event tree/fault tree analysis. The method presented consists of a structure called the operator action tree and a time reliability correlation which assumes the time available for making a decision to be the dominating factor in situations requiring cognitive human response. This limited approach decreases the magnitude and complexity of the decision modeling task. Specifically, in the past, some human performance models have attempted prediction by trying to emulate sequences of human actions, or by identifying and modeling the information processing approach applicable to the task. The model developed here is directed at describing the statistical performance of a representative group of hypothetical individuals responding to generalized situations.

  6. Scaling and correlation of human movements in cyberspace and physical space.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Huang, Zi-Gang; Huang, Liang; Liu, Huan; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the dynamics of human movements is key to issues of significant current interest such as behavioral prediction, recommendation, and control of epidemic spreading. We collect and analyze big data sets of human movements in both cyberspace (through browsing of websites) and physical space (through mobile towers) and find a superlinear scaling relation between the mean frequency of visit 〈f〉 and its fluctuation σ:σ∼〈f〉^{β} with β≈1.2. The probability distribution of the visiting frequency is found to be a stretched exponential function. We develop a model incorporating two essential ingredients, preferential return and exploration, and show that these are necessary for generating the scaling relation extracted from real data. A striking finding is that human movements in cyberspace and physical space are strongly correlated, indicating a distinctive behavioral identifying characteristic and implying that the behaviors in one space can be used to predict those in the other. PMID:25493727

  7. Scaling and correlation of human movements in cyberspace and physical space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Huang, Zi-Gang; Huang, Liang; Liu, Huan; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the dynamics of human movements is key to issues of significant current interest such as behavioral prediction, recommendation, and control of epidemic spreading. We collect and analyze big data sets of human movements in both cyberspace (through browsing of websites) and physical space (through mobile towers) and find a superlinear scaling relation between the mean frequency of visit and its fluctuation σ :σ ˜β with β ≈1.2 . The probability distribution of the visiting frequency is found to be a stretched exponential function. We develop a model incorporating two essential ingredients, preferential return and exploration, and show that these are necessary for generating the scaling relation extracted from real data. A striking finding is that human movements in cyberspace and physical space are strongly correlated, indicating a distinctive behavioral identifying characteristic and implying that the behaviors in one space can be used to predict those in the other.

  8. Correlation between beta- and alpha-adrenergic receptor concentrations in human placenta.

    PubMed

    Falkay, G; Melis, K; Kovács, L

    1994-05-01

    alpha 2- and beta-adrenergic receptors in human placental membranes have been investigated using the radioligands [3H]-RX 821002 and [3H]-dihydroalprenolol, respectively. The specific binding of the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist RX 821002 confirms the presence of an alpha 2-adrenoceptor in the human placenta, which has been characterized previously with [3H]-rauwolscine. The major finding presented here is a correlation between the alpha 2- and beta-adrenergic receptor concentrations (r = 0.765) in the human placenta at term. It is suggested that the alpha 2/beta adrenoceptor balance may play an important role in regulation of the vascular bed of the placenta. Determination of the alpha 2/beta ratio may help towards an understanding of the contractility of the placental vascular muscles.

  9. Correlation of Respirator Fit Measured on Human Subjects and a Static Advanced Headform

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Michael S.; He, Xinjian; Joseph, Michael E.; Zhuang, Ziqing; Heimbuch, Brian K.; Shaffer, Ronald E.; Choe, Melanie; Wander, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the correlation of N95 filtering face-piece respirator (FFR) fit between a Static Advanced Headform (StAH) and 10 human test subjects. Quantitative fit evaluations were performed on test subjects who made three visits to the laboratory. On each visit, one fit evaluation was performed on eight different FFRs of various model/size variations. Additionally, subject breathing patterns were recorded. Each fit evaluation comprised three two-minute exercises: “Normal Breathing,” “Deep Breathing,” and again “Normal Breathing.” The overall test fit factors (FF) for human tests were recorded. The same respirator samples were later mounted on the StAH and the overall test manikin fit factors (MFF) were assessed utilizing the recorded human breathing patterns. Linear regression was performed on the mean log10-transformed FF and MFF values to assess the relationship between the values obtained from humans and the StAH. This is the first study to report a positive correlation of respirator fit between a headform and test subjects. The linear regression by respirator resulted in R2 = 0.95, indicating a strong linear correlation between FF and MFF. For all respirators the geometric mean (GM) FF values were consistently higher than those of the GM MFF. For 50% of respirators, GM FF and GM MFF values were significantly different between humans and the StAH. For data grouped by subject/respirator combinations, the linear regression resulted in R2 = 0.49. A weaker correlation (R2 = 0.11) was found using only data paired by subject/respirator combination where both the test subject and StAH had passed a real-time leak check before performing the fit evaluation. For six respirators, the difference in passing rates between the StAH and humans was < 20%, while two respirators showed a difference of 29% and 43%. For data by test subject, GM FF and GM MFF values were significantly different for 40% of the subjects. Overall, the advanced headform system has

  10. Correlation between model observer and human observer performance in CT imaging when lesion location is uncertain

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Zhang, Yi; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Carter, Rickey; Toledano, Alicia Y.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between model observer and human observer performance in CT imaging for the task of lesion detection and localization when the lesion location is uncertain.Methods: Two cylindrical rods (3-mm and 5-mm diameters) were placed in a 35 × 26 cm torso-shaped water phantom to simulate lesions with −15 HU contrast at 120 kV. The phantom was scanned 100 times on a 128-slice CT scanner at each of four dose levels (CTDIvol = 5.7, 11.4, 17.1, and 22.8 mGy). Regions of interest (ROIs) around each lesion were extracted to generate images with signal-present, with each ROI containing 128 × 128 pixels. Corresponding ROIs of signal-absent images were generated from images without lesion mimicking rods. The location of the lesion (rod) in each ROI was randomly distributed by moving the ROIs around each lesion. Human observer studies were performed by having three trained observers identify the presence or absence of lesions, indicating the lesion location in each image and scoring confidence for the detection task on a 6-point scale. The same image data were analyzed using a channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO) with Gabor channels. Internal noise was added to the decision variables for the model observer study. Area under the curve (AUC) of ROC and localization ROC (LROC) curves were calculated using a nonparametric approach. The Spearman's rank order correlation between the average performance of the human observers and the model observer performance was calculated for the AUC of both ROC and LROC curves for both the 3- and 5-mm diameter lesions.Results: In both ROC and LROC analyses, AUC values for the model observer agreed well with the average values across the three human observers. The Spearman's rank order correlation values for both ROC and LROC analyses for both the 3- and 5-mm diameter lesions were all 1.0, indicating perfect rank ordering agreement of the figures of merit (AUC) between the

  11. Correlation of respirator fit measured on human subjects and a static advanced headform.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Michael S; He, Xinjian; Joseph, Michael E; Zhuang, Ziqing; Heimbuch, Brian K; Shaffer, Ronald E; Choe, Melanie; Wander, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the correlation of N95 filtering facepiece respirator (FFR) fit between a Static Advanced Headform (StAH) and 10 human test subjects. Quantitative fit evaluations were performed on test subjects who made three visits to the laboratory. On each visit, one fit evaluation was performed on eight different FFRs of various model/size variations. Additionally, subject breathing patterns were recorded. Each fit evaluation comprised three two-minute exercises: "Normal Breathing," "Deep Breathing," and again "Normal Breathing." The overall test fit factors (FF) for human tests were recorded. The same respirator samples were later mounted on the StAH and the overall test manikin fit factors (MFF) were assessed utilizing the recorded human breathing patterns. Linear regression was performed on the mean log10-transformed FF and MFF values to assess the relationship between the values obtained from humans and the StAH. This is the first study to report a positive correlation of respirator fit between a headform and test subjects. The linear regression by respirator resulted in R(2) = 0.95, indicating a strong linear correlation between FF and MFF. For all respirators the geometric mean (GM) FF values were consistently higher than those of the GM MFF. For 50% of respirators, GM FF and GM MFF values were significantly different between humans and the StAH. For data grouped by subject/respirator combinations, the linear regression resulted in R(2) = 0.49. A weaker correlation (R(2) = 0.11) was found using only data paired by subject/respirator combination where both the test subject and StAH had passed a real-time leak check before performing the fit evaluation. For six respirators, the difference in passing rates between the StAH and humans was < 20%, while two respirators showed a difference of 29% and 43%. For data by test subject, GM FF and GM MFF values were significantly different for 40% of the subjects. Overall, the advanced headform system has potential

  12. Slow Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infectivity Correlated with Low HIV Coreceptor Levels

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Cynthia L.

    2001-01-01

    The absolute number of CD4+ lymphocytes in blood is prognostic for disease progression, yet the cell surface density of CD4 receptors or chemokine receptors on a single cell has not previously been found to be predictive of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity outcome. It has recently been shown that human leukocyte elastase (HLE) and its ligand α1 proteinase inhibitor (α1PI; α1 antitrypsin) act as HIV fusion cofactors. The present study shows that decreased HIV infectivity is significantly correlated with decreased cell surface density of HLE but not with decreased CD4 nor chemokine receptors. In vitro HIV infectivity outcome in this study was predicted by the surface density of HLE on mononuclear phagocytes but not on lymphocytes. The set point HLE surface density was in part determined by α1PI. Decreased circulating α1PI was correlated with increased cell surface HLE and with increased HIV infectivity. The correlation of HIV infectivity outcome with surface HLE and circulating α1PI supports the utility of these HIV cofactors in diagnostic analysis and therapeutic intervention. PMID:11527806

  13. Midtarsal break variation in modern humans: Functional causes, skeletal correlates, and paleontological implications.

    PubMed

    DeSilva, J M; Bonne-Annee, R; Swanson, Z; Gill, C M; Sobel, M; Uy, J; Gill, S V

    2015-04-01

    The midtarsal break was once treated as a dichotomous, non-overlapping trait present in the foot of non-human primates and absent in humans. Recent work indicates that there is considerable variation in human midfoot dorsiflexion, with some overlap with the ape foot. These findings have called into question the uniqueness of the human lateral midfoot, and the use of osteological features in fossil hominins to characterize the midfoot of our extinct ancestors. Here, we present data on plantar pressure and pedal mechanics in a large sample of adults and children (n = 671) to test functional hypotheses concerning variation in midfoot flexibility. Lateral midfoot peak plantar pressure correlates with both sagittal plane flexion at the lateral tarsometatarsal joint, and dorsiflexion at the hallucal metatarsophalangeal joint. The latter finding suggests that midfoot laxity may compromise hallucal propulsion. Multiple regression statistics indicate that a low arch and pronation of the foot explain 40% of variation in midfoot peak plantar pressure, independent of age and BMI. MRI scans on a small subset of study participants (n = 19) reveals that curvature of the base of the 4th metatarsal correlates with lateral midfoot plantar pressure and that specific anatomies of foot bones do indeed reflect relative midfoot flexibility. However, while the shape of the base of the 4th metatarsal may reliably reflect midfoot mobility in individual hominins, given the wide range of overlapping variation in midfoot flexibility in both apes and humans, we caution against generalizing foot function in extinct hominin species until larger fossils samples are available.

  14. The Human Parahippocampal Region: I. Temporal Pole Cytoarchitectonic and MRI Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla, F.; Insausti, A. M.; Constans, J. M.; Salinas-Alamán, A.; Pró-Sistiaga, P.; Mohedano-Moriano, A.; Insausti, R.

    2010-01-01

    The temporal pole (TP) is the rostralmost portion of the human temporal lobe. Characteristically, it is only present in human and nonhuman primates. TP has been implicated in different cognitive functions such as emotion, attention, behavior, and memory, based on functional studies performed in healthy controls and patients with neurodegenerative diseases through its anatomical connections (amygdala, pulvinar, orbitofrontal cortex). TP was originally described as a single uniform area by Brodmann area 38, and von Economo (area TG of von Economo and Koskinas), and little information on its cytoarchitectonics is known in humans. We hypothesize that 1) TP is not a homogenous area and we aim first at fixating the precise extent and limits of temporopolar cortex (TPC) with adjacent fields and 2) its structure can be correlated with structural magnetic resonance images. We describe here the macroscopic characteristics and cytoarchitecture as two subfields, a medial and a lateral area, that constitute TPC also noticeable in 2D and 3D reconstructions. Our findings suggest that the human TP is a heterogeneous region formed exclusively by TPC for about 7 mm of the temporal tip, and that becomes progressively restricted to the medial and ventral sides of the TP. This cortical area presents topographical and structural features in common with nonhuman primates, which suggests an evolutionary development in human species. PMID:20064939

  15. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration inversely correlates with basal perfusion in human occipital lobe.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Manus J; Rane, Swati; Hussey, Erin; Mason, Emily; Pradhan, Subechhya; Waddell, Kevin W; Ally, Brandon A

    2014-03-01

    Commonly used neuroimaging approaches in humans exploit hemodynamic or metabolic indicators of brain function. However, fundamental gaps remain in our ability to relate such hemo-metabolic reactivity to neurotransmission, with recent reports providing paradoxical information regarding the relationship among basal perfusion, functional imaging contrast, and neurotransmission in awake humans. Here, sequential magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measurements of the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA+macromolecules normalized by the complex N-acetyl aspartate-N-acetyl aspartyl glutamic acid: [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG]), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of perfusion, fractional gray-matter volume, and arterial arrival time (AAT) are recorded in human visual cortex from a controlled cohort of young adult male volunteers with neurocognitive battery-confirmed comparable cognitive capacity (3 T; n=16; age=23±3 years). Regression analyses reveal an inverse correlation between [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] and perfusion (R=-0.46; P=0.037), yet no relationship between AAT and [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] (R=-0.12; P=0.33). Perfusion measurements that do not control for AAT variations reveal reduced correlations between [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] and perfusion (R=-0.13; P=0.32). These findings largely reconcile contradictory reports between perfusion and inhibitory tone, and underscore the physiologic origins of the growing literature relating functional imaging signals, hemodynamics, and neurotransmission.

  16. Correlation of human Bub1 expression with tumor-proliferating activity in salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Shigeishi, Hideo; Yoneda, Shingo; Taki, Masayuki; Nobumori, Takeshi; Ohta, Kouji; Higashikawa, Koichiro; Yasui, Wataru; Kamata, Nobuyuki

    2006-04-01

    Human Bub1 plays an important role at the spindle assembly check-point to prevent cell cycle progression following spindle damage. We examined the expression of Bub1 mRNA and protein in 21 human salivary gland tumors (7 pleomorphic adenomas, 2 warthin tumors, 5 mucoepidermoid carcinomas, 3 adenoid cystic carcinomas and 4 acinic cell carcinomas) and 3 normal submandibular glands using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or western blotting. The mean expression levels of Bub1 mRNA and protein were higher in malignant tumors (0.12+/-0.028/1.75+/-0.53) than normal submandibular glands (0.042+/-0.014/0.19+/-0.044) and benign tumors (0.058+/-0.01/0.97+/-0.44). We found a significant association between the level of Bub1 mRNA/protein expression and clinical stage in malignant tumors (Mann-Whitney U test, p=0.019/p=0.016). We analyzed its relation with the proliferative activity monitored by the Ki-67 labeling index by immunohistochemistry as well as the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) by Western blotting. A significant correlation was found between Bub1 mRNA/protein expression and the Ki-67 labeling index in salivary gland tumors (Spearman's correlation coefficient by rank test, p=0.026/p=0.002). These results indicate that increased expression of the human Bub1 gene is closely linked to abnormal cell proliferation in malignant conditions.

  17. Ubiquitin Carboxy-Terminal HydrolaseL3 Correlates with Human Sperm Count, Motility and Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meijiao; Yu, Tinghe; Hu, Lina; Cheng, Zhi; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L3 (UCHL3) belongs to the group of deubiquitinating enzymes and plays a part in apoptosis of germ cells and the differentiation of spermatocytes into spermatids. However, the exact role of UCHL3 in human spermatogenesis and sperm function remains unknown. Here we examined the level and activity of UCHL3 in spermatozoa from men with asthenozoospermia (A), oligoasthenozoospermia (OA) or normozoospermia (N). Immunofluorescence indicated that UCHL3 was mainly localized in the acrosome and throughout the flagella, and western blotting revealed a lower level in A or OA compared with N (p < 0.05). The catalytic activity of UCHL3 was decreased in spermatozoa from A or OA (p < 0.05, p < 0.001, respectively). The level and activity of UCHL3 were positively correlated with sperm count, concentration and motility. The UCHL3 level was positively correlated with the normal fertilization rate (FR) and percentage of embryos suitable for transfer/cryopreservation of in vitro fertilization (IVF). The UCHL3 activity was also positively correlated with FR, the percentage of embryos suitable for transfer/cryopreservation and high-quality embryos rate of IVF. Aforementioned correlations were not manifested in intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). These findings suggest that UCHL3 may play a role in male infertility. PMID:27780264

  18. Physical Exercise Habits Correlate with Gray Matter Volume of the Hippocampus in Healthy Adult Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killgore, William D. S.; Olson, Elizabeth A.; Weber, Mareen

    2013-12-01

    Physical activity facilitates neurogenesis of dentate cells in the rodent hippocampus, a brain region critical for memory formation and spatial representation. Recent findings in humans also suggest that aerobic exercise can lead to increased hippocampal volume and enhanced cognitive functioning in children and elderly adults. However, the association between physical activity and hippocampal volume during the period from early adulthood through middle age has not been effectively explored. Here, we correlated the number of minutes of self-reported exercise per week with gray matter volume of the hippocampus using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in 61 healthy adults ranging from 18 to 45 years of age. After controlling for age, gender, and total brain volume, total minutes of weekly exercise correlated significantly with volume of the right hippocampus. Findings highlight the relationship between regular physical exercise and brain structure during early to middle adulthood.

  19. Correlations between Different Heavy Metals in Diverse Body Fluids: Studies of Human Semen Quality

    PubMed Central

    Mínguez-Alarcón, Lidia; Mendiola, Jaime; Roca, Manuela; López-Espín, José J.; Guillén, José J.; Moreno, José M.; Moreno-Grau, Stella; Martínez-García, María J.; Vergara-Juárez, Nuria; Elvira-Rendueles, Belén; García-Sánchez, Antonio; Ten, Jorge; Bernabeu, Rafael; Torres-Cantero, Alberto M.

    2012-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that exposure to heavy metals may impair male reproduction. To measure the effect produced by low doses of heavy metals on semen parameters, it is necessary to clarify in which body fluids those measurements must be performed. Sixty-one men attending infertility clinics participated in our study. Concentrations of lead, cadmium, and mercury were measured in whole blood, blood plasma, and seminal plasma using spectroanalytical and electrochemical methods. Semen analyses were performed according to World Health Organization criteria. For statistical analysis, Spearman's rank correlations, mean comparison tests, and discriminant analysis were calculated. Significant correlations between the measured concentrations of the three heavy metals in the same biological fluids were observed. However, no similar relationship was seen when comparing the concentrations in different body fluids of the same metal. According to our results and previous publications, seminal plasma might be the best body fluid for assessing impairment of human semen parameters. PMID:22312326

  20. Correlated analysis of cellular DNA, membrane antigens and light scatter of human lymphoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Braylan, R.C.; Benson, N.A.; Nourse, V.; Kruth, H.S.

    1982-03-01

    Flow cytometric correlated analysis of membrane antigens, DNA, and light scatter was performed on human lymphoid cells using fluorescein (FITC)-conjugated antibodies to label B- and T-cell antigens and propidium iodide (PI) to stain DNA after ethanol fixation and RNase treatment. A FACS II flow cytometer was modified to obtain digitized measurements of two color fluorescence and light scatter emissions, simultaneously. Software was written to allow single parameter analysis or correlated analysis of any two of the three parameters acquired. Ethanol fixation preserved FITC surface labeling for at least 15 weeks, but produced marked changes in light scatter. No changes in FITC distributions were observed after RNase treatment and PI staining, and the presence of FITC labeling did not affect DNA distributions. Within heterogeneous cell populations, the DNA distribution of cell subpopulations identified by a membrane antigen was clearly demonstrated.

  1. Biplane correlation imaging for lung nodule detection: initial human subject results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majdi Nasab, Nariman; Samei, Ehsan; Dobbins, James T., III

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, we present performance of biplane correlation imaging (BCI) on set of chest x-ray projections of human data. BCI significantly minimizes the number of false positives (FPs) when used in conjunction with computer aided detection (CAD) by eliminating non-correlated nodule candidates. Sixty-one low exposure posterior projections were acquired from more than 20 human subjects with small angular separations (0.32 degree) over a range of 20 degrees along the vertical axis. All patients were previously diagnosed for the presence of lung nodules based on computed tomography (CT) examination. Images were processed following two steps. First, all images were analyzed using our CAD routine for chest radiography. This process proceeded with a BCI processing in which the results of CAD on each single projection were examined in terms of their geometrical correlation with those found in the other 60 projections based on the predetermined shift of possible nodule locations in each projection. The suspect entities with a geometrical correlation that coincided with the known location of the lesions were selected as nodules; otherwise they were ignored. An expert radiologist with reference to the associated CT dataset determined the truth regarding nodule location and sizes, which were then used to determine if the found nodules are true positive or false positive. The preliminary results indicated that the best performance was obtained when the angular separation of the projection pair was greater than about 6.7 degrees. Within the range of optimum angular separation, the number of FPs per image was 0-1 without impacting the number of true positives (TPs), averaged around 92%.

  2. Correlation of chromosome patterns in human leukemic cells with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.D.

    1992-06-01

    This project seeks to defining the chromosome segments associated with radiation induced leukemogenesis (treatment-related acute myeloid leukemia, or t-AML). Towards these goals genetic analysis of human chromosomes 5 and 7 continues to investigate correlation of treatment with balanced and unbalanced chromosomal translocations. Progress is being made in cloning the breakpoints in balanced translocations in t-AML, that is to clone the t(9;11) and t(11;19) breakpoints, to clone the t(3;21)(q26;q22) breakpoints and to determine the relationship of these translocations to prior exposure to topoisomerase II inhibitors. 11 figs. 3 figs.

  3. Effect of Polypurine Reverse Hoogsteen Hairpins on Relevant Cancer Target Genes in Different Human Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Xenia; Rodríguez, Laura; Solé, Anna; Lliberós, Carolina; Mencia, Núria; Ciudad, Carlos J; Noé, Véronique

    2015-08-01

    We studied the ability of polypurine reverse Hoogsteen hairpins (PPRHs) to silence a variety of relevant cancer-related genes in several human cell lines. PPRHs are hairpins formed by two antiparallel polypurine strands bound by intramolecular Hoogsteen bonds linked by a pentathymidine loop. These hairpins are able to bind to their target DNA sequence through Watson-Crick bonds producing specific silencing of gene expression. We designed PPRHs against the following genes: BCL2, TOP1, mTOR, MDM2, and MYC and tested them for mRNA levels, cytotoxicity, and apoptosis in prostate, pancreas, colon, and breast cancer cell lines. Even though all PPRHs were effective, the most remarkable results were obtained with those against BCL2 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in decreasing cell survival and mRNA levels and increasing apoptosis in prostate, colon, and pancreatic cancer cells. In the case of TOP1, MDM2, and MYC, their corresponding PPRHs produced a strong effect in decreasing cell viability and mRNA levels and increasing apoptosis in breast cancer cells. Thus, we confirm that the PPRH technology is broadly useful to silence the expression of cancer-related genes as demonstrated using target genes involved in metabolism (DHFR), proliferation (mTOR), DNA topology (TOP1), lifespan and senescence (telomerase), apoptosis (survivin, BCL2), transcription factors (MYC), and proto-oncogenes (MDM2).

  4. Does correlated color temperature affect the ability of humans to identify veins?

    PubMed

    Argyraki, Aikaterini; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we provide empirical evidence and demonstrate statistically that white illumination settings can affect the human ability to identify veins in the inner hand vasculature. A special light-emitting diode lamp with high color rendering index (CRI 84-95) was developed and the effect of correlated color temperature was evaluated, in the range between 2600 and 5700 K at an illuminance of 40±9  lx on the ability of adult humans to identify veins. It is shown that the ability to identify veins can, on average, be increased up to 24% when white illumination settings that do not resemble incandescent light are applied. The illuminance reported together with the effect of white illumination settings on direct visual perception of biosamples are relevant for clinical investigations during the night. PMID:26831595

  5. Coral reef degradation is not correlated with local human population density.

    PubMed

    Bruno, John F; Valdivia, Abel

    2016-01-01

    The global decline of reef-building corals is understood to be due to a combination of local and global stressors. However, many reef scientists assume that local factors predominate and that isolated reefs, far from human activities, are generally healthier and more resilient. Here we show that coral reef degradation is not correlated with human population density. This suggests that local factors such as fishing and pollution are having minimal effects or that their impacts are masked by global drivers such as ocean warming. Our results also suggest that the effects of local and global stressors are antagonistic, rather than synergistic as widely assumed. These findings indicate that local management alone cannot restore coral populations or increase the resilience of reefs to large-scale impacts. They also highlight the truly global reach of anthropogenic warming and the immediate need for drastic and sustained cuts in carbon emissions. PMID:27435659

  6. Coral reef degradation is not correlated with local human population density

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, John F.; Valdivia, Abel

    2016-01-01

    The global decline of reef-building corals is understood to be due to a combination of local and global stressors. However, many reef scientists assume that local factors predominate and that isolated reefs, far from human activities, are generally healthier and more resilient. Here we show that coral reef degradation is not correlated with human population density. This suggests that local factors such as fishing and pollution are having minimal effects or that their impacts are masked by global drivers such as ocean warming. Our results also suggest that the effects of local and global stressors are antagonistic, rather than synergistic as widely assumed. These findings indicate that local management alone cannot restore coral populations or increase the resilience of reefs to large-scale impacts. They also highlight the truly global reach of anthropogenic warming and the immediate need for drastic and sustained cuts in carbon emissions. PMID:27435659

  7. Coral reef degradation is not correlated with local human population density.

    PubMed

    Bruno, John F; Valdivia, Abel

    2016-07-20

    The global decline of reef-building corals is understood to be due to a combination of local and global stressors. However, many reef scientists assume that local factors predominate and that isolated reefs, far from human activities, are generally healthier and more resilient. Here we show that coral reef degradation is not correlated with human population density. This suggests that local factors such as fishing and pollution are having minimal effects or that their impacts are masked by global drivers such as ocean warming. Our results also suggest that the effects of local and global stressors are antagonistic, rather than synergistic as widely assumed. These findings indicate that local management alone cannot restore coral populations or increase the resilience of reefs to large-scale impacts. They also highlight the truly global reach of anthropogenic warming and the immediate need for drastic and sustained cuts in carbon emissions.

  8. Interspecies activity correlations reveal functional correspondence between monkey and human brain areas.

    PubMed

    Mantini, Dante; Hasson, Uri; Betti, Viviana; Perrucci, Mauro G; Romani, Gian Luca; Corbetta, Maurizio; Orban, Guy A; Vanduffel, Wim

    2012-02-05

    Evolution-driven functional changes in the primate brain are typically assessed by aligning monkey and human activation maps using cortical surface expansion models. These models use putative homologous areas as registration landmarks, assuming they are functionally correspondent. For cases in which functional changes have occurred in an area, this assumption prohibits to reveal whether other areas may have assumed lost functions. Here we describe a method to examine functional correspondences across species. Without making spatial assumptions, we assessed similarities in sensory-driven functional magnetic resonance imaging responses between monkey (Macaca mulatta) and human brain areas by temporal correlation. Using natural vision data, we revealed regions for which functional processing has shifted to topologically divergent locations during evolution. We conclude that substantial evolution-driven functional reorganizations have occurred, not always consistent with cortical expansion processes. This framework for evaluating changes in functional architecture is crucial to building more accurate evolutionary models.

  9. Human Breast Cancer Invasion and Aggression Correlates with ECM Stiffening and Immune Cell Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Acerbi, I; Cassereau, L; Dean, I; Shi, Q; Au, A; Park, C; Chen, YY; Liphardt, J; Hwang, ES; Weaver, VM

    2015-01-01

    Tumors are stiff and data suggest that the extracellular matrix stiffening that correlates with experimental mammary malignancy drives tumor invasion and metastasis. Nevertheless, the relationship between tissue and extracellular matrix stiffness and human breast cancer progression and aggression remains unclear. We undertook a biophysical and biochemical assessment of stromal-epithelial interactions in noninvasive, invasive and normal adjacent human breast tissue and in breast cancers of increasingly aggressive subtype. Our analysis revealed that human breast cancer transformation is accompanied by an incremental increase in collagen deposition and a progressive linearization and thickening of interstitial collagen. The linearization of collagen was visualized as an overall increase in tissue birefringence and was most striking at the invasive front of the tumor where the stiffness of the stroma and cellular mechanosignaling were the highest. Amongst breast cancer subtypes we found that the stroma at the invasive region of the more aggressive Basal-like and Her2 tumor subtypes was the most heterogeneous and the stiffest when compared to the less aggressive Luminal A and B subtypes. Intriguingly, we quantified the greatest number of infiltrating macrophages and the highest level of TGF beta signaling within the cells at the invasive front. We also established that stroma stiffness and the level of cellular TGF beta signaling positively correlated with each other and with the number of infiltrating tumor-activated, macrophages, which was highest in the more aggressive tumor subtypes. These findings indicate that human breast cancer progression and aggression, collagen linearization and stromal stiffening are linked and implicate tissue inflammation and TGF beta. PMID:25959051

  10. Human breast cancer invasion and aggression correlates with ECM stiffening and immune cell infiltration.

    PubMed

    Acerbi, I; Cassereau, L; Dean, I; Shi, Q; Au, A; Park, C; Chen, Y Y; Liphardt, J; Hwang, E S; Weaver, V M

    2015-10-01

    Tumors are stiff and data suggest that the extracellular matrix stiffening that correlates with experimental mammary malignancy drives tumor invasion and metastasis. Nevertheless, the relationship between tissue and extracellular matrix stiffness and human breast cancer progression and aggression remains unclear. We undertook a biophysical and biochemical assessment of stromal-epithelial interactions in noninvasive, invasive and normal adjacent human breast tissue and in breast cancers of increasingly aggressive subtype. Our analysis revealed that human breast cancer transformation is accompanied by an incremental increase in collagen deposition and a progressive linearization and thickening of interstitial collagen. The linearization of collagen was visualized as an overall increase in tissue birefringence and was most striking at the invasive front of the tumor where the stiffness of the stroma and cellular mechanosignaling were the highest. Amongst breast cancer subtypes we found that the stroma at the invasive region of the more aggressive Basal-like and Her2 tumor subtypes was the most heterogeneous and the stiffest when compared to the less aggressive luminal A and B subtypes. Intriguingly, we quantified the greatest number of infiltrating macrophages and the highest level of TGF beta signaling within the cells at the invasive front. We also established that stroma stiffness and the level of cellular TGF beta signaling positively correlated with each other and with the number of infiltrating tumor-activated macrophages, which was highest in the more aggressive tumor subtypes. These findings indicate that human breast cancer progression and aggression, collagen linearization and stromal stiffening are linked and implicate tissue inflammation and TGF beta. PMID:25959051

  11. Correlated Variability in the Breathing Pattern and End-Expiratory Lung Volumes in Conscious Humans

    PubMed Central

    Dellaca, Raffaele L.; Aliverti, Andrea; Lo Mauro, Antonella; Lutchen, Kenneth R.; Pedotti, Antonio; Suki, Bela

    2015-01-01

    In order to characterize the variability and correlation properties of spontaneous breathing in humans, the breathing pattern of 16 seated healthy subjects was studied during 40 min of quiet breathing using opto-electronic plethysmography, a contactless technology that measures total and compartmental chest wall volumes without interfering with the subjects breathing. From these signals, tidal volume (VT), respiratory time (TTOT) and the other breathing pattern parameters were computed breath-by-breath together with the end-expiratory total and compartmental (pulmonary rib cage and abdomen) chest wall volume changes. The correlation properties of these variables were quantified by detrended fluctuation analysis, computing the scaling exponentα. VT, TTOT and the other breathing pattern variables showed α values between 0.60 (for minute ventilation) to 0.71 (for respiratory rate), all significantly lower than the ones obtained for end-expiratory volumes, that ranged between 1.05 (for rib cage) and 1.13 (for abdomen) with no significant differences between compartments. The much stronger long-range correlations of the end expiratory volumes were interpreted by a neuromechanical network model consisting of five neuron groups in the brain respiratory center coupled with the mechanical properties of the respiratory system modeled as a simple Kelvin body. The model-based α for VT is 0.57, similar to the experimental data. While the α for TTOT was slightly lower than the experimental values, the model correctly predicted α for end-expiratory lung volumes (1.045). In conclusion, we propose that the correlations in the timing and amplitude of the physiological variables originate from the brain with the exception of end-expiratory lung volume, which shows the strongest correlations largely due to the contribution of the viscoelastic properties of the tissues. This cycle-by-cycle variability may have a significant impact on the functioning of adherent cells in the

  12. Identification of transcriptional macromolecular associations in human bone using browser based in silico analysis in a giant correlation matrix.

    PubMed

    Reppe, Sjur; Sachse, Daniel; Olstad, Ole K; Gautvik, Vigdis T; Sanderson, Paul; Datta, Harish K; Berg, Jens P; Gautvik, Kaare M

    2013-03-01

    Intracellular signaling is critically dependent on gene regulatory networks comprising physical molecular interactions. Presently, there is a lack of comprehensive databases for most human tissue types to verify such macromolecular interactions. We present a user friendly browser which helps to identify functional macromolecular interactions in human bone as significant correlations at the transcriptional level. The molecular skeletal phenotype has been characterized by transcriptome analysis of iliac crest bone biopsies from 84 postmenopausal women through quantifications of ~23,000 mRNA species. When the signal levels were inter-correlated, an array containing >260 million correlations was generated, thus recognizing the human bone interactome at the RNA level. The matrix correlation and p values were made easily accessible by a freely available online browser. We show that significant correlations within the giant matrix are reproduced in a replica set of 13 male vertebral biopsies. The identified correlations differ somewhat from transcriptional interactions identified in cell culture experiments and transgenic mice, thus demonstrating that care should be taken in extrapolating such results to the in vivo situation in human bone. The current giant matrix and web browser are a valuable tool for easy access to the human bone transcriptome and molecular interactions represented as significant correlations at the RNA-level. The browser and matrix should be a valuable hypothesis generating tool for identification of regulatory mechanisms and serve as a library of transcript relationships in human bone, a relatively inaccessible tissue.

  13. Computational assessment of mammography accreditation phantom images and correlation with human observer analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barufaldi, Bruno; Lau, Kristen C.; Schiabel, Homero; Maidment, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    Routine performance of basic test procedures and dose measurements are essential for assuring high quality of mammograms. International guidelines recommend that breast care providers ascertain that mammography systems produce a constant high quality image, using as low a radiation dose as is reasonably achievable. The main purpose of this research is to develop a framework to monitor radiation dose and image quality in a mixed breast screening and diagnostic imaging environment using an automated tracking system. This study presents a module of this framework, consisting of a computerized system to measure the image quality of the American College of Radiology mammography accreditation phantom. The methods developed combine correlation approaches, matched filters, and data mining techniques. These methods have been used to analyze radiological images of the accreditation phantom. The classification of structures of interest is based upon reports produced by four trained readers. As previously reported, human observers demonstrate great variation in their analysis due to the subjectivity of human visual inspection. The software tool was trained with three sets of 60 phantom images in order to generate decision trees using the software WEKA (Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis). When tested with 240 images during the classification step, the tool correctly classified 88%, 99%, and 98%, of fibers, speck groups and masses, respectively. The variation between the computer classification and human reading was comparable to the variation between human readers. This computerized system not only automates the quality control procedure in mammography, but also decreases the subjectivity in the expert evaluation of the phantom images.

  14. Correlations between Human Development and CO2 emissions: projections and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybski, D.; Costa, L.; Kropp, J.

    2011-12-01

    Although developing countries are called to participate on the efforts of reducing CO2 emissions in order to avoid dangerous climate change, the implications of CO2 reduction targets in human development standards of developing countries remain a matter of debate. We find positive and time dependent correlation between the Human Development Index (HDI) and per capita CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion. Based on this empirical relation, extrapolated HDI, and three population scenarios extracted from the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment report, we estimate future cumulative CO2 emissions. If current demographic and development trends are maintained, we estimate that by 2050 around 85% of the world's population will live in countries with high HDI (above 0.8) as defined in the United Nations Human Development Report 2009. In particular, we estimate that at least 300Gt of cumulative CO2 emissions between 2000 and 2050 are necessary for the development of developing countries in the year 2000. This value represents 30% of a previously calculated CO2 budget yielding a 75% probability of limiting global warming to 2°C. Since human development has been proved to be time and country dependent, we plead for future climate negotiations to consider a differentiated CO2 emissions reduction scheme for developing countries based on the achievement of concrete development goals.

  15. Bridging non-human primate correlates of protection to reassess the Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed booster schedule in humans.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Jarad M; Chen, Ligong; Dalton, Shannon; Niemuth, Nancy A; Sabourin, Carol L; Quinn, Conrad P

    2015-07-17

    Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA, BioThrax) is approved for use in humans as a priming series of 3 intramuscular (i.m.) injections (0, 1, 6 months; 3-IM) with boosters at 12 and 18 months, and annually thereafter for those at continued risk of infection. A reduction in AVA booster frequency would lessen the burden of vaccination, reduce the cumulative frequency of vaccine associated adverse events and potentially expand vaccine coverage by requiring fewer doses per schedule. Because human inhalation anthrax studies are neither feasible nor ethical, AVA efficacy estimates are determined using cross-species bridging of immune correlates of protection (COP) identified in animal models. We have previously reported that the AVA 3-IM priming series provided high levels of protection in non-human primates (NHP) against inhalation anthrax for up to 4 years after the first vaccination. Penalized logistic regressions of those NHP immunological data identified that anti-protective antigen (anti-PA) IgG concentration measured just prior to infectious challenge was the most accurate single COP. In the present analysis, cross-species logistic regression models of this COP were used to predict probability of survival during a 43 month study in humans receiving the current 3-dose priming and 4 boosters (12, 18, 30 and 42 months; 7-IM) and reduced schedules with boosters at months 18 and 42 only (5-IM), or at month 42 only (4-IM). All models predicted high survival probabilities for the reduced schedules from 7 to 43 months. The predicted survival probabilities for the reduced schedules were 86.8% (4-IM) and 95.8% (5-IM) at month 42 when antibody levels were lowest. The data indicated that 4-IM and 5-IM are both viable alternatives to the current AVA pre-exposure prophylaxis schedule.

  16. Genetic analysis of Raf1, Mdm2, c-Myc, Cdc25a and Cdc25b proto-oncogenes in 2',3'-dideoxycytidine- and 1,3-butadiene-induced lymphomas in B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, S; Söderkvist, P

    2000-07-20

    We have previously identified activation of ras proto-oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes including p53, p16(INK4a) and p15(INK4b) in 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC)- and/or 1,3-butadiene (BD)-induced lymphomas derived from B6C3F1 (C57BL/6xC3H/He) mice, indicating that alterations of ras signaling pathway, p53 and pRb growth control pathways are important in the development of these chemically induced lymphomas. However, there is still a subset of tumors that displayed no changes in these genes. Thus, we investigated whether the Raf1, Mdm2, c-Myc, Cdc25a and Cdc25b proto-oncogenes, which are implicated in the ras or p53 or pRb pathways, are alternative oncogenic target genes. Analyses of gross genomic alterations by Southern blots failed to reveal rearrangement or amplification in any of the tumors examined. Frequent point mutations on the substrate binding domain of the Raf1 gene has been reported in 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced murine lymphomas and lung tumors, along with a conspicuous lack of ras mutations [U. Naumann, I. Eisenmann-Tappe, U.R. Rapp, The role of raf kinases in development and growth of tumors, Recent Results Cancer Res., 143 (1997) 237-244]. To investigate whether Raf1 mutation is involved in our set of tumor especially those without ras mutations, the PCR-based single-strand conformation analyses (SSCA) and direct DNA sequencing were employed. No mutations but four genetic polymorphisms between C57BL/6 and C3H/He were found, with two of them reported as point mutations previously (op. cit.). The polymorphisms were utilized for allelic loss study of Raf1 locus. Losses of heterozygosity were found in six of 31 BD-induced lymphomas. These results indicate that genetic alterations of c-Myc, Cdc25, Raf1 and Mdm2 proto-oncogenes may not be involved in the development of ddC- and BD-induced lymphomas and the inactivation of tumor suppressor gene(s) located close to Raf1 gene might be important in the development of a subset of BD

  17. A novel measure to determine viewing priority and its neural correlates in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Marsman, Jan-Bernard C; Cornelissen, Frans W; Dorr, Michael; Vig, Eleonora; Barth, Erhardt; Renken, Remco J

    2016-01-01

    A key property of human visual behavior is the very frequent movement of our eyes to potentially relevant information in the environment. Observers thus continuously have to prioritize information for directing their eyes to. Research in this field has been hampered by a lack of appropriate measures and tools. Here, we propose and validate a novel measure of priority that takes advantage of the variability in the natural viewing behavior of individual observers. In short, our measure assumes that priority is low when observers' gaze behavior is inconsistent and high when it is very consistent. We calculated priority for gaze data obtained during an experiment in which participants viewed dynamic natural scenes while we simultaneously recorded their gaze position and brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Our priority measure shows only limited correlation with various saliency, surprise, and motion measures, indicating it is assessing a distinct property of visual behavior. Finally, we correlated our priority measure with the BOLD signal, thereby revealing activity in a select number of human occipital and parietal areas. This suggests the presence of a cortical network involved in computing and representing viewing priority. We conclude that our new analysis method allows for empirically establishing the priority of events in near-natural vision paradigms. PMID:27058271

  18. Transcriptional correlates of disease outcome in anticoagulant-treated non-human primates infected with ebolavirus.

    PubMed

    Garamszegi, Sara; Yen, Judy Y; Honko, Anna N; Geisbert, Joan B; Rubins, Kathleen H; Geisbert, Thomas W; Xia, Yu; Hensley, Lisa E; Connor, John H

    2014-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) infection in humans and non-human primates (NHPs) is highly lethal, and there is limited understanding of the mechanisms associated with pathogenesis and survival. Here, we describe a transcriptomic analysis of NHPs that survived lethal EBOV infection, compared to NHPs that did not survive. It has been previously demonstrated that anticoagulant therapeutics increase the survival rate in EBOV-infected NHPs, and that the characteristic transcriptional profile of immune response changes in anticoagulant-treated NHPs. In order to identify transcriptional signatures that correlate with survival following EBOV infection, we compared the mRNA expression profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from EBOV-infected NHPs that received anticoagulant treatment, to those that did not receive treatment. We identified a small set of 20 genes that are highly confident predictors and can accurately distinguish between surviving and non-surviving animals. In addition, we identified a larger predictive signature of 238 genes that correlated with disease outcome and treatment; this latter signature was associated with a variety of host responses, such as the inflammatory response, T cell death, and inhibition of viral replication. Notably, among survival-associated genes were subsets of genes that are transcriptionally regulated by (1) CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha, (2) tumor protein 53, and (3) megakaryoblastic leukemia 1 and myocardin-like protein 2. These pathways merit further investigation as potential transcriptional signatures of host immune response to EBOV infection. PMID:25079789

  19. Neural correlates of spatial and nonspatial attention determined using intracranial electroencephalographic signals in humans.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Young; Kim, Taekyung; Park, Jinsick; Lee, Eun Mi; Ryu, Han Uk; Kim, Sun I; Kim, In Young; Kang, Joong Koo; Jang, Dong Pyo; Husain, Masud

    2016-08-01

    Few studies have directly compared the neural correlates of spatial attention (i.e., attention to a particular location) and nonspatial attention (i.e., attention to a feature in the visual scene) using well-controlled tasks. Here, we investigated the neural correlates of spatial and nonspatial attention in humans using intracranial electroencephalography. The topography and number of electrodes showing significant event-related desynchronization (ERD) or event-related synchronization (ERS) in different frequency bands were studied in 13 epileptic patients. Performance was not significantly different between the two conditions. In both conditions, ERD in the low-frequency bands and ERS in the high-frequency bands were present bilaterally in the parietal cortex (prominently on the right hemisphere) and frontal regions. In addition to these common changes, spatial attention involved right-lateralized activity that was maximal in the right superior parietal lobule (SPL), whereas nonspatial attention involved wider brain networks including the bilateral parietal, frontal, and temporal regions, but still had maximal activity in the right parietal lobe. Within the parietal lobe, spatial attention involved ERD or ERS in the right SPL, whereas nonspatial attention involved ERD or ERS in the right inferior parietal lobule. These findings reveal that common as well as different brain networks are engaged in spatial and nonspatial attention. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3041-3054, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27125904

  20. Neural correlates of spatial and nonspatial attention determined using intracranial electroencephalographic signals in humans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ga Young; Kim, Taekyung; Park, Jinsick; Lee, Eun Mi; Ryu, Han Uk; Kim, Sun I.; Kim, In Young; Husain, Masud

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have directly compared the neural correlates of spatial attention (i.e., attention to a particular location) and nonspatial attention (i.e., attention to a feature in the visual scene) using well‐controlled tasks. Here, we investigated the neural correlates of spatial and nonspatial attention in humans using intracranial electroencephalography. The topography and number of electrodes showing significant event‐related desynchronization (ERD) or event‐related synchronization (ERS) in different frequency bands were studied in 13 epileptic patients. Performance was not significantly different between the two conditions. In both conditions, ERD in the low‐frequency bands and ERS in the high‐frequency bands were present bilaterally in the parietal cortex (prominently on the right hemisphere) and frontal regions. In addition to these common changes, spatial attention involved right‐lateralized activity that was maximal in the right superior parietal lobule (SPL), whereas nonspatial attention involved wider brain networks including the bilateral parietal, frontal, and temporal regions, but still had maximal activity in the right parietal lobe. Within the parietal lobe, spatial attention involved ERD or ERS in the right SPL, whereas nonspatial attention involved ERD or ERS in the right inferior parietal lobule. These findings reveal that common as well as different brain networks are engaged in spatial and nonspatial attention. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3041–3054, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27125904

  1. Dynamic biomechanics correlate with histopathology in human tibial cartilage: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Young, Allan A; Appleyard, Richard C; Smith, Margaret M; Melrose, James; Little, Christopher B

    2007-09-01

    Improved staging of cartilage degeneration is required, particularly during early stages when minimal surface damage is visible arthroscopically. Degradation of articular cartilage extracellular matrix, resulting from degenerative changes associated with osteoarthritis, can influence its functional properties. Cartilage mechanical properties therefore may provide a quantitative method for monitoring degenerative change in this tissue. We determined whether dynamic mechanical properties of cartilage (effective shear modulus and phase lag) measured with a handheld indenter correlated with histopathology scores, proteoglycan, and collagen content or expression of chondrocyte-specific (aggrecan, collagen II) or dedifferentiation (collagen I and III) genes in human osteoarthritic cartilage with International Cartilage Repair Society scores of 0 to 1. We observed an association between the histopathologic stage of cartilage disease and dynamic shear modulus and phase lag. In contrast, there generally was a poor relationship between cartilage biomechanical properties and biochemistry with the only noteworthy correlation being between shear modulus and collagen. Phase lag but not shear modulus correlated with gene expression. These data support the potential of dynamic indentation for assessing the stage of cartilage degeneration in tissue with minimal gross surface damage.

  2. A correlative review of acetylcholine synthesis in relation to histopathology of the human syncytiotrophoblast.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, M

    1986-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is localized in the syncytiotrophoblast layer of the human placental villous tissue. An attempt was made to correlate the ACh synthesis in different pathological placentas with the histopathology of the syncytiotrophoblast available in the literature. The ACh synthesis was estimated by 'in vitro' incubation of the placental tissue. Full-term (36-38 weeks) vaginally delivered pathological placentas and hydatid moles (28 weeks) were compared with normal placentas of the same age. The results suggested that: ACh synthesis is normal in states with normal syncytiotrophoblast (e.g., healthy greater than 42 week placenta, placenta praevia, twins, and hydramnios); high ACh synthesis is correlated with hormonal and immunological changes (e.g., diabetes mellitus and Rh-incompatibility); low levels of ACh synthesis occur in states with moderate syncytial degeneration (e.g., nephrotic syndrome and essential hypertension); very poor ACh synthesis occurs when syncytial degeneration is advanced (e.g., preeclampsia, eclampsia, intra-uterine death of fetus, vesicles of hydatid mole and placental tissue infarcts); and ACh synthesis is nil in material that is completely devoid of syncytiotrophoblast (e.g., placental tissue-like material, which rarely appears in between the vesicles of hydatid moles). In essence, the degree of reduction in ACh synthesis seems to correlate with the state of the syncytiotrophoblast in various pathological conditions; and ACh synthesis is greatly reduced during syncytial degeneration. It is concluded that the capacity of the placenta to synthesize ACh reflects the state of the syncytiotrophoblast. PMID:3799152

  3. Quantitative ultrashort echo time (UTE) MRI of human cortical bone: correlation with porosity and biomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Bae, Won C; Chen, Peter C; Chung, Christine B; Masuda, Koichi; D'Lima, Darryl; Du, Jiang

    2012-04-01

    In this study we describe the use of ultrashort echo time (UTE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate short and long T2* components as well as the water content of cortical bone. Fourteen human cadaveric distal femur and proximal tibia were sectioned to produce 44 rectangular slabs of cortical bone for quantitative UTE MR imaging, microcomputed tomography (µCT), and biomechanical testing. A two-dimensional (2D) UTE pulse sequence with a minimal nominal TE of 8 µseconds was used together with bicomponent analysis to quantify the bound and free water in cortical bone using a clinical 3T scanner. Total water concentration was measured using a 3D UTE sequence together with a reference water phantom. UTE MR measures of water content (total, free, and bound), T2* (short and long), and short and long T2* fractions were compared with porosity assessed with µCT, as well as elastic (modulus, yield stress, and strain) and failure (ultimate stress, failure strain, and energy) properties, using Pearson correlation. Porosity significantly correlated positively with total (R(2)  = 0.23; p < 0.01) and free (R(2)  = 0.31; p < 0.001) water content as well as long T2* fraction (R(2)  = 0.25; p < 0.001), and negatively with short T2* fraction and short T2* (R(2)  = 0.24; p < 0.01). Failure strain significantly correlated positively with short T2* (R(2)  = 0.29; p < 0.001), ultimate stress significantly correlated negatively with total (R(2)  = 0.25; p < 0.001) and bound (R(2)  = 0.22; p < 0.01) water content, and failure energy significantly correlated positively with both short (R(2)  = 0 30; p < 0.001) and long (R(2)  = 0.17; p < 0.01) T2* values. These results suggest that UTE MR measures are sensitive to the structure and failure properties of human cortical bone, and may provide a novel way of evaluating cortical bone quality.

  4. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Global NDVI Trends: Correlations with Climate and Human Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIU, Y.; Li, S.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: Changes in vegetation activity are driven by multiple natural and anthropogenic factors, which can be reflected by Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) derived from satellite. In this paper, NDVI trends from 1982 to 2012 are first estimated by the Theil-Sen median slope method to explore their spatial and temporal patterns. Then the impact of climate variables and human activity on the observed NDVI trends is analyzed. Our results show on average NDVI increased by 0.46×10-3 per year from 1982 to 2012 globally with decadal variations. For most regions of the world, a greening (increasing) - browning(decreasing) - greening (G-B-G) trend is observed over the periods 1982-2004, 1995-2004, and 2005-2012, respectively. A positive partial correlation of NDVI and temperature is observed in the first period but it decreases and occasionally becomes negative in the following periods, especially in the Humid Temperate and Dry Domain Regions. This suggests a weakened effect of temperature on vegetation growth. Precipitation, on the other hand, is found to have a positive impact on the NDVI trend. This effect becomes stronger in the third period of 1995-2004, especially in the Dry Domain Region. Anthropogenic effects and human activities, derived here from the Human Footprint Dataset and the associated Human Influence Index (HII), have varied impacts on the magnitude (absolute value) of the NDVI trends across continents. Significant positive effects are found in Asia, Africa, and Europe, suggesting that intensive human activity could accelerate the change in NDVI and vegetation. A more accurate attribution of vegetation change to specific climatic and anthropogenic factors is instrumental to understand vegetation dynamics and requires further research.

  5. Functional and morphological correlates of mandibular symphyseal form in a living human sample.

    PubMed

    Holton, Nathan E; Franciscus, Robert G; Ravosa, Matthew J; Southard, Thomas E

    2014-03-01

    Variation in recent human mandibular form is often thought to reflect differences in masticatory behavior associated with variation in food preparation and subsistence strategies. Nevertheless, while mandibular variation in some human comparisons appear to reflect differences in functional loading, other comparisons indicate that this relationship is not universal. This suggests that morphological variation in the mandible is influenced by other factors that may obscure the effects of loading on mandibular form. It is likely that highly strained mandibular regions, including the corpus, are influenced by well-established patterns of lower facial skeletal integration. As such, it is unclear to what degree mandibular form reflects localized stresses incurred during mastication vs. a larger set of correlated features that may influence bone distribution patterns. In this study, we examine the relationship between mandibular symphyseal bone distribution (i.e., second moments of area, cortical bone area) and masticatory force production (i.e., in vivo maximal bite force magnitude and estimated symphyseal bending forces) along with lower facial shape variation in a sample of n = 20 living human male subjects. Our results indicate that while some aspects of symphyseal form (e.g., wishboning resistance) are significantly correlated with estimates of symphyseal bending force magnitude, others (i.e., vertical bending resistance) are more closely tied to variation in lower facial shape. This suggests that while the symphysis reflects variation in some variables related to functional loading, the complex and multifactorial influences on symphyseal form underscores the importance of exercising caution when inferring function from the mandible especially in narrow taxonomic comparisons.

  6. A 2D correlation Raman spectroscopy analysis of a human cataractous lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacharz, Julia; Wesełucha-Birczyńska, Aleksandra; Paluszkiewicz, Czesława; Chaniecki, Piotr; Błażewicz, Marta

    2016-11-01

    This work is a continuation of our study of a cataractous human eye lens removed after phacoemulsification surgery. There are clear differences in the lens colors that allowed for distinguishing two opaque phases in the obtained biological material: the white- and yellow-phase. The Raman spectroscopy and 2D correlation spectroscopy method were used to trace a pathologically altered human cataract lens at a molecular level. Although the Raman spectra of these two phases are relatively similar, taking advantage of 2D correlation, and considering time as an external perturbation, the synchronous and asynchronous spectra were obtained showing completely different patterns. Prominent synchronous auto-peaks appear at 3340, 2920, 1736, 1665 and 1083 cm-1 for the white-, and at 2929 and 1670 cm-1 for the yellow phase. The white phase is characterized by intensive asynchronous peaks at -(2936, 3360), -(1650, 1674) and +(1620,1678). The modifications in the water contained in the white phase structure are ahead of the changes in the protein (CH3-groups), furthermore changes in β-conformation are asynchronous with respect to the α-structure. The yellow phase demonstrates asynchronous peaks: +(2857, 2928), +(1645,1673), +(1663, 1679), and +(1672,1707). These illustrate concomitant modifications in the β- and unordered conformation. Both forms of cataractous human eye lens, white- and yellow-phases, are degenerate forms of the eye lens proteins, both are arranged in a different way. The main differences are observed for the amide I, methyl, methylene and Osbnd H vibrational band region. The effect of Asp, Glu and Tyr amino acids in cataractous lens transformations was observed.

  7. PIXE analysis of human serum - A preliminary study of the correlation between trace elements in human serum and the ``Deficiency Syndrome Complex'' theory of traditional Chinese medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming-chien, Li; Ming-guang, Tan; Jun-fa, Chin; Kang-long, Shen; Zhi-xiang, Chen; Jia-hua, Chang; Wen, Zhu; Wei-yi, Li; Zong-qin, Xia; An-kun, Kuang

    1981-03-01

    To be able to study the correlation between trace elements and the "Deficiency Syndrome Complex" theory of traditional Chinese medicine, we have used a completely automated PIXE analysis system to determine the trace element concentrations in human serum. The experimental results show a marked correlation between the concentrations of trace elements in serum and the two types of patients with the "Deficiency Syndrome Complex".

  8. Alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells correlate with metastatic potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piao, C. Q.; Willey, J. C.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced lung cancer are not known. In the present study, alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human papillomavirus-immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by a single low dose of either alpha-particles or 1 GeV/nucleon (56)Fe were analyzed by PCR-single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) coupled with sequencing analysis and immunoprecipitation assay. A total of nine primary and four secondary tumor cell lines, three of which were metastatic, together with the parental BEP2D and primary human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were studied. The immunoprecipitation assay showed overexpression of mutant p53 proteins in all the tumor lines but not in NHBE and BEP2D cells. PCR-SSCP and sequencing analysis found band shifts and gene mutations in all four of the secondary tumors. A G-->T transversion in codon 139 in exon 5 that replaced Lys with Asn was detected in two tumor lines. One mutation each, involving a G-->T transversion in codon 215 in exon 6 (Ser-->lle) and a G-->A transition in codon 373 in exon 8 (Arg-->His), was identified in the remaining two secondary tumors. These results suggest that p53 alterations correlate with tumorigenesis in the BEP2D cell model and that mutations in the p53 gene may be indicative of metastatic potential.

  9. Correlations between Synaptic Initiation and Meiotic Recombination: A Study of Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gruhn, Jennifer R.; Al-Asmar, Nasser; Fasnacht, Rachael; Maylor-Hagen, Heather; Peinado, Vanessa; Rubio, Carmen; Broman, Karl W.; Hunt, Patricia A.; Hassold, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by programmed double strand breaks (DSBs), only a small subset of which are resolved into crossovers (COs). The mechanism determining the location of these COs is not well understood. Studies in plants, fungi, and insects indicate that the same genomic regions are involved in synaptic initiation and COs, suggesting that early homolog alignment is correlated with the eventual resolution of DSBs as COs. It is generally assumed that this relationship extends to mammals, but little effort has been made to test this idea. Accordingly, we conducted an analysis of synaptic initiation sites (SISs) and COs in human and mouse spermatocytes and oocytes. In contrast to our expectation, we observed remarkable sex- and species-specific differences, including pronounced differences between human males and females in both the number and chromosomal location of SISs. Further, the combined data from our studies in mice and humans suggest that the relationship between SISs and COs in mammals is a complex one that is not dictated by the sites of synaptic initiation as reported in other organisms, although it is clearly influenced by them. PMID:26749305

  10. Gene Expression Correlations in Human Cancer Cell Lines Define Molecular Interaction Networks for Epithelial Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Kurt W.; Zeeberg, Barry M.; Reinhold, William C.; Pommier, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Using gene expression data to enhance our knowledge of control networks relevant to cancer biology and therapy is a challenging but urgent task. Based on the premise that genes that are expressed together in a variety of cell types are likely to functions together, we derived mutually correlated genes that function together in various processes in epithelial-like tumor cells. Expression-correlated genes were derived from data for the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines, as well as data from the Broad Institute’s CCLE cell lines. NCI-60 cell lines that selectively expressed a mutually correlated subset of tight junction genes served as a signature for epithelial-like cancer cells. Those signature cell lines served as a seed to derive other correlated genes, many of which had various other epithelial-related functions. Literature survey yielded molecular interaction and function information about those genes, from which molecular interaction maps were assembled. Many of the genes had epithelial functions unrelated to tight junctions, demonstrating that new function categories were elicited. The most highly correlated genes were implicated in the following epithelial functions: interactions at tight junctions (CLDN7, CLDN4, CLDN3, MARVELD3, MARVELD2, TJP3, CGN, CRB3, LLGL2, EPCAM, LNX1); interactions at adherens junctions (CDH1, ADAP1, CAMSAP3); interactions at desmosomes (PPL, PKP3, JUP); transcription regulation of cell-cell junction complexes (GRHL1 and 2); epithelial RNA splicing regulators (ESRP1 and 2); epithelial vesicle traffic (RAB25, EPN3, GRHL2, EHF, ADAP1, MYO5B); epithelial Ca(+2) signaling (ATP2C2, S100A14, BSPRY); terminal differentiation of epithelial cells (OVOL1 and 2, ST14, PRSS8, SPINT1 and 2); maintenance of apico-basal polarity (RAB25, LLGL2, EPN3). The findings provide a foundation for future studies to elucidate the functions of regulatory networks specific to epithelial-like cancer cells and to probe for anti-cancer drug targets. PMID:24940735

  11. DNA fragmentation induced by fe ions in human cells: shielding influence on spatially correlated damage

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli, F.; Belli, M.; Campa, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Dini, V.; Esposito, G.; Rydberg, B.; Simone, G.; Tabocchini, M.A.

    2003-11-19

    Outside the magnetic field of the Earth, high energy heavy ions constitute a relevant part of the biologically significant dose to astronauts during the very long travels through space. The typical pattern of energy deposition in the matter by heavy ions on the microscopic scale is believed to produce spatially correlated damage in the DNA which is critical for radiobiological effects. We have investigated the influence of a lucite shielding on the initial production of very small DNA fragments in human fibroblasts irradiated with 1 GeV/u iron (Fe) ions. We also used small gamma, Greek-rays as reference radiation. Our results show: (1) a lower effect per incident ion when the shielding is used; (2) an higher DNA Double Strand Breaks (DSB) induction by Fe ions than by small gamma, Greek-rays in the size range 123 kbp; (3) a non-random DNA DSB induction by Fe ions.

  12. Correlation of mast cells in different stages of human periodontal diseases: Pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Raina; Gupta, Jagriti; Gupta, Krishna Kumar; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate and correlate the relationship between mast cells counts and different stages of human periodontal diseases. Materials and Methods: The study sample comprised 50 patients, which were divided into three groups, consisting of 10 cases of clinically healthy gingival tissues (control group) 20 cases of dental plaque-induced gingivitis with no attachment loss and 20 cases of localized chronic periodontitis (LCP) characterized by the loss of periodontal support. The samples for control group were obtained during tooth extractions for orthodontic reasons. The specimens were immediately fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin. Conclusion: In this study, LCP cases had higher mast cell counts compared to gingivitis sites or healthy tissues. Increased mast cell counts in the progressing sites of periodontal diseases may indicate the importance of these cells in the progression of chronic periodontitis. PMID:27194868

  13. DNA fragmentation induced by Fe ions in human cells: shielding influence on spatially correlated damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonelli, F.; Belli, M.; Campa, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Dini, V.; Esposito, G.; Rydberg, B.; Simone, G.; Tabocchini, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    Outside the magnetic field of the Earth, high energy heavy ions constitute a relevant part of the biologically significant dose to astronauts during the very long travels through space. The typical pattern of energy deposition in the matter by heavy ions on the microscopic scale is believed to produce spatially correlated damage in the DNA which is critical for radiobiological effects. We have investigated the influence of a lucite shielding on the initial production of very small DNA fragments in human fibroblasts irradiated with 1 GeV/u iron (Fe) ions. We also used gamma rays as reference radiation. Our results show: (1) a lower effect per incident ion when the shielding is used; (2) an higher DNA Double Strand Breaks (DSB) induction by Fe ions than by gamma rays in the size range 1-23 kbp; (3) a non-random DNA DSB induction by Fe ions. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cystic fibrosis mice carrying the missense mutation G551D replicate human genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, S J; Alton, E W; Smith, S N; Lunn, D P; Farley, R; Lovelock, P K; Thomson, S A; Hume, D A; Lamb, D; Porteous, D J; Dorin, J R; Wainwright, B J

    1996-01-01

    We have generated a mouse carrying the human G551D mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) by a one-step gene targeting procedure. These mutant mice show cystic fibrosis pathology but have a reduced risk of fatal intestinal blockage compared with 'null' mutants, in keeping with the reduced incidence of meconium ileus in G551D patients. The G551D mutant mice show greatly reduced CFTR-related chloride transport, displaying activity intermediate between that of cftr(mlUNC) replacement ('null') and cftr(mlHGU) insertional (residual activity) mutants and equivalent to approximately 4% of wild-type CFTR activity. The long-term survival of these animals should provide an excellent model with which to study cystic fibrosis, and they illustrate the value of mouse models carrying relevant mutations for examining genotype-phenotype correlations. Images PMID:8605891

  15. Behavioral and genetic correlates of the neural response to infant crying among human fathers

    PubMed Central

    Mascaro, Jennifer S.; Hackett, Patrick D.; Gouzoules, Harold; Lori, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Although evolution has shaped human infant crying and the corresponding response from caregivers, there is marked variation in paternal involvement and caretaking behavior, highlighting the importance of understanding the neurobiology supporting optimal paternal responses to cries. We explored the neural response to infant cries in fathers of children aged 1–2, and its relationship with hormone levels, variation in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, parental attitudes and parental behavior. Although number of AR CAG trinucleotide repeats was positively correlated with neural activity in brain regions important for empathy (anterior insula and inferior frontal gyrus), restrictive attitudes were inversely correlated with neural activity in these regions and with regions involved with emotion regulation (orbitofrontal cortex). Anterior insula activity had a non-linear relationship with paternal caregiving, such that fathers with intermediate activation were most involved. These results suggest that restrictive attitudes may be associated with decreased empathy and emotion regulation in response to a child in distress, and that moderate anterior insula activity reflects an optimal level of arousal that supports engaged fathering. PMID:24336349

  16. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression in human airway correlates with lung function.

    PubMed

    Lam, David Chi-Leung; Luo, Susan Yang; Fu, Kin-Hang; Lui, Macy Mei-Sze; Chan, Koon-Ho; Wistuba, Ignacio Ivans; Gao, Boning; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Ip, Mary Sau-Man; Minna, John Dorrance

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine and its derivatives, by binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) on bronchial epithelial cells, can regulate cellular signaling and inflammatory processes. Delineation of nAChR subtypes and their responses to nicotine stimulation in bronchial epithelium may provide information for therapeutic targeting in smoking-related inflammation in the airway. Expression of nAChR subunit genes in 60 bronchial epithelial biopsies and immunohistochemical staining for the subcellular locations of nAChR subunit expression were evaluated. Seven human bronchial epithelial cell lines (HBECs) were exposed to nicotine in vitro for their response in nAChR subunit gene expression to nicotine exposure and removal. The relative normalized amount of expression of nAChR α4, α5, and α7 and immunohistochemical staining intensity of nAChR α4, α5, and β3 expression showed significant correlation with lung function parameters. Nicotine stimulation in HBECs resulted in transient increase in the levels of nAChR α5 and α6 but more sustained increase in nAChR α7 expression. nAChR expression in bronchial epithelium was found to correlate with lung function. Nicotine exposure in HBECs resulted in both short and longer term responses in nAChR subunit gene expression. These results gave insight into the potential of targeting nAChRs for therapy in smoking-related inflammation in the airway. PMID:26608528

  17. The expression of AIB1 correlates with cellular proliferation in human prolactinomas.

    PubMed

    Carretero, José; Blanco, Enrique J; Carretero, Manuel; Carretero-Hernández, Marta; García-Barrado, Ma José; Iglesias-Osma, Ma Carmen; Burks, Deborah Jane; Font de Mora, Jaime

    2013-05-01

    Estrogens as well as certain growth factors strongly influence the development and growth of prolactinomas. However, the molecular mechanisms by which extracellular factors trigger prolactinomas are not well known. Amplified in breast cancer 1 (AIB1), also known as steroid receptor co-activator 3 (SRC-3), belongs to the p160/SRC family of nuclear receptor co-activators and is a major co-activator of the estrogen receptor. Here, we report that the estrogen receptor coactivator AIB1 is overexpressed in human prolactinomas and correlates with the detection of aromatase and estrogen receptor α (ERα). Of the 87 pituitary tumors evaluated in women, 56%, corresponding to hyperoprolactinemic women, contained an enriched population of prolactin-positive cells and hence were further classified as prolactinomas. All prolactinomas stained positive for both ERα and AIB1. Moreover, AIB1 sub-cellular distribution was indicative of the cell-cycle status of tumors; the nuclear expression of AIB1 was correlated with proliferative markers whereas the cytoplasmic localization of AIB1 coincided with active caspase-3. Thus, our results demonstrate for the first time that AIB1 is expressed in prolactinomas and suggest its participation in the regulation of proliferation and apoptosis of tumoral cells. Because aromatase expression is also enhanced in these prolactinomas and it is involved in the local production of estradiol, both mechanisms, ER-AIB1 and aromatase could be related.

  18. p53 mutations and human papillomavirus DNA in oral squamous cell carcinoma: correlation with apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Koh, J. Y.; Cho, N. P.; Kong, G.; Lee, J. D.; Yoon, K.

    1998-01-01

    Forty-two oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) were analysed for p53 mutations and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection to examine the prevalency of these factors and correlation with apoptotic index (AI; number of apoptotic cells per 100 tumour cells) of the tumour tissue. In polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-Southern blot analysis, HPV DNAs were detected from 22 out of 42 SCCs (52%) with predominance of HPV-16 (68%). p53 mutations in exons 5-8, screened by nested PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis, were observed in 16 of 42 tumours (38%). The state of the p53 gene did not show any correlation with HPV infection. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labelling (TUNEL) method was used for detection of apoptotic cells. The mean AI was 2.35, ranging from 0.31 to 6.63. SCCs associated with p53 mutation had significantly lower AI than those without p53 mutation (P < 0.01), whereas no difference in AI was found between SCCs with and without HPV infection. The results of this study confirmed that HPV infection and/or p53 mutations are implicated, but are not mutually exclusive events, in carcinogenesis of oral SCC and also showed that decrease in apoptosis is more closely related to p53 mutation than HPV infection. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9703282

  19. Correlation of protein and gene expression profiles of inflammatory proteins after endotoxin challenge in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Uma; Conway, Theresa M; Murdock, Paul; Mooney, Jeff L; Clark, Steve; Hedge, Priti; Bond, Brian C; Jazwinska, Elizabeth C; Barnes, Michael R; Tobin, Frank; Damian-Iordachi, Valeriu; Greller, Larry; Hurle, Mark; Stubbs, Andrew P; Li, Zhong; Valoret, Elizabeth I; Erickson-Miller, Connie; Cass, Lisa; Levitt, Blanche; Davis, Hugh M; Jorkasky, Diane K; Williams, William V

    2005-07-01

    Administration of endotoxin (LPS) in humans results in profound physiological responses, including activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the release of inflammatory factors. The time course of the response of selected inflammatory proteins was examined in healthy subjects (n = 6) administered a single intravenous dose of the purified derivative of endotoxin (3.0 ng/kg). Microarray analysis demonstrated changes in the expression of a number of genes, which were confirmed in separate in vitro endotoxin stimulation experiments. Subsequent TaqMan analysis of genes of interest indicated time-dependent changes in the expression of many of these genes. This included pre-B cell enhancing factor, which was identified on microarray analysis as being markedly upregulated following endotoxin stimulation. Protein expression of the genes examined by TaqMan analysis was measured and demonstrated the appearance of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and sTNF-R proteins in the plasma beginning within 1 h after dosing, followed by other cytokines/ inflammatory markers (e.g., IL-1ra, G-CSF, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10) and suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS-1 and SOCS-3). In general, cytokine protein expression correlated well with gene expression; however, the temporal profile of expression of some genes did not correlate well with the protein data. For many of these proteins, the lack of correlation was attributable to alternate tissue sources, which were demonstrated on TaqMan analysis. Principal component analysis indicated that cytokines could be grouped according to their temporal pattern of response, with most transcript levels returning to baseline 24 h following endotoxin administration. The combination of cDNA microarray and TaqMan analysis to identify and quantify changes in gene expression, along with the analysis of protein expression, can be useful in investigating inflammatory and other diseases.

  20. Remembering forward: Neural correlates of memory and prediction in human motor adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Scheidt, Robert A; Zimbelman, Janice L; Salowitz, Nicole M G; Suminski, Aaron J; Mosier, Kristine M; Houk, James; Simo, Lucia

    2011-01-01

    We used functional MR imaging (FMRI), a robotic manipulandum and systems identification techniques to examine neural correlates of predictive compensation for spring-like loads during goal-directed wrist movements in neurologically-intact humans. Although load changed unpredictably from one trial to the next, subjects nevertheless used sensorimotor memories from recent movements to predict and compensate upcoming loads. Prediction enabled subjects to adapt performance so that the task was accomplished with minimum effort. Population analyses of functional images revealed a distributed, bilateral network of cortical and subcortical activity supporting predictive load compensation during visual target capture. Cortical regions - including prefrontal, parietal and hippocampal cortices - exhibited trial-by-trial fluctuations in BOLD signal consistent with the storage and recall of sensorimotor memories or “states” important for spatial working memory. Bilateral activations in associative regions of the striatum demonstrated temporal correlation with the magnitude of kinematic performance error (a signal that could drive reward-optimizing reinforcement learning and the prospective scaling of previously learned motor programs). BOLD signal correlations with load prediction were observed in the cerebellar cortex and red nuclei (consistent with the idea that these structures generate adaptive fusimotor signals facilitating cancellation of expected proprioceptive feedback, as required for conditional feedback adjustments to ongoing motor commands and feedback error learning). Analysis of single subject images revealed that predictive activity was at least as likely to be observed in more than one of these neural systems as in just one. We conclude therefore that motor adaptation is mediated by predictive compensations supported by multiple, distributed, cortical and subcortical structures. PMID:21840405

  1. Inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in human colorectal cancer: correlation with tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cianchi, Fabio; Cortesini, Camillo; Fantappiè, Ornella; Messerini, Luca; Schiavone, Nicola; Vannacci, Alfredo; Nistri, Silvia; Sardi, Iacopo; Baroni, Gianna; Marzocca, Cosimo; Perna, Federico; Mazzanti, Roberto; Bechi, Paolo; Masini, Emanuela

    2003-03-01

    To investigate the potential involvement of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway in colorectal carcinogenesis, we correlated the expression and the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) with the degree of tumor angiogenesis in human colorectal cancer. Tumor samples and adjacent normal mucosa were obtained from 46 surgical specimens. Immunohistochemical expression of iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and CD31 was analyzed on paraffin-embedded tissue sections. iNOS activity and cyclic GMP levels were assessed by specific biochemical assays. iNOS protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. iNOS and VEGF mRNA levels were evaluated using Northern blot analysis. Both iNOS and VEGF expressions correlated significantly with intratumor microvessel density (r(s) = 0.31, P = 0.02 and r(s) = 0.67, P < 0.0001, respectively). A significant correlation was also found between iNOS and VEGF expression (P = 0.001). iNOS activity and cyclic GMP production were significantly higher in the cancer specimens than in the normal mucosa (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively), as well as in metastatic tumors than in nonmetastatic ones (P = 0.002 and P = 0.04, respectively). Western and Northern blot analyses confirmed the up-regulation of the iNOS protein and gene in the tumor specimens as compared with normal mucosa. NO seems to play a role in colorectal cancer growth by promoting tumor angiogenesis. PMID:12598314

  2. Relationship between plasma IGF-I levels, in vitro correlates of immunity, and human senescence.

    PubMed

    Krishnaraj, R; Zaks, A; Unterman, T

    1998-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is a polypeptide mitogen which is regulated by growth hormone (GH). IGF-I mediates many of the biological functions of GH, including the maintenance of lymphoid mass and functions. Since GH secretion declines with age, we asked whether changes in the availability of IGF-I might contribute to age-associated alterations in immune functions. As a first step, we examined relationships between plasma levels of IGF-I and in vitro correlates of immunity in young and elderly subjects. Heparinized plasma and lymphocytes were collected from the peripheral blood of 34 healthy young (aged 27 +/- 0.9 years, mean +/- SEM) and 41 elderly (79 +/- 1.3 years) volunteers (31 males and 44 females in total). Plasma levels of IGF-I, measured by radioimmunoassay after the removal of IGF-I-binding proteins, were reduced among elders compared to young controls (138 +/- 8.7 ng/mL vs 80.2 +/- 4.7 ng/mL, P < 0.001). The number of circulating lymphocytes did not change with age. The proliferative response ([3H]thymidine uptake into DNA) of T-cells to concanavalin A and B-cells to pokeweed mitogen were reduced among elders (P < 0.05). An increased spontaneous antitumor natural killer (NK) activity (P < 0.001) was accompanied by a higher percentage of CD16(+) NK cells among lymphocytes in older subjects (P < 0.001). The NK cell number was positively related to IGF-I levels in young volunteers but not among elders. Correlation analysis demonstrated a highly significant relationship between plasma IGF-I levels and T-cell (but not B-cell) proliferative response during aging (r = 0.492, P < 0.001). Our results imply that reduced immunocompetence may be one of the consequences of reduced IGF-I levels in human aging. Among the three types of immune cells tested, the T-cells were most sensitive to fluctuations in IGF-I levels. Reduced IGF-I availability may be one of the determinants of the decline in T-cell-mediated immune function in the elderly. To our knowledge

  3. Correlating optical coherence elastography based strain measurements with collagen content of the human ovarian tissue.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Sreyankar; Salehi, Hassan S; Wang, Tianheng; Wang, Xiaohong; Sanders, Melinda; Kueck, Angela; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2015-10-01

    In this manuscript, the initial feasibility of a catheter based phase stabilized swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system was studied for characterization of the strain inside different human ovarian tissue groups. The ovarian tissue samples were periodically compressed with 500 Hz square wave signal along the axial direction between the surface of an unfocused transducer and a glass cover slide. The displacement and corresponding strain were calculated during loading from different locations for each tissue sample. A total of 27 ex vivo ovaries from 16 patients were investigated. Statistically significant difference (p < 0.001) was observed between the average displacement and strain of the normal and malignant tissue groups. A sensitivity of 93.2% and a specificity of 83% were achieved using 25 microstrain (με) as the threshold. The collagen content of the tissues was quantified from the Sirius Red stained histological sections. The average collagen area fraction (CAF) obtained from the tissue groups were found to have a strong negative correlation (R = -0.75, p < 0.0001) with the amount of strain inside the tissue. This indicates much softer and degenerated tissue structure for the malignant ovaries as compared to the dense, collagen rich structure of the normal ovarian tissue. The initial results indicate that the swept source OCT system can be useful for estimating the elasticity of the human ovarian tissue. PMID:26504631

  4. Human keratin diseases: the increasing spectrum of disease and subtlety of the phenotype-genotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Irvine, A D; McLean, W H

    1999-05-01

    Keratins are obligate heterodimer proteins that form the intermediate filament cytoskeleton of all epithelial cells. Keratins are tissue and differentiation specific and are expressed in pairs of types I and II proteins. The spectrum of inherited human keratin diseases has steadily increased since the causative role of mutations in the basal keratinocyte keratins 5 and 14 in epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) was first reported in 1991. At the time of writing, mutations in 15 epithelial keratins and two trichocyte keratins have been associated with human diseases which include EBS, bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, ichthyosis bullosa of Siemens, diffuse and focal non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, pachyonychia congenita and monilethrix. Mutations in extracutaneous keratins have been reported in oral white sponge naevus and Meesmann's corneal dystrophy. New subtleties of phenotype-genotype correlation are emerging within the keratin diseases with widely varying clinical presentations attributable to similar mutations within the same keratin. Mutations in keratin-associated proteins have recently been reported for the first time. This article reviews clinical, ultrastructural and molecular aspects of all the keratin diseases described to date and delineates potential future areas of research in this field.

  5. Angiogenic gene signature in human pancreatic cancer correlates with TGF-beta and inflammatory transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Julie L.; Korc, Murray

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) are hypovascular, but overexpress pro-angiogenic factors and exhibit regions of microvasculature. Using RNA-seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we previously reported that ∼12% of PDACs have an angiogenesis gene signature with increased expression of multiple pro-angiogenic genes. By analyzing the recently expanded TCGA dataset, we now report that this signature is present in ∼35% of PDACs but that it is mostly distinct from an angiogenesis signature present in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs). These PDACs exhibit a transcriptome that reflects active TGF-β signaling, and up-regulation of several pro-inflammatory genes, and many members of JAK signaling pathways. Moreover, expression of SMAD4 and HDAC9 correlates with endothelial cell abundance in PDAC tissues. Concomitantly targeting the TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI) kinase with SB505124 and JAK1-2 with ruxolitinib suppresses JAK1 phosphorylation and blocks proliferative cross-talk between human pancreatic cancer cells (PCCs) and human endothelial cells (ECs), and these anti-proliferative effects were mimicked by JAK1 silencing in ECs. By contrast, either inhibitor alone does not suppress their enhanced proliferation in 3D co-cultures. These findings suggest that targeting both TGF-β and JAK1 signaling could be explored therapeutically in the 35% of PDAC patients whose cancers exhibit an angiogenesis gene signature. PMID:26586478

  6. Dose-response relationship for light intensity and ocular and electroencephalographic correlates of human alertness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cajochen, C.; Zeitzer, J. M.; Czeisler, C. A.; Dijk, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Light can elicit both circadian and acute physiological responses in humans. In a dose response protocol men and women were exposed to illuminances ranging from 3 to 9100 lux for 6.5 h during the early biological night after they had been exposed to <3 lux for several hours. Light exerted an acute alerting response as assessed by a reduction in the incidence of slow-eye movements, a reduction of EEG activity in the theta-alpha frequencies (power density in the 5-9 Hz range) as well as a reduction in self-reported sleepiness. This alerting response was positively correlated with the degree of melatonin suppression by light. In accordance with the dose response function for circadian resetting and melatonin suppression, the responses of all three indices of alertness to variations in illuminance were consistent with a logistic dose response curve. Half of the maximum alerting response to bright light of 9100 lux was obtained with room light of approximately 100 lux. This sensitivity to light indicates that variations in illuminance within the range of typical, ambient, room light (90-180 lux) can have a significant impact on subjective alertness and its electrophysiologic concomitants in humans during the early biological night.

  7. Global correlation analysis for microRNA and gene expression profiles in human obesity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiayu; Zhou, Changyu; Li, Jiarui; Su, Ziyuan; Sang, Haiyan; Jia, Erna; Si, Daoyuan

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is an increasing health problem associated with major adverse consequences for human health. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small endogenous non-coding RNAs, regulate the expression of genes that play roles in human body via posttranscriptional inhibition. To identify the miRNAs and their target genes involved in obesity, we downloaded the miRNA and gene expression profiles from gene expression omnibus (GEO) database and analyzed the differentially expressed miRNAs (DEMs) and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in adipose tissues from obese subjects compared to those from non-obese subjects. Then, we constructed the miRNA-target interaction network and conducted functional enrichment analysis of DEGs, and the targets negatively correlated with DEMs. We identified a total of 16 miRNAs and 192 genes that showed a significantly different expression and 3002 miRNA-target interaction pairs, including 182 regulatory pairs in obesity. Target genes of DEMs were found mainly enriched in several functions, such as collagen fibril organization, extracellular matrix part, and extracellular matrix structural constituent. Moreover, hsa-miR-425 and hsa-miR-126 had a significant number of target genes and hsa-miR-16/COL12A1 and hsa-miR-634/SLC4A4 interaction pairs are significantly co-expressed, suggesting that they might play important roles in the pathogenesis of obesity. Our study provides a bioinformatic basis for further research of molecular mechanism in obesity.

  8. Neural Correlates of Vocal Production and Motor Control in Human Heschl's Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Oya, Hiroyuki; Nourski, Kirill V.; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Larson, Charles R.; Brugge, John F.; Howard, Matthew A.; Greenlee, Jeremy D.W.

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated how pitch frequency, a perceptually relevant aspect of periodicity in natural human vocalizations, is encoded in Heschl's gyrus (HG), and how this information may be used to influence vocal pitch motor control. We recorded local field potentials from multicontact depth electrodes implanted in HG of 14 neurosurgical epilepsy patients as they vocalized vowel sounds and received brief (200 ms) pitch perturbations at 100 Cents in their auditory feedback. Event-related band power responses to vocalizations showed sustained frequency following responses that tracked voice fundamental frequency (F0) and were significantly enhanced in posteromedial HG during speaking compared with when subjects listened to the playback of their own voice. In addition to frequency following responses, a transient response component within the high gamma frequency band (75–150 Hz) was identified. When this response followed the onset of vocalization, the magnitude of the response was the same for the speaking and playback conditions. In contrast, when this response followed a pitch shift, its magnitude was significantly enhanced during speaking compared with playback. We also observed that, in anterolateral HG, the power of high gamma responses to pitch shifts correlated with the magnitude of compensatory vocal responses. These findings demonstrate a functional parcellation of HG with neural activity that encodes pitch in natural human voice, distinguishes between self-generated and passively heard vocalizations, detects discrepancies between the intended and heard vocalization, and contains information about the resulting behavioral vocal compensations in response to auditory feedback pitch perturbations. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The present study is a significant contribution to our understanding of sensor-motor mechanisms of vocal production and motor control. The findings demonstrate distinct functional parcellation of core and noncore areas within human

  9. Paclitaxel and beta-lapachone synergistically induce apoptosis in human retinoblastoma Y79 cells by downregulating the levels of phospho-Akt.

    PubMed

    D'Anneo, Antonella; Augello, Giuseppa; Santulli, Andrea; Giuliano, Michela; di Fiore, Riccardo; Messina, Concetta; Tesoriere, Giovanni; Vento, Renza

    2010-02-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) and beta-lapachone (LPC) are naturally occurring compounds that have shown a large spectrum of anticancer activity. In this article we show for the first time that PTX/LPC combination induces potent synergistic apoptotic effects in human retinoblastoma Y79 cells. Combination of suboptimal doses of PTX (0.3 nM) and LPC (1.5 microM) caused biochemical and morphological signs of apoptosis at 48 h of treatment. These effects were accompanied by potent lowering in inhibitor of apoptosis proteins and by activation of Bid and caspases 3 and 6 with lamin B and PARP breakdown. PTX/LPC combination acted by favoring p53 stabilization through a lowering in p-Akt levels and in ps166-MDM2, the phosphorylated-MDM2 form that enters the nucleus and induces p53 export and degradation. Treatment with wortmannin or transfection with a dominant negative form of Akt anticipated at 24 h the effects induced by PTX/LPC, suggesting a protective role against apoptosis played by Akt in Y79 cells. In line with these results, we demonstrated that Y79 cells contain constitutively active Akt, which forms a cytosolic complex with p53 and MDM2 driving p53 degradation. PTX/LPC treatment induced a weakness of Akt-MDM2-p53 complex and increased nuclear p53 levels. Our results suggest that phospho-Akt lowering is at the root of the apoptotic action exerted by PTX/LPC combination and provide strong validation for a treatment approach that targets survival signals represented by phospho-Akt and inhibitor of apoptosis proteins. PMID:19918798

  10. In human retinoblastoma Y79 cells okadaic acid-parthenolide co-treatment induces synergistic apoptotic effects, with PTEN as a key player.

    PubMed

    Di Fiore, Riccardo; Drago-Ferrante, Rosa; D'Anneo, Antonella; Augello, Giuseppa; Carlisi, Daniela; De Blasio, Anna; Giuliano, Michela; Tesoriere, Giovanni; Vento, Renza

    2013-10-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular malignancy of childhood. In developing countries, treatment is limited, long-term survival rates are low and current chemotherapy causes significant morbidity to pediatric patients and significantly limits dosing. Therefore there is an urgent need to identify new therapeutic strategies to improve the clinical outcome of patients with retinoblastoma. Here, we investigated the effects of two natural compounds okadaic acid (OKA) and parthenolide (PN) on human retinoblastoma Y79 cells. For the first time we showed that OKA/PN combination at subtoxic doses induces potent synergistic apoptotic effects accompanied by lowering in p-Akt levels, increasing in the stabilized forms of p53 and potent decrease in pS166-Mdm2. We also showed the key involvement of PTEN which, after OKA/PN treatment, potently increased before p53, thus suggesting that p53 activation was under PTEN action. Moreover, after PTEN-knockdown p-Akt/ pS166Mdm2 increased over basal levels and p53 significantly lowered, while OKA/PN treatment failed both to lower p-Akt and pS166-Mdm2 and to increase p53 below/over their basal levels respectively. OKA/PN treatment potently increased ROS levels whereas decreased those of GSH. Reducing cellular GSH by l-butathionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine treatment significantly anticipated the cytotoxic effect exerted by OKA/PN. Furthermore, the effects of OKA/PN treatment on both GSH content and cell viability were less pronounced in PTEN silenced cells than in control cells. The results provide strong suggestion for combining a treatment approach that targets the PTEN/Akt/Mdm2/p53 pathway. PMID:23938948

  11. The Neural Correlates of Chronic Symptoms of Vertigo Proneness in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Alsalman, Ola; Ost, Jan; Vanspauwen, Robby; Blaivie, Catherine; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular signals are of significant importance for variable functions including gaze stabilization, spatial perception, navigation, cognition, and bodily self-consciousness. The vestibular network governs functions that might be impaired in patients affected with vestibular dysfunction. It is currently unclear how different brain regions/networks process vestibular information and integrate the information into a unified spatial percept related to somatosensory awareness and whether people with recurrent balance complaints have a neural signature as a trait affecting their development of chronic symptoms of vertigo. Pivotal evidence points to a vestibular-related brain network in humans that is widely distributed in nature. By using resting state source localized electroencephalography in non-vertiginous state, electrophysiological changes in activity and functional connectivity of 23 patients with balance complaints where chronic symptoms of vertigo and dizziness are among the most common reported complaints are analyzed and compared to healthy subjects. The analyses showed increased alpha2 activity within the posterior cingulate cortex and the precuneues/cuneus and reduced beta3 and gamma activity within the pregenual and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex for the subjects with balance complaints. These electrophysiological variations were correlated with reported chronic symptoms of vertigo intensity. A region of interest analysis found reduced functional connectivity for gamma activity within the vestibular cortex, precuneus, frontal eye field, intra-parietal sulcus, orbitofrontal cortex, and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. In addition, there was a positive correlation between chronic symptoms of vertigo intensity and increased alpha-gamma nesting in the left frontal eye field. When compared to healthy subjects, there is evidence of electrophysiological changes in the brain of patients with balance complaints even outside chronic symptoms of vertigo

  12. Neural correlates of changing intention in the human FEF and IPS.

    PubMed

    Astle, Duncan E; Nixon, Elena; Jackson, Stephen R; Jackson, Georgina M

    2012-02-01

    Previous research demonstrates that our apparent mental flexibility depends largely on the strength of our prior intention; changing our intention in advance enables a smooth transition from one task to another (e.g., Astle DE, Jackson GM, Swainson R. J Cogn Neurosci 20: 255-267, 2008; Duncan J, Emslie H, Williams P, Johnson R, Freer C. Cogn Psychol 30: 257-303, 1996; Husain M, Parton A, Hodgson TL, Mort D, Rees G. Nat Neurosci 6: 117-118, 2003). However, these necessarily rapid anticipatory mechanisms have been difficult to study in the human brain. We used EEG and magnetoencephalography, specifically event-related potentials and fields (ERPs and ERFs), respectively, to explore the neural correlates of this important aspect of mental flexibility. Subjects performed a manual version of a pro/antisaccade task using preparatory cues to switch between the pro- and antirules. When subjects switched their intention, we observed a positivity over central electrodes, which correlated significantly with our behavioral data; the greater the ERP effect, the stronger the subject's change of intention. ERFs, alongside subject-specific structural MRIs, were used to project into source space. When subjects switched their intention, they showed significantly elevated activity in the right frontal eye field and left intraparietal sulcus (IPS); the greater the left IPS activity on switch trials, the stronger the subject's change of intention. This network has previously been implicated in the top-down control of eye movements, but here we demonstrate its role in the top-down control of a task set, in particular, that it is recruited when we change the task that we intend to perform. PMID:22114156

  13. Biplane correlation imaging: a feasibility study based on phantom and human data.

    PubMed

    Samei, Ehsan; Majdi-Nasab, Nariman; Dobbins, James T; McAdams, H Page

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to implement and evaluate the performance of a biplane correlation imaging (BCI) technique aimed to reduce the effect of anatomic noise and improve the detection of lung nodules in chest radiographs. Seventy-one low-dose posterior-anterior images were acquired from an anthropomorphic chest phantom with 0.28° angular separations over a range of ±10° along the vertical axis within an 11 s interval. Similar data were acquired from 19 human subjects with institutional review board approval and informed consent. The data were incorporated into a computer-aided detection (CAD) algorithm in which suspect lesions were identified by examining the geometrical correlation of the detected signals that remained relatively constant against variable anatomic backgrounds. The data were analyzed to determine the effect of angular separation, and the overall sensitivity and false-positives for lung nodule detection. The best performance was achieved for angular separations of the projection pairs greater than 5°. Within that range, the technique provided an order of magnitude decrease in the number of false-positive reports when compared with CAD analysis of single-view images. Overall, the technique yielded ~1.1 false-positive per patient with an average sensitivity of 75%. The results indicated that the incorporation of angular information can offer a reduction in the number of false-positives without a notable reduction in sensitivity. The findings suggest that the BCI technique has the potential for clinical implementation as a cost-effective technique to improve the detection of subtle lung nodules with lowered rate of false-positives.

  14. The Neural Correlates of Chronic Symptoms of Vertigo Proneness in Humans.

    PubMed

    Alsalman, Ola; Ost, Jan; Vanspauwen, Robby; Blaivie, Catherine; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular signals are of significant importance for variable functions including gaze stabilization, spatial perception, navigation, cognition, and bodily self-consciousness. The vestibular network governs functions that might be impaired in patients affected with vestibular dysfunction. It is currently unclear how different brain regions/networks process vestibular information and integrate the information into a unified spatial percept related to somatosensory awareness and whether people with recurrent balance complaints have a neural signature as a trait affecting their development of chronic symptoms of vertigo. Pivotal evidence points to a vestibular-related brain network in humans that is widely distributed in nature. By using resting state source localized electroencephalography in non-vertiginous state, electrophysiological changes in activity and functional connectivity of 23 patients with balance complaints where chronic symptoms of vertigo and dizziness are among the most common reported complaints are analyzed and compared to healthy subjects. The analyses showed increased alpha2 activity within the posterior cingulate cortex and the precuneues/cuneus and reduced beta3 and gamma activity within the pregenual and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex for the subjects with balance complaints. These electrophysiological variations were correlated with reported chronic symptoms of vertigo intensity. A region of interest analysis found reduced functional connectivity for gamma activity within the vestibular cortex, precuneus, frontal eye field, intra-parietal sulcus, orbitofrontal cortex, and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. In addition, there was a positive correlation between chronic symptoms of vertigo intensity and increased alpha-gamma nesting in the left frontal eye field. When compared to healthy subjects, there is evidence of electrophysiological changes in the brain of patients with balance complaints even outside chronic symptoms of vertigo

  15. The Neural Correlates of Chronic Symptoms of Vertigo Proneness in Humans.

    PubMed

    Alsalman, Ola; Ost, Jan; Vanspauwen, Robby; Blaivie, Catherine; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular signals are of significant importance for variable functions including gaze stabilization, spatial perception, navigation, cognition, and bodily self-consciousness. The vestibular network governs functions that might be impaired in patients affected with vestibular dysfunction. It is currently unclear how different brain regions/networks process vestibular information and integrate the information into a unified spatial percept related to somatosensory awareness and whether people with recurrent balance complaints have a neural signature as a trait affecting their development of chronic symptoms of vertigo. Pivotal evidence points to a vestibular-related brain network in humans that is widely distributed in nature. By using resting state source localized electroencephalography in non-vertiginous state, electrophysiological changes in activity and functional connectivity of 23 patients with balance complaints where chronic symptoms of vertigo and dizziness are among the most common reported complaints are analyzed and compared to healthy subjects. The analyses showed increased alpha2 activity within the posterior cingulate cortex and the precuneues/cuneus and reduced beta3 and gamma activity within the pregenual and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex for the subjects with balance complaints. These electrophysiological variations were correlated with reported chronic symptoms of vertigo intensity. A region of interest analysis found reduced functional connectivity for gamma activity within the vestibular cortex, precuneus, frontal eye field, intra-parietal sulcus, orbitofrontal cortex, and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. In addition, there was a positive correlation between chronic symptoms of vertigo intensity and increased alpha-gamma nesting in the left frontal eye field. When compared to healthy subjects, there is evidence of electrophysiological changes in the brain of patients with balance complaints even outside chronic symptoms of vertigo

  16. Bitter tastant responses in the amoeba Dictyostelium correlate with rat and human taste assays.

    PubMed

    Cocorocchio, Marco; Ives, Robert; Clapham, David; Andrews, Paul L R; Williams, Robin S B

    2016-01-01

    Treatment compliance is reduced when pharmaceutical compounds have a bitter taste and this is particularly marked for paediatric medications. Identification of bitter taste liability during drug discovery utilises the rat in vivo brief access taste aversion (BATA) test which apart from animal use is time consuming with limited throughput. We investigated the suitability of using a simple, non-animal model, the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum to investigate taste-related responses and particularly identification of compounds with a bitter taste liability. The effect of taste-related compounds on Dictyostelium behaviour following acute exposure (15 minutes) was monitored. Dictyostelium did not respond to salty, sour, umami or sweet tasting compounds, however, cells rapidly responded to bitter tastants. Using time-lapse photography and computer-generated quantification to monitor changes in cell membrane movement, we developed an assay to assess the response of Dictyostelium to a wide range of structurally diverse known bitter compounds and blinded compounds. Dictyostelium showed varying responses to the bitter tastants, with IC50 values providing a rank order of potency. Comparison of Dictyostelium IC50 values to those observed in response to a similar range of compounds in the rat in vivo brief access taste aversion test showed a significant (p = 0.0172) positive correlation between the two models, and additionally a similar response to that provided by a human sensory panel assessment test. These experiments demonstrate that Dictyostelium may provide a suitable model for early prediction of bitterness for novel tastants and drugs. Interestingly, a response to bitter tastants appears conserved from single-celled amoebae to humans. PMID:26708104

  17. Bitter tastant responses in the amoeba Dictyostelium correlate with rat and human taste assays.

    PubMed

    Cocorocchio, Marco; Ives, Robert; Clapham, David; Andrews, Paul L R; Williams, Robin S B

    2016-01-01

    Treatment compliance is reduced when pharmaceutical compounds have a bitter taste and this is particularly marked for paediatric medications. Identification of bitter taste liability during drug discovery utilises the rat in vivo brief access taste aversion (BATA) test which apart from animal use is time consuming with limited throughput. We investigated the suitability of using a simple, non-animal model, the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum to investigate taste-related responses and particularly identification of compounds with a bitter taste liability. The effect of taste-related compounds on Dictyostelium behaviour following acute exposure (15 minutes) was monitored. Dictyostelium did not respond to salty, sour, umami or sweet tasting compounds, however, cells rapidly responded to bitter tastants. Using time-lapse photography and computer-generated quantification to monitor changes in cell membrane movement, we developed an assay to assess the response of Dictyostelium to a wide range of structurally diverse known bitter compounds and blinded compounds. Dictyostelium showed varying responses to the bitter tastants, with IC50 values providing a rank order of potency. Comparison of Dictyostelium IC50 values to those observed in response to a similar range of compounds in the rat in vivo brief access taste aversion test showed a significant (p = 0.0172) positive correlation between the two models, and additionally a similar response to that provided by a human sensory panel assessment test. These experiments demonstrate that Dictyostelium may provide a suitable model for early prediction of bitterness for novel tastants and drugs. Interestingly, a response to bitter tastants appears conserved from single-celled amoebae to humans.

  18. Cross-correlative 3D micro-structural investigation of human bone processed into bone allografts.

    PubMed

    Singh, Atul Kumar; Gajiwala, Astrid Lobo; Rai, Ratan Kumar; Khan, Mohd Parvez; Singh, Chandan; Barbhuyan, Tarun; Vijayalakshmi, S; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Sinha, Neeraj; Kumar, Ashutosh; Bellare, Jayesh R

    2016-05-01

    Bone allografts (BA) are a cost-effective and sustainable alternative in orthopedic practice as they provide a permanent solution for preserving skeletal architecture and function. Such BA however, must be processed to be disease free and immunologically safe as well as biologically and clinically useful. Here, we have demonstrated a processing protocol for bone allografts and investigated the micro-structural properties of bone collected from osteoporotic and normal human donor samples. In order to characterize BA at different microscopic levels, a combination of techniques such as Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (ssNMR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), micro-computed tomography (μCT) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used for delineating the ultra-structural property of bone. ssNMR revealed the extent of water, collagen fine structure and crystalline order in the bone. These were greatly perturbed in the bone taken from osteoporotic bone donor. Among the processing methods analyzed, pasteurization at 60 °C and radiation treatment appeared to substantially alter the bone integrity. SEM study showed a reduction in Ca/P ratio and non-uniform distribution of elements in osteoporotic bones. μ-CT and MIMICS (Materialize Interactive Medical Image Control System) demonstrated that pasteurization and radiation treatment affects the BA morphology and cause a shift in the HU unit. However, the combination of all these processes restored all-important parameters that are critical for BA integrity and sustainability. Cross-correlation between the various probes we used quantitatively demonstrated differences in morphological and micro-structural properties between BA taken from normal and osteoporotic human donor. Such details could also be instrumental in designing an appropriate bone scaffold. For the best restoration of bone microstructure and to be used as a biomaterial allograft, a step-wise processing method is recommended that preserves all

  19. Dynamic compressive behavior of human meniscus correlates with its extra-cellular matrix composition.

    PubMed

    Bursac, P; Arnoczky, S; York, A

    2009-01-01

    The menisci of the knee play a significant role in the complex biomechanics of the joint and are critically important in maintaining articular cartilage health. While a general form-function relationship has been identified for the structural orientation of the extra-cellular matrix of the meniscus, the role of individual biochemical components has yet to be fully explored. To determine if correlations exist between the dynamic and static compressive modulus of human menisci and their major extra-cellular matrix constituents (collagen, glycosoaminoglycan and water content), 12 lateral and 11 medial menisci from 13 adult donors were examined. The results showed that in dynamic compression at high loading frequencies (0.1-1 Hz) the menisci behave as a rubber-like elastic material while at lower frequencies (0.01-0.03 Hz) significant viscous dissipation occurs. While regional variations in compressive moduli and extra-cellular matrix composition were observed, the magnitude of both dynamic and static compressive moduli were found to be insensitive to collagen content (p>0.4). However, this magnitude was found to significantly increase with increasing glycosaminoglycan content (p<0.001) and significantly decrease with increasing water content (p<0.001). The results of this study identify significant relationships between the viscoelastic behavior of the meniscus and its extra-cellular matrix composition.

  20. Chemosensory Ca2+ dynamics correlate with diverse behavioral phenotypes in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Veitinger, Thomas; Riffell, Jeffrey R; Veitinger, Sophie; Nascimento, Jaclyn M; Triller, Annika; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Schwane, Katlen; Geerts, Andreas; Wunder, Frank; Berns, Michael W; Neuhaus, Eva M; Zimmer, Richard K; Spehr, Marc; Hatt, Hanns

    2011-05-13

    In the female reproductive tract, mammalian sperm undergo a regulated sequence of prefusion changes that "prime" sperm for fertilization. Among the least understood of these complex processes are the molecular mechanisms that underlie sperm guidance by environmental chemical cues. A "hard-wired" Ca(2+) signaling strategy that orchestrates specific motility patterns according to given functional requirements is an emerging concept for regulation of sperm swimming behavior. The molecular players involved, the spatiotemporal characteristics of such motility-associated Ca(2+) dynamics, and the relation between a distinct Ca(2+) signaling pattern and a behavioral sperm phenotype, however, remain largely unclear. Here, we report the functional characterization of two human sperm chemoreceptors. Using complementary molecular, physiological, and behavioral approaches, we comparatively describe sperm Ca(2+) responses to specific agonists of these novel receptors and bourgeonal, a known sperm chemoattractant. We further show that individual receptor activation induces specific Ca(2+) signaling patterns with unique spatiotemporal dynamics. These distinct Ca(2+) dynamics are correlated to a set of stimulus-specific stereotyped behavioral responses that could play vital roles during various stages of prefusion sperm-egg chemical communication. PMID:21454470

  1. Neural correlates of forward planning in a spatial decision task in humans.

    PubMed

    Simon, Dylan Alexander; Daw, Nathaniel D

    2011-04-01

    Although reinforcement learning (RL) theories have been influential in characterizing the mechanisms for reward-guided choice in the brain, the predominant temporal difference (TD) algorithm cannot explain many flexible or goal-directed actions that have been demonstrated behaviorally. We investigate such actions by contrasting an RL algorithm that is model based, in that it relies on learning a map or model of the task and planning within it, to traditional model-free TD learning. To distinguish these approaches in humans, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging in a continuous spatial navigation task, in which frequent changes to the layout of the maze forced subjects continually to relearn their favored routes, thereby exposing the RL mechanisms used. We sought evidence for the neural substrates of such mechanisms by comparing choice behavior and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals to decision variables extracted from simulations of either algorithm. Both choices and value-related BOLD signals in striatum, although most often associated with TD learning, were better explained by the model-based theory. Furthermore, predecessor quantities for the model-based value computation were correlated with BOLD signals in the medial temporal lobe and frontal cortex. These results point to a significant extension of both the computational and anatomical substrates for RL in the brain.

  2. Prevalence, distribution and correlates of endocervical human papillomavirus types in Brazilian women

    PubMed Central

    Lippman, S A; Sucupira, M C A; Jones, H E; Luppi, C G; Palefsky, J; van de Wijgert, J H H M; Oliveira, R L S; Diaz, R S

    2010-01-01

    Summary We determined the prevalence, distribution and correlates of human papillomavirus (HPV) types in 386 mixed-income, sexually active women in São Paulo, Brazil. Endocervical samples were tested for HPV DNA with L1 primers MY09 and MY11; negative and indeterminate samples were retested using GP 5+/6+ consensus primers. HPV was detected in 35% of all women; high-risk/probable high-risk types in 20%; low-risk types in 7%; and an indeterminate type in 10%. Twenty-five HPV types were found overall: 17 (probable) high-risk types and eight low-risk types. Approximately one-third (29%) of women with HPV infection were positive for type 16 or 18 and 36% were positive for types 6, 11, 16 or 18. The presence of (probable) high-risk HPV was associated with younger age, more lifetime sex partners and abnormal vaginal flora. Additional studies mapping the distribution of HPV types worldwide are necessary to prepare for vaccination programmes and direct future vaccine development. PMID:20089995

  3. Correlation between radiation dose and p53 protein expression levels in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Mariana B; Fernandes, Thiago S; Silva, Edvane B; Amaral, Ademir

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the relationship between p53 protein levels and absorbed doses from in vitro irradiated human lymphocytes. For this, samples of blood from 23 donors were irradiated with 0.5; 1; 2; and 4 Gy from a Cobalt-60 source, and the percentages of lymphocytes expressing p53 were scored using Flow Cytometry. The subjects were divided into 3 groups, in accordance with the p53 levels expressed per radiation dose: low (Group I), high (Group II), and excessive levels (Group III). For all groups, the analyses showed that the p53 expression levels increase with the absorbed dose. Particularly for groups I and II, the correlation between this protein expression and the dose follows the linear-quadratic model, such as for radioinduced chromosomal aberrations. In conclusion, our findings indicate possible applications of this approach in evaluating individual radiosensitivity prior to radiotherapeutical procedures as well as in medical surveillance of occupationally exposed workers. Furthermore, due to the rapidity of flow-cytometric analyses, the methodology here employed would play an important role in emergency responses to a large-scale radiation incident where many people may have been exposed. PMID:26312422

  4. Exon organization of the human FKBP-12 gene: Correlation with structural and functional protein domains

    SciTech Connect

    DiLella, A.G.; Craig, R.J. )

    1991-09-03

    FKBP-12, the major T-cell binding protein for the immunosuppressive agents FK506 and rapamycin, catalyzes the interconversion of the cis and trans rotamers of the peptidyl-prolyl amide bond of peptide and protein substrates. The function of rotamase activity in cells and the role of FKBP-12 in immunoregulation is uncertain. In this paper the authors report the cloning and characterization of the human chromosomal FKBP-12 gene and four processed FKBP-12 pseudogenes. The FKBP-12 gene is 24 kilobases in length and contains five exons. The protein-coding region of the gene is divided into four exon modules that correlate with the structural and functional domains of the protein. The novel structure of FKBP-12 resulting form the topology of the antiparallel {beta}-sheet is the topological crossing of two loops that are encoded by separate exons. Separate exons also encode the antiparallel {beta}-sheet and {alpha}-helical region that define the drug-binding pocket and enzyme activity site of FKBP-12. The exon organization of the FKBP-12 gene structure will enable inactivation of this gene by homologous recombination in cells to provide a model to study the role of FKBP-12 in immunoregulation and normal cellular processes.

  5. Gene deletions and amplifications in human hepatocellular carcinomas: correlation with hepatocyte growth regulation.

    PubMed

    Nalesnik, Michael A; Tseng, George; Ding, Ying; Xiang, Guo-Sheng; Zheng, Zhong-liang; Yu, YanPing; Marsh, James W; Michalopoulos, George K; Luo, Jian-Hua

    2012-04-01

    Tissues from 98 human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) obtained from hepatic resections were subjected to somatic copy number variation (CNV) analysis. Most of these HCCs were discovered in livers resected for orthotopic transplantation, although in a few cases, the tumors themselves were the reason for the hepatectomies. Genomic analysis revealed deletions and amplifications in several genes, and clustering analysis based on CNV revealed five clusters. The LSP1 gene had the most cases with CNV (46 deletions and 5 amplifications). High frequencies of CNV were also seen in PTPRD (21/98), GNB1L (18/98), KIAA1217 (18/98), RP1-1777G6.2 (17/98), ETS1 (11/98), RSU1 (10/98), TBC1D22A (10/98), BAHCC1 (9/98), MAML2 (9/98), RAB1B (9/98), and YIF1A (9/98). The existing literature regarding hepatocytes or other cell types has connected many of these genes to regulation of cytoskeletal architecture, signaling cascades related to growth regulation, and transcription factors directly interacting with nuclear signaling complexes. Correlations with existing literature indicate that genomic lesions associated with HCC at the level of resolution of CNV occur on many genes associated directly or indirectly with signaling pathways operating in liver regeneration and hepatocyte growth regulation.

  6. Dynamic compressive behavior of human meniscus correlates with its extra-cellular matrix composition.

    PubMed

    Bursac, P; Arnoczky, S; York, A

    2009-01-01

    The menisci of the knee play a significant role in the complex biomechanics of the joint and are critically important in maintaining articular cartilage health. While a general form-function relationship has been identified for the structural orientation of the extra-cellular matrix of the meniscus, the role of individual biochemical components has yet to be fully explored. To determine if correlations exist between the dynamic and static compressive modulus of human menisci and their major extra-cellular matrix constituents (collagen, glycosoaminoglycan and water content), 12 lateral and 11 medial menisci from 13 adult donors were examined. The results showed that in dynamic compression at high loading frequencies (0.1-1 Hz) the menisci behave as a rubber-like elastic material while at lower frequencies (0.01-0.03 Hz) significant viscous dissipation occurs. While regional variations in compressive moduli and extra-cellular matrix composition were observed, the magnitude of both dynamic and static compressive moduli were found to be insensitive to collagen content (p>0.4). However, this magnitude was found to significantly increase with increasing glycosaminoglycan content (p<0.001) and significantly decrease with increasing water content (p<0.001). The results of this study identify significant relationships between the viscoelastic behavior of the meniscus and its extra-cellular matrix composition. PMID:19581729

  7. Scale invariant correlations between genes and SNPs on Human chromosome 1 reveal potential evolutionary mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kendal, Wayne S

    2007-03-21

    The local density of gene structures and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) along human chromosomes appears inhomogeneous. In chromosome 1, the density patterns from both these elements are shown here to exhibit similar scale invariant clustering, as well as long-ranged and scale invariant auto- and cross-correlations. The local densities of these elements sites can be accurately represented by the scale invariant exponential dispersion models, a group of stochastic models that act as limiting distributions for a wide range of generalized linear models. The scale invariant Poisson-gamma (PG) distribution is the most applicable of these models, since it describes the above findings and it lends itself to a stochastic mechanism for the accumulation of segmental chromosomal changes. This PG model describes the summation of neutral chromosomal mutations, deletions, rearrangements and recombinations, within chromosomal segments that are distinguished by their evolutionary genealogies. Scale invariance is a necessary property if such a description is to remain valid at different measurement scales. The observed density patterns, and proposed model, presumably represent the convergent summation of multiple stochastic processes within the evolutionary history of the chromosome. PMID:17137602

  8. Chemosensory Ca2+ Dynamics Correlate with Diverse Behavioral Phenotypes in Human Sperm*

    PubMed Central

    Veitinger, Thomas; Riffell, Jeffrey R.; Veitinger, Sophie; Nascimento, Jaclyn M.; Triller, Annika; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Schwane, Katlen; Geerts, Andreas; Wunder, Frank; Berns, Michael W.; Neuhaus, Eva M.; Zimmer, Richard K.; Spehr, Marc; Hatt, Hanns

    2011-01-01

    In the female reproductive tract, mammalian sperm undergo a regulated sequence of prefusion changes that “prime” sperm for fertilization. Among the least understood of these complex processes are the molecular mechanisms that underlie sperm guidance by environmental chemical cues. A “hard-wired” Ca2+ signaling strategy that orchestrates specific motility patterns according to given functional requirements is an emerging concept for regulation of sperm swimming behavior. The molecular players involved, the spatiotemporal characteristics of such motility-associated Ca2+ dynamics, and the relation between a distinct Ca2+ signaling pattern and a behavioral sperm phenotype, however, remain largely unclear. Here, we report the functional characterization of two human sperm chemoreceptors. Using complementary molecular, physiological, and behavioral approaches, we comparatively describe sperm Ca2+ responses to specific agonists of these novel receptors and bourgeonal, a known sperm chemoattractant. We further show that individual receptor activation induces specific Ca2+ signaling patterns with unique spatiotemporal dynamics. These distinct Ca2+ dynamics are correlated to a set of stimulus-specific stereotyped behavioral responses that could play vital roles during various stages of prefusion sperm-egg chemical communication. PMID:21454470

  9. Neural correlates of forward planning in a spatial decision task in humans

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Dylan Alexander; Daw, Nathaniel D.

    2011-01-01

    Although reinforcement learning (RL) theories have been influential in characterizing the brain’s mechanisms for reward-guided choice, the predominant temporal difference (TD) algorithm cannot explain many flexible or goal-directed actions that have been demonstrated behaviorally. We investigate such actions by contrasting an RL algorithm that is model-based, in that it relies on learning a map or model of the task and planning within it, to traditional model-free TD learning. To distinguish these approaches in humans, we used fMRI in a continuous spatial navigation task, in which frequent changes to the layout of the maze forced subjects continually to relearn their favored routes, thereby exposing the RL mechanisms employed. We sought evidence for the neural substrates of such mechanisms by comparing choice behavior and BOLD signals to decision variables extracted from simulations of either algorithm. Both choices and value-related BOLD signals in striatum, though most often associated with TD learning, were better explained by the model-based theory. Further, predecessor quantities for the model-based value computation were correlated with BOLD signals in the medial temporal lobe and frontal cortex. These results point to a significant extension of both the computational and anatomical substrates for RL in the brain. PMID:21471389

  10. Trends and properties of human cerebral cortex: correlations with cortical myelin content.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Matthew F; Goyal, Manu S; Preuss, Todd M; Raichle, Marcus E; Van Essen, David C

    2014-06-01

    "In vivo Brodmann mapping" or non-invasive cortical parcellation using MRI, especially by measuring cortical myelination, has recently become a popular research topic, though myeloarchitectonic cortical parcellation in humans previously languished in favor of cytoarchitecture. We review recent in vivo myelin mapping studies and discuss some of the different methods for estimating myelin content. We discuss some ways in which myelin maps may improve surface registration and be useful for cross-modal and cross-species comparisons, including some preliminary cross-species results. Next, we consider neurobiological aspects of why some parts of cortex are more myelinated than others. Myelin content is inversely correlated with intracortical circuit complexity - in general, more myelin content means simpler and perhaps less dynamic intracortical circuits. Using existing PET data and functional network parcellations, we examine metabolic differences in the differently myelinated cortical functional networks. Lightly myelinated cognitive association networks tend to have higher aerobic glycolysis than heavily myelinated early sensory-motor ones, perhaps reflecting greater ongoing dynamic anabolic cortical processes. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that intracortical myelination may stabilize intracortical circuits and inhibit synaptic plasticity. Finally, we discuss the future of the in vivo myeloarchitectural field and cortical parcellation--"in vivo Brodmann mapping"--in general.

  11. Dub3 expression correlates with tumor progression and poor prognosis in human epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Shu, Bin; Xi, Tao; Su, Ning; Liu, Jing

    2015-03-01

    Dub3 is a deubiquitinating enzyme. It is highly expressed in tumor-derived cell lines and has an established role in tumor proliferation. However, the role of Dub3 in human ovarian cancer remains unclear. Expression of Dub3 was evaluated in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The relationship between Dub3 expression and clinicopathological characteristics was analyzed. Using RNA interference, the effects of Dub3 on cell proliferation and apoptosis were investigated in ovarian cancer cell line. All normal ovary tissues exhibited very little or no Dub3 immunoreactivity. High levels of Dub3 expression were examined by immunohistochemical analysis in 13.3% of cystadenomas, in 30.0% of borderline tumors, and in 58.9% of ovarian carcinomas, respectively. Dub3 expression was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and clinical staging (P<0.05). Multivariate survival analysis indicated that Dub3 expression was an independent prognostic indicator of the survival of patients with ovarian cancer. Furthermore, the expression of Cdc25A was closely correlated with that of Dub3 in cancer cells and tissues. Knockdown of Dub3 could inhibit the proliferation of ovarian cancer cells and increase cell apoptosis. These data indicate that the Dub3 might be a valuable biomarker for the prediction of ovarian cancer prognosis and Dub3 inhibition might be a potential strategy for ovarian cancer treatment.

  12. Human phenylalanine hydroxylase mutations and hyperphenylalaninemia phenotypes: a metanalysis of genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Kayaalp, E; Treacy, E; Waters, P J; Byck, S; Nowacki, P; Scriver, C R

    1997-01-01

    We analyzed correlations between mutant genotypes at the human phenylalanine hydroxylase locus (gene symbol PAH) and the corresponding hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA) phenotypes (notably, phenylketonuria [OMIM 261600]). We used reports, both published and in the PAH Mutation Analysis Consortium Database, on 365 patients harboring 73 different PAH mutations in 161 different genotypes. HPA phenotypes were classified as phenylketonuria (PKU), variant PKU, and non-PKU HPA. By analysis both of homoallelic mutant genotypes and of "functionally hemizygous" heteroallelic genotypes, we characterized the phenotypic effect of 48 of the 73 different, largely missense mutations. Among those with consistent in vivo expression, 24 caused PKU, 3 caused variant PKU, and 10 caused non-PKU HPA. However, 11 mutations were inconsistent in their effect: 9 appeared in two different phenotype classes, and 2 (I65T and Y414C) appeared in all three classes. Seven mutations were inconsistent in phenotypic effect when in vitro (unit-protein) expression was compared with the corresponding in vivo phenotype (an emergent property). We conclude that the majority of PAH mutations confer a consistent phenotype and that this is concordant with their effects, when known, predicted from in vitro expression analysis. However, significant inconsistencies, both between in vitro and in vivo phenotypes and between different individuals with similar PAH genotypes, reveal that the HPA-phenotype is more complex than that predicted by Mendelian inheritance of alleles at the PAH locus. PMID:9399896

  13. Arginyltransferase ATE1 suppresses cell tumorigenic potential and inversely correlates with metastases in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Reena; Zhang, Fangliang; Colavita, Kristen; Leu, Nicolae Adrian; Kurosaka, Satoshi; Kumar, Akhilesh; Birnbaum, Michael D.; Győrffy, Balázs; Dong, Dawei W.; Shtutman, Michael; Kashina, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Arginylation is an emerging posttranslational modification mediated by arginyltransferase (ATE1) that is essential for mammalian embryogenesis and regulation of the cytoskeleton. Here, we discovered that Ate1 knockout embryonic fibroblasts exhibit tumorigenic properties, including abnormally rapid contact-independent growth, reduced ability to form cell-cell contacts, and chromosomal aberrations. Ate1 knockout fibroblasts can form large colonies in Matrigel and exhibit invasive behavior, unlike wild type fibroblasts. Furthermore, Ate1 knockout cells form tumors in subcutaneous xenograft assays in immunocompromised mice. Abnormal growth in these cells can be partially rescued by reintroduction of stably expressed specific Ate1 isoforms, which also reduce the ability of these cells to form tumors. Tumor array studies and bioinformatics analysis show that Ate1 is down-regulated in several types of human cancer samples at the protein level, and that its transcription level inversely correlates with metastatic progression and patient survival. We conclude that Ate1 knockout results in carcinogenic transformation of cultured fibroblasts, suggesting that in addition to its previously known activities Ate1 gene is essential for tumor suppression and also likely participates in suppression of metastatic growth. PMID:26686093

  14. Correlates to Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Status and Willingness to Vaccinate in Low-Income Philadelphia High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Sarah B.; Leader, Amy; Shwarz, Michelle; Greener, Judith; Patterson, Freda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the correlates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination or willingness to be vaccinated in urban, minority adolescents. Methods: Using responses to the 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey in Philadelphia, a random sample of high schools provided weighted data representing 20,941 9th to 12th graders. Stratified by…

  15. Sequential-digital image correlation for mapping human posterior sclera and optic nerve head deformation.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Jeffrey D; Genovese, Katia; Casaletto, Luciana; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    Optic nerve head (ONH) deformations may be involved in the onset or further development of glaucoma, including in patients with relatively normal intraocular pressures (IOPs). Characterizing posterior scleral deformations over physiological pressures may provide a better understanding of how changes in IOP lead to changes in the mechanical environment of the ONH and possibly retinal ganglion cell death. Pressure inflation measurement test protocols are commonly used to measure deformation of the peripapillary sclera with full-field noncontact optical methods. The purpose of this work was to develop and validate a new sequential 3D digital image correlation (S-DIC) approach for quantification of posterior scleral pressure induced deformation that improves z (in-depth) resolution of the DIC measurement without losing in-plane sensitivity, while also being able to contour and map deformations of the complex-shaped ONH. Our approach combines two orthogonal axes of parallax with standard 3D DIC methods using a single high-resolution camera. The enhanced capabilities of S-DIC with respect to standard 3D DIC has been demonstrated by carrying out a complete benchmark for shape, deformation, and strain measurement on an object of known complex geometry. Our S-DIC method provided a reconstruction accuracy of 0.17% and an uncertainty in z-position measurement of 8 μm. The developed methodology has also been applied to a human posterior scleral shell, including the full peripapillary sclera and optic nerve. The relatively inexpensive S-DIC approach may provide new information on the biomechanical deformations of the optic nerve head and, thus, the death of retinal ganglion cells in primary open angle glaucoma. PMID:24337344

  16. Immunodetection of histone epitopes correlates with early stages of apoptosis in activated human peripheral T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zunino, S. J.; Singh, M. K.; Bass, J.; Picker, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    By coupling intracellular staining with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated labeling of internucleosomal DNA strand breaks in a flow cytometric assay, we observed a strong correlation between apoptosis-associated DNA strand breaks and immunoreactivity with the monoclonal antibody (MAb) B-F6 in activated human peripheral blood T lymphocytes (PBTs). Although MAb B-F6 has been reported to be specific for the cytokine interleukin-6, Western blot analysis of activated PBT lysates revealed that the predominant protein band detected by this MAb was 17 kd (p17), distinct from the 23-kd core protein and 26- to 30-kd mature glycosylated forms of interleukin-6. Immunoaffinity isolation and amino-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of p17 revealed identity with the histone H2B, a finding confirmed by Western blot analysis of purified histones and by similar staining of activated PBTs with an unrelated anti-histone MAb. Neither histone staining nor DNA strand breakage was observed in freshly isolated PBTs; however, after T cell activation, histone immunoreactivity appeared to precede the appearance of DNA strand breaks, with both increasing to a maximal level by day 3 after activation. Two-parameter confocal immunofluorescence microscopy of histone and DNA staining confirmed a lack of histone immunoreactivity in viable cells and demonstrated co-localization of histone epitopes with abnormally clumped chromatin in apoptotic cells. These data indicate that alteration of histone epitope accessibility is a marker of early apoptosis and suggest that multiparameter flow cytometric analysis of intracellular epitopes may be a powerful tool in the elucidation of intracellular mechanisms of apoptosis. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:8702003

  17. Correlates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine coverage: A state-level analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Jennifer L.; Reiter, Paul L.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2014-01-01

    Background We tested the hypothesis that states with higher rates of cancers associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) would have lower HPV vaccine coverage. Methods We gathered state-level data on HPV-related cancer rates and HPV vaccine initiation coverage for girls and boys, separately, and HPV vaccine follow-through (i.e., receipt of 3 doses among those initiating the series) for girls only. In addition, we gathered state-level data on demographic composition and contact with the healthcare system. We calculated Pearson correlations for these ecological relationships. Results HPV vaccine initiation among girls was lower in states with higher levels of cervical cancer incidence and mortality (r=−.29 and −.46, respectively). In addition, vaccine follow-through among girls was lower in states with higher levels of cervical cancer mortality (r=−.30). Other cancer rates were associated with HPV vaccine initiation and follow-through among girls, but not among boys. HPV vaccine initiation among girls was lower in states with higher proportions of non-Hispanic black residents and lower proportions of higher income residents. HPV vaccine follow-through was higher in states with greater levels of adolescents' contact with the healthcare system. Conclusions HPV vaccine coverage for girls was lower in states with higher HPV-related cancer rates. Public health efforts should concentrate on geographic areas with higher cancer rates. Strengthening adolescent preventive healthcare use may be particularly important to increase vaccine follow-through. Cost-effectiveness analyses may overestimate the benefits of current vaccination coverage and underestimate the benefits of increasing coverage. PMID:25585064

  18. Productive human immunodeficiency virus infection levels correlate with AIDS-related manifestations in the patient

    SciTech Connect

    Mathez, D.; Paul, D.; de Belilovsky, C.; Sultan, Y.; Deleuze, J.; Gorin, I.; Saurin, W.; Decker, R.; Leibowitch, J. )

    1990-10-01

    Mononuclear cells were obtained from 71 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) seropositive subjects presenting and first visit either as asymptomatic or with minor symptoms and with CD4 lymphocytes greater than 550 per mm3 (group A, 35 patients) or as patients with AIDS, AIDS-related illnesses, or CD4 lymphocytes less than 400 per mm3 (group B, 36 patients). After 1-5 years of follow-up, 13 patients of group A had essentially retained their initial status (asymptomatics); the 22 others had suffered clinical or immunological deterioration (progressors). Frozen cells were thawed and submitted to lethal gamma-irradiation in vitro (4500 rads; 1 rad = 0.01 Gy) before they were cultured with normal phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes to determine radiation-resistant HIV expression ex vivo (R-HEV). HIV antigenemia correlated with R-HEV values in 142 samples (r = 0.92, P less than 0.001) but was a less sensitive predictor of disease than R-HEV. R-HEV was detected in all specimens from patients with major AIDS-related illnesses or HIV-associated CD4 lymphopenia. In 77% of the progressors from group A, R-HEV detection preceded the onset of AIDS-associated disease or CD4 lymphopenia by 1 year (average). Conversely, R-HEV was low or was not detected in 36 sequential specimens from the 13 patients who remained asymptomatic over the following 2-5 years. Thus, persistently low HIV expression in vivo predicted a nondiseased state, whereas higher HIV expression levels seemed necessary for disease to occur. These data indicate that R-HEV is related to productive HIV infection in vivo, the latter acting as a determinant of AIDS-related illnesses. In view of this, measurement of HIV expression levels in the patient should be useful in antiviral efficacy trials.

  19. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques promotes platelet activation. Correlation with ischaemic events.

    PubMed

    Lenti, Massimo; Falcinelli, Emanuela; Pompili, Marcella; de Rango, Paola; Conti, Valentina; Guglielmini, Giuseppe; Momi, Stefania; Corazzi, Teresa; Giordano, Giuseppe; Gresele, Paolo

    2014-06-01

    Purified active matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is able to promote platelet aggregation. We aimed to assess the role of MMP-2 expressed in atherosclerotic plaques in the platelet-activating potential of human carotid plaques and its correlation with ischaemic events. Carotid plaques from 81 patients undergoing endarterectomy were tested for pro-MMP-2 and TIMP-2 content by zymography and ELISA. Plaque extracts were incubated with gel-filtered platelets from healthy volunteers for 2 minutes before the addition of a subthreshold concentration of thrombin receptor activating peptide-6 (TRAP-6) and aggregation was assessed. Moreover, platelet deposition on plaque extracts immobilised on plastic coverslips under high shear-rate flow conditions was measured. Forty-three plaque extracts (53%) potentiated platelet aggregation (+233 ± 26.8%), an effect prevented by three different specific MMP-2 inhibitors (inhibitor II, TIMP-2, moAb anti-MMP-2). The pro-MMP-2/TIMP-2 ratio of plaques potentiating platelet aggregation was significantly higher than that of plaques not potentiating it (3.67 ± 1.21 vs 1.01 ± 0.43, p<0.05). Moreover, the platelet aggregation-potentiating effect, the active-MMP-2 content and the active MMP-2/pro-MMP-2 ratio of plaque extracts were significantly higher in plaques from patients who developed a subsequent major cardiovascular event. In conclusion, atherosclerotic plaques exert a prothrombotic effect by potentiating platelet activation due to their content of MMP-2; an elevated MMP-2 activity in plaques is associated with a higher rate of subsequent ischaemic cerebrovascular events. PMID:24499865

  20. The abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in human guts has correlation to the consumption of antibiotics in animal.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongfei; Yang, Xi; Lu, Na; Zhu, Baoli

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence has accumulated to support that the human gut is a reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes. We previously identified more than 1000 genes displaying high similarity with known antibiotic resistance genes in the human gut gene set generated from the Chinese, Danish, and Spanish populations. Here, first, we add our new understanding of antibiotic resistance genes in the US and the Japanese populations; next, we describe the structure of a vancomycin-resistant operon in a Danish sample; and finally, we provide discussions on the correlation of the abundance of resistance genes in human gut with the antibiotic consumption in human medicine and in animal husbandry. These results, combined with those we published previously, provide comprehensive insights into the antibiotic resistance genes in the human gut microbiota at a population level.

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: correlation but not causation.

    PubMed Central

    Duesberg, P H

    1989-01-01

    AIDS is an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome defined by a severe depletion of T cells and over 20 conventional degenerative and neoplastic diseases. In the U.S. and Europe, AIDS correlates to 95% with risk factors, such as about 8 years of promiscuous male homosexuality, intravenous drug use, or hemophilia. Since AIDS also correlates with antibody to a retrovirus, confirmed in about 40% of American cases, it has been hypothesized that this virus causes AIDS by killing T cells. Consequently, the virus was termed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and antibody to HIV became part of the definition of AIDS. The hypothesis that HIV causes AIDS is examined in terms of Koch's postulates and epidemiological, biochemical, genetic, and evolutionary conditions of viral pathology. HIV does not fulfill Koch's postulates: (i) free virus is not detectable in most cases of AIDS; (ii) virus can only be isolated by reactivating virus in vitro from a few latently infected lymphocytes among millions of uninfected ones; (iii) pure HIV does not cause AIDS upon experimental infection of chimpanzees or accidental infection of healthy humans. Further, HIV violates classical conditions of viral pathology. (i) Epidemiological surveys indicate that the annual incidence of AIDS among antibody-positive persons varies from nearly 0 to over 10%, depending critically on nonviral risk factors. (ii) HIV is expressed in less than or equal to 1 of every 10(4) T cells it supposedly kills in AIDS, whereas about 5% of all T cells are regenerated during the 2 days it takes the virus to infect a cell. (iii) If HIV were the cause of AIDS, it would be the first virus to cause a disease only after the onset of antiviral immunity, as detected by a positive "AIDS test." (iv) AIDS follows the onset of antiviral immunity only after long and unpredictable asymptomatic intervals averaging 8 years, although HIV replicates within 1 to 2 days and induces immunity within 1 to 2 months. (v) HIV supposedly causes AIDS

  2. Long-Range Correlations in the Sequence of Human Heartbeats and Other Biological Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teich, Malvin C.

    1998-03-01

    The sequence of heartbeat occurrence times provides information about the state of health of the heart. We used a variety of measures, including multiresolution wavelet analysis, to identify the form of the point process that describes the human heartbeat. These measures, which are based on both interbeat (R-R) intervals and counts (heart rate), have been applied to records for both normal and heart-failure patients drawn from a standard database, and various surrogate versions thereof. Several of these measures reveal scaling behavior (1/f-type fluctuations; long-range power-law correlations).(R. G. Turcott and M. C. Teich, Proc. SPIE) 2036 (Chaos in Biology and Medicine), 22--39 (1993). Essentially all of the R-R and count-based measures we investigated, including those that exhibit scaling, differ in statistically significant ways for the normal and heart-failure patients. The wavelet measures, however, reveal a heretofore unknown scale window, between 16 and 32 heartbeats, over which the magnitudes of the wavelet-coefficient variances fall into disjoint sets for the normal and heart-failure patients.(R. G. Turcott and M. C. Teich, Ann. Biomed. Eng.) 24, 269--293 (1996).^,(S. Thurner, M. C. Feurstein, and M. C. Teich, Phys. Rev. Lett.) (in press). This enables us to correctly classify every patient in the standard data set as either belonging to the heart-failure or normal group with 100% accuracy, thereby providing a clinically significant measure of the presence of heart-failure. Previous approaches have provided only statistically significant measures. The tradeoff between sensitivity and

  3. Stereomicroscopic study of the human tooth caries: clinical and morphological correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oancea, Roxana; Vasile, Liliana; Marchese, Cristian; Sava-Rosianu, Ruxandra

    2012-06-01

    loss that is very useful in grading the progression of the carious lesion. Conclusions: The stereomicroscopic study correlated with clinical and morphological data allowed to appreciate the extent of tissue involved in the carious process, but also the understanding of the enamel, dentine and cement matrix demineralization process, in proximity with the morpho-embryological markings of the human tooth structure.

  4. Lipid binding ability of human apolipoprotein E N-terminal domain isoforms: correlation with protein stability?

    PubMed

    Weers, Paul M M; Narayanaswami, Vasanthy; Choy, Nicole; Luty, Robert; Hicks, Les; Kay, Cyril M; Ryan, Robert O

    2003-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein (apo) E exists as one of three major isoforms, E2, E3 or E4. Individuals carrying the epsilon 4 allele have an increased risk of heart disease and premature onset of Alzheimer's disease. To investigate the molecular basis for this phenomenon, the N-terminal domain of apoE3, apoE2 and apoE4 were expressed in bacteria, isolated and employed in lipid binding and stability studies. Far UV circular dichroism spectroscopy in buffer at pH 7 revealed a similar amount of alpha-helix secondary structure for the three isoforms. By contrast, differences were noted in apoE-NT isoform-specific transformation of bilayer vesicles of dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) into discoidal complexes. ApoE4-NT induced transformation was most rapid, followed by apoE3-NT and apoE2-NT. To determine if differences in the rate of apoE-NT induced DMPG vesicle transformation is due to isoform-specific differences in helix bundle stability, guanidine HCl denaturation studies were conducted. The results revealed that apoE2-NT was the most stable, followed by apoE3-NT and apoE4-NT, establishing an inverse correlation between helix bundle stability and DMPG vesicle transformation rate at pH 7. When the zwitterionic dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) was employed as the model lipid surface, interaction of apoE-NT isoforms with the lipid substrate was slow. However, upon lowering the pH from 7 to 3, a dramatic increase in the rate of DMPC vesicle transformation rate was observed for each isoform. To evaluate if the increased DMPC vesicle transformation rates observed at low pH is due to pH-dependent alterations in helix bundle stability, guanidine HCl denaturation studies were performed. ApoE2-NT and apoE3-NT displayed increased resistance to denaturation as a function of decreasing pH, while apoE4-NT showed no change in stability. Studies with the fluorescent probe, 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid, indicated an increase in apoE hydrophobic surface exposure upon

  5. Exploratory Metabolomic Analyses Reveal Compounds Correlated with Lutein Concentration in Frontal Cortex, Hippocampus, and Occipital Cortex of Human Infant Brain.

    PubMed

    Lieblein-Boff, Jacqueline C; Johnson, Elizabeth J; Kennedy, Adam D; Lai, Chron-Si; Kuchan, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Lutein is a dietary carotenoid well known for its role as an antioxidant in the macula, and recent reports implicate a role for lutein in cognitive function. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in both pediatric and geriatric brain tissue. In addition, cognitive function in older adults correlated with macular and postmortem brain lutein concentrations. Furthermore, lutein was found to preferentially accumulate in the infant brain in comparison to other carotenoids that are predominant in diet. While lutein is consistently related to cognitive function, the mechanisms by which lutein may influence cognition are not clear. In an effort to identify potential mechanisms through which lutein might influence neurodevelopment, an exploratory study relating metabolite signatures and lutein was completed. Post-mortem metabolomic analyses were performed on human infant brain tissues in three regions important for learning and memory: the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and occipital cortex. Metabolomic profiles were compared to lutein concentration, and correlations were identified and reported here. A total of 1276 correlations were carried out across all brain regions. Of 427 metabolites analyzed, 257 were metabolites of known identity. Unidentified metabolite correlations (510) were excluded. In addition, moderate correlations with xenobiotic relationships (2) or those driven by single outliers (3) were excluded from further study. Lutein concentrations correlated with lipid pathway metabolites, energy pathway metabolites, brain osmolytes, amino acid neurotransmitters, and the antioxidant homocarnosine. These correlations were often brain region-specific. Revealing relationships between lutein and metabolic pathways may help identify potential candidates on which to complete further analyses and may shed light on important roles of lutein in the human brain during development.

  6. Exploratory Metabolomic Analyses Reveal Compounds Correlated with Lutein Concentration in Frontal Cortex, Hippocampus, and Occipital Cortex of Human Infant Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lieblein-Boff, Jacqueline C.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.; Kennedy, Adam D.; Lai, Chron-Si; Kuchan, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Lutein is a dietary carotenoid well known for its role as an antioxidant in the macula, and recent reports implicate a role for lutein in cognitive function. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in both pediatric and geriatric brain tissue. In addition, cognitive function in older adults correlated with macular and postmortem brain lutein concentrations. Furthermore, lutein was found to preferentially accumulate in the infant brain in comparison to other carotenoids that are predominant in diet. While lutein is consistently related to cognitive function, the mechanisms by which lutein may influence cognition are not clear. In an effort to identify potential mechanisms through which lutein might influence neurodevelopment, an exploratory study relating metabolite signatures and lutein was completed. Post-mortem metabolomic analyses were performed on human infant brain tissues in three regions important for learning and memory: the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and occipital cortex. Metabolomic profiles were compared to lutein concentration, and correlations were identified and reported here. A total of 1276 correlations were carried out across all brain regions. Of 427 metabolites analyzed, 257 were metabolites of known identity. Unidentified metabolite correlations (510) were excluded. In addition, moderate correlations with xenobiotic relationships (2) or those driven by single outliers (3) were excluded from further study. Lutein concentrations correlated with lipid pathway metabolites, energy pathway metabolites, brain osmolytes, amino acid neurotransmitters, and the antioxidant homocarnosine. These correlations were often brain region—specific. Revealing relationships between lutein and metabolic pathways may help identify potential candidates on which to complete further analyses and may shed light on important roles of lutein in the human brain during development. PMID:26317757

  7. Over-Expression of PUMA Correlates with the Apoptosis of Spinal Cord Cells in Rat Neuropathic Intermittent Claudication Model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bin; Shi, Jiangang; Jia, Lianshun; Yuan, Wen; Wu, Jianfeng; Fu, Zhiyi; Wang, Yuan; Liu, Ning; Guan, Zhengmao

    2013-01-01

    Background Neuropathic intermittent claudication (NIC) is a typical clinical symptom of lumbar spinal stenosis and the apoptosis of neurons caused by cauda equina compression (CEC) has been proposed as an important reason. Whereas, the factors and the mechanism involved in the process of apoptosis induced by CEC remain unclear. Methodology and Results In our modified rat model of NIC, a trapezoid-shaped silicon rubber was inserted into the epidural space under the L5 and L6 vertebral plate. Obvious apoptosis was observed in spinal cord cells after compression by TUNEL assay. Simultaneously, qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry showed that the expression levels of PUMA (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis) and p53 were upregulated significantly in spinal cord under compression, while the expression of p53 inhibitor MDM2 and SirT2 decreased in the same region. Furthermore, CEC also resulted in the upregulation of Bcl-2 pro-apoptotic genes expression and caspase-3 activation. With the protection of Methylprednisolone, the upregulation of PUMA and p53 expression as well as the decrease of MDM2 and SirT2 in spinal cord were partially rescued in western bolt analysis. Conclusions These results suggest that over-expression of PUMA correlates with CEC caused apoptosis of spinal cord cells, which is characterized by the increase of p53, Bax and Bad expression. PUMA upregulation might be crucial to induce apoptosis of spinal cord cells through p53-dependent pathway in CEC. PMID:23658678

  8. Schistosome-induced cholangiocyte proliferation and osteopontin secretion correlate with fibrosis and portal hypertension in human and murine schistosomiasis mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Thiago A.; Syn, Wing-Kin; Machado, Mariana V.; Vidigal, Paula V.; Resende, Vivian; Voieta, Izabela; Xie, Guanhua; Otoni, Alba; Souza, Márcia M.; Santos, Elisângela T.; Chan, Isaac S.; Trindade, Guilherme V.M.; Choi, Steve S.; Witek, Rafal P.; Pereira, Fausto E.; Secor, William E.; Andrade, Zilton A.; Lambertucci, José Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major cause of portal hypertension worldwide. It associates with portal fibrosis that develops during chronic infection. The mechanisms by which the pathogen evokes these host responses remain unclear. We evaluated the hypothesis that schistosome eggs release factors that directly stimulate liver cells to produce osteopontin (OPN), a pro-fibrogenic protein that stimulates hepatic stellate cells to become myofibroblasts. We also investigated the utility of OPN as a biomarker of fibrosis and/or severity of portal hypertension. Cultured cholangiocytes, Kupffer cells and hepatic stellate cells were treated with soluble egg antigen (SEA); OPN production was quantified by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRTPCR) and ELISA; cell proliferation was assessed by BrdU (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine). Mice were infected with Schistosoma mansoni for 6 or 16 weeks to cause early or advanced fibrosis. Liver OPN was evaluated by qRTPCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) and correlated with liver fibrosis and serum OPN. Livers from patients with schistosomiasis mansoni (early fibrosis n=15; advanced fibrosis n=72) or healthy adults (n=22) were immunostained for OPN and fibrosis markers. Results were correlated with plasma OPN levels and splenic vein pressures. SEA-induced cholangiocyte proliferation and OPN secretion (P<0.001 compared with controls). Cholangiocytes were OPN (+) in Schistosoma-infected mice and humans. Liver and serum OPN levels correlated with fibrosis stage (mice: r=0.861; human r=0.672, P=0.0001) and myofibroblast accumulation (mice: r=0.800; human: r=0.761, P=0.0001). Numbers of OPN (+) bile ductules strongly correlated with splenic vein pressure (r=0.778; P=0.001). S. mansoni egg antigens stimulate cholangiocyte proliferation and OPN secretion. OPN levels in liver and blood correlate with fibrosis stage and portal hypertension severity. PMID:26201095

  9. Vaccine approaches for bovine tuberculosis: Correlates of protection and relevance to human tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB), primarily due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans and Mycobacterium bovis in cattle, is a classic model of the One Health Concept. M. bovis Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) was first proven effective in cattle prior to use in humans. Recent experimental trials with cattle have d...

  10. Correlation network analysis reveals relationships between diet-induced changes in human gut microbiota and metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    Kelder, T; Stroeve, J H M; Bijlsma, S; Radonjic, M; Roeselers, G

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recent evidence suggests that the gut microbiota plays an important role in human metabolism and energy homeostasis and is therefore a relevant factor in the assessment of metabolic health and flexibility. Understanding of these host–microbiome interactions aids the design of nutritional strategies that act via modulation of the microbiota. Nevertheless, relating gut microbiota composition to host health states remains challenging because of the sheer complexity of these ecosystems and the large degrees of interindividual variation in human microbiota composition. Methods: We assessed fecal microbiota composition and host response patterns of metabolic and inflammatory markers in 10 apparently healthy men subjected to a high-fat high-caloric diet (HFHC, 1300 kcal/day extra) for 4 weeks. DNA was isolated from stool and barcoded 16S rRNA gene amplicons were sequenced. Metabolic health parameters, including anthropomorphic and blood parameters, where determined at t=0 and t=4 weeks. Results: A correlation network approach revealed diet-induced changes in Bacteroides levels related to changes in carbohydrate oxidation rates, whereas the change in Firmicutes correlates with changes in fat oxidation. These results were confirmed by multivariate models. We identified correlations between microbial diversity indices and several inflammation-related host parameters that suggest a relation between diet-induced changes in gut microbiota diversity and inflammatory processes. Conclusions: This approach allowed us to identify significant correlations between abundances of microbial taxa and diet-induced shifts in several metabolic health parameters. Constructed correlation networks provide an overview of these relations, revealing groups of correlations that are of particular interest for explaining host health aspects through changes in the gut microbiota. PMID:24979151

  11. Attenuating the p53 Pathway in Human Cancers: Many Means to the Same End.

    PubMed

    Wasylishen, Amanda R; Lozano, Guillermina

    2016-08-01

    The p53 pathway is perturbed in the majority of human cancers. Although this most frequently occurs through the direct mutation or deletion of p53 itself, there are a number of other alterations that can attenuate the pathway and contribute to tumorigenesis. For example, amplification of important negative regulators, MDM2 and MDM4, occurs in a number of cancers. In this work, we will review both the normal regulation of the p53 pathway and the different mechanisms of pathway inhibition in cancer, discuss these alterations in the context of the global genomic analyses that have been conducted across tumor types, and highlight the translational implications for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  12. DNA Copy Number Aberrations, and Human Papillomavirus Status in Penile Carcinoma. Clinico-Pathological Correlations and Potential Driver Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lambros, Maryou; Stankiewicz, Elzbieta; Ng, Charlotte K. Y.; Weigelt, Britta; Rajab, Ramzi; Tinwell, Brendan; Corbishley, Cathy; Watkin, Nick; Berney, Dan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.

    2016-01-01

    Penile squamous cell carcinoma is a rare disease, in which somatic genetic aberrations have yet to be characterized. We hypothesized that gene copy aberrations might correlate with human papillomavirus status and clinico-pathological features. We sought to determine the spectrum of gene copy number aberrations in a large series of PSCCs and to define their correlations with human papillomavirus, histopathological subtype, and tumor grade, stage and lymph node status. Seventy formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded penile squamous cell carcinomas were centrally reviewed by expert uropathologists. DNA was extracted from micro-dissected samples, subjected to PCR-based human papillomavirus assessment and genotyping (INNO-LiPA human papillomavirus Genotyping Extra Assay) and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization using a 32K Bacterial Artificial Chromosome array platform. Sixty-four samples yielded interpretable results. Recurrent gains were observed in chromosomes 1p13.3-q44 (88%), 3p12.3-q29 (86%), 5p15.33-p11 (67%) and 8p12-q24.3 (84%). Amplifications of 5p15.33-p11 and 11p14.1-p12 were found in seven (11%) and four (6%) cases, respectively. Losses were observed in chromosomes 2q33-q37.3 (86%), 3p26.3-q11.1 (83%) and 11q12.2-q25 (81%). Although many losses and gains were similar throughout the cohort, there were small significant differences observed at specific loci, between human papillomavirus positive and negative tumors, between tumor types, and tumor grade and nodal status. These results demonstrate that despite the diversity of genetic aberrations in penile squamous cell carcinomas, there are significant correlations between the clinico-pathological data and the genetic changes that may play a role in disease natural history and progression and highlight potential driver genes, which may feature in molecular pathways for existing therapeutic agents. PMID:26901676

  13. Visualizing Functional Pathways in the Human Brain Using Correlation Tensors and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhaohua; Xu, Ran; Bailey, Stephen K.; Wu, Tung-Lin; Morgan, Victoria L.; Cutting, Laurie E.; Anderson, Adam W.; Gore, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging usually detects changes in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals from T2*-sensitive acquisitions, and is most effective in detecting activity in brain cortex which is irrigated by rich vasculature to meet high metabolic demands. We recently demonstrated that MRI signals from T2*-sensitive acquisitions in a resting state exhibit structure-specific temporal correlations along white matter tracts. In this report we validate our preliminary findings and introduce spatio-temporal functional correlation tensors to characterize the directional preferences of temporal correlations in MRI signals acquired at rest. The results bear a remarkable similarity to data obtained by diffusion tensor imaging but without any diffusion-encoding gradients. Just as in gray matter, temporal correlations in resting state signals may reflect intrinsic synchronizations of neural activity in white matter. Here we demonstrate that functional correlation tensors are able to visualize long range white matter tracts as well as short range sub-cortical fibers imaged at rest, and that evoked functional activities alter these structures and enhance the visualization of relevant neural circuitry. Furthermore, we explore the biophysical mechanisms underlying these phenomena by comparing pulse sequences, which suggest that white matter signal variations are consistent with hemodynamic (BOLD) changes associated with neural activity. These results suggest new ways to evaluate MRI signal changes within white matter. PMID:26477562

  14. Hexokinase and phosphofructokinase activity and intracellular distribution correlate with aggressiveness and invasiveness of human breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Raquel G; Calaça, Isadora C; Celestrini, Deborah M; Correia-Carneiro, Ana Helena P; Costa, Mauricio M; Zancan, Patricia; Sola-Penna, Mauro

    2015-10-01

    Glycolytic enzymes, such as hexokinase and phosphofructokinase, have been reported to be upregulated in many cancer types. Here, we evaluated these two enzymes in 54 breast cancer samples collected from volunteers subjected to mastectomy, and the results were correlated with the prognosis markers commonly used. We found that both enzymes positively correlate with the major markers for invasiveness and aggressiveness. For invasiveness, the enzymes activities increase in parallel to the tumor size. Moreover, we found augmented activities for both enzymes when the samples were extirpated from patients presenting lymph node involvement or occurrence of metastasis. For aggressiveness, we stained the samples for the estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER-2, p53 and Ki-67. The enzyme activities positively correlated with all markers but Ki-67. Finally, we conclude that these enzymes are good markers for breast cancer prognosis.

  15. Hexokinase and phosphofructokinase activity and intracellular distribution correlate with aggressiveness and invasiveness of human breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Raquel G.; Calaça, Isadora C.; Celestrini, Deborah M.; Correia-Carneiro, Ana Helena P.; Costa, Mauricio M.; Zancan, Patricia; Sola-Penna, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Glycolytic enzymes, such as hexokinase and phosphofructokinase, have been reported to be upregulated in many cancer types. Here, we evaluated these two enzymes in 54 breast cancer samples collected from volunteers subjected to mastectomy, and the results were correlated with the prognosis markers commonly used. We found that both enzymes positively correlate with the major markers for invasiveness and aggressiveness. For invasiveness, the enzymes activities increase in parallel to the tumor size. Moreover, we found augmented activities for both enzymes when the samples were extirpated from patients presenting lymph node involvement or occurrence of metastasis. For aggressiveness, we stained the samples for the estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER-2, p53 and Ki-67. The enzyme activities positively correlated with all markers but Ki-67. Finally, we conclude that these enzymes are good markers for breast cancer prognosis. PMID:26320188

  16. Correlation Of An E-Nose System For Odor Assessment Of Shoe/Sock Systems With A Human Sensory Panel

    SciTech Connect

    Horras, Stephan; Reimann, Peter; Schuetze, Andreas; Gaiotto, Alessandra; Mayer, Maria

    2009-05-23

    Evaluation of strength and quality of smell is today still primarily done with human sensory panels. For a range of applications, technical systems for an objective smell assessment would provide a great benefit in R and D and also day-to-day application. The project presented here specifically addresses the problem of assessing the strength and unpleasantness of smell caused by sweat in shoes and socks by an E-nose system. The ultimate goal is to provide a tool for developing improved shoe/sock systems with optimized materials.The main approach to achieve this goal is to find a correlation between the assessment of a human sensory panel and the complex sensor response patterns of an E-Nose system to appraise the smell of sweat in shoes and socks. Therefore a range of test persons wear shoes and socks under defined ambient conditions in a controlled test environment as well as during everyday use. Afterwards the smell of the shoes and socks is both measured with the E-Nose system and assessed by a human sensory panel. We report here the results of the first larger test series and the identified correlation between the E-Nose system and the human assessment of the smell of sweat.

  17. Factors Influencing the Estimates of Correlation between Motor Unit Activities in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Negro, Francesco; Farina, Dario

    2012-01-01

    Background Alpha motoneurons receive common synaptic inputs from spinal and supraspinal pathways. As a result, a certain degree of correlation can be observed between motoneuron spike trains during voluntary contractions. This has been studied by using correlation measures in the time and frequency domains. These measures are interpreted as reflecting different types of connectivity in the spinal networks, although the relation between the degree of correlation of the output motoneuron spike trains and of their synaptic inputs is unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we analyze theoretically this relation and we complete this analysis by simulations and experimental data on the abductor digiti minimi muscle. The results demonstrate that correlation measures between motoneuron output spike trains are inherently influenced by the discharge rate and that this influence cannot be compensated by normalization. Because of the influence of discharge rate, frequency domain measures of correlation (coherence) do not identify the full frequency content of the common input signal when computed from pairs of motoneurons. Rather, an increase in sampling rate is needed by using cumulative spike trains of several motoneurons. Moreover, the application of averaging filters to the spike trains influences the magnitude of the estimated correlation levels calculated in the time, but not in the frequency domain (coherence). Conclusions It is concluded that the analysis of coherence in different frequency bands between cumulative spike trains of a sufficient number of motoneurons provides information on the spectrum of the common synaptic input. Nonetheless, the absolute values of coherent peaks cannot be compared across conditions with different cumulative discharge rates. PMID:23049762

  18. Histopathological Changes in the Human Posterior Cruciate Ligament During Aging and Osteoarthritis: Correlations with ACL and Cartilage Changes

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Yadin D.; Hasegawa, Akihiko; Patil, Shantanu; Koziol, James A.; Lotz, Martin K.; D’Lima, Darryl D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the histological patterns of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) degeneration during aging and in relation to changes in articular cartilage and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) across the entire adult age spectrum. Methods Human knee joints (n=120 from 65 donors) were processed within 72 hours postmortem. Articular cartilage surfaces were graded macroscopically. Each PCL was histologically evaluated for inflammation, mucinous changes, chondroid metaplasia, cystic changes and orientation of collagen fibers. Severity of PCL degeneration was classified as normal, mild, moderate or severe. PCL scores were compared to ACL and cartilage scores from the same knees. Results All knees had intact PCL. Histologically, 6% were normal, 76% showed mild, 12% moderate and 9% severe degeneration. Fiber disorientation was the most prevalent and severe change. Histological grades of PCL and ACL correlated but significantly fewer PCL than ACL showed severe changes. There was weaker correlation between aging and total histological PCL scores (R=0.26) compared to aging and ACL scores (R=0.42). ACL scores correlated with cartilage scores (R=0.54) while PCL scores increased with severity of OA from grades 0 to III but not between OA grades III to IV (R=0.32). In knees with ruptured ACL, the PCL scores correlated with cartilage scores of the lateral compartment. Conclusions PCL histopathological changes are less severe than in the ACL. PCL degeneration was associated with ACL and cartilage damage. The lack of correlation with age indicates independent pathways for PCL versus ACL degeneration. PMID:22872023

  19. Correlation of host immune response with quantitative recovery of Chlamydia trachomatis from the human endocervix.

    PubMed Central

    Brunham, R C; Kuo, C C; Cles, L; Holmes, K K

    1983-01-01

    We studied 95 women with uncomplicated Chlamydia trachomatis cervical infection. Quantitative isolation of C. trachomatis was performed in HeLa 229 cells, and the results were correlated with serum immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibody to the organism. We found that quantitative cultures for C. trachomatis can provide a meaningful measurement by which to evaluate the effect of the acquired immune response. In particular, secretory immunoglobulin A antibody to C. trachomatis in cervical secretion demonstrated a striking and inverse correlation with recovery of the organism from the cervix. It is suggested that this component of the immune response may regulate shedding of the organism. PMID:6840846

  20. Differential correlation between interleukin patterns in disseminated and chronic human paracoccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, C L; Silva, M F; Faccioli, L H; Pietro, R C; Cortez, S A; Foss, N T

    1995-01-01

    In an attempt to understand better the immunoregulatory disorders in paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), the possible correlation between interleukin pattern, lymphoproliferation, C-reactive protein (CRP) and specific antibody levels was investigated in the polarized clinical forms of this disease. We studied 16 PCM patients, eight with the disseminated disease (four under treatment and four non-treated) and eight with the chronic disease. The patients with disseminated disease exhibited high antibody titres specific to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antigen compared with patients with the chronic form of disease. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF), IL-1, IL-6 and CRP in the serum of non-treated disseminated PCM patients were increased, which correlated positively with the low mitogenic response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) (P < 0.01) and with the high antibody titres (P < 0.001) of these patients. Moreover, we found in the disseminated PCM patients positive correlations between IL-1 and IL-6 (P = 0.0007); IL-1 and TNF (P = 0.0045); IL-1 and IL-6 with the high antibody titres (P = 0.0834 and P = 0.0631, respectively); IL-1, IL-6 and TNF with CRP levels. By contrast, no correlations were found with those interleukins in the treated disseminated and chronic patients or in controls. It was interesting to find an inverse correlation between IL-4 and antibody production in non-treated disseminated PCM (r = -0.4770); moreover, a significant correlation (P = 0.0820) was found in chronic PCM patients with respect to the low level of either IL-4 and antibody titres against fungus antigen. Chronic PCM patients also had IL-2 levels inversely correlated with antibody production (r = -0.6313; P = 0.0628). Inverse correlations were also observed between IL-2 and IL-6 levels in non-treated disseminated patients (P = 0.0501) and between IL-2 and IL-4 in chronic patients (P = 0.0131). The inflammatory cytokines might have a pivotal role in the