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Sample records for human micro-vascular endothelial

  1. Lipopolysaccharide Induces Human Pulmonary Micro-Vascular Endothelial Apoptosis via the YAP Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Lei; Huang, Xiaoqin; Guo, Feng; Zhou, Zengding; Chang, Mengling; Tang, Jiajun; Huan, Jingning

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces a pathologic increase in lung vascular leakage under septic conditions. LPS-induced human pulmonary micro-vascular endothelial cell (HPMEC) apoptosis launches and aggravates micro-vascular hyper-permeability and acute lung injury (ALI). Previous studies show that the activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway is vital for LPS-induced EC apoptosis. Yes-associated protein (YAP) has been reported to positively regulate intrinsic apoptotic pathway in tumor cells apoptosis. However, the potential role of YAP protein in LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis has not been determined. In this study, we found that LPS-induced activation and nuclear accumulation of YAP accelerated HPMECs apoptosis. LPS-induced YAP translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus by the increased phosphorylation on Y357 resulted in the interaction between YAP and transcription factor P73. Furthermore, inhibition of YAP by small interfering RNA (siRNA) not only suppressed the LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis but also regulated P73-mediated up-regulation of BAX and down-regulation of BCL-2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that activation of the YAP/P73/(BAX and BCL-2)/caspase-3 signaling pathway played a critical role in LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis. Inhibition of the YAP might be a potential therapeutic strategy for lung injury under sepsis. PMID:27807512

  2. The surface protease ompT serves as Escherichia coli K1 adhesin in binding to human brain micro vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lei; Guo, Yan; Hui, Chang-Ye; Liu, Xiao-Lu; Zhang, Wen-Bing; Cao, Hong; Cao, Hong

    2014-05-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) K1 is the most common bacteria that cause meningitis in the neonatal period. But it's not entirely clear about how E. coli crosses the blood-brain barrier. The features of the ompT deletion in meningitic E. coli infection were texted in vitro. In comparison with the parent strain, the isogenic ompT deletion mutant was significantly less adhesive to human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). The adhesion-deficient phenotype of the mutant was restored to the level of the wild-type by complementing with low-level OmpT expression plasmid. Interestingly, the adhesion was enhanced by point mutation at the OmpT proposed catalytic residue D85. Compared with the poor adhesive activity of bovine serum albumin-coated fluorescent beads, recombinant OmpT or catalytically inactive variant of OmpT-coated beads bound to HBMEC monolayer effectively. Our study suggests that OmpT is important for bacterial adhesion while entering into central nervous system, and the adhesion does not involve in the proteolytic activity of OmpT.

  3. Force control of endothelium permeability in mechanically stressed pulmonary micro-vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Caluch, Adam; Fodil, Redouane; Féréol, Sophie; Zadigue, Patricia; Pelle, Gabriel; Louis, Bruno; Isabey, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical factors play a key role in the pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury (VILI) as contributing to alveolo-capillary barrier dysfunction. This study aims at elucidating the role of the cytoskeleton (CSK) and cell-matrix adhesion system in the stressed endothelium and more precisely in the loss of integrity of the endothelial barrier. We purposely develop a cellular model made of a monolayer of confluent Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HPMVECs) whose cytoskeleton (CSK) is directly exposed to sustained cyclic mechanical stress for 1 and 2 h. We used RGD-coated ferromagnetic beads and measured permeability before and after stress application. We find that endothelial permeability increases in the stressed endothelium, hence reflecting a loss of integrity. Structural and mechanical results suggest that this endothelial barrier alteration would be due to physically-founded discrepancies in latero-basal reinforcement of adhesion sites in response to the global increase in CSK stiffness or centripetal intracellular forces. Basal reinforcement of adhesion is presently evidenced by the marked redistribution of αvβ3 integrin with cluster formation in the stressed endothelium. PMID:22766716

  4. The effect of acute administration of Vitamin D on micro vascular endothelial function in Caucasians and South Asian Indians

    PubMed Central

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Alshammari, Faris; Khowailed, Iman Akef; Rodrigues, Sophia; Potnis, Pooja; Akerkar, Siddhesh; Shah, Jinal; Chung, Guyeon; Save, Rakhi

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitamin D is a modulator of the immune system. There is some limited evidence that it also increases local blood flow in response to stress. Material/Methods In the present study, we examined 20 age matched subjects; 10 whom were from India and 10 Caucasians from the United States. Subjects were administered 4000 IU of Vitamin D3 for 3 weeks at breakfast. The function of the endothelial cells was evaluated in 2 ways; first, the response to 4 minutes of vascular occlusion was measured with a laser Doppler flow meter and second, the blood flow response to local heat at 42°C for 6 minutes. Results The results of the experiments showed that, as reported previously, the endothelial function in people from India was less than their Caucasian counterparts. The blood flow response to heat was reduced after 3 weeks administration of vitamin D in both groups and the response to vascular occlusion in the Caucasian group. But there was only a 20% reduction in the blood flow response to heat in the Caucasian group and a 50% reduction in the group from India. Conclusions Thus acute doses of vitamin D may increase vascular tone and reduce blood flow to tissue during stressors. Dosages administered for a longer duration may have beneficial effects on endothelial function but this was not examined here. PMID:23917403

  5. Culture of human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gallicchio, M A

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial cells line the luminal surface of all blood vessels in the body. The endothelial surface in adult humans is composed of approximately l-6×l0(13) cells and covers an area of 1-7 m(2). Endothelium serves many functions, including fluid and solute exchange through cell contraction, provision of an antithrombogenic surface through tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and prostacyclin release, synthesis of angiogenic factors such as adenosine, allowance of leukocyte trafficking through adhesion molecule synthesis, presentation of antigens to the immune system, maintenance of vascular tone through nitric oxide and endothelin synthesis, and metabolism of circulating molecules through the release of enzymes such as lipoprotein lipase. PMID:21340938

  6. Estetrol Modulates Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthesis in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Montt-Guevara, Maria Magdalena; Giretti, Maria Silvia; Russo, Eleonora; Giannini, Andrea; Mannella, Paolo; Genazzani, Andrea Riccardo; Genazzani, Alessandro David; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    Estetrol (E4) is a natural human estrogen that is present at high concentrations during pregnancy. E4 has been reported to act as an endogenous estrogen receptor modulator, exerting estrogenic actions on the endometrium or the central nervous system but presenting antagonistic effects on the breast. Due to these characteristics, E4 is currently being developed for a number of clinical applications, including contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) is a key player for vascular function and disease during pregnancy and throughout aging in women. Endothelial NO is an established target of estrogens that enhance its formation in human endothelial cells. We here addressed the effects of E4 on the activity and expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). E4 stimulated the activation of eNOS and NO secretion in HUVEC. E4 was significantly less effective compared to E2, and a peculiar concentration-dependent effect was found, with higher amounts of E4 being less effective than lower concentrations. When E2 was combined with E4, an interesting pattern was noted. E4 antagonized NO synthesis induced by pregnancy-like E2 concentrations. However, E4 did not impede the modest induction of NO synthesis associated with postmenopausal-like E2 levels. These results support the hypothesis that E4 may be a regulator of NO synthesis in endothelial cells and raise questions on its peculiar signaling in this context. Our results may be useful to interpret the role of E4 during human pregnancy and possibly to help develop this interesting steroid for clinical use. PMID:26257704

  7. Estetrol Modulates Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthesis in Human Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Montt-Guevara, Maria Magdalena; Giretti, Maria Silvia; Russo, Eleonora; Giannini, Andrea; Mannella, Paolo; Genazzani, Andrea Riccardo; Genazzani, Alessandro David; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    Estetrol (E4) is a natural human estrogen that is present at high concentrations during pregnancy. E4 has been reported to act as an endogenous estrogen receptor modulator, exerting estrogenic actions on the endometrium or the central nervous system but presenting antagonistic effects on the breast. Due to these characteristics, E4 is currently being developed for a number of clinical applications, including contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) is a key player for vascular function and disease during pregnancy and throughout aging in women. Endothelial NO is an established target of estrogens that enhance its formation in human endothelial cells. We here addressed the effects of E4 on the activity and expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). E4 stimulated the activation of eNOS and NO secretion in HUVEC. E4 was significantly less effective compared to E2, and a peculiar concentration-dependent effect was found, with higher amounts of E4 being less effective than lower concentrations. When E2 was combined with E4, an interesting pattern was noted. E4 antagonized NO synthesis induced by pregnancy-like E2 concentrations. However, E4 did not impede the modest induction of NO synthesis associated with postmenopausal-like E2 levels. These results support the hypothesis that E4 may be a regulator of NO synthesis in endothelial cells and raise questions on its peculiar signaling in this context. Our results may be useful to interpret the role of E4 during human pregnancy and possibly to help develop this interesting steroid for clinical use. PMID:26257704

  8. Androgen receptor in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Estay, Verónica; Carreño, Daniela V; San Francisco, Ignacio F; Sotomayor, Paula; Godoy, Alejandro S; Smith, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible transcription factor, and a member of the steroid-thyroid-retinoid receptor superfamily, that mediates the biological effects of androgens in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. AR expression was identified in vascular cells nearly 20 years ago, and recent research has shown that AR mediates a variety of actions of androgens in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. In this mini-review, we review evidence indicating the importance of AR in human endothelial cell (HUVEC) homeostatic and pathogenic processes. Although a role for AR in the modulation of HUVEC biology is evident, the molecular mechanisms by which AR regulates HUVEC homeostasis and disease processes are not fully understood. Understanding these mechanisms could provide critical insights into the processes of pathogenesis of diseases ranging from cardiovascular disease to cancer that are major causes of human morbidity and mortality. PMID:25563353

  9. Asiaticoside Inhibits TNF-α-Induced Endothelial Hyperpermeability of Human Aortic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Fong, Lai Yen; Ng, Chin Theng; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Baharuldin, Mohamad Taufik Hidayat; Arifah, Abdul Kadir; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul; Zuraini, Ahmad

    2015-10-01

    The increase in endothelial permeability often promotes edema formation in various pathological conditions. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), a pro-atherogenic cytokine, impairs endothelial barrier function and causes endothelial dysfunction in early stage of atherosclerosis. Asiaticoside, one of the triterpenoids derived from Centella asiatica, is known to possess antiinflammatory activity. In order to examine the role of asiaticoside in preserving the endothelial barrier, we assessed its effects on endothelial hyperpermeability and disruption of actin filaments evoked by TNF-α in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). TNF-α caused an increase in endothelial permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran. Asiaticoside pretreatment significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced increased permeability. Asiaticoside also prevented TNF-α-induced actin redistribution by suppressing stress fiber formation. However, the increased F to G actin ratio stimulated by TNF-α was not changed by asiaticoside. Cytochalasin D, an actin depolymerizing agent, was used to correlate the anti-hyperpermeability effect of asiaticoside with actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, asiaticoside failed to prevent cytochalasin D-induced increased permeability. These results suggest that asiaticoside protects against the disruption of endothelial barrier and actin rearrangement triggered by TNF-α without a significant change in total actin pool. However, asiaticoside seems to work by other mechanisms to maintain the integrity of endothelial barrier rather than stabilizing the F-actin organization.

  10. Replication of human endothelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Lewis, L J; Hoak, J C; Maca, R D; Fry, G L

    1973-08-01

    Investigative studies dealing with the properties and functions of endothelial cells have been hampered because there has been little or no success in the isolation, growth, and passage of individual cells in large numbers. We have developed a system whereby pure cultures of endothelial cells derived from umbilical veins can be subcultured for at least five serial passages. Many facets of endothelial function and interaction can be evaluated with the use of this new adaptive system of isolation and culture. PMID:4718112

  11. The effects of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinole treatment on gonadal micro-vascularization and affected fertility examined by SEM and 3D-morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlbacher, K. M. T.; Minnich, B.

    2015-10-01

    The present study focuses on the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on the reproductive system in nude rats with special emphasis on how Δ9-THC impacts the vascularization of testes which in turn indirectly influences fertility. Basically, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) causes not only negative (psychoactive) effects in the human body as cannabinole administration in medical use (dose-dependent) offers multiple new treatment opportunities such as pain relief or containment of various cancers. Concerning the reproductive system it strongly influences CB-receptors along the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis resulting in reduced plasma testosterone levels. There is also altered sperm quality parameters reported such as sperm motility or sperm count. On the other hand Δ9-THC effects endothelial growth factors (VEGF, Ang-1 etc.) respectively acts on their specific receptors which in turn modify angiogenesis and vascularization of tissues and organs (e.g. tumorous tissues). This leads to new therapeutical strategies in the suppression of various cancers by inhibiting (neo-)vascularization and in turn famishment of tumorous tissues (lack of nutrition supply). Here we studied the micro-vascularization of gonads in a long-term THC-treated nude rat model by vascular corrosion casting, SEM and 3D-morphometry.

  12. Sickle erythrocytes inhibit human endothelial cell DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.; Zhou, M.A.; Bartlett-Pandite, A.; Wenc, K. )

    1990-11-15

    Patients with sickle cell anemia experience severe vascular occlusive phenomena including acute pain crisis and cerebral infarction. Obstruction occurs at both the microvascular and the arterial level, and the clinical presentation of vascular events is heterogeneous, suggesting a complex etiology. Interaction between sickle erythrocytes and the endothelium may contribute to vascular occlusion due to alteration of endothelial function. To investigate this hypothesis, human vascular endothelial cells were overlaid with sickle or normal erythrocytes and stimulated to synthesize DNA. The erythrocytes were sedimented onto replicate monolayers by centrifugation for 10 minutes at 17 g to insure contact with the endothelial cells. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine into endothelial cell DNA was markedly inhibited during contact with sickle erythrocytes. This inhibitory effect was enhanced more than twofold when autologous sickle plasma was present during endothelial cell labeling. Normal erythrocytes, with or without autologous plasma, had a modest effect on endothelial cell DNA synthesis. When sickle erythrocytes in autologous sickle plasma were applied to endothelial monolayers for 1 minute, 10 minutes, or 1 hour and then removed, subsequent DNA synthesis by the endothelial cells was inhibited by 30% to 40%. Although adherence of sickle erythrocytes to the endothelial monolayers was observed under these experimental conditions, the effect of sickle erythrocytes on endothelial DNA synthesis occurred in the absence of significant adherence. Hence, human endothelial cell DNA synthesis is partially inhibited by contact with sickle erythrocytes. The inhibitory effect of sickle erythrocytes occurs during a brief (1 minute) contact with the endothelial monolayers, and persists for at least 6 hours of 3H-thymidine labeling.

  13. Selective biological response of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells on cold-plasma-modified polyester vascular prostheses.

    PubMed

    Blanchemain, N; Aguilar, M R; Chai, F; Jimenez, M; Jean-Baptiste, E; El-Achari, A; Martel, B; Hildebrand, H F; Roman, J San

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this work was to improve the hemocompatibility and the selectivity according to cells of non-woven poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) membranes. Non-woven PET membranes were modified by a combined plasma-chemical process. The surface of these materials was pre-activated by cold-plasma treatment and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was grafted by the in situ free radical polymerization of acrylic acid (AA). The extent of this reaction and the number of carboxylic groups incorporated were evaluated by colorimetric titration using toluidine blue O. All samples were characterized by SEM, AFM and thermogravimetric analysis, and the mechanical properties of the PAA grafted sample were determined. A selective cell response was observed when human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMC) or human pulmonary micro vascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) were seeded on the modified surfaces. HPASMC proliferation decreased about 60%, while HPMEC proliferation was just reduced about 10%. PAA grafted samples did not present hemolytic activity and the platelet adhesion decreased about 28% on PAA grafted surfaces. PMID:22002636

  14. Endothelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Golub, Justin S.; Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Langer, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the potential to differentiate into various cell types and, thus, may be useful as a source of cells for transplantation or tissue engineering. We describe here the differentiation steps of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells forming vascular-like structures. The human embryonic-derived endothelial cells were isolated by using platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) antibodies, their behavior was characterized in vitro and in vivo, and their potential in tissue engineering was examined. We show that the isolated embryonic PECAM1+ cells, grown in culture, display characteristics similar to vessel endothelium. The cells express endothelial cell markers in a pattern similar to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, their junctions are correctly organized, and they have high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. In addition, the cells are able to differentiate and form tube-like structures when cultured on matrigel. In vivo, when transplanted into SCID mice, the cells appeared to form microvessels containing mouse blood cells. With further studies, these cells could provide a source of human endothelial cells that could be beneficial for potential applications such as engineering new blood vessels, endothelial cell transplantation into the heart for myocardial regeneration, and induction of angiogenesis for treatment of regional ischemia.

  15. Prolonged cyclic strain inhibits human endothelial cell growth.

    PubMed

    Peyton, Kelly J; Liu, Xiao-ming; Durante, William

    2016-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is continuously exposed to cyclic mechanical strain due to the periodic change in vessel diameter as a result of pulsatile blood flow. Since emerging evidence indicates the cyclic strain plays an integral role in regulating endothelial cell function, the present study determined whether application of a physiologic regimen of cyclic strain (6% at 1 hertz) influences the proliferation of human arterial endothelial cells. Prolonged exposure of human dermal microvascular or human aortic endothelial cells to cyclic strain for up to 7 days resulted in a marked decrease in cell growth. The strain-mediated anti-proliferative effect was associated with the arrest of endothelial cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, did not involve cell detachment or cytotoxicity, and was due to the induction of p21. Interestingly, the inhibition in endothelial cell growth was independent of the strain regimen since prolonged application of constant or intermittent 6% strain was also able to block endothelial cell proliferation. The ability of chronic physiologic cyclic strain to inhibit endothelial cell growth represents a previously unrecognized mechanism by which hemodynamic forces maintain these cells in a quiescent, non-proliferative state. PMID:26709656

  16. Brassinosteroids inhibit in vitro angiogenesis in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rárová, Lucie; Zahler, Stefan; Liebl, Johanna; Kryštof, Vladimír; Sedlák, David; Bartůněk, Petr; Kohout, Ladislav; Strnad, Miroslav

    2012-11-01

    Antiangiogenic activity of the brassinosteroid plant hormones (BRs) and their derivative cholestanon was investigated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). 24-Epibrassinolide and 28-homocastasterone from group of 21 tested natural BRs inhibited migration of HUVEC cells. Seven tested BRs decreased the number of tubes significantly. Synthetic analogue cholestanon inhibited angiogenesis in vitro more effectively than natural BRs. Because of the similarity of BRs to human steroids, we have also studied interactions of BRs with human steroid receptors. Synthetic BRs cholestanon showed agonistic effects on estrogen-receptor-α, estrogen-receptor-β and androgen receptor. Of the natural BRs, 24-epibrassinolide was found to be a weak antagonist of estrogen-receptor-α (ERα). Our results provide the first evidence that large group of BRs can inhibit in vitro angiogenesis of primary endothelial cells. BRs constitute a novel group of human steroid receptor activators or inhibitors with capacity to inhibit angiogenesis.

  17. Human cultured endothelial cells do secrete endothelin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Clozel, M.; Fischli, W. )

    1989-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been identified in the conditioned medium of porcine endothelial cells. Human endothelin (ET-1) cloned from a placenta cDNA library is similar to porcine, but it is not known whether endothelin itself is secreted by human endothelial cells. To answer this question, a conditioned medium taken every 48 h from confluent cultures of umbilical vein endothelial cells was analyzed by HPLC and all fractions were tested for their ability to inhibit ({sup 125}I)ET-1 binding on human placenta membranes. Only one fraction did inhibit ({sup 125}I)ET-1 binding. When the conditioned medium was spiked with ET-1, the same single fraction inhibited ({sup 125}I)ET-1 binding showing that ET-1, itself, is present in the conditioned medium of human endothelial cells. ET-1 accumulates with time, reaching a plateau at 48 h. ET-1 secretion is not increased by a 24-h incubation of endothelial cells with phorbol myristate acetate, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor, thrombin or neuropeptide Y.

  18. Acrylamide induces accelerated endothelial aging in a human cell model.

    PubMed

    Sellier, Cyril; Boulanger, Eric; Maladry, François; Tessier, Frédéric J; Lorenzi, Rodrigo; Nevière, Rémi; Desreumaux, Pierre; Beuscart, Jean-Baptiste; Puisieux, François; Grossin, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Acrylamide (AAM) has been recently discovered in food as a Maillard reaction product. AAM and glycidamide (GA), its metabolite, have been described as probably carcinogenic to humans. It is widely established that senescence and carcinogenicity are closely related. In vitro, endothelial aging is characterized by replicative senescence in which primary cells in culture lose their ability to divide. Our objective was to assess the effects of AAM and GA on human endothelial cell senescence. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) cultured in vitro were used as model. HUVECs were cultured over 3 months with AAM or GA (1, 10 or 100 μM) until growth arrest. To analyze senescence, β-galactosidase activity and telomere length of HUVECs were measured by cytometry and semi-quantitative PCR, respectively. At all tested concentrations, AAM or GA reduced cell population doubling compared to the control condition (p < 0.001). β-galactosidase activity in endothelial cells was increased when exposed to AAM (≥10 μM) or GA (≥1 μM) (p < 0.05). AAM (≥10 μM) or GA (100 μM) accelerated telomere shortening in HUVECs (p < 0.05). In conclusion, in vitro chronic exposure to AAM or GA at low concentrations induces accelerated senescence. This result suggests that an exposure to AAM might contribute to endothelial aging.

  19. Modest Visceral Fat Gain Causes Endothelial Dysfunction In Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Corral, Abel; Sert-Kuniyoshi, Fatima H.; Sierra-Johnson, Justo; Orban, Marek; Gami, Apoor; Davison, Diane; Singh, Prachi; Pusalavidyasagar, Snigdha; Huyber, Christine; Votruba, Susanne; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Jensen, Michael D.; Somers, Virend K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study sought to determine the impact of fat gain and its distribution on endothelial function in lean healthy humans. Background Endothelial dysfunction has been identified as an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. Whether fat gain impairs endothelial function is unknown. Methods A randomized controlled study to assess the effects of fat gain on endothelial function. We recruited 43 normal weight healthy volunteers (mean age 29 years; 18 women). Subjects were assigned to gain weight (approximately 4 kg) (n=35) or to maintain weight (n=8). Endothelial function (brachial artery flow mediated dilation -FMD) was measured at baseline, after fat gain (8 weeks) and after weight loss (16 weeks) for fat-gainers and at baseline and follow-up (8 weeks) for weight-maintainers. Body composition was measured by DXA and abdominal CT scans. Results After an average weight gain of 4.1 kg, fat-gainers significantly increased their total, visceral and subcutaneous fat. Blood pressure and overnight polysomnography did not change after fat gain or loss. FMD remained unchanged in weight-maintainers. FMD decreased in fat-gainers (9.1 ± 3% vs. 7.8 ± 3.2%, p =0.003), but recovered to baseline when subjects shed the gained weight. There was a significant correlation between the decrease in FMD and the increase in visceral fat gain (rho = −0.42, p=0.004), but not with subcutaneous fat gain (rho = −0.22, p=0.15). Conclusions In normal weight healthy young subjects, modest fat gain results in impaired endothelial function, even in the absence of changes in blood pressure. Endothelial function recovers after weight loss. Increased visceral rather than subcutaneous fat predicts endothelial dysfunction. PMID:20705223

  20. Synthesis of Antihemophilic Factor Antigen by Cultured Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, Eric A.; Hoyer, Leon W.; Nachman, Ralph L.

    1973-01-01

    Antihemophilic factor (AHF, Factor VIII) antigen has been demonstrated in cultured human endothelial cells by immunofluorescence studies using monospecific rabbit antibody to human AHF. Control studies with cultured human smooth muscle cells and human fibroblasts were negative. By radioimmunoassay it was demonstrated that cultured human endothelial cells contain AHF antigen which is released into the culture medium. Cultured smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts did not have this property. Cultured endothelial cells incorporated radioactive amino acids into high molecular weight, AHF antigen-rich protein fractions prepared from the culture media, 7% of the radioactive amino acid counts incorporated into this material were precipitated by globulin prepared from rabbit anti-AHF whereas normal rabbit globulin precipitated only 1.5% of the counts. Although cultured endothelial cells actively synthesize AHF antigen, AHF procoagulant activity was not detected in the culture medium. Studies seeking a basis for the lack of procoagulant activity have not clarified this deficiency, but they have established that exogenous AHF procoagulant activity is not inactivated by the tissue culture system. Images PMID:4583980

  1. Human Endothelial Cells: Use of Heparin in Cloning and Long-Term Serial Cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Susan C.; Mueller, Stephen N.; Levine, Elliot M.

    1983-11-01

    Endothelial cells from human blood vessels were cultured in vitro, with doubling times of 17 to 21 hours for 42 to 79 population doublings. Cloned human endothelial cell strains were established for the first time and had similar proliferative capacities. This vigorous cell growth was achieved by addition of heparin to culture medium containing reduced concentrations of endothelial cell growth factor. The routine cloning and long-term culture of human endothelial cells will facilitate studying the human endothelium in vitro.

  2. The effects of glucocorticoids on cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Maca, R D; Fry, G L; Hoak, J C

    1978-04-01

    The effects of hydrocortisone, dexamethasone and prednisone on the morphology, replication, DNA synthesis, cell protein content and protein synthesis of cultured, human endothelial cells were evaluated. After culturing the cells with these glucocorticoids for 24-48 h, the cells covered a greater portion of the culture surface area. The mean surface area of the individual endothelial cell treated with glucocorticoids was 1.53 times greater than that of the untreated control endothelial cell. When compared with controls, the endothelial cover provided by the cells treated with glucocorticoids was more extensive and in many instances covered the entire culture surface. The change in morphology was associated with an increase in protein synthesis and protein content of the cells without an increase in DNA synthesis or cellular replication. Dexamethasone was approximately 10-fold more effective than hydrocortisone, while prednisone was the least effective. Aldosterone, DOCA, testosterone, progesterone, oestradiol and oestriol were ineffective. These studies indicate that glucocorticoids can alter the morphology and biochemistry of cultured endothelial cells and may have implications for the effects of steroids in the treatment of thrombocytopenic states and vascular disorders in man. PMID:646949

  3. Novel role of lactosylceramide in vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated angiogenesis in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Mohanraj; Kolmakova, Antonina; Chatterjee, Subroto

    2005-10-14

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been implicated in angiogenesis associated with coronary heart disease, vascular complications in diabetes, inflammatory vascular diseases, and tumor metastasis. The mechanism of VEGF-driven angiogenesis involving glycosphingolipids such as lactosylceramide (LacCer), however, is not known. To demonstrate the involvement of LacCer in VEGF-induced angiogenesis, we used small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of LacCer synthase expression (GalT-V) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. This gene silencing markedly inhibited VEGF-induced platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) expression and angiogenesis. Second, we used D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (D-PDMP), an inhibitor of LacCer synthase and glucosylceramide synthase, that significantly mitigated VEGF-induced PECAM-1 expression and angiogenesis. Interestingly, these phenotypic changes were reversed by LacCer but not by structurally related compounds such as glucosylceramide, digalactosylceramide, and ceramide. In a human mesothelioma cell line (REN) that lacks the endogenous expression of PECAM-1, VEGF/LacCer failed to stimulate PECAM-1 expression and tube formation/angiogenesis. In REN cells expressing human PECAM-1 gene/protein, however, both VEGF and LacCer-induced PECAM-1 protein expression and tube formation/angiogenesis. In fact, VEGF-induced but not LacCer-induced angiogenesis was mitigated by SU-1498, a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Also, VEGF/LacCer-induced PECAM-1 expression and angiogenesis was mitigated by protein kinase C and phospholipase A2 inhibitors. These results indicate that LacCer generated in VEGF-treated endothelial cells may serve as an important signaling molecule for PECAM-1 expression and in angiogenesis. This finding and the reagents developed in our report may be useful as anti-angiogenic drugs for further studies in vitro and in vivo. PMID:16151023

  4. Isolation and characterization of endothelial progenitor cells from human blood.

    PubMed

    Mead, Laura E; Prater, Daniel; Yoder, Mervin C; Ingram, David A

    2008-07-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in adult human peripheral blood were originally identified in 1997 by Asahara et al., which challenged the paradigm that vasculogenesis is a process restricted to embryonic development. Since their original identification, EPCs have been extensively studied as biomarkers to assess the risk of cardiovascular disease in human subjects and as a potential cell therapeutic for vascular regeneration. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), which are a subtype of EPCs, were recently identified from circulating adult and human umbilical cord blood. In contrast to other types of EPCs, which display various monocyte/macrophage phenotypes and functions, ECFCs are characterized by robust proliferative potential, secondary and tertiary colony formation upon replating, and de novo blood vessel formation in vivo when transplanted into immunodeficient mice. In this unit, we describe detailed methodologies for isolation and characterization of ECFCs from both human peripheral and umbilical cord blood.

  5. Subtractive transcriptomics : establishing polarity drives human endothelial morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Glesne, D. A.; Zhang, W.; Mandava, S.; Ursos, L.; Buell, M. E.; Makowski, L.; Rodi, D. J.; Biosciences Division

    2006-04-15

    Although investigations of mature normal and tumor-derived capillaries have resulted in characterization of these structures at the phenotypic level, less is known regarding the initial molecular cues for cellular assembly of endothelial cells into human capillaries. Here, we employ a novel combination of microenvironmental manipulation and microarray data filtration over narrowly delineated temporal data series to identify the morphogenesis component apart from the proliferation component, as pooled human microvascular-derived endothelial cells are induced to form capillary-like structures in vitro in a murine tumor-derived matrix. The 217 morphogenesis-specific genes identified using this subtractive transcriptomics approach are mostly independent of the angiogenic proteins currently used as therapeutic targets for aberrant angiogenesis. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to validate 20% of these transcripts. Immunofluorescent analysis of proliferating and tube-forming cells validates at the protein level the morphogenesis-specific expression pattern of 16 of the 217 gene products identified. The transcripts that are selectively up-regulated in tube-forming endothelial cells reveal a temporal expression pattern of genes primarily associated with intracellular trafficking, guided migration, cytoskeletal reorganization, cellular adhesion, and proliferation inhibition. These data show that a sequential upregulation of genes that establish and maintain polarity occurs during migration and morphogenesis of in vitro human endothelial cells undergoing tubulogenesis; some of which may well be effective as novel antiangiogenic drug targets.

  6. Regulation of human endothelial progenitor cell maturation by polyurethane nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Hung, Huey-Shan; Yang, Yi-Chun; Lin, Yu-Chun; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Kao, Wei-Chien; Hsieh, Hsien-Hsu; Chu, Mei-Yun; Fu, Ru-Huei; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2014-08-01

    The mobilization and homing of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are critical to the development of an antithrombotic cardiovascular prosthesis. Polyurethane (PU) with superior elasticity may provide a mechanical environment resembling that of the natural vascular tissues. The topographical cues of PU were maximized by making nanocomposites with a small amount of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The nanocomposites of PU-AuNPs ("PU-Au") with a favorable response of endothelial cells were previously established. In the current study, the effect of PU and PU-Au nanocomposites on the behavior of human peripheral blood EPCs was investigated in vitro and in vivo. It was found that PU-Au promoted EPCs to become differentiated endothelial cells in vitro, confirmed by the increased expressions of CD31 and VEGF-R2 surface markers. The increased maturation of EPCs was significantly more remarkable on PU-Au, probably through the stromal derived factor 1α (SDF-1α)/CXCR4 signaling pathway. In vivo experiments showed that EPCs seeded on PU-Au coated catheters effectively reduced thrombosis by differentiation into endothelial cells. Surface endothelialization with CD31 and CD34 expression as well as intimal formation with α-SMA expression was significantly accelerated in the group receiving EPC-seeded PU-Au catheters. Moreover, the analysis of collagen deposition revealed a reduction of fibrosis in the group receiving EPC-seeded PU-Au catheters as compared to the other groups. These results suggest that EPCs engineered with a proper elastic substrate may provide unique endothelialization and antithrombogenic properties that benefit vascular tissue regeneration. PMID:24836305

  7. Mineralocorticoid Receptors Modulate Vascular Endothelial Function in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Luttrell, Meredith; Kim, Han-Kyul; Meade, Thomas H.; English, Mark; Segal, Mark S.; Christou, Demetra D.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity increases linearly with age and is associated with impaired vascular endothelial function and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) contribute to impaired vascular endothelial function in cardiovascular disease; however, their role in uncomplicated human obesity is unknown. Because plasma aldosterone levels are elevated in obesity and adipocytes may be a source of aldosterone, we hypothesized that MR modulate vascular endothelial function in older adults in an adiposity-dependent manner. To test this hypothesis, we administered MR blockade (Eplerenone; 100 mg/day) for 1 month in a balanced, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to 22 older adults (10 men, 55–79 years) varying widely in adiposity (body mass index: 20–45 kg/m2) but who were free from overt cardiovascular disease. We evaluated vascular endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation [FMD] via ultrasonography) and oxidative stress (plasma F2-isoprostanes and vascular endothelial cell protein expression of nitrotyrosine and NADPH oxidase p47phox) during placebo and MR blockade. In the whole group, oxidative stress (P>0.05) and FMD did not change with MR blockade (6.39±0.67 vs. 6.23±0.73 %, P=0.7, placebo vs. Eplerenone). However, individual improvements in FMD in response to Eplerenone were associated with higher total body fat (body mass index: r=0.45, P=0.02 and DXA-derived % body fat: r=0.50, P=0.009) and abdominal fat (total: r=0.61, P=0.005, visceral: r=0.67, P=0.002 and subcutaneous: r=0.48, P=0.03). In addition, greater improvements in FMD with Eplerenone were related with higher baseline fasting glucose (r=0.53, P=0.01). MR influence vascular endothelial function in an adiposity-dependent manner in healthy older adults. PMID:23786536

  8. Propofol ameliorates endothelial inflammation induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells: Role of phosphatase A2.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Minmin; Ding, Juan; Jiang, Hui; Kong, Lingchao; Sun, Zhirong; Chen, Jiawei; Miao, Changhong

    2015-10-01

    Hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) induces endothelial inflammation with augmentation of endothelial adhesion molecules over-expression. Propofol was reported to attenuate endothelial adhesion molecule expression in some situations. Here, we examined the molecular mechanism for how propofol restored H/R-mediated up-regulation of endothelial adhesion molecules in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Compared with the control group, H/R up-regulated expression of Pin-1 and PP2A, increased p66(Shc)-Ser(36) phosphorylation, induced p66(Shc) mitochondrial translocation, O2(-) accumulation and NF-κB activation, and decreased eNOS-Ser(1177) phosphorylation and nitric oxide (NO) production, thus up-regulating expression of endothelial adhesion molecules and increasing mononuclear-endothelial interaction. More importantly, except that propofol had no effect on H/R-induced p66(Shc)-Ser(36) phosphorylation, most of H/R-mediated changes were alleviated by propofol, resulting in the reduction of endothelial adhesion molecules expression and mononuclear-endothelial adhesion. Moreover, we demonstrated the protective effect of propofol on H/R-induced endothelial inflammation was similar to that of calyculin A, an inhibitor of PP2A. In contrast, FTY720, an activator of PP2A, antagonized the effect of propofol. Our data indicated that propofol down-regulated PP2A expression, leading to reduced dephosphorylation of p66(Shc)-Ser(36) and eNOS-Ser(1177), which is associated with ROS accumulation and NO reduction, resulting in inhibition of endothelial adhesion molecule expression and mononuclear-endothelial interaction.

  9. Sildenafil Reduces Insulin-Resistance in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mammi, Caterina; Pastore, Donatella; Lombardo, Marco F.; Ferrelli, Francesca; Caprio, Massimiliano; Consoli, Claudia; Tesauro, Manfredi; Gatta, Lucia; Fini, Massimo; Federici, Massimo; Sbraccia, Paolo; Donadel, Giulia; Bellia, Alfonso; Rosano, Giuseppe M.; Fabbri, Andrea; Lauro, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Background The efficacy of Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors to re-establish endothelial function is reduced in diabetic patients. Recent evidences suggest that therapy with PDE5 inhibitors, i.e. sildenafil, may increase the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) proteins in the heart and cardiomyocytes. In this study we analyzed the effect of sildenafil on endothelial cells in insulin resistance conditions in vitro. Methodology/Principal Findings Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with insulin in presence of glucose 30 mM (HG) and glucosamine 10 mM (Gluc-N) with or without sildenafil. Insulin increased the expression of PDE5 and eNOS mRNA assayed by Real time-PCR. Cytofluorimetric analysis showed that sildenafil significantly increased NO production in basal condition. This effect was partially inhibited by the PI3K inhibitor LY 294002 and completely inhibited by the NOS inhibitor L-NAME. Akt-1 and eNOS activation was reduced in conditions mimicking insulin resistance and completely restored by sildenafil treatment. Conversely sildenafil treatment can counteract this noxious effect by increasing NO production through eNOS activation and reducing oxidative stress induced by hyperglycaemia and glucosamine. Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that sildenafil might improve NOS activity of endothelial cells in insulin resistance conditions and suggest the potential therapeutic use of sildenafil for improving vascular function in diabetic patients. PMID:21297971

  10. Bilirubin is an Endogenous Antioxidant in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziberna, Lovro; Martelanc, Mitja; Franko, Mladen; Passamonti, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Bilirubin is a standard serum biomarker of liver function. Inexplicably, it is inversely correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Given the role of endothelial dysfunction in originating cardiovascular diseases, direct analysis of bilirubin in the vascular endothelium would shed light on these relationships. Hence, we used high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with thermal lens spectrometric detection and diode array detection for the determination of endogenous cellular IXα-bilirubin. To confirm the isomer IXα-bilirubin, we used ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a high-resolution mass spectrometer using an electrospray ionization source, as well as tandem mass spectrometric detection. We measured bilirubin in both arterial and venous rat endothelium (0.9–1.5 pmol mg−1 protein). In the human endothelial Ea.hy926 cell line, we demonstrated that intracellular bilirubin (3–5 pmol mg−1 protein) could be modulated by either extracellular bilirubin uptake, or by up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1, a cellular enzyme related to endogenous bilirubin synthesis. Moreover, we determined intracellular antioxidant activity by bilirubin, with EC50 = 11.4 ± 0.2 nM, in the range of reported values of free serum bilirubin (8.5–13.1 nM). Biliverdin showed similar antioxidant properties as bilirubin. We infer from these observations that intra-endothelial bilirubin oscillates, and may thus be a dynamic factor of the endothelial function. PMID:27381978

  11. Infection of human endothelial cells by human T-lymphotropic virus type I.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, D D; Rota, T R; Hirsch, M S

    1984-01-01

    We studied the effects of human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) on human endothelial cells in vitro. During cocultivation with an HTLV-I producer cell line (C91/PL), endothelial cells formed characteristic multinucleated syncytial giant cells. Inoculation with concentrated cell-free supernatant fluid from C91/PL cultures produced similar cytopathic effects, which were neutralized by pretreatment with HTLV-I specific human serum. HTLV-I antigens were detected in the cytoplasm of the multinucleated cells by indirect immunofluorescence. When endothelial cells showed maximal cytopathic changes, reverse transcriptase activity was demonstrated in the supernatant fluid and HTLV-I was isolated by cocultivation with peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This study demonstrates that HTLV-I tropism is not limited to lymphoid cells but extends to human endothelial cells as well. Images PMID:6095308

  12. Image analysis of human corneal endothelial cells based on fractal theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi; Luo, Qingming; Zeng, Shaoqun; Zhang, Xinyu; Huang, Dexiu; Chen, Weiguo

    1999-09-01

    A fast method is developed to quantitatively characterize the shape of human corneal endothelial cells with fractal theory and applied to analyze microscopic photographs of human corneal endothelial cells. The results show that human corneal endothelial cells possess the third characterization parameter-- fractal dimension, besides another two characterization parameter (its size and shape). Compared with tradition method, this method has many advantages, such as automatism, speediness, parallel processing and can be used to analyze large numbers of endothelial cells, the obtained values are statistically significant, it offers a new approach for clinic diagnosis of endothelial cells.

  13. Decrease of fibrinolytic activity in human endothelial cells by arsenite.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shinn-Jong; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Wu, Hua-Lin; Han, Huai-Song; Shi, Guey-Yueh

    2002-01-01

    Blackfoot disease (BFD) is an endemic peripheral vascular occlusive disease that occurred in the southwest coast of Taiwan. It is believed that arsenic in the drinking water from artesian wells plays an important role in the development of the disease. We have previously shown that BFD patients had significant lower tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) antigen level and higher plasminogen activator inhibitor, Type 1 (PAI-1) antigen level than normal controls. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of arsenite on the fibrinolytic and anticoagulant activities of cultured macrovascular and microvascular endothelial cells. Incubation of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1), but not human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), with arsenite caused a decrease of t-PA mRNA level, a rise of both PAI-1 mRNA level and PAI activity. Arsenite could also inhibit the thrombomodulin (TM) mRNA expression and reduce the TM antigen level in HMEC-1. In conclusion, arsenite had a greater effect on HMEC-1 as compared to HUVECs in lowering the fibrinolytic activity and may be responsible for the reduced capacity of fibrinolysis associated with BFD.

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Human Lung Lymphatic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Bruno; Falco, Angela; Madeddu, Denise; Frati, Caterina; Cavalli, Stefano; Graiani, Gallia; Gervasi, Andrea; Rinaldi, Laura; Lagrasta, Costanza; Maselli, Davide; Gnetti, Letizia; Silini, Enrico M; Quaini, Eugenio; Ampollini, Luca; Carbognani, Paolo; Quaini, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of lymphatic endothelial cells from the respiratory system may be crucial to investigate the role of the lymphatic system in the normal and diseased lung. We describe a simple and inexpensive method to harvest, isolate, and expand lymphatic endothelial cells from the human lung (HL-LECs). Fifty-five samples of healthy lung selected from patients undergoing lobectomy were studied. A two-step purification tool, based on paramagnetic sorting with monoclonal antibodies to CD31 and Podoplanin, was employed to select a pure population of HL-LECs. The purity of HL-LECs was assessed by morphologic criteria, immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and functional assays. Interestingly, these cells retain in vitro several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) implicated in cell survival and proliferation. HL-LECs represent a clinically relevant cellular substrate to study lymphatic biology, lymphoangiogenesis, interaction with microbial agents, wound healing, and anticancer therapy. PMID:26137493

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Human Lung Lymphatic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lorusso, Bruno; Falco, Angela; Madeddu, Denise; Frati, Caterina; Cavalli, Stefano; Graiani, Gallia; Gervasi, Andrea; Rinaldi, Laura; Lagrasta, Costanza; Maselli, Davide; Gnetti, Letizia; Silini, Enrico M.; Quaini, Eugenio; Ampollini, Luca; Carbognani, Paolo; Quaini, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of lymphatic endothelial cells from the respiratory system may be crucial to investigate the role of the lymphatic system in the normal and diseased lung. We describe a simple and inexpensive method to harvest, isolate, and expand lymphatic endothelial cells from the human lung (HL-LECs). Fifty-five samples of healthy lung selected from patients undergoing lobectomy were studied. A two-step purification tool, based on paramagnetic sorting with monoclonal antibodies to CD31 and Podoplanin, was employed to select a pure population of HL-LECs. The purity of HL-LECs was assessed by morphologic criteria, immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and functional assays. Interestingly, these cells retain in vitro several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) implicated in cell survival and proliferation. HL-LECs represent a clinically relevant cellular substrate to study lymphatic biology, lymphoangiogenesis, interaction with microbial agents, wound healing, and anticancer therapy. PMID:26137493

  16. Regulation of endothelial proliferation by the renin-angiotensin system in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Herr, D; Rodewald, M; Fraser, H M; Hack, G; Konrad, R; Kreienberg, R; Wulff, C

    2008-07-01

    This study was performed in order to evaluate the role of angiotensin II in physiological angiogenesis. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were stained for angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) immunocytochemically and for gene expression of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components. The regulation of the angiogenesis-associated genes vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietins (ANGPT1 and ANGPT2) were studied using quantitative RT-PCR. Furthermore, we examined the effect of angiotensin II on the proliferation of HUVEC using Ki-67 as well as BrdU immunocytochemistry and investigated whether the administration of the AGTR1 blocker candesartan or the VEGF antagonist FLT1-Fc could suppress the observed angiotensin II-dependent proangiogenic effect. AGTR1 was expressed in HUVEC and the administration of angiotensin II significantly increased the gene expression of VEGF and decreased the gene expression of ANGPT1. Since the expression of ANGPT2 was not affected significantly the ratio of ANGPT1/ANGPT2 was decreased. In addition, a significantly increased endothelial cell proliferation was observed after stimulation with angiotensin II, which was suppressed by the simultaneous administration of candesartan or the VEGF antagonist FLT1-Fc. These results indicate the potential capacity of angiotensin II in influencing angiogenesis by the regulation of angiogenesis-associated genes via AGTR1. Since VEGF blockade opposed the effect of angiotensin II on cell proliferation, it is hypothesised that VEGF mediates the angiotensin II-dependent effect in concert with the changes in angiopoietin expression. This is the first report of the RAS on the regulation of angiogenesis-associated genes in physiology.

  17. Human monocyte-endothelial cell interaction in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, N A; Abraham, E L; Pontier, S; Scott, W A; Cohn, Z A

    1985-12-01

    We have examined the interaction of freshly isolated human blood monocytes with cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro. Purified monocytes incubated with confluent primary or passaged endothelial cells (EC) for 90 min at 37 degrees C bound at maximal densities of 6.5-7.0 X 10(3)/mm2 (8 or 9 per EC) without causing disruption of the monolayer. Monocyte-EC binding proceeded in the presence of plasma proteins or optimal phagocytic doses of opsonized zymosan particles. The avidity of attachment was not diminished by alternative monocyte isolation techniques. Monocyte attachment to EC was dependent upon the presence of divalent cations (magnesium greater than calcium) and was inhibited at 4 degrees C. Monocytes selectively bound to EC when incubated with monolayers composed of smooth muscle cells and EC. Neither EC monolayer confluence nor a variety of EC culture conditions affected the high levels of monocyte binding. In contrast, human neutrophils (less than 1 per EC) and lymphocytes (less than 2-3.5 per EC) bound at lower maximal densities under the same conditions, while platelet reactivity remained minimal. The distinctively higher affinity of human blood monocytes relative to other circulating white cells for binding to cultured human EC may have relevance to their function in vivo.

  18. Modulation of Human Vascular Endothelial Cell Behaviors by Nanotopographic Cues

    PubMed Central

    Liliensiek, S.J.; Wood, J.A.; Yong, J.; Auerbach, R.; Nealey, P.F.; Murphy, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Basement membranes possess a complex three dimensional topography in the nanoscale and submicron range which have been shown to profoundly modulate a large menu of fundamental cell behaviors. Using the topographic features found in native vascular endothelial basement membranes as a guide, polyurethane substrates were fabricated containing anisotropically ordered ridge and groove structures and isotropically ordered pores from 200 nm to 2000 nm in size. We investigated the impact of biomimetic length-scale topographic cues on orientation/elongation, proliferation and migration on four human vascular endothelial cell-types from large and small diameter vessels. We found that all cell-types exhibited orientation and alignment with the most pronounced response on anisotropically ordered ridges ≥ 800 nm. HUVEC cells were the only cell-type examined to demonstrate a decrease in proliferation in response to the smallest topographic features regardless of surface order. On anisotropically ordered surfaces all cell types migrated preferentially parallel to the long axis of the ridges, with the greatest increase in cell migration being observed on the 1200 nm pitch. In contrast, cells did not exhibit any preference in direction or increase in migration speed on isotropically ordered surfaces. Overall, our data demonstrate that surface topographic features impact vascular endothelial cell behavior and that the impact of features varies with the cell behavior being considered, topographic feature scale, surface order, and the anatomic origin of the cell being investigated. PMID:20400175

  19. Syndecan-2 downregulation impairs angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Noguer, Oriol Villena, Joan; Lorita, Jordi; Vilaro, Senen; Reina, Manuel

    2009-03-10

    The formation of new blood vessels, or angiogenesis, is a necessary process during development but also for tumour growth and other pathologies. It is promoted by different growth factors that stimulate endothelial cells to proliferate, migrate, and generate new tubular structures. Syndecans, transmembrane heparan sulphate proteoglycans, bind such growth factors through their glycosaminoglycan chains and could transduce the signal to the cytoskeleton, thus regulating cell behaviour. We demonstrated that syndecan-2, the major syndecan expressed by human microvascular endothelial cells, is regulated by growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins, in both bidimensional and tridimensional culture conditions. The role of syndecan-2 in 'in vitro' tumour angiogenesis was also examined by inhibiting its core protein expression with antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides. Downregulation of syndecan-2 reduces spreading and adhesion of endothelial cells, enhances their migration, but also impairs the formation of capillary-like structures. These results suggest that syndecan-2 has an important function in some of the necessary steps that make up the angiogenic process. We therefore propose a pivotal role of this heparan sulphate proteoglycan in the formation of new blood vessels.

  20. Binding of tissue plasminogen activator to cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hajjar, K A; Hamel, N M; Harpel, P C; Nachman, R L

    1987-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and urokinase (u-PA), the major activators of plasminogen, are synthesized and released from endothelial cells. We previously demonstrated specific and functional binding of plasminogen to cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). In the present study we found that t-PA could bind to HUVEC. Binding of t-PA to HUVEC was specific, saturable, plasminogen-independent, and did not require lysine binding sites. The t-PA bound in a rapid and reversible manner, involving binding sites of both high (Kd, 28.7 +/- 10.8 pM; Bmax, 3,700 +/- 300) and low (Kd, 18.1 +/- 3.8 nM; Bmax 815,000 +/- 146,000) affinity. t-PA binding was 70% inhibited by a 100-fold molar excess of u-PA. When t-PA was bound to HUVEC, its apparent catalytic efficiency increased by three- or fourfold as measured by plasminogen activation. HUVEC-bound t-PA was active site-protected from its rapidly acting inhibitor: plasminogen activator inhibitor. These results demonstrate that t-PA specifically binds to HUVEC and that such binding preserves catalytic efficiency with respect to plasminogen activation. Therefore, endothelial cells can modulate hemostatic and thrombotic events at the cell surface by providing specific binding sites for activation of plasminogen. PMID:3119664

  1. Experimental Sleep Restriction Causes Endothelial Dysfunction in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Calvin, Andrew D.; Covassin, Naima; Kremers, Walter K.; Adachi, Taro; Macedo, Paula; Albuquerque, Felipe N.; Bukartyk, Jan; Davison, Diane E.; Levine, James A.; Singh, Prachi; Wang, Shihan; Somers, Virend K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic evidence suggests a link between short sleep duration and cardiovascular risk, although the nature of any relationship and mechanisms remain unclear. Short sleep duration has also been linked to an increase in cardiovascular events. Endothelial dysfunction has itself been implicated as a mediator of heightened cardiovascular risk. We sought to determine the effect of 8 days/8 nights of partial sleep restriction on endothelial function in healthy humans. Methods and Results Sixteen healthy volunteers underwent a randomized study of usual sleep versus sleep restriction of two‐thirds normal sleep time for 8 days/8 nights in a hospital‐based clinical research unit. The main outcome was endothelial function measured by flow‐mediated brachial artery vasodilatation (FMD). Those randomized to sleep restriction slept 5.1 hours/night during the experimental period compared with 6.9 hours/night in the control group. Sleep restriction was associated with significant impairment in FMD (8.6±4.6% during the initial pre‐randomization acclimation phase versus 5.2±3.4% during the randomized experimental phase, P=0.01) whereas no change was seen in the control group (5.0±3.0 during the acclimation phase versus 6.73±2.9% during the experimental phase, P=0.10) for a between‐groups difference of −4.40% (95% CI −7.00 to −1.81%, P=0.003). No change was seen in non‐flow mediated vasodilatation (NFMD) in either group. Conclusion In healthy individuals, moderate sleep restriction causes endothelial dysfunction. Clinical Trial Registration URL: ClinicalTrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01334788. PMID:25424573

  2. Conditioned medium from human umbilical vein endothelial cells markedly improves the proliferation and differentiation of circulating endothelial progenitors.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Germana; Parolini, Isabella; Cerio, Anna Maria; D'Angiò, Agnese; Pasquini, Luca; Carollo, Maria; Sargiacomo, Massimo; Testa, Ugo; Pelosi, Elvira

    2016-10-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been suggested as a precious source for generating functionally competent endothelial cells (ECs), candidate for various clinical applications. However, the paucity of these progenitor cells and the technical difficulties for their in vitro growth represent a main limitation to their use. In the present study we hypothesized that the paracrine effects of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) may improve endothelial cell generation from cord blood (CB) EPCs. In line with this hypothesis we showed that HUVEC conditioned medium (CM) or co-culture with HUVECs markedly improved the proliferation and differentiation and delayed the senescence of CB EPCs. The endothelial-promoting effect of CM seems to be related to smaller vesicles including exosomes (sEV/exo) contained in this medium and transferred to CB CD34(+) EPCs: in fact, purified preparations of sEV/exo isolated from CM mimicked the effect of CM to sustain endothelial formation. These observations provided the interesting indication that mature ECs exert a stimulatory effect on endothelial cell differentiation from CD34(+) cells. PMID:27667168

  3. Antiproliferative effect of elevated glucose in human microvascular endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamal, K.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has been implicated as a fundamental feature of the pathological complications of diabetes including retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulceration. However, previous studies devoted to examining the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on the endothelium have been performed largely in primary cultured cells of macrovessel origin. Difficulty in the harvesting and maintenance of microvascular endothelial cells in culture have hindered the study of this relevant population. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the effect of elevated glucose on the proliferation and involved signaling pathways of an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) that possess similar characteristics to their in vivo counterparts. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were grown in the presence of normal (5 mM) or high D-glucose (20 mM) for 14 days. The proliferative response of HMEC-1 was compared under these conditions as well as the cAMP and PKC pathways by in vitro assays. Elevated glucose significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) HMEC-1 proliferation after 7, 10, and 14 days. This effect was not mimicked by 20 mM mannitol. The antiproliferative effect was more pronounced with longer exposure (1-14 days) to elevated glucose and was irreversible 4 days after a 10-day exposure. The antiproliferative effect was partially reversed in the presence of a PKA inhibitor, Rp-cAMP (10-50 microM), and/or a PKC inhibitor, Calphostin C (10 nM). HMEC-1 exposed to elevated glucose (20 mM) for 14 days caused an increase in cyclic AMP accumulation, PKA, and PKC activity but was not associated with the activation of downstream events such as CRE and AP-1 binding activity. These data support the hypothesis that HMEC-1 is a suitable model to study the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on microvascular endothelial cells. Continued studies with HMEC-1 may prove advantageous in delineation of the molecular

  4. Cilengitide inhibits proliferation and differentiation of human endothelial progenitor cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Loges, Sonja; Butzal, Martin; Otten, Jasmin; Schweizer, Michaela; Fischer, Uta; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Hossfeld, Dieter K.; Schuch, Gunter; Fiedler, Walter . E-mail: fiedler@uke.uni-hamburg.de

    2007-06-15

    Bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells can function as endothelial progenitor cells. They are recruited to malignant tumors and differentiate into endothelial cells. This mechanism of neovascularization termed vasculogenesis is distinct from proliferation of pre-existing vessels. To better understand vasculogenesis we developed a cell culture model with expansion and subsequent endothelial differentiation of human CD133{sup +} progenitor cells in vitro. {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-integrins are expressed by endothelial cells and play a role in the attachment of endothelial cells to the extracellular matrix. We investigated the effect of Cilengitide, a peptide-like, high affinity inhibitor of {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}- and {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 5}-integrins in our in vitro system. We could show expression of {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-integrin on 60 {+-} 9% of non-adherent endothelial progenitors and on 91 {+-} 7% of differentiated endothelial cells. {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-integrin was absent on CD133{sup +} hematopoietic stem cells. Cilengitide inhibited proliferation of CD133{sup +} cells in a dose-dependent manner. The development of adherent endothelial cells from expanded CD133{sup +} cells was reduced even stronger by Cilengitide underlining its effect on integrin mediated cell adhesion. Expression of endothelial antigens CD144 and von Willebrand factor on differentiating endothelial precursors was decreased by Cilengitide. In summary, Cilengitide inhibits proliferation and differentiation of human endothelial precursor cells underlining its anti-angiogenic effects.

  5. High glucose causes dysfunction of the human glomerular endothelial glycocalyx.

    PubMed

    Singh, A; Fridén, V; Dasgupta, I; Foster, R R; Welsh, G I; Tooke, J E; Haraldsson, B; Mathieson, P W; Satchell, S C

    2011-01-01

    The endothelial glycocalyx is a gel-like layer which covers the luminal side of blood vessels. The glomerular endothelial cell (GEnC) glycocalyx is composed of proteoglycan core proteins, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains, and sialoglycoproteins and has been shown to contribute to the selective sieving action of the glomerular capillary wall. Damage to the systemic endothelial glycocalyx has recently been associated with the onset of albuminuria in diabetics. In this study, we analyze the effects of high glucose on the biochemical structure of the GEnC glycocalyx and quantify functional changes in its protein-restrictive action. We used conditionally immortalized human GEnC. Proteoglycans were analyzed by Western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence. Biosynthesis of GAG was analyzed by radiolabeling and quantified by anion exchange chromatography. FITC-albumin was used to analyze macromolecular passage across GEnC monolayers using an established in vitro model. We observed a marked reduction in the biosynthesis of GAG by the GEnC under high-glucose conditions. Further analysis confirmed specific reduction in heparan sulfate GAG. Expression of proteoglycan core proteins remained unchanged. There was also a significant increase in the passage of albumin across GEnC monolayers under high-glucose conditions without affecting interendothelial junctions. These results reproduce changes in GEnC barrier properties caused by enzymatic removal of heparan sulfate from the GEnC glycocalyx. They provide direct evidence of high glucose-induced alterations in the GEnC glycocalyx and demonstrate changes to its function as a protein-restrictive layer, thus implicating glycocalyx damage in the pathogenesis of proteinuria in diabetes.

  6. The seeding of human aortic endothelial cells on the extra-cellular matrix of human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    A post confluent layer (6th passage) of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was treated with 3 mM ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) to expose the subendothelial extra-cellular matrix (ECM). Normal human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) harvested by mechanical scraping were seeded onto the ECM of the HUVECs. The cells quickly attached and proliferated with normal morphology. To ensure confluency the HAECs were pooled after a brief trypsin/EDTA incubation and seeded onto the ECM of the same HUVECs (6th passage) cell line. They attached within 2 hours, and the cells grew to confluence displaying cobblestone morphology characteristic of phenotypic endothelium. HUVECs (11th passage) were seeded onto (6th passage) HUVECs ECM. The cells attached, proliferated to confluence within the normal time interval (7-8 days) and were positively characterized. A Corvita 6mm graft supplied with a gelatin/heparin matrix was densely seeded with HUVECs (6th passage). These cells also proliferated to confluence. The implications for improving the design of arterial grafts are discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:1390196

  7. 3D map of the human corneal endothelial cell.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiguo; Forest, Fabien; Gain, Philippe; Rageade, Damien; Bernard, Aurélien; Acquart, Sophie; Peoc'h, Michel; Defoe, Dennis M; Thuret, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (CECs) are terminally differentiated cells, specialized in regulating corneal hydration and transparency. They are highly polarized flat cells that separate the cornea from the aqueous humor. Their apical surface, in contact with aqueous humor is hexagonal, whereas their basal surface is irregular. We characterized the structure of human CECs in 3D using confocal microscopy of immunostained whole corneas in which cells and their interrelationships remain intact. Hexagonality of the apical surface was maintained by the interaction between tight junctions and a submembraneous network of actomyosin, braced like a drum. Lateral membranes, which support enzymatic pumps, presented complex expansions resembling interdigitated foot processes at the basal surface. Using computer-aided design and drafting software, we obtained a first simplified 3D model of CECs. By comparing their expression with those in epithelial, stromal and trabecular corneal cells, we selected 9 structural or functional proteins for which 3D patterns were specific to CECs. This first 3D map aids our understanding of the morphologic and functional specificity of CECs and could be used as a reference for characterizing future cell therapy products destined to treat endothelial dysfunctions. PMID:27381832

  8. Cytotoxicity of voriconazole on cultured human corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang Beom; Shin, Young Joo; Hyon, Joon Young; Wee, Won Ryang

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the toxicity of voriconazole on cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs). HCECs were cultured and exposed to various concentrations of voriconazole (5.0 to 1,000 μg/ml). Cell viability was measured using a Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) and live/dead viability/cytotoxicity assays. Cell damage was assessed using phase-contrast microscopy after 24 h of exposure to voriconazole. To analyze the effect of voriconazole on the intercellular barrier, immunolocalization of zonula occludens 1 (ZO1) was performed. A flow cytometric assay was performed to evaluate the apoptotic and necrotic effects of voriconazole on HCECs. Cytotoxicity tests demonstrated the dose-dependent toxic effect of voriconazole on HCECs. Voriconazole concentrations of ≥100 μg/ml led to a significant reduction in cell viability. The morphological characteristics of HCECs also changed in a dose-dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of voriconazole resulted in fading staining for ZO1. Higher concentrations of voriconazole resulted in an increased number of propidium iodide (PI)-positive cells, indicating activation of the proapoptotic pathway. In conclusion, voriconazole may have a dose-dependent toxic effect on cultured HCECs. The results of this study suggest that although voriconazole concentrations of up to 50 μg/ml do not decrease cell viability, intracameral voriconazole concentrations of ≥100 μg/ml may increase the risk of corneal endothelial damage.

  9. 3D map of the human corneal endothelial cell

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhiguo; Forest, Fabien; Gain, Philippe; Rageade, Damien; Bernard, Aurélien; Acquart, Sophie; Peoc’h, Michel; Defoe, Dennis M.; Thuret, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (CECs) are terminally differentiated cells, specialized in regulating corneal hydration and transparency. They are highly polarized flat cells that separate the cornea from the aqueous humor. Their apical surface, in contact with aqueous humor is hexagonal, whereas their basal surface is irregular. We characterized the structure of human CECs in 3D using confocal microscopy of immunostained whole corneas in which cells and their interrelationships remain intact. Hexagonality of the apical surface was maintained by the interaction between tight junctions and a submembraneous network of actomyosin, braced like a drum. Lateral membranes, which support enzymatic pumps, presented complex expansions resembling interdigitated foot processes at the basal surface. Using computer-aided design and drafting software, we obtained a first simplified 3D model of CECs. By comparing their expression with those in epithelial, stromal and trabecular corneal cells, we selected 9 structural or functional proteins for which 3D patterns were specific to CECs. This first 3D map aids our understanding of the morphologic and functional specificity of CECs and could be used as a reference for characterizing future cell therapy products destined to treat endothelial dysfunctions. PMID:27381832

  10. Thermal Pretreatment Improves Viability of Cryopreserved Human Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Nicola; Sun, Huan; Chatterjee, Anamika; Saha, Debapriya; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2015-10-01

    A high survival rate of cryopreserved cells requires optimal cooling and thawing rates in the presence of a cryoprotective agent (CPA) or a combination of CPAs in adequate concentrations. One of the most widely used CPAs, dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO), however is toxic at high concentrations and has detrimental effects on cellular functions. Additional processing steps are necessary to remove the CPA after thawing, which make the process expensive and time consuming. Therefore it is of great interest to develop new cryoprotective strategies to replace the currently used CPAs or to reduce their concentration. The aim of this study was to investigate if thermal activation of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC ST-1.6R), prior to cryopreservation, could improve their post-thaw viability since the resulting heat shock protein expression acts as an intrinsic cellular protection mechanism. The results of this study suggest that both heat and cold shock pretreatments improve cryopreservation outcome of the HPMEC ST-1.6R cells. By re-cultivating cells after heat shock treatment before cryopreservation, a significant increase in cellular membrane integrity and adherence capacity could be achieved. However a combination of thermal activation and cryopreservation with alternative CPAs such as ectoine and L-proline could not further enhance the cell viability. The results of this study showed that pretreatment of endothelial cells with thermal activation could be used to reduce the Me2SO concentration required in order to preserve cell viability after cryopreservation. PMID:26419006

  11. Thermal Pretreatment Improves Viability of Cryopreserved Human Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Nicola; Sun, Huan; Chatterjee, Anamika; Saha, Debapriya; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2015-10-01

    A high survival rate of cryopreserved cells requires optimal cooling and thawing rates in the presence of a cryoprotective agent (CPA) or a combination of CPAs in adequate concentrations. One of the most widely used CPAs, dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO), however is toxic at high concentrations and has detrimental effects on cellular functions. Additional processing steps are necessary to remove the CPA after thawing, which make the process expensive and time consuming. Therefore it is of great interest to develop new cryoprotective strategies to replace the currently used CPAs or to reduce their concentration. The aim of this study was to investigate if thermal activation of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC ST-1.6R), prior to cryopreservation, could improve their post-thaw viability since the resulting heat shock protein expression acts as an intrinsic cellular protection mechanism. The results of this study suggest that both heat and cold shock pretreatments improve cryopreservation outcome of the HPMEC ST-1.6R cells. By re-cultivating cells after heat shock treatment before cryopreservation, a significant increase in cellular membrane integrity and adherence capacity could be achieved. However a combination of thermal activation and cryopreservation with alternative CPAs such as ectoine and L-proline could not further enhance the cell viability. The results of this study showed that pretreatment of endothelial cells with thermal activation could be used to reduce the Me2SO concentration required in order to preserve cell viability after cryopreservation.

  12. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human microvascular endothelial cells: role in endothelial permeability

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yong; Ducatman, Alan; Ward, Rebecca; Leonard, Steve; Bukowski, Valerie; Guo, Nancy Lan; Shi, Xianglin; Vallyathan, Val; Castranova, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a member of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAA) containing an 8-carbon backbone. PFOS is a man-made chemical with carbon-fluorine bonds that are one of the strongest in organic chemistry and widely used in industry. Human occupational and environmental exposure to PFOS occurs globally. PFOS is non-biodegradable and persistent in the human body and environment. In this study, data demonstrated that exposure of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) to PFOS induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at both high and low concentrations. Morphologically, it was found that exposure to PFOS induced actin filament remodeling and endothelial permeability changes in HMVEC. Furthermore, data demonstrated the production of ROS plays a regulatory role in PFOS-induced actin filament remodeling and the increase in endothelial permeability. Our results indicate that the generation of ROS may play a role in PFOS-induced aberrations of the endothelial permeability barrier. The results generated from this study may provide a new insight into the potential adverse effects of PFOS exposure on humans at the cellular level. PMID:20391123

  13. Control of proliferation of human vascular endothelial cells. Characterization of the response of human umbilical vein endothelial cells to fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and thrombin.

    PubMed

    Gospodarowicz, D; Brown, K D; Birdwell, C R; Zetter, B R

    1978-06-01

    Because the response of human endothelial cells to growth factors and conditioning agents has broad implications for our understanding of wound healing angiogenesis, and human atherogenesis, we have investigated the responses of these cells to the fibroblast (FGF) and epidermal growth factors (EGF), as well as to the protease thrombin, which has been previously shown to potentiate the growth response of other cell types of FGF and EGF. Because the vascular endothelial cells that form the inner lining of blood vessels may be expected to be exposed to high thrombin concentrations after trauma or in pathological states associated with thrombosis, they are of particular interest with respect to the physiological role of this protease in potentiating cell proliferation. Our results indicate that human vascular endothelial cells respond poorly to either FGF or thrombin alone. In contrast, when cells are maintained in the presence of thrombin, their proliferative response to FGF is greatly increased even in cultures seeded at a density as low as 3 cells/mm2. Human vascular endothelial cells also respond to EGF and thrombin, although their rate of proliferation is much slower than when maintained with FGF and thrombin. In contrast, bovine vascular endothelial cells derived from vascular territories as diverse as the bovine heart, aortic arch, and umbilical vein respond maximally to FGF alone and neither respond to nor bind EGF. Furthermore, the response of bovine vascular endothelial cells to FGF was not potentiated by thrombin, indicating that the set of factors controlling the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells could be species-dependent. The requirement of cultured human vascular endothelial cells for thrombin could explain why the human cells, in contrast to bovine endothelial cells, are so difficult to maintain in tissue culture. Our results demonstrate that by using FGF and thrombin one can develop cultures of human vascular endothelial cells capable of

  14. Featured Article: Differential regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation by protease-activated receptors in adult human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Tillery, Lakeisha C; Epperson, Tenille A; Eguchi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors have been shown to regulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase through the phosphorylation of specific sites on the enzyme. It has been established that PAR-2 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Ser-1177 and leads to the production of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide, while PAR-1 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Thr-495 and decreases nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this study, we hypothesize a differential coupling of protease-activated receptors to the signaling pathways that regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in primary adult human coronary artery endothelial cells. Using Western Blot analysis, we showed that thrombin and the PAR-1 activating peptide, TFLLR, lead to the phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 in human coronary artery endothelial cells, which was blocked by SCH-79797 (SCH), a PAR-1 inhibitor. Using the nitrate/nitrite assay, we also demonstrated that the thrombin- and TFLLR-induced production of nitric oxide was inhibited by SCH and L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. In addition, we observed that TFLLR, unlike thrombin, significantly phosphorylated eNOS-Thr-495, which may explain the observed delay in nitric oxide production in comparison to that of thrombin. Activation of PAR-2 by SLIGRL, a PAR-2 specific ligand, leads to dual phosphorylation of both catalytic sites but primarily regulated eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation with no change in nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells. PAR-3, known as the non-signaling receptor, was activated by TFRGAP, a PAR-3 mimicking peptide, and significantly induced the phosphorylation of eNOS-Thr-495 with minimal phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 with no change in nitric oxide production. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-mediated eNOS-Ser-1177 phosphorylation was Ca2+-dependent using the Ca2+ chelator, BAPTA, while eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation was mediated via Rho kinase using the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632

  15. Featured Article: Differential regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation by protease-activated receptors in adult human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tillery, Lakeisha C; Epperson, Tenille A; Eguchi, Satoru; Motley, Evangeline D

    2016-03-01

    Protease-activated receptors have been shown to regulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase through the phosphorylation of specific sites on the enzyme. It has been established that PAR-2 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Ser-1177 and leads to the production of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide, while PAR-1 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Thr-495 and decreases nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this study, we hypothesize a differential coupling of protease-activated receptors to the signaling pathways that regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in primary adult human coronary artery endothelial cells. Using Western Blot analysis, we showed that thrombin and the PAR-1 activating peptide, TFLLR, lead to the phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 in human coronary artery endothelial cells, which was blocked by SCH-79797 (SCH), a PAR-1 inhibitor. Using the nitrate/nitrite assay, we also demonstrated that the thrombin- and TFLLR-induced production of nitric oxide was inhibited by SCH and L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. In addition, we observed that TFLLR, unlike thrombin, significantly phosphorylated eNOS-Thr-495, which may explain the observed delay in nitric oxide production in comparison to that of thrombin. Activation of PAR-2 by SLIGRL, a PAR-2 specific ligand, leads to dual phosphorylation of both catalytic sites but primarily regulated eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation with no change in nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells. PAR-3, known as the non-signaling receptor, was activated by TFRGAP, a PAR-3 mimicking peptide, and significantly induced the phosphorylation of eNOS-Thr-495 with minimal phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 with no change in nitric oxide production. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-mediated eNOS-Ser-1177 phosphorylation was Ca(2+)-dependent using the Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA, while eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation was mediated via Rho kinase using the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632

  16. Directed Endothelial Progenitor Differentiation from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Via Wnt Activation Under Defined Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaoping; Lian, Xiaojun; Palecek, Sean P

    2016-01-01

    Efficient derivation of endothelial cells and their progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can facilitate studies of human vascular development, disease modeling, drug discovery, and cell-based therapy. Here we provide a detailed protocol for directing hPSCs to functional endothelial cells and their progenitors in a completely defined, growth factor- and serum-free system by temporal modulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling via small molecules. We demonstrate a 10-day, two-stage process that recapitulates endothelial cell development, in which hPSCs first differentiate to endothelial progenitors that then generate functional endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. Methods to characterize endothelial cell identity and function are also described. PMID:27590162

  17. Assessment of endothelial and neurovascular function in human skin microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Roustit, Matthieu; Cracowski, Jean-Luc

    2013-07-01

    Peripheral microvascular dysfunction has been described in many physiological and pathological conditions. Owing to its accessibility, the cutaneous microcirculation provides a unique index of microvascular function. Skin microvascular function has therefore been proposed as a prognostic marker or for evaluating the effect of drugs on the microcirculation. Various reactivity tests, coupled with techniques measuring skin blood flux, are used to non-invasively explore both endothelial and neurovascular microvascular functioning in humans. We review the advantages and limitations of the main reactivity tests, including post-occlusive reactive hyperemia, local thermal hyperemia, pressure-induced vasodilation, and iontophoresis of vasodilators, combined with measurement techniques such as laser Doppler and laser speckle contrast imaging. Recent advances in our comprehension of the physiological pathways underlying these reactivity tests, as well as technological developments in microcirculation imaging, have provided reliable and reproducible tools for studying the microcirculation.

  18. Human growth hormone stimulates proliferation of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Rymaszewski, Z.; Cohen, R.M.; Chomczynski, P. )

    1991-01-15

    Growth hormone (GH) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. The authors sought to determine whether this could be mediated by an effect of GH on proliferation of endothelial cells, and, for this purpose, established long-term cultures of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (hREC) from normal postmortem human eyes. High-purity hREC preparations were selected for experiments, based on immunogluorescence with acetylated low density lipoprotein (LDL) and anti-factor VIII-related antigen. Growth requirements for these cells were complex, including serum for maintenance at slow growth rates and additional mitogens for more rapid proliferation. Exposure of hREC to physiologic doses of human GH (hGH) resulted in 100% greater cell number vs. control but could be elicited only in the presence of serum. When differing serum conditions were compared, hGH stimulated ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation up to 1.6- to 2.2-fold under each condition and increased DNA content significantly in the presence of human, horse, and fetal calf serum. In summary, hREC respond to physiologic concentrations of hGH in vitro with enhanced proliferation. This specific effect of GH on retinal microvascular endothelial cells supports the hypothesis of role for GH in endothelial cell biology.

  19. An Antagonistic Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Variant Inhibits VEGF-Stimulated Receptor Autophosphorylation and Proliferation of Human Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemeister, Gerhard; Schirner, Michael; Reusch, Petra; Barleon, Bernhard; Marme, Dieter; Martiny-Baron, Georg

    1998-04-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogen with a unique specificity for endothelial cells and a key mediator of aberrant endothelial cell proliferation and vascular permeability in a variety of human pathological situations, such as tumor angiogenesis, diabetic retinopathy, rheumatoid arthritis, or psoriasis. VEGF is a symmetric homodimeric molecule with two receptor binding interfaces lying on each pole of the molecule. Herein we report on the construction and recombinant expression of an asymmetric heterodimeric VEGF variant with an intact receptor binding interface at one pole and a mutant receptor binding interface at the second pole of the dimer. This VEGF variant binds to VEGF receptors but fails to induce receptor activation. In competition experiments, the heterodimeric VEGF variant antagonizes VEGF-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation and proliferation of endothelial cells. A 15-fold excess of the heterodimer was sufficient to inhibit VEGF-stimulated endothelial cell proliferation by 50%, and a 100-fold excess resulted in an almost complete inhibition. By using a rational approach that is based on the structure of VEGF, we have shown the feasibility to construct a VEGF variant that acts as an VEGF antagonist.

  20. Interleukin 3 stimulates proliferation and triggers endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 gene activation of human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brizzi, M F; Garbarino, G; Rossi, P R; Pagliardi, G L; Arduino, C; Avanzi, G C; Pegoraro, L

    1993-06-01

    Proliferation and functional activation of endothelial cells within a tissue site of inflammation are regulated by humoral factors released by cells, such as T lymphocytes and monocytes, infiltrating the perivascular space. In the present study we investigated the effects of interleukin 3 (IL-3), an activated T lymphocyte-derived cytokine, on cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Proliferative activity, evaluated both by estimation of the fraction of cells in the S phase and by direct cell count demonstrated that IL-3, at the dose of 25 ng/ml, enhances more than threefold both DNA synthesis and cell proliferation above baseline control conditions. Binding studies with radioiodinated ligand demonstrated that HUVEC constitutively express a smaller number of IL-3 binding sites (approximately 99 binding sites per cell, with an apparent Kd of 149 pM). Accordingly, molecular analysis showed the presence of transcripts for both alpha and beta subunits of the IL-3 receptor. Functional activation of endothelial cells was evaluated by the expression of the endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 (ELAM-1) transcript and by leukocyte adhesion. The ELAM-1 gene transcript was clearly detectable 4 h after IL-3 addition and started to decrease after 12 h. Moreover, IL-3-induced ELAM-1 transcription was followed by enhanced adhesion of neutrophils and CD4+ T cells to HUVEC. The findings that IL-3 can stimulate both proliferation and functional activation of endothelial cells suggest that this cytokine can be involved in sustaining the process of chronic inflammation.

  1. Transcript Analysis Reveals a Specific HOX Signature Associated with Positional Identity of Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toshner, Mark; Dunmore, Benjamin J.; McKinney, Eoin F.; Southwood, Mark; Caruso, Paola; Upton, Paul D.; Waters, John P.; Ormiston, Mark L.; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Nash, Gerard; Rana, Amer A.; Morrell, Nicholas W.

    2014-01-01

    The endothelial cell has a remarkable ability for sub-specialisation, adapted to the needs of a variety of vascular beds. The role of developmental programming versus the tissue contextual environment for this specialization is not well understood. Here we describe a hierarchy of expression of HOX genes associated with endothelial cell origin and location. In initial microarray studies, differential gene expression was examined in two endothelial cell lines: blood derived outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) and pulmonary artery endothelial cells. This suggested shared and differential patterns of HOX gene expression between the two endothelial lines. For example, this included a cluster on chromosome 2 of HOXD1, HOXD3, HOXD4, HOXD8 and HOXD9 that was expressed at a higher level in BOECs. Quantative PCR confirmed the higher expression of these HOXs in BOECs, a pattern that was shared by a variety of microvascular endothelial cell lines. Subsequently, we analysed publically available microarrays from a variety of adult cell and tissue types using the whole “HOX transcriptome” of all 39 HOX genes. Using hierarchical clustering analysis the HOX transcriptome was able to discriminate endothelial cells from 61 diverse human cell lines of various origins. In a separate publically available microarray dataset of 53 human endothelial cell lines, the HOX transcriptome additionally organized endothelial cells related to their organ or tissue of origin. Human tissue staining for HOXD8 and HOXD9 confirmed endothelial expression and also supported increased microvascular expression of these HOXs. Together these observations suggest a significant involvement of HOX genes in endothelial cell positional identity. PMID:24651450

  2. Delta- and gamma-tocotrienol isomers are potent in inhibiting inflammation and endothelial activation in stimulated human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Muid, Suhaila; Froemming, Gabriele R. Anisah; Rahman, Thuhairah; Ali, A. Manaf; Nawawi, Hapizah M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tocotrienols (TCTs) are more potent antioxidants than α-tocopherol (TOC). However, the effectiveness and mechanism of the action of TCT isomers as anti-atherosclerotic agents in stimulated human endothelial cells under inflammatory conditions are not well established. Aims 1) To compare the effects of different TCT isomers on inflammation, endothelial activation, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). 2) To identify the two most potent TCT isomers in stimulated human endothelial cells. 3) To investigate the effects of TCT isomers on NFκB activation, and protein and gene expression levels in stimulated human endothelial cells. Methods Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with various concentrations of TCT isomers or α-TOC (0.3–10 µM), together with lipopolysaccharides for 16 h. Supernatant cells were collected and measured for protein and gene expression of cytokines (interleukin-6, or IL-6; tumor necrosis factor-alpha, or TNF-α), adhesion molecules (intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, or ICAM-1; vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, or VCAM-1; and e-selectin), eNOS, and NFκB. Results δ-TCT is the most potent TCT isomer in the inhibition of IL-6, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and NFκB, and it is the second potent in inhibiting e-selectin and eNOS. γ-TCT isomer is the most potent isomer in inhibiting e-selectin and eNOS, and it is the second most potent in inhibiting is IL-6, VCAM-1, and NFκB. For ICAM-1 protein expression, the most potent is δ-TCT followed by α-TCT. α- and β-TCT inhibit IL-6 at the highest concentration (10 µM) but enhance IL-6 at lower concentrations. γ-TCT markedly increases eNOS expression by 8–11-fold at higher concentrations (5–10 µM) but exhibits neutral effects at lower concentrations. Conclusion δ- and γ-TCT are the two most potent TCT isomers in terms of the inhibition of inflammation and endothelial activation whilst enhancing eNOS, possibly mediated via the NFκB pathway. Hence, there is a

  3. SIRT3 Deficiency Induces Endothelial Insulin Resistance and Blunts Endothelial-Dependent Vasorelaxation in Mice and Human with Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lu; Zhang, Julei; Xing, Wenjuan; Zhang, Xing; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Haifeng; Chen, Li; Ning, Xiaona; Ji, Gang; Li, Jia; Zhao, Qingchuan; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the critical role of Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) in the development of many metabolic diseases, but the contribution of SIRT3 to vascular homeostasis remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of SIRT3 in endothelial insulin resistance and vascular dysfunction in obesity. We found an impaired insulin-induced mesenteric vasorelaxation and concomitant reduced vascular SIRT3 expression in morbid obese human subjects compared with the non-obese subjects. Downregulation of SIRT3 in cultured human endothelial cells increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) and impaired insulin signaling as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase and subsequent reduced nitric oxide (NO) release. In addition, obese mice induced by 24-week high-fat diet (HFD) displayed an impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation to both insulin and acetylcholine, which was further exacerbated by the gene deletion of Sirt3. Scavenging of mtROS not only restored insulin-stimulated NO production in SIRT3 knockdown cells, but also improved insulin-induced vasorelaxation in SIRT3 knockout mice fed with HFD. Taken together, our findings suggest that SIRT3 positively regulates endothelial insulin sensitivity and show that SIRT3 deficiency and resultant increased mtROS contribute to vascular dysfunction in obesity. PMID:27000941

  4. Adherence of human basophils to cultured umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bochner, B S; Peachell, P T; Brown, K E; Schleimer, R P

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which circulating human basophils adhere to vascular endothelium and migrate to sites of allergic reactions is unknown. Agents have been identified which stimulate the adherence of purified basophils to cultured human umbilical vein vascular endothelial cells (HuVEC). Treatment of HuVEC with interleukin 1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), bacterial endotoxin, and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) resulted in time and dose-dependent increases of adhesiveness for basophils. Coincubation of basophils and HuVEC for 10 min with C5a, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, the calcium ionophore A23187, platelet-activating factor, TNF, and TPA also resulted in significant dose-dependent increases in basophil adherence; this effect resulted from activation of the basophil. Adherence of basophils to HuVEC was time and temperature dependent, required divalent cations, and was unaffected by glucocorticoids. Monoclonal antibody 60.3, directed against the beta-subunit of the leukocyte adherence complex CD18, inhibited the binding of basophils to HuVEC. Adherence of basophils to vascular endothelium may be important in initiating basophil infiltrates in vivo. PMID:3130394

  5. Human hepatocytes and endothelial cells in organotypic membrane systems.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Simona; Campana, Carla; Morelli, Sabrina; Drioli, Enrico; De Bartolo, Loredana

    2011-12-01

    The realization of organotypic liver model that exhibits stable phenotype is a major challenge in the field of liver tissue engineering. In this study we developed liver organotypic co-culture systems by using synthetic and biodegradable membranes with primary human hepatocytes and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Synthetic membranes prepared by a polymeric blend constituted of modified polyetheretherketone (PEEK-WC) and polyurethane (PU) and biodegradable chitosan membranes were developed by phase inversion technique and used in homotypic and organotypic culture systems. The morphological and functional characteristics of cells in the organotypic co-culture membrane systems were evaluated in comparison with homotypic cultures and traditional systems. Hepatocytes in the organotypic co-culture systems exhibit compact polyhedral cells with round nuclei and well demarcated cell-cell borders like in vivo, as a result of heterotypic interaction with HUVECs. In addition HUVECs formed tube-like structures directly through the interactions with the membranes and hepatocytes and indirectly through the secretion of ECM proteins which secretion improved in the organotypic co-culture membrane systems. The heterotypic cell-cell contacts have beneficial effect on the hepatocyte albumin production, urea synthesis and drug biotransformation. The developed organotypic co-culture membrane systems elicit liver specific functions in vitro and could be applied for the realization of engineered liver tissues to be used in tissue engineering, drug metabolism studies and bioartificial liver devices. PMID:21871658

  6. SNEV overexpression extends the life span of human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Voglauer, Regina; Chang, Martina Wei-Fen; Dampier, Brigitta; Wieser, Matthias; Baumann, Kristin; Sterovsky, Thomas; Schreiber, Martin; Katinger, Hermann; Grillari, Johannes . E-mail: j.grillari@iam.boku.ac.at

    2006-04-01

    In a recent screening for genes downregulated in replicatively senescent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), we have isolated the novel protein SNEV. Since then SNEV has proven as a multifaceted protein playing a role in pre-mRNA splicing, DNA repair, and the ubiquitin/proteosome system. Here, we report that SNEV mRNA decreases in various cell types during replicative senescence, and that it is increased in various immortalized cell lines, as well as in breast tumors, where SNEV transcript levels also correlate with the survival of breast cancer patients. Since these mRNA profiles suggested a role of SNEV in the regulation of cell proliferation, the effect of its overexpression was tested. Thereby, a significant extension of the cellular life span was observed, which was not caused by altered telomerase activity or telomere dynamics but rather by enhanced stress resistance. When SNEV overexpressing cells were treated with bleomycin or bleomycin combined with BSO, inducing DNA damage as well as reactive oxygen species, a significantly lower fraction of apoptotic cells was found in comparison to vector control cells. These data suggest that high levels of SNEV might extend the cellular life span by increasing the resistance to stress or by improving the DNA repair capacity of the cells.

  7. Transdifferentiation of human endothelial progenitors into smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, HaYeun; Atchison, Leigh; Chen, Zaozao; Chakraborty, Syandan; Jung, Youngmee; Truskey, George A; Christoforou, Nicolas; Leong, Kam W

    2016-04-01

    Access to smooth muscle cells (SMC) would create opportunities for tissue engineering, drug testing, and disease modeling. Herein we report the direct conversion of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) to induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) by induced expression of MYOCD. The EPC undergo a cytoskeletal rearrangement resembling that of mesenchymal cells within 3 days post initiation of MYOCD expression. By day 7, the reprogrammed cells show upregulation of smooth muscle markers ACTA2, MYH11, and TAGLN by qRT-PCR and ACTA2 and MYH11 expression by immunofluorescence. By two weeks, they resemble umbilical artery SMC in microarray gene expression analysis. The iSMC, in contrast to EPC control, show calcium transients in response to phenylephrine stimulation and a contractility an order of magnitude higher than that of EPC as determined by traction force microscopy. Tissue-engineered blood vessels constructed using iSMC show functionality with respect to flow- and drug-mediated vasodilation and vasoconstriction. PMID:26874281

  8. Adhesion Molecule Expression in Human Endothelial Cells under Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudimov, E. G.; Andreeva, E. R.; Buravkova, L. B.

    2013-02-01

    High gravisensitivity of endothelium is now well recognized. Therefore, the microgravity can be one of the main factors affecting the endothelium in space flight. In this work we studied the effects of gravity vector randomization (3D-clinorotation in RPM) on the viability of endothelial cells from human umbilical vein (HUVEC) and the expression of adhesion molecules on its surface. After RPM exposure, HUVEC conditioning medium was collected for cytokines evaluation, a part of vials was used for immunocytochemistry and other one - for cytofluorimetric analysis of ICAM-I, VCAM-I, PECAM-I, E-selectin, Endoglin, VE-cadherin expression. The viability of HUVEC and constitutive expression of EC marker molecules PECAM-I and Endoglin were similar in all experimental groups both after 6 and 24 hrs of exposure. There were no differences in ICAM-I and E-selectin expression on HUVEC in 3 groups after 6 hrs of exposure. 24 hrs incubation has provoked decrease in ICAM-I and E-selectin expression. Thus, gravity vector randomization can lead to the disruption of ECs monolayer.

  9. Efficient Generation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Corneal Endothelial Cells by Directed Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Kathryn L.; Kunzevitzky, Noelia J.; Chiswell, Brian P.; Xia, Xin; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.; Lanza, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Aim To generate human embryonic stem cell derived corneal endothelial cells (hESC-CECs) for transplantation in patients with corneal endothelial dystrophies. Materials and Methods Feeder-free hESC-CECs were generated by a directed differentiation protocol. hESC-CECs were characterized by morphology, expression of corneal endothelial markers, and microarray analysis of gene expression. Results hESC-CECs were nearly identical morphologically to primary human corneal endothelial cells, expressed Zona Occludens 1 (ZO-1) and Na+/K+ATPaseα1 (ATPA1) on the apical surface in monolayer culture, and produced the key proteins of Descemet’s membrane, Collagen VIIIα1 and VIIIα2 (COL8A1 and 8A2). Quantitative PCR analysis revealed expression of all corneal endothelial pump transcripts. hESC-CECs were 96% similar to primary human adult CECs by microarray analysis. Conclusion hESC-CECs are morphologically similar, express corneal endothelial cell markers and express a nearly identical complement of genes compared to human adult corneal endothelial cells. hESC-CECs may be a suitable alternative to donor-derived corneal endothelium. PMID:26689688

  10. Speckle-correlation monitoring of the internal micro-vascular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnyakov, D. A.; Khmara, M. B.; Vilensky, M. A.; Kozlov, V. V.; Gorfinkel, I. V.; Zdrajevsky, R. A.

    2009-10-01

    The results of experimental study of possibility to monitor the micro-vascular blood flow in superficial tissues of various organs with the use of endoscope-based full-field speckle correlometer are presented. The blood microcirculation monitoring was carried out in the course of the laparotomy of abdominal cavity of laboratory animals (rats). Transfer of laser light to the area of interest and scattered radiation from the probed zone to the detector (CMOS camera) was carried out via fiber-optic bundles of endoscopic system. Microscopic hemodynamics was analyzed for small intestine, liver, spleen, kidney, and pancreas under different conditions (normal state, provocated peritonitis and ischemia, administration of vasodilative agents such as papaverine, lidocaine). The prospects and problems of internal monitoring of microvascular flow in laboratory and clinical conditions are discussed.

  11. Micro-vascular shape-memory polymer actuators with complex geometries obtained by laser stereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Lantada, Andrés; de Blas Romero, Adrián; Chacón Tanarro, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    In our work we present the complete development process of geometrically complex micro-vascular shape-memory polymer actuators. The complex geometries and three-dimensional networks are designed by means of computer aided design resources. Manufacture is accomplished, in a single step, by means of laser stereolithography, directly from the computer-aided design files with the three dimensional geometries of the different actuators under development. To our knowledge, laser stereolithography is applied here for the first time to the development of shape memory polymer devices with complex geometries and inner micro-vasculatures for their activation using a thermal fluid. Final testing of the developed actuators helps to validate the approach and to put forward some present challenges.

  12. Endothelial Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Polyglycolic Acid/Polylactic Acid Mesh.

    PubMed

    Deng, Meng; Gu, Yunpeng; Liu, Zhenjun; Qi, Yue; Ma, Gui E; Kang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC) is considered as a cell source potentially useful for angiogenesis in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This study investigated the growth and endothelial differentiation of human ADSCs on polyglycolic acid/polylactic acid (PGA/PLA) mesh compared to 2D plastic. Cell adhesion, viability, and distribution of hADSCs on PGA/PLA mesh were observed by CM-Dil labeling, live/dead staining, and SEM examination while endothelial differentiation was evaluated by flow cytometry, Ac-LDL/UEA-1 uptake assay, immunofluorescence stainings, and gene expression analysis of endothelial related markers. Results showed hADSCs gained a mature endothelial phenotype with a positive ratio of 21.4 ± 3.7% for CD31+/CD34- when induced in 3D mesh after 21 days, which was further verified by the expressions of a comprehensive range of endothelial related markers, whereas hADSCs in 2D induced and 2D/3D noninduced groups all failed to differentiate into endothelial cells. Moreover, compared to 2D groups, the expression for α-SMA was markedly suppressed in 3D cultured hADSCs. This study first demonstrated the endothelial differentiation of hADSCs on the PGA/PLA mesh and pointed out the synergistic effect of PGA/PLA 3D culture and growth factors on the acquisition of mature characteristic endothelial phenotype. We believed this study would be the initial step towards the generation of prevascularized tissue engineered constructs.

  13. A Methodology for Concomitant Isolation of Intimal and Adventitial Endothelial Cells from the Human Thoracic Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Anne; Veillat, Véronique; Loriot, Sandrine; Spuul, Pirjo; Madonna, Francesco; Roques, Xavier; Génot, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Aortic diseases are diverse and involve a multiplicity of biological systems in the vascular wall. Aortic dissection, which is usually preceded by aortic aneurysm, is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in modern societies. Although the endothelium is now known to play an important role in vascular diseases, its contribution to aneurysmal aortic lesions remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to define a reliable methodology for the isolation of aortic intimal and adventitial endothelial cells in order to throw light on issues relevant to endothelial cell biology in aneurysmal diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings We set up protocols to isolate endothelial cells from both the intima and the adventitia of human aneurysmal aortic vessel segments. Throughout the procedure, analysis of cell morphology and endothelial markers allowed us to select an endothelial fraction which after two rounds of expansion yielded a population of >90% pure endothelial cells. These cells have the features and functionalities of freshly isolated cells and can be used for biochemical studies. The technique was successfully used for aortic vessel segments of 20 patients and 3 healthy donors. Conclusions/Significance This simple and highly reproducible method allows the simultaneous preparation of reasonably pure primary cultures of intimal and adventitial human endothelial cells, thus providing a reliable source for investigating their biology and involvement in both thoracic aneurysms and other aortic diseases. PMID:26599408

  14. Substrates for Expansion of Corneal Endothelial Cells towards Bioengineering of Human Corneal Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Navaratnam, Jesintha; Utheim, Tor P.; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Shahdadfar, Aboulghassem

    2015-01-01

    Corneal endothelium is a single layer of specialized cells that lines the posterior surface of cornea and maintains corneal hydration and corneal transparency essential for vision. Currently, transplantation is the only therapeutic option for diseases affecting the corneal endothelium. Transplantation of corneal endothelium, called endothelial keratoplasty, is widely used for corneal endothelial diseases. However, corneal transplantation is limited by global donor shortage. Therefore, there is a need to overcome the deficiency of sufficient donor corneal tissue. New approaches are being explored to engineer corneal tissues such that sufficient amount of corneal endothelium becomes available to offset the present shortage of functional cornea. Although human corneal endothelial cells have limited proliferative capacity in vivo, several laboratories have been successful in in vitro expansion of human corneal endothelial cells. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of different substrates employed for in vitro cultivation of human corneal endothelial cells. Advances and emerging challenges with ex vivo cultured corneal endothelial layer for the ultimate goal of therapeutic replacement of dysfunctional corneal endothelium in humans with functional corneal endothelium are also presented. PMID:26378588

  15. A 90-Kilodalton Endothelial Cell Molecule Mediating Lymphocyte Binding in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmi, Marko; Jalkanen, Sirpa

    1992-09-01

    Interactions between leukocyte surface receptors and their ligands on vascular endothelial cells control lymphocyte traffic between the blood and various lymphoid organs, as well as extravasation of leukocytes into sites of inflammation. A heretofore undescribed 90-kilodalton human endothelial cell adhesion molecule (VAP-1) defined by a monoclonal antibody 1B2 is described. The expression pattern, molecular mass, functional properties, and an amino-terminal amino acid sequence define VAP-1 as an endothelial ligand for lymphocytes. VAP-1 helps to elucidate the complex heterotypic cell interactions that direct tissue-selective lymphocyte migration in man.

  16. Human endothelial progenitor cells internalize high-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Srisen, Kaemisa; Röhrl, Clemens; Meisslitzer-Ruppitsch, Claudia; Ranftler, Carmen; Ellinger, Adolf; Pavelka, Margit; Neumüller, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) originate either directly from hematopoietic stem cells or from a subpopulation of monocytes. Controversial views about intracellular lipid traffic prompted us to analyze the uptake of human high density lipoprotein (HDL), and HDL-cholesterol in human monocytic EPCs. Fluorescence and electron microscopy were used to investigate distribution and intracellular trafficking of HDL and its associated cholesterol using fluorescent surrogates (bodipy-cholesterol and bodipy-cholesteryl oleate), cytochemical labels and fluorochromes including horseradish peroxidase and Alexa Fluor® 568. Uptake and intracellular transport of HDL were demonstrated after internalization periods from 0.5 to 4 hours. In case of HDL-Alexa Fluor® 568, bodipy-cholesterol and bodipy-cholesteryl oleate, a photooxidation method was carried out. HDL-specific reaction products were present in invaginations of the plasma membrane at each time of treatment within endocytic vesicles, in multivesicular bodies and at longer periods of uptake, also in lysosomes. Some HDL-positive endosomes were arranged in form of "strings of pearl"- like structures. HDL-positive multivesicular bodies exhibited intensive staining of limiting and vesicular membranes. Multivesicular bodies of HDL-Alexa Fluor® 568-treated EPCs showed multilamellar intra-vacuolar membranes. At all periods of treatment, labeled endocytic vesicles and organelles were apparent close to the cell surface and in perinuclear areas around the Golgi apparatus. No HDL-related particles could be demonstrated close to its cisterns. Electron tomographic reconstructions showed an accumulation of HDL-containing endosomes close to the trans-Golgi-network. HDL-derived bodipy-cholesterol was localized in endosomal vesicles, multivesicular bodies, lysosomes and in many of the stacked Golgi cisternae and the trans-Golgi-network Internalized HDL-derived bodipy-cholesteryl oleate was channeled into the lysosomal intraellular

  17. Expression of endothelial selectin ligands on human leukocytes following dive.

    PubMed

    Glavas, Duska; Markotic, Anita; Valic, Zoran; Kovacic, Natasa; Palada, Ivan; Martinic, Roko; Breskovic, Toni; Bakovic, Darija; Brubakk, Alf O; Dujic, Zeljko

    2008-09-01

    The fact that impaired endothelial-dependent vasodilatation after scuba diving often occurs without visible changes in the endothelial layer implies its biochemical origin. Since Lewisx(CD15) and sialyl-Lewisx(CD15s) are granulocyte and monocyte carbohydrate antigens recognized as ligands by endothelial selectins, we assumed that they could be sensitive markers for impaired vasodilatation following diving. Using flow cytometry, we determined the CD15 and CD15s peripheral blood mononuclear cells of eight divers, 30 mins before and 50 mins after a single dive to 54 m for 20 mins bottom time. The number of gas bubbles in the right heart was monitored by ultrasound. Gas bubbles were seen in all eight divers, with the average number of bubbles/cm2 1.9+/-1.9. The proportion of CD15+monocytes increased 2-fold after the dive as well as the subpopulation of monocytes highly expressing CD15s. The absolute number of monocytes was slightly, but not significantly, increased after the dive, whereas the absolute number of granulocytes was markedly elevated (up to 61%). There were no significant correlations between bubble formation and CD15+monocyte expression (r=-0.56; P=0.17), as well as with monocytes highly expressing CD15s (r=0.43; P=0.29). This study suggests that biochemical changes induced by scuba diving primarily activate existing monocytes rather than increase the number of monocytes at a time of acute arterial endothelial dysfunction.

  18. Effects of glucocorticoids on the interaction of lymphoblastoid cells with human endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maca, R D; Fry, G L; Hakes, A D

    1978-08-01

    The adhesive characteristics of cultured acute lymphocytic leukemia cells (CCRF-CEM), lymphoma cells (Raji), and freshly isolated acute lymphocytic leukemia cells to human cultured endothelial cells were studied. An assay system was used whereby these neoplastic cells were allowed to interact with endothelial cells while being continuously agitated on a rocking platform. All cell lines adhered significantly to the endothelium monolayers. This process appeared not to be dependent upon intact microtubular or microfilament function. Likewise, removing surface sialic acid from either cell type did not alter this process. In contrast incubating the endothelial cells for 24 or 48 hr with dexamethasone decreased adhesiveness of either CCRF-CEM or Raji cells to the endothelial cells by approximately 40%. Incubating these cells with hydrocortisone instead of dexamethasone for 48 hr was equally as effective in altering the endothelial cell adhesiveness. The decreased adhesiveness could be blocked by cycloheximide, indicating that this altered adhesiveness of the endothelial cells involves protein synthesis, presumably of a surface protein. We suggest that this assay system may provide a means to evaluate other agents that can alter the surface characteristics of endothelial cells, which may have important implications in various disease states such as inflammation, thrombogenesis, and metastatic disease. PMID:276420

  19. Neutrophil-mediated protection of cultured human vascular endothelial cells from damage by growing Candida albicans hyphae

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.E. Jr.; Rotrosen, D.; Fontaine, J.W.; Haudenschild, C.C.; Diamond, R.D.

    1987-05-01

    Interactions were studied between human neutrophils and cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells invaded by Candida albicans. In the absence of neutrophils, progressive Candida germination and hyphal growth extensively damaged endothelial cell monolayers over a period of 4 to 6 hours, as determined both by morphological changes and release of /sup 51/Cr from radiolabeled endothelial cells. Monolayers were completely destroyed and replaced by hyphae after 18 hours of incubation. In contrast, when added 2 hours after the monolayers had been infected with Candida, neutrophils selectively migrated toward and attached to hyphae at points of hyphal penetration into individual endothelial cells (observed by time-lapse video-microscopy). Attached neutrophils spread over hyphal surfaces both within and beneath the endothelial cells; neutrophil recruitment to initial sites of leukocyte-Candida-endothelial cell interactions continued throughout the first 60 minutes of observation. Neutrophil spreading and stasis were observed only along Candida hyphae and at sites of Candida-endothelial cell interactions. These events resulted in 58.0% killing of Candida at 2 hours and subsequent clearance of Candida from endothelial cell monolayers, as determined by microcolony counts and morphological observation. On introduction of additional neutrophils to yield higher ratios of neutrophils to endothelial cells (10 neutrophils:1 endothelial cell), neutrophil migration toward hyphal elements continued. Despite retraction or displacement of occasional endothelial cells by invading Candida and neutrophils, most endothelial cells remained intact, viable, and motile as verified both by morphological observations and measurement of /sup 51/Cr release from radiolabeled monolayers.

  20. Differential regulation of angiopoietin 1 and angiopoietin 2 during dengue virus infection of human umbilical vein endothelial cells: implications for endothelial hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Ong, Siew Pei; Ng, Mah Lee; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2013-12-01

    Infection with dengue virus (DV) can result in dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome, where patients suffer from bleeding and plasma leakage involving endothelial cells. Angiopoietins (Ang) 1 and 2 are important angiogenic factors that affect endothelial barrier integrity. In this study, DV was observed to induce endothelial leakage at multiplicity of infection of 10 in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with interendothelial gap formation. Immunostaining of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) and zona occludin 1 (ZO-1) showed the absence of these endothelial junctional proteins at the cell-cell contact zones between adjacent cells. In addition, Ang1 that is required for protecting against endothelial hyperpermeability was found to be down-regulated during DV infection. Treatment with increasing concentrations of recombinant Ang1 was shown to prevent DV-induced endothelial hyperpermeability in a dose-dependent manner by preventing the down-regulation of VE-cadherin and ZO-1 at cell membrane. In contrast, the expression of Ang2, the natural antagonist of Ang1, was observed to be up-regulated during DV infection. Recombinant Ang2 added to HUVEC at non-toxic concentrations showed decreased in transendothelial electrical resistance reading and the down-regulation of VE-cadherin and ZO-1. These findings suggest that DV reduces the expression of Ang1 and enhances the expression of Ang2 in endothelial cells and that this imbalance of Ang 1 and Ang 2 may play a contributing role to the increased permeability of human primary endothelial cells during DV infection. PMID:23989887

  1. In vitro differentiation of human tooth germ stem cells into endothelial- and epithelial-like cells.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Ayşegül; Demirci, Selami; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2015-01-01

    Current clinical techniques in dental practice include stem cell and tissue engineering applications. Dental stem cells are promising primary cell source for mainly tooth tissue engineering. Interaction of mesenchymal stem cell with epithelial and endothelial cells is strictly required for an intact tooth morphogenesis. Therefore, it is important to investigate whether human tooth germ stem cells (hTGSCs) derived from wisdom tooth are suitable for endothelial and epithelial cell transformation in dental tissue regeneration approaches. Differentiation into endothelial and epithelial cell lineages were mimicked under defined conditions, confirmed by real time PCR, western blotting and immunocytochemical analysis by qualitative and quantitative methods. HUVECs and HaCaT cells were used as positive controls for the endothelial and epithelial differentiation assays, respectively. Immunocytochemical and western blotting analysis revealed that terminally differentiated cells expressed cell-lineage markers including CD31, VEGFR2, VE-Cadherin, vWF (endothelial cell markers), and cytokeratin (CK)-17, CK-19, EpCaM, vimentin (epithelial cell markers) in significant levels with respect to undifferentiated control cells. Moreover, high expression levels of VEGFR1, VEGFR2, VEGF, CK-18, and CK-19 genes were detected in differentiated endothelial and epithelial-like cells. Endothelial-like cells derived from hTGSCs were cultured on Matrigel, tube-like structure formations were followed as an indication for functional endothelial differentiation. hTGSCs successfully differentiate into various cell types with a broad range of functional abilities using an in vitro approach. These findings suggest that hTGSCs may serve a potential stem cell source for tissue engineering and cell therapy of epithelial and endothelial tissue.

  2. Nicotine induced changes in gene expression by human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Day, I; Ye, S

    2001-02-01

    The primary role of cigarette smoking in the development of coronary heart disease is to cause damage to the vascular endothelium, leading to endothelial cell dysfunction and initiating the pathogenesis of coronary atherosclerosis. We studied the response of human coronary artery endothelial cells to nicotine exposure by examining the expression of a panel of genes encoding molecules that have been shown to be involved in atherogenesis. Treatment of primary human coronary artery endothelial cells with nicotine for 24 h at concentrations (10(-5) and 10(-7) M) similar to those in the blood of smokers resulted in increased mRNA levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, angiotensin-I converting enzyme, tissue-type plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, von Willebrand factor, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. No change was detected in the expression levels of the genes encoding basic fibroblast growth factor, endothelin-1, endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 under these conditions. These data indicate that nicotine alters the expression of a number of endothelial genes whose products play major roles in regulating the vascular tone and thrombogenicity, making a contribution to the understanding of the effects of cigarette smoking on the development of coronary atherosclerosis. PMID:11166759

  3. Endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor induce interleukin-1 gene expression in adult human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Libby, P; Ordovas, J M; Auger, K R; Robbins, A H; Birinyi, L K; Dinarello, C A

    1986-08-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) can induce potentially pathogenic functions of vascular endothelial cells. This mediator was formerly thought to be produced primarily by activated macrophages. We report here that bacterial endotoxin and recombinant human tumor necrosis factor cause accumulation of IL-1 beta mRNA in adult human vascular endothelial cells. IL-1 alpha mRNA was also detected when endothelial cells were exposed to endotoxin under "superinduction" conditions in the presence of cycloheximide. Metabolic labeling of these cells during endotoxin stimulation demonstrated increased synthesis and secretion of immunoprecipitable IL-1 protein that comigrated electrophoretically with the predominant monocyte species. In parallel with increased IL-1 mRNA and protein, endothelial cells exposed to endotoxin also release biologically active IL-1 that was neutralized by anti-IL-1-antibody. Because bloodborne agents must traverse the endothelium before entering tissues, endothelial IL-1 production induced by microbial products or other injurious stimuli could initiate local responses to invasion. Endothelial cells are both a source of and target for IL-1; accordingly, this novel autocrine mechanism might play an early role in the pathogenesis of vasculitis, allograft rejection, and arteriosclerosis.

  4. Vascular endothelial growth factor in human preterm lung.

    PubMed

    Lassus, P; Ristimäki, A; Ylikorkala, O; Viinikka, L; Andersson, S

    1999-05-01

    Endothelial cell damage is characteristic for respiratory distress syndrome and development of chronic lung disease. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial mitogen that takes part in the growth and repair of vascular endothelial cells. We measured VEGF in 189 tracheal aspirate samples (TAF), and in 24 plasma samples from 44 intubated preterm infants (gestational age, 27.3 +/- 2.0 wk; birth weight, 962 +/- 319 g) during their first postnatal week. VEGF in TAF increased from 25 +/- 12 pg/ml (mean +/- SEM) on Day 1 to 526 +/- 120 pg/ml on Day 7 (mean concentrations, 106 +/- 25 pg/ml on Days 1 to 3 and 342 +/- 36 pg/ml on Days 4 to 7). In plasma, mean concentration of VEGF during the first week was 48 +/- 6 pg/ml, with no increase observed. In TAF, higher VEGF was found in patients born to mothers with premature rupture of the membranes, or chorionamnionitis, whereas preeclampsia of the mother was associated with lower VEGF (all p < 0.05). In TAF, no correlations existed between VEGF and gestational age or birth weight, but a correlation existed between lecithin/sphengomyelin ratio and VEGF (p < 0.05). During Days 4 to 7 patients developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) had lower VEGF in TAF than did those surviving without BPD (235 +/- 31 versus 383 +/- 50; p < 0.05). VEGF increased rapidly in the lungs of the preterm infant during the first days of life. VEGF may be indicative of pulmonary maturity and may participate in pulmonary repair after acute lung injury.

  5. Small Spacecraft Active Thermal Control: Micro-Vascular Composites Enable Small Satellite Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The Small Spacecraft Integrated Power System with Active Thermal Control project endeavors to achieve active thermal control for small spacecraft in a practical and lightweight structure by circulating a coolant through embedded micro-vascular channels in deployable composite panels. Typically, small spacecraft rely on small body mounted passive radiators to discard heat. This limits cooling capacity and leads to the necessity to design for limited mission operations. These restrictions severely limit the ability of the system to dissipate large amounts of heat from radios, propulsion systems, etc. An actively pumped cooling system combined with a large deployable radiator brings two key advantages over the state of the art for small spacecraft: capacity and flexibility. The use of a large deployable radiator increases the surface area of the spacecraft and allows the radiation surface to be pointed in a direction allowing the most cooling, drastically increasing cooling capacity. With active coolant circulation, throttling of the coolant flow can enable high heat transfer rates during periods of increased heat load, or isolate the radiator during periods of low heat dissipation.

  6. Sacrificial component fabrication for optimised production of micro-vascular polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, B.; Dixon, D.; McIlhagger, A.; Archer, E.

    2015-02-01

    Smart functional materials are a viable future goal for advanced applications in aerospace, space and medical applications. In this work micro-vascular polymer composite systems have been developed using sacrificial fibres produced from catalyst loaded Poly(lactic acid). The sacrificial fibres have been produced via a published technique which treated PLA in a solvent catalyst mixture of 60% Trifluoroethanol, 40% H2O dispersed with 10 wt% tin (II) oxalate catalyst. A second process of polymer extrusion of PLA using graded fill contents of tin (II) oxalate has also been developed for the up scaled production of fibres as an alternative to solution treatment. Thermal analysis (TGA) was used to compare sacrificial fibre specimens. PLA fibres produced via the polymer extrusion method outperformed solution treated fibres displaying a lower degradation onset temperature (average 25°C lower), higher degradation rates (observed through a derivative curve comparison) and lower residual catalyst content (0.67% solvent treated fibre against 0.16% extruded fibre). The continuous extrusion process is solvent free and is suitable for high volume production. This work has been carried out to fully understand the fabrication issues with sacrificial components.

  7. Ionizing radiation increases adhesiveness of human aortic endothelial cells via a chemokine-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Saman; Gupta, Kiran B; Kucik, Dennis F

    2012-05-01

    Exposure to radiation from a variety of sources is associated with increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Since radiation also induces inflammation, a possible mechanism is a change in the adhesiveness of vascular endothelial cells, triggering pro-atherogenic accumulation of leukocytes. To investigate this mechanism at the cellular level, the effect of X rays on adhesiveness of cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) was determined. HAECs were grown as monolayers and exposed to 0 to 30 Gy X rays, followed by measurement of adhesiveness under physiological shear stress using a flow chamber adhesion assay. Twenty-four hours after irradiation, HAEC adhesiveness was increased, with a peak effect at 15 Gy. Radiation had no significant effect on surface expression of the endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Antibody blockade of the leukocyte integrin receptors for ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, however, abolished the radiation-induced adhesiveness. Since these leukocyte integrins can be activated by chemokines presented on the endothelial cell surface, the effect of pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of chemokine-mediated integrin activation, was tested. PTX specifically inhibited radiation-induced adhesiveness, with no significant effect on nonirradiated cells. Therefore, radiation induces increased adhesiveness of aortic endothelial cells through chemokine-dependent signaling from endothelial cells to leukocytes, even in the absence of increased expression of the adhesion molecules involved.

  8. Increased expression of angiogenic factors in cultured human brain arteriovenous malformation endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming; Xu, Hongzhi; Qin, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Xiaoyu; Xu, Feng

    2014-09-01

    To compare the mRNA level of angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2, and MMP-9 in cultured human brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) endothelial cells (ECs) and normal brain endothelial cells (BECs). Tissue explants both from deformed vessels of AVM and normal microvessel were put into culture for endothelial cells. After the monolayer adherent ECs reached confluence, they were tested with endothelial specific marker CD34 and von Willebrand factor (vWF) by immunochemical assay. mRNA levels of VEGF-A, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in AVM endothelial cells (AVMECs) and BECs were measured by PCR. Immunostaining confirmed that more than 95 % of the cultured cells were CD34 (Fig. 1b) and/or vWF positive. Expression levels of VEGF-A and MMP-2 mRNAs were significantly higher in AVMECs than in BECs. The MMP-9 level was also increased in AVMECs, but the difference was not statistically significant. Vascular tissue explants adherent method is a better approach for isolation and culture of AVMECs. Cultured AVMECs expressed higher angiogenic factors (VEGF, MMP-2) than the controlled BECs, implicating angiogenesis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of AVM.

  9. The effect of donor variation and senescence on endothelial differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Portalska, Karolina Janeczek; Groen, Nathalie; Krenning, Guido; Georgi, Nicole; Mentink, Anouk; Harmsen, Martin C; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2013-11-01

    Application of autologous cells is considered for a broad range of regenerative therapies because it is not surrounded by the immunological and ethical issues of allo- or xenogenic cells. However, isolation, expansion, and application of autologous cells do suffer from variability in therapeutic efficacy due to donor to donor differences and due to prolonged culture. One important source of autologous cells is mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which can differentiate toward endothelial-like cells, thus making them an ideal candidate as cell source for tissue vascularization. Here we screened MSCs from 20 donors for their endothelial differentiation capacity and correlated it with the gene expression profile of the whole genome in the undifferentiated state. Cells of all donors were able to form tubes on Matrigel and induced the expression of endothelial genes, although with quantitative differences. In addition, we analyzed the effect of prolonged in vitro expansion on the multipotency of human MSCs and found that endothelial differentiation is only mildly sensitive to expansion-induced loss of differentiation as compared to osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Our results show the robustness of the endothelial differentiation protocol and the gene expression data give insight in the differences in endothelial differentiation between donors.

  10. Characterization of cationic amino acid transporters and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in human placental microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dye, J F; Vause, S; Johnston, T; Clark, P; Firth, J A; D'Souza, S W; Sibley, C P; Glazier, J D

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the expression and activity of arginine transporters and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human placental microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC). Using RT-PCR amplification products for eNOS, CAT1, CAT2A, CAT2B, CAT4, 4F2hc (CD98), rBAT and the light chains y+LAT1, y+LAT2, and b0+T1 were detected in HPMEC, but not B0+. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting confirmed the presence of 4F2hc and CAT1 protein in HPMEC. 4F2hc-light chain dimers were indicated by a shift in molecular mass detected under nonreducing conditions. L-Arginine transport into HPMEC was independent of Na+ or Cl- and was inhibited by the neutral amino acid glutamine, but not by cystine. The Ki for glutamine inhibition was greater in the absence of Na+. Kinetic analysis supported a two-transporter model attributed to system y+L and system y+. Expression of eNOS in HPMEC was detectable by immunohistochemistry and ELISA but not by Western blotting. Activity of eNOS in HPMEC, measured over 48 h, either as the basal production of nitric oxide (NO) or as the accumulation of intracellular cGMP was not detectable. We conclude that HPMEC transport cationic amino acids by systems y+ and y+L and that basal eNOS expression and activity in these cells is low. PMID:14597568

  11. Size and composition effects of household particles on inflammation and endothelial dysfunction of human coronary artery endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lian-Yu; Liu, I.-Jung; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Lin, Hui-Yi; Chuang, Kai-Jen

    2013-10-01

    People spend generally 90 percent of their time indoors, yet toxicity of household particles has not been thoroughly investigated before. The objective of this study is to examine particle size and components effects of household particles on human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC). We used two micro-orifice uniform deposit impactors to collect 60 sets of indoor particulate matters (PM) from 30 houses in Taipei, Taiwan. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) effects of household particles were determined by high-resolution gas chromatograph/high-resolution mass spectrometer, respectively. HCAEC were exposed to household particles extracts in three size ranges: PM0.1 (diameters less than 0.1 μm), PM1.0-0.1 (diameters between 1.0 and 0.1 μm), and PM10-1.0 (diameters between 10 and 1.0 μm) at 50 μg mL-1 for 4 h, and interleukin-6 (IL-6), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and nitric oxide (NO) concentrations in the medium were measured. We found that household PM1.0-0.1 was associated with increased IL-6 and ET-1 production and decreased NO synthesis. Naphthalene of PM1.0-0.1 was highly correlated with IL-6 and ET-1 production and NO reduction. We concluded that size and compositions of household particles were both important factors on inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in HCAEC.

  12. Endothelial Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Polyglycolic Acid/Polylactic Acid Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Meng; Gu, Yunpeng; Liu, Zhenjun; Qi, Yue; Ma, Gui E.; Kang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC) is considered as a cell source potentially useful for angiogenesis in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This study investigated the growth and endothelial differentiation of human ADSCs on polyglycolic acid/polylactic acid (PGA/PLA) mesh compared to 2D plastic. Cell adhesion, viability, and distribution of hADSCs on PGA/PLA mesh were observed by CM-Dil labeling, live/dead staining, and SEM examination while endothelial differentiation was evaluated by flow cytometry, Ac-LDL/UEA-1 uptake assay, immunofluorescence stainings, and gene expression analysis of endothelial related markers. Results showed hADSCs gained a mature endothelial phenotype with a positive ratio of 21.4 ± 3.7% for CD31+/CD34− when induced in 3D mesh after 21 days, which was further verified by the expressions of a comprehensive range of endothelial related markers, whereas hADSCs in 2D induced and 2D/3D noninduced groups all failed to differentiate into endothelial cells. Moreover, compared to 2D groups, the expression for α-SMA was markedly suppressed in 3D cultured hADSCs. This study first demonstrated the endothelial differentiation of hADSCs on the PGA/PLA mesh and pointed out the synergistic effect of PGA/PLA 3D culture and growth factors on the acquisition of mature characteristic endothelial phenotype. We believed this study would be the initial step towards the generation of prevascularized tissue engineered constructs. PMID:26106426

  13. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 by whisky congeners in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Keiko; Nemoto, Asuka; Tanaka, Izumi; Koshimizu, Seiichi; Suwa, Yoshihide; Ishihara, Hiroshi

    2010-08-01

    It is expected that the production of the cytoprotective heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein in endothelial cells would reduce severity of vascular injuries, while phenolic compounds are known to induce HO-1 mRNA and protein in various cells. We investigated the activation of HO-1 by whisky, which contains various phenolic substances. The congeners of whisky stored from 4 to 18 y in oak barrels were shown to induce an increase of HO-1 protein in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, while those of freshly distilled whisky spirit exhibited no activity. To determine the compounds with potent HO-1-inducing activity among the whisky congeners, several chemicals that had been reported to exist in whisky or oak barrels were screened, and coniferyl aldehyde and sinapyl aldehyde showed the activity. Thus, compounds that emerged in whisky during barrel storage induced cytoprotective protein, HO-1, in human endothelial cells.

  14. Human vascular tissue models formed from human induced pluripotent stem cell derived endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Belair, David G.; Whisler, Jordan A.; Valdez, Jorge; Velazquez, Jeremy; Molenda, James A.; Vickerman, Vernella; Lewis, Rachel; Daigh, Christine; Hansen, Tyler D.; Mann, David A.; Thomson, James A.; Griffith, Linda G.; Kamm, Roger D.; Schwartz, Michael P.; Murphy, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a strategy to model blood vessel development using a well-defined iPSC-derived endothelial cell type (iPSC-EC) cultured within engineered platforms that mimic the 3D microenvironment. The iPSC-ECs used here were first characterized by expression of endothelial markers and functional properties that included VEGF responsiveness, TNF-α-induced upregulation of cell adhesion molecules (MCAM/CD146; ICAM1/CD54), thrombin-dependent barrier function, shear stress-induced alignment, and 2D and 3D capillary-like network formation in Matrigel. The iPSC-ECs also formed 3D vascular networks in a variety of engineering contexts, yielded perfusable, interconnected lumen when co-cultured with primary human fibroblasts, and aligned with flow in microfluidics devices. iPSC-EC function during tubule network formation, barrier formation, and sprouting was consistent with that of primary ECs, and the results suggest a VEGF-independent mechanism for sprouting, which is relevant to therapeutic anti-angiogenesis strategies. Our combined results demonstrate the feasibility of using a well-defined, stable source of iPSC-ECs to model blood vessel formation within a variety of contexts using standard in vitro formats. PMID:25190668

  15. Tailoring Material Properties of Cardiac Matrix Hydrogels to Induce Endothelial Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeffords, Megan E.; Wu, Jinglei; Shah, Mickey; Hong, Yi; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac matrix hydrogel has shown great promise as an injectable biomaterial due to the possession of cardiac-specific extracellular matrix composition. A cardiac matrix hydrogel facilitating neovascularization will further improve its therapeutic outcomes in cardiac repair. In this study, we explored the feasibility of tailoring material properties of cardiac matrix hydrogels using a natural compound, genipin, to promote endothelial differentiation of stem cells. Our results demonstrated that the genipin crosslinking could increase the mechanical properties of the cardiac matrix hydrogel to a stiffness range promoting endothelial differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). It also decreased the swelling ratio and prolonged degradation without altering gelation time. Human mesenchymal stem cells cultured on the genipin crosslinked cardiac matrix hydrogels showed great viability. After 1-day culture, hMSCs demonstrated down-regulation of early endothelial marker expression and up-regulation of mature endothelial marker expression. Especially for 1 mM genipin crosslinked cardiac matrix hydrogels, hMSCs showed particularly significant expression of mature endothelial cell marker vWF. These attractive results indicate the potential of using genipin crosslinked cardiac matrix hydrogels to promote rapid vascularization for cardiac infarction treatment through minimally invasive therapy. PMID:25946697

  16. Inactivation of the Human Cytomegalovirus US20 Gene Hampers Productive Viral Replication in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cavaletto, Noemi; Luganini, Anna

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US12 gene family includes a group of 10 contiguous genes (US12 to US21) encoding predicted seven-transmembrane-domain (7TMD) proteins that are nonessential for replication within cultured fibroblasts. Nevertheless, inactivation of some US12 family members affects virus replication in other cell types; e.g., deletion of US16 or US18 abrogates virus growth in endothelial and epithelial cells or in human gingival tissue, respectively, suggesting a role for some US12 proteins in HCMV cell tropism. Here, we provide evidence that another member, US20, impacts the ability of a clinical strain of HCMV to replicate in endothelial cells. Through the use of recombinant HCMV encoding tagged versions of the US20 protein, we investigated the expression pattern, localization, and topology of the US20-encoded protein (pUS20). We show that pUS20 is expressed as a partially glycosylated 7TMD protein which accumulates late in infection in endoplasmic reticulum-derived peripheral structures localized outside the cytoplasmic virus assembly compartment (cVAC). US20-deficient mutants generated in the TR clinical strain of HCMV exhibited major growth defects in different types of endothelial cells, whereas they replicated normally in fibroblasts and epithelial cells. While the attachment and entry phases in endothelial cells were not significantly affected by the absence of US20 protein, US20-null viruses failed to replicate viral DNA and express representative E and L mRNAs and proteins. Taken together, these results indicate that US20 sustains the HCMV replication cycle at a stage subsequent to entry but prior to E gene expression and viral DNA synthesis in endothelial cells. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a major pathogen in newborns and immunocompromised individuals. A hallmark of HCMV pathogenesis is its ability to productively replicate in an exceptionally broad range of target cells, including endothelial cells, which represent

  17. Neutrophil killing of human umbilical vein endothelial cells is oxygen radical-mediated and enhanced by TNF-. alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Dame, M.K.; Varani, J.; Weinberg, J.M.; Ward, P.A. )

    1991-03-11

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells are sensitive to killing by activated human neutrophils. Killing is inhibited in the presence of catalase and deferoxamine mesylate but not soybean trypsin inhibitor. Reagent hydrogen peroxide can substitute for activated neutrophils in producing endothelial cell injury. These data suggest that lethal injury is due to the production of oxygen radicals by activated neutrophils. In these respects, the human umbilical vein endothelial cells are similar to rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells in that pretreatment with TNF-{alpha} increases sensitivity to injury by activated neutrophils. In part, the increased endothelial cell sensitivity to killing by neutrophils may be due to up-regulation of surface adhesion molecules. However, it was observed that cells passaged more than two times in culture did not demonstrate increased killing after treatment with TNF-{alpha} while up-regulation of neutrophil adhesion could be detected through several additional passages. Although the human umbilical vein endothelial cells are qualitatively similar to rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells in their sensitivity to killing, they are quantitatively much more resistant. What accounts for the relative resistance of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells is not fully understood. In the rat pulmonary artery endothelial cells, killing is known to be dependent on an intraendothelial source of iron. Pre-treatment of the human umbilical vein endothelial cells with 8-hydroxyquinoline-bound iron increased their sensitivity to oxidant injury. These data suggest that the availability of iron within the human umbilical vein endothelial cells may be a limiting factor in sensitivity to oxygen radical-mediated injury.

  18. Isolation and chromosomal localization of the human endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, L.J.; Michel, T.; Weremowicz, S.; Morton, C.C. )

    1994-01-15

    Endothelial NOS activity is a major determinant of vascular tone and blood pressure, and in several important (and sometimes hereditary) disease states, such as hypertension, diabetes, and atherosclerosis, the endothelial NO signaling system appears to be abnormal. To explore the relationship of the endothelial NOS activity, the authors isolated the human gene encoding the endothelial NOS. Genomic clones containing the 5[prime] end of this gene were identified in a human genomic library by applying a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approach. Identification of the human gene for endothelial NOS (NOS3) was confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis of the first coding exon, which was found to be identical to its cognate cDNA. The NOS3 gene spans at least 20 kb and appears to contain multiple introns. The transcription start site and promoter region of the NOS3 gene were identified by primer extension and ribonuclease protection assays. Sequencing of the putative promoter revealed consensus sequences for the shear stress-response element, as well as cytokine-responsive cis regulatory sequences, both possible important to the roles played by NOS3 in the normal and the diseased cardiovascular system. The authors also mapped the chromosomal location of the NOS3 gene. First, a chromosomal panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids was screened using PCR with oligonucleotide primers derived from the NOS3 genomic clone. The specificity of the amplified PCR product was confirmed by human and hamster genomic DNA controls, as well as by Southern blot analysis, using the NOS3 cDNA as probe. Definitive chromosomal assignment of the NOS3 gene to human chromosome 7 was based upon 0% discordancy; fluorescence in situ hybridization sublocalized the NOS3 gene to 7q36. The identification and characterization of the NOS3 gene may lead to further insights into heritable disease states associated with this gene product. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Micro- and nanotopography with extracellular matrix coating modulate human corneal endothelial cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Koo, Stephanie; Muhammad, Rizwan; Peh, Gary S L; Mehta, Jodhbir S; Yim, Evelyn K F

    2014-05-01

    The human corneal endothelium plays an important role in maintaining corneal transparency. Human corneal endothelial cells have limited regenerative capability in vivo. Consequently, endothelial dysfunction can occur following corneal endothelial trauma or inherited diseases. To restore endothelial function, corneal transplantation is needed. However, there is a worldwide shortage of donor corneas, motivating the development of a tissue-engineered graft alternative using cultivated endothelial cells. To induce in vitro cell proliferation, much effort has been made to improve culture conditions and to mimic the native extracellular microenvironment. We incorporated topographical and biochemical cues in our in vitro culture of human corneal endothelial cell line B4G12 (HCEC-B4G12) and hypothesized that manipulation of the extracellular environment can modulate cell proliferation, morphometry and phenotype. The topographies tested were nanopillars, microwells and micropillars on polydimethylsiloxane, while the biochemical factors were extracellular matrix protein coatings of fibronectin-collagen I (FC), FNC® coating mix (FNC) and laminin-chondroitin sulfate (LC). Cellular morphometry, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and zona occludens 1 (ZO-1) gene and protein expression were analyzed 3days after cells had formed a confluent monolayer. The cell circularity on all patterns and coatings was above 0.78. On all coatings, cell area was the lowest on micropillars. The coefficient of variation (CV) of the cell area was the lowest on nanopillars with an LC coating. With an FC coating, micropillars induced a better cellular outcome as the cells had the greatest circularity, smallest cell area and highest Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and ZO-1 gene and protein expression. With the LC coating, HCECs grown on nanopillars resulted in the lowest CV of the cell area and the highest ZO-1 gene expression. Thus, HCEC-B4G12 morphometry and phenotype can be improved using different topographical and biochemical

  20. Attenuation of signaling and nitric oxide production following prolonged leptin exposure in human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Blanquicett, Carmelo; Graves, Anitra; Kleinhenz, Dean J; Hart, C Michael

    2007-11-01

    Acute leptin exposure stimulates endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production in vitro. In contrast, chronic elevations in circulating leptin levels in patients with obesity are associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired endothelial NO production. Therefore, the goal of the current study was to examine the direct effects of acute and more sustained leptin stimulation on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and NO production in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). HAECs were treated with vehicle or with leptin (5 or 60 ng/mL) acutely (30-60 minutes) or for 72 hours. HAEC NO release into culture media was measured with a chemiluminescence technique, and superoxide (O(2)(-.)) production was measured with electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. HAEC eNOS activity was measured as the conversion of (3)H-arginine to (3)H-citrulline, and protein levels of eNOS, phospho-eNOS (serine 1177), Erk, phospho-Erk, suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS3), xanthine oxidase (XO), and the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase components p22phox, p67phox, Nox-4, and gp91phox were examined by Western blotting or immunoprecipitation. Acute leptin exposure increased eNOS serine 1177 phosphorylation and caused Erk activation. In contrast, prolonged leptin stimulation was not cytotoxic and failed to alter eNOS expression, phosphorylation, or HAEC NO release. Furthermore, prolonged leptin stimulation did not alter O(2)(-.) production or NADPH oxidase or XO expression but increased SOCS3 expression. In contrast to acute stimulation, prolonged (72 hours) stimulation does not alter endothelial cell NO or O(2)(-.) production. We postulate that chronic leptin stimulation, through increased SOCS3 expression, may attenuate the effects of leptin on vascular endothelial function. PMID:18062898

  1. Impact of Corneal Endothelial Dysfunctions on Intraocular Oxygen Levels in Human Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Andrew J. W.; Shui, Ying-Bo; Han, Yu-Ping; Bai, Fang; Siegfried, Carla J.; Beebe, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We studied the implications of corneal endothelial dysfunctions on oxidative stress in the anterior segment via in vivo measurements of oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in the anterior chamber (AC) of human eyes. Methods We recruited 51 patients undergoing cataract surgery and/or endothelial keratoplasty (EK). Endothelial cell density (ECD; n = 33) and central corneal thickness (CCT; n = 41) were measured on patients with relatively clear corneas. Before surgery, an oxygen sensor was introduced into the AC via a peripheral corneal paracentesis. In all patients, seven measurements of pO2 were obtained by positioning the flexible tip near the endothelium at the central cornea, at four cardinal subendothelial locations near the midperipheral cornea, and in the mid-AC and AC angle. In patients with pseudophakia or eyes undergoing cataract surgery, pO2 also was measured near the lens surface and in the posterior chamber. Results Consistent with our previous reports, a steep oxygen gradient was noted in the anterior segment of normal controls (n = 24). In patients with endothelial dysfunctions (n = 27), there was a significant increase of pO2 at all five subendothelial locations without a significant increase of pO2 in the AC angle. By regression analyses, subendothelial pO2 correlated inversely with ECD and positively with CCT in patients with endothelial dysfunctions. Conclusions This study demonstrates an even steeper intraocular oxygen gradient in eyes with corneal endothelial dysfunctions. It suggests that the reduced oxygen consumption in corneal endothelial cells may increase oxidative stress in the AC and the existence of an alternative aqueous inflow pathway that maintains a relatively low and constant pO2 at the AC angle. PMID:26447982

  2. Utilization of Microgravity Bioreactor for Differentiation and Growth of Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chu-Huang; Pellis, Neal R.

    1997-01-01

    The goal was to delineate mechanisms of genetic responses to angiogenic stimulation of human coronary arterial and dermal microvascular endothelial cells during exposure to microgravity. The NASA-designed rotating-wall vessel was used to create a three-dimensional culture environment with low shear-stress and microgravity simulating that in space. The primary specific aim was to determine whether simulated microgravity enhances endothelial cell growth and whether the growth enhancement is associated by augmented expression of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (BFGF) and c-fos, an immediate early gene and component of the transcription factor AP-1.

  3. Fluid Flow Stimulates Tissue Plasminogen Activator Secretion by Cultured Human Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, S. L.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    1989-03-01

    Wall shear stress generated by blood flow may regulate the expression of fibrinolytic proteins by endothelial cells. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor, type 1 (PAI-1) secretion by cultured human endothelial cells were not affected by exposure to venous shear stress (4 dynes/cm2). However, at arterial shear stresses of 15 and 25 dynes/cm2, the tPA secretion rate was 2.1 and 3.0 times greater, respectively, than the basal tPA secretion rate. PAI-1 secretion was unaffected by shear stress over the entire physiological range.

  4. Increased expression of extracellular proteins as a hallmark of human endothelial cell in vitro senescence.

    PubMed

    Hampel, B; Fortschegger, K; Ressler, S; Chang, M W; Unterluggauer, H; Breitwieser, A; Sommergruber, W; Fitzky, B; Lepperdinger, G; Jansen-Dürr, P; Voglauer, R; Grillari, J

    2006-05-01

    A convenient way to study processes of aging in distinct human tissues consists of a molecular analysis of cells from the tissue in question, that were explanted and grown in vitro until they reach senescence. Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), we have established an in vitro senescence model for human endothelial cells. A major hallmark of HUVEC in vitro senescence is the increased frequency of apoptotic cell death, which occurs as a determining feature of HUVEC senescence. Senescent endothelial cells are also found in vivo in atherosclerotic lesions, suggesting that the presence of such cells may contribute to the development of vascular pathology. To elucidate mechanisms underlying endothelial cell senescence and age-associated apoptosis, gene expression analyses were carried out. In these experiments, we observed the up-regulation of genes coding for extracellular proteins in senescent HUVEC. In particular, a significant upregulation of interleukin-8, VEGI, and the IGF-binding proteins 3 and 5 was observed. Upregulation of these genes was confirmed by both RT-PCR and Western blot. In the case of interleukin-8, a roughly 50-fold upregulation of the protein was also found in cellular supernatants. The extracellular proteins encoded by these genes are well known for their ability to modulate the apoptotic response of human cells, and in the case of interleukin-8, clear links to the establishment of atherosclerotic lesions have been defined. The results described here support a new model, where changes in the secretome of human endothelial cells contribute to vascular aging and vascular pathology. PMID:16626901

  5. Effect of salicylic acid on invasion of human vascular endothelial cells by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Park, Wan Beom; Kim, Sung-Han; Cho, Jae Hyun; Bang, Ji Hwan; Kim, Hong Bin; Kim, Nam Joong; Oh, Myoung-don; Choe, Kang Won

    2007-02-01

    Invasion of vascular endothelial cells by Staphylococcus aureus is associated with diverse complications and recurrent infection. Little is known about the effect of salicylic acid, the major metabolite of aspirin, on the interaction between S. aureus and vascular endothelial cells. We examined the adhesion of S. aureus strain 8325-4 cultured with or without salicylic acid to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and the ability of the strain to invade these cells. Strain 8325-4 cells grown in salicylic acid were significantly less adherent to and invasive in HUVECs. Production of cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 was lower from the HUVECs infected with clinical isolates of S. aureus cultured in salicylic acid compared with those unexposed to salicylic acid. This study raises the possibility of using salicylic acid as an adjuvant therapeutic agent in the treatment of S. aureus bacteremia to prevent its complications or recurrence.

  6. Transfer of ultrasmall iron oxide nanoparticles from human brain-derived endothelial cells to human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Halamoda Kenzaoui, Blanka; Angeloni, Silvia; Overstolz, Thomas; Niedermann, Philippe; Chapuis Bernasconi, Catherine; Liley, Martha; Juillerat-Jeanneret, Lucienne

    2013-05-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are being used or explored for the development of biomedical applications in diagnosis and therapy, including imaging and drug delivery. Therefore, reliable tools are needed to study the behavior of NPs in biological environment, in particular the transport of NPs across biological barriers, including the blood-brain tumor barrier (BBTB), a challenging question. Previous studies have addressed the translocation of NPs of various compositions across cell layers, mostly using only one type of cells. Using a coculture model of the human BBTB, consisting in human cerebral endothelial cells preloaded with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIO NPs) and unloaded human glioblastoma cells grown on each side of newly developed ultrathin permeable silicon nitride supports as a model of the human BBTB, we demonstrate for the first time the transfer of USPIO NPs from human brain-derived endothelial cells to glioblastoma cells. The reduced thickness of the permeable mechanical support compares better than commercially available polymeric supports to the thickness of the basement membrane of the cerebral vascular system. These results are the first report supporting the possibility that USPIO NPs could be directly transferred from endothelial cells to glioblastoma cells across a BBTB. Thus, the use of such ultrathin porous supports provides a new in vitro approach to study the delivery of nanotherapeutics to brain cancers. Our results also suggest a novel possibility for nanoparticles to deliver therapeutics to the brain using endothelial to neural cells transfer.

  7. Lysophosphatidic acid stimulates thrombomodulin lectin-like domain shedding in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Hualin; Lin ChiIou; Huang Yuanli; Chen, Pin-Shern; Kuo, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Mei-Shing; Wu, G.C.-C.; Shi, G.-Y.; Yang, H.-Y.; Lee Hsinyu

    2008-02-29

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an anticoagulant glycoprotein highly expressed on endothelial cell surfaces. Increased levels of soluble TM in circulation have been widely accepted as an indicator of endothelial damage or dysfunction. Previous studies indicated that various proinflammatory factors stimulate TM shedding in various cell types such as smooth muscle cells and epithelial cells. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator present in biological fluids during endothelial damage or injury. In the present study, we first observed that LPA triggered TM shedding in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). By Cyflow analysis, we showed that the LPA-induced accessibility of antibodies to the endothelial growth factor (EGF)-like domain of TM is independent of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), while LPA-induced TM lectin-like domain shedding is MMP-dependent. Furthermore, a stable cell line expressing TM without its lectin-like domain exhibited a higher cell proliferation rate than a stable cell line expressing full-length TM. These results imply that LPA induces TM lectin-like domain shedding, which might contribute to the exposure of its EGF-like domain for EGF receptor (EGFR) binding, thereby stimulating subsequent cell proliferation. Based on our findings, we propose a novel mechanism for the exposure of TM EGF-like domain, which possibly mediates LPA-induced EGFR transactivation.

  8. Coenzyme Q10 prevents high glucose-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Sekizaki, Naoto; Suzuki, Takashi; Kobayashi, Shinjiro; Wada, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Tadashi; Kimura, Ikuko; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu

    2007-07-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of vascular complications in diabetes. Although some clinical evidences suggest the use of an antioxidant reagent coenzyme Q10 in diabetes with hypertension, the direct effect of coenzyme Q10 on the endothelial functions has not been examined. In the present study, we therefore investigated the protective effect of coenzyme Q10 against high glucose-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC exposed to high glucose (30 mM) exhibited abnormal properties, including the morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis, overproduction of reactive oxygen species, activation of protein kinase Cbeta2, and increase in endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression. Treatment with coenzyme Q10 strongly inhibited these changes in HUVEC under high glucose condition. In addition, coenzyme Q10 inhibited high glucose-induced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, an endogenous caspase-3 substrate. These results suggest that coenzyme Q10 prevents reactive oxygen species-induced apoptosis through inhibition of the mitochondria-dependent caspase-3 pathway. Moreover, consistent with previous reports, high glucose caused upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) in HUVEC, and promoted the adhesion of U937 monocytic cells. Coenzyme Q10 displayed potent inhibitory effects against these endothelial abnormalities. Thus, we provide the first evidence that coenzyme Q10 has a beneficial effect in protecting against the endothelial dysfunction by high glucose-induced oxidative stress in vitro.

  9. Hepatocyte growth factor protects human endothelial cells against advanced glycation end products-induced apoposis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yijun . E-mail: zhou-yijun@hotmail.com; Wang Jiahe; Zhang Jin

    2006-06-02

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) form by a non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and biological proteins, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, we assessed AGEs effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) growth, proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, we investigated whether hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), an anti-apoptotic factor for endothelial cells, prevents AGEs-induced apoptosis of HUVECs. HUVECs were treated with AGEs in the presence or absence of HGF. Treatment of HUVECs with AGEs changed cell morphology, decreased cell viability, and induced DNA fragmentation, leading to apoptosis. Apoptosis was induced by AGEs in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. AGEs markedly elevated Bax and decreased NF-{kappa}B, but not Bcl-2 expression. Additionally, AGEs significantly inhibited cell growth through a pro-apoptotic action involving caspase-3 and -9 activations in HUVECs. Most importantly, pretreatment with HGF protected against AGEs-induced cytotoxicity in the endothelial cells. HGF significantly promoted the expression of Bcl-2 and NF-{kappa}B, while decreasing the activities of caspase-3 and -9 without affecting Bax level. Our data suggest that AGEs induce apoptosis in endothelial cells. HGF effectively attenuate AGEs-induced endothelial cell apoptosis. These findings provide new perspectives in the role of HGF in cardiovascular disease.

  10. Expression of endothelial cell-specific receptor tyrosine kinases and growth factors in human brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Kaipainen, A.; Mentula, P.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Paetau, A.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1995-01-01

    Key growth factor-receptor interactions involved in angiogenesis are possible targets for therapy of CNS tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific endothelial cell mitogen that has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis, a requirement for solid tumor growth. The expression of VEGF, the closely related placental growth factor (PIGF), the newly cloned endothelial high affinity VEGF receptors KDR and FLT1, and the endothelial orphan receptors FLT4 and Tie were analyzed by in situ hybridization in normal human brain tissue and in the following CNS tumors: gliomas, grades II, III, IV; meningiomas, grades I and II; and melanoma metastases to the cerebrum. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in the majority of low grade tumors studied and was highly expressed in cells of malignant gliomas. Significantly elevated levels of Tie, KDR, and FLT1 mRNAs, but not FLT4 mRNA, were observed in malignant tumor endothelia, as well as in endothelia of tissues directly adjacent to the tumor margin. In comparison, there was little or no receptor expression in normal brain vasculature. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that these endothelial receptors are induced during tumor progression and may play a role in tumor angiogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7856749

  11. A Maillard reaction product enhances eNOS activity in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Christoph A; Heiss, Elke H; Schachner, Daniel; Aristei, Yasmin; Severin, Theodor; Dirsch, Verena M

    2010-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is an important signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. Although dietary factors can modulate eNOS activity, putative effects of processed food are barely investigated. We aimed to examine whether the model Maillard reaction product 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-1-propyl-4(1H)-pyridone (HMPP), formed from maltol or starch and propylamine, affects the eNOS system. Incubation of EA.hy926 endothelial cells with 30-300 microM HMPP for 18 h enhanced endothelial NO release measured with the fluorescent probe diaminofluorescein-2 and eNOS activity determined by the [14C]L-arginine-[14C]L-citrulline conversion assay. HMPP increased NO production also in two different types of primary human endothelial cells. Protein levels of eNOS and inducible NO synthase remained unaltered by HMPP. HMPP inhibited eNOS activity within the first 2-4 h, whereas it potently increased eNOS activity after 12-24 h. Levels of eNOS phosphorylation, expression of heat-shock protein 90, caveolin-1 and various antioxidant enzymes were not affected. Intracellular reactive oxygen species remained unchanged by HMPP. This is the first study to demonstrate positive effects of a Maillard reaction product on eNOS activity and endothelial NO production, which is considered favourable for cardiovascular protection. PMID:20112298

  12. Oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by iron oxide nanoparticles in cultured human umbilical endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mo-Tao; Wang, Yun; Feng, Wei-Yue; Wang, Bing; Wang, Meng; Ouyang, Hong; Chai, Zhi-Fang

    2010-12-01

    Recent epidemiologic researches indicate that exposure to ultrafine particles (nanoparticles) is an independent risk factor for several cardiovascular diseases. The induction of endothelial injuries is hypothesized to be an attractive mechanism involved in these cardiovascular diseases. To investigate this hypothesis, the widely used iron nanomaterials, ferric oxide (Fe2O3) and ferriferrous oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were incubated with human umbilical endothelial cells (ECV304 cells) at different concentrations of 2, 20, 100 microg/mL. The cell viability, the rate of apoptosis, the apoptotic nuclear morphology and the mitochondria membrane potential were measured to estimate the cell necrosis and apoptosis caused by the nanoparticle exposure. The stimulation of superoxide anion (O2*-) and nitric oxide (NO) were examined to evaluate the stress responses of endothelial cells. Our results indicated that both the Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 nanoparticles could generate oxidative stress as well as the significant increase of nitric oxide in ECV304 cells. The loss of mitochondria membrane potential and the apoptotic chromatin condensation in the nucleus were observed as the early signs of apoptosis. It is inferred the stress response might be an important mechanism involving in endothelial cells apoptosis and death, and these injuries in endothelial cells might play a key role in downstream cardiovascular diseases such as atheroscelerosis, hypertension and myocardial infarction (MI).

  13. Nuclear p120 catenin unlocks mitotic block of contact-inhibited human corneal endothelial monolayers without disrupting adherent junctions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying-Ting; Chen, Hung-Chi; Chen, Szu-Yu; Tseng, Scheffer C G

    2012-08-01

    Contact inhibition ubiquitously exists in non-transformed cells that are in contact with neighboring cells. This phenomenon explains the poor regenerative capacity of in vivo human corneal endothelial cells during aging, injury and surgery. This study demonstrated that the conventional approach of expanding human corneal endothelial cells by disrupting contact inhibition with EDTA followed by bFGF activated canonical Wnt signaling and lost the normal phenotype to endothelial-mesenchymal transition, especially if TGFβ1 was added. By contrast, siRNA against p120 catenin (CTNND1) also uniquely promoted proliferation of the endothelial cells by activating trafficking of p120 catenin to the nucleus, thus relieving repression by nuclear Kaiso. This nuclear p120-catenin-Kaiso signaling is associated with activation of RhoA-ROCK signaling, destabilization of microtubules and inhibition of Hippo signaling, but not with activation of Wnt-β-catenin signaling. Consequently, proliferating human corneal endothelial cells maintained a hexagonal shape, with junctional expression of N-cadherin, ZO-1 and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Further expansion of human corneal endothelial monolayers with a normal phenotype and a higher density was possible by prolonging treatment with p120 catenin siRNA followed by its withdrawal. This new strategy of perturbing contact inhibition by selective activation of p120-catenin-Kaiso signaling without disrupting adherent junction could be used to engineer surgical grafts containing normal human corneal endothelial cells to meet a global corneal shortage and for endothelial keratoplasties. PMID:22505615

  14. Direct cytotoxic action of Shiga toxin on human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Obrig, T G; Del Vecchio, P J; Brown, J E; Moran, T P; Rowland, B M; Judge, T K; Rothman, S W

    1988-01-01

    To help explain a role of the Shiga toxin family in hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome in humans, it has been hypothesized that these toxins cause direct damage to the vascular endothelium. We now report that Shiga toxin purified from Shigella dysenteriae 1 does indeed have a direct cytotoxic effect on vascular endothelial cells in cultures. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in confluent monolayers were reduced 50% by 10(-8) M Shiga toxin after a lag period of 48 to 96 h. In comparison, nonconfluent HUVEC were reduced 50% by 10(-10) M Shiga toxin within a 24-h period. These data suggest that dividing endothelial cells are more sensitive to Shiga toxin than are quiescent cells in confluent monolayers. Both confluent and nonconfluent HUVEC specifically bound 125I-Shiga toxin. However, in response to the toxin, rates of incorporation of [3H]leucine into protein were more severely reduced in nonconfluent cells than in confluent cells. Toxin inhibition of protein synthesis preceded detachment of cells from the substratum. The specific binding of 125I-Shiga toxin to human endothelial cells and the cytotoxic response were both toxin dose dependent and neutralized by anti-Shiga toxin antibody. Heat-denatured Shiga toxin was without the cytotoxic effect. In addition, the complete culture system contained less than 0.1 ng of bacterial endotoxin per ml, as measured by the Limulus amoebocyte lysate test. PMID:3044997

  15. Novel Nox inhibitor of oxLDL-induced reactive oxygen species formation in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Stielow, Claudia; Catar, Rusan A; Muller, Gregor; Wingler, Kirstin; Scheurer, Peter; Schmidt, Harald H H W; Morawietz, Henning

    2006-05-26

    In this study, we investigated effects of a novel NAD(P)H oxidase (Nox)-inhibitor 3-benzyl-7-(2-benzoxazolyl)thio-1,2,3-triazolo[4,5-d]pyrimidine (VAS2870) on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in human endothelial cells. Primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells were cultured to confluence and ROS formation was induced with 50microg/ml oxLDL for 2h. ROS formation was detected by chemiluminescence (CL) using the Diogenes reagent. OxLDL induced ROS formation in human endothelial cells (171+/-12%; n=10, P<0.05 vs. control). This augmented ROS formation in response to oxLDL was completely inhibited by the Nox inhibitor VAS2870 (101+/-9%; n=7, P<0.05 vs. oxLDL). Similar results were obtained with superoxide dismutase (91+/-7%; n=7, P<0.05 vs. oxLDL). However, the Nox4 mRNA expression level was neither changed by oxLDL nor VAS2870. We conclude that VAS2870 could provide a novel strategy to inhibit the augmented endothelial superoxide anion formation in response to cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:16603125

  16. Anaphylatoxin C5a fails to promote prostacyclin release from cultured human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lunberg, C.; Marceau, F.; Huey, R.; Hugli, T.E.

    1986-03-01

    A predominantly relaxing effect of C5a on isolated blood vessels has been reported, which is associated with prostacyclin release from the vessel wall. Further, the well known hypothensive effect of C5a, also associated with increased prostacyclin output and preventable by indomethacin, indicates an involvement of endothelial cells in this reaction. In this study the authors characterized the response to C5a of cultured human endothelial cells from umbilical vein as measured by prostacyclin release. Prostacyclin was quantitated by radioimmunoassay as 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../. Subcultured cells respond to histamine and mellitin with increased prostacyclin production, but do not respond to leukotriene C4 (LTC/sub 4/). Primary cultures, on the other hand, respond to LTC/sub 4/ and the histamine response is 7-fold greater for these cells than for subcultured cells. However, neither primary nor subcultured cells release prostacyclin following application of either human C5a (100 nM) or C3a (1 ..mu..M). Also, these cells fail to show specific binding sites for /sup 125/I-C5a. In contrast, endothelial cells in the presence of human PMNs challenged with C5a release prostacyclin. These data suggest that C5a has no direct effect on the endothelial cell, but rather activates this cell indirectly via mediators from other cells known to respond to C5a.

  17. Transcriptional and functional adaptations of human endothelial cells to physiological chronic low oxygen.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi-Zhou; Wang, Kai; Li, Yan; Dai, Cai-Feng; Wang, Ping; Kendziorski, Christina; Chen, Dong-Bao; Zheng, Jing

    2013-05-01

    Endothelial cells chronically reside in low-O2 environments in vivo (2%-13% O2), which are believed to be critical for cell homeostasis. To elucidate the roles of this physiological chronic normoxia in human endothelial cells, we examined transcriptomes of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), proliferation and migration of HUVECs in response to fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), and underlying signaling mechanisms under physiological chronic normoxia. Immediately after isolation, HUVECs were cultured steadily under standard cell culture normoxia (SCN; 21% O2) or physiological chronic normoxia (PCN; 3% O2) up to 25 days. We found that PCN up-regulated 41 genes and down-regulated 21 genes, 90% of which differed from those previously reported from HUVECs cultured under SCN and exposed to acute low O2. Gene ontology analysis indicated that PCN-regulated genes were highly related to cell proliferation and migration, consistent with the results from benchtop assays that showed that PCN significantly enhanced FGF2- and VEGFA-stimulated cell proliferation and migration. Interestingly, preexposing the PCN cells to 21% O2 up to 5 days did not completely diminish PCN-enhanced cell proliferation and migration. These PCN-enhanced cell proliferations and migrations were mediated via augmented activation of MEK1/MEK2/ERK1/ERK2 and/or PI3K/AKT1. Importantly, these PCN-enhanced cellular responses were associated with an increase in activation of VEGFR2 but not FGFR1, without altering their expression. Thus, PCN programs endothelial cells to undergo dramatic changes in transcriptomes and sensitizes cellular proliferative and migratory responses to FGF2 and VEGFA. These PCN cells may offer a unique endothelial model, more closely mimicking the in vivo states.

  18. Concise Review: An Update on the Culture of Human Corneal Endothelial Cells for Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Mohit; Ferrari, Stefano; Sheridan, Carl; Kaye, Stephen; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2016-02-01

    The cornea forms the front window of the eye, enabling the transmission of light to the retina through a crystalline lens. Many disorders of the cornea lead to partial or total blindness, and therefore corneal transplantation becomes mandatory. Recently, selective corneal layer (as opposed to full thickness) transplantation has become popular because this leads to earlier rehabilitation and visual outcomes. Corneal endothelial disorders are a common cause of corneal disease and transplantation. Corneal endothelial transplantation is successful but limited worldwide because of lower donor corneal supply. Alternatives to corneal tissue for endothelial transplantation therefore require immediate attention. The field of human corneal endothelial culture for transplantation is rapidly emerging as a possible viable option. This manuscript provides an update regarding these developments. Significance: The cornea is the front clear window of the eye. It needs to be kept transparent for normal vision. It is formed of various layers of which the posterior layer (the endothelium) is responsible for the transparency of the cornea because it allows the transport of ions and solutes to and from the other layers of the cornea. Corneal blindness that results from the corneal endothelial dysfunction can be treated using healthy donor tissues. There is a huge demand for human donor corneas but limited supply, and therefore there is a need to identify alternatives that would reduce this demand. Research is underway to understand the isolation techniques for corneal endothelial cells, culturing these cells in the laboratory, and finding possible options to transplant these cells in the patients. This review article is an update on the recent developments in this field. PMID:26702128

  19. Concise Review: An Update on the Culture of Human Corneal Endothelial Cells for Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Mohit; Ferrari, Stefano; Sheridan, Carl; Kaye, Stephen; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2016-02-01

    The cornea forms the front window of the eye, enabling the transmission of light to the retina through a crystalline lens. Many disorders of the cornea lead to partial or total blindness, and therefore corneal transplantation becomes mandatory. Recently, selective corneal layer (as opposed to full thickness) transplantation has become popular because this leads to earlier rehabilitation and visual outcomes. Corneal endothelial disorders are a common cause of corneal disease and transplantation. Corneal endothelial transplantation is successful but limited worldwide because of lower donor corneal supply. Alternatives to corneal tissue for endothelial transplantation therefore require immediate attention. The field of human corneal endothelial culture for transplantation is rapidly emerging as a possible viable option. This manuscript provides an update regarding these developments. Significance: The cornea is the front clear window of the eye. It needs to be kept transparent for normal vision. It is formed of various layers of which the posterior layer (the endothelium) is responsible for the transparency of the cornea because it allows the transport of ions and solutes to and from the other layers of the cornea. Corneal blindness that results from the corneal endothelial dysfunction can be treated using healthy donor tissues. There is a huge demand for human donor corneas but limited supply, and therefore there is a need to identify alternatives that would reduce this demand. Research is underway to understand the isolation techniques for corneal endothelial cells, culturing these cells in the laboratory, and finding possible options to transplant these cells in the patients. This review article is an update on the recent developments in this field.

  20. Pterostilbene, an Active Constituent of Blueberries, Stimulates Nitric Oxide Production via Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong Hoon; Jeong, Sun-Oh; Chung, Hun-Teag; Pae, Hyun-Ock

    2015-09-01

    Endothelial dysfunction, a key process in development of cardiovascular diseases, is largely due to reduced nitric oxide (NO) derived from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Resveratrol has been reported to stimulate NO production via estrogen receptor α (ERα) activation in endothelial cells. Here, we investigated whether two natural methylated analogs of resveratrol, pterostilbene (Pts) and trans-3,5,4'-trimethoxystilbene (TMS), similarly to resveratrol, could influence endothelial NO release in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In HUVECs exposed to Pts or TMS, NO production and phosphorylation of eNOS, protein kinase B (Akt), and ERα were measured by using a fluorimetric NO assay kit and Western blot analysis, respectively. Dimethylated Pts, but not trimethylated TMS, stimulated dose-dependent NO production via eNOS phosphorylation. Pts also stimulated dose-dependent phosphorylation of Akt, but not of ERα. NO production and eNOS phosphorylation in response to Pts were significantly abolished by the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt inhibitor LY294002, but not by the ERα antagonist ICI182780. Our results suggest that Pts, but not TMS, is capable of inducing eNOS phosphorylation and the subsequent NO release, presumably, by activating PI3K/Akt pathway. The potential efficacy of Pts, an active constituent of blueberries, may aid in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases characterized by endothelial dysfunction.

  1. Biocompatibility of common polyimides with human endothelial cells for a cardiovascular microsensor.

    PubMed

    Starr, Peter; Agrawal, C Mauli; Bailey, Steven

    2016-02-01

    The cardiovasculature is an emerging niche for polyimide microdevices, yet the biocompatibility of polyimides with human endothelial cells has not been reported in the literature. In this study, we have evaluated an experimental polyimide-based pressure sensor for biological safety to determine its suitability for intravascular operation by using an in vitro model of human endothelium, following ISO 10993-5 protocols for extract tests and direct contact tests. First, SV-HCEC cells were incubated with extracts derived from common microfabrication polyimides utilized in the transducer (PMDA-ODA, BPDA-PPD, and a proprietary thermoplastic adhesive), and then labeled with selective probes to evaluate the effect of the polyimides on mitochondria and cell viability. Flow cytometry analysis showed that incubation of SV-HCECs with polyimide extracts resulted in no significant change in mitochondrial membrane potential (detected by JC-1) or apoptotic (annexin V) and necrotic (propidium iodide) cell death, when compared to incubation with extracts of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and untreated cells used as negative controls. Second, primary human endothelial cells were incubated in direct contact with the completed sensor and then labeled with selective probes for live-dead analysis (calcein-AM, ethidium homodimer-1). Endothelial cells showed no loss of viability when compared to negative controls. Combined, the studies show no significant change in early markers of stress or more strict markers of viability in endothelial cells treated with the polyimides tested. We conclude that these common microfabrication polyimides and the derived sensor are not cytotoxic to human endothelial cells, the primary cell type that cardiovascular sensors will contact in vivo. PMID:26418753

  2. Proangiogenic effects of environmentally relevant levels of bisphenol A in human primary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Helén; Brittebo, Eva

    2012-03-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely used in the manufacturing of consumer products such as plastic food containers and food cans. Experimental studies suggest a relationship between exposure to BPA and changes in metabolic processes and reproductive organs. Also, epidemiological studies report an association between elevated exposure to BPA and cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Although alterations in the vascular endothelium are implicated in pathological conditions associated with BPA, little is known about the effects of BPA in the human endothelium. This study aimed to investigate the effects of 0.1 nM-1 μM of BPA on selected biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The mRNA expression of biomarkers was assayed using qRT-PCR, and the production of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species was measured using the H(2)DCFDA and the DAF-FM assays. The effect of BPA on phosphorylated eNOS was examined using Western blot and immunofluorescence, and the endothelial tube formation assay was used to investigate in vitro angiogenesis. BPA (≤1 μM) increased the mRNA expression of the proangiogenic genes VEGFR-2, VEGF-A, eNOS, and Cx43 and increased the production of nitric oxide in HUVEC. Furthermore, BPA increased the expression of phosphorylated eNOS and endothelial tube formation in HUVEC. These studies demonstrate that environmentally relevant levels of BPA have direct proangiogenic effects on human primary endothelial cells in vitro suggesting that the human endothelium may be an important target for BPA.

  3. Intrinsic FGF2 and FGF5 promotes angiogenesis of human aortic endothelial cells in 3D microfluidic angiogenesis system

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ha-Rim; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Joo, Hyung Joon; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Chi-Yeon; Kim, Jong-Ho; Choi, Ji-Hyun; Cui, Long-Hui; Hong, Soon Jun; Chung, Seok; Lim, Do-Sun

    2016-01-01

    The human body contains different endothelial cell types and differences in their angiogenic potential are poorly understood. We compared the functional angiogenic ability of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) using a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic cell culture system. HAECs and HUVECs exhibited similar cellular characteristics in a 2D culture system; however, in the 3D microfluidic angiogenesis system, HAECs exhibited stronger angiogenic potential than HUVECs. Interestingly, the expression level of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)2 and FGF5 under vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A stimulation was significantly higher in HAECs than in HUVECs. Moreover, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of FGF2 and FGF5 more significantly attenuated vascular sprouting induced from HAECs than HUVECs. Our results suggest that HAECs have greater angiogenic potential through FGF2 and FGF5 upregulation and could be a compatible endothelial cell type to achieve robust angiogenesis. PMID:27357248

  4. Direct Antiangiogenic Actions of Cadmium on Human Vascular Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Woods, J. M.; Leone, M.; Klosowska, K.; Lamar, P. C.; Shaknovsky, T. J.; Prozialeck, W. C.

    2008-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is a primary target of cadmium (Cd) toxicity, but little is known regarding a potential mechanism whereby Cd may inhibit angiogenesis. Recent findings showing that Cd can disrupt cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion suggested that Cd might inhibit angiogenesis by altering the function of VE-cadherin, a molecule that is essential for angiogenesis. To address this issue, endothelial cells (ECs) were exposed to Cd in the presence of serum and subjected to angiogenesis-related cell migration and tube formation assays. Initial examination of cytotoxicity showed that ECs are rather resistant to the acute cytotoxic effects of Cd even at concentrations up to 1mM. However, 10μM Cd decreased migration of ECs. Cd concentrations of 500nM and greater significantly reduced organization of microvascular ECs into tubes. These antiangiogenic effects were evident even when ECs were preincubated with Cd and then washed to remove free Cd, indicating that Cd acted directly on the cells rather than on the extracellular matrix. Immunolocalization studies showed that Cd caused the redistribution of VE-cadherin from cell-cell contacts. These findings indicate that Cd acts in an angiostatic manner on ECs, and that this effect may involve alterations in the localization and function of VE cadherin. PMID:18243643

  5. Bortezomib induces autophagic death in proliferating human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Belloni, Daniela; Veschini, Lorenzo; Foglieni, Chiara; Dell'Antonio, Giacomo; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Ferrarini, Marina; Ferrero, Elisabetta

    2010-04-01

    The proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib has been approved for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM), thanks to its ability to induce MM cell apoptosis. Moreover, Bortezomib has antiangiogenic properties. We report that endothelial cells (EC) exposed to Bortezomib undergo death to an extent that depends strictly on their activation state. Indeed, while quiescent EC are resistant to Bortezomib, the drug results maximally toxic in EC switched toward angiogenesis with FGF, and exerts a moderate effect on subconfluent HUVEC. Moreover, EC activation state deeply influences the death pathway elicited by Bortezomib: after treatment, angiogenesis-triggered EC display typical features of apoptosis. Conversely, death of subconfluent EC is preceded by ROS generation and signs typical of autophagy, including intense cytoplasmic vacuolization with evidence of autophagosomes at electron microscopy, and conversion of the cytosolic MAP LC3 I form toward the autophagosome-associated LC3 II form. Treatment with the specific autophagy inhibitor 3-MA prevents both LC3 I/LC3 II conversion and HUVEC cell death. Finally, early removal of Bortezomib is accompanied by the recovery of cell shape and viability. These findings strongly suggest that Bortezomib induces either apoptosis or autophagy in EC; interfering with the autophagic response may potentiate the antiangiogenic effect of the drug.

  6. Wnt5a-mediated non-canonical Wnt signalling regulates human endothelial cell proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Chingwen Yeh Juching; Fan Taiping; Smith, Stephen K.; Charnock-Jones, D. Stephen

    2008-01-11

    Cell to cell interaction is one of the key processes effecting angiogenesis and endothelial cell function. Wnt signalling is mediated through cell-cell interaction and is involved in many developmental processes and cellular functions. In this study, we investigated the possible function of Wnt5a and the non-canonical Wnt pathway in human endothelial cells. We found that Wnt5a-mediated non-canonical Wnt signalling regulated endothelial cell proliferation. Blocking this pathway using antibody, siRNA or a down-stream inhibitor led to suppression of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and monolayer wound closure. We also found that the mRNA level of Wnt5a is up-regulated when endothelial cells are treated with a cocktail of inflammatory cytokines. Our findings suggest non-canonical Wnt signalling plays a role in regulating endothelial cell growth and possibly in angiogenesis.

  7. Spatiotemporal analysis of RhoA/B/C activation in primary human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, Nathalie R.; van Helden, Suzanne F.; Anthony, Eloise C.; Yin, Taofei; Wu, Yi I.; Goedhart, Joachim; Gadella, Theodorus W. J.; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells line the vasculature and are important for the regulation of blood pressure, vascular permeability, clotting and transendothelial migration of leukocytes and tumor cells. A group of proteins that that control the endothelial barrier function are the RhoGTPases. This study focuses on three homologous (>88%) RhoGTPases: RhoA, RhoB, RhoC of which RhoB and RhoC have been poorly characterized. Using a RhoGTPase mRNA expression analysis we identified RhoC as the highest expressed in primary human endothelial cells. Based on an existing RhoA FRET sensor we developed new RhoB/C FRET sensors to characterize their spatiotemporal activation properties. We found all these RhoGTPase sensors to respond to physiologically relevant agonists (e.g. Thrombin), reaching transient, localized FRET ratio changes up to 200%. These RhoA/B/C FRET sensors show localized GEF and GAP activity and reveal spatial activation differences between RhoA/C and RhoB. Finally, we used these sensors to monitor GEF-specific differential activation of RhoA/B/C. In summary, this study adds high-contrast RhoB/C FRET sensors to the currently available FRET sensor toolkit and uncover new insights in endothelial and RhoGTPase cell biology. This allows us to study activation and signaling by these closely related RhoGTPases with high spatiotemporal resolution in primary human cells. PMID:27147504

  8. Spatiotemporal analysis of RhoA/B/C activation in primary human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Nathalie R; van Helden, Suzanne F; Anthony, Eloise C; Yin, Taofei; Wu, Yi I; Goedhart, Joachim; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Hordijk, Peter L

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells line the vasculature and are important for the regulation of blood pressure, vascular permeability, clotting and transendothelial migration of leukocytes and tumor cells. A group of proteins that that control the endothelial barrier function are the RhoGTPases. This study focuses on three homologous (>88%) RhoGTPases: RhoA, RhoB, RhoC of which RhoB and RhoC have been poorly characterized. Using a RhoGTPase mRNA expression analysis we identified RhoC as the highest expressed in primary human endothelial cells. Based on an existing RhoA FRET sensor we developed new RhoB/C FRET sensors to characterize their spatiotemporal activation properties. We found all these RhoGTPase sensors to respond to physiologically relevant agonists (e.g. Thrombin), reaching transient, localized FRET ratio changes up to 200%. These RhoA/B/C FRET sensors show localized GEF and GAP activity and reveal spatial activation differences between RhoA/C and RhoB. Finally, we used these sensors to monitor GEF-specific differential activation of RhoA/B/C. In summary, this study adds high-contrast RhoB/C FRET sensors to the currently available FRET sensor toolkit and uncover new insights in endothelial and RhoGTPase cell biology. This allows us to study activation and signaling by these closely related RhoGTPases with high spatiotemporal resolution in primary human cells. PMID:27147504

  9. Influence of the oxygen microenvironment on the proangiogenic potential of human endothelial colony forming cells.

    PubMed

    Decaris, Martin L; Lee, Chang I; Yoder, Mervin C; Tarantal, Alice F; Leach, J Kent

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic angiogenesis is a promising strategy to promote the formation of new or collateral vessels for tissue regeneration and repair. Since changes in tissue oxygen concentrations are known to stimulate numerous cell functions, these studies have focused on the oxygen microenvironment and its role on the angiogenic potential of endothelial cells. We analyzed the proangiogenic potential of human endothelial colony-forming cells (hECFCs), a highly proliferative population of circulating endothelial progenitor cells, and compared outcomes to human dermal microvascular cells (HMVECs) under oxygen tensions ranging from 1% to 21% O2, representative of ischemic or healthy tissues and standard culture conditions. Compared to HMVECs, hECFCs (1) exhibited significantly greater proliferation in both ischemic conditions and ambient air; (2) demonstrated increased migration compared to HMVECs when exposed to chemotactic gradients in reduced oxygen; and (3) exhibited comparable or superior proangiogenic potential in reduced oxygen conditions when assessed using a vessel-forming assay. These data demonstrate that the angiogenic potential of both endothelial populations is influenced by the local oxygen microenvironment. However, hECFCs exhibit a robust angiogenic potential in oxygen conditions representative of physiologic, ischemic, or ambient air conditions, and these findings suggest that hECFCs may be a superior cell source for use in cell-based approaches for the neovascularization of ischemic or engineered tissues.

  10. Binding, internalization, and degradation of basic fibroblast growth factor in human microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bikfalvi, A.; Dupuy, E.; Inyang, A.L.; Tobelem, G. ); Fayein, N.; Courtois, Y. ); Leseche, G. )

    1989-03-01

    The binding, internalization, and degradation of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in human omental microvascular endothelial cells (HOME cells) were investigated. Binding studies of bFGF in human endothelial cells have not yet been reported. Basic FGF bound to HOME cells. The number of low-affinity binding sites was found to be variable. Washing the cells with 2 M phosphate-buffered saline removed completely {sup 125}I-bFGF bound to low-affinity binding sites but decreased also the high-affinity binding. The majority of the surface-bound {sup 125}I-bFGF was removed by washing the cells with acetic acid buffer at pH 3. At this temperature, degradation of the internalized ligand was followed after 1 hour by the appearance of three major bands of 15,000 10,000, and 8,000 Da and was inhibited by chloroquine. These results demonstrated two classes of binding sites for bFGF in HOME cells; the number of high-affinity binding sites being larger than the number reported for bovine capillary endothelial cells. The intracellular processing of bFGF in HOME cells seems to be different from that of heparin binding growth factor-1 in murine lung capillary endothelial cells and of eye-derived growth factor-1 in Chinese hamster fibroblasts.

  11. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells resist elongation due to shear stress.

    PubMed

    Reinitz, Adam; DeStefano, Jackson; Ye, Mao; Wong, Andrew D; Searson, Peter C

    2015-05-01

    Endothelial cells in straight sections of vessels are known to elongate and align in the direction of flow. This phenotype has been replicated in confluent monolayers of bovine aortic endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in cell culture under physiological shear stress. Here we report on the morphological response of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) in confluent monolayers in response to shear stress. Using a microfluidic platform we image confluent monolayers of HBMECs and HUVECs under shear stresses up to 16 dyne cm(-2). From live-cell imaging we quantitatively analyze the cell morphology and cell speed as a function of time. We show that HBMECs do not undergo a classical transition from cobblestone to spindle-like morphology in response to shear stress. We further show that under shear stress, actin fibers are randomly oriented in the cells indicating that there is no cytoskeletal remodeling. These results suggest that HBMECs are programmed to resist elongation and alignment under shear stress, a phenotype that may be associated with the unique properties of the blood-brain barrier.

  12. Magnetic field-guided cell delivery with nanoparticle-loaded human corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Moysidis, Stavros N; Alvarez-Delfin, Karen; Peschansky, Veronica J; Salero, Enrique; Weisman, Alejandra D; Bartakova, Alena; Raffa, Gabriella A; Merkhofer, Richard M; Kador, Karl E; Kunzevitzky, Noelia J; Goldberg, Jeffrey L

    2015-04-01

    To improve the delivery and integration of cell therapy using magnetic cell guidance for replacement of corneal endothelium, here we assess magnetic nanoparticles' (MNPs') effects on human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs) in vitro. Biocompatible, 50 nm superparamagnetic nanoparticles endocytosed by cultured HCECs induced no short- or long-term change in viability or identity. Assessment of guidance of the magnetic HCECs in the presence of different magnet shapes and field strengths showed a 2.4-fold increase in delivered cell density compared to gravity alone. After cell delivery, HCECs formed a functional monolayer, with no difference in tight junction formation between MNP-loaded and control HCECs. These data suggest that nanoparticle-mediated magnetic cell delivery may increase the efficiency of cell delivery without compromising HCEC survival, identity or function. Future studies may assess the safety and efficacy of this therapeutic modality in vivo. From the clinical editor: The authors show in this article that magnetic force facilitates the delivery of human corneal endothelial cells loaded by superparamagnetic nanoparticles to cornea, without changing their morphology, identity or functional properties. This novel idea can potentially have vast impact in the treatment of corneal endothelial dystrophies by providing self-endothelial cells after ex-vivo expansion. PMID:25596075

  13. Ghrelin stimulates angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells: Implications beyond GH release

    SciTech Connect

    Li Aihua; Cheng Guangli; Zhu Genghui; Tarnawski, Andrzej S. . E-mail: atarnawski@yahoo.com

    2007-02-09

    Ghrelin, a peptide hormone isolated from the stomach, releases growth hormone and stimulates appetite. Ghrelin is also expressed in pancreas, kidneys, cardiovascular system and in endothelial cells. The precise role of ghrelin in endothelial cell functions remains unknown. We examined the expression of ghrelin and its receptor (GHSR1) mRNAs and proteins in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) and determined whether ghrelin affects in these cells proliferation, migration and in vitro angiogenesis; and whether MAPK/ERK2 signaling is important for the latter action. We found that ghrelin and GHSR1 are constitutively expressed in HMVEC. Treatment of HMVEC with exogenous ghrelin significantly increased in these cells proliferation, migration, in vitro angiogenesis and ERK2 phosphorylation. MEK/ERK2 inhibitor, PD 98059 abolished ghrelin-induced in vitro angiogenesis. This is First demonstration that ghrelin and its receptor are expressed in human microvascular endothelial cells and that ghrelin stimulates HMVEC proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis through activation of ERK2 signaling.

  14. Liver cyst cytokines promote endothelial cell proliferation and development.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Kelley S; McWilliams, Ryan R; Amura, Claudia R; Barry, Nicholas P; Doctor, R Brian

    2009-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney (ADPKD) is highly prevalent genetic disease. Liver cyst disease is the most common extrarenal manifestation in ADPKD and accounts for up to 10% of ADPKD morbidity and mortality. The clinical features of ADPKD liver disease arise from dramatic increases in liver cyst volumes. To identify mechanisms that promote liver cyst growth, the present study characterized the degree of vascularization of liver cyst walls and determined that cyst-specific cytokines and growth factors can drive endothelial cell proliferation and development. Microscopic techniques demonstrated liver cyst walls are well vascularized. A comparative analysis found the vascular density in free liver cyst walls was greater in mice than in humans. Treatment of human micro-vascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) with human liver cyst fluid (huLCF) induced a rapid increase in vascular endothelium growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) phosphorylation that persisted for 45-60 min and was blocked by 20 microM SU5416, a VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Similarly, huLCF treatment of HMEC-1 cells induced an increase in the cell proliferation rate (131 +/- 6% of control levels; P > 0.05) and the degree of vascular development ('tube' diameter assay: 92 +/- 14 microm for huLCF vs. 12 +/- 7 microm for vehicle); P > 0.05). Both cell proliferation and vascular development were sensitive to SU5416. These studies indicate that factors secreted by liver cyst epithelia can activate VEGF signaling pathways and induce endothelial cell proliferation and differentiation. The present studies suggest that targeting VEGFR2-dependent angiogenesis may be an effective therapeutic strategy in blocking ADPKD liver cyst vascularization and growth. PMID:19596832

  15. Action of Shiga Toxin Type-2 and Subtilase Cytotoxin on Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, María M.; Sacerdoti, Flavia; Jancic, Carolina; Repetto, Horacio A.; Paton, Adrienne W.; Paton, James C.; Ibarra, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) associated with diarrhea is a complication of Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infection. In Argentina, HUS is endemic and responsible for acute and chronic renal failure in children younger than 5 years old. The human kidney is the most affected organ due to the presence of very Stx-sensitive cells, such as microvascular endothelial cells. Recently, Subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB) was proposed as a new toxin that may contribute to HUS pathogenesis, although its action on human glomerular endothelial cells (HGEC) has not been described yet. In this study, we compared the effects of SubAB with those caused by Stx2 on primary cultures of HGEC isolated from fragments of human pediatric renal cortex. HGEC were characterized as endothelial since they expressed von Willebrand factor (VWF) and platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1). HGEC also expressed the globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) receptor for Stx2. Both, Stx2 and SubAB induced swelling and detachment of HGEC and the consequent decrease in cell viability in a time-dependent manner. Preincubation of HGEC with C-9 −a competitive inhibitor of Gb3 synthesis-protected HGEC from Stx2 but not from SubAB cytotoxic effects. Stx2 increased apoptosis in a time-dependent manner while SubAB increased apoptosis at 4 and 6 h but decreased at 24 h. The apoptosis induced by SubAB relative to Stx2 was higher at 4 and 6 h, but lower at 24 h. Furthermore, necrosis caused by Stx2 was significantly higher than that induced by SubAB at all the time points evaluated. Our data provide evidence for the first time how SubAB could cooperate with the development of endothelial damage characteristic of HUS pathogenesis. PMID:23936204

  16. Effects of Fe particle irradiation on human endothelial barrier structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Preety; Guida, Peter; Grabham, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Space travel involves exposure to biologically effective heavy ion radiation and there is consequently a concern for possible degenerative disorders in humans. A significant target for radiation effects is the microvascular system, which is crucial to healthy functioning of the tissues. Its pathology is linked to disrupted endothelial barrier function and is not only a primary event in a range of degenerative diseases but also an important influencing factor in many others. Thus, an assessment of the effects of heavy ion radiation on endothelial barrier function would be useful for estimating the risks of space travel. This study was aimed at understanding the effects of high LET Fe particles (1 GeV/n) and is the first investigation of the effects of charged particles on the function of the human endothelial barrier. We used a set of established and novel endpoints to assess barrier function after exposure. These include, trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER), morphological effects, localization of adhesion and cell junction proteins (in 2D monolayers and in 3D tissue models), and permeability of molecules through the endothelial barrier. A dose of 0.50 Gy was sufficient to cause a progressive reduction in TEER measurements that were significant 48 hours after exposure. Concurrently, there were morphological changes and a 14% loss of cells from monolayers. Gaps also appeared in the normally continuous cell-border localization of the tight junction protein - ZO-1 but not the Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) in both monolayers and in 3D vessel models. Disruption of barrier function was confirmed by increased permeability to 3 kDa and 10 kDa dextran molecules. A dose of 0.25 Gy caused no detectible change in cell number, morphology, or TEER, but did cause barrier disruption since there were gaps in the cell border localization of ZO-1 and an increased permeability to 3 kDa dextran. These results indicate that Fe particles potently have

  17. Interleukin-33 stimulates GM-CSF and M-CSF production by human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Eliana; Stojkovic, Stefan; Kaun, Christoph; Lemberger, Christof E; de Martin, Rainer; Rauscher, Sabine; Gröger, Marion; Maurer, Gerald; Neumayer, Christoph; Huk, Ihor; Huber, Kurt; Demyanets, Svitlana; Wojta, Johann

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33, a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines, is involved in various inflammatory conditions targeting amongst other cells the endothelium. Besides regulating the maturation and functions of myeloid cells, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage-CSF (M-CSF) have been shown to play a role in such pathologies too. It was the aim of our study to investigate a possible influence of IL-33 on GM-CSF and M-CSF production by human endothelial cells. IL-33, but not IL-18 or IL-37, stimulated GM-CSF and M-CSF mRNA expression and protein production by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human coronary artery ECs (HCAECs) through the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathway in an IL-1-independent way. This effect was inhibited by the soluble form of ST2 (sST2), which is known to act as a decoy receptor for IL-33. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor fluvastatin could also be shown to moderately reduce the IL-33-mediated effect on M-CSF, but not on GM-CSF expression. In addition, IL-33, IL-1β, GM-CSF and M-CSF were detected in endothelial cells of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques using immunofluorescence. Upregulation of GM-CSF and M-CSF production by human endothelial cells, an effect that appears to be mediated by NF-κB and to be independent of IL-1, may be an additional mechanism through which IL-33 contributes to inflammatory activation of the vessel wall. PMID:27173404

  18. Nuclear p120 catenin unlocks mitotic block of contact-inhibited human corneal endothelial monolayers without disrupting adherent junctions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ying-Ting; Chen, Hung-Chi; Chen, Szu-Yu; Tseng, Scheffer C. G.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Contact inhibition ubiquitously exists in non-transformed cells that are in contact with neighboring cells. This phenomenon explains the poor regenerative capacity of in vivo human corneal endothelial cells during aging, injury and surgery. This study demonstrated that the conventional approach of expanding human corneal endothelial cells by disrupting contact inhibition with EDTA followed by bFGF activated canonical Wnt signaling and lost the normal phenotype to endothelial–mesenchymal transition, especially if TGFβ1 was added. By contrast, siRNA against p120 catenin (CTNND1) also uniquely promoted proliferation of the endothelial cells by activating trafficking of p120 catenin to the nucleus, thus relieving repression by nuclear Kaiso. This nuclear p120-catenin–Kaiso signaling is associated with activation of RhoA–ROCK signaling, destabilization of microtubules and inhibition of Hippo signaling, but not with activation of Wnt–β-catenin signaling. Consequently, proliferating human corneal endothelial cells maintained a hexagonal shape, with junctional expression of N-cadherin, ZO-1 and Na+/K+-ATPase. Further expansion of human corneal endothelial monolayers with a normal phenotype and a higher density was possible by prolonging treatment with p120 catenin siRNA followed by its withdrawal. This new strategy of perturbing contact inhibition by selective activation of p120-catenin–Kaiso signaling without disrupting adherent junction could be used to engineer surgical grafts containing normal human corneal endothelial cells to meet a global corneal shortage and for endothelial keratoplasties. PMID:22505615

  19. Neisseria meningitidis infection of human endothelial cells interferes with leukocyte transmigration by preventing the formation of endothelial docking structures

    PubMed Central

    Doulet, Nicolas; Donnadieu, Emmanuel; Laran-Chich, Marie-Pierre; Niedergang, Florence; Nassif, Xavier; Couraud, Pierre Olivier; Bourdoulous, Sandrine

    2006-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis elicits the formation of membrane protrusions on vascular endothelial cells, enabling its internalization and transcytosis. We provide evidence that this process interferes with the transendothelial migration of leukocytes. Bacteria adhering to endothelial cells actively recruit ezrin, moesin, and ezrin binding adhesion molecules. These molecules no longer accumulate at sites of leukocyte–endothelial contact, preventing the formation of the endothelial docking structures required for proper leukocyte diapedesis. Overexpression of exogenous ezrin or moesin is sufficient to rescue the formation of docking structures on and leukocyte migration through infected endothelial monolayers. Inversely, expression of the dominant-negative NH2-terminal domain of ezrin markedly inhibits the formation of docking structures and leukocyte diapedesis through noninfected monolayers. Ezrin and moesin thus appear as pivotal endothelial proteins required for leukocyte diapedesis that are titrated away by N. meningitidis. These results highlight a novel strategy developed by a bacterial pathogen to hamper the host inflammatory response by interfering with leukocyte–endothelial cell interaction. PMID:16717131

  20. Endothelial ischemia-reperfusion injury in humans: association with age and habitual exercise

    PubMed Central

    Umpierre, Daniel; Harrison, Michelle L.; Lin, Hsin-Fu; Tarumi, Takashi; Renzi, Christopher P.; Dhindsa, Mandeep; Hunter, Stacy D.; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2011-01-01

    Advancing age is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease. Endothelial dysfunction accompanied by increased oxidative stress and inflammation with aging may predispose older arteries to greater ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Because coronary artery ischemia cannot be induced safely, the effects of age and habitual endurance exercise on endothelial I/R injury have not been determined in humans. Using the brachial artery as a surrogate model of the coronary arteries, endothelial function, assessed by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), was measured before and after 20 min of continuous forearm occlusion in young sedentary (n = 10, 24 ± 2 yr) and middle-aged (n = 9, 48 ± 2 yr) sedentary adults to gain insight into the effects of primary aging on endothelial I/R injury. Young (n = 9, 25 ± 1 yr) and middle-aged endurance-trained (n = 9, 50 ± 2 yr) adults were also studied to determine whether habitual exercise provides protection from I/R injury. Fifteen minutes after ischemic injury, FMD decreased significantly by 37% in young sedentary, 35% in young endurance-trained, 68% in middle-aged sedentary, and 50% in middle-aged endurance-trained subjects. FMD returned to baseline levels within 30 min in young sedentary and endurance-trained subjects but remained depressed in middle-aged sedentary and endurance-trained subjects. Circulating markers of antioxidant capacity and inflammation were not related to FMD. In conclusion, advancing age is associated with a greater magnitude and delayed recovery from endothelial I/R injury in humans. Habitual endurance exercise may provide partial protection to the endothelium against this form of I/R injury with advancing age. PMID:21239631

  1. Organization and chromosomal localization of the human platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, K; Stenman, G; Honda, H; Sahlin, P; Andersson, A; Miyazono, K; Heldin, C H; Ishikawa, F; Takaku, F

    1991-01-01

    Human platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (hPD-ECGF) is a novel angiogenic factor which stimulates endothelial cell growth in vitro and promotes angiogenesis in vivo. We report here the cloning and sequencing of the gene for hPD-ECGF and its flanking regions. This gene is composed of 10 exons dispersed over a 4.3-kb region. Its promoter lacks a TATA box and a CCAAT box, structures characteristic of eukaryotic promoters. Instead, six copies of potential Sp1-binding sites (GGGCGG or CCGCCC) were clustered just upstream of the transcription start sites. Southern blot analysis using genomic DNAs from several vertebrates suggested that the gene for PD-ECGF is conserved phylogenetically among vertebrates. The gene for hPD-ECGF was localized to chromosome 22 by analysis of a panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrid lines. Images PMID:2005900

  2. Comparative immunochemical analysis of membrane proteins from human platelets and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, T; Pidard, D; Wautier, M P; Wautier, J L

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the expression of immunochemically-related membrane proteins on human platelets and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) by using cross-immunoprecipitation of 125I, surface-labeled cell extracts by cell-specific antisera, coupled to one- or two-dimensional SDS-PAGE. From 125I-labeled EC, an anti-platelet antiserum was found to immunoprecipitate major surface polypeptides comigrating with platelet GPIa, GPIIa and GPIIIa, and a protein with relative molecular mass Mr = 54,000. On the other hand, anti-EC antisera precipitated mostly GPIa, GPIc, GPIIa and GPIIIa from 125I-labeled platelets. These results supported previous reports demonstrating shared major membrane glycoproteins on platelets and EC, and suggested that the similar antigenicities in platelets and endothelial cells could play an important role in the pathogenesis of thrombosis and hemostasis in some immunologic disorders.

  3. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  4. Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell Interaction with Fluorine-Incorporated Amorphous Carbon Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Yukihiro; Hasebe, Terumitsu; Nagashima, So; Kamijo, Aki; Nakatani, Tatsuyuki; Yamagami, Takuji; Kitamura, Noriko; Kitagawa, Tomoya; Hotta, Atsushi; Takahashi, Koki; Suzuki, Tetsuya

    2012-09-01

    A major clinical concern in coronary intervention for cardiovascular disease is late stent thrombosis after the implantation of drug eluting stents (DES). DES widely used in clinical settings currently utilize polymer coatings, which can induce persistent arterial wall inflammation and delayed vascular healing, resulting in impaired endothelialization. We examined the viability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) for fluorine-incorporated amorphous carbon (a-C:H:F) coatings, which are known to be anti-thrombogenic. a-C:H:F and a-C:H were synthesized on the tissue culture dishes using radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition by varying the ratio of hexafluoroethane and acetylene. HUVECs were seeded on coated dishes for 6 days. The results indicate that the a-C:H:F surface does not disturb HUVEC proliferation in 6 days of culture and is promising for stent materials that allows the preservation of endothelialization, even if the fluorine concentration of a-C:H surface affects the early adhesion of endothelial cells.

  5. Microrheology and ROCK signaling of human endothelial cells embedded in a 3D matrix.

    PubMed

    Panorchan, Porntula; Lee, Jerry S H; Kole, Thomas P; Tseng, Yiider; Wirtz, Denis

    2006-11-01

    Cell function is profoundly affected by the geometry of the extracellular environment confining the cell. Whether and how cells plated on a two-dimensional matrix or embedded in a three-dimensional (3D) matrix mechanically sense the dimensionality of their environment is mostly unknown, partly because individual cells in an extended matrix are inaccessible to conventional cell-mechanics probes. Here we develop a functional assay based on multiple particle tracking microrheology coupled with ballistic injection of nanoparticles to measure the local intracellular micromechanical properties of individual cells embedded inside a matrix. With our novel assay, we probe the mechanical properties of the cytoplasm of individual human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) embedded in a 3D peptide hydrogel in the presence or absence of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We found that VEGF treatment, which enhances endothelial migration, increases the compliance and reduces the elasticity of the cytoplasm of HUVECs in a matrix. This VEGF-induced softening response of the cytoplasm is abrogated by specific Rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibition. These results establish combined particle-tracking microrheology and ballistic injection as the first method able to probe the micromechanical properties and mechanical response to agonists and/or drug treatments of individual cells inside a matrix. These results suggest that ROCK plays an essential role in the regulation of the intracellular mechanical response to VEGF of endothelial cells in a 3D matrix.

  6. Toxic effects of iron oxide nanoparticles on human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinying; Tan, Yanbin; Mao, Hui; Zhang, Minming

    2010-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been employed for hyperthermia treatments, stem cell therapies, cell labeling, and imaging modalities. The biocompatibility and cytotoxic effects of iron oxide nanoparticles when used in biomedical applications, however, are an ongoing concern. Endothelial cells have a critical role in this research dealing with tumors, cardiovascular disease and inflammation. However, there is little information dealing with the biologic effects of IONPs on the endothelial cell. This paper deals with the influence of dextran and citric acid coated IONPs on the behavior and function of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). After exposing endothelial cells to IONPs, dose-dependent effects on HUVECs viability, cytoskeleton and function were determined. Both citric acid and dextran coated particles appeared to be largely internalized by HUVECs through endocytosis and contribute to eventual cell death possibly by apoptosis. Cytoskeletal structures were greatly disrupted, as evidenced by diminished vinculin spots, and disorganized actin fiber and tubulin networks. The capacity of HUVECs to form a vascular network on Matrigel™ diminished after exposure to IONPs. Cell migration/invasion were inhibited significantly even at very low iron concentrations (0.1 mM). The results of this study indicate the great importance of thoroughly understanding nanoparticle-cell interactions, and the potential to exploit this understanding in tumor therapy applications involving IONPs as thermo/chemoembolization agents.

  7. p27 Nuclear localization and growth arrest caused by perlecan knockdown in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Katsuya; Oka, Kiyomasa; Matsumoto, Kunio; Nakamura, Toshikazu

    2010-02-12

    Perlecan, a secreted heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is a major component of the vascular basement membrane and participates in angiogenesis. Here, we used small interference RNA-mediated knockdown of perlecan expression to investigate the regulatory function of perlecan in the growth of human vascular endothelial cells. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced ERK phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression were unchanged by perlecan deficiency in endothelial cells; however, perlecan deficiency inhibited the Rb protein phosphorylation and DNA synthesis induced by bFGF. By contrast to cytoplasmic localization of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 in control endothelial cells, p27 was localized in the nucleus and its expression increased in perlecan-deficient cells, which suggests that p27 mediates inhibition of Rb phosphorylation. In addition to the well-characterized function of perlecan as a co-receptor for heparin-binding growth factors such as bFGF, our results suggest that perlecan plays an indispensible role in endothelial cell proliferation and acts through a mechanism that involves subcellular localization of p27.

  8. Human neural stem cell-induced endothelial morphogenesis requires autocrine/paracrine and juxtacrine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chung-Hsing; Modo, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Transplanted neural stem cells (NSC) interact with the host brain microenvironment. A neovascularization is commonly observed in the vicinity of the cell deposit, which is correlated with behavioral improvements. To elucidate the signaling mechanisms between human NSCs and endothelial cells (ECs), these were cocultured in an in vitro model in which NSC-induced endothelial morphogenesis produced a neurovascular environment. Soluble (autocrine/paracrine) and contact–mediated (juxtacrine) signaling molecules were evaluated for two conditionally immortalized fetal NSC lines derived from the cortical anlage (CTXOE03) and ganglionic eminence (STROC05), as well as an adult EC line (D3) derived from the cerebral microvasculature of a hippocampal biopsy. STROC05 were 4 times as efficient to induce endothelial morphogenesis compared to CTXOE03. The cascade of reciprocal interactions between NSCs and ECs in this process was determined by quantifying soluble factors, receptor mapping, and immunocytochemistry for extracellular matrix molecules. The mechanistic significance of these was further evaluated by pharmacological blockade. The sequential cell-specific regulation of autocrine/paracrine and juxtacrine signaling accounted for the differential efficiency of NSCs to induce endothelial morphogenesis. These in vitro studies shed new light on the reciprocal interactions between NSCs and ECs, which are pivotal for our mechanistic understanding of the efficacy of NSC transplantation. PMID:27374240

  9. Advanced oxidation protein products induce endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human renal glomerular endothelial cells through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiujie; Duan, Na; Wang, Yue; Shu, Shuangshuang; Xiang, Xiaohong; Guo, Tingting; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Shaojie; Tang, Xun; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) in renal glomerular endothelial cells plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Furthermore, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) have been shown to contribute to the progression of DN. However, whether AOPPs induce EndMT in renal glomerular endothelial cells remains unclear. Thus, we investigated the effect of AOPPs on human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs) and the mechanisms underlying the effects. Our results showed that AOPP treatment lowered the expression of vascular endothelial cadherin, CD31, and claudin 5 and induced the overexpression of α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, and fibroblast-specific protein 1, which indicated that AOPPs induced EndMT in HRGECs. Furthermore, AOPP stimulation increased the expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein, which suggested that AOPPs triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in HRGECs. Notably, the aforementioned AOPP effects were reversed following the treatment of cells with salubrinal, an inhibitor of ER stress, whereas the effects were reproduced after exposure to thapsigargin, an inducer of ER stress. Collectively, our results indicate that AOPPs trigger EndMT in HRGECs through the induction of ER stress. These findings suggest novel therapeutic strategies for inhibiting renal fibrosis by targeting ER stress.

  10. Advanced oxidation protein products induce endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human renal glomerular endothelial cells through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiujie; Duan, Na; Wang, Yue; Shu, Shuangshuang; Xiang, Xiaohong; Guo, Tingting; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Shaojie; Tang, Xun; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) in renal glomerular endothelial cells plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Furthermore, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) have been shown to contribute to the progression of DN. However, whether AOPPs induce EndMT in renal glomerular endothelial cells remains unclear. Thus, we investigated the effect of AOPPs on human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs) and the mechanisms underlying the effects. Our results showed that AOPP treatment lowered the expression of vascular endothelial cadherin, CD31, and claudin 5 and induced the overexpression of α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, and fibroblast-specific protein 1, which indicated that AOPPs induced EndMT in HRGECs. Furthermore, AOPP stimulation increased the expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein, which suggested that AOPPs triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in HRGECs. Notably, the aforementioned AOPP effects were reversed following the treatment of cells with salubrinal, an inhibitor of ER stress, whereas the effects were reproduced after exposure to thapsigargin, an inducer of ER stress. Collectively, our results indicate that AOPPs trigger EndMT in HRGECs through the induction of ER stress. These findings suggest novel therapeutic strategies for inhibiting renal fibrosis by targeting ER stress. PMID:26861949

  11. Monoclonal antibody to human endothelial cell surface internalization and liposome delivery in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Trubetskaya, O V; Trubetskoy, V S; Domogatsky, S P; Rudin, A V; Popov, N V; Danilov, S M; Nikolayeva, M N; Klibanov, A L; Torchilin, V P

    1988-02-01

    A monoclonal antibody (mAb), E25, is described that binds to the surface of cultured human endothelial cells. Upon binding E25 is rapidly internalized and digested intracellularly. Selective liposome targeting to the surface of the cells is performed using a biotinylated E25 antibody and an avidin-biotin system. Up to 30% of the cell-adherent liposomal lipid is internalized.

  12. Paracrine crosstalk between human hair follicle dermal papilla cells and microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bassino, Eleonora; Gasparri, Franco; Giannini, Valentina; Munaron, Luca

    2015-05-01

    Human follicle dermal papilla cells (FDPC) are a specialized population of mesenchymal cells located in the skin. They regulate hair follicle (HF) development and growth, and represent a reservoir of multipotent stem cells. Growing evidence supports the hypothesis that HF cycling is associated with vascular remodeling. Follicular keratinocytes release vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) that sustains perifollicular angiogenesis leading to an increase of follicle and hair size. Furthermore, several human diseases characterized by hair loss, including Androgenetic Alopecia, exhibit alterations of skin vasculature. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying HF vascularization remain largely unknown. In vitro coculture approaches can be successfully employed to greatly improve our knowledge and shed more light on this issue. Here we used Transwell-based co-cultures to show that FDPC promote survival, proliferation and tubulogenesis of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) more efficiently than fibroblasts. Accordingly, FDPC enhance the endothelial release of VEGF and IGF-1, two well-known proangiogenic growth factors. Collectively, our data suggest a key role of papilla cells in vascular remodeling of the hair follicle.

  13. Human Haemato-Endothelial Precursors: Cord Blood CD34+ Cells Produce Haemogenic Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Pelosi, Elvira; Castelli, Germana; Martin-Padura, Ines; Bordoni, Veronica; Santoro, Simona; Conigliaro, Alice; Cerio, Anna Maria; De Santis Puzzonia, Marco; Marighetti, Paola; Biffoni, Mauro; Alonzi, Tonino; Amicone, Laura; Alcalay, Myriam; Bertolini, Francesco; Testa, Ugo; Tripodi, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Embryologic and genetic evidence suggest a common origin of haematopoietic and endothelial lineages. In the murine embryo, recent studies indicate the presence of haemogenic endothelium and of a common haemato-endothelial precursor, the haemangioblast. Conversely, so far, little evidence supports the presence of haemogenic endothelium and haemangioblasts in later stages of development. Our studies indicate that human cord blood haematopoietic progenitors (CD34+45+144−), triggered by murine hepatocyte conditioned medium, differentiate into adherent proliferating endothelial precursors (CD144+CD105+CD146+CD31+CD45−) capable of functioning as haemogenic endothelium. These cells, proven to give rise to functional vasculature in vivo, if further instructed by haematopoietic growth factors, first switch to transitional CD144+45+ cells and then to haematopoietic cells. These results highlight the plasticity of haemato-endhothelial precursors in human post-natal life. Furthermore, these studies may provide highly enriched populations of human post-fetal haemogenic endothelium, paving the way for innovative projects at a basic and possibly clinical level. PMID:23226561

  14. Cyclic strain and motion control produce opposite oxidative responses in two human endothelial cell types.

    PubMed

    Sung, Hak-Joon; Yee, Andrew; Eskin, Suzanne G; McIntire, Larry V

    2007-07-01

    The phenotype of endothelial cells (ECs) is specific to the vascular bed from which they originate. To examine how mechanical forces alter the phenotype of different ECs, we compared the effects of cyclic strain and motion control on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and metabolism and cell adhesion molecule expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) vs. human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). HUVEC and HAEC were subjected to cyclic strain (10% or 20%, 1 Hz), to a motion control that simulated fluid agitation over the cells without strain, or to static conditions for 24 h. We measured H(2)O(2) production with dichlorodihydrofluorescein acetate and superoxide with dihydroethidium fluorescence changes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities spectrophotometrically; and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 protein expression with Western blot analyses. HUVEC under cyclic strain showed 1) higher intracellular H(2)O(2) levels, 2) increased SOD, catalase, and GPx activities, and 3) greater VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 protein expression, compared with motion control or static conditions. However, in HAEC, motion control induced higher levels of ROS, enzyme activities associated with ROS defense, and VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression than cyclic strain. The opposite responses obtained with these two human EC types may reflect their vessels of origin, in that HAEC are subjected to higher cyclic strain deformations in vivo than HUVEC.

  15. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A (VEGF-A) Mediates Activin A-Induced Human Trophoblast Endothelial-Like Tube Formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhu, Hua; Klausen, Christian; Peng, Bo; Leung, Peter C K

    2015-11-01

    Remodeling of maternal spiral arteries during pregnancy requires a subpopulation of extravillous cytotrophoblasts (EVTs) to differentiate into endovascular EVTs. Activin A, which is abundantly expressed at the maternal-fetal interface, has been shown to promote trophoblast invasion, but its role in endovascular differentiation remains unknown. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is well recognized as a key regulator in trophoblast endovascular differentiation. Whether and how activin A might regulate VEGF-A production in human trophoblasts and its relationship to endovascular differentiation have yet to be determined. In the present study, we found that activin A increased VEGF-A production in primary and immortalized (HTR8/SVneo) human EVT cells. In addition, activin A enhanced HTR8/SVneo endothelial-like tube formation, and these effects were attenuated by pretreatment with small interfering RNA targeting VEGF-A or the VEGF receptor 1/2 inhibitor SU4312. Pretreatment with the activin/TGF-β type 1 receptor (ALK4/5/7) inhibitor SB431542 abolished the stimulatory effects of activin A on phosphorylated mothers against decapentaplegic (SMAD)-2/3 phosphorylation, VEGF-A production, and endothelial-like tube formation. Moreover, small interfering RNA-mediated down-regulation of SMAD2, SMAD3, or common SMAD4 abolished the effects of activin A on VEGF-A production and endothelial-like tube formation. In conclusion, activin A may promote human trophoblast cell endothelial-like tube formation by up-regulating VEGF-A production in an SMAD2/3-SMAD4-dependent manner. These findings provide insight into the cellular and molecular events regulated by activin A during human implantation. PMID:26327470

  16. Contradictory Effects of Superoxide and Hydrogen Peroxide on KCa3.1 in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Shinkyu; Na, Hye-Young; Kim, Ji Aee; Cho, Sung-Eun

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated in various cells, including vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells, and regulate ion channel functions. KCa3.1 plays an important role in endothelial functions. However, the effects of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide radicals on the expression of this ion channel in the endothelium remain unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of ROS donors on KCa3.1 expression and the K+ current in primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The hydrogen peroxide donor, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP), upregulated KCa3.1 expression, while the superoxide donors, xanthine/xanthine oxidase mixture (X/XO) and lysopho-sphatidylcholine (LPC), downregulated its expression, in a concentration-dependent manner. These ROS donor effects were prevented by antioxidants or superoxide dismustase. Phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) was upregulated by TBHP and downregulated by X/XO. In addition, repressor element-1-silencing transcription factor (REST) was downregulated by TBHP, and upregulated by X/XO. Furthermore, KCa3.1 current, which was activated by clamping cells with 1 µM Ca2+ and applying the KCa3.1 activator 1-ethyl-2-benzimidazolinone, was further augmented by TBHP, and inhibited by X/XO. These effects were prevented by antioxidants. The results suggest that hydrogen peroxide increases KCa3.1 expression by upregulating pERK and downregulating REST, and augments the K+ current. On the other hand, superoxide reduces KCa3.1 expression by downregulating pERK and upregulating REST, and inhibits the K+ current. ROS thereby play a key role in both physiological and pathological processes in endothelial cells by regulating KCa3.1 and endothelial function. PMID:23776393

  17. Effects of Recombinant Human Erythropoietin on Resistance Artery Endothelial Function in Stage 4 Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Briet, Marie; Barhoumi, Tlili; Mian, Muhammad Oneeb Rehman; Sierra, Cristina; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Davidman, Michael; Bercovitch, David; Nessim, Sharon J.; Frisch, Gershon; Paradis, Pierre; Lipman, Mark L.; Schiffrin, Ernesto L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have raised concern about the safety of erythropoiesis‐stimulating agents because of evidence of increased risk of hypertension and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. In the present study, we investigated the effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) on endothelial function of gluteal subcutaneous resistance arteries isolated from 17 stage 4 patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate 21.9±7.4 mL/min per 1.73 m2) aged 63±13 years. Methods and Results Arteries were mounted on a pressurized myograph. EPO impaired endothelium‐dependent relaxation in a concentration‐dependent manner. The maximal response to acetylcholine with EPO at 1, 10, and 20 IU/mL was reduced by 12%, 34%, and 43%, respectively, compared with the absence of EPO (P<0.001). EPO‐induced endothelial dysfunction was significantly associated with carotid stiffness and history of cardiovascular events. EPO had no effect on norepinephrine‐induced vasoconstriction or sodium nitroprusside–induced relaxation. ABT‐627, an endothelin type A receptor antagonist, and tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic, partially reversed the altered endothelial function in the presence of EPO (P<0.01). Increased expression of endothelin‐1 was found in the vessel wall after incubation with EPO. Conclusions EPO alters endothelial function of resistance arteries in CKD patients via a mechanism involving in part oxidative stress and signaling through an endothelin type A receptor. EPO‐induced endothelial dysfunction could contribute to deleterious effects of EPO described in large interventional trials. PMID:23584809

  18. Induction of stearoyl-CoA desaturase protects human arterial endothelial cells against lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Peter, Andreas; Weigert, Cora; Staiger, Harald; Rittig, Kilian; Cegan, Alexander; Lutz, Philipp; Machicao, Fausto; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Schleicher, Erwin

    2008-08-01

    Endothelial lipotoxicity has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple stages of cardiovascular disease from early endothelial dysfunction to manifest atherosclerosis and its complications. Saturated free fatty acids are the major inducers of endothelial cell apoptosis and inflammatory cytokines. In humans, the enzyme human stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (hSCD-1) is the limiting step of the desaturation of saturated to monounsaturated fatty acids. Since we could demonstrate the expression of SCD-1 in primary human arterial endothelial cells (HAECs), we aimed to prove a beneficial role of upregulated hSCD-1 expression. In contrast to other cells that are less susceptible to lipotoxicity, hSCD-1 was not upregulated in HAECs upon palmitate treatment. Following that, we could show that upregulation of hSCD-1 using the LXR activator TO-901317 in HAECs protects the cells against palmitate-induced lipotoxicity, cell apoptosis, and expression of inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. Increased hSCD-1 activity was determined as increased C16:1/16:0 ratio and enhanced triglyceride storage in palmitate treated cells. The beneficial effect was clearly attributed to enhanced hSCD-1 activity. Overexpression of hSCD-1 blocked palmitate-induced cytotoxicity, and knockdown of hSCD-1 using siRNA abolished the protective effect of TO-901317 in HEK-293 cells. Additionally, inhibition of hSCD-1 with 10/12 CLA blocked the effect of TO-901317 on palmitate-induced lipotoxicity, cell apoptosis, and inflammatory cytokine induction in HAECs. We conclude that upregulation of hSCD-1 leads to a desaturation of saturated fatty acids and facilitates their esterification and storage, thereby preventing downstream effects of lipotoxicity in HAECs. These findings add a novel aspect to the atheroprotective actions of LXR activators in cardiovascular disease.

  19. A novel adipocytokine, chemerin exerts anti-inflammatory roles in human vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamawaki, Hideyuki; Kameshima, Satoshi; Usui, Tatsuya; Okada, Muneyoshi; Hara, Yukio

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin is a novel adipocytokine with almost unknown function in vasculature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin activates Akt/eNOS/NO pathways in endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin inhibits TNF-induced VCAM-1 via suppressing NF-{kappa}B and p38 signal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin is anti-inflammatory through producing NO in vascular endothelium. -- Abstract: Chemerin is a recently identified adipocytokine which plays a role on inflammation and adipocytes metabolism. However, its function in vasculature is largely unknown. We examined the effects of chemerin on vascular endothelial inflammatory states. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with chemerin (300 ng/ml, 20 min) induced phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) and endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) (Ser1177). Consistently, chemerin increased intracellular cyclic GMP content. Pretreatment with chemerin (1-300 ng/ml, 24 h) significantly inhibited phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B p65 (Ser536) and p38 as well as vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 expression induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} (5 ng/ml, 20 min-6 h). Inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B or p38 significantly inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression. Chemerin also inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression in rat isolated aorta. Moreover, chemerin significantly inhibited monocytes adhesion to TNF-{alpha}-stimulated endothelial cells. The inhibitory effect of chemerin on TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 was reversed by a NOS inhibitor. Conversely, an NO donor, sodium nitroprusside significantly inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1. The present results for the first time demonstrate that chemerin plays anti-inflammatory roles by preventing TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocytes adhesion in vascular

  20. Binding of ATP to vascular endothelial growth factor isoform VEGF-A165 is essential for inducing proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background ATP binding is essential for the bioactivity of several growth factors including nerve growth factor, fibroblast growth factor-2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Vascular endothelial growth factor isoform 165 (VEGF-A165) induces the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, however a dependence on ATP-binding is currently unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine if ATP binding is essential for the bioactivity of VEGF-A165. Results We found evidence that ATP binding toVEGF-A165 induced a conformational change in the secondary structure of the growth factor. This binding appears to be significant at the biological level, as we found evidence that nanomolar levels of ATP (4-8 nm) are required for the VEGF-A165-induced proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. At these levels, purinergic signaling by ATP via P2 receptors can be excluded. Addition of alkaline phosphate to cell culture lowered the ATP concentration in the cell culture medium to 1.8 nM and inhibited cell proliferation. Conclusions We propose that proliferation of endothelial cells is induced by a VEGF-A165-ATP complex, rather than VEGF-A165 alone. PMID:21619628

  1. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Platelet (PF-4) Factor 4 Inputs Modulate Human Microvascular Endothelial Signaling in a Three-Dimensional Matrix Migration Context*

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Ta-Chun; Tedford, Nathan C.; Reddy, Raven J.; Rimchala, Tharathorn; Wells, Alan; White, Forest M.; Kamm, Roger D.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The process of angiogenesis is under complex regulation in adult organisms, particularly as it often occurs in an inflammatory post-wound environment. As such, there are many impacting factors that will regulate the generation of new blood vessels which include not only pro-angiogenic growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor, but also angiostatic factors. During initial postwound hemostasis, a large initial bolus of platelet factor 4 is released into localized areas of damage before progression of wound healing toward tissue homeostasis. Because of its early presence and high concentration, the angiostatic chemokine platelet factor 4, which can induce endothelial anoikis, can strongly affect angiogenesis. In our work, we explored signaling crosstalk interactions between vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet factor 4 using phosphotyrosine-enriched mass spectrometry methods on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells cultured under conditions facilitating migratory sprouting into collagen gel matrices. We developed new methods to enable mass spectrometry-based phosphorylation analysis of primary cells cultured on collagen gels, and quantified signaling pathways over the first 48 h of treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor in the presence or absence of platelet factor 4. By observing early and late signaling dynamics in tandem with correlation network modeling, we found that platelet factor 4 has significant crosstalk with vascular endothelial growth factor by modulating cell migration and polarization pathways, centered around P38α MAPK, Src family kinases Fyn and Lyn, along with FAK. Interestingly, we found EphA2 correlational topology to strongly involve key migration-related signaling nodes after introduction of platelet factor 4, indicating an influence of the angiostatic factor on this ambiguous but generally angiogenic signal in this complex environment. PMID:24023389

  2. C. pneumoniae disrupts eNOS trafficking and impairs NO production in human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Konrad E; Wolf, Katerina

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) generated NO plays a crucial physiological role in the regulation of vascular tone. eNOS is a constitutively expressed synthase whose enzymatic function is regulated by dual acylation, phosphorylation, protein-protein interaction and subcellular localization. In endothelial cells, the enzyme is primarily localized to the Golgi apparatus (GA) and the plasma membrane where it binds to caveolin-1. Upon stimulation, the enzyme is translocated from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm where it generates NO. When activation of eNOS ceases, the majority of the enzyme is recycled back to the membrane fraction. An inability of eNOS to cycle between the cytosol and the membrane leads to impaired NO production and vascular dysfunction. Chlamydia pneumoniae is a Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterium that primarily infects epithelial cells of the human respiratory tract, but unlike any other chlamydial species, C. pneumoniae displays tropism toward atherosclerotic tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that C. pneumoniae inclusions colocalize with eNOS, and the microorganism interferes with trafficking of the enzyme from the GA to the plasma membrane in primary human aortic endothelial cells. This mislocation of eNOS results in significant inhibition of NO release by C. pneumoniae-infected cells. Furthermore, we show that the distribution of eNOS in C. pneumoniae-infected cells is altered due to an intimate association of the Golgi complex with chlamydial inclusions rather than by direct interaction of the enzyme with the chlamydial inclusion membrane.

  3. Slit2-Robo4 receptor responses inhibit ANDV directed permeability of human lung microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gorbunova, Elena E; Gavrilovskaya, Irina N; Mackow, Erich R

    2013-08-01

    Hantaviruses nonlytically infect human endothelial cells (ECs) and cause edematous and hemorrhagic diseases. Andes virus (ANDV) causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), and Hantaan virus (HTNV) causes hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Hantaviruses enhance vascular endothelial growth factor directed EC permeability resulting in the disassembly of inter-endothelial cell adherens junctions (AJs). Recent studies demonstrate that Slit2 binding to Robo1/Robo4 receptors on ECs has opposing effects on AJ disassembly and vascular fluid barrier functions. Here we demonstrate that Slit2 inhibits ANDV and HTNV induced permeability and AJ disassembly of pulmonary microvascular ECs (PMECs) by interactions with Robo4. In contrast, Slit2 had no effect on the permeability of ANDV infected human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs). Analysis of Robo1/Robo4 expression determined that PMECs express Robo4, but not Robo1, while HUVECs expressed both Robo4 and Robo1 receptors. SiRNA knockdown of Robo4 in PMECs prevented Slit2 inhibition of ANDV induced permeability demonstrating that Robo4 receptors determine PMEC responsiveness to Slit2. Collectively, this data demonstrates a selective role for Slit2/Robo4 responses within PMECs that inhibits ANDV induced permeability and AJ disassembly. These findings suggest Slit2s utility as a potential HPS therapeutic that stabilizes the pulmonary endothelium and antagonizes ANDV induced pulmonary edema.

  4. Successful silencing of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in human vascular endothelial cells using small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Hecke, Anneke; Brooks, Hilary; Meryet-Figuière, Matthieu; Minne, Stephanie; Konstantinides, Stavros; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Lebleu, Bernard; Schäfer, Katrin

    2006-05-01

    Clinical as well as experimental evidence suggests that vascular overexpression of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, the primary physiological inhibitor of both urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator, may be involved in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. We investigated the feasibility, efficacy and functional effects of PAI-1 gene silencing in human vascular endothelial cells using small interfering RNA. Double-stranded 21 bp-RNA molecules targeted at sequences within the human PAI-1 gene were constructed. Successful siRNA transfection of HUVEC was confirmed using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. One of five candidate siRNA sequences reduced PAI-1 mRNA and protein in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Suppression of PAI-1 mRNA was detected up to 72 hours after transfection. Moreover, siRNA treatment reduced the activity of PAI-1 released from HUVEC, and prevented the oxLDL- or LPS-induced upregulation of PAI-1 secretion. Importantly, siRNA treatment did not affect the expression of other endothelial-cell markers. Moreover, downregulation of PAI-1 significantly enhanced the ability of endothelial cells to adhere to vitronectin, and this effect could be reversed upon addition of recombinant PAI-1. SiRNA-mediated reduction of PAI-1 expression may be a promising strategy for dissecting the effects of PAI-1 on vascular homeostasis.

  5. Hemeoxygenase-1 Mediates an Adaptive Response to Spermidine-Induced Cell Death in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hana; Lee, Seung Eun; Kim, Gun-Dong; Park, Hye Rim; Park, Yong Seek

    2013-01-01

    Spermidine (SPD) is a ubiquitous polycation that is commonly distributed in living organisms. Intracellular levels of SPD are tightly regulated, and SPD controls cell proliferation and death. However, SPD undergoes oxidation in the presence of serum, producing aldehydes, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonia, which exert cytotoxic effect on cells. Hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) is thought to have a protective effect against oxidative stress. Upregulation of HO-1 in endothelial cells is considered to be beneficial in the cardiovascular disease. In the present study, we demonstrate that the ubiquitous polyamine, SPD, induces HO-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). SPD-induced HO-1 expression was examined by Western blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Involvement of reactive oxygen species, serum amine oxidase, PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, and transcription factor Nrf2 in the induction of HO-1 by SPD was also investigated. Furthermore, small interfering RNA knockdown of Nrf2 or HO-1 and treatment with the specific HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP exhibited a noteworthy increase of death of SPD-stimulated HUVECs. In conclusion, these results suggest that SPD induces PI3K/Akt-Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression in human endothelial cells, which may have a role in cytoprotection of the cells against oxidative stress-induced death. PMID:23983896

  6. Endothelin B receptors on human endothelial and smooth-muscle cells show equivalent binding pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Flynn, M A; Haleen, S J; Welch, K M; Cheng, X M; Reynolds, E E

    1998-07-01

    We have described the pharmacologic profiles of endothelin B receptors in human endothelial cells and vascular and nonvascular smooth-muscle cells. First, by amplifying endothelin B receptor numbers through the use of phosphoramidon and intact cell-binding techniques, we demonstrated the presence of these receptors in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (100% endothelin B receptors), human aortic smooth-muscle cells (22% endothelin B, 78% endothelin A receptors), and human bronchial smooth-muscle cells (55% endothelin B, 45% endothelin A receptors) by using [125I]-endothelin-1 radioligand binding. The typical binding profiles of the endothelin B receptors were established through competition binding curve analysis with endothelin-1, endothelin-3, sarafotoxin 6c, and the endothelin A receptor-selective antagonist BQ-123. In the presence of BQ-123, a diverse group of antagonists, including PD 142893, BQ-788, SB 209670, and Ro 47-0203, were used to probe for binding differences indicative of multiple endothelin B-receptor subtypes. The results indicate a rank order of potency for the antagonists of BQ-788 > SB 209670 > PD 142893 > Ro 47-0203 for each cell line, and that between any of these human cell lines, measurements of [125I]-endothelin-1-binding antagonism for each of the four test compounds differed by less than twofold. Although this study cannot discount the possibility of more than one endothelin B-receptor subtype in humans, it does indicate that these tissues express receptors that show equivalent binding pharmacology. PMID:9676729

  7. A role for GPR55 in human placental venous endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kremshofer, Julia; Siwetz, Monika; Berghold, Veronika M; Lang, Ingrid; Huppertz, Berthold; Gauster, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Endocannabinoids and their G protein-coupled receptors have been suggested to play a key role in human pregnancy, by regulating important aspects such as implantation, decidualization, placentation and labor. G protein-coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) was previously postulated to be another cannabinoid receptor, since specific cannabinoids were shown to act independently of the classical cannabinoid receptors CB1 or CB2. Current knowledge about GPR55 expression and function in human placenta is very limited and motivated us to evaluate human placental GPR55 expression in relation to other human peripheral tissues and to analyze spatiotemporal GPR55 expression in human placenta. Gene expression analysis revealed low GPR55 levels in human placenta, when compared to spleen and lung, the organs showing highest GPR55 expression. Moreover, expression analysis showed 5.8 fold increased placental GPR55 expression at term compared to first trimester. Immunohistochemistry located GPR55 solely at the fetal endothelium of first trimester and term placentas. qPCR and immunocytochemistry consistently confirmed GPR55 expression in isolated primary placental arterial and venous endothelial cells. Incubation with L-α-lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), the specific and functional ligand for GPR55, at a concentration of 1 µM, significantly enhanced migration of venous, but not arterial endothelial cells. LPI-enhanced migration was inhibited by the GPR55 antagonist O-1918, suggesting a role of the LPI-GPR55 axis in placental venous endothelium function. PMID:25869640

  8. Therapeutic transdifferentiation of human fibroblasts into endothelial cells using forced expression of lineage-specific transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wing Tak; Cooke, John P

    2016-01-01

    Transdifferentiation is the direct conversion from one somatic cell type into another desired somatic cell type. This reprogramming method offers an attractive approach for regenerative medicine. Here, we demonstrate that neonatal fibroblasts can be transdifferentiated into endothelial cells using only four endothelial transcription factors, namely, ETV2, FLI1, GATA2, and KLF4. We observed a significant up-regulation of endothelial genes including KDR, CD31, CD144, and vWF in human neonatal foreskin (BJ) fibroblasts infected with the lentiviral construct encoding the open reading frame of the four transcription factors. We observed morphological changes in BJ fibroblasts from the fibroblastic spindle shape into a more endothelial-like cobblestone structures. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed that ~16% of the infected cells with the lentiviral constructs encoding 4F expressed CD31. The sorted cells were allowed to expand for 2 weeks and these cells were immunostained and found to express endothelial markers CD31. The induced endothelial cells also incorporated fluorescence-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein and efficiently formed capillary-like networks when seeded on Matrigel. These results suggested that the induced endothelial cells were functional in vitro. Taken together, we successfully demonstrated the direct conversion of human neonatal fibroblasts into endothelial cells by transduction of lentiviral constructs encoding endothelial lineage-specific transcription factors ETV2, FLI1, GATA2, and KLF4. The directed differentiation of fibroblasts into endothelial cells may have significant utility in diseases characterized by fibrosis and loss of microvasculature. PMID:27081470

  9. Magnetic particle spectroscopy allows precise quantification of nanoparticles after passage through human brain microvascular endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, C.; Slabu, I.; Wiekhorst, F.; Bergemann, C.; von Eggeling, F.; Hochhaus, A.; Trahms, L.; Clement, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Crossing the blood-brain barrier is an urgent requirement for the treatment of brain disorders. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are a promising tool as carriers for therapeutics because of their physical properties, biocompatibility, and their biodegradability. In order to investigate the interaction of nanoparticles with endothelial cell layers in detail, in vitro systems are of great importance. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells are a well-suited blood-brain barrier model. Apart from generating optimal conditions for the barrier-forming cell units, the accurate detection and quantification of SPIONs is a major challenge. For that purpose we use magnetic particle spectroscopy to sensitively and directly quantify the SPION-specific iron content. We could show that SPION concentration depends on incubation time, nanoparticle concentration and location. This model system allows for further investigations on particle uptake and transport at cellular barriers with regard to parameters including particles’ shape, material, size, and coating.

  10. Magnetic particle spectroscopy allows precise quantification of nanoparticles after passage through human brain microvascular endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, C.; Slabu, I.; Wiekhorst, F.; Bergemann, C.; von Eggeling, F.; Hochhaus, A.; Trahms, L.; Clement, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Crossing the blood–brain barrier is an urgent requirement for the treatment of brain disorders. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are a promising tool as carriers for therapeutics because of their physical properties, biocompatibility, and their biodegradability. In order to investigate the interaction of nanoparticles with endothelial cell layers in detail, in vitro systems are of great importance. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells are a well-suited blood–brain barrier model. Apart from generating optimal conditions for the barrier-forming cell units, the accurate detection and quantification of SPIONs is a major challenge. For that purpose we use magnetic particle spectroscopy to sensitively and directly quantify the SPION-specific iron content. We could show that SPION concentration depends on incubation time, nanoparticle concentration and location. This model system allows for further investigations on particle uptake and transport at cellular barriers with regard to parameters including particles’ shape, material, size, and coating.

  11. Magnetic particle spectroscopy allows precise quantification of nanoparticles after passage through human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gräfe, C; Slabu, I; Wiekhorst, F; Bergemann, C; von Eggeling, F; Hochhaus, A; Trahms, L; Clement, J H

    2016-06-01

    Crossing the blood-brain barrier is an urgent requirement for the treatment of brain disorders. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are a promising tool as carriers for therapeutics because of their physical properties, biocompatibility, and their biodegradability. In order to investigate the interaction of nanoparticles with endothelial cell layers in detail, in vitro systems are of great importance. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells are a well-suited blood-brain barrier model. Apart from generating optimal conditions for the barrier-forming cell units, the accurate detection and quantification of SPIONs is a major challenge. For that purpose we use magnetic particle spectroscopy to sensitively and directly quantify the SPION-specific iron content. We could show that SPION concentration depends on incubation time, nanoparticle concentration and location. This model system allows for further investigations on particle uptake and transport at cellular barriers with regard to parameters including particles' shape, material, size, and coating. PMID:27163489

  12. Efficient nanoparticle mediated sustained RNA interference in human primary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mukerjee, Anindita; Shankardas, Jwalitha; Ranjan, Amalendu P; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K

    2011-11-01

    Endothelium forms an important target for drug and/or gene therapy since endothelial cells play critical roles in angiogenesis and vascular functions and are associated with various pathophysiological conditions. RNA mediated gene silencing presents a new therapeutic approach to overcome many such diseases, but the major challenge of such an approach is to ensure minimal toxicity and effective transfection efficiency of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to primary endothelial cells. In the present study, we formulated shAnnexin A2 loaded poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles which produced intracellular small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Annexin A2 and brought about the downregulation of Annexin A2. The per cent encapsulation of the plasmid within the nanoparticle was found to be 57.65%. We compared our nanoparticle based transfections with Lipofectamine mediated transfection, and our studies show that nanoparticle based transfection efficiency is very high (~97%) and is more sustained compared to conventional Lipofectamine mediated transfections in primary retinal microvascular endothelial cells and human cancer cell lines. Our findings also show that the shAnnexin A2 loaded PLGA nanoparticles had minimal toxicity with almost 95% of cells being viable 24 h post-transfection while Lipofectamine based transfections resulted in only 30% viable cells. Therefore, PLGA nanoparticle based transfection may be used for efficient siRNA transfection to human primary endothelial and cancer cells. This may serve as a potential adjuvant treatment option for diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and age related macular degeneration besides various cancers.

  13. Efficient nanoparticle mediated sustained RNA interference in human primary endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukerjee, Anindita; Shankardas, Jwalitha; Ranjan, Amalendu P.; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.

    2011-11-01

    Endothelium forms an important target for drug and/or gene therapy since endothelial cells play critical roles in angiogenesis and vascular functions and are associated with various pathophysiological conditions. RNA mediated gene silencing presents a new therapeutic approach to overcome many such diseases, but the major challenge of such an approach is to ensure minimal toxicity and effective transfection efficiency of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to primary endothelial cells. In the present study, we formulated shAnnexin A2 loaded poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles which produced intracellular small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Annexin A2 and brought about the downregulation of Annexin A2. The per cent encapsulation of the plasmid within the nanoparticle was found to be 57.65%. We compared our nanoparticle based transfections with Lipofectamine mediated transfection, and our studies show that nanoparticle based transfection efficiency is very high (~97%) and is more sustained compared to conventional Lipofectamine mediated transfections in primary retinal microvascular endothelial cells and human cancer cell lines. Our findings also show that the shAnnexin A2 loaded PLGA nanoparticles had minimal toxicity with almost 95% of cells being viable 24 h post-transfection while Lipofectamine based transfections resulted in only 30% viable cells. Therefore, PLGA nanoparticle based transfection may be used for efficient siRNA transfection to human primary endothelial and cancer cells. This may serve as a potential adjuvant treatment option for diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and age related macular degeneration besides various cancers.

  14. Role of asymmetrical dimethylarginine in inflammation-induced endothelial dysfunction in human atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Antoniades, Charalambos; Demosthenous, Michael; Tousoulis, Dimitris; Antonopoulos, Alexios S; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Toutouza, Marina; Marinou, Kyriakoula; Bakogiannis, Constantinos; Mavragani, Kleio; Lazaros, George; Koumallos, Nikolaos; Triantafyllou, Costas; Lymperiadis, Dimitris; Koutsilieris, Michael; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2011-07-01

    We explored the role of asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA) as a cause of endothelial dysfunction induced by systemic inflammation. In vitro data suggest that ADMA bioavailability is regulated by proinflammatory stimuli, but it is unclear whether ADMA is a link between inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in humans. In study 1 we recruited 351 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and 87 healthy controls. In study 2 we recruited 69 CAD, 69 healthy, and 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, whereas in study 3, 22 healthy and 70 CAD subjects were randomly assigned to Salmonella typhii vaccination (n=11 healthy and n=60 CAD) or placebo (n=11 healthy and n=10 CAD). Circulating interleukin 6/ADMA and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) were measured at 0 and 8 hours. In study 1, ADMA was inversely correlated with FMD in healthy individuals and CAD patients (P<0.0001 for both). However, interleukin 6 was inversely correlated with FMD (P<0.0001) in healthy subjects but not in CAD patients. The positive correlation between ADMA and interleukin 6 was stronger in healthy (r=0.515; P<0.0001) compared with CAD (r=0.289; P=0.0001) subjects. In study 2, both patients with rheumatoid arthritis and CAD had higher interleukin 6 (P<0.0001) and ADMA (P=0.004) but lower FMD (P=0.001) versus healthy subjects. In study 3, vaccination increased interleukin 6 in healthy (P<0.001) and CAD (P<0.001) subjects. FMD was reduced in healthy subjects (P<0.05), but its reduction in CAD was borderline. Vaccination increased ADMA only in healthy subjects (P<0.001). Systemic, low-grade inflammation leads to increased ADMA that may induce endothelial dysfunction. This study demonstrated that ADMA may be a link between inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in humans.

  15. Klotho modulates FGF23-mediated NO synthesis and oxidative stress in human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Richter, Beatrice; Haller, Jacqueline; Haffner, Dieter; Leifheit-Nestler, Maren

    2016-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a state of Klotho deficiency and excess of the phosphaturic hormone fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). Both dysregulations were shown to be associated with endothelial dysfunction in humans, but direct vascular effects of FGF23 remain largely elusive. In vitro experiments were performed to assess the effects of FGF23 (10 ng/mL) in relation to its co-receptor Klotho on nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and detoxification in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC). Membrane-bound Klotho is expressed in HCAEC, and FGF23 increases the expression of the Klotho shedding protease ADAM17, and consequently the secretion of soluble Klotho. FGF23 activates FGF receptor 1 and stimulates NO release via Akt-dependent activation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Both FGF receptor (FGFR)-dependent ROS formation via activation of NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2) as well as ROS degradation via superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and catalase (CAT) is stimulated by FGF23. Pre-incubation with a Klotho inhibitor blunts the FGF23-stimulated Akt-eNOS activation and NO synthesis, and decreases ROS degradation by blocking SOD2 and CAT enzymes, whereas FGF23-stimulated ROS synthesis via Nox2 is unaffected, resulting in low NO bioavailability and increased oxidative stress. Our data indicate that in the presence of Klotho, FGF23 induces NO release in HCAEC and its stimulating effects on ROS production are counterbalanced by increased ROS degradation. In states of Klotho deficiency, e.g., CKD, FGF23-mediated NO synthesis is blunted and ROS formation overrules ROS degradation. Thus, FGF23 excess may primarily promote oxidative stress and thus endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27448998

  16. Regulation of human heme oxygenase in endothelial cells by using sense and antisense retroviral constructs.

    PubMed

    Quan, S; Yang, L; Abraham, N G; Kappas, A

    2001-10-01

    Our objective was to determine whether overexpression and underexpression of human heme oxygenase (HHO)-1 could be controlled on a long-term basis by introduction of the HO-1 gene in sense (S) and antisense (AS) orientation with an appropriate vector into endothelial cells. Retroviral vector (LXSN) containing viral long terminal repeat promoter-driven human HO-1 S (LSN-HHO-1) and LXSN vectors containing HHO-1 promoter (HOP)-controlled HHO-1 S and AS (LSN-HOP-HHO-1 and LSN-HOP-HHO-1-AS) sequences were constructed and used to transfect rat lung microvessel endothelial cells (RLMV cells) and human dermal microvessel endothelial cells (HMEC-1 cells). RLMV cells transduced with HHO-1 S expressed human HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein associated with elevation in total HO activity compared with nontransduced cells. Vector-mediated expression of HHO-1 S or AS under control of HOP resulted in effective production of HO-1 or blocked induction of endogenous human HO-1 in HMEC-1 cells, respectively. Overexpression of HO-1 AS was associated with a long-term decrease (45%) of endogenous HO-1 protein and an increase (167%) in unmetabolized exogenous heme in HMEC-1 cells. Carbon monoxide (CO) production in HO-1 S- or AS-transduced HMEC-1 cells after heme treatment was increased (159%) or decreased (50%), respectively, compared with nontransduced cells. HO-2 protein levels did not change. These findings demonstrate that HHO-1 S and AS retroviral constructs are functional in enhancing and reducing HO activity, respectively, and thus can be used to regulate cellular heme levels, the activity of heme-dependent enzymes, and the rate of heme catabolism to CO and bilirubin.

  17. Alternative polyadenylation sites of human endothelial nitric oxide synthase mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ihara, Hideshi; Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Ida, Tomoaki; Kozaki, Shunji; Tsuyama, Shingo; Moss, Joel

    2010-01-01

    The mRNA 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) has been shown to have important roles in the regulation of mRNA function. In this study, we investigated the human endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) 3′-UTR to evaluate its potential regulatory role. 3′-RACE analysis revealed that the human eNOS mRNA has multiple alternative polyadenylation sites. Apart from the proximal site (418 bp downstream of the stop codon), we identified two additional distal sites approximately 770 and 1478 bp downstream of the stop codon. In addition, Northern analysis showed that the usage of these sites differed among human tissues. Further, amounts of these eNOS mRNAs were changed during growth of cultured human aortic endothelial cells; mRNAs with long 3′-UTRs decreased more rapidly than total mRNA, as cells approached confluency. Thus, the 3′-UTRs of human eNOS results from alternative polyadenylation sites and differ across tissues and during cell growth. PMID:17825792

  18. Endothelial-mesenchymal transition in normal human esophageal endothelial cells cocultured with esophageal adenocarcinoma cells: role of IL-1β and TGF-β2.

    PubMed

    Nie, Linghui; Lyros, Orestis; Medda, Rituparna; Jovanovic, Nebojsa; Schmidt, Jamie L; Otterson, Mary F; Johnson, Christopher P; Behmaram, Behnaz; Shaker, Reza; Rafiee, Parvaneh

    2014-11-01

    Endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) has been recognized as a key determinant of tumor microenvironment in cancer progression and metastasis. Endothelial cells undergoing EndoMT lose their endothelial markers, acquire the mesenchymal phenotype, and become more invasive with increased migratory abilities. Early stages of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) are characterized by strong microvasculature whose impact in tumor progression remains undefined. Our aim was to determine the role of EndoMT in EAC by investigating the impact of tumor cells on normal primary human esophageal microvascular endothelial cells (HEMEC). HEMEC were either cocultured with OE33 adenocarcinoma cells or treated with IL-1β and transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2) for indicated periods and analyzed for EndoMT-associated changes by real-time PCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescence staining, and functional assays. Additionally, human EAC tissues were investigated for detection of EndoMT-like cells. Our results demonstrate an increased expression of mesenchymal markers [fibroblast-specific protein 1 (FSP1), collagen1α2, vimentin, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and Snail], decreased expression of endothelial markers [CD31, von Willebrand factor VIII (vWF), and VE-cadherin], and elevated migration ability in HEMEC following coculture with OE33 cells. The EndoMT-related changes were inhibited by IL-1β and TGF-β2 gene silencing in OE33 cells. Recombinant IL-1β and TGF-β2 induced EndoMT in HEMEC. Although the level of VEGF expression was elevated in EndoMT cells, the angiogenic property of these cells was diminished. In vivo, by immunostaining EndoMT-like cells were detected at the invasive front of EAC. Our findings underscore a significant role for EndoMT in EAC and provide new insights into the mechanisms and significance of EndoMT in the context of tumor progression.

  19. Transcriptional regulation of the human iNOS gene by IL-1beta in endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kolyada, A. Y.; Madias, N. E.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vascular endothelium participates in the control of vascular tone and function via the release of nitric oxide (NO) by the endothelial-type NO synthase (eNOS). Inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression in endothelial cells occurs in many clinical conditions following induction by lipopolysaccharide or cytokines and generates large quantities of NO that result in endothelial cell activation and dysfunction. No information exists on the transcriptional regulation of the human iNOS gene (or that of other species) in endothelial cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined the transcriptional regulation of the human iNOS gene by interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) in rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PVEC) by transient cotransfections of different iNOS-promoter constructs and cDNA of different transcription factors and regulatory proteins. RESULTS: The -1034/+88 bp iNOS promoter was strongly induced by IL-1beta, the regulatory elements for such induction being localized downstream of -205 bp. Cotransfection experiments with NF-kappaB isoforms, IkappaB isoforms, and IKK mutants suggested that the NF-kappaB site at -115/-106 bp is important, but not sufficient, for induction of iNOS promoter and that the role of NF-kappaB is partially independent of its binding site. C/EBP sites within the -205/+88 bp region were shown to be responsible, along with NF-kappaB site, for induction of iNOS promoter by IL-1beta. Overexpression of C/EBPalpha, C/EBPdelta, and liver-enriched activator protein (LAP) activated the promoter, whereas overexpression of liver-enriched inhibitory protein (LIP) strongly suppressed it. C/EBPbeta (LAP and LIP isoforms) was constitutively present in PVEC and was induced (approximately 2-fold) by IL-1beta, whereas C/EBPdelta was not constitutively expressed but was strongly induced by IL-1beta. Both C/EBPbeta and C/EBPdelta participated in DNA-protein complex formation. CONCLUSION: Both NF-kappaB and C/EBP pathways are important for the

  20. Birth weight and characteristics of endothelial and smooth muscle cell cultures from human umbilical cord vessels

    PubMed Central

    Martín de Llano, José Javier; Fuertes, Graciela; Torró, Isabel; García Vicent, Consuelo; Fayos, José Luis; Lurbe, Empar

    2009-01-01

    Background Low birth weight has been related to an increased risk for developing high blood pressure in adult life. The molecular and cellular analysis of umbilical cord artery and vein may provide information about the early vascular characteristics of an individual. We have assessed several phenotype characteristics of the four vascular cell types derived from human umbilical cords of newborns with different birth weight. Further follow-up studies could show the association of those vascular properties with infancy and adulthood blood pressure. Methods Endothelial and smooth muscle cell cultures were obtained from umbilical cords from two groups of newborns of birth weight less than 2.8 kg or higher than 3.5 kg. The expression of specific endothelial cell markers (von Willebrand factor, CD31, and the binding and internalization of acetylated low-density lipoprotein) and the smooth muscle cell specific α-actin have been evaluated. Cell culture viability, proliferation kinetic, growth fraction (expression of Ki67) and percentage of senescent cells (detection of β-galactosidase activity at pH 6.0) have been determined. Endothelial cell projection area was determined by morphometric analysis of cell cultures after CD31 immunodetection. Results The highest variation was found in cell density at the confluence of endothelial cell cultures derived from umbilical cord arteries (66,789 ± 5,093 cells/cm2 vs. 45,630 ± 11,927 cells/cm2, p < 0.05). Morphometric analysis indicated that the projection area of the artery endothelial cells (1,161 ± 198 and 1,544 ± 472 μm2, p < 0.05), but not those derived from the vein from individuals with a birth weight lower than 2.8 kg was lower than that of cells from individuals with a birth weight higher than 3.5 kg. Conclusion The analysis of umbilical cord artery endothelial cells, which demonstrated differences in cell size related to birth weight, can provide hints about the cellular and molecular links between lower birth

  1. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 protects human umbilical vein endothelial cells against oxidative damage and increases endothelial nitric oxide production to reverse nitroglycerin tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hu, X Y; Fang, Q; Ma, D; Jiang, L; Yang, Y; Sun, J; Yang, C; Wang, J S

    2016-06-10

    Medical nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate, GTN) use is limited principally by tolerance typified by a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) produced by biotransformation. Such tolerance may lead to endothelial dysfunction by inducing oxidative stress. In vivo studies have demonstrated that aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) plays important roles in GTN biotransformation and tolerance. Thus, modification of ALDH2 expression represents a potentially effective strategy to prevent and reverse GTN tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. In this study, a eukaryotic expression vector containing the ALDH2 gene was introduced into human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by liposome-mediated transfection. An indirect immunofluorescence assay showed that ALDH2 expression increased 24 h after transfection. Moreover, real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting revealed significantly higher ALDH2 mRNA and protein expression in the gene-transfected group than in the two control groups. GTN tolerance was induced by treating HUVECs with 10 mM GTN for 16 h + 10 min, which significantly decreased NO levels in control cells, but not in those transfected with ALDH2. Overexpression of ALDH2 increased cell survival against GTN-induced cytotoxicity and conferred protection from oxidative damage resulting from nitrate tolerance, accompanied by decreased production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and reduced expression of heme oxygenase 1. Furthermore, ALDH2 overexpression promoted Akt phosphorylation under GTN tolerance conditions. ALDH2 gene transfection can reverse and prevent tolerance to GTN through its bioactivation and protect against oxidative damage, preventing the development of endothelial dysfunction.

  2. An Innovative Ultrasound Technique for Evaluation of Tumor Vascularity in Breast Cancers: Superb Micro-Vascular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ah Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Yeom, Suk Keu; Lee, Seung Wha; Chung, Hwan Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Tumor vascularity is an important indicator for differential diagnosis, tumor growth, and prognosis. Superb micro-vascular imaging (SMI) is an innovative ultrasound technique for vascular examination that uses a multidimensional filter to eliminate clutter and preserve extremely low-velocity flows. Theoretically, SMI could depict more vessels and more detailed vascular morphology, due to the increased sensitivity of slow blood flow. Here, we report the early experience of using SMI in 21 breast cancer patients. We evaluated tumor vascular features in breast cancer and compared SMI and conventional color or power Doppler imaging. SMI was superior to color or power Doppler imaging in detecting tumor vessels, the details of vessel morphology, and both peripheral and central vascular distribution. In conclusion, SMI is a promising ultrasound technique for evaluating microvascular information of breast cancers. PMID:27382399

  3. Effects of macro- versus nanoporous silicon substrates on human aortic endothelial cell behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formentín, Pilar; Alba, María; Catalán, Úrsula; Fernández-Castillejo, Sara; Pallarès, Josep; Solà, Rosà; Marsal, Lluís F.

    2014-08-01

    Human aortic endothelial cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, which is a common, progressive, and multifactorial disease that is the clinical endpoint of an inflammatory process and endothelial dysfunction. Study and development of new therapies against cardiovascular disease must be tested in vitro cell models, prior to be evaluated in vivo . To this aim, new cell culture platforms are developed that allow cells to grow and respond to their environment in a realistic manner. In this work, the cell adhesion and morphology of endothelial cells are investigated on functionalized porous silicon substrates with two different pore size configurations: macroporous and nanoporous silicon. Herein, we modified the surfaces of porous silicon substrates by aminopropyl triethoxysilane, and we studied how different pore geometries induced different cellular response in the cell morphology and adhesion. The cell growth over the surface of porous silicon becomes an attractive field, especially for medical applications. Surface properties of the biomaterial are associated with cell adhesion and as well as, with proliferation, migration and differentiation.

  4. Uptake and transport of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles through human brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, L B; Linemann, T; Pondman, K M; Lichota, J; Kim, K S; Pieters, R J; Visser, G M; Moos, T

    2013-10-16

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) formed by brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) constitutes a firm physical, chemical, and immunological barrier, making the brain accessible to only a few percent of potential drugs intended for treatment inside the central nervous system. With the purpose of overcoming the restraints of the BBB by allowing the transport of drugs, siRNA, or DNA into the brain, a novel approach is to use superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as drug carriers. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of fluorescent SPIONs to pass through human brain microvascular endothelial cells facilitated by an external magnet. The ability of SPIONs to penetrate the barrier was shown to be significantly stronger in the presence of an external magnetic force in an in vitro BBB model. Hence, particles added to the luminal side of the in vitro BBB model were found in astrocytes cocultured at a remote distance on the abluminal side, indicating that particles were transported through the barrier and taken up by astrocytes. Addition of the SPIONs to the culture medium did not negatively affect the viability of the endothelial cells. The magnetic force-mediated dragging of SPIONs through BCECs may denote a novel mechanism for the delivery of drugs to the brain.

  5. Sphingosine kinase-1 is a hypoxia-regulated gene that stimulates migration of human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalm, Stephanie; Doell, Frauke; Roemer, Isolde; Bubnova, Svetlana

    2008-04-18

    Sphingosine kinases (SK) catalyze the production of sphingosine-1-phosphate which in turn regulates cell responses such as proliferation and migration. Here, we show that exposure of the human endothelial cell line EA.hy 926 to hypoxia stimulates a increased SK-1, but not SK-2, mRNA, protein expression, and activity. This effect was due to stimulated SK-1 promoter activity which contains two putative hypoxia-inducible factor-responsive-elements (HRE). By deletion of one of the two HREs, hypoxia-induced promoter activation was abrogated. Furthermore, hypoxia upregulated the expression of HIF-1{alpha} and HIF-2{alpha}, and both contributed to SK-1 gene transcription as shown by selective depletion of HIF-1{alpha} or HIF-2{alpha} by siRNA. The hypoxia-stimulated SK-1 upregulation was functionally coupled to increased migration since the selective depletion of SK-1, but not of SK-2, by siRNAs abolished the migratory response. In summary, these data show that hypoxia upregulates SK-1 activity and results in an accelerated migratory capacity of endothelial cells. SK-1 may thus serve as an attractive therapeutic target to treat diseases associated with increased endothelial migration and angiogenesis such as cancer growth and progression.

  6. Hyperbaric oxygen induces a cytoprotective and angiogenic response in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Godman, Cassandra A; Chheda, Kousanee P; Hightower, Lawrence E; Perdrizet, George; Shin, Dong-Guk; Giardina, Charles

    2010-07-01

    A genome-wide microarray analysis of gene expression was carried out on human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) exposed to hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) under conditions that approximated clinical settings. Highly up-regulated genes included immediate early transcription factors (FOS, FOSB, and JUNB) and metallothioneins. Six molecular chaperones were also up-regulated immediately following HBOT, and all of these have been implicated in protein damage control. Pathway analysis programs identified the Nrf-2-mediated oxidative stress response as one of the primary responders to HBOT. Several of the microarray changes in the Nrf2 pathway and a molecular chaperone were validated using quantitative PCR. For all of the genes tested (Nrf2, HMOX1, HSPA1A, M1A, ACTC1, and FOS), HBOT elicited large responses, whereas changes were minimal following treatment with 100% O(2) in the absence of elevated pressure. The increased expression of immediate early and cytoprotective genes corresponded with an HBOT-induced increase in cell proliferation and oxidative stress resistance. In addition, HBOT treatment enhanced endothelial tube formation on Matrigel plates, with particularly dramatic effects observed following two daily HBO treatments. Understanding how HBOT influences gene expression changes in endothelial cells may be beneficial for improving current HBOT-based wound-healing protocols. These data also point to other potential HBOT applications where stimulating protection and repair of the endothelium would be beneficial, such as patient preconditioning prior to major surgery.

  7. Implanted neonatal human dermal fibroblasts influence the recruitment of endothelial cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, Susana G.; Brochhausen, Christoph; Negrão, Rita; Barbosa, Mário A.; Unger, Ronald E.; Kirkpatrick, C. James; Soares, Raquel; Granja, Pedro L.

    2012-01-01

    The vascularization of new tissue within a reasonable time is a crucial prerequisite for the success of different cell- and material-based strategies. Considering that angiogenesis is a multi-step process involving humoral and cellular regulatory components, only in vivo assays provide the adequate information about vessel formation and the recruitment of endothelial cells. The present study aimed to investigate if neonatal human dermal fibroblasts could influence in vivo neovascularization. Results obtained showed that fibroblasts were able to recruit endothelial cells to vascularize the implanted matrix, which was further colonized by murine functional blood vessels after one week. The vessels exhibited higher levels of hemoglobin, compared with the control matrix, implanted without fibroblasts, in which no vessel formation could be observed. No significant differences were detected in systemic inflammation. The presence of vessels originated from the host vasculature suggested that host vascular response was involved, which constitutes a fundamental aspect in the process of neovascularization. Fibroblasts implanted within matrigel increased the presence of endothelial cells with positive staining for CD31 and for CD34 and the production of collagen influencing the angiogenic process and promoting the formation of microvessels. New strategies in tissue engineering could be delineated with improved angiogenesis using neonatal fibroblasts. PMID:23507785

  8. Potential in vitro effects of carbon nanotubes on human aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Valerie G.; Li Zheng; Hulderman, Tracy; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Kashon, Michael L.; Simeonova, Petia P.

    2009-05-01

    Respiratory exposure of mice to carbon nanotubes induces pulmonary toxicity and adverse cardiovascular effects associated with atherosclerosis. We hypothesize that the direct contact of carbon nanotubes with endothelial cells will result in dose-dependent effects related to altered cell function and cytotoxicity which may play a role in potential adverse pulmonary and cardiovascular outcomes. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of purified single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT and MWCNT) on human aortic endothelial cells by evaluating actin filament integrity and VE-cadherin distribution by fluorescence microscopy, membrane permeability by measuring the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, proliferation/viability by WST-1 assay, and overall functionality by tubule formation assay. Marked actin filament and VE-cadherin disruption, cytotoxicity, and reduced tubule formation occurred consistently at 24 h post-exposure to the highest concentrations [50-150 {mu}g/10{sup 6} cells (1.5-4.5 {mu}g/ml)] for both SWCNT and MWCNT tested in our studies. These effects were not observed with carbon black exposure and carbon nanotube exposure in lower concentrations [1-10 {mu}g/10{sup 6} cells (0.04-0.4 {mu}g/ml)] or in any tested concentrations at 3 h post-exposure. Overall, the results indicate that SWCNT and MWCNT exposure induce direct effects on endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner.

  9. Identification of DNA-binding proteins on human umbilical vein endothelial cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, T M; Frampton, G; Cameron, J S

    1993-01-01

    The binding of anti-DNA antibodies to the endothelial cell is mediated through DNA, which forms a bridge between the immunoglobulin and the plasma membrane. We have shown that 32P-labelled DNA bound to the plasma membrane of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) by a saturable process, which could be competitively inhibited by non-radiolabelled DNA. In addition, DNA-binding was enhanced in HUVEC that had been treated with IL-1 alpha or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). DNA-binding proteins of mol. wt 46,000, 92,000, and 84,000 were identified by the binding of 32P-labelled DNA to plasma membrane proteins separated on SDS-PAGE. DNA-binding proteins of mol. wt 46,000 and 84,000 were also present in the cytosol and nucleus. Murine anti-DNA MoAb410 bound to a single band, at mol. wt 46,000, of plasma membrane protein, in the presence of DNA. Our results showed that DNA-binding proteins are present in different cellular fractions of endothelial cells. DNA-binding proteins on the cell membrane could participate in the in situ formation of immune deposits; and their presence in the cell nucleus suggests a potential role in the modulation of cell function. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8419070

  10. Chloroquine stimulates nitric oxide synthesis in murine, porcine, and human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ghigo, D; Aldieri, E; Todde, R; Costamagna, C; Garbarino, G; Pescarmona, G; Bosia, A

    1998-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical involved in the regulation of many cell functions and in the expression of several diseases. We have found that the antimalarial and antiinflammatory drug, chloroquine, is able to stimulate NO synthase (NOS) activity in murine, porcine, and human endothelial cells in vitro: the increase of enzyme activity is dependent on a de novo synthesis of some regulatory protein, as it is inhibited by cycloheximide but is not accompanied by an increased expression of inducible or constitutive NOS isoforms. Increased NO synthesis is, at least partly, responsible for chloroquine-induced inhibition of cell proliferation: indeed, NOS inhibitors revert the drug-evoked blockage of mitogenesis and ornithine decarboxylase activity in murine and porcine endothelial cells. The NOS-activating effect of chloroquine is dependent on its weak base properties, as it is exerted also by ammonium chloride, another lysosomotropic agent. Both compounds activate NOS by limiting the availability of iron: their stimulating effects on NO synthesis and inhibiting action on cell proliferation are reverted by iron supplementation with ferric nitrilotriacetate, and are mimicked by incubation with desferrioxamine. Our results suggest that NO synthesis can be stimulated in endothelial cells by chloroquine via an impairment of iron metabolism. PMID:9691096

  11. Endothelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EndoMT) in the Pathogenesis of Human Fibrotic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Piera-Velazquez, Sonsoles; Mendoza, Fabian A.; Jimenez, Sergio A.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrotic diseases encompass a wide spectrum of clinical entities including systemic fibrotic diseases such as systemic sclerosis, sclerodermatous graft versus host disease, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, and IgG4-associated sclerosing disease, as well as numerous organ-specific disorders including radiation-induced fibrosis, and cardiac, pulmonary, liver, and kidney fibrosis. Although their causative mechanisms are quite diverse, these diseases share the common feature of an uncontrolled and progressive accumulation of fibrous tissue macromolecules in affected organs leading to their dysfunction and ultimate failure. The pathogenesis of fibrotic diseases is complex and despite extensive investigation has remained elusive. Numerous studies have identified myofibroblasts as the cells responsible for the establishment and progression of the fibrotic process. Tissue myofibroblasts in fibrotic diseases originate from several sources including quiescent tissue fibroblasts, circulating CD34+ fibrocytes, and the phenotypic conversion of various cell types including epithelial and endothelial cells into activated myofibroblasts. However, the role of the phenotypic transition of endothelial cells into mesenchymal cells (Endothelial to Mesenchymal Transition or EndoMT) in the pathogenesis of fibrotic disorders has not been fully elucidated. Here, we review the evidence supporting EndoMT’s contribution to human fibrotic disease pathogenesis. PMID:27077889

  12. Permeability characteristics of human endothelial monolayers seeded on different extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Nooteboom, A; Hendriks, T; Ottehöller, I; van der Linden, C J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether endothelial monolayer permeability changes induced by inflammatory mediators are affected by the extracellular matrix protein used for cell seeding. METHODS: Human umbilical venular endothelial cells (HUVEC) were grown to confluent monolayers on membranes coated with either collagen, fibronectin or gelatin. The permeability to albumin and dextran was then assessed, both under normal conditions and after treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). RESULTS: With any of the three protein coatings, tight junctions were formed all over the monolayers. The permeability of the coated membranes to albumin and dextran was reduced strongly by confluent monolayers; the relative reduction was similar for the three matrix proteins used. Pre-incubation of the monolayers with either TNF-alpha or LPS increased permeability dose dependently. However, the relative increase due to either treatment was independent of the protein used for membrane coating. CONCLUSION: The extracellular matrix protein used for initial seeding of endothelial cultures plays a minor role in determining the permeability changes induced in HUVEC monolayers by inflammatory mediators. PMID:11200364

  13. Differentiation of immature DCs into endothelial-like cells in human esophageal carcinoma tissue homogenates.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Bai, Ruihua; Qin, Zhenzhu; Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Yanan; Yang, Hongyan; Huang, Youtian; Li, Gang; Zhao, Mingyao; Dong, Ziming

    2013-08-01

    We previously reported endothelial-like differentiation (ELD) of immature dendritic cells (iDCs) in the microenvironment derived from EC9706 human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma conditioned medium (CM). However, the CM is far different from the esophageal carcinoma tissue of patients. In addition, the potential role of peri-esophageal carcinoma in the ELD of iDCs is also unknown. In the present study, we showed that the tumor microenvironment derived from esophageal carcinoma homogenate promoted iDCs to differentiate from the DC pathway toward endothelial cells, while the peri-esophageal carcinoma homogenate did not have this function. During the course of ELD, ERK signaling pathway and CREB were activated. Blocking MEK, both the phosphorylation of ERK and CREB, and the ELD of iDCs were inhibited. These data suggest that esophageal carcinoma tissue, not peri-esophageal carcinoma tissue, can drive iDCs to differentiate into endothelial-like cells, instead of differentiation into mature DCs, thereby losing the ability of antigen presentation. PMID:23708958

  14. Biological Atomic Force Microscopy for Imaging Gold-Labeled Liposomes on Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zaske, Ana-María; Danila, Delia; Queen, Michael C.; Golunski, Eva; Conyers, Jodie L.

    2013-01-01

    Although atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used extensively to characterize cell membrane structure and cellular processes such as endocytosis and exocytosis, the corrugated surface of the cell membrane hinders the visualization of extracellular entities, such as liposomes, that may interact with the cell. To overcome this barrier, we used 90 nm nanogold particles to label FITC liposomes and monitor their endocytosis on human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) in vitro. We were able to study the internalization process of gold-coupled liposomes on endothelial cells, by using AFM. We found that the gold-liposomes attached to the HCAEC cell membrane during the first 15–30 min of incubation, liposome cell internalization occurred from 30 to 60 min, and most of the gold-labeled liposomes had invaginated after 2 hr of incubation. Liposomal uptake took place most commonly at the periphery of the nuclear zone. Dynasore monohydrate, an inhibitor of endocytosis, obstructed the internalization of the gold-liposomes. This study showed the versatility of the AFM technique, combined with fluorescent microscopy, for investigating liposome uptake by endothelial cells. The 90 nm colloidal gold nanoparticles proved to be a noninvasive contrast agent that efficiently improves AFM imaging during the investigation of biological nanoprocesses. PMID:26555999

  15. Quantitative phosphoproteomics unveils temporal dynamics of thrombin signaling in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Hernández-Fernaud, Juan Ramon; van den Eshof, Bart L.; Neilson, Lisa J.; Meijer, Alexander B.; Mertens, Koen

    2014-01-01

    Thrombin is the key serine protease of the coagulation cascade and a potent trigger of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1)-mediated platelet aggregation. In recent years, PAR1 has become an appealing target for anticoagulant therapies. However, the inhibitors that have been developed so far increase bleeding risk in patients, likely because they interfere with endogenous PAR1 signaling in the endothelium. Because of its complexity, thrombin-induced signaling in endothelial cells has remained incompletely understood. Here, we have combined stable isotope amino acids in cell culture, affinity-based phosphopeptide enrichment, and high-resolution mass spectrometry and performed a time-resolved analysis of the thrombin-induced signaling in human primary endothelial cells. We identified 2224 thrombin-regulated phosphorylation sites, the majority of which have not been previously related to thrombin. Those sites were localized on proteins that are novel to thrombin signaling, but also on well-known players such as PAR1, Rho-associated kinase 2, phospholipase C, and proteins related to actin cytoskeleton, cell-cell junctions, and Weibel-Palade body release. Our study provides a unique resource of phosphoproteins and phosphorylation sites that may generate novel insights into an intimate understanding of thrombin-mediated PAR signaling and the development of improved PAR1 antagonists that affect platelet but not endothelial cell function. PMID:24501219

  16. Quantitative phosphoproteomics unveils temporal dynamics of thrombin signaling in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Hernández-Fernaud, Juan Ramon; van den Eshof, Bart L; Neilson, Lisa J; Meijer, Alexander B; Mertens, Koen; Zanivan, Sara

    2014-03-20

    Thrombin is the key serine protease of the coagulation cascade and a potent trigger of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1)-mediated platelet aggregation. In recent years, PAR1 has become an appealing target for anticoagulant therapies. However, the inhibitors that have been developed so far increase bleeding risk in patients, likely because they interfere with endogenous PAR1 signaling in the endothelium. Because of its complexity, thrombin-induced signaling in endothelial cells has remained incompletely understood. Here, we have combined stable isotope amino acids in cell culture, affinity-based phosphopeptide enrichment, and high-resolution mass spectrometry and performed a time-resolved analysis of the thrombin-induced signaling in human primary endothelial cells. We identified 2224 thrombin-regulated phosphorylation sites, the majority of which have not been previously related to thrombin. Those sites were localized on proteins that are novel to thrombin signaling, but also on well-known players such as PAR1, Rho-associated kinase 2, phospholipase C, and proteins related to actin cytoskeleton, cell-cell junctions, and Weibel-Palade body release. Our study provides a unique resource of phosphoproteins and phosphorylation sites that may generate novel insights into an intimate understanding of thrombin-mediated PAR signaling and the development of improved PAR1 antagonists that affect platelet but not endothelial cell function. PMID:24501219

  17. Aspirin inhibits human coronary artery endothelial cell proliferation by upregulation of p53.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Subramanian; Joseph, Jacob; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2003-01-31

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA) is effective in the primary and secondary prevention of vascular events. This effect is mediated in large part by platelet inhibition; however, non-platelet-mediated effects may also be relevant in the overall efficacy of ASA. We determined the effect of ASA on the synthesis of DNA and total proteins in cultured human coronary endothelial cells (HCAECs). Fourth generation HCAECs were cultured and treated with ASA and rate of synthesis of DNA and total proteins was determined by incorporation of [3H]thymidine and [3H]proline, respectively. ASA inhibited DNA synthesis by 50% at a concentration of 1mM and protein synthesis by 50% at a concentration of 2mM. The inhibitory effect of ASA was observed as early as 2h after treatment of HCAECs. The inhibition of DNA and protein synthesis could be reversed within 24h after removal of the drug from the culture medium. Indomethacin also inhibited DNA and protein synthesis. Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of p53 protein was increased after treatment of the cells with ASA. These observations indicate that ASA decreases endothelial cell proliferation through cell cycle arrest mediated by enhanced p53 expression. Arrest of endothelial proliferation and activation may be an important mechanism of the beneficial effect of ASA in acute coronary syndromes.

  18. Human papillomavirus causes an angiogenic switch in keratinocytes which is sufficient to alter endothelial cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Li, F.; Mead, L.; White, H.; Walker, J.; Ingram, D.A.; Roman, A.

    2007-10-10

    One of the requirements for tumor growth is the ability to recruit a blood supply, a process known as angiogenesis. Angiogenesis begins early in the progression of cervical disease from mild to severe dysplasia and on to invasive cancer. We have previously reported that expression of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 (HPV16 E6E7) proteins in primary foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) decreases expression of two inhibitors and increases expression of two angiogenic inducers [Toussaint-Smith, E., Donner, D.B., Roman, A., 2004. Expression of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins in primary foreskin keratinocytes is sufficient to alter the expression of angiogenic factors. Oncogene 23, 2988-2995]. Here we report that HPV-induced early changes in the keratinocyte phenotype are sufficient to alter endothelial cell behavior both in vitro and in vivo. Conditioned media from HPV16 E6E7 expressing HFKs as well as from human cervical keratinocytes containing the intact HPV16 were able to stimulate proliferation and migration of human microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, introduction of the conditioned media into immunocompetent mice using a Matrigel plug model resulted in a clear angiogenic response. These novel data support the hypothesis that HPV proteins contribute not only to the uncontrolled keratinocyte growth seen following HPV infection but also to the angiogenic response needed for tumor formation.

  19. Sulfation of chlorotyrosine and nitrotyrosine by human lung endothelial and epithelial cells: Role of the human SULT1A3

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Shin; Yasuda, Tomoko; Liu, Ming-Yih; Shetty, Sreerama; Idell, Steven; Boggaram, Vijayakumar; Suiko, Masahito; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Fu Jian; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2011-03-01

    During inflammation, potent reactive oxidants formed may cause chlorination and nitration of both free and protein-bound tyrosine. In addition to serving as biomarkers of inflammation-mediated oxidative stress, elevated levels of chlorotyrosine and nitrotyrosine have been linked to the pathogenesis of lung and vascular disorders. The current study was designed to investigate whether the lung cells are equipped with mechanisms for counteracting these tyrosine derivatives. By metabolic labeling, chlorotyrosine O-[{sup 35}S]sulfate and nitrotyrosine O-[{sup 35}S]sulfate were found to be generated and released into the labeling media of human lung endothelial and epithelial cells labeled with [{sup 35}S]sulfate in the presence of added chlorotyrosine and nitrotyrosine. Enzymatic assays using the eleven known human cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) revealed SULT1A3 as the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the sulfation of chlorotyrosine and nitrotyrosine. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis demonstrated the expression of SULT1A3 in the lung endothelial and epithelial cells used in this study. Kinetic constants of the sulfation of chlorotyrosine and nitrotyrosine by SULT1A3 were determined. Collectively, these results suggest that sulfation by SULT1A3 in lung endothelial and epithelial cells may play a role in the inactivation and/or disposal of excess chlorotyrosine and nitrotyrosine generated during inflammation.

  20. Effect of Thrombus Composition and Viscosity on Sonoreperfusion Efficacy in a Model of Micro-Vascular Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Black, John J; Yu, Francois T H; Schnatz, Rick G; Chen, Xucai; Villanueva, Flordeliza S; Pacella, John J

    2016-09-01

    Distal embolization of micro-thrombi during stenting for myocardial infarction causes micro-vascular obstruction (MVO). We have previously shown that sonoreperfusion (SRP), a microbubble (MB)-mediated ultrasound (US) therapy, resolves MVO from venous micro-thrombi in vitro in saline. However, blood is more viscous than saline, and arterial thrombi that embolize during stenting are mechanically distinct from venous clot. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that MVO created with arterial micro-thrombi are more resistant to SRP therapy compared with venous micro-thrombi, and higher viscosity further increases the US requirement for effective SRP in an in vitro model of MVO. Lipid MBs suspended in plasma with adjusted viscosity (1.1 cP or 4.0 cP) were passed through tubing bearing a mesh with 40-μm pores to simulate a micro-vascular cross-section; upstream pressure reflected thrombus burden. To simulate MVO, the mesh was occluded with either arterial or venous micro-thrombi to increase upstream pressure to 40 mmHg ± 5 mmHg. Therapeutic long-tone-burst US was delivered to the occluded area for 20 min. MB activity was recorded with a passive cavitation detector. MVO caused by arterial micro-thrombi at either blood or plasma viscosity resulted in less effective SRP therapy compared to venous thrombi. Higher viscosity further reduced the effectiveness of SRP therapy. The passive cavitation detector showed a decrease in inertial cavitation when viscosity was increased, while stable cavitation was affected in a more complex manner. Overall, these data suggest that arterial thrombi may require higher acoustic pressure US than venous thrombi to achieve similar SRP efficacy; increased viscosity decreases SRP efficacy; and both inertial and stable cavitation are implicated in observed SRP efficacy. PMID:27207018

  1. Biophysical Properties of Scaffolds Modulate Human Blood Vessel Formation from Circulating Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Critser, Paul J.; Yoder, Mervin C.

    A functional vascular system forms early in development and is continually remodeled throughout the life of the organism. Impairment to the regeneration or repair of this system leads to tissue ischemia, dysfunction, and disease. The process of vascular formation and remodeling is complex, relying on local microenvironmental cues, cytokine signaling, and multiple cell types to function properly. Tissue engineering strategies have attempted to exploit these mechanisms to develop functional vascular networks for the generation of artificial tissues and therapeutic strategies to restore tissue homeostasis. The success of these strategies requires the isolation of appropriate progenitor cell sources which are straightforward to obtain, display high proliferative potential, and demonstrate an ability to form functional vessels. Several populations are of interest including endothelial colony-forming cells, a subpopulation of endothelial progenitor cells. Additionally, the development of scaffolds to deliver and support progenitor cell survival and function is crucial for the formation of functional vascular networks. The composition and biophysical properties of these scaffolds have been shown to modulate endothelial cell behavior and vessel formation. However, further investigation is needed to better understand how these mechanical properties and biophysical properties impact vessel formation. Additionally, several other cell populations are involved in neoangiogenesis and formation of tissue parenchyma and an understanding of the potential impact of these cell populations on the biophysical properties of scaffolds will also be needed to advance these strategies. This chapter examines how the biophysical properties of matrix scaffolds can influence vessel formation and remodeling and, in particular, the impact on in vivo human endothelial progenitor cell vessel formation.

  2. Primary culture of endothelial cells from atherosclerotic human aorta. Part 1. Identification, morphological and ultrastructural characteristics of two endothelial cell subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Antonov, A S; Nikolaeva, M A; Klueva, T S; Romanov YuA; Babaev, V R; Bystrevskaya, V B; Perov, N A; Repin, V S; Smirnov, V N

    1986-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) were harvested by 0.1% collagenase treatment for adult human thoracic aortas obtained 1-3 h after sudden death. At least 35-70% of EC were removed from the intimal surface of aorta, 90-95% of them being viable. Plating efficiency was 70-80%. Monolayer formation was achieved at a seeding density of 5-8 X 10(2) cells/mm2. The cells were identified as endothelium by the presence of Factor VIII antigen, Weigel-Palade bodies and typically endothelial morphology at confluence. Unlike endothelial cultures derived from human umbilical veins and infant aortas, primary cultures obtained from human adult aortas contain multinuclear EC with Factor VIII antigen and Weibel-Palade bodies. The number of multinuclear EC in cultures isolated from aortas affected by atherosclerosis was 2-fold higher (P less than 0.05) than in cultures obtained from grossly normal aortas taken from donors of the same age. EC with numerous lipid inclusions revealed by oil-red-O staining were present in all the EC primary cultures derived from aortas affected by atherosclerosis. No oil-red-O-positive cells were detected among the EC cultured from infant aorta, aorta of young donors, and umbilical vein. An electron microscopic examination of EC from atherosclerotic aorta in culture and in situ failed to reveal any ultrastructural peculiarities distinguishing multinuclear EC from the mononuclear EC. PMID:3004520

  3. Functional Characterization and Expression Profiling of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell- and Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zongjin; Hu, Shijun; Ghosh, Zhumur; Han, Zhongchao

    2011-01-01

    With regard to human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), in which adult cells are reprogrammed into embryonic-like cells using defined factors, their functional and transcriptional expression pattern during endothelial differentiation has yet to be characterized. In this study, hiPSCs and human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) were differentiated using the embryoid body method, and CD31+ cells were sorted. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of hiPSC-derived endothelial cells (hiPSC-ECs) and hESC-derived endothelial cells (hESC-ECs) demonstrated similar endothelial gene expression patterns. We showed functional vascular formation by hiPSC-ECs in a mouse Matrigel plug model. We compared the gene profiles of hiPSCs, hESCs, hiPSC-ECs, hESC-ECs, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) using whole genome microarray. Our analysis demonstrates that gene expression variation of hiPSC-ECs and hESC-ECs contributes significantly to biological differences between hiPSC-ECs and hESC-ECs as well as to the “distances” among hiPSCs, hESCs, hiPSC-ECs, hESC-ECs, and HUVECs. We further conclude that hiPSCs can differentiate into functional endothelial cells, but with limited expansion potential compared with hESC-ECs; thus, extensive studies should be performed to explore the cause and extent of such differences before clinical application of hiPSC-ECs can begin. PMID:21235328

  4. Factor VIIa binding to endothelial cell protein C receptor: Differences between mouse and human systems

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Prosenjit; Clark, Curtis A.; Gopalakrishnan, Ramakrishnan; Hedner, Ulla; Esmon, Charles T.; Pendurthi, Usha R.; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Recent in vitro studies have shown that the zymogen and activated form of FVII bind to endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR). At present, there is no evidence that FVIIa binds to EPCR on vascular endothelium in vivo in the presence of circulating protein C, a primary ligand for EPCR. The present study was carried out to investigate the interaction of murine and human ligands with murine EPCR both in vivo and in vitro. Measurement of endogenous plasma levels of FVII in wild-type, EPCR-deficient and EPCR-over expressing mice showed slightly lower levels of FVII in EPCR-over expressing mice. However, infusion of high concentrations of competing ligands, either human APCi or FVIIai, to EPCR-over expressing mice failed to increase plasma levels of mouse FVII whereas they increased the plasma levels of protein C by 2 to 3-fold. Examining the association of exogenously administered mouse FVIIa or human FVIIa by immunohistochemistry revealed that human, but not murine FVIIa, binds to the murine endothelium in an EPCR-dependent manner. In vitro binding studies performed using surface plasmon resonance and endothelial cells revealed that murine FVIIa binds murine EPCR negligibly. Human FVIIa binding to EPCR, particularly to mouse EPCR, is markedly enhanced by availability of Mg2+ ions. In summary, our data show that murine FVIIa binds poorly to murine EPCR, whereas human FVIIa binds efficiently to both murine and human EPCR. Our data suggest that one should consider the use of human FVIIa in mouse models to investigate the significance of FVIIa and EPCR interaction. PMID:22370814

  5. The isolation and culture of endothelial colony-forming cells from human and rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Rajesh S; Vadivel, Arul; Zhong, Shumei; Zong, Shumei; McConaghy, Suzanne; Ohls, Robin; Yoder, Mervin C; Thébaud, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Blood vessels are crucial for the normal development, lifelong repair and homeostasis of tissues. Recently, vascular progenitor cell-driven 'postnatal vasculogenesis' has been suggested as an important mechanism that contributes to new blood vessel formation and organ repair. Among several described progenitor cell types that contribute to blood vessel formation, endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) have received widespread attention as lineage-specific 'true' vascular progenitors. Here we describe a protocol for the isolation of pulmonary microvascular ECFCs from human and rat lung tissue. Our technique takes advantage of an earlier protocol for the isolation of circulating ECFCs from the mononuclear cellular fraction of peripheral blood. We adapted the earlier protocol to isolate resident ECFCs from the distal lung tissue. After enzymatic dispersion of rat or human lung samples into a cellular suspension, CD31-expressing cells are positively selected using magnetic-activated cell sorting and plated in endothelial-specific growth conditions. The colonies arising after 1-2 weeks in culture are carefully separated and expanded to yield pure ECFC cultures after a further 2-3 weeks. The resulting cells demonstrate the defining characteristics of ECFCs such as (i) 'cobblestone' morphology of cultured cell monolayers; (ii) acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake and Ulex europaeus lectin binding; (iii) tube-like network formation in Matrigel; (iv) expression of endothelial cell-specific surface markers and the absence of hematopoietic or myeloid surface antigens; (v) self-renewal potential displayed by the most proliferative cells; and (vi) contribution to de novo vessel formation in an in vivo mouse implant model. Assuming typical initial cell adhesion and proliferation rates, the entire procedure can be completed within 4 weeks. Isolation and culture of lung vascular ECFCs will allow assessment of the functional state of these cells in experimental and human

  6. The isolation and culture of endothelial colony-forming cells from human and rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Rajesh S; Vadivel, Arul; Zhong, Shumei; Zong, Shumei; McConaghy, Suzanne; Ohls, Robin; Yoder, Mervin C; Thébaud, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Blood vessels are crucial for the normal development, lifelong repair and homeostasis of tissues. Recently, vascular progenitor cell-driven 'postnatal vasculogenesis' has been suggested as an important mechanism that contributes to new blood vessel formation and organ repair. Among several described progenitor cell types that contribute to blood vessel formation, endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) have received widespread attention as lineage-specific 'true' vascular progenitors. Here we describe a protocol for the isolation of pulmonary microvascular ECFCs from human and rat lung tissue. Our technique takes advantage of an earlier protocol for the isolation of circulating ECFCs from the mononuclear cellular fraction of peripheral blood. We adapted the earlier protocol to isolate resident ECFCs from the distal lung tissue. After enzymatic dispersion of rat or human lung samples into a cellular suspension, CD31-expressing cells are positively selected using magnetic-activated cell sorting and plated in endothelial-specific growth conditions. The colonies arising after 1-2 weeks in culture are carefully separated and expanded to yield pure ECFC cultures after a further 2-3 weeks. The resulting cells demonstrate the defining characteristics of ECFCs such as (i) 'cobblestone' morphology of cultured cell monolayers; (ii) acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake and Ulex europaeus lectin binding; (iii) tube-like network formation in Matrigel; (iv) expression of endothelial cell-specific surface markers and the absence of hematopoietic or myeloid surface antigens; (v) self-renewal potential displayed by the most proliferative cells; and (vi) contribution to de novo vessel formation in an in vivo mouse implant model. Assuming typical initial cell adhesion and proliferation rates, the entire procedure can be completed within 4 weeks. Isolation and culture of lung vascular ECFCs will allow assessment of the functional state of these cells in experimental and human

  7. Generation of novel monoclonal antibodies for the enrichment and characterization of human corneal endothelial cells (hCENC) necessary for the treatment of corneal endothelial blindness

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Vanessa; Chin, Angela; Peh, Gary; Mehta, Jodhbir S; Choo, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the primary treatment option to restore vision for patients with corneal endothelial blindness. Although the success rate of treatment is high, limited availability of transplant grade corneas is a major obstacle. Tissue-engineered corneal endothelial grafts constructed using cultivated human corneal endothelial cells (hCENC) isolated from cadaveric corneas may serve as a potential graft source. Currently, tools for the characterization of cultured hCENC and enrichment of hCENC from potential contaminating cells such as stromal fibroblasts are lacking. In this study, we describe the generation and characterization of novel cell surface monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for hCENC. These mAbs could be used for enrichment and characterization of hCENC. Out of a total of 389 hybridomas, TAG-1A3 and TAG-2A12 were found to be specific to the corneal endothelial monolayer by immunostaining of frozen tissue sections. Both mAbs were able to clearly identify hCENC with good ‘cobblestone-like’ morphology from multiple donors. The antigen targets for TAG-1A3 and TAG-2A12 were found to be CD166/ALCAM and Peroxiredoxin-6 (Prdx-6), respectively, both of which have not been previously described as markers of hCENC. Additionally, unlike other Prdx-6 mAbs, TAG-2A12 was found to specifically bind cell surface Prdx-6, which was only expressed on hCENC and not on other cell types screened such as human corneal stromal fibroblasts (hCSF) and human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC). From our studies, we conclude that TAG-1A3 and TAG-2A12 are promising tools to quantitatively assess hCENC quality. It is also noteworthy that the binding specificity of TAG-2A12 could be used for the enrichment of hCENC from cell mixtures of hCSF and hPSC. PMID:25484056

  8. Human β-NGF gene transferred to cat corneal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wen-Juan; Liu, Min; Zhao, Gui-Qiu; Wang, Chuan-Fu; Hu, Li-Ting; Liu, Xiang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    AIM To transfect the cat corneal endothelial cells (CECs) with recombinant human β-nerve growth factor gene adeno-associated virus (AAV-β-NGF) and to observe the effect of the expressed β-NGF protein on the proliferation activity of cat CECs. METHODS The endothelium of cat cornea was torn under the microscope and rapidly cultivated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) to form single layer CECs and the passage 2 endothelial cells were used in this experiment. The recombinant human AAV-β-NGF was constructed. The recombinant human AAV-β-NGF was transferred into cat CECs directly. Three groups were as following: normal CEC control group, CEC-AAV control group and recombinant CEC-AAV-β-NGF group. Forty-eight hours after transfection, the total RNA was extracted from the CEC by Trizol. The expression of the β-NGF target gene detected by fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction; proliferation activity of the transfected CEC detected at 48h by MTT assay; the percentage of G1 cells among CECs after transfect was detected by flow cytometry method (FCM); cell morphology was observed under inverted phase contrast microscope. RESULTS The torn endothelium culture technique rapidly cultivated single layer cat corneal endothelial cells. The self-designed primers for the target gene and reference gene were efficient and special confirmed through electrophoresis analysis and DNA sequencing. Forty-eight hours after transfect, the human β-NGF gene mRNA detected by fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that there was no significant difference between normal CEC control group and CEC-AAV control group (P>0.05); there was significant difference between two control groups and recombinant CEC-AAV-β-NGF group (P<0.05). MTT assay showed that transfect of recombinant AAV-β-NGF promoted the proliferation activity of cat CEC, while there was no significant difference between normal CEC control group and CEC-AAV control group (P>0.05). FCM result

  9. Human endothelial cell-based assay for endotoxin as sensitive as the conventional Limulus Amebocyte Lysate assay.

    PubMed

    Unger, Ronald E; Peters, Kirsten; Sartoris, Anne; Freese, Christian; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2014-03-01

    Endotoxin, also known as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced by bacteria can be present in any liquid or on any biomaterial even if the material is sterile. Endotoxin in mammals can cause fever, inflammation, cell and tissue damage and irreversible septic shock and death. In the body, endothelial cells making up the blood vasculature and endothelial cells in vitro rapidly react to minute amounts of endotoxin resulting in a rapid induction of the cell adhesion molecule E-selectin. In this study we have used immunofluorescent staining to evaluate the expression of E-selectin on human microvascular endothelial cells from the skin (HDMEC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) exposed to various concentrations of LPS. In addition, the sensitivity of detection was compared with the most widely used assay for the presence of endotoxin, the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate assay (LAL). The detection of E-selectin on endothelial cells in the presence of LPS for 4 h was found to be at least as sensitive in detecting the same concentration using the LAL assay. A cell adhesion molecule-enzyme immunosorbent assay was also developed and used to quantify LPS using the endothelial cell model. A comparison of LAL and the immunofluorescent staining method was carried out with solutions, nanoparticles, biomaterial extracts and endothelial cells grown directly on biomaterials. Under all conditions, the endothelial/E-selectin model system was positive for the test samples that were positive by LAL. Thus, we propose the use of this highly sensitive, rapid, reproducible assay for the routine testing of endotoxin in all steps in the manufacturing process of materials destined for use in humans. This can give a rapid feedback and localization of bacterial contamination sources with the LAL being reserved for the testing of the final product. PMID:24456607

  10. A biomimetic physiological model for human adipose tissue by adipocytes and endothelial cell cocultures with spatially controlled distribution.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rui; Du, Yanan; Zhang, Renji; Lin, Feng; Luan, Jie

    2013-08-01

    An in vitro model that recapitulates the characteristics of native human adipose tissue would largely benefit pathology studies and therapy development. In this paper, we fabricated a physiological model composed of both human adipocytes and endothelial cells with spatially controlled distribution that biomimics the structure and composition of human adipose tissue. Detailed studies into the cell-cell interactions between the adipocytes and endothelial cells revealed a mutual-enhanced effect which resembles the in vivo routine. Furthermore, comparisons between planar coculture and model coculture demonstrated improved adipocyte function as well as endothelial cell proliferation under the same conditions. This research provided a reliable model for human adipose tissue development studies and potential obesity-related therapy development.

  11. Short and prolonged exposure to hyperglycaemia in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells: metabolic and osmotic effects.

    PubMed

    Moruzzi, Noah; Del Sole, Marianna; Fato, Romana; Gerdes, Jantje M; Berggren, Per-Olof; Bergamini, Christian; Brismar, Kerstin

    2014-08-01

    High blood glucose levels are the main feature of diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism linking high glucose concentration to diabetic complications is still not fully elucidated, particularly with regard to human physiology. Excess of glucose is likely to trigger a metabolic response depending on the cell features, activating deleterious pathways involved in the complications of diabetes. In this study, we aim to elucidate how acute and prolonged hyperglycaemia alters the biology and metabolism in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. We found that hyperglycaemia triggers a metabolic switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis that is maintained over prolonged time. Moreover, osmotic pressure is a major factor in the early metabolic response, decreasing both mitochondrial transmembrane potential and cellular proliferation. After prolonged exposure to hyperglycaemia we observed decreased mitochondrial steady-state and uncoupled respiration, together with a reduced ATP/ADP ratio. At the same time, we could not detect major changes in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and reactive oxygen species. We suggest that the physiological and metabolic alterations observed in healthy human primary fibroblasts and endothelial cells are an adaptive response to hyperglycaemia. The severity of metabolic and bioenergetics impairment associated with diabetic complications may occur after longer glucose exposure or due to interactions with cell types more sensitive to hyperglycaemia.

  12. Development of Blood and Lymphatic Endothelial Cells in Embryonic and Fetal Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Christopher; Mildner, Michael; Botta, Albert; Nemec, Lucas; Rogojanu, Radu; Beer, Lucian; Fiala, Christian; Eppel, Wolfgang; Bauer, Wolfgang; Petzelbauer, Peter; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2015-09-01

    Blood and lymphatic vessels provide nutrients for the skin and fulfill important homeostatic functions, such as the regulation of immunologic processes. In this study, we investigated the development of blood and lymphatic endothelial cells in prenatal human skin in situ using multicolor immunofluorescence and analyzed angiogenic molecules by protein arrays of lysates and cell culture supernatants. We found that at 8 to 10 weeks of estimated gestational age, CD144(+) vessels predominantly express the venous endothelial cell marker PAL-E, whereas CD144(+)PAL-E(-) vessels compatible with arteries only appear at the end of the first trimester. Lymphatic progenitor cells at 8 weeks of estimated gestational age express CD31, CD144, Prox1, and temporary PAL-E. At that developmental stage not all lymphatic progenitor cells express podoplanin or Lyve-1, which are acquired with advancing gestational age in a stepwise fashion. Already in second-trimester human skin, the phenotype of blood and lymphatic vessels roughly resembles the one in adult skin. The expression pattern of angiogenic molecules in lysates and cell culture supernatants of prenatal skin did not reveal the expected bent to proangiogenic molecules, indicating a complex regulation of angiogenesis during ontogeny. In summary, this study provides enticing new insights into the development and phenotypic characteristics of the vascular system in human prenatal skin.

  13. Endothelial lipase is highly expressed in macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Emil D; Nielsen, John E; Lindegaard, Marie L S; Hulten, Lillemor M; Schroeder, Torben V; Nielsen, Lars B

    2007-12-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is expressed in endothelial cells, and affects plasma lipoprotein metabolism by hydrolyzing phospholipids in HDL. To determine the cellular expression of EL mRNA and protein in human atherosclerotic lesions, we performed in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical studies on sections of carotid endarterectomy specimens from patients with symptomatic cerebrovascular disease. In each of eight patients, EL mRNA and/or protein were seen in areas between the necrotic core and the fibrotic cap where they colocalized with LPL and macrophage-specific CD68. Moreover, there was a positive association between the expression of EL mRNA and CD68 mRNA in plaques from 26 patients. The impact of differentiation from monocytes into macrophages, and subsequently foam cells (by incubation with acetylated LDL) on expression was studied using THP-1 monocytes and primary human monocytes. EL mRNA expression increased markedly when either type of monocytes was differentiated into macrophages. Upon further differentiation into foam cells EL mRNA decreased whereas protein levels remained high compared to monocytes. In conclusion, macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions display high levels of EL expression, and the level of EL expression varies greatly during transformation of blood monocytes into foam cells.

  14. Patterning human stem cells and endothelial cells with laser printing for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gaebel, Ralf; Ma, Nan; Liu, Jun; Guan, Jianjun; Koch, Lothar; Klopsch, Christian; Gruene, Martin; Toelk, Anita; Wang, Weiwei; Mark, Peter; Wang, Feng; Chichkov, Boris; Li, Wenzhong; Steinhoff, Gustav

    2011-12-01

    Recent study showed that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) could inhibit apoptosis of endothelial cells in hypoxic condition, increase their survival, and stimulate the angiogenesis process. In this project we applied Laser-Induced-Forward-Transfer (LIFT) cell printing technique and prepared a cardiac patch seeded with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human MSC (hMSC) in a defined pattern for cardiac regeneration. We seeded HUVEC and hMSC in a defined pattern on a Polyester urethane urea (PEUU) cardiac patch. On control patches an equal amount of cells was randomly seeded without LIFT. Patches were cultivated in vitro or transplanted in vivo to the infarcted zone of rat hearts after LAD-ligation. Cardiac performance was measured by left ventricular catheterization 8 weeks post infarction. Thereafter hearts were perfused with fluorescein tomato lectin for the assessment of functional blood vessels and stored for histology analyses. We demonstrated that LIFT-derived cell seeding pattern definitely modified growth characteristics of co-cultured HUVEC and hMSC leading to increased vessel formation and found significant functional improvement of infarcted hearts following transplantation of a LIFT-tissue engineered cardiac patch. Further, we could show enhanced capillary density and integration of human cells into the functionally connected vessels of murine vascular system. LIFT-based Tissue Engineering of cardiac patches for the treatment of myocardial infarction might improve wound healing and functional preservation. PMID:21911255

  15. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells in vitro: effect of cyclic AMP on cellular morphology and proliferation rate.

    PubMed

    Davison, P M; Karasek, M A

    1981-02-01

    Macrovascular endothelial cells isolated from the human umbilical vein and microvessel endothelium from the newborn foreskin dermis differ in their requirements for optimal growth in vitro. In the presence of 5 X 10(-4) M dibutyryl cyclic AMP (Bt2cAMP), human dermal microvessel endothelial cell proliferation rate increased to give a cell number of 203% of controls values by day 10 in culture. The cells retained their characteristic endothelial cell morphology, reached confluence, and could be serially passaged. Cells grown in the absence of Bt2cAMP did not proliferate readily and grew in a disorganized pattern. The effect of Bt2cAMP on microvascular endothelial cell proliferation rate and morphology could be duplicated by cholera toxin (CT) used together with isobutyl methylxanthine (IMX). These agents were found to elevate intracellular levels of cyclic AMP in microvascular endothelium over 40-fold. Human umbilical vein cells in culture failed to respond to either Bt2cAMP or CT together with IMX. The growth-promoting effect of dibutyryl cyclic AMP (Bt2cAMP) on human foreskin dermal microvascular endothelium in vitro is in marked contrast to the lack of response of human umbilical vein cells. These results provide further evidence of differences in the mechanisms that regulate macro and microvessel endothelial cell proliferation in vitro.

  16. Lectins as markers of endothelial cells: comparative study between human and animal cells.

    PubMed

    Roussel, F; Dalion, J

    1988-04-01

    Vascular endothelial cells were labelled with 10 vegetal lectins and 3 more monoclonal antibodies antiblood group ABO substances, in major organs of 14 common laboratory animals. After fixation in PLPa and paraffin embedding, cells were examined to determine their likeness to human cells. The most interesting reactive used was EEA, whose positivity defines upper mammalians. Blood B substance positivity and CSA negativity defines primates among which man is unique and defined by UEA I positivity and variability in ABO substance. CSA positivity defines non-primate upper mammalians. Rodents and birds were negative with all reactives tested. From the histochemical point of view, the animals closest to humans are monkeys, followed by swine and oxen, then by cat and dog and lastly by sheep. Rodents appear unrelated to humans in this system.

  17. A boost of BMP4 accelerates the commitment of human embryonic stem cells to the endothelial lineage.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Orit; Feraud, Olivier; Boyer-Di Ponio, Julie; Driancourt, Catherine; Clay, Denis; Le Bousse-Kerdiles, Marie-Caroline; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Uzan, Georges

    2009-08-01

    Embryoid bodies (EBs) generated during differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) contain vascular-like structures, suggesting that commitment of mesoderm progenitors into endothelial cells occurs spontaneously. We showed that bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), an inducer of mesoderm, accelerates the peak expression of CD133/kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR) and CD144/KDR. Because the CD133(+)KDR(+) population could represent endothelial progenitors, we sorted them at day 7 and cultured them in endothelial medium. These cells were, however, unable to differentiate into endothelial cells. Under standard conditions, the CD144(+)KDR(+) population represents up to 10% of the total cells at day 12. In culture, these cells, if sorted, give rise to a homogeneous population with a morphology typical of endothelial cells and express endothelial markers. These endothelial cells derived from the day 12 sorted population were functional, as assessed by different in vitro assays. When EBs were stimulated by BMP4, the CD144(+)KDR(+) peak was shifted to day 7. Most of these cells, however, were CD31(-), becoming CD31(+) in culture. They then expressed von Willebrand factor and were functional. This suggests that, initially, the BMP4-boosted day 7, CD144(+)KDR(+)CD31(-) population represents immature endothelial cells that differentiate into mature endothelial cells in culture. The expression of OCT3/4, a marker of immaturity for hESCs decreases during EB differentiation, decreasing faster following BMP4 induction. We also show that BMP4 inhibits the global expression of GATA2 and RUNX1, two transcription factors involved in hemangioblast formation, at day 7 and day 12.

  18. Human adipose tissue-resident monocytes exhibit an endothelial-like phenotype and display angiogenic properties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adipose tissue has the unique property of expanding throughout adult life, and angiogenesis is required for its growth. However, endothelial progenitor cells contribute minimally to neovascularization. Because myeloid cells have proven to be angiogenic, and monocytes accumulate in expanding adipose tissue, they might contribute to vascularization. Methods The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells from human adipose tissue were magnetically separated according to CD45 or CD14 expression. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were obtained from SVF CD45- cells. CD14+ monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood (PB) mononuclear cells and then cultured with SVF-derived MSCs. Freshly isolated or cultured cells were characterized with flow cytometry; the conditioned media were analyzed for the angiogenic growth factors, angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with Luminex Technology; their angiogenic capacity was determined in an in vivo gelatinous protein mixture (Matrigel) plug angiogenesis assay. Results CD45+ hematopoietic cells within the SVF contain CD14+ cells that co-express the CD34 progenitor marker and the endothelial cell antigens VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2/KDR), VEGFR1/Flt1, and Tie2. Co-culture experiments showed that SVF-derived MSCs promoted the acquisition of KDR and Tie-2 in PB monocytes. MSCs secreted significant amounts of Ang-2 and HGF, but minimal amounts of bFGF, G-CSF, or GM-CSF, whereas the opposite was observed for SVF CD14+ cells. Additionally, SVF CD14+ cells secreted significantly higher levels of VEGF and bFGF than did MSCs. Culture supernatants of PB monocytes cultured with MSCs contained significantly higher concentrations of VEGF, HGF, G-CSF, and GM-CSF than did the supernatants from cultures without MSCs

  19. Dual mechanism of vascular endothelial growth factor upregulation by hypoxia in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    von Marschall, Z; Cramer, T; Hocker, M; Finkenzeller, G; Wiedenmann, B; Rosewicz, S

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a key role in regulation of tumour associated angiogenesis. In the current study we analysed expression of VEGF and its receptors in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and investigated the molecular mechanisms of VEGF regulation by hypoxia.
METHODS—VEGF, kinase domain region (KDR)/fetal liver kinase 1 (flk-1), and flt-1 expression were examined by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation in 15 human HCC tissues. Expression of VEGF and regulation by hypoxia were assessed in three human HCC cell lines using a quantitative competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, ELISA, and a series of 5' deletion reporter gene constructs of the human VEGF promoter in transient transfection assays.
RESULTS—We observed over expression of VEGF mRNA and protein in HCC compared with cirrhosis or normal liver. Expression of VEGF in tumour cells was strongly increased in areas directly adjacent to necrotic/hypoxic regions. Both VEGF receptors were detected in vascular endothelia of HCC while only KDR/flk-1 receptors were detected in endothelial cells of cirrhotic livers. Expression of VEGF was observed in all human HCC cell lines examined. Hypoxia (1% oxygen) resulted in profound upregulation of VEGF mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, hypoxia treatment resulted in a doubling of VEGF mRNA stability. Deletion analysis of the human VEGF 5' flanking region −2018 and +50 demonstrated induction of VEGF promoter activity under hypoxic conditions which was significantly decreased following deletion of the region −1286 and −789 suggesting a substantial contribution of the −975 putative hypoxia inducible factor 1 binding site to hypoxia mediated transcriptional activation of the VEGF gene.
CONCLUSION—These data suggest hypoxia as a central stimulus of angiogenesis in human HCC through upregulation of VEGF gene expression by at least two distinct molecular mechanisms: activation of

  20. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α prevents endothelial progenitor cells senescence and enhances re-endothelialization of injured arteries via human telomerase reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaohua; Zhou, Yucheng; Bi, Xukun; Zhang, Jiefang; Fu, Guosheng; Zheng, Hao

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested that endothelial progenitor subpopulation (EPCs) number and activity were associated with EPCs senescence. Our previous study had shown that stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1α) could prevent EPCs senescence, which may be via telomerase. In this study, we further investigated the role of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (h-TERT) on the protective effect of SDF-1α against senescence. Knockdown h-TERT abrogated the protective effect of SDF-1α and abolished the effects of SDF-1α on migration and proliferation. Moreover, it inhibited EPCs recruitment. In conclusion, h-TERT served a critical role in the progress that SDF-1α prevented EPCs senescence and enhanced re-endothelialization of the injured arteries.

  1. Sphingosine 1-phosphate induces platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 phosphorylation in human endothelial cells through cSrc and Fyn.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ting; Chen, Shee-Uan; Chou, Chia-Hong; Lee, Hsinyu

    2008-08-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a multifunctional phospholipid which acts through a specific family of G protein-coupled receptors. Platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) form trans-homophilic binding at lateral cell border. Upon stimulation, its cytoplasmic tyrosine residues could be phosphorylated and interact with various downstream signaling molecules. In this study, we demonstrated that S1P induced PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation in human umbilical cord vein cells (HUVECs). By pharmacological inhibitors, it was suggested that G(i) and Src family kinases were involved in PECAM-1 phosphorylation. Moreover, cSrc and Fyn siRNA significantly suppressed S1P-induced PECAM-1 phosphorylation. These results suggested that S1P-induced PECAM-1 phosphorylation through G(i) and subsequent cSrc and Fyn. Our findings provide further understanding of S1P and PECAM-1 signaling as well as their functions in endothelial cells. PMID:18502612

  2. Selective induction of cell adhesion molecules by proinflammatory mediators in human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Nunn, Adrian D; Thomas, Regi

    2010-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory mediators can dramatically alter many responses of cultured endothelial cells in vitro, which are relevant to understanding the role played by the endothelium in inflammation in vivo. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of a comprehensive array of pro-inflammatory stimuli to modulate Cell Adhesion Molecule (CAM) expression in cultures of human microvascular cardiac endothelial cells (HMVEC.c). Cell ELISA, immunocy-tochemistry and flow cytometry were used to measure the CAM expressions in HMVEC.c in response to interleukins, TNF-α and LPS. Passage matched HMVEC.c from different donors showed different CAM expression profiles, confirming inherent variability in endothelial cells. Endothelial cells from different parts of the vasculature are exposed to different cytokines and thus different protein expression profiles. A thorough understanding of these innate differences in expression pattern of the microvasculatures of cardiac tissues might allow us the opportunity to target these tissues selectively. PMID:21072266

  3. The coffee diterpene kahweol inhibits tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced expression of cell adhesion molecules in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Kim, Ji Young; Hwang, Yong Pil; Lee, Kyung Jin; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Hye Gwang . E-mail: hgjeong@chosun.ac.kr

    2006-12-15

    Endothelial cells produce adhesion molecules after being stimulated with various inflammatory cytokines. These adhesion molecules play an important role in the development of atherogenesis. Recent studies have highlighted the chemoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of kahweol, a coffee-specific diterpene. This study examined the effects of kahweol on the cytokine-induced monocyte/human endothelial cell interaction, which is a crucial early event in atherogenesis. Kahweol inhibited the adhesion of TNF{alpha}-induced monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF{alpha}-induced protein and mRNA expression of the cell adhesion molecules, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. Furthermore, kahweol inhibited the TNF{alpha}-induced JAK2-PI3K/Akt-NF-{kappa}B activation pathway in these cells. Overall, kahweol has anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic activities, which occurs partly by down-regulating the pathway that affects the expression and interaction of the cell adhesion molecules on endothelial cells.

  4. Adherence of Staphylococcus epidermidis to human endothelial cells is associated with a polysaccharidic component of its extracellular mucous layer.

    PubMed

    Krevvata, Maria I; Spiliopoulou, Anastasia; Anastassiou, Evangelos D; Karamanos, Nikos; Kolonitsiou, Fevronia

    2011-06-01

    Bacterial adherence to eukaryotic cells is highly contributing to microbial pathogenesis. Bacterial adhesins, macromolecules, and glycosaminoglycan chains of the endothelial cell surface have been implicated in staphylococcal attachment. Our research group has isolated an antigenic polysaccharidic component of Staphylococcus epidermidis extracellular layer, known as 20-kDa PS (PS), and showed that antibodies against this polysaccharide protect from infections. Therefore, the role of PS in S. epidermidis adherence to endothelial cells was studied. For this purpose we examined the impact of PS on the ability of two S. epidermidis strains (a PS-producing and a non-PS-producing strain) to adhere to human endothelial cells in the presence or absence of specific antibodies to this polysaccharide. Hence, it is established that exogenous chondroitin sulfate (CS) decreases, in part, the S. epidermidis' attachment to endothelial cells and the antagonistic binding effect of CS and PS was also studied. The results obtained demonstrate that PS facilitates the adherence of S. epidermidis to both strains. CS abolished the PS-induced adherence in PS-producing strain and partially in the non-PS-producing one. Conclusively, the adherence of S. epidermidis to human endothelial cells is associated with its extracellular PS component and it is suggested that the bacterial binding via glycosaminoglycan chains is an important mechanism underlining the PS-induced binding to endothelial cells.

  5. Effect of extracellular human immunodeficiency virus type 1 glycoprotein 120 on primary human vascular endothelial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Huang, M B; Hunter, M; Bond, V C

    1999-09-20

    During the course of an HIV-1 infection, free infectious and noninfectious virus particles, and free HIV-1 proteins, circulate within the host, exposing the host endothelium to these viral factors, even if the endothelium is not infected. This suggests that extracellular HIV-1 proteins could influence endothelial cell function, leading to pathogenesis. In light of this, we have used primary cultured human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) to screen for effects of the HIV-1 protein gp120 on endothelial cell function. The results of this study show that short exposure of HUVEC cultures to this protein causes significant levels of cytotoxicity. Further, using several different assays, we have shown that this cytotoxic effect on HUVECs appears to be due to induction of an apoptotic program. The biphasic nature of gp120 titration curves suggests that multiple cellular factors are mediating these gp120-induced effects. Competition studies appear to confirm this by showing that the apoptotic effect is mediated through two cell surface receptors on HUVECs, CCR5 and CXCR4. Alternatively, competition studies examining CD4 receptors suggests that CD4 played no role in gp12O-induced effects on HUVECs.

  6. Scutellarin promotes in vitro angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhong-Xiu-Zi; Huang, Da-Yong; Li, Hai-Xia; Zhang, Li-Na; Lv, Yan-Hong; Cui, Hai-Dong; Zheng, Jin-Hua

    2010-09-10

    Research highlights: {yields} It has been shown that scutellarin exhibits a variety of pharmacological actions, including anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, vasodilator as well as cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ischemia protective effects, indicating beneficial vascular effects of scutellarin. Therefore, it is speculated that scutellarin may be able to stimulate angiogenesis, which could be beneficial in the treatment of ischemic disease, wound healing and tissue regeneration. {yields} The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the direct angiogenic actions of scutellarin on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. {yields} Our results showed that scutellarin to directly induce in vitro angiogenesis, which is closely correlated with upregulated MMP-2 expression, suggesting a potential for increasing angiogenesis. -- Abstract: Angiogenesis is critical to a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. Scutellarin, a major flavonoid of a Chinese herbal medicine Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand. Mazz. has been shown to offer beneficial effects on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular functions. However, scutellarin's effects on angiogenesis and underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Here, we studied angiogenic effects of scutellarin on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. Scutellarin was found by MTT assay to induce proliferation of HUVECs. In scutellarin-treated HUVECs, a dramatic increase in migration was measured by wound healing assay; Transwell chamber assay found significantly more invading cells in scutellarin-treated groups. Scutellarin also promoted capillary-like tube formation in HUVECs on Matrigel, and significantly upregulated platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 at both mRNA and protein levels. Scutellarin's angiogenic mechanism was investigated in vitro by measuring expression of angiogenic factors associated with cell migration and invasion. Scutellarin strongly induced MMP-2

  7. The cytotoxicity evaluation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles on human aortic endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Gaoyuan; Wu, Hengfang; Xiong, Fei; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Zhirui; Bian, Zhiping; Xu, Jindan; Gu, Chunrong; Gu, Ning; Chen, Xiangjian; Yang, Di

    2013-05-01

    One major obstacle for successful application of nanoparticles in medicine is its potential nanotoxicity on the environment and human health. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxicity effect of dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated iron oxide (DMSA-Fe2O3) using cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Our results showed that DMSA-Fe2O3 in the culture medium could be absorbed into HAECs, and dispersed in the cytoplasm. The cytotoxicity effect of DMSA-Fe2O3 on HAECs was dose-dependent, and the concentrations no more than 0.02 mg/ml had little toxic effect which were revealed by tetrazolium dye assay. Meanwhile, the cell injury biomarker, lactate dehydrogenase, was not significantly higher than that from control cells (without DMSA-Fe2O3). However, the endocrine function for endothelin-1 and prostacyclin I-2, as well as the urea transporter function, was altered even without obvious evidence of cell injury in this context. We also showed by real-time PCR analysis that DMSA-Fe2O3 exposure resulted in differential effects on the expressions of pro- and anti-apoptosis genes of HAECs. Meanwhile, it was noted that DMSA-Fe2O3 exposure could activate the expression of genes related to oxidative stress and adhesion molecules, which suggested that inflammatory response might be evoked. Moreover, we demonstrated by in vitro endothelial tube formation that even a small amount of DMSA-Fe2O3 (0.01 and 0.02 mg/ml) could inhibit angiogenesis by the HAECs. Altogether, these results indicate that DMSA-Fe2O3 have some cytotoxicity that may cause side effects on normal endothelial cells.

  8. Low Dose Iron Treatments Induce a DNA Damage Response in Human Endothelial Cells within Minutes

    PubMed Central

    Mollet, Inês G.; Giess, Adam; Paschalaki, Koralia; Periyasamy, Manikandan; Lidington, Elaine C.; Mason, Justin C.; Jones, Michael D.; Game, Laurence; Ali, Simak; Shovlin, Claire L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous reports from patients able to report vascular sequelae in real time, and recognition that serum non transferrin bound iron may reach or exceed 10μmol/L in the blood stream after iron tablets or infusions, led us to hypothesize that conventional iron treatments may provoke acute vascular injury. This prompted us to examine whether a phenotype could be observed in normal human endothelial cells treated with low dose iron. Methodology Confluent primary human endothelial cells (EC) were treated with filter-sterilized iron (II) citrate or fresh media for RNA sequencing and validation studies. RNA transcript profiles were evaluated using directional RNA sequencing with no pre-specification of target sequences. Alignments were counted for exons and junctions of the gene strand only, blinded to treatment types. Principal Findings Rapid changes in RNA transcript profiles were observed in endothelial cells treated with 10μmol/L iron (II) citrate, compared to media-treated cells. Clustering for Gene Ontology (GO) performed on all differentially expressed genes revealed significant differences in biological process terms between iron and media-treated EC, whereas 10 sets of an equivalent number of randomly selected genes from the respective EC gene datasets showed no significant differences in any GO terms. After 1 hour, differentially expressed genes clustered to vesicle mediated transport, protein catabolism, and cell cycle (Benjamini p = 0.0016, 0.0024 and 0.0032 respectively), and by 6 hours, to cellular response to DNA damage stimulus most significantly through DNA repair genes FANCG, BLM, and H2AFX. Comet assays demonstrated that 10μM iron treatment elicited DNA damage within 1 hour. This was accompanied by a brisk DNA damage response pulse, as ascertained by the development of DNA damage response (DDR) foci, and p53 stabilization. Significance These data suggest that low dose iron treatments are sufficient to modify the vascular endothelium

  9. Identification and characterization of angiogenesis targets through proteomic profiling of endothelial cells in human cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Mesri, Mehdi; Birse, Charlie; Heidbrink, Jenny; McKinnon, Kathy; Brand, Erin; Bermingham, Candy Lee; Feild, Brian; Fitzhugh, William; He, Tao; Ruben, Steve; Moore, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Genomic and proteomic analysis of normal and cancer tissues has yielded abundant molecular information for potential biomarker and therapeutic targets. Considering potential advantages in accessibility to pharmacological intervention, identification of targets resident on the vascular endothelium within tumors is particularly attractive. By employing mass spectrometry (MS) as a tool to identify proteins that are over-expressed in tumor-associated endothelium relative to normal cells, we aimed to discover targets that could be utilized in tumor angiogenesis cancer therapy. We developed proteomic methods that allowed us to focus our studies on the discovery of cell surface/secreted proteins, as they represent key antibody therapeutic and biomarker opportunities. First, we isolated endothelial cells (ECs) from human normal and kidney cancer tissues by FACS using CD146 as a marker. Additionally, dispersed human colon and lung cancer tissues and their corresponding normal tissues were cultured ex-vivo and their endothelial content were preferentially expanded, isolated and passaged. Cell surface proteins were then preferentially captured, digested with trypsin and subjected to MS-based proteomic analysis. Peptides were first quantified, and then the sequences of differentially expressed peptides were resolved by MS analysis. A total of 127 unique non-overlapped (157 total) tumor endothelial cell over-expressed proteins identified from directly isolated kidney-associated ECs and those identified from ex-vivo cultured lung and colon tissues including known EC markers such as CD146, CD31, and VWF. The expression analyses of a panel of the identified targets were confirmed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) including CD146, B7H3, Thy-1 and ATP1B3. To determine if the proteins identified mediate any functional role, we performed siRNA studies which led to previously unidentified functional dependency for B7H3 and ATP1B3.

  10. Identification and Characterization of Angiogenesis Targets through Proteomic Profiling of Endothelial Cells in Human Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Mesri, Mehdi; Birse, Charlie; Heidbrink, Jenny; McKinnon, Kathy; Brand, Erin; Bermingham, Candy Lee; Feild, Brian; FitzHugh, William; He, Tao; Ruben, Steve; Moore, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Genomic and proteomic analysis of normal and cancer tissues has yielded abundant molecular information for potential biomarker and therapeutic targets. Considering potential advantages in accessibility to pharmacological intervention, identification of targets resident on the vascular endothelium within tumors is particularly attractive. By employing mass spectrometry (MS) as a tool to identify proteins that are over-expressed in tumor-associated endothelium relative to normal cells, we aimed to discover targets that could be utilized in tumor angiogenesis cancer therapy. We developed proteomic methods that allowed us to focus our studies on the discovery of cell surface/secreted proteins, as they represent key antibody therapeutic and biomarker opportunities. First, we isolated endothelial cells (ECs) from human normal and kidney cancer tissues by FACS using CD146 as a marker. Additionally, dispersed human colon and lung cancer tissues and their corresponding normal tissues were cultured ex-vivo and their endothelial content were preferentially expanded, isolated and passaged. Cell surface proteins were then preferentially captured, digested with trypsin and subjected to MS-based proteomic analysis. Peptides were first quantified, and then the sequences of differentially expressed peptides were resolved by MS analysis. A total of 127 unique non-overlapped (157 total) tumor endothelial cell over-expressed proteins identified from directly isolated kidney-associated ECs and those identified from ex-vivo cultured lung and colon tissues including known EC markers such as CD146, CD31, and VWF. The expression analyses of a panel of the identified targets were confirmed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) including CD146, B7H3, Thy-1 and ATP1B3. To determine if the proteins identified mediate any functional role, we performed siRNA studies which led to previously unidentified functional dependency for B7H3 and ATP1B3. PMID:24236063

  11. The cytotoxicity evaluation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles on human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Gaoyuan; Wu, Hengfang; Xiong, Fei; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Zhirui; Bian, Zhiping; Xu, Jindan; Gu, Chunrong; Gu, Ning; Chen, Xiangjian; Yang, Di

    2013-01-01

    One major obstacle for successful application of nanoparticles in medicine is its potential nanotoxicity on the environment and human health. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxicity effect of dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated iron oxide (DMSA-Fe2O3) using cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Our results showed that DMSA-Fe2O3 in the culture medium could be absorbed into HAECs, and dispersed in the cytoplasm. The cytotoxicity effect of DMSA-Fe2O3 on HAECs was dose-dependent, and the concentrations no more than 0.02 mg/ml had little toxic effect which were revealed by tetrazolium dye assay. Meanwhile, the cell injury biomarker, lactate dehydrogenase, was not significantly higher than that from control cells (without DMSA-Fe2O3). However, the endocrine function for endothelin-1 and prostacyclin I-2, as well as the urea transporter function, was altered even without obvious evidence of cell injury in this context. We also showed by real-time PCR analysis that DMSA-Fe2O3 exposure resulted in differential effects on the expressions of pro- and anti-apoptosis genes of HAECs. Meanwhile, it was noted that DMSA-Fe2O3 exposure could activate the expression of genes related to oxidative stress and adhesion molecules, which suggested that inflammatory response might be evoked. Moreover, we demonstrated by in vitro endothelial tube formation that even a small amount of DMSA-Fe2O3 (0.01 and 0.02 mg/ml) could inhibit angiogenesis by the HAECs. Altogether, these results indicate that DMSA-Fe2O3 have some cytotoxicity that may cause side effects on normal endothelial cells.

  12. Provocation of pulmonary vascular endothelial injury in rabbits by human recombinant interleukin-1 beta.

    PubMed Central

    Goldblum, S E; Yoneda, K; Cohen, D A; McClain, C J

    1988-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) mediates components of the acute-phase response, stimulates granulocyte metabolism, and induces endothelial cell surface changes. We studied the effects of human recombinant IL-1 beta (rIL-1 beta) or rIL-1 alpha on circulating granulocytes, their sequestration within the pulmonary microvasculature, pulmonary edema formation, and changes in pulmonary vascular permeability to 125I-labeled albumin. rIL-1 beta administration induced significant (P less than 0.03) but transient granulocytopenia followed by significant (P less than 0.04) neutrophilia and significant (P less than 0.04) pulmonary leukostasis compared with saline-infused rabbits. Rabbits preinfused with 125I-labeled rabbit serum albumin and administered saline, rIL-1 beta, or rIL-1 alpha were sacrificed, and lung wet/dry weight ratios and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma 125I activities determined. Both rIL-1 beta and rIL-1 alpha increased lung wet/dry weight ratios (P less than 0.025 and P less than 0.01, respectively) compared with saline controls. rIL-1 beta increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid/plasma 125I radioactivity ratios (P less than 0.025). Electron microscopic analysis of lung sections obtained from rIL-1 beta-infused animals demonstrated endothelial injury, perivascular edema, and extravasation of an ultrastructural permeability tracer. The observation that human rIL-1 can evoke acute pulmonary vascular endothelial injury and lung edema in rabbits supports the hypothesis that IL-1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of the adult respiratory distress syndrome. Images PMID:3261716

  13. Dengue Virus Induces Novel Changes in Gene Expression of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Warke, Rajas V.; Xhaja, Kris; Martin, Katherine J.; Fournier, Marcia F.; Shaw, Sunil K.; Brizuela, Nathaly; de Bosch, Norma; Lapointe, David; Ennis, Francis A.; Rothman, Alan L.; Bosch, Irene

    2003-01-01

    Endothelial cells are permissive to dengue virus (DV) infection in vitro, although their importance as targets of DV infection in vivo remains a subject of debate. To analyze the virus-host interaction, we studied the effect of DV infection on gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by using differential display reverse transcription-PCR (DD-RTPCR), quantitative RT-PCR, and Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays. DD identified eight differentially expressed cDNAs, including inhibitor of apoptosis-1, 2′-5′ oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), a 2′-5′ OAS-like (OASL) gene, galectin-9, myxovirus protein A (MxA), regulator of G-protein signaling, endothelial and smooth muscle cell-derived neuropilin-like protein, and phospholipid scramblase 1. Microarray analysis of 22,000 human genes confirmed these findings and identified an additional 269 genes that were induced and 126 that were repressed more than fourfold after DV infection. Broad functional responses that were activated included the stress, defense, immune, cell adhesion, wounding, inflammatory, and antiviral pathways. These changes in gene expression were seen after infection of HUVECs with either laboratory-adapted virus or with virus isolated directly from plasma of DV-infected patients. Tumor necrosis factor alpha, OASL, and MxA and h-IAP1 genes were induced within the first 8 to 12 h after infection, suggesting a direct effect of DV infection. These global analyses of DV effects on cellular gene expression identify potentially novel mechanisms involved in dengue disease manifestations such as hemostatic disturbance. PMID:14557666

  14. Human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells respond to interaction with Entamoeba histolytica by changes in morphology, integrin signalling and cell death.

    PubMed

    Faust, Daniela M; Marquay Markiewicz, Jacques; Danckaert, Anne; Soubigou, Guillaume; Guillen, Nancy

    2011-07-01

    Invasive infection with Entamoeba histolytica causes intestinal and hepatic amoebiasis. In liver, parasites cross the endothelial barrier before abscess formation in the parenchyma. We focussed on amoebae interactions with human hepatic endothelial cells, the latter potentially playing a dual role in the infection process: as a barrier and as modulators of host defence responses. We characterized early responses of a human liver sinusoidal endothelial cell line to virulent and virulence-attenuated E. histolytica. Within the first minutes human cells start to retract, enter into apoptosis and die. In the presence of virulent amoebae, expression of genes related to cell cycle, cell death and integrin-mediated adhesion signalling was modulated, and actin fibre, focal adhesion kinase and paxillin localizations changed. Effects of inhibitors and amoeba strains not expressing pathogenic factors amoebapore A and cysteine protease A5 indicated that cell death and cytoskeleton disorganization depend upon parasite adhesion and amoebic cysteine proteinase activities. The data establish a relation between cytotoxic effects of E. histolytica and altered human target cell adhesion and suggest that interference with adhesion signalling triggers endothelial cell retraction and death. Understanding the roles of integrin signalling in endothelial cells will provide clues to unravel host-pathogen interactions during amoebic liver infection. PMID:21624031

  15. Human aortic endothelial cell morphology influenced by topography of porous silicon substrates.

    PubMed

    Formentín, Pilar; Catalán, Úrsula; Fernández-Castillejo, Sara; Alba, Maria; Baranowska, Malgorzata; Solà, Rosa; Pallarès, Josep; Marsal, Lluís F

    2015-10-01

    Porous silicon has received much attention because of its optical properties and for its usefulness in cell-based biosensing, drug delivery, and tissue engineering applications. Surface properties of the biomaterial are associated with cell adhesion and with proliferation, migration, and differentiation. The present article analyzes the behavior of human aortic endothelial cells in macro- and nanoporous collagen-modified porous silicon samples. On both substrates, cells are well adhered and numerous. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were employed to study the effects of porosity on the morphology of the cells. On macroporous silicon, filopodia is not observed but the cell spreads on the surface, increasing the lamellipodia surface which penetrates the macropore. On nanoporous silicon, multiple filopodia were found to branch out from the cell body. These results demonstrate that the pore size plays a key role in controlling the morphology and growth rate of human aortic endothelial cells, and that these forms of silicon can be used to control cell development in tissue engineering as well as in basic cell biology research.

  16. Effects of phthalates on the human corneal endothelial cell line B4G12.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Tanja; Cao, Yi; Kjærgaard, Søren K; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva C

    2012-01-01

    Phthalates are industrial chemicals used in many cosmetics. We evaluated an in vitro model for eye irritancy testing using the human corneal endothelial cell line B4G12. Cell proliferation and toxicity were assessed after exposing to di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP), di-n-octyl phthalate (DnOP), and di-isononyl phthalate (DINP). Gene expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines were evaluated after exposure to DBP. Decreased cell proliferation was observed for the phthalates DBP, BBP, and DEHP, and cell toxicity was observed for DBP and BBP. Upon DBP exposure at nontoxic concentrations, a significant increased gene expression and cytokine cell secretion were observed for interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-8, and also an increased IL-6 secretion was observed. In conclusion, the human corneal endothelial cell line B4G12 may be a potential model for inflammatory eye irritancy testing of phthalates. PMID:22723514

  17. A comprehensive characterization of membrane vesicles released by autophagic human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pallet, Nicolas; Sirois, Isabelle; Bell, Christina; Hanafi, Laïla-Aïcha; Hamelin, Katia; Dieudé, Mélanie; Rondeau, Christiane; Thibault, Pierre; Desjardins, Michel; Hebert, Marie-Josée

    2013-04-01

    The stress status of the apoptotic cell can promote phenotypic changes that have important consequences on the immunogenicity of the dying cell. Autophagy is one of the biological processes activated in response to a stressful condition. It is an important mediator of intercellular communications, both by regulating the unconventional secretion of molecules, including interleukin 1β, and by regulating the extracellular release of ATP from early stage apoptotic cells. Additionally, autophagic components can be released in a caspase-dependent manner by serum-starved human endothelial cells that have engaged apoptotic and autophagic processes. The nature and the components of the extracellular vesicles released by dying autophagic cells are not known. In this study, we have identified extracellular membrane vesicles that are released by human endothelial cells undergoing apoptosis and autophagy, and characterized their biochemical, ultrastructural, morphological properties as well as their proteome. These extracellular vesicles differ from classical apoptotic bodies because they do not contain nucleus components and are released independently of Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 activation. Instead, they are enriched with autophagosomes and mitochondria and convey various danger signals, including ATP, suggesting that they could be involved in the modulation of innate immunity. PMID:23436686

  18. Prunella vulgaris L. Upregulates eNOS expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ning; Bollinger, Larissa; Steinkamp-Fenske, Katja; Förstermann, Ulrich; Li, Huige

    2010-01-01

    The purported effects of "circulation-improving" herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) show striking similarities with the vascular actions of nitric oxide (NO) produced by the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). We have previously reported that Salviae miltiorrhizae radix and Zizyphi spinosae semen upregulate eNOS expression. In the present study, we studied the effect on eNOS gene expression of 15 Chinese herbs with potential effects on the vasculature, and identified Prunella vulgaris L. (PVL) (flowering spike) as a potent eNOS-upregulating agent. In EA.hy 926 cells, a cell line derived from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), an aqueous extract of PVL increased eNOS promoter activity, eNOS mRNA and protein expressions, as well as NO production in concentration- and time-dependent manners. We have previously shown that ursolic acid (a constituent of Salviae miltiorrhizae radix), betulinic acid (a compound present in Zizyphi spinosae semen), luteolin and cynaroside (ingredients of artichoke, Cynara scolymus L.) are capable of enhancing eNOS gene expression. These compounds are also present in significant quantities in PVL. Thus, PVL contains active principles that stimulate human eNOS gene expression, and such compounds may have therapeutic potential against cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20503475

  19. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of SUT-1, a sulfate transporter from human high endothelial venules

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Jean-Philippe; Baekkevold, Espen S.; Feliu, Jacques; Brandtzaeg, Per; Amalric, François

    1999-01-01

    High endothelial venules (HEV) are specialized postcapillary venules found in lymphoid organs and chronically inflamed tissues that support high levels of lymphocyte extravasation from the blood. One of the major characteristics of HEV endothelial cells (HEVEC) is their capacity to incorporate large amounts of sulfate into sialomucin-type counter-receptors for the lymphocyte homing receptor L-selectin. Here, we show that HEVEC express two functional classes of sulfate transporters defined by their differential sensitivity to the anion-exchanger inhibitor 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS), and we report the molecular characterization of a DIDS-resistant sulfate transporter from human HEVEC, designated SUT-1. SUT-1 belongs to the family of Na+-coupled anion transporters and exhibits 40–50% amino acid identity with the rat renal Na+/sulfate cotransporter, NaSi-1, as well as with the human and rat Na+/dicarboxylate cotransporters, NaDC-1/SDCT1 and NaDC-3/SDCT2. Functional expression studies in cRNA-injected Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that SUT-1 mediates high levels of Na+-dependent sulfate transport, which is resistant to DIDS inhibition. The SUT-1 gene mapped to human chromosome 7q33. Northern blotting analysis revealed that SUT-1 exhibits a highly restricted tissue distribution, with abundant expression in placenta. Reverse transcription–PCR analysis indicated that SUT-1 and the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTD), one of the two known human DIDS-sensitive sulfate transporters, are coexpressed in HEVEC. SUT-1 and DTD could correspond, respectively, to the DIDS-resistant and DIDS-sensitive components of sulfate uptake in HEVEC. Together, these results demonstrate that SUT-1 is a distinct human Na+-coupled sulfate transporter, likely to play a major role in sulfate incorporation in HEV. PMID:10535998

  20. Capillary morphogenesis during human endothelial cell invasion of three-dimensional collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Davis, G E; Black, S M; Bayless, K J

    2000-09-01

    Here, we describe assay systems that utilize serum-free defined media to evaluate capillary morphogenesis during human endothelial cell (EC) invasion of three-dimensional collagen matrices. ECs invade these matrices over a 1-3-d period to form capillary tubes. Blocking antibodies to the alpha2beta1 integrin interfere with invasion and morphogenesis while other integrin blocking antibodies do not. Interestingly, we observed increased invasion of ECs toward a population of underlying ECs undergoing morphogenesis. In addition, we have developed assays on microscope slides that display the invasion process horizontally, thereby enhancing our ability to image these events. Thus far, we have observed intracellular vacuoles that appear to regulate the formation of capillary lumens, and extensive cell processes that facilitate the interconnection of ECs during morphogenic events. These assays should enable further investigation of the morphologic steps and molecular events controlling human capillary tube formation in three-dimensional extracellular matrices.

  1. Effects of simulated microgravity on cell cycle in human endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovskaya, Alisa A.; Ignashkova, Tatiana I.; Bochenkova, Anna V.; Moskovtsev, Aleksey A.; Baranov, Victor M.; Kubatiev, Aslan A.

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the current study is to investigate effects of simulated microgravity on the cell cycle of endothelial cells. We analyze changes in the cell cycle after exposure of endothelial-like EA.hy 926 cells to simulated microgravity using a Desktop random positioning machine (RPM). Cell cycle profiles determined by flow cytometry show, that the percentage of the cells in the G0/G1 phase after 24 and 96 h of RPM-simulated microgravity is significantly increased as compared to the control group. However, no significant difference is observed after 120 h of RPM-simulated microgravity. In regard to S phase, the percentage of cells is significantly decreased after 24 and 96 h of RPM, respectively; whereas 120 h later, the number of S-phase cells is comparable to the control group. Thus, we show that simulated microgravity inhibits cell cycle progression of human EA.hy 926 cells from the G0/G1 phase to the S phase. We observe an effect of a hibernation-like state, when the growth of the cells in the RPM group slows down, but does not stop. Our results further show that simulated microgravity can affect adhesion of endothelial cells, and alpha-tubulin expression, as most cells begin to detach from the surface of OptiCell unit after 24 h, form aggregates after 48 h, and exhibit accumulation of alpha-tubulin around the nucleus after 48 h of exposure to simulated microgravity conditions. Our results demonstrate a chance in the cell cycle in a low gravitational field.

  2. Phthalimide neovascular factor 1 (PNF1) modulates MT1-MMP activity in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wieghaus, Kristen A; Gianchandani, Erwin P; Neal, Rebekah A; Paige, Mikell A; Brown, Milton L; Papin, Jason A; Botchwey, Edward A

    2009-07-01

    We are creating synthetic pharmaceuticals with angiogenic activity and potential to promote vascular invasion. We previously demonstrated that one of these molecules, phthalimide neovascular factor 1 (PNF1), significantly expands microvascular networks in vivo following sustained release from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLAGA) films. In addition, to probe PNF1 mode of action, we recently applied a novel pathway-based compendium analysis to a multi-timepoint, controlled microarray data set of PNF1-treated (vs. control) human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs), and we identified induction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and, subsequently, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signaling networks by PNF1. Here we validate this microarray data set with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Subsequently, we probe this data set and identify three specific TGF-beta-induced genes with regulation by PNF1 conserved over multiple timepoints-amyloid beta (A4) precursor protein (APP), early growth response 1 (EGR-1), and matrix metalloproteinase 14 (MMP14 or MT1-MMP)-that are also implicated in angiogenesis. We further focus on MMP14 given its unique role in angiogenesis, and we validate MT1-MMP modulation by PNF1 with an in vitro fluorescence assay that demonstrates the direct effects that PNF1 exerts on functional metalloproteinase activity. We also utilize endothelial cord formation in collagen gels to show that PNF1-induced stimulation of endothelial cord network formation in vitro is in some way MT1-MMP-dependent. Ultimately, this new network analysis of our transcriptional footprint characterizing PNF1 activity 1-48 h post-supplementation in HMVECs coupled with corresponding validating experiments suggests a key set of a few specific targets that are involved in PNF1 mode of action and important for successful promotion of the neovascularization that we have observed by the drug in vivo. PMID:19326468

  3. Pro-inflammatory cytokines downregulate Hsp27 and cause apoptosis of human retinal capillary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nahomi, Rooban B.; Palmer, Allison; Roth, Katelyn E.; Fort, Patrice E.; Nagaraj, Ram H.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of acellular capillaries in the retina, a hallmark feature of diabetic retinopathy, is caused by apoptosis of endothelial cells and pericytes. The biochemical mechanism of such apoptosis remains unclear. Small heat shock proteins play an important role in the regulation of apoptosis. In the diabetic retina, pro-inflammatory cytokines are upregulated. In this study, we investigated the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines on small heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) in human retinal endothelial cells (HREC). In HREC cultured in the presence of cytokine mixtures (CM), a significant downregulation of Hsp27 at the protein and mRNA level occurred, with no effect on HSF-1, the transcription factor for Hsp27. The presence of high glucose (25 mM) amplified the effects of cytokines on Hsp27. CM activated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and enhanced the production of kynurenine and ROS. An inhibitor of IDO, 1-methyl tryptophan (MT), inhibited the effects of CM on Hsp27. CM also upregulated NOS2 and, consequently, nitric oxide (NO). A NOS inhibitor, L-NAME, and a ROS scavenger blocked the CM-mediated Hsp27 downregulation. While a NO donor in the culture medium did not decrease the Hsp27 content, a peroxynitrite donor and exogenous peroxynitrite did. The cytokines and high glucose-induced apoptosis of HREC were inhibited by MT and L-NAME. Downregulation of Hsp27 by a siRNA treatment promoted apoptosis in HREC. Together, these data suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines induce the formation of ROS and NO, which, through the formation of peroxynitrite, reduce the Hsp27 content and bring about apoptosis of retinal capillary endothelial cells. PMID:24252613

  4. The inhibitory effect of simvastatin and aspirin on histamine responsiveness in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Absi, Mais; Bruce, Jason I; Ward, Donald T

    2014-04-01

    Statins and aspirin deliver well-established cardiovascular benefits resulting in their increased use as combined polypills to decrease risk of stroke and heart disease. However, the direct endothelial effect of combined statin/aspirin cotreatment remains unclear. Histamine is an inflammatory mediator that increases vascular permeability, and so we examined the effect of treating human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) for 24 h with 1 μM simvastatin and 100 μM aspirin on histamine responsiveness. Subsequent histamine (1 μM) challenge increased intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)i) concentration, an effect that was significantly inhibited by combined simvastatin/aspirin pretreatment but not when then the compounds were given separately, even at 10-fold higher concentrations. In contrast, the Ca(2+)i mobilization response to ATP challenge (10 μM) was not inhibited by combined simvastatin/aspirin pretreatment. The H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine significantly inhibited both histamine-induced Ca(2+)i mobilization and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, whereas ranitidine (H2 receptor antagonist) was without effect. However, combined simvastatin/aspirin pretreatment failed to decrease H1 receptor protein expression ruling out receptor downregulation as the mechanism of action. Histamine-induced ERK activation was also inhibited by atorvastatin pretreatment, while simvastatin further inhibited histamine-induced vascular endothelial cadherin phosphorylation as well as altered HUVEC morphology and inhibited actin polymerization. Therefore, in addition to the known therapeutic benefits of statins and aspirin, here we provide initial cellular evidence that combined statin/aspirin treatment inhibits histamine responsiveness in HUVECs.

  5. Interaction of Leptospira interrogans with Human Proteolytic Systems Enhances Dissemination through Endothelial Cells and Protease Levels

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Monica L.; Alvarez-Flores, Miryam P.; Kirchgatter, Karin; Romero, Eliete C.; Alves, Ivy J.; de Morais, Zenaide M.; Vasconcellos, Silvio A.; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported the ability of Leptospira to capture plasminogen (PLG) and generate plasmin (PLA) bound on the microbial surface in the presence of exogenous activators. In this work, we examined the effects of leptospiral PLG binding for active penetration through the endothelial cell barrier and activation. The results indicate that leptospires with PLG association or PLA activation have enhanced migration activity through human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers compared with untreated bacteria. Leptospira cells coated with PLG were capable of stimulating the expression of PLG activators by HUVECs. Moreover, leptospires endowed with PLG or PLA promoted transcriptional upregulation matrix metalloprotease 9 (MMP-9). Serum samples from patients with confirmed leptospirosis showed higher levels of PLG activators and total MMP-9 than serum samples from normal (healthy) subjects. The highest level of PLG activators and total MMP-9 was detected with microscopic agglutination test (MAT)-negative serum samples, suggesting that this proteolytic activity stimulation occurs at the early stage of the disease. Furthermore, a gelatin zymography profile obtained for MMPs with serum samples from patients with leptospirosis appears to be specific to leptospiral infection because serum samples from patients with unrelated infectious diseases produced no similar degradation bands. Altogether, the data suggest that the Leptospira-associated PLG or PLA might represent a mechanism that contributes to bacterial penetration of endothelial cells through an activation cascade of events that enhances the proteolytic capability of the organism. To our knowledge, this is the first proteolytic activity associated with leptospiral pathogenesis described to date. PMID:23478319

  6. α-Tocopherol suppresses antiangiogenic effect of δ-tocotrienol in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Akira; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2015-04-01

    Recently, tocotrienol (T3), a less well-known form of vitamin E, has gained attention as a potent hypocholesterolemic, anticancer and antiangiogenic agent. However, tocopherol (Toc), a commonly consumed form of vitamin E, has been reported to inhibit T3's effects (hypocholesterolemic and anticancer activity). There has been no report on Toc's effect on the antiangiogenic action of T3 during cotreatment. The aim of this study is to determine if and to what extent Toc affects the antiangiogenic effects of δ-T3 (the most potent isomer). This was achieved through cotreatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with δ-T3 and Toc (α-, β-, γ- and δ-isomers). Toc, especially α-Toc, attenuated δ-T3-induced cytotoxicity and tube degradation in cotreated HUVECs, while α-Toc treatments did not exhibit any effects. A rat aortic ring assay also showed inhibition of δ-T3's antiangiogenic effects by α-Toc. Further, in HUVEC study, cell cycle arrest and proapoptotic gene expression (p21, p27, caspase-3 and caspase-9) which were induced by δ-T3 were decreased by α-Toc treatment. α-Toc also suppressed δ-T3-induced dephosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and Akt pathway proteins. Additionally, uptake of δ-T3 into HUVECs was decreased by α-Toc. Here we demonstrate that α-Toc not only has little antiangiogenic effect on endothelial cells but also reduces the antiangiogenic effects of δ-T3 through modulation of its cellular uptake and of relevant signal transduction pathways. Understanding T3's antiangiogenic effects and interaction with Toc is important for developing medical applications.

  7. Adherence to human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L) of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For years Plasmodium vivax has been considered the cause of benign malaria. Nevertheless, it has been observed that this parasite can produce a severe disease comparable to Plasmodium falciparum. It has been suggested that some physiopathogenic processes might be shared by these two species, such as cytoadherence. Recently, it has been demonstrated that P. vivax-infected erythrocytes (Pv-iEs) have the capacity to adhere to endothelial cells, in which intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) seems to be involved in this process. Methods Adherence capacity of 21 Colombian isolates, from patients with P. vivax mono-infection to a microvascular line of human lung endothelium (HMVEC-L) was assessed in static conditions and binding was evaluated at basal levels or in tumor necrosis factor (TNF) stimulated cells. The adherence specificity for the ICAM-1 receptor was determined through inhibition with an anti-CD54 monoclonal antibody. Results The majority of P. vivax isolates, 13 out of 21 (61.9%), adhered to the HMVEC-L cells, but P. vivax adherence was at least seven times lower when compared to the four P. falciparum isolates. Moreover, HMVEC-L stimulation with TNF led to an increase of 1.6-fold in P. vivax cytoadhesion, similar to P. falciparum isolates (1.8-fold) at comparable conditions. Also, blockage of ICAM-1 receptor with specific antibodies showed a significant 50% adherence reduction. Conclusions Plasmodium vivax isolates found in Colombia are also capable of adhering specifically in vitro to lung endothelial cells, via ICAM-1 cell receptor, both at basal state and after cell stimulation with TNF. Collectively, these findings reinforce the concept of cytoadherence for P. vivax, but here, to a different endothelial cell line and using geographical distinct isolates, thus contributing to understanding P. vivax biology. PMID:24080027

  8. Monoclonal Antibody against Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme: Its Use as a Marker for Murine, Bovine, and Human Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, R.; Alby, L.; Grieves, J.; Joseph, J.; Lindgren, C.; Morrissey, L. W.; Sidky, Y. A.; Tu, M.; Watt, S. L.

    1982-12-01

    A monoclonal antibody has been prepared against rat angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). By selection for antibody binding to endothelial cells of bovine rather than rat origin we have obtained a reagent that has broad cross-species binding properties and that can at the same time serve as a useful marker for the surface of endothelial cells. The IgM-producing clone that we have established, α -ACE 3.1.1, has been grown in ascites form to yield ascites fluid that binds selectively to immobilized ACE at a >1:10,000 dilution. By use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, immunofluorescence histology, and flow cytometry, we have demonstrated the presence of ACE on endothelial cells of murine, bovine, and human origin. By means of a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS-IV) we have been able to selectively isolate viable endothelial cells from a mixture of endothelial cells and fibroblasts. We believe the antibody will be useful not only for the selection and in vitro cultivation of endothelial cells but also as a tool for the identification and pharmacological study of ACE.

  9. Sphingosine-1-phosphate induces human endothelial VEGF and MMP-2 production via transcription factor ZNF580: Novel insights into angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hui-Yan; Wei, Shu-Ping; Xu, Rui-Cheng; Xu, Peng-Xiao; Zhang, Wen-Cheng

    2010-05-07

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-induced migration and proliferation of endothelial cells are critical for angiogenesis. C2H2-zinc finger (ZNF) proteins usually play an essential role in altering gene expression and regulating the angiogenesis. The aim of this study is to investigate whether a novel human C2H2-zinc finger gene ZNF580 (Gene ID: 51157) is involved in the migration and proliferation of endothelial cells stimulated by S1P. Our study shows that EAhy926 endothelial cells express S1P1, S1P3 and S1P5 receptors. Furthermore, S1P upregulates both ZNF580 mRNA and protein levels in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. SB203580, the specific inhibitor of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) pathway, blocks the S1P-induced upregulation of ZNF580. Moreover, overexpression/downexpression of ZNF580 in EAhy926 cells leads to the enhancement/decrease of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression as well as the migration and proliferation of EAhy926 endothelial cells. These results elucidate the important role that ZNF580 plays in the process of migration and proliferation of endothelial cells, which provides a foundation for a novel approach to regulate angiogenesis.

  10. Modulation of cGMP by human HO-1 retrovirus gene transfer in pulmonary microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Nader G; Quan, Shuo; Mieyal, Paul A; Yang, Liming; Burke-Wolin, Theresa; Mingone, Christopher J; Goodman, Alvin I; Nasjletti, Alberto; Wolin, Michael S

    2002-11-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) stimulates guanylate cyclase (GC) and increases guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) levels. We transfected rat-lung pulmonary endothelial cells with a retrovirus-mediated human heme oxygenase (hHO)-1 gene. Pulmonary cells that expressed hHO-1 exhibited a fourfold increase in HO activity associated with decreases in the steady-state levels of heme and cGMP without changes in soluble GC (sGC) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) proteins or basal nitrite production. Heme elicited significant increases in CO production and intracellular cGMP levels in both pulmonary endothelial and pulmonary hHO-1-expressing cells. N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of NOS, significantly decreased cGMP levels in heme-treated pulmonary endothelial cells but not heme-treated hHO-1-expressing cells. In the presence of exogenous heme, CO and cGMP levels in hHO-1-expressing cells exceeded the corresponding levels in pulmonary endothelial cells. Acute exposure of endothelial cells to SnCl2, which is an inducer of HO-1, increased cGMP levels, whereas chronic exposure decreased heme and cGMP levels. These results indicate that prolonged overexpression of HO-1 ultimately decreases sGC activity by limiting the availability of cellular heme. Heme activates sGC and enhances cGMP levels via a mechanism that is largely insensitive to NOS inhibition.

  11. Microarray Analysis of Cell Cycle Gene Expression in Adult Human Corneal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ha Thi, Binh Minh; Campolmi, Nelly; He, Zhiguo; Pipparelli, Aurélien; Manissolle, Chloé; Thuret, Jean-Yves; Piselli, Simone; Forest, Fabien; Peoc'h, Michel; Garraud, Olivier; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (ECs) form a monolayer that controls the hydration of the cornea and thus its transparency. Their almost nil proliferative status in humans is responsible, in several frequent diseases, for cell pool attrition that leads to irreversible corneal clouding. To screen for candidate genes involved in cell cycle arrest, we studied human ECs subjected to various environments thought to induce different proliferative profiles compared to ECs in vivo. Donor corneas (a few hours after death), organ-cultured (OC) corneas, in vitro confluent and non-confluent primary cultures, and an immortalized EC line were compared to healthy ECs retrieved in the first minutes of corneal grafts. Transcriptional profiles were compared using a cDNA array of 112 key genes of the cell cycle and analysed using Gene Ontology classification; cluster analysis and gene map presentation of the cell cycle regulation pathway were performed by GenMAPP. Results were validated using qRT-PCR on 11 selected genes. We found several transcripts of proteins implicated in cell cycle arrest and not previously reported in human ECs. Early G1-phase arrest effectors and multiple DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest-associated transcripts were found in vivo and over-represented in OC and in vitro ECs. Though highly proliferative, immortalized ECs also exhibited overexpression of transcripts implicated in cell cycle arrest. These new effectors likely explain the stress-induced premature senescence that characterizes human adult ECs. They are potential targets for triggering and controlling EC proliferation with a view to increasing the cell pool of stored corneas or facilitating mass EC culture for bioengineered endothelial grafts. PMID:24747418

  12. Regulation of Thrombomodulin Expression and Release in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells by Cyclic Strain

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Colin; Murphy, Ronan P.; Cummins, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Thrombomodulin (TM), an integral membrane glycoprotein expressed on the lumenal surface of vascular endothelial cells, promotes anti-coagulant and anti-inflammatory properties. Release of functional TM from the endothelium surface into plasma has also been reported. Much is still unknown however about how endothelial TM is regulated by physiologic hemodynamic forces (and particularly cyclic strain) intrinsic to endothelial-mediated vascular homeostasis. Methods This study employed human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) to investigate the effects of equibiaxial cyclic strain (7.5%, 60 cycles/min, 24 hrs), and to a lesser extent, laminar shear stress (10 dynes/cm2, 24 hrs), on TM expression and release. Time-, dose- and frequency-dependency studies were performed. Results Our initial studies demonstrated that cyclic strain strongly downregulated TM expression in a p38- and receptor tyrosine kinase-dependent manner. This was in contrast to the upregulatory effect of shear stress. Moreover, both forces significantly upregulated TM release over a 48 hr period. With continuing focus on the cyclic strain-induced TM release, we noted both dose (0–7.5%) and frequency (0.5–2.0 Hz) dependency, with no attenuation of strain-induced TM release observed following inhibition of MAP kinases (p38, ERK-1/2), receptor tyrosine kinase, or eNOS. The concerted impact of cyclic strain and inflammatory mediators on TM release from HAECs was also investigated. In this respect, both TNFα (100 ng/ml) and ox-LDL (10–50 µg/ml) appeared to potentiate strain-induced TM release. Finally, inhibition of neither MMPs (GM6001) nor rhomboids (3,4-dichloroisocoumarin) had any effect on strain-induced TM release. However, significantly elevated levels (2.1 fold) of TM were observed in isolated microparticle fractions following 7.5% strain for 24 hrs. Conclusions A preliminary in vitro investigation into the effects of cyclic strain on TM in HAECs is presented

  13. Proinflammatory and prothrombotic effects on human vascular endothelial cells of Immune-cell-derived LIGHT

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective LIGHT (TNFSF 14) belongs to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily and is expressed by activated T cells as well as various types of antigen presenting cells. LIGHT binds to its cellular receptors TR2 and LTßR and has a co-stimulatory role in T cell activation. Here, we compared the relative expression of LIGHT in different immune cells and the biological activity of immune cell-derived LIGHT on endothelial cells. Methods and Results Surface expression of LIGHT and mRNA production by PBMC and isolated T cells (CD4+ or CD8+) significantly increased after stimulation with PMA (Phorbolester-12-Myristat-13-Acetat) + ionomycin. No LIGHT expression on PMA stimulated monocytes or monocytic-like THP-1 cells could be detected; differentiation of monocytes and THP-1 cells into macrophages, however, resulted in up-regulation of LIGHT. Supernatants of stimulated T cells contained higher concentrations of soluble LIGHT than macrophage supernatants normalized to cell numbers; release of soluble LIGHT was found to be dependent on metalloproteinase activity. Size determination of released soluble LIGHT by size exclusion chromatography revealed a molecular mass of ~60 kDa, suggesting a trimeric form. Released soluble LIGHT induced expression of proinflammatory antigens ICAM-1, tissue factor and IL-8 in human endothelial cells and caused apoptosis of IFN-γ pretreated endothelial cells. Soluble LIGHT was detected at low levels in sera of healthy controls and was significantly enhanced in sera of patients with chronic hepatitis C and rheumatoid arthritis (24.93 ± 9.41 vs.129.53 ± 49.14 and 172.13 ± 77.64; p < 0.0005). Conclusion These findings suggest that among immune cells activated T lymphocytes are the main source of soluble LIGHT with released amounts of soluble LIGHT markedly higher compared to platelets. Immune cell-derived membrane-bound and soluble trimeric LIGHT is biologically active, inducing proinflammatory changes in endothelial cells. Enhanced plasma

  14. Defining minimum essential factors to derive highly pure human endothelial cells from iPS/ES cells in an animal substance-free system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Ting; I-Shing Yu; Tsai, Kuen-Jer; Shih, Chien-Yu; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Su, Ih-Jen; Chiang, Po-Min

    2015-04-13

    It is desirable to obtain unlimited supplies of endothelial cells for research and therapeutics. However, current methods of deriving endothelial cells from humans suffer from issues, such as limited supplies, contamination from animal substances, and lengthy/complicated procedures. In this article we developed a way to differentiate human iPS and ES cells to highly pure endothelial cells in 5 days. The chemically defined system is robust, easy to perform, and free of animal substances. Using the system, we verified that combined TGFβ and canonical Wnt agonists are essential and sufficient for iPS/ES cell-to-mesoderm transition. Besides, VEGF-KDR signaling alone is required for endothelial formation at high density while supplementation with FGF allows for colonial endothelial differentiation. Finally, anti-adsorptive agents could enrich the endothelial output by allowing selective attachment of the endothelial precursors. The system was validated to work on multiple iPS/ES cells lines to produce endothelial cells capable of forming capillary-like structures in vitro and integrating into host vasculature in vivo. In sum, the simple yet robust differentiation system permits the unlimited supply of human endothelial cells. The defined and animal substance-free nature of the system is compatible with clinical applications and characterization of endothelial differentiation in an unbiased manner.

  15. Defining Minimum Essential Factors to Derive Highly Pure Human Endothelial Cells from iPS/ES Cells in an Animal Substance-Free System

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Ting; I.-Shing Yu; Tsai, Kuen-Jer; Shih, Chien-Yu; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Su, Ih-Jen; Chiang, Po-Min

    2015-01-01

    It is desirable to obtain unlimited supplies of endothelial cells for research and therapeutics. However, current methods of deriving endothelial cells from humans suffer from issues, such as limited supplies, contamination from animal substances, and lengthy/complicated procedures. In this article we developed a way to differentiate human iPS and ES cells to highly pure endothelial cells in 5 days. The chemically defined system is robust, easy to perform, and free of animal substances. Using the system, we verified that combined TGFβ and canonical Wnt agonists are essential and sufficient for iPS/ES cell-to-mesoderm transition. Besides, VEGF-KDR signaling alone is required for endothelial formation at high density while supplementation with FGF allows for colonial endothelial differentiation. Finally, anti-adsorptive agents could enrich the endothelial output by allowing selective attachment of the endothelial precursors. The system was validated to work on multiple iPS/ES cells lines to produce endothelial cells capable of forming capillary-like structures in vitro and integrating into host vasculature in vivo. In sum, the simple yet robust differentiation system permits the unlimited supply of human endothelial cells. The defined and animal substance-free nature of the system is compatible with clinical applications and characterization of endothelial differentiation in an unbiased manner. PMID:25864432

  16. High glucose and palmitate increases bone morphogenic protein 4 expression in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Oak-Kee; Yoo, Soon-Jib; Son, Jang-Won; Kim, Mee-Kyoung; Baek, Ki-Hyun; Song, Ki-Ho; Cha, Bong-Yun; Jo, Hanjoong

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigated whether hyperglycemia and/or free fatty acids (palmitate, PAL) aff ect the expression level of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4), a proatherogenic marker, in endothelial cells and the potential role of BMP4 in diabetic vascular complications. To measure BMP4 expression, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to high glucose concentrations and/or PAL for 24 or 72 h, and the effects of these treatments on the expression levels of adhesion molecules and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were examined. BMP4 loss-of-function status was achieved via transfection of a BMP4-specific siRNA. High glucose levels increased BMP4 expression in HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner. PAL potentiated such expression. The levels of adhesion molecules and ROS production increased upon treatment with high glucose and/or PAL, but this eff ect was negated when BMP4 was knocked down via siRNA. Signaling of BMP4, a proinflammatory and pro-atherogenic cytokine marker, was increased by hyperglycemia and PAL. BMP4 induced the expression of infl ammatory adhesion molecules and ROS production. Our work suggests that BMP4 plays a role in atherogenesis induced by high glucose levels and/or PAL. PMID:26937213

  17. In Vitro Effects of Hollow Gold Nanoshells on Human Aortic Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Chunrong; Wu, Hengfang; Ge, Gaoyuan; Li, Xiongzhi; Guo, Zhirui; Bian, Zhiping; Xu, Jindan; Lu, Hua; Chen, Xiangjian; Yang, Di

    2016-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles are emerging as promising biomedical tools due to their unique nanoscale characteristics. Our purpose was to synthesize a hollow-shaped gold nanoparticle and to investigate its effect on human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) in vitro. Hollow gold nanoshells with average 35-nm diameters and 10-nm shell thickness were obtained by galvanic replacement using quasi-spherical nanosilver as sacrifice-template. Our results showed that hollow gold nanoshells in the culture medium could be internalized into the cytoplasm of HAECs. No cytotoxicity effect of hollow gold nanoshells on HAECs was observed within the test concentrations (0-0.8 μg/mL) and test exposure period (0-72 h) by tetrazolium dye assay. Meanwhile, the release of cell injury biomarker, lactate dehydrogenase, was not significantly higher than that from control cells (without hollow gold nanoshells). The concentrations of vasodilators, nitric oxide, and prostacyclin I-2 were not changed, but the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 was decreased by hollow gold nanoshells treatment in HAECs. HAECs exposed to hollow gold nanoshells resulted in suppressing expressions of genes involved in apoptosis and activating expressions of genes of adhesion molecules. Moreover, we demonstrated by in vitro endothelial tube formation that hollow gold nanoshells (0.8 μg/mL) could not inhibit angiogenesis by the HAECs. Altogether, these results indicate that the structure and major function of HAECs would not be disrupted by hollow gold nanoshell treatment.

  18. Caveolae may enable albumin to enter human renal glomerular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Takahito; Takei, Takashi; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Uchida, Keiko; Tsuchiya, Ken; Nitta, Kosaku

    2015-06-01

    Caveolae on human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs) are increased in glomerular disease and correlate with the degree of albuminuria. To assess the mechanism by which caveolae contribute to albuminuria, we investigated whether albumin enters into HRGECs through caveolae. HRGECs were incubated with Alexa Fluor 488 labeled BSA or transferrin, followed by immunofluorescence localization with antibody to caveolin-1 (Cav-1), the main structural protein of caveolae, or clathrin, the major structural protein of clathrin coated pits, to assess whether BSA colocalized with Cav-1. HRGECs were also incubated with albumin and caveolae disrupting agents, including methyl beta cyclodextrin (MBCD) and nystatin, to determine whether disrupting caveolae interfered with albumin endocytosis into HRGECs. HRGECs were also incubated with albumin after transfection with Cav-1 small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Labeled BSA colocalized with Cav-1, but not with clathrin. In contrast, labeled transferrin colocalized with clathrin, but not with Cav-1. Incubation of HRGECs with MBCD or nystatin, or transfection with Cav-1 siRNA, significantly reduced the intracellular amounts of albumin and Cav-1, relative to normal HRGECs, as shown by western blotting and immunofluorescence. These findings indicate that albumin enters HRGECs through the caveolae, suggesting that caveolae play an important role in the pathogenesis of albuminuria by providing a pathway through which albumin can enter glomerular endothelial cells.

  19. Particulate matter induces prothrombotic microparticle shedding by human mononuclear and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Neri, Tommaso; Pergoli, Laura; Petrini, Silvia; Gravendonk, Lotte; Balia, Cristina; Scalise, Valentina; Amoruso, Angela; Pedrinelli, Roberto; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Bollati, Valentina; Celi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Particulate airborne pollution is associated with increased cardiopulmonary morbidity. Microparticles are extracellular vesicles shed by cells upon activation or apoptosis involved in physiological processes such as coagulation and inflammation, including airway inflammation. We investigated the hypothesis that particulate matter causes the shedding of microparticles by human mononuclear and endothelial cells. Cells, isolated from the blood and the umbilical cords of normal donors, were cultured in the presence of particulate from a standard reference. Microparticles were assessed in the supernatant as phosphatidylserine concentration. Microparticle-associated tissue factor was assessed by an one-stage clotting assay. Nanosight technology was used to evaluate microparticle size distribution. Particulate matter induces a dose- and time- dependent, rapid (1h) increase in microparticle generation in both cells. These microparticles express functional tissue factor. Particulate matter increases intracellular calcium concentration and phospholipase C inhibition reduces microparticle generation. Nanosight analysis confirmed that upon exposure to particulate matter both cells express particles with a size range consistent with the definition of microparticles (50-1000 nm). Exposure of mononuclear and endothelial cells to particulate matter upregulates the generation of microparticles at least partially mediated by calcium mobilization. This observation might provide a further link between airborne pollution and cardiopulmonary morbidity. PMID:26876346

  20. Improved Cryopreservation of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells: A Systematic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sultani, A. Billal; Marquez-Curtis, Leah A.; Elliott, Janet A. W.; McGann, Locksley E.

    2016-01-01

    Cryopreservation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) facilitated their commercial availability for use in vascular biology, tissue engineering and drug delivery research; however, the key variables in HUVEC cryopreservation have not been comprehensively studied. HUVECs are typically cryopreserved by cooling at 1 °C/min in the presence of 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). We applied interrupted slow cooling (graded freezing) and interrupted rapid cooling with a hold time (two-step freezing) to identify where in the cooling process cryoinjury to HUVECs occurs. We found that linear cooling at 1 °C/min resulted in higher membrane integrities than linear cooling at 0.2 °C/min or nonlinear two-step freezing. DMSO addition procedures and compositions were also investigated. By combining hydroxyethyl starch with DMSO, HUVEC viability after cryopreservation was improved compared to measured viabilities of commercially available cryopreserved HUVECs and viabilities for HUVEC cryopreservation studies reported in the literature. Furthermore, HUVECs cryopreserved using our improved procedure showed high tube forming capability in a post-thaw angiogenesis assay, a standard indicator of endothelial cell function. As well as presenting superior cryopreservation procedures for HUVECs, the methods developed here can serve as a model to optimize the cryopreservation of other cells. PMID:27708349

  1. Thioredoxin reductase 1 upregulates MCP-1 release in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhen-Bo; Shen, Xun

    2009-09-04

    To know if thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) plays a role in antioxidant defense mechanisms against atherosclerosis, effect of TrxR1 on expression/release of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) was investigated in activated human endothelial-like EAhy926 cells. The MCP-1 release and expression, cellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity of NF-{kappa}B subunit p65 were assayed in cells either overexpressing recombinant TrxR1 or having their endogenous TrxR1 knocked down. It was found that overexpression of TrxR1 enhanced, while knockdown of TrxR1 reduced MCP-1 release and expression. Upregulation of MCP-1 by TrxR1 was associated with increasing generation of intracellular ROS generation, enhanced nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity of NF-{kappa}B. Assay using NF-{kappa}B reporter revealed that TrxR1 upregulated transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B. This study suggests that TrxR1 enhances ROS generation, NF-{kappa}B activity and subsequent MCP-1 expression in endothelial cells, and may promote rather than prevent vascular endothelium from forming atherosclerotic plaque.

  2. In Vitro Effects of Hollow Gold Nanoshells on Human Aortic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chunrong; Wu, Hengfang; Ge, Gaoyuan; Li, Xiongzhi; Guo, Zhirui; Bian, Zhiping; Xu, Jindan; Lu, Hua; Chen, Xiangjian; Yang, Di

    2016-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles are emerging as promising biomedical tools due to their unique nanoscale characteristics. Our purpose was to synthesize a hollow-shaped gold nanoparticle and to investigate its effect on human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) in vitro. Hollow gold nanoshells with average 35-nm diameters and 10-nm shell thickness were obtained by galvanic replacement using quasi-spherical nanosilver as sacrifice-template. Our results showed that hollow gold nanoshells in the culture medium could be internalized into the cytoplasm of HAECs. No cytotoxicity effect of hollow gold nanoshells on HAECs was observed within the test concentrations (0-0.8 μg/mL) and test exposure period (0-72 h) by tetrazolium dye assay. Meanwhile, the release of cell injury biomarker, lactate dehydrogenase, was not significantly higher than that from control cells (without hollow gold nanoshells). The concentrations of vasodilators, nitric oxide, and prostacyclin I-2 were not changed, but the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 was decreased by hollow gold nanoshells treatment in HAECs. HAECs exposed to hollow gold nanoshells resulted in suppressing expressions of genes involved in apoptosis and activating expressions of genes of adhesion molecules. Moreover, we demonstrated by in vitro endothelial tube formation that hollow gold nanoshells (0.8 μg/mL) could not inhibit angiogenesis by the HAECs. Altogether, these results indicate that the structure and major function of HAECs would not be disrupted by hollow gold nanoshell treatment. PMID:27624340

  3. Differential Cytokine Responses in Human and Mouse Lymphatic Endothelial Cells to Cytokines in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chaitanya, G.V.; Franks, S.E.; Cromer, W.; Wells, S.R.; Bienkowska, M.; Jennings, M.H.; Ruddell, A.; Ando, T.; Wang, Y.; Gu, Y.; Sapp, M.; Mathis, J.M.; Jordan, P.A.; Minagar, A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Inflammatory cytokines dysregulate microvascular function, yet how cytokines affect lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) are unclear. Methods and Results We examined effects of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ on LEC proliferation, endothelial cell adhesion molecule (ECAM) expression, capillary formation, and barrier changes in murine (SV-LEC) and human LECs (HMEC-1a). Results All cytokines induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, MAdCAM-1, and E-selectin in SV-LECs; TNF-α, IL-1β and IFN-γ induced ECAMs (but not MAdCAM-1) in HMEC-1a. IL-1β increased, while IFN-γ and TNF-α reduced SV-LEC proliferation. While TNF-α induced, IFN-γ decreased, and IL-1β did not show any effect on HMEC-1a proliferation. TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ each reduced capillary formation in SV-LEC and in HMEC-1a. TNF-α and IL-1β reduced barrier in SV-LEC and HMEC-1a; IFN-γ did not affect SV-LEC barrier, but enhanced HMEC-1a barrier. Inflammatory cytokines alter LEC growth, activation and barrier function in vitro and may disturb lymphatic clearance increasing tissue edema in vivo. Conclusion Therapies that maintain or restore lymphatic function (including cytokines blockade), may represent important strategies for limiting inflammation. PMID:20863268

  4. Knockdown of ezrin suppresses the migration and angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liang-ping; Huang, Lei; Tian, Xun; Liang, Feng-qi; Wei, Jun-cheng; Zhang, Xian; Li, Sha; Zhang, Qing-hua

    2016-04-01

    Progressive tumor growth is dependent on angiogenesis. The mechanisms by which endothelial cells (ECs) are incorporated to develop new blood vessels are not well understood. Recent studies reveal that the ezrin radixin moesin (ERM) family members are key regulators of cellular activities such as adhesion, morphogenetic change, and migration. We hypothesized that ezrin, one of the ERM family members, may play important roles in ECs organization during angiogenesis, and new vessels formation in preexisting tissues. To test this hypothesis, in this study, we investigated the effects of ezrin gene silencing on the migration and angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. HUVECs were transfected with plasmids with ezrin-targeting short hairpin RNA by using the lipofectamine-2000 system. Wound assay in vitro and three-dimensional culture were used to detect the migration and angiogenesis capacity of HUVECs. The morphological changes of transfected cells were observed by confocal and phase contrast microscopy. Our results demonstrated that the decreased expression of ezrin in HUVECs significantly induced the morphogenetic changes and cytoskeletal reorganization of the transfected cells, and also reduced cell migration and angiogenesis capacity in vitro, suggesting that ezrin play an important role in the process of HUVECs migration and angiogenesis. PMID:27072970

  5. Improved Cryopreservation of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells: A Systematic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultani, A. Billal; Marquez-Curtis, Leah A.; Elliott, Janet A. W.; McGann, Locksley E.

    2016-10-01

    Cryopreservation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) facilitated their commercial availability for use in vascular biology, tissue engineering and drug delivery research; however, the key variables in HUVEC cryopreservation have not been comprehensively studied. HUVECs are typically cryopreserved by cooling at 1 °C/min in the presence of 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). We applied interrupted slow cooling (graded freezing) and interrupted rapid cooling with a hold time (two-step freezing) to identify where in the cooling process cryoinjury to HUVECs occurs. We found that linear cooling at 1 °C/min resulted in higher membrane integrities than linear cooling at 0.2 °C/min or nonlinear two-step freezing. DMSO addition procedures and compositions were also investigated. By combining hydroxyethyl starch with DMSO, HUVEC viability after cryopreservation was improved compared to measured viabilities of commercially available cryopreserved HUVECs and viabilities for HUVEC cryopreservation studies reported in the literature. Furthermore, HUVECs cryopreserved using our improved procedure showed high tube forming capability in a post-thaw angiogenesis assay, a standard indicator of endothelial cell function. As well as presenting superior cryopreservation procedures for HUVECs, the methods developed here can serve as a model to optimize the cryopreservation of other cells.

  6. Biocompatibility of pure titanium modified by human endothelial cell-derived extracellular matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xiaoqing; Wang, Jin; Zhu, Ying; Tu, Qiufen; Huang, Nan

    2010-04-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) used to modify biomaterial surface is a promising method for improving cardiovascular material hemocompatibility. In the present work, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are cultured and native ECM is obtained on pure titanium surface. Fourier infrared spectrum (FTIR) test proves the existence of amide I and amide II band on the modified titanium surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) further confirms the chemical composition and binding types of the ECM proteins on the titanium substrate. The results of light microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) exhibit the morphology of HUVEC derived ECM. There are higher water contact angles on the ECM modified samples. Furthermore, some ECM components, including fibronectin (FN), laminin (LN) and type IV collagen (IV-COL) are presented on ECM-covered titanium surface by immunofluorescence staining. The biological behavior of cultured HUVECs and adherent platelets on different samples are investigated by in vitro HUVECs culture and platelet adhesion. Cells exhibit better morphology and their proliferation ability greatly improve on the ECM-covered titanium. At the same time, the platelet adhesion and spreading are inhibited on ECM-covered titanium surface. These investigations demonstrate that ECM produced by HUVECs cannot only improve adhesion and proliferation ability of endothelial cell but also inhibit adhesion and activation of platelets. Thus, the approach described here may provide a basis for preparation of modified surface in cardiovascular implants application.

  7. High glucose and palmitate increases bone morphogenic protein 4 expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Oak-Kee; Yoo, Soon-Jib; Son, Jang-Won; Kim, Mee-Kyoung; Baek, Ki-Hyun; Song, Ki-Ho; Cha, Bong-Yun; Jo, Hanjoong; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang

    2016-03-01

    Here, we investigated whether hyperglycemia and/or free fatty acids (palmitate, PAL) aff ect the expression level of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4), a proatherogenic marker, in endothelial cells and the potential role of BMP4 in diabetic vascular complications. To measure BMP4 expression, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to high glucose concentrations and/or PAL for 24 or 72 h, and the effects of these treatments on the expression levels of adhesion molecules and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were examined. BMP4 loss-of-function status was achieved via transfection of a BMP4-specific siRNA. High glucose levels increased BMP4 expression in HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner. PAL potentiated such expression. The levels of adhesion molecules and ROS production increased upon treatment with high glucose and/or PAL, but this eff ect was negated when BMP4 was knocked down via siRNA. Signaling of BMP4, a proinflammatory and pro-atherogenic cytokine marker, was increased by hyperglycemia and PAL. BMP4 induced the expression of infl ammatory adhesion molecules and ROS production. Our work suggests that BMP4 plays a role in atherogenesis induced by high glucose levels and/or PAL. PMID:26937213

  8. Concise Review: Tissue-Specific Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Hannah K.; Canfield, Scott G.; Shusta, Eric V.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that endothelial cells (ECs) display significant heterogeneity across tissue types, playing an important role in tissue regeneration and homeostasis. Recent work demonstrating the derivation of tissue-specific microvascular endothelial cells (TS-MVECs) from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has ignited the potential to generate tissue-specific models which may be applied to regenerative medicine and in vitro modeling applications. Here we review techniques by which hPSC-derived TS-MVECs have been made to date and discuss how current hPSC-EC differentiation protocols may be directed towards tissue-specific fates. We begin by discussing the nature of EC tissue specificity in vivo and review general hPSC-EC differentiation protocols generated over the last decade. Finally, we describe how specificity can be integrated into hPSC-EC protocols to generate hPSC-derived TS-MVECs in vitro, including EC and parenchymal cell co-culture, directed differentiation, and direct reprogramming strategies. PMID:25070152

  9. Particulate matter induces prothrombotic microparticle shedding by human mononuclear and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Neri, Tommaso; Pergoli, Laura; Petrini, Silvia; Gravendonk, Lotte; Balia, Cristina; Scalise, Valentina; Amoruso, Angela; Pedrinelli, Roberto; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Bollati, Valentina; Celi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Particulate airborne pollution is associated with increased cardiopulmonary morbidity. Microparticles are extracellular vesicles shed by cells upon activation or apoptosis involved in physiological processes such as coagulation and inflammation, including airway inflammation. We investigated the hypothesis that particulate matter causes the shedding of microparticles by human mononuclear and endothelial cells. Cells, isolated from the blood and the umbilical cords of normal donors, were cultured in the presence of particulate from a standard reference. Microparticles were assessed in the supernatant as phosphatidylserine concentration. Microparticle-associated tissue factor was assessed by an one-stage clotting assay. Nanosight technology was used to evaluate microparticle size distribution. Particulate matter induces a dose- and time- dependent, rapid (1h) increase in microparticle generation in both cells. These microparticles express functional tissue factor. Particulate matter increases intracellular calcium concentration and phospholipase C inhibition reduces microparticle generation. Nanosight analysis confirmed that upon exposure to particulate matter both cells express particles with a size range consistent with the definition of microparticles (50-1000 nm). Exposure of mononuclear and endothelial cells to particulate matter upregulates the generation of microparticles at least partially mediated by calcium mobilization. This observation might provide a further link between airborne pollution and cardiopulmonary morbidity.

  10. Calcitonin gene-related peptide stimulates proliferation of human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Haegerstrand, A.; Larsson, O. ); Dalsgaard, C.J. Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm ); Jonzon, B. ); Nilsson, J. )

    1990-05-01

    The effects of the vasoactive perivascular neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), neurokinin A (NKA), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) on proliferation of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were investigated. CGRP was shown to increase both cell number and DNA synthesis, whereas NKA, NPY, and VIP were ineffective. {sup 125}I-labeled CGRP was shown to bind to HUVECs and this binding was displaced by addition of unlabeled CGRP, suggesting the existence of specific CGRP receptors. The effect of CGRP on formation of adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and inositol phosphates (InsP), two intracellular messengers known to be involved in regulation of cell proliferation, was investigated. CGRP stimulated cAMP formation but was without effect on the formation of InsP. Proliferation, as well as cAMP formation, was also stimulated by cholera toxin. Basic fibroblast growth factor stimulated growth without affecting cAMP or InsP formation, whereas thrombin, which increased InsP formation, did not stimulate proliferation. The authors thus suggest that CGRP may act as a local factor stimulating proliferation of endothelial cells; that the mechanism of action is associated with cAMP formation; and that this effect of CGRP may be important for formation of new vessels during physicological and pathophysiological events such as ischemia, inflammation, and wound healing.

  11. Tissue factor: A potent stimulator of Von Willebrand factor synthesis by human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Meiring, Muriel; Allers, W.; Le Roux, E.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and dysfunction of endothelial cells are thought to be triggers for the secretion of Von Willebrand factor. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and the coagulation factors, tissue factor and thrombin on the release and cleavage potential of ultra-large von Willebrand factor (ULVWF) and its cleavage protease by cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC were treated with IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α, tissue factor (TF) and thrombin, and combinations thereof for 24 hours under static conditions. The cells were then exposed to shear stress after which the VWF-propeptide levels and the VWF cleavage protease, ADAMTS13 content were measured. All treatments and their combinations, excluding IL-6, significantly stimulated the secretion of VWF from HUVEC. The VWF secretion from the HUVEC was stimulated most by the combination of TF with TNF-α. Slightly lower levels of ADAMTS13 secretion were found with all treatments. This may explain the thrombogenicity of patients with inflammation where extremely high VWF levels and slightly lower ADAMTS13 levels are present. PMID:27766025

  12. Hypericin-photodynamic therapy induces human umbilical vein endothelial cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Li, Zhuo-heng; Li, Yuan-yuan; Shi, San-jun; Zhou, Shi-wen; Fu, Yuan-yuan; Zhang, Qing; Yang, Xue; Fu, Ruo-qiu; Lu, Lai-chun

    2015-01-01

    The conventional photosensitizers used in photodynamic therapy (PDT), such as haematoporphyrin (HP), have not yet reached satisfactory therapeutic effects on port-wine stains (PWSs), due largely to the long-term dark toxicity. Previously we have showed that hypericin exhibited potent photocytotoxic effects on Roman chicken cockscomb model of PWSs. However, the molecular mechanism of hypericin-mediated photocytotoxicity remains unclear. In this study, we employed human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to investigate the hypericin-photolytic mechanism. Our study showed that hypericin-PDT induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in cell killings and an activation of the inflammatory response. Importantly, we have also discovered that photoactivated hypericin induced apoptosis by activating the mitochondrial caspase pathway and inhibiting the activation of the vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A)-mediated PI3K/Akt pathway. Notably, we found that hypericin exhibited a more potent photocytotoxic effect than HP, and largely addressed the inconvenience issue associated with the use of HP. Thereby, hypericin may be a better alternative to HP in treating PWSs. PMID:26673286

  13. The Effect of Shiga Toxin on Weibel-Palade Bodies in Primary Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Geelen, Joyce; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Linssen, Peter; van der Velden, Thea; Mertens, Koen; Monnens, Leo

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome is associated with the presence of Shiga toxin (Stx1, Stx2 and several variants) in the circulation. The aim of this study is to examine the possible triggering effect of Stx1 on the exocytosis of Weibel-Palade bodies (WPbs). Methods Cultured human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs) and glomerular microvascular endothelial cells (GMVECs) were stimulated by thrombin and Stx1 in both static and flowing conditions. The amount of secreted von Willebrand factor (VWF) in the supernatant as well as the remaining intracellular fraction was determined. Results In HUVECs and in 2 out of 4 GMVECs, the stimulation of Stx1 in flow at 1 dyne/cm2 resulted in a decrease of intracellular VWF. This is contrary to the results of Stx1 applied in static conditions. At a higher flow rate of 5 dyne/cm2, no effect in GMVECs was observed. Conclusion Stx1 can contribute, via an effect on WPbs, to the exocytosis of WPbs in flow conditions in HUVECs and probably in GMVECs. This results in the release of VWF, suggesting an initiating role of the coagulation system in the pathogenesis. PMID:25177338

  14. Cooperation between human fibrocytes and endothelial colony forming cells increases angiogenesis via CXCR4 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Smadja, David M.; Dorfmüller, Peter; Bieche, Ivan; Guerin, Coralie; Badoual, Cécile; Boscolo, Elisa; Kambouchner, Marianne; Cazes, Aurélie; Mercier, Olaf; Humbert, Marc; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce; Israël-Biet, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibrotic diseases of the lung are associated with a vascular remodeling process. Fibrocytes (Fy) are a distinct population of blood-borne cells that coexpress hematopoietic cell antigens and fibroblast markers, which have been shown to contribute to organ fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Fy might cooperate with endothelial colony forming cells to induce angiogenesis. Methods/Results We successfully isolated Fy from blood of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients, which were further characterized by flow cytometry, Reverse Transcriptase quantitative-PCR (RTQ-PCR), and confocal analysis. We investigated the interaction between Fy and cord blood derived endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC) angiogenic potential in vitro and in vivo in a Matrigel implant model. Compared to fibroblast culture media, secreted media from Fy increase ECFC proliferation and their differentiation ability via SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway. IPF-Fy co-implanted with human ECFC in a matrigel plug in immunodeficient mice formed functional microvascular beds, whereas fibroblasts did not. Evaluation of implants after 2 weeks revealed an extensive network of blood vessels containing erythrocytes. CXCR4 blockade significantly inhibited blood vessel formation in the implants. The clinical relevance of these data was confirmed by the high expression level of CXCR4 in vessels close to fibrotic areas in biopsy specimens from patients with IPF, in contrast to control lungs. Conclusions Circulating Fy might be contribute to the intense remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature in patients with IPF. PMID:25103869

  15. In Vitro Effects of Hollow Gold Nanoshells on Human Aortic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chunrong; Wu, Hengfang; Ge, Gaoyuan; Li, Xiongzhi; Guo, Zhirui; Bian, Zhiping; Xu, Jindan; Lu, Hua; Chen, Xiangjian; Yang, Di

    2016-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles are emerging as promising biomedical tools due to their unique nanoscale characteristics. Our purpose was to synthesize a hollow-shaped gold nanoparticle and to investigate its effect on human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) in vitro. Hollow gold nanoshells with average 35-nm diameters and 10-nm shell thickness were obtained by galvanic replacement using quasi-spherical nanosilver as sacrifice-template. Our results showed that hollow gold nanoshells in the culture medium could be internalized into the cytoplasm of HAECs. No cytotoxicity effect of hollow gold nanoshells on HAECs was observed within the test concentrations (0-0.8 μg/mL) and test exposure period (0-72 h) by tetrazolium dye assay. Meanwhile, the release of cell injury biomarker, lactate dehydrogenase, was not significantly higher than that from control cells (without hollow gold nanoshells). The concentrations of vasodilators, nitric oxide, and prostacyclin I-2 were not changed, but the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 was decreased by hollow gold nanoshells treatment in HAECs. HAECs exposed to hollow gold nanoshells resulted in suppressing expressions of genes involved in apoptosis and activating expressions of genes of adhesion molecules. Moreover, we demonstrated by in vitro endothelial tube formation that hollow gold nanoshells (0.8 μg/mL) could not inhibit angiogenesis by the HAECs. Altogether, these results indicate that the structure and major function of HAECs would not be disrupted by hollow gold nanoshell treatment.

  16. Hyperthermia stimulates plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Wojta, J.; Holzer, M.; Hufnagl, P.; Christ, G.; Hoover, R. L.; Binder, B. R.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of exposure to hyperthermia on the fibrinolytic potential of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in culture was studied. HUVEC responded to exposure to 42 degrees C with a time-dependent increase in plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) activity and antigen accompanied by a four- to fivefold increase in PAI-1 specific m-RNA and a decrease in tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) antigen. The effect of 8 hours exposure to hyperthermia on PAI-1 activity and antigen could not be reversed by reexposure of the cells to 37 degrees C for 24 hours as evidenced by continuously increased amounts of PAI-1 released into the conditioned media. t-PA release, however, decreased during the 24-hour period at 37 degrees C after exposure to hyperthermia. No difference in PAI-1 antigen present in the extracellular matrix of heat treated HUVEC as compared to HUVEC kept at 37 degrees C could be found. Our data supports the idea that hyperthermia is one stress factor that influences the fibrinolytic potential of endothelial cells. Images Figure 6 PMID:1928306

  17. HIF-2α Expression Regulates Sprout Formation into 3D Fibrin Matrices in Prolonged Hypoxia in Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nauta, Tessa D.; Duyndam, Monique C. A.; Weijers, Ester M.; van Hinsbergh, Victor M. W.; Koolwijk, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Background During short-term hypoxia, Hypoxia Inducible Factors (particular their subunits HIF-1α and HIF-2α) regulate the expression of many genes including the potent angiogenesis stimulator VEGF. However, in some pathological conditions chronic hypoxia occurs and is accompanied by reduced angiogenesis. Objectives We investigated the effect of prolonged hypoxia on the proliferation and sprouting ability of human microvascular endothelial cells and the involvement of the HIFs and Dll4/Notch signaling. Methods and Results Human microvascular endothelial cells (hMVECs), cultured at 20% oxygen for 14 days and seeded on top of 3D fibrin matrices, formed sprouts when stimulated with VEGF-A/TNFα. In contrast, hMVECs precultured at 1% oxygen for 14 days were viable and proliferative, but did not form sprouts into fibrin upon VEGF-A/TNFα stimulation at 1% oxygen. Silencing of HIF-2α with si-RNA partially restored the inhibition of endothelial sprouting, whereas HIF-1α or HIF-3α by si-RNA had no effect. No involvement of Dll4/Notch pathway in the inhibitory effect on endothelial sprouting by prolonged hypoxia was found. In addition, hypoxia decreased the production of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), needed for migration and invasion, without a significant effect on its inhibitor PAI-1. This was independent of HIF-2α, as si-HIF-2α did not counteract uPA reduction. Conclusion Prolonged culturing of hMVECs at 1% oxygen inhibited endothelial sprouting into fibrin. Two independent mechanisms contribute. Silencing of HIF-2α with si-RNA partially restored the inhibition of endothelial sprouting pointing to a HIF-2α-dependent mechanism. In addition, reduction of uPA contributed to reduced endothelial tube formation in a fibrin matrix during prolonged hypoxia. PMID:27490118

  18. A permanently growing human endothelial cell line supports productive infection with human cytomegalovirus under conditional cell growth arrest.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Diana; Hochdorfer, Daniel; Stoehr, Dagmar; Schubert, Axel; Lotfi, Ramin; May, Tobias; Wirth, Dagmar; Sinzger, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Infection of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) is assumed to contribute to dissemination of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Investigation of virus-host interactions in ECs such as human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) is limited due to the low maximal passage numbers of these primary cells. We tested a conditionally immortalized EC line (HEC-LTT) and a permanent cell line (EA.hy926) for their susceptibility to HCMV infection. Both cell lines resembled HUVECs in that they allowed for entry and immediate early protein expression of highly endotheliotropic HCMV strains but not of poorly endotheliotropic strains, rendering them suitable for analysis of the viral entry mechanism in ECs. The late phase of viral replication and release, however, was supported by growth-controlled HEC-LTT cells but not by EA.hy926 cells. HEC-LTT cells support both the early and late phase of viral replication and release infectious progeny virus at titers comparable to primary HUVECs; thus, the HEC-LTT cell line is a cell culture model representing the full viral replicative cycle of HCMV in ECs. The implementation of permanent HEC-LTT and EA.hy926 cell lines in HCMV research will facilitate long-term approaches that are not feasible in primary HUVECs.

  19. Isolation and Culture of Human Endothelial Cells from Micro- and Macro-vessels.

    PubMed

    Hewett, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    The endothelium from different vascular beds exhibits a high degree of phenotypic heterogeneity. Endothelial cells (EC) can be harvested easily from large vessels by mechanical removal or collagenase digestion. In particular, the human umbilical vein has been used due to its wide availability, and the study of ECs derived from it has undoubtedly greatly advanced our knowledge of vascular biology. However, the majority of the body's endothelium (>95 %) forms the microvasculature, and it is these cells providing the interface between the blood and tissues that play a critical role in the development of new blood vessels. This has led to the establishment of techniques for the isolation of microvascular ECs (MEC) from different tissues to provide more physiologically relevant in vitro models of angiogenesis and EC function.In this chapter the use of superparamagnetic beads (Dynabeads) coated with anti-PECAM-1 (CD31) antibodies (PECA-beads) to culture MECs from human adipose tissue is described along with the standard methods used to characterize them. Adipose tissue is an ideal source of MECs as it is composed mainly of adipocytes with a very rich microvasculature and is easy to disaggregate. Furthermore, it can be obtained in large quantities during plastic surgery procedures. Adipose obtained at reduction mammoplasty or abdominoplasty is first dissected free of the connective tissue, minced finely, and subjected to collagenase type II digestion. The adipocytes are removed by centrifugation to obtain a microvessel rich pellet, which is further disaggregated with trypsin/EDTA solution. Following filtration to remove fragments of the connective tissue, the pellet is incubated with PECA-beads and microvessel fragments/ECs and washed and harvested using a magnet. In addition, the adaptation of this basic technique for the isolation of the human lung and stomach MECs is also described along with common methods for the preparation of large vessel endothelial cells. PMID

  20. Isolation and Culture of Human Endothelial Cells from Micro- and Macro-vessels.

    PubMed

    Hewett, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    The endothelium from different vascular beds exhibits a high degree of phenotypic heterogeneity. Endothelial cells (EC) can be harvested easily from large vessels by mechanical removal or collagenase digestion. In particular, the human umbilical vein has been used due to its wide availability, and the study of ECs derived from it has undoubtedly greatly advanced our knowledge of vascular biology. However, the majority of the body's endothelium (>95 %) forms the microvasculature, and it is these cells providing the interface between the blood and tissues that play a critical role in the development of new blood vessels. This has led to the establishment of techniques for the isolation of microvascular ECs (MEC) from different tissues to provide more physiologically relevant in vitro models of angiogenesis and EC function.In this chapter the use of superparamagnetic beads (Dynabeads) coated with anti-PECAM-1 (CD31) antibodies (PECA-beads) to culture MECs from human adipose tissue is described along with the standard methods used to characterize them. Adipose tissue is an ideal source of MECs as it is composed mainly of adipocytes with a very rich microvasculature and is easy to disaggregate. Furthermore, it can be obtained in large quantities during plastic surgery procedures. Adipose obtained at reduction mammoplasty or abdominoplasty is first dissected free of the connective tissue, minced finely, and subjected to collagenase type II digestion. The adipocytes are removed by centrifugation to obtain a microvessel rich pellet, which is further disaggregated with trypsin/EDTA solution. Following filtration to remove fragments of the connective tissue, the pellet is incubated with PECA-beads and microvessel fragments/ECs and washed and harvested using a magnet. In addition, the adaptation of this basic technique for the isolation of the human lung and stomach MECs is also described along with common methods for the preparation of large vessel endothelial cells.

  1. Visfatin as a Novel Mediator Released by Inflamed Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Romacho, Tania; Villalobos, Laura A.; Cercas, Elena; Carraro, Raffaele; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F.; Peiró, Concepción

    2013-01-01

    Background Visfatin is a multifaceted adipokine whose circulating levels are enhanced in different metabolic diseases. Extracellular visfatin can exert various deleterious effects on vascular cells, including inflammation and proliferation. Limited evidence exists, however, on the capacity of human vascular cells to synthesize and release visfatin by themselves, under basal or pro-inflammatory conditions. Methods and Results Intracellular visfatin was detected by Western blot in non-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). However, exposing HUVEC for 18 h to a series of pro-inflammatory stimulus, such as interleukin (IL)-1β (1 to 10 ng/mL), tumor necrosis factor-α (1 to 10 ng/mL) or angiotensin II (10 pmol/L to 1 μmol/L) markedly enhanced intracellular visfatin content. Using IL-1β (10 ng/mL; 18 h), it was determined that the increase in intracellular visfatin, which was paralleled by enhanced visfatin mRNA levels, relied on a signalling mechanism involving both nuclear factor-κB and poly (ADP ribose) polymerase-1 activation. Moreover, IL-1β modified the sub-cellular localization of visfatin; while in non-stimulated HUVEC immunoreactive visfatin predominantly showed an intra-nuclear granular pattern, in IL-1β-inflamed cells an extra-nuclear filamentous staining, co-localising with F-actin fibers and suggesting a secretory pattern, was mainly found. Indeed, IL-1β promoted visfatin secretion, as determined by both ELISA and immunocytochemistry. Conclusions Human endothelial cells synthesize and release visfatin, particularly in response to inflammation. We suggest that the inflamed endothelium can be a source of visfatin, which arises as a local inflammatory mediator and a potential therapeutic target to interfere with vascular inflammation. PMID:24130902

  2. Human erythropoietin induces a pro-angiogenic phenotype in cultured endothelial cells and stimulates neovascularization in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, D; Presta, M; Vacca, A; Ria, R; Giuliani, R; Dell'Era, P; Nico, B; Roncali, L; Dammacco, F

    1999-04-15

    Hematopoietic and endothelial cell lineages share common progenitors. Accordingly, cytokines formerly thought to be specific for the hematopoietic system have been shown to affect several functions in endothelial cells, including angiogenesis. In this study, we investigated the angiogenic potential of erythropoietin (Epo), the main hormone regulating proliferation, differentiation, and survival of erythroid cells. Epo receptors (EpoRs) have been identified in the human EA.hy926 endothelial cell line by Western blot analysis. Also, recombinant human Epo (rHuEpo) stimulates Janus Kinase-2 (JAK-2) phosphorylation, cell proliferation, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) production in EA.hy926 cells and significantly enhances their differentiation into vascular structures when seeded on Matrigel. In vivo, rHuEpo induces a potent angiogenic response in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Accordingly, endothelial cells of the CAM vasculature express EpoRs, as shown by immunostaining with an anti-EpoR antibody. The angiogenic response of CAM blood vessels to rHuEpo was comparable to that elicited by the prototypic angiogenic cytokine basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), it occurred in the absence of a significant mononuclear cell infiltrate, and it was not mimicked by endothelin-1 (ET-1) treatment. Taken together, these data demonstrate the ability of Epo to interact directly with endothelial cells and to elicit an angiogenic response in vitro and in vivo and thus act as a bona fide direct angiogenic factor.

  3. Triple combination of irradiation, chemotherapy (pemetrexed), and VEGFR inhibition (SU5416) in human endothelial and tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, Marc; Abdollahi, Amir; Gong Ping; Stoffregen, Clemens; Lipson, Kenneth E.; Debus, Juergen; Weber, Klaus J.; Huber, Peter E. . E-mail: p.huber@dkfz.de

    2004-11-15

    Purpose: This is the first preclinical report evaluating a trimodal therapy consisting of irradiation, chemotherapy, and antiangiogenesis in the context of a multimodal anticancer strategy. The combination of the folate antimetabolite pemetrexed, SU5416, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor of VEGFR2, and irradiation was investigated in human endothelial cells and tumor cell lines. Methods and materials: Primary isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC), and human glioblastoma (U87) and prostate cancer cells (PC3) were exposed to pemetrexed (2 h) alone and in combination with SU5416 (2 h). When combined with irradiation up to 8 Gy, fixed concentrations of pemetrexed (1.06 {mu}M) and SU5416 (1.0 {mu}M) were used. Proliferation and clonogenic assays were conducted with endothelial and tumor cells. The migration/invasion ability of endothelial cells and the ability to produce tubular structures were tested in Matrigel and tube formation assays. Apoptosis was measured by sub-G1 DNA and caspase-3 flow cytometry. To investigate underlying cell signaling, immunocytochemistry was used to detect Akt survival signaling involvement. Results: Triple combination using only a low-toxicity drug exposure of pemetrexed and SU5416 results in greater response than each treatment alone or than each combination of two modalities in all tested endothelial and tumor cell models. Triple combination substantially inhibits proliferation, migration/invasion, tube formation, and clonogenic survival. Triple combination also induced the highest rate of apoptosis in HDMEC and HUVEC as indicated by sub-1 G1 and caspase-3 assessment. Interestingly, triple combination therapy also reduces proliferation and clonogenic survival significantly in U87 and PC3 tumor cell lines. SU5416 potently inhibited Akt phosphorylation which could be induced by radiation and radiochemotherapy in human endothelial cells. Conclusions: Our findings

  4. Lepidotol A from Mesua lepidota Inhibits Inflammatory and Immune Mediators in Human Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Rouger, Caroline; Derbré, Séverine; Charreau, Béatrice; Pabois, Angélique; Cauchy, Thomas; Litaudon, Marc; Awang, Khalijah; Richomme, Pascal

    2015-09-25

    Phytochemical investigation on the fruits of Mesua lepidota (Calophyllaceae) led to the isolation of seven new phenylcoumarin derivatives named lepidotols A-E (1-5) and lepidotins A and B (6, 7). These structures were elucidated by spectroscopic and spectrometric methods including UV, NMR, and HRMS. Lepidotol A (1), the major compound, was evaluated for its inhibitory effect on inflammation and immunity using endothelial cell-based cellular assays. At 10 μM, 1 exhibited an anti-inflammatory activity, with a significant inhibition of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression induced by tumor necrosis factor-α. Lepidotol A also showed a mild immunosuppressive effect, with inhibition of the major histocompatibility complex molecules, namely, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR and HLA-E.

  5. Antiangiogenic properties of cafestol, a coffee diterpene, in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuaiyu; Yoon, Yeo Cho; Sung, Mi-Jeong; Hur, Haeng-Jeon; Park, Jae-Ho

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cafestol inhibits tube formation and migration of VEGF-stimulated HUVEC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cafestol inhibits phosphorylation of FAK and Akt. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cafestol decreases NO production. -- Abstract: As angiogenesis plays important roles in tumor growth and metastasis, searching for antiangiogenic compounds is a promising tactic for treating cancers. Cafestol, a diterpene found mainly in unfiltered coffee, provides benefit through varied biological activity, including antitumorigenic, antioxidative, and anti-inflammatory effects. This study aimed to investigate the effects of cafestol on angiogenesis and to uncover the associated mechanism. We show that cafestol inhibits angiogenesis of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. This inhibition affects the following specific steps of the angiogenic process: proliferation, migration, and tube formation. The inhibitory effects of cafestol are accompanied by decreasing phosphorylation of FAK and Akt and by a decrease in nitric oxide production. Overall, cafestol inhibits angiogenesis by affecting the angiogenic signaling pathway.

  6. Aspirin Triggered-Lipoxin A4 Reduces the Adhesion of Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils to Endothelial Cells Initiated by Preeclamptic Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Villa, AM; Norling, LV; Serhan, CN; Cordero, D; Rojas, M; Cadavid, A

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Preeclampsia is a disorder of pregnancy, characterized by hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks of gestation. Here, we evaluated the role of aspirin triggered-lipoxin A4 (ATL, 15-epi-LXA4) on the modulation of the adhesion of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) to endothelial cells initiated by preeclamptic plasma. Materials and methods Plasma from preeclamptic, normotensive pregnant, and non-pregnant women were analysed for factors involved in regulating angiogenesis, inflammation and lipid peroxidation. Plasma from preeclamptic women was added to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and the adhesion of PMN (incubated with or without ATL) to cells was evaluated. Results Preeclampsia was associated with some augmented anti-angiogenic, oxidative and pro-inflammatory markers, as well as increasing human PMN-endothelial cell adhesion. This cell adhesion was reduced when human PMN were incubated with ATL prior to addition to endothelial monolayers. Discussions and Conclusions Our results are the starting point for further research on the efficacy and rational use of aspirin in preeclampsia. PMID:22974760

  7. RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA) AND VANADIUM-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN HUMAN VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) and vanadium-induced gene expression profiles in human vascular endothelial cells.
    Srikanth S. Nadadur, Urmila P. Kodavanti, Mary Jane Selgrade and Daniel L. Costa, Pulmonary Toxicology Branch, ETD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, N...

  8. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN HUMAN AND RAT VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA) AND VANADIUM (V)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene expression profiles in human and rat vascular endothelial cells exposed to residual oil fly ash (ROFA) or vanadium (V).
    Srikanth S. Nadadur, Darrell W. Winsett and Daniel L. Costa, US EPA, ORD, NHEERL (ETD, Pulmonary Toxicology Branch), Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

  9. Inherited human group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 deficiency abolishes platelet, endothelial, and leucocyte eicosanoid generation

    PubMed Central

    Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Reed, Daniel M.; Edin, Matthew L.; Rauzi, Francesca; Mataragka, Stefania; Vojnovic, Ivana; Bishop-Bailey, David; Milne, Ginger L.; Longhurst, Hilary; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Mitchell, Jane A.; Warner, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids are important vascular regulators, but the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) isoforms supporting their production within the cardiovascular system are not fully understood. To address this, we have studied platelets, endothelial cells, and leukocytes from 2 siblings with a homozygous loss-of-function mutation in group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2α). Chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to determine levels of a broad range of eicosanoids produced by isolated vascular cells, and in plasma and urine. Eicosanoid release data were paired with studies of cellular function. Absence of cPLA2α almost abolished eicosanoid synthesis in platelets (e.g., thromboxane A2, control 20.5 ± 1.4 ng/ml vs. patient 0.1 ng/ml) and leukocytes [e.g., prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), control 21.9 ± 7.4 ng/ml vs. patient 1.9 ng/ml], and this was associated with impaired platelet activation and enhanced inflammatory responses. cPLA2α-deficient endothelial cells showed reduced, but not absent, formation of prostaglandin I2 (prostacyclin; control 956 ± 422 pg/ml vs. patient 196 pg/ml) and were primed for inflammation. In the urine, prostaglandin metabolites were selectively influenced by cPLA2α deficiency. For example, prostacyclin metabolites were strongly reduced (18.4% of control) in patients lacking cPLA2α, whereas PGE2 metabolites (77.8% of control) were similar to healthy volunteer levels. These studies constitute a definitive account, demonstrating the fundamental role of cPLA2α to eicosanoid formation and cellular responses within the human circulation.—Kirkby, N. S., Reed, D. M., Edin, M. L., Rauzi, F., Mataragka, S., Vojnovic, I., Bishop-Bailey, D., Milne, G. L., Longhurst, H., Zeldin, D. C., Mitchell, J. A., Warner, T. D. Inherited human group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 deficiency abolishes platelet, endothelial, and leucocyte eicosanoid generation. PMID:26183771

  10. Human chorionic villus mesenchymal stromal cells reveal strong endothelial conversion properties.

    PubMed

    Meraviglia, Viviana; Vecellio, Matteo; Grasselli, Annalisa; Baccarin, Marco; Farsetti, Antonella; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Pompilio, Giulio; Coviello, Domenico A; Gaetano, Carlo; Di Segni, Marina; Rossini, Alessandra

    2012-06-01

    Chorion, amnion and villi are reservoirs of mesenchymal stromal cells (StC) and the hypothesis that StC from fetal tissues retain higher plasticity compared to adult StC has been suggested. Aimed at investigating this aspect, a series of in vitro experiments were performed with StC isolated from first trimester human chorionic villi (CVStC). CVStC were cultured in: (i) standard mesenchymal medium (MM) and (ii) AmniomaxII® (AM), specifically designed to grow amnion-derived cells in prenatal diagnostic procedures. Cells were then exposed to distinct differentiation treatments and distinguished according to morphology, immunophenotype and molecular markers. Human StC obtained from adult bone marrow (BMStC) were used as control. CVStC cultured either in MM or AM presented stromal morphology and immunophenotype, were negative for pluripotency factors (Nanog, Oct-4 and Sox-2), lacked detectable telomerase activity and retained high genomic stability. In AM, however, CVStC exhibited a faster proliferation rate compared to BMStC or CVStC kept in MM. During differentiation, CVStC were less efficient than BMStC in acquiring adipocytes and osteocytes features; the cardiomyogenic conversion occurred at low efficiency in both cell types. Remarkably, in the presence of pro-angiogenic factors, CVStC reprogrammed toward an endothelial-like phenotype at significantly higher efficiency than BMStC. This effect was particularly evident in CVStC expanded in AM. Mechanistically, the reduced CVStC expression of anti-angiogenic microRNA could support this process. The present study demonstrates that, despite of fetal origin, CVStC exhibit restricted plasticity, distinct from that of BMStC and predominantly directed toward the endothelial lineage.

  11. HSPA12B inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Li, Xuehan; Huang, Lei; Jiang, Surong; Tu, Fei; Zhang, Xiaojin; Ma, He; Li, Rongrong; Li, Chuanfu; Li, Yuehua; Ding, Zhengnian; Liu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein A12B (HSPA12B) is a newly discovered member of the HSP70 protein family. This study investigated the effects of HSPA12B on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the possible mechanisms involved. A HUVECs inflammatory model was induced by LPS. Overexpression of HSPA12B in HUVECs was achieved by infection with recombinant adenoviruses encoding green fluorescence protein-HSPA12B. Knockdown of HSPA12B was achieved by siRNA technique. Twenty four hours after virus infection or siRNA transfection, HUVECs were stimulated with 1 μg/ml LPS for 4 hrs. Endothelial cell permeability ability was determined by transwell permeability assay. The binding rate of human neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) with HUVECs was examined using myeloperoxidase assay. Cell migrating ability was determined by the wound-healing assay. The mRNA and protein expression levels of interested genes were analyzed by RT-qPCR and Western blot, respectively. The release of cytokines interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α was measured by ELISA. HSPA12B suppressed LPS-induced HUVEC permeability and reduced PMN adhesion to HUVECs. HSPA12B also inhibited LPS-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules and inflammatory cytokine expression. By contrast, knockdown of HSPA12B enhanced LPS-induced increases in the expression of adhesion molecules and inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, HSPA12B activated PI3K/Akt signalling pathway and pharmacological inhibition of this pathway by Wortmannin completely abrogated the protection of HSPA12B against inflammatory response in HUVECs. Our results suggest that HSPA12B attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory responses in HUVECs via activation of PI3K/Akt signalling pathway. PMID:25545050

  12. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-b in human astrocytoma.

    PubMed Central

    Gollmer, J. C.; Ladoux, A.; Gioanni, J.; Paquis, P.; Dubreuil, A.; Chatel, M.; Frelin, C.

    2000-01-01

    Growth of human malignant gliomas is stringently dependent on an angiogenic process that probably involves vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Expressions of mRNA coding for the different forms of VEGF were analyzed in surgical specimens from human astrocytomas. Low levels of placental growth factor (PGF) and VEGFC mRNA were observed in polymerase chain reaction, but not in Northern blot experiments. VEGF mRNA was found in some but not all grade and grade IV astrocytomas. VEGFB mRNA was observed in all tissue samples analyzed irrespective of the tumor grade. A new splice variant of VEGFB (VEGFB155) that lacks exons 5 and 6 is described. Expressions of VEGF mRNA in cultured glioblastomas cells were upregulated by hypoxia, but the sensitivity of the cells to hypoxia was reduced as compared with normal rat astrocytes. VEGF expression was depressed by dexamethasone. Expressions of VEGFB mRNA were affected neither by hypoxia nor by dexamethasone. The results indicate a coexpression of VEGF mRNA and VEGFB mRNA in human astrocytomas. Expression of VEGFB is markedly different from that of VEGF. Possible roles of VEGFB as a cofactor for hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in human astrocytomas are discussed. PMID:11303624

  13. Degradation of endothelial basement membrane by human breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, C.; Shiu, R.P.

    1986-04-01

    During metastasis, it is believed that tumor cells destroy the basement membrane (BM) of blood vessels in order to disseminate through the circulatory system. By radioactively labeling the extracellular matrix produced by primary endothelial cells in vitro, the ability of human breast cancer cells to degrade BM components was studied. We found that T-47D, a human breast cancer line, was able to degrade significant amounts of (35S)methionine-labeled and (3H)proline-labeled BM, but not 35SO4-labeled BM. Six other tumor cell lines of human breast origin were assayed in the same manner and were found to degrade BM to varying degrees. Several non-tumor cell lines tested showed relatively little degrading activity. The use of serum-free medium greatly enhanced degradation of the BM by tumor cells, suggesting a role for naturally occurring enzyme inhibitors in the serum. Direct cell contact with the BM was required for BM degradation, suggesting that the active enzymes are cell associated. The addition of hormones implicated in the etiology of breast cancer did not significantly alter the ability of T-47D cells to degrade the BM. The use of this assay affords future studies on the mechanism of invasion and metastasis of human breast cancer.

  14. Autocrine control of angiogenesis by endogenous acetylcholine in an in vitro model using human endothelial cells: evidence for an autocrine cholinergic system in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dhein, Stefan; Wermke, Alice; von Salisch, Sandy; Schlegel, Franziska; Stepan, Holger; Dohmen, Pascal Maria; Kostelka, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2015-05-01

    We wanted to elucidate whether acetylcholine as the endogenous ligand at cholinoceptors (ChRs) may have effects on angiogenesis and whether they are transduced through muscarinic or nicotinic ChRs. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were cultured until confluence and thereafter seeded in Matrigel in vitro angiogenesis assays for 18 hours. During the entire cell culture and angiogenesis period, cells were treated with vehicle, eserine (1 μM), in the absence or presence of additional atropine (1 μM) or mecamylamine (1 μM). Finally, the resulting angiogenetic network was investigated histologically. Eserine significantly enhanced acetylcholine formation. When acetylcholine acted through muscarinic ChRs (eserine + mecamylamine), we observed enhanced complexity of the angiogenic network pattern with increased tube length and cell number. In contrast, when acting through nicotinic ChRs (eserine + atropine), we found reduced complexity of pattern with less branches, shorter tubes, and reduced cell number. If acting on both types of ChRs (eserine alone), there were only very small effects. Using α-bungarotoxin, lobeline, and dihydro-β-erythroidine, we also could show that these effects to various degrees involve α7, α3/β2, and α4/β2 n-ChRs. In conclusion, our results support the hypothesis that human umbilical vein endothelial cells possess an autocrine nonneuronal cholinergic system regulating angiogenesic branch formation through the partially opposing effects of n-ChRs and m-ChRs.

  15. Protection of Candida parapsilosis from neutrophil killing through internalization by human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Kyle A; Longley, Sarah J; Bliss, Joseph M; Shaw, Sunil K

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is a fungal pathogen that is associated with hematogenously disseminated disease in premature neonates, acutely ill or immunocompromised patients. In cell culture, C. parapsilosis cells are actively and avidly endocytosed by endothelial cells via actin polymerization mediated by N-WASP. Here we present evidence that C. parapsilosis that were internalized by endothelial cells remained alive, and avoided being acidified or otherwise damaged via the host cell. Internalized fungal cells reproduced intracellularly and eventually burst out of the host endothelial cell. When neutrophils were added to endothelium and C. parapsilosis, they patrolled the endothelial surface and efficiently killed most adherent fungal cells prior to endocytosis. But after endocytosis by endothelial cells, internalized fungal cells evaded neutrophil killing. Silencing endothelial N-WASP blocked endocytosis of C. parapsilosis and left fungal cells stranded on the cell surface, where they were susceptible to neutrophil killing. These observations suggest that for C. parapsilosis to escape from the bloodstream, fungi may adhere to and be internalized by endothelial cells before being confronted and phagocytosed by a patrolling leukocyte. Once internalized by endothelial cells, C. parapsilosis may safely replicate to cause further rounds of infection. Immunosurveillance of the intravascular lumen by leukocytes crawling on the endothelial surface and rapid killing of adherent yeast may play a major role in controlling C. parapsilosis dissemination and infected endothelial cells may be a significant reservoir for fungal persistence. PMID:26039751

  16. Sialyl Lewis X mimetics attenuate E-selectin-mediated adhesion of leukocytes to irradiated human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hallahan, D E; Kuchibhotla, J; Wyble, C

    1997-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes histological changes in normal tissues that resemble those resulting from the inflammatory response. Inflammation is a multistep process requiring expression of adhesion molecules on the surface of endothelial cells which results in leukocyte extravasation. E-selectin is an adhesion molecule that mediates leukocyte "rolling" on the endothelium and is required for the inflammatory response. We quantified E-selectin expression and selectin-dependent adhesion of leukocytes to human endothelial cells after X irradiation to determine whether E-selectin participates in the radiation-mediated inflammation-like response. Immunofluorescence staining of irradiated endothelial cells demonstrated expression of E-selectin on the cell surface similar to that elicited by treatment with interleukin-1 (IL-1). Radiation-mediated expression of E-selectin was dependent on dose and time and occurred at doses as low as 0.5 Gy. Furthermore, the increased adhesion of leukocytes to irradiated endothelial cells was prevented by an E-selectin-blocking antibody. Sialyl Lewis X is one of the molecules on the surface of leukocytes that adheres to E-selectin. The anti-inflammatory agents glycyrrhizin and carminic acid, which are structural analogues of sialyl Lewis X, attenuated adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells treated with X rays or IL-1. These data implicate a new class of anti-inflammatory agents in the prevention of adhesions of leukocytes to the irradiated vascular endothelium. PMID:8989368

  17. Endothelial Cells Enhance Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication in Macrophages through a C/EBP-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eileen S.; Zhou, Huiyu; Henderson, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Macrophages are early targets of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and serve as potential reservoirs for long-term infection. Through inflammatory mediators and direct cell contact, infected macrophages interact with neighboring cell populations, such as the endothelium, which create a microenvironment favorable for HIV-1 replication. We hypothesize that the transcriptional activator C/EBPβ is critical for macrophages to respond to endothelial cell-derived signals. We show that endothelial cells significantly enhance C/EBPβ binding activity and HIV-1 replication in macrophages. This increase in HIV-1 transcription is due to cell-cell contact as well as the production of soluble factors, mediated in part by ICAM-1 and interleukin 6, respectively. Furthermore, C/EBP factors are necessary for endothelial cell-dependent activation of HIV-1 transcription in macrophages, and HIV-1 induction can be inhibited by a C/EBP dominant-negative protein. In addition, C/EBP binding sites are necessary for efficient LTR activity and HIV-1 replication in the presence of endothelial cells. Taken together, these results indicate that endothelial cells, through the activation of C/EBPβ, provide a microenvironment that supports HIV-1 replication in monocytes/macrophages. PMID:11559803

  18. Augmentation of Neovascularizaiton in Hindlimb Ischemia by Combined Transplantation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells-Derived Endothelial and Mural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Jun K.; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Homma, Koichiro; Chao, Ting-Hsing; Miyashita, Kazutoshi; Park, Kwijun; Oyamada, Naofumi; Sawada, Naoya; Taura, Daisuke; Fukunaga, Yasutomo; Tamura, Naohisa; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2008-01-01

    Background We demonstrated that mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells-derived vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGF-R2) positive cells could differentiate into both endothelial cells (EC) and mural cells (MC), and termed them as vascular progenitor cells (VPC). Recently, we have established a method to expand monkey and human ES cells-derived VPC with the proper differentiation stage in a large quantity. Here we investigated the therapeutic potential of human VPC-derived EC and MC for vascular regeneration. Methods and Results After the expansion of human VPC-derived vascular cells, we transplanted these cells to nude mice with hindlimb ischemia. The blood flow recovery and capillary density in ischemic hindlimbs were significantly improved in human VPC-derived EC-transplanted mice, compared to human peripheral and umbilical cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (pEPC and uEPC) transplanted mice. The combined transplantation of human VPC-derived EC and MC synergistically improved blood flow of ischemic hindlimbs remarkably, compared to the single cell transplantations. Transplanted VPC-derived vascular cells were effectively incorporated into host circulating vessels as EC and MC to maintain long-term vascular integrity. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the combined transplantation of human ES cells-derived EC and MC can be used as a new promising strategy for therapeutic vascular regeneration in patients with tissue ischemia. PMID:18301744

  19. Induction of oxidative stress, lysosome activation and autophagy by nanoparticles in human brain-derived endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Halamoda Kenzaoui, Blanka; Chapuis Bernasconi, Catherine; Guney-Ayra, Seher; Juillerat-Jeanneret, Lucienne

    2012-02-01

    Different types of NPs (nanoparticles) are currently under development for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in the biomedical field, yet our knowledge about their possible effects and fate in living cells is still limited. In the present study, we examined the cellular response of human brain-derived endothelial cells to NPs of different size and structure: uncoated and oleic acid-coated iron oxide NPs (8-9 nm core), fluorescent 25 and 50 nm silica NPs, TiO2 NPs (21 nm mean core diameter) and PLGA [poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)]-PEO [poly(ethylene oxide)] polymeric NPs (150 nm). We evaluated their uptake by the cells, and their localization, generation of oxidative stress and DNA-damaging effects in exposed cells. We show that NPs are internalized by human brain-derived endothelial cells; however, the extent of their intracellular uptake is dependent on the characteristics of the NPs. After their uptake by human brain-derived endothelial cells NPs are transported into the lysosomes of these cells, where they enhance the activation of lysosomal proteases. In brain-derived endothelial cells, NPs induce the production of an oxidative stress after exposure to iron oxide and TiO2 NPs, which is correlated with an increase in DNA strand breaks and defensive mechanisms that ultimately induce an autophagy process in the cells. PMID:22026563

  20. Isolation and growth of endothelial cells from the microvessels of the newborn human foreskin in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Davison, P M; Bensch, K; Karasek, M A

    1980-10-01

    A procedure for the isolation and in vitro cultivation of endothelial cells from the microvessels of the newborn human foreskin dermis is described. The epidermis was removed from foreskin tissue using a Castroviejo keratotome (0.1 mm shim). Endothelial cells were released from the dermal vessels by trypsinization of 5 mm2 sections of dermis at 37 degrees C for 40 min. Cells were expressed into Minimal Essential Medium (MEM) containing 10% pooled human serum, collected by centrifugation and plated onto either a plain plastic or a fibronectin treated culture surface. In primary culture the rate of endothelial cell proliferation was dependent upon serum type and concentration being optimal in 50% pooled human serum. High serum concentration in combination with pretreatment of the culture surface with fibronectin was required for maximal proliferation rate, for the cells to achieve confluence and for subcultivation. Primary and subcultured cells were characterized as endothelial by light microscopic, immunofluorescent (Factor VIII associated protein) and ultrastructural (Weibel-Palade body) criteria.

  1. Functional and Transcriptional Characterization of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Endothelial Cells for Treatment of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zongjin; Wilson, Kitchener D.; Smith, Bryan; Kraft, Daniel L.; Jia, Fangjun; Huang, Mei; Xie, Xiaoyan; Robbins, Robert C.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Weissman, Irving L.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells (hESC-ECs) has the potential to provide an unlimited source of cells for novel transplantation therapies of ischemic diseases by supporting angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. However, the endothelial differentiation efficiency of the conventional embryoid body (EB) method is low while the 2-dimensional method of co-culturing with mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) require animal product, both of which can limit the future clinical application of hESC-ECs. Moreover, to fully understand the beneficial effects of stem cell therapy, investigators must be able to track the functional biology and physiology of transplanted cells in living subjects over time. Methodology In this study, we developed an extracellular matrix (ECM) culture system for increasing endothelial differentiation and free from contaminating animal cells. We investigated the transcriptional changes that occur during endothelial differentiation of hESCs using whole genome microarray, and compared to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We also showed functional vascular formation by hESC-ECs in a mouse dorsal window model. Moreover, our study is the first so far to transplant hESC-ECs in a myocardial infarction model and monitor cell fate using molecular imaging methods. Conclusion Taken together, we report a more efficient method for derivation of hESC-ECs that express appropriate patterns of endothelial genes, form functional vessels in vivo, and improve cardiac function. These studies suggest that hESC-ECs may provide a novel therapy for ischemic heart disease in the future. PMID:20046878

  2. Inhibitory effects of three diketopiperazines from marine-derived bacteria on endothelial protein C receptor shedding in human endothelial cells and mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonhwa; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Choi, Hyukjae; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-04-01

    Diketopiperazine is a natural products found from bacteria, fungi, marine sponges, gorgonian and red algae. They are cyclic dipeptides possessing relatively simple and rigid structures with chiral nature and various side chains. The compounds in this structure class have been known to possess diverse bioactivities including antibiotic activity, anti-cancer activity, neuroprotective activity, and anti-inflammatory activity. The endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) plays an important role in the cytoprotective pathway and in the activation of protein C. Endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) can be shed from the cell surface, which is mediated by tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE). However, little is known about the effects of diketopiperazine on EPCR shedding. We investigated this issue by monitoring the effects of diketopiperazine on phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin (IL)-1β-induced EPCR shedding in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-mediated EPCR shedding in mice and underlying mechanism. Here, three (1-3) of diketopiperazines were isolated from two strains of marine-derived bacteria and 1-3 induced potent inhibition of PMA-, TNF-α-, IL-1β (in HUVECs), and CLP-induced EPCR shedding (in mice) via inhibition of phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) such as p38, janus kinase (JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. 1-3 also inhibited the expression and activity of PMA-induced TACE in HUVECs suggesting that p38, ERK1/2, and JNK could be molecular targets of 1-3. These results demonstrate the potential of 1-3 as an anti-EPCR shedding reagent against PMA-mediated and CLP-mediated EPCR shedding. PMID:27012760

  3. Inhibitory effects of three diketopiperazines from marine-derived bacteria on endothelial protein C receptor shedding in human endothelial cells and mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonhwa; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Choi, Hyukjae; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-04-01

    Diketopiperazine is a natural products found from bacteria, fungi, marine sponges, gorgonian and red algae. They are cyclic dipeptides possessing relatively simple and rigid structures with chiral nature and various side chains. The compounds in this structure class have been known to possess diverse bioactivities including antibiotic activity, anti-cancer activity, neuroprotective activity, and anti-inflammatory activity. The endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) plays an important role in the cytoprotective pathway and in the activation of protein C. Endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) can be shed from the cell surface, which is mediated by tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE). However, little is known about the effects of diketopiperazine on EPCR shedding. We investigated this issue by monitoring the effects of diketopiperazine on phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interleukin (IL)-1β-induced EPCR shedding in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-mediated EPCR shedding in mice and underlying mechanism. Here, three (1-3) of diketopiperazines were isolated from two strains of marine-derived bacteria and 1-3 induced potent inhibition of PMA-, TNF-α-, IL-1β (in HUVECs), and CLP-induced EPCR shedding (in mice) via inhibition of phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) such as p38, janus kinase (JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. 1-3 also inhibited the expression and activity of PMA-induced TACE in HUVECs suggesting that p38, ERK1/2, and JNK could be molecular targets of 1-3. These results demonstrate the potential of 1-3 as an anti-EPCR shedding reagent against PMA-mediated and CLP-mediated EPCR shedding.

  4. Functional Mineralocorticoid Receptors in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells Regulate ICAM-1 Expression and Promote Leukocyte Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Caprio, Massimiliano; Newfell, Brenna G.; la Sala, Andrea; Baur, Wendy; Fabbri, Andrea; Rosano, Giuseppe; Mendelsohn, Michael E.; Jaffe, Iris Z.

    2008-01-01

    In clinical trials, aldosterone antagonists decrease cardiovascular mortality and ischemia by unknown mechanisms. The steroid hormone aldosterone acts by binding to the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a ligand-activated transcription factor. In humans, aldosterone causes MR-dependent endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction and in animal models, aldosterone increases vascular macrophage infiltration and atherosclerosis. MR antagonists inhibit these effects without changing blood pressure, suggesting a direct role for vascular MR in EC function and atherosclerosis. Whether human vascular EC express functional MR is not known. Here we show that human coronary artery and aortic EC express MR mRNA and protein and that EC MR mediates aldosterone-dependent gene transcription. Human EC also express the enzyme 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2(11βHSD2) and inhibition of 11βHSD2 in aortic EC enhances gene transactivation by cortisol, supporting that EC 11βHSD2 is functional. Furthermore, aldosterone stimulates transcription of the proatherogenic leukocyte-EC adhesion molecule Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1(ICAM1) gene and protein expression on human coronary artery EC, an effect inhibited by the MR antagonist spironolactone and by MR knock-down with siRNA. Cell adhesion assays demonstrate that aldosterone promotes leukocyte-EC adhesion, an effect that is inhibited by spironolactone and ICAM1 blocking antibody, supporting that aldosterone induction of EC ICAM1 surface expression via MR mediates leukocyte-EC adhesion. These data show that aldosterone activates endogenous EC MR and proatherogenic gene expression in clinically important human EC. These studies describe a novel mechanism by which aldosterone may influence ischemic cardiovascular events and support a new explanation for the decrease in ischemic events in patients treated with aldosterone antagonists. PMID:18467630

  5. Isolation and characterization of lymphatic endothelial cells from human glossal lymphangioma.

    PubMed

    You, Lanying; Wu, Mingfu; Chen, Ying; Xu, Gang; Wei, Juncheng; Li, Qiong; Song, Anping; Zhao, Liangpin; Li, Shuang; Han, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Jianfeng; Lu, Yunpin; Wang, Shixuan; Ma, Ding; Meng, Li

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal lymphangiogenesis is associated with several diseases such as tumor metastasis and lymphangioma. Human lymphangioma originated from the transformation of lymphatic endothelium is a benign malformation of lymphatic vessels and its pathogenesis has up to date not been illuminated and its cell model has also not been established. An optimized method was used to isolate lymphatic endothelial cells from human glossal lymphangioma (GL-LECs) and GL-LECs were further primarily cultured and expanded. GL-LECs were of typical cobblestone appearance when they reached confluence. The weible-palade body was observed in the GL-LECs cytoplasm. Almost all GL-LECs were strongly positive for specific lymphatic markers FLT-4, LYVE-1 and prox-1 by immunocytochemistry. Furthermore, three-dimension tube-like capillaries of GL-LECs resembled the lymphatic system in vivo, and the GL-LECs spheroids sprouted radically out to form three-dimensional buds when embedded in the cultured BME. These results indicated that high purity GL-LECs were successfully isolated and expanded. They had the abilities of tube formation and differentiation in vitro, which provide a favorable cell model for further uncovering the pathogenesis of human lymphangiomas.

  6. Distinct innate immune responses in human macrophages and endothelial cells infected with shrew-borne hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ok Sarah; Yanagihara, Richard; Song, Jin-Won

    2012-12-01

    Although hantaviruses have been previously considered as rodent-borne pathogens, recent studies demonstrate genetically distinct hantaviruses in evolutionarily distant non-rodent reservoirs, including shrews, moles and bats. The immunological responses to these newfound hantaviruses in humans are unknown. We compared the innate immune responses to Imjin virus (MJNV) and Thottapalayam virus (TPMV), two shrew-borne hantaviruses, with that toward two rodent-borne hantaviruses, pathogenic Hantann virus (HTNV) and nonpathogenic Prospect Hill virus (PHV). Infection of human macrophages and endothelial cells with either HTNV or MJNV triggered productive viral replication and up-regulation of anti-viral responsive gene expression from day 1 to day 3 postinfection, compared with PHV and TPMV. Furthermore, HTNV, MJNV and TPMV infection led to prolonged increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines from days 3 to 7 postinfection. By contrast, PHV infection failed to induce pro-inflammatory responses. Distinct patterns of innate immune activation caused by MJNV suggest that it might be pathogenic to humans. PMID:22944108

  7. A monoclonal antibody to OspA inhibits association of Borrelia burgdorferi with human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Comstock, L E; Fikrig, E; Shoberg, R J; Flavell, R A; Thomas, D D

    1993-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that polyclonal antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi and some monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to borrelia major surface proteins caused inhibition of adherence of the bacteria to cultured human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVE) cells. In this study, fragment antigen binding (Fab) molecules generated from the immunoglobulin G fraction of rabbit anti-recombinant OspA serum were found to inhibit the adherence of B. burgdorferi to HUVE cells by 73%. Subsequently, MAbs were generated for use in determining whether or how B. burgdorferi outer surface proteins (Osps) A and/or B are involved in mediating attachment to, and/or invasion of, HUVE cells by B. burgdorferi. Twenty-two MAbs were generated to borrelial proteins with apparent molecular masses (determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) of 19, 31 (OspA), 34 (OspB), and 35 kDa. Fab molecules from one anti-OspA MAb, 9B3D, demonstrated an inhibitory effect on bacterial association with HUVE cells. None of the other MAbs, including the other anti-OspA MAbs, showed an inhibitory effect on cell association of greater than 5%. This effect of Fab 9B3D was concentration dependent and plateaued at approximately 6 micrograms of Fab per ml (nearly 80% inhibition of the bacterial association with the monolayer). Penetration assays and cell association experiments performed by using immunofluorescence also suggested that the inhibitory action of 9B3D occurs at the level of adherence. MAb 9B3D recognized the OspA of every North American strain tested (n = 19) but only 3 [corrected] of 20 strains from western Europe, Russia, and Japan, suggesting that the North American strains and strains from other parts of the world may use different molecules and/or different OspA epitopes to interact with endothelial cells. Immunoblots of Escherichia coli expressing different OspA fusion peptides suggested that the 9B3D epitope resides in the carboxy-terminal half of OspA. MAb 9B3D

  8. The Influence of C-Ions and X-rays on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Helm, Alexander; Lee, Ryonfa; Durante, Marco; Ritter, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Damage to the endothelium of blood vessels, which may occur during radiotherapy, is discussed as a potential precursor to the development of cardiovascular disease. We thus chose human umbilical vein endothelial cells as a model system to examine the effect of low- and high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Cells were exposed to 250 kV X-rays or carbon ions (C-ions) with the energies of either 9.8 MeV/u (LET = 170 keV/μm) or 91 MeV/u (LET = 28 keV/μm). Subculture of cells was performed regularly up to 46 days (~22 population doublings) post-irradiation. Immediately after exposure, cells were seeded for the colony forming assay. Additionally, at regular intervals, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) (JC-1 staining) and cellular senescence (senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining) were assessed. Cytogenetic damage was investigated by the micronucleus assay and the high-resolution multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) technique. Analysis of radiation-induced damage shortly after exposure showed that C-ions are more effective than X-rays with respect to cell inactivation or the induction of cytogenetic damage (micronucleus assay) as observed in other cell systems. For 9.8 and 91 MeV/u C-ions, relative biological effectiveness values of 2.4 and 1.5 were obtained for cell inactivation. At the subsequent time points, the number of micronucleated cells decreased to the control level. Analysis of chromosomal damage by mFISH technique revealed aberrations frequently involving chromosome 13 irrespective of dose or radiation quality. Disruption of the MMP was seen only a few days after exposure to X-rays or C-ions. Cellular senescence was not altered by radiation at any time point investigated. Altogether, our data indicate that shortly after exposure C-ions were more effective in damaging endothelial cells than X-rays. However, late damage to endothelial cells was not found for the applied conditions and endpoints.

  9. Desflurane Preconditioning Induces Oscillation of NF-κB in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Changhong; Tang, Jianguo; Zhu, Biao

    2013-01-01

    Background Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) has been implicated in anesthetic preconditioning (APC) induced protection against anoxia and reoxygenation (A/R) injury. The authors hypothesized that desflurane preconditioning would induce NF-κB oscillation and prevent endothelial cells apoptosis. Methods A human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) A/R injury model was used. A 30 minute desflurane treatment was initiated before anoxia. NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 was administered in some experiments before desflurane preconditioning. Cells apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry using annexin V–fluorescein isothiocyanate staining and cell viability was evaluated by modified tertrozalium salt (MTT) assay. The cellular superoxide dismutases (SOD) activitiy were tested by water-soluble tetrazolium salt (WST-1) assay. NF-κB p65 subunit nuclear translocation was detected by immunofluorescence staining. Expression of inhibitor of NF-κB-α (IκBα), NF-κB p65 and cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 1 (c-IAP1), B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), cysteine containing aspartate specific protease 3 (caspases-3) and second mitochondrial-derived activator of caspase (SMAC/DIABLO) were determined by western blot. Results Desflurane preconditioning caused phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB before anoxia, on the contrary, induced the synthesis of IκBα and inhibition of NF-κB after reoxygenation. Desflurane preconditioning up-regulated the expression of c-IAP1 and Bcl-2, blocked the cleavage of caspase-3 and reduced SMAC release, and decreased the cell death of HUVECs after A/R. The protective effect was abolished by BAY11-7082 administered before desflurane. Conclusions The results demonstrated that desflurane activated NF-κB during the preconditioning period and inhibited excessive activation of NF-κB in reperfusion. And the oscillation of NF-κB induced by desflurane preconditioning finally up-regulated antiapoptotic proteins expression and protected

  10. P2 receptor expression profiles in human vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingwei; Karlsson, Lena; Moses, Sara; Hultgårdh-Nilsson, Anna; Andersson, Maria; Borna, Catharina; Gudbjartsson, Tomas; Jern, Sverker; Erlinge, David

    2002-12-01

    P2 receptors mediate the actions of the extracellular nucleotides ATP, ADP, UTP, and UDP, regulating several physiologic responses including cardiac function, vascular tone, smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation, platelet aggregation, and the release of endothelial factors. P2 receptor characterization has been hampered by the lack of selective antagonists. The aim of the current study was to investigate the mRNA and protein expression of P2X and P2Y receptors in human SMC and in endothelial cells (EC). Smooth muscle cells were obtained from human mammary artery and EC from human umbilical vein. Using real-time PCR, the authors established quantitative mRNA assays. Protein expression was studied using Western blotting with recently developed antibodies. The P2X1 receptor was highly specific for human SMC, while the P2X4 was the highest expressed receptor in EC. The P2Y2 receptor was present in both SMC and EC. UTP-mediated effects in these cells are likely to be mediated by P2Y2 and not P2Y4 receptors since the latter had considerably lower expression. The P2Y6 receptor was expressed in both SMC and EC. The P2Y1 and surprisingly the P2Y11 receptors were the most abundantly expressed P2Y receptors in the endothelium. Overall, Western blotting confirmed the mRNA findings in most aspects, and most interestingly, indicated oligomerization of the P2Y1 receptor that may be important for its function. In conclusion, P2X1, P2Y2, and P2Y6 are the most expressed P2 receptors in SMC and are thus probably mediating the contractile and mitogenic actions of extracellular nucleotides. The P2X4, P2Y11, P2Y1, and P2Y2 are the most expressed P2 receptors in EC, and are most likely mediating release of nitric oxide, endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF), and t-PA induced by extracellular nucleotides. These findings will help to direct future cardiovascular drug development against the large P2 receptor family.

  11. Screening bioactive compounds from Ligusticum chuanxiong by high density immobilized human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Wang, Jing; Liu, Guangxin; Sun, Huanmei; Bian, Liujiao; Zhao, Xinfeng; Zheng, Xiaohui

    2015-07-01

    High throughput screening methodologies play a very important role in screening bioactive compounds from complex media. In this work, a new strategy for attaching cells onto amino microspheres using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as a probe was developed. The immobilization depended on the specific affinity between integrin on the cells and the RGD peptide, which was coated on poly[oligo (ethylene glycol) methacrylate] by atom transfer radical polymerization. Validated application of the stationary phase was performed in the analysis of Ligusticum chuanxiong extraction by high performance affinity chromatography-mass spectrometry. Three compounds were screened as the bioactive compounds of Ligusticum chuanxiong. Two of them were identified as 3-butyl-hexahydroisobenzofuran-1(3H)-one and tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), whereas the other one remains indistinct. The association constant of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and TMP binding to VEGF receptor (VEGFR) on HUVECs were calculated to be (1.04 ± 0.08) × 10(11) M(-1) and (9.84 ± 1.11) × 10(8) M(-1) by zonal elution. Molecular docking showed that one hydrogen bond was formed between N atom of TMP and 3-N atom of imidazole group in histidine(223) of VEGFR. Both zonal elution and molecular docking indicated that TMP and VEGF bind to the same site of VEGFR on HUVECs. It is possible to become a promising tool for high throughput screening of the bioactive compounds binding to HUVECs through broad application of the stationary phase. PMID:26018629

  12. MiR-29a modulates the angiogenic properties of human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zeran; Wu, Lingjiao; Zhu, Xiuming; Xu, Jie; Jin, Rong; Li, Guohong; Wu, Fusheng

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •miR-29a may be stimulated by hypoxia in HUVEC. •miR-29a regulates cell cycle, proliferation and tube network formation of HUVEC. •HMG box-containing protein-1(HBP1) is a direct target of miR-29a. •miR-29a has a potential value for treating angiogenesis-associated diseases. -- Abstract: Although extensive investigation has been made on miR-29a in relation to malignancies, only a little information has been provided about the angiogenic property of this miRNA so far. Herein, we sought to investigate the role of miR-29a in regulating cell cycle and angiogenic phenotype of endothelial cells. The results showed that miR-29a is highly expressed and upregulated by hypoxia-mimicking reagents in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Consistent with this preliminary finding, introduction of exogenous agomiR-29a, or Antagomir-29a altered cell cycle progression and promoted, or repressed the proliferation and tube formation of HUVEC, respectively. Furthermore, by using luciferase reporter assay, the expression of HBP1, a suppressor transcription factor was directly regulated by miR-29a through 3′-UTR. Increased or decreased HBP1 protein level was associated with the inhibition or overexpression of miR-29a, respectively. We conclude that miR-29a has a significant role in regulating cell cycle, proliferation and angiogenic properties of HUVEC, and this function is likely mediated through HBP1 protein at the post-transcriptional level. As a novel molecular target, miR-29a may have a potential value for the treatment of angiogenesis-associated diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and cancers.

  13. Sulodexide suppresses inflammation in human endothelial cells and prevents glucose cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ciszewicz, Marta; Polubinska, Alicja; Antoniewicz, Artur; Suminska-Jasinska, Katarzyna; Breborowicz, Andrzej

    2009-03-01

    Sulodexide is a mixture of heparin and dermatan sulfate with antithrombotic and profibrynolytic activity. Individual reports suggest the anti-inflammatory action of sulodexin. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of sulodexide on the release of the inflammatory mediators from endothelium in normal conditions and in cells chronically exposed to glucose. The experiments were performed on in vitro cultured human umbilical endothelial cells kept for 7 days in standard medium or in the same medium but supplemented with glucose 30 mmol/L. Sulodexide was added to the culture medium in concentrations of 0.125 lipase releasing unit (LRU)/mL, 0.25 LRU/mL, and 0.5 LRU/mL Spontaneous generation of oxygen-derived free radicals and the release of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) from the studied cells was evaluated. Additionally, the healing of the injured mesothelium was studied in the presence of sulodexide and glucose. Sulodexide caused the inhibition of the intracellular generation of free radicals in a dose-dependent manner (maximally by 32%, P < 0.01), as well as the inhibition of MCP-1 (maximally by 60%, P < 0.001) and IL-6 (maximally by 69%, P < 0.01). Cells cultured in a medium with glucose 30 mmol/L generated more free radicals (+20%, P < 0.05) and released more MCP-1 (+113%, P < 0.001) and IL-6 (+26%, P < 0.05). Cell monolayers treated with glucose had a decreased ability to heal after mechanical injury (-28%, P < 0.001). All these glucose effects were reversed when cells were exposed to sulodexide simultaneously. The results of our study demonstrate a significant anti-inflammatory action of sulodexide in the endothelial cells and a protective effect of that drug against glucose cytotoxicity. PMID:19218094

  14. Bradykinin Preconditioning Improves Therapeutic Potential of Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Infarcted Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yefei; Yan, Fengdi; Huang, Jie; Ma, Genshan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Stem cell preconditioning (PC) is a powerful approach in reducing cell death after transplantation. We hypothesized that PC human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPCs) with bradykinin (BK) enhance cell survival, inhibit apoptosis and repair the infarcted myocardium. Methods The hEPCs were preconditioned with or without BK. The hEPCs apoptosis induced by hypoxia along with serum deprivation was determined by annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/ propidium iodide staining. Cleaved caspase-3, Akt and eNOS expressions were determined by Western blots. Caspase-3 activity and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels were assessed in hEPCs. For in vivo studies, the survival and cardiomyocytes apoptosis of transplanted hEPCs were assessed using 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindodi- carbocyanine,4-chlorobenzenesul-fonate salt labeled hEPCs and TUNEL staining. Infarct size and cardiac function were measured at 10 days after transplantation, and the survival of transplanted hEPCs were visualized using near-infrared optical imaging. Results In vitro data showed a marked suppression in cell apoptosis following BK PC. The PC reduced caspase-3 activation, increased the Akt, eNOS phosphorylation and VEGF levels. In vivo data in preconditioned group showed a robust cell anti-apoptosis, reduction in infarct size, and significant improvement in cardiac function. The effects of BK PC were abrogated by the B2 receptor antagonist HOE140, the Akt and eNOS antagonists LY294002 and L-NAME, respectively. Conclusions The activation of B2 receptor-dependent PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway by BK PC promotes VEGF secretion, hEPC survival and inhibits apoptosis, thereby improving cardiac function in vivo. The BK PC hEPC transplantation for stem cell-based therapies is a novel approach that has potential for clinical used. PMID:24312554

  15. Discovery of molecular markers to discriminate corneal endothelial cells in the human body.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Masahito; Ohmiya, Hiroko; Hara, Susumu; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Tsujikawa, Motokazu; Nishida, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    The corneal endothelium is a monolayer of hexagonal corneal endothelial cells (CECs) on the inner surface of the cornea. CECs are critical in maintaining corneal transparency through their barrier and pump functions. CECs in vivo have a limited capacity in proliferation, and loss of a significant number of CECs results in corneal edema called bullous keratopathy which can lead to severe visual loss. Corneal transplantation is the most effective method to treat corneal endothelial dysfunction, where it suffers from donor shortage. Therefore, regeneration of CECs from other cell types attracts increasing interests, and specific markers of CECs are crucial to identify actual CECs. However, the currently used markers are far from satisfactory because of their non-specific expression in other cell types. Here, we explored molecular markers to discriminate CECs from other cell types in the human body by integrating the published RNA-seq data of CECs and the FANTOM5 atlas representing diverse range of cell types based on expression patterns. We identified five genes, CLRN1, MRGPRX3, HTR1D, GRIP1 and ZP4 as novel markers of CECs, and the specificities of these genes were successfully confirmed by independent experiments at both the RNA and protein levels. Notably none of them have been documented in the context of CEC function. These markers could be useful for the purification of actual CECs, and also available for the evaluation of the products derived from other cell types. Our results demonstrate an effective approach to identify molecular markers for CECs and open the door for the regeneration of CECs in vitro.

  16. Discovery of molecular markers to discriminate corneal endothelial cells in the human body.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Masahito; Ohmiya, Hiroko; Hara, Susumu; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Tsujikawa, Motokazu; Nishida, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    The corneal endothelium is a monolayer of hexagonal corneal endothelial cells (CECs) on the inner surface of the cornea. CECs are critical in maintaining corneal transparency through their barrier and pump functions. CECs in vivo have a limited capacity in proliferation, and loss of a significant number of CECs results in corneal edema called bullous keratopathy which can lead to severe visual loss. Corneal transplantation is the most effective method to treat corneal endothelial dysfunction, where it suffers from donor shortage. Therefore, regeneration of CECs from other cell types attracts increasing interests, and specific markers of CECs are crucial to identify actual CECs. However, the currently used markers are far from satisfactory because of their non-specific expression in other cell types. Here, we explored molecular markers to discriminate CECs from other cell types in the human body by integrating the published RNA-seq data of CECs and the FANTOM5 atlas representing diverse range of cell types based on expression patterns. We identified five genes, CLRN1, MRGPRX3, HTR1D, GRIP1 and ZP4 as novel markers of CECs, and the specificities of these genes were successfully confirmed by independent experiments at both the RNA and protein levels. Notably none of them have been documented in the context of CEC function. These markers could be useful for the purification of actual CECs, and also available for the evaluation of the products derived from other cell types. Our results demonstrate an effective approach to identify molecular markers for CECs and open the door for the regeneration of CECs in vitro. PMID:25807145

  17. Coenzyme Q10 Protects Human Endothelial Cells from β-Amyloid Uptake and Oxidative Stress-Induced Injury

    PubMed Central

    Durán-Prado, Mario; Frontiñán, Javier; Santiago-Mora, Raquel; Peinado, Juan Ramón; Parrado-Fernández, Cristina; Gómez-Almagro, María Victoria; Moreno, María; López-Domínguez, José Alberto; Villalba, José Manuel; Alcaín, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathological symptoms of Alzheimer's disease appear in advances stages, once neuronal damage arises. Nevertheless, recent studies demonstrate that in early asymptomatic stages, ß-amyloid peptide damages the cerebral microvasculature through mechanisms that involve an increase in reactive oxygen species and calcium, which induces necrosis and apoptosis of endothelial cells, leading to cerebrovascular dysfunction. The goal of our work is to study the potential preventive effect of the lipophilic antioxidant coenzyme Q (CoQ) against ß-amyloid-induced damage on human endothelial cells. We analyzed the protective effect of CoQ against Aβ-induced injury in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) using fluorescence and confocal microscopy, biochemical techniques and RMN-based metabolomics. Our results show that CoQ pretreatment of HUVECs delayed Aβ incorporation into the plasma membrane and mitochondria. Moreover, CoQ reduced the influx of extracellular Ca2+, and Ca2+ release from mitochondria due to opening the mitochondrial transition pore after β-amyloid administration, in addition to decreasing O2.− and H2O2 levels. Pretreatment with CoQ also prevented ß-amyloid-induced HUVECs necrosis and apoptosis, restored their ability to proliferate, migrate and form tube-like structures in vitro, which is mirrored by a restoration of the cell metabolic profile to control levels. CoQ protected endothelial cells from Aβ-induced injury at physiological concentrations in human plasma after oral CoQ supplementation and thus could be a promising molecule to protect endothelial cells against amyloid angiopathy. PMID:25272163

  18. Effects of Salvianolic Acid B on Protein Expression in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tsong-Min; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Wu, Hua-Lin; Wu, Chieh-Hsi; Su, Yan-Di; Wang, Hui-Lin; Wen, Hsin-Yun; Huang, Huey-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B (Sal B), a pure water-soluble compound extracted from Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae, has been reported to possess potential cardioprotective efficacy. To identify proteins or pathways by which Sal B might exert its protective activities on the cardiovascular system, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based comparative proteomics was performed, and proteins altered in their expression level after Sal B treatment were identified by MALDI-TOF MS/MS. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated at Sal B concentrations that can be reached in human plasma by pharmacological intervention. Results indicated that caldesmon, an actin-stabilizing protein, was downregulated in Sal B-exposed HUVECs. Proteins that showed increased expression levels upon Sal B treatment were vimentin, T-complex protein 1, protein disulfide isomerase, tropomyosin alpha, heat shock protein beta-1, UBX domain-containing protein 1, alpha enolase, and peroxiredoxin-2. Additionally, Sal B leads to increased phosphorylation of nucleophosmin in a dose-dependent manner and promotes proliferation of HUVECs. We found that Sal B exhibited a coordinated regulation of enzymes and proteins involved in cytoskeletal reorganization, oxidative stress, and cell growth. Our investigation would provide understanding to the endothelium protection information of Sal B. PMID:21423689

  19. Cultured human astrocytes secrete large cholesteryl ester- andtriglyceride-rich lipoproteins along with endothelial lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lin; Liu, Yanzhu; Forte, Trudy M.; Chisholm, Jeffrey W.; Parks, John S.; Shachter, Neil S.

    2003-12-01

    We cultured normal human astrocytes and characterized their secreted lipoproteins. Human astrocytes secreted lipoproteins in the size range of plasma VLDL (Peak 1), LDL (Peak 2), HDL (Peak 3) and a smaller peak (Peak 4), as determined by gel filtration chromatography, nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and transmission electron microscopy. Cholesterol enrichment of astrocytes led to a particular increase in Peak 1. Almost all Peak 2, 3 and 4 cholesterol and most Peak 1 cholesterol was esterified (unlike mouse astrocyte lipoproteins, which exhibited similar peaks but where cholesterol was predominantly non-esterified). Triglycerides were present at about 2/3 the level of cholesterol. LCAT was detected along with two of its activators, apolipoprotein (apo) A-IV and apoC-I. ApoA-I and apoA-II mRNA and protein were absent. ApoJ was present equally in all peaks but apoE was present predominantly in peaks 3 and 4. ApoB was not detected. The electron microscopic appearance of Peak 1 lipoproteins suggested partial lipolysis leading to the detection of a heparin-releasable triglyceride lipase consistent with endothelial lipase. The increased neuronal delivery of lipids from large lipoprotein particles, for which apoE4 has greater affinity than does apoE3, may be a mechanism whereby the apoE {var_epsilon}4 allele contributes to neurodegenerative risk.

  20. Occurring of In Vitro Functional Vasculogenic Pericytes from Human Circulating Early Endothelial Precursor Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Cantoni, Silvia; Bianchi, Francesca; Galletti, Margherita; Olivi, Elena; Alviano, Francesco; Galiè, Nazzareno; Ventura, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Pericytes are periendothelial cells of the microcirculation which contribute to tissue homeostasis and hemostasis by regulating microvascular morphogenesis and stability. Because of their multipotential ex vivo differentiation capabilities, pericytes are becoming very interesting in regenerative medicine field. Several studies address this issue by attempting to isolate pericyte/mesenchymal-like cells from peripheral blood; however the origin of these cells and their culture conditions are still debated. Here we showed that early Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs) expressing CD45+/CD146+/CD31+ can be a source of cells with pericyte/mesenchymal phenotype and function, identified as human Progenitor Perivascular Cells (hPPCs). We provided evidence that hPPCs have an immunophenotype consistent with Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) from human adipose tissue (hASCs) and fetal membranes of term placenta (FM-hMSCs). In addition, hPPCs can be subcultured and exhibit expression of pluripotent genes (OCT-4, KLF-4, and NANOG) as well as a remarkable vasculogenic potential. Our findings could be helpful to develop innovative cell-based therapies for future clinical applications with distinct therapeutic purposes. PMID:26064139

  1. Human Endothelial Protein C Receptor Overexpression Protects Intraportal Islet Grafts in Mice.

    PubMed

    Gock, H; Lee, K F E; Murray-Segal, L; Mysore, T B; d'Apice, A J F; Salvaris, E J; Cowan, P J

    2016-01-01

    Islet transplantation can potentially cure type 1 diabetes mellitus, but it is limited by a shortage of human donors as well as by islet graft destruction by inflammatory and thrombotic mechanisms. A possible solution to these problems is to use genetically modified pig islets. Endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) enhances protein C activation and regulates coagulation, inflammation, and apoptosis. We hypothesized that human EPCR (hEPCR) expression on donor islets would improve graft survival and function. Islets from an hEPCR transgenic mouse line strongly expressed the transgene, and hEPCR expression was maintained after islet isolation. Islets were transplanted from hEPCR mice and wild-type (WT) littermates into diabetic mice in a marginal-dose syngeneic intraportal islet transplantation model. The blood glucose level normalized within 5 days in 5 of 7 recipients of hEPCR islets, compared with only 2 of 7 recipients of WT islets (P < .05). Transplanted hEPCR islets had better preserved morphology and more intense insulin staining than WT grafts, and they retained transgene expression. The improved engraftment compared with WT islets suggests that inflammation and coagulation associated with the transplant process can be reduced by hEPCR expression on donor tissue. PMID:27569971

  2. Occurring of In Vitro Functional Vasculogenic Pericytes from Human Circulating Early Endothelial Precursor Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Francesca; Galletti, Margherita; Galiè, Nazzareno; Ventura, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Pericytes are periendothelial cells of the microcirculation which contribute to tissue homeostasis and hemostasis by regulating microvascular morphogenesis and stability. Because of their multipotential ex vivo differentiation capabilities, pericytes are becoming very interesting in regenerative medicine field. Several studies address this issue by attempting to isolate pericyte/mesenchymal-like cells from peripheral blood; however the origin of these cells and their culture conditions are still debated. Here we showed that early Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs) expressing CD45+/CD146+/CD31+ can be a source of cells with pericyte/mesenchymal phenotype and function, identified as human Progenitor Perivascular Cells (hPPCs). We provided evidence that hPPCs have an immunophenotype consistent with Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) from human adipose tissue (hASCs) and fetal membranes of term placenta (FM-hMSCs). In addition, hPPCs can be subcultured and exhibit expression of pluripotent genes (OCT-4, KLF-4, and NANOG) as well as a remarkable vasculogenic potential. Our findings could be helpful to develop innovative cell-based therapies for future clinical applications with distinct therapeutic purposes. PMID:26064139

  3. Calcium regulation of tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 release from cultured human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, C; Kaji, T; Sakamoto, M; Kozuka, H; Koizumi, F

    1994-04-15

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) produced by vascular endothelial cells converts plasminogen to plasmin which degrades fibrin. Since t-PA activity is greatly potentiated in the presence of fibrin (1,2), the activator is implicated in intravascular fibrinolysis. On the other hand, endothelial cells also produce plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) (3). The inhibitor associated with vascular endothelium rapidly inhibits t-PA, while that released into the liquid phase has a little anti-activator activity (4). However, clinical studies have shown that elevation of plasma PAI-1 level is a risk factor of thrombosis (5,6). It is thus suggested that the balance between t-PA and PAI-1 is important for the regulation of fibrinolysis. The release of t-PA and PAI-1 from vascular endothelial cells is regulated by physiological factors including thrombin (3,7), histamine (8), vasoconstrictor peptide endothelins (9,10) and cytokines (11). In addition, the regulation of the t-PA release and that of the PAI-1 release are not necessarily coupled. It has been shown that activated protein kinase C and cyclic AMP are involved in the stimulation and suppression, respectively, of the endothelial t-PA and PAI-1 production (12,13). However, the role of intracellular calcium in the regulation of endothelial t-PA and PAI-1 release has remained to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of calcium ionophore A23187 on the release of t-PA antigen (t-PA:Ag) and PAI-1 antigen (PAI-1:Ag) from cultured vascular endothelial cells derived from human umbilical vein.

  4. Impact of oxidative stress on human cytomegalovirus replication and on cytokine-mediated stimulation of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Scholz, M; Cinatl, J; Gross, V; Vogel, J U; Blaheta, R A; Freisleben, H J; Markus, B H; Doerr, H W

    1996-06-27

    Transplantation-related pathogenic factors such as ischemia or allograft-directed inflammation are associated with oxidative changes that might lead to cellular oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of oxidative stress on: (1) CMV replication in cultured human endothelial cells and (2) the stimulation of endothelial cells by proinfiammatory cytokines. Both pathomechanisms are known to contribute to graft rejection crises in vivo. Oxidative stress was induced in endothelial cell cultures with 10-200 microM buthionine sulfoximine. Western blotting showed a significant increase in the production of CMV-specific immediate early and late proteins in buthionine sulfoximine-treated cultures. Immunocytochemical staining suggested that this effect was caused by increased numbers of CMV antigen expressing cells (66% immediate early; 78%, late). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction for CMV-specific DNA and virus titration revealed that enhanced viral replication levels correlated with increased virion production. As a measure for the endothelial cell activation status, the surface expression of HLA-ABC and HLA-DR and adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, ELAM-1, VCAM-1) was quantified by fluorometric methods. Whereas oxidative stress alone did not modulate any surface molecule expression, the IFN-gamma-mediated expression of HLA-ABC and HLA-DR and the IL-1-mediated expression of ICAM-1, but not of ELAM-1 and VCAM-1 (IL-1 + TNF-alpha), was amplified. Interestingly, the amplification of HLA molecule expression was even higher in CMV-infected endothelial cells. This study provides evidence that oxidative stress contributes to the regulation of CMV replication, virus shedding, and the activation of endothelial cells by proinflammatory cytokines as it is observed in transplant recipients.

  5. Curcumin Attenuates Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Premature Senescence via the Activation of SIRT1 in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yueliu; Hu, Xiaorong; Hu, Gangying; Xu, Changwu; Jiang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial senescence has been proposed to be involved in endothelial dysfunction and atherogenesis. Curcumin, a natural phenol, possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of curcumin on endothelial senescence is unclear. This study explores the effect of curcumin on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced endothelial premature senescence and the mechanisms involved. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured, and premature senescence was induced with 100 µM H2O2. Results showed that pretreatment with curcumin significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced HUVECs' premature senescence, which was evidenced by a decreased percentage of senescence-associated β-galactosidase positive cells, improved cell division and decreased expression of senescence-associated protein p21 (all p<0.05). Pretreatment with curcumin decreased oxidative stress and apoptosis in H2O2-treated HUVECs. Treatment of HUVECs with H2O2 also down-regulated the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), decreased the level of nitric oxide in the culture medium, and inhibited the protein expression and enzymatic activity of silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1), while pretreatment with curcumin partly reversed these effects (all p<0.05). Treatment with curcumin alone enhanced the enzymatic activity of SIRT1, but didn't affect cellular senescence, cell growth or apoptosis compared to the Control. The inhibition of SIRT1 using SIRT1 short interfering RNA (siRNA) could decrease the expression and phosphorylation of eNOS and abrogate the protective effect of curcumin on H2O2-induced premature senescence. These findings suggest that curcumin could attenuate oxidative stress-induced HUVECs' premature senescence via the activation of SIRT1.

  6. Transfection of the Human Heme Oxygenase Gene Into Rabbit Coronary Microvessel Endothelial Cells: Protective Effect Against Heme and Hemoglobin Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, N. G.; Lavrovsky, Y.; Schwartzman, M. L.; Stoltz, R. A.; Levere, R. D.; Gerritsen, M. E.

    1995-07-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is a stress protein and has been suggested to participate in defense mechanisms against agents that may induce oxidative injury such as metals, endotoxin, heme/hemoglobin, and various cytokines. Overexpression of HO in cells might therefore protect against oxidative stress produced by certain of these agents, specifically heme and hemoglobin, by catalyzing their degradation to bilirubin, which itself has antioxidant properties. We report here the successful in vitro transfection of rabbit coronary microvessel endothelial cells with a functioning gene encoding the human HO enzyme. A plasmid containing the cytomegalovirus promoter and the human HO cDNA complexed to cationic liposomes (Lipofectin) was used to transfect rabbit endothelial cells. Cells transfected with human HO exhibited an ≈3.0-fold increase in enzyme activity and expressed a severalfold induction of human HO mRNA as compared with endogenous rabbit HO mRNA. Transfected and nontransfected cells expressed factor VIII antigen and exhibited similar acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake (two important features that characterize endothelial cells) with >85% of cells staining positive for each marker. Moreover, cells transfected with the human HO gene acquired substantial resistance to toxicity produced by exposure to recombinant hemoglobin and heme as compared with nontransfected cells. The protective effect of HO overexpression against heme/hemoglobin toxicity in endothelial cells shown in these studies provides direct evidence that the inductive response of human HO to such injurious stimuli represents an important tissue adaptive mechanism for moderating the severity of cell damage produced by these blood components.

  7. An Active Learning Approach for Rapid Characterization of Endothelial Cells in Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Raghav K.; Somasundar, Vinay H.; Griffith, Sandra D.; Zhu, Jianliang; Samoyedny, Drew; Tan, Kay See; Hu, Jiahao; Liao, Xuejun; Carin, Lawrence; Yoon, Sam S.; Flaherty, Keith T.; DiPaola, Robert S.; Heitjan, Daniel F.; Lal, Priti; Feldman, Michael D.; Roysam, Badrinath; Lee, William M. F.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, no available pathological or molecular measures of tumor angiogenesis predict response to antiangiogenic therapies used in clinical practice. Recognizing that tumor endothelial cells (EC) and EC activation and survival signaling are the direct targets of these therapies, we sought to develop an automated platform for quantifying activity of critical signaling pathways and other biological events in EC of patient tumors by histopathology. Computer image analysis of EC in highly heterogeneous human tumors by a statistical classifier trained using examples selected by human experts performed poorly due to subjectivity and selection bias. We hypothesized that the analysis can be optimized by a more active process to aid experts in identifying informative training examples. To test this hypothesis, we incorporated a novel active learning (AL) algorithm into FARSIGHT image analysis software that aids the expert by seeking out informative examples for the operator to label. The resulting FARSIGHT-AL system identified EC with specificity and sensitivity consistently greater than 0.9 and outperformed traditional supervised classification algorithms. The system modeled individual operator preferences and generated reproducible results. Using the results of EC classification, we also quantified proliferation (Ki67) and activity in important signal transduction pathways (MAP kinase, STAT3) in immunostained human clear cell renal cell carcinoma and other tumors. FARSIGHT-AL enables characterization of EC in conventionally preserved human tumors in a more automated process suitable for testing and validating in clinical trials. The results of our study support a unique opportunity for quantifying angiogenesis in a manner that can now be tested for its ability to identify novel predictive and response biomarkers. PMID:24603893

  8. Effects of cellular origin on differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cell–derived endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming-Tao; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Lee, Won Hee; Snyder, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be derived from various types of somatic cells by transient overexpression of 4 Yamanaka factors (OCT4, SOX2, C-MYC, and KLF4). Patient-specific iPSC derivatives (e.g., neuronal, cardiac, hepatic, muscular, and endothelial cells [ECs]) hold great promise in drug discovery and regenerative medicine. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether the cellular origin can affect the differentiation, in vivo behavior, and single-cell gene expression signatures of human iPSC–derived ECs. We derived human iPSCs from 3 types of somatic cells of the same individuals: fibroblasts (FB-iPSCs), ECs (EC-iPSCs), and cardiac progenitor cells (CPC-iPSCs). We then differentiated them into ECs by sequential administration of Activin, BMP4, bFGF, and VEGF. EC-iPSCs at early passage (10 < P < 20) showed higher EC differentiation propensity and gene expression of EC-specific markers (PECAM1 and NOS3) than FB-iPSCs and CPC-iPSCs. In vivo transplanted EC-iPSC–ECs were recovered with a higher percentage of CD31+ population and expressed higher EC-specific gene expression markers (PECAM1, KDR, and ICAM) as revealed by microfluidic single-cell quantitative PCR (qPCR). In vitro EC-iPSC–ECs maintained a higher CD31+ population than FB-iPSC–ECs and CPC-iPSC–ECs with long-term culturing and passaging. These results indicate that cellular origin may influence lineage differentiation propensity of human iPSCs; hence, the somatic memory carried by early passage iPSCs should be carefully considered before clinical translation. PMID:27398408

  9. Regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor expression in human colon cancer by interleukin-1β

    PubMed Central

    Akagi, Y; Liu, W; Xie, K; Zebrowski, B; Shaheen, R M; Ellis, L M

    1999-01-01

    Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an important angiogenic factor in colon cancer, is tightly regulated by factors in the microenvironment. However, specific factors indigenous to the organ microenvironment of colon cancer growth that regulate VEGF expression in human colon cancer are not well defined. We investigated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) induction of VEGF expression in colon cancer cells and the mechanism by which this occurs. HT29 human colon cancer cells were treated with IL-1β for various periods. Induction of VEGF mRNA by IL-1β peaked at 24 h (> fivefold) and returned to baseline by 48 h. SW620 human colon cancer cells also reached a peak induction of VEGF mRNA 24 h after treatment with IL-1β. VEGF was induced at a dose range between 1 and 20 ng ml−1 of IL-1β. IL-1β induction of VEGF was also confirmed at the protein level. To examine the mechanism for VEGF induction by IL-1β, we transiently transfected VEGF promoter-reporter constructs into HT29 cells. IL-1β increased the activity of the VEGF promoter-reporter construct. Pretreatment of HT29 cells with dactinomycin abrogated the induction of VEGF mRNA by IL-1β. The half-life of VEGF mRNA was not prolonged by treatment with IL-1β. These findings suggest that IL-1β regulates VEGF expression in human colon cancer cells by increasing transcription of the VEGF gene. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408390

  10. Plasma from human volunteers subjected to remote ischemic preconditioning protects human endothelial cells from hypoxia-induced cell damage.

    PubMed

    Weber, Nina C; Riedemann, Isabelle; Smit, Kirsten F; Zitta, Karina; van de Vondervoort, Djai; Zuurbier, Coert J; Hollmann, Markus W; Preckel, Benedikt; Albrecht, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Short repeated cycles of peripheral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) can protect distant organs from subsequent prolonged I/R injury; a phenomenon known as remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC). A RIPC-mediated release of humoral factors might play a key role in this protection and vascular endothelial cells are potential targets for these secreted factors. In the present study, RIPC-plasma obtained from healthy male volunteers was tested for its ability to protect human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC) from hypoxia-induced cell damage. 10 healthy male volunteers were subjected to a RIPC-protocol consisting of 4 × 5 min inflation/deflation of a blood pressure cuff located at the upper arm. Plasma was collected before (T0; control), directly after (T1) and 1 h after (T2) the RIPC procedure. HUVEC were subjected to 24 h hypoxia damage and simultaneously incubated with 5% of the respective RIPC-plasma. Cell damage was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-measurements. Western blot experiments of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1alpha), phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5), protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK-1/2) were performed. Furthermore, the concentrations of hVEGF were evaluated in the RIPC-plasma by sandwich ELISA. Hypoxia-induced cell damage was significantly reduced by plasma T1 (p = 0.02 vs T0). The protective effect of plasma T1 was accompanied by an augmentation of the intracellular HIF1alpha (p = 0.01 vs T0) and increased phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 (p = 0.03 vs T0). Phosphorylation of AKT and STAT5 remained unchanged. Analysis of the protective RIPC-plasma T1 showed significantly reduced levels of hVEGF (p = 0.01 vs T0). RIPC plasma protects endothelial cells from hypoxia-induced cell damage and humoral mediators as well as intracellular HIF1alpha may be involved.

  11. Analysis of biological effects in human endothelial cells after stimulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Zhang; Sun, Yeqing; Xu, Dan

    Space environment is characterized by strong radiation, ultra-high vacuum, weak magnetic field and microgravity. Among them, microgravity (10-4-10-6g) in space is different from gravity (1g) on earth, possibly causing visual disorders, muscle alterations, bone loss and dysfunction of cardiovascular systems. To study about microgravity environment, the most advanced rotary cell culture system (RCCS-1) was used to do stimulated microgravity (SMG) experiments in the ground. Up to now, most of studies focus on the biological effects under stimulated microgravity, but it is less known about the cellular response after stimulated microgravity. In the present study, we explored the subsequent effects of stimulated microgravity on human endothelial cells (HUVEC-C) after these cells were cultured on RCCS-1 for 48 hours. We co-cultured HUVEC-C cells with HillexⅡmicrocarriers in 60-mm culture dishes for 24h, followed by transferring them to RCCS-1 so that cells remain to be the state of SMG. In parallel, HUVEC-C cells were co-cultured with microcarriers in the ground condition. We found that stimulated microgravity induced cytoskeleton remodeling, cell cycle G2/M arrest and cellular senescence, consistent with previous reports. To study the subsequent effects of stimulated microgravity, we make cells detach from microcarriers and observed various effects including cell growth, cell adhesion, cytoskeleton, cell cycle, apoptosis and senescence. The results showed that those cells undergoing stimulated microgravity appeared obvious growth inhibition, a transition from the decrease in cell adhesion ability and cytoskeleton remodeling within 24h to induction of apoptosis and senescence-like phenotype in the later time with slight changes in cell cycle. Analysis of protein expression in western blot demonstrated that apoptosis-related protein PTEN was up-regulated on the time-dependent pattern after stimulated microgravity, indicating that PTEN-PI3K-Akt pathway might play an

  12. Flavonoids from artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) up-regulate endothelial-type nitric-oxide synthase gene expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Huige; Xia, Ning; Brausch, Isolde; Yao, Ying; Förstermann, Ulrich

    2004-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) represents an antithrombotic and anti-atherosclerotic principle in the vasculature. Hence, an enhanced expression of eNOS in response to pharmacological interventions could provide protection against cardiovascular diseases. In EA.hy 926 cells, a cell line derived from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), an artichoke leaf extract (ALE) increased the activity of the human eNOS promoter (determined by luciferase reporter gene assay). An organic subfraction from ALE was more potent in this respect than the crude extract, whereas an aqueous subfraction of ALE was without effect. ALE and the organic subfraction thereof also increased eNOS mRNA expression (measured by an RNase protection assay) and eNOS protein expression (determined by Western blot) both in EA.hy 926 cells and in native HUVECs. NO production (measured by NO-ozone chemiluminescence) was increased by both extracts. In organ chamber experiments, ex vivo incubation (18 h) of rat aortic rings with the organic subfraction of ALE enhanced the NO-mediated vasodilator response to acetylcholine, indicating that the up-regulated eNOS remained functional. Caffeoylquinic acids and flavonoids are two major groups of constituents of ALE. Interestingly, the flavonoids luteolin and cynaroside increased eNOS promoter activity and eNOS mRNA expression, whereas the caffeoylquinic acids cynarin and chlorogenic acid were without effect. Thus, in addition to the lipid-lowering and antioxidant properties of artichoke, an increase in eNOS gene transcription may also contribute to its beneficial cardiovascular profile. Artichoke flavonoids are likely to represent the active ingredients mediating eNOS up-regulation.

  13. RNA-seq analysis of transcriptomes in thrombin-treated and control human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cheranova, Dilyara; Gibson, Margaret; Chaudhary, Suman; Zhang, Li Qin; Heruth, Daniel P; Grigoryev, Dmitry N; Ye, Shui Qing

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of gene expression in cells via measurement of mRNA levels is a useful tool in determining how the transcriptional machinery of the cell is affected by external signals (e.g. drug treatment), or how cells differ between a healthy state and a diseased state. With the advent and continuous refinement of next-generation DNA sequencing technology, RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) has become an increasingly popular method of transcriptome analysis to catalog all species of transcripts, to determine the transcriptional structure of all expressed genes and to quantify the changing expression levels of the total set of transcripts in a given cell, tissue or organism. RNA-seq is gradually replacing DNA microarrays as a preferred method for transcriptome analysis because it has the advantages of profiling a complete transcriptome, providing a digital type datum (copy number of any transcript) and not relying on any known genomic sequence. Here, we present a complete and detailed protocol to apply RNA-seq to profile transcriptomes in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells with or without thrombin treatment. This protocol is based on our recent published study entitled "RNA-seq Reveals Novel Transcriptome of Genes and Their Isoforms in Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells Treated with Thrombin," in which we successfully performed the first complete transcriptome analysis of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells treated with thrombin using RNA-seq. It yielded unprecedented resources for further experimentation to gain insights into molecular mechanisms underlying thrombin-mediated endothelial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of inflammatory conditions, cancer, diabetes, and coronary heart disease, and provides potential new leads for therapeutic targets to those diseases. The descriptive text of this protocol is divided into four parts. The first part describes the treatment of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells with

  14. RNA-seq analysis of transcriptomes in thrombin-treated and control human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cheranova, Dilyara; Gibson, Margaret; Chaudhary, Suman; Zhang, Li Qin; Heruth, Daniel P; Grigoryev, Dmitry N; Ye, Shui Qing

    2013-02-13

    The characterization of gene expression in cells via measurement of mRNA levels is a useful tool in determining how the transcriptional machinery of the cell is affected by external signals (e.g. drug treatment), or how cells differ between a healthy state and a diseased state. With the advent and continuous refinement of next-generation DNA sequencing technology, RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) has become an increasingly popular method of transcriptome analysis to catalog all species of transcripts, to determine the transcriptional structure of all expressed genes and to quantify the changing expression levels of the total set of transcripts in a given cell, tissue or organism. RNA-seq is gradually replacing DNA microarrays as a preferred method for transcriptome analysis because it has the advantages of profiling a complete transcriptome, providing a digital type datum (copy number of any transcript) and not relying on any known genomic sequence. Here, we present a complete and detailed protocol to apply RNA-seq to profile transcriptomes in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells with or without thrombin treatment. This protocol is based on our recent published study entitled "RNA-seq Reveals Novel Transcriptome of Genes and Their Isoforms in Human Pulmonary Microvascular Endothelial Cells Treated with Thrombin," in which we successfully performed the first complete transcriptome analysis of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells treated with thrombin using RNA-seq. It yielded unprecedented resources for further experimentation to gain insights into molecular mechanisms underlying thrombin-mediated endothelial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of inflammatory conditions, cancer, diabetes, and coronary heart disease, and provides potential new leads for therapeutic targets to those diseases. The descriptive text of this protocol is divided into four parts. The first part describes the treatment of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells with

  15. Cyclosporin A differentially inhibits multiple steps in VEGF induced angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells through altered intracellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rafiee, Parvaneh; Heidemann, Jan; Ogawa, Hitoshi; Johnson, Nathan A; Fisher, Pamela J; Li, Mona S; Otterson, Mary F; Johnson, Christopher P; Binion, David G

    2004-01-01

    The immunosuppressive agent cyclosporin A (CsA), a calcineurin inhibitor which blocks T cell activation has provided the pharmacologic foundation for organ transplantation. CsA exerts additional effects on non-immune cell populations and may adversely effect microvascular endothelial cells, contributing to chronic rejection, a long-term clinical complication and significant cause of mortality in solid-organ transplants, including patients with small bowel allografts. Growth of new blood vessels, or angiogenesis, is a critical homeostatic mechanism in organs and tissues, and regulates vascular populations in response to physiologic requirements. We hypothesized that CsA would inhibit the angiogenic capacity of human gut microvessels. Primary cultures of human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells (HIMEC) were used to evaluate CsA's effect on four in vitro measures of angiogenesis, including endothelial stress fiber assembly, migration, proliferation and tube formation, in response to the endothelial growth factor VEGF. We characterized the effect of CsA on intracellular signaling mechanisms following VEGF stimulation. CsA affected all VEGF induced angiogenic events assessed in HIMEC. CsA differentially inhibited signaling pathways which mediated distinct steps of the angiogenic process. CsA blocked VEGF induced nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NFAT, activation of p44/42 MAPK, and partially inhibited JNK and p38 MAPK. CsA differentially affected signaling cascades in a dose dependent fashion and completely blocked expression of COX-2, which was integrally linked to HIMEC angiogenesis. These data suggest that CsA inhibits the ability of microvascular endothelial cells to undergo angiogenesis, impairing vascular homeostatic mechanisms and contributing to the vasculopathy associated with chronic rejection. PMID:15175101

  16. The effect of type 1 IFN on human aortic endothelial cell function in vitro: relevance to systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, John A; Ray, David W; Zeef, Leo A H; O'Neill, Terence; Bruce, Ian N; Alexander, M Yvonne

    2014-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The etiopathogenesis of premature CVD is not fully understood, but recently interferon-alpha (IFNα) has been implicated as a contributing factor. Since IFNα has been associated with both disease activity and endothelial dysfunction in lupus patients, we aimed to determine whether IFNα has direct effects on human aortic endothelial cell (HAoEC) function in vitro. We studied the function of IFNα2b-treated HAoECs in terms of cell proliferation, capillary-like network formation, and nitric oxide (NO) generation. Changes in gene expression were also analyzed using an exon gene array. IFNα2b regulated the expression of 198 genes, including recognized interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Gene ontology analysis showed over-representation of genes involved in antigen presentation and host response to virus but no significant changes in clusters of genes recognized as important in endothelial cell activation or dysfunction. HAoEC proliferation, tubule formation, and NO bioavailability were unchanged, suggesting that IFNα in isolation does not have a direct impact on aortic endothelial cell function. PMID:24444308

  17. Berberine Protects Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells against LPS-Induced Apoptosis by Blocking JNK-Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Junping; Wang, Lijun; Wang, Linyao; Qian, Senmi; Fang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a critical factor during the initiation of atherosclerosis. Berberine has a beneficial effect on endothelial function; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of berberine on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the molecular mechanisms mediating the effect. The effects of berberine on LPS-induced cell apoptosis and viability were measured with 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine staining, flow cytometry, and Cell Counting Kit-8 assays. The expression and/or activation of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic proteins or signaling pathways, including caspase-3, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, were determined with western blotting. The malondialdehyde levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and production of proinflammatory cytokines were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The results demonstrated that berberine pretreatment protected HUVECs from LPS-induced apoptosis, attenuated LPS-induced injury, inhibited LPS-induced JNK phosphorylation, increased MCL-1 expression and SOD activity, and decreased proinflammatory cytokine production. The effects of berberine on LPS-treated HUVECs were prevented by SP600125, a JNK-specific inhibitor. Thus, berberine might be a potential candidate in the treatment of endothelial cell injury-related vascular diseases. PMID:27478481

  18. Cigarette smoke extract induces aberrant cytochrome-c oxidase subunit II methylation and apoptosis in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Chen, Ping; Peng, Hong; Zhang, Hongliang; Chen, Yan; Cai, Shan; Lu, Qianjin; Guan, Chaxiang

    2015-03-01

    Cigarette smoke-induced apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the mechanisms responsible for endothelial apoptosis remain poorly understood. We conducted an in vitro study to investigate whether DNA methylation is involved in smoking-induced endothelial apoptosis. Human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) at a range of concentrations (0-10%). HUVECs were also incubated with a demethylating reagent, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidinem (AZA), with and without CSE. Apoptosis was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay and flow cytometry using annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide staining. We found that CSE treatment significantly increased HUVEC apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunoblot revealed that CSE treatment decreased cytochrome-c oxidase subunit II (COX II) mRNA and protein levels and decreased COX activity. Methylation-specific PCR and direct bisulfite sequencing revealed positive COX II gene methylation. AZA administration partly increased mRNA and protein expressions of COX II, and COX activity decreased by CSE and attenuated the toxic effects of CSE. Our results showed that CSE induced aberrant COX II methylation and apoptosis in HUVECs. PMID:25500741

  19. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell interaction with phospholipid polymer nanofibers coated by micro-patterned diamond-like carbon (DLC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Soki; Hasebe, Terumitsu; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Hotta, Atsushi

    2013-03-01

    Blood-contacting medical devices should possess the surface properties with the following two important characteristics: The first is the anti-thrombogenicity of the material surface and the second is the re-endothelialization over the device surface after long-term implantation, because endothelial cells have excellent anticoagulant properties in blood vessels. To develop highly hemocompatible materials that could promote surface endothelialization, we investigated biocompatible polymers coated with thin diamond-like carbon (DLC) film. In this research, we examined the viability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) for hydrophilic 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) fibers with DLC coatings, both of which were known to be anti-thrombogenic. DLC was synthesized on MPC by varying the ratio of covered area by patterned DLC. HUVECs were seeded on DLC-coated MPC for 6 days. The results indicated that the MPC surface with DLC did not disturb HUVEC proliferation in 6 days of culture. Additionally, we are currently making strong efforts to fabricate MPC fibers with bFGF which is an important growth factor involved in cell proliferation. MPC containing bFGF with DLC coatings could be extensively utilized for blood-contacting medical devices.

  20. Poly(I:C) Induces Human Lung Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction by Disrupting Tight Junction Expression of Claudin-5

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Yun; Stuart, Christine; Takeda, Kazuyo; D’Agnillo, Felice; Golding, Basil

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections are often accompanied by pulmonary microvascular leakage and vascular endothelial dysfunction via mechanisms that are not completely defined. Here, we investigated the effect of the Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [Poly(I:C)], a synthetic analog of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) commonly used to simulate viral infections, on the barrier function and tight junction integrity of primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Poly(I:C) stimulated IL-6, IL-8, TNFα, and IFNβ production in conjunction with the activation of NF-κB and IRF3 confirming the Poly(I:C)-responsiveness of these cells. Poly(I:C) increased endothelial monolayer permeability with a corresponding dose- and time-dependent decrease in the expression of claudin-5, a transmembrane tight junction protein and reduction of CLDN5 mRNA levels. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed disappearance of membrane-associated claudin-5 and co-localization of cytoplasmic claudin-5 with lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1. Chloroquine and Bay11-7082, inhibitors of TLR3 and NF-κB signaling, respectively, protected against the loss of claudin-5. Together, these findings provide new insight on how dsRNA-activated signaling pathways may disrupt vascular endothelial function and contribute to vascular leakage pathologies. PMID:27504984

  1. Berberine Protects Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells against LPS-Induced Apoptosis by Blocking JNK-Mediated Signaling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junping; Wang, Lijun; Wang, Linyao; Qian, Senmi; Zhang, Dayong; Fang, Jie; Pan, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a critical factor during the initiation of atherosclerosis. Berberine has a beneficial effect on endothelial function; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of berberine on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the molecular mechanisms mediating the effect. The effects of berberine on LPS-induced cell apoptosis and viability were measured with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine staining, flow cytometry, and Cell Counting Kit-8 assays. The expression and/or activation of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic proteins or signaling pathways, including caspase-3, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, were determined with western blotting. The malondialdehyde levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and production of proinflammatory cytokines were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The results demonstrated that berberine pretreatment protected HUVECs from LPS-induced apoptosis, attenuated LPS-induced injury, inhibited LPS-induced JNK phosphorylation, increased MCL-1 expression and SOD activity, and decreased proinflammatory cytokine production. The effects of berberine on LPS-treated HUVECs were prevented by SP600125, a JNK-specific inhibitor. Thus, berberine might be a potential candidate in the treatment of endothelial cell injury-related vascular diseases. PMID:27478481

  2. Soy isoflavones protect against H₂O₂-induced injury in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lianhai; Zhao, Xingyu; Qin, Yingxin; Zhu, Wenhe; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Anheng; Luo, Zhengli

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of soy isoflavones on the injury of human umbilical vein endothelial cells induced by H2O2. EVC‑304 cells were preincubated with soy isoflavones for 12 h, and then exposed to 100 µM H2O2 for 1 h. Cell viability was evaluated by a 3‑(4,5‑di‑methylthiazol‑2‑yl) 2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The apoptosis of EVC‑304 cells was detected by Hoechst 33258 and Annexin‑V/propidium iodide staining. The oxidative stress‑related biochemical parameters were detected and the expression of apoptosis‑related proteins was examined by western blot analysis. The results showed that incubation with soy isoflavones caused a significant increase in the viability of EVC‑304 cells and a decrease in cell apoptosis induced by H2O2. Soy isoflavones also markedly enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and reduced the level of malondialdehyde. Western blot analysis results show that soy isoflavones can modulate the activation of nuclear factor‑κB and the mitochondria‑mediated apoptosis signaling pathway. The results of this study indicated the potential biological relevance of soy isoflavones in the therapy of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26095641

  3. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Lysozyme Against HMGB1 in Human Endothelial Cells and in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonhwa; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Na, Dong Hee; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2015-10-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) was recently shown to be an important extracellular mediator of severe vascular inflammatory disease, sepsis. Lysozyme protects us from the ever-present danger of bacterial infection and binds to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with a high affinity. Here, we show, for the first time, the anti-septic effects of lysozyme in HMGB1-mediated inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. The data showed that lysozyme posttreatment suppressed LPS-mediated release of HMGB1 and HMGB1-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangement. Lysozyme also inhibited HMGB1-mediated hyperpermeability and leukocyte migration in human endothelial cells. In addition, lysozyme inhibited the HMGB1-mediated activation of Akt, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), extracellular regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 and production of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in HUVECs. Furthermore, lysozyme reduced the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced release of HMGB1, migration of leukocytes, septic mortality, and pulmonary damage in mice. Collectively, these results suggest lysozyme as a candidate therapeutic agent for the treatment of vascular inflammatory diseases via inhibition of the HMGB1 signaling pathway.

  4. Immunoexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor and Ki-67 in human gingival samples: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Kranti, K.; Mani, R.; Elizabeth, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate immunohistochemically vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Ki-67 in human gingival samples and to compare these factors between healthy and diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 subjects were included in the study. They were categorized into three groups: Periodontally healthy group, periodontally diseased gingiva without any systemic disease group and periodontally diseased gingiva with controlled type II diabetes mellitus (DM) group. Gingival biopsies were performed and immunohistochemical analysis were done for VEGF and Ki-67 staining in gingival samples. Results: The present study found moderate intensity staining for VEGF in periodontitis group and periodontitis with controlled type II DM group and mild intensity staining for VEGF in periodontally healthy group. With regard to Ki-67, negative staining was observed in periodontally healthy group and mild staining in periodontitis group and periodontitis with controlled type II DM group. Conclusion: Further investigation needs to be conducted to identify how VEGF and Ki-67 are involved in the tissue inflammation associated processes and the relationship between VEGF and Ki-67 in progression of periodontitis. PMID:26097335

  5. Characterization of nicardipine hydrochloride-induced cell injury in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Masanori; Kawai, Yoshiko; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Toyoda, Hiromu

    2015-02-01

    Nicardipine hydrochloride (NIC), a dihydropyridine calcium-channel blocking agent, has been widely used for the treatment of hypertension. Especially, nicardipine hydrochloride injection is used as first-line therapy for emergency treatment of abnormally high blood pressure. Although NIC has an attractive pharmacological profile, one of the dose-limiting factors of NIC is severe peripheral vascular injury after intravenous injection. The goal of this study was to better understand and thereby reduce NIC-mediated vascular injury. Here, we investigated the mechanism of NIC-induced vascular injury using human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). NIC decreased cell viability and increased percent of dead cells in a dose-dependent manner (10-30 μg/mL). Although cell membrane injury was not significant over 9 hr exposure, significant changes of cell morphology and increases in vacuoles in HMVECs were observed within 30 min of NIC exposure (30 μg/mL). Autophagosome labeling with monodansylcadaverine revealed increased autophagosomes in the NIC-treated cells, whereas caspase 3/7 activity was not increased in the NIC-treated cells (30 μg/mL). Additionally, NIC-induced reduction of cell viability was inhibited by 3-methyladenine, an inhibitor of autophagosome formation. These findings suggest that NIC causes severe peripheral venous irritation via induction of autophagic cell death and that inhibition of autophagy could contribute to the reduction of NIC-induced vascular injury.

  6. Endothelial differentiation in multipotent cells derived from mouse and human white mature adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Jumabay, Medet; Abdmaulen, Raushan; Urs, Sumithra; Heydarkhan-Hagvall, Sepideh; Chazenbalk, Gregorio D; Jordan, Maria C; Roos, Kenneth P; Yao, Yucheng; Boström, Kristina I

    2012-12-01

    White mature adipocytes give rise to multipotent cells, so-called de-differentiated fat (DFAT) cells, when losing their fat in culture. The objective of this study was to examine the ability of DFAT cells to give rise to endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro and vivo. We demonstrate that mouse and human DFAT cells, derived from adipose tissue and lipospirate, respectively, initially lack expression of CD34, CD31, CD146, CD45 and pericyte markers, distinguishing them from progenitor cells previously identified in adipose stroma. The DFAT cells spontaneously differentiate into vascular ECs in vitro, as determined by real-time PCR, fluorescence activated cell sorting, immunostaining, and formation of tube structures. Treatment with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)4 and BMP9, important in regulating angiogenesis, significantly enhances the EC differentiation. Furthermore, adipocyte-derived cells from Green Fluorescent Protein-transgenic mice were detected in the vasculature of infarcted myocardium up to 6 weeks after ligation of the left anterior descending artery in mice. We conclude that adipocyte-derived multipotent cells are able to spontaneously give rise to ECs, a process that is promoted by BMPs and may be important in cardiovascular regeneration and in physiological and pathological changes in fat and other tissues.

  7. Citrobacter freundii invades and replicates in human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Badger, J L; Stins, M F; Kim, K S

    1999-08-01

    Neonatal bacterial meningitis remains a disease with unacceptable rates of morbidity and mortality despite the availability of effective antimicrobial therapy. Citrobacter spp. cause neonatal meningitis but are unique in their frequent association with brain abscess formation. The pathogenesis of Citrobacter spp. causing meningitis and brain abscess is not well characterized; however, as with other meningitis-causing bacteria (e.g., Escherichia coli K1 and group B streptococci), penetration of the blood-brain barrier must occur. In an effort to understand the pathogenesis of Citrobacter spp. causing meningitis, we have used the in vitro blood-brain barrier model of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) to study the interaction between C. freundii and HBMEC. In this study, we show that C. freundii is capable of invading and trancytosing HBMEC in vitro. Invasion of HBMEC by C. freundii was determined to be dependent on microfilaments, microtubules, endosome acidification, and de novo protein synthesis. Immunofluorescence microscopy studies revealed that microtubules aggregated after HBMEC came in contact with C. freundii; furthermore, the microtubule aggregation was time dependent and seen with C. freundii but not with noninvasive E. coli HB101 and meningitic E. coli K1. Also in contrast to other meningitis-causing bacteria, C. freundii is able to replicate within HBMEC. This is the first demonstration of a meningitis-causing bacterium capable of intracellular replication within BMEC. The important determinants of the pathogenesis of C. freundii causing meningitis and brain abscess may relate to invasion of and intracellular replication in HBMEC.

  8. Evidence of endoplasmic reticulum-related Ca sup 2+ ATPase in human microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bikfalvi, A.; Enouf, J.; Bredoux, R.; Dupuy, E.; Bourdeau, N.; Levy-Toledano, S.; Tobelem, G. ); Lompre, A. )

    1989-09-01

    The authors demonstrated by immunological and molecular methods the presence of a reticulum endoplasmic-related Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase in human omental microvascular endothelial cells (HOME cells). HOME cells reacted positively with a previously characterized sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase antibody as demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence. Western blotting revealed that the antibody recognized a 95-100 kDa protein. {sup 35}S-Metabolic labeling led to the detection of a similar protein with which the purified sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase compete. Dot-blotting experiments indicated that a substantial amount of Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase was present in HOME cell membranes. In addition, Northern blot analysis using a cDNA probe from cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum showed the presence of mRNA species of 4 kb. As these experiments were conducted in comparison with cell types with well-defined Ca{sup 2+}-ATPases, the results suggest the presence of a endoplasmic reticulum-related Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase in HOME cells.

  9. [Effect of aspirin on function of human umbilical cord blood-derived late endothelial progenitor cells].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-Zhen; Li, Guo-Qiang; Liu, Meng; Sun, Sheng-Xuan; An, Guan-Yu; Dong, Ning-Zheng

    2013-08-01

    This study was aimed to investigate whether aspirin has effect on function of late endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Cord blood CD34(+) cells were purified using the ficoll density gradient centrifugation and human CD34 positive selection kit, then the cells were inoculated on fibronectin-coated culture plate. After culture for 2 weeks, adherent cells were identified as EPC by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, RT-PCR, uptake of Dil-Ac-LDL and matrigel tube formation assay. EPC were treated with different concentrations of aspirin (0.1, 1, 10, 100, 1 000, 10 000 µmol/L) for 24 h, then the proliferation, adhesion and migration ability of these cells were analyzed by CCK-8 assay and transwell methods. The results indicated that the low concentrations of aspirin (0.1 and 1 000 µmol/L) promoted late EPC adhesive and migratory capacity, but no obvious effect on proliferation of late EPC were observed. On the other hand, the high concentrations of aspirin (10 000 µmol/L) inhibited proliferation and migratory capacity of EPC, but had no obvious effect on adhesive ability of EPC. It is concluded that low concentration of aspirin promotes migration and adhesion of late EPC, while the high concentration of aspirin decreases EPC proliferation and migratory capacity of EPC.

  10. A proton-activated, outwardly rectifying chloride channel in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Zhiyong; Zhang Wei; Chen Liang; Wang Rong; Kan Xiaohong; Sun Guizhen; Liu Chunxi; Li Li Zhang Yun

    2008-07-04

    Extracellular acidic pH-activated chloride channel I{sub Cl,acid}, has been characterized in HEK 293 cells and mammalian cardiac myocytes. This study was designed to characterize I{sub Cl,acid} in human umbilical vein endothelial cells(HUVECs). The activation and deactivation of the current rapidly and repeatedly follows the change of the extracellular solution at pH 4.3, with the threshold pH 5.3. In addition, at very positive potentials, the current displays a time-dependent facilitation. pH-response relationship for I{sub Cl,acid} revealed that EC{sub 50} is pH 4.764 with a threshold pH value of pH 5.3 and nH of 14.545. The current can be blocked by the Cl{sup -} channel inhibitor DIDS (100 {mu}M). In summary, for the first time we report the presence of proton-activated, outwardly rectifying chloride channel in HUVECs. Because an acidic environment can develop in local myocardium under pathological conditions such as myocardial ischemia, I{sub Cl,acid} would play a role in regulation of EC function under these pathological conditions.

  11. Interleukin 1 stimulates platelet-activating factor production in cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bussolino, F; Breviario, F; Tetta, C; Aglietta, M; Mantovani, A; Dejana, E

    1986-01-01

    Monocyte-derived interleukin 1 (IL-1) was found to be a potent inducer of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in cultured human vascular endothelial cells (HEC). The product was identified as PAF by its behavior in chromatographic systems, its recovery of biological activity, and its physico-chemical properties and susceptibility to lipases. The response of HEC to IL-1 was concentration-dependent, took more than 2 h to become apparent, and decreased after 18 h of incubation. Most of the PAF produced was cell-associated and only a small amount (about 25% of the total) was released in the culture medium. To study the mechanism of IL-1-induced HEC-PAF production we tested the activity of 1-O-alkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine:acetyl/coenzyme A acetyltransferase in HEC. Acetyltransferase activity measured in IL-1-stimulated HEC lysates showed a three to five times greater maximum velocity, but the same Michaelis constant, as untreated cells. The regulation of PAF generation in HEC by IL-1 may be an important aspect of the two-way interaction between immunocompetent cells and vascular tissue. PMID:2872233

  12. Endocytic Pathways Used by Andes Virus to Enter Primary Human Lung Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Mike; Lin, Jin-Mann S.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.

    2016-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) is the major cause of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in South America. Despite a high fatality rate (up to 40%), no vaccines or antiviral therapies are approved to treat ANDV infection. To understand the role of endocytic pathways in ANDV infection, we used 3 complementary approaches to identify cellular factors required for ANDV entry into human lung microvascular endothelial cells. We screened an siRNA library targeting 140 genes involved in membrane trafficking, and identified 55 genes required for ANDV infection. These genes control the major endocytic pathways, endosomal transport, cell signaling, and cytoskeleton rearrangement. We then used infectious ANDV and retroviral pseudovirions to further characterize the possible involvement of 9 of these genes in the early steps of ANDV entry. In addition, we used markers of cellular endocytosis along with chemical inhibitors of known endocytic pathways to show that ANDV uses multiple routes of entry to infect target cells. These entry mechanisms are mainly clathrin-, dynamin-, and cholesterol-dependent, but can also occur via a clathrin-independent manner. PMID:27780263

  13. Imeglimin prevents human endothelial cell death by inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Detaille, D; Vial, G; Borel, A-L; Cottet-Rouselle, C; Hallakou-Bozec, S; Bolze, S; Fouqueray, P; Fontaine, E

    2016-01-01

    Imeglimin is the first in a new class of oral glucose-lowering agents, having recently completed its phase 2b trial. As Imeglimin did show a full prevention of β-cell apoptosis, and since angiopathy represents a major complication of diabetes, we studied Imeglimin protective effects on hyperglycemia-induced death of human endothelial cells (HMEC-1). These cells were incubated in several oxidative stress environments (exposure to high glucose and oxidizing agent tert-butylhydroperoxide) which led to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, cytochrome c release and cell death. These events were fully prevented by Imeglimin treatment. This protective effect on cell death occurred without any effect on oxygen consumption rate, on lactate production and on cytosolic redox or phosphate potentials. Imeglimin also dramatically decreased reactive oxygen species production, inhibiting specifically reverse electron transfer through complex I. We conclude that Imeglimin prevents hyperglycemia-induced cell death in HMEC-1 through inhibition of PTP opening without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration nor affecting cellular energy status. Considering the high prevalence of macrovascular and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetic subjects, these results together suggest a potential benefit of Imeglimin in diabetic angiopathy. PMID:27551496

  14. In vitro evaluation of the interactions between human corneal endothelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin San; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Giegengack, Matthew; Khan, Faraaz A; Khang, Gilson; Soker, Shay

    2013-02-01

    The corneal endothelium is the innermost cell layer of the cornea and rests on Descemet's membrane consisting of various extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins which can directly affect the cellular behaviors such as cell adhesion, proliferation, polarity, morphogenesis and function. The objective of this study was to investigate the interactions between the ECM environment and human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs), with the ultimate goal to improve cell proliferation and function in vitro. To evaluate the interaction of HCECs with ECM proteins, cells were seeded on ECM-coated tissue culture dishes, including collagen type I (COL I), collagen type IV (COL IV), fibronectin (FN), FNC coating mix (FNC) and laminin (LM). Cell adhesion and proliferation of HCECs on each substratum and expression of CEC markers were studied. The results showed that HCECs plated on the COL I, COL IV, FN and FNC-coated plates had enhanced cell adhesion initially; the number for COL I, COL IV, FN and FNC was significantly higher than the control (P < 0.05). In addition, cells grown on ECM protein-coated dishes showed more compact cellular morphology and CEC marker expression compared to cells seeded on uncoated dishes. Collectively, our results suggest that an adequate ECM protein combination can provide a long-term culture environment for HCECs for corneal endothelium transplantation.

  15. Inhibition of anchorage-dependent cell spreading triggers apoptosis in cultured human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    When cultivated on substrates that prevent cell adhesion (the polymer polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate, bovine serum albumin, and Teflon), human endothelial cells (EC) rapidly lost viability with a half-life of approximately 10 h. Dying EC showed the morphological and biochemical characteristics of apoptosis. The apoptotic process of suspended EC was delayed by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. To obtain information as to the mechanism involved in the apoptosis of suspended EC, we investigated whether adhesion to matrix proteins or integrin occupancy in EC retaining a round shape may affect EC suicide. EC bound to low coating concentration of either fibronectin or vitronectin, retaining a round shape and failing to organize actin microfilaments, underwent to rapid cell death; by contrast, cells on high substrate concentrations became flattened, showed actin microfilament organization, and retained viability. Addition of saturating amounts of soluble vitronectin to suspended round-shaped EC did not reduce the process of apoptosis. Finally, when suspended EC bound Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp- Ser-coated microbeads (approximately 10 microbeads/cell), yet retaining a round shape, the apoptotic process was not affected. Oncogene- transformed EC in suspension were less susceptible to cell death and apoptosis than normal EC. Overall, these data indicate that cell attachment to matrix or integrin binding per se is not sufficient for maintaining cell viability, and that cells need to undergo some minimal degree of shape change to survive. Modulation of interaction with the extracellular matrix can, therefore, be an important target for the control of angiogenesis. PMID:7523422

  16. Ionizing radiation induces immediate protein acetylation changes in human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Barjaktarovic, Zarko; Kempf, Stefan J.; Sriharshan, Arundhathi; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Atkinson, Michael J.; Tapio, Soile

    2015-01-01

    Reversible lysine acetylation is a highly regulated post-translational protein modification that is known to regulate several signaling pathways. However, little is known about the radiation-induced changes in the acetylome. In this study, we analyzed the acute post-translational acetylation changes in primary human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells 4 h after a gamma radiation dose of 2 Gy. The acetylated peptides were enriched using anti-acetyl conjugated agarose beads. A total of 54 proteins were found to be altered in their acetylation status, 23 of which were deacetylated and 31 acetylated. Pathway analyses showed three protein categories particularly affected by radiation-induced changes in the acetylation status: the proteins involved in the translation process, the proteins of stress response, and mitochondrial proteins. The activation of the canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling pathways affecting actin cytoskeleton signaling and cell cycle progression was predicted. The protein expression levels of two nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent deacetylases, sirtuin 1 and sirtuin 3, were significantly but transiently upregulated 4 but not 24 h after irradiation. The status of the p53 protein, a target of sirtuin 1, was found to be rapidly stabilized by acetylation after radiation exposure. These findings indicate that post-translational modification of proteins by acetylation and deacetylation is essentially affecting the radiation response of the endothelium. PMID:25840449

  17. Effects of Citral on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan; Zhao, Hongfeng; Liu, Jinyang; Fang, Chao; Miao, Renying

    2016-04-01

    Citral is an active compound of lemongrass oil which has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of citral on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response in a rat model of peritonitis and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). LPS was intraperitoneally injected into rats to establish a peritonitis model. The HUVECs were treated with citral for 12 h before exposure to LPS. The levels of TNF-α and IL-8 were measured using ELISA. Western blotting was used to detect the expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, NF-κB, and PPAR-γ. The results showed that citral had a protective effect against LPS-induced peritonitis. Citral decreased the levels of WBCs and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6. Citral also inhibited LPS-induced myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the peritoneal tissue. Treatment of HUVECs with citral significantly inhibited TNF-α and IL-8 expression induced by LPS. LPS-induced VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression were also suppressed by citral. Meanwhile, we found that citral inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB activation in HUVECs. Furthermore, we found that citral activated PPAR-γ and the anti-inflammatory effects of citral can be reversed by PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662. In conclusion, citral inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory response via activating PPAR-γ which attenuates NF-κB activation and inflammatory mediator production. PMID:26658749

  18. LIF-JAK1-STAT3 signaling delays contact inhibition of human corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Tseng, Scheffer C G; Zhang, Ming-Chang; Chen, Szu-Yu; Tighe, Sean; Lu, Wen-Juan; Zhu, Ying-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs) responsible for corneal transparency have limited proliferative capacity in vivo because of "contact-inhibition." This feature has hampered the ability to engineer HCECs for transplantation. Previously we have reported an in vitro model of HCECs in which contact inhibition was re-established at Day 21, even though cell junction and cell matrix interaction were not perturbed during isolation. Herein, we observe that such HCEC monolayers continue to expand and retain a normal phenotype for 2 more weeks if cultured in a leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-containing serum-free medium. Such expansion is accompanied initially by upregulation of Cyclin E2 colocalized with nuclear translocation of phosphorylated retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (p-Rb) at Day 21 followed by a delay in contact inhibition through activation of LIF-Janus kinase1 (JAK1)-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling at Day 35. The LIF-JAK1-STAT3 signaling is coupled with upregulation of E2F2 colocalized with nuclear p-Rb and with concomitant downregulation of p16(INK4a), of which upregulation is linked to senescence. Hence, activation of LIF-JAK1-STAT3 signaling to delay contact inhibition can be used as another strategy to facilitate engineering of HCEC grafts to solve the unmet global shortage of corneal grafts. PMID:25695744

  19. Identification of novel molecular markers through transcriptomic analysis in human fetal and adult corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinyin; Huang, Kevin; Nakatsu, Martin N; Xue, Zhigang; Deng, Sophie X; Fan, Guoping

    2013-04-01

    The corneal endothelium is composed of a monolayer of corneal endothelial cells (CECs), which is essential for maintaining corneal transparency. To better characterize CECs in different developmental stages, we profiled mRNA transcriptomes in human fetal and adult corneal endothelium with the goal to identify novel molecular markers in these cells. By comparing CECs with 12 other tissue types, we identified 245 and 284 signature genes that are highly expressed in fetal and adult CECs, respectively. Functionally, these genes are enriched in pathways characteristic of CECs, including inorganic anion transmembrane transporter, extracellular matrix structural constituent and cyclin-dependent protein kinase inhibitor activity. Importantly, several of these genes are disease target genes in hereditary corneal dystrophies, consistent with their functional significance in CEC physiology. We also identified stage-specific markers associated with CEC development, such as specific members in the transforming growth factor beta and Wnt signaling pathways only expressed in fetal, but not in adult CECs. Lastly, by the immunohistochemistry of ocular tissues, we demonstrated the unique protein localization for Wnt5a, S100A4, S100A6 and IER3, the four novel markers for fetal and adult CECs. The identification of a new panel of stage-specific markers for CECs would be very useful for characterizing CECs derived from stem cells or ex vivo expansion for cell replacement therapy. PMID:23257286

  20. Induction of vascular endothelial growth factor by nitric oxide in cultured human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Turpaev, K; Litvinov, D; Dubovaya, V; Panasyuk, A; Ivanov, D; Prassolov, V

    2001-06-01

    We investigated the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the control of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF) gene expression in cultured human articular chondrocytes. Cell treatment with the NO-generating compound nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) caused a significant accumulation of 4.4 kb VEGF mRNA, a major VEGF mRNA isoform expressing in chondrocytes. This is the first demonstration that NO can induce VEGF mRNA expression in chondrocytes. VEGF mRNA level was not affected in cells exposed to dibutyryl cGMP, a non-hydrolyzable analog of cGMP, suggesting that the cGMP system is not involved in NO-dependent transcriptional activation of VEGF gene. The GSNO-stimulated induction of VEGF mRNA was slightly attenuated by MAP protein kinase inhibitors PD98058 and SB203580, but was completely blocked in cells incubated with GSNO in the presence of catalase and superoxide dismutase, enzymes scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), or in the presence of thiol-containing antioxidants, N-acetyl cysteine and reduced glutathione. These results suggest that in articular chondrocytes the GSNO-induced VEGF gene transcriptional activation is dependent on endogenous ROS production and oxidative thiol modifications.

  1. Effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Kai-Jen; Lee, Kang-Yun; Pan, Chih-Hong; Lai, Ching-Huang; Lin, Lian-Yu; Ho, Shu-Chuan; Ho, Kin-Fai; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi

    2016-07-01

    Inhalation of zinc oxide (ZnO) metal fumes is known to cause metal fume fever and to have systemic effects; however, the effects of ZnO nanoparticles (ZnONPs) on the cardiovascular system remain unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the cardiovascular toxicity of ZnONPs. Human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) were exposed to ZnONPs of different sizes to investigate the cell viability, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), interleukin (IL)-6, nitric oxide (NO), and regulation of cardiovascular disease-related genes. Exposure of HCAECs to ZnONPs resulted in decreased cell viability and increased levels of 8-OHdG, IL-6, and NO. Downregulation of cardiovascular-associated genes was observed in response to ZnONPs in HCAECs determined by qPCR, suggesting that the calcium signaling pathway, neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, and renin-angiotensin system are important affected pathways in response to ZnONPs. Furthermore, we observed a significant response of AGTR1 to ZnONP exposure in HCAECs. Our results suggest that ZnONPs cause toxicity to HCAECs, which could be associated with cardiovascular dysfunction.

  2. Endothelial differentiation in multipotent cells derived from mouse and human white mature adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Jumabay, Medet; Abdmaulen, Raushan; Urs, Sumithra; Heydarkhan-Hagvall, Sepideh; Chazenbalk, Gregorio D; Jordan, Maria C; Roos, Kenneth P; Yao, Yucheng; Boström, Kristina I

    2012-12-01

    White mature adipocytes give rise to multipotent cells, so-called de-differentiated fat (DFAT) cells, when losing their fat in culture. The objective of this study was to examine the ability of DFAT cells to give rise to endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro and vivo. We demonstrate that mouse and human DFAT cells, derived from adipose tissue and lipospirate, respectively, initially lack expression of CD34, CD31, CD146, CD45 and pericyte markers, distinguishing them from progenitor cells previously identified in adipose stroma. The DFAT cells spontaneously differentiate into vascular ECs in vitro, as determined by real-time PCR, fluorescence activated cell sorting, immunostaining, and formation of tube structures. Treatment with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)4 and BMP9, important in regulating angiogenesis, significantly enhances the EC differentiation. Furthermore, adipocyte-derived cells from Green Fluorescent Protein-transgenic mice were detected in the vasculature of infarcted myocardium up to 6 weeks after ligation of the left anterior descending artery in mice. We conclude that adipocyte-derived multipotent cells are able to spontaneously give rise to ECs, a process that is promoted by BMPs and may be important in cardiovascular regeneration and in physiological and pathological changes in fat and other tissues. PMID:22999861

  3. Effective plasmid DNA and small interfering RNA delivery to diseased human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Slanina, H; Schmutzler, M; Christodoulides, M; Kim, K S; Schubert-Unkmeir, A

    2012-01-01

    Expression of exogenous DNA or small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro is significantly affected by the particular delivery system utilized. In this study, we evaluated the transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA and siRNA into human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and meningioma cells, which constitute the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, a target of meningitis-causing pathogens. Chemical transfection methods and various lipofection reagents including Lipofectamin™, FuGene™, or jetPRIME®, as well as physical transfection methods and electroporation techniques were applied. To monitor the transfection efficiencies, HBMEC and meningioma cells were transfected with the reporter plasmid pTagGFP2-actin vector, and efficiency of transfection was estimated by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. We established protocols based on electroporation using Cell Line Nucleofector® Kit V with the Amaxa® Nucleofector® II system from Lonza and the Neon® Transfection system from Invitrogen resulting in up to 41 and 82% green fluorescent protein-positive HBMEC, respectively. Optimal transfection solutions, pulse programs and length were evaluated. We furthermore demonstrated that lipofection is an efficient method to transfect meningioma cells with a transfection efficiency of about 81%. Finally, we applied the successful electroporation protocols to deliver synthetic siRNA to HBMEC and analyzed the role of the actin-binding protein cortactin in Neisseria meningitidis pathogenesis. PMID:23036990

  4. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is important for dengue virus infection in primary human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Pattanakitsakul, Sa-nga; Sinchaikul, Supachok; Chen, Shui-Tein; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2010-10-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) are the most severe forms of dengue virus infection with hemorrhage and plasma leakage. However, pathogenic mechanisms of DHF and DSS remain poorly understood. We therefore investigated host responses as determined by changes in the cellular proteome of primary human endothelial cells upon infection with dengue virus serotype 2 (DEN-2) at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 10 for 24 h. Two-dimensional PAGE and quantitative intensity analysis revealed 38 significantly altered protein spots (16 upregulated and 22 downregulated) in DEN-2-infected cells compared to mock controls. These altered proteins were successfully identified by mass spectrometry, including those involved in oxidative stress response, transcription and translation, cytoskeleton assembly, protein degradation, cell growth regulation, apoptosis, cellular metabolism, and antiviral response. The proteomic data were validated by Western blot analyses [upregulated ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 (UBE1) and downregulated annexin A2] and an immunofluorescence study (upregulated MxA). Interestingly, we found that MxA was colocalized with DEN-2 viral capsid protein, strengthening its role as an antiviral protein. Moreover, we also identified upregulation of a proteasome subunit. Our functional study revealed the significant role of ubiquitination in dengue infection and UBE1 inhibition by its specific inhibitor (UBEI-41) caused a significant reduction in the level of viral protein synthesis and its infectivity. Our findings suggest that various biological processes were triggered in response to dengue infection, particularly antiviral IFN and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways.

  5. Ethanol interferes with thrombin mediated changes in the morphology and cytoskeleton of human vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, K.J.; Rubin, R.; Hoek, J.; Williams, S.K. )

    1991-03-15

    The effect of physiological concentrations of ethanol (EtOH) on the response of human vascular endothelial cells (EC) to thrombin was examined Treatment of EC with EtOH concentrations of 20-85mM for 2-10 min. produced no significant changes in the morphology of 3- and 4-day monolayers established on fibronectin coated polystyrene. When examined immunofluorescently no significantly changes in the microfilament or microtubule structures were seen. Exposure of EC monolayers to 0.5 and 1 U/ml of thrombin for 1-60 minutes causes a concentration and time dependent monolayer retraction, evidenced by a general decrease in cell size, increase in visible gaps in the monolayer and redistribution of the microtubule and microfilament networks. Pretreatment of EC monolayers with EtOH for 3-5 minutes prior to addition of thrombin prevents the changes seen with thrombin alone. Immunofluorescent examination of the microfilament and microtubule structures suggests than EtOH may act in part via the microtubule network, which appears to be disorganized/disrupted when the EC are exposed to EtOH and then thrombin. Colchicine studies show that EC which have been pretreated with EtOH respond to colchicine differently then cells which have not previously seen EtOH. These data suggest that EtOH may alter EC monolayer responsiveness either by indirect changes which are reflected in cytoskeletal disorganization or possibly by direct influence on the cytoskeleton.

  6. Hepatitis C virus infection induces elevation of CXCL10 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Li; Zou, Ziying; Zhu, Bing; Hu, Zonghai; Zeng, Ping; Wu, Lijuan; Xiong, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) primarily infects liver tissues, while pathogenesis of extrahepatic tissues has been reported. About 50% of patients with HCV infection suffer from neurological disease. The underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the induction of CXC chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) by HCV infection. CXCL10 and its receptor CXCR3 were constitutively expressed in HBMECs. HCV infection induced CXCL10 elevation in HBMECs. The elevation of CXCL10 in HBMECs was eliminated when HCV infection was blocked by neutralizing antibodies. NF-κB is a positive regulator for CXCL10 transcription. HCV infection led to an increased phosphorylation of NF-κB (ser536) in HBMECs, and CXCL10 induced by HCV was slightly decreased when an inhibitor of NF-κB was added. IL1 beta and IFN gama were also upregulated in HCV infected HBMECs, and could be depressed by inhibitor of NF-κB. Thus, HCV infection leads to upregulated expression of CXCL10 in HBMECs, which is probably via the phosphorylation of NF-κB. The findings of this study provide potential mechanisms and novel targets for HCV induced neuroinflammation. J. Med. Virol. 88:1596-1603, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Exosomes derived from human macrophages suppress endothelial cell migration by controlling integrin trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Doo; Kim, Yeon Hyang; Kim, Doo-Sik

    2014-04-01

    Integrin trafficking, including internalization, recycling, and lysosomal degradation, is crucial for the regulation of cellular functions. Exosomes, nano-sized extracellular vesicles, are believed to play important roles in intercellular communications. This study demonstrates that exosomes released from human macrophages negatively regulate endothelial cell migration through control of integrin trafficking. Macrophage-derived exosomes promote internalization of integrin β1 in primary HUVECs. The internalized integrin β1 persistently accumulates in the perinuclear region and is not recycled back to the plasma membrane. Experimental results indicate that macrophage-derived exosomes stimulate trafficking of internalized integrin β1 to lysosomal compartments with a corresponding decrease in the integrin destined for recycling endosomes, resulting in proteolytic degradation of the integrin. Moreover, ubiquitination of HUVEC integrin β1 is enhanced by the exosomes, and exosome-mediated integrin degradation is blocked by bafilomycin A, a lysosomal degradation inhibitor. Macrophage-derived exosomes were also shown to effectively suppress collagen-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway and HUVEC migration, which are both dependent on integrin β1. These observations provide new insight into the functional significance of exosomes in the regulation of integrin trafficking.

  8. Regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor expression in human keratinocytes by retinoids.

    PubMed

    Diaz, B V; Lenoir, M C; Ladoux, A; Frelin, C; Démarchez, M; Michel, S

    2000-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is overexpressed in hyperproliferative diseases, such as psoriasis and cancers, which are characterized by increased angiogenesis. Experimentally, VEGF overexpression can be induced by the treatment of cell cultures and biological tissues with phorbol esters, such as 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Using normal human keratinocytes in conventional cultures and skin grafted onto nude mice in vivo, we show that retinoids can inhibit TPA-mediated VEGF gene induction at the transcriptional level. Because retinoids are biologically active either by interacting with the nuclear retinoic acid receptors or by interfering with the activator protein 1 (AP1) transcription factor, we studied the effect of the retinoic acid derivative CD 2409, which exhibits strong anti-AP1 activity but does not bind to the known retinoic acid receptors in vitro. The results demonstrate that the inhibition of VEGF expression by retinoids only depends on their anti-AP1 activity and does not require gene transactivation via retinoic acid response elements. Because the VEGF promoter contains four potential AP1 binding sites, we used different promoter constructs to identify the functional site responsible for TPA induction and retinoid inhibition. This site turned out to be localized at position -621 of the 5' flanking region of the VEGF gene.

  9. Apoptotic Endothelial Cells Demonstrate Increased Adhesiveness for Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    POTAPOVA, IRINA A.; COHEN, IRA S.; DORONIN, SERGEY V.

    2009-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) participate in the wound healing process in mammalians. Adhesion of MSCs to endothelium is a key step in the homing of MSCs circulating in the bloodstream to the sites of injury and inflammation. Because endothelial cells (ECs) may become apoptotic under certain pro-inflammatory conditions, we investigated the effects of pro-inflammatory, TNF-α and IL-1β, and pro-apoptotic agents, actinomycin D, cycloheximide, okadaic acid, wortmannin, and staurosporine, on human MSCs (hMSCs) adhesion to ECs. Treatment of ECs with pro-apoptotic agents markedly increased adhesion of hMSCs to ECs. This adhesion correlated with reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibition of NADH dehydrogenases, and release of von Willebrand factor (vWF) by ECs. Treatment of ECs with exogenous vWF also stimulated hMSC adhesion. These data provide evidence that apoptosis of ECs may regulate homing of hMSCs to the sites of tissue injury. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of apoptotic signaling pathways in ECs releases vWF which regulates hMSC adhesion to ECs. PMID:19023868

  10. Histamine stimulation of prostaglandin and HETE synthesis in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Revtyak, G.E.; Hughes, M.J.; Johnson, A.R.; Campbell, W.B.

    1988-08-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) cultured from human umbilical artery (UA) and vein (UV) metabolized (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid to prostaglandins (PGs), monohydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). Major radioactive products were identified as 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGE2, PGF2 alpha, 12-hydroxy heptadecatrienoic acid, 15-HETE, and 11-HETE. In addition, extracts from UV ECs contained 12-HETE, 5-HETE, 14,15-EET, and 5,6-EET as minor products, whereas extracts from UA ECs contained only 12-HETE as a minor product. UA ECs also produced metabolites comigrating with 14,15-EET, 11,12-EET, 8,9-EET, and 5,6-EET. Histamine increased the release of (/sup 14/C)PGs and (/sup 14/C)HETEs from (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid-labeled ECs. Indomethacin, aspirin, and nordihydroguauretic acid completely inhibited synthesis of both (/sup 14/C)PGs and (/sup 14/C)HETEs from exogenous (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid in these cells. Microsomes metabolized (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid to the same (/sup 14/C)PGs and (/sup 14/C)HETEs as intact cells. Pretreatment of microsomes with indomethacin completely inhibited formation of these products. These data indicate that UA ECs and UV ECs metabolize endogenous and exogenous arachidonic acid to both PGs and HETEs. Also 15-HETE and 11-HETE appear to be synthesized by a microsomal enzyme with the properties of cyclooxygenase.

  11. Imeglimin prevents human endothelial cell death by inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Detaille, D; Vial, G; Borel, A-L; Cottet-Rouselle, C; Hallakou-Bozec, S; Bolze, S; Fouqueray, P; Fontaine, E

    2016-01-01

    Imeglimin is the first in a new class of oral glucose-lowering agents, having recently completed its phase 2b trial. As Imeglimin did show a full prevention of β-cell apoptosis, and since angiopathy represents a major complication of diabetes, we studied Imeglimin protective effects on hyperglycemia-induced death of human endothelial cells (HMEC-1). These cells were incubated in several oxidative stress environments (exposure to high glucose and oxidizing agent tert-butylhydroperoxide) which led to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, cytochrome c release and cell death. These events were fully prevented by Imeglimin treatment. This protective effect on cell death occurred without any effect on oxygen consumption rate, on lactate production and on cytosolic redox or phosphate potentials. Imeglimin also dramatically decreased reactive oxygen species production, inhibiting specifically reverse electron transfer through complex I. We conclude that Imeglimin prevents hyperglycemia-induced cell death in HMEC-1 through inhibition of PTP opening without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration nor affecting cellular energy status. Considering the high prevalence of macrovascular and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetic subjects, these results together suggest a potential benefit of Imeglimin in diabetic angiopathy. PMID:27551496

  12. Differential protein expression in human corneal endothelial cells cultured from young and older donors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Cheng; Rawe, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To establish a baseline protein fingerprint of cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCEC), to determine whether the protein profiles exhibit age-related differences, and to identify proteins differentially expressed in HCEC cultured from young and older donors. Methods Corneas were obtained from five young (<30 years old) and five older donors (>50 years old). HCEC were cultured, and protein was extracted from confluent passage 3 cells. Extracts from each age group were pooled to form two samples. Proteins were separated on two-dimensional (2-D) gels and stained with SyproRuby. Resultant images were compared to identify protein spots that were either similarly expressed or differentially expressed by at least twofold. Protein spots were then identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Results Protein spots were well resolved, and patterns were reproducible on 2-D gels using either pH 3–10 or pH 4–7 IPG strips. Two-dimensional gels prepared with pH 4–7 IPG strips were used for differential display analysis, which was reproduced on three separate pairs of gels. MALDI-TOF identified 58 proteins with similar expression; 30 proteins were expressed twofold higher in HCEC from young donors; five proteins were expressed twofold higher in cells from older donors; and 10 proteins were identified in gels from young donors that did not match in gels from older donors. Several proteins expressed at higher levels in younger donors support metabolic activity, protect against oxidative damage, or mediate protein folding or degradation. Conclusions This is the first proteomic comparison of proteins expressed in HCEC cultured from young and older donors. Although restricted to proteins with isoelectric points between pH 4.0 and pH 7.0, the data obtained represent an initial step in the investigation of molecular mechanisms that underlie physiologically important age-related differences in cultured HCEC

  13. Expression of a functional extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in human aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegelstein, Roy C.; Xiong Yali; He Chaoxia; Hu Qinghua . E-mail: qinghuaa@jhmi.edu

    2006-03-31

    Extracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}) regulates the functions of many cell types through a G protein-coupled [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}-sensing receptor (CaR). Whether the receptor is functionally expressed in vascular endothelial cells is largely unknown. In cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC), RT-PCR yielded the expected 555-bp product corresponding to the CaR, and CaR protein was demonstrated by fluorescence immunostaining and Western blot. RT-PCR also demonstrated the expression in HAEC of alternatively spliced variants of the CaR lacking exon 5. Although stimulation of fura 2-loaded HAEC by several CaR agonists (high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}, neomycin, and gadolinium) failed to increase intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}), the CaR agonist spermine stimulated an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} that was diminished in buffer without Ca{sup 2+} and was abolished after depletion of an intracellular Ca{sup 2+} pool with thapsigargin or after blocking IP{sub 3}- and ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca{sup 2+} release with xestospongin C and with high concentration ryanodine, respectively. Spermine stimulated an increase in DAF-FM fluorescence in HAEC, consistent with NO production. Both the increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and in NO production were reduced or absent in HAEC transfected with siRNA specifically targeted to the CaR. HAEC express a functional CaR that responds to the endogenous polyamine spermine with an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}, primarily due to release of IP{sub 3}- and ryanodine-sensitive intracellular Ca{sup 2+} stores, leading to the production of NO. Expression of alternatively spliced variants of the CaR may result in the absence of a functional response to other known CaR agonists in HAEC.

  14. Influence of heavy ions on cell survival, cytogenetic damage and mitochondrial function of human endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Sylvia; Helm, Alexander; Lee, Ryonfa; Pollet, Dieter; Durante, Marco

    There is increasing evidence that there is an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease among atomic bomb survivors and radiotherapy patients, typically developing with a long latency. However, essentially no information is available on the potential cardiovascular risks associated with space radiation, in particular heavy ions. To address this issue, we have chosen human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) as a model system. Cells at an early passage number were irradiated with 0.1 to 4 Gy of either 9.8 MeV/u C-ions (LET=170 keV/µm), 91 MeV/u C-ions (LET=29 keV/µm) or 250 kV X-rays. Cells were regularly subcultured up to 40 days (20 population doublings) post-irradiation. Immediately after exposure cell inactivation was deter-mined by the colony forming assay. Furthermore, at selected time-points cytogenetic damage (formation of micronuclei in binucleated cells) and the mitochondrial membrane potential ΨM (flow cytometric analysis following JC-1 staining) were assessed. Measurement of the directly induced radiation damage showed that 9.8 MeV/u and 91 MeV/u C-ions were more effective than X-rays (i.e. about 3 and 2 times, respectively) with respect to cell inactivation or the in-duction of cytogenetic damage. At the subsequent days in the irradiated cultures the number of cells with micronuclei declined to the control level (3-5Altogether our data indicate that under the applied radiation conditions the integrity of mitochondria which play a significant role in the regulation of cardiovascular cell function is not impaired. With respect to directly induced genetic damage C-ions are more effective than X-rays as observed in other cell systems. If the effectiveness of charged particles for the occurrence of late chromosomal damage in endothelial cells is higher than that of sparsely ionizing radiation needs further clarification. The data obtained up to now indicate that sophisticated cytogenetic techniques have to be applied in order to draw any firm

  15. Transcriptome analysis of aldosterone-regulated genes in human vascular endothelial cell lines stably expressing mineralocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Sekizawa, Naoko; Yoshimoto, Takanobu; Hayakawa, Eri; Suzuki, Noriko; Sugiyama, Toru; Hirata, Yukio

    2011-07-20

    A series of studies have demonstrated that endothelial cell is one of the target tissues of aldosterone. Here, we have conducted a transcriptome analysis of aldosterone-inducible genes in human endothelial cell lines stably expressing human mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) by retroviral system (MR-EAhy). We found that aldosterone in physiologic concentrations robustly induced MR-dependent transcriptional response in MR-EAhy. By DNA microarray analysis, we validated 12 aldosterone-up-regulated genes among which at least seven were concomitantly associated with increased protein expression. We also found five aldosterone-down-regulated genes. Among 11 aldosterone-up-regulated genes tested, mRNA expressions of three (ESM1, SNF1LK, ANGPTL4) were significantly up-regulated in aortic tissue from aldosterone-induced hypertensive rats compared to those from control rats, suggesting their potential pathophysiologic significance in vivo. In conclusion, using MR stably expressed human endothelial cell lines, we identified a variety of aldosterone-inducible genes, suggesting their possible roles in the development and/or the protection for aldosterone-induced vascular injury.

  16. Impact of simulated microgravity on the secretory and adhesive activity of cultured human vascular endothelial cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudimov, Evgeny; Buravkova, Ludmila; Pogodina, Margarita; Andrianova, Irina

    The layer of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) is a dynamic,disseminated organ that perform the function of an interface between the blood and vascular wall. The endothelial monolayer is able to quickly respond to changes in the microenvironment due to its synthesis of vasoactive substances, chemokines, adhesion molecules expression, etc. ECs are highly sensitive to gravitational changes and capable of short-term and long-term responses (Sangha et al., 2001; Buravkova et al., 2005; Infanger et al., 2006, 2007. However, the question remains how to reflect the impact of microgravity on endothelium under the inflammatory process. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate secretory and adhesive activity of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) during simulated microgravity and TNF-a activation. HUVECs were isolated according to Gimbrone et al. (1978) in modification A. Antonov (1981) and used for experiments at 2-4 passages. HUVECs were activated by low level of TNF-a (2 ng/ml). Microgravity was generated by Random Positioning Machine (RPM, Dutch Space, Leiden) placed into the thermostat at 37°C. After 24 hours of clinorotation we measured adhesion molecules expression on the cell surface (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, PECAM-1, E-selectin, CD144, endoglin (CD105)) and cell viability using a flow cytometry. To evaluate the level of target gene expression was used the real time RT-PCR. IL-6 and IL-8 concentration was measured in the conditioned medium of HUVECs by using the ELISA test. We found that simulated microgravity within 24 hours caused a decrease of ICAM-1, CD144, and E-selectin expression, at the same time not affect the cell viability, endoglin and PECAM-1 expression on the surface HUVEC. Furthermore, there were no changes of the level of IL-6 and IL-8 gene expression and their products in the culture medium. TNF-activated HUVECs showed an increase in gene expression of interleukins and molecules involved in the adhesion process, which also was confirmed

  17. Chemical allergens stimulate human epidermal keratinocytes to produce lymphangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Ok-Nam; Ahn, Seyeon; Jin, Sun Hee; Hong, Soo Hyun; Lee, Jinyoung; Kim, Eun-Sun; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Chun, Young-Jin; Lee, Ai-Young; Noh, Minsoo

    2015-03-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a cell-mediated immune response that involves skin sensitization in response to contact with various allergens. Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis both play roles in the allergic sensitization process. Epidermal keratinocytes can produce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in response to UV irradiation and during wound healing. However, the effect of haptenic chemical allergens on the VEGF production of human keratinocytes, which is the primary contact site of toxic allergens, has not been thoroughly researched. We systematically investigated whether immune-regulatory cytokines and chemical allergens would lead to the production of VEGF in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs) in culture. VEGF production significantly increased when NHKs were treated with IFNγ, IL-1α, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-22 or TNFα. Among the human sensitizers listed in the OECD Test Guideline (TG) 429, we found that CMI/MI, DNCB, 4-phenylenediamine, cobalt chloride, 2-mercaptobenzothiazole, citral, HCA, cinnamic alcohol, imidazolidinyl urea and nickel chloride all significantly upregulated VEGF production in NHKs. In addition, common human haptenic allergens such as avobenzone, formaldehyde and urushiol, also induced the keratinocyte-derived VEGF production. VEGF upregulation by pro-inflammatory stimuli, IFNγ, DNCB or formaldehyde is preceded by the production of IL-8, an acute inflammatory phase cytokine. Lymphangiogenic VEGF-C gene transcription was significantly increased when NHKs were treated with formaldehyde, DNCB or urushiol, while transcription of VEGF-A and VEGF-B did not change. Therefore, the chemical allergen-induced VEGF upregulation is mainly due to the increase in lymphangiogenic VEGF-C transcription in NHKs. These results suggest that keratinocyte-derived VEGF may regulate the lymphangiogenic process during the skin sensitization process of ACD. - Highlights: • Pro-inflammatory cytokines induced VEGF production in normal human

  18. Bioluminescence imaging of transplanted human endothelial colony-forming cells in an ischemic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Zhao, Zhen; Wang, Chao; Wang, Cong-Xiao; Li, Pei-Cheng; Qian, Cheng; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Ischemic strokes are devastating events responsible for high mortality and morbidity worldwide each year. Endothelial colony-forming cell (ECFC) therapy holds promise for stroke treatment; however, grafted ECFCs need to be monitored better understand their biological behavior in vivo, so as to evaluate their safety and successful delivery. The objectives of this study are to visualize the fate of infused human cord blood derived ECFCs via bioluminescence imaging (BLI) in an ischemic stroke mouse model and to determine the therapeutic effects of ECFC transplantation. ECFCs derived from human umbilical cord blood were infected with lentivirus carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and firefly luciferase (Luc2) double fusion reporter gene. Labeled ECFCs were grafted into a photothrombotic ischemic stroke mouse model via intra-arterial injection though the left cardiac ventricle. The homing of infused cells and functional recovery of stroke mice were evaluated using BLI, neurological scoring, and immunohistochemistry. Significantly, BLI signals were highest in the brain on day 1 and decreased steadily until day 14. GFP-positive cells were also found surrounding infarct border zones in brain sections using immunohistochemical staining, suggesting that ECFCs properly homed to the ischemic brain tissue. Using a modified neurological severity score assay and histological analysis of brain slices with CD31 immunostaining in brain tissue, double cortin analysis, and the TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, we demonstrated functional restoration, improved angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and decreased apoptosis in ischemic mice after ECFC infusion. Collectively, our data support that ECFCs may be a promising therapeutic agent for stroke. PMID:27038754

  19. Ajoene inhibits the activation of human endothelial cells induced by porcine cells: implications for xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Benatuil, Lorenzo; Apitz-Castro, Rafael; Romano, Egidio

    2003-07-01

    Ajoene, is an organosulfur compound derived from garlic that strongly inhibit platelet aggregation, proliferation of human lymphocytes induced by phytohemagglutinin, and in general, blocks membrane-mediated signaling of cell activation. As a thrombotic microangiopathy frequently complicates procedures designed to induce pig-to-baboon chimerism by infusion of large amounts of pig progenitor cells in baboons, it was thought that ajoene might be useful to prevent such complication. For such purpose, we studied the effects of ajoene on the activation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) induced by pig peripheral blood mononuclear cells (p-PBMC). Co-cultures of p-PBMC with HUVEC results in activation of the HUVEC as shown by over-expression of E-selectin and vascular cells adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Ajoene (25 microm) strongly inhibits HUVEC activation induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or p-PBMC as shown by a down regulation of VCAM-1 and of E-selectin expression. After 5 or 8 h of pre-treatment with Ajoene, HUVEC incubated with TNF and p-PBMC showed an E-selectin or VCAM-1 expression, respectively, at levels similar to the positive control indicating that the inhibitory effect is transient. Ajoene at concentration of 25 microm or lower did not affect HUVEC viability. Based on the finding that Ajoene has a strong, although transient, inhibitory effect on the activation of the endothelium induced by pig cells and its known anti-platelet activity, it is suggested that this garlic compound could be useful to prevent the development of microangiopathy and thrombotic disorders seen in primates infused with pig cells.

  20. Balamuthia mandrillaris interactions with human brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Matin, Abdul; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Jung, Suk-Yul; Kim, Kwang Sik; Stins, Monique; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2007-08-01

    Balamuthia amoebic encephalitis (BAE) is a serious human disease almost always leading to death. An important step in BAE is amoebae invasion of the bloodstream, followed by their haematogenous spread. Balamuthia mandrillaris entry into the central nervous system most likely occurs at the blood-brain barrier sites. Using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs), which constitute the blood-brain barrier, this study determined (i) the ability of B. mandrillaris to bind to HBMECs and (ii) the associated molecular mechanisms. Adhesion assays revealed that B. mandrillaris exhibited greater than 90 % binding to HBMECs in vitro. To determine whether recognition of carbohydrate moieties on the surface of the HBMECs plays a role in B. mandrillaris adherence to the target cells, adhesion assays were performed in the presence of the saccharides mannose, galactose, xylose, glucose and fucose. It was observed that adherence of B. mandrillaris was significantly reduced by galactose, whilst the other saccharides had no effect. Acetone fixation of amoebae, but not of HBMECs, abolished adhesion, suggesting that B. mandrillaris adhesin(s) bind to galactose-containing glycoproteins of HBMECs. B. mandrillaris also bound to microtitre wells coated with galactose-BSA. By affinity chromatography using a galactose-Sepharose column, a galactose-binding protein (GBP) was isolated from detergent extracts of unlabelled amoebae. The isolation of a GBP from cell-surface-biotin-labelled amoebae suggested its membrane association. One-dimensional SDS-PAGE confirmed the proteinaceous nature of the GBP and determined its molecular mass as approximately 100 kDa. This is the first report suggesting the role of a GBP in B. mandrillaris interactions with HBMECs. PMID:17644721

  1. Bioluminescence imaging of transplanted human endothelial colony-forming cells in an ischemic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Zhao, Zhen; Wang, Chao; Wang, Cong-Xiao; Li, Pei-Cheng; Qian, Cheng; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Ischemic strokes are devastating events responsible for high mortality and morbidity worldwide each year. Endothelial colony-forming cell (ECFC) therapy holds promise for stroke treatment; however, grafted ECFCs need to be monitored better understand their biological behavior in vivo, so as to evaluate their safety and successful delivery. The objectives of this study are to visualize the fate of infused human cord blood derived ECFCs via bioluminescence imaging (BLI) in an ischemic stroke mouse model and to determine the therapeutic effects of ECFC transplantation. ECFCs derived from human umbilical cord blood were infected with lentivirus carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and firefly luciferase (Luc2) double fusion reporter gene. Labeled ECFCs were grafted into a photothrombotic ischemic stroke mouse model via intra-arterial injection though the left cardiac ventricle. The homing of infused cells and functional recovery of stroke mice were evaluated using BLI, neurological scoring, and immunohistochemistry. Significantly, BLI signals were highest in the brain on day 1 and decreased steadily until day 14. GFP-positive cells were also found surrounding infarct border zones in brain sections using immunohistochemical staining, suggesting that ECFCs properly homed to the ischemic brain tissue. Using a modified neurological severity score assay and histological analysis of brain slices with CD31 immunostaining in brain tissue, double cortin analysis, and the TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, we demonstrated functional restoration, improved angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and decreased apoptosis in ischemic mice after ECFC infusion. Collectively, our data support that ECFCs may be a promising therapeutic agent for stroke.

  2. Enhanced cellular responses and distinct gene profiles in human fetoplacental artery endothelial cells under chronic low oxygen.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi-Zhou; Wang, Kai; Li, Yan; Dai, Cai-Feng; Wang, Ping; Kendziorski, Christina; Chen, Dong-Bao; Zheng, Jing

    2013-12-01

    Fetoplacental endothelial cells are exposed to oxygen levels ranging from 2% to 8% in vivo. However, little is known regarding endothelial function within this range of oxygen because most laboratories use ambient air (21% O2) as a standard culture condition (SCN). We asked whether human umbilical artery endothelial cells (HUAECs) that were steadily exposed to the physiological chronic normoxia (PCN, 3% O2) for ∼20-25 days differed in their proliferative and migratory responses to FGF2 and VEGFA as well as in their global gene expression compared with those in the SCN. We observed that PCN enhanced FGF2- and VEGFA-stimulated cell proliferation and migration. In oxygen reversal experiments (i.e., when PCN cells were exposed to SCN for 24 h and vice versa), we found that preexposure to 21% O2 decreased the migratory ability, but not the proliferative ability, of the PCN-HUAECs in response to FGF2 and VEGFA. These PCN-enhanced cellular responses were associated with increased protein levels of HIF1A and NOS3, but not FGFR1, VEGFR1, and VEGFR2. Microarray analysis demonstrated that PCN up-regulated 74 genes and down-regulated 86, 14 of which were directly regulated by hypoxia-inducible factors as evaluated using in silico analysis. Gene function analysis further indicated that the PCN-regulated genes were highly related to cell proliferation and migration, consistent with the results from our functional assays. Given that PCN significantly alters cellular responses to FGF2 and VEGFA as well as transcription in HUAECs, it is likely that we may need to reexamine the current cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling fetoplacental endothelial functions, which were largely derived from endothelial models established under ambient O2.

  3. Genome-wide analysis of the effect of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma on human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guoguo; Yang, Yi; Liu, Hangfan; Liu, Kangdong; Zhao, Jimin; Chen, Xinhuan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yanyan; Lu, Jing; Dong, Ziming

    2016-07-01

    A large volume of data indicates that controlling tumor-associated angiogenesis is a promising therapy against cancer. However, angiogenesis is a complex process, little is known about the differential gene expression in the process of normal endothelial cell differentiation toward tumor vascular endothelial cells induced by tumor microenvironment. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of tumor microenvironment simulated by the supernatant of esophageal squamous cancer cells (KYSE70) on normal endothelial cells (HUVECs) at the whole genome level. The gene expression profile was studied through gene ontology and signal pathway analysis. Compared with the normal HUVECs, a total of 3769 differentially expressed genes in induced HUVECs were detected, including 1609 upregulated genes and 2160 downregulated genes. Moreover, the microarray data analysis showed that 11 significant biological processes and 10 significant signaling pathways changed most, which are associated with angiogenesis and cell differentiation. According to the different expression levels in the microarrays and their functions, four differentially expressed genes involved in tumor angiogenesis and cell differentiation (IL6, VEGFA, S1PR1, TYMP) were selected and analyzed by qRT-PCR. The qRT-PCR results were consistent with the microarray data. Furthermore, we simulated the tumor microenvironment by human esophageal carcinoma tissue homogenate to investigate its effect on HUVECs, the qRT-PCR results indicated that the above genes were highly expressed in HUVECs after induction by esophageal carcinoma tissue homogenate. In conclusion, tumor microenvironment impact on normal endothelial cells differentiated toward tumor vascular endothelial cells, and the selected genes, which are associated with tumor angiogenesis, would be anti-angiogenesis targets against esophageal carcinoma.

  4. Microparticles released by vascular endothelial cells increase hypoxia inducible factor expression in human proximal tubular HK-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Martínez, Ana Belen; Torija, Ana Valdehita; Carracedo, Julia; Ramirez, Rafael; de Lucio-Cazaña, Francisco Javier

    2014-08-01

    Microparticles are produced by vesiculation of the cell plasma membrane and serve as vectors of cell-to-cell communication. Co-culture experiments have shown that hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-α)-regulated-genes are up-regulated in human renal proximal tubular HK-2 cells by endothelial cell factors which might be transported inside endothelial microparticles (EMP). Here we aimed to study in HK-2 cells the effect of EMP, produced by activated endothelial cells, on HIF-α and HIF-α-regulated vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A). EMP, at a concentration much lower than that found in plasma, increased the expression of HIF-α/VEGF-A in a COX-2/EP2 receptor dependent manner. Since the EMP/cells ratio was ∼1/1000, we hypothesized that paracrine mediators produced by HK-2 cells amplified the initial signal. This hypothesis was confirmed by two facts which also suggested that the mediators were conveyed by particles released by HK-2 cells: (i) HIF-α was up-regulated in HK-2 cells treated with the pellet obtained from the conditioned medium of the EMP-treated HK-2 cells. (ii) In transwell experiments, EMP-treated cells increased the expression of HIF-α in untreated HK-2 cells. Interestingly, we detected these cells, particles that were released by EMP-treated HK-2 cells. Depending on the pathological context, activation of HIF-α and VEGF-A signaling in renal tissue/cells may have either beneficial or harmful effects. Therefore, our results suggest that their presence in the urinary space of EMP produced by activated endothelial cells may influence the outcome of a number of renal diseases.

  5. Interaction of human endothelial cells and nickel-titanium materials modified with silicon ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lotkov, Aleksandr I. Kashin, Oleg A.; Kudryavtseva, Yuliya A. Antonova, Larisa V. Matveeva, Vera G. Sergeeva, Evgeniya A.; Kudryashov, Andrey N.

    2015-10-27

    The paper studies the influence of chemical and phase compositions of NiTi surface layers modified with Si ions by plasma immersion implantation on their interaction with endothelial cells. It is shown that certain technological modes of Si ion implantation enhance the adhesion, proliferation, and viability of endothelial cells. It is found that the Si-modified NiTi surface is capable of stimulating the formation of capillary-like structures in the cell culture.

  6. Induction of Hepatic and Endothelial Differentiation by Perfusion in a Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model of Human Fetal Liver

    PubMed Central

    Pekor, Christopher; Gerlach, Jörg C.; Nettleship, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The development of functional engineered tissue constructs depends on high cell densities and appropriate vascularization. In this study we implemented a four-compartment three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture model for studying the effects of medium perfusion on endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic cell populations of primary human fetal liver in an in vivo-like environment. Human fetal liver cells were cultured in bioreactors configured to provide either perfusion or diffusion conditions. Metabolic activities of the cultures were monitored daily by measuring glucose consumption and lactate production. Cell viability during culture was analyzed by lactate dehydrogenase activity. Hepatic functionality was determined by the release of albumin and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in culture medium samples. After 4 days of culture, cells were analyzed for the expression of a variety of endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic genes, as well as the surface marker expression of CD31 and CD34 in flow cytometry. We found that medium perfusion increased the gene expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor (vWF), CD140b, CD309, and CD144 while decreasing the gene expression of the erythrocyte-surface marker CD235a. Hepatic differentiation was promoted under perfusion conditions as demonstrated by lower AFP and higher albumin secretion compared with cultures not exposed to medium perfusion. Additionally, cultures exposed to medium perfusion gave higher rates of glucose consumption and lactate production, indicating increased metabolic activity. In conclusion, high-density bioreactors configured to provide constant medium perfusion significantly induced hepatic and endothelial cell differentiation and provided improved conditions for the culture of human fetal liver cells compared with cultures without perfusion. PMID:25559936

  7. Multifactorial determinants that govern nanoparticle uptake by human endothelial cells under flow

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Stephen Paul; Jain, Namrata; O’Dowd, Frank; Paul, Toby; Kashanin, Dmitry; Gerard, Valerie A; Gun’ko, Yurii K; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Volkov, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelium is a potential target for therapeutic intervention in diverse pathological processes, including inflammation, atherosclerosis, and thrombosis. By virtue of their intravascular topography, endothelial cells are exposed to dynamically changing mechanical forces that are generated by blood flow. In the present study, we investigated the interactions of negatively charged 2.7 nm and 4.7 nm CdTe quantum dots and 50 nm silica particles with cultured endothelial cells under regulated shear stress (SS) conditions. Cultured cells within the engineered microfluidic channels were exposed to nanoparticles under static condition or under low, medium, and high SS rates (0.05, 0.1, and 0.5 Pa, respectively). Vascular inflammation and associated endothelial damage were simulated by treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or by compromising the cell membrane with the use of low Triton X-100 concentration. Our results demonstrate that SS is critical for nanoparticle uptake by endothelial cells. Maximal uptake was registered at the SS rate of 0.05 Pa. By contrast, endothelial exposure to mild detergents or TNF-α treatment had no significant effect on nanoparticle uptake. Atomic force microscopy demonstrated the increased formation of actin-based cytoskeletal structures, including stress fibers and membrane ruffles, which have been associated with nanoparticle endocytosis. In conclusion, the combinatorial effects of SS rates, vascular endothelial conditions, and nanoparticle physical and chemical properties must be taken into account for the successful design of nanoparticle–drug conjugates intended for parenteral delivery. PMID:22745555

  8. Multifactorial determinants that govern nanoparticle uptake by human endothelial cells under flow.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Stephen Paul; Jain, Namrata; O'Dowd, Frank; Paul, Toby; Kashanin, Dmitry; Gerard, Valerie A; Gun'ko, Yurii K; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Volkov, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelium is a potential target for therapeutic intervention in diverse pathological processes, including inflammation, atherosclerosis, and thrombosis. By virtue of their intravascular topography, endothelial cells are exposed to dynamically changing mechanical forces that are generated by blood flow. In the present study, we investigated the interactions of negatively charged 2.7 nm and 4.7 nm CdTe quantum dots and 50 nm silica particles with cultured endothelial cells under regulated shear stress (SS) conditions. Cultured cells within the engineered microfluidic channels were exposed to nanoparticles under static condition or under low, medium, and high SS rates (0.05, 0.1, and 0.5 Pa, respectively). Vascular inflammation and associated endothelial damage were simulated by treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) or by compromising the cell membrane with the use of low Triton X-100 concentration. Our results demonstrate that SS is critical for nanoparticle uptake by endothelial cells. Maximal uptake was registered at the SS rate of 0.05 Pa. By contrast, endothelial exposure to mild detergents or TNF-α treatment had no significant effect on nanoparticle uptake. Atomic force microscopy demonstrated the increased formation of actin-based cytoskeletal structures, including stress fibers and membrane ruffles, which have been associated with nanoparticle endocytosis. In conclusion, the combinatorial effects of SS rates, vascular endothelial conditions, and nanoparticle physical and chemical properties must be taken into account for the successful design of nanoparticle-drug conjugates intended for parenteral delivery.

  9. A benzothiophene-carboxamide is a potent inhibitor of IL-1beta induced VCAM-1 gene expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cobb, R R; Felts, K A; McKenzie, T C; Parry, G C; Mackman, N

    1996-03-18

    Vascular endothelial cells respond to cytokines such as IL-1 beta or TNF-alpha by undergoing a number of functional alterations. Among these alterations is the induction of cell surface adhesion molecules, including VCAM-1. In this report, we investigated the effects of a 3-alkoxybenzo[beta]thiophene-2-carboxamide (BZT) on the cytokine induction of VCAM-1 expression and activation of the transcription factor NF-kappa B in human endothelial cells. BZT blocked the IL-1 beta induced cell surface expression of VCAM-1 in human endothelial cells but did not prevent nuclear translocation of NF-kappa B. This study demonstrates that BZT is a potent inhibitor of VCAM-1 expression in human endothelial cells.

  10. Galectin-1 suppresses Methamphetamine induced neuroinflammation in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: Neuroprotective role in maintaining Blood Brain Barrier integrity

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Neil; Aalinkeel, R; Reynolds, JL; Nair, BB; Sykes, DE; Mammen, MJ; Schwartz, SA; Mahajan, SD

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) abuse can lead to the breakdown of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) integrity leading to compromised CNS function. The role of Galectins in the angiogenesis process in tumor-associated endothelial cells (EC) is well established; however no data are available on the expression of Galectins in normal human brain microvascular endothelial cells and their potential role in maintaining BBB integrity. We evaluated the basal gene/protein expression levels of Galectin-1, -3 and -9 in normal primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) that constitute the BBB and examined whether Meth altered Galectin expression in these cells, and if Galectin-1 treatment impacted the integrity of an in-vitro BBB. Our results showed that BMVEC expressed significantly higher levels of Galectin-1 as compared to Galectin-3 and -9. Meth treatment increased Galectin-1 expression in BMVEC. Meth induced decrease in TJ proteins ZO-1, Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 was reversed by Galectin-1. Our data suggests that Galectin-1 is involved in BBB remodeling and can increase levels of TJ proteins ZO-1 and Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 which helps maintain BBB tightness thus playing a neuroprotective role. Galectin-1 is thus an important regulator of immune balance from neurodegeneration to neuroprotection, which makes it an important therapeutic agent/target in the treatment of drug addiction and other neurological conditions. PMID:26236024

  11. [MIP-1α promotes the migration ability of Jurkat cell through human brain microvascular endothelial cell monolayer].

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi-Ran; Zhang, Shuang; Sun, Ying; Liu, Yi-Yang; Song, Qian; Hao, Yi-Wen

    2014-02-01

    This study was purposed to explore the mechanism of central nervous system (CNS) leukemia resulting from brain metastasis of human acute T-cell leukemia (T-ALL) cells and the role of MIP-1α in migration of Jurkat cells through human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). The real-time PCR, siRNA test, transendothelial migration test, endothelial permeability assay and cell adhesion assay were used to detect MIP-1α expression, penetration and migration ability as well as adhesion capability respectively. The results showed that the MIP-1α expression in Jurkat cells was higher than that in normal T cells and CCRF-HSB2, CCRF-CEM , SUP-T1 cells. The MIP-1α secreted from Jurkat cells enhanced the ability of Jurkat cells to penetrate through HBMEC, the ability of Jurkat cells treated by MIP-1α siRNA to adhere to HBMEC and to migrate trans endothelial cells decreased. It is concluded that the MIP-1α secreted from Jurkat cells participates in process of penetrating the Jurkat cells through HBMEC monolayer.

  12. Galectin-1 suppresses methamphetamine induced neuroinflammation in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: Neuroprotective role in maintaining blood brain barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Neil U; Aalinkeel, R; Reynolds, J L; Nair, B B; Sykes, D E; Mammen, M J; Schwartz, S A; Mahajan, S D

    2015-10-22

    Methamphetamine (Meth) abuse can lead to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity leading to compromised CNS function. The role of Galectins in the angiogenesis process in tumor-associated endothelial cells (EC) is well established; however no data are available on the expression of Galectins in normal human brain microvascular endothelial cells and their potential role in maintaining BBB integrity. We evaluated the basal gene/protein expression levels of Galectin-1, -3 and -9 in normal primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) that constitute the BBB and examined whether Meth altered Galectin expression in these cells, and if Galectin-1 treatment impacted the integrity of an in-vitro BBB. Our results showed that BMVEC expressed significantly higher levels of Galectin-1 as compared to Galectin-3 and -9. Meth treatment increased Galectin-1 expression in BMVEC. Meth induced decrease in TJ proteins ZO-1, Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 was reversed by Galectin-1. Our data suggests that Galectin-1 is involved in BBB remodeling and can increase levels of TJ proteins ZO-1 and Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 which helps maintain BBB tightness thus playing a neuroprotective role. Galectin-1 is thus an important regulator of immune balance from neurodegeneration to neuroprotection, which makes it an important therapeutic agent/target in the treatment of drug addiction and other neurological conditions.

  13. [Characterization of hemodynamic ex vivo model to study endothelial activation by TNF-α in prefunded human veins].

    PubMed

    López-Macay, Ambar; Ruiz-Medina, Edgar Josúe; Ventura-Gallegos, José Luis; Arechavaleta-Velasco, Fabián; Gómez-Quiroz, Luis Enrique; Konigsberg-Fainstein, Mina; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is recognized as part of the etiology of numerous diseases. The interaction among cells of the immunological system with local cells and molecules, such as cytokines and chemokines, allows cellular activation and response amplification. The importance of several physicochemical factors like frictional force, vascular flow, shear stress, and pressure is now recognized because they are known to modulate genetic expression and endothelial activation; however, there are very few studies that recreate such cellular microenvironments. Hence, it is of paramount importance to develop new models that will mimic physiological conditions. Our aim was to improve a human vein ex vivo model that would allow endothelial activation in flow conditions, to study the molecular components during adhesion, taking into consideration physicochemical parameters such as flow and shear stress. Endothelial umbilical human vein was used and activated with TNF-a in order to determine U937 monocytic cells adhesion, as well as cytokines secretion and ICAM-1 expression. This model will allow leukocyte adhesion studies, using different inflammatory stimulus, along with the signaling pathways involved in several pathologies. PMID:25946532

  14. [Characterization of hemodynamic ex vivo model to study endothelial activation by TNF-α in prefunded human veins].

    PubMed

    López-Macay, Ambar; Ruiz-Medina, Edgar Josúe; Ventura-Gallegos, José Luis; Arechavaleta-Velasco, Fabián; Gómez-Quiroz, Luis Enrique; Konigsberg-Fainstein, Mina; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is recognized as part of the etiology of numerous diseases. The interaction among cells of the immunological system with local cells and molecules, such as cytokines and chemokines, allows cellular activation and response amplification. The importance of several physicochemical factors like frictional force, vascular flow, shear stress, and pressure is now recognized because they are known to modulate genetic expression and endothelial activation; however, there are very few studies that recreate such cellular microenvironments. Hence, it is of paramount importance to develop new models that will mimic physiological conditions. Our aim was to improve a human vein ex vivo model that would allow endothelial activation in flow conditions, to study the molecular components during adhesion, taking into consideration physicochemical parameters such as flow and shear stress. Endothelial umbilical human vein was used and activated with TNF-a in order to determine U937 monocytic cells adhesion, as well as cytokines secretion and ICAM-1 expression. This model will allow leukocyte adhesion studies, using different inflammatory stimulus, along with the signaling pathways involved in several pathologies.

  15. Inhibitive Effects of Mulberry Leaf-Related Extracts on Cell Adhesion and Inflammatory Response in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chao, P.-Y.; Lin, K.-H.; Chiu, C.-C.; Yang, Y.-Y.; Huang, M.-Y.; Yang, C.-M.

    2013-01-01

    Effects of mulberry leaf-related extracts (MLREs) on hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes and on inflammatory signaling pathways in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were studied. The tested MLREs were rich in flavonols, especially bombyx faces tea (BT) in quercetin and kaempferol. Polyphenols, flavonoids, and anthocyanidin also abounded in BT. The best trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) was generated from the acidic methanolic extracts of BT. Acidic methanolic and water extracts of mulberry leaf tea (MT), mulberry leaf (M), and BT significantly inhibited DNA oxidative damage to lymphocytes based on the comet assay as compared to the H2O2-treated group. TNF-α-induced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion was significantly suppressed by MLREs. Additionally, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) expression was significantly reduced by BT and MT. Significant reductions were also observed in both NF-κB and activator protein (AP)-1 DNA binding by MLREs. Significant increases in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α and γ DNA binding by MLREs were also detected in M and MT extracts, but no evidence for PPAR α DNA binding in 50 μg/mL MT extract was found. Apparently, MLREs can provide distinct cytoprotective mechanisms that may contribute to its putative beneficial effects on suppressing endothelial responses to cytokines during inflammation. PMID:24371453

  16. Cultivation of corneal endothelial cells on a pericellular matrix prepared from human decidua-derived mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Numata, Ryohei; Okumura, Naoki; Nakahara, Makiko; Ueno, Morio; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Sasai, Yoshiki; Koizumi, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    The barrier and pump functions of the corneal endothelium are essential for the maintenance of corneal transparency. Although corneal transplantation is the only current therapy for treating corneal endothelial dysfunction, the potential of tissue-engineering techniques to provide highly efficient and less invasive therapy in comparison to corneal transplantation has been highly anticipated. However, culturing human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs) is technically difficult, and there is no established culture protocol. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a pericellular matrix prepared from human decidua-derived mesenchymal cells (PCM-DM) as an animal-free substrate for HCEC culture for future clinical applications. PCM-DM enhanced the adhesion of monkey CECs (MCECs) via integrin, promoted cell proliferation, and suppressed apoptosis. The HCECs cultured on the PCM-DM showed a hexagonal morphology and a staining profile characteristic of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and ZO-1 at the plasma membrane in vivo, whereas the control HCECs showed a fibroblastic phenotype. The cell density of the cultured HCECs on the PCM-DM was significantly higher than that of the control cells. These results indicate that PCM-DM provides a feasible xeno-free matrix substrate and that it offers a viable in vitro expansion protocol for HCECs while maintaining cellular functions for use as a subsequent clinical intervention for tissue-engineered based therapy of corneal endothelial dysfunction.

  17. Cadmium chloride alters mRNA levels of angiogenesis related genes in primary human endometrial endothelial cells grown in vitro.

    PubMed

    Helmestam, Malin; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli; Olovsson, Matts

    2010-11-01

    Cadmium, is known to cause adverse reproductive effects, and classified as an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC). Human endometrial endothelial cells (HEEC) have a key role in the regulation of endometrial angiogenesis. These cells are known to express estrogen receptors, a feature that makes them potential targets for EDCs such as cadmium. We have designed a co-culture system, in which HEEC were grown in the same cell culture medium as endometrial stromal cells but in separate, communicating chambers. With quantitative PCR, we investigated changes in mRNA expression of genes associated with angiogenesis, sex steroids and endothelial cell specific functions. We found that cadmium altered the mRNA expression of the two important angiogenic molecules VEGF-A and PLGF. Cadmium might thus affect endometrial angiogenesis and as a consequence cause endometrial dysfunction with an increased risk for fertility problems. PMID:20580663

  18. Purification of a Factor from Human Placenta That Stimulates Capillary Endothelial Cell Protease Production, DNA Synthesis, and Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscatelli, David; Presta, Marco; Rifkin, Daniel B.

    1986-04-01

    A protein that stimulates the production of plasminogen activator and latent collagenase in cultured bovine capillary endothelial cells has been purified 106-fold from term human placenta by using a combination of heparin affinity chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography, and gel chromatography. The purified molecule has a molecular weight of 18,700 as determined by NaDodSO4/PAGE under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. The purified molecule stimulates the production of plasminogen activator and latent collagenase in a dose-dependent manner between 0.1 and 10 ng of protein/ml. The purified protein also stimulates DNA synthesis and chemotaxis in capillary endothelial cells in the same concentration range. Thus, this molecule has all of the properties predicted for an angiogenic factor.

  19. A core human primary tumor angiogenesis signature identifies the endothelial orphan receptor ELTD1 as a key regulator of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Masiero, Massimo; Simões, Filipa Costa; Han, Hee Dong; Snell, Cameron; Peterkin, Tessa; Bridges, Esther; Mangala, Lingegowda S; Wu, Sherry Yen-Yao; Pradeep, Sunila; Li, Demin; Han, Cheng; Dalton, Heather; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Tuynman, Jurriaan B; Mortensen, Neil; Li, Ji-Liang; Patient, Roger; Sood, Anil K; Banham, Alison H; Harris, Adrian L; Buffa, Francesca M

    2013-08-12

    Limited clinical benefits derived from anti-VEGF therapy have driven the identification of new targets involved in tumor angiogenesis. Here, we report an integrative meta-analysis to define the transcriptional program underlying angiogenesis in human cancer. This approach identified ELTD1, an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor whose expression is induced by VEGF/bFGF and repressed by DLL4 signaling. Extensive analysis of multiple cancer types demonstrates significant upregulation of ELTD1 in tumor-associated endothelial cells, with a higher expression correlating with favorable prognosis. Importantly, ELTD1 silencing impairs endothelial sprouting and vessel formation in vitro and in vivo, drastically reducing tumor growth and greatly improving survival. Collectively, these results provide insight into the regulation of tumor angiogenesis and highlight ELTD1 as key player in blood vessel formation. PMID:23871637

  20. Anandamide inhibits endothelin-1 production by human cultured endothelial cells: a new vascular action of this endocannabinoid.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Ana María; Llanos, Miguel; Tamayo, Daniela; Hirsch, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonist anandamide (AEA) exerts vascular effects such as vasodilatation and hypotension. In this study, we determined the effect of AEA on endothelin-1 production by cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Anandamide (>or=5 micromol/l) significantly decreased endothelin-1 production in a dose-dependent manner, a response not affected by the specific CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist SR-141716A. Adenosine, via activation of adenosine receptors (also targets for SR-141716A), was not involved in these effects. Conversely, AEA increased nitric oxide (NO) production, an effect inhibited by SR-141716A, indicating the involvement of CB1 receptors. Therefore, we hypothesize that AEA effects on endothelial cells may lead to vasodilatation through independent concerted mechanisms, involving a non-CB1 receptor-dependent inhibition of endothelin-1 production and a CB1-mediated increase of NO.

  1. A core human primary tumor angiogenesis signature identifies the endothelial orphan receptor ELTD1 as a key regulator of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Masiero, Massimo; Simões, Filipa Costa; Han, Hee Dong; Snell, Cameron; Peterkin, Tessa; Bridges, Esther; Mangala, Lingegowda S; Wu, Sherry Yen-Yao; Pradeep, Sunila; Li, Demin; Han, Cheng; Dalton, Heather; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Tuynman, Jurriaan B; Mortensen, Neil; Li, Ji-Liang; Patient, Roger; Sood, Anil K; Banham, Alison H; Harris, Adrian L; Buffa, Francesca M

    2013-08-12

    Limited clinical benefits derived from anti-VEGF therapy have driven the identification of new targets involved in tumor angiogenesis. Here, we report an integrative meta-analysis to define the transcriptional program underlying angiogenesis in human cancer. This approach identified ELTD1, an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor whose expression is induced by VEGF/bFGF and repressed by DLL4 signaling. Extensive analysis of multiple cancer types demonstrates significant upregulation of ELTD1 in tumor-associated endothelial cells, with a higher expression correlating with favorable prognosis. Importantly, ELTD1 silencing impairs endothelial sprouting and vessel formation in vitro and in vivo, drastically reducing tumor growth and greatly improving survival. Collectively, these results provide insight into the regulation of tumor angiogenesis and highlight ELTD1 as key player in blood vessel formation.

  2. Towards hemerythrin-based blood substitutes: comparative performance to hemoglobin on human leukocytes and umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Fodor, Eva; Mot, Augustin; Deac, Florina; Arkosi, Mariann; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2011-06-01

    Hemerythrin is a dioxygen-carrying protein whose oxidative/nitrosative stress-related reactivity is lower than that of hemoglobin, which may warrant investigation of hemerythrin as raw material for artificial oxygen carriers ('blood substitutes'). We report here the first biological tests for hemerythrin and its chemical derivatives, comparing their performance with that of a representative competitor, glutaraldehyde-polymerized bovine hemoglobin. Hemerythrin (native or derivatized) exhibits a proliferative effect on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) cultures, as opposed to a slight inhibitory effect of hemoglobin. A similar positive effect is displayed on human lymphocytes by glutaraldehyde-polymerized hemerythrin, but not by native or polyethylene glycol-derivatized hemerythrin.

  3. Artesunate reduces chicken chorioallantoic membrane neovascularisation and exhibits antiangiogenic and apoptotic activity on human microvascular dermal endothelial cell.

    PubMed

    Huan-huan, Chen; Li-Li, You; Shang-Bin, Li

    2004-08-10

    Artesunate (ART), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin extracted from the Chinese herb Artemisia annua, is a safe and effective antimalarial drug. ART has now been analyzed for its anti-angiogenic activity in vivo and in vitro. The anti-angiogenic effect in vivo was evaluated on chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) neovascularisation model. ART started to significantly inhibit CAM angiogenesis at a low concentration of 10 nm/100 microl/egg, and completely inhibited the angiogenesis at 80 nm/100 microl/egg. The inhibitory effect of in vitro angiogenesis was tested on the models of proliferation and differentiation of human microvascular dermal endothelial cell line, an important representive of endothelial cells, as well as immunocytochemistry assay for two major VEGF receptors (Flt-1 and KDR/flk-1) expressions. The results showed that ART could remarkably inhibit proliferation and differentiation of endothelial cells in a dose-dependent form in a range of 12.5-100 microM. ART also could reduce Flt-1 and KDR/flk-1 expressions in a range of 0.1-0.5 microM. Furthermore, we examined the apoptosis of human microvascular dermal endothelial cell line induced by ART. The apoptosis was detected by morphological assay of ethidium bromide (EB)/acridine orange (AO) dual staining as well as DNA fragmentation assay of TUNEL labeling and quantified by flowcytometric PI assay. Our results suggest that the antiangiogenic effect induced by ART might occur by the induction of cellular apoptosis. These findings and the known low toxicity indicated ART might be a promising candidate for angiogenesis inhibitors. PMID:15219940

  4. Candida albicans triggers the expression of inflammatory genes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Feng, Wenli; Zhang, Jinyu; Xi, Zhiqin; Ma, Yan; Wang, Yanqing; Ji, Ying; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the pathogenesis of Candida albicans in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and to screen for aberrantly expressed genes during the process of infection. GSE7355 (accession no.) was downloaded from the National Center of Biotechnology Information Gene Expression Omnibus database and used to identify the differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) between the two groups, which included 4 samples from an untreated HUVEC control group, and 4 samples from HUVECs exposed to C. albicans. Subsequently, the gene ontology (GO) function package was used to perform GO and pathway enrichment analysis, prior to the extraction of DEG correlations in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using the String database. In total, 77 DEGs were identified, including 69 upregulated and 8 downregulated DEGs in the C. albicans-infected HUVEC samples. DEGs were significantly enriched in response to external stimuli and chemokine activity. In addition, DEG FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS) and interleukin (IL)-6 were significantly enriched in the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway. Nuclear factor κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells 2 (NFKB2) was significantly enriched in the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. In the interaction network of DEGs, according data included in the KEGG database, FOS and NFKB2 had higher connectivity degrees. Notably, FOS, IL-6 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 were demonstrated to have higher connectivity degrees in the PPI network. FOS, IL-6 and NFKB2 may be important genes for C. albicans infection in HUVECs, and these genes may act as therapeutic targets to treat patients infected with C. albicans. PMID:27602073

  5. Alpha-tocopherol inhibits agonist-induced monocytic cell adhesion to cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Faruqi, R; de la Motte, C; DiCorleto, P E

    1994-01-01

    Antioxidants have been proposed to be anti-atherosclerotic agents; however, the mechanisms underlying their beneficial effects are poorly understood. We have examined the effect of alpha-tocopherol (alpha-tcp) on one cellular event in atherosclerotic plaque development, monocyte adhesion to stimulated endothelial cells (ECs). Human umbilical vein ECs were pretreated with alpha-tcp before stimulation with known agonists of monocyte adhesion: IL-1 (10 ng/ml), LPS (10 ng/ml), thrombin (30 U/ml), or PMA (10 nM). Agonist-induced monocytic cell adhesion, but not basal adhesion, was inhibited in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by alpha-tcp. The IC50 of alpha-tcp on an IL-1-induced response was 45 microM. The inhibition correlated with a decrease in steady state levels of E-selectin mRNA and cell surface expression of E-selectin which is consistent with the ability of a monoclonal antibody to E-selectin to inhibit monocytic cell adhesion in this system. Probucol (50 microM) and N-acetylcysteine (20 mM) also inhibited agonist-induced monocytic cell adhesion; whereas, several other antioxidants had no significant effect. Protein kinase C (PKC) does not appear to play a role in the alpha-tcp effect since no suppression of phosphorylation of PKC substrates was observed. Activation of the transcription factor NF-kappa B is reported to be necessary but not sufficient for E-selectin expression in EC. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays failed to show an alpha-tcp-induced decrease in activation of this transcription factor after cytokine stimulation. It has been hypothesized that alpha-tcp acts as an anti-atherosclerotic molecule by inhibiting generation of oxidized LDL--a putative triggering molecule in the atherosclerotic process. Our results point to a novel alternative mechanism of action of alpha-tcp. Images PMID:7518838

  6. Mechanism of angiogenic effects of saponin from ginseng Radix rubra in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Morisaki, N.; Watanabe, S.; Tezuka, M.; Zenibayashi, M.; Shiina, R.; Koyama, N.; Kanzaki, T.; Saito, Y.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of saponin from Ginseng Radix rubra on angiogenesis (tube formation) and its key steps (protease secretion, proliferation and migration) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were examined to elucidate the mechanism of the tissue repairing effects of Ginseng Radix rubra. The effect on a wound healing model was also studied. 2. Tube formation was measured by an in vitro system. The activity and immunoreactivity of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) as a protease for angiogenesis and the immunoreactivity of its inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), were measured in conditioned medium of HUVEC stimulated for 24 h with saponin. Cell proliferation was measured by counting the cell numbers at 2-7 days after seeding. Migration was measured by Boyden's chamber method. The effect on wound healing was studied in the skin of diabetic rats. 3. Saponin at 10-100 micrograms ml-1 significantly stimulated tube formation by HUVEC in a dose-dependent manner. Saponin in a similar concentration-range increased the secretion of tPA from HUVEC as estimated by immunoreactivity and enzyme activity. On the other hand, PAI-1 immunoreactivity was slightly increased at 10 micrograms ml-1 of saponin, but then was significantly decreased at 50 and 100 micrograms ml-1. Cell proliferation was only slightly enhanced by 1-100 micrograms ml-1 of saponin, but migration was significantly enhanced by 10-100 micrograms ml-1 in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, saponin stimulated wound healing with enhanced angiogenesis in vivo.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 Figure 8 PMID:7582543

  7. Measurement of shear stress-mediated intracellular calcium dynamics in human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jafarnejad, M.; Cromer, W. E.; Kaunas, R. R.; Zhang, S. L.; Zawieja, D. C.

    2015-01-01

    The shear stress applied to lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) by lymph flow changes dramatically under normal conditions as well as in response to disease conditions and immune reactions. In general, LEC are known to regulate the contraction frequency and strength of lymphatic pumping in response to shear stress. Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) is an important factor that regulates lymphatic contraction characteristics. In this study, we measured changes in the [Ca2+]i under different shear stress levels and determined the source of this calcium signal. Briefly, human dermal LEC were cultured in custom-made microchannels for 3 days before loading with 2 µM fura-2 AM, a ratiometric calcium dye to measure [Ca2+]i. Step changes in shear stress resulted in a rapid increase in [Ca2+]i followed by a gradual return to the basal level and sometimes below the initial baseline (45.2 ± 2.2 nM). The [Ca2+]i reached a peak at 126.2 ± 5.6 nM for 10 dyn/cm2 stimulus, whereas the peak was only 71.8 ± 5.4 nM for 1 dyn/cm2 stimulus, indicating that the calcium signal depends on the magnitude of shear stress. Removal of the extracellular calcium from the buffer or pharmocological blockade of calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels significantly reduced the peak [Ca2+]i, demonstrating a role of extracellular calcium entry. Inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium pumps showed the importance of intracellular calcium stores in the initiation of this signal. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the shear-mediated calcium signal is dependent on the magnitude of the shear and involves ER store calcium release and extracellular calcium entry. PMID:25617358

  8. Effects of asiaticoside on human umbilical vein endothelial cell apoptosis induced by Aβ1-42.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo; Cai, Pengfei; Zhou, Jie; Liu, Minghua; Jiang, Xian

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the potential role of asiaticoside (AS) in Aβ1-42-induced apoptosis on the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC). HUVEC cells were divided into Aβ1-42 group (treated with 50 μM Aβ1-42), AS groups (treated with 50 μM Aβ1-42 and 10 mM, 1 mM, 0.1 mM or 0.01 mM AS), and negative control group (without treatments). Cell proliferation was detected by CCK-8 assay. Apoptosis was analyzed by Hochest33342 staining and flow cytometry. Western Blot was carried out to detect the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax protein. Aβ1-42 treatment inhibited cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis of HUVEC cells. Interestingly, AS at concentrations of 10 mM, 1 mM, 0.1 mM and 0.01 mM reversed the effects of Aβ1-42 by increasing cell survival rate and reducing apoptosis of HUVEC cells. Furthermore, the expression of Bcl-2 protein was increased whereas the expression of Bax protein was decreased in AS groups. Compared with Aβ1-42 group, the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax was significantly increased in AS groups (P < 0.05). These results suggested that AS may be effective in protecting cells from damage caused by aggregated Aβ1-42. And this effect may be attributed to the increase of Bcl-2 and decrease of Bax under AS treatment.

  9. Effects of asiaticoside on human umbilical vein endothelial cell apoptosis induced by Aβ1-42

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuo; Cai, Pengfei; Zhou, Jie; Liu, Minghua; Jiang, Xian

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the potential role of asiaticoside (AS) in Aβ1-42-induced apoptosis on the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC). HUVEC cells were divided into Aβ1-42 group (treated with 50 μM Aβ1-42), AS groups (treated with 50 μM Aβ1-42 and 10 mM, 1 mM, 0.1 mM or 0.01 mM AS), and negative control group (without treatments). Cell proliferation was detected by CCK-8 assay. Apoptosis was analyzed by Hochest33342 staining and flow cytometry. Western Blot was carried out to detect the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax protein. Aβ1-42 treatment inhibited cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis of HUVEC cells. Interestingly, AS at concentrations of 10 mM, 1 mM, 0.1 mM and 0.01 mM reversed the effects of Aβ1-42 by increasing cell survival rate and reducing apoptosis of HUVEC cells. Furthermore, the expression of Bcl-2 protein was increased whereas the expression of Bax protein was decreased in AS groups. Compared with Aβ1-42 group, the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax was significantly increased in AS groups (P < 0.05). These results suggested that AS may be effective in protecting cells from damage caused by aggregated Aβ1-42. And this effect may be attributed to the increase of Bcl-2 and decrease of Bax under AS treatment. PMID:26629083

  10. Vascular endothelial growth factor and nitric oxide synthase expression in human tooth germ development.

    PubMed

    Mastrangelo, F; Sberna, M T; Tettamanti, L; Cantatore, G; Tagliabue, A; Gherlone, E

    2016-01-01

    Vascular Endothelia Growth Factor (VEGF) and Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) expression, were evaluated in human tooth germs at two different stages of embryogenesis, to clarify the role of angiogenesis during tooth tissue differentiation and growth. Seventy-two third molar germ specimens were selected during oral surgery. Thirty-six were in the early stage and 36 in the later stage of tooth development. The samples were evaluated with Semi-quantitative Reverse Transcription-Polymerase chain Reaction analyses (RT-PcR), Western blot analysis (WB) and immunohistochemical analysis. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis showed a VEGF and NOS 1-2-3 positive reaction in all samples analysed. VEGF high positive decrease reaction was observed in stellate reticulum cells, ameloblast and odontoblast clusters in early stage compared to later stage of tooth germ development. Comparable VEGF expression was observed in endothelial cells of early and advanced stage growth. NOS1 and NOS3 expressions showed a high increased value in stellate reticulum cells, and ameloblast and odontoblast clusters in advanced stage compared to early stage of development. The absence or only moderate positive reaction of NOS2 was detected in all the different tissues. Positive NOS2 expression showed in advanced stage of tissue development compared to early stage. The action of VEGF and NOS molecules are important mediators of angiogenesis during dental tissue development. VEGF high positive expression in stellate reticulum cells in the early stage of tooth development compared to the later stage and the other cell types, suggests a critical role of the stellate reticulum during dental embryo-morphogenesis.

  11. Intracellular induction of the Bartonella henselae virB operon by human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Schmiederer, M; Arcenas, R; Widen, R; Valkov, N; Anderson, B

    2001-10-01

    One of the more recently identified bacterial exportation systems is the type IV secretion mechanism, which is characterized by a multiprotein complex that spans the inner and outer bacterial membranes and contains a pilin component. The most thoroughly studied type IV secretion system is encoded by the virB operon of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. In Bartonella henselae, 8 of the 10 virB operon genes share extensive homology and arrangement with the virB operon of A. tumefaciens. Sequencing of the region upstream of the B. henselae virB2 gene revealed a region with sequence homology to the vir box of A. tumefaciens. This possible promoter region was cloned upstream of the green fluorescent protein reporter gene in the promoterless vector pANT3 and used to transform B. henselae. Minimal reporter gene expression was seen in the transformed bacteria cultivated in the absence of host cells, but expression was strongly induced in intracellular bacteria cultivated with human microvascular endothelial cells. Deletion of an 87-bp fragment, which contained the putative vir box from the 5' end of the promoter region, diminished intracellular induction of the reporter gene. Host cell induction of the 17-kDa antigen gene, which replaces virB5 in B. henselae, was also demonstrated at the protein level using specific antiserum. Thus, expression of the virB genes of B. henselae is induced in bacteria, which have invaded host cells, through a mechanism that may be similar to the environment-sensing mechanism found in the virB operon of A. tumefaciens. PMID:11553594

  12. Influence of gestational diabetes mellitus on human umbilical vein endothelial cell miRNA.

    PubMed

    Tryggestad, Jeanie B; Vishwanath, Anu; Jiang, Shaoning; Mallappa, Ashwini; Teague, April M; Takahashi, Yusuke; Thompson, David M; Chernausek, Steven D

    2016-11-01

    We aimed to identify miRNAs whose expression levels in fetal tissues are altered by exposure to a diabetic milieu and elucidate the impact on target protein expression. Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects both immediate and future disease risk in the offspring. We hypothesized that GDM alters miRNA expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) that may influence metabolic processes. A cross-sectional design compared differences in miRNA expression in HUVECs and target protein abundance in placentae between infants of women with GDM (IGDM) and infants born to normoglycaemic controls. miRNAs were identified using microarray profiling and literature review and validated by quantitative PCR (qPCR). In vitro transfection studies explored the impact of the miRNA on target protein expression. Expression of seven miRNA species, miR-30c-5p, miR-452-5p, miR-126-3p, miR-130b-3p, miR-148a-3p, miR-let-7a-5p and miR-let-7g-5p, was higher in the HUVECs of IGDM. Abundance of the catalytic subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase α1 (AMPKα1) was decreased in the HUVECs and BeWo cells (transformed trophoblast cell line) transfected with miR-130b and miR-148a mimics. AMPKα1 expression was also decreased in placental tissues of IGDM. The expression of several miRNAs were altered by in utero exposure to DM in infants of women whose dysglycaemia was very well controlled by current standards. Decreased expression of AMPKα1 as a result of increased levels of miR-130b and miR-148a may potentially explain the decrease in fat oxidation we reported in infants at 1 month of age and, if persistent, may predispose offspring to future metabolic disease. PMID:27562513

  13. PEGylated lysozymes with anti-septic effects in human endothelial cells and in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonhwa; Park, Eun Ji; Kwak, Soyoung; Kim, Yejin; Na, Dong Hee; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2015-04-17

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) was recently shown to be an important extracellular mediator of severe vascular inflammatory disease, sepsis. Lysozyme (LYZ) has been shown to bind to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and have a potential for playing a role in the therapy of inflammatory diseases. However, the effect of LYZ on HMGB1-induced septic response has not been investigated. Moreover, PEGylation effects on the antiseptic activity of LYZ are not known. Here, we show, for the first time, the anti-septic effects of PEGylated LYZ (PEG-LYZ) in HMGB1-mediated inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. Among four mono-PEGylated LYZs with different PEGylation sites (N-terminus, Lys(13), Lys(33), and Lys(97)), N-terminally PEGylated LYZ showed the highest activity. Subsequently, among three N-terminally PEGylated LYZs prepared with aldehyde-activated PEGs of 5, 10, and 20 kDa, 5 kDa-PEG-conjugated LYZ (P5-K(1)-LYZ) showed the highest antiseptic activity. The data showed that P5-K(1)-LYZ post-treatment effectively suppressed LPS-mediated release of HMGB1. P5-K(1)-LYZ also inhibited HMGB1-mediated hyperpermeability in human endothelial cells. Furthermore, P5-K(1)-LYZ reduced the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced release of HMGB1 and septic mortality. Collectively, these results suggest P5-K(1)-LYZ as a candidate therapeutic agent for the treatment of vascular inflammatory diseases via inhibition of the HMGB1 signaling pathway. PMID:25769950

  14. Propagation of human corneal endothelial cells: a novel dual media approach.

    PubMed

    Peh, Gary S L; Chng, Zhenzhi; Ang, Heng-Pei; Cheng, Terence Y D; Adnan, Khadijah; Seah, Xin-Yi; George, Benjamin L; Toh, Kah-Peng; Tan, Donald T; Yam, Gary H F; Colman, Alan; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2015-01-01

    Corneal endothelium-associated corneal blindness is the most common indication for corneal transplantation. Restorative corneal transplant surgery is the only option to reverse the blindness, but a global shortage of donor material remains an issue. There are immense clinical interests in the development of alternative treatment strategies to alleviate current reliance on donor materials. For such endeavors, ex vivo propagation of human corneal endothelial cells (hCECs) is required, but current methodology lacks consistency, with expanded hCECs losing cellular morphology to a mesenchymal-like transformation. In this study, we describe a novel dual media culture approach for the in vitro expansion of primary hCECs. Initial characterization included analysis of growth dynamics of hCECs grown in either proliferative (M4) or maintenance (M5) medium. Subsequent comparisons were performed on isolated hCECs cultured in M4 alone against cells expanded using the dual media approach. Further characterizations were performed using immunocytochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, and gene expression microarray. At the third passage, results showed that hCECs propagated using the dual media approach were homogeneous in appearance, retained their unique polygonal cellular morphology, and expressed higher levels of corneal endothelium-associated markers in comparison to hCECs cultured in M4 alone, which were heterogeneous and fibroblastic in appearance. Finally, for hCECs cultured using the dual media approach, global gene expression and pathway analysis between confluent hCECs before and after 7-day exposure to M5 exhibited differential gene expression associated predominately with cell proliferation and wound healing. These findings showed that the propagation of primary hCECs using the novel dual media approach presented in this study is a consistent method to obtain bona fide hCECs. This, in turn, will elicit greater confidence in facilitating downstream development of

  15. Red Raspberry Phenols Inhibit Angiogenesis: A Morphological and Subcellular Analysis Upon Human Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sousa, M; Machado, V; Costa, R; Figueira, M E; Sepodes, B; Barata, P; Ribeiro, L; Soares, R

    2016-07-01

    Polyphenols are a class of natural compounds whose potential as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-angiogenesis has been reported in many pathological conditions. Red raspberry extract, rich in polyphenols, has been reported to exert anti-inflammatory effects and prevent cell proliferation in distinct animal models. However, the signaling pathways involved remain unknown. Herein, we used human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) to determine the influence of red raspberry phenolic compound extract concentrations, ranging from 10 to 250 µg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL, on endothelium viability (MTS assay), proliferation (BrdU incorporation), migration (injury assay), and capillary-like structures formation (Matrigel assay). Protein expression in cell lysates was determined by Western blot analysis. We showed that red raspberry extracts reduced cell viability (GI50  = 87,64 ± 6,59 μg GAE/mL) and proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. A significant abrogation of cells ability to migrate to injured areas, even at low concentrations, was observed by injury assay. Cell assembly into capillary-like structures on Matrigel also decreased in a dose dependent-manner for higher extract concentrations, as well as the number of branching points per unit of area. Protein expression analysis showed a dose-dependent decrease in Phospho-VEGFR2 expression, implying abrogation of VEGF signaling activity. We also showed for the first time that red raspberry phenolic compounds induce the rearrangement of filamentous actin cytoskeleton, with an isotropy increase found for higher testing concentrations. Taken together, our findings corroborate the anti-angiogenic potential of red raspberry phenolic compounds and provide new insights into their mode of action upon endothelium. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1604-1612, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Delivery of Molecules into Human Corneal Endothelial Cells by Carbon Nanoparticles Activated by Femtosecond Laser

    PubMed Central

    Jumelle, Clotilde; Mauclair, Cyril; Houzet, Julien; Bernard, Aurélien; He, Zhiguo; Forest, Fabien; Peoc’h, Michel; Acquart, Sophie; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (CECs) form a monolayer at the innermost face of the cornea and are the engine of corneal transparency. Nevertheless, they are a vulnerable population incapable of regeneration in humans, and their diseases are responsible for one third of corneal grafts performed worldwide. Donor corneas are stored in eye banks for security and quality controls, then delivered to surgeons. This period could allow specific interventions to modify the characteristics of CECs in order to increase their proliferative capacity, increase their resistance to apoptosis, or release immunosuppressive molecules. Delivery of molecules specifically into CECs during storage would therefore open up new therapeutic perspectives. For clinical applications, physical methods have a more favorable individual and general benefit/risk ratio than most biological vectors, but are often less efficient. The delivery of molecules into cells by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses is a promising recent technique developed on non-adherent cells. The nanoparticles are partly consummated by the reaction releasing CO and H2 gas bubbles responsible for the shockwave at the origin of cell transient permeation. Our aim was to develop an experimental setting to deliver a small molecule (calcein) into the monolayer of adherent CECs. We confirmed that increased laser fluence and time exposure increased uptake efficiency while keeping cell mortality below 5%. We optimized the area covered by the laser beam by using a motorized stage allowing homogeneous scanning of the cell culture surface using a spiral path. Calcein uptake reached median efficiency of 54.5% (range 50.3–57.3) of CECs with low mortality (0.5%, range (0.55–1.0)). After sorting by flow cytometry, CECs having uptaken calcein remained viable and presented normal morphological characteristics. Delivery of molecules into CECs by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser could prove useful for

  17. Synthesis, intracellular processing and secretion of thrombospondin in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Vischer, P; Beeck, H; Voss, B

    1985-12-16

    The biosynthesis of thrombospondin, a glycoprotein first described in platelets, has been studied in human endothelial cells. This glycoprotein has a molecular mass of 450 kDa. It is secreted and incorporated into the extracellular matrix of several cell types in culture. Pulse-chase experiments with [3H]leucine were performed and the synthesis and secretion of the glycoprotein was studied by immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The results of these experiments show that the three subunits of thrombospondin are identical in molecular mass. During synthesis there is a small but significant increase in molecular mass within 20 min after pulse labeling. The early form of thrombospondin is sensitive to endoglucosaminidase H treatment, indicating that a transformation of the oligosaccharide structures from 'high-mannose' to 'complex' structures takes place. Within 60 min after synthesis only the mature form of the glycoprotein is secreted into the medium. In the presence of tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-glycosylation, there is a reduction in molecular mass of the subunit from 165 kDa to 155 kDa. Pulse-chase experiments in the presence of tunicamycin supported the conclusion that the carbohydrate part is processed during biosynthesis. Inhibition of glycosylation had a pronounced effect on the secretion of thrombospondin. The decreased occurrence of thrombospondin in the culture medium seemed to be due to a high intracellular degradation rate of unglycosylated thrombospondin. Characterization of the glycopeptide structures of thrombospondin metabolically labeled with [3H]mannose by Bio-Gel P-4 and concanavalin-A-Sepharose column chromatography revealed that the oligosaccharide structures of the cellular and secreted forms of thrombospondin differ in their composition. PMID:3935437

  18. Delivery of Molecules into Human Corneal Endothelial Cells by Carbon Nanoparticles Activated by Femtosecond Laser.

    PubMed

    Jumelle, Clotilde; Mauclair, Cyril; Houzet, Julien; Bernard, Aurélien; He, Zhiguo; Forest, Fabien; Peoc'h, Michel; Acquart, Sophie; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (CECs) form a monolayer at the innermost face of the cornea and are the engine of corneal transparency. Nevertheless, they are a vulnerable population incapable of regeneration in humans, and their diseases are responsible for one third of corneal grafts performed worldwide. Donor corneas are stored in eye banks for security and quality controls, then delivered to surgeons. This period could allow specific interventions to modify the characteristics of CECs in order to increase their proliferative capacity, increase their resistance to apoptosis, or release immunosuppressive molecules. Delivery of molecules specifically into CECs during storage would therefore open up new therapeutic perspectives. For clinical applications, physical methods have a more favorable individual and general benefit/risk ratio than most biological vectors, but are often less efficient. The delivery of molecules into cells by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses is a promising recent technique developed on non-adherent cells. The nanoparticles are partly consummated by the reaction releasing CO and H2 gas bubbles responsible for the shockwave at the origin of cell transient permeation. Our aim was to develop an experimental setting to deliver a small molecule (calcein) into the monolayer of adherent CECs. We confirmed that increased laser fluence and time exposure increased uptake efficiency while keeping cell mortality below 5%. We optimized the area covered by the laser beam by using a motorized stage allowing homogeneous scanning of the cell culture surface using a spiral path. Calcein uptake reached median efficiency of 54.5% (range 50.3-57.3) of CECs with low mortality (0.5%, range (0.55-1.0)). After sorting by flow cytometry, CECs having uptaken calcein remained viable and presented normal morphological characteristics. Delivery of molecules into CECs by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser could prove useful for future

  19. Propagation of human corneal endothelial cells: a novel dual media approach.

    PubMed

    Peh, Gary S L; Chng, Zhenzhi; Ang, Heng-Pei; Cheng, Terence Y D; Adnan, Khadijah; Seah, Xin-Yi; George, Benjamin L; Toh, Kah-Peng; Tan, Donald T; Yam, Gary H F; Colman, Alan; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2015-01-01

    Corneal endothelium-associated corneal blindness is the most common indication for corneal transplantation. Restorative corneal transplant surgery is the only option to reverse the blindness, but a global shortage of donor material remains an issue. There are immense clinical interests in the development of alternative treatment strategies to alleviate current reliance on donor materials. For such endeavors, ex vivo propagation of human corneal endothelial cells (hCECs) is required, but current methodology lacks consistency, with expanded hCECs losing cellular morphology to a mesenchymal-like transformation. In this study, we describe a novel dual media culture approach for the in vitro expansion of primary hCECs. Initial characterization included analysis of growth dynamics of hCECs grown in either proliferative (M4) or maintenance (M5) medium. Subsequent comparisons were performed on isolated hCECs cultured in M4 alone against cells expanded using the dual media approach. Further characterizations were performed using immunocytochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, and gene expression microarray. At the third passage, results showed that hCECs propagated using the dual media approach were homogeneous in appearance, retained their unique polygonal cellular morphology, and expressed higher levels of corneal endothelium-associated markers in comparison to hCECs cultured in M4 alone, which were heterogeneous and fibroblastic in appearance. Finally, for hCECs cultured using the dual media approach, global gene expression and pathway analysis between confluent hCECs before and after 7-day exposure to M5 exhibited differential gene expression associated predominately with cell proliferation and wound healing. These findings showed that the propagation of primary hCECs using the novel dual media approach presented in this study is a consistent method to obtain bona fide hCECs. This, in turn, will elicit greater confidence in facilitating downstream development of

  20. Delivery of Molecules into Human Corneal Endothelial Cells by Carbon Nanoparticles Activated by Femtosecond Laser.

    PubMed

    Jumelle, Clotilde; Mauclair, Cyril; Houzet, Julien; Bernard, Aurélien; He, Zhiguo; Forest, Fabien; Peoc'h, Michel; Acquart, Sophie; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (CECs) form a monolayer at the innermost face of the cornea and are the engine of corneal transparency. Nevertheless, they are a vulnerable population incapable of regeneration in humans, and their diseases are responsible for one third of corneal grafts performed worldwide. Donor corneas are stored in eye banks for security and quality controls, then delivered to surgeons. This period could allow specific interventions to modify the characteristics of CECs in order to increase their proliferative capacity, increase their resistance to apoptosis, or release immunosuppressive molecules. Delivery of molecules specifically into CECs during storage would therefore open up new therapeutic perspectives. For clinical applications, physical methods have a more favorable individual and general benefit/risk ratio than most biological vectors, but are often less efficient. The delivery of molecules into cells by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses is a promising recent technique developed on non-adherent cells. The nanoparticles are partly consummated by the reaction releasing CO and H2 gas bubbles responsible for the shockwave at the origin of cell transient permeation. Our aim was to develop an experimental setting to deliver a small molecule (calcein) into the monolayer of adherent CECs. We confirmed that increased laser fluence and time exposure increased uptake efficiency while keeping cell mortality below 5%. We optimized the area covered by the laser beam by using a motorized stage allowing homogeneous scanning of the cell culture surface using a spiral path. Calcein uptake reached median efficiency of 54.5% (range 50.3-57.3) of CECs with low mortality (0.5%, range (0.55-1.0)). After sorting by flow cytometry, CECs having uptaken calcein remained viable and presented normal morphological characteristics. Delivery of molecules into CECs by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser could prove useful for future

  1. Comparison of Superb Micro-Vascular Ultrasound Imaging (SMI) and Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) for Detection of Endoleaks After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR)

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Marcin; Tomczak, Jolanta; Snoch-Ziółkiewicz, Magdalena; Dzieciuchowicz, Łukasz; Strauss, Ewa; Oszkinis, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 68 Final Diagnosis: Unusual clinical course Symptoms: None Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Angio CT Specialty: Surgery Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: High-resolution contrast-enhanced ultrasound is one of methods used in the detection and characterization of endoleaks, which is a frequent complication after EVAR. A new technology provided by Toshiba’s AplioTM 500 ultrasound system, called Superb Micro-Vascular Imaging (SMI), is dedicated specifically to imaging very low flow states and appears to be a promising new method for detection of endoleaks. Case Report: After endovascular treatment, a 68-year-old patient who had stent-graft implantation underwent clinical examinations, including contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), superb micro-vascular imaging (SMI), and computed tomographic angiography (CTA), revealing additional information about abnormal blood flow localized in the periphery of the sack of the left common iliac artery aneurysm. By using CEUS and SMI, the endoleak was clearly visible. Conclusions: This case report illustrates the potential clinical value of this advanced Doppler technology (SMI) and how it could influence clinical management. PMID:26806053

  2. Vascular progenitor cells isolated from human embryonic stem cells give rise to endothelial and smooth muscle like cells and form vascular networks in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lino S; Gerecht, Sharon; Shieh, Hester F; Watson, Nicki; Rupnick, Maria A; Dallabrida, Susan M; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Langer, Robert

    2007-08-01

    We report that human embryonic stem cells contain a population of vascular progenitor cells that have the ability to differentiate into endothelial-like and smooth muscle (SM)-like cells. Vascular progenitor cells were isolated from EBs grown in suspension for 10 days and were characterized by expression of the endothelial/hematopoietic marker CD34 (CD34+ cells). When these cells are subsequently cultured in EGM-2 (endothelial growth medium) supplemented with vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (50 ng/mL), they give rise to endothelial-like cells characterized by a cobblestone cell morphology, expression of endothelial markers (platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1, CD34, KDR/Flk-1, vascular endothelial cadherin, von Willebrand factor), incorporation of acetylated low-density lipoprotein, and formation of capillary-like structures when placed in Matrigel. In contrast, when CD34+ cells are cultured in EGM-2 supplemented with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (50 ng/mL), they give rise to SM-like cells characterized by spindle-shape morphology, expression of SM cell markers (alpha-SM actin, SM myosin heavy chain, calponin, caldesmon, SM alpha-22), and the ability to contract and relax in response to common pharmacological agents such as carbachol and atropine but rarely form capillary-like structures when placed in Matrigel. Implantation studies in nude mice show that both cell types contribute to the formation of human microvasculature. Some microvessels contained mouse blood cells, which indicates functional integration with host vasculature. Therefore, the vascular progenitors isolated from human embryonic stem cells using methods established in the present study could provide a means to examine the mechanisms of endothelial and SM cell development, and they could also provide a potential source of cells for vascular tissue engineering.

  3. Design and physicochemical characterization of poly(amidoamine) nanoparticles and the toxicological evaluation in human endothelial cells: applications to peptide delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Coué, Grégory; Freese, Christian; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, C James; Pickl, Karin E; Sinner, Frank M; Engbersen, Johan F J

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated nanoparticles formulated by self-assembly of a biodegradable poly(amidoamine) (PAA) and a fluorescently labeled peptide, in their capacity to internalize in endothelial cells and deliver the peptide, with possible applications for brain drug delivery. The nanoparticles were characterized in terms of size, surface charge, and loading efficiency, and were applied on human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (Huvec) cells. Cell-internalization and cytotoxicity experiments showed that the PAA-based nanocomplexes were essentially nontoxic, and the peptide was successfully internalized into cells. The results indicate that these PAAs have an excellent property as nontoxic carriers for intracellular protein and peptide delivery, and provide opportunities for novel applications in the delivery of peptides to endothelial cells of the brain.

  4. Anti inflammatory and anti angiogenic effect of black raspberry extract on human esophageal and intestinal microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Medda, Rituparna; Lyros, Orestis; Schmidt, Jamie L; Jovanovic, Nebojsa; Nie, Linghui; Link, Benjamin J; Otterson, Mary F; Stoner, Gary D; Shaker, Reza; Rafiee, Parvaneh

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenolic compounds (anthocyanins, flavonoid glycosides) in berries prevent the initiation, promotion, and progression of carcinogenesis in rat's digestive tract and esophagus, in part, via anti-inflammatory pathways. Angiogenesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation and tumorigenesis. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic effects of black raspberry extract (BRE) on two organ specific primary human intestinal microvascular endothelial cells, (HIMEC) and human esophageal microvascular endothelial cells (HEMEC), isolated from surgically resected human intestinal and donor discarded esophagus, respectively. HEMEC and HIMEC were stimulated with TNF-α/IL-1β with or without BRE. The anti-inflammatory effects of BRE were assessed based upon COX-2, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 gene and protein expression, PGE2 production, NFκB p65 subunit nuclear translocation as well as endothelial cell-leukocyte adhesion. The anti-angiogenic effects of BRE were assessed on cell migration, proliferation and tube formation following VEGF stimulation as well as on activation of Akt, MAPK and JNK signaling pathways. BRE inhibited TNF-α/IL-1β-induced NFκB p65 nuclear translocation, PGE2 production, up-regulation of COX-2, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 gene and protein expression and leukocyte binding in HEMEC but not in HIMEC. BRE attenuated VEGF-induced cell migration, proliferation and tube formation in both HEMEC and HIMEC. The anti-angiogenic effect of BRE is mediated by inhibition of Akt, MAPK and JNK phosphorylations. BRE exerted differential anti-inflammatory effects between HEMEC and HIMEC following TNF-α/IL-1β activation whereas demonstrated similar anti-angiogenic effects following VEGF stimulation in both cell lines. These findings may provide more insight into the anti-tumorigenic capacities of BRE in human disease and cancer.

  5. Effects on Nitric Oxide Production of Urolithins, Gut-Derived Ellagitannin Metabolites, in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Spigoni, Valentina; Mena, Pedro; Cito, Monia; Fantuzzi, Federica; Bonadonna, Riccardo C; Brighenti, Furio; Dei Cas, Alessandra; Del Rio, Daniele

    2016-08-02

    The consumption of foodstuffs yielding circulating compounds able to maintain endothelial function by improving nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability can be considered as an effective strategy for cardiovascular disease prevention. This work assessed the in vitro effects of urolithin A, urolithin B, and urolithin B-glucuronide, ellagitannin-derived metabolites of colonic origin, on NO release and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activation in primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Urolithins were tested both individually at 15 μM and as a mixture of 5 μM each, at different time points. The biotransformation of these molecules in cell media due to cell metabolism was also evaluated by UHPLC-MS(n). The mix of urolithins at 5 μM significantly increased nitrite/nitrate levels following 24 h of incubation, while single urolithins at 15 μM did not modify NO bioavailability. Both the mix of urolithins at 5 μM and urolithin B-glucuronide at 15 μM activated eNOS expression. All urolithins underwent metabolic reactions, but these were limited to conjugation with sulfate moieties. This study represents a step forward in the understanding of cardiovascular health benefits of ellagitannin-rich foodstuffs and backs the idea that peripheral cells may contribute to urolithin metabolism.

  6. Thrombin mitogenic responses and protein phosphorylation are different in cultured human endothelial cells derived from large and microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, E.; Bikfalvi, A.; Rendu, F.; Toledano, S.L.; Tobelem, G. )

    1989-12-01

    It is well established that thrombin induces various biological responses in endothelial cells derived from large vessels. However, little is known about the effects of thrombin on the microvasculature. Protein phosphorylation may be one of the mechanisms by which an extracellular stimulus initiates cellular events like proliferation. Therefore, we have compared the effects of either human alpha-thrombin or phorbol esters (TPA) on the proliferation or protein phosphorylation in endothelial cells derived from large vessels (umbilical vein, HUVEC) or microvessels (omental tissue, HOMEC). In HOMEC, thrombin did not stimulate cell proliferation and protein phosphorylation while TPA slightly reduced the cell proliferation and induced the phosphorylation of a 27-kDa protein. In contrast, in HUVEC, thrombin or TPA markedly enhanced the cell proliferation and stimulated the phosphorylation of a 59-kDa protein. These data indicate that endothelial cells from large and small vessels respond differently to thrombin and there is a complex and as yet unclear relationship between the proliferation and the protein phosphorylation induced by thrombin.

  7. Ulinastatin attenuates LPS-induced human endothelial cells oxidative damage through suppressing JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunping; Ma, Dandan; Chen, Man; Zhang, Linlin; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Jicheng; Qu, Xin; Wang, Chunting

    2016-06-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress is a main feature observed in the sepsis by increasing endothelial oxidative damage. Many studies have demonstrated that Ulinastatin (UTI) can inhibit pro-inflammatory proteases, decrease inflammatory cytokine levels and suppress oxidative stress. However, the potential molecular mechanism underlying UTI which exerts its antioxidant effect is not well understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of UTI on the LPS-induced oxidative stress and the underlying mechanisms using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). After oxidative stress induced By LPS in HUVECs, the cell viability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cytoplasm were measured. In addition, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were examined. We found that LPS resulted in a profound elevation of ROS production and MDA levels. The decrease in Cu/Zn-SOD protein and increased in Mn-SOD protein were observed in a time- and dose-dependent manner. These responses were suppressed by an addition of UTI. The increase in c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) phosphorylation by LPS in HUVECs was markedly blocked by UTI or JNK inhibitor SP600125. Our results suggest that UTI exerts its anti-oxidant effects by decreasing overproduction of ROS induced by LPS via suppressing JNK/c-Jun phosphorylation. Therefore UTI may play a protective role in vascular endothelial injury induced by oxidative stress such as sepsis. This study may provide insight into a possible molecular mechanism by which Ulinastatin inhibits LPS-induced oxidative stress.

  8. Effects on Nitric Oxide Production of Urolithins, Gut-Derived Ellagitannin Metabolites, in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Spigoni, Valentina; Mena, Pedro; Cito, Monia; Fantuzzi, Federica; Bonadonna, Riccardo C; Brighenti, Furio; Dei Cas, Alessandra; Del Rio, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    The consumption of foodstuffs yielding circulating compounds able to maintain endothelial function by improving nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability can be considered as an effective strategy for cardiovascular disease prevention. This work assessed the in vitro effects of urolithin A, urolithin B, and urolithin B-glucuronide, ellagitannin-derived metabolites of colonic origin, on NO release and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activation in primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Urolithins were tested both individually at 15 μM and as a mixture of 5 μM each, at different time points. The biotransformation of these molecules in cell media due to cell metabolism was also evaluated by UHPLC-MS(n). The mix of urolithins at 5 μM significantly increased nitrite/nitrate levels following 24 h of incubation, while single urolithins at 15 μM did not modify NO bioavailability. Both the mix of urolithins at 5 μM and urolithin B-glucuronide at 15 μM activated eNOS expression. All urolithins underwent metabolic reactions, but these were limited to conjugation with sulfate moieties. This study represents a step forward in the understanding of cardiovascular health benefits of ellagitannin-rich foodstuffs and backs the idea that peripheral cells may contribute to urolithin metabolism. PMID:27490528

  9. The interaction of sodium nitroprusside with human endothelial cells and platelets: nitroprusside and prostacyclin synergistically inhibit platelet function

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, R.I.; Weksler, B.B.; Jaffe, E.A.

    1982-12-01

    Sodium nitroprusside (NP) is a potent vasodilator that also inhibits platelet aggregation. To test the hypothesis that NP causes both of these effects by altering the balance between prostacyclin (PGI2) produced by endothelial cells and thromboxane A2 (TXA2) produced by platelets, we incubated each of these cell types with NP for 5 minutes and assayed the PGI2 and TXA2 produced. NP at pharmacologically achieved doses (0.01--30 micrograms/ml) inhibited platelet aggregation and resultant TXA2 synthesis in a dose- and time-dependent manner (p less than 0.001). The inhibition was not dependent on cAMP production, external calcium concentration, or suppression of TXA2 synthesis. NP did not alter the production of PGI2 by cultured human endothelial cells as measured by radioimmunoassay for 6-Keto-PGF1 alpha, the stable hydrolysis product of PGI2. However, supernates of NP-treated endothelial cells containing low, noninhibitory concentrations of NP unexpectedly inhibited platelet aggregation. This inhibition of platelet aggregation was due to synergy between PGI2 (0.1--3 nM) and NP (p interaction less than 0.03). The synergistic inhibition by NP and PGI2 of platelet aggregation and TXA2 synthesis in vivo may explain some of the beneficial actions of NP in the treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure.

  10. Protective effects of quercetin and taraxasterol against H2O2-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell injury in vitro

    PubMed Central

    YANG, DONGWEI; LIU, XINYE; LIU, MIN; CHI, HAO; LIU, JIRONG; HAN, HUAMIN

    2015-01-01

    Due to the association between inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis, the blockage of the inflammatory process that occurs on the endothelial cells may be a useful way of preventing atherosclerosis. In the present study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to investigate the protective effects of quercetin and taraxasterol against H2O2-induced oxidative damage and inflammation. HUVECs were pretreated with quercetin or taraxasterol at concentrations ranging between 0 and 210 µM for 12 h, prior to being administered different concentrations of H2O2 for 4 h. Cell viability and levels of apoptosis were assessed through cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assays, respectively, to determine the injury to the HUVECs. The viability loss in the H2O2-induced HUVECs was markedly restored in a concentration-dependent manner by pretreatment with quercetin or taraxasterol. This effect was accompanied by significantly decreased expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and cluster of differentiation (CD)80 for taraxasterol and that of CD80 for quercetin. In conclusion, the present study showed the protective effects of quercetin and taraxasterol against cell injury and inflammation in HUVECs and indicated that the effects were mediated via the downregulation of VCAM-1 and CD80 expression. This study has therefore served as a preliminary investigation on the anti-atherosclerotic and cardiovascular protective effects of quercetin and taraxasterol as dietary supplements. PMID:26622474

  11. Selected activities of Citrus maxima Merr. fruits on human endothelial cells: enhancing cell migration and delaying cellular aging.

    PubMed

    Buachan, Paiwan; Chularojmontri, Linda; Wattanapitayakul, Suvara K

    2014-04-21

    Endothelial injury and damage as well as accumulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aging play a significant role in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recent studies show an association of high citrus fruit intake with a lower risk of CVD and stroke but the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. This study investigated the effects of pummelo (Citrus maxima Merr. var. Tubtim Siam, CM) fruit extract on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs) migration and aging. The freeze-dried powder of fruit extract was characterized for antioxidant capacity (FRAP assay) and certain natural antioxidants, including ascorbic acid, gallic acid, hesperidin, and naringin (HPLC). Short-term (48 h) co-cultivation of HUVECs with CM enhanced cell migration as evaluated by a scratch wound assay and Boyden chamber assay. A long-term treatment with CM for 35 days significantly increased HUVEC proliferation capability as indicated by population doubling level (PDL). CM also delayed the onset of aging phenotype shown by senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining. Furthermore, CM was able to attenuate increased ROS levels in aged cells when determined by 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCDHF) while eNOS mRNA expression was increased but the eNOS protein level was not changed. Thus, further in vivo and clinical studies are warranted to support the use of pummelo as a functional fruit for endothelial health and CVD risk reduction.

  12. Quercetin protects human brain microvascular endothelial cells from fibrillar β-amyloid1–40-induced toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongjie; Zhou, Sibai; Li, Jinze; Sun, Yuhua; Hasimu, Hamlati; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Tiantai

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid beta-peptides (Aβ) are known to undergo active transport across the blood-brain barrier, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy has been shown to be a prominent feature in the majority of Alzheimer׳s disease. Quercetin is a natural flavonoid molecule and has been demonstrated to have potent neuroprotective effects, but its protective effect on endothelial cells under Aβ-damaged condition is unclear. In the present study, the protective effects of quercetin on brain microvascular endothelial cells injured by fibrillar Aβ1–40 (fAβ1–40) were observed. The results show that fAβ1–40-induced cytotoxicity in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) can be relieved by quercetin treatment. Quercetin increases cell viability, reduces the release of lactate dehydrogenase, and relieves nuclear condensation. Quercetin also alleviates intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and increases superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, it strengthens the barrier integrity through the preservation of the transendothelial electrical resistance value, the relief of aggravated permeability, and the increase of characteristic enzyme levels after being exposed to fAβ1–40. In conclusion, quercetin protects hBMECs from fAβ1–40-induced toxicity. PMID:26579424

  13. Donepezil attenuates high glucose-accelerated senescence in human umbilical vein endothelial cells through SIRT1 activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Tian, Feng; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Shanshan; Dong, Xueqing; Guo, Kai; Jing, Jing; Zhou, Ying; Chen, Yundai

    2015-09-01

    Cellular senescence of endothelial cells is a damage and stress response which induces pro-inflammatory, pro-atherosclerotic, and pro-thrombotic phenotypes. Donepezil is a drug used for the treatment of mild to moderate dementia of the Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the attenuation of endothelial cell senescence by donepezil and to explore the mechanisms underlying the anti-aging effects of donepezil. Our results indicated that high glucose (HG) markedly decreased cell viability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and this phenomenon was reversed by treatment with donepezil. Importantly, our results displayed that the frequency of senescent (SA-ß-gal-positive) cells and the expression level of senescence genes (PAI-1 and p21) were significantly higher in the HG group compared with the normal glucose (NG) group, and these changes were blocked by treatment with donepezil. Also, our results showed that donepezil inhibits the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which promotes cellular senescence. Pretreatment with nicotinamide (NAM), a sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) inhibitor, inhibited the reduction in senescence associated with donepezil. Indeed, our results indicated that donepezil increased the SIRT1 enzyme activity. Therefore, these results show that donepezil delays cellular senescence that is promoted under HG condition via activation of SIRT1.

  14. Association of Alix with late endosomal lysobisphosphatidic acid is important for dengue virus infection in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pattanakitsakul, Sa-nga; Poungsawai, Jesdaporn; Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Sinchaikul, Supachok; Chen, Shui-Tein; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2010-09-01

    The most severe form of dengue virus (DENV) infection is dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS), which is accompanied by increased vascular permeability indicating that endothelial cells are the targets of DENV infection. However, molecular mechanisms underlying DENV replication in endothelial cells remained poorly understood. We therefore examined changes in subcellular proteomes of different cellular compartments (including cytosolic, membrane/organelle, nucleus, and cytoskeleton) of human endothelial (EA.hy926) cells upon DENV2 infection using a 2-DE-based proteomics approach followed by Q-TOF MS and MS/MS. A total of 35 altered proteins were identified in these subcellular locales, including an increase in the level of Alix (apoptosis-linked gene-2-interacting protein X) in the cytosolic fraction of DENV2-infected cells compared to mock control cells. Double immunofluorescence staining revealed colocalization of Alix with late endosomal lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). This complex has been proposed to be involved in the export of DENV proteins from late endosomes to the cytoplasm. Subsequent functional study revealed that pretreatment with an anti-LBPA antibody prior to DENV challenge significantly reduced the level of viral envelope protein synthesis and DENV replication. Our data indicate that Alix plays a pivotal role in the early phase of DENV replication, particularly when it arrives at the late endosome stage. Blocking this step may lead to a novel therapeutic approach to reducing the level of DENV replication in vivo.

  15. Interleukin-8 increases vascular endothelial growth factor and neuropilin expression and stimulates ERK activation in human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zhang, Yuqing; Feurino, Louis W; Wang, Hao; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi

    2008-04-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is associated with tumorigenesis by promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Although up-regulation of IL-8 is indicated in many cancers, its function in pancreatic cancer has not been well characterized. In this study we examined the expression of IL-8 on pancreatic cancer cells and clinical tissue specimens, and investigated the effect of exogenous IL-8 on gene expression, and signaling in human pancreatic cancer cells. We found that pancreatic cancer cells expressed higher amount of IL-8 mRNA than normal human pancreatic ductal epithelium cells. IL-8 mRNA was also substantially overexpressed in 11 of 14 (79%) clinical pancreatic-adenocarcinoma samples compared with that in their surrounding normal tissues. Exogenous IL-8 up-regulated the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor(165), and neuropilin (NRP)-2 in BxPC-3 cells, one of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. IL-8 expression was inducible by hypoxia mimicking reagent cobalt chloride. In addition, IL-8 activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 signaling pathway in BxPC-3 cells. Our studies suggest that IL-8 might be a malignant factor in human pancreatic cancer by induction of vascular endothelial growth factor and NRP-2 expression and ERK activation. Targeting IL-8 along with other antiangiogenesis therapy could be an effective treatment for this malignancy.

  16. Astaxanthin alleviates oxidative stress insults-related derangements in human vascular endothelial cells exposed to glucose fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Abdelzaher, Lobna A; Imaizumi, Takahiro; Suzuki, Tokiko; Tomita, Kengo; Takashina, Michinori; Hattori, Yuichi

    2016-04-01

    Glycemic fluctuations may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, such as cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether the oxycarotenoid astaxanthin can reduce the detrimental effects of fluctuating glucose on vascular endothelial cells. Human umbilical venous endothelial cells were incubated for 3 days in media containing 5.5mM glucose, 22 mM glucose, or 5.5mM glucose alternating with 22 mM glucose in the absence or presence of astaxanthin or N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Constant high glucose increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, but such an effect was more pronounced in fluctuating glucose. This was associated with up-regulated p22(phox) expression and down-regulated peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ coactivator (PGC-1α) expression. Astaxanthin inhibited ROS generation, p22(phox) up-regulation, and PGC-1α down-regulation by the stimuli of glucose fluctuation. Fluctuating glucose, but not constant high glucose, significantly decreased the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation level at Ser-1177 without affecting total eNOS expression, which was prevented by astaxanthin as well as by the anti-oxidant NAC. Transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) showed increased cell apoptosis in fluctuating glucose. Glucose fluctuation also resulted in up-regulating gene expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, interleukin-6 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1. These adverse changes were subdued by astaxanthin. The phosphorylation levels of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 were significantly increased by glucose fluctuations, and astaxanthin significantly inhibited the increase in JNK and p38 phosphorylation. Taken together, our results suggest that astaxanthin can protect vascular endothelial cells against glucose fluctuation by reducing ROS generation.

  17. GSK3β inhibition activates the CDX/HOX pathway and promotes hemogenic endothelial progenitor differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Kenji; Nakajima, Marino; Kanokoda, Mai; Kyba, Michael; Dandapat, Abhijit; Tolar, Jakub; Saito, Megumu K; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Hara, Takahiko

    2016-01-01

    WNT/β-CATENIN signaling promotes the hematopoietic/endothelial differentiation of human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). The transient addition of a GSK3β inhibitor (GSKi) has been found to facilitate in vitro endothelial cell differentiation from hESCs/hiPSCs. Because hematopoietic and endothelial cells are derived from common progenitors (hemogenic endothelial progenitors [HEPs]), we examined the effect of transient GSKi treatment on hematopoietic cell differentiation from hiPSCs. We found that transient GSKi treatment at the start of hiPSC differentiation induction altered the gene expression profile of the cells. Multiple CDX/HOX genes, which are expressed in the posterior mesoderm of developing embryos, were significantly upregulated by GSKi treatment. Further, inclusion of the GSKi in a serum- and stroma-free culture with chemically defined medium efficiently induced HEPs, and the HEPs gave rise to various lineages of hematopoietic and endothelial cells. Therefore, transient WNT/β-CATENIN signaling triggers activation of the CDX/HOX pathway, which in turn confers hemogenic posterior mesoderm identity to differentiating hiPSCs. These data enhance our understanding of human embryonic hematopoietic/endothelial cell development and provide a novel in vitro system for inducing the differentiation of hematopoietic cells from hiPSCs. PMID:26477526

  18. Human iPSC-Derived Endothelial Cell Sprouting Assay in Synthetic Hydrogel Arrays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activation of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) by growth factors initiates a cascade of events in vivo consisting of EC tip cell selection, sprout formation, EC stalk cell proliferation, and ultimately vascular stabilization by support cells. Although EC functional assays can rec...

  19. Stereological Analysis of Neuron, Glial and Endothelial Cell Numbers in the Human Amygdaloid Complex

    PubMed Central

    García-Amado, María; Prensa, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Cell number alterations in the amygdaloid complex (AC) might coincide with neurological and psychiatric pathologies with anxiety imbalances as well as with changes in brain functionality during aging. This stereological study focused on estimating, in samples from 7 control individuals aged 20 to 75 years old, the number and density of neurons, glia and endothelial cells in the entire AC and in its 5 nuclear groups (including the basolateral (BL), corticomedial and central groups), 5 nuclei and 13 nuclear subdivisions. The volume and total cell number in these territories were determined on Nissl-stained sections with the Cavalieri principle and the optical fractionator. The AC mean volume was 956 mm3 and mean cell numbers (x106) were: 15.3 neurons, 60 glial cells and 16.8 endothelial cells. The numbers of endothelial cells and neurons were similar in each AC region and were one fourth the number of glial cells. Analysis of the influence of the individuals’ age at death on volume, cell number and density in each of these 24 AC regions suggested that aging does not affect regional size or the amount of glial cells, but that neuron and endothelial cell numbers respectively tended to decrease and increase in territories such as AC or BL. These accurate stereological measures of volume and total cell numbers and densities in the AC of control individuals could serve as appropriate reference values to evaluate subtle alterations in this structure in pathological conditions. PMID:22719923

  20. Hydrophilic bile acids protect human blood-brain barrier endothelial cells from disruption by unconjugated bilirubin: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Palmela, Inês; Correia, Leonor; Silva, Rui F. M.; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Kim, Kwang S.; Brites, Dora; Brito, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid and its main conjugate glycoursodeoxycholic acid are bile acids with neuroprotective properties. Our previous studies demonstrated their anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties in neural cells exposed to elevated levels of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) as in severe jaundice. In a simplified model of the blood-brain barrier, formed by confluent monolayers of a cell line of human brain microvascular endothelial cells, UCB has shown to induce caspase-3 activation and cell death, as well as interleukin-6 release and a loss of blood-brain barrier integrity. Here, we tested the preventive and restorative effects of these bile acids regarding the disruption of blood-brain barrier properties by UCB in in vitro conditions mimicking severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and using the same experimental blood-brain barrier model. Both bile acids reduced the apoptotic cell death induced by UCB, but only glycoursodeoxycholic acid significantly counteracted caspase-3 activation. Bile acids also prevented the upregulation of interleukin-6 mRNA, whereas only ursodeoxycholic acid abrogated cytokine release. Regarding barrier integrity, only ursodeoxycholic acid abrogated UCB-induced barrier permeability. Better protective effects were obtained by bile acid pre-treatment, but a strong efficacy was still observed by their addition after UCB treatment. Finally, both bile acids showed ability to cross confluent monolayers of human brain microvascular endothelial cells in a time-dependent manner. Collectively, data disclose a therapeutic time-window for preventive and restorative effects of ursodeoxycholic acid and glycoursodeoxycholic acid against UCB-induced blood-brain barrier disruption and damage to human brain microvascular endothelial cells. PMID:25821432