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Sample records for human micro-vascular endothelial

  1. Lipopolysaccharide Induces Human Pulmonary Micro-Vascular Endothelial Apoptosis via the YAP Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Lei; Huang, Xiaoqin; Guo, Feng; Zhou, Zengding; Chang, Mengling; Tang, Jiajun; Huan, Jingning

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces a pathologic increase in lung vascular leakage under septic conditions. LPS-induced human pulmonary micro-vascular endothelial cell (HPMEC) apoptosis launches and aggravates micro-vascular hyper-permeability and acute lung injury (ALI). Previous studies show that the activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway is vital for LPS-induced EC apoptosis. Yes-associated protein (YAP) has been reported to positively regulate intrinsic apoptotic pathway in tumor cells apoptosis. However, the potential role of YAP protein in LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis has not been determined. In this study, we found that LPS-induced activation and nuclear accumulation of YAP accelerated HPMECs apoptosis. LPS-induced YAP translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus by the increased phosphorylation on Y357 resulted in the interaction between YAP and transcription factor P73. Furthermore, inhibition of YAP by small interfering RNA (siRNA) not only suppressed the LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis but also regulated P73-mediated up-regulation of BAX and down-regulation of BCL-2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that activation of the YAP/P73/(BAX and BCL-2)/caspase-3 signaling pathway played a critical role in LPS-induced HPMEC apoptosis. Inhibition of the YAP might be a potential therapeutic strategy for lung injury under sepsis. PMID:27807512

  2. Differential Effects of Bartonella henselae on Human and Feline Macro- and Micro-Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Berrich, Moez; Kieda, Claudine; Grillon, Catherine; Monteil, Martine; Lamerant, Nathalie; Gavard, Julie; Boulouis, Henri Jean; Haddad, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    Bartonella henselae, a zoonotic agent, induces tumors of endothelial cells (ECs), namely bacillary angiomatosis and peliosis in immunosuppressed humans but not in cats. In vitro studies on ECs represent to date the only way to explore the interactions between Bartonella henselae and vascular endothelium. However, no comparative study of the interactions between Bartonella henselae and human (incidental host) ECs vs feline (reservoir host) ECs has been carried out because of the absence of any available feline endothelial cell lines. To this purpose, we have developed nine feline EC lines which allowed comparing the effects of Bartonella strains on human and feline micro-vascular ECs representative of the infection development sites such as skin, versus macro-vascular ECs, such as umbilical vein. Our model revealed intrinsic differences between human (Human Skin Microvascular ECs –HSkMEC and Human Umbilical Vein ECs – iHUVEC) and feline ECs susceptibility to Bartonella henselae infection. While no effect was observed on the feline ECs upon Bartonella henselae infection, the human ones displayed accelerated angiogenesis and wound healing. Noticeable differences were demonstrated between human micro- and macro-vasculature derived ECs both in terms of pseudo-tube formation and healing. Interestingly, Bartonella henselae effects on human ECs were also elicited by soluble factors. Neither Bartonella henselae-infected Human Skin Microvascular ECs clinically involved in bacillary angiomatosis, nor feline ECs increased cAMP production, as opposed to HUVEC. Bartonella henselae could stimulate the activation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) in homologous cellular systems and trigger VEGF production by HSkMECs only, but not iHUVEC or any feline ECs tested. These results may explain the decreased pathogenic potential of Bartonella henselae infection for cats as compared to humans and strongly suggest that an autocrine secretion of VEGF by human

  3. Differential effects of Bartonella henselae on human and feline macro- and micro-vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Berrich, Moez; Kieda, Claudine; Grillon, Catherine; Monteil, Martine; Lamerant, Nathalie; Gavard, Julie; Boulouis, Henri Jean; Haddad, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    Bartonella henselae, a zoonotic agent, induces tumors of endothelial cells (ECs), namely bacillary angiomatosis and peliosis in immunosuppressed humans but not in cats. In vitro studies on ECs represent to date the only way to explore the interactions between Bartonella henselae and vascular endothelium. However, no comparative study of the interactions between Bartonella henselae and human (incidental host) ECs vs feline (reservoir host) ECs has been carried out because of the absence of any available feline endothelial cell lines.To this purpose, we have developed nine feline EC lines which allowed comparing the effects of Bartonella strains on human and feline micro-vascular ECs representative of the infection development sites such as skin, versus macro-vascular ECs, such as umbilical vein.Our model revealed intrinsic differences between human (Human Skin Microvascular ECs -HSkMEC and Human Umbilical Vein ECs - iHUVEC) and feline ECs susceptibility to Bartonella henselae infection.While no effect was observed on the feline ECs upon Bartonella henselae infection, the human ones displayed accelerated angiogenesis and wound healing.Noticeable differences were demonstrated between human micro- and macro-vasculature derived ECs both in terms of pseudo-tube formation and healing. Interestingly, Bartonella henselae effects on human ECs were also elicited by soluble factors.Neither Bartonella henselae-infected Human Skin Microvascular ECs clinically involved in bacillary angiomatosis, nor feline ECs increased cAMP production, as opposed to HUVEC.Bartonella henselae could stimulate the activation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) in homologous cellular systems and trigger VEGF production by HSkMECs only, but not iHUVEC or any feline ECs tested.These results may explain the decreased pathogenic potential of Bartonella henselae infection for cats as compared to humans and strongly suggest that an autocrine secretion of VEGF by human skin

  4. Association between endothelial function and micro-vascular remodeling measured by synchrotron radiation pulmonary micro-angiography in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fuji, Satoko; Matsushita, Shonosuke; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Osaka, Motoo; Sakamoto, Hiroaki; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Miyakawa, Kazunori; Kubota, Misao; Hiramatsu, Yuji; Tokunaga, Chiho

    2016-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease which causes increased vascular resistance. In this study, our purpose was to quantify the micro-vascular remodeling in monocrotaline-induced PAH rats using synchrotron radiation pulmonary micro-angiography (SRPA), a method we have previously established in an in vivo rat model. To determine the relationship between endothelial function and vascular remodeling, the local expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was evaluated using immunohistochemical staining. Monocrotaline-induced PAH rats were created by subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline. After 2 weeks, SRPA was performed at the Photon Factory of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. The internal diameters of pulmonary arterioles were measured using SRPA images. Semi-quantified analyses of ET-1, eNOS and VEGF expression in pulmonary arterioles were performed by immunohistochemical staining. Micro-vascular density and the internal diameters of pulmonary arterioles were significantly decreased in PAH. ET-1 expression was significantly increased in PAH compared with the control (1.53 ± 0.45 vs. 0.80 ± 0.14) and eNOS expression was significantly decreased in PAH compared with the control (1.12 ± 0.59 vs. 1.91 ± 0.66), although VEGF expression did not differ between the groups. SRPA can be effectively used for visualizing the decreased pulmonary micro-vasculature associated with PAH. Increased ET-1 expression and decreased eNOS expression may contribute to the proliferation and vasospasm of pulmonary arterioles induced by endothelial dysfunction due to PAH. This SRPA technology may help to identify a correlation between endothelial function and micro-vasculature remodeling in PAH.

  5. Signaling hierarchy regulating human endothelial cell development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our present knowledge of the regulation of mammalian endothelial cell differentiation has been largely derived from studies of mouse embryonic development. However, unique mechanisms and hierarchy of signals that govern human endothelial cell development are unknown and, thus, explored in these stud...

  6. HUMAN VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS IN CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    Gimbrone, Michael A.; Cotran, Ramzi S.; Folkman, Judah

    1974-01-01

    Human endothelial cells, obtained by collagenase treatment of term umbilical cord veins, were cultured using Medium 199 supplemented with 20% fetal calf serum. Small clusters of cells initially spread on plastic or glass, coalesced and grew to form confluent monolayers of polygonal cells by 7 days. Cells in primary and subcultures were identified as endothelium by the presence of Weibel-Palade bodies by electron microscopy. A morphologically distinct subpopulation of cells contaminating some primary endothelial cultures was selectively subcultured, and identified by ultrastructural criteria as vascular smooth muscle. Autoradiography of endothelial cells after exposure to [3H]thymidine showed progressive increases in labeling in growing cultures beginning at 24 h. In recently confluent cultures, labeling indices were 2.4% in central closely packed regions, and 53.2% in peripheral growing regions. 3 days after confluence, labeling was uniform, being 3.5 and 3.9% in central and peripheral areas, respectively. When small areas of confluent cultures were experimentally "denuded," there were localized increases in [3H]thymidine labeling and eventual reconstitution of the monolayer. Liquid scintillation measurements of [3H]thymidine incorporation in primary and secondary endothelial cultures in microwell trays showed a similar correlation of DNA synthesis with cell density. These data indicate that endothelial cell cultures may provide a useful in vitro model for studying pathophysiologic factors in endothelial regeneration. PMID:4363161

  7. Androgen receptor in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Estay, Verónica; Carreño, Daniela V; San Francisco, Ignacio F; Sotomayor, Paula; Godoy, Alejandro S; Smith, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible transcription factor, and a member of the steroid-thyroid-retinoid receptor superfamily, that mediates the biological effects of androgens in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. AR expression was identified in vascular cells nearly 20 years ago, and recent research has shown that AR mediates a variety of actions of androgens in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. In this mini-review, we review evidence indicating the importance of AR in human endothelial cell (HUVEC) homeostatic and pathogenic processes. Although a role for AR in the modulation of HUVEC biology is evident, the molecular mechanisms by which AR regulates HUVEC homeostasis and disease processes are not fully understood. Understanding these mechanisms could provide critical insights into the processes of pathogenesis of diseases ranging from cardiovascular disease to cancer that are major causes of human morbidity and mortality. PMID:25563353

  8. Arecoline is cytotoxic for human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Mafaz; Cox, Stephen; Kelly, Elizabeth; Boadle, Ross; Zoellner, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Oral submucous fibrosis is a pre-malignant fibrotic condition caused by areca nut use and involves reduced mucosal vascularity. Arecoline is the principal areca nut alkaloid and is cytotoxic for epithelium and fibroblasts. Endothelial cell cycle arrest is reported on exposure to arecoline, as is cytotoxicity for endothelial-lung carcinoma hybrid cells. We here describe cytotoxicity for primary human endothelial cultures from seven separate donors. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were exposed to increasing concentrations of arecoline and examined by: phase-contrast microscopy, haemocytometer counts, transmission electron microscopy, lactate dehydrogenase release and the methyl-thiazol-tetrazolium assay. Vacuolation and detachment of endothelium were observed at and above arecoline concentrations of 333 μg/ml or more. Ultrastructural features of cellular stress were seen after 24-h treatment with 111 μg/ml arecoline and included reduced ribosomal studding of endoplasmic reticulum, increased autophagolysosomal structures, increased vacuolation and reduced mitochondrial cristae with slight swelling. Similar changes were seen at 4 h with arecoline at 333 μg/ml or above, but with more severe mitochondrial changes including increased electron density of mitochondrial matrix and greater cristal swelling, while by 24 h, these cells were frankly necrotic. Haemocytometer counts were paralleled by both lactate dehydrogenase release and the methyl-thiazol-tetrazolium assays. Arecoline is cytotoxic via necrosis for endothelium, while biochemical assays indicate no appreciable cellular leakage before death and detachment, as well as no clear effect on mitochondrial function in viable cells. Arecoline toxicity may thus contribute to reduced vascularity in oral submucous fibrosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Asiaticoside Inhibits TNF-α-Induced Endothelial Hyperpermeability of Human Aortic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Fong, Lai Yen; Ng, Chin Theng; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Baharuldin, Mohamad Taufik Hidayat; Arifah, Abdul Kadir; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul; Zuraini, Ahmad

    2015-10-01

    The increase in endothelial permeability often promotes edema formation in various pathological conditions. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), a pro-atherogenic cytokine, impairs endothelial barrier function and causes endothelial dysfunction in early stage of atherosclerosis. Asiaticoside, one of the triterpenoids derived from Centella asiatica, is known to possess antiinflammatory activity. In order to examine the role of asiaticoside in preserving the endothelial barrier, we assessed its effects on endothelial hyperpermeability and disruption of actin filaments evoked by TNF-α in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). TNF-α caused an increase in endothelial permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran. Asiaticoside pretreatment significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced increased permeability. Asiaticoside also prevented TNF-α-induced actin redistribution by suppressing stress fiber formation. However, the increased F to G actin ratio stimulated by TNF-α was not changed by asiaticoside. Cytochalasin D, an actin depolymerizing agent, was used to correlate the anti-hyperpermeability effect of asiaticoside with actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, asiaticoside failed to prevent cytochalasin D-induced increased permeability. These results suggest that asiaticoside protects against the disruption of endothelial barrier and actin rearrangement triggered by TNF-α without a significant change in total actin pool. However, asiaticoside seems to work by other mechanisms to maintain the integrity of endothelial barrier rather than stabilizing the F-actin organization.

  10. Tumor Endothelial Inflammation Predicts Clinical Outcome in Diverse Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Filippo, Matthew; Labay, Edwardine; Beckett, Michael A.; Mauceri, Helena J.; Liang, Hua; Darga, Thomas E.; Perakis, Samantha; Khan, Sajid A.; Sutton, Harold G.; Zhang, Wei; Khodarev, Nikolai N.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial cells contribute to the pathogenesis of numerous human diseases by actively regulating the stromal inflammatory response; however, little is known regarding the role of endothelial inflammation in the growth of human tumors and its influence on the prognosis of human cancers. Methods Using an experimental model of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-mediated inflammation, we characterized inflammatory gene expression in immunopurified tumor-associated endothelial cells. These genes formed the basis of a multivariate molecular predictor of overall survival that was trained and validated in four types of human cancer. Results We report that expression of experimentally derived tumor endothelial genes distinguished pathologic tissue specimens from normal controls in several human diseases associated with chronic inflammation. We trained these genes in human cancer datasets and defined a six-gene inflammatory signature that predicted significantly reduced overall survival in breast cancer, colon cancer, lung cancer, and glioma. This endothelial-derived signature predicted outcome independently of, but cooperatively with, standard clinical and pathological prognostic factors. Consistent with these findings, conditioned culture media from human endothelial cells stimulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines accelerated the growth of human colon and breast tumors in immunodeficient mice as compared with conditioned media from untreated endothelial cells. Conclusions This study provides the first prognostic cancer gene signature derived from an experimental model of tumor-associated endothelial inflammation. These findings support the notion that activation of inflammatory pathways in non-malignant tumor-infiltrating endothelial cells contributes to tumor growth and progression in multiple human cancers. Importantly, these results identify endothelial-derived factors that could serve as potential targets for therapy in diverse human cancers

  11. The effects of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinole treatment on gonadal micro-vascularization and affected fertility examined by SEM and 3D-morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlbacher, K. M. T.; Minnich, B.

    2015-10-01

    The present study focuses on the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on the reproductive system in nude rats with special emphasis on how Δ9-THC impacts the vascularization of testes which in turn indirectly influences fertility. Basically, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) causes not only negative (psychoactive) effects in the human body as cannabinole administration in medical use (dose-dependent) offers multiple new treatment opportunities such as pain relief or containment of various cancers. Concerning the reproductive system it strongly influences CB-receptors along the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis resulting in reduced plasma testosterone levels. There is also altered sperm quality parameters reported such as sperm motility or sperm count. On the other hand Δ9-THC effects endothelial growth factors (VEGF, Ang-1 etc.) respectively acts on their specific receptors which in turn modify angiogenesis and vascularization of tissues and organs (e.g. tumorous tissues). This leads to new therapeutical strategies in the suppression of various cancers by inhibiting (neo-)vascularization and in turn famishment of tumorous tissues (lack of nutrition supply). Here we studied the micro-vascularization of gonads in a long-term THC-treated nude rat model by vascular corrosion casting, SEM and 3D-morphometry.

  12. Sickle erythrocytes inhibit human endothelial cell DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.; Zhou, M.A.; Bartlett-Pandite, A.; Wenc, K. )

    1990-11-15

    Patients with sickle cell anemia experience severe vascular occlusive phenomena including acute pain crisis and cerebral infarction. Obstruction occurs at both the microvascular and the arterial level, and the clinical presentation of vascular events is heterogeneous, suggesting a complex etiology. Interaction between sickle erythrocytes and the endothelium may contribute to vascular occlusion due to alteration of endothelial function. To investigate this hypothesis, human vascular endothelial cells were overlaid with sickle or normal erythrocytes and stimulated to synthesize DNA. The erythrocytes were sedimented onto replicate monolayers by centrifugation for 10 minutes at 17 g to insure contact with the endothelial cells. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine into endothelial cell DNA was markedly inhibited during contact with sickle erythrocytes. This inhibitory effect was enhanced more than twofold when autologous sickle plasma was present during endothelial cell labeling. Normal erythrocytes, with or without autologous plasma, had a modest effect on endothelial cell DNA synthesis. When sickle erythrocytes in autologous sickle plasma were applied to endothelial monolayers for 1 minute, 10 minutes, or 1 hour and then removed, subsequent DNA synthesis by the endothelial cells was inhibited by 30% to 40%. Although adherence of sickle erythrocytes to the endothelial monolayers was observed under these experimental conditions, the effect of sickle erythrocytes on endothelial DNA synthesis occurred in the absence of significant adherence. Hence, human endothelial cell DNA synthesis is partially inhibited by contact with sickle erythrocytes. The inhibitory effect of sickle erythrocytes occurs during a brief (1 minute) contact with the endothelial monolayers, and persists for at least 6 hours of 3H-thymidine labeling.

  13. Endothelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Golub, Justin S.; Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Langer, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the potential to differentiate into various cell types and, thus, may be useful as a source of cells for transplantation or tissue engineering. We describe here the differentiation steps of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells forming vascular-like structures. The human embryonic-derived endothelial cells were isolated by using platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) antibodies, their behavior was characterized in vitro and in vivo, and their potential in tissue engineering was examined. We show that the isolated embryonic PECAM1+ cells, grown in culture, display characteristics similar to vessel endothelium. The cells express endothelial cell markers in a pattern similar to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, their junctions are correctly organized, and they have high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. In addition, the cells are able to differentiate and form tube-like structures when cultured on matrigel. In vivo, when transplanted into SCID mice, the cells appeared to form microvessels containing mouse blood cells. With further studies, these cells could provide a source of human endothelial cells that could be beneficial for potential applications such as engineering new blood vessels, endothelial cell transplantation into the heart for myocardial regeneration, and induction of angiogenesis for treatment of regional ischemia.

  14. Plasticity of human dedifferentiated adipocytes toward endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Poloni, Antonella; Maurizi, Giulia; Anastasi, Sara; Mondini, Eleonora; Mattiucci, Domenico; Discepoli, Giancarlo; Tiberi, Fabiola; Mancini, Stefania; Partelli, Stefano; Maurizi, Angela; Cinti, Saverio; Olivieri, Attilio; Leoni, Pietro

    2015-02-01

    The process of cellular differentiation in terminally differentiated cells is thought to be irreversible, and these cells are thought to be incapable of differentiating into distinct cell lineages. Our previous study showed that mature adipocytes represent an alternative source of mesenchymal stem cells. Here, results showed the capacity of mature adipocytes to differentiate into endothelial-like cells, using the ability of these cells to revert into an immature phase without any relievable chromosomal alterations. Mature adipocytes were isolated from human omental and subcutaneous fat and were dedifferentiated in vitro. The resulting cells were subcultivated for endothelial differentiation and were analyzed for their expression of specific genes and proteins. Endothelial-like cells were harvested from the differentiation medium and were traditionally cultured to evaluate the endothelial markers and the karyotype. Cells cultured in specific medium formed tube-like structures and expressed several endothelial marker genes and proteins. The endothelial-like cells expressed significantly higher levels of vascular endothelium growth factor receptor 2, vascular endothelial cadherin, Von Willebrand factor, and CD133 than the untreated cells. These cells were positively stained for CD31 and vascular endothelial cadherin, markers of mature endothelial cells. Moreover, the low-density lipoprotein-uptake assay demonstrated a functionally endothelial differentiation of these cells. When these cells were harvested and reseeded in basal medium, they lost the endothelial markers and reacquired the typical mesenchymal stem cell markers and the ability to expand in a short time period. Moreover, karyotype analysis showed that these cells reverted into an immature phase without any karyotype alterations. In conclusion, the results showed that adipocytes exhibited a great plasticity toward the endothelial lineage, suggesting their possible use in cell therapy applications for

  15. Aldosterone does not modify gene expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Verhovez, A; Williams, T A; Morello, F; Monticone, S; Brizzi, M F; Dentelli, P; Fallo, F; Fabris, B; Amenta, F; Gomez-Sanchez, C; Veglio, F; Mulatero, P

    2012-03-01

    The toxic effects of aldosterone on the vasculature, and in particular on the endothelial layer, have been proposed as having an important role in the cardiovascular pathology observed in mineralocorticoid-excess states. In order to characterize the genomic molecular mechanisms driving the aldosterone-induced endothelial dysfunction, we performed an expression microarray on transcripts obtained from both human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human coronary artery endothelial cells stimulated with 10 - 7 M aldosterone for 18 h. The results were then subjected to qRT-PCR confirmation, also including a group of genes known to be involved in the control of the endothelial function or previously described as regulated by aldosterone. The state of activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor was investigated by means of a luciferase-reporter assay using a plasmid encoding a mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid-sensitive promoter. Aldosterone did not determine any significant change in gene expression in either cell type both in the microarray and in the qRT-PCR analysis. The luciferase-reporter assay showed no activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor following aldosterone stimulation. The status of nonfunctionality of the mineralocorticoid receptor expressed in cultured human umbilical and coronary artery endothelial cells does not allow aldosterone to modify gene expression and provides evidence against either a beneficial or harmful genomic effect of aldosterone on healthy endothelial cells.

  16. "All-laser" endothelial corneal transplant in human patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesca; Menabuoni, Luca; Malandrini, Alex; Canovetti, Annalisa; Lenzetti, Ivo; Pini, Roberto

    2012-03-01

    Femtosecond laser sculpturing of corneal tissue is commonly used for the preparation of endothelial flaps. Diode laser welding of ocular tissues is a procedure that enables minimally invasive suturing of tissues. The combination of these laser based techniques results in a new approach to minimally invasive ophthalmic surgery, such as in endothelial corneal transplant (or endothelial keratoplasty - EK). In this work we present the "all laser" EK performed in human subjects. 24 pseudophakic patients with bullous keratopathy underwent EK: the femtosecond laser was used to prepare the 100 ìm thick and 8.5 mm diameter donor Descemet endothelial flap. After staining the stromal layer of the donor flap with a liquid ICG solution, the donor flap was inserted in the recipient eye by the use of the Busin injector. Then, the endothelial layer was laser-welded to the recipient eye (10 laser spots around the periphery of the flap), in order to reduce the risk of postoperative dislocation of the transplanted flap. A transplanted flap engraftment was observed in all the treated eyes. The staining procedure used to perform laser welding also enabled to evidence the stromal side of the donor flap, so as the flap was always placed in the right side position. The endothelial cells counts in both the laserwelded flaps and in a control group were in good agreement. The proposed technique is easy to perform and enables the reduction of postoperative endothelial flap dislocations.

  17. Translational issues for human corneal endothelial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Soh, Yu Qiang; Peh, Gary S L; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2017-09-01

    Corneal endothelial disorders collectively represent a significant healthcare burden in most developed nations, and corneal transplantation is currently the only treatment available for patients with poor visual acuity and corneal blindness secondary to endothelial failure. Although vision in these patients can be restored by transplantation, the global demand for donor human corneas is far in excess of what can be provided for by eye banks around the world, and this deficit is set to increase with an ageing global population. As such, there has been a pressing need to explore novel and more sustainable options for the treatment of corneal endothelial diseases. In recent years, significant progress has been made not only in the development of corneal endothelial cell culture techniques, but also in the exploration of various translational strategies. Considered together, we are now much closer to attaining success in the treatment of corneal endothelial diseases via a cell-based, tissue-engineering approach. The aim of this review article is to provide an update of the translational issues currently facing human corneal endothelial cell therapy. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Novel Identity and Functional Markers for Human Corneal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bartakova, Alena; Alvarez-Delfin, Karen; Weisman, Alejandra D.; Salero, Enrique; Raffa, Gabriella A.; Merkhofer, Richard M.; Kunzevitzky, Noelia J.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Human corneal endothelial cell (HCEC) density decreases with age, surgical complications, or disease, leading to vision impairment. Such endothelial dysfunction is an indication for corneal transplantation, although there is a worldwide shortage of transplant-grade tissue. To overcome the current poor donor availability, here we isolate, expand, and characterize HCECs in vitro as a step toward cell therapy. Methods Human corneal endothelial cells were isolated from cadaveric corneas and expanded in vitro. Cell identity was evaluated based on morphology and immunocytochemistry, and gene expression analysis and flow cytometry were used to identify novel HCEC-specific markers. The functional ability of HCEC to form barriers was assessed by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) assays. Results Cultured HCECs demonstrated canonical morphology for up to four passages and later underwent endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EnMT). Quality of donor tissue influenced cell measures in culture including proliferation rate. Cultured HCECs expressed identity markers, and microarray analysis revealed novel endothelial-specific markers that were validated by flow cytometry. Finally, canonical HCECs expressed higher levels of CD56, which correlated with higher TEER than fibroblastic HCECs. Conclusions In vitro expansion of HCECs from cadaveric donor corneas yields functional cells identifiable by morphology and a panel of novel markers. Markers described correlated with function in culture, suggesting a basis for cell therapy for corneal endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27196322

  19. Human cultured endothelial cells do secrete endothelin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Clozel, M.; Fischli, W. )

    1989-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been identified in the conditioned medium of porcine endothelial cells. Human endothelin (ET-1) cloned from a placenta cDNA library is similar to porcine, but it is not known whether endothelin itself is secreted by human endothelial cells. To answer this question, a conditioned medium taken every 48 h from confluent cultures of umbilical vein endothelial cells was analyzed by HPLC and all fractions were tested for their ability to inhibit ({sup 125}I)ET-1 binding on human placenta membranes. Only one fraction did inhibit ({sup 125}I)ET-1 binding. When the conditioned medium was spiked with ET-1, the same single fraction inhibited ({sup 125}I)ET-1 binding showing that ET-1, itself, is present in the conditioned medium of human endothelial cells. ET-1 accumulates with time, reaching a plateau at 48 h. ET-1 secretion is not increased by a 24-h incubation of endothelial cells with phorbol myristate acetate, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor, thrombin or neuropeptide Y.

  20. Expression of the beta 7 integrin by human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brezinschek, R. I.; Brezinschek, H. P.; Lazarovits, A. I.; Lipsky, P. E.; Oppenheimer-Marks, N.

    1996-01-01

    Integrin adhesion receptors mediate fundamental intercellular interactions of many cell types as well as cellular interactions with specific extracellular matrix molecules. To date, the beta 7 integrin has been shown to be expressed by leukocyte subsets and to mediate interactions of these cells with extracellular matrix molecules as well as with endothelial and epithelial cells. The data presented here indicate that human endothelial cells also express the beta 7 integrin both in vitro and in situ. Analysis of cDNA indicated that endothelial beta 7 was identical to that expressed by leukocytes. Cell surface expression of beta 7 was increased by exposure of the endothelium to the pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta. In leukocytes, beta 7 complexes with alpha 4 or alpha E integrin chains. Endothelial cells also expressed a number of alpha-integrin chains, including alpha 4, but not alpha E. The expression and utilization of beta 7, presumably complexed with alpha 4, by endothelial cells may be instrumental in the maintenance of the function or phenotype of endothelial cells. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8909254

  1. Modest Visceral Fat Gain Causes Endothelial Dysfunction In Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Corral, Abel; Sert-Kuniyoshi, Fatima H.; Sierra-Johnson, Justo; Orban, Marek; Gami, Apoor; Davison, Diane; Singh, Prachi; Pusalavidyasagar, Snigdha; Huyber, Christine; Votruba, Susanne; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Jensen, Michael D.; Somers, Virend K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study sought to determine the impact of fat gain and its distribution on endothelial function in lean healthy humans. Background Endothelial dysfunction has been identified as an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. Whether fat gain impairs endothelial function is unknown. Methods A randomized controlled study to assess the effects of fat gain on endothelial function. We recruited 43 normal weight healthy volunteers (mean age 29 years; 18 women). Subjects were assigned to gain weight (approximately 4 kg) (n=35) or to maintain weight (n=8). Endothelial function (brachial artery flow mediated dilation -FMD) was measured at baseline, after fat gain (8 weeks) and after weight loss (16 weeks) for fat-gainers and at baseline and follow-up (8 weeks) for weight-maintainers. Body composition was measured by DXA and abdominal CT scans. Results After an average weight gain of 4.1 kg, fat-gainers significantly increased their total, visceral and subcutaneous fat. Blood pressure and overnight polysomnography did not change after fat gain or loss. FMD remained unchanged in weight-maintainers. FMD decreased in fat-gainers (9.1 ± 3% vs. 7.8 ± 3.2%, p =0.003), but recovered to baseline when subjects shed the gained weight. There was a significant correlation between the decrease in FMD and the increase in visceral fat gain (rho = −0.42, p=0.004), but not with subcutaneous fat gain (rho = −0.22, p=0.15). Conclusions In normal weight healthy young subjects, modest fat gain results in impaired endothelial function, even in the absence of changes in blood pressure. Endothelial function recovers after weight loss. Increased visceral rather than subcutaneous fat predicts endothelial dysfunction. PMID:20705223

  2. Human Endothelial Cells: Use of Heparin in Cloning and Long-Term Serial Cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Susan C.; Mueller, Stephen N.; Levine, Elliot M.

    1983-11-01

    Endothelial cells from human blood vessels were cultured in vitro, with doubling times of 17 to 21 hours for 42 to 79 population doublings. Cloned human endothelial cell strains were established for the first time and had similar proliferative capacities. This vigorous cell growth was achieved by addition of heparin to culture medium containing reduced concentrations of endothelial cell growth factor. The routine cloning and long-term culture of human endothelial cells will facilitate studying the human endothelium in vitro.

  3. Ultrastructural pathology of endothelial tight junctions in human brain oedema.

    PubMed

    Castejón, Orlando J

    2012-01-01

    Cortical biopsies of patients with the diagnosis of complicated brain trauma, congenital hydrocephalus, brain vascular anomaly, and brain tumour are studied with the electron microscope using cortical biopsies of different cortical brain regions to analyze the alterations of endothelial junctions, and their participation in the pathogenesis of human brain oedema. In moderate oedema, most endothelial tight junctions are structurally closed and intact, while in some cases of severe oedema, the opening of tight endothelial junctions is observed. In very severe brain oedema, a considerable enlargement of interjunctional pockets of extracellular space is also seen suggesting that in highly increased cerebrovascular permeability, the endothelial junctions are open in their entire extent, and that an intercellular or paracellular route through interendothelial clefts for transferring haematogenous oedema fluid from blood to the capillary basement membrane and the brain parenchyma is formed, contributing to the formation of brain oedema. High intensity brain trauma, seizures, osmotic forces, hypoxic conditions, and alteration of tight junctions proteins would explain the opening of endothelial junctions in severe and complicated brain oedema. In congenital hydrocephalus, the capillary wall shows evident signs of blood-brain barrier dysfunction characterized by closed and open interendothelial junctions, increased endothelial vesicular and vacuolar transport, thin and fragmented basement membrane with areas of focal thickening, and discontinuous perivascular astrocytic end-feet. The perivascular space is notably dilated and widely communicated with the enlarged extracellular space in the neuropil, showing the contribution of damaged endothelial junction to the formation of interstitial or hydrocephalic brain oedema. Altered expression of tight junction proteins could cause a blood-brain barrier breakdown following brain injury and hypoxic conditions leading to brain oedema

  4. Human iPSC-Derived Endothelial Cell Sprouting Assay in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Activation of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) by growth factors initiates a cascade of events in vivo consisting of EC tip cell selection, sprout formation, EC stalk cell proliferation, and ultimately vascular stabilization by support cells. Although EC functional assays can recapitulate one or more aspects of angiogenesis in vitro, they are often limited by a lack of definition to the substratum and lack of dependence on key angiogenic signaling axes. Here, we designed and characterized a chemically-defined model of endothelial sprouting behavior in vitro using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells (iPSC-ECs). Thiol-ene photopolymerization was used to rapidly encapsulate iPSC-ECs at high density in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel spheres and subsequently to rapidly encapsulate iPSC-EC-containing hydrogel spheres in a cell-free over-layer. The hydrogel sprouting array here maintained pro-angiogenic phenotype of iPSC-ECs and supported growth factor-dependent proliferation and sprouting behavior. The sprouting model responded appropriately to several reference pharmacological angiogenesis inhibitors, which suggests the functional role of vascular endothelial growth factor, NF-κB, matrix metalloproteinase-2/9, protein kinase activity, and β-tubulin in endothelial sprouting. A blinded screen of 38 putative vascular disrupting compounds (pVDCs) from the US Environmental Protection Agency’s ToxCast library identified five compounds th

  5. The effects of glucocorticoids on cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Maca, R D; Fry, G L; Hoak, J C

    1978-04-01

    The effects of hydrocortisone, dexamethasone and prednisone on the morphology, replication, DNA synthesis, cell protein content and protein synthesis of cultured, human endothelial cells were evaluated. After culturing the cells with these glucocorticoids for 24-48 h, the cells covered a greater portion of the culture surface area. The mean surface area of the individual endothelial cell treated with glucocorticoids was 1.53 times greater than that of the untreated control endothelial cell. When compared with controls, the endothelial cover provided by the cells treated with glucocorticoids was more extensive and in many instances covered the entire culture surface. The change in morphology was associated with an increase in protein synthesis and protein content of the cells without an increase in DNA synthesis or cellular replication. Dexamethasone was approximately 10-fold more effective than hydrocortisone, while prednisone was the least effective. Aldosterone, DOCA, testosterone, progesterone, oestradiol and oestriol were ineffective. These studies indicate that glucocorticoids can alter the morphology and biochemistry of cultured endothelial cells and may have implications for the effects of steroids in the treatment of thrombocytopenic states and vascular disorders in man.

  6. Subtractive transcriptomics : establishing polarity drives human endothelial morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Glesne, D. A.; Zhang, W.; Mandava, S.; Ursos, L.; Buell, M. E.; Makowski, L.; Rodi, D. J.; Biosciences Division

    2006-04-15

    Although investigations of mature normal and tumor-derived capillaries have resulted in characterization of these structures at the phenotypic level, less is known regarding the initial molecular cues for cellular assembly of endothelial cells into human capillaries. Here, we employ a novel combination of microenvironmental manipulation and microarray data filtration over narrowly delineated temporal data series to identify the morphogenesis component apart from the proliferation component, as pooled human microvascular-derived endothelial cells are induced to form capillary-like structures in vitro in a murine tumor-derived matrix. The 217 morphogenesis-specific genes identified using this subtractive transcriptomics approach are mostly independent of the angiogenic proteins currently used as therapeutic targets for aberrant angiogenesis. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to validate 20% of these transcripts. Immunofluorescent analysis of proliferating and tube-forming cells validates at the protein level the morphogenesis-specific expression pattern of 16 of the 217 gene products identified. The transcripts that are selectively up-regulated in tube-forming endothelial cells reveal a temporal expression pattern of genes primarily associated with intracellular trafficking, guided migration, cytoskeletal reorganization, cellular adhesion, and proliferation inhibition. These data show that a sequential upregulation of genes that establish and maintain polarity occurs during migration and morphogenesis of in vitro human endothelial cells undergoing tubulogenesis; some of which may well be effective as novel antiangiogenic drug targets.

  7. Human endothelial dihydrofolate reductase low activity limits vascular tetrahydrobiopterin recycling.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jennifer; Rangel Filho, Artur; Sethumadhavan, Savitha; Celinska, Joanna; Widlansky, Michael; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette

    2013-10-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH₄) is required for NO synthesis and inhibition of superoxide release from endothelial NO synthase. Clinical trials using BH₄ to treat endothelial dysfunction have produced mixed results. Poor outcomes may be explained by the rapid systemic and cellular oxidation of BH₄. One of the oxidation products of BH₄, 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (7,8-BH₂), is recycled back to BH₄ by dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). This enzyme is ubiquitously distributed and shows a wide range of activity depending on species-specific factors and cell type. Information about the kinetics and efficiency of BH4 recycling in human endothelial cells receiving BH₄ treatment is lacking. To characterize this reaction, we applied a novel multielectrode coulometric HPLC method that enabled the direct quantification of 7,8-BH₂ and BH₄, which is not possible with fluorescence-based methodologies. We found that basal untreated BH₄ and 7,8-BH₂ concentrations in human endothelial cells (ECs) are lower than in bovine and murine endothelioma cells. Treatment of human ECs with BH₄ transiently increased intracellular BH₄ while accumulating the more stable 7,8-BH₂. This was different from bovine or murine ECs, which resulted in preferential BH₄ increase. Using BH₄ diastereomers, 6S-BH₄ and 6R-BH₄, the narrow contribution of enzymatic DHFR recycling to total intracellular BH₄ was demonstrated. Reduction of 7,8-BH₂ to BH₄ occurs at very slow rates in cells and needs supraphysiological levels of 7,8-BH₂, indicating this reaction is kinetically limited. Activity assays verified that human DHFR has very low affinity for 7,8-BH₂ (DHF7,8-BH₂) and folic acid inhibits 7,8-BH₂ recycling. We conclude that low activity of endothelial DHFR is an important factor limiting the benefits of BH4 therapies, which may be further aggravated by folate supplements.

  8. Serum factors involved in human microvascular endothelial cell morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Kevin; Siddiqui, Rafat A; Sliva, Daniel; Garcia, Joe G N; English, Denis

    2002-09-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that lipid and protein angiogenic factors operate in tandem to induce optimal angiogenic responses in vivo. This study was undertaken to clarify the nature of the substances in human serum that are responsible for its remarkable ability to promote capillary morphogenesis in vitro. The ability of dilute (2%) human serum to promote the morphogenic differentiation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells on Matrigel supports was depleted by more than 50% by treatment of the serum with activated charcoal, a procedure that effectively removes biologically active lipid growth factors. The remainder of the activity within serum was lost on heating to 60 degrees C for 60 minutes, indicating the involvement of a protein in the response. The ability of charcoal-treated serum to promote capillary morphogenesis was completely restored by the addition of sphingosine 1-phosphate (SPP, 500 nmol/L), but other lipids thought to be released into serum during clotting were ineffective. In addition, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) effectively restored the ability of heat-treated serum to promote endothelial cell morphogenesis, but other protein growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor, were ineffective. Together, SPP and bFGF were as effective as whole serum in promoting capillary morphogenesis. Responses to purified SPP were entirely sensitive to the effects of preexposure of the cells to pertussis toxin, whereas responses to bFGF were entirely pertussis toxin-resistant. Consistent with our hypothesis that two distinct factors in serum play a role in promoting capillary morphogenesis, responses induced by serum were inhibited approximately 50% by preexposure of endothelial cells to pertussis toxin. We conclude that platelet-released SPP acts in conjunction with circulating bFGF to promote capillary formation by microvascular endothelial cells. Lipid and protein growth factors

  9. High glucose induced endothelial to mesenchymal transition in human umbilical vein endothelial cell.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chun-Hong; Suriguga; Gong, Meng; Liu, Wen-Juan; Cui, Ning-Xuan; Wang, Ying; Du, Xin; Yi, Zong-Chun

    2017-06-01

    Studies have shown that endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) could contribute to the progression of diabetic nephropathy, diabetic renal fibrosis, and cardiac fibrosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of high glucose and related mechanism of MAPK inhibitor or specific antioxidant on the EndMT. In vitro human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured with 11mM, 30mM, 60mM and 120mM glucose for 0, 24, 48, 72 and 168h. Endothelial cell morphology was observed with microscope, and RT-PCR was used to detect mRNA expression of endothelial markers VE-cadherin and CD31, mesenchymal markers α-SMA and collagen I, and transforming growth factor TGF-β1. Immunofluorescence staining was performed to detect the expression of CD31 and α-SMA. The concentration of TGF-β1 in the supernatant was detected by ELISA. ERK1/2 phosphorylation level was detected by Western blot analysis. High glucose induced EndMT and increased the TGF-β1 level in HUVEC cells. Cells in high glucose for 7 days showed a significant decrease in mRNA expression of CD31 and VE-cadherin, and a significant increase in that of α-SMA and collagen I, while lost CD31 staining and acquired α-SMA staining. ERK signaling pathway blocker PD98059 significantly attenuated the high glucose-induced increase in the ERK1/2 phosphorylation level. PD98059 and NAC both inhibited high glucose-induced TGF-β1 expression and attenuated EndMT marker protein synthesis. High glucose could induce HUVEC cells to undergo EndMT. NAC and ERK signaling pathway may play important role in the regulation of the TGF-β1 biosynthesis during high glucose-induced EndMT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The expression of ADAMTS13 in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anyou; Duan, Qiaohong; Wu, Jingsheng; Liu, Xin; Sun, Zimin

    2016-06-01

    ADAMTS13, as a specific von Willebrand factor (VWF)-cleaving protease, prevents microvascular thrombosis of VWF/platelet thrombi. It has been reported that human vascular endothelial cells could also synthesize and secrete ADAMTS13, and these reports were focused in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. Considering the particularity of its huge quantity and structure of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs) in the body, whether ADAMTS13 is expressed in HMECs also needs to be confirmed. To investigate whether ADAMTS13 is expressed in HMECs. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) amplification detected ADAMTS13 mRNA in HMEC-1 cell line. The expression and distribution of ADAMTS13 protein and VWF were detected by fluorescence immunoassay and western blot. We observed the expression and distribution of ADAMTS13 in HMECs. We confirmed the expression of ADAMTS13 mRNA in HMEC-1, and found that there were some partly common distributions of ADAMTS13 protein and VWF. This study provides the evidence that HMECs also express ADAMTS13. HMECs might also be a primary source for human plasma ADAMTS13. The overlap region for the distribution of ADAMTS13 and VWF suggests that ADAMTS13 might have a potential regulation role for VWF inside cells.

  11. Bilirubin is an Endogenous Antioxidant in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziberna, Lovro; Martelanc, Mitja; Franko, Mladen; Passamonti, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Bilirubin is a standard serum biomarker of liver function. Inexplicably, it is inversely correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Given the role of endothelial dysfunction in originating cardiovascular diseases, direct analysis of bilirubin in the vascular endothelium would shed light on these relationships. Hence, we used high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with thermal lens spectrometric detection and diode array detection for the determination of endogenous cellular IXα-bilirubin. To confirm the isomer IXα-bilirubin, we used ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a high-resolution mass spectrometer using an electrospray ionization source, as well as tandem mass spectrometric detection. We measured bilirubin in both arterial and venous rat endothelium (0.9–1.5 pmol mg−1 protein). In the human endothelial Ea.hy926 cell line, we demonstrated that intracellular bilirubin (3–5 pmol mg−1 protein) could be modulated by either extracellular bilirubin uptake, or by up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1, a cellular enzyme related to endogenous bilirubin synthesis. Moreover, we determined intracellular antioxidant activity by bilirubin, with EC50 = 11.4 ± 0.2 nM, in the range of reported values of free serum bilirubin (8.5–13.1 nM). Biliverdin showed similar antioxidant properties as bilirubin. We infer from these observations that intra-endothelial bilirubin oscillates, and may thus be a dynamic factor of the endothelial function. PMID:27381978

  12. [Study of injury model in human umbilical vein endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Chang, Hong; Xie, Zhenyuan

    2004-01-01

    To establishment the injury by oxidized low density lipoprotein in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Huvecs were exposed to OX-LDL in vitro, then MTT and MDA of Huvecs were measured. After endothelium cells were exposed to different dose of OX-LDL 24 hours, MTT was decreased significantly, especially in the high dose OX-LDL group. OX-LDL could lead injury to Huvecs and might be related to atherosclerosis.

  13. Gamma-Glutamylcysteine Inhibits Oxidative Stress in Human Endothelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    γ-Glutamylcysteine inhibits oxidative stress in human endothelial cells Yukiko K. Nakamura a, Michael A. Dubick b, Stanley T. Omaye a,⁎ a Department...n f o Article history: Received 12 July 2011 Accepted 16 October 2011 Keywords: γ-Glutamylcysteine Glutathione Glutathione synthetase Oxidative stress...include reducing risks of oxidative stress-related injuries and diseases. The ob- jective of this studywas to investigate the efficacy of GGC on GSH

  14. Functional CB1 cannabinoid receptors in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Gao, B; Mirshahi, F; Sanyal, A J; Khanolkar, A D; Makriyannis, A; Kunos, G

    2000-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mRNA was detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in endothelial cells from human aorta and hepatic artery and in the ECV304 cell line derived from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. CB1 receptor-binding sites were detected by the high-affinity antagonist radioligand [(125)I]AM-251. In ECV304 cells, both the highly potent synthetic cannabinoid agonist HU-210 and the endogenous ligand anandamide induce activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, and the effect of HU-210 was completely blocked, whereas the effect of anandamide was partially inhibited by SR141716A, a selective CB1 receptor antagonist. Transfection of ECV304 cells with CB1 receptor antisense, but not sense, oligonucleotides caused the same pattern of inhibition as SR141716A. This provides more definitive evidence for the involvement of CB1 receptors in MAP kinase activation and suggests that anandamide may also activate MAP kinase via an additional, CB1 receptor-independent, SR141716A-resistant mechanism. The MAP kinase activation by anandamide in ECV304 cells requires genistein-sensitive tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C (PKC), and anandamide also activates p38 kinase and c-Jun kinase. These findings indicate that CB1 receptors located in human vascular endothelium are functionally coupled to the MAP kinase cascade. Activation of protein kinase cascades by anandamide may be involved in the modulation of endothelial cell growth and proliferation. PMID:10698714

  15. Resistin Increases Monolayer Permeability of Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jamaluddin, Md Saha; Yan, Shaoyu; Lü, Jianming; Liang, Zhengdong; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2013-01-01

    Resistin has been linked to obesity, insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, and the development of cardiovascular disease. Nevertheless, the effects and the molecular mechanisms of resistin on endothelial permeability, a key event in the development of atherosclerosis, inflammation, and vascular disease, are largely unknown. In order to determine the effect of resistin on endothelial permeability, human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) were treated with clinically relevant concentrations of resistin and the endothelial permeability was measured using the Transwell system with a Texas-Red-labeled dextran tracer. The permeability of HCAEC monolayers treated with resistin (80 ng/mL) was 51% higher than the permeability of control monolayers (P<0.05). The mRNA levels of tight junction proteins zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin in resistin-treated cells were 37% and 42% lower, respectively, than the corresponding levels in untreated cells. The protein levels of these molecules in resistin-treated cells were significantly reduced by 35% and 37%, respectively (P<0.05), as shown by flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic MnTBAP effectively blocked the resistin-mediated reduction of ZO-1 and occludin levels in HCAECs. In addition, superoxide anion production was increased from 21% (untreated cells) to 55% (cells treated with 40 ng/mL resistin), and 64% (resistin, 80 mg/mL) (P<0.05). The natural antioxidant Ginkgolide A effectively inhibited resistin-induced increase in permeability and the increase in superoxide anion production in HCAECs. Furthermore, resistin treatment significantly activated p38 MAPK, but not ERK1/2. Pretreatment of HCAECs with a p38 inhibitor effectively blocked resistin-induced permeability. These results provide new evidence that resistin may contribute to the vascular lesion formation via increasing endothelial permeability through the mechanism of oxidative stress and the activation of p38 MAPK. PMID

  16. Decrease of fibrinolytic activity in human endothelial cells by arsenite.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shinn-Jong; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Wu, Hua-Lin; Han, Huai-Song; Shi, Guey-Yueh

    2002-01-01

    Blackfoot disease (BFD) is an endemic peripheral vascular occlusive disease that occurred in the southwest coast of Taiwan. It is believed that arsenic in the drinking water from artesian wells plays an important role in the development of the disease. We have previously shown that BFD patients had significant lower tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) antigen level and higher plasminogen activator inhibitor, Type 1 (PAI-1) antigen level than normal controls. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of arsenite on the fibrinolytic and anticoagulant activities of cultured macrovascular and microvascular endothelial cells. Incubation of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1), but not human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), with arsenite caused a decrease of t-PA mRNA level, a rise of both PAI-1 mRNA level and PAI activity. Arsenite could also inhibit the thrombomodulin (TM) mRNA expression and reduce the TM antigen level in HMEC-1. In conclusion, arsenite had a greater effect on HMEC-1 as compared to HUVECs in lowering the fibrinolytic activity and may be responsible for the reduced capacity of fibrinolysis associated with BFD.

  17. High glucose induces DNA damage in cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, M; Montisano, D F; Toledo, S; Barrieux, A

    1986-01-01

    Morphologic and functional abnormalities of vascular endothelium are well recognized in diabetes. In view of our previous finding that high glucose concentrations accelerate death and hamper replication of cultured human endothelial cells, we have investigated in the same model the possibility that exposure to high glucose may result in DNA damage. DNA from human endothelial cells--but not from fibroblasts--exposed to 30 mM glucose for 9-14 d manifested an accelerated rate of unwinding in alkali indicative of an increased number of single strand breaks (P less than 0.001 vs. control). Endothelial cells exposed to high glucose also manifested an increased amount of hydroxy-urea-resistant thymidine incorporation (333 +/- 153 cpm/10(5) cells vs. 88 +/- 42 in control cells, mean +/- SD, P = 0.04), which is indicative of increased DNA repair synthesis. Neither DNA damage nor repair synthesis were increased by medium hypertonicity achieved with 30 mM mannitol. These findings suggest the possibility that, under conditions of high ambient glucose, excess glucose entry in cells that are insulin independent for glucose transport may, directly or indirectly, perturb DNA function. Further, they suggest the possibility that different individual capabilities to repair DNA damage--a process that is under genetic control--may represent a mechanism for different individual susceptibilities to development of diabetic vascular complication. PMID:3944257

  18. Mifepristone-exposured human endometrial endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Helmestam, Malin; Lindgren, Karin Elvine; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli; Olovsson, Matts

    2014-03-01

    The antiprogestin mifepristone has been used for more than 20 years as a medical alternative for early pregnancy termination. After mifepristone administration, significant changes have been observed in the endometrial vessels, with cell injury and cell death in capillary endothelial cells. In this study, the effect of mifepristone on human endometrial endothelial cells (HEECs) in vitro was evaluated using proliferation and viability assays, quantitative polymerase chain reaction of markers important for the regulation of angiogenesis, and by tube formation assay. There were no detectable effects of mifepristone on HEECs messenger RNA expression of the studied markers. Exposure to mifepristone did not alter tube formation. However, mifepristone exposure to HEECs cocultured with endometrial stromal cells significantly reduced the activity in the tube formation assay compared with mifepristone exposure of HEECs in monoculture. This implies that mifepristone causes changes in HEEC-associated angiogenic activity and that this effect is mediated through stromal cells via paracrine mechanisms.

  19. Mifepristone-Exposured Human Endometrial Endothelial Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Karin Elvine; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli; Olovsson, Matts

    2014-01-01

    The antiprogestin mifepristone has been used for more than 20 years as a medical alternative for early pregnancy termination. After mifepristone administration, significant changes have been observed in the endometrial vessels, with cell injury and cell death in capillary endothelial cells. In this study, the effect of mifepristone on human endometrial endothelial cells (HEECs) in vitro was evaluated using proliferation and viability assays, quantitative polymerase chain reaction of markers important for the regulation of angiogenesis, and by tube formation assay. There were no detectable effects of mifepristone on HEECs messenger RNA expression of the studied markers. Exposure to mifepristone did not alter tube formation. However, mifepristone exposure to HEECs cocultured with endometrial stromal cells significantly reduced the activity in the tube formation assay compared with mifepristone exposure of HEECs in monoculture. This implies that mifepristone causes changes in HEEC-associated angiogenic activity and that this effect is mediated through stromal cells via paracrine mechanisms. PMID:23885098

  20. Proinflammatory response of human endothelial cells to Brucella infection.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Mariana C; Bregante, Julieta; Delpino, M Victoria; Barrionuevo, Paula; Fossati, Carlos A; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Baldi, Pablo C

    2011-09-01

    Although vascular pathologies such as vasculitis, endocarditis and mycotic aneurysms have been described in brucellosis patients, the interaction of Brucella with the endothelium has not been characterized. In this study we show that Brucella abortus and Brucella suis can infect and replicate in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and in the microvascular endothelial cell line HMEC-1. Infection led to an increased production of IL-8, MCP-1 and IL-6 in HUVEC and HMEC-1 cells, and an increased expression of adhesion molecules (CD54 in both cells, CD106 and CD62E in HUVEC). Experiments with purified antigens from the bacterial outer membrane revealed that lipoproteins (Omp19) but not lipopolysaccharide mediate these proinflammatory responses. Infection of polarized HMEC-1 cells resulted in an increased capacity of these cells to promote the transmigration of neutrophils from the apical to the basolateral side of the monolayer, and the same phenomenon was observed when the cells were stimulated with live bacteria from the basolateral side. Overall, these results suggest that Brucella spp. can infect and survive within endothelial cells, and can induce a proinflammatory response that might be involved in the vascular manifestations of brucellosis. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Syndecan-2 downregulation impairs angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Noguer, Oriol Villena, Joan; Lorita, Jordi; Vilaro, Senen; Reina, Manuel

    2009-03-10

    The formation of new blood vessels, or angiogenesis, is a necessary process during development but also for tumour growth and other pathologies. It is promoted by different growth factors that stimulate endothelial cells to proliferate, migrate, and generate new tubular structures. Syndecans, transmembrane heparan sulphate proteoglycans, bind such growth factors through their glycosaminoglycan chains and could transduce the signal to the cytoskeleton, thus regulating cell behaviour. We demonstrated that syndecan-2, the major syndecan expressed by human microvascular endothelial cells, is regulated by growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins, in both bidimensional and tridimensional culture conditions. The role of syndecan-2 in 'in vitro' tumour angiogenesis was also examined by inhibiting its core protein expression with antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides. Downregulation of syndecan-2 reduces spreading and adhesion of endothelial cells, enhances their migration, but also impairs the formation of capillary-like structures. These results suggest that syndecan-2 has an important function in some of the necessary steps that make up the angiogenic process. We therefore propose a pivotal role of this heparan sulphate proteoglycan in the formation of new blood vessels.

  2. Distinct molecular basis for endothelial differentiation: gene expression profiles of human mesenchymal stem cells versus umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dandan; Wang, Yuezeng; Ye, Yilu; Yin, Guoli; Chen, Liqiong

    2014-01-01

    The capacity for endothelial differentiation has been described in mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from human bone marrow. To identify genes associated with the endothelial differentiation potential of this cell-type, and search for the optimal regulatory factors, the expression profile of MSC was compared with cDNA from primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells as controls, using cDNA chips with 4096 genes. The data were corroborated by quantitative PCR, Western blotting, and immunocytochemistry. Among the 3948 effective genes, ∼84% (3321) were co-expressed in both cell-types, and 627 were differentially expressed more than twofold in MSC versus EC. MSC highly expressed numerous stem-cell-like genes. Early development genes of endothelial cells, though not up-regulated, had a high expression in MSC, such as EDF1, MDG1, and EDG2. In contrast, mature endothelial growth and signal pathway genes, like VEGF, CXCR4, and CTNNB1, were down-regulated in MSC. In conclusion, human MSC have a distinct molecular basis for endothelial differentiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Glycoproteomic Analysis of the Secretome of Human Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiaoke; Bern, Marshall; Xing, Qiuru; Ho, Jenny; Viner, Rosa; Mayr, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Previous proteomics studies have partially unraveled the complexity of endothelial protein secretion but have not investigated glycosylation, a key modification of secreted and membrane proteins for cell communication. In this study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells were kept in serum-free medium before activation by phorbol-12-myristate-13 acetate, a commonly used secretagogue that induces exocytosis of endothelial vesicles. In addition to 123 secreted proteins, the secretome was particularly rich in membrane proteins. Glycopeptides were enriched by zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography resins and were either treated with PNGase F and H218O or directly analyzed using a recently developed workflow combining higher-energy C-trap dissociation (HCD) with electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) for a hybrid linear ion trap–orbitrap mass spectrometer. After deglycosylation with PNGase F in the presence of H218O, 123 unique peptides displayed 18O-deamidation of asparagine, corresponding to 86 proteins with a total of 121 glycosylation sites. Direct glycopeptide analysis via HCD-ETD identified 131 glycopeptides from 59 proteins and 118 glycosylation sites, of which 41 were known, 51 were predicted, and 26 were novel. Two methods were compared: alternating HCD-ETD and HCD-product-dependent ETD. The former detected predominantly high-intensity, multiply charged glycopeptides, whereas the latter preferentially selected precursors with complex/hybrid glycans for fragmentation. Validation was performed by means of glycoprotein enrichment and analysis of the input, the flow-through, and the bound fraction. This study represents the most comprehensive characterization of endothelial protein secretion to date and demonstrates the potential of new HCD-ETD workflows for determining the glycosylation status of complex biological samples. PMID:23345538

  4. Role of NADPH Oxidase-4 in Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hakami, Nora Y.; Ranjan, Amaresh K.; Hardikar, Anandwardhan A.; Dusting, Greg J.; Peshavariya, Hitesh M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) display a unique ability to promote angiogenesis and restore endothelial function in injured blood vessels. NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4)-derived hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) serves as a signaling molecule and promotes endothelial cell proliferation and migration as well as protecting against cell death. However, the role of NOX4 in EPC function is not completely understood. Methods: EPCs were isolated from human saphenous vein and mammary artery discarded during bypass surgery. NOX4 gene and protein expression in EPCs were measured by real time-PCR and Western blot analysis respectively. NOX4 gene expression was inhibited using an adenoviral vector expressing human NOX4 shRNA (Ad-NOX4i). H2O2 production was measured by Amplex red assay. EPC migration was evaluated using a transwell migration assay. EPC proliferation and viability were measured using trypan blue counts. Results: Inhibition of NOX4 using Ad-NOX4i reduced Nox4 gene and protein expression as well as H2O2 formation in EPCs. Inhibition of NOX4-derived H2O2 decreased both proliferation and migration of EPCs. Interestingly, pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) decreased NOX4 expression and reduced survival of EPCs. However, the survival of EPCs was further diminished by TNF-α in NOX4-knockdown cells, suggesting that NOX4 has a protective role in EPCs. Conclusion: These findings suggest that NOX4-type NADPH oxidase is important for proliferation and migration functions of EPCs and protects against pro-inflammatory cytokine induced EPC death. These properties of NOX4 may facilitate the efficient function of EPCs which is vital for successful neovascularization. PMID:28386230

  5. Antiproliferative effect of elevated glucose in human microvascular endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamal, K.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has been implicated as a fundamental feature of the pathological complications of diabetes including retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulceration. However, previous studies devoted to examining the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on the endothelium have been performed largely in primary cultured cells of macrovessel origin. Difficulty in the harvesting and maintenance of microvascular endothelial cells in culture have hindered the study of this relevant population. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the effect of elevated glucose on the proliferation and involved signaling pathways of an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) that possess similar characteristics to their in vivo counterparts. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were grown in the presence of normal (5 mM) or high D-glucose (20 mM) for 14 days. The proliferative response of HMEC-1 was compared under these conditions as well as the cAMP and PKC pathways by in vitro assays. Elevated glucose significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) HMEC-1 proliferation after 7, 10, and 14 days. This effect was not mimicked by 20 mM mannitol. The antiproliferative effect was more pronounced with longer exposure (1-14 days) to elevated glucose and was irreversible 4 days after a 10-day exposure. The antiproliferative effect was partially reversed in the presence of a PKA inhibitor, Rp-cAMP (10-50 microM), and/or a PKC inhibitor, Calphostin C (10 nM). HMEC-1 exposed to elevated glucose (20 mM) for 14 days caused an increase in cyclic AMP accumulation, PKA, and PKC activity but was not associated with the activation of downstream events such as CRE and AP-1 binding activity. These data support the hypothesis that HMEC-1 is a suitable model to study the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on microvascular endothelial cells. Continued studies with HMEC-1 may prove advantageous in delineation of the molecular

  6. Antiproliferative effect of elevated glucose in human microvascular endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamal, K.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has been implicated as a fundamental feature of the pathological complications of diabetes including retinopathy, neuropathy, and diabetic foot ulceration. However, previous studies devoted to examining the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on the endothelium have been performed largely in primary cultured cells of macrovessel origin. Difficulty in the harvesting and maintenance of microvascular endothelial cells in culture have hindered the study of this relevant population. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the effect of elevated glucose on the proliferation and involved signaling pathways of an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) that possess similar characteristics to their in vivo counterparts. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were grown in the presence of normal (5 mM) or high D-glucose (20 mM) for 14 days. The proliferative response of HMEC-1 was compared under these conditions as well as the cAMP and PKC pathways by in vitro assays. Elevated glucose significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) HMEC-1 proliferation after 7, 10, and 14 days. This effect was not mimicked by 20 mM mannitol. The antiproliferative effect was more pronounced with longer exposure (1-14 days) to elevated glucose and was irreversible 4 days after a 10-day exposure. The antiproliferative effect was partially reversed in the presence of a PKA inhibitor, Rp-cAMP (10-50 microM), and/or a PKC inhibitor, Calphostin C (10 nM). HMEC-1 exposed to elevated glucose (20 mM) for 14 days caused an increase in cyclic AMP accumulation, PKA, and PKC activity but was not associated with the activation of downstream events such as CRE and AP-1 binding activity. These data support the hypothesis that HMEC-1 is a suitable model to study the deleterious effects of elevated glucose on microvascular endothelial cells. Continued studies with HMEC-1 may prove advantageous in delineation of the molecular

  7. Falciparum Malaria-Infected Erythrocytes Specifically Bind to Cultured Human Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udeinya, Iroka J.; Schmidt, John A.; Aikawa, Masamichi; Miller, Louis H.; Green, Ira

    1981-07-01

    Erythrocytes infected with the late stages of the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum became attached to a subpopulation of cultured human endothelial cells by knoblike protrusions on the surface of the infected erythrocytes. Infected erythrocytes did not bind to cultured fibroblasts; uninfected erythrocytes did not bind to either endothelial cells or fibroblasts. The results suggest a specific receptor-ligand interaction between endothelial cells and a component, or components, in the knobs of the infected erythrocytes.

  8. Lymphocyte adhesion-dependent calcium signaling in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) can undergo dramatic phenotypic and functional alterations in response to humoral and cellular stimuli. These changes promote endothelial participation in the inflammatory response through active recruitment of immune effector cells, increased vascular permeability, and alteration in vascular tone. In an attempt to define early events in lymphocyte-mediated EC signaling, we investigated cytosolic-free calcium (Ca2+) changes in single, Fluo-3- labeled human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs), using an ACAS interactive laser cytometer. Of all lymphocyte subsets tested, allogeneic CD3-, CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells uniquely elicited oscillatory EC Ca2+ signals in cytokine (interleukin [IL]-1- or tumor necrosis factor [TNF])-treated ECs. The induction of these signals required avid intercellular adhesion, consisted of both Ca2+ mobilization and extracellular influx, and was associated with EC inositol phosphate (IP) generation. Simultaneous recording of NK and EC Ca2+ signals using two-color fluorescence detection revealed that, upon adhesion, NK cells flux prior to EC. Lymphocyte Ca2+ buffering with 1,2-bis-5-methyl-amino- phenoxylethane-N,N,N'-tetra-acetoxymethyl acetate (MAPTAM) demonstrated that lymphocyte fluxes are, in fact, prerequisites for the adhesion- dependent EC signals. mAb studies indicate that the beta 2 integrin- intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 adhesion pathway is critically involved. However, ICAM-1 antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of IL-1- mediated ICAM-1 hyperinduction had no effect on EC Ca2+ signaling in lymphocyte-EC conjugates, indicating that additional cytokine-induced EC alteration is required. These experiments combine features of lymphocyte-endothelial interactions, intercellular adhesion, EC cytokine activation and transmembrane signaling. The results implicate the IP/Ca2+ second messenger pathway in EC outside-in signaling induced by cytotoxic lymphocytes, and suggest that these signals may play a

  9. Oxytocin stimulates migration and invasion in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, M G; Chini, B; Vicentini, L M

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: It has recently been reported that oxytocin is produced by some tumour cell types, and that oxytocin receptors, belonging to the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family, are expressed in a variety of cell types. Among these, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) respond to oxytocin with an increased proliferation, suggesting a possible role for the hormone in the regulation of angiogenesis. Experimental approach: We employed chemotaxis and chemoinvasion assays to characterize the effect of oxytocin on HUVEC motility, and immunoblot analysis to study its molecular mechanisms of action. Key results: We showed that oxytocin stimulates migration and invasion in HUVECs via oxytocin receptor activation. Searching for the molecular mechanism(s) responsible for oxytocin's pro-migratory effect, we identified the Gq coupling of oxytocin receptors and phospholipase C (PLC) as the main effectors of oxytocin's action in HUVECs. We also found that oxytocin stimulates the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) via the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI-3-K)/AKT pathway, and that the activation of PI-3-K and formation of nitric oxide (NO) are required for the pro-migratory effect of oxytocin. Conclusions and implications: The ability of oxytocin to stimulate HUVEC motility and invasion suggests that the hormone can participate in physiopathological processes where activation of endothelial cells plays an important role, for example, in angiogenesis. Interestingly, both the AKT and eNOS phosphorylation induced by oxytocin receptor activation depended on PLC activity, thus suggesting the existence of a still undefined mechanism connecting PLC to the PI-3-K/AKT pathway, upon oxytocin stimulation. PMID:18059319

  10. Characterization of Endothelial Progenitor Cell Interactions with Human Tropoelastin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Young; Wise, Steven G.; Michael, Praveesuda L.; Bax, Daniel V.; Yuen, Gloria S. C.; Hiob, Matti A.; Yeo, Giselle C.; Filipe, Elysse C.; Dunn, Louise L.; Chan, Kim H.; Hajian, Hamid; Celermajer, David S.; Weiss, Anthony S.; Ng, Martin K. C.

    2015-01-01

    The deployment of endovascular implants such as stents in the treatment of cardiovascular disease damages the vascular endothelium, increasing the risk of thrombosis and promoting neointimal hyperplasia. The rapid restoration of a functional endothelium is known to reduce these complications. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are increasingly recognized as important contributors to device re-endothelialization. Extracellular matrix proteins prominent in the vessel wall may enhance EPC-directed re-endothelialization. We examined attachment, spreading and proliferation on recombinant human tropoelastin (rhTE) and investigated the mechanism and site of interaction. EPCs attached and spread on rhTE in a dose dependent manner, reaching a maximal level of 56±3% and 54±3%, respectively. EPC proliferation on rhTE was comparable to vitronectin, fibronectin and collagen. EDTA, but not heparan sulfate or lactose, reduced EPC attachment by 81±3%, while full attachment was recovered after add-back of manganese, inferring a classical integrin-mediated interaction. Integrin αVβ3 blocking antibodies decreased EPC adhesion and spreading on rhTE by 39±3% and 56±10% respectively, demonstrating a large contribution from this specific integrin. Attachment of EPCs on N-terminal rhTE constructs N25 and N18 accounted for most of this interaction, accompanied by comparable spreading. In contrast, attachment and spreading on N10 was negligible. αVβ3 blocking antibodies reduced EPC spreading on both N25 and N18 by 45±4% and 42±14%, respectively. In conclusion, rhTE supports EPC binding via an integrin mechanism involving αVβ3. N25 and N18, but not N10 constructs of rhTE contribute to EPC binding. The regulation of EPC activity by rhTE may have implications for modulation of the vascular biocompatibility of endovascular implants. PMID:26115013

  11. Mesenchymal Stem/Multipotent Stromal Cells from Human Decidua Basalis Reduce Endothelial Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Alshabibi, Manal A; Al Huqail, Al Joharah; Khatlani, Tanvir; Abomaray, Fawaz M; Alaskar, Ahmed S; Alawad, Abdullah O; Kalionis, Bill; Abumaree, Mohamed Hassan

    2017-09-15

    Recently, we reported the isolation and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from the decidua basalis of human placenta (DBMSCs). These cells express a unique combination of molecules involved in many important cellular functions, which make them good candidates for cell-based therapies. The endothelium is a highly specialized, metabolically active interface between blood and the underlying tissues. Inflammatory factors stimulate the endothelium to undergo a change to a proinflammatory and procoagulant state (ie, endothelial cell activation). An initial response to endothelial cell activation is monocyte adhesion. Activation typically involves increased proliferation and enhanced expression of adhesion and inflammatory markers by endothelial cells. Sustained endothelial cell activation leads to a type of damage to the body associated with inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. In this study, we examined the ability of DBMSCs to protect endothelial cells from activation through monocyte adhesion, by modulating endothelial proliferation, migration, adhesion, and inflammatory marker expression. Endothelial cells were cocultured with DBMSCs, monocytes, monocyte-pretreated with DBMSCs and DBMSC-pretreated with monocytes were also evaluated. Monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells was examined following treatment with DBMSCs. Expression of endothelial cell adhesion and inflammatory markers was also analyzed. The interaction between DBMSCs and monocytes reduced endothelial cell proliferation and monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. In contrast, endothelial cell migration increased in response to DBMSCs and monocytes. Endothelial cell expression of adhesion and inflammatory molecules was reduced by DBMSCs and DBMSC-pretreated with monocytes. The mechanism of reduced endothelial proliferation involved enhanced phosphorylation of the tumor suppressor protein p53. Our study shows for the first time that DBMSCs protect endothelial cells from activation by

  12. Human Corneal Endothelial Cells Expanded In Vitro Are a Powerful Resource for Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongsong; Sun, Hong; Hu, Min; Zhu, Min; Tighe, Sean; Chen, Shuangling; Zhang, Yuan; Su, Chenwei; Cai, Subo; Guo, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Human corneal endothelial cells have two major functions: barrier function mediated by proteins such as ZO-1 and pump function mediated by Na-K-ATPase which help to maintain visual function. However, human corneal endothelial cells are notorious for their limited proliferative capability in vivo and are therefore prone to corneal endothelial dysfunction that eventually may lead to blindness. At present, the only method to cure corneal endothelial dysfunction is by transplantation of a cadaver donor cornea with normal corneal endothelial cells. Due to the global shortage of donor corneas, it is vital to engineer corneal tissue in vitro that could potentially be transplanted clinically. In this review, we summarize the advances in understanding the behavior of human corneal endothelial cells, their current engineering strategy in vitro and their potential applications.

  13. Human Corneal Endothelial Cells Expanded In Vitro Are a Powerful Resource for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongsong; Sun, Hong; Hu, Min; Zhu, Min; Tighe, Sean; Chen, Shuangling; Zhang, Yuan; Su, Chenwei; Cai, Subo; Guo, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Human corneal endothelial cells have two major functions: barrier function mediated by proteins such as ZO-1 and pump function mediated by Na-K-ATPase which help to maintain visual function. However, human corneal endothelial cells are notorious for their limited proliferative capability in vivo and are therefore prone to corneal endothelial dysfunction that eventually may lead to blindness. At present, the only method to cure corneal endothelial dysfunction is by transplantation of a cadaver donor cornea with normal corneal endothelial cells. Due to the global shortage of donor corneas, it is vital to engineer corneal tissue in vitro that could potentially be transplanted clinically. In this review, we summarize the advances in understanding the behavior of human corneal endothelial cells, their current engineering strategy in vitro and their potential applications. PMID:28260988

  14. Volume changes of human endothelial cells induced by photodynamic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leunig, Andreas; Staub, Frank; Plesnila, Nick; Peters, Jurgen; Feyh, Jens; Gutmann, Ralph; Goetz, Alwin E.

    1996-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has shown promising results in treatment of malignant tumors. However, the mechanisms leading to tumor destruction during PDT are still not completely understood. In addition to effects on the microcirculation, damage to cellular structures has been observed following exposure of cells to PDT. A phenomenon preceding these events might possibly be cell swelling. We therefore studied the influence of treatment with Photofrin (PF) and laser light on volume changes and cell viability of endothelial cells. Endothelial cells were obtained from human umbilical cord veins (HUVEC) by an adaption of the method of Maruyama (1963). After subcultivation the cells were harvested and transferred as a cell suspension into a specially designed incubation chamber. Cells received either PF in concentrations of 1.5 or 3.0 (mu) g/ml and laser illumination (630 nm; 40 mW/cm2, 4 Joule), PF alone, or laser treatment only. Following start of PF incubation and after phototreatment cell samples were taken for volume measurements using flow cytometry and for studies of cellular morphology using scanning electron microscopy. Simultaneously, cell viability was monitored by the trypan blue exclusion test and colorimetric MTT assay. (abstract truncated)

  15. 3D map of the human corneal endothelial cell

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhiguo; Forest, Fabien; Gain, Philippe; Rageade, Damien; Bernard, Aurélien; Acquart, Sophie; Peoc’h, Michel; Defoe, Dennis M.; Thuret, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (CECs) are terminally differentiated cells, specialized in regulating corneal hydration and transparency. They are highly polarized flat cells that separate the cornea from the aqueous humor. Their apical surface, in contact with aqueous humor is hexagonal, whereas their basal surface is irregular. We characterized the structure of human CECs in 3D using confocal microscopy of immunostained whole corneas in which cells and their interrelationships remain intact. Hexagonality of the apical surface was maintained by the interaction between tight junctions and a submembraneous network of actomyosin, braced like a drum. Lateral membranes, which support enzymatic pumps, presented complex expansions resembling interdigitated foot processes at the basal surface. Using computer-aided design and drafting software, we obtained a first simplified 3D model of CECs. By comparing their expression with those in epithelial, stromal and trabecular corneal cells, we selected 9 structural or functional proteins for which 3D patterns were specific to CECs. This first 3D map aids our understanding of the morphologic and functional specificity of CECs and could be used as a reference for characterizing future cell therapy products destined to treat endothelial dysfunctions. PMID:27381832

  16. Human endothelial progenitor cells isolated from COPD patients are dysfunctional.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoran; Xie, Canmao

    2012-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). More than 44% of these patients present with generalized atherosclerosis at autopsy. It is accepted that endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) participate in the repair of dysfunctional endothelium and thus protects against atherosclerosis. However, whether COPD affects the repairing capacity of EPCs is unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine whether and how EPCs are involved in the vascular repair process in patients with COPD. In our study, EPCs from 25 COPD and 16 control patients were isolated by Ficoll density-gradient centrifugation and identified using fluorescence activated cell sorting. Transwell Migratory Assay was performed to determine the number of EPC colony-forming units and the adherent capacity late-EPCs to human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Following arterial damage in NOD/SCID mice, the number of EPCs incorporated at the injured vascular site was determined using a fluorescence microscope. We found that the number of EPC clusters and cell migration, as well as the expression of CXCR4, was significantly decreased in patients with COPD. Additionally, the number of late-EPCs adherent to HUVEC tubules was significantly reduced, and fewer VEGFR2(+)-staining cells were incorporated into the injured site in COPD patients. Our study demonstrates that EPC capacity of repair was affected in COPD patients, which may contribute to altered vascular endothelium in this patient population.

  17. Human endothelial cell responses to cardiovascular inspired pulsatile shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Matthew; Baugh, Lauren; Black, Lauren, III; Kemmerling, Erica

    2016-11-01

    It is well established that hemodynamic shear stress regulates blood vessel structure and the development of vascular pathology. This process can be studied via in vitro models of endothelial cell responses to pulsatile shear stress. In this study, a macro-scale cone and plate viscometer was designed to mimic various shear stress waveforms found in the body and apply these stresses to human endothelial cells. The device was actuated by a PID-controlled DC gear-motor. Cells were exposed to 24 hours of pulsatile shear and then imaged and stained to track their morphology and secretions. These measurements were compared with control groups of cells exposed to constant shear and no shear. The results showed that flow pulsatility influenced levels of secreted proteins such as VE-cadherin and neuroregulin IHC. Cell morphology was also influenced by flow pulsatility; in general cells exposed to pulsatile shear stress developed a higher aspect ratio than cells exposed to no flow but a lower aspect ratio than cells exposed to steady flow.

  18. Endothelial human dihydrofolate reductase low activity limits vascular tetrahydrobiopterin recycling

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jennifer; Filho, Artur Rangel; Sethumadhavan, Savitha; Celinska, Joanna; Widlansky, Michael; Vásquez-Vivar, Jeannette

    2013-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is required for NO synthesis and inhibition of superoxide release from eNOS. Clinical trials using BH4 to treat endothelial dysfunction have produced mixed results. Poor outcomes may be explained by the rapid systemic and cellular oxidation of BH4. One of the oxidation products of BH4, 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (7,8-BH2), is recycled back to BH4 by dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). This enzyme is ubiquitously distributed and shows a wide range of activity depending on species-specific factors and cell type. Information about the kinetics and efficiency of BH4 recycling in human endothelial cells receiving BH4 treatment is lacking. To characterize this reaction, we applied a novel multi-electrode coulometric HPLC method that enabled the direct quantification of 7,8-BH2 and BH4 which is not possible with fluorescent-based methodologies. We found that basal untreated BH4 and 7,8-BH2 concentrations in human ECs is lower than bovine and murine endothelioma cells. Treatment of human ECs with BH4 transiently increased intracellular BH4 while accumulating the more stable 7,8-BH2. This was different from bovine or murine ECs that resulted in preferential BH4 increase. Using BH4 diastereomers, 6S-BH4 and 6R-BH4, the narrow contribution of enzymatic DHFR recycling to total intracellular BH4 was demonstrated. Reduction of 7,8-BH2 to BH4 occurs at very slow rates in cells and needs supra-physiological levels of 7,8-BH2, indicating this reaction is kinetically limited. Activity assays verified that hDHFR has very low affinity for 7,8-BH2 (DHF7,8-BH2) and folic acid inhibits 7,8-BH2 recycling. We conclude that low activity of endothelial DHFR is an important factor limiting the benefits of BH4 therapies which may be further aggravated by folate supplements. PMID:23707606

  19. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human microvascular endothelial cells: role in endothelial permeability

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yong; Ducatman, Alan; Ward, Rebecca; Leonard, Steve; Bukowski, Valerie; Guo, Nancy Lan; Shi, Xianglin; Vallyathan, Val; Castranova, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a member of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAA) containing an 8-carbon backbone. PFOS is a man-made chemical with carbon-fluorine bonds that are one of the strongest in organic chemistry and widely used in industry. Human occupational and environmental exposure to PFOS occurs globally. PFOS is non-biodegradable and persistent in the human body and environment. In this study, data demonstrated that exposure of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) to PFOS induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at both high and low concentrations. Morphologically, it was found that exposure to PFOS induced actin filament remodeling and endothelial permeability changes in HMVEC. Furthermore, data demonstrated the production of ROS plays a regulatory role in PFOS-induced actin filament remodeling and the increase in endothelial permeability. Our results indicate that the generation of ROS may play a role in PFOS-induced aberrations of the endothelial permeability barrier. The results generated from this study may provide a new insight into the potential adverse effects of PFOS exposure on humans at the cellular level. PMID:20391123

  20. Lung endothelial cells strengthen, but brain endothelial cells weaken barrier properties of a human alveolar epithelium cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Winfried; Samwer, Fabian; Kunzmann, Steffen; Muellenbach, Ralf M; Wirth, Michael; Speer, Christian P; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola Y

    2012-11-01

    The blood-air barrier in the lung consists of the alveolar epithelium, the underlying capillary endothelium, their basement membranes and the interstitial space between the cell layers. Little is known about the interactions between the alveolar and the blood compartment. The aim of the present study was to gain first insights into the possible interplay between these two neighbored cell layers. We established an in vitro Transwell model of the alveolar epithelium based on human cell line H441 and investigated the influence of conditioned medium obtained from human lung endothelial cell line HPMEC-ST1.6R on the barrier properties of the H441 layers. As control for tissue specificity H441 layers were exposed to conditioned medium from human brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Addition of dexamethasone was necessary to obtain stable H441 cell layers. Moreover, dexamethasone increased expression of cell type I markers (caveolin-1, RAGE) and cell type II marker SP-B, whereas decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) in a concentration dependent manner. Soluble factors obtained from the lung endothelial cell line increased the barrier significantly proven by TEER values and fluorescein permeability on the functional level and by the differential expression of tight junctional proteins on the molecular level. In contrast to this, soluble factors derived from brain endothelial cells weakened the barrier significantly. In conclusion, soluble factors from lung endothelial cells can strengthen the alveolar epithelium barrier in vitro, which suggests communication between endothelial and epithelial cells regulating the integrity of the blood-air barrier.

  1. Silicon microgrooves for contact guidance of human aortic endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Pallarès, Josep; Solà, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    Background: Micro- and nanoscale substrates have been fabricated in order to study the influence of the topography on the cellular response. The aim of this work was to prepare different collagen-coated silicon substrates displaying grooves and ridges to mimic the aligned and elongated endothelium found in linear vessels, and to use them as substrates to study cell growth and behaviour. Results: The influence of groove-shaped substrates on cell adhesion, morphology and proliferation were assessed, by comparing them to flat silicon substrates, used as control condition. Using human aortic endothelial cells, microscopy images demonstrate that the cellular response is different depending on the silicon surface, when it comes to cell adhesion, morphology (alignment, circularity and filopodia presence) and proliferation. Moreover, these structures exerted no cytotoxic effect. Conclusion: The results suggest that topographical patterning influences cell response. Silicon groove substrates can be used in developing medical devices with microscale features to mimic the endothelium in lineal vessels. PMID:28462069

  2. Assessment of endothelial and neurovascular function in human skin microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Roustit, Matthieu; Cracowski, Jean-Luc

    2013-07-01

    Peripheral microvascular dysfunction has been described in many physiological and pathological conditions. Owing to its accessibility, the cutaneous microcirculation provides a unique index of microvascular function. Skin microvascular function has therefore been proposed as a prognostic marker or for evaluating the effect of drugs on the microcirculation. Various reactivity tests, coupled with techniques measuring skin blood flux, are used to non-invasively explore both endothelial and neurovascular microvascular functioning in humans. We review the advantages and limitations of the main reactivity tests, including post-occlusive reactive hyperemia, local thermal hyperemia, pressure-induced vasodilation, and iontophoresis of vasodilators, combined with measurement techniques such as laser Doppler and laser speckle contrast imaging. Recent advances in our comprehension of the physiological pathways underlying these reactivity tests, as well as technological developments in microcirculation imaging, have provided reliable and reproducible tools for studying the microcirculation.

  3. Silicon microgrooves for contact guidance of human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Castillejo, Sara; Formentín, Pilar; Catalán, Úrsula; Pallarès, Josep; Marsal, Lluís F; Solà, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    Background: Micro- and nanoscale substrates have been fabricated in order to study the influence of the topography on the cellular response. The aim of this work was to prepare different collagen-coated silicon substrates displaying grooves and ridges to mimic the aligned and elongated endothelium found in linear vessels, and to use them as substrates to study cell growth and behaviour. Results: The influence of groove-shaped substrates on cell adhesion, morphology and proliferation were assessed, by comparing them to flat silicon substrates, used as control condition. Using human aortic endothelial cells, microscopy images demonstrate that the cellular response is different depending on the silicon surface, when it comes to cell adhesion, morphology (alignment, circularity and filopodia presence) and proliferation. Moreover, these structures exerted no cytotoxic effect. Conclusion: The results suggest that topographical patterning influences cell response. Silicon groove substrates can be used in developing medical devices with microscale features to mimic the endothelium in lineal vessels.

  4. Featured Article: Differential regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation by protease-activated receptors in adult human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tillery, Lakeisha C; Epperson, Tenille A; Eguchi, Satoru; Motley, Evangeline D

    2016-03-01

    Protease-activated receptors have been shown to regulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase through the phosphorylation of specific sites on the enzyme. It has been established that PAR-2 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Ser-1177 and leads to the production of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide, while PAR-1 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Thr-495 and decreases nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this study, we hypothesize a differential coupling of protease-activated receptors to the signaling pathways that regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in primary adult human coronary artery endothelial cells. Using Western Blot analysis, we showed that thrombin and the PAR-1 activating peptide, TFLLR, lead to the phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 in human coronary artery endothelial cells, which was blocked by SCH-79797 (SCH), a PAR-1 inhibitor. Using the nitrate/nitrite assay, we also demonstrated that the thrombin- and TFLLR-induced production of nitric oxide was inhibited by SCH and L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. In addition, we observed that TFLLR, unlike thrombin, significantly phosphorylated eNOS-Thr-495, which may explain the observed delay in nitric oxide production in comparison to that of thrombin. Activation of PAR-2 by SLIGRL, a PAR-2 specific ligand, leads to dual phosphorylation of both catalytic sites but primarily regulated eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation with no change in nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells. PAR-3, known as the non-signaling receptor, was activated by TFRGAP, a PAR-3 mimicking peptide, and significantly induced the phosphorylation of eNOS-Thr-495 with minimal phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 with no change in nitric oxide production. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-mediated eNOS-Ser-1177 phosphorylation was Ca(2+)-dependent using the Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA, while eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation was mediated via Rho kinase using the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632

  5. Reprogramming Human Endothelial to Hematopoietic Cells Requires Vascular Induction

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Vladislav M.; Lis, Raphael; Liu, Ying; Kedem, Alon; James, Daylon; Elemento, Olivier; Butler, Jason M.; Scandura, Joseph M.; Rafii, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Generating engraftable human hematopoietic cells from autologous tissues promises new therapies for blood diseases. Directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells yields hematopoietic cells that poorly engraft. Here, we devised a method to phenocopy the vascular-niche microenvironment of hemogenic cells, thereby enabling reprogramming of human endothelial cells (ECs) into engraftable hematopoietic cells without transition through a pluripotent intermediate. Highly purified non-hemogenic human umbilical vein-ECs (HUVECs) or adult dermal microvascular ECs (hDMECs) were transduced with transcription factors (TFs), FOSB, GFI1, RUNX1, and SPI1 (FGRS), and then propagated on serum-free instructive vascular niche monolayers to induce outgrowth of hematopoietic colonies containing cells with functional and immunophenotypic features of multipotent progenitor cells (MPP). These reprogrammed ECs- into human-MPPs (rEC-hMPPs) acquire colony-forming cell (CFC) potential and durably engraft in immune-deficient mice after primary and secondary transplantation, producing long-term rEC-hMPP-derived myeloid (granulocytic/monocytic, erythroid, megakaryocytic) and lymphoid (NK, B) progeny. Conditional expression of FGRS transgenes, combined with vascular-induction, activates endogenous FGRS genes endowing rEC-hMPPs with a transcriptional and functional profile similar to self-renewing MPPs. Our approach underscores the role of inductive cues from vascular-niche in orchestrating and sustaining hematopoietic specification and may prove useful for engineering autologous hematopoietic grafts to treat inherited and acquired blood disorders. PMID:25030167

  6. Cryopreservation and lentiviral-mediated genetic modification of human primary cultured corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Suh, Leejee H; Zhang, Cheng; Chuck, Roy S; Stark, Walter J; Naylor, Stuart; Binley, Katie; Chakravarti, Shukti; Jun, Albert S

    2007-07-01

    To determine the viability and potential usefulness of cryopreserved human primary cultured corneal endothelial cells by characterizing their morphology, gene expression, and ability for genetic modification by the lentiviral vector equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). Primary cultured endothelial cells were dissociated from human corneas and grown in organ culture medium. Corneal endothelial cell origin was confirmed by morphology and immunostaining with polyclonal anti-collagen VIII antibodies. Cells of different passages were cryopreserved in medium containing dimethyl sulfoxide and were assessed after thawing for morphology, proliferative capacity, gene expression, and ability to form cell-cell junctions. EIAV encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) was used to transduce cryopreserved human corneal endothelial cells. Transduced cells were then sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and imaged with fluorescence microscopy. Cryopreserved, primary, cultured human corneal endothelial cells are viable and retain their ability to proliferate, produce collagen VIII, and express ZO-1, a tight-junction protein. EIAV-based gene transfer of eGFP is highly efficient and nontoxic to cryopreserved human primary cultured corneal endothelial cells. These genetically modified cells can be selected to nearly pure populations with FACS sorting. Human primary cultured corneal endothelial cells retain their phenotypic properties after cryopreservation. The ability to store, genetically modify, and sort these cells through FACS to pure populations has the potential to greatly expand their future therapeutic application to treat corneal endothelial disorders.

  7. An Antagonistic Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Variant Inhibits VEGF-Stimulated Receptor Autophosphorylation and Proliferation of Human Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemeister, Gerhard; Schirner, Michael; Reusch, Petra; Barleon, Bernhard; Marme, Dieter; Martiny-Baron, Georg

    1998-04-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogen with a unique specificity for endothelial cells and a key mediator of aberrant endothelial cell proliferation and vascular permeability in a variety of human pathological situations, such as tumor angiogenesis, diabetic retinopathy, rheumatoid arthritis, or psoriasis. VEGF is a symmetric homodimeric molecule with two receptor binding interfaces lying on each pole of the molecule. Herein we report on the construction and recombinant expression of an asymmetric heterodimeric VEGF variant with an intact receptor binding interface at one pole and a mutant receptor binding interface at the second pole of the dimer. This VEGF variant binds to VEGF receptors but fails to induce receptor activation. In competition experiments, the heterodimeric VEGF variant antagonizes VEGF-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation and proliferation of endothelial cells. A 15-fold excess of the heterodimer was sufficient to inhibit VEGF-stimulated endothelial cell proliferation by 50%, and a 100-fold excess resulted in an almost complete inhibition. By using a rational approach that is based on the structure of VEGF, we have shown the feasibility to construct a VEGF variant that acts as an VEGF antagonist.

  8. [Effects of endothelial lipase on mRNA expression of adhesion molecule of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Fang, Yu-qiang; Huang, Lan; Zhao, Xiao-hui; Yin, Yang-guang; Kang, Hua-li; Deng, Meng-yang

    2007-12-01

    To explore the relationship between human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) and endothelial lipase (EL), and the effect of EL on expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecule (ICAM). HUVECs was treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha(TNF-alpha) 10 microg/L and the mRNA of adhesion molecules [intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and E-selectin] were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Then the effect of 50 microg/L anti-endothelial lipase (anti-EL) antibody on the influence of TNF-alpha on these adhesion molecules was observed. After being treated with TNF-alpha, the mRNA of adhesion molecules expressed by HUVECs were significant up-regulated, there was significant difference compared with control group (all P<0.01). These effects of TNF-alpha were significantly abolished by 50 microg/L anti-EL antibody (P<0.05 or P<0.01). EL can affect the expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cell adhesion molecule. This effect of EL may play a role in the pathophysiologic process in the pathogenesis progress of atherosclerosis.

  9. Aging impairs transcriptional regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor in human microvascular endothelial cells: implications for angiogenesis and cell survival.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, A; Jones, M K; Szabo, S; Tarnawski, A S

    2014-04-01

    In some tissues, aging impairs angiogenesis and reduces expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF), a fundamental regulator of angiogenesis. We previously examined angiogenesis in aging and young gastric mucosa in vivo and in vitro and showed that an imbalance between expressions of VEGF (pro-angiogenic factor) and endostatin (anti-angiogenic protein) results in an aging-related impairment of angiogenesis in rats. However, the human relevance of these findings, and whether these mechanisms apply to endothelial cells derived from other tissues, is not clear. Since P-STAT3 and P-CREB are transcription factors that, in association with HIF-1α, can activate VEGF gene expression in some cells (e.g., liver cancer cells, vascular smooth muscle cells), we examined the expression of these two proteins in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) derived from aging and neonatal individuals. We examined and quantified in vitro angiogenesis, expression of VEGF, P-STAT3, P-CREB and importin-α in HMVECs isolated from neonates (neonatal) and a 66 year old subject (aging). We also examined the effects of treatment with exogenous VEGF and endostatin on in vitro angiogenesis in these cells. Endothelial cells isolated from aging individuals had impaired angiogenesis (vs. neonatal endothelial cells) and reduced expression of VEGF mRNA and protein. Aged HMVECs also had reduced importin-α expression, and reduced expression and nuclear translocation of P-STAT3 and P-CREB. Reduced VEGF gene expression in aged HMVECs strongly correlated with the decreased levels of P-STAT3, P-CREB and importin-α in these cells. Our study clearly demonstrates that endothelial cells from aging individuals have impaired angiogenesis and reduced expression of VEGF likely due to impaired nuclear transport of P-STAT3 and P-CREB transcription factors in these cells.

  10. Contribution of endothelial nitric oxide to blood pressure in humans.

    PubMed

    Gamboa, Alfredo; Shibao, Cyndya; Diedrich, André; Choi, Leena; Pohar, Bojan; Jordan, Jens; Paranjape, Sachin; Farley, Ginnie; Biaggioni, Italo

    2007-01-01

    Impaired endothelial-derived NO (eNO) is invoked in the development of many pathological conditions. Systemic inhibition of NO synthesis, used to assess the importance of NO to blood pressure (BP) regulation, increases BP by approximately 15 mm Hg. This approach underestimates the importance of eNO, because BP is restrained by baroreflex mechanisms and does not account for a role of neurally derived NO. To overcome these limitations, we induced complete autonomic blockade with trimethaphan in 17 normotensive healthy control subjects to eliminate baroreflex mechanisms and contribution of neurally derived NO. Under these conditions, the increase in BP reflects mostly blockade of tonic eNO. N(G)-Monomethyl-l-arginine (250 microg/kg per minute IV) increased mean BP by 6+/-3.7 mm Hg (from 77 to 82 mm Hg) in intact subjects and by 21+/-8.4 mm Hg (from 75 to 96 mm Hg) during autonomic blockade. We did not find a significant contribution of neurally derived NO to BP regulation after accounting for baroreflex buffering. To further validate this approach, we compared the effect of NOS inhibition during autonomic blockade in 10 normotensive individuals with that of 6 normotensive smokers known to have endothelial dysfunction but who were otherwise normal. As expected, normotensive smokers showed a significantly lower increase in systolic BP during selective eNO blockade (11+/-4.5 versus 30+/-2.3 mm Hg in normotensive individuals; P<0.005). Thus, we report a novel approach to preferentially evaluate the role of eNO on BP control in normal and disease states. Our results suggest that eNO is one of the most potent metabolic determinants of BP in humans, tonically restraining it by approximately 30 mm Hg.

  11. Transcript analysis reveals a specific HOX signature associated with positional identity of human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Toshner, Mark; Dunmore, Benjamin J; McKinney, Eoin F; Southwood, Mark; Caruso, Paola; Upton, Paul D; Waters, John P; Ormiston, Mark L; Skepper, Jeremy N; Nash, Gerard; Rana, Amer A; Morrell, Nicholas W

    2014-01-01

    The endothelial cell has a remarkable ability for sub-specialisation, adapted to the needs of a variety of vascular beds. The role of developmental programming versus the tissue contextual environment for this specialization is not well understood. Here we describe a hierarchy of expression of HOX genes associated with endothelial cell origin and location. In initial microarray studies, differential gene expression was examined in two endothelial cell lines: blood derived outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) and pulmonary artery endothelial cells. This suggested shared and differential patterns of HOX gene expression between the two endothelial lines. For example, this included a cluster on chromosome 2 of HOXD1, HOXD3, HOXD4, HOXD8 and HOXD9 that was expressed at a higher level in BOECs. Quantative PCR confirmed the higher expression of these HOXs in BOECs, a pattern that was shared by a variety of microvascular endothelial cell lines. Subsequently, we analysed publically available microarrays from a variety of adult cell and tissue types using the whole "HOX transcriptome" of all 39 HOX genes. Using hierarchical clustering analysis the HOX transcriptome was able to discriminate endothelial cells from 61 diverse human cell lines of various origins. In a separate publically available microarray dataset of 53 human endothelial cell lines, the HOX transcriptome additionally organized endothelial cells related to their organ or tissue of origin. Human tissue staining for HOXD8 and HOXD9 confirmed endothelial expression and also supported increased microvascular expression of these HOXs. Together these observations suggest a significant involvement of HOX genes in endothelial cell positional identity.

  12. Transcript Analysis Reveals a Specific HOX Signature Associated with Positional Identity of Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toshner, Mark; Dunmore, Benjamin J.; McKinney, Eoin F.; Southwood, Mark; Caruso, Paola; Upton, Paul D.; Waters, John P.; Ormiston, Mark L.; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Nash, Gerard; Rana, Amer A.; Morrell, Nicholas W.

    2014-01-01

    The endothelial cell has a remarkable ability for sub-specialisation, adapted to the needs of a variety of vascular beds. The role of developmental programming versus the tissue contextual environment for this specialization is not well understood. Here we describe a hierarchy of expression of HOX genes associated with endothelial cell origin and location. In initial microarray studies, differential gene expression was examined in two endothelial cell lines: blood derived outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) and pulmonary artery endothelial cells. This suggested shared and differential patterns of HOX gene expression between the two endothelial lines. For example, this included a cluster on chromosome 2 of HOXD1, HOXD3, HOXD4, HOXD8 and HOXD9 that was expressed at a higher level in BOECs. Quantative PCR confirmed the higher expression of these HOXs in BOECs, a pattern that was shared by a variety of microvascular endothelial cell lines. Subsequently, we analysed publically available microarrays from a variety of adult cell and tissue types using the whole “HOX transcriptome” of all 39 HOX genes. Using hierarchical clustering analysis the HOX transcriptome was able to discriminate endothelial cells from 61 diverse human cell lines of various origins. In a separate publically available microarray dataset of 53 human endothelial cell lines, the HOX transcriptome additionally organized endothelial cells related to their organ or tissue of origin. Human tissue staining for HOXD8 and HOXD9 confirmed endothelial expression and also supported increased microvascular expression of these HOXs. Together these observations suggest a significant involvement of HOX genes in endothelial cell positional identity. PMID:24651450

  13. Delta- and gamma-tocotrienol isomers are potent in inhibiting inflammation and endothelial activation in stimulated human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Muid, Suhaila; Froemming, Gabriele R. Anisah; Rahman, Thuhairah; Ali, A. Manaf; Nawawi, Hapizah M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tocotrienols (TCTs) are more potent antioxidants than α-tocopherol (TOC). However, the effectiveness and mechanism of the action of TCT isomers as anti-atherosclerotic agents in stimulated human endothelial cells under inflammatory conditions are not well established. Aims 1) To compare the effects of different TCT isomers on inflammation, endothelial activation, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). 2) To identify the two most potent TCT isomers in stimulated human endothelial cells. 3) To investigate the effects of TCT isomers on NFκB activation, and protein and gene expression levels in stimulated human endothelial cells. Methods Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with various concentrations of TCT isomers or α-TOC (0.3–10 µM), together with lipopolysaccharides for 16 h. Supernatant cells were collected and measured for protein and gene expression of cytokines (interleukin-6, or IL-6; tumor necrosis factor-alpha, or TNF-α), adhesion molecules (intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, or ICAM-1; vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, or VCAM-1; and e-selectin), eNOS, and NFκB. Results δ-TCT is the most potent TCT isomer in the inhibition of IL-6, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and NFκB, and it is the second potent in inhibiting e-selectin and eNOS. γ-TCT isomer is the most potent isomer in inhibiting e-selectin and eNOS, and it is the second most potent in inhibiting is IL-6, VCAM-1, and NFκB. For ICAM-1 protein expression, the most potent is δ-TCT followed by α-TCT. α- and β-TCT inhibit IL-6 at the highest concentration (10 µM) but enhance IL-6 at lower concentrations. γ-TCT markedly increases eNOS expression by 8–11-fold at higher concentrations (5–10 µM) but exhibits neutral effects at lower concentrations. Conclusion δ- and γ-TCT are the two most potent TCT isomers in terms of the inhibition of inflammation and endothelial activation whilst enhancing eNOS, possibly mediated via the NFκB pathway. Hence, there is a

  14. SIRT3 Deficiency Induces Endothelial Insulin Resistance and Blunts Endothelial-Dependent Vasorelaxation in Mice and Human with Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lu; Zhang, Julei; Xing, Wenjuan; Zhang, Xing; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Haifeng; Chen, Li; Ning, Xiaona; Ji, Gang; Li, Jia; Zhao, Qingchuan; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the critical role of Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) in the development of many metabolic diseases, but the contribution of SIRT3 to vascular homeostasis remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of SIRT3 in endothelial insulin resistance and vascular dysfunction in obesity. We found an impaired insulin-induced mesenteric vasorelaxation and concomitant reduced vascular SIRT3 expression in morbid obese human subjects compared with the non-obese subjects. Downregulation of SIRT3 in cultured human endothelial cells increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) and impaired insulin signaling as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase and subsequent reduced nitric oxide (NO) release. In addition, obese mice induced by 24-week high-fat diet (HFD) displayed an impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation to both insulin and acetylcholine, which was further exacerbated by the gene deletion of Sirt3. Scavenging of mtROS not only restored insulin-stimulated NO production in SIRT3 knockdown cells, but also improved insulin-induced vasorelaxation in SIRT3 knockout mice fed with HFD. Taken together, our findings suggest that SIRT3 positively regulates endothelial insulin sensitivity and show that SIRT3 deficiency and resultant increased mtROS contribute to vascular dysfunction in obesity. PMID:27000941

  15. SIRT3 Deficiency Induces Endothelial Insulin Resistance and Blunts Endothelial-Dependent Vasorelaxation in Mice and Human with Obesity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Zhang, Julei; Xing, Wenjuan; Zhang, Xing; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Haifeng; Chen, Li; Ning, Xiaona; Ji, Gang; Li, Jia; Zhao, Qingchuan; Gao, Feng

    2016-03-22

    Recent evidence implicates the critical role of Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) in the development of many metabolic diseases, but the contribution of SIRT3 to vascular homeostasis remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of SIRT3 in endothelial insulin resistance and vascular dysfunction in obesity. We found an impaired insulin-induced mesenteric vasorelaxation and concomitant reduced vascular SIRT3 expression in morbid obese human subjects compared with the non-obese subjects. Downregulation of SIRT3 in cultured human endothelial cells increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) and impaired insulin signaling as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase and subsequent reduced nitric oxide (NO) release. In addition, obese mice induced by 24-week high-fat diet (HFD) displayed an impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation to both insulin and acetylcholine, which was further exacerbated by the gene deletion of Sirt3. Scavenging of mtROS not only restored insulin-stimulated NO production in SIRT3 knockdown cells, but also improved insulin-induced vasorelaxation in SIRT3 knockout mice fed with HFD. Taken together, our findings suggest that SIRT3 positively regulates endothelial insulin sensitivity and show that SIRT3 deficiency and resultant increased mtROS contribute to vascular dysfunction in obesity.

  16. Converting enzyme inhibitor temocaprilat prevents high glucose-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yasunari, Kenichi; Maeda, Kensaku; Watanabe, Takanori; Nakamura, Munehiro; Asada, Akira; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2003-12-01

    We examined the involvement of the oxidative stress in high glucose-induced suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation. Chronic glucose treatment for 72 h concentration-dependently (5.6-22.2 mol/l) inhibited human coronary endothelial cell proliferation. Temocaprilat, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, at 10 nmol/l to 1 micromol/l inhibited high glucose (22.2 mmol/l)-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation. Temocaprilat at 1 micromol/l inhibited high glucose-induced membrane-bound protein kinase C activity in human aortic endothelial cells. The protein kinase C inhibitors calphostin C 100 nmol/l or chelerythrine 1 micromol/l inhibited high glucose-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation. Chronic high glucose treatment for 72 h increased intracellular oxidative stress, directly measured by flow cytometry using carboxydichlorofluorescein diacetate bis-acetoxymethyl ester, and this increase was significantly suppressed by temocaprilat 10 nmol/l to 1 micromol/l. Bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist icatibant 100 nmol/l significantly reduced the action of temocaprilat; whereas bradykinin B1 receptor antagonist des-Arg9-Leu8-bradykinin 100 nmol/l had no effect. These findings suggest that high glucose inhibits human aortic endothelial cell proliferation and that the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor temocaprilat inhibits high glucose-mediated suppression of human aortic endothelial cell proliferation, possibly through suppression of protein kinase C, bradykinin B2 receptors and oxidative stress.

  17. Ultrasound fails to induce proliferation of human brain and mouse endothelial cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodemer, Claus; Jenne, Jürgen; Fatar, Marc; Hennerici, Michael G.; Meairs, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    Both in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that ultrasound (US) is capable of inducing angiogenesis. There is no information, however, on whether ultrasound can induce proliferation of brain endothelial cells. We therefore explored the angiogenic potential of ultrasound on a novel immortalised human brain endothelial cell line (hCMEC/D3) and on mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (bEND3). Ultrasound failed to enhance cell proliferation in both cell lines at all acoustic pressures studied. Endothelial cell damage occurred at 0.24 MPa with significantly slower proliferation. Cells growing in Opticell{trade mark, serif} dishes did not show damage or reduced proliferation at these pressures.

  18. Decellularized extracellular matrix of human umbilical vein endothelial cells promotes endothelial differentiation of stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ting; Heng, Boon Chin; Xu, Jianguang; Zhu, Shaoyue; Yuan, Changyong; Lo, Edward Chin Man; Zhang, Chengfei

    2017-04-01

    Dental stem cells can serve as a potential source of functional endothelial cells for tissue engineering applications, but the endothelial-lineage differentiation efficiency is rather low even with growth factors and mechanical stimuli, which greatly limits their clinical applications. This is partly due to the deficiency of standard two-dimensional (2-D) culture systems, which is unable to recapitulate the three-dimensional (3-D) in vivo milieu that is rich in extracellular matrix. Hence, we extracted decellularized extracellular matrix from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs-DECM) to provide a bioactive substratum conducive to the endothelial differentiation of dental stem cells. Compared to cells plated on tissue culture polystyrene (TCP), stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) cultured on the HUVECs-DECM demonstrated more regular arrangement and elongated morphology. HUVECs-DECM significantly enhanced the rapid adhesion and proliferation rates of SHED, as demonstrated by WST-8 assay and immunocytochemistry indicating higher expression levels of vinculin by newly adherent SHED on HUVECs-DECM versus TCP. In addition, there was twofold to fivefold higher mRNA expression levels of endothelial-specific markers CD31 and VEGFR-2 in SHED after seven days of culture on DECM versus TCP. Functional testing with in vitro matrigel angiogenesis assay identified more capillary-like structure formation with significantly higher tubule length in SHED induced by DECM versus TCP. Hence, the results of this study provide a better understanding of the unique characteristics of cell-specific ECM and demonstrated the potential use of HUVECs-DECM as a culture substratum conducive for stimulating the endothelial differentiation of SHED for therapeutic angiogenic applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1083-1093, 2017.

  19. F-actin-anchored focal adhesions distinguish endothelial phenotypes of human arteries and veins.

    PubMed

    van Geemen, Daphne; Smeets, Michel W J; van Stalborch, Anne-Marieke D; Woerdeman, Leonie A E; Daemen, Mat J A P; Hordijk, Peter L; Huveneers, Stephan

    2014-09-01

    Vascular endothelial-cadherin- and integrin-based cell adhesions are crucial for endothelial barrier function. Formation and disassembly of these adhesions controls endothelial remodeling during vascular repair, angiogenesis, and inflammation. In vitro studies indicate that vascular cytokines control adhesion through regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, but it remains unknown whether such regulation occurs in human vessels. We aimed to investigate regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and cell adhesions within the endothelium of human arteries and veins. We used an ex vivo protocol for immunofluorescence in human vessels, allowing detailed en face microscopy of endothelial monolayers. We compared arteries and veins of the umbilical cord and mesenteric, epigastric, and breast tissues and find that the presence of central F-actin fibers distinguishes the endothelial phenotype of adult arteries from veins. F-actin in endothelium of adult veins as well as in umbilical vasculature predominantly localizes cortically at the cell boundaries. By contrast, prominent endothelial F-actin fibers in adult arteries anchor mostly to focal adhesions containing integrin-binding proteins paxillin and focal adhesion kinase and follow the orientation of the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. Other arterial F-actin fibers end in vascular endothelial-cadherin-based endothelial focal adherens junctions. In vitro adhesion experiments on compliant substrates demonstrate that formation of focal adhesions is strongly induced by extracellular matrix rigidity, irrespective of arterial or venous origin of endothelial cells. Our data show that F-actin-anchored focal adhesions distinguish endothelial phenotypes of human arteries from veins. We conclude that the biomechanical properties of the vascular extracellular matrix determine this endothelial characteristic. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Polyploidy impairs human aortic endothelial cell function and is prevented by nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Borradaile, Nica M; Pickering, J Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    Polyploid endothelial cells are found in aged and atherosclerotic arteries. However, whether increased chromosome content has an impact on endothelial cell function is unknown. We show here that human aortic endothelial cells become tetraploid as they approach replicative senescence. Furthermore, accumulation of tetraploid endothelial cells was accelerated during growth in high glucose. Interestingly, induction of polyploidy was completely prevented by modest overexpression of the NAD+ regenerating enzyme, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt). To determine the impact of polyploidy on endothelial cell function, independent of replicative senescence, we induced tetraploidy using the spindle poison, nocodazole. Global gene expression analyses of tetraploid endothelial cells revealed a dysfunctional phenotype characterized by a cell cycle arrest profile (decreased CCNE2/A2, RBL1, BUB1B; increased CDKN1A) and increased expression of genes involved in inflammation (IL32, TNFRSF21/10C, PTGS1) and extracellular matrix remodeling (COL5A1, FN1, MMP10/14). The protection from polyploidy conferred by Nampt was not associated with enhanced poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 or sirtuin (SIRT) 2 activity, but with increased SIRT1 activity, which reduced cellular reactive oxygen species and the associated oxidative stress stimulus for the induction of polyploidy. We conclude that human aortic endothelial cells are prone to chromosome duplication that, in and of itself, can induce characteristics of endothelial dysfunction. Moreover, the emergence of polyploid endothelial cells during replicative aging and glucose overload can be prevented by optimizing the Nampt-SIRT1 axis.

  1. Acidic fibroblast growth factor modulates Staphylococcus aureus adherence to human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, E A; Hatcher, V B; Lowy, F D

    1988-01-01

    Alteration of human endothelial cells may increase their susceptibility to staphylococcal invasion and thus may contribute to the development of intravascular staphylococcal disease. Acidic fibroblast growth factor, a potent regulator of endothelial cell function, had a significant effect on Staphylococcus aureus infection of cultured human endothelial cells. Three of four S. aureus strains had diminished adherence to endothelial cells when the latter were grown in the presence of acidic fibroblast growth factor (P less than 0.05). The diminished adherence was time dependent, maximal at 72 h, and independent of the initial bacterial inoculum. A twofold enhancement of S. aureus adherence was observed when endothelial cells were pretreated with heparitinase. Adherence was unaffected by endothelial cell activation by interleukin-1 or endotoxin. Thus, acidic fibroblast growth factor exerted a protective effect, deterring S. aureus adherence to cultured endothelial cells. Endothelial cell heparan sulfate was also directly involved in the adherence process. Subtle modulations of endothelial cells can significantly affect the ability of S. aureus to adhere to and then infect these cells. Similar alterations may contribute to the ability of S. aureus to infect endovascular tissue in vivo. PMID:3259546

  2. Human leucocytes in asthenozoospermic patients: endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression.

    PubMed

    Buldreghini, E; Hamada, A; Macrì, M L; Amoroso, S; Boscaro, M; Lenzi, A; Agarwal, A; Balercia, G

    2014-12-01

    In a basic study at the Andrology Unit, Department of Clinical and Molecular Sciences, Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy, we evaluated the pattern of mRNA endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression in human blood leucocytes isolated from normozoospermic fertile and asthenozoospermic infertile men to elucidate any pathogenic involvement in sperm cell motility. Forty infertile men with idiopathic asthenozoospermia and 45 normozoospermic fertile donors, age-matched, were included. Semen parameters were evaluated, and expression analysis of mRNA was performed in human leucocytes using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Sperm volume, count, motility and morphology were determined, and eNOS expression and Western blotting analyses were performed. A positive correlation was observed between the concentrations of NO and the percentage of immotile spermatozoa. The mRNA of eNOS was more expressed in peripheral blood leucocytes isolated from asthenozoospermic infertile men versus those of fertile normozoospermic men (7.46 ± 0.38 versus 7.06 ± 0.56, P = 0.0355). A significant up-regulation of eNOS gene in peripheral blood leucocytes was 1.52-fold higher than that of fertile donors. It is concluded that eNOS expression and activity are enhanced in blood leucocytes in men with idiopathic asthenozoospermia.

  3. Methodological issues in the assessment of skin microvascular endothelial function in humans.

    PubMed

    Cracowski, Jean-Luc; Minson, Christopher T; Salvat-Melis, Muriel; Halliwill, John R

    2006-09-01

    The study of microvascular function can be performed in humans using laser Doppler flowmetry of the skin. This technology lends itself to a wide range of applications for studying the endothelial function of skin blood vessels. We review the advantages and limitations of postocclusive hyperemia, local thermal hyperemia, acetylcholine iontophoresis, flowmotion and association with microdialysis as tools with which to investigate skin microvascular endothelial function in humans. Postocclusive hyperemia, thermal hyperemia and acetylcholine iontophoresis provide integrated indexes of microvascular function rather than specific endothelial markers. However, they are valuable tools and can be used as surrogate endpoints in clinical trials in which the assessment of microvascular function in humans is required.

  4. Focally regulated endothelial proliferation and cell death in human synovium.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, D. A.; Wade, M.; Mapp, P. I.; Blake, D. R.

    1998-01-01

    Angiogenesis and vascular insufficiency each may support the chronic synovial inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis. We have shown by quantitative immunohistochemistry and terminal uridyl deoxynucleotide nick end labeling that endothelial proliferation and cell death indices were each increased in synovia from patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared with osteoarthritic and noninflamed controls, whereas endothelial fractional areas did not differ significantly among disease groups. Markers of proliferation were associated with foci immunoreactive for vascular endothelial growth factor and integrin alpha(v)beta3, whereas cell death was observed in foci in which immunoreactivities for these factors were weak or absent. No association was found with thrombospondin immunoreactivity. The balance between angiogenesis and vascular regression in rheumatoid synovitis may be determined by the focal expression of angiogenic and endothelial survival factors. Increased endothelial cell turnover may contribute to microvascular dysfunction and thereby facilitate persistent synovitis. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9502411

  5. Age-related decline in prostacyclin synthesis by human aortic endothelial cells. Qualitative and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, O.; Yamada, T.; Fan, J. L.; Watanabe, T.

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the functional alteration of human aortic endothelial cells with aging, prostacyclin synthesis was qualitatively and quantitatively examined. The endothelial cells of human aortas and umbilical veins or inferior vena cavae were immunohistochemically examined and found positive for prostacyclin, but the intensity of aortic endothelial cells from older subjects was low. In addition to the endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells in the thickened intima, not the media, of the aorta were also immunoreactive. Endothelial cells were successfully cultured from human aortas obtained from infants through aged subjects and were subdivided into three groups: young, middle, and old. Prostacyclin synthesis by endothelial cells from all types of blood vessels was extremely great at the primary culture, but decreased abruptly in the following subcultures. Among the aortic endothelial cells, the young group synthesized the largest amount of prostacyclin in a conventional culture condition, with synthesis progressively decreasing in the older groups. The in vitro prostacyclin biosynthesis was supported by the qualitative analysis on the tissue sections. These results indicate that prostacyclin synthesis of the aortic endothelial cells decreases with age, but intimal smooth muscle cells potentially have a back-up mechanism and substitute this synthesis to some extent. The decreased synthesis of prostacyclin with age may play an important role in the development and advancement of thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1707240

  6. Pomegranate juice reduces oxidized low-density lipoprotein downregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in human coronary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    de Nigris, Filomena; Williams-Ignarro, Sharon; Botti, Chiara; Sica, Vincenzo; Ignarro, Louis J; Napoli, Claudio

    2006-11-01

    We examined the hypothesis that pomegranate juice (PJ) can revert the potent downregulation of the expression of endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (NOSIII) induced by oxidized low-density liporotein (oxLDL) in human coronary endothelial cells. Western blot and Northern blot analyses showed a significant decrease of NOSIII expression after a 24-h treatment with oxLDL. Accordingly, we observed a significant dose-dependent reduction in nitric oxide bioactivity represented by both basal and bradykinin-stimulated cellular cGMP accumulation. These phenomena were corrected significantly by the concomitant treatment with PJ. Our data suggest that PJ can exert beneficial effects on the evolution of clinical vascular complications, coronary heart disease, and atherogenesis in humans by enhancing the NOSIII bioactivity.

  7. The in vitro interaction of Sporothrix schenckii with human endothelial cells is modulated by cytokines and involves endothelial surface molecules.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Camila Castro; De Lima, Osana Cunha; De Carvalho, Laís; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila Maria; Morandi, Verônica

    2004-04-01

    Sporothrix schenckii is the etiological agent of sporotrichosis, a subcutaneous mycosis that can evolve to systemic complications in immunocompromised patients. Interactions with endothelium are thought to be essential for systemic infections. In the present work, we studied the interaction between S. schenckii and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). S. schenckii interacts with HUVECs in a time-dependent manner. Morphological analysis showed that yeasts locate to interendothelial junctions. Ultrastructural studies showed that internalized yeasts were found inside endocytic vacuoles as early as 2 h, without causing any detectable damage to HUVECs after 24 h of infection. The viability of infected HUVECs was confirmed by the MTT assay. When HUVECs were treated with different concentrations of Interleukin-1beta or transforming growth factor-beta, a significant dose-dependent increase in cell-associated yeasts was observed. The preliminary analysis of the endothelial surface ligands for S. schenckii cells revealed two major molecules, with Mr of approximately 90 and 135 kDa. The interaction of endothelial cell surface molecules with S. schenckii yeast cells was modulated by divalent cations. This is the first demonstration that S. schenckii is able to adhere and invade endothelial cells without significantly affect cellular integrity. Our results suggest the contribution of cytokine-modulated calcium-dependent molecules to this process.

  8. Effects of Constituent Compounds of Smilax china on Nicotine-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lincha, Victor Ruberio; Zhao, Bing-Tian; Woo, Mi-Hee; Yang, In-Jun; Shin, Heung-Mook

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of compounds isolated from 70% ethanol (EtOH) extraction of Smilax china L. (SCE), a plant belonging to the family Smilacaceae on nicotine-induced endothelial dysfunction (ED) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We isolated 10 compounds from ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction of 70% EtOH extract of SCE and investigated their inhibitory effect on nicotine-induced ED in endothelial cells. Kaempferol, kaempferol 7-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside, puerarin and ferulic acid showed strong inhibition of nicotine-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression while kaempferol, kaempferin, and caffeic acid attenuated intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) expression. Lepidoside, caffeic acid and methylsuccinic acid caused the highest up-regulated expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at the protein level with caffeic acid and ferulic acid showing strong inhibitory effects on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. In addition, ferulic acid and kaempferol showed inhibition against interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression while ferulic acid and caffeic acid showed comparatively higher inhibition of ED associated tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression. These results show the potential of the aforementioned compounds to reverse the toxic effects of nicotine on the endothelium.

  9. [Effects of crocetin on VCAM-1 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shu-guo; Zhao, Meng-qiu; Ren, You-nan; Yang, Jie-ren; Qian, Zhi-yu

    2015-01-01

    Crocetin, a naturally occurring carotenoid, possesses antioxidant and antiatherosclerotic properties, of which the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the effects of crocetin (0.1, 1, 10 μmol·L(-1)) on angiotensin II (Ang II, 0.1 μmol·L(-1)) induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. The effects of crocetin on the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also observed. The results demonstrated that crocetin notably suppressed Ang II induced NF-κB activation (P<0.01) and VCAM-1 expression (P<0.05, P<0.01) in HUVECs, accompanied by a markedly reduced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion (P<0.05, P<0.01). In addition, preincubation with crocetin resulted in a significant enhancement of cellular antioxidant capacity (P<0.05, P<0.01), while Ang II induced intracellular ROS decreased markedly (P<0.05, P<0.01). These results indicated that crocetin was capable of suppressing Ang II induced VCAM-1 expression and monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion by suppression of NF-κB activation, which might be derived from the enhancement of antioxidant capacity and subsequent reduction of intracellular ROS.

  10. Micro-vascular shape-memory polymer actuators with complex geometries obtained by laser stereolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Lantada, Andrés; de Blas Romero, Adrián; Chacón Tanarro, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    In our work we present the complete development process of geometrically complex micro-vascular shape-memory polymer actuators. The complex geometries and three-dimensional networks are designed by means of computer aided design resources. Manufacture is accomplished, in a single step, by means of laser stereolithography, directly from the computer-aided design files with the three dimensional geometries of the different actuators under development. To our knowledge, laser stereolithography is applied here for the first time to the development of shape memory polymer devices with complex geometries and inner micro-vasculatures for their activation using a thermal fluid. Final testing of the developed actuators helps to validate the approach and to put forward some present challenges.

  11. Speckle-correlation monitoring of the internal micro-vascular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnyakov, D. A.; Khmara, M. B.; Vilensky, M. A.; Kozlov, V. V.; Gorfinkel, I. V.; Zdrajevsky, R. A.

    2009-10-01

    The results of experimental study of possibility to monitor the micro-vascular blood flow in superficial tissues of various organs with the use of endoscope-based full-field speckle correlometer are presented. The blood microcirculation monitoring was carried out in the course of the laparotomy of abdominal cavity of laboratory animals (rats). Transfer of laser light to the area of interest and scattered radiation from the probed zone to the detector (CMOS camera) was carried out via fiber-optic bundles of endoscopic system. Microscopic hemodynamics was analyzed for small intestine, liver, spleen, kidney, and pancreas under different conditions (normal state, provocated peritonitis and ischemia, administration of vasodilative agents such as papaverine, lidocaine). The prospects and problems of internal monitoring of microvascular flow in laboratory and clinical conditions are discussed.

  12. Sulodexide reduces senescence-related changes in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Suminska-Jasinska, Katarzyna; Polubinska, Alicja; Ciszewicz, Marta; Mikstacki, Adam; Antoniewicz, Artur; Breborowicz, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Senescent endothelial cells acquire functional properties that make the vascular wall more prone to atherosclerotic changes. We tested whether senescence of the endothelial cells maintained in in vitro culture can be moderated by their simultaneous exposure to sulodexide. Material/Methods Replicative aging of the endothelial cells was studied during their 15 passages performed every 4 days in cells cultured in standard medium or in medium supplemented with sulodexide 0.5 LRU/mL. Changes in population doubling time and β-galactosidase activity were used as indexes of aging and compared with other cellular parameters. Results Repeated passages of endothelial cells induce their senescence, as reflected by prolongation of the population doubling time, increased β-galactosidase activity, oxidative stress and release of cytokines. Healing of the injured endothelial monolayer is impaired in senescent cells. Sulodexide partially prevents oxidative stress and totally eliminates other senescence-related changes such as increased release of MCP-1, lengthening of the population doubling time, and impaired healing of the cellular monolayer after its mechanical injury. Conclusions Sulodexide prevented cellular senescence in cultured endothelial cells, moderating features of the cellular senescence in endothelial cells in in vitro conditions, which potentially may have practical application. The administration of sulodexide could potentially be used in prevention of atherosclerotic changes. PMID:21455109

  13. Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells from human amniotic fluid to vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tancharoen, Waleephan; Aungsuchawan, Sirinda; Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Markmee, Runchana; Narakornsak, Suteera; Kieodee, Junjira; Boonma, Nonglak; Tasuya, Witoon

    2017-03-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a principle feature of vascular-related disease. Endothelial cells have been acquired for the purposes of the restoration of damaged tissue in therapeutic angiogenesis. However, their use is limited by expansion capacity and the small amount of cells that are obtained. Human amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (hAF-MSCs) are considered an important source for vascular tissue engineering. In this study, hAF-MSCs were characterized and then induced in order to differentiate into the endothelial-like cells. Human amniotic fluid cells (hAFCs) were obtained from amniocentesis at the second trimester of gestation. The cells were characterized as mesenchymal stem cells by flow cytometry. The results showed that the cells were positive for mesenchymal stem cell markers CD44, CD73, CD90 and HLA-ABC, and negative for CD31, Amniotic fluid stem cells marker: CD117, anti-human fibroblasts, HLA-DR and hematopoietic differentiation markers CD34 and CD45. The hAF-MSCs were differentiated into endothelial cells under the induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and analyzed for the expression of the endothelial-specific markers and function. The expression of the endothelial-specific markers was determined by reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), while immunofluorescent analysis demonstrated that the induced hAF-MSCs expressed von Willebrand factor (vWF), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), CD31 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The network formation assay showed that the induced hAF-MSCs formed partial networks. All results indicated that hAF-MSCs have the potential to be differentiated into endothelial-like cells, while human amniotic fluid might be a suitable source of MSCs for vascularized tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Microtubules Growth Rate Alteration in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alieva, Irina B.; Zemskov, Evgeny A.; Kireev, Igor I.; Gorshkov, Boris A.; Wiseman, Dean A.; Black, Stephen M.; Verin, Alexander D.

    2010-01-01

    To understand how microtubules contribute to the dynamic reorganization of the endothelial cell (EC) cytoskeleton, we established an EC model expressing EB3-GFP, a protein that marks microtubule plus-ends. Using this model, we were able to measure microtubule growth rate at the centrosome region and near the cell periphery of a single human EC and in the EC monolayer. We demonstrate that the majority of microtubules in EC are dynamic, the growth rate of their plus-ends is highest in the internal cytoplasm, in the region of the centrosome. Growth rate of microtubule plus-ends decreases from the cell center toward the periphery. Our data suggest the existing mechanism(s) of local regulation of microtubule plus-ends growth in EC. Microtubule growth rate in the internal cytoplasm of EC in the monolayer is lower than that of single EC suggesting the regulatory effect of cell-cell contacts. Centrosomal microtubule growth rate distribution in single EC indicated the presence of two subpopulations of microtubules with “normal” (similar to those in monolayer EC) and “fast” (three times as much) growth rates. Our results indicate functional interactions between cell-cell contacts and microtubules. PMID:20445745

  15. Microtubules growth rate alteration in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Alieva, Irina B; Zemskov, Evgeny A; Kireev, Igor I; Gorshkov, Boris A; Wiseman, Dean A; Black, Stephen M; Verin, Alexander D

    2010-01-01

    To understand how microtubules contribute to the dynamic reorganization of the endothelial cell (EC) cytoskeleton, we established an EC model expressing EB3-GFP, a protein that marks microtubule plus-ends. Using this model, we were able to measure microtubule growth rate at the centrosome region and near the cell periphery of a single human EC and in the EC monolayer. We demonstrate that the majority of microtubules in EC are dynamic, the growth rate of their plus-ends is highest in the internal cytoplasm, in the region of the centrosome. Growth rate of microtubule plus-ends decreases from the cell center toward the periphery. Our data suggest the existing mechanism(s) of local regulation of microtubule plus-ends growth in EC. Microtubule growth rate in the internal cytoplasm of EC in the monolayer is lower than that of single EC suggesting the regulatory effect of cell-cell contacts. Centrosomal microtubule growth rate distribution in single EC indicated the presence of two subpopulations of microtubules with "normal" (similar to those in monolayer EC) and "fast" (three times as much) growth rates. Our results indicate functional interactions between cell-cell contacts and microtubules.

  16. SNEV overexpression extends the life span of human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Voglauer, Regina; Chang, Martina Wei-Fen; Dampier, Brigitta; Wieser, Matthias; Baumann, Kristin; Sterovsky, Thomas; Schreiber, Martin; Katinger, Hermann; Grillari, Johannes . E-mail: j.grillari@iam.boku.ac.at

    2006-04-01

    In a recent screening for genes downregulated in replicatively senescent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), we have isolated the novel protein SNEV. Since then SNEV has proven as a multifaceted protein playing a role in pre-mRNA splicing, DNA repair, and the ubiquitin/proteosome system. Here, we report that SNEV mRNA decreases in various cell types during replicative senescence, and that it is increased in various immortalized cell lines, as well as in breast tumors, where SNEV transcript levels also correlate with the survival of breast cancer patients. Since these mRNA profiles suggested a role of SNEV in the regulation of cell proliferation, the effect of its overexpression was tested. Thereby, a significant extension of the cellular life span was observed, which was not caused by altered telomerase activity or telomere dynamics but rather by enhanced stress resistance. When SNEV overexpressing cells were treated with bleomycin or bleomycin combined with BSO, inducing DNA damage as well as reactive oxygen species, a significantly lower fraction of apoptotic cells was found in comparison to vector control cells. These data suggest that high levels of SNEV might extend the cellular life span by increasing the resistance to stress or by improving the DNA repair capacity of the cells.

  17. Transdifferentiation of human endothelial progenitors into smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, HaYeun; Atchison, Leigh; Chen, Zaozao; Chakraborty, Syandan; Jung, Youngmee; Truskey, George A; Christoforou, Nicolas; Leong, Kam W

    2016-04-01

    Access to smooth muscle cells (SMC) would create opportunities for tissue engineering, drug testing, and disease modeling. Herein we report the direct conversion of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) to induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) by induced expression of MYOCD. The EPC undergo a cytoskeletal rearrangement resembling that of mesenchymal cells within 3 days post initiation of MYOCD expression. By day 7, the reprogrammed cells show upregulation of smooth muscle markers ACTA2, MYH11, and TAGLN by qRT-PCR and ACTA2 and MYH11 expression by immunofluorescence. By two weeks, they resemble umbilical artery SMC in microarray gene expression analysis. The iSMC, in contrast to EPC control, show calcium transients in response to phenylephrine stimulation and a contractility an order of magnitude higher than that of EPC as determined by traction force microscopy. Tissue-engineered blood vessels constructed using iSMC show functionality with respect to flow- and drug-mediated vasodilation and vasoconstriction.

  18. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Inhibits the Proliferation of Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peyton, Kelly J.; Liu, Xiao-ming; Yu, Yajie; Yates, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionary conserved energy-sensing enzyme that regulates cell metabolism. Emerging evidence indicates that AMPK also plays an important role in modulating endothelial cell function. In the present study, we investigated whether AMPK modulates endothelial cell growth. Treatment of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells with the AMPK activators 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR), 6,7-dihydro-4-hydroxy-3-(2′-hydroxy[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-yl)-6-oxo-thieno[2,3-b]pyridine-5-carbonitrile (A-769662), or metformin inhibited cell proliferation and DNA synthesis. The antiproliferative action of AICAR was largely prevented by the adenosine kinase inhibitor 5′-iodotubercidin and mimicked by infecting endothelial cells with an adenovirus expressing constitutively active AMPK. In contrast, pharmacological blockade of endothelial nitric oxide synthase or heme oxygenase-1 activity failed to reverse the inhibition of endothelial cell growth by AICAR. Flow cytometry experiments revealed that pharmacological activation of AMPK arrested endothelial cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, and this was associated with increases in p53 phosphorylation and p53, p21, and p27 protein expression and decreases in cyclin A protein expression and retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation. In addition, silencing p21 and p27 expression partially restored the mitogenic response of AMPK-activated cells. Finally, activation of AMPK by AICAR blocked the migration of endothelial cells after scrape injury and stimulated tube formation by endothelial cells plated onto Matrigel-coated plates. In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that AMPK activation inhibits endothelial cell proliferation by elevating p21 and p27 expression. In addition, they show that AMPK regulates endothelial cell migration and differentiation and identify AMPK as an attractive therapeutic target in treating diseases associated with aberrant

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factor stimulates osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteal-derived cells expressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Hah, Young-Sool; Jun, Jin-Su; Lee, Seong-Gyun; Park, Bong-Wook; Kim, Deok Ryong; Kim, Uk-Kyu; Kim, Jong-Ryoul; Byun, June-Ho

    2011-02-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in bone development and postnatal bone fracture repair. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs) are primarily involved in angiogenesis. This study investigated the expression of VEGF isoforms, VEGFR-1, and VEGFR-2 during the osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteal-derived cells. In addition, the effect of exogenous VEGF on the osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteal-derived cells was also examined. The expression of the VEGF isoforms (VEGF(121), VEGF(165), VEGF(189), and VEGF(206)), VEGFR-1, and VEGFR-2 was observed in the periosteal-derived cells. Administration of KRN633, a VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 inhibitor, decreased the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity during the osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteal-derived cells. However, the administration of VEGFR2 Kinase Inhibitor IV, a VEGFR-2 inhibitor, did not affect the ALP activity. The addition of recombinant human VEGF(165) elevated the ALP activity and increased the calcium content in the periosteal-derived cells. Treating the periosteal-derived cells with recombinant human VEGF(165) resulted in an increase in Runx2 transactivation in the periosteal-derived cells. These results suggest that exogenous VEGF stimulates the osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteal-derived cells and VEGF might act as an autocrine growth factor for the osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteal-derived cells.

  20. Efficient Generation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Corneal Endothelial Cells by Directed Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Kathryn L.; Kunzevitzky, Noelia J.; Chiswell, Brian P.; Xia, Xin; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.; Lanza, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Aim To generate human embryonic stem cell derived corneal endothelial cells (hESC-CECs) for transplantation in patients with corneal endothelial dystrophies. Materials and Methods Feeder-free hESC-CECs were generated by a directed differentiation protocol. hESC-CECs were characterized by morphology, expression of corneal endothelial markers, and microarray analysis of gene expression. Results hESC-CECs were nearly identical morphologically to primary human corneal endothelial cells, expressed Zona Occludens 1 (ZO-1) and Na+/K+ATPaseα1 (ATPA1) on the apical surface in monolayer culture, and produced the key proteins of Descemet’s membrane, Collagen VIIIα1 and VIIIα2 (COL8A1 and 8A2). Quantitative PCR analysis revealed expression of all corneal endothelial pump transcripts. hESC-CECs were 96% similar to primary human adult CECs by microarray analysis. Conclusion hESC-CECs are morphologically similar, express corneal endothelial cell markers and express a nearly identical complement of genes compared to human adult corneal endothelial cells. hESC-CECs may be a suitable alternative to donor-derived corneal endothelium. PMID:26689688

  1. Chocolate procyanidins decrease the leukotriene-prostacyclin ratio in humans and human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Schramm, D D; Wang, J F; Holt, R R; Ensunsa, J L; Gonsalves, J L; Lazarus, S A; Schmitz, H H; German, J B; Keen, C L

    2001-01-01

    Polyphenolic phytochemicals inhibit vascular and inflammatory processes that contribute to disease. These effects are hypothesized to result from polyphenol-mediated alterations in cellular eicosanoid synthesis. The objective was to determine and compare the ability of cocoa procyanidins to alter eicosanoid synthesis in human subjects and cultured human aortic endothelial cells. After an overnight fast, 10 healthy subjects (4 men and 6 women) consumed 37 g low-procyanidin (0.09 mg/g) and high-procyanidin (4.0 mg/g) chocolate; the treatments were separated by 1 wk. The investigation had a randomized, blinded, crossover design. Plasma samples were collected before treatment and 2 and 6 h after treatment. Eicosanoids were quantitated by enzyme immunoassay. Endothelial cells were treated in vitro with procyanidins to determine whether the effects of procyanidin in vivo were associated with procyanidin-induced alterations in endothelial cell eicosanoid synthesis. Relative to the effects of the low-procyanidin chocolate, high-procyanidin chocolate induced increases in plasma prostacyclin (32%; P<0.05) and decreases in plasma leukotrienes (29%; P<0.04). After the in vitro procyanidin treatments, aortic endothelial cells synthesized twice as much 6-keto-prostaglandin F(1alpha) (P<0.01) and 16% less leukotriene (P<0.05) as did control cells. The in vitro and in vivo effects of procyanidins on plasma leukotriene-prostacyclin ratios in culture medium were also comparable: decreases of 58% and 52%, respectively. Data from this short-term investigation support the concept that certain food-derived flavonoids can favorably alter eicosanoid synthesis in humans, providing a plausible hypothesis for a mechanism by which they can decrease platelet activation in humans.

  2. Human Umbilical Cord Blood Endothelial Progenitor Cells Decrease Vein Graft Neointimal Hyperplasia in SCID Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shoukang; Malhotra, Anuj; Zhang, Lisheng; Deng, Shanming; Zhang, Taifang; Freedman, Neil J.; Storms, Robert; Peppel, Karsten; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J.; Dong, Chunming

    2014-01-01

    Aims Vein graft endothelial damage is a key step in the development of neointimal hyperplasia, leading to vein graft failure. We sought to determine whether exogenous endothelial progenitor cells could promote vein graft re-endothelialization, and thereby ameliorate neointimal hyperplasia. Methods and Results Carotid artery interposition grafting was performed with syngeneic inferior vena cavae in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Lineage-negative human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) cells (or medium alone) were injected into vein-grafted mice intraoperatively and 2 weeks postoperatively. In vein grafts from hUCB cell-injected mice, we found human HLA-expressing endothelial cells, as well as increased levels of VEGF and FGF-2. Furthermore, hUCB cells secreted VEGF and FGF-2 in vitro. The markedly enhanced endothelial regeneration, likely resulting from both direct engraftment and paracrine actions of hUCB cells, inhibited inflammatory response, diminished intimal cell proliferation, and reduced neointimal hyperplasia in the vein grafts. Conclusions hUCB cells may accelerate vein graft re-endothelialization via both direct differentiation into endothelial cells and release of paracrine factors to enhance endothelial regeneration and reduce inflammation. These data highlight a potential therapeutic role for cellular therapy in vessel injury. PMID:20451204

  3. Atherosclerosis- and age-related multinucleated variant endothelial cells in primary culture from human aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, O.; Fan, J. L.; Watanabe, T.

    1989-01-01

    Endothelial cells were cultured from human aortas and inferior venae cavae of autopsied subjects ranging in age from infancy to 85 years. Endothelial cells in 32 of more than 100 attempted cultures were pure enough for evaluation. Emerged endothelial cells in primary culture were classified into two types: typical endothelium and variant endothelium. Typical endothelial cells were small, round to polygonal shaped, and were arranged uniformly. Their diameter ranged from 50 to 70 microns. Variant endothelial cells were larger, ranging from 100 to 200 microns in diameter, and giant endothelial cells measuring more than 250 microns in diameter were scattered among them. Variant endothelial cells were usually multinucleated and possessed endothelium-specific markers of vWF and Weibel-Palade bodies. No incorporation of [3H]thymidine was found in the nuclei of cultured variant endothelial cells. Although most cultured endothelial cells were of the typical type, variant endothelial cells were interspersed throughout the culture. The ratio of variant endothelial cells to typical cells correlated well with the severity of atherosclerosis, but less so with aging. The number of variant endothelial cells in cultures from inferior venae cavae was slight and constant throughout all age groups. The presence of multinucleated endothelial cells in in vivo aortas was confirmed by both scanning and transmission electron microscopy. They sometimes existed in colonies in the aortas from elderly subjects with intimal-thickened or advanced atherosclerotic lesions. These results indicate that variant endothelial cells were present in vivo and their ratio in primary culture reflected the in vivo population. It is likely that these cells were formed by adhesion of adjacent typical endothelial cells and that this process was affected more by atherosclerosis than by aging. Although it is not clear if the multinucleated variant cells were formed before the formation of atherosclerotic plaque or

  4. Nitric oxide production contributes to the angiogenic properties of vascular endothelial growth factor in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Papapetropoulos, A; García-Cardeña, G; Madri, J A; Sessa, W C

    1997-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a regulator of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. To investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in VEGF-induced proliferation and in vitro angiogenesis, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used. VEGF stimulated the growth of HUVEC in an NO-dependent manner. In addition, VEGF promoted the NO-dependent formation of network-like structures in HUVEC cultured in three dimensional (3D) collagen gels. Exposure of cells to VEGF led to a concentration-dependent increase in cGMP levels, an indicator of NO production, that was inhibited by nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. VEGF-stimulated NO production required activation of tyrosine kinases and increases in intracellular calcium, since tyrosine kinase inhibitors and calcium chelators attenuated VEGF-induced NO release. Moreover, two chemically distinct phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI-3K) inhibitors attenuated NO release after VEGF stimulation. In addition, HUVEC incubated with VEGF for 24 h showed an increase in the amount of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) protein and the release of NO. In summary, both short- and long-term exposure of human EC to VEGF stimulates the release of biologically active NO. While long-term exposure increases eNOS protein levels, short-term stimulation with VEGF promotes NO release through mechanisms involving tyrosine and PI-3K kinases, suggesting that NO mediates aspects of VEGF signaling required for EC proliferation and organization in vitro. PMID:9399960

  5. Analysis of human cytomegalovirus replication in primary cultured human corneal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hosogai, Mayumi; Shima, Nobuyuki; Nakatani, Yoko; Inoue, Teruki; Iso, Tatsuya; Yokoo, Hideaki; Yorifuji, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Hideo; Kishi, Shoji; Isomura, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Background/aims Since the first case of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-induced corneal endotheliitis in which HCMV DNA was detected from the patient's aqueous humour using PCR, the clinical evidence for HCMV endotheliitis has been accumulating. However, it remains to be confirmed whether HCMV can efficiently replicate in corneal endothelial cells. We, therefore, sought to determine whether primary cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs) could support HCMV replication. Methods Human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) have been shown to be fully permissive for HCMV replication, and are commonly used as an in vitro model for HCMV lytic replication. Therefore, primary cultured HCECs or HFFs were infected with the vascular endotheliotropic HCMV strain TB40/E or laboratory strain Towne. We then compared viral mRNA and protein expression, genome replication and growth between the TB40/E-infected and Towne-infected HCECs and HFFs. Results When HCECs were infected with TB40/E or Towne, rounded cells resembling owl's eyes as well as viral antigens were detected. Viral mRNA synthesis and protein expression proceeded efficiently in the HCECs and HFFs infected with TB40/E or Towne at a high multiplicity of infection (MOI). Similarly, the viral genome was also effectively replicated, with UL44—a viral DNA polymerase processivity factor—foci observed in the nuclei of HCECs. HCECs produced a substantial number of infectious virions after infection with TB40/E at both a high and low MOI. Conclusions Primary cultured HCECs could efficiently support HCMV replication after infection at both a high and low MOI. PMID:26261231

  6. Increased human dermal microvascular endothelial cell survival induced by cysteamine.

    PubMed

    Besouw, M; van den Heuvel, L; van Eijsden, R; Bongaers, I; Kluijtmans, L; Dewerchin, M; Levtchenko, E

    2013-11-01

    Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disease caused by intralysosomal cystine accumulation, treated with cysteamine. Recently, new adverse effects of cysteamine were reported. Skin biopsies showed microvascular proliferation (angioendotheliomatosis). To examine the mechanism of angioendotheliomatosis associated with cysteamine toxicity, we examined the effect of cysteamine on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVEC). After cysteamine exposure (range 0-3.0 mM) during 24 h, cell viability was measured using water soluble tetrazolium salt-1 (WST-1) in both control HDMVEC and fibroblasts. Cell proliferation and apoptosis rate were measured in HDMVEC by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and caspase 3 and caspase 7 activity, respectively. Intracellular glutathione (GSH) was measured in HDMVEC after cysteamine exposure of 0, 0.1 or 1.0 mM. Medium and cysteamine were refreshed every 6 h to mimic the in vivo situation. Next, cell viability in HDMVEC was measured after 24 h of GSH exposure (range 0-10.0 mM). HDMVEC viability and proliferation increased after cysteamine exposure 0.03-3.0 mM (p < 0.01) and 0.03-1.0 mM (p = 0.01) respectively; cell viability in fibroblasts was not affected by incubation with cysteamine. Apoptosis remained unaffected by incubation with 0-1.0 mM cysteamine, 3.0 mM caused increased apoptosis. Intracellular GSH was significantly increased after incubation with cysteamine 0.1 mM (p = 0.02) and 1.0 mM (p < 0.01). HDMVEC viability increased after exposure to GSH 1.0-5.0 mM (p < 0.01). Cysteamine concentrations, similar to those described in plasma of cystinosis patients, stimulate HDMVEC viability and proliferation and increase intracellular GSH content. We postulate that this mechanism might underlie angioendotheliomatosis induced by cysteamine.

  7. Selective human endothelial cell activation by chemokines as a guide to cell homing.

    PubMed

    Crola Da Silva, Claire; Lamerant-Fayel, Nathalie; Paprocka, Maria; Mitterrand, Michèle; Gosset, David; Dus, Danuta; Kieda, Claudine

    2009-03-01

    An original model of organo-specific, immortalized and stabilized endothelial cell lines was used to delineate the part played by some chemokines (CCL21, CX3CL1, CCL5 and CXCL12) and their receptors in endothelium organo-specificity. Chemokine receptor expression and chemokine presentation were investigated on organo-specific human endothelial cell lines. Although the chemokines showed distinct binding patterns for the various endothelial cell lines, these were not correlated with the expression of the corresponding receptors (CX3CR1, CXCR4, CCR5 and CCR7). Experiments with CCL21 on peripheral lymph node endothelial cells demonstrated that the chemokine did not co-localize with its receptor but was associated with extracellular matrix components. The specific activity of chemokines was clearly shown to be related to the endothelial cell origin. Indeed, CX3CL1 and CCL21 promoted lymphocyte recruitment by endothelial cells from the appendix and peripheral lymph nodes, respectively, while CX3CL1 pro-angiogenic activity was restricted to endothelial cells from the appendix and skin. The high specificity of the chemokine/endothelium interaction allowed the design of a direct in vitro endothelial cell targeting assay. This unique cellular model demonstrated a fundamental role for chemokines in conferring on the endothelium its organo-specificity and its potential for tissue targeting through the selective binding, presentation and activation properties of chemokines.

  8. Constitutively Expressed IFITM3 Protein in Human Endothelial Cells Poses an Early Infection Block to Human Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiangjie; Zeng, Hui; Kumar, Amrita; Belser, Jessica A.; Maines, Taronna R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A role for pulmonary endothelial cells in the orchestration of cytokine production and leukocyte recruitment during influenza virus infection, leading to severe lung damage, has been recently identified. As the mechanistic pathway for this ability is not fully known, we extended previous studies on influenza virus tropism in cultured human pulmonary endothelial cells. We found that a subset of avian influenza viruses, including potentially pandemic H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2 viruses, could infect human pulmonary endothelial cells (HULEC) with high efficiency compared to human H1N1 or H3N2 viruses. In HULEC, human influenza viruses were capable of binding to host cellular receptors, becoming internalized and initiating hemifusion but failing to uncoat the viral nucleocapsid and to replicate in host nuclei. Unlike numerous cell types, including epithelial cells, we found that pulmonary endothelial cells constitutively express a high level of the restriction protein IFITM3 in endosomal compartments. IFITM3 knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) could partially rescue H1N1 virus infection in HULEC, suggesting IFITM3 proteins were involved in blocking human influenza virus infection in endothelial cells. In contrast, selected avian influenza viruses were able to escape IFITM3 restriction in endothelial cells, possibly by fusing in early endosomes at higher pH or by other, unknown mechanisms. Collectively, our study demonstrates that the human pulmonary endothelium possesses intrinsic immunity to human influenza viruses, in part due to the constitutive expression of IFITM3 proteins. Notably, certain avian influenza viruses have evolved to escape this restriction, possibly contributing to virus-induced pneumonia and severe lung disease in humans. IMPORTANCE Avian influenza viruses, including H5N1 and H7N9, have been associated with severe respiratory disease and fatal outcomes in humans. Although acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and progressive pulmonary

  9. Multi-scale undulations in human aortic endothelial cell fibers.

    PubMed

    Frketic, Jolie B; DeLaPeña, Abigail; Suaris, Melanie G; Zehnder, Steven M; Angelini, Thomas E

    2015-02-01

    Blood vessels often have an undulatory morphology, with excessive bending, kinking, and coiling occuring in diseased vasculature. The underlying physical causes of these morphologies are generally attributed, in combination, to changes in blood pressure, blood flow rate, and cell proliferation or apoptosis. However, pathological vascular morphologies often start during developmental vasculogenesis. At early stages of vasculogenesis, angioblasts (vascular endothelial cells that have not formed a lumen) assemble into primitive vessel-like fibers before blood flow occurs. If loose, fibrous aggregates of endothelial cells can generate multi-cellular undulations through mechanical instabilities, driven by the cytoskeleton, new insight into vasculature morphology may be achieved with simple in vitro models of endothelial cell fibers. Here we study mechanical instabilities in vessel-like structures made from endothelial cells embedded in a collagen matrix. We find that endothelial cell fibers contract radially over time, and undulate at two dominant wavelengths: approximately 1cm and 1mm. Simple mechanical models suggest that the long-wavelength undulation is Euler buckling in rigid confinement, while the short-wavelength buckle may arise from a mismatch between fiber bending energy and matrix deformation. These results suggest a combination of fiber-like geometry, cystoskeletal contractions, and extracellular matrix elasticity may contribute to undulatory blood vessel morphology in the absence of a lumen or blood pressure.

  10. Glyoxalase 1-knockdown in human aortic endothelial cells – effect on the proteome and endothelial function estimates

    PubMed Central

    Stratmann, Bernd; Engelbrecht, Britta; Espelage, Britta C.; Klusmeier, Nadine; Tiemann, Janina; Gawlowski, Thomas; Mattern, Yvonne; Eisenacher, Martin; Meyer, Helmut E.; Rabbani, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J.; Tschoepe, Diethelm; Poschmann, Gereon; Stühler, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG), an arginine-directed glycating agent, is implicated in diabetic late complications. MG is detoxified by glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) of the cytosolic glyoxalase system. The aim was to investigate the effects of MG accumulation by GLO1-knockdown under hyperglycaemic conditions in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) hypothesizing that the accumulation of MG accounts for the deleterious effects on vascular function. SiRNA-mediated knockdown of GLO1 was performed and MG concentrations were determined. The impact of MG on the cell proteome and targets of MG glycation was analysed, and confirmed by Western blotting. Markers of endothelial function and apoptosis were assessed. Collagen content was assayed in cell culture supernatant. GLO1-knockdown increased MG concentration in cells and culture medium. This was associated with a differential abundance of cytoskeleton stabilisation proteins, intermediate filaments and proteins involved in posttranslational modification of collagen. An increase in fibrillar collagens 1 and 5 was detected. The extracellular concentration of endothelin-1 was increased following GLO1-knockdown, whereas the phosphorylation and amount of eNOS was not influenced by GLO1-knockdown. The expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and of MCP-1 was elevated and apoptosis was increased. MG accumulation by GLO1-knockdown provoked collagen expression, endothelial inflammation and dysfunction and apoptosis which might contribute to vascular damage. PMID:27898103

  11. Lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis in transformed bovine brain endothelial cells and human dermal microvessel endothelial cells: the role of JNK.

    PubMed

    Karahashi, Hisae; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Arditi, Moshe

    2009-06-01

    Stimulation of transformed bovine brain endothelial cells (TBBEC) with LPS leads to apoptosis while human microvessel endothelial cells (HMEC) need the presence of cycloheximide (CHX) with LPS to induce apoptosis. To investigate the molecular mechanism of LPS-induced apoptosis in HMEC or TBBEC, we analyzed the involvement of MAPK and PI3K in TBBEC and HMEC. LPS-induced apoptosis in TBBEC was hallmarked by the activation of caspase 3, caspase 6, and caspase 8 after the stimulation of LPS, followed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and lactate dehydrogenase release. We also observed DNA cleavage determined by TUNEL staining in TBBEC treated with LPS. Herbimycin A, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and SP600125, a JNK inhibitor, suppressed the activation of caspases and lactate dehydrogenase release. Moreover, a PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) suppressed activation of caspases and combined treatment with both SP600125 and LY294002 completely inhibited the activation of caspases. These results suggest that the JNK signaling pathway through the tyrosine kinase and PI3K pathways is involved in the induction of apoptosis in LPS-treated TBBEC. On the other hand, we observed sustained JNK activation in HMEC treated with LPS and CHX, and neither ERK1/2 nor AKT were activated. The addition of SP600125 suppressed phosphorylation of JNK and the activation of caspase 3 in HMEC treated with LPS and CHX. These results suggest that JNK plays an important role in the induction of apoptosis in endothelial cells.

  12. Forkhead box O-1 modulation improves endothelial insulin resistance in human obesity.

    PubMed

    Karki, Shakun; Farb, Melissa G; Ngo, Doan T M; Myers, Samantha; Puri, Vishwajeet; Hamburg, Naomi M; Carmine, Brian; Hess, Donald T; Gokce, Noyan

    2015-06-01

    Increased visceral adiposity has been closely linked to insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, and cardiometabolic disease in obesity, but pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood. We sought to investigate mechanisms of vascular insulin resistance by characterizing depot-specific insulin responses and gain evidence that altered functionality of transcription factor forkhead box O-1 (FOXO-1) may play an important role in obesity-related endothelial dysfunction. We intraoperatively collected paired subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue samples from 56 severely obese (body mass index, 43 ± 7 kg/m(2)) and 14 nonobese subjects during planned surgical operations, and characterized depot-specific insulin-mediated responses using Western blot and quantitative immunofluorescence techniques. Insulin signaling via phosphorylation of FOXO-1 and consequent endothelial nitric oxide synthase stimulation was selectively impaired in the visceral compared with subcutaneous adipose tissue and endothelial cells of obese subjects. In contrast, tissue actions of insulin were preserved in nonobese individuals. Pharmacological antagonism with AS1842856 and biological silencing using small interfering RNA-mediated FOXO-1 knockdown reversed insulin resistance and restored endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation in the obese. We observed profound endothelial insulin resistance in the visceral adipose tissue of obese humans which improved with FOXO-1 inhibition. FOXO-1 modulation may represent a novel therapeutic target to diminish vascular insulin resistance. In addition, characterization of endothelial insulin resistance in the adipose microenvironment may provide clues to mechanisms of systemic disease in human obesity. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. A Methodology for Concomitant Isolation of Intimal and Adventitial Endothelial Cells from the Human Thoracic Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Anne; Veillat, Véronique; Loriot, Sandrine; Spuul, Pirjo; Madonna, Francesco; Roques, Xavier; Génot, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Aortic diseases are diverse and involve a multiplicity of biological systems in the vascular wall. Aortic dissection, which is usually preceded by aortic aneurysm, is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in modern societies. Although the endothelium is now known to play an important role in vascular diseases, its contribution to aneurysmal aortic lesions remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to define a reliable methodology for the isolation of aortic intimal and adventitial endothelial cells in order to throw light on issues relevant to endothelial cell biology in aneurysmal diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings We set up protocols to isolate endothelial cells from both the intima and the adventitia of human aneurysmal aortic vessel segments. Throughout the procedure, analysis of cell morphology and endothelial markers allowed us to select an endothelial fraction which after two rounds of expansion yielded a population of >90% pure endothelial cells. These cells have the features and functionalities of freshly isolated cells and can be used for biochemical studies. The technique was successfully used for aortic vessel segments of 20 patients and 3 healthy donors. Conclusions/Significance This simple and highly reproducible method allows the simultaneous preparation of reasonably pure primary cultures of intimal and adventitial human endothelial cells, thus providing a reliable source for investigating their biology and involvement in both thoracic aneurysms and other aortic diseases. PMID:26599408

  14. Substrates for Expansion of Corneal Endothelial Cells towards Bioengineering of Human Corneal Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Navaratnam, Jesintha; Utheim, Tor P.; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Shahdadfar, Aboulghassem

    2015-01-01

    Corneal endothelium is a single layer of specialized cells that lines the posterior surface of cornea and maintains corneal hydration and corneal transparency essential for vision. Currently, transplantation is the only therapeutic option for diseases affecting the corneal endothelium. Transplantation of corneal endothelium, called endothelial keratoplasty, is widely used for corneal endothelial diseases. However, corneal transplantation is limited by global donor shortage. Therefore, there is a need to overcome the deficiency of sufficient donor corneal tissue. New approaches are being explored to engineer corneal tissues such that sufficient amount of corneal endothelium becomes available to offset the present shortage of functional cornea. Although human corneal endothelial cells have limited proliferative capacity in vivo, several laboratories have been successful in in vitro expansion of human corneal endothelial cells. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of different substrates employed for in vitro cultivation of human corneal endothelial cells. Advances and emerging challenges with ex vivo cultured corneal endothelial layer for the ultimate goal of therapeutic replacement of dysfunctional corneal endothelium in humans with functional corneal endothelium are also presented. PMID:26378588

  15. 2-(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-5-(E)-propenylbenzofuran promotes endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ladurner, Angela; Atanasov, Atanas G; Heiss, Elke H; Baumgartner, Lisa; Schwaiger, Stefan; Rollinger, Judith M; Stuppner, Hermann; Dirsch, Verena M

    2012-09-15

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediates important vaso-protective and immunomodulatory effects. Aim of this study was to examine whether lignan derivatives isolated from the roots of the anti-inflammatory medicinal plant Krameria lappacea influence eNOS activity and endothelial nitric oxide (NO) release. The study was performed using cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and HUVEC-derived EA.hy926 cells. Among the eleven isolated compounds only 2-(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-5-(E)-propenylbenzofuran (DPPB) was able to increase eNOS enzyme activity. DPPB (1-10 μM) treatment for 24 h induced a significant and dose-dependent increase in eNOS activity as determined by the [(14)C]L-arginine/[(14)C]L-citrulline conversion assay. Immunoblotting studies further revealed a time-dependent DPPB-induced increase in eNOS-Ser(1177) and decrease in eNOS-Thr(495) phosphorylation, as well as increased AMPK phosphorylation at Thr(172), whereas Akt phosphorylation at Ser(473) was not affected. Si-RNA-mediated knockdown of AMPK and inhibition of CaMKKβ by STO 609, as well as intracellular Ca(2+) chelation by Bapta AM abolished the stimulating effect of DPPB on eNOS-Ser(1177) and AMPK-Thr(172) phosphorylation. Furthermore, we could show that DPPB increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations assessed with the fluorescent dye Fluo-3-AM. DPPB enhances eNOS activity and endothelial NO release by raising intracellular Ca(2+) levels and increases signaling through a CaMKKβ-AMPK dependent pathway.

  16. Mechanisms in decorin regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor-induced human trophoblast migration and acquisition of endothelial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lala, Neena; Girish, Gannareddy V; Cloutier-Bosworth, Alia; Lala, Peeyush K

    2012-09-01

    Extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells of the human placenta invade the uterine decidua and utero-placental arteries to establish an efficient exchange of key molecules between maternal and fetal blood. Trophoblast invasion is stringently regulated in situ both positively and negatively by a variety of factors at the fetal-maternal interface to maintain a healthy utero-placental homeostasis. One such factor, decorin, a transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta binding, leucine-rich proteoglycan produced by the decidua, negatively regulates EVT proliferation, migration, and invasiveness independent of TGF-beta. We reported that these decorin actions were mediated by its binding to multiple tyrosine kinase receptors, including vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2. The present study explores the mechanisms underlying decorin antagonism of VEGF (VEGF-A) stimulation of endovascular differentiation of EVT using our EVT cell line, HTR-8/SVneo. We observe that decorin inhibits VEGF-induced EVT cell migration and endothelial-like tube formation on matrigel. VEGF activates MAPKs (p38 MAPK, MEK3/6, and ERK1/2) in EVT cells, and the activation is blocked in both cases by decorin. Employing selective MAPK inhibitors, we show that both p38 and ERK pathways contribute independently to VEGF-induced EVT migration and capillary-like tube formation. VEGF upregulates the vascular endothelial (VE) markers VE-cadherin and beta-catenin in EVT and endothelial cells, and this upregulation is blocked by decorin and MAPK inhibitors. These results suggest that decorin inhibits VEGF-A stimulation of trophoblast migration and endovascular differentiation by interfering with p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 activation. Thus decorin-mediated dual impediment of endovascular differentiation of the EVT and angiogenesis may have implications for pathogenesis of preeclampsia, a hypoinvasive trophoblast disorder in pregnancy.

  17. Endothelial cells and human cerebral small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Hainsworth, Atticus H; Oommen, Asho T; Bridges, Leslie R

    2015-01-01

    Brain endothelial cells have unique properties in terms of barrier function, local molecular signaling, regulation of local cerebral blood flow (CBF) and interactions with other members of the neurovascular unit. In cerebral small vessel disease (arteriolosclerosis; SVD), the endothelial cells in small arteries survive, even when mural pathology is advanced and myocytes are severely depleted. Here, we review aspects of altered endothelial functions that have been implicated in SVD: local CBF dysregulation, endothelial activation and blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. Reduced CBF is reported in the diffuse white matter lesions that are a neuroradiological signature of SVD. This may reflect an underlying deficit in local CBF regulation (possibly via the nitric oxide/cGMP signaling pathway). While many laboratories have observed an association of symptomatic SVD with serum markers of endothelial activation, it is apparent that the origin of these circulating markers need not be brain endothelium. Our own neuropathology studies did not confirm local endothelial activation in small vessels exhibiting SVD. Local BBB failure has been proposed as a cause of SVD and associated parenchymal lesions. Some groups find that computational analyses of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, following systemic injection of a gadolinium-based contrast agent, suggest that extravasation into brain parenchyma is heightened in people with SVD. Our recent histochemical studies of donated brain tissue, using immunolabeling for large plasma proteins [fibrinogen, immunoglobulin G (IgG)], do not support an association of SVD with recent plasma protein extravasation. It is possible that a trigger leakage episode, or a size-selective loosening of the BBB, participates in SVD pathology.

  18. Resistin decreases expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase through oxidative stress in human coronary artery endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jun; Lü, Jian-Ming; Chai, Hong; Wang, Xinwen; Lin, Peter H.; Yao, Qizhi

    2010-01-01

    Resistin is a newly discovered adipocyte-derived cytokine that may play an important role in insulin resistance, diabetes, adipogenesis, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease. However, it is largely unknown whether resistin impairs endothelial functions by affecting the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) system. In this study, we determined the effect of human recombinant resistin protein on eNOS expression and regulation in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). When cells were treated with clinically relevant concentrations of resistin (40 or 80 ng/ml) for 24 h, the levels of eNOS mRNA, protein, and activity and eNOS mRNA stability were significantly reduced. Cellular nitric oxide levels were also decreased. In addition, the cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide anion, were significantly increased in resistin-treated HCAECs. Mitochondrial membrane potential and the activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase were reduced. Three antioxidants, seleno-l-methionine, ginsenoside Rb1, and MnTBAP (superoxide dismutase mimetic), effectively blocked resistin-induced eNOS downregulation. Meanwhile, resistin activated the mitogen-activated protein kinases p38 and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), and the specific p38 inhibitor SB-239063 effectively blocked resistin-induced ROS production and eNOS downregulation. Furthermore, immunoreactivity of resistin was increased in atherosclerotic regions of human aorta and carotid arteries. Thus resistin directly induces eNOS downregulation through overproduction of ROS and activation of p38 and JNK in HCAECs. Resistin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and imbalance in cellular redox enzymes may be the underlying mechanisms of oxidative stress. PMID:20435848

  19. Phenotypic modulations of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human dermal fibroblasts using two angiogenic assays.

    PubMed

    Bikfalvi, A; Cramer, E M; Tenza, D; Tobelem, G

    1991-01-01

    Different angiogenic assays in vitro have helped to define various events underlying angiogenesis. In this report we have compared the phenotypic modifications of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVE cells) and human dermal fibroblasts using Matrigel and collagen gels. Both HUVE cells and human dermal fibroblasts form a network of anastomosing cords that apparently resemble blood capillaries when grown on Matrigel. The whole network was formed by several cellular aggregates joined to each other by cellular cords. Lumen formation was not observed in this angiogenic system. In opposite, considerable differences between HUVE cells and human dermal fibroblasts were observed in the three-dimensional angiogenic assay on collagen gels described by Montesano et al [14]. These results indicate that data obtained with angiogenic systems using Matrigel must be interpreted with caution and that the assay described by Montesano et al [14], is more reliable to describe angiogenesis.

  20. Endothelial expression of Fc gamma receptor IIb in the full-term human placenta.

    PubMed

    Mishima, T; Kurasawa, G; Ishikawa, G; Mori, M; Kawahigashi, Y; Ishikawa, T; Luo, S-S; Takizawa, T; Goto, T; Matsubara, S; Takeshita, T; Robinson, J M; Takizawa, T

    2007-01-01

    In the third trimester, human placental endothelial cells express Fc gamma receptor IIb (FcgammaRIIb). This expression is unique because FcgammaRIIb is generally expressed on immune cells and is typically undetectable in adult endothelial cells. Recently, we found a novel FcgammaRIIb-defined, IgG-containing organelle in placental endothelial cells; this organelle may be a key structure for the transcytosis of IgG across the endothelial layer. In this study, we verify the expression of FcgammaRIIb in endothelial placenta cells and use reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and sequencing analyses to define the expressed FCGR2B mRNA transcript variant. We also investigated the distribution of FCGR2B mRNA and protein within the vascular tree of the full-term human placenta by RT-PCR and quantitative microscopy. The mRNA sequence of FCGR2B expressed specifically in placental endothelial cells is that of transcript variant 2. FcgammaRIIb expression and synthesis occur throughout the placental vascular tree but do not extend into the umbilical cord. This study provides additional information on FcgammaRIIb expression in the human placenta.

  1. NGF and NGF-receptor expression of cultured immortalized human corneal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sornelli, Federica; Lambiase, Alessandro; Mantelli, Flavio

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Several growth factors, including nerve growth factor (NGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), play an important role in the homeostasis of the ocular surface. The involvement of both these growth factors in the pathophysiology of intraocular tissues has been extensively investigated. Despite the expression of NGF receptors by corneal endothelium, to date the role of NGF on the endothelial cell remains to be determined. Using a clonal cell line of human corneal endothelial cells, the aim of this study was to investigate the expression of the NGF-receptor and the potential partnership of NGF and VEGF in maintaining cell viability in vitro. Methods A human endothelial cell line (B4G12), was cultured under serum-free conditions as previously described with and without addition of different concentrations of NGF, anti-NGF-antibody (ANA), or VEGF for 4 days and these cells were used for immuno-istochemical, biochemical, and molecular analyses. Results NGF induces overexpression of NGF-receptors and synthesis and release of VEGF by endothelial cells and these cells are able to produce and secrete NGF. Conclusions These observations indicate that human corneal endothelial cells are receptive to the action of NGF and that these cells may regulate NGF activity through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms. PMID:20680101

  2. Human microvascular lymphatic and blood endothelial cells produce fibrillin: deposition patterns and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Antonella; Gabbrielli, Erica; Villano, Marilisa; Messina, Mario; Ferrara, Francesco; Weber, Elisabetta

    2010-12-01

    Fibrillin microfibrils constitute a scaffold for elastin deposition in the wall of arteries and form the anchoring filaments that connect the lymphatic endothelium to surrounding elastic fibers. We previously reported that fibrillin is deposited in a honeycomb pattern in bovine arterial endothelial cells, which also deposit microfibril-associated glycoprotein (MAGP)-1, whereas thoracic duct endothelial cells form an irregular web. The present immunohistochemical study was designed to verify whether lymphatic and blood human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) isolated from human foreskin by the sequential use of a pan-endothelial marker, CD31, and the lymphatic specific marker, D2-40, deposit fibrillin and MAGP-1. In both cell types, fibrillin and MAGP-1 co-localized and were deposited with different patterns of increasing complexity co-existing in the same culture. Fibrillin microfibrils formed a wide-mesh honeycomb leaving fibrillin-free spaces that were gradually filled. This modality of fibrillin deposition, similar to that of bovine large artery endothelial cells, was basically the same in blood and lymphatic HDMECs. In some lymphatic HDMECs, fibrillin was initially deposited as uniformly scattered short fibrillin strands probably as a result of anchoring filaments carried over from the vessels of origin. Our findings show that blood and lymphatic endothelial cells participate in fibrillin deposition in human skin.

  3. Small Spacecraft Active Thermal Control: Micro-Vascular Composites Enable Small Satellite Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The Small Spacecraft Integrated Power System with Active Thermal Control project endeavors to achieve active thermal control for small spacecraft in a practical and lightweight structure by circulating a coolant through embedded micro-vascular channels in deployable composite panels. Typically, small spacecraft rely on small body mounted passive radiators to discard heat. This limits cooling capacity and leads to the necessity to design for limited mission operations. These restrictions severely limit the ability of the system to dissipate large amounts of heat from radios, propulsion systems, etc. An actively pumped cooling system combined with a large deployable radiator brings two key advantages over the state of the art for small spacecraft: capacity and flexibility. The use of a large deployable radiator increases the surface area of the spacecraft and allows the radiation surface to be pointed in a direction allowing the most cooling, drastically increasing cooling capacity. With active coolant circulation, throttling of the coolant flow can enable high heat transfer rates during periods of increased heat load, or isolate the radiator during periods of low heat dissipation.

  4. Novel use of the medtronic micro vascular plug for PDA closure in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Wang-Giuffre, Elizabeth W; Breinholt, John P

    2017-05-01

    To describe a single institution experience with a new endovascular occlusion device used for transcatheter patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) closure in preterm infants. The PDA is a defect largely treated via cardiac catheterization except for the smallest patients. Medical records and catheterization reports of all premature neonates who underwent PDA device closure with the Medtronic Micro Vascular Plug (MVP) (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) between September 2015 and June 2016 were reviewed. Procedural details, complications, and short term outcomes were recorded. Eight premature neonates born at a median gestational age of 28 weeks (23 to 35 weeks) underwent PDA closure with a Medtronic MVP. All devices were deployed via a 4F angled Glide catheter in prograde fashion without arterial access. Median age and weight was 52 days (15-112 days) and 2,550 g (1,800-3,500 g), respectively. Fluoroscopy and echocardiography were utilized for the procedure. Complete closure was achieved in all patients with no procedural complications, pulmonary artery or aortic obstruction or death. One device embolized 9 days after deployment and was successfully retrieved. This study describes transcatheter PDA closure with the Medtronic MVP. The major advantage is the ability to deliver the device via a standard catheter in prograde fashion, and avoid the hemodynamic instability produced by rigid delivery sheaths. It also further validates the ability to close the PDA without arterial access, providing improved access to this procedure to smaller and more vulnerable children. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Sacrificial component fabrication for optimised production of micro-vascular polymer composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, B.; Dixon, D.; McIlhagger, A.; Archer, E.

    2015-02-01

    Smart functional materials are a viable future goal for advanced applications in aerospace, space and medical applications. In this work micro-vascular polymer composite systems have been developed using sacrificial fibres produced from catalyst loaded Poly(lactic acid). The sacrificial fibres have been produced via a published technique which treated PLA in a solvent catalyst mixture of 60% Trifluoroethanol, 40% H2O dispersed with 10 wt% tin (II) oxalate catalyst. A second process of polymer extrusion of PLA using graded fill contents of tin (II) oxalate has also been developed for the up scaled production of fibres as an alternative to solution treatment. Thermal analysis (TGA) was used to compare sacrificial fibre specimens. PLA fibres produced via the polymer extrusion method outperformed solution treated fibres displaying a lower degradation onset temperature (average 25°C lower), higher degradation rates (observed through a derivative curve comparison) and lower residual catalyst content (0.67% solvent treated fibre against 0.16% extruded fibre). The continuous extrusion process is solvent free and is suitable for high volume production. This work has been carried out to fully understand the fabrication issues with sacrificial components.

  6. A human endothelial cell membrane protein that binds Staphylococcus aureus in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, D C; Hatcher, V B; Patel, D; Orr, G A; Higgins, L L; Lowy, F D

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated S. aureus adherence to human endothelial cells utilizing an in vitro model. Staphylococcus binding to confluent endothelial cell monolayers was saturable in both dose and time response studies suggesting that the binding interaction was specific. We have developed a technique, based on the pH dependent affinity of iminobiotin for streptavidin, for the isolation of an endothelial cell membrane component that binds S. aureus, in vitro. A 50-kD membrane component was isolated and purified using this approach. This component was trypsin sensitive, periodate insensitive, and did not label with [3H]glucosamine. [35S]Methionine and [125I]iodine labeling confirmed that the protein was synthesized by and expressed on the endothelial cell surface. Functional binding studies demonstrated that staphylococci, but not endothelial cells, bound to the protein when immobilized on microtiter wells. Preincubation of staphylococci with the purified protein significantly (P less than 0.001) reduced staphylococcal binding to cultured endothelial cells. The capacity of S. aureus to colonize and invade endovascular surfaces may in part be a consequence of staphylococcal interaction with this endothelial cell membrane protein. Images PMID:2318978

  7. Phyllanthus emblica L. Enhances Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Wound Healing and Sprouting.

    PubMed

    Chularojmontri, Linda; Suwatronnakorn, Maneewan; Wattanapitayakul, Suvara K

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is the hallmark of impaired wound healing and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Antioxidants from natural sources decrease oxidative stress and protect against cellular damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we examined the antioxidant constituents and capacity of Phyllanthus emblica L. (PE) fruit in freeze-dried power form. The pharmacological properties of PE were investigated using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in the aspects of endothelial cell proliferation, nitric oxide (NO) production, wound healing, cell migration, in vitro angiogenesis, and VEGF gene expression. The ASC content of PE was 1.574% + 0.046% (w/w) as determined by HPLC and the total phenolic content was 36.1% ± 0.7% gallic acid equivalent when measured by Folin-Ciocalteu assay. The FRAP assay revealed a relatively high antioxidant capacity at 3,643 + 192.5 µmole/mg. PE at 0.1 to 10 µg/mL did not significantly influence endothelial cell proliferation, but at higher concentrations PE decreased cell survival to 62%. PE significantly promoted NO production, endothelial wound closure, endothelial sprouting, and VEGF mRNA expression. Therefore, PE is a candidate for antioxidant supplement that promotes endothelial function and restores wound healing competency.

  8. Nanoliposomes protect against human arteriole endothelial dysfunction induced by β-amyloid peptide

    PubMed Central

    Truran, Seth; Weissig, Volkmar; Madine, Jillian; Davies, Hannah A; Guzman-Villanueva, Diana; Franco, Daniel A; Karamanova, Nina; Burciu, Camelia; Serrano, Geidy; Beach, Thomas G

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether nanoliposomes containing phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and phosphatidic acid (NLPA) prevent β-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42) fibrillation and Aβ42-induced human arteriole endothelial dysfunction. NLPA abolished Aβ42 fibril formation (thioflavin-T fluorescence/electron microscopy). In ex-vivo human adipose and leptomeningeal arterioles, Aβ42 impaired dilator response to acetylcholine that was reversed by NLPA; this protection was abolished by L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester. Aβ42 reduced human umbilical vein endothelial cell NO production that was restored by NLPA. Nanoliposomes prevented Aβ42 amyloid formation, reversed Aβ42-induced human microvascular endothelial dysfunction and may be useful in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26661197

  9. Immunocytochemical localization of vascular endothelial growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 of the human deciduous molar tooth germ development in the human fetus.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Yoko; Fujita, Toshiya; Sunohara, Masataka; Sato, Iwao

    2008-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key regulator of blood vessel endothelial development. We used immunohistochemical methods to demonstrate the localization of VEGF and its receptors, showing the specific expression pattern of VEGF and VEGF receptor in the human deciduous tooth from the cap to late bell stages in the human fetus. Immunoreactivity to VEGF and its receptor VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) was intensely positive in the inner enamel epithelium at the cap stage and ranged from negative to moderately positive in the bell stage. At the late bell stage, VEGF immunoreactivity was mainly positive but weak for VEGFR-2. The intensity of VEGF and VEGFR-2 in odontoblasts increases from cap stage to late bell stage. We postulate that the dissimilar expression of VEGF in inner enamel epithelium, ameloblast and odontoblast during each stage of human tooth development may affect tooth germ formation.

  10. High quality in vitro expansion of human endothelial progenitor cells of human umbilical vein origin.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yan; Yue, Zhen; Zhang, Haiying; Shi, Xu; Zhang, Mingrui; Chang, Xiaona; Gao, Hang; Li, Ronggui; Wang, Zonggui

    2017-01-01

    The limited availability of qualified endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) is a major challenge for regenerative medicine. In the present study, we isolated human EPCs from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by using magnetic micro-beads coated with an antibody against human CD34. Flow cytometric assay showed that majority of these cells expressed VEGFR2 (KDR), CD34 and CD133, three molecular markers for early EPCs. It was also found that a bioreactor micro-carrier cell culture system (bio-MCCS) was superior to dish culture for in vitro expansion of EPCs. It expanded more EPCs which were in the early stage, as shown by the expression of characteristic molecular markers and had better angiogenic potential, as shown by matrix-gel based in vitro angiogenesis assay. These results suggest that HUVECs might be a novel promising resource of EPCs for regenerative medicine and that a bio-MCCS cell culture system might be broadly used for in vitro expansion of EPCs.

  11. ROCK Inhibitor Enhances Adhesion and Wound Healing of Human Corneal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pipparelli, Aurélien; Arsenijevic, Yvan; Thuret, Gilles; Gain, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of corneal transparency is crucial for vision and depends mainly on the endothelium, a non-proliferative monolayer of cells covering the inner part of the cornea. When endothelial cell density falls below a critical threshold, the barrier and “pump” functions of the endothelium are compromised which results in corneal oedema and loss of visual acuity. The conventional treatment for such severe disorder is corneal graft. Unfortunately, there is a worldwide shortage of donor corneas, necessitating amelioration of tissue survival and storage after harvesting. Recently it was reported that the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 promotes adhesion, inhibits apoptosis, increases the number of proliferating monkey corneal endothelial cells in vitro and enhance corneal endothelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo in animal models. Using organ culture human cornea (N = 34), the effect of ROCK inhibitor was evaluated in vitro and ex vivo. Toxicity, corneal endothelial cell density, cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell morphometry, adhesion and wound healing process were evaluated by live/dead assay standard cell counting method, EdU labelling, Ki67, Caspase3, Zo-1 and Actin immunostaining. We demonstrated for the first time in human corneal endothelial cells ex vivo and in vitro, that ROCK inhibitor did not induce any toxicity effect and did not alter cell viability. ROCK inhibitor treatment did not induce human corneal endothelial cells proliferation. However, ROCK inhibitor significantly enhanced adhesion and wound healing. The present study shows that the selective ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 has no effect on human corneal endothelial cells proliferative capacities, but alters cellular behaviours. It induces changes in cell shape, increases cell adhesion and enhances wound healing ex vivo and in vitro. Its absence of toxicity, as demonstrated herein, is relevant for its use in human therapy. PMID:23626771

  12. Neutrophil-mediated protection of cultured human vascular endothelial cells from damage by growing Candida albicans hyphae

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.E. Jr.; Rotrosen, D.; Fontaine, J.W.; Haudenschild, C.C.; Diamond, R.D.

    1987-05-01

    Interactions were studied between human neutrophils and cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells invaded by Candida albicans. In the absence of neutrophils, progressive Candida germination and hyphal growth extensively damaged endothelial cell monolayers over a period of 4 to 6 hours, as determined both by morphological changes and release of /sup 51/Cr from radiolabeled endothelial cells. Monolayers were completely destroyed and replaced by hyphae after 18 hours of incubation. In contrast, when added 2 hours after the monolayers had been infected with Candida, neutrophils selectively migrated toward and attached to hyphae at points of hyphal penetration into individual endothelial cells (observed by time-lapse video-microscopy). Attached neutrophils spread over hyphal surfaces both within and beneath the endothelial cells; neutrophil recruitment to initial sites of leukocyte-Candida-endothelial cell interactions continued throughout the first 60 minutes of observation. Neutrophil spreading and stasis were observed only along Candida hyphae and at sites of Candida-endothelial cell interactions. These events resulted in 58.0% killing of Candida at 2 hours and subsequent clearance of Candida from endothelial cell monolayers, as determined by microcolony counts and morphological observation. On introduction of additional neutrophils to yield higher ratios of neutrophils to endothelial cells (10 neutrophils:1 endothelial cell), neutrophil migration toward hyphal elements continued. Despite retraction or displacement of occasional endothelial cells by invading Candida and neutrophils, most endothelial cells remained intact, viable, and motile as verified both by morphological observations and measurement of /sup 51/Cr release from radiolabeled monolayers.

  13. Dynamin-related protein 1 mediates low glucose-induced endothelial dysfunction in human arterioles.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Michael J; Wang, Jingli; Ying, Rong; Suboc, Tisha B; Malik, Mobin; Couillard, Allison; Branum, Amberly; Puppala, Venkata; Widlansky, Michael E

    2017-03-01

    Intensive glycemic regulation has resulted in an increased incidence of hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemic burden correlates with adverse cardiovascular complications and contributes acutely and chronically to endothelial dysfunction. Prior data indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to hypoglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction, but the mechanisms behind this linkage remain unknown. We attempt to determine whether clinically relevant low-glucose (LG) exposures acutely induce endothelial dysfunction through activation of the mitochondrial fission process. Characterization of mitochondrial morphology was carried out in cultured endothelial cells by using confocal microscopy. Isolated human arterioles were used to explore the effect LG-induced mitochondrial fission has on the formation of detrimental reactive oxygen species (ROS), bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO), and endothelial-dependent vascular relaxation. Fluorescence microscopy was employed to visualize changes in mitochondrial ROS and NO levels and videomicroscopy applied to measure vasodilation response. Pharmacological disruption of the profission protein Drp1 with Mdivi-1 during LG exposure reduced mitochondrial fragmentation among vascular endothelial cells (LG: 0.469; LG+Mdivi-1: 0.276; P = 0.003), prevented formation of vascular ROS (LG: 2.036; LG+Mdivi-1: 1.774; P = 0.005), increased the presence of NO (LG: 1.352; LG+Mdivi-1: 1.502; P = 0.048), and improved vascular dilation response to acetylcholine (LG: 31.6%; LG+Mdivi-1; 78.5% at maximum dose; P < 0.001). Additionally, decreased expression of Drp1 via siRNA knockdown during LG conditions also improved vascular relaxation. Exposure to LG imparts endothelial dysfunction coupled with altered mitochondrial phenotypes among isolated human arterioles. Disruption of Drp1 and subsequent mitochondrial fragmentation events prevents impaired vascular dilation, restores mitochondrial phenotype, and implicates mitochondrial fission as a primary

  14. Host defenses to Rickettsia rickettsii infection contribute to increased microvascular permeability in human cerebral endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Woods, Michael E; Olano, Juan P

    2008-03-01

    Rickettsiae are arthropod-borne intracellular bacterial pathogens that primarily infect the microvascular endothelium leading to systemic spread of the organisms and the major pathophysiological effect, increased microvascular permeability, and edema in vital organs such as the lung and brain. Much work has been done on mechanisms of immunity to rickettsiae, as well as the responses of endothelial cells to rickettsial invasion. However, to date, no one has described the mechanisms of increased microvascular permeability during acute rickettsiosis. We sought to establish an in vitro model of human endothelial-target rickettsial infection using the etiological agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Rickettsia rickettsii, and human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells. Endothelial cells infected with R. rickettsii exhibited a dose-dependent decrease in trans-endothelial electrical resistance, which translates into increased monolayer permeability. Additionally, we showed that the addition of pro-inflammatory stimuli essential to rickettsial immunity dramatically enhanced this effect. This increase in permeability correlates with dissociation of adherens junctions between endothelial cells and is not dependent on the presence of nitric oxide. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that increased microvascular permeability associated with rickettsial infection is partly attributable to intracellular rickettsiae and partly attributable to the immune defenses that have evolved to protect the host from rickettsial spread.

  15. Role of Rutin on Nitric Oxide Synthesis in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Zaiton; Chua, Kien Hui; Megat Mohd Nordin, Nor Anita; Abdullah Mahdy, Zaleha

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), is a major antiatherogenic factor in the blood vessel. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. Decreased availability of endothelial NO promotes the progression of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Rutin is a flavonoid with multiple cardiovascular protective effects. This study aimed to investigate the effects of rutin on eNOS and NO production in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC were divided into four groups: control; oxidative stress induction with 180 μM H2O2; treatment with 300 μM rutin; and concomitant induction with rutin and H2O2 for 24 hours. HUVEC treated with rutin produced higher amount of NO compared to control (P < 0.01). In the oxidative stress-induced HUVEC, rutin successfully induced cells' NO production (P < 0.01). Rutin promoted NO production in HUVEC by inducing eNOS gene expression (P < 0.05), eNOS protein synthesis (P < 0.01), and eNOS activity (P < 0.05). Treatment with rutin also led to increased gene and protein expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in HUVEC. Therefore, upregulation of eNOS expression by rutin may be mediated by bFGF. The results showed that rutin may improve endothelial function by augmenting NO production in human endothelial cells. PMID:25093198

  16. High Throughput Gene Expression Analysis Identifies Reliable Expression Markers of Human Corneal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chng, Zhenzhi; Peh, Gary S. L.; Herath, Wishva B.; Cheng, Terence Y. D.; Ang, Heng-Pei; Toh, Kah-Peng; Robson, Paul; Mehta, Jodhbir S.; Colman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Considerable interest has been generated for the development of suitable corneal endothelial graft alternatives through cell-tissue engineering, which can potentially alleviate the shortage of corneal transplant material. The advent of less invasive suture-less key-hole surgery options such as Descemet’s Stripping Endothelial Keratoplasty (DSEK) and Descemet’s Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty (DMEK), which involve transplantation of solely the endothelial layer instead of full thickness cornea, provide further impetus for the development of alternative endothelial grafts for clinical applications. A major challenge for this endeavor is the lack of specific markers for this cell type. To identify genes that reliably mark corneal endothelial cells (CECs) in vivo and in vitro, we performed RNA-sequencing on freshly isolated human CECs (from both young and old donors), CEC cultures, and corneal stroma. Gene expression of these corneal cell types was also compared to that of other human tissue types. Based on high throughput comparative gene expression analysis, we identified a panel of markers that are: i) highly expressed in CECs from both young donors and old donors; ii) expressed in CECs in vivo and in vitro; and iii) not expressed in corneal stroma keratocytes and the activated corneal stroma fibroblasts. These were SLC4A11, COL8A2 and CYYR1. The use of this panel of genes in combination reliably ascertains the identity of the CEC cell type. PMID:23844023

  17. Adenoviral delivery of human connexin37 induces endothelial cell death through apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Seul, Kyung H; Kang, Keum Y; Lee, Kyung S; Kim, Suhn H; Beyer, Eric C

    2004-07-09

    Gap junction channels formed of connexins directly link the cytoplasm of adjacent cells and have been implicated in intercellular signaling that may regulate the functions of vascular cells. To facilitate connexin manipulation and analysis of their roles in adult endothelial cells, we developed adenoviruses containing the vascular connexins (Cx37, Cx40, and Cx43). We infected cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells with control or connexin adenoviruses. Connexin expression was verified by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. Infection with the Cx37 adenovirus (but not control or other connexin adenoviruses) led to a dose-dependent death of the endothelial cells that was partially antagonized by the gap junction blocker alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid and altered the intercellular transfer of Lucifer yellow and neurobiotin. Cell morphology, Annexin V and TUNEL staining, and caspase 3 assays all implicated apoptosis in the cell death. These data suggest that connexin-specific alterations of intercellular communication may modulate endothelial cell growth and death.

  18. Vascular endothelial growth factor is a potential tumour angiogenesis factor in human gliomas in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plate, Karl H.; Breier, Georg; Weich, Herbert A.; Risau, Werner

    1992-10-01

    CLINICAL and experimental studies suggest that angiogenesis is a prerequisite for solid tumour growth1,2. Several growth factors with mitogenic or chemotactic activity for endothelial cells in vitro have been described, but it is not known whether these mediate tumour vascularization in vivo3,4. Glioblastoma, the most common and most malignant brain tumour in humans, is distinguished from astrocytoma by the presence of necroses and vascular prolifer-ations5'6. Here we show that expression of an endothelial cell-specific mitogen, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), is induced in astrocytoma cells but is dramatically upregulated in two apparently different subsets of glioblastoma cells. The high-affinity tyrosine kinase receptor for VEGF, flt, although not expressed in normal brain endothelium, is upregulated in tumour endothelial cells in vivo. These observations strongly support the concept that tumour angiogenesis is regulated by paracrine mechanisms and identify VEGF as a potential tumour angiogenesis factor in vivo.

  19. The effect of moesin overexpression on ageing of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Hee; Hong, In Ae; Oh, Sang Ho; Kwon, Yeon Sook; Cho, Soo Hyun; Lee, Kwang Hoon

    2009-11-01

    Senescence of microvascular endothelial cells is known to play an important role in the pathophysiology of vascular diseases related to ageing, but the accurate mechanism or related genes are not known. Moesin, a cytoskeletal protein and the most potent candidate as an ageing-related protein, showed obvious changes in expression when compared before and after ageing. In this study, a lentivirus was used to overexpress moesin in endothelial cells. The expression of cell cycle mediators such as p16, cyclin D1 and cdk4, which can be the markers of ageing, was compared by RNA and was shown to be suppressed in moesin overexpressed endothelial cells. In conclusion, it can be said that the expression of moesin delays senescence of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells and this fundamental discovery can be used as a basis for understanding the mechanism of ageing and age-related diseases.

  20. Enhanced Translation of Heme Oxygenase-2 Preserves Human Endothelial Cell Viability during Hypoxia*

    PubMed Central

    He, Jeff Z.; Ho, J. J. David; Gingerich, Sheena; Courtman, David W.; Marsden, Philip A.; Ward, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    Heme oxygenases (HOs) -1 and -2 catalyze the breakdown of heme to release carbon monoxide, biliverdin, and ferrous iron, which may preserve cell function during oxidative stress. HO-1 levels decrease in endothelial cells exposed to hypoxia, whereas the effect of hypoxia on HO-2 expression is unknown. The current study was carried out to determine if hypoxia alters HO-2 protein levels in human endothelial cells and whether this enzyme plays a role in preserving their viability during hypoxic stress. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs), and human blood outgrowth endothelial cells were exposed to 21% or 1% O2 for 48 or 16 h in the presence or absence of tumor necrosis factor-α (10 ng/ml) or H2O2 (100 μm). In all three endothelial cell types HO-1 mRNA and protein levels were decreased following hypoxic incubation, whereas HO-2 protein levels were unaltered. In HUVECs HO-2 levels were maintained during hypoxia despite a 57% reduction in steady-state HO-2 mRNA level and a 43% reduction in total protein synthesis. Polysome profiling revealed increased HO-2 transcript association with polysomes during hypoxia consistent with enhanced translation of these transcripts. Importantly, inhibition of HO-2 expression by small interference RNA increased oxidative stress, exacerbated mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and enhanced caspase activation and apoptotic cell death in cells incubated under hypoxic but not normoxic conditions. These data indicate that HO-2 is important in maintaining endothelial viability and may preserve local regulation of vascular tone, thrombosis, and inflammatory responses during reductions in systemic oxygen delivery. PMID:20118244

  1. Nicotine promotes vascular endothelial growth factor secretion by human trophoblast cells under hypoxic conditions and improves the proliferation and tube formation capacity of human umbilical endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongbo; Wu, Lanxiang; Wang, Yahui; Zhou, Jiayi; Li, Ruixia; Zhou, Jiabing; Wang, Zehua; Xu, Congjian

    2017-04-01

    Pre-eclampsia, characterized as defective uteroplacental vascularization, remains the major cause of maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Previous epidemiological studies demonstrated that cigarette smoking reduced the risk of pre-eclampsia. However, the molecular mechanism remains elusive. In the present study, it is demonstrated that a low dose of nicotine decreased soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (sFlt1) secretion in human trophoblast cells under hypoxic conditions. Nicotine was then observed to promote vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion by reducing sFlt1 secretion and increasing VEGF mRNA transcription. Further data showed that nicotine enhanced hypoxia-mediated hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression and HIF-1α small interfering RNA abrogated nicotine-induced VEGF secretion, indicating that HIF-1α may be responsible for nicotine-mediated VEGF transcription under hypoxic conditions. Moreover, conditioned medium from human trophoblast cells treated with nicotine under hypoxic conditions promoted the proliferation and tube formation capacity of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC) by promoting VEGF secretion. These findings indicate that nicotine may promote VEGF secretion in human trophoblast cells under hypoxic conditions by reducing sFlt1 secretion and up-regulating VEGF transcription and improve the proliferation and tube formation of HUVEC cells, which may contribute to elucidate the protective effect of cigarette smoking against pre-eclampsia. Copyright © 2017 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Gene expression microarray data from human microvascular endothelial cells supplemented with a low concentration of niacin

    PubMed Central

    Hughes-Large, Jennifer M.; Borradaile, Nica M.

    2016-01-01

    The systemic lipid modifying drug, niacin, can directly improve human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function under lipotoxic conditions, possibly through activation of niacin receptors “Niacin receptor activation improves human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during lipotoxicity” (Hughes-Large et al. 2014). Here we provide accompanying data collected using Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays to identify changes in gene expression in human microvascular endothelial cells treated with 10 μM niacin. Statistical analyses of robust multi-array average (RMA) values revealed that only 16 genes exhibited greater than 1.3-fold differential expression. Of these 16, only 5 were identified protein coding genes, while 3 of the remaining 11 genes appeared to be small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs. Altered expression of EFCAB4B, NAP1L2, and OR13C8 was confirmed by real time quantitative PCR. PMID:26937468

  3. Gene expression microarray data from human microvascular endothelial cells supplemented with a low concentration of niacin.

    PubMed

    Hughes-Large, Jennifer M; Borradaile, Nica M

    2016-03-01

    The systemic lipid modifying drug, niacin, can directly improve human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function under lipotoxic conditions, possibly through activation of niacin receptors "Niacin receptor activation improves human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during lipotoxicity" (Hughes-Large et al. 2014). Here we provide accompanying data collected using Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays to identify changes in gene expression in human microvascular endothelial cells treated with 10 μM niacin. Statistical analyses of robust multi-array average (RMA) values revealed that only 16 genes exhibited greater than 1.3-fold differential expression. Of these 16, only 5 were identified protein coding genes, while 3 of the remaining 11 genes appeared to be small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs. Altered expression of EFCAB4B, NAP1L2, and OR13C8 was confirmed by real time quantitative PCR.

  4. [Knockdown of RUNX3 inhibits hypoxia-induced endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition of human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhua; Li, Bingong; Wang, Yuqin; Wang, Delong; Zou, Jin; Ke, Xuan; Hao, Yanqin

    2016-12-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) knockdown on hypoxia-induced endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) of human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (HCMECs), and elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism. Methods HCMECs were cultured in hypoxic conditions and infected with RUNX3-RNAi lentivirus to knock-down the expression of RUNX3. Reverse transcription PCR was performed to detect the mRNA expressions of RUNX3 and EndoMT related genes such as CD31, vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1); Western blotting was used to determine the protein expressions of RUNX3, CD31, α-SMA and another molecules involved in EndoMT; and immunofluorescence cytochemistry was applied to observe the colocalization of CD31 and α-SMA. Results Hypoxia induced the transition of HCMECs to mesenchymal cells. Hypoxia up-regulated the expression of TGF-β2, Smad2/3, phosphorylation of Smad2/3 (p-Smad2/3), Notch-1, Hes1, and Hey1; knockdown of RUNX3 down-regulated the levels of Smad2/3, p-Smad2/3, Hes1, and Hey1 to different extents, and raised the levels of TGF-β2 and Notch-1. Conclusion Knockdown of RUNX3 in HCMECs attenuates hypoxia-induced EndoMT via partially inhibiting TGF-β and Notch signaling pathway.

  5. Cytoprotective and Antioxidant Effects of Steen Solution on Human Lung Spheroids and Human Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Pagano, F; Nocella, C; Sciarretta, S; Fianchini, L; Siciliano, C; Mangino, G; Ibrahim, M; De Falco, E; Carnevale, R; Chimenti, I; Frati, G

    2017-07-01

    Respiratory diseases represent a major healthcare burden worldwide. Lung transplantation (LTx) is the "gold standard" for end-stage patients, strongly limited by shortage of available/suitable donor lungs. Normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has significantly increased the number of lungs suitable for transplantation. Steen solution is used for EVLP, but the mechanisms involved in its beneficial properties remain to be clarified. We investigated the effects of Steen solution in an in vitro protocol of cold starvation and normothermic recovery on human lung spheroids, named pneumospheres (PSs), containing epithelial/basal cells, and on endothelial human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Steen solution significantly preserved the viability of PSs, reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) release by PSs and HUVECs, decreased NADPH-oxidase (NOX) activity in PSs, and reduced inflammatory cytokines expression levels in HUVECs. Steen solution was able to specifically reduce NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) isoform activation, particularly in PSs, as detected by soluble-NOX2 peptide and p47-phosphorylation. Interestingly, a specific NOX2 inhibitor could partly mimic the pro-survival effect of Steen on PSs. We provide the first evidence that Steen solution can preserve lung epithelial/progenitor cells viability partially through NOX2 downregulation, and exert antioxidant effects on parenchymal cells, with consequent ROS reduction. These results suggest that NOX2 inhibition might be an additional strategy to reduce cellular damage during LTx procedures. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  6. Engineering of Surface Functionality onto Polystyrene Microcarriers for the Attachment and Growth of Human Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Gordon M.; Foord, John S.; Griffiths, Jon-Paul; Parker, Emily M.; Moloney, Mark G.; Choong, Cleo

    2014-08-01

    This work reports the effects of introducing diverse chemical functionalities onto the surface of polystyrene microcarrier beads on their ability to function as injectable cell carriers. Cellular adhesion and proliferation, as well as cellular outgrowths from microcarrier surfaces, using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), were examined in detail. It was observed that initial cell adhesion appeared to be most significantly decreased by hydrophobicity, whilst cell proliferation appeared to be improved in most chemical functional groups over unmodified polystyrene. Overall, our study highlights the importance of surface chemistry in directing the growth and function of human endothelial cells.

  7. Human microvascular endothelial cells express receptors for platelet-derived growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Beitz, J.G.; Kim, Insoon; Calabresi, P.; Frackelton, A.R. Jr. )

    1991-03-01

    Endothelial cells have been widely thought to be unresponsive to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, a major growth factor released from stimulated platelets at the sites of vascular insults) and devoid of PDGF receptors. Nevertheless, in examining the growth-factor responses of microvascular endothelial cells isolated from human omental adipose tissue, the authors were surprised to detect PDGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of a 180-kDa glycoprotein, subsequently identified as the cellular receptor for PDGF by specific immunoprecipitation. Scatchard analysis of {sup 125}I-labeled PDGF binding to human microvascular endothelial cells revealed 30,000 PDGF receptors per cell with a K{sub d} of 0.14 nM. Normal cellular consequences of receptor activation were also observed, including tyrosine phosphorylation of a 42-kDa protein and serine phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6. Furthermore, PDGF was mitogenic for these cells. Microvascular endothelial cells play a central role in neovascularization required for wound healing and solid tumor growth. Thus, the discovery of functional PFDG receptors on human microvascular endothelial cells suggests a direct role for PDGF in this process.

  8. Upregulation of transmembrane endothelial junction proteins in human cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Schmidt, Dörthe; Schoenauer, Roman; Brokopp, Chad; Agarkova, Irina; Bozinov, Oliver; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Hoerstrup, Simon P

    2010-09-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are among the most prevalent cerebrovascular malformations, and endothelial cells seem to play a major role in the disease. However, the underlying mechanisms, including endothelial intercellular communication, have not yet been fully elucidated. In this article, the authors focus on the endothelial junction proteins CD31, VE-cadherin, and occludin as important factors for functional cell-cell contacts known as vascular adhesion molecules and adherence and tight junctions. Thirteen human CCM specimens and 6 control tissue specimens were cryopreserved and examined for the presence of VE-cadherin, occludin, and CD31 by immunofluorescence staining. Protein quantification was performed by triplicate measurements using western blot analysis. Immunofluorescent analyses of the CCM sections revealed a discontinuous pattern of dilated microvessels and capillaries as well as increased expression of occludin, VE-cadherin, and CD31 in the intima and in the enclosed parenchymal tissue compared with controls. Protein quantification confirmed these findings by showing upregulation of the levels of these proteins up to 2-6 times. A protocol enabling the molecular and morphological examination of the intercellular contact proteins in human CCM was validated. The abnormal and discontinuous pattern in these endothelial cell-contact proteins compared with control tissue explains the loose intercellular junctions that are considered to be one of the causes of CCM-associated bleeding or transendothelial oozing of erythrocytes. Despite the small number of specimens, this study demonstrates for the first time a quantitative analysis of endothelial junction proteins in human CCM.

  9. The Medtronic Micro Vascular Plug™ for Vascular Embolization in Children With Congenital Heart Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sathanandam, Shyam; Justino, Henri; Waller, B Rush; Gowda, Srinath T; Radtke, Wolfgang; Qureshi, Athar M

    2017-04-01

    To describe the early multi-center, clinical experience with the Medtronic Micro Vascular Plug™ (MVP) in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) undergoing vascular embolization. The MVP is a large diameter vascular occlusion device that can be delivered through a microcatheter for embolization of abnormal blood vessels. A retrospective review of embolization procedures using the MVP in children with CHD was performed in 3-centers. Occlusion of patent ductus arteriosus using the MVP was not included. Ten children underwent attempted occlusion using the MVP. The most common indication to use the MVP was failed attempted occlusion using other embolic devices. Five, single ventricle patients (median age 3-years, median weight 14.9 kg) underwent occlusion of veno-venous collaterals following bidirectional Glenn operation. Three patients (Median age 8 years) underwent occlusion of coronary artery fistulae (CAF). Two patients (age 7 months and 1 year) underwent occlusion of large aorto-pulmonary collaterals. A 7-day-old child with a large CAF required 2 MVPs and an Amplatzer Vascular Plug (AVP-II) for complete occlusion. Occlusion of all other blood vessels was achieved using a single MVP. One MVP embolized distally in an 8-years-old child with a large CAF. There were no other procedural complications or during follow-up (median 9 months). The MVP is a new, large-diameter vascular embolization device that can be delivered through a microcatheter. It may play an important role in providing highly effective occlusion of abnormal vessels in children. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Characterization of cationic amino acid transporters and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in human placental microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dye, J F; Vause, S; Johnston, T; Clark, P; Firth, J A; D'Souza, S W; Sibley, C P; Glazier, J D

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the expression and activity of arginine transporters and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human placental microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC). Using RT-PCR amplification products for eNOS, CAT1, CAT2A, CAT2B, CAT4, 4F2hc (CD98), rBAT and the light chains y+LAT1, y+LAT2, and b0+T1 were detected in HPMEC, but not B0+. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting confirmed the presence of 4F2hc and CAT1 protein in HPMEC. 4F2hc-light chain dimers were indicated by a shift in molecular mass detected under nonreducing conditions. L-Arginine transport into HPMEC was independent of Na+ or Cl- and was inhibited by the neutral amino acid glutamine, but not by cystine. The Ki for glutamine inhibition was greater in the absence of Na+. Kinetic analysis supported a two-transporter model attributed to system y+L and system y+. Expression of eNOS in HPMEC was detectable by immunohistochemistry and ELISA but not by Western blotting. Activity of eNOS in HPMEC, measured over 48 h, either as the basal production of nitric oxide (NO) or as the accumulation of intracellular cGMP was not detectable. We conclude that HPMEC transport cationic amino acids by systems y+ and y+L and that basal eNOS expression and activity in these cells is low.

  11. Size and composition effects of household particles on inflammation and endothelial dysfunction of human coronary artery endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lian-Yu; Liu, I.-Jung; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Lin, Hui-Yi; Chuang, Kai-Jen

    2013-10-01

    People spend generally 90 percent of their time indoors, yet toxicity of household particles has not been thoroughly investigated before. The objective of this study is to examine particle size and components effects of household particles on human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC). We used two micro-orifice uniform deposit impactors to collect 60 sets of indoor particulate matters (PM) from 30 houses in Taipei, Taiwan. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) effects of household particles were determined by high-resolution gas chromatograph/high-resolution mass spectrometer, respectively. HCAEC were exposed to household particles extracts in three size ranges: PM0.1 (diameters less than 0.1 μm), PM1.0-0.1 (diameters between 1.0 and 0.1 μm), and PM10-1.0 (diameters between 10 and 1.0 μm) at 50 μg mL-1 for 4 h, and interleukin-6 (IL-6), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and nitric oxide (NO) concentrations in the medium were measured. We found that household PM1.0-0.1 was associated with increased IL-6 and ET-1 production and decreased NO synthesis. Naphthalene of PM1.0-0.1 was highly correlated with IL-6 and ET-1 production and NO reduction. We concluded that size and compositions of household particles were both important factors on inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in HCAEC.

  12. Constitutively Expressed IFITM3 Protein in Human Endothelial Cells Poses an Early Infection Block to Human Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiangjie; Zeng, Hui; Kumar, Amrita; Belser, Jessica A; Maines, Taronna R; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2016-12-15

    A role for pulmonary endothelial cells in the orchestration of cytokine production and leukocyte recruitment during influenza virus infection, leading to severe lung damage, has been recently identified. As the mechanistic pathway for this ability is not fully known, we extended previous studies on influenza virus tropism in cultured human pulmonary endothelial cells. We found that a subset of avian influenza viruses, including potentially pandemic H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2 viruses, could infect human pulmonary endothelial cells (HULEC) with high efficiency compared to human H1N1 or H3N2 viruses. In HULEC, human influenza viruses were capable of binding to host cellular receptors, becoming internalized and initiating hemifusion but failing to uncoat the viral nucleocapsid and to replicate in host nuclei. Unlike numerous cell types, including epithelial cells, we found that pulmonary endothelial cells constitutively express a high level of the restriction protein IFITM3 in endosomal compartments. IFITM3 knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) could partially rescue H1N1 virus infection in HULEC, suggesting IFITM3 proteins were involved in blocking human influenza virus infection in endothelial cells. In contrast, selected avian influenza viruses were able to escape IFITM3 restriction in endothelial cells, possibly by fusing in early endosomes at higher pH or by other, unknown mechanisms. Collectively, our study demonstrates that the human pulmonary endothelium possesses intrinsic immunity to human influenza viruses, in part due to the constitutive expression of IFITM3 proteins. Notably, certain avian influenza viruses have evolved to escape this restriction, possibly contributing to virus-induced pneumonia and severe lung disease in humans.

  13. Human Bone Derived Collagen for the Development of an Artificial Corneal Endothelial Graft. In Vivo Results in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez, Natalia; Chacón, Manuel; Rodríguez-Barrientos, Carlos A.; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Naveiras, Miguel; Baamonde, Begoña; Alfonso, Jose F.; Zambrano-Andazol, Iriana; Riestra, Ana C.; Meana, Álvaro

    2016-01-01

    Corneal keratoplasty (penetrating or lamellar) using cadaveric human tissue, is nowadays the main treatment for corneal endotelial dysfunctions. However, there is a worldwide shortage of donor corneas available for transplantation and about 53% of the world’s population have no access to corneal transplantation. Generating a complete cornea by tissue engineering is still a tough goal, but an endothelial lamellar graft might be an easier task. In this study, we developed a tissue engineered corneal endothelium by culturing human corneal endothelial cells on a human purified type I collagen membrane. Human corneal endothelial cells were cultured from corneal rims after corneal penetrating keratoplasty and type I collagen was isolated from remnant cancellous bone chips. Isolated type I collagen was analyzed by western blot, liquid chromatography -mass spectrometry and quantified using the exponentially modified protein abundance index. Later on, collagen solution was casted at room temperature obtaining an optically transparent and mechanically manageable membrane that supports the growth of human and rabbit corneal endothelial cells which expressed characteristic markers of corneal endothelium: zonula ocluddens-1 and Na+/K+ ATPase. To evaluate the therapeutic efficiency of our artificial endothelial grafts, human purified type I collagen membranes cultured with rabbit corneal endothelial cells were transplanted in New Zealand white rabbits that were kept under a minimal immunosuppression regimen. Transplanted corneas maintained transparency for as long as 6 weeks without obvious edema or immune rejection and maintaining the same endothelial markers that in a healthy cornea. In conclusion, it is possible to develop an artificial human corneal endothelial graft using remnant tissues that are not employed in transplant procedures. This artificial endothelial graft can restore the integrality of corneal endothelium in an experimental model of endothelial dysfunction

  14. C-reactive protein increases plasminogen activator inhibitor–1 expression in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changyi; Nan, Bicheng; Lin, Peter; Yao, Qizhi

    2010-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an inflammatory marker which predicts cardiovascular disease. However, it is not fully understood whether CRP has direct effects on endothelial functions and gene expression. The purpose of current study was to determine the effects and molecular mechanisms of CRP on the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in human endothelial cells. Human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) were treated with CRP at clinically relevant concentrations for different durations. PAI-1 mRNA, protein and enzyme activities were studied. The effects of CRP on MAPK p38 phosphorylation was also studied by Bio-Plex luminex immunoassay. In addition, other types of human endothelial cells isolated from umbilical vein, skin, and lung microvessels were tested. CRP significantly increased PAI-1 mRNA levels in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The protein level and enzyme activity of PAI-1 in the supernatant of CRP-treated HCAEC cultures were significantly increased. Anti-CD32 antibody effectively blocked CRP-induced PAI-1 mRNA expression. In addition, CRP significantly increased CD32 mRNA levels and enhanced phosphorylation of MAPK p38. Furthermore, antioxidant curcumin dramatically inhibited CRP-induced PAI-1 mRNA expression. The effect of CRP on PAI-1 expression was also confirmed in other types of human endothelial cells. In conclusion, CRP significantly increased the expression of PAI-1 in HCAEC and other human endothelial cells. CRP also increased its receptor CD32 expression which may further enhance its action. CRP-induced PAI-1 expression may be mediated by oxidative stress and p38 signal pathway as antioxidant effectively blocks the effect of CRP on HCAEC. PMID:17949793

  15. Hyperphosphatemia induces senescence in human endothelial cells by increasing endothelin-1 production.

    PubMed

    Olmos, Gemma; Martínez-Miguel, Patricia; Alcalde-Estevez, Elena; Medrano, Diana; Sosa, Patricia; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Naves-Diaz, Manuel; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego; Ruiz-Torres, María Piedad; López-Ongil, Susana

    2017-08-31

    Hyperphosphatemia is related to some pathologies, affecting vascular cell behavior. This work analyzes whether high concentration of extracellular phosphate induces endothelial senescence through up-regulation of endothelin-1 (ET-1), exploring the mechanisms involved. The phosphate donor β-glycerophosphate (BGP) in human endothelial cells increased ET-1 production, endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) protein, and mRNA expression, which depend on the AP-1 activation through ROS production. In parallel, BGP also induced endothelial senescence by increasing p16 expression and the senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-ß-GAL) activity. ET-1 itself was able to induce endothelial senescence, increasing p16 expression and SA-ß-GAL activity. In addition, senescence induced by BGP was blocked when different ET-1 system antagonists were used. BGP increased ROS production at short times, and the presence of antioxidants prevented the effect of BGP on AP1 activation, ECE-1 expression, and endothelial senescence. These findings were confirmed in vivo with two animal models in which phosphate serum levels were increased: seven/eight nephrectomized rats as chronic kidney disease models fed on a high phosphate diet and aged mice. Both models showed hyperphosphatemia, higher levels of ET-1, and up-regulation in aortic ECE-1, suggesting a direct relationship between hyperphosphatemia and ET-1. Present results point to a new and relevant role of hyperphosphatemia on the regulation of ET-1 system and senescence induction at endothelial level, both in endothelial cells and aorta from two animal models. The mechanism involved showed a higher ROS production, which probably activates AP-1 transcription factor and, as a result, ECE-1 expression, increasing ET-1 synthesis, which in consequence induces endothelial senescence. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Therapeutic efficacy of human embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells in humanized mouse models harboring a human immune system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Heung-Mo; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Choi, Young-Sil; Park, Soon-Jung; Lee, Yong-Soo; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Sung-Joo; Chung, Hyung-Min

    2013-12-01

    Allogeneic transplantation of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derivatives has the potential to elicit the patient's immune response and lead to graft rejection. Although hESCs and their derivatives have been shown to have advantageous immune properties in vitro, such observations could not be determined experimentally in vivo because of ethical and technical constraints. However, the generation of humanized mice (hu-mice) harboring a human immune system has provided a tool to perform in vivo immunologic studies of human cells and tissues. Using this model, we sought to examine the therapeutic potential of hESC-derived endothelial cells, human embryonic fibroblasts, and cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells in a human immune system environment. All cell types transplanted in hu-mice showed significantly reduced cell survival during the first 14 days post-transplantation compared with that observed in immunodeficient mice. During this period, no observable therapeutic effects were detected in the hindlimb ischemic mouse models. After this point, the cells demonstrated improved survival and contributed to a long-term improvement in blood perfusion. All cell types showed reduced therapeutic efficacy in hu-mice compared with NOD scid IL2 receptor gamma chain knockout mice. Interestingly, the eventual improvement in blood flow caused by the hESC-derived endothelial cells in hu-mice was not much lower than that observed in NOD scid IL2 receptor gamma chain knockout mice. These findings suggest that hESC derivatives may be considered a good source for cell therapy and that hu-mice could be used as a preclinical in vivo animal model for the evaluation of therapeutic efficacy to predict the outcomes of human clinical trials.

  17. Human Micro- and Macrovascular Endothelial Cells Exposed to Simulated Microgravity Upregulate hsp70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, M.; Maier, J. A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Microgravity is known to have adverse effects on the eukaryotic cells. Here we report that microgravity affects the behaviour of human micro- and macro-vascular endothelial cells. To simulate microgravity we have utilized a NASA-developed bioreactor, the Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV). Macrovascular cells proliferate faster in the RWV than controls and, accordingly, downregulate p21, which inhibits the transition from the G1 to the S phase. On the contrary, microvascular cells are growth retarded in simulated microgravity and upregulate p21. No apoptosis was detected in both the cell types. In parallel, upregulation of heat shock protein (hsp) 70 was observed in the two cell types. Because it is reported the hsp70 increases endothelial survival, we hypothesize that hsp70 induction might protect against apoptosis. Hsp70 upregulation might therefore represent an important adaptive response of human endothelial cells to simulated microgravity.

  18. The effects of ginseng radix rubra on human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, S; Uchiyama, Y; Yoshida, K; Mizukawa, H; Haruki, E

    1998-01-01

    The effect of Ginseng Radix Rubra (Red ginseng) on human vascular endothelial cells was examined. Red ginseng was found to promote the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells, inhibit the production but promote the decomposition of endothelin, which is known to constrict blood vessels and raise blood pressure as well as accelerated the synthesis of nitric oxide, which is known to have an angio-tonic effect. Furthermore, Red ginseng was observed to increase the production of Interleukin 1 beta, which is known to play important roles in the homeostatic activities of the human body such as immunity and inflammation as well as increasing the production of tissue plasminogen activators, which suppress the formation of thrombin in the blood coagulation and fibrinolysis mechanisms. It is suggested that Red ginseng has the effect of accelerating endothelial cells proliferation and of promoting physiological activities.

  19. Derivation of blood-brain barrier endothelial cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lippmann, Ethan S; Azarin, Samira M; Kay, Jennifer E; Nessler, Randy A; Wilson, Hannah K; Al-Ahmad, Abraham; Palecek, Sean P; Shusta, Eric V

    2012-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is crucial to the health of the brain and is often compromised in neurological disease. Moreover, because of its barrier properties, this endothelial interface restricts uptake of neurotherapeutics. Thus, a renewable source of human BBB endothelium could spur brain research and pharmaceutical development. Here we show that endothelial cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) acquire BBB properties when co-differentiated with neural cells that provide relevant cues, including those involved in Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The resulting endothelial cells have many BBB attributes, including well-organized tight junctions, appropriate expression of nutrient transporters and polarized efflux transporter activity. Notably, they respond to astrocytes, acquiring substantial barrier properties as measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (1,450 ± 140 Ω cm2), and they possess molecular permeability that correlates well with in vivo rodent blood-brain transfer coefficients.

  20. Human vascular tissue models formed from human induced pluripotent stem cell derived endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Belair, David G.; Whisler, Jordan A.; Valdez, Jorge; Velazquez, Jeremy; Molenda, James A.; Vickerman, Vernella; Lewis, Rachel; Daigh, Christine; Hansen, Tyler D.; Mann, David A.; Thomson, James A.; Griffith, Linda G.; Kamm, Roger D.; Schwartz, Michael P.; Murphy, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a strategy to model blood vessel development using a well-defined iPSC-derived endothelial cell type (iPSC-EC) cultured within engineered platforms that mimic the 3D microenvironment. The iPSC-ECs used here were first characterized by expression of endothelial markers and functional properties that included VEGF responsiveness, TNF-α-induced upregulation of cell adhesion molecules (MCAM/CD146; ICAM1/CD54), thrombin-dependent barrier function, shear stress-induced alignment, and 2D and 3D capillary-like network formation in Matrigel. The iPSC-ECs also formed 3D vascular networks in a variety of engineering contexts, yielded perfusable, interconnected lumen when co-cultured with primary human fibroblasts, and aligned with flow in microfluidics devices. iPSC-EC function during tubule network formation, barrier formation, and sprouting was consistent with that of primary ECs, and the results suggest a VEGF-independent mechanism for sprouting, which is relevant to therapeutic anti-angiogenesis strategies. Our combined results demonstrate the feasibility of using a well-defined, stable source of iPSC-ECs to model blood vessel formation within a variety of contexts using standard in vitro formats. PMID:25190668

  1. Regulation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in primary human saphenous vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mouratidis, Petros XE; George, Andrew JT

    2015-01-01

    Background Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an enzyme associated with the regulation of immune responses. Cytokines such as IFNγ induce its expression in endothelial cells originating from immune-privileged sites. In this study, we investigate regulators of IDO in primary endothelial cells from a non-immune-privileged site and determine whether IDO expression affects immune cell behavior. Methods IDO expression was determined using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting. IDO activity was estimated using an IDO enzyme assay. Primary cells were transfected using microporation, and T-cell migration was determined using a cell transmigration assay. Results IDO is expressed in human saphenous vein endothelial cells after stimulation with IFNγ but not after treatment with TNFα, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, or IL-10. VEGFβ and heparin negatively regulate IFNγ-driven increases in IDO. Overexpression of IDO in endothelial cells does not affect transmigration of T-cells. Conclusion IDO is expressed in human saphenous vein endothelial cells after stimulation with IFNγ. Heparin and angiogenesis stimulators such as VEGFβ negatively regulate its expression. PMID:26056484

  2. Human Blood-Brain Barrier Endothelial Cells Derived from Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lippmann, Ethan S.; Azarin, Samira M.; Kay, Jennifer E.; Nessler, Randy A.; Wilson, Hannah K.; Al-Ahmad, Abraham; Palecek, Sean P.; Shusta, Eric V.

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in brain health and is often compromised in disease. Moreover, as a result of its significant barrier properties, this endothelial interface restricts neurotherapeutic uptake. Thus, a renewable source of human BBB endothelium could prove enabling for brain research and pharmaceutical development. Herein, we demonstrate that endothelial cells generated from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can be specified to possess many BBB attributes, including well-organized tight junctions, expression of nutrient transporters, and polarized efflux transporter activity. Importantly, hPSC-derived BBB endothelial cells respond to astrocytic cues yielding impressive barrier properties as measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (1450±140 Ωxcm2) and molecular permeability that correlates well with in vivo brain uptake. In addition, specification of hPSC-derived BBB endothelial cells occurs in concert with neural cell co-differentiation via Wnt/β-catenin signaling, consistent with previous transgenic studies. This study represents the first example of organ-specific endothelial differentiation from hPSCs. PMID:22729031

  3. Selenite protects human endothelial cells from oxidative damage and induces thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Miller, S; Walker, S W; Arthur, J R; Nicol, F; Pickard, K; Lewin, M H; Howie, A F; Beckett, G J

    2001-05-01

    The ability of selenium to protect cultured human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC), human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) from oxidative damage induced by 100 microM t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) was compared. Preincubation of human endothelial cells for 24 h with sodium selenite at concentrations as low as 5 nM provided significant protection against the harmful effects of 100 microM t-BuOOH, with complete protection being achieved with 40 nM selenite. The preincubation period was required for selenite to exert this protective effect on endothelial cells. When compared with selenium-deficient cells, the activities of cytoplasmic glutathione peroxidase (GPX-1), phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (GPX-4) and thioredoxin reductase (TR) were each induced approx. 3--4-fold by 40 nM selenite. HCAEC and HUVEC showed great similarity in their relative abilities to resist oxidative damage in the presence and absence of selenite, and the activities of TR and the GPXs were also similar in these cell types. BAEC were more susceptible to damage by 100 microM t-BuOOH than were human endothelial cells, and could not be protected completely by incubation with selenite at concentrations up to 160 nM. The activity of TR in human endothelial cells was approx. 25-fold greater than that in BAEC of a similar selenium status, but GPX-1 and GPX-4 activities were not significantly different between the human and bovine cells. These studies, although performed with a small number of cultures, show for the first time that selenium at low doses can provide significant protection of the human coronary artery endothelium against damage by oxidative stress. TR may be an important antioxidant selenoprotein in this regard, in addition to the GPXs. The data also suggest that HUVEC, but not BAEC, represent a suitable model system in which to study the effects of selenium on the endothelium of human coronary arteries.

  4. Isolation and chromosomal localization of the human endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, L.J.; Michel, T.; Weremowicz, S.; Morton, C.C. )

    1994-01-15

    Endothelial NOS activity is a major determinant of vascular tone and blood pressure, and in several important (and sometimes hereditary) disease states, such as hypertension, diabetes, and atherosclerosis, the endothelial NO signaling system appears to be abnormal. To explore the relationship of the endothelial NOS activity, the authors isolated the human gene encoding the endothelial NOS. Genomic clones containing the 5[prime] end of this gene were identified in a human genomic library by applying a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approach. Identification of the human gene for endothelial NOS (NOS3) was confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis of the first coding exon, which was found to be identical to its cognate cDNA. The NOS3 gene spans at least 20 kb and appears to contain multiple introns. The transcription start site and promoter region of the NOS3 gene were identified by primer extension and ribonuclease protection assays. Sequencing of the putative promoter revealed consensus sequences for the shear stress-response element, as well as cytokine-responsive cis regulatory sequences, both possible important to the roles played by NOS3 in the normal and the diseased cardiovascular system. The authors also mapped the chromosomal location of the NOS3 gene. First, a chromosomal panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids was screened using PCR with oligonucleotide primers derived from the NOS3 genomic clone. The specificity of the amplified PCR product was confirmed by human and hamster genomic DNA controls, as well as by Southern blot analysis, using the NOS3 cDNA as probe. Definitive chromosomal assignment of the NOS3 gene to human chromosome 7 was based upon 0% discordancy; fluorescence in situ hybridization sublocalized the NOS3 gene to 7q36. The identification and characterization of the NOS3 gene may lead to further insights into heritable disease states associated with this gene product. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Early gene response of human brain endothelial cells to Listeria monocytogenes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The gene expression of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) to Listeria monocytogenes at 4 hour infection was analyzed. Four hours after infection, the expression of 456 genes of HBMEC had changed (p<0.05). We noted that many active genes were involved in the formyl-methionylleucylph...

  6. Characterization and microarray analysis of genes in human lymphatic endothelial cells from patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yoshiko; Minami, Takashi; Fujimori, Minoru; Hosaka, Kayoko; Mizuno, Risuke; Ikomi, Fumitaka; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Ohhashi, Toshio

    2007-01-01

    We successfully isolated human lymphatic endothelial cells from afferent lymph vessels (HALEC) of sentinel lymph nodes in patients with breast cancer by using trypsin digestion. The cells were cultured in EGM-2 medium with 10% FBS under the condition of 5% O2, 5% CO2, and 90% N2 at 37 degrees C. The cultured cells exhibited a monolayer with cobblestone appearance and a marked phagocytosis of Dil-Ac-LDL. Immunohistochemical lymphatic vessel markers were also found, such as podoplanin, LYVE-1, VEGF receptor 3, and Prox-1. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis also showed that podoplanin, VEGF R3, and Prox-1 mRNA were expressed more selectively in the cultured cells. The cells had marked immunoreactivity to antisera of ecNOS, iNOS, COX1, and weak reactivity of COX2. Constitutively expressed cell-type specific genes of the cultured cells were also analyzed by oligonucleotide microarray methods. Compared with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), the cells selectively expressed 88 known genes such as angiopoietin-like 4, oxygen radicals-related enzymes, and adhesion molecules and the related proteoglycans. The findings suggest that the cultured cells seem to be human lymphatic endothelial cells. In conclusion, the isolated, cannulated and enzymatic digested method we adopted for culture of human lymphatic endothelial cells may be easy and useful for investigating cellular, molecular biological, and genomic properties of the cells.

  7. Preserved endothelial function in human obesity in the absence of insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance (IR) is frequently associated with endothelial dysfunction and has been proposed to play a major role in cardiovascular disease (CVD). On the other hand, obesity has long been related to IR and increased CVD. However it is not known if IR is a necessary condition for endothelial dysfunction in human obesity, allowing for preserved endothelial function in obese people when absent. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to assess the relationship between IR and endothelial dysfunction in human obesity and the mechanisms involved. Methods Twenty non-insulin resistant morbid obese (NIR-MO), 32 insulin resistant morbid obese (IR-MO), and 12 healthy subjects were included. Serum concentrations of glucose, insulin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), resistin and adiponectin were determined. IR was evaluated by HOMA-index. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to bradykinin (BK) in mesenteric microvessels was assessed in wire myograph. Results Serum IL-6, and TNF-α levels were elevated only in IR-MO patients while resistin was elevated and adiponectin reduced in all MO individuals. Mesenteric arteries from IR-MO, but not from NIR-MO subjects displayed blunted relaxation to BK. Vasodilatation was improved in IR-MO arteries by the superoxide scavenger, superoxide dismutase (SOD) or the mitochondrial-targeted SOD mimetic, mito-TEMPO. NADPH oxidase inhibitors (apocynin and VAS2870) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin failed to modify BK-induced vasodilatations. Superoxide generation was higher in vessels from IR-MO subjects and reduced by mito-TEMPO. Blockade of TNF-α with infliximab, but not inhibition of inducible NOS or cyclooxygenase, improved endothelial relaxation and decreased superoxide formation. Conclusions Endothelial dysfunction is observed in human morbid obesity only when insulin resistance is present. Mechanisms involved include augmented mitochondrial superoxide generation, and

  8. Generation and Characterization of Telomerase-Transfected Human Lymphatic Endothelial Cells with an Extended Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Nisato, Riccardo E.; Harrison, Jillian A.; Buser, Raphaele; Orci, Lelio; Rinsch, Chris; Montesano, Roberto; Dupraz, Philippe; Pepper, Michael S.

    2004-01-01

    The study of lymphatic endothelial cells and lymphangiogenesis has, in the past, been hampered by the lack of lymphatic endothelial-specific markers. The recent discovery of several such markers has permitted the isolation of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) from human skin. However, cell numbers are limited and purity is variable with the different isolation procedures. To overcome these problems, we have transfected human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVECs) with a retrovirus containing the coding region of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), and have produced a cell line, hTERT-HDLEC, with an extended lifespan. hTERT-HDLEC exhibit a typical cobblestone morphology when grown in culture, are contact-inhibited, and express endothelial cell-specific markers. hTERT-HDLEC also express the recognized lymphatic markers, Prox-1, LYVE-1 and podoplanin, as well as integrin α9, but do not express CD34. They also form tube-like structures in three-dimensional collagen gels when stimulated with vascular endothelial growth factors -A and -C. Based on these currently recognized criteria, these cells are LEC. Surprisingly, we also found that the widely studied HMEC-1 cell line expresses recognized lymphatic markers; however, these cells are also CD34-positive. In summary, the ectopic expression of hTERT increases the life span of LECs and does not affect their capacity to form tube-like structures in a collagen matrix. The production and characterization of hTERT-HDLEC will facilitate the study of the properties of lymphatic endothelium in vitro. PMID:15215158

  9. [Liposome-mediated human CD40 gene transfection and human umbilical vein endothelial ECV-304 cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-rong; Lin, Rong; Yang, Yu-cong; Gan, Wei-jie; Liu, Jun-tian; Lü, She-min

    2005-12-01

    To construct an eukaryotic expression vector containing human CD40 gene for its efficient, continuous and stable expression in human umbilical vein endothelial ECV-304 cells. The recombinant plasmid pUCD40 was digested with endonucleases to obtain human CD40 gene fragment, which was cloned into pCDNA3.1 vector to construct recombinant eukaryotic expression vector pCDNA3.1(+)/CD40. The recombinant vector was identified by enzyme digestion before introduced into ECV-304 cells via liposome, with the positive cell clones selected with G418. The stable transfection and expression of CD40 in ECV-304 cells were identified by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, Western blotting and flow cytometry, respectively. Enzyme digestion analysis showed that target gene had been cloned into the recombinant vector. The transfected ECV-304 cells successfully expressed human CD40 as determined by RT-PCR and Western-blotting, and 95% of the cells were CD40-positive as shown by flow cytometry. The recombinant eukaryotic expression vector pCDNA3.1(+)/CD40 has been successfully constructed, which is capable of stable transfection and expression of CD40 in ECV-304 cells to facilitate further investigation of the roles of CD40 molecule in antiatherosclerotic drug development.

  10. Utilization of Microgravity Bioreactor for Differentiation and Growth of Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chu-Huang; Pellis, Neal R.

    1997-01-01

    The goal was to delineate mechanisms of genetic responses to angiogenic stimulation of human coronary arterial and dermal microvascular endothelial cells during exposure to microgravity. The NASA-designed rotating-wall vessel was used to create a three-dimensional culture environment with low shear-stress and microgravity simulating that in space. The primary specific aim was to determine whether simulated microgravity enhances endothelial cell growth and whether the growth enhancement is associated by augmented expression of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (BFGF) and c-fos, an immediate early gene and component of the transcription factor AP-1.

  11. Endothelial function can be preserved during cryo-storage of human saphenous vein.

    PubMed

    Passani, S L; Angelini, G D; Breckenridge, I M; Newby, A C

    1988-01-01

    Endothelial functional integrity was quantified in human saphenous vein by measurement of stimulated (vortex-mixing) rates of prostacyclin production. Prostacyclin production was not inhibited by dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO), glycerol or sucrose at concentrations normally used for cryopreservation. Rapid freezing followed by storage for 3-4 weeks and thawing of veins pretreated with 15% (v/v) dimethylsulphoxide significantly impaired prostacyclin production. In contrast, slow freezing and thawing in the presence, but not the absence, of DMSO led to complete retention of prostacyclin production. We conclude that endothelial function can be preserved during cryostorage.

  12. Oxygen radicals induce human endothelial cells to express GMP-140 and bind neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The initial step in extravasation of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMNs]) to the extravascular space is adherence to the endothelium. We examined the effect of oxidants on this process by treating human endothelial cells with H2O2, t-butylhydroperoxide, or menadione. This resulted in a surface adhesive for PMN between 1 and 4 h after exposure. The oxidants needed to be present only for a brief period at the initiation of the assay. Adhesion was an endothelial cell- dependent process that did not require an active response from the PMN. The adhesive molecule was not platelet-activating factor, which mediates PMN adherence when endothelial cells are briefly exposed to higher concentrations of H2O2 (Lewis, M. S., R. E. Whatley, P. Cain, T. M. McIntyre, S. M. Prescott, and G. A. Zimmerman. 1988. J. Clin. Invest. 82:2045-2055), nor was it ELAM-1, an adhesive glycoprotein induced by cytokines. Oxidant-induced adhesion did not require protein synthesis, was inhibited by antioxidants, and, when peroxides were the oxidants, was inhibited by intracellular iron chelators. Granule membrane protein-140 (GMP-140) is a membrane-associated glycoprotein that can be translocated from its intracellular storage pool to the surface of endothelial cells where it acts as a ligand for PMN adhesion (Geng, J.-G., M. P. Bevilacqua, K. L. Moore, T. M. McIntyre, S. M. Prescott, J. M. Kim, G. A. Bliss, G. A. Zimmerman, and R. P. McEver. 1990. Nature (Lond). 343:757-760). We found that endothelial cells exposed to oxidants expressed GMP-140 on their surface, and that an mAb against GMP-140 or solubilized GMP-140 completely blocked PMN adherence to oxidant-treated endothelial cells. Thus, exposure of endothelial cells to oxygen radicals induces the prolonged expression of GMP-140 on the cell surface, which results in enhanced PMN adherence. PMID:1704376

  13. Biotin and glutathione targeting of solid nanoparticles to cross human brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Veszelka, Szilvia; Mészáros, Mária; Kiss, Lóránd; Kóta, Zoltán; Páli, Tibor; Hoyk, Zsófia; Bozsó, Zsolt; Fülöp, Lívia; Tóth, András; Rákhely, Gábor; Deli, Mária A

    2017-07-27

    Background The blood-brain barrier restricts drug penetration to the central nervous system. Targeted nanocarriers are new potential tools to increase the brain entry of drugs. Ligands of endogenous transporters of the blood-brain barrier can be used as targeting vectors for brain delivery of nanoparticles. Objective We tested biotin-labeled solid nanoparticles for the first time and compared to biotinylated glutathione-labeled nanoparticles in brain endothelial cells. Method Neutravidin coated fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles were derivatized with biotin and biotinylated glutathione. As a human in vitro blood-brain barrier model hCMEC/D3 brain endothelial cells were used. Cell viability by MTT test, uptake and transfer of the nanoparticles across the endothelial monolayers were measured. The uptake of the nanoparticles was visualized by confocal microscopy. Results The tested nanoparticles caused no change in cell viability. The uptake of biotin- and glutathione-labeled nanoparticles by brain endothelial cells was time-dependent and significantly higher compared to non-labeled nanoparticles. The penetration of the glutathione-labeled nanoparticles across the endothelial monolayer was higher than the biotin-targeted ones. Biotin- and glutathione-targeted nanoparticles were visualized in hCMEC/D3 cells. We verified that hCMEC/D3 express mRNA for sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT/SLC5A6) responsible for the blood-brain barrier transport of biotin. Conclusion Biotin as a ligand increased the uptake and the transfer of nanoparticles across brain endothelial cells. Biotinylated glutathione could further increase nanoparticle permeability through endothelial monolayers supporting its use as a brain targeting vector. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. The effects of interleukin-7 on the lymphangiogenic properties of human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Rawi, Mahir A A; Watkins, Gareth; Mansel, Robert E; Jiang, Wen G

    2005-09-01

    Lymphangiogenesis (growth of new lymphatic vessels) is thought to play an important role in cancer lymphatic spread to the regional lymph nodes. However, the molecular pathways involved in lymphangiogenesis and their regulation are still unclear. Recently, there has been a significant advance in the studies of the lymphatic system and lymphangiogenesis as several novel specific lymphatic markers are discovered. Here, the effects of several cytokines on the lymphatic expression of human endothelial cells were studied. Amongst these cytokines, interleukin-7 (IL-7) was found to have significant impact on the lymphatic expression as it induced the expression of podoplanin, prox-1 and LYVE-1 in endothelial cells. Furthermore, IL-7 enhanced endothelial cell growth, migration and generation of lymphatic tubules in vitro via upregulating the expression of the lymphangiogenic growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor-D. The specificity of these effects of IL-7 was confirmed using blocking anti-bodies and ribozyme transgene technology. These effects of IL-7 were totally abolished when IL-7R null endothelial cell mutants were used. IL-7 activated its transmembrane receptor, IL-7R, on endothelial cells, as well as its downstream signalling intermediates, Jak-1, Jak-3, PI3-K and Stat-5. Selective inhibition of these intermediates using specific inhibitors showed that IL-7 induced the afore-mentioned effects via a Wortmannin sensitive pathway. Collectively, these results demonstrate, for the first time, that IL-7 is a lymphangiogenic growth factor by inducing the lymphangiogenic properties of endothelial cells. This might have a significant impact on the lymphatic spread of solid tumours. Furthermore, interruption of IL-7 signalling might provide an attractive therapeutic option in cancer lymphatic metastasis.

  15. In vitro induction of human adipose-derived stem cells into lymphatic endothelial-like cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Chen, Xiao-hu; Li, Fu-gui; Chen, Yun-xian; Gu, Li-qiang; Zhu, Jia-kai; Li, Ping

    2015-02-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) may provide a suitable number of progenitors for the treatment of lymphatic edema; however, to date the protocols for inducing hADSCs into this tissue type have not been standardized. We wished to investigate the induction of hADSCs into lymphatic endothelial-like cells using vascular endothelial growth factor-C156S (VEGF-C156S) and other growth factors in vitro. hADSCs from healthy adult adipose tissue were purified using enzyme digestion. Differentiation was induced using medium containing VEGF-C156S and bovine fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Differentiation was confirmed using immunostaining for lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor (LYVE-1) and fms-related tyrosine kinase 4 (FLT-4), two lymphatic endothelial cell markers. The expression levels of LYVE-1, prospero homeobox 1 (PROX-1), and FLT-4 throughout induction were assessed using reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction. hADSCs were successfully obtained by trypsin digest and purification. Flow cytometry showed these cells were similar to mesenchymal stem cells, with a high positive rate of CD13, CD29, CD44, and CD105, and a low positive rate of CD31, CD34, CD45, and HLA-DR. Induction to lymphatic endothelial-like cells was successful, with cells expressing high levels of LYVE-1, PROX-1, and FLT-4. Adipose-derived stem cells can be induced to differentiate into lymphatic endothelial-like cells using a medium containing VEGF-C156S, bFGF, and other growth factors. This population of lymphatic endothelial-like cells may be useful for lymphatic reconstruction in the future.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa selective adherence to and entry into human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Plotkowski, M C; Saliba, A M; Pereira, S H; Cervante, M P; Bajolet-Laudinat, O

    1994-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa disseminated infections depends on bacterial interaction with blood vessels. We have hypothesized that in order to traverse the endothelial barrier, bacteria would have to adhere to and damage endothelial cells. To test this hypothesis, we studied the adherence to human endothelial cells in primary culture of the piliated P. aeruginosa strain PAK and of two isogenic nonpiliated strains: PAK/p-, which carries a mutation in the pilin structural gene, and PAK-N1, a mutant defective in the regulatory rpoN gene. PAK adhered significantly more than did the pilus-lacking strains. P. aeruginosa was also taken up by endothelial cells, as determined by quantitative bacteriologic assays and by transmission electron microscopy. This internalization of P. aeruginosa seems to be a selective process, since the piliated strain was taken up significantly more than the nonpiliated bacteria and the avirulent Escherichia coli DH5 alpha, even following bacterial centrifugation onto the cell monolayers. A significant fraction of the internalized P. aeruginosa PAK was recovered in a viable form after 6 h of residence within endothelial cells. Progressive endothelial cell damage resulted from PAK intracellular harboring, as indicated by the release of lactate dehydrogenase. An increasing concentration of PAK cells was recovered from the extracellular medium with time, suggesting that ingested bacteria were released from endothelial cells and multiplied freely. We speculate that in vivo the ability of some P. aeruginosa strains to resist intracellular residence would afford protection from host defenses and antibiotics and that the release of viable bacteria into bloodstream may represent a central feature of the pathogenesis of bacteremia in compromised patients. Images PMID:7960126

  17. [Labelling endothelial cells with the lectins from Cytisus sessilifolius and Ulex europaeus; comparison between human and animal cells].

    PubMed

    Roussel, F

    1985-01-01

    Cytisus sessilifolius Agglutinin (CSA) was compared with Ulex europaeus Agglutinin (UEA1) for labelling endothelial cells fixed and embedded in paraffin. Human profile characterized by a dimorphism shown by UEA1 with a positive preponderant population and a minor negative one is never found in tested animals. CSA does not mark any endothelial cell in man but reveals endothelial cells in swine, sheep, ox, dog. A dimorphism exists in ox with the same repartition as the one shown in man by UEA1.

  18. Activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase is dependent on its interaction with globular actin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mi, Qiongyu; Chen, Nan; Shaifta, Yasin; Xie, Liping; Lu, Hui; Liu, Zhen; Chen, Qi; Hamid, Colleen; Becker, Silke; Ji, Yong; Ferro, Albert

    2011-09-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) has been reported to associate with globular actin, and this association increases eNOS activity. Adenosine, histamine, salbutamol and thrombin cause activation of eNOS through widely different mechanisms. Whether these eNOS agonists can regulate eNOS activity through affecting its association with actin is unknown. As previously reported, we confirmed in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) that histamine and thrombin increased intracellular Ca(2+) whereas adenosine and salbutamol did not, and that these four agonists caused different effects on actin filament structure. Nevertheless, despite their divergent effects on intracellular Ca(2+) and on actin filament structure, we found by immunoprecipitation that adenosine, histamine, salbutamol and thrombin all caused an increase in association between eNOS and globular actin. This increase of association was inhibited by pre-treatment with phalloidin, an actin filament stabilizer. All of these agonists also increased phosphorylation of eNOS on serine residue 1177, eNOS activity, and cyclic guanosine-3', 5'-monophosphate, and these increases were all attenuated by phalloidin. Agonist-induced phosphorylation of eNOS on serine 1177 was attenuated by Akt inhibition, whereas association of eNOS with actin was not. We also found, in HEK-293 cells transfected with the eNOS mutants eNOS-S1177A or eNOS-S1177D, that the association between eNOS and globular actin was decreased as compared to cells transfected with wild-type eNOS. We conclude that association of globular actin with eNOS plays an essential and necessary role in agonist-induced eNOS activation, through enabling its phosphorylation by Akt at serine residue 1177.

  19. Angiogenic functions of voltage-gated Na+ Channels in human endothelial cells: modulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling.

    PubMed

    Andrikopoulos, Petros; Fraser, Scott P; Patterson, Lisa; Ahmad, Zahida; Burcu, Hakan; Ottaviani, Diego; Diss, James K J; Box, Carol; Eccles, Suzanne A; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2011-05-13

    Voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) activity has previously been reported in endothelial cells (ECs). However, the exact isoforms of VGSCs present, their mode(s) of action, and potential role(s) in angiogenesis have not been investigated. The main aims of this study were to determine the role of VGSC activity in angiogenic functions and to elucidate the potentially associated signaling mechanisms using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as a model system. Real-time PCR showed that the primary functional VGSC α- and β-subunit isoforms in HUVECs were Nav1.5, Nav1.7, VGSCβ1, and VGSCβ3. Western blots verified that VGSCα proteins were expressed in HUVECs, and immunohistochemistry revealed VGSCα expression in mouse aortic ECs in vivo. Electrophysiological recordings showed that the channels were functional and suppressed by tetrodotoxin (TTX). VGSC activity modulated the following angiogenic properties of HUVECs: VEGF-induced proliferation or chemotaxis, tubular differentiation, and substrate adhesion. Interestingly, different aspects of angiogenesis were controlled by the different VGSC isoforms based on TTX sensitivity and effects of siRNA-mediated gene silencing. Additionally, we show for the first time that TTX-resistant (TTX-R) VGSCs (Nav1.5) potentiate VEGF-induced ERK1/2 activation through the PKCα-B-RAF signaling axis. We postulate that this potentiation occurs through modulation of VEGF-induced HUVEC depolarization and [Ca(2+)](i). We conclude that VGSCs regulate multiple angiogenic functions and VEGF signaling in HUVECs. Our results imply that targeting VGSC expression/activity could be a novel strategy for controlling angiogenesis.

  20. STAT6 mediates apoptosis of human coronary arterial endothelial cells by interleukin-13.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yuki; Nitto, Takeaki; Inoue, Teruo; Node, Koichi

    2008-03-01

    Interleukin (IL)-13 is a cytokine produced by type 2 helper T cells that has pathophysiological roles in allergic inflammation and fibrosis formation. IL-13 shares many functional properties with IL-4, which promotes apoptosis of endothelial cells (ECs). We here investigated the effects of IL-13 on apoptosis using human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). Assessment by WST-1 assay demonstrated that IL-13 as well as IL-4 significantly inhibited cell growth. IL-13 significantly attenuated the cell viability and induced apoptosis of HCAECs as well. Expression of mRNA for vascular endothelial cell growth factor, which maintains survival of ECs, was significantly diminished by IL-13. The effects of IL-13 and IL-4 were abolished by depletion of STAT6 using RNA interference. These results suggest that IL-13 attenuates EC viability by inducing apoptosis, and that STAT6 plays pivotal roles on IL-13- and IL-4-induced apoptosis in ECs.

  1. Kaempferia parviflora ethanolic extract promoted nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wattanapitayakul, Suvara K; Suwatronnakorn, Maneewan; Chularojmontri, Linda; Herunsalee, Angkana; Niumsakul, Somchit; Charuchongkolwongse, Suphan; Chansuvanich, Nuchattra

    2007-04-04

    The rhizomes of Kaempferia parviflora (KP) (Zingiberaceae) have been used in Thai traditional medicine for health promotion and for the treatment of digestive disorders and gastric ulcer. This study investigated effect of KP on endothelial function. Studies in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) showed that KP dose-dependently increased nitrite concentrations in culture media after 48 h incubation. eNOS mRNA and protein expression were also enhanced. The induction of eNOS mRNA was detected at 4 h and plateau at 48 h while iNOS expression was not observed. These data demonstrate that KP has a great potential for a supplemental use in vascular endothelial health promotion.

  2. Adhesion and proliferation of human endothelial cells on photochemically modified polytetrafluoroethylene.

    PubMed

    Gumpenberger, T; Heitz, J; Bäuerle, D; Kahr, H; Graz, I; Romanin, C; Svorcik, V; Leisch, F

    2003-12-01

    We studied the adhesion and proliferation of human endothelial cells on photochemically modified polytetrafluoroethylene samples. The polymer surfaces were modified by exposure to the ultraviolet light of a Xe(2)(*)-excimer lamp at a wavelength of 172 nm in an ammonia atmosphere. Treatment times were between 10 and 20 min. The endothelial cell density was determined 1, 3 and 8 days after seeding by image analysis. Surface modification of the samples resulted in a significant increase in the number of adhering cells and in the formation of a confluent cell layer after 3-8 days. The results were comparable than those obtained on polystyrene Petri dishes, which are used as standard substrates in cell cultivation. Thus modified PTFE appears to be a promising material for the fabrication of artificial vascular prostheses coated with endothelial cells.

  3. Amadori-glycated phosphatidylethanolamine induces angiogenic differentiations in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Oak, Jeong-Ho; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Oikawa, Shinichi; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2003-12-04

    Glycation has been implicated in the endothelial dysfunction that contributes to both diabetes- and aging-associated vascular complications. The aim of the present study was to determine whether Amadori-glycated phosphatidylethanolamine (Amadori-PE), a lipid-linked glycation compound that is formed at an increased rate in hyperglycemic states, affected proliferation, migration and tube formation of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Amadori-PE at a low concentration of less than 5 microM significantly enhanced these three factors involved in angiogenesis. Furthermore, stimulation of HUVEC with Amadori-PE resulted in secretion of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), a pivotal enzyme in the initial step of angiogenesis. Our results demonstrated for the first time that Amadori-PE may be an important compound that promotes vascular disease as a result of its angiogenic activity on endothelial cells. We also demonstrated that MMP-2 is a primary mediator of Amadori-PE-driven angiogenesis.

  4. Expression of endothelial cell-specific receptor tyrosine kinases and growth factors in human brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Kaipainen, A.; Mentula, P.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Paetau, A.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1995-01-01

    Key growth factor-receptor interactions involved in angiogenesis are possible targets for therapy of CNS tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific endothelial cell mitogen that has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis, a requirement for solid tumor growth. The expression of VEGF, the closely related placental growth factor (PIGF), the newly cloned endothelial high affinity VEGF receptors KDR and FLT1, and the endothelial orphan receptors FLT4 and Tie were analyzed by in situ hybridization in normal human brain tissue and in the following CNS tumors: gliomas, grades II, III, IV; meningiomas, grades I and II; and melanoma metastases to the cerebrum. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in the majority of low grade tumors studied and was highly expressed in cells of malignant gliomas. Significantly elevated levels of Tie, KDR, and FLT1 mRNAs, but not FLT4 mRNA, were observed in malignant tumor endothelia, as well as in endothelia of tissues directly adjacent to the tumor margin. In comparison, there was little or no receptor expression in normal brain vasculature. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that these endothelial receptors are induced during tumor progression and may play a role in tumor angiogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7856749

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Sirtuin 6 in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lappas, Martha

    2012-01-01

    A prominent feature of inflammatory diseases is endothelial dysfunction. Factors associated with endothelial dysfunction include proinflammatory cytokines, adhesion molecules, and matrix degrading enzymes. At the transcriptional level, they are regulated by the histone deacetylase sirtuin (SIRT) 1 via its actions on the proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). The role of SIRT6, also a histone deacetylase, in regulating inflammation in endothelial cells is not known. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of SIRT6 knockdown on inflammatory markers in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS decreased expression of SIRT6 in HUVECs. Knockdown of SIRT6 increased the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8), COX-prostaglandin system, ECM remodelling enzymes (MMP-2, MMP-9 and PAI-1), the adhesion molecule ICAM-1, and proangiogenic growth factors VEGF and FGF-2; cell migration; cell adhesion to leukocytes. Loss of SIRT6 increased the expression of NF-κB, whereas overexpression of SIRT6 was associated with decreased NF-κB transcriptional activity. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the loss of SIRT6 in endothelial cells is associated with upregulation of genes involved in inflammation, vascular remodelling, and angiogenesis. SIRT6 may be a potential pharmacological target for inflammatory vascular diseases. PMID:23132960

  6. Lysophosphatidic acid stimulates thrombomodulin lectin-like domain shedding in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Hualin; Lin ChiIou; Huang Yuanli; Chen, Pin-Shern; Kuo, Cheng-Hsiang; Chen, Mei-Shing; Wu, G.C.-C.; Shi, G.-Y.; Yang, H.-Y.; Lee Hsinyu

    2008-02-29

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an anticoagulant glycoprotein highly expressed on endothelial cell surfaces. Increased levels of soluble TM in circulation have been widely accepted as an indicator of endothelial damage or dysfunction. Previous studies indicated that various proinflammatory factors stimulate TM shedding in various cell types such as smooth muscle cells and epithelial cells. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid mediator present in biological fluids during endothelial damage or injury. In the present study, we first observed that LPA triggered TM shedding in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). By Cyflow analysis, we showed that the LPA-induced accessibility of antibodies to the endothelial growth factor (EGF)-like domain of TM is independent of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), while LPA-induced TM lectin-like domain shedding is MMP-dependent. Furthermore, a stable cell line expressing TM without its lectin-like domain exhibited a higher cell proliferation rate than a stable cell line expressing full-length TM. These results imply that LPA induces TM lectin-like domain shedding, which might contribute to the exposure of its EGF-like domain for EGF receptor (EGFR) binding, thereby stimulating subsequent cell proliferation. Based on our findings, we propose a novel mechanism for the exposure of TM EGF-like domain, which possibly mediates LPA-induced EGFR transactivation.

  7. Hepatocyte growth factor protects human endothelial cells against advanced glycation end products-induced apoposis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yijun . E-mail: zhou-yijun@hotmail.com; Wang Jiahe; Zhang Jin

    2006-06-02

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) form by a non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and biological proteins, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, we assessed AGEs effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) growth, proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, we investigated whether hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), an anti-apoptotic factor for endothelial cells, prevents AGEs-induced apoptosis of HUVECs. HUVECs were treated with AGEs in the presence or absence of HGF. Treatment of HUVECs with AGEs changed cell morphology, decreased cell viability, and induced DNA fragmentation, leading to apoptosis. Apoptosis was induced by AGEs in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. AGEs markedly elevated Bax and decreased NF-{kappa}B, but not Bcl-2 expression. Additionally, AGEs significantly inhibited cell growth through a pro-apoptotic action involving caspase-3 and -9 activations in HUVECs. Most importantly, pretreatment with HGF protected against AGEs-induced cytotoxicity in the endothelial cells. HGF significantly promoted the expression of Bcl-2 and NF-{kappa}B, while decreasing the activities of caspase-3 and -9 without affecting Bax level. Our data suggest that AGEs induce apoptosis in endothelial cells. HGF effectively attenuate AGEs-induced endothelial cell apoptosis. These findings provide new perspectives in the role of HGF in cardiovascular disease.

  8. Coenzyme Q10 prevents high glucose-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Sekizaki, Naoto; Suzuki, Takashi; Kobayashi, Shinjiro; Wada, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Tadashi; Kimura, Ikuko; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu

    2007-07-02

    Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of vascular complications in diabetes. Although some clinical evidences suggest the use of an antioxidant reagent coenzyme Q10 in diabetes with hypertension, the direct effect of coenzyme Q10 on the endothelial functions has not been examined. In the present study, we therefore investigated the protective effect of coenzyme Q10 against high glucose-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC exposed to high glucose (30 mM) exhibited abnormal properties, including the morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis, overproduction of reactive oxygen species, activation of protein kinase Cbeta2, and increase in endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression. Treatment with coenzyme Q10 strongly inhibited these changes in HUVEC under high glucose condition. In addition, coenzyme Q10 inhibited high glucose-induced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, an endogenous caspase-3 substrate. These results suggest that coenzyme Q10 prevents reactive oxygen species-induced apoptosis through inhibition of the mitochondria-dependent caspase-3 pathway. Moreover, consistent with previous reports, high glucose caused upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) in HUVEC, and promoted the adhesion of U937 monocytic cells. Coenzyme Q10 displayed potent inhibitory effects against these endothelial abnormalities. Thus, we provide the first evidence that coenzyme Q10 has a beneficial effect in protecting against the endothelial dysfunction by high glucose-induced oxidative stress in vitro.

  9. Characterization of immortalized human umbilical and iliac vein endothelial cell lines after transfection with SV40 large T-antigen.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, E B; Veenstra, R; van Wijk, R; Molema, G; Hoekstra, A; Ruiters, M H; van der Meer, J

    2000-01-01

    Most in vitro studies of human endothelial cells have relied on cells derived from human umbilical veins (HUVEC); however, heterogeneity of primary cultured endothelial cells can make critical interpretation of results difficult. Several endothelial cell lines have been produced to serve as a more constant source of endothelial cells. In this study, we characterized the endothelial cell lines EVLB3 and EVLC2 derived from HUVEC, and EVLK1 and EVLK2 derived from human iliac vein endothelial cells (HIVEC). These cell lines maintained the typical endothelial cell cobblestone morphology and appeared to be growth factor independent. They lost PECAM-1 and von Willebrand factor, GP96 was reduced to the level of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC), but aSMC-actin was far less than in vascular SMC. Antigen levels of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) were comparable with young endothelial cells, and mRNA was present for tPA, PAI-1, tissue factor (TF), tissue factor pathway inhibitor and thrombomodulin. This study revealed that mRNA and protein expression of coagulation and fibrinolytic factors was influenced by the stage of cell confluence. No differences could be detected between the endothelial cell lines derived from HUVEC and HIVEC. These cell lines may be a useful tool for studies on cellular interactions of fibrinolytic components or exploring the regulation of TF expression.

  10. Biomimetic, ultrathin and elastic hydrogels regulate human neutrophil extravasation across endothelial-pericyte bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Lauridsen, Holly M.

    2017-01-01

    The vascular basement membrane—a thin, elastic layer of extracellular matrix separating and encasing vascular cells—provides biological and mechanical cues to endothelial cells, pericytes, and migrating leukocytes. In contrast, experimental scaffolds typically used to replicate basement membranes are stiff and bio-inert. Here, we present thin, porated polyethylene glycol hydrogels to replicate human vascular basement membranes. Like commercial transwells, our hydrogels are approximately 10μm thick, but like basement membranes, the hydrogels presented here are elastic (E: 50-80kPa) and contain a dense network of small pores. Moreover, the inclusion of bioactive domains introduces receptor-mediated biochemical signaling. We compare elastic hydrogels to common culture substrates (E: >2GPa) for human endothelial cell and pericyte monolayers and bilayers to replicate postcapillary venules in vitro. Our data demonstrate that substrate elasticity facilitates differences in vascular phenotype, supporting expression of vascular markers that are increasingly replicative of venules. Endothelial cells differentially express vascular markers, like EphB4, and leukocyte adhesion molecules, such as ICAM-1, with decreased mechanical stiffness. With porated PEG hydrogels we demonstrate the ability to evaluate and observe leukocyte recruitment across endothelial cell and pericyte monolayers and bilayers, reporting that basement membrane scaffolds can significantly alter the rate of vascular migration in experimental systems. Overall, this study demonstrates the creation and utility of a new and accessible method to recapture the mechanical and biological complexity of human basement membranes in vitro. PMID:28234918

  11. Immunofluorescence identifies distinct subsets of endothelial cells in the human liver

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Otto; Phillips, Anthony; Ruggiero, Katya; Bartlett, Adam; Dunbar, P. Rod

    2017-01-01

    As well as systemic vascular endothelial cells, the liver has specialised sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC). LSEC dysfunction has been documented in many diseased states yet their phenotype in normal human liver has not been comprehensively assessed. Our aim was to improve characterisation of subsets of endothelial cells and associated pericytes in the human liver. Immunofluorescence microscopy was performed on normal human liver tissue samples to assess endothelial and structural proteins in a minimum of three donors. LSEC are distributed in an acinar pattern and universally express CD36, but two distinctive subsets of LSEC can be identified in different acinar zones. Type 1 LSEC are CD36hiCD32−CD14−LYVE-1− and are located in acinar zone 1 of the lobule, while Type 2 LSEC are LYVE-1+CD32hiCD14+CD54+CD36mid-lo and are located in acinar zones 2 and 3 of the lobule. Portal tracts and central veins can be identified using markers for systemic vascular endothelia and pericytes, none of which are expressed by LSEC. In areas of low hydrostatic pressure LSEC are lined by stellate cells that express the pericyte marker CD146. Our findings identify distinctive populations of LSEC and distinguish these cells from adjacent stellate cells, systemic vasculature and pericytes in different zones of the liver acinus. PMID:28287163

  12. Anaphylatoxin C5a fails to promote prostacyclin release from cultured human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lunberg, C.; Marceau, F.; Huey, R.; Hugli, T.E.

    1986-03-01

    A predominantly relaxing effect of C5a on isolated blood vessels has been reported, which is associated with prostacyclin release from the vessel wall. Further, the well known hypothensive effect of C5a, also associated with increased prostacyclin output and preventable by indomethacin, indicates an involvement of endothelial cells in this reaction. In this study the authors characterized the response to C5a of cultured human endothelial cells from umbilical vein as measured by prostacyclin release. Prostacyclin was quantitated by radioimmunoassay as 6-keto-PGF/sub 1..cap alpha../. Subcultured cells respond to histamine and mellitin with increased prostacyclin production, but do not respond to leukotriene C4 (LTC/sub 4/). Primary cultures, on the other hand, respond to LTC/sub 4/ and the histamine response is 7-fold greater for these cells than for subcultured cells. However, neither primary nor subcultured cells release prostacyclin following application of either human C5a (100 nM) or C3a (1 ..mu..M). Also, these cells fail to show specific binding sites for /sup 125/I-C5a. In contrast, endothelial cells in the presence of human PMNs challenged with C5a release prostacyclin. These data suggest that C5a has no direct effect on the endothelial cell, but rather activates this cell indirectly via mediators from other cells known to respond to C5a.

  13. The Proangiogenic Effect of Iroquois Homeobox Transcription Factor Irx3 in Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Scarlett, Kisha; Pattabiraman, Vaishnavi; Barnett, Petrina; Liu, Dong; Anderson, Leonard M.

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a dynamic process required for embryonic development. However, postnatal vascular growth is characteristic of multiple disease states. Despite insights into the multistep process in which adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix proteins, growth factors, and their receptors work in concert to form new vessels from the preexisting vasculature, there remains a lack of insight of the nuclear transcriptional mechanisms that occur within endothelial cells (ECs) in response to VEGF. Iroquois homeobox gene 3 (Irx3) is a transcription factor of the Iroquois family of homeobox genes. Irx homeodomain transcription factors are involved in the patterning and development of several tissues. Irx3 is known for its role during embryogenesis in multiple organisms. However, the expression and function of Irx3 in human postnatal vasculature remains to be investigated. Here we show that Irx3 is expressed in human microvascular endothelial cells, and expression is elevated by VEGF stimulation. Genetic Irx3 gain and loss of function studies in human microvascular endothelial cells resulted in the modulation of EC migration during wound healing, chemotaxis and invasion, and tubulogenesis. Additionally, we observed increased delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4) expression, which suggests an increase in EC tip cell population. Finally, siRNA screening studies revealed that transient knockdown of Hey1, a downstream Notch signaling mediator, resulted in increased Irx3 expression in response to VEGF treatment. Strategies to pharmacologically regulate Irx3 function in adult endothelial cells may provide new therapies for angiogenesis. PMID:25512384

  14. CD133 positive progenitor endothelial cell lines from human cord blood.

    PubMed

    Paprocka, Maria; Krawczenko, Agnieszka; Dus, Danuta; Kantor, Aneta; Carreau, Aude; Grillon, Catherine; Kieda, Claudine

    2011-08-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) modulate postnatal vascularization and contribute to vessel regeneration in adults. Stem cells and progenitor cells were found in umbilical cord blood, bone marrow, and mobilized peripheral blood cells, from where they were isolated and cultured. However, the yield of progenitor cells is usually not sufficient for clinical application and the quality of progenitor cells varies. The aim of the study was the immortalization of early progenitor cells with high proliferative potential, capable to differentiate to EPCs and, further, toward endothelial cells. Two cell lines, namely HEPC-CB.1 and HEPC-CB.2 (human endothelial progenitor cells-cord blood) were isolated. As assessed by specific antibody labeling and flow cytometric analysis, they express a panel of stem cell markers: CD133, CD13, CD271, CD90 and also endothelial cell markers: CD202b, CD309 (VEGFR2), CD146, CD105, and CD143 but they do not present markers of finally differentiated endothelial cells: CD31, vWf, nor CD45 which is a specific hematopoietic cell marker. Using the multiplex Cytometric Bead Assay, the simultaneous production of proangiogenic cytokines IL8, angiogenin, and VEGF was demonstrated in normoxia and was shown to be increased by hypoxia. Both cell lines, similarly as mature endothelial cells, underwent in vitro pre-angiogenic process, formed pseudovessel structures and present an accelerated angiogenesis in hypoxic conditions. To date, these are the first CD133 positive established cell lines from human cord blood cells. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  15. Microfibrils and fibrillin-1 induce integrin-mediated signaling, proliferation and migration in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mariko, Boubacar; Ghandour, Zeinab; Raveaud, Stéphanie; Quentin, Mickaël; Usson, Yves; Verdetti, Jean; Huber, Philippe; Kielty, Cay; Faury, Gilles

    2010-11-01

    Microfibrils are macromolecular complexes associated with elastin to form elastic fibers that endow extensible tissues, such as arteries, lungs, and skin, with elasticity property. Fibrillin-1, the main component of microfibrils, is a 350-kDa glycoprotein for which genetic haploinsufficiency in humans can lead to Marfan syndrome, a severe polyfeatured pathology including aortic aneurysms and dissections. Microfibrils and fibrillin-1 fragments mediate adhesion of several cell types, including endothelial cells, while fibrillin-1 additionally triggers lung and mesangial cell migration. However, fibrillin-1-induced intracellular signaling is unknown. We have studied the signaling events induced in human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs) by aortic microfibrils as well as recombinant fibrillin-1 Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing fragments PF9 and PF14. Aortic microfibrils and PF14, not PF9, substantially and dose dependently increased HUVEC cytoplasmic and nuclear calcium levels measured using the fluorescent dye Fluo-3. This effect of PF14 was confirmed in bovine aortic endothelial cells. PF14 action in HUVECs was mediated by αvβ3 and α5β1 integrins, phospholipase-C, inosital 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and mobilization of intracellular calcium stores, whereas membrane calcium channels were not or only slightly implicated, as shown in patch-clamp experiments. Finally, PF14 enhanced endothelial cell proliferation and migration. Hence, fibrillin-1 sequences may physiologically activate endothelial cells. Genetic fibrillin-1 deficiency could alter normal endothelial signaling and, since endothelium dysfunction is an important contributor to Marfan syndrome, participate in the arterial anomalies associated with this developmental disease.

  16. Concise Review: An Update on the Culture of Human Corneal Endothelial Cells for Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Mohit; Ferrari, Stefano; Sheridan, Carl; Kaye, Stephen; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2016-02-01

    The cornea forms the front window of the eye, enabling the transmission of light to the retina through a crystalline lens. Many disorders of the cornea lead to partial or total blindness, and therefore corneal transplantation becomes mandatory. Recently, selective corneal layer (as opposed to full thickness) transplantation has become popular because this leads to earlier rehabilitation and visual outcomes. Corneal endothelial disorders are a common cause of corneal disease and transplantation. Corneal endothelial transplantation is successful but limited worldwide because of lower donor corneal supply. Alternatives to corneal tissue for endothelial transplantation therefore require immediate attention. The field of human corneal endothelial culture for transplantation is rapidly emerging as a possible viable option. This manuscript provides an update regarding these developments. Significance: The cornea is the front clear window of the eye. It needs to be kept transparent for normal vision. It is formed of various layers of which the posterior layer (the endothelium) is responsible for the transparency of the cornea because it allows the transport of ions and solutes to and from the other layers of the cornea. Corneal blindness that results from the corneal endothelial dysfunction can be treated using healthy donor tissues. There is a huge demand for human donor corneas but limited supply, and therefore there is a need to identify alternatives that would reduce this demand. Research is underway to understand the isolation techniques for corneal endothelial cells, culturing these cells in the laboratory, and finding possible options to transplant these cells in the patients. This review article is an update on the recent developments in this field.

  17. Concise Review: An Update on the Culture of Human Corneal Endothelial Cells for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Mohit; Ferrari, Stefano; Sheridan, Carl; Kaye, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The cornea forms the front window of the eye, enabling the transmission of light to the retina through a crystalline lens. Many disorders of the cornea lead to partial or total blindness, and therefore corneal transplantation becomes mandatory. Recently, selective corneal layer (as opposed to full thickness) transplantation has become popular because this leads to earlier rehabilitation and visual outcomes. Corneal endothelial disorders are a common cause of corneal disease and transplantation. Corneal endothelial transplantation is successful but limited worldwide because of lower donor corneal supply. Alternatives to corneal tissue for endothelial transplantation therefore require immediate attention. The field of human corneal endothelial culture for transplantation is rapidly emerging as a possible viable option. This manuscript provides an update regarding these developments. Significance The cornea is the front clear window of the eye. It needs to be kept transparent for normal vision. It is formed of various layers of which the posterior layer (the endothelium) is responsible for the transparency of the cornea because it allows the transport of ions and solutes to and from the other layers of the cornea. Corneal blindness that results from the corneal endothelial dysfunction can be treated using healthy donor tissues. There is a huge demand for human donor corneas but limited supply, and therefore there is a need to identify alternatives that would reduce this demand. Research is underway to understand the isolation techniques for corneal endothelial cells, culturing these cells in the laboratory, and finding possible options to transplant these cells in the patients. This review article is an update on the recent developments in this field. PMID:26702128

  18. Adaptation to oxygen deprivation in cultures of human pluripotent stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Truitt, Rachel; Luong, Eli; Drazer, German

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in vascular development through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) accumulation and downstream pathway activation. We sought to explore the in vitro response of cultures of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPCs), and human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to normoxic and hypoxic oxygen tensions. We first measured dissolved oxygen (DO) in the media of adherent cultures in atmospheric (21% O2), physiological (5% O2), and hypoxic oxygen conditions (1% O2). In cultures of both hEPCs and HUVECs, lower oxygen consumption was observed when cultured in 1% O2. At each oxygen tension, feeder-free cultured hESCs and iPSCs were found to consume comparable amounts of oxygen. Transport analysis revealed that the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) of hESCs and iPSCs decreased distinctly as DO availability decreased, whereas the OUR of all cell types was found to be low when cultured in 1% O2, demonstrating cell adaptation to lower oxygen tensions by limiting oxygen consumption. Next, we examined HIF-1α accumulation and the expression of target genes, including VEGF and angiopoietins (ANGPT; angiogenic response), GLUT-1 (glucose transport), BNIP3, and BNIP3L (autophagy and apoptosis). Accumulations of HIF-1α were detected in all four cell lines cultured in 1% O2. Corresponding upregulation of VEGF, ANGPT2, and GLUT-1 was observed in response to HIF-1α accumulation, whereas upregulation of ANGPT1 was detected only in hESCs and iPSCs. Upregulation of BNIP3 and BNIP3L was detected in all cells after 24-h culture in hypoxic conditions, whereas apoptosis was not detectable using flow cytometry analysis, suggesting that BNIP3 and BNIP3L can lead to cell autophagy rather than apoptosis. These results demonstrate adaptation of all cell types to hypoxia but different cellular responses, suggesting that continuous measurements and control over oxygen environments will

  19. Bortezomib induces autophagic death in proliferating human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Belloni, Daniela; Veschini, Lorenzo; Foglieni, Chiara; Dell'Antonio, Giacomo; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Ferrarini, Marina; Ferrero, Elisabetta

    2010-04-01

    The proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib has been approved for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM), thanks to its ability to induce MM cell apoptosis. Moreover, Bortezomib has antiangiogenic properties. We report that endothelial cells (EC) exposed to Bortezomib undergo death to an extent that depends strictly on their activation state. Indeed, while quiescent EC are resistant to Bortezomib, the drug results maximally toxic in EC switched toward angiogenesis with FGF, and exerts a moderate effect on subconfluent HUVEC. Moreover, EC activation state deeply influences the death pathway elicited by Bortezomib: after treatment, angiogenesis-triggered EC display typical features of apoptosis. Conversely, death of subconfluent EC is preceded by ROS generation and signs typical of autophagy, including intense cytoplasmic vacuolization with evidence of autophagosomes at electron microscopy, and conversion of the cytosolic MAP LC3 I form toward the autophagosome-associated LC3 II form. Treatment with the specific autophagy inhibitor 3-MA prevents both LC3 I/LC3 II conversion and HUVEC cell death. Finally, early removal of Bortezomib is accompanied by the recovery of cell shape and viability. These findings strongly suggest that Bortezomib induces either apoptosis or autophagy in EC; interfering with the autophagic response may potentiate the antiangiogenic effect of the drug.

  20. Efficient Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells to Endothelial Progenitors via Small-Molecule Activation of WNT Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Xiaojun; Bao, Xiaoping; Al-Ahmad, Abraham; Liu, Jialu; Wu, Yue; Dong, Wentao; Dunn, Kaitlin K.; Shusta, Eric V.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived endothelial cells and their progenitors may provide the means for vascularization of tissue-engineered constructs and can serve as models to study vascular development and disease. Here, we report a method to efficiently produce endothelial cells from hPSCs via GSK3 inhibition and culture in defined media to direct hPSC differentiation to CD34+CD31+ endothelial progenitors. Exogenous vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatment was dispensable, and endothelial progenitor differentiation was β-catenin dependent. Furthermore, by clonal analysis, we showed that CD34+CD31+CD117+TIE-2+ endothelial progenitors were multipotent, capable of differentiating into calponin-expressing smooth muscle cells and CD31+CD144+vWF+I-CAM1+ endothelial cells. These endothelial cells were capable of 20 population doublings, formed tube-like structures, imported acetylated low-density lipoprotein, and maintained a dynamic barrier function. This study provides a rapid and efficient method for production of hPSC-derived endothelial progenitors and endothelial cells and identifies WNT/β-catenin signaling as a primary regulator for generating vascular cells from hPSCs. PMID:25418725

  1. Intrinsic FGF2 and FGF5 promotes angiogenesis of human aortic endothelial cells in 3D microfluidic angiogenesis system

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ha-Rim; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Joo, Hyung Joon; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Chi-Yeon; Kim, Jong-Ho; Choi, Ji-Hyun; Cui, Long-Hui; Hong, Soon Jun; Chung, Seok; Lim, Do-Sun

    2016-01-01

    The human body contains different endothelial cell types and differences in their angiogenic potential are poorly understood. We compared the functional angiogenic ability of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) using a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic cell culture system. HAECs and HUVECs exhibited similar cellular characteristics in a 2D culture system; however, in the 3D microfluidic angiogenesis system, HAECs exhibited stronger angiogenic potential than HUVECs. Interestingly, the expression level of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)2 and FGF5 under vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A stimulation was significantly higher in HAECs than in HUVECs. Moreover, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of FGF2 and FGF5 more significantly attenuated vascular sprouting induced from HAECs than HUVECs. Our results suggest that HAECs have greater angiogenic potential through FGF2 and FGF5 upregulation and could be a compatible endothelial cell type to achieve robust angiogenesis. PMID:27357248

  2. [Methylenebisphosphonic acid alters the pattern of pericellular glycosaminoglycans and binding properties of CD44 in human endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Ievdokymova, N Iu; Karlova, N P; Baranova, N S; Komisarenko, S V

    2006-01-01

    The effect of methylenebisphosphonic acid (MBPA) on glycosaminoglycan metabolism, adhesive and proliferative properties of human endothelial cells has been investigated. It was demonstrated that MBPA (100 microM) inhibited the synthesis of all studied groups of glycosaminoglycans, but promoted the accumulation of heparan sulphate in endothelial pericellular matrix. Simultaneously, the redistribution of hyaluronic acid from pericellular matrix to the conditioned medium was observed. The decreased adhesion of endothelial cells to immobilized hyaluronic acid was not mediated by the alterations of CD44 expression. It was also demonstrated that MBPA affected the proliferative properties of endothelial cells. The alterations of glycosaminoglycan metabolism are considered to be involved in antiangiogenic effects of MBPA.

  3. HUMAN CORNEAL ENDOTHELIAL CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN A HUMAN EX VIVO MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sanjay V.; Bachman, Lori A.; Hann, Cheryl R.; Bahler, Cindy K.; Fautsch, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effects of incorporating superparamagnetic microspheres (SPMs) into cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs), and to describe preliminary experiments of HCEC transplantation, facilitated by SPMs and an external magnetic field, in a human anterior segment ex vivo model. Methods HCECs were cultured in monolayer and incorporated with magnetite oxide SPMs (900 nm, 300 nm, and 100 nm) at different concentrations. Cell viability, migration toward a magnetic field, and light transmittance were measured after incorporation of SPMs. HCEC transplantation to human recipients was investigated with anterior segments in organ culture subjected to an external magnetic field. Light and electron microscopy were used to assess HCEC attachment to corneal stroma. Results SPMs were incorporated into the cytoplasm of HCECs after overnight incubation. None of the SPMs affected the short-term viability of cultured HCECs (P>0.14, n=6) or their light transmittance (P>0.06, n=5), although there was a trend toward decreased transmittance with higher concentrations of the 900 nm SPM. Cell migration toward a magnetic field was higher for HCECs with incorporated SPMs than for HCECs without SPMs (P≤ 0.01, n=6), with dose-response relationships evident for the 300 nm and 100 nm SPMs. SPMs facilitated the attachment of HCECs to corneal stroma in the human anterior segment model with minimal change in intracameral (intraocular) pressure. Conclusions SPMs facilitate migration of HCECs toward a magnetic source and attachment of cells to corneal stroma without affecting cell viability or light transmittance. The human anterior segment model can be used to study HCEC transplantation. PMID:19136716

  4. Wnt5a-mediated non-canonical Wnt signalling regulates human endothelial cell proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Chingwen Yeh Juching; Fan Taiping; Smith, Stephen K.; Charnock-Jones, D. Stephen

    2008-01-11

    Cell to cell interaction is one of the key processes effecting angiogenesis and endothelial cell function. Wnt signalling is mediated through cell-cell interaction and is involved in many developmental processes and cellular functions. In this study, we investigated the possible function of Wnt5a and the non-canonical Wnt pathway in human endothelial cells. We found that Wnt5a-mediated non-canonical Wnt signalling regulated endothelial cell proliferation. Blocking this pathway using antibody, siRNA or a down-stream inhibitor led to suppression of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and monolayer wound closure. We also found that the mRNA level of Wnt5a is up-regulated when endothelial cells are treated with a cocktail of inflammatory cytokines. Our findings suggest non-canonical Wnt signalling plays a role in regulating endothelial cell growth and possibly in angiogenesis.

  5. Liver cyst cytokines promote endothelial cell proliferation and development.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Kelley S; McWilliams, Ryan R; Amura, Claudia R; Barry, Nicholas P; Doctor, R Brian

    2009-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney (ADPKD) is highly prevalent genetic disease. Liver cyst disease is the most common extrarenal manifestation in ADPKD and accounts for up to 10% of ADPKD morbidity and mortality. The clinical features of ADPKD liver disease arise from dramatic increases in liver cyst volumes. To identify mechanisms that promote liver cyst growth, the present study characterized the degree of vascularization of liver cyst walls and determined that cyst-specific cytokines and growth factors can drive endothelial cell proliferation and development. Microscopic techniques demonstrated liver cyst walls are well vascularized. A comparative analysis found the vascular density in free liver cyst walls was greater in mice than in humans. Treatment of human micro-vascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) with human liver cyst fluid (huLCF) induced a rapid increase in vascular endothelium growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) phosphorylation that persisted for 45-60 min and was blocked by 20 microM SU5416, a VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Similarly, huLCF treatment of HMEC-1 cells induced an increase in the cell proliferation rate (131 +/- 6% of control levels; P > 0.05) and the degree of vascular development ('tube' diameter assay: 92 +/- 14 microm for huLCF vs. 12 +/- 7 microm for vehicle); P > 0.05). Both cell proliferation and vascular development were sensitive to SU5416. These studies indicate that factors secreted by liver cyst epithelia can activate VEGF signaling pathways and induce endothelial cell proliferation and differentiation. The present studies suggest that targeting VEGFR2-dependent angiogenesis may be an effective therapeutic strategy in blocking ADPKD liver cyst vascularization and growth.

  6. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells resist elongation due to shear stress.

    PubMed

    Reinitz, Adam; DeStefano, Jackson; Ye, Mao; Wong, Andrew D; Searson, Peter C

    2015-05-01

    Endothelial cells in straight sections of vessels are known to elongate and align in the direction of flow. This phenotype has been replicated in confluent monolayers of bovine aortic endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in cell culture under physiological shear stress. Here we report on the morphological response of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) in confluent monolayers in response to shear stress. Using a microfluidic platform we image confluent monolayers of HBMECs and HUVECs under shear stresses up to 16 dyne cm(-2). From live-cell imaging we quantitatively analyze the cell morphology and cell speed as a function of time. We show that HBMECs do not undergo a classical transition from cobblestone to spindle-like morphology in response to shear stress. We further show that under shear stress, actin fibers are randomly oriented in the cells indicating that there is no cytoskeletal remodeling. These results suggest that HBMECs are programmed to resist elongation and alignment under shear stress, a phenotype that may be associated with the unique properties of the blood-brain barrier.

  7. Spatiotemporal analysis of RhoA/B/C activation in primary human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, Nathalie R.; van Helden, Suzanne F.; Anthony, Eloise C.; Yin, Taofei; Wu, Yi I.; Goedhart, Joachim; Gadella, Theodorus W. J.; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells line the vasculature and are important for the regulation of blood pressure, vascular permeability, clotting and transendothelial migration of leukocytes and tumor cells. A group of proteins that that control the endothelial barrier function are the RhoGTPases. This study focuses on three homologous (>88%) RhoGTPases: RhoA, RhoB, RhoC of which RhoB and RhoC have been poorly characterized. Using a RhoGTPase mRNA expression analysis we identified RhoC as the highest expressed in primary human endothelial cells. Based on an existing RhoA FRET sensor we developed new RhoB/C FRET sensors to characterize their spatiotemporal activation properties. We found all these RhoGTPase sensors to respond to physiologically relevant agonists (e.g. Thrombin), reaching transient, localized FRET ratio changes up to 200%. These RhoA/B/C FRET sensors show localized GEF and GAP activity and reveal spatial activation differences between RhoA/C and RhoB. Finally, we used these sensors to monitor GEF-specific differential activation of RhoA/B/C. In summary, this study adds high-contrast RhoB/C FRET sensors to the currently available FRET sensor toolkit and uncover new insights in endothelial and RhoGTPase cell biology. This allows us to study activation and signaling by these closely related RhoGTPases with high spatiotemporal resolution in primary human cells. PMID:27147504

  8. Influence of the oxygen microenvironment on the proangiogenic potential of human endothelial colony forming cells.

    PubMed

    Decaris, Martin L; Lee, Chang I; Yoder, Mervin C; Tarantal, Alice F; Leach, J Kent

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic angiogenesis is a promising strategy to promote the formation of new or collateral vessels for tissue regeneration and repair. Since changes in tissue oxygen concentrations are known to stimulate numerous cell functions, these studies have focused on the oxygen microenvironment and its role on the angiogenic potential of endothelial cells. We analyzed the proangiogenic potential of human endothelial colony-forming cells (hECFCs), a highly proliferative population of circulating endothelial progenitor cells, and compared outcomes to human dermal microvascular cells (HMVECs) under oxygen tensions ranging from 1% to 21% O2, representative of ischemic or healthy tissues and standard culture conditions. Compared to HMVECs, hECFCs (1) exhibited significantly greater proliferation in both ischemic conditions and ambient air; (2) demonstrated increased migration compared to HMVECs when exposed to chemotactic gradients in reduced oxygen; and (3) exhibited comparable or superior proangiogenic potential in reduced oxygen conditions when assessed using a vessel-forming assay. These data demonstrate that the angiogenic potential of both endothelial populations is influenced by the local oxygen microenvironment. However, hECFCs exhibit a robust angiogenic potential in oxygen conditions representative of physiologic, ischemic, or ambient air conditions, and these findings suggest that hECFCs may be a superior cell source for use in cell-based approaches for the neovascularization of ischemic or engineered tissues.

  9. Oxidative stress and apoptosis are induced in human endothelial cells exposed to urban particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Montiel-Dávalos, Angélica; Ibarra-Sánchez, María de Jesús; Ventura-Gallegos, José Luis; Alfaro-Moreno, Ernesto; López-Marure, Rebeca

    2010-02-01

    Correlations between exposure to particle matter (PM) with an aerodynamic diameter Endothelial cells seem to play a relevant role in the responses to PM due to their participation in pro-inflammatory events. In this study we determined the effect of PM(2.5) and PM(10) from Mexico City on human endothelial cells by means of evaluating reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), NF-kappaB translocation and cell death. For this purpose we used human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) as a model. The production of ROS was determined by the reduction of H(2)DCFDA and NO by Griess reagent. The translocation of NF-kappaB was evaluated by Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) and the cellular death by the translocation of phosphatidylserine. TNF-alpha was used as a positive control for endothelial cell activation. PM(2.5) and PM(10) induced the production of ROS (77% and 126% increase, respectively, vs. control) and NO (up to 132% and 233% increase, respectively, vs. control). PM(2.5) and PM(10) also induced the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB. All these events were associated with apoptosis. In conclusion, the activation of HUVEC induced by PM(2.5) and PM(10) is related with an oxidative stress, suggesting that these particles may participate in the development of cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases.

  10. Hypericin, a Naphthodianthrone Derivative, Prevents Methylglyoxal-Induced Human Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Do, Moon Ho; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2017-01-01

    Methylglyoxal (MGO) is a highly reactive metabolite of glucose which is known to cause damage and induce apoptosis in endothelial cells. Endothelial cell damage is implicated in the progression of diabetes-associated complications and atherosclerosis. Hypericin, a naphthodianthrone isolated from Hypericum perforatum L. (St. John’s Wort), is a potent and selective inhibitor of protein kinase C and is reported to reduce neuropathic pain. In this work, we investigated the protective effect of hypericin on MGO-induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Hypericin showed significant anti-apoptotic activity in MGO-treated HUVECs. Pretreatment with hypericin significantly inhibited MGO-induced changes in cell morphology, cell death, and production of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Hypericin prevented MGO-induced apoptosis in HUVECs by increasing Bcl-2 expression and decreasing Bax expression. MGO was found to activate mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Pretreatment with hypericin strongly inhibited the activation of MAPKs, including P38, JNK, and ERK1/2. Interestingly, hypericin also inhibited the formation of AGEs. These findings suggest that hypericin may be an effective regulator of MGO-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, hypericin downregulated the formation of AGEs and ameliorated MGO-induced dysfunction in human endothelial cells. PMID:27302958

  11. PX-18 Protects Human Saphenous Vein Endothelial Cells under Arterial Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Kupreishvili, Koba; Stooker, Wim; Emmens, Reindert W; Vonk, Alexander B A; Sipkens, Jessica A; van Dijk, Annemieke; Eijsman, Leon; Quax, Paul H; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Krijnen, Paul A J; Niessen, Hans W M

    2017-07-01

    Arterial blood pressure-induced shear stress causes endothelial cell apoptosis and inflammation in vein grafts after coronary artery bypass grafting. As the inflammatory protein type IIA secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-IIA) has been shown to progress atherosclerosis, we hypothesized a role for sPLA2-IIA herein. The effects of PX-18, an inhibitor of both sPLA2-IIA and apoptosis, on residual endothelium and the presence of sPLA2-IIA were studied in human saphenous vein segments (n = 6) perfused at arterial blood pressure with autologous blood for 6 hrs. The presence of PX-18 in the perfusion blood induced a significant 20% reduction in endothelial cell loss compared to veins perfused without PX18, coinciding with significantly reduced sPLA2-IIA levels in the media of the vein graft wall. In addition, PX-18 significantly attenuated caspase-3 activation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells subjected to shear stress via mechanical stretch independent of sPLA2-IIA. In conclusion, PX-18 protects saphenous vein endothelial cells from arterial blood pressure-induced death, possibly also independent of sPLA2-IIA inhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ghrelin stimulates angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells: Implications beyond GH release

    SciTech Connect

    Li Aihua; Cheng Guangli; Zhu Genghui; Tarnawski, Andrzej S. . E-mail: atarnawski@yahoo.com

    2007-02-09

    Ghrelin, a peptide hormone isolated from the stomach, releases growth hormone and stimulates appetite. Ghrelin is also expressed in pancreas, kidneys, cardiovascular system and in endothelial cells. The precise role of ghrelin in endothelial cell functions remains unknown. We examined the expression of ghrelin and its receptor (GHSR1) mRNAs and proteins in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) and determined whether ghrelin affects in these cells proliferation, migration and in vitro angiogenesis; and whether MAPK/ERK2 signaling is important for the latter action. We found that ghrelin and GHSR1 are constitutively expressed in HMVEC. Treatment of HMVEC with exogenous ghrelin significantly increased in these cells proliferation, migration, in vitro angiogenesis and ERK2 phosphorylation. MEK/ERK2 inhibitor, PD 98059 abolished ghrelin-induced in vitro angiogenesis. This is First demonstration that ghrelin and its receptor are expressed in human microvascular endothelial cells and that ghrelin stimulates HMVEC proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis through activation of ERK2 signaling.

  13. Effect of polyhexanide and gentamycin on human osteoblasts and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ince, Akif; Schütze, Norbert; Hendrich, Christian; Jakob, Franz; Eulert, Jochen; Löhr, Jochen F

    2007-03-10

    Infection of total joint replacements is painful, disabling and difficult to treat because of the increasing bacterial resistance against antibiotics. In view of this, antiseptics show limited bacterial tolerance and have a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. However, the application of antiseptics to bone is insufficiently studied in literature. Therefore, we investigated the biocompatibility of the antiseptic polyhexanide with bone related cells and asked whether supplementation to bone cement is appropriate in the management of total arthroplasty infections. We performed an in vitro study with immortalised human foetal osteoblast cells (hFOB 1.19) and human endothelial cells (EAhy 926). The cultured cells were exposed to media containing various concentrations of gentamicin (12.5-800 microg/ml) and polyhexanide (0.0006-0.01%) for six hours. We measured the phase-contrast microscopy images, the cell viability, cell number and the alkaline phosphatase activity as a parameter for osteogenic function. The exposure of hFOB and endothelial cells to polyhexanide showed a severe reduction of viability and cell number. Gentamicin did not have negative effects on hFOB and endothelial cell number and viability. The alkaline phosphatase activity of hFOB showed a significant decrease after exposure to polyhexanide and gentamicin. The viability and the cell number of endothelial cells seem more negatively affected by polyhexanide than the parameters of the hFOB-cells. The exposure of human osteoblasts and endothelial cells to polyhexanide at concentrations with questionable antibacterial activity resulted in severe cell damage whereas exposure to high dosed gentamicin did not. These results raise questions as to the feasibility of using antiseptics in bone cement for the treatment of total arthroplasty infections. Further in vivo studies are necessary to show the in vivo relevance of these in vitro findings.

  14. Three specific antigens to isolate endothelial progenitor cells from human liposuction material.

    PubMed

    Hager, Gudrun; Holnthoner, Wolfgang; Wolbank, Susanne; Husa, Anna-Maria; Godthardt, Kathrin; Redl, Heinz; Gabriel, Christian

    2013-11-01

    Human endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) play an important role in regenerative medicine and contribute to neovascularization on vessel injury. They are usually enriched from peripheral blood, cord blood and bone marrow. In human fat tissue, EPC are rare and their isolation remains a challenge. Fat tissue was prepared by collagenase digestion, and the expression of specific marker proteins was evaluated by flow cytometry in the stromal vascular fraction (SVF). For enrichment, magnetic cell sorting was performed with the use of CD133 microbeads and EPC were cultured until colonies appeared. A second purification was performed with CD34; additional isolation steps were performed with the use of a combination of CD34 and CD31 microbeads. Enriched cells were investigated by flow cytometry for the expression of endothelial specific markers, by Matrigel assay and by the uptake of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. The expression pattern confirmed the heterogeneous nature of the SVF, with rare numbers of CD133+ detectable. EPC gained from the SVF by magnetic enrichment showed cobblestone morphology of outgrowth endothelial cells and expressed the specific markers CD31, CD144, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)R2, CD146, CD73 and CD105. Functional integrity was confirmed by uptake of acetylated low-density lipoprotein and the formation of tube-like structures on Matrigel. Rare EPC can be enriched from human fat tissue by magnetic cell sorting with the use of a combination of microbeads directed against CD133, an early EPC marker, CD34, a stem cell marker, and CD31, a typical marker for endothelial cells. In culture, they differentiate into EC and hence could have the potential to contribute to neovascularization in regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Potentiation and tolerance of toll-like receptor priming in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Koch, Stephen R; Lamb, Fred S; Hellman, Judith; Sherwood, Edward R; Stark, Ryan J

    2017-02-01

    Repeated challenge of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alters the response to subsequent LPS exposures via modulation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Whether activation of other TLRs can modulate TLR4 responses, and vice versa, remains unclear. Specifically with regards to endothelial cells, a key component of innate immunity, the impact of TLR cross-modulation is unknown. We postulated that TLR2 priming (via Pam3Csk4) would inhibit TLR4-mediated responses while TLR3 priming (via Poly I:C) would enhance subsequent TLR4-inflammatory signaling. We studied human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and neonatal human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). Cells were primed with a combination of Poly I:C (10 μg/ml), Pam3Csk4 (10 μg/ml), or LPS (100 ng/ml), then washed and allowed to rest. They were then rechallenged with either Poly I:C, Pam3Csk4 or LPS. Endothelial cells showed significant tolerance to repeated LPS challenge. Priming with Pam3Csk4 also reduced the response to secondary LPS challenge in both cell types, despite a reduced proinflammatory response to Pam3Csk4 in HMVECs compared to HUVECs. Poly I:C priming enhanced inflammatory and interferon producing signals upon Poly I:C or LPS rechallenge, respectively. Poly I:C priming induced interferon regulatory factor 7, leading to enhancement of interferon production. Finally, both Poly I:C and LPS priming induced significant changes in receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 activity. Pharmacological inhibition of receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 or interferon regulatory factor 7 reduced the potentiated phenotype of TLR3 priming on TLR4 rechallenge. These results demonstrate that in human endothelial cells, prior activation of TLRs can have a significant impact on subsequent exposures and may contribute to the severity of the host response.

  16. Interleukin-33 induces urokinase in human endothelial cells--possible impact on angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stojkovic, S; Kaun, C; Heinz, M; Krychtiuk, K A; Rauscher, S; Lemberger, C E; de Martin, R; Gröger, M; Petzelbauer, P; Huk, I; Huber, K; Wojta, J; Demyanets, S

    2014-06-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) plays a pivotal role in extracellular proteolysis and is thought to be critically involved in the modulation of angiogenesis. Interleukin (IL)-33 is a member of the IL-1 cytokine family, which is thought to act as danger signal that is released from cells after injury. IL-33 is involved in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory diseases and previously was shown to induce angiogenesis and inflammatory activation of endothelial cells. We investigated the impact of IL-33 on u-PA in endothelial cells as a new possible function for IL-33. We could demonstrate that IL-33 upregulated u-PA mRNA expression and protein production in human coronary artery and human umbilical vein endothelial cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner via interaction with its receptor ST2 and activation of the nuclear factor-κB pathway but independent of autocrine IL-1-induced effects. The hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor simvastatin abrogated the IL-33-induced increase in u-PA, thus providing further evidence for pleiotropic effects of statins. IL-33 induced u-PA-dependent capillary-like tube formation and vessel sprouting. In human carotid atherosclerotic plaques (n = 16), u-PA mRNA positively correlated with IL-33 mRNA expression (r = 0.780, P < 0.001). Furthermore, IL-33 and u-PA protein were detected in endothelial cells in these samples using fluorescence immunohistochemistry. We hypothesize that IL-33, representing a danger signal that is released after tissue damage, in addition to its role in the inflammatory activation of endothelial cells, is involved in u-PA-driven angiogenesis, a process that has been shown before to be linked to inflammation in various pathologies. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  17. Improved biocompatibility of small intestinal submucosa (SIS) following conditioning by human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Woods, A M; Rodenberg, E J; Hiles, M C; Pavalko, F M

    2004-02-01

    Small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is a naturally occurring tissue matrix composed of extracellular matrix proteins and various growth factors. SIS is derived from the porcine jejunum and functions as a remodeling scaffold for tissue repair. While SIS has proven to be a useful biomaterial for implants in vivo, problems associated with endothelialization and thrombogenicity of SIS implants may limit its vascular utility. The goal of this study was to determine if the biological properties of SIS could be improved by growing human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) on SIS and allowing these cells to deposit human basement membrane proteins on the porcine substrate to create what we have called "conditioned" SIS (c-SIS). Using an approach in which HUVEC were grown for 2 weeks on SIS and then removed via a technique that leaves behind an intact basement membrane, we hypothesized that the surface properties of SIS might be improved. We found that when re-seeded on c-SIS, HUVEC exhibited enhanced organization of cell junctions and had increased metabolic activity compared to cells on native SIS (n-SIS). Furthermore, HUVEC grown on c-SIS released lower amounts of the pro-inflammatory prostaglandin PGI2 into the media compared to cells grown on n-SIS. Additionally, we found that adhesion of resting or activated human platelets to c-SIS was significantly decreased compared to n-SIS suggesting that, in addition to improved cell growth characteristics, conditioning SIS with human basement membrane proteins might decrease its thrombogenic potential. In summary, conditioning of porcine SIS by human endothelial cells improves key biological properties of the material that may improve its usefulness as remodeling scaffold for tissue repair. Identification of critical modifications of SIS by human endothelial cells should help guide future efforts to develop more biocompatible vascular grafts.

  18. Enhanced Human Endothelial Progenitor Cell Adhesion and Differentiation by a Bioinspired Multifunctional Nanomatrix

    PubMed Central

    Andukuri, Adinarayana; Sohn, Young-Doug; Anakwenze, Chidinma P.; Lim, Dong-Jin; Brott, Brigitta C.; Yoon, Young-Sup

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cell (EPC)-capturing techniques have led to revolutionary strategies that can improve the performance of cardiovascular implant devices and engineered tissues by enhancing re-endothelialization and angiogenesis. However, these strategies are limited by controversies regarding the phenotypic identities of EPCs as well as their inability to target and prevent the other afflictions associated with current therapies, namely, thrombosis and neointimal hyperplasia. Therefore, the goal of this study was to study the efficacy of a bioinspired multifunctional nanomatrix in recruiting and promoting the differentiation of EPCs toward an endothelial lineage. The bioinspired nanomatrix combines multiple components, including self-assembled peptide amphiphiles (PAs) that include cell adhesive ligands, nitric oxide (NO)-producing donors, and enzyme-mediated degradable sequences to achieve an endothelium-mimicking character. In this study, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were isolated and cultured on the bioinspired multifunctional nanomatrix. Initial cell adhesion, lectin staining, acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake, and expression of endothelial markers, including CD31, CD34, von Willebrand Factor, and VEGFR2, were analyzed. The results from this study indicate that the NO releasing bioinspired multifunctional nanomatrix promotes initial adhesion of EPCs when compared to control surfaces. The expression of endothelial markers is also increased on the bioinspired multifunctional nanomatrix, suggesting that it directs the differentiation of EPCs toward an endothelial phenotype. The bioinspired nanomatrix therefore provides a novel biomaterial-based platform for capturing as well as directing EPC behavior. Therefore, this study has the potential to positively impact the patency of cardiovascular devices such as stents and vascular grafts as well as enhanced angiogenesis for ischemic or engineered tissues. PMID:23126402

  19. [Extracorporeal cardiac shock wave therapy improved myocardial micro-vascular circulation after acute myocardial infarction at early stage in pigs].

    PubMed

    Tao, Si-ming; Guo, Tao; Wang, Yue; Cai, Hong-yan; Yang, Chao

    2011-03-01

    To explore the effect of low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy to improve myocardial micro-vascular circulation after acute myocardial infarction at the early stage in pig model. A total of 25 domestic pigs were used in this study. Model of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was created successfully by the implantation of angioplasty balloon in mid-distal segment of left anterior descending coronary artery (n=20). These AMI animals were divided two groups. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy to the ischemic myocardial region was performed for the group of shock wave therapy (n=15) at 3 days after acute myocardial infarction; The remaining AMI animals were treated in the same manner, but without the shock wave therapy (n=5), The other health animals (n=5) were used as blank control group. The number of endothelium cell, capillary density, VEGF mRNA level and collateral vessel Rentrop score in each group were evaluated and compared. Shock wave treatment up-regulated the mRNA expression of VEGF in the model of acute myocardial infarction (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the number of capillaries was significantly higher in the shock wave group than that of positive and blank control group (P < 0.05). The Rentrop score of collateral vessel indicated the reconstruction of collateral circulation in shock wave group. Extracorporeal cardiac shock wave therapy could effectively induce angiogenesis, up-regulate the expression of angiogenic factor, resulting in an improvement in micro-vascular circulation reconstruction of ischemic myocardial region.

  20. Effects of Fe particle irradiation on human endothelial barrier structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Preety; Guida, Peter; Grabham, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Space travel involves exposure to biologically effective heavy ion radiation and there is consequently a concern for possible degenerative disorders in humans. A significant target for radiation effects is the microvascular system, which is crucial to healthy functioning of the tissues. Its pathology is linked to disrupted endothelial barrier function and is not only a primary event in a range of degenerative diseases but also an important influencing factor in many others. Thus, an assessment of the effects of heavy ion radiation on endothelial barrier function would be useful for estimating the risks of space travel. This study was aimed at understanding the effects of high LET Fe particles (1 GeV/n) and is the first investigation of the effects of charged particles on the function of the human endothelial barrier. We used a set of established and novel endpoints to assess barrier function after exposure. These include, trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER), morphological effects, localization of adhesion and cell junction proteins (in 2D monolayers and in 3D tissue models), and permeability of molecules through the endothelial barrier. A dose of 0.50 Gy was sufficient to cause a progressive reduction in TEER measurements that were significant 48 hours after exposure. Concurrently, there were morphological changes and a 14% loss of cells from monolayers. Gaps also appeared in the normally continuous cell-border localization of the tight junction protein - ZO-1 but not the Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) in both monolayers and in 3D vessel models. Disruption of barrier function was confirmed by increased permeability to 3 kDa and 10 kDa dextran molecules. A dose of 0.25 Gy caused no detectible change in cell number, morphology, or TEER, but did cause barrier disruption since there were gaps in the cell border localization of ZO-1 and an increased permeability to 3 kDa dextran. These results indicate that Fe particles potently have

  1. Glycated human serum albumin induces NF-κB activation and endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rodiño-Janeiro, Bruno K; Paradela-Dobarro, Beatriz; Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; González-Peteiro, Mercedes; González-Juanatey, José R; Álvarez, Ezequiel

    2015-01-01

    Non-enzymatic glycated proteins could mediate diabetes vascular complications, but the molecular mechanisms are unknown. Our objective was to find new targets involved in the glycated human serum albumin (gHSA)-enhanced extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human endothelial cells. Some nuclear factors and phosphorylation cascades were analysed. gHSA activated nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), which up-regulated NOX4 and P22PHOX and enhanced ROS production. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB reversed gHSA-enhanced NOX4 expression and decreased gHSA-induced ROS production in extra- and intracellular spaces. The inhibition of activator protein-1 (AP-1) induced a rise in NOX4 and P22PHOX subunit expression and a down-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). AP-1 inhibition also enhanced extracellular ROS production in the presence of serum albumin, but not with gHSA. These results were explained by the eNOS uncoupling induced by gHSA, also demonstrated in this study. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase or mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 did not show to be involved in gHSA-induced ROS production. All together, the results suggested that gHSA-enhanced ROS production in endothelium is mediated by: 1) NF-κB activation and subsequence up-regulation of NADPH oxidase, 2) eNOS uncoupling. AP-1, although is not directly affected by gHSA, is another target for regulating NADPH oxidase and eNOS expression in endothelial cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of corneal endothelial morphology in graft assessment and prediction of endothelial cell loss during organ culture of human donor corneas.

    PubMed

    Hermel, Martin; Salla, Sabine; Fuest, Matthias; Walter, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Endothelial assessment is crucial in the release of corneas for grafting. We retrospectively analysed the role of endothelial morphology parameters in predicting endothelial cell loss during organ culture. Human donor corneas were cultured in minimal essential medium with 2% fetal calf serum and antibiotics. Initial endothelial morphology was assessed microscopically using score parameters polymegethism (POL), pleomorphism (PLE), granulation (GRA), vacuolization (VAC), segmentation of cell membranes (SEG), Descemet's folds (DF), trypan blue-positive cells (TBPC) and endothelial cell-free areas (ECFA). Some corneas were primarily rejected based on endothelial assessment. Endothelial cell density (ECD) was assessed at the beginning (I-ECD) and end of culture. Corneas were then placed in dehydration medium (as above + 5% dextran 500). In a subgroup, ECD was reassessed after dehydration. Endothelial cell loss during culture (ECL@Culture) and culture+dehydration (ECL-Culture&Dehydration) were calculated. Data were given as mean ± SD and analysed using multiple linear and logistic regression. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. I-ECD was 2812 ± 360/mm(2) (n = 2356). The decision to reject a cornea due to endothelial assessment was associated negatively with I-ECD (OR = 0.77/100 cells, CI 0.7-0.82) and positively with ECFA (OR = 2.7, CI 1.69-4.35), SEG (OR =1.3, CI 1.01-1.68) and donor age (OR = 1.26/decade, CI 1.33-1.41). ECL@Culture was 153 ± 201/mm(2) (n = 1277), ECL@Culture&Dehydration was 169 ± 183/mm(2) (n = 918). ECL@Culture was associated positively with donor age, I-ECD, GRA and TBPC, and negatively with PLE, and DF. ECL@Culture&Dehydration was associated positively with age, sex, initial ECD, POL, PLE, VAC and TBPC. Morphological parameters displayed associations with the exclusion of corneas from culture and with endothelial cell loss. Appropriate parameter selection for screening purposes may help improve

  3. Pulsatile atheroprone shear stress affects the expression of transient receptor potential channels in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Florian; Vorderwülbecke, Bernd J; Marki, Alex; Krueger, Katharina; Liu, Ying; Baumunk, Daniel; Zakrzewicz, Andreas; Tepel, Martin

    2012-06-01

    The goal of the study was to assess whether pulsatile atheroprone shear stress modulates the expression of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, TRPC3, TRPC6, TRPM7, and TRPV1 mRNA, in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. Exposure of cultured vascular endothelial cells to defined shear stress, producing a constant laminar flow (generating a shear stress of 6 dyne/cm(2)), laminar pulsatile atheroprotective flow (with a mean shear stress of 20 dyne/cm(2)), or laminar atheroprone bidirectional flow (with a mean shear stress of 0 dyne/cm(2)) differentially induced TRPC6 and TRPV1 mRNA as measured by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and normalized to GAPDH expression. Thereby, TRPC6 and TRPV1 mRNA expressions were significantly increased after 24 hours of exposure to an atheroprone flow profile compared with an atheroprotective flow profile. Furthermore, the expression of transcription factors GATA1 and GATA4 was significantly correlated with the expression of TRPC6 mRNA. In contrast, after 24 hours of constant laminar flow, the expression of TRPC6 and TRPV1 mRNA was unchanged, whereas the expression of TRPC3 and TRPM7 was significantly higher in endothelial cells exposed to shear stress in comparison with endothelial cells grown under static conditions. There was a significant association between the expression of TRPC6 and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA in human vascular tissue. No-flow and atheroprone flow conditions are equally characterized by an increase in the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α; however, inflammation-associated endothelial cell reactions may be further aggravated at atheroprone flow conditions by the increase of TRPV1 and TRPC6, as observed in our study.

  4. Selective ablation of immature blood vessels in established human tumors follows vascular endothelial growth factor withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, L E; Golijanin, D; Itin, A; Pode, D; Keshet, E

    1999-01-01

    Features that distinguish tumor vasculatures from normal blood vessels are sought to enable the destruction of preformed tumor vessels. We show that blood vessels in both a xenografted tumor and primary human tumors contain a sizable fraction of immature blood vessels that have not yet recruited periendothelial cells. These immature vessels are selectively obliterated as a consequence of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) withdrawal. In a xenografted glioma, the selective vulnerability of immature vessels to VEGF loss was demonstrated by downregulating VEGF transgene expression using a tetracycline-regulated expression system. In human prostate cancer, the constitutive production of VEGF by the glandular epithelium was suppressed as a consequence of androgen-ablation therapy. VEGF loss led, in turn, to selective apoptosis of endothelial cells in vessels devoid of periendothelial cells. These results suggest that the unique dependence on VEGF of blood vessels lacking periendothelial cells can be exploited to reduce an existing tumor vasculature.

  5. Organization and chromosomal localization of the human platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, K; Stenman, G; Honda, H; Sahlin, P; Andersson, A; Miyazono, K; Heldin, C H; Ishikawa, F; Takaku, F

    1991-01-01

    Human platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (hPD-ECGF) is a novel angiogenic factor which stimulates endothelial cell growth in vitro and promotes angiogenesis in vivo. We report here the cloning and sequencing of the gene for hPD-ECGF and its flanking regions. This gene is composed of 10 exons dispersed over a 4.3-kb region. Its promoter lacks a TATA box and a CCAAT box, structures characteristic of eukaryotic promoters. Instead, six copies of potential Sp1-binding sites (GGGCGG or CCGCCC) were clustered just upstream of the transcription start sites. Southern blot analysis using genomic DNAs from several vertebrates suggested that the gene for PD-ECGF is conserved phylogenetically among vertebrates. The gene for hPD-ECGF was localized to chromosome 22 by analysis of a panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrid lines. Images PMID:2005900

  6. Toxic effects of iron oxide nanoparticles on human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinying; Tan, Yanbin; Mao, Hui; Zhang, Minming

    2010-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been employed for hyperthermia treatments, stem cell therapies, cell labeling, and imaging modalities. The biocompatibility and cytotoxic effects of iron oxide nanoparticles when used in biomedical applications, however, are an ongoing concern. Endothelial cells have a critical role in this research dealing with tumors, cardiovascular disease and inflammation. However, there is little information dealing with the biologic effects of IONPs on the endothelial cell. This paper deals with the influence of dextran and citric acid coated IONPs on the behavior and function of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). After exposing endothelial cells to IONPs, dose-dependent effects on HUVECs viability, cytoskeleton and function were determined. Both citric acid and dextran coated particles appeared to be largely internalized by HUVECs through endocytosis and contribute to eventual cell death possibly by apoptosis. Cytoskeletal structures were greatly disrupted, as evidenced by diminished vinculin spots, and disorganized actin fiber and tubulin networks. The capacity of HUVECs to form a vascular network on Matrigel™ diminished after exposure to IONPs. Cell migration/invasion were inhibited significantly even at very low iron concentrations (0.1 mM). The results of this study indicate the great importance of thoroughly understanding nanoparticle-cell interactions, and the potential to exploit this understanding in tumor therapy applications involving IONPs as thermo/chemoembolization agents. PMID:20957160

  7. Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell Interaction with Fluorine-Incorporated Amorphous Carbon Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Yukihiro; Hasebe, Terumitsu; Nagashima, So; Kamijo, Aki; Nakatani, Tatsuyuki; Yamagami, Takuji; Kitamura, Noriko; Kitagawa, Tomoya; Hotta, Atsushi; Takahashi, Koki; Suzuki, Tetsuya

    2012-09-01

    A major clinical concern in coronary intervention for cardiovascular disease is late stent thrombosis after the implantation of drug eluting stents (DES). DES widely used in clinical settings currently utilize polymer coatings, which can induce persistent arterial wall inflammation and delayed vascular healing, resulting in impaired endothelialization. We examined the viability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) for fluorine-incorporated amorphous carbon (a-C:H:F) coatings, which are known to be anti-thrombogenic. a-C:H:F and a-C:H were synthesized on the tissue culture dishes using radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition by varying the ratio of hexafluoroethane and acetylene. HUVECs were seeded on coated dishes for 6 days. The results indicate that the a-C:H:F surface does not disturb HUVEC proliferation in 6 days of culture and is promising for stent materials that allows the preservation of endothelialization, even if the fluorine concentration of a-C:H surface affects the early adhesion of endothelial cells.

  8. Human neural stem cell-induced endothelial morphogenesis requires autocrine/paracrine and juxtacrine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chung-Hsing; Modo, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Transplanted neural stem cells (NSC) interact with the host brain microenvironment. A neovascularization is commonly observed in the vicinity of the cell deposit, which is correlated with behavioral improvements. To elucidate the signaling mechanisms between human NSCs and endothelial cells (ECs), these were cocultured in an in vitro model in which NSC-induced endothelial morphogenesis produced a neurovascular environment. Soluble (autocrine/paracrine) and contact–mediated (juxtacrine) signaling molecules were evaluated for two conditionally immortalized fetal NSC lines derived from the cortical anlage (CTXOE03) and ganglionic eminence (STROC05), as well as an adult EC line (D3) derived from the cerebral microvasculature of a hippocampal biopsy. STROC05 were 4 times as efficient to induce endothelial morphogenesis compared to CTXOE03. The cascade of reciprocal interactions between NSCs and ECs in this process was determined by quantifying soluble factors, receptor mapping, and immunocytochemistry for extracellular matrix molecules. The mechanistic significance of these was further evaluated by pharmacological blockade. The sequential cell-specific regulation of autocrine/paracrine and juxtacrine signaling accounted for the differential efficiency of NSCs to induce endothelial morphogenesis. These in vitro studies shed new light on the reciprocal interactions between NSCs and ECs, which are pivotal for our mechanistic understanding of the efficacy of NSC transplantation. PMID:27374240

  9. Glycosaminoglycan mimetic improves enrichment and cell functions of human endothelial progenitor cell colonies.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Fabien; Lavergne, Mélanie; Negroni, Elisa; Ferratge, Ségolène; Carpentier, Gilles; Gilbert-Sirieix, Marie; Siñeriz, Fernando; Uzan, Georges; Albanese, Patricia

    2014-05-01

    Human circulating endothelial progenitor cells isolated from peripheral blood generate in culture cells with features of endothelial cells named late-outgrowth endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC). In adult blood, ECFC display a constant quantitative and qualitative decline during life span. Even after expansion, it is difficult to reach the cell dose required for cell therapy of vascular diseases, thus limiting the clinical use of these cells. Glycosaminoglycans (GAG) are components from the extracellular matrix (ECM) that are able to interact and potentiate heparin binding growth factor (HBGF) activities. According to these relevant biological properties of GAG, we designed a GAG mimetic having the capacity to increase the yield of ECFC production from blood and to improve functionality of their endothelial outgrowth. We demonstrate that the addition of [OTR(4131)] mimetic during the isolation process of ECFC from Cord Blood induces a 3 fold increase in the number of colonies. Moreover, addition of [OTR(4131)] to cell culture media improves adhesion, proliferation, migration and self-renewal of ECFC. We provide evidence showing that GAG mimetics may have great interest for cell therapy applied to vascular regeneration therapy and represent an alternative to exogenous growth factor treatments to optimize potential therapeutic properties of ECFC.

  10. Human saphenous vein endothelial cell adhesion and expansion on micropatterned polytetrafluoroethylene.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Marie-Claude; Chevallier, Pascale; Hoesli, Corinne A; Lagueux, Jean; Bareille, Reine; Rémy, Murielle; Bordenave, Laurence; Durrieu, Marie-Christine; Laroche, Gaétan

    2013-03-01

    Intimal hyperplasia and thrombosis are responsible for the poor patency rates of small-diameter vascular grafts. These complications could be avoided by a rapid and strong adhesion of endothelial cells to the prosthetic surfaces, which typically consist of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) for small-diameter vessels. We have previously described two peptide micropatterning strategies that increase the endothelialization rates of PTFE. The micropatterns were generated either by inkjet printing 300 μm squares or by spraying 10.1 ± 0.1 μm diameter droplets of the CGRGDS cell adhesion peptide, while the remaining surface was functionalized using the CWQPPRARI cell migration peptide. We now directly compare these two micropatterning strategies and examine the effect of hydrodynamic stress on human saphenous vein endothelial cells grown on the patterned surfaces. No significant differences in cell adhesion were observed between the two micropatterning methods. When compared to unpatterned surfaces treated with a uniform mixture of the two peptides, the cell expansion was significantly higher on sprayed or printed surfaces after 9 days of static cell culture. In addition, after 6 h of exposure to hydrodynamic stress, the cell retention and cell cytoskeleton reorganization on the patterned surfaces was improved when compared to untreated or random treated surfaces. These results indicate that micropatterned surfaces lead to improved rates of PTFE endothelialization with higher resistance to hydrodynamic stress.

  11. eNOS-Dependent Antisenscence Effect of a Calcium Channel Blocker in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Toshio; Yamaguchi, Tomoe; Sakakibara, Yasufumi; Taguchi, Kumiko; Maeda, Morihiko; Kuzuya, Masafumi; Hattori, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Senescence of vascular endothelial cells is an important contributor to the pathogenesis of age-associated vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis. We investigated the effects of antihypertensive agents on high glucose-induced cellular senescence in human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs). Exposure of HUVECs to high glucose (22 mM) for 3 days increased senescence-associated- β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity, a senescence marker, and decreased telomerase activity, a replicative senescence marker. The calcium channel blocker nifedipine, but not the β1-adrenergic blocking agent atenolol or the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor perindopril, reduced SA-β-gal positive cells and prevented a decrease in telomerase activity in a high-glucose environment. This beneficial effect of nifedipine was associated with reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity. Thus, nifedipine prevented high glucose-induced ROS generation and increased basal eNOS phosphorylation level at Ser-1177. Treatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NAME) and transfection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting eNOS eliminated the anti-senscence effect of nifedipine. These results demonstrate that nifedipine can prevent endothelial cell senescence in an eNOS-dependent manner. The anti-senescence action of nifedipine may represent a novel mechanism by which it protects against atherosclerosis. PMID:24520379

  12. Human endothelial stem/progenitor cells, angiogenic factors and vascular repair

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Suzanne M.; Athanassopoulos, Athanasios; Harris, Adrian L.; Tsaknakis, Grigorios

    2010-01-01

    Neovascularization or new blood vessel formation is of utmost importance not only for tissue and organ development and for tissue repair and regeneration, but also for pathological processes, such as tumour development. Despite this, the endothelial lineage, its origin, and the regulation of endothelial development and function either intrinsically from stem cells or extrinsically by proangiogenic supporting cells and other elements within local and specific microenvironmental niches are still not fully understood. There can be no doubt that for most tissues and organs, revascularization represents the holy grail for tissue repair, with autologous endothelial stem/progenitor cells, their proangiogenic counterparts and the products of these cells all being attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. Historically, a great deal of controversy has surrounded the identification and origin of cells and factors that contribute to revascularization, the use of such cells or their products as biomarkers to predict and monitor tissue damage and repair or tumour progression and therapeutic responses, and indeed their efficacy in revascularizing and repairing damaged tissues. Here, we will review the role of endothelial progenitor cells and of supporting proangiogenic cells and their products, principally in humans, as diagnostic and therapeutic agents for wound repair and tissue regeneration. PMID:20843839

  13. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  14. Urea immunoliposome inhibits human vascular endothelial cell proliferation for hemangioma treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Urea injection has been used in hemangioma treatment as sclerotherapy. It shrinks vascular endothelial cells and induces degeneration, necrosis, and fibrosis. However, this treatment still has disadvantages, such as lacking targeting and difficulty in controlling the urea dosage. Thus, we designed a urea immunoliposome to improve the efficiency of treatment. Methods The urea liposome was prepared by reverse phase evaporation. Furthermore, the urea immunoliposome was generated by coupling the urea liposome with a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) monoclonal antibody using the glutaraldehyde cross-linking method. The influence of the urea immunoliposome on cultured human hemangioma vascular endothelial cells was observed preliminarily. Results Urea immunoliposomes showed typical liposome morphology under a transmission electron microscope, with an encapsulation percentage of 54.4% and a coupling rate of 36.84% for anti-VEGFR. Treatment with the urea immunoliposome significantly inhibited the proliferation of hemangioma vascular endothelial cells (HVECs) in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Conclusions The urea immunoliposome that we developed distinctly and persistently inhibited the proliferation of HVECs and is expected to be used in clinical hemangioma treatment. PMID:24266957

  15. Microrheology and ROCK Signaling of Human Endothelial Cells Embedded in a 3D Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Panorchan, Porntula; Lee, Jerry S. H.; Kole, Thomas P.; Tseng, Yiider; Wirtz, Denis

    2006-01-01

    Cell function is profoundly affected by the geometry of the extracellular environment confining the cell. Whether and how cells plated on a two-dimensional matrix or embedded in a three-dimensional (3D) matrix mechanically sense the dimensionality of their environment is mostly unknown, partly because individual cells in an extended matrix are inaccessible to conventional cell-mechanics probes. Here we develop a functional assay based on multiple particle tracking microrheology coupled with ballistic injection of nanoparticles to measure the local intracellular micromechanical properties of individual cells embedded inside a matrix. With our novel assay, we probe the mechanical properties of the cytoplasm of individual human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) embedded in a 3D peptide hydrogel in the presence or absence of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We found that VEGF treatment, which enhances endothelial migration, increases the compliance and reduces the elasticity of the cytoplasm of HUVECs in a matrix. This VEGF-induced softening response of the cytoplasm is abrogated by specific Rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibition. These results establish combined particle-tracking microrheology and ballistic injection as the first method able to probe the micromechanical properties and mechanical response to agonists and/or drug treatments of individual cells inside a matrix. These results suggest that ROCK plays an essential role in the regulation of the intracellular mechanical response to VEGF of endothelial cells in a 3D matrix. PMID:16891369

  16. p27 Nuclear localization and growth arrest caused by perlecan knockdown in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Katsuya; Oka, Kiyomasa; Matsumoto, Kunio; Nakamura, Toshikazu

    2010-02-12

    Perlecan, a secreted heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is a major component of the vascular basement membrane and participates in angiogenesis. Here, we used small interference RNA-mediated knockdown of perlecan expression to investigate the regulatory function of perlecan in the growth of human vascular endothelial cells. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced ERK phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression were unchanged by perlecan deficiency in endothelial cells; however, perlecan deficiency inhibited the Rb protein phosphorylation and DNA synthesis induced by bFGF. By contrast to cytoplasmic localization of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 in control endothelial cells, p27 was localized in the nucleus and its expression increased in perlecan-deficient cells, which suggests that p27 mediates inhibition of Rb phosphorylation. In addition to the well-characterized function of perlecan as a co-receptor for heparin-binding growth factors such as bFGF, our results suggest that perlecan plays an indispensible role in endothelial cell proliferation and acts through a mechanism that involves subcellular localization of p27.

  17. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  18. Primary structure of endoglin, an RGD-containing glycoprotein of human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gougos, A; Letarte, M

    1990-05-25

    Endoglin is a major glycoprotein of human vascular endothelium. As observed with monoclonal antibody 44G4, the distribution of endoglin is restricted to endothelial cells in all tissues except bone marrow. cDNA clones were isolated from an endothelial cell lambda gt11 cDNA library using a rabbit antibody prepared against endoglin purified from placenta. Eleven antibody-positive and cross-hybridizing clones were obtained; reactivity with endothelial cell 3.4-kilobase mRNA transcript was observed. The N-terminal sequence of placental endoglin was determined and found within the deduced protein sequence, thus confirming the identity of the cDNA and revealing a partial signal peptide. Endoglin is a type I integral membrane protein of Mr = 68,051 with an extracellular region of 561 amino acids, a hydrophobic transmembrane domain, and a 47-residue cytoplasmic tail. There are four potential N-linked glycosylation sites in the N-terminal domain and a probable O-glycan domain rich in Ser and Thr residues proximal to the membrane-spanning domain. Data base searches revealed that endoglin is a novel protein. The sequence contains an RGD tripeptide (374-376), the first identified on a surface protein of endothelium. The presence of RGD, a key recognition structure in cellular adhesion, suggests a critical role for endoglin in the binding of endothelial cells to integrins and/or other RGD receptors.

  19. Extracellular histones disarrange vasoactive mediators release through a COX-NOS interaction in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cremades, Daniel; Bueno-Betí, Carlos; García-Giménez, José Luis; Ibañez-Cabellos, José Santiago; Hermenegildo, Carlos; Pallardó, Federico V; Novella, Susana

    2017-02-28

    Extracellular histones are mediators of inflammation, tissue injury and organ dysfunction. Interactions between circulating histones and vascular endothelial cells are key events in histone-mediated pathologies. Our aim was to investigate the implication of extracellular histones in the production of the major vasoactive compounds released by human endothelial cells (HUVECs), prostanoids and nitric oxide (NO). HUVEC exposed to increasing concentrations of histones (0.001 to 100 μg/ml) for 4 hrs induced prostacyclin (PGI2) production in a dose-dependent manner and decreased thromboxane A2 (TXA2) release at 100 μg/ml. Extracellular histones raised cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) mRNA and protein expression, decreased COX-1 mRNA levels and did not change thromboxane A2 synthase (TXAS) expression. Moreover, extracellular histones decreased both, eNOS expression and NO production in HUVEC. The impaired NO production was related to COX-2 activity and superoxide production since was reversed after celecoxib (10 μmol/l) and tempol (100 μmol/l) treatments, respectively. In conclusion, our findings suggest that extracellular histones stimulate the release of endothelial-dependent mediators through an up-regulation in COX-2-PGIS-PGI2 pathway which involves a COX-2-dependent superoxide production that decreases the activity of eNOS and the NO production. These effects may contribute to the endothelial cell dysfunction observed in histone-mediated pathologies.

  20. Estrogen-like effects of wine extracts on nitric oxide synthesis in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Simoncini, Tommaso; Lenzi, Elena; Zöchling, Alfred; Gopal, Santhosh; Goglia, Lorenzo; Russo, Eleonora; Polak, Kinga; Casarosa, Elena; Jungbauer, Alois; Genazzani, Alessandro D; Genazzani, Andrea R

    2011-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction frequently ensues during the climacteric due to hormonal and metabolic changes. Non-pharmacological interventions such as lifestyle and dietary modifications are emerging as valuable strategies to counteract the cardiovascular consequences of ageing. A number of chemical components of wine, including alcohol and some polyphenols, are known to be active on the vessels. However, the molecular mechanisms through which they modulate endothelial function are largely unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of non-alcoholic wine fractions from five different wines on the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) via the expression and enzymatic activation of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human endothelial cells. All non-alcoholic fractions studied increased NO synthesis, although with different potencies. All wine extracts maximally enhanced NO production at doses in the range achieved with a moderate wine intake, with decreasing effects with further increases of the dose. Interestingly, a part of these actions was recruited via estrogen receptors (ERs). Within the polyphenols with known binding activity for ERs contained in the tested wines, resveratrol, epicatechin, syringic acid, apigenin, malvidin and ellagic acid were largely responsible for eNOS activation. These findings show that some of the non-alcoholic components of wine enhance the production of NO by the vessels acting on ERs, and suggest that a moderate intake of wine may benefit the cardiovascular system through estrogen-like effects.

  1. Low oxygen tension enhances endothelial fate of human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kusuma, Sravanti; Peijnenburg, Elizabeth; Patel, Parth; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Objective A critical regulator of the developing or regenerating vasculature is low oxygen tension. Precise elucidation of the role of low oxygen environments on endothelial commitment from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) necessitates controlled in vitro differentiation environments. Approach and Results We employed a feeder-free, two-dimensional differentiation system in which we could accurately monitor dissolved oxygen levels during hPSC differentiation toward early vascular cells (EVCs). We found that oxygen uptake rate of differentiating hPSCs is lower in 5% O2 compared to atmospheric conditions. EVCs differentiated in 5% O2 had an increased VEcad expression with clusters of VEcad+ cells surrounded by PDGFRβ+ cells. When we assessed the temporal effects of low oxygen differentiation environments, we determined that low oxygen environments during the early stages of EVC differentiation enhance endothelial lineage commitment. EVCs differentiated in 5% O2 exhibited an increased expression of VEcad and CD31 along with their localization to the membrane, enhanced lectin binding and acLDL uptake, rapid cord-like structure formation, and increased expression of arterial EC markers. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation during the early stages of differentiation abrogated the endothelial inductive effects of the low oxygen environments. Conclusions Low oxygen tension during early stages of EVC derivation induces endothelial commitment and maturation through the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, highlighting the importance of regulating oxygen tensions during hPSC-vascular differentiation. PMID:24526696

  2. Advanced oxidation protein products induce endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human renal glomerular endothelial cells through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiujie; Duan, Na; Wang, Yue; Shu, Shuangshuang; Xiang, Xiaohong; Guo, Tingting; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Shaojie; Tang, Xun; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) in renal glomerular endothelial cells plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Furthermore, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) have been shown to contribute to the progression of DN. However, whether AOPPs induce EndMT in renal glomerular endothelial cells remains unclear. Thus, we investigated the effect of AOPPs on human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs) and the mechanisms underlying the effects. Our results showed that AOPP treatment lowered the expression of vascular endothelial cadherin, CD31, and claudin 5 and induced the overexpression of α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, and fibroblast-specific protein 1, which indicated that AOPPs induced EndMT in HRGECs. Furthermore, AOPP stimulation increased the expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein, which suggested that AOPPs triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in HRGECs. Notably, the aforementioned AOPP effects were reversed following the treatment of cells with salubrinal, an inhibitor of ER stress, whereas the effects were reproduced after exposure to thapsigargin, an inducer of ER stress. Collectively, our results indicate that AOPPs trigger EndMT in HRGECs through the induction of ER stress. These findings suggest novel therapeutic strategies for inhibiting renal fibrosis by targeting ER stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Side population in human glioblastoma is non-tumorigenic and characterizes brain endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Golebiewska, Anna; Bougnaud, Sébastien; Stieber, Daniel; Brons, Nicolaas H. C.; Vallar, Laurent; Hertel, Frank; Klink, Barbara; Schröck, Evelin; Bjerkvig, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    The identification and significance of cancer stem-like cells in malignant gliomas remains controversial. It has been proposed that cancer stem-like cells display increased drug resistance, through the expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters that detoxify cells by effluxing exogenous compounds. Here, we investigated the ‘side population’ phenotype based on efflux properties of ATP-binding cassette transporters in freshly isolated human glioblastoma samples and intracranial xenografts derived thereof. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis on sorted cells obtained from glioblastoma biopsies, as well as human tumour xenografts developed in immunodeficient enhanced green fluorescence protein-expressing mice that allow an unequivocal tumour-stroma discrimination, we show that side population cells in human glioblastoma are non-neoplastic and exclusively stroma-derived. Tumour cells were consistently devoid of efflux properties regardless of their genetic background, tumour ploidy or stem cell associated marker expression. Using multi-parameter flow cytometry we identified the stromal side population in human glioblastoma to be brain-derived endothelial cells with a minor contribution of astrocytes. In contrast with their foetal counterpart, neural stem/progenitor cells in the adult brain did not display the side population phenotype. Of note, we show that CD133-positive cells often associated with cancer stem-like cells in glioblastoma biopsies, do not represent a homogenous cell population and include CD31-positive endothelial cells. Interestingly, treatment of brain tumours with the anti-angiogenic agent bevacizumab reduced total vessel density, but did not affect the efflux properties of endothelial cells. In conclusion our findings contribute to an unbiased identification of cancer stem-like cells and stromal cells in brain neoplasms, and provide novel insight into the complex issue of drug delivery to the brain. Since efflux properties of

  4. Driving vascular endothelial cell fate of human multipotent Isl1+ heart progenitors with VEGF modified mRNA.

    PubMed

    Lui, Kathy O; Zangi, Lior; Silva, Eduardo A; Bu, Lei; Sahara, Makoto; Li, Ronald A; Mooney, David J; Chien, Kenneth R

    2013-10-01

    Distinct families of multipotent heart progenitors play a central role in the generation of diverse cardiac, smooth muscle and endothelial cell lineages during mammalian cardiogenesis. The identification of precise paracrine signals that drive the cell-fate decision of these multipotent progenitors, and the development of novel approaches to deliver these signals in vivo, are critical steps towards unlocking their regenerative therapeutic potential. Herein, we have identified a family of human cardiac endothelial intermediates located in outflow tract of the early human fetal hearts (OFT-ECs), characterized by coexpression of Isl1 and CD144/vWF. By comparing angiocrine factors expressed by the human OFT-ECs and non-cardiac ECs, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A was identified as the most abundantly expressed factor, and clonal assays documented its ability to drive endothelial specification of human embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived Isl1+ progenitors in a VEGF receptor-dependent manner. Human Isl1-ECs (endothelial cells differentiated from hESC-derived ISL1+ progenitors) resemble OFT-ECs in terms of expression of the cardiac endothelial progenitor- and endocardial cell-specific genes, confirming their organ specificity. To determine whether VEGF-A might serve as an in vivo cell-fate switch for human ESC-derived Isl1-ECs, we established a novel approach using chemically modified mRNA as a platform for transient, yet highly efficient expression of paracrine factors in cardiovascular progenitors. Overexpression of VEGF-A promotes not only the endothelial specification but also engraftment, proliferation and survival (reduced apoptosis) of the human Isl1+ progenitors in vivo. The large-scale derivation of cardiac-specific human Isl1-ECs from human pluripotent stem cells, coupled with the ability to drive endothelial specification, engraftment, and survival following transplantation, suggest a novel strategy for vascular regeneration in the heart.

  5. Establishment of human tumoral ependymal cell lines and coculture with tubular-like human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brisson, C; Lelong-Rebel, I; Mottolèse, C; Jouvet, A; Fèvre-Montange, M; Saint Pierre, G; Rebel, G; Belin, M F

    2002-10-01

    Ependymomas, rare neoplasms of the central nervous system, occur predominantly in children. They are highly vascularized, and histological findings show many perivascular rosettes of tumoral cells radially organized around capillaries. Treatment of ependymomas relies on surgery combined with radio- or chemotherapy, but the efficiency of chemotherapy is limited, probably because of their multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. Progress in the therapy of these neoplasms is dramatically limited by the absence of cell line models. We established conditions for the long-term culture of human tumoral ependymocytes and their 3D coculture in Matrigel with endothelial cells. Histological, immunological, and ultrastructural studies showed that the morphological features (microvilli, cilia, and caveolae) of these cultured cells were similar to those of the tumor in vivo. The cells expressed potential oncological markers related to the immature state of tumoral cells (nestin and Notch-1), their tumorigenicity [caveolae and epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGF-R)], or the MDR phenotype [P-glycoprotein (P-gp)]. The expression of P-gp, EGF-R, and caveolin-1 by these tumoral ependymocytes could be useful in studies on new drugs. This coculture model might represent a new powerful tool to study new therapeutic delivery strategies in tumoral cells.

  6. Suppression of endothelin-3-induced nitric oxide synthesis by triglyceride in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Minami, M; Yokokawa, K; Kohno, M; Yasunari, K; Yoshikawa, J

    1998-01-01

    Reduced endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) production characterizes several vascular diseases. This study examined the effect of triglyceride on NO production induced by endothelin-3 (ET-3) in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Triglyceride-rich human plasma obtained after a high-carbohydrate diet with white wine was used in an ex vivo study. The plasma triglyceride fraction was found to consist of large amounts of palmitic and oleic acids detected by gas-liquid chromatography. Therefore, the effect of synthetic tripalmitin and triolein emulsion on NO production was also examined. ET-3 stimulated NO and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production and increased cytosolic Ca2+ levels in the endothelial cells (ECs). After incubation of the ECs with the triglyceride-rich plasma for 2 h, these responses to ET-3 were ameliorated in a triglyceride concentration-dependent manner (50-200 mg/dl). A synthesized emulsion of tripalmitin (100 mg/dl) and triolein (100 mg/dl) also blunted the responses to ET-3. Neither endothelial constitutive NO synthase mRNA expression nor its protein level was affected by treatment with triglycerides. These results suggest that triglyceride suppresses ET-3-induced NO synthesis in human ECs by inhibiting cytosolic Ca2+ elevation.

  7. Bradykinin promotes vascular endothelial growth factor expression and increases angiogenesis in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsin-Shan; Wang, Shih-Wei; Chang, An-Chen; Tai, Huai-Ching; Yeh, Hung-I; Lin, Yu-Min; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-01-15

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in men and shows a tendency for metastasis to distant organs. Angiogenesis is required for metastasis. Bradykinin (BK) is an inflammatory mediator involved in tumor growth and metastasis, but its role in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and angiogenesis in human prostate cancer remains unknown. The aim of this study was to examine whether BK promotes prostate cancer angiogenesis via VEGF expression. We found that exogenous BK increased VEGF expression in prostate cancer cells and further promoted tube formation in endothelial progenitor cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Pretreatment of prostate cancer with B2 receptor antagonist or small interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced BK-mediated VEGF production. The Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways were activated after BK treatment, and BK-induced VEGF expression was abolished by the specific inhibitor and siRNA of the Akt and mTOR cascades. BK also promoted nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) activity. Importantly, BK knockdown reduced VEGF expression and abolished prostate cancer cell conditional medium-mediated angiogenesis. Taken together, these results indicate that BK operates through the B2 receptor, Akt, and mTOR, which in turn activate NF-κB and AP-1, activating VEGF expression and contributing to angiogenesis in human prostate cancer cells.

  8. Paracrine crosstalk between human hair follicle dermal papilla cells and microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bassino, Eleonora; Gasparri, Franco; Giannini, Valentina; Munaron, Luca

    2015-05-01

    Human follicle dermal papilla cells (FDPC) are a specialized population of mesenchymal cells located in the skin. They regulate hair follicle (HF) development and growth, and represent a reservoir of multipotent stem cells. Growing evidence supports the hypothesis that HF cycling is associated with vascular remodeling. Follicular keratinocytes release vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) that sustains perifollicular angiogenesis leading to an increase of follicle and hair size. Furthermore, several human diseases characterized by hair loss, including Androgenetic Alopecia, exhibit alterations of skin vasculature. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying HF vascularization remain largely unknown. In vitro coculture approaches can be successfully employed to greatly improve our knowledge and shed more light on this issue. Here we used Transwell-based co-cultures to show that FDPC promote survival, proliferation and tubulogenesis of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) more efficiently than fibroblasts. Accordingly, FDPC enhance the endothelial release of VEGF and IGF-1, two well-known proangiogenic growth factors. Collectively, our data suggest a key role of papilla cells in vascular remodeling of the hair follicle.

  9. Preeclampsia does not alter vascular growth and expression of CD31 and vascular endothelial cadherin in human placentas.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhao, Ying-Jie; Zou, Qing-Yun; Zhang, Kevin; Wu, Yan-Ming; Zhou, Chi; Wang, Kai; Zheng, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by maternal endothelial dysfunction (e.g., increased maternal vascular permeability caused by the disassembly of endothelial junction proteins). However, it is unclear if preeclampsia is associated with impaired vascular growth and expression of endothelial junction proteins in human placentas. Herein, we examined vascular growth in placentas from women with normal term (NT) and preeclamptic (PE) pregnancies using two endothelial junction proteins as endothelial markers: CD31 and vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-Cad). We also compared protein and mRNA expression of CD31 and VE-Cad between NT and PE placentas, and determined the alternatively spliced expression of CD31 using PCR. We found that CD31 and VE-Cad were immunolocalized predominantly in villous endothelial cells. However, capillary number density (total capillary number per unit villous area) and capillary area density (total capillary lumen area per unit villous area) as well as CD31 and VE-Cad protein and mRNA levels were similar between NT and PE placentas. PCR in combination with sequence analysis revealed a single, full-length CD31, suggesting that there are no alternatively spliced isoform of CD31 expressed in placentas. These data indicate that preeclampsia does not significantly affect vascular growth or the expression of endothelial junction proteins in human placentas. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Expression of Pax2 in Human Renal Tumor-Derived Endothelial Cells Sustains Apoptosis Resistance and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fonsato, Valentina; Buttiglieri, Stefano; Deregibus, Maria Chiara; Puntorieri, Valeria; Bussolati, Benedetta; Camussi, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    The transcription factor Pax2 is known to play a key role during renal development and to act as an oncogene favoring renal tumor growth. We recently showed that endothelial cells derived from human renal carcinomas display abnormal characteristics of survival and angiogenic properties. In the present study we found that renal tumor-derived endothelial cells, but not normal endothelial cells, expressed Pax2 protein and mRNA. To down-regulate Pax2 expression, we transfected tumor-derived endothelial cells with an anti-sense PAX2 vector whereas we transfected normal human microvascular endothelial cells with a sense PAX2 vector to induce Pax2 expression. The inhibition of Pax2 expression in tumor-derived endothelial cells induced an increase in tumor suppressor PTEN expression and a decrease in Akt phosphorylation. In addition, decreased apoptosis resistance, adhesion, invasion, and in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis were observed. Conversely, Pax2 induction in normal endothelial cells conferred to these cells a proinvasive, proangiogenic phenotype similar to that of tumor-derived endothelial cells. These results indicate that Pax2 is involved in renal tumor angiogenesis and its expression may antagonize that of the PTEN tumor suppressor gene, affecting the Akt-survival pathway and promoting angiogenesis. PMID:16436683

  11. Value of energy substrates in HTK and UW to protect human liver endothelial cells against ischemia and reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Hermann; Janssen, Petra H E; Broelsch, Christoph E

    2004-01-01

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) depletion is a major cause of cellular injury during ischemia and reperfusion in organ transplantation. Therefore, histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution (HTK; alpha-ketoglutarate) and University of Wisconsin solution (UW; adenosine) were supplied with energy substrates to achieve graft viability. Nevertheless, their efficacy for maintaining the ATP level, particularly in human liver endothelial cells, was uncertain. Furthermore, it is of interest whether a high ATP level is beneficial in human liver endothelial cell viability. We used human liver endothelial cells between the 3rd and 6th passages in a cell culture model. Human liver endothelial cells were exposed to hypothermic preservation (4 degrees C) in HTK and UW for 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h with subsequent reperfusion of 6 h. ATP and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured after each interval. In comparison to HTK, UW demonstrates a statistically significantly higher level of ATP after each interval of ischemia (p < 0.001) and reperfusion (p < 0.002). Additionally, UW-preserved human liver endothelial cells exceed the ATP level of the warm control during all intervals of ischemia. The loss of cell viability (LDH) was statistically significantly higher after ischemia (p < 0.01) and reperfusion (p < 0.01) in HTK than in UW except after the interval of 48 h. In conclusion, adenosine was more effective than alpha-ketoglutarate in maintaining a high ATP level in human liver endothelial cells after ischemia and reperfusion. Different pathways of energy substrate utilization were a contributing factor. The beneficial effect of the higher ATP level caused by adenosine to human liver endothelial cell viability was limited to 24 h of ischemia. Beyond this ischemia time we could not prove a favorable impact of adenosine on human liver endothelial cells.

  12. Endothelial progenitor cells from human fetal aorta cure diabetic foot in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wan-Ni; Xu, Shi-Qing; Liang, Jian-Feng; Peng, Liang; Liu, Hong-Lin; Wang, Zai; Fang, Qing; Wang, Meng; Yin, Wei-Qin; Zhang, Wen-Jian; Lou, Jin-Ning

    2016-12-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) can repair the arterial endothelium during vascular injury. However, a reliable source of human EPCs is needed for therapeutic applications. In this study, we isolated human fetal aorta (HFA)-derived EPCs and analyzed the capacity of EPCs to differentiate into endothelial cells. In addition, because microvascular dysfunction is considered to be the major cause of diabetic foot (DF), we investigated whether transplantation of HFA-derived EPCs could treat DF in a rat model. EPCs were isolated from clinically aborted fetal aorta. RT-PCR, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, immunofluorescence, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to examine the expressions of CD133, CD34, CD31, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 (VEGFR2), von Willebrand Factor (vWF), and Endothelial Leukocyte Adhesion Molecule-1 (ELAM-1). Morphology and Dil-uptake were used to assess function of the EPCs. We then established a DF model by injecting microcarriers into the hind-limb arteries of Goto-Kakizaki rats and then transplanting the cultured EPCs into the ischemic hind limbs. Thermal infrared imaging, oxygen saturation apparatus, and laser Doppler perfusion imaging were used to monitor the progression of the disease. Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine the microvascular tissue formed by HFA-derived EPCs. We found that CD133, CD34, and VEGFR2 were expressed by HFA-derived EPCs. After VEGF induction, CD133 expression was significantly decreased, but expression levels of vWF and ELAM-1 were markedly increased. Furthermore, tube formation and Dil-uptake were improved after VEGF induction. These observations suggest that EPCs could differentiate into endothelial cells. In the DF model, temperature, blood flow, and oxygen saturation were reduced but recovered to a nearly normal level following injection of the EPCs in the hind limb. Ischemic symptoms also improved. Injected EPCs were

  13. SIRT-1 and vascular endothelial dysfunction with ageing in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Donato, Anthony J; Magerko, Katherine A; Lawson, Brooke R; Durrant, Jessica R; Lesniewski, Lisa A; Seals, Douglas R

    2011-09-15

    We tested the hypothesis that reductions in the cellular deacetylase, sirtuin-1 (SIRT-1), contribute to vascular endothelial dysfunction with ageing via modulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) acetylation/activation-associated nitric oxide (NO) production. In older (30 months, n = 14) vs. young (5-7 months, n = 16) B6D2F1 mice, aortic protein expression of SIRT-1 and eNOS phosphorylated at serine 1177 were lower (both P < 0.05), and acetylated eNOS was 6-fold higher (P < 0.05), whereas total eNOS did not differ (P = 0.65). Acetylcholine (ACh)-induced peak endothelium-dependent dilatation (EDD) was lower in isolated femoral arteries with ageing (P < 0.001). Incubation with sirtinol, a SIRT-1 inhibitor, reduced EDD in both young and older mice, abolishing age-related differences, whereas co-administration with l-NAME, an eNOS inhibitor, further reduced EDD similarly in both groups. Endothelium-independent dilatation to sodium nitroprusside (EID), was not altered by age or sirtinol treatment. In older (64 ± 1 years, n = 22) vs. young (25 ± 1 years, n = 16) healthy humans, ACh-induced forearm EDD was impaired (P = 0.01) and SIRT-1 protein expression was 37% lower in endothelial cells obtained from the brachial artery (P < 0.05), whereas EID did not differ. In the overall group, EDD was positively related to endothelial cell SIRT-1 protein expression (r = 0.44, P < 0.01). Reductions in SIRT-1 may play an important role in vascular endothelial dysfunction with ageing. SIRT-1 may be a key therapeutic target to treat arterial ageing.

  14. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced immune activation in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Equils, O; Naiki, Y; Shapiro, A M; Michelsen, K; Lu, D; Adams, J; Jordan, S

    2006-01-01

    In addition to its well-known role in mineral and skeletal homeostasis, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3[1,25-(OH)2, D3] regulates the differentiation, growth and function of a broad range of immune system cells, including monocytes, dendritic cells, T and B lymphocytes. Vascular endothelial cells play a major role in the innate immune activation during infections, sepsis and transplant rejection; however, currently there are no data on the effect of 1,25-(OH)2 D3 on microbial antigen-induced endothelial cell activation. Here we show that 1,25-(OH)2 D3 pretreatment of human microvessel endothelial cells (HMEC) inhibited the enteric Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation of transcription factor NF-κB and interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and regulated upon activation normal T cell exposed and secreted (RANTES) release. The effect of 1,25-(OH)2 D3 was not due to increased cell death or inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. 1,25-(OH)2 D3 pretreatment of HMEC did not block MyD88-independent LPS-induced interferon (IFN)-β promoter activation. 1,25-(OH)2 D3 pretreatment of HMEC did not modulate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) or MD-2 expression. These data suggest that 1,25-(OH)2 D3 may play a role in LPS-induced immune activation of endothelial cells during Gram-negative bacterial infections, and a suggest a potential role for 1,25-(OH)2 D3 and its analogues as an adjuvant in the treatment of Gram-negative sepsis. PMID:16367934

  15. SIRT-1 and vascular endothelial dysfunction with ageing in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Anthony J; Magerko, Katherine A; Lawson, Brooke R; Durrant, Jessica R; Lesniewski, Lisa A; Seals, Douglas R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We tested the hypothesis that reductions in the cellular deacetylase, sirtuin-1 (SIRT-1), contribute to vascular endothelial dysfunction with ageing via modulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) acetylation/activation-associated nitric oxide (NO) production. In older (30 months, n = 14) vs. young (5–7 months, n = 16) B6D2F1 mice, aortic protein expression of SIRT-1 and eNOS phosphorylated at serine 1177 were lower (both P < 0.05), and acetylated eNOS was 6-fold higher (P < 0.05), whereas total eNOS did not differ (P = 0.65). Acetylcholine (ACh)-induced peak endothelium-dependent dilatation (EDD) was lower in isolated femoral arteries with ageing (P < 0.001). Incubation with sirtinol, a SIRT-1 inhibitor, reduced EDD in both young and older mice, abolishing age-related differences, whereas co-administration with l-NAME, an eNOS inhibitor, further reduced EDD similarly in both groups. Endothelium-independent dilatation to sodium nitroprusside (EID), was not altered by age or sirtinol treatment. In older (64 ± 1 years, n = 22) vs. young (25 ± 1 years, n = 16) healthy humans, ACh-induced forearm EDD was impaired (P = 0.01) and SIRT-1 protein expression was 37% lower in endothelial cells obtained from the brachial artery (P < 0.05), whereas EID did not differ. In the overall group, EDD was positively related to endothelial cell SIRT-1 protein expression (r = 0.44, P < 0.01). Reductions in SIRT-1 may play an important role in vascular endothelial dysfunction with ageing. SIRT-1 may be a key therapeutic target to treat arterial ageing. PMID:21746786

  16. Isoflurane protects against human endothelial cell apoptosis by inducing sphingosine kinase-1 via ERK MAPK.

    PubMed

    Bakar, Adnan M; Park, Sang Won; Kim, Mihwa; Lee, H Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a major clinical problem affecting virtually every patient requiring critical care. Volatile anesthetics are frequently used during the perioperative period and protect the heart and kidney against ischemia and reperfusion injury. We aimed to determine whether isoflurane, the most commonly used volatile anesthetic in the USA, protects against endothelial apoptosis and necrosis and the mechanisms involved in this protection. Human endothelial EA.hy926 cells were pretreated with isoflurane or carrier gas (95% room air + 5% CO(2)) then subjected to apoptosis with tumor necrosis factor-α or to necrosis with hydrogen peroxide. DNA laddering and in situ Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase Biotin-dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) staining determined EA.hy926 cell apoptosis and percent LDH released determined necrosis. We also determined whether isoflurane modulates the expression and activity of sphingosine kinase-1 (SK1) and induces the phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK MAPK) as both enzymes are known to protect against cell death. Isoflurane pretreatment significantly decreased apoptosis in EA.hy926 cells as evidenced by reduced TUNEL staining and DNA laddering without affecting necrosis. Mechanistically, isoflurane induces the phosphorylation of ERK MAPK and increased SK1 expression and activity in EA.hy926 cells. Finally, selective blockade of SK1 (with SKI-II) or S1P(1) receptor (with W146) abolished the anti-apoptotic effects of isoflurane. Taken together, we demonstrate that isoflurane, in addition to its potent analgesic and anesthetic properties, protects against endothelial apoptosis most likely via SK1 and ERK MAPK activation. Our findings have significant clinical implication for protection of endothelial cells during the perioperative period and patients requiring critical care.

  17. Niacin receptor activation improves human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hughes-Large, Jennifer M; Pang, Dominic K T; Robson, Debra L; Chan, Pak; Toma, Jelena; Borradaile, Nica M

    2014-12-01

    Niacin (nicotinic acid) as a monotherapy can reduce vascular disease risk, but its mechanism of action remains controversial, and may not be dependent on systemic lipid modifying effects. Niacin has recently been shown to improve endothelial function and vascular regeneration, independent of correcting dyslipidemia, in rodent models of vascular injury and metabolic disease. As a potential biosynthetic precursor for NAD(+), niacin could elicit these vascular benefits through NAD(+)-dependent, sirtuin (SIRT) mediated responses. Alternatively, niacin may act through its receptor, GPR109A, to promote endothelial function, though endothelial cells are not known to express this receptor. We hypothesized that niacin directly improves endothelial cell function during exposure to lipotoxic conditions and sought to determine the potential mechanism(s) involved. Angiogenic function in excess palmitate was assessed by tube formation following treatment of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) with either a relatively low concentration of niacin (10 μM), or nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) (1 μM), a direct NAD(+) precursor. Although both niacin and NMN improved HMVEC tube formation during palmitate overload, only NMN increased cellular NAD(+) and SIRT1 activity. We further observed that HMVEC express GRP109A. Activation of this receptor with either acifran or MK-1903 recapitulated niacin-induced improvements in HMVEC tube formation, while GPR109A siRNA diminished the effect of niacin. Niacin, at a low concentration, improves HMVEC angiogenic function under lipotoxic conditions, likely independent of NAD(+) biosynthesis and SIRT1 activation, but rather through niacin receptor activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcriptional regulation of the CRLR gene in human microvascular endothelial cells by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, Leonid L; Smith, Dave M; Bicknell, Roy; Rees, Margaret C P

    2003-08-01

    Adrenomedullin is a 52 amino acid peptide that shows a remarkable range of effects on the vasculature that include inter alia, vasodilatation, regulation of permeability, inhibition of endothelial cell apoptosis, and promotion of angiogenesis. Recently the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR), and receptor activity modifying proteins (RAMPs) have become recognized as integral components of the adrenomedullin signaling system. However, mechanisms of regulation of CRLR expression are still largely unknown. This is in part due to lack of information on the gene promoter. In this study we have determined the transcriptional start of human CRLR cDNA by 5'-RACE and cloned the proximal 5'-flanking region of the gene by PCR. The 2318 bp genomic fragment contains the basal promoter of human CRLR, including potential TATA-boxes and several GC boxes. Regulatory elements binding known transcription factors, such as Sp-1, Pit-1, glucocorticoid receptor, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1alpha) were also identified. When cloned into reporter gene vectors, the genomic fragment showed significant promoter activity, indicating that the 5'-flanking region isolated by PCR contains the gene promoter of human CRLR. Of significance is that the cloned promoter fragments were activated by hypoxia when transfected in primary microvascular endothelial cells. Site-directed mutagenesis of the consensus hypoxia-response element (HRE) in the 5'-flanking region abolished such a response. We also demonstrated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR that transcription of the gene is activated by hypoxia in microvascular endothelial cells. In contrast, expression of RAMPs 1, 2, and 3 was unaffected by low oxygen tension. We conclude that simultaneous transcriptional up-regulation of CRLR and its ligand adrenomedullin in endothelial cells could lead to a potent survival loop and therefore might play a significant role in vascular responses to hypoxia and ischemia.

  19. A novel adipocytokine, chemerin exerts anti-inflammatory roles in human vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamawaki, Hideyuki; Kameshima, Satoshi; Usui, Tatsuya; Okada, Muneyoshi; Hara, Yukio

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin is a novel adipocytokine with almost unknown function in vasculature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin activates Akt/eNOS/NO pathways in endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin inhibits TNF-induced VCAM-1 via suppressing NF-{kappa}B and p38 signal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemerin is anti-inflammatory through producing NO in vascular endothelium. -- Abstract: Chemerin is a recently identified adipocytokine which plays a role on inflammation and adipocytes metabolism. However, its function in vasculature is largely unknown. We examined the effects of chemerin on vascular endothelial inflammatory states. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with chemerin (300 ng/ml, 20 min) induced phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) and endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) (Ser1177). Consistently, chemerin increased intracellular cyclic GMP content. Pretreatment with chemerin (1-300 ng/ml, 24 h) significantly inhibited phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B p65 (Ser536) and p38 as well as vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 expression induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} (5 ng/ml, 20 min-6 h). Inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B or p38 significantly inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression. Chemerin also inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression in rat isolated aorta. Moreover, chemerin significantly inhibited monocytes adhesion to TNF-{alpha}-stimulated endothelial cells. The inhibitory effect of chemerin on TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 was reversed by a NOS inhibitor. Conversely, an NO donor, sodium nitroprusside significantly inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1. The present results for the first time demonstrate that chemerin plays anti-inflammatory roles by preventing TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocytes adhesion in vascular

  20. Metabolism of vasoactive peptides by human endothelial cells in culture. Angiotensin I converting enzyme (kininase II) and angiotensinase.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A R; Erdös, E G

    1977-04-01

    Cultured endothelial cells provide a model for the study of interactions of vasoactive peptides with endothelium. Endothelial cell cultured from veins of human umbilical cords contain both angiotensin I converting enzyme (kininase II) and angiotensinase activities. Intact monolayers of cells can both activate angiotensin I and inactivate bradykinin when the peptides are added to culture flasks in protein-free medium. Intact suspended cells or lysed cells convert angiotensin I to angiotensin II, inactivate bradykinin, and hydrolyze hippuryldiglycine to hippuric acid and diglycine. These actions are inhibited by SQ 20881, the specific inhibitor of converting enzyme. The kininase activity of endothelial cells was partially inhibited by antibody to human lung converting enzyme. Endothelial cells also inactivate longer analogs of bradykinin, such as kallidin, methionyl-lysyl bradykinin, and bradykinin coupled covalently to 500,000 mol wt dextran. The endothelial cells retained converting enzyme activity through four successive subcultures, indicating that the enzyme is synthesized by the cells surface, and it is apparently a marker for endothelial cells, since cultured human fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, and baby hamster kidney cells do not have it. Endothelial cells also contain an aminopheptidase which hydrolyzes both angiotensin II and the synthetic substrate, alpha-L-aspartyl beta-naphthylamide. The angiotensinase activity increased when the cells were lysed, which suggests that the enzyme is localized within the cells, Hydrolysis of both alpha-L-aspartyl beta-naphthylamide and angiotensin II was inhibited by omicron-phenanthroline, indicating that the enzyme is an A-tipe anigotensinase.

  1. The use of adipose mesenchymal stem cells and human umbilical vascular endothelial cells on a fibrin matrix for endothelialized skin substitute.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Muñoz, Isabel; Granados, Rosario; Holguín Holgado, Purificación; García-Vela, José Antonio; Casares, Celia; Casares, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the reconstruction of human skin by tissue engineering represents a clinical challenge and has offered a therapeutic alternative. Avascular engineered skin equivalents have been available for several years and used to treat wounds due to burns, nonhealing ulcers, and surgical excisions. They are constituted by different types of cultured cells included in a three-dimensional structure that permits cellular proliferation to create tissue substitutes. The major drawback of these artificial skin substitutes is their lack of blood supply, since the endurance and cell proliferation of the substitute depend on an adequate oxygen and nutrient supply and on toxin removal. These functions are served by the vascular system. We have produced a new model of endothelialized skin substitute that promotes the formation of capillary-like structures by seeding human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with dermal fibroblasts and human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs) in a fibrin matrix. Dermal fibroblasts and hADMSCs produce extracellular matrix that stimulates cellular growth and proliferation. hADMSCs secrete significant quantities of angiogenic and antiapoptotic factors (vascular endothelial growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor), which induce in vitro differentiation of these cells into endothelial cells promoting angiogenesis and participating in tissue repair and skin regeneration processes. We obtained the artificial skin substitute with similar structure to native skin, including dermis and epidermis. We demonstrated that endothelial cells (CD31 and von Willebrand factor positive) proliferated and organized themselves into capillary-like structures within the fibrin matrix. The epidermis showed a complete epithelization by squamous cells (AE1/AE3 cytokeratin positive) with intracytoplasmic keratohyalin granules, hyperkeratosis, and parakeratosis. We have established a novel artificial skin substitute that facilitates the formation

  2. Decellularized Human Kidney Cortex Hydrogels Enhance Kidney Microvascular Endothelial Cell Maturation and Quiescence.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Ryan J; Xu, Jin; Luo, Ping; Xue, Jun; Wang, Yi; Kotha, Surya; Zeng, Wen; Fu, Xiaoyun; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Zheng, Ying

    2016-10-01

    The kidney peritubular microvasculature is highly susceptible to injury from drugs and toxins, often resulting in acute kidney injury and progressive chronic kidney disease. Little is known about the process of injury and regeneration of human kidney microvasculature, resulting from the lack of appropriate kidney microvascular models that can incorporate the proper cells, extracellular matrices (ECMs), and architectures needed to understand the response and contribution of individual vascular components in these processes. In this study, we present methods to recreate the human kidney ECM (kECM) microenvironment by fabricating kECM hydrogels derived from decellularized human kidney cortex. The majority of native matrix proteins, such as collagen-IV, laminin, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, and their isoforms were preserved in similar proportions as found in normal kidneys. Human kidney peritubular microvascular endothelial cells (HKMECs) became more quiescent when cultured on this kECM gel compared with culture on collagen-I-assessed using phenotypic, genotypic, and functional assays; whereas human umbilical vein endothelial cells became stimulated on kECM gels. We demonstrate for the first time that human kidney cortex can form a hydrogel suitable for use in flow-directed microphysiological systems. Our findings strongly suggest that selecting the proper ECM is a critical consideration in the development of vascularized organs on a chip and carries important implications for tissue engineering of all vascularized organs.

  3. Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells to cells similar to cord-blood endothelial colony–forming cells

    PubMed Central

    Vemula, Sasidhar; Meador, Jonathan Luke; Yoshimoto, Momoko; Ferkowicz, Michael J; Fett, Alexa; Gupta, Manav; Rapp, Brian M; Saadatzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Ginsberg, Michael; Elemento, Olivier; Lee, Younghee; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Chung, Hyung Min; Hong, Ki Sung; Reid, Emma; O'Neill, Christina L; Medina, Reinhold J; Stitt, Alan W; Murphy, Michael P; Rafii, Shahin; Broxmeyer, Hal E; Yoder, Mervin C

    2015-01-01

    The ability to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells into endothelial cells with properties of cord-blood endothelial colony–forming cells (CB-ECFCs) may enable the derivation of clinically relevant numbers of highly proliferative blood vessel–forming cells to restore endothelial function in patients with vascular disease. We describe a protocol to convert human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) or embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into cells similar to CB-ECFCs at an efficiency of >108 ECFCs produced from each starting pluripotent stem cell. The CB-ECFC-like cells display a stable endothelial phenotype with high clonal proliferative potential and the capacity to form human vessels in mice and to repair the ischemic mouse retina and limb, and they lack teratoma formation potential. We identify Neuropilin-1 (NRP-1)-mediated activation of KDR signaling through VEGF165 as a critical mechanism for the emergence and maintenance of CB-ECFC-like cells. PMID:25306246

  4. Simulated hypogravity stimulates cell spreading and wound healing in cultured human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Y; Kabaeva, N; Buravkova, L

    2000-07-01

    It is well known that endothelial cells (EC) are highly sensitive to mechanical influences such as hemodynamic conditions or pulsatile stretch. However, it is still unknown, how endothelium responds to the changed gravity. The results of some studies suggest that cellular elements of vascular wall and, particularly, endothelium, may directly participate in development of physiological responces to microgravity. On our suggestion, this is extremely attractive since vascular endothelium is one of the main regulators of vascular tone (via its interaction with vascular smooth muscle cells) and, consequently, can play not last role in maintaining of normal cardiovascular system operation in microgravity. On the other hand, the endothelium itself may be regarded as a widely dispersed organ of approximately 1.5 kg in weight (in the adult human organism). Finally, endothelium is not just a passive barrier between vascular wall and circulating blood but synthesizes, metabolizes, and releases a substances which act on adjacent cell systems or distant cell structures. The main aims of this study were: 1) the development of experimental model, allowing to study functional parameters of human endothelial cells in hypogravity conditions in vitro; 2) the verification of endothelial sensitivity to gravitational micro-environment.

  5. Protective effects of aspirin against oxidized LDL-induced inflammatory protein expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinjing; Qi, Ruomei; Li, Rui; Wu, Wei; Gao, Xin; Bao, Li; Lu, Shuzheng

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex vascular inflammatory disease. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is directly associated with chronic vascular inflammation. In this study, we hypothesized that nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibitor aspirin might affect the ox-LDL-induced inflammatory responses on human endothelial cells. To test this assumption, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression, IkappaB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation were determined in endothelial cells exposed to ox-LDL in the presence of aspirin. The results showed that aspirin significantly suppressed COX-2 and ICAM-1 expression induced by ox-LDL and also inhibited IkappaB phosphorylation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Moreover, aspirin reduced the level of p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Our findings suggest that aspirin can decrease inflammatory responses induced by ox-LDL, and the mechanism might be associated with NF-kappaB activation pathway and inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation.

  6. Conjugated linoleic acid isomers may diminish human macrophages adhesion to endothelial surface.

    PubMed

    Stachowska, Ewa; Siennicka, Aldona; Baśkiewcz-Hałasa, Magdalena; Bober, Joanna; Machalinski, Boguslaw; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2012-02-01

    Dysfunction of endothelial cells and activation of monocytes in the vascular wall are important pathogenetic factors of atherosclerosis. Conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) can modulate the function of immune system in humans: reduce the concentration of atherogenic lipoproteins, and the intensity of inflammatory processes in the plasma. In this paper, we focus on macrophage's surface integrins (β1 integrin CD49d/CD29-(VLA4); Mac-1 as well as endothelial human vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) surface adhesins: vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)) expression in relation to CLA isomer used during cell culture. Both CLA isomers decreased expression of VLA-4 and Mac-1 on macrophages compared with control cells (cultured with bovine serum albumine (BSA) or oxidized form of low-density lipoproteins). cis-9, trans-11 CLA isomer reduced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression on the endothelium surface. Strong tendency to reduce of adhesion of macrophages to HUVEC in the cells cultured with CLA isomers was observed. The potential role of cis-9, trans-11 CLA in the reduction of adhesion of macrophages to the HUVEC--one of the important steps in the inflammatory process, can be considerate. These mechanisms may contribute to the potent anti-atherosclerotic effects of CLA in vivo.

  7. Upregulation of functionally active vascular endothelial growth factor by human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Barbara; Schaarschmidt, Peter; Bossert, Andrea; Lüske, Anke; Finkenzeller, Günter; Mertens, Thomas; Michel, Detlef

    2005-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is known to modulate host gene expression and has been linked to the pathogenesis of vasculopathies; however, relevant pathomechanisms are still unclear. It was shown that HCMV infection leads to upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in human foreskin fibroblasts and coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMC). Activation of VEGF transcription by HCMV infection was confirmed by transient-expression experiments, which revealed that a short promoter fragment, pLuc135 (-85 to +50), is sufficient for activation. Site-directed mutagenesis of Sp1-recognition sites within this fragment abolished the upregulation of transcription. Functional VEGF protein is released into the culture supernatant of infected SMC. Incubation of endothelial cells with supernatants from HCMV-infected SMC cultures induced upregulation of VEGF receptor-2 expression on endothelial cells, as well as a significant upregulation of DNA synthesis, implicating cell proliferation. The mean incline of DNA synthesis at 48 and 72 h post-infection was 148 and 197 %, respectively. Addition of neutralizing antibodies against VEGF completely abolished this effect. Supernatants from SMC cultures incubated with UV-inactivated virus induced a comparable effect. This virus-induced paracrine effect may represent a molecular mechanism for HCMV-induced pathogenesis, such as inflammatory vasculopathies, by inducing a proatherogenic phenotype in SMC.

  8. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Platelet (PF-4) Factor 4 Inputs Modulate Human Microvascular Endothelial Signaling in a Three-Dimensional Matrix Migration Context*

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Ta-Chun; Tedford, Nathan C.; Reddy, Raven J.; Rimchala, Tharathorn; Wells, Alan; White, Forest M.; Kamm, Roger D.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The process of angiogenesis is under complex regulation in adult organisms, particularly as it often occurs in an inflammatory post-wound environment. As such, there are many impacting factors that will regulate the generation of new blood vessels which include not only pro-angiogenic growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor, but also angiostatic factors. During initial postwound hemostasis, a large initial bolus of platelet factor 4 is released into localized areas of damage before progression of wound healing toward tissue homeostasis. Because of its early presence and high concentration, the angiostatic chemokine platelet factor 4, which can induce endothelial anoikis, can strongly affect angiogenesis. In our work, we explored signaling crosstalk interactions between vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet factor 4 using phosphotyrosine-enriched mass spectrometry methods on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells cultured under conditions facilitating migratory sprouting into collagen gel matrices. We developed new methods to enable mass spectrometry-based phosphorylation analysis of primary cells cultured on collagen gels, and quantified signaling pathways over the first 48 h of treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor in the presence or absence of platelet factor 4. By observing early and late signaling dynamics in tandem with correlation network modeling, we found that platelet factor 4 has significant crosstalk with vascular endothelial growth factor by modulating cell migration and polarization pathways, centered around P38α MAPK, Src family kinases Fyn and Lyn, along with FAK. Interestingly, we found EphA2 correlational topology to strongly involve key migration-related signaling nodes after introduction of platelet factor 4, indicating an influence of the angiostatic factor on this ambiguous but generally angiogenic signal in this complex environment. PMID:24023389

  9. Venlafaxine protects methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis in the cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qinghua; Gu, Chengyao; Chen, Caijing

    2014-05-21

    It was reported that venlafaxine protects microvascular endothelial cells injury in several models. But the mechanisms of venlafaxine protects cell injury still poor understanding. Here, we shows that in the cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), we found that venlafaxine protects methylglyoxal (MGO)-induced cell injury, and the venlafaxine significant reduction in the level of reactive oxygen species, down-regulated expression of pro-apoptotic activated caspase-3 and Bax, increased BDNF release and expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 in the cultured HBMEC. Furthermore, we found that venlafaxine inhibits MGO-induced phosphorylation of JNK. Moreover, venlafaxine increased AKT phosphorylation and the protective effects of venlafaxine was inhibited by PI3K/AKT inhibitor. These findings suggest that venlafaxine protects MGO-induced HBMEC injury through PI3K/AKT and JNK pathway as the potential underlying mechanisms of HBMEC injury in diabetes.

  10. Magnetic particle spectroscopy allows precise quantification of nanoparticles after passage through human brain microvascular endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, C.; Slabu, I.; Wiekhorst, F.; Bergemann, C.; von Eggeling, F.; Hochhaus, A.; Trahms, L.; Clement, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Crossing the blood-brain barrier is an urgent requirement for the treatment of brain disorders. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are a promising tool as carriers for therapeutics because of their physical properties, biocompatibility, and their biodegradability. In order to investigate the interaction of nanoparticles with endothelial cell layers in detail, in vitro systems are of great importance. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells are a well-suited blood-brain barrier model. Apart from generating optimal conditions for the barrier-forming cell units, the accurate detection and quantification of SPIONs is a major challenge. For that purpose we use magnetic particle spectroscopy to sensitively and directly quantify the SPION-specific iron content. We could show that SPION concentration depends on incubation time, nanoparticle concentration and location. This model system allows for further investigations on particle uptake and transport at cellular barriers with regard to parameters including particles’ shape, material, size, and coating.

  11. Therapeutic transdifferentiation of human fibroblasts into endothelial cells using forced expression of lineage-specific transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wing Tak; Cooke, John P

    2016-01-01

    Transdifferentiation is the direct conversion from one somatic cell type into another desired somatic cell type. This reprogramming method offers an attractive approach for regenerative medicine. Here, we demonstrate that neonatal fibroblasts can be transdifferentiated into endothelial cells using only four endothelial transcription factors, namely, ETV2, FLI1, GATA2, and KLF4. We observed a significant up-regulation of endothelial genes including KDR, CD31, CD144, and vWF in human neonatal foreskin (BJ) fibroblasts infected with the lentiviral construct encoding the open reading frame of the four transcription factors. We observed morphological changes in BJ fibroblasts from the fibroblastic spindle shape into a more endothelial-like cobblestone structures. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed that ~16% of the infected cells with the lentiviral constructs encoding 4F expressed CD31. The sorted cells were allowed to expand for 2 weeks and these cells were immunostained and found to express endothelial markers CD31. The induced endothelial cells also incorporated fluorescence-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein and efficiently formed capillary-like networks when seeded on Matrigel. These results suggested that the induced endothelial cells were functional in vitro. Taken together, we successfully demonstrated the direct conversion of human neonatal fibroblasts into endothelial cells by transduction of lentiviral constructs encoding endothelial lineage-specific transcription factors ETV2, FLI1, GATA2, and KLF4. The directed differentiation of fibroblasts into endothelial cells may have significant utility in diseases characterized by fibrosis and loss of microvasculature.

  12. SOX17 Regulates Conversion of Human Fibroblasts Into Endothelial Cells and Erythroblasts by Dedifferentiation Into CD34(+) Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianghui; Jambusaria, Ankit; Hong, Zhigang; Marsboom, Glenn; Toth, Peter T; Herbert, Brittney-Shea; Malik, Asrar B; Rehman, Jalees

    2017-06-20

    The mechanisms underlying the dedifferentiation and lineage conversion of adult human fibroblasts into functional endothelial cells have not yet been fully defined. Furthermore, it is not known whether fibroblast dedifferentiation recapitulates the generation of multipotent progenitors during embryonic development, which give rise to endothelial and hematopoietic cell lineages. Here we established the role of the developmental transcription factor SOX17 in regulating the bilineage conversion of fibroblasts by the generation of intermediate progenitors. CD34(+) progenitors were generated after the dedifferentiation of human adult dermal fibroblasts by overexpression of pluripotency transcription factors. Sorted CD34(+) cells were transdifferentiated into induced endothelial cells and induced erythroblasts using lineage-specific growth factors. The therapeutic potential of the generated cells was assessed in an experimental model of myocardial infarction. Induced endothelial cells expressed specific endothelial cell surface markers and also exhibited the capacity for cell proliferation and neovascularization. Induced erythroblasts expressed erythroid surface markers and formed erythroid colonies. Endothelial lineage conversion was dependent on the upregulation of the developmental transcription factor SOX17, whereas suppression of SOX17 instead directed the cells toward an erythroid fate. Implantation of these human bipotential CD34(+) progenitors into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD-SCID) mice resulted in the formation of microvessels derived from human fibroblasts perfused with mouse and human erythrocytes. Endothelial cells generated from human fibroblasts also showed upregulation of telomerase. Cell implantation markedly improved vascularity and cardiac function after myocardial infarction without any evidence of teratoma formation. Dedifferentiation of fibroblasts to intermediate CD34(+) progenitors gives rise to endothelial cells and

  13. Neuregulin1-β decreases IL-1β-induced neutrophil adhesion to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Limin; Walas, Samantha; Leung, Wendy; Sykes, David B; Wu, Jiang; Lo, Eng H; Lok, Josephine

    2015-04-01

    Neuroinflammation contributes to the pathophysiology of diverse diseases including stroke, traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis, resulting in neurodegeneration and loss of neurological function. The response of the microvascular endothelium often contributes to neuroinflammation. One such response is the upregulation of endothelial adhesion molecules which facilitate neutrophil adhesion to the endothelium and their migration from blood to tissue. Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) is an endogenous growth factor which has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects in experimental stroke models. We hypothesized that NRG1 would decrease the endothelial response to inflammation and result in a decrease in neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells. We tested this hypothesis in an in vitro model of cytokine-induced endothelial injury, in which human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) were treated with IL-1β, along with co-incubation with vehicle or NRG1-β. Outcome measures included protein levels of endothelial ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin, as well as the number of neutrophils that adhere to the endothelial monolayer. Our data show that NRG1-β decreased the levels of VCAM-1, E-selectin, and neutrophil adhesion to brain microvascular endothelial cells activated by IL1-β. These findings open new possibilities for investigating NRG1 in neuroprotective strategies in brain injury.

  14. Neuregulin1-β decreases IL-1β-induced neutrophil adhesion to human brain microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Limin; Walas, Samantha; Leung, Wendy; Sykes, David B.; Wu, Jiang; Lo, Eng H.; Lok, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation contributes to the pathophysiology of diverse diseases including stroke, traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, and multiple sclerosis, resulting in neurodegeneration and loss of neurological function. The response of the microvascular endothelium often contributes to neuroinflammation. One such response is the up-regulation of endothelial adhesion molecules which facilitate neutrophil adhesion to the endothelium and their migration from blood to tissue. Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) is an endogenous growth factor which has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects in experimental stroke models. We hypothesized that NRG1 would decrease the endothelial response to inflammation, and result in a decrease in neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells. We tested this hypothesis in an in-vitro model of cytokine-induced endothelial injury, in which human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) were treated with IL-1β, along with co-incubation with vehicle or NRG1-β. Outcome measures included protein levels of endothelial ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin; as well as the number of neutrophils that adhere to the endothelial monolayer. Our data show that NRG1-β decreased the levels of VCAM-1, E-selectin, and neutrophil adhesion to brain microvascular endothelial cells activated by IL1-β. These findings open new possibilities for investigating NRG1 in neuroprotective strategies in brain injury. PMID:24863743

  15. Efficient nanoparticle mediated sustained RNA interference in human primary endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukerjee, Anindita; Shankardas, Jwalitha; Ranjan, Amalendu P.; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.

    2011-11-01

    Endothelium forms an important target for drug and/or gene therapy since endothelial cells play critical roles in angiogenesis and vascular functions and are associated with various pathophysiological conditions. RNA mediated gene silencing presents a new therapeutic approach to overcome many such diseases, but the major challenge of such an approach is to ensure minimal toxicity and effective transfection efficiency of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to primary endothelial cells. In the present study, we formulated shAnnexin A2 loaded poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles which produced intracellular small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Annexin A2 and brought about the downregulation of Annexin A2. The per cent encapsulation of the plasmid within the nanoparticle was found to be 57.65%. We compared our nanoparticle based transfections with Lipofectamine mediated transfection, and our studies show that nanoparticle based transfection efficiency is very high (~97%) and is more sustained compared to conventional Lipofectamine mediated transfections in primary retinal microvascular endothelial cells and human cancer cell lines. Our findings also show that the shAnnexin A2 loaded PLGA nanoparticles had minimal toxicity with almost 95% of cells being viable 24 h post-transfection while Lipofectamine based transfections resulted in only 30% viable cells. Therefore, PLGA nanoparticle based transfection may be used for efficient siRNA transfection to human primary endothelial and cancer cells. This may serve as a potential adjuvant treatment option for diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and age related macular degeneration besides various cancers.

  16. Klotho modulates FGF23-mediated NO synthesis and oxidative stress in human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Richter, Beatrice; Haller, Jacqueline; Haffner, Dieter; Leifheit-Nestler, Maren

    2016-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a state of Klotho deficiency and excess of the phosphaturic hormone fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). Both dysregulations were shown to be associated with endothelial dysfunction in humans, but direct vascular effects of FGF23 remain largely elusive. In vitro experiments were performed to assess the effects of FGF23 (10 ng/mL) in relation to its co-receptor Klotho on nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and detoxification in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC). Membrane-bound Klotho is expressed in HCAEC, and FGF23 increases the expression of the Klotho shedding protease ADAM17, and consequently the secretion of soluble Klotho. FGF23 activates FGF receptor 1 and stimulates NO release via Akt-dependent activation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Both FGF receptor (FGFR)-dependent ROS formation via activation of NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2) as well as ROS degradation via superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and catalase (CAT) is stimulated by FGF23. Pre-incubation with a Klotho inhibitor blunts the FGF23-stimulated Akt-eNOS activation and NO synthesis, and decreases ROS degradation by blocking SOD2 and CAT enzymes, whereas FGF23-stimulated ROS synthesis via Nox2 is unaffected, resulting in low NO bioavailability and increased oxidative stress. Our data indicate that in the presence of Klotho, FGF23 induces NO release in HCAEC and its stimulating effects on ROS production are counterbalanced by increased ROS degradation. In states of Klotho deficiency, e.g., CKD, FGF23-mediated NO synthesis is blunted and ROS formation overrules ROS degradation. Thus, FGF23 excess may primarily promote oxidative stress and thus endothelial dysfunction.

  17. Glucosamine exposure reduces proteoglycan synthesis in primary human endothelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Reine, Trine M.; Jenssen, Trond Geir; Kolset, Svein Olav

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Glucosamine (GlcN) supplements are promoted for medical reasons, for example, for patients with arthritis and other joint-related diseases. Oral intake of GlcN is followed by uptake in the intestine, transport in the circulation and thereafter delivery to chondrocytes. Here, it is postulated to have an effect on synthesis and turnover of extracellular matrix constituents expressed by these cells. Following uptake in the intestine, serum levels are transiently increased, and the endothelium is exposed to increased levels of GlcN. We investigated the possible effects of GlcN on synthesis of proteoglycans (PGs), an important matrix component, in primary human endothelial cells. Methods Primary human endothelial cells were cultured in vitro in medium with 5 mM glucose and 0–10 mM GlcN. PGs were recovered and analysed by western blotting, or by SDS-PAGE, gel chromatography or ion-exchange chromatography of 35S-PGs after 35S-sulphate labelling of the cells. Results The synthesis and secretion of 35S-PGs from cultured endothelial cells were reduced in a dose- and time-dependent manner after exposure to GlcN. PGs are substituted with sulphated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains, vital for PG function. The reduction in 35S-PGs was not related to an effect on GAG chain length, number or sulphation, but rather to the total expression of PGs. Conclusion Exposure of endothelial cells to GlcN leads to a general decrease in 35S-PG synthesis. These results suggest that exposure to high levels of GlcN can lead to decreased matrix synthesis, contrary to what has been claimed by supporters of such supplements. PMID:27667774

  18. Aging-related changes in oxidative stress response of human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Conti, Valeria; Corbi, Graziamaria; Simeon, Vittorio; Russomanno, Giusy; Manzo, Valentina; Ferrara, Nicola; Filippelli, Amelia

    2015-08-01

    Oxidative stress is strongly associated with aging and age-related diseases and plays a crucial role in endothelial dysfunction development. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of aging and stress response in humans, we examined changes to young and older human endothelial cells over time (72, 96 and 120 h), before and after H2O2-induced stress. We measured the expression of the deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and its transcriptional target Forkhead box O3a (Foxo3a); TBARS, a well-known marker of overall oxidative stress, and catalase activity as index of antioxidation. Moreover, we quantified levels of cellular senescence by senescence-associated β galactosidase (SA-βgal) assay. Under oxidative stress induction older cells showed a progressive decrease of Sirt1 and Foxo3a expression, persistently high TBARS levels with high, but ineffective Cat activity to counteract such levels. In addition cellular senescence drastically increased in older cells compared with Young cells both in presence and in the absence of oxidative stress. By following the cell behavior during the time course, we can hypothesize that while in young cells an oxidative stress induction stimulated an adequate response through activation of molecular factor crucial to counteract oxidative stress, the older cells are not able to adequately adapt themselves to external stress stimuli. During their life, endothelial cells impair the ability to defend themselves from oxidative stress stimuli. This dysfunction involves the pathway of Sirt1 a critical regulator of oxidative stress response and cellular lifespan, underlining its crucial role in endothelial homeostasis control during aging and age-associated diseases.

  19. Actions of serum and plasma albumin on intracellular Ca2+ in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, E; Nadal, A; Jacob, R; McNaughton, P

    1997-01-01

    1. The effects of serum and plasma albumin on [Ca2+]i in human endothelial cells were examined using single-cell Ca2+ imaging. Two types of endothelial cell were used: human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in primary culture, and the endothelial-derived cell line ECV304. 2. Serum albumin caused a large and transient rise in [Ca2+]i, due to Ca2+ release from an IP3-sensitive internal store, followed by a maintained elevation in [Ca2+]i attributable to Ca2+ influx from the external medium. A half-maximal rise in [Ca2+]i was produced by a concentration of serum albumin of about 1 microgram ml-1. 3. The Ca(2+)-releasing action of serum albumin is abolished by methanol extraction and is therefore attributable to an attached polar lipid. A possible candidate is lysophosphatidic acid, known to be released from platelets during blood coagulation, which produced similar effects to those of serum albumin. 4. In HUVEC, plasma albumin caused a sustained decrease in [Ca2+]i from the mean resting level of 114 nM to 58 nM. No effect of plasma albumin was observed in ECV304 cells. 5. The decrease in [Ca2+]i caused by plasma albumin is due to an uptake into intracellular stores. The store loading substantially potentiates the action of Ca(2+)-releasing agonists such as histamine. 6. The results show that normal plasma albumin, which carries few lipids, lowers [Ca2+]i and potentiates the actions of Ca(2+)-releasing agonists by promoting Ca2+ uptake into intracellular stores. When converted to the serum form, by binding lysophosphatidic acid released during blood coagulation, albumin has a potent effect in elevating [Ca2+]i. Blood coagulation may therefore play a role in regulating vascular tone and capillary permeability. PMID:9365906

  20. Human cytomegalovirus tropism for endothelial/epithelial cells: scientific background and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Revello, M Grazia; Gerna, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has been routinely isolated from and propagated in vitro in human embryonic lung fibroblast (HELF) cell cultures, while in vivo it is known to infect predominantly endothelial and epithelial cells. In recent years, genetic determinants of the HCMV tropism for endothelial/epithelial cells were identified in the UL131A/UL130/UL128 locus of HCMV genome of wild-type strains. UL131A-UL128 gene products form a complex with glycoprotein H (gH) and L (gL) resulting in a gH/gL/UL131A-UL128 complex that is required for HCMV entry into endothelial/epithelial cells. In contrast, virus entry into fibroblasts has its genetic determinants in the complex gH/gL/gO (or gH/gL). During primary HCMV infection, the neutralising antibody response measured in endothelial cells (EC) is potent, occurs very early and is directed mostly against combinations of two or three gene products of the UL131A-128 locus. On the contrary, neutralising antibodies measured in fibroblasts appear late, are relatively weak in potency and are directed against gH and gB. The T-cell immune response to UL131A-UL128 gene products remains to be investigated. Recently, a role has been proposed for neutralising antibody in conferring prevention/protection against HCMV infection/disease in pregnant women with primary HCMV infection. However, the level of cooperation between humoral immunity and the well-established T-cell protection remains to be defined.

  1. Effect of Thrombus Composition and Viscosity on Sonoreperfusion Efficacy in a Model of Micro-Vascular Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Black, John J; Yu, Francois T H; Schnatz, Rick G; Chen, Xucai; Villanueva, Flordeliza S; Pacella, John J

    2016-09-01

    Distal embolization of micro-thrombi during stenting for myocardial infarction causes micro-vascular obstruction (MVO). We have previously shown that sonoreperfusion (SRP), a microbubble (MB)-mediated ultrasound (US) therapy, resolves MVO from venous micro-thrombi in vitro in saline. However, blood is more viscous than saline, and arterial thrombi that embolize during stenting are mechanically distinct from venous clot. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that MVO created with arterial micro-thrombi are more resistant to SRP therapy compared with venous micro-thrombi, and higher viscosity further increases the US requirement for effective SRP in an in vitro model of MVO. Lipid MBs suspended in plasma with adjusted viscosity (1.1 cP or 4.0 cP) were passed through tubing bearing a mesh with 40-μm pores to simulate a micro-vascular cross-section; upstream pressure reflected thrombus burden. To simulate MVO, the mesh was occluded with either arterial or venous micro-thrombi to increase upstream pressure to 40 mmHg ± 5 mmHg. Therapeutic long-tone-burst US was delivered to the occluded area for 20 min. MB activity was recorded with a passive cavitation detector. MVO caused by arterial micro-thrombi at either blood or plasma viscosity resulted in less effective SRP therapy compared to venous thrombi. Higher viscosity further reduced the effectiveness of SRP therapy. The passive cavitation detector showed a decrease in inertial cavitation when viscosity was increased, while stable cavitation was affected in a more complex manner. Overall, these data suggest that arterial thrombi may require higher acoustic pressure US than venous thrombi to achieve similar SRP efficacy; increased viscosity decreases SRP efficacy; and both inertial and stable cavitation are implicated in observed SRP efficacy.

  2. Targeting the Ultra-structural and Micro-vascular Origins of Field Carcinogenesis Using Enhanced Backscattering Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radosevich, Andrew J.

    When thinking about cancerous tissue morphology, many times what comes to mind is a large growth of abnormal tissue that is somewhere between tens of microns and tens of centimeters in size. While these large scale changes are the most dramatic manifestation of cancer morphology, they exemplify only the final steps of a protracted process that may have taken course over multiple decades. On the other end of this process, the earliest and most subtle stages of cancer development are well-described under the concept of field carcinogenesis: the idea that a number of genetic/epigenetic changes located throughout an organ lead to ultra-structural and micro-vascular changes that create a 'fertile field' from which future cancer growth can emerge. The implications of field carcinogenesis are two-fold: First, it provides a glimpse into cancer development at the earliest stages possible. Such information can form a basis from which later cancer stages can be better understood. Second, it can be exploited to detect the presence of cancer at early time-points where prognosis is vastly improved. Given that many of the changes in field carcinogenesis are smaller than the diffraction limit of light, the tissue appears microscopically normal. Thus, in order to optically detect such changes, sophisticated instrumentation and analysis methods are needed. In this work, we review the use of enhanced backscattering (EBS) spectroscopy for targeting the ultra-structural and micro-vascular alterations associated with field carcinogenesis. We begin with a review of the optically-relevant changes occurring in field carcinogenesis and how they give rise to the scattering and absorbing signal observed in EBS. Next, we detail the experimental and numerical methods used to accurately measure and simulate EBS. Finally, we conclude with a discussion of the location and nature of the changes measured ex-vivo and a confirmation of the diagnostic potential for in-vivo application.

  3. Fc gamma receptor IIb participates in maternal IgG trafficking of human placental endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    ISHIKAWA, TOMOKO; TAKIZAWA, TAKAMI; IWAKI, JUN; MISHIMA, TAKUYA; UI-TEI, KUMIKO; TAKESHITA, TOSHIYUKI; MATSUBARA, SHIGEKI; TAKIZAWA, TOSHIHIRO

    2015-01-01

    The human placental transfer of maternal IgG is crucial for fetal and newborn immunity. Low-affinity immunoglobulin gamma Fc region receptor IIb2 (FCGR2B2 or FcγRIIb2) is exclusively expressed in an IgG-containing, vesicle-like organelle (the FCGR2B2 compartment) in human placental endothelial cells; thus, we hypothesized that the FCGR2B2 compartment functions as an IgG transporter. In this study, to examine this hypothesis, we performed in vitro bio-imaging analysis of IgG trafficking by FCGR2B2 compartments using human umbilical vein endothelial cells transfected with a plasmid vector containing enhanced GFP-tagged FCGR2B2 (pFCGR2B2-EGFP). FCGR2B2-EGFP signals were detected as intracellular vesicular structures similar to FCGR2B2 compartments in vivo. The internalization and transcytosis of IgG was significantly higher in the pFCGR2B2-EGFP-transfected cells than in the mock-transfected cells, and the majority of the internalized IgG was co-localized with the FCGR2B2-EGFP signals. Furthermore, we isolated FCGR2B2 compartments from the human placenta and found that the Rab family of proteins [RAS-related protein Rab family (RABs)] were associated with FCGR2B2 compartments. Among the RABs, RAB3D was expressed predominantly in placental endothelial cells. The downregulation of RAB3D by small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in a marked reduction in the FCGR2B2-EGFP signals at the cell periphery. Taken together, these findings suggest that FCGR2B2 compartments participate in the transcytosis of maternal IgG across the human placental endothelium and that RAB3D plays a role in regulating the intracellular dynamics of FCGR2B2 compartments. PMID:25778799

  4. Phentolamine inhibits angiogenesis in vitro: Suppression of proliferation migration and differentiation of human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Liangli; Liu, Chenyang; Kong, Yanan; Piao, Zhengguo; Cheng, Biao

    2016-06-16

    It is widely known that the β-adrenergic receptor (AR) blocker (propranolol) inhibits human endothelial cell (EC) angiogenesis in vitro, but how the α-AR antagonist (phentolamine) affects human EC angiogenesis has not yet been studied. Here, we show for the first time that both human dermal microvascular ECs (HDMECs) and human brain microvascular ECs (HBMECs) express α-ARs. Moreover, our results indicate that phentolamine inhibits the proliferation, migration, and tubulogenesis of HDMECs and HBMECs. Finally, VEGFR-2 and Ang1/2 expression of HDMECs was suppressed by phentolamine. Together, these results indicate that phentolamine impairs several critical events of neovascularization, and α-ARs, as well as the VEGF/VEGFR-2 and Ang/Tie-2 signaling pathways, may be involved in these processes. Our results suggest a novel therapeutic strategy for the use of α-blockers in the treatment of human angiogenesis-dependent diseases.

  5. Signatures of anthocyanin metabolites identified in humans inhibit biomarkers of vascular inflammation in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Emily F.; Smith, Michael J.; Zhang, Qingzhi; Raheem, K. Saki; O'Hagan, David; O'Connell, Maria A.

    2017-01-01

    Scope The physiological relevance of contemporary cell culture studies is often perplexing, given the use of unmetabolized phytochemicals at supraphysiological concentrations. We investigated the activity of physiologically relevant anthocyanin metabolite signatures, derived from a previous pharmacokinetics study of 500 mg 13C5‐cyanidin‐3‐glucoside in eight healthy participants, on soluble vascular adhesion molecule‐1 (VCAM‐1) and interleukin‐6 (IL‐6) in human endothelial cells. Methods and results Signatures of peak metabolites (previously identified at 1, 6, and 24 h post‐bolus) were reproduced using pure standards and effects were investigated across concentrations ten‐fold lower and higher than observed mean (<5 μM) serum levels. Tumor necrosis factor‐α (TNF‐α)‐stimulated VCAM‐1 was reduced in response to all treatments, with maximal effects observed for the 6 and 24 h profiles. Profiles tested at ten‐fold below mean serum concentrations (0.19–0.44 μM) remained active. IL‐6 was reduced in response to 1, 6, and 24 h profiles, with maximal effects observed for 6 h and 24 h profiles at concentrations above 2 μM. Protein responses were reflected by reductions in VCAM‐1 and IL‐6 mRNA, however there was no effect on phosphorylated NFκB‐p65 expression. Conclusion Signatures of anthocyanin metabolites following dietary consumption reduce VCAM‐1 and IL‐6 production, providing evidence of physiologically relevant biological activity. PMID:28457017

  6. Establishment of a new conditionally immortalized human skeletal muscle microvascular endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Sano, Hironori; Sano, Yasuteru; Ishiguchi, Eri; Shimizu, Fumitaka; Omoto, Masatoshi; Maeda, Toshihiko; Nishihara, Hideaki; Takeshita, Yukio; Takahashi, Shiori; Oishi, Mariko; Kanda, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    In skeletal muscle, the capillaries have tight junctions (TJs) that are structurally similar to those in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-nerve barrier (BNB). Although many findings have been clarified in the territory of BBB and BNB, few have so far examined the TJs of capillaries in the skeletal muscle. In addition, no in vitro human skeletal muscle microvasculature models have been reported thus far. We newly established a new human skeletal muscle microvascular endothelial cell (HSMMEC) line. HSMMECs were isolated from human skeletal muscle and were infected with retroviruses harboring temperature-sensitive SV40 T antigen and telomerase genes. This cell line, termed TSM15, showed a spindle fiber-shaped morphology, an immunoreactivity to anti-factor VIII and anti-VE-cadherin antibodies, and a temperature-sensitive growth. TSM15 cells grew stably for more than 40 passages when they were cultured at 33°C, thereby retaining their spindle fiber-shaped morphology and contact inhibition at confluence. The cells expressed tight junctional molecules such as claudin-5, occludin, and zonula occludens-1, as well as transporters such as a glucose transporter 1. The transendothelial electrical resistance of TSM15 was as high as those of the human brain microvascular endothelial cell line. This novel cell line might facilitate the analyses of the pathophysiology of inflammatory myopathy, such as dermatomyositis, and can improve our understanding of the physiological and biochemical properties of the microvasculature in human skeletal muscle. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. In Vitro Impact of Conditioned Medium From Demineralized Freeze-Dried Bone on Human Umbilical Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Harnik, Branko; Miron, Richard J; Buser, Daniel; Gruber, Reinhard

    2017-03-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for the consolidation of bone allografts. The underlying molecular mechanism, however, remains unclear. Soluble factors released from demineralized freeze-dried bone target mesenchymal cells; however, their effect on endothelial cells has not been investigated so far. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine the effect of conditioned medium from demineralized freeze-dried bone on human umbilical endothelial cells in vitro. Conditioned medium was first prepared from demineralized freeze-dried bone following 24 hours incubation at room temperature to produce demineralized bone conditioned media. Thereafter, conditioned medium was used to stimulate human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro by determining the cell response based on viability, proliferation, expression of apoptotic genes, a Boyden chamber to determine cell migration, and the formation of branches. The authors report here that conditioned medium decreased viability and proliferation of endothelial cells. Neither of the apoptotic marker genes was significantly altered when endothelial cells were exposed to conditioned medium. The Boyden chamber revealed that endothelial cells migrate toward conditioned medium. Moreover, conditioned medium moderately stimulated the formation of branches. These findings support the concept that conditioned medium from demineralized freeze-dried bone targets endothelial cells by decreasing their proliferation and enhancing their motility under these in vitro conditions.

  8. Androgen exposure increases human monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium and endothelial cell expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1.

    PubMed

    McCrohon, J A; Jessup, W; Handelsman, D J; Celermajer, D S

    1999-05-04

    Male sex is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. Owing to the importance of monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells in the development of atherosclerosis, we hypothesized that androgens might promote this process. We therefore studied the effects of the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on human monocyte adhesion to human endothelial cells and on endothelial cell-surface expression of adhesion molecules. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were grown to confluence in media supplemented with postmenopausal female serum, then exposed for 48 hours to either DHT (40 and 400 nmol/L), with or without the androgen receptor blocker hydroxyflutamide (HF) (4 micromol/L); HF alone; or vehicle control (ethanol 0.1%). Human monocytes obtained by elutriation were incubated for 1 hour with the HUVECs at 37 degrees C, and adhesion was measured by light microscopy. Compared with vehicle control, monocyte adhesion was increased in the androgen-treated HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner (116+/-6% and 128+/-3% for DHT 40 and 400 nmol/L respectively; P<0.001). HF blocked this increase (P>/=0.3 compared with control). Surface expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules was measured by ELISA and revealed an increased expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in the DHT-treated HUVECs (125+/-5% versus 100+/-4% in controls; P=0.002), an effect also antagonized by HF (P>/=0.3 compared with controls). Furthermore, the DHT-related increase in adhesion was completely blocked by coincubation with anti-VCAM-1 antibody. Comparable results were obtained in arterial endothelial cells and in endothelium stimulated with the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Androgen exposure is associated with increased human monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, a proatherogenic effect mediated at least in part by an increased endothelial cell-surface expression of VCAM-1.

  9. A comparison of the antigen-presenting capabilities of class II MHC-expressing human lung epithelial and endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, A C; Zhang, J G; Moy, J V; Ali, S; Kirby, J A

    1997-01-01

    Human lung alveolar epithelial cells constitutively express class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Human lung microvascular endothelial and small airway epithelial cells can be induced to express class II MHC by stimulation with the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma. The levels of class II MHC on lung epithelial and endothelial cells were comparable to those seen on an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B-cell line. However, the costimulatory molecules B7-1 and B7-2 were not expressed. The ability of the class II MHC expressing human lung parenchymal cells to present alloantigen to CD4+ T lymphocytes was investigated. Freshly isolated human alveolar epithelial cells (type II pneumocytes) and monolayers of interferon-gamma-stimulated small airway epithelial and lung microvascular endothelial cells were co-cultured with allogeneic CD4+ T lymphocytes and proliferation determined by [3H]thymidine incorporation. A clear difference was observed between effects of the epithelial and endothelial cells on CD4+ T-lymphocyte activation. Alveolar and small airway epithelial cells failed to stimulate the proliferation of allogeneic CD4+ T lymphocytes whereas lung microvascular endothelial cells did stimulate proliferation. This difference could not be explained by the levels of class II MHC or the lack of B7-1 and B7-2 solely. Microvascular endothelial cells, and not alveolar or small airway epithelial cells, possess B7-independent costimulatory pathways. PMID:9301537

  10. Antiangiogenic Effect of (±)-Haloperidol Metabolite II Valproate Ester [(±)-MRJF22] in Human Microvascular Retinal Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Melania; Amata, Emanuele; Vinciguerra, Shila; Fiorito, Jole; Giurdanella, Giovanni; Drago, Filippo; Caporarello, Nunzia; Prezzavento, Orazio; Arena, Emanuela; Salerno, Loredana; Rescifina, Antonio; Lupo, Gabriella; Anfuso, Carmelina Daniela; Marrazzo, Agostino

    2016-11-10

    (±)-MRJF22 [(±)-2], a novel prodrug of haloperidol metabolite II (sigma-1 receptor antagonist/sigma-2 receptor agonist ligand) obtained by conjugation to valproic acid (histone deacetylase inhibitor) via an ester bond, exhibits antiangiogenic activity, being able to reduce human retinal endothelial cell (HREC) viability in a comparable manner to bevacizumab. Moreover, (±)-2 was able to significantly reduce viable cells count, endothelial cell migration, and tube formation in vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) stimulated HREC cultures.

  11. Loss of CD34 expression in aging human choriocapillaris endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Elliott H; Flamme-Wiese, Miles J; Whitmore, S Scott; Wang, Kai; Tucker, Budd A; Mullins, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Structural and gene expression changes in the microvasculature of the human choroid occur during normal aging and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this study, we sought to determine the impact of aging and AMD on expression of the endothelial cell glycoprotein CD34. Sections from 58 human donor eyes were categorized as either young (under age 40), age-matched controls (> age 60 without AMD), or AMD affected (>age 60 with early AMD, geographic atrophy, or choroidal neovascularization). Dual labeling of sections with Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I lectin (UEA-I) and CD34 antibodies was performed, and the percentage of capillaries labeled with UEA-I but negative for anti-CD34 was determined. In addition, published databases of mouse and human retinal pigment epithelium-choroid were evaluated and CD34 expression compared between young and old eyes. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that while CD34 and UEA-I were colocalized in young eyes, there was variable loss of CD34 immunoreactivity in older donor eyes. While differences between normal aging and AMD were not significant, the percentage of CD34 negative capillaries in old eyes, compared to young eyes, was highly significant (p = 3.8×10(-6)). Endothelial cells in neovascular membranes were invariably CD34 positive. Published databases show either a significant decrease in Cd34 (mouse) or a trend toward decreased CD34 (human) in aging. These findings suggest that UEA-I and endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity are more consistent markers of aging endothelial cells in the choroid, and suggest a possible mechanism for the increased inflammatory milieu in the aging choroid.

  12. Loss of CD34 Expression in Aging Human Choriocapillaris Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Elliott H.; Flamme-Wiese, Miles J.; Whitmore, S. Scott; Wang, Kai; Tucker, Budd A.; Mullins, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Structural and gene expression changes in the microvasculature of the human choroid occur during normal aging and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this study, we sought to determine the impact of aging and AMD on expression of the endothelial cell glycoprotein CD34. Sections from 58 human donor eyes were categorized as either young (under age 40), age-matched controls (> age 60 without AMD), or AMD affected (>age 60 with early AMD, geographic atrophy, or choroidal neovascularization). Dual labeling of sections with Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I lectin (UEA-I) and CD34 antibodies was performed, and the percentage of capillaries labeled with UEA-I but negative for anti-CD34 was determined. In addition, published databases of mouse and human retinal pigment epithelium-choroid were evaluated and CD34 expression compared between young and old eyes. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that while CD34 and UEA-I were colocalized in young eyes, there was variable loss of CD34 immunoreactivity in older donor eyes. While differences between normal aging and AMD were not significant, the percentage of CD34 negative capillaries in old eyes, compared to young eyes, was highly significant (p = 3.8×10−6). Endothelial cells in neovascular membranes were invariably CD34 positive. Published databases show either a significant decrease in Cd34 (mouse) or a trend toward decreased CD34 (human) in aging. These findings suggest that UEA-I and endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity are more consistent markers of aging endothelial cells in the choroid, and suggest a possible mechanism for the increased inflammatory milieu in the aging choroid. PMID:24466138

  13. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 expression in the pulp of human primary and young permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Grando Mattuella, Leticia; Poli de Figueiredo, José Antonio; Nör, Jacques E; de Araujo, Fernando Borba; Medeiros Fossati, Anna Christina

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) in endothelial cells within the dental pulp of human primary and young permanent teeth and the spatial distribution of VEGFR-2-positive cells. Nine sound primary teeth and 4 sound young permanent teeth were evaluated by immunohistochemistry with a human anti-VEGFR-2 antibody. Stained tissue sections were analyzed qualitatively under light microscopy. Here we observed that endothelial cells of both primary and permanent teeth showed positive immunostaining for VEGFR-2. Notably, VEGFR-2-positive cells in the primary teeth tended to be found close to the subodontoblastic layer, whereas the spatial distribution of VEGFR-2 immunostaining in the permanent teeth was more uniform. In conclusion, VEGFR-2 was expressed in the microvascular endothelial cells of both primary and young permanent teeth, which suggests that these cells are capable of responding to the morphogenetic and survival signals mediated by VEGF.

  14. A Fermented Whole Grain Prevents Lipopolysaccharides-Induced Dysfunction in Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gabriele, Morena; Del Prato, Stefano; Pucci, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous signals derived by the gut microbiota such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) orchestrate inflammatory responses contributing to development of the endothelial dysfunction associated with atherosclerosis in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), bone marrow derived stem cells, promote recovery of damaged endothelium playing a pivotal role in cardiovascular repair. Since healthy nutrition improves EPCs functions, we evaluated the effect of a fermented grain, Lisosan G (LG), on early EPCs exposed to LPS. The potential protective effect of LG against LPS-induced alterations was evaluated as cell viability, adhesiveness, ROS production, gene expression, and NF-kB signaling pathway activation. Our results showed that LPS treatment did not affect EPCs viability and adhesiveness but induced endothelial alterations via activation of NF-kB signaling. LG protects EPCs from inflammation as well as from LPS-induced oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress reducing ROS levels, downregulating proinflammatory and proapoptotic factors, and strengthening antioxidant defense. Moreover, LG pretreatment prevented NF-kB translocation from the cytoplasm into the nucleus caused by LPS exposure. In human EPCs, LPS increases ROS and upregulates proinflammatory tone, proapoptotic factors, and antioxidants. LG protects EPCs exposed to LPS reducing ROS, downregulating proinflammatory and proapoptotic factors, and strengthening antioxidant defenses possibly by inhibiting NF-κB nuclear translocation. PMID:28386305

  15. A Fermented Whole Grain Prevents Lipopolysaccharides-Induced Dysfunction in Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Laura; Gabriele, Morena; Penno, Giuseppe; Garofolo, Monia; Longo, Vincenzo; Del Prato, Stefano; Lucchesi, Daniela; Pucci, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous signals derived by the gut microbiota such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS) orchestrate inflammatory responses contributing to development of the endothelial dysfunction associated with atherosclerosis in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), bone marrow derived stem cells, promote recovery of damaged endothelium playing a pivotal role in cardiovascular repair. Since healthy nutrition improves EPCs functions, we evaluated the effect of a fermented grain, Lisosan G (LG), on early EPCs exposed to LPS. The potential protective effect of LG against LPS-induced alterations was evaluated as cell viability, adhesiveness, ROS production, gene expression, and NF-kB signaling pathway activation. Our results showed that LPS treatment did not affect EPCs viability and adhesiveness but induced endothelial alterations via activation of NF-kB signaling. LG protects EPCs from inflammation as well as from LPS-induced oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress reducing ROS levels, downregulating proinflammatory and proapoptotic factors, and strengthening antioxidant defense. Moreover, LG pretreatment prevented NF-kB translocation from the cytoplasm into the nucleus caused by LPS exposure. In human EPCs, LPS increases ROS and upregulates proinflammatory tone, proapoptotic factors, and antioxidants. LG protects EPCs exposed to LPS reducing ROS, downregulating proinflammatory and proapoptotic factors, and strengthening antioxidant defenses possibly by inhibiting NF-κB nuclear translocation.

  16. Uptake and transport of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles through human brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, L B; Linemann, T; Pondman, K M; Lichota, J; Kim, K S; Pieters, R J; Visser, G M; Moos, T

    2013-10-16

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) formed by brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) constitutes a firm physical, chemical, and immunological barrier, making the brain accessible to only a few percent of potential drugs intended for treatment inside the central nervous system. With the purpose of overcoming the restraints of the BBB by allowing the transport of drugs, siRNA, or DNA into the brain, a novel approach is to use superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as drug carriers. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of fluorescent SPIONs to pass through human brain microvascular endothelial cells facilitated by an external magnet. The ability of SPIONs to penetrate the barrier was shown to be significantly stronger in the presence of an external magnetic force in an in vitro BBB model. Hence, particles added to the luminal side of the in vitro BBB model were found in astrocytes cocultured at a remote distance on the abluminal side, indicating that particles were transported through the barrier and taken up by astrocytes. Addition of the SPIONs to the culture medium did not negatively affect the viability of the endothelial cells. The magnetic force-mediated dragging of SPIONs through BCECs may denote a novel mechanism for the delivery of drugs to the brain.

  17. Human pulmonary artery endothelial cells in the model of mucopolysaccharidosis VI present a prohypertensive phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Golda, Adam; Jurecka, Agnieszka; Gajda, Karolina; Tylki-Szymańska, Anna; Lalik, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS VI) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal disorder caused by a deficient activity of N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase (ARSB). Pulmonary hypertension (PH) occurs in MPS VI patients and is a marker of bad prognosis. Malfunction of endothelium, which regulates vascular tonus and stimulates angiogenesis, can contribute to the occurrence of PH in MPS VI. Aim The aim of the study was to establish a human MPS VI cellular model of pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) and evaluate how it affects factors that may trigger PH such as proliferation, apoptosis, expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), natriuretic peptide type C (NPPC), and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA). Results Increasing concentrations of dermatan sulfate (DS) reduce the viability of the cells in both ARSB deficiency and controls, but hardly influence apoptosis. The expression of eNOS in HPAECs is reduced up to two thirds in the presence of DS. NPPC shows a biphasic expression reaction with an increase at 50 μg/mL DS and reduction at 0 and 100 μg/mL DS. The expression of VEGFA decreases with increasing DS concentrations and absence of elastin, and increases with increasing DS in the presence of elastin. Conclusion Our data suggest that MPS VI endothelium presents a prohypertensive phenotype due to the reduction of endothelium's proliferation ability and expression of vasorelaxing factors. PMID:26937388

  18. Surgical Skin Markers Impair Human Saphenous Vein Graft Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    EAGLE, SUSAN; BROPHY, COLLEEN M.; KOMALAVILAS, PADMINI; HOCKING, KYLE; PUTUMBAKA, GOWTHAMI; OSGOOD, MICHAEL; SEXTON, KEVIN; LEACCHE, MARZIA; CHEUNG-FLYNN, JOYCE

    2012-01-01

    Marking human saphenous vein graft (HSV) with a surgical skin marker to prevent twisting on implantation is a common practice in peripheral and coronary artery bypass procedures. This study is designed to examine the effects of surgical skin markers on the HSV smooth muscle and endothelial functional responses. De-identified HSV remnants were collected during peripheral and coronary artery bypass procedures. Physiologic responses of the HSV were measured using a muscle bath. Veins that were marked with surgical skin markers intraoperatively generated significantly less contractile force to depolarizing KCl (110 mM) and receptor-mediated contractile agonists than unmarked HSV, suggesting that surgical skin markers impaired HSV smooth muscle contractility. To directly access the effects of chemical components in the surgical skin markers, unmarked HSV was exposed to isopropyl alcohol (a solvent commonly used in surgical skin markers) or methylene blue (a dye). Smooth muscle contractility was significantly reduced by isopropyl alcohol and methylene blue. Endothelial-dependent relaxation to carbachol was significantly reduced after exposure to surgical skin markers. Our data demonstrated that marking HSV with surgical skin markers reduces smooth muscle and endothelial functional viability. PMID:21944360

  19. Short-term, low-dose cadmium exposure induces hyperpermeability in human renal glomerular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Liqun; Dong, Fengyun; Xu, Dongmei; Du, Linna; Yan, Suhua; Hu, Hesheng; Lobe, Corrinne G; Yi, Fan; Kapron, Carolyn M; Liu, Ju

    2016-02-01

    The kidney is the principal organ targeted by exposure to cadmium (Cd), a well-known toxic metal. Even at a low level, Cd damages glomerular filtration. However, little is known about the effects of Cd on the glomerular endothelium, which performs the filtration function and directly interacts with Cd in blood plasma. In this study, we cultured human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs) in the presence of serum with treatment of a short term (1 h) and low concentration (1 μm) of Cd, which mimics the pattern of glomerular endothelium exposure to Cd in vivo. We found that this short-term, low-dose Cd exposure does not induce cytotoxicity, but increases permeability in HRGECs monolayers and redistributes adherens junction proteins vascular endothelial-cadherin and β-catenin. Though short-term, low-dose Cd exposure activates all three major mitogen activated protein kinases, only the inhibitor of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase partially prevents Cd-induced hyperpermeability in HRGECs. Our data indicate that the presence of Cd in blood circulation might directly disrupt the glomerular endothelial cell barrier and contribute to the development of clinical symptoms of glomerular diseases. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Effects of macro- versus nanoporous silicon substrates on human aortic endothelial cell behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formentín, Pilar; Alba, María; Catalán, Úrsula; Fernández-Castillejo, Sara; Pallarès, Josep; Solà, Rosà; Marsal, Lluís F.

    2014-08-01

    Human aortic endothelial cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, which is a common, progressive, and multifactorial disease that is the clinical endpoint of an inflammatory process and endothelial dysfunction. Study and development of new therapies against cardiovascular disease must be tested in vitro cell models, prior to be evaluated in vivo . To this aim, new cell culture platforms are developed that allow cells to grow and respond to their environment in a realistic manner. In this work, the cell adhesion and morphology of endothelial cells are investigated on functionalized porous silicon substrates with two different pore size configurations: macroporous and nanoporous silicon. Herein, we modified the surfaces of porous silicon substrates by aminopropyl triethoxysilane, and we studied how different pore geometries induced different cellular response in the cell morphology and adhesion. The cell growth over the surface of porous silicon becomes an attractive field, especially for medical applications. Surface properties of the biomaterial are associated with cell adhesion and as well as, with proliferation, migration and differentiation.

  1. Potential in vitro effects of carbon nanotubes on human aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Valerie G.; Li Zheng; Hulderman, Tracy; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Kashon, Michael L.; Simeonova, Petia P.

    2009-05-01

    Respiratory exposure of mice to carbon nanotubes induces pulmonary toxicity and adverse cardiovascular effects associated with atherosclerosis. We hypothesize that the direct contact of carbon nanotubes with endothelial cells will result in dose-dependent effects related to altered cell function and cytotoxicity which may play a role in potential adverse pulmonary and cardiovascular outcomes. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of purified single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT and MWCNT) on human aortic endothelial cells by evaluating actin filament integrity and VE-cadherin distribution by fluorescence microscopy, membrane permeability by measuring the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, proliferation/viability by WST-1 assay, and overall functionality by tubule formation assay. Marked actin filament and VE-cadherin disruption, cytotoxicity, and reduced tubule formation occurred consistently at 24 h post-exposure to the highest concentrations [50-150 {mu}g/10{sup 6} cells (1.5-4.5 {mu}g/ml)] for both SWCNT and MWCNT tested in our studies. These effects were not observed with carbon black exposure and carbon nanotube exposure in lower concentrations [1-10 {mu}g/10{sup 6} cells (0.04-0.4 {mu}g/ml)] or in any tested concentrations at 3 h post-exposure. Overall, the results indicate that SWCNT and MWCNT exposure induce direct effects on endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner.

  2. Brugia malayi microfilariae adhere to human vascular endothelial cells in a C3-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Jan-Hendrik; McCarthy, David; Szestak, Tadge; Cook, Darren A.; Taylor, Mark J.; Craig, Alister G.; Lawson, Charlotte; Lawrence, Rachel A.

    2017-01-01

    Brugia malayi causes the human tropical disease, lymphatic filariasis. Microfilariae (Mf) of this nematode live in the bloodstream and are ingested by a feeding mosquito vector. Interestingly, in a remarkable co-evolutionary adaptation, Mf appearance in the peripheral blood follows a circadian periodicity and reaches a peak when the mosquito is most likely to feed. For the remaining hours, the majority of Mf sequester in the lung capillaries. This circadian phenomenon has been widely reported and is likely to maximise parasite fitness and optimise transmission potential. However, the mechanism of Mf sequestration in the lungs remains largely unresolved. In this study, we demonstrate that B. malayi Mf can, directly adhere to vascular endothelial cells under static conditions and under flow conditions, they can bind at high (but not low) flow rates. High flow rates are more likely to be experienced diurnally. Furthermore, a non-periodic nematode adheres less efficiently to endothelial cells. Strikingly C3, the central component of complement, plays a crucial role in the adherence interaction. These novel results show that microfilariae have the ability to bind to endothelial cells, which may explain their sequestration in the lungs, and this binding is increased in the presence of inflammatory mediators. PMID:28481947

  3. Interaction of Leptospira interrogans with human proteolytic systems enhances dissemination through endothelial cells and protease levels.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Monica L; Alvarez-Flores, Miryam P; Kirchgatter, Karin; Romero, Eliete C; Alves, Ivy J; de Morais, Zenaide M; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana M; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2013-05-01

    We have recently reported the ability of Leptospira to capture plasminogen (PLG) and generate plasmin (PLA) bound on the microbial surface in the presence of exogenous activators. In this work, we examined the effects of leptospiral PLG binding for active penetration through the endothelial cell barrier and activation. The results indicate that leptospires with PLG association or PLA activation have enhanced migration activity through human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers compared with untreated bacteria. Leptospira cells coated with PLG were capable of stimulating the expression of PLG activators by HUVECs. Moreover, leptospires endowed with PLG or PLA promoted transcriptional upregulation matrix metalloprotease 9 (MMP-9). Serum samples from patients with confirmed leptospirosis showed higher levels of PLG activators and total MMP-9 than serum samples from normal (healthy) subjects. The highest level of PLG activators and total MMP-9 was detected with microscopic agglutination test (MAT)-negative serum samples, suggesting that this proteolytic activity stimulation occurs at the early stage of the disease. Furthermore, a gelatin zymography profile obtained for MMPs with serum samples from patients with leptospirosis appears to be specific to leptospiral infection because serum samples from patients with unrelated infectious diseases produced no similar degradation bands. Altogether, the data suggest that the Leptospira-associated PLG or PLA might represent a mechanism that contributes to bacterial penetration of endothelial cells through an activation cascade of events that enhances the proteolytic capability of the organism. To our knowledge, this is the first proteolytic activity associated with leptospiral pathogenesis described to date.

  4. Laminin-guided highly efficient endothelial commitment from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Ryo; Niwa, Akira; Taniguchi, Yukimasa; Suzuki, Naoya M.; Toga, Junko; Yagi, Emiko; Saiki, Norikazu; Nishinaka-Arai, Yoko; Okada, Chihiro; Watanabe, Akira; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Saito, Megumu K.

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining highly purified differentiated cells via directed differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is an essential step for their clinical application. Among the various conditions that should be optimized, the precise role and contribution of the extracellular matrix (ECM) during differentiation are relatively unclear. Here, using a short fragment of laminin 411 (LM411-E8), an ECM predominantly expressed in the vascular endothelial basement membrane, we demonstrate that the directed switching of defined ECMs robustly yields highly-purified (>95%) endothelial progenitor cells (PSC-EPCs) without cell sorting from hPSCs in an integrin-laminin axis-dependent manner. Single-cell RNA-seq analysis revealed that LM411-E8 resolved intercellular transcriptional heterogeneity and escorted the progenitor cells to the appropriate differentiation pathway. The PSC-EPCs gave rise to functional endothelial cells both in vivo and in vitro. We therefore propose that sequential switching of defined matrices is an important concept for guiding cells towards desired fate. PMID:27804979

  5. Effects of macro- versus nanoporous silicon substrates on human aortic endothelial cell behavior

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Human aortic endothelial cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, which is a common, progressive, and multifactorial disease that is the clinical endpoint of an inflammatory process and endothelial dysfunction. Study and development of new therapies against cardiovascular disease must be tested in vitro cell models, prior to be evaluated in vivo. To this aim, new cell culture platforms are developed that allow cells to grow and respond to their environment in a realistic manner. In this work, the cell adhesion and morphology of endothelial cells are investigated on functionalized porous silicon substrates with two different pore size configurations: macroporous and nanoporous silicon. Herein, we modified the surfaces of porous silicon substrates by aminopropyl triethoxysilane, and we studied how different pore geometries induced different cellular response in the cell morphology and adhesion. The cell growth over the surface of porous silicon becomes an attractive field, especially for medical applications. Surface properties of the biomaterial are associated with cell adhesion and as well as, with proliferation, migration and differentiation. PMID:25246859

  6. Human papillomavirus causes an angiogenic switch in keratinocytes which is sufficient to alter endothelial cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Li, F.; Mead, L.; White, H.; Walker, J.; Ingram, D.A.; Roman, A.

    2007-10-10

    One of the requirements for tumor growth is the ability to recruit a blood supply, a process known as angiogenesis. Angiogenesis begins early in the progression of cervical disease from mild to severe dysplasia and on to invasive cancer. We have previously reported that expression of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 (HPV16 E6E7) proteins in primary foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) decreases expression of two inhibitors and increases expression of two angiogenic inducers [Toussaint-Smith, E., Donner, D.B., Roman, A., 2004. Expression of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins in primary foreskin keratinocytes is sufficient to alter the expression of angiogenic factors. Oncogene 23, 2988-2995]. Here we report that HPV-induced early changes in the keratinocyte phenotype are sufficient to alter endothelial cell behavior both in vitro and in vivo. Conditioned media from HPV16 E6E7 expressing HFKs as well as from human cervical keratinocytes containing the intact HPV16 were able to stimulate proliferation and migration of human microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, introduction of the conditioned media into immunocompetent mice using a Matrigel plug model resulted in a clear angiogenic response. These novel data support the hypothesis that HPV proteins contribute not only to the uncontrolled keratinocyte growth seen following HPV infection but also to the angiogenic response needed for tumor formation.

  7. In vivo perfusion of human skin substitutes with microvessels formed by adult circulating endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Kung, Elaine F; Wang, Feiya; Schechner, Jeffrey S

    2008-02-01

    At present, tissue-engineered human skin substitutes (HSSs) mainly function as temporary bioactive dressings due to inadequate perfusion. Failure to form functional vascular networks within the initial posttransplantation period compromises cell survival of the graft and its long-term viability in the wound bed. Our goal was to demonstrate that adult circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) seeded onto HSS can form functional microvessels capable of graft neovascularization and perfusion. Adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) underwent CD34 selection and endothelial cell (EC) culture conditions. After in vitro expansion, flow cytometry verified EC phenotype before their incorporation into HSS. After 2 weeks in vivo, immunohistochemical analysis, immunofluorescent microscopy, and microfil polymer perfusion were performed. CD34+ PBMCs differentiated into EPC demonstrating characteristic EC morphology and expression of CD31, Tie-2, and E-selectin after TNFalpha-induction. Numerous human CD31 and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1) microvessels within the engineered grafts (HSS/EPCs) inosculated with recipient murine circulation. Limitation of murine CD31 immunoreactivity to HSS margins showed angiogenesis was attributable to human EPC at 2 weeks posttransplantation. Delivery of intravenous rhodamine-conjugated UEA-1 and microfil polymer to HSS/EPCs demonstrated enhanced perfusion by functional microvessels compared to HSS control without EPCs. We successfully engineered functional microvessels in HSS by incorporating adult circulating EPCs. This autologous EC source can form vascular conduits enabling perfusion and survival of human bioengineered tissues.

  8. Efficient gene disruption in cultured primary human endothelial cells by CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Abrahimi, Parwiz; Chang, William G; Kluger, Martin S; Qyang, Yibing; Tellides, George; Saltzman, W Mark; Pober, Jordan S

    2015-07-03

    The participation of endothelial cells (EC) in many physiological and pathological processes is widely modeled using human EC cultures, but genetic manipulation of these untransformed cells has been technically challenging. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 nuclease (Cas9) technology offers a promising new approach. However, mutagenized cultured cells require cloning to yield homogeneous populations, and the limited replicative lifespan of well-differentiated human EC presents a barrier for doing so. To create a simple but highly efficient method using CRISPR/Cas9 to generate biallelic gene disruption in untransformed human EC. To demonstrate proof-of-principle, we used CRISPR/Cas9 to disrupt the gene for the class II transactivator. We used endothelial colony forming cell-derived EC and lentiviral vectors to deliver CRISPR/Cas9 elements to ablate EC expression of class II major histocompatibility complex molecules and with it, the capacity to activate allogeneic CD4(+) T cells. We show the observed loss-of-function arises from biallelic gene disruption in class II transactivator that leaves other essential properties of the cells intact, including self-assembly into blood vessels in vivo, and that the altered phenotype can be rescued by reintroduction of class II transactivator expression. CRISPR/Cas9-modified human EC provides a powerful platform for vascular research and for regenerative medicine/tissue engineering. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. AXL-Mediated Productive Infection of Human Endothelial Cells by Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; DeLalio, Leon J; Isakson, Brant E; Wang, Tony T

    2016-11-11

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is now recognized as a blood-borne pathogen, raising an important question about how the virus gets into human bloodstream. The imminent threat of the ZIKV epidemic to the global blood supply also demands novel therapeutics to stop virus transmission though transfusion. We intend to characterize ZIKV tropism for human endothelial cells (ECs) and provide potential targets for intervention. We conducted immunostaining, plaque assay, and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of ZIKV RNA to evaluate the possible infection of ECs by ZIKV. Both the African and the South American ZIKV strains readily infect human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human ECs derived from aortic and coronary artery, as well as the saphenous vein. Infected ECs released infectious progeny virus. Compared with the African strains, South American ZIKV isolates replicate faster in ECs and are partially cytopathic, suggesting enhanced virulence of these isolates. Flow cytometric analyses showed that the susceptibility of ECs positively correlated with the cell surface levels of tyrosine-protein kinase receptor UFO (AXL) receptor tyrosine kinase. Gain- and loss-of-function studies further revealed that AXL is required for ZIKV entry at a postbinding step. Finally, small-molecule inhibitors of the AXL kinase significantly reduced ZIKA infection of ECs. We identified EC as a key cell type for ZIKV infection. These data support the view of hematogenous dissemination of ZIKV and implicate AXL as a new target for antiviral therapy. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Sulfation of chlorotyrosine and nitrotyrosine by human lung endothelial and epithelial cells: Role of the human SULT1A3

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Shin; Yasuda, Tomoko; Liu, Ming-Yih; Shetty, Sreerama; Idell, Steven; Boggaram, Vijayakumar; Suiko, Masahito; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Fu Jian; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2011-03-01

    During inflammation, potent reactive oxidants formed may cause chlorination and nitration of both free and protein-bound tyrosine. In addition to serving as biomarkers of inflammation-mediated oxidative stress, elevated levels of chlorotyrosine and nitrotyrosine have been linked to the pathogenesis of lung and vascular disorders. The current study was designed to investigate whether the lung cells are equipped with mechanisms for counteracting these tyrosine derivatives. By metabolic labeling, chlorotyrosine O-[{sup 35}S]sulfate and nitrotyrosine O-[{sup 35}S]sulfate were found to be generated and released into the labeling media of human lung endothelial and epithelial cells labeled with [{sup 35}S]sulfate in the presence of added chlorotyrosine and nitrotyrosine. Enzymatic assays using the eleven known human cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs) revealed SULT1A3 as the enzyme responsible for catalyzing the sulfation of chlorotyrosine and nitrotyrosine. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis demonstrated the expression of SULT1A3 in the lung endothelial and epithelial cells used in this study. Kinetic constants of the sulfation of chlorotyrosine and nitrotyrosine by SULT1A3 were determined. Collectively, these results suggest that sulfation by SULT1A3 in lung endothelial and epithelial cells may play a role in the inactivation and/or disposal of excess chlorotyrosine and nitrotyrosine generated during inflammation.

  11. Effects of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal on cultured human aortic endothelial cells and myocardial cell.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Zhou, Ji-Lin; Wang, Ning-Fu; Xu, Hai-Ying

    2005-01-01

    To study the effects of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) on cultured human aortic endothelial cells and myocardial cells so as to explore the mechanism of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In situ cell death technique, quantitative DNA damage detection and immunohistochemistry were used to identify the cell apoptosis and DNA damage in cultured human aortic endothelial cells and myocardial cells. Tail moment was 32.80+/-1.12, 44.30+/-0.99 and 74.6+/-0.97 when HAOEC were treated with 5 muM, 10muM and 15 muM of HNE for 10 hours, which were of statistical significance when compared with the normal group (6.0+/-0.67, P < 0.001 respectively), But when HAOEC was treated with 1 muM of HNE, the tail moment was 11.3+/-0.9, which was of no statistical difference compared with the untreated group(P>0.05). When human aortic endothelial cells (HAOEC) were treated with 5 muM, 10muM and 15 muM of HNE for 10 hours, the percent of nonviable cells were 5.70+/-0.55, 25.96+/-2.02 and 50.80+/-3.40 (P<0.001 respectively when compared with the normal group with the percent of 0.27+/-0.13). But when HAOEC was treated with 1 muM of HNE for 10 hours, the percent of nonviable cells was 2.5+/-0.22, and no difference was observed when compared with the untreated group (P>0.05). When cultured human myocardial cells were treated with 5 muM of HNE for 10 hours, TUNEL staining showed a greater number of apoptotic cells in HNE-treated human myocardial cells. No TUNEL-positive cells were observed in untreated group. When HAOEC was treated with 5 muM of HNE for 10 hours, immunocytochemical labeling with polyclonal antibody to HNE-modified proteins revealed specific cytoplasmic staining in cells incubated with HNE, whereas staining was absent in control cells incubated with vehicle. But 1 muM of HNE treatment didn't present positive stainings. Higher concentrations of HNE (10 muM and 15 muM) showed much stronger positive stainings. HNE induces DNA damage and cell apoptosis of cultured aortic endothelial

  12. Calcification of Human Saphenous Vein Associated with Endothelial Dysfunction: A Pilot Histopathophysiological and Demographical Study

    PubMed Central

    Pedigo, Sydney L.; Guth, Christy M.; Hocking, Kyle M.; Banathy, Alex; Li, Fan Dong; Cheung-Flynn, Joyce; Brophy, Colleen M.; Guzman, Raul J.; Komalavilas, Padmini

    2017-01-01

    While the pathophysiology and clinical significance of arterial calcifications have been studied extensively, minimal focus has been placed on venous calcification deposition. In this study, we evaluated the association between calcium deposition in human saphenous vein (HSV), endothelial function, and patient demographic risk factors. Fifty-four HSV segments were collected at the time of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. The presence or absence of calcium deposits was visualized using the Von Kossa staining method. Endothelial function was determined by measuring muscle tissue contraction with phenylephrine and relaxation with carbachol in a muscle bath. Additional segments of vein underwent histologic evaluation for preexisting intimal thickness and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. Patient demographics data were obtained through our institution’s electronic medical record, with patient consent. Calcium was present in 16 of 54 samples (29.6%). Veins with calcium deposits had significantly greater intimal-to-medial thickness ratios (p = 0.0058) and increased extracellular collagen deposition (p = 0.0077). Endothelial relaxation was significantly compromised in calcified veins vs. those without calcium (p = 0.0011). Significant patient risk factors included age (p = 0.001) and preoperative serum creatinine (p = 0.017). Calcified veins can be characterized as having endothelial dysfunction with increased basal intimal thickness and increased ECM deposition. Patient risk factors for calcium deposits in veins were similar to those for arteries, namely, advanced age and kidney disease. Further studies are needed to determine the effect of preexisting vein calcification on short- and long-term graft patency. PMID:28232909

  13. Biophysical Properties of Scaffolds Modulate Human Blood Vessel Formation from Circulating Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Critser, Paul J.; Yoder, Mervin C.

    A functional vascular system forms early in development and is continually remodeled throughout the life of the organism. Impairment to the regeneration or repair of this system leads to tissue ischemia, dysfunction, and disease. The process of vascular formation and remodeling is complex, relying on local microenvironmental cues, cytokine signaling, and multiple cell types to function properly. Tissue engineering strategies have attempted to exploit these mechanisms to develop functional vascular networks for the generation of artificial tissues and therapeutic strategies to restore tissue homeostasis. The success of these strategies requires the isolation of appropriate progenitor cell sources which are straightforward to obtain, display high proliferative potential, and demonstrate an ability to form functional vessels. Several populations are of interest including endothelial colony-forming cells, a subpopulation of endothelial progenitor cells. Additionally, the development of scaffolds to deliver and support progenitor cell survival and function is crucial for the formation of functional vascular networks. The composition and biophysical properties of these scaffolds have been shown to modulate endothelial cell behavior and vessel formation. However, further investigation is needed to better understand how these mechanical properties and biophysical properties impact vessel formation. Additionally, several other cell populations are involved in neoangiogenesis and formation of tissue parenchyma and an understanding of the potential impact of these cell populations on the biophysical properties of scaffolds will also be needed to advance these strategies. This chapter examines how the biophysical properties of matrix scaffolds can influence vessel formation and remodeling and, in particular, the impact on in vivo human endothelial progenitor cell vessel formation.

  14. Polyphenolic flavonoids differ in their antiapoptotic efficacy in hydrogen peroxide-treated human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yean-Jung; Kang, Jung-Sook; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Lee, Yong-Jin; Choi, Jung-Suk; Kang, Young-Hee

    2003-04-01

    Oxidative injury induces cellular and nuclear damage that leads to apoptotic cell death. Agents or antioxidants that can inhibit production of reactive oxygen species can prevent apoptosis. We tested the hypothesis that flavonoids can inhibit H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. A 30-min pulse treatment with 0.25 mmol/L H(2)O(2) decreased endothelial cell viability within 24 h by approximately 40% (P < 0.05) with distinct nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation. In the H(2)O(2) apoptosis model, the addition of 50 micro mol/L of the flavanol (-)epigallocatechin gallate and the flavonol quercetin, which have in vitro radical scavenging activity, partially (P < 0.05) restored cell viability with a reduction in H(2)O(2)-induced apoptotic DNA damage. In contrast, the flavones, luteolin and apigenin, at the nontoxic dose of 50 micro mol/L, intensified cell loss (P < 0.05) after exposure to H(2)O(2) and did not protect cells from oxidant-induced apoptosis. The flavanones, hesperidin and naringin, did not have cytoprotective effects. The antioxidants, (-)epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin, inhibited endothelial apoptosis, enhanced the expression of bcl-2 protein and inhibited the expression of bax protein and the cleavage and activation of caspase-3. Therefore, flavanols and flavonols, in particular (-)epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin, qualify as potent antioxidants and are effective in preventing endothelial apoptosis caused by oxidants, suggesting that flavonoids have differential antiapoptotic efficacies. The antiapoptotic activity of flavonoids appears to be mediated at the mitochondrial bcl-2 and bax gene level.

  15. Impact of Calcium Signaling during Infection of Neisseria meningitidis to Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Asmat, Tauseef M.; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2014-01-01

    The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci) facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor) abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC) is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF) staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells. PMID:25464500

  16. Butyrate stimulates tissue-type plasminogen-activator synthesis in cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, T; van den Berg, J; Töns, A; Platenburg, G; Rijken, D C; van den Berg, E

    1987-01-01

    Incubation of cultured human endothelial cells with 5 mM-dibutyryl cyclic AMP led to an approx. 2-fold increase in tissue-type plasminogen-activator (t-PA) production over a 24 h incubation period. The stimulating effect of dibutyryl cyclic AMP could be explained by the slow liberation of butyrate, as the effect could be reproduced by addition of free butyrate to the medium, but not by addition of 8-bromo cyclic AMP or forskolin, agents known to raise intracellular cyclic AMP levels. With butyrate, an accelerated accumulation of t-PA antigen in the conditioned medium (CM) was observed after a lag period of about 6 h. Increasing amounts of butyrate caused an increasingly stimulatory effect, reaching a plateau at 5 mM-butyrate. The relative enhancement of t-PA production in the presence of 5 mM-butyrate varied among different endothelial cell cultures from 6- to 25-fold in 24 h CM. Such an increase in t-PA production was observed with both arterial and venous endothelial cells. The butyrate-induced increases in t-PA production were accompanied by increased t-PA mRNA levels. Analysis of radiolabelled CM and cell extracts by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis indicated that the potent action of butyrate is probably restricted to a small number of proteins. The accumulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) in CM from butyrate-treated cells varied only moderately. In our study of the relationship between structure and stimulatory activity, we found that a straight-chain C4 monocarboxylate structure with a methyl group at one end and a carboxy moiety at the other seems to be required for the optimal induction of t-PA in cultured endothelial cells. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. PMID:2827633

  17. Oxidation of 2-cys peroxiredoxins in human endothelial cells by hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid, and chloramines.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Melissa M; Vissers, Margreet C; Winterbourn, Christine C

    2012-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species released from neutrophils during vascular inflammation could contribute to endothelial dysfunction seen in diseases such as atherosclerosis. Activated neutrophils generate hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl), as well as chloramines that are formed when HOCl reacts with amino compounds. These oxidants preferentially target thiol groups and thiol-containing proteins. The peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are thiol proteins that have high reactivity with H(2)O(2) and may also be sensitive to HOCl and chloramines. We have investigated human umbilical vein endothelial cells and shown that their cytoplasmic (Prx1 and Prx2) and mitochondrial (Prx3) Prxs are oxidized when they are exposed to H(2)O(2), HOCl, or cell-permeable chloramines. H(2)O(2) converted the Prxs to hyperoxidized, inactive forms, with little accumulation of disulfide-linked dimers. The oxidized Prxs were reduced over hours, presumably due to the action of endothelial sulfiredoxin. In contrast to the hyperoxidation seen with H(2)O(2), HOCl and the chloramine derivatives of glycine and ammonia converted the Prxs to disulfide-linked dimers and dimerization was reversed within 10-30 min of oxidant removal. HOCl treatment caused thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) inhibition with no reversal of dimerization. The cytotoxicity of ammonia chloramine was increased when cells were pretreated with H(2)O(2) to hyperoxidize the Prxs, or when the chloramine was added in the presence of the TrxR inhibitor, auranofin. We describe the novel observation that exposure of nucleated cells to inflammatory oxidants results in the accumulation of Prxs in the dimeric form. Endothelial cell Prxs are sensitive targets for neutrophil-derived oxidants and may protect against their damaging effects.

  18. A Model of Giant Vacuole Dynamics in Human Schlemm’s Canal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pedrigi, Ryan M.; Simon, David; Reed, Ashley; Stamer, W. Daniel; Overby, Darryl R.

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous humour transport across the inner wall endothelium of Schlemm’s canal likely involves flow through giant vacuoles and pores, but the mechanics of how these structures form and how they influence the regulation of intraocular pressure (IOP) are not well understood. In this study, we developed an in vitro model of giant vacuole formation in human Schlemm’s canal endothelial cells (HSCECs) perfused in the basal-to-apical direction (i.e., the direction that flow crosses the inner wall in vivo) under controlled pressure drops (2 or 6 mmHg). The system was mounted on a confocal microscope for time-lapse en face imaging, and cells were stained with calcein, a fluorescent vital dye. At the onset of perfusion, elliptical void regions appeared within an otherwise uniformly stained cytoplasm, and 3-dimensional reconstructions revealed that these voids were dome-like outpouchings of the cell to form giant vacuole-like structures or GVLs that reproduced the classic “signet ring” appearance of true giant vacuoles. Increasing pressure drop from 2 to 6 mmHg increased GVL height (14 ± 4 vs. 21 ± 7 µm, p < 0.0001) and endothelial hydraulic conductivity (1.15 ± 0.04 vs. 2.11 ± 0.49 µL min−1 mmHg−1 cm−2; p < 0.001), but there was significant variability in the GVL response to pressure between cell lines isolated from different donors. During perfusion, GVLs were observed “migrating” and agglomerating about the cell layer and often collapsed despite maintaining the same pressure drop. GVL formation was also observed in human umbilical vein and porcine aortic endothelial cells, suggesting that giant vacuole formation is not a unique property of Schlemm’s canal cells. However, in these other cell types, GVLs were rarely observed “migrating” or contracting during perfusion, suggesting that Schlemm’s canal endothelial cells may be better adapted to withstand basal-to-apical directed pressure gradients. In conclusion, we have established an in vitro

  19. Effect of peritoneal dialysis fluid containing osmo-metabolic agents on human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bonomini, Mario; Di Silvestre, Sara; Di Tomo, Pamela; Di Pietro, Natalia; Mandatori, Domitilla; Di Liberato, Lorenzo; Sirolli, Vittorio; Chiarelli, Francesco; Indiveri, Cesare; Pandolfi, Assunta; Arduini, Arduino

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of glucose as the only osmotic agent in peritoneal dialysis (PD) solutions (PDSs) is believed to exert local (peritoneal) and systemic detrimental actions, particularly in diabetic PD patients. To improve peritoneal biocompatibility, we have developed more biocompatible PDSs containing xylitol and carnitine along with significantly less amounts of glucose and have tested them in cultured Human Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) obtained from the umbilical cords of healthy (C) and gestational diabetic (GD) mothers. Methods Primary C- and GD-HUVECs were treated for 72 hours with our PDSs (xylitol 0.7% and 1.5%, whereas carnitine and glucose were fixed at 0.02% and 0.5%, respectively) and two glucose-based PDSs (glucose 1.36% or 2.27%). We examined their effects on endothelial cell proliferation (cell count), viability (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay), intracellular nitro-oxidative stress (peroxynitrite levels), Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 membrane exposure (flow cytometry), and HUVEC-monocyte interactions (U937 adhesion assay). Results Compared to glucose-based PDSs, our in vitro studies demonstrated that the tested PDSs did not change the proliferative potential both in C- and GD-HUVECs. Moreover, our PDSs significantly improved endothelial cell viability, compared to glucose-based PDSs and basal condition. Notably, glucose-based PDSs significantly increased the intracellular peroxynitrite levels, Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 membrane exposure, and endothelial cell–monocyte interactions in both C- and GD-HUVECs, as compared with our experimental PDSs. Conclusion Present results show that in control and diabetic human endothelial cell models, xylitol–carnitine-based PDSs do not cause cytotoxicity, nitro-oxidative stress, and inflammation as caused by hypertonic glucose-based PDSs. Since xylitol and carnitine are also known to

  20. Human β-Defensin 3 Reduces TNF-α-Induced Inflammation and Monocyte Adhesion in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Tianying; Li, Houxuan; Zhou, Qian; Ni, Can; Zhang, Yangheng

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of human β-defensin 3 (hBD3) in the initiation stage of atherosclerosis with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) triggered by tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α. The effects of hBD3 on TNF-α-induced endothelial injury and inflammatory response were evaluated. Our data revealed that first, hBD3 reduced the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, hBD3 significantly prevented intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by HUVECs. Second, western blot analysis demonstrated that hBD3 dose-dependently suppressed the protein levels of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in TNF-α-induced HUVECs. As a result, hBD3 inhibited monocyte adhesion to TNF-α-treated endothelial cells. Additionally, hBD3 suppressed TNF-α-induced F-actin reorganization in HUVECs. Third, hBD3 markedly inhibited NF-κB activation by decreasing the phosphorylation of IKK-α/β, IκB, and p65 subunit within 30 min. Moreover, the phosphorylation of p38 and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway were also inhibited by hBD3 in HUVECs. In conclusion, hBD3 exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects in endothelial cells in response to TNF-α by inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK signaling. PMID:28348463

  1. The isolation and culture of endothelial colony-forming cells from human and rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Rajesh S; Vadivel, Arul; Zhong, Shumei; Zong, Shumei; McConaghy, Suzanne; Ohls, Robin; Yoder, Mervin C; Thébaud, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Blood vessels are crucial for the normal development, lifelong repair and homeostasis of tissues. Recently, vascular progenitor cell-driven 'postnatal vasculogenesis' has been suggested as an important mechanism that contributes to new blood vessel formation and organ repair. Among several described progenitor cell types that contribute to blood vessel formation, endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) have received widespread attention as lineage-specific 'true' vascular progenitors. Here we describe a protocol for the isolation of pulmonary microvascular ECFCs from human and rat lung tissue. Our technique takes advantage of an earlier protocol for the isolation of circulating ECFCs from the mononuclear cellular fraction of peripheral blood. We adapted the earlier protocol to isolate resident ECFCs from the distal lung tissue. After enzymatic dispersion of rat or human lung samples into a cellular suspension, CD31-expressing cells are positively selected using magnetic-activated cell sorting and plated in endothelial-specific growth conditions. The colonies arising after 1-2 weeks in culture are carefully separated and expanded to yield pure ECFC cultures after a further 2-3 weeks. The resulting cells demonstrate the defining characteristics of ECFCs such as (i) 'cobblestone' morphology of cultured cell monolayers; (ii) acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake and Ulex europaeus lectin binding; (iii) tube-like network formation in Matrigel; (iv) expression of endothelial cell-specific surface markers and the absence of hematopoietic or myeloid surface antigens; (v) self-renewal potential displayed by the most proliferative cells; and (vi) contribution to de novo vessel formation in an in vivo mouse implant model. Assuming typical initial cell adhesion and proliferation rates, the entire procedure can be completed within 4 weeks. Isolation and culture of lung vascular ECFCs will allow assessment of the functional state of these cells in experimental and human

  2. Human β-NGF gene transferred to cat corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wen-Juan; Liu, Min; Zhao, Gui-Qiu; Wang, Chuan-Fu; Hu, Li-Ting; Liu, Xiang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    To transfect the cat corneal endothelial cells (CECs) with recombinant human β-nerve growth factor gene adeno-associated virus (AAV-β-NGF) and to observe the effect of the expressed β-NGF protein on the proliferation activity of cat CECs. The endothelium of cat cornea was torn under the microscope and rapidly cultivated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) to form single layer CECs and the passage 2 endothelial cells were used in this experiment. The recombinant human AAV-β-NGF was constructed. The recombinant human AAV-β-NGF was transferred into cat CECs directly. Three groups were as following: normal CEC control group, CEC-AAV control group and recombinant CEC-AAV-β-NGF group. Forty-eight hours after transfection, the total RNA was extracted from the CEC by Trizol. The expression of the β-NGF target gene detected by fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction; proliferation activity of the transfected CEC detected at 48h by MTT assay; the percentage of G1 cells among CECs after transfect was detected by flow cytometry method (FCM); cell morphology was observed under inverted phase contrast microscope. The torn endothelium culture technique rapidly cultivated single layer cat corneal endothelial cells. The self-designed primers for the target gene and reference gene were efficient and special confirmed through electrophoresis analysis and DNA sequencing. Forty-eight hours after transfect, the human β-NGF gene mRNA detected by fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that there was no significant difference between normal CEC control group and CEC-AAV control group (P>0.05); there was significant difference between two control groups and recombinant CEC-AAV-β-NGF group (P<0.05). MTT assay showed that transfect of recombinant AAV-β-NGF promoted the proliferation activity of cat CEC, while there was no significant difference between normal CEC control group and CEC-AAV control group (P>0.05). FCM result showed that the

  3. Human β-NGF gene transferred to cat corneal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wen-Juan; Liu, Min; Zhao, Gui-Qiu; Wang, Chuan-Fu; Hu, Li-Ting; Liu, Xiang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    AIM To transfect the cat corneal endothelial cells (CECs) with recombinant human β-nerve growth factor gene adeno-associated virus (AAV-β-NGF) and to observe the effect of the expressed β-NGF protein on the proliferation activity of cat CECs. METHODS The endothelium of cat cornea was torn under the microscope and rapidly cultivated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) to form single layer CECs and the passage 2 endothelial cells were used in this experiment. The recombinant human AAV-β-NGF was constructed. The recombinant human AAV-β-NGF was transferred into cat CECs directly. Three groups were as following: normal CEC control group, CEC-AAV control group and recombinant CEC-AAV-β-NGF group. Forty-eight hours after transfection, the total RNA was extracted from the CEC by Trizol. The expression of the β-NGF target gene detected by fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction; proliferation activity of the transfected CEC detected at 48h by MTT assay; the percentage of G1 cells among CECs after transfect was detected by flow cytometry method (FCM); cell morphology was observed under inverted phase contrast microscope. RESULTS The torn endothelium culture technique rapidly cultivated single layer cat corneal endothelial cells. The self-designed primers for the target gene and reference gene were efficient and special confirmed through electrophoresis analysis and DNA sequencing. Forty-eight hours after transfect, the human β-NGF gene mRNA detected by fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that there was no significant difference between normal CEC control group and CEC-AAV control group (P>0.05); there was significant difference between two control groups and recombinant CEC-AAV-β-NGF group (P<0.05). MTT assay showed that transfect of recombinant AAV-β-NGF promoted the proliferation activity of cat CEC, while there was no significant difference between normal CEC control group and CEC-AAV control group (P>0.05). FCM result

  4. Notch alters VEGF responsiveness in human and murine endothelial cells by direct regulation of VEGFR-3 expression

    PubMed Central

    Shawber, Carrie J.; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Francisco, Esther; Vorontchikhina, Marina; Kitamura, Yukari; Stowell, Stephanie A.; Borisenko, Valeriya; Feirt, Nikki; Podgrabinska, Simona; Shiraishi, Kazuko; Chawengsaksophak, Kallayanee; Rossant, Janet; Accili, Domenico; Skobe, Mihaela; Kitajewski, Jan

    2007-01-01

    The Notch family of cell surface receptors and its ligands are highly conserved proteins that regulate cell fate determination, including those involved in mammalian vascular development. We report that Notch induces VEGFR-3 expression in vitro in human endothelial cells and in vivo in mice. In vitro, Notch in complex with the DNA-binding protein CBF-1/suppressor of hairless/Lag1 (CSL) bound the VEGFR-3 promoter and transactivated VEGFR-3 specifically in endothelial cells. Through induction of VEGFR-3, Notch increased endothelial cell responsiveness to VEGF-C, promoting endothelial cell survival and morphological changes. In vivo, VEGFR-3 was upregulated in endothelial cells with active Notch signaling. Mice heterozygous for null alleles of both Notch1 and VEGFR-3 had significantly reduced viability and displayed midgestational vascular patterning defects analogous to Notch1 nullizygous embryos. We found that Notch1 and Notch4 were expressed in normal and tumor lymphatic endothelial cells and that Notch1 was activated in lymphatic endothelium of invasive mammary micropapillary carcinomas. These results demonstrate that Notch1 and VEGFR-3 interact genetically, that Notch directly induces VEGFR-3 in blood endothelial cells to regulate vascular development, and that Notch may function in tumor lymphangiogenesis. PMID:17948123

  5. Human haemodynamic frequency harmonics regulate the inflammatory phenotype of vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Feaver, Ryan E; Gelfand, Bradley D; Blackman, Brett R

    2013-01-01

    Haemodynamic variations are inherent to blood vessel geometries (such as bifurcations) and correlate with regional development of inflammation and atherosclerosis. However, the complex frequency spectrum characteristics from these haemodynamics have never been exploited to test whether frequency variations are critical determinants of endothelial inflammatory phenotype. Here we utilize an experimental Fourier transform analysis to systematically manipulate individual frequency harmonics from human carotid shear stress waveforms applied in vitro to human endothelial cells. The frequency spectrum, specifically the 0 th and 1st harmonics, is a significant regulator of inflammation, including NF-κB activity and downstream inflammatory phenotype. Further, a harmonic-based regression-model predicts eccentric NF-κB activity observed in the human internal carotid artery. Finally, short interfering RNA-knockdown of the mechanosensor PECAM-1 reverses frequency-dependent regulation of NF-κB activity. Thus, PECAM-1 may have a critical role in the endothelium's exquisite sensitivity to complex shear stress frequency harmonics and provide a mechanism for the focal development of vascular inflammation.

  6. Production of functional human vascular endothelial growth factor(165) in transgenic rice cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Chung, Nguyen-Duc; Kim, Nan-Sun; Giap, Do Van; Jang, Seon-Hui; Oh, Sun-Mi; Jang, Sun-Hee; Kim, Tae-Geum; Jang, Yong-Suk; Yang, Moon-Sik

    2014-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) are secreted by tumor cells and other cells exposed to hypoxia, and play a critical role in the development and differentiation of the vascular system. In this study, we investigated the production of functional recombinant human VEGF165 (rhVEGF165) in transgenic rice cell suspension culture. Complementary DNA was synthesized from human leukemia HL60 cells and cloned into expression vectors under the control of the rice α-amylase 3D (RAmy3D) promoter. The rice seed (Oryza sativa L. cv. Dongjin) was transformed with this recombinant vector by the Agrobacterium mediated method and the integration of the target gene into the plant genome was confirmed by genomic PCR. The expression of rhVEGF165 in the rice cells was determined by Northern blot and Western blot analyses. The accumulated rhVEGF165 protein in the culture medium was 19 mg/L after 18 days of culturing in a sugar-free medium. The rhVEGF165 was purified using a heparin HP column and its biological activity was tested on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The purified rhVEGF165 significantly increased the proliferative activity of the HUVECs. Therefore, it was demonstrated that functional rhVEGF165 could be produced using transgenic rice suspension culture vector under the control of the RAmy3D promoter.

  7. Fast multi-spectral imaging technique for detection of circulating endothelial cells in human blood samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnyy, Ihor V.; Berezhna, Svitlana Y.

    2012-08-01

    The appearance of non-blood cells circulating in human peripheral bloodstream indicates an abnormal condition. One important category of these cells is circulating endothelial cells (CECs) shed by compromised blood vessels. Clinical applications that measure the blood level of CECs are hindered due to a lack of standardized instruments. The major challenge in detecting circulating non-blood cells is their extreme scarcity; 1 in 106 to 107. Described here is a new method for detection of rare cells in blood samples deposited on the adhesive microscopic slides and immunostained with distinct fluorescent markers. The key novelty of the proposed approach is an intelligent search principle and a dual-mode scanner to implement this principle. To begin, a fast scanning that uses a single beam is performed in the spectral channel where only rare cells produce florescence. Once a target cell is registered, the scanner switches on the imaging mode, auto-focuses and then records images in multiple spectral channels at the selected area. The instrument runs in repetitive cycles until the entire slide is scanned. The technology has been validated via detection of human umbilical vein endothelial cells spiked into human blood samples. In addition, the operational principle can be adapted for detection of other types of rare cells in blood.

  8. Development of Blood and Lymphatic Endothelial Cells in Embryonic and Fetal Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Christopher; Mildner, Michael; Botta, Albert; Nemec, Lucas; Rogojanu, Radu; Beer, Lucian; Fiala, Christian; Eppel, Wolfgang; Bauer, Wolfgang; Petzelbauer, Peter; Elbe-Bürger, Adelheid

    2015-09-01

    Blood and lymphatic vessels provide nutrients for the skin and fulfill important homeostatic functions, such as the regulation of immunologic processes. In this study, we investigated the development of blood and lymphatic endothelial cells in prenatal human skin in situ using multicolor immunofluorescence and analyzed angiogenic molecules by protein arrays of lysates and cell culture supernatants. We found that at 8 to 10 weeks of estimated gestational age, CD144(+) vessels predominantly express the venous endothelial cell marker PAL-E, whereas CD144(+)PAL-E(-) vessels compatible with arteries only appear at the end of the first trimester. Lymphatic progenitor cells at 8 weeks of estimated gestational age express CD31, CD144, Prox1, and temporary PAL-E. At that developmental stage not all lymphatic progenitor cells express podoplanin or Lyve-1, which are acquired with advancing gestational age in a stepwise fashion. Already in second-trimester human skin, the phenotype of blood and lymphatic vessels roughly resembles the one in adult skin. The expression pattern of angiogenic molecules in lysates and cell culture supernatants of prenatal skin did not reveal the expected bent to proangiogenic molecules, indicating a complex regulation of angiogenesis during ontogeny. In summary, this study provides enticing new insights into the development and phenotypic characteristics of the vascular system in human prenatal skin. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Human endothelial cell-based assay for endotoxin as sensitive as the conventional Limulus Amebocyte Lysate assay.

    PubMed

    Unger, Ronald E; Peters, Kirsten; Sartoris, Anne; Freese, Christian; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2014-03-01

    Endotoxin, also known as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced by bacteria can be present in any liquid or on any biomaterial even if the material is sterile. Endotoxin in mammals can cause fever, inflammation, cell and tissue damage and irreversible septic shock and death. In the body, endothelial cells making up the blood vasculature and endothelial cells in vitro rapidly react to minute amounts of endotoxin resulting in a rapid induction of the cell adhesion molecule E-selectin. In this study we have used immunofluorescent staining to evaluate the expression of E-selectin on human microvascular endothelial cells from the skin (HDMEC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) exposed to various concentrations of LPS. In addition, the sensitivity of detection was compared with the most widely used assay for the presence of endotoxin, the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate assay (LAL). The detection of E-selectin on endothelial cells in the presence of LPS for 4 h was found to be at least as sensitive in detecting the same concentration using the LAL assay. A cell adhesion molecule-enzyme immunosorbent assay was also developed and used to quantify LPS using the endothelial cell model. A comparison of LAL and the immunofluorescent staining method was carried out with solutions, nanoparticles, biomaterial extracts and endothelial cells grown directly on biomaterials. Under all conditions, the endothelial/E-selectin model system was positive for the test samples that were positive by LAL. Thus, we propose the use of this highly sensitive, rapid, reproducible assay for the routine testing of endotoxin in all steps in the manufacturing process of materials destined for use in humans. This can give a rapid feedback and localization of bacterial contamination sources with the LAL being reserved for the testing of the final product.

  10. Geranylgeranylacetone, heat shock protein 90/AMP-activated protein kinase/endothelial nitric oxide synthase/nitric oxide pathway, and endothelial function in humans.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Noritaka; Jitsuiki, Daisuke; Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Mikami, Shinsuke; Iwamoto, Yumiko; Kajikawa, Masato; Chayama, Kazuaki; Kihara, Yasuki; Noma, Kensuke; Goto, Chikara; Higashi, Yukihito

    2012-01-01

    Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) induces expression of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), an adaptor molecule for assembly of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation complex. The purpose of this study was to determine whether GGA enhances Hsp90 expression and augments endothelium-dependent vasodilation via upregulation of eNOS in humans. We evaluated the effects of GGA on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and on forearm blood flow (FBF) responses to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside in 40 healthy young men. Hsp90, eNOS, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and Akt expression in HUVECs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells was detected by Western blot analysis. GGA increased Hsp90 expression and phosphorylation of eNOS and AMPK but not Akt in HUVECs and increased Hsp90 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Oral administration of GGA (600 mg) augmented the FBF response to acetylcholine. Infusion of N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine, an NO synthase inhibitor, completely abolished GGA-induced augmentation of the FBF response to acetylcholine. GGA also augmented the acetylcholine-stimulated NO release in smokers. These findings suggest that GGA-induced activation of Hsp90/AMPK significantly increased NO-mediated vasodilation in healthy subjects, as well as in smokers. The use of GGA may be a new therapeutic approach for improving endothelial dysfunction.

  11. Dual mechanism of vascular endothelial growth factor upregulation by hypoxia in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    von Marschall, Z; Cramer, T; Hocker, M; Finkenzeller, G; Wiedenmann, B; Rosewicz, S

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a key role in regulation of tumour associated angiogenesis. In the current study we analysed expression of VEGF and its receptors in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and investigated the molecular mechanisms of VEGF regulation by hypoxia.
METHODS—VEGF, kinase domain region (KDR)/fetal liver kinase 1 (flk-1), and flt-1 expression were examined by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation in 15 human HCC tissues. Expression of VEGF and regulation by hypoxia were assessed in three human HCC cell lines using a quantitative competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, ELISA, and a series of 5' deletion reporter gene constructs of the human VEGF promoter in transient transfection assays.
RESULTS—We observed over expression of VEGF mRNA and protein in HCC compared with cirrhosis or normal liver. Expression of VEGF in tumour cells was strongly increased in areas directly adjacent to necrotic/hypoxic regions. Both VEGF receptors were detected in vascular endothelia of HCC while only KDR/flk-1 receptors were detected in endothelial cells of cirrhotic livers. Expression of VEGF was observed in all human HCC cell lines examined. Hypoxia (1% oxygen) resulted in profound upregulation of VEGF mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, hypoxia treatment resulted in a doubling of VEGF mRNA stability. Deletion analysis of the human VEGF 5' flanking region −2018 and +50 demonstrated induction of VEGF promoter activity under hypoxic conditions which was significantly decreased following deletion of the region −1286 and −789 suggesting a substantial contribution of the −975 putative hypoxia inducible factor 1 binding site to hypoxia mediated transcriptional activation of the VEGF gene.
CONCLUSION—These data suggest hypoxia as a central stimulus of angiogenesis in human HCC through upregulation of VEGF gene expression by at least two distinct molecular mechanisms: activation of

  12. Analysis of proteome response to the mobile phone radiation in two types of human primary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nylund, Reetta; Kuster, Niels; Leszczynski, Dariusz

    2010-10-18

    Use of mobile phones has widely increased over the past decade. However, in spite of the extensive research, the question of potential health effects of the mobile phone radiation remains unanswered. We have earlier proposed, and applied, proteomics as a tool to study biological effects of the mobile phone radiation, using as a model human endothelial cell line EA.hy926. Exposure of EA.hy926 cells to 900 MHz GSM radiation has caused statistically significant changes in expression of numerous proteins. However, exposure of EA.hy926 cells to 1800 MHz GSM signal had only very small effect on cell proteome, as compared with 900 MHz GSM exposure. In the present study, using as model human primary endothelial cells, we have examined whether exposure to 1800 MHz GSM mobile phone radiation can affect cell proteome. Primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells and primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells were exposed for 1 hour to 1800 MHz GSM mobile phone radiation at an average specific absorption rate of 2.0 W/kg. The cells were harvested immediately after the exposure and the protein expression patterns of the sham-exposed and radiation-exposed cells were examined using two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis-based proteomics (2DE-DIGE). There were observed numerous differences between the proteomes of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (both sham-exposed). These differences are most likely representing physiological differences between endothelia in different vascular beds. However, the exposure of both types of primary endothelial cells to mobile phone radiation did not cause any statistically significant changes in protein expression. Exposure of primary human endothelial cells to the mobile phone radiation, 1800 MHz GSM signal for 1 hour at an average specific absorption rate of 2.0 W/kg, does not affect protein expression, when the proteomes were examined immediately after the end of the

  13. Analysis of proteome response to the mobile phone radiation in two types of human primary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Use of mobile phones has widely increased over the past decade. However, in spite of the extensive research, the question of potential health effects of the mobile phone radiation remains unanswered. We have earlier proposed, and applied, proteomics as a tool to study biological effects of the mobile phone radiation, using as a model human endothelial cell line EA.hy926. Exposure of EA.hy926 cells to 900 MHz GSM radiation has caused statistically significant changes in expression of numerous proteins. However, exposure of EA.hy926 cells to 1800 MHz GSM signal had only very small effect on cell proteome, as compared with 900 MHz GSM exposure. In the present study, using as model human primary endothelial cells, we have examined whether exposure to 1800 MHz GSM mobile phone radiation can affect cell proteome. Results Primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells and primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells were exposed for 1 hour to 1800 MHz GSM mobile phone radiation at an average specific absorption rate of 2.0 W/kg. The cells were harvested immediately after the exposure and the protein expression patterns of the sham-exposed and radiation-exposed cells were examined using two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis-based proteomics (2DE-DIGE). There were observed numerous differences between the proteomes of human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (both sham-exposed). These differences are most likely representing physiological differences between endothelia in different vascular beds. However, the exposure of both types of primary endothelial cells to mobile phone radiation did not cause any statistically significant changes in protein expression. Conclusions Exposure of primary human endothelial cells to the mobile phone radiation, 1800 MHz GSM signal for 1 hour at an average specific absorption rate of 2.0 W/kg, does not affect protein expression, when the proteomes were examined

  14. Human adipose tissue-resident monocytes exhibit an endothelial-like phenotype and display angiogenic properties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adipose tissue has the unique property of expanding throughout adult life, and angiogenesis is required for its growth. However, endothelial progenitor cells contribute minimally to neovascularization. Because myeloid cells have proven to be angiogenic, and monocytes accumulate in expanding adipose tissue, they might contribute to vascularization. Methods The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells from human adipose tissue were magnetically separated according to CD45 or CD14 expression. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were obtained from SVF CD45- cells. CD14+ monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood (PB) mononuclear cells and then cultured with SVF-derived MSCs. Freshly isolated or cultured cells were characterized with flow cytometry; the conditioned media were analyzed for the angiogenic growth factors, angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with Luminex Technology; their angiogenic capacity was determined in an in vivo gelatinous protein mixture (Matrigel) plug angiogenesis assay. Results CD45+ hematopoietic cells within the SVF contain CD14+ cells that co-express the CD34 progenitor marker and the endothelial cell antigens VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2/KDR), VEGFR1/Flt1, and Tie2. Co-culture experiments showed that SVF-derived MSCs promoted the acquisition of KDR and Tie-2 in PB monocytes. MSCs secreted significant amounts of Ang-2 and HGF, but minimal amounts of bFGF, G-CSF, or GM-CSF, whereas the opposite was observed for SVF CD14+ cells. Additionally, SVF CD14+ cells secreted significantly higher levels of VEGF and bFGF than did MSCs. Culture supernatants of PB monocytes cultured with MSCs contained significantly higher concentrations of VEGF, HGF, G-CSF, and GM-CSF than did the supernatants from cultures without MSCs

  15. Scutellarin promotes in vitro angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhong-Xiu-Zi; Huang, Da-Yong; Li, Hai-Xia; Zhang, Li-Na; Lv, Yan-Hong; Cui, Hai-Dong; Zheng, Jin-Hua

    2010-09-10

    Research highlights: {yields} It has been shown that scutellarin exhibits a variety of pharmacological actions, including anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, vasodilator as well as cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ischemia protective effects, indicating beneficial vascular effects of scutellarin. Therefore, it is speculated that scutellarin may be able to stimulate angiogenesis, which could be beneficial in the treatment of ischemic disease, wound healing and tissue regeneration. {yields} The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the direct angiogenic actions of scutellarin on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. {yields} Our results showed that scutellarin to directly induce in vitro angiogenesis, which is closely correlated with upregulated MMP-2 expression, suggesting a potential for increasing angiogenesis. -- Abstract: Angiogenesis is critical to a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. Scutellarin, a major flavonoid of a Chinese herbal medicine Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand. Mazz. has been shown to offer beneficial effects on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular functions. However, scutellarin's effects on angiogenesis and underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Here, we studied angiogenic effects of scutellarin on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. Scutellarin was found by MTT assay to induce proliferation of HUVECs. In scutellarin-treated HUVECs, a dramatic increase in migration was measured by wound healing assay; Transwell chamber assay found significantly more invading cells in scutellarin-treated groups. Scutellarin also promoted capillary-like tube formation in HUVECs on Matrigel, and significantly upregulated platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 at both mRNA and protein levels. Scutellarin's angiogenic mechanism was investigated in vitro by measuring expression of angiogenic factors associated with cell migration and invasion. Scutellarin strongly induced MMP-2

  16. Isolation of Functional Human Endothelial Cells from Small Volumes of Umbilical Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Do Kang, Sa; Carlon, Tim A.; Jantzen, Alexandra E.; Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Ley, Melissa M.; Allen, Jason D.; Stabler, Thomas V.; Haley, N. Rebecca; Truskey, George A.; Achneck, Hardean E.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) isolated from endothelial progenitor cells in blood have great potential as a therapeutic tool to promote vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and treat cardiovascular diseases. However, current methods to isolate ECs are limited by a low yield with few colonies appearing during isolation. In order to utilize blood-derived ECs for therapeutic applications, a simple method is needed that can produce a high yield of ECs from small volumes of blood without the addition of animal-derived products. For the first time, we show that human endothelial cells can be isolated without the prior separation of blood components through the technique of diluted whole blood incubation (DWBI) utilizing commercially available human serum. We isolated ECs from small volumes of blood (~ 10 ml) via DWBI and characterized them with flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and uptake of DiI-labeled acetylated low density lipoprotein (DiI-Ac-LDL). These ECs are functional as demonstrated by their ability to form tubular networks in Matrigel, adhere and align with flow under physiological fluid shear stress, and produce increased nitric oxide under fluid flow. An average of 7.0 ± 2.5 EC colonies that passed all functional tests described above were obtained per 10 ml of blood as compared to only 0.3 ± 0.1 colonies with the traditional method based on density centrifugation. The time until first colony appearance was 8.3 ± 1.2 days for ECs isolated with the DWBI method and 12 ± 1.4 days for ECs isolated with the traditional isolation method. A simplified method, such as DWBI, in combination with advances in isolation yield could enable the use of blood-derived ECs in clinical practice. PMID:23604849

  17. Human endothelial and platelet septin SEPT11: cloning of novel variants and characterisation of interaction partners.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Ingrid; Bläser, Susanne; Röseler, Sabrina; Sandrock, Kirstin; Busse, Anja; Huber, Michael; Rempp, Hansjörg; Lieber, Mareike; Horn, Julia; Brendle, Cornelia; Zieger, Barbara

    2010-12-01

    Septins are cytoskeletal GTPases forming heteropolymeric complexes involved in processes characterised by active membrane movement such as cytokinesis, vesicle trafficking, and exocytosis. Septins are expressed in non-mitotic cells such as neurons and platelets. SEPT11 belongs to the SEPT6 group and was identified as interaction partner of SEPT5. We cloned and characterised novel SEPT11 variants and investigated interaction partners of SEPT11 in platelets and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. An endothelial cell library was used for cloning novel SEPT11 variants. Using Northern analysis the different SEPT11 transcripts were illustrated. Interaction studies were performed using yeast two-hybrid system, precipitation, FRET, and immunofluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate that SEPT11 partners with SEPT2, SEPT4 and SEPT7 using yeast two-hybrid system and precipitation. The interaction of SEPT11 with SEPT7 is also demonstrated by FRET. In addition to the known SEPT11 transcript (SEPT11_v1) we identified a novel SEPT11 variant (SEPT11_v2) as interaction partner of SEPT4 and SEPT7. Library screening of an endothelial cell library also revealed the presence of this novel SEPT11_v2 transcript. In addition, a third SEPT11 variant (SEPT11_v3) was identified. Expression of SEPT11_v1 and of SEPT11_v2 and SEPT11_v3 in human brain regions was investigated by Northern analysis. Further interaction partners of SEPT11 are characterised using immunofluorescence. Co-localisation of SEPT2, SEPT4, SEPT7 and SEPT11 with tubulin and transferrin receptor (endocytotic marker) is demonstrated. In addition, co-localisation of SEPT4 and SEPT11 with the vesicle-associated protein synaptobrevin 1 (VAMP1), but not clearly with actin, was shown. Only SEPT2 and SEPT7 definitely co-localised with actin, but not clearly with VAMP1.

  18. Effects of Aged Stored Autologous Red Blood Cells on Human Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Kanias, Tamir; Triulzi, Darrel; Donadee, Chenell; Barge, Suchitra; Badlam, Jessica; Jain, Shilpa; Belanger, Andrea M.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: A major abnormality that characterizes the red cell “storage lesion” is increased hemolysis and reduced red cell lifespan after infusion. Low levels of intravascular hemolysis after transfusion of aged stored red cells disrupt nitric oxide (NO) bioavailabity, via accelerated NO scavenging reaction with cell-free plasma hemoglobin. The degree of intravascular hemolysis post-transfusion and effects on endothelial-dependent vasodilation responses to acetylcholine have not been fully characterized in humans. Objectives: To evaluate the effects of blood aged to the limits of Food and Drug Administration–approved storage time on the human microcirculation and endothelial function. Methods: Eighteen healthy individuals donated 1 U of leukopheresed red cells, divided and autologously transfused into the forearm brachial artery 5 and 42 days after blood donation. Blood samples were obtained from stored blood bag supernatants and the antecubital vein of the infusion arm. Forearm blood flow measurements were performed using strain-gauge plethysmography during transfusion, followed by testing of endothelium-dependent blood flow with increasing doses of intraarterial acetylcholine. Measurements and Main Results: We demonstrate that aged stored blood has higher levels of arginase-1 and cell-free plasma hemoglobin. Compared with 5-day blood, the transfusion of 42-day packed red cells decreases acetylcholine-dependent forearm blood flows. Intravascular venous levels of arginase-1 and cell-free plasma hemoglobin increase immediately after red cell transfusion, with more significant increases observed after infusion of 42-day-old blood. Conclusions: We demonstrate that the transfusion of blood at the limits of Food and Drug Administration–approved storage has a significant effect on the forearm circulation and impairs endothelial function. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01137656) PMID:26222884

  19. Low Dose Iron Treatments Induce a DNA Damage Response in Human Endothelial Cells within Minutes

    PubMed Central

    Mollet, Inês G.; Giess, Adam; Paschalaki, Koralia; Periyasamy, Manikandan; Lidington, Elaine C.; Mason, Justin C.; Jones, Michael D.; Game, Laurence; Ali, Simak; Shovlin, Claire L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous reports from patients able to report vascular sequelae in real time, and recognition that serum non transferrin bound iron may reach or exceed 10μmol/L in the blood stream after iron tablets or infusions, led us to hypothesize that conventional iron treatments may provoke acute vascular injury. This prompted us to examine whether a phenotype could be observed in normal human endothelial cells treated with low dose iron. Methodology Confluent primary human endothelial cells (EC) were treated with filter-sterilized iron (II) citrate or fresh media for RNA sequencing and validation studies. RNA transcript profiles were evaluated using directional RNA sequencing with no pre-specification of target sequences. Alignments were counted for exons and junctions of the gene strand only, blinded to treatment types. Principal Findings Rapid changes in RNA transcript profiles were observed in endothelial cells treated with 10μmol/L iron (II) citrate, compared to media-treated cells. Clustering for Gene Ontology (GO) performed on all differentially expressed genes revealed significant differences in biological process terms between iron and media-treated EC, whereas 10 sets of an equivalent number of randomly selected genes from the respective EC gene datasets showed no significant differences in any GO terms. After 1 hour, differentially expressed genes clustered to vesicle mediated transport, protein catabolism, and cell cycle (Benjamini p = 0.0016, 0.0024 and 0.0032 respectively), and by 6 hours, to cellular response to DNA damage stimulus most significantly through DNA repair genes FANCG, BLM, and H2AFX. Comet assays demonstrated that 10μM iron treatment elicited DNA damage within 1 hour. This was accompanied by a brisk DNA damage response pulse, as ascertained by the development of DNA damage response (DDR) foci, and p53 stabilization. Significance These data suggest that low dose iron treatments are sufficient to modify the vascular endothelium

  20. Tumor-associated macrophages induce capillary morphogenesis of lymphatic endothelial cells derived from human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tauchi, Yukie; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Kumamoto, Kanako; Tokumoto, Mao; Sakimura, Chie; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Kimura, Kenjiro; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Amano, Ryosuke; Kubo, Naoshi; Muguruma, Kazuya; Yashiro, Masakazu; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Ohira, Masaichi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2016-08-01

    Tumor lymphangiogenesis is a major prognostic indicator of gastric cancer. Tumor-induced inflammation has been shown to attract tumor-associated macrophages that affect lymphangiogenesis. However, detailed mechanisms of macrophage-induced lymphangiogenesis have not been elucidated. Here, we evaluated the interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) derived from lymph nodes (LNs) of human gastric cancer. Lymphatic endothelial cells were directly or indirectly cocultured with macrophages from healthy human blood, with or without the supernatant of the gastric cancer cell line, OCUM-12. We analyzed the effect of cancer pretreated macrophages and of macrophages from metastatic LNs of gastric cancer on LECs. We observed morphological changes of LECs in coculture and assessed the gene expression of possible lymphangiogenic molecules of macrophages and LECs after contact coculture, and of cancer pretreated macrophages, by quantitative RT-PCR. Specimens of metastatic LN of gastric cancer were immunofluorescently stained. We found that tubulogenesis of LECs was observed only in the contact coculture model. OCUM-12 cells promoted macrophage-induced tubulogenesis of LECs. Relative gene expression of MMP and adhesion molecules was significantly upregulated in both capillary-forming LECs and cocultured macrophages. Cancer pretreated macrophages upregulated lymphangiogenic factors including inflammatory cytokines, MMPs, adhesion molecules, and vascular endothelial growth factor-C. Blocking of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and macrophage activation suppressed tubulogenesis of LECs. Immunohistochemistry showed macrophages localized around lymphatic vessels. Our results suggested that interaction between LECs and macrophages may be an important initial step of tumor lymphangiogenesis developing LN metastasis. Understanding of its mechanisms could be useful for future therapeutics of gastric cancer.

  1. Effects of Aged Stored Autologous Red Blood Cells on Human Endothelial Function.

    PubMed

    Risbano, Michael G; Kanias, Tamir; Triulzi, Darrel; Donadee, Chenell; Barge, Suchitra; Badlam, Jessica; Jain, Shilpa; Belanger, Andrea M; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; Gladwin, Mark T

    2015-11-15

    A major abnormality that characterizes the red cell "storage lesion" is increased hemolysis and reduced red cell lifespan after infusion. Low levels of intravascular hemolysis after transfusion of aged stored red cells disrupt nitric oxide (NO) bioavailabity, via accelerated NO scavenging reaction with cell-free plasma hemoglobin. The degree of intravascular hemolysis post-transfusion and effects on endothelial-dependent vasodilation responses to acetylcholine have not been fully characterized in humans. To evaluate the effects of blood aged to the limits of Food and Drug Administration-approved storage time on the human microcirculation and endothelial function. Eighteen healthy individuals donated 1 U of leukopheresed red cells, divided and autologously transfused into the forearm brachial artery 5 and 42 days after blood donation. Blood samples were obtained from stored blood bag supernatants and the antecubital vein of the infusion arm. Forearm blood flow measurements were performed using strain-gauge plethysmography during transfusion, followed by testing of endothelium-dependent blood flow with increasing doses of intraarterial acetylcholine. We demonstrate that aged stored blood has higher levels of arginase-1 and cell-free plasma hemoglobin. Compared with 5-day blood, the transfusion of 42-day packed red cells decreases acetylcholine-dependent forearm blood flows. Intravascular venous levels of arginase-1 and cell-free plasma hemoglobin increase immediately after red cell transfusion, with more significant increases observed after infusion of 42-day-old blood. We demonstrate that the transfusion of blood at the limits of Food and Drug Administration-approved storage has a significant effect on the forearm circulation and impairs endothelial function. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01137656).

  2. Corneal Endothelial Cell Integrity in Precut Human Donor Corneas Enhanced by Autocrine Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Coll, Timothy; Gloria, Dante; Sprehe, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a corneal endothelial (CE) cell autocrine factor, maintains the integrity of corneal endothelium in human donor corneoscleral explants precut for endothelial keratoplasty. Methods: Twelve paired human donor corneoscleral explants used as control versus VIP-treated explants (10 nM, 30 minutes, 37°C) were shipped (4°C) to the Lions Eye Institute for Transplantation and Research for precutting (Moria CBM-ALTK Keratome), shipped back to the laboratory, and cultured in ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, 0.83 nM, 37°C, 24 hours). Trephined endothelial discs (8–8.5 mm) were analyzed for differentiation markers (N-cadherin, CNTF receptor α subunit [CNTFRα], and connexin 43) by Western blot after a quarter of the discs from 4 paired explants were cut away and stained with alizarin red S for microscopic damage analysis. Two additional paired explants (6 days in culture) were stained for panoramic view of central CE damage. Results: VIP treatment increased N-cadherin and CNTFRα levels (mean ± SEM) to 1.38 ± 0.11-fold (P = 0.003) and 1.46 ± 0.22-fold (P = 0.03) of paired controls, respectively, whereas CE cell CNTF responsiveness in upregulation of connexin 43 increased to 2.02 ± 0.5 (mean ± SEM)-fold of the controls (P = 0.04). CE damage decreased from (mean ± SEM) 10.0% ± 1.2% to 1.6% ± 0.3% (P < 0.0001) and 9.1% ± 1.1% to 2.4% ± 1.0% (P = 0.0006). After 6 days in culture, the damage in whole CE discs decreased from 20.0% (control) to 5.5% (VIP treated). Conclusions: VIP treatment before precut enhanced the preservation of corneal endothelium. PMID:28181929

  3. The cytotoxicity evaluation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles on human aortic endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Gaoyuan; Wu, Hengfang; Xiong, Fei; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Zhirui; Bian, Zhiping; Xu, Jindan; Gu, Chunrong; Gu, Ning; Chen, Xiangjian; Yang, Di

    2013-05-01

    One major obstacle for successful application of nanoparticles in medicine is its potential nanotoxicity on the environment and human health. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxicity effect of dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated iron oxide (DMSA-Fe2O3) using cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Our results showed that DMSA-Fe2O3 in the culture medium could be absorbed into HAECs, and dispersed in the cytoplasm. The cytotoxicity effect of DMSA-Fe2O3 on HAECs was dose-dependent, and the concentrations no more than 0.02 mg/ml had little toxic effect which were revealed by tetrazolium dye assay. Meanwhile, the cell injury biomarker, lactate dehydrogenase, was not significantly higher than that from control cells (without DMSA-Fe2O3). However, the endocrine function for endothelin-1 and prostacyclin I-2, as well as the urea transporter function, was altered even without obvious evidence of cell injury in this context. We also showed by real-time PCR analysis that DMSA-Fe2O3 exposure resulted in differential effects on the expressions of pro- and anti-apoptosis genes of HAECs. Meanwhile, it was noted that DMSA-Fe2O3 exposure could activate the expression of genes related to oxidative stress and adhesion molecules, which suggested that inflammatory response might be evoked. Moreover, we demonstrated by in vitro endothelial tube formation that even a small amount of DMSA-Fe2O3 (0.01 and 0.02 mg/ml) could inhibit angiogenesis by the HAECs. Altogether, these results indicate that DMSA-Fe2O3 have some cytotoxicity that may cause side effects on normal endothelial cells.

  4. Long-Term Treatment of Native LDL Induces Senescence of Cultured Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sung-Tack; Park, Hoon; Yoon, Hyun Joong

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate whether the treatment of primary cultured human endothelial cells with native low-density lipoprotein (nLDL) could induce their senescence and to uncover some of the putative mechanisms involved. For this purpose, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were subcultured and/or continuously cultured with nLDL (0, 2, 5, and 10 μg protein/mL), for up to 9 days. The results indicated that nLDL inhibited the proliferation of HUVECs by arresting the cell cycle at G1 phase. The G1-arrested cells showed increase in cytosolic senescence-associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) activity, a biomarker of cellular senescence. The causative factor of the cellular senescence was nLDL itself and not oxidized LDL (oxLDL), since blocking LDL receptor (LDLR) with the anti-LDLR antibody opposed the nLDL-induced increase of SA-β-Gal activity and decrease of cellular proliferation. In addition, nLDL-induced cellular senescence by inhibiting the phosphorylation of pRb (G1 arrest) via p53 as well as p16 signal transduction pathways. G1 phase arrest of the senescent cells was not overcome by nLDL removal from the culture medium. Moreover, the nLDL-treated cells produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) dose- and time-dependently. These results suggested, for the first time, that long-term treatment of nLDL could induce the premature senescence of endothelial cells. PMID:28197300

  5. Plant proteolytic enzyme papain abrogates angiogenic activation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key regulator of physiologic and pathogenic angiogenesis in diseases such as cancer and diabetic retinopathy. It is known that cysteine proteases from plants, like bromelain and papain are capable to suppress inflammatory activation. Recent studies have demonstrated that they may interfere with angiogenesis related pathways as well. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-angiogenic effects of papain on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro. Methods Cell viability after prolonged treatment with papain was investigated by life cell staining and lactate dehydrogenase release assay. Angiogenic activation was assessed by ELISA against phosphorylated proteins AKT, MEK1/2, ERK1/2, SAPK/JNK and p38-MAPK. Growth inhibition was determined by means of an MTT-assay and cell migration by means of a scratch assay. Capability to form a capillary network was investigated using a tube formation assay. Results Papain did not induce proteolysis or cell detachment of HUVEC in a concentration range between 0 and 25 μg/mL. Four hours treatment with 10 μg/mL papain resulted in a reduced susceptibility of endothelial cells to activation by VEGF as determined by phosphorylation levels of Akt, MEK1/2, SAPK/JNK. Papain exerted a distinct inhibitory effect on cell growth, cell migration and tube formation with inhibition of tube formation detectable at concentrations as low as 1 μg/mL. Bromelain and ficin displayed similar effects with regard to cell growth and tube formation. Conclusion Papain showed a strong anti-angiogenic effect in VEGF activated HUVEC. This effect may be due to interference with AKT, MEK1/2 and SAPK/JNK phosphorylation. Two other plant derived cysteine proteases displayed similar inhibition of HUVEC cell growth and tube formation. These findings indicate that plant proteolytic enzymes may have potential as preventive and therapeutic agents against angiogenesis related human diseases

  6. Dengue Virus Induces Novel Changes in Gene Expression of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Warke, Rajas V.; Xhaja, Kris; Martin, Katherine J.; Fournier, Marcia F.; Shaw, Sunil K.; Brizuela, Nathaly; de Bosch, Norma; Lapointe, David; Ennis, Francis A.; Rothman, Alan L.; Bosch, Irene

    2003-01-01

    Endothelial cells are permissive to dengue virus (DV) infection in vitro, although their importance as targets of DV infection in vivo remains a subject of debate. To analyze the virus-host interaction, we studied the effect of DV infection on gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by using differential display reverse transcription-PCR (DD-RTPCR), quantitative RT-PCR, and Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays. DD identified eight differentially expressed cDNAs, including inhibitor of apoptosis-1, 2′-5′ oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), a 2′-5′ OAS-like (OASL) gene, galectin-9, myxovirus protein A (MxA), regulator of G-protein signaling, endothelial and smooth muscle cell-derived neuropilin-like protein, and phospholipid scramblase 1. Microarray analysis of 22,000 human genes confirmed these findings and identified an additional 269 genes that were induced and 126 that were repressed more than fourfold after DV infection. Broad functional responses that were activated included the stress, defense, immune, cell adhesion, wounding, inflammatory, and antiviral pathways. These changes in gene expression were seen after infection of HUVECs with either laboratory-adapted virus or with virus isolated directly from plasma of DV-infected patients. Tumor necrosis factor alpha, OASL, and MxA and h-IAP1 genes were induced within the first 8 to 12 h after infection, suggesting a direct effect of DV infection. These global analyses of DV effects on cellular gene expression identify potentially novel mechanisms involved in dengue disease manifestations such as hemostatic disturbance. PMID:14557666

  7. Engineered Microvasculature in PDMS Networks Using Endothelial Cells Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sivarapatna, Amogh; Ghaedi, Mahboobe; Xiao, Yang; Han, Edward; Aryal, Binod; Zhou, Jing; Fernandez-Hernando, Carlos; Qyang, Yibing; Hirschi, Karen K; Niklason, Laura E

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we used a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based platform for the generation of intact, perfusion-competent microvascular networks in vitro. COMSOL Multiphysics, a finite-element analysis and simulation software package, was used to obtain simulated velocity, pressure, and shear stress profiles. Transgene-free human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were differentiated into partially arterialized endothelial cells (hiPSC-ECs) in 5 d under completely chemically defined conditions, using the small molecule glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibitor CHIR99021 and were thoroughly characterized for functionality and arterial-like marker expression. These cells, along with primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), were seeded in the PDMS system to generate microvascular networks that were subjected to shear stress. Engineered microvessels had patent lumens and expressed VE-cadherin along their periphery. Shear stress caused by flowing medium increased the secretion of nitric oxide and caused endothelial cells s to align and to redistribute actin filaments parallel to the direction of the laminar flow. Shear stress also caused significant increases in gene expression for arterial markers Notch1 and EphrinB2 as well as antithrombotic markers Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF-2)/4. These changes in response to shear stress in the microvascular platform were observed in hiPSC-EC microvessels but not in microvessels that were derived from HUVECs, which indicated that hiPSC-ECs may be more plastic in modulating their phenotype under flow than are HUVECs. Taken together, we demonstrate the feasibly of generating intact, engineered microvessels in vitro, which replicate some of the key biological features of native microvessels.

  8. Ingestion of Broccoli Sprouts Does Not Improve Endothelial Function in Humans with Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Buris; Bellostas Muguerza, Natalia; Petersen, Atheline Major; Kveiborg, Britt; Madsen, Christian Rask; Thomas, Hermann; Ihlemann, Nikolaj; Sørensen, Jens Christian; Køber, Lars; Sørensen, Hilmer; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Domínguez, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Ingestion of glucosinolates has previously been reported to improve endothelial function in spontaneously hypertensive rats, possibly because of an increase in NO availability in the endothelium due to an attenuation of oxidative stress; in our study we tried to see if this also would be the case in humans suffering from essential hypertension. Methods 40 hypertensive individuals without diabetes and with normal levels of cholesterol were examined. The participants were randomized either to ingest 10 g dried broccoli sprouts, a natural donor of glucosinolates with high in vitro antioxidative potential, for a 4 week period or to continue their ordinary diet and act as controls. Blood pressure, endothelial function measured by flow mediated dilation (FMD) and blood samples were obtained from the participants every other week and the content of glucosinolates was measured before and after the study. Measurements were blinded to treatment allocation. Results In the interventional group overall FMD increased from 4% to 5.8% in the interventional group whereas in the control group FMD was stable (4% at baseline and 3.9% at the end of the study). The change in FMD in the interventional group was mainly due to a marked change in FMD in two participants while the other participants did not have marked changes in FMD. The observed differences were not statistically significant. Likewise significant changes in blood pressure or blood samples were not detected between or within groups. Diastolic blood pressure stayed essentially unchanged in both groups, while the systolic blood pressure showed a small non significant decrease (9 mm Hg) in the interventional group from a value of 153 mm Hg at start. Conclusion Daily ingestion of 10 g dried broccoli sprouts does not improve endothelial function in the presence of hypertension in humans. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00252018 PMID:20805984

  9. Induction of Apoptosis in Tumor-Associated Endothelial Cells and Therapy of Orthotopic Human Pancreatic Carcinoma in Nude Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Kenji; Kim, Sun-Jin; Thaker, Premal; Yazici, Sertac; Nam, Do-Hyun; He, Junqin; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Chiao, Paul J; Sclabas, Guido M; Abbruzzese, James L; Hamilton, Stanley R; Fidler, Isaiah J

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Although gemcitabine has been accepted as the first-line chemotherapeutic reagent for advanced pancreatic cancer, improvement of response rate and survival is not sufficient and patients often develop resistance. We hypothesized that the inhibition of phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) on tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells, combined with gemcitabine, would overcome the resistance to gemcitabine in orthotopic pancreatic tumor animal model. L3.6pl, human pancreatic cancer cells growing in the pancreas, and tumor-associated endothelial cells in microorgan environment highly expressed phosphorylated EGFR, VEGFR, and Akt, which regulates antiapoptotic mechanism. Oral administration of AEE788 (dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor against EGFR and VEGFR) inhibited the phosphorylation of EGFR, VEGFR, and Akt on tumor-associated endothelial cells as well as tumor cells. Although intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of gemcitabine showed limited inhibitory effect on tumor growth, combination with AEE788 and gemcitabine produced nearly 95% inhibition of tumor growth in parallel with a high level of apoptosis on tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells, and decreased microvascular density and proliferation rate. Collectively, these data indicate that dual inhibition of phosphorylation of EGFR and VEGFR, in combination with gemcitabine, produces apoptosis of tumor-associated endothelial cells and significantly suppresses human pancreatic cancer in nude mice. PMID:16026649

  10. The coffee diterpene kahweol inhibits tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced expression of cell adhesion molecules in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Kim, Ji Young; Hwang, Yong Pil; Lee, Kyung Jin; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Hye Gwang . E-mail: hgjeong@chosun.ac.kr

    2006-12-15

    Endothelial cells produce adhesion molecules after being stimulated with various inflammatory cytokines. These adhesion molecules play an important role in the development of atherogenesis. Recent studies have highlighted the chemoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of kahweol, a coffee-specific diterpene. This study examined the effects of kahweol on the cytokine-induced monocyte/human endothelial cell interaction, which is a crucial early event in atherogenesis. Kahweol inhibited the adhesion of TNF{alpha}-induced monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF{alpha}-induced protein and mRNA expression of the cell adhesion molecules, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. Furthermore, kahweol inhibited the TNF{alpha}-induced JAK2-PI3K/Akt-NF-{kappa}B activation pathway in these cells. Overall, kahweol has anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic activities, which occurs partly by down-regulating the pathway that affects the expression and interaction of the cell adhesion molecules on endothelial cells.

  11. Differentiation of human endometrial stem cells into endothelial-like cells on gelatin/chitosan/bioglass nanofibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Shamosi, Atefeh; Mehrabani, Davood; Azami, Mahmoud; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Siavashi, Vahid; Ghanbari, Hossein; Sharifi, Esmaeel; Roozafzoon, Reza; Ai, Jafar

    2017-02-01

    The capacity of gelatin/chitosan/bioactive glass nanopowders (GEL/CS/BGNPs) scaffolds was investigated for increasing human endometrial stem cells (hEnSCs) differentiation into the endothelial cells in the presence of angiogenic factors. GEL/CS nanofibrous scaffold with different contents of BGNPs were fabricated and assessed. Expression of endothelial markers (CD31, vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin), and KDR) in differentiated cells was evaluated. Results showed the diameter of nanofiber increases with decreasing the BG content in GEL/CS scaffolds. Moreover, in vitro study indicated that the GEL/CS/BGNPs scaffold with 1.5% BGNPs content provided a suitable three-dimensional structure for endothelial cells differentiation. Thus, the GEL/CS/BGNPs scaffold can be recommended for blood vessels repair.

  12. Expression of the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor in Cultured Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells: Regulation in Response to Cell Density

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Steven D.; Hobbs, Justin T.; Tracy, Steven M.; Chapman, Nora M.

    1999-01-01

    Primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) express the human coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (HCAR). Whereas HCAR expression in HeLa cells was constant with respect to cell density, HCAR expression in HUVEC increased with culture confluence. HCAR expression in HUVEC was not quantitatively altered by infection with coxsackievirus B. PMID:10400813

  13. Selenoprotein expression in endothelial cells from different human vasculature and species.

    PubMed

    Miller, S; Walker, S W; Arthur, J R; Lewin, M H; Pickard, K; Nicol, F; Howie, A F; Beckett, G J

    2002-10-09

    Selenium (Se) can protect endothelial cells (EC) from oxidative damage by altering the expression of selenoproteins with antioxidant function such as cytoplasmic glutathione peroxidase (cyGPX), phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPX) and thioredoxin reductase (TR). If the role of Se on EC function is to be studied, it is essential that a model system be chosen which reflects selenoprotein expression in human EC derived from vessels prone to developing atheroma. We have used [75Se]-selenite labelling and selenoenzyme measurements to compare the selenoproteins expressed by cultures of EC isolated from different human vasculature with EC bovine and porcine aorta. Only small differences were observed in selenoprotein expression and activity in EC originating from human coronary artery, human umbilical vein (HUVEC), human umbilical artery and the human EC line EAhy926. The selenoprotein profile in HUVEC was consistent over eight passages and HUVEC isolated from four cords also showed little variability. In contrast, EC isolated from pig and bovine aorta showed marked differences in selenoprotein expression when compared to human cells. This study firmly establishes the suitability and consistency of using HUVEC (and possibly the human cell line EAhy926) as a model to study the effects of Se on EC function in relation to atheroma development in the coronary artery. Bovine or porcine EC appear to be an inappropriate model.

  14. Growth factors and corneal endothelial cells: III. Stimulation of adult human corneal endothelial cell mitosis in vitro by defined mitogenic agents.

    PubMed

    Schultz, G; Cipolla, L; Whitehouse, A; Eiferman, R; Woost, P; Jumblatt, M

    1992-01-01

    Human corneal endothelial cells (HCEC) do not mitose extensively in vivo after damage to the endothelial layer. However, HCEC will divide in vitro if cultured under appropriate conditions. We measured the ability of various sera, plasma, growth factors, and nutritional substances to stimulate mitosis of HCEC during 5 days of organ culture after a central freeze injury to the endothelium. Supplementation of a chemically defined medium (CDM) with 20% fetal human serum (FHS) induced significantly higher numbers of mitotic figures or labeled nuclei of human or cat corneas compared with paired corneas cultured in CDM alone. Furthermore, addition of 20% FHS produced more labeled nuclei than did addition of 20% fetal bovine serum or 20% adult human serum. Dialyzed fetal human serum failed to stimulate mitosis, indicating that one or more components of fetal human serum with molecular weight less than 12,000 are essential for mitosis. Human plasma also failed to stimulate mitosis, but an extract of human platelets significantly stimulated high levels of nuclear labeling, suggesting that growth factors contained in platelet granules were responsible for serum-stimulated mitosis of HCEC. Addition of 100 nM epidermal growth factor (EGF) or 10 microM insulin to CDM supplemented with low levels of adult human serum (0.5%) stimulated significantly higher numbers of labeled nuclei compared with paired corneas cultured with 0.5% adult human serum. Supplementation of corneal storage media (K-Sol and CSM) with a mixture of chemically defined agents consisting of EGF, insulin, transferrin, selenium, linoleic acid, and albumin stimulated significantly higher numbers of labeled nuclei compared with paired corneas cultured in the unsupplemented corneal storage media.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. A comprehensive characterization of membrane vesicles released by autophagic human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pallet, Nicolas; Sirois, Isabelle; Bell, Christina; Hanafi, Laïla-Aïcha; Hamelin, Katia; Dieudé, Mélanie; Rondeau, Christiane; Thibault, Pierre; Desjardins, Michel; Hebert, Marie-Josée

    2013-04-01

    The stress status of the apoptotic cell can promote phenotypic changes that have important consequences on the immunogenicity of the dying cell. Autophagy is one of the biological processes activated in response to a stressful condition. It is an important mediator of intercellular communications, both by regulating the unconventional secretion of molecules, including interleukin 1β, and by regulating the extracellular release of ATP from early stage apoptotic cells. Additionally, autophagic components can be released in a caspase-dependent manner by serum-starved human endothelial cells that have engaged apoptotic and autophagic processes. The nature and the components of the extracellular vesicles released by dying autophagic cells are not known. In this study, we have identified extracellular membrane vesicles that are released by human endothelial cells undergoing apoptosis and autophagy, and characterized their biochemical, ultrastructural, morphological properties as well as their proteome. These extracellular vesicles differ from classical apoptotic bodies because they do not contain nucleus components and are released independently of Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 activation. Instead, they are enriched with autophagosomes and mitochondria and convey various danger signals, including ATP, suggesting that they could be involved in the modulation of innate immunity. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Interaction between human monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells induces vascular endothelial growth factor expression.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Y; Ikeda, U; Maeda, Y; Takahashi, M; Takizawa, T; Okada, M; Funayama, H; Shimada, K

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether synthesis of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a major mitogen for vascular endothelial cells, was induced by a cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Human VSMCs and THP-1 cells (human monocytoid cell) were cocultured. VEGF levels in the coculture medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Northern blot analysis of VEGF mRNA was performed using a specific cDNA probe. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine which types of cell produce VEGF. Adding THP-1 cells to VSMCs for 24 h increased VEGF levels of the culture media, 8- and 10-fold relative to those of THP-1 cells and VSMCs alone, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that VEGF mRNA expression was induced in the cocultured cells and peaked after 12 h. Immunohistochemistry disclosed that both types of cell in the coculture produced VEGF. Separate coculture experiments revealed that both direct contact and a soluble factor(s) contributed to VEGF production. Neutralizing anti-interleukin (IL)-6 antibody inhibited VEGF production by the coculture of THP-1 cells and VSMCs. A cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and VSMCs induced VEGF synthesis in both types of cell. An IL-6 mediated mechanism is at least partially involved in VEGF production by the cocultures. Local VEGF production induced by a monocyte-VSMC interaction may play an important role in atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling.

  17. c-Kit immunoexpression delineates a putative endothelial progenitor cell population in developing human lungs.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takaya; Suzuki, Satoshi; Fujino, Naoya; Ota, Chiharu; Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Takashi; Yamaya, Mutsuo; Kondo, Takashi; Kubo, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    Expression of c-Kit and its ligand, stem cell factor (SCF), in developing human lung tissue was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Twenty-eight human fetal lungs [age range 13 to 38 gestational wk (GW)] and 12 postnatal lungs (age range 1-79 yr) were evaluated. We identified c-Kit(+) cells in the lung mesenchyme as early as 13 GW. These mesenchymal c-Kit(+) cells in the lung did not express mast cell tryptase or α-smooth muscle actin. However, these cells did express CD34, VEGFR2, and Tie-2, indicating their endothelial lineage. Three-dimensional reconstructions of confocal laser scanning images revealed that c-Kit(+) cells displayed a closed-end tube formation that did not contain hematopoietic cells. From the pseudoglandular phase to the canalicular phase, c-Kit(+) cells appeared to continuously proliferate, to connect with central pulmonary vessels, and finally, to develop the lung capillary plexus. The spatial distribution of c-Kit- and SCF-positive cells was also demonstrated, and these cells were shown to be in close association. Our results suggest that c-Kit expression in early fetal lungs marks a progenitor population that is restricted to endothelial lineage. This study also suggests the potential involvement of c-Kit signaling in lung vascular development.

  18. Effect of cysteamine on oxidative stress-induced cell death of human corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Joo; Seo, Jong Mo; Chung, Tae Young; Hyon, Joon Young; Wee, Won Ryang

    2011-10-01

    The principal objective of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of cysteamine against the oxidative stress-induced cell death of human corneal endothelial cells. In this study, human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs) were cultured according to a previously published method. With treatment of 0 mM or 5 mM of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP) with various concentrations (0-50 mM) of cysteamine, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured using an oxidation-sensitive fluorescent probe, and dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) methods. Cell viability was assayed via the Cell Counting Kit-8 method. The levels of cellular glutathione were also assessed enzymatically with glutathione reductase using a commercial glutathione assay kit (Cayman Chemical, USA). This study showed that cysteamine reduced 2',7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein oxidation and increased glutathione. Cysteamine significantly inhibited tBHP-induced ROS production. Cysteamine-treated cells evidenced higher viability relative to the controls at 5 mM tBHP, and cysteamine also effectively protected HCECs against ROS-induced cell death via an increase in intracellular glutathione. Our data indicate that cysteamine was not toxic at low concentrations and, at high concentrations, protects HCECs against oxidative injury-mediated cell death via the inhibition of ROS production, although cysteamine is toxic in cells at high concentrations without oxidative stress.

  19. Human gamma interferon increases the binding of T lymphocytes to endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, C L; Haskard, D O; Cavender, D; Johnson, A R; Ziff, M

    1985-01-01

    Binding of lymphocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) was quantitated by measuring adhesion of 51Cr labelled lymphocytes to endothelial cell monolayers and rosette formation between lymphocytes and EC in suspension. Mitogen stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture supernatants and mixed lymphocyte reaction supernatants enhanced the binding of T lymphocytes to EC monolayers or suspensions preincubated with such supernatants. The active component of these supernatants appeared to be gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) since culture supernatants lost activity after heating at 56 degrees C for 60 min, exposure to pH 2.0 or treatment with anti-IFN-gamma. In addition, purified IFN-gamma increased the binding of T lymphocytes to EC (T-EC). This occurred in a concentration dependent manner when IFN-gamma was preincubated with EC but not with lymphocytes. While the optimum concentration of IFN-gamma was 250 u/ml, a significant enhancement was seen with as little as 10 u/ml. These findings suggest that IFN-gamma may play a part in the emigration of lymphocytes to perivascular chronic inflammatory sites by augmenting the adhesion of lymphocytes to the endothelium of small blood vessels. PMID:2935340

  20. B7 expression and antigen presentation by human brain endothelial cells: requirement for proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Prat, A; Biernacki, K; Becher, B; Antel, J P

    2000-02-01

    Interaction between systemic immune cells with cells of the blood-brain barrier is a central step in development of CNS-directed immune responses. Endothelial cells are the first cells of the blood-brain barrier encountered by migrating lymphocytes. To investigate the antigen-presenting capacity of human adult brain endothelial cells (HBECs), we used HBECs derived from surgically resected temporal lobe tissue, cocultured with allogeneic peripheral blood derived CD4+ T lymphocytes. HBECs in response to IFN-gamma, but not under basal culture conditions, expressed HLA-DR, B7.1 and B7.2 antigens. Despite such up-regulation, these IFN-gamma-treated HBECs, in contrast to human microglia and PB monocytes, did not sustain allogeneic CD4+ cell proliferation, supported only low levels of IL-2 and IFN-gamma production, and did not stimulate IL-2 receptor expression. CD4+ T cell proliferation and increased IL-2 receptor expression could be obtained by addition of IL-2. Our data suggests that, although HBECs cannot alone support T cell proliferation and cytokine production, HBECs acting in concert with cytokines derived from a proinflammatory environment could support such a response.

  1. Molecular cloning and functional expression of human connexin37, an endothelial cell gap junction protein.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, K E; Westphale, E M; Larson, D M; Wang, H Z; Veenstra, R D; Beyer, E C

    1993-01-01

    Gap junctions allow direct intercellular coupling between many cells including those in the blood vessel wall. They are formed by a group of related proteins called connexins, containing conserved transmembrane and extracellular domains, but unique cytoplasmic regions that may confer connexin-specific physiological properties. We used polymerase chain reaction amplification and cDNA library screening to clone DNA encoding a human gap junction protein, connexin37 (Cx37). The derived human Cx37 polypeptide contains 333 amino acids, with a predicted molecular mass of 37,238 D. RNA blots demonstrate that Cx37 is expressed in multiple organs and tissues (including heart, uterus, ovary, and blood vessel endothelium) and in primary cultures of vascular endothelial cells. Cx37 mRNA is coexpressed with connexin43 at similar levels in some endothelial cells, but at much lower levels in others. To demonstrate that Cx37 could form functional channels, we stably transfected communication-deficient Neuro2A cells with the Cx37 cDNA. The induced intercellular channels were studied by the double whole cell patch clamp technique. These channels were reversibly inhibited by the uncoupling agent, heptanol (2 mM). The expressed Cx37 channels exhibited multiple conductance levels and showed a pronounced voltage dependence. These electrophysiological characteristics are similar to, but distinct from, those of previously characterized connexins. Images PMID:7680674

  2. Expression, localization and control of activin A release from human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Borges, Lavinia E; Bloise, Enrrico; Dela Cruz, Cynthia; Massai, Lauretta; Ciarmela, Pasquapina; Apa, Rosanna; Luisi, Stefano; Severi, Filiberto M; Petraglia, Felice; Reis, Fernando M

    2015-01-01

    Activin-A is a member of the TGFβ superfamily found in maternal and umbilical cord blood throughout gestation. We investigated whether human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) express activin-A in vivo and tested the effects of vasoactive (endothelin-1), pro-inflammatory (interferon-γ, interleukin-8) and anti-inflammatory (dexamethasone, urocortin) factors on activin-A release by isolated HUVEC in vitro. Activin βA subunit protein and mRNA were strongly localized in the endothelial cells of umbilical veins and were also detectable in scattered cells of the cord connective tissue. Dimeric activin-A was detected in the HUVEC culture medium at picomolar concentrations. Activin-A release by HUVEC decreased after cell incubation with urocortin (p < 0.01), whereas no effect was observed with interleukin-8, interferon-γ, endothelin-1 or dexamethasone. In summary, activin-A is present in the human umbilical vein endothelium in vivo and is produced and released by isolated HUVEC. Activin-A secretion is inhibited in vitro by urocortin, a neuropeptide with predominantly anti-inflammatory action.

  3. Biophysical Assessment of Single Cell Cytotoxicity: Diesel Exhaust Particle-Treated Human Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yangzhe; Yu, Tian; Gilbertson, Timothy A.; Zhou, Anhong; Xu, Hao; Nguyen, Kytai Truong

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), a major source of traffic-related air pollution, has become a serious health concern due to its adverse influences on human health including cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. To elucidate the relationship between biophysical properties (cell topography, cytoskeleton organizations, and cell mechanics) and functions of endothelial cells exposed to DEPs, atomic force microscope (AFM) was applied to analyze the toxic effects of DEPs on a model cell line from human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry were also applied to further explore DEP-induced cytotoxicity in HAECs. Results revealed that DEPs could negatively impair cell viability and alter membrane nanostructures and cytoskeleton components in a dosage- and a time-dependent manner; and analyses suggested that DEPs-induced hyperpolarization in HAECs appeared in a time-dependent manner, implying DEP treatment would lead to vasodilation, which could be supported by down-regulation of cell biophysical properties (e.g., cell elasticity). These findings are consistent with the conclusion that DEP exposure triggers important biochemical and biophysical changes that would negatively impact the pathological development of cardiovascular diseases. For example, DEP intervention would be one cause of vasodilation, which will expand understanding of biophysical aspects associated with DEP cytotoxicity in HAECs. PMID:22662129

  4. Human aortic endothelial cell morphology influenced by topography of porous silicon substrates.

    PubMed

    Formentín, Pilar; Catalán, Úrsula; Fernández-Castillejo, Sara; Alba, Maria; Baranowska, Malgorzata; Solà, Rosa; Pallarès, Josep; Marsal, Lluís F

    2015-10-01

    Porous silicon has received much attention because of its optical properties and for its usefulness in cell-based biosensing, drug delivery, and tissue engineering applications. Surface properties of the biomaterial are associated with cell adhesion and with proliferation, migration, and differentiation. The present article analyzes the behavior of human aortic endothelial cells in macro- and nanoporous collagen-modified porous silicon samples. On both substrates, cells are well adhered and numerous. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were employed to study the effects of porosity on the morphology of the cells. On macroporous silicon, filopodia is not observed but the cell spreads on the surface, increasing the lamellipodia surface which penetrates the macropore. On nanoporous silicon, multiple filopodia were found to branch out from the cell body. These results demonstrate that the pore size plays a key role in controlling the morphology and growth rate of human aortic endothelial cells, and that these forms of silicon can be used to control cell development in tissue engineering as well as in basic cell biology research. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Dose dependent cytotoxicity of pranoprofen in cultured human corneal endothelial cells by inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Han; Wen, Qian; Fan, Ting-Jun; Ge, Yuan; Yu, Miao-Miao; Sun, Ling-Xiao; Zhao, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Pranoprofen (PPF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), is often used in keratitis treatment in clinic. Several studies have assessed in vitro the cytotoxicity of topical NSAIDs to corneal epithelial cells due to its importance for predicting human corneal toxicity. Damage by cytotoxic drugs can result in excessive loss of human corneal endothelial (HCE) cells which lead to decompensation of the endothelium and eventual loss of visual acuity. However, the endothelial cytotoxicity of PPF has not yet been reported using an in vitro model of HCE cells. This study assessed the cytotoxicity of PPF to HCE cells and its underlying mechanism. Cellular viability was determined using inverted phase contrast light microscopy, and plasma membrane permeability, genomic DNA fragmentation, and ultrastructure were detected by acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, DNA agarose gel electrophoresis, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The results on cellular viability showed that PPF at concentrations ranging from 0.0625 to 1.0 g/l had poignant cytotoxicity to HCE cells, and the extent of its cytotoxicity was dose- and time-dependent. Further characterization indicated that PPF induced plasma membrane permeability elevation, DNA fragmentation, and apoptotic body formation, proving its apoptosis inducing effect on HCE cells. In conclusion, PPF above 0.0625 g/l has poignant cytotoxicity on HCE cells in vitro by inducing cell apoptosis, and should be carefully employed in eye clinic.

  6. Bee products prevent VEGF-induced angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Izuta, Hiroshi; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Araki, Yoko; Mishima, Satoshi; Hara, Hideaki

    2009-11-17

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key regulator of pathogenic angiogenesis in diseases such as cancer and diabetic retinopathy. Bee products [royal jelly (RJ), bee pollen, and Chinese red propolis] from the honeybee, Apis mellifera, have been used as traditional health foods for centuries. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-angiogenic effects of bee products using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In an in vitro tube formation assay, HUVECs and fibroblast cells were incubated for 14 days with VEGF and various concentrations of bee products [RJ, ethanol extract of bee pollen, ethanol extract of Chinese red propolis and its constituent, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE)]. To clarify the mechanism of in vitro angiogenesis, HUVEC proliferation and migration were induced by VEGF with or without various concentrations of RJ, bee pollen, Chinese red propolis, and CAPE. RJ, bee pollen, Chinese red propolis, and CAPE significantly suppressed VEGF-induced in vitro tube formation in the descending order: CAPE > Chinese red propolis > bee pollen > RJ. RJ and Chinese red propolis suppressed both VEGF-induced HUVEC proliferation and migration. In contrast, bee pollen and CAPE suppressed only the proliferation. Among the bee products, Chinese red propolis and CAPE in particular showed strong suppressive effects against VEGF-induced angiogenesis. These findings indicate that Chinese red propolis and CAPE may have potential as preventive and therapeutic agents against angiogenesis-related human diseases.

  7. Bee products prevent VEGF-induced angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key regulator of pathogenic angiogenesis in diseases such as cancer and diabetic retinopathy. Bee products [royal jelly (RJ), bee pollen, and Chinese red propolis] from the honeybee, Apis mellifera, have been used as traditional health foods for centuries. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-angiogenic effects of bee products using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Methods In an in vitro tube formation assay, HUVECs and fibroblast cells were incubated for 14 days with VEGF and various concentrations of bee products [RJ, ethanol extract of bee pollen, ethanol extract of Chinese red propolis and its constituent, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE)]. To clarify the mechanism of in vitro angiogenesis, HUVEC proliferation and migration were induced by VEGF with or without various concentrations of RJ, bee pollen, Chinese red propolis, and CAPE. Results RJ, bee pollen, Chinese red propolis, and CAPE significantly suppressed VEGF-induced in vitro tube formation in the descending order: CAPE > Chinese red propolis >> bee pollen > RJ. RJ and Chinese red propolis suppressed both VEGF-induced HUVEC proliferation and migration. In contrast, bee pollen and CAPE suppressed only the proliferation. Conclusion Among the bee products, Chinese red propolis and CAPE in particular showed strong suppressive effects against VEGF-induced angiogenesis. These findings indicate that Chinese red propolis and CAPE may have potential as preventive and therapeutic agents against angiogenesis-related human diseases. PMID:19917137

  8. Recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 effectively inhibits angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinliang; Shi, Minglei; Xi, Yongyi; Gao, Lihua; Zhang, Guanyi; Shao, Yong; Chen, Huipeng; Hu, Xianwen

    2015-05-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in both physiological and pathological angiogenesis. VEGF receptor‑1 (VEGFR‑1) acts as a decoy VEGF receptor that enables the regulation of VEGF on the vascular endothelium. In the present study, the recombinant human VEGFR1D1‑3/Fc (rhVEGFR‑1), which contains key domains for VEGF binding, was cloned and expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The rhVEGFR‑1 protein was purified using protein‑A affinity chromatography. The molecular weight of rhVEGFR‑1 was found to be ~162 and 81 kD in non‑reducing and reducing SDS‑PAGE, respectively. The majority of the final protein products were in the dimeric conformation. Western blot analysis revealed that rhVEGFR‑1 was only capable of binding to the full glycan form of rhVEGF‑165 and rhVEGF‑121. The dissociation constant for the binding of rhVEGFR‑1 to VEGF‑165, detected using Biacore, was 285 pM. In addition, rhVEGFR‑1 inhibited the proliferation and migration of human microvascular endothelial cells. In vivo experiments also demonstrated that rhVEGFR‑1 inhibited chicken chorioallantoic membrane neovascularization and angiogenesis in nude mice. In conclusion, an anti‑angiogenic recombinant soluble VEGFR was expressed (up to 5 mg/l) in CHO cells and was shown to be capable of inhibiting neovascularization in vivo and in vitro.

  9. Endosulfan inducing apoptosis and necroptosis through activation RIPK signaling pathway in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianshuang; Wei, Jialiu; Ren, Lihua; Zhang, Jin; Yang, Man; Jing, Li; Wang, Ji; Sun, Zhiwei; Zhou, Xianqing

    2017-01-01

    Endosulfan, an organochlorine pesticide, was found in human blood, and its possible cardiovascular toxicity has been suggested. However, the mechanism about endothelial cell injuries induced by endosulfan has remained unknown. In the present study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were chosen to explore the toxicity mechanism and were treated with 0, 1, 6, and 12 μg/mL(-1) endosulfan for 24 h, respectively. The results showed that exposure to endosulfan could inhibit the cell viability, increase the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), damage the ultrastructure, and lead to apoptosis and necroptosis in HUVECs. Furthermore, endosulfan upregulated the expressions of receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1), receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3), mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL), caspase 8, and caspase 3, which means the activation of RIPK1 pathways. In addition, endosulfan promoted the increases of ROS, IL-1α, and IL-33 levels while antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) effectively attenuated the cytotoxicity from endosulfan. Taken together, these results have demonstrated that endosulfan induces the apoptosis and necroptosis of HUVECs, where the RIPK pathway plays a pro-necroptotic role and NAC plays an anti-necroptotic role. Our results may contribute to understanding cellular mechanisms for endosulfan-induced cardiovascular toxicity.

  10. Role of JNK in network formation of human lung microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Medhora, Meetha; Dhanasekaran, Anuradha; Pratt, Phillip F.; Cook, Craig R.; Dunn, Laurel K.; Gruenloh, Stephanie K.; Jacobs, Elizabeth R.

    2010-01-01

    The signaling mechanisms in vasculogenesis and/or angiogenesis remain poorly understood, limiting the ability to regulate growth of new blood vessels in vitro and in vivo. Cultured human lung microvascular endothelial cells align into tubular networks in the three-dimensional matrix, Matrigel. Overexpression of MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), an enzyme that inactivates the ERK, JNK, and p38 pathways, inhibited network formation of these cells. Adenoviral-mediated overexpression of recombinant MKP-3 (a dual specificity phosphatase that specifically inactivates the ERK pathway) and dominant negative or constitutively active MEK did not attenuate network formation in Matrigel compared with negative controls. This result suggested that the ERK pathway may not be essential for tube assembly, a conclusion which was supported by the action of specific MEK inhibitor PD 184352, which also did not alter network formation. Inhibition of the JNK pathway using SP-600125 or L-stereoisomer (L-JNKI-1) blocked network formation, whereas the p38 MAPK blocker SB-203580 slightly enhanced it. Inhibition of JNK also attenuated the number of small vessel branches in the developing chick chorioallantoic membrane. Our results demonstrate a specific role for the JNK pathway in network formation of human lung endothelial cells in vitro while confirming that it is essential for the formation of new vessels in vivo. PMID:18263671

  11. Tetracycline suppresses ATP gamma S-induced CXCL8 and CXCL1 production by the human dermal microvascular endothelial cell-1 (HMEC-1) cell line and primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bender, Anna; Zapolanski, Tamar; Watkins, Shannon; Khosraviani, Ava; Seiffert, Kristina; Ding, Wanhong; Wagner, John A; Granstein, Richard D

    2008-09-01

    Tetracyclines (TCN) have powerful anti-inflammatory properties in addition to their anti-microbial effects. These anti-inflammatory effects are thought to play a role in inhibiting cutaneous inflammation in patients with rosacea and acne; however, the mechanism(s) of this action remains poorly understood. We have previously shown that adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP)gamma S, a hydrolysis-resistant ATP analogue, augments secretion of pro-inflammatory messengers by a human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1). ATP released by the sympathetic nerves during stress may stimulate release of pro-inflammatory chemokines by dermal vessel endothelial cells, resulting in recruitment of inflammatory cells and exacerbation of inflammatory skin disease. Here we demonstrate that TCN inhibits ATP gamma S-induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators by HMEC-1 cells and primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. TCN dose-dependently inhibited ATP gamma S-induced augmentation of CXCL8 (interleukin-8) and CXCL1 (growth-regulated oncogene-alpha) production by HMEC-1 cells and primary human dermal endothelial cells in vitro. TCN and ATP gamma S did not affect HMEC-1 cell viability as determined by trypan-blue exclusion and cell counts. Inhibition of production of inflammatory mediators by endothelial cells may be one mechanism by which TCN improves inflammatory skin diseases. The ability to inhibit release of inflammatory mediators induced in HMEC-1 cells by purinergic agonists may be a useful way to screen for potential therapeutic agents for cutaneous inflammation.

  12. Method for Dual Viral Vector Mediated CRISPR-Cas9 Gene Disruption in Primary Human Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haixia; Liu, Menglin; Klomp, Jeff; Merrill, Bradley J; Rehman, Jalees; Malik, Asrar B

    2017-02-15

    Human endothelial cells (ECs) are widely used to study mechanisms of angiogenesis, inflammation, and endothelial permeability. Targeted gene disruption induced by Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-Associated Protein 9 (Cas9) nuclease gene editing is potentially an important tool for definitively establishing the functional roles of individual genes in ECs. We showed that co-delivery of adenovirus encoding EGFP-tagged Cas9 and lentivirus encoding a single guide RNA (sgRNA) in primary human lung microvascular ECs (HLMVECs) disrupted the expression of the Tie2 gene and protein. Tie2 disruption increased basal endothelial permeability and prevented permeability recovery following injury induced by the inflammatory stimulus thrombin. Thus, gene deletion via viral co-delivery of CRISPR-Cas9 in primary human ECs provides a novel platform to investigate signaling mechanisms of normal and perturbed EC function without the need for clonal expansion.

  13. Method for Dual Viral Vector Mediated CRISPR-Cas9 Gene Disruption in Primary Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Haixia; Liu, Menglin; Klomp, Jeff; Merrill, Bradley J.; Rehman, Jalees; Malik, Asrar B.

    2017-01-01

    Human endothelial cells (ECs) are widely used to study mechanisms of angiogenesis, inflammation, and endothelial permeability. Targeted gene disruption induced by Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-Associated Protein 9 (Cas9) nuclease gene editing is potentially an important tool for definitively establishing the functional roles of individual genes in ECs. We showed that co-delivery of adenovirus encoding EGFP-tagged Cas9 and lentivirus encoding a single guide RNA (sgRNA) in primary human lung microvascular ECs (HLMVECs) disrupted the expression of the Tie2 gene and protein. Tie2 disruption increased basal endothelial permeability and prevented permeability recovery following injury induced by the inflammatory stimulus thrombin. Thus, gene deletion via viral co-delivery of CRISPR-Cas9 in primary human ECs provides a novel platform to investigate signaling mechanisms of normal and perturbed EC function without the need for clonal expansion. PMID:28198371

  14. [Establishment of human infancy hemangioma-derived endothelial cell line XPTS-1 and animal model of human infancy hemangioma].

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Xiao, Xiao-e; Xu, Quan; Guo, Zheng-tuan

    2011-03-01

    To establish an immortalized human infancy hemangioma-derived endothelial cell line (HemEC) and animal model of human infancy hemangioma. Hemangioma-derived endothelial cells from specimen of human infancy hemangioma were cultured in vitro and monocloed, and then its growth curve was made, karyomorphism of chromosome analyzed, morphologic characteristics observe, factor VIII related antigen identified by immunohistochemical method.Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) was detected by flow cytometry. HemEC were inoculated subcutaneously in athymic mouse to establish animal model of infancy hemangioma. The animal model was observed closely and its pathological characteristic was also studied. The cultural cells grew active, and immortalized spontaneously when they were subcultured on sixteenth generation. This cell line was cultivated for more than 70 times within one year and in good condition after freezing and resuscitating once and again, and had the morphologic character of HemEC. The cell population doubling time was 22 h. Factor VIII and VEGFR-2 were expressed positively. Karyo type analysis of the cell line showed abnormal diploid with the modal chromosomal number varying between diploid and triploid. The cell line was then named XPTS-1. The animal model of infancy hemangioma was successfully established and its character of histopathology was similar with that of infancy hemangioma. The cell line of HemEC was successfully established and immortalized spontaneously, and had the morphologic and biological character of HemEC. The animal model of infancy hemangioma was successfully established and showed the character of histopathology similar with that of infancy hemangioma.

  15. Expression of leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion molecules on monocyte adhesion to human endothelial cells on plasma treated PET and PTFE in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pu, F R; Williams, R L; Markkula, T K; Hunt, J A

    2002-12-01

    We used a coculture model to evaluate the inflammatory potential of ammonia gas plasma modified PET and PTFE by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. In these studies, human endothelial cells from umbilical cord (HUVEC) and promonocytic U937 cells were used. HUVECs grown on polystyrene tissue culture coverslips and HUVECs stimulated with tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) were used as controls. U937 adhesion to endothelium on each surface was evaluated at day 1 and day 7. To further investigate the role of leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) in cell-to-cell interaction on material surfaces, the expression of the leukocyte-endothelial CAMs: ICAM-1, VCAM-1, PECAM-1, and E-selectin on HUVECs were evaluated after U937 cell adhesion. The results demonstrated that plasma treated PET (T-PET) and treated PTFE (T-PTFE) did not increase U937 cell adhesion compared to the negative control. Maximal adhesion of U937 cells to HUVEC was observed on TNF-alpha stimulated endothelium with significant differences between day 1 and day 7, which is consistent with our prior observation that T-PET and T-PTFE did not cause HUVECs to increase the expression of adhesion molecules. After U937 cell adhesion, the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 of HUVECs were not different on T-PET and T-PTFE compared with the negative control. However, the expression of E-selectin was reduced on day 1, but not on day 7. The effects of plasma treated PET and PTFE on HUVEC adhesion and proliferation were also studied. On day 1 there were slight increases in the growth of HUVECs on both of T-PET and T-PTFE but this was not statistically significant. On day 7, the cell number increased significantly on the surfaces compared to the negative control. The results demonstrate that the plasma treatment of PET and PTFE with ammonia improves the adhesion and growth of endothelial cells and these surfaces do not exhibit a direct inflammatory effect in terms of monocyte adhesion and expression of

  16. Transferrin-conjugated boron nitride nanotubes: protein grafting, characterization, and interaction with human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ciofani, Gianni; Del Turco, Serena; Genchi, Giada Graziana; D'Alessandro, Delfo; Basta, Giuseppina; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2012-10-15

    In this paper we report on a covalent grafting of boron nitride nanotubes with human transferrin. After silanization of the nanotube wall, transferrin was linked to the nanotubes through carbamide binding. The obtained transferrin-conjugated boron nitride nanotubes (tf-BNNTs) resulted stable in aqueous environments and were characterized in terms of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, size distribution analysis and Z-potential measurement. Effective covalent grafting of transferrin was demonstrated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The obtained tf-BNNTs were thereafter tested on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs); in particular cellular up-take was investigated by confocal, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, demonstrating the key role of transferrin during the internalization process. Here reported for the first time in the literature, the covalent BNNT functionalization with a targeting ligand represents a fundamental step towards BNNT exploitation as smart and selective nanocarriers in a number of nanomedicine applications.

  17. HJURP regulates cellular senescence in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells via a p53-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jong-Ik; Cho, Jung Hee; Kim, Jae-Ryong

    2013-08-01

    Holliday junction recognition protein (HJURP), a centromere protein-A (CENP-A) histone chaperone, mediates centromere-specific assembly of CENP-A nucleosome, contributing to high-fidelity chromosome segregation during cell division. However, the role of HJURP in cellular senescence of human primary cells remains unclear. We found that the expression levels of HJURP decreased in human dermal fibroblasts and umbilical vein endothelial cells in replicative or premature senescence. Ectopic expression of HJURP in senescent cells partially overcame cell senescence. Conversely, downregulation of HJURP in young cells led to premature senescence. p53 knockdown, but not p16 knockdown, abolished senescence phenotypes caused by HJURP reduction. These data suggest that HJURP plays an important role in the regulation of cellular senescence through a p53-dependent pathway and might contribute to tissue or organismal aging and protection of cellular transformation.

  18. Deoxynivalenol inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chao; Ji, Changyun; Qin, Weisen; Cao, Xifeng; Zhong, Jialian; Li, Yugu; Srinivas, Swaminath; Feng, Youjun; Deng, Xianbo

    2016-04-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a stable mycotoxins found in cereals infected by certain fungal species and causes adverse health effects in animals and human such as vomiting, diarrhea and reproductive toxicity. In this study, we investigated the toxic and apoptotic effects of DON in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), a good model for studying inflammation. The results show that DON significantly inhibited the viability of HUVECs. DON could also inhibit the proliferation of HUVECs through G2/M phase arrest in cell cycle progression. Moreover, oxidative stress induced by DON was indicated by observations of increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, DON also causes mitochondrial damage by decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential and inducing apoptosis by up-regulation of apoptosis-related genes like caspase-3, caspase-9, and Bax genes, and down-regulation of Bcl-2 gene. These results together suggest that DON could induce cell cycle arrest, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in HUVECs.

  19. The Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Cediranib (Recentin; AZD2171) Inhibits Endothelial Cell Function and Growth of Human Renal Tumor Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, Dietmar W. Brazelle, W.D.; Juergensmeier, Juliane M.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to examine the therapeutic potential of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling inhibitor cediranib in a human model of renal cell carcinoma (Caki-1). Methods and Materials: The effects of cediranib treatment on in vitro endothelial cell function (proliferation, migration, and tube formation), as well as in vivo angiogenesis and tumor growth, were determined. Results: In vitro, cediranib significantly impaired the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells and their ability to form tubes, but had no effect on the proliferation of Caki-1 tumor cells. In vivo, cediranib significantly reduced Caki-1 tumor cell-induced angiogenesis, reduced tumor perfusion, and inhibited the growth of Caki-1 tumor xenografts. Conclusions: The present results are consistent with the notion that inhibition of VEGF signaling leads to an indirect (i.e., antiangiogenic) antitumor effect, rather than a direct effect on tumor cells. These results further suggest that inhibition of VEGF signaling with cediranib may impair the growth of renal cell carcinoma.

  20. Heterogeneity in immunohistochemical, genomic, and biological properties of human lymphatic endothelial cells between initial and collecting lymph vessels.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yoshiko; Hosaka, Kayoko; Kaidoh, Maki; Minami, Takashi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Ohhashi, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    The immunohistochemical properties of selective lymph vessel markers, and NO synthase (NOS) and cyclo-oxygenase (COX) activities, were examined in two kinds of human lymphatic endothelial cells isolated from collecting (macro-) and initial (micro-) lymph vessels. The constitutively expressed genes in the two kinds of lymphatic endothelial cells were also evaluated by using oligonucleotide microarray analysis and RT-PCR. We also investigated the effects of oxygen concentration in culture conditions or growth factors such as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), VEGF-A, and VEGF-C on proliferation activities of the two kinds of human lymphatic endothelial cells. Immunoreactivity to LYVE-1 and the RT-PCR expression level of LYVE-1 mRNA in endothelial cells of micro-lymph vessels were stronger than those of macro-lymph vessels. Immunoreactivity to VEGF R1 was also observed as significantly stronger in the micro-lymph vessels. In contrast, the immunoreactivity to Prox-1 and the RT-PCR expression level of Prox-1 mRNA in endothelial cells of macro-lymph vessels were stronger than those of micro-lymph vessels. Similarly, immunoreactivity to ecNOS, iNOS, COX1, and COX2 was also found as significantly higher than in macro-lymph vessels. In contrast, the increase of O(2) concentration ranging from 5% to 21% caused a significant reduction of the proliferation activity of endothelial cells in macro-lymph vessels. In conclusion, these findings suggest marked heterogeneity in the immunohistochemical, genomic, and proliferation activity of human lymphatic endothelial cells between micro-(initial) and macro-(collecting) lymph vessels.

  1. Effects of simulated microgravity on cell cycle in human endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovskaya, Alisa A.; Ignashkova, Tatiana I.; Bochenkova, Anna V.; Moskovtsev, Aleksey A.; Baranov, Victor M.; Kubatiev, Aslan A.

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the current study is to investigate effects of simulated microgravity on the cell cycle of endothelial cells. We analyze changes in the cell cycle after exposure of endothelial-like EA.hy 926 cells to simulated microgravity using a Desktop random positioning machine (RPM). Cell cycle profiles determined by flow cytometry show, that the percentage of the cells in the G0/G1 phase after 24 and 96 h of RPM-simulated microgravity is significantly increased as compared to the control group. However, no significant difference is observed after 120 h of RPM-simulated microgravity. In regard to S phase, the percentage of cells is significantly decreased after 24 and 96 h of RPM, respectively; whereas 120 h later, the number of S-phase cells is comparable to the control group. Thus, we show that simulated microgravity inhibits cell cycle progression of human EA.hy 926 cells from the G0/G1 phase to the S phase. We observe an effect of a hibernation-like state, when the growth of the cells in the RPM group slows down, but does not stop. Our results further show that simulated microgravity can affect adhesion of endothelial cells, and alpha-tubulin expression, as most cells begin to detach from the surface of OptiCell unit after 24 h, form aggregates after 48 h, and exhibit accumulation of alpha-tubulin around the nucleus after 48 h of exposure to simulated microgravity conditions. Our results demonstrate a chance in the cell cycle in a low gravitational field.

  2. Organ-Specific Differences in Endothelial Permeability-Regulating Molecular Responses in Mouse and Human Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Adnan; van Meurs, Matijs; Moser, Jill; Popa, Eliane R.; Jongman, Rianne M.; Zwiers, Peter J.; Molema, Grietje; Zijlstra, Jan G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In patients with sepsis-induced multi-organ dysfunction syndrome, diverging patterns of oedema formation and loss of function in organs such as lung and kidney suggest that endothelial permeability-regulating molecular responses are differentially regulated. This potential differential regulation has been insufficiently studied at the level of components of adherens and tight junctions. We hypothesized that such a regulation by endothelial cells in sepsis takes place in an organ-specific manner. We addressed our hypothesis by studying by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction the expression of a predefined subset of EC permeability-related molecules (occludin, claudin-5, PV-1, CD-31, endomucin, Angiopoietin-1, Angiopoietin-2, Tie2, VEGFA, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, and VE-cadherin) in kidney and lung after systemic lipopolysacharide injection in mice, and in kidneys of patients who died of sepsis. We showed that baseline endothelial expression of permeability-related molecules differs in mouse kidney and lung. Moreover, we showed differential regulation of these molecules after lipopolysacharide injection in the two mouse organs. In lung we found a decrease in expression levels of molecules of the adherence and tight junctions complex and related signaling systems, compatible with increased permeability. In contrast, in kidney we found expression patterns of these molecules compatible with decreased permeability. Finally, we partially corroborated our findings in mouse kidney in human kidneys from septic patients. These findings may help to understand the clinical difference in the extent of oedema formation in kidney and lung in sepsis-associated organ failure. PMID:28151770

  3. Adherence to human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-L) of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For years Plasmodium vivax has been considered the cause of benign malaria. Nevertheless, it has been observed that this parasite can produce a severe disease comparable to Plasmodium falciparum. It has been suggested that some physiopathogenic processes might be shared by these two species, such as cytoadherence. Recently, it has been demonstrated that P. vivax-infected erythrocytes (Pv-iEs) have the capacity to adhere to endothelial cells, in which intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) seems to be involved in this process. Methods Adherence capacity of 21 Colombian isolates, from patients with P. vivax mono-infection to a microvascular line of human lung endothelium (HMVEC-L) was assessed in static conditions and binding was evaluated at basal levels or in tumor necrosis factor (TNF) stimulated cells. The adherence specificity for the ICAM-1 receptor was determined through inhibition with an anti-CD54 monoclonal antibody. Results The majority of P. vivax isolates, 13 out of 21 (61.9%), adhered to the HMVEC-L cells, but P. vivax adherence was at least seven times lower when compared to the four P. falciparum isolates. Moreover, HMVEC-L stimulation with TNF led to an increase of 1.6-fold in P. vivax cytoadhesion, similar to P. falciparum isolates (1.8-fold) at comparable conditions. Also, blockage of ICAM-1 receptor with specific antibodies showed a significant 50% adherence reduction. Conclusions Plasmodium vivax isolates found in Colombia are also capable of adhering specifically in vitro to lung endothelial cells, via ICAM-1 cell receptor, both at basal state and after cell stimulation with TNF. Collectively, these findings reinforce the concept of cytoadherence for P. vivax, but here, to a different endothelial cell line and using geographical distinct isolates, thus contributing to understanding P. vivax biology. PMID:24080027

  4. The Effect of Levonorgestrel on Fibrinolytic Factors in Human Endometrial Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Pakrashi, Tarita; Taylor, Joelle E; Nelson, Ashley; Archer, David F; Jacot, Terry

    2016-11-01

    The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system is considered a highly effective treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB). While LNG has established effects on the stromal and glandular compartments of the endometrial tissue, its effect on the endometrial endothelial cells has not been investigated. We examined whether LNG regulates fibrinolytic factors, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) secreted by human endometrial endothelial cells (HEECs) and determined the steroid receptor through which LNG exerts its effect on the endothelium. The HEECs were treated with LNG or progesterone and levels of tPA and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) measured. The HEECs were specifically examined for the presence of androgen receptors through Western blot. Levonorgestrel ± flutamide were added to HEECs and the levels of tPA and uPA were examined. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay performed on culture media confirmed a statistically significant decrease in tPA levels in cells treated with LNG (77.80% ± 8.0% of control; n = 5, P < .05 vs control) but not progesterone. The androgen receptor (110 kDa) was detected in HEEC lysates. The decrease in tPA was blocked by the addition of flutamide (101.3% ± 16% of control), a classic nonsteroidal androgen receptor blocker. There was no change in uPA or PAI-1 levels in cells treated with LNG. Levonorgestrel decreases tPA levels through the androgen receptor in HEECs. Thus, LNG inhibits tPA secretion by the endometrial endothelial cell. This response suggests reduction in HMB with LNG-IUS could reflect an LNG-mediated promotion of hemostasis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Bacterial Species- and Strain-Dependent Induction of Tissue Factor in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Veltrop, M. H. A. M.; Beekhuizen, H.; Thompson, J.

    1999-01-01

    A cardinal process in bacterial endocarditis (BE) is the activation of the clotting system and the formation of a fibrin clot on the inner surface of the heart, the so-called endocardial vegetation. The processes that lead to the activation of the clotting system on endothelial surfaces upon exposure to bacteria are largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated in an in vitro model whether infection of human endothelial cells (EC) with bacteria that are relevant to BE, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sanguis, and Staphylococcus epidermidis, leads to induction of tissue factor (TF)-dependent procoagulant activity (TFA) and whether this process is influenced by host factors, such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), that are produced in response to the bacteremia in vivo. The results show that S. aureus binds to and is internalized by EC, resulting in expression of TF mRNA and TF surface protein as well as generation of TFA within 4 to 8 h after infection. No TFA was found when EC were exposed to UV-irradiated S. aureus or bacterial cell wall fragments. S. sanguis and S. epidermidis, although also binding to EC, did not induce endothelial TFA. This indicates a species and strain dependency. EC also expressed TFA after exposure to IL-1. The enhanced TFA of EC after exposure to S. aureus was not prevented by IL-1 receptor antagonist, arguing against an auto- or paracrine contribution of endogenous IL-1. When IL-1 was applied together with bacteria, this had a synergistic effect on the induction of EC TFA. This was found in particular with S. aureus but also, although to a lesser degree, with S. sanguis and S. epidermidis. This influence of IL-1 on the species- and strain-dependent induction of EC TFA suggests that bacterial factors as well as host factors orchestrate the induction of coagulation in an early stage in the pathogenesis of endovascular disease, such as BE. PMID:10531276

  6. Effects of endomorphins on human umbilical vein endothelial cells under high glucose.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Wei, Suhong; Tian, Limin; Yan, Liping; Guo, Qian; Ma, Xiaoqin

    2011-01-01

    The endomorphin-1 (EM1) and endomorphin-2 (EM2) are endogenous opioid peptides, which modulate extensive bioactivities such as pain, cardiovascular responses, immunological responses and so on. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of EM1/EM2 on the primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) damaged by high glucose. PI AnnexinV-FITC detection was performed to evaluate the apoptosis rate. Levels of nitric oxide (NO) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity were measured by the Griess reaction and the conversion of 3H-arginine to 3H-citrulline, respectively. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) was evaluated by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell proliferation was determined by the MTT viability assay. mRNA expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and ET-1 were measured by real-time PCR. Our data showed that EM1/EM2 inhibited cell apoptosis. The high glucose induced increase in expression of NO, NOS and ET-1 were significantly attenuated by pretreatment with EM1/EM2 in a dose dependent manner. In addition, EM1/EM2 suppressed the mRNA eNOS and mRNA ET-1 expression in HUVECs under high glucose conditions. Naloxone, the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, did not influence the mRNA eNOS expression when it was administrated on its own; but it could significantly antagonize the effects induced by EM1/EM2. Furthermore, in all assay systems, EM1 was more potent than EM2. The results suggest that EM1/EM2 have a beneficial effect in protecting against the endothelial dysfunction by high glucose in vitro, and these effects were mediated by the opioid receptors in HUVECs.

  7. Organ-Specific Differences in Endothelial Permeability-Regulating Molecular Responses in Mouse and Human Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Adnan; van Meurs, Matijs; Moser, Jill; Popa, Eliane R; Jongman, Rianne M; Zwiers, Peter J; Molema, Grietje; Zijlstra, Jan G

    2017-02-01

    In patients with sepsis-induced MODS, diverging patterns of oedema formation and loss of function in organs such as lung and kidney suggest that endothelial permeability-regulating molecular responses are differentially regulated. This potential differential regulation has been insufficiently studied at the level of components of adherens and tight junctions. We hypothesized that such a regulation by endothelial cells in sepsis takes place in an organ-specific manner. We addressed our hypothesis by studying by quantitative RT-PCR the expression of a predefined subset of EC permeability-related molecules (occludin, claudin-5, PV-1, CD-31, endomucin, Angiopoietin-1, Angiopoietin-2, Tie2, VEGFA, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, and VE-cadherin) in kidney and lung after systemic LPS injection in mice, and in kidneys of patients who died of sepsis. We showed that baseline endothelial expression of permeability-related molecules differs in mouse kidney and lung. Moreover, we showed differential regulation of these molecules after LPS injection in the two mouse organs. In lung we found a decrease in expression levels of molecules of the adherence and tight junctions complex and related signalling systems, compatible with increased permeability. In contrast, in kidney we found expression patterns of these molecules compatible with decreased permeability. Finally, we partially corroborated our findings in mouse kidney in human kidneys from septic patients. These findings may help to understand the clinical difference in the extent of oedema formation in kidney and lung in sepsis-associated organ failure.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0.

  8. Carvacrol promotes angiogenic paracrine potential and endothelial differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells at low concentrations.

    PubMed

    Matluobi, Danial; Araghi, Atefeh; Maragheh, Behnaz Faramarzian Azimi; Rezabakhsh, Aysa; Soltani, Sina; Khaksar, Majid; Siavashi, Vahid; Feyzi, Adel; Bagheri, Hesam Saghaei; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Montazersaheb, Soheila

    2017-08-19

    Phenolic monoterpene compound, named Carvacrol, has been found to exert different biological outcomes. It has been accepted that the angiogenic activity of human mesenchymal stem cells was crucial in the pursuit of appropriate regeneration. In the current experiment, we investigated the contribution of Carvacrol on the angiogenic behavior of primary human mesenchymal stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells were exposed to Carvacrol in a dose ranging from 25 to 200μM for 48h. We measured cell survival rate by MTT assay and migration rate by a scratch test. The oxidative status was monitored by measuring SOD, GPx activity. The endothelial differentiation was studied by evaluating the level of VE-cadherin and vWF by real-time PCR and ELISA analyses. The content of VEGF and tubulogenesis behavior was monitored in vitro. We also conducted Matrigel plug in vivo CAM assay to assess the angiogenic potential of conditioned media from human mesenchymal stem cells after exposure to Carvacrol. Carvacrol was able to increase mesenchymal stem cell survival and migration rate (p<0.05). An increased activity of SOD was obtained while GPx activity unchanged or reduced. We confirmed the endothelial differentiation of stem cells by detecting vWF and VE-cadherin expression (p<0.05). The VEGF expression was increased and mesenchymal stem cells conditioned media improved angiogenesis tube formation in vitro (p<0.05). Moreover, histological analysis revealed an enhanced microvascular density at the site of Matrigel plug in CAM assay. Our data shed lights on the possibility of a Carvacrol to induce angiogenesis in human mesenchymal stem cells by modulating cell differentiation and paracrine angiogenic response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Microarray analysis of cell cycle gene expression in adult human corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ha Thi, Binh Minh; Campolmi, Nelly; He, Zhiguo; Pipparelli, Aurélien; Manissolle, Chloé; Thuret, Jean-Yves; Piselli, Simone; Forest, Fabien; Peoc'h, Michel; Garraud, Olivier; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (ECs) form a monolayer that controls the hydration of the cornea and thus its transparency. Their almost nil proliferative status in humans is responsible, in several frequent diseases, for cell pool attrition that leads to irreversible corneal clouding. To screen for candidate genes involved in cell cycle arrest, we studied human ECs subjected to various environments thought to induce different proliferative profiles compared to ECs in vivo. Donor corneas (a few hours after death), organ-cultured (OC) corneas, in vitro confluent and non-confluent primary cultures, and an immortalized EC line were compared to healthy ECs retrieved in the first minutes of corneal grafts. Transcriptional profiles were compared using a cDNA array of 112 key genes of the cell cycle and analysed using Gene Ontology classification; cluster analysis and gene map presentation of the cell cycle regulation pathway were performed by GenMAPP. Results were validated using qRT-PCR on 11 selected genes. We found several transcripts of proteins implicated in cell cycle arrest and not previously reported in human ECs. Early G1-phase arrest effectors and multiple DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest-associated transcripts were found in vivo and over-represented in OC and in vitro ECs. Though highly proliferative, immortalized ECs also exhibited overexpression of transcripts implicated in cell cycle arrest. These new effectors likely explain the stress-induced premature senescence that characterizes human adult ECs. They are potential targets for triggering and controlling EC proliferation with a view to increasing the cell pool of stored corneas or facilitating mass EC culture for bioengineered endothelial grafts.

  10. Microarray Analysis of Cell Cycle Gene Expression in Adult Human Corneal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ha Thi, Binh Minh; Campolmi, Nelly; He, Zhiguo; Pipparelli, Aurélien; Manissolle, Chloé; Thuret, Jean-Yves; Piselli, Simone; Forest, Fabien; Peoc'h, Michel; Garraud, Olivier; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (ECs) form a monolayer that controls the hydration of the cornea and thus its transparency. Their almost nil proliferative status in humans is responsible, in several frequent diseases, for cell pool attrition that leads to irreversible corneal clouding. To screen for candidate genes involved in cell cycle arrest, we studied human ECs subjected to various environments thought to induce different proliferative profiles compared to ECs in vivo. Donor corneas (a few hours after death), organ-cultured (OC) corneas, in vitro confluent and non-confluent primary cultures, and an immortalized EC line were compared to healthy ECs retrieved in the first minutes of corneal grafts. Transcriptional profiles were compared using a cDNA array of 112 key genes of the cell cycle and analysed using Gene Ontology classification; cluster analysis and gene map presentation of the cell cycle regulation pathway were performed by GenMAPP. Results were validated using qRT-PCR on 11 selected genes. We found several transcripts of proteins implicated in cell cycle arrest and not previously reported in human ECs. Early G1-phase arrest effectors and multiple DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest-associated transcripts were found in vivo and over-represented in OC and in vitro ECs. Though highly proliferative, immortalized ECs also exhibited overexpression of transcripts implicated in cell cycle arrest. These new effectors likely explain the stress-induced premature senescence that characterizes human adult ECs. They are potential targets for triggering and controlling EC proliferation with a view to increasing the cell pool of stored corneas or facilitating mass EC culture for bioengineered endothelial grafts. PMID:24747418

  11. Induction of vascular endothelial phenotype and cellular proliferation from human cord blood stem cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Brian; Z-M Wan, Jim; Abley, Doris; Akabutu, John

    2005-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that stem cells derived from adult hematopoietic tissues are capable of trans-differentiation into non-hematopoietic cells, and that the culture in microgravity ( μg) may modulate the proliferation and differentiation. We investigated the application of μg to human umbilical cord blood stem cells (CBSC) in the induction of vascular endothelial phenotype expression and cellular proliferation. CD34+ mononuclear cells were isolated from waste human umbilical cord blood samples and cultured in simulated μg for 14 days. The cells were seeded in rotary wall vessels (RWV) with or without microcarrier beads (MCB) and vascular endothelial growth factor was added during culture. Controls consisted of culture in 1 G. The cell cultures in RWV were examined by inverted microscopy. Cell counts, endothelial cell and leukocyte markers performed by flow-cytometry and FACS scan were assayed at days 1, 4, 7 and at the termination of the experiments. Culture in RWV revealed significantly increased cellular proliferation with three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like aggregates. At day 4, CD34+ cells cultured in RWV bioreactor without MCB developed vascular tubular assemblies and exhibited endothelial phenotypic markers. These data suggest that CD34+ human umbilical cord blood progenitors are capable of trans-differentiation into vascular endothelial cell phenotype and assemble into 3D tissue structures. Culture of CBSC in simulated μg may be potentially beneficial in the fields of stem cell biology and somatic cell therapy.

  12. Sphingosine-1-phosphate induces human endothelial VEGF and MMP-2 production via transcription factor ZNF580: Novel insights into angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hui-Yan; Wei, Shu-Ping; Xu, Rui-Cheng; Xu, Peng-Xiao; Zhang, Wen-Cheng

    2010-05-07

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-induced migration and proliferation of endothelial cells are critical for angiogenesis. C2H2-zinc finger (ZNF) proteins usually play an essential role in altering gene expression and regulating the angiogenesis. The aim of this study is to investigate whether a novel human C2H2-zinc finger gene ZNF580 (Gene ID: 51157) is involved in the migration and proliferation of endothelial cells stimulated by S1P. Our study shows that EAhy926 endothelial cells express S1P1, S1P3 and S1P5 receptors. Furthermore, S1P upregulates both ZNF580 mRNA and protein levels in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. SB203580, the specific inhibitor of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) pathway, blocks the S1P-induced upregulation of ZNF580. Moreover, overexpression/downexpression of ZNF580 in EAhy926 cells leads to the enhancement/decrease of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression as well as the migration and proliferation of EAhy926 endothelial cells. These results elucidate the important role that ZNF580 plays in the process of migration and proliferation of endothelial cells, which provides a foundation for a novel approach to regulate angiogenesis.

  13. Exosomes Derived from Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells Accelerate Cutaneous Wound Healing by Promoting Angiogenesis Through Erk1/2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jieyuan; Chen, Chunyuan; Hu, Bin; Niu, Xin; Liu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Guowei; Zhang, Changqing; Li, Qing; Wang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Chronic skin wounds represent one of the most common and disabling complications of diabetes. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are precursors of endothelial cells and can enhance diabetic wound repair by facilitating neovascularization. Recent studies indicate that the transplanted cells exert therapeutic effects primarily via a paracrine mechanism and exosomes are an important paracrine factor that can be directly used as therapeutic agents for regenerative medicine. However, application of exosomes in diabetic wound repair has been rarely reported. In this study, we demonstrated that the exosomes derived from human umbilical cord blood-derived EPCs (EPC-Exos) possessed robust pro-angiogenic and wound healing effects in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. By using a series of in vitro functional assays, we found that EPC-Exos could be incorporated into endothelial cells and significantly enhance endothelial cells' proliferation, migration, and angiogenic tubule formation. Moreover, microarray analyses indicated that exosomes treatment markedly altered the expression of a class of genes involved in Erk1/2 signaling pathway. It was further confirmed with functional study that this signaling process was the critical mediator during the exosomes-induced angiogenic responses of endothelial cells. Therefore, EPC-Exos are able to stimulate angiogenic activities of endothelial cells by activating Erk1/2 signaling, which finally facilitates cutaneous wound repair and regeneration. PMID:27994512

  14. Monoclonal Antibody against Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme: Its Use as a Marker for Murine, Bovine, and Human Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, R.; Alby, L.; Grieves, J.; Joseph, J.; Lindgren, C.; Morrissey, L. W.; Sidky, Y. A.; Tu, M.; Watt, S. L.

    1982-12-01

    A monoclonal antibody has been prepared against rat angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). By selection for antibody binding to endothelial cells of bovine rather than rat origin we have obtained a reagent that has broad cross-species binding properties and that can at the same time serve as a useful marker for the surface of endothelial cells. The IgM-producing clone that we have established, α -ACE 3.1.1, has been grown in ascites form to yield ascites fluid that binds selectively to immobilized ACE at a >1:10,000 dilution. By use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, immunofluorescence histology, and flow cytometry, we have demonstrated the presence of ACE on endothelial cells of murine, bovine, and human origin. By means of a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS-IV) we have been able to selectively isolate viable endothelial cells from a mixture of endothelial cells and fibroblasts. We believe the antibody will be useful not only for the selection and in vitro cultivation of endothelial cells but also as a tool for the identification and pharmacological study of ACE.

  15. Infection of Human Endothelial Cells by Japanese Encephalitis Virus: Increased Expression and Release of Soluble HLA-E

    PubMed Central

    Shwetank; Date, Onkar S.; Kim, Kwang S.; Manjunath, Ramanathapuram

    2013-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a single stranded RNA virus that infects the central nervous system leading to acute encephalitis in children. Alterations in brain endothelial cells have been shown to precede the entry of this flavivirus into the brain, but infection of endothelial cells by JEV and their consequences are still unclear. Productive JEV infection was established in human endothelial cells leading to IFN-β and TNF-α production. The MHC genes for HLA-A, -B, -C and HLA-E antigens were upregulated in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, the endothelial-like cell line, ECV 304 and human foreskin fibroblasts upon JEV infection. We also report the release/shedding of soluble HLA-E (sHLA-E) from JEV infected human endothelial cells for the first time. This shedding of sHLA-E was blocked by an inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). In addition, MMP-9, a known mediator of HLA solubilisation was upregulated by JEV. In contrast, human fibroblasts showed only upregulation of cell-surface HLA-E. Addition of UV inactivated JEV-infected cell culture supernatants stimulated shedding of sHLA-E from uninfected ECV cells indicating a role for soluble factors/cytokines in the shedding process. Antibody mediated neutralization of TNF-α as well as IFNAR receptor together not only resulted in inhibition of sHLA-E shedding from uninfected cells, it also inhibited HLA-E and MMP-9 gene expression in JEV-infected cells. Shedding of sHLA-E was also observed with purified TNF-α and IFN-β as well as the dsRNA analog, poly (I:C). Both IFN-β and TNF-α further potentiated the shedding when added together. The role of soluble MHC antigens in JEV infection is hitherto unknown and therefore needs further investigation. PMID:24236107

  16. Expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and vascular endothelial growth factor in association with neovascularization in human primary astrocytoma*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jian-wei; Zhan, Ren-ya; Tong, Ying; Zhou, Yong-qing; Zhang, Ming

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiogenesis in primary astrocytoma. Methods: Thirty-seven primary astrocytomas and 4 astrocytic hyperplasia samples were collected and divided into three groups according to histological grade. The expression of eNOS, VEGF and factor VIII related antigen (FVIIIRAg) were assayed by immunohistochemistry. Microvascular density was assessed by FVIIIRAg immunoreactivity. The intensity of immunoreactivity was graded according to the percentage of positive tumor cells. Results: No eNOS and VEGF were expressed in the astrocytes and vascular endothelium in astrocytic hyperplasia. The expression of eNOS or VEGF was light in low-grade astrocytoma and strong in glioblastoma. eNOS expression in astrocytoma was very positively correlated with VEGF. eNOS and VEGF expression in anaplastic astrocytoma was median in contrast to the low grade astrocytoma and glioblastoma. Lower microvascular density was found in low grade astrocytoma than that in higher grade malignant ones. The expressions of eNOS and VEGF were correlated with microvascular density and tumor malignancy. Conclusion: This finding suggests that eNOS and VEGF may have cooperative effect in tumor angiogenesis and play an important role in the pathogenesis of primary astrocytoma. PMID:15973775

  17. Proinflammatory and prothrombotic effects on human vascular endothelial cells of Immune-cell-derived LIGHT

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective LIGHT (TNFSF 14) belongs to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily and is expressed by activated T cells as well as various types of antigen presenting cells. LIGHT binds to its cellular receptors TR2 and LTßR and has a co-stimulatory role in T cell activation. Here, we compared the relative expression of LIGHT in different immune cells and the biological activity of immune cell-derived LIGHT on endothelial cells. Methods and Results Surface expression of LIGHT and mRNA production by PBMC and isolated T cells (CD4+ or CD8+) significantly increased after stimulation with PMA (Phorbolester-12-Myristat-13-Acetat) + ionomycin. No LIGHT expression on PMA stimulated monocytes or monocytic-like THP-1 cells could be detected; differentiation of monocytes and THP-1 cells into macrophages, however, resulted in up-regulation of LIGHT. Supernatants of stimulated T cells contained higher concentrations of soluble LIGHT than macrophage supernatants normalized to cell numbers; release of soluble LIGHT was found to be dependent on metalloproteinase activity. Size determination of released soluble LIGHT by size exclusion chromatography revealed a molecular mass of ~60 kDa, suggesting a trimeric form. Released soluble LIGHT induced expression of proinflammatory antigens ICAM-1, tissue factor and IL-8 in human endothelial cells and caused apoptosis of IFN-γ pretreated endothelial cells. Soluble LIGHT was detected at low levels in sera of healthy controls and was significantly enhanced in sera of patients with chronic hepatitis C and rheumatoid arthritis (24.93 ± 9.41 vs.129.53 ± 49.14 and 172.13 ± 77.64; p < 0.0005). Conclusion These findings suggest that among immune cells activated T lymphocytes are the main source of soluble LIGHT with released amounts of soluble LIGHT markedly higher compared to platelets. Immune cell-derived membrane-bound and soluble trimeric LIGHT is biologically active, inducing proinflammatory changes in endothelial cells. Enhanced plasma

  18. Talin Modulation by a Synthetic N-Acylurea Derivative Reduces Angiogenesis in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, I-Rang; Joo, Hyung Joon; Jeong, Minseon; Kim, Jong-Ho; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Kim, Chungho; Jung, Jong-Wha; Hong, Soon Jun

    2017-01-01

    Talin is a focal adhesion protein that activates integrins and recruits other focal adhesion proteins. Talin regulates the interactions between integrins and the extracellular matrix, which are critical for endothelial cells during angiogenesis. In this study, we successfully synthesized a novel talin modulator, N-((2-(1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl)carbamoyl)-2-(benzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yloxy)acetamide, referred to as KCH-1521. KCH-1521 was determined to bind talin and modulate downstream signaling molecules of talin. After 24 h of treatment, KCH-1521 changed the cell morphology of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and reduced focal adhesion protein expression including vinculin and paxillin. Talin downstream signaling is regulated via focal adhesion kinase (FAK), kinase B (AKT), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways, however, treatment with KCH-1521 decreased phosphorylation of FAK, AKT, and ERK, leading to reduction of cell proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. Interestingly, the expression of various angiogenic genes was significantly decreased after treatment with KCH-1521. Also, in vitro tube forming assay revealed that KCH-1521 reduced angiogenic networks in a time-dependent manner. To investigate the reversibility of its effects, KCH-1521 was removed after treatment. HUVECs recovered their morphology through rearrangement of the cytoskeleton and the expression of angiogenic genes was also recovered. By further optimization and in vivo studies of KCH-1521, a novel drug of talin modulation could be used to achieve therapeutic anti-angiogenesis for vascular diseases and cancers. PMID:28117756

  19. Particulate matter induces prothrombotic microparticle shedding by human mononuclear and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Neri, Tommaso; Pergoli, Laura; Petrini, Silvia; Gravendonk, Lotte; Balia, Cristina; Scalise, Valentina; Amoruso, Angela; Pedrinelli, Roberto; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Bollati, Valentina; Celi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Particulate airborne pollution is associated with increased cardiopulmonary morbidity. Microparticles are extracellular vesicles shed by cells upon activation or apoptosis involved in physiological processes such as coagulation and inflammation, including airway inflammation. We investigated the hypothesis that particulate matter causes the shedding of microparticles by human mononuclear and endothelial cells. Cells, isolated from the blood and the umbilical cords of normal donors, were cultured in the presence of particulate from a standard reference. Microparticles were assessed in the supernatant as phosphatidylserine concentration. Microparticle-associated tissue factor was assessed by an one-stage clotting assay. Nanosight technology was used to evaluate microparticle size distribution. Particulate matter induces a dose- and time- dependent, rapid (1h) increase in microparticle generation in both cells. These microparticles express functional tissue factor. Particulate matter increases intracellular calcium concentration and phospholipase C inhibition reduces microparticle generation. Nanosight analysis confirmed that upon exposure to particulate matter both cells express particles with a size range consistent with the definition of microparticles (50-1000 nm). Exposure of mononuclear and endothelial cells to particulate matter upregulates the generation of microparticles at least partially mediated by calcium mobilization. This observation might provide a further link between airborne pollution and cardiopulmonary morbidity.

  20. LR-90 prevents methylglyoxal-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Figarola, James L; Singhal, Jyotsana; Rahbar, Samuel; Awasthi, Sanjay; Singhal, Sharad S

    2014-05-01

    Methylglyoxal (MGO) is a highly reactive dicarbonyl compound known to induce cellular injury and cytoxicity, including apoptosis in vascular cells. Vascular endothelial cell apoptosis has been implicated in the pathophysiology and progression of atherosclerosis. We investigated whether the advanced glycation end-product inhibitor LR-90 could prevent MGO-induced apoptosis in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were pre-treated with LR-90 and then stimulated with MGO. Cell morphology, cytotoxicity and apoptosis were evaluated by light microscopy, MTT assay, and Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide double staining, respectively. Levels of Bax, Bcl-2, cytochrome c, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and caspase activities were assessed by Western blotting. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were measured with fluorescent probes. LR-90 dose-dependently prevented MGO-associated HUVEC cytotoxicity and apoptotic biochemical changes such as loss of MMP, increased Bax/Bcl-2 protein ratio, mitochondrial cytochrome c release and activation of caspase-3 and 9. Additionally, LR-90 blocked intracellular ROS formation and MAPK (p44/p42, p38, JNK) activation, though the latter seem to be not directly involved in MGO-induced HUVEC apoptosis. LR-90 prevents MGO-induced HUVEC apoptosis by inhibiting ROS and associated mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic signaling cascades, suggesting that LR-90 possess cytoprotective ability which could be beneficial in prevention of diabetic related-atherosclerosis.

  1. Phytochemical activation of Nrf2 protects human coronary artery endothelial cells against an oxidative challenge.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Elise L; McCord, Joe M; Reuland, Danielle J; Miller, Benjamin F; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2012-01-01

    Activation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a potential therapeutic intervention against endothelial cell oxidative stress and associated vascular disease. We hypothesized that treatment with the phytochemicals in the patented dietary supplement Protandim would induce Nrf2 nuclear localization and phase II antioxidant enzyme protein in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs), protecting against an oxidant challenge in an Nrf2- dependent manner. Protandim treatment induced Nrf2 nuclear localization, and HO-1 (778% of control ± 82.25 P < 0.01), SOD1 (125.9% of control ± 6.05 P < 0.01), NQO1 (126% of control ± 6.5 P < 0.01), and GR (119.5% of control ± 7.00 P < 0.05) protein expression in HCAEC. Treatment of HCAEC with H(2)O(2) induced apoptosis in 34% of cells while pretreatment with Protandim resulted in only 6% apoptotic cells (P < 0.01). Nrf2 silencing significantly decreased the Protandim-induced increase in HO-1 protein (P < 0.01). Nrf2 silencing also significantly decreased the protection afforded by Protandim against H(2)O(2)- induced apoptosis (P < 0.01 compared to no RNA, and P < 0.05 compared to control RNA). These results show that Protandim induces Nrf2 nuclear localization and antioxidant enzyme expression, and protection of HCAEC from an oxidative challenge is Nrf2 dependent.

  2. Phytochemical Activation of Nrf2 Protects Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells against an Oxidative Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Elise L.; McCord, Joe M.; Reuland, Danielle J.; Miller, Benjamin F.; Hamilton, Karyn L.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a potential therapeutic intervention against endothelial cell oxidative stress and associated vascular disease. We hypothesized that treatment with the phytochemicals in the patented dietary supplement Protandim would induce Nrf2 nuclear localization and phase II antioxidant enzyme protein in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs), protecting against an oxidant challenge in an Nrf2- dependent manner. Protandim treatment induced Nrf2 nuclear localization, and HO-1 (778% of control ± 82.25 P < 0.01), SOD1 (125.9% of control ± 6.05 P < 0.01), NQO1 (126% of control ± 6.5 P < 0.01), and GR (119.5% of control ± 7.00 P < 0.05) protein expression in HCAEC. Treatment of HCAEC with H2O2 induced apoptosis in 34% of cells while pretreatment with Protandim resulted in only 6% apoptotic cells (P < 0.01). Nrf2 silencing significantly decreased the Protandim-induced increase in HO-1 protein (P < 0.01). Nrf2 silencing also significantly decreased the protection afforded by Protandim against H2O2- induced apoptosis (P < 0.01 compared to no RNA, and P < 0.05 compared to control RNA). These results show that Protandim induces Nrf2 nuclear localization and antioxidant enzyme expression, and protection of HCAEC from an oxidative challenge is Nrf2 dependent. PMID:22685617

  3. Cytocompatibility evaluation of glycol-chitosan coated boron nitride nanotubes in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Del Turco, Serena; Ciofani, Gianni; Cappello, Valentina; Gemmi, Mauro; Cervelli, Tiziana; Saponaro, Chiara; Nitti, Simone; Mazzolai, Barbara; Basta, Giuseppina; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2013-11-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are intriguing nanomaterials with a wide range of potential biomedical applications. The assessment of BNNT interactions with biological systems, at both the cellular and subcellular levels, is an essential starting point for determining their bio-safety. We explore the effects of increasing concentrations of GC-BNNTs (0-100 μg/mL) on human vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), testing cell toxicity, proliferation, cytoskeleton integrity, cell activation and DNA damage. No significant changes were observed in cell viability, cytoskeleton integrity or DNA damage. Only a modest reduction in cell viability, tested by trypan blue assay, and the increased expression of vascular adhesion molecule-1, a marker of cell activation, were detected at the highest concentration used (100 μg/mL). Taken together, these findings indicate that GC-BNNTs do not affect endothelial cell biology, and are a promising first step in further investigation of their application potential in vascular targeting, imaging, and drug delivery.

  4. Effects of Dietary Decosahexaenoic Acid (Dha) on eNOS in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stebbins, Charles L.; Stice, James P.; Hart, C. Michael; Mbai, Fiona N.; Knowlton, Anne A.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction occurs in heart disease, and may reduce functional capacity via attenuations in peripheral blood flow. Dietary DHA may improve this dysfunction, but the mechanism is unknown. We determined if DHA enhances expression and activity of eNOS in cultured human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC). HCAEC from 4 donors were treated with 5 nM, 50 nM, or 1 μM DHA for 7 days to model chronic DHA exposure. A trend for increased expression of eNOS and phospho-eNOS was observed with 5 and 50 nM DHA. DHA also enhanced expression of two proteins instrumental in activation of eNOS; phospho-Akt (5 and 50 nM) and HSP90 (50 nM and 1 μM). VEGF-induced activation of Akt increased NOx in treated (50 nM DHA) vs. untreated HCAEC (9.2±1.0 vs. 3.3±1.1 μmols/μg protein/μl). Findings suggest that DHA enhances eNOS and Akt activity, augments HSP90 expression, and increases NO bioavailability in response to Akt kinase activation PMID:18682551

  5. Biocompatibility of pure titanium modified by human endothelial cell-derived extracellular matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xiaoqing; Wang, Jin; Zhu, Ying; Tu, Qiufen; Huang, Nan

    2010-04-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) used to modify biomaterial surface is a promising method for improving cardiovascular material hemocompatibility. In the present work, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are cultured and native ECM is obtained on pure titanium surface. Fourier infrared spectrum (FTIR) test proves the existence of amide I and amide II band on the modified titanium surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) further confirms the chemical composition and binding types of the ECM proteins on the titanium substrate. The results of light microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) exhibit the morphology of HUVEC derived ECM. There are higher water contact angles on the ECM modified samples. Furthermore, some ECM components, including fibronectin (FN), laminin (LN) and type IV collagen (IV-COL) are presented on ECM-covered titanium surface by immunofluorescence staining. The biological behavior of cultured HUVECs and adherent platelets on different samples are investigated by in vitro HUVECs culture and platelet adhesion. Cells exhibit better morphology and their proliferation ability greatly improve on the ECM-covered titanium. At the same time, the platelet adhesion and spreading are inhibited on ECM-covered titanium surface. These investigations demonstrate that ECM produced by HUVECs cannot only improve adhesion and proliferation ability of endothelial cell but also inhibit adhesion and activation of platelets. Thus, the approach described here may provide a basis for preparation of modified surface in cardiovascular implants application.

  6. The effects of adiponectin and leptin on human endothelial cell proliferation: a live-cell study.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Granada; Visitación Bartolomé, M; Miana, María; Jurado-López, Raquel; Martín, Ruben; Zuluaga, Pilar; Martinez-Martinez, Ernesto; Nieto, M Luisa; Alvarez-Sala, Luis A; Millán, Jesús; Lahera, Vicente; Cachofeiro, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    The effect of adiponectin and leptin on the proliferation of the human microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) was studied in the absence or presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS). The participation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt (PI-3K/Akt) pathways in this effect were evaluated. We studied the effect of both adipokines on the motility, mitosis, proliferation and cell death processes of HMEC-1 cells using live-cell imaging techniques. Adiponectin but not leptin further increased the proliferative effect induced by FBS on HMEC-1. This effect seems to be the consequence of an increase in the mitotic index in adiponectin-treated cells when compared to untreated ones. The presence of either the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor (PD98059), or PI-3K inhibitor (LY294002), reduced the effect of adiponectin in a dose-dependent manner. Neither adipokine was able to affect HMEC-1 proliferation in FBS-free conditions. Duration of mitosis, cell motility and the cell death process were similar in all conditions. These data suggest that adiponectin and leptin exert different effects on endothelial cell function. Adiponectin was able to potentiate proliferation of HMEC-1. This effect involves the activation of both PI3-K/Akt and ERK/MAPK pathways. However, it seems to exert minimal effects on HMEC-1 function in the case of leptin.

  7. LR-90 prevents methylglyoxal-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Figarola, James L.; Singhal, Jyotsana; Rahbar, Samuel; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Methylglyoxal (MGO) is a highly reactive dicarbonyl compound known to induce cellular injury and cytoxicity, including apoptosis in vascular cells. Vascular endothelial cell apoptosis has been implicated in the pathophysiology and progression of atherosclerosis. We investigated whether the advanced glycation end-product inhibitor LR-90 could prevent MGO-induced apoptosis in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were pre-treated with LR-90 and then stimulated with MGO. Cell morphology, cytotoxicity and apoptosis were evaluated by light microscopy, MTT assay, and Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide double staining, respectively. Levels of Bax, Bcl-2, cytochrome c, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and caspase activities were assessed by Western blotting. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were measured with fluorescent probes. LR-90 dose-dependently prevented MGO-associated HUVEC cytotoxicity and apoptotic biochemical changes such as loss of MMP, increased Bax/Bcl-2 protein ratio, mitochondrial cytochrome c release and activation of caspase-3 and 9. Additionally, LR-90 blocked intracellular ROS formation and MAPK (p44/p42, p38, JNK) activation, though the latter seem to be not directly involved in MGO-induced HUVEC apoptosis. LR-90 prevents MGO-induced HUVEC apoptosis by inhibiting ROS and associated mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic signaling cascades, suggesting that LR-90 possess cytoprotective ability which could be beneficial in prevention of diabetic related-atherosclerosis. PMID:24615331

  8. Tissue factor: A potent stimulator of Von Willebrand factor synthesis by human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Meiring, Muriel; Allers, W.; Le Roux, E.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and dysfunction of endothelial cells are thought to be triggers for the secretion of Von Willebrand factor. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and the coagulation factors, tissue factor and thrombin on the release and cleavage potential of ultra-large von Willebrand factor (ULVWF) and its cleavage protease by cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC were treated with IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α, tissue factor (TF) and thrombin, and combinations thereof for 24 hours under static conditions. The cells were then exposed to shear stress after which the VWF-propeptide levels and the VWF cleavage protease, ADAMTS13 content were measured. All treatments and their combinations, excluding IL-6, significantly stimulated the secretion of VWF from HUVEC. The VWF secretion from the HUVEC was stimulated most by the combination of TF with TNF-α. Slightly lower levels of ADAMTS13 secretion were found with all treatments. This may explain the thrombogenicity of patients with inflammation where extremely high VWF levels and slightly lower ADAMTS13 levels are present. PMID:27766025

  9. AXL-dependent infection of human fetal endothelial cells distinguishes Zika virus from other pathogenic flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Audrey Stéphanie; Shim, Byoung-Shik; Kwon, Young-Chan; Zhang, Rong; Otsuka, Yuka; Schmitt, Kimberly; Berri, Fatma; Diamond, Michael S.; Choe, Hyeryun

    2017-01-01

    Although a causal relationship between Zika virus (ZIKV) and microcephaly has been established, it remains unclear why ZIKV, but not other pathogenic flaviviruses, causes congenital defects. Here we show that when viruses are produced in mammalian cells, ZIKV, but not the closely related dengue virus (DENV) or West Nile virus (WNV), can efficiently infect key placental barrier cells that directly contact the fetal bloodstream. We show that AXL, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is the primary ZIKV entry cofactor on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and that ZIKV uses AXL with much greater efficiency than does DENV or WNV. Consistent with this observation, only ZIKV, but not WNV or DENV, bound the AXL ligand Gas6. In comparison, when DENV and WNV were produced in insect cells, they also infected HUVECs in an AXL-dependent manner. Our data suggest that ZIKV, when produced from mammalian cells, infects fetal endothelial cells much more efficiently than other pathogenic flaviviruses because it binds Gas6 more avidly, which in turn facilitates its interaction with AXL. PMID:28167751

  10. Improved Cryopreservation of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells: A Systematic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultani, A. Billal; Marquez-Curtis, Leah A.; Elliott, Janet A. W.; McGann, Locksley E.

    2016-10-01

    Cryopreservation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) facilitated their commercial availability for use in vascular biology, tissue engineering and drug delivery research; however, the key variables in HUVEC cryopreservation have not been comprehensively studied. HUVECs are typically cryopreserved by cooling at 1 °C/min in the presence of 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). We applied interrupted slow cooling (graded freezing) and interrupted rapid cooling with a hold time (two-step freezing) to identify where in the cooling process cryoinjury to HUVECs occurs. We found that linear cooling at 1 °C/min resulted in higher membrane integrities than linear cooling at 0.2 °C/min or nonlinear two-step freezing. DMSO addition procedures and compositions were also investigated. By combining hydroxyethyl starch with DMSO, HUVEC viability after cryopreservation was improved compared to measured viabilities of commercially available cryopreserved HUVECs and viabilities for HUVEC cryopreservation studies reported in the literature. Furthermore, HUVECs cryopreserved using our improved procedure showed high tube forming capability in a post-thaw angiogenesis assay, a standard indicator of endothelial cell function. As well as presenting superior cryopreservation procedures for HUVECs, the methods developed here can serve as a model to optimize the cryopreservation of other cells.

  11. AXL-dependent infection of human fetal endothelial cells distinguishes Zika virus from other pathogenic flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Richard, Audrey Stéphanie; Shim, Byoung-Shik; Kwon, Young-Chan; Zhang, Rong; Otsuka, Yuka; Schmitt, Kimberly; Berri, Fatma; Diamond, Michael S; Choe, Hyeryun

    2017-02-21

    Although a causal relationship between Zika virus (ZIKV) and microcephaly has been established, it remains unclear why ZIKV, but not other pathogenic flaviviruses, causes congenital defects. Here we show that when viruses are produced in mammalian cells, ZIKV, but not the closely related dengue virus (DENV) or West Nile virus (WNV), can efficiently infect key placental barrier cells that directly contact the fetal bloodstream. We show that AXL, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is the primary ZIKV entry cofactor on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and that ZIKV uses AXL with much greater efficiency than does DENV or WNV. Consistent with this observation, only ZIKV, but not WNV or DENV, bound the AXL ligand Gas6. In comparison, when DENV and WNV were produced in insect cells, they also infected HUVECs in an AXL-dependent manner. Our data suggest that ZIKV, when produced from mammalian cells, infects fetal endothelial cells much more efficiently than other pathogenic flaviviruses because it binds Gas6 more avidly, which in turn facilitates its interaction with AXL.

  12. Ceramide Production Mediates Aldosterone-Induced Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell (HUVEC) Damages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumei; Pan, Yu; Bian, Zhixiang; Chen, Peihua; Zhu, Shijian; Gu, Huiyi; Guo, Liping; Hu, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the underlying mechanism of aldosterone (Aldo)-induced vascular endothelial cell damages by focusing on ceramide. We confirmed that Aldo (at nmol/L) inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) survival, and induced considerable cell apoptosis. We propose that ceramide (mainly C18) production might be responsible for Aldo-mediated damages in HUVECs. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an anti-ceramide lipid, attenuated Aldo-induced ceramide production and following HUVEC damages. On the other hand, the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor PDMP or the ceramide (C6) potentiated Aldo-induced HUVEC apoptosis. Eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, almost completely blocked Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production and HUVEC damages. Molecularly, ceramide synthase 1 (CerS-1) is required for C18 ceramide production by Aldo. Knockdown of CerS-1 by targeted-shRNA inhibited Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and protected HUVECs from Aldo. Reversely, CerS-1 overexpression facilitated Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and potentiated HUVEC damages. Together, these results suggest that C18 ceramide production mediates Aldo-mediated HUVEC damages. MR and CerS-1 could be the two signaling molecule regulating C18 ceramide production by Aldo.

  13. Ceramide Production Mediates Aldosterone-Induced Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell (HUVEC) Damages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumei; Pan, Yu; Bian, Zhixiang; Chen, Peihua; Zhu, Shijian; Gu, Huiyi; Guo, Liping; Hu, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the underlying mechanism of aldosterone (Aldo)-induced vascular endothelial cell damages by focusing on ceramide. We confirmed that Aldo (at nmol/L) inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) survival, and induced considerable cell apoptosis. We propose that ceramide (mainly C18) production might be responsible for Aldo-mediated damages in HUVECs. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an anti-ceramide lipid, attenuated Aldo-induced ceramide production and following HUVEC damages. On the other hand, the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor PDMP or the ceramide (C6) potentiated Aldo-induced HUVEC apoptosis. Eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, almost completely blocked Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production and HUVEC damages. Molecularly, ceramide synthase 1 (CerS-1) is required for C18 ceramide production by Aldo. Knockdown of CerS-1 by targeted-shRNA inhibited Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and protected HUVECs from Aldo. Reversely, CerS-1 overexpression facilitated Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and potentiated HUVEC damages. Together, these results suggest that C18 ceramide production mediates Aldo-mediated HUVEC damages. MR and CerS-1 could be the two signaling molecule regulating C18 ceramide production by Aldo. PMID:26788916

  14. Aronia melanocarpa fruit extract exhibits anti-inflammatory activity in human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zapolska-Downar, D; Bryk, D; Małecki, M; Hajdukiewicz, K; Sitkiewicz, D

    2012-08-01

    Altered expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) has been implicated in a variety of chronic inflammatory conditions, including atherosclerosis. Regulation of adhesion molecule expression by specific redox-sensitive mechanisms has been reported. Additionally, it has been observed that the extract of Aronia melanocarpa (A. Melanocarpa) fruits, rich in polyphenols, exhibits potent anti-oxidant properties and displays cardioprotective activity. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were pretreated with various concentrations (primarily 50 μg/mL) of Aronia Melanocarpa fruit extract prior to treatment with TNFα (10 ng/mL) for various periods of time. The surface protein and mRNA expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were determined using flow cytometry and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. Adhesion of peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes (PBMLs) to TNFα-treated HAECs was evaluated by an adhesion assay. Activation of NF-κB was evaluated by measuring NF-κB p65 phosphorylation using flow cytometry. ROS production was determined by reduction in fluorescent 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). Tested A. Melanocarpa extract significantly inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, attenuated the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and decreased intracellular ROS production in TNFα-treated HAECs. We conclude that A. Melanocarpa fruit extract exhibits anti-inflammatory effects in HAECs by inhibiting the expression of endothelial CAMs, activation of NF-κB and production of ROS.

  15. Human aortic endothelial cell response to 316L stainless steel material microstructure.

    PubMed

    Choubey, Animesh; Marton, Denes; Sprague, Eugene A

    2009-10-01

    The role of metal microstructure (e.g. grain sizes) in modulating cell adherence behavior is not well understood. This study investigates the effect of varying grain sizes of 316L stainless steel (SS) on the attachment and spreading of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Four different grain size samples; from 16 to 66 microm (ASTM 9.0-4.9) were sectioned from sheets. Grain structure was revealed by polishing and etching with glycergia. Contact angle measurement was done to assess the hydrophilicity of the specimens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the roughness and surface chemistry of the specimens. Cells were seeded on mechanically polished and chemically etched specimens followed by identification of activated focal adhesion sites using fluorescently tagged anti-pFAK (phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase). The 16 microm grain size etched specimens had signifi