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Sample records for human monocytes treated

  1. Interleukin-1 production by antibiotic-treated human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Roche, Y; Fay, M; Gougerot-Pocidalo, M A

    1988-05-01

    The effects of penicillin, macrolides (spiramycin and erythromycin), cephalosporins (cefaclor and cefadroxil), tetracycline (doxycycline) and quinolones (pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin) on extracellular and cell-associated interleukin 1 (IL-1) activity from human adherent mononuclear leucocyte cells were investigated in vitro. When cells were treated with an antibiotic concentration of 10 mg/l, no apparent effect could be detected for penicillin, erythromycin, cephalosporins or quinolones, while a slight increase of extracellular IL-1 activity associated with a decrease of intracellular IL-1 activity was observed with spiramycin and doxycycline. When high antibiotic concentration were used, extracellular IL-1 activity was increased by macrolides and tetracycline, while both cell-associated and class II human monocyte antigen expression were decreased. A toxic effect may have been exerted by these antimicrobial agents, since cell viability was altered when they were used at high concentrations. In contrast, extracellular IL-1 activity was found to be decreased by quinolones and cephalosporins. Intracellular IL-1 activity was also decreased by cephalosporins, while quinolones did not modify either cell-associated IL-1 activity or class II human monocyte antigen expression. The effect induced by quinolones and cephalosporins occurred without modification of cell viability. IL-1 activity was shown to be affected by antibiotics over the same range of concentrations which are known to inhibit mononuclear leucocyte proliferation. Our data may help in defining the mechanism by which the mitogen-induced mononuclear proliferative response is suppressed by antimicrobial agents since this appears to involve the inhibition of IL-1 production or of its release.

  2. Absence of oxysterol-like side effects in human monocytic cells treated with phytosterols and oxyphytosterols.

    PubMed

    Vejux, Anne; Montange, Thomas; Martine, Lucy; Zarrouk, Amira; Riedinger, Jean-Marc; Lizard, Gérard

    2012-04-25

    Oxysterols, found in some commonly consumed foods, can induce a wide range of cytotoxic effects, which have been extensively studied. On the other hand, the side effects of phytosterols and oxyphytosterols are less well-known. Over the past few years, different types of foods have been enriched with phytosterols on the basis of the properties of these compounds that reduce circulating cholesterol levels in certain experimental conditions. It is therefore important to gain better knowledge of the risks and benefits of this type of diet. In this study, conducted in human monocytic U937 cells, the ability of phytosterols (sitosterol, campesterol) and oxyphytosterols (7β-hydroxysitosterol, 7-ketositosterol) to induce cell death, polar lipid accumulation, and pro-inflammatory cytokine (MCP-1; IL-8) secretion was determined and compared to that of oxysterols (7-ketocholesterol, 7β-hydroxycholesterol). Phytosterols and oxyphytosterols had no significant effects on the parameters studied; only 7β-hydroxysitosterol slightly increased cell death, whereas at the concentration used (20 μg/mL), strong cytotoxic effects were observed with the oxysterols. With sitosterol, campesterol, and 7-ketositosterol, IL-8 secretion was decreased, and with campesterol the intracellular polar lipid level was reduced. The data show that phytosterols and oxyphytosterols have no oxysterol-like side effects, and they rather argue in favor of phytosterols' beneficial effects.

  3. Changes of cell-surface thiols and intracellular signaling in human monocytic cell line THP-1 treated with diphenylcyclopropenone.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Morihiko; Motoyama, Akira; Suzuki, Mie; Yanagi, Masashi; Kitagaki, Masato; Kouzuki, Hirokazu; Hagino, Shigenobu; Itagaki, Hiroshi; Sasa, Hitoshi; Kagatani, Saori; Aiba, Setsuya

    2010-12-01

    Changes of cell-surface thiols induced by chemical treatment may affect the conformations of membrane proteins and intracellular signaling mechanisms. In our previous study, we found that a non-toxic dose of diphenylcyclopropene (DPCP), which is a potent skin sensitizer, induced an increase of cell-surface thiols in cells of a human monocytic cell line, THP-1. Here, we examined the influence of DPCP on intracellular signaling. First, we confirmed that DPCP induced an increase of cell-surface thiols not only in THP-1 cells, but also in primary monocytes. The intracellular reduced-form glutathione/oxidized-form glutathione ratio (GSH/GSSG ratio) was not affected by DPCP treatment. By means of labeling with a membrane-impermeable thiol-reactive compound, Alexa Fluor 488 C5 maleimide (AFM), followed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and analysis by liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), we identified several proteins whose thiol contents were modified in response to DPCP. These proteins included cell membrane components, such as actin and β-tubulin, molecular chaperones, such as heat shock protein 27A and 70, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducible proteins. Next, we confirmed the expression in DPCP-treated cells of spliced XBP1, a known marker of ER stress. We also detected the phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK and p38 MAPK, which are downstream signaling molecules in the IRE1α-ASK1 pathway, which is activated by ER stress. These data suggested that increase of cell-surface thiols might be associated with activation of ER stress-mediated signaling.

  4. Monocyte heterogeneity in human cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Adam M; Rogacev, Kyrill S; Schirmer, Stephan H; Sester, Martina; Böhm, Michael; Fliser, Danilo; Heine, Gunnar H

    2012-12-01

    Atherosclerosis has been characterized as an inflammatory process, in which monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages are of paramount importance. Contrasting with their established role in atherosclerosis, monocytes have not unanimously been found to predict cardiovascular events in large epidemiological studies. However, in these studies human monocyte heterogeneity has been largely overlooked so far. Three human monocyte subsets can be distinguished: classical CD14(++)CD16(-), intermediate CD14(++)CD16(+) and nonclassical CD14(+)CD16(++) monocytes. Of note, correct enumeration of subset counts requires appropriate staining and gating strategies that encompass a pan-monocytic marker (e.g. HLA-DR or CD86). In experimental studies on murine atherogenesis a monocyte subset-specific contribution to atherosclerosis has been established. However, major interspecies differences in atherogenesis itself, as well as in the immune system (including monocyte subset phenotype and distribution) preclude a direct extrapolation to human pathology. Experimental and pilot clinical studies point to a prominent involvement of intermediate CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes in human atherosclerosis. Future clinical studies should analyze monocyte heterogeneity in cardiovascular disease. If a specific contribution of intermediate monocytes should be confirmed, immunomodulation of this monocyte subset could represent a future therapeutic target in atherosclerosis.

  5. IL-33 stimulates the release of procoagulant microvesicles from human monocytes and differentially increases tissue factor in human monocyte subsets.

    PubMed

    Stojkovic, Stefan; Thulin, Åsa; Hell, Lena; Thaler, Barbara; Rauscher, Sabine; Baumgartner, Johanna; Gröger, Marion; Ay, Cihan; Demyanets, Svitlana; Neumayer, Christoph; Huk, Ihor; Spittler, Andreas; Huber, Kurt; Wojta, Johann; Siegbahn, Agneta; Åberg, Mikael

    2017-06-28

    Monocytes and monocyte-derived microvesicles (MVs) are the main source of circulating tissue factor (TF). Increased monocyte TF expression and increased circulating levels of procoagulant MVs contribute to the formation of a prothrombotic state in patients with cardiovascular disease. Interleukin (IL)-33 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in atherosclerosis and other inflammatory diseases, but its role in regulating thrombosis is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of IL-33 on the procoagulant properties of human monocytes and monocyte-derived MVs. IL-33 induced a time- and concentration-dependent increase of monocyte TF mRNA and protein levels via binding to the ST2-receptor and activation of the NF-κB-pathway. The IL-33 treated monocytes also released CD14+TF+ MVs and IL-33 was found to increase the TF activity of both the isolated monocytes and monocyte-derived MVs. The monocytes were classified into subsets according to their CD14 and CD16 expression. Intermediate monocytes (IM) showed the highest ST2 receptor expression, followed by non-classical monocytes (NCM), and classical monocytes (CM). IL-33 induced a significant increase of TF only in the IM (p<0.01), with a tendency in NCM (p=0.06), but no increase was observed in CM. Finally, plasma levels of IL-33 were positively correlated with CD14+TF+ MVs in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy (r=0.480; p=0.032; n=20). We hereby provide novel evidence that the proinflammatory cytokine IL-33 induces differential TF expression and activity in monocyte subsets, as well as the release of procoagulant MVs. In this manner, IL-33 may contribute to the formation of a prothrombotic state characteristic for cardiovascular disease.

  6. Primary human monocyte differentiation regulated by Nigella sativa pressed oil.

    PubMed

    Mat, Mahaya C; Mohamed, Azman S; Hamid, Shahrul S

    2011-11-21

    Oxidized low density lipoprotein plays an important role in development of foam cells in atherosclerosis. The study was focused on regulation of primary human monocyte growth and CD11b expression in presence of Nigella sativa oil. Primary human monocytes were isolated from whole blood and grown at 37°C and 5% CO₂ saturation for five days prior to treatment with Nigella sativa oil. The cells were plated and washed before treatment with ox-LDL (10 μg/ml) as positive control and combined treatment of ox-LDL (10 μg/ml) and (140 ng/ml) Nigella sativa oil. The growth progression was monitored every 24 hours for 3 days. Macrophages showed reduced growth in comparison to monocytes 24 hours after treatment with Nigella sativa oil. The mean cell diameter was significantly different between untreated and treated condition in monocytes and macrophages (p < 0.001). Similarly, intracellular lipid accumulation was hindered in combined treatment with Nigella sativa oil. This was further supported by cell surface expression analysis, where CD11b was markedly reduced in cells treated with combination oxLDL and Nigella sativa oil compared to oxLDL alone. More cells differentiated into macrophage-like cells when monocytes were supplemented with oxidized LDL alone. The finding provides preliminary evidence on regulation of cell growth and differentiation in monocyte and monocyte-derived macrophages by Nigella sativa oil. Further investigations need to be conducted to explain its mechanism in human monocyte.

  7. Human monocyte heterogeneity--a nephrological perspective.

    PubMed

    Rogacev, Kyrill S; Heine, Gunnar H

    2010-07-01

    Monocytes are key components of the innate immune system and are circulating precursors of tissue macrophages. Phenotypically and functionally, monocytes are a heterogeneous leukocyte subset. Based on the expression of CD14 and CD16, three human monocyte subsets can be distinguished: CD14++CD16-, CD14++CD16+ and CD14(+)CD16+ monocytes. The latter two subsets are often summarized as CD16+ monocytes. As these CD16+ cells are expanded in inflammatory conditions including end-stage renal disease, they have traditionally been termed proinflammatory monocytes, which is in contrast to murine monocyte nomenclature. More, each dialysis session induces a transient CD16+ monocytopenia.. In end-stage renal disease, both higher predialytic counts of CD16+ monocytes, and dialysis-induced CD16+ monocyte kinetic are predictors of cardiovascular outcome. So far, the functional differences of monocyte subsets and their pathophysiological role are still insufficiently understood. Copyright 2010 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Expression of leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion molecules on monocyte adhesion to human endothelial cells on plasma treated PET and PTFE in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pu, F R; Williams, R L; Markkula, T K; Hunt, J A

    2002-12-01

    We used a coculture model to evaluate the inflammatory potential of ammonia gas plasma modified PET and PTFE by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. In these studies, human endothelial cells from umbilical cord (HUVEC) and promonocytic U937 cells were used. HUVECs grown on polystyrene tissue culture coverslips and HUVECs stimulated with tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) were used as controls. U937 adhesion to endothelium on each surface was evaluated at day 1 and day 7. To further investigate the role of leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) in cell-to-cell interaction on material surfaces, the expression of the leukocyte-endothelial CAMs: ICAM-1, VCAM-1, PECAM-1, and E-selectin on HUVECs were evaluated after U937 cell adhesion. The results demonstrated that plasma treated PET (T-PET) and treated PTFE (T-PTFE) did not increase U937 cell adhesion compared to the negative control. Maximal adhesion of U937 cells to HUVEC was observed on TNF-alpha stimulated endothelium with significant differences between day 1 and day 7, which is consistent with our prior observation that T-PET and T-PTFE did not cause HUVECs to increase the expression of adhesion molecules. After U937 cell adhesion, the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 of HUVECs were not different on T-PET and T-PTFE compared with the negative control. However, the expression of E-selectin was reduced on day 1, but not on day 7. The effects of plasma treated PET and PTFE on HUVEC adhesion and proliferation were also studied. On day 1 there were slight increases in the growth of HUVECs on both of T-PET and T-PTFE but this was not statistically significant. On day 7, the cell number increased significantly on the surfaces compared to the negative control. The results demonstrate that the plasma treatment of PET and PTFE with ammonia improves the adhesion and growth of endothelial cells and these surfaces do not exhibit a direct inflammatory effect in terms of monocyte adhesion and expression of

  9. TIE-2 expressing monocytes in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Pabois, Angélique; Xenarios, Ioannis; Delaloye, Jean-François; Doucey, Marie-Agnès

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) are well known as a key player in the tumor microenvironment, which support cancer progression. More recently, a lineage of monocytes characterized by the expression of the TIE-2/Tek angiopoietin receptor identified a subset of circulating and tumor-associated monocytes endowed with proangiogenic activity. TIE-2 expressing monocytes (TEM) were found both in humans and mice. Here, we review the phenotypes and functions of TEM reported so far in human cancer and their potential use as markers of cancer progression and metastasis. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic approaches currently used or proposed to target TEM. PMID:28507810

  10. Successful Treatment of Human Monocytic Ehrlichiosis with Rifampin

    PubMed Central

    Ajmal, Saira; Hughes, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Currently recommended treatment regimens for human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME) include doxycycline or tetracycline. Antibiotic susceptibility studies demonstrate that rifampin has in vitro bactericidal activity against Ehrlichia. Case reports have suggested clinical response with rifampin treatment of human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA). We report the first case of HME successfully treated with rifampin. PMID:26918212

  11. Primary human monocyte differentiation regulated by Nigella sativa pressed oil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Oxidized low density lipoprotein plays an important role in development of foam cells in atherosclerosis. The study was focused on regulation of primary human monocyte growth and CD11b expression in presence of Nigella sativa oil. Methods Primary human monocytes were isolated from whole blood and grown at 37°C and 5% CO2 saturation for five days prior to treatment with Nigella sativa oil. The cells were plated and washed before treatment with ox-LDL (10 μg/ml) as positive control and combined treatment of ox-LDL (10 μg/ml) and (140 ng/ml) Nigella sativa oil. The growth progression was monitored every 24 hours for 3 days. Results Macrophages showed reduced growth in comparison to monocytes 24 hours after treatment with Nigella sativa oil. The mean cell diameter was significantly different between untreated and treated condition in monocytes and macrophages (p < 0.001). Similarly, intracellular lipid accumulation was hindered in combined treatment with Nigella sativa oil. This was further supported by cell surface expression analysis, where CD11b was markedly reduced in cells treated with combination oxLDL and Nigella sativa oil compared to oxLDL alone. More cells differentiated into macrophage-like cells when monocytes were supplemented with oxidized LDL alone. Conclusions The finding provides preliminary evidence on regulation of cell growth and differentiation in monocyte and monocyte-derived macrophages by Nigella sativa oil. Further investigations need to be conducted to explain its mechanism in human monocyte. PMID:22104447

  12. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, Katrin; Rehli, Michael; Singer, Katrin; Renner-Sattler, Kathrin; Kreutz, Marina

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. - Highlights: • Lactic acid broadly delays LPS-induced gene expression in human monocytes. • Expression of important monocyte effector molecules is affected by lactic acid. • Interference of lactic acid with TLR signaling causes the delayed gene expression. • The profound effect of lactic acid might contribute to immune suppression in tumors.

  13. Aliphatic alcohols in spirits inhibit phagocytosis by human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Pál, László; Árnyas, Ervin M; Bujdosó, Orsolya; Baranyi, Gergő; Rácz, Gábor; Ádány, Róza; McKee, Martin; Szűcs, Sándor

    2015-04-01

    A large volume of alcoholic beverages containing aliphatic alcohols is consumed worldwide. Previous studies have confirmed the presence of ethanol-induced immunosuppression in heavy drinkers, thereby increasing susceptibility to infectious diseases. However, the aliphatic alcohols contained in alcoholic beverages might also impair immune cell function, thereby contributing to a further decrease in microbicidal activity. Previous research has shown that aliphatic alcohols inhibit phagocytosis by granulocytes but their effect on human monocytes has not been studied. This is important as they play a crucial role in engulfment and killing of pathogenic microorganisms and a decrease in their phagocytic activity could lead to impaired antimicrobial defence in heavy drinkers. The aim of this study was to measure monocyte phagocytosis following their treatment with those aliphatic alcohols detected in alcoholic beverages. Monocytes were separated from human peripheral blood and phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan particles by monocytes treated with ethanol and aliphatic alcohols individually and in combination was determined. It was shown that these alcohols could suppress the phagocytic activity of monocytes in a concentration-dependent manner and when combined with ethanol, they caused a further decrease in phagocytosis. Due to their additive effects, it is possible that they may inhibit phagocytosis in a clinically meaningful way in alcoholics and episodic heavy drinkers thereby contribute to their increased susceptibility to infectious diseases. However, further research is needed to address this question.

  14. Two alloantigens on human monocytes: a diallelic system?

    PubMed

    Jager, M J; Claas, F H; D'Amaro, J; Baldwin, W M; van Rood, J J

    1987-07-01

    A positive monocyte crossmatch and therefore anti-monocyte antibodies are negative factors in bone marrow and renal transplantation. When the monocyte antigens themselves can be recognized, matching for the antigens involved here may become a possibility. In order to find useful anti-monocyte sera as typing reagents, human sera were screened against panel cells. Several monocyte specific sera were obtained. These sera recognized two monocyte antigens, HMA-1 and HMA-2. No similarity with any of the HLA antigens was observed. Every individual tested was positive for at least one of these two monocyte antigens, suggesting that HMA-1 and HMA-2 constitute a diallelic system.

  15. Initial Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against Human Monocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolini, Valentina; Nunez, Gabriel; Smith, R. Graham; Stastny, Peter; Capra, J. Donald

    1980-11-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies against human monocytes have been produced by somatic cell fusion. Extensive specificity analysis suggests that these antibodies react with most if not all human peripheral blood monocytes and not with highly purified T or B cells. Initial chemical characterization of the monocyte antigen recognized by two of these antibodies is presented. The molecule is a single polypeptide chain with an apparent molecular weight of 200,000. These reagents should prove useful in the clinical definition of disorders of monocyte differentiation, in studies of monocyte function, and in the elucidation of the genetics and structure of monocyte cell surface antigens.

  16. Effect of the Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1/CC Chemokine Receptor 2 System on Nephrin Expression in Streptozotocin-Treated Mice and Human Cultured Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tarabra, Elena; Giunti, Sara; Barutta, Federica; Salvidio, Gennaro; Burt, Davina; Deferrari, Giacomo; Gambino, Roberto; Vergola, Daniela; Pinach, Silvia; Perin, Paolo Cavallo; Camussi, Giovanni; Gruden, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a chemokine binding to the CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) and promoting monocyte infiltration, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. To assess the potential relevance of the MCP-1/CCR2 system in the pathogenesis of diabetic proteinuria, we studied in vitro if MCP-1 binding to the CCR2 receptor modulates nephrin expression in cultured podocytes. Moreover, we investigated in vivo if glomerular CCR2 expression is altered in kidney biopsies from patients with diabetic nephropathy and whether lack of MCP-1 affects proteinuria and expression of nephrin in experimental diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Expression of nephrin was assessed in human podocytes exposed to rh-MCP-1 by immunofluorescence and real-time PCR. Glomerular CCR2 expression was studied in 10 kidney sections from patients with overt nephropathy and eight control subjects by immunohistochemistry. Both wild-type and MCP-1 knockout mice were made diabetic with streptozotocin. Ten weeks after the onset of diabetes, albuminuria and expression of nephrin, synaptopodin, and zonula occludens-1 were examined by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. RESULTS In human podocytes, MCP-1 binding to the CCR2 receptor induced a significant reduction in nephrin both mRNA and protein expression via a Rho-dependent mechanism. The MCP-1 receptor, CCR2, was overexpressed in the glomerular podocytes of patients with overt nephropathy. In experimental diabetes, MCP-1 was overexpressed within the glomeruli and the absence of MCP-1 reduced both albuminuria and downregulation of nephrin and synaptopodin. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that the MCP-1/CCR2 system may be relevant in the pathogenesis of proteinuria in diabetes. PMID:19587356

  17. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Peter, Katrin; Rehli, Michael; Singer, Katrin; Renner-Sattler, Kathrin; Kreutz, Marina

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Monocytes and macrophages in malignant melanoma. II. Lysis of antibody-coated human erythrocytes as an assay of monocyte function.

    PubMed Central

    Nyholm, R. E.; Currie, G. A.

    1978-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells will lyse antibody-treated human erythrocytes. Using Group A red cells and a hyperimmune anti-A1 serum, we have devised a microassay for the cytolytic capacity of mononuclear cell suspensions. The effector cells responsible for red-cell lysis are mononuclear, adherent and phagocytic, and their activity is blocked by aggregated IgG. Their presence correlates well with non-specific esterase-containing cells and we conclude that they are monocytes. Dose-response curves of red-cell lysis plotted against numbers of monocytes were used to derive a simple parameter expressing the number of monocytes needed to lyse 15% of the 51Cr-labelled red cells. The assay was applied to a group of 27 normal controls and 36 patients with a histologically proven diagnosis of malignant melanoma. The results indicate that monocytes from patients show significantly greater lytic activity than those from the controls. These data suggest that monocytes from cancer patients are in some way activated, and that other defects in monocyte function which have been detected in cancer patients (defective chemotaxis and maturation) may be associated with monocyte "activation". PMID:638013

  19. The proliferative human monocyte subpopulation contains osteoclast precursors.

    PubMed

    Lari, Roya; Kitchener, Peter D; Hamilton, John A

    2009-01-01

    Immediate precursors of bone-resorbing osteoclasts are cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Particularly during clinical conditions showing bone loss, it would appear that osteoclast precursors are mobilized from bone marrow into the circulation prior to entering tissues undergoing such loss. The observed heterogeneity of peripheral blood monocytes has led to the notion that different monocyte subpopulations may have special or restricted functions, including as osteoclast precursors. Human peripheral blood monocytes were sorted based upon their degree of proliferation and cultured in macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF or CSF-1) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa-B ligand (RANKL). The monocyte subpopulation that is capable of proliferation gave rise to significantly more multinucleated, bone-resorbing osteoclasts than the bulk of the monocytes. Human peripheral blood osteoclast precursors reside in the proliferative monocyte subpopulation.

  20. MicroRNA profiling of human intermediate monocytes.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Adam M; Zhang, Lu; Emrich, Insa E; Rogacev, Kyrill S; Krezdorn, Nicolas; Rotter, Björn; Fliser, Danilo; Devaux, Yvan; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems; Heine, Gunnar H

    2017-03-01

    Among the three human monocyte subsets, intermediate CD14++CD16+ monocytes have been characterized as particularly proinflammatory cells in experimental studies and as potential biomarkers of cardiovascular risk in clinical cohorts. To further substantiate the distinct role of intermediate monocytes within human monocyte heterogeneity, we assessed subset-specific expression of miRNAs as central epigenetic regulators of gene expression. We hypothesized that intermediate monocytes have a distinct miRNA profile compared to classical and non-classical monocytes. By using small RNA-seq we analyzed 662 miRNAs in the three monocyte subsets. We identified 38 miRNAs that are differentially expressed in intermediate monocytes compared to both classical and non-classical monocytes with a p value of <10(-10), of which two miRNAs - miR-6087 (upregulated) and miR-150-5p (downregulated) - differed in their expression more than ten-fold. Pathway analysis of the 38 differentially expressed miRNAs linked intermediate monocytes to distinct biological processes such as gene regulation, cell differentiation, toll-like receptor signaling as well as antigen processing and presentation. Moreover, differentially expressed miRNAs were connected to those genes that we previously identified as markers of intermediate monocytes. In aggregation, we provide first genome-wide miRNA data in the context of monocyte heterogeneity, which substantiate the concept of monocyte trichotomy in human immunity. The identification of miRNAs that are specific for intermediate monocytes may allow to develop strategies, which particularly target this cell population while sparing the other two subsets.

  1. Pharmacological effects of mitraphylline from Uncaria tomentosa in primary human monocytes: Skew toward M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Montserrat-de la Paz, S; de la Puerta, R; Fernandez-Arche, A; Quilez, A M; Muriana, F J G; Garcia-Gimenez, M D; Bermudez, B

    2015-07-21

    Uncaria tomentosa (Willdenow ex Roemer & Schultes) DC. (Rubiaceae) is a Peruvian thorny liana, commonly known as "cat׳s claw", and traditionally used in folk medicine to deal with several inflammatory diseases. Mitraphylline (MTP) is the most abundant pentacyclic oxindolic alkaloid (POA) from U. Tomentosa and has been reported to modify the inflammatory response. Herein, we have sought to identify the mechanisms underlying this modulatory effect of MTP on primary human monocytes and its ability to regulate differentiation processes on human primary monocyte and monocyte-derived macrophages. In vitro studies with human primary monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages were performed. Monocytes and M0 macrophages were exposed to MTP (25μM) and LPS (100ng/mL). M0 macrophages were polarized to M1 and M2 phenotypes in the absence or presence of MTP. The activation state of monocytes/macrophages was assessed by flow cytometry, gene expression and protein analysis of different specific markers. In human primary monocytes, the incubation of MTP for 24h reduced the number of classical (CD14(++)CD16(-)) and intermediate (CD14(++)CD16(+)) subsets when compared to untreated or LPS-treated cells. MTP also reduced the chemotactic capacity of human primary monocytes. In addition, MTP promoted the polarization of M0 macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype, the abrogation of the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα, IL-6 or IL-1β, as well as the restoration of markers for M2 macrophages in LPS-treated M1 macrophages. Our results suggest that MTP may be a key modulator for regulating the plasticity of monocytes/macrophages and the attenuation of the inflammatory response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Borrelia burgdorferi induces chemokines in human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sprenger, H; Krause, A; Kaufmann, A; Priem, S; Fabian, D; Burmester, G R; Gemsa, D; Rittig, M G

    1997-01-01

    Lyme disease is clinically and histologically characterized by strong inflammatory reactions that contrast the paucity of spirochetes at lesional sites, indicating that borreliae induce mechanisms that amplify the inflammatory response. To reveal the underlying mechanisms of chemoattraction and activation of responding leukocytes, we investigated the induction of chemokines in human monocytes exposed to Borrelia burgdorferi by a dose-response and kinetic analysis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from Escherichia coli was used as a positive control stimulus. The release of the CXC chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8) and GRO-alpha and the CC chemokines MIP-1alpha, MCP-1, and RANTES was determined by specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and the corresponding gene expression patterns were determined by Northern blot analysis. The results showed a rapid and strong borrelia-inducible gene expression which was followed by the release of chemokines with peak levels after 12 to 16 h. Spirochetes and LPS were comparably effective in stimulating IL-8, GRO-alpha, MCP-1, and RANTES expression, whereas MIP-1alpha production preceded and exceeded chemokine levels induced by LPS. Unlike other bacteria, the spirochetes themselves did not bear or release factors with intrinsic chemotactic activity for monocytes or neutrophils. Thus, B. burgdorferi appears to be a strong inducer of chemokines which may, by the attraction and activation of phagocytic leukocytes, significantly contribute to inflammation and tissue damage observed in Lyme disease. PMID:9353009

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi: Inhibition of infection of human monocytes by aspirin.

    PubMed

    Carvalho de Freitas, Rafael; Lonien, Sandra Cristina Heim; Malvezi, Aparecida Donizette; Silveira, Guilherme Ferreira; Wowk, Pryscilla Fanini; da Silva, Rosiane Valeriano; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente; Bordignon, Juliano; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2017-09-19

    Cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi and its intracellular replication are essential for progression of the parasite life cycle and development of Chagas disease. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and other eicosanoids potently modulate host response and contribute to Chagas disease progression. In this study, we evaluated the effect of aspirin (ASA), a non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor on the T. cruzi invasion and its influence on nitric oxide and cytokine production in human monocytes. The pretreatment of monocytes with ASA or SQ 22536 (adenylate-cyclase inhibitor) induced a marked inhibition of T. cruzi infection. On the other hand, the treatment of monocytes with SQ 22536 after ASA restored the invasiveness of T. cruzi. This reestablishment was associated with a decrease in nitric oxide and PGE2 production, and also an increase of interleukin-10 and interleukin-12 by cells pre-treated with ASA. Altogether, these results reinforce the idea that the cyclooxygenase pathway plays a fundamental role in the process of parasite invasion in an in vitro model of T. cruzi infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Fatty acids from VLDL lipolysis products induce lipid droplet accumulation in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    den Hartigh, Laura J; Connolly-Rohrbach, Jaime E; Fore, Samantha; Huser, Thomas R; Rutledge, John C

    2010-01-01

    One mechanism by which monocytes become activated postprandially is by exposure to triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins such as very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). VLDL are hydrolyzed by lipoprotein lipase (LpL) at the blood-endothelial cell interface, releasing free fatty acids. In this study, we examined postprandial monocyte activation in more detail, and found that lipolysis products generated from postprandial VLDL induce the formation of lipid-filled droplets within cultured THP-1 monocytes, characterized by coherent anti-stokes Raman spectroscopy. Organelle-specific stains revealed an association of lipid droplets with the endoplasmic reticulum, confirmed by electron microscopy. Lipid droplet formation was reduced when LpL-released fatty acids were bound by bovine serum albumin, which also reduced cellular inflammation. Furthermore, saturated fatty acids induced more lipid droplet formation in monocytes compared to mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Monocytes treated with postprandial VLDL lipolysis products contained lipid droplets with more intense saturated Raman spectroscopic signals than monocytes treated with fasting VLDL lipolysis products. In addition, we found that human monocytes isolated during the peak postprandial period contain more lipid droplets compared to those from the fasting state, signifying that their development is not limited to cultured cells but also occurs in vivo. In summary, circulating free fatty acids can mediate lipid droplet formation in monocytes and potentially be used as a biomarker to assess an individual’s risk of developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:20208007

  5. Effects of adherence, activation and distinct serum proteins on the in vitro human monocyte maturation process.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Y; Griffith, R; Miller, P; Stevenson, G W; Lund, S; Kanapa, D J; Stevenson, H C

    1988-03-01

    Elutriator-purified human monocytes were cultured in a serum-free (SF) medium, and various serum proteins and functional activating agents were assessed for their effects on the in vitro maturation of human monocytes to macrophages. Following 3 days of suspension culture in Teflon labware, 60% of the monocytes were easily recovered. When varying concentrations of human AB serum (HuAB) were employed, human monocyte maturation progressed rapidly; the kinetics of this maturation process during cell suspension culture were very similar to the pattern observed following adherence culture. In contrast, when SF medium was employed, a marked retardation of the monocyte maturation process was observed; this could not be attributed to any changes in cell recovery and/or viability. Thus, cells could be maintained in their monocytoid form for 3 days when cultured in SF medium. When HuAB was added after 3 days of culture, human monocyte maturation into macrophages proceeded at a normal rate. We attempted to characterize certain of the serum protein(s) found in HuAB which promoted the monocyte maturation process. Human immunoglobulin G (IgG) was found to be the most potent serum protein in increasing 5'-N activity and decreasing peroxidase activity of suspension cultured monocytes. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) and albumin (Alb) were shown not to have significant monocyte maturation activity. Heat-treated human gamma globulin and IgG purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were shown to have patterns identical with that of untreated HGG and IgG with regard to promoting monocyte maturation; F(ab')2 was not an active maturation promoter, indicating the need for an intact Fc portion of the IgG molecule. Fibrinogen and fibronectin also had maturation promoting activity. Finally, addition of the potent monocyte functional activators, muramyl dipeptide (MDP), polyriboinosinic:polyribocytidilic acid (Poly I:C), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) had no effect on the monocyte

  6. Helium-neon and nitrogen laser irradiation accelerates the phagocytic activity of human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Hemvani, Nanda; Chitnis, Dhananjay Sadashiv; Bhagwanani, Nijram Satramdas

    2005-12-01

    Intracellular survival of mycobacteria within monocytes is a crucial stage in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis. The aim was to check intracellular survival of Mycobacterium fortuitum within the human monocytes exposed to He-Ne and nitrogen laser irradiation. Tuberculosis remains one of the most important infectious diseases for developing countries. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been tried to treat tubercular cavitory lung disease with encouraging results. The in vitro photobiological effect of low level laser radiation on the intracellular mycobacteria needs to be evaluated before we could go for large clinical trials. The aliquots of human monocytes from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and tuberculosis cases were exposed to He-Ne or nitrogen laser beam. The non-irradiated monocytes from the same source served as controls. The monocytes were then challenged with M. fortuitum, and surviving mycobacteria within monocytes were subjected to viable counts. Enhanced killing of mycobacterial cells was seen among monocytes exposed to He-Ne and nitrogen laser irradiation. He-Ne and nitrogen laser irradiation activates the monocytes to increase intracellular killing of mycobacteria.

  7. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) enhances lipopolysaccharide-stimulated tissue factor in human monocytes and monocyte-derived microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Williams, Julie C; Klein, Thomas W; Goldberger, Bruce A; Sleasman, John W; Mackman, Nigel; Goodenow, Maureen M

    2015-01-01

    Immunomodulatory effects in humans of Δ(9-)Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of marijuana are controversial. Tissue factor (TF), the activator of the extrinsic coagulation cascade, is increased on circulating activated monocytes and is expressed on microvesicles released from activated monocytes during inflammatory conditions, which perpetuate coagulopathies in a number of diseases. In view of the increased medicinal use of marijuana, effects of THC on human monocytes and monocyte-derived microvesicles activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were investigated. Peak levels of TF procoagulant activity developed in monocytes or microvesicles 6 h following LPS treatment and were unaltered by THC. After 24 h of LPS stimulation, TF activity declined in control-treated or untreated cells and microvesicles, but persisted with THC treatment. Peak TF protein occurred within 6 h of LPS treatment independent of THC; by 24 h, TF protein declined to almost undetectable levels without THC, but was about 4-fold greater with THC. Steady-state TF mRNA levels were similar up to 2 h in the presence of LPS with or without THC, while 10-fold greater TF mRNA levels persisted over 3-24 h with THC treatment. Activation of MAPK or NF-κB pathways was unaltered by THC treatment and inflammatory cytokine IL-6 levels were unchanged. In contrast, TNF and IL-8 levels were enhanced by 20-50 %. THC enhances TF expression in activated monocytes resulting in elevated procoagulant activity. Marijuana use could potentiate coagulopathies in individuals with chronic immune activation such as HIV-1 infection or inflammatory bowel disease.

  8. Stimulation of oxidative burst in human monocytes by lipoteichoic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, R; Kotb, M; Nagauker, O; Majumdar, G; Alkan, M; Ofek, I; Beachey, E H

    1990-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acid isolated from Streptococcus faecalis or Streptococcus pyogenes caused direct activation of the respiratory burst in human peripheral blood monocytes. This activity appears to be related to the ability of lipoteichoic acid to bind to the monocyte membrane and trigger the polarization of receptors (capping). Images PMID:2153634

  9. Interaction between human peripheral blood monocytes and tumor promoters: Effect on growth differentiation and function in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Keisari, Y.; Bucana, C.; Markovich, S.; Campbell, D.E. )

    1990-08-01

    Studies on the differentiation and activation of human monocytes in tissue cultures have usually been limited by the deterioration of human monocytes and macrophages in long-term cultures. In this study, we attempted to establish long-term human monocyte/macrophage cultures using the phorbol ester 12-0 tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), and we studied the morphology, function, and biochemical properties of such treated human blood monocytes. Enriched suspensions of monocytes were obtained using Ficoll-Hypaque gradient and cultured in the absence or presence of various concentrations of TPA. Samples were removed at different times and processed for scanning electron microscopy. Parallel samples were examined for numbers of adherent cells, phagocytosis, oxidative burst, beta-galactosidase assays, and lectin-mediated erythrolysis. TPA-treated monocytes survived in larger numbers in culture for up to 7 weeks and were more pleomorphic and exhibited higher beta-galactosidase activities after 14 days in culture than untreated monocytes. TPA-treated cells and untreated cells in long-term cultures showed a decrease in their oxidative burst activity while their phagocytic activity was not affected, and the TPA treatment augmented the lysis of wheat germ agglutinin-opsonized erythrocytes by the cultured monocytes. TPA treatment of adherent human monocytes resulted in cell cultures with increased numbers of viable and functionally adherent cells for extended periods of time and does not seem to interfere with the differentiation and maturation of the cells in culture.

  10. Activated platelets signal chemokine synthesis by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, A S; Elstad, M R; McEver, R P; McIntyre, T M; Moore, K L; Morrissey, J H; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A

    1996-01-01

    Human blood monocytes adhere rapidly and for prolonged periods to activated platelets that display P-selectin, an adhesion protein that recognizes a specific ligand on leukocytes, P-selectin glycoprotein-1. We previously demonstrated that P-selectin regulates expression and secretion of cytokines by stimulated monocytes when it is presented in a purified, immobilized form or by transfected cells. Here we show that thrombin-activated platelets induce the expression and secretion of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and IL-8 by monocytes. Enhanced monokine synthesis requires engagement of P-selectin glycoprotein-1 on the leukocyte by P-selectin on the platelet. Secretion of the chemokines is not, however, directly signaled by P-selectin; instead, tethering of the monocytes by P-selectin is required for their activation by RANTES (regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed presumed secreted), a platelet chemokine not previously known to induce immediate-early gene products in monocytes. Adhesion of monocytes to activated platelets results in nuclear translocation of p65 (RelA), a component of the NF-kappaB family of transcription factors that binds kappaB sequences in the regulatory regions of monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-8, and other immediate-early genes. However, expression of tissue factor, a coagulation protein that also has a kappaB sequence in the 5' regulatory region of its gene, is not induced in monocytes adherent to activated platelets. Thus, contact of monocytes with activated platelets differentially affects the expression of monocyte products. These experiments suggest that activated platelets regulate chemokine secretion by monocytes in inflammatory lesions in vivo and provide a model for the study of gene regulation in cell-cell interactions. PMID:8617886

  11. Toward a Reference Gene Catalog of Human Primary Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Mirsafian, Hoda; Ripen, Adiratna Mat; Manaharan, Thamilvaani; Mohamad, Saharuddin Bin; Merican, Amir Feisal

    2016-11-01

    Transcriptome analyses based on high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) provide powerful and quantitative characterization of cell types and in-depth understanding of biological systems in health and disease. In this study, we present a comprehensive transcriptome profile of human primary monocytes, a crucial component of the innate immune system. We performed deep RNA-Seq of monocytes from six healthy subjects and integrated our data with 10 other publicly available RNA-Seq datasets of human monocytes. A total of 1.9 billion reads were generated, which allowed us to capture most of the genes transcribed in human monocytes, including 11,994 protein-coding genes, 5558 noncoding genes (including long noncoding RNAs, precursor miRNAs, and others), 2819 pseudogenes, and 7034 putative novel transcripts. In addition, we profiled the expression pattern of 1155 transcription factors (TFs) in human monocytes, which are the main molecules in controlling the gene transcription. An interaction network was constructed among the top expressed TFs and their targeted genes, which revealed the potential key regulatory genes in biological function of human monocytes. The gene catalog of human primary monocytes provided in this study offers significant promise and future potential clinical applications in the fields of precision medicine, systems diagnostics, immunogenomics, and the development of innovative biomarkers and therapeutic monitoring strategies.

  12. Radiation effects on cultured human monocytes and on monocyte-derived macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Buescher, E.S.; Gallin, J.I.

    1984-06-01

    Prior to administration, leukocyte transfusions are commonly irradiated with up to 5,000 R to eliminate lymphocytes and thereby prevent graft-versus-host disease in the recipient. It has been widely believed that phagocytes are resistant to this irradiation. In a recent report, it was noted that phagocyte oxidative metabolism was compromised during preparation of white cells for transfusion. As part of the effort to examine the basis for this inhibition of phagocyte function during white cell preparation, an assessment was made of the effects of irradiation on the long-lived monocytes that have been shown to persist at inflammatory foci posttransfusion. Human monocytes were irradiated for up to 3 min, receiving 2,500-5,000 R. This irradiation damaged human monocytes, significantly decreasing their in vitro survival for the first 3 wk of culture, and growth as assessed by two-dimensional cell size measurements during the first 2 wk of culture. Despite smaller cell size, total cell protein was significantly increased over time in irradiated cultures. Extracellular release of lysozyme and beta-glucuronidase per cell was not affected by irradiation, but extracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release was significantly increased after irradiation. Irradiated monocytes killed Listeria monocytogenes at a slower rate than the nonirradiated controls. Thus, the data indicate that irradiation in doses used to prevent graft-versus-host disease in leukocyte transfusion recipients has a deleterious effect on in vitro human monocyte survival and function.

  13. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation for Human Monocyte Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wooden, Jessica; Ciborowski, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    The importance of Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technology has grown exponentially along with an increased interest in epigenetic regulation. The correlation of transcription factors with histone marks is now well established as the center of epigenetic studies; therefore, precise knowledge about histone marks is critical to unravel their molecular function and to understand their role in biological systems. This knowledge constantly accumulates and is provided openly in the expanding hubs of information such as the USCS Genome Browser. Nevertheless, as we gain more knowledge, we realize that the DNA-protein interactions are not driven by a “one size fits all” rule. Also, the diversity of interactions between DNA, histones, and transcriptional regulators is much bigger than previously considered. Besides a detailed protocol of sample preparation for the ChIP assay from primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM)a, we show that differences between various types of cells exist. Furthermore, we can postulate that such variations exist between transformed macrophage-like cell lines and primary macrophages obtained from healthy volunteers. We found that the most efficient fixation time for MDM is 10 minutes. Finally, to perform multiple analytical assays, we showed that even with thorough methodology, the yield of material obtained from primary cells is the major challenge. PMID:25220915

  14. Human monocyte differentiation stage affects response to arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Alvarez, Elizabeth; Pelaez, Carlos A; García, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    AA-induced cell death mechanisms acting on human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), U937 promonocytes and PMA-differentiated U937 cells were studied. Arachidonic acid induced apoptosis and necrosis in monocytes and U937 cells but only apoptosis in MDM and U937D cells. AA increased both types of death in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells and increased the percentage of TNFalpha+ cells and reduced IL-10+ cells. Experiments blocking these cytokines indicated that AA-mediated death was TNFalpha- and IL-10-independent. The differences in AA-mediated cell death could be explained by high ROS, calpain and sPLA-2 production and activity in monocytes. Blocking sPLA-2 in monocytes and treatment with antioxidants favored M. tuberculosis control whereas AA enhanced M. tuberculosis growth in MDM. Such evidence suggested that AA-modulated effector mechanisms depend on mononuclear phagocytes' differentiation stage.

  15. Design of phosphorylated dendritic architectures to promote human monocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Poupot, Mary; Griffe, Laurent; Marchand, Patrice; Maraval, Alexandrine; Rolland, Olivier; Martinet, Ludovic; L'Faqihi-Olive, Fatima-Ezzahra; Turrin, Cédric-Olivier; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Fournié, Jean-Jacques; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Poupot, Rémy

    2006-11-01

    As first defensive line, monocytes are a pivotal cell population of innate immunity. Monocyte activation can be relevant to a range of immune conditions and responses. Here we present new insights into the activation of monocytes by a series of phosphonic acid-terminated, phosphorus-containing dendrimers. Various dendritic or subdendritic structures were synthesized and tested, revealing the basic structural requirements for monocyte activation. We showed that multivalent character and phosphonic acid capping of dendrimers are crucial for monocyte targeting and activation. Confocal videomicroscopy showed that a fluorescein-tagged dendrimer binds to isolated monocytes and gets internalized within a few seconds. We also found that dendrimers follow the phagolysosomial route during internalization by monocytes. Finally, we performed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments between a specifically designed fluorescent dendrimer and phycoerythrin-coupled antibodies. We showed that the typical innate Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 is clearly involved, but not alone, in the sensing of dendrimers by monocytes. In conclusion, phosphorus-containing dendrimers appear as precisely tunable nanobiotools able to target and activate human innate immunity and thus prove to be good candidates to develop new drugs for immunotherapies.

  16. Distinct functional programming of human fetal and adult monocytes.

    PubMed

    Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth R; Kim, Charles C; Burt, Trevor D; McCune, Joseph M

    2014-03-20

    Preterm birth affects 1 out of 9 infants in the United States and is the leading cause of long-term neurologic handicap and infant mortality, accounting for 35% of all infant deaths in 2008. Although cytokines including interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-6, and IL-1 are produced in response to in utero infection and are strongly associated with preterm labor, little is known about how human fetal immune cells respond to these cytokines. We demonstrate that fetal and adult CD14(+)CD16(-) classical monocytes are distinct in terms of basal transcriptional profiles and in phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) in response to cytokines. Fetal monocytes phosphorylate canonical and noncanonical STATs and respond more strongly to IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-4 than adult monocytes. We demonstrate a higher ratio of SOCS3 to IL-6 receptor in adult monocytes than in fetal monocytes, potentially explaining differences in STAT phosphorylation. Additionally, IFN-γ signaling results in upregulation of antigen presentation and costimulatory machinery in adult, but not fetal, monocytes. These findings represent the first evidence that primary human fetal and adult monocytes are functionally distinct, potentially explaining how these cells respond differentially to cytokines implicated in development, in utero infections, and the pathogenesis of preterm labor.

  17. Data for proteomic analysis of Human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Eligini, S; Brioschi, M; Fiorelli, S; Tremoli, E; Colli, S; Banfi, C

    2015-09-01

    This data article is referred to the research article entitled Human monocyte-derived macrophages are heterogeneous: proteomic profile of different phenotypes by Eligini et al. Eligini S., Brioschi M., Fiorelli S., Tremoli E., Banfi C., Colli S. Human monocyte-derived macrophages are heterogeneous: proteomic profile of different phenotypes. J. Proteomics 124, 2015, 112-123. Macrophages obtained in vitro from blood monocytes are largely used as surrogate model of tissue macrophages that are heterogeneous and not easy to obtain and handle. Under spontaneous differentiation in vitro, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) display two dominant subsets (round and spindle) that show different transcriptional, antigenic, and functional profiles mimicking, at least in part, the heterogeneity of tissue macrophages. This article reports the nano-LC-MS(E) analysis of the proteome of round and spindle MDMs allowing a deeper comprehension of macrophage heterogeneity.

  18. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in human atheromatous plaques.

    PubMed Central

    Nelken, N A; Coughlin, S R; Gordon, D; Wilcox, J N

    1991-01-01

    Monocytes appear to be central to atherogenesis both as the progenitors of foam cells and as a potential source of growth factors mediating intimal hyperplasia, but the chemical messages which stimulate the influx of monocytes into human atheroma remain unknown. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is a recently described molecule with powerful monocyte chemotactic activity expressed by monocytes, vascular endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells in culture. To begin to address the role of MCP-1 in vivo, we examined 10 normal arteries and 14 diseased human arteries for MCP-1 expression by in situ hybridization. MCP-1 mRNA was detected in 16% of 10,768 cells counted in human carotid endarterectomy specimens with highest expression seen in organizing thrombi (33%) and in macrophage rich areas bordering the necrotic lipid core (24%) as compared to the fibrous cap (8%) and the necrotic lipid core itself (5%). Based on immunohistochemical staining of serial sections and on cell morphology, MCP-1 mRNA appeared to be expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), mesenchymal appearing intimal cells (MICs), and macrophages. By contrast, few cells expressing MCP-1 mRNA were found in normal arteries (less than 0.1%). These data suggest a potential role for MCP-1 in mediating monocytic infiltration of the artery wall. Images PMID:1843454

  19. Heterogeneity of human monocytes: an optimized four-color flow cytometry protocol for analysis of monocyte subsets.

    PubMed

    Tallone, Tiziano; Turconi, Giovanna; Soldati, Gianni; Pedrazzini, Giovanni; Moccetti, Tiziano; Vassalli, Giuseppe

    2011-04-01

    Monocytes are central mediators in the development of atherosclerotic plaques. They circulate in blood and eventually migrate into tissue including the vessel wall where they give rise to macrophages and dendritic cells. The existence of monocyte subsets with distinct roles in homeostasis and inflammation suggests specialization of function. These subsets are identified based on expression of the CD14 and CD16 markers. Routinely applicable protocols remain elusive, however. Here, we present an optimized four-color flow cytometry protocol for analysis of human blood monocyte subsets using a specific PE-Cy5-conjugated monoclonal antibody (mAb) to HLA-DR, a PE-Cy7-conjugated mAb to CD14, a FITC-conjugated mAb to CD16, and PE-conjugated mAbs to additional markers relevant to monocyte function. Classical CD14(+)CD16(-) monocytes (here termed "Mo1" subset) expressed high CCR2, CD36, CD64, and CD62L, but low CX(3)CR1, whereas "nonclassical" CD14(lo)CD16(+) monocytes (Mo3) essentially showed the inverse expression pattern. CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes (Mo2) expressed high HLA-DR, CD36, and CD64. In patients with stable coronary artery disease (n = 13), classical monocytes were decreased, whereas "nonclassical" monocytes were increased 90% compared with healthy subjects with angiographically normal coronary arteries (n = 14). Classical monocytes from CAD patients expressed higher CX(3)CR1 and CCR2 than controls. Thus, stable CAD is associated with expansion of the nonclassical monocyte subset and increased expression of inflammatory markers on monocytes. Flow cytometric analysis of monocyte subsets and marker expression may provide valuable information on vascular inflammation. This may translate into the identification of monocyte subsets as selective therapeutic targets, thus avoiding adverse events associated with indiscriminate monocyte inhibition.

  20. Tumoricidal activity of human monocytes activated in vitro by free and liposome-encapsulated human lymphokines.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinerman, E S; Schroit, A J; Fogler, W E; Fidler, I J

    1983-01-01

    Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from normal donors obtained by separation on a Percoll gradient were incubated with free or liposome-entrapped lymphokines produced from concanavalin A-stimulated lymphocytes and then were tested for cytotoxic activity against tumor cells. The treated monocytes lysed tumorigenic melanoma and glioblastoma target cells, but had no effect on three types of nontumorigenic target cells. The activation of monocytes to become tumoricidal was caused by macrophage-activating factor (MAF) and not by contamination with endotoxins, concanavalin A, or interferon. The endocytosis of liposomes containing MAF, but not of those containing control supernatants, led to the activation of cytotoxic properties in the monocytes. Activation by liposome-encapsulated MAF was very efficient and required less than 1/800th of the amount of free MAF necessary to achieve the same levels of cytotoxicity. Thus, the encapsulation of mitogen-induced MAF in liposomes could provide an effective approach for the activation of blood monocytes in situ. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:6348087

  1. Derivation of multipotent progenitors from human circulating CD14+ monocytes.

    PubMed

    Seta, Noriyuki; Kuwana, Masataka

    2010-07-01

    Circulating CD14(+) monocytes are originated from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow and believed to be committed precursors for phagocytes, such as macrophages. Recently, we have reported a primitive cell population termed monocyte-derived multipotential cells (MOMCs), which has a fibroblast-like morphology in culture and a unique phenotype positive for CD14, CD45, CD34, and type I collagen. MOMCs are derived from circulating CD14(+) monocytes, but circulating precursors for MOMCs still remain undetermined. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles of MOMCs and other monocyte-derived cells has revealed that embryonic stem cell markers, Nanog and Oct-4, are specifically expressed by MOMCs. In vitro generation of MOMCs requires binding to fibronectin and exposure to soluble factors derived from activated platelets. MOMCs contain progenitors with capacity to differentiate into a variety of nonphagocytes, including bone, cartilage, fat, skeletal and cardiac muscle, neuron, and endothelium, indicating that circulating monocytes are more multipotent than previously thought. In addition, MOMCs are capable of promoting ex vivo expansion of human hematopoietic progenitor cells through direct cell-to-cell contact and secretion of a variety of hematopoietic growth factors. These findings obtained from the research on MOMCs indicate that CD14(+) monocytes in circulation are involved in a variety of physiologic functions other than innate and acquired immune responses, such as repair and regeneration of the damaged tissue.

  2. Maturation and demise of human primary monocytes by carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Nicola, Milena; Mirabile Gattia, Daniele; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2013-06-01

    The possibility of exploiting carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biomedical practices requires thorough analysis of the chemical or bulk effects they may exert on the immune system, the complex network that recognizes and eliminates foreign particles. In particular, the phagocytosing ability of cells belonging to the monocyte/macrophage lineage may render these immune cells an ideal toxicological target of pristine CNT, which may form aggregates of size exceeding monocyte/macrophage phagocytosing plasticity. To shed light on this issue, we analyzed the effects that pristine multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) without metal or biological impurities exert on survival and activation of freshly explanted human peripheral blood monocytes, analyzing in parallel the non-phagocytosing lymphocytes, and using graphite as control carbon material. MWCNT (diameter 10-50 nm, length up to 10 μm) exert two different toxic effects on mononuclear leukocytes: a minor apoptogenic effect (on lymphocytes > monocytes), and a major, apoptosis-independent effect that exclusively and deeply affect monocyte homeostasis. Analysis of monocyte number, adhesion, redox equilibrium, and the differentiation markers CD14 and CD11b reveals that MWCNT cause the selective disappearance of phagocytosis-competent monocytes by mechanisms related to the presence of large nanoparticle aggregates, suggesting phenomena of bulk toxicity possibly consisting of frustrated phagocytosis. At the same time, MWCNT stimulate adhesion of the phagocytosis-incompetent monocytes, and their differentiation toward a peculiar maturation asset. These observations point out novel mechanisms of CNT toxicity, renewing concerns that they may impair the innate immune system deranging the inflammatory responses.

  3. Monocyte-mediated T-cell suppression and augmented monocyte tryptophan catabolism after human hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hainz, Ursula; Obexer, Petra; Winkler, Christiana; Sedlmayr, Peter; Takikawa, Osamu; Greinix, Hildegard; Lawitschka, Anita; Pütschger, Ulrike; Fuchs, Dietmar; Ladisch, Stephan; Heitger, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    T-cell dysfunction after human hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is generally attributed to intrinsic T-cell defects. Here we show that the characteristic impaired proliferative responses to polyclonal stimulation of post-HSCT peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PB-MCs) were markedly (4-fold) improved by T-cell enrichment. Conversely, addback of post-HSCT monocytes to these enriched T cells dampened their proliferative responses, suggesting that post-HSCT monocytes effectively mediate T-cell suppression. As a mechanism possibly contributing to monocyte-mediated T-cell suppression, we investigated monocyte tryptophan catabolism by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase into kynurenine, which has been implicated in regulating T-cell responses. Compared with controls, all post-HSCT monocyte-containing cell cultures (total PBMCs, monocytes, and monocyte/T-cell cocultures), but not monocyte-depleted populations, secreted elevated amounts of kynurenine. Blockade of tryptophan catabolism improved the proliferative responses. The slightly increased kynurenine release and substantial release of neopterin by unstimulated post-HSCT monocytes suggests that they were in a state of continuous activation. Superimposed on this state, stimulation of these cells caused a striking, additional increase (10-fold) in kynurenine release, and they triggered marked apoptosis of autologous post-HSCT T cells. We conclude that the amplified kynurenine release by post-HSCT monocytes, particularly induced upon stimulation, may underlie their suppressor activity, which in turn may contribute to the depressed T-cell immune responses after HSCT. PMID:15677560

  4. Identification of Motile Sperm Domain–Containing Protein 2 as Regulator of Human Monocyte Migration

    PubMed Central

    Yacov, Niva; Salem, Yaniv; Propheta-Meiran, Oshrat; Ishai, Eti; Breitbart, Eyal

    2017-01-01

    Binding of chemokines to their cognate receptors on monocytes instigates a cascade of events that directs these cells to migrate to sites of inflammation and cancerous tissues. Although targeting of selected chemokine receptors on monocytes exhibited preclinical efficacy, attempts to translate these studies to the clinic have failed thus far, possibly due to redundancy of the target receptor. We reveal that motile sperm domain–containing protein 2 (MOSPD2), a protein with a previously unknown function, regulates monocyte migration in vitro. This protein was found to be expressed on the cytoplasmic membrane of human monocytes. Silencing or neutralizing MOSPD2 in monocytes restricted their migration when induced by different chemokines. Mechanistically, silencing MOSPD2 inhibited signaling events following chemokine receptor ligation. When tested for expression in other immune cell subsets, MOSPD2 was apparent also, though less abundantly, in neutrophils, but not in lymphocytes. Thus, in the presence of neutralizing Abs, neutrophil migration was inhibited to some extent whereas lymphocyte migration remained intact. In view of these results, we suggest MOSPD2 as a potential target protein for treating diseases in which monocyte and neutrophil accumulation is correlated with pathogenesis. PMID:28137892

  5. Identification of Motile Sperm Domain-Containing Protein 2 as Regulator of Human Monocyte Migration.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Itzhak; Yacov, Niva; Salem, Yaniv; Propheta-Meiran, Oshrat; Ishai, Eti; Breitbart, Eyal

    2017-03-01

    Binding of chemokines to their cognate receptors on monocytes instigates a cascade of events that directs these cells to migrate to sites of inflammation and cancerous tissues. Although targeting of selected chemokine receptors on monocytes exhibited preclinical efficacy, attempts to translate these studies to the clinic have failed thus far, possibly due to redundancy of the target receptor. We reveal that motile sperm domain-containing protein 2 (MOSPD2), a protein with a previously unknown function, regulates monocyte migration in vitro. This protein was found to be expressed on the cytoplasmic membrane of human monocytes. Silencing or neutralizing MOSPD2 in monocytes restricted their migration when induced by different chemokines. Mechanistically, silencing MOSPD2 inhibited signaling events following chemokine receptor ligation. When tested for expression in other immune cell subsets, MOSPD2 was apparent also, though less abundantly, in neutrophils, but not in lymphocytes. Thus, in the presence of neutralizing Abs, neutrophil migration was inhibited to some extent whereas lymphocyte migration remained intact. In view of these results, we suggest MOSPD2 as a potential target protein for treating diseases in which monocyte and neutrophil accumulation is correlated with pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Effects of 4-chlorotestosterone acetate on the phagocytic activity of human monocytes: results of double-blind trial

    PubMed Central

    Magliulo, E.; Giraldi, M.; Cattaneo, E.; Marchioni, E.

    1972-01-01

    A comparative trial on 4-chlorotestosterone acetate and placebo was conducted in humans by the double-blind technique. The effects of the drug were tested by measuring the phagocytic activity of blood monocytes in vitro for colloidal carbon. Monocytes from patients treated with 4-chlorotestosterone acetate displayed a phagocytic power significantly higher than that of monocytes from patients treated with the placebo. Such an increased phagocytic activity is discussed in relation to cell mechanisms and their role in anti-infective defence. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4556011

  7. Moderate restriction of macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by SAMHD1 in monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Taya, Kahoru; Nakayama, Emi E; Shioda, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains are able to grow to high titers in human monocyte-derived macrophages. However, it was recently reported that cellular protein SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 replication in human cells of the myeloid lineage, including monocyte-derived macrophages. Here we show that degradation of SAMHD1 in monocyte-derived macrophages was associated with moderately enhanced growth of the macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strain. SAMHD1 degradation was induced by treating target macrophages with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) particles containing viral protein X. For undifferentiated monocytes, HIV-2 particle treatment allowed undifferentiated monocytes to be fully permissive for productive infection by the macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strain. In contrast, untreated monocytes were totally resistant to HIV-1 replication. These results indicated that SAMHD1 moderately restricts even a macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strain in monocyte-derived macrophages, whereas the protein potently restricts HIV-1 replication in undifferentiated monocytes.

  8. Soy isoflavones attenuate human monocyte adhesion to endothelial cell-specific CD54 by inhibiting monocyte CD11a.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Shanmugam; Stewart, Bradford W; Badger, Thomas M

    2006-09-01

    Soy-based diets have been shown to protect against the development of atherosclerosis; however, the underlying mechanism(s) remain unknown. Interaction between activated monocytes and inflamed endothelial cells is an early event in atherogenesis. Therefore, we examined whether treatment of monocytes with soy phytochemicals could inhibit their adhesion to the endothelial cell-specific protein, CD54, a key factor in monocyte adhesion. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed AIN-93G diets containing soy protein isolate or casein. Sera from soy-fed rats inhibited CD54-dependent monocyte adhesion, whereas sera from casein-fed rats did not. To determine whether isoflavones in the sera of soy-fed rats were involved in this inhibition, monocytes were preincubated with soy isoflavones. Isoflavone treatment inhibited monocyte adhesion to CD54 protein, as well as to endothelial cells expressing CD54. Monocyte expression of CD11a, the cognate receptor for CD54, was unaffected by isoflavones. However, binding of the activation epitope-specific antibody mAb24, which binds specifically to the active form of CD11a, was significantly lower in soy isoflavone-treated monocytes than in media-treated cells. These findings suggest that inhibition of CD54-dependent monocyte adhesion by soy isoflavones is mediated in part by affinity regulation of CD11a. Inhibition of monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells by isoflavones resulted in reduced expression of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. Collectively, these data suggest that the athero-protective effect of soy diets may be mediated by blocking monocyte-endothelial cell interaction.

  9. Growth hormone activation of human monocytes for superoxide production but not tumor necrosis factor production, cell adherence, or action against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Warwick-Davies, J; Lowrie, D B; Cole, P J

    1995-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that growth hormone (GH) is a human macrophage-activating factor which primes monocytes for enhanced production of H2O2 in vitro. This report extends our observations to other monocyte functions relevant to infection. We find that GH also primes monocytes for O2- production, to a degree similar to the effect of gamma interferon. Neither macrophage-activating factor alone stimulates monocytes to release bioactive tumor necrosis factor. However, GH, unlike gamma interferon, does not synergize with endotoxin for enhanced tumor necrosis factor production. In further contrast, GH does not alter monocyte adherence or morphology, while phagocytosis and killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by GH-treated monocytes are also unaffected. Therefore, despite the multiplicity of the effects of GH on the immune system in vivo, its effects on human monocytes in vitro appear to be limited to priming for the release of reactive oxygen intermediates. PMID:7591064

  10. The monocyte binding domain(s) on human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Woof, J M; Nik Jaafar, M I; Jefferis, R; Burton, D R

    1984-06-01

    Monocyte binding has previously been assigned to the C gamma 3 domain of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) largely on the ability of the pFc' fragment to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. This ability is markedly reduced compared to the intact parent IgG. We find this result with a conventional pFc' preparation but this preparation is found to contain trace contamination of parent IgG as demonstrated by reactivity with monoclonal antibodies directed against C gamma 2 domain and light-chain epitopes of human IgG. Extensive immunoaffinity purification of the pFc' preparation removes its inhibitory ability indicating that this originates in the trace contamination of parent IgG (or Fc). Neither of the human IgG1 paraproteins TIM, lacking the C gamma 2 domain, or SIZ, lacking the C gamma 3 domain, are found to inhibit the monocyte-IgG interaction. The hinge-deleted IgG1 Dob protein shows little or no inhibitory ability. Indirect evidence for the involvement of the C gamma 2 domain in monocyte binding is considered. We suggest finally that the site of interaction is found either on the C gamma 2 domain alone or between the C gamma 2 and C gamma 3 domains.

  11. Gemifloxacin inhibits cytokine secretion by lipopolysaccharide stimulated human monocytes at the post-transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Araujo, F; Slifer, T; Li, S; Kuver, A; Fong, L; Remington, J

    2004-03-01

    The fluroquinolone gemifloxacin was examined for its capacity to modulate secretion of cytokines by human monocytes stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Monocytes from six male and two female healthy volunteers were stimulated with LPS, exposed to gemifloxacin and the amounts of secreted IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-alpha measured at 3, 6 and 24 h. The results revealed that LPS alone increased secretion of each cytokine significantly. Treatment of the LPS-stimulated monocytes with gemifloxacin resulted in a significant inhibition (p < 0.01) of secretion of each of the cytokines from monocytes of the eight volunteers. Nuclear extracts of the human monocyte cell line, THP-1, were used in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay to determine whether gemifloxacin affects nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) activation. In addition, RNA from THP-1 cells was used in Northern blots to determine whether inhibition of secretion of IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha by gemifloxacin occurred at the transcription or translation level. Whereas LPS induced a rapid increase in NF-kappa B activation, gemifloxacin alone did not. Gemifloxacin did not affect the kinetics or decrease the extent of activation. Northern blots indicated that the inhibitory activity of gemifloxacin occurred post-transcription. Thus, gemifloxacin may modulate the immune response by altering secretion of cytokines by human monocytes. Although the concentrations of gemifloxacin used were higher than those observed in the serum of human volunteers treated with the dose under clinical development, it should be taken into consideration that concentrations at tissue and intracellular levels may be considerably higher than serum concentrations.

  12. [The effects of PEMF on the activation of human monocytes].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoying; Han, Xiaoyu; Wang, Qian; Wu, Wenchao; Liu, Xiaojing

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on the activation of human monocytes (THP-1). Cultured THP-1 cells were exposed to PEMF stimulation with radiation of 32Hz or 64Hz respectively, using sinusoidal wave, and 1mT, twice a day, 30 minutes each time, with an interval of 8 hours, for 3 days. Those with 0Hz stimulation served as the controls. Monocytes activation was monitored by measuring both the release of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) from monocytes and their adhesion to monolayers of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs was evaluated by cell counting method. The secretion of MCP-1 from THP-1 cells was detected by ELISA and MCP-1 mRNA expression was assessed by real time quantitative RT-PCR. The data showed that exposure to PEMF with above parameters could significantly inhibit the adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs and decrease the MCP-1 mRNA and protein expression. The results demonstrated that exposure to PEMF of 1mT, 32Hz or 64Hz for 3 days could significantly inhibit the activation of THP-1 cells.

  13. The inability of human immunodeficiency virus to infect chimpanzee monocytes can be overcome by serial viral passage in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Gendelman, H E; Ehrlich, G D; Baca, L M; Conley, S; Ribas, J; Kalter, D C; Meltzer, M S; Poiesz, B J; Nara, P

    1991-01-01

    Studies of lentivirus infection in ruminants, nonhuman primates, and humans suggest that virus infection of macrophages plays a central role in the disease process. To investigate whether human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can infect chimpanzee macrophages, we recovered monocytes from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-1-negative animals and inoculated these and control human monocytes with a panel of four human-passaged monocytotropic virus strains and one chimpanzee-passaged isolate. HIV-1 infected human monocytes synthesized proviral DNA, viral mRNA, p24 antigen, and progeny virions. In contrast, except for the chimpanzee-passaged HIV-1 isolate, chimpanzee monocytes failed to support HIV-1 replication when cultured under both identical and a variety of other conditions. Proviral DNA was demonstrated only at background levels in these cell cultures by polymerase chain reaction for gag- and env-related sequences. Interestingly, the chimpanzee-passaged HIV-1 isolate did not replicate in human monocytes; viral p24 antigens and progeny virions were not detected. The same monocytotropic panel of HIV-1 strains replicated in both human and chimpanzee CD4+ T lymphoblasts treated with phytohemagglutinin and interleukin-2. The failure of HIV-1 to infect chimpanzee monocytes, which can be overcome by serial in vivo viral passage, occurs through a block early in the viral life cycle. Images PMID:1674968

  14. Glucocorticoids enhance the in vivo migratory response of human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Yeager, Mark P; Pioli, Patricia A; Collins, Jane; Barr, Fiona; Metzler, Sara; Sites, Brian D; Guyre, Paul M

    2016-05-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are best known for their potent anti-inflammatory effects. However, an emerging model for glucocorticoid (GC) regulation of in vivo inflammation also includes a delayed, preparatory effect that manifests as enhanced inflammation following exposure to an inflammatory stimulus. When GCs are transiently elevated in vivo following exposure to a stressful event, this model proposes that a subsequent period of increased inflammatory responsiveness is adaptive because it enhances resistance to a subsequent stressor. In the present study, we examined the migratory response of human monocytes/macrophages following transient in vivo exposure to stress-associated concentrations of cortisol. Participants were administered cortisol for 6h to elevate in vivo cortisol levels to approximate those observed during major systemic stress. Monocytes in peripheral blood and macrophages in sterile inflammatory tissue (skin blisters) were studied before and after exposure to cortisol or placebo. We found that exposure to cortisol induced transient upregulation of monocyte mRNA for CCR2, the receptor for monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) as well as for the chemokine receptor CX3CR1. At the same time, mRNA for the transcription factor IκBα was decreased. Monocyte surface expression of CCR2 but not CX3CR1 increased in the first 24h after cortisol exposure. Transient exposure to cortisol also led to an increased number of macrophages and neutrophils in fluid derived from a sterile inflammatory site in vivo. These findings suggest that the delayed, pro-inflammatory effects of cortisol on the human inflammatory responses may include enhanced localization of effector cells at sites of in vivo inflammation.

  15. Anticancer drug bortezomib increases interleukin-8 expression in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Sanacora, Shannon; Urdinez, Joaquin; Chang, Tzu-Pei; Vancurova, Ivana

    2015-05-01

    Bortezomib (BZ) is the first clinically approved proteasome inhibitor that has shown remarkable anticancer activity in patients with hematological malignancies. However, many patients relapse and develop resistance; yet, the molecular mechanisms of BZ resistance are not fully understood. We have recently shown that in solid tumors, BZ unexpectedly increases expression of the pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8), while it inhibits expression of other NFκB-regulated genes. Since monocytes and macrophages are major producers of IL-8, the goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that BZ increases the IL-8 expression in human monocytes and macrophages. Here, we show that BZ dramatically increases the IL-8 expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated U937 macrophages as well as in unstimulated U937 monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, while it inhibits expression of IL-6, IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α. In addition, our results show that the underlying mechanisms involve p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, which is required for the BZ-induced IL-8 expression. Together, these data suggest that the BZ-increased IL-8 expression in monocytes and macrophages may represent one of the mechanisms responsible for the BZ resistance and indicate that targeting the p38-mediated IL-8 expression could enhance the BZ effectiveness in cancer treatment.

  16. Effects of botulinum toxin type D on secretion of tumor necrosis factor from human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, K.; Spriggs, D.; Ohno, T.; Kufe, D.

    1989-05-01

    Botulinum toxins are potent neurotoxins which block the release of neurotransmitters. The effects of these toxins on hematopoietic cells, however, are unknown. Monocytes secrete a variety of polypeptide growth factors, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF). In the study reported here, the effects of botulinum toxin type D on the secretion of TNF from human monocytes were examined. The results demonstrate that biotulinum toxin type D inhibits the release of TNF from monocytes activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. Botulinum toxin type D had no detectable effect on intracellular TNF levels in LPS-treated monocytes, indicating that the effects of this toxin involve the secretory process. This inhibitory effect of botulinum toxin type D on TNF secretion from LPS-treated monocytes was partially reversed by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate or introduction of guanosine 5'-(/gamma/-thio)t-riphosphate into these cells. The results demonstrate that TNF secretion is regulated by at least two distinct guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, one responsible for the activation of phospholiphase C and another which acts as a substrate for botulinum toxin type D. ADP-ribosylation of monocyte membranes by botulinum toxin type D demonstrated the presence of three substrates with M/sub r/s of 45,000, 21,000, and 17,000. While the role of these substrates in exocytosis is unknown, the results suggest that the M/sub r/ 21,000 substrate is involved in a process other than TNF secretion.

  17. A curated compendium of monocyte transcriptome datasets of relevance to human monocyte immunobiology research

    PubMed Central

    Rinchai, Darawan; Boughorbel, Sabri; Presnell, Scott; Quinn, Charlie; Chaussabel, Damien

    2016-01-01

    Systems-scale profiling approaches have become widely used in translational research settings. The resulting accumulation of large-scale datasets in public repositories represents a critical opportunity to promote insight and foster knowledge discovery. However, resources that can serve as an interface between biomedical researchers and such vast and heterogeneous dataset collections are needed in order to fulfill this potential. Recently, we have developed an interactive data browsing and visualization web application, the Gene Expression Browser (GXB). This tool can be used to overlay deep molecular phenotyping data with rich contextual information about analytes, samples and studies along with ancillary clinical or immunological profiling data. In this note, we describe a curated compendium of 93 public datasets generated in the context of human monocyte immunological studies, representing a total of 4,516 transcriptome profiles. Datasets were uploaded to an instance of GXB along with study description and sample annotations. Study samples were arranged in different groups. Ranked gene lists were generated based on relevant group comparisons. This resource is publicly available online at http://monocyte.gxbsidra.org/dm3/landing.gsp. PMID:27158452

  18. Aluminum induces inflammatory and proteolytic alterations in human monocytic cell line.

    PubMed

    Ligi, D; Santi, M; Croce, L; Mannello, F

    2015-11-01

    The increasing exposure to aluminum has been linked with the development of different human pathologies (e.g., breast cancer, myofasciitis, neurodegenerative diseases), probably due to the consistent presence of aluminum salts in widely diffused cosmetic products and vaccines. However, the mechanisms underlying immunologic and proliferative alterations still remain unknown. In the present study we investigated the ability of different aluminum compounds (i.e., aluminum chloride vs Imject® Alum, a mixture of aluminum and magnesium hydroxide) to trigger both inflammatory and proteolytic responses in U-937 human monocytic cell line. We demonstrated, by multiplex immunoassay analyses, that monocytic cells treated with both Imject Alum and aluminum chloride showed different and peculiar expression profiles of 27 inflammatory mediators and 5 matrix metalloproteinases, with respect to untreated control cells. In particular, we found dose-dependent significantly increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and chemoattractant chemokines; whereas among metalloproteinases, only collagenolytic protease showed a significant dose-dependent increase in Imject-treated cells with respect to controls and Al-chloride treated cells. Noteworthy, we found only in Imject Alum-treated cells the significant positive correlations among collagenolytic metalloproteinase and increased expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines, suggesting a possible involvement of aluminum in regulating the acute inflammatory responses. In agreement to emerging evidences, for the first time we demonstrated that the treatment of monocyte cells with aluminum-based adjuvant is able to induce an inflammatory status and a proteolytic cascade activation. In fact, the cell treatment with Imject Alum induced increased levels of several cytokines and proteinases, suggesting these monocyte mediators as possible biomarkers for aluminum-linked diseases. The identification of the biochemical pathways

  19. Priming of human monocytes for enhanced lipopolysaccharide responses: expression of alpha interferon, interferon regulatory factors, and tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, M P; Zoon, K C

    1993-01-01

    Culture of human monocytes with either granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) results in a primed state, during which these cells express heightened responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The production of IFN-alpha in response to LPS by human monocytes has an absolute requirement for priming. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) expression is also greatly enhanced in primed monocytes after LPS stimulation, but unlike IFN-alpha, TNF is readily expressed in unprimed monocytes as well. In an effort to determine the molecular events associated with IFN-alpha induction in this system, freshly isolated human monocytes were primed by culture with either IFN-gamma or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and then treated with LPS; expression of IFN-alpha subtype 2 (IFN-alpha 2), IFN regulatory factors (IRFs), and TNF was assessed by Northern (RNA blot) analysis. IRF-1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in monocytes and is regulated by both LPS and priming cytokines, but its expression alone does not correlate with the induction of IFN-alpha 2 expression. IRF-2 mRNA is expressed in a more gradual manner following LPS stimulation, implying a possible feedback mechanism for inhibiting IFN-alpha expression. However, nuclear run-on analysis indicates that IFN-alpha 2 is not transcriptionally modulated in this system, in striking contrast to TNF, which is clearly regulated at the transcriptional level. In addition, IFN-alpha 2 mRNA accumulation is superinduced when primed monocytes are treated with LPS plus cycloheximide, while TNF mRNA is relatively unaffected. The results demonstrate that priming can affect subsequent LPS-induced gene expression at different levels in human monocytes. Images PMID:8335353

  20. Bacillus anthracis’ lethal toxin induces broad transcriptional responses in human peripheral monocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anthrax lethal toxin (LT), produced by the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis, is a highly effective zinc dependent metalloprotease that cleaves the N-terminus of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MAPKK or MEKs) and is known to play a role in impairing the host immune system during an inhalation anthrax infection. Here, we present the transcriptional responses of LT treated human monocytes in order to further elucidate the mechanisms of LT inhibition on the host immune system. Results Western Blot analysis demonstrated cleavage of endogenous MEK1 and MEK3 when human monocytes were treated with 500 ng/mL LT for four hours, proving their susceptibility to anthrax lethal toxin. Furthermore, staining with annexin V and propidium iodide revealed that LT treatment did not induce human peripheral monocyte apoptosis or necrosis. Using Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays, we identified over 820 probe sets differentially regulated after LT treatment at the p <0.001 significance level, interrupting the normal transduction of over 60 known pathways. As expected, the MAPKK signaling pathway was most drastically affected by LT, but numerous genes outside the well-recognized pathways were also influenced by LT including the IL-18 signaling pathway, Toll-like receptor pathway and the IFN alpha signaling pathway. Multiple genes involved in actin regulation, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation and cytokine signaling were identified after treatment with anthrax LT. Conclusion We conclude LT directly targets human peripheral monocytes and causes multiple aberrant gene responses that would be expected to be associated with defects in human monocyte’s normal signaling transduction pathways and function. This study provides further insights into the mechanisms associated with the host immune system collapse during an anthrax infection, and suggests that anthrax LT may have additional downstream targets outside the well-known MAPK

  1. Sulforaphane mitigates cadmium-induced toxicity pattern in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Alkharashi, Nouf Abdulkareem Omer; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Alshatwi, Ali A

    2017-10-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a highly toxic and widely distributed heavy metal that induces various diseases in humans through environmental exposure. Therefore, alleviation of Cd-induced toxicity in living organisms is necessary. In this study, we investigated the protective role of sulforaphane on Cd-induced toxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and monocytes. Sulforaphane did not show any major reduction in the viability of lymphocytes and monocytes. However, Cd treatment at a concentration of 50μM induced around 69% cell death. Treatment of IC10-Cd and 100μM sulforaphane combination for 24 and 48h increased viability by 2 and 9% in cells subjected to Cd toxicity, respectively. In addition, IC25 of Cd and 100μM sulforaphane combination recovered 17-20% of cell viability. Cd induced apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Sulforaphane treatment reduced Cd-induced cell death in lymphocytes and monocytes. Our results clearly indicate that when the cells were treated with Cd+sulforaphane combination, sulforaphane decreased the Cd-induced cytotoxic effect in lymphocytes and monocytes. In addition, sulforaphane concentration plays a major role in the alleviation of Cd-induced toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The "Intermediate" CD14(++)CD16(+) monocyte subset increases in severe peripheral artery disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Aschenbrenner, Teresa; Wendorff, Heiko; Czubba, Maria; Glinzer, Almut; Haller, Bernhard; Schiemann, Matthias; Zimmermann, Alexander; Berger, Hermann; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Meier, Reinhard; Wohlgemuth, Walter A; Libby, Peter; Zernecke, Alma

    2016-12-19

    Monocytes are key players in atherosclerotic. Human monocytes display a considerable heterogeneity and at least three subsets can be distinguished. While the role of monocyte subset heterogeneity has already been well investigated in coronary artery disease (CAD), the knowledge about monocytes and their heterogeneity in peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) still is limited. Therefore, we aimed to investigate monocyte subset heterogeneity in patients with PAOD. Peripheral blood was obtained from 143 patients suffering from PAOD (Rutherford stage I to VI) and three monocyte subsets were identified by flow cytometry: CD14(++)CD16(-) classical monocytes, CD14(+)CD16(++) non-classical monocytes and CD14(++)CD16(+) intermediate monocytes. Additionally the expression of distinct surface markers (CD106, CD162 and myeloperoxidase MPO) was analyzed. Proportions of CD14(++)CD16(+) intermediate monocyte levels were significantly increased in advanced stages of PAOD, while classical and non-classical monocytes displayed no such trend. Moreover, CD162 and MPO expression increased significantly in intermediate monocyte subsets in advanced disease stages. Likewise, increased CD162 and MPO expression was noted in CD14(++)CD16(-) classical monocytes. These data suggest substantial dynamics in monocyte subset distributions and phenotypes in different stages of PAOD, which can either serve as biomarkers or as potential therapeutic targets to decrease the inflammatory burden in advanced stages of atherosclerosis.

  3. Immunomodulating and antiviral activities of Uncaria tomentosa on human monocytes infected with Dengue Virus-2.

    PubMed

    Reis, Sonia Regina I N; Valente, Ligia M M; Sampaio, André L; Siani, Antonio C; Gandini, Mariana; Azeredo, Elzinandes L; D'Avila, Luiz A; Mazzei, José L; Henriques, Maria das Graças M; Kubelka, Claire F

    2008-03-01

    Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC., a large woody vine native to the Amazon and Central American rainforests has been used medicinally by indigenous peoples since ancient times and has scientifically proven immunomodulating, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic and antioxidant activities. Several inflammatory mediators that are implicated in vascular permeability and shock are produced after Dengue Virus (DENV) infection by monocytes, the primary targets for virus replication. Here we assessed the immunoregulatory and antiviral activities from U. tomentosa-derived samples, which were tested in an in vitro DENV infection model. DENV-2 infected human monocytes were incubated with U. tomentosa hydro-alcoholic extract or either its pentacyclic oxindole alkaloid-enriched or non-alkaloid fractions. The antiviral activity was determined by viral antigen (DENV-Ag) detection in monocytes by flow cytometry. Our results demonstrated an in vitro inhibitory activity by both extract and alkaloidal fraction, reducing DENV-Ag+ cell rates in treated monocytes. A multiple microbead immunoassay was applied for cytokine determination (TNF-alpha, IFN-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10) in infected monocyte culture supernatants. The alkaloidal fraction induced a strong immunomodulation: TNF-alpha and IFN-alpha levels were significantly decreased and there was a tendency towards IL-10 modulation. We conclude that the alkaloidal fraction was the most effective in reducing monocyte infection rates and cytokine levels. The antiviral and immunomodulating in vitro effects from U. tomentosa pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids displayed novel properties regarding therapeutic procedures in Dengue Fever and might be further investigated as a promising candidate for clinical application.

  4. Monophosphoryl lipid A stimulated up-regulation of nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide release by human monocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saha, D C; Astiz, M E; Lin, R Y; Rackow, E C; Eales, L J

    1997-10-01

    Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) is a derivative of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with reduced toxicity which has been shown to modulate various immune functions in monocytes. We examined whether human monocytes can be stimulated to produce nitric oxide (NO) and its catalytic enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Monocytes were stimulated with LPS or MPL and both NOS and NO (as nitrite) production were measured. MPL at high doses (> 100 micrograms/ml) stimulated monocytes to release NO that was significantly greater than both the control and LPS-treated monocytes (p < 0.05). NO release by control cells and the LPS treated cells was not significantly different. Both arginase and N-monomethyl arginine (NMLA) inhibited the MPL stimulated release of NO (p < 0.01). MPL significantly increased inducible NOS (iNOS) expression as measured by both fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry (p < 0.05). Similarly, both soluble NOS (sNOS) and particulate NOS (pNOS) activity were significantly up-regulated by MPL (p < 0.05). Significant correlations were found between pNOS expression and sNOS release (r = 0.72, p < 0.0001) and between 12 h NO release and sNOS production (r = 0.44, p < 0.005). These experiments confirm that human monocytes can be stimulated with MPL to produce NO in vitro and suggest that up-regulation of pNOS does not preclude NO release.

  5. T helper 2 cytokines differently regulate monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production by human peripheral blood monocytes and alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yano, S; Yanagawa, H; Nishioka, Y; Mukaida, N; Matsushima, K; Sone, S

    1996-09-15

    Th2 cytokines, such as IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13, suppress proinflammatory cytokine production by monocytes/macrophages. Since monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is presumed to play an important role in monocyte recruitment and activation during inflammatory and immune responses, we examined here the effects of these Th2 cytokines on MCP-1 production by human blood monocytes and alveolar macrophages. Unstimulated, highly purified blood monocytes did not produce MCP-1 spontaneously, while LPS treatment induced the production of MCP-1 and its mRNA expression. All Th2 cytokines tested suppressed LPS-induced MCP-1 production and its mRNA expression, although the suppressive effect of IL-13 was weaker than that of IL-4 or IL-10. In contrast, IL-10, but neither IL-4 nor IL-13, induced unstimulated peripheral blood monocytes to produce biologically active MCP-1 protein within 4 h, reaching a maximal level at 12 h. IL-10-induced MCP-1 production was reduced by pretreatment of IL-10 with anti-IL-10 Ab, negating the involvement of contaminated endotoxin. Moreover, IL-10 induced MCP-1 mRNA expression in unstimulated monocytes, independent of de novo protein synthesis. Furthermore, human alveolar macrophages produced MCP-1 spontaneously, and the production was inhibited by IL-4 or IL-13, but was augmented by IL-10. These findings suggest that IL-10 regulates MCP-1 production by monocytes/macrophages in a different way from other Th2 cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13, and contributes to host defense responses.

  6. Monocytes are Essential for the Neuroprotective Effect of Human Cord Blood Cells Following Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Womble, T. A.; Green, S.; Shahaduzzaman, M.; Grieco, J.; Sanberg, P. R.; Pennypacker, K. R.; Willing, A. E.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic administration of human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) mononuclear cells (MNC) following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in the rat reduces infarct size and, more importantly, restores motor function. The HUCB cell preparation is composed of immature T-cells, B-cells, monocytes and stem cells. In this study we examined whether the beneficial effects of HUCB injection were attributable to one of these cell types. Male Sprague Dawley rats underwent permanent MCAO followed 48 hours later by intravenous administration of HUCB MNC preparations depleted of either CD14+ monocytes, CD133+ stem cells, CD2+ T-cells or CD19+ B cells. Motor function was measured prior to MCAO and 30 days post-stroke. When CD14+ monocytes were depleted from the HUCB MNC, activity and motor asymmetry were similar to the MCAO only treated animals. Monocyte depletion prevented HUCB cell treatment from reducing infarct size while monocyte enrichment was sufficient to reduce infarct size. Administration of monocyte-depleted HUCB cells did not suppress Iba1 labeling of microglia in the infarcted area relative to treatment with the whole HUCB preparation. These data demonstrate that the HUCB monocytes provide the majority of the efficacy in reducing infarct volume and promoting functional recovery. PMID:24472845

  7. Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Induces Differentiation and Adhesion of Human Monocytes and the Monocytic Cell Line U937

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frostegard, Johan; Nilsson, Jan; Haegerstrand, Anders; Hamsten, Anders; Wigzell, Hans; Gidlund, Magnus

    1990-02-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for development of atherosclerosis. In experimental animals fed a high-cholesterol diet, monocytes adhere to the arterial endothelium and penetrate into the intima where they differentiate into macrophages and ingest lipids thus giving rise to fatty streaks, the earliest type of atherosclerotic plaque. Macrophages express few receptors for normal low density lipo-protein (LDL) but can take up oxidized LDL by way of a scavenger receptor. The present study was designed to investigate the possible role of oxidized LDL in recruitment of resident intimal macrophages. We found that oxidized LDL induced enhanced expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules on human monocytes and U937 cells, a well-established system for studies of monocytic differentiation. Oxidized LDL also induced enhanced expression of the surface antigen LEuM3 but caused decreased expression of CD4 antigen, a pattern compatible with expression of a more differentiated macrophage-like phenotype. Oxidized LDL also initiated aggregation of monocytes and U937 cells and stimulated adhesion of U937 cells to cultured endothelial cells. The results indicate that oxidized LDL may contribute to development of atherosclerosis by inducing adhesion of monocytes to the arterial intima and by stimulating intimal monocytes to differentiate into resident macrophages.

  8. Homocysteine stimulates the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 receptor (CCR2) in human monocytes: possible involvement of oxygen free radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G; O, K

    2001-01-01

    Homocysteinaemia is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis. The development of atherosclerosis involves monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1)-mediated monocyte recruitment to the lesion site. The action of MCP-1 is mostly via its interaction with MCP-1 receptor (CCR2), which is the major receptor for MCP-1 on the surface of monocytes. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of homocysteine on CCR2 expression in human THP-1 monocytes. Cells were incubated with various concentrations of homocysteine for 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. The expression of CCR2 mRNA was determined by nuclease protection assay and the CCR2 protein was measured by Western immunoblotting analysis. The binding of MCP-1 to CCR2 as a functional receptor on the monocyte surface was determined by flow cytometry. Homocysteine (0.05-0.2 mM) significantly enhanced the expression of CCR2 mRNA (129-209% of the control) and CCR2 protein (up to 183% of control) in these cells after 24 h of incubation. Stimulation of CCR2 expression was associated with a parallel increase in the binding activity of CCR2 (129-191% of control) as well as an enhanced chemotactic response of homocysteine-treated monocytes. Further investigation revealed that the levels of superoxide were significantly elevated in cells incubated with homocysteine for 12-48 h. The addition of superoxide dismutase, a scavenger of superoxide, to the culture medium abolished the stimulatory effect of homocysteine on CCR2 expression as well as the binding activity of the receptor. The stimulatory effect of homocysteine on the expression of CCR2 mRNA and the levels of CCR2 protein was also observed in human peripheral blood monocytes. In conclusion, the present study has clearly demonstrated that homocysteine stimulates CCR2 expression in monocytes, leading to an enhanced binding activity and chemotatic response. Homocysteine-induced superoxide formation might serve as one of the underlying mechanisms for this effect

  9. Monocytic Differentiation Inhibits Infection and Granulocytic Differentiation Potentiates Infection by the Agent of Human Granulocytic Ehrlichiosis

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Marina B.; Hayes, Stanley F.; Goodman, Jesse L.

    1998-01-01

    Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) is an emerging tick-borne infection with a specific tropism for granulocytes. We previously isolated and cultivated the HGE agent in the promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60 and have also demonstrated the susceptibility of both granulocytic and monocytic human marrow progenitors. Circulating monocytes have not been observed to be infected, suggesting that cell susceptibility may be differentiation specific. To evaluate this hypothesis, HL-60 cells were differentiated towards granulocytes (with dimethyl sulfoxide or all-trans retinoic acid) or toward monocytes-macrophages (with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate [TPA], gamma interferon, or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3) and then challenged with HGE. HGE binding, internalization, and proliferation were compared in differentiated and untreated control HL-60 cells by immunofluorescence, electron microscopy, and Giemsa staining. Granulocytic differentiation resulted in a doubling of HGE binding and enhanced infection consistent with the agent’s clinical tropism for neutrophils. Granulocytic cells were unable to kill internalized ehrlichiae even after activation induced by N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe alone or together with tumor necrosis factor alpha. In contrast, monocyte-macrophage differentiation with TPA resulted in complete resistance to infection through at least two distinct mechanisms: (i) reduction in binding and uptake and (ii) killing of any internalized organisms. Diminished binding in TPA-treated cells correlated with their reduced expression of sialyl Lewis x (CD15s), a putative cellular receptor component for HGE. The degree of monocytic differentiation and activation induced (i.e., TPA > gamma interferon > vitamin D3) correlated with resistance to HGE. Thus, HL-60 cells exhibit a striking differentiation-specific susceptibility to HGE. Differentiation-induced changes in bacterial adhesion and killing capacity underlie the tropism of HGE for granulocytic HL-60 cells and

  10. Stimulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha production in human monocytes by inhibitors of protein phosphatase 1 and 2A

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The protein phosphatase 1 and 2A inhibitor, okadaic acid, has been shown to stimulate many cellular functions by increasing the phosphorylation state of phosphoproteins. In human monocytes, okadaic acid by itself stimulates tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA accumulation and TNF-alpha synthesis. Calyculin A, a more potent inhibitor of phosphatase 1, has similar effects. TNF-alpha mRNA accumulation in okadaic acid-treated monocytes is due to increased TNF- alpha mRNA stability and transcription rate. The increase in TNF-alpha mRNA stability is more remarkable in okadaic acid-treated monocytes than the mRNA stability of other cytokines, such as interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta, and IL-6. Gel retardation studies show the stimulation of AP-1, AP-2, and NF-kappa B binding activities in okadaic acid-stimulated monocytes. This increase may correlate with the increase in TNF-alpha mRNA transcription rate. In addition to the stimulation of TNF-alpha secretion by monocytes, okadaic acid appears to modulate TNF-alpha precursor processing, as indicated by a marked increase in the cell-associated 26-kD precursor. These results suggest that active basal phosphorylation/dephosphorylation occurs in monocytes, and that protein phosphatase 1 or 2A is important in regulating TNF-alpha gene transcription, translation, and posttranslational modification. PMID:1324971

  11. Conversion of human fibroblasts into monocyte-like progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Vitaloni, Marianna; Guenechea, Guillermo; Xia, Yun; Kurian, Leo; Dubova, Ilir; Bueren, Juan; Laricchia-Robbio, Leopoldo; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua

    2014-01-01

    Reprogramming technologies have emerged as a promising approach for future regenerative medicine. Here we report on the establishment of a novel methodology allowing for the conversion of human fibroblasts into Hematopoietic Progenitor-like Cells (HPC) with macrophage differentiation potential. SOX2 overexpression in human fibroblasts, a gene found to be upregulated during hematopoietic reconstitution in mice, induced the rapid appearance of CD34+ cells with a concomitant upregulation of mesoderm-related markers. Profiling of Cord Blood hematopoietic progenitor cell populations identified miR-125b as a factor facilitating commitment of SOX2-generated CD34+ cells to immature hematopoietic-like progenitor cells with grafting potential. Further differentiation towards the monocytic lineage resulted in the appearance of CD14+ cells with functional phagocytic capacity. In vivo transplantation of SOX2/miR-125b-generated CD34+ cells facilitated the maturation of the engrafted cells towards CD45+ cells and ultimately the monocytic/macrophage lineage. Altogether, our results indicate that strategies combining lineage conversion and further lineage specification by in vivo or in vitro approaches could help to circumvent long-standing obstacles for the reprogramming of human cells into hematopoietic cells with clinical potential. PMID:25175072

  12. Relationship of superoxide production to cytoplasmic free calcium in human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Scully, S P; Segel, G B; Lichtman, M A

    1986-01-01

    Calcium has been proposed as an intracellular second messenger for activation of secretion, phagocytosis, and the oxidative burst of neutrophils. We have examined the role of calcium in human monocyte activation. Concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated monocytes displayed an increment in cytoplasmic ionized calcium at 31 +/- 6 s and the onset of superoxide production at 61 +/- 9 s. The increase in cytoplasmic calcium invariably preceded the onset of superoxide production. If the external calcium concentration was reduced to less than 28 nM by the addition of 10 mM EGTA, superoxide production was not diminished at 5 min; however, superoxide production decreased thereafter. The Con A-evoked increment in cytoplasmic ionized calcium was blunted upon the addition of EGTA and decreased further with time. Both the production of superoxide and the Con A-evoked increment in cytoplasmic ionized calcium displayed a 50% inhibition after 15 min of calcium depletion and were completely inhibited after 60 min. Total cell calcium fell from 0.7 to 0.5 fmol/cell, and the basal level of ionized calcium fell from 83 to 30 nM after 60 min. Histidine, a strong chelator of divalent cations other than calcium and magnesium, had no effect on monocyte superoxide production or on ionized calcium concentrations, indicating that EGTA inhibition was due to cell calcium depletion. In calcium-depleted cells, Con A did not evoke superoxide production until calcium was restored to the incubation medium. The restoration of calcium to Con A-treated, calcium-depleted monocytes permitted a rapid rise in the cytoplasmic ionized calcium, and the production of superoxide within 9 s. These data suggest that an increase in ionized cytoplasmic calcium is necessary for the activation of monocyte superoxide production by Con A. The rise in ionized calcium in response to Con A results, in part, from an internal redistribution of calcium, which is sufficient to permit superoxide generation. PMID:3007579

  13. Characterization of calcium oxalate crystal-induced changes in the secretome of U937 human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Sintiprungrat, Kitisak; Singhto, Nilubon; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-03-01

    In kidney stone disease, migratory monocytes have been found to mediate progressive renal inflammation through the secretion of numerous inflammatory mediators. However, whether calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM), which is the major crystalline compound of kidney stones, has any effects on proteins secreted from monocytes remained largely unknown. The present study aimed to characterize changes in the secretome of U937 human monocytes induced by COM crystals. The viability of cells in serum/protein-free medium was serially evaluated and the data revealed that an exposure time of 16 h was optimal for this study, whereas prolonged incubation for 24 h resulted in declined cell viability. Using this optimal time-point, the secreted proteins recovered from serum/protein-free culture supernatants of controlled and COM-treated cells were resolved in 2-DE and stained with Deep Purple fluorescent dye. Quantitative intensity analysis revealed statistically significant changes in levels of 18 secreted proteins (14 increased and 4 decreased) from COM-treated cells. These significantly altered secreted proteins were then identified by Q-TOF MS and/or MS/MS analyses. Among these, the increased levels of secreted heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), HSP70 and β-actin were confirmed by Western blot analysis. The increased level of extracellular HSP90 was confirmed on the COM-treated cell surface by the immunofluorescence study, whereas the increased secretion of IFN-α was validated by ELISA. Global protein network analysis, literature search and bioinformatics revealed that these significantly altered secreted proteins were involved mainly in immune response and cell survival. Therefore, changes in the secretome of monocytes induced by COM crystals may be related, at least in part, to progressive renal inflammation found in kidney stone disease.

  14. Human macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), a novel chemoattractant for monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Godiska, R; Chantry, D; Raport, C J; Sozzani, S; Allavena, P; Leviten, D; Mantovani, A; Gray, P W

    1997-05-05

    A cDNA encoding a novel human chemokine was isolated by random sequencing of cDNA clones from human monocyte-derived macrophages. This protein has been termed macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) because it appears to be synthesized specifically by cells of the macrophage lineage. MDC has the four-cysteine motif and other highly conserved residues characteristic of CC chemokines, but it shares <35% identity with any of the known chemokines. Recombinant MDC was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells and purified by heparin-Sepharose chromatography. NH2-terminal sequencing and mass spectrophotometry were used to verify the NH2 terminus and molecular mass of recombinant MDC (8,081 dalton). In microchamber migration assays, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and IL-2-activated natural killer cells migrated to MDC in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximal chemotactic response at 1 ng/ml. Freshly isolated monocytes also migrated toward MDC, but with a peak response at 100 ng/ml MDC. Northern analyses indicated MDC is highly expressed in macrophages and in monocyte-derived dendritic cells, but not in monocytes, natural killer cells, or several cell lines of epithelial, endothelial, or fibroblast origin. High expression was also detected in normal thymus and less expression in lung and spleen. Unlike most other CC chemokines, MDC is encoded on human chromosome 16. MDC is thus a unique member of the CC chemokine family that may play a fundamental role in the function of dendritic cells, natural killer cells, and monocytes.

  15. C-reactive protein (CRP) induces chemokine secretion via CD11b/ICAM-1 interaction in human adherent monocytes.

    PubMed

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Steffens, Sabine; Burger, Fabienne; Pelli, Graziano; Monaco, Claudia; Mach, François

    2008-10-01

    Several studies support C-reactive protein (CRP) as a systemic cardiovascular risk factor. The recent detection of CRP in arterial intima suggests a dual activity in atherosclerosis as a circulating and tissue mediator on vascular and immune cells. In the present paper, we focused on the inflammatory effects of CRP on human monocytes, which were isolated by Ficoll-Percoll gradients and cultured in adherence to polystyrene, endothelial cell monolayer, or in suspension. Chemokine levels, adhesion molecule, and chemokine receptor expression were detected by ELISA, flow cytometry, and real-time RT-PCR. Migration assays were performed in a Boyden chamber. Stimulation with CRP induced release of CCL2, CCL3, and CCL4 in adherent monocytes through the binding to CD32a, CD32b, and CD64, whereas no effect was observed in suspension culture. This was associated with CRP-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules membrane-activated complex 1 (Mac-1) and ICAM-1 on adherent monocytes. Blockade of Mac-1/ICAM-1 interaction inhibited the CRP-induced chemokine secretion. In addition, CRP reduced mRNA and surface expression of corresponding chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5 in adherent monocytes. This effect was a result of chemokine secretion, as coincubation with neutralizing anti-CCL2, anti-CCL3, and anti-CCL4 antibodies reversed the effect of CRP. Accordingly, a reduced migration of CRP-treated monocytes to CCL2 and CCL3 was observed. In conclusion, our data suggest an in vitro model to study CRP activities in adherent and suspension human monocytes. CRP-mediated induction of adhesion molecules and a decrease of chemokine receptors on adherent monocytes might contribute to the retention of monocytes within atherosclerotic lesions and recruitment of other circulating cells.

  16. Expression of ACAT-1 protein in human atherosclerotic lesions and cultured human monocytes-macrophages.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, A; Sakashita, N; Lee, O; Takahashi, K; Horiuchi, S; Hakamata, H; Morganelli, P M; Chang, C C; Chang, T Y

    1998-10-01

    The acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) gene was first cloned in 1993 (Chang et al, J Biol Chem. 1993;268:20747-20755; designated ACAT-1). Using affinity-purified antibodies raised against the N-terminal portion of human ACAT-1 protein, we performed immunohistochemical localization studies and showed that the ACAT-1 protein was highly expressed in atherosclerotic lesions of the human aorta. We also performed cell-specific localization studies using double immunostaining and showed that ACAT-1 was predominantly expressed in macrophages but not in smooth muscle cells. We then used a cell culture system in vitro to monitor the ACAT-1 expression in differentiating monocytes-macrophages. The ACAT-1 protein content increased by up to 10-fold when monocytes spontaneously differentiated into macrophages. This increase occurred within the first 2 days of culturing the monocytes and reached a plateau level within 4 days of culturing, indicating that the increase in ACAT-1 protein content is an early event during the monocyte differentiation process. The ACAT-1 protein expressed in the differentiating monocytes-macrophages was shown to be active by enzyme assay in vitro. The high levels of ACAT-1 present in macrophages maintained in culture can explain the high ACAT-1 contents found in atherosclerotic lesions. Our results thus support the idea that ACAT-1 plays an important role in differentiating monocytes and in forming macrophage foam cells during the development of human atherosclerosis.

  17. Physicochemical characterization of cytostatic factors released from human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nissen-Meyer, J; Hammerstrøm, J

    1982-01-01

    Cultured human monocytes released cytostatic activity upon in vitro activation with lymphokines and lipopolysaccharide. This activity was mainly due to the presence of two different cytostatic factors, termed CstF I and II, which were separated by ion-exchange chromatography. At neutral pH, CstF I bound to the weak anion exchanger DEAE-Sephacel but not to the weak cation exchanger CM-Sepharose, whereas CstF II bound to CM-Sepharose but not to DEAE-Sephacel. The molecular weights of CstF I and II as determined by gel filtration were 55,000 and 40,000, respectively. Upon chromatofocusing, CstF I behaved as if it had an isoelectric point of 5.3. Neither CstF I nor CstF II bound specifically to concanavalin A-Sepharose, indicating the absence of carbohydrate residues containing alpha-D-mannopyranosyl, alpha-D-glucopyranosyl, or sterically related components. Both factors were susceptible to inactivation by proteinase K, demonstrating their protein nature. CstF II was purified more than 3,000-fold upon chromatography on CM-Sepharose and Sephacryl S-200. Ion-exchange chromatography and chromatofocusing of CstF I removed 97% of the proteins in the monocyte supernatant, but only 15% of the activity was recovered, resulting in a fivefold purification of CstF I. PMID:7141697

  18. Atypical Activin A and IL-10 Production Impairs Human CD16+ Monocyte Differentiation into Anti-Inflammatory Macrophages.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Érika; Domínguez-Soto, Ángeles; Nieto, Concha; Flores-Sevilla, José Luis; Pacheco-Blanco, Mariana; Campos-Peña, Victoria; Meraz-Ríos, Marco A; Vega, Miguel A; Corbí, Ángel L; Sánchez-Torres, Carmen

    2016-02-01

    Human CD14(++)CD16(-) and CD14(+/lo)CD16(+) monocyte subsets comprise 85 and 15% of blood monocytes, respectively, and are thought to represent distinct stages in the monocyte differentiation pathway. However, the differentiation fates of both monocyte subsets along the macrophage (Mϕ) lineage have not yet been elucidated. We have now evaluated the potential of CD14(++) CD16(-) and CD16(+) monocytes to differentiate and to be primed toward pro- or anti-inflammatory Mϕs upon culture with GM-CSF or M-CSF, respectively (subsequently referred to as GM14, M14, GM16, or M16). Whereas GM16 and GM14 were phenotypic and functionally analogous, M16 displayed a more proinflammatory profile than did M14. Transcriptomic analyses evidenced that genes associated with M-CSF-driven Mϕ differentiation (including FOLR2, IL10, IGF1, and SERPINB2) are underrepresented in M16 with respect to M14. The preferential proinflammatory skewing of M16 relative to M14 was found to be mediated by the secretion of activin A and the low levels of IL-10 produced by M16. In fact, activin A receptor blockade during the M-CSF-driven differentiation of CD16(+) monocytes, or addition of IL-10-containing M14-conditioned medium, significantly enhanced their expression of anti-inflammatory-associated molecules while impairing their acquisition of proinflammatory-related markers. Thus, we propose that M-CSF drives CD14(++)CD16- monocyte differentiation into bona fide anti-inflammatory Mϕs in a self-autonomous manner, whereas M-CSF-treated CD16(+) monocytes generate Mϕs with a skewed proinflammatory profile by virtue of their high activin A expression unless additional anti-inflammatory stimuli such as IL-10 are provided.

  19. Comparative uptake of grepafloxacin and ciprofloxacin by a human monocytic cell line, THP-1.

    PubMed

    Hara, T; Takemura, H; Kanemitsu, K; Yamamoto, H; Shimada, J

    2000-09-01

    The present study was designed to compare the uptake of grepafloxacin by a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, with that of ciprofloxacin. THP-1 cells were incubated with 20 microg/ml of either drug, and the entry of the drugs into the cells was determined using a velocity gradient centrifugation technique and HPLC assay. Antibiotic uptake by the cells was expressed as the ratio of the intracellular to the extracellular drug concentration (IC/EC). Grepafloxacin entered THP-1 cells readily within 5 min, and at steady-state (37 degrees C; 60 min), the IC/EC ratio of grepafloxacin (11.9 +/- 1.7; n = 13) was about 2.4-fold higher than that of ciprofloxacin (5.0 +/- 1.3; n = 13). The ratios decreased at low incubation temperature (4 degrees C), in paraformaldehyde-treated dead cells, and at low extracellular pH (pH 6.0), but were not influenced by high extracellular pH (pH, 9.0). Characterization of fluoroquinolone uptake suggests that these drugs penetrate the THP-1 membrane by passive diffusion, and also, in part, via an active transport system. We also examined the uptake of the two fluoroquinolones in phorbol 12 myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated adherent THP-1 cells (THP-1 macrophages). The IC/EC ratios for both fluoroquinolones in the THP-1 macrophages were significantly higher than those in the THP-1 monocytes. Further the uptake of three other fluoroquinolones, levofloxacin, tosufloxacin, and sparfloxacin, by THP-1 monocytes was examined in comparative studies. The IC/EC ratio of grepafloxacin was comparable to that of sparfloxacin and significantly higher than that of the other fluoroquinolones. Our results indicate that grepafloxacin exhibits better intracellular accumulation than ciprofloxacin and other fluoroquinolones in human monocytic and macrophage-like cells.

  20. (-)-Epicatechin attenuates high-glucose-induced inflammation by epigenetic modulation in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Herrera, Isabel; Chen, Xinpu; Ramos, Sonia; Devaraj, Sridevi

    2017-04-01

    Diabetes is a pro-inflammatory state associated with increased monocyte activity. NF-κB is the master switch of inflammation and is activated during diabetes. (-)-Epicatechin (EC), the main cocoa flavonol, displays anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic effects under high glucose conditions. Recently, it has been suggested that dietary polyphenols might modulate chromatin remodelling by epigenetic changes and regulate monocyte NF-κB activation and cytokine expression under diabetic conditions. The aim of the study was to test the potential anti-inflammatory role of EC via inducing posttranslational histone changes in the presence of a high glucose (HG) concentrations. Human monocytic cells (THP-1 cells) were pre-treated with EC (5 μM) and 4 h later exposed to 25 mM glucose (HG) for a total of 24 h. Control cells were grown under normoglycemic conditions (NG, 5.5 mM glucose). Acetyl CBP/p300, HDAC4, total histone 3 (HH3), H3K9ac, H3K4me2 and H3K9me2, and phosphorylated and total levels of p65-NF-κB were analysed by Western blot. Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity was measured in nuclear lysates, and TNF-α release was evaluated in culture media. EC incubation restored to control levels (NG) the changes induced by HG in p-p65/p65-NF-ĸB ratio, acetyl CBP/p300 values and HAT activity. Moreover, EC pre-treatment counteracted the increased acetylation of H3K9 and H3K4 dimethylation and attenuated the diminished H3K9 dimethylation triggered by HG. EC also significantly decreased HG-enhanced HDAC4 levels and TNF-α release, respectively. EC induces epigenetic changes and decreased NF-κB and TNF-α levels in human monocytes cultured in HG conditions such as in diabetes.

  1. CTLA-4 is expressed by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and regulates their functions.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Stefania; Carrega, Paolo; Saverino, Daniele; Piccioli, Patrizia; Camoriano, Marta; Morabito, Anna; Dozin, Beatrice; Fontana, Vincenzo; Simone, Rita; Mortara, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Ferlazzo, Guido; Pistillo, Maria Pia

    2010-10-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is the major negative regulator of T-cell responses, although growing evidence supports its wider role as an immune attenuator that may also act in other cell lineages. Here, we have analyzed the expression of CTLA-4 in human monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), and the effect of its engagement on cytokine production and T-cell stimulatory activity by mature DCs. CTLA-4 was highly expressed on freshly isolated monocytes, then down-modulated upon differentiation toward immature DCs (iDCs) and it was markedly upregulated on mature DCs obtained with different stimulations (lipopolysaccharides [LPS], Poly:IC, cytokines). In line with the functional role of CTLA-4 in T cells, treatment of mDCs with an agonistic anti-CTLA-4 mAb significantly enhanced secretion of regulatory interleukin (IL)-10 but reduced secretion of IL-8/IL-12 pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as autologous CD4+ T-cell proliferation in response to stimulation with recall antigen purified protein derivative (PPD) loaded-DCs. Neutralization of IL-10 with an anti-IL-10 antibody during the mDCs-CD4+ T-cell co-culture partially restored the ability of anti-CTLA-4-treated mDCs to stimulate T-cell proliferation in response to PPD. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that CTLA-4 receptor is expressed by human monocyte-derived mDCs upon their full activation and that it exerts immune modulatory effects.

  2. Identification of Genes Responsive to Solar Simulated UV Radiation in Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Hortensia; Lamana, Amalia; Mittelbrunn, María; Perez-Gala, Silvia; Gonzalez, Salvador; García-Diez, Amaro; Vega, Miguel; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation has profound effects on the skin and the systemic immune system. Several effects of UV radiation on Dendritic cells (DCs) functions have been described. However, gene expression changes induced by UV radiation in DCs have not been addressed before. In this report, we irradiated human monocyte-derived DCs with solar-simulated UVA/UVB and analyzed regulated genes on human whole genome arrays. Results were validated by RT-PCR and further analyzed by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). Solar-simulated UV radiation up-regulated expression of genes involved in cellular stress and inflammation, and down-regulated genes involved in chemotaxis, vesicular transport and RNA processing. Twenty four genes were selected for comparison by RT-PCR with similarly treated human primary keratinocytes and human melanocytes. Several genes involved in the regulation of the immune response were differentially regulated in UVA/UVB irradiated human monocyte-derived DCs, such as protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type E (PTPRE), thrombospondin-1 (THBS1), inducible costimulator ligand (ICOSL), galectins, Src-like adapter protein (SLA), IL-10 and CCR7. These results indicate that UV-exposure triggers the regulation of a complex gene repertoire involved in human-DC–mediated immune responses. PMID:19707549

  3. Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Infection of the Three Monocyte Subsets Contributes to Viral Burden in Humans

    PubMed Central

    de Castro-Amarante, Maria Fernanda; McKinnon, Katherine; Washington Parks, Robyn; Galli, Veronica; Omsland, Maria; Andresen, Vibeke; Massoud, Raya; Brunetto, Giovanna; Caruso, Breanna; Venzon, David; Jacobson, Steven

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because the viral DNA burden correlates with disease development, we investigated the contribution of monocyte subsets (classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocytes) to the total viral burden in 22 human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected individuals by assessing their infectivity status, frequency, as well as chemotactic and phagocytic functions. All three monocyte subsets sorted from HTLV-1-infected individuals were positive for viral DNA, and the frequency of classical monocytes was lower in the blood of HTLV-1-infected individuals than in that of uninfected individuals, while the expression levels of the chemokine receptors CCR5, CXCR3, and CX3CR1 in classical monocytes were higher in HTLV-1-infected individuals than uninfected individuals; the percentage of intermediate monocytes and their levels of chemokine receptor expression did not differ between HTLV-1-infected and uninfected individuals. However, the capacity of intermediate monocytes to migrate to CCL5, the ligand for CCR5, was higher, and a higher proportion of nonclassical monocytes expressed CCR1, CXCR3, and CX3CR1. The level of viral DNA in the monocyte subsets correlated with the capacity to migrate to CCL2, CCL5, and CX3CL1 for classical monocytes, with lower levels of phagocytosis for intermediate monocytes, and with the level of viral DNA in CD8+ and CD4+ T cells for nonclassical monocytes. These data suggest a model whereby HTLV-1 infection augments the number of classical monocytes that migrate to tissues and become infected and the number of infected nonclassical monocytes that transmit virus to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These results, together with prior findings in a macaque model of HTLV-1 infection, support the notion that infection of monocytes by HTLV-1 is likely a requisite for viral persistence in humans. IMPORTANCE Monocytes have been implicated in immune regulation and disease progression in patients with HTLV-1-associated inflammatory diseases. We detected

  4. High Cellular Monocyte Activation in People Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus on Combination Antiretroviral Therapy and Lifestyle-Matched Controls Is Associated With Greater Inflammation in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Booiman, Thijs; Wit, Ferdinand W.; Maurer, Irma; De Francesco, Davide; Sabin, Caroline A.; Harskamp, Agnes M.; Prins, Maria; Garagnani, Paolo; Pirazzini, Chiara; Franceschi, Claudio; Fuchs, Dietmar; Gisslén, Magnus; Winston, Alan; Reiss, Peter; Reiss, P.; Wit, F. W. N. M.; Schouten, J.; Kooij, K. W.; van Zoest, R. A.; Elsenga, B. C.; Janssen, F. R.; Heidenrijk, M.; Zikkenheiner, W.; van der Valk, M.; Kootstra, N. A.; Booiman, T.; Harskamp-Holwerda, A. M.; Boeser-Nunnink, B.; Maurer, I.; Mangas Ruiz, M. M.; Girigorie, A. F.; Villaudy, J.; Frankin, E.; Pasternak, A.; Berkhout, B.; van der Kuyl, T.; Portegies, P.; Schmand, B. A.; Geurtsen, G. J.; ter Stege, J. A.; Klein Twennaar, M.; Majoie, C. B. L. M.; Caan, M. W. A.; Su, T.; Weijer, K.; Bisschop, P. H. L. T.; Kalsbeek, A.; Wezel, M.; Visser, I.; Ruhé, H. G.; Franceschi, C.; Garagnani, P.; Pirazzini, C.; Capri, M.; Dall’Olio, F.; Chiricolo, M.; Salvioli, S.; Hoeijmakers, J.; Pothof, J.; Prins, M.; Martens, M.; Moll, S.; Berkel, J.; Totté, M.; Kovalev, S.; Gisslén, M.; Fuchs, D.; Zetterberg, H.; Winston, A.; Underwood, J.; McDonald, L.; Stott, M.; Legg, K.; Lovell, A.; Erlwein, O.; Doyle, N.; Kingsley, C.; Sharp, D. J.; Leech, R.; Cole, J. H.; Zaheri, S.; Hillebregt, M. M. J.; Ruijs, Y. M. C.; Benschop, D. P.; Burger, D.; de Graaff-Teulen, M.; Guaraldi, G.; Bürkle, A.; Sindlinger, T.; Moreno-Villanueva, M.; Keller, A.; Sabin, C.; de Francesco, D.; Libert, C.; Dewaele, S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Increased monocyte activation and intestinal damage have been shown to be predictive for the increased morbidity and mortality observed in treated people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV). Methods. A cross-sectional analysis of cellular and soluble markers of monocyte activation, coagulation, intestinal damage, and inflammation in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of PLHIV with suppressed plasma viremia on combination antiretroviral therapy and age and demographically comparable HIV-negative individuals participating in the Comorbidity in Relation to AIDS (COBRA) cohort and, where appropriate, age-matched blood bank donors (BBD). Results. People living with HIV, HIV-negative individuals, and BBD had comparable percentages of classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocytes. Expression of CD163, CD32, CD64, HLA-DR, CD38, CD40, CD86, CD91, CD11c, and CX3CR1 on monocytes did not differ between PLHIV and HIV-negative individuals, but it differed significantly from BBD. Principal component analysis revealed that 57.5% of PLHIV and 62.5% of HIV-negative individuals had a high monocyte activation profile compared with 2.9% of BBD. Cellular monocyte activation in the COBRA cohort was strongly associated with soluble markers of monocyte activation and inflammation in the CSF. Conclusions. People living with HIV and HIV-negative COBRA participants had high levels of cellular monocyte activation compared with age-matched BBD. High monocyte activation was predictive for inflammation in the CSF. PMID:28680905

  5. Immunoregulatory adherent cells in human tuberculosis: radiation-sensitive antigen-specific suppression by monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinhenz, M.E.; Ellner, J.J.

    1985-07-01

    In human tuberculosis, adherent mononuclear cells (AMC) selectively depress in vitro responses to the mycobacterial antigen tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD). The phenotype of this antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell was characterized by examining the functional activity of adherent cells after selective depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or OKM1-reactive monocytes. Adherent cell suppression was studied in the (/sup 3/H)thymidine-incorporation microculture assay by using T cells rigorously depleted of T cells with surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (T gamma cells) as antigen-responsive cells. PPD-induced (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation by these non gamma T cells was uniformly reduced (mean, 42% +/- 10% (SD)) when autologous AMC were added to non gamma T cells at a ratio of 1:2. Antigen-specific suppression by AMC was not altered by depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or treatment with indomethacin. However, AMC treated with OKM1 and complement or gamma irradiation (1,500 rads) no longer suppressed tuberculin responses in vitro. These studies identify the antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell in tuberculosis as an OKM1-reactive, non-erythrocyte-rosetting monocyte. The radiosensitivity of this monocyte immunoregulatory function may facilitate its further definition.

  6. CD13 mediates phagocytosis in human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Licona-Limón, Ileana; Garay-Canales, Claudia A; Muñoz-Paleta, Ofelia; Ortega, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    CD13 is a membrane-bound ectopeptidase, highly expressed on monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. CD13 is involved in diverse functions, including degradation of peptide mediators, cellular adhesion, migration, viral endocytosis, signaling, and positive modulation of phagocytosis mediated by FcγRs and other phagocytic receptors. In this work, we explored whether besides acting as an accessory receptor, CD13 by itself is a primary phagocytic receptor. We found that hCD13 mediates efficient phagocytosis of large particles (erythrocytes) modified so as to interact with the cell only through CD13 in human macrophages and THP-1 monocytic cells. The extent of this phagocytosis is comparable with the phagocytosis mediated through the canonical phagocytic receptor FcγRI. Furthermore, we demonstrated that hCD13 expression in the nonphagocytic cell line HEK293 is sufficient to enable these cells to internalize particles bound through hCD13. CD13-mediated phagocytosis is independent of other phagocytic receptors, as it occurs in the absence of FcγRs, CR3, and most phagocytic receptors. Phagocytosis through CD13 is independent of its enzymatic activity but is dependent on actin rearrangement and activation of PI3K and is partially dependent on Syk activation. Moreover, the cross-linking of CD13 with antibodies rapidly induced pSyk in human macrophages. Finally, we observed that antibody-mediated cross-linking of hCD13, expressed in the murine macrophage-like J774 cell line, induces production of ROS. These results demonstrate that CD13 is a fully competent phagocytic receptor capable of mediating internalization of large particles.

  7. Expression and regulation of Schlafen (SLFN) family members in primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells

    PubMed Central

    Puck, Alexander; Aigner, Regina; Modak, Madhura; Cejka, Petra; Blaas, Dieter; Stöckl, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Schlafen (SLFN/Slfn) family members have been investigated for their involvement in fundamental cellular processes including growth regulation, differentiation and control of viral replication. However, most research has been focused on the characterization of Slfns within the murine system or in human cell lines. Since little is known about SLFNs in primary human immune cells, we set out to analyze the expression and regulation of the six human SLFN genes in monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) and T cells. Comparison of SLFN gene expression across these three cell types showed high mRNA expression of SLFN11 in monocytes and moDCs and high SLFN5 expression in T cells, indicating functional importance within these cell types. Differentiation of monocytes to moDCs leads to the gradual upregulation of SLFN12L and SLFN13 while SLFN12 levels were decreased by differentiation stimuli. Stimulation of moDCs via human rhinovirus, lipopolysaccharide, or IFN-α lead to strong upregulation of SLFN gene expression, while peptidoglycan poorly stimulated regulation of both SLFNs and the classical interferon-stimulated gene MxA. T cell activation was found to downregulate the expression of SLFN5, SLFN12 and SLFN12L, which was reversible upon addition of exogenous IFN-α. In conclusion, we demonstrate, that SLFN gene upregulation is mainly dependent on autocrine type I interferon signaling in primary human immune cells. Rapid decrease of SLFN expression levels following T cell receptor stimulation indicates a role of SLFNs in the regulation of human T cell quiescence. PMID:26623250

  8. Expression and regulation of Schlafen (SLFN) family members in primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells.

    PubMed

    Puck, Alexander; Aigner, Regina; Modak, Madhura; Cejka, Petra; Blaas, Dieter; Stöckl, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Schlafen (SLFN/Slfn) family members have been investigated for their involvement in fundamental cellular processes including growth regulation, differentiation and control of viral replication. However, most research has been focused on the characterization of Slfns within the murine system or in human cell lines. Since little is known about SLFNs in primary human immune cells, we set out to analyze the expression and regulation of the six human SLFN genes in monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) and T cells. Comparison of SLFN gene expression across these three cell types showed high mRNA expression of SLFN11 in monocytes and moDCs and high SLFN5 expression in T cells, indicating functional importance within these cell types. Differentiation of monocytes to moDCs leads to the gradual upregulation of SLFN12L and SLFN13 while SLFN12 levels were decreased by differentiation stimuli. Stimulation of moDCs via human rhinovirus, lipopolysaccharide, or IFN-α lead to strong upregulation of SLFN gene expression, while peptidoglycan poorly stimulated regulation of both SLFNs and the classical interferon-stimulated gene MxA. T cell activation was found to downregulate the expression of SLFN5, SLFN12 and SLFN12L, which was reversible upon addition of exogenous IFN-α. In conclusion, we demonstrate, that SLFN gene upregulation is mainly dependent on autocrine type I interferon signaling in primary human immune cells. Rapid decrease of SLFN expression levels following T cell receptor stimulation indicates a role of SLFNs in the regulation of human T cell quiescence.

  9. Binding of Soluble Yeast β-Glucan to Human Neutrophils and Monocytes is Complement-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Nandita; Chan, Anissa S. H.; Guerrero, Faimola; Maristany, Carolyn M.; Qiu, Xiaohong; Walsh, Richard M.; Ertelt, Kathleen E.; Jonas, Adria Bykowski; Gorden, Keith B.; Dudney, Christine M.; Wurst, Lindsay R.; Danielson, Michael E.; Elmasry, Natalie; Magee, Andrew S.; Patchen, Myra L.; Vasilakos, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The immunomodulatory properties of yeast β-1,3/1,6 glucans are mediated through their ability to be recognized by human innate immune cells. While several studies have investigated binding of opsonized and unopsonized particulate β-glucans to human immune cells mainly via complement receptor 3 (CR3) or Dectin-1, few have focused on understanding the binding characteristics of soluble β-glucans. Using a well-characterized, pharmaceutical-grade, soluble yeast β-glucan, this study evaluated and characterized the binding of soluble β-glucan to human neutrophils and monocytes. The results demonstrated that soluble β-glucan bound to both human neutrophils and monocytes in a concentration-dependent and receptor-specific manner. Antibodies blocking the CD11b and CD18 chains of CR3 significantly inhibited binding to both cell types, establishing CR3 as the key receptor recognizing the soluble β-glucan in these cells. Binding of soluble β-glucan to human neutrophils and monocytes required serum and was also dependent on incubation time and temperature, strongly suggesting that binding was complement-mediated. Indeed, binding was reduced in heat-inactivated serum, or in serum treated with methylamine or in serum reacted with the C3-specific inhibitor compstatin. Opsonization of soluble β-glucan was demonstrated by detection of iC3b, the complement opsonin on β-glucan-bound cells, as well as by the direct binding of iC3b to β-glucan in the absence of cells. Binding of β-glucan to cells was partially inhibited by blockade of the alternative pathway of complement, suggesting that the C3 activation amplification step mediated by this pathway also contributed to binding. PMID:23964276

  10. NFκB2/p100 is a key factor for endotoxin tolerance in human monocytes: a demonstration using primary human monocytes from patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Cubillos-Zapata, Carolina; Hernández-Jiménez, Enrique; Toledano, Víctor; Esteban-Burgos, Laura; Fernández-Ruíz, Irene; Gómez-Piña, Vanesa; Del Fresno, Carlos; Siliceo, María; Prieto-Chinchiña, Patricia; Pérez de Diego, Rebeca; Boscá, Lisardo; Fresno, Manuel; Arnalich, Francisco; López-Collazo, Eduardo

    2014-10-15

    Endotoxin tolerance (ET) is a state of reduced responsiveness to endotoxin stimulation after a primary bacterial insult. This phenomenon has been described in several pathologies, including sepsis, in which an endotoxin challenge results in reduced cytokine production. In this study, we show that the NFκ L chain enhancer of activated B cells 2 (NFκB2)/p100 was overexpressed and accumulated in a well-established in vitro human monocyte model of ET. The p100 accumulation in these cells inversely correlated with the inflammatory response after LPS stimulation. Knocking down NFκB2/p100 using small interfering RNA in human monocytes further indicated that p100 expression is a crucial factor in the progression of ET. The monocytes derived from patients with sepsis had high levels of p100, and a downregulation of NFκB2/p100 in these septic monocytes reversed their ET status.

  11. Importance of CD49d-VCAM interactions in human monocyte adhesion to porcine endothelium.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowski, P; Artrip, J H; Ankersmit, J; Schuster, M; John, R; Wang, S F; Ma, N; Michler, R E; Itescu, S

    1998-02-01

    By using a primate model of natural antibody depletion, we have previously shown that delayed rejection of porcine cardiac xenografts in unmodified primate recipients resulted from xenograft infiltration with monocyte/macrophage lineage cells. In the present study, we initially showed that human monocytes/macrophages demonstrated significantly greater adherence to unstimulated pig aortic endothelial cells (PAEC) than to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Human TNF-alpha augmented monocyte adhesion to HUVEC by 5-fold higher levels than to PAEC. This effect could not be explained on the basis of incompatibility between human TNF-alpha and its receptor on PAEC since porcine VCAM expression increased by 75-85% after stimulation with TNF-alpha. TNF-augmented monocyte adherence was abrogated by either treatment of PAEC with an anti-VCAM Mab or monocytes with an anti-CD49d Mab. These results suggest that VCAM-CD49d interactions are important in adhesion of human monocytes to PAEC but may not be as effective as those between human monocytes and allogeneic endothelium, perhaps because of structural differences across species. Other interactions, as yet undefined, must explain the relative increase in adhesiveness of human monocytes for unstimulated PAEC versus HUVEC. In experiments investigating the functional consequences of this enhanced monocyte adherence, PAEC stimulation induced 10-fold higher levels of macrophage-derived IL-1 beta and 3-fold higher levels of T cell proliferation compared with HUVEC. Using an anti-DR Mab to interrupt antigen presentation by autologous macrophages markedly reduced the T cell proliferative response to PAEC. Together, these results indicate that the enhanced adherence of human monocytes to PAEC contributes to xenograft rejection beyond the hyperacute period by leading to tissue infiltration, elaboration of cytokines, and an augmented indirect pathway of T cell xenoantigen recognition.

  12. Characterization of the CD14++CD16+ monocyte population in human bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Mandl, Manuela; Schmitz, Susanne; Weber, Christian; Hristov, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have divided blood monocytes according to their expression of the surface markers CD14 and CD16 into following subsets: classical CD14(++)CD16(-), intermediate CD14(++)CD16(+) and nonclassical CD14(+)CD16(++) monocytes. These subsets differ in phenotype and function and are further correlated to cardiovascular disease, inflammation and cancer. However, the CD14/CD16 nature of resident monocytes in human bone marrow remains largely unknown. In the present study, we identified a major population of CD14(++)CD16(+) monocytes by using cryopreserved bone marrow mononuclear cells from healthy donors. These cells express essential monocyte-related antigens and chemokine receptors such as CD11a, CD18, CD44, HLA-DR, Ccr2, Ccr5, Cx3cr1, Cxcr2 and Cxcr4. Notably, the expression of Ccr2 was inducible during culture. Furthermore, sorted CD14(++)CD16(+) bone marrow cells show typical macrophage morphology, phagocytic activity, angiogenic features and generation of intracellular oxygen species. Side-by-side comparison of the chemokine receptor profile with unpaired blood samples also demonstrated that these rather premature medullar monocytes mainly match the phenotype of intermediate and partially of (non)classical monocytes. Together, human monocytes obviously acquire their definitive CD14/CD16 signature in the bloodstream and the medullar monocytes probably transform into CD14(++)CD16- and CD14(+)CD16(++) subsets which appear enriched in the periphery.

  13. Cerium dioxide nanoparticles do not modulate the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Salik; Al-Nsour, Faris; Rice, Annette B; Marshburn, Jamie; Ji, Zhaoxia; Zink, Jeffery I; Yingling, Brenda; Walker, Nigel J; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerium dioxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have potential therapeutic applications and are widely used for industrial purposes. However, the effects of these nanoparticles on primary human cells are largely unknown. The ability of nanoparticles to exacerbate pre-existing inflammatory disorders is not well documented for engineered nanoparticles, and is certainly lacking for CeO2 nanoparticles. We investigated the inflammation-modulating effects of CeO2 nanoparticles at noncytotoxic concentrations in human peripheral blood monocytes. Methods CD14+ cells were isolated from peripheral blood samples of human volunteers. Cells were exposed to either 0.5 or 1 μg/mL of CeO2 nanoparticles over a period of 24 or 48 hours with or without lipopolysaccharide (10 ng/mL) prestimulation. Modulation of the inflammatory response was studied by measuring secreted tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, macrophage chemotactic protein-1, interferon-gamma, and interferon gamma-induced protein 10. Results CeO2 nanoparticle suspensions were thoroughly characterized using dynamic light scattering analysis (194 nm hydrodynamic diameter), zeta potential analysis (−14 mV), and transmission electron microscopy (irregular-shaped particles). Transmission electron microscopy of CD14+ cells exposed to CeO2 nanoparticles revealed that these nanoparticles were efficiently internalized by monocytes and were found either in vesicles or free in the cytoplasm. However, no significant differences in secreted cytokine profiles were observed between CeO2 nanoparticle-treated cells and control cells at noncytotoxic doses. No significant effects of CeO2 nanoparticle exposure subsequent to lipopolysaccharide priming was observed on cytokine secretion. Moreover, no significant difference in lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine production was observed after exposure to CeO2 nanoparticles followed by lipopolysaccharide exposure. Conclusion CeO2 nanoparticles at noncytotoxic concentrations neither

  14. Cerium Dioxide Nanoparticles Induce Apoptosis and Autophagy in Human Peripheral Blood Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Salik; Al-Nsour, Faris; Rice, Annette B.; Marshburn, Jamie; Yingling, Brenda; Ji, Zhaoxia; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Walker, Nigel J.; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) have diversified industrial uses and novel therapeutic applications are actively being pursued. There is lack of mechanistic data concerning the effects of CeO2 NPs on primary human cells. We aimed at characterizing the cytotoxic effects of CeO2 NPs in human peripheral blood monocytes. CeO2 NPs and their suspensions were thoroughly characterized, including using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and zeta potential analysis. Blood from healthy human volunteers was drawn through phlebotomy and CD14+ cells were isolated. Cells were exposed to CeO2 NPs (0.5–10 μg/mL) for 20 or 40 hours and mechanisms of cell injury were studied. TEM revealed that CeO2 NPs are internalized by monocytes and are found either in vesicles or free in the cytoplasm. CeO2 NP exposure leads to decrease in cell viability and treated cells exhibit characteristic hallmarks of apoptosis (activation of Bax, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA fragmentation). CeO2 NP toxicity is caused by mitochondrial damage leading to apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) release, but not due to caspase activation or reactive oxygen species production. Moreover, CeO2 NP exposure leads to autophagy, which is further increased after pharmacological inhibition of tumour suppressor protein p53. Inhibition of autophagy partially reverses cell death by CeO2 NPs. It is concluded that CeO2 NPs are toxic to primary human monocytes at relatively low doses. PMID:22717232

  15. Characterization of Human Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells by Imaging Flow Cytometry: A Comparison between Two Monocyte Isolation Protocols.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Gloria; Parira, Tiyash; Laverde, Alejandra; Casteleiro, Gianna; El-Mabhouh, Amal; Nair, Madhavan; Agudelo, Marisela

    2016-10-18

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen presenting cells of the immune system that play a crucial role in lymphocyte responses, host defense mechanisms, and pathogenesis of inflammation. Isolation and study of DCs have been important in biological research because of their distinctive features. Although they are essential key mediators of the immune system, DCs are very rare in blood, accounting for approximately 0.1 - 1% of total blood mononuclear cells. Therefore, alternatives for isolation methods rely on the differentiation of DCs from monocytes isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The utilization of proper isolation techniques that combine simplicity, affordability, high purity, and high yield of cells is imperative to consider. In the current study, two distinct methods for the generation of DCs will be compared. Monocytes were selected by adherence or negatively enriched using magnetic separation procedure followed by differentiation into DCs with IL-4 and GM-CSF. Monocyte and MDDC viability, proliferation, and phenotype were assessed using viability dyes, MTT assay, and CD11c/ CD14 surface marker analysis by imaging flow cytometry. Although the magnetic separation method yielded a significant higher percentage of monocytes with higher proliferative capacity when compared to the adhesion method, the findings have demonstrated the ability of both techniques to simultaneously generate monocytes that are capable of proliferating and differentiating into viable CD11c+ MDDCs after seven days in culture. Both methods yielded > 70% CD11c+ MDDCs. Therefore, our results provide insights that contribute to the development of reliable methods for isolation and characterization of human DCs.

  16. Helicobacter pylori Lipopolysaccharide Binds to CD14 and Stimulates Release of Interleukin-8, Epithelial Neutrophil-Activating Peptide 78, and Monocyte Chemotactic Protein 1 by Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, Charles M.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Keates, Sarah; Linevsky, Joanne K.; Kelly, Ciarán P.

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori gastritis is characterized by leukocyte infiltration of the gastric mucosa. The aims of this study were to determine whether H. pylori-derived factors stimulate chemokine release from human monocytes and to ascertain whether H. pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may be responsible for this effect. Human peripheral blood monocytes were exposed to an H. pylori water extract (HPE) or to purified H. pylori LPS. Levels of the chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78 (ENA-78), and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The contribution of H. pylori LPS to monocyte activation was determined by using the LPS antagonist Rhodobacter sphaeroides lipid A (RSLA) and a blocking monoclonal antibody to CD14 (60bca). HPE increased monocyte secretion of IL-8, ENA-78, and MCP-1. Heat treatment of HPE did not reduce its ability to activate monocytes. Purified H. pylori LPS also stimulated monocyte chemokine production but was 1,000-fold less potent than Salmonella minnesota lipid A. RSLA blocked H. pylori LPS-induced monocyte IL-8 release in a dose-dependent fashion (maximal inhibition 82%, P < 0.001). RSLA also inhibited HPE-induced IL-8 release (by 93%, P < 0.001). The anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody 60bca substantially inhibited IL-8 release from HPE-stimulated monocytes (by 88%, P < 0.01), whereas the nonblocking anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody did not. These experiments with potent and specific LPS inhibitors indicate that the main monocyte-stimulating factor in HPE is LPS. H. pylori LPS, acting through CD14, stimulates human monocytes to release the neutrophil-activating chemokines IL-8 and ENA-78 and the monocyte-activating chemokine MCP-1. Despite its low relative potency, H. pylori LPS may play an important role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori gastritis. PMID:9784544

  17. Androgen exposure increases human monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium and endothelial cell expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1.

    PubMed

    McCrohon, J A; Jessup, W; Handelsman, D J; Celermajer, D S

    1999-05-04

    Male sex is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. Owing to the importance of monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells in the development of atherosclerosis, we hypothesized that androgens might promote this process. We therefore studied the effects of the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on human monocyte adhesion to human endothelial cells and on endothelial cell-surface expression of adhesion molecules. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were grown to confluence in media supplemented with postmenopausal female serum, then exposed for 48 hours to either DHT (40 and 400 nmol/L), with or without the androgen receptor blocker hydroxyflutamide (HF) (4 micromol/L); HF alone; or vehicle control (ethanol 0.1%). Human monocytes obtained by elutriation were incubated for 1 hour with the HUVECs at 37 degrees C, and adhesion was measured by light microscopy. Compared with vehicle control, monocyte adhesion was increased in the androgen-treated HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner (116+/-6% and 128+/-3% for DHT 40 and 400 nmol/L respectively; P<0.001). HF blocked this increase (P>/=0.3 compared with control). Surface expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules was measured by ELISA and revealed an increased expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in the DHT-treated HUVECs (125+/-5% versus 100+/-4% in controls; P=0.002), an effect also antagonized by HF (P>/=0.3 compared with controls). Furthermore, the DHT-related increase in adhesion was completely blocked by coincubation with anti-VCAM-1 antibody. Comparable results were obtained in arterial endothelial cells and in endothelium stimulated with the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Androgen exposure is associated with increased human monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, a proatherogenic effect mediated at least in part by an increased endothelial cell-surface expression of VCAM-1.

  18. Exosomes derived from alcohol-treated hepatocytes horizontally transfer liver specific miRNA-122 and sensitize monocytes to LPS.

    PubMed

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Bala, Shashi; Kodys, Karen; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2015-05-14

    Hepatocyte damage and inflammation in monocytes/macrophages are central to the pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis (AH). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate all of these processes. MiRNA-122 is abundantly expressed in hepatocytes while monocytes/macrophages have low levels. The role of exosomes in AH and possible cross talk between hepatocyte-derived exosomes and immune cells is not explored yet. Here, we show that the number of exosomes significantly increases in the sera of healthy individuals after alcohol binge drinking and in mice after binge or chronic alcohol consumption. Exosomes isolated from sera after alcohol consumption or from in vitro ethanol-treated hepatocytes contained miRNA-122. Exosomes derived from ethanol-treated Huh7.5 cells were taken up by the recipients THP1 monocytes and horizontally transferred a mature form of liver-specific miRNA-122. In vivo, liver mononuclear cells and Kupffer cells from alcohol-fed mice had increased miRNA-122 levels. In monocytes, miRNA-122 transferred via exosomes inhibited the HO-1 pathway and sensitized to LPS stimulation and increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Finally, inflammatory effects of exosomes from ethanol-treated hepatocytes were prevented by using RNA interference via exosome-mediated delivery of a miRNA-122 inhibitor. These results demonstrate that first, exosomes mediate communication between hepatocytes and monocytes/macrophages and second, hepatocyte-derived miRNA-122 can reprogram monocytes inducing sensitization to LPS.

  19. CD4 Ligation on Human Blood Monocytes Triggers Macrophage Differentiation and Enhances HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Anjie; Krutzik, Stephan R.; Levin, Bernard R.; Kasparian, Saro; Zack, Jerome A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A unique aspect of human monocytes, compared to monocytes from many other species, is that they express the CD4 molecule. However, the role of the CD4 molecule in human monocyte development and function is not known. We determined that the activation of CD4 via interaction with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) triggers cytokine expression and the differentiation of human monocytes into functional mature macrophages. Importantly, we determined that CD4 activation induces intracellular signaling in monocytes and that inhibition of the MAPK and Src family kinase pathways blocked the ability of CD4 ligation to trigger macrophage differentiation. We observed that ligation of CD4 by MHC-II on activated endothelial cells induced CD4-mediated macrophage differentiation of blood monocytes. Finally, CD4 ligation by MHC-II increases the susceptibility of blood-derived monocytes to HIV binding and subsequent infection. Altogether, our studies have identified a novel function for the CD4 molecule on peripheral monocytes and suggest that a unique set of events that lead to innate immune activation differ between humans and mice. Further, these events can have effects on HIV infection and persistence in the macrophage compartment. IMPORTANCE The CD4 molecule, as the primary receptor for HIV, plays an important role in HIV pathogenesis. There are many cell types that express CD4 other than the primary HIV target, the CD4+ T cell. Other than allowing HIV infection, the role of the CD4 molecule on human monocytes or macrophages is not known. We were interested in determining the role of CD4 in human monocyte/macrophage development and function and the potential effects of this on HIV infection. We identified a role for the CD4 molecule in triggering the activation and development of a monocyte into a macrophage following its ligation. Activation of the monocyte through the CD4 molecule in this manner increases the ability of monocytes to bind to and become

  20. Monocyte subset dynamics in human atherosclerosis can be profiled with magnetic nano-sensors.

    PubMed

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Lee, Hakho; Chudnovskiy, Aleksey; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Etzrodt, Martin; Pittet, Mikael J; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Croce, Kevin; Libby, Peter; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K

    2009-05-22

    Monocytes are circulating macrophage and dendritic cell precursors that populate healthy and diseased tissue. In humans, monocytes consist of at least two subsets whose proportions in the blood fluctuate in response to coronary artery disease, sepsis, and viral infection. Animal studies have shown that specific shifts in the monocyte subset repertoire either exacerbate or attenuate disease, suggesting a role for monocyte subsets as biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Assays are therefore needed that can selectively and rapidly enumerate monocytes and their subsets. This study shows that two major human monocyte subsets express similar levels of the receptor for macrophage colony stimulating factor (MCSFR) but differ in their phagocytic capacity. We exploit these properties and custom-engineer magnetic nanoparticles for ex vivo sensing of monocytes and their subsets. We present a two-dimensional enumerative mathematical model that simultaneously reports number and proportion of monocyte subsets in a small volume of human blood. Using a recently described diagnostic magnetic resonance (DMR) chip with 1 microl sample size and high throughput capabilities, we then show that application of the model accurately quantifies subset fluctuations that occur in patients with atherosclerosis.

  1. Cannabidiol induced a contrasting pro-apoptotic effect between freshly isolated and precultured human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hsin-Ying; Chang, An-Chi; Wang, Chia-Chi; Kuo, Fu-Hua; Lee, Chi-Ya; Liu, Der-Zen; Jan, Tong-Rong

    2010-08-01

    It has been documented that cannabidiol (CBD) induced apoptosis in a variety of transformed cells, including lymphocytic and monocytic leukemias. In contrast, a differential sensitivity between normal lymphocytes and monocytes to CBD-mediated apoptosis has been reported. The present study investigated the pro-apoptotic effect of CBD on human peripheral monocytes that were either freshly isolated or precultured for 72 h. CBD markedly enhanced apoptosis of freshly isolated monocytes in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, whereas precultured monocytes were insensitive. By comparison, both cells were sensitive to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. CBD significantly diminished the cellular thiols and glutathione in freshly isolated monocytes. The apoptosis induced by CBD was abrogated in the presence of N-acetyl-{sub L}-cysteine, a precursor of glutathione. In addition, precultured monocytes contained a significantly greater level of glutathione and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) compared to the freshly isolated cells. The HO-1 competitive inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin partially but significantly restored the sensitivity of precultured monocytes to CBD-mediated apoptosis. Collectively, our results demonstrated a contrasting pro-apoptotic effect of CBD between precultured and freshly isolated monocytes, which was closely associated with the cellular level of glutathione and the antioxidative capability of the cells.

  2. Lipid profiling of polarized human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Montenegro-Burke, J Rafael; Sutton, Jessica A; Rogers, Lisa M; Milne, Ginger L; McLean, John A; Aronoff, David M

    2016-12-01

    The highly orchestrated transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming during activation drastically transforms the main functions and physiology of human macrophages across the polarization spectrum. Lipids, for example, can modify protein function by acting remotely as signaling molecules but also locally by altering the physical properties of cellular membranes. These changes play key roles in the functions of highly plastic immune cells due to their involvement in inflammation, immune responses, phagocytosis and wound healing processes. We report an analysis of major membrane lipids of distinct phenotypes of resting (M0), classically activated (M1), alternatively activated (M2a) and deactivated (M2c) human monocyte derived macrophages from different donors. Samples were subjected to supercritical fluid chromatography-ion mobility-mass spectrometry analysis, which allowed separations based on lipid class, facilitating the profiling of their fatty acid composition. Different levels of arachidonic acid mobilization as well as other fatty acid changes were observed for different lipid classes in the distinct polarization phenotypes, suggesting the activation of highly orchestrated and specific enzymatic processes in the biosynthesis of lipid signaling molecules and cell membrane remodeling. Thromboxane A2 production appeared to be a specific marker of M1 polarization. These alterations to the global composition of lipid bi-layer membranes in the cell provide a potential methodology for the definition and determination of cellular and tissue activation states.

  3. Fluoroquinolone Transport by Human Monocytes: Characterization and Comparison to Other Cells of Myeloid Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Bounds, Steven J.; Nakkula, Robin; Walters, John D.

    2000-01-01

    Human monocytes transport and accumulate ciprofloxacin and other fluoroquinolones. Although little is known about the mechanisms of transport, we expected monocytes to be similar to other cells of myeloid lineage. In the present study, monocyte fluoroquinolone transport was characterized and compared to the corresponding transport pathways of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and HL-60 cells. Ciprofloxacin transport by monocytes was saturable, temperature dependent, sodium independent, and relatively insensitive to pH. Quiescent monocytes transported ciprofloxacin with a Km of 171 μg/ml and a Vmax of 32.7 ng/min/106 cells. Adenine competitively inhibited ciprofloxacin transport by quiescent monocytes (Ki = 3.8 mM), but nucleosides had no significant inhibitory effect. In all of these respects, transport by monocytes was similar to that observed for quiescent PMNs and immature HL-60 cells. Unlike PMNs, however, monocytes and immature HL-60 cells did not exhibit dramatically enhanced ciprofloxacin transport when activated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Consistent with this finding, HL-60 cells committed to granulocytic differentiation exhibited a significant component of PMA-inducible ciprofloxacin transport activity, while HL-60 cells committed to monocytic differentiation did not. In PMNs, the PMA-inducible component of transport appeared to be mobilized from a granule compartment, since its activity could be modulated by agents that enhance or inhibit stimulated degranulation. Thus, quiescent monocytes, PMNs, and HL-60 cells take up ciprofloxacin via similar energy-dependent transport mechanisms. Unlike granulocytes, monocytes do not express a second, higher-affinity pathway for ciprofloxacin accumulation when they are activated by PMA. PMID:10991832

  4. CD16 regulates TRIF-dependent TLR4 response in human monocytes and their subsets.

    PubMed

    Shalova, Irina N; Kajiji, Tasneem; Lim, Jyue Yuan; Gómez-Piña, Vanesa; Fernández-Ruíz, Irene; Arnalich, Francisco; Iau, Philip Tsau Choong; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Wong, Siew-Cheng; Biswas, Subhra K

    2012-04-15

    Blood monocytes recognize Gram-negative bacteria through the TLR4, which signal via MyD88- and TRIF-dependent pathway to trigger an immune-inflammatory response. However, a dysregulated inflammatory response by these cells often leads to severe pathologies such as sepsis. We investigated the role of CD16 in the regulation of human monocyte response to Gram-negative endotoxin and sepsis. Blood monocytes from sepsis patients demonstrated an upregulation of several TRIF-dependent genes as well as a selective expansion of CD16-expressing (CD16(+)) monocytes. Gene expression and biochemical studies revealed CD16 to regulate the TRIF-dependent TLR4 pathway in monocytes by activating Syk, IFN regulatory factor 3, and STAT1, which resulted in enhanced expression of IFNB, CCL5, and CXCL10. CD16 also upregulated the expression of IL-1R-associated kinase M and IL-1 receptor antagonist, which are negative regulators of the MyD88-dependent pathway. CD16 overexpression or small interfering RNA knockdown in monocytes confirmed the above findings. Interestingly, these results were mirrored in the CD16(+) monocyte subset isolated from sepsis patients, providing an in vivo confirmation to our findings. Collectively, the results from the current study demonstrate CD16 as a key regulator of the TRIF-dependent TLR4 pathway in human monocytes and their CD16-expressing subset, with implications in sepsis.

  5. Interleukin-6 production by human monocytes stimulated with Cryptococcus neoformans components.

    PubMed

    Delfino, D; Cianci, L; Lupis, E; Celeste, A; Petrelli, M L; Curró, F; Cusumano, V; Teti, G

    1997-06-01

    In order to ascertain if Cryptococcus neoformans components can induce interleukin-6 (IL-6) production, we stimulated human whole blood with purified capsular products. Their potencies in stimulating IL-6 release were mannoproteins > galactoxylomannan = glucuronoxylomannan > alpha(1-3)glucan. IL-6 production was tumor necrosis factor alpha independent and required the presence of monocytes and plasma. Since IL-6 can stimulate replication of the human immunodeficiency virus in monocytic cells, these findings may be clinically relevant.

  6. Interleukin-6 production by human monocytes stimulated with Cryptococcus neoformans components.

    PubMed Central

    Delfino, D; Cianci, L; Lupis, E; Celeste, A; Petrelli, M L; Curró, F; Cusumano, V; Teti, G

    1997-01-01

    In order to ascertain if Cryptococcus neoformans components can induce interleukin-6 (IL-6) production, we stimulated human whole blood with purified capsular products. Their potencies in stimulating IL-6 release were mannoproteins > galactoxylomannan = glucuronoxylomannan > alpha(1-3)glucan. IL-6 production was tumor necrosis factor alpha independent and required the presence of monocytes and plasma. Since IL-6 can stimulate replication of the human immunodeficiency virus in monocytic cells, these findings may be clinically relevant. PMID:9169790

  7. DNA Microarray Analysis of Human Monocytes Early Response Genes upon Infection with Rickettsia rickettsii

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-15

    DNA Microarray Analysis of Human Monocytes Early Response Genes upon Infection with Rickettsia rickettsii Chien-Chung Chao Rickettsiae Diseases...TITLE AND SUBTITLE DNA Microarray Analysis of Human Monocytes Early Response Genes upon Infection with Rickettsia rickettsii 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...ANSI Std Z39-18 Rickettsiae • Gram negative coccobacillary bacteria • Obligate intracellular organisms • Arthropod-borne • Cause febrile diseases (mild

  8. Suppressive effect of iron on concanavalin A-induced multinucleated giant cell formation by human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Kiyoshi; Nishiya, Koji; Hisakawa, Naoko; Wang, Honggang; Hashimoto, Kozo

    2003-11-01

    Immune dysfunction in patients with iron overload has been reported. Iron disturbed CD2 expression on T-cells, cell-mediated immunity by Th1 cells and monocyte functions including phagocytosis and natural killer activity. In the present study, we examined the effects of iron and desferrioxamine (DFX, an iron chelator) on generation of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) by human monocytes in vitro. Human monocytes were isolated from venous blood and cultured with concanavalin A (Con A) stimulation with additives, ferric citrate (Fe-citrate) or sodium citrate (Na-citrate) or DFX for 4 days. The cells were fixed and subjected to Wright staining. MGC formation was observed under light microscopy. Con A induced MGC formation in a dose-dependent manner, and reached a plateau after 3 days of incubation. MGC formation was suppressed when Con A-stimulated monocytes were cultured with the co-addition of Fe-citrate but not Na-citrate only in the early phase of culture (less than 24 hours). DFX also suppressed MGC formation in a dose-dependent manner. Using flow cytometry analysis, the co-addition of Fe-citrate significantly suppressed CD18 (beta2 integrin) and CD54 (ICAM-I) but not CD11a (alpha integrin) expression on Con A-stimulated monocytes. Iron supressed the generation of MGC by human monocytes in vitro. These observations suggested that iron might affect MGC generation by down-regulation of adhesion molecule expression on monocytes.

  9. Profiling of the three circulating monocyte subpopulations in human obesity.

    PubMed

    Devêvre, Estelle F; Renovato-Martins, Mariana; Clément, Karine; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Cremer, Isabelle; Poitou, Christine

    2015-04-15

    Three subpopulations of circulating monocytes have been described: CD14(2+)CD16(-) (classical monocytes [CM]), CD14(2+)CD16(+) (intermediate monocytes [IM]), and CD14(+)CD16(2+) (nonclassical monocytes [NCM]). We previously showed that obesity is associated with an increased proportion of IM and NCM. Our objective is to decipher the migratory and inflammatory functions of each monocyte subset in obesity-related low-grade inflammation. Twenty-six healthy, normal-weight and nondiabetic volunteers (C) and 40 obese nondiabetic (Ob) individuals were included in this study. We explored the gene expression profile of 18 inflammatory genes in each subset of C and Ob subjects and measured protein expression of the upregulated genes. We then tested their functional response to TLR signaling in both groups. We showed an increased expression of CX3CR1 in all monocyte subpopulations and of CCR2 and CCR5 in CM and IM in the Ob group. We found negative correlation between CCR2 and CX3CR1 expressions and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, whereas CCR5 expression was positively linked to obesity-related metabolic traits. Production of inflammatory proteins upon bacterial LPS and viral ssRNA stimulation was higher in CM and NCM of the Ob group compared with the C group. Our work highlights an enhanced inflammatory phenotype of monocytes with a higher response to TLR4 and TLR8 stimulations in obesity. Moreover, it suggests an increased migration capacity of CM and IM subpopulations.

  10. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase mediates IL-8 induction by the ribotoxin deoxynivalenol in human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Zahidul; Gray, Jennifer S.; Pestka, James J. . E-mail: pestka@msu.edu

    2006-06-15

    The effects of the ribotoxic trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated IL-8 expression were investigated in cloned human monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). DON (250 to 1000 ng/ml) induced both IL-8 mRNA and IL-8 heteronuclear RNA (hnRNA), an indicator of IL-8 transcription, in the human U937 monocytic cell line in a concentration-dependent manner. Expression of IL-8 hnRNA, mRNA and protein correlated with p38 phosphorylation and was completely abrogated by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. DON at 500 ng/ml similarly induced p38-dependent IL-8 protein and mRNA expression in PBMC cultures from healthy volunteers. Significantly increased IL-6 and IL-1{beta} intracellular protein and mRNA expression was also observed in PBMC treated with DON (500 ng/ml) which were also partially p38-dependent. Flow cytometry of PBMC revealed that DON-induced p38 phosphorylation varied among individuals relative to both threshold toxin concentrations (25-100 ng/ml) and relative increases in percentages of phospho-p38{sup +} cells. DON-induced p38 activation occurred exclusively in the CD14{sup +} monocyte population. DON was devoid of agonist activity for human Toll-like receptors 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8 and 9. However, two other ribotoxins, emetine and anisomycin, induced p38 phosphorylation in PBMC similarly to DON. Taken together, these data suggest that (1) p38 activation was required for induction of IL-8 and proinflammatory gene expression in the monocyte and (2) DON induced p38 activation in human monocytes via the ribotoxic stress response.

  11. The “Intermediate” CD14++CD16+ monocyte subset increases in severe peripheral artery disease in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Aschenbrenner, Teresa; Wendorff, Heiko; Czubba, Maria; Glinzer, Almut; Haller, Bernhard; Schiemann, Matthias; Zimmermann, Alexander; Berger, Hermann; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Meier, Reinhard; Wohlgemuth, Walter A.; Libby, Peter; Zernecke, Alma

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes are key players in atherosclerotic. Human monocytes display a considerable heterogeneity and at least three subsets can be distinguished. While the role of monocyte subset heterogeneity has already been well investigated in coronary artery disease (CAD), the knowledge about monocytes and their heterogeneity in peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) still is limited. Therefore, we aimed to investigate monocyte subset heterogeneity in patients with PAOD. Peripheral blood was obtained from 143 patients suffering from PAOD (Rutherford stage I to VI) and three monocyte subsets were identified by flow cytometry: CD14++CD16− classical monocytes, CD14+CD16++ non-classical monocytes and CD14++CD16+ intermediate monocytes. Additionally the expression of distinct surface markers (CD106, CD162 and myeloperoxidase MPO) was analyzed. Proportions of CD14++CD16+ intermediate monocyte levels were significantly increased in advanced stages of PAOD, while classical and non-classical monocytes displayed no such trend. Moreover, CD162 and MPO expression increased significantly in intermediate monocyte subsets in advanced disease stages. Likewise, increased CD162 and MPO expression was noted in CD14++CD16− classical monocytes. These data suggest substantial dynamics in monocyte subset distributions and phenotypes in different stages of PAOD, which can either serve as biomarkers or as potential therapeutic targets to decrease the inflammatory burden in advanced stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:27991581

  12. The subcellular particulate NADPH-dependent O2.(-)-generating oxidase from human blood monocytes: comparison to the neutrophil system.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, A N; Santinga, J T; Gabig, T G

    1982-10-01

    Highly purified preparations of normal human monocytes obtained from peripheral blood were shown to contain a subcellular particulate O2.(-)-generating oxidase system. This O2.(-)-generating activity was present in particulate preparations from monocytes that had been previously stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate but was low or absent in control preparations from unstimulated monocytes or stimulated monocytes from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease. In the stimulated preparations from normal monocytes, O2.(-)-generation was linearly proportional to cell protein concentration, insensitive to inhibition by azide, and dependent on NADPH as substrate. These characteristics are similar to the O2.(-)-generating oxidase system from human neutrophils. A significant difference in the apparent Km for NADPH was shown between preparations from stimulated monocytes and neutrophils (monocyte 83 +/- 16 microM, neutrophil 31 +/- 5 microM, mean +/- SE). Additionally, affinity of the stimulated monocyte particulate preparation for NADH was unmeasurably low.

  13. Expression of interleukin 2 receptors by monocytes from patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and induction of monocyte interleukin 2 receptors by human immunodeficiency virus in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, J B; McCartney-Francis, N; Smith, P D; Simon, G; Gartner, S; Wahl, L M; Popovic, M; Wahl, S M

    1990-01-01

    A population of circulating mononuclear cells from patients with AIDS was identified which expressed interleukin 2 receptors (IL-2R). By dual-fluorescence flow microfluorometry, the patients' IL-2R+ cells were further identified as Leu M3+ monocytes (29.4 +/- 5.2% of the Leu M3+ cells were IL-2R+, n = 15), whereas Leu M3+ monocytes from normal subjects were IL-2R negative (2.0 +/- 0.42%; P less than 0.001). By Northern analysis, monocytes from AIDS patients, but not control subjects, constitutively expressed steady-state levels of IL-2R mRNA. Functionally, the IL-2R+ monocytes were capable of depleting IL-2 from culture supernatants, suggesting a mechanism for the reduced IL-2 levels commonly seen in AIDS patients. IL-2R+ monocytes also expressed increased levels of surface HLA-DR which may favor monocyte T-cell interactions and the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In additional studies, normal monocytes were infected with a macrophage-tropic HIV isolate in vitro and monitored for IL-2R and HLA-DR expression. Within 24-48 h after exposure to HIV in vitro, but before evidence of productive infection, greater than 25% of the monocytes became IL-2R+ with increasing numbers of IL-2R+ cells and HLA-DR levels through day 6. These early signaling effects of HIV could be mimicked by adding purified HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the monocytes. This stimulation of monocytes before or independent of productive infection of the cells by HIV is consistent with in vivo observations of activated and/or abnormal functions by monocytes that do not appear to be infected with HIV in AIDS patients. Images PMID:2295695

  14. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol treatment during human monocyte differentiation reduces macrophage susceptibility to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Williams, Julie C; Appelberg, Sofia; Goldberger, Bruce A; Klein, Thomas W; Sleasman, John W; Goodenow, Maureen M

    2014-06-01

    The major psychoactive component of marijuana, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), also acts to suppress inflammatory responses. Receptors for THC, CB1, CB2, and GPR55, are differentially expressed on multiple cell types including monocytes and macrophages, which are important modulators of inflammation in vivo and target cells for HIV-1 infection. Use of recreational and medicinal marijuana is increasing, but the consequences of marijuana exposure on HIV-1 infection are unclear. Ex vivo studies were designed to investigate effects on HIV-1 infection in macrophages exposed to THC during or following differentiation. THC treatment of primary human monocytes during differentiation reduced HIV-1 infection of subsequent macrophages by replication competent or single cycle CCR5 using viruses. In contrast, treatment of macrophages with THC immediately prior to or continuously following HIV-1 exposure failed to alter infection. Specific receptor agonists indicated that the THC effect during monocyte differentiation was mediated primarily through CB2. THC reduced the number of p24 positive cells with little to no effect on virus production per infected cell, while quantitation of intracellular viral gag pinpointed the THC effect to an early event in the viral life cycle. Cells treated during differentiation with THC displayed reduced expression of CD14, CD16, and CD163 and donor dependent increases in mRNA expression of selected viral restriction factors, suggesting a fundamental alteration in phenotype. Ultimately, the mechanism of THC suppression of HIV-1 infection was traced to a reduction in cell surface HIV receptor (CD4, CCR5 and CXCR4) expression that diminished entry efficiency.

  15. Altered Monocyte and Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule Expression Is Linked to Vascular Inflammation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Manjusha; Bowman, Emily; Gabriel, Janelle; Amburgy, Taylor; Mayne, Elizabeth; Zidar, David A.; Maierhofer, Courtney; Turner, Abigail Norris; Bazan, Jose A.; Koletar, Susan L.; Lederman, Michael M.; Sieg, Scott F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals have increased risk for vascular thrombosis, potentially driven by interactions between activated leukocytes and the endothelium. Methods. Monocyte subsets (CD14+CD16−, CD14+CD16+, CD14DimCD16+) from HIV negative (HIV−) and antiretroviral therapy-treated HIV positive (HIV+) participants (N = 19 and 49) were analyzed by flow cytometry for adhesion molecule expression (lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 [LFA-1], macrophage-1 antigen [Mac-1], CD11c/CD18, very late antigen [VLA]-4) and the fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1); these receptors recognize ligands (intercellular adhesion molecules [ICAMs], vascular cell adhesion molecule [VCAM]-1, fractalkine) on activated endothelial cells (ECs) and promote vascular migration. Plasma markers of monocyte (soluble [s]CD14, sCD163) and EC (VCAM-1, ICAM-1,2, fractalkine) activation and systemic (tumor necrosis factor receptor [TNFR-I], TNFR-II) and vascular (lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 [Lp-PLA2]) inflammation were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. Proportions of CD16+ monocyte subsets were increased in HIV+ participants. Among all monocyte subsets, levels of LFA-1 were increased and CX3CR1 levels were decreased in HIV+ participants (P < .01). Levels of sCD163, sCD14, fractalkine, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, TNFR-II, and Lp-PLA2 were also increased in HIV+ participants (P < .05), and levels of sCD14, TNFR-I, and TNFR-II were directly related to ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 levels in HIV+ participants. Expression of CX3CR1 on monocyte subsets was inversely related to plasma Lp-PLA2 (P < .05 for all). Conclusions. Increased proportions of CD16+ monocytes, cells with altered adhesion molecule expression, combined with elevated levels of their ligands, may promote vascular inflammation in HIV infection. PMID:28066794

  16. Effects of tropism and virulence of Leishmania parasites on cytokine production by infected human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Meddeb-Garnaoui, A; Zrelli, H; Dellagi, K

    2009-01-01

    The nature of early interactions between Leishmania and macrophages which determine the outcome of infection can be related directly to parasite biological properties. Here we compared the capacity of L. major (Lm) strains, reported to be high (LmHV) and low virulent and (LmLV) in the mouse model and L. infantum (Li) strains, dermotropic (LiD) and viscerotropic (LiV), to infect and modulate cytokine production in human peripheral blood derived monocytes. Monocytes were infected with metacyclic promastigotes for 24, 48 and 72 h. Parasite burden was significantly higher in Lm- than in Li-infected monocytes. LmHV and LiD induced a significantly higher parasite burden than LmLV and LiV respectively. Cytokine production was evaluated in monocytes infected for 24 h. Contrary to interleukin (IL)-12p70, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and transforming growth factor-β production was increased significantly in infected monocytes with no differences between strains. Lm isolates induced significantly higher quantities of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α than Li isolates. Low levels of IL-10 were induced by all Leishmania strains and, interestingly, co-stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was accompanied by a dramatic increase in IL-10 production by infected monocytes. In conclusion, Lm isolates displaying different levels of virulence in mice exhibited significant differences in parasite burden but similar abilities to modulate cytokine production in human monocytes. Li strains showed weaker infectivity and TNF-α inducing-capacity compared with Lm strains. The dramatic increase of IL-10 production in infected monocytes co-stimulated by LPS may play a role in disease progression considering the presence of LPS during bacterial superinfections observed during human leishmaniasis. PMID:19040614

  17. Binding of human C-reactive protein to monocytes: analysis by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Ballou, S P; Cleveland, R P

    1991-01-01

    An opsonic role has been proposed as a major function of C-reactive protein (CRP) in humans. In support of this hypothesis, recent radiolabelled ligand binding studies have provided evidence for the presence of specific receptors for soluble human CRP on human phagocytic cells, including neutrophils and monocytes. In order to confirm specific binding of CRP to monocytes and to quantify the percentage of such cells capable of expressing binding sites, we employed a sensitive biotin-avidin fluorescence assay to study the CRP-monocyte interaction. It was observed that 67% of monocytes bound biotinylated CRP in a dose-dependent manner, that the binding was calcium dependent, and that it could be inhibited by 60% in the presence of a greater than 20-fold excess of competing native CRP. In other experiments, neither IgG nor heat-aggregated IgG inhibited the binding of CRP to monocytes; and no significant binding to lymphocyte population could be detected. These studies confirm the ability of human CRP to bind to a majority of human monocytes in a calcium-dependent and specific manner, and provide further support for a biologically important interaction of this acute-phase protein with phagocytic cells. PMID:2025959

  18. Monocyte prostaglandins inhibit procollagen secretion by human vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for plaque stability.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimmons, C; Proudfoot, D; Bowyer, D E

    1999-02-01

    Extracellular matrix remodelling occurs during atherosclerosis dictating the structure of the plaque and thus the resistance to rupture. Monocytes and macrophages are believed to play a role in this remodelling. In the present study, filter-separated co-culture has been used to study the effect of monocytes on procollagen turnover by human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). In this system, freshly isolated human peripheral blood monocytes inhibited procollagen secretion from VSMC without affecting either degradation of procollagen, or DNA synthesis by the VSMC. Insertion of a 12 kDa dialysis membrane between the two cell types and treatment with indomethacin showed that the inhibitory factor was of low molecular weight and was cyclooxygenase-dependent. Pre-incubation of each cell type with indomethacin demonstrated that monocyte, but not VSMC cyclooxygenase was required. Thus, the inhibitory effect on procollagen secretion was due, most likely, to monocyte prostaglandins. Neither inhibition of thromboxane synthetase, nor blocking IL-1 activity, reduced the inhibitory activity. Addition of prostaglandins PGE1, PGE2 and PGF2alpha to VSMC cultures caused a reduction in procollagen secretion which was equivalent to, but was not additive with, the maximal effect achieved by monocytes. Monocytes and macrophages are a major source of prostaglandins and these molecules are likely to play an important role in collagen turnover within lesions.

  19. Activation of tumoricidal properties in human blood monocytes by muramyl dipeptide requires specific intracellular interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Fogler, W.E.; Fidler, I.J.

    1986-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanism by which muramyl dipeptide (MDP) activates antitumor cytotoxic properties in normal and interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..)-primed human peripheral blood monocytes. The structurally and functionally active MDP analog, nor-muramyl dipeptide (nor-MDP), and (/sup 3/H)nor-MDP were used as reference glycopeptides. Direct activation of normal, noncytotoxic monocytes by nor-MDP was enhanced its encapsulation within multilamellar vesicles (MLV). Studies with (/sup 3/H)nor-MDP revealed that the activation of monocytes by nor-MDP was not attributable to its interaction with a specific cell surface receptor, nor did it result merely from the internalization by monocytes of glycopeptide. Subthreshold concentrations of nor-MDP could activate tumor cytotoxic properties in IFN-..gamma..-primed monocytes. The intracellular interaction of (/sup 3/H)nor-MDP with IFN-..gamma..-primed monocytes was specific in that intracellular levels of radiolabeled material could be displaced and recovered as intact molecules by unlabeled nor-MDP, but not by a biologically inactive MDP stereoisomer. Collectively, these results suggest that the activation of tumoricidal properties in human blood monocytes by MDP occurs subsequent to intracellular interaction with specific MDP receptors.

  20. Suppression of human monocyte interleukin-1beta production by ajulemic acid, a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid.

    PubMed

    Zurier, Robert B; Rossetti, Ronald G; Burstein, Sumner H; Bidinger, Bonnie

    2003-02-15

    Oral administration of ajulemic acid (AjA), a cannabinoid acid devoid of psychoactivity, reduces joint tissue damage in rats with adjuvant arthritis. Because interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) are central to the progression of inflammation and joint tissue injury in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, we investigated human monocyte IL-1beta and TNFalpha responses after the addition of AjA to cells in vitro. Peripheral blood and synovial fluid monocytes (PBM and SFM) were isolated from healthy subjects and patients with inflammatory arthritis, respectively, treated with AjA (0-30 microM) in vitro, and then stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Cells were harvested for mRNA, and supernatants were collected for cytokine assay. Addition of AjA to PBM and SFM in vitro reduced both steady-state levels of IL-1beta mRNA and secretion of IL-1beta in a concentration-dependent manner. Suppression was maximal (50.4%) at 10 microM AjA (P<0.05 vs untreated controls, N=7). AjA did not influence TNFalpha gene expression in or secretion from PBM. Reduction of IL-1beta by AjA may help explain the therapeutic effects of AjA in the animal model of arthritis. Development of nonpsychoactive therapeutically useful synthetic analogs of Cannabis constituents, such as AjA, may help resolve the ongoing debate about the use of marijuana as medicine.

  1. Bryostatins trigger human polymorphonuclear neutrophil and monocyte oxidative metabolism: association with in vitro antineoplastic activity.

    PubMed

    Esa, A H; Warren, J T; Hess, A D; May, W S

    1995-01-01

    Bryostatin-1-but not bryostatin-13-a macrocyclic lactone isolated from the marine bryozoan Bugula neritina, triggered human polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) and monocyte release of reactive oxygen radicals, as measured by the generation of lucigenin chemiluminescence and by the ferricytochrome c reduction assay. The release of oxygen radicals by bryostatins was sensitive to inhibitors of protein kinases, but resistant to the inhibition of phospholipase A2 activity and arachidonic acid metabolism (prior treatment with mepacrine or indomethacin). Comparison of the effect of protein kinase (PK) inhibitors H-8, H-7 and staurosporine on bryostatin-1-induced neutrophil oxygen radical release further suggested a requirement for activation of phospholipid-dependent PKC, but not for cGMP- or cAMP-dependent PK. In cytostatic assays, PMNs treated with bryostatin-1 inhibited the growth of the erythroleukaemic cell line K562 in a concentration-dependent manner. These findings suggest that the reported antineoplastic effect of bryostatins may result at least in part from activation of PMNs and monocytes.

  2. Two distinct receptors account for recognition of maleyl-albumin in human monocytes during differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Haberland, M E; Rasmussen, R R; Olch, C L; Fogelman, A M

    1986-01-01

    A comparison of the receptor-mediated interaction of malondialdehyde-low density lipoprotein and maleyl-albumin has been examined in human monocytes during differentiation in vitro. The recognition of both ligands by the scavenger receptor of these cells has been confirmed. We now report that human monocytes express a second cellular surface receptor for maleyl-albumin that is distinct from the scavenger receptor. The activity of the maleyl-albumin receptor, determined by both binding and lysosomal hydrolytic assays, substantially exceeds that of the scavenger receptor in freshly isolated monocytes. A dramatic and rapid decline in the activity of the maleyl-albumin receptor occurs within 72 to 96 h during differentiation in vitro. At day 7, while only 5-10% of the original activity of the maleyl-albumin receptor remains, it is similar to that of the maximally expressed scavenger receptor. Both the binding and hydrolysis of ligand mediated by the maleyl-albumin receptor are specifically inhibited by alpha-casein and alkaline-treated albumin; neither of these proteins is recognized by the scavenger receptor. The occurrence of the exceptionally active maleyl-albumin receptor on freshly isolated human monocytes suggests that it participates in processes necessary to the function of the cells that diminish in importance after differentiation of the monocytes into macrophages in vitro. Furthermore, while maleyl-albumin is a useful adjunct to studies of cellular events mediated by the scavenger receptor, the presence of a second receptor for maleyl-albumin must be taken into account as a potential contributing and complicating event. Images PMID:3949974

  3. Augmentation of human monocyte opsonin-independent phagocytosis by fragments of human plasma fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Czop, J K; Kadish, J L; Austen, K F

    1981-06-01

    Human plasma fibronectin isolated by gelatin-affinity chromatography increases in a dose-dependent fashion the number of human monocytes that ingest particulate activators of the human alternative complement pathway in a fully synthetic medium. The fibronectin effect is selective for these particulate activators, does not extend to particles whose ingestion is dependent upon opsonization with IgG, and is not observed with pretreatment of the monocytes. Affinity chromatography with monoclonal antibody to plasma fibronectin of 440,000 daltons reveals that only 12-53% of the protein in a phagocytically active gelatin-affinity-purified fibronectin preparations is bound to the antibody. The protein eluted after affinity chromatography with monoclonal antibody of active preparations, which represented 10-43% of the protein applied, exhibits a 2- to 10-fold increment of activity per microgram of protein above the starting gelatin-affinity-purified material. Thus, the activity that augments the percent of human monocytes ingesting particulate activators of the alternative pathway is antigenically defined as plasma fibronectin. Preparations containing only intact 440,000-dalton fibronectin are also bound to and eluted from the monoclonal antibody, but they fail to augment phagocytosis. When inactive 440,000-dalton plasma fibronectin is subjected to limited trypsin cleavage, phagocytosis-enhancing activity develops that is bound to and elutes from the affinity column prepared with monoclonal antibody, thereby indicating that the enhancing activity of plasma fibronectin resides in cleavage fragments.

  4. Mechanism involved in interleukin-21-induced phagocytosis in human monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vallières, F; Girard, D

    2017-02-01

    The interleukin (IL)-21/IL-21 receptor (R) is a promising system to be exploited for the development of therapeutic strategies. Although the biological activities of IL-21 and its cell signalling events have been largely studied in immunocytes, its interaction with human monocytes and macrophages have been neglected. Previously, we reported that IL-21 enhances Fc gamma receptor (FcRγ)-mediated phagocytosis in human monocytes and in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) and identified Syk as a novel molecular target of IL-21. Here, we elucidate further how IL-21 promotes phagocytosis in these cells. Unlike its ability to enhance phagocytosis of opsonized sheep red blood cells (SRBCs), IL-21 did not promote phagocytosis of Escherichia coli and zymosan by monocytes and did not alter the cell surface expression of CD16, CD32 and CD64. In HMDM, IL-21 was found to enhance phagocytosis of zymosan. In addition, we found that IL-21 activates p38, protein kinase B (Akt), signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-1 and STAT-3 in monocytes and HMDM. Using a pharmacological approach, we demonstrate that IL-21 enhances phagocytosis by activating some mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt and Janus kinase (JAK)-STAT pathways. These results obtained in human monocytes and macrophages have to be considered for a better exploitation of the IL-21/IL-21R system for therapeutic purposes. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  5. Functional heterogeneity of colony-stimulating factor-induced human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Kiyoko S

    2002-07-01

    Macrophages have various functions and play a critical role in host defense and the maintenance of homeostasis. However, macrophages are heterogeneous and exhibit a wide range of phenotypes with regard to their morphology, cell surface antigen expression, and function. When blood monocytes are cultured in medium alone in vitro, monocytes die, and colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) such as macrophage (M)-CSF or granulocyte-macrophage (GM)-CSF are necessary for their survival and differentiation into macrophages. However, M-CSF-induced monocyte-derived macrophages (M-Mphi) and GM-CSF-induced monocyte-derived macrophages (GM-Mphi) are distinct in their morphology, cell surface antigen expression, and functions, including Fcgamma receptor mediated-phagocytosis, H2O2 production, H2O2 sensitivity, catalase activity, susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and suppressor activity. The characteristics of GM-Mphi resemble those of human alveolar macrophages.

  6. Augmented TLR2 expression on monocytes in both human Kawasaki disease and a mouse model of coronary arteritis.

    PubMed

    Lin, I-Chun; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Lin, Ying-Jui; Wang, Feng-Shen; Wang, Lin; Huang, Shun-Chen; Chien, Shao-Ju; Huang, Chien-Fu; Wang, Chih-Lu; Yu, Hong-Ren; Chen, Rong-Fu; Yang, Kuender D

    2012-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) of unknown immunopathogenesis is an acute febrile systemic vasculitis and the leading cause of acquired heart diseases in childhood. To search for a better strategy for the prevention and treatment of KD, this study compared and validated human KD immunopathogenesis in a mouse model of Lactobacillus casei cell wall extract (LCWE)-induced coronary arteritis. Recruited subjects fulfilled the criteria of KD and were admitted for intravenous gamma globulin (IVIG) treatment at the Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital from 2001 to 2009. Blood samples from KD patients were collected before and after IVIG treatment, and cardiovascular abnormalities were examined by transthoracic echocardiography. Wild-type male BALB/c mice (4-week-old) were intraperitoneally injected with LCWE (1 mg/mL) to induce coronary arteritis. The induced immune response in mice was examined on days 1, 3, 7, and 14 post injections, and histopathology studies were performed on days 7 and 14. Both human KD patients and LCWE-treated mice developed coronary arteritis, myocarditis, valvulitis, and pericarditis, as well as elevated plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in acute phase. Most of these proinflammatory cytokines declined to normal levels in mice, whereas normal levels were achieved in patients only after IVIG treatment, with a few exceptions. Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, but not TLR4 surface enhancement on circulating CD14+ monocytes, was augmented in KD patients before IVIG treatment and in LCWE-treated mice, which declined in patients after IVIG treatment. This result suggests that that not only TLR2 augmentation on CD14+ monocytes might be an inflammatory marker for both human KD patients and LCWE-induced CAL mouse model but also this model is feasible for studying therapeutic strategies of coronary arteritis in human KD by modulating TLR2-mediated immune activation on CD14

  7. Augmented TLR2 Expression on Monocytes in both Human Kawasaki Disease and a Mouse Model of Coronary Arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, I-Chun; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Lin, Ying-Jui; Wang, Feng-Shen; Wang, Lin; Huang, Shun-Chen; Chien, Shao-Ju; Huang, Chien-Fu; Wang, Chih-Lu; Yu, Hong-Ren; Chen, Rong-Fu; Yang, Kuender D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Kawasaki disease (KD) of unknown immunopathogenesis is an acute febrile systemic vasculitis and the leading cause of acquired heart diseases in childhood. To search for a better strategy for the prevention and treatment of KD, this study compared and validated human KD immunopathogenesis in a mouse model of Lactobacillus casei cell wall extract (LCWE)-induced coronary arteritis. Methods Recruited subjects fulfilled the criteria of KD and were admitted for intravenous gamma globulin (IVIG) treatment at the Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital from 2001 to 2009. Blood samples from KD patients were collected before and after IVIG treatment, and cardiovascular abnormalities were examined by transthoracic echocardiography. Wild-type male BALB/c mice (4-week-old) were intraperitoneally injected with LCWE (1 mg/mL) to induce coronary arteritis. The induced immune response in mice was examined on days 1, 3, 7, and 14 post injections, and histopathology studies were performed on days 7 and 14. Results Both human KD patients and LCWE-treated mice developed coronary arteritis, myocarditis, valvulitis, and pericarditis, as well as elevated plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in acute phase. Most of these proinflammatory cytokines declined to normal levels in mice, whereas normal levels were achieved in patients only after IVIG treatment, with a few exceptions. Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, but not TLR4 surface enhancement on circulating CD14+ monocytes, was augmented in KD patients before IVIG treatment and in LCWE-treated mice, which declined in patients after IVIG treatment. Conclusion This result suggests that that not only TLR2 augmentation on CD14+ monocytes might be an inflammatory marker for both human KD patients and LCWE-induced CAL mouse model but also this model is feasible for studying therapeutic strategies of coronary arteritis in human KD by modulating TLR2

  8. Endotoxin triggers tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-dependent cytotoxicity from interferon-. gamma. (IFN-. gamma. ) primed and unprimed human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kornbluth, R.S.; Edgington, T.S.

    1986-03-05

    Under endotoxin-free conditions, the authors have found that human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) lack spontaneous monocyte-mediated cytotoxicity against actinomycin D-treated WEHI 164 target cells in a 6 hr /sup 51/Cr release assay. However, small amounts of endotoxin (e.g., LPS) rapidly induce monocyte-mediated cytotoxicity. IFN-..gamma.. alone is incapable of inducing monocyte cytotoxicity. Instead, pretreatment of PBM with IFN-..gamma.. for 36 hr or more primes them for triggering by amounts of endotoxin that are almost 100-fold less than that required for unprimed cells. These conditions are analogous to the two step activation sequence described for mice where IFN-..gamma.. primes and LPS triggers macrophage cytotoxic capacity. Additionally, the authors have observed that neutralizing anti-TNF monoclonal antibody abolishes the cytotoxicity measured here; and rTNF is directly cytotoxic to the target cells used in this assay. Thus, TNF is both necessary and sufficient for the monocyte mediated cytotoxicity. Since IFN-..gamma.. is thought to be produced during a variety of immunological reactions, these findings may help to explain the augmented capacity of immunologically stimulated animals for LPS-triggered TNF production and their enhanced sensitivity to the lethal effects of endotoxin.

  9. Pathobiology of HIV in the Human Monocyte-Macrophage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-10

    found to augment myelopoiesis in vitro and protect monocyte-macrophage from toxic effects of Zidovudine and ganciclovir. Kit ligand/stem cell factor had...cytotoxicity of important agents such as Zidovudine and ganciclovir in the treatment of HIV disease and its complicating opportunistic infections. We also

  10. Immunomodulatory Drugs Regulate HMGB1 Release from Activated Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schierbeck, Hanna; Wähämaa, Heidi; Andersson, Ulf; Harris, Helena Erlandsson

    2010-01-01

    Several HMGB1-specific antagonists have provided beneficial results in multiple models of inflammatory disease–preclinical trials including arthritis. Since no HMGB1-specific targeted therapy has yet reached the clinic, we have performed in vitro studies to investigate whether any of a selection of well-established antirheumatic drugs inhibit HMGB1 release as part of its mode of action. Freshly purified peripheral blood monocytes from healthy donors were stimulated in cultures with LPS and IFNγ to cause HMGB1 and TNF release detected in ELISPOT assays. Effects on the secretion were assessed in cultures supplemented with dexamethasone, cortisone, chloroquine, gold sodium thiomalate, methotrexate, colchicine, etanercept or anakinra. Pharmacologically relevant doses of dexamethasone, gold sodium thiomalate and chloroquine inhibited the extracellular release of HMGB1 in a dose-dependent mode. Immunostaining demonstrated that dexamethasone caused intracellular HMGB1 retention. No effects on HMGB1 secretion were observed in cultures with activated monocytes by any of the other studied agents. TNF production in LPS/IFNγ-activated monocytes was readily downregulated by dexamethasone and, to some extent, by chloroquine and etanercept. We conclude that dexamethasone, gold sodium thiomalate and chloroquine share a capacity to inhibit HMGB1 release from activated monocytes. PMID:20386869

  11. ACTIVATED NEUTROPHILS INHIBIT PHAGOCYTOSIS BY HUMAN MONOCYTE CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously reported the correlation of decreased phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan by sputum monocytic cells with the increase in sputum neutrophils in volunteers 6h after inhalation of endotoxin (20,000 EU) (Alexis, et al. JACI, 2003;112:353). To define whether an intrin...

  12. ACTIVATED NEUTROPHILS INHIBIT PHAGOCYTOSIS BY HUMAN MONOCYTE CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously reported the correlation of decreased phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan by sputum monocytic cells with the increase in sputum neutrophils in volunteers 6h after inhalation of endotoxin (20,000 EU) (Alexis, et al. JACI, 2003;112:353). To define whether an intrin...

  13. FSH-Receptor Isoforms and FSH-dependent Gene Transcription in Human Monocytes and Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Lisa J; Tourkova, Irina; Wang, Yujuan; Sharrow, Allison C; Landau, Michael S; Yaroslavskiy, Beatrice B; Li, Sun; Zaidi, Mone; Blair, Harry C

    2010-01-01

    Cells of the monocyte series respond to follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) by poorly characterized mechanisms. We studied FSH-receptors (FSH-R) and FSH response in nontransformed human monocytes and in osteoclasts differentiated from these cells. Western blot and PCR confirmed FSH-R expression on monocytes or osteoclasts, although at low levels relative to ovarian controls. Monocyte and osteoclast FSH-Rs differed from FSH-R from ovarian cells, reflecting variable splicing in exons 8–10. Monocytes produced no cAMP, the major signal in ovarian cells, in response to FSH. However, monocytes or osteoclasts transcribed TNFα in response to the FSH. No relation of expression of osteoclast FSH-R to the sex of cell donors or to exposure to sex hormones was apparent. Controls for FSH purity and endotoxin contamination were negative. Unamplified cRNA screening in adherent CD14 cells after 2 hours in 25 ng/ml FSH showed increased transcription of RANKL signalling proteins. Transcription of key proteins that stimulate bone turnover, TNFα and TSG-6, increased 2–3 fold after FSH treatment. Smaller but significant changes occurred in transcripts of selected signalling, adhesion, and cytoskeletal proteins. We conclude that monocyte and osteoclast FSH response diverges from that of ovarian cells, reflecting, at least in part, varying FSH-R isoforms. PMID:20171950

  14. Ultrastructural studies on dengue virus type 2 infection of cultured human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Jesus A; Hernandez, Juan Pablo; Valero, Nereida; Espina, Luz Marina; Añez, German J

    2005-03-31

    Early interaction of dengue virus and monocyte/macrophages could be an important feature for virus dissemination after its initial entry via the mosquito vector. Since ultrastructural analysis of this interaction has not been reported, dengue type 2 (DEN2) virus-infected human monocyte cultures were studied at 1, 2, 4 and 6 hours after infection. Typical dengue particles and fuzzy coated viral particles were 35 to 42 nm and 74 to 85 nm respectively. Viruses were engulfed by phagocytosis and macropicnocytosis leading to huge vacuoles and phagosomes inside the monocytes. Interaction of monocytes with DEN2 virus induced apoptosis, characterized by nuclear condensation and fragmentation, cellular shrinkage, blebbing and budding phenomena and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by neighboring monocytes. This finding was confirmed by TUNEL. Ultrastructural features associated to DEN2 virus replication were not observed. These data suggest that clearance of the virus by monocytes and cellular death are the main features during the initial interaction of DEN2 virus and monocytes and this could be important in the rapid elimination of the virus after infection by mosquito vector.

  15. Ultrastructural studies on dengue virus type 2 infection of cultured human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mosquera, Jesus A; Hernandez, Juan Pablo; Valero, Nereida; Espina, Luz Marina; Añez, German J

    2005-01-01

    Background Early interaction of dengue virus and monocyte/macrophages could be an important feature for virus dissemination after its initial entry via the mosquito vector. Since ultrastructural analysis of this interaction has not been reported, dengue type 2 (DEN2) virus-infected human monocyte cultures were studied at 1, 2, 4 and 6 hours after infection. Results Typical dengue particles and fuzzy coated viral particles were 35 to 42 nm and 74 to 85 nm respectively. Viruses were engulfed by phagocytosis and macropicnocytosis leading to huge vacuoles and phagosomes inside the monocytes. Interaction of monocytes with DEN2 virus induced apoptosis, characterized by nuclear condensation and fragmentation, cellular shrinkage, blebbing and budding phenomena and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by neighboring monocytes. This finding was confirmed by TUNEL. Ultrastructural features associated to DEN2 virus replication were not observed. Conclusion These data suggest that clearance of the virus by monocytes and cellular death are the main features during the initial interaction of DEN2 virus and monocytes and this could be important in the rapid elimination of the virus after infection by mosquito vector. PMID:15801983

  16. Cellular requirements for the formation of EA rosettes by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Passwell, J H; Schneeberger, E; Merler, E

    1978-01-01

    The binding of sensitized red cells to Fc receptors in human monocytes was studied by evaluating the effects of various pharmacological reagents and other treatments on EA rosette formation. Cytochalasin B and 2-deoxyglucose inhibited rosette formation in a dose-dependent manner. Sodium azide and incubation at 4 degrees also inhibited rosette formation, while at 37 degrees increased numbers of RBCs bound to the monocytes. The microtubular poisons, vinblastine and colchicine at high concentrations resulted in decreased adherence of monocytes and inhibition of rosette formation, while at low concentrations of colchicine, enhanced rosette formation was sometimes observed. Contrary to the effects on rosette formation, binding of [125I] IgG to monocyte monolayers was not altered by treatment of the monocytes with drugs. Magnesium ions were required to promote monocyte adherence, but both magnesium and calcium were needed for the best rosette formation. We conclude that the formation of EA rosettes is dependent not merely on binding of IgG to the Fc receptor but requires metabolically active monocytes, an intact cytostructure and suitable environmental conditions (temperature and cation concentration). Images Figure 3 PMID:738764

  17. Expression of the cytochrome P450 epoxygenase CYP2J2 in human monocytic leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Kaeko; Nitto, Takeaki; Inoue, Teruo; Node, Koichi

    2008-08-29

    CYP2J2 is one of the cytochrome P450 epoxygenases involved in the metabolism of arachidonic acid. CYP2J2 has been identified in several tissues, especially cardiovascular tissues. CYP2J2 has cardiovascular effects, as epoxyeicosatrienoic acid, one of its metabolites, has anti-inflammatory and vasodilative activities. We investigated the expression of CYP2J2 in human leukocytes using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting and immunostaining. Human monocytic cells, but not human neutrophils, exhibited constitutive expression of CYP2J2. Furthermore, the expression of CYP2J2 mRNA increased when the human monocytic cell line THP-1 cells and human monocytes were stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and macrophage-colony stimulating factor in combination with granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor, respectively. These results suggest that expression of CYP2J2 was up-regulated when human monocytes differentiated into macrophages and that human monocytic cells and macrophages have a pathway to metabolize arachidonic acid using CYP epoxygenases.

  18. Interaction studies reveal specific recognition of an anti-inflammatory polyphosphorhydrazone dendrimer by human monocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledall, Jérémy; Fruchon, Séverine; Garzoni, Matteo; Pavan, Giovanni M.; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Turrin, Cédric-Olivier; Blanzat, Muriel; Poupot, Rémy

    2015-10-01

    Dendrimers are nano-materials with perfectly defined structure and size, and multivalency properties that confer substantial advantages for biomedical applications. Previous work has shown that phosphorus-based polyphosphorhydrazone (PPH) dendrimers capped with azabisphosphonate (ABP) end groups have immuno-modulatory and anti-inflammatory properties leading to efficient therapeutic control of inflammatory diseases in animal models. These properties are mainly prompted through activation of monocytes. Here, we disclose new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory activation of human monocytes by ABP-capped PPH dendrimers. Following an interdisciplinary approach, we have characterized the physicochemical and biological behavior of the lead ABP dendrimer with model and cell membranes, and compared this experimental set of data to predictive computational modelling studies. The behavior of the ABP dendrimer was compared to the one of an isosteric analog dendrimer capped with twelve azabiscarboxylate (ABC) end groups instead of twelve ABP end groups. The ABC dendrimer displayed no biological activity on human monocytes, therefore it was considered as a negative control. In detail, we show that the ABP dendrimer can bind both non-specifically and specifically to the membrane of human monocytes. The specific binding leads to the internalization of the ABP dendrimer by human monocytes. On the contrary, the ABC dendrimer only interacts non-specifically with human monocytes and is not internalized. These data indicate that the bioactive ABP dendrimer is recognized by specific receptor(s) at the surface of human monocytes.Dendrimers are nano-materials with perfectly defined structure and size, and multivalency properties that confer substantial advantages for biomedical applications. Previous work has shown that phosphorus-based polyphosphorhydrazone (PPH) dendrimers capped with azabisphosphonate (ABP) end groups have immuno-modulatory and anti

  19. Human monocytes respond to extracellular cAMP through A2A and A2B adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sciaraffia, Ester; Riccomi, Antonella; Lindstedt, Ragnar; Gesa, Valentina; Cirelli, Elisa; Patrizio, Mario; De Magistris, Maria Teresa; Vendetti, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we test the hypothesis that cAMP, acting as an extracellular mediator, affects the physiology and function of human myeloid cells. The cAMP is a second messenger recognized as a universal regulator of several cellular functions in different organisms. Many studies have shown that extracellular cAMP exerts regulatory functions, acting as first mediator in multiple tissues. However, the impact of extracellular cAMP on cells of the immune system has not been fully investigated. We found that human monocytes exposed to extracellular cAMP exhibit higher expression of CD14 and lower amount of MHC class I and class II molecules. When cAMP-treated monocytes are exposed to proinflammatory stimuli, they exhibit an increased production of IL-6 and IL-10 and a lower amount of TNF-α and IL-12 compared with control cells, resembling the features of the alternative-activated macrophages or M2 macrophages. In addition, we show that extracellular cAMP affects monocyte differentiation into DCs, promoting the induction of cells displaying an activated, macrophage-like phenotype with reduced capacity of polarized, naive CD4+ T cells into IFN-γ-producing lymphocytes compared with control cells. The effects of extracellular cAMP on monocytes are mediated by CD73 ecto-5′-nucleotidase and A2A and A2B adenosine receptors, as selective antagonists could reverse its effects. Of note, the expression of CD73 molecules has been found on the membrane of a small population of CD14+CD16+ monocytes. These findings suggest that an extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway is active in cells of the immune systems. PMID:24652540

  20. Epstein-Barr virus infection-induced inflammasome activation in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Torii, Yuka; Murata, Takayuki; Yoshiyama, Hironori; Kimura, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoshinori

    2017-01-01

    Inflammasomes are cytoplasmic sensors that regulate the activity of caspase-1 and the secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or interleukin-18 (IL-18) in response to foreign molecules, including viral pathogens. They are considered to be an important link between the innate and adaptive immune responses. However, the mechanism by which inflammasome activation occurs during primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection remains unknown. Human B lymphocytes and epithelial cells are major targets of EBV, although it can also infect a variety of other cell types. In this study, we found that EBV could infect primary human monocytes and the monocyte cell line, THP-1, inducing inflammasome activation. We incubated cell-free EBV with THP-1 cells or primary human monocytes, then confirmed EBV infection using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Lytic and latent EBV genes were detected by real-time RT-PCR in EBV-infected monocytes. EBV infection of THP-1 cells and primary human monocytes induced caspase-dependent IL-1β production, while EBV infection of B-cell or T-cell lines did not induce IL-1β production. To identify the sensor molecule responsible for inflammasome activation during EBV infection, we examined the mRNA and the protein levels of NLR family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3), absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2), and interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16). Increased AIM2 levels were observed in EBV-infected THP-1 cells and primary human monocytes, whereas levels of IFI16 and NLRP3 did not show remarkable change. Furthermore, knockdown of AIM2 by small interfering RNA attenuated caspase-1 activation. Taken together, our results suggest that EBV infection of human monocytes induces caspase-1-dependent IL-1β production, and that AIM2, acting as an inflammasome, is involved in this response. PMID:28369146

  1. PARK2 Mediates Interleukin 6 and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1 Production by Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    de Léséleuc, Louis; Girard, Manon; Huong, Nguyen Thu; Ba, Nguyen Ngoc; Van Thuc, Nguyen; Truman, Richard; Spencer, John S.; Adams, Linda; Thai, Vu Hong; Alcais, Alexandre; Schurr, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy is a persistent infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that still affects over 200,000 new patients annually. The host genetic background is an important risk factor for leprosy susceptibility and the PARK2 gene is a replicated leprosy susceptibility candidate gene. The protein product of PARK2, Parkin, is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is involved in the development of various forms of Parkinsonism. The human macrophage is both a natural host cell of M. leprae as well as a primary mediator of natural immune defenses, in part by secreting important pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Here, we report that down-regulation of Parkin in THP-1 macrophages, human monocyte-derived macrophages and human Schwann cells resulted in a consistent and specific decrease in interleukin-6 (IL-6) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1/CCL2) production in response to mycobacteria or LPS. Interestingly, production of IL-6 at 6 hours by THP-1 cells stimulated with live M. leprae and M. bovis BCG was dependent on pretreatment with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD). Parkin knockdown in VD-treated cells blocked IL-6 induction by mycobacteria. However, IκB-α phosphorylation and levels of IκB-ξ, a nuclear protein required for IL-6 expression, were not affected by Parkin silencing. Phosphorylation of MAPK ERK1/2 and p38 was unaffected by Parkin silencing while JNK activation was promoted but did not explain the altered cytokine production. In a final set of experiments we found that genetic risk factors of leprosy located in the PARK2 promoter region were significantly correlated with M. leprae sonicate triggered CCL2 and IL6 transcript levels in whole blood assays. These results associated genetically controlled changes in the production of MCP-1/CCL2 and IL-6 with known leprosy susceptibility factors. PMID:23350010

  2. Functional heterogeneity of colony-stimulating factor-induced human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Kiyoko S; Komuro, Iwao; Kanazawa, Hiroko; Yamazaki, Toshio; Mochida, Keiko; Kishi, Fumio

    2006-01-01

    Macrophages (Mphis) have various functions and play a critical role in host defense and the maintenance of homeostasis. Mphis exist in every tissue in the body, but Mphis from different tissues exhibit a wide range of phenotypes with regard to their morphology, cell surface antigen expression and function, and are called by different names. However, the precise mechanism of the generation of macrophage heterogeneity is not known. In the present study, the authors examined the functional heterogeneity of Mphis generated from human monocytes under the influence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage-CSF (M-CSF). CD14 positive human monocytes (Mos) were incubated with M-CSF and GM-CSF for 6-7 days to stimulate the generation of M-CSF-induced monocyte-derived Mphis (M-Mphis) and GM-CSF-induced monocyte-derived Mphis (GM-Mphis), respectively. The expression of cell surface antigens and several functions such as antigen presenting cell activity, susceptibility to oxidant stress, and the susceptibility to HIV-1 and mycobacterium tuberculosis infection were examined. GM-Mphis and M-Mphis are distinct in their morphology, cell surface antigen expression, and functions examined. The phenotype of GM-Mphis closely resembles that of human Alveolar-Mphis (A-Mphis), indicating that CSF-induced human monocyte-derived Mphis are useful to clarify the molecular mechanism of heterogeneity of human Mphis, and GM-Mphis will become a model of human A-Mphis.

  3. KR-31543 reduces the production of proinflammatory molecules in human endothelial cells and monocytes and attenuates atherosclerosis in mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Hoon; Yoo, Ji-Young; Kim, Sun-Ok; Yoo, Sung-Eun

    2012-01-01

    KR-31543, (2S, 3R, 4S)-6-amino-4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N-(2-methyl-2H-tetrazol-5-ylmethyl) amino]-3,4-dihydro-2-dimethyoxymethyl-3-hydroxy-2-methyl-2H-1-benz opyran is a new neuroprotective agent for ischemia-reperfusion damage. It has also been reported that KR-31543 has protective effects on lipid peroxidation and H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species production. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties of KR-31543. We observed that KR-31543 treatment reduced the production of MCP-1, IL-8, and VCAM-1 in HUVECs, and of MCP-1 and IL-6 in THP-1 human monocytes. We also examined the effect of KR-31543 on monocytes migration in vitro. KR-31543 treatment effectively reduced the migration of THP-1 human monocytes to the HUVEC monolayer in a dose-dependent manner. We next examined the effects of this compound on atherogenesis in LDL receptor deficient (Ldlr-/-) mice. After 10 weeks of western diet, the formation of atherosclerotic lesion in aorta was reduced in the KR-31543-treated group compared to the control group. The accumulation of macrophages in lesion was also reduced in KR-31543 treated group. However, the plasma levels of total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglyceride were not affected by KR-31543 treatment. Taken together, these results show that KR-31543 has anti-inflammatory properties on human monocytes and endothelial cells, and inhibits fatty streak lesion formation in mouse model of atherosclerosis, suggesting the potential of KR-31543 for the treatment for atherosclerosis. PMID:23143639

  4. KR-31543 reduces the production of proinflammatory molecules in human endothelial cells and monocytes and attenuates atherosclerosis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hoon; Yoo, Ji-Young; Kim, Sun-Ok; Yoo, Sung-Eun; Oh, Goo Taeg

    2012-12-31

    KR-31543, (2S, 3R, 4S)-6-amino-4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl)- N-(2-methyl-2H-tetrazol-5-ylmethyl) amino]-3,4-dihydro- 2-dimethyoxymethyl-3-hydroxy-2-methyl-2H-1-benz opyran is a new neuroprotective agent for ischemiareperfusion damage. It has also been reported that KR-31543 has protective effects on lipid peroxidation and H₂O₂-induced reactive oxygen species production. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties of KR-31543. We observed that KR-31543 treatment reduced the production of MCP-1, IL-8, and VCAM-1 in HUVECs, and of MCP-1 and IL-6 in THP-1 human monocytes. We also examined the effect of KR-31543 on monocytes migration in vitro. KR-31543 treatment effectively reduced the migration of THP-1 human monocytes to the HUVEC monolayer in a dose-dependent manner. We next examined the effects of this compound on atherogenesis in LDL receptor deficient (Ldlr ⁻/⁻) mice. After 10 weeks of western diet, the formation of atherosclerotic lesion in aorta was reduced in the KR-31543-treated group compared to the control group. The accumulation of macrophages in lesion was also reduced in KR-31543 treated group. However, the plasma levels of total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglyceride were not affected by KR-31543 treatment. Taken together, these results show that KR-31543 has anti-inflammatory properties on human monocytes and endothelial cells, and inhibits fatty streak lesion formation in mouse model of atherosclerosis, suggesting the potential of KR-31543 for the treatment for atherosclerosis.

  5. Viral infection triggers rapid differentiation of human blood monocytes into dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wanqiu; Gibbs, James S; Lu, Xiuju; Brooke, Christopher B; Roy, Devika; Modlin, Robert L; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W

    2012-03-29

    Surprisingly little is known about the interaction of human blood mononuclear cells with viruses. Here, we show that monocytes are the predominant cell type infected when peripheral blood mononuclear cells are exposed to viruses ex vivo. Remarkably, infection with vesicular stomatitis virus, vaccinia virus, and a variety of influenza A viruses (including circulating swine-origin virus) induces monocytes to differentiate within 18 hours into CD16(-)CD83(+) mature dendritic cells with enhanced capacity to activate T cells. Differentiation into dendritic cells does not require cell division and occurs despite the synthesis of viral proteins, which demonstrates that monocytes counteract the capacity of these highly lytic viruses to hijack host cell biosynthetic capacity. Indeed, differentiation requires infectious virus and viral protein synthesis. These findings demonstrate that monocytes are uniquely susceptible to viral infection among blood mononuclear cells, with the likely purpose of generating cells with enhanced capacity to activate innate and acquired antiviral immunity.

  6. CD16 is indispensable for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Yeap, Wei Hseun; Wong, Kok Loon; Shimasaki, Noriko; Teo, Esmeralda Chi Yuan; Quek, Jeffrey Kim Siang; Yong, Hao Xiang; Diong, Colin Phipps; Bertoletti, Antonio; Linn, Yeh Ching; Wong, Siew Cheng

    2016-09-27

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is exerted by immune cells expressing surface Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) against cells coated with antibody, such as virus-infected or transformed cells. CD16, the FcγRIIIA, is essential for ADCC by NK cells, and is also expressed by a subset of human blood monocytes. We found that human CD16- expressing monocytes have a broad spectrum of ADCC capacities and can kill cancer cell lines, primary leukemic cells and hepatitis B virus-infected cells in the presence of specific antibodies. Engagement of CD16 on monocytes by antibody bound to target cells activated β2-integrins and induced TNFα secretion. In turn, this induced TNFR expression on the target cells, making them susceptible to TNFα-mediated cell death. Treatment with TLR agonists, DAMPs or cytokines, such as IFNγ, further enhanced ADCC. Monocytes lacking CD16 did not exert ADCC but acquired this property after CD16 expression was induced by either cytokine stimulation or transient transfection. Notably, CD16+ monocytes from patients with leukemia also exerted potent ADCC. Hence, CD16+ monocytes are important effectors of ADCC, suggesting further developments of this property in the context of cellular therapies for cancer and infectious diseases.

  7. Technical Advance: Liposomal alendronate depletes monocytes and macrophages in the nonhuman primate model of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Burwitz, Benjamin J.; Reed, Jason S.; Hammond, Katherine B.; Ohme, Merete A.; Planer, Shannon L.; Legasse, Alfred W.; Ericsen, Adam J.; Richter, Yoram; Golomb, Gershon; Sacha, Jonah B.

    2014-01-01

    Nonhuman primates are critical animal models for the study of human disorders and disease and offer a platform to assess the role of immune cells in pathogenesis via depletion of specific cellular subsets. However, this model is currently hindered by the lack of reagents that safely and specifically ablate myeloid cells of the monocyte/macrophage Lin. Given the central importance of macrophages in homeostasis and host immunity, development of a macrophage-depletion technique in nonhuman primates would open new avenues of research. Here, using LA at i.v. doses as low as 0.1 mg/kg, we show a >50% transient depletion of circulating monocytes and tissue-resident macrophages in RMs by an 11-color flow cytometric analysis. Diminution of monocytes was followed rapidly by emigration of monocytes from the bone marrow, leading to a rebound of monocytes to baseline levels. Importantly, LA was well-tolerated, as no adverse effects or changes in gross organ function were observed during depletion. These results advance the ex vivo study of myeloid cells by flow cytometry and pave the way for in vivo studies of monocyte/macrophage biology in nonhuman primate models of human disease. PMID:24823811

  8. In Vitro Brucella suis Infection Prevents the Programmed Cell Death of Human Monocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Antoine; Terraza, Annie; Ouahrani-Bettache, Safia; Liautard, Jean-Pierre; Dornand, Jacques

    2000-01-01

    During the complex interaction between an infectious agent and a host organism, the pathogen can interfere with the host cell's programmed death to its own benefit. Induction or prevention of host cell apoptosis appears to be a critical step for determining the infection outcome. Members of the gram-negative bacterial genus Brucella are intracellular pathogens which preferentially invade monocytic cells and develop within these cells. We investigated the effect of Brucella suis infection on apoptosis of human monocytic phagocytes. The present study provides evidence that Brucella infection inhibited spontaneously occurring apoptosis in human monocytes. Prevention of monocyte apoptosis was not mediated by Brucella lipopolysaccharide and required bacterial survival within infected cells. Both invaded and noninvaded cells were protected, indicating that soluble mediators released during infection were involved in the phenomenon. Analysis of Brucella-infected monocytes revealed specific overexpression of the A1 gene, a member of the bcl-2 family implicated in the survival of hematopoietic cells. Brucella infection also rendered macrophage-like cells resistant to Fas ligand- or gamma interferon-induced apoptosis, suggesting that Brucella infection protected host cells from several cytotoxic processes occurring at different steps of the immune response. The present data clearly show that Brucella suis modulated the monocyte/macrophage's apoptotic response to the advantage of the pathogen, thus preventing host cell elimination. This might represent a strategy for Brucella development in infected hosts. PMID:10603407

  9. CD16 is indispensable for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yeap, Wei Hseun; Wong, Kok Loon; Shimasaki, Noriko; Teo, Esmeralda Chi Yuan; Quek, Jeffrey Kim Siang; Yong, Hao Xiang; Diong, Colin Phipps; Bertoletti, Antonio; Linn, Yeh Ching; Wong, Siew Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is exerted by immune cells expressing surface Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) against cells coated with antibody, such as virus-infected or transformed cells. CD16, the FcγRIIIA, is essential for ADCC by NK cells, and is also expressed by a subset of human blood monocytes. We found that human CD16− expressing monocytes have a broad spectrum of ADCC capacities and can kill cancer cell lines, primary leukemic cells and hepatitis B virus-infected cells in the presence of specific antibodies. Engagement of CD16 on monocytes by antibody bound to target cells activated β2-integrins and induced TNFα secretion. In turn, this induced TNFR expression on the target cells, making them susceptible to TNFα-mediated cell death. Treatment with TLR agonists, DAMPs or cytokines, such as IFNγ, further enhanced ADCC. Monocytes lacking CD16 did not exert ADCC but acquired this property after CD16 expression was induced by either cytokine stimulation or transient transfection. Notably, CD16+ monocytes from patients with leukemia also exerted potent ADCC. Hence, CD16+ monocytes are important effectors of ADCC, suggesting further developments of this property in the context of cellular therapies for cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:27670158

  10. Pathobiology of HIV in the Human Monocyte-Macrophage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-03

    macrophages using the adenoassociated virus vector system for purposes of introducing anti-H:V gene . IA. ISency ERM IS. NU•MB, OF PAGES HIV, Monocytes...receptors as well as strategies to deliver genes capable of inhibiting HIV using newly developed vectors. The methodology for the work performed was...transcriptional regulation of HIV as well as characterization of functional genes . The development of antisense constructs within the adenoassociated virus vectors

  11. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 is a receptor for human resistin and mediates inflammatory actions of human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sahmin; Lee, Hyun-Chae; Kwon, Yoo-Wook; Lee, Sang Eun; Cho, Youngjin; Kim, Joonoh; Lee, Soobeom; Kim, Ju-Young; Lee, Jaewon; Yang, Han-Mo; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Nam, Ky-Youb; Chung, Junho; Lazar, Mitchell A; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2014-03-04

    Human resistin is a cytokine that induces low-grade inflammation by stimulating monocytes. Resistin-mediated chronic inflammation can lead to obesity, atherosclerosis, and other cardiometabolic diseases. Nevertheless, the receptor for human resistin has not been clarified. Here, we identified adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) as a functional receptor for human resistin and clarified its intracellular signaling pathway to modulate inflammatory action of monocytes. We found that human resistin directly binds to CAP1 in monocytes and upregulates cyclic AMP (cAMP) concentration, protein kinase A (PKA) activity, and NF-κB-related transcription of inflammatory cytokines. Overexpression of CAP1 in monocytes enhanced the resistin-induced increased activity of the cAMP-dependent signaling. Moreover, CAP1-overexpressed monocytes aggravated adipose tissue inflammation in transgenic mice that express human resistin from their monocytes. In contrast, suppression of CAP1 expression abrogated the resistin-mediated inflammatory activity both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, CAP1 is the bona fide receptor for resistin leading to inflammation in humans.

  12. A new role for monocytes in modulating myometrial inflammation during human labor.

    PubMed

    Srikhajon, Khetsopon; Shynlova, Oksana; Preechapornprasert, Anyarin; Chanrachakul, Boonsri; Lye, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Here we fully characterize the cytokine profile of laboring human myometrium using Luminex analysis of 48 cytokine proteins, and stereologically quantified infiltration of monocytes and neutrophils into the myometrium. We hypothesized that monocytes can regulate their accumulation in the myometrium by disruption of proinflammatory cytokines to prevent an uncontrolled inflammatory response after labor onset. We isolated primary human myometrial cells (HMCs) from term, nonlaboring myometrial biopsies. Confluent HMCs were cocultured directly with human monocytic (THP-1) or lymphocytic (U937) cells, and with the same cells spatially separated by a membrane insert. After 72 h, HMCs and THP-1 were harvested separately, and RNA was extracted and analyzed by quantitative PCR. Coculture supernatants were collected and analyzed by Luminex assay and ELISA. We found that the laboring human myometrium produces significantly higher amounts of interleukin (IL) 6, IL9, IL18, IL1RA, CCL2, CCL7, CXCL8, CSF3, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, which coincides with the influx of immune cells. The direct contact or presence of THP-1 monocytes (but not U937 cells) significantly decreased CCL2 protein levels and increased IL1RA protein levels secreted by HMCs. This time-dependent decrease of CCL2 was greater with increasing number of monocytes being in direct contact with HMCs. We suggest a novel mechanism by which monocytes are first recruited to the myometrium by multiple cytokines and contribute to the physiologic inflammation of labor. After completing transmigration, activated monocytes disrupt locally established CCL2 gradients (possible by CCR2-mediated consumption) to limit their accumulation in the uterus. This mechanism may serve as a negative feedback loop to control the local inflammation and promote a return to homeostasis. © 2014 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  13. Cardiomyogenic potential of mesenchymal progenitors derived from human circulating CD14+ monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Hiroaki; Inoue, Takafumi; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Yasuoka, Hidekata; Kawakami, Yutaka; Ogawa, Satoshi; Ikeda, Yasuo; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Kuwana, Masataka

    2005-12-01

    Previously, we reported a unique CD14+CD45+CD34+type I collagen+ cell fraction derived from human circulating CD14+ monocytes, named monocyte-derived mesenchymal progenitors (MOMPs). These primitive cells differentiate along mesenchymal lineages, including bone, cartilage, fat, and skeletal muscle. Here, we demonstrate that CD14+ monocytes generate MOMPs that differentiate into cardiomyocytes. MOMPs labeled with a fluorescent marker and co-cultivated with rat cardiomyocytes for 4 weeks expressed the cardiomyocyte-specific transcription factors Nkx2.5, GATA-4, eHAND, and MEF2 and the hematopoietic/monocytic markers CD45 and CD14 within 10 days and retained their proliferative capacity for up to 16 days. A subpopulation of MOMPs subsequently expressed the cardiomyocyte-specific markers micro-sarcomeric actinin, troponin I, and atrial natriuretic peptide on day 21. Furthermore, fluorescence-labeled, spontaneously beating cells that formed gap junctions with adjacent rat cardiomyocytes appeared in these cultures and these cells exhibited electrophysiological properties typical of ventricular myocytes. The co-cultivation of human MOMPs with rat GFP-tagged cardiomyocytes resulted in the generation of human cardiomyocytes lacking green fluorescent protein (GFP) staining, suggesting that our observations could not solely be explained by cell fusion. Our results demonstrate for the first time that human circulating CD14+ monocytes include progenitors capable of proliferating and differentiating along the cardiomyogenic lineage via their differentiation into MOMPs.

  14. Lenalidomide increases human dendritic cell maturation in multiple myeloma patients targeting monocyte differentiation and modulating mesenchymal stromal cell inhibitory properties.

    PubMed

    Costa, Federica; Vescovini, Rosanna; Bolzoni, Marina; Marchica, Valentina; Storti, Paola; Toscani, Denise; Accardi, Fabrizio; Notarfranchi, Laura; Dalla Palma, Benedetta; Manferdini, Cristina; Manni, Sabrina; Todaro, Giannalisa; Lisignoli, Gina; Piazza, Francesco; Aversa, Franco; Giuliani, Nicola

    2017-08-08

    The use of Lenalidomide (LEN), to reverse tumor-mediated immune suppression and amplify multiple myeloma-specific immunity is currently being explored. Particularly, LEN effects on dendritic cells (DCs) are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the potential effect of LEN on DC differentiation and activity. DCs were differentiated either from CD14(+) cells obtained from patients with multiple myeloma or from a human monocytic cell line. LEN, at the concentration range reached in vivo, significantly increased the median intensity expression of HLA-DR, CD86 and CD209 by DCs derived from both bone marrow and peripheral myeloma monocytes and enhanced the production of Interleukin-8, C-C motif chemokine ligand (CCL) 2, CCL5 and tumor necrosis factor-α. Consistently, LEN pre-treated DCs showed an increased ability to stimulate autologous CD3(+) cell proliferation. LEN effect on dendritic differentiation was associated with the degradation of the Cereblon-related factors Ikaros and Aiolos. Moreover, we showed that LEN also blunted mesenchymal stromal cell inhibitory effect on dendritic differentiation, inhibiting Casein Kinase-1α levels. Finally, in vitro data were confirmed in ex vivo cultures obtained from relapsed myeloma patients treated with LEN, showing a significant increase of DC differentiation from peripheral blood monocytes. In conclusion, LEN increased the expression of mature dendritic markers both directly and indirectly and enhanced DC ability to stimulate T cell proliferation and to release chemokines. This suggests a new possible mechanism by which LEN could exert its anti-myeloma activity.

  15. PGE2 confers survivin-dependent apoptosis resistance in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Baratelli, Felicita; Krysan, Kostyantyn; Heuzé-Vourc'h, Nathalie; Zhu, Li; Escuadro, Brian; Sharma, Sherven; Reckamp, Karen; Dohadwala, Mariam; Dubinett, Steven M

    2005-08-01

    Control of apoptosis is fundamental for dendritic cell (DC) homeostasis. Numerous factors maintain DC viability throughout their lifespan, including inhibitor of apoptosis proteins. Among them, survivin is overexpressed in many human malignancies, but its physiological function in normal cells has not been fully delineated. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), also overproduced in several malignancies, has shown to induce proapoptotic and antiapoptotic effects in different cell types, including immune cells. In DC, PGE2 predominantly affects maturation and modulates immune functions. Here, we show that exposure of monocyte-derived DC to PGE2 (10(-5) M) for 72 h significantly increased DC survivin mRNA and protein expression. In contrast, DC, matured with lipopolysaccharide or tumor necrosis factor alpha, did not reveal survivin induction in response to PGE2. Following exposure to apoptotic stimuli, DC treated with PGE2 exhibited an overall increased viability compared with control DC, and this effect was correlated inversely with caspase-3 activation. Moreover, PGE2-treated, survivin-deficient DC demonstrated reduced viability in response to apoptotic stimuli. Further analysis indicated that PGE2 induced DC survivin expression in an E prostanoid (EP)2/EP4 receptor and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-dependent manner. These findings suggest that PGE2-dependent regulation of survivin is important in modulating apoptosis resistance in human DC.

  16. Caspase-8 inhibition represses initial human monocyte activation in septic shock model

    PubMed Central

    Oliva-Martin, Maria Jose; Sanchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Rodhe, Johanna; Carrillo-Jimenez, Alejandro; Vlachos, Pinelopi; Herrera, Antonio Jose; Garcia-Quintanilla, Albert; Caballero-Velazquez, Teresa; Perez-Simon, Jose Antonio; Joseph, Bertrand; Venero, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    In septic patients, the onset of septic shock occurs due to the over-activation of monocytes. We tested the therapeutic potential of directly targeting innate immune cell activation to limit the cytokine storm and downstream phases. We initially investigated whether caspase-8 could be an appropriate target given it has recently been shown to be involved in microglial activation. We found that LPS caused a mild increase in caspase-8 activity and that the caspase-8 inhibitor IETD-fmk partially decreased monocyte activation. Furthermore, caspase-8 inhibition induced necroptotic cell death of activated monocytes. Despite inducing necroptosis, caspase-8 inhibition reduced LPS-induced expression and release of IL-1β and IL-10. Thus, blocking monocyte activation has positive effects on both the pro and anti-inflammatory phases of septic shock. We also found that in primary mouse monocytes, caspase-8 inhibition did not reduce LPS-induced activation or induce necroptosis. On the other hand, broad caspase inhibitors, which have already been shown to improve survival in mouse models of sepsis, achieved both. Thus, given that monocyte activation can be regulated in humans via the inhibition of a single caspase, we propose that the therapeutic use of caspase-8 inhibitors could represent a more selective alternative that blocks both phases of septic shock at the source. PMID:27250033

  17. Leptin regulates CD16 expression on human monocytes in a sex‐specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Joseph G.; Sharma, Gyanendra; Sloan, Gloria; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Baker, R. Randall; Mazzoli, Andrew; Kraj, Barbara; Mulloy, Anthony; Cortez‐Cooper, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Fat mass is linked mechanistically to the cardiovascular system through leptin, a 16 kDa protein produced primarily by adipocytes. In addition to increasing blood pressure via hypothalamic‐sympathetic pathways, leptin stimulates monocyte migration, cytokine secretion, and other functions that contribute to atherosclerotic plaque development. These functions are also characteristics of CD16‐positive monocytes that have been implicated in the clinical progression of atherosclerosis. This investigation sought to determine if leptin promoted the development of such CD16‐positive monocytes. Cells from 45 healthy men and women with age ranging from 20 to 59 years were analyzed. Circulating numbers of CD14++16++ monocytes, which are primary producers of TNFα, were positively related to plasma leptin concentrations (P < 0.0001), with a stronger correlation in men (P < 0.05 for leptin × sex interaction). In vitro, recombinant human leptin induced CD16 expression in a dose‐related manner (P = 0.02), with a stronger influence on monocytes from men (P = 0.03 for leptin × sex interaction). There were no sex‐related differences in total leptin receptor expression on any monocyte subtypes, relative expression of long versus short isoforms of the receptor, or soluble leptin receptor concentrations in the plasma. The number of circulating CD14+16++ monocytes, which preferentially migrate into nascent plaques, was positively related to systolic blood pressure (R = 0.56, P = 0.0008) and intima‐media thickness (R = 0.37, P = 0.03), and negatively related to carotid compliance (R = −0.39, P = 0.02). These observations indicate that leptin promotes the development of CD16‐positive monocyte populations in a sex‐specific manner and that these subpopulations are associated with diminished vascular function. PMID:25303952

  18. Differential Activation of Human Monocytes and Lymphocytes by Distinct Strains of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Luísa M. D.; Viana, Agostinho; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia M. C.; Gollob, Kenneth J.; Dutra, Walderez O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi strains are currently classified into six discrete typing units (DTUs) named TcI to VI. It is known that these DTUs have different geographical distribution, as well as biological features. TcI and TcII are major DTUs found in patients from northern and southern Latin America, respectively. Our hypothesis is that upon infection of human peripheral blood cells, Y strain (Tc II) and Col cl1.7 (Tc I), cause distinct immunological changes, which might influence the clinical course of Chagas disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated the infectivity of CFSE-stained trypomastigotes of Col cl1.7 and Y strain in human monocytes for 15 and 72 hours, and determined the immunological profile of lymphocytes and monocytes exposed to the different isolates using multiparameter flow cytometry. Our results showed a similar percentage and intensity of monocyte infection by Y and Col cl1.7. We also observed an increased expression of CD80 and CD86 by monocytes infected with Col cl1.7, but not Y strain. IL-10 was significantly higher in monocytes infected with Col cl1.7, as compared to Y strain. Moreover, infection with Col cl1.7, but not Y strain, led to an increased expression of IL-17 by CD8+ T cells. On the other hand, we observed a positive correlation between the expression of TNF-alpha and granzyme A only after infection with Y strain. Conclusion/Significance Our study shows that while Col cl1.7 induces higher monocyte activation and, at the same time, production of IL-10, infection with Y strain leads to a lower monocyte activation but higher inflammatory profile. These results show that TcI and TcII have a distinct immunological impact on human cells during early infection, which might influence disease progression. PMID:26147698

  19. Surface layer proteins from Clostridium difficile induce inflammatory and regulatory cytokines in human monocytes and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ausiello, Clara Maria; Cerquetti, Marina; Fedele, Giorgio; Spensieri, Fabiana; Palazzo, Raffaella; Nasso, Maria; Frezza, Simona; Mastrantonio, Paola

    2006-09-01

    Clostridium difficile, an etiological agent of most cases of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, exerts its pathological action mainly by the activity of toxin A and toxin B. Less known is the role that S-layer proteins (SLPs), predominant surface components of the bacterium, may play in pathogenesis. Here, we evaluate the ability of SLPs to modulate the function of human monocytes and dendritic cells (DC) and to induce inflammatory and regulatory cytokines, influencing the natural and adaptive immune response. To this aim, SLPs were extracted from the clinical isolate C253 and characterized for their effects on immune cells. SLPs induced the release of elevated amounts of interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-6 pro-inflammatory cytokines by resting monocytes, induced maturation of human monocyte-derived DC (MDDC), and enhanced proliferation of allogeneic T cells. C253-SLP-treated MDDC also secreted large amounts of IL-10 and IL-12p70 and induced a mixed Th1/Th2 orientation of immune response in naïve CD4 T cells. In conclusion, C. difficile SLPs may contribute to the pathogenicity of the bacterium by perturbing the fine balance of inflammatory and regulatory cytokines. These data are of interest also in the light of the possible use of SLPs in a multicomponent vaccine against C. difficile infections for high-risk patients.

  20. Increased synthesis of eicosanoids by human monocytes following leucine and methionine enkephalin administration

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederhold, M.D.; Ou, D.W.

    1986-03-05

    Regulation of eicosanoid biosynthesis by neuropeptides was investigated in human peripheral blood monocytes from normal donors. Metabolites of /sup 3/H-arachidonic acid (/sup 3/H-AA) were analyzed by thin layer and high pressure liquid chromatography following exposure to 0.2 ..mu..gm/ml and 2.0 ..mu..gm/ml of leucine (L-ENK) and methionine (M-ENK) enkephalin. Supernatants of cultured cells were analyzed. The data indicate that both leucine and methionine enkephalin can stimulate eicosanoid biosynthesis in human monocytes, and may indicate a possible regulatory mechanism between the central nervous system and the reticuloendothelial system.

  1. Human Monocytes in the Presence of Interferons Alpha2a and Gamma Are Potent Killers of Serous Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines in Combination with Paclitaxel and Carboplatin

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Chase L.; Zoon, Kathryn C.

    2015-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) play an important role in immune surveillance of tumors; however, their efficacy in the treatment of malignancies has been limited. Monocytes are mononuclear phagocytes that are critical to the generation of an innate immune response to tumors. The authors and others have shown that treatment of tumor cell lines in vitro and in vivo with human monocytes primed with type I and type II IFNs results in killing. We now expand on this work, in an extended panel of ovarian cancer cell lines. In this study, we hypothesized that there would be variable sensitivity amongst cell lines to the killing properties of monocytes and IFNs. To this end, we explored the interactions of IFN primed monocytes in conjunction with the standard of therapy for ovarian cancer, taxane, and platinum-based chemotherapeutics. Using 6 ovarian cancer cell lines, we demonstrated that there is variation from cell line to cell line in the ability of IFN-α2a and IFN-γ primed monocytes to synergistically kill target tumor cells, and further, there is an additive killing effect when target cells are treated with both IFN primed monocytes and chemotherapy. PMID:25068849

  2. Regulation of nutrition-associated receptors in blood monocytes of normal weight and obese humans.

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, Olga; Hornemann, Silke; Weimer, Sandra; Lu, Ye; Murahovschi, Veronica; Zhuk, Sergei; Seltmann, Anne-Cathrin; Malashicheva, Anna; Kostareva, Anna; Kruse, Michael; Busjahn, Andreas; Rudovich, Natalia; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H

    2015-03-01

    Obesity, type 2 diabetes and associated metabolic diseases are characterized by low-grade systemic inflammation which involves interplay of nutrition and monocyte/macrophage functions. We suggested that some factors such as nutrient components, neuropeptides involved in the control of gastrointestinal functions, and gastrointestinal hormones might influence immune cell functions and in this way contribute to the disease pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the mRNA expression of twelve nutrition-associated receptors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), isolated monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages and their regulation under the switching from the high-carbohydrate low-fat diet to the low-carbohydrate high-fat (LC/HFD) isocaloric diet in healthy humans. The mRNA expression of receptors for short chain fatty acids (GPR41, GPR43), bile acids (TGR5), incretins (GIPR, GLP1R), cholecystokinin (CCKAR), neuropeptides VIP and PACAP (VIPR1, VIPR2), and neurotensin (NTSR1) was detected in PBMC and monocytes, while GPR41, GPR43, GIPR, TGR5, and VIPR1 were found in macrophages. Correlations of the receptor expression in monocytes with a range of metabolic and inflammatory markers were found. In non-obese subjects, the dietary switch to LC/HFD induced the increase of GPR43 and VIPR1 expression in monocytes. No significant differences of receptor expression between normal weight and moderately obese subjects were found. Our study characterized for the first time the expression pattern of nutrition-associated receptors in human blood monocytes and its dietary-induced changes linking metabolic responses to nutrition with immune functions in health and metabolic diseases.

  3. Modulation of the effector function of human monocytes for Mycobacterium avium by human immunodeficiency virus-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Shiratsuchi, H; Johnson, J L; Toossi, Z; Ellner, J J

    1994-01-01

    Disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection in AIDS is associated with high tissue burdens (10(9)-10(10) mycobacteria/g tissue) of organism. The basis for the extraordinary susceptibility of AIDS to M. avium infection is unclear. HIV or its constituents may alter mononuclear phagocyte functions resulting in enhanced intracellular M. avium growth. The effects of an envelope glycoprotein (gp120), a transmembrane protein (p121), and core proteins of HIV-1 on M. avium infection of human monocytes were examined. Preculturing monocytes with gp120 inhibited M. avium phagocytosis and consistently enhanced intracellular growth of six M. avium strains. Pretreatment with p121, gag5, or p24 did not inhibit phagocytosis nor enhance intracellular growth of M. avium. Incubation of gp120 with soluble CD4 before addition to monocyte cultures or pretreatment of monocytes with OKT4A abrogated gp120 effects on M. avium phagocytosis and intracellular growth. gp120 also augmented cytokine production by infected monocytes. These results suggest that gp120, but not p121 or core proteins, modulate monocyte phagocytosis and enhance intracellular growth of M. avium at least in part through monocyte CD4 receptors. Direct effects of HIV-1 products may, therefore, contribute to the diathesis of AIDS to develop disseminated M. avium infection and to the extensive replication of the organisms within tissue macrophages. Images PMID:8113420

  4. Monocyte-expressed urokinase regulates human vascular smooth muscle cell migration in a coculture model.

    PubMed

    Kusch, Angelika; Tkachuk, Sergey; Lutter, Steffen; Haller, Hermann; Dietz, Rainer; Lipp, Martin; Dumler, Inna

    2002-01-01

    Interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) with monocytes recruited to the arterial wall at a site of injury, with resultant modulation of VSMC growth and migration, are central to the development of vascular intimal thickening. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expressed by monocytes is a potent chemotactic factor for VSMC and might serve for the acceleration of vascular remodeling. In this report, we demonstrate that coculture of human VSMC with freshly isolated peripheral blood-derived human monocytes results in significant VSMC migration that increases during the coculture period. Accordingly, VSMC adhesion was inhibited with similar kinetics. VSMC proliferation, however, was not affected and remained at the same basal level during the whole period of coculture. The increase of VSMC migration in coculture was equivalent to the uPA-induced migration of monocultured VSMC and was blocked by addition into coculture of soluble uPAR (suPAR). Analysis of uPA and uPAR expression in cocultured cells demonstrated that monocytes are a major source of uPA, whose expression increases in coculture five-fold, whereas VSMC display an increased expression of cell surface-associated uPAR. These findings indicate that upregulated uPA production by monocytes following vascular injury acts most likely as an endogenous activator of VSMC migration contributing to the remodeling of vessel walls.

  5. Meglumine antimonate treatment enhances phagocytosis and TNF-α production by monocytes in human cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    de Saldanha, Rosana Regina; Martins-Papa, Marianna Carminatti; Sampaio, Raimunda Nonata Ribeiro; Muniz-Junqueira, Maria Imaculada

    2012-10-01

    This work evaluated phagocytic function, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), TNF-α and IL-10 production by monocytes and serum INF-γ levels in New World human cutaneous leishmaniasis and the influence of meglumine antimonate treatment on these immune functions. The phagocytic capacity of monocytes in untreated Leishmania-infected individuals was significantly (2.5 times) lower than that of healthy controls, and antimonial treatment increased the phagocytosis by monocytes by about five times at the end of therapy. The leishmaniasis patients showed 3.9 times higher H(2)O(2) production than controls and treatment with meglumine antimonate did not influence the production of H(2)O(2), which remained enhanced until the end of treatment. Individuals with leishmaniasis showed 6.3 times lower TNF-α production than healthy individuals and meglumine antimonate treatment caused a significant increment (11.9 times) in its production. INF-γ serum levels were higher in Leishmania-infected individuals than healthy controls, and the production of IL-10 by monocytes was not influenced by infection or antimonial treatment. Enhancement of monocyte functions by the antimonial treatment suggests that the immunomodulatory effects of the drug may also play a part in the way meglumine antimonate acts against the parasite in human leishmaniasis, by directly increasing phagocytosis and TNF-α production. Copyright © 2012 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Monocyte human leukocyte antigen-DR transcriptional downregulation by cortisol during septic shock.

    PubMed

    Le Tulzo, Yves; Pangault, Celine; Amiot, Laurence; Guilloux, Valérie; Tribut, Olivier; Arvieux, Cédric; Camus, Christophe; Fauchet, Renée; Thomas, Rémi; Drénou, Bernard

    2004-05-15

    Monocyte deactivation has been identified as a major factor of immunosuppression in sepsis and is associated with a loss of surface human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) expression on circulating monocytes. Using flow cytometry, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, we investigated this phenomenon in septic patients. We confirmed the early loss of monocyte HLA-DR expression in all infected patients and demonstrated that this persistent lowered expression at Day 6 correlated with severity scores, secondary infection, and death. This phenomenon occurred at a transcriptional level via a decrease in the class II transactivator A (CIITA) transcription. Furthermore, these abnormalities correlated with the high cortisol levels observed in sepsis and not with those of other putative factors such as catecholamines or interleukin-10. Finally, in vitro studies evidenced that glucocorticoids decrease HLA-DR expression at a transcriptional level via a decrease in CIITA mRNA levels, mainly by down modulating its isoforms I and III. We conclude that in human sepsis, the loss of HLA-DR expression on circulating monocytes is associated with a poor outcome. We suggest that the high endogenous cortisol level observed in septic shock may be a possible new factor involved in the loss of HLA-DR expression on monocytes via its effect on HLA-DR and CIITA transcription.

  7. Inhibition of human arterial smooth muscle cell growth by human monocyte/macrophages: a co-culture study.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, D; Fitzsimmons, C; Torzewski, J; Bowyer, D E

    1999-07-01

    Monocyte/macrophages produce a variety of substances which may influence the function of smooth muscle cells (SMC). During atherogenesis, macrophages are thought to modulate SMC migration, proliferation and synthesis of extracellular matrix. Such modulation is the balance between stimulatory and inhibitory influences. Thus, for example, our earlier studies have shown that macrophages not only secrete mitogens, but also produce small molecular weight inhibitors of SMC proliferation. In the present study, we have used a co-culture system in which human monocyte/macrophages were separated from human arterial SMC (hSMC) by a filter with the optional addition of a 12 kDa cut-off dialysis membrane, in order to assess their effect on hSMC growth. We have found that human peripheral blood-derived monocytes produced a substance of < 12 kDa that inhibited hSMC growth in the co-culture system. The monocyte-derived factor causing this effect was completely blocked by indomethacin, indicating that growth-inhibitory factors produced by the monocytes were cyclooxygenase products. We have shown that PGE1 and PGE2 inhibit hSMC growth, making them likely candidates for the effector molecules released from monocytes in our co-culture system.

  8. Induction of ceruloplasmin synthesis by IFN-gamma in human monocytic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, B.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Prok, A.; Cathcart, M. K.; Fox, P. L.

    1997-01-01

    Ceruloplasmin is a 132-kDa glycoprotein abundant in human plasma. It has multiple in vitro activities, including copper transport, lipid pro- and antioxidant activity, and oxidation of ferrous ion and aromatic amines; however, its physiologic role is uncertain. Although ceruloplasmin is synthesized primarily by the liver in adult humans, production by cells of monocytic origin has been reported. We here show that IFN-gamma is a potent inducer of ceruloplasmin synthesis by monocytic cells. Activation of human monoblastic leukemia U937 cells with IFN-gamma increased the production of ceruloplasmin by at least 20-fold. The identity of the protein was confirmed by plasmin fingerprinting. IFN-gamma also increased ceruloplasmin mRNA. Induction followed a 2- to 4-h lag and was partially blocked by cycloheximide, indicating a requirement for newly synthesized factors. Ceruloplasmin induction in monocytic cells was agonist specific, as IL-1, IL-4, IL-6, IFN-alpha, IFN-beta, TNF-alpha, and LPS were completely ineffective. The induction was also cell type specific, as IFN-gamma did not induce ceruloplasmin synthesis in endothelial or smooth muscle cells. In contrast, IFN-gamma was stimulatory in other monocytic cells, including THP-1 cells and human peripheral blood monocytes, and also in HepG2 cells. Ceruloplasmin secreted by IFN-gamma-stimulated U937 cells had ferroxidase activity and was, in fact, the only secreted protein with this activity. Monocytic cell-derived ceruloplasmin may contribute to defense responses via its ferroxidase activity, which may drive iron homeostasis in a direction unfavorable to invasive organisms.

  9. Induction of ceruloplasmin synthesis by IFN-gamma in human monocytic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, B.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Prok, A.; Cathcart, M. K.; Fox, P. L.

    1997-01-01

    Ceruloplasmin is a 132-kDa glycoprotein abundant in human plasma. It has multiple in vitro activities, including copper transport, lipid pro- and antioxidant activity, and oxidation of ferrous ion and aromatic amines; however, its physiologic role is uncertain. Although ceruloplasmin is synthesized primarily by the liver in adult humans, production by cells of monocytic origin has been reported. We here show that IFN-gamma is a potent inducer of ceruloplasmin synthesis by monocytic cells. Activation of human monoblastic leukemia U937 cells with IFN-gamma increased the production of ceruloplasmin by at least 20-fold. The identity of the protein was confirmed by plasmin fingerprinting. IFN-gamma also increased ceruloplasmin mRNA. Induction followed a 2- to 4-h lag and was partially blocked by cycloheximide, indicating a requirement for newly synthesized factors. Ceruloplasmin induction in monocytic cells was agonist specific, as IL-1, IL-4, IL-6, IFN-alpha, IFN-beta, TNF-alpha, and LPS were completely ineffective. The induction was also cell type specific, as IFN-gamma did not induce ceruloplasmin synthesis in endothelial or smooth muscle cells. In contrast, IFN-gamma was stimulatory in other monocytic cells, including THP-1 cells and human peripheral blood monocytes, and also in HepG2 cells. Ceruloplasmin secreted by IFN-gamma-stimulated U937 cells had ferroxidase activity and was, in fact, the only secreted protein with this activity. Monocytic cell-derived ceruloplasmin may contribute to defense responses via its ferroxidase activity, which may drive iron homeostasis in a direction unfavorable to invasive organisms.

  10. Potent toxicity of 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine toward human monocytes in vitro and in vivo. A novel approach to immunosuppressive therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, C J; Terai, C; Lotz, M; Curd, J G; Piro, L D; Beutler, E; Carson, D A

    1990-01-01

    Lymphoid cells were thought to be uniquely susceptible to excess 2'-deoxyadenosine (dAdo), when exposed to inhibitors of adenosine deaminase (ADA). However, we now find that human monocytes are as sensitive as lymphocytes to dAdo or to the ADA-resistant congener 2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (CldAdo). Monocytes exposed in vitro to CldAdo, or to dAdo plus deoxycoformycin rapidly developed DNA strand breaks. Both the DNA damage and the toxicity of CldAdo or dAdo toward monocytes were blocked by deoxycytidine, but not by inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. A partial decrease in RNA synthesis and a gradual decline of cellular NAD were early biochemical events associated with monocyte DNA damage. Low CldAdo concentrations (5-20 nM) inhibited monocyte phagocytosis and reduced the release of interleukin 6. Higher CldAdo concentrations led to a dose- and time-dependent loss of monocyte viability. Circulating monocytes disappeared within 1 wk in patients with cutaneous T cell lymphoma or with rheumatoid arthritis during continuous CldAdo infusion. The marked sensitivity of human monocyte function and survival to CldAdo in vitro, together with the monocyte depletion in patients receiving CldAdo chemotherapy, suggests that CldAdo or other dAdo analogues offer a novel therapeutic strategy for chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases characterized by inappropriate monocyte deployment or function. PMID:1700795

  11. The human homolog of the JE gene encodes a monocyte secretory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, B J; Stier, P; Ernst, T; Wong, G G

    1989-01-01

    The mouse fibroblast gene, JE, was one of the first platelet-derived growth factor-inducible genes to be described as such. The protein encoded by JE (mJE) is the prototype of a large family of secreted, cytokinelike glycoproteins, all of whose members are induced by a mitogenic or activation signal in monocytes macrophages, and T lymphocytes; JE is the only member to have been identified in fibroblasts. We report the identification of a human homolog for murine JE, cloned from human fibroblasts. The protein predicted by the coding sequence of human JE (hJE) is 55 amino acids shorter than mJE, and its sequence is identical to that of a recently purified monocyte chemoattractant. When expressed in COS cells, the human JE cDNA directed the secretion of N-glycosylated proteins of Mr 16,000 to 18,000 as well as proteins of Mr 15,500, 15,000, and 13,000. Antibodies raised against mJE recognized these hJE species, all of which were secreted by human fibroblasts. hJE expression was stimulated in HL60 cells during phorbol myristate acetate-induced monocytoid differentiation. However, resting human monocytes constitutively secreted hJE; treatment with gamma interferon did not enhance hJE expression in monocytes, and treatment with phorbol myristate acetate or lipopolysaccharide inhibited its expression. Thus, human JE encodes yet another member of the large family of JE-related cytokinelike proteins, in this case a novel human monocyte and fibroblast secretory protein. Images PMID:2513477

  12. Interleukin-1 and interleukin-6 gene expression in human monocytes stimulated with Salmonella typhimurium porins.

    PubMed Central

    Galdiero, M; Cipollaro de L'ero, G; Donnarumma, G; Marcatili, A; Galdiero, F

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify whether Salmonella typhimurium porins can affect the expression of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) genes. Human monocytes were treated with porins, and total RNAs were analysed by Northern blotting to evaluate the expression of IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 in both treated and untreated cell cultures. Porins induced a significant increase in IL-1 and IL-6 transcripts. This increase was related to the dose of porins, and it peaked 5 hr after treatment. The same results were obtained when polymyxin B was added to the porin preparation to eliminate eventual traces of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) associated with porins. The porins-mediated increase in interleukin transcripts did not require de novo protein synthesis, and it was because of the enhanced half-life of IL-1 and IL-6 mRNAs, rather an increased rate of gene transcription. These data suggest that porins may affect inflammatory and immunological responses by enhancing the expression of cytokine genes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8567029

  13. Lactic acid and acidification inhibit TNF secretion and glycolysis of human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Dietl, Katrin; Renner, Kathrin; Dettmer, Katja; Timischl, Birgit; Eberhart, Karin; Dorn, Christoph; Hellerbrand, Claus; Kastenberger, Michael; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A; Oefner, Peter J; Andreesen, Reinhard; Gottfried, Eva; Kreutz, Marina P

    2010-02-01

    High concentrations of lactic acid (LA) are found under various pathophysiological conditions and are accompanied by an acidification of the environment. To study the impact of LA on TNF secretion, human LPS-stimulated monocytes were cultured with or without LA or the corresponding pH control. TNF secretion was significantly suppressed by low concentrations of LA (< or = 10 mM), whereas only strong acidification had a similar effect. This result was confirmed in a coculture model of human monocytes with multicellular tumor spheroids. Blocking synthesis of tumor-derived lactate by oxamic acid, an inhibitor of lactate dehydrogenase, reversed the suppression of TNF secretion in this coculture model. We then investigated possible mechanisms underlying the suppression. Uptake of [3-(13)C]lactate by monocytes was shown by hyphenated mass spectrometry. As lactate might interfere with glycolysis, the glycolytic flux of monocytes was determined. We added [1,2-(13)C(2)]glucose to the culture medium and measured glucose uptake and conversion into [2,3-(13)C(2)]lactate. Activation of monocytes increased the glycolytic flux and the secretion of lactate, whereas oxygen consumption was decreased. Addition of unlabeled LA resulted in a highly significant decrease in [2,3-(13)C(2)]lactate secretion, whereas a mere corresponding decrease in pH exerted a less pronounced effect. Both treatments increased intracellular [2,3-(13)C(2)]lactate levels. Blocking of glycolysis by 2-deoxyglucose strongly inhibited TNF secretion, whereas suppression of oxidative phosphorylation by rotenone had little effect. These results support the hypothesis that TNF secretion by human monocytes depends on glycolysis and suggest that LA and acidification may be involved in the suppression of TNF secretion in the tumor environment.

  14. Characterization of avirulent mutant Legionella pneumophila that survive but do not multiply within human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, is a Gram-negative bacterium and a facultative intracellular parasite that multiplies in human monocytes and alveolar macrophages. In this paper, mutants of L. pneumophila avirulent for human monocytes were obtained and extensively characterized. The mutants were obtained by serial passage of wild-type L. pneumophila on suboptimal artificial medium. None of 44 such mutant clones were capable of multiplying in monocytes or exerting a cytopathic effect on monocyte monolayers. Under the same conditions, wild-type L. pneumophila multiplied 2.5-4.5 logs, and destroyed the monocyte monolayers. The basis for the avirulent phenotype was an inability of the mutants to multiply intracellularly. Both mutant and wild-type bacteria bound to and were ingested by monocytes, and both entered by coiling phagocytosis. Thereafter, their intracellular destinies diverged. The wild-type formed a distinctive ribosome-lined replicative phagosome, inhibited phagosome-lysosome fusion, and multiplied intracellularly. The mutant did not form the distinctive phagosome nor inhibit phagosome-lysosome fusion. The mutant survived intracellularly but did not replicate in the phagolysosome. In all other respects studied, the mutant and wild-type bacteria were similar. They had similar ultrastructure and colony morphology; both formed colonies of compact and diffuse type. They had similar structural and secretory protein profiles and LPS profile by PAGE. Both the mutant and wild-type bacteria were completely resistant to human complement in the presence or absence of high titer anti-L. pneumophila antibody. The mutant L. pneumophila have tremendous potential for enhancing our understanding of the intracellular biology of L. pneumophila and other parasites that follow a similar pathway through the mononuclear phagocyte. Such mutants also show promise for enhancing our understanding of immunity to L. pneumophila, and they may serve

  15. Intracellular Survival of Brucella spp. in Human Monocytes Involves Conventional Uptake but Special Phagosomes

    PubMed Central

    Rittig, Michael G.; Alvarez-Martinez, Maria-Teresa; Porte, Françoise; Liautard, Jean-Pierre; Rouot, Bruno

    2001-01-01

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular parasites of various mammals, including humans, typically infecting lymphoid as well as reproductive organs. We have investigated how B. suis and B. melitensis enter human monocytes and in which compartment they survive. Peripheral blood monocytes readily internalized nonopsonized brucellae and killed most of them within 12 to 18 h. The presence of Brucella-specific antibodies (but not complement) increased the uptake of bacteria without increasing their intracellular survival, whereas adherence of the monocytes or incubation in Ca2+- and Mg2+-free medium reduced the uptake. Engulfment of all Brucella organisms (regardless of bacterial viability or virulence) initially resulted in phagosomes with tightly apposed walls (TP). Most TP were fully fusiogenic and matured to spacious phagolysosomes containing degraded bacteria, whereas some TP (more in monocyte-derived macrophages, HeLa cells, and CHO cells than in monocytes) remained tightly apposed to intact bacteria. Immediate treatment of infected host cells with the lysosomotropic base ammonium chloride caused a swelling of all phagosomes and a rise in the intraphagosomal pH, abolishing the intracellular survival of Brucella. These results indicate that (i) human monocytes readily internalize Brucella in a conventional way using various phagocytosis-promoting receptors, (ii) the maturation of some Brucella phagosomes is passively arrested between the steps of acidification and phagosome-lysosome fusion, (iii) brucellae are killed in maturing but not in arrested phagosomes, and (iv) survival of internalized Brucella depends on an acidic intraphagosomal pH and/or close contact with the phagosomal wall. PMID:11349069

  16. Liver X receptor is a key regulator of cytokine release in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Myhre, Anders E; Agren, Joanna; Dahle, Maria K; Tamburstuen, Margareth V; Lyngstadaas, Ståle P; Collins, A Jon L; Foster, Simon J; Thiemermann, Christoph; Aasen, Ansgar O; Wang, Jacob E

    2008-04-01

    Aberrant regulation of innate immune responses and uncontrolled cytokine bursts are hallmarks of sepsis and endotoxemia. Activation of the nuclear liver X receptor (LXR) was recently demonstrated to suppress inflammatory genes. Our aim was to investigate the expression of LXR in human monocytes under normal and endotoxemic conditions and to study the influence of LXR activation on endotoxin-induced cytokine synthesis and release. Adherent human monocytes or whole blood were pretreated with a synthetic LXR agonist (3-{3-[(2-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-benzyl)-(2,2-diphenyl-ethyl)-amino]-propoxy}-phenyl)-acetic acid) and subsequently challenged with LPS (from Escherichia coli) or peptidoglycan (from Staphylococcus aureus). Cytokine release was assessed by a Multiplex antibody bead kit, and cytokine mRNA levels were measured by real-time reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We found that LXRalpha mRNA was up-regulated in CD14+ monocytes in LPS-challenged blood, whereas LXRbeta mRNA was not altered. Addition of 3-{3-[(2-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-benzyl)-(2,2-diphenyl-ethyl)-amino]-propoxy}-phenyl)-acetic acid to monocytes suppressed the LPS-induced release of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p40, TMF-alpha, macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha, macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 in a concentration-dependent manner. Surprisingly, an accompanying decrease in cytokine mRNA accumulation was not observed. The suppressed cytokine release could not be explained by a diminished transport of mRNA out of the nucleus or a decreased secretion of cytokines. We propose that LXR is a key regulator of cytokine release in LPS-challenged human monocytes, possibly by interfering with translational events.

  17. Human monocyte spreading induced by factor Bb of the alternative pathway of complement activation. A possible role for C5 in monocyte spreading

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The central serine esterase of the alternative pathway of complement (APC) activation, activated factor B (Bb), has been shown recently to induce murine macrophages and human monocytes to become spread on a glass substrata. It has also been established that to induce the spreading reaction, the catalytic site of the Bb enzyme must be structurally intact since treatment of Bb with heat (56 degrees C for 30 min) or diisopropylfluorophosphate (10(-3) M) destroyed both enzymatic and spreading activities. In the C3b,Bb complex, Bb exhibits restricted substrate specificity for C3 and C5. With this in mind, the role of C3 and C5 in the monocyte spreading reaction was explored in the present study. Expression of C3 and C5 on the surface of human peripheral blood monocytes was investigated by the direct fluorescent antibody technique employing fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated anti- C3 or C5 F(ab')2 antibody fragments. It was found that C3 and C5 were present on 6 +/- 7% of freshly prepared monocytes and that expression of C5, but not C3, increased to 70 +/- 6% when monocytes were incubated for 3 d in serum-free medium. Biosynthesis of C5 was indicated when it was found that under serum-free conditions, monocytes incorporated [3H]leucine into immunoprecipitable C5 with an apparent mol wt of 180,000 on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The role of C3 and C5 in the monocyte spreading reaction induced by factor Bb was explored by testing for the ability of anti-C3 and anti- C5 Fab' antibody fragments to block monocyte spreading. It was found that anti-C5 Fab' inhibited by up to 100% the 3-h human monocyte spreading reaction induced by Bb; in contrast, anti-C3 Fab' or anti-C4 Fab' inhibited by less than 10%. That the inhibitory effect of anti-C5 Fab' was exerted directly on the monocyte was established when it was found that the 3-h monocyte spreading reaction was significantly inhibited by pretreating monocytes with anti-C5 Fab' for 20 min and then

  18. Environmentally relevant dose of arsenic interferes in functions of human monocytes derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Bahari, Abbas; Salmani, Vahid

    2017-06-05

    Arsenic is a major environmental pollutant and highly hazardous toxin to human health, which well established as carcinogen and immune deregulatory properties. Dendritic cells (DCs) have a pivotal role in cell-mediated immunity for T-cell activation and antigen presentation. In this study, T cell activation, some key functional genes expression, cell stability and phagocytosis capacity of human monocytes derived DCs (MDDCs) were analyzed after in vitro exposure to very low dose of arsenic for 12 and 24h. Arsenic decreased continually phagocytosis capacity of MDDCs. Furthermore, down-regulation of the cell-surface expression of the co-stimulatory molecule CD40 after 24h post treatment with arsenic, confirmed arsenic interferers in the phagocytosis process. Pro inflammatory cytokines, IL1β and TNFα were more expressed in arsenic-treated MDDCs while IL6 transiently was down regulated. In general, our novel findings here strongly suggest that low level of arsenic dysregulates four fundamental immune processes of DCs. Mechanistically; this could explain the observed immunodeficiency activity of Arsenic, and give direction for comprehension the pathogenesis of Arsenic-induced diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Recognition and destruction of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin-infected human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    We have established a long-term culture system to study macrophages chronically infected with mycobacteria. Monocytes are infected with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and support exponential intracellular replication without profound perturbation of normal host cell function. We have used this system to investigate lymphokine-activated killer (LAK)-mediated cytolysis. We have found that interleukin 2 stimulation of peripheral blood lymphocytes generates a cytotoxic activity against human monocytes. A CD56- subpopulation of LAK cells specifically recognizes and lyses BCG-infected cells. Lysis of the host cell has no effect on parasite viability and results in the liberation of bacteria capable of infecting more cells. PMID:7684432

  20. Enhancement of human monocyte phagocytic function by alpha 2HS glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, J G; André, C M

    1981-01-01

    Human alpha 2HS glycoprotein was isolated from normal adult serum and its effect on monocyte phagocytic function (in vitro) was investigated. The results demonstrate that alpha 2HS glycoprotein enhances the ability of peripheral blood monocytes to take up radiolabelled latex particles compared to control cells. Enhanced uptake required the simultaneous presence of cells, substrate and alpha 2HS glycoprotein. This uptake was dependent on the concentration of alpha 2HS glycoprotein offering the possibility that reduced levels of this protein, as in malignant and inflammatory disease, may result in decreased phagocytic function. PMID:7203533

  1. A new method of preparing monocyte suspensions from human whole blood.

    PubMed

    Stoll, H P; Krämer, S; Oberhausen, E

    1986-01-01

    A method of isolating monocytes from human whole blood is described. The technique is primarily based on simple centrifugation steps that follow Tylose-sedimentation as well as on the use of the new density gradient medium Nycodens. Counterflow centrifugation is not involved. The final monocyte suspension is free of platelets. The contaminating cells are predominantly lymphocytes. As a whole, the method is a modification of the Nycodens technique published by Boyum in 1983, which leads to a total elimination of platelet contamination in the final cell suspension.

  2. Immunomodulatory action of Copaifera spp oleoresins on cytokine production by human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Karina Basso; Conti, Bruno José; Murbach Teles Andrade, Bruna Fernanda; Mangabeira da Silva, Jonas Joaquim; Rogez, Hervé Louis Ghislain; Crevelin, Eduardo José; Beraldo de Moraes, Luiz Alberto; Veneziani, Rodrigo; Ambrósio, Sérgio Ricardo; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp; Sforcin, José Maurício

    2015-03-01

    Copaifera spp oleoresins have been used in folk medicine for centuries; nevertheless, its immunomodulatory action has not been investigated. Thus, the goal of this study was to characterize different oleoresins and to verify their action on human monocytes regarding pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production (TNF-α and IL-10, respectively). The chemical composition of Brazilian Copaifera reticulata, Copaifera duckey and Copaifera multijuga oleoresins was analyzed by HPLC-MS. Cell viability was assessed by MTT method after incubation of cells with Copaifera spp. Noncytotoxic concentrations of oleoresins were incubated with human monocytes from healthy donors, and cytokine production was determined by ELISA. HPLC-MS analysis for terpenes allowed the identification of six diterpene acids and one sesquiterpene acid. Oleoresins exerted no cytotoxic effects on human monocytes. All oleoresins had a similar profile: LPS-induced TNF-α production was maintained by oleoresins, while a significant inhibitory action on IL-10 production was seen. Copaifera oleoresins seemed to exert an activator profile on human monocytes without affecting cell viability. Such effect may be due to the presence of either diterpene or sesquiterpene acids; however, further studies are necessary to determine the involvement of such compounds in Copaifera immunomodulatory effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Cyclic dinucleotides modulate human T-cell response through monocyte cell death.

    PubMed

    Tosolini, Marie; Pont, Frédéric; Verhoeyen, Els; Fournié, Jean-Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Cyclic dinucleotides, a class of microbial messengers, have been recently identified in bacteria, but their activity in humans remains largely unknown. Here, we have studied the function of cyclic dinucleotides in humans. We found that c-di-AMP and cGAMP, two adenosine-based cyclic dinucleotides, activated T lymphocytes in an unusual manner through monocyte cell death. c-di-AMP and cGAMP induced the selective apoptosis of human monocytes, and T lymphocytes were activated by the direct contact with these dying monocytes. The ensuing T-cell response comprised cell-cycle exit, phenotypic maturation into effector memory cells and proliferation arrest, but not cell death. This quiescence was transient since T cells remained fully responsive to further restimulation. Together, our results depict a novel activation pattern for human T lymphocytes: a transient quiescence induced by c-di-AMP- or cGAMP-primed apoptotic monocytes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Effect of interferon on the induction of human monocyte secretion of interleukin-1 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Newton, R C

    1985-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of interferons on the induction of human monocyte secretion of interleukin-1 (IL-1) activity by lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Monocytes do not spontaneously produce IL-1 and the addition of interferons to the culture does not lead to detectable secretion. Addition of LPS alone induces the release of measurable amounts of IL-1 activity. The addition of low doses (1-10 units/ml) of alpha, beta, or gamma interferon to the LPS-stimulated cultures further increases this secretion by 50%. The addition of 1000 units/ml of alpha or beta interferon leads to inhibition of IL-1 release. By contrast, gamma interferon is a dose dependent enhancer of IL-1 release. The effect of gamma interferon is on the production of IL-1 and is not an enhancement of IL-1 activity in the biological assay. Results demonstrate that addition of gamma interferon to monocytes increases the rate of secretion of IL-1 by these cells. Gamma interferon also appears to abrogate the loss in the ability of monocytes to produce IL-1 activity after overnight culture. This last result parallels the maintainence of the expression of the HLA-DR surface marker on monocytes by gamma interferon. These results may help define a mechanism involving IL-1 generation which could have bearing on the in vivo pyrogenic effects of purified gamma interferon. PMID:2416675

  5. A human T cell clone that mediates the monocyte procoagulant response to specific sensitizing antigen.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, B S; Reitnauer, P J; Hank, J A; Sondel, P M

    1985-09-01

    A panel of human purified protein derivative of the tubercle bacillus (PPD)-reactive T cell clones was derived by cloning out of soft agar followed by cultivation on inactivated feeder cells in the presence of interleukin-2. 1 of 4 clones tested was able to mediate an increase in monocyte procoagulant activity (PCA) in response to PPD. All four clones had identical surface marker phenotypes (T4+, T8-) and proliferated in response to antigen. The reactive T cell clone possessed no PCA of its own, but upon being presented with PPD was able to instruct monocytes to increase their expression of PCA. Antigen presentation could be performed only by autologous monocytes; allogeneic monocytes from donors unrelated to the donor of the reactive clone could not present antigen to cells of the clone in a way that would initiate the procoagulant response. Cells of the reactive clone did not mediate increased monocyte PCA in response to Candida, even though peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the donor demonstrated increased PCA to both Candida and PPD. Thus, the PCA response to specific antigen can be mediated by a single clone of cells that shows specificity in the recognition of both antigen and antigen presenting cell.

  6. Circulating classical monocytes are associated with CD11c+ macrophages in human visceral adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Kristiaan; Gaens, Katrien; Bijnen, Mitchell; Verboven, Kenneth; Jocken, Johan; Wetzels, Suzan; Wijnands, Erwin; Hansen, Dominique; van Greevenbroek, Marleen; Duijvestijn, Adriaan; Biessen, Erik A. L.; Blaak, Ellen E.; Stehouwer, Coen D. A.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.

    2017-01-01

    Immune cell accumulation in adipose tissue (AT) is associated with the development of AT inflammation, resulting in metabolic dysfunction. Circulating immune cell patterns may reflect immune cell accumulation in expanding AT. However, data linking human leukocytes in blood and AT is lacking. We investigated whether blood immune cell populations are associated with their counterparts in subcutaneous (scAT) or visceral AT (vAT). Flow cytometry was performed on blood, scAT and vAT from 16 lean and 29 obese men. Circulating natural killer (NK)-cells, classical monocytes and nonclassical monocytes were higher in obese individuals. vAT, but not scAT, of obese individuals contained more inflammatory CD11c+ “M1” macrophages and NK cells compared to lean individuals. Blood classical monocytes were associated with CD11c+ macrophages in vAT but not scAT. This association was unrelated to expression of the adhesion molecules CD11b and CD11c or of the chemokine receptor CX3CR1 on these monocytes. Other AT immune cells were not associated with their respective counterparts in blood. Finally, CD11c+ macrophages and CD4+ T-cells in vAT were associated with their counterparts in scAT. In conclusion, blood classical monocytes reflect CD11c+ macrophages in vAT. PMID:28198418

  7. Cytokine and Eicosanoid Production by Cultured Human Monocytes Exposed to Titanium Particulate Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Timothy M.; Manley, Paul A.; Sims, Paul A.; Albrecht, Ralph; Darien, Benjamin J.

    1999-10-01

    Phagocytosis of particulate wear debris from arthroplasties by macrophages induces an inflammatory response that has been linked to implant loosening and premature failure of artificial joints. Inflammatory mediators released by phagocytic macrophages such as tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-[alpha]), interleukin-1[beta] (IL-1[beta]), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) are believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of aseptic loosening. The objective of this study was to characterize titanium alloy particulates that closely match wear debris found around joint arthroplasties and to study their effects on the biosynthesis of inflammatory mediators by cultured monocytes. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated from healthy human volunteers. Monocytes were cultured in 96-well plates for 24 h, washed, and exposed to three concentrations of titanium particulates and controls from 18Ð24 h. Supernatants were assayed for TNF-[alpha], IL-1[beta], IL-6, and PGE2 activity. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) verified the titanium alloy to be Ti6A14V. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed significant titanium particulate heterogeneity with approximately 95% of the particles <1 micrometer in diameter. SEM and EDX technology was useful in the characterization of the titanium particulates utilized for in vitro models of titanium-induced cytokine release by monocytes. Incubation of titanium particulates (in concentrations similar to those found around loosened prosthetic joints) with cultured monocytes significantly increased their production of TNF-[alpha], IL-1[beta], and PGE2.

  8. Interleukin 10 Increases CCR5 Expression and HIV Infection in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sozzani, Silvano; Ghezzi, Silvia; Iannolo, Gioacchino; Luini, Walter; Borsatti, Alessandro; Polentarutti, Nadia; Sica, Antonio; Locati, Massimo; Mackay, Charles; Wells, Timothy N.C.; Biswas, Priscilla; Vicenzi, Elisa; Poli, Guido; Mantovani, Alberto

    1998-01-01

    The immunosuppressive and antiinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL) 10 selectively upregulates the expression of the CC chemokine receptors CCR5, 2, and 1 in human monocytes by prolonging their mRNA half-life. IL-10–stimulated monocytes display an increased number of cell surface receptors for, and better chemotactic responsiveness to, relevant agonists than do control cells. In addition, IL-10–stimulated monocytes are more efficiently infected by HIV BaL. This effect was associated to the enhancement of viral entry through CCR5. These data add support to an emerging paradigm in which pro- and antiinflammatory molecules exert reciprocal and opposing influence on chemokine agonist production and receptor expression. PMID:9449724

  9. Impaired antigen presentation and potent phagocytic activity identifying tumor-tolerant human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Soares-Schanoski, Alessandra; Jurado, Teresa; Córdoba, Raúl; Siliceo, María; Fresno, Carlos Del; Gómez-Piña, Vanesa; Toledano, Victor; Vallejo-Cremades, Maria T; Alfonso-Iñiguez, Sergio; Carballo-Palos, Arkaitz; Fernández-Ruiz, Irene; Cubillas-Zapata, Carolina; Biswas, Subhra K; Arnalich, Francisco; García-Río, Francisco; López-Collazo, Eduardo

    2012-06-29

    Monocyte exposure to tumor cells induces a transient state in which these cells are refractory to further exposure to cancer. This phenomenon, termed "tumor tolerance", is characterized by a decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines in response to tumors. In the past, we found that this effect comprises IRAK-M up regulation and TLR4 and CD44 activation. Herein we have established a human model of tumor tolerance and have observed a marked down-regulation of MHCII molecules as well as the MHCII master regulator, CIITA, in monocytes/macrophages. These cells combine an impaired capability for antigen presentation with potent phagocytic activity and exhibit an M2-like phenotype. In addition circulating monocytes isolated from Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia patients exhibited the same profile as tumor tolerant cells after tumor ex vivo exposition.

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 induces cellular polarization, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 redistribution, and multinucleated giant cell generation in human primary monocytes but not in monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fais, S; Borghi, P; Gherardi, G; Logozzi, M; Belardelli, F; Gessani, S

    1996-12-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on some morphologic and functional changes in cultured human monocytes/macrophages at different stages of differentiation. Freshly isolated monocytes infected with HIV-1 24 hours after seeding exhibited marked morphologic changes such as uropod formation, polarization of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on the cytoplasmic projection, the redistribution of alpha-actinin on cell-membrane dots, and an increased release of soluble ICAM-1. These changes preceded the increase in monocyte-monocyte fusion and the formation of multinucleated giant cells. In contrast, HIV-1 infection did not affect monocyte-derived macrophages in terms of either cellular polarization or multinucleated giant cell formation. Immunocytochemistry showed that HIV-1 matrix protein was present mostly in bi- and trinucleated cells, which suggests that multinucleated giant cells may represent a long-lived and highly productive cellular source of HIV. The treatment of the HIV-1-infected monocytes with azidodeoxythymidine virtually abolished all viral-induced morphofunctional changes. On the whole, these results indicate that blood monocytes and differentiated macrophages may be affected differently by HIV infection, as monocytes seem to be much more prone to polarize, undergo homotypic fusion, and form multinucleated giant cells. These changes may confer to HIV-infected monocytes an increased ability to transmigrate through endothelia into tissues, whereas differentiated macrophages may have a predominant role as a widespread reservoir of HIV.

  11. Novel ex vivo culture method for human monocytes uses shear flow to prevent total loss of transendothelial diapedesis function.

    PubMed

    Tsubota, Yoshiaki; Frey, Jeremy M; Raines, Elaine W

    2014-01-01

    Monocyte recruitment to inflammatory sites and their transendothelial migration into tissues are critical to homeostasis and pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases. However, even short-term suspension culture of primary human monocytes leads to phenotypic changes. In this study, we characterize the functional effects of ex vivo monocyte culture on the steps involved in monocyte transendothelial migration. Our data demonstrate that monocyte diapedesis is impaired by as little as 4 h culture, and the locomotion step is subsequently compromised. After 16 h in culture, monocyte diapedesis is irreversibly reduced by ∼90%. However, maintenance of monocytes under conditions mimicking physiological flow (5-7.5 dyn/cm²) is sufficient to reduce diapedesis impairment significantly. Thus, through the application of shear during ex vivo culture of monocytes, our study establishes a novel protocol, allowing functional analyses of monocytes not currently possible under static culture conditions. These data further suggest that monocyte-based therapeutic applications may be measurably improved by alteration of ex vivo conditions before their use in patients.

  12. A 48-kilodalton Mycoplasma fermentans membrane protein induces cytokine secretion by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kostyal, D A; Butler, G H; Beezhold, D H

    1994-01-01

    Mycoplasma fermentans is one of several Mycoplasma species that have been reported to stimulate tumor necrosis factor (TNF) secretion from monocytes. This activity has been associated primarily with the mycoplasma membrane fraction. In this article, we have characterized a membrane protein that stimulates TNF and interleukin 1 beta secretion. The TNF-releasing activity partitioned into the Triton X-114 detergent phase, suggesting that the molecules is hydrophobic. The secretion of TNF is elevated in the presence of serum, which suggests that a serum component may play a role in the interaction between this mycoplasma protein and monocytes. Treatment of monocytes with monoclonal anti-CD14 antibody had no effect on the levels of TNF-releasing activity. By using the monocyte Western blot (immunoblot) technique, we have determined the molecular mass of the active molecule to be 48 kDa. This molecule appears to be distinct from the recently described family of variable lipoproteins of M. fermentans. Mycoplasma particulate material treated with proteinase K lost all inducing activity, whereas lipoprotein lipase-treated samples retained some level of activity. Images PMID:7520421

  13. Differentiation of human CD14+ monocytes: an experimental investigation of the optimal culture medium and evidence of a lack of differentiation along the endothelial line

    PubMed Central

    Safi, Wajima; Kuehnl, Andreas; Nüssler, Andreas; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Pelisek, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the optimal culturing media for human CD14+ monocytes and to evaluate whether these cells are capable of differentiating into vascular endothelial cells. Human monocytes isolated from peripheral blood were cultured for 1, 3, 7, 10 or 14 days in different media containing either 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), 10% autologous donor serum (Auto), 10% FBS with interleukin-3 and macrophage colony stimulating factor (FBS-WF) or 10% Auto and the same growth factors (AU-WF). The cells were differentiated using endothelial cell conditioning medium (EC). Viability was measured using the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay, and the cells were characterized by histology, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Monocytes treated with Auto, FBS-WF or AU-WF medium generated a significant higher yield of vital cells after 7 days in culture compared with FBS-only medium (mean difference (MD)=0.318, P=0.01; MD=1.83, P=0.04; or MD=0.271, P=0.01 and MD=0.318, P=0.102). All tested media led to the differentiation of monocytes into macrophages, identified by CD68, especially in the FBS-WF medium (MD=+18.3% P=0.04). Differentiation into ECs caused a significant decrease in cell viability in all media. Endothelial cell markers, including CD31, CD144, VEGF, VEGF-R2 and CD34, could not be detected. Autologous serum significantly increases the yield of monocyte-derived cells with a higher effectiveness than commonly used FBS-only serum. There is no further benefit in culturing monocytes longer than 7 days. The cultivation of monocytes in the tested media leads preferentially to differentiation into macrophages. Differentiation into endothelial cells did not take place. PMID:27080367

  14. Localized adhesion of monocytes to human atherosclerotic plaques demonstrated in vitro: implications for atherogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Poston, R. N.; Johnson-Tidey, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Blood-derived macrophages in the arterial intima are a characteristic feature of active atherosclerotic plaques. Adherent monocytes on the luminal surface and increased adhesion molecules on the endothelium have suggested that specific molecular mechanisms are involved in monocyte/macrophage traffic into the arterial wall. Adhesion of human monocytes and related cell lines was therefore studied in vitro to histological sections of human plaques. At 37 degrees C, these cells bound selectively to the plaques. Binding to the endothelium occurred and was also present extensively in the diseased intima. Inhibition studies showed that the endothelial and general intimal binding had largely similar molecular properties. Strong inhibition was produced by antibodies to the monocyte-specific adhesion molecule CD14, to beta2 integrins, and to ICAM-1. Likewise, a peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence was strongly inhibitory, suggesting that binding of leukocyte integrins to arterial extracellular matrix was synergistic with cell-cell interactions. A P-selectin antibody was exceptional in giving selective inhibition of endothelial adhesion, which correlates with the specific endothelial localization of this adhesion molecule. These results show that monocytes adhere to atherosclerotic plaques through the focal activation of multiple arterial wall adhesion molecules, confirming the adhesion hypothesis. A positive feedback theory for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis can be suggested, based on the ability of macrophages in the wall to activate the endothelium, induce adhesion molecules, and facilitate additional monocyte entry. The adhesion assay provides a means for the identification of adhesion inhibitors with therapeutic potential. Images Figure 2 PMID:8686764

  15. Human β-Defensin 3 Reduces TNF-α-Induced Inflammation and Monocyte Adhesion in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Tianying; Li, Houxuan; Zhou, Qian; Ni, Can; Zhang, Yangheng

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of human β-defensin 3 (hBD3) in the initiation stage of atherosclerosis with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) triggered by tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α. The effects of hBD3 on TNF-α-induced endothelial injury and inflammatory response were evaluated. Our data revealed that first, hBD3 reduced the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, hBD3 significantly prevented intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by HUVECs. Second, western blot analysis demonstrated that hBD3 dose-dependently suppressed the protein levels of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in TNF-α-induced HUVECs. As a result, hBD3 inhibited monocyte adhesion to TNF-α-treated endothelial cells. Additionally, hBD3 suppressed TNF-α-induced F-actin reorganization in HUVECs. Third, hBD3 markedly inhibited NF-κB activation by decreasing the phosphorylation of IKK-α/β, IκB, and p65 subunit within 30 min. Moreover, the phosphorylation of p38 and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway were also inhibited by hBD3 in HUVECs. In conclusion, hBD3 exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects in endothelial cells in response to TNF-α by inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK signaling. PMID:28348463

  16. Pathogenicity of Mycobacterium avium for human monocytes: absence of macrophage-activating factor activity of gamma interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Toba, H; Crawford, J T; Ellner, J J

    1989-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is a frequent opportunistic pathogen in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We compared 12 strains of M. avium in an in vitro model of pathogenicity. Peripheral blood-derived monocytes from healthy individuals were infected with M. avium in vitro. Bacterial uptake and intracellular replication were assessed by microscopic count of acid-fast bacilli and CFU of bacteria, respectively, in lysed monocytes. The CFU assay showed that among five AIDS-associated strains, only one replicated in monocytes. Two of seven non-AIDS-associated strains replicated intracellularly. In addition, we examined the effect of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) on M. avium infection. IFN-gamma treatment of monocytes decreased phagocytosis and had no effect on the intracellular replication of M. avium. Thus, most strains of M. avium do not multiply within monocytes from healthy individuals and IFN-gamma does not have macrophage-activating factor activity for M. avium infection of human monocytes. PMID:2491838

  17. Induction of release of tumor necrosis factor from human monocytes by staphylococci and staphylococcal peptidoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, C P; Mattsson, E; Martinez-Martinez, L; De Graaf, L; Van Strijp, J A; Verbrugh, H A; Verhoef, J; Fleer, A

    1993-01-01

    The role of cytokines in gram-positive infections is still relatively poorly defined. The purpose of this study was to establish whether or not intact staphylococci and purified peptidoglycans and peptidoglycan components derived from staphylococci are capable of stimulating the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by human monocytes. We show here that intact staphylococci and purified peptidoglycans, isolated from three Staphylococcus epidermidis and three S. aureus strains, were indeed able to induce secretion of TNF by human monocytes in a concentration-dependent fashion. TNF release was detected by both enzyme immunoassay and the L929 fibroblast bioassay. In the enzyme immunoassay, a minimal concentration of peptidoglycan of 1 micrograms/ml was required to detect TNF release by monocytes, whereas in the bioassay a peptidoglycan concentration of 10 micrograms/ml was needed to detect a similar amount of TNF release. Peptidoglycan components such as the stem peptide, tetra- and pentaglycine, and muramyl dipeptide were unable to induce TNF release from human monocytes. PMID:8406805

  18. Phenolic compounds alone or in combination may be involved in propolis effects on human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Eliza de Oliveira; Conti, Bruno José; Santiago, Karina Basso; Conte, Fernanda Lopes; Oliveira, Lucas Pires Garcia; Hernandes, Rodrigo Tavanelli; Golim, Marjorie de Assis; Sforcin, José Maurício

    2017-01-01

    Propolis is a natural product with a complex chemical composition. Its isolated compounds exert biological activities; however, its synergistic effects are unknown. The involvement of phenolic acids (caffeic - Caf, dihydrocinnamic - Cin and p-coumaric - Cou) alone or in combination was investigated in the action of propolis in human monocytes. Cell viability was analysed by MTT assay; TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 production by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); cell markers expression by flow cytometry; colony-forming units were counted to assess the microbicidal activity; and H2 O2 production was analysed by colorimetric assay. Treatments did not affect monocytes viability. Propolis and combinations containing Caf enhanced TNF-α production by resting cells. Propolis, Cin, Cou and Caf + Cin stimulated IL-6 production. All treatments upregulated IL-10. In LPS-stimulated cells, treatments downregulated IL-6 and maintained TNF-α and IL-10 production. A lower TLR-2 expression was seen than propolis. Caf + Cin enhanced TLR-4 expression. Propolis, Caf and Caf + Cin stimulated H2 O2 production, whereas propolis, Cin, Cou, and Caf + Cin + Cou induced a higher fungicidal activity. Cin and Cin + Cou increased the bactericidal activity of human monocytes. Propolis activated human monocytes, and acids were involved differently in propolis activity. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide induces autotaxin expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Song; Zhang Junjie

    2009-01-09

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted enzyme with lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, which converts lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) into lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive phospholipid involved in numerous biological activities, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration. In the present study, we found that bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a well-known initiator of the inflammatory response, induced ATX expression in monocytic THP-1 cells. The activation of PKR, JNK, and p38 MAPK was required for the ATX induction. The LPS-induced ATX in THP-1 cells was characterized as the {beta} isoform. In the presence of LPC, ATX could promote the migrations of THP-1 and Jurkat cells, which was inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of Gi-mediated LPA receptor signaling. In summary, LPS induces ATX expression in THP-1 cells via a PKR, JNK and p38 MAPK-mediated mechanism, and the ATX induction is likely to enhance immune cell migration in proinflammatory response by regulating LPA levels in the microenvironment.

  20. Antithrombin III, but not C1 esterase inhibitor reduces inflammatory response in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocytes in an ex-vivo whole blood setting.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Patrick; Nestler, Frank; Leimert, Anja; Bucher, Michael; Czeslick, Elke; Sablotzki, Armin; Raspè, Christoph

    2014-12-01

    In order to examine the immunomodulatory effects of antithrombin III (AT-III) and C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) in human monocytes, we investigated the intracellular expression of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in an ex-vivo laboratory study in a whole blood setting. Heparinized whole blood samples from 23 healthy male and female volunteers (mean age: 27±7years) were pre-incubated with clinically relevant concentrations of AT-III (n=11) and C1-INH (n=12), then stimulated with 0.2 ng/mL lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 3h. After phenotyping CD14⁺ monocytes, intracellular expression of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α was assessed using flow cytometry. In addition, 12 whole blood samples (AT-III and C1-INH, n=6 each) were examined using hirudin for anticoagulation; all samples were processed in the same way. To exclude cytotoxicity effects, 7-amino-actinomycin D and Nonidet P40 staining were used to investigate probes. This study is the first to demonstrate the influence of C1-INH and AT-III on the monocytic inflammatory response in a whole blood setting, which mimics the optimal physiological setting. Cells treated with AT-III exhibited significant downregulation of the proportion of gated CD14⁺ monocytes for IL-6 and IL-8, in a dose-dependent manner; downregulation for TNF-α did not reach statistical significance. There were no significant effects on mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). In contrast, C1-INH did not significantly reduce the proportion of gated CD14⁺ monocytes or the MFI regarding IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-8. When using hirudin for anticoagulation, no difference in the anti-inflammatory properties of AT-III and C1-INH in monocytes occurs. Taken together, in contrast to TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly downregulated in monocytes in an ex-vivo setting of human whole blood when treated with AT-III. This finding implicates monocytes as an important point of action regarding the anti-inflammatory properties of AT-III in sepsis. C1

  1. In vitro production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha by human monocytes stimulated with lipopolysaccharide is positively correlated with increased blood monocytes after exposure to a swine barn.

    PubMed

    Willson, P J; Khozani, T Talaei; Juurlink, B H J; Senthilselvan, A; Rennie, D C; Gerdts, V; Gawaziuk, J; Schneberger, D; Burch, Lauranell H; Dosman, J A

    2008-01-01

    Recently there has been interest in the air quality in and around intensive livestock production facilities, such as modern swine production barns, where agricultural workers and surrounding residents may be exposed to elevated levels of organic dusts. The health effects of these exposures are not completely understood. The study that is reported here is a component of a larger investigation of the relationships among the acute effects of high-concentration endotoxin exposure (swine barn dust), polymorphisms in the TLR4 gene, and respiratory outcomes following exposure to swine confinement buildings. The relationships among a mediator of acute lung inflammation, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and clinical responses to acute swine barn exposure were characterized. Analysis of the results showed that in vitro stimulation of human monocytes with as little as 1 ng/ml of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced a significant increase in the monocytes that produced TNF-alpha. Although the proportion of TNF-alpha-positive monocytes after in vitro stimulation with 1 ng/ml of LPS was not associated with gender or TLR4 genotype, it was positively associated with the concentration of monocytes in blood after barn exposure. Thus, these two responses to different forms of LPS exposure are significantly correlated, and more responsive monocytes in vitro indicate a forthcoming relative monocytosis, post barn exposure, which may initiate a cascade of chronic inflammation.

  2. Monocyte/macrophage-derived microparticles up-regulate inflammatory mediator synthesis by human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cerri, Chiara; Chimenti, Daniele; Conti, Ilaria; Neri, Tommaso; Paggiaro, Pierluigi; Celi, Alessandro

    2006-08-01

    Cell-derived microparticles (MP) are membrane fragments shed by virtually all eukaryotic cells upon activation or during apoptosis that play a significant role in physiologically relevant processes, including coagulation and inflammation. We investigated whether MP derived from monocytes/macrophages have the potential to modulate human airway epithelial cell activation. Monocytes/macrophages were isolated from the buffy coats of blood donors by Ficoll gradient centrifugation, followed by overnight culture of the mononuclear cell fraction. Adherent cells were washed and incubated with the calcium ionophore, A23187, or with histamine. The MP-containing supernatant was incubated with cells of the human bronchial epithelial line BEAS-2B and of the human alveolar line A549. IL-8, MCP-1, and ICAM-1 production was assessed by ELISA and by RT-PCR. In some experiments, monocytes/macrophages were stained with the fluorescent lipid intercalating dye PKH67, and the supernatant was analyzed by FACS. Stimulation of monocytes/macrophages with A23187 caused the release of particles that retain their fluorescent lipid intercalating label, indicating that they are derived from cell membranes. Incubation with A549 and BEAS-2B cells up-regulate IL-8 synthesis. Ultrafiltration and ultracentrifugation of the material abolished the effect, indicating that particulate matter, rather than soluble molecules, is responsible for it. Up-regulation of MCP-1 and ICAM-1 was also demonstrated in A549 cells. Similar results were obtained with histamine. Our data show that human monocytes/macrophages release MP that have the potential to sustain the innate immunity of the airway epithelium, as well as to contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases of the lungs through up-regulation of proinflammatory mediators.

  3. Baseline Gene Expression Signatures in Monocytes from Multiple Sclerosis Patients Treated with Interferon-beta

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Marta F.; Nurtdinov, Ramil N.; Río, Jordi; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background A relatively large proportion of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients do not respond to interferon-beta (IFNb) treatment. In previous studies with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we identified a subgroup of IFNb non-responders that was characterized by a baseline over-expression of type I IFN inducible genes. Additional mechanistic experiments carried out in IFNb non-responders suggested a selective alteration of the type I IFN signaling pathway in the population of blood monocytes. Here, we aimed (i) to investigate whether the type I IFN signaling pathway is up-regulated in isolated monocytes from IFNb non-responders at baseline; and (ii) to search for additional biological pathways in this cell population that may be implicated in the response to IFNb treatment. Methods Twenty RRMS patients classified according to their clinical response to IFNb treatment and 10 healthy controls were included in the study. Monocytes were purified from PBMC obtained before treatment by cell sorting and the gene expression profiling was determined with oligonucleotide microarrays. Results and discussion Purified monocytes from IFNb non-responders were characterized by an over-expression of type I IFN responsive genes, which confirms the type I IFN signature in monocytes suggested from previous studies. Other relevant signaling pathways that were up-regulated in IFNb non-responders were related with the mitochondrial function and processes such as protein synthesis and antigen presentation, and together with the type I IFN signaling pathway, may also be playing roles in the response to IFNb. PMID:23637780

  4. Fetal bovine serum xenoproteins modulate human monocyte adhesion and protein release on biomaterials in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, David; Joyce, Evan James; Kao, Weiyuan John

    2010-01-01

    Monocyte-derived macrophages are critical in the host foreign body response to biomaterials and have been studied extensively in various culture conditions in vitro such as medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS) or autologous human serum (AHS). Since monocyte maturation into macrophages is highly plastic and may vary considerably depending on the surface, isolation procedures, and in vitro culture conditions, we hypothesize that variations in protein adsorption and serum type will greatly impact monocyte behavior in a surface-dependent manner. The impact of xenoproteins on monocyte-surface interaction is not well studied methodically and the use of AHS rather than FBS for macrophage-biomaterials studies in vitro is far from universal. The commonly used reference materials: tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), polyethylene glycol (PEG), and poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were employed in this study and we found a 3-fold higher adherent monocyte density on TCPS when AHS was used versus FBS-supplemented medium. On PEG hydrogels, an 8-10 fold higher adhesion density was observed when AHS was employed versus FBS, while on PDMS no difference in adhesion density was observed between the two sera conditions. Additionally, the presence of lipopolysaccharide abrogated the serum-dependent effect on cell adhesion on TCPS. Significant differential variations in protein release were observed between the serum conditions on these surfaces, in particular there was a 100-fold higher concentration of growth-related oncogene for the AHS condition on PDMS even though the adhesion levels were comparable between the two serum conditions. These results emphasize the combined impact of the surface type and FBS xenoproteins in mediating the observed monocyte response to biomaterials in vitro. PMID:20837169

  5. Human THP-1 monocyte uptake and cellular disposition of 14C-grepafloxacin.

    PubMed

    Hall, Iris H; Schwab, Ute E; Ward, E Stacy; Rublein, John C; Butts, John D; Ives, Timothy J

    2004-02-01

    Uptake of (14)C-grepafloxacin into human mononuclear (THP-1) cells was determined at pH 7.4, 6.8, or 5.0 over a 4-log antibiotic concentration. Grepafloxacin was taken up by THP-1 monocytes rapidly by both a passive and an active transport mechanism at pH 7.4. Its uptake was initially linear, with equilibrium being reached after approximately 1 h. Efflux followed first-order clearance and was complete within 1 h, suggesting no longterm sequestering of the antibiotic occurred. Neither cell number nor serum protein binding appeared to have any effect on antibiotic uptake. High intracellular concentrations were achieved and the ratios of cellular to extracellular antibiotic concentration (IC/EC) were between 529 and 644 at 0.04 micro g/ml at pH 7.4 and 6.8, suggesting that monocytes may contain sufficient levels of grepafloxacin for affecting bacteriostatic killing. Grepafloxacin disposition within the THP-1 monocytes showed large amounts present in the nucleus and cell sap in stimulated and unstimulated cells, and its presence was evenly distributed throughout the cytosol, nuclei, lysosomes, mitochondria, and ribosomes. After stimulation by zymogen A, Staphylococcus aureus, or Streptococcus pneumoniae, increased amounts of grepafloxacin were found within THP-1 monocytes and isolated phagosome vacuoles. No antibiotic sequestration occurred inside stimulated monocytes, although a sufficient intracellular grepafloxacin concentration was available to kill phagocytized bacteria. Metabolic inhibitors, suppressors of K(+)/Cl(-) and Cl(-) transporters, inhibitors of the phagocytic process, low temperature, and low pH inhibited grepafloxacin uptake by THP-1 monocytes.

  6. Binding of recombinant HIV coat protein gp120 to human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Finbloom, D.S.; Hoover, D.L.; Meltzer, M.S. )

    1991-02-15

    Inasmuch as the exact level of CD4 Ag expression on macrophages is controversial and because HIV may interact with macrophages in a manner different from that on T cells, we analyzed the binding of gp120 to freshly isolated and cultured monocytes. rgp120 was iodinated using the lactoperoxidase method to a sp. act. of 600 Ci/mmol. Highly purified monocytes (greater than 90%) were isolated from the leukapheresed blood of normal volunteers by Ficoll-Hypaque sedimentation followed by countercurrent centrifugal elutriation and cultured 7 days in DMEM supplemented with 1000 U/ml macrophage CSF in 10% human serum. Whereas MOLT/4 cells consistently bound freshly prepared 125I-rgp120 at 80% specificity with 5100 +/- 700 mol/cell, MCSF cultured monocytes bound rgp120 at only 0 to 20% specificity and 420 +/- 200 mol/cell. Most of the radioactivity bound by these cells could not be blocked by the addition of unlabeled rgp120. In contrast, the U937 myeloid cell line bound rgp120 with 50% specificity and about 2500 mol/cell. Whereas the antibody OKT4a (anti-CD4) blocked 80% of the binding on MOLT/4 cells and 50% on U937 cells, binding was only inhibited on the average of 6% on cultured monocytes. When soluble rCD4 was used as an inhibitor, binding to MOLT/4 cells was blocked by 80%. In contrast, binding to cultured monocytes was inhibited by 28%. HIV infectivity was blocked by similar concentrations of OKT4a. These observations suggest that although most binding of gp120 to cultured monocytes is not to the CD4 determinant, several hundred molecules do bind to a CD4-like molecule which promotes virus entry and replication.

  7. Monocytes increase human cardiac myofibroblast-mediated extracellular matrix remodeling through TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Mewhort, Holly E M; Lipon, Brodie D; Svystonyuk, Daniyil A; Teng, Guoqi; Guzzardi, David G; Silva, Claudia; Yong, V Wee; Fedak, Paul W M

    2016-03-15

    Following myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac myofibroblasts remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM), preventing mechanical complications. However, prolonged myofibroblast activity leads to dysregulation of the ECM, maladaptive remodeling, fibrosis, and heart failure (HF). Chronic inflammation is believed to drive persistent myofibroblast activity; however, the mechanisms are unclear. We assessed the influence of peripheral blood monocytes on human cardiac myofibroblast activity in a three-dimensional (3D) ECM microenvironment. Human cardiac myofibroblasts isolated from surgical biopsies of the right atrium and left ventricle were seeded into 3D collagen matrices. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated from healthy human donors and cocultured with myofibroblasts. Monocytes increased myofibroblast activity measured by collagen gel contraction (baseline: 57.6 ± 5.9% vs. coculture: 65.2 ± 7.1% contraction; P < 0.01) and increased local ECM remodeling quantified by confocal microscopy. Under coculture conditions that allow indirect cellular interaction via paracrine factors but prevent direct cell-cell contact, monocytes had minimal effects on myofibroblast activity (17.9 ± 11.1% vs. 6.4 ± 7.0% increase, respectively; P < 0.01). When cells were cultured under direct contact conditions, multiplex analysis of the coculture media revealed an increase in the paracrine factors TGF-β1 and matrix metalloproteinase 9 compared with baseline (122.9 ± 10.1 pg/ml and 3,496.0 ± 190.4 pg/ml, respectively, vs. 21.5 ± 16.3 pg/ml and 183.3 ± 43.9 pg/ml; P < 0.001). TGF-β blockade abolished the monocyte-induced increase in cardiac myofibroblast activity. These data suggest that direct cell-cell interaction between monocytes and cardiac myofibroblasts stimulates TGF-β-mediated myofibroblast activity and increases remodeling of local matrix. Peripheral blood monocyte interaction with human cardiac myofibroblasts stimulates myofibroblast activity through release of TGF-β1

  8. Fu-Ling, a Chinese herbal drug, modulates cytokine secretion by human peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Yu, S J; Tseng, J

    1996-01-01

    Fu-Ling, the sclederma of Poria cocos (Schw.) Wolf, has long been used as a sedative and diuretic in traditional Chinese herbal medicine. Our study demonstrated that the substances extracted from Fu-Ling by 50% hot ethanol significantly augmented the secretion of interleukins IL-1 beta and IL-6 6 h after in vitro cultivation of human peripheral blood monocytes. The augmented effect was dose dependent. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion was also increased as the cells were treated with 0.4 mg/ml or higher doses of Fu-Ling extract. By contrast, Fu-Ling extract significantly suppressed the secretion of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) 3 h after the in vitro drug treatment. The suppressive effect was shown at doses as low as 0.2 mg/ml of Fu-Ling extract. Since Fu-Ling extract enhanced the secretion of immune stimulators (IL-1 beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha) but suppressed the secretion of an immune suppressor (TGF-beta), the substance in 50% hot ethanol extract of Fu-Ling might have potentiated the immune response. Fu-Ling extract was further fractionated by reverse-phase column chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The components showing activity in modulating the cytokine secretion were relatively high in hydrophobicity.

  9. Neurogenic potential of progenitors derived from human circulating CD14+ monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Hiroaki; Inoue, Takafumi; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Yasutomi, Daisuke; Kawakami, Yutaka; Ogawa, Satoshi; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Ikeda, Yasuo; Kuwana, Masataka

    2006-04-01

    We previously reported a primitive cell fraction derived from human circulating CD14+ monocytes, named monocyte-derived multipotential cells (MOMC), that can differentiate along mesenchymal lineages, including bone, cartilage, fat, skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle. In this study, we investigated whether MOMC can differentiate into the neuronal lineage. MOMC were fluorescently labelled and cocultivated with a primary culture of rat neurons for up to 4 weeks. The protein and gene expressions of neuron-specific markers in the human MOMC were evaluated over time using immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and reverse transcription followed by PCR. Shortly after cocultivation with rat neurons, nearly all the MOMC expressed early neuroectodermal markers, Mash1, Neurogenin2 and NeuroD, together with nestin, an intermediate filament expressed in neurogenesis. After 14 days of coculture, a subpopulation of MOMC displayed a multipolar morphology with elongated neurites and expressed mature neuron-specific markers, including neurofilament, microtubule-associated protein type 2, beta3-tubulin, NeuN and Hu. Transdifferentiation of monocytes into the neuroectodermal lineage was shown by the simultaneous expression of proneural markers and CD45/CD14 early in the differentiation process. The cocultivated MOMC retained their proliferative capacity for at least 16 days. Finally, the neuronal differentiation of MOMC was observed when they were cultured with neurons without cell-to-cell contact. The capacity of MOMC to differentiate into both mesodermal and neuroectodermal lineages suggests that circulating CD14+ monocytes are more multipotential than previously thought.

  10. DNA methylation profiling reveals differences in the 3 human monocyte subsets and identifies uremia to induce DNA methylation changes during differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zawada, Adam M.; Schneider, Jenny S.; Michel, Anne I.; Rogacev, Kyrill S.; Hummel, Björn; Krezdorn, Nicolas; Müller, Soeren; Rotter, Björn; Winter, Peter; Obeid, Rima; Geisel, Jürgen; Fliser, Danilo; Heine, Gunnar H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human monocytes are a heterogeneous cell population consisting of 3 subsets: classical CD14++CD16-, intermediate CD14++CD16+ and nonclassical CD14+CD16++ monocytes. Via poorly characterized mechanisms, intermediate monocyte counts rise in chronic inflammatory diseases, among which chronic kidney disease is of particular epidemiologic importance. DNA methylation is a central epigenetic feature that controls hematopoiesis. By applying next-generation Methyl-Sequencing we now tested how far the 3 monocyte subsets differ in their DNA methylome and whether uremia induces DNA methylation changes in differentiating monocytes. We found that each monocyte subset displays a unique phenotype with regards to DNA methylation. Genes with differentially methylated promoter regions in intermediate monocytes were linked to distinct immunological processes, which is in line with results from recent gene expression analyses. In vitro, uremia induced dysregulation of DNA methylation in differentiating monocytes, which affected several transcription regulators important for monocyte differentiation (e.g., FLT3, HDAC1, MNT) and led to enhanced generation of intermediate monocytes. As potential mediator, the uremic toxin and methylation inhibitor S-adenosylhomocysteine induced shifts in monocyte subsets in vitro, and associated with monocyte subset counts in vivo. Our data support the concept of monocyte trichotomy and the distinct role of intermediate monocytes in human immunity. The shift in monocyte subsets that occurs in chronic kidney disease, a proinflammatory condition of substantial epidemiological impact, may be induced by accumulation of uremic toxins that mediate epigenetic dysregulation. PMID:27018948

  11. DNA methylation profiling reveals differences in the 3 human monocyte subsets and identifies uremia to induce DNA methylation changes during differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Adam M; Schneider, Jenny S; Michel, Anne I; Rogacev, Kyrill S; Hummel, Björn; Krezdorn, Nicolas; Müller, Soeren; Rotter, Björn; Winter, Peter; Obeid, Rima; Geisel, Jürgen; Fliser, Danilo; Heine, Gunnar H

    2016-04-02

    Human monocytes are a heterogeneous cell population consisting of 3 subsets: classical CD14++CD16-, intermediate CD14++CD16+ and nonclassical CD14+CD16++ monocytes. Via poorly characterized mechanisms, intermediate monocyte counts rise in chronic inflammatory diseases, among which chronic kidney disease is of particular epidemiologic importance. DNA methylation is a central epigenetic feature that controls hematopoiesis. By applying next-generation Methyl-Sequencing we now tested how far the 3 monocyte subsets differ in their DNA methylome and whether uremia induces DNA methylation changes in differentiating monocytes. We found that each monocyte subset displays a unique phenotype with regards to DNA methylation. Genes with differentially methylated promoter regions in intermediate monocytes were linked to distinct immunological processes, which is in line with results from recent gene expression analyses. In vitro, uremia induced dysregulation of DNA methylation in differentiating monocytes, which affected several transcription regulators important for monocyte differentiation (e.g., FLT3, HDAC1, MNT) and led to enhanced generation of intermediate monocytes. As potential mediator, the uremic toxin and methylation inhibitor S-adenosylhomocysteine induced shifts in monocyte subsets in vitro, and associated with monocyte subset counts in vivo. Our data support the concept of monocyte trichotomy and the distinct role of intermediate monocytes in human immunity. The shift in monocyte subsets that occurs in chronic kidney disease, a proinflammatory condition of substantial epidemiological impact, may be induced by accumulation of uremic toxins that mediate epigenetic dysregulation.

  12. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation inhibits in vitro differentiation of human monocytes and Langerhans dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Barbara; Richter, Susanne; Kneidinger, Doris; Waltenberger, Darina; Woisetschläger, Maximilian; Strobl, Herbert

    2009-07-01

    The transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) represents a promising therapeutic target in allergy and autoimmunity. AhR signaling induced by the newly described ligand VAF347 inhibits allergic lung inflammation as well as suppresses pancreatic islet allograft rejection. These effects are likely mediated via alterations in dendritic cell (DC) function. Moreover, VAF347 induces tolerogenic DCs. Langerhans cells (LCs) are immediate targets of exogenous AhR ligands at epithelial surfaces; how they respond to AhR ligands remained undefined. We studied AhR expression and function in human LCs and myelopoietic cell subsets using a lineage differentiation and gene transduction model of human CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors. We found that AhR is highly regulated during myeloid subset differentiation. LCs expressed highest AhR levels followed by monocytes. Conversely, neutrophil granulocytes lacked AhR expression. AhR ligands including VAF347 arrested the differentiation of monocytes and LCs at an early precursor cell stage, whereas progenitor cell expansion or granulopoiesis remained unimpaired. AhR expression was coregulated with the transcription factor PU.1 during myeloid subset differentiation. VAF347 inhibited PU.1 induction during initial monocytic differentiation, and ectopic PU.1 restored monocyte and LC generation in the presence of this compound. AhR ligands failed to interfere with cytokine receptor signaling during LC differentiation and failed to impair LC activation/maturation. VAF347-mediated antiproliferative effect on precursors undergoing LC lineage differentiation occurred in a clinically applicable serum-free culture model and was not accompanied by apoptosis induction. In conclusion, AhR agonist signaling interferes with transcriptional processes leading to monocyte/DC lineage commitment of human myeloid progenitor cells.

  13. Biological effects of double-walled carbon nanotubes on the innate immune system: An in vitro study on THP-1 human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Dekali, Samir; Bachelet, Christine; Maunoir-Regimbal, Séverine; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Debouzy, Jean-Claude; Crouzier, David

    2016-07-15

    DWCNTs have numerous industrial and biomedical applications and several studies reported that they could act as immunomodulator systems. The immune system is the first line of defence of the human body when exposed to particulate matter. In order to investigate DWCNTs' role on innate immunity, we used THP-1 monocytic cells for the purpose of this study. We showed that DWCNTs were not cytotoxic until 6h, 24h, 48h and 72h of incubation with THP-1 monocytic cells (concentrations tested from 10 to 50μg/mL). From 6h to 72h of incubation of THP-1 cells with DWCNTs, we measured a significant increase of the baseline cell index using xCELLigence(®) technology showing cell adhesion. After 24h of exposure, DWCNTs agglomerates were localized in THP-1 monocyte cytoplasm and cell adhesion was observed simultaneously with a significant increase in the expression of CD11b and CD14 cell surface proteins. Pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and IL-10) was also measured in supernatants after 6h or 24h of exposure to DWCNTs. This pro-inflammatory response was increased in THP-1 monocytic cells pre-treated with LPS. Altogether, our data indicate that DWCNTs induce an increased pro-inflammatory response of THP-1 monocytes and seem to modulate cell surface protein expression confirming that DWCNTs could act as stimulators of innate immunity.

  14. Alcohol-Induced miR-27a Regulates Differentiation and M2 Macrophage Polarization of Normal Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Banishree; Bruneau, Johanna C.; Kodys, Karen; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a leading cause of liver disease characterized by liver inflammation, fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, or liver cirrhosis. Immunomodulatory effects of alcohol on monocytes and macrophages contribute to alcoholic liver disease. Alcohol use, an independent risk factor for progression of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection–mediated liver disease, impairs host defense and alters cytokine production and monocyte/macrophage activation. We hypothesized that alcohol and HCV have synergistic effects on the phenotype and function of monocytes. Our data show that acute alcohol binge drinking in healthy volunteers results in increased frequency of CD16+ and CD68+ and M2-type (CD206+, dendritic cell [DC]-SIGN+–expressing and IL-10–secreting) circulating CD14+ monocytes. Expression of HCV-induced CD68 and M2 markers (CD206 and DC-SIGN) in normal monocytes was further enhanced in the presence of alcohol. The levels of microRNA (miR)-27a was significantly upregulated in monocytes cultured in the presence of alcohol or alcohol and HCV as compared with HCV alone. The functional role of miR-27a in macrophage polarization was demonstrated by transfecting monocytes with an miR-27a inhibitor that resulted in reduced alcohol- and HCV- mediated monocyte activation (CD14 and CD68 expression), polarization (CD206 and DC-SIGN expression), and IL-10 secretion. Over-expression of miR-27a in monocytes enhanced IL-10 secretion via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. We found that miR-27a promoted ERK phosphorylation by downregulating the expression of ERK inhibitor sprouty2 in monocytes. Thus, we identified that sprouty2 is a target of miR-27a in human monocytes. In summary, our study demonstrates the regulatory role of miR-27a in alcohol-induced monocyte activation and polarization. PMID:25716995

  15. Effect of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide Contamination on Gutta Percha- versus Resilon-Induced Human Monocyte Cell Line Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Hadjati, Jamshid; Assadian, Hadi; Ghorbanzadeh, Abdollah; Nourizadeh, Maryam; Fattah, Tahereh; Shokouhinejad, Noushin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Cytotoxic effects of obturation materials were tested in presence and absence of endotoxin on human monocytes in vitro. Materials and Methods: Human monocytes from THP-1 cell line were cultured. Three millimeters from the tip of each Resilon and gutta percha points were cut and directly placed at the bottom of the culture wells. Cultured cells were exposed to gutta percha (groups G1 and G2) and Resilon (R1 and R2). Ten μg/ml bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was added to the culture wells in groups G1 and R1. Positive control included the bacterial LPS without the root canal filling material and the negative control contained the cells in culture medium only. Viability of cells was tested in all groups after 24, 48, and 72 hours using the methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay for at least 3 times to obtain reproducible results. Optical density values were read and the data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and post hoc statistical test. Results: The results showed that cells in G2 had the lowest rate of viability at 24 hours, but the lowest rate of viable cells was recorded in G1 at 48 and 72 hours. The effect of LPS treatment was not statistically significant. Resilon groups showed cell viability values higher than those of gutta percha groups, although statistically non-significant (P=0.105). Cell viability values were lower in gutta percha than Resilon groups when LPS-treated and LPS-untreated groups were compared independently at each time point. Conclusion: It could be concluded that none of the tested root canal filling materials had toxic effects on cultured human monocyte cells whether in presence or absence of LPS contamination. PMID:26056523

  16. Human CD64-targeted non-viral siRNA delivery system for blood monocyte gene modulation

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Seok-Beom; Kim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Jang Kyoung; Chung, Jee Young; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2017-01-01

    A subset of phagocytes including inflammatory monocytes in blood migrate and give rise to macrophages in inflammatory tissues which generated the idea that blood monocytes are the therapeutic targets for drug delivery. Fc gamma receptor I (CD64) is a membrane receptor for the Fc region of immunoglobulin G, primarily expressed on monocyte-lineage, and H22 a monoclonal antibody for human CD64 had shown rapid blood monocyte binding and occupation in clinical studies. Small interfering RNA-mediated gene silencing as a therapeutic has been proposed and is a promising strategy in terms of its “knock-down” ability on the target gene prior to translation. However, its instability and off-targeting effect must be overcome for success in clinical studies. In this study, we developed a non-viral delivery system composed of oligo-nona-arginine (9R) and anti-human CD64 single chain antibodies (H22) for human monocyte-specific siRNA delivery. A targeted and efficient siRNA delivery mediated by anti-CD64 scFv-9R was observed in CD64 positive human leukemia cells, THP-1. With primary human blood cells, anti-CD64 scFv-9R mediated gene silencing was quantitatively confirmed representing blood monocyte selective gene delivery. These results demonstrate the potential of anti-CD64 scFv-9R mediated siRNA delivery for the treatment of human inflammatory diseases via blood monocytes gene delivery. PMID:28169353

  17. Iron oxide nanoparticles modulate lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in primary human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Susann; Stenvik, Jørgen; Nilsen, Asbjørn M

    2016-01-01

    Co-stimulation of the immune system to more than one agent concomitantly is very common in real life, and considering the increasing use of engineered nanoparticles and nanomaterials, it is highly relevant to assess the ability of these materials to modulate key innate immune responses, which has not yet been studied in detail. We investigated the immunomodulatory effects of 10 nm and 30 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) on primary human monocytes in the presence and absence of Toll-like receptor 4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Prior to the cell studies, we characterized the physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles in cell culture medium and ensured that the nanoparticles were free from biological contamination. Cellular uptake of the IONPs in monocytes was assessed using transmission electron microscopy. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that the IONPs per se did not induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β. However, the IONPs had the ability to suppress LPS-induced nuclear factor kappa B activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines in primary human monocytes in an LPS and a particle dose-dependent manner. Using confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled LPS, we showed that the effects correlated with impaired LPS internalization by monocytes in the presence of IONPs, which could be partly explained by LPS adsorption onto the nanoparticle surface. Additionally, the results from particle pretreatment experiments indicate that other cellular mechanisms might also play a role in the observed effects, which warrants further studies to elucidate the additional mechanisms underlying the capacity of IONPs to alter the reactivity of monocytes to LPS and to mount an appropriate cellular response. PMID:27695322

  18. Iron oxide nanoparticles modulate lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in primary human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Grosse, Susann; Stenvik, Jørgen; Nilsen, Asbjørn M

    Co-stimulation of the immune system to more than one agent concomitantly is very common in real life, and considering the increasing use of engineered nanoparticles and nanomaterials, it is highly relevant to assess the ability of these materials to modulate key innate immune responses, which has not yet been studied in detail. We investigated the immunomodulatory effects of 10 nm and 30 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) on primary human monocytes in the presence and absence of Toll-like receptor 4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Prior to the cell studies, we characterized the physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles in cell culture medium and ensured that the nanoparticles were free from biological contamination. Cellular uptake of the IONPs in monocytes was assessed using transmission electron microscopy. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that the IONPs per se did not induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β. However, the IONPs had the ability to suppress LPS-induced nuclear factor kappa B activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines in primary human monocytes in an LPS and a particle dose-dependent manner. Using confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled LPS, we showed that the effects correlated with impaired LPS internalization by monocytes in the presence of IONPs, which could be partly explained by LPS adsorption onto the nanoparticle surface. Additionally, the results from particle pretreatment experiments indicate that other cellular mechanisms might also play a role in the observed effects, which warrants further studies to elucidate the additional mechanisms underlying the capacity of IONPs to alter the reactivity of monocytes to LPS and to mount an appropriate cellular response.

  19. Human antiphospholipid antibodies induce TNFalpha in monocytes via Toll-like receptor 8.

    PubMed

    Döring, Yvonne; Hurst, Julia; Lorenz, Mareike; Prinz, Nadine; Clemens, Natascha; Drechsler, Maik D; Bauer, Stefan; Chapman, Joab; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Blank, Miri; Lackner, Karl J; von Landenberg, Philipp

    2010-03-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is characterized by recurrent arterial and/or venous thromboses, pregnancy loss and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). One of the discussed mechanisms of this thrombotic activity in APS patients is attributed to TNFalpha secretion in monocytes after aPL stimulation. To investigate this mechanism in detail, we employed a monoclonal aPL and IgG fractions of APS patients for stimulation of human peripheral monocytes. Stimulation with this monoclonal aPL resulted in an increased expression and secretion of TNFalpha, caused by specific upregulation of TLR8 mRNA and protein expression levels. To confirm the specificity of this finding we could demonstrate that the TNFalpha enhancement could be neutralized by a TLR8-specific inhibitory DNA-oligonucleotide and could be further increased by adding the specific ligands for TLR8. Using APS patients IgG fractions for stimulation of peripheral monocytes revealed a similar TLR8 mRNA elevation and increase in TNFalpha-production. Furthermore the TLR8 expression level in PBMC's of APS patients was as well significantly elevated. It could be demonstrated that the TNFalpha release in monocytes resulting from aPL stimulation was exclusively induced by TLR8 engagement. This could be confirmed in PBMC's of APS patients, hinting that endogenous stimulation of TLR8 in APS patients and consecutive elevation of TNFalpha promotes a proinflammatory environment.

  20. Human monocytes/macrophages are a target of Neisseria meningitidis Adhesin A (NadA).

    PubMed

    Franzoso, Susanna; Mazzon, Cristina; Sztukowska, Maryta; Cecchini, Paola; Kasic, Tihana; Capecchi, Barbara; Tavano, Regina; Papini, Emanuele

    2008-05-01

    Specific surface proteins of Neisseria meningitidis have been proposed to stimulate leukocytes during tissue invasion and septic shock. In this study, we demonstrate that the adhesin N. meningitidis Adhesin A (NadA) involved in the colonization of the respiratory epithelium by hypervirulent N. meningitidis B strains also binds to and activates human monocytes/macrophages. Expression of NadA on the surface on Escherichia coli does not increase bacterial-monocyte association, but a NadA-positive strain induced a significantly higher amount of TNF-alpha and IL-8 compared with the parental NadA-negative strain, suggesting that NadA has an intrinsic stimulatory action on these cells. Consistently, highly pure, soluble NadA(Delta351-405), a proposed component of an antimeningococcal vaccine, efficiently stimulates monocytes/macrophages to secrete a selected pattern of cytokines and chemotactic factors characterized by high levels of IL-8, IL-6, MCP-1, and MIP-1alpha and low levels of the main vasoactive mediators TNF-alpha and IL-1. NadA(Delta351-405) also inhibited monocyte apoptosis and determined its differentiation into a macrophage-like phenotype.

  1. Transforming growth factor beta enhances integrin expression and type IV collagenase secretion in human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, S M; Allen, J B; Weeks, B S; Wong, H L; Klotman, P E

    1993-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), secreted within an inflammatory site or injected locally, induces leukocyte margination, chemotaxis, and accumulation. In addition to its potent direct chemotactic activity, TGF-beta may promote this leukocyte response by influencing cell surface integrin expression. At picomolar concentrations, TGF-beta increases steady-state mRNA levels for both the alpha 5 and the beta 1 chain of the fibronectin receptor in human blood monocytes. This increase in gene expression is reflected by selectively enhanced expression of alpha 5 (CDw49e), beta 1 (CDw29), and also alpha 3 (CDw49c) adhesion molecules on the cell surface. Functionally, TGF-beta promotes, in a dose- and time-dependent fashion, monocyte adhesion to type IV collagen, laminin, and fibronectin. Potentially facilitating the movement of monocytes through the extracellular matrix, TGF-beta triggers transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of both the 92-kDa and the 72-kDa gelatinase/type IV collagenase. Thus, TGF-beta may play a pivotal role in the early phases of inflammation and repair through its ability to mediate monocyte adhesion, chemotaxis, and enzymatic digestion of extracellular matrix, whereas in chronic lesions, excess TGF-beta may contribute to persistent leukocyte accumulation. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8506302

  2. Glycosyltransferase and sulfotransferase gene expression profiles in human monocytes, dendritic cells and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Trottein, François; Schaffer, Lana; Ivanov, Stoyan; Paget, Christophe; Vendeville, Catherine; Groux-Degroote, Sophie; Lee, Suzanna; Krzewinski-Recchi, Marie-Ange; Head, Steven R; Gosset, Philippe; Delannoy, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Using a focused glycan-gene microarray, we compared the glycosyltransferase (GT) and sulfotransferase gene expression profile of human monocytes relative to immature and mature dendritic cells (DCs) or macrophages (Mφs). Microarray analysis indicated that monocytes express transcripts for a full set of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of N- and O-glycans potentially elongated by poly-LacNAc chains with type II terminal sequences. Monocytes also express genes encoding enzymes involved in glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis but have a limited capacity for glycolipid synthesis. Among genes significantly expressed in monocytes (90 out of 175), 39 are modulated in DCs and/or Mφ, a large proportion being increased in both cell types. This change in GT and sulfotransferase genes might potentially enforce the capacity of differentiated cells to synthesize branched N-glycans and mucin-type O-glycans, and to remodel of cell surface proteoglycans during the differentiation process. Stimulation of DCs and Mφs with lipopolysaccharide caused a decrease in gene expression mainly affecting genes found to be positively modulated during the differentiation steps. Validation of this analysis was provided by quantitative real-time PCR and flow cytometry of cell surface glycan epitopes. Collectively, this study implies an important modification of the pattern of glycosylation in DCs and Mφs undergoing differentiation and maturation with potential biological consequences. PMID:19533340

  3. Methamphetamine cytotoxicity and effect on LPS-stimulated IL-1beta production by human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Tipton, D A; Legan, Z T; Dabbous, M Kh

    2010-04-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is associated with "METH mouth", characterized by rampant dental decay and destruction of periodontal bone and soft tissues. In periodontitis, monocyte/macrophages, stimulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), produce interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), contributing to bone and soft tissue degradation. Effects of METH on monocyte/macrophages and its role in periodontitis are unknown. The objective of this study was to determine METH cytotoxicity and effects on constitutive and LPS-stimulated IL-1beta production in THP-1 human monocytes. METH significantly reduced cell viability, assessed by activity of a mitochondrial enzyme, by 20-40% after 24h, with recovery at longer periods. Brief exposure to METH caused <10% cytotoxicity (measured by an assay that detects membrane damage). LPS from E. coli or the periodontopathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. n.) significantly increased IL-1beta production (measured by ELISA). Despite cytotoxicity of some METH concentrations, METH had no significant effect on constitutive IL-1beta production. However, METH generally increased LPS-stimulated IL-1beta levels, reaching statistical significance at 5x10(-5)M METH ( approximately 50% to >100% increase). The study suggests that METH potentiation of periodontopathogen LPS stimulation of IL-1beta in monocytes could contribute to periodontitis in METH abusers, consistent with other studies suggesting a role for increased IL-1beta in deleterious effects of METH. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Lenalidomide increases human dendritic cell maturation in multiple myeloma patients targeting monocyte differentiation and modulating mesenchymal stromal cell inhibitory properties

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Federica; Vescovini, Rosanna; Bolzoni, Marina; Marchica, Valentina; Storti, Paola; Toscani, Denise; Accardi, Fabrizio; Notarfranchi, Laura; Dalla Palma, Benedetta; Manferdini, Cristina; Manni, Sabrina; Todaro, Giannalisa; Lisignoli, Gina; Piazza, Francesco; Aversa, Franco; Giuliani, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    The use of Lenalidomide (LEN), to reverse tumor-mediated immune suppression and amplify multiple myeloma-specific immunity is currently being explored. Particularly, LEN effects on dendritic cells (DCs) are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the potential effect of LEN on DC differentiation and activity. DCs were differentiated either from CD14+ cells obtained from patients with multiple myeloma or from a human monocytic cell line. LEN, at the concentration range reached in vivo, significantly increased the median intensity expression of HLA-DR, CD86 and CD209 by DCs derived from both bone marrow and peripheral myeloma monocytes and enhanced the production of Interleukin-8, C-C motif chemokine ligand (CCL) 2, CCL5 and tumor necrosis factor-α. Consistently, LEN pre-treated DCs showed an increased ability to stimulate autologous CD3+ cell proliferation. LEN effect on dendritic differentiation was associated with the degradation of the Cereblon-related factors Ikaros and Aiolos. Moreover, we showed that LEN also blunted mesenchymal stromal cell inhibitory effect on dendritic differentiation, inhibiting Casein Kinase-1α levels. Finally, in vitro data were confirmed in ex vivo cultures obtained from relapsed myeloma patients treated with LEN, showing a significant increase of DC differentiation from peripheral blood monocytes. In conclusion, LEN increased the expression of mature dendritic markers both directly and indirectly and enhanced DC ability to stimulate T cell proliferation and to release chemokines. This suggests a new possible mechanism by which LEN could exert its anti-myeloma activity. PMID:28881793

  5. Regulatory monocytes in helminth infections: insights from the modulation during human hookworm infection.

    PubMed

    Passos, Lívia Silva Araújo; Gazzinelli-Guimarães, Pedro Henrique; Oliveira Mendes, Tiago Antônio de; Guimarães, Ana Clara Gazzinelli; Silveira Lemos, Denise da; Ricci, Natasha Delaqua; Gonçalves, Ricardo; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Bueno, Lilian Lacerda

    2017-04-08

    While the macrophage polarization is well characterized in helminth infections, the natural heterogeneity of monocytes with multiple cell phenotypes might influence the outcome of neglected diseases, such hookworm infection. Here, we report the profile of monocytes in human hookworm infections as a model to study the regulatory subpopulation of monocytes in helminth infections. Blood samples were collected from 19 Necator americanus-infected individuals and 13 healthy individuals. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated, and immunophenotyping was conducted by flow cytometry. The expressions of genes encoding human nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), interleukin 4 (IL-4), arginase-1 (Arg-1) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase were quantified by qPCR. Plasma levels of IL-4 were determined by sandwich ELISA. Unpaired t-tests or Mann-Whitney tests were used depending on the data distribution. Hookworm infected individuals (HWI) showed a significant increase in the number of monocytes/mm(3) (555.2 ± 191.0) compared to that of the non-infected (NI) individuals (120.4 ± 44.7) (p < 0.0001). While the frequencies of CD14(+)IL-10(+) and CD14(+)IL-12(+) cells were significantly reduced in the HWI compared to NI group (p = 0.0289 and p < 0.0001, respectively), the ratio between IL-10/IL-12 producing monocytes was significantly elevated in HWI (p = 0.0004), indicating the potential regulatory activity of these cells. Measurement of IL-4 levels and gene expression of IL-4 and Arg-1 (highly expressed in alternatively activated macrophages) revealed no significant differences between the NI and HWI groups. Interestingly, individuals from the HWI group had higher expression of the iNOS gene (associated with a regulatory profile) (20.27 ± 2.97) compared to the NI group (11.28 ± 1.18, p = 0.0409). Finally, individuals from the HWI group had a significantly higher frequency of CD206(+)CD23(+)IL-10(+) (7.57 ± 1.96) cells compared to

  6. Regulation of the class II MHC pathway in primary human monocytes by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hornell, Tara M C; Beresford, Guy W; Bushey, Alyssa; Boss, Jeremy M; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2003-09-01

    GM-CSF stimulates the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors and also affects mature cell function. These effects have led to the use of GM-CSF as a vaccine adjuvant with promising results; however, the mechanisms underlying GM-CSF-mediated immune potentiation are incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that the immune stimulatory role of GM-CSF is in part due to effects on class II MHC Ag presentation. We find that, in primary human monocytes treated for 24-48 h, GM-CSF increases surface class II MHC expression and decreases the relative level of the invariant chain-derived peptide, CLIP, bound to surface class II molecules. GM-CSF also increases expression of the costimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40, but not the differentiation marker CD1a or CD16. Furthermore, GM-CSF-treated monocytes are better stimulators in a mixed leukocyte reaction. Additional analyses of the class II pathway revealed that GM-CSF increases total protein and RNA levels of HLA-DR, DM, and DOalpha. Expression of class II transactivator (CIITA) types I and III, but not IV, transcripts increases in response to GM-CSF. Furthermore, GM-CSF increases the amount of CIITA associated with the DR promoter. Thus, our data argue that the proinflammatory role of GM-CSF is mediated in part through increased expression of key molecules involved in the class II MHC pathway via induction of CIITA.

  7. Human Monocytes Promote Th1 and Th17 Responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae ▿

    PubMed Central

    Olliver, Marie; Hiew, Jeffni; Mellroth, Peter; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Bergman, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia, meningitis, and sepsis in children. Human immunity to pneumococcal infections has been assumed to depend on anticapsular antibodies. However, recent findings from murine models suggest that alternative mechanisms, dependent on T helper cells, are also involved. Although the immunological events in which T helper cells contribute to acquired immunity have been studied in mice, little is known about how these responses are generated in humans. Therefore, we examined bacterial and host factors involved in the induction of Th1 and Th17 responses, using a coculture model of human monocytes and CD4+ T cells. We show that monocytes promote effector cytokine production by memory T helper cells, leading to a mixed Th1/Th17 (gamma interferon [IFN-γ]/interleukin-17 [IL-17]) profile. Both T helper cytokines were triggered by purified pneumococcal peptidoglycan; however, the balance between the two immune effector arms depended on bacterial viability. Accordingly, live pneumococci triggered a Th1-biased response via monocyte production of IL-12p40, whereas heat-killed pneumococci triggered a Th17 response through TLR2 signaling. An increased understanding of human T helper responses is essential for the development of novel pneumococcal vaccines designed to elicit cell-mediated immunity. PMID:21788380

  8. Expression of extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor in human peripheral blood monocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Olozak, I.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Butters, R. R.; Kifor, O.; Scadden, D. T.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor playing key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+o) homeostasis in parathyroid gland and kidney. Macrophage-like mononuclear cells appear at sites of osteoclastic bone resorption during bone turnover and may play a role in the "reversal" phase of skeletal remodeling that follows osteoclastic resorption and precedes osteoblastic bone formation. Bone resorption produces substantial local increases in Ca2+o that could provide a signal for such mononuclear cells present locally within the bone marrow microenvironment. Indeed, previous studies by other investigators have shown that raising Ca2+o either in vivo or in vitro stimulated the release of interleukin-6 (IL-6) from human peripheral blood monocytes, suggesting that these cells express a Ca2+o-sensing mechanism. In these earlier studies, however, the use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) failed to detect transcripts for the CaR previously cloned from parathyroid and kidney in peripheral blood monocytes. Since we recently found that non-specific esterase-positive, putative monocytes isolated from murine bone marrow express the CaR, we reevaluated the expression of this receptor in human peripheral blood monocytes. Immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis, performed using a polyclonal antiserum specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in human monocytes. In addition, the use of RT-PCR with CaR-specific primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products, identified CaR transcripts in the cells. Therefore, taken together, our data show that human peripheral blood monocytes possess both CaR protein and mRNA very similar if not identical to those expressed in parathyroid and kidney that could mediate the previously described, direct effects of Ca2+o on these cells. Furthermore, since mononuclear cells isolated from bone marrow also express the CaR, the latter might play some role in

  9. Expression of extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor in human peripheral blood monocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Olozak, I.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Butters, R. R.; Kifor, O.; Scadden, D. T.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor playing key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+o) homeostasis in parathyroid gland and kidney. Macrophage-like mononuclear cells appear at sites of osteoclastic bone resorption during bone turnover and may play a role in the "reversal" phase of skeletal remodeling that follows osteoclastic resorption and precedes osteoblastic bone formation. Bone resorption produces substantial local increases in Ca2+o that could provide a signal for such mononuclear cells present locally within the bone marrow microenvironment. Indeed, previous studies by other investigators have shown that raising Ca2+o either in vivo or in vitro stimulated the release of interleukin-6 (IL-6) from human peripheral blood monocytes, suggesting that these cells express a Ca2+o-sensing mechanism. In these earlier studies, however, the use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) failed to detect transcripts for the CaR previously cloned from parathyroid and kidney in peripheral blood monocytes. Since we recently found that non-specific esterase-positive, putative monocytes isolated from murine bone marrow express the CaR, we reevaluated the expression of this receptor in human peripheral blood monocytes. Immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis, performed using a polyclonal antiserum specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in human monocytes. In addition, the use of RT-PCR with CaR-specific primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products, identified CaR transcripts in the cells. Therefore, taken together, our data show that human peripheral blood monocytes possess both CaR protein and mRNA very similar if not identical to those expressed in parathyroid and kidney that could mediate the previously described, direct effects of Ca2+o on these cells. Furthermore, since mononuclear cells isolated from bone marrow also express the CaR, the latter might play some role in

  10. Human intravenous immunoglobulin (hIVIG) inhibits anti-CD32 antibody binding to canine DH82 cells and canine monocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Taryn A; Miller, Michelle M; Fogle, Jonathan E

    2013-02-15

    The IgG receptors CD16 and CD32 (Fc(γ)RIII and Fc(γ)RII) link the humoral immune response to effector cell immune responses by binding immune complexes. Human intravenous immunoglobulin (hIVIG) consisting of immunoglobulin from pooled donors is reported to block Fc(γ)Rs and has been used to treat a variety of canine autoimmune disorders. Fc(γ)Rs have been poorly described for canine monocytes; therefore, the objectives of this study were to: (1) identify canine monocyte/macrophage Fc(γ)R (CD16 and CD32) expression and (2) demonstrate in vitro hIVIG binding to these receptors. The canine monocyte/macrophage-like cell line (DH82) and monocytes isolated from peripheral blood of healthy dogs were evaluated by flow cytometry (FACS) for CD16 and CD32 expression using commercially available anti-CD16 and anti-CD32 antibodies directed against the human isoforms. The mean percentage of cells expressing CD16 was 55% of DH82 cells and 13% of blood monocytes and the mean percentage of cells expressing CD32 was 85% of DH82 cells and 73% of blood monocytes. Immunoprecipitation of canine DH82 cells lysate using the same anti-CD16 or anti-CD32 antibodies suggested that these anti-human antibodies recognize the canine homologues. To demonstrate Fc(γ)R blockade, cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of hIVIG and then incubated with anti-CD16 or anti-CD32 antibodies. The percentage of CD32 expression decreased in a concentration dependent fashion in DH82 cells and blood monocytes after incubation with increasing concentrations of IVIG, suggesting that hIVIG was binding to CD32 and inhibiting anti-CD32 antibody binding. The same results were not demonstrated with anti-CD16 antibody. We believe this is the first report to demonstrate Fc(γ) receptors CD16 and CD32 expression on canine monocytes and in vitro CD32 binding by human IgG, which may represent one of the immunomodulatory mechanisms of hIVIG.

  11. Glutamine and alanine-induced differential expression of intracellular IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α in LPS-stimulated monocytes in human whole-blood.

    PubMed

    Raspé, C; Czeslick, E; Weimann, A; Schinke, C; Leimert, A; Kellner, P; Simm, A; Bucher, M; Sablotzki, A

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the effects of the commonly-used immunomodulators l-glutamine, l-alanine, and the combination of both l-alanyl-l-glutamine (Dipeptamin(®)) on intracellular expression of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α during endotoxemia, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human monocytes in a whole blood system were investigated by flow cytometry. Whole blood of twenty-seven healthy volunteers was stimulated with LPS and incubated with three different amino acid solutions (1. l-glutamine, 2. l-alanine, 3. l-alanyl-l-glutamine, each concentration 2 mM, 5 mM, incubation time 3 h). CD14(+) monocytes were phenotyped in whole-blood and intracellular expression of cytokines was assessed by flow cytometry. Our investigations showed for the first time in whole blood probes, imitating best physiologically present cellular interactions, that l-glutamine caused a dose-independent inhibitory effect on IL-6 and TNF-α production in human monocytes stimulated with LPS. However, l-alanine had contrary effects on IL-6 expression, significantly upregulating expression of IL-6 in LPS-treated monocytes. The impact of l-alanine on the expression of TNF-α was comparable with glutamine. Neither amino acid was able to affect IL-8 production in LPS-stimulated monocytes. The combination of both did not influence significantly IL-6 and IL-8 expression in monocytes during endotoxemia, however strongly reduced TNF-α production. For the regulation of TNF-α, l-glutamine, l-alanine and the combination of both show a congruent and exponentiated downregulating effect during endotoxemia, for the modulation of IL-6, l-glutamine and l-alanine featured opposite regulation leading to a canceling impact of each other when recombining both amino acids.

  12. Alcohol and Cannabinoids Differentially Affect HIV Infection and Function of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells (MDDC).

    PubMed

    Agudelo, Marisela; Figueroa, Gloria; Yndart, Adriana; Casteleiro, Gianna; Muñoz, Karla; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Atluri, Venkata; Nair, Madhavan P

    2015-01-01

    During human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, alcohol has been known to induce inflammation while cannabinoids have been shown to have an anti-inflammatory role. For instance cannabinoids have been shown to reduce susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and attenuate HIV replication in macrophages. Recently, we demonstrated that alcohol induces cannabinoid receptors and regulates cytokine production by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC). However, the ability of alcohol and cannabinoids to alter MDDC function during HIV infection has not been clearly elucidated yet. In order to study the potential impact of alcohol and cannabinoids on differentiated MDDC infected with HIV, monocytes were cultured for 7 days with GM-CSF and IL-4, differentiated MDDC were infected with HIV-1Ba-L and treated with EtOH (0.1 and 0.2%), THC (5 and 10 μM), or JWH-015 (5 and 10 μM) for 4-7 days. HIV infection of MDDC was confirmed by p24 and Long Terminal Repeats (LTR) estimation. MDDC endocytosis assay and cytokine array profiles were measured to investigate the effects of HIV and substances of abuse on MDDC function. Our results show the HIV + EtOH treated MDDC had the highest levels of p24 production and expression when compared with the HIV positive controls and the cannabinoid treated cells. Although both cannabinoids, THC and JWH-015 had lower levels of p24 production and expression, the HIV + JWH-015 treated MDDC had the lowest levels of p24 when compared to the HIV + THC treated cells. In addition, MDDC endocytic function and cytokine production were also differentially altered after alcohol and cannabinoid treatments. Our results show a differential effect of alcohol and cannabinoids, which may provide insights into the divergent inflammatory role of alcohol and cannabinoids to modulate MDDC function in the context of HIV infection.

  13. In vitro activity, postantibiotic effect and human monocyte activity of grepafloxacin against Legionella species.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Jacques; St-Pierre, Claude

    1999-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the in vitro antimicrobial activity, postantibiotic effect (PAE) and human monocyte activity of grepafloxacin compared with sparfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, erythromycin and rifampicin against 181 strains of Legionella pneumophila, nine strains of L. micdadei, 10 strains of L. dumoffii, seven strains of L. longbeachae and seven other Legionella strains. METHODS: MICs were determined by standard agar dilution using buffered yeast extract (BYE) agar. PAE and human monocyte activity were determined by standard culture techniques. RESULTS: Grepafloxacin, sparfloxacin and rifampicin were the most active agents against L. pneumophila (MIC90 human monocytes. However, only grepafloxacin and ciprofloxacin prevented regrowth or killed L. pneumophila after removal of extracellular antibiotic. CONCLUSIONS: Grepafloxacin showed effective antibacterial activity against the Legionella spp. tested, and has a PAE and activity within human monocytes that suggest it may be useful in the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections caused by Legionella spp.

  14. Interaction of Salmonella typhi strains with cultured human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Sizemore, D R; Elsinghorst, E A; Eck, L C; Branstrom, A A; Hoover, D L; Warren, R L; Rubin, F A

    1997-01-01

    Human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) provided this laboratory with a tool to develop a primary-cell assay for evaluating the relative virulence of newly constructed Salmonella typhi carrier strains. In this study, the interaction with and survival within MDM were compared for delta aroA143-attenuated strains, wild-type virulent strains, and the current oral-vaccine strain, Ty21a. PMID:8975929

  15. Distinct Expression and Function of FcεRII in Human B Cells and Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wenming; Grobe, William; Walgenbach-Brünagel, Gisela; Flicker, Sabine; Yu, Chunfeng; Sylvester, Marc; Allam, Jean-Pierre; Oldenburg, Johannes; Garbi, Natalio; Valenta, Rudolf; Novak, Natalija

    2017-04-15

    FcεRII is a multifunctional low-affinity IgER that is involved in the pathogenesis of allergic, inflammatory, and neoplastic diseases. Although discrepancies in FcεRII-mediated functions are being increasingly recognized, the consequences of FcεRII activation are not completely understood. In this study, we evaluated the expression of FcεRII on human blood cells and found that it was primarily expressed on monocytes and B cells. Although IL-4 promoted expression of the FcεRIIb isoform on B cells and monocytes, the expression of the FcεRIIa isoform was not dependent on IL-4. Furthermore, FcεRII predominantly bound allergen-IgE complexes on B cells but not on monocytes. FcεRII-mediated allergen-IgE complex uptake by B cells directed Ags to MHC class II-rich compartments. FcεRII-bearing monocytes and B cells expressed high levels of the FcεRII sheddase a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10, which implies that they are important sources of soluble FcεRII. Moreover, we identified that IgE immune complex stimulation of FcεRII activated intracellular tyrosine phosphorylation via Syk in B cells but not in monocytes. Importantly, FcεRII-mediated signaling by allergen-IgE immune complexes increased IFN-γ production in B cells of allergic patients during the build-up phase of allergen-specific immunotherapy. Together, our results demonstrate that FcεRII mediates cell type-dependent function in allergic reactions. In addition, the results identify a novel allergen-IgE complex/FcεRII/Syk/IFN-γ pathway in allergic responses and suggest that FcεRII may play a role in regulating allergic reactions via modulating IFN-γ production in B cells.

  16. CD14{sup +} monocytes promote the immunosuppressive effect of human umbilical cord matrix stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ding; Chen, Ke; Du, Wei Ting; Han, Zhi-Bo; Ren, He; Chi, Ying; and others

    2010-09-10

    Here, the effect of CD14{sup +} monocytes on human umbilical cord matrix stem cell (hUC-MSC)-mediated immunosuppression was studied in vitro. hUC-MSCs exerted a potent inhibitory effect on the proliferation and interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) secretion capacities of CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells in response to anti-CD3/CD28 stimulation. Transwell co-culture system revealed that the suppressive effect was primarily mediated by soluble factors. Addition of prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors (indomethacin or NS-398) almost completely abrogated the immunosuppression activity of hUC-MSCs, identifying prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) as an important soluble mediator. CD14{sup +} monocytes were found to be able to enhance significantly the immunosuppressive effect of hUC-MSCs in a dose-dependent fashion. Moreover, the inflammatory cytokine IL-1{beta}, either exogenously added or produced by CD14{sup +} monocytes in culture, could trigger expression of high levels of PGE{sub 2} by hUC-MSCs, whereas inclusion of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) in the culture down-regulated not only PGE{sub 2} expression, but also reversed the promotional effect of CD14{sup +} monocytes and partially restored CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cell proliferation and IFN-{gamma} secretion. Our data demonstrate an important role of monocytes in the hUC-MSC-induced immunomodulation, which may have important implications in future efforts to explore the clinical potentials of hUC-MSCs.

  17. In vitro anti-inflammatory effects and immunomodulation by gemifloxacin in stimulated human THP-1 monocytes.

    PubMed

    Hall, I H; Schwab, U; Ward, E S; Ives, T

    2004-09-01

    Cultured human THP-1 monocytes were exposed to serial concentrations of gemifloxacin over 4 h after pre-stimulation with zymogen A for 1 h or Staphylococcus aureus for 2 h. The following parameters were assessed: pH, phagocytosis, c-AMP, NO, TNFalpha, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8 and H2O2 levels, enzyme activities of protein kinase C, NADPH oxidase, SOD, gluthathion reductase, NAG and cathepsin D as well as lipid peroxidation. The reversiblity of these changes was determined in the presence of known blockers of the phagocytic process. The effects of gemifloxacin on DNA synthesis and killing of S. aureus was assessed in bacteria alone and in those bacteria phagocytosed by THP-1 monocytes over 24 h. Gemifloxacin in stimulated THP-1 monocytes over the first 30 min caused an increase in c-AMP, NO, H2O2 and TNFalpha levels and protein kinase C, NADPH oxidase, glutathione reductase, NAG and cathepsin D activities. The pH became more acidic and phagocytosis was stimulated. These parameters were reversed at 1 h and continued to decline until 4 h. Lipid peroxidation was at the highest levels at 1 h and IL-8 levels at 2 h. DNA synthesis and bacterial growth were suppressed at 2 h in both S. aureus alone and bacteria phagocytosed by THP-1 monocytes. These effects were at a higher magnitude at 24 h. Gemifloxacin initiates a phagocyticidal effect of THP-1 monocytes at an early time of 30 min which plays a role in killing bacteria but a higher magnitude of killing of bacteria occurs later by a standard static mechanism. This early action of gemifloxacin should decrease the spread of infection and the inflammatory response since the tissue destruction process was attenuated at 4 h.

  18. Impaired NLRP3 inflammasome activity during fetal development regulates IL-1β production in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish A; Jen, Roger; Kan, Bernard; Sharma, Abhinav; Marchant, Elizabeth; Tang, Anthony; Gadawski, Izabelle; Senger, Christof; Skoll, Amanda; Turvey, Stuart E; Sly, Laura M; Côté, Hélène C F; Lavoie, Pascal M

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production is impaired in cord blood monocytes. However, the mechanism underlying this developmental attenuation remains unclear. Here, we analyzed the extent of variability within the Toll-like receptor (TLR)/NLRP3 inflammasome pathways in human neonates. We show that immature low CD14 expressing/CD16(pos) monocytes predominate before 33 weeks of gestation, and that these cells lack production of the pro-IL-1β precursor protein upon LPS stimulation. In contrast, high levels of pro-IL-1β are produced within high CD14 expressing monocytes, although these cells are unable to secrete mature IL-1β. The lack of secreted IL-1β in these monocytes parallels a reduction of NLRP3 induction following TLR stimulation resulting in a lack of caspase-1 activity before 29 weeks of gestation, whereas expression of the apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD and function of the P2×7 receptor are preserved. Our analyses also reveal a strong inhibitory effect of placental infection on LPS/ATP-induced caspase-1 activity in cord blood monocytes. Lastly, secretion of IL-1β in preterm neonates is restored to adult levels during the neonatal period, indicating rapid maturation of these responses after birth. Collectively, our data highlight important developmental mechanisms regulating IL-1β responses early in gestation, in part due to a downregulation of TLR-mediated NLRP3 expression. Such mechanisms may serve to limit potentially damaging inflammatory responses in a developing fetus. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during sepsis mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α.

    PubMed

    Shalova, Irina N; Lim, Jyue Yuan; Chittezhath, Manesh; Zinkernagel, Annelies S; Beasley, Federico; Hernández-Jiménez, Enrique; Toledano, Victor; Cubillos-Zapata, Carolina; Rapisarda, Annamaria; Chen, Jinmiao; Duan, Kaibo; Yang, Henry; Poidinger, Michael; Melillo, Giovanni; Nizet, Victor; Arnalich, Francisco; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Biswas, Subhra K

    2015-03-17

    Sepsis is characterized by a dysregulated inflammatory response to infection. Despite studies in mice, the cellular and molecular basis of human sepsis remains unclear and effective therapies are lacking. Blood monocytes serve as the first line of host defense and are equipped to recognize and respond to infection by triggering an immune-inflammatory response. However, the response of these cells in human sepsis and their contribution to sepsis pathogenesis is poorly understood. To investigate this, we performed a transcriptomic, functional, and mechanistic analysis of blood monocytes from patients during sepsis and after recovery. Our results revealed the functional plasticity of monocytes during human sepsis, wherein they transited from a pro-inflammatory to an immunosuppressive phenotype, while enhancing protective functions like phagocytosis, anti-microbial activity, and tissue remodeling. Mechanistically, hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α) mediated this functional re-programming of monocytes, revealing a potential mechanism for their therapeutic targeting to regulate human sepsis.

  20. Blood monocytes and tumor-infiltrating macrophages in human breast cancer: differences in activation level as assessed by lysozyme content.

    PubMed

    Steele, R J; Eremin, O; Brown, M

    1983-11-01

    The lysozyme content of tumor-infiltrating macrophages (TIM) from human breast carcinomas has been compared with that of blood monocytes both from breast cancer patients and tumor-free controls. Cells were identified as macrophages or monocytes with the use of rosetting reactions to detect receptors for the Fc portion of IgG and differentiation antigens, and lysozyme was detected by an immunoperoxidase technique on cytocentrifuge preparations of rosetted cells. Significantly more monocytes from patients with breast cancer contained lysozyme than monocytes from comparable controls, suggesting the presence of activated circulating blood monocytes. Conversely, TIM were virtually devoid of lysozyme. This lack of enzyme was not due to methodologic factors and may represent defective antitumor activity.

  1. Vitamin C suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced procoagulant response of human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Parahuleva, M S; Jung, J; Burgazli, M; Erdogan, A; Parviz, B; Hölschermann, H

    2016-05-01

    Although vitamin C is a strong antioxidant, the epidemiologic evidence to support its role in lowering risk of cardiovascular disease is inconsistent. In order to define the role of vitamin C in vascular pathophysiology, we have investigated the effect of vitamin C on the tissue factor (TF) and Factor VII Activating Protease (FSAP) expression induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in human monocyte-derived macrophages. Vitamin C at clinically relevant doses was tested to its ability to influence the LPS- and reactive oxygen species (ROS) - generating system of xanthine/xanthine oxidase (X/XO) NF-kB activity in human monocyte-derived macrophages. Vitamin C-treatment prevents LPS- and ROS-induced DNA-binding activity of NF-kB in a concentration-dependent fashion. Vitamin C also inhibited the phosphorylation and proteolytic degradation of the inhibitor protein IkBa. In parallel to regulate NF-kB activity, vitamin C reduced the expression of TF and FSAP, genes known to be induced by bacterial LPS and triggered the extrinsic coagulation cascade and linked thrombosis with inflammation. Vitamin C alters pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulatory processes via inhibition of NF-kB activation and exerts beneficial antiatherogenic effects on human monocyte-derived macrophages in addition to its anti-oxidant properties.

  2. Natural haemozoin induces expression and release of human monocyte tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1.

    PubMed

    Polimeni, Manuela; Valente, Elena; Ulliers, Daniela; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Giribaldi, Giuliana; Prato, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Recently matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and its endogenous inhibitor (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, TIMP-1) have been implicated in complicated malaria. In vivo, mice with cerebral malaria (CM) display high levels of both MMP-9 and TIMP-1, and in human patients TIMP-1 serum levels directly correlate with disease severity. In vitro, natural haemozoin (nHZ, malarial pigment) enhances monocyte MMP-9 expression and release. The present study analyses the effects of nHZ on TIMP-1 regulation in human adherent monocytes. nHZ induced TIMP-1 mRNA expression and protein release, and promoted TNF-α, IL-1β, and MIP-1α/CCL3 production. Blocking antibodies or recombinant cytokines abrogated or mimicked nHZ effects on TIMP-1, respectively. p38 MAPK and NF-κB inhibitors blocked all nHZ effects on TIMP-1 and pro-inflammatory molecules. Still, total gelatinolytic activity was enhanced by nHZ despite TIMP-1 induction. Collectively, these data indicate that nHZ induces inflammation-mediated expression and release of human monocyte TIMP-1 through p38 MAPK- and NF-κB-dependent mechanisms. However, TIMP-1 induction is not sufficient to counterbalance nHZ-dependent MMP-9 enhancement. Future investigation on proteinase-independent functions of TIMP-1 (i.e. cell survival promotion and growth/differentiation inhibition) is needed to clarify the role of TIMP-1 in malaria pathogenesis.

  3. Blood monocyte transcriptome and epigenome analyses reveal loci associated with human atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongmei; Reynolds, Lindsay M; Ding, Jingzhong; Hou, Li; Lohman, Kurt; Young, Tracey; Cui, Wei; Huang, Zhiqing; Grenier, Carole; Wan, Ma; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Siscovick, David; Hou, Lifang; Psaty, Bruce M; Rich, Stephen S; Rotter, Jerome I; Kaufman, Joel D; Burke, Gregory L; Murphy, Susan; Jacobs, David R; Post, Wendy; Hoeschele, Ina; Bell, Douglas A; Herrington, David; Parks, John S; Tracy, Russell P; McCall, Charles E; Stein, James H

    2017-08-30

    Little is known regarding the epigenetic basis of atherosclerosis. Here we present the CD14+ blood monocyte transcriptome and epigenome signatures associated with human atherosclerosis. The transcriptome signature includes transcription coactivator, ARID5B, which is known to form a chromatin derepressor complex with a histone H3K9Me2-specific demethylase and promote adipogenesis and smooth muscle development. ARID5B CpG (cg25953130) methylation is inversely associated with both ARID5B expression and atherosclerosis, consistent with this CpG residing in an ARID5B enhancer region, based on chromatin capture and histone marks data. Mediation analysis supports assumptions that ARID5B expression mediates effects of cg25953130 methylation and several cardiovascular disease risk factors on atherosclerotic burden. In lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human THP1 monocytes, ARID5B knockdown reduced expression of genes involved in atherosclerosis-related inflammatory and lipid metabolism pathways, and inhibited cell migration and phagocytosis. These data suggest that ARID5B expression, possibly regulated by an epigenetically controlled enhancer, promotes atherosclerosis by dysregulating immunometabolism towards a chronic inflammatory phenotype.The molecular mechanisms mediating the impact of environmental factors in atherosclerosis are unclear. Here, the authors examine CD14+ blood monocyte's transcriptome and epigenome signatures to find differential methylation and expression of ARID5B to be associated with human atherosclerosis.

  4. Matrix metalloproteinase-12 gene regulation by a PPAR alpha agonist in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Souissi, Imen Jguirim; Billiet, Ludivine; Cuaz-Perolin, Clarisse; Rouis, Mustapha

    2008-11-01

    MMP-12, a macrophage-specific matrix metalloproteinase with large substrate specificity, has been reported to be highly expressed in mice, rabbits and human atherosclerotic lesions. Increased MMP-12 from inflammatory macrophages is associated with several degenerative diseases such as atherosclerosis. In this manuscript, we show that IL-1{beta}, a proinflammatory cytokine found in atherosclerotic plaques, increases both mRNA and protein levels of MMP-12 in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM). Since peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), such as PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, are expressed in macrophages and because PPAR activation exerts an anti-inflammatory effect on vascular cells, we have investigated the effect of PPAR{alpha} and {gamma} isoforms on MMP-12 regulation in HMDM. Our results show that MMP-12 expression (mRNA and protein) is down regulated in IL-1{beta}-treated macrophages only in the presence of a specific PPAR{alpha} agonist, GW647, in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, this inhibitory effect was abolished in IL-1{beta}-stimulated peritoneal macrophages isolated from PPAR{alpha}{sup -/-} mice and treated with the PPAR{alpha} agonist, GW647. Moreover, reporter gene transfection experiments using different MMP-12 promoter constructs showed a reduction of the promoter activities by {approx} 50% in IL-1{beta}-stimulated PPAR{alpha}-pre-treated cells. However, MMP-12 promoter analysis did not reveal the presence of a PPRE response element. The IL-1{beta} effect is known to be mediated through the AP-1 binding site. Mutation of the AP-1 site, located at - 81 in the MMP-12 promoter region relative to the transcription start site, followed by transfection analysis, gel shift and ChIP experiments revealed that the inhibitory effect was the consequence of the protein-protein interaction between GW 647-activated PPAR{alpha} and c-Fos or c-Jun transcription factors, leading to inhibition of their binding to the AP-1 motif. These studies

  5. Cell-to-cell contact of human monocytes with infected arterial smooth-muscle cells enhances growth of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Puolakkainen, Mirja; Campbell, Lee Ann; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Richards, Theresa; Patton, Dorothy L; Kuo, Cho-Chou

    2003-02-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae can infect arterial cells. It has been shown that coculture of human monocytes (U937) and endothelial cells promotes infection of C. pneumoniae in endothelial cells and that the enhancement was mediated by a soluble factor (insulin-like growth factor 2) secreted by monocytes. In this study, it is shown that coculture of monocytes with C. pneumoniae enhances infection of C. pneumoniae in arterial smooth-muscle cells 5.3-fold at a monocyte-to-smooth-muscle cell ratio of 5. However, unlike endothelial cells, no enhancement was observed if monocytes were placed in cell culture inserts or if conditioned medium from monocyte cultures was used, which suggests that cell-to-cell contact is critical. The addition of mannose 6-phosphate or octyl glucoside, a nonionic detergent containing a sugar group, to cocultures inhibited the enhancement. These findings suggest that the monocyte-smooth-muscle cell interaction may be mediated by mannose 6-phosphate receptors present on monocytes.

  6. Tissue factor activity in human monocytes is regulated by plasma: implications for the high and low responder phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Nijziel, M; van Oerle, R; van 't Veer, C; van Pampus, E; Lindhout, T; Hamulyák, K

    2001-01-01

    The 'high and low responder phenomenon' of monocyte tissue factor (MTF) activity has been attributed to effects on monocytes by granulocytes, platelets and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To study the possible contribution of plasma to the high and low responder phenomenon, we measured the MTF activity in isolated cryopreserved human monocytes from two donors (monocytes A and monocytes B) after incubation in a plasma environment depleted of granulocytes, platelets and LPS. In buffer only, MTF activity was 643 and 679 fM (fM = final concentration of tissue factor), in normal pooled plasma, it was 1478 and 1615 fM (P = 0.001), respectively, in monocytes A and in monocytes B. Incubation with individual plasma samples from healthy controls (n = 43) gave a median MTF of 1355 fM (range 1044-1976 fM) and 1329 fM (range 858-1951 fM) respectively. A plasma consistently induced a higher or lower level of MTF activity in both monocytes: r = 0.82 (P < 0.00001). Coumarin use did not influence the high and low responder phenomenon. In the absence of granulocytes, platelets and LPS, plasma determines the high and low responder phenomenon. This phenomenon is not influenced by coumarin treatment.

  7. Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Growth in Human Monocytes as a Risk Factor for Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Clamfication) Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Growth in Human Monocytes as a Risk Factor for Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever 𔃼 PERSONAL AjTHOR(S...FELD GROUP SUBGROUP Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Growth in Human Monocytes as a Risk Factor for Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever. 19...ABSTRAC7 (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) Serum specimens~collected during a prospective study of dengue infections among

  8. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal–placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN+CD14+CD1a− phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal–fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  9. CD16⁺ monocytes with smooth muscle cell characteristics are reduced in human renal chronic transplant dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Boersema, M; van den Born, J C; van Ark, J; Harms, G; Seelen, M A; van Dijk, M C R F; van Goor, H; Navis, G J; Popa, E R; Hillebrands, J L

    2015-05-01

    In chronic transplant dysfunction (CTD), persistent (allo)immune-mediated inflammation eventually leads to tissue remodeling including neointima formation in intragraft arteries. We previously showed that recipient-derived neointimal α-SMA(+) smooth muscle-like cells are present in human renal allografts with CTD. Human PBMC contain myeloid cells capable of differentiating into α-SMA(+) cells in vitro; the phenotype of the ancestral subset is as yet unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether monocyte subsets contain cells with smooth muscle-like cell differentiation capacity and whether CTD in renal transplant recipients is associated with a shift in these monocyte subsets. To accomplish this goal, monocyte subsets from healthy controls were sorted based on CD14 and CD16 expression to investigate gene expression levels of mesenchymal markers α-SMA and SM22α. CD14(+)/CD16(++) monocytes displayed increased α-SMA and SM22α mRNA expression compared with CD14(++)/CD16(-) monocytes, suggesting increased differentiation potential toward smooth muscle-like cells. Flow cytometry revealed that in non-CTD transplant recipients the percentage of CD14(+)/CD16(++) monocytes was reduced, with an even further reduction in patients with CTD. To determine a potential correlation between CD14(+)/CD16(++) monocytes and α-SMA(+) cell outgrowth potential in vitro, PBMC of healthy controls and transplant recipients with and without CTD were cultured under fibrotic culture conditions, and indeed a significant correlation (p=0.0002, r=0.62) was observed. Finally, double staining for α-SMA and CD16 revealed presence of α-SMA(+)CD16(+) cells in kidney explants from CTD patients, albeit at very low numbers. Our data represent evidence that, compared to CD14(++)CD16(-) monocytes, CD14(+)CD16(++) monocytes have an increased expression of smooth muscle cell-associated genes. This monocyte subpopulation is reduced in renal transplant patients with CTD, possibly due to selective

  10. Adiponectin Enhances Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression and Promotes Monocyte Adhesion in Human Synovial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsien-Te; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Chen, Jui-Chieh; Shih, James Meng-Kun; Chen, Yen-Jen; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Adiponectin is a protein hormone secreted predominantly by differentiated adipocytes and is involved in energy homeostasis. Adiponectin expression is significantly high in the synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is an important adhesion molecule that mediates monocyte adhesion and infiltration during OA pathogenesis. Adiponectin-induced expression of ICAM-1 in human OA synovial fibroblasts (OASFs) was examined by using qPCR, flow cytometry and western blotting. The intracellular signaling pathways were investigated by pretreated with inhibitors or transfection with siRNA. The monocyte THP-1 cell line was used for an adhesion assay with OASFs. Stimulation of OASFs with adiponectin induced ICAM-1 expression. Pretreatment with AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitors (AraA and compound C) or transfection with siRNA against AMPKα1 and two AMPK upstream activator- liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) diminished the adiponectin-induced ICAM-1 expression. Stimulation of OASFs with adiponectin increased phosphorylation of LKB1, CaMKII, AMPK, and c-Jun, resulting in c-Jun binding to AP-1 element of ICAM-1 promoter. In addition, adiponectin-induced activation of the LKB1/CaMKII, AMPK, and AP-1 pathway increased the adhesion of monocytes to the OASF monolayer. Our results suggest that adiponectin increases ICAM-1 expression in human OASFs via the LKB1/CaMKII, AMPK, c-Jun, and AP-1 signaling pathway. Adiponectin-induced ICAM-1 expression promoted the adhesion of monocytes to human OASFs. These findings may provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of OA and can utilize this knowledge to design a new therapeutic strategy. PMID:24667577

  11. Factor H Binds to Extracellular DNA Traps Released from Human Blood Monocytes in Response to Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Luke D.; Abdelfatah, Mahmoud A.; Jo, Emeraldo A. H.; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Westermann, Martin; Beyersdorf, Niklas; Lorkowski, Stefan; Zipfel, Peter F.; Skerka, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Upon systemic infection with human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans (C. albicans), human monocytes and polymorph nuclear neutrophilic granulocytes are the first immune cells to respond and come into contact with C. albicans. Monocytes exert immediate candidacidal activity and inhibit germination, mediate phagocytosis, and kill fungal cells. Here, we show that human monocytes spontaneously respond to C. albicans cells via phagocytosis, decondensation of nuclear DNA, and release of this decondensed DNA in the form of extracellular traps (called monocytic extracellular traps: MoETs). Both subtypes of monocytes (CD14++CD16−/CD14+CD16+) formed MoETs within the first hours upon contact with C. albicans. MoETs were characterized by the presence of citrullinated histone, myeloperoxidase, lactoferrin, and elastase. MoETs were also formed in response to Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, indicating a general reaction of monocytes to infectious microbes. MoET induction differs from extracellular trap formation in macrophages as MoETs are not triggered by simvastatin, an inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis and inducer of extracellular traps in macrophages. Extracellular traps from both monocytes and neutrophils activate complement and C3b is deposited. However, factor H (FH) binds via C3b to the extracellular DNA, mediates cofactor activity, and inhibits the induction of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta in monocytes. Altogether, the results show that human monocytes release extracellular DNA traps in response to C. albicans and that these traps finally bind FH via C3b to presumably support clearance without further inflammation. PMID:28133459

  12. A Single-Cell Gene-Expression Profile Reveals Inter-Cellular Heterogeneity within Human Monocyte Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Gren, Susanne T.; Rasmussen, Thomas B.; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Håkansson, Katarina; Gerwien, Jens G.; Grip, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Human monocytes are a heterogeneous cell population classified into three different subsets: Classical CD14++CD16-, intermediate CD14++CD16+, and non-classical CD14+CD16++ monocytes. These subsets are distinguished by their differential expression of CD14 and CD16, and unique gene expression profile. So far, the variation in inter-cellular gene expression within the monocyte subsets is largely unknown. In this study, the cellular variation within each human monocyte subset from a single healthy donor was described by using a novel single-cell PCR gene-expression analysis tool. We investigated 86 different genes mainly encoding cell surface markers, and proteins involved in immune regulation. Within the three human monocyte subsets, our descriptive findings show multimodal expression of key immune response genes, such as CD40, NFⱪB1, RELA, TLR4, TLR8 and TLR9. Furthermore, we discovered one subgroup of cells within the classical monocytes, which showed alterations of 22 genes e.g. IRF8, CD40, CSF1R, NFⱪB1, RELA and TNF. Additionally one subgroup within the intermediate and non-classical monocytes also displayed distinct gene signatures by altered expression of 8 and 6 genes, respectively. Hence the three monocyte subsets can be further subdivided according to activation status and differentiation, independently of the traditional classification based on cell surface markers. Demonstrating the use and the ability to discover cell heterogeneity within defined populations of human monocytes is of great importance, and can be useful in unravelling inter-cellular variation in leukocyte populations, identifying subpopulations involved in disease pathogenesis and help tailor new therapies. PMID:26650546

  13. Creatine kinase expression and creatine phosphate accumulation are developmentally regulated during differentiation of mouse and human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the expression of creatine kinase (CK) and the accumulation of creatine phosphate during the differentiation of human and mouse peripheral blood monocytes. Mouse monocytes cultured for 24 h do not contain detectable levels of CK and creatine phosphate. However, resident tissue macrophages and inflammatory elicited macrophages obtained from the peritoneal cavities of mice have 70 and 300 mU per mg protein of CK activity and contain 3 and 6 mol of creatine phosphate per mol of ATP, respectively. The major isozyme of CK in these cells has been identified as the brain form. These findings suggest that the differentiation of monocytes into macrophages is associated with the expression of CK and the accumulation of creatine phosphate. We have found a similar pattern in human monocytes. Human blood monocytes, maintained in culture for 24 or 48 h, do not contain detectable levels of CK or creatine phosphate. Monocyte-derived macrophages (monocytes maintained in tissue cultures for 1 to 2 wk) have up to 100 mU per mg protein of CK activity and contain 0.5 mol of creatine phosphate per mol of ATP. Human macrophages express multiple isozymes of CK including the brain (BB) and possibly the mitochondrial forms of this enzyme. Thus, the expression of CK and the accumulation of creatine phosphate in human monocytes is induced by their in vitro cultivation. The induction of CK during in vitro cultivation occurs independently of the concentration of creatine in the medium. However, the size of the creatine phosphate pool varies with respect to extracellular creatine concentration. Creatine phosphate and CK are not detectable in freshly isolated human lymphocytes, polymorphonuclear leukocytes or erythrocytes, but are found in freshly isolated human platelets. PMID:6699543

  14. Interaction between human monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells induces vascular endothelial growth factor expression.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Y; Ikeda, U; Maeda, Y; Takahashi, M; Takizawa, T; Okada, M; Funayama, H; Shimada, K

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether synthesis of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a major mitogen for vascular endothelial cells, was induced by a cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Human VSMCs and THP-1 cells (human monocytoid cell) were cocultured. VEGF levels in the coculture medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Northern blot analysis of VEGF mRNA was performed using a specific cDNA probe. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine which types of cell produce VEGF. Adding THP-1 cells to VSMCs for 24 h increased VEGF levels of the culture media, 8- and 10-fold relative to those of THP-1 cells and VSMCs alone, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that VEGF mRNA expression was induced in the cocultured cells and peaked after 12 h. Immunohistochemistry disclosed that both types of cell in the coculture produced VEGF. Separate coculture experiments revealed that both direct contact and a soluble factor(s) contributed to VEGF production. Neutralizing anti-interleukin (IL)-6 antibody inhibited VEGF production by the coculture of THP-1 cells and VSMCs. A cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and VSMCs induced VEGF synthesis in both types of cell. An IL-6 mediated mechanism is at least partially involved in VEGF production by the cocultures. Local VEGF production induced by a monocyte-VSMC interaction may play an important role in atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling.

  15. ER stress induced impaired TLR signaling and macrophage differentiation of human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Komura, Takuya; Sakai, Yoshio; Honda, Masao; Takamura, Toshinari; Wada, Takashi; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2013-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress causes impairment of the intracellular protein synthesis machinery, affecting various organ functions and homeostasis systems, including immunity. We found that ER stress induced by the N-linked glycosylation inhibitor, tunicamycin, caused susceptibility to apoptosis in the human monocytic cell line, THP-1 cells. Importantly, prior to tunicamycin-induced apoptosis, the proinflammatory response to toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation was attenuated with respect to the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines. This impaired expression of proinflammatory cytokines was a consequence of the inhibition of NF-κB activation. Moreover, tunicamycin-induced ER stress disturbed the differentiation of THP-1 cells into macrophages induced by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate treatment. We also confirmed that ER stress affected the response of primary human monocytes to TLR ligand and their ability to differentiate into macrophages. These data suggest that ER stress imposes an important pathological insult to the immune system, affecting the crucial functions of monocytes.

  16. Melleolides induce rapid cell death in human primary monocytes and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bohnert, Markus; Scherer, Olga; Wiechmann, Katja; König, Stefanie; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Werz, Oliver

    2014-08-01

    The melleolides are structurally unique and bioactive natural products of the basidiomycete genus Armillaria. Here, we report on cytotoxic effects of melleolides from Armillaria mellea towards non-transformed human primary monocytes and human cancer cell lines, respectively. In contrast to staurosporine or pretubulysin that are less cytotoxic for monocytes, the cytotoxic potency of the active melleolides in primary monocytes is comparable to that in cancer cells. The onset of the cytotoxic effects of melleolides was rapid (within <1 h), as compared to the apoptosis inducer staurosporine, the protein biosynthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, and the DNA transcription inhibitor actinomycin D (>5 h, each). Side-by-side comparison with the detergent triton X-100 and staurosporine in microscopic and flow cytometric analysis studies as well as analysis of the viability of mitochondria exclude cell lysis and apoptosis as relevant or primary mechanisms. Our results rather point to necrotic features of cell death mediated by an as yet elusive but rapid mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. In vitro immunotoxicity assessment of culture-derived extracellular vesicles in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rosas, Lucia E.; Elgamal, Ola A.; Mo, Xiaokui; Phelps, Mitch A.; Schmittgen, Thomas D.; Papenfuss, Tracey L.

    2016-01-01

    The potential to engineer extracellular vesicles (EV) that target specific cells and deliver a therapeutic payload has propelled a growing interest in their development as promising therapeutics. These EV are often produced from cultured cells. Very little is known about the interaction of cell culture-derived EV with cells of the immune system and their potential immunomodulatory effects. The present study evaluated potential immunotoxic effects of HEK293T-derived EV on the human monocytic cell lines THP-1 and U937. Incubation of cells with different doses of EV for 16–24 h was followed by assessment of cytotoxicity and cell function by flow cytometry. Changes in cell functionality were evaluated by the capacity of cells to phagocytize fluorescent microspheres. In addition, the internalization of labeled EV in THP-1 and U937 cells was evaluated. Exposure to EV did not affect the viability of THP-1 or U937 cells. Although lower doses of the EV increased phagocytic capacity in both cell lines, phagocytic efficiency of individual cells was not affected by EV exposure at any of the doses evaluated. This study also demonstrated that THP-1 and U937 monocytic cells are highly permissive to EV entry in a dose-response manner. These results suggest that, although HEK293T-derived EV are efficiently internalized by human monocytic cells, they do not exert a cytotoxic effect or alter phagocytic efficiency on the cell lines evaluated. PMID:27075513

  18. Characterization of human monocyte activation by a water soluble preparation of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae.

    PubMed

    Pugh, N; Pasco, D S

    2001-11-01

    Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (AFA) is a fresh-water microalgae that is consumed as a nutrient-dense food source and for its health-enhancing properties. The current research characterizes the effect of a water soluble preparation from AFA on human monocyte/macrophage function and compares the effect of AFA with responses from known agents that modulate the immune system. At 0.5 pg/ml the AFA extract robustly activated nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) directed luciferase expression in THP-1 human monocytic cells to levels at 50% of those achieved by maximal concentrations (10 microg/ml) of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In addition, the AFA extract substantially increased mRNA levels of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and enhanced the DNA binding activity of NF-kappa B. The effects of AFA water soluble preparation were similar to the responses displayed by LPS, but clearly different from responses exhibited by tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) and interferon-gamma (INF-gamma). Pretreatment of THP-1 monocytes with factors known to induce hyporesponsiveness suppressed both AFA-dependent and LPS-dependent activation. These results suggest that the macrophage-activating properties of the AFA water soluble preparation are mediated through pathways that are similar to LPS-dependent activation.

  19. INFgamma stimulates arginine transport through system y+L in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Rotoli, Bianca Maria; Bussolati, Ovidio; Sala, Roberto; Barilli, Amelia; Talarico, Enrica; Gazzola, Gian C; Dall'Asta, Valeria

    2004-07-30

    Freshly isolated human monocytes transport L-arginine mostly through a sodium independent, NEM insensitive pathway inhibited by L-leucine in the presence, but not in the absence of sodium. Interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) stimulates this pathway, identifiable with system y+L, and markedly enhances the expression of SLC7A7, the gene that encodes for system y+L subunit y+LAT1, but not of SLC7A6, that codes for the alternative subunit y+LAT2. System y+ plays a minor role in arginine uptake by monocytes and the expression of system y+-related genes, SLC7A1 and SLC7A2, is not changed by IFNgamma. These results demonstrate that system y+L is sensitive to IFNgamma.

  20. Transcriptional profiling reveals functional dichotomy between human slan(+) non-classical monocytes and myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen-Kerkhoff, Nathalie; Lundberg, Kristina; Westers, Theresia M; Kordasti, Shahram; Bontkes, Hetty J; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Lindstedt, Malin; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A

    2017-10-01

    Human 6-sulfo LacNac-positive (slan(+)) cells have been subject to a paradigm debate. They have previously been classified as a distinct dendritic cell (DC) subset. However, evidence has emerged that they may be more related to monocytes than to DCs. To gain deeper insight into the functional specialization of slan(+) cells, we have compared them with both conventional myeloid DC subsets (CD1c(+) and CD141(+)) in human peripheral blood (PB). With the use of genome-wide transcriptional profiling, as well as functional tests, we clearly show that slan(+) cells form a distinct, non-DC-like population. They cluster away from both DC subsets, and their gene-expression profile evidently suggests involvement in distinct inflammatory processes. An extensive transcriptional meta-analysis confirmed the relationship of slan(+) cells with the monocytic compartment rather than with DCs. From a functional perspective, their ability to prime CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells is relatively low. Combined with the finding that "antigen presentation by MHC class II" is at the top of under-represented pathways in slan(+) cells, this points to a minimal role in directing adaptive T cell immunity. Rather, the higher expression levels of complement receptors on their cell surface, together with their high secretion of IL-1β and IL-6, imply a specific role in innate inflammatory processes, which is consistent with their recent identification as non-classical monocytes. This study extends our knowledge on DC/monocyte subset biology under steady-state conditions and contributes to our understanding of their role in immune-mediated diseases and their potential use in immunotherapeutic strategies. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  1. Saturated fatty acids activate caspase-4/5 in human monocytes, triggering IL-1β and IL-18 release.

    PubMed

    Pillon, Nicolas J; Chan, Kenny L; Zhang, Shitian; Mejdani, Marios; Jacobson, Maya R; Ducos, Alexandre; Bilan, Philip J; Niu, Wenyan; Klip, Amira

    2016-11-01

    Obesity is associated with metabolic tissue infiltration by monocyte-derived macrophages. Saturated fatty acids contribute to proinflammatory gene induction in tissue-embedded immune cells. However, it is unknown how circulating monocytes, the macrophage precursors, react to high-fat environments. In macrophages, saturated fatty acids activate inflammatory pathways and, notably, prime caspase-associated inflammasomes. Inflammasome-activated IL-1β contributes to type 2 diabetes. We hypothesized that 1) human monocytes from obese patients show caspase activation, and 2) fatty acids trigger this response and consequent release of IL-1β/IL-18. Human peripheral blood monocytes were sorted by flow cytometry, and caspase activity was measured with a FLICA dye-based assay. Blood monocytes from obese individuals exhibited elevated caspase activity. To explore the nature and consequence of this activity, human THP1 monocytes were exposed to saturated or unsaturated fatty acids. Caspase activity was revealed by isoform-specific cleavage and enzymatic activity; cytokine expression/release was measured by qPCR and ELISA. Palmitate, but not palmitoleate, increased caspase activity in parallel to the release of IL-1β and IL-18. Palmitate induced eventual monocyte cell death with features of pyroptosis (an inflammation-linked cell death program involving caspase-4/5), scored through LDH release, vital dye influx, cell volume changes, and nuclear morphology. Notably, selective gene silencing or inhibition of caspase-4/5 reduced palmitate-induced release of IL-1β and IL-18. In summary, monocytes from obese individuals present elevated caspase activity. Mechanistically, palmitate activates a pyroptotic program in monocytes through caspase-4/5, causing inflammatory cytokine release, additional to inflammasomes. These caspases represent potential, novel, therapeutic targets to taper obesity-associated inflammation. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Minimally modified low density lipoprotein induces monocyte chemotactic protein 1 in human endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, S.D.; Berliner, J.A.; Valente, A.J.; Territo, M.C.; Navab, M.; Parhami, F.; Gerrity, R.; Schwartz, C.J.; Fogelman, A.M.

    1990-07-01

    After exposure to low density lipoprotein (LDL) that had been minimally modified by oxidation (MM-LDL), human endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) cultured separately or together produced 2- to 3-fold more monocyte chemotactic activity than did control cells or cells exposed to freshly isolated LDL. This increase in monocyte chemotactic activity was paralleled by increases in mRNA levels for a monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) that is constitutively produced by the human glioma U-105MG cell line. Antibody that had been prepared against cultured baboon smooth muscle cell chemotactic factor (anti-SMCF) did not inhibit monocyte migration induced by the potent bacterial chemotactic factor f-Met-Leu-Phe. However, anti-SMCF completely inhibited the monocyte chemotactic activity found in the media of U-105MG cells, EC, and SMC before and after exposure to MM-LDL. Moreover, monocyte migration into the subendothelial space of a coculture of EC and SMC that had been exposed to MM-LDL was completely inhibited by anti-SMCF. Anti-SMCF specifically immunoprecipitated 10-kDa and 12.5-kDa proteins from EC. Incorporation of (35S)methionine into the immunoprecipitated proteins paralleled the monocyte chemotactic activity found in the medium of MM-LDL stimulated EC and the levels of MCP-1 mRNA found in the EC. We conclude that SMCF is in fact MCP-1 and MCP-1 is induced by MM-LDL.

  3. Ultrastructural studies of the interaction between liposome-activated human blood monocytes and allogeneic tumor cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bucana, C. D.; Hoyer, L. C.; Schroit, A. J.; Kleinerman, E.; Fidler, I. J.

    1983-01-01

    Human blood monocytes were activated to become tumoricidal by incubation with liposomes containing muramyl tripeptide-phosphatidylethanolamine, a lipophilic derivative of muramyl dipeptide. The interaction of both tumoricidal and control monocytes with target melanoma cells was analyzed by means of light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The authors found increased clustering around the melanoma cells by tumoricidal monocytes as compared with the control monocytes. The initial clustering of the tumoricidal monocytes around the tumor cells was followed by the establishment of numerous focal points of contact (binding), some of which actually exhibited areas of discontinuous membrane, a finding confirmed by stereophotography. By 24-48 hours of cocultivation, many of the target cells exhibited zones of vacuolation in the immediate vicinity of the tumoricidal monocytes, suggesting target cell damage. (This finding was confirmed by time-course cytotoxicity assays.) The authors conclude that tumor cell lysis mediated by activated human blood monocytes occurs as the final step in a process that includes the establishment of a direct cell-cell contact, damage to the target cell membrane, and the development of areas of vacuolation in the target cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:6859224

  4. cGAS Senses Human Cytomegalovirus and Induces Type I Interferon Responses in Human Monocyte-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paijo, Jennifer; Döring, Marius; Spanier, Julia; Grabski, Elena; Nooruzzaman, Mohammed; Schmidt, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Messerle, Martin; Hornung, Veit; Kaever, Volkhard; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections of healthy individuals are mostly unnoticed and result in viral latency. However, HCMV can also cause devastating disease, e.g., upon reactivation in immunocompromised patients. Yet, little is known about human immune cell sensing of DNA-encoded HCMV. Recent studies indicated that during viral infection the cyclic GMP/AMP synthase (cGAS) senses cytosolic DNA and catalyzes formation of the cyclic di-nucleotide cGAMP, which triggers stimulator of interferon genes (STING) and thus induces antiviral type I interferon (IFN-I) responses. We found that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) as well as monocyte-derived DC and macrophages constitutively expressed cGAS and STING. HCMV infection further induced cGAS, whereas STING expression was only moderately affected. Although pDC expressed particularly high levels of cGAS, and the cGAS/STING axis was functional down-stream of STING, as indicated by IFN-I induction upon synthetic cGAMP treatment, pDC were not susceptible to HCMV infection and mounted IFN-I responses in a TLR9-dependent manner. Conversely, HCMV infected monocyte-derived cells synthesized abundant cGAMP levels that preceded IFN-I production and that correlated with the extent of infection. CRISPR/Cas9- or siRNA-mediated cGAS ablation in monocytic THP-1 cells and primary monocyte-derived cells, respectively, impeded induction of IFN-I responses following HCMV infection. Thus, cGAS is a key sensor of HCMV for IFN-I induction in primary human monocyte-derived DC and macrophages. PMID:27058035

  5. Lactoferrin inhibits or promotes Legionella pneumophila intracellular multiplication in nonactivated and interferon gamma-activated human monocytes depending upon its degree of iron saturation. Iron-lactoferrin and nonphysiologic iron chelates reverse monocyte activation against Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, T F; Horwitz, M A

    1991-01-01

    We have been exploring the role of iron in the pathogenesis of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication in human monocytes is iron dependent and that IFN gamma-activated monocytes inhibit L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication by limiting the availability of iron. In this study, we have investigated the effect on L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication of lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein which is internalized via specific receptors on monocytes, and of nonphysiologic iron chelates which enter monocytes by a receptor-independent route. Apolactoferrin completely inhibited L. pneumophila multiplication in nonactivated monocytes, and enhanced the capacity of IFN gamma-activated monocytes to inhibit L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication. In contrast, iron-saturated lactoferrin had no effect on the already rapid rate of L. pneumophila multiplication in nonactivated monocytes. Moreover, it reversed the capacity of activated monocytes to inhibit L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication, demonstrating that L. pneumophila can utilize iron from the lactoferrin-lactoferrin receptor pathway. The capacity of iron-lactoferrin to reverse monocyte activation was dependent upon its percent iron saturation and not just its total iron content. Similarly, the nonphysiologic iron chelates ferric nitrilotriacetate and ferric ammonium citrate completely reverse and ferric pyrophosphate partially reversed the capacity of IFN gamma-activated monocytes to inhibit L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication, demonstrating that L. pneumophila can utilize iron derived from nonphysiologic iron chelates internalized by monocytes independently of the transferrin and lactoferrin endocytic pathways. This study suggests that at sites of inflammation, lactoferrin may inhibit or promote L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication in mononuclear phagocytes depending upon

  6. Effects of transforming growth factor-beta on long-term human cord blood monocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Orcel, P.; Bielakoff, J.; De Vernejoul, M.C. )

    1990-02-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) modulates growth and differentiation in many cell types and is abundant in bone matrix. We recently showed that human cord blood monocytes cultured in the presence of 1,25(OH)2D3 acquire some features of osteoclast precursors. Since TGF-beta has been shown to influence bone resorption in organ culture, we have studied the effect of TGF-beta (1-1,000 pg/ml) on cord blood monocyte cultures. These cells were cultured on plastic substrate during 3 weeks in the presence of 20% horse serum and 10(-9) M 1,25(OH)2D3. TGF-beta, from a concentration of 10 pg/ml in the culture medium, decreased in a dose dependent manner the formation of multinucleated cells. At a concentration of TGF-beta of 1 ng/ml, the multinucleated cells were reduced to 2.1% +/- 0.3%, compared to 19.3% +/- 1.5% in control cultures. TGF-beta inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the proliferation of cord blood monocytes as assessed by 3H-thymidine incorporation at 7 and 14 days of culture. The fusion index was also decreased by 3 weeks of treatment with TGF-beta. Indomethacin did not reverse the inhibitory effects of TGF-beta. The expression of the osteoclastic phenotype was assessed using two different antibodies: 23C6, a monoclonal antibody directed against the vitronectin receptor, which is highly expressed by osteoclasts but not by adult monocytes, and an antibody to HLA-DR, which is not present on osteoclast. TGF-beta decreased the expression of HLA-DR and increased in a dose-dependent manner the proportion of 23C6-labeled cells; these results suggest that TGF-beta could modulate a differentiation effect to the osteoclastic phenotype. However, when cord blood monocytes were cultured on devitalized rat calvariae prelabeled with 45Ca, TGF-beta did not induce any 45Ca release from bone cultured with monocytes.

  7. Human adipose tissue-resident monocytes exhibit an endothelial-like phenotype and display angiogenic properties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adipose tissue has the unique property of expanding throughout adult life, and angiogenesis is required for its growth. However, endothelial progenitor cells contribute minimally to neovascularization. Because myeloid cells have proven to be angiogenic, and monocytes accumulate in expanding adipose tissue, they might contribute to vascularization. Methods The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells from human adipose tissue were magnetically separated according to CD45 or CD14 expression. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were obtained from SVF CD45- cells. CD14+ monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood (PB) mononuclear cells and then cultured with SVF-derived MSCs. Freshly isolated or cultured cells were characterized with flow cytometry; the conditioned media were analyzed for the angiogenic growth factors, angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with Luminex Technology; their angiogenic capacity was determined in an in vivo gelatinous protein mixture (Matrigel) plug angiogenesis assay. Results CD45+ hematopoietic cells within the SVF contain CD14+ cells that co-express the CD34 progenitor marker and the endothelial cell antigens VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2/KDR), VEGFR1/Flt1, and Tie2. Co-culture experiments showed that SVF-derived MSCs promoted the acquisition of KDR and Tie-2 in PB monocytes. MSCs secreted significant amounts of Ang-2 and HGF, but minimal amounts of bFGF, G-CSF, or GM-CSF, whereas the opposite was observed for SVF CD14+ cells. Additionally, SVF CD14+ cells secreted significantly higher levels of VEGF and bFGF than did MSCs. Culture supernatants of PB monocytes cultured with MSCs contained significantly higher concentrations of VEGF, HGF, G-CSF, and GM-CSF than did the supernatants from cultures without MSCs

  8. Effects of monascin on anti-inflammation mediated by Nrf2 activation in advanced glycation end product-treated THP-1 monocytes and methylglyoxal-treated wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Hong; Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Huang, Tao; Chang, Yu-Ying; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2013-02-13

    Hyperglycemia is associated with advanced glycation end products (AGEs). This study was designed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of monascin on receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE) signal and THP-1 monocyte inflammation after treatment with S100b, a specific ligand of RAGE. Monascin inhibited cytokine production by S100b-treated THP-1 monocytes via up-regulation of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and alleviated p47phox translocation to the membrane. Methylglyoxal (MG, 600 mg/kg bw) was used to induce diabetes in Wistar rats. Inhibitions of RAGE and p47phox by monascin were confirmed by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of MG-induced rats. Silymarin (SM) was used as a positive control group. It was found that monascin promoted heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression mediated by Nrf2. Suppressions of AGEs, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β (IL-β) in serum of MG-induced rats were attenuated in the monascin administration group treated with retinoic acid (RA). RA treatment resulted in Nrf2 inactivation by increasing RA receptor-α (RARα) activity, suggesting that RA acts as an inhibitor of Nrf2. The results showed that monascin exerted anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects mediated by Nrf2 to prevent the development of diseases such as type 2 diabetes caused by inflammation.

  9. Human β defensin-3 induces chemokines from monocytes and macrophages: diminished activity in cells from HIV-infected persons.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Velizar; Funderburg, Nicholas; Weinberg, Aaron; Sieg, Scott

    2013-12-01

    Human β defensin-3 (hBD-3) is an antimicrobial peptide with diverse functionality. We investigated the capacity of hBD-3 and, for comparison, Pam3CSK4 and LL-37 to induce co-stimulatory molecules and chemokine expression in monocytes. These stimuli differentially induced CD80 and CD86 on the surface of monocytes and each stimulant induced a variety of chemokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), Gro-α, macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP1β), while only hBD-3 and Pam3CSK4 significantly induced the angiogenesis factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Human BD-3 induced similar chemokines in monocyte-derived macrophages and additionally induced expression of Regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and presumably secreted (RANTES) in these cells. Comparison of monocytes from HIV(+) and HIV(-) donors indicated that monocytes from HIV(+) donors were more likely to spontaneously express certain chemokines (MIP-1α, MIP-1β and MCP-1) and less able to increase expression of other molecules in response to hBD-3 (MDC, Gro-α and VEGF). Chemokine receptor expression (CCR5, CCR2 and CXCR2) was relatively normal in monocytes from HIV(+) donors compared with cells from HIV(-) donors with the exception of diminished expression of the receptor for MDC, CCR4, which was reduced in the patrolling monocyte subset (CD14(+)  CD16(++) ) of HIV(+) donors. These observations implicate chemokine induction by hBD-3 as a potentially important mechanism for orchestrating cell migration into inflamed tissues. Alterations in chemokine production or their receptors in monocytes of HIV-infected persons could influence cell migration and modify the effects of hBD-3 at sites of inflammation.

  10. Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria induce a common early response in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We infected freshly isolated human peripheral monocytes with live bacteria of three clinically important gram-positive bacterial species, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Listeria monocytogenes and studied the ensuing early transcriptional response using expression microarrays. Thus the observed response was unbiased by signals originating from other helper and effector cells of the host and was not limited to induction by solitary bacterial constituents. Results Activation of monocytes was demonstrated by the upregulation of chemokine rather than interleukin genes except for the prominent expression of interleukin 23, marking it as the early lead cytokine. This activation was accompanied by cytoskeleton rearrangement signals and a general anti-oxidative stress and anti-apoptotic reaction. Remarkably, the expression profiles also provide evidence that monocytes participate in the regulation of angiogenesis and endothelial function in response to these pathogens. Conclusion Regardless of the invasion properties and survival mechanisms of the pathogens used, we found that the early response comprised of a consistent and common response. The common response was hallmarked by the upregulation of interleukin 23, a rather unexpected finding regarding Listeria infection, as this cytokine has been linked primarily to the control of extracellular bacterial dissemination. PMID:21044323

  11. Tailored HIV-1 Vectors for Genetic Modification of Primary Human Dendritic Cells and Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Stéphanie; Nguyen, Xuan-Nhi; Turpin, Jocelyn; Cordeil, Stephanie; Nazaret, Nicolas; Croze, Séverine; Mahieux, Renaud; Lachuer, Joël; Legras-Lachuer, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) play a key role in the regulation of the immune system and are the target of numerous gene therapy applications. The genetic modification of MDDCs is possible with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-derived lentiviral vectors (LVs) but requires high viral doses to bypass their natural resistance to viral infection, and this in turn affects their physiological properties. To date, a single viral protein is able to counter this restrictive phenotype, Vpx, a protein derived from members of the HIV-2/simian immunodeficiency virus SM lineage that counters at least two restriction factors present in myeloid cells. By tagging Vpx with a short heterologous membrane-targeting domain, we have obtained HIV-1 LVs incorporating high levels of this protein (HIV-1-Src-Vpx). These vectors efficiently transduce differentiated MDDCs and monocytes either as previously purified populations or as populations within unsorted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In addition, these vectors can be efficiently pseudotyped with receptor-specific envelopes, further restricting their cellular tropism almost uniquely to MDDCs. Compared to conventional HIV-1 LVs, these novel vectors allow for an efficient genetic modification of MDDCs and, more importantly, do not cause their maturation or affect their survival, which are unwanted side effects of the transduction process. This study describes HIV-1-Src-Vpx LVs as a novel potent tool for the genetic modification of differentiated MDDCs and of circulating monocyte precursors with strong potential for a wide range of gene therapy applications. PMID:23077304

  12. Modulation of the cytokine response in human monocytes by mycobacterium leprae phenolic glycolipid-1.

    PubMed

    Manca, Claudia; Peixoto, Blas; Malaga, Wladimir; Guilhot, Christophe; Kaplan, Gilla

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic but treatable infectious disease caused by the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae. M. leprae cell wall is characterized by a unique phenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1) reported to have several immune functions. We have examined the role of PGL-1 in the modulation of monocyte cytokine/chemokine production in naive human monocytes. PGL-1 in its purified form or expressed in a recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Colmette-Guérin (BCG) background (rBCG-PGL-1) was tested. We found that PGL-1 selectively modulated the induction of specific monocyte cytokines and chemokines and, when used as prestimulus, exerted priming and/or inhibitory effects on the induction of selected cytokines/chemokines in response to a second stimulus. Taken together, the results of this study support a modulatory role for PGL-1 in the innate immune response to M. leprae. Thus, PGL-1 may play an important role in the development of the anergic clinical forms of disease and in tissue damage seen in lepromatous patients and during the reactional states of leprosy.

  13. Thrombin selectively induces transcription of genes in human monocytes involved in inflammation and wound healing.

    PubMed

    López, Mercedes L; Bruges, Gustavo; Crespo, Gustavo; Salazar, Victor; Deglesne, Pierre-Antoine; Schneider, Heike; Cabrera-Fuentes, Hector; Schmitz, M Lienhard; Preissner, Klaus T

    2014-11-01

    Thrombin is essential for blood coagulation but functions also as a mediator of cellular signalling. Gene expression microarray experiments in human monocytes revealed thrombin-induced upregulation of a limited subset of genes, which are almost exclusively involved in inflammation and wound healing. Among these, the expression of F3 gene encoding for tissue factor (TF) was enhanced indicating that this physiological initiator of coagulation cascade may create a feed-forward loop to enhance blood coagulation. Activation of protease-activated receptor type 1 (PAR1) was shown to play a main role in promoting TF expression. Moreover, thrombin induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, an event that is required for expression of thrombin-regulated genes. Thrombin also increased the expression of TF at the protein level in monocytes as evidenced by Western blot and immunostaining. Furthermore, FXa generation induced by thrombin-stimulated monocytes was abolished by a TF blocking antibody and therefore it is entirely attributable to the expression of tissue factor. This cellular activity of thrombin provides a new molecular link between coagulation, inflammation and wound healing.

  14. Phospholipid metabolism in zymosan stimulated human monocytes: modulation by cyclic AMP (cAMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey R.W.; Manzi, R.M.; Hoffstein, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Oxygenated products of arachidonic acid (AA) are critical components in the development of the inflammatory response. Monocytes exposed to inflammatory stimuli are capable of converting free AA into these bioactive molecules. However, the limiting step in the formation of these compounds is thought to be the mechanism responsible for the release of esterified AA from phospholipids. When (/sup 3/H) AA labeled monocytes were challenged with opsonized zymosan, 28 +/- 2% of the incorporated counts were released compared to 8 +/- 1% for the control. Upon pretreatment with isobutyl methyl xanthine (IBMX) or dibutyrl cyclic AMP (d-cAMP) zymosan stimulated AA release was markedly reduced. The IC/sub 50/'s were 4 x 10/sup -4/M and 7 x 10/sup -4/M respectively. Analysis of (/sup 3/H) AA incorporation into cellular phospholipids showed that phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) were the primary pools labeled. Loss of label from both of these pools was evident after exposure to zymosan, however, pretreatment of cells with IBMX or d-cAMP inhibited release of (/sup 3/H)AA from the PC pool but not from the PI pool. The results show that human monocytes challenged with opsonized zymosan release arachidonic acid via cAMP-dependent and independent pathways. Furthermore, they suggest that a phospholipase activity (possibly A/sub 2/) against PC is modulated by cAMP.

  15. Tailored HIV-1 vectors for genetic modification of primary human dendritic cells and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Durand, Stéphanie; Nguyen, Xuan-Nhi; Turpin, Jocelyn; Cordeil, Stephanie; Nazaret, Nicolas; Croze, Séverine; Mahieux, Renaud; Lachuer, Joël; Legras-Lachuer, Catherine; Cimarelli, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) play a key role in the regulation of the immune system and are the target of numerous gene therapy applications. The genetic modification of MDDCs is possible with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-derived lentiviral vectors (LVs) but requires high viral doses to bypass their natural resistance to viral infection, and this in turn affects their physiological properties. To date, a single viral protein is able to counter this restrictive phenotype, Vpx, a protein derived from members of the HIV-2/simian immunodeficiency virus SM lineage that counters at least two restriction factors present in myeloid cells. By tagging Vpx with a short heterologous membrane-targeting domain, we have obtained HIV-1 LVs incorporating high levels of this protein (HIV-1-Src-Vpx). These vectors efficiently transduce differentiated MDDCs and monocytes either as previously purified populations or as populations within unsorted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In addition, these vectors can be efficiently pseudotyped with receptor-specific envelopes, further restricting their cellular tropism almost uniquely to MDDCs. Compared to conventional HIV-1 LVs, these novel vectors allow for an efficient genetic modification of MDDCs and, more importantly, do not cause their maturation or affect their survival, which are unwanted side effects of the transduction process. This study describes HIV-1-Src-Vpx LVs as a novel potent tool for the genetic modification of differentiated MDDCs and of circulating monocyte precursors with strong potential for a wide range of gene therapy applications.

  16. Sequence and molecular characterization of human monocyte/neutrophil elastase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Remold-O'Donnell, E; Chin, J; Alberts, M

    1992-06-15

    cDNA encoding human monocyte/neutrophil elastase inhibitor (EI), a M(r) approximately 42,000 protein with serpin-like functional properties, has been sequenced. The 1316-base-pair sequence was obtained from overlapping clones and amplified DNA from libraries of monocyte-like and neutrophil-like cells. Hybridization with EI cDNA identified three EI mRNA species of 1.5, 1.9, and 2.6 kilobases in U937 monocyte-like cells and no hybridizing mRNA in lymphoblastoid cells lacking detectable EI. The cDNA open reading frame encodes a 379-amino acid protein, of which 167 residues were confirmed by tryptic peptides. Although EI may function extracellularly as well as intracellularly, its deduced sequence lacks a typical cleavable N-terminal signal sequence. Sequence analysis established that EI is a member of the serpin superfamily. EI has greatest homology (50.1% identity of amino acids) with plasminogen activator inhibitor 2, also a monocyte protein, and ovalbumin and gene Y, which were previously grouped as an ancient branch of the serpin superfamily. The extent of EI identity with the functionally related serpin alpha 1 antitrypsin is only 30.1%. Sequence alignment indicates that the reactive center P1 residue is Cys-344, consistent with abrogation of elastase inhibitory activity by iodoacetamide and making EI a naturally occurring Cys-serpin. The cleavable bond, Cys-Met, suggests an oxidation-sensitive molecule capable of inhibiting more than one serine protease. Oxidation sensitivity would limit the place of action of EI to the immediate vicinity of carrier cells. The molecular structure will help clarify the likely role of EI in regulating protease action and preventing tissue damage by phagocytic cells.

  17. Sequence and molecular characterization of human monocyte/neutrophil elastase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Remold-O'Donnell, E; Chin, J; Alberts, M

    1992-01-01

    cDNA encoding human monocyte/neutrophil elastase inhibitor (EI), a M(r) approximately 42,000 protein with serpin-like functional properties, has been sequenced. The 1316-base-pair sequence was obtained from overlapping clones and amplified DNA from libraries of monocyte-like and neutrophil-like cells. Hybridization with EI cDNA identified three EI mRNA species of 1.5, 1.9, and 2.6 kilobases in U937 monocyte-like cells and no hybridizing mRNA in lymphoblastoid cells lacking detectable EI. The cDNA open reading frame encodes a 379-amino acid protein, of which 167 residues were confirmed by tryptic peptides. Although EI may function extracellularly as well as intracellularly, its deduced sequence lacks a typical cleavable N-terminal signal sequence. Sequence analysis established that EI is a member of the serpin superfamily. EI has greatest homology (50.1% identity of amino acids) with plasminogen activator inhibitor 2, also a monocyte protein, and ovalbumin and gene Y, which were previously grouped as an ancient branch of the serpin superfamily. The extent of EI identity with the functionally related serpin alpha 1 antitrypsin is only 30.1%. Sequence alignment indicates that the reactive center P1 residue is Cys-344, consistent with abrogation of elastase inhibitory activity by iodoacetamide and making EI a naturally occurring Cys-serpin. The cleavable bond, Cys-Met, suggests an oxidation-sensitive molecule capable of inhibiting more than one serine protease. Oxidation sensitivity would limit the place of action of EI to the immediate vicinity of carrier cells. The molecular structure will help clarify the likely role of EI in regulating protease action and preventing tissue damage by phagocytic cells. Images PMID:1376927

  18. In Vitro Experimental Model of Trained Innate Immunity in Human Primary Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Bekkering, Siroon; Blok, Bastiaan A; Joosten, Leo A B; Riksen, Niels P; van Crevel, Reinout; Netea, Mihai G

    2016-12-01

    Innate immune memory, or trained immunity, has recently been described to be an important property of cells of the innate immune system. Due to the increased interest in this important new field of immunological investigation, we sought to determine the optimal conditions for an in vitro experimental protocol of monocyte training using three of the most commonly used training stimuli from the literature: β-glucan, the bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). We investigated and optimized a protocol of monocyte trained immunity induced by an initial training period with β-glucan, BCG, or oxLDL, followed by washing and resting of the cells and, thereafter, restimulation with secondary bacterial stimuli. The training and resting time intervals were varied to identify the optimal setting for the long-term induction of trained immunity. Trained immunity was assessed in terms of the secondary cytokine response, the production of reactive oxygen species, cell morphology, and induction of glycolysis. Monocytes primed with β-glucan, BCG, and oxLDL showed increased pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine responses upon restimulation with nonrelated stimuli. Also, all three stimuli induced a switch to glycolysis (the Warburg effect). These effects were most pronounced when the training interval was 24 h and the resting time interval was 6 days. Training with BCG and oxLDL also led to the increased production of reactive oxygen species, whereas training with β-glucan led to the decreased production of reactive oxygen species. We describe the optimal conditions for an in vitro experimental model with human primary monocytes for study of the induction of trained innate immunity by microbial and metabolic stimuli.

  19. Ultrafine carbon particles down-regulate CYP1B1 expression in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Christiane; Frankenberger, Marion; Stanzel, Franz; Seidel, Albrecht; Schramm, Karl-Werner; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems; Hofer, Thomas PJ

    2009-01-01

    Background Cytochrome P450 monoxygenases play an important role in the defence against inhaled toxic compounds and in metabolizing a wide range of xenobiotics and environmental contaminants. In ambient aerosol the ultrafine particle fraction which penetrates deeply into the lungs is considered to be a major factor for adverse health effects. The cells mainly affected by inhaled particles are lung epithelial cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Results In this study we have analyzed the effect of a mixture of fine TiO2 and ultrafine carbon black Printex 90 particles (P90) on the expression of cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) in human monocytes, macrophages, bronchial epithelial cells and epithelial cell lines. CYP1B1 expression is strongly down-regulated by P90 in monocytes with a maximum after P90 treatment for 3 h while fine and ultrafine TiO2 had no effect. CYP1B1 was down-regulated up to 130-fold and in addition CYP1A1 mRNA was decreased 13-fold. In vitro generated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), epithelial cell lines, and primary bronchial epithelial cells also showed reduced CYP1B1 mRNA levels. Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is inducing CYB1B1 but ultrafine P90 can still down-regulate gene expression at 0.1 μM of BaP. The P90-induced reduction of CYP1B1 was also demonstrated at the protein level using Western blot analysis. Conclusion These data suggest that the P90-induced reduction of CYP gene expression may interfere with the activation and/or detoxification capabilities of inhaled toxic compounds. PMID:19835593

  20. Daily quadratic trend in basal monocyte expressed HSP72 in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Lee; Midgley, Adrian W; Chrismas, Bryna; Madden, Leigh A; Vince, Rebecca V; McNaughton, Lars R

    2010-05-01

    The inducible human stress protein heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) performs vital roles within the body at rest and during periods of stress. Recently it was shown over a 24 h period that basal HSP72 followed a diurnal variation. However, these results and previous literature demonstrate noticeable inter-subject variation in basal HSP72 expression. The notion of intra/inter-day variation in basal HSP72 expression has not been explored in detail. Basal monocyte expressed HSP72 was determined every 3 h, over a 9 h period in 12 healthy male subjects (20.2 +/- 1.9 years, 178.7 +/- 5.6 cm, 75.1 +/- 6.0 kg) within a temperature controlled laboratory. A significant quadratic trend was observed for time (F = 26.0, P = 0.001, partial eta(2) = 0.74), where HSP72 decreased between 0800 and 1100 hours (P < 0.001) and then increased between 1100 and 1400 hours (P = 0.015). The main effect for day (F = 2.6, P = 0.14) and the day x time interaction effect (F = 3.9, P = 0.08) were not significant. There was no correlation between serum and monocyte expressed HSP72, with no significant effect for time (F = 2.0, P = 0.21) in serum HSP72 expression. The results support findings by others that basal monocyte expressed HSP72 follows a diurnal variation which incorporates a quadratic trend, which is not compromised by any significant daily variation and that serum HSP72 expression has no endogenous circadian rhythm. The significant quadratic trend in basal monocyte HSP72 expression shown here highlights the need to tightly control variables, such as timing of sample collection, as it is known basal values influence the magnitude of HSP72 expression post-stressor/intervention.

  1. An evaluation of the putative human mammary tumour retrovirus associated with peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, L. P.; Carroll, A. R.; Rhodes, P.; Wood, J.; Read, N. G.

    1991-01-01

    The primary aims of this study were purification and molecular cloning of a putative retrovirus designated human mammary tumour virus (HMTV). However, our preliminary unpublished data of negative reverse transcriptase (RT) activity in ostensibly 'infected' cells led us to re-examine the evidence for this virus; namely multinucleate giant cell (MNGC) formation and RT activity in cultured blood monocytes from breast cancer patients versus benign breast tumour and normal control subjects. MNGCs from by fusion of monocytes and we estimated the total number of cell fusions which had occurred after 10 days of culture in vitro by counting cells with two, three, four and five or more nuclei (n) and by measuring the density of adherent mononuclear cells for each subject studied. We found no clear-cut difference in MNGC formation between the three subject groups. Moreover, a substantial number of cultures, encompassing the three groups, showed far more MNGCs per 10(5) monocytes than previously reported. Various parametric and nonparametric statistical analyses were performed on the multinucleate cell data and only one parametric test, which utilised the density of monolayers as a co-variate, showed a statistically significant difference at the 5% level between the breast cancer and the normal subject groups. We observed marked subject-to-subject variation in multinucleate cell formation and we suggest that the evidence for a difference between the breast cancer and the normal groups is marginal. Further, MNGC formation by breast cancer monocytes may not be attributed to the presence of a retrovirus since 5'-Azacytidine (AZA), an agent known to stimulate replication of latent retroviruses showed no effect on the MNGC formation. In addition, culture supernatants from the three groups were assayed for RT activity and no test sample gave a significant signal above background. Preliminary transmission electron microscopy analysis failed to identify viral particles in MNGCs

  2. Bordetella pertussis Infection of Primary Human Monocytes Alters HLA-DR Expression

    PubMed Central

    Shumilla, Jennifer A.; Lacaille, Vashti; Hornell, Tara M. C.; Huang, Jennifer; Narasimhan, Supraja; Relman, David A.; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2004-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis is the causative agent of whooping cough, a potentially lethal respiratory disease in children. In immunocompetent individuals, B. pertussis infection elicits an effective adaptive immune response driven by activated CD4+ T cells. However, live B. pertussis persists in the host for 3 to 4 weeks prior to clearance. Thus, B. pertussis appears to have evolved short-term mechanisms for immune system evasion. We investigated the effects of B. pertussis wild-type strain BP338 on antigen presentation in primary human monocytes. BP338 infection reduced cell surface expression of HLA-DR and CD86 but not that of major histocompatibility complex class I proteins. This change in cell surface HLA-DR expression reflected intracellular redistribution of HLA-DR. The proportion of peptide-loaded molecules was unchanged in infected cells, suggesting that intracellular retention occurred after peptide loading. Although B. pertussis infection of monocytes induced rapid and robust expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10), HLA-DR redistribution did not appear to be explained by increased IL-10 levels. BP338-infected monocytes exhibited reduced synthesis of HLA-DR dimers. Interestingly, those HLA-DR proteins that were generated appeared to be longer-lived than HLA-DR in uninfected monocytes. BP338 infection also prevented gamma interferon (IFN-γ) induction of HLA-DR protein synthesis. Using mutant strains of B. pertussis, we found that reduction in HLA-DR surface expression was due in part to the presence of pertussis toxin whereas the inhibition of IFN-γ induction of HLA-DR could not be linked to any of the virulence factors tested. These data demonstrate that B. pertussis utilizes several mechanisms to modulate HLA-DR expression. PMID:14977950

  3. Bordetella pertussis infection of primary human monocytes alters HLA-DR expression.

    PubMed

    Shumilla, Jennifer A; Lacaille, Vashti; Hornell, Tara M C; Huang, Jennifer; Narasimhan, Supraja; Relman, David A; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2004-03-01

    Bordetella pertussis is the causative agent of whooping cough, a potentially lethal respiratory disease in children. In immunocompetent individuals, B. pertussis infection elicits an effective adaptive immune response driven by activated CD4(+) T cells. However, live B. pertussis persists in the host for 3 to 4 weeks prior to clearance. Thus, B. pertussis appears to have evolved short-term mechanisms for immune system evasion. We investigated the effects of B. pertussis wild-type strain BP338 on antigen presentation in primary human monocytes. BP338 infection reduced cell surface expression of HLA-DR and CD86 but not that of major histocompatibility complex class I proteins. This change in cell surface HLA-DR expression reflected intracellular redistribution of HLA-DR. The proportion of peptide-loaded molecules was unchanged in infected cells, suggesting that intracellular retention occurred after peptide loading. Although B. pertussis infection of monocytes induced rapid and robust expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10), HLA-DR redistribution did not appear to be explained by increased IL-10 levels. BP338-infected monocytes exhibited reduced synthesis of HLA-DR dimers. Interestingly, those HLA-DR proteins that were generated appeared to be longer-lived than HLA-DR in uninfected monocytes. BP338 infection also prevented gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) induction of HLA-DR protein synthesis. Using mutant strains of B. pertussis, we found that reduction in HLA-DR surface expression was due in part to the presence of pertussis toxin whereas the inhibition of IFN-gamma induction of HLA-DR could not be linked to any of the virulence factors tested. These data demonstrate that B. pertussis utilizes several mechanisms to modulate HLA-DR expression.

  4. Manumycin A downregulates release of proinflammatory cytokines from TNF alpha stimulated human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Cecrdlova, Eva; Petrickova, Katerina; Kolesar, Libor; Petricek, Miroslav; Sekerkova, Alena; Svachova, Veronika; Striz, Ilja

    2016-01-01

    Macrolide antibiotics such as azithromycin or clarithromycin are known to have potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects but these properties cannot be widely used due to a risk of bacterial resistance. We studied another polyketide antibiotic, structurally related manumycin A known as a streptomycete derived farnesyltransferase inhibitor with limited antibacterial effects, with respect to its potential regulation of mRNA expression of several genes associated with proinflammatory responses. Downregulation of mRNA for IL-6, TLR-8, IL-1 beta and IL-10 was found in THP-1 cells after 4h stimulation with TNF alpha in the presence of manumycin A and downregulated TLR-8 and EGR-1 genes were observed after 8h. Among the genes upregulated in response to manumycin were HMOX-1, TNFRSF10A, IL-1R1, TICAM2, NLRP12 after 4h and only IL-1R1 after 8h. Furthermore, manumycin A was found to inhibit IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-8 production in TNF alpha stimulated THP-1 cells and peripheral blood monocytes in a dose dependent manner (0.25-1 μM of manumycin A) without affecting cell viability. Cell viability of blood monocytes decreased by about 30% at manumycin A doses of 2-5 μM. Manumycin A also inhibited IL-18 release from THP-1 cells, while in cultures of blood monocytes, this cytokine was not detectable. That manumycin A mediated downregulation of proinflammatory genes in human monocytes confirmed by a measurement of cytokine levels in culture supernatants, together with a very limited effect on cell viability, might suggest potential anti-inflammatory properties of this polyketide antibiotic.

  5. Differentiation of a Human Monocytic Cell Line Associated with Increased Production of Rift Valley Fever Virus by Infected Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    Production of Rift Valley Fever Virus by Infected Cells Richard M. Lewis, Thomas M. Cosgriff, Clarence J. Peters, and John C. Morrill Division of Medicine and...Prior studies have shown that RVF virus productively infects peritoneal macrophages from susceptible rat strains. The U937 human monocytic cell line...was used to determine the effect of monocytic cell differentiation on the degree of viral production by cell cultures infected with RVF virus

  6. Diminished Production of Monocyte Proinflammatory Cytokines during Human Immunodeficiency Virus Viremia Is Mediated by Type I Interferons▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tilton, John C.; Johnson, Alison J.; Luskin, Marlise R.; Manion, Maura M.; Yang, Jun; Adelsberger, Joseph W.; Lempicki, Richard A.; Hallahan, Claire W.; McLaughlin, Mary; Mican, JoAnn M.; Metcalf, Julia A.; Iyasere, Christiana; Connors, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and high-level HIV replication on the function of monocytes was investigated. HIV-positive patients had elevated levels of spontaneous production of some or all of the monocyte proinflammatory cytokines measured (interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) compared to uninfected controls. In patients on therapy with high frequencies of monocytes producing proinflammatory cytokines, this frequency was diminished in the context of viremia during an interruption of therapy. Diminished production of proinflammatory cytokines during viremia was restored by culture with autologous CD4+ T cells or monocytes from an on-therapy time point or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Microarray analysis demonstrated that diminished monocyte production of proinflammatory cytokines was correlated with elevated type I interferon-stimulated gene transcripts. The addition of exogenous alpha 2A interferon diminished the spontaneous production of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α but did not affect responses to LPS, recapitulating the changes observed for HIV-viremic patients. These results suggest that monocyte function is diminished during high-level HIV viremia and that this effect is mediated by chronic stimulation by type I interferons. This effect on monocytes during viremia may play a role in diminished innate or adaptive immune system functions in HIV-infected patients. In addition, the restoration of these functions may also play a role in some immune reconstitution syndromes observed during initiation of therapy. PMID:17005663

  7. Two-step separation of human peripheral blood monocytes on discontinuous density gradients of colloidal silica-polyvinylpyrrolidinone.

    PubMed

    Nathanson, S D; Zamfirescu, P L; Drew, S I; Wilbur, S

    1977-01-01

    Normal human peripheral blood monocytes were purified by a two-step separation. The first step, the standard Ficoll--Hypaque (F--H) buoyant density centrifugation, yielded mainly mononuclear cells, of which 24 +/- 9% were monocytes. Isopycnic centrifugation on discontinuous gradients of colloidal silica polyvinylpyrrolidinone (CS-PVP) further separated these mononuclear cells. The density interface between 1.070 and 1.060 g/ml yielded 82 +/- 7% monocytes, 5 +/- 4% granulocytes and 13 +/- 8% lymphocytes. Sixty-six percent of the monocytes obtained after F--H separation were recovered in this layer. The monocytes were intact and viable and retained their ability to phagocytose and kill Candida pseudotropicalis and to spread on glass coverslips. Motility (both random and towards a chemoattractant) was retained but was quantitatively less than after F--H separation alone. The relative purity of the monocyte population allowed assessment of major histocompatibility surface antigens by serotyping. This confirmed the presence of HLA and Ia-like antigens on monocytes.

  8. Adjuvant-induced Human Monocyte Secretome Profiles Reveal Adjuvant- and Age-specific Protein Signatures*

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Djin-Ye; Dowling, David J.; Ahmed, Saima; Choi, Hyungwon; Brightman, Spencer; Bergelson, Ilana; Berger, Sebastian T.; Sauld, John F.; Pettengill, Matthew; Kho, Alvin T.; Pollack, Henry J.; Steen, Hanno; Levy, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants boost vaccine responses, enhancing protective immunity against infections that are most common among the very young. Many adjuvants activate innate immunity, some via Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs), whose activities varies with age. Accordingly, characterization of age-specific adjuvant-induced immune responses may inform rational adjuvant design targeting vulnerable populations. In this study, we employed proteomics to characterize the adjuvant-induced changes of secretomes from human newborn and adult monocytes in response to Alum, the most commonly used adjuvant in licensed vaccines; Monophosphoryl Lipid A (MPLA), a TLR4-activating adjuvant component of a licensed Human Papilloma Virus vaccine; and R848 an imidazoquinoline TLR7/8 agonist that is a candidate adjuvant for early life vaccines. Monocytes were incubated in vitro for 24 h with vehicle, Alum, MPLA, or R848 and supernatants collected for proteomic analysis employing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) (data available via ProteomeXchange, ID PXD003534). 1894 non-redundant proteins were identified, of which ∼30 - 40% were common to all treatment conditions and ∼5% were treatment-specific. Adjuvant-stimulated secretome profiles, as identified by cluster analyses of over-represented proteins, varied with age and adjuvant type. Adjuvants, especially Alum, activated multiple innate immune pathways as assessed by functional enrichment analyses. Release of lactoferrin, pentraxin 3, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 was confirmed in newborn and adult whole blood and blood monocytes stimulated with adjuvants alone or adjuvanted licensed vaccines with distinct clinical reactogenicity profiles. MPLA-induced adult monocyte secretome profiles correlated in silico with transcriptome profiles induced in adults immunized with the MPLA-adjuvanted RTS,S malaria vaccine (Mosquirix™). Overall, adjuvants such as Alum, MPLA and R848 give rise to distinct and age-specific monocyte secretome profiles

  9. Vitamin D3 induces autophagy in human monocytes/macrophages via cathelicidin.

    PubMed

    Yuk, Jae-Min; Shin, Dong-Min; Lee, Hye-Mi; Yang, Chul-Su; Jin, Hyo Sun; Kim, Kwang-Kyu; Lee, Zee-Won; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kim, Jin-Man; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2009-09-17

    Autophagy and vitamin D3-mediated innate immunity have been shown to confer protection against infection with intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here, we show that these two antimycobacterial defenses are physiologically linked via a regulatory function of human cathelicidin (hCAP-18/LL-37), a member of the cathelicidin family of antimicrobial proteins. We show that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3), the active form of vitamin D, induced autophagy in human monocytes via cathelicidin, which activated transcription of the autophagy-related genes Beclin-1 and Atg5. 1,25D3 also induced the colocalization of mycobacterial phagosomes with autophagosomes in human macrophages in a cathelicidin-dependent manner. Furthermore, the antimycobacterial activity in human macrophages mediated by physiological levels of 1,25D3 required autophagy and cathelicidin. These results indicate that human cathelicidin, a protein that has direct antimicrobial activity, also serves as a mediator of vitamin D3-induced autophagy.

  10. Influence of suramin on the expression of Fc receptors and other markers on human monocytes and U937 cells, and on their phagocytic properties.

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, C; Spittler, A; Willheim, M; Szépfalusi, Z; Agis, H; Köller, M; Peterlik, M; Boltz-Nitulescu, G

    1994-01-01

    Suramin, a polyanionic and polycyclic compound, was initially used for the treatment of trypanosomiasis and onchocerciasis. In the last decade, it has been used in therapy of cancer and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The influence of suramin on the expression of various markers by human mononuclear phagocytes is not known and was, therefore, presently investigated. Suramin inhibited the proliferation of U937 cells and mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. The constitutive and cytokine-driven expression of Fc receptors for IgG (Fc gamma RI and Fc gamma RII), IgE (Fc epsilon RII) and IgA (Fc alpha R) on blood monocytes and U937 cells was suppressed by suramin. The basal level, as well as cytokine-induced major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens, was markedly diminished on suramin-treated monocytes. Furthermore, suramin dramatically reduced expression of CD14 and partially reduced complement receptor type 3 (CR3) and CR4 expression on monocytes. In contrast, suramin slightly induced MHC class I antigens on monocytes and CD71 on U937 cells. The capacity of monocytes to phagocytose IgG-sensitized ox erythrocytes, opsonized Escherichia coli, or fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated latex beads was significantly inhibited. Northern blot analysis showed that the amount of Fc epsilon RII-specific mRNA was only partially reduced, suggesting that other mechanisms may be involved in the regulation of Fc epsilon RII expression. Our data demonstrate that suramin suppresses the expression of various cell-surface structures on human mononuclear phagocytes and impairs their phagocytic capacity. Images Figure 2 PMID:8039810

  11. Inflammatory gene expression in monocytes of patients with schizophrenia: overlap and difference with bipolar disorder. A study in naturalistically treated patients.

    PubMed

    Drexhage, Roosmarijn C; van der Heul-Nieuwenhuijsen, Leonie; Padmos, Roos C; van Beveren, Nico; Cohen, Dan; Versnel, Marjan A; Nolen, Willem A; Drexhage, Hemmo A

    2010-11-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates an activated inflammatory response system as a vulnerability factor for schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD). We aimed to detect a specific inflammatory monocyte gene expression signature in SZ and compare such signature with our recently described inflammatory monocyte gene signature in BD. A quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) case-control gene expression study was performed on monocytes of 27 SZ patients and compared to outcomes collected in 56 BD patients (all patients naturalistically treated). For Q-PCR we used nine 'SZ specific genes' (found in whole genome analysis), the 19 BD signature genes (previously found by us) and six recently described autoimmune diabetes inflammatory monocyte genes. Monocytes of SZ patients had (similar to those of BD patients) a high inflammatory set point composed of three subsets of strongly correlating genes characterized by different sets of transcription/MAPK regulating factors. Subset 1A, characterized by ATF3 and DUSP2, and subset 1B, characterized by EGR3 and MXD1, were shared between BD and SZ patients (up-regulated in 67% and 51%, and 34% and 41%, respectively). Subset 2, characterized by PTPN7 and NAB2 was up-regulated in the monocytes of 62% BD, but down-regulated in the monocytes of 48% of SZ patients. Our approach shows that monocytes of SZ and BD patients overlap, but also differ in inflammatory gene expression. Our approach opens new avenues for nosological classifications of psychoses based on the inflammatory state of patients, enabling selection of those patients who might benefit from an anti-inflammatory treatment.

  12. Association of monocyte to HDL cholesterol level with contrast induced nephropathy in STEMI patients treated with primary PCI.

    PubMed

    Sağ, Saim; Yıldız, Abdülmecit; Aydin Kaderli, Aysel; Gül, Bülent Cuma; Bedir, Ömer; Ceğilli, Ercan; Özdemir, Bülent; Can, Fatma Ezgi; Aydınlar, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) has been proven to be a clinical condition related to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. In recent studies, the monocyte to high density lipoprotein ratio (MHR) has been postulated as a novel parameter associated with adverse renal and cardiovascular outcomes. In this study we investigated the association of MHR with CIN in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Consecutive STEMI patients treated with primary PCI were prospectively recruited. Subjects were categorized into two groups; as patients who developed CIN (CIN+) and patients who did not develop CIN (CIN-) during hospitalization. CIN was defined as either a 25% increase in serum creatinine from baseline or 44.20 µmol/L increase in absolute value, within 72 h of intravenous contrast administration. A total number of 209 patients were included in the study. Thirty-two patients developed CIN (15.3%). In the CIN (+) patients, monocytes were higher [1.02 (0.83-1.39) vs. 0.69 (0.53-0.90) 109/L, p<0.01] and HDL cholesterol levels were lower [0.88 (0.78-1.01) vs. 0.98 (0.88-1.14) mmol/L, p<0.01]. In addition, MHR was significantly higher in the CIN (+) group [1.16 (0.89-2.16) vs. 0.72 (0.53-0.95) 109/mmol, p<0.01]. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, MHR, Mehran score, AGEF score and CV/eGFR were independently correlated with CIN. Higher MHR levels may predict CIN development after primary PCI in STEMI patients.

  13. MicroRNA Cargo of Extracellular Vesicles from Alcohol-exposed Monocytes Signals Naive Monocytes to Differentiate into M2 Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Banishree; Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Kodys, Karen; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-coated extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by cells can serve as vehicles for delivery of biological materials and signals. Recently, we demonstrated that alcohol-treated hepatocytes cross-talk with immune cells via exosomes containing microRNA (miRNAs). Here, we hypothesized that alcohol-exposed monocytes can communicate with naive monocytes via EVs. We observed increased numbers of EVs, mostly exosomes, secreted by primary human monocytes and THP-1 monocytic cells in the presence of alcohol in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. EVs derived from alcohol-treated monocytes stimulated naive monocytes to polarize into M2 macrophages as indicated by increased surface expression of CD68 (macrophage marker), M2 markers (CD206 (mannose receptor) and CD163 (scavenger receptor)), secretion of IL-10, and TGFβ and increased phagocytic activity. miRNA profiling of the EVs derived from alcohol-treated THP-1 monocytes revealed high expression of the M2-polarizing miRNA, miR-27a. Treatment of naive monocytes with control EVs overexpressing miR-27a reproduced the effect of EVs from alcohol-treated monocytes on naive monocytes and induced M2 polarization, suggesting that the effect of alcohol EVs was mediated by miR-27a. We found that miR-27a modulated the process of phagocytosis by targeting CD206 expression on monocytes. Importantly, analysis of circulating EVs from plasma of alcoholic hepatitis patients revealed increased numbers of EVs that contained high levels of miR-27a as compared with healthy controls. Our results demonstrate the following: first, alcohol increases EV production in monocytes; second, alcohol-exposed monocytes communicate with naive monocytes via EVs; and third, miR-27a cargo in monocyte-derived EVs can program naive monocytes to polarize into M2 macrophages. PMID:26527689

  14. Protein tyrosine kinase activity is essential for Fc gamma receptor-mediated intracellular killing of Staphylococcus aureus by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, L; Nibbering, P H; Zomerdijk, T P; van Furth, R

    1994-01-01

    Our previous study revealed that the intracellular killing of Staphylococcus aureus by human monocytes after cross-linking Fc gamma receptor I (Fc gamma RI) or Fc gamma RII is a phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent process. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity plays a role in the Fc gamma R-mediated intracellular killing of bacteria and activation of PLC in these cells. The results showed that phagocytosis of bacteria by monocytes was not affected by the PTK inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin-47. The intracellular killing of S. aureus by monocytes after cross-linking Fc gamma RII or Fc gamma RII with anti-Fc gamma R monoclonal antibody and a bridging antibody or with human immunoglobulin G (IgG) was inhibited by these compounds in a dose-dependent fashion. The production of O2- by monocytes after stimulation with IgG or IgG-opsonized S. aureus was almost completely blocked by the PTK inhibitor. These results indicate that inhibition of PTK impairs the oxygen-dependent bactericidal mechanisms of monocytes. Genistein and tyrphostin-47, which do not affect the enzymatic activity of purified PLC, prevented activation of PLC after cross-linking Fc gamma RI or Fc gamma RII, measured as an increase in the intracellular inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate concentration. Cross-linking Fc gamma RI or Fc gamma RII induced rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins in monocytes, one of which was identified as PLC-gamma 1, and the phosphorylation could be completely blocked by PTK inhibitors, leading to the conclusion that activation of PLC after cross-linking Fc gamma R in monocytes is regulated by PTK activity. Together, these results demonstrate that PTK activity is essential for the activation of PLC which is involved in the Fc gamma R-mediated intracellular killing of S. aureus by human monocytes. Images PMID:7927687

  15. Human monocyte-derived macrophages are heterogenous: Proteomic profile of different phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Eligini, S; Brioschi, M; Fiorelli, S; Tremoli, E; Banfi, C; Colli, S

    2015-06-21

    Tissue macrophages play a key role in many aspects of human physiology and pathology. These cells are heterogeneous both in term of morphology and function. As an example, heterogeneity has been reported within the atherosclerotic lesions where distinct populations exert opposite functions driving plaque progression or stability. Tissue macrophages are not easily obtained and differentiated blood-derived monocytes are largely used as surrogate model. We previously reported that human macrophages spontaneously differentiated from adherent monocytes show two dominant subsets, distinct for morphology (spindle and round) and functions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the intracellular proteome of these two macrophage subsets by means of a microproteomic workflow properly set up to simultaneously identify and quantify proteins from a minimal number of morphotypically heterogeneous cells in culture. We report two distinct proteomic profiles that distinguish round from spindle macrophages. In particular, differential abundances were observed for proteins involved in membrane traffic regulation, lipid handling, efferocytosis, and protection against stress conditions. Results reinforce and extend previous data on the functional and antigenic profile of these macrophage phenotypes strengthening the suitability of our model to focus on macrophage heterogeneity. Tissue macrophages patrol homeostatic functions, immune surveillance, and resolution of inflammation. The spectrum of macrophage activation states is, therefore, wide and gives ground for the heterogeneity of these cells, documented in health and disease. This study provides knowledge of the distinct proteome that characterises the two dominant morphotypes (round and spindle) of human macrophages that, in our culture condition, are generated by spontaneous differentiation from blood-derived monocytes. Results extend previous data about the different antigenic, transcriptional, and functional profiles of these

  16. Induction of IL-12 from human monocytes after stimulation with Androctonus crassicauda scorpion venom.

    PubMed

    Saadi, Samahir; Assarehzadegan, Mohammad-Ali; Pipelzadeh, Mohammad Hassan; Hadaddezfuli, Reza

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the capacity of venom from Androctonus crassicauda to induce expression/production of interleukin (IL)-12 by isolated human monocytes. For this purpose, isolated human monocytes were exposed to different concentrations of the venom (0.16-20 μg/ml) for varying periods (6, 12, and 24 h). Apart from measures of venom cytotoxicity (i.e., lactase dehydrogenase activity [LDH] release), measures of IL-12 p40 mRNA (by Real-time PCR) of IL-12 release (by ELISA) were performed. The results showed that the venom produced significant concentration- and duration of incubation-dependent cytotoxicity. Expression of IL-12 p40 mRNA was significantly increased at all exposure timepoints relative to that in unexposed cells, but was maximal after 6 h of exposure. At that timepoint, the effect from a dose of 2.5 μg venom/ml provided the maximal increase among all doses tested. At the level of the protein itself, IL-12 production remained almost consistently elevated (vs. unexposed control values) across all exposure timepoints, with the greatest formation again occurring after 6 h of incubation at a dose of 2.5 μg venom/ml. The findings from this study demonstrated that venom from the A. crassicauda scorpion contained active constituents that could induce a sustained activation of human monocytes that was manifested, in part, as promotion of the expression/production of IL-12. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Outer Membrane Vesicles from Brucella abortus Promote Bacterial Internalization by Human Monocytes and Modulate Their Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Cora N.; Delpino, M. Victoria; Fossati, Carlos A.; Baldi, Pablo C.

    2012-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by some Gram-negative bacteria have been shown to exert immunomodulatory effects that favor the establishment of the infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the interaction of OMVs from Brucella abortus with human epithelial cells (HeLa) and monocytes (THP-1), and the potential immunomodulatory effects they may exert. Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, FITC-labeled OMVs were shown to be internalized by both cell types. Internalization was shown to be partially mediated by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Pretreatment of THP-1 cells with Brucella OMVs inhibited some cytokine responses (TNF-α and IL-8) to E. coli LPS, Pam3Cys or flagellin (TLR4, TLR2 and TLR5 agonists, respectively). Similarly, pretreatment with Brucella OMVs inhibited the cytokine response of THP-1 cells to B. abortus infection. Treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs during IFN-γ stimulation reduced significantly the inducing effect of this cytokine on MHC-II expression. OMVs induced a dose-dependent increase of ICAM-1 expression on THP-1 cells and an increased adhesion of these cells to human endothelial cells. The addition of OMVs to THP-1 cultures before the incubation with live B. abortus resulted in increased numbers of adhered and internalized bacteria as compared to cells not treated with OMVs. Overall, these results suggest that OMVs from B. abortus exert cellular effects that promote the internalization of these bacteria by human monocytes, but also downregulate the innate immune response of these cells to Brucella infection. These effects may favor the persistence of Brucella within host cells. PMID:23189190

  18. Outer membrane vesicles from Brucella abortus promote bacterial internalization by human monocytes and modulate their innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Cora N; Delpino, M Victoria; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2012-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by some gram-negative bacteria have been shown to exert immunomodulatory effects that favor the establishment of the infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the interaction of OMVs from Brucella abortus with human epithelial cells (HeLa) and monocytes (THP-1), and the potential immunomodulatory effects they may exert. Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, FITC-labeled OMVs were shown to be internalized by both cell types. Internalization was shown to be partially mediated by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Pretreatment of THP-1 cells with Brucella OMVs inhibited some cytokine responses (TNF-α and IL-8) to E. coli LPS, Pam3Cys or flagellin (TLR4, TLR2 and TLR5 agonists, respectively). Similarly, pretreatment with Brucella OMVs inhibited the cytokine response of THP-1 cells to B. abortus infection. Treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs during IFN-γ stimulation reduced significantly the inducing effect of this cytokine on MHC-II expression. OMVs induced a dose-dependent increase of ICAM-1 expression on THP-1 cells and an increased adhesion of these cells to human endothelial cells. The addition of OMVs to THP-1 cultures before the incubation with live B. abortus resulted in increased numbers of adhered and internalized bacteria as compared to cells not treated with OMVs. Overall, these results suggest that OMVs from B. abortus exert cellular effects that promote the internalization of these bacteria by human monocytes, but also downregulate the innate immune response of these cells to Brucella infection. These effects may favor the persistence of Brucella within host cells.

  19. Control of pro-inflammatory cytokine release from human monocytes with the use of an interleukin-10 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hardik; Davidson, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    The monocytes (MONOs) can be considered as "double-edge swords"; they have both important pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory functions manifested in part by cytokine production and release. Although MONOs are circulating cells, they are the major precursors of a variety of tissue-specific immune cells such as the alveolar macrophage, dendritic cells, microglial cells, and Kupffer cells. Unlike the polymorphonuclear leukocyte, which produces no or very little interleukin-10 (IL-10), the monocyte can produce this potent anti-inflammatory cytokine to control inflammation. IL-10, on an equimolar basis, is a more potent inhibitor of pro-inflammatory cytokines produced by monocytes than many anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids which are used clinically. This chapter describes how to isolate monocytes from human blood and the use of IL-10 monoclonal antibody to determine the effect and timing of endogenous IL-10 release on the production and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  20. Transcriptional profiling of human monocytes identifies the inhibitory receptor CD300a as regulator of transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Ghavampour, Sharang; Lange, Carsten; Bottino, Cristina; Gerke, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Local inflammatory responses are characterized by the recruitment of circulating leukocytes from the blood to sites of inflammation, a process requiring the directed migration of leukocytes across the vessel wall and hence a penetration of the endothelial lining. To identify underlying signalling events and novel factors involved in these processes we screened for genes differentially expressed in human monocytes following their adhesion to and passage through an endothelial monolayer. Functional annotation clustering of the genes identified revealed an overrepresentation of those associated with inflammation/immune response, in particular early monocyte to macrophage differentiation. Among the gene products so far not implicated in monocyte transendothelial migration was the inhibitory immune receptor CD300a. CD300a mRNA and protein levels were upregulated following transmigration and engagement of the receptor by anti-CD300a antibodies markedly reduced monocyte transendothelial migration. In contrast, siRNA mediated downregulation of CD300a in human monocytes increased their rate of migration. CD300a colocalized and cosedimented with actin filaments and, when activated, caused F-actin cytoskeleton alterations. Thus, monocyte transendothelial migration is accompanied by an elevation of CD300a which serves an inhibitory function possibly required for termination of the actual transmigration.

  1. In vivo gamma tocopherol supplementation decreases systemic oxidative stress and cytokine responses of human monocytes in normal and asthmatic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wiser, Jessica; Alexis, Neil E.; Jiang, Qing; Wu, Weidong; Robinette, Carole; Roubey, Robert; Peden, David B.

    2008-01-01

    We have recently reported that gamma tocopherol (γT) reduces allergen and zymosan-induced inflammation using rodent models. As an initial step in extending these observations to humans, we conducted an open-label, Phase I dosing study of two doses (one or two capsules/daily for one week) of a gamma tocopherol rich preparation containing 623mg of γ tocopherol, 61.1mg of d-α-tocopherol, 11.1 mg of d-β-tocopherol (11.1mg), and 231 mg of d-σ-tocopherol per capsule. Endpoints for this study include serum levels of 5-nitro-gamma tocopherol, as a marker of oxidative stress, and changes in serum gamma, alpha and delta tocopherol and γ-2′-carboxyethyl-6-hydroxychroman (CEHC) six and 24 hours after the first dose and after 1 week of treatment. To assess biological activity of this treatment, we obtained peripheral blood mononuclear cells at baseline and after 1 week of treatment with 2 capsules of a gamma tocopherol rich preparation/day, and examined the inflammatory cytokine response of these cells in culture to ex-vivo endotoxin/LPS (0.01 ng/ml) challenge. We also monitored a number of safety endpoints to examine how well this preparation is tolerated in 8 normal volunteers (4 allergic and 4 non-allergic) and 8 allergic asthmatics. We further obtained human monocytes from a subset of these volunteers and treated them ex vivo with γT, αT,γ-CEHC and α-CEHC and assessed their actions on LPS induced degradation of IkBα, and JNK signaling and ROS generation. As detailed herein, this open label study demonstrates that gamma tocopherol enriched supplementation decreased systemic oxidative stress, increased serum levels of gamma tocopherol, and inhibited monocyte responses to LPS without any adverse health effects. Further,in vitro treatment of human monocytes with γ-CEHC and α-CEHC inhibits ROS generation and LPS-induced degradation of IκB and JNK activation. PMID:18405673

  2. Epstein-Barr virus induces MCP-1 secretion by human monocytes via TLR2.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Eric; Fiola, Stéphanie; Olivier, Martin; Gosselin, Jean

    2007-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a gammaherpesvirus infecting the majority of the human adult population in the world. TLR2, a member of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, has been implicated in the immune responses to different viruses including members of the herpesvirus family, such as human cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus type 1, and varicella-zoster virus. In this report, we demonstrate that infectious and UV-inactivated EBV virions lead to the activation of NF-kappaB through TLR2 using HEK293 cells cotransfected with TLR2-expressing vector along with NF-kappaB-Luc reporter plasmid. NF-kappaB activation in HEK293-TLR2 cells (HEK293 cells transfected with TLR2) by EBV was not enhanced by the presence of CD14. The effect of EBV was abrogated by pretreating HEK293-TLR2 cells with blocking anti-TLR2 antibodies or by preincubating viral particles with neutralizing anti-EBV antibodies 72A1. In addition, EBV infection of primary human monocytes induced the release of MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein 1), and the use of small interfering RNA targeting TLR2 significantly reduced such a chemokine response to EBV. Taken together, these results indicate that TLR2 may be an important pattern recognition receptor in the immune response directed against EBV infection.

  3. Measurement of reactive oxygen metabolites produced by human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to mineral dusts.

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, P.; Klockars, M.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to develop an in-vitro model for studying mineral dust-induced production of reactive oxygen metabolites by human macrophages. Monocytes isolated from human buffy coats were cultured in vitro for 1-6 days. Quartz particles induced both luminol- and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) by the adherent cells. However, the luminol response decreased form day to day, obviously due to a decrease in the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity of the cells, whereas the lucigenin response showed no such MPO dependence. The luminol response was inhibited by superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and the MPO-inhibitor azide, while the lucigenin response was inhibited by SOD and catalase but stimulated by azide. There was a positive correlation between the lucigenin responses and the results obtained with the established cytochrome c assay for superoxide, when opsonized zymosan was used as a stimulant. The effects of quartz, titanium dioxide, chrysotile asbestos, and wollastonite particles were investigated with the lucigenin assay. Quartz and chrysotile caused prominent light emission by 6-day-old macrophages, whereas titanium dioxide and wollastonite caused weak responses. We conclude that mineral dusts induce production of reactive oxygen metabolites by human monocyte-derived macrophages, and that the quantitative responses depend on both physical and physicochemical dust properties, the nature of which are still to be defined. PMID:2169299

  4. Cellular myeloperoxidase activity in human monocytes stimulated by hyposialylated immunoglobulins and rheumatoid factors.

    PubMed Central

    Dodon, M D; Gazzolo, L; Quash, G A

    1984-01-01

    When hyposialylated , immunoglobulins become immunogenic and tend to form aggregates. In pursuit of the possibility that hyposialylated immunoglobulins (hs-Ig) can trigger human mononuclear phagocytic cells, we have investigated the effects of such hs-Ig on the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity of these cells. The incubation of human monocytes with aggregated hs-Ig leads to the decrease of intracellular MPO activity. This decrease is dependent on the incubation time, on the amount of hs-Ig added, and on the degree of aggregation. Incubation with unaggregated hs-Ig has a similar effect, thus providing evidence that the loss of sialic acid residues per se is enough to render these molecules capable of decreasing the MPO content of phagocytic cells. Furthermore, human rheumatoid factors, isolated from the sera of rheumatoid arthritis patients, and previously characterized as hyposailylated Ig, interact in the same way with monocytes in triggering the MPO decrease. These observations imply that hs-Ig may be considered as active stimuli in the induction of inflammatory processes, through the initiation of oxidative reactions. PMID:6329948

  5. HDAC8 Prevents Anthrax Lethal Toxin-induced Cell Cycle Arrest through Silencing PTEN in Human Monocytic THP-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Soon-Duck; Cho, Woohyun; Kim, Sung Ouk

    2017-01-01

    Anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx) is a cytotoxic virulence factor that causes cell cycle arrest and cell death in various cell types. However, susceptibility to the cytotoxic effects varies depending on cell types. In proliferating monocytes, LeTx has only transient cytotoxic effects due to activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT-mediated adaptive responses. To date, the mechanism of LeTx in activating PI3K-AKT signaling axis is unknown. This study shows that the histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8) is involved in activating PI3K-AKT signaling axis through down-regulating the phosphatase and tensin homolog 1 (PTEN) in human monocytic THP-1 cells. The HDAC8-specific activator TM-2-51 and inhibitor PCI-34051 enhanced and prevented, respectively, AKT activation and cell cycle progression in LeTx-treated cells. Furthermore, HDAC8 induced tri-methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3), which is known to suppress PTEN expression, through at least in part down-regulating the H3K27me3 eraser Jumonji Domain Containing (JMJD) 3. Importantly, the JMJD3-specific inhibitor GSK-J4 induced AKT activation and protected cell cycle arrest in LeTx-treated cells, regardless the presence of HDAC8 activity. Collectively, this study for the first time demonstrated that HDAC8 activity determines susceptibility to cell cycle arrest induced by LeTx, through regulating the PI3K-PTEN-AKT signaling axis. PMID:28509866

  6. A human coronavirus responsible for the common cold massively kills dendritic cells but not monocytes.

    PubMed

    Mesel-Lemoine, Mariana; Millet, Jean; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Law, Helen; Vabret, Astrid; Lorin, Valérie; Escriou, Nicolas; Albert, Matthew L; Nal, Béatrice; Tangy, Frédéric

    2012-07-01

    Human coronaviruses are associated with upper respiratory tract infections that occasionally spread to the lungs and other organs. Although airway epithelial cells represent an important target for infection, the respiratory epithelium is also composed of an elaborate network of dendritic cells (DCs) that are essential sentinels of the immune system, sensing pathogens and presenting foreign antigens to T lymphocytes. In this report, we show that in vitro infection by human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) induces massive cytopathic effects in DCs, including the formation of large syncytia and cell death within only few hours. In contrast, monocytes are much more resistant to infection and cytopathic effects despite similar expression levels of CD13, the membrane receptor for HCoV-229E. While the differentiation of monocytes into DCs in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4 requires 5 days, only 24 h are sufficient for these cytokines to sensitize monocytes to cell death and cytopathic effects when infected by HCoV-229E. Cell death induced by HCoV-229E is independent of TRAIL, FasL, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and caspase activity, indicating that viral replication is directly responsible for the observed cytopathic effects. The consequence of DC death at the early stage of HCoV-229E infection may have an impact on the early control of viral dissemination and on the establishment of long-lasting immune memory, since people can be reinfected multiple times by HCoV-229E.

  7. A Human Coronavirus Responsible for the Common Cold Massively Kills Dendritic Cells but Not Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mesel-Lemoine, Mariana; Millet, Jean; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Law, Helen; Vabret, Astrid; Lorin, Valérie; Escriou, Nicolas; Albert, Matthew L.; Nal, Béatrice

    2012-01-01

    Human coronaviruses are associated with upper respiratory tract infections that occasionally spread to the lungs and other organs. Although airway epithelial cells represent an important target for infection, the respiratory epithelium is also composed of an elaborate network of dendritic cells (DCs) that are essential sentinels of the immune system, sensing pathogens and presenting foreign antigens to T lymphocytes. In this report, we show that in vitro infection by human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) induces massive cytopathic effects in DCs, including the formation of large syncytia and cell death within only few hours. In contrast, monocytes are much more resistant to infection and cytopathic effects despite similar expression levels of CD13, the membrane receptor for HCoV-229E. While the differentiation of monocytes into DCs in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4 requires 5 days, only 24 h are sufficient for these cytokines to sensitize monocytes to cell death and cytopathic effects when infected by HCoV-229E. Cell death induced by HCoV-229E is independent of TRAIL, FasL, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and caspase activity, indicating that viral replication is directly responsible for the observed cytopathic effects. The consequence of DC death at the early stage of HCoV-229E infection may have an impact on the early control of viral dissemination and on the establishment of long-lasting immune memory, since people can be reinfected multiple times by HCoV-229E. PMID:22553325

  8. Human Cytomegalovirus Promotes Survival of Infected Monocytes via a Distinct Temporal Regulation of Cellular Bcl-2 Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Collins-McMillen, Donna; Kim, Jung Heon; Nogalski, Maciej T.; Stevenson, Emily V.; Caskey, Joshua R.; Cieply, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monocytes play a key role in the hematogenous dissemination of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) to target organ systems. To infect monocytes and reprogram them to deliver infectious virus, HCMV must overcome biological obstacles, including the short life span of monocytes and their antiviral proapoptotic response to infection. We have shown that virally induced upregulation of cellular Mcl-1 promotes early survival of HCMV-infected monocytes, allowing cells to overcome an early apoptotic checkpoint at around 48 h postinfection (hpi). Here, we demonstrate an HCMV-dependent shift from Mcl-1 as the primary antiapoptotic player to the related protein, Bcl-2, later during infection. Bcl-2 was upregulated in HCMV-infected monocytes beginning at 48 hpi. Treatment with the Bcl-2 antagonist ABT-199 only reduced the prosurvival effects of HCMV in target monocytes beginning at 48 hpi, suggesting that Mcl-1 controls survival prior to 48 hpi, while Bcl-2 promotes survival after 48 hpi. Although Bcl-2 was upregulated following viral binding/signaling through cellular integrins (compared to Mcl-1, which is upregulated through binding/activation of epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR]), it functioned similarly to Mcl-1, adopting the early role of Mcl-1 in preventing caspase-3 cleavage/activation. This distinct, HCMV-induced shift from Mcl-1 to Bcl-2 occurs in response to a cellular upregulation of proapoptotic Bax, as small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of Bax reduced the upregulation of Bcl-2 in infected monocytes and rescued the cells from the apoptotic effects of Bcl-2 inhibition. Our data demonstrate a distinct survival strategy whereby HCMV induces a biphasic regulation of cellular Bcl-2 proteins to promote host cell survival, leading to viral dissemination and the establishment of persistent HCMV infection. IMPORTANCE Hematogenous dissemination of HCMV via infected monocytes is a crucial component of the viral survival strategy and is required for the

  9. Cryptic chemotactic activity of fibronectin for human monocytes resides in the 120-kDa fibroblastic cell-binding fragment.

    PubMed

    Clark, R A; Wikner, N E; Doherty, D E; Norris, D A

    1988-08-25

    Monocytes and lymphocytes form a second wave of infiltrating blood leukocytes in areas of tissue injury. The mechanisms for monocyte accumulation at these sites are not completely understood. Recently, however, fragments from extracellular matrix proteins including collagen, elastin, and fibronectin have been shown to induce monocyte chemotaxis. In this report we demonstrate that chemotactic activity for human monocytes is expressed when a 120-kDa fragment containing the RGDS cell-binding peptide is released from intact fibronectin or from larger fibronectin fragments. Monocytes, either from mononuclear cell Ficoll-Hypaque preparations (10-20% monocytes, 89-90% lymphocytes) or from elutriation preparations (95% monocytes, 5% lymphocytes), but not lymphocytes, migrated toward 120-kDa fragment preparations (10(-7) M) in blind-end chambers when the cells were separated from the chemoattractant by a 5-micron pore polycarbonate filter either alone or overlying a 0.45-micron pore nitrocellulose filter. Neutrophils migrated toward zymosan-activated serum but not toward 10(-5)-10(-8) M concentrations of the 120-kDa fragment. Intact fibronectin had no chemotactic activity for human monocytes. Fibronectin was isolated from citrated human plasma by sequential gelatin-Sepharose affinity and DEAE ion-exchange chromatography in the presence of buffers containing 1 mM phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride to prevent fragmentation. Controlled enzymatic digestion with thermolysin cleaved fibronectin into 30 kDa fibrin, 45 kDa collagen, and 150/160-kDa cell and heparin domains. Upon prolonged digestion, purified 150/160-kDa fragments were cleaved into 120-kDa cell and 30/40-kDa heparin-binding fragments. Even though the intact fibronectin molecule, the 150/160-kDa fragments, and the 120-kDa fragment, have cell binding activity for Chinese hamster ovary fibroblasts, only the 120-kDa fragment expressed chemotactic activity for human monocytes. Thus, the 120-kDa fibroblastic cell

  10. Glycodelin-A stimulates interleukin-6 secretion by human monocytes and macrophages through L-selectin and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheuk-Lun; Lam, Eve Y F; Lam, Kevin K W; Koistinen, Hannu; Seppälä, Markku; Ng, Ernest H Y; Yeung, William S B; Chiu, Philip C N

    2012-10-26

    Macrophages represent the second major type of decidual leukocytes at the fetomaternal interface. Changes in macrophage number and activity are associated with fetal loss and pregnancy complications. Glycodelin-A (GdA) is an abundant glycoprotein in the first-trimester decidua. It is involved in fetomaternal defense and early placental development through its regulatory activities in various immune cells. The N-glycosylation of GdA mediates the binding and therefore the activities of the molecule. In this study, we studied the biological activities of GdA in the functions of human monocytes/macrophages. GdA was purified from amniotic fluid by affinity chromatography. GdA treatment did not affect the viability, cell death, or phagocytic activity of the monocytes/macrophages. GdA, but not recombinant glycodelin without glycosylation, induced IL-6 production as demonstrated by cytokine array, intracellular staining, and ELISA. GdA also induced phosphorylation of ERK in monocytes/macrophages. The involvement of ERKs in IL-6 induction was confirmed using pharmacological inhibitors. Co-immunoprecipitation showed that L-selectin on the monocytes/macrophages was the binding protein of GdA. Treatment with anti-L-selectin antibody reduced GdA binding and GdA-induced IL-6 production. GdA-treated macrophages suppressed IFN-γ expression by co-cultured T-helper cells in an IL-6-dependent manner. These results show that GdA interacts with L-selectin to induce IL-6 production in monocytes/macrophages by activating the ERK signaling pathway. In turn, the increased IL-6 production suppresses IFN-γ expression in T-helper cells, which may play an important role in inducing a Th-2-polarized cytokine environment that flavors the immunotolerance of the fetoplacental unit.

  11. Synergistic enhancement of cytokine-induced human monocyte matrix metalloproteinase-1 by C-reactive protein and oxidized LDL through differential regulation of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yahong; Wahl, Larry M

    2006-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) and oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) are associated with inflammatory lesions, such as coronary artery disease, in which monocytes and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) may play a major role in the rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Monocytes are recruited to inflammation sites by monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), which may also participate in the activation of monocytes. The objective of this study was to compare the individual and combined effect of CRP and ox-LDL on human monocyte MMP-1 and the role of MCP-1 in this effect. Although CRP or ox-LDL failed to induce MMP-1 in control monocytes, these molecules enhanced MMP-1 production induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with a synergistic increase in MMP-1 occurring in the presence of both mediators. Enhancement of MMP-1 by CRP and ox-LDL was attributable to a differential increase in MCP-1 and prostaglandin E2(PGE2). CRP, at physiological concentrations, induced high levels of MCP-1 and relatively low levels of PGE2, whereas ox-LDL caused a significant enhancement of PGE2 with little affect on MCP-1. Accordingly, CRP- and ox-LDL-induced MMP-1 production by monocytes was inhibited by anti-MCP-1 antibodies and indomethacin, respectively. Moreover, addition of exogenous MCP-1 or PGE2 enhanced MMP-1 production by TNF-alpha- and GM-CSF-stimulated monocytes. These results show that the combination of CRP and ox-LDL can cause a synergistic enhancement of the role of monocytes in inflammation, first, by increasing MCP-1, which attracts more monocytes and directly enhances MMP-1 production by activated monocytes, and second, by elevating PGE2 production, which also leads to higher levels of MMP-1.

  12. Modulation of the development of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells by lithium chloride.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ko-Jiunn; Lee, Yueh-Lun; Yang, Yi-Yuan; Shih, Neng-Yao; Ho, Chia-Chen; Wu, Yu-Chen; Huang, Tze-Sing; Huang, Ming-Chyi; Liu, Hsing-Cheng; Shen, Winston W; Leu, Sy-Jye

    2011-02-01

    Lithium has been used or explored to treat psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases that are frequently associated with an abnormal immune status. It is likely that lithium may work through modulation of immune responses in these patients. Because dendritic cells (DC) play a central role in regulating immune responses, this study investigated the influence of lithium chloride (LiCl) on the development and function of DC. Exposure to LiCl during the differentiation of human monocyte-derived immature DCs (iDC) enhances CD86 and CD83 expression and increases the production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α. However, the presence of LiCl during LPS-induced maturation of iDC has the opposite effect. During iDC differentiation, LiCl suppresses the activity of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β, and activates PI3K and MEK. In addition, LiCl activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) during iDC differentiation, a pathway not described before. Each of these signaling pathways appears to have distinct impact on the differentiating iDC. The enhanced CD86 expression by LiCl involves the PI3K/AKT and GSK-3β pathway. LiCl modulates the expression of CD83 in iDC mainly through MEK/ERK, PI3K/AKT, and PPARγ pathways, while the increased production of IL-1β and TNF-α mainly involves the MEK/ERK pathway. The effect of LiCl on IL-6/IL-8/IL-10 secretion in iDC is mediated through inhibition of GSK-3β. We have also demonstrated that PPARγ is downstream of GSK-3β and is responsible for the LiCl-mediated modulation of CD86/83 and CD1 expression, but not IL-6/8/10 secretion. The combined influence of these molecular signaling pathways may account for certain clinical effect of lithium.

  13. Production of recombinant human monocyte/neutrophil elastase inhibitor (rM/NEI).

    PubMed

    Cooley, J; Mathieu, B; Remold-O'Donnell, E; Mandle, R J

    1998-10-01

    Recombinant human monocyte/neutrophil elastase inhibitor (rM/NEI) was expressed with a baculovirus expression system. The purified recombinant protein was shown to inhibit human neutrophil elastase by the formation of a stable equimolar complex, as had been shown for M/NEI isolated from monocyte-derived cell lines. rM/NEI was remarkably stable in aqueous buffers from pH 6 to pH 8, but not in buffers below pH 6. rM/NEI activity was stable when subjected to freeze-thaw cycles and low temperature storage in Tris or phosphate buffers. rM/NEI could also be lyophilized without significant loss of activity. A 1.6-g batch of greater than 95% purity in rM/NEI was obtained by anion exchange and size exclusion chromatography with yields of 7 to 8 mg per liter of cultured insect cells. Methods and protocols were chosen for compatibility with large-scale cGMP production and were suitable for biochemical characterization and preclinical evaluation of rM/NEI as a therapeutic agent for cystic fibrosis. The availability of large amounts of purified rM/NEI will facilitate clinical evaluation of rM/NEI for prevention of the elastase-mediated destruction of lung tissue associated with the morbidity and mortality of cystic fibrosis. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  14. Dynamic Modulation of Innate Immune Response by Varying Dosages of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in Human Monocytic Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Matthew C.; Gilliam, Elizabeth A.; Button, Julia; Li, Liwu

    2014-01-01

    Innate monocytes and macrophages can be dynamically programmed into distinct states depending upon the strength of external stimuli. Innate programming may bear significant relevance to the pathogenesis and resolution of human inflammatory diseases. However, systems analyses with regard to the dynamic programming of innate leukocytes are lacking. In this study, we focused on the dynamic responses of human promonocytic THP-1 cells to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We observed that varying dosages of LPS differentially modulate the expression of selected pro- and anti- inflammatory mediators such as IL-6 and IL-33. Super-low dosages of LPS preferentially induced the pro-inflammatory mediator IL-6, while higher dosages of LPS induced both IL-6 and IL-33. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that super-low and high doses of LPS cause differential activation of GSK3 and Akt, as well as the transcription factors FoxO1 and CREB. Inhibition of GSK3 enabled THP-1 cells to express IL-33 when challenged with super-low dose LPS. On the other hand, activation of CREB with adenosine suppressed IL-6 expression. Taken together, our study reveals a dynamic modulation of monocytic cells in response to varying dosages of endotoxin, and may shed light on our understanding of the dynamic balance that controls pathogenesis and resolution of inflammatory diseases. PMID:24970893

  15. Investigating the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type One-Infected Monocyte-Derived Macrophage Secretome

    PubMed Central

    Ciborowski, Pawel; Kadiu, Irena; Rozek, Wojciech; Smith, Lynette; Bernhardt, Kristen; Fladseth, Melissa; Ricardo-Dukelow, Mary; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2007-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (bone marrow monocyte-derived macrophages, alveolar macrophages, perivascular macrophages, and microglia) are reservoirs and vehicles of dissemination for the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). How virus alters mononuclear phagocyte immunoregulatory activities to complete its life cycle and influence disease is incompletely understood. In attempts to better understanding the influence of virus on macrophage functions, we used one-dimensional electrophoresis, and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to analyze the secretome of HIV-1 infected human monocyte-derived macrophages. We identified 111 proteins in culture supernatants of control (uninfected) and virus-infected cells. Differentially expressed cytoskeletal, enzymes, redox, and immunoregulatory protein classes were discovered and validated by Western-blot tests. These included, but were not limited to, cystatin C, cystatin B, chitinase 3-like 1 protein, cofilin-1, L-plastin, superoxide dismutase, leukotriene A4 hydrolase, and α-enolase. This study, through the use of a unique proteomics platform, provides novel insights into virus-host cell interactions that affect the functional role of macrophages in HIV disease. PMID:17320137

  16. Plant-derived micronutrients suppress monocyte adhesion to cultured human aortic endothelial cell layer by modulating its extracellular matrix composition.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Vadim; Ivanova, Svetlana; Kalinovsky, Tatiana; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Matthias

    2008-07-01

    Monocyte adhesion to endothelium plays an important role in atherosclerosis. We investigated the effects of micronutrients on monocyte-binding properties of extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by human aortic endothelial cells (AoEC). Confluent cultures of AoEC were exposed to ascorbic acid, quercetin, gotu kola extract (10% asiatic acid), green tea extract (40% epigallocatechin gallate), or a mixture of these micronutrients for 48 hours. AoEC-produced ECM was exposed by differential treatment. U937 monocyte adhesion was assayed by fluorescence. ECM composition was assayed immunochemically and with radiolabeled metabolic precursors. AoEC exposure to micronutrients reduced ECM capacity to bind monocytes in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was accompanied by profound changes in the ECM composition. Correlation analysis revealed that changes in monocyte adhesion to ECM had the strongest positive correlation with ECM content for laminin (CC = 0.9681, P < 0.01), followed by fibronectin, collagens type III, I, and IV, biglycan, heparan sulfate, and elastin. The strongest negative correlation was with chondroitin sulfate (CC = -0.9623, P < 0.01), followed by perlecan and versican. Individual micronutrients had diverse effects on ECM composition and binding properties, and their mixture was the most effective treatment. In conclusion, micronutrient-dependent reduction of monocyte adhesion to endothelium is partly mediated through specific modulation of ECM composition and properties.

  17. Systemic increase in human maternal circulating CD14+CD16- MCP-1+ monocytes as a marker of labor.

    PubMed

    Bardou, Marc; Hadi, Tarik; Mace, Guillaume; Pesant, Matthieu; Debermont, Julie; Barrichon, Marina; Wendremaire, Maeva; Laurent, Nicole; Sagot, Paul; Lirussi, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    To study the influence of pregnancy and labor on the proportion and level of activation of monocyte subpopulations in human pregnancy. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from healthy nonpregnant women (n = 6); women in the third-trimester of healthy pregnancies (n = 18) and women with preterm premature rupture of membranes (n = 46), just before delivery for the last 2 groups. Monocyte subpopulations were characterized by flow cytometry using CD14, CD16, and activation level using macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and CCR2 antibodies. The relative proportion of each monocyte subset in nonpregnant women was similar to that in women with healthy or complicated pregnancies. However, pregnancy was associated with a significant decrease in MCP-1 expressing monocytes (79.5% ± 19.8% vs 9.3% ± 6.8% and 11.9% ± 8.3% for nonpregnant, healthy pregnancy, and preterm premature rupture of membranes (respectively, P < .05). Spontaneous labor was associated with a return to nonpregnant values for the proportion of MCP-1 expressing monocytes in both normal (74.4% ± 16.9) and preterm premature rupture of membranes pregnancy (68.4% ± 35.6), irrespective of the mode of delivery (vaginal or cesarean section). This was not observed in women who delivered without spontaneous labor onset. CCR-2 (MCP-1 receptor) expression was not modified in monocytes at the time of labor, but was significantly increased in granulocytes (3646 ± 1080 vs 7338 ± 2718 for nonlaboring and laboring preterm premature rupture of membranes, respectively, P < .05) CONCLUSION: In light of previous reports of a role for MCP-1 in labor, our results suggest the downregulation of activation levels of monocytes, via MCP-1 expression might be involved in maternofetal immune tolerance. Monocyte reactivation might be associated with labor. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Psoriatic cutaneous inflammation promotes human monocyte differentiation into active osteoclasts, facilitating bone damage.

    PubMed

    Raimondo, Annunziata; Lembo, Serena; Di Caprio, Roberta; Donnarumma, Giovanna; Monfrecola, Giuseppe; Balato, Nicola; Ayala, Fabio; Balato, Anna

    2017-06-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory arthropathy that can be associated with focal bone erosions. Psoriasis usually precedes the psoriatic arthritis onset by an average of 10 years, but this relation is not yet fully elucidated. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-33, OPN, IL-17, and TNF-α are involved in both psoriasis and PsA pathogenesis as well as in bone homeostasis. In this study, we have demonstrated that IL-33, OPN, IL-17, and TNF-α induced the release of a wide range of pro-osteoclastogenic factors from the skin, such as RANKL, that promote monocyte differentiation in osteoclasts. The addition of osteoprotegerin, a RANKL inhibitor, to monocyte cultures treated with supernatant from stimulated skin did not completely deplete osteoclast formation, suggesting that skin produced several additional pro-osteoclastogenic mediators, which could act in a RANKL-independent manner. Moreover, we have found that RANKL serum levels as well as osteoclast number and activity in psoriatic patients with and without arthritis, was influenced by severity of cutaneous disease. Our data demonstrate that psoriatic cutaneous inflammation contributes to bone damage. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Monoclonal antibody to a subset of human monocytes found only in the peripheral blood and inflammatory tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Zwadlo, G.; Schlegel, R.; Sorg, C.

    1986-07-15

    A monoclonal antibody is described that was generated by immunizing mice with cultured human blood monocytes. The antibody (27E10) belongs to the IgG1 subclass and detects a surface antigen at M/sub r/ 17,000 that is found on 20% of peripheral blood monocytes. The antigen is increasingly expressed upon culture of monocytes, reaching a maximum between days 2 and 3. Stimulation of monocytes with interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..), 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Ylalanine (fMLP) increased the 27E10 antigen density. The amount of 27E10-positive cells is not or is only weakly affected. The antigen is absent from platelets, lymphotyces, and all tested human cell lines, yet it cross-reacts with 15% of freshly isolated granulocytes. By using the indirect immunoperoxidase technique, the antibody is found to be negative on cryostat sections of normal human tissue (skin, lung, and colon) and positive on only a few monocyte-like cells in liver and on part of the cells of the splenic red pulp. In inflammatory tissue, however, the antibody is positive on monocytes/macrophages and sometimes on endothelial cells and epidermal cells, depending on the stage and type of inflammation, e.g., BCG ranulomas are negative, whereas psoriasis vulgaris, atopic dermatitis, erythrodermia, pressure urticaria, and periodontitis contain positively staining cells. In contact eczemas at different times after elicitation (6 hr, 24 hr, and 72 hr), the 27E10 antigen is seen first after 24 hr on a few infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, which increase in numbers after 72 hr.

  20. Interleukin-10 Stimulates Coxiella burnetii Replication in Human Monocytes through Tumor Necrosis Factor Down-Modulation: Role in Microbicidal Defect of Q Fever

    PubMed Central

    Ghigo, Eric; Capo, Christian; Raoult, Didier; Mege, Jean-Louis

    2001-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii, an obligate intracellular bacterium, is the agent of Q fever. The chronic form of the disease is associated with the overproduction of interleukin-10 and deficient C. burnetii killing by monocytes. We hypothesized that the replication of C. burnetii inside monocytes requires a macrophage-deactivating cytokine such as interleukin-10. In the absence of interleukin-10, C. burnetii survived but did not replicate in monocytes. C. burnetii replication (measured 15 days) was induced in interleukin-10-treated monocytes. This effect of interleukin-10 is specific since transforming growth factor β1 had no effect on bacterial replication. C. burnetii replication involves the down-modulation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) release. First, interleukin-10 suppressed C. burnetii-stimulated production of TNF. Second, the addition of recombinant TNF to interleukin-10-treated monocytes inhibited bacterial replication. Third, the incubation of infected monocytes with neutralizing anti-TNF antibodies favored C. burnetii replication. On the other hand, deficient C. burnetii killing by monocytes from patients with chronic Q fever involves interleukin-10. Indeed, C. burnetii replication was observed in monocytes from patients with Q fever endocarditis, but not in those from patients with acute Q fever. Bacterial replication was inhibited by neutralizing anti-interleukin-10 antibodies. As monocytes from patients with endocarditis overproduced interleukin-10, the defective bacterial killing is likely related to endogenous interleukin-10. These results suggest that interleukin-10 enables monocytes to support C. burnetii replication and to favor the development of chronic Q fever. PMID:11254592

  1. Genetics and Beyond – The Transcriptome of Human Monocytes and Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Tanja; Wild, Philipp; Szymczak, Silke; Rotival, Maxime; Schillert, Arne; Castagne, Raphaele; Maouche, Seraya; Germain, Marine; Lackner, Karl; Rossmann, Heidi; Eleftheriadis, Medea; Sinning, Christoph R.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Lubos, Edith; Mennerich, Detlev; Rust, Werner; Perret, Claire; Proust, Carole; Nicaud, Viviane; Loscalzo, Joseph; Hübner, Norbert; Tregouet, David; Münzel, Thomas; Ziegler, Andreas; Tiret, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    Background Variability of gene expression in human may link gene sequence variability and phenotypes; however, non-genetic variations, alone or in combination with genetics, may also influence expression traits and have a critical role in physiological and disease processes. Methodology/Principal Findings To get better insight into the overall variability of gene expression, we assessed the transcriptome of circulating monocytes, a key cell involved in immunity-related diseases and atherosclerosis, in 1,490 unrelated individuals and investigated its association with >675,000 SNPs and 10 common cardiovascular risk factors. Out of 12,808 expressed genes, 2,745 expression quantitative trait loci were detected (P<5.78×10−12), most of them (90%) being cis-modulated. Extensive analyses showed that associations identified by genome-wide association studies of lipids, body mass index or blood pressure were rarely compatible with a mediation by monocyte expression level at the locus. At a study-wide level (P<3.9×10−7), 1,662 expression traits (13.0%) were significantly associated with at least one risk factor. Genome-wide interaction analyses suggested that genetic variability and risk factors mostly acted additively on gene expression. Because of the structure of correlation among expression traits, the variability of risk factors could be characterized by a limited set of independent gene expressions which may have biological and clinical relevance. For example expression traits associated with cigarette smoking were more strongly associated with carotid atherosclerosis than smoking itself. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that the monocyte transcriptome is a potent integrator of genetic and non-genetic influences of relevance for disease pathophysiology and risk assessment. PMID:20502693

  2. Tacaribe Virus but Not Junin Virus Infection Induces Cytokine Release from Primary Human Monocytes and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Groseth, Allison; Hoenen, Thomas; Weber, Michaela; Wolff, Svenja; Herwig, Astrid; Kaufmann, Andreas; Becker, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the development of disease during arenavirus infection are poorly understood. However, common to all hemorrhagic fever diseases is the involvement of macrophages as primary target cells, suggesting that the immune response in these cells may be of paramount importance during infection. Thus, in order to identify features of the immune response that contribute to arenavirus pathogenesis, we have examined the growth kinetics and cytokine profiles of two closely related New World arenaviruses, the apathogenic Tacaribe virus (TCRV) and the hemorrhagic fever-causing Junin virus (JUNV), in primary human monocytes and macrophages. Both viruses grew robustly in VeroE6 cells; however, TCRV titres were decreased by approximately 10 fold compared to JUNV in both monocytes and macrophages. Infection of both monocytes and macrophages with TCRV also resulted in the release of high levels of IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α, while levels of IFN-α, IFN-β and IL-12 were not affected. However, we could show that the presence of these cytokines had no direct effect on growth of either TCRV of JUNV in macrophages. Further analysis also showed that while the production of IL-6 and IL-10 are dependent on viral replication, production of TNF-α also occurs after exposure to UV-inactivated TCRV particles and is thus independent of productive virus infection. Surprisingly, JUNV infection did not have an effect on any of the cytokines examined indicating that, in contrast to other viral hemorrhagic fever viruses, macrophage-derived cytokine production is unlikely to play an active role in contributing to the cytokine dysregulation observed in JUNV infected patients. Rather, these results suggest that an early, controlled immune response by infected macrophages may be critical for the successful control of infection of apathogenic viruses and prevention of subsequent disease, including systemic cytokine dysregulation. PMID:21572983

  3. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells from horses differ from dendritic cells of humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Mauel, Susanne; Steinbach, Falko; Ludwig, Hanns

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the initiators of immune responses and are present in most tissues in vivo. To generate myeloid DC from monocytes (MoDC) in vitro the necessary cytokines are granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Using degenerated primers delineated from other species and rapid amplification of cDNA ends reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RACE RT-PCR), the cDNA of equine (eq.) GM-CSF was cloned and found to have a point deletion at the 3′-end of eq.GM-CSF, resulting in a 24-nucleotide extended open reading frame not described in any species thus far. For differentiating eq.MoDC, monocytes were stimulated with eq.GM-CSF and eq.IL-4. The eq.MoDC was analysed by both light and electron microscopy and by flow cytometry and mixed lymphocyte reaction. The eq.MoDC obtained had the typical morphology and function of DC, including the ability to stimulate allogeneic T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. In contrast to the human system, however, monocytes had to be differentiated for 6–7 days before immature DC were obtained. Our data also indicate that lipopolysaccharide or poly(I:C) alone are not sufficient to confer the full phenotypic transition into mature DC. Thus our study contributes to understanding the heterogeneity of immunity and adds important information on the equine immune system, which is clearly distinct from those of mice or man. PMID:16556260

  4. Effect of nicotine on advanced glycation end product-induced immune response in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideo Kohka; Liu, Keyue; Wake, Hidenori; Mori, Shuji; Zhang, Jiyong; Liu, Rui; Yoshino, Tadashi; Nishibori, Masahiro

    2010-03-01

    The up-regulation of adhesion molecule expressions on monocytes enhances cell-to-cell interactions with T cells, leading to cytokine production. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are modifications of proteins/lipids that become nonenzymatically glycated after contact with aldose sugars. Among various subtypes of AGEs, glyceraldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-2) and glycolaldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-3) induce the expressions of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, B7.1, B7.2, and CD40 on monocytes, the production of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and the lymphocyte proliferation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Nicotine is reported to inhibit the activation of monocytes via nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha7 subunit (alpha7-nAChR). In the present study, we found that nicotine inhibited the actions of AGE-2 and AGE-3. A nonselective and selective alpha7-nAChR antagonist, mecamylamine and alpha-bungarotoxin, reversed the inhibitory effects of nicotine, suggesting the involvement of alpha7-nAChR stimulation. Nicotine induced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), and cAMP in the presence and absence of AGE-2 and AGE-3. PGE(2) is known to activate the EP(2)/EP(4) receptor, increasing the cAMP level and protein kinase A (PKA) activity. The actions of nicotine were reversed in part by an EP(2)-receptor antagonist, AH6809, an EP(4)-receptor antagonist, AH23848, and a PKA inhibitor, N-[2-(p-bromocinnamyl-amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide dihydrochloride (H89). These results indicate that the mechanism of action of nicotine may be partially via endogenous PGE(2) production.

  5. Phospholipase D from Loxosceles laeta Spider Venom Induces IL-6, IL-8, CXCL1/GRO-α, and CCL2/MCP-1 Production in Human Skin Fibroblasts and Stimulates Monocytes Migration.

    PubMed

    Rojas, José M; Arán-Sekul, Tomás; Cortés, Emmanuel; Jaldín, Romina; Ordenes, Kely; Orrego, Patricio R; González, Jorge; Araya, Jorge E; Catalán, Alejandro

    2017-04-05

    Cutaneous loxoscelism envenomation by Loxosceles spiders is characterized by the development of a dermonecrotic lesion, strong inflammatory response, the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, and leukocyte migration to the bite site. The role of phospholipase D (PLD) from Loxosceles in the recruitment and migration of monocytes to the envenomation site has not yet been described. This study reports on the expression and production profiles of cytokines and chemokines in human skin fibroblasts treated with catalytically active and inactive recombinant PLDs from Loxosceles laeta (rLlPLD) and lipid inflammatory mediators ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the evaluation of their roles in monocyte migration. Recombinant rLlPLD1 (active) and rLlPLD2 (inactive) isoforms induce interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, CXCL1/GRO-α, and CCL2/monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression and secretion in fibroblasts. Meanwhile, C1P and LPA only exhibited a minor effect on the expression and secretion of these cytokines and chemokines. Moreover, neutralization of both enzymes with anti-rLlPLD1 antibodies completely inhibited the secretion of these cytokines and chemokines. Importantly, conditioned media from fibroblasts, treated with rLlPLDs, stimulated the transmigration of THP-1 monocytes. Our data demonstrate the direct role of PLDs in chemotactic mediator synthesis for monocytes in human skin fibroblasts and indicate that inflammatory processes play an important role during loxoscelism.

  6. Phospholipase D from Loxosceles laeta Spider Venom Induces IL-6, IL-8, CXCL1/GRO-α, and CCL2/MCP-1 Production in Human Skin Fibroblasts and Stimulates Monocytes Migration

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, José M.; Arán-Sekul, Tomás; Cortés, Emmanuel; Jaldín, Romina; Ordenes, Kely; Orrego, Patricio R.; González, Jorge; Araya, Jorge E.; Catalán, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Cutaneous loxoscelism envenomation by Loxosceles spiders is characterized by the development of a dermonecrotic lesion, strong inflammatory response, the production of pro-inflammatory mediators, and leukocyte migration to the bite site. The role of phospholipase D (PLD) from Loxosceles in the recruitment and migration of monocytes to the envenomation site has not yet been described. This study reports on the expression and production profiles of cytokines and chemokines in human skin fibroblasts treated with catalytically active and inactive recombinant PLDs from Loxosceles laeta (rLlPLD) and lipid inflammatory mediators ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the evaluation of their roles in monocyte migration. Recombinant rLlPLD1 (active) and rLlPLD2 (inactive) isoforms induce interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, CXCL1/GRO-α, and CCL2/monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression and secretion in fibroblasts. Meanwhile, C1P and LPA only exhibited a minor effect on the expression and secretion of these cytokines and chemokines. Moreover, neutralization of both enzymes with anti-rLlPLD1 antibodies completely inhibited the secretion of these cytokines and chemokines. Importantly, conditioned media from fibroblasts, treated with rLlPLDs, stimulated the transmigration of THP-1 monocytes. Our data demonstrate the direct role of PLDs in chemotactic mediator synthesis for monocytes in human skin fibroblasts and indicate that inflammatory processes play an important role during loxoscelism. PMID:28379166

  7. Characterization of a receptor for human monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor/interleukin-8

    SciTech Connect

    Grob, P.M.; David, E.; Warren, T.C.; DeLeon, R.P.; Farina, P.R.; Homon, C.A. )

    1990-05-15

    Monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor/interleukin-8 (MDNCF/IL-8) is an 8,000-dalton protein produced by monocytes which exhibits activity as a chemoattractant for neutrophils with maximal activity achieved at a concentration of 50 ng/ml. This polypeptide has been iodinated by chloramine-T methodology (350 Ci/mM), and specific receptors for MDNCF/IL-8 have been detected on human neutrophils, U937 cells, THP-1 cells, and dimethyl sulfoxide-differentiated HL-60 cells. The binding of MDNCF/IL-8 to human neutrophils is not inhibited by interleukin-1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, insulin, or epidermal growth factor. In addition, chemoattractants such as C5a, fMet-Leu-Phe, leukotriene B4, and platelet-activating factor fail to inhibit binding, suggesting that MDNCF/IL-8 utilizes a unique receptor. The receptor for MDNCF/IL-8 is apparently glycosylated since ligand binding is inhibited by the presence of wheat germ agglutinin, a lectin with a binding specificity for N-acetylglucosamine and neuraminic acid. Steady state binding experiments indicate Kd values of 4 and 0.5 nM and receptor numbers of 75,000 and 7,400 for human neutrophils and differentiated HL-60 cells, respectively. 125I-MDNCF/IL-8 bound to human neutrophils is rapidly internalized and subsequently released from cells as trichloroacetic acid-soluble radioactivity. Affinity labeling experiments suggest that the human neutrophil MDNCF/IL-8 receptor exhibits a mass of approximately 58,000 daltons.

  8. IgE and IL-33-mediated triggering of human basophils inhibits TLR4-induced monocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Rivellese, Felice; Suurmond, Jolien; de Paulis, Amato; Marone, Gianni; Huizinga, Tom W J; Toes, René E M

    2014-10-01

    Basophils are circulating granulocytes, best known as effector cells in allergic reactions. Recent studies in mice suggest that they might also participate in the suppression of chronic inflammation. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of purified human basophils to modulate monocyte responses upon IL-33 and IgE triggering. Activation of human basophils with IL-33 induced the production of IL-4 and the release of histamine, and enhanced their IgE-mediated activation. In addition, basophils triggered with IL-33 and anti-IgE significantly suppressed the LPS-induced production of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α and the upregulation of the costimulatory molecule CD80 by monocytes. These effects were mainly explained by the release of histamine, as they could be inhibited by the histamine receptor 2 antagonist ranitidine, with a smaller contribution of IL-4. In contrast, basophil-derived IL-4 and histamine had opposing effects on the expression of the inhibitory Fc γ receptor IIb and the production of IL-10 by monocytes. Our data show that basophils can influence monocyte activation and suggest a previously unrecognized role for human basophils in the modulation of monocyte-mediated immune responses, through the balanced secretion of histamine and IL-4.

  9. Monocytic cells derived from human embryonic stem cells and fetal liver share common differentiation pathways and homeostatic functions.

    PubMed

    Klimchenko, Olena; Di Stefano, Antonio; Geoerger, Birgit; Hamidi, Sofiane; Opolon, Paule; Robert, Thomas; Routhier, Mélanie; El-Benna, Jamel; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Boukour, Siham; Lescure, Bernadette; Solary, Eric; Vainchenker, William; Norol, Françoise

    2011-03-17

    The early emergence of macrophages and their large pattern of tissue distribution during development suggest that they may play a critical role in the initial steps of embryogenesis. In the present study, we show that monocytic cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and from fetal liver follow a differentiation pathway different to that of adult cells, leading to specific functions. Embryonic and fetal monocytic cells differentiated from a CD14(low)CD16(-) precursor to form CD14(high)CD16(+) cells without producing the CD14(high)CD16(-) cell population that predominates in adult peripheral blood. Both demonstrated an enhanced expression of genes encoding tissue-degrading enzymes, chemokines, and scavenger receptors, as was previously reported for M2 macrophages. Compared with adult blood monocytes, embryonic and fetal monocytic cells secreted high amounts of proteins acting on tissue remodeling and angiogenesis, and most of them expressed the Tie2 receptor. Furthermore, they promoted vascular remodeling in xenotransplanted human tumors. These findings suggest that the regulation of human fetal and embryonic monocytic cell differentiation leads to the generation of cells endowed mainly with anti-inflammatory and remodeling functions. Trophic and immunosuppressive functions of M2-polarized macrophages link fetus and tumor development, and hESCs offer a valuable experimental model for in vitro studies of mechanisms sustaining these processes.

  10. Adenylyl Cyclase-Associated Protein 1(CAP1) is a Receptor for Human Resistin and Mediates Inflammatory Actions of Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sahmin; Lee, Hyun-Chae; Kwon, Yoo-Wook; Lee, Sang Eun; Cho, Youngjin; Kim, Joonoh; Lee, Soobeom; Kim, Ju-Young; Lee, Jaewon; Yang, Han-Mo; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Nam, Ky-Youb; Chung, Junho; Lazar, Mitchell A.; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Resistin is a cytokine that induces low-grade inflammation by stimulating monocytes in human. Resistin-mediated chronic inflammation can lead to obesity, atherosclerosis and other cardiometabolic disease. Nevertheless, the receptor for human resistin has not yet been clarified. Here, we identified adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1(CAP1) as a functional receptor for human resistin and clarified its intracellular signaling pathway to modulate inflammatory action of monocytes. We found that human resistin directly binds to CAP1 in monocytes and up-regulates intracellular cAMP concentration, PKA activity and NF-kB-related transcription of inflammatory cytokines. Over-expression of CAP1 in monocytes enhanced resistin-induced increased activity of cAMP-dependent signaling pathway. Moreover, CAP1-over-expressed monocytes aggravated adipose tissue inflammation in transgenic mice that express human resistin from their monocytes. In contrast, suppression of CAP1 expression abrogated the resistin-mediated inflammatory activity both in vitro and in vivo. Our results highlight CAP1 as the bona fide receptor for resistin leading to inflammation in human. PMID:24606903

  11. Systems toxicology-based assessment of the candidate modified risk tobacco product THS2.2 for the adhesion of monocytic cells to human coronary arterial endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Poussin, Carine; Laurent, Alexandra; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia; De Leon, Hector

    2016-01-02

    Alterations of endothelial adhesive properties by cigarette smoke (CS) can progressively favor the development of atherosclerosis which may cause cardiovascular disorders. Modified risk tobacco products (MRTPs) are tobacco products developed to reduce smoking-related risks. A systems biology/toxicology approach combined with a functional in vitro adhesion assay was used to assess the impact of a candidate heat-not-burn technology-based MRTP, Tobacco Heating System (THS) 2.2, on the adhesion of monocytic cells to human coronary arterial endothelial cells (HCAECs) compared with a reference cigarette (3R4F). HCAECs were treated for 4h with conditioned media of human monocytic Mono Mac 6 (MM6) cells preincubated with low or high concentrations of aqueous extracts from THS2.2 aerosol or 3R4F smoke for 2h (indirect treatment), unconditioned media (direct treatment), or fresh aqueous aerosol/smoke extracts (fresh direct treatment). Functional and molecular investigations revealed that aqueous 3R4F smoke extract promoted the adhesion of MM6 cells to HCAECs via distinct direct and indirect concentration-dependent mechanisms. Using the same approach, we identified significantly reduced effects of aqueous THS2.2 aerosol extract on MM6 cell-HCAEC adhesion, and reduced molecular changes in endothelial and monocytic cells. Ten- and 20-fold increased concentrations of aqueous THS2.2 aerosol extract were necessary to elicit similar effects to those measured with 3R4F in both fresh direct and indirect exposure modalities, respectively. Our systems toxicology study demonstrated reduced effects of an aqueous aerosol extract from the candidate MRTP, THS2.2, using the adhesion of monocytic cells to human coronary endothelial cells as a surrogate pathophysiologically relevant event in atherogenesis.

  12. Milk-derived bioactive peptides inhibit human endothelial-monocyte interactions via PPAR-γ dependent regulation of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Marcone, Simone; Haughton, Karen; Simpson, Paul J; Belton, Orina; Fitzgerald, Desmond J

    2015-01-01

    Milk-derived bioactive peptides retain many biological properties and have therapeutic effects in cardiovascular disorders such as atherosclerosis. Under inflammatory conditions the expression of endothelial cells adhesion molecules is induced, increasing monocyte adhesion to human vessel wall, a critical step in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In the present work we explored the effects of milk-derived bioactive peptides on the expression of the inflammatory phenotype of human endothelial cells and their effects on monocyte adherence to endothelial cells. Treatment of endothelial cells with milk-derived hydrolysate inhibited their production of inflammatory proteins MCP-1 and IL-8 and expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin. Milk derived hydrolysate also attenuated the adhesion of human monocytes to activated endothelial cells. The effect was similar to that obtained in endothelial cells treated with troglitazone, a ligand of peroxisome proliferators-activator receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ). PPAR-γ is a transcription factor which when activated antagonises the pro-inflammatory capability of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). We further examined whether the effects of milk-derived hydrolysates on endothelial cells may be mediated through NF-κB activation via a PPAR-γ dependent mechanism. The specific PPAR-γ inhibitor, GW9662 blocked the effects of the hydrolysate on the NF-κB-mediated chemokines and adhesion molecules expression in endothelial cells. These results suggest that milk-derived bioactive peptides work as anti-atherogenic agents through the inhibition of endothelial-dependent adhesive interactions with monocytes by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway through a PPAR-γ dependent mechanism.

  13. In vitro Effects of Selected Saponins on the Production and Release of Lysozyme Activity of Human Monocytic and Epithelial Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Helal, Racha; Melzig, Matthias F.

    2011-01-01

    Lysozyme is one of the most important factors of innate immunity and a unique enzybiotic in that it exerts not only antibacterial activity, but also antiviral, anti-inflammatory, anticancer and immunomodulatory activities. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether in vitro exposure to saponins can affect the release and production of lysozyme activity in human monocytic cells THP-1, and in human epithelial cells HT-29. Lysozyme activity levels in cell culture fluids were measured using highly sensitive fluorescence-based lysozyme activity assay. Majority of the examined saponins were demonstrated to stimulate significantly the release of lysozyme activity of monocytes and epithelial cells after one hour treatment at non-toxic concentrations. On the contrary, cells treated with saponins for longer periods up to 72 hours showed tendency to decrease in the secretion and production of lysozyme activity. However, these inhibitory effects of saponins observed with long-term treatment periods were mostly associated with toxic effects of saponins to cells. The results suggested positive contribution of some saponins to lysozyme release of monocytes and epithelial cells upon short exposure. Furthermore, demonstrated ability of these saponins to enhance the release of lysozyme activity can present a new mechanism contribute to explaining important biological characteristics of saponins, including the antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory or immune-stimulating properties. PMID:21773070

  14. Endogenous NGF regulates CGRP expression in human monocytes, and affects HLA-DR and CD86 expression and IL-10 production.

    PubMed

    Bracci-Laudiero, Luisa; Aloe, Luigi; Caroleo, Maria Cristina; Buanne, Pasquale; Costa, Nicola; Starace, Giuseppe; Lundeberg, Thomas

    2005-11-15

    Our recent results on autocrine nerve growth factor (NGF) synthesis in B lymphocytes, which directly regulates the expression and release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a neuropeptide known to down-regulate immune response, led us to propose an anti-inflammatory action of NGF. In the present work, we investigated whether the endogenous synthesis of NGF can regulate the expression of CGRP in other antigen-presenting cells, such as monocytes, and whether this may have a functional effect. Our data indicate that human monocytes synthesize basal levels of NGF and CGRP and that, following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation, NGF and CGRP expression are both up-regulated. When endogenous NGF is neutralized, the up-regulation of CGRP expression induced by LPS is inhibited. The expression of membrane molecules involved in T-cell activation such as human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) and CD86 is affected by endogenous NGF, and similar effects were obtained using a CGRP(1) receptor antagonist. In addition, NGF deprivation in LPS-treated monocytes significantly decreases interleukin 10 (IL-10) synthesis. Our findings indicate that endogenous NGF synthesis has a functional role and may represent a physiologic mechanism to down-regulate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and CD86 expression and alter the development of immune responses.

  15. In vitro studies of human monocyte migration across endothelium in response to leukotriene B4 and f-Met-Leu-Phe.

    PubMed Central

    Migliorisi, G.; Folkes, E.; Pawlowski, N.; Cramer, E. B.

    1987-01-01

    Relatively little is known about monocyte emigration from the vasculature or about the factors that regulate this process. In this study, a human in vitro model of a blood vessel wall was used for examination of monocyte transendothelial migration. Umbilical vein endothelial cells were grown to confluency on amnion connective tissue, and human monocytes were stimulated to cross the monolayer in response to the chemoattractants leukotriene B4 or f-Met-Leu-Phe. The pattern and time course of monocyte migration were similar for the two chemotactic factors. In both cases, approximately 40-50% of the adherent monocytes extended single or multiple pseudopods into the apical endothelial surface. This indenting behavior was also observed in the absence of chemotactic factors. It was not affected by the medium (M199 or Gey's) or method of monocyte isolation. Neutrophils also displayed this behavior, but only about half as many neutrophils as monocytes indented the endothelial surface. The integrity of the endothelium remained intact as the monocytes traversed the monolayer. When the monocytes reached the basal surface of the endothelium, they frequently wedged themselves between the basal surface of the endothelium and its basal lamina. The monocytes then invaded the basal lamina and accumulated in the connective tissue. In response to both f-Met-Leu-Phe and leukotriene B4, monocyte migration across the endothelium began as early as 10 minutes. The average rate of accumulation in the connective tissue peaked at 30 minutes; and by 60 minutes, 25-35% of the monocytes had traversed the monolayer. Approximately two to three times as many monocytes traversed the endothelium under conditions of chemotaxis as under conditions of chemokinesis or random migration. These studies provide the basis for understanding the process of monocyte migration out of the bloodstream and lay the foundation for the study of their differentiation into macrophages in the connective tissue. Images

  16. CX(3)CR1 and vascular adhesion protein-1-dependent recruitment of CD16(+) monocytes across human liver sinusoidal endothelium.

    PubMed

    Aspinall, Alexander I; Curbishley, Stuart M; Lalor, Patricia F; Weston, Chris J; Blahova, Miroslava; Liaskou, Evaggelia; Adams, Rebecca M; Holt, Andrew P; Adams, David H

    2010-06-01

    The liver contains macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) that are critical for the regulation of hepatic inflammation. Most hepatic macrophages and mDCs are derived from monocytes recruited from the blood through poorly understood interactions with hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (HSECs). Human CD16(+) monocytes are thought to contain the precursor populations for tissue macrophages and mDCs. We report that CD16(+) cells localize to areas of active inflammation and fibrosis in chronic inflammatory liver disease and that a unique combination of cell surface receptors promotes the transendothelial migration of CD16(+) monocytes through human HSECs under physiological flow. CX(3)CR1 activation was the dominant pertussis-sensitive mechanism controlling transendothelial migration under flow, and expression of the CX(3)CR1 ligand CX(3)CL1 is increased on hepatic sinusoids in chronic inflammatory liver disease. Exposure of CD16(+) monocytes to immobilized purified CX(3)CL1 triggered beta1-integrin-mediated adhesion to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and induced the development of a migratory phenotype. Following transmigration or exposure to soluble CX(3)CL1, CD16(+) monocytes rapidly but transiently lost expression of CX(3)CR1. Adhesion and transmigration across HSECs under flow was also dependent on vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) on the HSECs. Our data suggest that CD16(+) monocytes are recruited by a combination of adhesive signals involving VAP-1 and CX(3)CR1 mediated integrin-activation. Thus a novel combination of surface molecules, including VAP-1 and CX(3)CL1 promotes the recruitment of CD16(+) monocytes to the liver, allowing them to localize at sites of chronic inflammation and fibrosis.

  17. Human cytomegalovirus interleukin-10 polarizes monocytes toward a deactivated M2c phenotype to repress host immune responses.

    PubMed

    Avdic, Selmir; Cao, John Z; McSharry, Brian P; Clancy, Leighton E; Brown, Rebecca; Steain, Megan; Gottlieb, David J; Abendroth, Allison; Slobedman, Barry

    2013-09-01

    Several human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genes encode products that modulate cellular functions in a manner likely to enhance viral pathogenesis. This includes UL111A, which encodes homologs of human interleukin-10 (hIL-10). Depending upon signals received, monocytes and macrophages become polarized to either classically activated (M1 proinflammatory) or alternatively activated (M2 anti-inflammatory) subsets. Skewing of polarization toward an M2 subset may benefit the virus by limiting the proinflammatory responses to infection, and so we determined whether HCMV-encoded viral IL-10 influenced monocyte polarization. Recombinant viral IL-10 protein polarized CD14(+) monocytes toward an anti-inflammatory M2 subset with an M2c phenotype, as demonstrated by high expression of CD163 and CD14 and suppression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II. Significantly, in the context of productive HCMV infection, viral IL-10 produced by infected cells polarized uninfected monocytes toward an M2c phenotype. We also assessed the impact of viral IL-10 on heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), which is an enzyme linked with suppression of inflammatory responses. Polarization of monocytes by viral IL-10 resulted in upregulation of HO-1, and inhibition of HO-1 function resulted in a loss of capacity of viral IL-10 to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-1β, implicating HO-1 in viral IL-10-induced suppression of proinflammatory cytokines by M2c monocytes. In addition, a functional consequence of monocytes polarized with viral IL-10 was a decreased capacity to activate CD4(+) T cells. This study identifies a novel role for viral IL-10 in driving M2c polarization, which may limit virus clearance by restricting proinflammatory and CD4(+) T cell responses at sites of infection.

  18. Monocyte/macrophage trafficking in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome encephalitis: Lessons from human and nonhuman primate studies

    PubMed Central

    Fischer-Smith, Tracy; Bell, Christie; Croul, Sidney; Lewis, Mark; Rappaport, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Here the authors discuss evidence in human and animal models supporting two opposing views regarding the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the central nervous system (CNS): (1) HIV infection in the CNS is a compartmentalized infection, with the virus-infected macrophages entering the CNS early, infecting resident microglia and astrocytes, and achieving a state of latency with evolution toward a fulminant CNS infection late in the course of disease; or alternatively, (2) events in the periphery lead to altered monocyte/macrophage (MΦ) homeostasis, with increased CNS invasion of infected and/or uninfected MΦs. Here the authors have reevaluated evidence presented in the favor of the latter model, with a discussion of phenotypic characteristics distinguishing normal resident microglia with those accumulating in HIV encephalitis (HIVE). CD163 is normally expressed by perivascular MΦs but not resident microglia in normal CNS of humans and rhesus macaques. In agreement with other studies, the authors demonstrate expression of CD163 by brain MΦs in HIVE and simian immunodeficiency virus encephalitis (SIVE). CNS tissues from HIV-sero positive individuals with HIVE or HIV-associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) were also examined. In HIVE, the authors further demonstrate colocalization of CD163 and CD16 (FcγIII recptor) gene expression, the latter marker associated with HIV infection of monocyte in vivo and permissivity of infection. Indeed, CD163+ MΦs and microglia are often productively infected in HIVE CNS. In SIV infected rhesus macaques, CD163+ cells accumulate perivascularly, within nodular lesions and the parenchyma in animals with encephalitis. Likewise, parenchymal microglia and perivascular MΦs are CD163+ in HIVE. In contrast to HIVE, CD163+perivascular and parenchymal MΦs in HIV-associated PML were only associated with areas of demyelinating lesions. Interestingly, SIV-infected rhesus macaques whose viral burden was

  19. Monocyte/macrophage trafficking in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome encephalitis: lessons from human and nonhuman primate studies.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Smith, Tracy; Bell, Christie; Croul, Sidney; Lewis, Mark; Rappaport, Jay

    2008-08-01

    Here the authors discuss evidence in human and animal models supporting two opposing views regarding the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the central nervous system (CNS): (1) HIV infection in the CNS is a compartmentalized infection, with the virus-infected macrophages entering the CNS early, infecting resident microglia and astrocytes, and achieving a state of latency with evolution toward a fulminant CNS infection late in the course of disease; or alternatively, (2) events in the periphery lead to altered monocyte/macrophage (MPhi) homeostasis, with increased CNS invasion of infected and/or uninfected MPhis. Here the authors have reevaluated evidence presented in the favor of the latter model, with a discussion of phenotypic characteristics distinguishing normal resident microglia with those accumulating in HIV encephalitis (HIVE). CD163 is normally expressed by perivascular MPhi s but not resident microglia in normal CNS of humans and rhesus macaques. In agreement with other studies, the authors demonstrate expression of CD163 by brain MPhi s in HIVE and simian immunodeficiency virus encephalitis (SIVE). CNS tissues from HIV-sero positive individuals with HIVE or HIV-associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) were also examined. In HIVE, the authors further demonstrate colocalization of CD163 and CD16 (Fcgamma III recptor) gene expression, the latter marker associated with HIV infection of monocyte in vivo and permissivity of infection. Indeed, CD163(+) MPhis and microglia are often productively infected in HIVE CNS. In SIV infected rhesus macaques, CD163(+) cells accumulate perivascularly, within nodular lesions and the parenchyma in animals with encephalitis. Likewise, parenchymal microglia and perivascular MPhi s are CD163(+) in HIVE. In contrast to HIVE, CD163(+)perivascular and parenchymal MPhi s in HIV-associated PML were only associated with areas of demyelinating lesions. Interestingly, SIV-infected rhesus macaques

  20. Comparison of Ultrastructural Cytotoxic Effects of Carbon and Carbon/Iron Particulates on Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Long, John F.; Waldman, W. James; Kristovich, Robert; Williams, Marshall; Knight, Deborah; Dutta, Prabir K.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the presence of iron in carbon particulates enhances ultrastructural perturbation in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) after phagocytosis. We used 1-μm synthetic carbon-based particulates, designed to simulate environmental particulates of mass median aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5). Cultures of human MDMs or T-lymphocytes (as a nonphagocytic control) were exposed to carbon or carbon/iron particulates for various time periods and examined by transmission electron microscopy for ultrastructural changes. T-cells failed to internalize either of the particulates and showed no organelle or nuclear changes. Conversely, MDMs avidly phagocytized the particulates. MDMs treated with C particulates exhibited morphologic evidence of macrophage activation but no evidence of lysis of organelles. In contrast, MDMs treated with C/Fe particulates exhibited coalescence of particulate-containing lysosomes. This phenomenon was not observed in the case of C particulates. By 24 hr there was a tendency of the C/Fe particulates to agglomerate into loose or compact clusters. Surrounding the compact C/Fe agglomerates was a uniform zone of nearly total organelle lysis. The lytic changes diminished in proportion to the distance from the agglomerate. In such cells, the nucleus showed loss of chromatin. Although C particles induced no detectable oxidative burst on treated MDMs, C/Fe particles induced a nearly 5-fold increase in the extracellular oxidative burst by treated MDMs compared with untreated controls. Iron bound to C particles catalyzed the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to generate hydroxyl radicals. Results of these studies suggest that, among particulates of similar size, biologic activity can vary profoundly as a function of particulate physicochemical properties. PMID:15687054

  1. Human Monocyte-Derived Osteoclasts Are Targeted by Staphylococcal Pore-Forming Toxins and Superantigens

    PubMed Central

    Flammier, Sacha; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Badiou, Cédric; Henry, Thomas; Vandenesch, François; Laurent, Frédéric; Trouillet-Assant, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of bone and joint infections (BJIs). Staphylococcal pathogenesis involves numerous virulence factors including secreted toxins such as pore-forming toxins (PFTs) and superantigens. The role of these toxins on BJI outcome is largely unknown. In particular, few studies have examined how osteoclasts, the bone-resorbing cells, respond to exposure to staphylococcal PFTs and superantigens. We investigated the direct impact of recombinant staphylococcal toxins on human primary mature monocyte-derived osteoclasts, in terms of cytotoxicity and cell activation with cell death and bone resorption assays, using macrophages of the corresponding donors as a reference. Monocyte-derived osteoclasts displayed similar toxin susceptibility profiles compared to macrophages. Specifically, we demonstrated that the Panton-Valentine leukocidin, known as one of the most powerful PFT which lyses myeloid cells after binding to the C5a receptor, was able to induce the death of osteoclasts. The archetypal superantigen TSST-1 was not cytotoxic but enhanced the bone resorption activity of osteoclasts, suggesting a novel mechanism by which superantigen-producing S. aureus can accelerate the destruction of bone tissue during BJI. Altogether, our data indicate that the diverse clinical presentations of BJIs could be related, at least partly, to the toxin profiles of S. aureus isolates involved in these severe infections. PMID:26934588

  2. Isolation and characterization of auxotrophic mutants of Legionella pneumophila that fail to multiply in human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, C S; Chen, J X; Shuman, H A

    1988-01-01

    Attempts to isolate auxotrophic mutants of Legionella pneumophila have been hampered by the complex nutritional composition of the media used to cultivate this organism. We developed a semidefined medium, designated CAA, to facilitate the isolation and characterization of Legionella auxotrophs. Unlike previously described chemically defined media for this organism, L. pneumophila formed colonies on CAA agar. Using this medium, we isolated several independent tryptophan auxotrophs of strain Philadelphia-1 after ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis and penicillin enrichment. Trimethoprim selection was used to isolate several independent thymidine-requiring mutants of the same strain. The thymidine auxotrophs exhibited a marked decrease in viability when they were deprived of thymidine. The results of monocyte infection experiments with both the tryptophan and thymidine auxotrophs indicated that the thymidine auxotrophs were incapable of intracellular survival or multiplication. In contrast, the tryptophan auxotrophs grew well in monocyte cultures. The isolation of additional auxotrophic mutants will facilitate the study of the nutritional requirements of L. pneumophila for growth in human mononuclear phagocytes. PMID:3372016

  3. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  4. Chemotactic activity of Helicobacter pylori sonicate for human polymorphonuclear leucocytes and monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, H; Andersen, L P

    1992-01-01

    The immunopathology of Helicobacter pylori associated active chronic gastritis, which is characterised by predominance of polymorphonuclear leucocyte infiltration, is largely unknown. To evaluate the role of bacterial components as inflammatory mediators ultracentrifuged sonicated preparations were made of clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori. The crude sonicates were shown to exhibit chemotactic activity for human polymorphonuclear leucocytes and blood monocytes in a concentration dependent fashion. The potency was comparable with previously described bacterial derived cytotaxins. The cytotaxin(s) was non-dialysable and completely destroyed by proteinase. Heat treatment did not decrease the chemotactic activity, but in sonicate subjected to 100 degrees C for 15 minutes all activity disappeared after dialysis suggesting the breakdown of a larger protein to small fragments that are still biological active. By ammonium sulphate precipitation at increasing concentrations the cytotaxin(s) was selectively found in 10% ammonium sulphate saturation, and by further molecular gel separation the chemotactic activity was found in the molecular size range from 25 to 35 kDa. The demonstration of a polymorphonuclear leucocyte and monocyte cytotaxin from Helicobacter pylori sonicate may help in understanding the mucosal immune response in gastric inflammatory diseases. PMID:1624151

  5. The human syndrome of dendritic cell, monocyte, B and NK lymphoid deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bigley, Venetia; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Doulatov, Sergei; Wang, Xiao-Nong; Dickinson, Rachel; McGovern, Naomi; Jardine, Laura; Pagan, Sarah; Dimmick, Ian; Chua, Ignatius; Wallis, Jonathan; Lordan, Jim; Morgan, Cliff; Kumararatne, Dinakantha S.; Doffinger, Rainer; van der Burg, Mirjam; van Dongen, Jacques; Cant, Andrew; Dick, John E.; Hambleton, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Congenital or acquired cellular deficiencies in humans have the potential to reveal much about normal hematopoiesis and immune function. We show that a recently described syndrome of monocytopenia, B and NK lymphoid deficiency additionally includes the near absence of dendritic cells. Four subjects showed severe depletion of the peripheral blood HLA-DR+ lineage− compartment, with virtually no CD123+ or CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs) and very few CD14+ or CD16+ monocytes. The only remaining HLA-DR+ lineage− cells were circulating CD34+ progenitor cells. Dermal CD14+ and CD1a+ DC were also absent, consistent with their dependence on blood-derived precursors. In contrast, epidermal Langerhans cells and tissue macrophages were largely preserved. Combined loss of peripheral DCs, monocytes, and B and NK lymphocytes was mirrored in the bone marrow by complete absence of multilymphoid progenitors and depletion of granulocyte-macrophage progenitors. Depletion of the HLA-DR+ peripheral blood compartment was associated with elevated serum fms-like tyrosine kinase ligand and reduced circulating CD4+CD25hiFoxP3+ T cells, supporting a role for DC in T reg cell homeostasis. PMID:21242295

  6. Structure of human monocyte chemoattractant protein 4 (MCP-4/CCL13)

    SciTech Connect

    Barinka, Cyril; Prahl, Adam; Lubkowski, Jacek

    2008-04-02

    Monocyte chemoattractant proteins (MCPs) belong to the CC chemokine family and are involved in many (patho)physiological processes characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration, including tissue remodeling, atherosclerosis and cancer metastasis. Here, the crystal structure of human monocyte chemoattractant protein 4 (MCP-4) refined at 1.70 {angstrom} resolution is reported with crystallographic values R = 0.180 and R{sub free} = 0.212. The overall MCP-4 fold reveals the typical tertiary features of the CC chemokine family. A central three-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet is C-terminally flanked by an overlaying {alpha}-helix, while the N-terminal part of the molecule forms an extended loop that is anchored to the rest of the molecule via two disulfide bridges, Cys11-Cys35 and Cys12-Cys51. The crystal packing suggests the existence of MCP-4 dimers with a dimerization interface similar to those previously reported for the X-ray structures of MCP-1 and MCP-2.

  7. Granzyme K synergistically potentiates LPS-induced cytokine responses in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wensink, Annette C.; Kemp, Vera; Fermie, Job; García Laorden, M. Isabel; van der Poll, Tom; Hack, C. Erik; Bovenschen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Granzymes are serine proteases released by cytotoxic lymphocytes to induce apoptosis in virus-infected cells and tumor cells. Evidence is emerging that granzymes also play a role in controlling inflammation. Granzyme serum levels are elevated in patients with autoimmune diseases and infections, including sepsis. However, the function of extracellular granzymes in inflammation largely remains unknown. Here, we show that granzyme K (GrK) binds to Gram-negative bacteria and their cell-wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS). GrK synergistically enhances LPS-induced cytokine release in vitro from primary human monocytes and in vivo in a mouse model of LPS challenge. Intriguingly, these extracellular effects are independent of GrK catalytic activity. GrK disaggregates LPS from micelles and augments LPS–CD14 complex formation, thereby likely boosting monocyte activation by LPS. We conclude that extracellular GrK is an unexpected direct modulator of LPS–TLR4 signaling during the antimicrobial innate immune response. PMID:24711407

  8. Gliadin activates arginase pathway in RAW264.7 cells and in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Barilli, Amelia; Rotoli, Bianca Maria; Visigalli, Rossana; Dall'Asta, Valeria

    2014-09-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered in susceptible individuals by the ingestion of gliadin-containing grains. Recent studies have demonstrated that macrophages play a key role in the pathogenesis of CD through the release of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines and nitric oxide (NO). Since arginine is the obliged substrate of iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase), the enzyme that produces large amount of NO, the aim of this work is to investigate arginine metabolic pathways in RAW264.7 murine macrophages after treatment with PT-gliadin (PTG) in the absence and in the presence of IFNγ. Our results demonstrate that, besides strengthening the IFNγ-dependent activation of iNOS, gliadin is also an inducer of arginase, the enzyme that transforms arginine into ornithine and urea. Gliadin treatment increases, indeed, the expression and the activity of arginase, leading to the production of polyamines through the subsequent induction of ornithine decarboxylase. This effect is strengthened by IFNγ. The activation of these pathways takes advantage of the increased availability of arginine due to a decreased system y(+)l-mediated efflux, likely ascribable to a reduced expression of Slc7a6 transporter. A significant induction of arginase expression is also observed in human monocytes from healthy subject upon treatment with gliadin, thus demonstrating that gluten components trigger changes in arginine metabolism in monocyte/macrophage cells.

  9. Signal transduction pathways leading to the production of IL-8 by human monocytes are differentially regulated by dexamethasone.

    PubMed Central

    Anttila, H S; Reitamo, S; Ceska, M; Hurme, M

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that IL-8 gene expression is enhanced by various stimuli, which induce different signal transduction pathways. A lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pathway has been reported to be inhibited by glucocorticoids in monocytes. We have now examined the effect of dexamethasone on the LPS-induced and other signal transduction pathways leading to the production of IL-8 by human monocytes. Dexamethasone inhibited the production of IL-8 stimulated with a cyclic adenosine monophosphate analog or LPS. In contrast, dexamethasone had no significant effect on a phorbol ester (PMA)-stimulated IL-8 production. These results suggest that the signal transduction pathways leading to the production of IL-8 by human monocytes are differentially regulated by dexamethasone. PMID:1325308

  10. Oxygen-Loaded Nanodroplets Effectively Abrogate Hypoxia Dysregulating Effects on Secretion of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 by Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gulino, Giulia Rossana; Magnetto, Chiara; Khadjavi, Amina; Panariti, Alice; Rivolta, Ilaria; Soster, Marco; Argenziano, Monica; Cavalli, Roberta; Giribaldi, Giuliana; Guiot, Caterina; Prato, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes play a key role in the inflammatory stage of the healing process. To allow monocyte migration to injured tissues, the balances between secreted matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs) must be finely modulated. However, a reduction of blood supply and local oxygen tension can modify the phenotype of immune cells. Intriguingly, hypoxia might be targeted by new effective oxygenating devices such as 2H,3H-decafluoropentane- (DFP-) based oxygen-loaded nanodroplets (OLNs). Here, hypoxia effects on gelatinase/TIMP release from human peripheral monocytes were investigated, and the therapeutic potential of dextran-shelled OLNs was evaluated. Normoxic monocytes constitutively released ~500 ng/mL MMP-9, ~1.3 ng/mL TIMP-1, and ~0.6 ng/mL TIMP-2 proteins. MMP-2 was not detected. After 24 hours, hypoxia significantly altered MMP-9/TIMP-1 balance by reducing MMP-9 and increasing TIMP-1, without affecting TIMP-2 secretion. Interestingly OLNs, not displaying toxicity to human monocytes after cell internalization, effectively counteracted hypoxia, restoring a normoxia-like MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio. The action of OLNs was specifically dependent on time-sustained oxygen diffusion up to 24 h from their DFP-based core. Therefore, OLNs appear as innovative, nonconventional, cost-effective, and nontoxic therapeutic tools, to be potentially employed to restore the physiological invasive phenotype of immune cells in hypoxia-associated inflammation. PMID:25878404

  11. Verotoxin activates mitogen-activated protein kinase in human peripheral blood monocytes: role in apoptosis and proinflammatory cytokine release

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Pamela; Smith, Susan J; Giembycz, Mark A; Rotondo, Dino; Plevin, Robin

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we examined the role of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases in the effects of verotoxins (VTs), from Escherichia coli O157:H7, upon both apoptosis and the release of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulated factor (GM-CSF) from human monocytes. Both VT1 and VT2 stimulated a weak, transient increase in c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity and a strong activation of both p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) and extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) activity in human monocytes, which was sustained in the case of p38 MAP kinase. Stimulation of human monocytes with VT2 (100 ng ml−1) did not result in an increase in apoptosis; however, the toxin stimulated the release of both TNF-α and GM-CSF. Pretreatment of human monocytes with the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580, at concentrations from 100 nM to 10 μM, significantly decreased the VT1- and VT2-induced TNF-α and GM-CSF release from monocytes. In contrast, inhibition of MEK1 with PD98059 only significantly decreased GM-CSF release. Pretreatment of monocytes with SP600125 inhibited both GM-CSF and TNF-α production; however, significant effects upon p38 MAP kinase and ERK activation were observed. Taken together, these results suggest a role for p38 MAP kinase and ERK in cytokine generation in response to the verotoxins. A role for JNK remains undetermined. PMID:14597601

  12. Role of endogenous ceruloplasmin in low density lipoprotein oxidation by human U937 monocytic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenwald, E; Fox, P L

    1996-01-01

    Oxidation of lipids and lipoproteins by macrophages is an important event during atherogenesis. Activation of monocytic cells by zymosan and other agonists results in the release of multiple oxidant species and consequent oxidation of LDL. We now show evidence that ceruloplasmin, a copper-containing acute phase reactant, is secreted by zymosan-activated U937 monocytic cells, and that the protein has an important role in LDL oxidation by these cells. In one approach, ceruloplasmin has been shown to exhibit oxidant activity under the appropriate conditions. Exogenous addition of purified human ceruloplasmin stimulates U937 cell oxidation of LDL to nearly the same extent as activation by zymosan. In contrast to previous cell-free experiments (Ehrenwald, E., G.M. Chisom, and P.L. Fox. 1994. Intact human ceruloplasmin oxidatively modifies low density lipoprotein. J. Clin. Invest. 93:1493-1501.) in which ceruloplasmin by itself (in PBS) oxidizes LDL, under the conditions of the current experiments (in RPMI 1640 medium) ceruloplasmin only oxidizes LDL in the presence of cells; the mechanism by which cells overcome the inhibition by medium components has not been ascertained. As further evidence for a role of ceruloplasmin, activation of U937 cells with zymosan induces ceruloplasmin mRNA and ceruloplasmin protein synthesis after a 5-6 h lag that is consistent with that preceding LDL oxidation. Finally, neutralization by a highly specific polyclonal antibody to human ceruloplasmin inhibits LDL oxidation by at least 65%. Moreover, multiple antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeted to different regions of the ceruloplasmin mRNA block LDL oxidation by up to 95%. The specific action of the antisense oligonucleotides has been verified by showing inhibition of ceruloplasmin synthesis and by the ability of exogenous ceruloplasmin to overcome the inhibition. In summary, these results are consistent with a mechanism in which cell-derived ceruloplasmin participates in oxidation of LDL

  13. Global Effect of Interleukin-10 on the Transcriptional Profile Induced by Neisseria meningitidis in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Øvstebø, Reidun; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Brusletto, Berit; Dalsbotten Aass, Hans Christian; Kierulf, Peter; Brandtzaeg, Petter; Berg, Jens Petter

    2012-01-01

    In meningococcal septic shock, the dominant inducer of inflammation is lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the outer membrane of Neisseria meningitidis, while interleukin-10 (IL-10) is the principal anti-inflammatory cytokine. We have used microarrays and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis to study the global effects of IL-10 on gene expression induced by N. meningitidis, after exposure of human monocytes (n = 5) for 3 h to N. meningitidis (106 cells/ml), recombinant human IL-10 (rhIL-10) (25 ng/ml), and N. meningitidis combined with rhIL-10. N. meningitidis and IL-10 differentially expressed 3,579 and 648 genes, respectively. IL-10 downregulated 125 genes which were upregulated by N. meningitidis, including NLRP3, the key molecule of the NLRP3 inflammasome. IL-10 also upregulated 270 genes which were downregulated by N. meningitidis, including members of the leukocyte immunuglobulin-like receptor (LIR) family. Fifty-three genes revealed a synergistically increased expression when N. meningitidis and IL-10 were combined. AIM2 (the principal molecule of the AIM2 inflammasome) was among these genes (fold change [FC], 18.3 versus 7.4 and 9.4 after stimulation by N. meningitidis and IL-10, respectively). We detected reduced concentrations (92% to 40%) of six cytokines (IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], macrophage inflammatory protein alpha [MIP-α], MIP-β) in the presence of IL-10, compared with concentrations with stimulation by N. meningitidis alone. Our data analysis of the effects of IL-10 on gene expression induced by N. meningitidis suggests that high plasma levels of IL-10 in meningococcal septic shock plasma may have a profound effect on a variety of functions and cellular processes in human monocytes, including cell-to-cell signaling, cellular movement, cellular development, antigen presentation, and cell death. PMID:22966040

  14. Human antibodies against dengue enhance dengue viral infectivity without suppressing type I interferon secretion in primary human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kou, Zhihua; Lim, Joanne Y H; Beltramello, Martina; Quinn, Matthew; Chen, Huiyuan; Liu, Shengyong; Liu, Shengyo-ng; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Martnez-Sobrido, Luis; Diamond, Michael S; Schlesinger, Jacob J; de Silva, Aravinda; Sallusto, Federica; Jin, Xia

    2011-02-05

    It remains unclear whether antibody-dependent-enhancement (ADE) of dengue infection merely augments viral attachment and entry through Fcγ receptors or immune complex binding to Fcγ receptors triggers an intrinsic signaling cascade that changes the viral permissiveness of the cell. Using human dengue-immune sera and novel human monoclonal antibodies against dengue in combination with virologic and immunologic techniques, we found that ADE infection increased the proportion of infected primary human monocytes modestly from 0.2% ± 0.1% (no Ab) to 1.7% ± 1.6% (with Ab) but the total virus output markedly from 2 ± 2 (× 10(3)) FFU to 120 ± 153 (× 10(3))FFU. However, this increased virus production was not associated with a reduced secretion of type I interferon or an elevated secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10. These results demonstrate that the regulation of virus production in ADE infection of primary human monocytes is more complex than previously appreciated.

  15. Inhibitory and stimulatory effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanine on human T and B lymphocytes and human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ulmer, A J; Pryjma, J; Tarnok, Z; Ernst, M; Flad, H D

    1990-01-01

    Pyocyanine, a pigment produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has dual dose-dependent stimulatory as well as inhibitory effects on immune responses in vitro as measured by DNA synthesis of human T and B lymphocytes, interleukin-2 (IL-2) production by human T lymphocytes, immunoglobulin production by human B lymphocytes, and monokine production by human monocytes. In general, stimulatory activity was found at low concentrations of pyocyanine, whereas high concentrations of the pigment resulted in an inhibition of responses. At a pyocyanine concentration of 0.1 micrograms/ml or less the proliferation of T and B lymphocytes was enhanced, but at 0.5 micrograms/ml it was suppressed. IL-2 production by T lymphocytes was enhanced at concentrations up to 0.5 micrograms/ml but totally inhibited at 1.0 micrograms/ml. The differentiation of B lymphocytes to become immunoglobulin-producing cells was also enhanced in the presence of low doses of pyocyanine, whereas secretion of immunoglobulin by B lymphocytes was suppressed at all concentrations of pyocyanine. In contrast to the dual effects of pyocyanine on lymphocyte response, lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor release by monocytes was markedly enhanced by low as well as high concentrations of pyocyanine. From these results we conclude that this property of pyocyanine may lead to suppression of specific defense mechanisms and enhance harmful inflammatory reactions of the host during infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:2106495

  16. Monocyte-mediated delivery of polymeric backpacks to inflamed tissues: a generalized strategy to deliver drugs to treat inflammation.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Aaron C; Gilbert, Jonathan B; Kumar, Sunny; Gupta, Vivek; Cohen, Robert E; Rubner, Michael F; Mitragotri, Samir

    2015-02-10

    Targeted delivery of drugs and imaging agents to inflamed tissues, as in the cases of cancer, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and arthritis, represents one of the major challenges in drug delivery. Monocytes possess a unique ability to target and penetrate into sites of inflammation. Here, we describe a broad approach to take advantage of the natural ability of monocytes to target and deliver flat polymeric particles ("Cellular Backpacks") to inflamed tissues. Cellular backpacks attach strongly to the surface of monocytes but do not undergo phagocytosis due to backpack's size, disk-like shape and flexibility. Following attachment of backpacks, monocytes retain important cellular functions including transmigration through an endothelial monolayer and differentiation into macrophages. In two separate in vivo inflammation models, backpack-laden monocytes exhibit increased targeting to inflamed tissues. Cellular backpacks, and their abilities to attach to monocytes without impairing monocyte functions and 'hitchhike' to a variety of inflamed tissues, offer a new platform for both cell-mediated therapies and broad targeting of inflamed tissues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Prognostic Value of Baseline Lymphocyte, Neutrophil, and Monocyte Counts in Locally Advanced Cervical Carcinoma Treated with Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Himler, Justin; Nagel, Christa I.; Resnick, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    Background. To determine the prognostic significance of pretreatment levels of circulating lymphocyte (CLC), neutrophil (CNC), and monocyte (CMC) counts in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma (CC) treated with definitive radiation. Methods. A retrospective, dual-institution review of patients with Stage IB2-IVA CC from 2005 to 2015. Progression-free (PFS) and Overall Survival (OS) were determined for high and low CLC, CNC, and CMC groups. Multivariate analysis was used to confirm prognostic value of baseline leukocyte counts. Results. 181 patients were included. Median follow-up time was 26 (3–89) months. CNC had no effect on PFS or OS. PFS was similar between CMC groups; however, OS was significantly improved for patients with low CMC (62.5 versus 45.3 months, p = 0.016). High CLC was associated with improved PFS (48.5 versus 27.8 months, p = 0.048) and OS (58.4 versus 34.9 months, p = 0.048). On multivariate analysis, high CNC was associated with increased relapse risk (HR 1.12, p = 0.006) and low CLC was associated with increased mortality risk (HR 0.67, p = 0.027). Conclusion. This study demonstrates that leukocyte values can provide prognostic information in CC. These hypothesis-generating findings warrant further prospective investigations. PMID:28239396

  18. Natural isoprenoids inhibit LPS-induced-production of cytokines and nitric oxide in aminobisphosphonate-treated monocytes.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Tommasini, Alberto; Crovella, Sergio; Pontillo, Alessandra

    2010-06-01

    The inhibition of mevalonate pathway through genetic defects (mevalonate kinase deficiency, MKD) or pharmacologic drugs (aminobisphosphonates) causes a shortage of intermediate compounds and, in particular, of geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate (GGPP) associated to the activation of caspase-1 and IL-1beta release. Geraniol (GOH), farnesol (FOH), geranylgeraniol (GGOH) and menthol (MOH), due to their isoprenoid structure, are supposed to enter the mevalonate pathway and to by-pass the biochemical block, reconstituting the pathway. Considering the already known side effects of aminobisphosphonates, and the lack of a specific treatment for MKD, we evaluated the impact of these natural isoprenoids compounds in a RAW cell lines chemically treated with the aminobisphosphonate alendronate, and in monocytes isolated from 2 patients affected by MKD. GOH, FOH, GGOH and MOH were all capable to diminish inflammatory marker levels induced by LPS. These natural isoprenoids could be proposed as novel therapeutic approach for the still orphan drug MKD, but also considered for the evaluation of possible inflammatory side effects of aminobisphosphonates.

  19. Both plasmacytoid dendritic cells and monocytes stimulate natural killer cells early during human herpes simplex virus type 1 infections.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Karin; Thomann, Sabrina; Vogel, Benjamin; Schuster, Philipp; Schmidt, Barbara

    2014-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a member of the herpes virus family, is characterized by a short replication cycle, high cytopathogenicity and distinct neurotropism. Primary infection and reactivation may cause severe diseases in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed individuals. This study investigated the role of human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) in the activation of natural killer (NK) cells for the control of herpesviral infections. Within peripheral blood mononuclear cells, UV-inactivated HSV-1 and CpG-A induced CD69 up-regulation on NK cells, whereas infectious HSV-1 was particularly active in inducing NK cell effector functions interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion and degranulation. The pDC-derived IFN-α significantly contributed to NK cell activation, as evident from neutralization and cell depletion experiments. In addition, monocyte-derived tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induced after exposure to infectious HSV-1 was found to stimulate IFN-γ secretion. A minority of monocytes was shown to be non-productively infected in experiments using fluorescently labelled viruses and quantitative PCR analyses. HSV-1-exposed monocytes up-regulated classical HLA-ABC and non-classical HLA-E molecules at the cell surface in an IFN-α-dependent manner, whereas stress molecules MICA/B were not induced. Notably, depletion of monocytes reduced NK cell effector functions induced by infectious HSV-1 (P < 0.05). Altogether, our data suggest a model in which HSV-1-stimulated pDC and monocytes activate NK cells via secretion of IFN-α and TNF-α. In addition, infection of monocytes induces NK cell effector functions via TNF-α-dependent and TNF-α-independent mechanisms. Hence, pDC and monocytes, which are among the first cells infiltrating herpetic lesions, appear to have important bystander functions for NK cells to control these viral infections.

  20. Telmisartan ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced innate immune response through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Tao; Benicky, Julius; Wang, Juan; Orecna, Martina; Sanchez-Lemus, Enrique; Saavedra, Juan M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1) blockers (ARBs) reduce the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced innate immune response in human circulating monocytes expressing few AT1. To clarify the mechanisms of anti-inflammatory effects of ARBs with different peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ)-activating potencies, we focused our study on telmisartan, an ARB with the highest PPARγ-stimulating activity. Methods Human circulating monocytes and monocytic THP-1 (human acute monocytic leukemia cell line) cells were exposed to 50 ng/ml LPS with or without pre-incubation with telmisartan. AT1 mRNA and protein expressions were determined by real-time PCR and membrane receptor binding assay, respectively. The expression of pro-inflammatory factors was determined by real-time PCR, western blot analysis and ELISA. PPARγ activation was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and its role was determined by pharmacological inhibition and PPARγ gene silencing. Results In human monocytes, telmisartan significantly attenuated the LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory factors, the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin E2, nuclear factor-κB activation and reactive oxygen species formation. In THP-1 cells, telmisartan significantly reduced LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-α, inhibitor of κB-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 gene expression and MCP-1-directed migration. Telmisartan also stimulated the expression of the PPARγ target genes cluster of differentiation 36 and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 1 in monocytes. The anti-inflammatory effects of telmisartan were prevented by both PPARγ antagonism and PPARγ gene silencing. Anti-inflammatory effects of ARBs correlated with their PPARγ agonist potency. Conclusion Our observations demonstrate that in human monocytes, ARBs inhibit the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory response to a

  1. Minocycline ameliorates LPS-induced inflammation in human monocytes by novel mechanisms including LOX-1, Nur77 and LITAF inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Tao; Wang, Juan; Benicky, Julius; Saavedra, Juan M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Minocycline exhibits anti-inflammatory properties independent of its antibiotic activity, ameliorating inflammatory responses in monocytes and macrophages. However, the mechanisms of minocycline anti-inflammatory effects are only partially understood. Methods Human circulating monocytes were cultured in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), 50 ng/ml, and minocycline (10–40 µM). Gene expression was determined by RT-PCR, cytokine and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release by ELISA, protein expression, phosphorylation and nuclear translocation by Western blotting. Results Minocycline significantly reduced the inflammatory response in LPS-challenged monocytes, decreasing LPS-induced transcription of pro-inflammatory tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and the LPS-stimulated TNF-α, IL-6 and PGE2 release. Minocycline inhibited LPS-induced activation of the lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), NF-κB, LPS-induced TNF-α factor (LITAF) and the Nur77 nuclear receptor. Mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of minocycline include a reduction of LPS-stimulated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) activation and stimulation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. Conclusions We provide novel evidence demonstrating that the anti-inflammatory effects of minocycline in human monocytes include, in addition to decreased NF-κB activation, abrogation of the LPS-stimulated LOX-1, LITAF, Nur77 pathways, p38 MAPK inhibition and PI3K/Akt activation. Our results reveal that minocycline inhibits points of convergence of distinct and interacting signaling pathways mediating multiple inflammatory signals which may influence monocyte activation, traffic and recruitment into the brain. General significance Our results in primary human monocytes contribute to explain the profound anti-inflammatory and protective effects of minocycline in

  2. HIV-1 Nef activates STAT1 in human monocytes/macrophages through the release of soluble factors.

    PubMed

    Federico, M; Percario, Z; Olivetta, E; Fiorucci, G; Muratori, C; Micheli, A; Romeo, G; Affabris, E

    2001-11-01

    Monocytes/macrophages play a predominant role in the immunologic network by secreting and reacting to a wide range of soluble factors. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection leads to deep immunologic dysfunctions, also as a consequence of alterations in the pattern of cytokine release. Recent studies on in vivo models demonstrated that the expression of HIV Nef alone mimics many pathogenetic effects of HIV infection. In particular, Nef expression in monocytes/macrophages has been correlated with remarkable modifications in the pattern of secreted soluble factors, suggesting that the interaction of Nef with monocytes/macrophages plays a role in the pathogenesis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This study sought to define possible alterations in intracellular signaling induced by Nef in monocytes/macrophages. Results demonstrate that HIV-1 Nef specifically activates both alpha and beta isoforms of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). This was observed both by infecting human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) with HIV-1 deletion mutants, and by exploiting the ability of MDMs to internalize soluble, recombinant Nef protein (rNef). STAT1-alpha activation occurs on phosphorylation of both C-terminal Tyr701 and Ser727 and leads to a strong binding activity. Nef-dependent STAT1 activation is followed by increased expression of both STAT1 and interferon regulatory factor-1, a transcription factor transcriptionally regulated by STAT1 activation. It was also established that Nef-induced STAT1- alpha/beta activation occurs through the secretion of soluble factors. Taken together, the results indicate that HIV-1 Nef could interfere with STAT1-governed intracellular signaling in human monocytes/macrophages.

  3. Captopril increases the intensity of monocyte infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and induces human T helper type 17 cells

    PubMed Central

    Coelho dos Santos, J S; Menezes, C A S; Villani, F N A; Magalhães, L M D; Scharfstein, J; Gollob, K J; Dutra, W O

    2010-01-01

    The anti-hypertensive drug captopril is used commonly to reduce blood pressure of patients with severe forms of Chagas disease, a cardiomyopathy caused by chronic infection with the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Captopril acts by inhibiting angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), the vasopressor metallopeptidase that generates angiotensin II and promotes the degradation of bradykinin (BK). Recent studies in mice models of Chagas disease indicated that captopril can potentiate the T helper type 1 (Th1)-directing natural adjuvant property of BK. Equipped with kinin-releasing cysteine proteases, T. cruzi trypomastigotes were shown previously to invade non-professional phagocytic cells, such as human endothelial cells and murine cardiomyocytes, through the signalling of G protein-coupled bradykinin receptors (B2KR). Monocytes are also parasitized by T. cruzi and these cells are known to be important for the host immune response during infection. Here we showed that captopril increases the intensity of T. cruzi infection of human monocytes in vitro. The increased parasitism was accompanied by up-regulated expression of ACE in human monocytes. While T. cruzi infection increased the expression of interleukin (IL)-10 by monocytes significantly, compared to uninfected cells, T. cruzi infection in association with captopril down-modulated IL-10 expression by the monocytes. Surprisingly, studies with peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed that addition of the ACE inhibitor in association with T. cruzi increased expression of IL-17 by CD4+ T cells in a B2KR-dependent manner. Collectively, our results suggest that captopril might interfere with host–parasite equilibrium by enhancing infection of monocytes, decreasing the expression of the modulatory cytokine IL-10, while guiding development of the proinflammatory Th17 subset. PMID:20964644

  4. Membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase is involved in migration of human monocytes and is regulated through their interaction with fibronectin or endothelium.

    PubMed

    Matías-Román, Salomón; Gálvez, Beatriz G; Genís, Laura; Yáñez-Mó, María; de la Rosa, Gonzalo; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Arroyo, Alicia G

    2005-05-15

    Membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is involved in endothelial and tumor-cell migration, but its putative role in leukocyte migration has not been characterized yet. Here, we demonstrate that anti-MT1-MMP monoclonal antibody (mAb) impaired monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1)-stimulated monocyte migration on fibronectin (FN), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). In addition, monocyte transmigration through tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-activated endothelium is also inhibited by anti-MT1-MMP mAb. Therefore, regulation of MT1-MMP in human peripheral blood monocytes was investigated. First, MT1-MMP clustering was observed at motility-associated membrane protrusions of MCP-1-stimulated monocytes migrating on FN, VCAM-1, or ICAM-1 and at the leading edge, together with profilin, of monocytes transmigrating through activated endothelial cells. In addition, up-regulation of MT1-MMP expression was induced in human monocytes upon attachment to FN in a manner dependent on alpha4beta1 and alpha5beta1 integrins. Binding of monocytes to TNF-alpha-activated human endothelial cells as well as to VCAM-1 or ICAM-1 also resulted in an increase of MT1-MMP expression. These findings correlated with an enhancement of MT1-MMP fibrinolytic activity in monocytes bound to FN, VCAM-1, or ICAM-1. Our data show that MT1-MMP is required during human monocyte migration and endothelial transmigration and that MT1-MMP localization, expression, and activity are regulated in monocytes upon contact with FN or endothelial ligands, pointing to a key role of MT1-MMP in monocyte recruitment during inflammation.

  5. Tumor necrosis factor alpha gene expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells exposed to beryllium.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, G M; Pandey, J P; Schmidt, M G; Arnaud, P; Goust, J M

    1996-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease, which results from occupational exposure to particulate beryllium, is characterized by the development of lung granulomas and progressive pulmonary fibrosis. Increased production of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta) by pulmonary alveolar macrophages occurs in many chronic fibrotic lung diseases and is thought to contribute to the disease process. The purpose of the present study was to investigate cytokine production by human monocytic cells exposed to beryllium in vitro. The results indicated that such cells respond to beryllium ions in the presence of fluoride by accumulation of messenger ribonucleic acid for both tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta. These findings suggest that inhaled beryllium may directly stimulate the production of these cytokines by alveolar macrophages in vitro.

  6. Sargaquinoic Acid Inhibits TNF-α-Induced NF-κB Signaling, Thereby Contributing to Decreased Monocyte Adhesion to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs).

    PubMed

    Gwon, Wi-Gyeong; Lee, Bonggi; Joung, Eun-Ji; Choi, Min-Woo; Yoon, Nayoung; Shin, Taisun; Oh, Chul-Woong; Kim, Hyeung-Rak

    2015-10-21

    Sargaquinoic acid (SQA) has been known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This study investigated the effects of SQA isolated from Sargassum serratifolium on the inhibition of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced monocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). SQA decreased the expression of cell adhesion molecules such as intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 as well as chemotactic cytokines such as interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in TNF-α-treated HUVECs. As a result, SQA prevented monocyte adhesion to TNF-α-induced adhesion. SQA also inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) translocation into the nucleus by preventing proteolytic degradation of inhibitor κB-α. Overall, SQA protects against TNF-α-induced vascular inflammation through inhibition of the NF-κB pathway in HUVECs. These data suggest that SQA may be used as a therapeutic agent for vascular inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis.

  7. Suppression of human monocyte tumour necrosis factor-α release by glucocorticoid therapy: relationship to systemic monocytopaenia and cortisol suppression

    PubMed Central

    Steer, James H; Vuong, Quylinh; Joyce, David A

    1997-01-01

    Aims Glucocorticoids suppress the release of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by macrophages in vitro and cause monocytopaenia in vivo. These actions may contribute to anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant effects. We therefore examined relationships between prednisolone concentration, suppression of monocyte TNF-α release, monocytopaenia and suppression of total cortisol concentration in healthy volunteers treated with a single dose (1.5 mg kg−1 ) of the glucocorticoid, prednisolone. Methods Monocyte numbers, total cortisol concentration and prednisolone concentration were measured in blood samples collected over 48 h after the dose. Plasma from these samples was also tested for its capacity to suppress lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α release from monocytes in autologous whole blood cultures. Results At 4 h after the dose, monocyte numbers in peripheral blood had fallen to a mean of 18% of the pre-dose level whilst plasma total cortisol had fallen to 9% of the pre-dose concentration. Monocyte numbers recovered in concordance with elimination of prednisolone and there was a significant relative monocytosis at 24 h. The recovery of plasma cortisol was delayed in comparison, with cortisol remaining significantly suppressed at 24 h. Plasma samples taken at 2 h after the dose (corresponding to peak plasma prednisolone concentration) suppressed the lipopolysaccharide-stimulated production of TNF-α by autologous blood monocytes to 27% of pre-dose control. Plasma collected at intervals over the 48 h from dosing also suppressed monocyte TNF-α release in relation to the prednisolone concentration therein. Suppression was largely reversed by the glucocorticoid antagonist, mifepristone. A similar relationship between prednisolone concentration and TNF-α suppression was observed when prednisolone was added to blood samples collected from the volunteers when they were drug-free. Conclusions Blood concentrations of prednisolone achieved after a dose of 1.5 mg kg

  8. Modulation of human monocyte CD36 by type 2 diabetes mellitus and other atherosclerotic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Lopez, Rosa M; Llorente-Cortes, Vicenta; López-Carmona, Dolores; Mayas, Dolores M; Gomez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Tinahones, Francisco J; Badimon, Lina

    2011-08-01

    The pathophysiological role of CD36 in atherosclerosis seems to be largely dependent on its pro-inflammatory function and ability to take up oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Controversy exists concerning the potential beneficial/harmful effects of vascular CD36 inhibition in atherosclerosis. However, as atherosclerosis in murine models does not result in clinical end points such as plaque rupture and thrombotic ischaemia, typical of human disease, clinical studies are required to understand the functional role of CD36 in human atherosclerosis. Our aim was to investigate whether CD36 expression in monocytes is modulated by the presence of an increasing number of atherosclerotic risk factors, and specifically by hyperglycaemia because of diabetes mellitus. The study included 33 patients with advanced atherosclerosis and eight healthy blood donors, as controls. The patients were classified according to the presence of atherosclerotic risk factors. Diabetes mellitus was classified as either well-controlled or poorly controlled. Monocytes were exposed in vitro to low (5·5mM) or high glucose (26mM) concentrations for increasing times. Our results demonstrated that protein levels of glycated CD36 were significantly higher in patients with 3-4 atherosclerotic risk factors than in those with 0-2 atherosclerotic risk factors or in subjects with no atherosclerotic symptoms (P=0·04, in both cases). However, when we analysed just the poorly controlled diabetic patients, their glycated CD36 levels were lower. These data were corroborated by in vitro studies demonstrating that increasing glucose concentrations reduced glycated protein levels (P<0·05). Our results demonstrate that CD36 expression is altered by hyperglycaemia in atherosclerotic patients. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2011 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  9. Surface expression of Mo3e antigen by activated human monocytes and U-937 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Todd R.F. III; Bury, M.J.; Liu, D.Y.

    1986-03-05

    The surface expression of a protease-sensitive antigen, Mo3e, by activated human monocytes and U-937 cells is a plasma membrane feature of the activated state. Mo3e, which is an 80 kD protein on Western blot analysis, may represent the surface receptor for migration inhibitory factor (MIF), as evidenced by inhibition of MIF responsiveness produced by anti-Mo3e monoclonal antibody. Mo3e is barely detectable (by surface immunofluorescence) on freshly isolated monocytes but becomes expressed in high antigen density during 18-24 hrs culture in medium containing E. coli lipopolysaccharide (> 1 ng/ml), 4..beta..-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) (5-10 nM), or muramyl dipeptide (0.1-1 ..mu..M). In U-937 cells, Mo3e surface expression is detectable after 24 hrs exposure to PMA and other pharmacological activators of protein kinase C: 4..beta..-phorbol 12, 13 dibutyrate, 4..beta..-phorbol 12, 13 didecanoate, mezerein, or Sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol. The biologically-inactivate phorbol compounds, 4..cap alpha..-phorbol 12, 13 didecanoate and 4/sub ..beta../-phorbol do not stimulate Mo3e expression. The calcium ionophore, ionomycin, has a synergistic effect on Mo3e expression stimulated by PMA; conversely, calcium antagonists block PMA-induced Mo3e expression. These results suggest the involvement of protein kinase C activation and intracellular calcium mobilization in the stimulated expression of Mo3e by activated human mononuclear phagocytes.

  10. Flagella from Five Cronobacter Species Induce Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in Macrophage Derivatives from Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Rocha-Ramírez, Luz M.; Ochoa, Sara A.; Gónzalez-Pedrajo, Bertha; Espinosa, Norma; Eslava, Carlos; Hernández-Chiñas, Ulises; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Rodríguez-Leviz, Alejandra; Valencia-Mayoral, Pedro; Sadowinski-Pine, Stanislaw; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Estrada-García, Iris; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre; Rosas, Irma; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Cronobacter spp. are opportunistic pathogens linked to lie-threatening infections in neonates and contaminated powdered infant formula that has been epidemiologically associated with these cases. Clinical symptoms of Cronobacter include necrotizing enterocolitis, bacteremia, and meningitis. Flagella from C. sakazakii are involved in biofilm formation and its adhesion to epithelial cells. We investigated the role of flagella from C. sakazakii ST1 and ST4, C. malonaticus, C. muytjensii, C. turicensis and C. dublinensis during the activation of cytokines (IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10) in macrophage derivatives from human monocytes, which has not been extensively studied. The production and identity of flagella from the five Cronobacter species were visualized and recognized with anti-flagella antibodies by immunogold labeling through transmission electron microscopy. Purified flagella were dissociated into monomers in 12% SDS-PAGE Coomassie blue-stained gels showing a band of ∼28 kDa and, in addition, mass spectrometry revealed the presence of several peptides that correspond to flagellin. Flagella (100 ng) induced the release of IL-8 (3314–6025 pg/ml), TNF-α (39–359 pg/ml), and IL-10 (2–96 pg/ml), in macrophage isolates from human monocytes and similar results were obtained when flagella were dissociated into monomers. Inhibition assays using three dilutions of anti-flagella antibodies (1∶10, 1∶100, and 1∶200) suppressed the secretion of IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10 between 95–100% using 100 ng of protein. A transfection assay using 293-hTLR5 cells showed IL-8 release of 197 pg/ml and suppression in the secretion of IL-8 when anti-hTLR5-IgA antibodies were used at different concentrations. These observations suggest that flagella and flagellin are involved in an inflammatory response dependent on TLR5 recognition, which could contribute to the pathogenesis of the bacteria. PMID:23284883

  11. Geranylated flavanone tomentodiplacone B inhibits proliferation of human monocytic leukaemia (THP-1) cells

    PubMed Central

    Kollár, Peter; Bárta, Tomáš; Závalová, Veronika; Šmejkal, Karel; Hampl, Aleš

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Paulownia tomentosa is a rich source of geranylated flavanones, some of which we have previously shown to have cytotoxic activity. To identify members of this class of compounds with cytostatic effects, we assessed the effects of the geranylated flavanone tomentodiplacone B (TOM B) on cell cycle progression and cell cycle regulatory pathways of THP-1 human monocytic leukaemia cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cell viability was measured by dye exclusion and proliferation by WST-1 assays; cell cycle was monitored by flow cytometry. Regulatory proteins were assessed by immunoprecipitation and kinase assays, and Western blotting. KEY RESULTS Tomentodiplacone B had no effect during the first 24 h of cell growth at concentrations between 1 and 2.5 µM, but inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations of 5 µM or higher. Growth inhibition during the first 24 h of exposure to TOM B was not accompanied by cytotoxicity as cells were accumulated in G1 phase dose-dependently. This G1 phase accumulation was associated with down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity and also protein levels of cyclins E1 and A2. However, key stress-related molecules (γ-H2AX, p53 and p21) were not induced, suggesting that TOM B acts by directly inhibiting the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 signalling pathway rather than initiating DNA damage or cellular stress. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our study provides the first evidence that TOM B directly inhibits proliferation of human monocytic leukaemia cells, and thus is a potential anticancer agent, preventing leukaemia cells from progressing from G1 phase into DNA synthesis. PMID:21175584

  12. Human monocyte-derived macrophages spontaneously differentiated in vitro show distinct phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Eligini, Sonia; Crisci, Mauro; Bono, Elisa; Songia, Paola; Tremoli, Elena; Colombo, Gualtiero I; Colli, Susanna

    2013-07-01

    Tissue macrophages are resident phagocytes that acquire specific phenotypes according to the microenvironment. Morphological and functional heterogeneity has been evidenced in different homeostatic and pathological conditions. Indeed, the nature of macrophage subsets may have either harmful or beneficial functions in disease progression/resolution. Therefore the possibility to pharmacologically manipulate heterogeneity represents a relevant challenge. Since human tissue macrophages are not easily obtained, various in vitro models are currently used that do not adequately reflect the heterogeneity and plasticity of tissue macrophages. We had previously reported that two dominant and distinct macrophage morphotypes co-exist in the same culture of human monocytes spontaneously differentiated for 7 days in autologous serum. The present study was aimed to the phenotypic characterization of these morphotypes, that is, round- and spindle-shaped. We observed that, besides substantial differences in cytoskeleton architecture, round monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) showed higher lipid content, increased macropinocytosis/efferocytosis capacity, and overexpression of CD163, interleukin (IL)-10, and transforming growth factor (TGF) β2. Conversely, spindle MDMs exhibited enhanced respiratory burst and higher expression of the chemokine (C-C motif) ligands 18 and 24 (CCL18 and CCL24). Overall, round MDMs show functional traits reminiscent of the non-inflammatory and reparative M2 phenotype, whereas spindle MDMs exhibit a pro-inflammatory profile and express genes driving lymphocyte activation and eosinophil recruitment. MDMs obtained in the culture condition herein described represent a valuable model to disentangle and manipulate the functional heterogeneity of tissue macrophages that has been disclosed in scenarios spanning from inflammatory and wounding responses to atherosclerotic lesions. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Proteoglycans regulate the chemotaxis of dendritic cells derived from human peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Hironori; Takahashi, Kenji; Monzen, Satoru; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a type of antigen-presenting cell which play an essential role in the immune system. The transition from immature DC (iDCs) to mature DCs (mDCs) requires appropriate maturation stimuli, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines or pathogen-derived components. Proteoglycans (PGs), which are composed of core proteins and the glycosaminoglycans that bind to them, are one of the main components of the extracellular matrix around pathogens such as bacteria. This study investigated the effects of PG extracted from the nasal septum cartilage of whale (W-PG) on the maturation of DCs derived from human peripheral blood monocytes. iDCs were prepared from human monocytes using granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). The iDCs were stimulated by W-PG alone. In another type of experiment, the iDCs were stimulated by MIX (tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-1beta, IL-6 and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))) or a combination of MIX plus W-PG. The stimulation of W-PG alone did not induce the phenotypic maturation from iDCs. However, W-PG promoted the up-regulation of chemokine receptor CCR7-surface expression and the chemotactic responsiveness to CCR7 ligand macrophage inflammatory protein-3beta on MIX-stimulated mDCs although W-PG did not influence matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity which is an important factor in DC migration through the extracellular matrix. The findings that W-PG can selectively regulate the chemotactic activity of DCs in vitro under inflammatory conditions therefore indicate that the interaction of PGs with immune cells including DCs plays an important role in the immune response under the milieu of innate immunity.

  14. Flagella from five Cronobacter species induce pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophage derivatives from human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Rocha-Ramírez, Luz M; Ochoa, Sara A; González-Pedrajo, Bertha; Gónzalez-Pedrajo, Bertha; Espinosa, Norma; Eslava, Carlos; Hernández-Chiñas, Ulises; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Rodríguez-Leviz, Alejandra; Valencia-Mayoral, Pedro; Sadowinski-Pine, Stanislaw; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Estrada-García, Iris; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre; Rosas, Irma; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Cronobacter spp. are opportunistic pathogens linked to lie-threatening infections in neonates and contaminated powdered infant formula that has been epidemiologically associated with these cases. Clinical symptoms of Cronobacter include necrotizing enterocolitis, bacteremia, and meningitis. Flagella from C. sakazakii are involved in biofilm formation and its adhesion to epithelial cells. We investigated the role of flagella from C. sakazakii ST1 and ST4, C. malonaticus, C. muytjensii, C. turicensis and C. dublinensis during the activation of cytokines (IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10) in macrophage derivatives from human monocytes, which has not been extensively studied. The production and identity of flagella from the five Cronobacter species were visualized and recognized with anti-flagella antibodies by immunogold labeling through transmission electron microscopy. Purified flagella were dissociated into monomers in 12% SDS-PAGE Coomassie blue-stained gels showing a band of ∼28 kDa and, in addition, mass spectrometry revealed the presence of several peptides that correspond to flagellin. Flagella (100 ng) induced the release of IL-8 (3314-6025 pg/ml), TNF-α (39-359 pg/ml), and IL-10 (2-96 pg/ml), in macrophage isolates from human monocytes and similar results were obtained when flagella were dissociated into monomers. Inhibition assays using three dilutions of anti-flagella antibodies (1∶10, 1∶100, and 1∶200) suppressed the secretion of IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10 between 95-100% using 100 ng of protein. A transfection assay using 293-hTLR5 cells showed IL-8 release of 197 pg/ml and suppression in the secretion of IL-8 when anti-hTLR5-IgA antibodies were used at different concentrations. These observations suggest that flagella and flagellin are involved in an inflammatory response dependent on TLR5 recognition, which could contribute to the pathogenesis of the bacteria.

  15. Salvianolic acid B suppresses maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells by activating PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Aijun; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Shijun; Shi, Dazhuo; Xu, Lei; Cheng, Yong; Wang, Keqiang; Chen, Keji; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Salvianolic acid B (Sal B), a water-soluble antioxidant derived from a Chinese medicinal herb, is known to be effective in the prevention of atherosclerosis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the anti-atherosclerotic effect of Sal B might be mediated by suppressing maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (h-monDC). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH h-monDC were derived by incubating purified human monocytes with GM-CSF and IL-4. h-monDC were pre-incubated with or without Sal B and stimulated by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in the presence or absence of PPARγ siRNA. Expression of h-monDC membrane molecules (CD40, CD86, CD1a, HLA-DR) were analysed by FACS, cytokines were measured by elisa and the TLR4-associated signalling pathway was determined by Western blotting. KEY RESULTS Ox-LDL promoted h-monDC maturation, stimulated CD40, CD86, CD1a, HLA-DR expression and IL-12, IL-10, TNF-α production; and up-regulated TLR4 signalling. These effects were inhibited by Sal B. Sal B also triggered PPARγ activation and promoted PPARγ nuclear translocation, attenuated ox-LDL-induced up-regulation of TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary-response protein 88 and inhibited the downstream p38-MAPK signalling cascade. Knocking down PPARγ with the corresponding siRNA blocked these effects of Sal B. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our data suggested that Sal B effectively suppressed maturation of h-monDC induced by ox-LDL through PPARγ activation. PMID:21649636

  16. Inability of pyrogenic, purified Bordetella pertussis lipid A to induce interleukin-1 release by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Caroff, M; Cavaillon, J M; Fitting, C; Haeffner-Cavaillon, N

    1986-01-01

    Free lipid A of Bordetella pertussis, Neisseria meningitidis, and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was prepared by hydrolysis in acetate buffer (pH 4.5); in addition, lipid A from B. pertussis and E. coli was prepared by hydrolysis in mineral acid (HCl). The precipitates obtained were purified by extraction methods in toluene-methanol and are referred to as crude lipid A. Purified lipid A from N. meningitidis and B. pertussis was obtained by extraction in a mixture of chloroform-methanol-water-triethylamine. The different preparations were tested for their pyrogenicity (endogenous pyrogen; EP) and their capacity to trigger the release of interleukin-1 (IL-1; previously known as lymphocyte-activating factor; LAF) by human monocytes. Crude lipid A from E. coli and N. meningitidis were both IL-1 inducers. Crude B. pertussis lipid A (acetate buffer; pH 4.5), which contains a beta-1-6-linked D-glucosamine disaccharide, two phosphoryl groups, and five fatty acids, was pyrogenic and an IL-1 inducer (EP+/LAF+); but crude B. pertussis lipid A (0.25 N HCl), which lacked the glycosidic phosphoryl group, was 1,000-fold less pyrogenic than the diphosphorylated lipid A, yet it retained its IL-1-inducing capacity (EP-/LAF+). Purified N. meningitidis lipid A was not an inducer of IL-1 release and purified B. pertussis lipid A exhibited identical pyrogenicity as the parent LPS but was devoid of any IL-1-release inducing capacity (EP+/LAF-). These results demonstrate that for some endotoxins, purified lipid A is unable to induce IL-1 release by human monocytes; however, it is pyrogenic, supporting the hypothesis that IL-1 and EP are induced by different determinants on the LPS molecule. Images PMID:2876960

  17. Prostaglandin E2 suppresses beta1-integrin expression via E-prostanoid receptor in human monocytes/macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Shunji; Ichiyama, Takashi; Kohno, Fumitaka; Korenaga, Yuno; Ohsaki, Ayami; Hirano, Reiji; Haneda, Yasuhiro; Fukano, Reiji; Furukawa, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Beta1-integrins mediate cell attachment to different extracellular matrix proteins, intracellular proteins, and intercellular adhesions. Recently, it has been reported that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has anti-inflammatory properties such as inhibition of the expression of adhesion molecules or production of chemokines. However, the effect of PGE2 on the expression of beta1-integrin remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of PGE2 on the expression of beta1-integrin in the human monocytic cell line THP-1 and in CD14+ monocytes/macrophages in human peripheral blood. For this, we examined the role of four subtypes of PGE2 receptors and E-prostanoid (EP) receptors on PGE2-mediated inhibition. We found that PGE2 significantly inhibited the expression of beta1-integrin, mainly through EP4 receptors in THP-1 cells and CD14+ monocytes/macrophages in human peripheral blood. We suggest that PGE2 has anti-inflammatory effects, leading to the inhibited expression of beta1-integrin in human monocytes/macrophages, and that the EP4 receptor may play an important role in PGE2-mediated inhibition. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A phased strategy to differentiate human CD14+monocytes into classically and alternatively activated macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Zarif, Jelani C; Hernandez, James R; Verdone, James E; Campbell, Scott P; Drake, Charles G; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    There are currently several in vitro strategies to differentiate human CD14(+) monocytes isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) into the M1 or M2 macrophage cell types. Each cell type is then verified using flow cytometric analysis of cell-surface markers. Human CD14(+) monocytes have the potential to differentiate into M1 and M2 macrophages, both of which demonstrate varying degrees of cell-surface antigen overlap. Using multiple surface markers with current macrophage polarization protocols, our data reveal several limitations of currently used methods, such as highly ambiguous cell types that possess cell-surface marker overlap and functional similarities. Utilizing interleukin-6 (IL-6) and two phases of cytokine exposure, we have developed a protocol to differentiate human monocytes into M1, M2, or dendritic cells (DCs) with greater efficiency and fidelity relative to macrophages and DCs that are produced by commonly used methods. This is achieved via alterations in cytokine composition, dosing, and incubation times, as well as improvements in verification methodology. Our method reliably reproduces human in vitro monocyte-derived DCs and macrophage models that will aid in better defining and understanding innate and adaptive immunity, as well as pathologic states.

  19. [EVALUATION OF THE HUMAN SENSITIVITY TO SMALLPOX VIRUS BY THE PRIMARY CULTURES OF THE MONOCYTE-MACROPHAGES].

    PubMed

    Zamedyanskaya, A S; Titova, K A; Sergeev, Al A; Kabanov, A S; Bulychev, L E; Sergeev, Ar A; Galakhova, D O; Nesterov, A E; Nosareva, O V; Shishkina, L N; Taranov, O S; Omigov, V V; Agafonov, A P; Sergeev, A N

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the primary cultures of granulocytes, mononuclear, and monocyte-macrophage cells derived from human blood were performed using variola virus (VARV) in the doses of 0.001-0.021 PFU/cell (plaques-forming units per cell). Positive dynamics of the virus accumulation was observed only in the monocyte-macrophages with maximum values of virus concentration (5.0-5.5 Ig PFU/ml) mainly within six days after the infection. The fact of VARV replication in the monocyte-macrophages was confirmed by the data of electron microscopy. At the same time, virus vaccines when tested in doses 3.3 and 4.2 Ig PFU/ml did not show the ability to reproduce in these human cells. The people sensitivity to VARV as assessed from the data obtained on human monocyte-macrophages corresponded to -1 PFU (taking into account the smooth interaction of the virus in the body to the cells of this type), which is consistent to previously found theoretical data on the virus sensitivity. The human susceptibility to VARV assessed experimentally can be used to predict the adequacy of developed smallpox models (in vivo) based on susceptible animals. This is necessary for reliable assessment of the efficiency of development of drugs for treatment and prophylaxis of the smallpox.

  20. Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 Influences Fate Decision of Human Monocytes Differentiated from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Speidel, Anna; Felk, Sandra; Reinhardt, Peter; Sterneckert, Jared; Gillardon, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are strongly associated with familial Parkinson's disease (PD). High expression levels in immune cells suggest a role of LRRK2 in regulating the immune system. In this study, we investigated the effect of the LRRK2 (G2019S) mutation in monocytes, using a human stem cell-derived model expressing LRRK2 at endogenous levels. We discovered alterations in the differentiation pattern of LRRK2 mutant, compared to non-mutant isogenic controls, leading to accelerated monocyte production and a reduction in the non-classical CD14+CD16+ monocyte subpopulation in the LRRK2 mutant cells. LPS-treatment of the iPSC-derived monocytes significantly increased the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, demonstrating a functional response without revealing any significant differences between the genotypes. Assessment of the migrational capacity of the differentiated monocytes revealed moderate deficits in LRRK2 mutant cells, compared to their respective controls. Our findings indicate a pivotal role of LRRK2 in hematopoietic fate decision, endorsing the involvement of the immune system in the development of PD.

  1. Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 Influences Fate Decision of Human Monocytes Differentiated from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Felk, Sandra; Reinhardt, Peter; Sterneckert, Jared; Gillardon, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are strongly associated with familial Parkinson’s disease (PD). High expression levels in immune cells suggest a role of LRRK2 in regulating the immune system. In this study, we investigated the effect of the LRRK2 (G2019S) mutation in monocytes, using a human stem cell-derived model expressing LRRK2 at endogenous levels. We discovered alterations in the differentiation pattern of LRRK2 mutant, compared to non-mutant isogenic controls, leading to accelerated monocyte production and a reduction in the non-classical CD14+CD16+ monocyte subpopulation in the LRRK2 mutant cells. LPS-treatment of the iPSC-derived monocytes significantly increased the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, demonstrating a functional response without revealing any significant differences between the genotypes. Assessment of the migrational capacity of the differentiated monocytes revealed moderate deficits in LRRK2 mutant cells, compared to their respective controls. Our findings indicate a pivotal role of LRRK2 in hematopoietic fate decision, endorsing the involvement of the immune system in the development of PD. PMID:27812199

  2. Cell Surface Expression and Function of the Macromolecular C1 Complex on the Surface of Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hosszu, Kinga K.; Valentino, Alisa; Ji, Yan; Matkovic, Mara; Pednekar, Lina; Rehage, Nina; Tumma, Nithin; Peerschke, Ellinor I. B.; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis of the subunits of the C1 complex (C1q, C1s, C1r), and its regulator C1 inhibitor (C1-Inh) by human monocytes has been previously established. However, surface expression of these molecules by monocytes has not been shown. Using flow cytometry and antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we show here for the first time that, in addition to C1q, peripheral blood monocytes, and the monocyte-derived U937 cells express C1s and C1r, as well as Factor B and C1-Inh on their surface. C1s and C1r immunoprecipitated with C1q, suggesting that at least some of the C1q on these cells is part of the C1 complex. Furthermore, the C1 complex on U937 cells was able to trigger complement activation via the classical pathway. The presence of C1-Inh may ensure that an unwarranted autoactivation of the C1 complex does not take place. Since C1-Inh closely monitors the activation of the C1 complex in a sterile or infectious inflammatory environment, further elucidation of the role of C1 complex is crucial to dissect its function in monocyte, dendritic cell, and T cell activities, and its implications in host defense and tolerance. PMID:22566921

  3. The urokinase receptor is required for human monocyte chemotaxis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Gyetko, M R; Todd, R F; Wilkinson, C C; Sitrin, R G

    1994-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (Mphi) produce urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and also express a specific cell-surface receptor for urokinase, uPAR. The concomitant expression of these proteins provides a mechanism by which Mphi can degrade extracellular matrix proteins during directed cell migration. In this study, we sought to determine if uPAR plays a role in Mphi chemotaxis that is distinct from its role in matrix proteolysis. Exposing adherent monocytes to a chemotactic gradient causes plasma membrane uPAR to localize strongly to the leading edge of cell migration. Adherence alone or exposure to FMLP had no effect on uPAR expression. Using Boyden chamber chemotaxis assays, we demonstrate that treating mononuclear cells with an anti-uPAR mAb (either as an intact mAb or F[ab']2) ablates chemotaxis induced by FMLP and monocyte chemotactic peptide-1 (P < 0.001). Inactivating the catalytic activity of uPAR-bound uPA had no effect on chemotaxis. Similarly, blocking uPAR expression with an antisense oligonucleotide to uPAR completely ablates chemotaxis, but blocking uPA expression with an antisense oligonucleotide to uPA has a minimal effect. We therefore demonstrate that expression and unimpeded function of uPAR plays an obligate role in M phi chemotaxis by mechanisms that are largely independent of its ligand, uPA. Combined with its known role in mediating pericellular proteolysis, these observations demonstrate that uPAR is essential for both locomotion and traversing tissue barriers during M phi migration. Images PMID:8163642

  4. Identification of LPS-inducible genes downregulated by ubiquinone in human THP-1 monocytes.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Constance; Döring, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) is an obligatory element in the respiratory chain and functions as a potent antioxidant of lipid membranes. More recently, anti-inflammatory effects as well as an impact of CoQ(10) on gene expression have been observed. To reveal putative effects of Q(10) on LPS-induced gene expression, whole genome expression analysis was performed in the monocytic cell line THP-1. Thousand one hundred twenty-nine and 710 probe sets have been identified to be significantly (P treated cells when compared with controls, respectively. Text mining analysis of the top 50 LPS upregulated genes revealed a functional connection in the NFkappaB pathway and confirmed our applied in vitro stimulation model. Moreover, 33 LPS-sensitive genes have been identified to be significantly downregulated by Q(10)-treatment between a factor of 1.32 and 1.85. GeneOntology (GO) analysis revealed for the Q(10)-sensitve genes a primary involvement in protein metabolism (e.g., HERC1 and EPS15), cell proliferation (e.g., CCDC100 and SMURF1), and transcriptional processes (e.g., CNOT4 and STK4). Three genes were either related to NFkappaB transcription factor activity (ERC1), cytokinesis (DIAPH2), or modulation of oxidative stress (MSRA). In conclusion, our data provide evidence that Q(10) downregulates LPS-inducible genes in the monocytic cell line THP-1. Thus, the previously described effects of Q(10) on the reduction of proinflammatory mediators might be due to its antioxidant impact on gene expression.

  5. The monocyte locomotion inhibitory factor produced by Entamoeba histolytica inhibits induced nitric oxide production in human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Rico, G; Leandro, E; Rojas, S; Giménez, J A; Kretschmer, R R

    2003-07-01

    The monocyte locomotion inhibitory factor, an anti-inflammatory pentapeptide produced by Entamoeba histolytica, inhibits the in vitro production of nitric oxide induced by cytokines (INF-gamma, TNF-alpha) or PMA in human leukocytes. This can be added to the other previously reported functional effects of this factor, such as the inhibition of monocyte locomotion and the synthesis of reactive oxygen intermediates in both monocytes and neutrophils. The decreased nitric oxide production may interfere with the killing of amebas by neutrophils in the early invasive stages of amebiasis, when oxidative mechanisms are used [reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates either individually or synergistically via peroxynitrite (ONOO(-))], and in the advanced stages, when both non-oxidative and oxidative (including nitric oxide) mechanisms are employed by macrophages. Diminished nitric oxide production by leukocytes may also contribute to the paucity of late inflammatory components in amebic abscess of the liver and other amebic lesions.

  6. Human monocyte-derived suppressor cells control graft-versus-host disease by inducing regulatory forkhead box protein 3-positive CD8+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Janikashvili, Nona; Trad, Malika; Gautheron, Alexandrine; Samson, Maxime; Lamarthée, Baptiste; Bonnefoy, Francis; Lemaire-Ewing, Stéphanie; Ciudad, Marion; Rekhviashvili, Khatuna; Seaphanh, Famky; Gaugler, Béatrice; Perruche, Sylvain; Bateman, Andrew; Martin, Laurent; Audia, Sylvain; Saas, Philippe; Larmonier, Nicolas; Bonnotte, Bernard

    2015-06-01

    Adoptive transfer of immunosuppressive cells has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of immune-mediated disorders. However, only a limited number of such cells can be isolated from in vivo specimens. Therefore efficient ex vivo differentiation and expansion procedures are critically needed to produce a clinically relevant amount of these suppressive cells. We sought to develop a novel, clinically relevant, and feasible approach to generate ex vivo a subpopulation of human suppressor cells of monocytic origin, referred to as human monocyte-derived suppressive cells (HuMoSCs), which can be used as an efficient therapeutic tool to treat inflammatory disorders. HuMoSCs were generated from human monocytes cultured for 7 days with GM-CSF and IL-6. The immune-regulatory properties of HuMoSCs were investigated in vitro and in vivo. The therapeutic efficacy of HuMoSCs was evaluated by using a graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) model of humanized mice (NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc(-/-) [NSG] mice). CD33+ HuMoSCs are highly potent at inhibiting the proliferation and activation of autologous and allogeneic effector T lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. The suppressive activity of these cells depends on signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation. Of therapeutic relevance, HuMoSCs induce long-lasting memory forkhead box protein 3-positive CD8+ regulatory T lymphocytes and significantly reduce GvHD induced with human PBMCs in NSG mice. Ex vivo-generated HuMoSCs inhibit effector T lymphocytes, promote the expansion of immunosuppressive forkhead box protein 3-positive CD8+ regulatory T cells, and can be used as an efficient therapeutic tool to prevent GvHD. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Transmigration of polymorphnuclear neutrophils and monocytes through the human blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier after bacterial infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial invasion through the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) during bacterial meningitis causes secretion of proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines followed by the recruitment of leukocytes into the CNS. In this study, we analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms of polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) and monocyte transepithelial transmigration (TM) across the BCSFB after bacterial infection. Methods Using an inverted transwell filter system of human choroid plexus papilloma cells (HIBCPP), we studied leukocyte TM rates, the migration route by immunofluorescence, transmission electron microscopy and focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy, the secretion of cytokines/chemokines by cytokine bead array and posttranslational modification of the signal regulatory protein (SIRP) α via western blot. Results PMNs showed a significantly increased TM across HIBCPP after infection with wild-type Neisseria meningitidis (MC58). In contrast, a significantly decreased monocyte transmigration rate after bacterial infection of HIBCPP could be observed. Interestingly, in co-culture experiments with PMNs and monocytes, TM of monocytes was significantly enhanced. Analysis of paracellular permeability and transepithelial electrical resistance confirmed an intact barrier function during leukocyte TM. With the help of the different imaging techniques we could provide evidence for para- as well as for transcellular migrating leukocytes. Further analysis of secreted cytokines/chemokines showed a distinct pattern after stimulation and transmigration of PMNs and monocytes. Moreover, the transmembrane glycoprotein SIRPα was deglycosylated in monocytes, but not in PMNs, after bacterial infection. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that PMNs and monoctyes differentially migrate in a human BCSFB model after bacterial infection. Cytokines and chemokines as well as transmembrane proteins such as SIRPα may be involved in this process. PMID:23448224

  8. Characterization of the Kynurenine Pathway in CD8(+) Human Primary Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Braidy, Nady; Rossez, Helene; Lim, Chai K; Jugder, Bat-Erdene; Brew, Bruce J; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2016-11-01

    The kynurenine (KYN) pathway (KP) is a major degradative pathway of the amino acid, L-tryptophan (TRP), that ultimately leads to the anabolism of the essential pyridine nucleotide, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. TRP catabolism results in the production of several important metabolites, including the major immune tolerance-inducing metabolite KYN, and the neurotoxin and excitotoxin quinolinic acid. Dendritic cells (DCs) have been shown to mediate immunoregulatory roles that mediated by TRP catabolism. However, characterization of the KP in human DCs has so far only been partly delineated. It is critical to understand which KP enzymes are expressed and which KP metabolites are produced to be able to understand their regulatory effects on the immune response. In this study, we characterized the KP in human monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) in comparison with the human primary macrophages using RT-PCR, high-pressure gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, and immunocytochemistry. Our results show that the KP is entirely expressed in human MDDC. Following activation of the KP using interferon gamma, MDDCs can mediate apoptosis of T h cells in vitro. Understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating KP metabolism in MDDCs may provide renewed insight for the development of novel therapeutics aimed at modulating immunological effects and peripheral tolerance.

  9. Human monocyte-derived soluble product(s) has an accessory function in the generation of histamine- and concanavalin A-induced suppressor T cells.

    PubMed

    Beer, D J; Dinarello, C A; Rosenwasser, L J; Rocklin, R E

    1982-08-01

    We have analyzed the cellular interactions required for the generation of histamine- and concanavalin A (Con A)-induced suppressor T cells by employing a co-culture assay and techniques for fractionation of human blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). PBMC cultured in the presence of histamine (0.1 mM-1 mM) or Con A (20 micrograms/ml) for 24 h, mitomycin treated and subsequently combined with autologous mitogen-stimulated mononuclear cells, significantly suppressed a subsequent blastogenic response. PBMC fractionated over nylon wool columns and depleted of adherent cells and enriched for T cells (NWNA-T) were unable to generate suppressor activity. However, suppressor cell function by NWNA-T cells was reconstituted by the addition of autologous monocytes. In both the histamine and ConA suppressor systems, the requirement for monocytes in the activation process was enhanced by suspending the NWNA-T population in supernatants derived from allogeneic monocytes stimulated with heat-killed Staphylococcus albus. These crude supernatants contained leukocytic pyrogen (LP) and lymphocyte activating factor (LAF). Sequential purification and separation of the crude supernatants using gel-filtration, immunoadsorption, and isoelectric focusing demonstrated that only those fractions containing LP and LAF were capable to reconstituting NWNA-T cell histamine and Con A-induced suppressor activity. Thus, these studies suggest that the accessory role of supernatants derived from activated monocytes in the generation of suppressor cells may be mediated by LP/LAF. Further studies are in progress to explore the mechanism by which soluble factors stimulate suppressor T cells.

  10. TGF-beta and vitamin D3 utilize distinct pathways to suppress IL-12 production and modulate rapid differentiation of human monocytes into CD83+ dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Lyakh, Lyudmila A; Sanford, Michael; Chekol, Sebel; Young, Howard A; Roberts, Anita B

    2005-02-15

    We previously demonstrated that agents known to signal infection or inflammation can rapidly and directly drive differentiation of human CD14+ monocytes into CD83+ dendritic cells (DCs) when introduced to cells under serum-free conditions. In this study, we evaluated the effects of TGF-beta and vitamin D3 (VitD3) on the proportion and function of monocytes that adopt DC characteristics. TGF-beta significantly decreased the proportion of cells that rapidly adopted stable DC characteristics in response to LPS, but had little or no effect on calcium ionophore-induced differentiation. In contrast, VitD3 showed no such pathway specificity and dramatically suppressed differentiation of monocytes into DCs in response to these agents. Both TGF-beta and VitD3 altered cytokine and chemokine production in LPS-treated monocytes, inhibited IL-12 and IL-10 secretion, and decreased the functional capacity of DCs. Despite the similar effects of TGF-beta and VitD3, there are significant differences in the signaling pathways used by these agents, as evidenced by their distinct effects on LPS- and calcium ionophore-induced DC differentiation, on LPS-induced secretion of IL-10, and on two members of the NF-kappaB family of transcription factors, RelB and cRel. These studies identify TGF-beta and VitD3 as potent regulatory factors that use distinct pathways to suppress both the differentiation of DCs as well as their capacity to secrete the Th1-polarizing cytokine IL-12. Because these agents are present in serum and negatively affect DC differentiation at physiological concentrations, our findings are likely to have significance regarding the in vivo role of TGF-beta and VitD3 in determining the type of immune responses.

  11. Stable Extracellular RNA Fragments of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Induce Early Apoptosis in Human Monocytes via a Caspase-8 Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Obregón-Henao, Andrés; Duque-Correa, María A.; Rojas, Mauricio; García, Luis F.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Ortiz, Blanca L.; Belisle, John T.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular basis of pathogen-induced host cell apoptosis is well characterized for a number of microorganisms. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is known to induce apoptosis and it was shown that live but not heat killed M. tuberculosis stimulates this biological pathway in monocytes. The dependence of this activity on live bacilli led us to hypothesize that products released or secreted by M. tuberculosis are the primary apoptotic factors for human monocytes. Thus, the culture filtrate of in vitro grown M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv was fractioned by conventional chromatography and the apoptosis-inducing activity of individual fractions was measured on human monocytes. The tests employed included measurement of cell membrane damage, caspase activation, and cytokine release. Small molecular weight RNAs of M. tuberculosis were recognized as the predominant apoptosis inducing factors. The RNA was comprised primarily of tRNA and rRNA fragments that stably accumulate in the culture filtrate during early log-phase growth. The RNA fragments signaled through a caspase-8 dependent, caspase-1 and TNF-α independent pathway that ultimately compromised the human monocytes' ability to control M. tuberculosis infection. These studies provide the first report of bacterial RNA inducing apoptosis. They also provide a foundation to pursue pathways for secretion or release of nucleic acids from M. tuberculosis and the impact of secreted RNA fragments on pathogenesis. PMID:22253841

  12. Early activation of MyD88-mediated autophagy sustains HSV-1 replication in human monocytic THP-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Siracusano, Gabriel; Venuti, Assunta; Lombardo, Daniele; Mastino, Antonio; Esclatine, Audrey; Sciortino, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular degradation pathway that exerts numerous functions in vital biological processes. Among these, it contributes to both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, pathogens have evolved strategies to manipulate autophagy for their own advantage. By monitoring autophagic markers, we showed that HSV-1 transiently induced autophagosome formation during early times of the infection of monocytic THP-1 cells and human monocytes. Autophagy is induced in THP-1 cells by a mechanism independent of viral gene expression or viral DNA accumulation. We found that the MyD88 signaling pathway is required for HSV-1-mediated autophagy, and it is linked to the toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Interestingly, autophagy inhibition by pharmacological modulators or siRNA knockdown impaired viral replication in both THP-1 cells and human monocytes, suggest that the virus exploits the autophagic machinery to its own benefit in these cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that the early autophagic response induced by HSV-1 exerts a proviral role, improving viral production in a semi-permissive model such as THP-1 cells and human monocytes. PMID:27509841

  13. Assessing the Immunosafety of Engineered Nanoparticles with a Novel in Vitro Model Based on Human Primary Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Italiani, Paola; Casals, Eudald; Valkenborg, Dirk; Mertens, Inge; Baggerman, Geert; Nelissen, Inge; Puntes, Victor F; Boraschi, Diana

    2016-10-13

    The possibility that nanomaterials could perturb the normal course of an inflammatory response is a key issue when assessing nanoimmunosafety. The alteration of the normal progress of an inflammatory response may have pathological consequences, since inflammation is a major defensive mechanism and its efficiency maintains the body's health. The immunosafety of engineered nanoparticles at nontoxic concentrations was investigated with the use of a human primary monocyte-based in vitro system, which reproduces in a simplified fashion the full course of the physiological inflammatory response, from initiation and development to resolution. The kinetics of expression and production of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines and the proteomic profiles were used for describing the inflammatory defensive response. We assessed the ability of gold and silver nanoparticles to trigger inflammation and to interfere with the course of an ongoing defensive reaction. While neither nanoparticle type was able to directly activate monocytes, silver nanoparticles could exacerbate the inflammatory response of monocytes but did not interfere with the resolution of the inflammatory reaction. These findings support the use of human primary monocyte-based in vitro assays for realistically investigating the effects of engineered nanoparticles on human innate immune responses, in order to predict the immunological risk of nanomaterials and implement safe nanoparticle-based applications.

  14. Stable extracellular RNA fragments of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induce early apoptosis in human monocytes via a caspase-8 dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Obregón-Henao, Andrés; Duque-Correa, María A; Rojas, Mauricio; García, Luis F; Brennan, Patrick J; Ortiz, Blanca L; Belisle, John T

    2012-01-01

    The molecular basis of pathogen-induced host cell apoptosis is well characterized for a number of microorganisms. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is known to induce apoptosis and it was shown that live but not heat killed M. tuberculosis stimulates this biological pathway in monocytes. The dependence of this activity on live bacilli led us to hypothesize that products released or secreted by M. tuberculosis are the primary apoptotic factors for human monocytes. Thus, the culture filtrate of in vitro grown M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv was fractioned by conventional chromatography and the apoptosis-inducing activity of individual fractions was measured on human monocytes. The tests employed included measurement of cell membrane damage, caspase activation, and cytokine release. Small molecular weight RNAs of M. tuberculosis were recognized as the predominant apoptosis inducing factors. The RNA was comprised primarily of tRNA and rRNA fragments that stably accumulate in the culture filtrate during early log-phase growth. The RNA fragments signaled through a caspase-8 dependent, caspase-1 and TNF-α independent pathway that ultimately compromised the human monocytes' ability to control M. tuberculosis infection. These studies provide the first report of bacterial RNA inducing apoptosis. They also provide a foundation to pursue pathways for secretion or release of nucleic acids from M. tuberculosis and the impact of secreted RNA fragments on pathogenesis.

  15. Monocyte procoagulant activity and plasminogen activator. Role in human renal allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.H.; Cardella, C.J.; Schulman, J.; Levy, G.A.

    1985-10-01

    Currently the mechanism of renal allograft rejection is not well understood. This study was designed to determine whether induction of monocyte procoagulant activity (MCPA) is important in the pathogenesis of renal allograft rejection. The MPCA assay was performed utilizing a one stage clotting assay both in normal and in factor-VII-deficient plasma. There was no increase in spontaneous MPCA in 20 patients with endstage renal failure and in 10 patients following abdominal or orthopedic operation, as compared with 20 normal controls. MPCA was assessed daily in 18 patients who had received renal allografts. Rejection episodes (RE) were predicted on the basis of persistent elevation in MPCA as compared with pretransplant levels. Rejection was diagnosed clinically and treated on the basis of standard criteria. Treated RE were compared with those predicted by elevated MPCA, and 3 patients were assessed as having no RE by MPCA and by standard criteria. In 8 RE, MPCA correlated temporally with RE (same day) when compared with standard criteria. In 12 RE, MPCA was predictive of rejection preceding standard criteria by at least 24 hr. There were 7 false-positive predictions on the basis of MPCA; however, there was only 1 false negative. MPCA was shown to be a prothrombinase by its dependence only on prothrombin and fibrinogen for full activity. MPCA may be important in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection, and additionally it may be a useful adjunct in the clinical management of this disease.

  16. Microbial Pattern Recognition Causes Distinct Functional Micro-RNA Signatures in Primary Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Häsler, Robert; Jacobs, Gunnar; Till, Andreas; Grabe, Nils; Cordes, Christian; Nikolaus, Susanna; Lao, Kaiqin

    2012-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are short, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression post transcriptionally. Several studies have demonstrated the relevance of miRNAs for a wide range of cellular mechanisms, however, the current knowledge on how miRNAs respond to relevant external stimuli, e.g. in disease scenarios is very limited. To generate a descriptive picture of the miRNA network associated to inflammatory responses, we quantified the levels of 330 miRNAs upon stimulation with a panel of pro-inflammatory components such as microbial pattern molecules (flagellin, diacylated lipopeptide lipopolysaccharide, muramyl dipeptide), infection with Listeria monocytogenes and TNF-α as pro-inflammatory control in primary human monocytes using real time PCR. As a result, we found distinct miRNA response clusters for each stimulus used. Additionally, we identified potential target genes of three selected miRNAs miR-129-5p, miR-146a and miR-378 which were part of PAMP-specific response clusters by transfecting THP1 monocytes with the corresponding pre- or anti-miRNAs and microfluidic PCR arrays. The miRNAs induced distinct transcriptomal signatures, e.g. overexpression of miRNA129-5p, which was selectively upregulated by the NOD2-elicitor MDP, led to an upregulation of DEFB1, IRAK1, FBXW7 and IKK γ (Nemo). Our findings on highly co-regulated clusters of miRNAs support the hypothesis that miRNAs act in functional groups. This study indicates that miRNAs play an important role in fine-tuning inflammatory mechanisms. Further investigation in the field of miRNA responses will help to understand their effects on gene expression and may close the regulatory gap between mRNA and protein expression in inflammatory diseases. PMID:22363568

  17. Human brucellosis is characterized by an intense Th1 profile associated with a defective monocyte function.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Zapata, Manuel; Matías, Marlene J; Prieto, Alfredo; Jonde, Marco A; Monserrat, Jorge; Sánchez, Lorenzo; Reyes, Eduardo; De la Hera, Antonio; Alvarez-Mon, Melchor

    2010-07-01

    In animal models, a defective Th1 response appears to be critical in the pathogenesis of brucellosis, but the Th1 response in human brucellosis patients remains partially undefined. Peripheral blood from 24 brucellosis patients was studied before and 45 days after antibiotherapy. Twenty-four sex- and age-matched healthy donors were analyzed in parallel. Significantly increased levels of interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12p40, gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), but not of IL-10, in serum and/or significantly increased percentages of samples with detectable levels of these cytokines, measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), were found for untreated brucellosis patients, but these levels were reduced and/or normalized after treatment. Flow cytometry studies showed that the intracytoplasmic expression of IFN-gamma, IL-2, and TNF-alpha, but not that of IL-4, by phorbol myristate-activated CD4(+) CD3(+) and CD8(+) CD3(+) T lymphocytes was significantly increased in untreated brucellosis patients and was also partially normalized after antibiotherapy. The percentage of phagocytic cells, the mean phagocytic activity per cell, and the phagocytic indices for monocytes at baseline were defective and had only partially reverted at follow-up. T lymphocytes from untreated brucellosis patients are activated in vivo and show Th1 cytokine production polarization, with strikingly high serum IFN-gamma levels. In spite of this Th1 environment, we found deficient effector phagocytic activity in peripheral blood monocytes.

  18. Human Brucellosis Is Characterized by an Intense Th1 Profile Associated with a Defective Monocyte Function▿

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Zapata, Manuel; Matías, Marlene J.; Prieto, Alfredo; Jonde, Marco A.; Monserrat, Jorge; Sánchez, Lorenzo; Reyes, Eduardo; De la Hera, Antonio; Alvarez-Mon, Melchor

    2010-01-01

    In animal models, a defective Th1 response appears to be critical in the pathogenesis of brucellosis, but the Th1 response in human brucellosis patients remains partially undefined. Peripheral blood from 24 brucellosis patients was studied before and 45 days after antibiotherapy. Twenty-four sex- and age-matched healthy donors were analyzed in parallel. Significantly increased levels of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12p40, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), but not of IL-10, in serum and/or significantly increased percentages of samples with detectable levels of these cytokines, measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), were found for untreated brucellosis patients, but these levels were reduced and/or normalized after treatment. Flow cytometry studies showed that the intracytoplasmic expression of IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α, but not that of IL-4, by phorbol myristate-activated CD4+ CD3+ and CD8+ CD3+ T lymphocytes was significantly increased in untreated brucellosis patients and was also partially normalized after antibiotherapy. The percentage of phagocytic cells, the mean phagocytic activity per cell, and the phagocytic indices for monocytes at baseline were defective and had only partially reverted at follow-up. T lymphocytes from untreated brucellosis patients are activated in vivo and show Th1 cytokine production polarization, with strikingly high serum IFN-γ levels. In spite of this Th1 environment, we found deficient effector phagocytic activity in peripheral blood monocytes. PMID:20404074

  19. Microbial pattern recognition causes distinct functional micro-RNA signatures in primary human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Häsler, Robert; Jacobs, Gunnar; Till, Andreas; Grabe, Nils; Cordes, Christian; Nikolaus, Susanna; Lao, Kaiqin; Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are short, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression post transcriptionally. Several studies have demonstrated the relevance of miRNAs for a wide range of cellular mechanisms, however, the current knowledge on how miRNAs respond to relevant external stimuli, e.g. in disease scenarios is very limited. To generate a descriptive picture of the miRNA network associated to inflammatory responses, we quantified the levels of 330 miRNAs upon stimulation with a panel of pro-inflammatory components such as microbial pattern molecules (flagellin, diacylated lipopeptide lipopolysaccharide, muramyl dipeptide), infection with Listeria monocytogenes and TNF-α as pro-inflammatory control in primary human monocytes using real time PCR. As a result, we found distinct miRNA response clusters for each stimulus used. Additionally, we identified potential target genes of three selected miRNAs miR-129-5p, miR-146a and miR-378 which were part of PAMP-specific response clusters by transfecting THP1 monocytes with the corresponding pre- or anti-miRNAs and microfluidic PCR arrays. The miRNAs induced distinct transcriptomal signatures, e.g. overexpression of miRNA129-5p, which was selectively upregulated by the NOD2-elicitor MDP, led to an upregulation of DEFB1, IRAK1, FBXW7 and IKK γ (Nemo). Our findings on highly co-regulated clusters of miRNAs support the hypothesis that miRNAs act in functional groups. This study indicates that miRNAs play an important role in fine-tuning inflammatory mechanisms. Further investigation in the field of miRNA responses will help to understand their effects on gene expression and may close the regulatory gap between mRNA and protein expression in inflammatory diseases.

  20. Uric acid priming in human monocytes is driven by the AKT-PRAS40 autophagy pathway.

    PubMed

    Crişan, Tania O; Cleophas, Maartje C P; Novakovic, Boris; Erler, Kathrin; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Netea, Mihai G; Dinarello, Charles A; Joosten, Leo A B

    2017-05-23

    Metabolic triggers are important inducers of the inflammatory processes in gout. Whereas the high serum urate levels observed in patients with gout predispose them to the formation of monosodium urate (MSU) crystals, soluble urate also primes for inflammatory signals in cells responding to gout-related stimuli, but also in other common metabolic diseases. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms through which uric acid selectively lowers human blood monocyte production of the natural inhibitor IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) and shifts production toward the highly inflammatory IL-1β. Monocytes from healthy volunteers were first primed with uric acid for 24 h and then subjected to stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the presence or absence of MSU. Transcriptomic analysis revealed broad inflammatory pathways associated with uric acid priming, with NF-κB and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling strongly increased. Functional validation did not identify NF-κB or AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, but uric acid priming induced phosphorylation of AKT and proline-rich AKT substrate 40 kDa (PRAS 40), which in turn activated mTOR. Subsequently, Western blot for the autophagic structure LC3-I and LC3-II (microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3) fractions, as well as fluorescence microscopy of LC3-GFP-overexpressing HeLa cells, revealed lower autophagic activity in cells exposed to uric acid compared with control conditions. Interestingly, reactive oxygen species production was diminished by uric acid priming. Thus, the Akt-PRAS40 pathway is activated by uric acid, which inhibits autophagy and recapitulates the uric acid-induced proinflammatory cytokine phenotype.

  1. Gene response of human monocytic cells for the detection of antimigraine activity of feverfew extracts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Fu; Leung, Albert Y

    2007-11-01

    The herb feverfew is a folk remedy for various conditions, including inflammation, fever, psoriasis, rheumatism, and asthma. Like many herbal medicines, feverfew's mechanisms of action in the human body are largely unknown and its active ingredients remain elusive. Very often, different extraction methods of herb material produce different physical and biochemical properties and variation in clinical efficacy. We identified 3 major methods of extraction for feverfew aerial parts and used microarray technology to test the hypothesis that extracts produced by different methods elicit different gene expression profiles. We have identified approximately 200 genes that are consistently regulated by the 2 presumptive active antimigraine feverfew extracts but not associated with the inactive extract. Our results suggest that the presumptive active feverfew extracts potently stimulate more genes in human cells than the inactive extracts. We also identified several genes as unique signatures for these active extracts. All 3 feverfew extracts exhibited similar blockades on lipopolysaccharide-mediated TNF-alpha (tumor necrosis factor alpha) release, implicating that TNF-alpha is not responsible for the differences in the effects of the 3 feverfew extracts in human cells. In contrast, the active extracts more effectively suppressed CCL2 (also known as monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, MCP-1) than the inactive extracts, suggesting that CCL2 is a potential cellular target for feverfew's antimigraine effects.

  2. RANK Expression and Osteoclastogenesis in Human Monocytes in Peripheral Blood from Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) appears as inflammation of synovial tissue and joint destruction. Receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) is a member of the TNF receptor superfamily and a receptor for the RANK ligand (RANKL). In this study, we examined the expression of RANKhigh and CCR6 on CD14+ monocytes from patients with RA and healthy volunteers. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from both the RA patients and the healthy volunteers. Osteoclastogenesis from monocytes was induced by RANKL and M-CSF in vitro. To study the expression of RANKhigh and CCR6 on CD14+ monocytes, two-color flow cytometry was performed. Levels of expression of RANK on monocytes were significantly correlated with the level of osteoclastogenesis in the healthy volunteers. The expression of RANKhigh on CD14+ monocyte in RA patients without treatment was elevated and that in those receiving treatment was decreased. In addition, the high-level expression of RANK on CD14+ monocytes was correlated with the high-level expression of CCR6 in healthy volunteers. Monocytes expressing both RANK and CCR6 differentiate into osteoclasts. The expression of CD14+RANKhigh in untreated RA patients was elevated. RANK and CCR6 expressed on monocytes may be novel targets for the regulation of bone resorption in RA and osteoporosis. PMID:27822475

  3. CD163 and CD206 expression does not correlate with tolerance and cytokine production in LPS-tolerant human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Alves-Januzzi, Amanda Barba; Brunialti, Milena Karina Colo; Salomao, Reinaldo

    2017-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-tolerant monocytes produce small amounts of inflammatory cytokines, which is one of the characteristics of the alternative activated macrophages (AAM). These cells exhibited an increased expression of CD206 and CD163. Given the functional similarities of AAMs with the modulation of monocytes' functions observed during sepsis and LPS-tolerance, we evaluated whether the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production by LPS-tolerant monocytes is associated with the phenotype of cells expressing CD206 and CD163. We investigated whether tolerant human monocytes would modulate their expression of CD206 and CD163, markers of alternative activation, and whether the level of their expression would be related to cytokines detection. Tolerance to LPS was induced in peripheral blood mononuclear cell by pre-incubating the cells with increasing concentrations of LPS. The expression of CD206 and CD163 and intracellular TNF-α and IL-6 was determined 24 h after LPS challenge by flow cytometry. No differences in CD163 expression were observed between tolerant and non-tolerant cells, while the expression of CD206, which was decreased following LPS stimulation in non-tolerized cells, was further reduced in tolerant cells. Decreased production of inflammatory cytokines was observed in the tolerized cells, regardless of the expression of CD163 and CD206, with the exception of IL-6 in CD206+ monocytes, which was similarly expressed in both tolerized and non-tolerized cells. The effect of LPS in the expression of CD163 and CD206 on monocytes is not reverted in LPS tolerant cells, and the inhibition of inflammatory cytokines in tolerant cells is not related with modulation of these receptors. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  4. Lipooligosaccharide from Bordetella pertussis induces mature human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and drives a Th2 biased response.

    PubMed

    Fedele, Giorgio; Celestino, Ignacio; Spensieri, Fabiana; Frasca, Loredana; Nasso, Maria; Watanabe, Mineo; Remoli, Maria Elena; Coccia, Eliana Marina; Altieri, Fabio; Ausiello, Clara Maria

    2007-06-01

    Bordetella pertussis has a distinctive cell wall lipooligosaccharide (LOS) that is released from the bacterium during bacterial division and killing. LOS directly participates in host-bacterial interactions, in particular influencing the dendritic cells' (DC) immune regulatory ability. We analyze LOS mediated toll-like receptor (TLR) activation and dissect the role played by LOS on human monocyte-derived (MD)DC functions and polarization of the host T cell response. LOS activates TLR4-dependent signaling and induces mature MDDC able to secrete IL-10. LOS-matured MDDC enhance allogeneic presentation and skew T helper (Th) cell polarization towards a Th2 phenotype. LOS protects MDDC from undergoing apoptosis, prolonging their longevity and their functions. Compared to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the classical DC maturation stimulus, LOS was a less efficient inducer of TLR4 signaling, MDDC maturation, IL-10 secretion and allogeneic T cell proliferation and it was not able to induce IL-12p70 production in MDDC. However, the MDDC apoptosis protection exerted by LOS and LPS were comparable. In conclusion, LOS treated MDDC are able to perform antigen presentation in a context that promotes licensing of Th2 effectors. Considering these properties, the use of LOS in the formulation of acellular pertussis vaccines to potentiate protective and adjuvant capacity should be taken into consideration.

  5. Humanized mice efficiently engrafted with fetal hepatoblasts and syngeneic immune cells develop human monocytes and NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Billerbeck, Eva; Mommersteeg, Michiel C.; Shlomai, Amir; Xiao, Jing W.; Andrus, Linda; Bhatta, Ankit; Vercauteren, Koen; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Dorner, Marcus; Krishnan, Anuradha; Charlton, Michael R.; Chiriboga, Luis; Rice, Charles M.; de Jong, Ype P.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Human liver chimeric mice are useful models of human hepatitis virus infection, including hepatitis B and C virus infections. Independently, immunodeficient mice reconstituted with CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) derived from fetal liver reliably develop human T and B lymphocytes. Combining these systems has long been hampered by inefficient liver reconstitution of human fetal hepatoblasts. Our study aimed to enhance hepatoblast engraftment in order to create a mouse model with syngeneic human liver and immune cells. Methods The effects of human oncostatin-M administration on fetal hepatoblast engraftment into immunodeficient fah−/− mice was tested. Mice were then transplanted with syngeneic human hepatoblasts and HSC after which human leukocyte chimerism and functionality were analyzed by flow cytometry, and mice were challenged with HBV. Results Addition of human oncostatin-M enhanced human hepatoblast engraftment in immunodeficient fah−/− mice by 5–100 fold. In contrast to mice singly engrafted with HSC, which predominantly developed human T and B lymphocytes, mice co-transplanted with syngeneic hepatoblasts also contained physiological levels of human monocytes and natural killer cells. Upon infection with HBV, these mice displayed rapid and sustained viremia. Conclusions Our study provides a new mouse model with improved human fetal hepatoblast engraftment and an expanded human immune cell repertoire. With further improvements, this model may become useful for studying human immunity against viral hepatitis. Lay summary Important human pathogens such as hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus only infect human cells which complicates the development of mouse models for the study of these pathogens. One way to make mice permissive for human pathogens is the transplantation of human cells into immune-compromised mice. For instance, the transplantation of human liver cells will allow the infection of

  6. CD32 expression and signaling is down-regulated by transforming growth factor-beta 1 on human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Reterink, T J; Klar-Mohamad, N; Nibbering, P H; van Es, L A; Daha, M R

    1996-08-01

    CD32 (Fc gamma RII) is the most abundantly distributed class of IgG Fc receptors in the human body. In this study, we analyzed the effect of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1, a cytokine with strong immunosuppressive function, on the expression and function of CD32 on freshly isolated peripheral blood monocytes and three human monocytic cell lines, U937, THP-1 and Mono mac-6. We found that TGF-beta 1 down-regulates CD32 expression on monocytes and all monocytic cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. A mean down-regulation of CD32 expression on THP-1 cells of 54 +/- 3.2% after 24 h was found at a concentration of 1 ng/ml TGF-beta 1. At the mRNA level, TGF-beta 1 induced a twofold down-regulation of CD32. Cross-linking of CD32 induced an increase in the concentration of intracellular Ca2+, which was reduced by 50% by TGF-beta 1, suggesting a decreased downstream signaling mediated by the receptor.

  7. Induction of heme oxygenase 1 by arsenite inhibits cytokine-induced monocyte adhesion to human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xi; Pi Jingbo; Liu Wenlan; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu Kejian; Feng Changjian

    2009-04-15

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an oxidative stress responsive gene upregulated by various physiological and exogenous stimuli. Arsenite, as an oxidative stressor, is a potent inducer of HO-1 in human and rodent cells. In this study, we investigated the mechanistic role of arsenite-induced HO-1 in modulating tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) induced monocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Arsenite pretreatment, which upregulated HO-1 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced monocyte adhesion to HUVEC and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 protein expression by 50% and 40%, respectively. Importantly, knockdown of HO-1 by small interfering RNA abolished the arsenite-induced inhibitory effects. These results indicate that induction of HO-1 by arsenite inhibits the cytokine-induced monocyte adhesion to HUVEC by suppressing adhesion molecule expression. These findings established an important mechanistic link between the funct