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Sample records for human monocytes treated

  1. Vitrification of human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Hirsh, A; Erbe, E F; Bross, J B; Steere, R L; Williams, R J

    1986-04-01

    Human monocytes purified from peripheral blood by counterflow centrifugal elutriation were cryopreserved in a vitreous state at 1 atm pressure. The vitrification solution was Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS) containing (w/v) 20.5% Me2SO, 15.5% acetamide, 10% propylene glycol, and 6% polyethylene glycol. Fifteen milliliters of this solution was added dropwise to 1 ml of a concentrated monocyte suspension at 0 degrees C. Of this, 0.8 ml was drawn into silicone tubing and rapidly cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature, stored for various periods, and rapidly warmed in an ice bath. The vitrification solution was removed by slow addition of HBSS containing 20% fetal calf serum. The numerical cell recovery was about 92% and most of these retained normal phagocytic and chemotactic ability. Differential scanning calorimeter records of the solution show a glass transition at -115 degrees C during cooling and warming, but no evidence of ice formation during cooling. Devitrification occurs at about -70 degrees C during warming at rates as rapid as 80 degrees C/min. The amount of devitrification is dependent upon the warming rate. Freeze-fracture freeze-etch electron microscope observations revealed no ice either intra- or extracellularly in samples rapidly cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures except for small amounts in some cellular organelles. However, if these cell suspensions were warmed rapidly to -70 degrees C and then held for 5 min, allowing devitrification to occur, the preparation contained significant amounts of both intra- and extracellular ice. Biological data showed that this devitrification was associated with severe loss of cell function. PMID:3698640

  2. Interaction of Legionella micdadei with human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Weinbaum, D L; Benner, R R; Dowling, J N; Alpern, A; Pasculle, A W; Donowitz, G R

    1984-01-01

    We have recently shown that Legionella micdadei is ingested, but not killed, by human neutrophils. Herein we investigate the role of human monocytes in defense against this organism. Serum and monocytes from normal donors having no detectable antibody to L. micdadei were used. Egg-passaged L. micdadei organisms multiplied inside these monocytes with a peak growth of 2 log units within 12 h. No growth occurred when monocytes were omitted or when sonicated monocytes were used. Electron microscopy 18 h after infection revealed these organisms to be intracellular in normal-appearing phagosomes. When the input multiplicity of L. micdadei was greater than 1 CFU per monocyte, no intracellular growth occurred. When egg-passaged Legionella pneumophila organisms were used, intracellular organisms were found in phagosomes studded with ribosomes at the same time period. Peak intracellular growth of L. pneumophilia occurred by 48 h. L. micdadei activated the complement system and was opsonized by C3. However the use of complement-depleted (heat-inactivated) serum as the opsonic source had no effect on the bacterium's ingestion or growth in the monocyte. Thus, L. micdadei multiples in human monocytes. This entry and growth is independent of antibody or complement. The intracellular locations of L. micdadei and L. pneumophila differ, suggesting different mechanisms for the survival of these two organisms in the monocyte. Images PMID:6480116

  3. Sources of heterogeneity in human monocyte subsets

    PubMed Central

    Appleby, Laura J.; Nausch, Norman; Midzi, Nicholas; Mduluza, Takafira; Allen, Judith E.; Mutapi, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    Human monocytes are commonly defined and discriminated by the extent of their cell surface expression of CD14 and CD16, with associated differences in function and phenotype related to the intensity of expression of these markers. With increasing interest into the function and behaviour of monocytes, it is important to have a clear understanding of how differing strategies of analysis can affect results and how different protocols and population backgrounds can affect this highly morphogenic cell type. Using PBMCs from populations with differing ethnicities and histories of parasite exposure we have characterized monocyte phenotype based on intensity of CD14 and CD16 expression. Using the surface markers HLA-DR, CCR2 and CX3CR1, we compared monocyte phenotype between populations and further assessed changes in monocytes with freezing and thawing of PBMCs. Our results reveal that there is a progression of surface marker expression based on intensity of CD14 or CD16 expression, stressing the importance of careful gating of monocyte subtypes. Freezing and thawing of the PBMCs has no effect generally on the monocytes, although it does lead to a decrease in CD16 and CX3CR1 expression. We show that there are differences in the monocyte populations based on ethnicity and history of exposure to the common parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Schistosoma haematobium. This study highlights that blood monocytes consist of a continuous population of cells, within which the dominant phenotype may vary dependent on the background of the study population. Comparing results from monocyte studies therefore needs to be done with great care, as ethnic background of donor population, gating strategy and processing of PBMCs may all have an effect on outcome of monocyte phenotype. PMID:23557598

  4. Successful Treatment of Human Monocytic Ehrlichiosis with Rifampin

    PubMed Central

    Ajmal, Saira; Hughes, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Currently recommended treatment regimens for human monocytic ehrlichiosis (HME) include doxycycline or tetracycline. Antibiotic susceptibility studies demonstrate that rifampin has in vitro bactericidal activity against Ehrlichia. Case reports have suggested clinical response with rifampin treatment of human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA). We report the first case of HME successfully treated with rifampin. PMID:26918212

  5. Primary human monocyte differentiation regulated by Nigella sativa pressed oil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Oxidized low density lipoprotein plays an important role in development of foam cells in atherosclerosis. The study was focused on regulation of primary human monocyte growth and CD11b expression in presence of Nigella sativa oil. Methods Primary human monocytes were isolated from whole blood and grown at 37°C and 5% CO2 saturation for five days prior to treatment with Nigella sativa oil. The cells were plated and washed before treatment with ox-LDL (10 μg/ml) as positive control and combined treatment of ox-LDL (10 μg/ml) and (140 ng/ml) Nigella sativa oil. The growth progression was monitored every 24 hours for 3 days. Results Macrophages showed reduced growth in comparison to monocytes 24 hours after treatment with Nigella sativa oil. The mean cell diameter was significantly different between untreated and treated condition in monocytes and macrophages (p < 0.001). Similarly, intracellular lipid accumulation was hindered in combined treatment with Nigella sativa oil. This was further supported by cell surface expression analysis, where CD11b was markedly reduced in cells treated with combination oxLDL and Nigella sativa oil compared to oxLDL alone. More cells differentiated into macrophage-like cells when monocytes were supplemented with oxidized LDL alone. Conclusions The finding provides preliminary evidence on regulation of cell growth and differentiation in monocyte and monocyte-derived macrophages by Nigella sativa oil. Further investigations need to be conducted to explain its mechanism in human monocyte. PMID:22104447

  6. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, Katrin; Rehli, Michael; Singer, Katrin; Renner-Sattler, Kathrin; Kreutz, Marina

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. - Highlights: • Lactic acid broadly delays LPS-induced gene expression in human monocytes. • Expression of important monocyte effector molecules is affected by lactic acid. • Interference of lactic acid with TLR signaling causes the delayed gene expression. • The profound effect of lactic acid might contribute to immune suppression in tumors.

  7. Aliphatic alcohols in spirits inhibit phagocytosis by human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Pál, László; Árnyas, Ervin M; Bujdosó, Orsolya; Baranyi, Gergő; Rácz, Gábor; Ádány, Róza; McKee, Martin; Szűcs, Sándor

    2015-04-01

    A large volume of alcoholic beverages containing aliphatic alcohols is consumed worldwide. Previous studies have confirmed the presence of ethanol-induced immunosuppression in heavy drinkers, thereby increasing susceptibility to infectious diseases. However, the aliphatic alcohols contained in alcoholic beverages might also impair immune cell function, thereby contributing to a further decrease in microbicidal activity. Previous research has shown that aliphatic alcohols inhibit phagocytosis by granulocytes but their effect on human monocytes has not been studied. This is important as they play a crucial role in engulfment and killing of pathogenic microorganisms and a decrease in their phagocytic activity could lead to impaired antimicrobial defence in heavy drinkers. The aim of this study was to measure monocyte phagocytosis following their treatment with those aliphatic alcohols detected in alcoholic beverages. Monocytes were separated from human peripheral blood and phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan particles by monocytes treated with ethanol and aliphatic alcohols individually and in combination was determined. It was shown that these alcohols could suppress the phagocytic activity of monocytes in a concentration-dependent manner and when combined with ethanol, they caused a further decrease in phagocytosis. Due to their additive effects, it is possible that they may inhibit phagocytosis in a clinically meaningful way in alcoholics and episodic heavy drinkers thereby contribute to their increased susceptibility to infectious diseases. However, further research is needed to address this question.

  8. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Peter, Katrin; Rehli, Michael; Singer, Katrin; Renner-Sattler, Kathrin; Kreutz, Marina

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment.

  9. Human monocytes can produce tissue-type plasminogen activator

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Evidence has previously been presented that monocytes and macrophages produce urokinase-type plasminogen activator. We have shown for the first time that human monocytes, when stimulated appropriately in vitro, can produce tissue type-plasminogen activator (t-PA) of 70 kD. Detection of t-PA mRNA was consistent with the biochemical and immunological characterization of t-PA produced by human monocytes. PMID:2494295

  10. Human monocyte-endothelial cell interaction in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, N A; Abraham, E L; Pontier, S; Scott, W A; Cohn, Z A

    1985-12-01

    We have examined the interaction of freshly isolated human blood monocytes with cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro. Purified monocytes incubated with confluent primary or passaged endothelial cells (EC) for 90 min at 37 degrees C bound at maximal densities of 6.5-7.0 X 10(3)/mm2 (8 or 9 per EC) without causing disruption of the monolayer. Monocyte-EC binding proceeded in the presence of plasma proteins or optimal phagocytic doses of opsonized zymosan particles. The avidity of attachment was not diminished by alternative monocyte isolation techniques. Monocyte attachment to EC was dependent upon the presence of divalent cations (magnesium greater than calcium) and was inhibited at 4 degrees C. Monocytes selectively bound to EC when incubated with monolayers composed of smooth muscle cells and EC. Neither EC monolayer confluence nor a variety of EC culture conditions affected the high levels of monocyte binding. In contrast, human neutrophils (less than 1 per EC) and lymphocytes (less than 2-3.5 per EC) bound at lower maximal densities under the same conditions, while platelet reactivity remained minimal. The distinctively higher affinity of human blood monocytes relative to other circulating white cells for binding to cultured human EC may have relevance to their function in vivo.

  11. Interaction between human peripheral blood monocytes and tumor promoters: Effect on growth differentiation and function in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Keisari, Y.; Bucana, C.; Markovich, S.; Campbell, D.E. )

    1990-08-01

    Studies on the differentiation and activation of human monocytes in tissue cultures have usually been limited by the deterioration of human monocytes and macrophages in long-term cultures. In this study, we attempted to establish long-term human monocyte/macrophage cultures using the phorbol ester 12-0 tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), and we studied the morphology, function, and biochemical properties of such treated human blood monocytes. Enriched suspensions of monocytes were obtained using Ficoll-Hypaque gradient and cultured in the absence or presence of various concentrations of TPA. Samples were removed at different times and processed for scanning electron microscopy. Parallel samples were examined for numbers of adherent cells, phagocytosis, oxidative burst, beta-galactosidase assays, and lectin-mediated erythrolysis. TPA-treated monocytes survived in larger numbers in culture for up to 7 weeks and were more pleomorphic and exhibited higher beta-galactosidase activities after 14 days in culture than untreated monocytes. TPA-treated cells and untreated cells in long-term cultures showed a decrease in their oxidative burst activity while their phagocytic activity was not affected, and the TPA treatment augmented the lysis of wheat germ agglutinin-opsonized erythrocytes by the cultured monocytes. TPA treatment of adherent human monocytes resulted in cell cultures with increased numbers of viable and functionally adherent cells for extended periods of time and does not seem to interfere with the differentiation and maturation of the cells in culture.

  12. A fast-acting elastase inhibitor in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    A proteinase inhibitor active against neutrophil and pancreatic elastase was detected in extracts of cultured human monocytes and the human monocyte-like cell line U937. This component forms a covalent complex with the active site of elastase; the complex is stable in boiling sodium dodecyl sulfate solution, and is susceptible to nucleophilic cleavage. The activity of the elastase inhibitor is not detected in extracts of freshly isolated monocytes, but becomes detectable when the monocytes are allowed to mature in culture, with maximum levels occurring at 5-7 d. The monocyte inhibitor is fast- acting; its reaction with 125I-labeled elastase is complete in less than 1 min at 37 degrees C. Analysis by electrophoresis and studies using a heteroantiserum to alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor demonstrated that the elastase inhibitor of monocytes/U937 cells is not identical to alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor, the major elastase inhibitor of blood plasma. The extent of conversion of 125I-elastase to the 125I-elastase- inhibitor complex is proportional to the amount of U937 extract or cultured monocyte extract, indicating that this reaction can serve to quantify the elastase inhibitor. The elastase inhibitor is an abundant component in mature monocytes, with greater than or equal to 1.5 X 10(6) molecules/cell (greater than or equal to 12 micrograms per 10(8) cells, greater than 0.1% of total cell protein). Its mol wt is estimated at 50,000. Thus, the monocyte inhibitor should be classified as a putative regulator of neutrophil (and monocyte) elastase activity at inflammatory sites. This designation is based on the properties of the molecule, including its high concentration in maturing monocytes, its affinity for elastase, and its fast reaction with this enzyme. PMID:3906019

  13. Radiation effects on cultured human monocytes and on monocyte-derived macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Buescher, E.S.; Gallin, J.I.

    1984-06-01

    Prior to administration, leukocyte transfusions are commonly irradiated with up to 5,000 R to eliminate lymphocytes and thereby prevent graft-versus-host disease in the recipient. It has been widely believed that phagocytes are resistant to this irradiation. In a recent report, it was noted that phagocyte oxidative metabolism was compromised during preparation of white cells for transfusion. As part of the effort to examine the basis for this inhibition of phagocyte function during white cell preparation, an assessment was made of the effects of irradiation on the long-lived monocytes that have been shown to persist at inflammatory foci posttransfusion. Human monocytes were irradiated for up to 3 min, receiving 2,500-5,000 R. This irradiation damaged human monocytes, significantly decreasing their in vitro survival for the first 3 wk of culture, and growth as assessed by two-dimensional cell size measurements during the first 2 wk of culture. Despite smaller cell size, total cell protein was significantly increased over time in irradiated cultures. Extracellular release of lysozyme and beta-glucuronidase per cell was not affected by irradiation, but extracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release was significantly increased after irradiation. Irradiated monocytes killed Listeria monocytogenes at a slower rate than the nonirradiated controls. Thus, the data indicate that irradiation in doses used to prevent graft-versus-host disease in leukocyte transfusion recipients has a deleterious effect on in vitro human monocyte survival and function.

  14. Induction of tissue transglutaminase in human peripheral blood monocytes

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The levels and activity of tissue transglutaminase were studied in human peripheral blood monocytes during differentiation into macrophages in vitro. The enzyme was present at low levels in freshly isolated monocytes (less than 20 ng/mg cell protein) but increased 50- fold during 10 d of adherent culture in autologous serum, reaching levels of 0.1% of total cellular protein. The rate of appearance of tissue transglutaminase in monocytes was accelerated by low levels of lipopolysaccharide. The half-life of disappearance of transglutaminase from human monocytes was 11 and 7 h in 2-d-old and 10-d-old cells, respectively. Treatment of 1-day-old monocytes with actinomycin D for 24 h blocked the increase in transglutaminase levels. These results indicated that the induction of gene transcription and protein synthesis was responsible for the increased transglutaminase levels and activity observed with cultured human monocytes. The induction of tissue transglutaminase may be a component in the in vivo differentiation of human monocytes into macrophages. PMID:6141210

  15. Human monocyte differentiation stage affects response to arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Alvarez, Elizabeth; Pelaez, Carlos A; García, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    AA-induced cell death mechanisms acting on human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), U937 promonocytes and PMA-differentiated U937 cells were studied. Arachidonic acid induced apoptosis and necrosis in monocytes and U937 cells but only apoptosis in MDM and U937D cells. AA increased both types of death in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells and increased the percentage of TNFalpha+ cells and reduced IL-10+ cells. Experiments blocking these cytokines indicated that AA-mediated death was TNFalpha- and IL-10-independent. The differences in AA-mediated cell death could be explained by high ROS, calpain and sPLA-2 production and activity in monocytes. Blocking sPLA-2 in monocytes and treatment with antioxidants favored M. tuberculosis control whereas AA enhanced M. tuberculosis growth in MDM. Such evidence suggested that AA-modulated effector mechanisms depend on mononuclear phagocytes' differentiation stage.

  16. Pregnancy and Preeclampsia Affect Monocyte Subsets in Humans and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Borghuis, Theo; Klok, Pieter A.; Groen, Bart; Bolt, Annemarie; de Vos, Paul; van Pampus, Maria G.; Wong, Tsz Y.; van Goor, Harry; Bakker, Winston W.; Faas, Marijke M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Both nonclassical and intermediate monocytes have been implicated in different inflammatory conditions. We hypothesized that these monocytes would increase during pregnancy, a condition associated with generalized activation of inflammatory responses and that they would increase even more during preeclampsia, in which inflammatory responses are further stimulated. In the present study we investigated changes in monocyte subsets during healthy pregnancy and preeclampsia in humans and rats. Methods Blood monocyte subsets of nonpregnant, preeclamptic and healthy pregnant women were identified with CD14 and CD16. In nonpregnant and pregnant rats, blood monocytes were identified with CD172a and CD43, as well as in rats infused with adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a pro-inflammatory stimulus known to induce preeclampsia-like symptoms. Total and CD206-positive macrophages were quantified in placentas of these animals. Results Lower percentages of classical monocytes were found in pregnant women (91%–[83–98%]) compared to nonpregnant women (94%–[90–98%]) and even less in preeclamptic patients (90%–[61–92%]). In contrast, the percentage of combined nonclassical/intermediate monocytes was higher in pregnant women (8.5%–[2.3–16.6%] vs. 5.6%–[1.9–9.5%]) and even higher in preeclamptic patients (9.9%–[7.8–38.7%]), which was caused by a selective increase of intermediate monocytes. In rats, we also found lower percentages of classical monocytes and higher percentages of nonclassical monocytes in pregnant versus nonpregnant rats. ATP infusion increased the percentage of nonclassical monocytes in pregnant rats even further but not in nonpregnant rats. These nonclassical monocytes showed a more activated phenotype in pregnant ATP-infused rats only. Mesometrial triangles of ATP-infused rats had less CD206-positive macrophages as compared to those of saline-infused rats. Conclusion The higher percentage of nonclassical/intermediate monocytes found

  17. Inhibition of the Differentiation of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells by Human Gingival Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Séguier, Sylvie; Tartour, Eric; Guérin, Coralie; Couty, Ludovic; Lemitre, Mathilde; Lallement, Laetitia; Folliguet, Marysette; Naderi, Samah El; Terme, Magali; Badoual, Cécile; Lafont, Antoine; Coulomb, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether gingival fibroblasts (GFs) can modulate the differentiation and/or maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and analyzed soluble factors that may be involved in this immune modulation. Experiments were performed using human monocytes in co-culture with human GFs in Transwell® chambers or using monocyte cultures treated with conditioned media (CM) from GFs of four donors. The four CM and supernatants from cell culture were assayed by ELISA for cytokines involved in the differentiation of dendritic cells, such as IL-6, VEGF, TGFβ1, IL-13 and IL-10. The maturation of monocyte-derived DCs induced by LPS in presence of CM was also studied. Cell surface phenotype markers were analyzed by flow cytometry. In co-cultures, GFs inhibited the differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs and the strength of this blockade correlated with the GF/monocyte ratio. Conditioned media from GFs showed similar effects, suggesting the involvement of soluble factors produced by GFs. This inhibition was associated with a lower stimulatory activity in MLR of DCs generated with GFs or its CM. Neutralizing antibodies against IL-6 and VEGF significantly (P<0.05) inhibited the inhibitory effect of CM on the differentiation of monocytes-derived DCs and in a dose dependent manner. Our data suggest that IL-6 is the main factor responsible for the inhibition of DCs differentiation mediated by GFs but that VEGF is also involved and constitutes an additional mechanism. PMID:23936476

  18. Studies on the metabolism of triphenylphosphate by carboxylesterases and human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Paxman, D.G. III.

    1988-01-01

    Resin workers exposed to triphenylphosphate (TPP), an organophosphate (OP) flame retardant and plasticizer, had a decreased expression of carboxylesterase (CBE) activity in their peripheral blood monocytes. The mechanisms of CBE inhibition by TPP were investigated using purified hog liver CBE and intact human monocytes. TPP inactivated hog liver CBE in a time and dose dependent manner, and this inhibition was partially reversed by alkaline phosphatase (AP). Analysis of ({sup 14}C)TPP metabolites from the enzymatic reaction by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GM-C) identified phenol as the hydrolytic metabolite of TPP. Human monocytes cultured with ({sup 14}C)TPP also released phenol. In addition to phenol, several phenol metabolites, such as catechol, hydroquinone, 2,2 biphenol and 4,4 biphenol were also generated by monocytes. An identical pattern of these metabolites was also formed from monocytes incubated with radiolabelled phenol. This cellular degradation of TPP was inhibited by diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), but not observed in neutrophil or lymphocyte cultures. Activation of monocytes with gamma interferon (IFN-g), f-Met-Leu-Phe, and serum treated zymosan (STZ) enhanced the levels of phenolic metabolites and, further, shifted the metabolism of TPP towards the formation of the biphenolic metabolites.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies specific for human monocytes, granulocytes and endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, N; MacDonald, S; Slusarenko, M; Beverley, P C

    1984-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies against antigens of human myeloid cells have been produced and thoroughly characterized in terms of their reactions with peripheral blood cells, cell lines, nine lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues and the polypeptides with which they react. UCHM1 and SmO identify antigens present on the majority of blood monocytes and a variable, but lower, proportion of tissue macrophages. From their morphology and location in tissues, these cells appear to be recirculating monocytes. SMO antigen is also present on platelets. In addition, both antibodies stained endothelial cells, SMO in all tissues examined and UCHM1 variably. Biochemical investigation indicated that the UCHM1 antigen is a protein of 52,000 MW while the SMO antigen could not be indentified. The antibodies TG1 and 28 identify antigens mainly present on granulocytes. While mAb 28 reacted with neutrophils, TG1 also stained eosinophils and stained strongly a proportion of monocytes. TG1 also reacted variably with some non-haemopoietic cell lines. Both antibodies reacted predominantly with granulocytes in tissue sections. MAb TG1 precipitated a single polypeptide of 156,000 MW from monocytes and granulocytes, while mAb 28 precipitated non-convalently associated polypeptides of 83,000 and 155,000 MW from granulocytes but only a single molecule from monocytes, corresponding to the lower MW chain of 83,000. The epitope with which mAb 28 reacts appears not to be exposed on the surface of intact monocytes. This suggests that a similar or identical 83,000 MW molecule is made by both neutrophils and monocytes, but that its expression differs according to cell type. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:6389324

  20. The effects of chemotherapeutic drugs on human monocyte-derived dendritic cell differentiation and antigen presentation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, J; Kinn, J; Zirakzadeh, A A; Sherif, A; Norstedt, G; Wikström, A-C; Winqvist, O

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that chemotherapeutic agents may increase the anti-tumoral immune response. Based on the pivotal role of dendritic cells (DCs) in host tumour-specific immune responses, we investigated the effect of commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs dexamethasone, doxorubicin, cisplatin and irinotecan and glucocorticoids on monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs). Dexamethasone displayed the strongest inhibitory effect on DC differentiation. The effect of cisplatin and irinotecan was moderate, while only weak effects were noticed for doxorubicin. Surprisingly, when the functional consequence of chemotherapy-treated CD14+ monocytes and their capacity to activate CD4+ T responders cells were investigated, cisplatin-treated monocytes gave rise to increased T cell proliferation. However, dexamethasone, doxorubicin and irinotecan-pretreated monocytes did not stimulate any increased T cell proliferation. Further investigation of this observation revealed that cisplatin treatment during DC differentiation up-regulated significantly the interferon (IFN)-β transcript. By contrast, no effect was evident on the expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6 or IFN-α transcripts. Blocking IFN-β attenuated the cisplatin-enhanced T cell proliferation significantly. In conclusion, cisplatin treatment enhanced the immune stimulatory ability of human monocytes, a mechanism mediated mainly by the increased production of IFN-β. PMID:23600838

  1. Growth hormone activation of human monocytes for superoxide production but not tumor necrosis factor production, cell adherence, or action against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Warwick-Davies, J; Lowrie, D B; Cole, P J

    1995-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that growth hormone (GH) is a human macrophage-activating factor which primes monocytes for enhanced production of H2O2 in vitro. This report extends our observations to other monocyte functions relevant to infection. We find that GH also primes monocytes for O2- production, to a degree similar to the effect of gamma interferon. Neither macrophage-activating factor alone stimulates monocytes to release bioactive tumor necrosis factor. However, GH, unlike gamma interferon, does not synergize with endotoxin for enhanced tumor necrosis factor production. In further contrast, GH does not alter monocyte adherence or morphology, while phagocytosis and killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by GH-treated monocytes are also unaffected. Therefore, despite the multiplicity of the effects of GH on the immune system in vivo, its effects on human monocytes in vitro appear to be limited to priming for the release of reactive oxygen intermediates. PMID:7591064

  2. Current management of human granulocytic anaplasmosis, human monocytic ehrlichiosis and Ehrlichia ewingii ehrlichiosis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Rachael J; Stephen Dumler, J; Carlyon, Jason A

    2009-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia chaffeensis and Ehrlichia ewingii are emerging tick-borne pathogens and are the causative agents of human granulocytic anaplasmosis, human monocytic ehrlichiosis and E. ewingii ehrlichiosis, respectively. Collectively, these are referred to as human ehrlichioses. These obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens of the family Anaplasmataceae are transmitted by Ixodes spp. or Amblyomma americanum ticks and infect peripherally circulating leukocytes to cause infections that range in clinical spectra from asymptomatic seroconversion to mild, severe or, in rare instances, fatal disease. This review describes: the ecology of each pathogen; the epidemiology, clinical signs and symptoms of the human diseases that each causes; the choice methods for diagnosing and treating human ehrlichioses; recommendations for patient management; and is concluded with suggestions for potential future research. PMID:19681699

  3. Effects of botulinum toxin type D on secretion of tumor necrosis factor from human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, K.; Spriggs, D.; Ohno, T.; Kufe, D.

    1989-05-01

    Botulinum toxins are potent neurotoxins which block the release of neurotransmitters. The effects of these toxins on hematopoietic cells, however, are unknown. Monocytes secrete a variety of polypeptide growth factors, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF). In the study reported here, the effects of botulinum toxin type D on the secretion of TNF from human monocytes were examined. The results demonstrate that biotulinum toxin type D inhibits the release of TNF from monocytes activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. Botulinum toxin type D had no detectable effect on intracellular TNF levels in LPS-treated monocytes, indicating that the effects of this toxin involve the secretory process. This inhibitory effect of botulinum toxin type D on TNF secretion from LPS-treated monocytes was partially reversed by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate or introduction of guanosine 5'-(/gamma/-thio)t-riphosphate into these cells. The results demonstrate that TNF secretion is regulated by at least two distinct guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, one responsible for the activation of phospholiphase C and another which acts as a substrate for botulinum toxin type D. ADP-ribosylation of monocyte membranes by botulinum toxin type D demonstrated the presence of three substrates with M/sub r/s of 45,000, 21,000, and 17,000. While the role of these substrates in exocytosis is unknown, the results suggest that the M/sub r/ 21,000 substrate is involved in a process other than TNF secretion.

  4. A curated compendium of monocyte transcriptome datasets of relevance to human monocyte immunobiology research.

    PubMed

    Rinchai, Darawan; Boughorbel, Sabri; Presnell, Scott; Quinn, Charlie; Chaussabel, Damien

    2016-01-01

    Systems-scale profiling approaches have become widely used in translational research settings. The resulting accumulation of large-scale datasets in public repositories represents a critical opportunity to promote insight and foster knowledge discovery. However, resources that can serve as an interface between biomedical researchers and such vast and heterogeneous dataset collections are needed in order to fulfill this potential. Recently, we have developed an interactive data browsing and visualization web application, the Gene Expression Browser (GXB). This tool can be used to overlay deep molecular phenotyping data with rich contextual information about analytes, samples and studies along with ancillary clinical or immunological profiling data. In this note, we describe a curated compendium of 93 public datasets generated in the context of human monocyte immunological studies, representing a total of 4,516 transcriptome profiles. Datasets were uploaded to an instance of GXB along with study description and sample annotations. Study samples were arranged in different groups. Ranked gene lists were generated based on relevant group comparisons. This resource is publicly available online at http://monocyte.gxbsidra.org/dm3/landing.gsp. PMID:27158452

  5. A curated compendium of monocyte transcriptome datasets of relevance to human monocyte immunobiology research

    PubMed Central

    Rinchai, Darawan; Boughorbel, Sabri; Presnell, Scott; Quinn, Charlie; Chaussabel, Damien

    2016-01-01

    Systems-scale profiling approaches have become widely used in translational research settings. The resulting accumulation of large-scale datasets in public repositories represents a critical opportunity to promote insight and foster knowledge discovery. However, resources that can serve as an interface between biomedical researchers and such vast and heterogeneous dataset collections are needed in order to fulfill this potential. Recently, we have developed an interactive data browsing and visualization web application, the Gene Expression Browser (GXB). This tool can be used to overlay deep molecular phenotyping data with rich contextual information about analytes, samples and studies along with ancillary clinical or immunological profiling data. In this note, we describe a curated compendium of 93 public datasets generated in the context of human monocyte immunological studies, representing a total of 4,516 transcriptome profiles. Datasets were uploaded to an instance of GXB along with study description and sample annotations. Study samples were arranged in different groups. Ranked gene lists were generated based on relevant group comparisons. This resource is publicly available online at http://monocyte.gxbsidra.org/dm3/landing.gsp. PMID:27158452

  6. Aluminum induces inflammatory and proteolytic alterations in human monocytic cell line.

    PubMed

    Ligi, D; Santi, M; Croce, L; Mannello, F

    2015-11-01

    The increasing exposure to aluminum has been linked with the development of different human pathologies (e.g., breast cancer, myofasciitis, neurodegenerative diseases), probably due to the consistent presence of aluminum salts in widely diffused cosmetic products and vaccines. However, the mechanisms underlying immunologic and proliferative alterations still remain unknown. In the present study we investigated the ability of different aluminum compounds (i.e., aluminum chloride vs Imject® Alum, a mixture of aluminum and magnesium hydroxide) to trigger both inflammatory and proteolytic responses in U-937 human monocytic cell line. We demonstrated, by multiplex immunoassay analyses, that monocytic cells treated with both Imject Alum and aluminum chloride showed different and peculiar expression profiles of 27 inflammatory mediators and 5 matrix metalloproteinases, with respect to untreated control cells. In particular, we found dose-dependent significantly increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and chemoattractant chemokines; whereas among metalloproteinases, only collagenolytic protease showed a significant dose-dependent increase in Imject-treated cells with respect to controls and Al-chloride treated cells. Noteworthy, we found only in Imject Alum-treated cells the significant positive correlations among collagenolytic metalloproteinase and increased expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines, suggesting a possible involvement of aluminum in regulating the acute inflammatory responses. In agreement to emerging evidences, for the first time we demonstrated that the treatment of monocyte cells with aluminum-based adjuvant is able to induce an inflammatory status and a proteolytic cascade activation. In fact, the cell treatment with Imject Alum induced increased levels of several cytokines and proteinases, suggesting these monocyte mediators as possible biomarkers for aluminum-linked diseases. The identification of the biochemical pathways

  7. Effects of antidepressants on IP-10 production in LPS-activated THP-1 human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jui-Hsiu; Kuo, Chang-Hung; Yang, Pinchen; Cheng, Kuang-Hung; Wang, Peng-Wei; Chen, Cheng-Chung; Hung, Chih-Hsing

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder and cardiovascular disease are common serious illnesses worldwide. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitors may reduce the mortality of cardiovascular disease patients with comorbid depression. Interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10), a type 1 T helper cell (Th1)-related chemokine, contributes to manifestations of atherosclerosis during cardiovascular inflammations; however, the pathophysiological mechanisms linking cardiovascular disease and effective antidepressants have remained elusive. We investigated the in vitro effects of six different classes of antidepressants on the IP-10 chemokine expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated monocytes, and their detailed intracellular mechanisms. The human monocytes were pretreated with antidepressants (10⁻⁸-10⁻⁵ M) before LPS-stimulation. IP-10 was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and then intracellular signaling was investigated using Western blotting and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Fluoxetine and bupropion suppressed LPS-induced IP-10 expression in monocytes, and they had no cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, fluoxetine inhibited LPS-induced IP-10 expression via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-p38 pathway. Fluoxetine and bupropion could not only treat depression but also reduce Th1-related chemokine IP-10 production in human monocytes. Our results may indicate a possible mechanism related to how particular antidepressants reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  8. Immunomodulating and antiviral activities of Uncaria tomentosa on human monocytes infected with Dengue Virus-2.

    PubMed

    Reis, Sonia Regina I N; Valente, Ligia M M; Sampaio, André L; Siani, Antonio C; Gandini, Mariana; Azeredo, Elzinandes L; D'Avila, Luiz A; Mazzei, José L; Henriques, Maria das Graças M; Kubelka, Claire F

    2008-03-01

    Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC., a large woody vine native to the Amazon and Central American rainforests has been used medicinally by indigenous peoples since ancient times and has scientifically proven immunomodulating, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic and antioxidant activities. Several inflammatory mediators that are implicated in vascular permeability and shock are produced after Dengue Virus (DENV) infection by monocytes, the primary targets for virus replication. Here we assessed the immunoregulatory and antiviral activities from U. tomentosa-derived samples, which were tested in an in vitro DENV infection model. DENV-2 infected human monocytes were incubated with U. tomentosa hydro-alcoholic extract or either its pentacyclic oxindole alkaloid-enriched or non-alkaloid fractions. The antiviral activity was determined by viral antigen (DENV-Ag) detection in monocytes by flow cytometry. Our results demonstrated an in vitro inhibitory activity by both extract and alkaloidal fraction, reducing DENV-Ag+ cell rates in treated monocytes. A multiple microbead immunoassay was applied for cytokine determination (TNF-alpha, IFN-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10) in infected monocyte culture supernatants. The alkaloidal fraction induced a strong immunomodulation: TNF-alpha and IFN-alpha levels were significantly decreased and there was a tendency towards IL-10 modulation. We conclude that the alkaloidal fraction was the most effective in reducing monocyte infection rates and cytokine levels. The antiviral and immunomodulating in vitro effects from U. tomentosa pentacyclic oxindole alkaloids displayed novel properties regarding therapeutic procedures in Dengue Fever and might be further investigated as a promising candidate for clinical application.

  9. Regulation of human peripheral blood monocyte DR antigen expression in vitro by lymphokines and recombinant interferons.

    PubMed Central

    Sztein, M B; Steeg, P S; Johnson, H M; Oppenheim, J J

    1984-01-01

    The in vitro regulation of adult human monocyte DR antigen expression was studied. Normally about 75% of freshly obtained human peripheral blood monocytes express DR antigens as determined by anti-DR and complement-mediated cytotoxicity assays. DR expression on monocytes in unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures persisted to variable degrees for up to 5 d of incubation. However, when the mononuclear cells were thoroughly depleted of nonadherent cells, cultured monocytes consistently exhibited progressively decreased DR expression over 2-5 d of incubation. Readdition of nonadherent cells to the adherent cell population prevented or delayed this decrease in monocyte DR antigen expression. Thus, monocyte DR expression diminished markedly during in vitro incubation; however, the presence of nonadherent cells somehow interfered with this process. In other experiments, peripheral adherent monocytes, which had been cultured for 2-3 d to reduce their DR expression, could be induced to reexpress DR antigens after 2 d of incubation with unpurified lymphokine-containing culture supernatants, recombinant human interferon-alpha, or recombinant human gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). The reinduction of DR expression on human monocytes by lymphokines was abrogated by an antiserum produced to the synthetic N-terminal amino acids of human IFN-gamma, indicating that IFN-gamma is the active mediator in the lymphokine-containing preparations. Monocytes cultured with lymphokines or recombinant interferons also could initiate a significantly greater mixed lymphocyte response than control monocytes. Thus, IFN-gamma-containing lymphokines and recombinant interferons are required to induce human monocyte DR expression and accessory cell capacity in vitro, since in their absence monocytes become DR antigen-deficient. Finally, incubation of unfractionated human mononuclear cells with anti-human IFN-gamma also promoted the loss of monocyte DR expression. These findings suggest

  10. Monocytes are Essential for the Neuroprotective Effect of Human Cord Blood Cells Following Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Womble, T. A.; Green, S.; Shahaduzzaman, M.; Grieco, J.; Sanberg, P. R.; Pennypacker, K. R.; Willing, A. E.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic administration of human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) mononuclear cells (MNC) following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in the rat reduces infarct size and, more importantly, restores motor function. The HUCB cell preparation is composed of immature T-cells, B-cells, monocytes and stem cells. In this study we examined whether the beneficial effects of HUCB injection were attributable to one of these cell types. Male Sprague Dawley rats underwent permanent MCAO followed 48 hours later by intravenous administration of HUCB MNC preparations depleted of either CD14+ monocytes, CD133+ stem cells, CD2+ T-cells or CD19+ B cells. Motor function was measured prior to MCAO and 30 days post-stroke. When CD14+ monocytes were depleted from the HUCB MNC, activity and motor asymmetry were similar to the MCAO only treated animals. Monocyte depletion prevented HUCB cell treatment from reducing infarct size while monocyte enrichment was sufficient to reduce infarct size. Administration of monocyte-depleted HUCB cells did not suppress Iba1 labeling of microglia in the infarcted area relative to treatment with the whole HUCB preparation. These data demonstrate that the HUCB monocytes provide the majority of the efficacy in reducing infarct volume and promoting functional recovery. PMID:24472845

  11. Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Induces Differentiation and Adhesion of Human Monocytes and the Monocytic Cell Line U937

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frostegard, Johan; Nilsson, Jan; Haegerstrand, Anders; Hamsten, Anders; Wigzell, Hans; Gidlund, Magnus

    1990-02-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for development of atherosclerosis. In experimental animals fed a high-cholesterol diet, monocytes adhere to the arterial endothelium and penetrate into the intima where they differentiate into macrophages and ingest lipids thus giving rise to fatty streaks, the earliest type of atherosclerotic plaque. Macrophages express few receptors for normal low density lipo-protein (LDL) but can take up oxidized LDL by way of a scavenger receptor. The present study was designed to investigate the possible role of oxidized LDL in recruitment of resident intimal macrophages. We found that oxidized LDL induced enhanced expression of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules on human monocytes and U937 cells, a well-established system for studies of monocytic differentiation. Oxidized LDL also induced enhanced expression of the surface antigen LEuM3 but caused decreased expression of CD4 antigen, a pattern compatible with expression of a more differentiated macrophage-like phenotype. Oxidized LDL also initiated aggregation of monocytes and U937 cells and stimulated adhesion of U937 cells to cultured endothelial cells. The results indicate that oxidized LDL may contribute to development of atherosclerosis by inducing adhesion of monocytes to the arterial intima and by stimulating intimal monocytes to differentiate into resident macrophages.

  12. The Bioenergetic Health Index is a sensitive measure of oxidative stress in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Balu K; Zhi, Degui; Darley-Usmar, Victor M; Mitchell, Tanecia

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic and bioenergetic dysfunction are associated with oxidative stress and thought to be a common underlying mechanism of chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. Recent findings support an emerging concept that circulating leukocytes and platelets can act as sensors or biomarkers of mitochondrial function in patients subjected to metabolic diseases. It is proposed that systemic stress-induced alterations in leukocyte bioenergetics are the consequence of several factors including reactive oxygen species. This suggests that oxidative stress mediated changes in leukocyte mitochondrial function could be used as an indicator of bioenergetic health in individuals. To test this concept, we investigated the effect of the redox cycling agent, 2,3 dimethoxynaphthoquinone (DMNQ) on the bioenergetic profiles of monocytes isolated from healthy human subjects using the extracellular flux analyzer. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that the bioenergetic health index (BHI), a single value that represents the bioenergetic health of individuals, is dynamically sensitive to oxidative stress in human monocytes. DMNQ decreased monocyte ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiration, and reserve capacity and caused an increase in proton leak and non-mitochondrial respiration compared to monocytes not treated with DMNQ. The BHI was a more sensitive indicator of the DMNQ-dependent changes in bioenergetics than any individual parameter. These data suggest that monocytes are susceptible to oxidative stress mediated by DMNQ and this can be accurately assessed by the BHI. Taken together, our findings suggest that the BHI has the potential to act as a functional biomarker of the impact of systemic oxidative stress in patients with metabolic disorders.

  13. Moesin Functions as a Lipopolysaccharide Receptor on Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Ziad N.; Amar, Salomon; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]), a glycolipid found in the outer membranes of gram-negative bacteria, induces the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 by monocytes/macrophages. The secretion of these biologically active compounds leads to multiple pathological conditions, such as septic shock. There is substantial evidence that chronic exposure to LPS mediates, at least in part, the tissue destruction associated with gram-negative infection. CD14, a 55-kDa protein, has been identified as an LPS receptor. In conjunction with a serum protein, LPS binding protein (LBP), LPS-CD14 interactions mediate many LPS functions in the inflammatory response. However, CD14 lacks a cytoplasmic domain, or any known signal transduction sequence motif, suggesting the existence of another cell surface domain capable of transducing signals. In this paper, we report a second, CD14-independent LPS binding site, which, based on biological activity, appears to be a functional LPS receptor. Cross-linking experiments were performed to identify LPS binding sites. Two molecules were identified: a 55-kDa protein (CD14) and a second, 78-kDa band. Sequencing of the 78-kDa protein by mass spectroscopic analysis revealed 100% homology with moesin (membrane-organizing extension spike protein). Antibody to CD14 induced partial blocking of the LPS response. However, antimoesin monoclonal antibody completely blocked the LPS-induced TNF-α response in human monocytes, without blocking CD14 binding of LPS. Irrelevant isotype controls had no effect. Additional experiments were performed to evaluate the specificity of the antimoesin blocking. Separate experiments evaluated antimoesin effects on monocyte chemotaxis, IL-1 production in response to IL-1 stimulation, and TNF-α secretion in response to Staphylococcus aureus stimulation. Antimoesin blocked only LPS-mediated events. The data suggest that moesin

  14. Inorganic arsenite alters macrophage generation from human peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Teruaki; Ohta, Takami; Fujiwara, Kitao

    2005-03-01

    Inorganic arsenite has caused severe inflammatory chronic poisoning in humans through the consumption of contaminated well water. In this study, we examined the effects of arsenite at nanomolar concentrations on the in vitro differentiation of human macrophages from peripheral blood monocytes. While arsenite was found to induce cell death in a culture system containing macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), macrophages induced by granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF) survived the treatment, but were morphologically, phenotypically, and functionally altered. In particular, arsenite-induced cells expressed higher levels of a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen, HLA-DR, and CD14. They were more effective at inducing allogeneic or autologous T cell responses and responded more strongly to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by inflammatory cytokine release as compared to cells induced by GM-CSF alone. On the other hand, arsenite-induced cells expressed lower levels of CD11b and CD54 and phagocytosed latex beads or zymosan particles less efficiently. We also demonstrated that the optimum amount of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by nM arsenite might play an important role in this abnormal monocyte differentiation. This work may have implications in chronic arsenic poisoning because the total peripheral blood arsenic concentrations of these patients are at nM levels.

  15. Cultured human monocytes synthesize and secrete alpha2-macroglobulin

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    alpha2-Macroglobulin levels in the supernates of cultures of different subpopulations of human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes were assayed by a radioimmunoassay. Unfractionated mononuclear leukocytes produced greater amounts of the macroglobulin (4.0 vs. 0.8 ng/10(6) cells) than did subpopulations enriched in T or B+T lymphocytes, by passage through nylon wool or cotton wool columns, respectively. Still higher concentrations of alpha2-macroglobulin (40 ng/10(6) cells) were measured in the supernates of glass-adherent mononuclear leukocyte cultures. These results suggest that cells of monocyte-macrophage lineage are mainly, if not exclusively, responsible for the appearance of alpha2- macroglobulin in the supernate of human peripheral blood leukocyte cultures. The de novo synthesis and release of alpha2- macroglobulin by cultured monocytes was demonstrated by immunoprecipitation of radioactivity from supernates of 32S-methionine- labeled glass-adherent cells. Antiserum against purified alpha2- macroglobulin was used in both Ouchterlony double diffusion and double antibody precipitation tests. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of immunoprecipitates showed that most of the radioactivity comigrated with authentic alpha2-macroglobulin subunit at about 160,000 daltons. PMID:68095

  16. Atypical Activin A and IL-10 Production Impairs Human CD16+ Monocyte Differentiation into Anti-Inflammatory Macrophages.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Érika; Domínguez-Soto, Ángeles; Nieto, Concha; Flores-Sevilla, José Luis; Pacheco-Blanco, Mariana; Campos-Peña, Victoria; Meraz-Ríos, Marco A; Vega, Miguel A; Corbí, Ángel L; Sánchez-Torres, Carmen

    2016-02-01

    Human CD14(++)CD16(-) and CD14(+/lo)CD16(+) monocyte subsets comprise 85 and 15% of blood monocytes, respectively, and are thought to represent distinct stages in the monocyte differentiation pathway. However, the differentiation fates of both monocyte subsets along the macrophage (Mϕ) lineage have not yet been elucidated. We have now evaluated the potential of CD14(++) CD16(-) and CD16(+) monocytes to differentiate and to be primed toward pro- or anti-inflammatory Mϕs upon culture with GM-CSF or M-CSF, respectively (subsequently referred to as GM14, M14, GM16, or M16). Whereas GM16 and GM14 were phenotypic and functionally analogous, M16 displayed a more proinflammatory profile than did M14. Transcriptomic analyses evidenced that genes associated with M-CSF-driven Mϕ differentiation (including FOLR2, IL10, IGF1, and SERPINB2) are underrepresented in M16 with respect to M14. The preferential proinflammatory skewing of M16 relative to M14 was found to be mediated by the secretion of activin A and the low levels of IL-10 produced by M16. In fact, activin A receptor blockade during the M-CSF-driven differentiation of CD16(+) monocytes, or addition of IL-10-containing M14-conditioned medium, significantly enhanced their expression of anti-inflammatory-associated molecules while impairing their acquisition of proinflammatory-related markers. Thus, we propose that M-CSF drives CD14(++)CD16- monocyte differentiation into bona fide anti-inflammatory Mϕs in a self-autonomous manner, whereas M-CSF-treated CD16(+) monocytes generate Mϕs with a skewed proinflammatory profile by virtue of their high activin A expression unless additional anti-inflammatory stimuli such as IL-10 are provided. PMID:26729812

  17. Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Infection of the Three Monocyte Subsets Contributes to Viral Burden in Humans

    PubMed Central

    de Castro-Amarante, Maria Fernanda; McKinnon, Katherine; Washington Parks, Robyn; Galli, Veronica; Omsland, Maria; Andresen, Vibeke; Massoud, Raya; Brunetto, Giovanna; Caruso, Breanna; Venzon, David; Jacobson, Steven

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because the viral DNA burden correlates with disease development, we investigated the contribution of monocyte subsets (classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocytes) to the total viral burden in 22 human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected individuals by assessing their infectivity status, frequency, as well as chemotactic and phagocytic functions. All three monocyte subsets sorted from HTLV-1-infected individuals were positive for viral DNA, and the frequency of classical monocytes was lower in the blood of HTLV-1-infected individuals than in that of uninfected individuals, while the expression levels of the chemokine receptors CCR5, CXCR3, and CX3CR1 in classical monocytes were higher in HTLV-1-infected individuals than uninfected individuals; the percentage of intermediate monocytes and their levels of chemokine receptor expression did not differ between HTLV-1-infected and uninfected individuals. However, the capacity of intermediate monocytes to migrate to CCL5, the ligand for CCR5, was higher, and a higher proportion of nonclassical monocytes expressed CCR1, CXCR3, and CX3CR1. The level of viral DNA in the monocyte subsets correlated with the capacity to migrate to CCL2, CCL5, and CX3CL1 for classical monocytes, with lower levels of phagocytosis for intermediate monocytes, and with the level of viral DNA in CD8+ and CD4+ T cells for nonclassical monocytes. These data suggest a model whereby HTLV-1 infection augments the number of classical monocytes that migrate to tissues and become infected and the number of infected nonclassical monocytes that transmit virus to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These results, together with prior findings in a macaque model of HTLV-1 infection, support the notion that infection of monocytes by HTLV-1 is likely a requisite for viral persistence in humans. IMPORTANCE Monocytes have been implicated in immune regulation and disease progression in patients with HTLV-1-associated inflammatory diseases. We detected

  18. Regulated expression of platelet factor 4 in human monocytes--role of PARs as a quantitatively important monocyte activation pathway.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Andreas; Rhyn, Petra; Schoedon, Gabriela; Schaer, Dominik J

    2005-07-01

    Human mononuclear phagocytes have recently been shown to express constitutively and even more so, upon stimulation with bacteria, fungi, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), zymosan, or thrombin platelet basic protein (PBP). This CXC chemokine as well as platelet factor 4 (PF4), which is located genomically at a short distance from the PBP, were previously considered to be specific markers for the megakaryocyte cell lineage. Both chemokines have signaling and antimicrobial activity. In the present studies, transcriptional and expressional regulation of PF4 and related chemokines was studied in human monocytes. As shown by quantitative mRNA analysis, Western blots, radioimmunoprecipitation of cell extracts, and immunofluorescence and quantitatively with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, human monocytes express PF4 in the same order of magnitude as the known, regulated CXC chemokine interleukin (IL)-8. Expression of PF4 is up-regulated at the mRNA and protein level by thrombin and mediated by proteinase-activated receptors (PARs), resulting in a 32- to 128-fold higher mRNA level and leading to an up-to-sixfold increase of the peptide concentration in monocyte culture supernatants. Thrombin and the synthetic ligand of PAR-1 and PAR-2, SFLLRN, also induced comparable increases in the levels of mRNA for PBP, IL-8, regulated on activation, normal T expressed and secreted (RANTES), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and macrophage-inflammatory protein-1alpha and increased synthesis of these chemokines as shown by immunofluorescence or a quantitative immunobead-based method. The induction of increased mRNA levels for all chemokines by SFLLRN was unsurpassed by LPS, zymosan, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and IL-1. Activation of monocytes through PARs represents an alternate activation mechanism, independent from IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, or other signaling pathways. PMID:15788441

  19. Immunoregulatory adherent cells in human tuberculosis: radiation-sensitive antigen-specific suppression by monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinhenz, M.E.; Ellner, J.J.

    1985-07-01

    In human tuberculosis, adherent mononuclear cells (AMC) selectively depress in vitro responses to the mycobacterial antigen tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD). The phenotype of this antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell was characterized by examining the functional activity of adherent cells after selective depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or OKM1-reactive monocytes. Adherent cell suppression was studied in the (/sup 3/H)thymidine-incorporation microculture assay by using T cells rigorously depleted of T cells with surface receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (T gamma cells) as antigen-responsive cells. PPD-induced (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation by these non gamma T cells was uniformly reduced (mean, 42% +/- 10% (SD)) when autologous AMC were added to non gamma T cells at a ratio of 1:2. Antigen-specific suppression by AMC was not altered by depletion of sheep erythrocyte-rosetting T cells or treatment with indomethacin. However, AMC treated with OKM1 and complement or gamma irradiation (1,500 rads) no longer suppressed tuberculin responses in vitro. These studies identify the antigen-specific adherent suppressor cell in tuberculosis as an OKM1-reactive, non-erythrocyte-rosetting monocyte. The radiosensitivity of this monocyte immunoregulatory function may facilitate its further definition.

  20. Nitric oxide production in fluoro-edenite treated mouse monocyte-macrophage cultures.

    PubMed

    Cardile, Venera; Proietti, Lidia; Panico, Annamaria; Lombardo, Laura

    2004-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated the involvement of NO in the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects caused by fluoro-edenite in mouse monocyte-macrophage cell line J774. Fluoro-edenite is a new asbestos-like amphibole present in the benmoreitic lavas recently extracted from stone quarries in Biancavilla, a village located in the Etnean Volcanic Complex (Catania, Italy) of eastern Sicily, in which an epidemiological survey evidenced a cluster of cases of the mortality due to pleural mesothelioma. Fluoro-edenite appears as a probable carcinogenic agent. Nitrite and nitrate concentration (NO) in the supernatant was quantified by colorimetric assay based on the Griess reaction and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthetase) expression was determined by immunostaining in mouse monocyte-macrophage cell line J774 treated with different concentrations of fluoro-edenite (5, 50 and 100 microg/ml) for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. Parallel experiments were performed treating the cultures also with lipopolysaccharides (LPS), used as inflammation-inducing molecule. In our experimental conditions, fluoro-edenite did not modify the level of NO and the expression of iNOS at the experimental used concentrations for 24, 48 and 72 h. These parameters were significantly modified at the higher doses (50 and 100 microg/ml) of fluoro-edenite for 96 h and were further more increased, in concentration- and time-dependent manner, when cell cultures were treated with fluoro-edenite and LPS. These findings provide convincing evidence that NO is involved in the fluoro-edenite-induced cytotoxicity and geno-toxicity in mouse monocyte-macrophage cell line J774 when the fiber remain for longer times and particularly in cultures treated with LPS, demonstrating that inflammatory disorders appear to increase the risk for lung cancer induced by fluoro-edenite probably by the involvement of NO.

  1. CD13 mediates phagocytosis in human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Licona-Limón, Ileana; Garay-Canales, Claudia A; Muñoz-Paleta, Ofelia; Ortega, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    CD13 is a membrane-bound ectopeptidase, highly expressed on monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. CD13 is involved in diverse functions, including degradation of peptide mediators, cellular adhesion, migration, viral endocytosis, signaling, and positive modulation of phagocytosis mediated by FcγRs and other phagocytic receptors. In this work, we explored whether besides acting as an accessory receptor, CD13 by itself is a primary phagocytic receptor. We found that hCD13 mediates efficient phagocytosis of large particles (erythrocytes) modified so as to interact with the cell only through CD13 in human macrophages and THP-1 monocytic cells. The extent of this phagocytosis is comparable with the phagocytosis mediated through the canonical phagocytic receptor FcγRI. Furthermore, we demonstrated that hCD13 expression in the nonphagocytic cell line HEK293 is sufficient to enable these cells to internalize particles bound through hCD13. CD13-mediated phagocytosis is independent of other phagocytic receptors, as it occurs in the absence of FcγRs, CR3, and most phagocytic receptors. Phagocytosis through CD13 is independent of its enzymatic activity but is dependent on actin rearrangement and activation of PI3K and is partially dependent on Syk activation. Moreover, the cross-linking of CD13 with antibodies rapidly induced pSyk in human macrophages. Finally, we observed that antibody-mediated cross-linking of hCD13, expressed in the murine macrophage-like J774 cell line, induces production of ROS. These results demonstrate that CD13 is a fully competent phagocytic receptor capable of mediating internalization of large particles.

  2. Expression and regulation of Schlafen (SLFN) family members in primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells.

    PubMed

    Puck, Alexander; Aigner, Regina; Modak, Madhura; Cejka, Petra; Blaas, Dieter; Stöckl, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Schlafen (SLFN/Slfn) family members have been investigated for their involvement in fundamental cellular processes including growth regulation, differentiation and control of viral replication. However, most research has been focused on the characterization of Slfns within the murine system or in human cell lines. Since little is known about SLFNs in primary human immune cells, we set out to analyze the expression and regulation of the six human SLFN genes in monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) and T cells. Comparison of SLFN gene expression across these three cell types showed high mRNA expression of SLFN11 in monocytes and moDCs and high SLFN5 expression in T cells, indicating functional importance within these cell types. Differentiation of monocytes to moDCs leads to the gradual upregulation of SLFN12L and SLFN13 while SLFN12 levels were decreased by differentiation stimuli. Stimulation of moDCs via human rhinovirus, lipopolysaccharide, or IFN-α lead to strong upregulation of SLFN gene expression, while peptidoglycan poorly stimulated regulation of both SLFNs and the classical interferon-stimulated gene MxA. T cell activation was found to downregulate the expression of SLFN5, SLFN12 and SLFN12L, which was reversible upon addition of exogenous IFN-α. In conclusion, we demonstrate, that SLFN gene upregulation is mainly dependent on autocrine type I interferon signaling in primary human immune cells. Rapid decrease of SLFN expression levels following T cell receptor stimulation indicates a role of SLFNs in the regulation of human T cell quiescence. PMID:26623250

  3. A novel in vitro human microglia model: characterization of human monocyte-derived microglia.

    PubMed

    Etemad, Samar; Zamin, Rasheeda Mohd; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Filgueira, Luis

    2012-07-30

    Microglia are the innate immune cells of the central nervous system. They help maintaining physiological homeostasis and contribute significantly to inflammatory responses in the course of infection, injury and degenerative processes. To date, there is no standardized simple model available to investigate the biology of human microglia. The aim of this study was to establish a new human microglia model. For that purpose, human peripheral blood monocytes were cultured in serum free medium in the presence of M-CSF, GM-CSF, NGF and CCL2 to generate monocyte-derived microglia (M-MG). M-MG were clearly different in morphology, phenotype and function from freshly isolated monocytes, cultured monocytes in the absence of the cytokines and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (M-DC) cultured in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4. M-MG acquired a ramified morphology with primary and secondary processes. M-MG displayed a comparable phenotype to the human microglia cell line HMC3, expressing very low levels of CD45, CD14 and HLA-DR, CD11b and CD11c; and undetectable levels of CD40, CD80 and CD83, and a distinct pattern of chemokine receptors (positive for CCR1, CCR2, CCR4, CCR5, CXCR1, CXCR3, CX3CR1; negative for CCR6 and CCR7). In comparison with M-DC, M-MG displayed lower T-lymphocyte stimulatory capacity, as well as lower phagocytosis activity. The described protocol for the generation of human monocyte-derived microglia is feasible, well standardized and reliable, as it uses well defined culture medium and recombinant cytokines, but no serum or conditioned medium. This protocol will certainly be very helpful for future studies investigating the biology and pathology of human microglia. PMID:22659341

  4. Ciprofloxacin inhibits advanced glycation end products-induced adhesion molecule expression on human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mori, S; Takahashi, HK; Liu, K; Wake, H; Zhang, J; Liu, R; Yoshino, T; Nishibori, M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) subtypes, proteins or lipids that become glycated after exposure to sugars, can induce complications in diabetes. Among the various AGE subtypes, glyceraldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-2) and glycolaldehyde-derived AGE (AGE-3) are involved in inflammation in diabetic patients; monocytes are activated by these AGEs. Ciprofloxacin (CIP), a fluorinated 4-quinolone, is often used clinically to treat infections associated with diabetis due to its antibacterial properties. It also modulates immune responses in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) therefore we investigated the involvement of AGEs in these effects. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 was examined by flow cytometry. The production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cAMP were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression was determined by Western blot analysis. Lymphocyte proliferation was determined by [3H]-thymidine uptake. KEY RESULTS CIP induced PGE2 production in monocytes, irrespective of the presence of AGE-2 and AGE-3, by enhancing COX-2 expression; this led to an elevation of intracellular cAMP in monocytes. Non-selective and selective COX-2 inhibitors, indomethacin and NS398, inhibited CIP-induced PGE2 and cAMP production. In addition, CIP inhibited AGE-2- and AGE-3-induced expressions of ICAM-1, B7.1, B7.2 and CD40 in monocytes, the production of TNF-α and IFN-γ and lymphocyte proliferation in PBMC. Indomethacin, NS398 and a protein kinase A inhibitor, H89, inhibited the actions of CIP. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS CIP exerts immunomodulatory activity via PGE2, implying therapeutic potential of CIP for the treatment of AGE-2- and AGE-3-induced inflammatory responses. PMID:20718752

  5. Exosomes derived from alcohol-treated hepatocytes horizontally transfer liver specific miRNA-122 and sensitize monocytes to LPS

    PubMed Central

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Bala, Shashi; Kodys, Karen; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte damage and inflammation in monocytes/macrophages are central to the pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis (AH). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate all of these processes. MiRNA-122 is abundantly expressed in hepatocytes while monocytes/macrophages have low levels. The role of exosomes in AH and possible cross talk between hepatocyte-derived exosomes and immune cells is not explored yet. Here, we show that the number of exosomes significantly increases in the sera of healthy individuals after alcohol binge drinking and in mice after binge or chronic alcohol consumption. Exosomes isolated from sera after alcohol consumption or from in vitro ethanol-treated hepatocytes contained miRNA-122. Exosomes derived from ethanol-treated Huh7.5 cells were taken up by the recipients THP1 monocytes and horizontally transferred a mature form of liver-specific miRNA-122. In vivo, liver mononuclear cells and Kupffer cells from alcohol-fed mice had increased miRNA-122 levels. In monocytes, miRNA-122 transferred via exosomes inhibited the HO-1 pathway and sensitized to LPS stimulation and increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Finally, inflammatory effects of exosomes from ethanol-treated hepatocytes were prevented by using RNA interference via exosome-mediated delivery of a miRNA-122 inhibitor. These results demonstrate that first, exosomes mediate communication between hepatocytes and monocytes/macrophages and second, hepatocyte-derived miRNA-122 can reprogram monocytes inducing sensitization to LPS. PMID:25973575

  6. Apoptosis of human monocytes and macrophages by Mycobacterium avium sonicate.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, T; Catanzaro, A; Rao, S P

    1997-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an intracellular organism which multiplies predominantly within human macrophages. This organism has previously been shown to induce apoptosis in human macrophages. With a view to identifying M. avium components that induce cell death in infected host cells, sonicated extracts of M. avium as well as individual components isolated from the M. avium sonicate were tested in various assays with a human monocytic cell line (THP-1). THP-1 cells incubated with M. avium sonicate showed significantly reduced viability after a 2-day exposure compared to control cells incubated with media alone. This effect was dose dependent, with only 6.6% +/- 5.2% and 48.8% +/- 10.3% of the cells being viable by trypan blue exclusion at 600 and 300 microg/ml, respectively. Control cells, on the other hand, exhibited a viability of 98.8% +/- 1.0%. In addition, an 80% ammonium sulfate fraction of the M. avium sonicate and the previously characterized 68-kDa protein were found to have similar effects on THP-1 cells. In both cases, the reduction in viability was due to apoptosis characterized by chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation by agarose gel electrophoresis, or terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated d-UTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and release of nuclear matrix protein (NMP) into the culture medium. M. avium sonicate-induced apoptosis of THP-1 cells was completely inhibited by the commonly used antioxidants pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) and butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), indicating that the generation of free oxygen radicals may be responsible for inducing cell death. M. avium sonicate was found to induce apoptosis of monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) as well. This effect was not reversed in the presence of PDTC and was not accompanied with DNA fragmentation when determined by agarose gel electrophoresis, as seen in the case of THP-1 cells. However, these MDMs were found to contain fragmented DNA by TUNEL. These findings suggest that the mechanism

  7. Modulation of the expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in stimulated human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlin-Hansen, L.; Eskeland, T.; Kolset, S.O. )

    1989-09-05

    Proteoglycan biosynthesis was studied in human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) after exposure to typical activators of the monocyte/macrophage system: interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). By morphological examination, both monocytes and MDM were stimulated by these activators. Treatment with IFN-gamma resulted in a slight decrease in the expression of (35S)chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) in both monocytes and MDM, whereas LPS treatment increased the (35S)CSPG expression 1.8 and 2.2 times, respectively. PMA, in contrast, decreased the CSPG expression 0.4 times in monocytes, whereas MDM were stimulated to increase the biosynthesis 1.9 times. An increase in the sulfate density of the chondroitin sulfate chains was evident following differentiation of monocytes into MDM due to the expression of disulfated disaccharide units of the chondroitin sulfate E type (CS-E). However, monocytes exposed to PMA did also express disaccharides of the chondroitin sulfate E type. Furthermore, the expression of CS-E in MDM was increased 2 times following PMA treatment. An inactive phorbol ester, phorbol 12,13-diacetate, did not affect the expression of CS-E in either monocytes or MDM when compared with control cultures, suggesting that protein kinase C-dependent signal pathways may be involved in the regulation of sulfation of CSPG. Exposure to LPS or IFN-gamma did not lead to any changes in the sulfation of the chondroitin sulfate chains.

  8. Cannabidiol induced a contrasting pro-apoptotic effect between freshly isolated and precultured human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hsin-Ying; Chang, An-Chi; Wang, Chia-Chi; Kuo, Fu-Hua; Lee, Chi-Ya; Liu, Der-Zen; Jan, Tong-Rong

    2010-08-01

    It has been documented that cannabidiol (CBD) induced apoptosis in a variety of transformed cells, including lymphocytic and monocytic leukemias. In contrast, a differential sensitivity between normal lymphocytes and monocytes to CBD-mediated apoptosis has been reported. The present study investigated the pro-apoptotic effect of CBD on human peripheral monocytes that were either freshly isolated or precultured for 72 h. CBD markedly enhanced apoptosis of freshly isolated monocytes in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, whereas precultured monocytes were insensitive. By comparison, both cells were sensitive to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. CBD significantly diminished the cellular thiols and glutathione in freshly isolated monocytes. The apoptosis induced by CBD was abrogated in the presence of N-acetyl-{sub L}-cysteine, a precursor of glutathione. In addition, precultured monocytes contained a significantly greater level of glutathione and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) compared to the freshly isolated cells. The HO-1 competitive inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin partially but significantly restored the sensitivity of precultured monocytes to CBD-mediated apoptosis. Collectively, our results demonstrated a contrasting pro-apoptotic effect of CBD between precultured and freshly isolated monocytes, which was closely associated with the cellular level of glutathione and the antioxidative capability of the cells.

  9. The effect of HA, TCP and ALCAP bioceramic capsules on the viability of human monocyte and monocyte derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ross, L; Benghuzzi, H; Tucci, M; Callender, M; Cason, Z; Spence, L

    1996-01-01

    The relationship between various bioceramics used in surgical implantation and inflammatory cellular response has not been fully elucidated. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of various biomedical ceramics such as tricalcium phosphate (TCP), hydroxyapatite (HA), and aluminum-calcium-phosphorous oxide (ALCAP) on the adherence and viability of human monocyte and monocyte derived macrophages in vitro. The monocytes were isolated from human peripheral blood and seeded at a density of 5 x 10(5) cells/well according to standard laboratory procedures. Cells were considered macrophages after remaining in culture for 24 hours. Cells were then plated in each microtiter well loaded with ceramic capsules (HA, TCP and ALCAP) and buffered control. At the end of 1, 2, 3, and 7 days the viability and cell number of monocyte or monocyte derived macrophages were determined using an established assay. Cell number was determined in control wells with known amounts of cell number, a standard curve was generated by plotting absorbance units versus cell number. Biochemical analysis was performed on the aliquots obtained from the experimental and control wells at the end of each phase of the investigation. The data from this experiment suggest that: (I) monocytes and macrophages are capable of adhering to the surface of HA, TCP and ALCAP in an in vitro environment for over a 7 day period. (II) Long term incubation of ceramic capsules with macrophages revealed that the cells experienced gradual disassociation phenomenon with a greater number of cell detachment seen in the ALCAP contained wells. (III) SEM analysis of representative capsules demonstrated that there is an increase in the number of micropores on the surface of the materials after contacting a cellular environment. This observation suggest that the material surface has been modified (TCP > HA = ALCAP). (IV) Biochemical analysis of aliquots at the end of each phase showed a significant change (P < 0

  10. Butyrate affects differentiation, maturation and function of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Millard, A L; Mertes, P M; Ittelet, D; Villard, F; Jeannesson, P; Bernard, J

    2002-01-01

    We studied the in vitro effects of butyric acid on differentiation, maturation and function of dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages (MΦ) generated from human monocytes. A non-toxic dose of butyrate was shown to alter the phenotypic differentiation process of DC as assessed by a persistence of CD14, and a decreased CD54, CD86 and HLA class II expression. The more immature differentiation stage of treated cells was confirmed further by their increased phagocytic capability, their altered capacity to produce IL-10 and IL-12, and their weak allostimulatory abilities. Butyrate also altered DC terminal maturation, regardless of the maturation inducer, as demonstrated by a strong down-regulation of CD83, a decreased expression of CD40, CD86 and HLA class II. Similarly, butyrate altered MΦ differentiation, down-regulating the expression of the restricted membrane antigens and reducing the phagocytic capacity of treated cells. To investigate further the mechanism by which butyrate hampers the monocyte dual differentiation pathway, we studied the effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 alone or in combination with butyrate on the phenotypic features of DC. Unlike 1,25(OH)2D3, butyrate inhibited DC differentiation without redirecting it towards MΦ. Combined treatment gave rise to a new cell subset (CD14high, CD86 and HLA-DRlow) phenotypically distinct from monocytes. These results reveal an alternative mechanism of inhibition of DC and MΦ differentiation. Altogether, our data demonstrate a novel immune suppression property of butyrate that may modulate both inflammatory and immune responses and support further the interest for butyrate and its derivatives as new immunotherapeutic agents. PMID:12390312

  11. Distinct Responses of Human Monocyte Subsets to Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia1

    PubMed Central

    Serbina, Natalya V.; Cherny, Mathew; Shi, Chao; Bleau, Sharon A.; Collins, Nancy H.; Young, James W.; Pamer, Eric G.

    2009-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an environmental fungus that causes life-threatening infections in neutropenic patients. In the absence of intact innate immunity, inhaled A. fumigatus spores (conidia) germinate in the lung, forming hyphae that invade blood vessels and disseminate to other tissues. Although macrophages and neutrophils are postulated to provide defense against invasive fungal infection, animal models and human studies suggest that circulating monocytes also contribute to antifungal immunity. Although human monocyte subsets, defined as either CD14+CD16− or CD14+ CD16+, have been extensively characterized, their respective roles during fungal infection remain undefined. We isolated CD14+CD16− and CD14+CD16+ monocytes from healthy allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation donors and compared their ability to phagocytose and inhibit A. fumigatus conidia. Both monocyte subsets efficiently phagocytose conidia, but only CD14+CD16− monocytes inhibit conidial germination yet secrete little TNF. In contrast CD14+CD16+ do not inhibit conidial germination and secrete large amounts of TNF. Although CD14+CD16− and CD14+CD16+ monocytes differ in their response to dormant conidia, responses are similar if conidia are already germinated at the time of monocyte uptake. Our study demonstrates that functional CD14+CD16− and CD14+CD16+ monocytes can be isolated from allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation donors and that these subsets differ in their response to A. fumigatus conidia. PMID:19635902

  12. The selective binding and transmigration of monocytes through the junctional complexes of human endothelium

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Human monocytes show a high affinity for vascular endothelium both in vitro and in vivo. To explore monocyte-endothelial interaction in greater detail, we have developed a new in vitro model for growth of human endothelial cells (EC). Human umbilical vein EC (HUVEC) cultured upon collagen gels form confluent monolayers of EC that bind silver at their intercellular border similar to cells in situ. Intercellular junctional structures, both adherens and tight junctions, were identified. In contrast, HUVEC grown on plastic surfaces did not stain with silver. The silver-staining characteristic of EC-collagen monolayers was reversible and related to their in vitro maturation and senescence. Silver staining of EC borders provided a grid by which the location of monocyte binding to the luminal surface of individual EC could be assessed. Using this technique, we found that monocytes preferentially bound to the margins of EC, in approximation to the silver-staining junctions. These results suggest that EC determinants recognized by monocytes occur in a unique topographical distribution on the apical face of EC. After binding, monocytes migrated through the EC monolayers at high basal rates. The lack of penetration of collagen gels in the absence of an EC monolayer suggested the generation of EC- specific chemotactic signal(s). Monocytes were observed to pass between EC without evidence of disruption of the monolayer. Silver stain remained present during all phases of migration, and under transmission electron microscopy, junctional complexes were found proximal to monocytes that had just completed their passage through the monolayer. After orientation to the basal surface of the EC monolayer, monocytes migrated randomly into the underlying collagen gel. Monocyte adherence, penetration, migration, and long term survival can be studied under these conditions. PMID:3183575

  13. Human monocyte CD14 is upregulated by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Landmann, R; Knopf, H P; Link, S; Sansano, S; Schumann, R; Zimmerli, W

    1996-01-01

    Membrane CD14 is involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced monocyte activation; it binds LPS, and antibodies against CD14 block the effects of low-dose LPS. It is unknown how LPS regulates its own receptor CD14 in vitro. Therefore, we investigated the effects of LPS on CD14 mRNA and membrane and soluble CD14 (mCD14 and sCD14, respectively) in human monocytes and macrophages. No changes were observed during the first 3 h of LPS stimulation. After 6 to 15 h, LPS weakly reduced CD14 mRNA and mCD14 and transiently enhanced sCD14 release. A 2-day incubation with LPS caused increases in the levels of CD14 mRNA (2-fold), mCD14 (2-fold), sCD14 (1.5-fold), and LPS-fluorescein isothiocyanate binding (1.5-fold); a 5-h incubation with LPS was sufficient to induce the late effects on mCD14 and sCD14. The maximal effect on mCD14 and sCD14 was reached with > or = 1 ng of LPS per ml; the proportional distribution of the two sCD14 isoforms was not modified by LPS. Besides rough and smooth LPS, lipid A, heat-killed Escherichia coli, lipoteichoic acid, and Staphylococcus aureus cell wall extract (10 micrograms/ml) caused similar increases of mCD14. The LPS effect was blocked by polymyxin B but not by anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha, anti-interleukin-6, anti-gamma interferon, and anti-LPS-binding protein. LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha production was abolished after a second 4-h challenge. In contrast, the LPS-induced increases CD14 mRNA, mCD14, and sCD14 were stronger and appeared earlier after a second LPS challenge. In conclusion, CD14 is transcriptionally upregulated by LPS and other bacterial cell wall constituents. PMID:8613389

  14. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase mediates IL-8 induction by the ribotoxin deoxynivalenol in human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Zahidul; Gray, Jennifer S.; Pestka, James J. . E-mail: pestka@msu.edu

    2006-06-15

    The effects of the ribotoxic trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated IL-8 expression were investigated in cloned human monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). DON (250 to 1000 ng/ml) induced both IL-8 mRNA and IL-8 heteronuclear RNA (hnRNA), an indicator of IL-8 transcription, in the human U937 monocytic cell line in a concentration-dependent manner. Expression of IL-8 hnRNA, mRNA and protein correlated with p38 phosphorylation and was completely abrogated by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. DON at 500 ng/ml similarly induced p38-dependent IL-8 protein and mRNA expression in PBMC cultures from healthy volunteers. Significantly increased IL-6 and IL-1{beta} intracellular protein and mRNA expression was also observed in PBMC treated with DON (500 ng/ml) which were also partially p38-dependent. Flow cytometry of PBMC revealed that DON-induced p38 phosphorylation varied among individuals relative to both threshold toxin concentrations (25-100 ng/ml) and relative increases in percentages of phospho-p38{sup +} cells. DON-induced p38 activation occurred exclusively in the CD14{sup +} monocyte population. DON was devoid of agonist activity for human Toll-like receptors 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8 and 9. However, two other ribotoxins, emetine and anisomycin, induced p38 phosphorylation in PBMC similarly to DON. Taken together, these data suggest that (1) p38 activation was required for induction of IL-8 and proinflammatory gene expression in the monocyte and (2) DON induced p38 activation in human monocytes via the ribotoxic stress response.

  15. Release of salusin-beta from human monocytes/macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kengo; Fujimoto, Kazumi; Koyama, Takatoshi; Shichiri, Masayoshi

    2010-06-01

    the release of salusin-beta. These data demonstrate that salusin-beta, which induces macrophage foam cell formation, is secreted in its authentic form from human monocytes/macrophages.

  16. Differences in PGE2 Production between Primary Human Monocytes and Differentiated Macrophages: Role of IL-1β and TRIF/IRF3

    PubMed Central

    Romantseva, Tatiana; Golding, Hana; Zaitseva, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is induced in vivo by bacterial products including TLR agonists. To determine whether PGE2 is induced directly or via IL-1β, human monocytes and macrophages were cultured with LPS or with Pam3CSK4 in presence of caspase-1 inhibitor, ZVAD, or IL-1R antagonist, Kineret. TLR agonists induced PGE2 in macrophages exclusively via IL-1β-independent mechanisms. In contrast, ZVAD and Kineret reduced PGE2 production in LPS-treated (but not in Pam3CSK4-treated) monocytes, by 30–60%. Recombinant human IL-1β augmented COX-2 and mPGES-1 mRNA and PGE2 production in LPS-pretreated monocytes but not in un-primed or Pam3CSK4-primed monocytes. This difference was explained by the finding that LPS but not Pam3CSK4 induced phosphorylation of IRF3 in monocytes suggesting activation of the TRIF signaling pathway. Knocking down TRIF, TRAM, or IRF3 genes by siRNA inhibited IL-1β-induced COX-2 and mPGES-1 mRNA. Blocking of TLR4 endocytosis during LPS priming prevented the increase in PGE2 production by exogenous IL-1β. Our data showed that TLR2 agonists induce PGE2 in monocytes independently from IL-1β. In the case of TLR4, IL-1β augments PGE2 production in LPS-primed monocytes (but not in macrophages) through a mechanism that requires TLR4 internalization and activation of the TRIF/IRF3 pathway. These findings suggest a key role for blood monocytes in the rapid onset of fever in animals and humans exposed to bacterial products and some novel adjuvants. PMID:24870145

  17. Attractin, a dipeptidyl peptidase IV/CD26-like enzyme, is expressed on human peripheral blood monocytes and potentially influences monocyte function.

    PubMed

    Wrenger, Sabine; Faust, Jürgen; Friedrich, Daniel; Hoffmann, Torsten; Hartig, Roland; Lendeckel, Uwe; Kähne, Thilo; Thielitz, Anja; Neubert, Klaus; Reinhold, Dirk

    2006-09-01

    The ectoenzyme dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DP IV; CD26) was shown to play a crucial role in T cell activation. Several compounds inhibiting DP IV-like activity are currently under investigation for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, colitis ulcerosa, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, and other diseases. In the present study, we show that human peripheral blood monocytes express a DP IV-like enzyme activity, which could be inhibited completely by the synthetic DP IV inhibitor Lys[Z(NO(2))]-thiazolidide. DP IV immunoreactivity was not detectable on monocytes, and DP IV transcript levels of monocytes were near the detection limit of quantitative polymerase chain reaction. However, monocytes exhibit a strong mRNA expression of the multifunctional DP IV-like ectoenzyme attractin and were highly positive for attractin in flow cytometric analysis. Fluorescence microscopy clearly demonstrated that attractin is located on the cell surface of monocytes. Attractin immunoprecipitates hydrolyzed Gly-Pro-pNA, indicating that monocyte-expressed attractin possesses DP IV-like activity. Inhibitor kinetic studies with purified human plasma attractin revealed that Lys[Z(NO(2))]-thiazolidide not only inhibits DP IV but also attractin (50% inhibition concentration=8.45 x 10(-9) M). Studying the influence of this inhibitor on monocyte functions, we observed a clear reduction of cell adhesion to fibronectin-coated culture plates in the presence of Lys[Z(NO(2))]-thiazolidide. Moreover, this inhibitor significantly modulates the production of interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist, IL-6, and transforming growth factor-beta1 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated monocyte cultures. In summary, here, we demonstrate for the first time expression of attractin on monocytes and provide first data suggesting that drugs directed to DP IV-like enzyme activity could affect monocyte function via attractin inhibition. PMID:16835316

  18. Isolation and cryopreservation of human peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, T; Nickolov, C; Buckureshtliev, A; Mincheff, M; Tsoney, L; Terziev, R; Popov, D

    1986-12-01

    A modification of the Freundlich and Avdalovic method (J. Immunol. Methods 62, 31 (1983] is reported. Buffy coats, separated and pooled together, are used for isolation of monocytes (70% yield, 100% purity). Cell density of working suspension is increased up to 0.65 X 10(9) cells/75 cm2 surface by multiplication of the active fibronectin sites. For the purpose, cryoprecipitate is used instead of plasma for coating the glass-gelatin surface. Monocytes, isolated by that procedure, could be successfully cryopreserved with dimethyl sulfoxide cryoprotective solution.

  19. Augmentation of human monocyte opsonin-independent phagocytosis by fragments of human plasma fibronectin.

    PubMed Central

    Czop, J K; Kadish, J L; Austen, K F

    1981-01-01

    Human plasma fibronectin isolated by gelatin-affinity chromatography increases in a dose-dependent fashion the number of human monocytes that ingest particulate activators of the human alternative complement pathway in a fully synthetic medium. The fibronectin effect is selective for these particulate activators, does not extend to particles whose ingestion is dependent upon opsonization with IgG, and is not observed with pretreatment of the monocytes. Affinity chromatography with monoclonal antibody to plasma fibronectin of 440,000 daltons reveals that only 12-53% of the protein in a phagocytically active gelatin-affinity-purified fibronectin preparations is bound to the antibody. The protein eluted after affinity chromatography with monoclonal antibody of active preparations, which represented 10-43% of the protein applied, exhibits a 2- to 10-fold increment of activity per microgram of protein above the starting gelatin-affinity-purified material. Thus, the activity that augments the percent of human monocytes ingesting particulate activators of the alternative pathway is antigenically defined as plasma fibronectin. Preparations containing only intact 440,000-dalton fibronectin are also bound to and eluted from the monoclonal antibody, but they fail to augment phagocytosis. When inactive 440,000-dalton plasma fibronectin is subjected to limited trypsin cleavage, phagocytosis-enhancing activity develops that is bound to and elutes from the affinity column prepared with monoclonal antibody, thereby indicating that the enhancing activity of plasma fibronectin resides in cleavage fragments. PMID:6943567

  20. Variables affecting production of monocyte chemotactic factor 1 from human leukocytes stimulated with Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Levitz, S M; North, E A; Jiang, Y; Nong, S H; Kornfeld, H; Harrison, T S

    1997-01-01

    The chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is produced predominantly by mononuclear phagocytes and stimulates recruitment into infected tissues of blood monocytes and T cells. These cell types are thought to be critical to host defenses against infections due to Cryptococcus neoformans, a major cause of disease in persons with AIDS and other disorders of cell-mediated immunity. Accordingly, in the present study, we examined the conditions under which human monocytes and bronchoalveolar macrophages (BAM) are stimulated by C. neoformans to produce MCP-1. C. neoformans was a potent inducer of MCP-1 release from monocytes, with levels of chemokine secreted similar to that seen following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). BAM, in contrast, were stimulated by LPS, but not by C. neoformans, to secrete MCP-1. A peak in MCP-1 mRNA was seen 8 h following cryptococcal stimulation of monocytes. Nine strains of C. neoformans stimulated monocytes to release MCP-1, and there was only modest variation between strains. However, when an individual strain was used, the capacity of C. neoformans to stimulate monocyte MCP-1 release did vary, depending upon the conditions used to grow the fungal stimuli. Finally, C. neoformans stimulated comparable quantities of MCP-1 release in monocytes from donors with and without human immunodeficiency virus infection. These data establish C. neoformans as a potent stimulator of MCP-1 in monocytes, but not in BAM. The failure of C. neoformans to stimulate MCP-1 in BAM, if occurring in vivo, could result in a diminished cell-mediated inflammatory response following inhalation of airborne fungi. PMID:9038295

  1. Endotoxin triggers tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-dependent cytotoxicity from interferon-. gamma. (IFN-. gamma. ) primed and unprimed human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kornbluth, R.S.; Edgington, T.S.

    1986-03-05

    Under endotoxin-free conditions, the authors have found that human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) lack spontaneous monocyte-mediated cytotoxicity against actinomycin D-treated WEHI 164 target cells in a 6 hr /sup 51/Cr release assay. However, small amounts of endotoxin (e.g., LPS) rapidly induce monocyte-mediated cytotoxicity. IFN-..gamma.. alone is incapable of inducing monocyte cytotoxicity. Instead, pretreatment of PBM with IFN-..gamma.. for 36 hr or more primes them for triggering by amounts of endotoxin that are almost 100-fold less than that required for unprimed cells. These conditions are analogous to the two step activation sequence described for mice where IFN-..gamma.. primes and LPS triggers macrophage cytotoxic capacity. Additionally, the authors have observed that neutralizing anti-TNF monoclonal antibody abolishes the cytotoxicity measured here; and rTNF is directly cytotoxic to the target cells used in this assay. Thus, TNF is both necessary and sufficient for the monocyte mediated cytotoxicity. Since IFN-..gamma.. is thought to be produced during a variety of immunological reactions, these findings may help to explain the augmented capacity of immunologically stimulated animals for LPS-triggered TNF production and their enhanced sensitivity to the lethal effects of endotoxin.

  2. Reactive oxygen species enhance TLR10 expression in the human monocytic cell line THP-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghee; Kim, Yeon Ju; Koh, Hyun Sook; Jang, Tae Yang; Park, Hyo Eun; Kim, Jae Young

    2010-01-01

    We investigated TLR10 expression in human monocytes, THP-1 cells, cultured in hypoxia (3% O(2)). Levels of both TLR10 mRNA and protein in THP-1 cells cultured in hypoxia were significantly higher than those cultured in normoxia (20% O(2)). We examined intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) content in hypoxic cells, and TLR10 expression in cells treated with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), to determine whether the increase in TLR10 expression observed with hypoxia was due to an increase in intracellular ROS levels. We found that the level of intracellular ROS in cells subject to hypoxia was significantly higher than in normoxia. Experiments with ROS synthesis inhibitors revealed that hypoxia induced ROS production is mainly due to NADPH oxidase activity. TLR10 mRNA expression was increased by treatment with H(2)O(2) at concentrations ranging from 50 to 250 μM. We screened the TLR10 promoter and found putative binding sites for transcription factors (TFs), such as NF-κB, NF-AT and AP-1. Next, we examined TF activities using a luciferase reporter assay. Activities of NF-κB, NF-AT and AP-1 in the cells treated with H(2)O(2) were significantly higher than in untreated cells. The experiment with TF inhibitors revealed that ROS-induced upregulation of TLR10 expression is mainly due to NF-κB activation. Overall, our results suggest that hypoxia or ROS increase TLR10 expression in human monocytes and the transcriptional activities of NF-κB are involved in this process. Therefore, it is suggested that ROS produced by various exogenous stimuli may play a crucial role in the regulation of expression and function of TLR10 as second messengers.

  3. ACTIVATED NEUTROPHILS INHIBIT PHAGOCYTOSIS BY HUMAN MONOCYTE CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously reported the correlation of decreased phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan by sputum monocytic cells with the increase in sputum neutrophils in volunteers 6h after inhalation of endotoxin (20,000 EU) (Alexis, et al. JACI, 2003;112:353). To define whether an intrin...

  4. Interaction studies reveal specific recognition of an anti-inflammatory polyphosphorhydrazone dendrimer by human monocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledall, Jérémy; Fruchon, Séverine; Garzoni, Matteo; Pavan, Giovanni M.; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Turrin, Cédric-Olivier; Blanzat, Muriel; Poupot, Rémy

    2015-10-01

    Dendrimers are nano-materials with perfectly defined structure and size, and multivalency properties that confer substantial advantages for biomedical applications. Previous work has shown that phosphorus-based polyphosphorhydrazone (PPH) dendrimers capped with azabisphosphonate (ABP) end groups have immuno-modulatory and anti-inflammatory properties leading to efficient therapeutic control of inflammatory diseases in animal models. These properties are mainly prompted through activation of monocytes. Here, we disclose new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory activation of human monocytes by ABP-capped PPH dendrimers. Following an interdisciplinary approach, we have characterized the physicochemical and biological behavior of the lead ABP dendrimer with model and cell membranes, and compared this experimental set of data to predictive computational modelling studies. The behavior of the ABP dendrimer was compared to the one of an isosteric analog dendrimer capped with twelve azabiscarboxylate (ABC) end groups instead of twelve ABP end groups. The ABC dendrimer displayed no biological activity on human monocytes, therefore it was considered as a negative control. In detail, we show that the ABP dendrimer can bind both non-specifically and specifically to the membrane of human monocytes. The specific binding leads to the internalization of the ABP dendrimer by human monocytes. On the contrary, the ABC dendrimer only interacts non-specifically with human monocytes and is not internalized. These data indicate that the bioactive ABP dendrimer is recognized by specific receptor(s) at the surface of human monocytes.Dendrimers are nano-materials with perfectly defined structure and size, and multivalency properties that confer substantial advantages for biomedical applications. Previous work has shown that phosphorus-based polyphosphorhydrazone (PPH) dendrimers capped with azabisphosphonate (ABP) end groups have immuno-modulatory and anti

  5. KR-31543 reduces the production of proinflammatory molecules in human endothelial cells and monocytes and attenuates atherosclerosis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hoon; Yoo, Ji-Young; Kim, Sun-Ok; Yoo, Sung-Eun; Oh, Goo Taeg

    2012-12-31

    KR-31543, (2S, 3R, 4S)-6-amino-4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl)- N-(2-methyl-2H-tetrazol-5-ylmethyl) amino]-3,4-dihydro- 2-dimethyoxymethyl-3-hydroxy-2-methyl-2H-1-benz opyran is a new neuroprotective agent for ischemiareperfusion damage. It has also been reported that KR-31543 has protective effects on lipid peroxidation and H₂O₂-induced reactive oxygen species production. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties of KR-31543. We observed that KR-31543 treatment reduced the production of MCP-1, IL-8, and VCAM-1 in HUVECs, and of MCP-1 and IL-6 in THP-1 human monocytes. We also examined the effect of KR-31543 on monocytes migration in vitro. KR-31543 treatment effectively reduced the migration of THP-1 human monocytes to the HUVEC monolayer in a dose-dependent manner. We next examined the effects of this compound on atherogenesis in LDL receptor deficient (Ldlr ⁻/⁻) mice. After 10 weeks of western diet, the formation of atherosclerotic lesion in aorta was reduced in the KR-31543-treated group compared to the control group. The accumulation of macrophages in lesion was also reduced in KR-31543 treated group. However, the plasma levels of total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglyceride were not affected by KR-31543 treatment. Taken together, these results show that KR-31543 has anti-inflammatory properties on human monocytes and endothelial cells, and inhibits fatty streak lesion formation in mouse model of atherosclerosis, suggesting the potential of KR-31543 for the treatment for atherosclerosis.

  6. Technical advance: liposomal alendronate depletes monocytes and macrophages in the nonhuman primate model of human disease.

    PubMed

    Burwitz, Benjamin J; Reed, Jason S; Hammond, Katherine B; Ohme, Merete A; Planer, Shannon L; Legasse, Alfred W; Ericsen, Adam J; Richter, Yoram; Golomb, Gershon; Sacha, Jonah B

    2014-09-01

    Nonhuman primates are critical animal models for the study of human disorders and disease and offer a platform to assess the role of immune cells in pathogenesis via depletion of specific cellular subsets. However, this model is currently hindered by the lack of reagents that safely and specifically ablate myeloid cells of the monocyte/macrophage Lin. Given the central importance of macrophages in homeostasis and host immunity, development of a macrophage-depletion technique in nonhuman primates would open new avenues of research. Here, using LA at i.v. doses as low as 0.1 mg/kg, we show a >50% transient depletion of circulating monocytes and tissue-resident macrophages in RMs by an 11-color flow cytometric analysis. Diminution of monocytes was followed rapidly by emigration of monocytes from the bone marrow, leading to a rebound of monocytes to baseline levels. Importantly, LA was well-tolerated, as no adverse effects or changes in gross organ function were observed during depletion. These results advance the ex vivo study of myeloid cells by flow cytometry and pave the way for in vivo studies of monocyte/macrophage biology in nonhuman primate models of human disease. PMID:24823811

  7. Technical Advance: Liposomal alendronate depletes monocytes and macrophages in the nonhuman primate model of human disease

    PubMed Central

    Burwitz, Benjamin J.; Reed, Jason S.; Hammond, Katherine B.; Ohme, Merete A.; Planer, Shannon L.; Legasse, Alfred W.; Ericsen, Adam J.; Richter, Yoram; Golomb, Gershon; Sacha, Jonah B.

    2014-01-01

    Nonhuman primates are critical animal models for the study of human disorders and disease and offer a platform to assess the role of immune cells in pathogenesis via depletion of specific cellular subsets. However, this model is currently hindered by the lack of reagents that safely and specifically ablate myeloid cells of the monocyte/macrophage Lin. Given the central importance of macrophages in homeostasis and host immunity, development of a macrophage-depletion technique in nonhuman primates would open new avenues of research. Here, using LA at i.v. doses as low as 0.1 mg/kg, we show a >50% transient depletion of circulating monocytes and tissue-resident macrophages in RMs by an 11-color flow cytometric analysis. Diminution of monocytes was followed rapidly by emigration of monocytes from the bone marrow, leading to a rebound of monocytes to baseline levels. Importantly, LA was well-tolerated, as no adverse effects or changes in gross organ function were observed during depletion. These results advance the ex vivo study of myeloid cells by flow cytometry and pave the way for in vivo studies of monocyte/macrophage biology in nonhuman primate models of human disease. PMID:24823811

  8. CD16 is indispensable for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yeap, Wei Hseun; Wong, Kok Loon; Shimasaki, Noriko; Teo, Esmeralda Chi Yuan; Quek, Jeffrey Kim Siang; Yong, Hao Xiang; Diong, Colin Phipps; Bertoletti, Antonio; Linn, Yeh Ching; Wong, Siew Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is exerted by immune cells expressing surface Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) against cells coated with antibody, such as virus-infected or transformed cells. CD16, the FcγRIIIA, is essential for ADCC by NK cells, and is also expressed by a subset of human blood monocytes. We found that human CD16− expressing monocytes have a broad spectrum of ADCC capacities and can kill cancer cell lines, primary leukemic cells and hepatitis B virus-infected cells in the presence of specific antibodies. Engagement of CD16 on monocytes by antibody bound to target cells activated β2-integrins and induced TNFα secretion. In turn, this induced TNFR expression on the target cells, making them susceptible to TNFα-mediated cell death. Treatment with TLR agonists, DAMPs or cytokines, such as IFNγ, further enhanced ADCC. Monocytes lacking CD16 did not exert ADCC but acquired this property after CD16 expression was induced by either cytokine stimulation or transient transfection. Notably, CD16+ monocytes from patients with leukemia also exerted potent ADCC. Hence, CD16+ monocytes are important effectors of ADCC, suggesting further developments of this property in the context of cellular therapies for cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:27670158

  9. Organochlorine insecticides induce NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species in human monocytic cells via phospholipase A2/arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Mangum, Lee C; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Stokes, John V; Matthews, Anberitha T; Lee, Jung Hwa; Chambers, Janice E; Ross, Matthew K

    2015-04-20

    Bioaccumulative organohalogen chemicals, such as organochlorine (OC) insecticides, have been increasingly associated with disease etiology; however, the mechanistic link between chemical exposure and diseases, such as atherosclerosis, cancer, and diabetes, is complex and poorly defined. Systemic oxidative stress stemming from OC exposure might play a vital role in the development of these pathologies. Monocytes are important surveillance cells of the innate immune system that respond to extracellular signals possessing danger-associated molecular patterns by synthesizing oxyradicals, such as superoxide, for the purpose of combating infectious pathogens. We hypothesized that OC chemicals can be toxic to monocytes because of an inappropriate elevation in superoxide-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) capable of causing cellular oxidative damage. Reactive oxyradicals are generated in monocytes in large part by NADPH oxidase (Nox). The present study was conducted to examine the ability of two chlorinated cyclodiene compounds, trans-nonachlor and dieldrin, as well as p,p'-DDE, a chlorinated alicyclic metabolite of DDT, to stimulate Nox activity in a human monocytic cell line and to elucidate the mechanisms for this activation. Human THP-1 monocytes treated with either trans-nonachlor or dieldrin (0.1-10 μM in the culture medium) exhibited elevated levels of intracellular ROS, as evidenced by complementary methods, including flow cytometry analysis using the probe DCFH-DA and hydroethidine-based fluorometric and UPLC-MS assays. In addition, the induced reactive oxygen flux caused by trans-nonachlor was also observed in two other cell lines, murine J774 macrophages and human HL-60 cells. The central role of Nox in OC-mediated oxidative stress was demonstrated by the attenuated superoxide production in OC-exposed monocytes treated with the Nox inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium and VAS-2870. Moreover, monocytes challenged with OCs exhibited increased phospho-p47(phox

  10. Activation-dependent cell death of human monocytes is a novel mechanism of fine-tuning inflammation and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Däbritz, Jan; Weinhage, Toni; Varga, Georg; Wirth, Timo; Ehrchen, Jan M; Barczyk-Kahlert, Katarzyna; Roth, Johannes; Schwarz, Tobias; Foell, Dirk

    2016-08-01

    In patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), increased release of IFN-γ and GM-CSF in cells infiltrating synovial tissue can be a potent driver of monocyte activation. Given the fundamental role of monocyte activation in remodeling the early phases of inflammatory responses, here we analyze the GM-CSF/IFN-γ induced activity of human monocytes in such a situation in vitro and in vivo. Monocytes from healthy donors were isolated and stimulated with GM-CSF ± IFN-γ. Monocyte activation and death were analyzed by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence microscopy, ELISA, and qPCR. T-cell GM-CSF/IFN-γ expression and monocyte function were determined in synovial fluid and peripheral blood from 15 patients with active JIA and 21 healthy controls. Simultaneous treatment with GM-CSF and IFN-γ induces cell death of monocytes. This cell death is partly cathepsin B-associated and has morphological characteristics of necrosis. Monocytes responding to costimulation with strong proinflammatory activities are consequently eliminated. Monocytes surviving this form of hyperactivation retain normal cytokine production. Cathepsin B activity is increased in monocytes isolated from synovial fluid from patients with active arthritis. Our data suggest GM-CSF/IFN-γ induced cell death of monocytes as a novel mechanism to eliminate overactivated monocytes, thereby potentially balancing inflammation and autoimmunity in JIA. PMID:27159026

  11. Arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid suppress osteoclast formation and activity in human CD14+ monocytes, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kasonga, Abe E; Deepak, Vishwa; Kruger, Marlena C; Coetzee, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    An unbalanced diet can have adverse effects on health. Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) have been the focus of research owing to their necessity of inclusion in a healthy diet. However, the effects of LCPUFAs on human osteoclast formation and function have not been explored before. A human CD14+ monocyte differentiation model was used to elucidate the effects of an ω-3 LCPUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and an ω-6 LCPUFA, arachidonic acid (AA), on osteoclast formation and activity. CD14+ monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors and stimulated with macrophage colony stimulating factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand to generate osteoclasts. Data from this study revealed that both the LCPUFAs decreased osteoclast formation potential of CD14+ monocytes in a dose-dependent manner when treated at an early stage of differentiation. Moreover, when exposed at a late stage of osteoclast differentiation AA and DHA impaired the bone resorptive potential of mature osteoclasts without affecting osteoclast numbers. AA and DHA abrogated vitronectin receptor expression in differentiating as well as mature osteoclasts. In contrast, the degree of inhibition for calcitonin receptor expression varied between the LCPUFAs with only AA causing inhibition during osteoclast differentiation. Furthermore, AA and DHA down regulated the expression of key osteoclast-specific genes in differentiating as well as mature osteoclasts. This study demonstrates for the first time that LCPUFAs can modulate osteoclast formation and function in a human primary osteoclast cell line.

  12. Human casein alpha s1 (CSN1S1) skews in vitro differentiation of monocytes towards macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The milk-derived protein human Casein alpha s1 (CSN1S1) has recently been detected in blood cells and was shown to possess proinflammatory properties. In the present study, we investigated the effect of CSN1S1 on the differentiation of monocytes. Methods Primary human monocytes were stimulated with recombinant CSN1S1 and compared to cells stimulated with GM-CSF/IL-4 or M-CSF/IFNγ. Morphological changes were assessed by microscopy and quantification of surface markers of differentiation by FACS analysis. Phagocytic activity of CSN1S1 stimulated cells was measured by quantification of zymosan labeled particle uptake. The role of mitogen activated protein kinases for CSN1S1-induced differentiation of monocytes and proinflammatory cytokine expression was assessed by supplementation of specific inhibitors. Results CSN1S1 at a concentration of 10 μg/ml resulted in morphological changes (irregular shape, pseudopodia) and aggregation of cells, comparable to changes observed in M-CSF/IFNγ differentiated macrophages. Surface marker expression was altered after 24 h with an upregulation of CD14 (mean 2.5 fold) and CD64 (1.9 fold) in CSN1S1 stimulated cells. CSN1S1 treated cells showed a characteristic surface marker pattern for macrophages after 120 h of incubation (CD14high, CD64high, CD83low, CD1alow) comparable to changes observed in M-CSF/IFNγ treated monocytes. Furthermore, phagocytic activity was increased 1.4 and 1.9 fold following stimulation with 10 μg/ml CSN1S1 after 24 and 48 h, respectively. Early GM-CSF, but not GM-CSF/IL-4 induced differentiation of monocytes towards dendritic cells (DC) was inhibited by addition of CSN1S1. Finally, CSN1S1 induced upregulation of CD14 was impeded by inhibition of ERK1/2, while inhibition of the mitogen activated protein kinases JNK and p38 did not influence cellular differentiation. However, JNK and p38 inhibitors impeded CSN1S1 induced secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1b or IL-6. Conclusions CSN1S1

  13. Differential Oxidative Stress Induced by Dengue Virus in Monocytes from Human Neonates, Adult and Elderly Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Nereida; Mosquera, Jesús; Añez, Germán; Levy, Alegria; Marcucci, Rafael; de Mon, Melchor Alvarez

    2013-01-01

    Changes in immune response during lifespan of man are well known. These changes involve decreased neonatal and elderly immune response. In addition, it has been shown a relationship between immune and oxidative mechanisms, suggesting that altered immune response could be associated to altered oxidative response. Increased expression of nitric oxide (NO) has been documented in dengue and in monocyte cultures infected with different types of dengue virus. However, there is no information about the age-dependent NO oxidative response in humans infected by dengue virus. In this study, monocyte cultures from neonatal, elderly and adult individuals (n = 10 each group) were infected with different dengue virus types (DENV- 1 to 4) and oxidative/antioxidative responses and apoptosis were measured at days 1 and 3 of culture. Increased production of NO, lipid peroxidation and enzymatic and nonenzymatic anti-oxidative responses in dengue infected monocyte cultures were observed. However, neonatal and elderly monocytes had lower values of studied parameters when compared to those in adult-derived cultures. Apoptosis was present in infected monocytes with higher values at day 3 of culture. This reduced oxidant/antioxidant response of neonatal and elderly monocytes could be relevant in the pathogenesis of dengue disease. PMID:24069178

  14. Abnormal NF-kappa B function characterizes human type 1 diabetes dendritic cells and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Mollah, Zia U A; Pai, Saparna; Moore, Craig; O'Sullivan, Brendan J; Harrison, Matthew J; Peng, Judy; Phillips, Karen; Prins, Johannes B; Cardinal, John; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2008-03-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) differentiation is abnormal in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, the nature of the relationship between this abnormality and disease pathogenesis is unknown. We studied the LPS response in monocytes and monocyte-derived DCs isolated from T1DM patients and from non-T1DM controls. In T1DM patients, late LPS-mediated nuclear DNA binding by RelA, p50, c-Rel, and RelB was impaired as compared with type 2 DM, rheumatoid arthritis, and healthy subjects, associated with impaired DC CD40 and MHC class I induction but normal cytokine production. In TIDM monocytes, RelA and RelB were constitutively activated, and the src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-1), a negative regulator of NF-kappaB, was overexpressed. Addition of sodium stibogluconate, a SHP-1 inhibitor, to DCs differentiating from monocyte precursors restored their capacity to respond to LPS in approximately 60% of patients. The monocyte and DC NF-kappaB response to LPS is thus a novel phenotypic and likely pathogenetic marker for human T1DM. SHP-1 is at least one NF-kappaB regulatory mechanism which might be induced as a result of abnormal inflammatory signaling responses in T1DM monocytes. PMID:18292540

  15. Accelerated in vitro differentiation of blood monocytes into dendritic cells in human sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Faivre, V; Lukaszewicz, A-C; Alves, A; Charron, D; Payen, D; Haziot, A

    2007-01-01

    Sepsis-induced immune depression is characterized by infection susceptibility and monocyte early deactivation. Because monocytes are precursors for dendritic cells (DC), alterations in their differentiation into DC may contribute to defective immune responses in septic patients. We therefore investigated the ability of monocytes to differentiate into functional DC in vitro in patients undergoing surgery for peritonitis. Monocytes from 20 patients collected immediately after surgery (D0), at week 1 and at weeks 3–4 and from 11 control donors were differentiated into immature DC. We determined the phenotype of monocytes and derived DC, and analysed the ability of DC to respond to microbial products and to elicit T cell responses in a mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR). We show that, although monocytes from septic patients were deactivated with decreased responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan and low human leucocyte antigen D-related (HLA-DR) expression, they expressed the co-stimulatory molecule CD80, CD40 and CCR7. Monocytes collected from patients at D0 and week 1 differentiated faster into DC with early loss of CD14 expression. Expression of HLA-DR increased dramatically in culture to reach control levels, as did responses of DC to LPS and peptidoglycan. However, although patient and control immature DC had similar abilities to induce T cell proliferation in MLR, maturation of DC derived from patients did not increase T cell responses. These results show that circulating monocytes from septic patients express markers of activation and/or differentiation despite functional deactivation, and differentiate rapidly into phenotypically normal DC. These DC fail, however, to increase their T cell activation abilities upon maturation. PMID:17302891

  16. Acute phase protein and antioxidant responses in dogs with experimental acute monocytic ehrlichiosis treated with rifampicin.

    PubMed

    Karnezi, Dimitra; Ceron, Jose J; Theodorou, Konstantina; Leontides, Leonidas; Siarkou, Victoria I; Martinez, Silvia; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Harrus, Shimon; Koutinas, Christos K; Pardali, Dimitra; Mylonakis, Mathios E

    2016-02-29

    There is currently lack of information on the changes of acute phase proteins (APP) and antioxidant markers and their clinical relevance as treatment response indicators in canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME). The objective of this study was to investigate the patterns of C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (Hp), ferritin and paraoxonase-1 (PON-1) during treatment of dogs with acute CME with rifampicin. Blood serum samples from ten Beagle dogs with experimental acute CME were retrospectively examined. Five dogs (Group A) were treated with rifampicin (10mg/Kg/24h), per os, for 3 weeks and 5 dogs (Group B) received no treatment (infected controls). Two Beagle dogs served as uninfected controls. Blood serum samples were serially examined prior to Ehrlichia canis inoculation and on post-inoculation days 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42. Significant changes of CRP, Hp, ferritin and PON-1 values were found in the majority of infected dogs. However, their concentrations did not differ between the two groups during the treatment observation period. The results of this study indicate that although several APP and PON-1 tend to significantly change in the majority of dogs with acute CME, they were of limited clinical relevance as treatment response indicators in this experimental setting.

  17. Acute phase protein and antioxidant responses in dogs with experimental acute monocytic ehrlichiosis treated with rifampicin.

    PubMed

    Karnezi, Dimitra; Ceron, Jose J; Theodorou, Konstantina; Leontides, Leonidas; Siarkou, Victoria I; Martinez, Silvia; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Harrus, Shimon; Koutinas, Christos K; Pardali, Dimitra; Mylonakis, Mathios E

    2016-02-29

    There is currently lack of information on the changes of acute phase proteins (APP) and antioxidant markers and their clinical relevance as treatment response indicators in canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (CME). The objective of this study was to investigate the patterns of C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (Hp), ferritin and paraoxonase-1 (PON-1) during treatment of dogs with acute CME with rifampicin. Blood serum samples from ten Beagle dogs with experimental acute CME were retrospectively examined. Five dogs (Group A) were treated with rifampicin (10mg/Kg/24h), per os, for 3 weeks and 5 dogs (Group B) received no treatment (infected controls). Two Beagle dogs served as uninfected controls. Blood serum samples were serially examined prior to Ehrlichia canis inoculation and on post-inoculation days 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42. Significant changes of CRP, Hp, ferritin and PON-1 values were found in the majority of infected dogs. However, their concentrations did not differ between the two groups during the treatment observation period. The results of this study indicate that although several APP and PON-1 tend to significantly change in the majority of dogs with acute CME, they were of limited clinical relevance as treatment response indicators in this experimental setting. PMID:26854345

  18. Differential Activation of Human Monocytes and Lymphocytes by Distinct Strains of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Luísa M. D.; Viana, Agostinho; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia M. C.; Gollob, Kenneth J.; Dutra, Walderez O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi strains are currently classified into six discrete typing units (DTUs) named TcI to VI. It is known that these DTUs have different geographical distribution, as well as biological features. TcI and TcII are major DTUs found in patients from northern and southern Latin America, respectively. Our hypothesis is that upon infection of human peripheral blood cells, Y strain (Tc II) and Col cl1.7 (Tc I), cause distinct immunological changes, which might influence the clinical course of Chagas disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated the infectivity of CFSE-stained trypomastigotes of Col cl1.7 and Y strain in human monocytes for 15 and 72 hours, and determined the immunological profile of lymphocytes and monocytes exposed to the different isolates using multiparameter flow cytometry. Our results showed a similar percentage and intensity of monocyte infection by Y and Col cl1.7. We also observed an increased expression of CD80 and CD86 by monocytes infected with Col cl1.7, but not Y strain. IL-10 was significantly higher in monocytes infected with Col cl1.7, as compared to Y strain. Moreover, infection with Col cl1.7, but not Y strain, led to an increased expression of IL-17 by CD8+ T cells. On the other hand, we observed a positive correlation between the expression of TNF-alpha and granzyme A only after infection with Y strain. Conclusion/Significance Our study shows that while Col cl1.7 induces higher monocyte activation and, at the same time, production of IL-10, infection with Y strain leads to a lower monocyte activation but higher inflammatory profile. These results show that TcI and TcII have a distinct immunological impact on human cells during early infection, which might influence disease progression. PMID:26147698

  19. Calpain inhibition induces activation of the distinct signalling pathways and cell migration in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Noma, Haruyoshi; Kato, Takayuki; Fujita, Hisakazu; Kitagawa, Maki; Yamano, Tsunekazu; Kitagawa, Seiichi

    2009-09-01

    We have recently reported that constitutively active calpain negatively regulates activation of the distinct signalling pathways and cell migration in human neutrophils. Here, we report that a similar regulatory system is also functioning in human monocytes, but not lymphocytes. Calpain was constitutively active in resting human monocytes, but not lymphocytes. Mitogen-activated protein kinases, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and p21-activated kinase (PAK, an effector molecule of Rac) were rapidly (within 1 min) activated in monocytes, but not lymphocytes, upon exposure to calpain inhibitors (PD150606 and N-acetyl-Leu-Leu-Nle-CHO), but not PD145305 (the inactive analogue of PD150606). Following activation of these signalling pathways, monocytes displayed active migration within 5 min after exposure to calpain inhibitors, and active migration was sustained for more than 45 min. The micropipette method revealed that calpain inhibition-mediated monocyte migration was chemotaxis, not random migration. The studies with pharmacological inhibitors suggest that calpain inhibition-mediated monocyte migration is mediated by activation of ERK, p38, JNK, PI3K/Akt and Rac. NSC23766 (Rac inhibitor) and pertussis toxin (PTX) suppressed calpain inhibitor-induced phosphorylation of distinct signalling molecules (PAK, ERK, p38, JNK and Akt) as well as cell migration, suggesting that the PTX-sensitive G protein and Rac axis may be a possible key target of calpain inhibitors. These findings suggest that constitutively active calpain negatively regulates activation of the distinct signalling pathways and cell migration in resting monocytes, but not lymphocytes.

  20. Induction of a type I interferon signature in normal human monocytes by gadolinium-based contrast agents: comparison of linear and macrocyclic agents.

    PubMed

    Wermuth, P J; Jimenez, S A

    2014-01-01

    The gadolinium-based contrast agent (GdBCA) Omniscan activates human macrophages through Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and TLR-7 signalling. To explore the mechanisms responsible we compared the ability of linear and macrocyclic GdBCA to induce a type I interferon signature and a proinflammatory/profibrotic phenotype in normal human monocytes in vitro. Expression of genes associated with type I interferon signalling and inflammation and production of their corresponding proteins were determined. Both linear and macrocyclic GdBCA stimulated expression of multiple type I interferon-regulated genes and the expression of numerous chemokines, cytokines and growth factors in normal human peripheral blood monocytes. There was no correlation between the magnitude of the measured response and the Gd chelate used. To explore the mechanisms responsible for GdBCA induction of fibrosis in nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in vitro, normal human dermal fibroblasts were incubated with GdBCA-treated monocyte culture supernatants and the effects on profibrotic gene expression were examined. Supernatants from monocytes exposed to all GdBCA stimulated types I and III collagen, fibronectin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression in normal dermal fibroblasts. The results indicate that the monocyte activation induced by GdBCA may be the initial step in the development of GdBCA associated fibrosis in NSF.

  1. Induction of a type I interferon signature in normal human monocytes by gadolinium-based contrast agents: comparison of linear and macrocyclic agents

    PubMed Central

    Wermuth, P J; Jimenez, S A

    2014-01-01

    The gadolinium-based contrast agent (GdBCA) Omniscan activates human macrophages through Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and TLR-7 signalling. To explore the mechanisms responsible we compared the ability of linear and macrocyclic GdBCA to induce a type I interferon signature and a proinflammatory/profibrotic phenotype in normal human monocytes in vitro. Expression of genes associated with type I interferon signalling and inflammation and production of their corresponding proteins were determined. Both linear and macrocyclic GdBCA stimulated expression of multiple type I interferon-regulated genes and the expression of numerous chemokines, cytokines and growth factors in normal human peripheral blood monocytes. There was no correlation between the magnitude of the measured response and the Gd chelate used. To explore the mechanisms responsible for GdBCA induction of fibrosis in nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in vitro, normal human dermal fibroblasts were incubated with GdBCA-treated monocyte culture supernatants and the effects on profibrotic gene expression were examined. Supernatants from monocytes exposed to all GdBCA stimulated types I and III collagen, fibronectin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression in normal dermal fibroblasts. The results indicate that the monocyte activation induced by GdBCA may be the initial step in the development of GdBCA associated fibrosis in NSF. PMID:24111526

  2. Functional and phenotypic characteristics of alternative activation induced in human monocytes by interleukin-4 or the parasitic nematode Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei; Mahapatra, Lily; Moore, Vanessa; Sanprasert, Vivornpun; Nutman, Thomas B

    2011-10-01

    Human monocytes from patients with patent filarial infections are studded with filarial antigen and express markers associated with alternative activation of macrophages (MΦ). To explore the role of filaria-derived parasite antigen in differentiation of human monocytes, cells were exposed to microfilariae (mf) of Brugia malayi, and their phenotypic and functional characteristics were compared with those of monocytes exposed to factors known to generate either alternatively (interleukin-4 [IL-4]) or classically (macrophage colony-stimulating factor [MCSF]) activated MΦ. IL-4 upregulated mRNA expression of CCL13, CCL15, CCL17, CCL18, CCL22, CLEC10A, MRC1, CADH1, CD274, and CD273 associated with alternative activation of MΦ but not arginase 1. IL-4-cultured monocytes had a diminished ability to promote proliferation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells compared to that of unexposed monocytes. Similar to results with IL-4, exposure of monocytes to live mf induced upregulation of CCL15, CCL17, CCL18, CCL22, CD274, and CD273 and downregulation of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), TLR5, and TLR7. In contrast to results with MCSF-cultured monocytes, exposure of monocytes to mf resulted in significant inhibition of the phagocytic ability of these cells to the same degree as that seen with IL-4. Our data suggest that short exposure of human monocytes to IL-4 induces a phenotypic characteristic of alternative activation and that secreted filarial products skew monocytes similarly. PMID:21788379

  3. Increased synthesis of eicosanoids by human monocytes following leucine and methionine enkephalin administration

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederhold, M.D.; Ou, D.W.

    1986-03-05

    Regulation of eicosanoid biosynthesis by neuropeptides was investigated in human peripheral blood monocytes from normal donors. Metabolites of /sup 3/H-arachidonic acid (/sup 3/H-AA) were analyzed by thin layer and high pressure liquid chromatography following exposure to 0.2 ..mu..gm/ml and 2.0 ..mu..gm/ml of leucine (L-ENK) and methionine (M-ENK) enkephalin. Supernatants of cultured cells were analyzed. The data indicate that both leucine and methionine enkephalin can stimulate eicosanoid biosynthesis in human monocytes, and may indicate a possible regulatory mechanism between the central nervous system and the reticuloendothelial system.

  4. Lovastatin increases arachidonic acid levels and stimulates thromboxane synthesis in human liver and monocytic cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Hrboticky, N; Tang, L; Zimmer, B; Lux, I; Weber, P C

    1994-01-01

    The effect of lovastatin (LOV), the inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase, on linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6) metabolism was examined in human monocytic Mono Mac 6 (MM6) and hepatoma Hep G2 cells. The desaturation of LA was examined after LOV (72 h, 10 microM) or dimethylsulfoxide (LOV carrier, < 0.1%) and [14C]LA (last 18 h, 0.3 microCi, 5 microM). In both cell lines, LOV reduced the percentage of 14C label associated with LA and increased the percentage of label in the 20:4n-6 and the 22:5n-6 fractions. In Hep G2 but not MM6 cells, this effect was fully reversible by means of coincubation with mevalonic acid (500 microM), but not with cholesterol or lipoproteins. In both cell lines, the LOV-mediated increase in LA desaturation resulted in dose-dependent reductions of LA and elevations of AA in cellular phospholipids. The lipids secreted by LOV-treated Hep G2 cells were also enriched in arachidonic acid (AA). In the MM6 cells, LOV increased release of thromboxane upon stimulation with the calcium ionophore A23187. In summary, our findings of higher LA desaturation and AA enrichment of lipids secreted by the Hep G2 cells suggest that LOV treatment may increase the delivery of AA from the liver to extrahepatic tissues. The changes in membrane fatty acid composition can influence a variety of cellular functions, such as eicosanoid synthesis in monocytic cells. The mechanism appears to be related to the reduced availability of intermediates of cholesterogenesis. PMID:8282787

  5. Binding of Streptococcus mutans SR protein to human monocytes: production of tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1, and interleukin 6.

    PubMed

    Soell, M; Holveck, F; Schöller, M; Wachsmann, R D; Klein, J P

    1994-05-01

    To examine the possible implication of protein SR, an I/II-related antigen from Streptococcus mutans OMZ 175 (serotype f), in inflammatory reactions, we tested the immunomodulatory effects of protein SR on human monocytes. Using biotinylated protein, we provide evidence that protein SR binds to human monocytes in dose-, time-, and calcium-dependent manners through specific interactions. These results were confirmed by competition experiments using either soluble human monocyte extract or anti-SR immunoglobulin G. Binding occurred through lectin-like interactions between SR and carbohydrate portions of monocyte membrane glycoproteins, since binding could be inhibited by several sugars, especially fucose and N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), which were confirmed by ligand blotting to be the primer ligands recognized by SR on human monocyte extracts. The ability of protein SR to stimulate the production of cytokines by human circulating monocytes was then examined. The release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 1 beta, and interleukin 6 is time and dose dependent and not affected by the addition of polymyxin B. Activation of monocytes resulted from specific binding of SR to NANA and fucose present on cell surface glycoproteins since TNF-alpha release could be inhibited by sialidase and pronase treatment of monocytes and by NANA and fucose. These results confirm that sialic acid and fucose present on cell surface macromolecules and especially glycoproteins are needed for the binding of SR to monocytes and for the release of TNF-alpha. PMID:8168943

  6. Binding of Streptococcus mutans SR protein to human monocytes: production of tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1, and interleukin 6.

    PubMed Central

    Soell, M; Holveck, F; Schöller, M; Wachsmann, R D; Klein, J P

    1994-01-01

    To examine the possible implication of protein SR, an I/II-related antigen from Streptococcus mutans OMZ 175 (serotype f), in inflammatory reactions, we tested the immunomodulatory effects of protein SR on human monocytes. Using biotinylated protein, we provide evidence that protein SR binds to human monocytes in dose-, time-, and calcium-dependent manners through specific interactions. These results were confirmed by competition experiments using either soluble human monocyte extract or anti-SR immunoglobulin G. Binding occurred through lectin-like interactions between SR and carbohydrate portions of monocyte membrane glycoproteins, since binding could be inhibited by several sugars, especially fucose and N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), which were confirmed by ligand blotting to be the primer ligands recognized by SR on human monocyte extracts. The ability of protein SR to stimulate the production of cytokines by human circulating monocytes was then examined. The release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 1 beta, and interleukin 6 is time and dose dependent and not affected by the addition of polymyxin B. Activation of monocytes resulted from specific binding of SR to NANA and fucose present on cell surface glycoproteins since TNF-alpha release could be inhibited by sialidase and pronase treatment of monocytes and by NANA and fucose. These results confirm that sialic acid and fucose present on cell surface macromolecules and especially glycoproteins are needed for the binding of SR to monocytes and for the release of TNF-alpha. Images PMID:8168943

  7. Differential in vivo activation of monocyte subsets during low-grade inflammation through experimental endotoxemia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, B.; Hohensinner, P. J.; Krychtiuk, K. A.; Matzneller, P.; Koller, L.; Brekalo, M.; Maurer, G.; Huber, K.; Zeitlinger, M.; Jilma, B.; Wojta, J.; Speidl, W. S.

    2016-01-01

    Human monocytes are a heterogeneous cell population, which can be divided into a classical (CD14++CD16−), a non-classical (CD14+CD16+), and an intermediate (CD14++CD16+) subset. We hypothesized that low-grade inflammation may differentially affect monocyte subsets. We used a human lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion model to mimic low-grade inflammation to identify, which monocyte subsets are preferentially activated under these conditions. Monocyte subsets were identified by staining for CD14 and CD16, activation status of monocytes was analyzed by staining for CD11b and a novel in situ mRNA hybridization approach to detect IL-6 and IL-8 specific mRNA at the single-cell level by flow cytometry. After LPS challenge, cell numbers of monocyte subsets dropped after 2 h with cell numbers recovering after 6 h. Distribution of monocyte subsets was skewed dramatically towards the intermediate subset after 24 h. Furthermore, intermediate monocytes displayed the largest increase of CD11b expression after 2 h. Finally, IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA levels increased in intermediate and non-classical monocytes after 6 h whereas these mRNA levels in classical monocytes changed only marginally. In conclusion, our data indicates that the main responding subset of monocytes to standardized low-grade inflammation induced by LPS in humans is the CD14++CD16+ intermediate subset followed by the CD14+CD16+ non-classical monocyte subset. Circulating classical monocytes showed comparably less reaction to LPS challenge in vivo. PMID:27444882

  8. Differential in vivo activation of monocyte subsets during low-grade inflammation through experimental endotoxemia in humans.

    PubMed

    Thaler, B; Hohensinner, P J; Krychtiuk, K A; Matzneller, P; Koller, L; Brekalo, M; Maurer, G; Huber, K; Zeitlinger, M; Jilma, B; Wojta, J; Speidl, W S

    2016-01-01

    Human monocytes are a heterogeneous cell population, which can be divided into a classical (CD14++CD16-), a non-classical (CD14+CD16+), and an intermediate (CD14++CD16+) subset. We hypothesized that low-grade inflammation may differentially affect monocyte subsets. We used a human lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion model to mimic low-grade inflammation to identify, which monocyte subsets are preferentially activated under these conditions. Monocyte subsets were identified by staining for CD14 and CD16, activation status of monocytes was analyzed by staining for CD11b and a novel in situ mRNA hybridization approach to detect IL-6 and IL-8 specific mRNA at the single-cell level by flow cytometry. After LPS challenge, cell numbers of monocyte subsets dropped after 2 h with cell numbers recovering after 6 h. Distribution of monocyte subsets was skewed dramatically towards the intermediate subset after 24 h. Furthermore, intermediate monocytes displayed the largest increase of CD11b expression after 2 h. Finally, IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA levels increased in intermediate and non-classical monocytes after 6 h whereas these mRNA levels in classical monocytes changed only marginally. In conclusion, our data indicates that the main responding subset of monocytes to standardized low-grade inflammation induced by LPS in humans is the CD14++CD16+ intermediate subset followed by the CD14+CD16+ non-classical monocyte subset. Circulating classical monocytes showed comparably less reaction to LPS challenge in vivo. PMID:27444882

  9. Membrane damage and repair in primary monocytes exposed to human β-defensin-3

    PubMed Central

    Lioi, Anthony B.; Reyes Rodriguez, Angel L.; Funderburg, Nicholas T.; Feng, Zhimin; Weinberg, Aaron; Sieg, Scott F.

    2012-01-01

    Interactions of AMPs with plasma membranes of primary human immune cells are poorly characterized. Analysis of PI exclusion as a measure of membrane integrity indicated that hBD-3 caused membrane perturbations in monocytes but not T or B cells at concentrations typically used to kill bacteria or to induce activation of APCs. Bleb-like structures were observed in monocytes exposed to hBD-3. These cells also increased surface expression of LAMP1, a membrane repair marker after exposure to hBD-3. Furthermore, cell death was enhanced by adding an inhibitor of membrane repair. Removal of cholesterol from membranes resulted in greater susceptibility of cells to hBD-3, but cholesterol content was not different between the cell types, as assessed by filipin staining. Freshly isolated monocytes expressed higher levels of the negatively charged phospholipid, PS, on their outer leaflet compared with B or T cells. Preincubation of monocytes with molecules that bind PS protected these cells from hBD-3-induced membrane damage, suggesting that outer-membrane PS expression can at least partially explain monocyte susceptibility to hBD-3. The potential for membrane disruption caused by AMPs should be evaluated in various cell types when considering these molecules for therapeutic applications in humans. PMID:22837529

  10. Size-dependent effect of zinc oxide on toxicity and inflammatory potential of human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Devashri; Kannan, G M; Vijayaraghavan, R

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of nanomedicines, it is important to understand their potential immunotoxicity. Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles have several applications in the pharmaceutical and biomedicine industries. This study investigates the effect of particles size (nano and micro) of ZnO on viability, phagocytosis, and cytokine induction in human monocytes, THP-1 cells, a model of the innate immune system. Cells were incubated with nano (approximately 100 nm) and micro (approximately 5 μm) sized ZnO particles in a concentration range of 10-100 μg/ml. The parameters measured included the MTT assay, phagocytosis assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), gene expression, and DNA analysis. ZnO particles significantly decreased cell viability in a size- and concentration-dependent manner associated with significant alterations in phagocytic capacity of monocytes. Exposure of THP-1 cells to both sizes of ZnO stimulated and increased release of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and IL-6, as well as chemokine IL-8, and upregulated the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 genes. However, ZnO particles did not markedly affect monocytes DNA. Collectively, these results suggest higher propensity of nano ZnO particles in inducing cytotoxicity and inflammation in human monocytes regardless of micro size, and caution needs to be taken concerning their biological application. PMID:24555677

  11. Induction of ceruloplasmin synthesis by IFN-gamma in human monocytic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazumder, B.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Prok, A.; Cathcart, M. K.; Fox, P. L.

    1997-01-01

    Ceruloplasmin is a 132-kDa glycoprotein abundant in human plasma. It has multiple in vitro activities, including copper transport, lipid pro- and antioxidant activity, and oxidation of ferrous ion and aromatic amines; however, its physiologic role is uncertain. Although ceruloplasmin is synthesized primarily by the liver in adult humans, production by cells of monocytic origin has been reported. We here show that IFN-gamma is a potent inducer of ceruloplasmin synthesis by monocytic cells. Activation of human monoblastic leukemia U937 cells with IFN-gamma increased the production of ceruloplasmin by at least 20-fold. The identity of the protein was confirmed by plasmin fingerprinting. IFN-gamma also increased ceruloplasmin mRNA. Induction followed a 2- to 4-h lag and was partially blocked by cycloheximide, indicating a requirement for newly synthesized factors. Ceruloplasmin induction in monocytic cells was agonist specific, as IL-1, IL-4, IL-6, IFN-alpha, IFN-beta, TNF-alpha, and LPS were completely ineffective. The induction was also cell type specific, as IFN-gamma did not induce ceruloplasmin synthesis in endothelial or smooth muscle cells. In contrast, IFN-gamma was stimulatory in other monocytic cells, including THP-1 cells and human peripheral blood monocytes, and also in HepG2 cells. Ceruloplasmin secreted by IFN-gamma-stimulated U937 cells had ferroxidase activity and was, in fact, the only secreted protein with this activity. Monocytic cell-derived ceruloplasmin may contribute to defense responses via its ferroxidase activity, which may drive iron homeostasis in a direction unfavorable to invasive organisms.

  12. Human monocytes recognize porcine endothelium via the interaction of galectin 3 and alpha-GAL.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rongyu; Greenwald, Allen; Peterson, Mark D; Waddell, Thomas K

    2006-07-15

    Monocytes are one of the key inflammatory cells recruited to xenografts and play an important role in delayed xenograft rejection. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of monocytes to bind to the major xenoantigen Gal-alpha(1,3)Gal-beta(1,4)GlcNAc-R; however, the receptor that mediates this interaction has yet to be identified. We provide evidence that it is Galectin-3, a approximately 30-kDa lectin that recognizes beta-galactosides (Gal-beta(1-3/4)GlcNAc) and plays diverse roles in many physiological and pathological events. Human monocyte binding is strikingly increased on porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAEC), which express high levels of Gal-alpha(1,3)Gal-beta(1,4)GlcNAc-R, compared with human aortic endothelial cells. Human monocytes obtained from healthy donors bind to Gal-alpha(1,3)Gal-beta(1,4)GlcNAc-R at variable intensities. This variation of binding intensity was consistent and reproducible in individual donors. Galectin-3 is mainly expressed in human monocytes, not lymphocytes. Purified Galectin-3 is able to bind directly to Gal-alpha(1,3)Gal-beta(1,4)GlcNAc-R. Galectin-3 can also be affinity isolated from monocytes (and not lymphocytes) using an Gal-alpha(1,3)Gal-beta(1,4)GlcNAc-R-biotin/streptavidin-bead pull-down system. Soluble Galectin-3 binds preferentially to PAEC vs human aortic endothelial cells, and this binding can be inhibited by lactose, indicating dependence on the carbohydrate recognition domain of Galectin-3. Gal-alpha(1,3)Gal-beta(1,4)GlcNAc-R is at least partly responsible for this phenomenon, as binding decreased after digestion of PAEC with alpha-galactosidase. Furthermore, monocytes pretreated with a blocking anti-Galectin-3 Ab show decreased adhesion to PAEC when compared with isotype control in a parallel plate flow chamber perfusion assay. Thus, we conclude that Galectin-3 expressed in human monocytes is a receptor for the major xenoantigen (Gal-alpha(1,3)Gal-beta(1,4)GlcNAc-R), expressed on porcine endothelial cells

  13. Interleukin-1 and interleukin-6 gene expression in human monocytes stimulated with Salmonella typhimurium porins.

    PubMed Central

    Galdiero, M; Cipollaro de L'ero, G; Donnarumma, G; Marcatili, A; Galdiero, F

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify whether Salmonella typhimurium porins can affect the expression of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) genes. Human monocytes were treated with porins, and total RNAs were analysed by Northern blotting to evaluate the expression of IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 in both treated and untreated cell cultures. Porins induced a significant increase in IL-1 and IL-6 transcripts. This increase was related to the dose of porins, and it peaked 5 hr after treatment. The same results were obtained when polymyxin B was added to the porin preparation to eliminate eventual traces of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) associated with porins. The porins-mediated increase in interleukin transcripts did not require de novo protein synthesis, and it was because of the enhanced half-life of IL-1 and IL-6 mRNAs, rather an increased rate of gene transcription. These data suggest that porins may affect inflammatory and immunological responses by enhancing the expression of cytokine genes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8567029

  14. The human homolog of the JE gene encodes a monocyte secretory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, B J; Stier, P; Ernst, T; Wong, G G

    1989-01-01

    The mouse fibroblast gene, JE, was one of the first platelet-derived growth factor-inducible genes to be described as such. The protein encoded by JE (mJE) is the prototype of a large family of secreted, cytokinelike glycoproteins, all of whose members are induced by a mitogenic or activation signal in monocytes macrophages, and T lymphocytes; JE is the only member to have been identified in fibroblasts. We report the identification of a human homolog for murine JE, cloned from human fibroblasts. The protein predicted by the coding sequence of human JE (hJE) is 55 amino acids shorter than mJE, and its sequence is identical to that of a recently purified monocyte chemoattractant. When expressed in COS cells, the human JE cDNA directed the secretion of N-glycosylated proteins of Mr 16,000 to 18,000 as well as proteins of Mr 15,500, 15,000, and 13,000. Antibodies raised against mJE recognized these hJE species, all of which were secreted by human fibroblasts. hJE expression was stimulated in HL60 cells during phorbol myristate acetate-induced monocytoid differentiation. However, resting human monocytes constitutively secreted hJE; treatment with gamma interferon did not enhance hJE expression in monocytes, and treatment with phorbol myristate acetate or lipopolysaccharide inhibited its expression. Thus, human JE encodes yet another member of the large family of JE-related cytokinelike proteins, in this case a novel human monocyte and fibroblast secretory protein. Images PMID:2513477

  15. Modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kharazmi, A; Nielsen, H; Hovgaard, D; Borregaard, N; Nissen, N I

    1991-04-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been shown to inhibit the chemotaxis and enhance the oxidative burst response of human neutrophils in vitro. The present study describes the effect of recombinant GM-CSF on the neutrophil and monocyte function in patients with lymphoma undergoing GM-CSF treatment. Patients with either Hodgkin's or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were treated with various dosages (2-16 micrograms kg-1 body weight per day for 5 days) of rhGM-CSF by intravenous or subcutaneous route. Prior to and on day 5 of rhGM-CSF treatment, neutrophil and monocyte chemotaxis and chemiluminescence responses to f-Met-Leu-Phe, zymosan activated serum (ZAS) and opsonized zymosan (OZ) were determined. It was observed that chemotactic response of neutrophils to f-Met-Leu-Phe and ZAS was reduced, whereas the chemiluminescence response of both cell types to f-Met-Leu-Phe and zymosan was enhanced by up to 43-fold. rhGM-CSF treatment did not affect degranulation of the neutrophils as measured by release of vitamin B12 binding protein. Degree of modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by rhGM-CSF was independent of rhGM-CSF dosages administered. These data suggest that phagocytic defence system may be enhanced by GM-CSF treatment and that this cytokine may be a useful therapeutic adjunct in compromised patients.

  16. Differential regulation of TLR4 expression in human B cells and monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ganley-Leal, Lisa M.; Liang, YanMei; Jagannathan-Bogdan, Madhumita; Farraye, Francis A.; Nikolajczyk, Barbara S.

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an innate immune receptor that is constitutively and inducibly activated in monocytes. Although TLR4 is expressed at very low levels on human B cells from healthy individuals, recent reports showed that TLR4 expression and function is elevated in B cells from inflammatory disease patients. New data showed that TLR4 expression on B cell is increased upon stimulation through surface Igμ and CD40 in combination with IL-4. In contrast, monocyte stimulation through CD40 and IL-4 receptors decreased TLR4 surface expression. Analysis of molecular signatures of TLR4 activation in stimulated B cells suggested that TLR4 is regulated by different mechanisms in B cells compared to monocytes. PU.1 and interferon regulatory factor association with the TLR4 promoter are sufficient for TLR4 transcription, but are not sufficient for surface TLR4 expression on B cells. In contrast, the PU.1/IRF combination is sufficient for surface TLR4 expression on monocytes. These data identify mechanisms that can activate B cell TLR4 expression in inflammatory disease patients, and demonstrate that B cells have additional layers of TLR4 regulation absent in monocytes. PMID:20956019

  17. The interaction between filarial parasites and human monocyte/macrophage populations.

    PubMed

    Semnani, Roshanak Tolouei

    2013-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is a mafor tropical disease affecting approximately 120 million people worldwide. Patent infection, by and large, is clinically asymptomatic but is associated with the inability of T cells to proliferate or produce IFN-γ in response to parasite antigen. Monocyte dysfunction is one hypothesis felt to explain the lack of an antigen-specific T cell response. In fact, monocytes from filaria-infected individuals have been shown to be studded with internalized filarial antigens. Understanding how the phenotype and the function of these monocytes are altered through the internalization of these parasite antigens is one of the areas our laboratory has focused on. In fact, the existence and/or function of alternatively activated macrophages in murine models of filarial infections have been extensively studied. Whether this population of macrophages can be induced in human filarial infections is the main focus of this review. PMID:23456837

  18. Induction of release of tumor necrosis factor from human monocytes by staphylococci and staphylococcal peptidoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, C P; Mattsson, E; Martinez-Martinez, L; De Graaf, L; Van Strijp, J A; Verbrugh, H A; Verhoef, J; Fleer, A

    1993-01-01

    The role of cytokines in gram-positive infections is still relatively poorly defined. The purpose of this study was to establish whether or not intact staphylococci and purified peptidoglycans and peptidoglycan components derived from staphylococci are capable of stimulating the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by human monocytes. We show here that intact staphylococci and purified peptidoglycans, isolated from three Staphylococcus epidermidis and three S. aureus strains, were indeed able to induce secretion of TNF by human monocytes in a concentration-dependent fashion. TNF release was detected by both enzyme immunoassay and the L929 fibroblast bioassay. In the enzyme immunoassay, a minimal concentration of peptidoglycan of 1 micrograms/ml was required to detect TNF release by monocytes, whereas in the bioassay a peptidoglycan concentration of 10 micrograms/ml was needed to detect a similar amount of TNF release. Peptidoglycan components such as the stem peptide, tetra- and pentaglycine, and muramyl dipeptide were unable to induce TNF release from human monocytes. PMID:8406805

  19. O- and N-glycosylation lead to different molecular mass forms of human monocyte interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Gross, V; Andus, T; Castell, J; Vom Berg, D; Heinrich, P C; Gerok, W

    1989-04-24

    The biosynthesis and secretion of human interleukin-6 (IL-6) was studied in monocyte cultures stimulated with endotoxin. After labeling with [35S]methionine and immunoprecipitation with a specific antiserum one major (24 kDa) and four minor (27.5, 23.3, 22.5 and 21.8 kDa) molecular mass forms of IL-6 could be found in the cells and media. Incubation of monocyte media with sialidase and subsequently with endo-alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, which cleaves Gal(beta 1-3)Gal-NAc from serine or threonine, led to the formation of only two forms of IL-6 with apparent molecular masses of 25 and 21.8 kDa. The latter had an electrophoretic mobility indistinguishable from that of 125I-labeled recombinant human IL-6. The results suggest that human monocyte IL-6 carries O-glycosidically bound carbohydrates with a Gal(beta 1-3)Gal-NAc core to which only sialic acid is bound. Differences in O-glycosylation are the major cause for the molecular heterogeneity of IL-6. A small part of IL-6 (27.5 kDa form) is in addition N-glycosylated. Incubation of monocytes with tunicamycin and 1-deoxymynnojirimycin and treatment of IL-6 with endoglucosaminidase H suggested that the 27.5 kDa form of IL-6 carries at least one N-linked complex-type oligosaccharide chain. PMID:2523818

  20. Antithrombin III, but not C1 esterase inhibitor reduces inflammatory response in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocytes in an ex-vivo whole blood setting.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Patrick; Nestler, Frank; Leimert, Anja; Bucher, Michael; Czeslick, Elke; Sablotzki, Armin; Raspè, Christoph

    2014-12-01

    In order to examine the immunomodulatory effects of antithrombin III (AT-III) and C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) in human monocytes, we investigated the intracellular expression of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in an ex-vivo laboratory study in a whole blood setting. Heparinized whole blood samples from 23 healthy male and female volunteers (mean age: 27±7years) were pre-incubated with clinically relevant concentrations of AT-III (n=11) and C1-INH (n=12), then stimulated with 0.2 ng/mL lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 3h. After phenotyping CD14⁺ monocytes, intracellular expression of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α was assessed using flow cytometry. In addition, 12 whole blood samples (AT-III and C1-INH, n=6 each) were examined using hirudin for anticoagulation; all samples were processed in the same way. To exclude cytotoxicity effects, 7-amino-actinomycin D and Nonidet P40 staining were used to investigate probes. This study is the first to demonstrate the influence of C1-INH and AT-III on the monocytic inflammatory response in a whole blood setting, which mimics the optimal physiological setting. Cells treated with AT-III exhibited significant downregulation of the proportion of gated CD14⁺ monocytes for IL-6 and IL-8, in a dose-dependent manner; downregulation for TNF-α did not reach statistical significance. There were no significant effects on mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). In contrast, C1-INH did not significantly reduce the proportion of gated CD14⁺ monocytes or the MFI regarding IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-8. When using hirudin for anticoagulation, no difference in the anti-inflammatory properties of AT-III and C1-INH in monocytes occurs. Taken together, in contrast to TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly downregulated in monocytes in an ex-vivo setting of human whole blood when treated with AT-III. This finding implicates monocytes as an important point of action regarding the anti-inflammatory properties of AT-III in sepsis. C1

  1. Monocytes increase human cardiac myofibroblast-mediated extracellular matrix remodeling through TGF-β1.

    PubMed

    Mewhort, Holly E M; Lipon, Brodie D; Svystonyuk, Daniyil A; Teng, Guoqi; Guzzardi, David G; Silva, Claudia; Yong, V Wee; Fedak, Paul W M

    2016-03-15

    Following myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac myofibroblasts remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM), preventing mechanical complications. However, prolonged myofibroblast activity leads to dysregulation of the ECM, maladaptive remodeling, fibrosis, and heart failure (HF). Chronic inflammation is believed to drive persistent myofibroblast activity; however, the mechanisms are unclear. We assessed the influence of peripheral blood monocytes on human cardiac myofibroblast activity in a three-dimensional (3D) ECM microenvironment. Human cardiac myofibroblasts isolated from surgical biopsies of the right atrium and left ventricle were seeded into 3D collagen matrices. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated from healthy human donors and cocultured with myofibroblasts. Monocytes increased myofibroblast activity measured by collagen gel contraction (baseline: 57.6 ± 5.9% vs. coculture: 65.2 ± 7.1% contraction; P < 0.01) and increased local ECM remodeling quantified by confocal microscopy. Under coculture conditions that allow indirect cellular interaction via paracrine factors but prevent direct cell-cell contact, monocytes had minimal effects on myofibroblast activity (17.9 ± 11.1% vs. 6.4 ± 7.0% increase, respectively; P < 0.01). When cells were cultured under direct contact conditions, multiplex analysis of the coculture media revealed an increase in the paracrine factors TGF-β1 and matrix metalloproteinase 9 compared with baseline (122.9 ± 10.1 pg/ml and 3,496.0 ± 190.4 pg/ml, respectively, vs. 21.5 ± 16.3 pg/ml and 183.3 ± 43.9 pg/ml; P < 0.001). TGF-β blockade abolished the monocyte-induced increase in cardiac myofibroblast activity. These data suggest that direct cell-cell interaction between monocytes and cardiac myofibroblasts stimulates TGF-β-mediated myofibroblast activity and increases remodeling of local matrix. Peripheral blood monocyte interaction with human cardiac myofibroblasts stimulates myofibroblast activity through release of TGF-β1

  2. Complete amino acid sequence of a human monocyte chemoattractant, a putative mediator of cellular immune reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, E A; Yoshimura, T; Leonard, E J; Tanaka, S; Griffin, P R; Shabanowitz, J; Hunt, D F; Appella, E

    1989-01-01

    In a study of the structural basis for leukocyte specificity of chemoattractants, we determined the complete amino acid sequence of human glioma-derived monocyte chemotactic factor (GDCF-2), a peptide that attracts human monocytes but not neutrophils. The choice of a tumor cell product for analysis was dictated by its relative abundance and an amino acid composition indistinguishable from that of lymphocyte-derived chemotactic factor (LDCF), the agonist thought to account for monocyte accumulation in cellular immune reactions. By a combination of Edman degradation and mass spectrometry, it was established that GDCF-2 comprises 76 amino acid residues, commencing at the N terminus with pyroglutamic acid. The peptide contains four half-cystines, at positions 11, 12, 36, and 52, which create a pair of loops, clustered at the disulfide bridges. The relative positions of the half-cystines are almost identical to those of monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor (MDNCF), a peptide of similar mass but with only 24% sequence identity to GDCF. Thus, GDCF and MDNCF have a similar gross secondary structure because of the loops formed by the clustered disulfides, and their different leukocyte specificities are most likely determined by the large differences in primary sequence. PMID:2648385

  3. Baseline Gene Expression Signatures in Monocytes from Multiple Sclerosis Patients Treated with Interferon-beta

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Marta F.; Nurtdinov, Ramil N.; Río, Jordi; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background A relatively large proportion of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients do not respond to interferon-beta (IFNb) treatment. In previous studies with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we identified a subgroup of IFNb non-responders that was characterized by a baseline over-expression of type I IFN inducible genes. Additional mechanistic experiments carried out in IFNb non-responders suggested a selective alteration of the type I IFN signaling pathway in the population of blood monocytes. Here, we aimed (i) to investigate whether the type I IFN signaling pathway is up-regulated in isolated monocytes from IFNb non-responders at baseline; and (ii) to search for additional biological pathways in this cell population that may be implicated in the response to IFNb treatment. Methods Twenty RRMS patients classified according to their clinical response to IFNb treatment and 10 healthy controls were included in the study. Monocytes were purified from PBMC obtained before treatment by cell sorting and the gene expression profiling was determined with oligonucleotide microarrays. Results and discussion Purified monocytes from IFNb non-responders were characterized by an over-expression of type I IFN responsive genes, which confirms the type I IFN signature in monocytes suggested from previous studies. Other relevant signaling pathways that were up-regulated in IFNb non-responders were related with the mitochondrial function and processes such as protein synthesis and antigen presentation, and together with the type I IFN signaling pathway, may also be playing roles in the response to IFNb. PMID:23637780

  4. Biological effects of double-walled carbon nanotubes on the innate immune system: An in vitro study on THP-1 human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Dekali, Samir; Bachelet, Christine; Maunoir-Regimbal, Séverine; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Debouzy, Jean-Claude; Crouzier, David

    2016-07-15

    DWCNTs have numerous industrial and biomedical applications and several studies reported that they could act as immunomodulator systems. The immune system is the first line of defence of the human body when exposed to particulate matter. In order to investigate DWCNTs' role on innate immunity, we used THP-1 monocytic cells for the purpose of this study. We showed that DWCNTs were not cytotoxic until 6h, 24h, 48h and 72h of incubation with THP-1 monocytic cells (concentrations tested from 10 to 50μg/mL). From 6h to 72h of incubation of THP-1 cells with DWCNTs, we measured a significant increase of the baseline cell index using xCELLigence(®) technology showing cell adhesion. After 24h of exposure, DWCNTs agglomerates were localized in THP-1 monocyte cytoplasm and cell adhesion was observed simultaneously with a significant increase in the expression of CD11b and CD14 cell surface proteins. Pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and IL-10) was also measured in supernatants after 6h or 24h of exposure to DWCNTs. This pro-inflammatory response was increased in THP-1 monocytic cells pre-treated with LPS. Altogether, our data indicate that DWCNTs induce an increased pro-inflammatory response of THP-1 monocytes and seem to modulate cell surface protein expression confirming that DWCNTs could act as stimulators of innate immunity. PMID:27475286

  5. Biological effects of double-walled carbon nanotubes on the innate immune system: An in vitro study on THP-1 human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Dekali, Samir; Bachelet, Christine; Maunoir-Regimbal, Séverine; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Debouzy, Jean-Claude; Crouzier, David

    2016-07-15

    DWCNTs have numerous industrial and biomedical applications and several studies reported that they could act as immunomodulator systems. The immune system is the first line of defence of the human body when exposed to particulate matter. In order to investigate DWCNTs' role on innate immunity, we used THP-1 monocytic cells for the purpose of this study. We showed that DWCNTs were not cytotoxic until 6h, 24h, 48h and 72h of incubation with THP-1 monocytic cells (concentrations tested from 10 to 50μg/mL). From 6h to 72h of incubation of THP-1 cells with DWCNTs, we measured a significant increase of the baseline cell index using xCELLigence(®) technology showing cell adhesion. After 24h of exposure, DWCNTs agglomerates were localized in THP-1 monocyte cytoplasm and cell adhesion was observed simultaneously with a significant increase in the expression of CD11b and CD14 cell surface proteins. Pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and IL-10) was also measured in supernatants after 6h or 24h of exposure to DWCNTs. This pro-inflammatory response was increased in THP-1 monocytic cells pre-treated with LPS. Altogether, our data indicate that DWCNTs induce an increased pro-inflammatory response of THP-1 monocytes and seem to modulate cell surface protein expression confirming that DWCNTs could act as stimulators of innate immunity.

  6. Alcohol-Induced miR-27a Regulates Differentiation and M2 Macrophage Polarization of Normal Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Banishree; Bruneau, Johanna C.; Kodys, Karen; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a leading cause of liver disease characterized by liver inflammation, fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, or liver cirrhosis. Immunomodulatory effects of alcohol on monocytes and macrophages contribute to alcoholic liver disease. Alcohol use, an independent risk factor for progression of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection–mediated liver disease, impairs host defense and alters cytokine production and monocyte/macrophage activation. We hypothesized that alcohol and HCV have synergistic effects on the phenotype and function of monocytes. Our data show that acute alcohol binge drinking in healthy volunteers results in increased frequency of CD16+ and CD68+ and M2-type (CD206+, dendritic cell [DC]-SIGN+–expressing and IL-10–secreting) circulating CD14+ monocytes. Expression of HCV-induced CD68 and M2 markers (CD206 and DC-SIGN) in normal monocytes was further enhanced in the presence of alcohol. The levels of microRNA (miR)-27a was significantly upregulated in monocytes cultured in the presence of alcohol or alcohol and HCV as compared with HCV alone. The functional role of miR-27a in macrophage polarization was demonstrated by transfecting monocytes with an miR-27a inhibitor that resulted in reduced alcohol- and HCV- mediated monocyte activation (CD14 and CD68 expression), polarization (CD206 and DC-SIGN expression), and IL-10 secretion. Over-expression of miR-27a in monocytes enhanced IL-10 secretion via activation of the ERK signaling pathway. We found that miR-27a promoted ERK phosphorylation by downregulating the expression of ERK inhibitor sprouty2 in monocytes. Thus, we identified that sprouty2 is a target of miR-27a in human monocytes. In summary, our study demonstrates the regulatory role of miR-27a in alcohol-induced monocyte activation and polarization. PMID:25716995

  7. Human monocytes and macrophages undergo M1-type inflammatory polarization in response to high levels of glucose.

    PubMed

    Torres-Castro, Israel; Arroyo-Camarena, Úrsula D; Martínez-Reyes, Camilo P; Gómez-Arauz, Angélica Y; Dueñas-Andrade, Yareth; Hernández-Ruiz, Joselín; Béjar, Yadira L; Zaga-Clavellina, Verónica; Morales-Montor, Jorge; Terrazas, Luis I; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Escobedo, Galileo

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data suggest that elevated glucose may promote inflammatory activation of monocytic lineage cells with the ability to injure vascular endothelial tissue of diabetic patients, however evidence in primary human monocytes and macrophages is still insufficient. We investigated the effect of high glucose concentration on the inflammatory capacity of human macrophages in vitro and examined whether similar responses were detectable in circulating monocytes from prediabetic patients. Primary monocytes were isolated from healthy blood donors and differentiated into macrophages. Differentiated macrophages were exposed to normal levels of glucose (NG), high glucose (HG) or high mannitol as osmotic pressure control (OP) for three days. Using PCR, ELISA and flow cytometry, we found that HG macrophages showed overexpression of CD11c and inducible nitric oxide synthase as well as down-regulation of arginase-1 and interleukin (IL)-10 with respect to NG and OP macrophages. Consistent with in vitro results, circulating monocytes from hyperglycemic patients exhibited higher levels of CD11c and lower expression of CD206 than monocytes from normoglycemic controls. In subjects with hyperglycemia, elevation in CD11c(+) monocytes was associated with increased obesity, insulin resistance, and triglyceridemia as well as low serum IL-10. Our data suggest that human monocytes and macrophages undergo M1-like inflammatory polarization when exposed to high levels of glucose on in vitro culture conditions and in patients with hyperglycemia. These results demonstrate that excess glucose has direct effects on macrophage activation though the molecular mechanisms mediating such a response remain to be elucidated. PMID:27269375

  8. Monocytes Induce STAT3 Activation in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Promote Osteoblast Formation

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaidou, Vicky; Wong, Mei Mei; Redpath, Andia N.; Ersek, Adel; Baban, Dilair F.; Williams, Lynn M.; Cope, Andrew P.; Horwood, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    A major therapeutic challenge is how to replace bone once it is lost. Bone loss is a characteristic of chronic inflammatory and degenerative diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. Cells and cytokines of the immune system are known to regulate bone turnover by controlling the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts, the bone resorbing cells. However, less is known about the regulation of osteoblasts (OB), the bone forming cells. This study aimed to investigate whether immune cells also regulate OB differentiation. Using in vitro cell cultures of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), it was shown that monocytes/macrophages potently induced MSC differentiation into OBs. This was evident by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) after 7 days and the formation of mineralised bone nodules at 21 days. This monocyte-induced osteogenic effect was mediated by cell contact with MSCs leading to the production of soluble factor(s) by the monocytes. As a consequence of these interactions we observed a rapid activation of STAT3 in the MSCs. Gene profiling of STAT3 constitutively active (STAT3C) infected MSCs using Illumina whole human genome arrays showed that Runx2 and ALP were up-regulated whilst DKK1 was down-regulated in response to STAT3 signalling. STAT3C also led to the up-regulation of the oncostatin M (OSM) and LIF receptors. In the co-cultures, OSM that was produced by monocytes activated STAT3 in MSCs, and neutralising antibodies to OSM reduced ALP by 50%. These data indicate that OSM, in conjunction with other mediators, can drive MSC differentiation into OB. This study establishes a role for monocyte/macrophages as critical regulators of osteogenic differentiation via OSM production and the induction of STAT3 signalling in MSCs. Inducing the local activation of STAT3 in bone cells may be a valuable tool to increase bone formation in osteoporosis and arthritis, and in localised bone remodelling during fracture repair. PMID:22802946

  9. Comparative Analysis of the Interaction of Helicobacter pylori with Human Dendritic Cells, Macrophages, and Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fehlings, Michael; Drobbe, Lea; Moos, Verena; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Hagen, Jana; Beigier-Bompadre, Macarena; Pang, Ervinna; Belogolova, Elena; Churin, Yuri; Schneider, Thomas; Meyer, Thomas F.; Aebischer, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori may cause chronic gastritis, gastric cancer, or lymphoma. Myeloid antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are most likely involved in the induction and expression of the underlying inflammatory responses. To study the interaction of human APC subsets with H. pylori, we infected monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), and monocyte-derived (classically activated; M1) macrophages with H. pylori and analyzed phenotypic alterations, cytokine secretion, phagocytosis, and immunostimulation. Since we detected CD163+ (alternatively activated; M2) macrophages in gastric biopsy specimens from H. pylori-positive patients, we also included monocyte-derived M2 macrophages in the study. Upon H. pylori infection, monocytes secreted interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12p40 (partially secreted as IL-23) but not IL-12p70. Infected DCs became activated, as shown by the enhanced expression of CD25, CD80, CD83, PDL-1, and CCR7, and secreted IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, and IL-23. However, infection led to significantly downregulated CD209 and suppressed the constitutive secretion of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). H. pylori-infected M1 macrophages upregulated CD14 and CD32, downregulated CD11b and HLA-DR, and secreted mainly IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, and IL-23. Activation of DCs and M1 macrophages correlated with increased capacity to induce T-cell proliferation and decreased phagocytosis of dextran. M2 macrophages upregulated CD14 and CD206 and secreted IL-10 but produced less of the proinflammatory cytokines than M1 macrophages. Thus, H. pylori affects the functions of human APC subsets differently, which may influence the course and the outcome of H. pylori infection. The suppression of MIF in DCs constitutes a novel immune evasion mechanism exploited by H. pylori. PMID:22615251

  10. MCP-1–Activated Monocytes Induce Apoptosis in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongli; Elner, Susan G.; Chen, Xun; Field, Matthew G.; Petty, Howard R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The inflammatory response in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is characterized by mononuclear leukocyte infiltration of the outer blood–retina barrier formed by the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). A key mechanistic element in AMD progression is RPE dysfunction and apoptotic cell loss. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1–activated monocytes induce human RPE apoptosis and whether Ca2+ and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in this process. Methods. A cell-based fluorometric assay was used to measure intracellular Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i) in RPE cells loaded with fluorescent Ca2+ indicator. Intracellular RPE ROS levels were measured by using the 5- and 6-chloromethyl-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescence diacetate acetyl ester (CM-H2DCFDA) assay. RPE apoptosis was evaluated by activated caspase-3, Hoechst staining, and apoptosis ELISA. Results. MCP-1–activated human monocytes increased [Ca2+]i, ROS levels, and apoptosis in RPE cells, all of which were inhibited by 8-bromo-cyclic adenosine diphosphoribosyl ribose (8-Br-cADPR), an antagonist of cADPR. Although the ROS scavengers pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) significantly inhibited ROS production and apoptosis induced by activated monocytes, they did not affect induced Ca2+ levels. The induced Ca2+ levels and apoptosis in RPE cells were inhibited by an antibody against cluster of differentiation antigen 14 (CD14), an adhesion molecule expressed by these cells. Conclusions. These results indicate that CD14, Ca2+, and ROS are involved in activated monocyte-induced RPE apoptosis and that cADPR contributes to these changes. Understanding the complex interactions among CD14, cADPR, Ca2+, and ROS may provide new insights and treatments of retinal diseases, including AMD. PMID:21447688

  11. Iron oxide nanoparticles modulate lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in primary human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Susann; Stenvik, Jørgen; Nilsen, Asbjørn M

    2016-01-01

    Co-stimulation of the immune system to more than one agent concomitantly is very common in real life, and considering the increasing use of engineered nanoparticles and nanomaterials, it is highly relevant to assess the ability of these materials to modulate key innate immune responses, which has not yet been studied in detail. We investigated the immunomodulatory effects of 10 nm and 30 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) on primary human monocytes in the presence and absence of Toll-like receptor 4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Prior to the cell studies, we characterized the physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles in cell culture medium and ensured that the nanoparticles were free from biological contamination. Cellular uptake of the IONPs in monocytes was assessed using transmission electron microscopy. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that the IONPs per se did not induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β. However, the IONPs had the ability to suppress LPS-induced nuclear factor kappa B activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines in primary human monocytes in an LPS and a particle dose-dependent manner. Using confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled LPS, we showed that the effects correlated with impaired LPS internalization by monocytes in the presence of IONPs, which could be partly explained by LPS adsorption onto the nanoparticle surface. Additionally, the results from particle pretreatment experiments indicate that other cellular mechanisms might also play a role in the observed effects, which warrants further studies to elucidate the additional mechanisms underlying the capacity of IONPs to alter the reactivity of monocytes to LPS and to mount an appropriate cellular response. PMID:27695322

  12. Iron oxide nanoparticles modulate lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in primary human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Grosse, Susann; Stenvik, Jørgen; Nilsen, Asbjørn M

    2016-01-01

    Co-stimulation of the immune system to more than one agent concomitantly is very common in real life, and considering the increasing use of engineered nanoparticles and nanomaterials, it is highly relevant to assess the ability of these materials to modulate key innate immune responses, which has not yet been studied in detail. We investigated the immunomodulatory effects of 10 nm and 30 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) on primary human monocytes in the presence and absence of Toll-like receptor 4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Prior to the cell studies, we characterized the physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles in cell culture medium and ensured that the nanoparticles were free from biological contamination. Cellular uptake of the IONPs in monocytes was assessed using transmission electron microscopy. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that the IONPs per se did not induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β. However, the IONPs had the ability to suppress LPS-induced nuclear factor kappa B activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines in primary human monocytes in an LPS and a particle dose-dependent manner. Using confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled LPS, we showed that the effects correlated with impaired LPS internalization by monocytes in the presence of IONPs, which could be partly explained by LPS adsorption onto the nanoparticle surface. Additionally, the results from particle pretreatment experiments indicate that other cellular mechanisms might also play a role in the observed effects, which warrants further studies to elucidate the additional mechanisms underlying the capacity of IONPs to alter the reactivity of monocytes to LPS and to mount an appropriate cellular response.

  13. Human monocytes/macrophages are a target of Neisseria meningitidis Adhesin A (NadA).

    PubMed

    Franzoso, Susanna; Mazzon, Cristina; Sztukowska, Maryta; Cecchini, Paola; Kasic, Tihana; Capecchi, Barbara; Tavano, Regina; Papini, Emanuele

    2008-05-01

    Specific surface proteins of Neisseria meningitidis have been proposed to stimulate leukocytes during tissue invasion and septic shock. In this study, we demonstrate that the adhesin N. meningitidis Adhesin A (NadA) involved in the colonization of the respiratory epithelium by hypervirulent N. meningitidis B strains also binds to and activates human monocytes/macrophages. Expression of NadA on the surface on Escherichia coli does not increase bacterial-monocyte association, but a NadA-positive strain induced a significantly higher amount of TNF-alpha and IL-8 compared with the parental NadA-negative strain, suggesting that NadA has an intrinsic stimulatory action on these cells. Consistently, highly pure, soluble NadA(Delta351-405), a proposed component of an antimeningococcal vaccine, efficiently stimulates monocytes/macrophages to secrete a selected pattern of cytokines and chemotactic factors characterized by high levels of IL-8, IL-6, MCP-1, and MIP-1alpha and low levels of the main vasoactive mediators TNF-alpha and IL-1. NadA(Delta351-405) also inhibited monocyte apoptosis and determined its differentiation into a macrophage-like phenotype.

  14. Lymphocyte-conditioned medium protects human monocyte-macrophages from cholesteryl ester accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Fogelman, A M; Seager, J; Haberland, M E; Hokom, M; Tanaka, R; Edwards, P A

    1982-01-01

    Exposure of human monocyte-macrophages to as little as 50 microliters of cultured medium from lymphocytes stimulated by concanavalin A (Con A) resulted in a dramatic decrease in the activities of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor pathway, the LDL-dextran sulfate pathway, and the scavenger receptor pathway. This effect was not seen when the monocyte-macrophages were exposed to culture medium from lymphocytes cultured without Con A or with Con A together with alpha-methyl mannoside or control medium without lymphocytes. The activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase also decreased in monocyte-macrophages exposed to culture medium from stimulated lymphocytes. Acyl-CoA:cholesterol O-acyltransferase activity, protein synthesis, protein content, phagocytosis of heat-killed yeast, and non-receptor-mediated endocytosis were not inhibited. Monocyte-macrophages exposed to malondialdehyde altered-LDL in the presence of stimulated lymphocyte culture medium accumulated substantially less cholesteryl esters than did cells in control medium. We propose that substances produced by stimulated lymphocytes may be useful in protecting macrophages from cholesteryl ester accumulation. Images PMID:6278500

  15. Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans serotype b-specific polysaccharide antigen stimulates production of chemotactic factors and inflammatory cytokines by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, N; Yamashita, Y; Ikeda, D; Koga, T

    1996-01-01

    Serotype b-specific polysaccharide antigen (SPA) was extracted from whole cells of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 by autoclaving and purified by chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-25 and Sephacryl S-300. SPA induced the release of monocyte and leukocyte chemotactic factors by human monocytes. Polymyxin B had almost no effect on the release of monocyte chemotactic factor, but a monoclonal antibody against SPA markedly inhibited it. Human monocytes stimulated with SPA exhibited the increased mRNA expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and a neutrophil chemotactic factor, interleukin-8 (IL-8). On the other hand, SPA induced the release of IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and enhanced the expression of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNAs. Human monocytes expressed MCP-1 and IL-8 mRNAs when stimulated by human recombinant IL-1alpha, I1-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha, suggesting that these inflammatory cytokines induced by SPA might participate in the production of chemotactic factors in human monocytes. PMID:8698480

  16. Differentiation of human monocytes and derived subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells by the HLDA10 monoclonal antibody panel

    PubMed Central

    Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Machacek, Christian; Fischer, Michael B; Stockinger, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte system, consisting of monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), has an important role in tissue homeostasis as well as in eliciting immune responses against invading pathogens. Blood monocytes have been viewed for decades as precursors of tissue macrophages. Although the newest data show that in the steady state resident macrophages of many organs are monocyte independent, blood monocytes critically contribute to tissue macrophage and DC pools upon inflammation. To better understand the relationship between these populations and their phenotype, we isolated and differentiated human blood CD14+ monocytes in vitro into immature and mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) as well as into seven different monocyte-derived macrophage subsets. We used the panel of 70 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) submitted to the 10th Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigen Workshop to determine the expression profiles of these 10 populations by flow cytometry. We now can compile subpanels of mAbs to differentiate the 10 monocyte/macrophage/MoDC subsets, providing the basis for novel diagnostic and therapeutic tools. PMID:26900469

  17. An in vitro model for dengue virus infection that exhibits human monocyte infection, multiple cytokine production and dexamethasone immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Reis, Sônia Regina Nogueira Ignácio; Sampaio, André Luiz Franco; Henriques, Maria das Graças Muller; Gandini, Mariana; Azeredo, Elzinandes Leal; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes

    2007-12-01

    An important cytokine role in dengue fever pathogenesis has been described. These molecules can be associated with haemorrhagic manifestations, coagulation disorders, hypotension and shock, all symptoms implicated in vascular permeability and disease worsening conditions. Several immunological diseases have been treated by cytokine modulation and dexamethasone is utilized clinically to treat pathologies with inflammatory and autoimmune etiologies. We established an in vitro model with human monocytes infected by dengue virus-2 for evaluating immunomodulatory and antiviral activities of potential pharmaceutical products. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated significant dengue antigen detection in target cells two days after infection. TNF-alpha, IFN-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10 are produced by in vitro infected monocytes and are significantly detected in cell culture supernatants by multiplex microbead immunoassay. Dexamethasone action was tested for the first time for its modulation in dengue infection, presenting optimistic results in both decreasing cell infection rates and inhibiting TNF-alpha, IFN-alpha and IL-10 production. This model is proposed for novel drug trials yet to be applied for dengue fever.

  18. Analysis of human blood monocyte activation at the level of gene expression. Expression of alpha interferon genes during activation of human monocytes by poly IC/LC and muramyl dipeptide

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Human monocytes were activated to secrete alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) by poly IC/LC but not by other monocyte activators, such as muramyl dipeptide (MDP). In contrast, monocytes were activated to secrete fibroblast growth factor (FGF) release by MDP but not by poly IC/LC. The amount of total RNA present in unactivated and activated human monocytes was similar. Using two 32P-labeled cDNA probes (pLM001 and HuIFN-alpha 2) for human IFN-alpha genes in hybridization studies, we analyzed messenger RNA species from this gene family in activated human monocytes. After activation with poly IC/LC, two other mRNA species (2.8 and 5.5 kb) were detected in addition to the 1.0 kb mRNA normally associated with IFN-alpha secretion. Unexpectedly, monocytes activated with MDP also contained 2.8 kb IFN-alpha mRNA. There was associated with this 2.8 kb IFN-alpha mRNA, found in MDP-activated monocytes, appreciable levels of intracellular IFN-alpha activity in the absence of detectable secreted IFN-alpha. Thus the secretion of IFN-alpha in activated human monocytes can be correlated with the appearance of a 1.0 kb mRNA species after poly IC/LC exposure. Secretion appears to be defective in MDP-stimulated monocytes even though they contain active intracellular IFN-alpha apparently translated from the 2.8 kb mRNA. PMID:3838335

  19. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), -2, and -3 are chemotactic for human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Taub, D D; Proost, P; Murphy, W J; Anver, M; Longo, D L; van Damme, J; Oppenheim, J J

    1995-01-01

    Monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, -2, and -3 all have been shown to induce monocyte/macrophage migration in vitro and MCP-1, also known as MCAF, chemoattracts basophils and mast cells. We report here that natural MCP-1 as well as synthetic preparations of MCP-2 and MCP-3 stimulate significant in vitro chemotaxis of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes. This MCP-induced migration was dose-dependent and directional, but not chemokinetic. Phenotypic analysis of the T cell population responsive to MCP-1, MCP-2, and MCP-3 demonstrates that both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells migrated in response to these chemokines. Similar results were observed using human CD4+ and CD8+ T cell clones. Neutralizing antisera to MCAF or MCP-2 abrogated T cell migration in response to MCP-1 and MCP-2, respectively, but not to RANTES. Subcutaneous administration of purified MCP-1 into the hind flanks of SCID mice engrafted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) induced significant human CD3+ T cell infiltration into the site of injection at 4 h. These results demonstrate that MCP-1, MCP-2, and MCP-3 are inflammatory mediators that specifically stimulate the directional migration of T cells as well as monocytes and may play an important role in immune cell recruitment into sites of antigenic challenge. Images PMID:7883984

  20. The effect of short-chain fatty acids on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Nastasi, Claudia; Candela, Marco; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Geisler, Carsten; Hansen, Morten; Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn; Biagi, Elena; Andersen, Mads Hald; Brigidi, Patrizia; Ødum, Niels; Litman, Thomas; Woetmann, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota is essential for human health and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of several diseases. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), such as acetate, butyrate and propionate, are end-products of microbial fermentation of macronutrients that distribute systemically via the blood. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional response of immature and LPS-matured human monocyte-derived DC to SCFA. Our data revealed distinct effects exerted by each individual SCFA on gene expression in human monocyte-derived DC, especially in the mature ones. Acetate only exerted negligible effects, while both butyrate and propionate strongly modulated gene expression in both immature and mature human monocyte-derived DC. An Ingenuity pathway analysis based on the differentially expressed genes suggested that propionate and butyrate modulate leukocyte trafficking, as SCFA strongly reduced the release of several pro-inflammatory chemokines including CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11. Additionally, butyrate and propionate inhibited the expression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokines such as IL-6 and IL-12p40 showing a strong anti-inflammatory effect. This work illustrates that bacterial metabolites far from the site of their production can differentially modulate the inflammatory response and generally provides new insights into host-microbiome interactions. PMID:26541096

  1. Glutamine and alanine-induced differential expression of intracellular IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α in LPS-stimulated monocytes in human whole-blood.

    PubMed

    Raspé, C; Czeslick, E; Weimann, A; Schinke, C; Leimert, A; Kellner, P; Simm, A; Bucher, M; Sablotzki, A

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the effects of the commonly-used immunomodulators l-glutamine, l-alanine, and the combination of both l-alanyl-l-glutamine (Dipeptamin(®)) on intracellular expression of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α during endotoxemia, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human monocytes in a whole blood system were investigated by flow cytometry. Whole blood of twenty-seven healthy volunteers was stimulated with LPS and incubated with three different amino acid solutions (1. l-glutamine, 2. l-alanine, 3. l-alanyl-l-glutamine, each concentration 2 mM, 5 mM, incubation time 3 h). CD14(+) monocytes were phenotyped in whole-blood and intracellular expression of cytokines was assessed by flow cytometry. Our investigations showed for the first time in whole blood probes, imitating best physiologically present cellular interactions, that l-glutamine caused a dose-independent inhibitory effect on IL-6 and TNF-α production in human monocytes stimulated with LPS. However, l-alanine had contrary effects on IL-6 expression, significantly upregulating expression of IL-6 in LPS-treated monocytes. The impact of l-alanine on the expression of TNF-α was comparable with glutamine. Neither amino acid was able to affect IL-8 production in LPS-stimulated monocytes. The combination of both did not influence significantly IL-6 and IL-8 expression in monocytes during endotoxemia, however strongly reduced TNF-α production. For the regulation of TNF-α, l-glutamine, l-alanine and the combination of both show a congruent and exponentiated downregulating effect during endotoxemia, for the modulation of IL-6, l-glutamine and l-alanine featured opposite regulation leading to a canceling impact of each other when recombining both amino acids.

  2. Inhibition of Human Group IIA-Secreted Phospholipase A2 and THP-1 Monocyte Recruitment by Maslinic Acid.

    PubMed

    Yap, Wei Hsum; Ahmed, Nafees; Lim, Yang Mooi

    2016-10-01

    Maslinic acid is a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid which has anti-inflammatory properties. A recent study showed that secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) may be a potential binding target of maslinic acid. The human group IIA (hGIIA)-sPLA2 is found in human sera and their levels are correlated with severity of inflammation. This study aims to determine whether maslinic acid interacts with hGIIA-sPLA2 and inhibits inflammatory response induced by this enzyme. It is shown that maslinic acid enhanced intrinsic fluorescence of hGIIA-sPLA2 and inhibited its enzyme activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Molecular docking revealed that maslinic acid binds to calcium binding and interfacial phospholipid binding site, suggesting that it inhibit access of catalytic calcium ion for enzymatic reaction and block binding of the enzyme to membrane phospholipid. The hGIIA-sPLA2 enzyme is also responsible in mediating monocyte recruitment and differentiation. Results showed that maslinic acid inhibit hGIIA-sPLA2-induced THP-1 cell differentiation and migration, and the effect observed is specific to hGIIA-sPLA2 as cells treated with maslinic acid alone did not significantly affect the number of adherent and migrated cells. Considering that hGIIA-sPLA2 enzyme is known to hydrolyze glyceroacylphospholipids present in lipoproteins and cell membranes, maslinic acid may bind and inhibit hGIIA-sPLA2 enzymatic activity, thereby reduces the release of fatty acids and lysophospholipids which stimulates monocyte migration and differentiation. This study is the first to report on the molecular interaction between maslinic acid and inflammatory target hGIIA-sPLA2 as well as its effect towards hGIIA-sPLA2-induced THP-1 monocyte adhesive and migratory capabilities, an important immune-inflammation process in atherosclerosis.

  3. Expression of extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor in human peripheral blood monocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Olozak, I.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Butters, R. R.; Kifor, O.; Scadden, D. T.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor playing key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+o) homeostasis in parathyroid gland and kidney. Macrophage-like mononuclear cells appear at sites of osteoclastic bone resorption during bone turnover and may play a role in the "reversal" phase of skeletal remodeling that follows osteoclastic resorption and precedes osteoblastic bone formation. Bone resorption produces substantial local increases in Ca2+o that could provide a signal for such mononuclear cells present locally within the bone marrow microenvironment. Indeed, previous studies by other investigators have shown that raising Ca2+o either in vivo or in vitro stimulated the release of interleukin-6 (IL-6) from human peripheral blood monocytes, suggesting that these cells express a Ca2+o-sensing mechanism. In these earlier studies, however, the use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) failed to detect transcripts for the CaR previously cloned from parathyroid and kidney in peripheral blood monocytes. Since we recently found that non-specific esterase-positive, putative monocytes isolated from murine bone marrow express the CaR, we reevaluated the expression of this receptor in human peripheral blood monocytes. Immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis, performed using a polyclonal antiserum specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in human monocytes. In addition, the use of RT-PCR with CaR-specific primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products, identified CaR transcripts in the cells. Therefore, taken together, our data show that human peripheral blood monocytes possess both CaR protein and mRNA very similar if not identical to those expressed in parathyroid and kidney that could mediate the previously described, direct effects of Ca2+o on these cells. Furthermore, since mononuclear cells isolated from bone marrow also express the CaR, the latter might play some role in

  4. A quantitative method for measuring innate phagocytosis by human monocytes using real-time flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ben J; Sun, Chun; Fuller, Stephen; Skarratt, Kristen K; Petrou, Steven; Wiley, James S

    2014-04-01

    Phagocytosis is central to immunity however a rapid and standardized method is much needed for quantitative assessment of the phagocytic process. We describe a real-time flow cytometric method to quantitate the phagocytosis of fluorescent latex beads by human monocytes in serum-free conditions. Effects of buffer composition, temperature, pH, and bead surface on phagocytic rate are described. The innate phagocytic ability of human monocytes from single subjects measured by this method was relatively stable over many months although phagocytosis rate varied as much as two-fold between individuals. Comparable results were obtained with a simplified method using several mL of whole blood which is suitable for routine clinical application. This method also allows two-color flow cytometric measurement of cytosolic calcium levels during the phagocytic uptake of fluorescent beads.

  5. Alcohol and Cannabinoids Differentially Affect HIV Infection and Function of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells (MDDC)

    PubMed Central

    Agudelo, Marisela; Figueroa, Gloria; Yndart, Adriana; Casteleiro, Gianna; Muñoz, Karla; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Atluri, Venkata; Nair, Madhavan P.

    2015-01-01

    During human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, alcohol has been known to induce inflammation while cannabinoids have been shown to have an anti-inflammatory role. For instance cannabinoids have been shown to reduce susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and attenuate HIV replication in macrophages. Recently, we demonstrated that alcohol induces cannabinoid receptors and regulates cytokine production by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC). However, the ability of alcohol and cannabinoids to alter MDDC function during HIV infection has not been clearly elucidated yet. In order to study the potential impact of alcohol and cannabinoids on differentiated MDDC infected with HIV, monocytes were cultured for 7 days with GM-CSF and IL-4, differentiated MDDC were infected with HIV-1Ba-L and treated with EtOH (0.1 and 0.2%), THC (5 and 10 μM), or JWH-015 (5 and 10 μM) for 4–7 days. HIV infection of MDDC was confirmed by p24 and Long Terminal Repeats (LTR) estimation. MDDC endocytosis assay and cytokine array profiles were measured to investigate the effects of HIV and substances of abuse on MDDC function. Our results show the HIV + EtOH treated MDDC had the highest levels of p24 production and expression when compared with the HIV positive controls and the cannabinoid treated cells. Although both cannabinoids, THC and JWH-015 had lower levels of p24 production and expression, the HIV + JWH-015 treated MDDC had the lowest levels of p24 when compared to the HIV + THC treated cells. In addition, MDDC endocytic function and cytokine production were also differentially altered after alcohol and cannabinoid treatments. Our results show a differential effect of alcohol and cannabinoids, which may provide insights into the divergent inflammatory role of alcohol and cannabinoids to modulate MDDC function in the context of HIV infection. PMID:26733986

  6. Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL) induces phenotypic and functional characteristics of macrophages in THP-1 cells and human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Pujari, Radha; Kumar, Natesh; Ballal, Suhas; Eligar, Sachin M; Anupama, S; Bhat, Ganapati; Swamy, Bale M; Inamdar, Shashikala R; Shastry, Padma

    2015-02-01

    We have previously reported that a fungal lectin, Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL), stimulates proliferation and secretion of Th1/Th2 cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In the present study, we evaluated the ability of RBL to differentiate human monocytes to macrophages. RBL induced morphological changes indicative of differentiation in primary monocytes and THP-1 cells. Stimulation with RBL resulted in significant up-regulation of differentiation markers - CD54, HLA-DR, CD11b and CD11c and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines - IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6. Functionally, RBL profoundly increased phagocytic activity in monocytes. In THP-1 cells, RBL-induced phagocytosis was higher compared to the effect induced by combination of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). RBL induced a significant increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in comparison with a combined treatment of PMA+LPS. Mechanistic studies revealed the involvement of the NF-κB pathway in RBL-induced differentiation of monocytes. The data suggest that RBL mimics the combined action of PMA and LPS to induce morphological and functional differentiation in human monocytes and monocytic cell line - THP-1 to macrophages. Human monocytes differentiated to macrophages with RBL have the potential as an in vitro model to study macrophage biology. PMID:25555439

  7. Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL) induces phenotypic and functional characteristics of macrophages in THP-1 cells and human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Pujari, Radha; Kumar, Natesh; Ballal, Suhas; Eligar, Sachin M; Anupama, S; Bhat, Ganapati; Swamy, Bale M; Inamdar, Shashikala R; Shastry, Padma

    2015-02-01

    We have previously reported that a fungal lectin, Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL), stimulates proliferation and secretion of Th1/Th2 cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In the present study, we evaluated the ability of RBL to differentiate human monocytes to macrophages. RBL induced morphological changes indicative of differentiation in primary monocytes and THP-1 cells. Stimulation with RBL resulted in significant up-regulation of differentiation markers - CD54, HLA-DR, CD11b and CD11c and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines - IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6. Functionally, RBL profoundly increased phagocytic activity in monocytes. In THP-1 cells, RBL-induced phagocytosis was higher compared to the effect induced by combination of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). RBL induced a significant increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in comparison with a combined treatment of PMA+LPS. Mechanistic studies revealed the involvement of the NF-κB pathway in RBL-induced differentiation of monocytes. The data suggest that RBL mimics the combined action of PMA and LPS to induce morphological and functional differentiation in human monocytes and monocytic cell line - THP-1 to macrophages. Human monocytes differentiated to macrophages with RBL have the potential as an in vitro model to study macrophage biology.

  8. CD14{sup +} monocytes promote the immunosuppressive effect of human umbilical cord matrix stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ding; Chen, Ke; Du, Wei Ting; Han, Zhi-Bo; Ren, He; Chi, Ying; and others

    2010-09-10

    Here, the effect of CD14{sup +} monocytes on human umbilical cord matrix stem cell (hUC-MSC)-mediated immunosuppression was studied in vitro. hUC-MSCs exerted a potent inhibitory effect on the proliferation and interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) secretion capacities of CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells in response to anti-CD3/CD28 stimulation. Transwell co-culture system revealed that the suppressive effect was primarily mediated by soluble factors. Addition of prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors (indomethacin or NS-398) almost completely abrogated the immunosuppression activity of hUC-MSCs, identifying prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) as an important soluble mediator. CD14{sup +} monocytes were found to be able to enhance significantly the immunosuppressive effect of hUC-MSCs in a dose-dependent fashion. Moreover, the inflammatory cytokine IL-1{beta}, either exogenously added or produced by CD14{sup +} monocytes in culture, could trigger expression of high levels of PGE{sub 2} by hUC-MSCs, whereas inclusion of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) in the culture down-regulated not only PGE{sub 2} expression, but also reversed the promotional effect of CD14{sup +} monocytes and partially restored CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cell proliferation and IFN-{gamma} secretion. Our data demonstrate an important role of monocytes in the hUC-MSC-induced immunomodulation, which may have important implications in future efforts to explore the clinical potentials of hUC-MSCs.

  9. Histamine induced elevation of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Holden, C A; Chan, S C; Norris, S; Hanifin, J M

    1987-10-01

    We have previously reported histamine desensitization of human blood mononuclear leukocytes resulting in reduced cAMP responses to beta-adrenergic agonists, histamine and prostaglandin E1. This heterologous desensitization occurred at low, micromolar histamine concentrations and was accompanied by elevation of cAMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in these cells. We have now investigated the activity of PDE in the lymphocyte and monocyte fractions of mononuclear leukocytes to determine the site of histamine effect. PDE activity per cell was higher in monocytes (0.075 +/- 0.070 units) than lymphocytes (0.026 +/- 0.08) units). Monocytes responded to 10(-6) M histamine stimulation with a much greater increase in PDE activity (0.354 +/- 0.1 units) than did lymphocytes (0.047 +/- 0.015 units). Histamine receptor studies, using thiazolylethylamine and chlorpheniramine as H1-agonist and antagonist respectively and dimaprit and cimetidine as H2-agonists and antagonists respectively, indicated that the histamine stimulation of PDE activity is mediated predominantly through H1 histamine receptor in the monocytes and the H1 receptor in the lymphocytes. Previously histamine had been thought to increase cyclic AMP by acting on H2 receptors to activate adenylate cyclase. Our studies show that stimulation of H1 or H2 receptors by low histamine concentration can cause the opposite effect i.e. increased catabolism and a net reduction in cAMP levels. The localization of this effect predominantly to monocytes indicates a potentially important mechanism for histamine action on immune regulation. PMID:2891264

  10. Alpha-tocopherol inhibits agonist-induced monocytic cell adhesion to cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Faruqi, R; de la Motte, C; DiCorleto, P E

    1994-01-01

    Antioxidants have been proposed to be anti-atherosclerotic agents; however, the mechanisms underlying their beneficial effects are poorly understood. We have examined the effect of alpha-tocopherol (alpha-tcp) on one cellular event in atherosclerotic plaque development, monocyte adhesion to stimulated endothelial cells (ECs). Human umbilical vein ECs were pretreated with alpha-tcp before stimulation with known agonists of monocyte adhesion: IL-1 (10 ng/ml), LPS (10 ng/ml), thrombin (30 U/ml), or PMA (10 nM). Agonist-induced monocytic cell adhesion, but not basal adhesion, was inhibited in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by alpha-tcp. The IC50 of alpha-tcp on an IL-1-induced response was 45 microM. The inhibition correlated with a decrease in steady state levels of E-selectin mRNA and cell surface expression of E-selectin which is consistent with the ability of a monoclonal antibody to E-selectin to inhibit monocytic cell adhesion in this system. Probucol (50 microM) and N-acetylcysteine (20 mM) also inhibited agonist-induced monocytic cell adhesion; whereas, several other antioxidants had no significant effect. Protein kinase C (PKC) does not appear to play a role in the alpha-tcp effect since no suppression of phosphorylation of PKC substrates was observed. Activation of the transcription factor NF-kappa B is reported to be necessary but not sufficient for E-selectin expression in EC. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays failed to show an alpha-tcp-induced decrease in activation of this transcription factor after cytokine stimulation. It has been hypothesized that alpha-tcp acts as an anti-atherosclerotic molecule by inhibiting generation of oxidized LDL--a putative triggering molecule in the atherosclerotic process. Our results point to a novel alternative mechanism of action of alpha-tcp. Images PMID:7518838

  11. In vitro anti-inflammatory effects and immunomodulation by gemifloxacin in stimulated human THP-1 monocytes.

    PubMed

    Hall, I H; Schwab, U; Ward, E S; Ives, T

    2004-09-01

    Cultured human THP-1 monocytes were exposed to serial concentrations of gemifloxacin over 4 h after pre-stimulation with zymogen A for 1 h or Staphylococcus aureus for 2 h. The following parameters were assessed: pH, phagocytosis, c-AMP, NO, TNFalpha, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8 and H2O2 levels, enzyme activities of protein kinase C, NADPH oxidase, SOD, gluthathion reductase, NAG and cathepsin D as well as lipid peroxidation. The reversiblity of these changes was determined in the presence of known blockers of the phagocytic process. The effects of gemifloxacin on DNA synthesis and killing of S. aureus was assessed in bacteria alone and in those bacteria phagocytosed by THP-1 monocytes over 24 h. Gemifloxacin in stimulated THP-1 monocytes over the first 30 min caused an increase in c-AMP, NO, H2O2 and TNFalpha levels and protein kinase C, NADPH oxidase, glutathione reductase, NAG and cathepsin D activities. The pH became more acidic and phagocytosis was stimulated. These parameters were reversed at 1 h and continued to decline until 4 h. Lipid peroxidation was at the highest levels at 1 h and IL-8 levels at 2 h. DNA synthesis and bacterial growth were suppressed at 2 h in both S. aureus alone and bacteria phagocytosed by THP-1 monocytes. These effects were at a higher magnitude at 24 h. Gemifloxacin initiates a phagocyticidal effect of THP-1 monocytes at an early time of 30 min which plays a role in killing bacteria but a higher magnitude of killing of bacteria occurs later by a standard static mechanism. This early action of gemifloxacin should decrease the spread of infection and the inflammatory response since the tissue destruction process was attenuated at 4 h.

  12. Human lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells: III. Effect of L-phenylalanine methyl ester on LAK cell activation from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: possible protease involvement of monocytes, natural killer cells and LAK cells.

    PubMed

    Leung, K H

    1991-01-01

    We have shown that depletion of monocytes from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by L-phenylalanine methyl ester (PheOMe) enhanced lymphokine-activated killer cell (LAK) generation by recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) at high cell density. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of action of PheOMe on LAK activation by using trypsin, chymotrypsin, tosylphenylalaninechloromethanol (TPCK, a chymotrypsin inhibitor), tosyl-L-lysinechloromethane (TLCK, a trypsin inhibitor), phenylalaninol (PheOH), and benzamidine. PBMC were treated with 1-5 mM PheOMe for 40 min at room temperature in combination with the various agents, washed and assessed for their effects on natural killer (NK) activity against K562 cells and monocyte depletion. The treated cells were then cultured with or without rIL-2 for 3 days. LAK cytotoxicity was assayed against 51Cr-labeled K562 and Raji tumor target cells. TPCK at 10 micrograms/ml partially inhibited depletion of monocytes by PheOMe. TLCK did not prevent depletion of monocytes nor inhibition of NK activity induced by PheOMe. TPCK and TLCK inhibited NK activity by themselves. TPCK but not TLCK inhibited rIL-2 induction of LAK cells. On the other hand, PheOH and benzamidine (analogs of PheOMe) lacked any effect on monocyte depletion but abrogated the inhibitory effect of PheOMe on NK activity. They had no effect on rIL-2 activation of LAK activity enhanced by PheOMe. Trypsin potentiated the inhibitory effect of PheOMe on NK activity and monocyte depletion. Trypsin partially inhibited IL-2 activation of LAK activity enhanced by PheOMe. Chymotrypsin had little effect on NK activity but prevented the inhibitory effect of PheOMe on NK activity. It had little effect on monocyte depletion induced by PheOMe. PheOMe was hydrolysed by monocytes and chymotrypsin to Phe and methanol as determined by HPLC. TPCK inhibited hydrolysis of PheOMe by monocytes. Our data suggest that the effects of PheOMe on monocytes, NK cells and LAK

  13. Induction of IL-12 from human monocytes after stimulation with Androctonus crassicauda scorpion venom.

    PubMed

    Saadi, Samahir; Assarehzadegan, Mohammad-Ali; Pipelzadeh, Mohammad Hassan; Hadaddezfuli, Reza

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the capacity of venom from Androctonus crassicauda to induce expression/production of interleukin (IL)-12 by isolated human monocytes. For this purpose, isolated human monocytes were exposed to different concentrations of the venom (0.16-20 μg/ml) for varying periods (6, 12, and 24 h). Apart from measures of venom cytotoxicity (i.e., lactase dehydrogenase activity [LDH] release), measures of IL-12 p40 mRNA (by Real-time PCR) of IL-12 release (by ELISA) were performed. The results showed that the venom produced significant concentration- and duration of incubation-dependent cytotoxicity. Expression of IL-12 p40 mRNA was significantly increased at all exposure timepoints relative to that in unexposed cells, but was maximal after 6 h of exposure. At that timepoint, the effect from a dose of 2.5 μg venom/ml provided the maximal increase among all doses tested. At the level of the protein itself, IL-12 production remained almost consistently elevated (vs. unexposed control values) across all exposure timepoints, with the greatest formation again occurring after 6 h of incubation at a dose of 2.5 μg venom/ml. The findings from this study demonstrated that venom from the A. crassicauda scorpion contained active constituents that could induce a sustained activation of human monocytes that was manifested, in part, as promotion of the expression/production of IL-12. PMID:26415903

  14. Down-regulated expression of monocyte/macrophage major histocompatibility complex receptors in human and mouse monocytes by expression of their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Yamana, H; Tashiro-Yamaji, J; Hayashi, M; Maeda, S; Shimizu, T; Tanigawa, N; Uchiyama, K; Kubota, T; Yoshida, R

    2014-01-01

    Mouse monocyte/macrophage major histocompatibility complex (MHC) receptor 1 (MMR1; or MMR2) specific for H-2Dd (or H-2Kd) molecules is expressed on monocytes from non-H-2Dd (or non-H-2Kd), but not those from H-2Dd (or H-2Kd), inbred mice. The MMR1 and/or MMR2 is essential for the rejection of H-2Dd- and/or H-2Kd-transgenic mouse skin onto C57BL/6 (H-2DbKb) mice. Recently, we found that human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B44 was the sole ligand of human MMR1 using microbeads that had been conjugated with 80 types of HLA class I molecules covering 94·2% (or 99·4%) and 92·4% (or 96·2%) of HLA-A and B molecules of Native Americans (or Japanese), respectively. In the present study, we also explored the ligand specificity of human MMR2 using microbeads. Microbeads coated with HLA-A32, HLA-B13 or HLA-B62 antigens bound specifically to human embryonic kidney (HEK)293T or EL-4 cells expressing human MMR2 and to the solubilized MMR2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein; and MMR2+ monocytes from a volunteer bound HLA-B62 molecules with a Kd of 8·7 × 10−9 M, implying a three times down-regulation of MMR2 expression by the ligand expression. H-2Kd (or H-2Dd) transgene into C57BL/6 mice down-regulated not only MMR2 (or MMR1) but also MMR1 (or MMR2) expression, leading to further down-regulation of MMR expression. In fact, monocytes from two (i.e. MMR1+/MMR2+ and MMR1–/MMR2–) volunteers bound seven to nine types of microbeads among 80, indicating ≤ 10 types of MMR expression on monocytes. The physiological role of constitutive MMRs on monocytes possibly towards allogeneic (e.g. fetal) cells in the blood appears to be distinct from that of inducible MMRs on macrophages toward allografts in tissue. PMID:24842626

  15. Matrix metalloproteinase-12 gene regulation by a PPAR alpha agonist in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Souissi, Imen Jguirim; Billiet, Ludivine; Cuaz-Perolin, Clarisse; Rouis, Mustapha

    2008-11-01

    MMP-12, a macrophage-specific matrix metalloproteinase with large substrate specificity, has been reported to be highly expressed in mice, rabbits and human atherosclerotic lesions. Increased MMP-12 from inflammatory macrophages is associated with several degenerative diseases such as atherosclerosis. In this manuscript, we show that IL-1{beta}, a proinflammatory cytokine found in atherosclerotic plaques, increases both mRNA and protein levels of MMP-12 in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM). Since peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), such as PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, are expressed in macrophages and because PPAR activation exerts an anti-inflammatory effect on vascular cells, we have investigated the effect of PPAR{alpha} and {gamma} isoforms on MMP-12 regulation in HMDM. Our results show that MMP-12 expression (mRNA and protein) is down regulated in IL-1{beta}-treated macrophages only in the presence of a specific PPAR{alpha} agonist, GW647, in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, this inhibitory effect was abolished in IL-1{beta}-stimulated peritoneal macrophages isolated from PPAR{alpha}{sup -/-} mice and treated with the PPAR{alpha} agonist, GW647. Moreover, reporter gene transfection experiments using different MMP-12 promoter constructs showed a reduction of the promoter activities by {approx} 50% in IL-1{beta}-stimulated PPAR{alpha}-pre-treated cells. However, MMP-12 promoter analysis did not reveal the presence of a PPRE response element. The IL-1{beta} effect is known to be mediated through the AP-1 binding site. Mutation of the AP-1 site, located at - 81 in the MMP-12 promoter region relative to the transcription start site, followed by transfection analysis, gel shift and ChIP experiments revealed that the inhibitory effect was the consequence of the protein-protein interaction between GW 647-activated PPAR{alpha} and c-Fos or c-Jun transcription factors, leading to inhibition of their binding to the AP-1 motif. These studies

  16. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal-placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN(+)CD14(+)CD1a(-) phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal-fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  17. Human monocytes undergo functional re-programming during differentiation to dendritic cell mediated by human extravillous trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Shao, Qianqian; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Lin; He, Ying; Wang, Lijie; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal immune adaptation is required for a successful pregnancy to avoid rejection of the fetal–placental unit. Dendritic cells within the decidual microenvironment lock in a tolerogenic profile. However, how these tolerogenic DCs are induced and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we show that human extravillous trophoblasts redirect the monocyte-to-DC transition and induce regulatory dendritic cells. DCs differentiated from blood monocytes in the presence of human extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo displayed a DC-SIGN+CD14+CD1a− phenotype, similar with decidual DCs. HTR8-conditioned DCs were unable to develop a fully mature phenotype in response to LPS, and altered the cytokine secretory profile significantly. Functionally, conditioned DCs poorly induced the proliferation and activation of allogeneic T cells, whereas promoted CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells generation. Furthermore, the supernatant from DC and HTR-8/SVneo coculture system contained significant high amount of M-CSF and MCP-1. Using neutralizing antibodies, we discussed the role of M-CSF and MCP-1 during monocyte-to-DCs differentiation mediated by extravillous trophoblasts. Our data indicate that human extravillous trophoblasts play an important role in modulating the monocyte-to-DC differentiation through M-CSF and MCP-1, which facilitate the establishment of a tolerogenic microenvironment at the maternal–fetal interface. PMID:26857012

  18. Characterization of a human blood monocyte subset with low peroxidase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Y; Miller, P J; Thurman, G B; Neubauer, R H; Oliver, C; Favilla, T; Beman, J A; Oldham, R K; Stevenson, H C

    1983-01-01

    Two human monocyte subsets from the peripheral blood of healthy donors have been isolated in greater than 90% purity by countercurrent centrifugal elutration and human serum albumin gradients and their functional capabilities have been assessed. We have demonstrated that one subset ("regular" monocytes, RM) showed intense cytoplasmic peroxidase staining and contained substantial peroxidase activity. In contrast, another subset ("intermediate" monocytes, IM) stained poorly for peroxidase and had low peroxidase activity. By electron microscopic analysis combined with peroxidase localization, it was found that IM had fewer peroxidase-positive granules per cell than did RM. IM coelutriated with some lymphocytes and by cell sizing analysis were shown to be slightly smaller than RM. Functional and cytochemical analysis of these subsets indicated that IM had less activity than RM in assays such as accessory cell function for mitogen-induced T lymphocyte proliferation and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and that fewer IM expressed OKM1 antigen and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) receptors on their membranes than did RM. The subset of IM not bearing either the PWM receptor or the OKM1 antigen had very low peroxidase activity. IM also were found to have a greater sensitivity to polyriboinosinic and polyribocytidilic acid (100 micrograms/ml)-induced secretion of interferon. There was no significant difference in the phagocytic capability, the percentage of Fc receptor-positive cells, 5'-nucleotidase activity, DR antigen expression, or the responsiveness to migration inhibitory factor of IM as compared with RM. Furthermore, it was found that the ratio of IM to RM increased after prolonged cytapheresis, which suggests that IM are more mobilizable than RM from the extravascular reservoirs of human monocytes. Images FIGURE 5 PMID:6193141

  19. Borrelia garinii Induces CXCL13 Production in Human Monocytes through Toll-Like Receptor 2▿

    PubMed Central

    Rupprecht, Tobias A.; Kirschning, Carsten J.; Popp, Bernadette; Kastenbauer, Stefan; Fingerle, Volker; Pfister, Hans-Walter; Koedel, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested an important role for the B-cell-attracting chemokine CXCL13 in the B-cell-dominated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) infiltrate in patients with neuroborreliosis (NB). High levels of CXCL13 were present in the CSF of NB patients. It has not been clear, however, whether high CSF CXCL13 titers are specific for NB or are a characteristic of other spirochetal diseases as well. Furthermore, the mechanisms leading to the observed CXCL13 expression have not been identified yet. Here we describe similarly elevated CSF CXCL13 levels in patients with neurosyphilis, while pneumococcal meningitis patient CSF do not have high CXCL13 levels. In parallel, challenge of human monocytes in vitro with two of the spirochetal causative organisms, Borrelia garinii (the Borrelia species most frequently found in NB patients) and Treponema pallidum, but not challenge with pneumococci, induced CXCL13 release. This finding implies that a common spirochetal motif is a CXCL13 inducer. Accordingly, we found that the lipid moiety N-palmitoyl-S-(bis[palmitoyloxy]propyl)cystein (Pam3C) (three palmitoyl residues bound to N-terminal cysteine) of the spirochetal lipoproteins is critical for the CXCL13 induction in monocytes. As the Pam3C motif is known to signal via Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and an anti-TLR2 monoclonal antibody blocked CXCL13 production of human monocytes incubated with B. garinii, this suggests that TLR2 is a major mediator of Borrelia-induced secretion of CXCL13 from human monocytes. PMID:17562761

  20. Profiling of histamine H4 receptor agonists in native human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gschwandtner, M; Koether, B; Werfel, T; Stark, H; Gutzmer, R

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Since the identification of the histamine H4 receptor, several ligands activating this receptor have been described and more compounds are in development. These ligands are well characterized in pharmacological assays, including radioligand competition binding studies, GTPγS and GTPase assays. In most cases, these experiments are performed in transfected cell lines, expressing unnaturally high levels of target receptors and G-protein signalling components. In this study we investigated the specific properties of H4 receptor ligands in native cells. Experimental Approach Histamine and five different H4 receptor agonists – 4-methylhistamine, UR-PI376, clobenpropit, VUF8430 and ST-1006 – were characterized in freshly isolated human monocytes. The ligands (10 nM–10 μM) were tested as inhibitors of IL-12p70 secretion from human monocytes and the effects of the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine and the H4 receptor antagonist JNJ7777120 on their action was investigated. Key Results Histamine and all the tested agonists reduced IL-12p70 secretion into monocyte supernatants by 40–70%. The potencies varied with pEC50 values ranging from 5.7 to 6.9, depending on the agonist used. All potencies were lower than those determined in the original investigations of the compounds. Pretreatment of monocytes with H2 or H4 receptor antagonists showed that some H4 receptor ligands also had low activity at the H2 receptor. Conclusions and Implications Our study demonstrates discrepancies between the potencies obtained from assays in transfected cell lines and assays in native human cells, indicating the importance of evaluating H4 receptor ligands in native cells. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23638754

  1. Isolation and partial characterization of a specific alpha-fetoprotein receptor on human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Y; Zeng, C Q; Alpert, E

    1992-01-01

    Since a large body of data has suggested a significant role for alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in the regulation of the immune response at a number of levels, we examined the possibility of a specific receptor for AFP on the immune recognition cell, the monocyte/macrophage. Microscopic autoradiography exhibited an obvious binding of AFP almost exclusively on human peripheral monocytes but not on lymphocytes. In a human monocyte cell line (U937) Scatchard plot analysis indicated the presence of two distinct AFP-specific binding sites with a Kd of 5 x 10(-11) M, 49 binding sites per cell, and 2.5 x 10(-7) M, 7,800 binding sites per cell. 125I-ASD-AFP, AFP-radiolabeled bifunctional photoactivatable thio-cleavable cross-linker, was used to isolate the AFP binding protein from U937 cells. After ultraviolet photoactivation, 125I-sulfosuccinimidyl 2-(p-azido-salicylamido)ethyl-1,3'-dithiopropionate was covalently linked to the putative receptor. Autoradiography of SDS gradient PAGE under reducing conditions showed a major radiolabeled band at between 62 and 65 kD. To confirm the specificity of the finding, recombination of AFP with the isolated receptor was examined in artificially reconstituted membrane vesicles, which also resulted in a single band at approximately 62-65 kD by SDS-PAGE autoradiography. From the data above, we concluded that human monocytes possess a specific AFP binding protein on the membrane, a putative receptor, which may be involved with the physiological regulation of the immune response. Images PMID:1383274

  2. Human TLR8 is activated upon recognition of Borrelia burgdorferi RNA in the phagosome of human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes, Jorge L.; La Vake, Carson J.; Weinerman, Bennett; Luu, Stephanie; O'Connell, Caitlin; Verardi, Paulo H.; Salazar, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    Phagocytosed Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), the Lyme disease spirochete, induces a robust and complex innate immune response in human monocytes, in which TLR8 cooperates with TLR2 in the induction of NF-κB-mediated cytokine production, whereas TLR8 is solely responsible for transcription of IFN-β through IRF7. We now establish the role of Bb RNA in TLR8-mediated induction of IFN-β. First, using TLR2-transfected HEK.293 cells, which were unable to phagocytose intact Bb, we observed TLR2 activation by lipoprotein-rich borrelial lysates and TLR2 synthetic ligands but not in response to live spirochetes. Purified Bb RNA, but not borrelial DNA, triggered TLR8 activation. Neither of these 2 ligands induced activation of TLR7. Using purified human monocytes we then show that phagocytosed live Bb, as well as equivalent amounts of borrelial RNA delivered into the phagosome by polyethylenimine (PEI), induces transcription of IFN-β and secretion of TNF-α. The cytokine response to purified Bb RNA was markedly impaired in human monocytes naturally deficient in IRAK-4 and in cells with knockdown TLR8 expression by small interfering RNA. Using confocal microscopy we provide evidence that TLR8 colocalizes with internalized Bb RNA in both early (EEA1) and late endosomes (LAMP1). Live bacterial RNA staining indicates that spirochetal RNA does not transfer from the phagosome into the cytosol. Using fluorescent dextran particles we show that phagosomal integrity in Bb-infected monocytes is not affected. We demonstrate, for the first time, that Bb RNA is a TLR8 ligand in human monocytes and that transcription of IFN-β in response to the spirochete is induced from within the phagosomal vacuole through the TLR8-MyD88 pathway. PMID:23906644

  3. Cytokine response by human monocytes to Clostridium difficile toxin A and toxin B.

    PubMed Central

    Flegel, W A; Müller, F; Däubener, W; Fischer, H G; Hadding, U; Northoff, H

    1991-01-01

    Clostridium difficile toxins A and B isolated from strain VPI 10463 were tested for induction of cytokine release by human monocytes. Toxin B at 10(-12) M activated human monocytes as measured by release of interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), or IL-6. These effects of toxin B were heat labile (51 degrees C, 30 min). Toxin B was as effective as bacterial lipopolysaccharides in inducing IL-1 beta but less effective in inducing TNF or IL-6. Toxin B and lipopolysaccharides were synergistic in induction of IL-1 beta, TNF, and IL-6. The toxin A preparation used was 1,000-fold less active than toxin B. Apart from the difference in activity, the two toxins showed identical patterns of reaction and there was no synergism between them. A short pulse with toxin B was sufficient to trigger IL-1 release. Toxin B was also extremely toxic for monocytes. The toxicity and the induced proinflammatory monokines (IL-1 and TNF) may contribute to the pathogenic mechanisms of C. difficile infection and pseudomembranous colitis. Images PMID:1910012

  4. Dengue-2 infection and the induction of apoptosis in human primary monocytes.

    PubMed

    Torrentes-Carvalho, Amanda; Azeredo, Elzinandes L; Reis, Sonia R I; Miranda, Alessandro S; Gandini, Mariana; Barbosa, Luciana S; Kubelka, Claire F

    2009-12-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are important targets for dengue virus (DENV) replication; they induce inflammatory mediators and are sources of viral dissemination in the initial phase of the disease. Apoptosis is an active process of cellular destruction genetically regulated, in which a complex enzymatic pathway is activated and may be trigged by many viral infections. Since the mechanisms of apoptotic induction in DENV-infected target cells are not yet defined, we investigated the virus-cell interaction using a model of primary human monocyte infection with DENV-2 with the aim of identifying apoptotic markers. Cultures analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy yielded DENV antigen positive cells with rates that peaked at the second day post infection (p.i.), decayed afterwards and produced the apoptosis-related cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-10. Phosphatidylserine, an early marker for apoptosis, was increased at the cell surface and the Fas death receptor was upregulated at the second day p.i. at significantly higher rates in DENV infected cell cultures than controls. However, no detectable changes were observed in the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in infected cultures. Our data support virus modulation of extrinsic apoptotic factors in the in vitro model of human monocyte DENV-2 infection. DENV may be interfering in activation and death mechanisms by inducing apoptosis in target cells.

  5. Granzyme K synergistically potentiates LPS-induced cytokine responses in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Wensink, Annette C; Kemp, Vera; Fermie, Job; García Laorden, M Isabel; van der Poll, Tom; Hack, C Erik; Bovenschen, Niels

    2014-04-22

    Granzymes are serine proteases released by cytotoxic lymphocytes to induce apoptosis in virus-infected cells and tumor cells. Evidence is emerging that granzymes also play a role in controlling inflammation. Granzyme serum levels are elevated in patients with autoimmune diseases and infections, including sepsis. However, the function of extracellular granzymes in inflammation largely remains unknown. Here, we show that granzyme K (GrK) binds to Gram-negative bacteria and their cell-wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS). GrK synergistically enhances LPS-induced cytokine release in vitro from primary human monocytes and in vivo in a mouse model of LPS challenge. Intriguingly, these extracellular effects are independent of GrK catalytic activity. GrK disaggregates LPS from micelles and augments LPS-CD14 complex formation, thereby likely boosting monocyte activation by LPS. We conclude that extracellular GrK is an unexpected direct modulator of LPS-TLR4 signaling during the antimicrobial innate immune response.

  6. Arsenic trioxide induces apoptosis of human monocytes during macrophagic differentiation through nuclear factor-kappaB-related survival pathway down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Lemarie, Anthony; Morzadec, Claudie; Mérino, Delphine; Micheau, Olivier; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) is known to be toxic toward leukemia cells. In this study, we determined its effects on survival of human monocytic cells during macrophagic differentiation, an important biological process involved in the immune response. As(2)O(3) used at clinically relevant pharmacological concentrations induced marked apoptosis of human blood monocytes during differentiation with either granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Apoptosis of monocytes was associated with increased caspase activities and decreased DNA binding of p65 nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB); like As(2)O(3), the selective NF-kappaB inhibitor (E)-3-[(4-methylphenyl)-sulfonyl]-2-propenenitrile (Bay 11-7082) strongly reduced survival of differentiating monocytes. The role of NF-kappaB in arsenic toxicity was also studied in promonocytic U937 cells during phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced macrophagic differentiation. In these cells, As(2)O(3) first reduced DNA binding of p65 NF-kappaB and subsequently induced apoptosis. In addition, overexpression of the p65 NF-kappaB subunit, following stable infection with a p65 retroviral expressing vector, increased survival of As(2)O(3)-treated U937 cells. As(2)O(3) specifically decreased protein levels of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein and FLICE-inhibitory protein, two NF-kappaB-regulated genes in both U937 cells and blood monocytes during their differentiations. Finally, As(2)O(3) was found to inhibit macrophagic differentiation of monocytic cells when used at cytotoxic concentrations; however, overexpression of the p65 NF-kappaB subunit in U937 cells reduced its effects toward differentiation. In contrast to monocytes, well differentiated macrophages were resistant to low concentrations of As(2)O(3). Altogether, our study demonstrates that clinically relevant concentrations of As(2)O(3) induced marked apoptosis of monocytic cells during in vitro macrophagic differentiation

  7. Elevated Plasma Soluble CD14 Levels Correlate with the Monocyte Response Status During Hantaan Virus Infection in Humans.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kang; Zhang, Chunmei; Zhang, Yusi; Zhang, Yun; Zhuang, Ran; Jin, Boquan; Ma, Ying

    2015-10-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV) infection can cause severe hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in humans. CD14, a pattern recognition receptor recognizing lipopolysaccharide, is highly expressed on monocytes and can be shed as soluble CD14 (sCD14) upon monocyte activation. To understand the role of sCD14 in HFRS, the sCD14 plasma concentrations from 45 HFRS patients were quantified, and the relationships between the plasma sCD14 level and the monocyte response status and clinical parameters were analyzed. The plasma sCD14 levels were significantly higher in the HFRS patients and they correlated with monocyte expansion and activation, which were characterized by increased blood monocyte counts, the proportion of CD14(++)CD16(+) intermediate monocytes, as well as elevated plasma tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and soluble CD163 (sCD163) levels. Additionally, the high plasma sCD14 levels positively correlated with white blood cell counts and blood urea nitrogen levels and negatively correlated with platelet counts in the HFRS patients. Taken together, our data indicate that elevated plasma sCD14 levels are associated with the monocyte response status during HTNV infection in humans.

  8. Human adipose tissue-resident monocytes exhibit an endothelial-like phenotype and display angiogenic properties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adipose tissue has the unique property of expanding throughout adult life, and angiogenesis is required for its growth. However, endothelial progenitor cells contribute minimally to neovascularization. Because myeloid cells have proven to be angiogenic, and monocytes accumulate in expanding adipose tissue, they might contribute to vascularization. Methods The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells from human adipose tissue were magnetically separated according to CD45 or CD14 expression. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were obtained from SVF CD45- cells. CD14+ monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood (PB) mononuclear cells and then cultured with SVF-derived MSCs. Freshly isolated or cultured cells were characterized with flow cytometry; the conditioned media were analyzed for the angiogenic growth factors, angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with Luminex Technology; their angiogenic capacity was determined in an in vivo gelatinous protein mixture (Matrigel) plug angiogenesis assay. Results CD45+ hematopoietic cells within the SVF contain CD14+ cells that co-express the CD34 progenitor marker and the endothelial cell antigens VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2/KDR), VEGFR1/Flt1, and Tie2. Co-culture experiments showed that SVF-derived MSCs promoted the acquisition of KDR and Tie-2 in PB monocytes. MSCs secreted significant amounts of Ang-2 and HGF, but minimal amounts of bFGF, G-CSF, or GM-CSF, whereas the opposite was observed for SVF CD14+ cells. Additionally, SVF CD14+ cells secreted significantly higher levels of VEGF and bFGF than did MSCs. Culture supernatants of PB monocytes cultured with MSCs contained significantly higher concentrations of VEGF, HGF, G-CSF, and GM-CSF than did the supernatants from cultures without MSCs

  9. cGAS Senses Human Cytomegalovirus and Induces Type I Interferon Responses in Human Monocyte-Derived Cells.

    PubMed

    Paijo, Jennifer; Döring, Marius; Spanier, Julia; Grabski, Elena; Nooruzzaman, Mohammed; Schmidt, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Messerle, Martin; Hornung, Veit; Kaever, Volkhard; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections of healthy individuals are mostly unnoticed and result in viral latency. However, HCMV can also cause devastating disease, e.g., upon reactivation in immunocompromised patients. Yet, little is known about human immune cell sensing of DNA-encoded HCMV. Recent studies indicated that during viral infection the cyclic GMP/AMP synthase (cGAS) senses cytosolic DNA and catalyzes formation of the cyclic di-nucleotide cGAMP, which triggers stimulator of interferon genes (STING) and thus induces antiviral type I interferon (IFN-I) responses. We found that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) as well as monocyte-derived DC and macrophages constitutively expressed cGAS and STING. HCMV infection further induced cGAS, whereas STING expression was only moderately affected. Although pDC expressed particularly high levels of cGAS, and the cGAS/STING axis was functional down-stream of STING, as indicated by IFN-I induction upon synthetic cGAMP treatment, pDC were not susceptible to HCMV infection and mounted IFN-I responses in a TLR9-dependent manner. Conversely, HCMV infected monocyte-derived cells synthesized abundant cGAMP levels that preceded IFN-I production and that correlated with the extent of infection. CRISPR/Cas9- or siRNA-mediated cGAS ablation in monocytic THP-1 cells and primary monocyte-derived cells, respectively, impeded induction of IFN-I responses following HCMV infection. Thus, cGAS is a key sensor of HCMV for IFN-I induction in primary human monocyte-derived DC and macrophages. PMID:27058035

  10. cGAS Senses Human Cytomegalovirus and Induces Type I Interferon Responses in Human Monocyte-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paijo, Jennifer; Döring, Marius; Spanier, Julia; Grabski, Elena; Nooruzzaman, Mohammed; Schmidt, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Messerle, Martin; Hornung, Veit; Kaever, Volkhard; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections of healthy individuals are mostly unnoticed and result in viral latency. However, HCMV can also cause devastating disease, e.g., upon reactivation in immunocompromised patients. Yet, little is known about human immune cell sensing of DNA-encoded HCMV. Recent studies indicated that during viral infection the cyclic GMP/AMP synthase (cGAS) senses cytosolic DNA and catalyzes formation of the cyclic di-nucleotide cGAMP, which triggers stimulator of interferon genes (STING) and thus induces antiviral type I interferon (IFN-I) responses. We found that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) as well as monocyte-derived DC and macrophages constitutively expressed cGAS and STING. HCMV infection further induced cGAS, whereas STING expression was only moderately affected. Although pDC expressed particularly high levels of cGAS, and the cGAS/STING axis was functional down-stream of STING, as indicated by IFN-I induction upon synthetic cGAMP treatment, pDC were not susceptible to HCMV infection and mounted IFN-I responses in a TLR9-dependent manner. Conversely, HCMV infected monocyte-derived cells synthesized abundant cGAMP levels that preceded IFN-I production and that correlated with the extent of infection. CRISPR/Cas9- or siRNA-mediated cGAS ablation in monocytic THP-1 cells and primary monocyte-derived cells, respectively, impeded induction of IFN-I responses following HCMV infection. Thus, cGAS is a key sensor of HCMV for IFN-I induction in primary human monocyte-derived DC and macrophages. PMID:27058035

  11. Upregulation of expression of the chemokine receptor CCR5 by hydrogen peroxide in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, Geneviève; Le Gouill, Christian; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2003-02-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that an oxidative stress can serve as a signal to regulate the expression of CCR5. When human monocytes were exposed to graded concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), CCR5 mRNA levels increased maximally at 4 h of exposure to 200 microM of H(2)O(2) and decreased by 24 h of treatment. Pretreatment of monocytes with the NF-kappaB inhibitor BAY 11-8072 blocked the H(2)O(2)-induced augmentation of CCR5 mRNA expression, suggesting a role for this transcription factor in the regulation of CCR5 expression. CCR5 protein expression on the plasma membrane was also increased by treatment with H(2)O(2,) as assessed by flow cytometry. This was accompanied by enhanced responsiveness of H(2)O(2)-pretreated monocytes to the CCR5 ligand MIP-1beta in terms of chemotaxis and c-fos gene activation. Our results suggest that oxidative stress may indeed modulate the expression of chemokine receptors and thus contribute to regulation of the inflammatory process.

  12. Upregulation of expression of the chemokine receptor CCR5 by hydrogen peroxide in human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Lehoux, Geneviève; Le Gouill, Christian; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that an oxidative stress can serve as a signal to regulate the expression of CCR5. When human monocytes were exposed to graded concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), CCR5 mRNA levels increased maximally at 4 h of exposure to 200 microM of H(2)O(2) and decreased by 24 h of treatment. Pretreatment of monocytes with the NF-kappaB inhibitor BAY 11-8072 blocked the H(2)O(2)-induced augmentation of CCR5 mRNA expression, suggesting a role for this transcription factor in the regulation of CCR5 expression. CCR5 protein expression on the plasma membrane was also increased by treatment with H(2)O(2,) as assessed by flow cytometry. This was accompanied by enhanced responsiveness of H(2)O(2)-pretreated monocytes to the CCR5 ligand MIP-1beta in terms of chemotaxis and c-fos gene activation. Our results suggest that oxidative stress may indeed modulate the expression of chemokine receptors and thus contribute to regulation of the inflammatory process. PMID:12745546

  13. Tailored HIV-1 vectors for genetic modification of primary human dendritic cells and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Durand, Stéphanie; Nguyen, Xuan-Nhi; Turpin, Jocelyn; Cordeil, Stephanie; Nazaret, Nicolas; Croze, Séverine; Mahieux, Renaud; Lachuer, Joël; Legras-Lachuer, Catherine; Cimarelli, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) play a key role in the regulation of the immune system and are the target of numerous gene therapy applications. The genetic modification of MDDCs is possible with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-derived lentiviral vectors (LVs) but requires high viral doses to bypass their natural resistance to viral infection, and this in turn affects their physiological properties. To date, a single viral protein is able to counter this restrictive phenotype, Vpx, a protein derived from members of the HIV-2/simian immunodeficiency virus SM lineage that counters at least two restriction factors present in myeloid cells. By tagging Vpx with a short heterologous membrane-targeting domain, we have obtained HIV-1 LVs incorporating high levels of this protein (HIV-1-Src-Vpx). These vectors efficiently transduce differentiated MDDCs and monocytes either as previously purified populations or as populations within unsorted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In addition, these vectors can be efficiently pseudotyped with receptor-specific envelopes, further restricting their cellular tropism almost uniquely to MDDCs. Compared to conventional HIV-1 LVs, these novel vectors allow for an efficient genetic modification of MDDCs and, more importantly, do not cause their maturation or affect their survival, which are unwanted side effects of the transduction process. This study describes HIV-1-Src-Vpx LVs as a novel potent tool for the genetic modification of differentiated MDDCs and of circulating monocyte precursors with strong potential for a wide range of gene therapy applications.

  14. A lymphokine regulates expression of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor in human monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Takemura, S; Rossing, T H; Perlmutter, D H

    1986-01-01

    Biosynthesis and secretion of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1 PI) has been demonstrated in primary cultures of human mononuclear phagocytes, making it possible to study regulation of alpha 1 PI in normal (PiMM) and homozygous-deficient (PiZZ) individuals. In this study, expression of alpha 1 PI by blood monocytes, bronchoalveolar, and breast milk macrophages decreased during 1 wk in culture whereas expression of other secreted proteins increased. The addition of crude supernatants from mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells to confluent monolayers of mononuclear phagocytes after 1 wk in culture resulted in a 2- to 2.5-fold increase in alpha 1 PI expression. The increase in alpha 1 PI expression was dose- and time-dependent, and involved a mechanism acting at a pretranslational level as shown by an increase in specific messenger RNA content corresponding to the increase in synthesis and secretion of alpha 1 PI. Although alpha 1 PI was expressed in native form and in forms complexed with serine protease by monocytes early in culture, it was expressed in its native form alone when monocytes were incubated with the lymphokine after 1 wk in culture. The regulating factor had the characteristics of a polypeptide and was derived from T lymphocytes, but it was not interferon-alpha, -beta, -gamma, or interleukin 2. This lymphokine also stimulated synthesis of alpha 1 PI in monocytes of homozygous-deficient PiZZ individuals, but had minimal effect on secretion, thereby increasing the intracellular accumulation of the inhibitor and exaggerating the defect in secretion of alpha 1 PI in these individuals. Regulation of mononuclear phagocyte alpha 1 PI expression by a lymphokine provides a model for further analysis of the effect of enhanced synthesis on a defect in posttranslational processing/secretion and for analysis of differential regulation of protease and inhibitor expressed in the same cells. Images PMID:3485658

  15. Circulating Blood Monocyte Subclasses and Lipid-Laden Adipose Tissue Macrophages in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Pecht, Tal; Haim, Yulia; Bashan, Nava; Shapiro, Hagit; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Kirshtein, Boris; Clément, Karine; Shai, Iris; Rudich, Assaf

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral adipose tissue foam cells are increased in human obesity, and were implicated in adipose dysfunction and increased cardio-metabolic risk. In the circulation, non-classical monocytes (NCM) are elevated in obesity and associate with atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes. We hypothesized that circulating NCM correlate and/or are functionally linked to visceral adipose tissue foam cells in obesity, potentially providing an approach to estimate visceral adipose tissue status in the non-surgical obese patient. Methods We preformed ex-vivo functional studies utilizing sorted monocyte subclasses from healthy donors. Moreover, we assessed circulating blood monocyte subclasses and visceral fat adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) lipid content by flow-cytometry in paired blood and omental-fat samples collected from patients (n = 65) undergoing elective abdominal surgery. Results Ex-vivo, NCM and NCM-derived macrophages exhibited lower lipid accumulation capacity compared to classical or intermediate monocytes/-derived macrophages. Moreover, of the three subclasses, NCM exhibited the lowest migration towards adipose tissue conditioned-media. In a cohort of n = 65, increased %NCM associated with higher BMI (r = 0.250,p<0.05) and ATM lipid content (r = 0.303,p<0.05). Among patients with BMI≥25Kg/m2, linear regression models adjusted for age, sex or BMI revealed that NCM independently associate with ATM lipid content, particularly in men. Conclusions Collectively, although circulating blood NCM are unlikely direct functional precursor cells for adipose tissue foam cells, their increased percentage in the circulation may clinically reflect higher lipid content in visceral ATMs. PMID:27442250

  16. MicroRNA Cargo of Extracellular Vesicles from Alcohol-exposed Monocytes Signals Naive Monocytes to Differentiate into M2 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Saha, Banishree; Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Kodys, Karen; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-coated extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by cells can serve as vehicles for delivery of biological materials and signals. Recently, we demonstrated that alcohol-treated hepatocytes cross-talk with immune cells via exosomes containing microRNA (miRNAs). Here, we hypothesized that alcohol-exposed monocytes can communicate with naive monocytes via EVs. We observed increased numbers of EVs, mostly exosomes, secreted by primary human monocytes and THP-1 monocytic cells in the presence of alcohol in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. EVs derived from alcohol-treated monocytes stimulated naive monocytes to polarize into M2 macrophages as indicated by increased surface expression of CD68 (macrophage marker), M2 markers (CD206 (mannose receptor) and CD163 (scavenger receptor)), secretion of IL-10, and TGFβ and increased phagocytic activity. miRNA profiling of the EVs derived from alcohol-treated THP-1 monocytes revealed high expression of the M2-polarizing miRNA, miR-27a. Treatment of naive monocytes with control EVs overexpressing miR-27a reproduced the effect of EVs from alcohol-treated monocytes on naive monocytes and induced M2 polarization, suggesting that the effect of alcohol EVs was mediated by miR-27a. We found that miR-27a modulated the process of phagocytosis by targeting CD206 expression on monocytes. Importantly, analysis of circulating EVs from plasma of alcoholic hepatitis patients revealed increased numbers of EVs that contained high levels of miR-27a as compared with healthy controls. Our results demonstrate the following: first, alcohol increases EV production in monocytes; second, alcohol-exposed monocytes communicate with naive monocytes via EVs; and third, miR-27a cargo in monocyte-derived EVs can program naive monocytes to polarize into M2 macrophages.

  17. Fibronectin and serum amyloid P component stimulate C3b- and C3bi- mediated phagocytosis in cultured human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) and serum amyloid P component (SAP) markedly enhance phagocytosis mediated by the C3b and C3bi receptors of cultured human monocytes but not of granulocytes. (The C3b and C3bi receptors of granulocytes can be activated by treatment of these phagocytes with PMA.) Activation of monocyte C3 receptors by FN is developmentally regulated: Freshly explanted monocytes respond to FN with a small increase in C3 receptor-mediated phagocytosis while monocytes matured in culture exhibit a much greater response. The mechanism of action of FN on C3 receptors of cultured monocytes is unique in two respects. First, while substrate-bound FN or SAP activate monocyte C3 receptors, soluble FN does not. Second, stimulation of the basal surface of monocyte plasma membranes by substrate-bound FN activates C3b and C3bi receptors on the apical surface of the plasma membrane, i.e., at sites remote from the segments of membrane in contact with the FN or SAP. PMID:6225825

  18. Tetrahydrophthalazine derivative "sodium nucleinate" exert its anti-inflammatory effects through inhibition of oxidative burst in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Jukić, Tomislav; Ihan, Alojz; Jukić, Dubravko

    2012-06-01

    We described the use of a new chemical substance Sodium nucleinate (SN) as an immunomodulatory substance exhibiting antiinflammatory properties. Sodium nucleinate (SN) registrated in Russian Federation as Tamerit, is 2-amino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrophthalazine-1,4-dione sodium salt dihydrate, derivative of well known chemical substance luminol. To comprehend the mechanisms of SN immunomodulatory activity, we examined the SN modulation of the oxidative burst responses of whole blood human monocytes and polimorphonuclear cells (PMC) stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or E. coli suspension in vitro. SN did not inhibit the proportion of neutrophils and monocytes phagocytosing E. coli. Oxidative burst responses of monocytes stimulated with PMA were strongly inhibited at SN concentration ranging from 10-500 mg/ml, less efficient inhibitor was SN in E. coli stimulated monocytes (inhibition range was from 50-500 mg/ml SN). SN inhibited PMC oxidative burst only in range 100-500 mg/ml SN. In conclusion, we found SN as an efficient inhibitor of oxidative burst in monocytes. Since ROS generation in monocytes/macrophages has been found to be important for LPS-driven production of several proinflammatory cytokines, SN may exsert its antiinflammatory effects through monocyte/macrophage oxidative burst inhibition.

  19. Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived superantigen induces proinflammatory monokine gene expression in the THP-1 human monocytic cell line.

    PubMed Central

    al-Daccak, R; Mehindate, K; Hébert, J; Rink, L; Mecheri, S; Mourad, W

    1994-01-01

    Soluble factors produced by Mycoplasma arthritidis play an important role in the pathology of arthritis in rodents, which closely resembles human rheumatoid arthritis. At least one of the products of these microorganisms, M. arthritidis-T cell mitogen (MAM), has biological activities in common with superantigens. These superantigens activate T cells in a V beta-restricted fashion, and this response is strictly dependent on the presence of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-positive cells. In the present study, we have examined the ability of MAM to induce proinflammatory monokine (interleukin 1 beta [IL-1 beta] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-alpha]) gene expression in the THP-1 monocytic cell line. Treatment of these cells (which express a very low level of HLA-DR molecules) with gamma interferon (INF-gamma) induced HLA-DR, -DQ, and -DP molecules and enabled them to respond to MAM in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in an increase in the level of steady-state mRNA for IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha. Stimulation of the U937 monocytic cell line (MHC class II-negative even after INF-gamma treatment) with MAM did not induce either IL-1 beta or TNF-alpha transcription. Moreover, MAM adsorption on Raji (MHC class II-positive) cells resulted in the loss of its cytokine-inducing activity to induce monokine gene expression. These findings demonstrate clearly that MAM induces monokine gene expression following interaction with MHC class II molecules. Pretreatment of INF-gamma-treated THP-1 cells with the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D prevented the induction of monokine mRNA, whereas cycloheximide superinduced mRNA after stimulation with MAM. Finally, our results, obtained with protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors and antiphosphotyrosine Western blotting (immunoblotting), indicate that protein tyrosine kinase is involved in MAM-induced IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha gene expression in the THP-1 monocytic cell line. The capacity of MAM to induce proinflammatory

  20. Human Amnion-Derived Stem Cells Have Immunosuppressive Properties on NK Cells and Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiali; Koike-Soko, Chika; Sugimoto, Jun; Yoshida, Toshiko; Okabe, Motonori; Nikaido, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Human amnion-derived cells are considered to be a promising alternative cell source for their potential clinical use in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine because of their proliferation and differentiation ability. The cells can easily be obtained from human amnion, offering a potential source without medical intervention. It has been proven that human amnion-derived cells express immunosuppressive factors CD59 and HLA-G, implying that they may have an immunosuppressive function. To assess the immunosuppressive activity, we investigated the effect of human amnion-derived cells on NK cell and monocyte function. Amnion-derived cells inhibited the cytotoxicity of NK cells to K562 cells. The inhibition depended on the NK/amnion-derived cell ratio. The inhibition of NK cytotoxicity was recovered by continuous culturing without amnion-derived cells. The inhibition of NK cytotoxicity was related to the downregulation of the expression of the activated NK receptors and the production of IFN-γ, as well as the upregulation of the expression of IL-10 and PGE2 in human amnion-derived cells. The addition of antibody to IL-10 or PGE2 inhibitor tended to increase NK cytotoxicity. IL-10 and PGE2 might be involved in the immunosuppressive activity of amniotic cells toward NK cells. Amniotic cells also suppressed the activity of cytokine production in monocytes analyzed with TNF-α and IL-6. These data suggested that amniotic cells have immunosuppressive activity.

  1. Adjuvant-induced Human Monocyte Secretome Profiles Reveal Adjuvant- and Age-specific Protein Signatures.

    PubMed

    Oh, Djin-Ye; Dowling, David J; Ahmed, Saima; Choi, Hyungwon; Brightman, Spencer; Bergelson, Ilana; Berger, Sebastian T; Sauld, John F; Pettengill, Matthew; Kho, Alvin T; Pollack, Henry J; Steen, Hanno; Levy, Ofer

    2016-06-01

    Adjuvants boost vaccine responses, enhancing protective immunity against infections that are most common among the very young. Many adjuvants activate innate immunity, some via Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs), whose activities varies with age. Accordingly, characterization of age-specific adjuvant-induced immune responses may inform rational adjuvant design targeting vulnerable populations. In this study, we employed proteomics to characterize the adjuvant-induced changes of secretomes from human newborn and adult monocytes in response to Alum, the most commonly used adjuvant in licensed vaccines; Monophosphoryl Lipid A (MPLA), a TLR4-activating adjuvant component of a licensed Human Papilloma Virus vaccine; and R848 an imidazoquinoline TLR7/8 agonist that is a candidate adjuvant for early life vaccines. Monocytes were incubated in vitro for 24 h with vehicle, Alum, MPLA, or R848 and supernatants collected for proteomic analysis employing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) (data available via ProteomeXchange, ID PXD003534). 1894 non-redundant proteins were identified, of which ∼30 - 40% were common to all treatment conditions and ∼5% were treatment-specific. Adjuvant-stimulated secretome profiles, as identified by cluster analyses of over-represented proteins, varied with age and adjuvant type. Adjuvants, especially Alum, activated multiple innate immune pathways as assessed by functional enrichment analyses. Release of lactoferrin, pentraxin 3, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 was confirmed in newborn and adult whole blood and blood monocytes stimulated with adjuvants alone or adjuvanted licensed vaccines with distinct clinical reactogenicity profiles. MPLA-induced adult monocyte secretome profiles correlated in silico with transcriptome profiles induced in adults immunized with the MPLA-adjuvanted RTS,S malaria vaccine (Mosquirix™). Overall, adjuvants such as Alum, MPLA and R848 give rise to distinct and age-specific monocyte secretome profiles

  2. Adjuvant-induced Human Monocyte Secretome Profiles Reveal Adjuvant- and Age-specific Protein Signatures*

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Djin-Ye; Dowling, David J.; Ahmed, Saima; Choi, Hyungwon; Brightman, Spencer; Bergelson, Ilana; Berger, Sebastian T.; Sauld, John F.; Pettengill, Matthew; Kho, Alvin T.; Pollack, Henry J.; Steen, Hanno; Levy, Ofer

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants boost vaccine responses, enhancing protective immunity against infections that are most common among the very young. Many adjuvants activate innate immunity, some via Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs), whose activities varies with age. Accordingly, characterization of age-specific adjuvant-induced immune responses may inform rational adjuvant design targeting vulnerable populations. In this study, we employed proteomics to characterize the adjuvant-induced changes of secretomes from human newborn and adult monocytes in response to Alum, the most commonly used adjuvant in licensed vaccines; Monophosphoryl Lipid A (MPLA), a TLR4-activating adjuvant component of a licensed Human Papilloma Virus vaccine; and R848 an imidazoquinoline TLR7/8 agonist that is a candidate adjuvant for early life vaccines. Monocytes were incubated in vitro for 24 h with vehicle, Alum, MPLA, or R848 and supernatants collected for proteomic analysis employing liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) (data available via ProteomeXchange, ID PXD003534). 1894 non-redundant proteins were identified, of which ∼30 - 40% were common to all treatment conditions and ∼5% were treatment-specific. Adjuvant-stimulated secretome profiles, as identified by cluster analyses of over-represented proteins, varied with age and adjuvant type. Adjuvants, especially Alum, activated multiple innate immune pathways as assessed by functional enrichment analyses. Release of lactoferrin, pentraxin 3, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 was confirmed in newborn and adult whole blood and blood monocytes stimulated with adjuvants alone or adjuvanted licensed vaccines with distinct clinical reactogenicity profiles. MPLA-induced adult monocyte secretome profiles correlated in silico with transcriptome profiles induced in adults immunized with the MPLA-adjuvanted RTS,S malaria vaccine (Mosquirix™). Overall, adjuvants such as Alum, MPLA and R848 give rise to distinct and age-specific monocyte secretome profiles

  3. SECTM1 produced by tumor cells attracts human monocytes via CD7-mediated activation of the PI3K pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Ge, Yingbin; Xiao, Min; Lopez-Coral, Alfonso; Li, Ling; Roesch, Alexander; Huang, Catherine; Alexander, Peter; Vogt, Thomas; Xu, Xiaowei; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Lieu, Melissa; Belser, Eric; Liu, Rui; Somasundaram, Rajasekharan; Herlyn, Meenhard; Kaufman, Russel E

    2014-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have essential roles in tumor progression and metastasis. Tumor cells recruit myeloid progenitors and monocytes to the tumor site, where they differentiate into TAMs; however, this process is not well studied in humans. Here we show that human CD7, a T-cell and NK cell receptor, is highly expressed by monocytes and macrophages. Expression of CD7 decreases in M-CSF-differentiated macrophages and in melanoma-conditioned medium-induced macrophages (MCMI/Mφ) in comparison to monocytes. A ligand for CD7, SECTM1 (secreted and transmembrane protein 1), is highly expressed in many tumors, including melanoma cells. We show that SECTM1 binds to CD7 and significantly increases monocyte migration by activation of the PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase) pathway. In human melanoma tissues, tumor-infiltrating macrophages expressing CD7 are present. These melanomas, with CD7-positive inflammatory cell infiltrations, frequently highly express SECTM1, including an N-terminal, soluble form, which can be detected in the sera of metastatic melanoma patients but not in normal sera. Taken together, our data demonstrate that CD7 is present on monocytes and tumor macrophages and that its ligand, SECTM1, is frequently expressed in corresponding melanoma tissues, possibly acting as a chemoattractant for monocytes to modulate the melanoma microenvironment.

  4. SECTM1 Produced by Tumor Cells Attracts Human Monocytes Via CD7-mediated Activation of the PI3K Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Ge, Yingbin; Xiao, Min; Lopez-Coral, Alfonso; Li, Ling; Roesch, Alexander; Huang, Catherine; Alexander, Peter; Vogt, Thomas; Xu, Xiaowei; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Lieu, Melissa; Belser, Eric; Liu, Rui; Somasundaram, Rajasekharan; Herlyn, Meenhard; Kaufman, Russel E.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play essential roles in tumor progression and metastasis. Tumor cells recruit myeloid progenitors and monocytes to the tumor site, where they differentiate into TAMs; however, this process is not well studied in humans. Here we show that human CD7, a T cell and NK cell receptor, is highly expressed by monocytes and macrophages. Expression of CD7 decreases in M-CSF differentiated macrophages and in Melanoma-conditioned Medium Induced Macrophages (MCMI/Mϕ) in comparison to monocytes. A ligand for CD7, SECTM1 (Secreted and transmembrane protein 1), is highly expressed in many tumors, including melanoma cells. We show that SECTM1 binds to CD7 and significantly increases monocyte migration by activation of the PI3K pathway. In human melanoma tissues, tumor-infiltrating macrophages expressing CD7 are present. These melanomas, with CD7-positive inflammatory cell infiltrations, frequently highly express SECTM1, including an N-terminal, soluble form, which can be detected in the sera of metastatic melanoma patients but not in normal sera. Taken together, our data demonstrate that CD7 is present on monocytes and tumor macrophages, and that its ligand, SECTM1, is frequently expressed in corresponding melanoma tissues, possibly acting as a chemoattractant for monocytes to modulate the melanoma microenvironment. PMID:24157461

  5. The human cytomegalovirus lytic cycle is induced by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in peripheral blood monocytes and in the THP-1 monocytic cell line.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-En; Miller, William E

    2015-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) resides in a latent form in hematopoietic progenitors and undifferentiated cells within the myeloid lineage. Maturation and differentiation along the myeloid lineage triggers lytic replication. Here, we used peripheral blood monocytes and the monocytic cell line THP-1 to investigate the effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on HCMV replication. Interestingly, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 induces lytic replication marked by upregulation of HCMV gene expression and production of infectious virus. Moreover, we demonstrate that the effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 correlate with maturation/differentiation of the monocytes and not by directly stimulating the MIEP. These results are somewhat surprising as 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 typically boosts immunity to bacteria and viruses rather than driving the infectious life cycle as it does for HCMV. Defining the signaling pathways kindled by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 will lead to a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms that determine the fate of HCMV once it infects cells in the myeloid lineage. PMID:25965798

  6. The human cytomegalovirus lytic cycle is induced by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in peripheral blood monocytes and in the THP-1 monocytic cell line.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-En; Miller, William E

    2015-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) resides in a latent form in hematopoietic progenitors and undifferentiated cells within the myeloid lineage. Maturation and differentiation along the myeloid lineage triggers lytic replication. Here, we used peripheral blood monocytes and the monocytic cell line THP-1 to investigate the effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on HCMV replication. Interestingly, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 induces lytic replication marked by upregulation of HCMV gene expression and production of infectious virus. Moreover, we demonstrate that the effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 correlate with maturation/differentiation of the monocytes and not by directly stimulating the MIEP. These results are somewhat surprising as 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 typically boosts immunity to bacteria and viruses rather than driving the infectious life cycle as it does for HCMV. Defining the signaling pathways kindled by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 will lead to a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms that determine the fate of HCMV once it infects cells in the myeloid lineage.

  7. Outer membrane vesicles from Brucella abortus promote bacterial internalization by human monocytes and modulate their innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Cora N; Delpino, M Victoria; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2012-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by some gram-negative bacteria have been shown to exert immunomodulatory effects that favor the establishment of the infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the interaction of OMVs from Brucella abortus with human epithelial cells (HeLa) and monocytes (THP-1), and the potential immunomodulatory effects they may exert. Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, FITC-labeled OMVs were shown to be internalized by both cell types. Internalization was shown to be partially mediated by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Pretreatment of THP-1 cells with Brucella OMVs inhibited some cytokine responses (TNF-α and IL-8) to E. coli LPS, Pam3Cys or flagellin (TLR4, TLR2 and TLR5 agonists, respectively). Similarly, pretreatment with Brucella OMVs inhibited the cytokine response of THP-1 cells to B. abortus infection. Treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs during IFN-γ stimulation reduced significantly the inducing effect of this cytokine on MHC-II expression. OMVs induced a dose-dependent increase of ICAM-1 expression on THP-1 cells and an increased adhesion of these cells to human endothelial cells. The addition of OMVs to THP-1 cultures before the incubation with live B. abortus resulted in increased numbers of adhered and internalized bacteria as compared to cells not treated with OMVs. Overall, these results suggest that OMVs from B. abortus exert cellular effects that promote the internalization of these bacteria by human monocytes, but also downregulate the innate immune response of these cells to Brucella infection. These effects may favor the persistence of Brucella within host cells. PMID:23189190

  8. Outer Membrane Vesicles from Brucella abortus Promote Bacterial Internalization by Human Monocytes and Modulate Their Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Cora N.; Delpino, M. Victoria; Fossati, Carlos A.; Baldi, Pablo C.

    2012-01-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by some Gram-negative bacteria have been shown to exert immunomodulatory effects that favor the establishment of the infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the interaction of OMVs from Brucella abortus with human epithelial cells (HeLa) and monocytes (THP-1), and the potential immunomodulatory effects they may exert. Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, FITC-labeled OMVs were shown to be internalized by both cell types. Internalization was shown to be partially mediated by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Pretreatment of THP-1 cells with Brucella OMVs inhibited some cytokine responses (TNF-α and IL-8) to E. coli LPS, Pam3Cys or flagellin (TLR4, TLR2 and TLR5 agonists, respectively). Similarly, pretreatment with Brucella OMVs inhibited the cytokine response of THP-1 cells to B. abortus infection. Treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs during IFN-γ stimulation reduced significantly the inducing effect of this cytokine on MHC-II expression. OMVs induced a dose-dependent increase of ICAM-1 expression on THP-1 cells and an increased adhesion of these cells to human endothelial cells. The addition of OMVs to THP-1 cultures before the incubation with live B. abortus resulted in increased numbers of adhered and internalized bacteria as compared to cells not treated with OMVs. Overall, these results suggest that OMVs from B. abortus exert cellular effects that promote the internalization of these bacteria by human monocytes, but also downregulate the innate immune response of these cells to Brucella infection. These effects may favor the persistence of Brucella within host cells. PMID:23189190

  9. Eicosanoid modulation by the short-chain fatty acid n-butyrate in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kovarik, Johannes J; Hölzl, Markus A; Hofer, Johannes; Waidhofer-Söllner, Petra; Sobanov, Yury; Koeffel, René; Saemann, Marcus D; Mechtcheriakova, Diana; Zlabinger, Gerhard J

    2013-07-01

    n-Butyrate deriving from bacterial fermentation in the mammalian intestine is a key determinant in gastrointestinal homeostasis. We examined the effects of this short-chain fatty acid and Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR) and TLR4 engagement on inflammatory/immunity-associated genes, cyclo-oxygenases (COXs), prostaglandins (PGs) and leukotrienes (LTs) in human monocytes. Before RNA isolation, freshly isolated human monocytes were co-incubated for different time-points with 1 mm n-butyrate alone or in combination with bacterial stimuli. Based on a knowledge-driven approach, a signature of 180 immunity/inflammation-associated genes was picked and real-time PCR analysis was performed. Pathway analysis was carried out using a web-based database analysing program. Based on these gene expression studies the findings were evaluated at the protein/mediator level by Western blot analysis, FACS and ELISA. Following co-incubation with n-butyrate and lipopolysaccharide, key enzymes of the eicosanoid pathway, like PTGS2 (COX-2), TXS, ALOX5, LTA4H and LTC4S, were significantly up-regulated compared with stimulation with lipopolysaccharide alone. Furthermore, release of the lipid mediators PGE(2), 15d-PGJ(2), LTB(4) and thromboxane B(2) was increased by n-butyrate. Regarding signalling, n-butyrate had no additional effect on mitogen-activated protein kinase and interfered differently with early and late phases of nuclear factor-κB signalling. Our results suggest that among many other mediators of eicosanoid signalling n-butyrate massively induces PGE(2) production by increasing the expression of PTGS2 (COX-2) in monocytes following TLR4 and TLR2 activation and induces secretion of LTB(4) and thromboxane B(2). This underscores the role of n-butyrate as a crucial mediator of gut-specific immunity.

  10. A human coronavirus responsible for the common cold massively kills dendritic cells but not monocytes.

    PubMed

    Mesel-Lemoine, Mariana; Millet, Jean; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Law, Helen; Vabret, Astrid; Lorin, Valérie; Escriou, Nicolas; Albert, Matthew L; Nal, Béatrice; Tangy, Frédéric

    2012-07-01

    Human coronaviruses are associated with upper respiratory tract infections that occasionally spread to the lungs and other organs. Although airway epithelial cells represent an important target for infection, the respiratory epithelium is also composed of an elaborate network of dendritic cells (DCs) that are essential sentinels of the immune system, sensing pathogens and presenting foreign antigens to T lymphocytes. In this report, we show that in vitro infection by human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) induces massive cytopathic effects in DCs, including the formation of large syncytia and cell death within only few hours. In contrast, monocytes are much more resistant to infection and cytopathic effects despite similar expression levels of CD13, the membrane receptor for HCoV-229E. While the differentiation of monocytes into DCs in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4 requires 5 days, only 24 h are sufficient for these cytokines to sensitize monocytes to cell death and cytopathic effects when infected by HCoV-229E. Cell death induced by HCoV-229E is independent of TRAIL, FasL, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and caspase activity, indicating that viral replication is directly responsible for the observed cytopathic effects. The consequence of DC death at the early stage of HCoV-229E infection may have an impact on the early control of viral dissemination and on the establishment of long-lasting immune memory, since people can be reinfected multiple times by HCoV-229E.

  11. Human Cytomegalovirus Promotes Survival of Infected Monocytes via a Distinct Temporal Regulation of Cellular Bcl-2 Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Collins-McMillen, Donna; Kim, Jung Heon; Nogalski, Maciej T.; Stevenson, Emily V.; Caskey, Joshua R.; Cieply, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monocytes play a key role in the hematogenous dissemination of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) to target organ systems. To infect monocytes and reprogram them to deliver infectious virus, HCMV must overcome biological obstacles, including the short life span of monocytes and their antiviral proapoptotic response to infection. We have shown that virally induced upregulation of cellular Mcl-1 promotes early survival of HCMV-infected monocytes, allowing cells to overcome an early apoptotic checkpoint at around 48 h postinfection (hpi). Here, we demonstrate an HCMV-dependent shift from Mcl-1 as the primary antiapoptotic player to the related protein, Bcl-2, later during infection. Bcl-2 was upregulated in HCMV-infected monocytes beginning at 48 hpi. Treatment with the Bcl-2 antagonist ABT-199 only reduced the prosurvival effects of HCMV in target monocytes beginning at 48 hpi, suggesting that Mcl-1 controls survival prior to 48 hpi, while Bcl-2 promotes survival after 48 hpi. Although Bcl-2 was upregulated following viral binding/signaling through cellular integrins (compared to Mcl-1, which is upregulated through binding/activation of epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR]), it functioned similarly to Mcl-1, adopting the early role of Mcl-1 in preventing caspase-3 cleavage/activation. This distinct, HCMV-induced shift from Mcl-1 to Bcl-2 occurs in response to a cellular upregulation of proapoptotic Bax, as small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of Bax reduced the upregulation of Bcl-2 in infected monocytes and rescued the cells from the apoptotic effects of Bcl-2 inhibition. Our data demonstrate a distinct survival strategy whereby HCMV induces a biphasic regulation of cellular Bcl-2 proteins to promote host cell survival, leading to viral dissemination and the establishment of persistent HCMV infection. IMPORTANCE Hematogenous dissemination of HCMV via infected monocytes is a crucial component of the viral survival strategy and is required for the

  12. Glucose transporter 1-expressing proinflammatory monocytes are elevated in combination antiretroviral therapy-treated and untreated HIV+ subjects.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Clovis S; Anzinger, Joshua J; Zhou, Jingling; Gouillou, Maelenn; Landay, Alan; Jaworowski, Anthony; McCune, Joseph M; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2014-12-01

    Monocyte activation during HIV-1 infection is associated with increased plasma levels of inflammatory markers and increased risk for premature development of age-related diseases. Because activated monocytes primarily use glucose to support cellular metabolism, we hypothesized that chronic monocyte activation during HIV-1 infection induces a hypermetabolic response with increased glucose uptake. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated glucose transporter 1 (Glut1) expression and glucose uptake by monocyte subpopulations in HIV-seropositive (HIV(+)) treatment-naive individuals (n = 17), HIV(+) individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy with viral loads below detection (n = 11), and HIV-seronegative (HIV(-)) individuals (n = 16). Surface expression of Glut1 and cellular uptake of the fluorescent glucose analog 2-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1, 3-diazol-4-yl) amino)-2 deoxyglucose were analyzed by flow cytometry on monocyte subpopulations. Irrespective of treatment status, monocytes from HIV(+) persons had significantly increased surface expression of Glut1 compared with those from HIV(-) controls. Nonclassical (CD14(+)CD16(++)) and intermediate (CD14(++)CD16(+)) monocyte subpopulations showed higher Glut1 expression than did classical (CD14(++)CD16(-)) monocytes. Intermediate monocytes from treatment-naive HIV(+) individuals also showed increased uptake of 2-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1, 3-diazol-4-yl) amino)-2 deoxyglucose compared with those from HIV(-) controls. Our results show that HIV infection is associated with increased glucose metabolism in monocytes and that Glut1 expression by proinflammatory monocytes is a potential marker of inflammation in HIV-infected subjects. However, the possibility exists whereby other Gluts such as Glut3 and Glut4 may also support the influx of glucose into activated and inflammatory monocyte populations.

  13. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Attenuates the Oxidative Stress-Induced Decrease of CD33 Expression in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Beltrán, Silvia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Gonzalez-Reyes, Susana; Juarez-Figueroa, Ulises E.; Gonzalez, Yolanda

    2013-01-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is a natural lignan with recognized antioxidant and beneficial properties that is isolated from Larrea tridentata. In this study, we evaluated the effect of NDGA on the downregulation of oxidant stress-induced CD33 in human monocytes (MNs). Oxidative stress was induced by iodoacetate (IAA) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and was evaluated using reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and cell viability. NDGA attenuates toxicity, ROS production and the oxidative stress-induced decrease of CD33 expression secondary to IAA or H2O2 in human MNs. It was also shown that NDGA (20 μM) attenuates cell death in the THP-1 cell line that is caused by treatment with either IAA or H2O2. These results suggest that NDGA has a protective effect on CD33 expression, which is associated with its antioxidant activity in human MNs. PMID:23533689

  14. The hepatitis B virus e antigen suppresses the respiratory burst and mobility of human monocytes and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Leu, Chuen-Miin; Lu, Yong-Chen; Peng, Wei-Li; Chu, Hsin-Tzu; Hu, Cheng-po

    2014-11-01

    The Hepatitis B virus (HBV) e antigen (HBeAg) is a secretory, non-structural protein, and associated with persistent infection of HBV. Previous studies indicate that HBeAg is able to regulate T cell-mediated responses, however, the interaction between HBeAg and the innate immune system is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that recombinant HBeAg (rHBe) bound to human peripheral blood monocytes, neutrophils, and B lymphocytes but not to T lymphocytes. We focused on investigating the effects of HBeAg on monocytes and neutrophils and found that rHBe decreased the respiratory burst in both types of cells. Furthermore, we observed that cell migration in monocytes and neutrophils was suppressed by rHBe in a transwell assay. The attenuation of rHBe was not caused by a general cytotoxic effect because rHBe treatment stimulated low levels of cytokine and chemokine production by monocytes and it promoted neutrophil survival. Since the recruitment of monocytes and neutrophils to the infected site is crucial for the initiation of inflammation, HBeAg may modulate innate immune responses by diminishing the respiratory burst and migration of monocytes and neutrophils, which might interfere with the subsequent innate and adaptive immune responses against HBV, leading to the establishment of chronic infection.

  15. Proteome analysis of human monocytic THP-1 cells primed with oxidized low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong Han; Kim, Hyun Tae; Choi, Myung-Sook; Lee, Won Ha; Huh, Tae-Lin; Park, Yong Bok; Moon, Byung Jo; Kwon, Oh-Shin

    2006-02-01

    Native low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and oxidized LDL (oxLDL) possess a wide variety of biological properties, and play a central role in atherogenesis. In this study, we used a proteomic analysis of human monocyte THP-1 cells induced with oxLDL or with LDL, to identify proteins potentially involved in atherosclerotic processes. Of the 2500 proteins detected, 93 were differentially expressed as a result of priming with LDL or oxLDL. The proteins were unambiguously identified by comparing the masses of their tryptic peptides with those of all known proteins using MALDI-TOF MS and the NCBI database. The largest differences in expression were observed for vimentin (94-fold increase), meningioma-expressed antigen 6 (48-fold increase), serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (40-fold increase), and beta-1,3-galactosyltransferase (15-fold increase). In contrast, the abundance of an unnamed protein product and phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decreased 30-fold and 25-fold, respectively. The expression of some selected proteins was confirmed by Western blot and RT-PCR analyses. The proteins identified in this study are attractive candidates for further biomarker research. This description of the altered protein profiles induced by oxLDL in human monocytes will support functional studies of the macrophage-derived foam cells involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:16402358

  16. Age-Related Gene Expression Differences in Monocytes from Human Neonates, Young Adults, and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Ann-Jay; Kollmann, Tobias R.; Smale, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of age-related differences in the innate and adaptive immune systems have been proposed to contribute to the increased susceptibility to infection of human neonates and older adults. The emergence of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) provides an opportunity to obtain an unbiased, comprehensive, and quantitative view of gene expression differences in defined cell types from different age groups. An examination of ex vivo human monocyte responses to lipopolysaccharide stimulation or Listeria monocytogenes infection by RNA-seq revealed extensive similarities between neonates, young adults, and older adults, with an unexpectedly small number of genes exhibiting statistically significant age-dependent differences. By examining the differentially induced genes in the context of transcription factor binding motifs and RNA-seq data sets from mutant mouse strains, a previously described deficiency in interferon response factor-3 activity could be implicated in most of the differences between newborns and young adults. Contrary to these observations, older adults exhibited elevated expression of inflammatory genes at baseline, yet the responses following stimulation correlated more closely with those observed in younger adults. Notably, major differences in the expression of constitutively expressed genes were not observed, suggesting that the age-related differences are driven by environmental influences rather than cell-autonomous differences in monocyte development. PMID:26147648

  17. Pharmacologic inhibition of tpl2 blocks inflammatory responses in primary human monocytes, synoviocytes, and blood.

    PubMed

    Hall, J Perry; Kurdi, Yahya; Hsu, Sang; Cuozzo, John; Liu, Julie; Telliez, Jean-Baptiste; Seidl, Katherine J; Winkler, Aaron; Hu, Yonghan; Green, Neal; Askew, G Roger; Tam, Steve; Clark, James D; Lin, Lih-Ling

    2007-11-16

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that controls the initiation and progression of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Tpl2 is a MAPKKK in the MAPK (i.e. ERK) pathway, and the Tpl2-MEK-ERK signaling pathway is activated by the pro-inflammatory mediators TNFalpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, and bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide (LPS)). Moreover, Tpl2 is required for TNFalpha expression. Thus, pharmacologic inhibition of Tpl2 should be a valid approach to therapeutic intervention in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases in humans. We have developed a series of highly selective and potent Tpl2 inhibitors, and in the present study we have used these inhibitors to demonstrate that the catalytic activity of Tpl2 is required for the LPS-induced activation of MEK and ERK in primary human monocytes. These inhibitors selectively target Tpl2 in these cells, and they block LPS- and IL-1beta-induced TNFalpha production in both primary human monocytes and human blood. In rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes these inhibitors block ERK activation, cyclooxygenase-2 expression, and the production of IL-6, IL-8, and prostaglandin E(2), and the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-1 and MMP-3. Taken together, our results show that inhibition of Tpl2 in primary human cell types can decrease the production of TNFalpha and other pro-inflammatory mediators during inflammatory events, and they further support the notion that Tpl2 is an appropriate therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis and other human inflammatory diseases. PMID:17848581

  18. Monoclonal antibody to a subset of human monocytes found only in the peripheral blood and inflammatory tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Zwadlo, G.; Schlegel, R.; Sorg, C.

    1986-07-15

    A monoclonal antibody is described that was generated by immunizing mice with cultured human blood monocytes. The antibody (27E10) belongs to the IgG1 subclass and detects a surface antigen at M/sub r/ 17,000 that is found on 20% of peripheral blood monocytes. The antigen is increasingly expressed upon culture of monocytes, reaching a maximum between days 2 and 3. Stimulation of monocytes with interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..), 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Ylalanine (fMLP) increased the 27E10 antigen density. The amount of 27E10-positive cells is not or is only weakly affected. The antigen is absent from platelets, lymphotyces, and all tested human cell lines, yet it cross-reacts with 15% of freshly isolated granulocytes. By using the indirect immunoperoxidase technique, the antibody is found to be negative on cryostat sections of normal human tissue (skin, lung, and colon) and positive on only a few monocyte-like cells in liver and on part of the cells of the splenic red pulp. In inflammatory tissue, however, the antibody is positive on monocytes/macrophages and sometimes on endothelial cells and epidermal cells, depending on the stage and type of inflammation, e.g., BCG ranulomas are negative, whereas psoriasis vulgaris, atopic dermatitis, erythrodermia, pressure urticaria, and periodontitis contain positively staining cells. In contact eczemas at different times after elicitation (6 hr, 24 hr, and 72 hr), the 27E10 antigen is seen first after 24 hr on a few infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, which increase in numbers after 72 hr.

  19. Autocrine motility factor receptor promotes the proliferation of human acute monocytic leukemia THP-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YINGCHAO; MA, LINA; WANG, CHUNMEI; SHENG, GUANGYAO; FENG, LEI; YIN, CHUYUN

    2015-01-01

    The aberrant activation of autocrine motility factor receptor (AMFR) has been implicated in several types of human cancer. The present study aimed to elucidate the effect of AMFR on the regulation of proliferation in an acute monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1. THP-1 cells were transfected with AMFR-targeted small interfering (si)RNA and a plasmid encoding a truncated AMFR, AMFR-C, (pcDNA3.1-AMFR-C). The mRNA and protein levels of AMFR and the downstream targets, rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase 2 (ROCK2), cyclin D1, and B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2, were measured using reverse transcription-quantitatibe polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analyses. The effects on cell cycle and apoptosis were investigated using flow cytometry. The present study successfully established the knockdown of AMFR and expression of AMFR-C in the THP-1 cells. Downregulation of AMFR induced cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, and increased apoptosis of the THP-1 cells (all P<0.05). The AMFR siRNA increased the percentage of early apoptotic cells between 3.88±1.43 and 19.58±4.29% (P<0.05). The expression levels of ROCK2, cyclin D1 and Bcl-2 were reduced by the downregulation of AMFR and enhanced by overexpression of AMFR-C. In conclusion, AMFR appears to be crucial for the proliferation of the THP-1 acute monocytic leukemia cell line. Therefore, AMFR may represent a potential target for the treatment of acute monocytic leukemia. PMID:26136223

  20. Effect of olive oil phenols on the production of inflammatory mediators in freshly isolated human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosignoli, Patrizia; Fuccelli, Raffaela; Fabiani, Roberto; Servili, Maurizio; Morozzi, Guido

    2013-08-01

    Recent in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that the anti-inflammatory properties of extra virgin olive oil may be involved in the prevention of chronic degenerative diseases. In this study, the ability of olive oil phenols to influence the release of superoxide anions (O2-), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and the expression of cyclooxygenase2 (COX2) in human monocytes, freshly isolated from healthy donors, was investigated. O2- were measured by superoxide dismutase-inhibitable cytochrome c reduction and PGE2 and TNFα production were determined in culture medium with appropriate enzyme immunoassay kits. COX2 mRNA and protein were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western immunoblotting, respectively. Treatment of monocytes for 24 h with 100 μM of hydroxytyrosol (3,4-DHPEA), tyrosol (p-HPEA) and their secoiridoid derivatives (3,4-DHPEA and p-HPEA linked to the dialdehydic form of elenolic acid: 3,4-DHPEA-EDA and p-HPEA-EDA, respectively) significantly (P<.05) inhibited the production of O2(-) as follows: 3,4-DHPEA (40%,), p-HPEA (9%), 3,4-DHPEA-EDA (25%) and p-HPEA-EDA (36%). Hydroxytyrosol also considerably reduced the expression of COX2 at both the mRNA and protein level (P<.05) and caused a clear dose-dependent reduction of PGE2 released into the culture medium (45% and 71% at 50 and 100 μM, respectively, P<.05). The COX2 mRNA was also efficiently inhibited by the secoiridoids. Moreover, it was shown that hydroxytyrosol increased the monocytes TNFα production. In addition to other chemopreventive properties, these results suggest that the health effects of olive oil phenols may be related to their ability to modulate the production of pro-inflammatory molecules, a property common to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:23477728

  1. Interferon gamma-activated human monocytes downregulate transferrin receptors and inhibit the intracellular multiplication of Legionella pneumophila by limiting the availability of iron.

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, T F; Horwitz, M A

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the role of iron in the intracellular biology of Legionella pneumophila in human monocytes and in the effector arm of cell-mediated immune defense against this intracellular bacterial pathogen. To determine if L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication is iron dependent, we studied the effect of the iron chelator deferoxamine on L. pneumophila infection of monocytes. Deferoxamine at 15 microM completely inhibited L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication. The inhibitory effect of deferoxamine was reversed with equimolar iron-saturated transferrin but not apotransferrin. To examine the potential role of iron in monocyte activation, we investigated the influence of iron-saturated transferrin on L. pneumophila multiplication in IFN gamma-activated monocytes. Iron transferrin, but not apotransferrin, neutralized the capacity of activated monocytes to inhibit L. pneumophila multiplication. To explore a potential mechanism by which activated monocytes might limit the availability of intracellular iron, we examined transferrin receptor expression on nonactivated and activated monocytes cultured in vitro for 5 d. By fluorescence-activated flow cytometry, activated monocytes exhibited markedly fewer transferrin receptors than nonactivated monocytes. By Scatchard analysis of 125I-transferrin binding to monocytes, nonactivated monocytes had 38,300 +/- 12,700 (mean +/- SE) transferrin binding sites, whereas activated monocytes had 10,300 +/- 1,600, a reduction of 73%. Activated and nonactivated monocytes had a similar mean Kd (1.8 +/- 0.2 nM). This study demonstrates that (a) L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication is iron dependent; (b) activated monocytes inhibit L. pneumophila multiplication by limiting the availability of intracellular iron; and (c) transferrin receptors are downregulated on IFN gamma-activated monocytes. Images PMID:2496141

  2. In vitro Effects of Selected Saponins on the Production and Release of Lysozyme Activity of Human Monocytic and Epithelial Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Helal, Racha; Melzig, Matthias F.

    2011-01-01

    Lysozyme is one of the most important factors of innate immunity and a unique enzybiotic in that it exerts not only antibacterial activity, but also antiviral, anti-inflammatory, anticancer and immunomodulatory activities. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether in vitro exposure to saponins can affect the release and production of lysozyme activity in human monocytic cells THP-1, and in human epithelial cells HT-29. Lysozyme activity levels in cell culture fluids were measured using highly sensitive fluorescence-based lysozyme activity assay. Majority of the examined saponins were demonstrated to stimulate significantly the release of lysozyme activity of monocytes and epithelial cells after one hour treatment at non-toxic concentrations. On the contrary, cells treated with saponins for longer periods up to 72 hours showed tendency to decrease in the secretion and production of lysozyme activity. However, these inhibitory effects of saponins observed with long-term treatment periods were mostly associated with toxic effects of saponins to cells. The results suggested positive contribution of some saponins to lysozyme release of monocytes and epithelial cells upon short exposure. Furthermore, demonstrated ability of these saponins to enhance the release of lysozyme activity can present a new mechanism contribute to explaining important biological characteristics of saponins, including the antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory or immune-stimulating properties. PMID:21773070

  3. Human caspase-4 and caspase-5 regulate the one-step non-canonical inflammasome activation in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Viganò, Elena; Diamond, Catherine Emma; Spreafico, Roberto; Balachander, Akhila; Sobota, Radoslaw M; Mortellaro, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes promote the early host response to infection releasing key pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β. The biologically inactive IL-1β precursor is processed to active form by inflammasomes, multi-protein complexes activating caspase-1. Human monocytes exhibit an unconventional one-step pathway of inflammasome activation in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alone. Although this lineage-restricted mechanism is likely to contribute to the pathology of endotoxin shock, signalling pathways regulating this mechanism are currently unknown. Here we report that caspase-4 and caspase-5 mediate IL-1α and IL-1β release from human monocytes after LPS stimulation. Although caspase-4 remains uncleaved, caspase-5 undergoes rapid processing upon LPS treatment. We also identify an additional caspase-5 cleavage product in LPS-stimulated monocytes, which correlates with IL-1 secretion. This one-step pathway requires Syk activity and Ca(2+) flux instigated by CD14/TLR4-mediated LPS internalization. Identification of caspase-4/5 as the key determinants of one-step inflammasome activation in human monocytes provides potential targets for therapeutic intervention in endotoxin shock. PMID:26508369

  4. Receptor-mediated Modulation of Human Monocyte, Neutrophil, Lymphocyte, and Platelet Function by Phorbol Diesters

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Bonnie J.; Weinberg, J. Brice

    1982-01-01

    The tumor promoting phorbol diesters elicit a variety of responses from normal and leukemic blood cells in vitro by apparently interacting with cellular receptors. The biologically active ligand [20-3H] phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate ([3H]PDBu) bound specifically to intact human lymphocytes, monocytes, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), and platelets, but not to erythrocytes. Binding, which was comparable for all four blood cell types, occurred rapidly at 23° and 37°C, reaching a maximum by 20-30 min usually followed by a 30-40% decrease in cell associated radioactivity over the next 30-60 min. The time course for binding was temperature dependent with equilibrium binding occurring after 120-150 min at 4°C, with no subsequent loss of cell-associated radioactivity at this temperature. Bound [3H]PDBu could be eluted by addition of unlabeled PDBu. Scatchard analysis of data from 4°C binding studies revealed linear plots with high affinity receptors in these cell types with dissociation constants and receptors per cell of 60 nM and 7.8 × 105/cell for lymphocytes, 51 nM and 15.5 × 105/cell for monocytes, 38 nM and 4.0 × 105/cell for PMN, and 19 nM and 2.9 × 104/cell for platelets. Structure-activity studies using unlabeled phorbol-related compounds demonstrated a close correlation between their abilities to inhibit binding of [3H]PDBu to cells and their abilities to induce cellular responses (monocyte and PMN H2O2 secretion, lymphocyte 3HTdR incorporation, and platelet tritiated serotonin release); phorbol and 4-alpha phorbol were inactive while phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), PDBu, mezerein, and phorbol 12,13-diacetate (in decreasing order of potency) inhibited [3H]PDBu binding and elicited the various responses. Thus, these high affinity, specific receptors for the phorbol diesters, present on monocytes, lymphocytes, PMN, and platelets, mediate the pleiotypic effects induced by these ligands. PMID:6956584

  5. Pre-incubation of human monocytes results in loss of effector activity and diminished stimulation of the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, M M; Liebman, M L; Hassid, A I; Berk, G I

    1983-01-01

    Human monocytes were cultured at 37 degrees C for 72 h, washed, adjusted for viability and compared to freshly prepared monocytes for stimulation of the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (AMLR) and effector function. Pre-incubated monocytes were less potent AMLR stimulators than were freshly prepared cells. Pre-incubated monocytes demonstrated less antibody-dependent tumour killing of CCRF-CEM, less killing of Staphylococci and less spontaneous tumour killing of K-562 than did fresh monocytes. Pre-incubated monocytes produced less prostaglandin E2, demonstrated less surface Ia antigen and were less efficient accessory cells for antigen presentation than were fresh monocytes. AMLR stimulation correlated with monocyte killing (r = 0.95) and PGE2 production (r = 0.98). Thus, monocytes pre-incubated for 3 days are less active effector cells, display less surface Ia antigen and are less potent stimulators of the AMLR than fresh monocytes. Moreover, in this system, monocyte effector activity correlates with ability to stimulate the AMLR. PMID:6224613

  6. Monocyte/macrophage trafficking in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome encephalitis: lessons from human and nonhuman primate studies.

    PubMed

    Fischer-Smith, Tracy; Bell, Christie; Croul, Sidney; Lewis, Mark; Rappaport, Jay

    2008-08-01

    Here the authors discuss evidence in human and animal models supporting two opposing views regarding the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the central nervous system (CNS): (1) HIV infection in the CNS is a compartmentalized infection, with the virus-infected macrophages entering the CNS early, infecting resident microglia and astrocytes, and achieving a state of latency with evolution toward a fulminant CNS infection late in the course of disease; or alternatively, (2) events in the periphery lead to altered monocyte/macrophage (MPhi) homeostasis, with increased CNS invasion of infected and/or uninfected MPhis. Here the authors have reevaluated evidence presented in the favor of the latter model, with a discussion of phenotypic characteristics distinguishing normal resident microglia with those accumulating in HIV encephalitis (HIVE). CD163 is normally expressed by perivascular MPhi s but not resident microglia in normal CNS of humans and rhesus macaques. In agreement with other studies, the authors demonstrate expression of CD163 by brain MPhi s in HIVE and simian immunodeficiency virus encephalitis (SIVE). CNS tissues from HIV-sero positive individuals with HIVE or HIV-associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) were also examined. In HIVE, the authors further demonstrate colocalization of CD163 and CD16 (Fcgamma III recptor) gene expression, the latter marker associated with HIV infection of monocyte in vivo and permissivity of infection. Indeed, CD163(+) MPhis and microglia are often productively infected in HIVE CNS. In SIV infected rhesus macaques, CD163(+) cells accumulate perivascularly, within nodular lesions and the parenchyma in animals with encephalitis. Likewise, parenchymal microglia and perivascular MPhi s are CD163(+) in HIVE. In contrast to HIVE, CD163(+)perivascular and parenchymal MPhi s in HIV-associated PML were only associated with areas of demyelinating lesions. Interestingly, SIV-infected rhesus macaques

  7. Patterns of Transcriptional Response to 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 and Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide in Primary Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kariuki, Silvia N.; Blischak, John D.; Nakagome, Shigeki; Witonsky, David B.; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D), plays an important immunomodulatory role, regulating transcription of genes in the innate and adaptive immune system. The present study examines patterns of transcriptome-wide response to 1,25D, and the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in primary human monocytes, to elucidate pathways underlying the effects of 1,25D on the immune system. Monocytes obtained from healthy individuals of African-American and European-American ancestry were treated with 1,25D, LPS, or both, simultaneously. The addition of 1,25D during stimulation with LPS induced significant upregulation of genes in the antimicrobial and autophagy pathways, and downregulation of proinflammatory response genes compared to LPS treatment alone. A joint Bayesian analysis enabled clustering of genes into patterns of shared transcriptional response across treatments. The biological pathways enriched within these expression patterns highlighted several mechanisms through which 1,25D could exert its immunomodulatory role. Pathways such as mTOR signaling, EIF2 signaling, IL-8 signaling, and Tec Kinase signaling were enriched among genes with opposite transcriptional responses to 1,25D and LPS, respectively, highlighting the important roles of these pathways in mediating the immunomodulatory activity of 1,25D. Furthermore, a subset of genes with evidence of interethnic differences in transcriptional response was also identified, suggesting that in addition to the well-established interethnic variation in circulating levels of vitamin D, the intensity of transcriptional response to 1,25D and LPS also varies between ethnic groups. We propose that dysregulation of the pathways identified in this study could contribute to immune-mediated disease risk. PMID:26976439

  8. Human Monocyte-Derived Osteoclasts Are Targeted by Staphylococcal Pore-Forming Toxins and Superantigens

    PubMed Central

    Flammier, Sacha; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Badiou, Cédric; Henry, Thomas; Vandenesch, François; Laurent, Frédéric; Trouillet-Assant, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of bone and joint infections (BJIs). Staphylococcal pathogenesis involves numerous virulence factors including secreted toxins such as pore-forming toxins (PFTs) and superantigens. The role of these toxins on BJI outcome is largely unknown. In particular, few studies have examined how osteoclasts, the bone-resorbing cells, respond to exposure to staphylococcal PFTs and superantigens. We investigated the direct impact of recombinant staphylococcal toxins on human primary mature monocyte-derived osteoclasts, in terms of cytotoxicity and cell activation with cell death and bone resorption assays, using macrophages of the corresponding donors as a reference. Monocyte-derived osteoclasts displayed similar toxin susceptibility profiles compared to macrophages. Specifically, we demonstrated that the Panton-Valentine leukocidin, known as one of the most powerful PFT which lyses myeloid cells after binding to the C5a receptor, was able to induce the death of osteoclasts. The archetypal superantigen TSST-1 was not cytotoxic but enhanced the bone resorption activity of osteoclasts, suggesting a novel mechanism by which superantigen-producing S. aureus can accelerate the destruction of bone tissue during BJI. Altogether, our data indicate that the diverse clinical presentations of BJIs could be related, at least partly, to the toxin profiles of S. aureus isolates involved in these severe infections. PMID:26934588

  9. Structure of human monocyte chemoattractant protein 4 (MCP-4/CCL13)

    SciTech Connect

    Barinka, Cyril; Prahl, Adam; Lubkowski, Jacek

    2008-04-02

    Monocyte chemoattractant proteins (MCPs) belong to the CC chemokine family and are involved in many (patho)physiological processes characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration, including tissue remodeling, atherosclerosis and cancer metastasis. Here, the crystal structure of human monocyte chemoattractant protein 4 (MCP-4) refined at 1.70 {angstrom} resolution is reported with crystallographic values R = 0.180 and R{sub free} = 0.212. The overall MCP-4 fold reveals the typical tertiary features of the CC chemokine family. A central three-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet is C-terminally flanked by an overlaying {alpha}-helix, while the N-terminal part of the molecule forms an extended loop that is anchored to the rest of the molecule via two disulfide bridges, Cys11-Cys35 and Cys12-Cys51. The crystal packing suggests the existence of MCP-4 dimers with a dimerization interface similar to those previously reported for the X-ray structures of MCP-1 and MCP-2.

  10. IκBζ Regulates Human Monocyte Pro-Inflammatory Responses Induced by Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Kruthika; Rahman, Mohd. Akhlakur; Mitra, Srabani; Knoell, Daren L.; Woodiga, Shireen A.; King, Samantha J.

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal lung infections represent a major cause of death worldwide. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NFKBIZ gene, encoding the transcription factor IκBζ, are associated with increased susceptibility to invasive pneumococcal disease. We hence analyzed how IκBζ might regulate inflammatory responses to pneumococcal infection. We first demonstrate that IκBζ is expressed in human blood monocytes but not in bronchial epithelial cells, in response to wild type pneumococcal strain D39. D39 transiently induced IκBζ in a dose dependent manner, with subsequent induction of downstream molecules involved in host defense. Of these molecules, IκBζ knockdown reduced the expression of IL-6 and GMCSF. Furthermore, IκBζ overexpression increased the activity of IL-6 and GMCSF promoters, supporting the knockdown findings. Pneumococci lacking either pneumolysin or capsule still induced IκBζ. While inhibition of TLR1/TLR2 blocked D39 induced IκBζ expression, TLR4 inhibition did not. Blockade of p38 MAP kinase and NFκB suppressed D39 induced IκBζ. Overall, our data demonstrates that IκBζ regulates monocyte inflammatory responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae by promoting the production of IL-6 and GMCSF. PMID:27597997

  11. IκBζ Regulates Human Monocyte Pro-Inflammatory Responses Induced by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Kruthika; Rahman, Mohd Akhlakur; Mitra, Srabani; Knoell, Daren L; Woodiga, Shireen A; King, Samantha J; Wewers, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal lung infections represent a major cause of death worldwide. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the NFKBIZ gene, encoding the transcription factor IκBζ, are associated with increased susceptibility to invasive pneumococcal disease. We hence analyzed how IκBζ might regulate inflammatory responses to pneumococcal infection. We first demonstrate that IκBζ is expressed in human blood monocytes but not in bronchial epithelial cells, in response to wild type pneumococcal strain D39. D39 transiently induced IκBζ in a dose dependent manner, with subsequent induction of downstream molecules involved in host defense. Of these molecules, IκBζ knockdown reduced the expression of IL-6 and GMCSF. Furthermore, IκBζ overexpression increased the activity of IL-6 and GMCSF promoters, supporting the knockdown findings. Pneumococci lacking either pneumolysin or capsule still induced IκBζ. While inhibition of TLR1/TLR2 blocked D39 induced IκBζ expression, TLR4 inhibition did not. Blockade of p38 MAP kinase and NFκB suppressed D39 induced IκBζ. Overall, our data demonstrates that IκBζ regulates monocyte inflammatory responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae by promoting the production of IL-6 and GMCSF. PMID:27597997

  12. Human Monocyte-Derived Osteoclasts Are Targeted by Staphylococcal Pore-Forming Toxins and Superantigens.

    PubMed

    Flammier, Sacha; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Badiou, Cédric; Henry, Thomas; Vandenesch, François; Laurent, Frédéric; Trouillet-Assant, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of bone and joint infections (BJIs). Staphylococcal pathogenesis involves numerous virulence factors including secreted toxins such as pore-forming toxins (PFTs) and superantigens. The role of these toxins on BJI outcome is largely unknown. In particular, few studies have examined how osteoclasts, the bone-resorbing cells, respond to exposure to staphylococcal PFTs and superantigens. We investigated the direct impact of recombinant staphylococcal toxins on human primary mature monocyte-derived osteoclasts, in terms of cytotoxicity and cell activation with cell death and bone resorption assays, using macrophages of the corresponding donors as a reference. Monocyte-derived osteoclasts displayed similar toxin susceptibility profiles compared to macrophages. Specifically, we demonstrated that the Panton-Valentine leukocidin, known as one of the most powerful PFT which lyses myeloid cells after binding to the C5a receptor, was able to induce the death of osteoclasts. The archetypal superantigen TSST-1 was not cytotoxic but enhanced the bone resorption activity of osteoclasts, suggesting a novel mechanism by which superantigen-producing S. aureus can accelerate the destruction of bone tissue during BJI. Altogether, our data indicate that the diverse clinical presentations of BJIs could be related, at least partly, to the toxin profiles of S. aureus isolates involved in these severe infections. PMID:26934588

  13. Monocytes in Kaposi's sarcoma lesions are productively infected by human herpesvirus 8.

    PubMed Central

    Blasig, C; Zietz, C; Haar, B; Neipel, F; Esser, S; Brockmeyer, N H; Tschachler, E; Colombini, S; Ensoli, B; Stürzl, M

    1997-01-01

    PCR analysis and serological studies demonstrated a close association between Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus, or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), and the development of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). The majority of the KS cells were shown to be latently infected by the virus. In this study we investigated which type of cell is productively infected in KS lesions. In situ hybridization was performed with strand-specific RNA probes complementary to the sequences coding for the minor capsid protein (VP23) of HHV-8. The VP23 gene is specifically expressed during the lytic or replicative period of the virus life cycle, and therefore it is a useful marker to detect productively infected cells. By in situ hybridization of KS lesions, a strong hybridization signal was detected only in a small subset of the KS cells of the lesions. Simultaneous application of immunohistochemical staining and in situ hybridization identified the virus-replicating cells to be of monocytic origin. Productively infected monocytes may be an important reservoir for transmission of the virus and for the increase and maintenance of the high load of HHV-8 generally observed in nodular KS lesions during late stages of infection. PMID:9311888

  14. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  15. In-Vitro Differentiation of Mature Dendritic Cells From Human Blood Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Dirk; Soruri, Afsaneh; Schwartz, Peter; Peters, J. Hinrich

    1998-01-01

    Representing the most potent antigen-presenting cells, dendritic cells (DC) can now be generated from human blood monocytes. We recently presented a novel protocol employing GM-CSF, IL-4, and IFN-γ to differentiate monocyte-derived DC in vitro. Here, such cells are characterized in detail. Cells in culture exhibited both dendritic and veiled morphologies, the former being adherent and the latter suspended. Phenotypically, they were CD1a-/dim, CD11a+, CD11b++, CD11c+, CD14dim/-, CD16a-/dim, CD18+, CD32dim/-, CD33+, CD40+, CD45R0+, CD50+, CD54+, CD64-/dim, CD68+, CD71+, CD80dim, CD86+/++, MHC class I++/+++ HLA-DR++/+++ HLA-DP+, and HLA-DQ+. The DC stimulated a strong allogeneic T-cell response, and further evidence for their autologous antigen-specific stimulation is discussed. Although resembling a mature CD 11c+CD45R0+ blood DC subset identified earlier, their differentiation in the presence of the Thl and Th2 cytokines IFN-γ and IL-4 indicates that these DC may conform to mature mucosal DC. PMID:9716903

  16. Oxygen-Loaded Nanodroplets Effectively Abrogate Hypoxia Dysregulating Effects on Secretion of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 by Human Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Gulino, Giulia Rossana; Magnetto, Chiara; Khadjavi, Amina; Panariti, Alice; Rivolta, Ilaria; Soster, Marco; Argenziano, Monica; Cavalli, Roberta; Giribaldi, Giuliana; Guiot, Caterina; Prato, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes play a key role in the inflammatory stage of the healing process. To allow monocyte migration to injured tissues, the balances between secreted matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs) must be finely modulated. However, a reduction of blood supply and local oxygen tension can modify the phenotype of immune cells. Intriguingly, hypoxia might be targeted by new effective oxygenating devices such as 2H,3H-decafluoropentane- (DFP-) based oxygen-loaded nanodroplets (OLNs). Here, hypoxia effects on gelatinase/TIMP release from human peripheral monocytes were investigated, and the therapeutic potential of dextran-shelled OLNs was evaluated. Normoxic monocytes constitutively released ~500 ng/mL MMP-9, ~1.3 ng/mL TIMP-1, and ~0.6 ng/mL TIMP-2 proteins. MMP-2 was not detected. After 24 hours, hypoxia significantly altered MMP-9/TIMP-1 balance by reducing MMP-9 and increasing TIMP-1, without affecting TIMP-2 secretion. Interestingly OLNs, not displaying toxicity to human monocytes after cell internalization, effectively counteracted hypoxia, restoring a normoxia-like MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio. The action of OLNs was specifically dependent on time-sustained oxygen diffusion up to 24 h from their DFP-based core. Therefore, OLNs appear as innovative, nonconventional, cost-effective, and nontoxic therapeutic tools, to be potentially employed to restore the physiological invasive phenotype of immune cells in hypoxia-associated inflammation. PMID:25878404

  17. Activated Human Mast Cells Induce LOX-1-Specific Scavenger Receptor Expression in Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Alanne-Kinnunen, Mervi; Lappalainen, Jani; Öörni, Katariina; Kovanen, Petri T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Activated mast cells in atherosclerotic lesions degranulate and release bioactive compounds capable of regulating atherogenesis. Here we examined the ability of activated human primary mast cells to regulate the expression of the major scavenger receptors in cultured human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs). Results Components released by immunologically activated human primary mast cells induced a transient expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1) mRNA in HMDMs, while the expression of two other scavenger receptors, MSR1 and CD36, remained unaffected. The LOX-1-inducing secretory components were identified as histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1), which exhibited a synergistic effect on LOX-1 mRNA expression. Histamine induced a transient expression of LOX-1 protein. Mast cell –induced increase in LOX-1 expression was not associated with increased uptake of oxidized LDL by the macrophages. Conclusions Mast cell-derived histamine, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 act in concert to induce a transient increase in LOX-1 expression in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. The LOX-1-inducing activity potentially endows mast cells a hitherto unrecognized role in the regulation of innate immune reactions in atherogenesis. PMID:25250731

  18. Natural isoprenoids inhibit LPS-induced-production of cytokines and nitric oxide in aminobisphosphonate-treated monocytes.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Tommasini, Alberto; Crovella, Sergio; Pontillo, Alessandra

    2010-06-01

    The inhibition of mevalonate pathway through genetic defects (mevalonate kinase deficiency, MKD) or pharmacologic drugs (aminobisphosphonates) causes a shortage of intermediate compounds and, in particular, of geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate (GGPP) associated to the activation of caspase-1 and IL-1beta release. Geraniol (GOH), farnesol (FOH), geranylgeraniol (GGOH) and menthol (MOH), due to their isoprenoid structure, are supposed to enter the mevalonate pathway and to by-pass the biochemical block, reconstituting the pathway. Considering the already known side effects of aminobisphosphonates, and the lack of a specific treatment for MKD, we evaluated the impact of these natural isoprenoids compounds in a RAW cell lines chemically treated with the aminobisphosphonate alendronate, and in monocytes isolated from 2 patients affected by MKD. GOH, FOH, GGOH and MOH were all capable to diminish inflammatory marker levels induced by LPS. These natural isoprenoids could be proposed as novel therapeutic approach for the still orphan drug MKD, but also considered for the evaluation of possible inflammatory side effects of aminobisphosphonates.

  19. Monocyte-mediated delivery of polymeric backpacks to inflamed tissues: a generalized strategy to deliver drugs to treat inflammation.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Aaron C; Gilbert, Jonathan B; Kumar, Sunny; Gupta, Vivek; Cohen, Robert E; Rubner, Michael F; Mitragotri, Samir

    2015-02-10

    Targeted delivery of drugs and imaging agents to inflamed tissues, as in the cases of cancer, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and arthritis, represents one of the major challenges in drug delivery. Monocytes possess a unique ability to target and penetrate into sites of inflammation. Here, we describe a broad approach to take advantage of the natural ability of monocytes to target and deliver flat polymeric particles ("Cellular Backpacks") to inflamed tissues. Cellular backpacks attach strongly to the surface of monocytes but do not undergo phagocytosis due to backpack's size, disk-like shape and flexibility. Following attachment of backpacks, monocytes retain important cellular functions including transmigration through an endothelial monolayer and differentiation into macrophages. In two separate in vivo inflammation models, backpack-laden monocytes exhibit increased targeting to inflamed tissues. Cellular backpacks, and their abilities to attach to monocytes without impairing monocyte functions and 'hitchhike' to a variety of inflamed tissues, offer a new platform for both cell-mediated therapies and broad targeting of inflamed tissues. PMID:25481443

  20. Sargaquinoic Acid Inhibits TNF-α-Induced NF-κB Signaling, Thereby Contributing to Decreased Monocyte Adhesion to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs).

    PubMed

    Gwon, Wi-Gyeong; Lee, Bonggi; Joung, Eun-Ji; Choi, Min-Woo; Yoon, Nayoung; Shin, Taisun; Oh, Chul-Woong; Kim, Hyeung-Rak

    2015-10-21

    Sargaquinoic acid (SQA) has been known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This study investigated the effects of SQA isolated from Sargassum serratifolium on the inhibition of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced monocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). SQA decreased the expression of cell adhesion molecules such as intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 as well as chemotactic cytokines such as interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in TNF-α-treated HUVECs. As a result, SQA prevented monocyte adhesion to TNF-α-induced adhesion. SQA also inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) translocation into the nucleus by preventing proteolytic degradation of inhibitor κB-α. Overall, SQA protects against TNF-α-induced vascular inflammation through inhibition of the NF-κB pathway in HUVECs. These data suggest that SQA may be used as a therapeutic agent for vascular inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. PMID:26437568

  1. In vitro interaction of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia with human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Roscetto, Emanuela; Vitiello, Laura; Muoio, Rosa; Soriano, Amata A; Iula, Vita D; Vollaro, Antonio; De Gregorio, Eliana; Catania, Maria R

    2015-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is increasingly identified as an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised, cancer and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Knowledge on innate immune responses to S. maltophilia and its potential modulation is poor. The present work investigated the ability of 12 clinical S. maltophilia strains (five from CF patients, seven from non-CF patients) and one environmental strain to survive inside human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). The effects of the bacteria on maturation of and cytokine secretion by DCs were also measured. S. maltophilia strains presented a high degree of heterogeneity in internalization and intracellular replication efficiencies as well as in the ability of S. maltophilia to interfere with normal DCs maturation. By contrast, all S. maltophilia strains were able to activate DCs, as measured by increase in the expression of surface maturation markers and proinflammatory cytokines secretion.

  2. Tumor necrosis factor alpha gene expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells exposed to beryllium.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, G M; Pandey, J P; Schmidt, M G; Arnaud, P; Goust, J M

    1996-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease, which results from occupational exposure to particulate beryllium, is characterized by the development of lung granulomas and progressive pulmonary fibrosis. Increased production of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta) by pulmonary alveolar macrophages occurs in many chronic fibrotic lung diseases and is thought to contribute to the disease process. The purpose of the present study was to investigate cytokine production by human monocytic cells exposed to beryllium in vitro. The results indicated that such cells respond to beryllium ions in the presence of fluoride by accumulation of messenger ribonucleic acid for both tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta. These findings suggest that inhaled beryllium may directly stimulate the production of these cytokines by alveolar macrophages in vitro. PMID:8629860

  3. Analyzing Illumina Gene Expression Microarray Data Obtained From Human Whole Blood Cell and Blood Monocyte Samples.

    PubMed

    Teumer, Alexander; Schurmann, Claudia; Schillert, Arne; Schramm, Katharina; Ziegler, Andreas; Prokisch, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Microarray profiling of gene expression is widely applied to studies in molecular biology and functional genomics. Experimental and technical variations make not only the statistical analysis of single studies but also meta-analyses of different studies very challenging. Here, we describe the analytical steps required to substantially reduce the variations of gene expression data without affecting true effect sizes. A software pipeline has been established using gene expression data from a total of 3358 whole blood cell and blood monocyte samples, all from three German population-based cohorts, measured on the Illumina HumanHT-12 v3 BeadChip array. In summary, adjustment for a few selected technical factors greatly improved reliability of gene expression analyses. Such adjustments are particularly required for meta-analyses of different studies. PMID:26614070

  4. Effect of pregnancy-specific β1-glycoprotein on indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase activity in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Zamorina, S A; Timganova, V P; Bochkova, M S; Khramtsov, P V; Raev, M B

    2016-07-01

    The role of heterogenic human pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (PSG), obtained by the authors' technology, in the regulation of the indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity in female blood monocytes has been studied in vitro. PSG stimulated IDO activity under the conditions of induction of the monocytes by interferon-γ. Upon the induction of cell proliferation by lipopolysaccharides, the stimulating effect was obtained only with 10 μg/mL of PSG. Enhanced IDO activity is probably a factor of peripheral immunological tolerance and antimicrobial protection against intracellular infections in the gestation period. PMID:27595833

  5. [EVALUATION OF THE HUMAN SENSITIVITY TO SMALLPOX VIRUS BY THE PRIMARY CULTURES OF THE MONOCYTE-MACROPHAGES].

    PubMed

    Zamedyanskaya, A S; Titova, K A; Sergeev, Al A; Kabanov, A S; Bulychev, L E; Sergeev, Ar A; Galakhova, D O; Nesterov, A E; Nosareva, O V; Shishkina, L N; Taranov, O S; Omigov, V V; Agafonov, A P; Sergeev, A N

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the primary cultures of granulocytes, mononuclear, and monocyte-macrophage cells derived from human blood were performed using variola virus (VARV) in the doses of 0.001-0.021 PFU/cell (plaques-forming units per cell). Positive dynamics of the virus accumulation was observed only in the monocyte-macrophages with maximum values of virus concentration (5.0-5.5 Ig PFU/ml) mainly within six days after the infection. The fact of VARV replication in the monocyte-macrophages was confirmed by the data of electron microscopy. At the same time, virus vaccines when tested in doses 3.3 and 4.2 Ig PFU/ml did not show the ability to reproduce in these human cells. The people sensitivity to VARV as assessed from the data obtained on human monocyte-macrophages corresponded to -1 PFU (taking into account the smooth interaction of the virus in the body to the cells of this type), which is consistent to previously found theoretical data on the virus sensitivity. The human susceptibility to VARV assessed experimentally can be used to predict the adequacy of developed smallpox models (in vivo) based on susceptible animals. This is necessary for reliable assessment of the efficiency of development of drugs for treatment and prophylaxis of the smallpox.

  6. [EVALUATION OF THE HUMAN SENSITIVITY TO SMALLPOX VIRUS BY THE PRIMARY CULTURES OF THE MONOCYTE-MACROPHAGES].

    PubMed

    Zamedyanskaya, A S; Titova, K A; Sergeev, Al A; Kabanov, A S; Bulychev, L E; Sergeev, Ar A; Galakhova, D O; Nesterov, A E; Nosareva, O V; Shishkina, L N; Taranov, O S; Omigov, V V; Agafonov, A P; Sergeev, A N

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the primary cultures of granulocytes, mononuclear, and monocyte-macrophage cells derived from human blood were performed using variola virus (VARV) in the doses of 0.001-0.021 PFU/cell (plaques-forming units per cell). Positive dynamics of the virus accumulation was observed only in the monocyte-macrophages with maximum values of virus concentration (5.0-5.5 Ig PFU/ml) mainly within six days after the infection. The fact of VARV replication in the monocyte-macrophages was confirmed by the data of electron microscopy. At the same time, virus vaccines when tested in doses 3.3 and 4.2 Ig PFU/ml did not show the ability to reproduce in these human cells. The people sensitivity to VARV as assessed from the data obtained on human monocyte-macrophages corresponded to -1 PFU (taking into account the smooth interaction of the virus in the body to the cells of this type), which is consistent to previously found theoretical data on the virus sensitivity. The human susceptibility to VARV assessed experimentally can be used to predict the adequacy of developed smallpox models (in vivo) based on susceptible animals. This is necessary for reliable assessment of the efficiency of development of drugs for treatment and prophylaxis of the smallpox. PMID:27451498

  7. Functional characterisation of human pulmonary monocyte-like cells in lipopolysaccharide-mediated acute lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously reported the presence of novel subpopulations of pulmonary monocyte-like cells (PMLC) in the human lung; resident PMLC (rPMLC, HLA-DR+CD14++CD16+cells) and inducible PMLC (iPMLC, HLA-DR+CD14++CD16- cells). iPMLC are significantly increased in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid following inhalation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We have carried out the first functional evaluation of PMLC subpopulations in the inflamed lung, following the isolation of these cells, and other lineages, from BAL fluid using novel and complex protocols. Methods iPMLC, rPMLC, alveolar macrophages (AM), neutrophils, and regulatory T cells were quantified in BAL fluid of healthy subjects at 9 hours post-LPS inhalation (n = 15). Cell surface antigen expression by iPMLC, rPMLC and AM and the ability of each lineage to proliferate and to undergo phagocytosis were investigated using flow cytometry. Basal cytokine production by iPMLC compared to AM following their isolation from BAL fluid and the responsiveness of both cell types following in vitro treatment with the synthetic corticosteroid dexamethasone were assessed. Results rPMLC have a significantly increased expression of mature macrophage markers and of the proliferation antigen Ki67, compared to iPMLC. Our cytokine data revealed a pro-inflammatory, corticosteroid-resistant phenotype of iPMLC in this model. Conclusions These data emphasise the presence of functionally distinct subpopulations of the monocyte/macrophage lineage in the human lung in experimental acute lung inflammation. PMID:24684897

  8. Flagella from Five Cronobacter Species Induce Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in Macrophage Derivatives from Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Rocha-Ramírez, Luz M.; Ochoa, Sara A.; Gónzalez-Pedrajo, Bertha; Espinosa, Norma; Eslava, Carlos; Hernández-Chiñas, Ulises; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Rodríguez-Leviz, Alejandra; Valencia-Mayoral, Pedro; Sadowinski-Pine, Stanislaw; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Estrada-García, Iris; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre; Rosas, Irma; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Cronobacter spp. are opportunistic pathogens linked to lie-threatening infections in neonates and contaminated powdered infant formula that has been epidemiologically associated with these cases. Clinical symptoms of Cronobacter include necrotizing enterocolitis, bacteremia, and meningitis. Flagella from C. sakazakii are involved in biofilm formation and its adhesion to epithelial cells. We investigated the role of flagella from C. sakazakii ST1 and ST4, C. malonaticus, C. muytjensii, C. turicensis and C. dublinensis during the activation of cytokines (IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10) in macrophage derivatives from human monocytes, which has not been extensively studied. The production and identity of flagella from the five Cronobacter species were visualized and recognized with anti-flagella antibodies by immunogold labeling through transmission electron microscopy. Purified flagella were dissociated into monomers in 12% SDS-PAGE Coomassie blue-stained gels showing a band of ∼28 kDa and, in addition, mass spectrometry revealed the presence of several peptides that correspond to flagellin. Flagella (100 ng) induced the release of IL-8 (3314–6025 pg/ml), TNF-α (39–359 pg/ml), and IL-10 (2–96 pg/ml), in macrophage isolates from human monocytes and similar results were obtained when flagella were dissociated into monomers. Inhibition assays using three dilutions of anti-flagella antibodies (1∶10, 1∶100, and 1∶200) suppressed the secretion of IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10 between 95–100% using 100 ng of protein. A transfection assay using 293-hTLR5 cells showed IL-8 release of 197 pg/ml and suppression in the secretion of IL-8 when anti-hTLR5-IgA antibodies were used at different concentrations. These observations suggest that flagella and flagellin are involved in an inflammatory response dependent on TLR5 recognition, which could contribute to the pathogenesis of the bacteria. PMID:23284883

  9. The monocyte locomotion inhibitory factor produced by Entamoeba histolytica inhibits induced nitric oxide production in human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Rico, G; Leandro, E; Rojas, S; Giménez, J A; Kretschmer, R R

    2003-07-01

    The monocyte locomotion inhibitory factor, an anti-inflammatory pentapeptide produced by Entamoeba histolytica, inhibits the in vitro production of nitric oxide induced by cytokines (INF-gamma, TNF-alpha) or PMA in human leukocytes. This can be added to the other previously reported functional effects of this factor, such as the inhibition of monocyte locomotion and the synthesis of reactive oxygen intermediates in both monocytes and neutrophils. The decreased nitric oxide production may interfere with the killing of amebas by neutrophils in the early invasive stages of amebiasis, when oxidative mechanisms are used [reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates either individually or synergistically via peroxynitrite (ONOO(-))], and in the advanced stages, when both non-oxidative and oxidative (including nitric oxide) mechanisms are employed by macrophages. Diminished nitric oxide production by leukocytes may also contribute to the paucity of late inflammatory components in amebic abscess of the liver and other amebic lesions.

  10. Inhibition of intracellular growth of Histoplasma capsulatum yeast cells by cytokine-activated human monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, S L; Gootee, L; Bucher, C; Bullock, W E

    1991-01-01

    Human monocytes/macrophages (M psi) were infected with Histoplasma capsulatum yeast cells, and intracellular growth was quantified after 24 h of incubation in medium alone or in medium containing cytokines. Yeast cells multiplied within freshly isolated monocytes, cultured M psi, and alveolar M psi with intracellular generation times of 14.2 +/- 1.4, 18.5 +/- 2.1, and 19.9 +/- 1.9 h (mean +/- standard error of the mean), respectively. Monocytes and M psi inhibited the intracellular growth of yeast cells in response to cytokine supernatant; maximum inhibition was obtained when cytokines were added to cell monolayers immediately after infection. Opsonization of yeast cells in normal serum or in H. capsulatum-immune serum did not affect the intracellular generation time of yeast cells in either control M psi or cytokine-activated M psi. PMID:1898916

  11. Effects of verocytotoxin-1 on nonadherent human monocytes: binding characteristics, protein synthesis, and induction of cytokine release.

    PubMed

    van Setten, P A; Monnens, L A; Verstraten, R G; van den Heuvel, L P; van Hinsbergh, V W

    1996-07-01

    The epidemic form of the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) has been associated with a verocytotoxin producing Escherichia coli infection. Endothelial cell damage of glomeruli and arterioles of the kidney plays a central role in the pathogenesis of HUS. A number of observations in vivo and in vitro indicate that inflammatory mediators contribute to this process. In this study we investigated the binding of 125I-verocytotoxin-1 (VT-1) to freshly isolated human nonadherent monocytes as well as the nature of the ligand to which VT-1 binds on monocytes. On the average, freshly isolated monocytes have 0.07 x 10(5) specific binding sites for 125I-VT-1 per cell. Preincubation of nonadherent monocytes with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused a 23- to 30-fold increase of specific binding sites for VT-1 as shown by Scatchard plot analysis. Thin-layer chromatography of extracted neutral glycolipids of the cells and subsequent binding of 125I-VT-1 showed that human monocytes bind VT-1 to a globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) species that is different from that found on endothelial cells, probably a short-chain fatty acyl Gb3 or an alpha-OH-Gb3. In addition, we evaluated the functional consequences of VT-1 binding to human monocytes by investigating the effects of VT-1 on the total protein synthesis and, specifically, the production of the cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-6, and IL-8. We observed that VT-1 did not inhibit overall protein synthesis, nor under basal conditions, neither after stimulation with LPS, in contrast to previous observations with endothelial cells. Furthermore, we found that VT-1 induces the synthesis of the cytokines IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-8 in nonstimulated monocytes by a LPS-independent cell activation. The increase in the production of cytokines was parallelled by an increase in mRNA, as was demonstrated for IL-6 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. These data suggest that

  12. Lipoxin A4 and B4 are potent stimuli for human monocyte migration and adhesion: selective inactivation by dehydrogenation and reduction

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Monocyte recruitment and adherence are important events in inflammatory and vascular diseases. Here, we evaluated the actions of lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and LXB4, a series of lipoxygenase products from arachidonic acid generated by cell-cell interactions, on human monocytes. LXA4 and LXB4 (10(-7) M) each increased monocyte migration in chamber chemotaxis assays and, in migration under agarose, exhibited chemotactic indices similar to those of the chemotactic peptide formyl-methionyl-leucyl- phenylalanine at 10(-10)-10(-8) M and to the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) at 10(-8)-10(-7) M with a rank order of potency: Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 alpha > LXA4 approximately LXB4 approximately MIP-1 alpha. Lipoxins also stimulated monocyte adherence to laminin. In addition, human monocytes rapidly transformed LXA4 and LXB4 to several metabolites. LXB4 (> 80%) was converted within 30 s to new products, in a trend similar to that of LXA4. The novel monocyte-derived LXB4 products were identified as 5-oxo- 6,7-dihydro-LXB4 and 6,7-dihydro-LXB4, indicating a role for site- selective dehydrogenation and reduction. Unlike monocytes, intact polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) did not metabolize LXA4 in significant quantities, and only approximately 12% of exogenous LXB4 was omega-oxidized to 20-OH-LXB4 and 20-COOH-LXB4 by PMN. To determine if lipoxin conversion altered bioactivity, we evaluated the actions of these metabolites on monocytes. Each of the novel products of LXA4 and LXB4 from monocytes, namely oxo- and dihydrolipoxins, were essentially inactive in stimulating monocyte adherence. In contrast, the omega- oxidation products of LXB4 isolated from PMN were equipotent with LXB4 for monocyte adherence. Dehydrogenation of LXA4 in monocytes appears to be carried out by a 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase, which is present in human monocytes as determined by reverse transcription PCR and Western blots. Together, these results provide the first

  13. Early activation of MyD88-mediated autophagy sustains HSV-1 replication in human monocytic THP-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Siracusano, Gabriel; Venuti, Assunta; Lombardo, Daniele; Mastino, Antonio; Esclatine, Audrey; Sciortino, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular degradation pathway that exerts numerous functions in vital biological processes. Among these, it contributes to both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, pathogens have evolved strategies to manipulate autophagy for their own advantage. By monitoring autophagic markers, we showed that HSV-1 transiently induced autophagosome formation during early times of the infection of monocytic THP-1 cells and human monocytes. Autophagy is induced in THP-1 cells by a mechanism independent of viral gene expression or viral DNA accumulation. We found that the MyD88 signaling pathway is required for HSV-1-mediated autophagy, and it is linked to the toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Interestingly, autophagy inhibition by pharmacological modulators or siRNA knockdown impaired viral replication in both THP-1 cells and human monocytes, suggest that the virus exploits the autophagic machinery to its own benefit in these cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that the early autophagic response induced by HSV-1 exerts a proviral role, improving viral production in a semi-permissive model such as THP-1 cells and human monocytes. PMID:27509841

  14. Stable extracellular RNA fragments of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induce early apoptosis in human monocytes via a caspase-8 dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Obregón-Henao, Andrés; Duque-Correa, María A; Rojas, Mauricio; García, Luis F; Brennan, Patrick J; Ortiz, Blanca L; Belisle, John T

    2012-01-01

    The molecular basis of pathogen-induced host cell apoptosis is well characterized for a number of microorganisms. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is known to induce apoptosis and it was shown that live but not heat killed M. tuberculosis stimulates this biological pathway in monocytes. The dependence of this activity on live bacilli led us to hypothesize that products released or secreted by M. tuberculosis are the primary apoptotic factors for human monocytes. Thus, the culture filtrate of in vitro grown M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv was fractioned by conventional chromatography and the apoptosis-inducing activity of individual fractions was measured on human monocytes. The tests employed included measurement of cell membrane damage, caspase activation, and cytokine release. Small molecular weight RNAs of M. tuberculosis were recognized as the predominant apoptosis inducing factors. The RNA was comprised primarily of tRNA and rRNA fragments that stably accumulate in the culture filtrate during early log-phase growth. The RNA fragments signaled through a caspase-8 dependent, caspase-1 and TNF-α independent pathway that ultimately compromised the human monocytes' ability to control M. tuberculosis infection. These studies provide the first report of bacterial RNA inducing apoptosis. They also provide a foundation to pursue pathways for secretion or release of nucleic acids from M. tuberculosis and the impact of secreted RNA fragments on pathogenesis.

  15. Stable Extracellular RNA Fragments of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Induce Early Apoptosis in Human Monocytes via a Caspase-8 Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Obregón-Henao, Andrés; Duque-Correa, María A.; Rojas, Mauricio; García, Luis F.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Ortiz, Blanca L.; Belisle, John T.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular basis of pathogen-induced host cell apoptosis is well characterized for a number of microorganisms. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is known to induce apoptosis and it was shown that live but not heat killed M. tuberculosis stimulates this biological pathway in monocytes. The dependence of this activity on live bacilli led us to hypothesize that products released or secreted by M. tuberculosis are the primary apoptotic factors for human monocytes. Thus, the culture filtrate of in vitro grown M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv was fractioned by conventional chromatography and the apoptosis-inducing activity of individual fractions was measured on human monocytes. The tests employed included measurement of cell membrane damage, caspase activation, and cytokine release. Small molecular weight RNAs of M. tuberculosis were recognized as the predominant apoptosis inducing factors. The RNA was comprised primarily of tRNA and rRNA fragments that stably accumulate in the culture filtrate during early log-phase growth. The RNA fragments signaled through a caspase-8 dependent, caspase-1 and TNF-α independent pathway that ultimately compromised the human monocytes' ability to control M. tuberculosis infection. These studies provide the first report of bacterial RNA inducing apoptosis. They also provide a foundation to pursue pathways for secretion or release of nucleic acids from M. tuberculosis and the impact of secreted RNA fragments on pathogenesis. PMID:22253841

  16. Monocyte procoagulant activity and plasminogen activator. Role in human renal allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.H.; Cardella, C.J.; Schulman, J.; Levy, G.A.

    1985-10-01

    Currently the mechanism of renal allograft rejection is not well understood. This study was designed to determine whether induction of monocyte procoagulant activity (MCPA) is important in the pathogenesis of renal allograft rejection. The MPCA assay was performed utilizing a one stage clotting assay both in normal and in factor-VII-deficient plasma. There was no increase in spontaneous MPCA in 20 patients with endstage renal failure and in 10 patients following abdominal or orthopedic operation, as compared with 20 normal controls. MPCA was assessed daily in 18 patients who had received renal allografts. Rejection episodes (RE) were predicted on the basis of persistent elevation in MPCA as compared with pretransplant levels. Rejection was diagnosed clinically and treated on the basis of standard criteria. Treated RE were compared with those predicted by elevated MPCA, and 3 patients were assessed as having no RE by MPCA and by standard criteria. In 8 RE, MPCA correlated temporally with RE (same day) when compared with standard criteria. In 12 RE, MPCA was predictive of rejection preceding standard criteria by at least 24 hr. There were 7 false-positive predictions on the basis of MPCA; however, there was only 1 false negative. MPCA was shown to be a prothrombinase by its dependence only on prothrombin and fibrinogen for full activity. MPCA may be important in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection, and additionally it may be a useful adjunct in the clinical management of this disease.

  17. Dendritic Cells Differentiated from Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Monocytes Exhibit Tolerogenic Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Kyung; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Human umbilical cord blood (UCB) is rich in diverse hematopoietic stem cells that are competent to differentiate into various cell types with immunological compatibility at transplantation. Thus, UCB is a potential source for the preparation of dendritic cells (DCs) to be used for cell therapy against inflammatory disorders or cancers. However, the immunological properties of UCB-derived DCs are not fully characterized. In this study, we investigated the phenotypes and functions of UCB monocyte-derived DCs (UCB-DCs) in comparison with those of adult peripheral blood (APB) monocyte-derived DCs (APB-DCs). UCB-DCs contained less CD1a(+) DCs, which is known as immunostimulatory DCs, than APB-DCs. UCB-DCs exhibited lower expression of CD80, MHC proteins, and DC-SIGN, but higher endocytic activity, than APB-DCs. Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of UCB-DCs minimally augmented the expression of maturation markers and production of interleukin (IL)-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, but potently expressed IL-10. When UCB-DCs were cocultured with CD14(+) cell-depleted allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells, they weakly induced the proliferation, surface expression of activation markers, and interferon (IFN)-γ production of T lymphocytes compared with APB-DCs. UCB possessed higher levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) than APB, which might be responsible for tolerogenic phenotypes and functions of UCB-DCs. Indeed, APB-DCs prepared in the presence of PGE2 exhibited CD1a(-)CD14(+) phenotypes with tolerogenic properties, including weak maturation, impaired IL-12 production, and negligible T lymphocyte activation as UCB-DCs did. Taken together, we suggest that UCB-DCs have tolerogenic properties, which might be due to PGE2 highly sustained in UCB.

  18. Microbial pattern recognition causes distinct functional micro-RNA signatures in primary human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Häsler, Robert; Jacobs, Gunnar; Till, Andreas; Grabe, Nils; Cordes, Christian; Nikolaus, Susanna; Lao, Kaiqin; Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are short, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression post transcriptionally. Several studies have demonstrated the relevance of miRNAs for a wide range of cellular mechanisms, however, the current knowledge on how miRNAs respond to relevant external stimuli, e.g. in disease scenarios is very limited. To generate a descriptive picture of the miRNA network associated to inflammatory responses, we quantified the levels of 330 miRNAs upon stimulation with a panel of pro-inflammatory components such as microbial pattern molecules (flagellin, diacylated lipopeptide lipopolysaccharide, muramyl dipeptide), infection with Listeria monocytogenes and TNF-α as pro-inflammatory control in primary human monocytes using real time PCR. As a result, we found distinct miRNA response clusters for each stimulus used. Additionally, we identified potential target genes of three selected miRNAs miR-129-5p, miR-146a and miR-378 which were part of PAMP-specific response clusters by transfecting THP1 monocytes with the corresponding pre- or anti-miRNAs and microfluidic PCR arrays. The miRNAs induced distinct transcriptomal signatures, e.g. overexpression of miRNA129-5p, which was selectively upregulated by the NOD2-elicitor MDP, led to an upregulation of DEFB1, IRAK1, FBXW7 and IKK γ (Nemo). Our findings on highly co-regulated clusters of miRNAs support the hypothesis that miRNAs act in functional groups. This study indicates that miRNAs play an important role in fine-tuning inflammatory mechanisms. Further investigation in the field of miRNA responses will help to understand their effects on gene expression and may close the regulatory gap between mRNA and protein expression in inflammatory diseases. PMID:22363568

  19. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Holers, V M; Kotzin, B L

    1985-01-01

    We used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. None of the monoclonal autoantibodies appeared to bind to a significant percentage of cells of relatively small cell size, either before or after culture. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Further experiments, including those using aggregated Ig to block antibody binding, strongly indicated that anti-histone antibody binding was not Fc receptor mediated. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations (0.25 micrograms/ml) of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases. Images PMID:3876357

  20. Protective effect of thioredoxin upon NO-mediated cell injury in THP1 monocytic human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ferret, P J; Soum, E; Negre, O; Wollman, E E; Fradelizi, D

    2000-01-01

    Although NO has been postulated to play important roles in host defences, it is potentially damaging for exposed cells, including for the macrophages producing the NO. Thus a network of radical acceptors and enzymes is thought to play an important redox-buffering role to protect cells against NO-mediated injury. We examined the properties of the redox systems superoxide dismutase (SOD)/catalase, glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx), in regulating the viability of two human monocytic cell lines (THP1 and U937) exposed to the NO-generating compound diethylene triamine-nitric oxide (DETA-NO). We observed that NO-induced cytotoxic effects were time- and dose-dependent towards the two cell lines. After vitamin-induced differentiation in vitro with retinoic acid (RA) and 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D(3) (VD), termed RA/VD, we observed that THP1 RA/VD cells became more resistant to NO-mediated cytotoxicity whereas the susceptibility of U937 cells was not modified. Using Western blotting and reverse-transcriptase PCR methods, we observed that gene transcription and protein expression of Trx and thioredoxin reductase were significantly increased upon RA/VD treatment and differentiation in THP1 cells. By contrast, SOD/catalase and GSH redox state remained unmodified. Finally, a stable transfectant THP1 line overexpressing Trx was found to be more resistant than THP1 control cells that were untransfected or transfected with an empty plasmid, when exposed to DETA-NO in vitro. In conclusion, we observed an inverse correlation between cell susceptibility to NO damaging effects and Trx expression, suggesting that the Trx system may have important preventative capacities towards NO-mediated cellular injury in monocytic macrophage cells. PMID:10698704

  1. Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor affects activation and function of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Ye, Z; Kijlstra, A; Zhou, Y; Yang, P

    2014-08-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is well known for mediating the toxic effects of dioxin-containing pollutants, but has also been shown to be involved in the natural regulation of the immune response. In this study, we investigated the effect of AhR activation by its endogenous ligands 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) and 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE) on the differentiation, maturation and function of monocyte-derived DCs in Behçet's disease (BD) patients. In this study, we showed that AhR activation by FICZ and ITE down-regulated the expression of co-stimulatory molecules including human leucocyte antigen D-related (HLA-DR), CD80 and CD86, while it had no effect on the expression of CD83 and CD40 on DCs derived from BD patients and normal controls. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated dendritic cells (DCs) from active BD patients showed a higher level of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-23 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α production. FICZ or ITE significantly inhibited the production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-23 and TNF-α, but induced IL-10 production by DCs derived from active BD patients and normal controls. FICZ or ITE-treated DCs significantly inhibited the T helper type 17 (Th17) and Th1 cell response. Activation of AhR either by FICZ or ITE inhibits DC differentiation, maturation and function. Further studies are needed to investigate whether manipulation of the AhR pathway may be used to treat BD or other autoimmune diseases.

  2. Reprogramming of human peripheral blood monocytes to erythroid lineage by blocking of the PU-1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Masoumeh; Deezagi, Abdolkhalegh; Ebrahimi, Marzieh

    2016-03-01

    In hematopoietic system development, PU.1 and GATA-1 as lineage-specific transcription factors (TF) are expressed in common myeloid progenitors. The cross antagonism between them ascertains gene expression programs of monocytic and erythroid cells, respectively. This concept in transdifferentiation approaches has not been well considered yet, especially in intralineage conversion systems. To demonstrate whether PU.1 suppression induces monocyte lineage conversion into red blood cells, a combination of three PU.1-specific siRNAs was implemented to knock down PU.1 gene expression and generate the balance in favor of GATA-1 expression to induce erythroid differentiation. For this purpose, monocytes were isolated from human peripheral blood and transfected by PU.1 siRNAs. In transfected monocytes, the rate of PU.1 expression in mRNA level was significantly decreased until 0.38 ± 0.118 when compared to untreated monocytes at 72 h (p value ≤0.05) which resulted in significant overexpression of GATA1 of 16.1 ± 0.343-fold compared to the untreated group (p value ≤0.01). Subsequently, overexpression of hemoglobin (α 13.26 ± 1.34-fold; p value≤0.0001) and β-globin (37.55 ± 16.56-fold; p value≤0.0001) was observed when compared to control groups. The results of western immunoblotting confirm those findings too. While, reduced expression of monocyte, CD14 gene, was observed in qRT-PCR and flow cytometry results. Our results suggest that manipulating the ratio of the two TFs in bifurcation differentiation pathways via applying siRNA technology can possibly change the cells' fate as a safe way for therapeutics application.

  3. The detection and localization of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Negus, R P; Stamp, G W; Relf, M G; Burke, F; Malik, S T; Bernasconi, S; Allavena, P; Sozzani, S; Mantovani, A; Balkwill, F R

    1995-01-01

    Chemokines may control the macrophage infiltrate found in many solid tumors. In human ovarian cancer, in situ hybridization detected mRNA for the macrophage chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in 16/17 serous carcinomas, 4/4 mucinous carcinomas, 2/2 endometrioid carcinomas, and 1/3 borderline tumors. In serous tumors, mRNA expression mainly localized to the epithelial areas, as did immunoreactive MCP-1 protein. In the other tumors, both stromal and epithelial expression were seen. All tumors contained variable numbers of cells positive for the macrophage marker CD68. MCP-1 mRNA was also detected in the stroma of 5/5 normal ovaries. RT-PCR demonstrated mRNA for MCP-1 in 7/7 serous carcinomas and 6/6 ovarian cancer cell lines. MCP-1 protein was detected by ELISA in ascites from patients with ovarian cancer (mean 4.28 ng/ml) and was produced primarily by the cancer cells. Human MCP-1 protein was also detected in culture supernatants from cell lines and in ascites from human ovarian tumor xenografts which induce a peritoneal monocytosis in nude mice. We conclude that the macrophage chemoattractant MCP-1 is produced by epithelial ovarian cancer and that the tumor cells themselves are probably a major source. MCP-1 may contribute to the accumulation of tumor-associated macrophages, which may subsequently influence tumor behavior. Images PMID:7738202

  4. Induction of heme oxygenase 1 by arsenite inhibits cytokine-induced monocyte adhesion to human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xi; Pi Jingbo; Liu Wenlan; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu Kejian; Feng Changjian

    2009-04-15

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an oxidative stress responsive gene upregulated by various physiological and exogenous stimuli. Arsenite, as an oxidative stressor, is a potent inducer of HO-1 in human and rodent cells. In this study, we investigated the mechanistic role of arsenite-induced HO-1 in modulating tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) induced monocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Arsenite pretreatment, which upregulated HO-1 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced monocyte adhesion to HUVEC and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 protein expression by 50% and 40%, respectively. Importantly, knockdown of HO-1 by small interfering RNA abolished the arsenite-induced inhibitory effects. These results indicate that induction of HO-1 by arsenite inhibits the cytokine-induced monocyte adhesion to HUVEC by suppressing adhesion molecule expression. These findings established an important mechanistic link between the functional monocyte adhesion properties of HUVEC and the induction of HO-1 by arsenite.

  5. Increased Platelet Reactivity Is Associated with Circulating Platelet-Monocyte Complexes and Macrophages in Human Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Vrijenhoek, Joyce E. P.; van Holten, Thijs C.; Elsenberg, Ellen H. A. M.; Mak-Nienhuis, Elske M.; de Borst, Gert Jan; Jukema, J. Wouter; Pijls, Nico H. J.; Waltenberger, Johannes; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Moll, Frans L.; McClellan, Elizabeth; Stubbs, Andrew; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Hoefer, Imo; de Groot, Philip G.; Roest, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective Platelet reactivity, platelet binding to monocytes and monocyte infiltration play a detrimental role in atherosclerotic plaque progression. We investigated whether platelet reactivity was associated with levels of circulating platelet-monocyte complexes (PMCs) and macrophages in human atherosclerotic carotid plaques. Methods Platelet reactivity was determined by measuring platelet P-selectin expression after platelet stimulation with increasing concentrations of adenosine diphosphate (ADP), in two independent cohorts: the Circulating Cells cohort (n = 244) and the Athero-Express cohort (n = 91). Levels of PMCs were assessed by flow cytometry in blood samples of patients who were scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention (Circulating Cells cohort). Monocyte infiltration was semi-quantitatively determined by histological examination of atherosclerotic carotid plaques collected during carotid endarterectomy (Athero-Express cohort). Results We found increased platelet reactivity in patients with high PMCs as compared to patients with low PMCs (median (interquartile range): 4153 (1585–11267) area under the curve (AUC) vs. 9633 (3580–21565) AUC, P<0.001). Also, we observed increased platelet reactivity in patients with high macrophage levels in atherosclerotic plaques as compared to patients with low macrophage levels in atherosclerotic plaques (mean±SD; 8969±3485 AUC vs. 7020±3442 AUC, P = 0.02). All associations remained significant after adjustment for age, sex and use of drugs against platelet activation. Conclusion Platelet reactivity towards ADP is associated with levels of PMCs and macrophages in human atherosclerotic carotid plaques. PMID:25122139

  6. Mechanism of Hericium erinaceus (Yamabushitake) mushroom-induced apoptosis of U937 human monocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Phil; Kang, Mi Young; Choi, Yong Hee; Kim, Jae Ho; Nam, Seok Hyun; Friedman, Mendel

    2011-06-01

    Phytochemicals in some foods are a potential source of bioactive safe compounds for cancer chemoprevention and suppression of tumor initiation, promotion, and metastasis. In the present study, we evaluated hot water (HWE), microwaved 50% ethanol (MWE), acidic (ACE), and alkaline (AKE) extracts of the fruitbody (sporocarp) of Hericium erinaceus (Yamabushitake, Lion's Mane) mushrooms for their ability to induce apoptosis (programmed cell death) in U937 human monocytic leukemia cells. Cell culture, cell viability, cytotoxicity, flow cytometry, chromosomal DNA integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, and activation and inhibition of caspase assays were carried out to help define the mechanism of observed apoptosis. The aqueous and aqueous/ethanolic extracts were active in all assays, whereas the acidic and alkaline extracts with the similar proximate compositions were both inactive. The results of the bioassays with the active extracts are consistent with an apoptosis mechanism governing suppression of the cell proliferation pathway that involves activation of mitochondria-mediated caspase-3 and caspase-9 but not caspase-8. Proximate analysis of the freeze-dried mushroom powder showed that it contains high amounts of proteins, carbohydrates, and minerals. The results indicate that H. erinaceus mushrooms may have therapeutic potential against human leukemia.

  7. Integration is required for productive infection of monocyte-derived macrophages by human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Englund, G; Theodore, T S; Freed, E O; Engelman, A; Martin, M A

    1995-01-01

    Certain human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates are able to productively infect nondividing cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. We have used a molecular genetic approach to construct two different HIV-1 integrase mutants that were studied in the context of an infectious, macrophage-tropic HIV-1 molecular clone. One mutant, HIV-1 delta D(35)E, containing a 37-residue deletion within the central, catalytic domain of integrase, was noninfectious in both peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte-derived macrophages. The HIV-1 delta D(35)E mutant, however, exhibited defects in the assembly and/or release of progeny virions in transient transfection assays, as well as defects in entry and/or viral DNA synthesis during the early stages of monocyte-derived macrophage infection. The second mutant, HIV-1D116N/8, containing a single Asp-to-Asn substitution at the invariant Asp-116 residue of integrase, was also noninfectious in both peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte-derived macrophages but, in contrast to HIV-1 delta D(35)E, was indistinguishable from wild-type virus in reverse transcriptase production. PCR analysis indicated that HIV-1D116N/8 entered monocyte-derived macrophages efficiently and reverse transcribed its RNA but was unable to complete its replication cycle because of a presumed block to integration. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that integration is an obligate step in productive HIV-1 infection of activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and primary human macrophage cultures. PMID:7707554

  8. Phenotypic and functional characterization of macrophages with therapeutic potential generated from human cirrhotic monocytes in a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Joanna K.; Mackinnon, Alison C.; Wojtacha, Dvina; Pope, Caroline; Fraser, Alasdair R.; Burgoyne, Paul; Bailey, Laura; Pass, Chloe; Atkinson, Anne; Mcgowan, Neil W.A.; Manson, Lynn; Turner, Mark L.; Campbell, John D.M.; Forbes, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    Background aims Macrophages have complex roles in the liver. The aim of this study was to compare profiles of human monocyte-derived macrophages between controls and cirrhotic patients, to determine whether chronic inflammation affects precursor number or the phenotype, with the eventual aim to develop a cell therapy for cirrhosis. Methods Infusion of human macrophages in a murine liver fibrosis model demonstrated a decrease in markers of liver injury (alanine transaminase, bilirubin, aspartate transaminase) and fibrosis (transforming growth factor-β, α-smooth muscle actin, phosphatidylserine receptor) and an increase in markers of liver regeneration (matrix metalloproteinases [MMP]-9, MMP-12 and TNF-related weak inducer of apoptosis). CD14+ monocytes were then isolated from controls. Monocytes were matured into macrophages for 7 days using a Good Manufacturing Practice–compatible technique. Results There was no significant difference between the mean number of CD14+ monocytes isolated from cirrhotic patients (n = 9) and controls (n = 10); 2.8 ± SEM 0.54 × 108 and 2.5 ± 0.56 × 108, respectively. The mean yield of mature macrophages cultured was also not significantly different between cirrhotic patients and controls (0.9 × 108 ± 0.38 × 108, with more than 90% viability and 0.65 × 108 ± 0.16 × 108, respectively. Maturation to macrophages resulted in up-regulation of a number of genes (MMP-9, CCL2, interleukin [IL]-10 and TNF-related weak inducer of apoptosis). A cytokine and chemokine polymerase chain reaction array, comparing the control and cirrhotic macrophages, revealed no statistically significant differences. Conclusions Macrophages can be differentiated from cirrhotic patients' apheresis-derived CD14 monocytes and develop the same pro-resolution phenotype as control macrophages, indicating their suitability for clinical therapy. PMID:26342993

  9. Age-related variations in the methylome associated with gene expression in human monocytes and T cells.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Lindsay M; Taylor, Jackson R; Ding, Jingzhong; Lohman, Kurt; Johnson, Craig; Siscovick, David; Burke, Gregory; Post, Wendy; Shea, Steven; Jacobs, David R; Stunnenberg, Hendrik; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Hoeschele, Ina; McCall, Charles E; Herrington, David M; Tracy, Russell P; Liu, Yongmei

    2014-11-18

    Age-related variations in DNA methylation have been reported; however, the functional relevance of these differentially methylated sites (age-dMS) are unclear. Here we report potentially functional age-dMS, defined as age- and cis-gene expression-associated methylation sites (age-eMS), identified by integrating genome-wide CpG methylation and gene expression profiles collected ex vivo from circulating T cells (227 CD4+ samples) and monocytes (1,264 CD14+ samples, age range: 55-94 years). None of the age-eMS detected in 227 T-cell samples are detectable in 1,264 monocyte samples, in contrast to the majority of age-dMS detected in T cells that replicated in monocytes. Age-eMS tend to be hypomethylated with older age, located in predicted enhancers and preferentially linked to expression of antigen processing and presentation genes. These results identify and characterize potentially functional age-related methylation in human T cells and monocytes, and provide novel insights into the role age-dMS may have in the aging process.

  10. High glucose concentrations induce TNF-α production through the down-regulation of CD33 in primary human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background CD33 is a membrane receptor containing a lectin domain and a cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) that is able to inhibit cytokine production. CD33 is expressed by monocytes, and reduced expression of CD33 correlates with augmented production of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-8. However, the role of CD33 in the inflammation associated with hyperglycemia and diabetes is unknown. Therefore, we studied CD33 expression and inflammatory cytokine secretion in freshly isolated monocytes from patients with type 2 diabetes. To evaluate the effects of hyperglycemia, monocytes from healthy donors were cultured with different glucose concentrations (15-50 mmol/l D-glucose), and CD33 expression and inflammatory cytokine production were assessed. The expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling protein-3 (SOCS-3) and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also evaluated to address the cellular mechanisms involved in the down-regulation of CD33. Results CD33 expression was significantly decreased in monocytes from patients with type 2 diabetes, and higher levels of TNF-α, IL-8 and IL-12p70 were detected in the plasma of patients compared to healthy donors. Under high glucose conditions, CD33 protein and mRNA expression was significantly decreased, whereas spontaneous TNF-α secretion and SOCS-3 mRNA expression were increased in monocytes from healthy donors. Furthermore, the down-regulation of CD33 and increase in TNF-α production were prevented when monocytes were treated with the antioxidant α-tocopherol and cultured under high glucose conditions. Conclusion Our results suggest that hyperglycemia down-regulates CD33 expression and triggers the spontaneous secretion of TNF-α by peripheral monocytes. This phenomenon involves the generation of ROS and the up-regulation of SOCS-3. These observations support the importance of blood glucose control for maintaining innate immune function and suggest

  11. Metabolic profiling during HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hollenbaugh, Joseph A; Montero, Catherine; Schinazi, Raymond F; Munger, Joshua; Kim, Baek

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated cellular metabolism profiles of HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). First, HIV-2 GL-AN displays faster production kinetics and greater amounts of virus as compared to HIV-1s: YU-2, 89.6 and JR-CSF. Second, quantitative LC-MS/MS metabolomics analysis demonstrates very similar metabolic profiles in glycolysis and TCA cycle metabolic intermediates between HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected macrophages, with a few notable exceptions. The most striking metabolic change in MDMs infected with HIV-2 relative to HIV-1-infected MDMs was the increased levels of quinolinate, a metabolite in the tryptophan catabolism pathway that has been linked to HIV/AIDS pathogenesis. Third, both HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected MDMs showed elevated levels of ribose-5-phosphate, a key metabolic component in nucleotide biosynthesis. Finally, HIV-2 infected MDMs display increased dNTP concentrations as predicted by Vpx-mediated SAMHD1 degradation. Collectively, these data show differential metabolic changes during HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection of macrophages.

  12. Cryomicroscopic determination of the membrane osmotic properties of human monocytes at subfreezing temperatures.

    PubMed

    McCaa, C; Diller, K R; Aggarwal, S J; Takahashi, T

    1991-08-01

    Monocytes were isolated from fresh whole human blood and resuspended in Hanks balanced salt solution; a portion of the cells was mixed with an equal volume of 2M dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to form a 1 M solution. Microliter volumes of cell suspension were placed directly onto a computer-controlled cryostage and cooled to a predetermined subzero temperature. Ice was nucleated in the extracellular medium and a continuous video record was made of the subsequent osmotically induced volume changes of individual cells owing to exposure to the concentrated extracellular solutes. Selected micrographs emphasizing the initial transient data were digitized for computer analysis with an interactive boundary tracing algorithm to determine metric parameters of specific cells, and apparent volume changes were measured as a function of elapsed time after nucleation. The Kedem-Katchalsky-coupled transport equations were fit to the data using a network thermodynamic model implemented on a microcomputer to determine values for the permeability properties Lp, omega, and sigma. Experiments were performed over the temperature range from -7 degrees to -10 degrees C. Cells pre-equilibrated with DMSO had a lower Lp and a higher activation energy, delta E, than without additive, although the statistical significance of the difference could not be substantiated. It was found that the movement of DMSO across the plasma membrane in response to extracellular freezing was apparently so much smaller than the water flux that values for omega and sigma could not be determined from the data base. PMID:1935177

  13. Human endotoxin tolerance is associated with enrichment of the CD14+ CD16+ monocyte subset.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Nieto, Aimée; Zentella, Alejandro; Moreno, José; Ventura, José L; Pedraza, Sigifredo; Velázquez, Juan R

    2015-01-01

    Prior exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induces a state of cell resistance to subsequent LPS restimulation, known as endotoxin tolerance, mainly by repressing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We established an endotoxin tolerance model in human monocytes Endotoxin-tolerant cells showed a decrease in IκBα degradation and diminished expression of Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) (both messenger RNA [mRNA] and protein content). The myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/MyD88 splice variant (MyD88s) ratio, an indirect way to test the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) MyD88-dependent signaling cascade, did not change in endotoxin-tolerant cells when compared to LPS-stimulated or -unstimulated ones. Remarkably, cell population analysis indicated a significant increase of the CD14+ CD16+ subset only under the endotoxin-tolerant condition. Furthermore, endotoxin-tolerant cells produced higher amounts of C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10), a typical MyD88-independent cytokine.

  14. Unsaturated fatty acids prevent activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes/macrophages[S

    PubMed Central

    L'homme, Laurent; Esser, Nathalie; Riva, Laura; Scheen, André; Paquot, Nicolas; Piette, Jacques; Legrand-Poels, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in many obesity-associated diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and gouty arthritis, through its ability to induce interleukin (IL)-1β release. The molecular link between obesity and inflammasome activation is still unclear, but free fatty acids have been proposed as one triggering event. Here we reported opposite effects of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) compared with unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) on NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes/macrophages. Palmitate and stearate, both SFAs, triggered IL-1β secretion in a caspase-1/ASC/NLRP3-dependent pathway. Unlike SFAs, the UFAs oleate and linoleate did not lead to IL-1β secretion. In addition, they totally prevented the IL-1β release induced by SFAs and, with less efficiency, by a broad range of NLRP3 inducers, including nigericin, alum, and monosodium urate. UFAs did not affect the transcriptional effect of SFAs, suggesting a specific effect on the NLRP3 activation. These results provide a new anti-inflammatory mechanism of UFAs by preventing the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and, therefore, IL-1β processing. By this way, UFAs might play a protective role in NLRP3-associated diseases. PMID:24006511

  15. Human endotoxin tolerance is associated with enrichment of the CD14+ CD16+ monocyte subset.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Nieto, Aimée; Zentella, Alejandro; Moreno, José; Ventura, José L; Pedraza, Sigifredo; Velázquez, Juan R

    2015-01-01

    Prior exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induces a state of cell resistance to subsequent LPS restimulation, known as endotoxin tolerance, mainly by repressing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We established an endotoxin tolerance model in human monocytes Endotoxin-tolerant cells showed a decrease in IκBα degradation and diminished expression of Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) (both messenger RNA [mRNA] and protein content). The myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/MyD88 splice variant (MyD88s) ratio, an indirect way to test the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) MyD88-dependent signaling cascade, did not change in endotoxin-tolerant cells when compared to LPS-stimulated or -unstimulated ones. Remarkably, cell population analysis indicated a significant increase of the CD14+ CD16+ subset only under the endotoxin-tolerant condition. Furthermore, endotoxin-tolerant cells produced higher amounts of C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10), a typical MyD88-independent cytokine. PMID:25172544

  16. Responsiveness of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells to thimerosal and mercury derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Migdal, C.; Tailhardat, M.; Courtellemont, P.; Haftek, M.; Serres, M.

    2010-07-15

    Several cases of skin sensitization have been reported following the application of thimerosal, which is composed of ethyl mercury and thiosalicylic acid (TSA). However, few in vitro studies have been carried out on human dendritic cells (DCs) which play an essential role in the initiation of allergic contact dermatitis. The aim of the present study was to identify the effect of thimerosal and other mercury compounds on human DCs. To address this purpose, DCs derived from monocytes (mono-DCs) were used. Data show that thimerosal and mercury derivatives induced DC activation, as monitored by CD86 and HLA-DR overexpression associated with the secretion of tumor necrosis factor {alpha} and interleukin 8, similarly to lipopolysaccharide and the sensitizers, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB) and nickel sulfate, which were used as positive controls. In contrast, TSA, the non-mercury part of thimerosal, as well as dichloronitrobenzene, a DNCB negative control, and the irritant, sodium dodecyl sulfate, had no effect. Moreover, oxidative stress, monitored by ROS induction and depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, was induced by thimerosal and mercury compounds, as well as DNCB, in comparison with hydrogen peroxide, used as a positive control. The role of thiol oxidation in the initiation of mono-DC activation was confirmed by a pre-treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine which strongly decreased chemical-induced CD86 overexpression. These data are in agreement with several clinical observations of the high relevance of thimerosal in patch-test reactions and prove that human mono-DCs are useful in vitro tools for determining the allergenic potency of chemicals.

  17. Replication of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lathrop, Stephanie K; Binder, Kelsey A; Starr, Tregei; Cooper, Kendal G; Chong, Audrey; Carmody, Aaron B; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia

    2015-07-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a common cause of food-borne gastrointestinal illness, but additionally it causes potentially fatal bacteremia in some immunocompromised patients. In mice, systemic spread and replication of the bacteria depend upon infection of and replication within macrophages, but replication in human macrophages is not widely reported or well studied. In order to assess the ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to replicate in human macrophages, we infected primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) that had been differentiated under conditions known to generate different phenotypes. We found that replication in MDM depends greatly upon the phenotype of the cells, as M1-skewed macrophages did not allow replication, while M2a macrophages and macrophages differentiated with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) alone (termed M0) did. We describe how additional conditions that alter the macrophage phenotype or the gene expression of the bacteria affect the outcome of infection. In M0 MDM, the temporal expression of representative genes from Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2 (SPI1 and SPI2) and the importance of the PhoP/Q two-component regulatory system are similar to what has been shown in mouse macrophages. However, in contrast to mouse macrophages, where replication is SPI2 dependent, we observed early SPI2-independent replication in addition to later SPI2-dependent replication in M0 macrophages. Only SPI2-dependent replication was associated with death of the host cell at later time points. Altogether, our results reveal a very nuanced interaction between Salmonella and human macrophages. PMID:25895967

  18. Transcriptional modulation of a human monocytic cell line exposed to PM(10) from an urban area.

    PubMed

    Bastonini, Emanuela; Verdone, Loredana; Morrone, Stefania; Santoni, Angela; Settimo, Gaetano; Marsili, Giovanni; La Fortezza, Marco; Di Mauro, Ernesto; Caserta, Micaela

    2011-08-01

    Insight into the mechanisms by which ambient air particulate matter mediates adverse health effects is needed to provide biological plausibility to epidemiological studies demonstrating an association between PM(10) exposure and increased morbidity and mortality. In vitro studies of the effects of air pollution on human cells help to establish conditions for the analysis of cause-effect relationships. One of the major challenges is to test native atmosphere in its complexity, rather than the various components individually. We have developed an in vitro system in which human monocyte-macrophage U937 cells are directly exposed to filters containing different amounts of PM(10) collected in the city of Rome. Transcriptional profiling obtained after short exposure (1h) of cells to a filter containing 1666μg PM(10) (77.6μg/cm(2)) using a macroarray panel of 1176 genes reveals a significant change in the mRNA level (>2 fold) for 87 genes relative to cells exposed to a control filter. Overall, 9 out of 87 modulated genes were annotated as "lung cancer". qRT-PCR confirmed the induction of relevant genes involved in DNA repair and apoptosis, specifically: ERCC1, TDG, DAD1 and MCL1. In cells exposed for 10min, 1h and 3h to different amounts of PM(10), transcription of TNFα and TRAP1, which code for a key pro-inflammatory cytokine and a mitochondrial protein involved in cell protection from oxidative stress, respectively, was shown to be modulated in a time-dependent, but not a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these data indicate that it is possible to analyze the effects of untreated particulate matter on human cells by the direct-exposure approach we have developed, possibly providing new clues to traffic-related health hazard.

  19. Reconfigurable microfluidic device with integrated antibody arrays for capture, multiplexed stimulation, and cytokine profiling of human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Tam; Rahimian, Ali; Stybayeva, Gulnaz; Gao, Yandong; Kwa, Timothy; Van de Water, Judy; Revzin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes represent a class of immune cells that play a key role in the innate and adaptive immune response against infections. One mechanism employed by monocytes for sensing foreign antigens is via toll-like receptors (TLRs)—transmembrane proteins that distinguish classes of foreign pathogens, for example, bacteria (TLR4, 5, and 9) vs. fungi (TLR2) vs. viruses (TLR3, 7, and 8). Binding of antigens activates a signaling cascade through TLR receptors that culminate in secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Detection of these cytokines can provide valuable clinical data for drug developers and disease investigations, but this usually requires a large sample volume and can be technically inefficient with traditional techniques such as flow cytometry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, or luminex. This paper describes an approach whereby antibody arrays for capturing cells and secreted cytokines are encapsulated within a microfluidic device that can be reconfigured to operate in serial or parallel mode. In serial mode, the device represents one long channel that may be perfused with a small volume of minimally processed blood. Once monocytes are captured onto antibody spots imprinted into the floor of the device, the straight channel is reconfigured to form nine individually perfusable chambers. To prove this concept, the microfluidic platform was used to capture monocytes from minimally processed human blood in serial mode and then to stimulate monocytes with different TLR agonists in parallel mode. Three cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-10, were detected using anti-cytokine antibody arrays integrated into each of the six chambers. We foresee further use of this device in applications such as pediatric immunology or drug/vaccine testing where it is important to balance small sample volume with the need for high information content. PMID:26339315

  20. Biofilm-forming Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria undergo lipopolysaccharide structural modifications and induce enhanced inflammatory cytokine response in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ciornei, Cristina D; Novikov, Alexey; Beloin, Christophe; Fitting, Catherine; Caroff, Martine; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Adib-Conquy, Minou

    2010-10-01

    To determine whether growth of bacteria in biofilms triggers a specific immune response, we compared cytokine induction in human monocytes and mouse macrophages by planktonic and biofilm bacteria. We compared Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, two bacteria often colonizing the airways of cystic fibrosis patients. Planktonic and biofilm S. aureus induced equivalent amounts of cytokine in human monocytes. In contrast, biofilm-forming P. aeruginosa induced a higher production of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-6 than their planktonic counterpart, both for clinical isolates and laboratory strains. This increased cytokine production was partly dependent on phagocytosis. In contrast, no difference in cytokine induction was observed with mouse macrophages. We investigated the structures of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) of these Gram-negative bacteria in biofilm and planktonic cultures of P. aeruginosa. Switch between the two life-styles was shown to cause several reversible LPS structure modifications affecting the lipid A and polysaccharide moieties of both clinical isolates and laboratory strains. In addition, LPS isolated from biofilm-grown bacteria induced slightly more inflammatory cytokines than that extracted from its planktonic counterpart. Our results, therefore, show that P. aeruginosa biofilm LPS undergoes structural modifications that only partially contribute to an increased inflammatory response from human monocytes. PMID:19710099

  1. Effects of an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist on human sleep, sleep-associated memory consolidation, and blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Eva-Maria; Linz, Barbara; Diekelmann, Susanne; Besedovsky, Luciana; Lange, Tanja; Born, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines like interleukin-1 beta (IL-1) are major players in the interaction between the immune system and the central nervous system. Various animal studies report a sleep-promoting effect of IL-1 leading to enhanced slow wave sleep (SWS). Moreover, this cytokine was shown to affect hippocampus-dependent memory. However, the role of IL-1 in human sleep and memory is not yet understood. We administered the synthetic IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra (IL-1ra) in healthy humans (100mg, subcutaneously, before sleep; n=16) to investigate the role of IL-1 signaling in sleep regulation and sleep-dependent declarative memory consolidation. Inasmuch monocytes have been considered a model for central nervous microglia, we monitored cytokine production in classical and non-classical blood monocytes to gain clues about how central nervous effects of IL-1ra are conveyed. Contrary to our expectation, IL-1ra increased EEG slow wave activity during SWS and non-rapid eye movement (NonREM) sleep, indicating a deepening of sleep, while sleep-associated memory consolidation remained unchanged. Moreover, IL-1ra slightly increased prolactin and reduced cortisol levels during sleep. Production of IL-1 by classical monocytes was diminished after IL-1ra. The discrepancy to findings in animal studies might reflect species differences and underlines the importance of studying cytokine effects in humans. PMID:25535859

  2. Effects of an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist on human sleep, sleep-associated memory consolidation, and blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Eva-Maria; Linz, Barbara; Diekelmann, Susanne; Besedovsky, Luciana; Lange, Tanja; Born, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines like interleukin-1 beta (IL-1) are major players in the interaction between the immune system and the central nervous system. Various animal studies report a sleep-promoting effect of IL-1 leading to enhanced slow wave sleep (SWS). Moreover, this cytokine was shown to affect hippocampus-dependent memory. However, the role of IL-1 in human sleep and memory is not yet understood. We administered the synthetic IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra (IL-1ra) in healthy humans (100mg, subcutaneously, before sleep; n=16) to investigate the role of IL-1 signaling in sleep regulation and sleep-dependent declarative memory consolidation. Inasmuch monocytes have been considered a model for central nervous microglia, we monitored cytokine production in classical and non-classical blood monocytes to gain clues about how central nervous effects of IL-1ra are conveyed. Contrary to our expectation, IL-1ra increased EEG slow wave activity during SWS and non-rapid eye movement (NonREM) sleep, indicating a deepening of sleep, while sleep-associated memory consolidation remained unchanged. Moreover, IL-1ra slightly increased prolactin and reduced cortisol levels during sleep. Production of IL-1 by classical monocytes was diminished after IL-1ra. The discrepancy to findings in animal studies might reflect species differences and underlines the importance of studying cytokine effects in humans.

  3. Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Differentially Inhibit Cytokine Production by Peripheral Blood Monocytes Subpopulations and Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Laranjeira, Paula; Gomes, Joana; Pedrosa, Monia; Martinho, Antonio; Antunes, Brigida; Ribeiro, Tania; Santos, Francisco; Domingues, Rosario; Abecasis, Manuel; Trindade, Helder; Paiva, Artur

    2015-01-01

    The immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) rendered them an attractive therapeutic approach for immune disorders and an increasing body of evidence demonstrated their clinical value. However, the influence of MSC on the function of specific immune cell populations, namely, monocyte subpopulations, is not well elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of human bone marrow MSC on the cytokine and chemokine expression by peripheral blood classical, intermediate and nonclassical monocytes, and myeloid dendritic cells (mDC), stimulated with lipopolysaccharide plus interferon (IFN)γ. We found that MSC effectively inhibit tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α and macrophage inflammatory protein- (MIP-) 1β protein expression in monocytes and mDC, without suppressing CCR7 and CD83 protein expression. Interestingly, mDC exhibited the highest degree of inhibition, for both TNF-α and MIP-1β, whereas the reduction of TNF-α expression was less marked for nonclassical monocytes. Similarly, MSC decreased mRNA levels of interleukin- (IL-) 1β and IL-6 in classical monocytes, CCL3, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL10 in classical and nonclassical monocytes, and IL-1β and CXCL10 in mDC. MSC do not impair the expression of maturation markers in monocytes and mDC under our experimental conditions; nevertheless, they hamper the proinflammatory function of monocytes and mDC, which may impede the development of inflammatory immune responses. PMID:26060498

  4. Bresol inhibits phosphodiesterase 4 gene expression and modulates the levels of select mediators of inflammation in human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Sandeep Varma, R; Ashok, G; Vidyashankar, S; Nandakumar, K S; Patki, P S

    2011-01-01

    Bresol-a poly-herbal formulation, has been reported to be effective against bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis in children. In vivo studies have supported the anti-histaminic and anti-anaphylactic action of bresol. However, the mechanism of action of bresol in modulation of inflammation has not been studied at the cellular and molecular level. The present study was aimed to elucidate the mechanism(s) of action of bresol at the cellular and molecular levels, using human monocyte leukemia cells. The effects of bresol on phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) gene expression were analyzed using human monocytic U937 leukemia cells. The ability of bresol to stimulate cAMP formation in these cells, as well as its effects on mediators of inflammation like tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), nitric oxide (NO), and cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated U937 cells, were also studied. The results here indicated that bresol exhibited potential anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting LPS-induced PDE4B gene expression in the cells. Bresol also dose dependently activated cAMP formation, and inhibited TNFα, NO, as well as COX-2 formation in the LPS-stimulated cells. Based upon the results, we concluded that the reported anti-inflammatory activity of bresol might be attributed to its abilities to inhibit PDE4B and thus elevate cAMP levels in human monocytes. The anti-inflammatory effects of bresol might also be a result of the capacity of bresol to modulate the formation of TNFα, NO, and COX-2 in monocytes.

  5. Inflammatory Transcriptome Profiling of Human Monocytes Exposed Acutely to Cigarette Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Wright, William R.; Parzych, Katarzyna; Crawford, Damian; Mein, Charles; Mitchell, Jane A.; Paul-Clark, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is responsible for 5 million deaths worldwide each year, and is a major risk factor for cardiovascular and lung diseases. Cigarette smoke contains a complex mixture of over 4000 chemicals containing 1015 free radicals. Studies show smoke is perceived by cells as an inflammatory and xenobiotic stimulus, which activates an immune response. The specific cellular mechanisms driving cigarette smoke-induced inflammation and disease are not fully understood, although the innate immune system is involved in the pathology of smoking related diseases. Methodology/Principle findings To address the impact of smoke as an inflammagen on the innate immune system, THP-1 cells and Human PBMCs were stimulated with 3 and 10% (v/v) cigarette smoke extract (CSE) for 8 and 24 hours. Total RNA was extracted and the transcriptome analysed using Illumina BeadChip arrays. In THP-1 cells, 10% CSE resulted in 80 genes being upregulated and 37 downregulated by ≥1.5 fold after 8 hours. In PBMCs stimulated with 10% CSE for 8 hours, 199 genes were upregulated and 206 genes downregulated by ≥1.5 fold. After 24 hours, the number of genes activated and repressed by ≥1.5 fold had risen to 311 and 306 respectively. The major pathways that were altered are associated with cell survival, such as inducible antioxidants, protein chaperone and folding proteins, and the ubiquitin/proteosome pathway. Conclusions Our results suggest that cigarette smoke causes inflammation and has detrimental effects on the metabolism and function of innate immune cells. In addition, THP-1 cells provide a genetically stable alternative to primary cells for the study of the effects of cigarette smoke on human monocytes. PMID:22363418

  6. Human c-fgr induces a monocyte-specific enzyme in NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Kazushi; Akiyama, Tetsu; Toyoshima, Kumao ); Wongsasant, Budsaba )

    1991-12-01

    The mutant c-fgr protein (p58{sup c-fgr/F523}) containing Phe-523 instead of Tyr-523 exhibited transforming activity in NIH 3T3 cells like other protein-tyrosine kinases of the src family, but normal p58{sup c-fgr} (p58{sup c-fgr/wt}) did not. The mutant protein showed tyrosine kinase activity threefold higher than that of the normal protein in vitro. Surprisingly, transfection of the normal c-fgr gene into NIH 3T3 cells resulted in induction of sodium fluoride (NaF)-sensitive {alpha}-naphthyl butyrate esterase ({alpha}-NBE), marker enzyme of cells of monocytic origin, which was not induced in v-src-, v-fgr-, or lyn-transfected NIH 3T3 cells. The NaF-sensitive {alpha}-NBE induced in c-fgr transfectants was shown by isoelectric focusing to have a pI of 5.2 to 5.4, a range which was the same as those for thioglycolate-induced murine peritoneal macrophages and 1{alpha}, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}-treated WEHI-3B cells. Immunoblotting studies with antophosphotyrosine antibodies revealed that 58-, 62-, 75-, 120-, 200-, and 230-kDa proteins were commonly phosphorylated at tyrosine residues in NIH 3T3 cells transfected with normal and mutated c-fgr, while 95-kDa protein was significantly phosphorylated at tyrosine residues in NIH 3T3 cells transfected with normal and mutated c-fgr, while 95-kDa protein was significantly phosphorylated at tyrosine residues in cells transfected with the mutated c-fgr. These findings suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of specific cellular substrate proteins is important in induction of NaF-sensitive {alpha}-NBE and cell transformation by p58{sup c-fgr}.

  7. An anti-human monocyte/macrophage monoclonal antibody, reacting most strongly with macrophages in lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed

    Hogg, N; Selvendran, Y

    1985-05-01

    In this report, we have described monoclonal antibody (mAb) 24 which bound specifically to a 174,000 polypeptide present on 45 +/- 16% of human monocytes. Expression of the 24 molecule increased on monocytes when they were cultured. When tissues were examined using immunohistochemical techniques, macrophages (Mph) associated with skin and with lymphoid organs strongly expressed the mAb 24 molecule, whereas, Mph in nonlymphoid organs were only weakly positive. mAb 24 reacted with cells of Mph morphology plus cells of interdigitating appearance in T-cell areas, suggesting that these cells might belong to the Mph cell lineage. There was no reaction with other types of cells, such as Langerhans cells, osteoclasts, dendritic reticulum cells, and endothelial cells. The fact that the molecule recognised by mAb 24 is particularly associated with Mph in lymphoid tissue suggests that it might have a function in immune responses. PMID:2581704

  8. Adhesion and erythrophagocytosis of human senescent erythrocytes by autologous monocytes and their inhibition by beta-galactosyl derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Vaysse, J; Gattegno, L; Bladier, D; Aminoff, D

    1986-01-01

    Senescent human erythrocytes (RBC) are able to adhere to and be phagocytized by autologous monocytes in vitro to a greater extent than are young RBC. This adhesion and erythrophagocytosis of senescent RBC is inhibited by D-galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, their corresponding derivatives of bovine serum albumin, and lactose. On the other hand, D-glucose, D-mannose, L-fucose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, and their corresponding derivatives of bovine serum albumin are noninhibiting. The glycopeptides released by tryptic digestion of senescent RBC and purified on immobilized peanut agglutinin are the most effective inhibitors of both RBC adhesion and phagocytosis by autologous monocytes obtained from peripheral blood. PMID:3456592

  9. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells turn into foamy dendritic cells with IL-17A1[S

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Giulia; Bernoud-Hubac, Nathalie; Bissay, Nathalie; Debard, Cyrille; Daira, Patricia; Meugnier, Emmanuelle; Proamer, Fabienne; Hanau, Daniel; Vidal, Hubert; Aricò, Maurizio; Delprat, Christine; Mahtouk, Karène

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases. In the field of immunometabolism, we have studied the impact of IL-17A on the lipid metabolism of human in vitro-generated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Microarrays and lipidomic analysis revealed an intense remodeling of lipid metabolism induced by IL-17A in DCs. IL-17A increased 2–12 times the amounts of phospholipids, cholesterol, triglycerides, and cholesteryl esters in DCs. Palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), and oleic (18:ln-9c) acid were the main fatty acid chains present in DCs. They were strongly increased in response to IL-17A while their relative proportion remained unchanged. Capture of extracellular lipids was the major mechanism of lipid droplet accumulation, visualized by electron microscopy and Oil Red O staining. Besides this foamy phenotype, IL-17A induced a mixed macrophage-DC phenotype and expression of the nuclear receptor NR1H3/liver X receptor-α, previously identified in the context of atherosclerosis as the master regulator of cholesterol homeostasis in macrophages. These IL-17A-treated DCs were as competent as untreated DCs to stimulate allogeneic naive T-cell proliferation. Following this first characterization of lipid-rich DCs, we propose to call these IL-17A-dependent cells “foamy DCs” and discuss the possible existence of foamy DCs in atherosclerosis, a metabolic and inflammatory disorder involving IL-17A. PMID:25833686

  10. Acute Stress Reduces Wound-Induced Activation of Microbicidal Potential of Ex Vivo Isolated Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Miho; Stemmer, Andreas; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychological stress delays wound healing but the precise underlying mechanisms are unclear. Macrophages play an important role in wound healing, in particular by killing microbes. We hypothesized that (a) acute psychological stress reduces wound-induced activation of microbicidal potential of human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM), and (b) that these reductions are modulated by stress hormone release. Methods Fourty-one healthy men (mean age 35±13 years) were randomly assigned to either a stress or stress-control group. While the stress group underwent a standardized short-term psychological stress task after catheter-induced wound infliction, stress-controls did not. Catheter insertion was controlled. Assessing the microbicidal potential, we investigated PMA-activated superoxide anion production by HMDM immediately before and 1, 10 and 60 min after stress/rest. Moreover, plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine and salivary cortisol were repeatedly measured. In subsequent in vitro studies, whole blood was incubated with norepinephrine in the presence or absence of phentolamine (norepinephrine blocker) before assessing HMDM microbicidal potential. Results Compared with stress-controls, HMDM of the stressed subjects displayed decreased superoxide anion-responses after stress (p’s <.05). Higher plasma norepinephrine levels statistically mediated lower amounts of superoxide anion-responses (indirect effect 95% CI: 4.14–44.72). Norepinephrine-treated HMDM showed reduced superoxide anion-production (p<.001). This effect was blocked by prior incubation with phentolamine. Conclusions Our results suggest that acute psychological stress reduces wound-induced activation of microbicidal potential of HMDM and that this reduction is mediated by norepinephrine. This might have implications for stress-induced impairment in wound healing. PMID:23431364

  11. Effects of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and cytokines on the expression of MHC antigens, complement receptors and other antigens on human blood monocytes and U937 cells: role in cell differentiation, activation and phagocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Spittler, A; Willheim, M; Leutmezer, F; Ohler, R; Krugluger, W; Reissner, C; Lucas, T; Brodowicz, T; Roth, E; Boltz-Nitulescu, G

    1997-01-01

    The effect of calcitriol/1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, alone and in combination with cytokines, on the expression of various antigens (Ag) on human peripheral blood monocytes and U937 cells was studied by flow cytometry. Both constitutive and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ Ag expression on monocytes was significantly down-regulated by calcitriol, IL-10 and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). The effects of calcitriol were concentration dependent and reached maximal inhibitory levels after 3-5 days. Modulation of HLA-DR by calcitriol and IFN-gamma at the protein level correlated with the amount of mRNA specific for the HLA-DR alpha-chain, as judged by Northern blot analysis. The basal as well as IL-4, IL-6, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and TGF-beta-driven levels of HLA-ABC Ag were significantly diminished by calcitriol. On U937 cells calcitriol markedly induced CD11a and CD11b expression and weakly up-regulated CD11c whereas on monocytes, constitutive CD11a, CD11b and CD11c expression was significantly down-regulated by calcitriol. The expression of CD14 Ag was strongly induced on U937 cells but only modestly on monocytes. Both the basal level of CD71 and IL-4, IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha-driven expression was diminished on calcitriol-treated U937 cells. In addition, calcitriol suppressed the expression of CD71 Ag on monocytes. The ability of monocytes to phagocytize opsonized Escherichia coli was diminished by calcitriol. Our results demonstrate that calcitriol, alone or in combination with cytokines, modulates expression of MHC, CD11b, CD11c, CD14 and CD71 Ag on both monocytes and U937 cells, and impairs the phagocytic property of monocytes. Images Figure 2 PMID:9135559

  12. Biosynthesis and secretion of M- and Z-type alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by human monocytes. Effect of inhibitors of glycosylation and of oligosaccharide processing on secretion and function.

    PubMed

    Gross, V; vom Berg, D; Kreuzkamp, J; Ganter, U; Bauer, J; Würtemberger, G; Schulz-Huotari, C; Beeser, H; Gerok, W

    1990-03-01

    The biosynthesis and secretion of M-type and Z-type alpha 1-antitrypsin was studied in human monocytes. In monocytes of PiMM individuals alpha 1-antitrypsin represented 0.08% of the newly synthesized proteins and 0.44% of the secreted proteins. Two molecular forms of alpha 1-antitrypsin could be identified: a 51-kDa intracellular form, susceptible to endoglucosaminidase H, thus representing the high-mannose type precursor form and a 56-kDa form resistant to endoglucosaminidase H which was secreted into the medium. Inhibition of de novo glycosylation by tunicamycin impaired the secretion of M-type alpha 1-antitrypsin by about 75% whereas inhibition of oligosaccharide processing by the mannosidase II inhibitor swainsonine did not alter the secretion of M-type alpha 1-antitrypsin. alpha 1-Antitrypsin secreted by human monocytes was functionally active as measured by complex formation with porcine pancreatic elastase. Even unglycosylated alpha 1-antitrypsin secreted by human monocytes treated with tunicamycin formed a complex with elastase. In monocytes of PiZZ individuals the secretion of alpha 1-antitrypsin was decreased. 72% of newly synthesized M-type alpha 1-antitrypsin, but only 35% of newly synthesized Z-type alpha 1-antitrypsin were secreted during a labeling period of 3 h with [35S]methionine. The 51-kDa form of Z-type alpha 1-antitrypsin accumulated intracellularly, whereas the 56-kDa form was secreted. Inhibition of oligosaccharide processing by swainsonine did not alter the decreased secretion of Z-type alpha 1-antitrypsin, whereas inhibition of de novo glycosylation by tunicamycin blocked the secretion of Z-type alpha 1-antitrypsin completely. PMID:2111144

  13. A sea urchin lectin, SUL-1, from the Toxopneustid sea urchin induces DC maturation from human monocyte and drives Th1 polarization in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Takei, Masao . E-mail: mtakei@fz-borstel.de; Nakagawa, Hideyuki

    2006-05-15

    The sea urchin Toxopneustes pileolus belonging to the family Toxopneustidae, they have well-developed globiferous pedicellariae with pharmacologically active substances. We have purified a novel sea urchin lectin-1 (SUL-1) from the large globiferous pedicellariae of T. pileolus. Dendritic cells (DC) are professional APC and play a pivotal role in controlling immune responses. This study investigated whether SUL-1 can drive DC maturation from human immature monocyte-derived DC in vitro. Human monocytes were cultured with GM-CSF and IL-4 for 6 days followed by another 1 day in the presence of SUL-1 or LPS. DC harvested on day 7 were examined using functional assays. The expression levels of CD1a, CD80, CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR as expressed by mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) on DC differentiated from immature DC after culture with 1.0 {mu}g/ml of SUL-1 for 1 day were enhanced and decreased endocytic activity. SUL-1-treated DC also displayed enhanced T cell stimulatory capacity in an MLR, as measured by T cell proliferation. Cell surface expression of CD80, CD83 and CD86 on SUL-1-treated DC was inhibited by anti-DC-SIGN mAb, while anti-DC-SIGN mAb had no influence on allogeneic T cell proliferation by SUL-1-treated DC. DC differentiated with SUL-1 induced the differentiation of naive T cell towards a helper T cell type 1 (Th1) response at DC/T (1:5) cells ratio depending on IL-12 secretion. In CTL assay, the production of IFN-{gamma} and {sup 51}Cr release on SUL-1-treated DC were more augmented than of immature DC or LPS-treated DC. SUL-1-treated DC expressed CCR7 and had a high migration to MIP-3{beta}. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in SUL-1-treated DC was also induced by MIP-3{beta}. These results suggest that SUL-1 bindings to DC-SIGN on surface of immature DC may lead to differentiate DC from immature DC. Moreover, it suggests that SUL-1 may be used on DC-based vaccines for cancer immunotherapy.

  14. Human and mouse monocytes display distinct signalling and cytokine profiles upon stimulation with FFAR2/FFAR3 short-chain fatty acid receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Zhiwei; Er, Jun Zhi; Tan, Nguan Soon; Lu, Jinhua; Liou, Yih-Cherng; Grosse, Johannes; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2016-01-01

    Knockout mice studies implicate the mammalian short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) receptors, FFAR2 and FFAR3– in colitis, arthritis and asthma. However, the correlation with human biology is uncertain. Here, we detected FFAR2 and FFAR3 expression in human monocytes via immunohistochemistry. Upon treatment with acetate SCFA or FFAR2- and FFAR3-specific synthetic agonists, human monocytes displayed elevated p38 phosphorylation and attenuated C5, CCL1, CCL2, GM-CSF, IL-1α, IL-1β and ICAM-1 inflammatory cytokine expression. Acetate and FFAR2 agonist treatment also repressed Akt and ERK2 signalling. Surprisingly, mouse monocytes displayed a distinct response to acetate treatment, elevating GM-CSF, IL-1α, and IL-1β cytokine expression. This effect persisted in FFAR2/3-knockout mouse monocytes and was not reproduced by synthetic agonists, suggesting a FFAR2/3 independent mechanism in mice. Collectively, we show that SCFAs act via FFAR2/3 to modulate human monocyte inflammatory responses– a pathway that is absent in mouse monocytes. PMID:27667443

  15. Cellular uptake and reactive oxygen species modulation of cerium oxide nanoparticles in human monocyte cell line U937.

    PubMed

    Lord, Megan S; Jung, MoonSun; Teoh, Wey Yang; Gunawan, Cindy; Vassie, James A; Amal, Rose; Whitelock, John M

    2012-11-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) are promising materials for intracellular oxygen free radical scavenging providing a potential therapy for reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated inflammatory processes. In this study rhombohedral-shaped nanoceria were synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis with tuneable particle diameters between 3 and 94 nm by changing the liquid precursor flow rate. Monocytes and macrophages are major players in inflammatory processes as their production of ROS species has important downstream effects on cell signalling. Therefore, this study examined the ability of the nanoceria to be internalised by the human monocytic cell line, U937, and scavenge intracellular ROS. U937 cells activated in the presence of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) were found to be more responsive to the nanoceria than U937 cells, which may not be surprising given the role of monocyte/macrophages in phagocytosing foreign material. The smaller particles were found to contain more crystal lattice defects with which to scavenge ROS, however a greater proportion of both the U937 and activated U937 cell populations responded to the larger particles. Hence all nanoceria particle sizes examined in this study were equally effective in scavenging intracellular ROS. PMID:22841920

  16. MONOCYTE HUMAN LEUKOCYTE ANTIGEN–DR EXPRESSION—A TOOL TO DISTINGUISH INTESTINAL BACTERIAL INFECTIONS FROM INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE?

    PubMed Central

    Tillinger, Wolfgang; Jilch, Ruth; Waldhoer, Thomas; Reinisch, Walter; Junger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Background We sought to determine the quantitative expression of human leukocyte antigen–DR (HLA-DR) on monocytes in patients with acute intestinal bacterial infections and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods The quantitative expression of HLA-DR on monocytes was determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis in patients with IBD, patients with acute intestinal bacterial infections (bact.), and healthy subjects (contr.). Results The quantitative expression of HLA-DR in patients with bact. (n = 20; 90,000 molecules per monocyte; confidence interval [CI], 79,000–102,000) was significantly higher than that in patients with ulcerative colitis (n = 40, 30,000; CI, 30,000–38,000; P < 0.0001), Crohn disease (n = 80, 31,000; CI, 32,000–39,000; P < 0.0001), or in contr. (n = 28, 39,000; CI, 36,000–46,000; P < 0.0001). In patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease, HLA-DR expression was significantly decreased, as compared with contr. (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). With a cutoff point of 50,000, HLA-DR showed a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 92% in discriminating between bact. and active IBD. Conclusion The quantitative measurement of HLA-DR expression could serve as a valuable tool to discriminate between bact. and active IBD. PMID:23860582

  17. Efficient and rapid uptake of magnetic carbon nanotubes into human monocytic cells: implications for cell-based cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Gul-Uludag, Hilal; Lu, Weibing; Xu, Peng; Xing, James; Chen, Jie

    2012-05-01

    Monocyte-based gene therapies in cancer have been hampered by either the resistance of these cells to non-viral molecular delivery methods or their poor trafficking to the tumor site after their ex vivo manipulations. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNP)-loaded genetically engineered monocytes can efficiently delivered to tumor site by external magnetic field, but they are not ideal delivery tools due to their spherical shape. Hence, we have investigated the cellular uptake efficiency and cytotoxicity of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labelled magnetic carbon nanotubes (FITC-mCNT) in human monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1 for application in cell-based gene therapy against cancer. Uptake of FITC-mCNT into THP-1 cells reached 100% only 1 h after the delivery. Confocal imaging confirmed that FITC-mCNT entered the cell cytoplasm and even into the nucleus. FITC-mCNT uptake did not compromise cell viability. This delivery system might therefore enhance cell-based cancer gene therapies.

  18. Palmitate-induced inflammatory pathways in human adipose microvascular endothelial cells promote monocyte adhesion and impair insulin transcytosis.

    PubMed

    Pillon, Nicolas J; Azizi, Paymon M; Li, Yujin E; Liu, Jun; Wang, Changsen; Chan, Kenny L; Hopperton, Kathryn E; Bazinet, Richard P; Heit, Bryan; Bilan, Philip J; Lee, Warren L; Klip, Amira

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is associated with inflammation and immune cell recruitment to adipose tissue, muscle and intima of atherosclerotic blood vessels. Obesity and hyperlipidemia are also associated with tissue insulin resistance and can compromise insulin delivery to muscle. The muscle/fat microvascular endothelium mediates insulin delivery and facilitates monocyte transmigration, yet its contribution to the consequences of hyperlipidemia is poorly understood. Using primary endothelial cells from human adipose tissue microvasculature (HAMEC), we investigated the effects of physiological levels of fatty acids on endothelial inflammation and function. Expression of cytokines and adhesion molecules was measured by RT-qPCR. Signaling pathways were evaluated by pharmacological manipulation and immunoblotting. Surface expression of adhesion molecules was determined by immunohistochemistry. THP1 monocyte interaction with HAMEC was measured by cell adhesion and migration across transwells. Insulin transcytosis was measured by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Palmitate, but not palmitoleate, elevated the expression of IL-6, IL-8, TLR2 (Toll-like receptor 2), and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1). HAMEC had markedly low fatty acid uptake and oxidation, and CD36 inhibition did not reverse the palmitate-induced expression of adhesion molecules, suggesting that inflammation did not arise from palmitate uptake/metabolism. Instead, inhibition of TLR4 to NF-κB signaling blunted palmitate-induced ICAM-1 expression. Importantly, palmitate-induced surface expression of ICAM-1 promoted monocyte binding and transmigration. Conversely, palmitate reduced insulin transcytosis, an effect reversed by TLR4 inhibition. In summary, palmitate activates inflammatory pathways in primary microvascular endothelial cells, impairing insulin transport and increasing monocyte transmigration. This behavior may contribute in vivo to reduced tissue insulin action and enhanced tissue

  19. HIGH GLUCOSE INDUCES TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR EXPRESSION IN HUMAN MONOCYTES: MECHANISM OF ACTIVATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Hyperglycemia induced inflammation is central in diabetes complications and monocytes are important in orchestrating these effects. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in innate immune responses as well as inflammation. However, there is a paucity of data examining the expression a...

  20. Enhanced production of the chemotactic cytokines interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in human abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A. E.; Kunkel, S. L.; Pearce, W. H.; Shah, M. R.; Parikh, D.; Evanoff, H. L.; Haines, G. K.; Burdick, M. D.; Strieter, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    Inflammatory leukocytes play a central role in the pathogenesis of human atherosclerotic disease, from early atherogenesis to the late stages of atherosclerosis, such as aneurysm formation. We have shown previously that human abdominal aortic aneurysms are characterized by the presence of numerous chronic inflammatory cells throughout the vessel wall (Am J Pathol 1990, 137: 1199-1213). The signals that attract lymphocytes and monocytes into the aortic wall in aneurysmal disease remain to be precisely defined. We have studied the production of the chemotactic cytokines interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) by aortic tissues obtained from 47 subjects. We compared the antigenic production of these cytokines by explants of: 1) human abdominal aneurysmal tissue, 2) occlusive (atherosclerotic) aortas, and 3) normal aortas. IL-8, which is chemotactic for neutrophils, lymphocytes, and endothelial cells was liberated in greater quantities by abdominal aortic aneurysms than by occlusive or normal aortas. Using immunohistochemistry, macrophages, and to a lesser degree endothelial cells, were found to be positive for the expression of antigenic IL-8. Similarly, MCP-1, a potent chemotactic cytokine for monocytes/macrophages, was released by explants from abdominal aortic aneurysms in greater quantities than by explants from occlusive or normal aortas. Using immunohistochemistry, the predominant MCP-1 antigen-positive cells were macrophages and to a lesser extent smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate that human abdominal aortic aneurysms produce IL-8 and MCP-1, both of which may serve to recruit additional inflammatory cells into the abdominal aortic wall, hence perpetuating the inflammatory reaction that may result in the pathology of vessel wall destruction and aortic aneurysm formation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8494046

  1. Immune complexes (IC) down-regulate the basal and interferon-γ-induced expression of MHC Class II on human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Barrionuevo, P; Beigier-Bompadre, M; De La Barrera, S; Alves-Rosa, M F; Fernandez, G; Palermo, M S; Isturiz, M A

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of Fc receptors for IgG (FcγRs) on monocytes/macrophages with immune complexes (IC) triggers regulatory and effector functions. Previous studies have shown that FcγR–IC interactions inhibit the IFN-γ-induced expression of MHC class II in murine macrophages. However, the mechanism(s) responsible for these effects have not been elucidated. In addition, whether this IC-dependent effect also occurs in human cells is not known. Taking into account the fact that IC and IFN-γ are frequently found in infections and autoimmune disorders, together with the crucial role MHC class II molecules play in the regulation of immune response, we explored the effect and mechanism of IC-induced MHC class II down-regulation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). This effect was studied either in the presence or absence of IFN-γ. We demonstrate that IC exert a drastic inhibition of basal and IFN-γ-induced expression of MHC class II on human monocytes. This effect was mediated through the interaction of IC with both FcγRI and FcγRII. Moreover, similar results were obtained using supernatants from IC-treated PBMC. The IC-induced down-regulation of MHC class II is abrogated by pepstatin and phosphoramidon, supporting the role of aspartic protease(s) and metalloprotease(s) in this process. In parallel with MHC class II expression, antigen presentation was markedly inhibited in the presence of IC. PMID:11529917

  2. The Pelargonium sidoides Extract EPs 7630 Drives the Innate Immune Defense by Activating Selected MAP Kinase Pathways in Human Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Witte, Katrin; Koch, Egon; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Wolk, Kerstin; Sabat, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pelargonium sidoides is a medical herb and respective extracts are used very frequently for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. However, the effects of Pelargonium sidoides and a special extract prepared from its roots (EPs 7630) on human immune cells are not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that EPs 7630 induced a rapid and dose-dependent production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 by human blood immune cells. This EPs 7630-induced cytokine profile was more pro-inflammatory in comparison with the profile induced by viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. The search for EPs 7630 target cells revealed that T-cells did not respond to EPs 7630 stimulation by production of TNF-α, IL-6, or IL-10. Furthermore, pretreatment of T-cells with EPs 7630 did not modulate their TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 secretion during subsequent activation. In contrast to lymphocytes, monocytes showed clear intracellular TNF-α staining after EPs 7630 treatment. Accordingly, EPs 7630 predominantly provoked activation of MAP kinases and inhibition of p38 strongly reduced the monocyte TNF-α production. The pretreatment of blood immune cells with EPs 7630 lowered their secretion of TNF-α and IL-10 and caused an IL-6 dominant response during second stimulation with viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. In summary, we demonstrate that EPs 7630 activates human monocytes, induces MAP kinase-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokines in these cells, and specifically modulates their production capacity of mediators known to lead to an increase of acute phase protein production in the liver, neutrophil generation in the bone marrow, and the generation of adaptive Th17 and Th22 cells.

  3. The Pelargonium sidoides Extract EPs 7630 Drives the Innate Immune Defense by Activating Selected MAP Kinase Pathways in Human Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Witte, Katrin; Koch, Egon; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Wolk, Kerstin; Sabat, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pelargonium sidoides is a medical herb and respective extracts are used very frequently for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. However, the effects of Pelargonium sidoides and a special extract prepared from its roots (EPs 7630) on human immune cells are not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that EPs 7630 induced a rapid and dose-dependent production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 by human blood immune cells. This EPs 7630-induced cytokine profile was more pro-inflammatory in comparison with the profile induced by viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. The search for EPs 7630 target cells revealed that T-cells did not respond to EPs 7630 stimulation by production of TNF-α, IL-6, or IL-10. Furthermore, pretreatment of T-cells with EPs 7630 did not modulate their TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 secretion during subsequent activation. In contrast to lymphocytes, monocytes showed clear intracellular TNF-α staining after EPs 7630 treatment. Accordingly, EPs 7630 predominantly provoked activation of MAP kinases and inhibition of p38 strongly reduced the monocyte TNF-α production. The pretreatment of blood immune cells with EPs 7630 lowered their secretion of TNF-α and IL-10 and caused an IL-6 dominant response during second stimulation with viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. In summary, we demonstrate that EPs 7630 activates human monocytes, induces MAP kinase-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokines in these cells, and specifically modulates their production capacity of mediators known to lead to an increase of acute phase protein production in the liver, neutrophil generation in the bone marrow, and the generation of adaptive Th17 and Th22 cells. PMID:26406906

  4. Herpes simplex virus type 1-induced FasL expression in human monocytic cells and its implications for cell death, viral replication, and immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Iannello, Alexandre; Debbeche, Olfa; El Arabi, Raoudha; Samarani, Suzanne; Hamel, David; Rozenberg, Flore; Heveker, Nikolaus; Ahmad, Ali

    2011-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitously occurring pathogen that infects humans early in childhood. The virus persists as a latent infection in dorsal root ganglia, especially of the trigeminal nerve, and frequently becomes reactivated in humans under conditions of stress. Monocytic cells constitute an important component of the innate and adaptive immune responses. We show here for the first time that HSV-1 stimulates human FasL promoter and induces de novo expression of FasL on the surface of human monocytic cells, including monocytes and macrophages. This virus-induced FasL expression causes death of monocytic cells growing in suspension, but not in monolayers (e.g., macrophages). The addition of a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor, as well as anti-FasL antibodies, reduced cell death but increased viral replication in the virus-infected cell cultures. We also show here for the first time that the virus-induced de novo expression of FasL on the cell surface acts as an immune evasion mechanism by causing the death of interacting human CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells. Our study provides novel insights on FasL expression and cell death in HSV-infected human monocytic cells and their impact on interacting immune cells.

  5. Microgravity modifies protein kinase C isoform translocation in the human monocytic cell line U937 and human peripheral blood T-cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Jason P.; Gaubert, Francois; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Schmitt, Didier; Hashemi, B. B. (Principal Investigator); Hughes-Fulford, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Individual protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms fulfill distinct roles in the regulation of the commitment to differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in both monocytes and T-cells. The human monocyte like cell line U937 and T-cells were exposed to microgravity, during spaceflight and the translocation (a critical step in PKC signaling) of individual isoforms to cell particulate fraction examined. PKC activating phorbol esters induced a rapid translocation of several PKC isoforms to the particulate fraction of U937 monocytes under terrestrial gravity (1 g) conditions in the laboratory. In microgravity, the translocation of PKC beta II, delta, and epsilon in response to phorbol esters was reduced in microgravity compared to 1 g, but was enhanced in weak hypergravity (1.4 g). All isoforms showed a net increase in particulate PKC following phorbol ester stimulation, except PKC delta which showed a net decrease in microgravity. In T-cells, phorbol ester induced translocation of PKC delta was reduced in microgravity, compared to 1 g, while PKC beta II translocation was not significantly different at the two g-levels. These data show that microgravity differentially alters the translocation of individual PKC isoforms in monocytes and T-cells, thus providing a partial explanation for the modifications previously observed in the activation of these cell types under microgravity.

  6. New method to differentiate human peripheral blood monocytes into insulin producing cells: Human hematosphere culture.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Yang, Ji Min; Choi, Jae-Il; Yun, Ji-Yeon; Jang, Jae Hee; Kim, Joonoh; Kim, Ju-Young; Oh, Il-Young; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Park, Young-Bae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2012-02-24

    Strategy to differentiate stem cells into insulin producing cells (IPCs) in vitro has been a promising one to get cell source of β-cell replacement therapy for diabetes. It has been suggested that islets and neurons share features and nestin-positive cells could differentiate into IPCs. We have recently developed a three-dimensional culture system using human peripheral blood cells named as blood-born hematosphere (BBHS). Here we showed that most of BBHS were composed of nestin-positive cells. Under the four-stage differentiation protocol for IPCs, we plated nestin-positive BBHS onto fibronectin-coated dish. These cells form islet-like clusters and most of them expressed insulin. Pancreatic specific genes were turned on, such as transcription factors (Pdx-1, Ngn3 and Nkx6.1), genes related to endocrine function (Glut-2 and PC2) or β cell function (Kir6.2, SUR1). Furthermore islet differentiation was confirmed by dithizone (DTZ) staining to detect zinc ion which binds insulin protein within the cells. Finally, IPCs derived from BBHS showed capability to secrete insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Taken together, our novel protocol successfully induced islet-like human insulin producing cells out of BBHS. This strategy of ex vivo expansion of IPCs using BBHS provides an autologous therapeutic cell source for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:22310720

  7. SARS coronavirus spike protein-induced innate immune response occurs via activation of the NF-kappaB pathway in human monocyte macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dosch, Susan F; Mahajan, Supriya D; Collins, Arlene R

    2009-06-01

    A purified recombinant spike (S) protein was studied for its effect on stimulating human peripheral blood monocyte macrophages (PBMC). We examined inflammatory gene mRNA abundances found in S protein-treated PBMC using gene arrays. We identified differential mRNA abundances of genes with functional properties associated with antiviral (CXCL10) and inflammatory (IL-6 and IL-8) responses. We confirmed cytokine mRNA increases by real-time quantitative(q) RT-PCR or ELISA. We further analyzed the sensitivity and specificity of the prominent IL-8 response. By real-time qRT-PCR, S protein was shown to stimulate IL-8 mRNA accumulation in a dose dependent manner while treatment with E protein did not. Also, titration of S protein-specific production and secretion of IL-8 by ELISA showed that the dose of 5.6nM of S produced a significant increase in IL-8 (p=0.003) compared to mock-treated controls. The increase in IL-8 stimulated by a concentration of 5.6nM of S was comparable to concentrations seen for S protein binding to ACE2 or to neutralizing monoclonal antibody suggesting a physiological relevance. An NF-kappaB inhibitor, TPCK (N-Tosyl-L-Phenylalanine Chloromethyl Ketone) could suppress IL-8 production and secretion in response to S protein in PBMC and THP-1 cells and in HCoV-229E virus-infected PBMC. Activation and translocation of NF-kappaB was shown to occur rapidly following exposure of PBMC or THP-1 cells to S protein using a highly sensitive assay for active nuclear NF-kappaB p65 transcription factor. The results further suggested that released or secreted S protein could activate blood monocytes through recognition by toll-like receptor (TLR)2 ligand.

  8. Scavenger receptor of human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) and murine macrophages for nonenzymatically glycosylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Takata, K; Horiuchi, S; Araki, N; Shiga, M; Saitoh, M; Morino, Y

    1989-11-17

    Long-term incubation of proteins with glucose undergo a series of nonenzymatic reactions to form advanced glycosylation end product (AGE) with fluorescence and brown color. The receptor for AGE-proteins was demonstrated in murine macrophages (Vlassara et al. (1985) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82. 5588). Our recent study with rat macrophages revealed that the receptor also recognized proteins modified with aliphatic aldehydes such as formaldehyde or glycolaldehyde, indicating its close identity to a scavenger receptor for aldehyde-modified proteins (Takata, K. et al. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263. 14819). This notion was tested in the present study with human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1 cells), human monocyte macrophages and murine peritoneal macrophages. Endocytic uptake of AGE-proteins and aldehyde-modified proteins was inhibited in a cross-competitive fashion. The receptor activities of THP-1 cells for AGE-albumin and aldehyde-modified proteins were induced synchronously by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Furthermore, upon reduction by NaBH4 of the Schiff base formed between proteins and glucose or aldehydes, no ligand activity was generated. However, once the ligand activity was generated, NaBH4 was no longer effective for the ligand activity. Thus, a structure in common between AGE-proteins and aldehyde-modified proteins may be crucial for recognition by the human macrophage receptor.

  9. Pericellular mobilization of the tissue-destructive cysteine proteinases, cathepsins B, L, and S, by human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, V Y; Zhang, Q Y; Weiss, S J

    1995-01-01

    Human macrophages are believed to damage host tissues in chronic inflammatory disease states, but these cells have been reported to express only modest degradative activity in vitro. However, while examining the ability of human monocytes to degrade the extracellular matrix component elastin, we identified culture conditions under which the cells matured into a macrophage population that displayed a degradative phenotype hundreds of times more destructive than that previously ascribed to any other cell population. The monocyte-derived macrophages synthesized elastinolytic matrix metalloproteinases (i.e., gelatinase B and matrilysin) as well as cysteine proteinases (i.e., cathepsins B, L, and S), but only the cathepsins were detected in the extracellular milieu as fully processed, mature enzymes by either vital fluorescence or active-site labeling. Consistent with these observations, macrophage-mediated elastinolytic activity was not affected by matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors but could be almost completely abrogated by inhibiting cathepsins L and S. These data demonstrate that human macrophages mobilize cysteine proteinases to arm themselves with a powerful effector mechanism that can participate in the pathophysiologic remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7731994

  10. CCN4 induces vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human synovial fibroblasts and promotes monocyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju-Fang; Hou, Sheng-Mou; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Huang, Chun-Yin; Hsu, Chin-Jung; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-05-01

    CCN4 is a cysteine-rich protein that belongs to the Cyr61, CTGF, Nov family of matricellular proteins. Here, we investigated the intracellular signaling pathways involved in CCN4-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human osteoarthritis synovial fibroblasts. Stimulation of OASFs with CCN4 induced VCAM-1 expression. CCN4-induced VCAM-1 expression was attenuated by αvβ5 or α6β1 integrin antibody, Syk inhibitor, PKCδ inhibitor (rottlerin), JNK inhibitor (SP600125), and AP-1 inhibitors (curcumin and tanshinone). Stimulation of cells with CCN4 increased Syk, PKCδ, and JNK activation. Treatment of OASFs with CCN4 also increased c-Jun phosphorylation, AP-1-luciferase activity, and c-Jun binding to the AP-1 element in the VCAM-1 promoter. Moreover, up-regulation of VCAM-1 increased the adhesion of monocytes to OASF monolayers, and this adhesion was attenuated by transfection with a VCAM-1 siRNA. Our results suggest that CCN4 increases VCAM-1 expression in human OASFs via the Syk, PKCδ, JNK, c-Jun, and AP-1 signaling pathways. The CCN4-induced VCAM-1 expression promoted monocyte adhesion to human OASFs. PMID:23313051

  11. High levels of WNT-5A in human glioma correlate with increased presence of tumor-associated microglia/monocytes.

    PubMed

    Dijksterhuis, Jacomijn P; Arthofer, Elisa; Marinescu, Voichita D; Nelander, Sven; Uhlén, Mathias; Pontén, Frederik; Mulder, Jan; Schulte, Gunnar

    2015-12-10

    Malignant gliomas are among the most severe types of cancer, and the most common primary brain tumors. Treatment options are limited and the prognosis is poor. WNT-5A, a member of the WNT family of lipoglycoproteins, plays a role in oncogenesis and tumor progression in various cancers, whereas the role of WNT-5A in glioma remains obscure. Based on the role of WNT-5A as an oncogene, its potential to regulate microglia cells and the glioma-promoting capacities of microglia cells, we hypothesize that WNT-5A has a role in regulation of immune functions in glioma. We investigated WNT-5A expression by in silico analysis of the cancer genome atlas (TCGA) transcript profiling of human glioblastoma samples and immunohistochemistry experiments of human glioma tissue microarrays (TMA). Our results reveal higher WNT-5A protein levels and mRNA expression in a subgroup of gliomas (WNT-5A(high)) compared to non-malignant control brain tissue. Furthermore, we show a significant correlation between WNT-5A in the tumor and presence of major histocompatibility complex Class II-positive microglia/monocytes. Our data pinpoint a positive correlation between WNT-5A and a proinflammatory signature in glioma. We identify increased presence of microglia/monocytes as an important aspect in the inflammatory transformation suggesting a novel role for WNT-5A in human glioma.

  12. Filarial excretory-secretory products induce human monocytes to produce lymphangiogenic mediators.

    PubMed

    Weinkopff, Tiffany; Mackenzie, Charles; Eversole, Rob; Lammie, Patrick J

    2014-07-01

    The nematodes Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia spp. infect over 120 million people worldwide, causing lymphedema, elephantiasis and hydrocele, collectively known as lymphatic filariasis. Most infected individuals appear to be asymptomatic, but many exhibit sub-clinical manifestations including the lymphangiectasia that likely contributes to the development of lymphedema and elephantiasis. As adult worm excretory-secretory products (ES) do not directly activate lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC), we investigated the role of monocyte/macrophage-derived soluble factors in the development of filarial lymphatic pathology. We analyzed the production of IL-8, IL-6 and VEGF-A by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from naïve donors following stimulation with filarial ES products. ES-stimulated PBMCs produced significantly more IL-8, IL-6 and VEGF-A compared to cells cultured in medium alone; CD14(+) monocytes appear to be the primary producers of IL-8 and VEGF-A, but not IL-6. Furthermore, IL-8, IL-6 and VEGF-A induced in vitro tubule formation in LEC Matrigel cultures. Matrigel plugs supplemented with IL-8, IL-6, VEGF-A, or with supernatants from ES-stimulated PBMCs and implanted in vivo stimulated lymphangiogenesis. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that monocytes/macrophages exposed to filarial ES products may modulate lymphatic function through the secretion of soluble factors that stimulate the vessel growth associated with the pathogenesis of filarial disease.

  13. Fc alpha receptors mediate release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 by human monocytes following receptor aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Patry, C; Herbelin, A; Lehuen, A; Bach, J F; Monteiro, R C

    1995-01-01

    The functional capacity of the human monocyte receptor for the Fc portion of IgA (Fc alpha R) in mediating signal transduction was evaluated by cytokine release. F(ab')2 fragments of anti-Fc alpha R monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were used as specific probes to induce release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Multivalent cross-linking by a secondary anti-mouse antibody [F(ab')2 fragments] induced a significant release of TNF-alpha and IL-6 by human blood mononuclear cells, indicating requirements for Fc alpha R aggregation on the cell surface to transmit signals. Both cytokines were released exclusively by adherent cells, identifying monocytes as the responding cells within the mononuclear cell population. This cytokine release could not be due to contaminating endotoxins, because it was not abolished by polymyxin B, a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibitor. Moreover, purified recombinant soluble Fc alpha R inhibited the anti-Fc alpha R mAb-mediated cytokine release from blood monocytes, demonstrating that TNF-alpha and IL-6 were released in a receptor-specific manner. Our data suggest that Fc alpha R, through its capacity to mediate secretion of IL-6, may play an important role in B-cell proliferation and immunoglobulin production. On the other hand, release of TNF-alpha following stimulation of Fc alpha R molecules directly implicates these receptors in amplification and regulation of the inflammatory process occurring during IgA-mediated host defence. PMID:7590867

  14. Short-term in vitro responses of human peripheral blood monocytes to ferritic stainless steel fiber networks.

    PubMed

    Spear, Rose L; Brooks, Roger A; Markaki, Athina E

    2013-05-01

    Beneficial effects on bone-implant bonding may accrue from ferromagnetic fiber networks on implants which can deform in vivo inducing controlled levels of mechanical strain directly in growing bone. This approach requires ferromagnetic fibers that can be implanted in vivo without stimulating undue inflammatory cell responses or cytotoxicity. This study examines the short-term in vitro responses, including attachment, viability, and inflammatory stimulation, of human peripheral blood monocytes to 444 ferritic stainless steel fiber networks. Two types of 444 networks, differing in fiber cross section and thus surface area, were considered alongside austenitic stainless steel fiber networks, made of 316L, a widely established implant material. Similar high percent seeding efficiencies were measured by CyQuant® on all fiber networks after 48 h of cell culture. Extensive cell attachment was confirmed by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy, which showed round monocytes attached at various depths into the fiber networks. Medium concentrations of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were determined as indicators of viability and inflammatory responses, respectively. Percent LDH concentrations were similar for both 444 fiber networks at all time points, whereas significantly lower than those of 316L control networks at 24 h. All networks elicited low-level secretions of TNF-α, which were significantly lower than that of the positive control wells containing zymosan. Collectively, the results indicate that 444 networks produce comparable responses to medical implant grade 316L networks and are able to support human peripheral blood monocytes in short-term in vitro cultures without inducing significant inflammatory or cytotoxic effects.

  15. Selective killing of human monocytes and cytokine release provoked by sphingomyelinase (beta-toxin) of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Walev, I; Weller, U; Strauch, S; Foster, T; Bhakdi, S

    1996-01-01

    The best-known activity of Staphylococcus aureus sphingomyelinase C, alias beta-toxin, is as a hemolysin that provokes hot-cold lysis of erythrocytes which contain substantial amounts of sphingomyelin in the plasma membrane. Sheep erythrocytes are most susceptible, and we found that one hemolytic unit, representing the toxin concentration that elicits 50% hemolysis of 2.5 X 10(8) erythrocytes per ml, corresponds to 0.05 enzyme units or to approximately 0.25 microg of sphingomyelinase per ml. The cytotoxic action of beta-toxin on nucleated cells has not been described in any detail before, and the present investigation was undertaken to fill this information gap. We now identify beta-toxin as a remarkably potent monocytocidal agent. At a concentration of 0.001 U/ml, corresponding to approximately 5 ng/ml, beta-toxin killed over 50% of human monocytes (10(6) cells per ml) within 60 min. By contrast, 1 to 5 microg of beta-toxin per ml had no cytocidal effects on human granulocytes, fibroblasts, lymphocytes, or erythrocytes. A selective monocytocidal action was also observed with sphingomyelinase C from Bacillus cereus and a Streptomyces sp., whereas phospholipase A2 and phospholipase D at 100 U/ml were without effect. Monocytes succumbing to the action of beta-toxin processed and released interleukin-1beta, soluble interleukin-6 receptor, and soluble CD14 into the supernatant. Thus, monocyte killing by beta-toxin is associated with cytokine-related events that are important for the initiation and progression of infectious disease. These findings uncover a potentially important role for sphingomyelinase as a determinant of microbial pathogenicity. PMID:8757823

  16. Differential effects of antidepressants on glucocorticoid receptors in human primary blood cells and human monocytic U-937 cells.

    PubMed

    Heiske, Andreas; Jesberg, Jutta; Krieg, Jürgen-Christian; Vedder, Helmut

    2003-04-01

    A number of data support the assumption that antidepressants (ADs) normalize the altered function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) system involved in the pathophysiology of depressive disorder via direct effects on glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). In the present study, we examined the tricyclic ADs desipramine (DESI) and imipramine (IMI), the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor maprotiline (MAPRO), and the noradrenergic and specific serotonergic AD (NaSSA) mirtazapine (MIR) for their effects on GR expression in primary human leukocytes and in monocytic U-937 cells. Semiquantitative RT-PCR indicated that the ADs exert differential effects on GR-mRNA levels in both primary human leukocytes and U-937 cells: whereas MAPRO and IMI did not induce pronounced changes in GR-mRNA levels, DESI and MIR significantly decreased the amounts of GR-mRNA in both cell systems. Further characterization of the effects of MIR revealed a time dependency of the regulation with an initial increase of GR-mRNA levels above control levels after 2.5 h of treatment and a decrease after 4, 24, and 48 h of incubation. A dose-response analysis demonstrated maximal effects of MIR at a concentration of 10(-7) M. Immunohistochemical studies showed that MIR increased the GR protein levels in a time-dependent manner and that this upregulation appeared earlier by additional treatment with dexamethasone (DEX). A translocation of the GR protein from the cytoplasm to the nucleus was induced between 24 and 48 h of treatment with MIR and MIR/DEX, respectively. Taken together, our data further support the assumption that ADs influence the neuroendocrine and immune system via effects on cellular GRs. PMID:12655328

  17. From Human Monocytes to Genome-Wide Binding Sites - A Protocol for Small Amounts of Blood: Monocyte Isolation/ChIP-Protocol/Library Amplification/Genome Wide Computational Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weiterer, Sebastian; Uhle, Florian; Bhuju, Sabin; Jarek, Michael; Weigand, Markus A.; Bartkuhn, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation in combination with a genome-wide analysis via high-throughput sequencing is the state of the art method to gain genome-wide representation of histone modification or transcription factor binding profiles. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis in the context of human experimental samples is limited, especially in the case of blood cells. The typically extremely low yields of precipitated DNA are usually not compatible with library amplification for next generation sequencing. We developed a highly reproducible protocol to present a guideline from the first step of isolating monocytes from a blood sample to analyse the distribution of histone modifications in a genome-wide manner. Conclusion: The protocol describes the whole work flow from isolating monocytes from human blood samples followed by a high-sensitivity and small-scale chromatin immunoprecipitation assay with guidance for generating libraries compatible with next generation sequencing from small amounts of immunoprecipitated DNA. PMID:24732314

  18. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor- and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Mediated Matrix Metalloproteinase Production by Human Osteoblasts and Monocytes after Infection with Brucella abortus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Scian, Romina; Barrionuevo, Paula; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Baldi, Pablo C.; Delpino, M. Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarticular complications are common in human brucellosis, but the pathogenic mechanisms involved are largely unknown. Since matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in joint and bone damage in inflammatory and infectious diseases, we investigated the production of MMPs by human osteoblasts and monocytes, either upon Brucella abortus infection or upon reciprocal stimulation with factors produced by each infected cell type. B. abortus infection of the normal human osteoblastic cell line hFOB 1.19 triggered a significant release of MMP-2, which was mediated in part by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) acting on these same cells. Supernatants from infected osteoblasts exhibited increased levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and induced the migration of human monocytes (THP-1 cell line). Infection with B. abortus induced a high MMP-9 secretion in monocytes, which was also induced by heat-killed B. abortus and by the Omp19 lipoprotein from B. abortus. These effects were mediated by Toll-like receptor 2 and by the action of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) produced by these same cells. Supernatants from B. abortus-infected monocytes induced MMP-2 secretion in uninfected osteoblasts, and this effect was mediated by TNF-α. Similarly, supernatants from infected osteoblasts induced MMP-9 secretion in uninfected monocytes. This effect was mediated by GM-CSF, which induced TNF-α production by monocytes, which in turn induced MMP-9 in these cells. These results suggest that MMPs could be potentially involved in the tissue damage observed in osteoarticular brucellosis. PMID:20956574

  19. Phenotypic and functional changes in peripheral blood monocytes during progression of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Effects of soluble immune complexes, cytokines, subcellular particulates from apoptotic cells, and HIV-1-encoded proteins on monocytes phagocytic function, oxidative burst, transendothelial migration, and cell surface phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Trial, J; Birdsall, H H; Hallum, J A; Crane, M L; Rodriguez-Barradas, M C; de Jong, A L; Krishnan, B; Lacke, C E; Figdor, C G; Rossen, R D

    1995-01-01

    We postulated that changes in the cell surface display of molecules that facilitate cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions may reflect the changing immunosurveillance capacity of blood monocytes during progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. In Centers for Disease Control (CDC) stage A patients, whose monocytes' ability to phagocytose bacteria and generate reactive oxygen intermediates is often increased, the frequency of monocytes expressing CD49d, HLA-DP, HLA-DQ, and an activation epitope of CD11a/CD18 was increased and monocyte transendothelial migration was unimpaired. In CDC stage B/C patients, whose monocytes' ability to phagocytose bacteria and migrate across confluent endothelial monolayers was diminished, surface expression of CD49e and CD62L and the percentage of monocytes expressing CD18, CD11a, CD29, CD49e, CD54, CD58, CD31, and HLA-I were significantly decreased. Incubating normal donor monocytes with immune complexes in vitro reproduced the phenotypic and functional abnormalities seen in stage B/C patients. By contrast, in vitro stimulation with subcellular particulates released by apoptotic lymphocytes reproduced changes seen in stage A patients' monocytes. Although circulating monocytes appear to be activated at all stages, these data suggest that the high levels of circulating immune complexes, found predominantly in the later stages of HIV infection, may be particularly instrumental in reducing the monocyte's capacity to maintain surveillance against infection. Images PMID:7706478

  20. Morphological and biochemical modifications of human macrophages treated with various biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Carr, S; Johnston, W; Benghuzzi, H; Tucci, M; Puckett, A; Tsao, A; Hughes, J

    1999-01-01

    Although tissue culture techniques are used extensively to explore the biocompatibility of various biomaterials used in orthopaedic, dental and pharmaceutical fields, the role of these materials towards human monocytes/macrophages has not been fully elucidated. The specific objectives of this investigation were: (1) to determine the biochemical markers resulting from exposure of the human monocytes/macrophages to titanium (TI), large size polyethylene (LSP), submicron polyethylene (SPE), hydroxyapatite (HA), large particle size tricalcium phosphate (LTCP), and small particle size tricalcium phosphate (STCP), and (2) to morphologically evaluate the viability of the cells treated with the aforementioned biomaterials. Approximately 15 volunteers donated blood for each phase (24, 48, and 72 hours) of the experiment. The monocytes were isolated by following established lab procedures (Histopaque 1077 and 1119). Aseptic techniques were followed throughout each phase. Each phase contained four experimental groups (TI, LSP, SPE, HA). Each group was comprised of six wells. The total protein, catalase, LDH, MDA, and cell count were measured using established lab protocols. Data obtained suggests that: (I) regardless of the biomaterial being used all experimental groups experienced remarkable phagocytosis in the first two phases (24, 48 hours), (II) during the 24 hour phase MDA activities were increased in TI, LTCP, and STCP treated wells when compared to the control and other experimental groups, (III) in the 48 hour phase the MDA level increased in LPE and STCP treated cells, (IV) there were significant differences in LDH levels in LPE, STCP, and SPE at 24 hours compared to the control and other experimental groups, (V) LDH activities were increased in LPE, STCP, SPE, and LTCP at 48 hours, and (VI) at 72 hours there were significant increases in catalase activity in HA, TI, SPE and LPE when compared to the control group and other experimental groups. Information obtained

  1. Optimization of Protein Solubilization for the Analysis of the CD14 Human Monocyte Membrane Proteome Using LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaoying; Johann, Donald J.; Hakami, Ramin M.; Xiao, Zhen; Meng, Zhaojing; Ulrich, Robert G.; Issaq, Haleem J.; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Blonder, Josip

    2009-01-01

    Proteomic profiling of membrane proteins is of vital importance in the search for disease biomarkers and drug development. However, the slow pace in this field has resulted mainly from the difficulty to analyze membrane proteins by mass spectrometry (MS). The objective of this investigation was to explore and optimize solubilization of membrane proteins for shotgun membrane proteomics of the CD14 human monocytes by examining different systems that rely on: i) an organic solvent (methanol) ii) an acid-labile detergent 3-[3-(1,1-bisalkyloxyethyl)pyridin-1-yl]propane-1-sulfonate) (PPS), iii) a combination of both agents (methanol + PPS). Solubilization efficiency of different buffers was first compared using bacteriorhodopsin as a model membrane protein. Selected approaches were then applied on a membrane subproteome isolated from a highly enriched human monocyte population that was ~98% positive for CD14 expression by FACS analysis. A methanol-based buffer yielded 194 proteins of which 93 (48%) were mapped as integral membrane proteins. The combination of methanol and acid-cleavable detergent gave similar results; 203 identified proteins of which 93 (46 %) were mapped integral membrane proteins. However, employing PPS a total of 216 proteins of which 75 (35 %) were mapped integral membrane proteins. These results indicate that methanol unaided or in combination with PPS yielded significantly higher membrane protein identification/enrichment than the PPS alone. PMID:19709643

  2. Decreased inducible expression of CD80 and CD86 in human monocytes after ultraviolet-B irradiation: its involvement in inactivation of allogenecity.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, M; Takahashi, T A; Azuma, M; Ogiso, C; Maekawa, T L; Yagita, H; Okumura, K; Sekiguchi, S

    1996-03-15

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation of antigen presenting cells (APCs) modifies their allogenecity, resulting in inhibition of the proliferative response of T cells in mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Costimulation by the CD28 ligand CD80 (B7/B7-1) and CD86 (B70/B7-2) plays an important role during T-cell proliferation by augmenting synthesis of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and other cytokines. In this study, we demonstrated induced expression of both CD80 and CD86 during allogeneic MLR, though human freshly isolated monocytes express CD86 constitutively with a much lower level of CD80. A monoclonal antibody (MoAb) against CD86, but not CD80, efficiently inhibited allogeneic T-cell proliferative responses stimulated with highly purified monocytes. UV-B exposure (0 to 1,000 J/m2) of monocytes inhibited the proliferation of T lymphocytes in MLR in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis showed that UV-B exposure of monocytes impaired the constitutive expression of CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) by 24 hours after irradiation, but the effect on CD86 was relatively less. The surface expression of CD80, CD86, CD54, and HLA-DR on monocytes was further augmented by interferon (IFN)-gamma; this cytokine-induced expression was dose-dependently reduced by UV-B irradiation. Similarly, the upregulation of these molecules following allogeneic MLR was downregulated by UV-B irradiation. UV-B irradiation of monocytes inhibited the expression of IL-2 mRNA in monocyte-stimulated allogeneic MLR. In contrast, the addition of anti-CD28 MoAb at the onset of MLR prevented, at least partially, the reduction of IL-2 mRNA. These results strongly suggest that the impairment of inducible expression of CD86 and CD80 may contribute to the reduced MLR response following exposure of monocytes of UV-B.

  3. GM-CSF Down-Regulates TLR Expression via the Transcription Factor PU.1 in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Kambis; Wisgrill, Lukas; Wessely, Isabelle; Diesner, Susanne C.; Schüller, Simone; Dürr, Celia; Heinle, Armando; Sachet, Monika; Pollak, Arnold; Förster-Waldl, Elisabeth; Spittler, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are crucial sensors of microbial agents such as bacterial or viral compounds. These receptors constitute key players in the induction of inflammation, e.g. in septic or chronic inflammatory diseases. Colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) such as granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF) or granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF) have been extensively investigated in their capacity to promote myelopoiesis in febrile neutropenia or to overcome immunosuppression in patients suffering from sepsis-associated neutropenia or from monocytic immunoincompetence. We report here that GM-CSF, downregulates TLR1, TLR2 and TLR4 in a time- and dose-dependent fashion in human monocytes. Diminished pathogen recognition receptor expression was accompanied by reduced downstream p38 and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling upon lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding—and accordingly led to impaired proinflammatory cytokine production. Knockdown experiments of the transcription factors PU.1 and VentX showed that GM-CSF driven effects on TLR regulation is entirely PU.1 but not VentX dependent. We further analysed monocyte TLR and CD14 expression upon exposure to the IMID® immunomodulatory drug Pomalidomide (CC-4047), a Thalidomide analogue known to downregulate PU.1. Indeed, Pomalidomide in part reversed the GM-CSF-mediated effects. Our data indicate a critical role of PU.1 in the regulation of TLR1, 2, 4 and of CD14, thus targeting PU.1 ultimately results in TLR modulation. The PU.1 mediated immunomodulatory properties of GM-CSF should be taken into consideration upon usage of GM-CSF in inflammatory or infection-related conditions. PMID:27695085

  4. TNF-alpha-independent IL-8 expression: alterations in bacterial challenge dose cause differential human monocytic cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Patrone, Julia B; Bish, Samuel E; Stein, Daniel C

    2006-07-15

    We examined the effects of different bacterial doses of Neisseria gonorrhoeae on the cytokine response of primary human monocytes. The data indicate that a low multiplicity of infection (MOI) challenge (MOI = 0.1) results in substantial production of IL-8 and other chemokines/cytokines, in the absence of significant TNF-alpha production. Positive control challenges (MOI = 10) induced levels of IL-8 that were comparable to the low MOI challenges, but now induced significant levels of TNF-alpha. Induction of IL-8 expression in low MOI challenges was not mediated by an autocrine response as pretreatment of monocytes with neutralizing Abs against TNF-alpha or IL-1beta had no effect on IL-8 expression. IL-8 induction resulting from gonococcal challenge was shown to require NF-kappaB activation, though this activation was limited by the inoculating dose. These data indicate that IL-8 induction results from direct contact between bacteria and monocytes. Analysis of the overall cytokine profile revealed patterns of expression for growth-regulated oncogene, MCP-1, and IL-6 that were similar to IL-8. Analysis of various MAPKs indicated that low MOI challenges were able to efficiently activate both the ERK and p38 pathways, but in contrast to positive control samples, failed to activate the JNK pathway. A lack of phosphorylated JNK leads to decreased production of AP-1 dimers, transcription factors that are critical for efficient transcription of TNF-alpha. Therefore, we propose a mechanism where a low MOI gonococcal challenge results in diminished AP-1 activity and TNF-alpha production while IL-8 levels remain constant. PMID:16818792

  5. Staphylococcus aureus Leukocidin A/B (LukAB) Kills Human Monocytes via Host NLRP3 and ASC when Extracellular, but Not Intracellular

    PubMed Central

    DuMont, Ashley L.; Torres, Victor J.; Duncan, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections are a growing health burden worldwide, and paramount to this bacterium’s pathogenesis is the production of virulence factors, including pore-forming leukotoxins. Leukocidin A/B (LukAB) is a recently discovered toxin that kills primary human phagocytes, though the underlying mechanism of cell death is not understood. We demonstrate here that LukAB is a major contributor to the death of human monocytes. Using a variety of in vitro and ex vivo intoxication and infection models, we found that LukAB activates Caspase 1, promotes IL-1β secretion and induces necrosis in human monocytes. Using THP1 cells as a model for human monocytes, we found that the inflammasome components NLRP3 and ASC are required for LukAB-mediated IL-1β secretion and necrotic cell death. S. aureus was shown to kill human monocytes in a LukAB dependent manner under both extracellular and intracellular ex vivo infection models. Although LukAB-mediated killing of THP1 monocytes from extracellular S. aureus requires ASC, NLRP3 and the LukAB-receptor CD11b, LukAB-mediated killing from phagocytosed S. aureus is independent of ASC or NLRP3, but dependent on CD11b. Altogether, this study provides insight into the nature of LukAB-mediated killing of human monocytes. The discovery that S. aureus LukAB provokes differential host responses in a manner dependent on the cellular contact site is critical for the development of anti-infective/anti-inflammatory therapies that target the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:26069969

  6. The PRKAA1/AMPKα1 pathway triggers autophagy during CSF1-induced human monocyte differentiation and is a potential target in CMML.

    PubMed

    Obba, Sandrine; Hizir, Zoheir; Boyer, Laurent; Selimoglu-Buet, Dorothée; Pfeifer, Anja; Michel, Gregory; Hamouda, Mohamed-Amine; Gonçalvès, Diogo; Cerezo, Michael; Marchetti, Sandrine; Rocchi, Stephane; Droin, Nathalie; Cluzeau, Thomas; Robert, Guillaume; Luciano, Frederic; Robaye, Bernard; Foretz, Marc; Viollet, Benoit; Legros, Laurence; Solary, Eric; Auberger, Patrick; Jacquel, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is induced during differentiation of human monocytes into macrophages that is mediated by CSF1/CSF-1/M-CSF (colony stimulating factor 1 [macrophage]). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that link CSF1 receptor engagement to the induction of autophagy. Here we show that the CAMKK2-PRKAA1-ULK1 pathway is required for CSF1-induced autophagy and human monocyte differentiation. We reveal that this pathway links P2RY6 to the induction of autophagy, and we decipher the signaling network that links the CSF1 receptor to P2RY6-mediated autophagy and monocyte differentiation. In addition, we show that the physiological P2RY6 ligand UDP and the specific P2RY6 agonist MRS2693 can restore normal monocyte differentiation through reinduction of autophagy in primary myeloid cells from some but not all chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) patients. Collectively, our findings highlight an essential role for PRKAA1-mediated autophagy during differentiation of human monocytes and pave the way for future therapeutic interventions for CMML.

  7. Inhibition of Leishmania donovani promastigote DNA topoisomerase I and human monocyte DNA topoisomerases I and II by antimonial drugs and classical antitopoisomerase agents.

    PubMed

    Walker, John; Saravia, Nancy G

    2004-10-01

    We have compared the inhibitor sensitivities of DNA topoisomerase I (TOPI) from Leishmania donovani promastigotes and TOPs I and II of human monocytes using pentavalent and trivalent antimonials (SbV, SbIII) and classical TOP inhibitors. Bis-benzimidazoles (Hoechst-33258 and -33342) were potent inhibitors of both parasite and human TOPI, but Hoechst-33342 was markedly less cytotoxic to promastigotes than to monocytes in vitro. Leishmania donovani was also considerably less sensitive than monocytes to camptothecin, both at enzyme and cellular levels. Sodium stibogluconate (SSG) was the only antimonial to inhibit TOPI, exhibiting a significant (P < 0.05) 3-fold greater potency against the L. donovani enzyme but showed low cytotoxicities against intact promastigotes. The SbV meglumine antimoniate failed to inhibit TOPI and showed negligible cytotoxicities, whereas SbIII drugs were lethal to parasites and monocytes yet poor inhibitors of TOPI. Monocyte TOPII was inhibited by bis-benzimidazoles and insensitive to antimonials and camptothecin. The disparity between the high leishmanicidal activity and low anti-TOPI potency of SbIII indicates that in vivo targeting of L. donovani TOPI by the reductive pathway of antimonial activation is improbable. Nevertheless, the potent direct inhibition of TOPI by SSG and the differential interactions of camptothecin with L. donovani and human TOPI support the possibility of developing parasite-specific derivatives. PMID:15562618

  8. Interleukin-16 stimulates the expression and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mathy, N L; Scheuer, W; Lanzendörfer, M; Honold, K; Ambrosius, D; Norley, S; Kurth, R

    2000-01-01

    Interleukin-16 (IL-16) acts as a chemoattractant for CD4+ cells, as a modulator of T-cell activation, and plays a key role in asthma. This report describes the cytokine-inducing effects of IL-16 on total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and PBMC subpopulations. While CD4+ T lymphocytes did not secrete cytokines in response to rhIL-16, CD14+ CD4+ monocytes and maturing macrophages secrete IL-1β, IL-6, IL-15 and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) upon rhIL-16 stimulation. The mRNA species for these four cytokines were detected as early as 4 hr post-stimulation, with protein being secreted by 24 hr. Secretion of IL-1β and IL-6 by total PBMC was dose dependent, with maximal secretion being observed using 50 ng/ml rhIL-16. However, for IL-15 or TNF-α maximal secretion by total PBMC occurred with all concentrations between 5 ng/ml to 500 ng/ml rhIL-16. Purified monocytes/macrophages secreted maximal concentrations of all four cytokines in the presence of 500 ng/ml rhIL-16, except for monocytes where maximal secretion of IL-15 was, interestingly, observed with only 50 ng/ml rhIL-16. The use of higher concentrations of rhIL-16 (1000 ng/ml) inhibited secretion of all four cytokines. While these IL-16-induced cytokines are likely to be involved in the immune system's response to antigen, the data suggest that IL-16 may play a key role in initiating and/or sustaining an inflammatory response. PMID:10809960

  9. Measuring Granulocyte and Monocyte Phagocytosis and Oxidative Burst Activity in Human Blood.

    PubMed

    Meaney, Mary Pat; Nieman, David C; Henson, Dru A; Jiang, Qi; Wang, Fu-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The granulocyte and monocyte phagocytosis and oxidative burst (OB) activity assay can be used to study the innate immune system. This manuscript provides the necessary methodology to add this assay to an exercise immunology arsenal. The first step in this assay is to prepare two aliquots ("H" and "F") of whole blood (heparin). Then, dihydroethidium is added to the H aliquot, and both aliquots are incubated in a warm water bath followed by a cold water bath. Next, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is added to the H aliquot and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled S. aureus is added to the F aliquot (bacteria:phagocyte = 8:1), and both aliquots are incubated in a warm water bath followed by a cold water bath. Then, trypan blue is added to each aliquot to quench extracellular fluorescence, and the cells are washed with phosphate-buffered saline. Next, the red blood cells are lysed, and the white blood cells are fixed. Finally, a flow cytometer and appropriate analysis software are used to measure granulocyte and monocyte phagocytosis and OB activity. This assay has been used for over 20 years. After heavy and prolonged exertion, athletes experience a significant but transient increase in phagocytosis and an extended decrease in OB activity. The post-exercise increase in phagocytosis is correlated with inflammation. In contrast to normal weight individuals, granulocyte and monocyte phagocytosis is chronically elevated in overweight and obese participants, and is modestly correlated with C-reactive protein. In summary, this flow cytometry-based assay measures the phagocytosis and OB activity of phagocytes and can be used as an additional measure of exercise- and obesity-induced inflammation. PMID:27684595

  10. Nerve growth factor downregulates inflammatory response in human monocytes through TrkA.

    PubMed

    Prencipe, Giusi; Minnone, Gaetana; Strippoli, Raffaele; De Pasquale, Loredana; Petrini, Stefania; Caiello, Ivan; Manni, Luigi; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Bracci-Laudiero, Luisa

    2014-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) levels are highly increased in inflamed tissues, but their role is unclear. We show that NGF is part of a regulatory loop in monocytes: inflammatory stimuli, while activating a proinflammatory response through TLRs, upregulate the expression of the NGF receptor TrkA. In turn, NGF, by binding to TrkA, interferes with TLR responses. In TLR-activated monocytes, NGF reduces inflammatory cytokine production (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8) while inducing the release of anti-inflammatory mediators (IL-10 and IL-1 receptor antagonist). NGF binding to TrkA affects TLR signaling, favoring pathways that mediate inhibition of inflammatory responses: it increases Akt phosphorylation, inhibits glycogen synthase kinase 3 activity, reduces IκB phosphorylation and p65 NF-κB translocation, and increases nuclear p50 NF-κB binding activity. Use of TrkA inhibitors in TLR-activated monocytes abolishes the effects of NGF on the activation of anti-inflammatory signaling pathways, thus increasing NF-κB pathway activation and inflammatory cytokine production while reducing IL-10 production. PBMC and mononuclear cells obtained from the synovial fluid of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis show marked downregulation of TrkA expression. In ex vivo experiments, the addition of NGF to LPS-activated juvenile idiopathic arthritis to both mononuclear cells from synovial fluid and PBMC fails to reduce the production of IL-6 that, in contrast, is observed in healthy donors. This suggests that defective TrkA expression may facilitate proinflammatory mechanisms, contributing to chronic tissue inflammation and damage. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel regulatory mechanism of inflammatory responses through NGF and its receptor TrkA, for which abnormality may have pathogenic implications for chronic inflammatory diseases.

  11. Human monocytes and macrophages express NADPH oxidase 5; a potential source of reactive oxygen species in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Manea, Adrian; Manea, Simona-Adriana; Gan, Ana Maria; Constantin, Alina; Fenyo, Ioana Madalina; Raicu, Monica; Muresian, Horia; Simionescu, Maya

    2015-05-22

    Monocytes (Mon) and Mon-derived macrophages (Mac) orchestrate important oxidative and inflammatory reactions in atherosclerosis by secreting reactive oxygen species (ROS) due, in large part, to the upregulated NADPH oxidases (Nox). The Nox enzymes have been extensively investigated in human Mon and Mac. However, the expression and functional significance of the Nox5 subtypes is not known. We aimed at elucidating whether Nox5 is expressed in human Mon and Mac, and examine its potential role in atherosclerosis. Human monocytic THP-1 cell line and CD14(+) Mon were employed to search for Nox5 expression. RT-PCR, Western blot, lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence and dihydroethidium assays were utilized to examine Nox5 in these cells. We found that Nox5 transcription variants and proteins are constitutively expressed in THP-1 cells and primary CD14(+) Mon. Silencing of Nox5 protein expression by siRNA reduced the Ca(2+)-dependent Nox activity and the formation of ROS in Mac induced by A23187, a selective Ca(2+) ionophore. Exposure of Mac to increasing concentrations of IFNγ (5-100 ng/ml) or oxidized LDL (5-100 μg/ml) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in Nox5 protein expression and elevation in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that Nox5 is present in CD68(+) Mac-rich area within human carotid artery atherosclerotic plaques. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first evidence that Nox5 is constitutively expressed in human Mon. Induction of Nox5 expression in IFNγ- and oxidized LDL-exposed Mac and the presence of Nox5 in Mac-rich atheroma are indicative of the implication of Nox5 in atherogenesis. PMID:25871798

  12. Human monocytes and macrophages express NADPH oxidase 5; a potential source of reactive oxygen species in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Manea, Adrian; Manea, Simona-Adriana; Gan, Ana Maria; Constantin, Alina; Fenyo, Ioana Madalina; Raicu, Monica; Muresian, Horia; Simionescu, Maya

    2015-05-22

    Monocytes (Mon) and Mon-derived macrophages (Mac) orchestrate important oxidative and inflammatory reactions in atherosclerosis by secreting reactive oxygen species (ROS) due, in large part, to the upregulated NADPH oxidases (Nox). The Nox enzymes have been extensively investigated in human Mon and Mac. However, the expression and functional significance of the Nox5 subtypes is not known. We aimed at elucidating whether Nox5 is expressed in human Mon and Mac, and examine its potential role in atherosclerosis. Human monocytic THP-1 cell line and CD14(+) Mon were employed to search for Nox5 expression. RT-PCR, Western blot, lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence and dihydroethidium assays were utilized to examine Nox5 in these cells. We found that Nox5 transcription variants and proteins are constitutively expressed in THP-1 cells and primary CD14(+) Mon. Silencing of Nox5 protein expression by siRNA reduced the Ca(2+)-dependent Nox activity and the formation of ROS in Mac induced by A23187, a selective Ca(2+) ionophore. Exposure of Mac to increasing concentrations of IFNγ (5-100 ng/ml) or oxidized LDL (5-100 μg/ml) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in Nox5 protein expression and elevation in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that Nox5 is present in CD68(+) Mac-rich area within human carotid artery atherosclerotic plaques. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first evidence that Nox5 is constitutively expressed in human Mon. Induction of Nox5 expression in IFNγ- and oxidized LDL-exposed Mac and the presence of Nox5 in Mac-rich atheroma are indicative of the implication of Nox5 in atherogenesis.

  13. Innate Immune Proteins C1q and Mannan-Binding Lectin Enhance Clearance of Atherogenic Lipoproteins by Human Monocytes and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Deborah A.; Tenner, Andrea J.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that is characterized by the accumulation of modified lipoproteins in the arterial intima. C1q and mannan-binding lectin (MBL) are not only recognition components involved in activation of inflammation via the complement cascade, but they are also able to directly modulate phagocyte activation. Studies in C1q−/− and MBL−/− mice suggest that these molecules play a protective role in the early atherosclerotic lesion in the absence of, or prior to, expression of other complement components. However, in later stages, complement activation becomes an inappropriate inflammatory response, contributing to disease pathology. Therefore, to investigate possible molecular interactions of C1q and MBL in atherosclerotic lesions, we examined the influence of C1q and MBL in the clearance of native and modified lipoproteins by human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages. Both C1q and MBL are shown to bind and enhance the monocyte/monocyte-derived macrophage clearance of modified forms of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), including oxidized LDL and acetylated LDL, but not native LDL. Modified forms of LDL activate the classical complement pathway, but no lectin pathway activation was detected. Interestingly, monocytes that ingested modified LDL in the presence of C1q or MBL upregulated surface CD80 and CD31, as well as CCL2 chemokine gene expression. However, C1q and MBL also significantly reduced levels of free cholesterol accumulation in monocytes and human monocyte-derived macrophages that ingested oxidized LDL, while enhancing high-density lipoprotein–specific cholesterol efflux from these cells. These results suggest a novel pathway in which C1q and MBL influence removal and metabolism of atherogenic forms of LDL in the early stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:20833838

  14. MicroRNA-155 modulates the interleukin-1 signaling pathway in activated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ceppi, Maurizio; Pereira, Patricia M.; Dunand-Sauthier, Isabelle; Barras, Emmanuèle; Reith, Walter; Santos, Manuel A.; Pierre, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    In response to inflammatory stimulation, dendritic cells (DCs) have a remarkable pattern of differentiation (maturation) that exhibits specific mechanisms to control immunity. Here, we show that in response to Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), several microRNAs (miRNAs) are regulated in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Among these miRNAs, miR-155 is highly up-regulated during maturation. Using LNA silencing combined to microarray technology, we have identified the Toll-like receptor/interleukin-1 (TLR/IL-1) inflammatory pathway as a general target of miR-155. We further demonstrate that miR-155 directly controls the level of TAB2, an important signal transduction molecule. Our observations suggest, therefore, that in mature human DCs, miR-155 is part of a negative feedback loop, which down-modulates inflammatory cytokine production in response to microbial stimuli. PMID:19193853

  15. Cadmium inhibits IL-6 production and IL-6 mRNA expression in a human monocytic cell line, THP-1

    SciTech Connect

    Funkhouser, S.W.; Vredevoe, D.L.; Martinez-Maza, O. )

    1994-07-01

    Cadmium is a known immunotoxic agent in animal studies. Cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system are strategically located at portals of entry in humans and therefore may be particularly at risk for cadmium exposure through contaminated air, food, and drinking water. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were changes in interleukin-6 (IL-6) production, a pleiotropic cytokine, when an activated human monocytic cell line was exposed to cadmium. Results suggest that there were statistically significant lower levels of IL-6 at 0.06 mM cadmium (P < 0.05), and 0.8 and 0.1 mM cadmium (P < 0.01), determined via the ELISA method. IL-6 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels were also decreased at these cadmium concentrations. The addition of a chelating agent, EDTA, to the cultures prevented the suppression of IL-6 secretion. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Human iNKT Cells Promote Protective Inflammation by Inducing Oscillating Purinergic Signaling in Monocyte-Derived DCs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuequn; Pocock, Ginger M; Sharma, Akshat; Peery, Stephen L; Fites, J Scott; Felley, Laura; Zarnowski, Robert; Stewart, Douglas; Berthier, Erwin; Klein, Bruce S; Sherer, Nathan M; Gumperz, Jenny E

    2016-09-20

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are innate T lymphocytes that promote host defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. Whether microbial ligands are required for their protective effects remains unclear. Here, we show that iNKT cells stimulate human-monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) to produce inflammatory mediators in a manner that does not require the presence of microbial compounds. Interleukin 2 (IL-2)-exposed iNKT cells selectively induced repeated cytoplasmic Ca(2+) fluxes in DCs that were dependent on signaling by the P2X7 purinergic receptor and mediated by ATP released during iNKT-DC interactions. Exposure to iNKT cells led to DC cyclooxygenase 2 (PTGS2) gene transcription, and release of PGE2 that was associated with vascular permeabilization in vivo. Additionally, soluble factors were released that induced neutrophil recruitment and activation and enhanced control of Candida albicans. These results suggest that sterile interactions between iNKT cells and monocyte-derived DCs lead to the production of non-redundant inflammatory mediators that promote neutrophil responses. PMID:27653689

  17. Hypoxia reduces constitutive and TNF-{alpha}-induced expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in human proximal renal tubular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xuan; Kimura, Hideki . E-mail: hkimura@fmsrsa.fukui-med.ac.jp; Hirota, Kiichi; Sugimoto, Hidehiro; Yoshida, Haruyoshi

    2005-10-07

    Chronic hypoxia has been reported to be associated with macrophage infiltration in progressive forms of kidney disease. Here, we investigated the regulatory effects of hypoxia on constitutive and TNF-{alpha}-stimulated expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in cultured human proximal renal tubular cells (HPTECs). Hypoxia reduced constitutive MCP-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent fashion for up to 48 h. Hypoxia also inhibited MCP-1 up-regulation by TNF-{alpha}. Treatment with actinomycin D showed that hypoxic down-regulation of MCP-1 expression resulted mainly from a decrease in the transcription but not the mRNA stability. Immunoblot and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that treatment with hypoxia or an iron chelator, desferrioxamine, induced nuclear accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) in HPTECs. Desferrioxamine mimicked hypoxia in the reduction of MCP-1 expression. However, overexpression of a dominant negative form of HIF-1{alpha} did not abolish the hypoxia-induced reduction of MCP-1 expression in HPTECs. These results suggest that hypoxia is an important negative regulator of monocyte chemotaxis to the renal inflamed interstitium, by reducing MCP-1 expression partly via hypoxia-activated signals other than the HIF-1 pathway.

  18. Gallic Acid Decreases Inflammatory Cytokine Secretion Through Histone Acetyltransferase/Histone Deacetylase Regulation in High Glucose-Induced Human Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wooje; Lee, Sang Yeol; Son, Young-Jin; Yun, Jung-Mi

    2015-07-01

    Hyperglycemia contributes to diabetes and several diabetes-related complications. Gallic acid is a polyhydroxy phenolic compound found in various natural products. In this study, we investigated the effects and mechanism of gallic acid on proinflammatory cytokine secretion in high glucose-induced human monocytes (THP-1 cells). THP-1 cells were cultured under normoglycemic or hyperglycemic conditions, in the absence or presence of gallic acid. Hyperglycemic conditions significantly induced histone acetylation, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, and proinflammatory cytokine release from THP-1 cells, whereas gallic acid suppressed NF-κB activity and cytokine release. It also significantly reduced CREB-binding protein/p300 (CBP/p300, a NF-κB coactivator) gene expression, acetylation levels, and CBP/p300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity. In addition, histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) expression was significantly induced. These results suggest that gallic acid inhibits hyperglycemic-induced cytokine production in monocytes through epigenetic changes involving NF-κB. Therefore, gallic acid may have potential for the treatment and prevention of diabetes and its complications.

  19. Treatment of methimazole-induced severe aplastic anemia with recombinant human granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor and glucocorticosteroids.

    PubMed

    López-Karpovitch, X; Ulloa-Aguirre, A; von Eiff, C; Hurtado-Monroy, R; Alanis, A

    1992-01-01

    The in vivo response to recombinant human granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (rHu GM-CSF) in facilitating the reconstitution of granulomonopoiesis was evaluated in a patient with Graves' disease who developed severe aplastic anemia during methimazole therapy. After 10 days of treatment with rHu GM-CSF, the neutrophil and monocyte counts rose to 1.65 x 10(9)/l and 0.41 x 10(9)/l, respectively. However, the patient was still dependent on erythrocyte and platelet transfusions. Two days after rHu GM-CSF withdrawal, the neutrophil count dropped off to 0.41 x 10(9)/l.rHu GM-CSF was reinitiated for 2 days along with glucocorticosteroids. With this combined therapeutic approach, the neutrophil count returned to normal and remained stable, and both Hb and platelet values began to improve. It is concluded that the combination of rHu GM-CSF and glucocorticosteroids can be used as a therapeutic option that may lead to beneficial results in drug-induced aplastic anemia.

  20. Long non-coding RNA-DANCR in human circulating monocytes: a potential biomarker associated with postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xiang; Gu, Peng-cheng; Xu, San-zhong; Lin, Xiang-jin

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a common disease characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and low trauma fractures, mainly resulting from exceeding bone resorption by osteoclasts over bone formation by osteoblasts. Circulating monocytes are directly involved in osteoclastogenesis, and lncRNAs are believed to be involved in the osteoblast differentiation. However, no study has been conducted to identify the roles of lncRNA in circulating monocytes associated with human osteoporosis. In this study, we found significant upregulation of DANCR in the blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) from low-BMD patients with the qRT-PCR analyses. We further found that DANCR promoted the expression of IL6 and TNF-α at both mRNA level and protein level in MNCs. After deletion of DANCR with siRNAs, the levels of IL6 and TNF-α are decreased in the MNCs from low-BMD postmenopausal women. Moreover, DANCR level was correlated with IL6 and TNF-α in postmenopausal women with low BMD. Furthermore, we found that DANCR-induced IL6 and TNF-α in MNCs had bone-resorbing activity. These results indicate that DANCR is involved in the pathology of osteoporosis and may be as a biomarker for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  1. Differential expression of the fractalkine chemokine receptor (CX3CR1) in human monocytes during differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Panek, Cecilia Analia; Ramos, Maria Victoria; Mejias, Maria Pilar; Abrey-Recalde, Maria Jimena; Fernandez-Brando, Romina Jimena; Gori, Maria Soledad; Salamone, Gabriela Verónica; Palermo, Marina Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Circulating monocytes (Mos) may continuously repopulate macrophage (MAC) or dendritic cell (DC) populations to maintain homeostasis. MACs and DCs are specialized cells that play different and complementary immunological functions. Accordingly, they present distinct migratory properties. Specifically, whereas MACs largely remain in tissues, DCs are capable of migrating from peripheral tissues to lymphoid organs. The aim of this work was to analyze the expression of the fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) during the monocytic differentiation process. Freshly isolated Mos express high levels of both CX3CR1 mRNA and protein. During the Mo differentiation process, CX3CR1 is downregulated in both DCs and MACs. However, MACs showed significantly higher CX3CR1 expression levels than did DC. We also observed an antagonistic CX3CR1 regulation by interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 during MAC activation through the classical and alternative MAC pathways, respectively. IFN-γ inhibited the loss of CX3CR1, but IL-4 induced it. Additionally, we demonstrated an association between CX3CR1 expression and apoptosis prevention by soluble fractalkine (sCX3CL1) in Mos, DCs and MACs. This is the first report demonstrating sequential and differential CX3CR1 modulation during Mo differentiation. Most importantly, we demonstrated a functional link between CX3CR1 expression and cell survival in the presence of sCX3CL1. PMID:25502213

  2. Effects of dietary salt levels on monocytic cells and immune responses in healthy human subjects: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Yi, Buqing; Titze, Jens; Rykova, Marina; Feuerecker, Matthias; Vassilieva, Galina; Nichiporuk, Igor; Schelling, Gustav; Morukov, Boris; Choukèr, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    Increasing evidence indicated that excess salt consumption can impose risks on human health and a reduction in daily salt intake from the current average of approximately 12 g/d to 5-6 g/d was suggested by public health authorities. The studies on mice have revealed that sodium chloride plays a role in the modulation of the immune system and a high-salt diet can promote tissue inflammation and autoimmune disease. However, translational evidence of dietary salt on human immunity is scarce. We used an experimental approach of fixing salt intake of healthy human subjects at 12, 9, and 6 g/d for months and examined the relationship between salt-intake levels and changes in the immune system. Blood samples were taken from the end point of each salt intake period. Immune phenotype changes were monitored through peripheral leukocyte phenotype analysis. We assessed immune function changes through the characterization of cytokine profiles in response to mitogen stimulation. The results showed that subjects on the high-salt diet of 12 g/d displayed a significantly higher number of immune cell monocytes compared with the same subjects on a lower-salt diet, and correlation test revealed a strong positive association between salt-intake levels and monocyte numbers. The decrease in salt intake was accompanied by reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-23, along with enhanced producing ability of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. These results suggest that in healthy humans high-salt diet has a potential to bring about excessive immune response, which can be damaging to immune homeostasis, and a reduction in habitual dietary salt intake may induce potentially beneficial immune alterations.

  3. Alpha-toxin induces programmed cell death of human T cells, B cells, and monocytes during USA300 infection.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Tyler K; Pallister, Kyler B; DuMont, Ashley L; DeWald, Mark; Watkins, Robert L; Pallister, Erik Q; Malone, Cheryl; Griffith, Shannon; Horswill, Alexander R; Torres, Victor J; Voyich, Jovanka M

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examines the influence of alpha-toxin (Hla) during USA300 infection of human leukocytes. Survival of an USA300 isogenic deletion mutant of hla (USA300Δhla) in human blood was comparable to the parental wild-type strain and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) plasma membrane permeability caused by USA300 did not require Hla. Flow cytometry analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) following infection by USA300, USA300Δhla, and USA300Δhla transformed with a plasmid over-expressing Hla (USA300Δhla Comp) demonstrated this toxin plays a significant role inducing plasma membrane permeability of CD14(+), CD3(+), and CD19(+) PBMCs. Rapid plasma membrane permeability independent of Hla was observed for PMNs, CD14(+) and CD19(+) PBMCs following intoxication with USA300 supernatant while the majority of CD3(+) PBMC plasma membrane permeability induced by USA300 required Hla. Addition of recombinant Hla to USA300Δhla supernatant rescued CD3(+) and CD19(+) PBMC plasma membrane permeability generated by USA300 supernatant. An observed delay in plasma membrane permeability caused by Hla in conjunction with Annexin V binding and ApoBrdU Tunel assays examining PBMCs intoxicated with recombinant Hla or infected with USA300, USA300Δhla, USA300Δhla Comp, and USA300ΔsaeR/S suggest Hla induces programmed cell death of monocytes, B cells, and T cells that results in plasma membrane permeability. Together these findings underscore the importance of Hla during S. aureus infection of human tissue and specifically demonstrate Hla activity during USA300 infection triggers programmed cell death of human monocytes, T cells and B cells that leads to plasma membrane permeability.

  4. Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:3 alters the expression of serologic HLA-B27 epitopes on human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Wuorela, M; Jalkanen, S; Kirveskari, J; Laitio, P; Granfors, K

    1997-01-01

    The expression of serologic HLA-B27 epitopes on leukocytes of patients with reactive arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis has been shown to be modified in the course of the disease. The purpose of this work was to study whether phagocytosis of arthritis-triggering microbes in vitro alters the expression of HLA-B27 molecules on human antigen-presenting cells and to characterize the underlying mechanisms. Human monocytes and HLA-B27- or HLA-A2-transfected human U-937 cells were exposed to Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:3. The expression of different epitopes of HLA-B27 was monitored by using immunofluorescence, and their synthesis was determined by quantitative immunoprecipitation. Our results show that phagocytosis of Y. enterocolitica serotype O:3 changed the expression of serological HLA-B27 epitopes. This was due to the reduced synthesis of HLA-B27 molecules. The expression of especially the epitopes which depend on the presence of peptides in the antigen-binding groove was changed. The expression of the ME1 epitope, which has been shown to be important for T-cell recognition in patients with reactive arthritis, was decreased. Down-regulation of epitopes important for the T-cell recognition may impair the elimination of arthritis-triggering microbes and lead to persistent infection. In addition, Y. enterocolitica serotype O:3 seemed to alter the repertoire of peptides presented by the HLA-B27 molecules on human monocytes. This may have a role in the pathogenesis of reactive arthritis via an autoimmune mechanism. PMID:9169732

  5. Human Cytomegalovirus-Encoded Human Interleukin-10 (IL-10) Homolog Amplifies Its Immunomodulatory Potential by Upregulating Human IL-10 in Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Avdic, Selmir; McSharry, Brian P.; Steain, Megan; Poole, Emma; Sinclair, John; Abendroth, Allison

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gene UL111A encodes cytomegalovirus-encoded human interleukin-10 (cmvIL-10), a homolog of the potent immunomodulatory cytokine human interleukin 10 (hIL-10). This viral homolog exhibits a range of immunomodulatory functions, including suppression of proinflammatory cytokine production and dendritic cell (DC) maturation, as well as inhibition of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II. Here, we present data showing that cmvIL-10 upregulates hIL-10, and we identify CD14+ monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages and DCs as major sources of hIL-10 secretion in response to cmvIL-10. Monocyte activation was not a prerequisite for cmvIL-10-mediated upregulation of hIL-10, which was dose dependent and controlled at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, cmvIL-10 upregulated expression of tumor progression locus 2 (TPL2), which is a regulator of the positive hIL-10 feedback loop, whereas expression of a negative regulator of the hIL-10 feedback loop, dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), remained unchanged. Engagement of the hIL-10 receptor (hIL-10R) by cmvIL-10 led to upregulation of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), an enzyme linked with suppression of inflammatory responses, and this upregulation was required for cmvIL-10-mediated upregulation of hIL-10. We also demonstrate an important role for both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and STAT3 in the upregulation of HO-1 and hIL-10 by cmvIL-10. In addition to upregulating hIL-10, cmvIL-10 could exert a direct immunomodulatory function, as demonstrated by its capacity to upregulate expression of cell surface CD163 when hIL-10 was neutralized. This study identifies a mechanistic basis for cmvIL-10 function, including the capacity of this viral cytokine to potentially amplify its immunosuppressive impact by upregulating hIL-10 expression. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a large, double-stranded DNA virus that causes significant human disease

  6. Detection of calcium activity in human monocytes by the fura-2 fluorescence method: in vitro differentiation sensitizes cells to dihydropyridine calcium channel modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Cabello, Olga A.; Shan, Qin; Tittel, Frank K.; Henry, Philip D.

    1994-07-01

    Dihydropyridine (DHP) calcium channel blockers have been shown to suppress atherogenesis in various species and controlled angiographic trials suggest that these drugs may retard the progression of occlusive coronary disease in humans. Because mononuclear leukocytes play a key role in the formation of early and advanced atheromatous lesions, we determined effects of DHP calcium channel modulators on calcium uptake by cells of the monocytic lineage. Human peripheral blood monocytes were evaluated before and after undergoing in vitro differentiation induced by two days of culture with fetal calf serum and FMLP. Changes in intracellular calcium activity were estimated with fura-2, a fluorescent calcium indicator. Freshly isolated (unactivated) monocytes were insensitive to DHP drugs both in the presence and absence of high potassium membrane depolarization. In contrast, nisoldipine, a DHP calcium channel blocker, and BAY K 8644, a DHP calcium channel activator, decreased and increased calcium uptake by KC1-depolarized differentiated monocytes. Results suggest that differentiation of monocytes to macrophages may involve a change in the expression and/or regulation of DHP- sensitive calcium channels.

  7. IFN-gamma enhances killing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by human monocytes more effectively than GM-CSF in the presence of daptomycin and other antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Raymond P; Baltch, Aldona L; Ritz, William J; Michelsen, Phyllis B; Bopp, Lawrence H

    2010-09-01

    Because cytokines have been utilized in treatment of sepsis in neonates, we studied the effects of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and GM-CSF on killing of intracellular methicilin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by human monocyte derived macrophages (MDM) in the presence of daptomycin (Dap), rifampin (Rif), gentamicin (Gen), and combinations of these drugs. MDM infected with MRSA were treated with Dap (1 x MIC), Gen (0.5 x MIC), or Rif (1 x MIC), singly or in combination, with or without cytokines. MDM were lysed and viable bacteria counted. With antibiotics, MDM activated by IFN-gamma had a more rapid and prolonged bacterial killing effect than MDM activated by GM-CSF. This effect was most obvious with the triple-drug combination. In contrast, GM-CSF reduced intracellular killing under most experimental conditions compared to the effect of antibiotics alone. Dap alone and two- and three-drug combinations demonstrated significant killing effect for the 48 h of the assay. IFN-gamma enhanced rapid intracellular killing of MRSA in the presence of triple-drug treatment or Dap alone. GM-CSF in combination with the antibiotics reduced killing under most conditions studied. Further studies to confirm these observations with IFN-gamma-activated MDM and other MRSA strains are needed to support clinical trials for difficult-to-treat MRSA infections.

  8. Glioblastoma cells induce differential glutamatergic gene expressions in human tumor-associated microglia/macrophages and monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Choi, Judy; Stradmann-Bellinghausen, Beate; Yakubov, Eduard; Savaskan, Nicolai E; Régnier-Vigouroux, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma cells produce and release high amounts of glutamate into the extracellular milieu and subsequently can trigger seizure in patients. Tumor-associated microglia/macrophages (TAMs), consisting of both parenchymal microglia and monocytes-derived macrophages (MDMs) recruited from the blood, are known to populate up to 1/3 of the glioblastoma tumor environment and exhibit an alternative, tumor-promoting and supporting phenotype. However, it is unknown how TAMs respond to the excess extracellular glutamate in the glioblastoma microenvironment. We investigated the expressions of genes related to glutamate transport and metabolism in human TAMs freshly isolated from glioblastoma resections. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed (i) significant increases in the expressions of GRIA2 (GluA2 or AMPA receptor 2), SLC1A2 (EAAT2), SLC1A3 (EAAT1), (ii) a near-significant decrease in the expression of SLC7A11 (cystine-glutamate antiporter xCT) and (iii) a remarkable increase in GLUL expression (glutamine synthetase) in these cells compared to adult primary human microglia. TAMs co-cultured with glioblastoma cells also exhibited a similar glutamatergic profile as freshly isolated TAMs except for a slight increase in SLC7A11 expression. We next analyzed these genes expressions in cultured human MDMs derived from peripheral blood monocytes for comparison. In contrast, MDMs co-cultured with glioblastoma cells compared to MDMs co-cultured with normal astrocytes exhibited decreased expressions in the tested genes except for GLUL. This is the first study to demonstrate transcriptional changes in glutamatergic signaling of TAMs in a glioblastoma microenvironment, and the findings here suggest that TAMs and MDMs might potentially elicit different cellular responses in the presence of excess extracellular glutamate. PMID:26047211

  9. Activation of human monocyte-derived macrophages cultured on Teflon: response to interferon-gamma during terminal maturation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Andreesen, R; Gadd, S; Brugger, W; Löhr, G W; Atkins, R C

    1988-05-01

    Macrophages (M phi) are potential antitumor effector cells derived from circulating blood monocytes (mo). Most studies on human mo/M phi biology and function have been performed using immature mo precursor cells. However, the conclusions drawn may be questionable, as mo have to undergo terminal differentiation before they reach relevant tissue sites of inflammation and immune reaction. We have analyzed the ability of mo-derived, teflon-cultured M phi to respond to activating stimuli with an increased tumor cytotoxic effector cell function using recombinant interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), IFN-alpha 2, granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin(IL) 2, IL 1 alpha, and bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) as mediator molecules. It could be shown that the response of M phi to the most potent activator molecule, IFN-gamma, depends on the terminal differentiation from the mo stage to the mature M phi. Whereas adherent mo could be activated only moderately, M phi increased their cytotoxicity by a factor of up to 400. IFN-gamma activation positively correlated with the effector cell number, the time of incubation and the dosage used. Activation did not depend on the presence of LPS, and was lost within 24 to 48 h. LPS itself activated cells only in the microgram range. IFN-alpha 2 activated M phi only at a two log higher concentration than IFN-gamma; GM-CSF was only slightly effective, whereas M phi incubation with IL 1 alpha or IL 2 did not result in M phi activation. Thus, the ability of human M phi to become activated appears to be a function of cellular maturation and is acquired during the terminal step of M phi differentiation. Teflon-cultured M phi could facilitate studies of the activation of human M phi and may be more suitable cells for adoptive immunotherapy in cancer patients than blood monocytes. PMID:3136081

  10. Agonists of proteinase-activated receptor-2 enhance IFN-gamma-inducible effects on human monocytes: role in influenza A infection.

    PubMed

    Feld, Micha; Shpacovitch, Victoria M; Ehrhardt, Christina; Kerkhoff, Claus; Hollenberg, Morley D; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Ludwig, Stephan; Steinhoff, Martin

    2008-05-15

    Proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)) is expressed by different types of human leukocytes and involved in the development of inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, its precise role in the regulation of human monocyte and macrophage function during viral infection remains unclear. Also, the ability of PAR(2) agonists to enhance the effects induced by immune mediators during infection or inflammation is still poorly investigated. Therefore, we investigated the ability of a PAR(2) agonist to enhance IFN-gamma-induced suppression of influenza A virus replication in human monocytes. We found that this effect correlates with an increased abundance of IkappaBalpha after costimulation of cells with PAR(2) agonist and IFN-gamma. Remarkably, coapplication of PAR(2) agonist and IFN-gamma also enhances the effects of IFN-gamma on IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10 kDa release, and CD64 and alphaVbeta3 surface expression by human monocytes. Together, these findings indicate a potentially protective role of PAR(2) activation during the progression of influenza A virus infection. This effect could be associated with the ability of PAR(2) agonists to enhance IFN-gamma-induced protective effects on human monocytes.

  11. Expression of GM1, a marker of lipid rafts, defines two subsets of human monocytes with differential endocytic capacity and lipopolysaccharide responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Altamirano, M Maximina Bertha; Aguilar-Carmona, Israel; Sánchez-García, F Javier

    2007-01-01

    Monocytes constitute 5–10% of total human peripheral blood leucocytes and remain in circulation for several days before replenishing the tissue macrophage populations. Monocytes display heterogeneity in size, granularity and nuclear morphology, and in the expression of cell membrane molecules, such as CD14, CD16, CD32, CD64, major histocompatibility complex class II, CCR2, CCR5, among others. This has led to the suggestion that individual monocyte/macrophage populations have specialized functions within their microenvironments. This study provides evidence for the occurrence of two peripheral blood monocyte subpopulations on the basis of their differential expression of GM1, a sphingolipid found mostly in lipid rafts, a CD14+ GM1low population and a CD14+ GM1high population comprising about 97·5% and 2·5% of total CD14+ cells, respectively. GM1 expression correlates with functional differences in terms of endocytic activity, susceptibility to mycobacterial infection, and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (modulation of Toll-like receptor-4 expression). CD14+ GM1low cells proved to be less endocytic and more responsive to LPS, whereas CD14+ GM1high cells are more endocytic and less responsive to LPS. In addition, during monocyte to macrophage differentiation in vitro, the percentage of CD14+ GM1high cells increases from about 2·5% at day 1 to more than 50% at day 7 of culture. These results suggest that GM1low and GM1high monocytes in peripheral blood, represent either different stages of maturation or different subsets with specialized activities. The expression of CD16 on GM1high favours the first possibility and, on the other hand that up-regulation of GM1 expression and probably lipid rafts function is involved in the monocyte to macrophage differentiation process. PMID:17250589

  12. Plasma levels of the chemokines monocyte chemotactic proteins-1 and -2 are elevated in human sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bossink, A W; Paemen, L; Jansen, P M; Hack, C E; Thijs, L G; Van Damme, J

    1995-11-15

    Because of their effects on monocytes, monocyte chemotactic proteins-1 and -2 (MCP-1 and MCP-2) may participate in the pathophysiology of sepsis. We measured circulating MCP-1 and MCP-2 levels in 42 septic patients having positive local or blood cultures. MCP-1 and MCP-2 levels were elevated in 24 (57%) and 25 (59%) of 42 septic patients, respectively, compared with healthy volunteers. Both patients with gram-positive and gram-negative infections had elevated MCP-1 plasma levels (P = .0001) and P < .0001), respectively; Mann-Whitney-U test), whereas patients with gram-positive infection, but not those with gram-negative infection, had increased MCP-2 plasma levels (P= .0182). No relative differences in MCP-1 and MCP-2 plasma levels were observed between several subgroups of patients (sepsis v septic shock; survivors v nonsurvivors), although levels of MCP-1 were the highest in patients with the more severe forms of sepsis, ie, those with shock or a lethal outcome. Serial observations showed that MCP-1 and MCP-2 plasma levels remained elevated for at least 48 hours. MCP-1 correlated weakly with interleukin-8 and MCP-2, the correlations for which were most pronounced in patients with septic shock. MCP-2 correlated with interleukin-8, and surprisingly, with the complement activation product C3a; these correlations further improved when analyzing patients with septic shock or when applying gram-positive infections. Thus, our results not only show increased MCP-1 and MCP-2 levels in patients with sepsis, but also suggest that the synthesis and release of MCP-1 and MCP-2 in sepsis are differently regulated in part.

  13. IL12, IL10, IFNγ and TNFα Expression in Human Primary Monocytes Stimulated with Bacterial Heat Shock GroEL (Hsp64) Protein

    PubMed Central

    Nalbant, Ayten; Saygılı, Tahsin

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacillus (Aggregatibacter) actinomycetemicomitans (Aa) is a bacterium that lives in the oral cavity and plays an important role in periodontal diseases. The effect of A.actinomycetemcomitans’s heat shock family protein GroEL on host or immune cells including monocytes is quite limited. In this study, the recombinant A.actinomycetemcomitans’s GroEL protein (rAaGroEL) was used as an antigen and its effects on monocytes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was investigated. To do that, PBMCs were stimulated with rAaGroEL protein at different time points (16h to 96h) and the cytokines of CD14+ monocytes were detected with intracellular cytokine staining by Flow cytometry. Data showed that AaGroEL protein has an antigenic effect on human primary monocytes. AaGroEL protein responsive CD14 monocytes stimulates the expression of IL12, IL10, IFNγ and TNFα cytokines with different kinetics and expression profile. Therefore, A. actinomycetemcomitans’s heat shock GroEL protein can modulate innate and adaptive immune responses and contribute to an inflammatory diseases pathology. PMID:27119521

  14. Endogenous production of interleukin 15 by activated human monocytes is critical for optimal production of interferon-gamma by natural killer cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Carson, W E; Ross, M E; Baiocchi, R A; Marien, M J; Boiani, N; Grabstein, K; Caligiuri, M A

    1995-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are large granular lymphocytes that constitutively express functional IL-2 receptors. We have shown that recombinant human IL-15 uses the IL-2 receptor to activate human NK cells and can synergize with recombinant human IL-12 to stimulate NK cell production of IFN-gamma in vitro. IFN-gamma production by NK cells is critical in the prevention of overwhelming infection by obligate intracellular microbial pathogens in several experimental animal models. Herein, we demonstrate that human monocytes produce IL-15 protein within 5 h of activation with LPS. Using an IL-15-neutralizing antiserum in a coculture of LPS-activated monocytes and NK cells, we demonstrate that monocyte-derived IL-15 is critical for optimal NK cell production of IFN-gamma. Endogenous IL-15 activates NK cells through the IL-2 receptor, and with endogenous IL-12, regulates NK cell IFN-gamma after monocyte activation by LPS. These in vitro studies are the first to characterize a function for endogenous IL-15, and as such, suggest an important role for IL-15 during the innate immune response. IL-15 may be an important ligand for the NK cell IL-2 receptor in vivo. Images PMID:8675621

  15. DEAD-box proteins, like Leishmania eIF4A, modulate interleukin (IL)-12, IL-10 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha production by human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Barhoumi, M; Meddeb-Garnaoui, A; Tanner, N K; Banroques, J; Kaabi, B; Guizani, I

    2013-01-01

    Previously we showed that His-tagged, recombinant, Leishmania infantum eukaryotic initiation factor (LeIF) was both an RNA-dependent ATPase and an ATP-dependent RNA helicase in vitro, as described for other members of the DEAD-box helicase family. In addition, we showed that LeIF induces the production of IL-12, IL-10, and TNF-α by human monocytes. This study aims to characterize the cytokine-inducing activity in human monocytes of several proteins belonging to the DEAD-box family from mammals and yeast. All tested proteins contained the 11 conserved motifs (Q, I, Ia, GG Ib, II, III, IV, QxxR, V and VI) characteristic of DEAD-box proteins, but they have different biological functions and different percentages of identities with LeIF. We show that these mammalian or yeast recombinant proteins also are able to induce IL-12, IL-10 and TNF-α secretion by monocytes of healthy human subjects. This cytokine-inducing activity is proteinase K sensitive and polymyxin B resistant. Our results show that the induction of cytokines in human monocytes is not unique to the protein LeIF of Leishmania, and it suggests that the activity of certain DEAD-box proteins can be exploited as adjuvant and/or to direct immune responses towards a Th1 profile in vaccination or immunotherapy protocols. PMID:23363368

  16. Roles of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and NF-kappaB in human cytomegalovirus-mediated monocyte diapedesis and adhesion: strategy for viral persistence.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Shane; Bivins-Smith, Elizabeth R; Tilley, A Michael; Bentz, Gretchen L; Chan, Gary; Minard, Jessica; Yurochko, Andrew D

    2007-07-01

    Infected peripheral blood monocytes are proposed to play a key role in the hematogenous dissemination of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) to tissues, a critical step in the establishment of HCMV persistence and the development of HCMV-associated diseases. We recently provided evidence for a unique strategy involved in viral dissemination: HCMV infection of primary human monocytes promotes their transendothelial migration and differentiation into proinflammatory macrophages permissive for the replication of the original input virus. To decipher the mechanism of hematogenous spread, we focused on the viral dysregulation of early cellular processes involved in transendothelial migration. Here, we present evidence that both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase [PI(3)K] and NF-kappaB activities were crucial for the HCMV induction of monocyte motility and firm adhesion to endothelial cells. We found that the beta(1) integrins, the beta(2) integrins, intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), and ICAM-3 were upregulated following HCMV infection and that they played a key role in the firm adhesion of infected monocytes to the endothelium. The viral regulation of adhesion molecule expression is complex, with PI(3)K and NF-kappaB affecting the expression of each adhesion molecule at different stages of the expression cascade. Our data demonstrate key roles for PI(3)K and NF-kappaB signaling in the HCMV-induced cellular changes in monocytes and identify the biological rationale for the activation of these pathways in infected monocytes, which together suggest a mechanism for how HCMV promotes viral spread to and persistence within host organs.

  17. Inhibition of HIV-1 Replication in Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages by Parasite Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Andreani, Guadalupe; Celentano, Ana M.; Solana, María E.; Cazorla, Silvia I.; Malchiodi, Emilio L.; Martínez Peralta, Liliana A.; Dolcini, Guillermina L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage are one of the major targets of HIV-1 infection and serve as reservoirs for viral persistence in vivo. These cells are also the target of the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, being one of the most important endemic protozoonoses in Latin America. It has been demonstrated in vitro that co-infection with other pathogens can modulate HIV replication. However, no studies at cellular level have suggested an interaction between T. cruzi and HIV-1 to date. Methodology/Principal Findings By using a fully replicative wild-type virus, our study showed that T. cruzi inhibits HIV-1 antigen production by nearly 100% (p<0.001) in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). In different infection schemes with luciferase-reporter VSV-G or BaL pseudotyped HIV-1 and trypomastigotes, T. cruzi induced a significant reduction of luciferase level for both pseudotypes in all the infection schemes (p<0.001), T. cruzi-HIV (>99%) being stronger than HIV-T. cruzi (∼90% for BaL and ∼85% for VSV-G) infection. In MDM with established HIV-1 infection, T. cruzi significantly inhibited luciferate activity (p<0.01). By quantifying R-U5 and U5-gag transcripts by real time PCR, our study showed the expression of both transcripts significantly diminished in the presence of trypomastigotes (p<0.05). Thus, T. cruzi inhibits viral post-integration steps, early post-entry steps and entry into MDM. Trypomastigotes also caused a ∼60-70% decrease of surface CCR5 expression on MDM. Multiplication of T. cruzi inside the MDM does not seem to be required for inhibiting HIV-1 replication since soluble factors secreted by trypomastigotes have shown similar effects. Moreover, the major parasite antigen cruzipain, which is secreted by the trypomastigote form, was able to inhibit viral production in MDM over 90% (p<0.01). Conclusions/Significance Our study showed that T. cruzi inhibits HIV-1 replication at several replication stages in

  18. Augmentation of the human monocyte/macrophage chemiluminescence response during short-term exposure to interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Kumaratilake, L M; Ferrante, A; Bates, E J; Kowanko, I C

    1990-01-01

    The effects of short-term (30 min) pre-incubation of human monocytes and macrophages (3-day cultured monocytes) with leucocyte-derived human interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and recombinant human tumour necrosis factor-alpha (rTNF-alpha) were examined. Pre-incubation of either monocytes or macrophages with rTNF-alpha or IFN-gamma (100 U/5 x 10(5) cells) augmented their respiratory burst to formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP), measured by the luminol- and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence assay. In addition, both cell types showed a burst of respiratory activity in the presence of rTNF-alpha or IFN-gamma only. The effects of IFN-gamma were removed by adsorption with an anti-IFN-gamma monoclonal antibody and those of rTNF-alpha were abolished by heating at 100 degrees C, or by the addition of anti-TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody. The results demonstrate that both IFN-gamma and rTNF-alpha are stimulators of monocytes and macrophages, and rapidly alter the capacity of the cells to respond to fMLP, which binds to cell surface receptors. PMID:2113442

  19. Induction of interleukin-1 production by ligands binding to the scavenger receptor in human monocytes and the THP-1 cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Palkama, T

    1991-01-01

    Foam cell formation via lipid accumulation through the scavenger receptor in human monocyte/macrophages is believed to be one of the earliest events in atherogenesis. In this study we demonstrate that stimulation of the scavenger receptor activates monocytes to produce interleukin-1 (IL-1). Polyinosinic acid (poly I) and fucoidan, both ligands known to bind to the scavenger receptor, induced IL-1 beta production in human monocytes. Polycytidylic acid, a structurally related compound to poly I, which does not bind to the scavenger receptor, was used as a negative control and had virtually no effect on IL-1 production. THP-1 cells, which normally do not express scavenger receptors, were almost unresponsive to poly I and fucoidan. PMA priming, which has been reported to up-regulate scavenger receptor expression in THP-1 cells, significantly enhanced IL-1 production by fucoidan and poly I. IL-1 produced by scavenger receptor stimulation was shown to be secreted extracellularly, and biologically active. Scavenger receptor-mediated IL-1 production was inhibited by H7, a protein kinase C inhibitor, and enhanced by IBMX, an inhibitor of cyclic AMP degradation, suggesting a synergistic effect of protein kinase C and cyclic AMP-mediated signal transduction pathways in scavenger receptor-mediated IL-1 production. Due to the potentially deleterious effects of IL-1 on the vessel wall, IL-1 produced by ligand binding to the scavenger receptor in human monocytes may play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Images Figure 3 PMID:1663075

  20. Monocyte-induced recovery of inflammation-associated hepatocellular dysfunction in a biochip-based human liver model.

    PubMed

    Gröger, Marko; Rennert, Knut; Giszas, Benjamin; Weiß, Elisabeth; Dinger, Julia; Funke, Harald; Kiehntopf, Michael; Peters, Frank T; Lupp, Amelie; Bauer, Michael; Claus, Ralf A; Huber, Otmar; Mosig, Alexander S

    2016-02-23

    Liver dysfunction is an early event in sepsis-related multi-organ failure. We here report the establishment and characterization of a microfluidically supported in vitro organoid model of the human liver sinusoid. The liver organoid is composed of vascular and hepatocyte cell layers integrating non-parenchymal cells closely reflecting tissue architecture and enables physiological cross-communication in a bio-inspired fashion. Inflammation-associated liver dysfunction was mimicked by stimulation with various agonists of toll-like receptors. TLR-stimulation induced the release of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and diminished expression of endothelial VE-cadherin, hepatic MRP-2 transporter and apolipoprotein B (ApoB), resulting in an inflammation-related endothelial barrier disruption and hepatocellular dysfunction in the liver organoid. However, interaction of the liver organoid with human monocytes attenuated inflammation-related cell responses and restored MRP-2 transporter activity, ApoB expression and albumin/urea production. The cellular events observed in the liver organoid closely resembled pathophysiological responses in the well-established sepsis model of peritoneal contamination and infection (PCI) in mice and clinical observations in human sepsis. We therefore conclude that this human liver organoid model is a valuable tool to investigate sepsis-related liver dysfunction and subsequent immune cell-related tissue repair/remodeling processes.

  1. Monocyte-induced recovery of inflammation-associated hepatocellular dysfunction in a biochip-based human liver model

    PubMed Central

    Gröger, Marko; Rennert, Knut; Giszas, Benjamin; Weiß, Elisabeth; Dinger, Julia; Funke, Harald; Kiehntopf, Michael; Peters, Frank T.; Lupp, Amelie; Bauer, Michael; Claus, Ralf A.; Huber, Otmar; Mosig, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Liver dysfunction is an early event in sepsis-related multi-organ failure. We here report the establishment and characterization of a microfluidically supported in vitro organoid model of the human liver sinusoid. The liver organoid is composed of vascular and hepatocyte cell layers integrating non-parenchymal cells closely reflecting tissue architecture and enables physiological cross-communication in a bio-inspired fashion. Inflammation-associated liver dysfunction was mimicked by stimulation with various agonists of toll-like receptors. TLR-stimulation induced the release of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and diminished expression of endothelial VE-cadherin, hepatic MRP-2 transporter and apolipoprotein B (ApoB), resulting in an inflammation-related endothelial barrier disruption and hepatocellular dysfunction in the liver organoid. However, interaction of the liver organoid with human monocytes attenuated inflammation-related cell responses and restored MRP-2 transporter activity, ApoB expression and albumin/urea production. The cellular events observed in the liver organoid closely resembled pathophysiological responses in the well-established sepsis model of peritoneal contamination and infection (PCI) in mice and clinical observations in human sepsis. We therefore conclude that this human liver organoid model is a valuable tool to investigate sepsis-related liver dysfunction and subsequent immune cell-related tissue repair/remodeling processes. PMID:26902749

  2. HLA-G1, but Not HLA-G3, Suppresses Human Monocyte/Macrophage-mediated Swine Endothelial Cell Lysis.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, H; Maeda, A; Lo, P C; Matsuura, R; Esquivel, E L; Asada, M; Sakai, R; Nakahata, K; Yamamichi, T; Umeda, S; Deguchi, K; Ueno, T; Okuyama, H; Miyagawa, S

    2016-05-01

    The inhibitory function of HLA-G1, a class Ib molecule, on monocyte/macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity was examined. The expression of inhibitory receptors that interact with HLA-G, immunoglobulin-like transcript 2 (ILT2), ILT4, and KIR2DL4 (CD158d) on in vitro-generated macrophages obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-activated THP-1 cells were examined by flow cytometry. cDNAs of HLA-G1, HLA-G3, HLA-E, and human β2-microglobulin were prepared, transfected into pig endothelial cells (PECs), and macrophage- and the THP-1 cell-mediated PEC cytolysis was then assessed. In vitro-generated macrophages expressed not only ILT2 and ILT4 but CD158d as well. The transgenic HLA-G1 on PEC indicated a significant suppression in macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity, which was equivalent to that of transgenic HLA-E. HLA-G1 was clearly expressed on the cell surface of PEC, whereas the levels of HLA-G3 were much lower and remained in the intracellular space. On the other hand, the PMA-activated THP-1 cell was less expressed these inhibitory molecules than in vitro-generated macrophages. Therefore, the HLA-G1 on PECs showed a significant but relatively smaller suppression to THP-1 cell-mediated cytotoxicity compared to in vitro-generated macrophages. These results indicate that by generating HLA-G1, but not HLA-G3, transgenic pigs can protect porcine grafts from monocyte/macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:27320605

  3. Powerful Identification of Cis-regulatory SNPs in Human Primary Monocytes Using Allele-Specific Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Almlöf, Jonas Carlsson; Lundmark, Per; Lundmark, Anders; Ge, Bing; Maouche, Seraya; Göring, Harald H. H.; Liljedahl, Ulrika; Enström, Camilla; Brocheton, Jessy; Proust, Carole; Godefroy, Tiphaine; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Jolley, Jennifer; Crisp-Hihn, Abigail; Foad, Nicola; Lloyd-Jones, Heather; Stephens, Jonathan; Gwilliam, Rhian; Rice, Catherine M.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Samani, Nilesh J.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Pastinen, Tomi; Deloukas, Panos; Goodall, Alison H.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Cambien, François; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2012-01-01

    A large number of genome-wide association studies have been performed during the past five years to identify associations between SNPs and human complex diseases and traits. The assignment of a functional role for the identified disease-associated SNP is not straight-forward. Genome-wide expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis is frequently used as the initial step to define a function while allele-specific gene expression (ASE) analysis has not yet gained a wide-spread use in disease mapping studies. We compared the power to identify cis-acting regulatory SNPs (cis-rSNPs) by genome-wide allele-specific gene expression (ASE) analysis with that of traditional expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping. Our study included 395 healthy blood donors for whom global gene expression profiles in circulating monocytes were determined by Illumina BeadArrays. ASE was assessed in a subset of these monocytes from 188 donors by quantitative genotyping of mRNA using a genome-wide panel of SNP markers. The performance of the two methods for detecting cis-rSNPs was evaluated by comparing associations between SNP genotypes and gene expression levels in sample sets of varying size. We found that up to 8-fold more samples are required for eQTL mapping to reach the same statistical power as that obtained by ASE analysis for the same rSNPs. The performance of ASE is insensitive to SNPs with low minor allele frequencies and detects a larger number of significantly associated rSNPs using the same sample size as eQTL mapping. An unequivocal conclusion from our comparison is that ASE analysis is more sensitive for detecting cis-rSNPs than standard eQTL mapping. Our study shows the potential of ASE mapping in tissue samples and primary cells which are difficult to obtain in large numbers. PMID:23300628

  4. Piceatannol and its metabolite, isorhapontigenin, induce SIRT1 expression in THP-1 human monocytic cell line.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Shinpei; Kinoshita, Yosuke; Maruki-Uchida, Hiroko; Yanae, Koji; Sai, Masahiko; Ito, Tatsuhiko

    2014-11-01

    Piceatannol is a phytochemical that is present in large amounts in passion fruit (Passiflora edulis) seeds, and is an analog of resveratrol. Recently, the absorption and metabolism of piceatannol were investigated in rats, and isorhapontigenin, O-methyl piceatannol, was detected as a piceatannol metabolite in rat plasma. To elucidate the function of piceatannol and its metabolites, we investigated the expression of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) in THP-1 monocytic cells after treatment with piceatannol and its metabolites, and compared their effects with those of resveratrol and its metabolites. Piceatannol and resveratrol upregulated the expression levels of SIRT1 mRNA and SIRT1 protein. An extract of passion fruit seeds, which contained high levels of piceatannol, also upregulated SIRT1 mRNA expression. As for the metabolites, isorhapontigenin upregulated SIRT1 mRNA expression, whereas resveratrol glucuronides and sulfate did not affect SIRT1 expression. These findings indicate that after intake of piceatannol, not only piceatannol itself, but also its metabolite, isorhapontigenin, contributed to the upregulation of SIRT1 expression. PMID:25360511

  5. Characterization of two types of osteoclasts from human peripheral blood monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Yuasa, Kimitaka . E-mail: yuasa911@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Mori, Kouki; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Sudo, Akihiro; Uchida, Atsumasa; Ito, Yasuhiko

    2007-05-04

    The two osteoclastogenesis pathways, receptor activator nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL)-mediated and fusion regulatory protein-1 (FRP-1)-mediated osteoclastogenesis, have recently been reported. There were significant differences in differentiation and activation mechanisms between the two pathways. When monocytes were cultured with FRP-1 without adding M-CSF, essential for the RANKL system, TRAP-positive polykaryocyte formation occurred. FRP-1-mediated osteoclasts formed larger pits on mineralized calcium phosphate plates than RANKL+M-CSF-mediated osteoclasts did. Lacunae on dentin surfaces induced by FRP-1-mediated osteoclasts were inclined to be single and isolated. However, osteoclasts induced by RANKL+M-CSF made many connected pits on dentin surfaces as if they crawled on there. Interestingly, FRP-1 osteoclastogenesis was enhanced by M-CSF/IL-1{alpha}, while chemotactic behavior to the dentin slices was not effected. There were differences in pH and concentration of HCO3- at culture endpoint and in adherent feature to dentin surfaces. Our findings indicate there are two types of osteoclasts with distinct properties.

  6. Activation of human monocytes by streptococcal rhamnose glucose polymers is mediated by CD14 antigen, and mannan binding protein inhibits TNF-alpha release.

    PubMed

    Soell, M; Lett, E; Holveck, F; Schöller, M; Wachsmann, D; Klein, J P

    1995-01-15

    The present work was initiated to define mechanisms that account for the binding on human monocytes of streptococcal cell wall polysaccharides formed by rhamnose glucose polymers (RGPs), and subsequent stimulatory activities. We show here that RGPs bind to and stimulate human monocytes to produce TNF-alpha in a dose-dependent manner. To detect cell surface RGPs binding proteins, intact monocytes were biotinylated before lysis with Nonidet P-40 and solubilized proteins were incubated with RGPs Affi-Prep beads. One major membrane protein of 55 kDa was specifically detected and identified as CD14 because it reacted with anti-CD14 mAbs. Furthermore, anti-CD14 mAbs were able to perform a dose-dependent inhibition of RGPs binding, and suppressed TNF-alpha release from RGPs-stimulated monocytes. Moreover, we demonstrated that RGPs also bind to CD11b; however, this binding is not implicated in synthesis of TNF-alpha. Interestingly, RGPs binding to monocytes was enhanced by human normal serum (HNS) whereas HNS inhibits the TNF-alpha-stimulating activity of RGPs. Western blotting analysis of HNS proteins purified on RGPs Affi-prep beads revealed three specific bands of 75, 55, and 32 kDa reactive with anti-C3 Abs, anti-CD14 mAbs (TUK4), and anti-human mannan binding protein (hMBP)-derived peptide IgG, respectively. These results suggest that C3, soluble CD14, and hMBP form complexes that are probably active in enhancing the binding of RGPs to monocytes. Additional studies have shown that hMBP that recognizes RGPs prevents, unlike the LPS binding protein, TNF-alpha release by inhibiting the binding of RGPs to CD14 Ag. By incubating cells with a constant amount of RGPs-hMBP complexes in the presence or absence of increasing concentrations of C1q, we also demonstrated that C1q receptor mediates the binding and probably the uptake of RGPs-hMBP complexes by human monocytes. PMID:7529289

  7. In vitro Catecholamine Exposure Produces Variable Effects on the B7 Costimulatory Pathway in Human Monocytic Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salicru, A. N.; Crucian, B.; Sams, Clarence; Actor, J. K.; Marshall, G. D., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Catecholamines have been associated with immunomodulation of the adaptive immune system towards a Th2 response in vitro. We therefore examined the role of in vitro epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) exposure on the B7 costimulatory expression of antigen presenting cells (APC) from human monocytic cell lines and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). THP1 monocytic cells and CD14+ cells from normal human PBMC were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and incubated with physiologic stress levels (10(exp -6) - 10(exp -8)M) of EPI or NE for 24 hours. Cells were subsequently stained with CD80 FITC, CD86 PE, and CD14 PC5 antibodies and analyzed by flow cytometry for changes in fluorescence and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). Exposure of THP1 to EPI in vitro at concentrations of 10(exp -6), 10(exp -7) and 10(exp -8)M significantly decreased mean CD80 from 42 plus or minus 0.7% to 11 plus or minus 0.44%, 19.1 plus or minus 2.0%, and 30.7 plus or minus 2.1% expression, respectively (p less than 0.01). In addition, CD86 expression increased with EPI at 10(exp -6), 10(exp -7) and 10(exp -8) M from 9.2 plus or minus 0.52% to 41 plus or minus 3.8%, 26.4 plus or minus 1.9%, and 15.74 plus or minus 1.8% expression, respectively (p less than 0.01). Similar results for mean CD80 and CD86 percent expression were observed for CD14+ cells from PBMC with a sample size of N = 6 and for NE when substituted for EPI. The data show that in vitro exposure to catecholamines significantly decreases %CD86 expression and significantly increases %CD86 expression in THP1 cells and human CD14+ APC. Previous studies have suggested an association between increased CD86 expression and TH2 activity. Thus, these data suggest that immunomodulation by catecholamines results in part by the variable effects of the B7 costimulatory pathway in APC.

  8. Biphasic influence of PGE2 on the resorption activity of osteoclast-like cells derived from human peripheral blood monocytes and mouse RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Lutter, Anne-Helen; Hempel, Ute; Anderer, Ursula; Dieter, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Osteoclasts are large bone-resorbing cells of hematopoietic origin. Their main function is to dissolve the inorganic component hydroxyapatite and to degrade the organic bone matrix. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) indirectly affects osteoclasts by stimulating osteoblasts to release factors that influence osteoclast activity. The direct effect of PGE2 on osteoclasts is still controversial. To study the influence of PGE2 on osteoclast activity, human peripheral blood monocytes (hPBMC) and mouse RAW264.7 cells were cultured on osteoblast-derived extracellular matrix. hPBMC and RAW264.7 cells were differentiated by the addition of macrophage colony-stimulation factor and receptor activator of NFκB ligand and treated with PGE2 before and after differentiation induction. The pit area, an indicator of resorption activity, and the activity of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase were dose-dependently inhibited when PGE2 was present ab initio, whereas the resorption activity remained unchanged when the cells were exposed to PGE2 from day 4 of culture. These results lead to the conclusion that PGE2 treatment inhibits only the differentiation of precursor osteoclasts whereas differentiated osteoclasts are not affected. PMID:27499447

  9. Candida albicans Targets a Lipid Raft/Dectin-1 Platform to Enter Human Monocytes and Induce Antigen Specific T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    de Turris, Valeria; Teloni, Raffaela; Chiani, Paola; Bromuro, Carla; Mariotti, Sabrina; Pardini, Manuela; Nisini, Roberto; Torosantucci, Antonella; Gagliardi, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Several pathogens have been described to enter host cells via cholesterol-enriched membrane lipid raft microdomains. We found that disruption of lipid rafts by the cholesterol-extracting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin or by the cholesterol-binding antifungal drug Amphotericin B strongly impairs the uptake of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans by human monocytes, suggesting a role of raft microdomains in the phagocytosis of the fungus. Time lapse confocal imaging indicated that Dectin-1, the C-type lectin receptor that recognizes Candida albicans cell wall-associated β-glucan, is recruited to lipid rafts upon Candida albicans uptake by monocytes, supporting the notion that lipid rafts act as an entry platform. Interestingly disruption of lipid raft integrity and interference with fungus uptake do not alter cytokine production by monocytes in response to Candida albicans but drastically dampen fungus specific T cell response. In conclusion, these data suggest that monocyte lipid rafts play a crucial role in the innate and adaptive immune responses to Candida albicans in humans and highlight a new and unexpected immunomodulatory function of the antifungal drug Amphotericin B.

  10. Candida albicans Targets a Lipid Raft/Dectin-1 Platform to Enter Human Monocytes and Induce Antigen Specific T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Chiani, Paola; Bromuro, Carla; Mariotti, Sabrina; Pardini, Manuela; Nisini, Roberto; Torosantucci, Antonella; Gagliardi, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Several pathogens have been described to enter host cells via cholesterol-enriched membrane lipid raft microdomains. We found that disruption of lipid rafts by the cholesterol-extracting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin or by the cholesterol-binding antifungal drug Amphotericin B strongly impairs the uptake of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans by human monocytes, suggesting a role of raft microdomains in the phagocytosis of the fungus. Time lapse confocal imaging indicated that Dectin-1, the C-type lectin receptor that recognizes Candida albicans cell wall-associated β-glucan, is recruited to lipid rafts upon Candida albicans uptake by monocytes, supporting the notion that lipid rafts act as an entry platform. Interestingly disruption of lipid raft integrity and interference with fungus uptake do not alter cytokine production by monocytes in response to Candida albicans but drastically dampen fungus specific T cell response. In conclusion, these data suggest that monocyte lipid rafts play a crucial role in the innate and adaptive immune responses to Candida albicans in humans and highlight a new and unexpected immunomodulatory function of the antifungal drug Amphotericin B. PMID:26562838

  11. Effects of bee venom against Propionibacterium acnes-induced inflammation in human keratinocytes and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Yeon; Lee, Woo-Ram; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; An, Hyun-Jin; Chang, Young-Chae; Han, Sang-Mi; Park, Yoon-Yub; Pak, Sok Cheon; Park, Kwan-Kyu

    2015-06-01

    Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) cause inflammatory acne and play an important role in the pathogenesis of acne by inducing inflammatory mediators. P. acnes contributes to the inflammatory responses of acne by activating inflammatory cells, keratinocytes and sebocytes to secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8. Bee venom has traditionally been used in the treatment of certain immune-related diseases. However, there has not yet been a robust trial to prove the therapeutic effect of bee venom in skin inflammation. The aim of the present study was to investigate anti-inflammatory properties of bee venom in skin inflammation induced by P. acnes using keratinocytes (HaCaT) and monocytes (THP-1). P. acnes is known to stimulate the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1, IL-8, IL-12 and TNF-α. In the present study, the production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-1β, IL-8 and TNF-α was increased by P. acnes treatment in HaCaT and THP-1 cells. By contrast, bee venom effectively inhibited the secretion of IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-8 and TNF-α. Furthermore, P. acnes treatment activated the expression of IL-8 and toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in HaCaT cells. However, bee venom inhibited the expression of IL-8 and TLR2 in heat-killed P. acnes. Based on these results, it is concluded that bee venom has an effective anti-inflammatory activity against P. acnes in HaCaT and THP-1 cells. Therefore, we suggest that bee venom is an alternative treatment to antibiotic therapy of acne. PMID:25872535

  12. Leishmania Induces Survival, Proliferation and Elevated Cellular dNTP Levels in Human Monocytes Promoting Acceleration of HIV Co-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Daddacha, Waaqo; Overstreet, Michael G.; Lazarski, Chris A.; Fowell, Deborah J.; Kim, Baek

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease that is widely prevalent in many tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Infection with Leishmania has been recognized to induce a striking acceleration of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) infection in coinfected individuals through as yet incompletely understood mechanisms. Cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage are the predominant cell types coinfected by both pathogens. Monocytes and macrophages contain extremely low levels of deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) due to their lack of cell cycling and S phase, where dNTP biosynthesis is specifically activated. Lentiviruses, such as HIV-1, are unique among retroviruses in their ability to replicate in these non-dividing cells due, at least in part, to their highly efficient reverse transcriptase (RT). Nonetheless, viral replication progresses more efficiently in the setting of higher intracellular dNTP concentrations related to enhanced enzyme kinetics of the viral RT. In the present study, in vitro infection of CD14+ peripheral blood-derived human monocytes with Leishmania major was found to induce differentiation, marked elevation of cellular p53R2 ribonucleotide reductase subunit and R2 subunit expression. The R2 subunit is restricted to the S phase of the cell cycle. Our dNTP assay demonstrated significant elevation of intracellular monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) dNTP concentrations in Leishmania-infected cell populations as compared to control cells. Infection of Leishmania-maturated MDMs with a pseudotyped GFP expressing HIV-1 resulted in increased numbers of GFP+ cells in the Leishmania-maturated MDMs as compared to control cells. Interestingly, a sub-population of Leishmania-maturated MDMs was found to have re-entered the cell cycle, as demonstrated by BrdU labeling. In conclusion, Leishmania infection of primary human monocytes promotes the induction of an S phase environment and elevated dNTP levels with notable elevation of HIV-1 expression

  13. C1q Differentially Modulates Phagocytosis and Cytokine Responses during Ingestion of Apoptotic Cells by Human Monocytes, Macrophages, and Dendritic Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Deborah A.; Laust, Amanda K.; Nelson, Edward L.; Tenner, Andrea J.

    2010-01-01

    C1q, the first component of the classical complement pathway, is also a pattern recognition receptor involved in the recognition and clearance of apoptotic cells. C1q deficiency in humans leads to development of lupus-like autoimmune disease, and it has been speculated that impaired clearance of apoptotic cells may contribute to disease development. Since phagocytes initiate specific and appropriate immune responses as a result of initial ligand-receptor interactions, regulation of gene expression by C1q may also contribute to the sculpting of an immune response to the ingested “self-Ags.” In this study, the role of C1q in apoptotic cell clearance and subsequent modulation of cytokine release by phagocytes was assessed including donor matched human monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs), and dendritic cells (DCs). First, C1q binding is much greater to late compared with early apoptotic cells. Second, C1q binding to apoptotic cells significantly enhanced the levels of ingestion by monocytes but had no effect on HMDM and DC uptake. Third, in the presence of serum, C1q bound to apoptotic cells, activated the complement pathway, leading to C3b deposition, and enhancement of uptake of apoptotic cells by monocytes, HMDMs, and DCs. Finally, although C1q, either immobilized on a plate or bound to apoptotic cells, modulates the LPS-induced cytokine levels released by human monocytes, HMDMs, and DCs toward a more limited immune response, both the degree and direction of modulation differed significantly depending on the differentiation state of the phagocyte, providing further evidence of the integration of these cell- and environment-specific signals in determining appropriate immune responses. PMID:19864605

  14. TNF-alpha is secreted by monocytes in transit to become macrophages, but not by peripheral blood monocytes, following OK-432 (lyophilized S. pyogenes) stimulation.

    PubMed

    Olsnes, C; Stavang, H; Olofsson, J; Aarstad, H J

    2007-12-01

    OK-432, penicillin-killed Streptococcus pyogenes, is used in treating lymphangiomas and carcinomas. We have studied proinflammatory interleukin (IL) secretion following OK-432 stimulation of total blood, peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) and purified monocytes in vitro. OK-432 stimulation of purified monocytes gave IL-1beta, IL-1RA, IL-6, IL-12p40 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha response. OK-432 stimulation of cells within blood did, however, not yield TNF-alpha secretion. When PBMC or monocytes were cultured in low-attachment wells a decreased IL secretion was observed compared to adherent cells. Inhibition of Syk kinase with piceatannol, only at high, non-specific doses, but not PI3 kinase inhibition with LY294002 or Wortmannin, decreased monocyte IL response to OK-432. This shows that beta(1-3)-integrin receptor function is not necessary for monocyte OK-432-stimulated TNF-alpha secretion. Direct blockage of the beta(2)-integrin (CD18) receptor by anti-CD18 antibody was also unable to prevent the stimulating effects of OK-432 in human monocytes. On the other hand, Syk phosphorylation is elevated upon adherence of monocytes and this is further increased by OK-432 stimulation, as shown by Western blot. The Fc-receptor was also ruled out as a main receptor of the OK-432 monocyte response. In conclusion, TNF-alpha secretion is only found in monocytes removed from blood. This TNF-alpha secretion is not mediated through the beta(1-3)-integrin receptors. OK-432 may act as a target-seeking substance whereby only monocytes adhered, e.g. to a tumour cell, become cytotoxic in part explaining why OK-432 is well suited as a cancer treatment drug.

  15. Postprandial VLDL lipolysis products increase monocyte adhesion and lipid droplet formation via activation of ERK2 and NFκB

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Robin; Norman, Jennifer E.; Rutledge, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Postprandial lipemia is characterized by a transient increase in circulating triglyceride-rich lipoproteins such as very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and has been shown to activate monocytes in vivo. Lipolysis of VLDL releases remnant particles, phospholipids, monoglycerides, diglycerides, and fatty acids in close proximity to endothelial cells and monocytes. We hypothesized that postprandial VLDL lipolysis products could activate and recruit monocytes by increasing monocyte expression of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules, and that such activation is related to the development of lipid droplets. Freshly isolated human monocytes were treated with VLDL lipolysis products (2.28 mmol/l triglycerides + 2 U/ml lipoprotein lipase), and monocyte adhesion to a primed endothelial monolayer was observed using a parallel plate flow chamber coupled with a CCD camera. Treated monocytes showed more rolling and adhesion than controls, and an increase in transmigration between endothelial cells. The increased adhesive events were related to elevated expression of key integrin complexes including Mac-1 [αm-integrin (CD11b)/β2-integrin (CD18)], CR4 [αx-integrin (CD11c)/CD18] and VLA-4 [α4-integrin (CD49d)/β1-integrin (CD29)] on treated monocytes. Treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and THP-1 monocytes with VLDL lipolysis products increased expression of TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-8 over controls, with concurrent activation of NFkB and AP-1. NFκB and AP-1-induced cytokine and integrin expression was dependent on ERK and Akt phosphorylation. Additionally, fatty acids from VLDL lipolysis products induced ERK2-dependent lipid droplet formation in monocytes, suggesting a link to inflammatory signaling pathways. These results provide novel mechanisms for postprandial monocyte activation by VLDL lipolysis products, suggesting new pathways and biomarkers for chronic, intermittent vascular injury. PMID:24163071

  16. Collagen Induces Maturation of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells by Signaling through Osteoclast-Associated Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Heidi S.; Nitze, Louise M.; Zeuthen, Louise H.; Keller, Pernille; Gruhler, Albrecht; Pass, Jesper; Chen, Jianhe; Guo, Li; Fleetwood, Andrew J.; Hamilton, John A.; Berchtold, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is widely expressed on human myeloid cells. Collagen types (Col)I, II, and III have been described as OSCAR ligands, and ColII peptides can induce costimulatory signaling in receptor activator for NF-κB–dependent osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we isolated collagen as an OSCAR-interacting protein from the membranes of murine osteoblasts. We have investigated a functional outcome of the OSCAR–collagen interaction in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). OSCAR engagement by ColI/II-induced activation/maturation of DCs is characterized by upregulation of cell surface markers and secretion of cytokines. These collagen-matured DCs (Col-DCs) were efficient drivers of allogeneic and autologous naive T cell proliferation. The T cells expanded by Col-DCs secreted cytokines with no clear T cell polarization pattern. Global RNA profiling revealed that multiple proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines and cytokine receptors, components of the stable immune synapse (namely CD40, CD86, CD80, and ICAM-1), as well as components of TNF and TLR signaling, are transcriptional targets of OSCAR in DCs. Our findings indicate the existence of a novel pathway by which extracellular matrix proteins locally drive maturation of DCs during inflammatory conditions, for example, within synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients, where collagens become exposed during tissue remodeling and are thus accessible for interaction with infiltrating precursors of DCs. PMID:25725106

  17. Activities of tigecycline and comparators against Legionella pneumophila and Legionella micdadei extracellularly and in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Lawrence H; Baltch, Aldona L; Ritz, William J; Michelsen, Phyllis B; Smith, Raymond P

    2011-01-01

    The activity of tigecycline against Legionellae, which are intracellular pathogens, was evaluated intracellularly in human phagocytes and extracellularly, and compared to the activities of erythromycin and levofloxacin. Clinical isolates of L. pneumophila serogroups 1, 5, and 6 and L. micdadei were tested in time-kill experiments. Extracellular experiments were done using buffered yeast extract broth. For intracellular assays, monolayers of human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were infected with L. pneumophila or L. micdadei. Antibiotics (0.05-2.5 × MIC) were then added. MDM were lysed at 0, 24, 48, and 72 h and viable bacteria in the lysates were enumerated. Based on multiples of the MICs, tigecycline was less active extracellularly than levofloxacin or erythromycin. However, intracellular killing of both L. pneumophila and L. micdadei by tigecycline at 72 h was greater than for erythromycin or levofloxacin. Currently, evidence does not support the use of tigecycline as a first-line drug for treatment of Legionella infections. However, since Legionellae are intracellular pathogens, these results suggest that tigecycline should be effective for treatment of infections caused by these bacteria.

  18. Collagen induces maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells by signaling through osteoclast-associated receptor.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Heidi S; Nitze, Louise M; Zeuthen, Louise H; Keller, Pernille; Gruhler, Albrecht; Pass, Jesper; Chen, Jianhe; Guo, Li; Fleetwood, Andrew J; Hamilton, John A; Berchtold, Martin W; Panina, Svetlana

    2015-04-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is widely expressed on human myeloid cells. Collagen types (Col)I, II, and III have been described as OSCAR ligands, and ColII peptides can induce costimulatory signaling in receptor activator for NF-κB-dependent osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we isolated collagen as an OSCAR-interacting protein from the membranes of murine osteoblasts. We have investigated a functional outcome of the OSCAR-collagen interaction in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). OSCAR engagement by ColI/II-induced activation/maturation of DCs is characterized by upregulation of cell surface markers and secretion of cytokines. These collagen-matured DCs (Col-DCs) were efficient drivers of allogeneic and autologous naive T cell proliferation. The T cells expanded by Col-DCs secreted cytokines with no clear T cell polarization pattern. Global RNA profiling revealed that multiple proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines and cytokine receptors, components of the stable immune synapse (namely CD40, CD86, CD80, and ICAM-1), as well as components of TNF and TLR signaling, are transcriptional targets of OSCAR in DCs. Our findings indicate the existence of a novel pathway by which extracellular matrix proteins locally drive maturation of DCs during inflammatory conditions, for example, within synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients, where collagens become exposed during tissue remodeling and are thus accessible for interaction with infiltrating precursors of DCs.

  19. Zerumbone suppresses phorbol ester-induced expression of multiple scavenger receptor genes in THP-1 human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Ai; Kaneko, Yuki; Murakami, Akira; Ohigashi, Hajime

    2007-04-01

    Unregulated uptake of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL) via macrophage scavenger receptors (SRs), such as lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), is a key event in atherosclerosis. In the present study, we used differentiated Caco-2 cells as a model of the human small intestine to evaluate the suppressive effects of 16 traditional food items selected from Okinawa on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced LOX-1 mRNA expression in THP-1 human monocyte-like cells. Three Zingiberaceae plants, Curcuma aromatica Salisbury, Curcuma longa L., and Zingiber zerumbet Smith, markedly suppressed that expression. When added to the apical sides of Caco-2 monolayers, zerumbone, a sesquiterpene from Z. zerumbet Smith, was found to permeate into the basolateral medium as an intact structure in a time-dependent manner. alpha-Humulene, a structural analog of zerumbone lacking the alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl group, did not suppress LOX-1 mRNA expression, indicating that its electrophilic moiety might play pivotal roles in its activities. Further, zerumbone attenuated the expression of SR-A, SR-PSOX, and CD36, but not that of CD68 or CLA-1, leading to a blockade of DiI-acLDL uptake, while it also inhibited the transcriptional activities of activator protein-1 and nuclear factor-kappaB. Together, our results indicate that zerumbone is a potential phytochemical for regulating atherosclerosis with reasonable action mechanisms.

  20. Suppression of NRF2-ARE activity sensitizes chemotherapeutic agent-induced cytotoxicity in human acute monocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Wang, Huihui; Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Dong, Jian; Zhou, Tong; Qu, Weidong; Peng, Shuangqing; Li, Jin; Carmichael, Paul L; Nelson, Bud; Clewell, Rebecca; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E; Pi, Jingbo

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), a master regulator of the antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent transcription, plays a pivotal role in chemical detoxification in normal and tumor cells. Consistent with previous findings that NRF2-ARE contributes to chemotherapeutic resistance of cancer cells, we found that stable knockdown of NRF2 by lentiviral shRNA in human acute monocytic leukemia (AML) THP-1 cells enhanced the cytotoxicity of several chemotherapeutic agents, including arsenic trioxide (As2O3), etoposide and doxorubicin. Using an ARE-luciferase reporter expressed in several human and mouse cells, we identified a set of compounds, including isonicotinic acid amides, isoniazid and ethionamide, that inhibited NRF2-ARE activity. Treatment of THP-1 cells with ethionamide, for instance, significantly reduced mRNA expression of multiple ARE-driven genes under either basal or As2O3-challenged conditions. As determined by cell viability and cell cycle, suppression of NRF2-ARE by ethionamide also significantly enhanced susceptibility of THP-1 and U937 cells to As2O3-induced cytotoxicity. In THP-1 cells, the sensitizing effect of ethionamide on As2O3-induced cytotoxicity was highly dependent on NRF2. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that ethionamide suppresses NRF2-ARE signaling and disrupts the transcriptional network of the antioxidant response in AML cells, leading to sensitization to chemotherapeutic agents.

  1. Differential Induction of Cytokines by Human Neonatal, Adult, and Elderly Monocyte/Macrophages Infected with Dengue Virus

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Nereida; Levy, Alegria; Añez, Germán; Marcucci, Rafael; Alvarez-Mon, Melchor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Immunosuppressive status against infections in monocytes from neonates and elderly subjects has been reported. The interaction between dengue virus and monocytes/macrophages plays an important role during dengue disease. The aim of this study was to determine the cytokine response of monocytes from individuals with different ages after infection with dengue virus. Monocyte/macrophage cultures from neonatal, adult, and elderly subjects (n=10 each group) were incubated with all four dengue virus types (DENV-1 to -4). After 1 and 3 days of culture, cytokine concentrations (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β) were determined in culture supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. Increased production of all studied cytokines was induced by the different viral types in monocyte/macrophage cultures regardless of their source. However, lower cytokine concentrations were found in neonatal and elderly monocytes. The relative monocyte/macrophage immunosuppressive status observed in neonates and the elderly could be relevant during dengue infection in those age groups and important in innate and adaptive immunity responses against this virus. PMID:24801946

  2. The IL-12 Response of Primary Human Dendritic Cells and Monocytes to Toxoplasma gondii Is Stimulated by Phagocytosis of Live Parasites Rather Than Host Cell Invasion.

    PubMed

    Tosh, Kevin W; Mittereder, Lara; Bonne-Annee, Sandra; Hieny, Sara; Nutman, Thomas B; Singer, Steven M; Sher, Alan; Jankovic, Dragana

    2016-01-01

    As a major natural host for Toxoplasma gondii, the mouse is widely used for the study of the immune response to this medically important protozoan parasite. However, murine innate recognition of toxoplasma depends on the interaction of parasite profilin with TLR11 and TLR12, two receptors that are functionally absent in humans. This raises the question of how human cells detect and respond to T. gondii. In this study, we show that primary monocytes and dendritic cells from peripheral blood of healthy donors produce IL-12 and other proinflammatory cytokines when exposed to toxoplasma tachyzoites. Cell fractionation studies determined that IL-12 and TNF-α secretion is limited to CD16(+) monocytes and the CD1c(+) subset of dendritic cells. In direct contrast to their murine counterparts, human myeloid cells fail to respond to soluble tachyzoite extracts and instead require contact with live parasites. Importantly, we found that tachyzoite phagocytosis, but not host cell invasion, is required for cytokine induction. Together these findings identify CD16(+) monocytes and CD1c(+) dendritic cells as the major myeloid subsets in human blood-producing innate cytokines in response to T. gondii and demonstrate an unappreciated requirement for phagocytosis of live parasites in that process. This form of pathogen sensing is distinct from that used by mice, possibly reflecting a direct involvement of rodents and not humans in the parasite life cycle.

  3. Role of proteinase-activated receptor-2 in anti-bacterial and immunomodulatory effects of interferon-γ on human neutrophils and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Shpacovitch, Victoria M; Feld, Micha; Holzinger, Dirk; Kido, Makiko; Hollenberg, Morley D; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Ludwig, Stephan; Roth, Johannes; Luger, Thomas; Steinhoff, Martin

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies show that proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)) contributes to the development of inflammatory responses. However, investigations into the precise role of PAR(2) activation in the anti-microbial defence of human leucocytes are just beginning. We therefore evaluated the contribution of PAR(2) to the anti-microbial response of isolated human innate immune cells. We found that PAR(2) agonist, acting alone, enhances phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus and killing of Escherichia coli by human leucocytes, and that the magnitude of the effect is similar to that of interferon-γ (IFN-γ). However, co-application of PAR(2) -cAP and IFN-γ did not enhance the phagocytic and bacteria-killing activity of leucocytes beyond that triggered by either agonist alone. On the other hand, IFN-γ enhances PAR(2) agonist-induced monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) secretion by human neutrophils and monocytes. Furthermore, phosphoinositide-3 kinase and janus kinase molecules are involved in the synergistic effect of PAR(2) agonist and IFN-γ on MCP-1 secretion. Our findings suggest a potentially protective role of PAR(2) agonists in the anti-microbial defence established by human monocytes and neutrophils.

  4. CD11c/CD18 Dominates Adhesion of Human Monocytes, Macrophages and Dendritic Cells over CD11b/CD18

    PubMed Central

    Ungai-Salánki, Rita; Orgován, Norbert; Szabó, Bálint; Horváth, Róbert; Erdei, Anna; Bajtay, Zsuzsa

    2016-01-01

    Complement receptors CR3 (CD11b/CD18) and CR4 (CD11c/CD18) belong to the family of beta2 integrins and are expressed mainly by myeloid cell types in humans. Previously, we proved that CR3 rather than CR4 plays a key role in phagocytosis. Here we analysed how CD11b and CD11c participate in cell adhesion to fibrinogen, a common ligand of CR3 and CR4, employing human monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) highly expressing CD11b as well as CD11c. We determined the exact numbers of CD11b and CD11c on these cell types by a bead-based technique, and found that the ratio of CD11b/CD11c is 1.2 for MDDCs, 1.7 for MDMs and 7.1 for monocytes, suggesting that the function of CD11c is preponderant in MDDCs and less pronounced in monocytes. Applying state-of-the-art biophysical techniques, we proved that cellular adherence to fibrinogen is dominated by CD11c. Furthermore, we found that blocking CD11b significantly enhances the attachment of MDDCs and MDMs to fibrinogen, demonstrating a competition between CD11b and CD11c for this ligand. On the basis of the cell surface receptor numbers and the measured adhesion strength we set up a model, which explains the different behavior of the three cell types. PMID:27658051

  5. Divergent dose-related effects of gamma-interferon therapy on in vitro antibody-dependent cellular and nonspecific cytotoxicity by human peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Weiner, L M; Steplewski, Z; Koprowski, H; Litwin, S; Comis, R L

    1988-02-15

    Twenty-seven patients with advanced gastrointestinal malignancies received recombinant gamma-interferon (rIFN-gamma, Biogen) prior to treatment with the murine monoclonal antibody 17-1A (Centocor), which mediates human monocyte antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). rIFN-gamma was used because it enhances human monocyte Fc receptor expression, nonspecific monocyte cytotoxicity (NSMC) and ADCC in vitro. The study was designed to identify a rIFN-gamma dose with acceptable toxicities which enhanced NSMC and ADCC. Patients received one course of therapy consisting of rIFN-gamma by 4-h infusions daily for 4 days at doses ranging from 0.001 to 80.0 X 10(6) units/m2/d, followed by 400 mg of 17-1A on day 5. The maximally tolerated dose of rIFN-gamma in this study was 40 X 10(6) units/d. Significant toxicity was seen at the high (greater than 1 X 10(6) units) but not low (less than or equal to 1 X 10(6) units) dose levels. Monocytes were isolated from patients' peripheral blood at baseline and on Days 3 and 5 for cytotoxicity studies which measured 111-In release from SW1116 cells which bear the target antigen of 17-1A. Low dose rIFN-gamma enhanced NSMC by Day 5 as well as did high dose therapy. ADCC enhancement was seen with low dose therapy (% specific lysis on Day 5 = 23.5 +/- 6.4 SEM versus baseline of 9.6 +/- 3.3, P = 0.03), but not with high dose rIFN-gamma treatment. Total (i.e., NSMC + ADCC) monocyte cytotoxicity was equivalent in the low and high dose treatment groups, although ADCC contributed more to total values in the low dose group. These findings were particularly striking if monocytes were exposed to additional rIFN-gamma in vitro prior to incubation with labeled target cells. We conclude that low dose rIFN-gamma therapy is at least equivalent, and possibly superior to high doses in this setting. Furthermore, low dose therapy, supplemented by ex vivo incubation of purified monocytes with rIFN-gamma, may be an optimal treatment strategy for this

  6. Subcellular proteomic analysis of host-pathogen interactions using human monocytes exposed to Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C G; Gonzales, A D; Choi, M W; Chromy, B A; Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S L

    2004-05-20

    Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, is of concern to human health both from an infectious disease and a civilian biodefense perspective. While Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis share more than 90% DNA homology, they have significantly different clinical manifestations. Plague is often fatal if untreated, yet Y. pseudotuberculosis causes severe intestinal distress and is rarely fatal. A better understanding of host response to these closely related pathogens may help explain the different mechanisms of virulence and pathogenesis that result in such different clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to characterize host protein expression changes in human monocyte-like U937 cells after exposure to Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis. In order to gain global proteomic coverage of host response, proteins from cytoplasmic, nuclear and membrane fractions of host cells were studied by 2-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) and relative protein expression differences were quantitated. Differentially expressed proteins, with at least 1.5 fold expression changes and p values of 0.01 or less, were identified by MALDI-MS or LC/MS/MS. With these criteria, differential expression was detected in 16 human proteins after Y. pestis exposure and 13 human proteins after Y. pseudotuberculosis exposure, of which only two of the differentially expressed proteins identified were shared between the two exposures. Proteins identified in this study are reported to be involved in a wide spectrum of cellular functions and host defense mechanisms including apoptosis, cytoskeletal rearrangement, protein synthesis and degradation, DNA replication and transcription, metabolism, protein folding, and cell signaling. Notably, the differential expression patterns observed can distinguish the two pathogen exposures from each other and from unexposed host cells. The functions of the differentially expressed proteins identified provide insight on the different

  7. Monocyte exosomes induce adhesion molecules and cytokines via activation of NF-κB in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Norina; Sun, Bing; Gupta, Archana; Rempel, Hans; Pulliam, Lynn

    2016-09-01

    HIV-infected individuals have activated monocytes with an IFNα phenotype and elevated levels of circulating LPS. These individuals also have a risk of premature cardiovascular disease. The effect of activated monocyte exosomes (Exos) on endothelial cells is unknown. To determine whether Exos from immune-activated monocytes could alter endothelial cell expression and contribute to monocyte/macrophage transmigration and adhesion, we isolated Exos from monocytes stimulated with IFNα, LPS, or both (I/L). We show that monocyte Exos contain different inflammatory microRNA cargo depending on stimulation. When LPS Exos or I/L Exos were added to HUVECs, we found a significant increase in adhesion molecule ICAM-1, chemokine ligand (CCL)-2, and cytokine IL-6 mRNAs and proteins compared with cells treated with IFNα Exos or Exos derived from unstimulated monocytes. Inhibition of transcription factor NF-κB, a common inflammatory cytokine pathway, prevented induction of CCL2, IL6, and ICAM1 Inhibition of TLR4 resulted in differential blockage of the targets. Our results demonstrate for the first time that primary human monocyte Exos enter endothelial cells and cause dysfunction via the TLR4 and NF-κB pathways, which may contribute to heart disease in HIV infection and other diseases involving chronic immune activation.-Tang, N., Sun, B., Gupta, A., Rempel, H., Pulliam, L. Monocyte exosomes induce adhesion molecules and cytokines via activation of NF-κB in endothelial cells. PMID:27226520

  8. In vitro impact of bisphenols BPA, BPF, BPAF and 17β-estradiol (E2) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cell generation, maturation and function.

    PubMed

    Švajger, Urban; Dolenc, Marija Sollner; Jeras, Matjaž

    2016-05-01

    Bisphenols (BPs) are widely spread pollutants that act as estrogen-like endocrine disruptors and are potentially affecting human health on a long run. We explored the effects of BPA, BPF and BPAF, on in vitro differentiation and maturation of MDDCs. Monocytes were treated with 17β-estradiol (E2) and each BP at the beginning of their differentiation into iMDDCs. We found that 10 and 50 μM of BPA and BPF, 10 and 30μM of BPAF and 10 and 50 nM of E2 did not affect cell viability. However, 50 μM of BPA and BPF, as well as 10 and 30 μM of BPAF, significantly decreased the endocytotic capacity of iMDDCs. Both, BPA (50 μM) and BPAF (30 μM) decreased the expression of CD1a and increased the amount of DC-SIGN molecules on iMDDCs. The E2 pre-treatment moderately decreased expression of CD80, CD86 and CD83 co-stimulatory molecules while increasing the numbers of HLA-DR on mMDDCs. Only BPAF significantly influenced the expression of CD80 and CD86 (both decreased), as well as CD83 and HLA-DR molecules (both increased) on mMDDCs. In addition, BPAF modulated DC maturation signaling pathways by lowering the phosphorylation of p65 NF-κB (nuclear factor-kappaB) and ERK (extracellular signal regulated kinase) 1/2 proteins. Consequently, the in vitro proliferation of allogeneic T cells, stimulated with differently pre-treated iMDDCs and mMDDCs, was significantly reduced only in case of BPAF.

  9. In vitro impact of bisphenols BPA, BPF, BPAF and 17β-estradiol (E2) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cell generation, maturation and function.

    PubMed

    Švajger, Urban; Dolenc, Marija Sollner; Jeras, Matjaž

    2016-05-01

    Bisphenols (BPs) are widely spread pollutants that act as estrogen-like endocrine disruptors and are potentially affecting human health on a long run. We explored the effects of BPA, BPF and BPAF, on in vitro differentiation and maturation of MDDCs. Monocytes were treated with 17β-estradiol (E2) and each BP at the beginning of their differentiation into iMDDCs. We found that 10 and 50 μM of BPA and BPF, 10 and 30μM of BPAF and 10 and 50 nM of E2 did not affect cell viability. However, 50 μM of BPA and BPF, as well as 10 and 30 μM of BPAF, significantly decreased the endocytotic capacity of iMDDCs. Both, BPA (50 μM) and BPAF (30 μM) decreased the expression of CD1a and increased the amount of DC-SIGN molecules on iMDDCs. The E2 pre-treatment moderately decreased expression of CD80, CD86 and CD83 co-stimulatory molecules while increasing the numbers of HLA-DR on mMDDCs. Only BPAF significantly influenced the expression of CD80 and CD86 (both decreased), as well as CD83 and HLA-DR molecules (both increased) on mMDDCs. In addition, BPAF modulated DC maturation signaling pathways by lowering the phosphorylation of p65 NF-κB (nuclear factor-kappaB) and ERK (extracellular signal regulated kinase) 1/2 proteins. Consequently, the in vitro proliferation of allogeneic T cells, stimulated with differently pre-treated iMDDCs and mMDDCs, was significantly reduced only in case of BPAF. PMID:26945833

  10. Serum-induced potentiation of tumor necrosis factor alpha production by human monocytes in response to staphylococcal peptidoglycan: involvement of different serum factors.

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, E; Rollof, J; Verhoef, J; Van Dijk, H; Fleer, A

    1994-01-01

    Peptidoglycan from a Staphylococcus epidermidis strain, isolated from a patient with septicemia, was preincubated with human serum. This mixture was then investigated for its potency to induce tumor necrosis factor (TNF) secretion by human blood monocytes. TNF was measured in the supernatants by using a bioassay and/or an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific for TNF alpha (TNF-alpha). Although earlier studies indicated that staphylococcal peptidoglycan alone is a relatively poor stimulator of TNF-alpha production, the present study shows that human serum highly potentiates peptidoglycan-induced TNF-alpha release by human monocytes. In the presence of serum and in the low-dose range, peptidoglycan was almost as potent as endotoxin. At high peptidoglycan concentrations, monocytes showed an extremely high TNF-alpha response, but again only in the presence of serum. At low peptidoglycan doses, the stimulatory effect of serum was abrogated by heat treatment or depleting serum of complement components C1 and C3/C4, which suggests a role for the classical complement pathway. At high doses of peptidoglycan, the serum stimulatory effect depended mainly on immunoglobulin G. PMID:8063400

  11. Synthesis of complement factor B by the human monocyte U-937 cell line. Augmentation by immunostimulatory agents

    SciTech Connect

    Minta, J.O.

    1988-09-01

    The human pre-monocytic cell line U-937 was shown to synthesize and to secrete increasing amounts of factor B in short term cultures in serum-free medium containing BSA. The kinetics of factor B production were higher on day 2 than on days 1 and 3. The production of factor B was reversibly inhibited by cycloheximide, indicating de novo synthesis. Metabolic labeling with (/sup 35/S)-methionine and SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that both intracellular and secreted factor B were single-chain proteins with similar m.w. (90,000), which co-migrated with purified plasma factor B. Incubation of U-937 cells with the immunostimulants PMA, LPS, IFN-gamma, and IL-1 resulted in a dose-dependent augmentation of factor B production. A 24-h exposure to IL-1 was shown to be required for maximal stimulation. A combination of suboptimal doses of LPS and IFN-gamma was shown to exert a synergistic effect on factor B production. The U-937 cell line is thus a valuable model for the study of the regulation of the factor B gene expression.

  12. Downregulation by cryptococcal polysaccharide of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta secretion from human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Vecchiarelli, A; Retini, C; Pietrella, D; Monari, C; Tascini, C; Beccari, T; Kozel, T R

    1995-01-01

    The regulation by Cryptococcus neoformans encapsulation of interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production by human monocytes was investigated. By using encapsulated and acapsular C. neoformans, we demonstrated that both strains induce cytokine production, although the acapsular strain was a better stimulator than the thinly encapsulated strain. The cytokine levels produced by cells stimulated by the two strains were lower and followed a different kinetic than those stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Purified capsular polysaccharide inhibits TNF-alpha secretion induced by LPS or acapsular C. neoformans. In contrast, no regulator effect on IL-1 beta was observed when LPS was used. The secretory response of these cytokines follows different pathways of macrophage activation; in fact, complete inhibition of TNF-alpha does not affect IL-1 beta production and vice versa. These data indicate that purified capsular polysaccharide of C. neoformans could contribute to the in vivo progress of cryptococcosis by suppressing cytokine production of macrophages and suggest that a therapeutic approach to address the suppressive effect of cryptococal polysaccharide could be devised. PMID:7622213

  13. Scavenger receptor-mediated recognition of maleyl bovine plasma albumin and the demaleylated protein in human monocyte macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Haberland, M E; Fogelman, A M

    1985-01-01

    Maleyl bovine plasma albumin competed on an equimolar basis with malondialdehyde low density lipoprotein (LDL) in suppressing the lysosomal hydrolysis of 125I-labeled malondialdehyde LDL mediated by the scavenger receptor of human monocyte macrophages. Maleyl bovine plasma albumin, in which 94% of the amino groups were modified, exhibited an anodic mobility in agarose electrophoresis 1.7 times that of the native protein. Incubation of maleyl bovine plasma albumin at pH 3.5 regenerated the free amino groups and restored the protein to the same electrophoretic mobility as native albumin. The demaleylated protein suppressed 75% of the hydrolysis of 125I-labeled malondialdehyde LDL and greater than 80% of 125I-labeled maleyl bovine plasma albumin. The ability of the demaleylated protein to compete was abolished after treatment with guanidine hydrochloride. Although ligands recognized by the scavenger receptor typically are anionic, we propose that addition of new negative charge achieved by maleylation, rather than directly forming the receptor binding site(s), induces conformational changes in albumin as a prerequisite to expression of the recognition domain(s). The altered conformation of the modified protein apparently persists after removal of the maleyl groups. We conclude that the primary sequence of albumin, rather than addition of new negative charge, provides the recognition determinant(s) essential for interaction of maleyl bovine plasma albumin with the scavenger receptor. PMID:3857610

  14. Fibrinogen up-regulates the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 in human saphenous vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Harley, S L; Powell, J T

    1999-01-01

    High concentrations of fibrinogen in plasma have been associated with an increased risk of saphenous vein graft pathology. We have investigated the ability of fibrinogen to up-regulate the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) in cultured human saphenous vein endothelial cells (HSVEC) isolated from saphenous vein. Increasing concentrations of fibrinogen (0-4 microM) stimulated a 20-fold increase in MCP-1 secretion within 4 h. Incubation of HSVEC with 2 microM fibrinogen for 4 h also caused a 2-fold increase in the MCP-1-to-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA ratio. The fibrinogen-mediated MCP-1 secretion fell to basal levels after preincubation of HSVEC with the complex of fibrinogen fragments D and E but remained unchanged after preincubation of HSVEC with either fibrinogen fragment E, s-ICAM-1 or the pentapeptide GRGDV. In contrast, fibrinogen fragment D acted as a potent inhibitor of fibrinogen-mediated MCP-1 secretion. Labelled fibrinogen fragment D bound to HSVEC with a K(d) of 6.5 microM. These findings indicate that fibrinogen, at physiological concentrations, uses an epitope on the fibrinogen D domain to bind to a receptor on HSVEC to up-regulate MCP-1 expression and secretion. This receptor seems to be distinct from intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and the integrins previously recognized as fibrinogen receptors. PMID:10417339

  15. Serum amyloid A induces contrary immune responses via formyl peptide receptor-like 1 in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Park, Kyoung Sun; Shin, Eun Ha; Jo, Seong Ho; Kim, Sang Doo; Jo, Eun Jin; Lee, Youl-Nam; Lee, Chuhee; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2006-07-01

    Although the level of serum amyloid A has been reported to be up-regulated during inflammatory response, the role of serum amyloid A on the regulation of inflammation and immune response has not been elucidated. We found that serum amyloid A stimulated the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-10, which are proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, respectively, in human monocytes. Low concentrations of serum amyloid A stimulated TNF-alpha production with maximal activity at 6 h after stimulation, whereas high concentrations of serum amyloid A stimulated IL-10 production with maximal activity at 12 h. The activations of the two cytokines by serum amyloid A occurred at both the transcription and translational levels. Signaling events induced by serum amyloid A included the activation of two mitogen-activated protein kinases (extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38 kinase), which were found to be required for TNF-alpha and IL-10 production, respectively. The stimulation of formyl peptide receptor-like-1-expressing RBL-2H3 cells, but not of vector-expressing RBL-2H3 cells with serum amyloid A, induced mitogen-activated protein kinases activation and the accumulation of the RNAs of these two cytokines. Together, our findings suggest that serum amyloid A modulates contrary immune responses via formyl peptide receptor-like 1, by inducing TNF-alpha or IL-10, and demonstrate that extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38 kinase play counteracting roles in this process.

  16. Human Monocyte Heat Shock Protein 72 Responses to Acute Hypoxic Exercise after 3 Days of Exercise Heat Acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ben J.; Mackenzie, Richard W. A.; Cox, Valerie; James, Rob S.; Thake, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether short-term heat acclimation (STHA) could confer increased cellular tolerance to acute hypoxic exercise in humans as determined via monocyte HSP72 (mHSP72) expression. Sixteen males were separated into two matched groups. The STHA group completed 3 days of exercise heat acclimation; 60 minutes cycling at 50% V˙O2peak in 40°C 20% relative humidity (RH). The control group (CON) completed 3 days of exercise training in 20°C, 40% RH. Each group completed a hypoxic stress test (HST) one week before and 48 hours following the final day of CON or STHA. Percentage changes in HSP72 concentrations were similar between STHA and CON following HST1 (P = 0.97). STHA induced an increase in basal HSP72 (P = 0.03) with no change observed in CON (P = 0.218). Basal mHSP72 remained elevated before HST2 for the STHA group (P < 0.05) and was unchanged from HST1 in CON (P > 0.05). Percent change in mHSP72 was lower after HST2 in STHA compared to CON (P = 0.02). The mHSP72 response to hypoxic exercise was attenuated following 3 days of heat acclimation. This is indicative of improved tolerance and ability to cope with the hypoxic insult, potentially mediated in part by increased basal reserves of HSP72. PMID:25874231

  17. (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shifts assignments for human endothelial monocyte-activating polypeptide EMAP II.

    PubMed

    Lozhko, Dmytro; Stanek, Jan; Kazimierczuk, Krzysztof; Zawadzka-Kazimierczuk, Anna; Kozminski, Wiktor; Zhukov, Igor; Kornelyuk, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Endothelial and monocyte-activating polypeptide II (EMAP II) is a cytokine that plays an important role in inflammation, apoptosis and angiogenesis processes in tumour tissues. Structurally, the EMAP II is a 169 amino acid residues long C-terminal domain (residues 147-312) of auxiliary tRNA binding protein p43. In spite of existence in pdb databank of two X-ray structures there are some important aspects of EMAP II cytokine function which are still not fully understood in detail. To obtain information about 3D structure and backbone dynamic processes in solution we perform structure evaluation of human EMAP II cytokine by NMR spectroscopy. The standard approach to sequence-specific backbone assignment using 3D NMR data sets was not successful in our studies and was supplemented by recently developed 4D NMR experiments with random sampling of evolution time space. Here we report the backbone and side chain (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shifts in solution for recombinant EMAP II cytokine together with secondary structure provided by TALOS + software.

  18. Effect of size of man-made and natural mineral fibers on chemiluminescent response in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Ohyama, M; Otake, T; Morinaga, K

    2001-01-01

    Fiber size is an important factor in the tumorigenicity of various mineral fibers and asbestos fibers in animal experiments. We examined the time course of the ability to induce lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) from human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to Japan Fibrous Material standard reference samples (glass wool, rock wool, micro glass fiber, two types of refractory ceramic fiber, refractory mullite fiber, potassium titanium whisker, silicon carbide whisker, titanium oxide whisker, and wollastonite). We determined how fiber length or width might modify the response of cells. We found that the patterns of time-dependent increase of CL (sigmoid type) were similar for each sample except wollastonite. We observed a strong correlation between geometric-mean length and ability to induce CL in seven samples > 6 microm in length over the time course (largest r(2) = 0.9760). Although we also observed a close positive correlation between geometric-mean width and the ability to induce CL in eight samples < 1.8 microm in width at 15 min (r(2) = 0.8760), a sample of 2.4 microm in width had a low ability to induce CL. Moreover, the relationship between width and the rate of increase in ability to induce CL had a negative correlation at 30-60 min (largest r(2) = 0.7473). Our findings suggest that the release of superoxide from macrophages occurs nonspecifically for various types of mineral fibers depending on fiber length. PMID:11675268

  19. Genomic Profiling of a Human Leukemic Monocytic Cell-Line (THP-1) Exposed to Alpha Particle Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    This study examined alpha (α-) particle radiation effects on global changes in gene expression in human leukemic monocytic cells (THP-1) for the purposes of mining for candidate biomarkers that could be used for the development of a biological assessment tool. THP-1 cells were exposed to α-particle radiation at a dose range of 0 to 1.5 Gy. Twenty-four hours and three days after exposure gene expression was monitored using microarray technology. A total of 16 genes were dose responsive and classified as early onset due to their expression 24 h after exposure. Forty-eight transcripts were dose responsive and classified as late-onset as they were expressed 72 h after exposure. Among these genes, 6 genes were time and dose responsive and validated further using alternate technology. These transcripts were upregulated and associated with biological processes related to immune function, organelle stability and cell signalling/communication. This panel of genes merits further validation to determine if they are strong candidate biomarkers indicative of α-particle exposure. PMID:23097634

  20. Retinoic acid regulates CD1d gene expression at the transcriptional level in human and rodent monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiuyan; Ross, A Catharine

    2007-04-01

    CD1d belongs to a group of nonclassical antigen-presenting molecules that present glycolipid antigens and thereby activate natural killer T (NKT) cells, a subset of bifunctional T cells. Little is known so far regarding the expression and physiologic regulation of CD1d. Here we show that all-trans-retinoic acid (RA), the active metabolite of vitamin A, rapidly (1 hr after treatment) increases CD1d mRNA in human and rodent monocytic cells at a physiologic dose (10 nM). The induction is RA specific and RA receptor (RAR) dependent-RA and an RARalpha agonist, Am580, both had a pronounced positive effect, whereas the addition of RARalpha antagonist partially blocked the increase in CD1d mRNA induced by RA and Am580. The induction was also completely blocked by the presence of actinomycin D. A putative RA-response element was identified in the distal 5' flanking region of the CD1d gene, which binds nuclear retinoid receptors and was responsive to RA in both gel mobility shift assay and transient transfection assay in THP-1 cells. These results further confirmed the transcriptional regulation of RA in CD1d gene expression. Moreover, RA significantly increased alpha-galactosylceramide-induced spleen cell proliferation. These studies together provide evidence for a previously unknown mechanism of CD1d gene expression regulation by RA and suggest that RA is a significant modulator of NKT cell activation.

  1. Proinflammatory Response of Human Osteoblastic Cell Lines and Osteoblast-Monocyte Interaction upon Infection with Brucella spp.▿

    PubMed Central

    Delpino, M. Victoria; Fossati, Carlos A.; Baldi, Pablo C.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of Brucella spp. to infect human osteoblasts and the cytokine response of these cells to infection were investigated in vitro. Brucella abortus, B. suis, B. melitensis, and B. canis were able to infect the SaOS-2 and MG-63 osteoblastic cell lines, and the first three species exhibited intracellular replication. B. abortus internalization was not significantly affected by pretreatment of cells with cytochalasin D but was inhibited up to 92% by colchicine. A virB10 mutant of B. abortus could infect but not replicate within osteoblasts, suggesting a role for the type IV secretion system in intracellular survival. Infected osteoblasts produced low levels of chemokines (interleukin-8 [IL-8] and macrophage chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1]) and did not produce proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]). However, osteoblasts stimulated with culture supernatants from Brucella-infected human monocytes (THP-1 cell line) produced chemokines at levels 12-fold (MCP-1) to 17-fold (IL-8) higher than those of infected osteoblasts and also produced IL-6. In the inverse experiment, culture supernatants from Brucella-infected osteoblasts induced the production of IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α by THP-1 cells. The induction of TNF-α and IL-1β was largely due to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor produced by infected osteoblasts, as demonstrated by inhibition with a specific neutralizing antibody. This study shows that Brucella can invade and replicate within human osteoblastic cell lines, which can directly and indirectly mount a proinflammatory response. Both phenomena may have a role in the chronic inflammation and bone and joint destruction observed in osteoarticular brucellosis. PMID:19103778

  2. Circulating CD14brightCD16+ ‘Intermediate’ Monocytes Exhibit Enhanced Parasite Pattern Recognition in Human Helminth Infection

    PubMed Central

    Meurs, Lynn; Mbow, Moustapha; Dièye, Tandakha Ndiaye; Mboup, Souleymane; Polman, Katja; Mountford, Adrian P.

    2014-01-01

    Circulating monocyte sub-sets have recently emerged as mediators of divergent immune functions during infectious disease but their role in helminth infection has not been investigated. In this study we evaluated whether ‘classical’ (CD14brightCD16−), ‘intermediate’ (CD14brightCD16+), and ‘non-classical’ (CD14dimCD16+) monocyte sub-sets from peripheral blood mononuclear cells varied in both abundance and ability to bind antigenic material amongst individuals living in a region of Northern Senegal which is co-endemic for Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium. Monocyte recognition of excretory/secretory (E/S) products released by skin-invasive cercariae, or eggs, of S. mansoni was assessed by flow cytometry and compared between S. mansoni mono-infected, S. mansoni and S. haematobium co-infected, and uninfected participants. Each of the three monocyte sub-sets in the different infection groups bound schistosome E/S material. However, ‘intermediate’ CD14brightCD16+ monocytes had a significantly enhanced ability to bind cercarial and egg E/S. Moreover, this elevation of ligand binding was particularly evident in co-infected participants. This is the first demonstration of modulated parasite pattern recognition in CD14brightCD16+ intermediate monocytes during helminth infection, which may have functional consequences for the ability of infected individuals to respond immunologically to infection. PMID:24762736

  3. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 alpha stimulate late shedding of p75 TNF receptors but not p55 TNF receptors from human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Joyce, D A; Steer, J H

    1995-11-01

    Soluble receptors for TNF (sTNF-R) are present at elevated concentrations in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. They are presumably released by cells of the synovial membrane, including the monocyte-derived synovial macrophages. Cytokines from the synovium, including IL-1 and TNF-alpha, may stimulate release. We therefore examined the release of sTNF-R from monocytes exposed to IL-1 and TNF-alpha. Elutriator-purified human blood monocytes spontaneously released both the p75 and the p55 sTNF-R (1011 +/- 199 and 177 +/- 20 pg/10(6) cells, respectively, mean +/- SEM) during 48 h of in vitro culture. TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha induced time- and concentration-dependent increases in the release of sTNF-R75 from monocytes, but neither had a measurable effect on the release of sTNF-R55. The release of sTNF-R75 was inhibited by cycloheximide. Neither lymphocytes nor polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) released measurable sTNF-R spontaneously or in response to stimulation with IL-1 alpha, but TNF-alpha stimulated the release of small amounts of sTNF-R75 by PMN. The timing, cycloheximide sensitivity, and selectivity of stimulated release of TNF-R75 by monocytes are consistent with previous observations on other cell types of late (8-20 h) increased synthesis and turnover of cell surface TNF-R75, but not TNF-R55, after stimulation with TNF-alpha or IL-1. These observations help to explain why elevated levels of sTNF-R in synovial fluid coexist with enhanced expression of cell surface TNF-R on synovial macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:8590306

  4. Dipterinyl Calcium Pentahydrate Inhibits Intracellular Mycobacterial Growth in Human Monocytes via the C-C Chemokine MIP-1β and Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Sakala, Isaac G.; Eickhoff, Christopher S.; Blazevic, Azra; Moheno, Phillip; Silver, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the top three leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, complicated by the emergence of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and high rates of HIV coinfection. It is important to develop new antimycobacterial drugs and immunomodulatory therapeutics and compounds that enhance antituberculous immunity. Dipterinyl calcium pentahydrate (DCP), a calcium-complexed pterin compound, has previously been shown to inhibit human breast cancer cells and hepatitis B virus (HBV). DCP inhibitory effects were attributed to induction of apoptosis and/or increased production of interleukin 12 (IL-12) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). In this study, we tested the ability of DCP to mediate inhibition of intracellular mycobacteria within human monocytes. DCP treatment of infected monocytes resulted in a significant reduction in viability of intracellular but not extracellular Mycobacterium bovis BCG. The antimicrobial activity of DCP was comparable to that of pyrazinamide (PZA), one of the first-line antituberculosis drugs currently used. DCP potentiated monocyte antimycobacterial activity by induction of the cysteine-cysteine (C-C) chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP-1β) and inducible nitric oxide synthase 2. Addition of human anti-MIP-1β neutralizing antibody or a specific inhibitor of the l-arginase-nitric oxide pathway (NG-monomethyl l-arginine [l-NMMA] monoacetate) reversed the inhibitory effects of DCP on intracellular mycobacterial growth. These findings indicate that DCP induced mycobacterial killing via MIP-1β- and nitric oxide-dependent effects. Hence, DCP acts as an immunoregulatory compound enhancing the antimycobacterial activity of human monocytes. PMID:23509148

  5. Acanthamoeba castellanii Genotype T4 Stimulates the Production of Interleukin-10 as Well as Proinflammatory Cytokines in THP-1 Cells, Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, and Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mattana, Antonella; Sanna, Manuela; Cano, Antonella; Delogu, Giuseppe; Erre, Giuseppe; Roberts, Craig W; Henriquez, Fiona L; Fiori, Pier Luigi; Cappuccinelli, Piero

    2016-10-01

    Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba can cause severe and chronic infections in humans, mainly localized in immune privileged sites, such as the brain and the eye. Monocytes/macrophages are thought to be involved in Acanthamoeba infections, but little is known about how these facultative parasites influence their functions. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of Acanthamoeba on human monocytes/macrophages during the early phase of infection. Here, THP-1 cells, primary human monocytes isolated from peripheral blood, and human monocyte-derived macrophages were either coincubated with trophozoites of a clinical isolate of Acanthamoeba (genotype T4) or stimulated with amoeba-derived cell-free conditioned medium. Production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and IL-12), anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10), and chemokine (IL-8) was evaluated at specific hours poststimulation (ranging from 1.5 h to 23 h). We showed that both Acanthamoeba trophozoites and soluble amoebic products induce an early anti-inflammatory monocyte-macrophage phenotype, characterized by significant production of IL-10; furthermore, challenge with either trophozoites or their soluble metabolites stimulate both proinflammatory cytokines and chemokine production, suggesting that this protozoan infection results from the early induction of coexisting, opposed immune responses. Results reported in this paper confirm that the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by monocytes and macrophages can play a role in the development of the inflammatory response during Acanthamoeba infections. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that Acanthamoeba stimulates IL-10 production in human innate immune cells, which might both promote the immune evasion of Acanthamoeba and limit the induced inflammatory response. PMID:27481240

  6. Acanthamoeba castellanii Genotype T4 Stimulates the Production of Interleukin-10 as Well as Proinflammatory Cytokines in THP-1 Cells, Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, and Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Manuela; Cano, Antonella; Delogu, Giuseppe; Erre, Giuseppe; Roberts, Craig W.; Henriquez, Fiona L.; Fiori, Pier Luigi; Cappuccinelli, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba can cause severe and chronic infections in humans, mainly localized in immune privileged sites, such as the brain and the eye. Monocytes/macrophages are thought to be involved in Acanthamoeba infections, but little is known about how these facultative parasites influence their functions. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of Acanthamoeba on human monocytes/macrophages during the early phase of infection. Here, THP-1 cells, primary human monocytes isolated from peripheral blood, and human monocyte-derived macrophages were either coincubated with trophozoites of a clinical isolate of Acanthamoeba (genotype T4) or stimulated with amoeba-derived cell-free conditioned medium. Production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and IL-12), anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10), and chemokine (IL-8) was evaluated at specific hours poststimulation (ranging from 1.5 h to 23 h). We showed that both Acanthamoeba trophozoites and soluble amoebic products induce an early anti-inflammatory monocyte-macrophage phenotype, characterized by significant production of IL-10; furthermore, challenge with either trophozoites or their soluble metabolites stimulate both proinflammatory cytokines and chemokine production, suggesting that this protozoan infection results from the early induction of coexisting, opposed immune responses. Results reported in this paper confirm that the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by monocytes and macrophages can play a role in the development of the inflammatory response during Acanthamoeba infections. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that Acanthamoeba stimulates IL-10 production in human innate immune cells, which might both promote the immune evasion of Acanthamoeba and limit the induced inflammatory response. PMID:27481240

  7. Regulation of LPS-induced tissue factor expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells by curcumin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tissue factor (TF) is a transmembrane receptor, which initiates thrombotic episodes associated with various diseases. In addition to membrane-bound TF, we have discovered an alternatively spliced form of human TF mRNA. It was later confirmed that this form of TF mRNA expresses a soluble protein circ...

  8. Sesquiterpene lactones induce distinct forms of cell death that modulate human monocyte-derived macrophage responses.

    PubMed

    López-Antón, Nancy; Hermann, Corinna; Murillo, Renato; Merfort, Irmgard; Wanner, Gerhard; Vollmar, Angelika M; Dirsch, Verena M

    2007-01-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SQTLs) are shown to possess anti-inflammatory as well as cytotoxic activity. No study, however, links both activities. We, therefore, hypothesized that SQTL-treated, dying cells might induce an anti-inflammatory response in cocultured THP-1 macrophages. Here we show that SQTLs bearing either an alpha,beta-unsaturated cyclopentenone or an alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone induce different forms of cell death. Whereas the cyclopentenone SQTL induced typical apoptosis, the alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone SQTLs-induced cell death lacked partly classical signs of apoptosis, such as DNA fragmentation. All SQTLs, however, activated caspases and the nuclear morphology of cell death was dependent on caspase activation. Most interestingly, alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone SQTLs induced a more pronounced phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure than the cyclopentenone SQTL. Especially, 7-hydroxycostunolide (HC), with an alpha-methylene-gamma-lactone substituted with a hydroxyl group, showed a striking fast and pronounced PS translocation. This result was in agreement with a strong activation of phagocytosis in cocultured THP-1 macrophages. Interestingly, HC-treated Jurkat cells led to an early (3.5 h) but transient increase in TNF-alpha levels in macrophage coculture. Release of TGF-beta remained unaffected after 18 h. We propose that this type of SQTL may influence local inflammation by transiently activating the immune system and help to clear cells by inducing a form of cell death that promotes phagocytosis.

  9. Hyperspectral Imaging Using Intracellular Spies: Quantitative Real-Time Measurement of Intracellular Parameters In Vivo during Interaction of the Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus fumigatus with Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mohebbi, Sara; Erfurth, Florian; Hennersdorf, Philipp; Brakhage, Axel A.; Saluz, Hans Peter

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a technique based on the combination of classical spectroscopy and conventional digital image processing. It is also well suited for the biological assays and quantitative real-time analysis since it provides spectral and spatial data of samples. The method grants detailed information about a sample by recording the entire spectrum in each pixel of the whole image. We applied HSI to quantify the constituent pH variation in a single infected apoptotic monocyte as a model system. Previously, we showed that the human-pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus conidia interfere with the acidification of phagolysosomes. Here, we extended this finding to monocytes and gained a more detailed analysis of this process. Our data indicate that melanised A. fumigatus conidia have the ability to interfere with apoptosis in human monocytes as they enable the apoptotic cell to recover from mitochondrial acidification and to continue with the cell cycle. We also showed that this ability of A. fumigatus is dependent on the presence of melanin, since a non-pigmented mutant did not stop the progression of apoptosis and consequently, the cell did not recover from the acidic pH. By conducting the current research based on the HSI, we could measure the intracellular pH in an apoptotic infected human monocyte and show the pattern of pH variation during 35 h of measurements. As a conclusion, we showed the importance of melanin for determining the fate of intracellular pH in a single apoptotic cell. PMID:27727286

  10. Mechanisms of modulation of cytokine release by human cord blood monocytes exposed to high concentrations of caffeine

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-Valdez, Raul; Ahlawat, Rajni; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Gauda, Estelle B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Serum caffeine concentrations >20µg/mL (100 µM) in infants treated for apnea of prematurity increases TNF-α and decreases IL-10, change that perhaps is linked to co-morbidities. We hypothesize that this pro-inflammatory cytokine profile may be linked to differential binding of caffeine to adenosine receptor subtypes (AR), inhibition of phosphodiesterases (PDEs), and modulation of toll-like receptors (TLR). Methods LPS-activated cord blood monocytes (CBM) from 19 infants were exposed to caffeine (0 to 200 µM) with or without previous exposure to A1R, A3R, or PDE IV antagonists to determine changes in dose-response curves. Cytokines levels (ELISA), intracellular cAMP accumulation (EIA) and TLR gene expression (real time qRT PCR) were measured. Results Caffeine at ≤100µM decreased TNF-α levels (~25%, p=0.01) and cAMP. All caffeine concentrations decreased IL-10 levels (17 to 35%, p<0.01). A1R, A3R and PDE blockades decreased TNF-α (31%, 21%, and 88%, p≤0.01), but not IL-10. Caffeine further decreased TNF-α following A3R and PDE blockades. Caffeine concentrations directly correlated to TLR4 gene expression (r=0.84; p<0.001). Conclusion Neither A3R, nor PDE blockades are involved in caffeine’s modulation of cytokine release by CBM at any concentration. Besides A1R blockade, caffeine’s up-regulation of TLR4 may promote inflammation at high concentrations. PMID:26982450

  11. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF{kappa}B in LPS-induced CD40 expression on human monocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weidong | Alexis, Neil E. |; Chen Xian |; Bromberg, Philip A. |; Peden, David B. ||

    2008-04-15

    CD40 is a costimulatory molecule linking innate and adaptive immune responses to bacterial stimuli, as well as a critical regulator of functions of other costimulatory molecules. The mechanisms regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced CD40 expression have not been adequately characterized in human monocytic cells. In this study we used a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, to investigate the possible mechanisms of CD40 expression following LPS exposure. Exposure to LPS resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase in CD40 expression. Further studies using immunoblotting and pharmacological inhibitors revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and NF{kappa}B were activated by LPS exposure and involved in LPS-induced CD40 expression. Activation of MAPKs was not responsible for LPS-induced NF{kappa}B activation. TLR4 was expressed on THP-1 cells and pretreatment of cells with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) neutralizing antibody (HTA125) significantly blunted LPS-induced MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation and ensuing CD40 expression. Additional studies with murine macrophages expressing wild type and mutated TLR4 showed that TLR4 was implicated in LPS-induced ERK and NF{kappa}B activation, and CD40 expression. Moreover, blockage of MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression. In summary, LPS-induced CD40 expression in monocytic cells involves MAPKs and NF{kappa}B.

  12. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases and NFkappaB in LPS-induced CD40 expression on human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weidong; Alexis, Neil E; Chen, Xian; Bromberg, Philip A; Peden, David B

    2008-04-15

    CD40 is a costimulatory molecule linking innate and adaptive immune responses to bacterial stimuli, as well as a critical regulator of functions of other costimulatory molecules. The mechanisms regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced CD40 expression have not been adequately characterized in human monocytic cells. In this study we used a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, to investigate the possible mechanisms of CD40 expression following LPS exposure. Exposure to LPS resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase in CD40 expression. Further studies using immunoblotting and pharmacological inhibitors revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and NFkappaB were activated by LPS exposure and involved in LPS-induced CD40 expression. Activation of MAPKs was not responsible for LPS-induced NFkappaB activation. TLR4 was expressed on THP-1 cells and pretreatment of cells with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) neutralizing antibody (HTA125) significantly blunted LPS-induced MAPK and NFkappaB activation and ensuing CD40 expression. Additional studies with murine macrophages expressing wild type and mutated TLR4 showed that TLR4 was implicated in LPS-induced ERK and NFkappaB activation, and CD40 expression. Moreover, blockage of MAPK and NFkappaB activation inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression. In summary, LPS-induced CD40 expression in monocytic cells involves MAPKs and NFkappaB.

  13. A hot water extract of Curcuma longa inhibits adhesion molecule protein expression and monocyte adhesion to TNF-α-stimulated human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Kengo; Muroyama, Koutarou; Yamamoto, Norio; Murosaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    The recruitment of arterial leukocytes to endothelial cells is an important step in the progression of various inflammatory diseases. Therefore, its modulation is thought to be a prospective target for the prevention or treatment of such diseases. Adhesion molecules on endothelial cells are induced by proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and contribute to the recruitment of leukocytes. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hot water extract of Curcuma longa (WEC) on the protein expression of adhesion molecules, monocyte adhesion induced by TNF-α in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). Treatment of HUVECs with WEC significantly suppressed both TNF-α-induced protein expression of adhesion molecules and monocyte adhesion. WEC also suppressed phosphorylation and degradation of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, alpha (IκBα) induced by TNF-α in HUVECs, suggesting that WEC inhibits the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis alters the differentiation of monocytes into macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Castaño, Diana; Barrera, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows that in vitro infection of human monocytes by Mycobacterium tuberculosis affected monocyte to macrophage differentiation. Despite the low bacterial load used, M. tuberculosis-infected monocytes had fewer granules, displayed a reduced number of cytoplasmic projections and decreased HLA class II, CD68, CD86 and CD36 expression compared to cells differentiated in the absence of mycobacteria. Infected cells produced less IL-12p70, TNF-α, IL-10, IL-6 and high IL-1β in response to lipopolysaccharide and purified protein M. tuberculosis-derived. Reduced T-cell proliferative response and IFN-γ secretion in response to phytohemagglutinin and culture filtrate proteins from M. tuberculosis was also observed in infected cells when compared to non-infected ones. The ability of monocytes differentiated in the presence of M. tuberculosis to control mycobacterial growth in response to IFN-γ stimulation was attenuated, as determined by bacterial plate count; however, they had a similar ability to uptake fluorescent M. tuberculosis and latex beads compared to non-infected cells. Recombinant IL-1β partially altered monocyte differentiation into macrophages; however, treating M. tuberculosis-infected monocytes with IL-1RA did not reverse the effects of infection during differentiation. The results indicated that M. tuberculosis infection altered monocyte differentiation into macrophages and affected their ability to respond to innate stimuli and activate T-cells.

  15. Use of the human monocytic leukemia THP-1 cell line and co-incubation with microsomes to identify and differentiate hapten and prohapten sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Chipinda, Itai; Ruwona, Tinashe B; Templeton, Steven P; Siegel, Paul D

    2011-02-27

    Consumer and medical products can contain leachable chemical allergens which can cause skin sensitization. Recent efforts have been directed at the development of non-animal based tests such as in vitro cell activation assays for the identification of skin sensitizers. Prohapten identification by in vitro assays is still problematic due to the lack of prohapten bioactivation. The present study evaluated the effect of hapten and prohapten exposure on cell surface markers expression (CD86, CD54 and CD40) in the human monocytic leukemia, THP-1, cell line. Upregulation of activation and costimulatory markers are key events in the allergic sensitization process and have been reported to serve as indicators of skin sensitization. Cells were exposed to the prohaptens benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), carvone oxime (COx), cinnamic alcohol (CA) and isoeugenol (IEG) at concentrations ranging from 1 to 10 μM for 24 and 48 h. The direct-binding haptens dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), benzoquinone (BQ), hydroxylethyl acrylate (HEA) and benzylbromide (BB) were used as positive controls. Cells were also exposed to the irritants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sulfanilamide (SFA). Bioactivation of prohaptens was achieved by adding aroclor-induced rat liver microsomes (S9) to the cell cultures. Consistent upregulation of surface expressions of CD86, CD54 (ICAM-1) and CD40 was observed in THP-1 cells treated with direct-acting haptens (±S9) or prohapten (+S9). Upregulation of these markers was not observed after exposure to skin irritants or prohaptens in the absence of exogenously added S9. In conclusion, modification of in vitro cell culture assays to include co-incubation with microsomes enhances identification of prohaptens and allows them to be clearly distinguished from direct-binding haptens. PMID:21163322

  16. Hydrogen sulfide induces the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines in human monocyte cell line U937 via the ERK-NF-kappaB pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Liang; Ang, Abel Damien; Zhang, Huili; Moore, Philip K; Bhatia, Madhav

    2007-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is now considered an endogenous, gaseous mediator, which has been demonstrated to be involved in many inflammatory states. However, the mechanism of its proinflammatory function remains unknown. In the present study, we used IFN-gamma-primed human monocytic cell line U937 to investigate the effects of H2S in vitro on monocytes. We found that treatment with the H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide, led to significant increases in the mRNA expression and protein production of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6 in U937 cells. H2S-triggered monocyte activation was confirmed further by the up-regulation of CD11b expression on the cell surface. We also observed that H2S could induce a rapid degradation of IkappaBalpha and subsequent activation of NF-kappaB p65, and this effect was attenuated by Bay 11-7082, a specific inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with Bay 11-7082 substantially inhibited the secretion of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6 induced by H2S. We also found that H2S stimulated the phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/2, but not of p38 MAPK and JNK, and pretreatment with PD98059, a selective MEK1 antagonist, could inhibit H2S-induced NF-kappaB activation markedly. Together, our findings suggest for the first time that H2S stimulates the activation of human monocytes with the generation of proinflammatory cytokines, and this response is, at least partially, through the ERK-NF-kappaB signaling pathway.

  17. Effects of titanium(iv) ions on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Erwin Ph; Mhawi, Amir; Clode, Peta; Saunders, Martin; Filgueira, Luis

    2009-03-01

    Orthopaedic metal implants composed of titanium are routinely used in bone fracture repair and for joint replacement therapies. A considerable fraction of implant recipients are unable to benefit due to implant failure resulting from aseptic loosening, while others may experience cutaneous sensitivity to titanium after implantation. An adaptive immune reactivity towards titanium ions, originating from the biocorrosion of the implants, could play a role. As an initiator of the adaptive immune response, dendritic cells (DC) were studied for uptake and characteristics after titanium exposure. Energy filtered transmission electron microscopy showed uptake of titanium(iv) (Ti(iv)) ions by DCs in vitro and co-localisation with phosphorus-rich cell structures of the DC membranes (phospholipids), cytoplasm (ribosomes and phosphorylated proteins) and the nucleus (DNA). DC maturation and function were investigated by measuring cell surface marker expression by flow cytometry. After exposure, DCs showed a decrease in MHC class II (HLA-DR), co-stimulatory molecules (CD40, CD80 & CD86) and chemokine receptors (CCR) 6 and CCR7 but an increase in CCR4 after Ti(iv) treatment. However, Ti(iv) treated DCs had an increased stimulatory capacity towards allogenic lymphocytes. A Ti(iv) concentration dependant increase of IL-12p70 was observed amidst decrease of the other measured cytokines (TGF-β1 and TGF-β2). Hence, Ti(iv) alters DC properties, resulting in an enhanced T lymphocyte reactivity and deviation towards a Th1 type immune response. This effect may be responsible for the inflammatory side effects of titanium implants seen in patients.

  18. NADPH Oxidase/ROS-Dependent VCAM-1 Induction on TNF-α-Challenged Human Cardiac Fibroblasts Enhances Monocyte Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Yang, Chien-Chung; Wang, Chen-Yu; Tseng, Hui-Ching; Pan, Chih-Shuo; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2016-01-01

    The inflammation-dependent adhesion molecule expressions are characterized in cardiovascular diseases and myocardial tissue infiltrations. Several pro-inflammatory cytokines are elevated in the acute myocardial injury and infarction. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is raised in the injury tissues and inflammatory regions and involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac injury, inflammation, and apoptosis. In fibroblasts, TNF-α-triggered expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 aggravated the heart inflammation. However, the mechanisms underlying TNF-α-mediated VCAM-1 expression in cardiac fibroblasts remain unclear. Here, the primary cultured human cardiac fibroblasts (HCFs) were used to investigate the effects of TNF-α on VCAM-1 expression. The molecular evidence, including protein, mRNA, and promoter analyses, indicated that TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 gene expression is mediated through the TNFR-dependent manner. Activation of TNF-α/TNFR system triggered PKCα-dependent NADPH oxidase (Nox)/reactive oxygen species (ROS) signal linking to MAPK cascades, and then led to activation of the transcription factor, AP-1. Moreover, the results of mRNA and promoter assay demonstrated that c-Jun/AP-1 phosphorylated by TNF-α turns on VCAM-1 gene expression. Subsequently, up-regulated VCAM-1 on the cell surface of TNF-α-challenged HCFs increased the number of monocytes adhering to these cells. These results indicated that in HCFs, activation of AP-1 by PKCα-dependent Nox/ROS/MAPKs cascades is required for TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression. To clarify the mechanisms of TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression in HCFs may provide therapeutic strategies for heart injury and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26858641

  19. Epigenome-wide effects of vitamin D and their impact on the transcriptome of human monocytes involve CTCF

    PubMed Central

    Seuter, Sabine; Neme, Antonio; Carlberg, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The physiological functions of vitamin D are mediated by its metabolite 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) activating the transcription factor vitamin D receptor (VDR). In THP-1 human monocytes we demonstrated epigenome-wide effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 at 8979 loci with significantly modulated chromatin accessibility. Maximal chromatin opening was observed after 24 h, while after 48 h most sites closed again. The chromatin-organizing protein CTCF bound to 14% of the 1,25(OH)2D3-sensitive chromatin regions. Interestingly, 1,25(OH)2D3 affected the chromatin association of CTCF providing an additional mechanism for the epigenome-wide effects of the VDR ligand. The 1,25(OH)2D3-modulated transcriptome of THP-1 cells comprised 1284 genes, 77.5% of which responded only 24 h after stimulation. During the 1,25(OH)2D3 stimulation time course the proportion of down-regulated genes increased from 0% to 44.9% and the top-ranking physiological function of the respective genes shifted from anti-microbial response to connective tissue disorders. The integration of epigenomic and transcriptomic data identified 165 physiologically important 1,25(OH)2D3 target genes, including HTT and NOD2, whose expression can be predicted primarily from epigenomic data of their genomic loci. Taken together, a large number of 1,25(OH)2D3-triggered epigenome-wide events precede and accompany the transcriptional activation of target genes of the nuclear hormone. PMID:26715761

  20. In Vitro Evidence for Immune-Modulatory Properties of Non-Digestible Oligosaccharides: Direct Effect on Human Monocyte Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    van Bergenhenegouwen, Jeroen; Knippels, Leon M. J.; Garssen, Johan; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Infant formulas containing non-digestible oligosaccharides (NDO) similar to the composition in breast milk or a combination of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and NDO have been shown to harbor preventive effects towards immune-regulatory disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the immune-modulatory potential of non-digestible short chain galacto- and long chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scGOS/lcFOS) mimicking the natural distribution of oligosaccharides in human breast milk in presence or absence of certain LAB strains in human monocyte derived dendritic cells (MoDC). Immature human MoDC prepared from peripheral blood of healthy non-atopic volunteers were screened in vitro after stimulation with specific scGOS/lcFOS in presence or absence of LAB. IL-10 and IL-12p70 release was analyzed after 24 hours in cell-free supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A luminex-based assay was conducted to assess further cytokine and chemokine release by MoDC. To investigate the resulting T cell response, stimulated MoDC were co-incubated with naïve T cells in allogeneic stimulation assays and intracellular Foxp3 expression, as well as immune-suppressive capacity was determined. Oligosaccharides did not induce relevant amounts of IL-12p70 production, but did promote IL-10 release by MoDC. Furthermore, scGOS/lcFOS mixtures exerted a significant enhancing effect on LAB induced IL-10 secretion by MoDC while no increase in IL-12p70 production was observed. Blocking toll like receptor (TLR)4 abrogated the increase in IL-10 in both the direct stimulation and the LAB stimulation of MoDC, suggesting that scGOS/lcFOS act via TLR4. Finally, scGOS/lcFOS-treated MoDC were shown to upregulate the number of functional suppressive Foxp3 positive T cells following allogeneic stimulation. Our results indicate anti-inflammatory and direct, microbiota independent, immune-modulatory properties of scGOS/lcFOS mixtures on human MoDC suggesting a possible induction of

  1. Prognostic Implication of the Absolute Lymphocyte to Absolute Monocyte Count Ratio in Patients With Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Treated With Doxorubicin, Bleomycin, Vinblastine, and Dacarbazine or Equivalent Regimens.

    PubMed

    Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros P; Dimopoulou, Maria N; Angelopoulou, Maria K; Petevi, Kyriaki; Pangalis, Gerassimos A; Moschogiannis, Maria; Dimou, Maria; Boutsikas, George; Kanellopoulos, Alexandros; Gainaru, Gabriella; Plata, Eleni; Flevari, Pagona; Koutsi, Katerina; Papageorgiou, Loula; Telonis, Vassilios; Tsaftaridis, Panayiotis; Sachanas, Sotirios; Yiakoumis, Xanthoula; Tsirkinidis, Pantelis; Viniou, Nora-Athina; Siakantaris, Marina P; Variami, Eleni; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Meletis, John; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Konstantopoulos, Kostas

    2016-03-01

    Low absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) to absolute monocyte count (AMC) ratio (ALC/AMC) is an independent prognostic factor in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), but different cutoffs (1.1, 1.5, and 2.9) have been applied. We aimed to validate the prognostic significance of ALC/AMC in 537 homogenously treated (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine or equivalents ± radiotherapy) classical HL patients at various cutoffs. The median ALC/AMC was 2.24 (0.44-20.50). The median AMC was 0.653 × 10(9)/L (0.050-2.070). Lower ALC/AMC was associated with established markers of adverse prognosis. In total, 477 (89%), 418 (78%), and 189 (35%) patients had an ALC/AMC ratio of ≥1.1, ≥1.5, and ≥2.9; respectively; 20% had monocytosis (≥0.9 × 10(9)/L). Ten-year time to progression (TTP) was 77% versus 55% for patients with ALC/AMC ≥1.1 and <1.1 (p = .0002), 76% versus 68% for ALC/AMC ≥1.5 and <1.5 (p = .049), 77% versus 73% for ALC/AMC ≥2.9 and <2.9 (p = .35), and 79% versus 70% for ALC/AMC ≥2.24 and <2.24 (p = .08), respectively. In stages ΙΑ/ΙΙΑ and in patients ≥60 years old, ALC/AMC had no significant effect on TTP. In advanced stages, ALC/AMC was significant only at the cutoff of 1.1 (10-year TTP 67% vs. 48%; p = .016). In younger, advanced-stage patients, the differences were more pronounced. In multivariate analysis of TTP, ALC/AMC < 1.1 (p = .007) and stage IV (p < .001) were independent prognostic factors; ALC/AMC was independent of International Prognostic Score in another model. ALC/AMC was more predictive of overall survival than TTP. At the cutoff of 1.1, ALC/AMC had independent prognostic value in multivariate analysis. However, the prognostically inferior group comprised only 11% of patients. Further research is needed prior to the widespread use of this promising marker. PMID:26921291

  2. Prognostic Implication of the Absolute Lymphocyte to Absolute Monocyte Count Ratio in Patients With Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Treated With Doxorubicin, Bleomycin, Vinblastine, and Dacarbazine or Equivalent Regimens.

    PubMed

    Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros P; Dimopoulou, Maria N; Angelopoulou, Maria K; Petevi, Kyriaki; Pangalis, Gerassimos A; Moschogiannis, Maria; Dimou, Maria; Boutsikas, George; Kanellopoulos, Alexandros; Gainaru, Gabriella; Plata, Eleni; Flevari, Pagona; Koutsi, Katerina; Papageorgiou, Loula; Telonis, Vassilios; Tsaftaridis, Panayiotis; Sachanas, Sotirios; Yiakoumis, Xanthoula; Tsirkinidis, Pantelis; Viniou, Nora-Athina; Siakantaris, Marina P; Variami, Eleni; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Meletis, John; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Konstantopoulos, Kostas

    2016-03-01

    Low absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) to absolute monocyte count (AMC) ratio (ALC/AMC) is an independent prognostic factor in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), but different cutoffs (1.1, 1.5, and 2.9) have been applied. We aimed to validate the prognostic significance of ALC/AMC in 537 homogenously treated (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine or equivalents ± radiotherapy) classical HL patients at various cutoffs. The median ALC/AMC was 2.24 (0.44-20.50). The median AMC was 0.653 × 10(9)/L (0.050-2.070). Lower ALC/AMC was associated with established markers of adverse prognosis. In total, 477 (89%), 418 (78%), and 189 (35%) patients had an ALC/AMC ratio of ≥1.1, ≥1.5, and ≥2.9; respectively; 20% had monocytosis (≥0.9 × 10(9)/L). Ten-year time to progression (TTP) was 77% versus 55% for patients with ALC/AMC ≥1.1 and <1.1 (p = .0002), 76% versus 68% for ALC/AMC ≥1.5 and <1.5 (p = .049), 77% versus 73% for ALC/AMC ≥2.9 and <2.9 (p = .35), and 79% versus 70% for ALC/AMC ≥2.24 and <2.24 (p = .08), respectively. In stages ΙΑ/ΙΙΑ and in patients ≥60 years old, ALC/AMC had no significant effect on TTP. In advanced stages, ALC/AMC was significant only at the cutoff of 1.1 (10-year TTP 67% vs. 48%; p = .016). In younger, advanced-stage patients, the differences were more pronounced. In multivariate analysis of TTP, ALC/AMC < 1.1 (p = .007) and stage IV (p < .001) were independent prognostic factors; ALC/AMC was independent of International Prognostic Score in another model. ALC/AMC was more predictive of overall survival than TTP. At the cutoff of 1.1, ALC/AMC had independent prognostic value in multivariate analysis. However, the prognostically inferior group comprised only 11% of patients. Further research is needed prior to the widespread use of this promising marker.

  3. Differential regulation of toll-like receptor-2, toll-like receptor-4, CD16 and human leucocyte antigen-DR on peripheral blood monocytes during mild and severe dengue fever

    PubMed Central

    Azeredo, Elzinandes L; Neves-Souza, Patrícia C; Alvarenga, Allan R; Reis, Sônia R N I; Torrentes-Carvalho, Amanda; Zagne, Sonia-Maris O; Nogueira, Rita M R; Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia M; Kubelka, Claire F

    2010-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF), a public health problem in tropical countries, may present severe clinical manifestations as result of increased vascular permeability and coagulation disorders. Dengue virus (DENV), detected in peripheral monocytes during acute disease and in in vitro infection, leads to cytokine production, indicating that virus–target cell interactions are relevant to pathogenesis. Here we investigated the in vitro and in vivo activation of human peripheral monocytes after DENV infection. The numbers of CD14+ monocytes expressing the adhesion molecule intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) were significantly increased during acute DF. A reduced number of CD14+ human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR+ monocytes was observed in patients with severe dengue when compared to those with mild dengue and controls; CD14+ monocytes expressing toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 were increased in peripheral blood from dengue patients with mild disease, but in vitro DENV-2 infection up-regulated only TLR2. Increased numbers of CD14+ CD16+ activated monocytes were found after in vitro and in vivo DENV-2 infection. The CD14high CD16+ monocyte subset was significantly expanded in mild dengue, but not in severe dengue. Increased plasma levels of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-18 in dengue patients were inversely associated with CD14high CD16+, indicating that these cells might be involved in controlling exacerbated inflammatory responses, probably by IL-10 production. We showed here, for the first time, phenotypic changes on peripheral monocytes that were characteristic of cell activation. A sequential monocyte-activation model is proposed in which DENV infection triggers TLR2/4 expression and inflammatory cytokine production, leading eventually to haemorrhagic manifestations, thrombocytopenia, coagulation disorders, plasmatic leakage and shock development, but may also produce factors that act in order to control both intense

  4. Differential regulation of toll-like receptor-2, toll-like receptor-4, CD16 and human leucocyte antigen-DR on peripheral blood monocytes during mild and severe dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Azeredo, Elzinandes L; Neves-Souza, Patrícia C; Alvarenga, Allan R; Reis, Sônia R N I; Torrentes-Carvalho, Amanda; Zagne, Sonia-Maris O; Nogueira, Rita M R; Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia M; Kubelka, Claire F

    2010-06-01

    Dengue fever (DF), a public health problem in tropical countries, may present severe clinical manifestations as result of increased vascular permeability and coagulation disorders. Dengue virus (DENV), detected in peripheral monocytes during acute disease and in in vitro infection, leads to cytokine production, indicating that virus-target cell interactions are relevant to pathogenesis. Here we investigated the in vitro and in vivo activation of human peripheral monocytes after DENV infection. The numbers of CD14(+) monocytes expressing the adhesion molecule intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) were significantly increased during acute DF. A reduced number of CD14(+) human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR(+) monocytes was observed in patients with severe dengue when compared to those with mild dengue and controls; CD14(+) monocytes expressing toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 were increased in peripheral blood from dengue patients with mild disease, but in vitro DENV-2 infection up-regulated only TLR2. Increased numbers of CD14(+) CD16(+) activated monocytes were found after in vitro and in vivo DENV-2 infection. The CD14(high) CD16(+) monocyte subset was significantly expanded in mild dengue, but not in severe dengue. Increased plasma levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin (IL)-18 in dengue patients were inversely associated with CD14(high) CD16(+), indicating that these cells might be involved in controlling exacerbated inflammatory responses, probably by IL-10 production. We showed here, for the first time, phenotypic changes on peripheral monocytes that were characteristic of cell activation. A sequential monocyte-activation model is proposed in which DENV infection triggers TLR2/4 expression and inflammatory cytokine production, leading eventually to haemorrhagic manifestations, thrombocytopenia, coagulation disorders, plasmatic leakage and shock development, but may also produce factors that act in

  5. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Cellular Entry and Exit in the T Lymphocytic and Monocytic Compartments: Mechanisms and Target Opportunities During Viral Disease.

    PubMed

    Aiamkitsumrit, Benjamas; Sullivan, Neil T; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Pirrone, Vanessa; Wigdahl, Brian

    2015-01-01

    During the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection, a number of cell types throughout the body are infected, with the majority of cells representing CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. Both types of cells express, to varying levels, the primary receptor molecule, CD4, as well as one or both of the coreceptors, CXCR4 and CCR5. Viral tropism is determined by both the coreceptor utilized for entry and the cell type infected. Although a single virus may have the capacity to infect both a CD4+ T cell and a cell of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, the mechanisms involved in both the entry of the virus into the cell and the viral egress from the cell during budding and viral release differ depending on the cell type. These host-virus interactions and processes can result in the differential targeting of different cell types by selected viral quasispecies and the overall amount of infectious virus released into the extracellular environment or by direct cell-to-cell spread of viral infectivity. This review covers the major steps of virus entry and egress with emphasis on the parts of the replication process that lead to differences in how the virus enters, replicates, and buds from different cellular compartments, such as CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. PMID:26111588

  6. Patterns of in vitro cell-death, metaloproteinase-9 and pro-inflammatory cytokines in human monocytes induced by the BCG vaccine, Moreau strain.

    PubMed

    Simas, C J A; Silva, D P H; Ponte, C G G; Castello-Branco, L R R; Antas, P R Z

    2011-09-01

    Mononuclear cells have been implicated in the primary inflammatory response against mycobacteria. Yet, little is known about the interaction of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) with human monocytes. Here, we investigated the potential of BCG Moreau strain to induce in vitro specific cell-death utilizing a flow cytometry approach that revealed an increase in apoptosis events in BCG-stimulated monocytes from healthy adults. We also detected a concomitant release of interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), but not metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. In addition, annexin V-propidium iodide double staining demonstrated an enhancement of monocytes necrosis, but not apoptosis, following BCG Moreau strain stimulation of umbilical vein cells from naïve, neonate. This pattern was paralleled by different pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, as well as MMP-9 induction when compared to the adults. Our findings support the hypothesis that BCG induces distinct cell-death patterns during the maturation of the immune system and that this pattern might set the stage for a subsequent antimycobacterial immune response that might have profound effects during vaccination.

  7. Evaluation of suppressive and pro-resolving effects of EPA and DHA in human primary monocytes and T-helper cells[S

    PubMed Central

    Jaudszus, Anke; Gruen, Michael; Watzl, Bernhard; Ness, Christina; Roth, Alexander; Lochner, Alfred; Barz, Dagmar; Gabriel, Holger; Rothe, Michael; Jahreis, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Despite their beneficial anti-inflammatory properties, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) may increase the infection risk at high doses, likely by generating an immune-depressed state. To assess the contribution of different immune cell populations to the immunomodulatory fatty acid effect, we comparatively investigated several aspects of inflammation in human T-helper (Th) cells and monocytes. Both fatty acids, but DHA to a lesser extent compared with EPA, selectively and dose-dependently reduced the percentage of cytokine-expressing Th cells in a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ-dependent fashion, whereas the expression of the cell surface marker CD69 was unaltered on activated T cells. In monocytes, both EPA and DHA increased interleukin (IL)-10 without affecting tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-6. Cellular incorporation of EPA and DHA occurred mainly at the expense of arachidonic acid. Concomitantly, thromboxane B (TXB)2 and leukotriene B (LTB)4 in supernatants decreased, while levels of TXB3 and LTB5 increased. This increase was independent of activation and in accordance with cyclooxygenase expression patterns in monocytes. Moreover, EPA and DHA gave rise to a variety of mono- and trihydroxy derivatives of highly anti-inflammatory potential, such as resolvins and their precursors. Our results suggest that EPA and DHA do not generally affect immune cell functions in an inhibitory manner but rather promote pro-resolving responses. PMID:23349208

  8. Fate of gamma-interferon-activated killer blood monocytes adoptively transferred into the abdominal cavity of patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, H.C.; Keenan, A.M.; Woodhouse, C.; Ottow, R.T.; Miller, P.; Steller, E.P.; Foon, K.A.; Abrams, P.G.; Beman, J.; Larson, S.M.

    1987-11-15

    Five patients with colorectal cancer widely metastatic to peritoneal surfaces have been treated i.p. with infusions of autologous blood monocytes made cytotoxic by in vitro incubation with human gamma-interferon. The monocytes were purified by a combination of cytapheresis and counter-current centrifugal elutriation procedures; each week approximately 350 million activated monocytes were given to patients as adoptive immunotherapy by a single i.p. instillation. On the eighth cycle of treatment the trafficking of i.p. infused blood monocytes was studied in two patients by prelabeling the cells with /sup 111/In. These activated cells became distributed widely within the peritoneal cavity. Two and 5 days after infusion their position within the peritoneum had not changed. When peritoneal specimens were obtained 36 h after /sup 111/In-labeled monocyte infusion, labeled monocytes were demonstrated to be associated with the serosal surfaces by autoradiographic analysis. Scintiscanning structures outside the abdominal cavity revealed that /sup 111/In-labeled monocytes infused i.p. did not traffic to other organs during the 5 days of the study. We conclude that i.p. adoptive transfer of autologous killer blood monocytes is an effective way of delivering these cytotoxic cells to sites of tumor burden on peritoneal surfaces in these cancer patients.

  9. A unique anti-CD115 monoclonal antibody which inhibits osteolysis and skews human monocyte differentiation from M2-polarized macrophages toward dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Haegel, Hélène; Thioudellet, Christine; Hallet, Rémy; Geist, Michel; Menguy, Thierry; Le Pogam, Fabrice; Marchand, Jean-Baptiste; Toh, Myew-Ling; Duong, Vanessa; Calcei, Alexandre; Settelen, Nathalie; Preville, Xavier; Hennequi, Marie; Grellier, Benoit; Ancian, Philippe; Rissanen, Jukka; Clayette, Pascal; Guillen, Christine; Rooke, Ronald; Bonnefoy, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Cancer progression has been associated with the presence of tumor-associated M2-macrophages (M2-TAMs) able to inhibit anti-tumor immune responses. It is also often associated with metastasis-induced bone destruction mediated by osteoclasts. Both cell types are controlled by the CD115 (CSF-1R)/colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1, M-CSF) pathway, making CD115 a promising target for cancer therapy. Anti-human CD115 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that inhibit the receptor function have been generated in a number of laboratories. These mAbs compete with CSF-1 binding to CD115, dramatically affecting monocyte survival and preventing osteoclast and macrophage differentiation, but they also block CD115/CSF-1 internalization and degradation, which could lead to potent rebound CSF-1 effects in patients after mAb treatment has ended. We thus generated and selected a non-ligand competitive anti-CD115 mAb that exerts only partial inhibitory effects on CD115 signaling without blocking the internalization or the degradation of the CD115/CSF-1 complex. This mAb, H27K15, affects monocyte survival only minimally, but downregulates osteoclast differentiation and activity. Importantly, it inhibits monocyte differentiation to CD163(+)CD64(+) M2-polarized suppressor macrophages, skewing their differentiation toward CD14(-)CD1a(+) dendritic cells (DCs). In line with this observation, H27K15 also drastically inhibits monocyte chemotactic protein-1 secretion and reduces interleukin-6 production; these two molecules are known to be involved in M2-macrophage recruitment. Thus, the non-depleting mAb H27K15 is a promising anti-tumor candidate, able to inhibit osteoclast differentiation, likely decreasing metastasis-induced osteolysis, and able to prevent M2 polarization of TAMs while inducing DCs, hence contributing to the creation of more efficient anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:23924795

  10. Degree of oxidation of low density lipoprotein affects expression of CD36 and PPARgamma, but not cytokine production, by human monocyte-macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Ian C; Symes, Carole E; Renaudin, Pauline; Nova, Esther; Mesa, Maria Dolores; Boukouvalas, George; Leake, David S; Yaqoob, Parveen

    2003-06-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) exhibits many atherogenic effects, including the promotion of monocyte recruitment to the arterial endothelium and the induction of scavenger receptor expression. However, while atherosclerosis involves chronic inflammation within the arterial intima, it is unclear whether oxLDL alone provides a direct inflammatory stimulus for monocyte-macrophages. Furthermore, oxLDL is not a single, well-defined entity, but has structural and physical properties which vary according to the degree of oxidation. We tested the hypothesis that the biological effects of oxLDL will vary according to its degree of oxidation and that some species of oxLDL will have atherogenic properties, while other species may be responsible for its inflammatory activity. The atherogenic and inflammatory properties of LDL oxidized to predetermined degrees (mild, moderate and extensive oxidation) were investigated in a single system using human monocyte-derived macrophages. Expression of CD36 mRNA was up-regulated by mildly- and moderately-oxLDL, but not highly-oxLDL. The expression of the transcription factor, proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma), which has been proposed to positively regulate the expression of CD36, was increased to the greatest degree by highly-oxLDL. However, the DNA binding activity of PPARgamma was increased only by mildly- and moderately-oxLDL. None of the oxLDL species appeared to be pro-inflammatory towards monocytes, either directly or indirectly through mediators derived from lymphocytes, regardless of the degree of oxidation.

  11. A unique anti-CD115 monoclonal antibody which inhibits osteolysis and skews human monocyte differentiation from M2-polarized macrophages toward dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Haegel, Hélène; Thioudellet, Christine; Hallet, Rémy; Geist, Michel; Menguy, Thierry; Le Pogam, Fabrice; Marchand, Jean-Baptiste; Toh, Myew-Ling; Duong, Vanessa; Calcei, Alexandre; Settelen, Nathalie; Preville, Xavier; Hennequi, Marie; Grellier, Benoit; Ancian, Philippe; Rissanen, Jukka; Clayette, Pascal; Guillen, Christine; Rooke, Ronald; Bonnefoy, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Cancer progression has been associated with the presence of tumor-associated M2-macrophages (M2-TAMs) able to inhibit anti-tumor immune responses. It is also often associated with metastasis-induced bone destruction mediated by osteoclasts. Both cell types are controlled by the CD115 (CSF-1R)/colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1, M-CSF) pathway, making CD115 a promising target for cancer therapy. Anti-human CD115 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that inhibit the receptor function have been generated in a number of laboratories. These mAbs compete with CSF-1 binding to CD115, dramatically affecting monocyte survival and preventing osteoclast and macrophage differentiation, but they also block CD115/CSF-1 internalization and degradation, which could lead to potent rebound CSF-1 effects in patients after mAb treatment has ended. We thus generated and selected a non-ligand competitive anti-CD115 mAb that exerts only partial inhibitory effects on CD115 signaling without blocking the internalization or the degradation of the CD115/CSF-1 complex. This mAb, H27K15, affects monocyte survival only minimally, but downregulates osteoclast differentiation and activity. Importantly, it inhibits monocyte differentiation to CD163(+)CD64(+) M2-polarized suppressor macrophages, skewing their differentiation toward CD14(-)CD1a(+) dendritic cells (DCs). In line with this observation, H27K15 also drastically inhibits monocyte chemotactic protein-1 secretion and reduces interleukin-6 production; these two molecules are known to be involved in M2-macrophage recruitment. Thus, the non-depleting mAb H27K15 is a promising anti-tumor candidate, able to inhibit osteoclast differentiation, likely decreasing metastasis-induced osteolysis, and able to prevent M2 polarization of TAMs while inducing DCs, hence contributing to the creation of more efficient anti-tumor immune responses.

  12. Plasmodium falciparum Infection of Human Volunteers Activates Monocytes and CD16+ Dendritic Cells and Induces Upregulation of CD16 and CD1c Expression

    PubMed Central

    Teirlinck, Anne C.; Roestenberg, Meta; Bijker, Else M.; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are key players in the induction and regulation of immune responses. In Plasmodium falciparum malaria, determination of which cells and pathways are activated in the network of APCs remains elusive. We therefore investigated the effects of a controlled human malaria infection in healthy, malaria-naive volunteers on the subset composition and activation status of dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytes. While subsets of monocytes increased in frequency during blood-stage infection, DC frequencies remained largely stable. Activation markers classically associated with peptide presentation to and priming of αβT cells, HLA-DR and CD86, were upregulated in monocytes and inflammatory CD16 myeloid DCs (mDCs) but not in the classical CD1c, BDCA2, or BDCA3 DC subsets. In addition, these activated APC subsets showed increased expression of CD1c, which is involved in glycolipid antigen presentation, and of the immune complex binding Fcγ receptor III (CD16). Our data show that P. falciparum asexual parasites do not activate classical DC subsets but instead activate mainly monocytes and inflammatory CD16 mDCs and appear to prime alternative activation pathways via induction of CD16 and/or CD1c. Changes in expression of these surface molecules might increase antigen capture and enhance glycolipid antigen presentation in addition to the classical major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) peptide presentation and thereby contribute to the initiation of T-cell responses in malaria. (This study has been registered at Clinicaltrials.gov under registration no. NCT01086917.) PMID:26169270

  13. Periodontitis‐associated pathogens P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans activate human CD14+ monocytes leading to enhanced Th17/IL‐17 responses

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wan‐Chien; van Asten, Saskia D.; Burns, Lachrissa A.; Evans, Hayley G.; Walter, Gina J.; Hashim, Ahmed; Hughes, Francis J.

    2016-01-01

    The Th17/IL‐17 pathway is implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis (PD), however the mechanisms are not fully understood. We investigated the mechanism by which the periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) promote a Th17/IL‐17 response in vitro, and studied IL‐17+ CD4+ T‐cell frequencies in gingival tissue and peripheral blood from patients with PD versus periodontally healthy controls. Addition of Pg or Aa to monocyte/CD4+ T‐cell co‐cultures promoted a Th17/IL‐17 response in vitro in a dose‐ and time‐dependent manner. Pg or Aa stimulation of monocytes resulted in increased CD40, CD54 and HLA‐DR expression, and enhanced TNF‐α, IL‐1β, IL‐6 and IL‐23 production. Mechanistically, IL‐17 production in Pg‐stimulated co‐cultures was partially dependent on IL‐1β, IL‐23 and TLR2/TLR4 signalling. Increased frequencies of IL‐17+ cells were observed in gingival tissue from patients with PD compared to healthy subjects. No differences were observed in IL‐17+ CD4+ T‐cell frequencies in peripheral blood. In vitro, Pg induced significantly higher IL‐17 production in anti‐CD3 mAb‐stimulated monocyte/CD4+ T‐cell co‐cultures from patients with PD compared to healthy controls. Our data suggest that periodontal pathogens can activate monocytes, resulting in increased IL‐17 production by human CD4+ T cells, a process that appears enhanced in patients with PD. PMID:27334899

  14. The presence and possible role of monocyte infiltration in human chronic proliferative glomerulonephritides. Light microscopic, immunofluorescence, and histochemical correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Monga, G.; Mazzucco, G.; di Belgiojoso, G. B.; Busnach, G.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-seven cases of chronic glomerulonephritis with proliferative pattern (11 cases of primary mixed IgG-IgM cryoglobulinemia, 8 cases of SLE, and 8 cases of primary membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis) were studied with particular attention to the glomerular monocyte infiltration. The latter, detected by means of nonspecific esterase technique, was compared with the presence of hyaline thrombi and intraluminal immunoglobulin lumps. Monocyte infiltration was heavy and almost constant in cryoglobulinemia, less important in SLE, and practically absent in membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. By means of immunofluorescence technique on paraffin embedded material, monocytes are shown to contain IgG and IgM, suggesting a phagocytic activity on some types of immune complexes. Since monocytes are migrant cells, and therefore easily removable from the glomeruli by the bloodstream, it seems that they could be responsible for regression of glomerular hypercellularity as reported in some patients with cryoglobulinemia showing clinical improvement. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:371410

  15. Production of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-1 inhibitor by human monocytes exposed to dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Chang, D M; Shaio, M F

    1994-10-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever-dengue shock syndrome, the most severe manifestation of an acute dengue virus (DV) infection, is endemic in Southeast Asia. Antibody-dependent enhancement of DV growth in mononuclear phagocytes is thought to be the mechanism whereby preexisting dengue antibodies confer excess risk for this outcome. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) may play an important role in the pathogenetic mechanisms that cause dengue fever and shock. It was shown that both IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha are secreted from monocytes within 4 h after DV infection. However, there was no increase in IL-1 secretion by virus-stimulated monocytes from dengue fever patients compared with healthy controls. Significant amounts of IL-1 were secreted by DV-infected monocytes in the presence of aggregated immunoglobulin or immune complexes. In addition, a new 600-kDa IL-1 inhibitor from the supernatants of DV-infected monocytes was identified. This inhibitor may cause immunosuppression and influence the process of DV infection.

  16. Integrated MicroRNA-mRNA-Analysis of Human Monocyte Derived Macrophages upon Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sharbati, Jutta; Lewin, Astrid; Kutz-Lohroff, Barbara; Kamal, Elisabeth; Einspanier, Ralf; Sharbati, Soroush

    2011-01-01

    Background Many efforts have been made to understand basal mechanisms of mycobacterial infections. Macrophages are the first line of host immune defence to encounter and eradicate mycobacteria. Pathogenic species have evolved different mechanisms to evade host response, e.g. by influencing macrophage apoptotic pathways. However, the underlying molecular regulation is not fully understood. A new layer of eukaryotic regulation of gene expression is constituted by microRNAs. Therefore, we present a comprehensive study for identification of these key regulators and their targets in the context of host macrophage response to mycobacterial infections. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed microRNA as well as mRNA expression analysis of human monocyte derived macrophages infected with several Mycobacterium avium hominissuis strains by means of microarrays as well as quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). The data revealed the ability of all strains to inhibit apoptosis by transcriptional regulation of BCL2 family members. Accordingly, at 48 h after infection macrophages infected with all M. avium strains showed significantly decreased caspase 3 and 7 activities compared to the controls. Expression of let-7e, miR-29a and miR-886-5p were increased in response to mycobacterial infection at 48 h. The integrated analysis of microRNA and mRNA expression as well as target prediction pointed out regulative networks identifying caspase 3 and 7 as potential targets of let-7e and miR-29a, respectively. Consecutive reporter assays verified the regulation of caspase 3 and 7 by these microRNAs. Conclusions/Significance We show for the first time that mycobacterial infection of human macrophages causes a specific microRNA response. We furthermore outlined a regulatory network of potential interactions between microRNAs and mRNAs. This study provides a theoretical concept for unveiling how distinct mycobacteria could manipulate host cell response. In addition, functional

  17. Effects of Cigarette Smoke Condensate on Oxidative Stress, Apoptotic Cell Death, and HIV Replication in Human Monocytic Cells.

    PubMed

    Rao, Pss; Ande, Anusha; Sinha, Namita; Kumar, Anil; Kumar, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    While cigarette smoking is prevalent amongst HIV-infected patients, the effects of cigarette smoke constituents in cells of myeloid lineage are poorly known. Recently, we have shown that nicotine induces oxidative stress through cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2A6-mediated pathway in U937 monocytic cells. The present study was designed to examine the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC), which contains majority of tobacco constituents, on oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, expression of CYP1A1, and/or HIV-1 replication in HIV-infected (U1) and uninfected U937 cells. The effects of CSC on induction of CYP1 enzymes in HIV-infected primary macrophages were also analyzed. The results showed that the CSC-mediated increase in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in U937 cells is dose- and time-dependent. Moreover, CSC treatment was found to induce cytotoxicity in U937 cells through the apoptotic pathway via activation of caspase-3. Importantly, pretreatment with vitamin C blocked the CSC-mediated production of ROS and induction of caspase-3 activity. In U1 cells, acute treatment of CSC increased ROS production at 6H (>2-fold) and both ROS (>2 fold) and HIV-1 replication (>3-fold) after chronic treatment. The CSC mediated effects were associated with robust induction in the expression of CYP1A1 mRNA upon acute CSC treatment of U937 and U1 cells (>20-fold), and upon chronic CSC treatment to U1 cells (>30-fold). In addition, the CYP1A1 induction in U937 cells was mediated through the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor pathway. Lastly, CSC, which is known to increase viral replication in primary macrophages, was also found to induce CYP1 enzymes in HIV-infected primary macrophages. While mRNA levels of both CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 were elevated following CSC treatment, only CYP1B1 protein levels were increased in HIV-infected primary macrophages. In conclusion, these results suggest a possible association between oxidative stress, CYP1 expression, and viral replication in CSC-treated

  18. Effects of Cigarette Smoke Condensate on Oxidative Stress, Apoptotic Cell Death, and HIV Replication in Human Monocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Namita; Kumar, Anil; Kumar, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    While cigarette smoking is prevalent amongst HIV-infected patients, the effects of cigarette smoke constituents in cells of myeloid lineage are poorly known. Recently, we have shown that nicotine induces oxidative stress through cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2A6-mediated pathway in U937 monocytic cells. The present study was designed to examine the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC), which contains majority of tobacco constituents, on oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, expression of CYP1A1, and/or HIV-1 replication in HIV-infected (U1) and uninfected U937 cells. The effects of CSC on induction of CYP1 enzymes in HIV-infected primary macrophages were also analyzed. The results showed that the CSC-mediated increase in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in U937 cells is dose- and time-dependent. Moreover, CSC treatment was found to induce cytotoxicity in U937 cells through the apoptotic pathway via activation of caspase-3. Importantly, pretreatment with vitamin C blocked the CSC-mediated production of ROS and induction of caspase-3 activity. In U1 cells, acute treatment of CSC increased ROS production at 6H (>2-fold) and both ROS (>2 fold) and HIV-1 replication (>3-fold) after chronic treatment. The CSC mediated effects were associated with robust induction in the expression of CYP1A1 mRNA upon acute CSC treatment of U937 and U1 cells (>20-fold), and upon chronic CSC treatment to U1 cells (>30-fold). In addition, the CYP1A1 induction in U937 cells was mediated through the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor pathway. Lastly, CSC, which is known to increase viral replication in primary macrophages, was also found to induce CYP1 enzymes in HIV-infected primary macrophages. While mRNA levels of both CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 were elevated following CSC treatment, only CYP1B1 protein levels were increased in HIV-infected primary macrophages. In conclusion, these results suggest a possible association between oxidative stress, CYP1 expression, and viral replication in CSC-treated

  19. Inflammatory dysregulation of blood monocytes in Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Grozdanov, Veselin; Bliederhaeuser, Corinna; Ruf, Wolfgang P; Roth, Valerie; Fundel-Clemens, Kathrin; Zondler, Lisa; Brenner, David; Martin-Villalba, Ana; Hengerer, Bastian; Kassubek, Jan; Ludolph, Albert C; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Danzer, Karin M

    2014-11-01

    Despite extensive effort on studying inflammatory processes in the CNS of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, implications of peripheral monocytes are still poorly understood. Here, we set out to obtain a comprehensive picture of circulating myeloid cells in PD patients. We applied a human primary monocyte culture system and flow cytometry-based techniques to determine the state of monocytes from PD patients during disease. We found that the classical monocytes are enriched in the blood of PD patients along with an increase in the monocyte-recruiting chemoattractant protein CCL2. Moreover, we found that monocytes from PD patients display a pathological hyperactivity in response to LPS stimulation that correlates with disease severity. Inflammatory pre-conditioning was also reflected on the transcriptome in PD monocytes using next-generation sequencing. Further, we identified the CD95/CD95L as a key regulator for the PD-associated alteration of circulating monocytes. Pharmacological neutralization of CD95L reverses the dysregulation of monocytic subpopulations in favor of non-classical monocytes. Our results suggest that PD monocytes are in an inflammatory predisposition responding with hyperactivation to a "second hit". These results provide the first direct evidence that circulating human peripheral blood monocytes are altered in terms of their function and composition in PD patients. This study provides insights into monocyte biology in PD and establishes a basis for future studies on peripheral inflammation. PMID:25284487

  20. Human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 p30, but not p12/p8, counteracts toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and TLR4 signaling in human monocytes and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Fenizia, Claudio; Fiocchi, Martina; Jones, Kathryn; Parks, Robyn Washington; Ceribelli, Michele; Chevalier, Sebastien A; Edwards, Dustin; Ruscetti, Francis; Pise-Masison, Cynthia A; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2014-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTLV-1) p30 protein, essential for virus infectivity in vivo, is required for efficient infection of human dendritic cells (DCs) but not B and T cells in vitro. We used a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, and dendritic cells to study the mechanism of p30 and p12/p8 requirements in these cell types. p30 inhibited the expression of interferon (IFN)-responsive genes (ISG) following stimulation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and by poly(I·C) of TLR3 but not of TLR7/8 with imiquimod. Results with THP-1 mirrored those for ex vivo human primary monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (Mo-mDC). The effect of p30 on TLR signaling was also demonstrated by ablating its expression within a molecular clone of HTLV-1. HTLV-1 infection of monocytes inhibited TLR3- and TLR4-induced ISG expression by 50 to 90% depending on the genes, whereas the isogenic clone p30 knockout virus was less effective at inhibiting TLR3 and TRL4 signaling and displayed lower infectivity. Viral expression and inhibition of ISG transcription was, however, rescued by restoration of p30 expression. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that p30 inhibits initiation and elongation of PU.1-dependent transcription of IFN-α1, IFN-β, and TLR4 genes upon TLR stimulation. In contrast, experiments conducted with p12/p8 did not demonstrate an effect on ISG expression. These results provide a mechanistic explanation of the requirement of p30 for HTLV-1 infectivity in vivo, suggest that dampening interferon responses in monocytes and DCs is specific for p30, and represent an essential early step for permissive HTLV-1 infection and persistence.

  1. Unlike PPAR{gamma}, PPAR{alpha} or PPAR{beta}/{delta} activation does not promote human monocyte differentiation toward alternative macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Brozek, John; Derudas, Bruno; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2009-08-28

    Macrophages adapt their response to micro-environmental signals. While Th1 cytokines promote pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages, Th2 cytokines promote an 'alternative' anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage phenotype. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors expressed in macrophages where they control the inflammatory response. It has been shown that PPAR{gamma} promotes the differentiation of monocytes into anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages in humans and mice, while a role for PPAR{beta}/{delta} in this process has been reported only in mice and no data are available for PPAR{alpha}. Here, we show that in contrast to PPAR{gamma}, expression of PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta}/{delta} overall does not correlate with the expression of M2 markers in human atherosclerotic lesions, whereas a positive correlation with genes of lipid metabolism exists. Moreover, unlike PPAR{gamma}, PPAR{alpha} or PPAR{beta}/{delta} activation does not influence human monocyte differentiation into M2 macrophages in vitro. Thus, PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{beta}/{delta} do not appear to modulate the alternative differentiation of human macrophages.

  2. Epstein-Barr virus envelope glycoprotein gp350 induces NF-kappaB activation and IL-1beta synthesis in human monocytes-macrophages involving PKC and PI3-K.

    PubMed

    D'Addario, M; Ahmad, A; Xu, J W; Menezes, J

    1999-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a highly immunotropic human herpesvirus with oncogenic potential and is involved in numerous pathologies. EBV utilizes its major envelope glycoprotein gp350 to bind to its receptor CR2/CD21 on target cells for initiating the infection. We have previously shown that EBV is able to modulate transcription and translation of a number of cytokine genes via its gp350-mediated binding to this receptor. However, the effects of the binding of purified gp350 to CR2/CD21 on plastic-adherent monocyte-macrophages (AMM) have not been investigated. These cells are a rich source of potent proinflammatory and immune-modulating cytokines, and express low levels of CR2/CD21. We show here for the first time that recombinant gp350 (rgp350) causes production of the potent proinflammatory cytokine IL-1beta in human AMM. Surprisingly, rgp350 is comparable in this capacity to the phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate. This induction of IL-1beta production was accompanied by increased steady-state levels of its mRNA in gp350-treated AMM, and was dependent on the specific binding of rgp350 to the EBV receptor CR2/CD21. We also show that the signaling pathways resulting in the induction of IL-1beta synthesis by rgp350 required protein kinase C and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5 triphosphate kinase activities and occurred via activation of the NF-kappaB family of transcription factors.-D'Addario, M., Ahmad, A., Xu, J. W., Menezes, J. Epstein-Barr virus envelope glycoprotein gp350 induces NF-kappaB activation and IL-1beta synthesis in human monocytes-macrophages involving PKC and PI3-K. PMID:10593868

  3. A nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitor BAY11-7082 inhibits interactions between human endothelial cells, T cells, and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, B; Liu, Z; Wang, P; Wu, C; Xu, H

    2008-10-01

    Costimulatory molecules play critical roles during cell-mediated immune responses. We undertook this study to determine whether CD154-CD40 interactions induced human endothelial cell (EC) activation via the nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB pathway, and whether the upregulation of monocyte-derived CD40 and CD80 is NF-kappaB pathway dependent. A CD154-expressing D1.1 cell-EC coculture with or without the NF-kappaB inhibitor BAY11-7082 was established to examine EC activation as indicated by CD62E expression. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-EC cocultures were performed in the presence or absence of BAY11-7082; the expression of CD40 and CD80 on monocytes was analyzed by FACS. Allogeneic mixed lymphocyte-EC reaction (MLER) was performed to determine the inhibitory effects of BAY11-7082 to prevent lymphocyte proliferation. FACS demonstrated upregulation of EC-derived CD62E expression induced by CD154 expressing D1.1 cells. BAY11-7082 pretreated EC failed to upregulate CD62E after interaction with D1.1 cells. Monocytes upregulated CD40 and CD80 expression during PBMC-HEC interaction, and BAY11-7082 suppressed monocyte-derived CD40 and CD80 expression in a dose-dependent manner. The monocyte-derived CD86 expression was downregulated by NF-kappaB inhibitor. BAY11-7082 demonstrated inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation of allogeneic MLER. This study demonstrated that the NF-kappaB inhibitor BAY11-7082 prevented CD154-CD40 interaction-induced EC activation, suggesting that the activation of EC by T-cell-derived CD154 is via NF-kappaB pathway. The NF-kappaB inhibitor suppressed upregulation of monocytederived CD40 and CD80. Additionally, BAY11-7082 suppressed lymphocyte proliferation in response to allogeneic EC. These data indicated that NF-kappaB plays an important role in regulating costimulatory molecules in allogeneic immune responses, and strengthens the rationale for the use of NF-kappaB-directed therapy in allotransplantation.

  4. Application of peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) staining for detection and localization of dengue-2 viral antigen. II. Observations for the antibody enhancement activity in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kamasanttaya, K; Churdboonchart, V; Yoksan, S; Bhamarapravati, N

    1987-06-01

    Peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) staining was applied to measure the antibody enhancement activity in human monocytes. Increasing in number of infected cells can be seen with increasing of staining intensity of the cells by ordinary light microscope. Shifting of the optimum enhancement activity was found in previously tritiated antiserum indicated that for titration of antibody enhancement activity several dilutions of antiserum should be included in each experiment. Validity of the PAP method was made by the comparison of the results with Infectious Center Assay (ICA). With this technique, titration for antibody enhancement for dengue virus infection can be done with non-expensive equipment and can be kept for comparison for months.

  5. TLR4-mediated expression of Mac-1 in monocytes plays a pivotal role in monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jin; Choi, Eun Kyoung; Seo, Kyo Won; Bae, Jin Ung; Park, So Youn; Kim, Chi Dae

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is known to mediate monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, however, its role on the expression of monocyte adhesion molecules is unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of TLR4 on the expression of monocyte adhesion molecules, and determined the functional role of TLR4-induced adhesion molecules on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. When THP-1 monocytes were stimulated with Kdo2-Lipid A (KLA), a specific TLR4 agonist, Mac-1 expression was markedly increased in association with an increased adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells. These were attenuated by anti-Mac-1 antibody, suggesting a functional role of TLR4-induced Mac-1 on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. In monocytes treated with MK886, a 5-lipoxygenase (LO) inhibitor, both Mac-1 expression and monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells induced by KLA were markedly attenuated. Moreover, KLA increased the expression of mRNA and protein of 5-LO, suggesting a pivotal role of 5-LO on these processes. In in vivo studies, KLA increased monocyte adhesion to aortic endothelium of wild-type (WT) mice, which was attenuated in WT mice treated with anti-Mac-1 antibody as well as in TLR4-deficient mice. Taken together, TLR4-mediated expression of Mac-1 in monocytes plays a pivotal role on monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium, leading to increased foam cell formation in the development of atherosclerosis.

  6. TLR4-Mediated Expression of Mac-1 in Monocytes Plays a Pivotal Role in Monocyte Adhesion to Vascular Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kyo Won; Bae, Jin Ung; Park, So Youn; Kim, Chi Dae

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is known to mediate monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, however, its role on the expression of monocyte adhesion molecules is unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of TLR4 on the expression of monocyte adhesion molecules, and determined the functional role of TLR4-induced adhesion molecules on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. When THP-1 monocytes were stimulated with Kdo2-Lipid A (KLA), a specific TLR4 agonist, Mac-1 expression was markedly increased in association with an increased adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells. These were attenuated by anti-Mac-1 antibody, suggesting a functional role of TLR4-induced Mac-1 on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. In monocytes treated with MK886, a 5-lipoxygenase (LO) inhibitor, both Mac-1 expression and monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells induced by KLA were markedly attenuated. Moreover, KLA increased the expression of mRNA and protein of 5-LO, suggesting a pivotal role of 5-LO on these processes. In in vivo studies, KLA increased monocyte adhesion to aortic endothelium of wild-type (WT) mice, which was attenuated in WT mice treated with anti-Mac-1 antibody as well as in TLR4-deficient mice. Taken together, TLR4-mediated expression of Mac-1 in monocytes plays a pivotal role on monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium, leading to increased foam cell formation in the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:25116953

  7. Antibody-dependent antitumor cytotoxicity by human monocytes cultured with recombinant macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Induction of efficient antibody-mediated antitumor cytotoxicity not detected by isotope release assays.

    PubMed

    Munn, D H; Cheung, N K

    1989-08-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is known to stimulate proliferation of monocyte/macrophage progenitors and enhance in vitro antitumor cytotoxicity by murine macrophages. In this paper we have shown that recombinant human M-CSF causes human peripheral blood monocytes to differentiate in culture into metabolically active macrophage-like cells. These cells mediate very efficient antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against human melanoma and neuroblastoma cell lines in the presence of two murine IgG3 mAbs (3F8 and R24). They also mediate antibody-independent cytotoxicity (or cytostasis) to a lesser extent. Human serum had an inconsistent effect on ADCC, but often induced similar high levels of ADCC. Cytotoxicity was measured using a novel ELISA to detect surviving tumor cells after ADCC. Two conventional isotope-release assays (51Cr and [3H]TdR) underestimated or entirely failed to detect ADCC by M-CSF-activated monocytes. Optimal activation occurred with 100-300 U/ml of M-CSF, and required 9-11 d for completion. Most of the M-CSF cultured monocytes expressed the low-affinity Fc receptor (CD16). ADCC by cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage using murine IgG3 mAbs may have significance for the immunotherapy of human malignancies.

  8. Identification and Characterization of Two Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cell Subpopulations with Different Functions in Dying Cell Clearance and Different Patterns of Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Amir; Tabib, Adi; Atallah, Mizhir; Krispin, Alon; Mevorach, Dror

    2016-01-01

    Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mdDCs) are versatile cells that are used widely for research and experimental therapies. Although different culture conditions can affect their characteristics, there are no known subpopulations. Since monocytes differentiate into dendritic cells (DCs) in a variety of tissues and contexts, we asked whether they can give rise to different subpopulations. In this work we set out to characterize two human mdDC subpopulations that we identified and termed small (DC-S) and large (DC-L). Morphologically, DC-L are larger, more granular and have a more complex cell membrane. Phenotypically, DC-L show higher expression of a wide panel of surface molecules and stronger responses to maturation stimuli. Transcriptomic analysis confirmed their separate identities and findings were consistent with the phenotypes observed. Although they show similar apoptotic cell uptake, DC-L have different capabilities for phagocytosis, demonstrate better antigen processing, and have significantly better necrotic cell uptake. These subpopulations also have different patterns of cell death, with DC-L presenting an inflammatory, “dangerous” phenotype while DC-S mostly downregulate their surface markers upon cell death. Apoptotic cells induce an immune-suppressed phenotype, which becomes more pronounced among DC-L, especially after the addition of lipopolysaccharide. We propose that these two subpopulations correspond to inflammatory (DC-L) and steady-state (DC-S) DC classes that have been previously described in mice and humans. PMID:27690130

  9. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocytes is modulated by cyclic AMP, prostaglandin E(2), and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Hinz, B; Brune, K; Pahl, A

    2000-11-30

    Using human blood monocytes (for determination of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA by RT-PCR) and human whole blood (for prostanoid determination), the present study investigates the influence of the second messenger cAMP on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced COX-2 expression with particular emphasis on the role of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in this process. Elevation of intracellular cAMP with a cell-permeable cAMP analogue (dibutyryl cAMP), an adenylyl cyclase activator (cholera toxin), or a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine) substantially enhanced LPS-induced PGE(2) formation and COX-2 mRNA expression, but did not modify COX-2 enzyme activity. Moreover, up-regulation of LPS-induced COX-2 expression was caused by PGE(2), butaprost (selective agonist of the adenylyl cyclase-coupled EP(2) receptor) and 11-deoxy PGE(1) (EP(2)/EP(4) agonist), whereas sulprostone (EP(3)/EP(1) agonist) left COX-2 expression unaltered. Abrogation of LPS-induced PGE(2) synthesis with the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 caused a decrease in COX-2 mRNA levels that was restored by exogenous PGE(2) and mimicked by S(+)-flurbiprofen and ketoprofen. Overall, these results indicate a modulatory role of cAMP in the regulation of COX-2 expression. PGE(2), a cAMP-elevating final product of the COX-2 pathway, may autoregulate COX-2 expression in human monocytes via a positive feedback mechanism.

  10. Divergent JAM-C Expression Accelerates Monocyte-Derived Cell Exit from Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Miljkovic-Licina, Marijana; Lee, Boris P.; Fischer, Nicolas; Fish, Richard J.; Kwak, Brenda; Fisher, Edward A.; Imhof, Beat A.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, caused in part by monocytes in plaques, continues to be a disease that afflicts the modern world. Whilst significant steps have been made in treating this chronic inflammatory disease, questions remain on how to prevent monocyte and macrophage accumulation in atherosclerotic plaques. Junctional Adhesion Molecule C (JAM-C) expressed by vascular endothelium directs monocyte transendothelial migration in a unidirectional manner leading to increased inflammation. Here we show that interfering with JAM-C allows reverse-transendothelial migration of monocyte-derived cells, opening the way back out of the inflamed environment. To study the role of JAM-C in plaque regression we used a mouse model of atherosclerosis, and tested the impact of vascular JAM-C expression levels on monocyte reverse transendothelial migration using human cells. Studies in-vitro under inflammatory conditions revealed that overexpression or gene silencing of JAM-C in human endothelium exposed to flow resulted in higher rates of monocyte reverse-transendothelial migration, similar to antibody blockade. We then transplanted atherosclerotic, plaque-containing aortic arches from hyperlipidemic ApoE-/- mice into wild-type normolipidemic recipient mice. JAM-C blockade in the recipients induced greater emigration of monocyte-derived cells and further diminished the size of atherosclerotic plaques. Our findings have shown that JAM-C forms a one-way vascular barrier for leukocyte transendothelial migration only when present at homeostatic copy numbers. We have also shown that blocking JAM-C can reduce the number of atherogenic monocytes/macrophages in plaques by emigration, providing a novel therapeutic strategy for chronic inflammatory pathologies. PMID:27442505

  11. Human Bladder Uroepithelial Cells Synergize with Monocytes to Promote IL-10 Synthesis and Other Cytokine Responses to Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Duell, Benjamin L.; Carey, Alison J.; Dando, Samantha J.; Schembri, Mark A.; Ulett, Glen C.

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are a major source of morbidity for women and the elderly, with Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) being the most prevalent causative pathogen. Studies in recent years have defined a key anti-inflammatory role for Interleukin-10 (IL-10) in urinary tract infection mediated by UPEC and other uropathogens. We investigated the nature of the IL-10-producing interactions between UPEC and host cells by utilising a novel co-culture model that incorporated lymphocytes, mononuclear and uroepithelial cells in histotypic proportions. This co-culture model demonstrated synergistic IL-10 production effects between monocytes and uroepithelial cells following infection with UPEC. Membrane inserts were used to separate the monocyte and uroepithelial cell types during infection and revealed two synergistic IL-10 production effects based on contact-dependent and soluble interactions. Analysis of a comprehensive set of immunologically relevant biomarkers in monocyte-uroepithelial cell co-cultures highlighted that multiple cytokine, chemokine and signalling factors were also produced in a synergistic or antagonistic fashion. These results demonstrate that IL-10 responses to UPEC occur via multiple interactions between several cells types, implying a complex role for infection-related IL-10 during UTI. Development and application of the co-culture model described in this study is thus useful to define the degree of contact dependency of biomarker production to UPEC, and highlights the relevance of histotypic co-cultures in studying complex host-pathogen interactions. PMID:24155979

  12. Human bladder uroepithelial cells synergize with monocytes to promote IL-10 synthesis and other cytokine responses to uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Duell, Benjamin L; Carey, Alison J; Dando, Samantha J; Schembri, Mark A; Ulett, Glen C

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are a major source of morbidity for women and the elderly, with Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) being the most prevalent causative pathogen. Studies in recent years have defined a key anti-inflammatory role for Interleukin-10 (IL-10) in urinary tract infection mediated by UPEC and other uropathogens. We investigated the nature of the IL-10-producing interactions between UPEC and host cells by utilising a novel co-culture model that incorporated lymphocytes, mononuclear and uroepithelial cells in histotypic proportions. This co-culture model demonstrated synergistic IL-10 production effects between monocytes and uroepithelial cells following infection with UPEC. Membrane inserts were used to separate the monocyte and uroepithelial cell types during infection and revealed two synergistic IL-10 production effects based on contact-dependent and soluble interactions. Analysis of a comprehensive set of immunologically relevant biomarkers in monocyte-uroepithelial cell co-cultures highlighted that multiple cytokine, chemokine and signalling factors were also produced in a synergistic or antagonistic fashion. These results demonstrate that IL-10 responses to UPEC occur via multiple interactions between several cells types, implying a complex role for infection-related IL-10 during UTI. Development and application of the co-culture model described in this study is thus useful to define the degree of contact dependency of biomarker production to UPEC, and highlights the relevance of histotypic co-cultures in studying complex host-pathogen interactions.

  13. Both common and specialty mushrooms inhibit adhesion molecule expression and in vitro binding of monocytes to human aortic endothelial cells in a pro-inflammatory environment

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of mortality in the United States as well as globally. Epidemiological studies show that regular fruit and vegetable consumption reduces CVD risk, in part, due to antioxidant activity and immunomodulation since oxidative stress and inflammation are features of atherogenesis. Accumulating evidence also shows that dietary fungi, viz., mushrooms, can protect against chronic disease by altering inflammatory environments such as those associated with CVD although most research has focused on specialty mushrooms. In this study, we tested the ability of both common and specialty mushrooms to inhibit cellular processes associated with CVD. Methods Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were incubated overnight with control media with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) vehicle (1% v/v) or containing DMSO extracts of whole dehydrated mushrooms (0.1 mg/mL), which included Agaricus bisporus (white button and crimini), Lentinula edodes (shiitake), Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster), and Grifola frondosa (maitake). Monolayers were subsequently washed and incubated with medium alone or containing the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β (5 ng/mL) for 6 h to upregulate pro-atherosclerotic adhesion molecules (AM). AM expression was assayed by ELISA and binding of U937 human monocytes pre-loaded with fluorescent dye was determined. Results White button mushrooms consistently reduced (p < 0.05) VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and E-selectin-1 expression, whereas other test mushrooms significantly modulated AM expression singly, collectively, or combinatorially. All mushrooms, however, significantly reduced binding of monocytes to both quiescent and cytokine-stimulated monolayers. Conclusion These data provide evidence that dietary mushrooms can inhibit cellular processes such as adhesion molecule expression and ultimate binding of monocytes to the endothelium under pro-inflammatory conditions, which are associated with CVD. As a result, these findings support

  14. Gypenoside XLIX, a naturally occurring gynosaponin, PPAR-alpha dependently inhibits LPS-induced tissue factor expression and activity in human THP-1 monocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tom Hsun-Wei; Van Hoan Tran; Roufogalis, Basil D.; Li Yuhao . E-mail: yuhao@pharm.usyd.edu.au

    2007-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is involved not only in the progression of atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases, but is also associated with tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis and hence may be an attractive target for directed cancer therapeutics. Gynostemma pentaphyllum (GP) is widely used in the treatment of various cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis, as well as cancers. Gypenoside (Gyp) XLIX, a dammarane-type glycoside, is one of the prominent components in GP. We have recently reported Gyp XLIX to be a potent peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha activator. Here we demonstrate that Gyp XLIX (0-300 {mu}M) concentration dependently inhibited TF promoter activity after induction by the inflammatory stimulus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in human monocytic THP-1 cells transfected with promoter reporter constructs pTF-LUC. Furthermore, Gyp XLIX inhibited LPS-induced TF mRNA and protein overexpression in THP-1 monocyte cells. Its inhibition of LPS-induced TF hyperactivity was further confirmed by chromogenic enzyme activity assay. The activities of Gyp XLIX reported in this study were similar to those of Wy-14643, a potent synthetic PPAR-alpha activator. Furthermore, the Gyp XLIX-induced inhibitory effect on TF luciferase activity was completely abolished in the presence of the PPAR-alpha selective antagonist MK-886. The present findings suggest that Gyp XLIX inhibits LPS-induced TF overexpression and enhancement of its activity in human THP-1 monocytic cells via PPAR-alpha-dependent pathways. The data provide new insights into the basis of the use of the traditional Chinese herbal medicine G. pentaphyllum for the treatment of cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases, as well as cancers.

  15. Monosodium urate crystal-induced pro-interleukin-1β production is post-transcriptionally regulated via the p38 signaling pathway in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yeon-Ho; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Won-Woo

    2016-01-01

    IL-1β is a key mediator of sterile inflammation in response to endogenous particulates, a type of damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMPs) molecule derived from damaged cells. Despite the well-known role of sterile particulates such as monosodium urate (MSU) crystals as inflammasome inducers in monocytes/macrophages, little is known regarding how pro-IL-1β synthesis is induced under sterile inflammatory conditions. We provide evidence that MSU crystals post-transcriptionally induce the rapid production of pro-IL-1β in human primary monocytes. Metabolic labeling and pull-down assays for newly-synthesized proteins clearly showed that MSU crystals rapidly, within 30 min, induce the synthesis of pro-IL-1β as well as global proteins. Notably, MSU crystal-induced pro-IL-1β synthesis is selectively dependent on the p38 MAPK pathway, whereas global protein synthesis is mediated via the mTOR, ERK1/2, and p38 pathways. Furthermore, inhibition of Mnk1, a substrate of p38, blocked MSU crystal-induced pro-IL-1β synthesis downstream of eIF4E phosphorylation. In addition, the p38 MAPK pathway leading to phosphorylation of MK2 was also critical for stabilization of pro-IL-1β mRNA following MSU stimulation. Our findings demonstrate that post-transcriptional regulation via p38 MAPK plays a central role in the rapid synthesis of pro-IL-1β in response to MSU crystals, which is an essential step for IL-1β production in human monocytes. PMID:27694988

  16. Impact of 3-D printed PLA- and chitosan-based scaffolds on human monocyte/macrophage responses: unraveling the effect of 3-D structures on inflammation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Catarina R; Serra, Tiziano; Oliveira, Marta I; Planell, Josep A; Barbosa, Mário A; Navarro, Melba

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies have pointed towards a decisive role of inflammation in triggering tissue repair and regeneration, while at the same time it is accepted that an exacerbated inflammatory response may lead to rejection of an implant. Within this context, understanding and having the capacity to regulate the inflammatory response elicited by 3-D scaffolds aimed for tissue regeneration is crucial. This work reports on the analysis of the cytokine profile of human monocytes/macrophages in contact with biodegradable 3-D scaffolds with different surface properties, architecture and controlled pore geometry, fabricated by 3-D printing technology. Fabrication processes were optimized to create four different 3-D platforms based on polylactic acid (PLA), PLA/calcium phosphate glass or chitosan. Cytokine secretion and cell morphology of human peripheral blood monocytes allowed to differentiate on the different matrices were analyzed. While all scaffolds supported monocyte/macrophage adhesion and stimulated cytokine production, striking differences between PLA-based and chitosan scaffolds were found, with chitosan eliciting increased secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, while PLA-based scaffolds induced higher production of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12/23 and IL-10. Even though the material itself induced the biggest differences, the scaffold geometry also impacted on TNF-α and IL-12/23 production, with chitosan scaffolds having larger pores and wider angles leading to a higher secretion of these pro-inflammatory cytokines. These findings strengthen the appropriateness of these 3-D platforms to study modulation of macrophage responses by specific parameters (chemistry, topography, scaffold architecture). PMID:24211731

  17. Adhesomes: specific granules containing receptors for laminin, C3bi/fibrinogen, fibronectin, and vitronectin in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have localized several major extracellular matrix protein receptors in the specific granules of human polymorphonuclear (PMN) and monocytic leukocytes using double label immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) with ultrathin frozen sections and colloidal-gold conjugates. Rabbit antibodies to 67-kD human laminin receptor (LNR) were located on the inner surface of the specific granule membrane and within its internal matrix. LNR antigens co-distributed with lactoferrin, a marker of specific granules, but did not co-localize with elastase in azurophilic granules of PMNs. Further, CD11b/CD18 (leukocyte receptor for C3bi, fibrinogen, endothelial cells, and endotoxin), mammalian fibronectin receptor (FNR), and vitronectin receptor (VNR) antigens were also co- localized with LNR in PMN specific granules. A similar type of granule was found in monocytes which stained for LNR, FNR, VNR, CD18, and lysozyme. Activation of PMNs with either PMA, f-met-leu-phe (fMLP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), or monocytic leukocytes with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induced fusion of specific granules with the cell membrane and expression of both LNR and CD18 antigens on the outer cell surface. Further, stimulation led to augmented PMN adhesion on LN substrata, and six- to eightfold increases in specific binding of soluble LN that was inhibited by LNR antibody. These results indicate that four types of extracellular matrix receptors are located in leukocyte specific granules, and suggest that up-regulation of these receptors during inflammation may mediate leukocyte adhesion and extravasation. We have thus termed leukocyte specific granules adhesomes. PMID:2480353

  18. Biophysical regulation of Chlamydia pneumoniae-infected monocyte recruitment to atherosclerotic foci

    PubMed Central

    Evani, Shankar J.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae infection is implicated in atherosclerosis although the contributory mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesize that C. pneumoniae infection favors the recruitment of monocytes to atherosclerotic foci by altering monocyte biophysics. Primary, fresh human monocytes were infected with C. pneumoniae for 8 h, and the interactions between monocytes and E-selectin or aortic endothelium under flow were characterized by video microscopy and image analysis. The distribution of membrane lipid rafts and adhesion receptors were analyzed by imaging flow cytometry. Infected cells rolled on E-selectin and endothelial surfaces, and this rolling was slower, steady and uniform compared to uninfected cells. Infection decreases cholesterol levels, increases membrane fluidity, disrupts lipid rafts, and redistributes CD44, which is the primary mediator of rolling interactions. Together, these changes translate to higher firm adhesion of infected monocytes on endothelium, which is enhanced in the presence of LDL. Uninfected monocytes treated with LDL or left untreated were used as baseline control. Our results demonstrate that the membrane biophysical changes due to infection and hyperlipidemia are one of the key mechanisms by which C. pneumoniae can exacerbate atherosclerotic pathology. These findings provide a framework to characterize the role of ‘infectious burden’ in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:26785849

  19. Biophysical regulation of Chlamydia pneumoniae-infected monocyte recruitment to atherosclerotic foci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evani, Shankar J.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae infection is implicated in atherosclerosis although the contributory mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesize that C. pneumoniae infection favors the recruitment of monocytes to atherosclerotic foci by altering monocyte biophysics. Primary, fresh human monocytes were infected with C. pneumoniae for 8 h, and the interactions between monocytes and E-selectin or aortic endothelium under flow were characterized by video microscopy and image analysis. The distribution of membrane lipid rafts and adhesion receptors were analyzed by imaging flow cytometry. Infected cells rolled on E-selectin and endothelial surfaces, and this rolling was slower, steady and uniform compared to uninfected cells. Infection decreases cholesterol levels, increases membrane fluidity, disrupts lipid rafts, and redistributes CD44, which is the primary mediator of rolling interactions. Together, these changes translate to higher firm adhesion of infected monocytes on endothelium, which is enhanced in the presence of LDL. Uninfected monocytes treated with LDL or left untreated were used as baseline control. Our results demonstrate that the membrane biophysical changes due to infection and hyperlipidemia are one of the key mechanisms by which C. pneumoniae can exacerbate atherosclerotic pathology. These findings provide a framework to characterize the role of ‘infectious burden’ in the development and progression of atherosclerosis.

  20. Glucocorticoid treatment skews human monocyte differentiation into a hemoglobin-clearance phenotype with enhanced heme-iron recycling and antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Vallelian, Florence; Schaer, Christian A; Kaempfer, Theresa; Gehrig, Peter; Duerst, Elena; Schoedon, Gabriele; Schaer, Dominik J

    2010-12-01

    Glucocorticoids are used extensively to treat autoimmune hemolytic anemias. Some beneficial effects of glucocorticoid pulse therapy have also been reported in sickle cell disease and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Based on established concepts of hemoglobin (Hb) toxicity and physiologic Hb scavenger systems, we evaluated whether glucocorticoids could support an adaptive response to extracellular Hb independently of their immunosuppressive activities. Using global proteome and transcriptome analysis with mass-spectrometry (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry) and gene-array experiments, we found that glucocorticoid treatment in vitro and in patients on glucocorticoid-pulse therapy polarized monocytes into a M2/alternatively activated phenotype with high Hb-scavenger receptor (CD163) expression and enhanced Hb-clearance and detoxification capability. Monocytes concurrently exposed to the interactive activity of glucocorticoids and extracellular Hb were characterized by high expression of a group of antioxidant enzymes known to be regulated by the conserved oxidative response transcription factor nuclear factor E2-related factor. Further, suppressed transferrin receptor, together with high ferroportin expression, pointed to a shift in iron homeostasis directed toward an increased cellular export of heme-derived iron. Therefore, stimulating Hb-endocytosis by CD163 and enhancing antioxidative homeostasis and iron recycling may be an essential activity of glucocorticoids that helps alleviate the adverse effects of extracellular Hb. PMID:20739658

  1. Quantification and accurate normalisation of small RNAs through new custom RT-qPCR arrays demonstrates Salmonella-induced microRNAs in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Small interfering and non-coding RNAs regulate gene expression across all kingdoms of life. MicroRNAs constitute an important group of metazoan small RNAs regulating development but also disease. Accordingly, in functional genomics microRNA expression analysis sheds more and more light on the dynamic regulation of gene expression in various cellular processes. Results We have developed custom RT-qPCR arrays allowing for accurate quantification of 31 small RNAs in triplicate using a 96 well format. In parallel, we provide accurate normalisation of microRNA expression data based on the quantification of 5 reference snRNAs. We have successfully employed such arrays to study microRNA regulation during human monocyte differentiation as well as Salmonella infection. Besides well-known protagonists such as miR-146 or miR-155, we identified the up-regulation of miR-21, miR-222, miR-23b, miR-24, miR-27a as well as miR-29 upon monocyte differentiation or infection, respectively. Conclusions The provided protocol for RT-qPCR arrays enables straight-forward microRNA expression analysis. It is fully automatable, compliant with the MIQE guidelines and can be completed in only 1 day. The application of these arrays revealed microRNAs that may mediate monocyte host defence mechanisms by regulating the TGF-β signalling upon Salmonella infection. The introduced arrays are furthermore suited for customised quantification of any class of small non-coding RNAs as exemplified by snRNAs and thus provide a versatile tool for ubiquitous applications. PMID:22248082

  2. Modulation of TREM2 by CD33: a protein QTL study integrates Alzheimer loci in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Gail; White, Charles C.; Winn, Phoebe A.; Cimpean, Maria; Replogle, Joseph M.; Glick, Laura R.; Cuerdon, Nicole E.; Ryan, Katie J.; Johnson, Keith A.; Schneider, Julie A.; Bennett, David A.; Chibnik, Lori B.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M.; De Jager, Philip L.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report results from a protein quantitative trait analysis in monocytes from 226 individuals to evaluate cross-talk between Alzheimer loci. We find that the NME8 locus influences PTK2B and that the CD33 risk allele leads to greater TREM2 expression. Further, we observe (1) a decreased TREM1/TREM2 ratio with a TREM1 risk allele, (2) decreased TREM2 expression with CD33 suppression, and (3) elevated cortical TREM2 mRNA expression with amyloid pathology. PMID:26414614

  3. TRPM2 regulates TXNIP-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation via interaction with p47 phox under high glucose in human monocytic cells

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Hisa Hui Ling; Vong, Chi Teng; Kwan, Yiu Wa; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen; Hoi, Maggie Pui Man

    2016-01-01

    Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by hyperglycemia increased the secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications. Although high glucose (HG)-induced oxidative stress and aberrant Ca2+ channels activity causes an increase in transmembrane Ca2+ influx, however the relative contribution of Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels is not well studied. Here, we identified that HG (30 mM glucose for 48 h) induced the activation of the NLRP3-ASC inflammasome, leading to caspase-1 activation, and IL-1β and IL-18 secretion in human monocytic cell lines. Moreover, we used a hyperglycemia model in U937 monocytes, showing that the activation of TRPM2 was augmented, and TRPM2-mediated Ca2+ influx was critical for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. This pathway involved NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production and TXNIP-NLRP3 inflammasome pathway. Furthermore, the inhibition of TRPM2 reduced ROS production and lowered NADPH oxidase activity via cooperatively interaction with p47 phox in response to HG. These results provided a mechanistic linking between TRPM2-mediated Ca2+ influx and p47 phox signaling to induce excess ROS production and TXNIP-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation under HG, and suggested that TRPM2 represented a potential target for alleviating NLRP3 inflammasome activation related to hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress in Type 2 diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). PMID:27731349

  4. ADAM10 Cell Surface Expression but Not Activity Is Critical for Staphylococcus aureus α-Hemolysin-Mediat