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Sample records for human muscle stem

  1. Human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells retain stem cell properties after expansion in myosphere culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Yan; Li, Yuan; Chen, Chao; Stoelzel, Katharina; Kaufmann, Andreas M.

    2011-04-15

    Human skeletal muscle contains an accessible adult stem-cell compartment in which differentiated myofibers are maintained and replaced by a self-renewing stem cell pool. Previously, studies using mouse models have established a critical role for resident stem cells in skeletal muscle, but little is known about this paradigm in human muscle. Here, we report the reproducible isolation of a population of cells from human skeletal muscle that is able to proliferate for extended periods of time as floating clusters of rounded cells, termed 'myospheres' or myosphere-derived progenitor cells (MDPCs). The phenotypic characteristics and functional properties of these cells were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Our results showed that these cells are clonogenic, express skeletal progenitor cell markers Pax7, ALDH1, Myod, and Desmin and the stem cell markers Nanog, Sox2, and Oct3/4 significantly elevated over controls. They could be maintained proliferatively active in vitro for more than 20 weeks and passaged at least 18 times, despite an average donor-age of 63 years. Individual clones (4.2%) derived from single cells were successfully expanded showing clonogenic potential and sustained proliferation of a subpopulation in the myospheres. Myosphere-derived cells were capable of spontaneous differentiation into myotubes in differentiation media and into other mesodermal cell lineages in induction media. We demonstrate here that direct culture and expansion of stem cells from human skeletal muscle is straightforward and reproducible with the appropriate technique. These cells may provide a viable resource of adult stem cells for future therapies of disease affecting skeletal muscle or mesenchymal lineage derived cell types.

  2. Research Sees Potential to Make Bone, Muscle from Human Stem Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159885.html Research Sees Potential to Make Bone, Muscle From Human Stem Cells Could be a major advance for regenerative medicine, ... and chemical signals needed to make bone, heart muscle and 10 other cells types from human stem cells within a matter of days. The researchers ...

  3. Clonogenic multipotent stem cells in human adipose tissue differentiate into functional smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Larissa V.; Alfonso, Zeni; Zhang, Rong; Leung, Joanne; Wu, Benjamin; Ignarro, Louis J.

    2006-01-01

    Smooth muscle is a major component of human tissues and is essential for the normal function of a multitude of organs including the intestine, urinary tract and the vascular system. The use of stem cells for cell-based tissue engineering and regeneration strategies represents a promising alternative for smooth muscle repair. For such strategies to succeed, a reliable source of smooth muscle precursor cells must be identified. Adipose tissue provides an abundant source of multipotent cells. In this study, the capacity of processed lipoaspirate (PLA) and adipose-derived stem cells to differentiate into phenotypic and functional smooth muscle cells was evaluated. To induce differentiation, PLA cells were cultured in smooth muscle differentiation medium. Smooth muscle differentiation of PLA cells induced genetic expression of all smooth muscle markers and further confirmed by increased protein expression of smooth muscle cell-specific α actin (ASMA), calponin, caldesmon, SM22, myosin heavy chain (MHC), and smoothelin. Clonal studies of adipose derived multipotent cells demonstrated differentiation of these cells into smooth muscle cells in addition to trilineage differentiation capacity. Importantly, smooth muscle-differentiated cells, but not their precursors, exhibit the functional ability to contract and relax in direct response to pharmacologic agents. In conclusion, adipose-derived cells have the potential to differentiate into functional smooth muscle cells and, thus, adipose tissue can be a useful source of cells for treatment of injured tissues where smooth muscle plays an important role. PMID:16880387

  4. Nuclear fusion-independent smooth muscle differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells induced by a smooth muscle environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Jack, Gregory S; Rao, Nagesh; Zuk, Patricia; Ignarro, Louis J; Wu, Benjamin; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2012-03-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells hASC have been isolated and were shown to have multilineage differentiation capacity. Although both plasticity and cell fusion have been suggested as mechanisms for cell differentiation in vivo, the effect of the local in vivo environment on the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells has not been evaluated. We previously reported the in vitro capacity of smooth muscle differentiation of these cells. In this study, we evaluate the effect of an in vivo smooth muscle environment in the differentiation of hASC. We studied this by two experimental designs: (a) in vivo evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation of hASC injected into a smooth muscle environment and (b) in vitro evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation capacity of hASC exposed to bladder smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate a time-dependent differentiation of hASC into mature smooth muscle cells when these cells are injected into the smooth musculature of the urinary bladder. Similar findings were seen when the cells were cocultured in vitro with primary bladder smooth muscle cells. Chromosomal analysis demonstrated that microenvironment cues rather than nuclear fusion are responsible for this differentiation. We conclude that cell plasticity is present in hASCs, and their differentiation is accomplished in the absence of nuclear fusion.

  5. Exosomes from differentiating human skeletal muscle cells trigger myogenesis of stem cells and provide biochemical cues for skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Suk; Yoon, Hwa In; Lee, Kyoung Soo; Choi, Young Chan; Yang, Seong Hyun; Kim, In-San; Cho, Yong Woo

    2016-01-28

    Exosomes released from skeletal muscle cells play important roles in myogenesis and muscle development via the transfer of specific signal molecules. In this study, we investigated whether exosomes secreted during myotube differentiation from human skeletal myoblasts (HSkM) could induce a cellular response from human adipose-derived stem cells (HASCs) and enhance muscle regeneration in a muscle laceration mouse model. The exosomes contained various signal molecules including myogenic growth factors related to muscle development, such as insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), and platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA). Interestingly, exosome-treated HASCs fused with neighboring cells at early time points and exhibited a myotube-like phenotype with increased expression of myogenic proteins (myosin heavy chain and desmin). On day 21, mRNAs of terminal myogenic genes were also up-regulated in exosome-treated HASCs. Moreover, in vivo studies demonstrated that exosomes from differentiating HSkM reduced the fibrotic area and increased the number of regenerated myofibers in the injury site, resulting in significant improvement of skeletal muscle regeneration. Our findings suggest that exosomes act as a biochemical cue directing stem cell differentiation and provide a cell-free therapeutic approach for muscle regeneration.

  6. Smooth Muscle Precursor Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Li, Yan Hui; Wei, Yi; Green, Morgaine; Wani, Prachi; Zhang, Pengbo; Pera, Renee Reijo; Chen, Bertha

    2016-01-01

    There is great interest in using stem cells (SC) to regenerate a deficient urethral sphincter in patients with urinary incontinence. The smooth muscle component of the sphincter is a significant contributor to sphincter function. However, current translational efforts for sphincter muscle restoration focus only on skeletal muscle regeneration because they rely on adult mesenchymal SC as cell source. These adult SC do not yield sufficient smooth muscle cells (SMCs) for transplantation. We may be able to overcome this limitation by using pluripotent stem cell (PSC) to derive SMCs. Hence, we sought to investigate whether smooth muscle precursor cells (pSMCs) derived from human PSCs can restore urethral function in an animal model generated by surgical urethrolysis and ovariectomy. Rats were divided into four groups: control (no intervention), sham saline (surgery + saline injection), bladder SMC (surgery + human bladder SMC injection), and treatment (surgery + pSMC injection, which includes human embryonic stem cell (hESC) H9-derived pSMC, episomal reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)-derived pSMC, or viral reprogrammed iPSC-derived pSMC). pSMCs (2 × 106 cells/rat) were injected periurethrally 3 weeks postsurgery. Leak point pressure (LPP) and baseline external urethral sphincter electromyography were measured 5 weeks postinjection. Both iPSC-derived pSMC treatment groups showed significantly higher LPP compared to the sham saline group, consistent with restoration of urethral sphincter function. While the difference between the H9-derived pSMC treatment and sham saline group was not significant, it did show a trend toward restoration of the LPP to the level of intact controls. Our data indicate that pSMCs derived from human PSCs (hESC and iPSC) can restore sphincter function. PMID:26785911

  7. Fibroblast growth factor-23 induces cellular senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells from skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sato, Chisato; Iso, Yoshitaka; Mizukami, Takuya; Otabe, Koji; Sasai, Masahiro; Kurata, Masaaki; Sanbe, Takeyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro; Miyazaki, Akira; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-02-12

    Although muscle wasting and/or degeneration are prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease, it remains unknown whether FGF-23 influences muscle homeostasis and regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in skeletal muscle are distinct from satellite cells and have a known association with muscle degeneration. In this study we sought to investigate the effects of FGF-23 on MSCs isolated from human skeletal muscle in vitro. The MSCs expressed FGF receptors (1 through 4) and angiotensin-II type 1 receptor, but no traces of the Klotho gene were detected. MSCs and satellite cells were treated with FGF-23 and angiotensin-II for 48 h. Treatment with FGF-23 significantly decreased the number of MSCs compared to controls, while treatment with angiotensin-II did not. FGF-23 and angiotensin-II both left the cell counts of the satellite cells unchanged. The FGF-23-treated MSCs exhibited the senescent phenotype, as judged by senescence-associated β-galactosidase assay, cell morphology, and increased expression of p53 and p21 in western blot analysis. FGF-23 also significantly altered the gene expression of oxidative stress regulators in the cells. In conclusion, FGF-23 induced premature senescence in MSCs from skeletal muscle via the p53/p21/oxidative-stress pathway. The interaction between the MSCs and FGF-23 may play a key role in the impaired muscle reparative mechanisms of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26797283

  8. Fibroblast growth factor-23 induces cellular senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells from skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sato, Chisato; Iso, Yoshitaka; Mizukami, Takuya; Otabe, Koji; Sasai, Masahiro; Kurata, Masaaki; Sanbe, Takeyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro; Miyazaki, Akira; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-02-12

    Although muscle wasting and/or degeneration are prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease, it remains unknown whether FGF-23 influences muscle homeostasis and regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in skeletal muscle are distinct from satellite cells and have a known association with muscle degeneration. In this study we sought to investigate the effects of FGF-23 on MSCs isolated from human skeletal muscle in vitro. The MSCs expressed FGF receptors (1 through 4) and angiotensin-II type 1 receptor, but no traces of the Klotho gene were detected. MSCs and satellite cells were treated with FGF-23 and angiotensin-II for 48 h. Treatment with FGF-23 significantly decreased the number of MSCs compared to controls, while treatment with angiotensin-II did not. FGF-23 and angiotensin-II both left the cell counts of the satellite cells unchanged. The FGF-23-treated MSCs exhibited the senescent phenotype, as judged by senescence-associated β-galactosidase assay, cell morphology, and increased expression of p53 and p21 in western blot analysis. FGF-23 also significantly altered the gene expression of oxidative stress regulators in the cells. In conclusion, FGF-23 induced premature senescence in MSCs from skeletal muscle via the p53/p21/oxidative-stress pathway. The interaction between the MSCs and FGF-23 may play a key role in the impaired muscle reparative mechanisms of chronic kidney disease.

  9. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  10. SMOOTH MUSCLE STEM CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) originate from multiple types of progenitor cells. In the embryo, the most well-studied SMC progenitor is the cardiac neural crest stem cell. Smooth muscle differentiation in the neural crest lineage is controlled by a combination of cell intrinsic factors, includ...

  11. Genetic complementation of human muscle cells via directed stem cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Manuel A F V; Swildens, Jim; Holkers, Maarten; Narain, Anjali; van Nierop, Gijsbert P; van de Watering, Marloes J M; Knaän-Shanzer, Shoshan; de Vries, Antoine A F

    2008-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the X chromosome-linked DMD gene, which encodes the sarcolemma-stabilizing protein-dystrophin. Initial attempts at DMD therapy deployed muscle progenitor cells from healthy donors. The utilization of these cells is, however, hampered by their immunogenicity, while those from DMD patients are scarce and display limited ex vivo replication. Nonmuscle cells with myogenic capacity may offer valuable alternatives especially if, to allow autologous transplantation, they are amenable to genetic intervention. As a paradigm for therapeutic gene transfer by heterotypic cell fusion we are investigating whether human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can serve as donors of recombinant DMD genes for recipient human muscle cells. Here, we show that forced MyoD expression in hMSCs greatly increases their tendency to participate in human myotube formation turning them into improved DNA delivery vehicles. Efficient loading of hMSCs with recombinant DMD was achieved through a new tropism-modified high-capacity adenoviral (hcAd) vector directing striated muscle-specific synthesis of full-length dystrophin. This study introduces the principle of genetic complementation of gene-defective cells via directed cell fusion and provides an initial framework to test whether transient MyoD synthesis in autologous, gene-corrected hMSCs increases their potential for treating DMD and, possibly, other muscular dystrophies.

  12. Robust derivation of epicardium and its differentiated smooth muscle cell progeny from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Dharini; Gambardella, Laure; Bernard, William G; Serrano, Felipe; Mascetti, Victoria L; Pedersen, Roger A; Talasila, Amarnath; Sinha, Sanjay

    2015-04-15

    The epicardium has emerged as a multipotent cardiovascular progenitor source with therapeutic potential for coronary smooth muscle cell, cardiac fibroblast (CF) and cardiomyocyte regeneration, owing to its fundamental role in heart development and its potential ability to initiate myocardial repair in injured adult tissues. Here, we describe a chemically defined method for generating epicardium and epicardium-derived smooth muscle cells (EPI-SMCs) and CFs from human pluripotent stem cells (HPSCs) through an intermediate lateral plate mesoderm (LM) stage. HPSCs were initially differentiated to LM in the presence of FGF2 and high levels of BMP4. The LM was robustly differentiated to an epicardial lineage by activation of WNT, BMP and retinoic acid signalling pathways. HPSC-derived epicardium displayed enhanced expression of epithelial- and epicardium-specific markers, exhibited morphological features comparable with human foetal epicardial explants and engrafted in the subepicardial space in vivo. The in vitro-derived epicardial cells underwent an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition when treated with PDGF-BB and TGFβ1, resulting in vascular SMCs that displayed contractile ability in response to vasoconstrictors. Furthermore, the EPI-SMCs displayed low density lipoprotein uptake and effective lowering of lipoprotein levels upon treatment with statins, similar to primary human coronary artery SMCs. Cumulatively, these findings suggest that HPSC-derived epicardium and EPI-SMCs could serve as important tools for studying human cardiogenesis, and as a platform for vascular disease modelling and drug screening.

  13. Ex Vivo Expansion and In Vivo Self-Renewal of Human Muscle Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Charville, Gregory W; Cheung, Tom H; Yoo, Bryan; Santos, Pauline J; Lee, Gordon K; Shrager, Joseph B; Rando, Thomas A

    2015-10-13

    Adult skeletal muscle stem cells, or satellite cells (SCs), regenerate functional muscle following transplantation into injured or diseased tissue. To gain insight into human SC (huSC) biology, we analyzed transcriptome dynamics by RNA sequencing of prospectively isolated quiescent and activated huSCs. This analysis indicated that huSCs differentiate and lose proliferative potential when maintained in high-mitogen conditions ex vivo. Further analysis of gene expression revealed that p38 MAPK acts in a transcriptional network underlying huSC self-renewal. Activation of p38 signaling correlated with huSC differentiation, while inhibition of p38 reversibly prevented differentiation, enabling expansion of huSCs. When transplanted, expanded huSCs differentiated to generate chimeric muscle and engrafted as SCs in the sublaminar niche with a greater frequency than freshly isolated cells or cells cultured without p38 inhibition. These studies indicate characteristics of the huSC transcriptome that promote expansion ex vivo to allow enhanced functional engraftment of a defined population of self-renewing huSCs. PMID:26344908

  14. Generation of human muscle fibers and satellite-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chal, Jérome; Al Tanoury, Ziad; Hestin, Marie; Gobert, Bénédicte; Aivio, Suvi; Hick, Aurore; Cherrier, Thomas; Nesmith, Alexander P; Parker, Kevin K; Pourquié, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    Progress toward finding a cure for muscle diseases has been slow because of the absence of relevant cellular models and the lack of a reliable source of muscle progenitors for biomedical investigation. Here we report an optimized serum-free differentiation protocol to efficiently produce striated, millimeter-long muscle fibers together with satellite-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in vitro. By mimicking key signaling events leading to muscle formation in the embryo, in particular the dual modulation of Wnt and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway signaling, this directed differentiation protocol avoids the requirement for genetic modifications or cell sorting. Robust myogenesis can be achieved in vitro within 1 month by personnel experienced in hPSC culture. The differentiating culture can be subcultured to produce large amounts of myogenic progenitors amenable to numerous downstream applications. Beyond the study of myogenesis, this differentiation method offers an attractive platform for the development of relevant in vitro models of muscle dystrophies and drug screening strategies, as well as providing a source of cells for tissue engineering and cell therapy approaches. PMID:27583644

  15. Generation of human muscle fibers and satellite-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chal, Jérome; Al Tanoury, Ziad; Hestin, Marie; Gobert, Bénédicte; Aivio, Suvi; Hick, Aurore; Cherrier, Thomas; Nesmith, Alexander P; Parker, Kevin K; Pourquié, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    Progress toward finding a cure for muscle diseases has been slow because of the absence of relevant cellular models and the lack of a reliable source of muscle progenitors for biomedical investigation. Here we report an optimized serum-free differentiation protocol to efficiently produce striated, millimeter-long muscle fibers together with satellite-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in vitro. By mimicking key signaling events leading to muscle formation in the embryo, in particular the dual modulation of Wnt and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway signaling, this directed differentiation protocol avoids the requirement for genetic modifications or cell sorting. Robust myogenesis can be achieved in vitro within 1 month by personnel experienced in hPSC culture. The differentiating culture can be subcultured to produce large amounts of myogenic progenitors amenable to numerous downstream applications. Beyond the study of myogenesis, this differentiation method offers an attractive platform for the development of relevant in vitro models of muscle dystrophies and drug screening strategies, as well as providing a source of cells for tissue engineering and cell therapy approaches.

  16. Differentiation of Human Induced-Pluripotent Stem Cells into Smooth-Muscle Cells: Two Novel Protocols.

    PubMed

    Yang, Libang; Geng, Zhaohui; Nickel, Thomas; Johnson, Caitlin; Gao, Lin; Dutton, James; Hou, Cody; Zhang, Jianyi

    2016-01-01

    Conventional protocols for differentiating human induced-pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) can be inefficient and generally fail to yield cells with a specific SMC phenotype (i.e., contractile or synthetic SMCs). Here, we present two novel hiPSC-SMC differentiation protocols that yield SMCs with predominantly contractile or synthetic phenotypes. Flow cytometry analyses of smooth-muscle actin (SMA) expression indicated that ~45% of the cells obtained with each protocol assumed an SMC phenotype, and that the populations could be purified to ~95% via metabolic selection. Assessments of cellular mRNA and/or protein levels indicated that SMA, myosin heavy chain II, collagen 1, calponin, transgelin, connexin 43, and vimentin expression in the SMCs obtained via the Contractile SMC protocol and in SMCs differentiated via a traditional protocol were similar, while SMCs produced via the Sythetic SMC protocol expressed less calponin, more collagen 1, and more connexin 43. Differences were also observed in functional assessments of the two SMC populations: the two-dimensional surface area of Contractile SMCs declined more extensively (to 12% versus 44% of original size) in response to carbachol treatment, while quantification of cell migration and proliferation were greater in Synthetic SMCs. Collectively, these data demonstrate that our novel differentiation protocols can efficiently generate SMCs from hiPSCs. PMID:26771193

  17. Improved Neurological Outcome by Intramuscular Injection of Human Amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells in a Muscle Denervation Model

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hong-Lin; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Lu, Zong-Han; Chiang, Chien-Yi; Yang, Dar-Yu; Sheehan, Jason; Pan, Hung-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The skeletal muscle develops various degrees of atrophy and metabolic dysfunction following nerve injury. Neurotrophic factors are essential for muscle regeneration. Human amniotic fluid derived stem cells (AFS) have the potential to secrete various neurotrophic factors necessary for nerve regeneration. In the present study, we assess the outcome of neurological function by intramuscular injection of AFS in a muscle denervation and nerve anastomosis model. Materials and Methods Seventy two Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200–250 gm were enrolled in this study. Muscle denervation model was conducted by transverse resection of a sciatic nerve with the proximal end sutured into the gluteal muscle. The nerve anastomosis model was performed by transverse resection of the sciatic nerve followed by four stitches reconnection. These animals were allocated to three groups: control, electrical muscle stimulation, and AFS groups. Results NT-3 (Neurotrophin 3), BDNF (Brain derived neurotrophic factor), CNTF (Ciliary neurotrophic factor), and GDNF (Glia cell line derived neurotrophic factor) were highly expressed in AFS cells and supernatant of culture medium. Intra-muscular injection of AFS exerted significant expression of several neurotrophic factors over the distal end of nerve and denervated muscle. AFS caused high expression of Bcl-2 in denervated muscle with a reciprocal decrease of Bad and Bax. AFS preserved the muscle morphology with high expression of desmin and acetylcholine receptors. Up to two months, AFS produced significant improvement in electrophysiological study and neurological functions such as SFI (sciatic nerve function index) and Catwalk gait analysis. There was also significant preservation of the number of anterior horn cells and increased nerve myelination as well as muscle morphology. Conclusion Intramuscular injection of AFS can protect muscle apoptosis and likely does so through the secretion of various neurotrophic factors. This protection

  18. Vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation from human stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Sarah K; Husain, Mansoor

    2016-05-15

    Transplantation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a promising cellular therapy to promote angiogenesis and wound healing. However, VSMCs are derived from diverse embryonic sources which may influence their role in the development of vascular disease and in its therapeutic modulation. Despite progress in understanding the mechanisms of VSMC differentiation, there remains a shortage of robust methods for generating lineage-specific VSMCs from pluripotent and adult stem/progenitor cells in serum-free conditions. Here we describe a method for differentiating pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as skin-derived precursors, into lateral plate-derived VSMCs including 'coronary-like' VSMCs and neural crest-derived VSMC, respectively. We believe this approach will have broad applications in modeling origin-specific disease vulnerability and in developing personalized cell-based vascular grafts for regenerative medicine. PMID:26678794

  19. Smooth-muscle-like cells derived from human embryonic stem cells support and augment cord-like structures in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vo, Elaine; Hanjaya-Putra, Donny; Zha, Yuanting; Kusuma, Sravanti; Gerecht, Sharon

    2010-06-01

    Engineering vascularized tissue is crucial for its successful implantation, survival, and integration with the host tissue. Vascular smooth muscle cells (v-SMCs) provide physical support to the vasculature and aid in maintaining endothelial viability. In this study, we show an efficient derivation of v-SMCs from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and demonstrate their functionality and ability to support the vasculature in vitro. Human ESCs were differentiated in monolayers and supplemented with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1). Human ESC-derived smooth-muscle-like cells (SMLCs) were found to highly express specific smooth muscle cell (SMC) markers--including alpha-smooth muscle actin, calponin, SM22, and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain--to produce and secrete fibronectin and collagen, and to contract in response to carbachol. In vitro tubulogenesis assays revealed that these hESC-derived SMLCs interacted with human endothelial progenitor cell (EPCs) to form longer and thicker cord-like structures in vitro. We have demonstrated a simple protocol for the efficient derivation of highly purified SMLCs from hESCs. These in vitro functional SMLCs interacted with EPCs to support and augment capillary-like structures (CLSs), demonstrating the potential of hESCs as a cell source for therapeutic vascular tissue engineering.

  20. VCAM-1 expression on dystrophic muscle vessels has a critical role in the recruitment of human blood-derived CD133+ stem cells after intra-arterial transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gavina, Manuela; Belicchi, Marzia; Rossi, Barbara; Ottoboni, Linda; Colombo, Fabio; Meregalli, Mirella; Battistelli, Maurizio; Forzenigo, Laura; Biondetti, Piero; Pisati, Federica; Parolini, Daniele; Farini, Andrea; Issekutz, Andrew C; Bresolin, Nereo; Rustichelli, Franco; Constantin, Gabriela; Torrente, Yvan

    2006-10-15

    Recently our group demonstrated the myogenic capacity of human CD133(+) cells isolated from peripheral blood when delivered in vivo through the arterial circulation into the muscle of dystrophic scid/mdx mice. CD133(+) stem cells express the adhesion molecules CD44, LFA-1, PSGL-1, alpha4-integrins, L-selectin, and chemokine receptor CCR7. Moreover these cells adhere in vitro to VCAM-1 spontaneously and after stimulation with CCL19. Importantly, after muscle exercise, we found that the expression of VCAM-1 is strongly up-regulated in dystrophic muscle vessels, whereas the number of rolling and firmly adhered CD133(+) stem cells significantly increased. Moreover, human dystrophin expression was significantly increased when muscle exercise was performed 24 hours before the intra-arterial injection of human CD133(+) cells. Finally, treatment of exercised dystrophic mice with anti-VCAM-1 antibodies led to a dramatic blockade of CD133(+) stem cell migration into the dystrophic muscle. Our results show for the first time that the expression of VCAM-1 on dystrophic muscle vessels induced by exercise controls muscle homing of human CD133(+) stem cells, opening new perspectives for a potential therapy of muscular dystrophy based on the intra-arterial delivery of CD133(+) stem cells.

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Extra Ocular Muscle Harbor Neuroectodermal Differentiation Potential

    PubMed Central

    Magdalene, Damaris; Bhattacharyya, Jina; Jaganathan, Bithiah Grace

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been proposed as suitable candidates for cell therapy for neurological disorderssince they exhibit good neuronal differentiation capacity. However, for better therapeutic outcomes, it is necessary to isolate MSC from a suitable tissue sourcethat posses high neuronal differentiation. In this context, we isolated MSC from extra ocular muscle (EOM) tissue and tested the in vitro neuronal differentiation potential. In the current study, EOM tissue derived MSC were characterized and compared with bone marrow derived MSC. We found that EOM derived MSC proliferated as a monolayer and showed similarities in morphology, growth properties and cell surface marker expression with bone marrow derived MSC and expressed high levels of NES, OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 in its undifferentiated state. They also expressed embryonic cell surface marker SSEA4 and their intracellular mitochondrial distribution pattern was similar to that of multipotent stem cells. Although EOM derived MSC differentiated readily into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes, they differentiated more efficiently into neuroectodermal cells. The differentiation into neuroectodermal cellswas confirmed by the expression of neuronal markers NGFR and MAP2B. Thus, EOM derived MSC might be good candidates for stem cell based therapies for treating neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27248788

  2. Muscle stem cells at a glance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu Xin; Dumont, Nicolas A.; Rudnicki, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Muscle stem cells facilitate the long-term regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle. This self-renewing population of satellite cells has only recently been defined through genetic and transplantation experiments. Although muscle stem cells remain in a dormant quiescent state in uninjured muscle, they are poised to activate and produce committed progeny. Unlike committed myogenic progenitor cells, the self-renewal capacity gives muscle stem cells the ability to engraft as satellite cells and capitulate long-term regeneration. Similar to other adult stem cells, understanding the molecular regulation of muscle stem cells has significant implications towards the development of pharmacological or cell-based therapies for muscle disorders. This Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster will review satellite cell characteristics and therapeutic potential, and provide an overview of the muscle stem cell hallmarks: quiescence, self-renewal and commitment. PMID:25300792

  3. Unique proliferation response in odontoblastic cells derived from human skeletal muscle stem cells by cytokine-induced matrix metalloproteinase-3

    SciTech Connect

    Ozeki, Nobuaki; Hase, Naoko; Kawai, Rie; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Hiyama, Taiki; Kondo, Ayami; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Mogi, Makio

    2015-02-01

    A pro-inflammatory cytokine mixture (CM: interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ) and IL-1β-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 activity have been shown to increase the proliferation of rat dental pulp cells and murine stem cell-derived odontoblast-like cells. This suggests that MMP-3 may regulate wound healing and regeneration in the odontoblast-rich dental pulp. Here, we determined whether these results can be extrapolated to human dental pulp by investigating the effects of CM-induced MMP-3 up-regulation on the proliferation and apoptosis of purified odontoblast-like cells derived from human skeletal muscle stem cells. We used siRNA to specifically reduce MMP-3 expression. We found that CM treatment increased MMP-3 mRNA and protein levels as well as MMP-3 activity. Cell proliferation was also markedly increased, with no changes in apoptosis, upon treatment with CM and following the application of exogenous MMP-3. Endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases were constitutively expressed during all experiments and unaffected by MMP-3. Although treatment with MMP-3 siRNA suppressed cell proliferation, it also unexpectedly increased apoptosis. This siRNA-mediated increase in apoptosis could be reversed by exogenous MMP-3. These results demonstrate that cytokine-induced MMP-3 activity regulates cell proliferation and suppresses apoptosis in human odontoblast-like cells. - Highlights: • Pro-inflammatory cytokines induce MMP-3 activity in human odontoblast-like cells. • Increased MMP-3 activity can promote cell proliferation in odontoblasts. • Specific loss of MMP-3 increases apoptosis in odontoblasts. • MMP-3 has potential as a promising new target for pupal repair and regeneration.

  4. Cooperation of endothelial and smooth muscle cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells enhances neovascularization in dermal wounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Koung Li; Song, Sun-Hwa; Choi, Kyu-Sil; Suh, Wonhee

    2013-11-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are generated through the reprogramming of somatic cells into an embryonic stem cell-like state, such that vascular cells differentiated from hiPSCs might be a suitable autologous cell source for vascular regeneration. The goal of this study was to assess whether cotransplantation of endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) differentiated from hiPSCs could promote neovascularization and tissue repair in a murine dermal wound model. hiPSCs were differentiated into ECs and SMCs; the differentiated cells displayed cell-specific surface markers. Compared to primary somatic cells, ECs and SMCs, which were differentiated from hiPSCs, strongly cooperated to enhance in vitro tubular network formation. In vivo gel assays in athymic nude mice showed that the coimplantation of differentiated ECs and SMCs significantly increased vascularization, unlike that observed in the case of implantation of differentiated ECs alone. In a murine full-thickness wound model, when compared with the transplantation of primary somatic cells or phosphate-buffered saline, cotransplantation of differentiated ECs and SMCs markedly enhanced neovascularization in injured tissues and accelerated wound healing. These results demonstrate that cotransplantation of hiPSC-derived ECs and SMCs may be feasible as a new autologous cell therapy for neovascularization and tissue repair.

  5. Epigenetic reprogramming of human embryonic stem cells into skeletal muscle cells and generation of contractile myospheres.

    PubMed

    Albini, Sonia; Coutinho, Paula; Malecova, Barbora; Giordani, Lorenzo; Savchenko, Alex; Forcales, Sonia Vanina; Puri, Pier Lorenzo

    2013-03-28

    Direct generation of a homogeneous population of skeletal myoblasts from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and formation of three-dimensional contractile structures for disease modeling in vitro are current challenges in regenerative medicine. Previous studies reported on the generation of myoblasts from ESC-derived embryoid bodies (EB), but not from undifferentiated ESCs, indicating the requirement for mesodermal transition to promote skeletal myogenesis. Here, we show that selective absence of the SWI/SNF component BAF60C (encoded by SMARCD3) confers on hESCs resistance to MyoD-mediated activation of skeletal myogenesis. Forced expression of BAF60C enables MyoD to directly activate skeletal myogenesis in hESCs by instructing MyoD positioning and allowing chromatin remodeling at target genes. BAF60C/MyoD-expressing hESCs are epigenetically committed myogenic progenitors, which bypass the mesodermal requirement and, when cultured as floating clusters, give rise to contractile three-dimensional myospheres composed of skeletal myotubes. These results identify BAF60C as a key epigenetic determinant of hESC commitment to the myogenic lineage and establish the molecular basis for the generation of hESC-derived myospheres exploitable for "disease in a dish" models of muscular physiology and dysfunction.

  6. A comparison of human smooth muscle and mesenchymal stem cells as potential cell sources for tissue-engineered vascular patches.

    PubMed

    Williams, Corin; Xie, Angela W; Emani, Sirisha; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Emani, Sitaram M; Wong, Joyce Y

    2012-05-01

    In pediatric patients requiring vascular reconstruction, the development of a cell-based tissue-engineered vascular patch (TEVP) has great potential to overcome current issues with nonliving graft materials. Determining the optimal cell source is especially critical to TEVP success. In this study, we compared the ability of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HuAoSMCs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to form cell sheets on thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm) substrates. hMSCs treated with transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) and ascorbic acid (AA) had higher expression of SMC-specific proteins compared to HuAoSMCs. hMSCs also had larger cell area and grew to confluence more quickly on PIPAAm than did HuAoSMCs. hMSCs typically formed cell sheets in 2-3 weeks and had greater wet tissue weight and collagen content compared with HuAoSMC sheets, which generally required growth for up to 5 weeks. Assays for calcification and alkaline phosphatase activity revealed that the osteogenic potential of TGFβ1+AA-treated hMSCs was low; however, Alcian Blue staining suggested high chondrogenic behavior of TGFβ1+AA-treated hMSCs. Although hMSCs are promising for cell-based TEVPs in their ability to form robust tissue with significant extracellular matrix content, improved control over hMSC behavior will be required for long-term TEVP success.

  7. Biomechanical strain induces elastin and collagen production in human pluripotent stem cell-derived vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wanjare, Maureen; Agarwal, Nayan

    2015-01-01

    Blood vessels are subjected to numerous biomechanical forces that work harmoniously but, when unbalanced because of vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) dysfunction, can trigger a wide range of ailments such as cerebrovascular, peripheral artery, and coronary artery diseases. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) serve as useful therapeutic tools that may help provide insight on the effect that such biomechanical stimuli have on vSMC function and differentiation. In this study, we aimed to examine the effect of biomechanical strain on vSMCs derived from hPSCs. The effects of two types of tensile strain on hPSC-vSMC derivatives at different stages of differentiation were examined. The derivatives included smooth muscle-like cells (SMLCs), mature SMLCs, and contractile vSMCs. All vSMC derivatives aligned perpendicularly to the direction of cyclic uniaxial strain. Serum deprivation and short-term uniaxial strain had a synergistic effect in enhancing collagen type I, fibronectin, and elastin gene expression. Furthermore, long-term uniaxial strain deterred collagen type III gene expression, whereas long-term circumferential strain upregulated both collagen type III and elastin gene expression. Finally, long-term uniaxial strain downregulated extracellular matrix (ECM) expression in more mature vSMC derivatives while upregulating elastin in less mature vSMC derivatives. Overall, our findings suggest that in vitro application of both cyclic uniaxial and circumferential tensile strain on hPSC-vSMC derivatives induces cell alignment and affects ECM gene expression. Therefore, mechanical stimulation of hPSC-vSMC derivatives using tensile strain may be important in modulating the phenotype and thus the function of vSMCs in tissue-engineered vessels. PMID:26108668

  8. Biomechanical strain induces elastin and collagen production in human pluripotent stem cell-derived vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wanjare, Maureen; Agarwal, Nayan

    2015-01-01

    Blood vessels are subjected to numerous biomechanical forces that work harmoniously but, when unbalanced because of vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) dysfunction, can trigger a wide range of ailments such as cerebrovascular, peripheral artery, and coronary artery diseases. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) serve as useful therapeutic tools that may help provide insight on the effect that such biomechanical stimuli have on vSMC function and differentiation. In this study, we aimed to examine the effect of biomechanical strain on vSMCs derived from hPSCs. The effects of two types of tensile strain on hPSC-vSMC derivatives at different stages of differentiation were examined. The derivatives included smooth muscle-like cells (SMLCs), mature SMLCs, and contractile vSMCs. All vSMC derivatives aligned perpendicularly to the direction of cyclic uniaxial strain. Serum deprivation and short-term uniaxial strain had a synergistic effect in enhancing collagen type I, fibronectin, and elastin gene expression. Furthermore, long-term uniaxial strain deterred collagen type III gene expression, whereas long-term circumferential strain upregulated both collagen type III and elastin gene expression. Finally, long-term uniaxial strain downregulated extracellular matrix (ECM) expression in more mature vSMC derivatives while upregulating elastin in less mature vSMC derivatives. Overall, our findings suggest that in vitro application of both cyclic uniaxial and circumferential tensile strain on hPSC-vSMC derivatives induces cell alignment and affects ECM gene expression. Therefore, mechanical stimulation of hPSC-vSMC derivatives using tensile strain may be important in modulating the phenotype and thus the function of vSMCs in tissue-engineered vessels. PMID:26108668

  9. Ex Vivo Gene Therapy Using Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Deliver Growth Factors in the Skeletal Muscle of a Familial ALS Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masatoshi; Svendsen, Clive N

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic protein and molecule delivery to target sites by transplanted human stem cells holds great promise for ex vivo gene therapy. Our group has demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of ex vivo gene therapy targeting the skeletal muscles in a transgenic rat model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We used human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and genetically modified them to release neuroprotective growth factors such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Intramuscular growth factor delivery via hMSCs can enhance neuromuscular innervation and motor neuron survival in a rat model of ALS (SOD1(G93A) transgenic rats). Here, we describe the protocol of ex vivo delivery of growth factors via lentiviral vector-mediated genetic modification of hMSCs and hMSC transplantation into the skeletal muscle of a familial ALS rat model.

  10. Platelet-Rich Plasma Promotes the Proliferation of Human Muscle Derived Progenitor Cells and Maintains Their Stemness

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongshuai; Usas, Arvydas; Poddar, Minakshi; Chen, Chien-Wen; Thompson, Seth; Ahani, Bahar; Cummins, James; Lavasani, Mitra; Huard, Johnny

    2013-01-01

    Human muscle-derived progenitor cells (hMDPCs) offer great promise for muscle cell-based regenerative medicine; however, prolonged ex-vivo expansion using animal sera is necessary to acquire sufficient cells for transplantation. Due to the risks associated with the use of animal sera, the development of a strategy for the ex vivo expansion of hMDPCs is required. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for the ex-vivo expansion of hMDPCs. Pre-plated MDPCs, myoendothelial cells, and pericytes are three populations of hMDPCs that we isolated by the modified pre-plate technique and Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS), respectively. Pooled allogeneic human PRP was obtained from a local blood bank, and the effect that thrombin-activated PRP-releasate supplemented media had on the ex-vivo expansion of the hMDPCs was tested against FBS supplemented media, both in vitro and in vivo. PRP significantly enhanced short and long-term cell proliferation, with or without FBS supplementation. Antibody-neutralization of PDGF significantly blocked the mitogenic/proliferative effects that PRP had on the hMDPCs. A more stable and sustained expression of markers associated with stemness, and a decreased expression of lineage specific markers was observed in the PRP-expanded cells when compared with the FBS-expanded cells. The in vitro osteogenic, chondrogenic, and myogenic differentiation capacities of the hMDPCs were not altered when expanded in media supplemented with PRP. All populations of hMDPCs that were expanded in PRP supplemented media retained their ability to regenerate myofibers in vivo. Our data demonstrated that PRP promoted the proliferation and maintained the multi-differentiation capacities of the hMDPCs during ex-vivo expansion by maintaining the cells in an undifferentiated state. Moreover, PDGF appears to be a key contributing factor to the beneficial effect that PRP has on the proliferation of hMDPCs. PMID

  11. Myogenic differentiation potential of human tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells and their potential for use to promote skeletal muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    PARK, SAEYOUNG; CHOI, YOONYOUNG; JUNG, NAMHEE; YU, YEONSIL; RYU, KYUNG-HA; KIM, HAN SU; JO, INHO; CHOI, BYUNG-OK; JUNG, SUNG-CHUL

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are regarded as an important source of cells which may be used to promote the regeneration of skeletal muscle (SKM) which has been damaged due to defects in the organization of muscle tissue caused by congenital diseases, trauma or tumor removal. In particular, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which require less invasive harvesting techniques, represent a valuable source of cells for stem cell therapy. In the present study, we demonstrated that human tonsil-derived MSCs (T-MSCs) may differentiate into myogenic cells in vitro and that the transplantation of myoblasts and myocytes generated from human T-MSCs mediates the recovery of muscle function in vivo. In order to induce myogenic differentiation, the T-MSC-derived spheres were cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/nutrient mixture F-12 (DMEM/F-12) supplemented with 1 ng/ml transforming growth factor-β, non-essential amino acids and insulin-transferrin-selenium for 4 days followed by culture in myogenic induction medium [low-glucose DMEM containing 2% fetal bovine serum (FBS) and 10 ng/ml insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1)] for 14 days. The T-MSCs sequentially differentiated into myoblasts and skeletal myocytes, as evidenced by the increased expression of skeletal myogenesis-related markers [including α-actinin, troponin I type 1 (TNNI1) and myogenin] and the formation of myotubes in vitro. The in situ transplantation of T-MSCs into mice with a partial myectomy of the right gastrocnemius muscle enhanced muscle function, as demonstrated by gait assessment (footprint analysis), and restored the shape of SKM without forming teratomas. Thus, T-MSCs may differentiate into myogenic cells and effectively regenerate SKM following injury. These results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of T-MSCs to promote SKM regeneration following injury. PMID:27035161

  12. Human Muscle Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The stimulus of gravity affects RNA production, which helps maintain the strength of human muscles on Earth (top), as seen in this section of muscle fiber taken from an astronaut before spaceflight. Astronauts in orbit and patients on Earth fighting muscle-wasting diseases need countermeasures to prevent muscle atrophy, indicated here with white lipid droplets (bottom) in the muscle sample taken from the same astronaut after spaceflight. Kerneth Baldwin of the University of California, Irvine, is conducting research on how reducing the stimulus of gravity affects production of the RNA that the body uses as a blueprint for making muscle proteins. Muscle proteins are what give muscles their strength, so when the RNA blueprints aren't available for producing new proteins to replace old ones -- a situation that occurs in microgravity -- the muscles atrophy. When the skeletal muscle system is exposed to microgravity during spaceflight, the muscles undergo a reduced mass that translates to a reduction in strength. When this happens, muscle endurance decreases and the muscles are more prone to injury, so individuals could have problems in performing extravehicular activity [space walks] or emergency egress because their bodies are functionally compromised.

  13. Direct muscle delivery of GDNF with human mesenchymal stem cells improves motor neuron survival and function in a rat model of familial ALS

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masatoshi; McHugh, Jacalyn; Tork, Craig; Shelley, Brandon; Hayes, Antonio; Bellantuono, Ilaria; Aebischer, Patrick; Svendsen, Clive N.

    2008-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease in which there is a progressive loss of motor neurons and their connections to muscle leading to paralysis. To maintain muscle connections in a rat model of familial ALS, we performed intramuscular transplantation with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) as “Trojan horses” to deliver growth factors to the terminals of motor neurons as well as the skeletal muscles. hMSC engineered to secrete glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (hMSC-GDNF) were transplanted bilaterally into three muscle groups. The cells survived within the muscle, released GDNF, and significantly increased the number of neuromuscular connections and motor neuron cell bodies in the spinal cord at mid stages of the disease. Furthermore, intramuscular transplantation with hMSC-GDNF could ameliorate motor neuron loss within the spinal cord which connected to the limb muscles with transplants. While disease onset was similar in all animals, hMSC-GDNF significantly delayed disease progression, increasing overall lifespan by up to 28 days, which is one of the longest effects on survival noted for this rat model of familial ALS. This pre-clinical data provides a novel and practical approach towards ex vivo gene therapy for ALS. PMID:18797452

  14. Effects of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Isolated from Wharton's Jelly of the Umbilical Cord and Conditioned Media on Skeletal Muscle Regeneration Using a Myectomy Model

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, T.; Armada-da Silva, P. A. S.; Amorim, I.; Rêma, A.; Caseiro, A. R.; Gärtner, A.; Rodrigues, M.; Lopes, M. A.; Bártolo, P. J.; Santos, J. D.; Luís, A. L.; Maurício, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has good regenerative capacity, but the extent of muscle injury and the developed fibrosis might prevent complete regeneration. The in vivo application of human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSCs) of the umbilical cord and the conditioned media (CM) where the HMSCs were cultured and expanded, associated with different vehicles to induce muscle regeneration, was evaluated in a rat myectomy model. Two commercially available vehicles and a spherical hydrogel developed by our research group were used. The treated groups obtained interesting results in terms of muscle regeneration, both in the histological and in the functional assessments. A less evident scar tissue, demonstrated by collagen type I quantification, was present in the muscles treated with HMSCs or their CM. In terms of the histological evaluation performed by ISO 10993-6 scoring, it was observed that HMSCs apparently have a long-term negative effect, since the groups treated with CM presented better scores. CM could be considered an alternative to the in vivo transplantation of these cells, as it can benefit from the local tissue response to secreted molecules with similar results in terms of muscular regeneration. Searching for an optimal vehicle might be the key point in the future of skeletal muscle tissue engineering. PMID:25379040

  15. Effects of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Isolated from Wharton's Jelly of the Umbilical Cord and Conditioned Media on Skeletal Muscle Regeneration Using a Myectomy Model.

    PubMed

    Pereira, T; Armada-da Silva, P A S; Amorim, I; Rêma, A; Caseiro, A R; Gärtner, A; Rodrigues, M; Lopes, M A; Bártolo, P J; Santos, J D; Luís, A L; Maurício, A C

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has good regenerative capacity, but the extent of muscle injury and the developed fibrosis might prevent complete regeneration. The in vivo application of human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSCs) of the umbilical cord and the conditioned media (CM) where the HMSCs were cultured and expanded, associated with different vehicles to induce muscle regeneration, was evaluated in a rat myectomy model. Two commercially available vehicles and a spherical hydrogel developed by our research group were used. The treated groups obtained interesting results in terms of muscle regeneration, both in the histological and in the functional assessments. A less evident scar tissue, demonstrated by collagen type I quantification, was present in the muscles treated with HMSCs or their CM. In terms of the histological evaluation performed by ISO 10993-6 scoring, it was observed that HMSCs apparently have a long-term negative effect, since the groups treated with CM presented better scores. CM could be considered an alternative to the in vivo transplantation of these cells, as it can benefit from the local tissue response to secreted molecules with similar results in terms of muscular regeneration. Searching for an optimal vehicle might be the key point in the future of skeletal muscle tissue engineering.

  16. Pluripotent Stem Cells for Gene Therapy of Degenerative Muscle Diseases.

    PubMed

    Loperfido, Mariana; Steele-Stallard, Heather B; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; VandenDriessche, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent a unique source for cell-based therapies and regenerative medicine. The intrinsic features of these cells such as their easy accessibility and their capacity to be expanded indefinitely overcome some limitations of conventional adult stem cells. Furthermore, the possibility to derive patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in combination with the current development of gene modification methods could be used for autologous cell therapies of some genetic diseases. In particular, muscular dystrophies are considered to be a good candidate due to the lack of efficacious therapeutic treatments for patients to date, and in view of the encouraging results arising from recent preclinical studies. Some hurdles, including possible genetic instability and their efficient differentiation into muscle progenitors through vector/transgene-free methods have still to be overcome or need further optimization. Additionally, engraftment and functional contribution to muscle regeneration in pre-clinical models need to be carefully assessed before clinical translation. This review offers a summary of the advanced methods recently developed to derive muscle progenitors from pluripotent stem cells, as well as gene therapy by gene addition and gene editing methods using ZFNs, TALENs or CRISPR/Cas9. We have also discussed the main issues that need to be addressed for successful clinical translation of genetically corrected patient-specific pluripotent stem cells in autologous transplantation trials for skeletal muscle disorders.

  17. Spontaneous and specific myogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on polyethylene glycol-linked multi-walled carbon nanotube films for skeletal muscle engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunyan; Andersen, Henrik; Ozyilmaz, Barbaros; Ramaprabhu, Sundara; Pastorin, Giorgia; Ho, Han Kiat

    2015-11-21

    This study explored the influence of polyethylene glycol-linked multi-walled carbon nanotube (PEG-CNT) films on skeletal myogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). PEG-CNT films were prepared with nanoscale surface roughness, orderly arrangement of PEG-CNTs, high hydrophilicity and high mechanical strength. Notably, PEG-CNT films alone could direct the skeletal myogenic differentiation of hMSCs in the absence of myogenic induction factors. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that the non-induced hMSCs plated on the PEG-CNT films, compared to the negative control, presented significant up-regulation of general myogenic markers including early commitment markers of myoblast differentiation protein-1 (MyoD) and desmin, as well as a late phase marker of myosin heavy chain-2 (MHC). Corresponding protein analysis by immunoblot assays corroborated these results. Skeletal muscle-specific markers, fast skeletal troponin-C (TnC) and ryanodine receptor-1 (Ryr) were also significantly increased in the non-induced hMSCs on PEG-CNT films by RT-PCR. For these cells, the commitment to specific skeletal myoblasts was further proved by the absence of enhanced adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic markers. This study elucidated that PEG-CNT films supported a dedicated differentiation of hMSCs into a skeletal myogenic lineage and can work as a promising material towards skeletal muscle injury repair. PMID:26486984

  18. Cytokine Mediated Control of Muscle Stem Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Joanisse, Sophie; Parise, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells, known as satellite cells (SC), are an absolute requirement for muscle regeneration and contribute significantly to post-natal muscle growth. This stem cell population is governed by a network of transcription factors collectively referred to as the myogenic regulatory factors. These factors are responsible for the progression of a SC from the quiescent state through activation, proliferation and terminal differentiation in a process referred to as the myogenic programme. At each stage in this process, cytokines and growth factors have been shown to play a role in directing the myogenic response. The myogenic programme is complex and requires input from a host of factors that provide both stimulatory and inhibitory signals that regulate SC. Despite years of work in this field, there remains a paucity of information on the precise factors that drive the myogenic programme. In recent years, factors, such as IL-6, have been shown to be critical factors in promoting SC proliferation. In fact, a complete absence of IL-6 in skeletal muscle substantially impairs muscle SC proliferation. These observations highlight the potential importance of the inflammatory response and the cross-talk between inflammatory cells and SC in promoting muscle repair and growth. This chapter will focus on recent advances in cytokine (and some growth factors) regulation of SC. Work from cell, animal and human models will be discussed. PMID:27003395

  19. Vascular progenitor cells isolated from human embryonic stem cells give rise to endothelial and smooth muscle like cells and form vascular networks in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lino S; Gerecht, Sharon; Shieh, Hester F; Watson, Nicki; Rupnick, Maria A; Dallabrida, Susan M; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Langer, Robert

    2007-08-01

    We report that human embryonic stem cells contain a population of vascular progenitor cells that have the ability to differentiate into endothelial-like and smooth muscle (SM)-like cells. Vascular progenitor cells were isolated from EBs grown in suspension for 10 days and were characterized by expression of the endothelial/hematopoietic marker CD34 (CD34+ cells). When these cells are subsequently cultured in EGM-2 (endothelial growth medium) supplemented with vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (50 ng/mL), they give rise to endothelial-like cells characterized by a cobblestone cell morphology, expression of endothelial markers (platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1, CD34, KDR/Flk-1, vascular endothelial cadherin, von Willebrand factor), incorporation of acetylated low-density lipoprotein, and formation of capillary-like structures when placed in Matrigel. In contrast, when CD34+ cells are cultured in EGM-2 supplemented with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (50 ng/mL), they give rise to SM-like cells characterized by spindle-shape morphology, expression of SM cell markers (alpha-SM actin, SM myosin heavy chain, calponin, caldesmon, SM alpha-22), and the ability to contract and relax in response to common pharmacological agents such as carbachol and atropine but rarely form capillary-like structures when placed in Matrigel. Implantation studies in nude mice show that both cell types contribute to the formation of human microvasculature. Some microvessels contained mouse blood cells, which indicates functional integration with host vasculature. Therefore, the vascular progenitors isolated from human embryonic stem cells using methods established in the present study could provide a means to examine the mechanisms of endothelial and SM cell development, and they could also provide a potential source of cells for vascular tissue engineering.

  20. Human Adipose Tissue Derived Stem Cells as a Source of Smooth Muscle Cells in the Regeneration of Muscular Layer of Urinary Bladder Wall

    PubMed Central

    SALEM, Salah Abood; HWIE, Angela Ng Min; SAIM, Aminuddin; CHEE KONG, Christopher Ho; SAGAP, Ismail; SINGH, Rajesh; YUSOF, Mohd Reusmaazran; MD ZAINUDDIN, Zulkifili; HJ IDRUS, Ruszymah

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adipose tissue provides an abundant source of multipotent cells, which represent a source of cell-based regeneration strategies for urinary bladder smooth muscle repair. Our objective was to confirm that adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) can be differentiated into smooth muscle cells. Methods: In this study, adipose tissue samples were digested with 0.075% collagenase, and the resulting ADSCs were cultured and expanded in vitro. ADSCs at passage two were differentiated by incubation in smooth muscle inductive media (SMIM) consisting of MCDB I31 medium, 1% FBS, and 100 U/mL heparin for three and six weeks. ADSCs in non-inductive media were used as controls. Characterisation was performed by cell morphology and gene and protein expression. Result: The differentiated cells became elongated and spindle shaped, and towards the end of six weeks, sporadic cell aggregation appeared that is typical of smooth muscle cell culture. Smooth muscle markers (i.e. alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA), calponin, and myosin heavy chain (MHC)) were used to study gene expression. Expression of these genes was detected by PCR after three and six weeks of differentiation. At the protein expression level, ASMA, MHC, and smoothelin were expressed after six weeks of differentiation. However, only ASMA and smoothelin were expressed after three weeks of differentiation. Conclusion: Adipose tissue provides a possible source of smooth muscle precursor cells that possess the potential capability of smooth muscle differentiation. This represents a promising alternative for urinary bladder smooth muscle repair. PMID:24044001

  1. The emergence of Pax7-expressing muscle stem cells during vertebrate head muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Julia Meireles; Hawrot, Katarzyna; Sharpe, Colin; Noble, Anna; Wood, William M.; Jorge, Erika C.; Goldhamer, David J.; Kardon, Gabrielle; Dietrich, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Pax7 expressing muscle stem cells accompany all skeletal muscles in the body and in healthy individuals, efficiently repair muscle after injury. Currently, the in vitro manipulation and culture of these cells is still in its infancy, yet muscle stem cells may be the most promising route toward the therapy of muscle diseases such as muscular dystrophies. It is often overlooked that muscular dystrophies affect head and body skeletal muscle differently. Moreover, these muscles develop differently. Specifically, head muscle and its stem cells develop from the non-somitic head mesoderm which also has cardiac competence. To which extent head muscle stem cells retain properties of the early head mesoderm and might even be able to switch between a skeletal muscle and cardiac fate is not known. This is due to the fact that the timing and mechanisms underlying head muscle stem cell development are still obscure. Consequently, it is not clear at which time point one should compare the properties of head mesodermal cells and head muscle stem cells. To shed light on this, we traced the emergence of head muscle stem cells in the key vertebrate models for myogenesis, chicken, mouse, frog and zebrafish, using Pax7 as key marker. Our study reveals a common theme of head muscle stem cell development that is quite different from the trunk. Unlike trunk muscle stem cells, head muscle stem cells do not have a previous history of Pax7 expression, instead Pax7 expression emerges de-novo. The cells develop late, and well after the head mesoderm has committed to myogenesis. We propose that this unique mechanism of muscle stem cell development is a legacy of the evolutionary history of the chordate head mesoderm. PMID:26042028

  2. A Novel Method for Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Smooth Muscle-Like Cells on Clinically Deliverable Thermally Induced Phase Separation Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Nina; Ahmadi, Raheleh

    2015-01-01

    Muscle degeneration is a prevalent disease, particularly in aging societies where it has a huge impact on quality of life and incurs colossal health costs. Suitable donor sources of smooth muscle cells are limited and minimally invasive therapeutic approaches are sought that will augment muscle volume by delivering cells to damaged or degenerated areas of muscle. For the first time, we report the use of highly porous microcarriers produced using thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) to expand and differentiate adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSCs) into smooth muscle-like cells in a format that requires minimal manipulation before clinical delivery. AdMSCs readily attached to the surface of TIPS microcarriers and proliferated while maintained in suspension culture for 12 days. Switching the incubation medium to a differentiation medium containing 2 ng/mL transforming growth factor beta-1 resulted in a significant increase in both the mRNA and protein expression of cell contractile apparatus components caldesmon, calponin, and myosin heavy chains, indicative of a smooth muscle cell-like phenotype. Growth of smooth muscle cells on the surface of the microcarriers caused no change to the integrity of the polymer microspheres making them suitable for a cell-delivery vehicle. Our results indicate that TIPS microspheres provide an ideal substrate for the expansion and differentiation of AdMSCs into smooth muscle-like cells as well as a microcarrier delivery vehicle for the attached cells ready for therapeutic applications. PMID:25205072

  3. Spontaneous and specific myogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on polyethylene glycol-linked multi-walled carbon nanotube films for skeletal muscle engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunyan; Andersen, Henrik; Ozyilmaz, Barbaros; Ramaprabhu, Sundara; Pastorin, Giorgia; Ho, Han Kiat

    2015-10-01

    This study explored the influence of polyethylene glycol-linked multi-walled carbon nanotube (PEG-CNT) films on skeletal myogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). PEG-CNT films were prepared with nanoscale surface roughness, orderly arrangement of PEG-CNTs, high hydrophilicity and high mechanical strength. Notably, PEG-CNT films alone could direct the skeletal myogenic differentiation of hMSCs in the absence of myogenic induction factors. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that the non-induced hMSCs plated on the PEG-CNT films, compared to the negative control, presented significant up-regulation of general myogenic markers including early commitment markers of myoblast differentiation protein-1 (MyoD) and desmin, as well as a late phase marker of myosin heavy chain-2 (MHC). Corresponding protein analysis by immunoblot assays corroborated these results. Skeletal muscle-specific markers, fast skeletal troponin-C (TnC) and ryanodine receptor-1 (Ryr) were also significantly increased in the non-induced hMSCs on PEG-CNT films by RT-PCR. For these cells, the commitment to specific skeletal myoblasts was further proved by the absence of enhanced adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic markers. This study elucidated that PEG-CNT films supported a dedicated differentiation of hMSCs into a skeletal myogenic lineage and can work as a promising material towards skeletal muscle injury repair.This study explored the influence of polyethylene glycol-linked multi-walled carbon nanotube (PEG-CNT) films on skeletal myogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). PEG-CNT films were prepared with nanoscale surface roughness, orderly arrangement of PEG-CNTs, high hydrophilicity and high mechanical strength. Notably, PEG-CNT films alone could direct the skeletal myogenic differentiation of hMSCs in the absence of myogenic induction factors. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed

  4. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Haagsman, Henk P.; Roelen, Bernard A.J.

    2010-02-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  5. Isolation and Culture of Muscle Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Mozzetta, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are key epigenetic factors responsible for the proper spatiotemporal repression of defined transcriptional programs along the process of cell differentiation, including myogenesis. The discovery of the pivotal role played by PcG factors during myogenic differentiation relied on the possibility to culture myogenic cells in vitro. We describe here the methods currently used to isolate muscle stem cells (MuSCs) both from single myofibers and from bulk muscles by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), highlighting experimental details and critical steps. Through these techniques MuSCs can be efficiently isolated and cultured in vitro to recapitulate the different phases of myogenesis: activation, expansion, differentiation, and self-renewal. PMID:27659996

  6. Human skeletal muscle biochemical diversity

    PubMed Central

    Tirrell, Timothy F.; Cook, Mark S.; Carr, J. Austin; Lin, Evie; Ward, Samuel R.; Lieber, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The molecular components largely responsible for muscle attributes such as passive tension development (titin and collagen), active tension development (myosin heavy chain, MHC) and mechanosensitive signaling (titin) have been well studied in animals but less is known about their roles in humans. The purpose of this study was to perform a comprehensive analysis of titin, collagen and MHC isoform distributions in a large number of human muscles, to search for common themes and trends in the muscular organization of the human body. In this study, 599 biopsies were obtained from six human cadaveric donors (mean age 83 years). Three assays were performed on each biopsy – titin molecular mass determination, hydroxyproline content (a surrogate for collagen content) and MHC isoform distribution. Titin molecular mass was increased in more distal muscles of the upper and lower limbs. This trend was also observed for collagen. Percentage MHC-1 data followed a pattern similar to collagen in muscles of the upper extremity but this trend was reversed in the lower extremity. Titin molecular mass was the best predictor of anatomical region and muscle functional group. On average, human muscles had more slow myosin than other mammals. Also, larger titins were generally associated with faster muscles. These trends suggest that distal muscles should have higher passive tension than proximal ones, and that titin size variability may potentially act to ‘tune’ the protein's mechanotransduction capability. PMID:22786631

  7. Mimicking the niche: cytokines expand muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Quarta, Marco; Rando, Thomas A

    2015-07-01

    Muscle stem cells (MuSCs) have long been considered to be potential therapeutic vehicles for diseases of muscle such as muscular dystrophies. A recent study published in Cell Research by Fu et al. reveals that recapitulating in vitro the in vivo microenvironment of MuSCs that occurs during muscle regeneration might be a major step towards translation.

  8. APC is required for muscle stem cell proliferation and skeletal muscle tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Alice; Lacour, Floriane; Giordani, Lorenzo; Colnot, Sabine; Maire, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a crucial regulator of many stem cell types. In constantly cycling stem cells of fast turnover tissues, APC loss results in the constitutive activation of a Wnt target gene program that massively increases proliferation and leads to malignant transformation. However, APC function in skeletal muscle, a tissue with a low turnover rate, has never been investigated. Here we show that conditional genetic disruption of APC in adult muscle stem cells results in the abrogation of adult muscle regenerative potential. We demonstrate that APC removal in adult muscle stem cells abolishes cell cycle entry and leads to cell death. By using double knockout strategies, we further prove that this phenotype is attributable to overactivation of β-catenin signaling. Our results demonstrate that in muscle stem cells, APC dampens canonical Wnt signaling to allow cell cycle progression and radically diverge from previous observations concerning stem cells in actively self-renewing tissues. PMID:26304725

  9. APC is required for muscle stem cell proliferation and skeletal muscle tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Alice; Lacour, Floriane; Giordani, Lorenzo; Colnot, Sabine; Maire, Pascal; Le Grand, Fabien

    2015-08-31

    The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a crucial regulator of many stem cell types. In constantly cycling stem cells of fast turnover tissues, APC loss results in the constitutive activation of a Wnt target gene program that massively increases proliferation and leads to malignant transformation. However, APC function in skeletal muscle, a tissue with a low turnover rate, has never been investigated. Here we show that conditional genetic disruption of APC in adult muscle stem cells results in the abrogation of adult muscle regenerative potential. We demonstrate that APC removal in adult muscle stem cells abolishes cell cycle entry and leads to cell death. By using double knockout strategies, we further prove that this phenotype is attributable to overactivation of β-catenin signaling. Our results demonstrate that in muscle stem cells, APC dampens canonical Wnt signaling to allow cell cycle progression and radically diverge from previous observations concerning stem cells in actively self-renewing tissues. PMID:26304725

  10. Invited review: Stem cells and muscle diseases: advances in cell therapy strategies.

    PubMed

    Negroni, Elisa; Gidaro, Teresa; Bigot, Anne; Butler-Browne, Gillian S; Mouly, Vincent; Trollet, Capucine

    2015-04-01

    Despite considerable progress to increase our understanding of muscle genetics, pathophysiology, molecular and cellular partners involved in muscular dystrophies and muscle ageing, there is still a crucial need for effective treatments to counteract muscle degeneration and muscle wasting in such conditions. This review focuses on cell-based therapy for muscle diseases. We give an overview of the different parameters that have to be taken into account in such a therapeutic strategy, including the influence of muscle ageing, cell proliferation and migration capacities, as well as the translation of preclinical results in rodent into human clinical approaches. We describe recent advances in different types of human myogenic stem cells, with a particular emphasis on myoblasts but also on other candidate cells described so far [CD133+ cells, aldehyde dehydrogenase-positive cells (ALDH+), muscle-derived stem cells (MuStem), embryonic stem cells (ES) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS)]. Finally, we provide an update of ongoing clinical trials using cell therapy strategies.

  11. Myogenic Progenitors from Mouse Pluripotent Stem Cells for Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Magli, Alessandro; Incitti, Tania; Perlingeiro, Rita C R

    2016-01-01

    Muscle homeostasis is maintained by resident stem cells which, in both pathologic and non-pathologic conditions, are able to repair or generate new muscle fibers. Although muscle stem cells have tremendous regenerative potential, their application in cell therapy protocols is prevented by several restrictions, including the limited ability to grow ex vivo. Since pluripotent stem cells have the unique potential to both self-renew and expand almost indefinitely, they have become an attractive source of progenitors for regenerative medicine studies. Our lab has demonstrated that embryonic stem cell (ES)-derived myogenic progenitors retain the ability to repair existing muscle fibers and contribute to the pool of resident stem cells. Because of their relevance in both cell therapy and disease modeling, in this chapter we describe the protocol to derive myogenic progenitors from murine ES cells followed by their intramuscular delivery in a murine muscular dystrophy model. PMID:27492174

  12. Advancements in stem cells treatment of skeletal muscle wasting

    PubMed Central

    Meregalli, Mirella; Farini, Andrea; Sitzia, Clementina; Torrente, Yvan

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders, in which progressive muscle wasting and weakness is often associated with exhaustion of muscle regeneration potential. Although physiological properties of skeletal muscle tissue are now well known, no treatments are effective for these diseases. Muscle regeneration was attempted by means transplantation of myogenic cells (from myoblast to embryonic stem cells) and also by interfering with the malignant processes that originate in pathological tissues, such as uncontrolled fibrosis and inflammation. Taking into account the advances in the isolation of new subpopulation of stem cells and in the creation of artificial stem cell niches, we discuss how these emerging technologies offer great promises for therapeutic approaches to muscle diseases and muscle wasting associated with aging. PMID:24575052

  13. Muscle-derived stem cells isolated as non-adherent population give rise to cardiac, skeletal muscle and neural lineages

    SciTech Connect

    Arsic, Nikola; Mamaeva, Daria; Lamb, Ned J.; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-04-01

    Stem cells with the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types can be extracted from a wide array of adult tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we have analyzed a population of cells isolated from skeletal muscle on the basis of their poor adherence on uncoated or collagen-coated dishes that show multi-lineage differentiation in vitro. When analysed under proliferative conditions, these cells express stem cell surface markers Sca-1 (65%) and Bcrp-1 (80%) but also MyoD (15%), Neuronal {beta} III-tubulin (25%), GFAP (30%) or Nkx2.5 (1%). Although capable of growing as non-attached spheres for months, when given an appropriate matrix, these cells adhere giving rise to skeletal muscle, neuronal and cardiac muscle cell lineages. A similar cell population could not be isolated from either bone marrow or cardiac tissue suggesting their specificity to skeletal muscle. When injected into damaged muscle, these non-adherent muscle-derived cells are retrieved expressing Pax7, in a sublaminar position characterizing satellite cells and participate in forming new myofibers. These data show that a non-adherent stem cell population can be specifically isolated and expanded from skeletal muscle and upon attachment to a matrix spontaneously differentiate into muscle, cardiac and neuronal lineages in vitro. Although competing with resident satellite cells, these cells are shown to significantly contribute to repair of injured muscle in vivo supporting that a similar muscle-derived non-adherent cell population from human muscle may be useful in treatment of neuromuscular disorders.

  14. Skeletal muscle stem cells adopt a dormant cell state post mortem and retain regenerative capacity.

    PubMed

    Latil, Mathilde; Rocheteau, Pierre; Châtre, Laurent; Sanulli, Serena; Mémet, Sylvie; Ricchetti, Miria; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Chrétien, Fabrice

    2012-01-01

    The accessibility to stem cells from healthy or diseased individuals, and the maintenance of their potency are challenging issues for stem cell biology. Here we report the isolation of viable and functional skeletal myogenic cells from humans up to 17 days, and mice up to 14 days post mortem, much longer beyond previous reports. Muscle stem cells are enriched in post mortem tissue, suggesting a selective survival advantage compared with other cell types. Transplantation of mouse muscle and haematopoietic stem cells regenerates tissues robustly. Cellular quiescence contributes to this cell viability where cells adopt a reversible dormant state characterized by reduced metabolic activity, a prolonged lag phase before the first cell division, elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and a transcriptional status less primed for commitment. Finally, severe hypoxia, or anoxia is critical for maintaining stem cell viability and regenerative capacity. Thus, these cells provide a useful resource for studying stem cell biology.

  15. Virgin birth: engineered heart muscle from parthenogenetic stem cells.

    PubMed

    McSweeney, Sara J; Schneider, Michael D

    2013-03-01

    Cardiac muscle restitution, or true regeneration, is an unmet need in the treatment of myocardial infarction (MI), prompting a decade of study with stem cells of many kinds. Among key obstacles to effective cardiac cell grafting are the cost of autologous stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, the ethical implications of using embryonic stem cell (ESC) products, immunological barriers to allogeneic cells, functional maturation beyond just the correct lineage decision, and the lack of durable engraftment. In this issue of the JCI, Didié and colleagues show that cardiomyocytes made from parthenogenetic stem cells (PSCs) and deployed as engineered heart muscle (EHM) may overcome all of these formidable barriers.

  16. Human Stem Cells for Craniomaxillofacial Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, William Niall Alexander; Cameron, Malcolm Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Human stem cell research represents an exceptional opportunity for regenerative medicine and the surgical reconstruction of the craniomaxillofacial complex. The correct architecture and function of the vastly diverse tissues of this important anatomical region are critical for life supportive processes, the delivery of senses, social interaction, and aesthetics. Craniomaxillofacial tissue loss is commonly associated with inflammatory responses of the surrounding tissue, significant scarring, disfigurement, and psychological sequelae as an inevitable consequence. The in vitro production of fully functional cells for skin, muscle, cartilage, bone, and neurovascular tissue formation from human stem cells, may one day provide novel materials for the reconstructive surgeon operating on patients with both hard and soft tissue deficit due to cancer, congenital disease, or trauma. However, the clinical translation of human stem cell technology, including the application of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in novel regenerative therapies, faces several hurdles that must be solved to permit safe and effective use in patients. The basic biology of hPSCs remains to be fully elucidated and concerns of tumorigenicity need to be addressed, prior to the development of cell transplantation treatments. Furthermore, functional comparison of in vitro generated tissue to their in vivo counterparts will be necessary for confirmation of maturity and suitability for application in reconstructive surgery. Here, we provide an overview of human stem cells in disease modeling, drug screening, and therapeutics, while also discussing the application of regenerative medicine for craniomaxillofacial tissue deficit and surgical reconstruction. PMID:24564584

  17. Human Satellite Cell Transplantation and Regeneration from Diverse Skeletal Muscles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoti; Wilschut, Karlijn J; Kouklis, Gayle; Tian, Hua; Hesse, Robert; Garland, Catharine; Sbitany, Hani; Hansen, Scott; Seth, Rahul; Knott, P Daniel; Hoffman, William Y; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-09-01

    Identification of human satellite cells that fulfill muscle stem cell criteria is an unmet need in regenerative medicine. This hurdle limits understanding how closely muscle stem cell properties are conserved among mice and humans and hampers translational efforts in muscle regeneration. Here, we report that PAX7 satellite cells exist at a consistent frequency of 2-4 cells/mm of fiber in muscles of the human trunk, limbs, and head. Xenotransplantation into mice of 50-70 fiber-associated, or 1,000-5,000 FACS-enriched CD56(+)/CD29(+) human satellite cells led to stable engraftment and formation of human-derived myofibers. Human cells with characteristic PAX7, CD56, and CD29 expression patterns populated the satellite cell niche beneath the basal lamina on the periphery of regenerated fibers. After additional injury, transplanted satellite cells robustly regenerated to form hundreds of human-derived fibers. Together, these findings conclusively delineate a source of bona-fide endogenous human muscle stem cells that will aid development of clinical applications.

  18. Trichinella spiralis in human muscle (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This is the parasite Trichinella spiralis in human muscle tissue. The parasite is transmitted by eating undercooked ... produce large numbers of larvae that migrate into muscle tissue. The cysts may cause muscle pain and ...

  19. Isolation, characterization, and differentiation of human multipotent dermal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Fukunaga-Kalabis, Mizuho; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2013-01-01

    Skin, as the body's largest organ, has been extensively used to study adult stem cells. Most previous skin-related studies have focused on stem cells isolated from hair follicles and from keratinocytes. Here we present a protocol to isolate multipotent neural crest stem-like dermis-derived stem cells (termed dermal stem cells or DSCs) from human neonatal foreskins. DSCs grow like neural spheres in human embryonic stem cell medium and gain the ability to self-renew and differentiate into several cell lineages including melanocytes, neuronal cells, Schwann cells, smooth muscle cells, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. These cells express neural crest stem cell markers (NGFRp75 and nestin) as well as an embryonic stem cell marker (OCT4).

  20. Skeletal muscle stem cells from animals I. Basic cell biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Skeletal muscle stem cells from food-producing animals have been of interest to agricultural life scientists seeking to develop a better understanding of the molecular regulation of lean tissue (skeletal muscle protein hypertrophy) and intramuscular fat (marbling) development. Enhanced understanding...

  1. Stem Cell Antigen-1 in Skeletal Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Harold S.; Samad, Tahmina; Cholsiripunlert, Sompob; Khalifian, Saami; Gong, Wenhui; Ritner, Carissa; Aurigui, Julian; Ling, Vivian; Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Bennett, Stephen; Hoffman, Julien; Oishi, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) is a member of the Ly-6 multigene family encoding highly homologous, glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins. Sca-1 is expressed on muscle-derived stem cells and myogenic precursors recruited to sites of muscle injury. We previously reported that inhibition of Sca-1 expression stimulated myoblast proliferation in vitro and regulated the tempo of muscle repair in vivo. Despite its function in myoblast expansion during muscle repair, a role for Sca-1 in normal, post-natal muscle has not been thoroughly investigated. We systematically compared Sca-1-/- (KO) and Sca-1+/+ (WT) mice and hindlimb muscles to elucidate the tissue, contractile, and functional effects of Sca-1 in young and aging animals. Comparison of muscle volume, fibrosis, myofiber cross-sectional area, and Pax7+ myoblast number showed little differences between ages or genotypes. Exercise protocols, however, demonstrated decreased stamina in KO versus WT mice, with young KO mice achieving results similar to aging WT animals. In addition, KO mice did not improve with practice, while WT animals demonstrated conditioning over time. Surprisingly, myomechanical analysis of isolated muscles showed that KO young muscle generated more force and experienced less fatigue. However, KO muscle also demonstrated incomplete relaxation with fatigue. These findings suggest that Sca-1 is necessary for muscle conditioning with exercise, and that deficient conditioning in Sca-1 KO animals becomes more pronounced with age. PMID:24042315

  2. Visualizing the Functional Heterogeneity of Muscle Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Yasuo; Ogawa, Shizuka; Ono, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells are satellite cells that play crucial roles in tissue repair and regeneration after muscle injury. Accumulating evidence indicates that satellite cells are genetically and functionally heterogeneous, even within the same muscle. A small population of satellite cells possesses "stemness" and exhibits the remarkable ability to regenerate through robust self-renewal when transplanted into a regenerating muscle niche. In contrast, not all satellite cells self-renew. For example, some cells are committed myogenic progenitors that immediately undergo myogenic differentiation with minimal cell division after activation. Recent studies illuminate the cellular and molecular characteristics of the functional heterogeneity among satellite cells. To evaluate heterogeneity and stem cell dynamics, here we describe methods to conduct a clonal analysis of satellite cells and to visualize a slowly dividing cell population. PMID:27052612

  3. Transplantated Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Embryonic Stem Cells Promote Muscle Regeneration and Accelerate Functional Recovery of Injured Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ninagawa, Nana Takenaka; Isobe, Eri; Hirayama, Yuri; Murakami, Rumi; Komatsu, Kazumi; Nagai, Masataka; Kobayashi, Mami; Kawabata, Yuka

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We previously established that mesenchymal stem cells originating from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells (E-MSCs) showed markedly higher potential for differentiation into skeletal muscles in vitro than common mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Further, the E-MSCs exhibited a low risk for teratoma formation. Here we evaluate the potential of E-MSCs for differentiation into skeletal muscles in vivo and reveal the regeneration and functional recovery of injured muscle by transplantation. E-MSCs were transplanted into the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle 24 h following direct clamping. After transplantation, the myogenic differentiation of E-MSCs, TA muscle regeneration, and re-innervation were morphologically analyzed. In addition, footprints and gaits of each leg under spontaneous walking were measured by CatWalk XT, and motor functions of injured TA muscles were precisely analyzed. Results indicate that >60% of transplanted E-MSCs differentiated into skeletal muscles. The cross-sectional area of the injured TA muscles of E-MSC–transplanted animals increased earlier than that of control animals. E-MSCs also promotes re-innervation of the peripheral nerves of injured muscles. Concerning function of the TA muscles, we reveal that transplantation of E-MSCs promotes the recovery of muscles. This is the first report to demonstrate by analysis of spontaneous walking that transplanted cells can accelerate the functional recovery of injured muscles. Taken together, the results show that E-MSCs have a high potential for differentiation into skeletal muscles in vivo as well as in vitro. The transplantation of E-MSCs facilitated the functional recovery of injured muscles. Therefore, E-MSCs are an efficient cell source in transplantation. PMID:23914336

  4. Systemic Delivery of Allogenic Muscle Stem Cells Induces Long-Term Muscle Repair and Clinical Efficacy in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Rouger, Karl; Larcher, Thibaut; Dubreil, Laurence; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Le Guiner, Caroline; Jouvion, Gregory; Delorme, Bruno; Lieubeau, Blandine; Carlus, Marine; Fornasari, Benoît; Theret, Marine; Orlando, Priscilla; Ledevin, Mireille; Zuber, Céline; Leroux, Isabelle; Deleau, Stéphane; Guigand, Lydie; Testault, Isabelle; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Fiszman, Marc; Chérel, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic progressive muscle disease resulting from the lack of dystrophin and without effective treatment. Adult stem cell populations have given new impetus to cell-based therapy of neuromuscular diseases. One of them, muscle-derived stem cells, isolated based on delayed adhesion properties, contributes to injured muscle repair. However, these data were collected in dystrophic mice that exhibit a relatively mild tissue phenotype and clinical features of DMD patients. Here, we characterized canine delayed adherent stem cells and investigated the efficacy of their systemic delivery in the clinically relevant DMD animal model to assess potential therapeutic application in humans. Delayed adherent stem cells, named MuStem cells (muscle stem cells), were isolated from healthy dog muscle using a preplating technique. In vitro, MuStem cells displayed a large expansion capacity, an ability to proliferate in suspension, and a multilineage differentiation potential. Phenotypically, they corresponded to early myogenic progenitors and uncommitted cells. When injected in immunosuppressed dystrophic dogs, they contributed to myofiber regeneration, satellite cell replenishment, and dystrophin expression. Importantly, their systemic delivery resulted in long-term dystrophin expression, muscle damage course limitation with an increased regeneration activity and an interstitial expansion restriction, and persisting stabilization of the dog's clinical status. These results demonstrate that MuStem cells could provide an attractive therapeutic avenue for DMD patients. PMID:21924229

  5. Biomechanical Origins of Muscle Stem Cell Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, James B; Cheng, Richard Y; Davoudi, Sadegh; Gilbert, Penney M

    2016-04-10

    Skeletal muscle, the most abundant and widespread tissue in the human body, contracts upon receiving electrochemical signals from the nervous system to support essential functions such as thermoregulation, limb movement, blinking, swallowing and breathing. Reconstruction of adult muscle tissue relies on a pool of mononucleate, resident muscle stem cells, known as "satellite cells", expressing the paired-box transcription factor Pax7 necessary for their specification during embryonic development and long-term maintenance during adult life. Satellite cells are located around the myofibres in a niche at the interface of the basal lamina and the host fibre plasma membrane (i.e., sarcolemma), at a very low frequency. Upon damage to the myofibres, quiescent satellite cells are activated and give rise to a population of transient amplifying myogenic progenitor cells, which eventually exit the cell cycle permanently and fuse to form new myofibres and regenerate the tissue. A subpopulation of satellite cells self-renew and repopulate the niche, poised to respond to future demands. Harnessing the potential of satellite cells relies on a complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms guiding their regulation in vivo. Over the past several decades, studies revealed many signal transduction pathways responsible for satellite cell fate decisions, but the niche cues driving the activation and silencing of these pathways are less clear. Here we explore the scintillating possibility that considering the dynamic changes in the biophysical properties of the skeletal muscle, namely stiffness, and the stretch and shear forces to which a myofibre can be subjected to may provide missing information necessary to gain a full understanding of satellite cell niche regulation. PMID:26004541

  6. Regenerative function of immune system: Modulation of muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Saini, Jasdeep; McPhee, Jamie S; Al-Dabbagh, Sarah; Stewart, Claire E; Al-Shanti, Nasser

    2016-05-01

    Ageing is characterised by progressive deterioration of physiological systems and the loss of skeletal muscle mass is one of the most recognisable, leading to muscle weakness and mobility impairments. This review highlights interactions between the immune system and skeletal muscle stem cells (widely termed satellite cells or myoblasts) to influence satellite cell behaviour during muscle regeneration after injury, and outlines deficits associated with ageing. Resident neutrophils and macrophages in skeletal muscle become activated when muscle fibres are damaged via stimuli (e.g. contusions, strains, avulsions, hyperextensions, ruptures) and release high concentrations of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors into the microenvironment. These localised responses serve to attract additional immune cells which can reach in excess of 1×10(5) immune cell/mm(3) of skeletal muscle in order to orchestrate the repair process. T-cells have a delayed response, reaching peak activation roughly 4 days after the initial damage. The cytokines and growth factors released by activated T-cells play a key role in muscle satellite cell proliferation and migration, although the precise mechanisms of these interactions remain unclear. T-cells in older people display limited ability to activate satellite cell proliferation and migration which is likely to contribute to insufficient muscle repair and, consequently, muscle wasting and weakness. If the factors released by T-cells to activate satellite cells can be identified, it may be possible to develop therapeutic agents to enhance muscle regeneration and reduce the impact of muscle wasting during ageing and disease. PMID:27039885

  7. Regenerative function of immune system: Modulation of muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Saini, Jasdeep; McPhee, Jamie S; Al-Dabbagh, Sarah; Stewart, Claire E; Al-Shanti, Nasser

    2016-05-01

    Ageing is characterised by progressive deterioration of physiological systems and the loss of skeletal muscle mass is one of the most recognisable, leading to muscle weakness and mobility impairments. This review highlights interactions between the immune system and skeletal muscle stem cells (widely termed satellite cells or myoblasts) to influence satellite cell behaviour during muscle regeneration after injury, and outlines deficits associated with ageing. Resident neutrophils and macrophages in skeletal muscle become activated when muscle fibres are damaged via stimuli (e.g. contusions, strains, avulsions, hyperextensions, ruptures) and release high concentrations of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors into the microenvironment. These localised responses serve to attract additional immune cells which can reach in excess of 1×10(5) immune cell/mm(3) of skeletal muscle in order to orchestrate the repair process. T-cells have a delayed response, reaching peak activation roughly 4 days after the initial damage. The cytokines and growth factors released by activated T-cells play a key role in muscle satellite cell proliferation and migration, although the precise mechanisms of these interactions remain unclear. T-cells in older people display limited ability to activate satellite cell proliferation and migration which is likely to contribute to insufficient muscle repair and, consequently, muscle wasting and weakness. If the factors released by T-cells to activate satellite cells can be identified, it may be possible to develop therapeutic agents to enhance muscle regeneration and reduce the impact of muscle wasting during ageing and disease.

  8. Satellite Cells and the Muscle Stem Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Price, Feodor

    2013-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle in mammals is a stable tissue under normal circumstances but has remarkable ability to repair after injury. Skeletal muscle regeneration is a highly orchestrated process involving the activation of various cellular and molecular responses. As skeletal muscle stem cells, satellite cells play an indispensible role in this process. The self-renewing proliferation of satellite cells not only maintains the stem cell population but also provides numerous myogenic cells, which proliferate, differentiate, fuse, and lead to new myofiber formation and reconstitution of a functional contractile apparatus. The complex behavior of satellite cells during skeletal muscle regeneration is tightly regulated through the dynamic interplay between intrinsic factors within satellite cells and extrinsic factors constituting the muscle stem cell niche/microenvironment. For the last half century, the advance of molecular biology, cell biology, and genetics has greatly improved our understanding of skeletal muscle biology. Here, we review some recent advances, with focuses on functions of satellite cells and their niche during the process of skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:23303905

  9. Muscle stem cells in developmental and regenerative myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jong-Sun; Krauss, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Skeletal muscle development serves as a paradigm for cell lineage specification and cell differentiation. Adult skeletal muscle has high regenerative capacity, with satellite cells the primary source of this capability. This review describes recent findings on developmental and adult myogenesis with emphasis on emerging distinctions between various muscle groups and stages of myogenesis. Recent findings Muscle progenitors of the body are derived from multipotent cells of the dermomyotome and express the transcription factors Pax3 and Pax7. These cells self-renew or induce expression of muscle regulatory factors (MRFs) and differentiate. The roles of Pax3+, Pax7+ and specific MRF+ progenitor populations in trunk and limb myogenesis have been identified through cell ablation in the mouse. Various head muscles and associated satellite cells have differing developmental origins, and rely on distinct combinations of transcriptional regulators, than trunk and limb muscles. Several genetic and sorting protocols demonstrate that satellite cells are heterogeneous with some possessing stem cell properties; the relative roles of lineage and niche in these properties are being explored. While cellular mechanisms of developmental, post-natal and adult regenerative myogenesis are thought to be similar, recent studies reveal distinct genetic requirements for embryonic, fetal, post-natal and adult regenerative myogenesis. Summary Genetic determinants of formation or repair of various muscles during different stages myogenesis are unexpectedly diverse. Future studies should illuminate these differences, as well as mechanisms that underlie stem cell properties of satellite cells. PMID:20098319

  10. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibition negatively affects muscle stem cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Bellayr, Ian; Holden, Kyle; Mu, Xiaodong; Pan, Haiying; Li, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a large and complex system that is crucial for structural support, movement and function. When injured, the repair of skeletal muscle undergoes three phases: inflammation and degeneration, regeneration and fibrosis formation in severe injuries. During fibrosis formation, muscle healing is impaired because of the accumulation of excess collagen. A group of zinc-dependent endopeptidases that have been found to aid in the repair of skeletal muscle are matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). MMPs are able to assist in tissue remodeling through the regulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components, as well as contributing to cell migration, proliferation, differentiation and angiogenesis. In the present study, the effect of GM6001, a broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor, on muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) is investigated. We find that MMP inhibition negatively impacts skeletal muscle healing by impairing MDSCs in migratory and multiple differentiation abilities. These results indicate that MMP signaling plays an essential role in the wound healing of muscle tissue because their inhibition is detrimental to stem cells residing in skeletal muscle. PMID:23329998

  11. Human jaw and muscle modelling.

    PubMed

    Peck, Christopher C; Hannam, Alan G

    2007-04-01

    Dynamic mathematical modelling is an invaluable method to help understand the biomechanics of the anatomically and functionally complex masticatory system. It provides insight into variables which are impossible to measure directly such as joint loads and individual muscle tensions, and into physical relationships between jaw structure and function. Individual parameters can be modified easily to understand their influence on function. Our models are constructed with best available structural and functional data, and evaluated against human jaw behaviour. Image data provide hard and soft tissue morphology and the jaw's inertial properties. The drive to the system is provided by actuators which simulate active and passive jaw muscle properties. In whole-jaw modelling, muscle models which behave plausibly rather than mimic the ultra-structural cross-bridge interactions are common since they are computationally feasible. Whole-jaw models have recently incorporated flexible finite-elements to explore tissue distortion in the temporomandibular joint and tongue movements. Furthermore, the jaw has been integrated with laryngeal models to explore complex tasks such as swallowing. These dynamic models have helped better understand joint loading, movement constraints and muscle activation strategies. Future directions will include further incorporation of rigid and flexible model dynamics and the creation of subject-specific models to better understand the functional implications of pathology.

  12. Conditioned medium derived from umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells regenerates atrophied muscles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Z-Hun; Kim, Sun-Mi; Choi, Yong-Soo

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the regenerative effects and regulatory mechanisms of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs)-derived conditioned medium (CM) in atrophied muscles using an in vivo model. To determine the appropriate harvest point of UC-CM, active factor content was analyzed in the secretome over time. A muscle atrophy model was induced in rats by hindlimb suspension (HS) for 2 weeks. Next, UC-CM was injected directly into the soleus muscle of both hind legs to assess its regenerative efficacy on atrophy-related factors after 1 week of HS. During HS, muscle mass and muscle fiber size were significantly reduced by over 2-fold relative to untreated controls. Lactate accumulation within the muscles was similarly increased. By contrast, all of the above analytical factors were significantly improved in HS-induced rats by UC-CM injection compared with saline injection. Furthermore, the expression levels of desmin and skeletal muscle actin were significantly elevated by UC-CM treatment. Importantly, UC-CM effectively suppressed expression of the atrophy-related ubiquitin E3-ligases, muscle ring finger 1 and muscle atrophy F-box by 2.3- and 2.1-fold, respectively. UC-CM exerted its actions by stimulating the phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling cascade. These findings suggest that UC-CM provides an effective stimulus to recover muscle status and function in atrophied muscles. PMID:27457384

  13. Conditioned medium derived from umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells regenerates atrophied muscles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Z-Hun; Kim, Sun-Mi; Choi, Yong-Soo

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the regenerative effects and regulatory mechanisms of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs)-derived conditioned medium (CM) in atrophied muscles using an in vivo model. To determine the appropriate harvest point of UC-CM, active factor content was analyzed in the secretome over time. A muscle atrophy model was induced in rats by hindlimb suspension (HS) for 2 weeks. Next, UC-CM was injected directly into the soleus muscle of both hind legs to assess its regenerative efficacy on atrophy-related factors after 1 week of HS. During HS, muscle mass and muscle fiber size were significantly reduced by over 2-fold relative to untreated controls. Lactate accumulation within the muscles was similarly increased. By contrast, all of the above analytical factors were significantly improved in HS-induced rats by UC-CM injection compared with saline injection. Furthermore, the expression levels of desmin and skeletal muscle actin were significantly elevated by UC-CM treatment. Importantly, UC-CM effectively suppressed expression of the atrophy-related ubiquitin E3-ligases, muscle ring finger 1 and muscle atrophy F-box by 2.3- and 2.1-fold, respectively. UC-CM exerted its actions by stimulating the phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling cascade. These findings suggest that UC-CM provides an effective stimulus to recover muscle status and function in atrophied muscles.

  14. Urinary Bladder Smooth Muscle Engineered from Adipose Stem Cells and a Three Dimensional Synthetic Composite

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Gregory S.; Zhang, Rong; Lee, Min; Xu, Yuhan; Wu, Ben; Rodríguez, Larissa V.

    2009-01-01

    Human adipose stem cells were cultured in smooth muscle inductive media and seeded into synthetic bladder composites to tissue engineer bladder smooth muscle. 85:15 poly-lactic-glycolic acid bladder dome composites were cast using an electropulled microfiber luminal surface combined with an outer porous sponge. Cell seeded bladders expressed smooth muscle actin, myosin heavy chain, calponinin, and caldesmon via RT-PCR and immunoflourescence. Nude rats (n=45) underwent removal of half their bladder and repair using: (i) augmentation with the adipose stem cell seeded composites, (ii) augmentation with a matched acellular composite, or (iii) suture closure. Animals were followed for 12 weeks post-implantation and bladders were explanted serially. Results showed that bladder capacity and compliance were maintained in the cell seeded group throughout the 12 weeks, but deteriorated in the acellular scaffold group sequentially with time. Control animals repaired with sutures regained their baseline bladder capacities by week 12, demonstrating a long term limitation of this model. Histological analysis of explanted materials demonstrated viable adipose stem cells and increasing smooth muscle mass in the cell seeded scaffolds with time. Tissue bath stimulation demonstrated smooth muscle contraction of the seeded implants but not the acellular implants after 12 weeks in vivo. Our study demonstrates the feasibility and short term physical properties of bladder tissue engineered from adipose stem cells. PMID:19345408

  15. Action of Obestatin in Skeletal Muscle Repair: Stem Cell Expansion, Muscle Growth, and Microenvironment Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gurriarán-Rodríguez, Uxía; Santos-Zas, Icía; González-Sánchez, Jessica; Beiroa, Daniel; Moresi, Viviana; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Lin, Wei; Viñuela, Juan E; Señarís, José; García-Caballero, Tomás; Casanueva, Felipe F; Nogueiras, Rubén; Gallego, Rosalía; Renaud, Jean-Marc; Adamo, Sergio; Pazos, Yolanda; Camiña, Jesús P

    2015-01-01

    The development of therapeutic strategies for skeletal muscle diseases, such as physical injuries and myopathies, depends on the knowledge of regulatory signals that control the myogenic process. The obestatin/GPR39 system operates as an autocrine signal in the regulation of skeletal myogenesis. Using a mouse model of skeletal muscle regeneration after injury and several cellular strategies, we explored the potential use of obestatin as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of trauma-induced muscle injuries. Our results evidenced that the overexpression of the preproghrelin, and thus obestatin, and GPR39 in skeletal muscle increased regeneration after muscle injury. More importantly, the intramuscular injection of obestatin significantly enhanced muscle regeneration by simulating satellite stem cell expansion as well as myofiber hypertrophy through a kinase hierarchy. Added to the myogenic action, the obestatin administration resulted in an increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and the consequent microvascularization, with no effect on collagen deposition in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the potential inhibition of myostatin during obestatin treatment might contribute to its myogenic action improving muscle growth and regeneration. Overall, our data demonstrate successful improvement of muscle regeneration, indicating obestatin is a potential therapeutic agent for skeletal muscle injury and would benefit other myopathies related to muscle regeneration. PMID:25762009

  16. Action of obestatin in skeletal muscle repair: stem cell expansion, muscle growth, and microenvironment remodeling.

    PubMed

    Gurriarán-Rodríguez, Uxía; Santos-Zas, Icía; González-Sánchez, Jessica; Beiroa, Daniel; Moresi, Viviana; Mosteiro, Carlos S; Lin, Wei; Viñuela, Juan E; Señarís, José; García-Caballero, Tomás; Casanueva, Felipe F; Nogueiras, Rubén; Gallego, Rosalía; Renaud, Jean-Marc; Adamo, Sergio; Pazos, Yolanda; Camiña, Jesús P

    2015-06-01

    The development of therapeutic strategies for skeletal muscle diseases, such as physical injuries and myopathies, depends on the knowledge of regulatory signals that control the myogenic process. The obestatin/GPR39 system operates as an autocrine signal in the regulation of skeletal myogenesis. Using a mouse model of skeletal muscle regeneration after injury and several cellular strategies, we explored the potential use of obestatin as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of trauma-induced muscle injuries. Our results evidenced that the overexpression of the preproghrelin, and thus obestatin, and GPR39 in skeletal muscle increased regeneration after muscle injury. More importantly, the intramuscular injection of obestatin significantly enhanced muscle regeneration by simulating satellite stem cell expansion as well as myofiber hypertrophy through a kinase hierarchy. Added to the myogenic action, the obestatin administration resulted in an increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and the consequent microvascularization, with no effect on collagen deposition in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the potential inhibition of myostatin during obestatin treatment might contribute to its myogenic action improving muscle growth and regeneration. Overall, our data demonstrate successful improvement of muscle regeneration, indicating obestatin is a potential therapeutic agent for skeletal muscle injury and would benefit other myopathies related to muscle regeneration.

  17. Asymmetric division of clonal muscle stem cells coordinates muscle regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, David B; Nguyen, Phong Dang; Siegel, Ashley L; Ehrlich, Ophelia V; Sonntag, Carmen; Phan, Jennifer M N; Berger, Silke; Ratnayake, Dhanushika; Hersey, Lucy; Berger, Joachim; Verkade, Heather; Hall, Thomas E; Currie, Peter D

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle is an example of a tissue that deploys a self-renewing stem cell, the satellite cell, to effect regeneration. Recent in vitro studies have highlighted a role for asymmetric divisions in renewing rare "immortal" stem cells and generating a clonal population of differentiation-competent myoblasts. However, this model currently lacks in vivo validation. We define a zebrafish muscle stem cell population analogous to the mammalian satellite cell and image the entire process of muscle regeneration from injury to fiber replacement in vivo. This analysis reveals complex interactions between satellite cells and both injured and uninjured fibers and provides in vivo evidence for the asymmetric division of satellite cells driving both self-renewal and regeneration via a clonally restricted progenitor pool.

  18. Noninvasive Tracking of Quiescent and Activated Muscle Stem Cell (MuSC) Engraftment Dynamics In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Ho, Andrew T V; Blau, Helen M

    2016-01-01

    Muscle stem cells play a central role in muscle regeneration. Most studies in the field of muscle regeneration focus on the unraveling of muscle stem cell biology to devise strategies for treating failing muscles as seen in aging and muscle-related diseases. However, the common method used in assessing stem cell function in vivo is laborious, as it involves time-consuming immunohistological analyses by microscopy on serial cryo-sections of the muscle post stem cell transplantation. Here we describe an alternative method, which adapts the bioluminescence imaging (BLI) technique to allow noninvasive tracking of engrafted stem-cell function in vivo in real-time. This assay system enables longitudinal studies in the same mice over time and reveals parameters, not feasible by traditional analysis, such as the magnitude and dynamics of engrafted muscle stem cell expansion in vivo in response to a particular drug treatment or muscle injury. PMID:27492173

  19. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; McKay, Bryon R; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  20. Perspectives on human stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyu Won

    2009-09-01

    Human stem cell research draws not only scientists' but the public's attention. Human stem cell research is considered to be able to identify the mechanism of human development and change the paradigm of medical practices. However, there are heated ethical and legal debates about human stem cell research. The core issue is that of human dignity and human life. Some prefer human adult stem cell research or iPS cell research, others hES cell research. We do not need to exclude any type of stem cell research because each has its own merits and issues, and they can facilitate the scientific revolution when working together.

  1. Rejuvenation of the muscle stem cell population restores strength to injured aged muscles.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D; Gilbert, Penney M; Porpiglia, Ermelinda; Mourkioti, Foteini; Lee, Steven P; Corbel, Stephane Y; Llewellyn, Michael E; Delp, Scott L; Blau, Helen M

    2014-03-01

    The elderly often suffer from progressive muscle weakness and regenerative failure. We demonstrate that muscle regeneration is impaired with aging owing in part to a cell-autonomous functional decline in skeletal muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Two-thirds of MuSCs from aged mice are intrinsically defective relative to MuSCs from young mice, with reduced capacity to repair myofibers and repopulate the stem cell reservoir in vivo following transplantation. This deficiency is correlated with a higher incidence of cells that express senescence markers and is due to elevated activity of the p38α and p38β mitogen-activated kinase pathway. We show that these limitations cannot be overcome by transplantation into the microenvironment of young recipient muscles. In contrast, subjecting the MuSC population from aged mice to transient inhibition of p38α and p38β in conjunction with culture on soft hydrogel substrates rapidly expands the residual functional MuSC population from aged mice, rejuvenating its potential for regeneration and serial transplantation as well as strengthening of damaged muscles of aged mice. These findings reveal a synergy between biophysical and biochemical cues that provides a paradigm for a localized autologous muscle stem cell therapy for the elderly.

  2. Embryonic Stem Cell Patents and Human Dignity

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the assertion that human embryonic stem cells patents are immoral because they violate human dignity. After analyzing the concept of human dignity and its role in bioethics debates, this article argues that patents on human embryos or totipotent embryonic stem cells violate human dignity, but that patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells do not. Since patents on pluripotent or multipotent stem cells may still threaten human dignity by encouraging people to treat embryos as property, patent agencies should carefully monitor and control these patents to ensure that patents are not inadvertently awarded on embryos or totipotent stem cells. PMID:17922198

  3. Skeletal muscle perfusion and stem cell delivery in muscle disorders using intra-femoral artery canulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Matthias, Nadine; Hunt, Samuel D; Wu, Jianbo; Darabi, Radbod

    2015-11-15

    Muscular dystrophies are among major inherited muscle disorders characterized by progressive muscle damage and fibrosis with no definitive cure. Recently, gene or cell based therapies have been developed to restore the missing gene expression or replace the damaged tissues. In order to test the efficiency of these therapies in mice models of muscular dystrophies, the arterial route of delivery is very advantageous as it provides uniform muscle exposure to the therapeutic agents or cells. Although there are few reports of arterial delivery of the therapeutic agents or cells in mice, there is no in-depth description and evaluation of its efficacy in perfusion of downstream muscles. This study is aimed to develop a practical method for intra-femoral artery perfusion in mice and to evaluate perfusion efficiency using near-infrared-fluorescence (NIRF) imaging as well as histology following stem cell delivery. Our results provide a practical guide to perform this delicate method in mice. By using a sensitive fluorescent dye, different muscle groups of the hindlimb have been evaluated for proper perfusion. As the final step, we have validated the efficiency of arterial cell delivery into muscles using human iPS-derived myogenic cells in an immunodeficient mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (NSG-mdx(4cv)).

  4. Muscle reorganisation through local injection of stem cells in the diaphragm of mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The diaphragm is the major respiratory muscle affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and is responsible for causing 80% of deaths. The use of mechanical forces that act on the body or intermittent pressure on the airways improves the quality of life of patients but does not prevent the progression of respiratory failure. Thus, diseases that require tissue repair, such as DMD, represent a group of pathologies that have great potential for cell therapy. The application of stem cells directly into the diaphragm instead of systemic application can reduce cell migration to other affected areas and increase the chances of muscle reorganisation. The mdx mouse is a suitable animal model for this research because its diaphragmatic phenotype is similar to human DMD. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the potential cell implantation in the diaphragm muscle after the xenotransplantation of stem cells. Methods A total of 9 mice, including 3 control BALB/Cmice, 3 5-month-old mdx mice without stem cell injections and 3 mdx mice injected with stem cells, were used. The animals injected with stem cells underwent laparoscopy so that stem cells from GFP-labelled rabbit olfactory epithelium could be locally injected into the diaphragm muscle. After 8 days, all animals were euthanised, and the diaphragm muscle was dissected and subjected to histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Results Both the fresh diaphragm tissue and immunohistochemical analyses showed immunopositive GFP labelling of some of the cells and immunonegativity of myoblast bundles. In the histological analysis, we observed a reduction in the inflammatory infiltrate as well as the presence of a few peripheral nuclei and myoblast bundles. Conclusion We were able to implant stem cells into the diaphragm via local injection, which promoted moderate muscle reorganisation. The presence of myoblast bundles cannot be attributed to stem cell incorporation because there was no immunopositive

  5. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells: Methods and Application

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Biraja C.; Jiang, Zhengxin; Suh, Carol; Qyang, Yibing

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play a major role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology and their capability to differentiation into virtually every cell type in the human body make this field a ray of hope for vascular regenerative therapy and for understanding disease mechanism. In this review, we first discuss the recent iPSC technology and vascular smooth muscle development from embryo and then examine different methodology to derive VSMCs from iPSCs and their applications in regenerative therapy and disease modeling. PMID:25559088

  6. Human stem cell ethics: beyond the embryo.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, Jeremy

    2008-06-01

    Human embryonic stem cell research has elicited powerful debates about the morality of destroying human embryos. However, there are important ethical issues related to stem cell research that are unrelated to embryo destruction. These include particular issues involving different types of cells used, the procurement of such cells, in vivo use of stem cells, intellectual property, and conflicts of interest.

  7. Laminin regulates PDGFRβ+ cell stemness and muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Norris, Erin H.; E. Mason, Christopher; Strickland, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    Muscle-resident PDGFRβ+ cells, which include pericytes and PW1+ interstitial cells (PICs), play a dual role in muscular dystrophy. They can either undergo myogenesis to promote muscle regeneration or differentiate into adipocytes and other cells to compromise regeneration. How the differentiation and fate determination of PDGFRβ+ cells are regulated, however, remains unclear. Here, by utilizing a conditional knockout mouse line, we report that PDGFRβ+ cell-derived laminin inhibits their proliferation and adipogenesis, but is indispensable for their myogenesis. In addition, we show that laminin alone is able to partially reverse the muscle dystrophic phenotype in these mice at the molecular, structural and functional levels. Further RNAseq analysis reveals that laminin regulates PDGFRβ+ cell differentiation/fate determination via gpihbp1. These data support a critical role of laminin in the regulation of PDGFRβ+ cell stemness, identify an innovative target for future drug development and may provide an effective treatment for muscular dystrophy. PMID:27138650

  8. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tabebordbar, Mohammadsharif; Zhu, Kexian; Cheng, Jason K W; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J; Yan, Winston X; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Church, George M; Wagers, Amy J

    2016-01-22

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated, but still functional, protein. In this study, we developed and tested a direct gene-editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored the Dmd reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes, and muscle stem cells after local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle.

  9. In vivo gene editing in dystrophic mouse muscle and muscle stem cells#

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jason K.W.; Chew, Wei Leong; Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Yan, Winston X.; Maesner, Claire; Wu, Elizabeth Y.; Xiao, Ru; Ran, F. Ann; Cong, Le; Zhang, Feng; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Church, George M.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene, encoding dystrophin, compromise myofiber integrity and drive muscle deterioration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Removing one or more exons from the mutated transcript can produce an in-frame mRNA and a truncated but still functional protein. In this study, we develop and test a direct gene editing approach to induce exon deletion and recover dystrophin expression in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Delivery by adeno-associated virus (AAV) of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 endonucleases coupled with paired guide RNAs flanking the mutated Dmd exon23 resulted in excision of intervening DNA and restored Dystrophin reading frame in myofibers, cardiomyocytes and muscle stem cells following local or systemic delivery. AAV-Dmd CRISPR-treatment partially recovered muscle functional deficiencies and generated a pool of endogenously corrected myogenic precursors in mdx mouse muscle. PMID:26721686

  10. Sympathetic innervation of human muscle spindles

    PubMed Central

    Radovanovic, Dina; Peikert, Kevin; Lindström, Mona; Domellöf, Fatima Pedrosa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of sympathetic innervation in human muscle spindles, using antibodies against neuropeptide Y (NPY), NPY receptors and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). A total of 232 muscle spindles were immunohistochemically examined. NPY and NPY receptors were found on the intrafusal fibers, on the blood vessels supplying muscle spindles and on free nerve endings in the periaxial space. TH-immunoreactivity was present mainly in the spindle nerve and vessel. This is, to our knowledge, the first morphological study concerning the sympathetic innervation of the human muscle spindles. The results provide anatomical evidence for direct sympathetic innervation of the intrafusal fibers and show that sympathetic innervation is not restricted to the blood vessels supplying spindles. Knowledge about direct sympathetic innervation of the muscle spindle might expand our understanding of motor and proprioceptive dysfunction under stress conditions, for example, chronic muscle pain syndromes. PMID:25994126

  11. Wnt7a stimulates myogenic stem cell motility and engraftment resulting in improved muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Bentzinger, C Florian; von Maltzahn, Julia; Dumont, Nicolas A; Stark, Danny A; Wang, Yu Xin; Nhan, Kevin; Frenette, Jérôme; Cornelison, D D W; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2014-04-14

    Wnt7a/Fzd7 signaling stimulates skeletal muscle growth and repair by inducing the symmetric expansion of satellite stem cells through the planar cell polarity pathway and by activating the Akt/mTOR growth pathway in muscle fibers. Here we describe a third level of activity where Wnt7a/Fzd7 increases the polarity and directional migration of mouse satellite cells and human myogenic progenitors through activation of Dvl2 and the small GTPase Rac1. Importantly, these effects can be exploited to potentiate the outcome of myogenic cell transplantation into dystrophic muscles. We observed that a short Wnt7a treatment markedly stimulated tissue dispersal and engraftment, leading to significantly improved muscle function. Moreover, myofibers at distal sites that fused with Wnt7a-treated cells were hypertrophic, suggesting that the transplanted cells deliver activated Wnt7a/Fzd7 signaling complexes to recipient myofibers. Taken together, we describe a viable and effective ex vivo cell modulation process that profoundly enhances the efficacy of stem cell therapy for skeletal muscle.

  12. An artificial niche preserves the quiescence of muscle stem cells and enhances their therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Quarta, Marco; Brett, Jamie O; DiMarco, Rebecca; De Morree, Antoine; Boutet, Stephane C; Chacon, Robert; Gibbons, Michael C; Garcia, Victor A; Su, James; Shrager, Joseph B; Heilshorn, Sarah; Rando, Thomas A

    2016-07-01

    A promising therapeutic strategy for diverse genetic disorders involves transplantation of autologous stem cells that have been genetically corrected ex vivo. A major challenge in such approaches is a loss of stem cell potency during culture. Here we describe an artificial niche for maintaining muscle stem cells (MuSCs) in vitro in a potent, quiescent state. Using a machine learning method, we identified a molecular signature of quiescence and used it to screen for factors that could maintain mouse MuSC quiescence, thus defining a quiescence medium (QM). We also engineered muscle fibers that mimic the native myofiber of the MuSC niche. Mouse MuSCs maintained in QM on engineered fibers showed enhanced potential for engraftment, tissue regeneration and self-renewal after transplantation in mice. An artificial niche adapted to human cells similarly extended the quiescence of human MuSCs in vitro and enhanced their potency in vivo. Our approach for maintaining quiescence may be applicable to stem cells isolated from other tissues. PMID:27240197

  13. Synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis induces α-smooth muscle actin in human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells through a TGF-β1-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hae Young; Kim, Min Young; Kim, Kyung Hye; Lee, Il Hwan; Shin, Sang Hun; Lee, Jung Sub

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, inflammatory autoimmune disorder that causes the immune system to attack the joints. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is a secreted protein that promotes differentiation of synovial fibroblasts to α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive myofibroblasts to repair the damaged joints. Synovial fluid from patients with RA (RA-SF) induced expression of α-SMA in human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs). RA-SF-induced α-SMA expression was abrogated by immunodepletion of TGF-β1 from RA-SF with anti-TGF-β1 antibody. Furthermore, pretreatment of hASCs with the TGF-β type I receptor inhibitor SB431542 or lentiviral small hairpin RNA-mediated silencing of TGF-β type I receptor expression in hASCs blocked RA-SF-induced α-SMA expression. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of Smad2 or adenoviral overexpression of Smad7 (an inhibitory Smad isoform) completely inhibited RA-SF-stimulated α-SMA expression. These results suggest that TGF-β1 plays a pivotal role in RA-SF-induced differentiation of hASCs to α-SMA-positive cells. PMID:20628268

  14. Stem cell differentiation and human liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Li; Medine, Claire N; Zhu, Liang; Hay, David C

    2012-01-01

    Human stem cells are scalable cell populations capable of cellular differentiation. This makes them a very attractive in vitro cellular resource and in theory provides unlimited amounts of primary cells. Such an approach has the potential to improve our understanding of human biology and treating disease. In the future it may be possible to deploy novel stem cell-based approaches to treat human liver diseases. In recent years, efficient hepatic differentiation from human stem cells has been achieved by several research groups including our own. In this review we provide an overview of the field and discuss the future potential and limitations of stem cell technology. PMID:22563188

  15. Cell-Surface Protein Profiling Identifies Distinctive Markers of Progenitor Cells in Human Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Nakatani, Masashi; Ikemoto-Uezumi, Madoka; Yamamoto, Naoki; Morita, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Asami; Yamada, Harumoto; Kasai, Takehiro; Masuda, Satoru; Narita, Asako; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Fukada, So-Ichiro; Nishino, Ichizo; Tsuchida, Kunihiro

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle contains two distinct stem/progenitor populations. One is the satellite cell, which acts as a muscle stem cell, and the other is the mesenchymal progenitor, which contributes to muscle pathogeneses such as fat infiltration and fibrosis. Detailed and accurate characterization of these progenitors in humans remains elusive. Here, we performed comprehensive cell-surface protein profiling of the two progenitor populations residing in human skeletal muscle and identified three previously unrecognized markers: CD82 and CD318 for satellite cells and CD201 for mesenchymal progenitors. These markers distinguish myogenic and mesenchymal progenitors, and enable efficient isolation of the two types of progenitors. Functional study revealed that CD82 ensures expansion and preservation of myogenic progenitors by suppressing excessive differentiation, and CD201 signaling favors adipogenesis of mesenchymal progenitors. Thus, cell-surface proteins identified here are not only useful markers but also functionally important molecules, and provide valuable insight into human muscle biology and diseases. PMID:27509136

  16. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P.; McKay, Bryon R.; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B.; van Loon, Luc J. C.; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models. PMID:26557092

  17. Decellularized ECM Effects on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Stemness and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Pattabhi, Sudhakara rao; Martinez, Jessica S.; Keller, Thomas C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Microenvironment extracellular matrices (ECMs) influence cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. The ECMs of different microenvironments have distinctive compositions and architectures. This investigation addresses effects ECMs deposited by a variety of cell types and decellularized with a cold-EDTA protocol have on multipotent human mesenchymal stromal/stem cell (hMSC) behavior and differentiation. The cold-EDTA protocol removes intact cells from ECM, with minimal ECM damage and contamination. The decellularized ECMs deposited by cultured hMSCs, osteogenic hMSCs, and two smooth muscle cell (SMC) lines were tested for distinctive effects on the behavior and differentiation of early passage (‘naïve’) hMSC plated and cultured on the decellularized ECMs. Uninduced hMSC decellularized ECM enhanced naïve hMSC proliferation and cell motility while maintaining stemness. Decellularized ECM deposited by osteogenic hMSCs early in the differentiation process stimulated naïve hMSCs osteogenesis and substrate biomineralization in the absence of added dexamethasone, but this osteogenic induction potential was lower in ECMs decellularized later in the osteogenic hMSC differentiation process. Decellularized ECMs deposited by two smooth muscle cell lines induced naïve hMSCs to become smooth muscle cell-like with distinctive phenotypic characteristics of contractile and synthetic smooth muscle cells. This investigation demonstrates a useful approach for obtaining functional cell-deposited ECM and highlights the importance of ECM specificity in influencing stem cell behavior. PMID:25578478

  18. Functional dysregulation of stem cells during aging: a focus on skeletal muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    García-Prat, Laura; Sousa-Victor, Pedro; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2013-09-01

    Aging of an organism is associated with the functional decline of tissues and organs, as well as a sharp decline in the regenerative capacity of stem cells. A prevailing view holds that the aging rate of an individual depends on the ratio of tissue attrition to tissue regeneration. Therefore, manipulations that favor the balance towards regeneration may prevent or delay aging. Skeletal muscle is a specialized tissue composed of postmitotic myofibers that contract to generate force. Satellite cells are the adult stem cells responsible for skeletal muscle regeneration. Recent studies on the biology of skeletal muscle and satellite cells in aging have uncovered the critical impact of systemic and niche factors on stem cell functionality and demonstrated the capacity of aged satellite cells to rejuvenate and increase their regenerative potential when exposed to a youthful environment. Here we review the current literature on the coordinated relationship between cell extrinsic and intrinsic factors that regulate the function of satellite cells, and ultimately determine tissue homeostasis and repair during aging, and which encourage the search for new anti-aging strategies.

  19. Phosphorylation of human skeletal muscle myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, M.E.; Lingley, M.D.; Stuart, D.S.; Hoffman-Goetz, L.

    1986-03-01

    Phosphorylation of the P-light chains (phosphorylatable light chains) in human skeletal muscle myosin was studied in vitro and in vivo under resting an d contracted conditions. biopsy samples from rested vastus lateralis muscle of male and female subjects were incubated in oxygenated physiological solution at 30/sup 0/C. Samples frozen following a quiescent period showed the presence of only unphosphorylated P-light chains designated LC2f (light chain two of fast myosin) CL2s and LC2s'(light chains two of slow myosin). Treatment with caffeine (10 mM) or direct electrical stimulation resulted in the appearance of three additional bands which were identified as the phosphorylated forms of the P-light chains i.e. LC2f-P, LC2s-P and LC2s'-P. The presence of phosphate was confirmed by prior incubation with (/sup 30/P) orthophosphate. Muscle samples rapidly frozen from resting vastus lateralis muscle revealed the presence of unphosphorylated and phosphorylated P-light chains in approximately equal ratios. Muscle samples rapidly frozen following a maximal 10 second isometric contraction showed virtually only phosphorylated fast and slow P-light chains. These results reveal that the P-light chains in human fast and slow myosin may be rapidly phosphorylated, but the basal level of phosphorylation in rested human muscle considerably exceeds that observed in animal muscles studied in vitro or in situ.

  20. Cell motion predicts human epidermal stemness

    PubMed Central

    Toki, Fujio; Tate, Sota; Imai, Matome; Matsushita, Natsuki; Shiraishi, Ken; Sayama, Koji; Toki, Hiroshi; Higashiyama, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    Image-based identification of cultured stem cells and noninvasive evaluation of their proliferative capacity advance cell therapy and stem cell research. Here we demonstrate that human keratinocyte stem cells can be identified in situ by analyzing cell motion during their cultivation. Modeling experiments suggested that the clonal type of cultured human clonogenic keratinocytes can be efficiently determined by analysis of early cell movement. Image analysis experiments demonstrated that keratinocyte stem cells indeed display a unique rotational movement that can be identified as early as the two-cell stage colony. We also demonstrate that α6 integrin is required for both rotational and collective cell motion. Our experiments provide, for the first time, strong evidence that cell motion and epidermal stemness are linked. We conclude that early identification of human keratinocyte stem cells by image analysis of cell movement is a valid parameter for quality control of cultured keratinocytes for transplantation. PMID:25897083

  1. GLUT-3 expression in human skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, C. A.; Wen, G.; Peng, B. H.; Popov, V. L.; Hudnall, S. D.; Campbell, G. A.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle biopsy homogenates contain GLUT-3 mRNA and protein. Before these studies, it was unclear where GLUT-3 was located in muscle tissue. In situ hybridization using a midmolecule probe demonstrated GLUT-3 within all muscle fibers. Fluorescent-tagged antibody reacting with affinity-purified antibody directed at the carboxy-terminus demonstrated GLUT-3 protein in all fibers. Slow-twitch muscle fibers, identified by NADH-tetrazolium reductase staining, possessed more GLUT-3 protein than fast-twitch fibers. Electron microscopy using affinity-purified primary antibody and gold particle-tagged second antibody showed that the majority of GLUT-3 was in association with triads and transverse tubules inside the fiber. Strong GLUT-3 signals were seen in association with the few nerves that traversed muscle sections. Electron microscopic evaluation of human peripheral nerve demonstrated GLUT-3 within the axon, with many of the particles related to mitochondria. GLUT-3 protein was found in myelin but not in Schwann cells. GLUT-1 protein was not present in nerve cells, axons, myelin, or Schwann cells but was seen at the surface of the peripheral nerve in the perineurium. These studies demonstrated that GLUT-3 mRNA and protein are expressed throughout normal human skeletal muscle, but the protein is predominantly found in the triads of slow-twitch muscle fibers.

  2. Noninvasive analysis of human neck muscle function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, M. S.; Meyer, R. A.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Feeback, D. L.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    selected muscles that have been examined in human electromyographic studies. Neck muscle function and morphology can be studied at a detailed level using exercise-induced shifts in magnetic resonance images.

  3. Human stem cells and articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Inui, Atsuyuki; Iwakura, Takashi; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-11-05

    The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  4. Thermosensitivity of muscle: high-intensity thermal stimulation of muscle tissue induces muscle pain in humans

    PubMed Central

    Graven-Nielsen, T; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Mense, S

    2002-01-01

    Small-calibre afferent units responding to thermal stimuli have previously been reported to exist in muscle. The question as to whether these receptors in humans mediate subjective thermal sensations from muscle remains unresolved. The aims of the present study were to determine in humans whether intramuscular injection of warm and cold isotonic saline elicits temperature sensations, muscle pain or any other sensations. In 15 subjects, no thermal sensations assessed on a temperature visual analogue scale (VAS) could be detected with intramuscular injections of isotonic saline (1.5 ml) into the anterior tibial muscle at temperatures ranging from 8 to 48 °C. The same subjects recorded strongly increasing scores on a temperature VAS when thermal stimuli in the same intensity range were applied to the skin overlying the muscle by a contact thermode. However, i.m. isotonic saline of 48 °C induced muscle pain with peak scores of 3.2 ± 0.8 cm on a VAS scale ranging from 0 to 10 cm. Using the the McGill pain questionnaire a subgroup, of subjects qualitatively described the pain using the ‘thermal hot’ and ‘dullness’ word groups. Temperature measurements within the muscle during the stimulating injections showed that the time course of the pain sensation elicited by saline at 48 °C paralleled that of the intramuscular temperature and far outlasted the injection time. The present data show that high-intensity thermal stimulation of muscle is associated with muscle pain. High-threshold warm-sensitive receptors may mediate the pain following activation by temperatures of 48 °C or more. Taken together, the data indicate that thermosensation from a given volume of muscle is less potent than nociception. PMID:11956350

  5. Internal organization in the human jaw muscles.

    PubMed

    Hannam, A G; McMillan, A S

    1994-01-01

    The human jaw muscles are essential to mastication and play an important part in craniofacial growth. They contribute to dental and articular forces, deform the mandible, and, like other tissues, are subject to disorders, often manifested as pain. The literature describes how their contraction is controlled by the nervous system, and how their general structure and function contribute to craniofacial biology, but there has been little appraisal of their internal organization. Most of these muscles are not simple; they are multipennate, complexly layered, and divided by aponeuroses. This arrangement provides substantial means for differential contraction. In many ways, jaw muscle fibers are intrinsically dissimilar from those found in other skeletal muscles, because they are arranged in homogeneous clusters and generally reveal type I or type II histochemical profiles. Most are type I and are distributed preferentially in the anterior and deeper parts of the jaw closers. Additionally, most motor unit (MU) territories are smaller than those in the limbs. There is circumstantial evidence for intramuscular partitioning based in part on innervation by primary muscle nerve branches. During normal function. MU recruitment and the rate coding of MU firing in human jaw muscles follow the general principles established for the limbs, but even here they differ in important respects. Jaw muscle MUs do not have stable force recruitment thresholds and seem to rely more on rate coding than on sequential unit recruitment to grade the amplitude of muscle contraction. Unlike those in the limbs, their twitch tensions correlate weakly with MU fatiguability and contraction speed, probably because there are so few slow, fatigue-resistant MUs in the jaw muscles. Moreover, the type I fibers that are present in such large numbers do not contract as slowly as normally expected. To complicate matters, estimation of jaw MU twitch tensions is extremely difficult, because it is affected by the

  6. Pluripotent stem cell derivation and differentiation toward cardiac muscle: novel techniques and advances in patent literature.

    PubMed

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Thorrez, Lieven; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2013-04-01

    Pluripotent stem cells hold unprecedented potential for regenerative medicine, disease modeling and drug screening. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), standard model for pluripotency studies, have been recently flanked by induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). iPSCs are obtained from somatic cells via epigenetic and transcriptional reprogramming, overcoming ESC-related ethical issues and enabling the possibility of donor-matching pluripotent cell lines. Since the European Court of Justice banned patents involving embryo disaggregation to generate human ESCs, iPSCs can now fuel the willingness of European companies to invest in treatments based on stem cells. Moreover, iPSCs share many unique features of ESCs, such as unlimited self-renewal potential and broad differentiation capability, even though iPSCs seem more susceptible to genomic instability and display epigenetic biases as compared to ESCs. Both ESCs and iPSCs have been intensely investigated for cardiomyocyte production and cardiac muscle regeneration, both in human and animal models. In vitro and in vivo studies are continuously expanding and refining this field via genetic manipulation and cell conditioning, trying to achieve standard and reproducible products, eligible for clinical and biopharmaceutical scopes. This review focuses on the recently growing body of patents, concerning technical advances in production, expansion and cardiac differentiation of ESCs and iPSCs.

  7. Perivascular Stem Cells Diminish Muscle Atrophy and Retain Viability in a Rotator Cuff Tear Model

    PubMed Central

    Eliasberg, Claire; Jensen, Andrew; Dar, Ayelet; Kowalski, Tomasz J.; Murray, Iain; Khan, Adam Z.; Natsuhara, Kyle; Garagozlo, Cameron; McAllister, David R.; Petrigliano, Frank A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are a common cause of shoulder pain and often necessitate surgical repair. Muscle changes including atrophy, fibrosis, and fatty degeneration can develop after RCTs, which may compromise surgical repair and clinical outcomes. Lipoaspirate-derived human perivascular stem cells (PSCs) have demonstrated myogenic and angiogenic potential in other small animal models of muscle injury. We hypothesized that the administration of PSCs following massive RCTs may help to diminish these muscle changes in a small animal model. Methods: A total of 90 immunodeficient mice were used (15 groups, N=6). Each was assigned to one of three surgical groups: i) sham, ii) supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendon transection (TT), or iii) TT and suprascapular nerve denervation (TT+DN). PSCs were harvested from human lipoaspirate and sorted using fluorescence-activated cell sorting into small blood vessel residing pericytes (CD146+ CD34- CD45- CD31-) and large blood perivascular adventitial cells (CD146- CD34+ CD45- CD31-). Mice received either a) no injection, b) saline injection, c) pericyte injection, or d) adventitial cell injection at the time of the index procedure or at two weeks following index surgery. The supraspinatus muscles were harvested six weeks after the index procedure. Muscle atrophy was assessed by measuring percent wet muscle weight change for each sample. Muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA), fibrosis, and fatty degeneration were analyzed using Image J™. Additionally, pericytes and adventitial cells were transduced with a luciferase-containing construct. Animals were given injections of luciferin and imaged using IVIS to track in vivo bioluminescence following injections to assess cell viability. Results: Treatment with PSC injection after TT resulted in less wet weight loss and greater muscle fiber CSA than control groups (P<0.05). The TT+DN groups treated with PSC injections two weeks post-op also had less muscle weight loss

  8. From hair to heart: nestin-expressing hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells differentiate to beating cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yashiro, Masateru; Mii, Sumiyuki; Aki, Ryoichi; Hamada, Yuko; Arakawa, Nobuko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Hoffman, Robert M; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the neural stem-cell marker nestin is expressed in hair follicle stem cells located in the bulge area which are termed hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells. HAP stem cells from mouse and human could form spheres in culture, termed hair spheres, which are keratin 15-negative and CD34-positive and could differentiate to neurons, glia, keratinocytes, smooth muscle cells, and melanocytes in vitro. Subsequently, we demonstrated that nestin-expressing stem cells could effect nerve and spinal cord regeneration in mouse models. In the present study, we demonstrated that HAP stem cells differentiated to beating cardiac muscle cells. We separated the mouse vibrissa hair follicle into 3 parts (upper, middle, and lower), and suspended each part separately in DMEM containing 10% FBS. All three parts of hair follicle differentiated to beating cardiac muscle cells as well as neurons, glial cells, keratinocytes and smooth muscle cells. The differentiation potential to cardiac muscle is greatest in the upper part of the follicle. The beat rate of the cardiac muscle cells was stimulated by isoproterenol and inhibited by propanolol. HAP stem cells have potential for regenerative medicine for heart disease as well as nerve and spinal cord repair.

  9. Differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to muscle fiber to model Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chal, Jérome; Oginuma, Masayuki; Al Tanoury, Ziad; Gobert, Bénédicte; Sumara, Olga; Hick, Aurore; Bousson, Fanny; Zidouni, Yasmine; Mursch, Caroline; Moncuquet, Philippe; Tassy, Olivier; Vincent, Stéphane; Miyanari, Ayako; Bera, Agata; Garnier, Jean-Marie; Guevara, Getzabel; Hestin, Marie; Kennedy, Leif; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Drayton, Bernadette; Cherrier, Thomas; Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Gussoni, Emanuela; Relaix, Frédéric; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Pourquié, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    During embryonic development, skeletal muscles arise from somites, which derive from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Using PSM development as a guide, we establish conditions for the differentiation of monolayer cultures of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells into PSM-like cells without the introduction of transgenes or cell sorting. We show that primary and secondary skeletal myogenesis can be recapitulated in vitro from the PSM-like cells, providing an efficient, serum-free protocol for the generation of striated, contractile fibers from mouse and human pluripotent cells. The mouse ES cells also differentiate into Pax7(+) cells with satellite cell characteristics, including the ability to form dystrophin(+) fibers when grafted into muscles of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Fibers derived from ES cells of mdx mice exhibit an abnormal branched phenotype resembling that described in vivo, thus providing an attractive model to study the origin of the pathological defects associated with DMD. PMID:26237517

  10. Muscle pain: animal and human experimental and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Marchettini, P

    1993-10-01

    The search for the identification of the sensory apparatus encoding muscle pain sensation in humans is recounted. Basic neurophysiologic animal studies, leading to a description of slowly conducting afferent from muscle and definition of high threshold polymodal muscle nociceptors, and pioneer psychophysic human studies together with recent microneurographic experiments in humans are described. The phenomena of muscle pain broad localization and distant referral are discussed, and clinical implications are extrapolated to interpret muscle pain as a localizing sign of mononeuropathy or radiculopathy. The identification of human muscle nociceptors has defined the scientific standard to test emerging clinical descriptions having muscle pain as a symptom.

  11. Skeletal muscle responses to unweighting in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Gary A.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of earth-based studies is presented emphasizing the data on muscular strength and size derived from experiments under simulated microgravity. The studies involve the elimination of weight-bearing responsibility of lower-limb human musculature to simulate the unweighting effects of space travel in the absence of exercise. Reference is given to bedrest and unilateral lower-limb suspension, both of which provide data that demonstrate the decreased strength of the knee extensors of 20-25 percent. The response is related to the decrease in cross-sectional area of the knee extensors which is a direct indication of muscle-fiber atrophy. Most of the effects of unweighting are associated with extensor muscles in the lower limbs and not with postural muscles. Unweighting is concluded to cause significant adaptations in the human neuromuscular system that require further investigation.

  12. Identification and Characterization of the Dermal Panniculus Carnosus Muscle Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Naldaiz-Gastesi, Neia; Goicoechea, María; Alonso-Martín, Sonia; Aiastui, Ana; López-Mayorga, Macarena; García-Belda, Paula; Lacalle, Jaione; San José, Carlos; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Trouilh, Lidwine; Anton-Leberre, Véronique; Herrero, Diego; Matheu, Ander; Bernad, Antonio; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Carvajal, Jaime J; Relaix, Frédéric; Lopez de Munain, Adolfo; García-Parra, Patricia; Izeta, Ander

    2016-09-13

    The dermal Panniculus carnosus (PC) muscle is important for wound contraction in lower mammals and represents an interesting model of muscle regeneration due to its high cell turnover. The resident satellite cells (the bona fide muscle stem cells) remain poorly characterized. Here we analyzed PC satellite cells with regard to developmental origin and purported function. Lineage tracing shows that they originate in Myf5(+), Pax3/Pax7(+) cell populations. Skin and muscle wounding increased PC myofiber turnover, with the satellite cell progeny being involved in muscle regeneration but with no detectable contribution to the wound-bed myofibroblasts. Since hematopoietic stem cells fuse to PC myofibers in the absence of injury, we also studied the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to the PC satellite cell compartment, demonstrating that cells of donor origin are capable of repopulating the PC muscle stem cell niche after irradiation and bone marrow transplantation but may not fully acquire the relevant myogenic commitment.

  13. 3 CFR - Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of July 30, 2009 Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research..., scientifically worthy human stem cell research, including human embryonic stem cell research, to the...

  14. Muscular dystrophy in a dish: engineered human skeletal muscle mimetics for disease modeling and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alec S T; Davis, Jennifer; Lee, Gabsang; Mack, David L; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-09-01

    Engineered in vitro models using human cells, particularly patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), offer a potential solution to issues associated with the use of animals for studying disease pathology and drug efficacy. Given the prevalence of muscle diseases in human populations, an engineered tissue model of human skeletal muscle could provide a biologically accurate platform to study basic muscle physiology, disease progression, and drug efficacy and/or toxicity. Such platforms could be used as phenotypic drug screens to identify compounds capable of alleviating or reversing congenital myopathies, such as Duchene muscular dystrophy (DMD). Here, we review current skeletal muscle modeling technologies with a specific focus on efforts to generate biomimetic systems for investigating the pathophysiology of dystrophic muscle. PMID:27109386

  15. Myosin Heavy Chain Composition of the Human Hyoglossus Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Sokoloff, Alan J.; Daugherty, Megan; Li, Haiyan

    2013-01-01

    The human tongue muscle hyoglossus (HG) muscle is active in oro-motor behaviors encompassing a wide range of tongue movement speeds. Here we test the hypothesis that the human HG is composed of “uncommon” myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms MHCembryonic, MHCneonatal and MHCslow tonic as has been reported for other head and neck muscles active during kinematically diverse behaviors. Following reaction of human HG with antibodies specific for MHCI, MHCIIA, MHCII, MHCembryonic, MHCextraocular, MHCneonatal and MHCslow tonic only antibodies to MHCI, MHCIIA and MHCIIA-X label more than occasional muscle fibers. These antibodies describe five phenotypes with prevalence MHCIIA>MHCI>MHCI-IIX>MHCI-IIA>MHCIIX. In MHC composition, the human HG is thus similar to human appendicular muscles, the human tongue muscle styloglossus and many human head and neck muscles but different from human masseter and extraocular muscles which contain five or more MHC isoforms. PMID:19526266

  16. Skeletal muscle responses to unloading in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, G.; Tesch, P.; Hather, B.; Adams, G.; Buchanan, P.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the effects of unloading on skeletal muscle structure. Method: Eight subjects walked on crutches for six weeks with a 110 cm elevated sole on the right shoe. This removed weight bearing by the left lower limb. Magnetic resonance imaging of both lower limbs and biopsies of the left m. vastus laterallis (VL) were used to study muscle structure. Results: Unloading decreased (P less than 0.05) muscle cross-sectional areas (CSA) of the knee extensors 16 percent. The knee flexors showed about 1/2 of this response (-7 percent, P less than 0.05). The three vasti muscles each showed decreases (P less than 0.05) of about 15 percent. M. rectus femoris did not change. Mean fiber CSA in VL decreased (P less than 0.05) 14 percent with type 2 and type 1 fibers showing reductions of 15 and 11 percent respectively. The ankle extensors showed a 20 percent decrease (P less than 0.05) in CSA. The reduction for the 'fast' m. gastrocnemius was 27 percent compared to the 18 percent decrease for the 'slow' soleus. Summary: The results suggest that decreases in muscle CSA are determined by the relative change in impact loading history because atrophy was (1) greater in extensor than flexor muscles, (2) at least as great in fast as compared to slow muscles or fibers, and (3) not dependent on single or multi-joint function. They also suggest that the atrophic responses to unloading reported for lower mammals are quantitatively but not qualitatively similar to those of humans.

  17. Human Adipose Stem Cells: From Bench to Bedside.

    PubMed

    De Francesco, Francesco; Ricci, Giulia; D'Andrea, Francesco; Nicoletti, Giovanni Francesco; Ferraro, Giuseppe Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Stem cell-based therapies for repair and regeneration of different tissues are becoming more important in the treatment of several diseases. Adult stem cells currently symbolize the most available source of cell progenitors for tissue engineering and repair and can be harvested using minimally invasive procedures. Moreover, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), the most widely used stem cells in stem cell-based therapies, are multipotent progenitors, with capability to differentiate into cartilage, bone, connective, muscle, and adipose tissue. So far, bone marrow has been regarded as the main source of MSCs. To date, human adult adipose tissue may be the best suitable alternative source of MSCs. Adipose stem cells (ASCs) can be largely extracted from subcutaneous human adult adipose tissue. A large number of studies show that adipose tissue contains a biologically and clinically interesting heterogeneous cell population called stromal vascular fraction (SVF). The SVF may be employed directly or cultured for selection and expansion of an adherent population, so called adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). In recent years, literature based on data related to SVF cells and ASCs has augmented considerably: These studies have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of SVF cells and ASCs in vivo in animal models. On the basis of these observations, in several countries, various clinical trials involving SVF cells and ASCs have been permitted. This review aims at summarizing data regarding either ASCs cellular biology or ASCs-based clinical trials and at discussing the possible future clinical translation of ASCs and their potentiality in cell-based tissue engineering.

  18. Sepsis induces long-term metabolic and mitochondrial muscle stem cell dysfunction amenable by mesenchymal stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rocheteau, P.; Chatre, L.; Briand, D.; Mebarki, M.; Jouvion, G.; Bardon, J.; Crochemore, C.; Serrani, P.; Lecci, P. P.; Latil, M.; Matot, B.; Carlier, P. G.; Latronico, N.; Huchet, C.; Lafoux, A.; Sharshar, T.; Ricchetti, M.; Chrétien, F.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, or systemic inflammatory response syndrome, is the major cause of critical illness resulting in admission to intensive care units. Sepsis is caused by severe infection and is associated with mortality in 60% of cases. Morbidity due to sepsis is complicated by neuromyopathy, and patients face long-term disability due to muscle weakness, energetic dysfunction, proteolysis and muscle wasting. These processes are triggered by pro-inflammatory cytokines and metabolic imbalances and are aggravated by malnutrition and drugs. Skeletal muscle regeneration depends on stem (satellite) cells. Herein we show that mitochondrial and metabolic alterations underlie the sepsis-induced long-term impairment of satellite cells and lead to inefficient muscle regeneration. Engrafting mesenchymal stem cells improves the septic status by decreasing cytokine levels, restoring mitochondrial and metabolic function in satellite cells, and improving muscle strength. These findings indicate that sepsis affects quiescent muscle stem cells and that mesenchymal stem cells might act as a preventive therapeutic approach for sepsis-related morbidity. PMID:26666572

  19. Characterization of an Injury Induced Population of Muscle-Derived Stem Cell-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vojnits, Kinga; Pan, HaiYing; Mu, Xiaodong; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    We recently discovered a novel population of stem cells from the injured murine skeletal muscle. These injury induced muscle-derived stem cell-like cells (iMuSCs) are partially reprogrammed from differentiated myogenic cells and display a pluripotent-like state. The iMuSCs exhibit stem cell properties including the ability to differentiate into multiple lineages, such as neurogenic and myogenic differentiations; they also display a superior migration capacity that demonstrating a strong ability of muscle engraftment in vivo. IMuSCs express several pluripotent and myogenic stem cell markers; have the capability to form embryoid bodies and teratomas, and can differentiate into all three germ layers. Moreover, blastocyst microinjection showed that the iMuSCs contributed to chimeric embryos but could not complete germline transmission. Our results indicate that the iMuSCs are in a partially reprogrammed state of pluripotency, which are generated by the microenvironment of injured skeletal muscle. PMID:26611864

  20. [Research progress of induced pluripotent stem cells in treatment of muscle atrophy].

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhongkai; Yang, Chensong; Sun, Guixin

    2016-03-01

    Muscle atrophy caused by nerve injury is a common and difficult clinical problem. The development of stem cell researches has opened up a new way for the treatment of nerve injury-induced muscle atrophy. The induced pluripotent stem cells(iPSCs)can differentiate into various types of cells and have more advantages than embryonic stem cells (ESCs). After being transplanted into the damaged area, iPSCs are guided by neurogenic signals to the lesion sites, to repair the damaged nerve, promote generation of axon myelination, rebuild neural circuits and restore physiological function. Meanwhile, iPSCs can also differentiate into muscle cells and promote muscle tissue regeneration. Therefore, it would be possible to attenuate muscle atrophy caused by nerve injury with iPSCs treatment. PMID:27273988

  1. Human adipose stem cells: current clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Gir, Phanette; Oni, Georgette; Brown, Spencer A; Mojallal, Ali; Rohrich, Rod J

    2012-06-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells are multipotent cells that can easily be extracted from adipose tissue, are capable of expansion in vitro, and have the capacity to differentiate into multiple cell lineages, which have the potential for use in regenerative medicine. However, several issues need to be studied to determine safe human use. For example, there are questions related to isolation and purification of adipose-derived stem cells, their effect on tumor growth, and the enforcement of U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. Numerous studies have been published, with the interest in the potential for regenerative medicine continually growing. Several clinical trials using human adipose stem cell therapy are currently being performed around the world, and there has been a rapid evolution and expansion of their number. The purpose of this article was to review the current published basic science evidence and ongoing clinical trials involving the use of adipose-derived stem cells in plastic surgery and in regenerative medicine in general. The results of the studies and clinical trials using adipose-derived stem cells reported in this review seem to be promising not only in plastic surgery but also in a wide variety of other specialties. Nevertheless, those reported showed disparity in the way adipose-derived stem cells were used. Further basic science experimental studies with standardized protocols and larger randomized trials need to be performed to ensure safety and efficacy of adipose-derived stem cells use in accordance with U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines.

  2. Centre for human development, stem cells & regeneration.

    PubMed

    Oreffo, Richard O C

    2014-01-01

    The Centre for Human Development, Stem Cells and Regeneration (CHDSCR) was founded in 2004 as a cross-disciplinary research and translational program within the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Southampton. The Centre undertakes fundamental research into early development and stem cells together with applied translational research for patient benefit. The Centre has vibrant and thriving multidisciplinary research programs that harness the translational strength of the Faculty together with an innovative Stem Cell PhD program, outstanding clinical infrastructure and enterprise to deliver on this vision.

  3. Sphincter Contractility After Muscle-Derived Stem Cells Autograft into the Cryoinjured Anal Sphincters of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung-Bum; Lee, Haet Nim; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Jun-Seok; Lee, Hye Seung

    2008-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to determine whether the injection of muscle-derived stem cells into the anal sphincter can improve functional properties in a fecal incontinence rat model. Methods Cryoinjured rats were utilized as a fecal incontinence model. The gastrocnemius muscles of normal three-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the purification of the muscle-derived stem cells. The experimental group was divided into three subgroups: normal control; cryoinjured; and muscle-derived stem cells (3 × 106 cells) injection group of cryoinjured rats. All groups were subsequently employed in contractility experiments using muscle strips from the anal sphincter, one week after preparation. Results Contractility in the cryoinjured group was significantly lower than in the control after treatment with acetylcholine and KCl. In the muscle-derived stem cells injection group, contraction amplitude was higher than in the cryoinjured group but not significantly (20.5 ± 21.3 vs. 17.3 ± 3.4 g per gram tissue, with acetylcholine (10−4 mol/l); 31 ± 14.2 vs. 18.4 ± 7.9 g per gram tissue, with KCl (10−4 mol/l)). PKH-26-labeled transplanted cells were detected in all of the grafted sphincters. Differentiated muscle masses stained positively for alpha smooth muscle actin and myosin heavy chain at the muscle-derived stem cells injection sites. Conclusions This is the first study reporting that autologous muscle-derived stem cell grafts may be a tool for improving anal sphincter function. PMID:18536965

  4. Making Skeletal Muscle from Progenitor and Stem Cells: Development versus Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lydia; Rozo, Michelle E.; Lepper, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    For locomotion, vertebrate animals use the force generated by contractile skeletal muscles. These muscles form an actin/myosin-based bio-machinery that is attached to skeletal elements to effect body movement and maintain posture. The mechanics, physiology, and homeostasis of skeletal muscles in normal and disease states are of significant clinical interest. How muscles originate from progenitors during embryogenesis has attracted considerable attention from developmental biologists. How skeletal muscles regenerate and repair themselves after injury by the use of stem cells is an important process to maintain muscle homeostasis throughout lifetime. In recent years, much progress has been made towards uncovering the origins of myogenic progenitors and stem cells as well as the regulation of these cells during development and regeneration. PMID:22737183

  5. Vascular Potential of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iacobas, Ionela; Vats, Archana; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death and disability in the US. Understanding the biological activity of stem and progenitor cells, and their ability to contribute to the repair, regeneration and remodeling of the heart and blood vessels affected by pathologic processes is an essential part of the paradigm in enabling us to achieve a reduction in related deaths. Both human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are promising sources of cells for clinical cardiovascular therapies. Additional in vitro studies are needed, however, to understand their relative phenotypes and molecular regulation toward cardiovascular cell fates. Further studies in translational animal models are also needed to gain insights into the potential and function of both human ES- and iPS-derived cardiovascular cells, and enable translation from experimental and pre-clinical studies to human trials. PMID:20453170

  6. Leptin receptors in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Borja; Santana, Alfredo; Fuentes, Teresa; Delgado-Guerra, Safira; Cabrera-Socorro, Alfredo; Dorado, Cecilia; Calbet, Jose A L

    2007-05-01

    Human skeletal muscle expresses leptin receptor mRNA; however, it remains unknown whether leptin receptors (OB-R) are also expressed at the protein level. Fourteen healthy men (age = 33.1 +/- 2.0 yr, height = 175.9 +/- 1.7 cm, body mass = 81.2 +/- 3.8 kg, body fat = 22.5 +/- 1.9%; means +/- SE) participated in this investigation. The expression of OB-R protein was determined in skeletal muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue, and hypothalamus using a polyclonal rabbit anti-human leptin receptor. Three bands with a molecular mass close to 170, 128, and 98 kDa were identified by Western blot with the anti-OB-R antibody. All three bands were identified in skeletal muscle: the 98-kDa and 170-kDa bands were detected in hypothalamus, and the 98-kDa and 128-kDa bands were detected in thigh subcutaneous adipose tissue. The 128-kDa isoform was not detected in four subjects, whereas in the rest its occurrence was fully explained by the presence of intermuscular adipose tissue, as demonstrated using an anti-perilipin A antibody. No relationship was observed between the basal concentration of leptin in serum and the 170-kDa band density. In conclusion, a long isoform of the leptin receptor with a molecular mass close to 170 kDa is expressed at the protein level in human skeletal muscle. The amount of 170-kDa protein appears to be independent of the basal concentration of leptin in serum.

  7. Characterization of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Paul J; Andrews, Peter W

    2013-12-18

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), whether embryonic stem cells or induced PSCs, offer enormous opportunities for regenerative medicine and other biomedical applications once we have developed the ability to harness their capacity for extensive differentiation. Central to this is our ability to identify and characterize such PSCs, but this is fraught with potential difficulties that arise from a tension between functional definitions of pluripotency and the more convenient use of 'markers', a problem exacerbated by ethical issues, our lack of knowledge of early human embryonic development, and differences from the mouse paradigm.

  8. Smooth muscles and stem cells of embryonic guts express KIT, PDGFRRA, CD34 and many other stem cell antigens: suggestion that GIST arise from smooth muscles and gut stem cells.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is believed to original from interstitial cells of (ICC) present in Auerbach's nerve plexus. GIST frequently shows gain-of-function mutations of KIT and PDGFRA. In practical pathology, GIST is diagnosed by positive immunostaining or KIT and/or CD34. The author herein demonstrates that human embryonic gastrointestinal tract smooth muscles (HEGITSM) and human embryonic stem gastrointestinal cells (HEGISC) consistently express KIT, CD34, NCAM, PDGFRA and other stem cell (SC) antigens NSE, synaptophysin, chromogranin, bcl-2, ErbB, and MET throughout the embryonic development of 7-40 gestational week (GW). CK14 was negative. The author examines 42 cases (7-40 GW) of embryonic GI tract (EGI). The HEGISM, HEGIST, and gall bladder smooth muscles (SM) were consistently positive for KIT, CD34, NCAM, PDGFRA, synaptophysin, chromogranin, NSE, bcl-2, ErbB2, and MET in foregut, stomach, GB, midgut, and hindgut throughout the fetal life (7-40 GW). The stem cells (SC) were seen to create the SM, nerves, ICC, and other all structures of GI tract. In adult gastrointestinal walls (n=30), KIT, CD34, PDGFRA, and S100 proteins were expressed in Auerbach's nerve plexus and ICC. The bronchial and vascular SM of embryos did not express these molecules. In GIST, frequent expressions of KIT (100%, 30/30), CD34 (90%, 27/30), and PDGFRA (83%, 25/30) were seen. In general, characteristics of tumors recapitulate their embryonic life. Therefore, it is strongly suggested that GIST may be originated from GI SM and/or GI SC in addition to ICC.

  9. Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity promotes survival of human muscle precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Elise; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Notarnicola, Cécile; Rouger, Karl; Serratrice, Nicolas; Bonnieu, Anne; Gay, Stéphanie; Bacou, Francis; Duret, Cédric; Carnac, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are a family of enzymes that efficiently detoxify aldehydic products generated by reactive oxygen species and might therefore participate in cell survival. Because ALDH activity has been used to identify normal and malignant cells with stem cell properties, we asked whether human myogenic precursor cells (myoblasts) could be identified and isolated based on their levels of ALDH activity. Human muscle explant-derived cells were incubated with ALDEFLUOR, a fluorescent substrate for ALDH, and we determined by flow cytometry the level of enzyme activity. We found that ALDH activity positively correlated with the myoblast-CD56+ fraction in those cells, but, we also observed heterogeneity of ALDH activity levels within CD56-purified myoblasts. Using lentiviral mediated expression of shRNA we demonstrated that ALDH activity was associated with expression of Aldh1a1 protein. Surprisingly, ALDH activity and Aldh1a1 expression levels were very low in mouse, rat, rabbit and non-human primate myoblasts. Using different approaches, from pharmacological inhibition of ALDH activity by diethylaminobenzaldehyde, an inhibitor of class I ALDH, to cell fractionation by flow cytometry using the ALDEFLUOR assay, we characterized human myoblasts expressing low or high levels of ALDH. We correlated high ALDH activity ex vivo to resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cytotoxic effect and in vivo to improved cell viability when human myoblasts were transplanted into host muscle of immune deficient scid mice. Therefore detection of ALDH activity, as a purification strategy, could allow non-toxic and efficient isolation of a fraction of human myoblasts resistant to cytotoxic damage. PMID:19840193

  10. Generation of skeletal muscle from transplanted embryonic stem cells in dystrophic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bhagavati, Satyakam . E-mail: satyakamb@hotmail.com; Xu Weimin

    2005-07-29

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have great therapeutic potential because of their capacity to proliferate extensively and to form any fully differentiated cell of the body, including skeletal muscle cells. Successful generation of skeletal muscle in vivo, however, requires selective induction of the skeletal muscle lineage in cultures of ES cells and following transplantation, integration of appropriately differentiated skeletal muscle cells with recipient muscle. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a severe progressive muscle wasting disease due to a mutation in the dystrophin gene and the mdx mouse, an animal model for DMD, are characterized by the absence of the muscle membrane associated protein, dystrophin. Here, we show that co-culturing mouse ES cells with a preparation from mouse muscle enriched for myogenic stem and precursor cells, followed by injection into mdx mice, results occasionally in the formation of normal, vascularized skeletal muscle derived from the transplanted ES cells. Study of this phenomenon should provide valuable insights into skeletal muscle development in vivo from transplanted ES cells.

  11. The central role of muscle stem cells in regenerative failure with aging

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Helen M; Cosgrove, Benjamin D; Ho, Andrew T V

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mass, function, and repair capacity all progressively decline with aging, restricting mobility, voluntary function, and quality of life. Skeletal muscle repair is facilitated by a population of dedicated muscle stem cells (MuSCs), also known as satellite cells, that reside in anatomically defined niches within muscle tissues. In adult tissues, MuSCs are retained in a quiescent state until they are primed to regenerate damaged muscle through cycles of self-renewal divisions. With aging, muscle tissue homeostasis is progressively disrupted and the ability of MuSCs to repair injured muscle markedly declines. Until recently, this decline has been largely attributed to extrinsic age-related alterations in the microenvironment to which MuSCs are exposed. However, as highlighted in this Perspective, recent reports show that MuSCs also progressively undergo cell-intrinsic alterations that profoundly affect stem cell regenerative function with aging. A more comprehensive understanding of the interplay of stem cell–intrinsic and extrinsic factors will set the stage for improving cell therapies capable of restoring tissue homeostasis and enhancing muscle repair in the aged. PMID:26248268

  12. Generation of skeletal muscle cells from pluripotent stem cells: advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Abujarour, Ramzey; Valamehr, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) possess unlimited proliferative potential while maintaining the ability to differentiate into any cell type including skeletal muscle cells (SMCs). hPSCs are amenable to genetic editing and can be derived from patient somatic cells, and thus represent a promising option for cell therapies for the treatment of degenerative diseases such as muscular dystrophies. There are unresolved challenges however associated with the derivation and scale-up of hPSCs and generation of differentiated cells in large quantity and high purity. Reported myogenic differentiation protocols are long, require cell sorting and/or rely on ectopic expression of myogenic master regulators. More recent advances have been made with the application of small molecules to enhance the myogenic differentiation efficiency and the identification of more selective markers for the enrichment of myogenic progenitors with enhanced regenerative potential. Here we review the field of myogenic differentiation and highlight areas requiring further research.

  13. HLA Engineering of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Riolobos, Laura; Hirata, Roli K; Turtle, Cameron J; Wang, Pei-Rong; Gornalusse, German G; Zavajlevski, Maja; Riddell, Stanley R; Russell, David W

    2013-01-01

    The clinical use of human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives is limited by the rejection of transplanted cells due to differences in their human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes. This has led to the proposed use of histocompatible, patient-specific stem cells; however, the preparation of many different stem cell lines for clinical use is a daunting task. Here, we develop two distinct genetic engineering approaches that address this problem. First, we use a combination of gene targeting and mitotic recombination to derive HLA-homozygous embryonic stem cell (ESC) subclones from an HLA-heterozygous parental line. A small bank of HLA-homozygous stem cells with common haplotypes would match a significant proportion of the population. Second, we derive HLA class I–negative cells by targeted disruption of both alleles of the Beta-2 Microglobulin (B2M) gene in ESCs. Mixed leukocyte reactions and peptide-specific HLA-restricted CD8+ T cell responses were reduced in class I–negative cells that had undergone differentiation in embryoid bodies. These B2M−/− ESCs could act as universal donor cells in applications where the transplanted cells do not express HLA class II genes. Both approaches used adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors for efficient gene targeting in the absence of potentially genotoxic nucleases, and produced pluripotent, transgene-free cell lines. PMID:23629003

  14. Interactions between muscle stem cells, mesenchymal-derived cells and immune cells in muscle homeostasis, regeneration and disease.

    PubMed

    Farup, J; Madaro, L; Puri, P L; Mikkelsen, U R

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has revealed the importance of reciprocal functional interactions between different types of mononuclear cells in coordinating the repair of injured muscles. In particular, signals released from the inflammatory infiltrate and from mesenchymal interstitial cells (also known as fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs)) appear to instruct muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to break quiescence, proliferate and differentiate. Interestingly, conditions that compromise the functional integrity of this network can bias muscle repair toward pathological outcomes that are typically observed in chronic muscular disorders, that is, fibrotic and fatty muscle degeneration as well as myofiber atrophy. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the regulation of this network in physiological and pathological conditions, and anticipate the potential contribution of its cellular components to relatively unexplored conditions, such as aging and physical exercise. PMID:26203859

  15. Interactions between muscle stem cells, mesenchymal-derived cells and immune cells in muscle homeostasis, regeneration and disease

    PubMed Central

    Farup, J; Madaro, L; Puri, P L; Mikkelsen, U R

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has revealed the importance of reciprocal functional interactions between different types of mononuclear cells in coordinating the repair of injured muscles. In particular, signals released from the inflammatory infiltrate and from mesenchymal interstitial cells (also known as fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs)) appear to instruct muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to break quiescence, proliferate and differentiate. Interestingly, conditions that compromise the functional integrity of this network can bias muscle repair toward pathological outcomes that are typically observed in chronic muscular disorders, that is, fibrotic and fatty muscle degeneration as well as myofiber atrophy. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the regulation of this network in physiological and pathological conditions, and anticipate the potential contribution of its cellular components to relatively unexplored conditions, such as aging and physical exercise. PMID:26203859

  16. Interactions between muscle stem cells, mesenchymal-derived cells and immune cells in muscle homeostasis, regeneration and disease.

    PubMed

    Farup, J; Madaro, L; Puri, P L; Mikkelsen, U R

    2015-07-23

    Recent evidence has revealed the importance of reciprocal functional interactions between different types of mononuclear cells in coordinating the repair of injured muscles. In particular, signals released from the inflammatory infiltrate and from mesenchymal interstitial cells (also known as fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs)) appear to instruct muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to break quiescence, proliferate and differentiate. Interestingly, conditions that compromise the functional integrity of this network can bias muscle repair toward pathological outcomes that are typically observed in chronic muscular disorders, that is, fibrotic and fatty muscle degeneration as well as myofiber atrophy. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the regulation of this network in physiological and pathological conditions, and anticipate the potential contribution of its cellular components to relatively unexplored conditions, such as aging and physical exercise.

  17. Human-Mouse Chimerism Validates Human Stem Cell Pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Mascetti, Victoria L; Pedersen, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are defined by their capacity to differentiate into all three tissue layers that comprise the body. Chimera formation, generated by stem cell transplantation to the embryo, is a stringent assessment of stem cell pluripotency. However, the ability of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to form embryonic chimeras remains in question. Here we show using a stage-matching approach that human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have the capacity to participate in normal mouse development when transplanted into gastrula-stage embryos, providing in vivo functional validation of hPSC pluripotency. hiPSCs and hESCs form interspecies chimeras with high efficiency, colonize the embryo in a manner predicted from classical developmental fate mapping, and differentiate into each of the three primary tissue layers. This faithful recapitulation of tissue-specific fate post-transplantation underscores the functional potential of hPSCs and provides evidence that human-mouse interspecies developmental competency can occur.

  18. Methods for Mitochondria and Mitophagy Flux Analyses in Stem Cells of Resting and Regenerating Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    García-Prat, Laura; Martínez-Vicente, Marta; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria generate most of the cell's supply of ATP as a source of energy. They are also implicated in the control of cell's growth and death. Because of these critical functions, mitochondrial fitness is key for cellular homeostasis. Often, however, mitochondria become defective following damage or stress. To prevent accumulation of damaged mitochondria, the cells clear them through mitophagy, which is defined as the selective degradation of mitochondria by autophagy (the process for degradation of long-lived proteins and damaged organelles in lysosomes). Recently, constitutive mitophagic activity has been reported in quiescent muscle stem cells (satellite cells), which sustain regeneration of skeletal muscle. In response to muscle damage, these cells activate, expand, and differentiate to repair damaged myofibers. Mitophagy was shown to be required for maintenance of satellite cells in their healthy quiescent state. Conversely, damaged mitochondria accumulated in satellite cells with aging and this was attributed to defective mitophagy. This caused increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and loss of muscle stem cell regenerative capacity at old age. In this chapter, we describe different experimental strategies to evaluate mitochondria status and mitophagy in muscle stem cells from mice. They should improve our ability to study muscle stem homeostasis in adult life, and their loss of function in aging and disease. PMID:27492176

  19. Immortalization of primary human smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Reyes, N; Halbert, C L; Smith, P P; Benditt, E P; McDougall, J K

    1992-01-01

    Primary human aortic and myometrial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were immortalized using an amphotropic recombinant retroviral construct containing the E6 and E7 open reading frames (ORFs) of human papillomavirus type 16. The SMCs expressing the E6/E7 ORFs have considerably elevated growth rates when compared with nonimmortalized control cells and show no signs of senescence with long-term passage. The first SMC line derived in this study has been maintained in continuous tissue culture for greater than 1 year (greater than 180 population doublings). The immortalized SMCs have decreased cell size and decreased content of muscle-specific alpha-actin filaments as determined by indirect immunofluorescence. Southern blot analysis has demonstrated the stable integration of the E6/E7 ORFs in the retrovirally infected cells, and radioimmunoprecipitation has confirmed the continued expression of the E6 and E7 genes. Cytogenetic studies of the SMC lines have revealed essentially diploid populations except for the myometrial clonal line, which became aneuploid at late passage (greater than 125 doublings). These cell lines were not tumorigenic in nude mice. Images PMID:1311088

  20. Molecular biology of human muscle disease

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, P.W.; Epstein, H.F. )

    1991-01-01

    The molecular revolution that is transforming the entire biomedical field has had far-reaching impact in its application to inherited human muscle disease. The gene for Duchenne muscular dystrophy was one of the first cloned without knowledge of the defective protein product. This success was based upon the availability of key chromosomal aberrations that provided molecular landmarks for the disease locus. Subsequent discoveries regarding the mode of expression for this gene, the structure and localization of its protein product dystrophin, and molecular diagnosis of affected and carrier individuals constitute a paradigm for investigation of human genetics. Finding the gene for myotonic muscular dystrophy is requiring the brute force approach of cloning several million bases of DNA, identifying expressed sequences, and characterizing candidate genes. The gene that causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been found serendipitously to be one of the genetic markers on chromosome 14, the {beta} myosin heavy chain.

  1. Glucose transporter expression in human skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Gaster, M; Handberg, A; Beck-Nielsen, H; Schroder, H D

    2000-09-01

    The present study was initiated to investigate GLUT-1 through -5 expression in developing and mature human skeletal muscle. To bypass the problems inherent in techniques using tissue homogenates, we applied an immunocytochemical approach, employing the sensitive enhanced tyramide signal amplification (TSA) technique to detect the localization of glucose transporter expression in human skeletal muscle. We found expression of GLUT-1, GLUT-3, and GLUT-4 in developing human muscle fibers showing a distinct expression pattern. 1) GLUT-1 is expressed in human skeletal muscle cells during gestation, but its expression is markedly reduced around birth and is further reduced to undetectable levels within the first year of life; 2) GLUT-3 protein expression appears at 18 wk of gestation and disappears after birth; and 3) GLUT-4 protein is diffusely expressed in muscle cells throughout gestation, whereas after birth, the characteristic subcellular localization is as seen in adult muscle fibers. Our results show that GLUT-1, GLUT-3, and GLUT-4 seem to be of importance during muscle fiber growth and development. GLUT-5 protein was undetectable in fetal and adult skeletal muscle fibers. In adult muscle fibers, only GLUT-4 was expressed at significant levels. GLUT-1 immunoreactivity was below the detection limit in muscle fibers, indicating that this glucose transporter is of minor importance for muscle glucose supply. Thus we hypothesize that GLUT-4 also mediates basal glucose transport in muscle fibers, possibly through constant exposure to tonal contraction and basal insulin levels. PMID:10950819

  2. Myogenic progenitors and imaging single-cell flow analysis: a model to study commitment of adult muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Trapecar, Martin; Kelc, Robi; Gradisnik, Lidija; Vogrin, Matjaz; Rupnik, Marjan Slak

    2014-12-01

    Research on skeletal muscles suffers from a lack of appropriate human models to study muscle formation and regeneration on the regulatory level of single cells. This hampers both basic understanding and the development of new therapeutic approaches. The use of imaging multicolour flow cytometry and myogenic stem cells can help fill this void by allowing researchers to visualize and quantify the reaction of individual cultured cells to bioactives or other physiological impulses. As proof of concept, we subjected human CD56+ satellite cells to reference bioactives follistatin and Malva sylvestris extracts and then used imaging multicolor flow cytometry to visualize the stepwise activation of myogenic factors MyoD and myogenin in individual cells. This approach enabled us to evaluate the potency of these bioactives to stimulate muscle commitment. To validate this method, we used multi-photon confocal microscopy to confirm the potential of bioactives to stimulate muscle differentiation and expression of desmin. Imaging multicolor flow cytometry revealed statistically significant differences between treated and untreated groups of myogenic progenitors and we propose the utilization of this concept as an integral part of future muscle research strategies.

  3. The Effect of Nutritional Supplements on Muscle-Derived Stem Cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fernyhough, Melinda E.; Bucci, Luke R.; Feliciano, Jeff; Dodson, Michael V.

    2010-01-01

    Postnatal muscle stem cells, recognized as myogenic satellite cells, were isolated from sheep skeletal muscle and used in these experiments. Forty-one different metabolic compounds that are commonly found in commercially-available oral supplements were exposed to primary muscle stem cell cultures, in an effort to ascertain whether any one compound could alter satellite cell proliferation or differentiation (a first step towards elucidating the metabolomics or nutrigenomics of these stem cells). These compounds included energetic moieties, amino acid analogs, fatty acids and analogs including different forms of conjugated linoleic acid, minerals and mineral conjugates, insect hormones, caffeine, plant extracts, and extracts from over-the-counter supplements, and were obtained by key manufacturers in a form that would be commercially available. The compounds were sterilized and then exposed to myogenic satellite cell cultures at different levels (ranging from toxic to physiologic) to ascertain if there would be an effect. The results suggested that exposure of satellite cells to only a few compounds resulted in any measurable effect(s). Ten compounds elicited increases in proliferation, and four compounds promoted increases in differentiation. These results suggest avenues for the exploration of enhancing muscle stem cell activity of interest for muscle wasting disorders, sarcopenia of aging and physical performance. PMID:24855542

  4. Intrinsic Ability of Adult Stem Cell in Skeletal Muscle: An Effective and Replenishable Resource to the Establishment of Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fujimaki, Shin; Machida, Masanao; Hidaka, Ryo; Asashima, Makoto; Takemasa, Tohru; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    Adult stem cells play an essential role in mammalian organ maintenance and repair throughout adulthood since they ensure that organs retain their ability to regenerate. The choice of cell fate by adult stem cells for cellular proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation into multiple lineages is critically important for the homeostasis and biological function of individual organs. Responses of stem cells to stress, injury, or environmental change are precisely regulated by intercellular and intracellular signaling networks, and these molecular events cooperatively define the ability of stem cell throughout life. Skeletal muscle tissue represents an abundant, accessible, and replenishable source of adult stem cells. Skeletal muscle contains myogenic satellite cells and muscle-derived stem cells that retain multipotent differentiation abilities. These stem cell populations have the capacity for long-term proliferation and high self-renewal. The molecular mechanisms associated with deficits in skeletal muscle and stem cell function have been extensively studied. Muscle-derived stem cells are an obvious, readily available cell resource that offers promise for cell-based therapy and various applications in the field of tissue engineering. This review describes the strategies commonly used to identify and functionally characterize adult stem cells, focusing especially on satellite cells, and discusses their potential applications. PMID:23818907

  5. Identification and Characterization of the Dermal Panniculus Carnosus Muscle Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Naldaiz-Gastesi, Neia; Goicoechea, María; Alonso-Martín, Sonia; Aiastui, Ana; López-Mayorga, Macarena; García-Belda, Paula; Lacalle, Jaione; San José, Carlos; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Trouilh, Lidwine; Anton-Leberre, Véronique; Herrero, Diego; Matheu, Ander; Bernad, Antonio; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Carvajal, Jaime J; Relaix, Frédéric; Lopez de Munain, Adolfo; García-Parra, Patricia; Izeta, Ander

    2016-09-13

    The dermal Panniculus carnosus (PC) muscle is important for wound contraction in lower mammals and represents an interesting model of muscle regeneration due to its high cell turnover. The resident satellite cells (the bona fide muscle stem cells) remain poorly characterized. Here we analyzed PC satellite cells with regard to developmental origin and purported function. Lineage tracing shows that they originate in Myf5(+), Pax3/Pax7(+) cell populations. Skin and muscle wounding increased PC myofiber turnover, with the satellite cell progeny being involved in muscle regeneration but with no detectable contribution to the wound-bed myofibroblasts. Since hematopoietic stem cells fuse to PC myofibers in the absence of injury, we also studied the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to the PC satellite cell compartment, demonstrating that cells of donor origin are capable of repopulating the PC muscle stem cell niche after irradiation and bone marrow transplantation but may not fully acquire the relevant myogenic commitment. PMID:27594590

  6. Muscle fiber and motor unit behavior in the longest human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Harris, A John; Duxson, Marilyn J; Butler, Jane E; Hodges, Paul W; Taylor, Janet L; Gandevia, Simon C

    2005-09-14

    The sartorius muscle is the longest muscle in the human body. It is strap-like, up to 600 mm in length, and contains five to seven neurovascular compartments, each with a neuromuscular endplate zone. Some of its fibers terminate intrafascicularly, whereas others may run the full length of the muscle. To assess the location and timing of activation within motor units of this long muscle, we recorded electromyographic potentials from multiple intramuscular electrodes along sartorius muscle during steady voluntary contraction and analyzed their activity with spike-triggered averaging from a needle electrode inserted near the proximal end of the muscle. Approximately 30% of sartorius motor units included muscle fibers that ran the full length of the muscle, conducting action potentials at 3.9 +/- 0.1 m/s. Most motor units were innervated within a single muscle endplate zone that was not necessarily near the midpoint of the fiber. As a consequence, action potentials reached the distal end of a unit as late as 100 ms after initiation at an endplate zone. Thus, contractile activity is not synchronized along the length of single sartorius fibers. We postulate that lateral transmission of force from fiber to endomysium and a wide distribution of motor unit endplates along the muscle are critical for the efficient transmission of force from sarcomere to tendon and for the prevention of muscle injury caused by overextension of inactive regions of muscle fibers.

  7. Directed Differentiation of Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Lian, Qizhou; Zhang, Yuelin; Liang, Xiaoting; Gao, Fei; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent stromal cells, also known as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), possess great potential to generate a wide range of cell types including endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, bone, cartilage, and lipid cells. This protocol describes in detail how to perform highly efficient, lineage-specific differentiation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with an MSCs fate. The approach uses a clinically compliant protocol with chemically defined media, feeder-free conditions, and a CD105 positive and CD24 negative selection to achieve a single cell-based MSCs derivation from differentiating human pluripotent cells in approximately 20 days. Cells generated with this protocol express typical MSCs surface markers and undergo adipogenesis, osteogenesis, and chondrogenesis similar to adult bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). Nonetheless, compared with adult BM-MSCs, iPSC-MSCs display a higher proliferative capacity, up to 120 passages, without obvious loss of self-renewal potential and constitutively express MSCs surface antigens. MSCs generated with this protocol have numerous applications, including expansion to large scale cell numbers for tissue engineering and the development of cellular therapeutics. This approach has been used to rescue limb ischemia, allergic disorders, and cigarette smoke-induced lung damage and to model mesenchymal and vascular disorders of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS). PMID:27236679

  8. The extraocular muscle stem cell niche is resistant to ageing and disease

    PubMed Central

    Formicola, Luigi; Marazzi, Giovanna; Sassoon, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Specific muscles are spared in many degenerative myopathies. Most notably, the extraocular muscles (EOMs) do not show clinical signs of late stage myopathies including the accumulation of fibrosis and fat. It has been proposed that an altered stem cell niche underlies the resistance of EOMs in these pathologies, however, to date, no reports have provided a detailed characterization of the EOM stem cell niche. PW1/Peg3 is expressed in progenitor cells in all adult tissues including satellite cells and a subset of interstitial non-satellite cell progenitors in muscle. These PW1-positive interstitial cells (PICs) include a fibroadipogenic progenitor population (FAP) that give rise to fat and fibrosis in late stage myopathies. PICs/FAPs are mobilized following injury and FAPs exert a promyogenic role upon myoblasts in vitro but require the presence of a minimal population of satellite cells in vivo. We and others recently described that FAPs express promyogenic factors while satellite cells express antimyogenic factors suggesting that PICs/FAPs act as support niche cells in skeletal muscle through paracrine interactions. We analyzed the EOM stem cell niche in young adult and aged wild-type mice and found that the balance between PICs and satellite cells within the EOM stem cell niche is maintained throughout life. Moreover, in the adult mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the EOM stem cell niche is unperturbed compared to normal mice, in contrast to Tibialis Anterior (TA) muscle, which displays signs of ongoing degeneration/regeneration. Regenerating mdx TA shows increased levels of both PICs and satellite cells, comparable to normal unaffected EOMs. We propose that the increase in PICs that we observe in normal EOMs contributes to preserving the integrity of the myofibers and satellite cells. Our data suggest that molecular cues regulating muscle regeneration are intrinsic properties of EOMs. PMID:25520657

  9. Human Skeletal Muscle Health with Spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trappe, Scott

    2012-07-01

    This lecture will overview the most recent aerobic and resistance exercise programs used by crewmembers while aboard the International Space Station (ISS) for six months and examine its effectiveness for protecting skeletal muscle health. Detailed information on the exercise prescription program, whole muscle size, whole muscle performance, and cellular data obtained from muscle biopsy samples will be presented. Historically, detailed information on the exercise program while in space has not been available. These most recent exercise and muscle physiology findings provide a critical foundation to guide the exercise countermeasure program forward for future long-duration space missions.

  10. Muscle protein analysis. II. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of normal and diseased human skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C.S.; Barany, M.; Danon, M.J.; Anderson, N.G.

    1980-07-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to analyze the major proteins of normal and pathological human-muscle samples. The normal human-muscle pattern contains four myosin light chains: three that co-migrate with the myosin light chains from rabbit fast muscle (extensor digitorum longus), and one that co-migrates with the light chain 2 from rabbit slow muscle (soleus). Of seven Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples, four yielded patterns with decreased amounts of actin and myosin relative to normal muscle, while three samples gave patterns comparable to that for normal muscle. Six samples from patients with myotonic dystrophy also gave normal patterns. In nemaline rod myopathy, in contrast, the pattern was deficient in two of the fast-type myosin light chains.

  11. The decision on the "optimal" human pluripotent stem cell.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Margit; Schipany, Katharina; Hengstschläger, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Because of recent advances, the array of human pluripotent stem cells now contains embryonic stem cells, derived from "surplus" in vitro fertilization embryos or from cloned embryos; induced pluripotent stem cells; and amniotic fluid stem cells. Here, we compare these stem cell types regarding ethical and legal concerns, cultivation conditions, genomic stability, tumor developing potentials, and applicability for disease modeling and human therapy. This overview highlights that in the future appropriate methodological management must include a decision on the "optimal" stem cell to use before the specific application.

  12. Tonic muscle pain does not increase fusimotor drive to human leg muscles: implications for chronic muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Fazalbhoy, Azharuddin; Macefield, Vaughan G; Birznieks, Ingvars

    2013-06-01

    Experimental pain induced in animals has shown that noxious stimulation of group III and IV afferents increases the firing of muscle spindles via a reflex excitation of fusimotor (γ) motoneurones. Chronic muscle pain has been hypothesized to develop as a result of a vicious cycle involving this mechanism. In order to explore the effects of long-lasting muscle pain on the fusimotor system, single unit muscle spindle afferents were recorded from 15 subjects. Afferent activity was recorded from foot and ankle extensor muscles whilst infusing hypertonic saline into the tibialis anterior muscle of the ipsilateral leg, producing moderate-strong pain lasting for ∼60 min. A change in fusimotor drive was inferred by observing changes in the mean discharge rate of spontaneously active muscle spindle afferents. Homonymous and heteronymous muscles remained relaxed and showed no increase in activity, arguing against any fusimotor-driven increase in motor activity, and there was no net change in the firing of muscle spindle afferents. We conclude that long-lasting stimulation of group III and IV afferents fails to excite fusimotor neurones and increase muscle spindle discharge. Accordingly, the vicious cycle theory has no functional basis for the development of myalgia in human subjects. PMID:23417691

  13. Intramuscular nerve distribution pattern in the human tibialis posterior muscle.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Masahiro; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Terashima, Toshio; Miki, Akinori

    2015-03-01

    The human tibialis posterior muscle (TPM) has developed to maintain the foot arches for adopting bipedal locomotion. The insertion tendon of this muscle is U-shaped in a cross section, and the fibular part of the muscle whose muscle fibers originated from the fibula has a unique architecture. To understand the developmental history of the human TPM, distribution pattern of intramuscular nerves was investigated in ten sides of eight cadavers. Muscular branches entering the TPM could be classified into five types according to the distribution pattern in the muscle. The nerves innervating the part deeper to the insertion tendon ran transversely in the medial direction toward the tibia. Muscular branches innervating the fibular part ran medioinferiorly, and in four cases had communicating rami with the nerve innervating the other parts of this muscle. Muscular branches innervating the superficial layer whose muscle bundles originated from the tibia ran laterally toward the fibula. These results suggest that the fibular part might develop from the common primordium of the TPM, and the deeper layer of the muscle might expand laterally during the development to acquire a new attaching space on the interosseous membrane and fibula. The superficial layer might also develop laterally to acquire the additional attaching spaces on the fascia of the flexor digitorum longus muscle and flexor hallucis longus muscle, thus the insertion tendon might become U-shaped. With these measures, the TPM might be able to increase muscle volume to yield stronger power. PMID:24791909

  14. Human muscle spindle sensitivity reflects the balance of activity between antagonistic muscles.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Muscle spindles are commonly considered as stretch receptors encoding movement, but the functional consequence of their efferent control has remained unclear. The "α-γ coactivation" hypothesis states that activity in a muscle is positively related to the output of its spindle afferents. However, in addition to the above, possible reciprocal inhibition of spindle controllers entails a negative relationship between contractile activity in one muscle and spindle afferent output from its antagonist. By recording spindle afferent responses from alert humans using microneurography, I show that spindle output does reflect antagonistic muscle balance. Specifically, regardless of identical kinematic profiles across active finger movements, stretch of the loaded antagonist muscle (i.e., extensor) was accompanied by increased afferent firing rates from this muscle compared with the baseline case of no constant external load. In contrast, spindle firing rates from the stretching antagonist were lowest when the agonist muscle powering movement (i.e., flexor) acted against an additional resistive load. Stepwise regressions confirmed that instantaneous velocity, extensor, and flexor muscle activity had a significant effect on spindle afferent responses, with flexor activity having a negative effect. Therefore, the results indicate that, as consequence of their efferent control, spindle sensitivity (gain) to muscle stretch reflects the balance of activity between antagonistic muscles rather than only the activity of the spindle-bearing muscle.

  15. Control of abdominal muscles by brain stem respiratory neurons in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.; Ezure, Kazuhisa; Suzuki, Ichiro

    1985-01-01

    The nature of the control of abdominal muscles by the brain stem respiratory neurons was investigated in decerebrate unanesthetized cats. First, it was determined which of the brain stem respiratory neurons project to the lumbar cord (from which the abdominal muscles receive part of their innervation), by stimulating the neurons monopolarly. In a second part of the study, it was determined if lumbar-projecting respiratory neurons make monosynaptic connections with abdominal motoneurons; in these experiments, discriminate spontaneous spikes of antidromically acivated expiratory (E) neurons were used to trigger activity from both L1 and L2 nerves. A large projection was observed from E neurons in the caudal ventral respiratory group to the contralateral upper lumber cord. However, cross-correlation experiments found only two (out of 47 neuron pairs tested) strong monosynaptic connections between brain stem neurons and abdominal motoneurons.

  16. High efficiency in human muscle: an anomaly and an opportunity?

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Frank E.; Ortega, Justus D.; Jubrias, Sharon A.; Conley, Kevin E.; Kushmerick, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Can human muscle be highly efficient in vivo? Animal muscles typically show contraction-coupling efficiencies <50% in vitro but a recent study reports that the human first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle of the hand has an efficiency value in vivo of 68%. We examine two key factors that could account for this apparently high efficiency value: (1) transfer of cross-bridge work into mechanical work and (2) the use of elastic energy to do external work. Our analysis supports a high contractile efficiency reflective of nearly complete transfer of muscular to mechanical work with no contribution by recycling of elastic energy to mechanical work. Our survey of reported contraction-coupling efficiency values puts the FDI value higher than typical values found in small animals in vitro but within the range of values for human muscle in vivo. These high efficiency values support recent studies that suggest lower Ca2+ cycling costs in working contractions and a decline in cost during repeated contractions. In the end, our analysis indicates that the FDI muscle may be exceptional in having an efficiency value on the higher end of that reported for human muscle. Thus, the FDI muscle may be an exception both in contraction-coupling efficiency and in Ca2+ cycling costs, which makes it an ideal muscle model system offering prime conditions for studying the energetics of muscle contraction in vivo. PMID:21795559

  17. High efficiency in human muscle: an anomaly and an opportunity?

    PubMed

    Nelson, Frank E; Ortega, Justus D; Jubrias, Sharon A; Conley, Kevin E; Kushmerick, Martin J

    2011-08-15

    Can human muscle be highly efficient in vivo? Animal muscles typically show contraction-coupling efficiencies <50% in vitro but a recent study reports that the human first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle of the hand has an efficiency value in vivo of 68%. We examine two key factors that could account for this apparently high efficiency value: (1) transfer of cross-bridge work into mechanical work and (2) the use of elastic energy to do external work. Our analysis supports a high contractile efficiency reflective of nearly complete transfer of muscular to mechanical work with no contribution by recycling of elastic energy to mechanical work. Our survey of reported contraction-coupling efficiency values puts the FDI value higher than typical values found in small animals in vitro but within the range of values for human muscle in vivo. These high efficiency values support recent studies that suggest lower Ca(2+) cycling costs in working contractions and a decline in cost during repeated contractions. In the end, our analysis indicates that the FDI muscle may be exceptional in having an efficiency value on the higher end of that reported for human muscle. Thus, the FDI muscle may be an exception both in contraction-coupling efficiency and in Ca(2+) cycling costs, which makes it an ideal muscle model system offering prime conditions for studying the energetics of muscle contraction in vivo.

  18. Origin of the styloglossus muscle in the human fetus

    PubMed Central

    Mérida-Velasco, J R; Rodríguez-Vazquez, J F; de la Cuadra Blanco, C; Sánchez-Montesinos, I; Mérida-Velasco, J A

    2006-01-01

    The origin of the styloglossus muscle was histologically studied bilaterally in nine human fetuses (18 sides). In all cases, the muscle originated in Reichert's cartilage, which gives rise to the temporal styloid process. We identified three types of variation: type A, an accessory muscle fascicle originating from the mandibular angle, found in 7 cases (12 sides); type B, where the styloglossus muscle was attached to the mandibular angle by fibrous tracts, found in three cases (4 sides); and type C, where an accessory muscle fascicle arose from the fibrous tract connecting Reichert's cartilage to the mandibular angle; found in one case. In all cases (2 sides), the styloglossus muscle was innervated by the hypoglossal nerve. Relationships between the styloglossus muscle and vasculonervous elements of the prestyloid and retrostyloid spaces were analysed. PMID:16637887

  19. Origin of the styloglossus muscle in the human fetus.

    PubMed

    Mérida-Velasco, J R; Rodríguez-Vazquez, J F; de la Cuadra Blanco, C; Sánchez-Montesinos, I; Mérida-Velasco, J A

    2006-05-01

    The origin of the styloglossus muscle was histologically studied bilaterally in nine human fetuses (18 sides). In all cases, the muscle originated in Reichert's cartilage, which gives rise to the temporal styloid process. We identified three types of variation: type A, an accessory muscle fascicle originating from the mandibular angle, found in 7 cases (12 sides); type B, where the styloglossus muscle was attached to the mandibular angle by fibrous tracts, found in three cases (4 sides); and type C, where an accessory muscle fascicle arose from the fibrous tract connecting Reichert's cartilage to the mandibular angle; found in one case. In all cases (2 sides), the styloglossus muscle was innervated by the hypoglossal nerve. Relationships between the styloglossus muscle and vasculonervous elements of the prestyloid and retrostyloid spaces were analysed.

  20. Deciding on human embryonic stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Burgin, Eileen

    2009-03-01

    This paper examines the influences that congressional staff people viewed as important in shaping legislators' voting decisions on the human embryonic stem (ES) cell research bill in the 109th Congress, the first legislation vetoed by President George W. Bush. The analysis illuminates factors that impact congressional decision making on a salient issue with a strong moral component. Constituent concerns, ideology, and a desire to make good public policy all centrally affected members' choices; however, moral overtones permeated considerations relevant to the human ES cell research question. In addition, at least three influences that directly reflect or relate to members' moral claims - religious convictions, personal connections to potential beneficiaries of human ES cell research, and moral pressure from outside interests - were important also. The analysis draws on data gathered from interviews with congressional aides.

  1. Tissue-engineered human bioartificial muscles expressing a foreign recombinant protein for gene therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C.; Shansky, J.; Del Tatto, M.; Forman, D. E.; Hennessey, J.; Sullivan, K.; Zielinski, B. A.; Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1999-01-01

    Murine skeletal muscle cells transduced with foreign genes and tissue engineered in vitro into bioartificial muscles (BAMs) are capable of long-term delivery of soluble growth factors when implanted into syngeneic mice (Vandenburgh et al., 1996b). With the goal of developing a therapeutic cell-based protein delivery system for humans, similar genetic tissue-engineering techniques were designed for human skeletal muscle stem cells. Stem cell myoblasts were isolated, cloned, and expanded in vitro from biopsied healthy adult (mean age, 42 +/- 2 years), and elderly congestive heart failure patient (mean age, 76 +/- 1 years) skeletal muscle. Total cell yield varied widely between biopsies (50 to 672 per 100 mg of tissue, N = 10), but was not significantly different between the two patient groups. Percent myoblasts per biopsy (73 +/- 6%), number of myoblast doublings prior to senescence in vitro (37 +/- 2), and myoblast doubling time (27 +/- 1 hr) were also not significantly different between the two patient groups. Fusion kinetics of the myoblasts were similar for the two groups after 20-22 doublings (74 +/- 2% myoblast fusion) when the biopsy samples had been expanded to 1 to 2 billion muscle cells, a number acceptable for human gene therapy use. The myoblasts from the two groups could be equally transduced ex vivo with replication-deficient retroviral expression vectors to secrete 0.5 to 2 microg of a foreign protein (recombinant human growth hormone, rhGH)/10(6) cells/day, and tissue engineered into human BAMs containing parallel arrays of differentiated, postmitotic myofibers. This work suggests that autologous human skeletal myoblasts from a potential patient population can be isolated, genetically modified to secrete foreign proteins, and tissue engineered into implantable living protein secretory devices for therapeutic use.

  2. Genome editing in human stem cells.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Susan M; Mali, Prashant; Church, George M

    2014-01-01

    The use of custom-engineered sequence-specific nucleases (including CRISPR/Cas9, ZFN, and TALEN) allows genetic changes in human cells to be easily made with much greater efficiency and precision than before. Engineered double-stranded DNA breaks can efficiently disrupt genes, or, with the right donor vector, engineer point mutations and gene insertions. However, a number of design considerations should be taken into account to ensure maximum gene targeting efficiency and specificity. This is especially true when engineering human embryonic stem or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which are more difficult to transfect and less resilient to DNA damage than immortalized tumor cell lines. Here, we describe a protocol for easily engineering genetic changes in human iPSCs, through which we typically achieve targeting efficiencies between 1% and 10% without any subsequent selection steps. Since this protocol only uses the simple transient transfection of plasmids and/or single-stranded oligonucleotides, most labs will easily be able to perform it. We also describe strategies for identifying, cloning, and genotyping successfully edited cells, and how to design the optimal sgRNA target sites and donor vectors. Finally, we discuss alternative methods for gene editing including viral delivery vectors, Cas9 nickases, and orthogonal Cas9 systems.

  3. Pluripotent states of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifei; Lai, Dongmei

    2015-02-01

    Since human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) were first isolated and successfully cultured in vitro, the pluripotent potential of hESCs has been underestimated. The pluripotency of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) can be categorized as naïve and primed, depending on their corresponding in vivo developing phases. mESC morphology differs at distinct pluripotent states, which differ in signaling dependence, gene expression, epigenetic features, and developmental potential. hESCs resemble mouse stem cells at primed pluripotency, and consequently are believed to correspond to a later developmental stage in vivo than mESCs. Nevertheless, recent studies indicate that a naïve state of pluripotency may exist in hESCs, and the pluripotency of hESCs also can be enhanced by genetic modification or optimized culture systems. These findings provide novel insight into the properties and differentiation potential of hESCs. Here, we review the recent advances in characterization of ESC states and investigate the mechanisms regulating hESC pluripotency. PMID:25393391

  4. Stem Cell Models of Human Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Kelava, Iva; Lancaster, Madeline A

    2016-06-01

    Recent breakthroughs in pluripotent stem cell technologies have enabled a new class of in vitro systems for functional modeling of human brain development. These advances, in combination with improvements in neural differentiation methods, allow the generation of in vitro systems that reproduce many in vivo features of the brain with remarkable similarity. Here, we describe advances in the development of these methods, focusing on neural rosette and organoid approaches, and compare their relative capabilities and limitations. We also discuss current technical hurdles for recreating the cell-type complexity and spatial architecture of the brain in culture and offer potential solutions.

  5. Gene Expression Profiling of Muscle Stem Cells Identifies Novel Regulators of Postnatal Myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Rochat, Anne; Mademtzoglou, Despoina; Morais, Jessica; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Auradé, Frédéric; Chang, Ted Hung-Tse; Zammit, Peter S; Relaix, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle growth and regeneration require a population of muscle stem cells, the satellite cells, located in close contact to the myofiber. These cells are specified during fetal and early postnatal development in mice from a Pax3/7 population of embryonic progenitor cells. As little is known about the genetic control of their formation and maintenance, we performed a genome-wide chronological expression profile identifying the dynamic transcriptomic changes involved in establishment of muscle stem cells through life, and acquisition of muscle stem cell properties. We have identified multiple genes and pathways associated with satellite cell formation, including set of genes specifically induced (EphA1, EphA2, EfnA1, EphB1, Zbtb4, Zbtb20) or inhibited (EphA3, EphA4, EphA7, EfnA2, EfnA3, EfnA4, EfnA5, EphB2, EphB3, EphB4, EfnBs, Zfp354c, Zcchc5, Hmga2) in adult stem cells. Ephrin receptors and ephrins ligands have been implicated in cell migration and guidance in many tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we show that Ephrin receptors and ephrins ligands are also involved in regulating the adult myogenic program. Strikingly, impairment of EPHB1 function in satellite cells leads to increased differentiation at the expense of self-renewal in isolated myofiber cultures. In addition, we identified new transcription factors, including several zinc finger proteins. ZFP354C and ZCCHC5 decreased self-renewal capacity when overexpressed, whereas ZBTB4 increased it, and ZBTB20 induced myogenic progression. The architectural and transcriptional regulator HMGA2 was involved in satellite cell activation. Together, our study shows that transcriptome profiling coupled with myofiber culture analysis, provides an efficient system to identify and validate candidate genes implicated in establishment/maintenance of muscle stem cells. Furthermore, tour de force transcriptomic profiling provides a wealth of data to inform for future stem cell-based muscle therapies. PMID:27446912

  6. Gene Expression Profiling of Muscle Stem Cells Identifies Novel Regulators of Postnatal Myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Rochat, Anne; Mademtzoglou, Despoina; Morais, Jessica; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Auradé, Frédéric; Chang, Ted Hung-Tse; Zammit, Peter S.; Relaix, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle growth and regeneration require a population of muscle stem cells, the satellite cells, located in close contact to the myofiber. These cells are specified during fetal and early postnatal development in mice from a Pax3/7 population of embryonic progenitor cells. As little is known about the genetic control of their formation and maintenance, we performed a genome-wide chronological expression profile identifying the dynamic transcriptomic changes involved in establishment of muscle stem cells through life, and acquisition of muscle stem cell properties. We have identified multiple genes and pathways associated with satellite cell formation, including set of genes specifically induced (EphA1, EphA2, EfnA1, EphB1, Zbtb4, Zbtb20) or inhibited (EphA3, EphA4, EphA7, EfnA2, EfnA3, EfnA4, EfnA5, EphB2, EphB3, EphB4, EfnBs, Zfp354c, Zcchc5, Hmga2) in adult stem cells. Ephrin receptors and ephrins ligands have been implicated in cell migration and guidance in many tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we show that Ephrin receptors and ephrins ligands are also involved in regulating the adult myogenic program. Strikingly, impairment of EPHB1 function in satellite cells leads to increased differentiation at the expense of self-renewal in isolated myofiber cultures. In addition, we identified new transcription factors, including several zinc finger proteins. ZFP354C and ZCCHC5 decreased self-renewal capacity when overexpressed, whereas ZBTB4 increased it, and ZBTB20 induced myogenic progression. The architectural and transcriptional regulator HMGA2 was involved in satellite cell activation. Together, our study shows that transcriptome profiling coupled with myofiber culture analysis, provides an efficient system to identify and validate candidate genes implicated in establishment/maintenance of muscle stem cells. Furthermore, tour de force transcriptomic profiling provides a wealth of data to inform for future stem cell-based muscle therapies. PMID:27446912

  7. Observational study on the occurrence of muscle spindles in human digastric and mylohyoideus muscles.

    PubMed

    Saverino, Daniele; De Santanna, Amleto; Simone, Rita; Cervioni, Stefano; Cattrysse, Erik; Testa, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Although the occurrence of muscle spindles (MS) is quite high in most skeletal muscles of humans, few MS, or even absence, have been reported in digastric and mylohyoideus muscles. Even if this condition is generally accepted and quoted in many papers and books, observational studies are scarce and based on histological sections of a low number of specimens. The aim of the present study is to confirm previous data, assessing MS number in a sample of digastric and mylohyoideus muscles. We investigated 11 digastric and 6 mylohyoideus muscles from 13 donors. Muscle samples were embedded in paraffin wax, cross-sectioned in a rostrocaudal direction, and stained using haematoxylin-eosin. A mean of 5.1 ± 1.1 (range 3-7) MS was found in digastric muscles and mean of 0.5 ± 0.8 (range 0-2) in mylohyoideus muscles. A significant difference (P < 0.001) was found with the control sample, confirming the correctness of the histological procedure. Our results support general belief that the absolute number of spindles is sparse in digastric and mylohyoideus muscles. External forces, such as food resistance during chewing or gravity, do not counteract jaw-opening muscles. It is conceivable that this condition gives them a limited proprioceptive importance and a reduced need for having specific receptors as MS.

  8. Human skeletal muscle protein breakdown during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    Human spaceflight is associated with a loss of body protein. Excretion of 3-methylhistidine (3-MH) in the urine is a useful measurement of myofibrillar protein breakdown. Bed rest, particularly with 6 degrees head-down tilt, is an accepted ground-based model for human spaceflight. The objectives of this report were to compare 3-MH excretion from two Life Sciences shuttle missions (duration 9.5 and 15 days, n = 9) and from 17 days of bed rest (n = 7) with 6 degrees head-down tilt. The bed rest study was designed to mimic an actual Life Sciences spaceflight and so incorporated an extensive battery of physiological tests focused on the musculoskeletal system. Results showed that nitrogen retention, based on excretion of nitrogen in the urine, was reduced during both bed rest [from 22 +/- 1 to 1 +/- 5 mg N x kg(-1) x day(-1) (n = 7; P < 0.05)] and spaceflight [from 57 +/- 9 to 19 +/- 3 mg N x kg(-1) x day(-1) (n = 9; P < 0.05)]. 3-MH excretion was unchanged with either bed rest [pre-bed rest 5.30 +/- 0.29 vs. bed rest 5.71 +/- 0.30 micromol 3-MH x kg(-1) x day(-1), n = 7; P = not significant (NS)] or spaceflight [preflight 4.98 +/- 0.37 vs. 4.59 +/- 0.39 micromol 3-MH x kg(-1) x day(-1) in-flight, n = 9; P = NS]. We conclude that 1) 3-MH excretion was unaffected by spaceflight on the shuttle or with bed rest plus exercise, and 2) because protein breakdown (elevated 3-MH) was increased on Skylab but not on the shuttle, it follows that muscle protein breakdown is not an inevitable consequence of spaceflight.

  9. Human Naive Embryonic Stem Cells: How Full Is the Glass?

    PubMed

    Wang, Yixuan; Gao, Shaorong

    2016-03-01

    Human naive embryonic stem cells in the ground state of pluripotency provide a new opportunity to study human developmental biology and potential clinical applications. Two studies now report related work in human naive stem cell derivation and DNA methylation analysis, with one reporting some differences from oocyte and blastocyst profiles. PMID:26942847

  10. Telocytes and putative stem cells in ageing human heart.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Laurentiu M; Curici, Antoanela; Wang, Enshi; Zhang, Hao; Hu, Shengshou; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Tradition considers that mammalian heart consists of about 70% non-myocytes (interstitial cells) and 30% cardiomyocytes (CMs). Anyway, the presence of telocytes (TCs) has been overlooked, since they were described in 2010 (visit www.telocytes.com). Also, the number of cardiac stem cells (CSCs) has not accurately estimated in humans during ageing. We used electron microscopy to identify and estimate the number of cells in human atrial myocardium (appendages). Three age-related groups were studied: newborns (17 days-1 year), children (6-17 years) and adults (34-60 years). Morphometry was performed on low-magnification electron microscope images using computer-assisted technology. We found that interstitial area gradually increases with age from 31.3 ± 4.9% in newborns to 41 ± 5.2% in adults. Also, the number of blood capillaries (per mm(2) ) increased with several hundreds in children and adults versus newborns. CMs are the most numerous cells, representing 76% in newborns, 88% in children and 86% in adults. Images of CMs mitoses were seen in the 17-day newborns. Interestingly, no lipofuscin granules were found in CMs of human newborns and children. The percentage of cells that occupy interstitium were (depending on age): endothelial cells 52-62%; vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes 22-28%, Schwann cells with nerve endings 6-7%, fibroblasts 3-10%, macrophages 1-8%, TCs about 1% and stem cells less than 1%. We cannot confirm the popular belief that cardiac fibroblasts are the most prevalent cell type in the heart and account for about 20% of myocardial volume. Numerically, TCs represent a small fraction of human cardiac interstitial cells, but because of their extensive telopodes, they achieve a 3D network that, for instance, supports CSCs. The myocardial (very) low capability to regenerate may be explained by the number of CSCs, which decreases fivefold by age (from 0.5% to 0.1% in newborns versus adults).

  11. Directed Myogenic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Emi; Woltjen, Knut; Sakurai, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have opened the door to recreating pathological conditions in vitro using differentiation into diseased cells corresponding to each target tissue. Yet for muscular diseases, a method for reproducible and efficient myogenic differentiation from human iPSCs is required for in vitro modeling. Here, we introduce a myogenic differentiation protocol mediated by inducible transcription factor expression that reproducibly and efficiently drives human iPSCs into myocytes. Delivering a tetracycline-inducible, myogenic differentiation 1 (MYOD1) piggyBac (PB) vector to human iPSCs enables the derivation of iPSCs that undergo uniform myogenic differentiation in a short period of time. This differentiation protocol yields a homogenous skeletal muscle cell population, reproducibly reaching efficiencies as high as 70-90 %. MYOD1-induced myocytes demonstrate characteristics of mature myocytes such as cell fusion and cell twitching in response to electric stimulation within 14 days of differentiation. This differentiation protocol can be applied widely in various types of patient-derived human iPSCs and has great prospects in disease modeling particularly with inherited diseases that require studies of early pathogenesis and drug screening. PMID:25971915

  12. Directed Myogenic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Emi; Woltjen, Knut; Sakurai, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have opened the door to recreating pathological conditions in vitro using differentiation into diseased cells corresponding to each target tissue. Yet for muscular diseases, a method for reproducible and efficient myogenic differentiation from human iPSCs is required for in vitro modeling. Here, we introduce a myogenic differentiation protocol mediated by inducible transcription factor expression that reproducibly and efficiently drives human iPSCs into myocytes. Delivering a tetracycline-inducible, myogenic differentiation 1 (MYOD1) piggyBac (PB) vector to human iPSCs enables the derivation of iPSCs that undergo uniform myogenic differentiation in a short period of time. This differentiation protocol yields a homogenous skeletal muscle cell population, reproducibly reaching efficiencies as high as 70-90 %. MYOD1-induced myocytes demonstrate characteristics of mature myocytes such as cell fusion and cell twitching in response to electric stimulation within 14 days of differentiation. This differentiation protocol can be applied widely in various types of patient-derived human iPSCs and has great prospects in disease modeling particularly with inherited diseases that require studies of early pathogenesis and drug screening.

  13. Regulation of Muscle Stem Cell Functions: A Focus on the p38 MAPK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Segalés, Jessica; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2016-01-01

    Formation of skeletal muscle fibers (myogenesis) during development and after tissue injury in the adult constitutes an excellent paradigm to investigate the mechanisms whereby environmental cues control gene expression programs in muscle stem cells (satellite cells) by acting on transcriptional and epigenetic effectors. Here we will review the molecular mechanisms implicated in the transition of satellite cells throughout the distinct myogenic stages (i.e., activation from quiescence, proliferation, differentiation, and self-renewal). We will also discuss recent findings on the causes underlying satellite cell functional decline with aging. In particular, our review will focus on the epigenetic changes underlying fate decisions and on how the p38 MAPK signaling pathway integrates the environmental signals at the chromatin to build up satellite cell adaptive responses during the process of muscle regeneration, and how these responses are altered in aging. A better comprehension of the signaling pathways connecting external and intrinsic factors will illuminate the path for improving muscle regeneration in the aged.

  14. [Human pluripotent stem cell and neural differentiation].

    PubMed

    Wataya, Takafumi; Muguruma, Keiko; Sasai, Yoshiki

    2008-10-01

    Recovery of lost brain function is an important issue in medical studies because neurons of the central nervous system (CNS) have poor potential for regeneration. Since few CNS diseases can be treated completely by medicines, regenerative therapy by using stem cells should be studied as a new type of therapeutic intervention. The efficacy of cell replacement therapy in Parkinson's disease has been well investigated. Several studies on fetal tissue transplantation have revealed that quantity and purity of transplanted cells are necessary for recovery of symptoms. SFEB (Serum-free floating culture of embryoid body-like aggregates) method is capable of inducing multi-potential CNS progenitors that can be steered to differentiate into region-specific tissues. On the basis of the existing knowledge of embryology, we have succeeded in the generating of various types of neurons such as telencephalic, cerebeller (Purkinje and granule cells), retinal (photoreceptor cells) and hypothalamic neurons. Application of this culture method to human ES (hES) cells is necessary for clinical purpose: however, poor survival of hES cells in SFEB culture might limit the possibility of using these cells for future medical applications. We found that a selective Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, Y-27632, markedly diminished the dissociation-induced apoptosis of hES cells and enabled the cells to form aggregates in SFEB culture. For both mouse and human ES cells, SFEB culture is a favorable method that can generate large amounts of region-specific neurons. However, stem cell-based therapy continues to face several obstacles. It is important that researchers in the basic sciences and clinical medicine should discuss these problems together to overcome both scientific and ethical issues related to stem cells.

  15. Genetic Manipulation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Eiges, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    One of the great advantages of embryonic stem (ES) cells over other cell types is their accessibility to genetic manipulation. They can easily undergo genetic modifications while remaining pluripotent, and can be selectively propagated, allowing the clonal expansion of genetically altered cells in culture. Since the first isolation of ES cells in mice, many effective techniques have been developed for gene delivery and manipulation of ES cells. These include transfection, electroporation, and infection protocols, as well as different approaches for inserting, deleting, or changing the expression of genes. These methods proved to be extremely useful in mouse ES cells, for monitoring and directing differentiation, discovering unknown genes, and studying their function, and are now being extensively implemented in human ES cells (HESCs). This chapter describes the different approaches and methodologies that have been applied for the genetic manipulation of HESCs and their applications. Detailed protocols for generating clones of genetically modified HESCs by transfection, electroporation, and infection will be described, with special emphasis on the important technical details that are required for this purpose. All protocols are equally effective in human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.

  16. Human Wharton's jelly stem cells have unique transcriptome profiles compared to human embryonic stem cells and other mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fong, Chui-Yee; Chak, Li-Ling; Biswas, Arijit; Tan, Jee-Hian; Gauthaman, Kalamegam; Chan, Woon-Khiong; Bongso, Ariff

    2011-03-01

    The human umbilical cord that originates from the embryo is an extra-embryonic membrane and the Wharton's jelly within it is a rich source of stem cells (hWJSCs). It is not definitely known whether these cells behave as human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) or both. They have the unique properties of high proliferation rates, wide multipotency, hypoimmunogenicity, do not induce teratomas and have anticancer properties. These advantages are important considerations for their use in cell based therapies and treatment of cancers. In a search for properties that confer these advantages we compared a detailed transcriptome profiling of hWJSCs using DNA microarrays with that of a panel of known hESCs, hMSCs and stromal cells. hWJSCs expressed low levels of the pluripotent embryonic stem cell markers including POUF1, NANOG, SOX2 and LIN28, thus explaining why they do not produce teratomas. Several cytokines were significantly upregulated in hWJSCs including IL12A which is associated with the induction of apoptosis, thus explaining their anticancer properties. When GO Biological Process analysis was compared between the various stem cell types, hWJSCs showed an increased expression of genes associated with the immune system, chemotaxis and cell death. The ability to modulate immune responses makes hWJSCs an important compatible stem cell source for transplantation therapy in allogeneic settings without immunorejection. The data in the present study which is the first detailed report on hWJSC transcriptomes provide a foundation for future functional studies where the exact mechanisms of these unique properties of hWJSCs can be confirmed.

  17. Pluripotent Conversion of Muscle Stem Cells Without Reprogramming Factors or Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Bose, Bipasha; Shenoy P, Sudheer

    2016-02-01

    Muscle derived stem cells (MDSCs) are multipotent stem cells that can differentiate into several lineages including skeletal muscle precursor cells. Here, we show that MDSCs from myostatin null mice (Mstn (-/-) ) can be readily induced into pluripotent stem cells without using reprogramming factors. Microarray studies revealed a strong upregulation of markers like Leukemia Inhibitory factor (LIF) and Leukemia Inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) in Mstn (-/-) MDSCs as compared to wild type MDSCs (WT-MDSCs). Furthermore when cultured in mouse embryonic stem cell media with LIF for 95 days, Mstn (-/-) MDSCs formed embryonic stem cell (ES) like colonies. We termed such ES like cells as the culture-induced pluripotent stem cells (CiPSC). CiPSCs from Mstn (-/-) MDSCs were phenotypically similar to ESCs, expressed high levels of Oct4, Nanog, Sox2 and SSEA-1, maintained a normal karyotype. Furthermore, CiPSCs formed embryoid bodies and teratomas when injected into immunocompromised mice. In addition, CiPSCs differentiated into somatic cells of all three lineages. We further show that culturing in ES cell media, resulted in hypermethylation and downregulation of BMP2 in Mstn(-/-) MDSCs. Western blot further confirmed a down regulation of BMP2 signaling in Mstn (-/-) MDSCs in supportive of pluripotent reprogramming. Given that down regulation of BMP2 has been shown to induce pluripotency in cells, we propose that lack of myostatin epigenetically reprograms the MDSCs to become pluripotent stem cells. Thus, here we report the successful establishment of ES-like cells from adult stem cells of the non-germline origin under culture-induced conditions without introducing reprogramming genes.

  18. Regenerative capacity of old muscle stem cells declines without significant accumulation of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Wendy; Ho, Michelle Liane; Desai, Rajiv; Tham, Andrea; Chen, Robert Yuzen; Kung, Sunny; Elabd, Christian; Conboy, Irina M

    2013-01-01

    The performance of adult stem cells is crucial for tissue homeostasis but their regenerative capacity declines with age, leading to failure of multiple organs. In skeletal muscle this failure is manifested by the loss of functional tissue, the accumulation of fibrosis, and reduced satellite cell-mediated myogenesis in response to injury. While recent studies have shown that changes in the composition of the satellite cell niche are at least in part responsible for the impaired function observed with aging, little is known about the effects of aging on the intrinsic properties of satellite cells. For instance, their ability to repair DNA damage and the effects of a potential accumulation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) on their regenerative performance remain unclear. This work demonstrates that old muscle stem cells display no significant accumulation of DNA DSBs when compared to those of young, as assayed after cell isolation and in tissue sections, either in uninjured muscle or at multiple time points after injury. Additionally, there is no significant difference in the expression of DNA DSB repair proteins or globally assayed DNA damage response genes, suggesting that not only DNA DSBs, but also other types of DNA damage, do not significantly mark aged muscle stem cells. Satellite cells from DNA DSB-repair-deficient SCID mice do have an unsurprisingly higher level of innate DNA DSBs and a weakened recovery from gamma-radiation-induced DNA damage. Interestingly, they are as myogenic in vitro and in vivo as satellite cells from young wild type mice, suggesting that the inefficiency in DNA DSB repair does not directly correlate with the ability to regenerate muscle after injury. Overall, our findings suggest that a DNA DSB-repair deficiency is unlikely to be a key factor in the decline in muscle regeneration observed upon aging.

  19. Primary Bioassay of Human Myeloma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamburger, Anne; Salmon, Sydney E.

    1977-01-01

    The ability to clone primary tumors in soft agar has proven useful in the study of the kinetics and biological properties of tumor stem cells. We report the development of an in vitro assay which permits formation of colonies of human monoclonal plasma cells in soft agar. Colony growth has been observed from bone marrow aspirates from 75% of the 70 patients with multiple myeloma or related monoclonal disorders studied. Growth was induced with either 0.02 ml of human type O erythrocytes or 0.25 ml of medium conditioned by the adherent spleen cells of mineral oil-primed BALB/c mice. 5-500 colonies appeared after 2-3 wk in culture yielding a plating efficiency of 0.001-0.1%. The number of myeloma colonies was proportional to the number of cells plated between concentrations of 105-106 and back-extrapolated through zero, suggesting that colonies were clones derived from single myeloma stem cells. Morphological, histochemical, and functional criteria showed the colonies to consist of immature plasmablasts and mature plasma cells. 60-80% of cells picked from colonies contained intracytoplasmic monoclonal immunoglobulin. Colony growth was most easily achieved from the bone marrow cells of untreated patients or those in relapse. Only 50% of bone marrow samples from patients in remission were successfully cultured. Tritiated thymidine suicide studies provided evidence that for most myeloma patients, a very high proportion of myeloma colony-forming cells was actively in transit through the cell cycle. Velocity sedimentation at 1 g showed myeloma stem cells sedimented in a broad band with a peak at 13 mm/h. Antibody to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not reduce the number or size of the colonies. Increased numbers of myeloma colonies were seen when the marrow was depleted of colony-stimulating factor elaborating adherent cells before plating. This bioassay should prove useful in studying the in vitro biological behavior of certain bone marrow-derived (B

  20. EMG recording in human lip muscles: can single muscles be isolated?

    PubMed

    Blair, C; Smith, A

    1986-06-01

    Electromyography, recording the electrical activity of muscles, is an electrophysiological method that has been used widely in the study of movement performance by human subjects. Borrowing from the tradition of electromyographic studies of limb muscles, investigators interested in speech production have used the method to address many important experimental questions. Unfortunately, data recorded from craniofacial muscles generally have been discussed without reference to problems of interpretation that could arise due to the unique anatomical features of the muscles, particularly the lip muscles. Anatomical data show that the fibers of different muscles of the lips are interdigitated so that fibers with differing spatial orientation typically are found within a small section of lower lip tissue. The anatomical data are consistent with results of physiological studies of the lower lip muscles that have suggested that motor units with different physiological characteristics are found within a single recording site. Together, the anatomical and electrophysiological data suggest that, even with intramuscular electrodes, the probability of recording from a single muscle of the lip in isolation is extremely low. The fact that the activity of more than one muscle is likely to be sampled critically determines the nature of the conclusions that can be drawn from the data.

  1. Stem Cell Differentiation Toward the Myogenic Lineage for Muscle Tissue Regeneration: A Focus on Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ostrovidov, Serge; Shi, Xuetao; Sadeghian, Ramin Banan; Salehi, Sahar; Fujie, Toshinori; Bae, Hojae; Ramalingam, Murugan; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue engineering is one of the important ways for regenerating functionally defective muscles. Among the myopathies, the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive disease due to mutations of the dystrophin gene leading to progressive myofiber degeneration with severe symptoms. Although current therapies in muscular dystrophy are still very challenging, important progress has been made in materials science and in cellular technologies with the use of stem cells. It is therefore useful to review these advances and the results obtained in a clinical point of view. This article focuses on the differentiation of stem cells into myoblasts, and their application in muscular dystrophy. After an overview of the different stem cells that can be induced to differentiate into the myogenic lineage, we introduce scaffolding materials used for muscular tissue engineering. We then described some widely used methods to differentiate different types of stem cell into myoblasts. We highlight recent insights obtained in therapies for muscular dystrophy. Finally, we conclude with a discussion on stem cell technology. We discussed in parallel the benefits brought by the evolution of the materials and by the expansion of cell sources which can differentiate into myoblasts. We also discussed on future challenges for clinical applications and how to accelerate the translation from the research to the clinic in the frame of DMD.

  2. Production of good manufacturing practice-grade human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells for therapeutic use.

    PubMed

    Van Pham, Phuc; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2015-01-01

    Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs) are multipotent stem cells that can be differentiated into several specific cell types such as adipocytes, osteoblasts, and chondroblasts. They also were demonstrated to trans-differentiate into other cell lineages such as muscle cells and neurons. Thus, they are considered a promising stem cell source for therapeutic use. Here, we describe a method for production of good manufacturing practice-grade human UCB-MSCs for therapeutic use. The obtained UCB-MSCs are free of allogenous or xenogenous proteins. In addition, these MSCs could maintain the MSC phenotype in long-term culture.

  3. Decellularized Human Skeletal Muscle as Biologic Scaffold for Reconstructive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Porzionato, Andrea; Sfriso, Maria Martina; Pontini, Alex; Macchi, Veronica; Petrelli, Lucia; Pavan, Piero G.; Natali, Arturo N.; Bassetto, Franco; Vindigni, Vincenzo; De Caro, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Engineered skeletal muscle tissues have been proposed as potential solutions for volumetric muscle losses, and biologic scaffolds have been obtained by decellularization of animal skeletal muscles. The aim of the present work was to analyse the characteristics of a biologic scaffold obtained by decellularization of human skeletal muscles (also through comparison with rats and rabbits) and to evaluate its integration capability in a rabbit model with an abdominal wall defect. Rat, rabbit and human muscle samples were alternatively decellularized with two protocols: n.1, involving sodium deoxycholate and DNase I; n.2, trypsin-EDTA and Triton X-NH4OH. Protocol 2 proved more effective, removing all cellular material and maintaining the three-dimensional networks of collagen and elastic fibers. Ultrastructural analyses with transmission and scanning electron microscopy confirmed the preservation of collagen, elastic fibres, glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans. Implantation of human scaffolds in rabbits gave good results in terms of integration, although recellularization by muscle cells was not completely achieved. In conclusion, human skeletal muscles may be effectively decellularized to obtain scaffolds preserving the architecture of the extracellular matrix and showing mechanical properties suitable for implantation/integration. Further analyses will be necessary to verify the suitability of these scaffolds for in vitro recolonization by autologous cells before in vivo implantation. PMID:26140375

  4. Morphology of muscle attachment sites in the modern human hand does not reflect muscle architecture

    PubMed Central

    Williams-Hatala, E. M.; Hatala, K. G.; Hiles, S.; Rabey, K. N.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle attachment sites (entheses) on dry bones are regularly used by paleontologists to infer soft tissue anatomy and to reconstruct behaviors of extinct organisms. This method is commonly applied to fossil hominin hand bones to assess their abilities to participate in Paleolithic stone tool behaviors. Little is known, however, about how or even whether muscle anatomy and activity regimes influence the morphologies of their entheses, especially in the hand. Using the opponens muscles from a sample of modern humans, we tested the hypothesis that aspects of hand muscle architecture that are known to be influenced by behavior correlate with the size and shape of their associated entheses. Results show no consistent relationships between these behaviorally-influenced aspects of muscle architecture and entheseal morphology. Consequently, it is likely premature to infer patterns of behavior, such as stone tool making in fossil hominins, from these same entheses. PMID:27334440

  5. Biological impact of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Martín, Miguel; Menéndez, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Research on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent (iPS) stem cells is currently a field of great potential in biomedicine. These cells represent a highly valuable tool for developmental biology studies, disease models, and drug screening and toxicity. The ultimate goal of hESCs and iPS cell research is the treatment of diseases or disorders for which there is currently no treatment or existing therapies are only partially effective. Despite the disproportionate short-term hopes generated, which are putting too much pressure on scientists, the international scientific community is making rapid progress in understanding hESCs and iPS cells. Nonetheless, great efforts have to be made to provide an answer to still quite basic questions concerning their biology. Moreover, translation to clinical applications in cell replacement therapy requires prior solution to ethical barriers. The recent development of iPS cells has provided a strong alternative to overcome ethical issues concerning hESCs. However, an in-depth characterization of their genetic and epigenetic features, as well as their differentiation potential still remains to be undertaken. This chapter will describe, precisely, what the critical issues are, where scientific and ethical barriers stand, and how we are to overcome them. Only then, we shall finally discover whether hESCs and iPS cells will allow building reproducible disease models, and whether they really are a safe tool, with great potential for regenerative medicine.

  6. A developmentally regulated switch from stem cells to dedifferentiation for limb muscle regeneration in newts.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hibiki Vincent; Ng, Nathaniel Chuen Yin; Yang Yu, Zhan; Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Maruo, Fumiaki; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2016-01-01

    The newt, a urodele amphibian, is able to repeatedly regenerate its limbs throughout its lifespan, whereas other amphibians deteriorate or lose their ability to regenerate limbs after metamorphosis. It remains to be determined whether such an exceptional ability of the newt is either attributed to a strategy, which controls regeneration in larvae, or on a novel one invented by the newt after metamorphosis. Here we report that the newt switches the cellular mechanism for limb regeneration from a stem/progenitor-based mechanism (larval mode) to a dedifferentiation-based one (adult mode) as it transits beyond metamorphosis. We demonstrate that larval newts use stem/progenitor cells such as satellite cells for new muscle in a regenerated limb, whereas metamorphosed newts recruit muscle fibre cells in the stump for the same purpose. We conclude that the newt has evolved novel strategies to secure its regenerative ability of the limbs after metamorphosis. PMID:27026263

  7. A developmentally regulated switch from stem cells to dedifferentiation for limb muscle regeneration in newts.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hibiki Vincent; Ng, Nathaniel Chuen Yin; Yang Yu, Zhan; Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Maruo, Fumiaki; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2016-03-30

    The newt, a urodele amphibian, is able to repeatedly regenerate its limbs throughout its lifespan, whereas other amphibians deteriorate or lose their ability to regenerate limbs after metamorphosis. It remains to be determined whether such an exceptional ability of the newt is either attributed to a strategy, which controls regeneration in larvae, or on a novel one invented by the newt after metamorphosis. Here we report that the newt switches the cellular mechanism for limb regeneration from a stem/progenitor-based mechanism (larval mode) to a dedifferentiation-based one (adult mode) as it transits beyond metamorphosis. We demonstrate that larval newts use stem/progenitor cells such as satellite cells for new muscle in a regenerated limb, whereas metamorphosed newts recruit muscle fibre cells in the stump for the same purpose. We conclude that the newt has evolved novel strategies to secure its regenerative ability of the limbs after metamorphosis.

  8. A developmentally regulated switch from stem cells to dedifferentiation for limb muscle regeneration in newts

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hibiki Vincent; Ng, Nathaniel Chuen Yin; Yang Yu, Zhan; Casco-Robles, Martin Miguel; Maruo, Fumiaki; Tsonis, Panagiotis A.; Chiba, Chikafumi

    2016-01-01

    The newt, a urodele amphibian, is able to repeatedly regenerate its limbs throughout its lifespan, whereas other amphibians deteriorate or lose their ability to regenerate limbs after metamorphosis. It remains to be determined whether such an exceptional ability of the newt is either attributed to a strategy, which controls regeneration in larvae, or on a novel one invented by the newt after metamorphosis. Here we report that the newt switches the cellular mechanism for limb regeneration from a stem/progenitor-based mechanism (larval mode) to a dedifferentiation-based one (adult mode) as it transits beyond metamorphosis. We demonstrate that larval newts use stem/progenitor cells such as satellite cells for new muscle in a regenerated limb, whereas metamorphosed newts recruit muscle fibre cells in the stump for the same purpose. We conclude that the newt has evolved novel strategies to secure its regenerative ability of the limbs after metamorphosis. PMID:27026263

  9. Human skeletal muscle xenograft as a new preclinical model for muscle disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanfan; King, Oliver D.; Rahimov, Fedik; Jones, Takako I.; Ward, Christopher W.; Kerr, Jaclyn P.; Liu, Naili; Emerson, Charles P.; Kunkel, Louis M.; Partridge, Terence A.; Wagner, Kathryn R.

    2014-01-01

    Development of novel therapeutics requires good animal models of disease. Disorders for which good animal models do not exist have very few drugs in development or clinical trial. Even where there are accepted, albeit imperfect models, the leap from promising preclinical drug results to positive clinical trials commonly fails, including in disorders of skeletal muscle. The main alternative model for early drug development, tissue culture, lacks both the architecture and, usually, the metabolic fidelity of the normal tissue in vivo. Herein, we demonstrate the feasibility and validity of human to mouse xenografts as a preclinical model of myopathy. Human skeletal muscle biopsies transplanted into the anterior tibial compartment of the hindlimbs of NOD-Rag1null IL2rγnull immunodeficient host mice regenerate new vascularized and innervated myofibers from human myogenic precursor cells. The grafts exhibit contractile and calcium release behavior, characteristic of functional muscle tissue. The validity of the human graft as a model of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is demonstrated in disease biomarker studies, showing that gene expression profiles of xenografts mirror those of the fresh donor biopsies. These findings illustrate the value of a new experimental model of muscle disease, the human muscle xenograft in mice, as a feasible and valid preclinical tool to better investigate the pathogenesis of human genetic myopathies and to more accurately predict their response to novel therapeutics. PMID:24452336

  10. In search of human hematopoietic stem cell identity.

    PubMed

    Ivanovs, Andrejs; Medvinsky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Better insight into hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) development in the human embryo and fetus is crucial for translational research. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Prashad et al. (2014) describe a novel surface marker for human fetal liver HSCs, glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein GPI-80, that is functionally required for their self-renewal.

  11. Expiratory muscle loading increases intercostal muscle blood flow during leg exercise in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulos, Dimitris; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Cherouveim, Evgenia; Andrianopoulos, Vasilis; Roussos, Charis; Zakynthinos, Spyros; Vogiatzis, Ioannis

    2010-08-01

    We investigated whether expiratory muscle loading induced by the application of expiratory flow limitation (EFL) during exercise in healthy subjects causes a reduction in quadriceps muscle blood flow in favor of the blood flow to the intercostal muscles. We hypothesized that, during exercise with EFL quadriceps muscle blood flow would be reduced, whereas intercostal muscle blood flow would be increased compared with exercise without EFL. We initially performed an incremental exercise test on eight healthy male subjects with a Starling resistor in the expiratory line limiting expiratory flow to approximately 1 l/s to determine peak EFL exercise workload. On a different day, two constant-load exercise trials were performed in a balanced ordering sequence, during which subjects exercised with or without EFL at peak EFL exercise workload for 6 min. Intercostal (probe over the 7th intercostal space) and vastus lateralis muscle blood flow index (BFI) was calculated by near-infrared spectroscopy using indocyanine green, whereas cardiac output (CO) was measured by an impedance cardiography technique. At exercise termination, CO and stroke volume were not significantly different during exercise, with or without EFL (CO: 16.5 vs. 15.2 l/min, stroke volume: 104 vs. 107 ml/beat). Quadriceps muscle BFI during exercise with EFL (5.4 nM/s) was significantly (P = 0.043) lower compared with exercise without EFL (7.6 nM/s), whereas intercostal muscle BFI during exercise with EFL (3.5 nM/s) was significantly (P = 0.021) greater compared with that recorded during control exercise (0.4 nM/s). In conclusion, increased respiratory muscle loading during exercise in healthy humans causes an increase in blood flow to the intercostal muscles and a concomitant decrease in quadriceps muscle blood flow.

  12. Muscle biopsies show that FES of denervated muscles reverses human muscle degeneration from permanent spinal motoneuron lesion.

    PubMed

    Kern, Helmut; Rossini, Katia; Carraro, Ugo; Mayr, Winfried; Vogelauer, Michael; Hoellwarth, Ursula; Hofer, Christian

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents biopsy analyses in support of the clinical evidence of muscle recovery induced by a new system of life-long functional-electrical-stimulation (FES) training in permanent spinal-motoneuron-denervated human muscle. Not earlier than 1 year after subjects experienced complete conus cauda lesion, their thigh muscles were electrically stimulated at home for several years with large skin surface electrodes and an expressly designed stimulator that delivered much longer impulses than those presently available for clinical use. The poor excitability of long-term denervated muscles was first improved by several months of twitch-contraction training. Then, the muscles were tetanically stimulated against progressively increased loads. Needle biopsies of vastus lateralis from long-term denervated subjects showed severe myofiber atrophy or lipodystrophy beginning 2 years after spinal cord injury (SCI). Muscle biopsies from a group of 3.6- to 13.5-year denervated subjects, who underwent 2.4 to 9.3 years of FES, show that this progressive training almost reverted long-term muscle atrophy/degeneration.

  13. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy as a Counter-Measure for Human Exploration of Deep Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohi, S.; Roach, A.-N.; Ramsahai, S.; Kim, B. C.; Fitzgerald, W.; Riley, D. A.; Gonda, S. R.

    2004-01-01

    Human exploration of deep space depends, in part, on our ability to counter severe/invasive disorders that astronauts experience in space environments. The known symptoms include hematological/cardiac abnormalities,bone and muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders, and cancer. Exploiting the extraordinary plasticity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which differentiate not only to all types of blood cells, but also to various tissues, we have advanced a hypothesis that ome of the space-caused disorders maybe amenable to hematopoietis stem cell therapy(HSCT) so as to maintain promote human exploration of deep space. Using mouse models of human anemia beta-thaiassemia) as well as spaceflight (hindlimb unloading system), we have obtained feasibility results of HSCT for space anemia, muscle loss, and immunodeficiency. For example, in the case of HSCT for muscle loss, the beta-galactosidese marked HSCs were detected in the hindlimbs of unloaded mouse following transplantation by -X-gal wholemaunt staining procedure. Histochemicaland physical analyses indicated structural contribution of HSCs to the muscle. HSCT for immunodeficiency was investigated ising beta-galactosidese gene-tagged Escherichia coli as the infectious agent. Results of the X-gal staining procedure indicated the rapeutic role of the HSCT. To facilitate the HSCT in space, growth of HSCs were optimized in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture systems, including Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB).

  14. Recording sound from human skeletal muscle: technical and physiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Bolton, C F; Parkes, A; Thompson, T R; Clark, M R; Sterne, C J

    1989-02-01

    In order to examine technical factors that influence muscle sound recording, single twitches of muscle were utilized since their waveforms were likely to be reproducible. We observed that satisfactory recordings could be made with either Archer air interface, or Hewlett-Packard direct contact sensor, microphones. Firm contact and stability between the microphone and the skin surface were particularly important. Frequencies below 20 Hz, the lower limit of the human auditory range, must be recorded, since they account for at least 90% of the power of the muscle sound wave. The chief frequencies were below 4 Hz. The sound wave produced by a maximal twitch of human thenar muscle induced by median nerve stimulation at the wrist is maximal in amplitude over the center and recedes to near zero at the margins of the muscle. It is preceded by the muscle compound action potential and is followed by the force curve, recorded with a strain gauge attached to the thumb. The sound resembles force in total time course, and it increases with increasing strengths of nerve stimulation. However, it differs in its latency, phase relationships, and response to nerve stimulation at different frequencies. Some of the features of muscle sound suggest it relates to both the active contractile and the parallel elastic components of muscle during a twitch contraction, but not the series elastic component.

  15. Morphologic Indication for Proprioception in the Human Ciliary Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Flügel-Koch, Cassandra; Neuhuber, Winfried L.; Kaufman, Paul L.; Lütjen-Drecoll, Elke

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To search for proprioceptive nerve terminals in human ciliary muscle. Methods In 48 human donor eyes, histologic and ultrathin sections cut in different planes and wholemounts of the ciliary muscle were studied. Immunohistochemical staining with antibodies against pan-neuronal antigens and antigens reported as markers for sensory terminals in other organs was performed. Results Among the markers for proprioceptive terminals, only calretinin was present in the ciliary body. Calretinin-immunoreactive (IR) nerve terminals surrounded the posterior and reticular ciliary muscle tips and their elastic tendons. Terminals in that region contained mitochondria and neurofilaments. At the anterior tips larger terminals with numerous membrane-filled vesicles were located between the muscle fibers. The most elaborate network of calretinin-IR nerve fibers was present in the ground plate covering the circular muscle portion. Here calretinin-IR neurons with morphologic features of mechanoreception were present. Within the circular muscle portion numerous calretinin-IR ganglion cells were found. Their processes were connected to the calretinin-IR network but also surrounded ciliary muscle cells and NADPH-diaphorase-positive ganglion cells. Conclusions These morphologic findings indicate that there are proprioreceptors in the ciliary muscle that morphologically and presumably functionally differ at different locations. At the posterior muscle tips, the receptors could measure stretch of the tendons, whereas the large receptor organs located at the anterior muscle tips morphologically resemble mechanoreceptors measuring shear stress. The presence of the numerous intrinsic nerve cells indicates that contraction of the circular muscle portion can be modulated locally via a self-contained reflex arc. PMID:19578020

  16. Calprotectin is released from human skeletal muscle tissue during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Ole Hartvig; Andersen, Kasper; Fischer, Christian; Nielsen, Anders Rinnov; Nielsen, Søren; Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Aastrøm, Maj-brit; Borup, Rehannah; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has been identified as a secretory organ. We hypothesized that IL-6, a cytokine secreted from skeletal muscle during exercise, could induce production of other secreted factors in skeletal muscle. IL-6 was infused for 3 h into healthy young males (n = 7) and muscle biopsies obtained at time points 0, 3 and 6 h in these individuals and in resting controls. Affymetrix microarray analysis of gene expression changes in skeletal muscle biopsies identified a small set of genes changed by IL-6 infusion. RT-PCR validation confirmed that S100A8 and S100A9 mRNA were up-regulated 3-fold in skeletal muscle following IL-6 infusion compared to controls. Furthermore, S100A8 and S100A9 mRNA levels were up-regulated 5-fold in human skeletal muscle following cycle ergometer exercise for 3 h at ∼60% of in young healthy males (n = 8). S100A8 and S100A9 form calprotectin, which is known as an acute phase reactant. Plasma calprotectin increased 5-fold following acute cycle ergometer exercise in humans, but not following IL-6 infusion. To identify the source of calprotectin, healthy males (n = 7) performed two-legged dynamic knee extensor exercise for 3 h with a work load of ∼50% of peak power output and arterial–femoral venous differences were obtained. Arterial plasma concentrations for calprotectin increased 2-fold compared to rest and there was a net release of calprotectin from the working muscle. In conclusion, IL-6 infusion and muscle contractions induce expression of S100A8 and S100A9 in skeletal muscle. However, IL-6 alone is not a sufficient stimulus to facilitate release of calprotectin from skeletal muscle. PMID:18511485

  17. Muscle biopsies from human muscle diseases with myopathic pathology reveal common alterations in mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Sunitha, Balaraju; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Kumar, Manish; Keshava Prasad, Thottethodi Subrahmanya; Nalini, Atchayaram; Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2016-07-01

    Muscle diseases are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and manifest as dystrophic, inflammatory and myopathic pathologies, among others. Our previous study on the cardiotoxin mouse model of myodegeneration and inflammation linked muscle pathology with mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated whether human muscle diseases display mitochondrial changes. Muscle biopsies from muscle disease patients, represented by dysferlinopathy (dysfy) (dystrophic pathology; n = 43), polymyositis (PM) (inflammatory pathology; n = 24), and distal myopathy with rimmed vacuoles (DMRV) (distal myopathy; n = 31) were analyzed. Mitochondrial damage (ragged blue and COX-deficient fibers) was revealed in dysfy, PM, and DMRV cases by enzyme histochemistry (SDH and COX-SDH), electron microscopy (vacuolation and altered cristae) and biochemical assays (significantly increased ADP/ATP ratio). Proteomic analysis of muscle mitochondria from all three muscle diseases by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis demonstrated down-regulation of electron transport chain (ETC) complex subunits, assembly factors and Krebs cycle enzymes. Interestingly, 80 of the under-expressed proteins were common among the three pathologies. Assay of ETC and Krebs cycle enzyme activities validated the MS data. Mitochondrial proteins from muscle pathologies also displayed higher tryptophan (Trp) oxidation and the same was corroborated in the cardiotoxin model. Molecular modeling predicted Trp oxidation to alter the local structure of mitochondrial proteins. Our data highlight mitochondrial alterations in muscle pathologies, represented by morphological changes, altered mitochondrial proteome and protein oxidation, thereby establishing the role of mitochondrial damage in human muscle diseases. We investigated whether human muscle diseases display mitochondrial changes. Muscle biopsies

  18. Muscle biopsies from human muscle diseases with myopathic pathology reveal common alterations in mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Sunitha, Balaraju; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Kumar, Manish; Keshava Prasad, Thottethodi Subrahmanya; Nalini, Atchayaram; Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2016-07-01

    Muscle diseases are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and manifest as dystrophic, inflammatory and myopathic pathologies, among others. Our previous study on the cardiotoxin mouse model of myodegeneration and inflammation linked muscle pathology with mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated whether human muscle diseases display mitochondrial changes. Muscle biopsies from muscle disease patients, represented by dysferlinopathy (dysfy) (dystrophic pathology; n = 43), polymyositis (PM) (inflammatory pathology; n = 24), and distal myopathy with rimmed vacuoles (DMRV) (distal myopathy; n = 31) were analyzed. Mitochondrial damage (ragged blue and COX-deficient fibers) was revealed in dysfy, PM, and DMRV cases by enzyme histochemistry (SDH and COX-SDH), electron microscopy (vacuolation and altered cristae) and biochemical assays (significantly increased ADP/ATP ratio). Proteomic analysis of muscle mitochondria from all three muscle diseases by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis demonstrated down-regulation of electron transport chain (ETC) complex subunits, assembly factors and Krebs cycle enzymes. Interestingly, 80 of the under-expressed proteins were common among the three pathologies. Assay of ETC and Krebs cycle enzyme activities validated the MS data. Mitochondrial proteins from muscle pathologies also displayed higher tryptophan (Trp) oxidation and the same was corroborated in the cardiotoxin model. Molecular modeling predicted Trp oxidation to alter the local structure of mitochondrial proteins. Our data highlight mitochondrial alterations in muscle pathologies, represented by morphological changes, altered mitochondrial proteome and protein oxidation, thereby establishing the role of mitochondrial damage in human muscle diseases. We investigated whether human muscle diseases display mitochondrial changes. Muscle biopsies

  19. Age-dependent motor unit remodelling in human limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Piasecki, Mathew; Ireland, Alex; Jones, David A; McPhee, Jamie S

    2016-06-01

    Voluntary control of skeletal muscle enables humans to interact with and manipulate the environment. Lower muscle mass, weakness and poor coordination are common complaints in older age and reduce physical capabilities. Attention has focused on ways of maintaining muscle size and strength by exercise, diet or hormone replacement. Without appropriate neural innervation, however, muscle cannot function. Emerging evidence points to a neural basis of muscle loss. Motor unit number estimates indicate that by age around 71 years, healthy older people have around 40 % fewer motor units. The surviving low- and moderate-threshold motor units recruited for moderate intensity contractions are enlarged by around 50 % and show increased fibre density, presumably due to collateral reinnervation of denervated fibres. Motor unit potentials show increased complexity and the stability of neuromuscular junction transmissions is decreased. The available evidence is limited by a lack of longitudinal studies, relatively small sample sizes, a tendency to examine the small peripheral muscles and relatively few investigations into the consequences of motor unit remodelling for muscle size and control of movements in older age. Loss of motor neurons and remodelling of surviving motor units constitutes the major change in ageing muscles and probably contributes to muscle loss and functional impairments. The deterioration and remodelling of motor units likely imposes constraints on the way in which the central nervous system controls movements. PMID:26667009

  20. Detection of chromosomal regions showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Bisognin, Andrea; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Danieli, Gian Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Background Rhabdomyosarcoma is a relatively common tumour of the soft tissue, probably due to regulatory disruption of growth and differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells. Identification of genes differentially expressed in normal skeletal muscle and in rhabdomyosarcoma may help in understanding mechanisms of tumour development, in discovering diagnostic and prognostic markers and in identifying novel targets for drug therapy. Results A Perl-code web client was developed to automatically obtain genome map positions of large sets of genes. The software, based on automatic search on Human Genome Browser by sequence alignment, only requires availability of a single transcribed sequence for each gene. In this way, we obtained tissue-specific chromosomal maps of genes expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma or skeletal muscle. Subsequently, Perl software was developed to calculate gene density along chromosomes, by using a sliding window. Thirty-three chromosomal regions harbouring genes mostly expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma were identified. Similarly, 48 chromosomal regions were detected including genes possibly related to function of differentiated skeletal muscle, but silenced in rhabdomyosarcoma. Conclusion In this study we developed a method and the associated software for the comparative analysis of genomic expression in tissues and we identified chromosomal segments showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, appearing as candidate regions for harbouring genes involved in origin of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma representing possible targets for drug treatment and/or development of tumor markers. PMID:15176974

  1. Development of Human Muscle Protein Measurement with MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chen; Evans, Harlan; Leblanc, Adrian D.

    1997-01-01

    It is known that micro-gravity has a strong influence on the human musculoskeletal system. A number of studies have shown that significant changes in skeletal muscles occur in both space flight and bedrest simulation. In our 5 week bedrest study, the cross-sectional area of soleus-gastrocnemius decreased about 12% while the cross-sectional area of anterior calf muscles decreased about 4%. Using volume measurements, these losses increased after 17 weeks to approximately 30% and 21% respectively. Significant muscle atrophy was also found on the SL-J crew members after only 8 days in space. It is important that these effects are fully understood so that countermeasures can be developed. The same knowledge might also be useful in preventing muscle atrophy related to other medical problems. A major problem with anatomical measurements of muscle during bed rest and microgravity is the influence of fluid shifts and water balance on the measurement of muscle volume, especially when the exposure duration is short and the atrophy is relatively small. Fluid shifts were documented in Skylab by visual observations of blood vessel distention, rapid changes in limb volume, center of mass measurements and subjective descriptions such as puffy faces and head fullness. It has been reported that the muscle water content of biopsied soleus muscles decreased following 8 hours of head down tilt bed rest. Three aspects of fluid shifts that can affect volume measurements are: first, the shift of fluid that occurs whenever there is a change from upright to a recumbent position and vice versa; second, the potential for fluid accumulation in the lower limbs resulting from muscle damage caused by overextending atrophied muscle or swelling caused by deconditioned precapillary sphincter muscles during reambulation; third, the net change of hydration level during and after bed rest or spaceflight. Because of these transitory fluid shifts, muscle protein is expected to represent muscle capacity

  2. Embryonic origins of human vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for in vitro modeling and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sanjay; Iyer, Dharini; Granata, Alessandra

    2014-06-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) arise from multiple origins during development, raising the possibility that differences in embryological origins between SMCs could contribute to site-specific localization of vascular diseases. In this review, we first examine the developmental pathways and embryological origins of vascular SMCs and then discuss in vitro strategies for deriving SMCs from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We then review in detail the potential for vascular disease modeling using iPSC-derived SMCs and consider the pathological implications of heterogeneous embryonic origins. Finally, we touch upon the role of human ESC-derived SMCs in therapeutic revascularization and the challenges remaining before regenerative medicine using ESC- or iPSC-derived cells comes of age.

  3. Nucleosome Organization in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Puya G; Pedersen, Brian A; Taylor, Jared F; Khattab, Omar S; Chen, Yu-Han; Chen, Yumay; Jacobsen, Steven E; Wang, Ping H

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental repeating unit of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome. Besides being involved in packaging DNA, nucleosome organization plays an important role in transcriptional regulation and cellular identity. Currently, there is much debate about the major determinants of the nucleosome architecture of a genome and its significance with little being known about its role in stem cells. To address these questions, we performed ultra-deep sequencing of nucleosomal DNA in two human embryonic stem cell lines and integrated our data with numerous epigenomic maps. Our analyses have revealed that the genome is a determinant of nucleosome organization with transcriptionally inactive regions characterized by a "ground state" of nucleosome profiles driven by underlying DNA sequences. DNA sequence preferences are associated with heterogeneous chromatin organization around transcription start sites. Transcription, histone modifications, and DNA methylation alter this "ground state" by having distinct effects on both nucleosome positioning and occupancy. As the transcriptional rate increases, nucleosomes become better positioned. Exons transcribed and included in the final spliced mRNA have distinct nucleosome profiles in comparison to exons not included at exon-exon junctions. Genes marked by the active modification H3K4m3 are characterized by lower nucleosome occupancy before the transcription start site compared to genes marked by the inactive modification H3K27m3, while bivalent domains, genes associated with both marks, lie exactly in the middle. Combinatorial patterns of epigenetic marks (chromatin states) are associated with unique nucleosome profiles. Nucleosome organization varies around transcription factor binding in enhancers versus promoters. DNA methylation is associated with increasing nucleosome occupancy and different types of methylations have distinct location preferences within the nucleosome core particle. Finally, computational analysis of nucleosome

  4. Mitochondria in human pluripotent stem cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    TeSlaa, Tara; Setoguchi, Kiyoko; Teitell, Michael A

    2016-04-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have great potential in regenerative medicine because they can differentiate into any cell type in the body. Genome integrity is vital for human development and for high fidelity passage of genetic information across generations through the germ line. To ensure genome stability, hPSCs maintain a lower rate of mutation than somatic cells and undergo rapid apoptosis in response to DNA damage and additional cell stresses. Furthermore, cellular metabolism and the cell cycle are also differentially regulated between cells in pluripotent and differentiated states and can aid in protecting hPSCs against DNA damage and damaged cell propagation. Despite these safeguards, clinical use of hPSC derivatives could be compromised by tumorigenic potential and possible malignant transformation from failed to differentiate cells. Since hPSCs and mature cells differentially respond to cell stress, it may be possible to specifically target undifferentiated cells for rapid apoptosis in mixed cell populations to enable safer use of hPSC-differentiated cells in patients.

  5. Mitochondria in human pluripotent stem cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    TeSlaa, Tara; Setoguchi, Kiyoko; Teitell, Michael A

    2016-04-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have great potential in regenerative medicine because they can differentiate into any cell type in the body. Genome integrity is vital for human development and for high fidelity passage of genetic information across generations through the germ line. To ensure genome stability, hPSCs maintain a lower rate of mutation than somatic cells and undergo rapid apoptosis in response to DNA damage and additional cell stresses. Furthermore, cellular metabolism and the cell cycle are also differentially regulated between cells in pluripotent and differentiated states and can aid in protecting hPSCs against DNA damage and damaged cell propagation. Despite these safeguards, clinical use of hPSC derivatives could be compromised by tumorigenic potential and possible malignant transformation from failed to differentiate cells. Since hPSCs and mature cells differentially respond to cell stress, it may be possible to specifically target undifferentiated cells for rapid apoptosis in mixed cell populations to enable safer use of hPSC-differentiated cells in patients. PMID:26828436

  6. Energy expenditure during human gait. II - Role of muscle groups.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Silvia; Garcia, Isabel; Franco, Marian; Alonso-Vazquez, Ana; Ambrosio, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    A phenomenological model of muscle energy expenditure developed in part I of the paper, is utilized as a physiological cost function to estimate the muscle forces during normal locomotion. The model takes into account muscular behaviors typically observed during human gait, such as submaximal activation, variable muscular contraction conditions and muscular fiber type. The solution of the indeterminate biomechanical problem is obtained by integrating multibody dynamics and the global static optimization technique that considers the whole motion. The results for an application case indicate the important role of muscle groups in coordinating multijoint motion with the objective of minimizing metabolic costs of transport during locomotion.

  7. Human muscle proteins: analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C.S.; Danon, M.J.; Anderson, N.G.

    1983-09-01

    Proteins from single frozen sections of human muscle were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and detected by fluorography or Coomassie Blue staining. The major proteins were identical in different normal muscles obtained from either sex at different ages, and in Duchenne and myotonic dystrophy samples. Congenital myopathy denervation atrophy, polymyositis, and Becker's muscular dystrophy samples, however, showed abnormal myosin light chain compositions, some with a decrease of fast-fiber myosin light chains and others with a decrease of slow-fiber light chains. These protein alterations did not correlate with any specific disease, and may be cause by generalized muscle-fiber damage.

  8. Isolation, identification and differentiation of human embryonic cartilage stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Changhao; Yan, Zi; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Qi; Wei, Anhui; Yang, Xi; Wang, Yi

    2015-07-01

    We isolated human embryonic cartilage stem cells (hECSCs), a novel stem cell population, from the articular cartilage of eight-week-old human embryos. These stem cells demonstrated a marker expression pattern and differentiation potential intermediate to those of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human adult stem cells (hASCs). hECSCs expressed markers associated with both hESCs (OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, SSEA-3 and SSEA-4) and human adult stem cells (hASCs) (CD29, CD44, CD90, CD73 and CD10). These cells also differentiated into adipocytes, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, neurons and islet-like cells under specific inducing conditions. We identified N(6), 2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (Bt2cAMP) as an inducer of chondrogenic differentiation in hECSCs. Similar results using N(6), 2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (Bt2cAMP) were obtained for two other types of human embryonic tissue-derived stem cells, human embryonic hepatic stem cells (hEHSCs) and human embryonic amniotic fluid stem cells (hEASCs), both of which exhibited a marker expression pattern similar to that of hECSCs. The isolation of hECSCs and the discovery that N(6), 2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (Bt2cAMP) induces chondrogenic differentiation in different stem cell populations might aid the development of strategies in tissue engineering and cartilage repair.

  9. Myosin Heavy Chain Composition of the Human Genioglossus Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Megan; Luo, Qingwei; Sokoloff, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The human tongue muscle genioglossus (GG) is active in speech, swallowing, respiration, and oral transport, behaviors encompassing a wide range of tongue shapes and movement speeds. Studies demonstrate substantial diversity in patterns of human GG motor unit activation, but whether this is accompanied by complex expression of muscle…

  10. Urinary bladder smooth muscle regeneration utilizing bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell seeded elastomeric poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citrate) based thin films.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arun K; Hota, Partha V; Matoka, Derek J; Fuller, Natalie J; Jandali, Danny; Thaker, Hatim; Ameer, Guillermo A; Cheng, Earl Y

    2010-08-01

    Bladder regeneration studies have yielded inconclusive results possibly due to the use of unfavorable cells and primitive scaffold design. We hypothesized that human mesenchymal stem cells seeded onto poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citrate) elastomeric thin films would provide a suitable milieu for partial bladder regeneration. POCfs were created by reacting citric acid with 1,8-octanediol and seeded on opposing faces with human MSCs and urothelial cells; normal bladder smooth muscle cells and UCs, or unseeded POCfs. Partial cystectomized nude rats were augmented with the aforementioned POCfs, enveloped with omentum and sacrificed at 4 and 10 weeks. Isolated bladders were subjected to Trichrome and anti-human gamma-tubulin, calponin, caldesmon, smooth muscle gamma-actin, and elastin stainings. Mechanical testing of POCfs revealed a Young's modulus of 138 kPa with elongation 137% its initial length without permanent deformation demonstrating its high uniaxial elastic potential. Trichrome and immunofluorescent staining of MSC/UC POCf augmented bladders exhibited typical bladder architecture with muscle bundle formation and the expression and retention of bladder smooth muscle contractile proteins of human derivation. Quantitative morphometry of MSC/UC samples revealed muscle/collagen ratios approximately 1.75x greater than SMC/UC controls at 10 weeks. Data demonstrate MSC seeded POCfs support partial regeneration of bladder tissue in vivo.

  11. [Research with human embryo stem cells. Foundations and judicial limits].

    PubMed

    Eser, Albin; Koch, Hans-Georg

    2004-01-01

    Research with human embryos, and particularly, the use for scientific purposes of human embryonic stem cells has given raise to different sort of problems at the international level. One of the most strict regulation in this field, is this lecture Professors Albin Eser and Hans-Georg Koch analyse the german legal framework in relation with the use of embryos and human embryonic stem cells for scientific purposes.

  12. Identification of a new stem cell population that generates Drosophila flight muscles

    PubMed Central

    Gunage, Rajesh D; Reichert, Heinrich; VijayRaghavan, K

    2014-01-01

    How myoblast populations are regulated for the formation of muscles of different sizes is an essentially unanswered question. The large flight muscles of Drosophila develop from adult muscle progenitor (AMP) cells set-aside embryonically. The thoracic segments are all allotted the same small AMP number, while those associated with the wing-disc proliferate extensively to give rise to over 2500 myoblasts. An initial amplification occurs through symmetric divisions and is followed by a switch to asymmetric divisions in which the AMPs self-renew and generate post-mitotic myoblasts. Notch signaling controls the initial amplification of AMPs, while the switch to asymmetric division additionally requires Wingless, which regulates Numb expression in the AMP lineage. In both cases, the epidermal tissue of the wing imaginal disc acts as a niche expressing the ligands Serrate and Wingless. The disc-associated AMPs are a novel muscle stem cell population that orchestrates the early phases of adult flight muscle development. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03126.001 PMID:25135939

  13. Human trunk extensor muscles physiology and ergonomics.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, K

    1997-01-01

    The paravertebral muscles (PM) act together with the hamstrings and calf muscles as important postural muscles. Both the histochemistry, biochemistry, strength and endurance of the PM were studied. Moreover attention was drawn to the exposure of PM, in particular the internal exposure level but to a certain degree repetitiveness and duration, in various job elements, and their various physiological acute responses. The thesis also deal with possible relations between the function of the PM and the magnitude of low-back trouble (LBP), and if PM muscle fatigue may play a role as a mediating factor for the occurrence of work related LBP. The lumbar PM is dominated by relatively small ST fibers with a well-developed network of capillaries, especially distinct in the central sections of PM (lumbar longissimus muscle) in females. It is remarkable that ST fibers are of the same size or larger compared to the FT fibers even in well-trained subjects. Further on PM is characterized by high activity levels of enzymes, oxidative as well as non-oxidative, important for the resynthesis of ATP and CrP. Also the level of muscles glycogen concentration is high. Altogether the PM have seemingly a potential for different metabolic pathways which may be selectively activated for a given activity. The average trunk extensor MVC varies in the different studies from 194-342 Nm and 252-450 Nm in females and males respectively. This is in accordance with predictions based specific strength, muscle cross sections and lever arms from the literature. The large range in strength due to dimension, age and training have to be considered when such data are used for e.g. ergonomic standardization and biomechanical modelling. The sex difference is smaller (female:male trunk extensor strength ratio = 0.7-0.8) than reported earlier. The small age reduction (25-60 year) of the trunk extensor strength, 0.5% per year, is probably caused by the fact that the ST dominated musculature is less sensitive to

  14. Myotubes derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cells mirror in vivo insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Iovino, Salvatore; Burkart, Alison M; Warren, Laura; Patti, Mary Elizabeth; Kahn, C Ronald

    2016-02-16

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) represent a unique tool for the study of the pathophysiology of human disease, because these cells can be differentiated into multiple cell types in vitro and used to generate patient- and tissue-specific disease models. Given the critical role for skeletal muscle insulin resistance in whole-body glucose metabolism and type 2 diabetes, we have created a novel cellular model of human muscle insulin resistance by differentiating iPS cells from individuals with mutations in the insulin receptor (IR-Mut) into functional myotubes and characterizing their response to insulin in comparison with controls. Morphologically, IR-Mut cells differentiated normally, but had delayed expression of some muscle differentiation-related genes. Most importantly, whereas control iPS-derived myotubes exhibited in vitro responses similar to primary differentiated human myoblasts, IR-Mut myotubes demonstrated severe impairment in insulin signaling and insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake and glycogen synthesis. Transcriptional regulation was also perturbed in IR-Mut myotubes with reduced insulin-stimulated expression of metabolic and early growth response genes. Thus, iPS-derived myotubes from individuals with genetically determined insulin resistance demonstrate many of the defects observed in vivo in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle and provide a new model to analyze the molecular impact of muscle insulin resistance. PMID:26831110

  15. Myotubes derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cells mirror in vivo insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Iovino, Salvatore; Burkart, Alison M; Warren, Laura; Patti, Mary Elizabeth; Kahn, C Ronald

    2016-02-16

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) represent a unique tool for the study of the pathophysiology of human disease, because these cells can be differentiated into multiple cell types in vitro and used to generate patient- and tissue-specific disease models. Given the critical role for skeletal muscle insulin resistance in whole-body glucose metabolism and type 2 diabetes, we have created a novel cellular model of human muscle insulin resistance by differentiating iPS cells from individuals with mutations in the insulin receptor (IR-Mut) into functional myotubes and characterizing their response to insulin in comparison with controls. Morphologically, IR-Mut cells differentiated normally, but had delayed expression of some muscle differentiation-related genes. Most importantly, whereas control iPS-derived myotubes exhibited in vitro responses similar to primary differentiated human myoblasts, IR-Mut myotubes demonstrated severe impairment in insulin signaling and insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake and glycogen synthesis. Transcriptional regulation was also perturbed in IR-Mut myotubes with reduced insulin-stimulated expression of metabolic and early growth response genes. Thus, iPS-derived myotubes from individuals with genetically determined insulin resistance demonstrate many of the defects observed in vivo in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle and provide a new model to analyze the molecular impact of muscle insulin resistance.

  16. Neoplastic human embryonic stem cells as a model of radiation resistance of human cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Dingwall, Steve; Lee, Jung Bok; Guezguez, Borhane; Fiebig, Aline; McNicol, Jamie; Boreham, Douglas; Collins, Tony J.; Bhatia, Mick

    2015-01-01

    Studies have implicated that a small sub-population of cells within a tumour, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs), have an enhanced capacity for tumour formation in multiple cancers and may be responsible for recurrence of the disease after treatment, including radiation. Although comparisons have been made between CSCs and bulk-tumour, the more important comparison with respect to therapy is between tumour-sustaining CSC versus normal stem cells that maintain the healthy tissue. However, the absence of normal known counterparts for many CSCs has made it difficult to compare the radiation responses of CSCs with the normal stem cells required for post-radiotherapy tissue regeneration and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Here we demonstrate that transformed human embryonic stem cells (t-hESCs), showing features of neoplastic progression produce tumours resistant to radiation relative to their normal counterpart upon injection into immune compromised mice. We reveal that t-hESCs have a reduced capacity for radiation induced cell death via apoptosis and exhibit altered cell cycle arrest relative to hESCs in vitro. t-hESCs have an increased expression of BclXL in comparison to their normal counterparts and re-sensitization of t-hESCs to radiation upon addition of BH3-only mimetic ABT737, suggesting that overexpression of BclXL underpins t-hESC radiation insensitivity. Using this novel discovery platform to investigate radiation resistance in human CSCs, our study indicates that chemotherapy targeting Bcl2-family members may prove to be an adjuvant to radiotherapy capable of targeting CSCs. PMID:26082437

  17. Neoplastic human embryonic stem cells as a model of radiation resistance of human cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dingwall, Steve; Lee, Jung Bok; Guezguez, Borhane; Fiebig, Aline; McNicol, Jamie; Boreham, Douglas; Collins, Tony J; Bhatia, Mick

    2015-09-01

    Studies have implicated that a small sub-population of cells within a tumour, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs), have an enhanced capacity for tumour formation in multiple cancers and may be responsible for recurrence of the disease after treatment, including radiation. Although comparisons have been made between CSCs and bulk-tumour, the more important comparison with respect to therapy is between tumour-sustaining CSC versus normal stem cells that maintain the healthy tissue. However, the absence of normal known counterparts for many CSCs has made it difficult to compare the radiation responses of CSCs with the normal stem cells required for post-radiotherapy tissue regeneration and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Here we demonstrate that transformed human embryonic stem cells (t-hESCs), showing features of neoplastic progression produce tumours resistant to radiation relative to their normal counterpart upon injection into immune compromised mice. We reveal that t-hESCs have a reduced capacity for radiation induced cell death via apoptosis and exhibit altered cell cycle arrest relative to hESCs in vitro. t-hESCs have an increased expression of BclXL in comparison to their normal counterparts and re-sensitization of t-hESCs to radiation upon addition of BH3-only mimetic ABT737, suggesting that overexpression of BclXL underpins t-hESC radiation insensitivity. Using this novel discovery platform to investigate radiation resistance in human CSCs, our study indicates that chemotherapy targeting Bcl2-family members may prove to be an adjuvant to radiotherapy capable of targeting CSCs.

  18. Generation of skeletal muscle cells from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells as an in vitro model and for therapy of muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Salani, Sabrina; Donadoni, Chiara; Rizzo, Federica; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P; Corti, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness likely associated with exhaustion of muscle regeneration potential. At present, no cures or efficacious treatments are available for these diseases, but cell transplantation could be a potential therapeutic strategy. Transplantation of myoblasts using satellite cells or other myogenic cell populations has been attempted to promote muscle regeneration, based on the hypothesis that the donor cells repopulate the muscle and contribute to its regeneration. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and more recently induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) could generate an unlimited source of differentiated cell types, including myogenic cells. Here we review the literature regarding the generation of myogenic cells considering the main techniques employed to date to elicit efficient differentiation of human and murine ESCs or iPSCs into skeletal muscle. We also critically analyse the possibility of using these cellular populations as an alternative source of myogenic cells for cell therapy of MDs. PMID:22129481

  19. Cyclooxygenase products sensitize muscle mechanoreceptors in humans with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Middlekauff, Holly R; Chiu, Josephine; Hamilton, Michele A; Fonarow, Gregg C; Maclellan, W Robb; Hage, Antoine; Moriguchi, Jaime; Patel, Jignesh

    2008-04-01

    Prior work in animals and humans suggests that muscle mechanoreceptor control of sympathetic activation [muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA)] during exercise in heart failure (HF) patients is heightened compared with that of healthy humans and that muscle mechanoreceptors are sensitized by metabolic by-products. We sought to determine whether cyclooxygenase products and/or endogenous adenosine, two metabolites of ischemic exercise, sensitize muscle mechanoreceptors during rhythmic handgrip (RHG) exercise in HF patients. Indomethacin, which inhibits the production of prostaglandins, and saline control were infused in 12 HF patients. In a different protocol, aminophylline, which inhibits adenosine receptors, and saline control were infused in 12 different HF patients. MSNA was recorded (microneurography). During exercise following saline, MSNA increased in the first minute of exercise, consistent with baseline heightened mechanoreceptor sensitivity. MSNA continued to increase during 3 min of RHG, indicative that muscle mechanoreceptors are sensitized by ischemia metabolites. Indomethacin, but not aminophylline, markedly attenuated the increase in MSNA during the entire 3 min of low-level rhythmic exercise, consistent with the sensitization of muscle mechanoreceptors by cyclooxygenase products. Interestingly, even the early increase in MSNA was abolished by indomethacin infusion, indicative of the very early generation of cyclooxygenase products after the onset of exercise in HF patients. In conclusion, muscle mechanoreceptors mediate the increase in MSNA during low-level RHG exercise in HF. Cyclooxygenase products, but not endogenous adenosine, play a central role in muscle mechanoreceptor sensitization. Finally, muscle mechanoreceptors in patients with HF have heightened basal sensitivity to mechanical stimuli, which also appears to be mediated by the early generation of cyclooxygenase products, resulting in exaggerated early increases in MSNA.

  20. Noninvasive pulsed focused ultrasound allows spatiotemporal control of targeted homing for multiple stem cell types in murine skeletal muscle and the magnitude of cell homing can be increased through repeated applications

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Scott R.; Ziadloo, Ali; Kim, Saejeong J.; Nguyen, Ben A.; Frank, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are promising therapeutics for cardiovascular diseases and intravenous injection is the most desirable route of administration clinically. Subsequent homing of exogenous stem cells to pathological loci is frequently required for therapeutic efficacy and is mediated by chemo attractants (cell adhesion molecules, cytokines, and growth factors). Homing processes are inefficient and depend on short-lived pathological inflammation that limits the window of opportunity for cell injections. Noninvasive pulsed focused ultrasound (plus), which emphasizes mechanical ultrasound-tissue interactions, can be precisely targeted in the body and is a promising approach to target and maximize stem cell delivery by stimulating chemo attractant expression in plus-treated tissue prior to cell infusions. We demonstrate that plus is nondestructive to marine skeletal muscle tissue (no necrosis, hemorrhage, or muscle stem cell activation) and initiates a largely M2-type macrophage response. We also demonstrate local up regulation of chemo attractants in plus-treated skeletal muscle leads to enhance homing, permeability, and retention of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and human endothelial precursor cells (EPC). Furthermore, the magnitude of MSC or EPC homing was increased when plus treatments and cell infusions were repeated daily. This study demonstrates that plus defines transient “molecular zip codes” of elevated chemo attractants in targeted muscle tissue, which effectively provides spatiotemporal control and tenability of the homing process for multiple stem cell types. plus is a clinically-translatable modality that may ultimately improve homing efficiency and flexibility of cell therapies for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23922277

  1. Developing defined culture systems for human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Valamehr, Bahram; Tsutsui, Hideaki; Ho, Chih-Ming; Wu, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells hold promising potential in many therapeutics applications including regenerative medicine and drug discovery. Over the past three decades, embryonic stem cell research has illustrated that embryonic stem cells possess two important and distinct properties: the ability to continuously self-renew and the ability to differentiate into all specialized cell types. In this article, we will discuss the continuing evolution of human pluripotent stem cell culture by examining requirements needed for the maintenance of self-renewal in vitro. We will also elaborate on the future direction of the field toward generating a robust and completely defined culture system, which has brought forth collaborations amongst biologists and engineers. As human pluripotent stem cell research progresses towards identifying solutions for debilitating diseases, it will be critical to establish a defined, reproducible and scalable culture system to meet the requirements of these clinical applications. PMID:21916597

  2. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from human blood.

    PubMed

    Loh, Yuin-Han; Agarwal, Suneet; Park, In-Hyun; Urbach, Achia; Huo, Hongguang; Heffner, Garrett C; Kim, Kitai; Miller, Justine D; Ng, Kitwa; Daley, George Q

    2009-05-28

    Human dermal fibroblasts obtained by skin biopsy can be reprogrammed directly to pluripotency by the ectopic expression of defined transcription factors. Here, we describe the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells from CD34+ mobilized human peripheral blood cells using retroviral transduction of OCT4/SOX2/KLF4/MYC. Blood-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells are indistinguishable from human embryonic stem cells with respect to morphology, expression of surface antigens, and pluripotency-associated transcription factors, DNA methylation status at pluripotent cell-specific genes, and the capacity to differentiate in vitro and in teratomas. The ability to reprogram cells from human blood will allow the generation of patient-specific stem cells for diseases in which the disease-causing somatic mutations are restricted to cells of the hematopoietic lineage. PMID:19299331

  3. Telocytes and putative stem cells in ageing human heart

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Laurentiu M; Curici, Antoanela; Wang, Enshi; Zhang, Hao; Hu, Shengshou; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Tradition considers that mammalian heart consists of about 70% non-myocytes (interstitial cells) and 30% cardiomyocytes (CMs). Anyway, the presence of telocytes (TCs) has been overlooked, since they were described in 2010 (visit http://www.telocytes.com). Also, the number of cardiac stem cells (CSCs) has not accurately estimated in humans during ageing. We used electron microscopy to identify and estimate the number of cells in human atrial myocardium (appendages). Three age-related groups were studied: newborns (17 days–1 year), children (6–17 years) and adults (34–60 years). Morphometry was performed on low-magnification electron microscope images using computer-assisted technology. We found that interstitial area gradually increases with age from 31.3 ± 4.9% in newborns to 41 ± 5.2% in adults. Also, the number of blood capillaries (per mm2) increased with several hundreds in children and adults versus newborns. CMs are the most numerous cells, representing 76% in newborns, 88% in children and 86% in adults. Images of CMs mitoses were seen in the 17-day newborns. Interestingly, no lipofuscin granules were found in CMs of human newborns and children. The percentage of cells that occupy interstitium were (depending on age): endothelial cells 52–62%; vascular smooth muscle cells and pericytes 22–28%, Schwann cells with nerve endings 6–7%, fibroblasts 3–10%, macrophages 1–8%, TCs about 1% and stem cells less than 1%. We cannot confirm the popular belief that cardiac fibroblasts are the most prevalent cell type in the heart and account for about 20% of myocardial volume. Numerically, TCs represent a small fraction of human cardiac interstitial cells, but because of their extensive telopodes, they achieve a 3D network that, for instance, supports CSCs. The myocardial (very) low capability to regenerate may be explained by the number of CSCs, which decreases fivefold by age (from 0.5% to 0.1% in newborns versus adults). PMID:25545142

  4. Reverse engineering human neurodegenerative disease using pluripotent stem cell technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Deng, Wenbin

    2016-05-01

    With the technology of reprogramming somatic cells by introducing defined transcription factors that enables the generation of "induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)" with pluripotency comparable to that of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), it has become possible to use this technology to produce various cells and tissues that have been difficult to obtain from living bodies. This advancement is bringing forth rapid progress in iPSC-based disease modeling, drug screening, and regenerative medicine. More and more studies have demonstrated that phenotypes of adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders could be rather faithfully recapitulated in iPSC-derived neural cell cultures. Moreover, despite the adult-onset nature of the diseases, pathogenic phenotypes and cellular abnormalities often exist in early developmental stages, providing new "windows of opportunity" for understanding mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders and for discovering new medicines. The cell reprogramming technology enables a reverse engineering approach for modeling the cellular degenerative phenotypes of a wide range of human disorders. An excellent example is the study of the human neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using iPSCs. ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of upper and lower motor neurons (MNs), culminating in muscle wasting and death from respiratory failure. The iPSC approach provides innovative cell culture platforms to serve as ALS patient-derived model systems. Researchers have converted iPSCs derived from ALS patients into MNs and various types of glial cells, all of which are involved in ALS, to study the disease. The iPSC technology could be used to determine the role of specific genetic factors to track down what's wrong in the neurodegenerative disease process in the "disease-in-a-dish" model. Meanwhile, parallel experiments of targeting the same specific genes in human ESCs could also be performed to control

  5. Asymmetric Self-Renewal and Commitment of Satellite Stem Cells in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Shihuan; Kuroda, Kazuki; Le Grand, Fabien; Rudnicki, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Satellite cells play a central role in mediating the growth and regeneration of skeletal muscle. However, whether satellite cells are stem cells, committed progenitors, or dedifferentiated myoblasts has remained unclear. Using Myf5-Cre and ROSA26-YFP Cre-reporter alleles, we observed that in vivo 10% of sublaminar Pax7-expressing satellite cells have never expressed Myf5. Moreover, we found that Pax7+/Myf5− satellite cells gave rise to Pax7+/Myf5+ satellite cells through apical-basal oriented divisions that asymmetrically generated a basal Pax7+/Myf5− and an apical Pax7+/Myf5+ cells. Prospective isolation and transplantation into muscle revealed that whereas Pax7+/Myf5+ cells exhibited precocious differentiation, Pax7+/Myf5− cells extensively contributed to the satellite cell reservoir throughout the injected muscle. Therefore, we conclude that satellite cells are a heterogeneous population composed of stem cells and committed progenitors. These results provide critical insights into satellite cell biology and open new avenues for therapeutic treatment of neuromuscular diseases. PMID:17540178

  6. Myosin Heavy Chain Composition of the Human Genioglossus Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Daugherty, Megan; Luo, Qingwei; Sokoloff, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The human tongue muscle genioglossus (GG) is active in speech, swallowing, respiration and oral transport, behaviors encompassing a wide range of tongue shapes and movement speeds. Studies demonstrate substantial diversity in patterns of human GG motor unit activation but whether this is accompanied by complex expression of muscle contractile proteins is not known. Purpose We tested for conventional myosin heavy chain MHCI, MHCIIA, MHCIIX, developmental MHCembryonic and MHCneonatal and unconventional MHCαcardiac, MHCextraocular and MHCslow tonic in antero-superior (GG-A) and posterior (GG-P) adult human GG. Method SDS-PAGE, Western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to describe MHC composition of GG-A and GG-P and the prevalence of muscle fiber MHC phenotypes in GG-A. Results: By SDS-PAGE, only conventional MHC are present with ranking from most to least prevalent MHCIIA>MHCI>MHCIIX in GG-A and MHCI>MHCIIA>MHCIIX in GG-P. By immunohistochemistry many muscle fibers contain MHCI, MHCIIA and MHCIIX but few contain developmental or unconventional MHC. GG-A is composed of five phenotypes (MHCIIA>MHCI-IIX>MHCI>MHCI-IIA>MHCIIX). Phenotypes MHCI, MHCIIA and MHCI-IIX account for 96% of muscle fibers. Conclusions Despite activation of GG during kinematically diverse behaviors and complex patterns of GG motor unit activity, the human GG is composed of conventional MHC isoforms and three primary MHC phenotypes. PMID:22337492

  7. TAK1 modulates satellite stem cell homeostasis and skeletal muscle repair

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Yuji; Hindi, Sajedah M.; Sato, Shuichi; Xiong, Guangyan; Akira, Shizuo; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Satellite cells are resident adult stem cells that are required for regeneration of skeletal muscle. However, signalling mechanisms that regulate satellite cell function are less understood. Here we demonstrate that transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is important in satellite stem cell homeostasis and function. Inactivation of TAK1 in satellite cells inhibits muscle regeneration in adult mice. TAK1 is essential for satellite cell proliferation and its inactivation causes precocious differentiation. Moreover, TAK1-deficient satellite cells exhibit increased oxidative stress and undergo spontaneous cell death, primarily through necroptosis. TAK1 is required for the activation of NF-κB and JNK in satellite cells. Forced activation of NF-κB improves survival and proliferation of TAK1-deficient satellite cells. Furthermore, TAK1-mediated activation of JNK is essential to prevent oxidative stress and precocious differentiation of satellite cells. Collectively, our study suggests that TAK1 is required for maintaining the pool of satellite stem cells and for regenerative myogenesis. PMID:26648529

  8. TAK1 modulates satellite stem cell homeostasis and skeletal muscle repair.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yuji; Hindi, Sajedah M; Sato, Shuichi; Xiong, Guangyan; Akira, Shizuo; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-12-09

    Satellite cells are resident adult stem cells that are required for regeneration of skeletal muscle. However, signalling mechanisms that regulate satellite cell function are less understood. Here we demonstrate that transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is important in satellite stem cell homeostasis and function. Inactivation of TAK1 in satellite cells inhibits muscle regeneration in adult mice. TAK1 is essential for satellite cell proliferation and its inactivation causes precocious differentiation. Moreover, TAK1-deficient satellite cells exhibit increased oxidative stress and undergo spontaneous cell death, primarily through necroptosis. TAK1 is required for the activation of NF-κB and JNK in satellite cells. Forced activation of NF-κB improves survival and proliferation of TAK1-deficient satellite cells. Furthermore, TAK1-mediated activation of JNK is essential to prevent oxidative stress and precocious differentiation of satellite cells. Collectively, our study suggests that TAK1 is required for maintaining the pool of satellite stem cells and for regenerative myogenesis.

  9. Polyphenolic composition of grape stem extracts affects antioxidant activity in endothelial and muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    GOUTZOURELAS, NIKOLAOS; STAGOS, DIMITRIOS; SPANIDIS, YPATIOS; LIOSI, MARIA; APOSTOLOU, ANNA; PRIFTIS, ALEXANDROS; HAROUTOUNIAN, SERKO; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.; KOURETAS, DEMETRIOS

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was the assessment of the antioxidant effects of polyphenolic extracts derived from the stems of three Greek grape varieties (Moshomayro, Mavrotragano and Mandilaria) in endothelial (EA.hy926) and muscle (C2C12) cells. We also investigated the effects of the polyphenolic composition on the antioxidant effects of the grape stem extracts. For this purpose, the endothelial and muscle cells were treated with low non-cytotoxic concentrations of the extracts for 24 h in order to assess the effects of the extracts on cellular redox status using oxidative stress biomarkers. The oxidative stress markers were thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyl (CARB) levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and glutathione (GSH) levels. The results revealed that treatment of the EA.hy926 cells with Mandilaria extract significantly decreased the TBARS levels by 14.8% and the CARB levels by 25.9 %, while it increased the GSH levels by 15.8% compared to the controls. Moreover, treatment of the EA.hy926 cells with Mavrotragano extract significantly increased the GSH levels by 20.2%, while it significantly decreased the TBARS and CARB levels by 12.5% and 16.6%, respectively. Treatment of the C2C12 cells with Mandilaria extract significantly decreased the TBARS levels by 47.3 %, the CARB levels by 39.0 % and the ROS levels by 21.8%, while it increased the GSH levels by 22.6% compared to the controls. Moreover, treatment of the C2C12 cells with Mavrotragano significantly decreased the TBARS, CARB and ROS levels by 36.2%, 35.9% and 16.5%, respectively. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledgel, our results demonstrate for the first time that treatment with grape stem extracts at low concentrations improves the redox status of endothelial and muscle cells. Thus, grape stem extracts may be used for developing antioxidant food supplements or biofunctional foods. However, it was also found that the polyphenolic composition of grape stem

  10. Polyphenolic composition of grape stem extracts affects antioxidant activity in endothelial and muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Stagos, Dimitrios; Spanidis, Ypatios; Liosi, Maria; Apostolou, Anna; Priftis, Alexandros; Haroutounian, Serko; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Kouretas, Demetrios

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was the assessment of the antioxidant effects of polyphenolic extracts derived from the stems of three Greek grape varieties (Moshomayro, Mavrotragano and Mandilaria) in endothelial (EA.hy926) and muscle (C2C12) cells. We also investigated the effects of the polyphenolic composition on the antioxidant effects of the grape stem extracts. For this purpose, the endothelial and muscle cells were treated with low non-cytotoxic concentrations of the extracts for 24 h in order to assess the effects of the extracts on cellular redox status using oxidative stress biomarkers. The oxidative stress markers were thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyl (CARB) levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and glutathione (GSH) levels. The results revealed that treatment of the EA.hy926 cells with Mandilaria extract significantly decreased the TBARS levels by 14.8% and the CARB levels by 25.9 %, while it increased the GSH levels by 15.8% compared to the controls. Moreover, treatment of the EA.hy926 cells with Mavrotragano extract significantly increased the GSH levels by 20.2%, while it significantly decreased the TBARS and CARB levels by 12.5% and 16.6%, respectively. Treatment of the C2C12 cells with Mandilaria extract significantly decreased the TBARS levels by 47.3 %, the CARB levels by 39.0 % and the ROS levels by 21.8%, while it increased the GSH levels by 22.6% compared to the controls. Moreover, treatment of the C2C12 cells with Mavrotragano significantly decreased the TBARS, CARB and ROS levels by 36.2%, 35.9% and 16.5%, respectively. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledgel, our results demonstrate for the first time that treatment with grape stem extracts at low concentrations improves the redox status of endothelial and muscle cells. Thus, grape stem extracts may be used for developing antioxidant food supplements or biofunctional foods. However, it was also found that the polyphenolic composition of grape stem

  11. Polyphenolic composition of grape stem extracts affects antioxidant activity in endothelial and muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Stagos, Dimitrios; Spanidis, Ypatios; Liosi, Maria; Apostolou, Anna; Priftis, Alexandros; Haroutounian, Serko; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Kouretas, Demetrios

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was the assessment of the antioxidant effects of polyphenolic extracts derived from the stems of three Greek grape varieties (Moshomayro, Mavrotragano and Mandilaria) in endothelial (EA.hy926) and muscle (C2C12) cells. We also investigated the effects of the polyphenolic composition on the antioxidant effects of the grape stem extracts. For this purpose, the endothelial and muscle cells were treated with low non-cytotoxic concentrations of the extracts for 24 h in order to assess the effects of the extracts on cellular redox status using oxidative stress biomarkers. The oxidative stress markers were thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyl (CARB) levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and glutathione (GSH) levels. The results revealed that treatment of the EA.hy926 cells with Mandilaria extract significantly decreased the TBARS levels by 14.8% and the CARB levels by 25.9 %, while it increased the GSH levels by 15.8% compared to the controls. Moreover, treatment of the EA.hy926 cells with Mavrotragano extract significantly increased the GSH levels by 20.2%, while it significantly decreased the TBARS and CARB levels by 12.5% and 16.6%, respectively. Treatment of the C2C12 cells with Mandilaria extract significantly decreased the TBARS levels by 47.3 %, the CARB levels by 39.0 % and the ROS levels by 21.8%, while it increased the GSH levels by 22.6% compared to the controls. Moreover, treatment of the C2C12 cells with Mavrotragano significantly decreased the TBARS, CARB and ROS levels by 36.2%, 35.9% and 16.5%, respectively. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledgel, our results demonstrate for the first time that treatment with grape stem extracts at low concentrations improves the redox status of endothelial and muscle cells. Thus, grape stem extracts may be used for developing antioxidant food supplements or biofunctional foods. However, it was also found that the polyphenolic composition of grape stem

  12. Derivation of stromal (skeletal and mesenchymal) stem-like cells from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Amer; Harkness, Linda; Abdallah, Basem M; Elsafadi, Mona; Al-Nbaheen, May S; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Kassem, Moustapha

    2012-11-20

    Derivation of bone forming cells (osteoblasts) from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is a prerequisite for their use in clinical applications. However, there is no standard protocol for differentiating hESCs into osteoblastic cells. The aim of this study was to identify the emergence of a human stromal (mesenchymal and skeletal) stem cell (hMSC)-like population, known to be osteoblastic cell precursors and to test their osteoblastic differentiation capacity in ex vivo cultures and in vivo. We cultured hESCs in a feeder-free environment using serum replacement and as suspension aggregates (embryoid bodies; hEBs). Over a 20 day developmental period, the hEBs demonstrated increasing enrichment for cells expressing hMSC markers: CD29, CD44, CD63, CD56, CD71, CD73, CD105, CD106, and CD166 as revealed by immunohistochemical staining and flow cytometry (fluorescence-activated cell sorting) analysis. Ex vivo differentiation of hEBs using bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2) combined with standard osteoblast induction medium led to weak osteoblastic induction. Conversely, subcutaneous in vivo implantation of day 20 hEBs in immune deficient mice, mixed with hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) as an osteoconductive scaffold, revealed bone and cartilage, and fibrous tissue elements after 8 weeks. These tissues were of human origin and there was no evidence of differentiation to nonmesodermal tissues. hEBs implanted in the absence of HA/TCP formed vacuolated tissue containing glandular, fibrous and muscle-like tissue elements. Conversely, implantation of undifferentiated hESCs resulted in the formation of a teratoma containing a mixture of endodermal, mesodermal, and ectodermal tissues. Our study demonstrates that hMSC-like cells can be obtained from hESCs and they can be induced to form skeletal tissues in vivo when combined with HA/TCP. These findings are relevant for tissue engineering and suggest that differentiated hEBs can provide an unlimited source for

  13. Therapeutic effects of mouse adipose-derived stem cells and losartan in the skeletal muscle of injured mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Mi; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Joo; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Hwang, Meeyul; Kim, Choong-Yong; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are an attractive source of cells for stem cell therapy. Losartan has been reported to improve ASC transplantation in injured mouse muscles. In the present study, we investigated whether the combined treatment of losartan and ASCs in the injured muscles of mdx mice improves regeneration. The combined treatment of ASCs and losartan remarkably improved muscle regeneration and induced muscle hypertrophy. In addition, ASCs and losartan treatment downregulated transforming growth factor-β and inhibited muscle fibrosis. We observed cells coexpressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and dystrophin in the muscle samples of mice transplanted with GFP-positive ASCs. In the coculture in vitro experiment, we also observed that the GFP ASCs differentiated into dystrophin-expressing myotubes. The present study shows that the combination of transplanted ASCs and treatment with losartan ameliorated muscle fibrosis and improved muscle regeneration in injured mdx mice. Thus, we suggest that combined treatment with losartan and ASCs could help to improve muscle regeneration in the muscles of injured patients, including DMD patients.

  14. Therapeutic potential of perivascular cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dar, Ayelet; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2015-09-01

    Vascularization of injured tissues or artificial grafts is a major challenge in tissue engineering, stimulating a continued search for alternative sources for vasculogenic cells and the development of therapeutic strategies. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), either embryonic or induced, offer a plentiful platform for the derivation of large numbers of vasculogenic cells, as required for clinical transplantations. Various protocols for generation of vasculogenic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from hPSCs have been described with considerably different SMC derivatives. In addition, we recently identified hPSC-derived pericytes, which are similar to their physiological counterparts, exhibiting unique features of blood vessel-residing perivascular cells, as well as multipotent mesenchymal precursors with therapeutic angiogenic potential. In this review we refer to methodologies for the development of a variety of perivascular cells from hPSCs with respect to developmental induction, differentiation capabilities, potency and their dual function as mesenchymal precursors. The therapeutic effect of hPSC-derived perivascular cells in experimental models of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are described and compared to those of their native physiological counterparts.

  15. Methods for derivation of multipotent neural crest cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Avery, John; Dalton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Summary Multipotent, neural crest cells (NCCs) produce a wide-range of cell types during embryonic development. This includes melanocytes, peripheral neurons, smooth muscle cells, osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. The protocol described here allows for highly-efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells to a neural crest fate within 15 days. This is accomplished under feeder-free conditions, using chemically defined medium supplemented with two small molecule inhibitors that block glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling. This technology is well-suited as a platform to understand in greater detail the pathogenesis of human disease associated with impaired neural crest development/migration. PMID:25986498

  16. Patenting human genes and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Martin-Rendon, Enca; Blake, Derek J

    2007-01-01

    Cell lines and genetically modified single cell organisms have been considered patentable subjects for the last two decades. However, despite the technical patentability of genes and stem cell lines, social and legal controversy concerning their 'ownership' has surrounded stem cell research in recent years. Some granted patents on stem cells with extremely broad claims are casting a shadow over the commercialization of these cells as therapeutics. However, in spite of those early patents, the number of patent applications related to stem cells is growing exponentially. Both embryonic and adult stem cells have the ability to differentiate into several cell lineages in an organism as a result of specific genetic programs that direct their commitment and cell fate. Genes that control the pluripotency of stem cells have been recently identified and the genetic manipulation of these cells is becoming more efficient with the advance of new technologies. This review summarizes some of the recent published patents on pluripotency genes, gene transfer into stem cells and genetic reprogramming and takes the hematopoietic and embryonic stem cell as model systems.

  17. Skeletal muscle disorders associated with selenium deficiency in humans.

    PubMed

    Chariot, Patrick; Bignani, Olivier

    2003-06-01

    Skeletal muscle disorders manifested by muscle pain, fatigue, proximal weakness, and serum creatine kinase (CK) elevation have been reported in patients with selenium deficiency. The object of this report was to review the conditions in which selenium deficiency is associated with human skeletal muscle disorders and to evaluate the importance of mitochondrial alterations in these disorders. A systematic literature review using the Medline database and Cochrane Library provided 38 relevant articles. The main conditions associated with selenium deficiency fell into three categories: (1) insufficient selenium intake in low soil-selenium areas; (2) parenteral or enteral nutrition, or malabsorption; and (3) chronic conditions associated with oxidative stress, such as chronic alcohol abuse and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. In low soil-selenium areas, reversibility of muscle symptoms was similar after selenium supplementation and placebo administration, suggesting a role for other factors in the development of disease. In parenteral or enteral nutrition, or malabsorption, muscle symptoms improved after selenium supplementation in 18 of 19 patients (median delay: 4 weeks). The reason that only a minority of selenium-deficient patients present with skeletal muscle disorders is unclear and is possibly related to cofactors, such as viral infections and drugs. Prospective studies of selenium-deficient myopathies would be useful in critically ill patients, alcohol abusers, and HIV-infected patients. PMID:12766976

  18. Robotic Powered Transfer Mechanism modeling on Human Muscle Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yukio

    It is considered in engineering that one power source can operate one joint. However, support movement mechanism of living organism is multi joint movement mechanism. Considerably different from mechanical movement mechanism, two pairs of uni-articular muscles and a pair of bi-articular muscles are involved in it. In leg, movements observed in short run including leg idling, heel contact and toeing are operated by bi-articular muscles of the thigh showing strong legs to support body weight. Pursuit of versatility in welfare robot brings its comparison with conventional machinery or industrial robot to the fore. Request for safety and technology allowing elderly people to operate the robot is getting stronger in the society. The robot must be safe when it is used together with other welfare equipment and simpler system avoiding difficult operation has to be constructed. Appearance of recent care and assistance robot is getting similar to human arm in comparison with industrial robot. Being easily able to imagine from industrial robot, mid-heavyweight articulated robot to support 60-70kgf combined with large output motor and reduction gears is next to impossible to be installed in the bath room. This research indicated that upper limb arm and lower limb thigh of human and animals are holding coalitional muscles and movement of uni-artcular muscle and bi-articular muscle conjure the image of new actuators.

  19. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Expression in Normal and Diseased Human Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oronzi Scott, M.; Sylvester, J. E.; Heiman-Patterson, T.; Shi, Y.-J.; Fieles, W.; Stedman, H.; Burghes, A.; Ray, P.; Worton, R.; Fischbeck, K. H.

    1988-03-01

    A probe for the 5' end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene was used to study expression of the gene in normal human muscle, myogenic cell cultures, and muscle from patients with DMD. Expression was found in RNA from normal fetal muscle, adult cardiac and skeletal muscle, and cultured muscle after myoblast fusion. In DMD muscle, expression of this portion of the gene was also revealed by in situ RNA hybridization, particularly in regenerating muscle fibers.

  20. Generation of functional hepatocytes from human spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zheng; Sun, Min; Yuan, Qingqing; Niu, Minghui; Yao, Chencheng; Hou, Jingmei; Wang, Hong; Wen, Liping; Liu, Yun; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2016-01-01

    To generate functional human hepatocytes from stem cells and/or extra-hepatic tissues could provide an important source of cells for treating liver diseases. Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) have an unlimited plasticity since they can dedifferentiate and transdifferentiate to other cell lineages. However, generation of mature and functional hepatocytes from human SSCs has not yet been achieved. Here we have for the first time reported direct transdifferentiation of human SSCs to mature and functional hepatocytes by three-step induction using the defined condition medium. Human SSCs were first transdifferentiated to hepatic stem cells, as evidenced by their morphology and biopotential nature of co-expressing hepatocyte and cholangiocyte markers but not hallmarks for embryonic stem cells. Hepatic stem cells were further induced to differentiate into mature hepatocytes identified by their morphological traits and strong expression of CK8, CK18, ALB, AAT, TF, TAT, and cytochrome enzymes rather than CK7 or CK19. Significantly, mature hepatocytes derived from human SSCs assumed functional attributes of human hepatocytes, because they could produce albumin, remove ammonia, and uptake and release indocyanine green. Moreover, expression of β-CATENIN, HNF4A, FOXA1 and GATA4 was upregulated during the transdifferentiation of human SSCs to mature hepatocytes. Collectively, human SSCs could directly transdifferentiate to mature and functional hepatocytes. This study could offer an invaluable source of human hepatocytes for curing liver disorders and drug toxicology screening and provide novel insights into mechanisms underlying human liver regeneration. PMID:26840458

  1. Glutamine attenuates post-traumatic glutathione depletion in human muscle.

    PubMed

    Fläring, U B; Rooyackers, O E; Wernerman, J; Hammarqvist, F

    2003-03-01

    Glutathione is quantitatively the most important endogenous scavenger system. Glutathione depletion in skeletal muscle is pronounced following major trauma and sepsis in intensive care unit patients. Also, following elective surgery, glutathione depletion occurs in parallel with a progressive decline in muscle glutamine concentration. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that glutamine supplementation may counteract glutathione depletion in a human trauma model. A homogeneous group of patients (n = 17) undergoing a standardized surgical procedure were prospectively randomly allocated to receive glutamine (0.56 g x day(-1) x kg(-1)) or placebo as part of isonitrogenous and isocaloric nutrition. Percutaneous muscle biopsies and blood samples were taken pre-operatively and at 24 and 72 h after surgery. The concentrations of muscle glutathione and related amino acids were determined in muscle tissue and plasma. In the control (unsupplemented) subjects, total muscle glutathione had decreased by 47+/-8% and 37+/-11% and reduced glutathione had decreased by 53+/-10% and 45+/-16% respectively at 24 and 72 h after surgery (P < 0.05). In contrast, in the glutamine-supplemented group, no significant post-operative decreases in total or reduced glutathione were seen following surgery. Muscle free glutamine had decreased at 72 h after surgery in both groups, by 41.4+/-14.8% (P < 0.05) in the glutamine-supplemented group and by 46.0+/-14.3% (P < 0.05) in the control group. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that intravenous glutamine supplementation attenuates glutathione depletion in skeletal muscle in humans following standardized surgical trauma.

  2. Direct reprogramming of human neural stem cells by OCT4.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Beom; Greber, Boris; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Meyer, Johann; Park, Kook In; Zaehres, Holm; Schöler, Hans R

    2009-10-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have been generated from mouse and human somatic cells by ectopic expression of four transcription factors (OCT4 (also called POU5F1), SOX2, c-Myc and KLF4). We previously reported that Oct4 alone is sufficient to reprogram directly adult mouse neural stem cells to iPS cells. Here we report the generation of one-factor human iPS cells from human fetal neural stem cells (one-factor (1F) human NiPS cells) by ectopic expression of OCT4 alone. One-factor human NiPS cells resemble human embryonic stem cells in global gene expression profiles, epigenetic status, as well as pluripotency in vitro and in vivo. These findings demonstrate that the transcription factor OCT4 is sufficient to reprogram human neural stem cells to pluripotency. One-factor iPS cell generation will advance the field further towards understanding reprogramming and generating patient-specific pluripotent stem cells. PMID:19718018

  3. Patterning as a signature of human epidermal stem cell regulation

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Allon M.; Nikolaidou-Neokosmidou, Varvara; Doupé, David P.; Jones, Philip H.; Simons, Benjamin D.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how stem cells are regulated in adult tissues is a major challenge in cell biology. In the basal layer of human epidermis, clusters of almost quiescent stem cells are interspersed with proliferating and differentiating cells. Previous studies have shown that the proliferating cells follow a pattern of balanced stochastic cell fate. This behaviour enables them to maintain homeostasis, while stem cells remain confined to their quiescent clusters. Intriguingly, these clusters reappear spontaneously in culture, suggesting that they may play a functional role in stem cell auto-regulation. We propose a model of pattern formation that explains how clustering could regulate stem cell activity in homeostatic tissue through contact inhibition and stem cell aggregation. PMID:21632613

  4. Isolation of blood-vessel-derived multipotent precursors from human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Chen, William C W; Saparov, Arman; Corselli, Mirko; Crisan, Mihaela; Zheng, Bo; Péault, Bruno; Huard, Johnny

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs), the native identity and localization of MSCs have been obscured by their retrospective isolation in culture. Recently, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), we and other researchers prospectively identified and purified three subpopulations of multipotent precursor cells associated with the vasculature of human skeletal muscle. These three cell populations: myogenic endothelial cells (MECs), pericytes (PCs), and adventitial cells (ACs), are localized respectively to the three structural layers of blood vessels: intima, media, and adventitia. All of these human blood-vessel-derived stem cell (hBVSC) populations not only express classic MSC markers but also possess mesodermal developmental potentials similar to typical MSCs. Previously, MECs, PCs, and ACs have been isolated through distinct protocols and subsequently characterized in separate studies. The current isolation protocol, through modifications to the isolation process and adjustments in the selective cell surface markers, allows us to simultaneously purify all three hBVSC subpopulations by FACS from a single human muscle biopsy. This new method will not only streamline the isolation of multiple BVSC subpopulations but also facilitate future clinical applications of hBVSCs for distinct therapeutic purposes. PMID:25177794

  5. Development of the stapedius muscle and pyramidal eminence in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to systematize the key developmental phases of the stapedius muscle and the pyramidal eminence to clarify their formation, as well as to understand the variations and anomalies that can affect these structures. Sixty human embryos and fetuses between 38 days and 17 weeks of development were studied. The stapedius muscle is formed by two anlagen, one for the tendon, which derives from the internal segment of the interhyale, and another for the belly, located in the second pharyngeal arch medial to the facial nerve and near the interhyale but forming a completely independent anlage. In the interhyale, two segments were differentiated, these forming an angle; at the vertex, the belly of the stapedius muscle is attached. The internal segment is located from the attachment of the belly of the stapedius muscle to the anlage of the stapes, forming the anlage of the tendon of the stapedius muscle. The external segment completely disappears at the beginning of the fetal period. The pyramidal eminence is formed by an anlage independent of Reichert’s cartilage, from the mesenchymal tissue of the tympanic cavity, which condenses around the belly of the stapedius muscle from 12 weeks of post-conception development. The length of the tendon of the stapedius muscle in adults varies, depending on the attachment site of the belly of the stapedius muscle in the interhyale, which would determine the length of the internal segment (anlage of the tendon) and consequently the tendon length. This variation depends on the greater or lesser persistence of the angulation observed during development, between the tendon and the belly of the stapedius muscle. PMID:19531086

  6. Development of the stapedius muscle and pyramidal eminence in humans.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the study was to systematize the key developmental phases of the stapedius muscle and the pyramidal eminence to clarify their formation, as well as to understand the variations and anomalies that can affect these structures. Sixty human embryos and fetuses between 38 days and 17 weeks of development were studied. The stapedius muscle is formed by two anlagen, one for the tendon, which derives from the internal segment of the interhyale, and another for the belly, located in the second pharyngeal arch medial to the facial nerve and near the interhyale but forming a completely independent anlage. In the interhyale, two segments were differentiated, these forming an angle; at the vertex, the belly of the stapedius muscle is attached. The internal segment is located from the attachment of the belly of the stapedius muscle to the anlage of the stapes, forming the anlage of the tendon of the stapedius muscle. The external segment completely disappears at the beginning of the fetal period. The pyramidal eminence is formed by an anlage independent of Reichert's cartilage, from the mesenchymal tissue of the tympanic cavity, which condenses around the belly of the stapedius muscle from 12 weeks of post-conception development. The length of the tendon of the stapedius muscle in adults varies, depending on the attachment site of the belly of the stapedius muscle in the interhyale, which would determine the length of the internal segment (anlage of the tendon) and consequently the tendon length. This variation depends on the greater or lesser persistence of the angulation observed during development, between the tendon and the belly of the stapedius muscle.

  7. Regulation of Muscle Stem Cell Functions: A Focus on the p38 MAPK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Segalés, Jessica; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2016-01-01

    Formation of skeletal muscle fibers (myogenesis) during development and after tissue injury in the adult constitutes an excellent paradigm to investigate the mechanisms whereby environmental cues control gene expression programs in muscle stem cells (satellite cells) by acting on transcriptional and epigenetic effectors. Here we will review the molecular mechanisms implicated in the transition of satellite cells throughout the distinct myogenic stages (i.e., activation from quiescence, proliferation, differentiation, and self-renewal). We will also discuss recent findings on the causes underlying satellite cell functional decline with aging. In particular, our review will focus on the epigenetic changes underlying fate decisions and on how the p38 MAPK signaling pathway integrates the environmental signals at the chromatin to build up satellite cell adaptive responses during the process of muscle regeneration, and how these responses are altered in aging. A better comprehension of the signaling pathways connecting external and intrinsic factors will illuminate the path for improving muscle regeneration in the aged. PMID:27626031

  8. Regulation of Muscle Stem Cell Functions: A Focus on the p38 MAPK Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Segalés, Jessica; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2016-01-01

    Formation of skeletal muscle fibers (myogenesis) during development and after tissue injury in the adult constitutes an excellent paradigm to investigate the mechanisms whereby environmental cues control gene expression programs in muscle stem cells (satellite cells) by acting on transcriptional and epigenetic effectors. Here we will review the molecular mechanisms implicated in the transition of satellite cells throughout the distinct myogenic stages (i.e., activation from quiescence, proliferation, differentiation, and self-renewal). We will also discuss recent findings on the causes underlying satellite cell functional decline with aging. In particular, our review will focus on the epigenetic changes underlying fate decisions and on how the p38 MAPK signaling pathway integrates the environmental signals at the chromatin to build up satellite cell adaptive responses during the process of muscle regeneration, and how these responses are altered in aging. A better comprehension of the signaling pathways connecting external and intrinsic factors will illuminate the path for improving muscle regeneration in the aged. PMID:27626031

  9. Nutrition and muscle loss in humans during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.

    1999-01-01

    The protein loss in humans during spaceflight is partly due to a normal adaptive response to a decreased work load on the muscles involved in weight bearing. The process is mediated by changes in prostaglandin release, secondary to the decrease in tension on the affected muscles. On missions, where there is a high level of physical demands on the astronauts, there tends to be an energy deficit, which adds to the muscle protein loss and depletes the body fat reserves. While the adaptive response is a normal part of homeostasis, the additional protein loss from an energy deficit can, in the long run, have a negative effect on health and capability of humans to live and work in space and afterward return to Earth.

  10. Characterizing the radioresponse of pluripotent and multipotent human stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lan, Mary L; Acharya, Munjal M; Tran, Katherine K; Bahari-Kashani, Jessica; Patel, Neal H; Strnadel, Jan; Giedzinski, Erich; Limoli, Charles L

    2012-01-01

    The potential capability of stem cells to restore functionality to diseased or aged tissues has prompted a surge of research, but much work remains to elucidate the response of these cells to genotoxic agents. To more fully understand the impact of irradiation on different stem cell types, the present study has analyzed the radioresponse of human pluripotent and multipotent stem cells. Human embryonic stem (ES) cells, human induced pluripotent (iPS) cells, and iPS-derived human neural stem cells (iPS-hNSCs) cells were irradiated and analyzed for cell survival parameters, differentiation, DNA damage and repair and oxidative stress at various times after exposure. While irradiation led to dose-dependent reductions in survival, the fraction of surviving cells exhibited dose-dependent increases in metabolic activity. Irradiation did not preclude germ layer commitment of ES cells, but did promote neuronal differentiation. ES cells subjected to irradiation exhibited early apoptosis and inhibition of cell cycle progression, but otherwise showed normal repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Cells surviving irradiation also showed acute and persistent increases in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that were significant at nearly all post-irradiation times analyzed. We suggest that stem cells alter their redox homeostasis to adapt to adverse conditions and that radiation-induced oxidative stress plays a role in regulating the function and fate of stem cells within tissues compromised by radiation injury.

  11. Identification of a putative pathway for the muscle homing of stem cells in a muscular dystrophy model.

    PubMed

    Torrente, Yvan; Camirand, Geoffrey; Pisati, Federica; Belicchi, Marzia; Rossi, Barbara; Colombo, Fabio; El Fahime, Mosthapha; Caron, Nicolas J; Issekutz, Andrew C; Constantin, Gabriela; Tremblay, Jacques P; Bresolin, Nereo

    2003-08-01

    Attempts to repair muscle damage in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by transplanting skeletal myoblasts directly into muscles are faced with the problem of the limited migration of these cells in the muscles. The delivery of myogenic stem cells to the sites of muscle lesions via the systemic circulation is a potential alternative approach to treat this disease. Muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) were obtained by a MACS(R) multisort method. Clones of MDSCs, which were Sca-1+/CD34-/L-selectin+, were found to adhere firmly to the endothelium of mdx dystrophic muscles after i.v. or i.m. injections. The subpopulation of Sca-1+/CD34- MDSCs expressing L-selectin was called homing MDSCs (HMDSCs). Treatment of HMDSCs with antibodies against L-selectin prevented adhesion to the muscle endothelium. Importantly, we found that vascular endothelium from striate muscle of young mdx mice expresses mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1 (MAdCAM-1), a ligand for L-selectin. Our results showed for the first time that the expression of the adhesion molecule L-selectin is important for muscle homing of MDSCs. This discovery will aid in the improvement of a potential therapy for muscular dystrophy based on the systemic delivery of MDSCs.

  12. Glycomics of human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Jun-Ichi; Okada, Kazue; Shinohara, Yasuro

    2016-10-01

    Most cells are coated by a dense glycocalyx composed of glycoconjugates such as glycosphingolipids, glycoproteins, and proteoglycans. The overall glycomic profile is believed to be crucial for the diverse roles of glycans, which are mediated by specific interactions that regulate cell-cell adhesion, the immune response, microbial pathogenesis, and other cellular events. Many cell surface markers were discovered and identified as glycoconjugates such as stage-specific embryonic antigen, Tra-1-60/81 and various other cell surface molecules (e.g., cluster of differentiation). Recent progress in the development of analytical methodologies and strategies has begun to clarify the cellular glycomics of various cells including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). The glycomic profiles of these cells are highly cell type-specific and reflect cellular alterations, such as development, differentiation and cancerous change. In this mini review, we briefly summarize the glycosylation spectra specific to hESCs and hiPSCs, which cover glycans of all major glycoconjugates (i.e., glycosphingolipids, N- and O-glycans of glycoproteins, and glycosaminoglycans) and free oligosaccharides.

  13. In vivo Study on Depressant Effects and Muscle Coordination Activity of Galphimia glauca Stem Methanol Extract

    PubMed Central

    Garige, Baba Shankar Rao; Keshetti, Srisailam; Vattikuti, Uma Maheshwara Rao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Galphimia glauca is an evergreen shrub found across peninsular India, belonging to family Malpighiaceae. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the in vivo depressant effects and muscle coordination activity of G. glauca stem methanol extract (GGSME). Materials and Methods: The stem methanol extract was administered in Swiss albino mice in 1 day to study the central nervous system (CNS) depressant and muscle coordination activity employing animal models such as sodium pentobarbital-induced sleep test, hole-board test, open field test, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsions, picrotoxin-induced convulsions, grip strengthening test in mice, and Rota-rod test. Results: The LD50 of GGSME was found to be >2000 mg/kg body weight (b.w.). Mice treated with stem methanol extract at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, b.w. doses extended the sleeping time induced by sodium pentobarbital (40 mg/kg. b.w., i.p.). The stem methanol extract at 400 mg/kg dose showed a significant (P ≤ 0.001) dose-dependent decrease in the number of rears and head dipping number in the hole-board test. The extract exhibited a significant (P ≤ 0.001) effect on the ambulatory behavior of mice in the open field test and also extended the onset of seizures induced by PTZ (90 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) and picrotoxin (10 mg/kg, b.w., i.p.). The extract also exhibited significant (P ≤ 0.001) effects on muscle coordination in rota-rod and grip strengthening test in mice. Conclusion: The study results conclude that the GGSME has a potential CNS depressant and muscle relaxant effects compared to the standard drugs. SUMMARY Anxiety is implicated in the number of psychiatric disordersIn vivo depressant activity is studied employing animal models like Sodium pentobarbital-.induced sleep test, Hole-board test, Open field test, Pentylenetetrazole induced convulsions and Picrotoxin-induced convulsions tests.Muscle coordination activity is studied employing animal models like Grip strengthening

  14. In vivo Study on Depressant Effects and Muscle Coordination Activity of Galphimia glauca Stem Methanol Extract

    PubMed Central

    Garige, Baba Shankar Rao; Keshetti, Srisailam; Vattikuti, Uma Maheshwara Rao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Galphimia glauca is an evergreen shrub found across peninsular India, belonging to family Malpighiaceae. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the in vivo depressant effects and muscle coordination activity of G. glauca stem methanol extract (GGSME). Materials and Methods: The stem methanol extract was administered in Swiss albino mice in 1 day to study the central nervous system (CNS) depressant and muscle coordination activity employing animal models such as sodium pentobarbital-induced sleep test, hole-board test, open field test, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsions, picrotoxin-induced convulsions, grip strengthening test in mice, and Rota-rod test. Results: The LD50 of GGSME was found to be >2000 mg/kg body weight (b.w.). Mice treated with stem methanol extract at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, b.w. doses extended the sleeping time induced by sodium pentobarbital (40 mg/kg. b.w., i.p.). The stem methanol extract at 400 mg/kg dose showed a significant (P ≤ 0.001) dose-dependent decrease in the number of rears and head dipping number in the hole-board test. The extract exhibited a significant (P ≤ 0.001) effect on the ambulatory behavior of mice in the open field test and also extended the onset of seizures induced by PTZ (90 mg/kg b.w., i.p.) and picrotoxin (10 mg/kg, b.w., i.p.). The extract also exhibited significant (P ≤ 0.001) effects on muscle coordination in rota-rod and grip strengthening test in mice. Conclusion: The study results conclude that the GGSME has a potential CNS depressant and muscle relaxant effects compared to the standard drugs. SUMMARY Anxiety is implicated in the number of psychiatric disordersIn vivo depressant activity is studied employing animal models like Sodium pentobarbital-.induced sleep test, Hole-board test, Open field test, Pentylenetetrazole induced convulsions and Picrotoxin-induced convulsions tests.Muscle coordination activity is studied employing animal models like Grip strengthening

  15. Leucine incorporation into mixed skeletal muscle protein in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, K.S.; Halliday, D.; Griggs, R.C. Clinical Research Centre, Harrow )

    1988-02-01

    Fractional mixed skeletal muscle protein synthesis (FMPS) was estimated in 10 postabsorptive healthy men by determining the increment in the abundance of ({sup 13}C)-leucine in quadriceps muscle protein during an intravenous infusion of L-(1-{sup 13}C)leucine. Whole-body muscle protein synthesis (MPS) was calculated based on the estimation of muscle mass from creatinine excretion and compared with whole-body protein synthesis (WBPS) calculated from the nonoxidative portion of leucine flux. A significant correlation was found between MPS. The contribution of MPS to WBPS was 27 {plus minus} 1%, which is comparable to the reports in other species. Morphometric analyses of adjacent muscle samples in eight subjects demonstrated that the biopsy specimens consisted of 86.5 {plus minus} 2% muscular as opposed to other tissues. Because fiber type composition varies between biopsies, the authors examined the relationship between proportions of each fiber type and FMPS. Variation in the composition of biopsies and in fiber-type proportion did not affect the estimation of muscle protein synthesis rate. They conclude that stable isotope techniques using serial needle biopsies permit the direct measurement of FMPS in humans and that this estimation is correlated with an indirect estimation of WBPS.

  16. Multi-frequency bioimpedance in human muscle assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Else Marie; Sørensen, Emma Rudbæk; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2015-01-01

    Bioimpedance analysis (BIA) is a well-known and tested method for body mass and muscular health assessment. Multi-frequency BIA (mfBIA) equipment now makes it possible to assess a particular muscle as a whole, as well as looking at a muscle at the fiber level. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that mfBIA can be used to assess the anatomical, physiological, and metabolic state of skeletal muscles. mfBIA measurements focusing on impedance, resistance, reactance, phase angle, center frequency, membrane capacitance, and both extracellular and intracellular resistance were carried out. Eight healthy human control subjects and three selected cases were examined to demonstrate the extent to which this method may be used clinically, and in relation to training in sport. The electrode setup is shown to affect the mfBIA parameters recorded. Our recommendation is the use of noble metal electrodes in connection with a conductance paste to accommodate the typical BIA frequencies, and to facilitate accurate impedance and resistance measurements. The use of mfBIA parameters, often in conjunction with each other, can be used to reveal indications of contralateral muscle loss, extracellular fluid differences, contracted state, and cell transport/metabolic activity, which relate to muscle performance. Our findings indicate that mfBIA provides a noninvasive, easily measurable and very precise momentary assessment of skeletal muscles. PMID:25896978

  17. The accommodative ciliary muscle function is preserved in older humans

    PubMed Central

    Tabernero, Juan; Chirre, Emmanuel; Hervella, Lucia; Prieto, Pedro; Artal, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Presbyopia, the loss of the eye’s accommodation capability, affects all humans aged above 45–50 years old. The two main reasons for this to happen are a hardening of the crystalline lens and a reduction of the ciliary muscle functionality with age. While there seems to be at least some partial accommodating functionality of the ciliary muscle at early presbyopic ages, it is not yet clear whether the muscle is still active at more advanced ages. Previous techniques used to visualize the accommodation mechanism of the ciliary muscle are complicated to apply in the older subjects, as they typically require fixation stability during long measurement times and/or to have an ultrasound probe directly in contact with the eye. Instead, we used our own developed method based on high-speed recording of lens wobbling to study the ciliary muscle activity in a small group of pseudophakic subjects (around 80 years old). There was a significant activity of the muscle, clearly able to contract under binocular stimulation of accommodation. This supports a purely lenticular-based theory of presbyopia and it might stimulate the search for new solutions to presbyopia by making use of the remaining contraction force still presented in the aging eye. PMID:27151778

  18. The accommodative ciliary muscle function is preserved in older humans.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, Juan; Chirre, Emmanuel; Hervella, Lucia; Prieto, Pedro; Artal, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Presbyopia, the loss of the eye's accommodation capability, affects all humans aged above 45-50 years old. The two main reasons for this to happen are a hardening of the crystalline lens and a reduction of the ciliary muscle functionality with age. While there seems to be at least some partial accommodating functionality of the ciliary muscle at early presbyopic ages, it is not yet clear whether the muscle is still active at more advanced ages. Previous techniques used to visualize the accommodation mechanism of the ciliary muscle are complicated to apply in the older subjects, as they typically require fixation stability during long measurement times and/or to have an ultrasound probe directly in contact with the eye. Instead, we used our own developed method based on high-speed recording of lens wobbling to study the ciliary muscle activity in a small group of pseudophakic subjects (around 80 years old). There was a significant activity of the muscle, clearly able to contract under binocular stimulation of accommodation. This supports a purely lenticular-based theory of presbyopia and it might stimulate the search for new solutions to presbyopia by making use of the remaining contraction force still presented in the aging eye. PMID:27151778

  19. Re-Evaluation of Sarcolemma Injury and Muscle Swelling in Human Skeletal Muscles after Eccentric Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ji-Guo; Liu, Jing-Xia; Carlsson, Lena; Thornell, Lars-Eric; Stål, Per S.

    2013-01-01

    The results regarding the effects of unaccustomed eccentric exercise on muscle tissue are often conflicting and the aetiology of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) induced by eccentric exercise is still unclear. This study aimed to re-evaluate the paradigm of muscular alterations with regard to muscle sarcolemma integrity and fibre swelling in human muscles after voluntary eccentric exercise leading to DOMS. Ten young males performed eccentric exercise by downstairs running. Biopsies from the soleus muscle were obtained from 6 non-exercising controls, 4 exercised subjects within 1 hour and 6 exercised subjects at 2–3 days and 7–8 days after the exercise. Muscle fibre sarcolemma integrity, infiltration of inflammatory cells and changes in fibre size and fibre phenotype composition as well as capillary supply were examined with specific antibodies using enzyme histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Although all exercised subjects experienced DOMS which peaked between 1.5 to 2.5 days post exercise, no significant sarcolemma injury or inflammation was detected in any post exercise group. The results do not support the prevailing hypothesis that eccentric exercise causes an initial sarcolemma injury which leads to subsequent inflammation after eccentric exercise. The fibre size was 24% larger at 7–8 days than at 2–3 days post exercise (p<0.05). In contrast, the value of capillary number per fibre area tended to decrease from 2–3 days to 7–8 days post exercise (lower in 5 of the 6 subjects at 7–8 days than at 2–3 days; p<0.05). Thus, the increased fibre size at 7–8 days post exercise was interpreted to reflect fibre swelling. Because the fibre swelling did not appear at the time that DOMS peaked (between 1.5 to 2.5 days post exercise), we concluded that fibre swelling in the soleus muscle is not directly associated with the symptom of DOMS. PMID:23614012

  20. Electromyogram premotion silent period and tension development in human muscle.

    PubMed

    Kawahats, K; Miyashita, M

    1983-11-01

    The EMG silent period has been observed frequently just before rapid movement from a slightly sustained contraction of the muscle. Our experiments were designed to show the relation between the tension developed in an intact human muscle and the occurrence of this silent period. Tension in the knee extensor was obtained from the floor reaction force of a living subject in a squatting position on the basis of a lever ratio-joint angle diagram obtained directly from measurements on an isolated knee extensor muscle of a human cadaver. The muscle tension was calculated under the condition that the floor reaction force in the squatting position passed through the anklebone, and decreased from 8.7 to 0.8 kN with an increase in the knee joint angle from 1.13 to 2.74 rad. When the center of pressure was not assumed, the increased knee extensor muscle torque with a decrease in the knee angle was estimated biomechanically from the free body diagram. Consistently, the EMG recordings confirmed an increased muscle activity with a reduction in the joint angle. The premotion silent period for the knee extensors and their antagonist with movement from the squatting position appeared to be limited to a knee joint angle of 2.44 to 3.07 rad, where the requirement for tension in those muscles was low. This silent period could be interpreted as an electromyographic transitional phase attributable to a switching mechanism in central nervous activity. The premotion silent period was most likely to appear prior to a swift, well coordinated movement. PMID:6628618

  1. N-acetylcysteine inhibits muscle fatigue in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Reid, M B; Stokić, D S; Koch, S M; Khawli, F A; Leis, A A

    1994-01-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is a nonspecific antioxidant that selectively inhibits acute fatigue of rodent skeletal muscle stimulated at low (but not high) tetanic frequencies and that decreases contractile function of unfatigued muscle in a dose-dependent manner. The present experiments test the hypothesis that NAC pretreatment can inhibit acute muscular fatigue in humans. Healthy volunteers were studied on two occasions each. Subjects were pretreated with NAC 150 mg/kg or 5% dextrose in water by intravenous infusion. The subject then sat in a chair with surface electrodes positioned over the motor point of tibialis anterior, an ankle dorsiflexor of mixed-fiber composition. The muscle was stimulated to contract electrically (40-55 mA, 0.2-ms pulses) and force production was measured. Function of the unfatigued muscle was assessed by measuring the forces produced during maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) of ankle dorsiflexor muscle groups and during electrical stimulation of tibialis anterior at 1, 10, 20, 40, 80, and 120 Hz (protocol 1). Fatigue was produced using repetitive tetanic stimulations at 10 Hz (protocol 1) or 40 Hz (protocol 2); intermittent stimulations subsequently were used to monitor recovery from fatigue. The contralateral leg then was studied using the same protocol. Pretreatment with NAC did not alter the function of unfatigued muscle; MVC performance and the force-frequency relationship of tibialis anterior were unchanged. During fatiguing contractions stimulated at 10 Hz, NAC increased force output by approximately 15% (P < 0.0001), an effect that was evident after 3 min of repetitive contraction (P < 0.0125) and persisted throughout the 30-min protocol. NAC had no effect on fatigue induced using 40 Hz stimuli or on recovery from fatigue. N-acetylcysteine pretreatment can improve performance of human limb muscle during fatiguing exercise, suggesting that oxidative stress plays a causal role in the fatigue process and identifying antioxidant

  2. The architectural organization of human stem cell cycle regulatory machinery.

    PubMed

    Stein, Gary S; Stein, Janet L; van J Wijnen, Andre; Lian, Jane B; Montecino, Martin; Medina, Ricardo; Kapinas, Kristie; Ghule, Prachi; Grandy, Rodrigo; Zaidi, Sayyed K; Becker, Klaus A

    2012-01-01

    Two striking features of human embryonic stem cells that support biological activity are an abbreviated cell cycle and reduced complexity to nuclear organization. The potential implications for rapid proliferation of human embryonic stem cells within the context of sustaining pluripotency, suppressing phenotypic gene expression and linkage to simplicity in the architectural compartmentalization of regulatory machinery in nuclear microenvironments is explored. Characterization of the molecular and architectural commitment steps that license human embryonic stem cells to initiate histone gene expression is providing understanding of the principal regulatory mechanisms that control the G1/S phase transition in primitive pluripotent cells. From both fundamental regulatory and clinical perspectives, further understanding of the pluripotent cell cycle in relation to compartmentalization of regulatory machinery in nuclear microenvironments is relevant to applications of stem cells for regenerative medicine and new dimensions to therapy where traditional drug discovery strategies have been minimally effective.

  3. Skeletal muscle responses to lower limb suspension in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hather, Bruce M.; Adams, Gregory R.; Tesch, Per A.; Dudley, Gary A.

    1992-01-01

    The morphological responses of human skeletal muscle to unweighting were assessed by analyzing multiple transaxial magnetic resonance (MR) images of both lower limbs and skeletal muscle biopsies of the unweighted lower limb before and after six weeks of unilaterial (left) lower limb suspension (ULLS). Results indicated that, as a results of 6 weeks of unweighting (by the subjects walking on crutches using only one limb), the cross sectional area (CSA) of the thigh muscle of the unweighted left limb decreased 12 percent, while the CSA of the right thigh muscle did not change. The decrease was due to a twofold greater response of the knee extensors than the knee flexors. The pre- and post-ULLS biopsies of the left vastus lateralis showed a 14 percent decrease in average fiber CSA due to unweighting. The number of capillaries surrounding the different fiber types was unchanged after ULLS. Results showed that the adaptive responses of human skeletal muscle to unweighting are qualitatively, but not quantitatively, similar to those of lower mammals and not necessarily dependent on the fiber-type composition.

  4. Artificial muscle: the human chimera is the future.

    PubMed

    Tozzi, P

    2011-12-14

    Severe heart failure and cerebral stroke are broadly associated with the impairment of muscular function that conventional treatments struggle to restore. New technologies enable the construction of "smart" materials that could be of great help in treating diseases where the main problem is muscle weakness. These materials "behave" similarly to biological systems, because the material directly converts energy, for example electrical energy into movement. The extension and contraction occur silently like in natural muscles. The real challenge is to transfer this amazing technology into devices that restore or replace the mechanical function of failing muscle. Cardiac assist devices based on artificial muscle technology could envelope a weak heart and temporarily improve its systolic function, or, if placed on top of the atrium, restore the atrial kick in chronic atrial fibrillation. Artificial sphincters could be used to treat urinary incontinence after prostatectomy or faecal incontinence associated with stomas. Artificial muscles can restore the ability of patients with facial paralysis due to stroke or nerve injury to blink. Smart materials could be used to construct an artificial oesophagus including peristaltic movement and lower oesophageal sphincter function to replace the diseased oesophagus thereby avoiding the need for laparotomy to mobilise stomach or intestine. In conclusion, in the near future, smart devices will integrate with the human body to fill functional gaps due to organ failure, and so create a human chimera.

  5. Ciprofloxacin Improves the Stemness of Human Dermal Papilla Cells.

    PubMed

    Kiratipaiboon, Chayanin; Tengamnuay, Parkpoom; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2016-01-01

    Improvement in the expansion method of adult stem cells may augment their use in regenerative therapy. Using human dermal papilla cell line as well as primary dermal papilla cells as model systems, the present study demonstrated that ciprofloxacin treatment could prevent the loss of stemness during culture. Clonogenicity and stem cell markers of dermal papilla cells were shown to gradually decrease in the culture in a time-dependent manner. Treatment of the cells with nontoxic concentrations of ciprofloxacin could maintain both stem cell morphology and clonogenicity, as well as all stem cells markers. We found that ciprofloxacin exerted its effect through ATP-dependent tyrosine kinase/glycogen synthase kinase3β dependent mechanism which in turn upregulated β-catenin. Besides, ciprofloxacin was shown to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition in DPCs as the transcription factors ZEB1 and Snail were significantly increased. Furthermore, the self-renewal proteins of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, namely, Nanog and Oct-4 were significantly upregulated in the ciprofloxacin-treated cells. The effects of ciprofloxacin in preserving stem cell features were confirmed in the primary dermal papilla cells directly obtained from human hair follicles. Together, these results revealed a novel application of ciprofloxacin for stem cell maintenance and provided the underlying mechanisms that are responsible for the stemness in dermal papilla cells.

  6. Cryopreservation of Human Stem Cells for Clinical Application: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Stem cells have been used in a clinical setting for many years. Haematopoietic stem cells have been used for the treatment of both haematological and non-haematological disease; while more recently mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow have been the subject of both laboratory and early clinical studies. Whilst these cells show both multipotency and expansion potential, they nonetheless do not form stable cell lines in culture which is likely to limit the breadth of their application in the field of regenerative medicine. Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells, capable of forming stable cell lines which retain the capacity to differentiate into cells from all three germ layers. This makes them of special significance in both regenerative medicine and toxicology. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells may also provide a similar breadth of utility without some of the confounding ethical issues surrounding embryonic stem cells. An essential pre-requisite to the commercial and clinical application of stem cells are suitable cryopreservation protocols for long-term storage. Whilst effective methods for cryopreservation and storage have been developed for haematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, embryonic cells and iPS cells have proved more refractory. This paper reviews the current state of cryopreservation as it pertains to stem cells and in particular the embryonic and iPS cell. PMID:21566712

  7. P38 MAPK signaling underlies a cell autonomous loss of stem cell self-renewal in aged skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bernet, Jennifer D.; Doles, Jason D.; Hall, John K.; Kelly-Tanaka, Kathleen; Carter, Thomas A.; Olwin, Bradley B.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle aging results in a gradual loss of skeletal muscle mass, skeletal muscle function and decreased regenerative capacity, which can lead to sarcopenia and increased mortality. While the mechanisms underlying sarcopenia remain unclear, the skeletal muscle stem cell, or satellite cell, is required for muscle regeneration. Therefore, identification of signaling pathways affecting satellite cell function during aging may provide insights into therapeutic targets for combating sarcopenia. Here, we show that a cell-autonomous loss in self-renewal occurs via alterations in FGF Receptor 1 and p38αβ MAPK signaling in aged satellite cells. We further demonstrate that pharmacological manipulation of these pathways can ameliorate age-associated self-renewal defects. Thus, our data highlight an age-associated deregulation of a satellite cell homeostatic network and reveal potential therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of progressive muscle wasting. PMID:24531379

  8. Pericapillary basement membrane thickening in human skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Baum, Oliver; Bigler, Marius

    2016-09-01

    The basement membrane (BM) surrounding capillaries in skeletal muscles varies physiologically in thickness according to age, physical fitness, and anatomical site in humans. Furthermore, the pericapillary BM thickness (CBMT) increases pathophysiologically during several common disease states, including peripheral arterial disease and diabetes mellitus. This review on CBM thickening in human skeletal muscles is two pronged. First, it addresses the advantages/disadvantages of grid- and tablet-based measuring and morphometric techniques that are implemented to assess the CBMT on transmission electron micrographs. Second, it deals with the biology of CBM thickening in skeletal muscles, particularly its possible causes, molecular mechanisms, and functional impact. CBM thickening is triggered by several physical factors, including diabetes-associated glycation, hydrostatic pressure, and inflammation. Increased biosynthesis of type IV collagen expression or repetitive cycles in pericyte or endothelial cell degeneration/proliferation appear to be most critical for CBM accumulation. A thickened CBM obviously poses a greater barrier for diffusion, lowers the microvascular elasticity, and impedes transcytosis of inflammatory cells. Our own morphometric data reveal the CBM enlargement to be not accompanied by the pericyte coverage. Owing to an overlap or redundancy in the capillary supply, CBM thickening in skeletal muscles might not be such a devastating occurrence as in organs with endarterial circulation (e.g., kidney and retina). CBM growth in skeletal muscles can be reversed by training or administration of antidiabetic drugs. In conclusion, CBM thickening in skeletal muscles is a microvascular remodeling process by which metabolic, hemodynamic, and inflammatory forces are integrated together and which could play a hitherto underestimated role in etiology/progression of human diseases.

  9. Sex hormones establish a reserve pool of adult muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Han, Gi-Chan; Seo, Ji-Yun; Park, Inkuk; Park, Wookjin; Jeong, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Su Hyeon; Bae, Sung-Hwan; Seong, Jinwoo; Yum, Min-Kyu; Hann, Sang-Hyeon; Kwon, Young-Guen; Seo, Daekwan; Choi, Man Ho; Kong, Young-Yun

    2016-09-01

    Quiescent satellite cells, known as adult muscle stem cells, possess a remarkable ability to regenerate skeletal muscle following injury throughout life. Although they mainly originate from multipotent stem/progenitor cells of the somite, the mechanism underlying the establishment of quiescent satellite cell populations is unknown. Here, we show that sex hormones induce Mind bomb 1 (Mib1) expression in myofibres at puberty, which activates Notch signalling in cycling juvenile satellite cells and causes them to be converted into adult quiescent satellite cells. Myofibres lacking Mib1 fail to send Notch signals to juvenile satellite cells, leading to impaired cell cycle exit and depletion. Our findings reveal that the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis drives Mib1 expression in the myofibre niche. Moreover, the same axis regulates the re-establishment of quiescent satellite cell populations following injury. Our data show that sex hormones establish adult quiescent satellite cell populations by regulating the myofibre niche at puberty and re-establish them during regeneration.

  10. Sex hormones establish a reserve pool of adult muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Han, Gi-Chan; Seo, Ji-Yun; Park, Inkuk; Park, Wookjin; Jeong, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Su Hyeon; Bae, Sung-Hwan; Seong, Jinwoo; Yum, Min-Kyu; Hann, Sang-Hyeon; Kwon, Young-Guen; Seo, Daekwan; Choi, Man Ho; Kong, Young-Yun

    2016-09-01

    Quiescent satellite cells, known as adult muscle stem cells, possess a remarkable ability to regenerate skeletal muscle following injury throughout life. Although they mainly originate from multipotent stem/progenitor cells of the somite, the mechanism underlying the establishment of quiescent satellite cell populations is unknown. Here, we show that sex hormones induce Mind bomb 1 (Mib1) expression in myofibres at puberty, which activates Notch signalling in cycling juvenile satellite cells and causes them to be converted into adult quiescent satellite cells. Myofibres lacking Mib1 fail to send Notch signals to juvenile satellite cells, leading to impaired cell cycle exit and depletion. Our findings reveal that the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis drives Mib1 expression in the myofibre niche. Moreover, the same axis regulates the re-establishment of quiescent satellite cell populations following injury. Our data show that sex hormones establish adult quiescent satellite cell populations by regulating the myofibre niche at puberty and re-establish them during regeneration. PMID:27548913

  11. The relationship between human skeletal muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase activity and muscle aerobic capacity.

    PubMed

    Love, Lorenzo K; LeBlanc, Paul J; Inglis, J Greig; Bradley, Nicolette S; Choptiany, Jon; Heigenhauser, George J F; Peters, Sandra J

    2011-08-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is a mitochondrial enzyme responsible for regulating the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA for use in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. PDH is regulated through phosphorylation and inactivation by PDH kinase (PDK) and dephosphorylation and activation by PDH phosphatase (PDP). The effect of endurance training on PDK in humans has been investigated; however, to date no study has examined the effect of endurance training on PDP in humans. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine differences in PDP activity and PDP1 protein content in human skeletal muscle across a range of muscle aerobic capacities. This association is important as higher PDP activity and protein content will allow for increased activation of PDH, and carbohydrate oxidation. The main findings of this study were that 1) PDP activity (r(2) = 0.399, P = 0.001) and PDP1 protein expression (r(2) = 0.153, P = 0.039) were positively correlated with citrate synthase (CS) activity as a marker for muscle aerobic capacity; 2) E1α (r(2) = 0.310, P = 0.002) and PDK2 protein (r(2) = 0.229, P =0.012) are positively correlated with muscle CS activity; and 3) although it is the most abundant isoform, PDP1 protein content only explained ∼ 18% of the variance in PDP activity (r(2) = 0.184, P = 0.033). In addition, PDP1 in combination with E1α explained ∼ 38% of the variance in PDP activity (r(2) = 0.383, P = 0.005), suggesting that there may be alternative regulatory mechanisms of this enzyme other than protein content. These data suggest that with higher muscle aerobic capacity (CS activity) there is a greater capacity for carbohydrate oxidation (E1α), in concert with higher potential for PDH activation (PDP activity). PMID:21596918

  12. miR-128 regulates differentiation of hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells into smooth muscle cells by targeting SMAD2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihao; Pang, Li; Zhao, Huiying; Song, Lei; Wang, Yuehui; Sun, Qi; Guo, Chunjie; Wang, Bin; Qin, Xiujiao; Pan, Aiqun

    2016-05-01

    Human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells (hHFMSCs) are an important source of cardiovascular tissue engineering for their differentiation potential into smooth muscle cells (SMCs), yet the molecular pathways underlying such fate determination is unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that play critical roles in cell differentiation. In present study, we found that miR-128 was remarkably decreased during the differentiation of hHFMSCs into SMCs induced by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Moreover, overexpression of miR-128 led to decreased expression of SMC cellular marker proteins, such as smooth muscle actin (SMA) and calponin, in TGF-β1-induced SMC differentiation. Further, we identified that miR-128 targeted the 3'-UTR of SMAD2 transcript for translational inhibition of SMAD2 protein, and knockdown of SMAD2 abrogated the promotional effect of antagomir-128 (miR-128 neutralizer) on SMC differentiation. These results suggest that miR-128 regulates the differentiation of hHFMSCs into SMCs via targeting SMAD2, a main transcription regulator in TGF-β signaling pathway involving SMC differentiation. The miR-128/SMAD2 axis could therefore be considered as a candidate target in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine for SMCs. PMID:27087048

  13. miR-128 regulates differentiation of hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells into smooth muscle cells by targeting SMAD2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihao; Pang, Li; Zhao, Huiying; Song, Lei; Wang, Yuehui; Sun, Qi; Guo, Chunjie; Wang, Bin; Qin, Xiujiao; Pan, Aiqun

    2016-05-01

    Human hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells (hHFMSCs) are an important source of cardiovascular tissue engineering for their differentiation potential into smooth muscle cells (SMCs), yet the molecular pathways underlying such fate determination is unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that play critical roles in cell differentiation. In present study, we found that miR-128 was remarkably decreased during the differentiation of hHFMSCs into SMCs induced by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Moreover, overexpression of miR-128 led to decreased expression of SMC cellular marker proteins, such as smooth muscle actin (SMA) and calponin, in TGF-β1-induced SMC differentiation. Further, we identified that miR-128 targeted the 3'-UTR of SMAD2 transcript for translational inhibition of SMAD2 protein, and knockdown of SMAD2 abrogated the promotional effect of antagomir-128 (miR-128 neutralizer) on SMC differentiation. These results suggest that miR-128 regulates the differentiation of hHFMSCs into SMCs via targeting SMAD2, a main transcription regulator in TGF-β signaling pathway involving SMC differentiation. The miR-128/SMAD2 axis could therefore be considered as a candidate target in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine for SMCs.

  14. Evaluation of adipose-derived stem cells for tissue-engineered muscle repair construct-mediated repair of a murine model of volumetric muscle loss injury.

    PubMed

    Kesireddy, Venu

    2016-01-01

    Volumetric muscle loss (VML) can occur from congenital defects, muscle wasting diseases, civilian or military injuries, and as a result of surgical removal of muscle tissue (eg, cancer), all of which can lead to irrevocable functional and cosmetic defects. Current tissue engineering strategies to repair VML often employ muscle-derived progenitor cells (MDCs) as one component. However, there are some inherent limitations in their in vitro culture expansion. Thus, this study explores the potential of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) as an alternative cell source to MDCs for tissue engineering of skeletal muscle. A reproducible VML injury model in murine latissimus dorsi muscle was used to evaluate tissue-engineered muscle repair (TEMR) constructs incorporating MDCs or ADSCs. Importantly, histological analysis revealed that ADSC-seeded constructs displayed regeneration potential that was comparable to those seeded with MDCs 2 months postrepair. Furthermore, morphological analysis of retrieved constructs demonstrated signs of neotissue formation, including cell fusion, fiber formation, and scaffold remodeling. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated positive staining for both structural and functional proteins. Positive staining for vascular structures indicated the potential for long-term neotissue survival and integration with existing musculature. Qualitative observation of lentivirus-Cherry-labeled donor cells by immunohistochemistry indicates that participation of ADSCs in new hybrid myofiber formation incorporating donor cells was relatively low, compared to donor MDCs. However, ADSCs appear to participate in vascularization. In summary, I have demonstrated that TEMR constructs generated with ADSCs displayed skeletal muscle regeneration potential comparable to TEMR-MDC constructs as previously reported. PMID:27114706

  15. Evaluation of adipose-derived stem cells for tissue-engineered muscle repair construct-mediated repair of a murine model of volumetric muscle loss injury

    PubMed Central

    Kesireddy, Venu

    2016-01-01

    Volumetric muscle loss (VML) can occur from congenital defects, muscle wasting diseases, civilian or military injuries, and as a result of surgical removal of muscle tissue (eg, cancer), all of which can lead to irrevocable functional and cosmetic defects. Current tissue engineering strategies to repair VML often employ muscle-derived progenitor cells (MDCs) as one component. However, there are some inherent limitations in their in vitro culture expansion. Thus, this study explores the potential of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) as an alternative cell source to MDCs for tissue engineering of skeletal muscle. A reproducible VML injury model in murine latissimus dorsi muscle was used to evaluate tissue-engineered muscle repair (TEMR) constructs incorporating MDCs or ADSCs. Importantly, histological analysis revealed that ADSC-seeded constructs displayed regeneration potential that was comparable to those seeded with MDCs 2 months postrepair. Furthermore, morphological analysis of retrieved constructs demonstrated signs of neotissue formation, including cell fusion, fiber formation, and scaffold remodeling. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated positive staining for both structural and functional proteins. Positive staining for vascular structures indicated the potential for long-term neotissue survival and integration with existing musculature. Qualitative observation of lentivirus-Cherry-labeled donor cells by immunohistochemistry indicates that participation of ADSCs in new hybrid myofiber formation incorporating donor cells was relatively low, compared to donor MDCs. However, ADSCs appear to participate in vascularization. In summary, I have demonstrated that TEMR constructs generated with ADSCs displayed skeletal muscle regeneration potential comparable to TEMR–MDC constructs as previously reported. PMID:27114706

  16. Regional Differences in Muscle Energy Metabolism in Human Muscle by 31P-Chemical Shift Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kime, Ryotaro; Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Hongo, Yoshinori; Ohno, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Ayumi; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported significant region-dependent differences in the fiber-type composition of human skeletal muscle. It is therefore hypothesized that there is a difference between the deep and superficial parts of muscle energy metabolism during exercise. We hypothesized that the inorganic phosphate (Pi)/phosphocreatine (PCr) ratio of the superficial parts would be higher, compared with the deep parts, as the work rate increases, because the muscle fiber-type composition of the fast-type may be greater in the superficial parts compared with the deep parts. This study used two-dimensional 31Phosphorus Chemical Shift Imaging (31P-CSI) to detect differences between the deep and superficial parts of the human leg muscles during dynamic knee extension exercise. Six healthy men participated in this study (age 27±1 year, height 169.4±4.1 cm, weight 65.9±8.4 kg). The experiments were carried out with a 1.5-T superconducting magnet with a 5-in. diameter circular surface coil. The subjects performed dynamic one-legged knee extension exercise in the prone position, with the transmit-receive coil placed under the right quadriceps muscles in the magnet. The subjects pulled down an elastic rubber band attached to the ankle at a frequency of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 Hz for 320 s each. The intracellular pH (pHi) was calculated from the median chemical shift of the Pi peak relative to PCr. No significant difference in Pi/PCr was observed between the deep and the superficial parts of the quadriceps muscles at rest. The Pi/PCr of the superficial parts was not significantly increased with increasing work rate. Compared with the superficial areas, the Pi/PCr of the deep parts was significantly higher (p<0.05) at 1 Hz. The pHi showed no significant difference between the two parts. These results suggest that muscle oxidative metabolism is different between deep and superficial parts of quadriceps muscles during dynamic exercise. PMID:26782194

  17. Regional Differences in Muscle Energy Metabolism in Human Muscle by 31P-Chemical Shift Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kime, Ryotaro; Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Hongo, Yoshinori; Ohno, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Ayumi; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported significant region-dependent differences in the fiber-type composition of human skeletal muscle. It is therefore hypothesized that there is a difference between the deep and superficial parts of muscle energy metabolism during exercise. We hypothesized that the inorganic phosphate (Pi)/phosphocreatine (PCr) ratio of the superficial parts would be higher, compared with the deep parts, as the work rate increases, because the muscle fiber-type composition of the fast-type may be greater in the superficial parts compared with the deep parts. This study used two-dimensional 31Phosphorus Chemical Shift Imaging (31P-CSI) to detect differences between the deep and superficial parts of the human leg muscles during dynamic knee extension exercise. Six healthy men participated in this study (age 27±1 year, height 169.4±4.1 cm, weight 65.9±8.4 kg). The experiments were carried out with a 1.5-T superconducting magnet with a 5-in. diameter circular surface coil. The subjects performed dynamic one-legged knee extension exercise in the prone position, with the transmit-receive coil placed under the right quadriceps muscles in the magnet. The subjects pulled down an elastic rubber band attached to the ankle at a frequency of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 Hz for 320 s each. The intracellular pH (pHi) was calculated from the median chemical shift of the Pi peak relative to PCr. No significant difference in Pi/PCr was observed between the deep and the superficial parts of the quadriceps muscles at rest. The Pi/PCr of the superficial parts was not significantly increased with increasing work rate. Compared with the superficial areas, the Pi/PCr of the deep parts was significantly higher (p<0.05) at 1 Hz. The pHi showed no significant difference between the two parts. These results suggest that muscle oxidative metabolism is different between deep and superficial parts of quadriceps muscles during dynamic exercise.

  18. Progress in stem cell therapy for major human neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Morales, P L; Revilla, A; Ocaña, I; González, C; Sainz, P; McGuire, D; Liste, I

    2013-10-01

    Human neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease, stroke or spinal cord injury are caused by the loss of neurons and glial cells in the brain or spinal cord in the Central Nervous System (CNS). Stem cell technology has become an attractive option to investigate and treat these diseases. Several types of neurons and glial cells have successfully been generated from stem cells, which in some cases, have ameliorated some dysfunctions both in animal models of neurological disorders and in patients at clinical level. Stem cell-based therapies can be beneficial by acting through several mechanisms such as cell replacement, modulation of inflammation and trophic actions. Here we review recent and current remarkable clinical studies involving stem cell-based therapy for AD and stroke and provide an overview of the different types of stem cells available nowadays, their main properties and how they are developing as a possible therapy for neurological disorders.

  19. A robust method to derive functional neural crest cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kreitzer, Faith R; Salomonis, Nathan; Sheehan, Alice; Huang, Miller; Park, Jason S; Spindler, Matthew J; Lizarraga, Paweena; Weiss, William A; So, Po-Lin; Conklin, Bruce R

    2013-01-01

    Neural crest (NC) cells contribute to the development of many complex tissues of all three germ layers during embryogenesis, and its abnormal development accounts for several congenital birth defects. Generating NC cells-including specific subpopulations such as cranial, cardiac, and trunk NC cells-from human pluripotent stem cells will provide a valuable model system to study human development and disease. Here, we describe a rapid and robust NC differentiation method called "LSB-short" that is based on dual SMAD pathway inhibition. This protocol yields high percentages of NC cell populations from multiple human induced pluripotent stem and human embryonic stem cell lines in 8 days. The resulting cells can be propagated easily, retain NC marker expression over multiple passages, and can spontaneously differentiate into several NC-derived cell lineages, including smooth muscle cells, peripheral neurons, and Schwann cells. NC cells generated by this method represent cranial, cardiac and trunk NC subpopulations based on global gene expression analyses, are similar to in vivo analogues, and express a common set of NC alternative isoforms. Functionally, they are also able to migrate appropriately in response to chemoattractants such as SDF-1, FGF8b, and Wnt3a. By yielding NC cells that likely represent all NC subpopulations in a shorter time frame than other published methods, our LSB-short method provides an ideal model system for further studies of human NC development and disease.

  20. A robust method to derive functional neural crest cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kreitzer, Faith R; Salomonis, Nathan; Sheehan, Alice; Huang, Miller; Park, Jason S; Spindler, Matthew J; Lizarraga, Paweena; Weiss, William A; So, Po-Lin; Conklin, Bruce R

    2013-01-01

    Neural crest (NC) cells contribute to the development of many complex tissues of all three germ layers during embryogenesis, and its abnormal development accounts for several congenital birth defects. Generating NC cells-including specific subpopulations such as cranial, cardiac, and trunk NC cells-from human pluripotent stem cells will provide a valuable model system to study human development and disease. Here, we describe a rapid and robust NC differentiation method called "LSB-short" that is based on dual SMAD pathway inhibition. This protocol yields high percentages of NC cell populations from multiple human induced pluripotent stem and human embryonic stem cell lines in 8 days. The resulting cells can be propagated easily, retain NC marker expression over multiple passages, and can spontaneously differentiate into several NC-derived cell lineages, including smooth muscle cells, peripheral neurons, and Schwann cells. NC cells generated by this method represent cranial, cardiac and trunk NC subpopulations based on global gene expression analyses, are similar to in vivo analogues, and express a common set of NC alternative isoforms. Functionally, they are also able to migrate appropriately in response to chemoattractants such as SDF-1, FGF8b, and Wnt3a. By yielding NC cells that likely represent all NC subpopulations in a shorter time frame than other published methods, our LSB-short method provides an ideal model system for further studies of human NC development and disease. PMID:23862100

  1. INVITED REVIEW: Evolution of meat animal growth research during the past 50 years: Adipose and muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dodson, M V; Allen, R E; Du, M; Bergen, W G; Velleman, S G; Poulos, S P; Fernyhough-Culver, M; Wheeler, M B; Duckett, S K; Young, M R I; Voy, B H; Jiang, Z; Hausman, G J

    2015-02-01

    If one were to compare today's animal growth research to research from a mere 50 yr ago, one would see programs with few similarities. The evolution of this research from whole-animal through cell-based and finally molecular and genomic studies has been enhanced by the identification, isolation, and in vitro evaluation of adipose- and muscle-derived stem cells. This paper will highlight the struggles and the milestones that make this evolving area of research what it is today. The contribution of adipose and muscle stem cell research to development and growth, tissue regeneration, and final carcass composition are reviewed.

  2. Expansion of Multipotent Stem Cells from the Adult Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Murrell, Wayne; Palmero, Emily; Bianco, John; Stangeland, Biljana; Joel, Mrinal; Paulson, Linda; Thiede, Bernd; Grieg, Zanina; Ramsnes, Ingunn; Skjellegrind, Håvard K.; Nygård, Ståle; Brandal, Petter; Sandberg, Cecilie; Vik-Mo, Einar; Palmero, Sheryl; Langmoen, Iver A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of stem cells in the adult human brain has revealed new possible scenarios for treatment of the sick or injured brain. Both clinical use of and preclinical research on human adult neural stem cells have, however, been seriously hampered by the fact that it has been impossible to passage these cells more than a very few times and with little expansion of cell numbers. Having explored a number of alternative culturing conditions we here present an efficient method for the establishment and propagation of human brain stem cells from whatever brain tissue samples we have tried. We describe virtually unlimited expansion of an authentic stem cell phenotype. Pluripotency proteins Sox2 and Oct4 are expressed without artificial induction. For the first time multipotency of adult human brain-derived stem cells is demonstrated beyond tissue boundaries. We characterize these cells in detail in vitro including microarray and proteomic approaches. Whilst clarification of these cells’ behavior is ongoing, results so far portend well for the future repair of tissues by transplantation of an adult patient’s own-derived stem cells. PMID:23967194

  3. Loss of fibronectin from the aged stem cell niche affects the regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle in mice.

    PubMed

    Lukjanenko, Laura; Jung, M Juliane; Hegde, Nagabhooshan; Perruisseau-Carrier, Claire; Migliavacca, Eugenia; Rozo, Michelle; Karaz, Sonia; Jacot, Guillaume; Schmidt, Manuel; Li, Liangji; Metairon, Sylviane; Raymond, Frederic; Lee, Umji; Sizzano, Federico; Wilson, David H; Dumont, Nicolas A; Palini, Alessio; Fässler, Reinhard; Steiner, Pascal; Descombes, Patrick; Rudnicki, Michael A; Fan, Chen-Ming; von Maltzahn, Julia; Feige, Jerome N; Bentzinger, C Florian

    2016-08-01

    Age-related changes in the niche have long been postulated to impair the function of somatic stem cells. Here we demonstrate that the aged stem cell niche in skeletal muscle contains substantially reduced levels of fibronectin (FN), leading to detrimental consequences for the function and maintenance of muscle stem cells (MuSCs). Deletion of the gene encoding FN from young regenerating muscles replicates the aging phenotype and leads to a loss of MuSC numbers. By using an extracellular matrix (ECM) library screen and pathway profiling, we characterize FN as a preferred adhesion substrate for MuSCs and demonstrate that integrin-mediated signaling through focal adhesion kinase and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway is strongly de-regulated in MuSCs from aged mice because of insufficient attachment to the niche. Reconstitution of FN levels in the aged niche remobilizes stem cells and restores youth-like muscle regeneration. Taken together, we identify the loss of stem cell adhesion to FN in the niche ECM as a previously unknown aging mechanism. PMID:27376579

  4. Calcitonin Receptor Signaling Inhibits Muscle Stem Cells from Escaping the Quiescent State and the Niche.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Watanabe, Yoko; Ohtani, Takuji; Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Mikami, Norihisa; Nakamura, Miki; Sato, Takahiko; Ikawa, Masahito; Hoshino, Mikio; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Tsujikawa, Kazutake; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Fukada, So-ichiro

    2015-10-13

    Calcitonin receptor (Calcr) is expressed in adult muscle stem cells (muscle satellite cells [MuSCs]). To elucidate the role of Calcr, we conditionally depleted Calcr from adult MuSCs and found that impaired regeneration after muscle injury correlated with the decreased number of MuSCs in Calcr-conditional knockout (cKO) mice. Calcr signaling maintained MuSC dormancy via the cAMP-PKA pathway but had no impact on myogenic differentiation of MuSCs in an undifferentiated state. The abnormal quiescent state in Calcr-cKO mice resulted in a reduction of the MuSC pool by apoptosis. Furthermore, MuSCs were found outside their niche in Calcr-cKO mice, demonstrating cell relocation. This emergence from the sublaminar niche was prevented by the Calcr-cAMP-PKA and Calcr-cAMP-Epac pathways downstream of Calcr. Altogether, the findings demonstrated that Calcr exerts its effect specifically by keeping MuSCs in a quiescent state and in their location, maintaining the MuSC pool. PMID:26440893

  5. Derivation of human embryonic stem cells in defined conditions.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Tenneille E; Levenstein, Mark E; Jones, Jeffrey M; Berggren, W Travis; Mitchen, Erika R; Frane, Jennifer L; Crandall, Leann J; Daigh, Christine A; Conard, Kevin R; Piekarczyk, Marian S; Llanas, Rachel A; Thomson, James A

    2006-02-01

    We have previously reported that high concentrations of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) support feeder-independent growth of human embryonic stem (ES) cells, but those conditions included poorly defined serum and matrix components. Here we report feeder-independent human ES cell culture that includes protein components solely derived from recombinant sources or purified from human material. We describe the derivation of two new human ES cell lines in these defined culture conditions.

  6. Cancer Genes Hypermethylated in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Calvanese, Vincenzo; Horrillo, Angelica; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Suarez-Álvarez, Beatriz; Fernandez, Agustín F.; Lara, Ester; Casado, Sara; Menendez, Pablo; Bueno, Clara; Garcia-Castro, Javier; Rubio, Ruth; Lapunzina, Pablo; Alaminos, Miguel; Borghese, Lodovica; Terstegge, Stefanie; Harrison, Neil J.; Moore, Harry D.; Brüstle, Oliver; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Andrews, Peter W.; Soria, Bernat; Esteller, Manel; Fraga, Mario F.

    2008-01-01

    Developmental genes are silenced in embryonic stem cells by a bivalent histone-based chromatin mark. It has been proposed that this mark also confers a predisposition to aberrant DNA promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) in cancer. We report here that silencing of a significant proportion of these TSGs in human embryonic and adult stem cells is associated with promoter DNA hypermethylation. Our results indicate a role for DNA methylation in the control of gene expression in human stem cells and suggest that, for genes repressed by promoter hypermethylation in stem cells in vivo, the aberrant process in cancer could be understood as a defect in establishing an unmethylated promoter during differentiation, rather than as an anomalous process of de novo hypermethylation. PMID:18820729

  7. Derivation of three new human embryonic stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Cara K; Chami, Omar; Peura, Teija T; Bosman, Alexis; Dumevska, Biljana; Schmidt, Uli; Stojanov, Tomas

    2010-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells capable of extensive self-renewal and differentiation to all cells of the embryo proper. Here, we describe the derivation and characterization of three Sydney IVF human embryonic stem cell lines not already reported elsewhere, designated SIVF001, SIVF002, and SIVF014. The cell lines display typical compact colony morphology of embryonic stem cells, have stable growth rates over more than 40 passages and are cytogenetically normal. Furthermore, the cell lines express pluripotency markers including Nanog, Oct4, SSEA3 and Tra-1-81, and are capable of generating teratoma cells derived from each of the three germ layers in immunodeficient mice. These experiments show that the cell lines constitute pluripotent stem cell lines. PMID:20198447

  8. Training, leptin receptors and SOCS3 in human muscle.

    PubMed

    Olmedillas, H; Guerra, B; Guadalupe-Grau, A; Santana, A; Fuentes, T; Dorado, C; Serrano-Sanchez, J A; Calbet, J A L

    2011-05-01

    Endurance exercise induces SUPPRESSOR of CYTOKINE SIGNALING 3 (SOCS3) mRNA expression in rodent skeletal muscle and endurance training overimposed on strength training blunts the hypertrophic response to strength training by an unknown mechanism. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a concurrent strength and endurance training on fat mass, serum leptin concentration, muscle morphology, and muscle vastus lateralis leptin receptors (OB-Rb) and SOCS3 protein expression. 16 healthy young men were assigned to a control (C; n=7), and to a 12-week weightlifting (3 sessions/week)+endurance training program (T; n=9) group. Training enhanced maximal dynamic strength in lower and upper body exercises (18-54%), reduced fat mass by 1.8 kg and serum leptin concentration per kg of fat mass, and elicited muscle hypertrophy of type 2 (+18.5%, P<0.05) but not of type 1 muscle fibres (+4.6%, P=NS). No significant changes were observed in either OB-Rb or SOCS3 protein expression with training. In conclusion, concurrent strength and endurance training reduces fat mass and serum leptin and the ratio leptin/fat mass without significant effects on vastus lateralis OB-Rb protein expression. Training does not increase the basal expression of SOCS3 protein in humans.

  9. Mechanical stimulation improves tissue-engineered human skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Courtney A.; Smiley, Beth L.; Mills, John; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    Human bioartificial muscles (HBAMs) are tissue engineered by suspending muscle cells in collagen/MATRIGEL, casting in a silicone mold containing end attachment sites, and allowing the cells to differentiate for 8 to 16 days. The resulting HBAMs are representative of skeletal muscle in that they contain parallel arrays of postmitotic myofibers; however, they differ in many other morphological characteristics. To engineer improved HBAMs, i.e., more in vivo-like, we developed Mechanical Cell Stimulator (MCS) hardware to apply in vivo-like forces directly to the engineered tissue. A sensitive force transducer attached to the HBAM measured real-time, internally generated, as well as externally applied, forces. The muscle cells generated increasing internal forces during formation which were inhibitable with a cytoskeleton depolymerizer. Repetitive stretch/relaxation for 8 days increased the HBAM elasticity two- to threefold, mean myofiber diameter 12%, and myofiber area percent 40%. This system allows engineering of improved skeletal muscle analogs as well as a nondestructive method to determine passive force and viscoelastic properties of the resulting tissue.

  10. [Multipotency of adult stem cells derived from human amnion].

    PubMed

    Shi, Mingxia; Li, Weijia; Li, Bingzong; Li, Jing; Zhao, Chunhua

    2009-05-01

    Adult stem cells are drawing more and more attention due to the potential application in degenerative medicine without posing any moral problem. There is growing evidence showing that the human amnion contains various types of adult stem cell. Since amniotic tissue is readily available, it has the potential to be an important source of regenerative medicine material. In this study we tried to find multipotent adult stem cells in human amnion. We isolated stem cells from amniotic mesenchymal cells by limiting dilution assay. Similar to bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells, these cells displayed a fibroblast like appearance. They were positive for CD105, CD29, CD44, negative for haematopoietic (GlyA, CD31, CD34, CD45) and epithelial cell (pan-CK) markers. These stem cells had the potential to differentiate not only into osteogenic, adipogenic and endothelial lineages, but also hepatocyte-like cells and neural cells at the single-cell level depending on the culture conditions. They had the capacity for self-renewal and multilineage differentiation even after being expanded for more than 30 population doublings in vitro. So they may be an ideal stem cell source for inherited or degenerative diseases treatment.

  11. Novel in vitro culture condition improves the stemness of human dermal stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Shim, Joong Hyun; Lee, Tae Ryong; Shin, Dong Wook

    2013-12-01

    Cell therapy using adult stem cells has emerged as a potentially new approach for the treatment of various diseases. Therefore, it is an essential procedure to maintain the stemness of adult stem cells for clinical treatment. We previously reported that human dermal stem/progenitor cells (hDSPCs) can be enriched using collagen type IV. However, hDSPCs gradually lose their stem cell properties as in vitro passages continue. In the present study, we developed optimized in vitro culture condition to improve the stemness of these hDSPCs. To evaluate whether the stemness of hDSPCs is well sustained in various culture conditions, we measured the expression levels of SOX2, NANOG, and S100B, which are well-known representative dermal progenitor markers. We observed that hDSPCs grown in three-dimensional (3D) culture condition had higher expression levels of those markers compared with hDSPCs grown in two-dimensional (2D) culture condition. Under the 3D culture condition, we further demonstrated that a high glucose (4.5 g/L) concentration enhanced the expression levels of the dermal progenitor markers, whereas O(2) concentration did not affect. We also found that skin-derived precursor (SKP) culture medium was the most effective, among various culture media, in increasing the dermal progenitor marker expression. We finally demonstrated that this optimized culture condition enhanced the expression level of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), the proliferation, and the multipotency of hDSPCs, an important characteristic of stem cells. Taken together, these results suggested that this novel in vitro culture condition improves the stemness of hDSPCs.

  12. The ethics of patenting human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Audrey R

    2009-09-01

    Just as human embryonic stem cell research has generated controversy about the uses of human embryos for research and therapeutic applications, human embryonic stem cell patents raise fundamental ethical issues. The United States Patent and Trademark Office has granted foundational patents, including a composition of matter (or product) patent to the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), the University of Wisconsin-Madison's intellectual property office. In contrast, the European Patent Office rejected the same WARF patent application for ethical reasons. This article assesses the appropriateness of these patents placing the discussion in the context of the deontological and consequentialist ethical issues related to human embryonic stem cell patenting. It advocates for a patent system that explicitly takes ethical factors into account and explores options for new types of intellectual property arrangements consistent with ethical concerns.

  13. Hurdles to clinical translation of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Neofytou, Evgenios; O'Brien, Connor Galen; Couture, Larry A; Wu, Joseph C

    2015-07-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells are known to have the capacity to renew indefinitely, being intrinsically able to differentiate into many different cell types. These characteristics have generated tremendous enthusiasm about the potential applications of these cells in regenerative medicine. However, major challenges remain with the development and testing of novel experimental stem cell therapeutics in the field. In this Review, we focus on the nature of the preclinical challenges and discuss potential solutions that could help overcome them. Furthermore, we discuss the use of allogeneic versus autologous stem cell products, including a review of their respective advantages and disadvantages, major clinical requirements, quality standards, time lines, and costs of clinical grade development.

  14. Vascular potential of human pluripotent stem cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death and disability in the US. Understanding the biological activity of stem and progenitor cells, and their ability to contribute to the repair, regeneration and remodeling of the heart and blood vessels affected by pathological processes is an ess...

  15. Cryopreservation of human pluripotent stem cells: a general protocol.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takamichi; Suemori, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreservation is an essential technique to preserve stem cells, semipermanently sustaining their potentials. There are two main approaches of cryopreservation for human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). The first is the vitrification, which involves instantaneous freeze and thaw of hPSCs. The second is the conventional slow-cooling method and a rapid thaw. Both cryopreservation protocols have been standardized and optimized to yield high survivability of hPSCs.

  16. Derivation of a Homozygous Human Androgenetic Embryonic Stem Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chenhui; Huang, Sunxing; Qi, Quan; Fu, Rui; Zhu, Wanwan; Cai, Bing; Hong, Pingping; Liu, Zhengxin; Gu, Tiantian; Zeng, Yanhong; Wang, Jing; Xu, Yanwen; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Qi; Zhou, Canquan

    2015-10-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have long been considered as a promising source for cell replacement therapy. However, one major obstacle for the use of these cells is immune compatibility. Histocompatible human parthenogenetic ESCs have been reported as a new method for generating human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched hESCs. To further investigate the possibility of obtaining histocompatible stem cells from uniparental embryos, we tried to produce androgenetic haploid human embryos by injecting a single spermatozoon into enucleated human oocyte, and establish human androgenetic embryonic stem (hAGES) cell lines from androgenetic embryos. In the present study, a diploid hAGES cell line has been established, which exhibits typical features of human ESCs, including the expression of pluripotency markers, having differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo, and stable propagation in an undifferentiated state (>P40). Bisulfite sequencing of the H19, Snrpn, Meg3, and Kv imprinting control regions suggested that hAGES cells maintained to a certain extent a sperm methylation pattern. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism, short tandem repeat, and HLA analyses revealed that the hAGES cell genome was highly homozygous. These results suggest that hAGES cells from spermatozoon could serve as a useful tool for studying the mechanisms underlying genomic imprinting in humans. It might also be used as a potential resource for cell replacement therapy as parthenogenetic stem cells.

  17. An in vivo model of human small intestine using pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Carey L; Mahe, Maxime M; Múnera, Jorge; Howell, Jonathan C; Sundaram, Nambirajan; Poling, Holly M; Schweitzer, Jamie I; Vallance, Jefferson E; Mayhew, Christopher N; Sun, Ying; Grabowski, Gregory; Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Spence, Jason R; Shroyer, Noah F; Wells, James M; Helmrath, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into organ-specific subtypes offers an exciting avenue for the study of embryonic development and disease processes, for pharmacologic studies and as a potential resource for therapeutic transplant1,2. To date, limited in vivo models exist for human intestine, all of which are dependent upon primary epithelial cultures or digested tissue from surgical biopsies that include mesenchymal cells transplanted on biodegradable scaffolds3,4. Here, we generated human intestinal organoids (HIOs) produced in vitro from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)5,6 that can engraft in vivo. These HIOs form mature human intestinal epithelium with intestinal stem cells contributing to the cryptvillus architecture and a laminated human mesenchyme, both supported by mouse vasculature ingrowth. In vivo transplantation resulted in marked expansion and maturation of the epithelium and mesenchyme, as demonstrated by differentiated intestinal cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, tuft cells and enteroendocrine cells), presence of functional brush-border enzymes (lactase, sucrase-isomaltase and dipeptidyl peptidase 4) and visible subepithelial and smooth muscle layers when compared with HIOs in vitro. Transplanted intestinal tissues demonstrated digestive functions as shown by permeability and peptide uptake studies. Furthermore, transplanted HIO-derived tissue was responsive to systemic signals from the host mouse following ileocecal resection, suggesting a role for circulating factors in the intestinal adaptive response7–9. This model of the human small intestine may pave the way for studies of intestinal physiology, disease and translational studies. PMID:25326803

  18. Cartilage tissue engineering identifies abnormal human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Liu, Shiying; Woltjen, Knut; Thomas, Bradley; Meng, Guoliang; Hotta, Akitsu; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Ellis, James; Yamanaka, Shinya; Rancourt, Derrick E

    2013-01-01

    Safety is the foremost issue in all human cell therapies, but human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) currently lack a useful safety indicator. Studies in chimeric mice have demonstrated that certain lines of iPSCs are tumorigenic; however a similar screen has not been developed for human iPSCs. Here, we show that in vitro cartilage tissue engineering is an excellent tool for screening human iPSC lines for tumorigenic potential. Although all human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and most iPSC lines tested formed cartilage safely, certain human iPSCs displayed a pro-oncogenic state, as indicated by the presence of secretory tumors during cartilage differentiation in vitro. We observed five abnormal iPSC clones amoungst 21 lines derived from five different reprogramming methods using three cellular origins. We conclude that in vitro cartilage tissue engineering is a useful approach to identify abnormal human iPSC lines.

  19. Advances in culture and manipulation of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Qian, X; Villa-Diaz, L G; Krebsbach, P H

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of pluripotent stem cell biology and emerging technologies to reprogram somatic cells to a stem cell-like state are helping bring stem cell therapies for a range of human disorders closer to clinical reality. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have become a promising resource for regenerative medicine and research into early development because these cells are able to self-renew indefinitely and are capable of differentiation into specialized cell types of all 3 germ layers and trophoectoderm. Human PSCs include embryonic stem cells (hESCs) derived from the inner cell mass of blastocyst-stage embryos and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) generated via the reprogramming of somatic cells by the overexpression of key transcription factors. The application of hiPSCs and the finding that somatic cells can be directly reprogrammed into different cell types will likely have a significant impact on regenerative medicine. However, a major limitation for successful therapeutic application of hPSCs and their derivatives is the potential xenogeneic contamination and instability of current culture conditions. This review summarizes recent advances in hPSC culture and methods to induce controlled lineage differentiation through regulation of cell-signaling pathways and manipulation of gene expression as well as new trends in direct reprogramming of somatic cells.

  20. Recent developments in StemBase: a tool to study gene expression in human and murine stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sandie, Reatha; Palidwor, Gareth A; Huska, Matthew R; Porter, Christopher J; Krzyzanowski, Paul M; Muro, Enrique M; Perez-Iratxeta, Carolina; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2009-01-01

    Background Currently one of the largest online repositories for human and mouse stem cell gene expression data, StemBase was first designed as a simple web-interface to DNA microarray data generated by the Canadian Stem Cell Network to facilitate the discovery of gene functions relevant to stem cell control and differentiation. Findings Since its creation, StemBase has grown in both size and scope into a system with analysis tools that examine either the whole database at once, or slices of data, based on tissue type, cell type or gene of interest. As of September 1, 2008, StemBase contains gene expression data (microarray and Serial Analysis of Gene Expression) from 210 stem cell samples in 60 different experiments. Conclusion StemBase can be used to study gene expression in human and murine stem cells and is available at . PMID:19284540

  1. Muscles do more positive than negative work in human locomotion

    PubMed Central

    DeVita, Paul; Helseth, Joseph; Hortobagyi, Tibor

    2008-01-01

    Summary Muscle work during level walking and ascent and descent ramp and stairway walking was assessed in order to explore the proposition that muscles perform more positive than negative work during these locomotion tasks. Thirty four healthy human adults were tested while maintaining a constant average walking velocity in the five gait conditions. Ground reaction force and sagittal plane kinematic data were obtained during the stance phases of these gaits and used in inverse dynamic analyses to calculate joint torques and powers at the hip, knee and ankle. Muscle work was derived as the area under the joint power vs time curves and was partitioned into positive, negative and net components. Dependent t-tests were used to compare positive and negative work in level walking and net joint work between ascent and descent gaits on the ramp and stairs (P<0.010). Total negative and positive work in level walking was −34 J and 50 J, respectively, with the difference in magnitude being statistically significant (P<0.001). Level walking was therefore performed with 16 J of net positive muscle work per step. The magnitude of the net work in ramp ascent was 25% greater than the magnitude of net work in ramp descent (89 vs −71 J m−1, P<0.010). Similarly, the magnitude of the net work in stair ascent was 43% greater than the magnitude of net work in stair descent (107 vs −75 J step−1, P<0.000). We identified three potential causes for the reduced negative vs positive work in these locomotion tasks: (1) the larger magnitude of the accelerations induced by the larger ground reaction forces in descending compared to ascending gaits elicited greater energy dissipation in non-muscular tissues, (2) the ground reaction force vector was directed closer to the joint centers in ramp and stair descent compared to ascent, which reduced the load on the muscular tissues and their energy dissipating response, and (3) despite the need to produce negative muscle work in descending

  2. Human resting muscle tone (HRMT): narrative introduction and modern concepts.

    PubMed

    Masi, Alfonse T; Hannon, John Charles

    2008-10-01

    Human resting muscle (myofascial) tone (HRMT) is the passive tonus or tension of skeletal muscle that derives from its intrinsic (EMG-silent) molecular viscoelastic properties. The word tone has been used to convey varying clinical and physiological features that have led to confusion and controversy. HRMT is the vital low-level, passive tension, and resistance to stretch that contributes importantly to maintain postural stability in balanced equilibrium positions. In contrast, co-contraction of muscle is an active neuromotor control that provides greater levels of tonus for increased stabilization. Functionally, HRMT is integrated with other passive fascial and ligamentous tensional networks of the body to form a biotensegrity system. This review aims to achieve better understandings of HRMT and its functional roles. Nature is frugal and man's adaptations to gravitational forces and erect postures seemingly evolved mechanisms in skeletal muscle tissues to economically enhance stability. Normal passive muscle tone helps to maintain relaxed standing body posture with minimally increased energy costs (circa 7% over supine), and often for prolonged durations without fatigue. Available data infer polymorphic variations in normal myofascial tone. However, few quantitative studies have been performed to establish normal frequency distributions of degrees of myofascial tone. Clinical experience indicates that persons with certain symptomatic musculoskeletal conditions may have palpably increased resting muscle firmness or hardness (EMG-silent), such as that of the upper trapezius in tension-type headache, and the lumbodorsal extensors (hartspann) in degenerative lumbar disc disease and ankylosing spondylitis. In summary, resting skeletal muscle tone is an intrinsic viscoelastic tension exhibited within the body's kinematic chains. It functions inseparably from fascial (i.e., myofascial) tissues and ligamentous structures. Thus, HRMT is a passive myofascial property which

  3. Generation of human melanocytes from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Shigeki; Imaizumi, Yoichi; Akamatsu, Wado; Okano, Hideyuki; Kawakami, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has provided a model system for studying early events during human development. Developmentally melanocytes originate from migratory neural crest cells that emerge from the neural plate during embryogenesis after a complex process of differentiation, proliferation, and migration out of the neural tube along defined pathways. In the adult, human melanocytes are located in the basal layer of the epidermis, hair follicles, uvea, inner ear, and meninges. In the epidermis, melanocytes produce melanin pigment that gives color to the skin as well as providing protection from ultraviolet light damage. In addition, melanocytes transfer melanin pigment to hair matrix keratinocytes during each hair cycle to maintain hair pigmentation. Characterization of mouse melanocyte stem cells (MELSCs) is more complete than for humans. MELSCs are located in the bulge region of hair follicles, where hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) also reside. Recently, it has been demonstrated that HFSCs provide a functional nice for MELSCs. According to current cancer stem cell theory, melanomas are considered to evolve from MELSCs, although the exact mechanism remains to be elucidated fully. In humans, importantly, the lack of more specific markers of MELSCs, current understanding of the molecular regulations of melanocyte development remains incomplete. Recently, the generation of melanocytes from iPSCs has lead to some clarification of human melanocyte development in vitro. Utilization of iPSC-derived melanocytes may prove invaluable in further study of human melanocytic development and novel therapies for patients suffering with pigmentation disorders and melanoma.

  4. Pax7 Is Necessary and Sufficient for the Myogenic Specification of CD45+:Sca1+ Stem Cells from Injured Muscle

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    CD45+:Sca1+ adult stem cells isolated from uninjured muscle do not display any myogenic potential, whereas those isolated from regenerating muscle give rise to myoblasts expressing the paired-box transcription factor Pax7 and the bHLH factors Myf5 and MyoD. By contrast, CD45+:Sca1+ isolated from injured Pax7 −/− muscle were incapable of forming myoblasts. Infection of CD45+:Sca1+ cells from uninjured muscle with retrovirus expressing Pax7 efficiently activated the myogenic program. The resulting myoblasts expressed Myf5 and MyoD and differentiated into myotubes that expressed myogenin and myosin heavy chain. Infection of CD45−:Sca1− cells from Pax7 −/− muscle similarly gave rise to myoblasts. Notably, infection of Pax7-deficient muscle with adenoviral Pax7 resulted in the de novo formation of regenerated myofibers. Taken together, these results indicate that Pax7 is necessary and sufficient to induce the myogenic specification of CD45+ stem cells resident in adult skeletal muscle. Moreover, these experiments suggest that viral transduction of Pax7 is a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of neuromuscular degenerative diseases. PMID:15138500

  5. Morphometric and Statistical Analysis of the Palmaris Longus Muscle in Human and Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Aversi-Ferreira, Roqueline A. G. M. F.; Bretas, Rafael Vieira; Maior, Rafael Souto; Davaasuren, Munkhzul; Paraguassú-Chaves, Carlos Alberto; Nishijo, Hisao; Aversi-Ferreira, Tales Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    The palmaris longus is considered a phylogenetic degenerate metacarpophalangeal joint flexor muscle in humans, a small vestigial forearm muscle; it is the most variable muscle in humans, showing variation in position, duplication, slips and could be reverted. It is frequently studied in papers about human anatomical variations in cadavers and in vivo, its variation has importance in medical clinic, surgery, radiological analysis, in studies about high-performance athletes, in genetics and anthropologic studies. Most studies about palmaris longus in humans are associated to frequency or case studies, but comparative anatomy in primates and comparative morphometry were not found in scientific literature. Comparative anatomy associated to morphometry of palmaris longus could explain the degeneration observed in this muscle in two of three of the great apes. Hypothetically, the comparison of the relative length of tendons and belly could indicate the pathway of the degeneration of this muscle, that is, the degeneration could be associated to increased tendon length and decreased belly from more primitive primates to those most derivate, that is, great apes to modern humans. In conclusion, in primates, the tendon of the palmaris longus increase from Lemuriformes to modern humans, that is, from arboreal to terrestrial primates and the muscle became weaker and tending to be missing. PMID:24860810

  6. Central nervous system control of the laryngeal muscles in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2005-01-01

    Laryngeal muscle control may vary for different functions such as: voice for speech communication, emotional expression during laughter and cry, breathing, swallowing, and cough. This review discusses the control of the human laryngeal muscles for some of these different functions. Sensori-motor aspects of laryngeal control have been studied by eliciting various laryngeal reflexes. The role of audition in learning and monitoring ongoing voice production for speech is well known; while the role of somatosensory feedback is less well understood. Reflexive control systems involving central pattern generators may contribute to swallowing, breathing and cough with greater cortical control during volitional tasks such as voice production for speech. Volitional control is much less well understood for each of these functions and likely involves the integration of cortical and subcortical circuits. The new frontier is the study of the central control of the laryngeal musculature for voice, swallowing and breathing and how volitional and reflexive control systems may interact in humans. PMID:15927543

  7. Development of Scalable Culture Systems for Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Azarin, Samira M.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2009-01-01

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, in therapeutic applications will require the development of robust, scalable culture technologies for undifferentiated cells. Advances made in large-scale cultures of other mammalian cells will facilitate expansion of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), but challenges specific to hESCs will also have to be addressed, including development of defined, humanized culture media and substrates, monitoring spontaneous differentiation and heterogeneity in the cultures, and maintaining karyotypic integrity in the cells. This review will describe our current understanding of environmental factors that regulate hESC self-renewal and efforts to provide these cues in various scalable bioreactor culture systems. PMID:20161686

  8. Chimeric animal models in human stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Glover, Joel C; Boulland, Jean-Luc; Halasi, Gabor; Kasumacic, Nedim

    2009-01-01

    The clinical use of stem cells for regenerative medicine is critically dependent on preclinical studies in animal models. In this review we examine some of the key issues and challenges in the use of animal models to study human stem cell biology-experimental standardization, body size, immunological barriers, cell survival factors, fusion of host and donor cells, and in vivo imaging and tracking. We focus particular attention on the various imaging modalities that can be used to track cells in living animals, comparing their strengths and weaknesses and describing technical developments that are likely to lead to new opportunities for the dynamic assessment of stem cell behavior in vivo. We then provide an overview of some of the most commonly used animal models, their advantages and disadvantages, and examples of their use for xenotypic transplantation of human stem cells, with separate reviews of models involving rodents, ungulates, nonhuman primates, and the chicken embryo. As the use of human somatic, embryonic, and induced pluripotent stem cells increases, so too will the range of applications for these animal models. It is likely that increasingly sophisticated uses of human/animal chimeric models will be developed through advances in genetic manipulation, cell delivery, and in vivo imaging.

  9. Developing human-nonhuman chimeras in human stem cell research: ethical issues and boundaries.

    PubMed

    Karpowicz, Phillip; Cohen, Cynthia B; van der Kooy, Derek

    2005-06-01

    The transplantation of adult human neural stem cells into prenatal non-humans offers an avenue for studying human neural cell development without direct use of human embryos. However, such experiments raise significant ethical concerns about mixing human and nonhuman materials in ways that could result in the development of human-nonhuman chimeras. This paper examines four arguments against such research, the moral taboo, species integrity, "unnaturalness," and human dignity arguments, and finds the last plausible. It argues that the transfer of human brain or retinal stem cells to nonhuman embryos would not result in the development of human-nonhuman chimeras that denigrate human dignity, provided such stem cells are dissociated. The article provides guidelines that set ethical boundaries for conducting such research that are consonant with the requirements of human dignity.

  10. Stem Cells: A Renaissance in Human Biology Research.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-16

    The understanding of human biology and how it relates to that of other species represents an ancient quest. Limited access to human material, particularly during early development, has restricted researchers to only scratching the surface of this inherently challenging subject. Recent technological innovations, such as single cell "omics" and human stem cell derivation, have now greatly accelerated our ability to gain insights into uniquely human biology. The opportunities afforded to delve molecularly into scarce material and to model human embryogenesis and pathophysiological processes are leading to new insights of human development and are changing our understanding of disease and choice of therapy options.

  11. Stem Cells: A Renaissance in Human Biology Research.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-16

    The understanding of human biology and how it relates to that of other species represents an ancient quest. Limited access to human material, particularly during early development, has restricted researchers to only scratching the surface of this inherently challenging subject. Recent technological innovations, such as single cell "omics" and human stem cell derivation, have now greatly accelerated our ability to gain insights into uniquely human biology. The opportunities afforded to delve molecularly into scarce material and to model human embryogenesis and pathophysiological processes are leading to new insights of human development and are changing our understanding of disease and choice of therapy options. PMID:27315475

  12. A fetal human heart cardiac-inducing RNA (CIR) promotes the differentiation of stem cells into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kochegarov, Andrei; Moses-Arms, Ashley; Lemanski, Larry F

    2015-08-01

    A specific human fetal heart RNA has been discovered, which has the ability to induce myocardial cell formation from mouse embryonic and human-induced pluripotent stem cells in culture. In this study, commercially obtained RNA from human fetal heart was cloned, sequenced, and synthesized using standard laboratory approaches. Molecular analyses of the specific fetal cardiac-inducing RNA (CIR), revealed that it is a fragment of N-sulfoglucosaminesulfohydrolase and the caspase recruitment domain family member 14 precursor. Stem cells transfected with CIRs often form into spindle-shaped cells characteristic of cardiomyocytes,and express the cardiac-specific contractile protein marker, troponin-T, in addition to tropomyosin and α-actinin as detected by immunohistochemical staining. Expression of these contractile proteins showed organization into sarcomeric myofibrils characteristic of striated cardiac muscle cells. Computer analyses of the RNA secondary structures of the active CIR show significant similarities to a RNA from salamander or myofibril-inducing RNA (MIR), which also promotes non-muscle cells to differentiate into cardiac muscle. Thus, these two RNAs, salamander MIR and the newly discovered human-cloned CIR reported here, appear to have evolutionarily conserved secondary structures suggesting that both play major roles in vertebrate heart development and, particularly, in the differentiation of cardiomyocytes from non-muscle cells during development.

  13. A fetal human heart cardiac-inducing RNA (CIR) promotes the differentiation of stem cells into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kochegarov, Andrei; Moses-Arms, Ashley; Lemanski, Larry F

    2015-08-01

    A specific human fetal heart RNA has been discovered, which has the ability to induce myocardial cell formation from mouse embryonic and human-induced pluripotent stem cells in culture. In this study, commercially obtained RNA from human fetal heart was cloned, sequenced, and synthesized using standard laboratory approaches. Molecular analyses of the specific fetal cardiac-inducing RNA (CIR), revealed that it is a fragment of N-sulfoglucosaminesulfohydrolase and the caspase recruitment domain family member 14 precursor. Stem cells transfected with CIRs often form into spindle-shaped cells characteristic of cardiomyocytes,and express the cardiac-specific contractile protein marker, troponin-T, in addition to tropomyosin and α-actinin as detected by immunohistochemical staining. Expression of these contractile proteins showed organization into sarcomeric myofibrils characteristic of striated cardiac muscle cells. Computer analyses of the RNA secondary structures of the active CIR show significant similarities to a RNA from salamander or myofibril-inducing RNA (MIR), which also promotes non-muscle cells to differentiate into cardiac muscle. Thus, these two RNAs, salamander MIR and the newly discovered human-cloned CIR reported here, appear to have evolutionarily conserved secondary structures suggesting that both play major roles in vertebrate heart development and, particularly, in the differentiation of cardiomyocytes from non-muscle cells during development. PMID:25761723

  14. Role of miRNAs in muscle stem cell biology: proliferation, differentiation and death.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Stefania; Cassano, Marco; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2012-01-01

    miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate post-transcriptionally gene expression by degradation or translational repression of specific target mRNAs. In the 90s, lin-4 and let-7 were firstly identified as small regulatory RNAs able to control C. elegans larval development, by specifically targeting the 3'UTR of lin-14 and lin-28, respectively. These findings have introduced a novel and wide layer of complexity in the regulation of mRNA and protein expression. Lin-4 and let-7 are now considered the founding members of an abundant class of small fine-tuned RNAs, called microRNAs (miRNAs), in viruses, green algae, plants, flies, worms, and in mammals. In humans, the estimated number of genes encoding for miRNAs is as high as 1000 and around 30% of the protein-coding genes are post-transcriptionally controlled by miRNAs. This article reviews the role of miRNAs in regulating several biological responses in muscle cells, ranging from proliferation, differentiation and adaptation to stress cues. Cardiac and skeletal muscles are powerful examples to summarize the activity of miRNAs in cell fate specification, lineage differentiation and metabolic pathways. Indeed, specific miRNAs control the number of proliferating muscle progenitors to guarantee the proper formation of the heart and muscle fibers and to assure the self-renewal of muscle progenitors during adult tissue regeneration. On the other side, several other miRNAs promote the differentiation of muscle progenitors into skeletal myofibers or into cardiomyocytes, where metabolic activity, survival and remodeling process in response to stress, injury and chronic diseases are also fine-tuned by miRNAs. PMID:22352753

  15. Human embryonic stem cell research: ethical and legal issues.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J A

    2001-01-01

    The use of human embryonic stem cells to replace damaged cells and tissues promises future hope for the treatment of many diseases. However, many countries now face complex ethical and legal questions as a result of the research needed to develop these cell-replacement therapies. The challenge that must be met is how to permit research on human embryonic tissue to occur while maintaining respect for human life generally.

  16. Mitochondrial respiration regulates adipogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Marsboom, Glenn; Toth, Peter T; Rehman, Jalees

    2013-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult multipotent stem cells which can be isolated from bone marrow, adipose tissue as well as other tissues and have the capacity to differentiate into a variety of mesenchymal cell types such as adipocytes, osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Differentiation of stem cells into mature cell types is guided by growth factors and hormones, but recent studies suggest that metabolic shifts occur during differentiation and can modulate the differentiation process. We therefore investigated mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial respiration and the mitochondrial membrane potential during adipogenic differentiation of human MSCs. In addition, we inhibited mitochondrial function to assess its effects on adipogenic differentiation. Our data show that mitochondrial biogenesis and oxygen consumption increase markedly during adipogenic differentiation, and that reducing mitochondrial respiration by hypoxia or by inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain significantly suppresses adipogenic differentiation. Furthermore, we used a novel approach to suppress mitochondrial activity using a specific siRNA-based knockdown of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), which also resulted in an inhibition of adipogenic differentiation. Taken together, our data demonstrates that increased mitochondrial activity is a prerequisite for MSC differentiation into adipocytes. These findings suggest that metabolic modulation of adult stem cells can maintain stem cell pluripotency or direct adult stem cell differentiation.

  17. Where do injectable stem cell treatments apply in treatment of muscle, tendon, and ligament injuries?

    PubMed

    Mautner, Kenneth; Blazuk, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Treatment options for muscle, tendon, and ligament injuries span a constantly evolving spectrum. For years, treatments focused on symptomatic relief. Closer scrutiny of symptomatic treatment suggests that the provision of transient relief of symptoms may have caused more harm than good. Cortisone injections provide a trade-off of short-term relief for poorer long-term outcomes. When conventional treatment failed, patients have faced limited options including surgery, which has increased risk and limited efficacy. Regenerative injections offer a more robust option for soft tissue disease. Basic science and clinical studies show conflicting results to support the use of platelet-rich plasma injections for soft tissue disorders, and even fewer trials have focused on injectable stem cells with limited findings. Additional studies are needed to determine the potential benefits of this regenerative therapy. PMID:25864658

  18. Analysis of Intracellular Calcium Signaling in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Péntek, Adrienn; Pászty, Katalin; Apáti, Ágota

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of changes in intracellular calcium concentration is one of the most common and useful tools for studying signal transduction pathways or cellular responses in basic research and drug screening purposes as well. Increasing number of such applications using human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives requires development of calcium signal measurements for this special cell type. Here we describe a modified protocol for analysis of calcium signaling events in human embryonic stem cells, which can be used for other pluripotent cell types (such as iPSC) or their differentiated offspring as well.

  19. [In vitro strategies for human gametes production from stem cells].

    PubMed

    Tosca, Lucie; Courtot, Anne-Marie; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2011-10-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESC) are self-renewal and pluripotent cells that are able to differentiate in vitro into several cell types in favourable conditions. Technical protocols for in vitro gametes production have been developed in mice and human species. The functionality of such differentiated cells is not always analysed and an early meiotic arrest is a current observation. These kinds of experimentations have also been tested from human induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSC). However, differentiation ends shortly at the primordial germ cell stage.

  20. Stem and progenitor cell dysfunction in human trisomies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Binbin; Filippi, Sarah; Roy, Anindita; Roberts, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Trisomy 21, the commonest constitutional aneuploidy in humans, causes profound perturbation of stem and progenitor cell growth, which is both cell context dependent and developmental stage specific and mediated by complex genetic mechanisms beyond increased Hsa21 gene dosage. While proliferation of fetal hematopoietic and testicular stem/progenitors is increased and may underlie increased susceptibility to childhood leukemia and testicular cancer, fetal stem/progenitor proliferation in other tissues is markedly impaired leading to the characteristic craniofacial, neurocognitive and cardiac features in individuals with Down syndrome. After birth, trisomy 21-mediated premature aging of stem/progenitor cells may contribute to the progressive multi-system deterioration, including development of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25520324

  1. Human forearm position sense after fatigue of elbow flexor muscles

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, L D; Hesse, C W; Morgan, D L; Proske, U

    2004-01-01

    After a period of eccentric exercise of elbow flexor muscles of one arm in young, adult human subjects, muscles became fatigued and damaged. Damage indicators were a fall in force, change in resting elbow angle and delayed onset of soreness. After the exercise, subjects were asked to match the forearm angle of one arm, whose position was set by the experimenter, with their other arm. Subjects matched the position of the unsupported reference arm, when this was unexercised, with a significantly more flexed position in their exercised indicator arm. Errors were in the opposite direction when the reference arm was exercised. The size of the errors correlated with the drop in force. Less consistent errors were observed when the reference arm was supported. A similar pattern of errors was seen after concentric exercise, which does not produce muscle damage. The data suggested that subjects were using as a position cue the perceived effort required to maintain a given forearm angle against the force of gravity. The fall in force from fatigue after exercise meant more effort was required to maintain a given position. That led to matching errors between the exercised and unexercised arms. It was concluded that while a role for muscle spindles in kinaesthesia cannot be excluded, detailed information about static limb position can be derived from the effort required to support the limb against the force of gravity. PMID:15181165

  2. Aging induced loss of stemness with concomitant gain of myogenic properties of a pure population of CD34(+)/CD45(-) muscle derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bose, Bipasha; Shenoy, P Sudheer

    2016-01-01

    Aging is accompanied by the functional decline of cells, tissues, and organs, as well as, a striking increase in susceptibility to a wide range of diseases. Within a tissue, both differentiated cells and adult stem cells are susceptible to intrinsic and extrinsic changes while aging. Muscle derived stem cells (MDSCs) are tissue specific stem cells which have been studied well for their multipotential nature. Although there are reports relating to diminished function and regenerative capacity of aged MDSCs as compared to their young counterparts, not much has been reported relating to the concomitant gain in unipotent nature of aged MDSCs. In this study, we report an inverse correlation between aging and expression of adult/mesenchymal stem cell markers and a direct correlation between aging and myogenecity in MDSCs. Aged MDSCs were able to generate a greater number of dystrophin positive myofibres, as compared to, the young MDSCs when transplanted in muscle of dystrophic mice. Our data, therefore, suggests that aging stress adds to the decline in stem cell characteristics with a concomitant increase in unipotency, in terms of, myogenecity of MDSCs. This study, hence, also opens the possibilities of using unipotent aged MDSCs as potential candidates for transplantation in patients with muscular dystrophies.

  3. Neovascularization in a mouse model via stem cells derived from human fetal amniotic membranes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwi Gon; Choi, Ook Hwan

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of culture-expanded mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), derived from amniotic membranes, on neovascularization and blood flow, in an animal model of limb ischemia in immune-deficient mice. MSCs were cultured from human amniotic membranes by collagenase digestion. Human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) were administered intramuscularly at three different sites of the ischemic leg whose femoral vessels were ligated. After 4 weeks of culture, a population of homogeneous mesenchymal cells was isolated from the human amniotic membranes after confluence was reached. We performed three different groups of mice model [controls, hAMSCs, conditioned media from the hAMSCs (hAMSCs-CM)]. The blood flow recovery in the hindlimb ischemia model was significantly higher in the hAMSC-transplanted group than in the control group. Moreover, hAMSCs-CM significantly improved the cutaneous blood flow. The histological examination showed that red fluorescence (CM-DiI)-labeled hAMSCs was detected in the interstitial tissues between the muscle fibers 2 weeks after transplantation. The results of this study showed that hAMSCs may be an attractive, alternative source of progenitor or stem cells for basic research as well as clinical applications.

  4. Clinical outcomes related to muscle mass in humans with cancer and catabolic illnesses.

    PubMed

    Baracos, Vickie; Kazemi-Bajestani, Seyyed Mohammad Reza

    2013-10-01

    It is generally accepted that excessive loss of skeletal muscle mass is detrimental. Depletion of muscle mass is associated with poor prognosis in diabetes, trauma, sepsis, lung disease, renal failure and heart failure. In this review we discuss the emergence of muscle mass measurement using diagnostic imaging and the relationship between muscle mass and clinical outcome. The pursuit of specific biochemical targets for reversal of muscle wasting, has spawned a host of investigator initiated research on muscle wasting as well as investigational new drug programs in pharmaceutical companies. Research on therapeutics targeting muscle is to a large extent done in animal models, with relatively few investigations done using human muscle or reporting upon muscle mass or muscle-related outcomes in humans. Since ∼1990, a quantitative approach, as opposed to a purely functional approach, to muscle atrophy and hypertrophy has become accessible with the advent of image-based assessments (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging). These methods have high specificity and precision. In conclusion, current imaging techniques allow us to quantify the degree of muscularity of different individuals, to relate muscle mass to disease-specific outcomes, to define sarcopenia [severe muscle depletion] in quantitative terms, to detect the prevalence and rates of catabolic loss of muscle, the behavior of specific individual muscles and to define the efficacy of different therapies developed for the treatment of muscle wasting. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting.

  5. Human dental pulp stem cells: Applications in future regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Potdar, Pravin D; Jethmalani, Yogita D

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are pluripotent cells, having a property of differentiating into various types of cells of human body. Several studies have developed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from various human tissues, peripheral blood and body fluids. These cells are then characterized by cellular and molecular markers to understand their specific phenotypes. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are having a MSCs phenotype and they are differentiated into neuron, cardiomyocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, liver cells and β cells of islet of pancreas. Thus, DPSCs have shown great potentiality to use in regenerative medicine for treatment of various human diseases including dental related problems. These cells can also be developed into induced pluripotent stem cells by incorporation of pluripotency markers and use for regenerative therapies of various diseases. The DPSCs are derived from various dental tissues such as human exfoliated deciduous teeth, apical papilla, periodontal ligament and dental follicle tissue. This review will overview the information about isolation, cellular and molecular characterization and differentiation of DPSCs into various types of human cells and thus these cells have important applications in regenerative therapies for various diseases. This review will be most useful for postgraduate dental students as well as scientists working in the field of oral pathology and oral medicine. PMID:26131314

  6. Human mesenchymal stem cells - current trends and future prospective

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Imran; Subbarao, Raghavendra Baregundi; Rho, Gyu Jin

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are cells specialized cell, capable of renewing themselves through cell division and can differentiate into multi-lineage cells. These cells are categorized as embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and adult stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells which can be isolated from human and animal sources. Human MSCs (hMSCs) are the non-haematopoietic, multipotent stem cells with the capacity to differentiate into mesodermal lineage such as osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes as well ectodermal (neurocytes) and endodermal lineages (hepatocytes). MSCs express cell surface markers like cluster of differentiation (CD)29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105 and lack the expression of CD14, CD34, CD45 and HLA (human leucocyte antigen)-DR. hMSCs for the first time were reported in the bone marrow and till now they have been isolated from various tissues, including adipose tissue, amniotic fluid, endometrium, dental tissues, umbilical cord and Wharton's jelly which harbours potential MSCs. hMSCs have been cultured long-term in specific media without any severe abnormalities. Furthermore, MSCs have immunomodulatory features, secrete cytokines and immune-receptors which regulate the microenvironment in the host tissue. Multilineage potential, immunomodulation and secretion of anti-inflammatory molecules makes MSCs an effective tool in the treatment of chronic diseases. In the present review, we have highlighted recent research findings in the area of hMSCs sources, expression of cell surface markers, long-term in vitro culturing, in vitro differentiation potential, immunomodulatory features, its homing capacity, banking and cryopreservation, its application in the treatment of chronic diseases and its use in clinical trials. PMID:25797907

  7. Skeletal muscle stem cells express anti-apoptotic ErbB receptors during activation from quiescence

    SciTech Connect

    Golding, Jon P. . E-mail: j.p.golding@open.ac.uk; Calderbank, Emma; Partridge, Terence A.; Beauchamp, Jonathan R.

    2007-01-15

    To be effective for tissue repair, satellite cells (the stem cells of adult muscle) must survive the initial activation from quiescence. Using an in vitro model of satellite cell activation, we show that erbB1, erbB2 and erbB3, members of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase family, appear on satellite cells within 6 h of activation. We show that signalling via erbB2 provides an anti-apoptotic survival mechanism for satellite cells during the first 24 h, as they progress to a proliferative state. Inhibition of erbB2 signalling with AG825 reduced satellite cell numbers, concomitant with elevated caspase-8 activation and TUNEL labelling of apoptotic satellite cells. In serum-free conditions, satellite cell apoptosis could be largely prevented by a mixture of erbB1, erbB3 and erbB4 ligand growth factors, but not by neuregulin alone (erbB3/erbB4 ligand). Furthermore, using inhibitors specific to discrete intracellular signalling pathways, we identify MEK as a pro-apoptotic mediator, and the erbB-regulated factor STAT3 as an anti-apoptotic mediator during satellite cell activation. These results implicate erbB2 signalling in the preservation of a full compliment of satellite cells as they activate in the context of a damaged muscle.

  8. Growth of bone marrow and skeletal muscle side population stem cells in suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Pacak, Christina A; Cowan, Douglas B

    2014-01-01

    The ability to efficiently isolate and expand various stem cell populations in vitro is crucial for successful translation of cell-based therapies to the clinical setting. One such heterogeneous population that possesses a remarkable potential for the development of cell-based treatments for a variety of degenerative diseases and disorders is called the Side Population (SP). For many years, investigators have isolated these primitive cells based upon their ability to efflux the fluorophore Hoechst 33342. This attribute enabled separation of SP cells derived from multiple tissue sources from other endogenous cell populations using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). While all tissue-specific SP fractions appear to contain cells with multi-potent stem cell activity, the therapeutic utility of these cells has yet to be fully realized because of the scarcity of this fraction in vivo. In view of that, we developed a method to expand adult murine bone marrow and skeletal muscle-derived SP cells in vitro. Here, we describe a spinner-flask culture system that supports the growth of SP cells in suspension when they are combined with feeder cells cultured on spherical microcarriers. In this way, their distinguishing biological characteristics can be maintained, attachment-stimulated differentiation is avoided, and therapeutically relevant quantities of SP cells are generated. Modification of the described procedure may permit expansion of the SP from other relevant tissue sources and our method is amenable to establishing compliance with current good manufacturing practices. PMID:25173160

  9. Nuclear Nox4 Role in Stemness Power of Human Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maraldi, Tullia; Guida, Marianna; Zavatti, Manuela; Resca, Elisa; Bertoni, Laura; La Sala, Giovanni B.; De Pol, Anto

    2015-01-01

    Human amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSC) are an attractive source for cell therapy due to their multilineage differentiation potential and accessibility advantages. However the clinical application of human stem cells largely depends on their capacity to expand in vitro, since there is an extensive donor-to-donor heterogeneity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cellular oxidative stress are involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes of stem cells, including pluripotency, proliferation, differentiation, and stress resistance. The mode of action of ROS is also dependent on the localization of their target molecules. Thus, the modifications induced by ROS can be separated depending on the cellular compartments they affect. NAD(P)H oxidase family, particularly Nox4, has been known to produce ROS in the nucleus. In the present study we show that Nox4 nuclear expression (nNox4) depends on the donor and it correlates with the expression of transcription factors involved in stemness regulation, such as Oct4, SSEA-4, and Sox2. Moreover nNox4 is linked with the nuclear localization of redox sensitive transcription factors, as Nrf2 and NF-κB, and with the differentiation potential. Taken together, these results suggest that nNox4 regulation may have important effects in stem cell capability through modulation of transcription factors and DNA damage. PMID:26273418

  10. Neurotrophic Factor-Secreting Autologous Muscle Stem Cell Therapy for the Treatment of Laryngeal Denervation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Halum, Stacey L.; McRae, Bryan; Bijangi-Vishehsaraei, Khadijeh; Hiatt, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine if the spontaneous reinnervation that characteristically ensues after recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury could be selectively promoted and directed to certain laryngeal muscles with the use of neurotrophic factor (NF)-secreting muscle stem cell (MSC) vectors while antagonistic reinnervation is inhibited with vincristine (VNC). Study Design Basic science investigations involving primary cell cultures, gene cloning/transfer, and animal experiments. Methods (i.) MSC survival assays were used to test multiple individual NFs in vitro. (ii.) Motoneuron outgrowth assays assessed the trophic effects of identified NF on cranial nerve X-derived (CNX) motoneurons in vitro. (iii.) Therapeutic NF was cloned into a lentiviral vector, and MSCs were tranduced to secrete NF. 60 rats underwent left RLN transection injury, and at 3 weeks received injections of either MSCs (n=24), MSCs secreting NF (n=24), or saline (n=12) into the left thyroarytenoid muscle complex (TA); half of the animals in the MSC groups simultaneously received left posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) injections of vincristine (VNC) while half the animals received saline. Results (i.) Ciliary-derived neurotrophic factor (CNTF) had the greatest survival-promoting effect on MSCs in culture. (ii.) Addition of CNTF (50 ng/mL) to CN X motoneuron cultures resulted in enhanced neurite outgrowth and branching. (iii.) In the animal model, the injected MSCs fused with the denervated myofibers, immunohistochemistry demonstrated enhanced reinnervation based on motor endplate to nerve contact, and RT-PCR confirmed stable CNTF expression at longest follow-up (4 months) in the CNTF-secreting MSC treated groups. Conclusions MSC therapy may have a future role in selectively promoting and directing laryngeal reinnervation after RLN injury. Level of evidence: NA PMID:22965802

  11. Improving human skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain fiber typing efficiency.

    PubMed

    Murach, Kevin A; Bagley, James R; McLeland, Kathryn A; Arevalo, Jose A; Ciccone, Anthony B; Malyszek, Kylie K; Wen, Yuan; Galpin, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Single muscle fiber sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel-electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) is a sensitive technique for determining skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition of human biopsy samples. However, the number of fibers suitable to represent fiber type distribution via this method is undefined. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis (VL) of nine resistance-trained males (25 ± 1 year, height = 179 ± 5 cm, mass = 82 ± 8 kg). Single fiber MHC composition was determined via SDS-PAGE. VL fiber type distribution [percent MHC I, I/IIa, IIa, IIa/IIx, and total "hybrids" (i.e. I/IIa + IIa/IIx)] was evaluated according to number of fibers analyzed per person (25 vs. 125). VL fiber type distribution did not differ according to number of fibers analyzed (P > 0.05). VL biopsy fiber type distribution of nine subjects is represented by analyzing 25 fibers per person. These data may help minimize cost, personnel-time, and materials associated with this technique, thereby improving fiber typing efficiency in humans. PMID:26842420

  12. Derivation of Skeletal Myogenic Precursors from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Using Conditional Expression of PAX7.

    PubMed

    Darabi, Radbod; Perlingeiro, Rita C R

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapies are considered as one of the most promising approaches for the treatment of degenerating pathologies including muscle disorders and dystrophies. Advances in the approach of reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells allow for the possibility of using the patient's own pluripotent cells to generate specific tissues for autologous transplantation. In addition, patient-specific tissue derivatives have been shown to represent valuable material for disease modeling and drug discovery. Nevertheless, directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into a specific lineage is not a trivial task especially in the case of skeletal myogenesis, which is generally poorly recapitulated during the in vitro differentiation of pluripotent stem cells.Here, we describe a practical and efficient method for the derivation of skeletal myogenic precursors from differentiating human pluripotent stem cells using controlled expression of PAX7. Flow cytometry (FACS) purified myogenic precursors can be expanded exponentially and differentiated in vitro into myotubes, enabling researchers to use these cells for disease modeling as well as therapeutic purposes.

  13. Human skeletal muscle fibre types and force: velocity properties.

    PubMed

    MacIntosh, B R; Herzog, W; Suter, E; Wiley, J P; Sokolosky, J

    1993-01-01

    It has been reported that there is a relationship between power output and fibre type distribution in mixed muscle. The strength of this relationship is greater in the range of 3-8 rad.s-1 during knee extension compared to slower or faster angular knee extensor speeds. A mathematical model of the force: velocity properties of muscle with various combinations of fast- and slow-twitch fibres may provide insight into why specific velocities may give better predictions of fibre type distribution. In this paper, a mathematical model of the force:velocity relationship for mixed muscle is presented. This model demonstrates that peak power and optimal velocity should be predictive of fibre distribution and that the greatest fibre type discrimination in human knee extensor muscles should occur with measurement of power output at an angular velocity just greater than 7 rad.s-1. Measurements of torque:angular velocity relationships for knee extension on an isokinetic dynamometer and fibre type distribution in biopsies of vastus lateralis muscles were made on 31 subjects. Peak power and optimal velocity were determined in three ways: (1) direct measurement, (2) linear regression, and (3) fitting to the Hill equation. Estimation of peak power and optimal velocity using the Hill equation gave the best correlation with fibre type distribution (r < 0.5 for peak power or optimal velocity and percentage of fast-twitch fibres). The results of this study confirm that prediction of fibre type distribution is facilitated by measurement of peak power at optimal velocity and that fitting of the data to the Hill equation is a suitable method for evaluation of these parameters.

  14. Exercise-induced histone modifications in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Sean L; Fairlie, Erin; Garnham, Andrew P; Hargreaves, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle adaptations to exercise confer many of the health benefits of physical activity and occur partly through alterations in skeletal muscle gene expression. The exact mechanisms mediating altered skeletal muscle gene expression in response to exercise are unknown. However, in recent years, chromatin remodelling through epigenetic histone modifications has emerged as a key regulatory mechanism controlling gene expression in general. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of exercise on global histone modifications that mediate chromatin remodelling and transcriptional activation in human skeletal muscle in response to exercise. In addition, we sought to examine the signalling mechanisms regulating these processes. Following 60 min of cycling, global histone 3 acetylation at lysine 9 and 14, a modification associated with transcriptional initiation, was unchanged from basal levels, but was increased at lysine 36, a site associated with transcriptional elongation. We examined the regulation of the class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs), which are enzymes that suppress histone acetylation and have been implicated in the adaptations to exercise. While we found no evidence of proteasomal degradation of the class IIa HDACs, we found that HDAC4 and 5 were exported from the nucleus during exercise, thereby removing their transcriptional repressive function. We also observed activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the calcium–calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in response to exercise, which are two kinases that induce phosphorylation-dependent class IIa HDAC nuclear export. These data delineate a signalling pathway that might mediate skeletal muscle adaptations in response to exercise. PMID:19884317

  15. Metabolic heterogeneity in human calf muscle during maximal exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenborne, K. Free Univ. of Brussels ); McCully, K.; Kakihira, H.; Prammer. M.; Bolinger, L.; Detre, J.A.; Walter, G.; Chance, B.; Leigh. J.S. ); De Meirleir, K. )

    1991-07-01

    Human skeletal muscle is composed of various muscle fiber types. The authors hypothesized that differences in metabolism between fiber types could be detected noninvasively with {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy during maximal exercise. This assumes that during maximal exercise all fiber types are recruited and all vary in the amount of acidosis. The calf muscles of seven subjects were studied. Two different coils were applied: an 11-cm-diameter surface coil and a five-segment meander coil. The meander coil was used to localize the {sup 31}P signal to either the medial or the lateral gastrocnemius. Maximal exercise, consisting of rapid plantar flexions, resulted in an 83.7% {plus minus} 7.8% decrease of the phosphocreatine pool and an 8-fold increase of the inorganic phosphate (P{sub i}) pool. At rest the P{sub i} pool was observed as a single resonance (pH 7.0). Toward the end of the first minute of exercise, three subjects showed three distinct P{sub i} peaks. During the second minute of exercise the pH values stabilized. The same pattern was seen when the signal was collected from the medial or lateral gastrocnemius. In four subjects only two distinct P{sub i} peaks were observed. The P{sub i} peaks had differing relative areas in different subjects, but they were reproducible in each individual. This method allowed is to study the appearance and disappearance of the different P{sub i} peaks, together with the changes in pH. Because multiple P{sub i} peaks were seen in single muscles they most likely identify different muscle fiber types.

  16. Identification of Small Molecules Which Induce Skeletal Muscle Differentiation in Embryonic Stem Cells via Activation of the Wnt and Inhibition of Smad2/3 and Sonic Hedgehog Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunwoo; Haller, Corinne; Manneville, Carole; Doll, Thierry; Fruh, Isabelle; Keller, Caroline Gubser; Richards, Shola M; Ibig-Rehm, Yvonne; Patoor, Maude; Goette, Marjo; Bouchez, Laure C; Mueller, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    The multilineage differentiation capacity of mouse and human embryonic stem (ES) cells offers a testing platform for small molecules that mediate mammalian lineage determination and cellular specialization. Here we report the identification of two small molecules which drives mouse 129 ES cell differentiation to skeletal muscle with high efficiency without any genetic modification. Mouse embryoid bodies (EBs) were used to screen a library of 1,000 small molecules to identify compounds capable of inducing high levels of Pax3 mRNA. Stimulation of EBs with SMIs (skeletal muscle inducer, SMI1 and SMI2) from the screen resulted in a high percentage of intensively twitching skeletal muscle fibers 3 weeks after induction. Gene expression profiling studies that were carried out for mode of actions analysis showed that SMIs activated genes regulated by the Wnt pathway and inhibited expression of Smad2/3 and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) target genes. A combination of three small molecules known to modulate these three pathways acted similarly to the SMIs found here, driving ES cells from 129 as well as Balb/c and C57Bl/6 to skeletal muscle. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the SMI drives ES cells to skeletal muscle via concerted activation of the Wnt pathway, and inhibition of Smad2/3 signaling and Shh pathways. This provides important developmental biological information about skeletal muscle differentiation from embryonic stem cells and may lead to the development of new therapeutics for muscle disease.

  17. Identification of Small Molecules Which Induce Skeletal Muscle Differentiation in Embryonic Stem Cells via Activation of the Wnt and Inhibition of Smad2/3 and Sonic Hedgehog Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunwoo; Haller, Corinne; Manneville, Carole; Doll, Thierry; Fruh, Isabelle; Keller, Caroline Gubser; Richards, Shola M; Ibig-Rehm, Yvonne; Patoor, Maude; Goette, Marjo; Bouchez, Laure C; Mueller, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    The multilineage differentiation capacity of mouse and human embryonic stem (ES) cells offers a testing platform for small molecules that mediate mammalian lineage determination and cellular specialization. Here we report the identification of two small molecules which drives mouse 129 ES cell differentiation to skeletal muscle with high efficiency without any genetic modification. Mouse embryoid bodies (EBs) were used to screen a library of 1,000 small molecules to identify compounds capable of inducing high levels of Pax3 mRNA. Stimulation of EBs with SMIs (skeletal muscle inducer, SMI1 and SMI2) from the screen resulted in a high percentage of intensively twitching skeletal muscle fibers 3 weeks after induction. Gene expression profiling studies that were carried out for mode of actions analysis showed that SMIs activated genes regulated by the Wnt pathway and inhibited expression of Smad2/3 and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) target genes. A combination of three small molecules known to modulate these three pathways acted similarly to the SMIs found here, driving ES cells from 129 as well as Balb/c and C57Bl/6 to skeletal muscle. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the SMI drives ES cells to skeletal muscle via concerted activation of the Wnt pathway, and inhibition of Smad2/3 signaling and Shh pathways. This provides important developmental biological information about skeletal muscle differentiation from embryonic stem cells and may lead to the development of new therapeutics for muscle disease. PMID:26577380

  18. Stem cell programs are retained in human leukemic lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Fan, D; Zhou, X; Li, Z; Li, Z-Q; Duan, C; Liu, T; Zhang, F; Huang, Y; Zhang, Y; Gao, F; Guo, Y; Gupta, R; Chen, G; Enver, T; Tang, J; Hong, D

    2015-04-16

    Leukemic lymphoblasts within different immunophenotypic populations possess stem cell properties. However, whether or not the self-renewal program is retained from stem cells or conferred on progenitors by leukemogenic molecules remains unknown. We have addressed the issue in the context of TEL-AML1-associated acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) by profiling a refined program edited from genes essential for self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells and B-cell development. Bioinformatic analysis shows that ALL populations are loosely clustered and close to the normal population that contains stem and primitive progenitor cells. This finding indicates that immunophenotypes do not reflect maturation stages in ALL and that the self-renewal program may be retained from stem cells. Results of assessing 'first hit' function of TEL-AML1 in different populations of normal cells demonstrate the molecular model. Therefore, the current study shows a leukemogenic scenario of human ALL in which programs of stem cells are sustained in distinct fractions by leukemogenic mutations.

  19. Fast-muscle-specific expression of human aldolase A transgenes.

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, M; Maire, P; Concordet, J P; Moch, C; Porteu, A; Kahn, A; Daegelen, D

    1994-01-01

    The expression of the human aldolase A gene is controlled by three alternative promoters. In transgenic mice, pN and pH are active in all tissues whereas pM is activated specifically in adult muscles composed mainly of fast, glycolytic fibers. To detect potential regulatory regions involved in the fast-muscle-specific activation of pM, we analyzed DNase I hypersensitivity in a 4.3-kbp fragment from the 5' end of the human aldolase A gene. Five hypersensitive sites were located near the transcription initiation site of each promoter in those transgenic-mouse tissues in which the corresponding promoter was active. Only one muscle-specific hypersensitive site was detected, mapping near pM. To functionally delimit the elements required for muscle-specific activity of pM, we performed a deletion analysis of the aldolase A 5' region in transgenic mice. Our results show that a 280-bp fragment containing 235 bp of pM proximal upstream sequences together with the noncoding M exon is sufficient for tissue-specific expression of pM. When a putative MEF-2-binding site residing in this proximal pM region is mutated, pM is still active and no change in its tissue specificity is detected. Furthermore, we observed a modulation of pM activity by elements lying further upstream and downstream from pM. Interestingly, pM was expressed in a tissue-specific way in all transgenic mice in which the 280-bp region was present (32 lines and six founder animals). This observation led us to suggest that the proximal pM region contains elements that are able to override to some extent the effects of the surrounding chromatin. Images PMID:7935397

  20. Imagining STEM Higher Education Futures: Advancing Human Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    The paper explores a conceptual approach to the question of what it means to provide a university education that addresses equity, and encourages the formation of STEM graduates oriented to public-good values and with commitments to making professional contributions to society which will advance human well-being. It considers and rejects…

  1. Establishment of immortalized human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Teng, Zan; Yoshida, Toshiko; Okabe, Motonori; Toda, Ayaka; Higuchi, Osamu; Nogami, Makiko; Yoneda, Noriko; Zhou, Kaixuan; Kyo, Satoru; Kiyono, Touru; Nikaido, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Human amniotic mesenchymal cells (HAM cells) are known to contain somatic stem cells possessing the characteristics of pluripotency. However, little is known about the biology of these somatic cells because isolated HAM cells from amniotic membrane have a limited lifespan. To overcome this problem, we attempted to prolong the lifespan of HAM cells by infecting retrovirus encoding human papillomavirus type16E6 and E7 (HPV16E6E7), bmi-1, and/or human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) genes and investigated their characteristics as stem cells. We confirmed the immortalization of the four lines of cultured HAM cells for about 1 year. Immortalized human amnion mesenchymal cells (iHAM cells) have continued to proliferate over 200 population doublings (PDs). iHAM cells were positive for CD73, CD90, CD105, and CD44 and negative for CD34, CD14, CD45, and HLA-DR. They expressed stem cell markers such as Oct3/4, Sox2, Nanog, Klf4, SSEA4, c-myc, vimentin, and nestin. They showed adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation abilities after induction. These results suggested that immortalized cell lines with characteristics of stem cells can be established. iHAM cells with an extended lifespan can be used to produce good experimental models both in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Expansion of human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chou, Song; Chu, Pat; Hwang, William; Lodish, Harvey

    2010-10-01

    A recent Science paper reported a purine derivative that expands human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells in culture (Boitano et al., 2010) by antagonizing the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Major problems need to be overcome before ex vivo HSC expansion can be used clinically.

  3. Derivation of the human embryonic stem cell line RCM1.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, P A; Tye, B J; Sneddon, S; Bruce, K; Dand, P; Russell, G; Collins, D M; Greenshields, A; McDonald, K; Bradburn, H; Gardner, J; Downie, J M; Courtney, A; Brison, D R

    2016-03-01

    The human embryonic stem cell line RCM-1 was derived from a failed to fertilise egg undergoing parthenogenetic stimulation. The cell line shows normal pluripotency marker expression and differentiation to three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. It has a normal 46XX female karyotype and microsatellite PCR identity, HLA and blood group typing data is available. PMID:27346018

  4. Human neural stem cells promote proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells and enhance angiogenesis in ischemic rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Sun; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Seung U.; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of human neural stem cells into the dentate gyrus or ventricle of rodents has been reportedly to enhance neurogenesis. In this study, we examined endogenous stem cell proliferation and angiogenesis in the ischemic rat brain after the transplantation of human neural stem cells. Focal cerebral ischemia in the rat brain was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Human neural stem cells were transplanted into the subventricular zone. The behavioral performance of human neural stem cells-treated ischemic rats was significantly improved and cerebral infarct volumes were reduced compared to those in untreated animals. Numerous transplanted human neural stem cells were alive and preferentially localized to the ipsilateral ischemic hemisphere. Furthermore, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine-labeled endogenous neural stem cells were observed in the subventricular zone and hippocampus, where they differentiated into cells immunoreactive for the neural markers doublecortin, neuronal nuclear antigen NeuN, and astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein in human neural stem cells-treated rats, but not in the untreated ischemic animals. The number of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine-positive ⁄ anti-von Willebrand factor-positive proliferating endothelial cells was higher in the ischemic boundary zone of human neural stem cells-treated rats than in controls. Finally, transplantation of human neural stem cells in the brains of rats with focal cerebral ischemia promoted the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells and their differentiation into mature neural-like cells, and enhanced angiogenesis. This study provides valuable insights into the effect of human neural stem cell transplantation on focal cerebral ischemia, which can be applied to the development of an effective therapy for stroke. PMID:27073384

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Nora; Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva; Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs; Apati, Agota

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  6. Nanotopography Promotes Pancreatic Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyung Woo; Cha, Kyoung Je; Han, Jiyou; Jang, Yu Jin; Kim, Dong Sung; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2016-03-22

    Although previous studies suggest that nanotopographical features influence properties and behaviors of stem cells, only a few studies have attempted to derive clinically useful somatic cells from human pluripotent stem cells using nanopatterned surfaces. In the present study, we report that polystyrene nanopore-patterned surfaces significantly promote the pancreatic differentiation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. We compared different diameters of nanopores and showed that 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces highly upregulated the expression of PDX1, a critical transcription factor for pancreatic development, leading to an approximately 3-fold increase in the percentage of differentiating PDX1(+) pancreatic progenitors compared with control flat surfaces. Furthermore, in the presence of biochemical factors, 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces profoundly enhanced the derivation of pancreatic endocrine cells producing insulin, glucagon, or somatostatin. We also demonstrate that nanopore-patterned surface-induced upregulation of PDX1 is associated with downregulation of TAZ, suggesting the potential role of TAZ in nanopore-patterned surface-mediated mechanotransduction. Our study suggests that appropriate cytokine treatments combined with nanotopographical stimulation could be a powerful tool for deriving a high purity of desired cells from human pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26900863

  7. Nanotopography Promotes Pancreatic Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Kim, Hyung Woo; Cha, Kyoung Je; Han, Jiyou; Jang, Yu Jin; Kim, Dong Sung; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2016-03-22

    Although previous studies suggest that nanotopographical features influence properties and behaviors of stem cells, only a few studies have attempted to derive clinically useful somatic cells from human pluripotent stem cells using nanopatterned surfaces. In the present study, we report that polystyrene nanopore-patterned surfaces significantly promote the pancreatic differentiation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. We compared different diameters of nanopores and showed that 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces highly upregulated the expression of PDX1, a critical transcription factor for pancreatic development, leading to an approximately 3-fold increase in the percentage of differentiating PDX1(+) pancreatic progenitors compared with control flat surfaces. Furthermore, in the presence of biochemical factors, 200 nm nanopore-patterned surfaces profoundly enhanced the derivation of pancreatic endocrine cells producing insulin, glucagon, or somatostatin. We also demonstrate that nanopore-patterned surface-induced upregulation of PDX1 is associated with downregulation of TAZ, suggesting the potential role of TAZ in nanopore-patterned surface-mediated mechanotransduction. Our study suggests that appropriate cytokine treatments combined with nanotopographical stimulation could be a powerful tool for deriving a high purity of desired cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

  8. Sequential cancer mutations in cultured human intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Drost, Jarno; van Jaarsveld, Richard H; Ponsioen, Bas; Zimberlin, Cheryl; van Boxtel, Ruben; Buijs, Arjan; Sachs, Norman; Overmeer, René M; Offerhaus, G Johan; Begthel, Harry; Korving, Jeroen; van de Wetering, Marc; Schwank, Gerald; Logtenberg, Meike; Cuppen, Edwin; Snippert, Hugo J; Medema, Jan Paul; Kops, Geert J P L; Clevers, Hans

    2015-05-01

    Crypt stem cells represent the cells of origin for intestinal neoplasia. Both mouse and human intestinal stem cells can be cultured in medium containing the stem-cell-niche factors WNT, R-spondin, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and noggin over long time periods as epithelial organoids that remain genetically and phenotypically stable. Here we utilize CRISPR/Cas9 technology for targeted gene modification of four of the most commonly mutated colorectal cancer genes (APC, P53 (also known as TP53), KRAS and SMAD4) in cultured human intestinal stem cells. Mutant organoids can be selected by removing individual growth factors from the culture medium. Quadruple mutants grow independently of all stem-cell-niche factors and tolerate the presence of the P53 stabilizer nutlin-3. Upon xenotransplantation into mice, quadruple mutants grow as tumours with features of invasive carcinoma. Finally, combined loss of APC and P53 is sufficient for the appearance of extensive aneuploidy, a hallmark of tumour progression.

  9. Human dermal stem cells differentiate into functional epidermal melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Fukunaga-Kalabis, Mizuho; Yu, Hong; Xu, Xiaowei; Kong, Jun; Lee, John T; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2010-03-15

    Melanocytes sustain a lifelong proliferative potential, but a stem cell reservoir in glabrous skin has not yet been found. Here, we show that multipotent dermal stem cells isolated from human foreskins lacking hair follicles are able to home to the epidermis to differentiate into melanocytes. These dermal stem cells, grown as three-dimensional spheres, displayed a capacity for self-renewal and expressed NGFRp75, nestin and OCT4, but not melanocyte markers. In addition, cells derived from single-cell clones were able to differentiate into multiple lineages including melanocytes. In a three-dimensional skin equivalent model, sphere-forming cells differentiated into HMB45-positive melanocytes, which migrated from the dermis to the epidermis and aligned singly among the basal layer keratinocytes in a similar fashion to pigmented melanocytes isolated from the epidermis. The dermal stem cells were negative for E-cadherin and N-cadherin, whereas they acquired E-cadherin expression and lost NGFRp75 expression upon contact with epidermal keratinocytes. These results demonstrate that stem cells in the dermis of human skin with neural-crest-like characteristics can become mature epidermal melanocytes. This finding could significantly change our understanding of the etiological factors in melanocyte transformation and pigmentation disorders; specifically, that early epigenetic or genetic alterations leading to transformation may take place in the dermis rather than in the epidermis.

  10. Human Skeletal Muscle Disuse Atrophy: Effects on Muscle Protein Synthesis, Breakdown, and Insulin Resistance—A Qualitative Review

    PubMed Central

    Rudrappa, Supreeth S.; Wilkinson, Daniel J.; Greenhaff, Paul L.; Smith, Kenneth; Idris, Iskandar; Atherton, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    The ever increasing burden of an aging population and pandemic of metabolic syndrome worldwide demands further understanding of the modifiable risk factors in reducing disability and morbidity associated with these conditions. Disuse skeletal muscle atrophy (sometimes referred to as “simple” atrophy) and insulin resistance are “non-pathological” events resulting from sedentary behavior and periods of enforced immobilization e.g., due to fractures or elective orthopedic surgery. Yet, the processes and drivers regulating disuse atrophy and insulin resistance and the associated molecular events remain unclear—especially in humans. The aim of this review is to present current knowledge of relationships between muscle protein turnover, insulin resistance and muscle atrophy during disuse, principally in humans. Immobilization lowers fasted state muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and induces fed-state “anabolic resistance.” While a lack of dynamic measurements of muscle protein breakdown (MPB) precludes defining a definitive role for MPB in disuse atrophy, some proteolytic “marker” studies (e.g., MPB genes) suggest a potential early elevation. Immobilization also induces muscle insulin resistance (IR). Moreover, the trajectory of muscle atrophy appears to be accelerated in persistent IR states (e.g., Type II diabetes), suggesting IR may contribute to muscle disuse atrophy under these conditions. Nonetheless, the role of differences in insulin sensitivity across distinct muscle groups and its effects on rates of atrophy remains unclear. Multifaceted time-course studies into the collective role of insulin resistance and muscle protein turnover in the setting of disuse muscle atrophy, in humans, are needed to facilitate the development of appropriate countermeasures and efficacious rehabilitation protocols. PMID:27610086

  11. Human Skeletal Muscle Disuse Atrophy: Effects on Muscle Protein Synthesis, Breakdown, and Insulin Resistance-A Qualitative Review.

    PubMed

    Rudrappa, Supreeth S; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Greenhaff, Paul L; Smith, Kenneth; Idris, Iskandar; Atherton, Philip J

    2016-01-01

    The ever increasing burden of an aging population and pandemic of metabolic syndrome worldwide demands further understanding of the modifiable risk factors in reducing disability and morbidity associated with these conditions. Disuse skeletal muscle atrophy (sometimes referred to as "simple" atrophy) and insulin resistance are "non-pathological" events resulting from sedentary behavior and periods of enforced immobilization e.g., due to fractures or elective orthopedic surgery. Yet, the processes and drivers regulating disuse atrophy and insulin resistance and the associated molecular events remain unclear-especially in humans. The aim of this review is to present current knowledge of relationships between muscle protein turnover, insulin resistance and muscle atrophy during disuse, principally in humans. Immobilization lowers fasted state muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and induces fed-state "anabolic resistance." While a lack of dynamic measurements of muscle protein breakdown (MPB) precludes defining a definitive role for MPB in disuse atrophy, some proteolytic "marker" studies (e.g., MPB genes) suggest a potential early elevation. Immobilization also induces muscle insulin resistance (IR). Moreover, the trajectory of muscle atrophy appears to be accelerated in persistent IR states (e.g., Type II diabetes), suggesting IR may contribute to muscle disuse atrophy under these conditions. Nonetheless, the role of differences in insulin sensitivity across distinct muscle groups and its effects on rates of atrophy remains unclear. Multifaceted time-course studies into the collective role of insulin resistance and muscle protein turnover in the setting of disuse muscle atrophy, in humans, are needed to facilitate the development of appropriate countermeasures and efficacious rehabilitation protocols. PMID:27610086

  12. Human Skeletal Muscle Disuse Atrophy: Effects on Muscle Protein Synthesis, Breakdown, and Insulin Resistance—A Qualitative Review

    PubMed Central

    Rudrappa, Supreeth S.; Wilkinson, Daniel J.; Greenhaff, Paul L.; Smith, Kenneth; Idris, Iskandar; Atherton, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    The ever increasing burden of an aging population and pandemic of metabolic syndrome worldwide demands further understanding of the modifiable risk factors in reducing disability and morbidity associated with these conditions. Disuse skeletal muscle atrophy (sometimes referred to as “simple” atrophy) and insulin resistance are “non-pathological” events resulting from sedentary behavior and periods of enforced immobilization e.g., due to fractures or elective orthopedic surgery. Yet, the processes and drivers regulating disuse atrophy and insulin resistance and the associated molecular events remain unclear—especially in humans. The aim of this review is to present current knowledge of relationships between muscle protein turnover, insulin resistance and muscle atrophy during disuse, principally in humans. Immobilization lowers fasted state muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and induces fed-state “anabolic resistance.” While a lack of dynamic measurements of muscle protein breakdown (MPB) precludes defining a definitive role for MPB in disuse atrophy, some proteolytic “marker” studies (e.g., MPB genes) suggest a potential early elevation. Immobilization also induces muscle insulin resistance (IR). Moreover, the trajectory of muscle atrophy appears to be accelerated in persistent IR states (e.g., Type II diabetes), suggesting IR may contribute to muscle disuse atrophy under these conditions. Nonetheless, the role of differences in insulin sensitivity across distinct muscle groups and its effects on rates of atrophy remains unclear. Multifaceted time-course studies into the collective role of insulin resistance and muscle protein turnover in the setting of disuse muscle atrophy, in humans, are needed to facilitate the development of appropriate countermeasures and efficacious rehabilitation protocols.

  13. A medium hyperglycosylated podocalyxin enables noninvasive and quantitative detection of tumorigenic human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tateno, Hiroaki; Onuma, Yasuko; Ito, Yuzuru; Hiemori, Keiko; Aiki, Yasuhiko; Shimizu, Madoka; Higuchi, Kumiko; Fukuda, Masakazu; Warashina, Masaki; Honda, Susumu; Asashima, Makoto; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    While human pluripotent stem cells are attractive sources for cell-replacement therapies, a major concern remains regarding their tumorigenic potential. Thus, safety assessment of human pluripotent stem cell-based products in terms of tumorigenicity is critical. Previously we have identified a pluripotent stem cell-specific lectin probe rBC2LCN recognizing hyperglycosylated podocalyxin as a cell surface ligand. Here we demonstrate that hyperglycosylated podocalyxin is secreted from human pluripotent stem cells into cell culture supernatants. We establish a sandwich assay system, named the GlycoStem test, targeting the soluble hyperglycosylated podocalyxin using rBC2LCN. The GlycoStem test is sufficiently sensitive and quantitative to detect residual human pluripotent stem cells. This work provides a proof of concept for the noninvasive and quantitative detection of tumorigenic human pluripotent stem cells using cell culture supernatants. The developed method should increase the safety of human pluripotent stem cell-based cell therapies. PMID:24518842

  14. The current state of research with human pluripotent stem cells in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pranke, Patricia; Chagastelles, Pedro; Sperling, Laura E

    2014-12-01

    This article provides a brief overview of research with human pluripotent stem cells in Brazil, the federal funding supporting this research, and the legislation that allows the isolation of human embryonic stem cells.

  15. Clone-derived human AF-amniotic fluid stem cells are capable of skeletal myogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaorong; Zhang, Shengli; Zhou, Junmei; Chen, Baisong; Shang, Yafeng; Gao, Tongbing; Wang, Xue; Xie, Hua; Chen, Fang

    2012-08-01

    Stem cell-based therapy may be the most promising method to cure skeletal muscle degenerative diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and trauma in the future. Human amniotic fluid is enriched with early-stage stem cells from developing fetuses and these cells have cardiomyogenic potential both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the characteristics of human amniotic fluid-derived AF-type stem (HAF-AFS) cells by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence staining, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation analysis. After confirming the stemness of HAF-AFS cells, we tested whether HAF-AFS cells could differentiate into skeletal myogenic cells in vitro and incorporate into regenerating skeletal muscle in vivo. By temporary exposure to the DNA demethylation agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza dC) or co-cultured with C2C12 myoblasts, HAF-AFS cells differentiated into skeletal myogenic cells, expressing skeletal myogenic cell-specific markers such as Desmin, Troponin I (Tn I) and α-Actinin. Four weeks after transplantation into cardiotoxin-injured and X-ray-irradiated tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of NOD/SCID mice, HAF-AFS cells survived, differentiated into myogenic precursor cells and fused with host myofibres. The findings that HAF-AFS cells differentiate into myogenic cells in vitro and incorporate in skeletal muscle regeneration in vivo hold the promise of HAF-AFS cell-based therapy for skeletal muscle degenerative diseases.

  16. Human Pluripotent Stem Cells: Applications and Challenges in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hibaoui, Youssef; Feki, Anis

    2012-01-01

    The ability to generate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) holds great promise for the understanding and the treatment of human neurological diseases in modern medicine. The hPSCs are considered for their in vitro use as research tools to provide relevant cellular model for human diseases, drug discovery, and toxicity assays and for their in vivo use in regenerative medicine applications. In this review, we highlight recent progress, promises, and challenges of hPSC applications in human neurological disease modeling and therapies. PMID:22934023

  17. Immunological changes in human skeletal muscle and blood after eccentric exercise and multiple biopsies.

    PubMed

    Malm, C; Nyberg, P; Engstrom, M; Sjodin, B; Lenkei, R; Ekblom, B; Lundberg, I

    2000-11-15

    1. A role of the immune system in muscular adaptation to physical exercise has been suggested but data from controlled human studies are scarce. The present study investigated immunological events in human blood and skeletal muscle by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry after eccentric cycling exercise and multiple biopsies. 2. Immunohistochemical detection of neutrophil- (CD11b, CD15), macrophage- (CD163), satellite cell- (CD56) and IL-1beta-specific antigens increased similarly in human skeletal muscle after eccentric cycling exercise together with multiple muscle biopsies, or multiple biopsies only. 3. Changes in immunological variables in blood and muscle were related, and monocytes and natural killer (NK) cells appeared to have governing functions over immunological events in human skeletal muscle. 4. Delayed onset muscle soreness, serum creatine kinase activity and C-reactive protein concentration were not related to leukocyte infiltration in human skeletal muscle. 5. Eccentric cycling and/or muscle biopsies did not result in T cell infiltration in human skeletal muscle. Modes of stress other than eccentric cycling should therefore be evaluated as a myositis model in human. 6. Based on results from the present study, and in the light of previously published data, it appears plausible that muscular adaptation to physical exercise occurs without preceding muscle inflammation. Nevertheless, leukocytes seem important for repair, regeneration and adaptation of human skeletal muscle.

  18. Muscle Fatigue Affects the Interpolated Twitch Technique When Assessed Using Electrically-Induced Contractions in Human and Rat Muscles.

    PubMed

    Neyroud, Daria; Cheng, Arthur J; Bourdillon, Nicolas; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    The interpolated twitch technique (ITT) is the gold standard to assess voluntary activation and central fatigue. Yet, its validity has been questioned. Here we studied how peripheral fatigue can affect the ITT. Repeated contractions at submaximal frequencies were produced by supramaximal electrical stimulations of the human adductor pollicis muscle in vivo and of isolated rat soleus fiber bundles; an extra stimulation pulse was given during contractions to induce a superimposed twitch. Human muscles fatigued by repeated 30-Hz stimulation trains (3 s on-1 s off) showed an ~80% reduction in the superimposed twitch force accompanied by a severely reduced EMG response (M-wave amplitude), which implies action potential failure. Subsequent experiments combined a less intense stimulation protocol (1.5 s on-3 s off) with ischemia to cause muscle fatigue, but which preserved M-wave amplitude. However, the superimposed twitch force still decreased markedly more than the potentiated twitch force; with ITT this would reflect increased "voluntary activation." In contrast, the superimposed twitch force was relatively spared when a similar protocol was performed in rat soleus bundles. Force relaxation was slowed by >150% in fatigued human muscles, whereas it was unchanged in rat soleus bundles. Accordingly, results similar to those in the human muscle were obtained when relaxation was slowed by cooling the rat soleus muscles. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that muscle fatigue can confound the quantification of central fatigue using the ITT.

  19. Muscle Fatigue Affects the Interpolated Twitch Technique When Assessed Using Electrically-Induced Contractions in Human and Rat Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Neyroud, Daria; Cheng, Arthur J.; Bourdillon, Nicolas; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    The interpolated twitch technique (ITT) is the gold standard to assess voluntary activation and central fatigue. Yet, its validity has been questioned. Here we studied how peripheral fatigue can affect the ITT. Repeated contractions at submaximal frequencies were produced by supramaximal electrical stimulations of the human adductor pollicis muscle in vivo and of isolated rat soleus fiber bundles; an extra stimulation pulse was given during contractions to induce a superimposed twitch. Human muscles fatigued by repeated 30-Hz stimulation trains (3 s on–1 s off) showed an ~80% reduction in the superimposed twitch force accompanied by a severely reduced EMG response (M-wave amplitude), which implies action potential failure. Subsequent experiments combined a less intense stimulation protocol (1.5 s on–3 s off) with ischemia to cause muscle fatigue, but which preserved M-wave amplitude. However, the superimposed twitch force still decreased markedly more than the potentiated twitch force; with ITT this would reflect increased “voluntary activation.” In contrast, the superimposed twitch force was relatively spared when a similar protocol was performed in rat soleus bundles. Force relaxation was slowed by >150% in fatigued human muscles, whereas it was unchanged in rat soleus bundles. Accordingly, results similar to those in the human muscle were obtained when relaxation was slowed by cooling the rat soleus muscles. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that muscle fatigue can confound the quantification of central fatigue using the ITT. PMID:27445844

  20. Severely Atrophic Human Muscle Fibers With Nuclear Misplacement Survive Many Years of Permanent Denervation.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut

    2016-06-13

    Likewise in rodents, after complete spinal cord injury (SCI) the lower motor neuron (LMN) denervated human muscle fibers lose completely the myofibrillar apparatus and the coil distribution of myonuclei that are relocated in groups (nuclear clumps) in the center of severely atrophic muscle fibers. Up to two years of LMN denervation the muscle fibers with nuclear clumps are very seldom, but in this cohort of patients the severely atrophic muscle fibers are frequent in muscle biopsies harvested three to six years after SCI. Indeed, the percentage increased to 27 ± 9% (p< 0.001), and then abruptly decreased from the 6th year onward, when fibrosis takes over to neurogenic muscle atrophy. Immunohistochemical analyses shown that nuclear misplacements occurred in both fast and slow muscle fibers. In conclusion, human muscle fibers survive permanent denervation much longer than generally accepted and relocation of nuclei is a general behavior in long term denervated muscle fibers. PMID:27478559

  1. Severely Atrophic Human Muscle Fibers With Nuclear Misplacement Survive Many Years of Permanent Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Likewise in rodents, after complete spinal cord injury (SCI) the lower motor neuron (LMN) denervated human muscle fibers lose completely the myofibrillar apparatus and the coil distribution of myonuclei that are relocated in groups (nuclear clumps) in the center of severely atrophic muscle fibers. Up to two years of LMN denervation the muscle fibers with nuclear clumps are very seldom, but in this cohort of patients the severely atrophic muscle fibers are frequent in muscle biopsies harvested three to six years after SCI. Indeed, the percentage increased to 27 ± 9% (p< 0.001), and then abruptly decreased from the 6th year onward, when fibrosis takes over to neurogenic muscle atrophy. Immunohistochemical analyses shown that nuclear misplacements occurred in both fast and slow muscle fibers. In conclusion, human muscle fibers survive permanent denervation much longer than generally accepted and relocation of nuclei is a general behavior in long term denervated muscle fibers. PMID:27478559

  2. Mechanical effects of muscle contraction increase intravascular ATP draining quiescent and active skeletal muscle in humans

    PubMed Central

    Crecelius, Anne R.; Kirby, Brett S.; Richards, Jennifer C.

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) evokes vasodilation and is implicated in the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise. Mechanical stresses to erythrocytes and endothelial cells stimulate ATP release in vitro. How mechanical effects of muscle contractions contribute to increased plasma ATP during exercise is largely unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that simulated mechanical effects of muscle contractions increase [ATP]venous and ATP effluent in vivo, independent of changes in tissue metabolic demand, and further increase plasma ATP when superimposed with mild-intensity exercise. In young healthy adults, we measured forearm blood flow (FBF) (Doppler ultrasound) and plasma [ATP]v (luciferin-luciferase assay), then calculated forearm ATP effluent (FBF×[ATP]v) during rhythmic forearm compressions (RFC) via a blood pressure cuff at three graded pressures (50, 100, and 200 mmHg; Protocol 1; n = 10) and during RFC at 100 mmHg, 5% maximal voluntary contraction rhythmic handgrip exercise (RHG), and combined RFC + RHG (Protocol 2; n = 10). [ATP]v increased from rest with each cuff pressure (range 144–161 vs. 64 ± 13 nmol/l), and ATP effluent was graded with pressure. In Protocol 2, [ATP]v increased in each condition compared with rest (RFC: 123 ± 33; RHG: 51 ± 9; RFC + RHG: 96 ± 23 vs. Mean Rest: 42 ± 4 nmol/l; P < 0.05), and ATP effluent was greatest with RFC + RHG (RFC: 5.3 ± 1.4; RHG: 5.3 ± 1.1; RFC + RHG: 11.6 ± 2.7 vs. Mean Rest: 1.2 ± 0.1 nmol/min; P < 0.05). We conclude that the mechanical effects of muscle contraction can 1) independently elevate intravascular ATP draining quiescent skeletal muscle without changes in local metabolism and 2) further augment intravascular ATP during mild exercise associated with increases in metabolism and local deoxygenation; therefore, it is likely one stimulus for increasing intravascular ATP during exercise in humans. PMID:23429876

  3. Lipid storage changes in human skeletal muscle during detraining

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Rong; Wen, Caiyun; Li, Jiance; Harris, M. Brennan; Liu, Yung-Yang; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Exercise training is known to increase intramuscular triglyceride content in both trained and untrained legs. The purpose of the study was to determine the changes of intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) and extramyocellular lipids (EMCL) of both trained and untrained legs during detraining. We measured both IMCL and EMCL levels in previously trained vs. untrained legs during 4-weeks of detraining after 6-weeks of strength training. Eight young men (aged 21.4 ± 1.4 years) trained their vastus lateralis muscle in one leg using a dynamometer, whereas the contralateral leg served as untrained control. Muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), IMCL, EMCL, total creatine (creatine + phophocreatine) of extensor (vastus lateralis) muscles were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectra (1H-MRS) before training, 3 days after and 28 days after the last bout of training. CSA was increased in both legs by Day 3 after training, and was still high at Day 28 post-training; IMCL increased in both legs by Day 3 after training, then decreased at Day 28 post-training only in the untrained leg; EMCL shows no significant change by Day 3 after training, but at Day 28 post-training has increased in the trained leg and decreased in the untrained leg; total creatine did not change significantly. Conclusion: Decreases of IMCL and EMCL storages in previously untrained leg during detraining indicates an ectopic influence on tissue lipid storage by different metabolic demand among tissues in the same human body. PMID:26578981

  4. Morphine attenuates cholinergic nerve activity in human isolated colonic muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Burleigh, D. E.; Trout, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    The action of morphine on cholinergic nerves in human sigmoid taenia coli muscle strips (taenia) was investigated using a radiolabelling technique. Basal release of tritiated material from taenia was increased by electrical field stimulation (EFS). This increase was tetrodotoxin (3.14 microM)-sensitive and calcium-dependent. Analysis of basal and stimulated release of tritiated material indicated that evoked release (i.e. stimulated minus basal) is almost entirely due to an increase in [3H]-acetylcholine ([3H]-ACh) output. Evoked release of [3H]-ACh was dependent on the current strength and could be greatly reduced by exposing taenia to hemicholinium (34.8, 87.0 microM) before and during incubation with [3H]-choline (4 microCi ml-1, 15 Ci mmol-1). Spontaneous activity, muscle tone and the motor response of taenia to EFS were unaffected by morphine. Evoked, but not basal, release of tritiated material was inhibited by morphine (1.32-13.20 microM) in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibition of release was frequency-dependent and naloxone (0.28 microM)-sensitive. The possible relationship between the effects of morphine on cholinergic nerves in taenia muscle and its actions in vivo are discussed. PMID:2873856

  5. Transdifferentiation of human endothelial progenitors into smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, HaYeun; Atchison, Leigh; Chen, Zaozao; Chakraborty, Syandan; Jung, Youngmee; Truskey, George A; Christoforou, Nicolas; Leong, Kam W

    2016-04-01

    Access to smooth muscle cells (SMC) would create opportunities for tissue engineering, drug testing, and disease modeling. Herein we report the direct conversion of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) to induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) by induced expression of MYOCD. The EPC undergo a cytoskeletal rearrangement resembling that of mesenchymal cells within 3 days post initiation of MYOCD expression. By day 7, the reprogrammed cells show upregulation of smooth muscle markers ACTA2, MYH11, and TAGLN by qRT-PCR and ACTA2 and MYH11 expression by immunofluorescence. By two weeks, they resemble umbilical artery SMC in microarray gene expression analysis. The iSMC, in contrast to EPC control, show calcium transients in response to phenylephrine stimulation and a contractility an order of magnitude higher than that of EPC as determined by traction force microscopy. Tissue-engineered blood vessels constructed using iSMC show functionality with respect to flow- and drug-mediated vasodilation and vasoconstriction. PMID:26874281

  6. Muscle sympathetic outflow during horizontal linear acceleration in humans.

    PubMed

    Cui, J; Iwase, S; Mano, T; Katayama, N; Mori, S

    2001-08-01

    To elucidate the effects of linear acceleration on muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in humans, 16 healthy men were tested in a linear accelerator. Measurements of MSNA, electrocardiogram, blood pressure, and thoracic impedance were undertaken during linear acceleration. Sinusoidal linear acceleration with peak values at +/-0.10, +/-0.15, and +/-0.20 G was applied in anteroposterior (+/-G(x), n = 10) or lateral (+/-G(y), n = 6) directions. The total activity and burst rate of MSNA decreased significantly during forward, backward, left, or right linear accelerations. The total activity of MSNA decreased to 50.5 +/- 6.9, 52.5 +/- 4.4, 71.2 +/- 9.6, and 67.6 +/- 8.2% from the baselines (100%) during linear accelerations with peak values at +/-0.20 G in the four directions, respectively. These results suggest that dynamic stimulation of otolith organs in horizontal directions in humans might inhibit MSNA directly in order to quickly redistribute blood to muscles during postural reflexes induced by passive movement, which supports the concept that the vestibular system contributes to sympathetic regulation in humans.

  7. Calcium oscillations in human mesenteric vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Dorado, Jorge; Garcia-Alonso, Mauricio; van Breemen, Cornelis; Tejerina, Teresa; Fameli, Nicola

    2014-02-28

    Phenylephrine (PE)-induced oscillatory fluctuations in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) of vascular smooth muscle have been observed in many blood vessels isolated from a wide variety of mammals. Paradoxically, until recently similar observations in humans have proven elusive. In this study, we report for the first time observations of adrenergically-stimulated [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in human mesenteric artery smooth muscle. In arterial segments preloaded with Fluo-4 AM and mounted on a myograph on the stage of a confocal microscope, we observed PE-induced oscillations in [Ca(2+)]i, which initiated and maintained vasoconstriction. These oscillations present some variability, possibly due to compromised health of the tissue. This view is corroborated by our ultrastructural analysis of the cells, in which we found only (5 ± 2)% plasma membrane-sarcoplasmic reticulum apposition, markedly less than measured in healthy tissue from laboratory animals. We also partially characterized the oscillations by using the inhibitory drugs 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and nifedipine. After PE contraction, all drugs provoked relaxation of the vessel segments, sometimes only partial, and reduced or inhibited oscillations, except CPA, which rarely caused relaxation. These preliminary results point to a potential involvement of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) in the maintenance of the Ca(2+) oscillations observed in human blood vessels. PMID:24508261

  8. Modelling human disease with pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, In-Hyun; Sullivan, Gareth J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in the field of cellular reprogramming has opened up the doors to a new era of disease modelling, as pluripotent stem cells representing a myriad of genetic diseases can now be produced from patient tissue. These cells can be expanded and differentiated to produce a potentially limitless supply of the affected cell type, which can then be used as a tool to improve understanding of disease mechanisms and test therapeutic interventions. This process requires high levels of scrutiny and validation at every stage, but international standards for the characterisation of pluripotent cells and their progeny have yet to be established. Here we discuss the current state of the art with regard to modelling diseases affecting the ectodermal, mesodermal and endodermal lineages, focussing on studies which have demonstrated a disease phenotype in the tissue of interest. We also discuss the utility of pluripotent cell technology for the modelling of cancer and infectious disease. Finally, we spell out the technical and scientific challenges which must be addressed if the field is to deliver on its potential and produce improved patient outcomes in the clinic. PMID:23444871

  9. Human hTM. cap alpha. gene: Expression in muscle and nonmuscle tissue

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, A.R.; Gooding, C.

    1988-01-01

    The authors isolated a cDNA clone from a human skeletal muscle library which contains the complete protein-coding sequence of a skeletal muscle ..cap alpha..-tropomyosin. This cDNA sequence defines a fourth human tropomyosin gene, the hTM..cap alpha.. gene, which is distinct from the hTM/sub nm/ gene encoding a closely related isoform of skeletal muscle ..cap alpha..-tropomyosin. In cultured human fibroblasts, the hTM..cap alpha.. gene encodes both skeletal-muscle- and smooth-muscle-type ..cap alpha..-tropomyosins by using an alternative mRNA-splicing mechanism.

  10. Generating trunk neural crest from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Miller; Miller, Matthew L.; McHenry, Lauren K.; Zheng, Tina; Zhen, Qiqi; Ilkhanizadeh, Shirin; Conklin, Bruce R.; Bronner, Marianne E.; Weiss, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCC) are stem cells that generate different lineages, including neuroendocrine, melanocytic, cartilage, and bone. The differentiation potential of NCC varies according to the level from which cells emerge along the neural tube. For example, only anterior “cranial” NCC form craniofacial bone, whereas solely posterior “trunk” NCC contribute to sympathoadrenal cells. Importantly, the isolation of human fetal NCC carries ethical and scientific challenges, as NCC induction typically occur before pregnancy is detectable. As a result, current knowledge of NCC biology derives primarily from non-human organisms. Important differences between human and non-human NCC, such as expression of HNK1 in human but not mouse NCC, suggest a need to study human NCC directly. Here, we demonstrate that current protocols to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (PSC) to NCC are biased toward cranial NCC. Addition of retinoic acid drove trunk-related markers and HOX genes characteristic of a posterior identity. Subsequent treatment with bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) enhanced differentiation to sympathoadrenal cells. Our approach provides methodology for detailed studies of human NCC, and clarifies roles for retinoids and BMPs in the differentiation of human PSC to trunk NCC and to sympathoadrenal lineages. PMID:26812940

  11. Task Dependent Motor Strategy of Human Triceps Surae Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Hideaki; Ihashi, Kouji; Ichie, Masayoshi; Handa, Yasunobu

    2004-01-01

    Even though many investigators have analyzed the functional difference of the three heads of triceps surae in human, none of them succeeded to clarify the distinctive functional difference of those three muscles. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the integrated EMGs (IEMGs) of the triceps surae muscle, gastrocnemius and soleus, were task dependent. IEMGs of the medial head of the gastrocnemius (GM), lateral head of the gastrocnemius (GL), and soleus (SO) were investigated at three different knee joint angles, at four different duration of ramp contraction, with the generation of a single ongoing force, from 0 to the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Three-way ANOVAs for repeated measures were used to estimate differences in IEMG values in each of the GM, GL, and SO, taken at four different durations of ramp contraction (5, 10, 15 and 20 s), at three different knee joint angles (0 deg, 30 deg and 90 deg), across ankle plantar flexion levels of force (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70% MVC). According to three-way ANOVAs for repeated measures, IEMG of the GM muscle showed a first-order interaction between force and knee joint angle. In addition, IEMG of the GL muscle showed first-order interactions between the level of force and knee joint angle, and between the level of force and duration of ramp contraction. Furthermore, IEMG of the SO showed a main effect only on level of force. These results suggest that the each head of the triceps surae may work task dependently. PMID:25792933

  12. Techniques of Human Embryonic Stem Cell and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derivation.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Jarosław; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2016-10-01

    Developing procedures for the derivation of human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) gave rise to novel pathways into regenerative medicine research. For many years, stem cells have attracted attention as a potentially unlimited cell source for cellular therapy in neurodegenerative disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and spinal cord injuries, for example. In these studies, adult stem cells were insufficient; therefore, many attempts were made to obtain PSCs by other means. This review discusses key issues concerning the techniques of pluripotent cell acquisition. Technical and ethical issues hindered the medical use of somatic cell nuclear transfer and embryonic stem cells. Therefore, induced PSCs (iPSCs) emerged as a powerful technique with great potential for clinical applications, patient-specific disease modelling and pharmaceutical studies. The replacement of viral vectors or the administration of analogous proteins or chemical compounds during cell reprogramming are modifications designed to reduce tumorigenesis risk and to augment the procedure efficiency. Intensified analysis of new PSC lines revealed other barriers to overcome, such as epigenetic memory, disparity between human and mouse pluripotency, and variable response to differentiation of some iPSC lines. Thus, multidimensional verification must be conducted to fulfil strict clinical-grade requirements. Nevertheless, the first clinical trials in patients with spinal cord injury and macular dystrophy were recently carried out with differentiated iPSCs, encouraging alternative strategies for potential autologous cellular therapies.

  13. Human induced pluripotent stem cells: A disruptive innovation.

    PubMed

    De Vos, J; Bouckenheimer, J; Sansac, C; Lemaître, J-M; Assou, S

    2016-01-01

    This year (2016) will mark the 10th anniversary of the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The finding that the transient expression of four transcription factors can radically remodel the epigenome, transcriptome and metabolome of differentiated cells and reprogram them into pluripotent stem cells has been a major and groundbreaking technological innovation. In this review, we discuss the major applications of this technology that we have grouped in nine categories: a model to study cell fate control; a model to study pluripotency; a model to study human development; a model to study human tissue and organ physiology; a model to study genetic diseases in a dish; a tool for cell rejuvenation; a source of cells for drug screening; a source of cells for regenerative medicine; a tool for the production of human organs in animals.

  14. Human cloning, stem cell research. An Islamic perspective.

    PubMed

    Al-Aqeel, Aida I

    2009-12-01

    The rapidly changing technologies that involve human subjects raise complex ethical, legal, social, and religious issues. Recent advances in the field of cloning and stem cell research have introduced new hopes for the treatment of serious diseases. But this promise has raised many complex questions. This field causes debate and challenge, not only among scientists but also among ethicists, religious scholars, governments, and politicians. There is no consensus on the morality of human cloning, even within specific religious traditions. In countries in which religion has a strong influence on political decision making, the moral status of the human embryo is at the center of the debate. Because of the inevitable consequences of reproductive cloning, it is prohibited in Islam. However, stem cell research for therapeutic purposes is permissible with full consideration, and all possible precautions in the pre-ensoulment stages of early fetus development, if the source is legitimate.

  15. Human dental mesenchymal stem cells and neural regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li; Tsutsui, Takeki

    2013-09-01

    Nerve tissue presents inherent difficulties for its effective regeneration. Stem cell transplantation is considered an auspicious treatment for neuronal injuries. Recently, human dental mesenchymal stem cells (DMSCs) have received extensive attention in the field of regenerative medicine due to their accessibility and multipotency. Since their origin is within the neural crest, they can be differentiated into neural crest-derived cells including neuron and glia cells both in vitro and in vivo. DMSCs are also able to secrete a wide variety of neurotrophins and chemokines, which promote neuronal cells to survival and differentiation. Experimental evidence has shown that human DMSCs engraftment recovered neuronal tissue damage in animal models of central nervous system injuries. Human DMSCs can be a new hope for treatment of nervous system diseases and deficits such as spinal cord injury, stroke and Parkinson's disease.

  16. Hurdles to clinical translation of human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Neofytou, Evgenios; O’Brien, Connor Galen; Couture, Larry A.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells are known to have the capacity to renew indefinitely, being intrinsically able to differentiate into many different cell types. These characteristics have generated tremendous enthusiasm about the potential applications of these cells in regenerative medicine. However, major challenges remain with the development and testing of novel experimental stem cell therapeutics in the field. In this Review, we focus on the nature of the preclinical challenges and discuss potential solutions that could help overcome them. Furthermore, we discuss the use of allogeneic versus autologous stem cell products, including a review of their respective advantages and disadvantages, major clinical requirements, quality standards, time lines, and costs of clinical grade development. PMID:26132109

  17. Measurement of human embryonic stem cell in the growing cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Zhao, L.; Oh, Steve K. W.; Chong, W. K.; Ong, J. K.; Chen, Allen K.; Choo, Andre B. H.

    2008-09-01

    A measurement and imaging system has been developed for in-line continuous measurement of live, unmodified, human embryonic stem cells (hESC). The measurement will not affect cell growth, structure, sterility and suitability for clinical use. The stem cell imaging system (SCIS) can be used to support the optimization of automated stem cell growth for invitro study and for high-volume bio-manufacture. This paper present the experimental and analysis for the optimization of system parameters. A non-linear lighting is developed to obtain a clear images. The individual cluster can be traced from day one to day two. The whole system is calibrated with measurement microscope and haemacytometer. The measurement accuracy is better than 90%.

  18. Biobanking human embryonic stem cell lines: policy, ethics and efficiency.

    PubMed

    Holm, Søren

    2015-12-01

    Stem cell banks curating and distributing human embryonic stem cells have been established in a number of countries and by a number of private institutions. This paper identifies and critically discusses a number of arguments that are used to justify the importance of such banks in policy discussions relating to their establishment or maintenance. It is argued (1) that 'ethical arguments' are often more important in the establishment phase and 'efficiency arguments' more important in the maintenance phase, and (2) that arguments relating to the interests of embryo and gamete donors are curiously absent from the particular stem cell banking policy discourse. This to some extent artificially isolates this discourse from the broader discussions about the flows of reproductive materials and tissues in modern society, and such isolation may lead to the interests of important actors being ignored in the policy making process.

  19. The safety of human pluripotent stem cells in clinical treatment.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Oscar E; Domogatskaya, Anna; Volchkov, Pavel; Rodin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have practically unlimited proliferation potential and a capability to differentiate into any cell type in the human body. Since the first derivation in 1998, they have been an attractive source of cells for regenerative medicine. Numerous ethical, technological, and regulatory complications have been hampering hPSC use in clinical applications. Human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), parthenogenetic human ESCs, human nuclear transfer ESCs, and induced pluripotent stem cells are four types of hPSCs that are different in many clinically relevant features such as propensity to epigenetic abnormalities, generation methods, and ability for development of autologous cell lines. Propensity to genetic mutations and tumorigenicity are common features of all pluripotent cells that complicate hPSC-based therapies. Several recent advances in methods of derivation, culturing, and monitoring of hPSCs have addressed many ethical concerns and technological challenges in development of clinical-grade hPSC lines. Generation of banks of such lines may be useful to minimize immune rejection of hPSC-derived allografts. In this review, we discuss different sources of hPSCs available at the moment, various safety risks associated with them, and possible solutions for successful use of hPSCs in the clinic. We also discuss ongoing clinical trials of hPSC-based treatments.

  20. The safety of human pluripotent stem cells in clinical treatment.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Oscar E; Domogatskaya, Anna; Volchkov, Pavel; Rodin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have practically unlimited proliferation potential and a capability to differentiate into any cell type in the human body. Since the first derivation in 1998, they have been an attractive source of cells for regenerative medicine. Numerous ethical, technological, and regulatory complications have been hampering hPSC use in clinical applications. Human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), parthenogenetic human ESCs, human nuclear transfer ESCs, and induced pluripotent stem cells are four types of hPSCs that are different in many clinically relevant features such as propensity to epigenetic abnormalities, generation methods, and ability for development of autologous cell lines. Propensity to genetic mutations and tumorigenicity are common features of all pluripotent cells that complicate hPSC-based therapies. Several recent advances in methods of derivation, culturing, and monitoring of hPSCs have addressed many ethical concerns and technological challenges in development of clinical-grade hPSC lines. Generation of banks of such lines may be useful to minimize immune rejection of hPSC-derived allografts. In this review, we discuss different sources of hPSCs available at the moment, various safety risks associated with them, and possible solutions for successful use of hPSCs in the clinic. We also discuss ongoing clinical trials of hPSC-based treatments. PMID:26140342

  1. Histological organization is similar in human vocal muscle and tongue--a study of muscles and nerves.

    PubMed

    de Campos, Deivis; do Nascimento, Patrícia Severo; Ellwanger, Joel Henrique; Gehlen, Gunther; Rodrigues, Mariana Freitas; Jotz, Geraldo Pereira; Xavier, Léder Leal

    2012-11-01

    One of the most exciting questions about the human voice is how the vocal fold produces and modulates different sounds. One hypothesis to explain the wide range of movements found in the vocal fold is based on the variety of muscle fiber orientations in the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. The tongue (TO) muscle is considered the most complex structure in the body in terms of muscle fiber orientation and movements. Thus, possible similarities between these two muscles and their innervations, the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) and hypoglossal nerve (XII), could explain the complex movements executed by the focal fold. Moreover, such studies help us to understand some microanatomical aspects of vocal fold reinnervation, based on XII-to-RLN anastomosis. Therefore, this study investigates the histological organization of TA and TO muscles and their innervations (n=12 subjects). The muscle fibers were classified into three categories according to their orientation (transverse, undefined, and longitudinal). To quantify the percentage of fibers in each category in the TA and TO, the shape coefficient (shape Z) was estimated. Qualitative analysis and estimation of fiber area and shape Z show that the histological organization of TA and TO muscle is similar. Both muscles present the same percentage of transversal (~72%), undefined (~15%), and longitudinal fibers (~10%). By contrast, the authors' analysis of the morphometric parameters of the RLN and XII shows that there is no correlation between these nerves. In conclusion, in humans, TA and TO muscles present similar histological organization and this finding could help to explain interesting questions about human phonation.

  2. Feasible muscle activation ranges based on inverse dynamics analyses of human walking.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Cole S; Sohn, M Hongchul; Allen, Jessica L; Ting, Lena H

    2015-09-18

    Although it is possible to produce the same movement using an infinite number of different muscle activation patterns owing to musculoskeletal redundancy, the degree to which observed variations in muscle activity can deviate from optimal solutions computed from biomechanical models is not known. Here, we examined the range of biomechanically permitted activation levels in individual muscles during human walking using a detailed musculoskeletal model and experimentally-measured kinetics and kinematics. Feasible muscle activation ranges define the minimum and maximum possible level of each muscle's activation that satisfy inverse dynamics joint torques assuming that all other muscles can vary their activation as needed. During walking, 73% of the muscles had feasible muscle activation ranges that were greater than 95% of the total muscle activation range over more than 95% of the gait cycle, indicating that, individually, most muscles could be fully active or fully inactive while still satisfying inverse dynamics joint torques. Moreover, the shapes of the feasible muscle activation ranges did not resemble previously-reported muscle activation patterns nor optimal solutions, i.e. static optimization and computed muscle control, that are based on the same biomechanical constraints. Our results demonstrate that joint torque requirements from standard inverse dynamics calculations are insufficient to define the activation of individual muscles during walking in healthy individuals. Identifying feasible muscle activation ranges may be an effective way to evaluate the impact of additional biomechanical and/or neural constraints on possible versus actual muscle activity in both normal and impaired movements.

  3. Mechano-growth factor peptide, the COOH terminus of unprocessed insulin-like growth factor 1, has no apparent effect on myoblasts or primary muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fornaro, Mara; Hinken, Aaron C; Needle, Saul; Hu, Erding; Trendelenburg, Anne-Ulrike; Mayer, Angelika; Rosenstiel, Antonia; Chang, Calvin; Meier, Viktor; Billin, Andrew N; Becherer, J David; Brace, Arthur D; Evans, William J; Glass, David J; Russell, Alan J

    2014-01-15

    A splice form of IGF-1, IGF-1Eb, is upregulated after exercise or injury. Physiological responses have been ascribed to the 24-amino acid COOH-terminal peptide that is cleaved from the NH3-terminal 70-amino acid mature IGF-1 protein. This COOH-terminal peptide was termed "mechano-growth factor" (MGF). Activities claimed for the MGF peptide included enhancing muscle satellite cell proliferation and delaying myoblast fusion. As such, MGF could represent a promising strategy to improve muscle regeneration. Thus, at our two pharmaceutical companies, we attempted to reproduce the claimed effect of MGF peptides on human and mouse muscle myoblast proliferation and differentiation in vitro. Concentrations of peptide up to 500 ng/ml failed to increase the proliferation of C2C12 cells or primary human skeletal muscle myoblasts. In contrast, all cell types exhibited a proliferative response to mature IGF-1 or full-length IGF-1Eb. MGF also failed to inhibit the differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes. To address whether the response to MGF was lost in these tissue culture lines, we measured proliferation and differentiation of primary mouse skeletal muscle stem cells exposed to MGF. This, too, failed to demonstrate a significant effect. Finally, we tested whether MGF could alter a separate documented in vitro effect of the peptide, activation of p-ERK, but not p-Akt, in cardiac myocytes. Although a robust response to IGF-1 was observed, there were no demonstrated activating responses from the native or a stabilized MGF peptide. These results call in to question whether there is a physiological role for MGF.

  4. Directed Endothelial Progenitor Differentiation from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Via Wnt Activation Under Defined Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaoping; Lian, Xiaojun; Palecek, Sean P

    2016-01-01

    Efficient derivation of endothelial cells and their progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can facilitate studies of human vascular development, disease modeling, drug discovery, and cell-based therapy. Here we provide a detailed protocol for directing hPSCs to functional endothelial cells and their progenitors in a completely defined, growth factor- and serum-free system by temporal modulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling via small molecules. We demonstrate a 10-day, two-stage process that recapitulates endothelial cell development, in which hPSCs first differentiate to endothelial progenitors that then generate functional endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. Methods to characterize endothelial cell identity and function are also described. PMID:27590162

  5. Diploid, but not haploid, human embryonic stem cells can be derived from microsurgically repaired tripronuclear human zygotes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yong; Li, Rong; Huang, Jin; Yu, Yang; Qiao, Jie

    2013-01-15

    Human embryonic stem cells have shown tremendous potential in regenerative medicine, and the recent progress in haploid embryonic stem cells provides new insights for future applications of embryonic stem cells. Disruption of normal fertilized embryos remains controversial; thus, the development of a new source for human embryonic stem cells is important for their usefulness. Here, we investigated the feasibility of haploid and diploid embryo reconstruction and embryonic stem cell derivation using microsurgically repaired tripronuclear human zygotes. Diploid and haploid zygotes were successfully reconstructed, but a large proportion of them still had a tripolar spindle assembly. The reconstructed embryos developed to the blastocyst stage, although the loss of chromosomes was observed in these zygotes. Finally, triploid and diploid human embryonic stem cells were derived from tripronuclear and reconstructed zygotes (from which only one pronucleus was removed), but haploid human embryonic stem cells were not successfully derived from the reconstructed zygotes when two pronuclei were removed. Both triploid and diploid human embryonic stem cells showed the general characteristics of human embryonic stem cells. These results indicate that the lower embryo quality resulting from abnormal spindle assembly contributed to the failure of the haploid embryonic stem cell derivation. However, the successful derivation of diploid embryonic stem cells demonstrated that microsurgical tripronuclear zygotes are an alternative source of human embryonic stem cells. In the future, improving spindle assembly will facilitate the application of triploid zygotes to the field of haploid embryonic stem cells.

  6. Diploid, but not haploid, human embryonic stem cells can be derived from microsurgically repaired tripronuclear human zygotes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yong; Li, Rong; Huang, Jin; Yu, Yang; Qiao, Jie

    2013-01-15

    Human embryonic stem cells have shown tremendous potential in regenerative medicine, and the recent progress in haploid embryonic stem cells provides new insights for future applications of embryonic stem cells. Disruption of normal fertilized embryos remains controversial; thus, the development of a new source for human embryonic stem cells is important for their usefulness. Here, we investigated the feasibility of haploid and diploid embryo reconstruction and embryonic stem cell derivation using microsurgically repaired tripronuclear human zygotes. Diploid and haploid zygotes were successfully reconstructed, but a large proportion of them still had a tripolar spindle assembly. The reconstructed embryos developed to the blastocyst stage, although the loss of chromosomes was observed in these zygotes. Finally, triploid and diploid human embryonic stem cells were derived from tripronuclear and reconstructed zygotes (from which only one pronucleus was removed), but haploid human embryonic stem cells were not successfully derived from the reconstructed zygotes when two pronuclei were removed. Both triploid and diploid human embryonic stem cells showed the general characteristics of human embryonic stem cells. These results indicate that the lower embryo quality resulting from abnormal spindle assembly contributed to the failure of the haploid embryonic stem cell derivation. However, the successful derivation of diploid embryonic stem cells demonstrated that microsurgical tripronuclear zygotes are an alternative source of human embryonic stem cells. In the future, improving spindle assembly will facilitate the application of triploid zygotes to the field of haploid embryonic stem cells. PMID:23255130

  7. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Julie M; Thompson, Timothy; Geskin, Albert; LaFramboise, William; Lagasse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  8. Effects of sildenafil and/or muscle derived stem cells on myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that long-term oral daily PDE 5 inhibitors (PDE5i) counteract fibrosis, cell loss, and the resulting dysfunction in tissues of various rat organs and that implantation of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (MDSC) exerts some of these effects. PDE5i and stem cells in combination were found to be more effective in non-MI cardiac repair than each treatment separately. We have now investigated whether sildenafil at lower doses and MDSC, alone or in combination are effective to attenuate LV remodeling after MI in rats. Methods MI was induced in rats by ligature of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Treatment groups were: “Series A”: 1) untreated; 2) oral sildenafil 3 mg/kg/day from day 1; and “Series B”: intracardiac injection at day 7 of: 3) saline; 4) rat MDSC (106 cells); 5) as #4, with sildenafil as in #2. Before surgery, and at 1 and 4 weeks, the left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) was measured. LV sections were stained for collagen, myofibroblasts, apoptosis, cardiomyocytes, and iNOS, followed by quantitative image analysis. Western blots estimated angiogenesis and myofibroblast accumulation, as well as potential sildenafil tachyphylaxis by PDE 5 expression. Zymography estimated MMPs 2 and 9 in serum. Results As compared to untreated MI rats, sildenafil improved LVEF, reduced collagen, myofibroblasts, and circulating MMPs, and increased cardiac troponin T. MDSC replicated most of these effects and stimulated cardiac angiogenesis. Concurrent MDSC/sildenafil counteracted cardiomyocyte and endothelial cells loss, but did not improve LVEF or angiogenesis, and upregulated PDE 5. Conclusions Long-term oral sildenafil, or MDSC given separately, reduce the MI fibrotic scar and improve left ventricular function in this rat model. The failure of the treatment combination may be due to inducing overexpression of PDE5. PMID:22871104

  9. Derivation and differentiation of haploid human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sagi, Ido; Chia, Gloryn; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Peretz, Mordecai; Weissbein, Uri; Sui, Lina; Sauer, Mark V; Yanuka, Ofra; Egli, Dieter; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2016-04-01

    Diploidy is a fundamental genetic feature in mammals, in which haploid cells normally arise only as post-meiotic germ cells that serve to ensure a diploid genome upon fertilization. Gamete manipulation has yielded haploid embryonic stem (ES) cells from several mammalian species, but haploid human ES cells have yet to be reported. Here we generated and analysed a collection of human parthenogenetic ES cell lines originating from haploid oocytes, leading to the successful isolation and maintenance of human ES cell lines with a normal haploid karyotype. Haploid human ES cells exhibited typical pluripotent stem cell characteristics, such as self-renewal capacity and a pluripotency-specific molecular signature. Moreover, we demonstrated the utility of these cells as a platform for loss-of-function genetic screening. Although haploid human ES cells resembled their diploid counterparts, they also displayed distinct properties including differential regulation of X chromosome inactivation and of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, alongside reduction in absolute gene expression levels and cell size. Surprisingly, we found that a haploid human genome is compatible not only with the undifferentiated pluripotent state, but also with differentiated somatic fates representing all three embryonic germ layers both in vitro and in vivo, despite a persistent dosage imbalance between the autosomes and X chromosome. We expect that haploid human ES cells will provide novel means for studying human functional genomics and development.

  10. Derivation and differentiation of haploid human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sagi, Ido; Chia, Gloryn; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Peretz, Mordecai; Weissbein, Uri; Sui, Lina; Sauer, Mark V; Yanuka, Ofra; Egli, Dieter; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2016-04-01

    Diploidy is a fundamental genetic feature in mammals, in which haploid cells normally arise only as post-meiotic germ cells that serve to ensure a diploid genome upon fertilization. Gamete manipulation has yielded haploid embryonic stem (ES) cells from several mammalian species, but haploid human ES cells have yet to be reported. Here we generated and analysed a collection of human parthenogenetic ES cell lines originating from haploid oocytes, leading to the successful isolation and maintenance of human ES cell lines with a normal haploid karyotype. Haploid human ES cells exhibited typical pluripotent stem cell characteristics, such as self-renewal capacity and a pluripotency-specific molecular signature. Moreover, we demonstrated the utility of these cells as a platform for loss-of-function genetic screening. Although haploid human ES cells resembled their diploid counterparts, they also displayed distinct properties including differential regulation of X chromosome inactivation and of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, alongside reduction in absolute gene expression levels and cell size. Surprisingly, we found that a haploid human genome is compatible not only with the undifferentiated pluripotent state, but also with differentiated somatic fates representing all three embryonic germ layers both in vitro and in vivo, despite a persistent dosage imbalance between the autosomes and X chromosome. We expect that haploid human ES cells will provide novel means for studying human functional genomics and development. PMID:26982723

  11. Human adipose-derived stem cell transplantation as a potential therapy for collagen VI-related congenital muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neuromuscular disorders characterized by muscle weakness within the first two years of life. Collagen VI-related muscle disorders have recently emerged as one of the most common types of CMD. COL6 CMD is caused by deficiency and/or dysfunction of extracellular matrix (ECM) protein collagen VI. Currently, there is no specific treatment for this disabling and life-threatening disease. The primary cellular targets for collagen VI CMD therapy are fibroblasts in muscle, tendon and skin, as opposed to muscle cells for other types of muscular dystrophies. However, recent advances in stem cell research have raised the possibility that use of adult stem cells may provide dramatic new therapies for treatment of COL6 CMD. Methods Here, we developed a procedure for isolation of human stem cells from the adipose layer of neonatal skin. The adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC) were examined for expression of ECM and related genes using gene expression array analysis. The therapeutic potential of ADSC was assessed after a single intramuscular transplantation in collagen VI-deficient mice. Results Analysis of primary cultures confirmed that established ADSC represent a morphologically homogenous population with phenotypic and functional features of adult mesenchymal stem cells. A comprehensive gene expression analysis showed that ADSC express a vast array of ECM genes. Importantly, it was observed that ADSC synthesize and secrete all three collagen VI chains, suggesting suitability of ADSC for COL6 CMD treatment. Furthermore, we have found that a single intramuscular transplantation of ADSC into Col6a1−/−Rag1−/− mice under physiological and cardiotoxin-induced injury/regeneration conditions results in efficient engraftment and migration of stem cells within the skeletal muscle. Importantly, we showed that ADSC can survive long-term and continuously secrete the

  12. Integrating human stem cell expansion and neuronal differentiation in bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Margarida; Brito, Catarina; Costa, Eunice M; Sousa, Marcos FQ; Alves, Paula M

    2009-01-01

    Background Human stem cells are cellular resources with outstanding potential for cell therapy. However, for the fulfillment of this application, major challenges remain to be met. Of paramount importance is the development of robust systems for in vitro stem cell expansion and differentiation. In this work, we successfully developed an efficient scalable bioprocess for the fast production of human neurons. Results The expansion of undifferentiated human embryonal carcinoma stem cells (NTera2/cl.D1 cell line) as 3D-aggregates was firstly optimized in spinner vessel. The media exchange operation mode with an inoculum concentration of 4 × 105 cell/mL was the most efficient strategy tested, with a 4.6-fold increase in cell concentration achieved in 5 days. These results were validated in a bioreactor where similar profile and metabolic performance were obtained. Furthermore, characterization of the expanded population by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that NT2 cells maintained their stem cell characteristics along the bioreactor culture time. Finally, the neuronal differentiation step was integrated in the bioreactor process, by addition of retinoic acid when cells were in the middle of the exponential phase. Neurosphere composition was monitored and neuronal differentiation efficiency evaluated along the culture time. The results show that, for bioreactor cultures, we were able to increase significantly the neuronal differentiation efficiency by 10-fold while reducing drastically, by 30%, the time required for the differentiation process. Conclusion The culture systems developed herein are robust and represent one-step-forward towards the development of integrated bioprocesses, bridging stem cell expansion and differentiation in fully controlled bioreactors. PMID:19772662

  13. Inferring human stem cell behaviour from epigenetic drift.

    PubMed

    Shibata, D

    2009-01-01

    Although conventional experimental manipulations are impractical, it may be possible to infer human stem cell fates by 'reading' histories recorded within their genomes. Genomes are almost perfect copies of copies, and ancestries may be surreptitiously recorded by replication errors that inevitably accumulate. The greater the number of divisions, the greater the number of replication errors ('a molecular clock hypothesis'). Mutations rarely occur during a lifetime, but DNA methylation patterns are also copied after DNA replication and measurably drift with ageing at certain CpG sites in mitotic tissues, such as the colon. Such passenger methylation pattern variation may effectively function as 'epigenetic' somatic cell mitotic clocks. Replication errors can only accumulate in long-lived stem cell lineages, so methylation pattern drift largely records stem cell behaviour. How methylation patterns may encode stem cell ancestries is illustrated with two types of small reproductive units--colon crypt niches with continuous genealogies, and hair follicles with punctuated genealogies. Potentially, the genealogy of any human cell may be inferred by 'reading' its genome. PMID:19031430

  14. Myostatin acts as an autocrine/paracrine negative regulator in myoblast differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Kishida, Tsunao; Ejima, Akika; Gojo, Satoshi; Mazda, Osam

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► iPS-derived cells express myostatin and its receptor upon myoblast differentiation. ► Myostatin inhibits myoblast differentiation by inhibiting MyoD and Myo5a induction. ► Silencing of myostatin promotes differentiation of human iPS cells into myoblasts. -- Abstract: Myostatin, also known as growth differentiation factor (GDF-8), regulates proliferation of muscle satellite cells, and suppresses differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes via down-regulation of key myogenic differentiation factors including MyoD. Recent advances in stem cell biology have enabled generation of myoblasts from pluripotent stem cells, but it remains to be clarified whether myostatin is also involved in regulation of artificial differentiation of myoblasts from pluripotent stem cells. Here we show that the human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cells that were induced to differentiate into myoblasts expressed myostatin and its receptor during the differentiation. An addition of recombinant human myostatin (rhMyostatin) suppressed induction of MyoD and Myo5a, resulting in significant suppression of myoblast differentiation. The rhMyostatin treatment also inhibited proliferation of the cells at a later phase of differentiation. RNAi-mediated silencing of myostatin promoted differentiation of human iPS-derived embryoid body (EB) cells into myoblasts. These results strongly suggest that myostatin plays an important role in regulation of myoblast differentiation from iPS cells of human origin. The present findings also have significant implications for potential regenerative medicine for muscular diseases.

  15. Modeling neurodevelopmental disorders using human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Telias, Michael; Ben-Yosef, Dalit

    2014-08-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders (NDs) are impairments that affect the development and growth of the brain and the central nervous system during embryonic and early postnatal life. Genetically manipulated animals have contributed greatly to the advancement of ND research, but many of them differ considerably from the human phenotype. Cellular in vitro models are also valuable, but the availability of human neuronal cells is limited and their lifespan in culture is short. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, comprise a powerful tool for studying developmentally regulated diseases, including NDs. We reviewed all recent studies in which hPSCs were used as in vitro models for diseases and syndromes characterized by impairment of neurogenesis or synaptogenesis leading to intellectual disability and delayed neurodevelopment. We analyzed their methodology and results, focusing on the data obtained following in vitro neural differentiation and gene expression and profiling of the derived neurons. Electrophysiological recording of action potentials, synaptic currents and response to neurotransmitters is pivotal for validation of the neuronal fate as well as for assessing phenotypic dysfunctions linked to the disease in question. We therefore focused on the studies which included electrophysiological recordings on the in vitro-derived neurons. Finally, we addressed specific issues that are critical for the advancement of this area of research, specifically in providing a reliable human pre-clinical research model and drug screening platform. PMID:24728983

  16. Identification of a candidate stem cell in human gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Rohan; Li, Yaming; Fohrer, Helene; Guzik, Lynda; Stolz, Donna Beer; Chandran, Uma R; LaFramboise, William A; Lagasse, Eric

    2015-05-01

    There are currently no reports of identification of stem cells in human gallbladder. The differences between human gallbladder and intrahepatic bile duct (IHBD) cells have also not been explored. The goals of this study were to evaluate if human fetal gallbladder contains a candidate stem cell population and if fetal gallbladder cells are distinct from fetal IHBD cells. We found that EpCAM+CD44+CD13+ cells represent the cell population most enriched for clonal self-renewal from primary gallbladder. Primary EpCAM+CD44+CD13+ cells gave rise to EpCAM+CD44+CD13+ and EpCAM+CD44+CD13- cells in vitro, and gallbladder cells expanded in vitro exhibited short-term engraftment in vivo. Last, we found that CD13, CD227, CD66, CD26 and CD49b were differentially expressed between gallbladder and IHBD cells cultured in vitro indicating clear phenotypic differences between the two cell populations. Microarray analyses of expanded cultures confirmed that both cell types have unique transcriptional profiles with predicted functional differences in lipid, carbohydrate, nucleic acid and drug metabolism. In conclusion, we have isolated a distinct clonogenic population of epithelial cells from primary human fetal gallbladder with stem cell characteristics and found it to be unique compared to IHBD cells.

  17. Expression profiles of muscle disease-associated genes and their isoforms during differentiation of cultured human skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The formation of contractile myofibrils requires the stepwise onset of expression of muscle specific proteins. It is likely that elucidation of the expression patterns of muscle-specific sarcomeric proteins is important to understand muscle disorders originating from defects in contractile sarcomeric proteins. Methods We investigated the expression profile of a panel of sarcomeric components with a focus on proteins associated with a group of congenital disorders. The analyses were performed in cultured human skeletal muscle cells during myoblast proliferation and myotube development. Results Our culture technique resulted in the development of striated myotubes and the expression of adult isoforms of the sarcomeric proteins, such as fast TnI, fast TnT, adult fast and slow MyHC isoforms and predominantly skeletal muscle rather than cardiac actin. Many proteins involved in muscle diseases, such as beta tropomyosin, slow TnI, slow MyBPC and cardiac TnI were readily detected in the initial stages of muscle cell differentiation, suggesting the possibility of an early role for these proteins as constituent of the developing contractile apparatus during myofibrillogenesis. This suggests that in disease conditions the mechanisms of pathogenesis for each of the mutated sarcomeric proteins might be reflected by altered expression patterns, and disturbed assembly of cytoskeletal, myofibrillar structures and muscle development. Conclusions In conclusion, we here confirm that cell cultures of human skeletal muscle are an appropriate tool to study developmental stages of myofibrillogenesis. The expression of several disease-associated proteins indicates that they might be a useful model system for studying the pathogenesis of muscle diseases caused by defects in specific sarcomeric constituents. PMID:23273262

  18. Feasible Muscle Activation Ranges Based on Inverse Dynamics Analyses of Human Walking

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Cole S.; Sohn, M. Hongchul; Allen, Jessica L.; Ting, Lena H.

    2015-01-01

    Although it is possible to produce the same movement using an infinite number of different muscle activation patterns owing to musculoskeletal redundancy, the degree to which observed variations in muscle activity can deviate from optimal solutions computed from biomechanical models is not known. Here, we examined the range of biomechanically permitted activation levels in individual muscles during human walking using a detailed musculoskeletal model and experimentally-measured kinetics and kinematics. Feasible muscle activation ranges define the minimum and maximum possible level of each muscle’s activation that satisfy inverse dynamics joint torques assuming that all other muscles can vary their activation as needed. During walking, 73% of the muscles had feasible muscle activation ranges that were greater than 95% of the total muscle activation range over more than 95% of the gait cycle, indicating that, individually, most muscles could be fully active or fully inactive while still satisfying inverse dynamics joint torques. Moreover, the shapes of the feasible muscle activation ranges did not resemble previously-reported muscle activation patterns nor optimal solutions, i.e. static optimization and computed muscle control, that are based on the same biomechanical constraints. Our results demonstrate that joint torque requirements from standard inverse dynamics calculations are insufficient to define the activation of individual muscles during walking in healthy individuals. Identifying feasible muscle activation ranges may be an effective way to evaluate the impact of additional biomechanical and/or neural constraints on possible versus actual muscle activity in both normal and impaired movements. PMID:26300401

  19. CD146 expression on mesenchymal stem cells is associated with their vascular smooth muscle commitment

    PubMed Central

    Espagnolle, Nicolas; Guilloton, Fabien; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Gadelorge, Mélanie; Sensébé, Luc; Bourin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are plastic adherent cells that can differentiate into various tissue lineages, including osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. However, this progenitor property is not shared by all cells within the MSC population. In addition, MSCs vary in their proliferation capacity and expression of markers. Because of heterogeneity of CD146 expression in the MSC population, we compared CD146−/Low and CD146High cells under clonal conditions and after sorting of the non-clonal cell population to determine whether this expression is associated with specific functions. CD146−/Low and CD146High bone marrow MSCs did not differ in colony-forming unit-fibroblast number, osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation or in vitro haematopoietic-supportive activity. However, CD146−/Low clones proliferated slightly but significantly faster than did CD146High clones. In addition, a strong expression of CD146 molecule was associated with a commitment to a vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) lineage characterized by a strong up-regulation of calponin-1 and SM22α expression and an ability to contract collagen matrix. Thus, within a bone marrow MSC population, certain subpopulations characterized by high expression of CD146, are committed towards a VSMC lineage. PMID:24188055

  20. CD146 expression on mesenchymal stem cells is associated with their vascular smooth muscle commitment.

    PubMed

    Espagnolle, Nicolas; Guilloton, Fabien; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Gadelorge, Mélanie; Sensébé, Luc; Bourin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are plastic adherent cells that can differentiate into various tissue lineages, including osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. However, this progenitor property is not shared by all cells within the MSC population. In addition, MSCs vary in their proliferation capacity and expression of markers. Because of heterogeneity of CD146 expression in the MSC population, we compared CD146(-/Low) and CD146(High) cells under clonal conditions and after sorting of the non-clonal cell population to determine whether this expression is associated with specific functions. CD146(-/Low) and CD146(High) bone marrow MSCs did not differ in colony-forming unit-fibroblast number, osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation or in vitro haematopoietic-supportive activity. However, CD146(-/Low) clones proliferated slightly but significantly faster than did CD146(High) clones. In addition, a strong expression of CD146 molecule was associated with a commitment to a vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) lineage characterized by a strong up-regulation of calponin-1 and SM22α expression and an ability to contract collagen matrix. Thus, within a bone marrow MSC population, certain subpopulations characterized by high expression of CD146, are committed towards a VSMC lineage.

  1. Implantable tissue-engineered blood vessels from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gui, Liqiong; Dash, Biraja C; Luo, Jiesi; Qin, Lingfeng; Zhao, Liping; Yamamoto, Kota; Hashimoto, Takuya; Wu, Hongwei; Dardik, Alan; Tellides, George; Niklason, Laura E; Qyang, Yibing

    2016-09-01

    Derivation of functional vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) to generate tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) holds great potential in treating patients with vascular diseases. Herein, hiPSCs were differentiated into alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and calponin-positive VSMCs, which were seeded onto polymer scaffolds in bioreactors for vascular tissue growth. A functional TEBV with abundant collagenous matrix and sound mechanics resulted, which contained cells largely positive for α-SMA and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC). Moreover, when hiPSC-derived TEBV segments were implanted into nude rats as abdominal aorta interposition grafts, they remained unruptured and patent with active vascular remodeling, and showed no evidence of teratoma formation during a 2-week proof-of-principle study. Our studies represent the development of the first implantable TEBVs based on hiPSCs, and pave the way for developing autologous or allogeneic grafts for clinical use in patients with vascular disease. PMID:27336184

  2. A regulatory argument against human embryonic stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Napier, Stephen

    2009-10-01

    This article explores the plausibility of an argument against embryonic stem cell research based on what the regulations already say about research on pregnant women and fetuses. The center of the argument is the notion of vulnerability and whether such a concept is applicable to human embryos. It is argued that such an argument can be made plausible. The article concludes by responding to several important objections.

  3. Generation of folliculogenic human epithelial stem cells from induced pluripotent stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruifeng; Zheng, Ying; Burrows, Michelle; Liu, Shujing; Wei, Zhi; Nace, Arben; Guo, Wei; Kumar, Suresh; Cotsarelis, George; Xu, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial stem cells (EpSCs) in the hair follicle bulge are required for hair follicle growth and cycling. The isolation and propagation of human EpSCs for tissue engineering purposes remains a challenge. Here we develop a strategy to differentiate human iPSCs (hiPSCs) into CD200+/ITGA6+ EpSCs that can reconstitute the epithelial components of the hair follicle and interfollicular epidermis. The hiPSC-derived CD200+/ITGA6+ cells show a similar gene expression signature as EpSCs directly isolated from human hair follicles. Human iPSC-derived CD200+/ITGA6+ cells are capable of generating all hair follicle lineages including the hair shaft, and the inner and outer root sheaths in skin reconstitution assays. The regenerated hair follicles possess a KRT15+ stem cell population and produce hair shafts expressing hair-specific keratins. These results suggest an approach for generating large numbers of human EpSCs for tissue engineering and new treatments for hair loss, wound healing and other degenerative skin disorders.

  4. Paracrine effects of haematopoietic cells on human mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuanhu

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell function decline during ageing can involve both cell intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. Bone and blood formation are intertwined in bone marrow, therefore haematopoietic cells and bone cells could be extrinsic factors for each other. In this study, we assessed the paracrine effects of extrinsic factors from haematopoietic cells on human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Our data showed that haematopoietic cells stimulate proliferation, osteoblast differentiation and inhibit senescence of MSCs; TNF-α, PDGF-β, Wnt1, 4, 6, 7a and 10a, sFRP-3 and sFRP-5 are dominantly expressed in haematopoietic cells; the age-related increase of TNF-α in haematopoietic cells may perform as a negative factor in the interactions of haematopoietic cells on MSCs via TNF-α receptors and then activating NF-κB signaling or Wnt/β-catenin signaling to induce senescence and reduce osteoblast differentiation in MSCs. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that there are paracrine interactions of haematopoietic cells on human MSCs; immunosenescence may be one of the extrinsic mechanisms by which skeletal stem cell function decline during human skeletal ageing. PMID:26030407

  5. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gill, Katherine P; Hung, Sandy S C; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E; Nayagam, Bryony A; Cook, Anthony L; Hewitt, Alex W; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C B

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  6. A Novel Class of Human Cardiac Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Moccetti, Tiziano; Leri, Annarosa; Goichberg, Polina; Rota, Marcello; Anversa, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Following the recognition that hematopoietic stem cells improve the outcome of myocardial infarction in animal models, bone marrow mononuclear cells, CD34-positive cells, and mesenchymal stromal cells have been introduced clinically. The intracoronary or intramyocardial injection of these cell classes has been shown to be safe and to produce a modest but significant enhancement in systolic function. However, the identification of resident cardiac stem cells in the human heart (hCSCs) has created great expectation concerning the potential implementation of this category of autologous cells for the management of the human disease. Although phase 1 clinical trials have been conducted with encouraging results, the search for the most powerful hCSC for myocardial regeneration is in its infancy. This manuscript discusses the efforts performed in our laboratory to characterize the critical biological variables that define the growth reserve of hCSCs. Based on the theory of the immortal DNA template, we propose that stem cells retaining the old DNA represent 1 of the most powerful cells for myocardial regeneration. Similarly, the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptors in hCSCs recognizes a cell phenotype with superior replicating reserve. However, the impressive recovery in ventricular hemodynamics and anatomy mediated by clonal hCSCs carrying the "mother" DNA underscores the clinical relevance of this hCSC class for the treatment of human heart failure.

  7. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Katherine P.; Hung, Sandy S. C.; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y.; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E.; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Cook, Anthony L.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  8. A Novel Class of Human Cardiac Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moccetti, Tiziano; Leri, Annarosa; Goichberg, Polina; Rota, Marcello; Anversa, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Following the recognition that hematopoietic stem cells improve the outcome of myocardial infarction in animal models, bone marrow mononuclear cells, CD34-positive cells and mesenchymal stromal cells have been introduced clinically. The intracoronary or intramyocardial injection of these cell classes has been shown to be safe and to produce a modest but significant enhancement in systolic function. However, the identification of resident cardiac stem cells in the human heart (hCSCs) has created great expectation concerning the potential implementation of this category of autologous cells for the management of the human disease. Although phase 1 clinical trials have been conducted with encouraging results, the search for the most powerful hCSC for myocardial regeneration is in its infancy. This manuscript discusses the efforts performed in our laboratory to characterize the critical biological variables that define the growth reserve of hCSCs. Based on the theory of the immortal DNA template, we propose that stem cells retaining the old DNA represent one of the most powerful cells for myocardial regeneration. Similarly, the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptors in hCSCs recognizes a cell phenotype with superior replicating reserve. However, the impressive recovery in ventricular hemodynamics and anatomy mediated by clonal hCSCs carrying the “mother” DNA underscores the clinical relevance of this hCSC class for the treatment of human heart failure. PMID:25807105

  9. GLIOMA STEM CELL HOMING TO THE HUMAN SUBVENTRICULAR ZONE

    PubMed Central

    Sanai, Nader; Kusne, Yael; Su, Ning; Hemdan, Sandy; Mirzadeh, Zaman; Shi, Fu-Dong

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: (blind field) METHODS: Using intraoperatively-derived human tissue, we employ a combination of cell culture, FACS-sorting, and immunohistochemistry techniques to characterize human glioma and GSC homing to the SVZ, as well as identify new, targetable cytokine pathways relevant to this niche. RESULTS: Our analysis identifies glioma cells homing to human SVZ and co-opting the gap layer for tangential migration. Interestingly, we find that human SVZ-invasive glioma cells are 50-fold more likely to function as glioma stem cells. Organotypic slice culture and co-culture assays also identify chemotactic effects, associated integrins, and related extracellular matrix proteins of 3 SVZ-enriched ligands (EGF, PDGF-BB, and SDF1) known to drive pro-migratory glioma pathways. CONCLUSIONS: Despite its quiescence, the adult human SVZ retains the signaling machinery to support cell migration and these mechanisms may be co-opted by glioma stem cells during subependymal spread in humans. SECONDARY CATEGORY: n/a.

  10. Generation of human melanocytes from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Shigeki; Imaizumi, Yoichi; Okada, Yohei; Akamatsu, Wado; Kuwahara, Reiko; Ohyama, Manabu; Amagai, Masayuki; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kawakami, Yutaka

    2011-01-13

    Epidermal melanocytes play an important role in protecting the skin from UV rays, and their functional impairment results in pigment disorders. Additionally, melanomas are considered to arise from mutations that accumulate in melanocyte stem cells. The mechanisms underlying melanocyte differentiation and the defining characteristics of melanocyte stem cells in humans are, however, largely unknown. In the present study, we set out to generate melanocytes from human iPS cells in vitro, leading to a preliminary investigation of the mechanisms of human melanocyte differentiation. We generated iPS cell lines from human dermal fibroblasts using the Yamanaka factors (SOX2, OCT3/4, and KLF4, with or without c-MYC). These iPS cell lines were subsequently used to form embryoid bodies (EBs) and then differentiated into melanocytes via culture supplementation with Wnt3a, SCF, and ET-3. Seven weeks after inducing differentiation, pigmented cells expressing melanocyte markers such as MITF, tyrosinase, SILV, and TYRP1, were detected. Melanosomes were identified in these pigmented cells by electron microscopy, and global gene expression profiling of the pigmented cells showed a high similarity to that of human primary foreskin-derived melanocytes, suggesting the successful generation of melanocytes from iPS cells. This in vitro differentiation system should prove useful for understanding human melanocyte biology and revealing the mechanism of various pigment cell disorders, including melanoma.

  11. Neural stem cells in the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    For decades, it was believed that the adult brain was a quiescent organ unable to produce new neurons. At the beginning of the1960's, this dogma was challenged by a small group of neuroscientists. To date, it is well-known that new neurons are generated in the adult brain throughout life. Adult neurogenesis is primary confined to the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the forebrain and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus within the hippocampus. In both the human and the rodent brain, the primary progenitor of adult SVZ is a subpopulation of astrocytes that have stem-cell-like features. The human SVZ possesses a peculiar cell composition and displays important organizational differences when compared to the SVZ of other mammals. Some evidence suggests that the human SVZ may be not only an endogenous source of neural precursor cells for brain repair, but also a source of brain tumors. In this review, we described the cytoarchitecture and cellular composition of the SVZ in the adult human brain. We also discussed some clinical implications of SVZ, such as: stem-cell-based therapies against neurodegenerative diseases and its potential as a source of malignant cells. Understanding the biology of human SVZ and its neural progenitors is one of the crucial steps to develop novel therapies against neurological diseases in humans. PMID:23181200

  12. Development of the stapedius muscle and unilateral agenesia of the tendon of the stapedius muscle in a human fetus.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Mérida-Velasco, J R; Verdugo-López, S

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to analyze the development of the stapedius muscle to understand an isolated unilateral absence of the tendon of the stapedius muscle in a human fetus. The study was made on 50 human embryos and fetuses aged 38 days to 17 weeks post-conception. The stapedius muscle was formed by two anlagen, one for the tendon, which derives from the internal segment of the interhyale and another for the belly, located in the second pharyngeal arch, medially to the facial nerve and near the interhyale. In the interhyale, two segments were observed forming an angle and delimited by the attachment of the belly of the stapedius muscle. The internal segment will form the tendon. The lateral segment of the interhyale was attached to the cranial end of the Reichert's cartilage (laterohyale), and normally it disappears at the beginning of the fetal period. The right unilateral agenesia of the tendon of the stapedius muscle, observed for the first time in a human fetus of 14 weeks post-conception development (PCd), was brought about by the lack of formation or the regression of the internal segment of the interhyale. It presented a belly of the stapedius muscle with an anomalous arrangement, and with a pseudo tendon originated by the persistence of the external segment of the interhyale.

  13. Exceptional evolutionary divergence of human muscle and brain metabolomes parallels human cognitive and physical uniqueness.

    PubMed

    Bozek, Katarzyna; Wei, Yuning; Yan, Zheng; Liu, Xiling; Xiong, Jieyi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Tomita, Masaru; Pääbo, Svante; Pieszek, Raik; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R; Ely, John J; Steinhauser, Dirk; Willmitzer, Lothar; Bangsbo, Jens; Hansson, Ola; Call, Josep; Giavalisco, Patrick; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2014-05-01

    Metabolite concentrations reflect the physiological states of tissues and cells. However, the role of metabolic changes in species evolution is currently unknown. Here, we present a study of metabolome evolution conducted in three brain regions and two non-neural tissues from humans, chimpanzees, macaque monkeys, and mice based on over 10,000 hydrophilic compounds. While chimpanzee, macaque, and mouse metabolomes diverge following the genetic distances among species, we detect remarkable acceleration of metabolome evolution in human prefrontal cortex and skeletal muscle affecting neural and energy metabolism pathways. These metabolic changes could not be attributed to environmental conditions and were confirmed against the expression of their corresponding enzymes. We further conducted muscle strength tests in humans, chimpanzees, and macaques. The results suggest that, while humans are characterized by superior cognition, their muscular performance might be markedly inferior to that of chimpanzees and macaque monkeys. PMID:24866127

  14. Exceptional Evolutionary Divergence of Human Muscle and Brain Metabolomes Parallels Human Cognitive and Physical Uniqueness

    PubMed Central

    Bozek, Katarzyna; Wei, Yuning; Yan, Zheng; Liu, Xiling; Xiong, Jieyi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Tomita, Masaru; Pääbo, Svante; Pieszek, Raik; Sherwood, Chet C.; Hof, Patrick R.; Ely, John J.; Steinhauser, Dirk; Willmitzer, Lothar; Bangsbo, Jens; Hansson, Ola; Call, Josep; Giavalisco, Patrick; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Metabolite concentrations reflect the physiological states of tissues and cells. However, the role of metabolic changes in species evolution is currently unknown. Here, we present a study of metabolome evolution conducted in three brain regions and two non-neural tissues from humans, chimpanzees, macaque monkeys, and mice based on over 10,000 hydrophilic compounds. While chimpanzee, macaque, and mouse metabolomes diverge following the genetic distances among species, we detect remarkable acceleration of metabolome evolution in human prefrontal cortex and skeletal muscle affecting neural and energy metabolism pathways. These metabolic changes could not be attributed to environmental conditions and were confirmed against the expression of their corresponding enzymes. We further conducted muscle strength tests in humans, chimpanzees, and macaques. The results suggest that, while humans are characterized by superior cognition, their muscular performance might be markedly inferior to that of chimpanzees and macaque monkeys. PMID:24866127

  15. Myostatin acts as an autocrine/paracrine negative regulator in myoblast differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Kishida, Tsunao; Ejima, Akika; Gojo, Satoshi; Mazda, Osam

    2013-02-01

    Myostatin, also known as growth differentiation factor (GDF-8), regulates proliferation of muscle satellite cells, and suppresses differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes via down-regulation of key myogenic differentiation factors including MyoD. Recent advances in stem cell biology have enabled generation of myoblasts from pluripotent stem cells, but it remains to be clarified whether myostatin is also involved in regulation of artificial differentiation of myoblasts from pluripotent stem cells. Here we show that the human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cells that were induced to differentiate into myoblasts expressed myostatin and its receptor during the differentiation. An addition of recombinant human myostatin (rhMyostatin) suppressed induction of MyoD and Myo5a, resulting in significant suppression of myoblast differentiation. The rhMyostatin treatment also inhibited proliferation of the cells at a later phase of differentiation. RNAi-mediated silencing of myostatin promoted differentiation of human iPS-derived embryoid body (EB) cells into myoblasts. These results strongly suggest that myostatin plays an important role in regulation of myoblast differentiation from iPS cells of human origin. The present findings also have significant implications for potential regenerative medicine for muscular diseases. PMID:23291166

  16. Comparison of human adipose-derived stem cells and bone marrow-derived stem cells in a myocardial infarction model.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Jeppe Grøndahl; Frøbert, Ole; Holst-Hansen, Claus; Kastrup, Jens; Baandrup, Ulrik; Zachar, Vladimir; Fink, Trine; Simonsen, Ulf

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of myocardial infarction (MI) with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and recently also adipose-derived stem cells has shown promising results. In contrast to clinical trials and their use of autologous bone marrow-derived cells from the ischemic patient, the animal MI models are often using young donors and young, often immune-compromised, recipient animals. Our objective was to compare bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with adipose-derived stem cells from an elderly ischemic patient in the treatment of MI using a fully grown non-immune-compromised rat model. Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from adipose tissue and bone marrow and compared with respect to surface markers and proliferative capability. To compare the regenerative potential of the two stem cell populations, male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive intramyocardial injections of adipose-derived stem cells, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, or phosphate-buffered saline 1 week following induction of MI. After 4 weeks, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was improved in the adipose-derived stem cell group, and scar wall thickness was greater compared with the saline group. Adipose-derived as well as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells prevented left ventricular end diastolic dilation. Neither of the cell groups displayed increased angiogenesis in the myocardium compared with the saline group. Adipose-derived stem cells from a human ischemic patient preserved cardiac function following MI, whereas this could not be demonstrated for bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, with only adipose-derived stem cells leading to an improvement in LVEF. Neither of the stem cell types induced myocardial angiogenesis, raising the question whether donor age and health have an effect on the efficacy of stem cells used in the treatment of MI.

  17. Comparison of human adipose-derived stem cells and bone marrow-derived stem cells in a myocardial infarction model.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Jeppe Grøndahl; Frøbert, Ole; Holst-Hansen, Claus; Kastrup, Jens; Baandrup, Ulrik; Zachar, Vladimir; Fink, Trine; Simonsen, Ulf

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of myocardial infarction (MI) with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and recently also adipose-derived stem cells has shown promising results. In contrast to clinical trials and their use of autologous bone marrow-derived cells from the ischemic patient, the animal MI models are often using young donors and young, often immune-compromised, recipient animals. Our objective was to compare bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with adipose-derived stem cells from an elderly ischemic patient in the treatment of MI using a fully grown non-immune-compromised rat model. Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from adipose tissue and bone marrow and compared with respect to surface markers and proliferative capability. To compare the regenerative potential of the two stem cell populations, male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive intramyocardial injections of adipose-derived stem cells, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, or phosphate-buffered saline 1 week following induction of MI. After 4 weeks, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was improved in the adipose-derived stem cell group, and scar wall thickness was greater compared with the saline group. Adipose-derived as well as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells prevented left ventricular end diastolic dilation. Neither of the cell groups displayed increased angiogenesis in the myocardium compared with the saline group. Adipose-derived stem cells from a human ischemic patient preserved cardiac function following MI, whereas this could not be demonstrated for bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, with only adipose-derived stem cells leading to an improvement in LVEF. Neither of the stem cell types induced myocardial angiogenesis, raising the question whether donor age and health have an effect on the efficacy of stem cells used in the treatment of MI. PMID:23211469

  18. PTEN deficiency reprogrammes human neural stem cells towards a glioblastoma stem cell-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shunlei; Yuan, Guohong; Liu, Xiaomeng; Ren, Ruotong; Li, Jingyi; Zhang, Weizhou; Wu, Jun; Xu, Xiuling; Fu, Lina; Li, Ying; Yang, Jiping; Zhang, Weiqi; Bai, Ruijun; Yi, Fei; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Gao, Hua; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Zhang, Chuanbao; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Xiaomin; Jiang, Tao; Qu, Jing; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Guang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor frequently mutated in many types of cancers. Here we show that targeted disruption of PTEN leads to neoplastic transformation of human neural stem cells (NSCs), but not mesenchymal stem cells. PTEN-deficient NSCs display neoplasm-associated metabolic and gene expression profiles and generate intracranial tumours in immunodeficient mice. PTEN is localized to the nucleus in NSCs, binds to the PAX7 promoter through association with cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB)/CREB binding protein (CBP) and inhibits PAX7 transcription. PTEN deficiency leads to the upregulation of PAX7, which in turn promotes oncogenic transformation of NSCs and instates 'aggressiveness' in human glioblastoma stem cells. In a large clinical database, we find increased PAX7 levels in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma. Furthermore, we identify that mitomycin C selectively triggers apoptosis in NSCs with PTEN deficiency. Together, we uncover a potential mechanism of how PTEN safeguards NSCs, and establish a cellular platform to identify factors involved in NSC transformation, potentially permitting personalized treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:26632666

  19. PTEN deficiency reprogrammes human neural stem cells towards a glioblastoma stem cell-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Duan, Shunlei; Yuan, Guohong; Liu, Xiaomeng; Ren, Ruotong; Li, Jingyi; Zhang, Weizhou; Wu, Jun; Xu, Xiuling; Fu, Lina; Li, Ying; Yang, Jiping; Zhang, Weiqi; Bai, Ruijun; Yi, Fei; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Gao, Hua; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Zhang, Chuanbao; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Xiaomin; Jiang, Tao; Qu, Jing; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Guang-Hui

    2015-12-03

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor frequently mutated in many types of cancers. Here we show that targeted disruption of PTEN leads to neoplastic transformation of human neural stem cells (NSCs), but not mesenchymal stem cells. PTEN-deficient NSCs display neoplasm-associated metabolic and gene expression profiles and generate intracranial tumours in immunodeficient mice. PTEN is localized to the nucleus in NSCs, binds to the PAX7 promoter through association with cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB)/CREB binding protein (CBP) and inhibits PAX7 transcription. PTEN deficiency leads to the upregulation of PAX7, which in turn promotes oncogenic transformation of NSCs and instates 'aggressiveness' in human glioblastoma stem cells. In a large clinical database, we find increased PAX7 levels in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma. Furthermore, we identify that mitomycin C selectively triggers apoptosis in NSCs with PTEN deficiency. Together, we uncover a potential mechanism of how PTEN safeguards NSCs, and establish a cellular platform to identify factors involved in NSC transformation, potentially permitting personalized treatment of glioblastoma.

  20. Nanofibrous substrates support colony formation and maintain stemness of human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gauthaman, Kalamegam; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Yee, Fong Chui; Peh, Gary Swee Lim; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Bongso, Ariff

    2009-01-01

    Inadequate cell numbers in culture is one of the hurdles currently delaying the application of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) for transplantation therapy. Nanofibrous scaffolds have been effectively used to expand and differentiate non-colony forming multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) for the repair of tissues or organs. In the present study, we evaluated the influence of nanofibrous scaffolds for hESC proliferation, increase in colony formation, self-renewal properties, undifferentiation and retention of ‘stemness’. Polycaprolactone/collagen (PCL/collagen) and PCL/gelatin nanofibrous scaffolds were fabricated using electrospinning technology. The hESCs were seeded on the nanofibrous scaffolds in the presence or absence of mitomycin-C treated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). The hESCs grown on both scaffolds in the presence of the MEFs produced an increase in cell growth of 47.58% (P≤ 0.006) and 40.18% (P≤ 0.005), respectively, over conventional controls of hESCs on MEFs alone. The hESC colonies were also larger in diameter on the scaffolds compared to controls (PCL/collagen, 156.25 ± 7 μM and PCL/gelatin, 135.42 ± 5 μM). Immunohistochemistry of the hESCs grown on the nanofibrous scaffolds with MEFs, demonstrated positive staining for the various stemness-related markers (octamer 4 [OCT-4], tumour rejection antigen-1–60, GCTM-2 and TG-30), and semi-quantitative RT-PCR for the pluripotent stemness genomic markers (NANOG, SOX-2, OCT-4) showed that they were also highly expressed. Continued successful propagation of hESC colonies from nanofibrous scaffolds back to conventional culture on MEFs was also possible. Nanofibrous scaffolds support hESC expansion in an undifferentiated state with retention of stemness characteristics thus having tremendous potential in scaling up cell numbers for transplantation therapy. PMID:19228268

  1. Human pluripotent stem cell-derived limbal epithelial stem cells on bioengineered matrices for corneal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Mikhailova, Alexandra; Ilmarinen, Tanja; Ratnayake, Anjula; Petrovski, Goran; Uusitalo, Hannu; Skottman, Heli; Rafat, Mehrdad

    2016-05-01

    Corneal epithelium is renewed by limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs), a type of tissue-specific stem cells located in the limbal palisades of Vogt at the corneo-scleral junction. Acute trauma or inflammatory disorders of the ocular surface can destroy these stem cells, leading to limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) - a painful and vision-threatening condition. Treating these disorders is often challenging and complex, especially in bilateral cases with extensive damage. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide new opportunities for corneal reconstruction using cell-based therapy. Here, we investigated the use of hPSC-derived LESC-like cells on bioengineered collagen matrices in serum-free conditions, aiming for clinical applications to reconstruct the corneal epithelium and partially replace the damaged stroma. Differentiation of hPSCs towards LESC-like cells was directed using small-molecule induction followed by maturation in corneal epithelium culture medium. After four to five weeks of culture, differentiated cells were seeded onto bioengineered matrices fabricated as transparent membranes of uniform thickness, using medical-grade porcine collagen type I and a hybrid cross-linking technology. The bioengineered matrices were fully transparent, with high water content and swelling capacity, and parallel lamellar microstructure. Cell proliferation of hPSC-LESCs was significantly higher on bioengineered matrices than on collagen-coated control wells after two weeks of culture, and LESC markers p63 and cytokeratin 15, along with proliferation marker Ki67 were expressed even after 30 days in culture. Overall, hPSC-LESCs retained their capacity to self-renew and proliferate, but were also able to terminally differentiate upon stimulation, as suggested by protein expression of cytokeratins 3 and 12. We propose the use of bioengineered collagen matrices as carriers for the clinically-relevant hPSC-derived LESC-like cells, as a novel tissue engineering approach for

  2. Human brain stem structures respond differentially to noxious heat.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Alexander; Franz, Marcel; Dietrich, Caroline; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Concerning the physiological correlates of pain, the brain stem is considered to be one core region that is activated by noxious input. In animal studies, different slopes of skin heating (SSH) with noxious heat led to activation in different columns of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG). The present study aimed at finding a method for differentiating structures in PAG and other brain stem structures, which are associated with different qualities of pain in humans according to the structures that were associated with different behavioral significances to noxious thermal stimulation in animals. Brain activity was studied by functional MRI in healthy subjects in response to steep and shallow SSH with noxious heat. We found differential activation to different SSH in the PAG and the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). In a second experiment, we demonstrate that the different SSH were associated with different pain qualities. Our experiments provide evidence that brainstem structures, i.e., the PAG and the RVM, become differentially activated by different SSH. Therefore, different SSH can be utilized when brain stem structures are investigated and when it is aimed to activate these structures differentially. Moreover, percepts of first pain were elicited by shallow SSH whereas percepts of second pain were elicited by steep SSH. The stronger activation of these brain stem structures to SSH, eliciting percepts of second vs. first pain, might be of relevance for activating different coping strategies in response to the noxious input with the two types of SSH.

  3. A Comparison of Culture Characteristics between Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Dental Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yusoff, Nurul Hidayat; Alshehadat, Saaid Ayesh; Azlina, Ahmad; Kannan, Thirumulu Ponnuraj; Hamid, Suzina Sheikh Abdul

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, the field of stem cell biology is of major interest among researchers due to its broad therapeutic potential. Stem cells are a class of undifferentiated cells that are able to differentiate into specialised cell types. Stem cells can be classified into two main types: adult stem cells (adult tissues) and embryonic stem cells (embryos formed during the blastocyst phase of embryological development). This review will discuss two types of adult mesenchymal stem cells, dental stem cells and amniotic stem cells, with respect to their differentiation lineages, passage numbers and animal model studies. Amniotic stem cells have a greater number of differentiation lineages than dental stem cells. On the contrary, dental stem cells showed the highest number of passages compared to amniotic stem cells. For tissue regeneration based on animal studies, amniotic stem cells showed the shortest time to regenerate in comparison with dental stem cells.

  4. Regional neuromuscular regulation within human rectus femoris muscle during gait.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kohei; Kouzaki, Motoki; Moritani, Toshio

    2014-11-01

    The spatial distribution pattern of neuromuscular activation within the human rectus femoris (RF) muscle was investigated during gait by multi-channel surface electromyography (surface EMG). Eleven healthy men walked on a treadmill with three gait speeds (4, 5, and 6 km/h) and gradients (0°, 12.5°, and 25°). The spatial distribution of surface EMG was tested by central locus activation (CLA), which is calculated from 2-D multi-channel surface EMG with 46 surface electrodes. For all conditions, CLA was around the middle regions during the swing-to-stance transition and moved in a proximal direction during the stance phase and stance-to-swing transition (p<0.05). CLA during the stance-to-swing transition and early swing phase significantly moved to proximal site with increasing gait speed (p<0.05). During the early stance and swing phases, with increasing grade, CLA significantly moved distally (p<0.05). These results suggest that the RF muscle is regionally activated during a gait cycle and is non-uniformly regulated longitudinally.

  5. Effect of swim exercise training on human muscle fiber function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, R. H.; Costill, D. L.; Gardetto, P. R.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of swim exercise training on the human muscle fiber function was investigated in swimmers trained in a typical collegiate swim-training program followed by an intensified 10-day training period. The measured parameters included the peak tension (P0), negative log molar Ca(2+) concentration (pCa)-force, and maximal shortening speed (Vmax) of the slow-twitch type I and fast-twitch type II fibers obtained by biopsy from the deltoid muscle. The P0 values were found to be not altered after either the training or the 10-day intensive program. The type I fibers from the trained swimmers showed pCa-force curves shifted to the right, such that higher free Ca(2+) levels were required to elicit a given percent of P0. The training program significantly increased the Vmax in the type I fibers and decreased that of the type II fibers, and the 10-day intensive training produced a further significant decrease of the type II fibers.

  6. Isolation of human umbilical arterial smooth muscle cells (HUASMC).

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Maximiano P; Relvas, Ricardo; Chiquita, Samuel; Correia, Ilídio J

    2010-07-03

    The human umbilical cord (UC) is a biological sample that can be easily obtained just after birth. This biological sample is, most of the time, discarded and their collection does not imply any added risk to the newborn or mother s health. Moreover no ethical concerns are raised. The UC is composed by one vein and two arteries from which both endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs), two of the main cellular components of blood vessels, can be isolated. In this project the SMCs were obtained after enzymatic treatment of the UC arteries accordingly the experimental procedure previously described by Jaffe et al. After cell isolation they were kept in t-flash with DMEM-F12 supplemented with 5% of fetal bovine serum and were cultured for several passages. Cells maintained their morphological and other phenotypic characteristics in the different generations. The aim of this study was to isolate smooth muscle cells in order to use them as models for future assays with constrictor drugs, isolate and structurally characterize L-type calcium channels, to study cellular and molecular aspects of the vascular function and to use them in tissue engineering.

  7. Genomic organization of the human skeletal muscle sodium channel gene

    SciTech Connect

    George, A.L. Jr.; Iyer, G.S.; Kleinfield, R.; Kallen, R.G.; Barchi, R.L. )

    1993-03-01

    Voltage-dependent sodium channels are essential for normal membrane excitability and contractility in adult skeletal muscle. The gene encoding the principal sodium channel [alpha]-subunit isoform in human skeletal muscle (SCN4A) has recently been shown to harbor point mutations in certain hereditary forms of periodic paralysis. The authors have carried out an analysis of the detailed structure of this gene including delination of intron-exon boundaries by genomic DNA cloning and sequence analysis. The complete coding region of SCN4A is found in 32.5 kb of genomic DNA and consists of 24 exons (54 to >2.2 kb) and 23 introns (97 bp-4.85 kb). The exon organization of the gene shows no relationship to the predicted functional domains of the channel protein and splice junctions interrupt many of the transmembrane segments. The genomic organization of sodium channels may have been partially conserved during evolution as evidenced by the observation that 10 of the 24 splice junctions in SCN4A are positioned in homologous locations in a putative sodium channel gene in Drosophila (para). The information presented here should be extremely useful both for further identifying sodium channel mutations and for gaining a better understanding of sodium channel evolution. 39 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Derivation of novel human ground state naive pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gafni, Ohad; Weinberger, Leehee; Mansour, Abed AlFatah; Manor, Yair S; Chomsky, Elad; Ben-Yosef, Dalit; Kalma, Yael; Viukov, Sergey; Maza, Itay; Zviran, Asaf; Rais, Yoach; Shipony, Zohar; Mukamel, Zohar; Krupalnik, Vladislav; Zerbib, Mirie; Geula, Shay; Caspi, Inbal; Schneir, Dan; Shwartz, Tamar; Gilad, Shlomit; Amann-Zalcenstein, Daniela; Benjamin, Sima; Amit, Ido; Tanay, Amos; Massarwa, Rada; Novershtern, Noa; Hanna, Jacob H

    2013-12-12

    Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are isolated from the inner cell mass of blastocysts, and can be preserved in vitro in a naive inner-cell-mass-like configuration by providing exogenous stimulation with leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and small molecule inhibition of ERK1/ERK2 and GSK3β signalling (termed 2i/LIF conditions). Hallmarks of naive pluripotency include driving Oct4 (also known as Pou5f1) transcription by its distal enhancer, retaining a pre-inactivation X chromosome state, and global reduction in DNA methylation and in H3K27me3 repressive chromatin mark deposition on developmental regulatory gene promoters. Upon withdrawal of 2i/LIF, naive mouse ES cells can drift towards a primed pluripotent state resembling that of the post-implantation epiblast. Although human ES cells share several molecular features with naive mouse ES cells, they also share a variety of epigenetic properties with primed murine epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). These include predominant use of the proximal enhancer element to maintain OCT4 expression, pronounced tendency for X chromosome inactivation in most female human ES cells, increase in DNA methylation and prominent deposition of H3K27me3 and bivalent domain acquisition on lineage regulatory genes. The feasibility of establishing human ground state naive pluripotency in vitro with equivalent molecular and functional features to those characterized in mouse ES cells remains to be defined. Here we establish defined conditions that facilitate the derivation of genetically unmodified human naive pluripotent stem cells from already established primed human ES cells, from somatic cells through induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell reprogramming or directly from blastocysts. The novel naive pluripotent cells validated herein retain molecular characteristics and functional properties that are highly similar to mouse naive ES cells, and distinct from conventional primed human pluripotent cells. This includes competence in the generation

  9. Derivation of Genea057 human embryonic stem cell line.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Chami, Omar; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-01-01

    The Genea057 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XX karyotype and female allele pattern through traditional karyotyping, CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea057 was demonstrated with 97% of cells expressing Nanog, 81% Oct4, 75% Tra1-60 and 97% SSEA4, a PluriTest Pluripotency score of 27.59 and Novelty score of 1.32. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination. PMID:27345782

  10. Derivation of Genea042 human embryonic stem cell line.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Chami, Omar; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-03-01

    The Genea042 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XX karyotype and female allele pattern through traditional karyotyping, CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea042 was demonstrated with 81% of cells expressing Nanog, 95% Oct4, 53% Tra1-60 and 97% SSEA4, a PluriTest Pluripotency score of 30.06, Novelty score of 1.24 and Alkaline Phosphatase activity. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination. PMID:27345994

  11. Derivation of Genea052 human embryonic stem cell line.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Chami, Omar; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-03-01

    The Genea052 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XY karyotype and male allele pattern through CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea052 was demonstrated with 85% of cells expressing Nanog, 87% Oct4, 60% Tra1-60 and 97% SSEA4, a PluriTest Pluripotency score of 27.21, Novelty score of 1.2 and tri-lineage teratoma formation. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination. PMID:27345996

  12. Derivation of Genea015 human embryonic stem cell line.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Chami, Omar; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-03-01

    The Genea015 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XY karyotype and male Allele pattern through traditional karyotyping, CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea015 was demonstrated with 80% of cells expressing Nanog, 97% Oct4, 75% Tra1-60 and 98% SSEA4, a PluriTest Pluripotency score of 29.52, Novelty score of 1.3 and Alkaline Phosphatase activity. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination. PMID:27346028

  13. Derivation of Genea047 human embryonic stem cell line.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Chami, Omar; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-03-01

    The Genea047 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XX karyotype and female allele pattern through traditional karyotyping, CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea047 was demonstrated with 88% of cells expressing Nanog, 95% Oct4, 59% Tra1-60 and 99% SSEA4, a PluriTest Pluripotency score of 30.86, Novelty score of 1.23 and tri-lineage teratoma formation. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination. PMID:27345995

  14. Derivation of Genea043 human embryonic stem cell line.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Chami, Omar; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-01-01

    The Genea043 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XY karyotype and male allele pattern through traditional karyotyping, CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea043 was demonstrated with 92% of cells expressing Nanog, 95% Oct4, 61% Tra1-60 and 99% SSEA4, a PluriTest Pluripotency score of 31.74, Novelty score of 1.2 and Alkaline Phosphatase activity. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination. PMID:27345801

  15. Derivation of Genea016 human embryonic stem cell line.

    PubMed

    Dumevska, Biljana; Chami, Omar; McKernan, Robert; Goel, Divya; Peura, Teija; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-01-01

    The Genea016 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XX karyotype and female Allele pattern through traditional karyotyping, CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea016 was demonstrated with 77% of cells expressing Nanog, 95% Oct4, 53% Tra1-60 and 98% SSEA4, a PluriTest Pluripotency score of 28.4, Novelty score of 1.37 and Alkaline Phosphatase activity. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination. PMID:27345780

  16. Engineering human cells and tissues through pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeffrey R; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2016-08-01

    The utility of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) depends on their ability to produce functional cells and tissues of the body. Two strategies have been developed: directed differentiation of enriched populations of cells that match a regional and functional profile and spontaneous generation of three-dimensional organoids that resemble tissues in the body. Genomic editing of hPSCs and their differentiated cells broadens the use of the hPSC paradigm in studying human cellular function and disease as well as developing therapeutics.

  17. Human amniotic fluid stem cell preconditioning improves their regenerative potential.

    PubMed

    Rota, Cinzia; Imberti, Barbara; Pozzobon, Michela; Piccoli, Martina; De Coppi, Paolo; Atala, Anthony; Gagliardini, Elena; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Benedetti, Valentina; Fabricio, Aline S C; Squarcina, Elisa; Abbate, Mauro; Benigni, Ariela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2012-07-20

    Human amniotic fluid stem (hAFS) cells, a novel class of broadly multipotent stem cells that share characteristics of both embryonic and adult stem cells, have been regarded as promising candidate for cell therapy. Taking advantage by the well-established murine model of acute kidney injury (AKI), we studied the proregenerative effect of hAFS cells in immunodeficient mice injected with the nephrotoxic drug cisplatin. Infusion of hAFS cells in cisplatin mice improved renal function and limited tubular damage, although not to control level, and prolonged animal survival. Human AFS cells engrafted injured kidney predominantly in peritubular region without acquiring tubular epithelial markers. Human AFS cells exerted antiapoptotic effect, activated Akt, and stimulated proliferation of tubular cells possibly via local release of factors, including interleukin-6, vascular endothelial growth factor, and stromal cell-derived factor-1, which we documented in vitro to be produced by hAFS cells. The therapeutic potential of hAFS cells was enhanced by cell pretreatment with glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which markedly ameliorated renal function and tubular injury by increasing stem cell homing to the tubulointerstitial compartment. By in vitro studies, GDNF increased hAFS cell production of growth factors, motility, and expression of receptors involved in cell homing and survival. These findings indicate that hAFS cells can promote functional recovery and contribute to renal regeneration in AKI mice via local production of mitogenic and prosurvival factors. The effects of hAFS cells can be remarkably enhanced by GDNF preconditioning.

  18. Human Amniotic Fluid Stem Cell Preconditioning Improves Their Regenerative Potential

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Cinzia; Imberti, Barbara; Pozzobon, Michela; Piccoli, Martina; De Coppi, Paolo; Atala, Anthony; Gagliardini, Elena; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Benedetti, Valentina; Fabricio, Aline S.C.; Squarcina, Elisa; Abbate, Mauro; Benigni, Ariela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Human amniotic fluid stem (hAFS) cells, a novel class of broadly multipotent stem cells that share characteristics of both embryonic and adult stem cells, have been regarded as promising candidate for cell therapy. Taking advantage by the well-established murine model of acute kidney injury (AKI), we studied the proregenerative effect of hAFS cells in immunodeficient mice injected with the nephrotoxic drug cisplatin. Infusion of hAFS cells in cisplatin mice improved renal function and limited tubular damage, although not to control level, and prolonged animal survival. Human AFS cells engrafted injured kidney predominantly in peritubular region without acquiring tubular epithelial markers. Human AFS cells exerted antiapoptotic effect, activated Akt, and stimulated proliferation of tubular cells possibly via local release of factors, including interleukin-6, vascular endothelial growth factor, and stromal cell–derived factor-1, which we documented in vitro to be produced by hAFS cells. The therapeutic potential of hAFS cells was enhanced by cell pretreatment with glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which markedly ameliorated renal function and tubular injury by increasing stem cell homing to the tubulointerstitial compartment. By in vitro studies, GDNF increased hAFS cell production of growth factors, motility, and expression of receptors involved in cell homing and survival. These findings indicate that hAFS cells can promote functional recovery and contribute to renal regeneration in AKI mice via local production of mitogenic and prosurvival factors. The effects of hAFS cells can be remarkably enhanced by GDNF preconditioning. PMID:22066606

  19. Cripto is essential to capture mouse epiblast stem cell and human embryonic stem cell pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Fiorenzano, Alessandro; Pascale, Emilia; D'Aniello, Cristina; Acampora, Dario; Bassalert, Cecilia; Russo, Francesco; Andolfi, Gennaro; Biffoni, Mauro; Francescangeli, Federica; Zeuner, Ann; Angelini, Claudia; Chazaud, Claire; Patriarca, Eduardo J; Fico, Annalisa; Minchiotti, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Known molecular determinants of developmental plasticity are mainly transcription factors, while the extrinsic regulation of this process has been largely unexplored. Here we identify Cripto as one of the earliest epiblast markers and a key extracellular determinant of the naive and primed pluripotent states. We demonstrate that Cripto sustains mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal by modulating Wnt/β-catenin, whereas it maintains mouse epiblast stem cell (EpiSC) and human ESC pluripotency through Nodal/Smad2. Moreover, we provide unprecedented evidence that Cripto controls the metabolic reprogramming in ESCs to EpiSC transition. Remarkably, Cripto deficiency attenuates ESC lineage restriction in vitro and in vivo, and permits ESC transdifferentiation into trophectoderm lineage, suggesting that Cripto has earlier functions than previously recognized. All together, our studies provide novel insights into the current model of mammalian pluripotency and contribute to the understanding of the extrinsic regulation of the first cell lineage decision in the embryo. PMID:27586544

  20. Cripto is essential to capture mouse epiblast stem cell and human embryonic stem cell pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Fiorenzano, Alessandro; Pascale, Emilia; D'Aniello, Cristina; Acampora, Dario; Bassalert, Cecilia; Russo, Francesco; Andolfi, Gennaro; Biffoni, Mauro; Francescangeli, Federica; Zeuner, Ann; Angelini, Claudia; Chazaud, Claire; Patriarca, Eduardo J.; Fico, Annalisa; Minchiotti, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Known molecular determinants of developmental plasticity are mainly transcription factors, while the extrinsic regulation of this process has been largely unexplored. Here we identify Cripto as one of the earliest epiblast markers and a key extracellular determinant of the naive and primed pluripotent states. We demonstrate that Cripto sustains mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal by modulating Wnt/β-catenin, whereas it maintains mouse epiblast stem cell (EpiSC) and human ESC pluripotency through Nodal/Smad2. Moreover, we provide unprecedented evidence that Cripto controls the metabolic reprogramming in ESCs to EpiSC transition. Remarkably, Cripto deficiency attenuates ESC lineage restriction in vitro and in vivo, and permits ESC transdifferentiation into trophectoderm lineage, suggesting that Cripto has earlier functions than previously recognized. All together, our studies provide novel insights into the current model of mammalian pluripotency and contribute to the understanding of the extrinsic regulation of the first cell lineage decision in the embryo. PMID:27586544

  1. Endothelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Golub, Justin S.; Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Langer, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the potential to differentiate into various cell types and, thus, may be useful as a source of cells for transplantation or tissue engineering. We describe here the differentiation steps of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells forming vascular-like structures. The human embryonic-derived endothelial cells were isolated by using platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) antibodies, their behavior was characterized in vitro and in vivo, and their potential in tissue engineering was examined. We show that the isolated embryonic PECAM1+ cells, grown in culture, display characteristics similar to vessel endothelium. The cells express endothelial cell markers in a pattern similar to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, their junctions are correctly organized, and they have high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. In addition, the cells are able to differentiate and form tube-like structures when cultured on matrigel. In vivo, when transplanted into SCID mice, the cells appeared to form microvessels containing mouse blood cells. With further studies, these cells could provide a source of human endothelial cells that could be beneficial for potential applications such as engineering new blood vessels, endothelial cell transplantation into the heart for myocardial regeneration, and induction of angiogenesis for treatment of regional ischemia.

  2. Human embryonic stem cells carrying mutations for severe genetic disorders.

    PubMed

    Frumkin, Tsvia; Malcov, Mira; Telias, Michael; Gold, Veronica; Schwartz, Tamar; Azem, Foad; Amit, Ami; Yaron, Yuval; Ben-Yosef, Dalit

    2010-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (HESCs) carrying specific mutations potentially provide a valuable tool for studying genetic disorders in humans. One preferable approach for obtaining these cell lines is by deriving them from affected preimplantation genetically diagnosed embryos. These unique cells are especially important for modeling human genetic disorders for which there are no adequate research models. They can be further used to gain new insights into developmentally regulated events that occur during human embryo development and that are responsible for the manifestation of genetically inherited disorders. They also have great value for the exploration of new therapeutic protocols, including gene-therapy-based treatments and disease-oriented drug screening and discovery. Here, we report the establishment of 15 different mutant human embryonic stem cell lines derived from genetically affected embryos, all donated by couples undergoing preimplantation genetic diagnosis in our in vitro fertilization unit. For further information regarding access to HESC lines from our repository, for research purposes, please email dalitb@tasmc.health.gov.il. PMID:20186514

  3. Fibre operating lengths of human lower limb muscles during walking

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Edith M.; Delp, Scott L.

    2011-01-01

    Muscles actuate movement by generating forces. The forces generated by muscles are highly dependent on their fibre lengths, yet it is difficult to measure the lengths over which muscle fibres operate during movement. We combined experimental measurements of joint angles and muscle activation patterns during walking with a musculoskeletal model that captures the relationships between muscle fibre lengths, joint angles and muscle activations for muscles of the lower limb. We used this musculoskeletal model to produce a simulation of muscle–tendon dynamics during walking and calculated fibre operating lengths (i.e. the length of muscle fibres relative to their optimal fibre length) for 17 lower limb muscles. Our results indicate that when musculotendon compliance is low, the muscle fibre operating length is determined predominantly by the joint angles and muscle moment arms. If musculotendon compliance is high, muscle fibre operating length is more dependent on activation level and force–length–velocity effects. We found that muscles operate on multiple limbs of the force–length curve (i.e. ascending, plateau and descending limbs) during the gait cycle, but are active within a smaller portion of their total operating range. PMID:21502124

  4. Characterization of human carbonic anhydrase III from skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Carter, N; Jeffery, S; Shiels, A; Edwards, Y; Tipler, T; Hopkinson, D A

    1979-10-01

    A third form of human carbonic anhydrase (CA III), found at high concentrations in skeletal muscle, has been purified and characterized. This isozyme shows relatively poor hydratase and esterase activities compared to the red cell isozymes, CA I and CA II, but is similar to these isozymes in subunit structure (monomer) and molecular size (28,000). CA III is liable to posttranslational modification by thiol group interaction. Monomeric secondary isozymes, sensitive to beta-mercaptoethanol, are found in both crude and purified material and can be generated in vitro by the addition of thiol reagents. Active dimeric isozymes, generated apparently by the formation of intermolecular disulfide bridges, also occur but account for only a small proportion of the total protein and appear only when the concentration of CA III is particularly high.

  5. Cellular dynamics of regeneration reveals role of two distinct Pax7 stem cell populations in larval zebrafish muscle repair

    PubMed Central

    Pipalia, Tapan G.; Koth, Jana; Roy, Shukolpa D.; Hammond, Christina L.; Kawakami, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heterogeneity of stem cells or their niches is likely to influence tissue regeneration. Here we reveal stem/precursor cell diversity during wound repair in larval zebrafish somitic body muscle using time-lapse 3D confocal microscopy on reporter lines. Skeletal muscle with incision wounds rapidly regenerates both slow and fast muscle fibre types. A swift immune response is followed by an increase in cells at the wound site, many of which express the muscle stem cell marker Pax7. Pax7+ cells proliferate and then undergo terminal differentiation involving Myogenin accumulation and subsequent loss of Pax7 followed by elongation and fusion to repair fast muscle fibres. Analysis of pax7a and pax7b transgenic reporter fish reveals that cells expressing each of the duplicated pax7 genes are distinctly localised in uninjured larvae. Cells marked by pax7a only or by both pax7a and pax7b enter the wound rapidly and contribute to muscle wound repair, but each behaves differently. Low numbers of pax7a-only cells form nascent fibres. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that the more numerous pax7b-marked cells frequently fuse to pre-existing fibres, contributing more strongly than pax7a-only cells to repair of damaged fibres. pax7b-marked cells are more often present in rows of aligned cells that are observed to fuse into a single fibre, but more rarely contribute to nascent regenerated fibres. Ablation of a substantial portion of nitroreductase-expressing pax7b cells with metronidazole prior to wounding triggered rapid pax7a-only cell accumulation, but this neither inhibited nor augmented pax7a-only cell-derived myogenesis and thus altered the cellular repair dynamics during wound healing. Moreover, pax7a-only cells did not regenerate pax7b cells, suggesting a lineage distinction. We propose a modified founder cell and fusion-competent cell model in which pax7a-only cells initiate fibre formation and pax7b cells contribute to fibre growth. This newly discovered cellular

  6. Concise review: programming human pluripotent stem cells into blood.

    PubMed

    Easterbrook, Jennifer; Fidanza, Antonella; Forrester, Lesley M

    2016-06-01

    Blood disorders are treated with cell therapies including haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation as well as platelet and red blood cell transfusions. However the source of cells is entirely dependent on donors, procedures are susceptible to transfusion-transmitted infections and serious complications can arise in recipients due to immunological incompatibility. These problems could be alleviated if it was possible to produce haematopoietic cells in vitro from an autologous and renewable cell source. The production of haematopoietic cells in the laboratory from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a route to realize this goal but it has proven challenging to generate long-term reconstituting HSCs. To date, the optimization of differentiation protocols has mostly relied on the manipulation of extrinsic signals to mimic the in vivo environment. We review studies that have taken an alternative approach to modulate intrinsic signals by enforced expression of transcription factors. Single and combinations of multiple transcription factors have been used in a variety of contexts to enhance the production of haematopoietic cells from human pluripotent stem cells. This programming approach, together with the recent advances in the production and use of synthetic transcription factors, holds great promise for the production of fully functional HSCs in the future.

  7. hPSCreg--the human pluripotent stem cell registry.

    PubMed

    Seltmann, Stefanie; Lekschas, Fritz; Müller, Robert; Stachelscheid, Harald; Bittner, Marie-Sophie; Zhang, Weiping; Kidane, Luam; Seriola, Anna; Veiga, Anna; Stacey, Glyn; Kurtz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The human pluripotent stem cell registry (hPSCreg), accessible at http://hpscreg.eu, is a public registry and data portal for human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell lines (hESC and hiPSC). Since their first isolation the number of hESC lines has steadily increased to over 3000 and new iPSC lines are generated in a rapidly growing number of laboratories as a result of their potentially broad applicability in biomedicine and drug testing. Many of these lines are deposited in stem cell banks, which are globally established to store tens of thousands of lines from healthy and diseased donors. The Registry provides comprehensive and standardized biological and legal information as well as tools to search and compare information from multiple hPSC sources and hence addresses a translational research need. To facilitate unambiguous identification over different resources, hPSCreg automatically creates a unique standardized name for each cell line registered. In addition to biological information, hPSCreg stores extensive data about ethical standards regarding cell sourcing and conditions for application and privacy protection. hPSCreg is the first global registry that holds both, manually validated scientific and ethical information on hPSC lines, and provides access by means of a user-friendly, mobile-ready web application. PMID:26400179

  8. hPSCreg—the human pluripotent stem cell registry

    PubMed Central

    Seltmann, Stefanie; Lekschas, Fritz; Müller, Robert; Stachelscheid, Harald; Bittner, Marie-Sophie; Zhang, Weiping; Kidane, Luam; Seriola, Anna; Veiga, Anna; Stacey, Glyn; Kurtz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The human pluripotent stem cell registry (hPSCreg), accessible at http://hpscreg.eu, is a public registry and data portal for human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell lines (hESC and hiPSC). Since their first isolation the number of hESC lines has steadily increased to over 3000 and new iPSC lines are generated in a rapidly growing number of laboratories as a result of their potentially broad applicability in biomedicine and drug testing. Many of these lines are deposited in stem cell banks, which are globally established to store tens of thousands of lines from healthy and diseased donors. The Registry provides comprehensive and standardized biological and legal information as well as tools to search and compare information from multiple hPSC sources and hence addresses a translational research need. To facilitate unambiguous identification over different resources, hPSCreg automatically creates a unique standardized name for each cell line registered. In addition to biological information, hPSCreg stores extensive data about ethical standards regarding cell sourcing and conditions for application and privacy protection. hPSCreg is the first global registry that holds both, manually validated scientific and ethical information on hPSC lines, and provides access by means of a user-friendly, mobile-ready web application. PMID:26400179

  9. Concise review: programming human pluripotent stem cells into blood.

    PubMed

    Easterbrook, Jennifer; Fidanza, Antonella; Forrester, Lesley M

    2016-06-01

    Blood disorders are treated with cell therapies including haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation as well as platelet and red blood cell transfusions. However the source of cells is entirely dependent on donors, procedures are susceptible to transfusion-transmitted infections and serious complications can arise in recipients due to immunological incompatibility. These problems could be alleviated if it was possible to produce haematopoietic cells in vitro from an autologous and renewable cell source. The production of haematopoietic cells in the laboratory from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may provide a route to realize this goal but it has proven challenging to generate long-term reconstituting HSCs. To date, the optimization of differentiation protocols has mostly relied on the manipulation of extrinsic signals to mimic the in vivo environment. We review studies that have taken an alternative approach to modulate intrinsic signals by enforced expression of transcription factors. Single and combinations of multiple transcription factors have been used in a variety of contexts to enhance the production of haematopoietic cells from human pluripotent stem cells. This programming approach, together with the recent advances in the production and use of synthetic transcription factors, holds great promise for the production of fully functional HSCs in the future. PMID:26996518

  10. Epigenetic regulation of human adipose-derived stem cells differentiation.

    PubMed

    Daniunaite, Kristina; Serenaite, Inga; Misgirdaite, Roberta; Gordevicius, Juozas; Unguryte, Ausra; Fleury-Cappellesso, Sandrine; Bernotiene, Eiva; Jarmalaite, Sonata

    2015-12-01

    Adult stem cells have more restricted differentiation potential than embryonic stem cells (ESCs), but upon appropriate stimulation can differentiate into cells of different germ layers. Epigenetic factors, including DNA modifications, take a significant part in regulation of pluripotency and differentiation of ESCs. Less is known about the epigenetic regulation of these processes in adult stem cells. Gene expression profile and location of DNA modifications in adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and their osteogenically differentiated lineages were analyzed using Agilent microarrays. Methylation-specific PCR and restriction-based quantitative PCR were applied for 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) detection in selected loci. The level of DNA modifications in the POU5F1 locus was quantified with deep sequencing. Expression levels of selected genes were assayed by real-time PCR. ADSCs differentiation into osteogenic lineages involved marked changes in both 5mC and 5hmC profiles, but 5hmC changes were more abundant. 5mC losses and 5hmC gains were the main events observed during ADSCs differentiation, and were accompanied by increased expression of TET1 (P = 0.009). In ADSCs, POU5F1 was better expressed than NANOG or SOX2 (P ≤ 0.001). Both 5mC and 5hmC marks were present in the POU5F1 locus, but only hydroxymethylation of specific cytosine showed significant effect on the gene expression. In summary, the data of our study suggest significant involvement of changes in 5hmC profile during the differentiation of human adult stem cells.

  11. A predictive model of muscle excitations based on muscle modularity for a large repertoire of human locomotion conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Vargas, Jose; Sartori, Massimo; Dosen, Strahinja; Torricelli, Diego; Pons, Jose L.; Farina, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Humans can efficiently walk across a large variety of terrains and locomotion conditions with little or no mental effort. It has been hypothesized that the nervous system simplifies neuromuscular control by using muscle synergies, thus organizing multi-muscle activity into a small number of coordinative co-activation modules. In the present study we investigated how muscle modularity is structured across a large repertoire of locomotion conditions including five different speeds and five different ground elevations. For this we have used the non-negative matrix factorization technique in order to explain EMG experimental data with a low-dimensional set of four motor components. In this context each motor components is composed of a non-negative factor and the associated muscle weightings. Furthermore, we have investigated if the proposed descriptive analysis of muscle modularity could be translated into a predictive model that could: (1) Estimate how motor components modulate across locomotion speeds and ground elevations. This implies not only estimating the non-negative factors temporal characteristics, but also the associated muscle weighting variations. (2) Estimate how the resulting muscle excitations modulate across novel locomotion conditions and subjects. The results showed three major distinctive features of muscle modularity: (1) the number of motor components was preserved across all locomotion conditions, (2) the non-negative factors were consistent in shape and timing across all locomotion conditions, and (3) the muscle weightings were modulated as distinctive functions of locomotion speed and ground elevation. Results also showed that the developed predictive model was able to reproduce well the muscle modularity of un-modeled data, i.e., novel subjects and conditions. Muscle weightings were reconstructed with a cross-correlation factor greater than 70% and a root mean square error less than 0.10. Furthermore, the generated muscle excitations matched

  12. Small Diameter Blood Vessels Bioengineered From Human Adipose-derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Renpeng; Zhu, Lei; Fu, Shibo; Qian, Yunliang; Wang, Danru; Wang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Bioengineering of small-diameter blood vessels offers a promising approach to reduce the morbidity associated with coronary artery and peripheral vascular disease. The aim of this study was to construct a two-layered small-diameter blood vessel using smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) differentiated from human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs). The outer layer was constructed with biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL)-gelatin mesh seeded with SMCs, and this complex was then rolled around a silicone tube under pulsatile stimulation. After incubation for 6 to 8 weeks, the PCL-gelatin degraded and the luminal supporting silicone tube was removed. The smooth muscle layer was subsequently lined with ECs differentiated from hASCs after stimulation with VEGF and BMP4 in combination hypoxia. The phenotype of differentiated SMCs and ECs, and the cytotoxicity of the scaffold and biomechanical assessment were analyzed. Our results demonstrated that the two-layered bioengineered vessels exhibited biomechanical properties similar to normal human saphenous veins (HSV). Therefore, hASCs provide SMCs and ECs for bioengineering of small-diameter blood vessels. PMID:27739487

  13. A microcalorimetric study of the sodium-potassium-pump and thermogenesis in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Fagher, B; Sjögren, A; Monti, M

    1987-11-01

    Thermogenesis in human skeletal muscle was monitored by measurement of heat production using perfusion microcalorimetry. Heat production significantly correlated with relative body weight. The energy expenditure of the Na-K-pump (delta P), assessed after inhibition by ouabain in Krebs-Ringer phosphate buffer containing glucose and insulin, amounted to 6% of the total heat production in vastus lateralis muscle. Muscle potassium positively correlated with delta P (r = 0.84, P less than 0.005). For rectus abdominis muscle delta P was 8-15%; 95% confidence interval for the difference was 3-5% when comparison was made with vastus lateralis. The finding of a positive relationship between delta P and muscle magnesium (r = 0.68, P less than 0.04) is possibly explained by the dependence of ATP hydrolysis on internal magnesium. Our data on resting thermogenesis in small muscle samples agree to previous estimates of O2 consumption in human skeletal muscle in vivo.

  14. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies. PMID:27347935

  15. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies. PMID:27347935

  16. Dynamic and social behaviors of human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Phadnis, Smruti M.; Loewke, Nathan O.; Dimov, Ivan K.; Pai, Sunil; Amwake, Christine E.; Solgaard, Olav; Baer, Thomas M.; Chen, Bertha; Pera, Renee A. Reijo

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can self-renew or differentiate to diverse cell types, thus providing a platform for basic and clinical applications. However, pluripotent stem cell populations are heterogeneous and functional properties at the single cell level are poorly documented leading to inefficiencies in differentiation and concerns regarding reproducibility and safety. Here, we use non-invasive time-lapse imaging to continuously examine hPSC maintenance and differentiation and to predict cell viability and fate. We document dynamic behaviors and social interactions that prospectively distinguish hPSC survival, self-renewal, and differentiation. Results highlight the molecular role of E-cadherin not only for cell-cell contact but also for clonal propagation of hPSCs. Results indicate that use of continuous time-lapse imaging can distinguish cellular heterogeneity with respect to pluripotency as well as a subset of karyotypic abnormalities whose dynamic properties were monitored. PMID:26381699

  17. CD13 promotes mesenchymal stem cell-mediated regeneration of ischemic muscle

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. Mamunur; Subramani, Jaganathan; Ghosh, Mallika; Denninger, Jiyeon K.; Takeda, Kotaro; Fong, Guo-Hua; Carlson, Morgan E.; Shapiro, Linda H.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent, tissue-resident cells that can facilitate tissue regeneration and thus, show great promise as potential therapeutic agents. Functional MSCs have been isolated and characterized from a wide array of adult tissues and are universally identified by the shared expression of a core panel of MSCs markers. One of these markers is the multifunctional cell surface peptidase CD13 that has been shown to be expressed on human and murine MSCs from many tissues. To investigate whether this universal expression indicates a functional role for CD13 in MSC biology we isolated, expanded and characterized MSCs from bone marrow of wild type (WT) and CD13KO mice. Characterization of these cells demonstrated that both WT and CD13KO MSCs expressed the full complement of MSC markers (CD29, CD44, CD49e, CD105, Sca1), showed comparable proliferation rates and were capable of differentiating toward the adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. However, MSCs lacking CD13 were unable to differentiate into vascular cells, consistent with our previous characterization of CD13 as an angiogenic regulator. Compared to WT MSCs, adhesion and migration on various extracellular matrices of CD13KO MSCs were significantly impaired, which correlated with decreased phospho-FAK levels and cytoskeletal alterations. Crosslinking human MSCs with activating CD13 antibodies increased cell adhesion to endothelial monolayers and induced FAK activation in a time dependent manner. In agreement with these in vitro data, intramuscular injection of CD13KO MSCs in a model of severe ischemic limb injury resulted in significantly poorer perfusion, decreased ambulation, increased necrosis and impaired vascularization compared to those receiving WT MSCs. This study suggests that CD13 regulates FAK activation to promote MSC adhesion and migration, thus, contributing to MSC-mediated tissue repair. CD13 may present a viable target to enhance the efficacy of mesenchymal stem cell

  18. Nanotechnology & human stem cells: Applications in cardiogenesis and neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomov, Martin L.

    Human stem cell research holds an unprecedented promise to revolutionize the way we approach medicine and healthcare in general, moving us from a position of mostly addressing the symptoms to a state where treatments can focus on removing the underlying causes of a condition. Stem cell research can shed light into normal developmental pathways, as we are beginning to replicate them in a petri dish and can also be used to model diseases and abnormal conditions. Direct applications can range from finding cures for single or multigene diseases to demonstrating that we can replace these genes with a normal copy. We can even begin to model lifelong conditions such as aging by iPSC technology by relying on fetal, young, adult, and centenarian populations to provide insights into the process. We have also begun to understand the microenvironment in which specific cell populations reside. Being able to replicate the chemical, physical mechanical, and spatial needs of those cells, research groups are successfully generating full organs using cadaver scaffolds of heart and kidney, and there is promising research to reach the same success with other organs, such as the liver, and pancreas. Advances in those areas open an enormous potential to study organs, organoids, organ valves, tubes or other functional elements such as beating cardiomyocytes in vitro. There is also the need to evaluate the whole genome of induced and differentiated cells, with its myriad of interacting pathways. Bioinformatics can help our understanding of embryogenesis, organ differentiation and function. It can also help optimize our stem cell and bio-scaffold tools to advance closer to functional organs and tissues. Such a combination approach will also include pluripotency evaluation and multi-lineage differentiation, as well as platforms that may assist in cell therapies: 3D structures, micro-ribbons, directed patterning to name a few. There is now a clearer path forward with stem cell research than

  19. Phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor bisperoxovanadium endows myogenic cells with enhanced muscle stem cell functions via epigenetic modulation of Sca-1 and Pw1 promoters.

    PubMed

    Smeriglio, Piera; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Masciarelli, Silvia; Madaro, Luca; Iosue, Ilaria; Marrocco, Valeria; Relaix, Frédéric; Fazi, Francesco; Marazzi, Giovanna; Sassoon, David A; Bouché, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the regulation of the stem cell fate is fundamental for designing novel regenerative medicine strategies. Previous studies have suggested that pharmacological treatments with small molecules provide a robust and reversible regulation of the stem cell program. Previously, we showed that treatment with a vanadium compound influences muscle cell fatein vitro In this study, we demonstrate that treatment with the phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor bisperoxovanadium (BpV) drives primary muscle cells to a poised stem cell stage, with enhanced function in muscle regenerationin vivofollowing transplantation into injured muscles. Importantly, BpV-treated cells displayed increased self-renewal potentialin vivoand replenished the niche in both satellite and interstitial cell compartments. Moreover, we found that BpV treatment induces specific activating chromatin modifications at the promoter regions of genes associated with stem cell fate, includingSca-1andPw1 Thus, our findings indicate that BpV resets the cell fate program by specific epigenetic regulations, such that the committed myogenic cell fate is redirected to an earlier progenitor cell fate stage, which leads to an enhanced regenerative stem cell potential.-Smeriglio, P., Alonso-Martin, S., Masciarelli, S., Madaro, L., Iosue, I., Marrocco, V., Relaix, F., Fazi, F., Marazzi, G., Sassoon, D. A., Bouché, M. Phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor bisperoxovanadium endows myogenic cells with enhanced muscle stem cell functionsviaepigenetic modulation of Sca-1 and Pw1 promoters.

  20. Characterization of distinct mesenchymal-like cell populations from human skeletal muscle in situ and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Lecourt, Severine; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Fromigue, Olivia; Vauchez, Karine; Andriamanalijaona, Rina; Ternaux, Brigitte; Lacassagne, Marie-Noelle; Robert, Isabelle; Boumediene, Karim; Chereau, Frederic; Marie, Pierre; and others

    2010-09-10

    Human skeletal muscle is an essential source of various cellular progenitors with potential therapeutic perspectives. We first used extracellular markers to identify in situ the main cell types located in a satellite position or in the endomysium of the skeletal muscle. Immunohistology revealed labeling of cells by markers of mesenchymal (CD13, CD29, CD44, CD47, CD49, CD62, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD146, and CD15 in this study), myogenic (CD56), angiogenic (CD31, CD34, CD106, CD146), hematopoietic (CD10, CD15, CD34) lineages. We then analysed cell phenotypes and fates in short- and long-term cultures of dissociated muscle biopsies in a proliferation medium favouring the expansion of myogenic cells. While CD56{sup +} cells grew rapidly, a population of CD15{sup +} cells emerged, partly from CD56{sup +} cells, and became individualized. Both populations expressed mesenchymal markers similar to that harboured by human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. In differentiation media, both CD56{sup +} and CD15{sup +} cells shared osteogenic and chondrogenic abilities, while CD56{sup +} cells presented a myogenic capacity and CD15{sup +} cells presented an adipogenic capacity. An important proportion of cells expressed the CD34 antigen in situ and immediately after muscle dissociation. However, CD34 antigen did not persist in culture and this initial population gave rise to adipogenic cells. These results underline the diversity of human muscle cells, and the shared or restricted commitment abilities of the main lineages under defined conditions.

  1. Human Finger-Prick Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Facilitate the Development of Stem Cell Banking

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hong-Kee; Toh, Cheng-Xu Delon; Ma, Dongrui; Yang, Binxia; Liu, Tong Ming; Lu, Jun; Wong, Chee-Wai; Tan, Tze-Kai; Li, Hu; Syn, Christopher; Tan, Eng-Lee; Lim, Bing; Lim, Yoon-Pin; Cook, Stuart A.

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from somatic cells of patients can be a good model for studying human diseases and for future therapeutic regenerative medicine. Current initiatives to establish human iPSC (hiPSC) banking face challenges in recruiting large numbers of donors with diverse diseased, genetic, and phenotypic representations. In this study, we describe the efficient derivation of transgene-free hiPSCs from human finger-prick blood. Finger-prick sample collection can be performed on a “do-it-yourself” basis by donors and sent to the hiPSC facility for reprogramming. We show that single-drop volumes of finger-prick samples are sufficient for performing cellular reprogramming, DNA sequencing, and blood serotyping in parallel. Our novel strategy has the potential to facilitate the development of large-scale hiPSC banking worldwide. PMID:24646489

  2. Human finger-prick induced pluripotent stem cells facilitate the development of stem cell banking.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hong-Kee; Toh, Cheng-Xu Delon; Ma, Dongrui; Yang, Binxia; Liu, Tong Ming; Lu, Jun; Wong, Chee-Wai; Tan, Tze-Kai; Li, Hu; Syn, Christopher; Tan, Eng-Lee; Lim, Bing; Lim, Yoon-Pin; Cook, Stuart A; Loh, Yuin-Han

    2014-05-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from somatic cells of patients can be a good model for studying human diseases and for future therapeutic regenerative medicine. Current initiatives to establish human iPSC (hiPSC) banking face challenges in recruiting large numbers of donors with diverse diseased, genetic, and phenotypic representations. In this study, we describe the efficient derivation of transgene-free hiPSCs from human finger-prick blood. Finger-prick sample collection can be performed on a "do-it-yourself" basis by donors and sent to the hiPSC facility for reprogramming. We show that single-drop volumes of finger-prick samples are sufficient for performing cellular reprogramming, DNA sequencing, and blood serotyping in parallel. Our novel strategy has the potential to facilitate the development of large-scale hiPSC banking worldwide.

  3. A murine-ES like state facilitates transgenesis and homologous recombination in human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Buecker, Christa; Chen, Hsu-Hsin; Polo, Jose; Daheron, Laurence; Bu, Lei; Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Okwieka, Patricia; Porter, Andrew; Gribnau, Joost; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Geijsen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Murine embryonic stem cells have been shown to exist in two functionally distinct pluripotent states, embryonic stem cells (ES cell)- and epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs), which are defined by the culture growth factor conditions. Human ES cells appear to exist in an epiblast-like state, which in comparison to their murine counterparts, is relatively difficult to propagate and manipulate. As a result, gene targeting is difficult and to-date only a handful of human knock-in or knock-out cell lines exist. We explored whether an alternative stem cell state exists for human stem cells as well, and demonstrate that manipulation of the growth factor milieu allows the derivation of a novel human stem cell type that displays morphological, molecular and functional properties of murine ES cells and facilitates gene targeting. As such, the murine ES-like state provides a powerful tool for the generation of recombinant human pluripotent stem cell lines. PMID:20569691

  4. Rigid microenvironments promote cardiac differentiation of mouse and human embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshi, Armin; Nakashima, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Haruko; Eaimkhong, Sarayoot; Evseenko, Denis; Reed, Jason; Stie